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Sample records for limited-stage small-cell esophageal

  1. Surgery in limited stage small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Hansen, H H

    1999-01-01

    The role of surgery in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is controversial. Surgery has several potential advantages because it may reduce the frequency of local relapses, it does not impede the intensity of chemotherapy, it does not affect the bone marrow, and surgical staging may be of prognostic...

  2. Effect of early chemoradiotherapy in patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer

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    Ha, In Bong; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Jeong, Ho Jin; Choi, Hoon Sik; Chai, Gyu Young; Kang, Myoung Hee; Kim, Hoon Gu; Lee, Gyeong Won; Na, Jae Beom; Kang, Ki Mun [Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    We evaluated the effect of early chemoradiotherapy on the treatment of patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC). Between January 2006 and December 2011, thirty-one patients with histologically proven LS-SCLC who were treated with two cycles of chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy and consolidation chemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. The chemotherapy regimen was composed of etoposide and cisplatin. Thoracic radiotherapy consisted of 50 to 60 Gy (median, 54 Gy) given in 5 to 6.5 weeks. The follow-up period ranged from 5 to 53 months (median, 22 months). After chemoradiotherapy, 35.5% of the patients (11 patients) showed complete response, 61.3% (19 patients) showed partial response, 3.2% (one patient) showed progressive disease, resulting in an overall response rate of 96.8% (30 patients). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall survival (OS) rates were 66.5%, 41.0%, and 28.1%, respectively, with a median OS of 21.3 months. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year progression free survival (PFS) rates were 49.8%, 22.8%, and 13.7%, respectively, with median PFS of 12 months. The patterns of failure were: locoregional recurrences in 29.0% (nine patients), distant metastasis in 9.7% (three patients), and both locoregional and distant metastasis in 9.7% (three patients). Grade 3 or 4 toxicities of leukopenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia were observed in 32.2%, 29.0%, and 25.8%, respectively. Grade 3 radiation esophagitis and radiation pneumonitis were shown in 12.9% and 6.4%, respectively. We conclude that early chemoradiotherapy for LS-SCLC provides feasible and acceptable local control and safety.

  3. Once vs. twice daily thoracic irradiation in limited stage small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun Sang; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Ju Ock; Kim, Sun Young; Cho, Moon June

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted comparing single dally fraction (SDF) thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) with twice daily (BID) TRT to determine the potential benefit of BID TRT in limited-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Endpoints of the study were response, survival, pattern of failure, and acute toxicity. Between November 1989 to December 1996, 78 patients with histologically proven limited-stage SCLC were treated at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Chungnam National University Hospital. Of these, 9 were irradiated for palliative intent, and 1 had recurrent disease. Remaining 68 patients were enrolled in this study. There were 26 patients with a median age of 58 years, and 22 (85%) ECOG performance score of less than 1 in SDF TRT. There were 42 patients with a median age of 57 years, and 36 (86%) ECOG performance score of less than 1 in BID TRT. By radiation fractionation regimen, there were 26 in SDF TRT and 42 in BID TRT. SDF TRT consisted of 180 cGy, 5 days a week. BID TRT consisted of 150 cGY BID, 5 days a week in 13 of 42 and 120 cGy BID, in 29 of 42. And the twice daily fractions were separated by at least 4 hours. Total radiotherapy doses were between 5040 and 6940 cGy (median, 5040 cGy) in SDF TRT and was between 4320 and 5100 cGy (median, 4560 cGy) in BID TRT. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) was recommended for patients who achieved a CR. The recommended PCI dose was 2500 cGy/10 fractions. Chemotherapy consisted of CAV (cytoxan 1000 mg/m 2 , adriamycin 40 mg/m 2 , vincristine 1 mg/m 2 ) alternating with VPP (cisplatin 60 mg/m 2 , etoposide 100 mg/m 2 ) every 3 weeks in 25 (96%) of SDF TRT and in 40 (95%) of BID TRT. Median cycle of chemotherapy was six in both group. Timing for chemotherapy was sequential in 23 of SDF TRT and in 3 BID TRT, and concurrent in 3 of SDF TRT and in 39 of BID TRT. Follow-up ranged from 2 of 99 months (median, 14 months) in both groups. Of the 26 SDF TRT, 9 (35%) achieved a complete response (CR) and 14 (54

  4. Prospective study of proton-beam radiation therapy for limited-stage small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rwigema, Jean-Claude M; Verma, Vivek; Lin, Liyong; Berman, Abigail T; Levin, William P; Evans, Tracey L; Aggarwal, Charu; Rengan, Ramesh; Langer, Corey; Cohen, Roger B; Simone, Charles B

    2017-11-01

    Existing data supporting the use of proton-beam therapy (PBT) for limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) are limited to a single 6-patient case series. This is the first prospective study to evaluate clinical outcomes and toxicities of PBT for LS-SCLC. This study prospectively analyzed patients with primary, nonrecurrent LS-SCLC definitively treated with PBT and concurrent chemotherapy from 2011 to 2016. Clinical backup intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans were generated for each patient and were compared with PBT plans. Outcome measures included local control (LC), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) rates and toxicities. Thirty consecutive patients were enrolled and evaluated. The median dose was 63.9 cobalt gray equivalents (range, 45-66.6 cobalt gray equivalents) in 33 to 37 fractions delivered daily (n = 18 [60.0%]) or twice daily (n = 12 [40.0%]). The concurrent chemotherapy was cisplatin/etoposide (n = 21 [70.0%]) or carboplatin/etoposide (n = 9 [30.0%]). In comparison with the backup IMRT plans, PBT allowed statistically significant reductions in the cord, heart, and lung mean doses and the volume receiving at least 5 Gy but not in the esophagus mean dose or the lung volume receiving at least 20 Gy. At a median follow-up of 14 months, the 1-/2-year LC and RFS rates were 85%/69% and 63%/42%, respectively. The median OS was 28.2 months, and the 1-/2-year OS rates were 72%/58%. There was 1 case each (3.3%) of grade 3 or higher esophagitis, pneumonitis, anorexia, and pericardial effusion. Grade 2 pneumonitis and esophagitis were seen in 10.0% and 43.3% of patients, respectively. In the first prospective registry study and largest analysis to date of PBT for LS-SCLC, PBT was found to be safe with a limited incidence of high-grade toxicities. Cancer 2017;123:4244-4251. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  5. Current Treatments for Surgically Resectable, Limited-Stage, and Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2017-12-01

    The prevalence of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has declined in the U.S. as the prevalence of tobacco use has declined. However, a significant number of people in the U.S. are current or former smokers and are at risk of developing SCLC. Routine histological or cytological evaluation can reliably make the diagnosis of SCLC, and immunohistochemistry stains (thyroid transcription factor-1, chromogranin, synaptophysin, and CD56) can be used if there is uncertainty about the diagnosis. Rarely do patients present with SCLC amendable to surgical resection, and evaluation requires a meticulous workup for extra-thoracic metastases and invasive staging of the mediastinum. Resected patients require adjuvant chemotherapy and/or thoracic radiation therapy (TRT), and prophylactic cranial radiation (PCI) should be considered depending on the stage. For limited-stage disease, concurrent platinum-etoposide and TRT followed by PCI is the standard. Thoracic radiation therapy should be started early in treatment, and can be given twice daily to 45 Gy or once daily to 60-70 Gy. For extensive-stage disease, platinum-etoposide remains the standard first-line therapy, and the standard second-line therapy is topotecan. Preliminary studies have demonstrated the activity of immunotherapy, and the response rate is approximately 10-30% with some durable responses observed. Rovalpituzumab tesirine, an antibody drug conjugate, has shown promising activity in patients with high delta-like protein 3 tumor expression (approximately 70% of patients with SCLC). The emergence of these and other promising agents has rekindled interest in drug development in SCLC. Several ongoing trials are investigating novel agents in the first-line, maintenance, and second-line settings. This review will provide an update on the standard therapies for surgically resected limited-stage small cell lung cancer and extensive-stage small cell lung cancer that have been investigated in recent clinical trials. © Alpha

  6. Prospective study on stereotactic radiotherapy of limited-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Morten; Roed, Henrik; Hansen, Anders Traberg

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To test the effect of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in       the treatment of medically inoperable patients with limited-stage       non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a Phase II trial. Methods and       Materials: Forty patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated with SBRT...... resulted in a high       probability of local control and a promising survival rate. The toxicity       after SBRT of lung tumors was moderate. However, deterioration in       performance status, respiratory insufficiency, and other side effects were       observed...

  7. Peripheral blood stem cell harvest in patients with limited stage small-cell lung cancer

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    Katakami, Nobuyuki; Takakura, Shunji; Fujii, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Takashi; Umeda, Bunichi [Kobe City General Hospital (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    Chemotherapy plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) induced mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) was performed in patients with limited stage small-cell lung cancer. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin/etoposide or cisplatin/adriamycin/etoposide. The amounts of CD34 positive cells and granulocyte-macrophage colony forming units (CFU-GM) collected during 2-3 courses of apheresis were 3.1{+-}2.9 x 10{sup 6}/kg (n=10) and 3.1{+-}1.5 x 10{sup 5}/kg (n=8) , respectively. Adequate amounts of PBSC were also harvested even in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Eight patients were successfully treated with high-dose chemotherapy consisting of ifosfamide, carboplatin and etoposide with PBSC transfusion. The patients'-bone marrow reconstruction was rapid and no treatment-related death was observed. (author)

  8. Low doses of prophylactic cranial irradiation effective in limited stage small cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubenstein, James H.; Dosoretz, Daniel E.; Katin, Michael J.; Blitzer, Peter H.; Salenius, Sharon A.; Floody, Patrick A.; Harwin, William N.; Teufel, Thomas E.; Raymond, Michael G.; Reeves, James A.; Hart, Lowell L.; McCleod, Michael J.; Pizarro, Alejandro; Gabarda, Antonio L.; Rana, Van G.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) for the prevention of brain metastasis in small cell lung cancer remains controversial, both in terms of efficacy and the optimal dose-fractionation scheme. We performed this study to evaluate the efficacy of PCI at low doses. Methods and Materials: One hundred and ninety-seven patients were referred to our institution for treatment of limited stage small cell carcinoma of the lung between June 1986 and December 1992. Follow-up ranged from 1.1 to 89.8 months, with a mean of 19 months. Eighty-five patients received PCI. Results: Patients receiving PCI exhibited brain failure in 15%, while 38% of untreated patients developed metastases. This degree of prophylaxis was achieved with a median total dose of 25.20 Gy and a median fraction size of 1.80 Gy. At these doses, acute and late complications were minimal. Patients receiving PCI had significantly better 1-year and 2-year overall survivals (68% and 46% vs. 33% and 13%). However, patients with a complete response (CR) to chemotherapy and better Karnofsky performance status (KPS) were overrepresented in the PCI group. In an attempt to compare similar patients in both groups (PCI vs. no PCI), only patients with KPS ≥ 80, CR or near-CR to chemotherapy, and treatment with attempt to cure, were compared. In this good prognostic group, survival was still better in the PCI group (p = 0.0018). Conclusion: In this patient population, relatively low doses of PCI have accomplished a significant reduction in the incidence of brain metastasis with little toxicity. Whether such treatment truly improves survival awaits the results of additional prospective randomized trials

  9. Locoregional failures following thoracic irradiation in patients with limited-stage small cell lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuliani, Meredith E.; Lindsay, Patricia E.; Sun, Alexander; Bezjak, Andrea; Le, Lisa W.; Brade, Anthony; Cho, John; Leighl, Natasha B.; Shepherd, Frances A.; Hope, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the patterns of loco-regional (LR) and distant failure in patients with limited-stage small cell lung carcinoma (LS-SCLC) treated with curative intent. Methods: From 1997 to 2008, 253 LS-SCLC patients were treated with curative intent chemo-radiation at our institution. A retrospective review identified sites of failure. The cumulative LR failure (LRF) rate was calculated. Distant failure-free survival (FFS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Volumetric images of LR failures were delineated and registered with the original radiation treatment plans if available. Dosimetric parameters for the delineated failure volumes were calculated from the original treatment information. Results: The median follow-up was 19 months. The site of first failure was LR in 34, distant in 80 and simultaneous LR and distant in 31 patients. The cumulative LRF rate was 29% and 38% at 2 and 5 years. OS was 44% at 2 years. Seventy patients had electronically archived treatment plans of which there were 16 LR failures (7 local and 39 regional failure volumes). Of the local and regional failure volumes 29% and 31% were in-field, respectively. Conclusions: The predominant pattern of LR failure was marginal or out-of-field. LR failures may be preventable with improved radiotherapy target definition.

  10. Limited-stage small cell lung cancer: current chemoradiotherapy treatment paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Gore, Elizabeth M

    2010-01-01

    In the U.S., the prevalence of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is declining, probably reflecting the decreasing prevalence of tobacco use. However, a significant number of patients will receive a diagnosis of SCLC, and approximately 40% of patients with SCLC will have limited-stage (LS) disease, which is potentially curable with the combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The standard therapy for LS-SCLC is concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and the 5-year survival rate observed in clinical trials is approximately 25%. The standard chemotherapy remains cisplatin and etoposide, but carboplatin is frequently used in patients who cannot tolerate or have a contraindication to cisplatin. Substantial improvements in survival have been made through improvements in radiation therapy. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is the preferred therapy for patients who are appropriate candidates. The optimal timing of concurrent chemoradiotherapy is during the first or second cycle, based on data from meta-analyses. The optimal radiation schedule and dose remain topics of debate, but 1.5 Gy twice daily to a total of 45 Gy and 1.8-2.0 Gy daily to a total dose of 60-70 Gy are commonly used treatments. For patients who obtain a near complete or complete response, prophylactic cranial radiation reduces the incidence of brain metastases and improves overall survival. The ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and Cancer and Leukemia Group B and the European and Canadian phase III trials will investigate different radiation treatment paradigms for patients with LS-SCLC, and completion of these trials is critical.

  11. A meta-analysis of the Timing of Chest Radiotherapy in Patients with Limited-stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui ZHAO

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Although evidence for a significant survival benefit of chest radiotherapy has been proven, no conclusion could be drawn regarding the optimal timing of chest radiation. The aim of this study is to explore whether the timing of chest radiation may influence the survival of the patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LSSCLC by performing a literature-based meta-analysis. Methods By searching Medline, CENTRAL (the Cochrane central register of controlled trials, CBM, and CNKI, et al, we collected both domestic and overseas published documents about randomized trials comparing different timing chest radiotherapy in patients with LS-SCLC. Early chest radiation was regarded as beginning within 30 days after the start of chemotherapy. Random or fixed effect models were applied to conduct meta-analysis on the trials. The combined odds ratio (OR and the 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated to estimate the mortality in 2 or 3 years and toxicity of the two treatments. The statistical heterogeneity was determined by cochran’s Chi-square test (Q test. The Begg’ test was used to determine the publication bias. Results Six trials that included a total of 1 189 patients were analyzed in the meta-analysis 587 patients were in the early radiation group and 602 patients were in the late radiation group. Considering all 6 eligible trials, the overall survival at 2/3 years was not significantly different between early and late chest radiation (OR=0.78, 95%CI: 0.55-1.05, Z=1.68, P=0.093. For the toxicity, no obvious difference was observed for early chest radiotherapy compared with late irradiation in pneumonitis (OR=1.93, 95%CI: 0.97-3.86, P=0.797, esophagitis (OR=1.43, 95%CI: 0.95-2.13, P=0.572 and thrombocytopenia (OR=1.23, 95%CI: 0.88-1.77, P=0.746, respectively. Conclusion No statistical difference was observed in 2/3 years survival and toxicity, including pneumonitis, esophagitis and thrombocytopenia, between

  12. Long term observations in combined modality therapy for limited stage small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colletier, Philip J.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Schea, Randi A.; Allen, Pamela; Cox, James D.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: With the discovery that patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) exhibit a high level of sensitivity to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the treatment of SCLC became a model for the success of combined modality treatment. In this retrospective review, we analyze the outcomes and patterns of failure when patients are treated with chemotherapy and thoracic irradiation. The relative values of sequential and concurrent chemotherapy, in conjunction with chest irradiation, are assessed. The potential benefit of prophylactic cranial irradiation is explored. The impact of prognostic factors for long term survival of SCLC patients are examined to identify pretreatment patient characteristics and treatment parameters which might predict for a favorable outcome. Materials and Methods: We identified 190 patients treated at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center from January 1985 to December 1992 with curative intent for limited stage SCLC. Prognostic factors were determined using univariate and multivariate analysis. The significant covariates for each outcome endpoint were evaluated. Probabilities of local failure, overall survival, relapse-free survival, and distant metastasis-free survival were calculated from the time of treatment using actuarial life table analysis. Results: The median age was 61, with 51% males. There were 119 patients treated sequentially, and 71 concurrently. The Karnofsky Performance Status was >= 90 in 48% of patients in the concurrent cohort, vs. 35% of the sequential group. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) was delivered in 117 cases (62%). There were 51 long term survivors, defined as survival >=36 months. The median follow-up in surviving patients was 75 months. At the time of the analysis, 166 patients (87%) had expired. The crude 2 and 3 year survival rate for the entire group was 38.4% and 26.8%, respectively. The actuarial 2-year survival was 39.9%, and at 3 years the actuarial survival was 27.8%. The median actuarial

  13. Dosimetric rationale and early experience at UFPTI of thoracic proton therapy and chemotherapy in limited-stage small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colaco, Rovel J.; Huh, Soon; Nichols, Romaine; Morris, Christopher G.; Flampouri, Stella; Li, Zuofeng; Hoppe, Bradford S.; D'Agostino, Harry; Pham, Dat C.; Bajwa, Abubakr A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard of care in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Treatment with conventional x-ray therapy (XRT) is associated with high toxicity rates, particularly acute grade 3+ esophagitis and pneumonitis. We present outcomes for the first known series of limited-stage SCLC patients treated with proton therapy and a dosimetric comparison of lung and esophageal doses with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Material and methods: Six patients were treated; five concurrently and one sequentially. Five patients received 60-66 CGE in 30-34 fractions once daily and one patient received 45 CGE in 30 fractions twice daily. All six patients received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, v3.0, was used to grade toxicity. IMRT plans were also generated and compared with proton plans. Results: The median follow-up was 12.0 months. The one-year overall and progression-free survival rates were 83% and 66%, respectively. There were no cases of acute grade 3+ esophagitis or acute grade 2+ pneumonitis, and no other acute grade 3+ non-hematological toxicities were seen. One patient with a history of pulmonary fibrosis and atrial fibrillation developed worsening symptoms four months after treatment requiring oxygen. Three patients died; two of progressive disease and one after a fall. The latter patient was disease-free at 36 months after treatment. Another patient recurred and is alive, while two patients remain disease-free at 12 months of follow-up. Proton therapy proved superior to IMRT across all esophageal and lung dose volume points. Conclusion. In this small series of SCLC patients treated with proton therapy with radical intent, treatment was well tolerated with no cases of acute grade 3+ esophagitis or acute grade 2+ pneumonitis. Dosimetric comparison showed better sparing of lung and esophagus with proton therapy. Proton therapy merits further

  14. Dosimetric rationale and early experience at UFPTI of thoracic proton therapy and chemotherapy in limited-stage small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colaco, Rovel J.; Huh, Soon; Nichols, Romaine; Morris, Christopher G.; Flampouri, Stella; Li, Zuofeng; Hoppe, Bradford S. [Univ. of Florida Proton Therapy Inst., Jacksonville (United States)], e-mail: bhoppe@floridaproton.org; D' Agostino, Harry [Dept. of Thoracic Surgery, Univ. of Florida Coll. of Medicine, Gainesville (United States); Pham, Dat C. [Dept. of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Univ. of Florida Coll. of Medicine, Gainesville (United States); Bajwa, Abubakr A. [Dept. of Medicine, Univ. of Florida Coll. of Medicine, Gainesville (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Background: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard of care in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Treatment with conventional x-ray therapy (XRT) is associated with high toxicity rates, particularly acute grade 3+ esophagitis and pneumonitis. We present outcomes for the first known series of limited-stage SCLC patients treated with proton therapy and a dosimetric comparison of lung and esophageal doses with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Material and methods: Six patients were treated; five concurrently and one sequentially. Five patients received 60-66 CGE in 30-34 fractions once daily and one patient received 45 CGE in 30 fractions twice daily. All six patients received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, v3.0, was used to grade toxicity. IMRT plans were also generated and compared with proton plans. Results: The median follow-up was 12.0 months. The one-year overall and progression-free survival rates were 83% and 66%, respectively. There were no cases of acute grade 3+ esophagitis or acute grade 2+ pneumonitis, and no other acute grade 3+ non-hematological toxicities were seen. One patient with a history of pulmonary fibrosis and atrial fibrillation developed worsening symptoms four months after treatment requiring oxygen. Three patients died; two of progressive disease and one after a fall. The latter patient was disease-free at 36 months after treatment. Another patient recurred and is alive, while two patients remain disease-free at 12 months of follow-up. Proton therapy proved superior to IMRT across all esophageal and lung dose volume points. Conclusion. In this small series of SCLC patients treated with proton therapy with radical intent, treatment was well tolerated with no cases of acute grade 3+ esophagitis or acute grade 2+ pneumonitis. Dosimetric comparison showed better sparing of lung and esophagus with proton therapy. Proton therapy merits further

  15. Limited stage small cell carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract: a clinicopathologic and prognostic analysis of 27 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Peng

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Small cell carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract is a rare and aggressive neuroendocrine tumor. This study aims to analyze the clinical characteristics and potential prognostic factors for patients with limited stage small cell carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract. The records of 27 patients with limited stage small cell carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract, who all received surgery with lymphadenectomy, were retrieved and analyzed retrospectively. The median age of patients was 60 years old (range 38-79. The primary locations of tumor were the esophagus (74.1% and stomach (14.8%. The rate of preoperative accurate diagnosis (16.7% was low for small cell carcinoma of the esophagus and stomach. 40.7% of all the patients had regional lymph node metastases. Five patients underwent surgery alone, and the other 22 were treated with surgery + postoperative chemotherapy. All patients had disease progression or recurrence. The overall median survival time was 10 months and the 1-year survival rate was 37.0%. Patients who received postoperative chemotherapy had a median survival time of 12 months, which was superior to the 5-month survival of for those who only had surgery (P<0.0001. TNM stage (P=0.02 and postoperative chemotherapy (P<0.0001 were considered as two prognostic factors in univariate analysis. Postoperative chemotherapy was a significant independent prognostic factor in multivariate analysis (P=0.01. The prognosis for patients with limited stage small cell carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract remains dismal, however, postoperative chemotherapy may have the potential to improve the outcome for these patients.

  16. Comparison of treatment outcomes between involved-field and elective nodal irradiation in limited-stage small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Tae-Jin; Kim, Hak-Jae; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Heo, Dae-Seog; Kim, Young-Whan; Lee, Se-Hoon

    2012-01-01

    The present study was performed to assess the usefulness of involved-field irradiation and the impact of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-based staging on treatment outcomes in limited-stage small cell lung cancer. Eighty patients who received definitive chemoradiotherapy for limited-stage small cell lung cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Fifty patients were treated with involved-field irradiation, which means that the radiotherapy portal includes only clinically identifiable tumors. The other 30 patients were irradiated with a comprehensive portal, including uninvolved mediastinal and/or supraclavicular lymph nodes, so-called elective nodal irradiation. No significant difference was seen in clinical factors between the two groups. At a median follow-up of 27 months (range, 5-75 months), no significant differences were observed in 3 year overall survival (44.6 vs. 54.1%, P=0.220) and 3 year progression-free survival (24.4 vs. 42.8%, P=0.133) between the involved-field irradiation group and the elective nodal irradiation group, respectively. For patients who did not undergo positron emission tomography scans, 3 year overall survival (29.3 vs. 56.3%, P=0.022) and 3 year progression-free survival (11.0 vs. 50.0%, P=0.040) were significantly longer in the elective nodal irradiation group. Crude incidences of isolated nodal failure were 6.0% in the involved-field irradiation group and 0% in the elective nodal irradiation group, respectively. All isolated nodal failures were developed in patients who had not undergone positron emission tomography scans in their initial work-ups. If patients did not undergo positron emission tomography-based staging, the omission of elective nodal irradiation resulted in impaired survival outcomes and raised the risk of isolated nodal failure. Therefore, involved-field irradiation for limited-stage small cell lung cancer might be reasonable only with positron emission tomography scan implementation. (author)

  17. Chest radiotherapy in limited-stage small cell lung cancer: facts, questions, prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Ruysscher, D.; Vansteenkiste, J.

    2000-01-01

    Limited-disease small cell lung cancer (LD-SCLC) is initially very sensitive to both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, the 5-year survival is generally only 10-15%, with most patients failing with therapy refractory relapses, both locally and in distant sites. The addition of chest irradiation to chemotherapy increases the absolute survival by approximately 5%. We reviewed the many controversies regarding optimal timing and irradiation technique. No strong data support total radiation doses over 50 Gy. According to one phase III trial and several retrospective studies, increasing the volume of the radiation fields to the pre-chemotherapy turnout volume instead of the post-chemotherapy volume does not improve local control. The total time in which the entire combined-modality treatment is delivered may be important. From seven randomized trials, it can be concluded that the timing of the radiotherapy as such is not very important. Some phase III trials support the use of accelerated chest radiation together with cisplatin-etoposide chemotherapy, delivered from the first day of treatment, although no firm conclusions can be drawn from the available data. The best results are reported in studies in which the time from the start of treatment to the end of the radiotherapy was less than 30 days. This has to be taken into consideration when treatment modalities incorporating new chemotherapeutic agents and radiotherapy are considered. (author)

  18. Role of prophylactic brain irradiation in limited stage small cell lung cancer: clinical, neuropsychologic, and CT sequelae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laukkanen, E.; Klonoff, H.; Allan, B.; Graeb, D.; Murray, N.

    1988-01-01

    Ninety-four patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer treated between 1981 and 1985 with a regimen including prophylactic brain irradiation (PBI) after combination chemotherapy were assessed for compliance with PBI, brain relapse, and neurologic morbidity. Seventy-seven percent of patients had PBI and of these, 22% developed brain metastases after a median time of 11 months post treatment. The brain was the apparent unique initial site of relapse in 10% of PBI cases but more commonly brain relapse was preceded or accompanied by failure at other sites, especially the chest. Brain metastases were the greatest cause of morbidity in 50% of PBI failures. Twelve of 14 PBI patients alive 2 years after treatment had oncologic, neurologic, and neuropsychological evaluation, and brain CT. All long-term survivors were capable of self care and none fulfilled diagnostic criteria for dementia, with three borderline cases. One third had pretreatment neurologic dysfunction and two thirds post treatment neurologic symptoms, most commonly recent memory loss. Fifty percent had subtle motor findings. Intellectual functioning was at the 38th percentile with most patients having an unskilled occupational history. Neuropsychologic impairment ratings were borderline in three cases and definitely impaired in seven cases. CT scans showed brain atrophy in all cases with mild progression in those having a pre-treatment baseline. Periventricular and subcortical low density lesions identical to the CT appearance of subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy were seen in 82% of posttreatment CT studies, and lacunar infarcts in 54%. Neuropsychologic impairment scores and the extent of CT periventricular low density lesions were strongly associated

  19. A Prospective Randomized Study of the Radiotherapy Volume for Limited-stage Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao HU

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Controversies exists with regard to target volumes as far as thoracic radiotherapy (TRT is concerned in the multimodality treatment for limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LSCLC. The aim of this study is to prospectively compare the local control rate, toxicity profiles, and overall survival (OS between patients received different target volumes irradiation after induction chemotherapy. Methods LSCLC patients received 2 cycles of etoposide and cisplatin (EP induction chemotherapy and were randomly assigned to receive TRT to either the post- or pre-chemotherapy tumor extent (GTV-T as study arm and control arm, CTV-N included the positive nodal drainage area for both arms. One to 2 weeks after induction chemotherapy, 45 Gy/30 Fx/19 d TRT was administered concurrently with the third cycle of EP regimen. After that, additional 3 cycles of EP consolidation were administered. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI was administered to patients with a complete response. Results Thirty-seven and 40 patients were randomly assigned to study arm and control arm. The local recurrence rates were 32.4% and 28.2% respectively (P=0.80; the isolated nodal failure (INF rate were 3.0% and 2.6% respectively (P=0.91; all INF sites were in the ipsilateral supraclavicular fossa. Medastinal N3 disease was the risk factor for INF (P=0.02, OR=14.13, 95%CI: 1.47-136.13. During radiotherapy, grade I, II weight loss was observed in 29.4%, 5.9% and 56.4%, 7.7% patients respectively (P=0.04. Grade 0-I and II-III late pulmonary injury was developed in 97.1%, 2.9% and 86.4%, 15.4% patients respectively (P=0.07. Median survival time was 22.1 months and 26.9 months respectively. The 1 to 3-year OS were 77.9%, 44.4%, 37.3% and 75.8%, 56.3%, 41.7% respectively (P=0.79. Conclusion The preliminary results of this study indicate that irradiant the post-chemotherapy tumor extent (GTV-T and positive nodal drainage area did not decrease local control and overall

  20. [Analysis of Prognostic Factors and Clinical Characteristics for Patients with Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer with Pleural Effusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kunpeng; Wang, Youyou; Qi, Jing; Zhao, Lujun; Wang, Ping

    2018-01-20

    Malignant pleural effusion (PE) was generally defined as pleural effusion containing tumors with poor prognosis. Some kinds of undefined pleural effusions due to too small amount of effusion had poor prognosis too. This study aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics and prognostic factors of patients who suffered from limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) complicated with pleural effusion. A retrospective analysis included 542 patients who were diagnosed with LS-SCLC and had treatment in our hospital from October 2007 to January 2016. We had observed 109 patients who were diagnosed with pleural effusion at their first visit to the doctor. We analyzed the clinical characters, survival time and the prognostic factors of the 109 patients. Our main observation targets were overall survival (OS) and progression free survival (PFS). The median OS and PFS of whole group were 29.4 and 18.2 months. Before treatment, survival time of patients with PE were significantly shorter than patients without PE (median OS: 21.0 vs 31.7 months; median PFS: 14.1 vs 9.1 months; Log-rank, P=0.001, P=0.014). Multi-factor analysis of multivariate Cox shows PE was the independent prognostic factor of LS-SCLC (P=0.04). Single factor analysis showed factors affecting PE patient's survival time included clinical stages, lymph node (LN) stages, KPS scores, pulmonary atelectasis and the state of pleural after treatment. Cox multi-factor analysis reminded that the state of pleural effusion after treatment was the independent prognostic factor of LS-SCLC complicated with pleural effusion (P=0.016). There were three groups was apportioned patients without pleural effusion before treatment (group 1; n=433), patients whose pleural effusion disappeared after treatment (group 2; n=67) and patients whose pleural effusion didn't disappear after treatment (group 3; n=32).The median OS were 31.7, 23.2, 16.8 months in the group 1, 2, 3 and the median PFS were 19.1, 17.9, 11.4 months. Obvious

  1. Analysis of Incidental Radiation Dose to Uninvolved Mediastinal/Supraclavicular Lymph Nodes in Patients with Limited-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated Without Elective Nodal Irradiation

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    Ahmed, Irfan; DeMarco, Marylou; Stevens, Craig W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Fulp, William J. [Biostatistics Core, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Dilling, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Dilling@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Classic teaching states that treatment of limited-stage small cell lung cancer (L-SCLC) requires large treatment fields covering the entire mediastinum. However, a trend in modern thoracic radiotherapy is toward more conformal fields, employing positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans to determine the gross tumor volume (GTV). This analysis evaluates the dosimetric results when using selective nodal irradiation (SNI) to treat a patient with L-SCLC, quantitatively comparing the results to standard Intergroup treatment fields. Sixteen consecutive patients with L-SCLC and central mediastinal disease who also underwent pretherapy PET/CT scans were studied in this analysis. For each patient, we created SNI treatment volumes, based on the PET/CT-based criteria for malignancy. We also created 2 ENI plans, the first without heterogeneity corrections, as per the Intergroup 0096 study (ENI{sub off}) and the second with heterogeneity corrections while maintaining constant the number of MUs delivered between these latter 2 plans (ENI{sub on}). Nodal stations were contoured using published guidelines, then placed into 4 'bins' (treated nodes, 1 echelon away, >1 echelon away within the mediastinum, contralateral hilar/supraclavicular). These were aggregated across the patients in the study. Dose to these nodal bins and to tumor/normal structures were compared among these plans using pairwise t-tests. The ENI{sub on} plans demonstrated a statistically significant degradation in dose coverage compared with the ENI{sub off} plans. ENI and SNI both created a dose gradient to the lymph nodes across the mediastinum. Overall, the gradient was larger for the SNI plans, although the maximum dose to the '1 echelon away' nodes was not statistically different. Coverage of the GTV and planning target volume (PTV) were improved with SNI, while simultaneously reducing esophageal and spinal cord dose though at the expense of modestly reduced dose to

  2. Analysis of incidental radiation dose to uninvolved mediastinal/supraclavicular lymph nodes in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer treated without elective nodal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Irfan; DeMarco, Marylou; Stevens, Craig W; Fulp, William J; Dilling, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Classic teaching states that treatment of limited-stage small cell lung cancer (L-SCLC) requires large treatment fields covering the entire mediastinum. However, a trend in modern thoracic radiotherapy is toward more conformal fields, employing positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans to determine the gross tumor volume (GTV). This analysis evaluates the dosimetric results when using selective nodal irradiation (SNI) to treat a patient with L-SCLC, quantitatively comparing the results to standard Intergroup treatment fields. Sixteen consecutive patients with L-SCLC and central mediastinal disease who also underwent pretherapy PET/CT scans were studied in this analysis. For each patient, we created SNI treatment volumes, based on the PET/CT-based criteria for malignancy. We also created 2 ENI plans, the first without heterogeneity corrections, as per the Intergroup 0096 study (ENI(off)) and the second with heterogeneity corrections while maintaining constant the number of MUs delivered between these latter 2 plans (ENI(on)). Nodal stations were contoured using published guidelines, then placed into 4 "bins" (treated nodes, 1 echelon away, >1 echelon away within the mediastinum, contralateral hilar/supraclavicular). These were aggregated across the patients in the study. Dose to these nodal bins and to tumor/normal structures were compared among these plans using pairwise t-tests. The ENI(on) plans demonstrated a statistically significant degradation in dose coverage compared with the ENI(off) plans. ENI and SNI both created a dose gradient to the lymph nodes across the mediastinum. Overall, the gradient was larger for the SNI plans, although the maximum dose to the "1 echelon away" nodes was not statistically different. Coverage of the GTV and planning target volume (PTV) were improved with SNI, while simultaneously reducing esophageal and spinal cord dose though at the expense of modestly reduced dose to anatomically distant lymph nodes

  3. Phase 2 Study of Accelerated Hypofractionated Thoracic Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Limited-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer

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    Xia, Bing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Cancer Center, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hangzhou Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou (China); Hong, Ling-Zhi [Department of Oncology, Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Cai, Xu-Wei; Zhu, Zheng-Fei; Liu, Qi; Zhao, Kuai-Le; Fan, Min; Mao, Jing-Fang; Yang, Huan-Jun; Wu, Kai-Liang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Cancer Center, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Fu, Xiao-Long, E-mail: xlfu1964@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the efficacy and toxicity of accelerated hypofractionated thoracic radiation therapy (HypoTRT) combined with concurrent chemotherapy in the treatment of limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC), with the hypothesis that both high radiation dose and short radiation time are important in this setting. Methods and Materials: Patients with previously untreated LS-SCLC, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 to 2, and adequate organ function were eligible. HypoTRT of 55 Gy at 2.5 Gy per fraction over 30 days was given on the first day of the second or third cycle of chemotherapy. An etoposide/cisplatin regimen was given to 4 to 6 cycles. Patients who had a good response to initial treatment were offered prophylactic cranial irradiation. The primary endpoint was the 2-year progression-free survival rate. Results: Fifty-nine patients were enrolled from July 2007 through February 2012 (median age, 58 years; 86% male). The 2-year progression-free survival rate was 49.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 35.3%-62.7%). Median survival time was 28.5 months (95% CI 9.0-48.0 months); the 2-year overall survival rate was 58.2% (95% CI 44.5%-71.9%). The 2-year local control rate was 76.4% (95% CI 63.7%-89.1%). The severe hematologic toxicities (grade 3 or 4) were leukopenia (32%), neutropenia (25%), and thrombocytopenia (15%). Acute esophagitis and pneumonitis of grade ≥3 occurred in 25% and 10% of the patients, respectively. Thirty-eight patients (64%) received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Conclusion: Our study showed that HypoTRT of 55 Gy at 2.5 Gy per fraction daily concurrently with etoposide/cisplatin chemotherapy has favorable survival and acceptable toxicity. This radiation schedule deserves further investigation in LS-SCLC.

  4. A case of limbic encephalitis presenting as a paraneoplastic manifestation of limited stage small cell lung cancer: a case report

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    Butt Mohammad

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The differential diagnosis of altered mental status and behavioral change is very extensive. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is a rare cause of cognitive impairment, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Case presentation A 64-year-old British Caucasian woman presented to our hospital with a 12-week history of confusion and short-term memory loss. She was hyponatremic with a serum sodium level of 128mmol/L. Moreover, there was evidence of left hilar prominence on the chest radiograph. A thoracic computed tomography scan showed left hilar opacity with confluent lymphadenopathy. A percutaneous biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of small cell lung cancer. There was no radiological evidence of brain metastasis on the computed tomography scan. In view of continued cognitive impairment, which was felt to be disproportionate to hyponatremia, a magnetic resonance imaging scan of the brain was undertaken. It showed hyperintense signals from both hippocampi, highly suggestive of limbic encephalitis presenting as a paraneoplastic manifestation of small cell lung cancer. She had a significant radiological and clinical response following chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Conclusion This case highlights the importance of considering paraneoplastic syndromes in patients with neurological symptoms in the context of lung malignancy. If initial investigations fail to reveal the cause of cognitive impairment in a patient with malignancy, magnetic resonance imaging may be invaluable in the diagnosis of limbic encephalitis. The clinical presentation, diagnostic techniques and management of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis are discussed in this case report.

  5. Comparison of outcomes in patients with stage III versus limited stage IV non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheruvu, Praveena; Metcalfe, Su K; Metcalfe, Justin; Chen, Yuhchyau; Okunieff, Paul; Milano, Michael T

    2011-01-01

    Standard therapy for metastatic non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) includes palliative systemic chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Recent studies of patients with limited metastases treated with curative-intent stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) have shown encouraging survival. We hypothesized that patients treated with SBRT for limited metastases have comparable outcomes with those treated with curative-intent radiation for Stage III NSCLC. We retrospectively reviewed the records of NSCLC patients treated with curative-intent radiotherapy at the University of Rochester from 2000-2008. We identified 3 groups of patients with NSCLC: stage III, stage IV, and recurrent stage IV (initial stage I-II). All stage IV NSCLC patients treated with SBRT had ≤ 8 lesions. Of 146 patients, 88% had KPS ≥ 80%, 30% had > 5% weight loss, and 95% were smokers. The 5-year OS from date of NSCLC diagnosis for stage III, initial stage IV and recurrent stage IV was 7%, 14%, and 27% respectively. The 5-year OS from date of metastatic diagnosis was significantly (p < 0.00001) superior among those with limited metastases (≤ 8 lesions) versus stage III patients who developed extensive metastases not amenable to SBRT (14% vs. 0%). Stage IV NSCLC is a heterogeneous patient population, with a selected cohort apparently faring better than Stage III patients. Though patients with limited metastases are favorably selected by virtue of more indolent disease and/or less bulky disease burden, perhaps staging these patients differently is appropriate for prognostic and treatment characterization. Aggressive local therapy may be indicated in these patients, though prospective clinical studies are needed

  6. Phase I North Central Cancer Treatment Group Trial-N9923 of escalating doses of twice-daily thoracic radiation therapy with amifostine and with alternating chemotherapy in limited stage small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garces, Yolanda I.; Okuno, Scott H.; Schild, Steven E.; Mandrekar, Sumithra J.; Bot, Brian M.; Martens, John M.; Wender, Donald B.; Soori, Gamini S.; Moore, Dennis F.; Kozelsky, Timothy F.; Jett, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The primary goal was to identify the maximum tolerable dose (MTD) of thoracic radiation therapy (TRT) that can be given with chemotherapy and amifostine for patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LSCLC). Methods and Materials: Treatment began with two cycles of topotecan (1 mg/m 2 ) Days 1 to 5 and paclitaxel (175 mg/m 2 ) Day 5 (every 3 weeks) given before and after TRT. The TRT began at 6 weeks. The TRT was given in 120 cGy fractions b.i.d. and the dose escalation (from 4,800 cGy, dose level 1, to 6,600 cGy, dose level 4) followed the standard 'cohorts of 3' design. The etoposide (E) (50 mg/day) and cisplatin (C) (3 mg/m 2 ) were given i.v. before the morning TRT and amifostine (500 mg/day) was given before the afternoon RT. This was followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI). The dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were defined as Grade ≥4 hematologic, febrile neutropenia, esophagitis, or other nonhematologic toxicity, Grade ≥3 dyspnea, or Grade ≥2 pneumonitis. Results: Fifteen patients were evaluable for the Phase I portion of the trial. No DLTs were seen at dose levels 1 and 2. Two patients on dose level 4 experienced DLTs: 1 patient had a Grade 4 pneumonitis, dyspnea, fatigue, hypokalemia, and anorexia, and 1 patient had a Grade 5 hypoxia attributable to TRT. One of 6 patients on dose level 3 had a DLT, Grade 3 esophagitis. The Grade ≥3 toxicities seen in at least 10% of patients during TRT were esophagitis (53%), leukopenia (33%), dehydration (20%), neutropenia (13%), and fatigue (13%). The median survival was 14.5 months. Conclusion: The MTD of b.i.d. TRT was 6000 cGy (120 cGy b.i.d.) with EP and amifostine

  7. Process of care and preliminary outcome in limited-stage small-cell lung cancer: results of the 1995-1997 patterns of care study in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Takashi; Sumi, Minako; Sawa, Yoshihide M.S.; Teshima, Teruki; Hara, Ryusuke; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the practice process using the national average (Na); to compare differences in the process of care by age group; and to provide a preliminary outcome data for limited-stage small-cell lung cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials: The Patterns of Care Study conducted a nationwide survey of the care process for Stage I-III small-cell lung cancer in Japan. Patients were divided into three age groups: <65 years (younger group, n = 73); between 65 and 74 years (intermediate group, n = 81); and ≥75 years (elderly group, n = 20). Results: The NA for the total dose was 49.0 Gy, and for use of photon energy ≥6 MV, chemotherapy, and prophylactic cranial irradiation was 77.3%, 93.2%, and 1.69%, respectively. Age stratification had no impact on the variables of radiotherapy (RT) such as total dose and field size. Only 37% of patients received chemotherapy and thoracic RT concurrently. The proportion of patients who received chemotherapy and RT concurrently was 44%, 27%, and 25% of the younger, intermediate, and elderly groups, respectively (p = 0.029). Etoposide and cisplatin were less frequently used in the elderly group (≥75 years old). Overall survival at 3 years for the entire group was 26%. The 3-year survival rate was 30% in the younger group, 28% in the intermediate group, and 9% in the elderly group. Variables found to have a significant impact on survival by multivariate analysis were the use of chemotherapy (p = 0.030), age (p 0.032), and T stage (p = 0.042). Conclusion: Calculated NAs showed that the results of clinical study had favorably penetrated into the practice process in Japan. The results demonstrated that patient age significantly influenced the process of chemotherapy such as the use of etoposide and cisplatin for limited-stage small-cell lung cancer in Japan. More concurrent chemotherapy and thoracic RT and the application of prophylactic cranial irradiation for complete responders need to be investigated in the future

  8. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Limited-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer

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    Shirvani, Shervin M.; Komaki, Ritsuko [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Heymach, John V.; Fossella, Frank V. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chang, Joe Y., E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Omitting elective nodal irradiation from planning target volumes does not compromise outcomes in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, but whether the same is true for those with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) is unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we sought to determine the clinical outcomes and the frequency of elective nodal failure in patients with LS-SCLC staged using positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with involved-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2008, 60 patients with LS-SCLC at our institution underwent disease staging using positron emission tomography/computed tomography before treatment using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan in which elective nodal irradiation was intentionally omitted from the planning target volume (mode and median dose, 45 Gy in 30 fractions; range, 40.5 Gy in 27 fractions to 63.8 Gy in 35 fractions). In most cases, concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was administered. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcomes to determine the overall survival, relapse-free survival, and failure patterns. Elective nodal failure was defined as recurrence in initially uninvolved hilar, mediastinal, or supraclavicular nodes. Survival was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median age of the study patients at diagnosis was 63 years (range, 39-86). The median follow-up duration was 21 months (range, 4-58) in all patients and 26 months (range, 4-58) in the survivors. The 2-year actuarial overall survival and relapse-free survival rate were 58% and 43%, respectively. Of the 30 patients with recurrence, 23 had metastatic disease and 7 had locoregional failure. We observed only one isolated elective nodal failure. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the outcomes in patients with LS-SCLC staged with positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with definitive intensity

  9. Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography-Guided Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Limited-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirvani, Shervin M.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Heymach, John V.; Fossella, Frank V.; Chang, Joe Y.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Omitting elective nodal irradiation from planning target volumes does not compromise outcomes in patients with non–small-cell lung cancer, but whether the same is true for those with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) is unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we sought to determine the clinical outcomes and the frequency of elective nodal failure in patients with LS-SCLC staged using positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with involved-field intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 2005 and 2008, 60 patients with LS-SCLC at our institution underwent disease staging using positron emission tomography/computed tomography before treatment using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy plan in which elective nodal irradiation was intentionally omitted from the planning target volume (mode and median dose, 45 Gy in 30 fractions; range, 40.5 Gy in 27 fractions to 63.8 Gy in 35 fractions). In most cases, concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy was administered. We retrospectively reviewed the clinical outcomes to determine the overall survival, relapse-free survival, and failure patterns. Elective nodal failure was defined as recurrence in initially uninvolved hilar, mediastinal, or supraclavicular nodes. Survival was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median age of the study patients at diagnosis was 63 years (range, 39–86). The median follow-up duration was 21 months (range, 4–58) in all patients and 26 months (range, 4–58) in the survivors. The 2-year actuarial overall survival and relapse-free survival rate were 58% and 43%, respectively. Of the 30 patients with recurrence, 23 had metastatic disease and 7 had locoregional failure. We observed only one isolated elective nodal failure. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the outcomes in patients with LS-SCLC staged with positron emission tomography/computed tomography and treated with definitive

  10. Analysis of risk factors for pulmonary complications in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer. A single-centre retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sas-Korczynska, Beata; Kamzol, Wojciech; Luczynska, Elzbieta; Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    The most effective therapy in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS SCLC) seems to be chemotherapy (using platinum-based regimens) and thoracic radiotherapy (TRT), which is followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation. The analysed group comprised 217 patients who received combined treatment for LS SCLC, i.e. chemotherapy (according to cisplatin and etoposide schedule) and TRT (concurrent in 101 and sequential in 116 patients). The influence of chemoradiotherapy (ChT-RT) schedule on treatment results (frequency of complete response, survival rates, and incidence of treatment failure and complications) was evaluated, and the frequency and severity of pulmonary complications were analysed to identify risk factors. The 5-year survival rates in concurrent vs. sequential ChT-RT schedules were 27.3 vs. 11.7% (overall) and 28 vs. 14.3% (disease-free). The frequencies of adverse events in relation to concurrent vs. sequential therapy were 85.1 vs. 9.5% (haematological complications) and 58.4 vs. 38.8% (pulmonary fibrosis), respectively. It was found that concurrent ChT-RT (hazard ratio, HR 2.75), a total dose equal to or more than 54 Gy (HR 2.55), the presence of haematological complications (HR 1.89) and a lung volume receiving a dose equal to or greater than 20 Gy exceeding 31% (HR 1.06) were the risk factors for pulmonary complications. Pulmonary complications after ChT-RT developed in 82% of patients treated for LS SCLC. In comparison to the sequential approach, concurrent ChT-RT had a positive effect on treatment outcome. However, this is a factor that can impair treatment tolerance, which manifests in the appearance of side effects. (orig.) [de

  11. Omitting elective nodal irradiation during thoracic irradiation in limited-stage small cell lung cancer--evidence from a phase II trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaco, Rovel; Sheikh, Hamid; Lorigan, Paul; Blackhall, Fiona; Hulse, Paul; Califano, Raffaele; Ashcroft, Linda; Taylor, Paul; Thatcher, Nicholas; Faivre-Finn, Corinne

    2012-04-01

    Omitting elective nodal irradiation (ENI) in limited-stage disease small cell lung cancer (LD-SCLC) is expected to result in smaller radiation fields. We report on data from a randomised phase II trial that omitted ENI in patients receiving concurrent chemo-radiotherapy for LD-SCLC. 38 patients with LD-SCLC were randomised to receive once-daily (66 Gy in 33 fractions) or twice-daily (45 Gy in 30 fractions) radiotherapy (RT). 3D-conformal RT was given concurrently with cisplatin and etoposide starting with the second cycle of a total of four cycles. The gross tumour volume was defined as primary tumour with involved lymph nodes (nodes ≥1 cm in short axis) identifiable with CT imaging. ENI was not used. Six recurrence patterns were identified: recurrence within planning target volume (PTV) only, recurrence within PTV+regional nodal recurrence and/or distant recurrence, isolated nodal recurrence outside PTV, nodal recurrence outside PTV+distant recurrence, distant metastases only and no recurrence. At median follow-up 16.9 months, 31/38 patients were evaluable and 14/31 patients had relapsed. There were no isolated nodal recurrences. Eight patients relapsed with intra-thoracic disease: 2 within PTV only, 4 within PTV and distantly and 2 with nodal recurrence outside PTV plus distant metastases. Rates of grade 3+ acute oesophagitis and pneumonitis in the 31 evaluable patients were 23 and 3% respectively. In our study of LD-SCLC, omitting ENI based on CT imaging was not associated with a high risk of isolated nodal recurrence, although further prospective studies are needed to confirm this. Routine ENI omission will be further evaluated prospectively in the ongoing phase III CONVERT trial (NCT00433563). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A retrospective analysis of survival outcomes for two different radiotherapy fractionation schedules given in the same overall time for limited stage small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettington, Catherine S.; Bryant, Guy; Hickey, Brigid; Tripcony, Lee; Pratt, Gary; Fay, Michael

    2013-01-01

    To compare survival outcomes for two fractionation schedules of thoracic radiotherapy, both given over 3 weeks, in patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC). At Radiation Oncology Mater Centre (ROMC) and the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH), patients with LS-SCLC treated with curative intent are given radiotherapy (with concurrent chemotherapy) to a dose of either 40Gy in 15 fractions ('the 40Gy/15⧣group') or 45Gy in 30 fractions ('the 45Gy/30⧣group'). The choice largely depends on institutional preference. Both these schedules are given over 3 weeks, using daily and twice-daily fractionation respectively. The records of all such patients treated from January 2000 to July 2009 were retrospectively reviewed and survival outcomes between the two groups compared. Of 118 eligible patients, there were 38 patients in the 40Gy/15⧣ group and 41 patients in the 45Gy/30⧣ group. The median relapse-free survival time was 12 months in both groups. Median overall survival was 21 months (95% CI 2–37 months) in the 40Gy/15⧣ group and 26 months (95% CI 1–48 months) in the 45Gy/30⧣ group. The 5-year overall survival rates were 20% and 25%, respectively (P=0.24). On multivariate analysis, factors influencing overall survival were: whether prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) was given (P=0.01) and whether salvage chemotherapy was given at the time of relapse (P=0.057). Given the small sample size, the potential for selection bias and the retrospective nature of our study it is not possible to draw firm conclusions regarding the efficacy of hypofractionated thoracic radiotherapy compared with hyperfractionated accelerated thoracic radiotherapy however hypofractionated radiotherapy may result in equivalent relapse-free survival.

  13. Comparison of the effectiveness of ''late'' and ''early'' prophylactic cranial irradiation in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sas-Korczynska, Beata; Korzeniowski, Stanislaw; Wojcik, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the effectiveness of timing of application of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in patients with small cell lung cancer in limited stage of disease (LS SCLC). Patients and methods: between 1995 and 2004, 129 patients with LS SCLC were treated within two consecutive phase II studies assessing different schedules of combined treatment. All patients received chemotherapy and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy. In 86 patients (66.7%) who developed complete response in the thorax, PCI was performed either after chemoradiotherapy (''late'' PCI, n = 45 [52.4%]) or during chemoradiotherapy (''early'' PCI, n = 41 [47.7%]). In the latter case, PCI was given immediately after the end of thoracic radiotherapy and prior to the last cycles of chemotherapy to a total dose of 30 Gy in 2-Gy fractions to the whole brain. The results were evaluated with regard to 4-year rates of overall survival, disease-free survival, and brain metastases-free survival. Additionally, the prognostic role of PCI application and its time delay in relation to survival rates and incidence of brain metastases was estimated. Results: the 4-year survival rates were 25.5% for overall survival, 26.8% for disease-free survival, and 67.8% for brain metastases-free survival. During the observation period, 32 patients (24.8%) developed brain metastases, which occured in 20 of 43 patients (46.5%) without and only in twelve out of 86 patients (14%) with PCI. The 4-year brain metastases-free survival rates were 81.8%, if PCI was applied, versus 32.2%, if no such procedure was used (for p = 0.0000). The timing of PCI appeared to be an important factor in terms of decreasing the incidence of brain metastases. Conclusion: PCI significantly decreases the incidence of brain metastases and delays their development in patients with LS SCLC. ''Early'' PCI is more effective than PCI applied after combined therapy. (orig.)

  14. Effect of dose of thoracic irradiation on recurrence in patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer. Initial results of a Canadian Multicenter Randomized Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coy, P.; Hodson, I.; Payne, D.G.; Evans, W.K.; Feld, R.; MacDonald, A.S.; Osoba, D.; Pater, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    Patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer were initially randomized to receive either three courses of Cyclophosphamide, Adriamycin, and Vincristine (CAV) followed by three courses of VP-16 and Cis-platin (VP-PT) or six courses of alternating CAV and VP-PT. Responding patients received prophylactic cranial radiation (PCI) after three courses of chemotherapy (CT) and loco-regional thoracic radiation (LRTR) after six courses. No maintenance chemotherapy was given. Patients receiving LRTR were randomized to receive either 25 Gy in ten fractions over 2 weeks (SD) or 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks (HD). In both arms the pre-chemotherapy disease was treated with a 2 cm margin around the primary tumor volume. The mediastinum was included in the treatment volume and the supraclavicular nodes were also included if involved originally. The spinal cord was shielded after 32 Gy. Of the 333 patients enrolled by the time the trial closed in October 1984, 168 were eventually randomized to LRTR and are eligible for response assessment. The overall response rate after combined RT and CT was 94% (CR 67%, PR 27%). The CR rate for SD was 65% and for HD 69%. The combined treatment was well tolerated by most patients. Forty-nine percent of HD patients developed dysphagia compared to 26% of those SD (p less than 0.01). At the time of this analysis the median duration of follow-up since randomization to radiotherapy is 30 months. The median local progression-free survival on HD is 49 weeks. On SD it is 38 weeks (p = 0.05, one sided). The actuarial incidence of local progression by 2 years is 69% on HD and 80% on LD. There is as yet no significant difference in overall survival between the two arms. It appears that HD radiotherapy as administered in this study may have an impact on local control, but it is too early to determine if this will translate into a survival benefit

  15. Impact of thoracic radiotherapy timing in limited-stage small-cell lung cancer: usefulness of the individual patient data meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ruysscher, D; Lueza, B; Le Péchoux, C; Johnson, D H; O'Brien, M; Murray, N; Spiro, S; Wang, X; Takada, M; Lebeau, B; Blackstock, W; Skarlos, D; Baas, P; Choy, H; Price, A; Seymour, L; Arriagada, R; Pignon, J-P

    2016-10-01

    Chemotherapy (CT) combined with radiotherapy is the standard treatment of 'limited-stage' small-cell lung cancer. However, controversy persists over the optimal timing of thoracic radiotherapy and CT. We carried out a meta-analysis of individual patient data in randomized trials comparing earlier versus later radiotherapy, or shorter versus longer radiotherapy duration, as defined in each trial. We combined the results from trials using the stratified log-rank test to calculate pooled hazard ratios (HRs). The primary outcome was overall survival. Twelve trials with 2668 patients were eligible. Data from nine trials comprising 2305 patients were available for analysis. The median follow-up was 10 years. When all trials were analysed together, 'earlier or shorter' versus 'later or longer' thoracic radiotherapy did not affect overall survival. However, the HR for overall survival was significantly in favour of 'earlier or shorter' radiotherapy among trials with a similar proportion of patients who were compliant with CT (defined as having received 100% or more of the planned CT cycles) in both arms (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.69-0.91), and in favour of 'later or longer' radiotherapy among trials with different rates of CT compliance (HR 1.19, 1.05-1.34, interaction test, P < 0.0001). The absolute gain between 'earlier or shorter' versus 'later or longer' thoracic radiotherapy in 5-year overall survival for similar and for different CT compliance trials was 7.7% (95% CI 2.6-12.8%) and -2.2% (-5.8% to 1.4%), respectively. However, 'earlier or shorter' thoracic radiotherapy was associated with a higher incidence of severe acute oesophagitis than 'later or longer' radiotherapy. 'Earlier or shorter' delivery of thoracic radiotherapy with planned CT significantly improves 5-year overall survival at the expense of more acute toxicity, especially oesophagitis. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights

  16. Quantitative analysis of tumor shrinkage due to chemotherapy and its implication for radiation treatment planning in limited-stage small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Bing; Wang, Jia-Zhou; Liu, Qi; Cheng, Jing-Yi; Zhu, Zheng-Fei; Fu, Xiao-Long

    2013-01-01

    The optimal timing of chemoradiotherapy in limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) hasn’t been established, although evidence from studies supported that patients can benefit from early radiation therapy. The purpose of this study was to quantify tumor shrinkage in response to induction chemotherapy (IC), evaluate the impact of tumor shrinkage on radiation dosimetric parameters and determine its implication for the timing of radiation therapy for patients with LS-SCLC. Twenty patients with LS-SCLC who were treated with IC followed by concomitant radiation therapy were investigated retrospectively. Ten patients received 1 cycle of IC, and 10 patients received 2 cycles of IC. Pre-IC CT imaging was coregistered with a simulation CT, and virtual radiation plans were created for pre- and post-IC thoracic disease in each case. The changes in the gross target volume (GTV), planning target volume (PTV) and dosimetric factors associated with the lungs, esophagus and heart were analyzed. The mean GTV and PTV for all of the patients decreased by 60.9% and 40.2%, respectively, which resulted in a significant reduction in the radiation exposure to the lungs, esophagus and heart. Changes in the PTV and radiation exposure of normal tissue were not significantly affected by the number of chemotherapy cycles delivered, although patients who received 2 cycles of IC had a greater decrease in GTV than those who received only 1 cycle of IC (69.6% vs. 52.1%, p = 0.273). Our data showed that targeting the tumor post-IC may reduce the radiation dose to normal tissue in patients with LS-SCLC. However, the benefit to the normal tissue was not increased by an additional cycle of IC. These findings suggest that the first cycle of chemotherapy is very important for tumor shrinkage and that initiating thoracic radiation therapy at the second cycle of chemotherapy may be a reasonable strategy for timing of radiation therapy in LS-SCLC treatment

  17. Analysis of risk factors for pulmonary complications in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer. A single-centre retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sas-Korczynska, Beata; Kamzol, Wojciech [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Cracow Branch, Clinic of Oncology and Department of Radiotherapy, Cracow (Poland); Luczynska, Elzbieta [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Cracow Branch, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Cracow (Poland); Sokolowski, Andrzej [Cracow University of Economics, Department of Statistics, Cracow (Poland)

    2017-02-15

    The most effective therapy in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS SCLC) seems to be chemotherapy (using platinum-based regimens) and thoracic radiotherapy (TRT), which is followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation. The analysed group comprised 217 patients who received combined treatment for LS SCLC, i.e. chemotherapy (according to cisplatin and etoposide schedule) and TRT (concurrent in 101 and sequential in 116 patients). The influence of chemoradiotherapy (ChT-RT) schedule on treatment results (frequency of complete response, survival rates, and incidence of treatment failure and complications) was evaluated, and the frequency and severity of pulmonary complications were analysed to identify risk factors. The 5-year survival rates in concurrent vs. sequential ChT-RT schedules were 27.3 vs. 11.7% (overall) and 28 vs. 14.3% (disease-free). The frequencies of adverse events in relation to concurrent vs. sequential therapy were 85.1 vs. 9.5% (haematological complications) and 58.4 vs. 38.8% (pulmonary fibrosis), respectively. It was found that concurrent ChT-RT (hazard ratio, HR 2.75), a total dose equal to or more than 54 Gy (HR 2.55), the presence of haematological complications (HR 1.89) and a lung volume receiving a dose equal to or greater than 20 Gy exceeding 31% (HR 1.06) were the risk factors for pulmonary complications. Pulmonary complications after ChT-RT developed in 82% of patients treated for LS SCLC. In comparison to the sequential approach, concurrent ChT-RT had a positive effect on treatment outcome. However, this is a factor that can impair treatment tolerance, which manifests in the appearance of side effects. (orig.) [German] Die wirksamste Therapie bei einem kleinzelligen Lungenkrebs im limitierten Stadium (LS SCLC) scheinen Chemotherapie (platinbasierte Regime) und thorakale Strahlentherapie (TRT) zu sein, begleitet von der prophylaktischen Schaedelbestrahlung. Analysiert wurden 217 Patienten, die eine kombinierte Behandlung

  18. Intervention with the hypoxic tumor cell sensitizer etanidazole in the combined modality treatment of limited stage small-cell lung cancer. A one-institution study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urtasun, Raul C.; Palmer, Martin; Kinney, Brenda; Belch, Andrew; Hewitt, Joanne; Hanson, John

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: We report the toxicity, patterns of failure and survival of a cohort of patients with limited disease (LD) small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) treated with combined radiation and chemotherapy. During the course of thoracic irradiation, we added intravenous (i.v.) etanidazole (SR-2508, a third-generation 2-nitroimidazole) as a hypoxic cell sensitizer in an attempt to reduce the primary local failure rate and improve survival. Methods and Materials: Between July 1988 and August 1990, 30 consecutive patients with limited disease SCLC were enrolled and treated on a Phase II protocol receiving a standard combination chemotherapy regimen utilizing i.v. cisplatin 25 mg/m 2 /day x 3 days, i.v. etoposide 100 mg/m 2 /day x 3 days alternating with intravenous cyclophosphamide 1000 mg/m 2 /day, intravenous doxorubicin 15 mg/m 2 , and intravenous vincristine 2 mg (CAV) to a total of six cycles every 3 weeks. Radiotherapy and etanidazole were started after the first cycle of chemotherapy. Etanidazole was administered intravenously at a dose of 2 g/m 2 three times per week for a total of 30 g/m 2 during the course of thoracic radiation that delivered 50.00 Gy tumor dose in 25 fractions in an overall time of 6 weeks. Results: The overall response rate of the primary lesion in the thorax was 96% (CR + PR), with 64% complete responses. The median time to treatment failure was 18 months. Of the patients that have relapsed, only 18% failed in the thorax (alone or concomitant with other sites). This is a marked improvement compared to the 40-50% rate reported in the literature. The 2-year crude survival was 46%. The 3- and 5-year crude survival rate with no evidence of disease was 33 and 30%, respectively. We have observed a 10% increase in the incidence of transient etanidazole related peripheral neuropathies compared to previous etanidazole studies not utilizing systemic chemotherapy. There was no increased incidence of radiation esophagitis, pulmonary toxicity, or nephro- or

  19. Predictors of pulmonary toxicity in limited stage small cell lung cancer patients treated with induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy and 70 Gy daily radiotherapy: CALGB 30904.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Joseph K; Pang, Herbert; Bogart, Jeffrey A; Blackstock, A William; Urbanic, James J; Hogson, Lydia; Crawford, Jeffrey; Vokes, Everett E

    2013-12-01

    Standard therapy for limited stage small cell lung cancer (L-SCLC) is concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy followed by prophylactic cranial radiotherapy. Predictors of post chemoradiotherapy pulmonary toxicity in limited stage (LS) small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients are not well defined. Current guidelines are derived from non-small cell lung cancer regimens, and do not account for the unique biology of this disease. Therefore, we analyzed patients on three consecutive CALGB LS-SCLC trials treated with concurrent chemotherapy and daily high dose radiotherapy (70 Gy) to determine patient and treatment related factors predicting for post-treatment pulmonary toxicity. Patients treated on CALGB protocols 39808, 30002, 30206 investigating two cycles of chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemotherapy and 70 Gy daily thoracic radiation therapy were pooled. Patient, tumor, and treatment related factors were evaluated to determine predictors of grade 3–5 pulmonary toxicities after concurrent chemoradiotherapy. 100 patients were included. No patient experienced grade 4–5 post-treatment pulmonary toxicity. Patients who experienced post-treatment pulmonary toxicity were more likely to be older (median age 69 vs 60, p = 0.09) and have smaller total lung volumes (2565 cc vs 3530 cc, p = 0.05).). Furthermore,exposure of larger volumes of lung to lower (median V5 = 70%, p = 0.09, median V10 = 63%, p = 0.07), inter-mediate (median V20 = 50, p = 0.04) and high (median V60 = 25%, p = 0.01) doses of radiation were all associated with post-treatment grade 3 pulmonary toxicity, as was a larger mean lung radiation dose(median 31 Gy) p = 0.019. Post-treatment pulmonary toxicity following the completion of 2 cycles of chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemotherapy and high dose daily radiation therapy was uncommon. Care should be taken to minimize mean lung radiation exposure, as well as volumes of low, intermediate and high doses of radiation.

  20. Acute esophagitis for patients with local-regional advanced non small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Yi; Brink, Carsten; Knap, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Esophagitis is common in patients treated with definitive radiotherapy for local-regional advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this study was to estimate the dose-effect relationship using clinical and dosimetric parameters in patients receiving intensity modulated...... significantly associated with esophagitis. The two models using the relative esophagus volume irradiated above 40Gy (V40, OR=2.18/10% volume) or the length of esophagus irradiated above 40Gy (L40, OR=4.03/5cm) were optimal. The upper part of esophagus was more sensitive and females experienced more toxicity...... than men. CONCLUSION: V40 and L40 were most effective dosimetric predictors of grade ⩾2 esophagitis. The upper part of esophagus was more sensitive....

  1. Changes in Patterns of Care for Limited-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Results of the 99-01 Patterns of Care Study-A Nationwide Survey in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uno, Takashi; Sumi, Minako; Ishihara, Yoshitomo M.S.; Numasaki, Hodaka M.S.; Mitsumori, Michihide; Teshima, Teruki

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study was undertaken to analyze the practice process of thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) and evaluate changes in patterns of care for patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) in Japan. Methods and Materials: The Patterns of Care Study (PCS) conducted the second nationwide survey of care process for patients with LS-SCLC treated by using TRT between 1999 and 2001. Results: The PCS collected data for 139 patients with LS-SCLC (man-woman ratio, 5:1; median age, 69 years; age > 70 years, 43%; Karnofsky Performance Status > 70, 73%; and Stage III, 88%). Median total dose was 50 Gy. Twice-daily TRT was used in 44% of patients. Median field size was 12 x 14 cm. The most commonly used photon energy was 10 MV (77%), whereas obsolete techniques using 60 Co or X-ray energy less than 6 MV comprised 12%. Three-dimensional conformal therapy was used with 12% of patients. Computed tomography simulation was performed in 40% of cases. Only 12 patients (8.6%) received prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI). Concurrent chemotherapy and TRT (CCRT) was used for 94 patients (68%). Only 6 patients (4.4%) entered clinical trials. Compared with the previous PCS 95-97, significant increases in the use of CCRT (34-68%; p < 0.0001), twice-daily TRT (15-44%; p < 0.0001), and PCI (1.7-8.6%; p =0.0045) were observed, although the absolute number of patients receiving PCI was still extremely low. Conclusions: Evidence-based CCRT and twice-daily TRT has penetrated into clinical practice. However, PCI is not yet widely accepted in Japan

  2. Radiation-induced esophageal structure in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated with chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Masaaki; Itoh, Hisao; Kawamura, Masashi

    1989-01-01

    Five out 165 cases (3.0%) which were treated for non-small cell lung cancer with radiotherapy (98 cases were treated with chemoradiotherapy, and the other 67 case, radiotherapy alone) developed esophageal stricture. Their clinical courses, the relationship among radiation dosage, combination with chemotherapy, the length of the irradiated esophagus, and the occurrence of esophageal stricture were reviewed. One of the 5 cases was a case with lung cancer in Bloom's syndrome, which developed an esophageal stricture after receiving only 30.6 Gy (the TDF value was 46.2) to the esophagus. This case suggests the possibility that a patient with Bloom's syndrome is more radiosensitive than normal controls. The other 4 cases were treated with combined chemoradiotherapy. One of the 4 cases was treated with concomitant use of bleomycin (BLM), while the TDF value was not more than 100 (75.4). The concomitant use of BLM was almost certainly the cause of the esophageal stricture. The other 3 cases were treated with chemoradiotherapy, the TDF values of which were more than 100 (108.7, 112.5, and 129.3). The chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy and the overdosage were considered to be the cause of the esophageal stricture in these 3 cases. These data suggest that in Bloom's syndrome, radiotherapy should be performed carefully and that BLM should not be used simultaneously with irradiation to the esophagus. It is also believed that a radiation dose over 100 in TDF value to the esophagus should be discouraged when chemotherapy is codmbined. (author)

  3. Radiation-induced esophagitis in local advanced non-small cell lung cancer after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Dandan; Wang Yuxiang; Qiu Rong; Zhu Shuchai; Tian Xiuming; Qiao Xueying

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore radiation-induced esophagitis and its related factors in the patients with local advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) which were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT). Methods: From January 2001 to December 2008, 203 patients who suffered from stage Ⅲ NSCLC were achieved, including 163 males and 40 females, with a median age of 63 years old, while 79 cases were in stage Ⅲ_a and 124 in stage Ⅲ_b. The equivalent median dose of tumor was 62 Gy(range of 50-78 Gy). Among them, 74 cases were administered with radiotherapy alone, 45 with sequential radiotherapy and chemotherapy, 87 cases with concurrent radiochemotherapy. Radiation esophagitis was evaluated with RTOG standard. The dosimetric parameters was estimated from dose volume histogrma (DVH). The clinical and dosimetric parameters of radiation esophagitis were evaluated by spearman correlatived univariate and Logistic multivariable analysis.Results After radiotherapy, out of 203 patients, 87 had acute radiation esophagitis(RE), 47 in grade 1, 37 in grade 2, and 3 in grade 3 RE. According to spearman correlatived analysis, the correlatived factors included ages, chemotherapy, GTV, PTV, the mean doses of PTV and lung, the max and mean dose of esophagus, V_4_0, V_4_5, V_5_0, V_5_5, V_6_0, length of esophagus (total circumference) treated with 45 Gy (LETT_4_5), and LETT_5_0 (r = -0.162-0.235, P 0.05). There were 21 factors, such as gender, age, smoking, clinical stage, site of tumor, chemotherapy, GTV, PTV, mean dose of PTV and lung, max and mean dose of esophagus, V_4_0-V_6_0 of esophagus, LETT_4_5_-_6_0, incorporated into multivariable analysis, only chemotherapy and V_4_5 of esophagus were independent predicted factors(Wald = 4.626, 9.882, P < 0.05). Conclusions: In local advanced NSCLC after 3D-CRT, chemotherapy(especially concurrent radiochemotherapy) could increase radiation-induced esophagitis. The parameter of DVH could also be used to predict

  4. A case of Esophageal small cell carcinoma with multiple liver metastases responding to chemotherapy with Irinotecan plus Cisplatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, K.; Kohnoe, S.; Toh, Y.; Haraguchi, M.; Okamura, T.; Nishiyama, K.; Baba, H.; Maehara, Y.

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of small cell esophageal carcinoma (SCEC) with multiple liver metastases treated with some success by chemotherapy with irinotecan (CPT-11) plus cisplatin (CDDP). Radiologic and endoscopic examination of a 75-year-old man with multiple liver tumors disclosed a 4.0-cm type 2 tumor in the middle third of the esophagus. An endoscopically obtained biopsy specimen was diagnosed as undifferentiated small cell carcinoma. Multiple liver metastases were confirmed but lymph node metastases and distant metastases other than those in the liver were not detected. After six courses of chemotherapy with CPT-11 plus CDDP, the primary lesion showed complete response and liver metastases showed partial response. However, because all lesions almost immediately relapsed or progressed, arterial infusion chemotherapy for liver metastases and radiation for the primary lesion were given as second-line treatment. The primary lesion showed complete response with radiation. Arterial infusion chemotherapy prevented the progression of liver metastases once, but the patient died of liver failure at last. No distant lesions including metastatic lymph nodes were confirmed over the course of his illness, and the patient survived for a year after first diagnosis. Although the prognosis of SCEC is quite unfavorable due to highly aggressive behavior, a better prognosis is possible with effective chemotherapy and second-line treatment is important in improving prognosis

  5. Predicting Radiation Esophagitis Using 18F-FDG PET During Chemoradiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Qurrat; Sun, Alexander; Becker, Nathan; Higgins, Jane; Marshall, Andrea; Le, Lisa W; Vines, Douglass C; McCloskey, Paula; Ford, Victoria; Clarke, Katy; Yap, Mei; Bezjak, Andrea; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer with chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is limited by development of toxicity in normal tissue, including radiation esophagitis (RE). Increasingly, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is being used for adaptive planning. Our aim was to assess changes in esophageal FDG uptake during CRT and relate the changes to the onset and severity of RE. This prospective study in patients with stage II-III non-small cell lung cancer involved serial four-dimensional computed tomography and PET scans during CRT (60-74Gy). RE was recorded weekly using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (v4.0), and imaging was performed at weeks 0, 2, 4, and 7. Changes in the esophagus's peak standard uptake value (SUVpeak) were analyzed for each time point and correlated with grade of RE using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. The volume of esophagus receiving 50 Gy (V50) and volume of esophagus receiving 60 Gy (V60) were correlated with the development of RE, and the C-statistic (area under the curve [AUC]) was calculated to measure predictivity of grade 3 RE. RE developed in 20 of 27 patients (74%), with grade 3 reached in 6 (22%). A significant percentage increase in SUVpeak in the patients with RE was noted at week 4 (p = 0.01) and week 7 (p = 0.03). For grade 3 RE, a significant percentage increase in SUVpeak was noted at week 2 (p = 0.01) and week 7 (p = 0.03) compared with that for less than grade 3 RE. Median V50 (46.3%) and V60 (33.4%) were significantly higher in patients with RE (p = 0.04). The AUC measurements suggested that the percentage change in SUVpeak at week 2 (AUC = 0.69) and V50 (AUC = 0.67) and V60 (AUC = 0.66) were similarly predictive of grade 3 RE. Serial FDG-PET images during CRT show significant increases in SUVpeak for patients in whom RE develops. The changes at week 2 may predict those at risk for the development of grade 3 RE and may be informative for adaptive planning and

  6. Prediction of Radiation Esophagitis in Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Clinical Factors, Dosimetric Parameters, and Pretreatment Cytokine Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter G. Hawkins

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Radiation esophagitis (RE is a common adverse event associated with radiotherapy for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. While plasma cytokine levels have been correlated with other forms of radiation-induced toxicity, their association with RE has been less well studied. We analyzed data from 126 patients treated on 4 prospective clinical trials. Logistic regression models based on combinations of dosimetric factors [maximum dose to 2 cubic cm (D2cc and generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD], clinical variables, and pretreatment plasma levels of 30 cytokines were developed. Cross-validated estimates of area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC and log likelihood were used to assess prediction accuracy. Dose-only models predicted grade 3 RE with AUC values of 0.750 (D2cc and 0.727 (gEUD. Combining clinical factors with D2cc increased the AUC to 0.779. Incorporating pretreatment cytokine measurements, modeled as direct associations with RE and as potential interactions with the dose-esophagitis association, produced AUC values of 0.758 and 0.773, respectively. D2cc and gEUD correlated with grade 3 RE with odds ratios (ORs of 1.094/Gy and 1.096/Gy, respectively. Female gender was associated with a higher risk of RE, with ORs of 1.09 and 1.112 in the D2cc and gEUD models, respectively. Older age was associated with decreased risk of RE, with ORs of 0.992/year and 0.991/year in the D2cc and gEUD models, respectively. Combining clinical with dosimetric factors but not pretreatment cytokine levels yielded improved prediction of grade 3 RE compared to prediction by dose alone. Such multifactorial modeling may prove useful in directing radiation treatment planning.

  7. Predicting Esophagitis After Chemoradiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, David A., E-mail: david.palma@uwo.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oberije, Cary [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Belderbos, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dios, Núria Rodríguez de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Barriger, R. Bryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Moreno-Jiménez, Marta [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology Division, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Kim, Tae Hyun [Center for Proton Therapy, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Ramella, Sara [Division of Radiation Oncology, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy); Everitt, Sarah [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia and Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University (Australia); Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); De Ruyck, Kim [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) improves survival compared with sequential treatment for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, but it increases toxicity, particularly radiation esophagitis (RE). Validated predictors of RE for clinical use are lacking. We performed an individual-patient-data meta-analysis to determine factors predictive of clinically significant RE. Methods and Materials: After a systematic review of the literature, data were obtained on 1082 patients who underwent CCRT, including patients from Europe, North America, Asia, and Australia. Patients were randomly divided into training and validation sets (2/3 vs 1/3 of patients). Factors predictive of RE (grade ≥2 and grade ≥3) were assessed using logistic modeling, with the concordance statistic (c statistic) used to evaluate the performance of each model. Results: The median radiation therapy dose delivered was 65 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 2.1 years. Most patients (91%) received platinum-containing CCRT regimens. The development of RE was common, scored as grade 2 in 348 patients (32.2%), grade 3 in 185 (17.1%), and grade 4 in 10 (0.9%). There were no RE-related deaths. On univariable analysis using the training set, several baseline factors were statistically predictive of RE (P<.05), but only dosimetric factors had good discrimination scores (c > .60). On multivariable analysis, the esophageal volume receiving ≥60 Gy (V60) alone emerged as the best predictor of grade ≥2 and grade ≥3 RE, with good calibration and discrimination. Recursive partitioning identified 3 risk groups: low (V60 <0.07%), intermediate (V60 0.07% to 16.99%), and high (V60 ≥17%). With use of the validation set, the predictive model performed inferiorly for the grade ≥2 endpoint (c = .58) but performed well for the grade ≥3 endpoint (c = .66). Conclusions: Clinically significant RE is common, but life-threatening complications occur in <1% of patients. Although several factors

  8. Predictors of radiation-induced esophageal toxicity in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Anurag K.; Lockett, Mary Ann; Bradley, Jeffrey D.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and clinical/dosimetric predictors of acute and late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3-5 esophageal toxicity in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 207 consecutive patients with NSCLC who were treated with high-dose, definitive 3D-CRT between March 1991 and December 1998. This population consisted of 107 men and 100 women. The median age was 67 years (range 31-90). The following patient and treatment parameters were studied: age, gender, race, performance status, sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, presence of subcarinal nodes, pretreatment weight loss, mean dose to the entire esophagus, maximal point dose to the esophagus, and percentage of volume of esophagus receiving >55 Gy. All doses are reported without heterogeneity corrections. The median prescription dose to the isocenter in this population was 70 Gy (range 60-74) delivered in 2-Gy daily fractions. All patients were treated once daily. Acute and late esophageal toxicities were graded by Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Patient and clinical/dosimetric factors were coded and correlated with acute and late Grade 3-5 esophageal toxicity using univariate and multivariate regression analyses. Results: Of 207 patients, 16 (8%) developed acute (10 patients) or late (13 patients) Grade 3-5 esophageal toxicity. Seven patients had both acute and late Grade 3-5 esophageal toxicity. One patient died (Grade 5 esophageal toxicity) of late esophageal perforation. Concurrent chemotherapy, maximal point dose to the esophagus >58 Gy, and a mean dose to the entire esophagus >34 Gy were significantly associated with a risk of Grade 3-5 esophageal toxicity on univariate analysis. Concurrent chemotherapy and maximal point dose to the esophagus >58 Gy retained significance on multivariate analysis. Of 207 patients

  9. Dosimetry analysis on radiation-induced acute esophagitis after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZZhu Shuchai; Cui Yanli; Li Juan; Liu Zhikun; Shen Wenbin; Su Jingwei; Wang Yuxiang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the related factors with radiation-induced esophagitis after threedimensional conformal radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), in order to explore the predictors for optimizing the treatment planning of NSCLC. Methods: From Aug 2000 to Dec 2004, 104 NSCLC patients received radiotherapy and were eligible for this study, 45 cases squamous cell carcinoma, 20 cases adenocarcinoma, 33 cases carrying with cancer cells by test and 6 case with no definitive pathologic feature.46 patients were treated with three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT), the other 58 patients conventional radiotherapy (CRT) before later-course 3DCRT. All the patients received the prescribed dose between 60-78 Gy and the median dose 66 Gy. The correlation of the variables were evaluated by Spearman relationship analysis. The morbidity of radiation-induced esophagitis was analyzed by X 2 test. The multivariate effect on radiation-induced esophagitis was statistically processed by Logistic regression model. Results: In 104 patients, the morbidity of radiation- induced esophagitis was 46.2%, including 32 cases at grade 1, 15 cases at grade 2, 1 case at grade 3. Univariate analysis showed the maximal and mean dose of esophagus, the volume of esophagus irradiated, the values of V 40 , V 45 , V 50 , V 55 , V 60 , LETT 45 , LETT 50 , LETT 55 , LETT 60 for the esophagus were correlated with radiation-induced esophagitis. Logistic regression model showed that the maximum dose received by the esophagus was the independent factor of ≥ 2 grade radiation-induced esophagitis. Conclusions: The maxmal dose of esophagus received might be the important factor of radiation-induced esophagitis. (authors)

  10. Tratamento do câncer de pequenas células de pulmão: doença limitada: resultados de uma única instituição Treatment of limited stage small-cell lung cancer: results from a single center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Jenwei Chen

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Relatar os resultados de tratamento de pacientes com câncer de pulmão de pequenas células com doença limitada (CPPC-DL, num período de dez anos, numa única instituição, para controle de qualidade e comparação com dados de literatura. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Entre janeiro de 1992 e dezembro de 2002, 101 pacientes portadores de CPPC-DL completaram tratamento em nossa instituição. Seus resultados foram revistos e incluíram quimioterapia, radioterapia, a seqüência dos dois tratamentos e o uso de irradiação profilática cerebral (PCI. A radiação foi administrada com dose mediana de 45 Gy em 1,8 a 2 Gy por fração. A dose mediana de PCI foi de 25 Gy em dez frações. RESULTADOS: O seguimento mediano foi de 50,6 meses e a idade mediana dos pacientes foi de 63 anos. Houve 85 mortes confirmadas, 5 pacientes foram perdidos de seguimento e 11 estavam vivos. O tempo de sobrevida mediano foi de 11 meses, a sobrevida global em dois e cinco anos foi de 25,5% e 10%, respectivamente. Não houve diferença significante na sobrevida global em dois ou cinco anos segundo a idade e sexo dos pacientes. Também não houve diferença significante na sobrevida global entre os pacientes que realizaram PCI ou não, ou foram tratados em dois períodos diferentes (1997-2002 vs. 1992-1996. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados de tratamento dos pacientes portadores de CPPC-DL na nossa instituição refletem as constantes mudanças no manuseio do CPPC. Nossa sobrevida global em dois anos de 25,5% é semelhante a outros resultados uni-institucionais publicados, mas menor que os resultados de 47% a 54% recentemente publicados por grupos cooperativos.OBJECTIVE: To report the results of the treatment of patients with small-cell lung cancer with limited disease (SCLC-LD in a single institution during a 10-year period, for quality assurance and comparison with data from the literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between January 1992 and December 2002, 101 patients with

  11. Current therapy of small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, M; Lassen, U; Hansen, H H

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the most important recent clinical trials on the treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Two randomized studies addressing the timing of thoracic radiotherapy in limited stage SCLC are discussed. In the smaller of the two studies (n = 103), a survival benefit was associated...

  12. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  13. Functional promoter rs2868371 variant of HSPB1 associates with radiation-induced esophageal toxicity in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with radio(chemo)therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis; Wei Qingyi; Yuan Xianglin; Gomez, Daniel; Liu Zhensheng; Zhuang Yan; Yin Ming; Li Minghuan; Wang, Li-E; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the heat shock protein beta-1 (HSPB1) gene and the risk of radiation-induced esophageal toxicity (RIET) in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Materials and methods: The experimental dataset comprised 120 NSCLC patients who were treated with radio(chemo)therapy between 2005 and 2009, when novel radiation techniques were implemented at MD Anderson. The validation dataset comprised 181 NSCLC patients treated between 1998 and 2004. We genotyped two SNPs of the HSPB1 gene (rs2868370 and rs2868371) by TaqMan assay. Results: Univariate and multivariate analyses of the experimental dataset showed that the CG/GG genotypes of HSPB1 rs2868371 were associated with significantly lower risk of grade ⩾3 RIET than the CC genotype (univariate hazard ratio [HR] 0.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.10–0.91; P = 0.033; multivariate HR 0.29; 95% CI, 0.09–0.97; P = 0.045). This difference in risk was replicated in the validation cohort despite the different radiation techniques used during that period. Conclusions: The CG/GG genotypes of HSPB1 rs2868371 were associated with lower risk of RIET, compared with the CC genotype in patients with NSCLC treated with radio(chemo)therapy. This finding should be validated in large multi-institutional prospective trials.

  14. Small cell glioblastoma or small cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbrandt, Christine; Sathyadas, Sathya; Dahlrot, Rikke H

    2013-01-01

    was admitted to the hospital with left-sided loss of motor function. A MRI revealed a 6 cm tumor in the right temporoparietal area. The histology was consistent with both glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) but IHC was suggestive of a SCLC metastasis. PET-CT revealed...

  15. A phase II study of VP-16-ifosfamide-cisplatin combination chemotherapy plus early concurrent thoracic irradiation for previously untreated limited small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, In Sook; Park, Young Suk; Kwon, Sung Hee

    2000-01-01

    At present the addition of thoracic irradiation to combination chemotherapy is a standard treatment for limited staged small cell ling cancer. However, there is still controversy about the optimum timing of chest irradiation. We conducted a phase II study of etoposide (VP-16)-ifosfamide-cisplatin (VIP) combination chemotherapy plus early concurrent thoracic irradiation for the patients with previously untreated limited small cell lung cancer in order to assess if the treatment modality could improve the response rate and the toxicity. Forty-four patients with limited small cell lung cancer were treated with etoposide-ifosfamide-cisplatin and concurrent thoracic irradiation. Combination chemotherapy consisted of etoposide 100 mg/m 2 (on day 1-3), ifosfamide 1000 mg/m 2 (on days 1 and 2) and cisplatin 100 mg/m 2 (on day 1). Concurrent thoracic irradiation consisted of a total of 4000 cGy over 4 weeks starting on the first day of the first chemotherapy. All patients who showed a complete response were given prophylactic cranial irradiation for 2.5 weeks. Forty-four of the 49 patients who entered the study from May 1994 to August 1998 were evaluable. The median age was 59 years and 40 patients had a performance status of 0 or 1. The median survival time was 22.5 months. Twenty-eight patients (62%) showed a complete response and 16 (38%) a partial response. Twenty-four patients (54%) developed grade 3 or 4 neutropenia; there was a 9% RTOG score 3 or 4 esophagitis. VIP combination chemotherapy and early concurrent thoracic irradiation for patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer revealed excellent antitumor response with tolerable toxicity. (author)

  16. Small-cell osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edeiken, J.; Raymond, A.K.; Ayala, A.G.; Benjamin, R.S.; Murray, J.A.; Carrasco, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Small-cell osteosarcoma, a subtype of osteogenic sarcoma, consists of sheets of round cells that produce an osteoid matrix. It may be confused with Ewing sarcoma if the osteoid matrix is not included in the biopsy. The distinctive radiographic features of an osteoblastic tumor and a pattern of permeative destruction will confirm the histologic diagnosis or indicate the true nature if tumor osteoid is not included in the histological sections. We add 13 patients to the 32 previously reported in the literature. Fourteen (31%) of the 45 are living and well, though three have been followed for only 2 months. The treatments have been so varied that a statistically significant evaluation cannot be developed. The radiographic features are not distinctive, but the diagnosis may be suggested when a tumor has osteoblastic features in the metaphysis and extends well down into the shaft with a pattern of permeative destruction. The radiographic features are especially important when limited biopsies reveal only sheets of round cells, thus suggesting Ewing sarcoma. The presence of an osteoid-producing tumor as evident by osteoblastic new bone formation will lead to the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  17. Small-cell carcinoma of the esophagus with regression after combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, J.A.; Levine, M.S.; Silberg, D.G.; Phillipe, L.

    1995-01-01

    The authors present an unusual case of small-cell carcinoma of the esophagus, which manifested on double-contrast esophagography as an ulcerated submucosal mass. The lesion underwent dramatic regression after combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy, which has occasionally been used as an alternative to surgery in patients with this rare but aggressive esophageal neoplasm. (author). 8 refs., 4 figs

  18. Small cell carcinoma arising in Barrett's esophagus: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markogiannakis Haridimos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Gastrointestinal tract small cell carcinoma is an infrequent and aggressive neoplasm that represents 0.1–1% of gastrointestinal malignancies. Very few cases of small cell esophageal carcinoma arising in Barrett's esophagus have been reported in the literature. An extremely rare case of primary small cell carcinoma of the distal third of the esophagus arising from dysplastic Barrett's esophagus is herein presented. Case presentation A 62-year-old man with gastroesophageal reflux history presented with epigastric pain, epigastric fullness, dysphagia, anorexia, and weight loss. Esophagogastroscopy revealed an ulceroproliferative, intraluminar mass in the distal esophagus obstructing the esophageal lumen. Biopsy showed small cell esophageal carcinoma. Contrast-enhanced chest and abdominal computed tomography demonstrated a large tumor of the distal third of the esophagus without any lymphadenopathy or distant metastasis. Preoperative chemotherapy with cisplatine and etoposide for 3 months resulted in a significant reduction of the tumor. After en block esophagectomy with two field lymph node dissection, proximal gastrectomy, and cervical esophagogastric anastomosis, the patient was discharged on the 14th postoperative day. Histopathology revealed a primary small cell carcinoma of the distal third of the esophagus arising from dysplastic Barrett's esophagus. The patient received another 3 month course of postoperative chemotherapy with the same agents and remained free of disease at 12 month review. Conclusion Although small cell esophageal carcinoma is rare and its association with dysplastic Barrett's esophagus is extremely infrequent, the high carcinogenic risk of Barrett's epithelium should be kept in mind. Prognosis is quite unfavorable; a better prognosis might be possible with early diagnosis and treatment strategies incorporating chemotherapy along with oncological radical surgery and/or radiotherapy as part of a

  19. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Research shows that smoking marijuana may help cancer cells grow. But there is no direct link between ...

  20. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  1. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Small ...

  2. Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  3. Esophageal motility in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, A H; Iorio, N; Schey, R

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus and is a potential cause of dysphagia and food impaction, most commonly affecting young men. Esophageal manometry findings vary from normal motility to aperistalsis, simultaneous contractions, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus or hypotonic lower esophageal sphincter (LES). It remains unclear whether esophageal dysmotility plays a significant role in the clinical symptoms of EoE. Our aim is to review the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and effect of treatment on esophageal dysmotility in EoE. A literature search utilizing the PubMed database was performed using keywords: eosinophilic esophagitis, esophageal dysmotility, motility, manometry, impedance planimetry, barium esophagogram, endoscopic ultrasound, and dysphagia. Fifteen studies, totaling 387 patients with eosinophilic esophagitis were identified as keeping in accordance with the aim of this study and included in this review. The occurrence of abnormal esophageal manometry was reported to be between 4 and 87% among patients with EoE. Esophageal motility studies have shown reduced distensibility, abnormal peristalsis, and hypotonicity of the LES in patients with EoE, which may also mimic other esophageal motility disorders such as achalasia or nutcracker esophagus. Studies have shown conflicting results regarding the presence of esophageal dysmotility and symptoms with some reports suggesting a higher rate of food impaction, while others report no correlation between motor function and dysphagia. Motility dysfunction of the esophagus in EoE has not been well reported in the literature and studies have reported conflicting evidence regarding the clinical significance of dysmotility seen in EoE. The correlation between esophageal dysmotility and symptoms of EoE remains unclear. Larger studies are needed to investigate the incidence of esophageal dysmotility, clinical implications, and effect of treatment on

  4. Herpetic esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shortsleeve, M.J.; Gauvin, G.P.; Gardner, R.C.; Greenberg, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Four patients with herpetic esophagitis were examined. In three of them, the presenting symptom was odynophagia. Early in the course of herpetic esophagitis, shallow round and oval ulcers were seen on barium esophagograms. Later, the ulcers filled with fibrinous exudate, forming nodular plaques that projected into the esophageal lumen. Although these findings are diagnostic of esophagitis, they are not specific for a herpes virus infection. The definitive diagnosis must be established by histologic examination, which demonstrates the cytopathic effect of the herpes virus infection within the squamous epithelium

  5. Energy efficient design of cognitive small cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildemeersch, Matthias; Wildemeersch, Matthias; Quek, Tony Q.S.; Rabbachin, Alberto; Slump, Cornelis H.; Huang, Aiping; Kim, Dong-In; Mueller, P.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneous networks consisting of a macrocell tier and a small cell tier are considered an attractive solution to cope with the fierce increase of mobile traffic demand. Nevertheless, a massive deployment of small cell access points (SAPs) leads also to a considerable increase in energy

  6. Small cell networks deployment, management, and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Claussen, Holger; Ho, Lester; Razavi, Rouzbeh; Kucera, Stepan

    2018-01-01

    Small Cell Networks: Deployment, Management, and Optimization addresses key problems of the cellular network evolution towards HetNets. It focuses on the latest developments in heterogeneous and small cell networks, as well as their deployment, operation, and maintenance. It also covers the full spectrum of the topic, from academic, research, and business to the practice of HetNets in a coherent manner. Additionally, it provides complete and practical guidelines to vendors and operators interested in deploying small cells. The first comprehensive book written by well-known researchers and engineers from Nokia Bell Labs, Small Cell Networks begins with an introduction to the subject--offering chapters on capacity scaling and key requirements of future networks. It then moves on to sections on coverage and capacity optimization, and interference management. From there, the book covers mobility management, energy efficiency, and small cell deployment, ending with a section devoted to future trends and applicat...

  7. Differences in Normal Tissue Response in the Esophagus Between Proton and Photon Radiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using In Vivo Imaging Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedzielski, Joshua S; Yang, Jinzhong; Mohan, Radhe; Titt, Uwe; Mirkovic, Dragan; Stingo, Francesco; Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel R; Martel, Mary K; Briere, Tina M; Court, Laurence E

    2017-11-15

    To determine whether there exists any significant difference in normal tissue toxicity between intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or proton therapy for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer. A total of 134 study patients (n=49 treated with proton therapy, n=85 with IMRT) treated in a randomized trial had a previously validated esophageal toxicity imaging biomarker, esophageal expansion, quantified during radiation therapy, as well as esophagitis grade (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0), on a weekly basis during treatment. Differences between the 2 modalities were statically analyzed using the imaging biomarker metric value (Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance), as well as the incidence and severity of esophagitis grade (χ 2 and Fisher exact tests, respectively). The dose-response of the imaging biomarker was also compared between modalities using esophageal equivalent uniform dose, as well as delivered dose to an isotropic esophageal subvolume. No statistically significant difference in the distribution of esophagitis grade, the incidence of grade ≥3 esophagitis (15 and 11 patients treated with IMRT and proton therapy, respectively), or the esophageal expansion imaging biomarker between cohorts (P>.05) was found. The distribution of imaging biomarker metric values had similar distributions between treatment arms, despite a slightly higher dose volume in the proton arm (P>.05). Imaging biomarker dose-response was similar between modalities for dose quantified as esophageal equivalent uniform dose and delivered esophageal subvolume dose. Regardless of treatment modality, there was high variability in imaging biomarker response, as well as esophagitis grade, for similar esophageal doses between patients. There was no significant difference in esophageal toxicity from either proton- or photon-based radiation therapy as quantified by esophagitis grade or the esophageal expansion imaging biomarker. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  8. Prophylactic cranial irradiation in small cell lung cancer: a single institution experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, J; Kehoe, M; Sasiadek, W; Hacking, D; Calvert, P

    2014-03-01

    Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) is used to prevent the development of brain metastases in small cell lung carcinoma. PCI confers an overall survival (OS) benefit in both limited and extensive stage disease. We analyze the incidence of symptomatic brain metastases, progression-free survival (PFS) and OS in a cohort of patients who received PCI, in a 5-year period. A retrospective review of all patients who had received PCI between 2006 and 2011 at the Whitfield Clinic was completed. Patient- and disease-related characteristics, the number of patients who developed brain metastases, PFS and OS data were collected. 24 patients were identified. 14 (58.3 %) patients were male, 10 (41.7 %) were female, with a mean age of 62.5 years (range 31-78). All patients were smokers. 12 (50 %) patients had limited stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC), 12 (50 %) had extensive stage disease. 2 (8.2 %) patients developed brain metastases post PCI (p = 0.478.) The median PFS for limited stage SCLC was 13 months (range 3-20) and 10 months (range 5-18) for extensive stage SCLC. Median OS was 15 months (range 4-29) in limited stage SCLC, and 11 months (range 5-29) in extensive stage SCLC. Our study demonstrated a low incidence of symptomatic brain metastases and favourable median PFS and OS in the patients that received PCI, when compared to published phase III data.

  9. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Dietary therapy and nutrition management of eosinophilic esophagitis: ... of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. J Allergy Clin Immunol Pract . 2017;5(2): ...

  10. Role of Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors in Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Maryann R; Alrajhi, Abdullah M; Durand, Cheryl R

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounts for approximately 13% of all lung cancer diagnoses each year. SCLC is characterized by a rapid doubling time, early metastatic spread, and an unfavorable prognosis overall. Most patients with SCLC will respond to initial treatment; however, the majority will experience a disease recurrence and response to second-line therapies is poor. Immune checkpoint inhibitors may be an option given the success in other diseases. A literature search was conducted using Medline (1946-July week 1, 2017) and Embase (1996-2017 week 28) with the search terms small cell lung cancer combined with nivolumab or ipilimumab or pembrolizumab or atezolizumab or tremelimumab or durvalumab. Five clinical trials, including extended follow-up for 2, that evaluated immune checkpoint inhibitors in limited stage or extensive stage SCLC were included. In 2 phase 2 trials, ipilimumab was added to upfront chemotherapy. In both trials, an improvement in progression-free survival was seen. Toxicity, when combined with a platinum and etoposide, was significant. In a confirmatory phase 3 trial, ipilimumab did not prolong overall survival when added to first-line chemotherapy. Overall, response rates were similar between the placebo and ipilimumab groups. A phase 1/2 trial evaluated nivolumab alone or in combination with ipilimumab in recurrent SCLC. Results revealed that nivolumab monotherapy and the combination of nivolumab and ipilimumab were relatively safe and had antitumor activity. Pembrolizumab has been evaluated in a multicohort, phase 1b trial. Preliminary data showed a durable response in the second-line setting. Given the lack of overall survival data and significant toxicity associated with the combination of ipilimumab with first-line chemotherapy, this treatment is not a reasonable option at this time. Nivolumab alone or in combination with ipilimumab is a valid option for recurrent SCLC.

  11. Esophageal motility in eosinophilic esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Weiss

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Motility dysfunction of the esophagus in EoE has not been well reported in the literature and studies have reported conflicting evidence regarding the clinical significance of dysmotility seen in EoE. The correlation between esophageal dysmotility and symptoms of EoE remains unclear. Larger studies are needed to investigate the incidence of esophageal dysmotility, clinical implications, and effect of treatment on patients with EoE.

  12. Esophageal microbiome in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Kirk Harris

    Full Text Available The microbiome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of allergic and inflammatory diseases. The mucosa affected by eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE is composed of a stratified squamous epithelia and contains intraepithelial eosinophils. To date, no studies have identified the esophageal microbiome in patients with EoE or the impact of treatment on these organisms. The aim of this study was to identify the esophageal microbiome in EoE and determine whether treatments change this profile. We hypothesized that clinically relevant alterations in bacterial populations are present in different forms of esophagitis.In this prospective study, secretions from the esophageal mucosa were collected from children and adults with EoE, Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD and normal mucosa using the Esophageal String Test (EST. Bacterial load was determined using quantitative PCR. Bacterial communities, determined by 16S rRNA gene amplification and 454 pyrosequencing, were compared between health and disease.Samples from a total of 70 children and adult subjects were examined. Bacterial load was increased in both EoE and GERD relative to normal subjects. In subjects with EoE, load was increased regardless of treatment status or degree of mucosal eosinophilia compared with normal. Haemophilus was significantly increased in untreated EoE subjects as compared with normal subjects. Streptococcus was decreased in GERD subjects on proton pump inhibition as compared with normal subjects.Diseases associated with mucosal eosinophilia are characterized by a different microbiome from that found in the normal mucosa. Microbiota may contribute to esophageal inflammation in EoE and GERD.

  13. Esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuis, O.; Ganem, G.; Denis, F.; Bera, G.; Pointreau, Y.; Pradier, O.; Martin, P.; Mirabel, X.

    2010-01-01

    Esophageal cancers are highly malignant tumours with often a poor prognosis, except for minimal lesions treated with surgery. Radiation therapy, or combined radiation and chemotherapy is the most used therapeutic modality, alone or before oesophagectomy. The delineation of target volumes is now more accurate owing the possibility to use routinely the new imaging techniques (mainly PET). The aim of this work is to precise the radio-anatomical particularities, the pattern of spread of esophageal cancer and the principles of 3D conformal radiotherapy illustrated with a clinical case. (authors)

  14. Multi-User MIMO Across Small Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finn, Danny; Ahmadi, Hamed; Cattoni, Andrea Fabio

    2014-01-01

    The main contribution of this work is the proposal and assessment of the MU-MIMO across Small Cells concept. MU-MIMO is the spatial multiplexing of multiple users on a single time-frequency resource. In small cell networks, where the number of users per cell is low, finding suitable sets of users...... to be co-scheduled for MU-MIMO is not always possible. In these cases we propose MU-MIMO-based cell reassignments of users into adjacent cells to enable MU-MIMO operation. From system level simulations we found that, when the initial number of users per small cell is four, cell reassignment results in a 21.......7% increase in the spectral efficiency gain attributed to MU-MIMO, and a higher percentage increase when the initial number of users per cell is lower. Going forward, we will extend this work to also consider energy savings through switching off small cells which are emptied by the reassignment process....

  15. Therapeutic effect analysis of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Zhijun; Cao Yongzhen; Zhang Wenxue; Liang Feng

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the treatment effect of non-small cell lung cancer of three dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and to study the effect of patient survival related factors. Methods: Retrospective analysis was mack for 136 cases of non-small cell lung cancer, all accept 3D-CRT, through the case data collection and long-term follow-up, using the single factor and multiple factor analysis survival time and its influencing factors. Results: The recent curative effects of 136 cases of patients with three dimensional conformal radiotherapy: Complete response (CR) 14.7% (20/136), partial response (PR) 60.3 (82/136), stable disease(SD) 19.9% (27/136), progression disease (PD) 5.1% (7/136), total effective rate is 75% (102/136). One, two, three, five year survival rate is 79.4%, 45.4%, 22.1%, 12.5%. Side effects: Class 1 radiated esophagitis 35 cases, Class 2 radiated esophagitis 16 cases, Class 3 and above radiated esophagitis 0 case. Class I radiated pneumonia 20 cases, Class 2 radiated pneumonia 9 cases, Class 3 radiated pneumonia 0 case. Single factor analysis shows the influence of gender, age, pathology, phase, dose, and first-phase curative effect to the survival time are of a statistical significance, Multiple factor analysis showed KPS score, phase, dose, first-phase curative effect are the survival time independent factors. Conclusion: 3D-CRT for patients with non-small cell lung carcinoma is a safe, effective treatment method, Side effects are relatively low, and the patients survival time is long after radiotherapy. (authors)

  16. Primary Small Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus: Clinico- pathological Features and Therapeutic Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevárez, Andrea; Saftoiu, A; Bhutani, M S

    2011-01-01

    Primary esophageal small cell carcinoma (SmCC) is a rare disease with a poor prognosis despite agressive multimodality combination treatment. This article presents the case of a 76-year old women diagnosed with pimary esophageal SmCC. The diagnosis was established by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with biopsies that confirmed an esophageal SmCC positive to synaptophysin, chromogranin, CD56, TTF-1, and cytokeratin 8/18. Further staging procedures included CT, PET and EUS, followed by combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Restaging was then performed, again with PET and CT of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis. This was then followed by salvage esophagectomy due to the presence of residual tumor. Surgical pathology confirmed a 3 cm SmCC, with invasion of the submucosa and lymphovascular invasion. In conclusion, the article describes the rare occurrence of esophageal SmCC, together with the algorithm of diagnosis and staging based on state-of-the-art imaging methods. This was followed by combination chemoradiotherapy and surgical esophagectomy as the standard of care in this aggressive disease.

  17. Esophageal perforation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... esophagus into the space around the lungs. Collapsed lung. X-rays taken after you drink a non-harmful dye can help pinpoint the location of the perforation. You may also have chest CT scan look for an abscess in the chest or esophageal cancer.

  18. Esophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. B.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas in esophageal cancer (EC) has changed, and focus directed towards tumors of the distal esophagus and the esophagogastric junction. The genetic events leading to EC are not fully clarified, but important risk factors have been...

  19. Objectively Quantifying Radiation Esophagitis With Novel Computed Tomography–Based Metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedzielski, Joshua S., E-mail: jsniedzielski@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Houston, Texas (United States); Yang, Jinzhong [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Houston, Texas (United States); Stingo, Francesco [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Martel, Mary K.; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Houston, Texas (United States); Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Briere, Tina M. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Court, Laurence E. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: To study radiation-induced esophageal expansion as an objective measure of radiation esophagitis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Eighty-five patients had weekly intra-treatment CT imaging and esophagitis scoring according to Common Terminlogy Criteria for Adverse Events 4.0, (24 Grade 0, 45 Grade 2, and 16 Grade 3). Nineteen esophageal expansion metrics based on mean, maximum, spatial length, and volume of expansion were calculated as voxel-based relative volume change, using the Jacobian determinant from deformable image registration between the planning and weekly CTs. An anatomic variability correction method was validated and applied to these metrics to reduce uncertainty. An analysis of expansion metrics and radiation esophagitis grade was conducted using normal tissue complication probability from univariate logistic regression and Spearman rank for grade 2 and grade 3 esophagitis endpoints, as well as the timing of expansion and esophagitis grade. Metrics' performance in classifying esophagitis was tested with receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: Expansion increased with esophagitis grade. Thirteen of 19 expansion metrics had receiver operating characteristic area under the curve values >0.80 for both grade 2 and grade 3 esophagitis endpoints, with the highest performance from maximum axial expansion (MaxExp1) and esophageal length with axial expansion ≥30% (LenExp30%) with area under the curve values of 0.93 and 0.91 for grade 2, 0.90 and 0.90 for grade 3 esophagitis, respectively. Conclusions: Esophageal expansion may be a suitable objective measure of esophagitis, particularly maximum axial esophageal expansion and esophageal length with axial expansion ≥30%, with 2.1 Jacobian value and 98.6 mm as the metric value for 50% probability of grade 3 esophagitis. The uncertainty in esophageal Jacobian calculations can be reduced

  20. Objectively Quantifying Radiation Esophagitis With Novel Computed Tomography–Based Metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedzielski, Joshua S.; Yang, Jinzhong; Stingo, Francesco; Martel, Mary K.; Mohan, Radhe; Gomez, Daniel R.; Briere, Tina M.; Liao, Zhongxing; Court, Laurence E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To study radiation-induced esophageal expansion as an objective measure of radiation esophagitis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Eighty-five patients had weekly intra-treatment CT imaging and esophagitis scoring according to Common Terminlogy Criteria for Adverse Events 4.0, (24 Grade 0, 45 Grade 2, and 16 Grade 3). Nineteen esophageal expansion metrics based on mean, maximum, spatial length, and volume of expansion were calculated as voxel-based relative volume change, using the Jacobian determinant from deformable image registration between the planning and weekly CTs. An anatomic variability correction method was validated and applied to these metrics to reduce uncertainty. An analysis of expansion metrics and radiation esophagitis grade was conducted using normal tissue complication probability from univariate logistic regression and Spearman rank for grade 2 and grade 3 esophagitis endpoints, as well as the timing of expansion and esophagitis grade. Metrics' performance in classifying esophagitis was tested with receiver operating characteristic analysis. Results: Expansion increased with esophagitis grade. Thirteen of 19 expansion metrics had receiver operating characteristic area under the curve values >0.80 for both grade 2 and grade 3 esophagitis endpoints, with the highest performance from maximum axial expansion (MaxExp1) and esophageal length with axial expansion ≥30% (LenExp30%) with area under the curve values of 0.93 and 0.91 for grade 2, 0.90 and 0.90 for grade 3 esophagitis, respectively. Conclusions: Esophageal expansion may be a suitable objective measure of esophagitis, particularly maximum axial esophageal expansion and esophageal length with axial expansion ≥30%, with 2.1 Jacobian value and 98.6 mm as the metric value for 50% probability of grade 3 esophagitis. The uncertainty in esophageal Jacobian calculations can be reduced

  1. Activity Limitation Stages Are Associated With Risk of Hospitalization Among Medicare Beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Ling; Pan, Qiang; Xie, Dawei; Kurichi, Jibby E; Streim, Joel E; Bogner, Hillary R; Saliba, Debra; Hennessy, Sean

    2017-05-01

    Activity limitation stages based on activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) are associated with 3-year mortality in elderly Medicare beneficiaries, yet their associations with hospitalization risk in this population have not been studied. To examine the independent association of activity limitation stages with risk of hospitalization within a year among Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 years and older. Cohort study. Community. A total of 9447 community-dwelling elderly Medicare beneficiaries from the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey for years 2005-2009. Stages were derived for ADLs and IADLs separately. Associations of stages with time to first hospitalization and time to recurrent hospitalizations within a year were assessed with Cox proportional hazards models, with which we accounted for baseline sociodemographics, smoking status, comorbidities, and the year of survey entry. Time to first hospitalization and time to recurrent hospitalizations within 1 year. The adjusted risk of first hospitalization increased with greater activity limitation stages (except stage III). The hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for ADL stages I-IV compared with stage 0 (no limitations) were 1.49 (1.36-1.63), 1.61 (1.44-1.80), 1.54 (1.35-1.76), and 2.06 (1.61-2.63), respectively. The pattern for IADL stages was similar. For recurrent hospitalizations, activity limitation stages were associated with the risk of the first hospitalization but not with subsequent hospitalizations. Activity limitation stages are associated with the risk of first hospitalization in the subsequent year among elderly Medicare beneficiaries. Stages capture clinically interpretable profiles of ADL and IADL functionality and describe preserved functions and activity limitation in an aggregated measure. Stage can inform interventions to ameliorate disability and thus reduce the risk of a subsequent hospitalization in this population. IV. Copyright © 2017

  2. Small cell lung cancer: chemo- and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drings, P.

    1992-01-01

    Small-Cell Lung Cancer - Chemo- and Radiotherapy: Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) should be regarded as a systematic disease for which systematic therapy, i.e. chemotherapy, is considered as the cornerstone of treatment. Combination chemotherapy consisting of 2 or mostly 3 active drugs, given at an adequate dose, should be used. Thoracic radiation therapy promises both survival and local-regional control benefits to patients though its optimal role remains to be definitively established. The results of treatment have reached a plateau with a remission rate of up to 90% in stage 'limited disease' and 60% in stage 'extensive disease'. But considering long-term results diseasefree survival and cure only seem possible in 5-10% of patients with limited disease. (orig.) [de

  3. Esophageal Mucormycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Boatright

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare invasive fungal infection with high mortality. It usually affects patients with poorly controlled diabetes, immunosuppression, or hematological malignancies. Gastroenterologists need to be aware of this rare infection because endoscopy can facilitate early diagnosis and prompt appropriate therapy. Here we describe a case of invasive esophageal mucormycosis that developed in a 63-year-old man with diabetes, acute promyelocytic leukemia, and prolonged leukopenia after chemotherapy. Upper endoscopy showed distal circumferential esophageal wall thickening with devitalization. The mucosa did not bleed after endoscopic biopsy. Histopathology confirmed mucormycosis. He was treated with various antifungal agents including echinocandins, fluconazole, and liposomal amphotericin B. Despite aggressive antifungal therapy and supportive care, the patient died 24 days later.

  4. Management of esophageal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, L.D.; Mercer, C.D.; McCallum, R.W.; Kozarek, R.

    1987-01-01

    This book integrates gastroenterology and thoracic surgery to detail the comprehensive management of esophageal disease. It describes radiologic and functional evaluation of the esophagus, endoscopy, medical and surgical treatments, and results and also covers gastroesophageal reflux disease, tumors motility, esophageal replacement, intubation, esophageal diverticula, caustic esophageal injury. It presents Dr. Hill's surgical procedures in detail.

  5. Impaired esophageal motor function in eosinophilic esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilio Santander

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic immunoallergic inflammatory disease of the esophagus that represents a major cause of digestive morbidity among the pediatric and young adult populations. Despite the fact that key symptoms in adults include dysphagia and food impaction, many patients lack structural changes in the esophagus to account for their complaints, which suggests the presence of underlying motor disorders and esophageal distensibility impairment. In the last few years the esophageal motility of these patients has been studied using various approaches, most particularly high-resolution manometry, ambulatory manometry, and impedance planimetry. This review focuses on the most relevant findings and scientific evidence regarding esophageal motor disorders in eosinophilic esophagitis.

  6. Impaired esophageal motor function in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander, Cecilio; Chavarría-Herbozo, Carlos M; Becerro-González, Irene; Burgos-Santamaría, Diego

    2015-10-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a chronic immunoallergic inflammatory disease of the esophagus that represents a major cause of digestive morbidity among the pediatric and young adult populations. Despite the fact that key symptoms in adults include dysphagia and food impaction, many patients lack structural changes in the esophagus to account for their complaints, which suggests the presence of underlying motor disorders and esophageal distensibility impairment. In the last few years the esophageal motility of these patients has been studied using various approaches, most particularly high-resolution manometry, ambulatory manometry, and impedance planimetry. This review focuses on the most relevant findings and scientific evidence regarding esophageal motor disorders in eosinophilic esophagitis.

  7. Morphometric Characterization of Small Cell Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chisoi Anca

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The morphometry in histopathology is used to characterize cell populations belonging to different tissues and to identify differences in their parameters with prognostic implications. To achieve morphometric examination were selected 6 of 24 cases identified as small cell lymphocytic lymphoma. For each case analysis was done on five fields, for each field measuring the parameters of 20 cells. The studied parameters were for cytoplasm: cytoplasmic area, maximum and minimum cytoplasmic diameter, cytoplasmic perimeter; for nucleus were measured: nuclear area, minimum and maximum nuclear diameter, nuclear perimeter, nuclear contour index, nuclear ellipticity index, nuclear irregularity index. Also the nucleocytoplasmic ratio was calculated in all studied cases. Small cell lymphocytic lymphoma is characterized in morphometric terms having a small cytoplasmic area (average 29.206 and also a small nuclear area (mean 28.939 having a nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio appearance suggestive for adult lymphocyte. A nuclear contour index small value (3.946, ellipticity index value also small (3.521 and small nuclear irregularity index (3.965. Standard deviations, in any of the studied morphometric categories, is around or below 1 suggesting monomorphic cell appearance. These morphometric and microscopic features characterized mainly by a small population of adult lymphocytes, monomorphic, with rounded hipercromic nuclei, dense chromatin, support the framing into indolent lymphoma group in terms of clinical outcome.

  8. Dynamic esophageal scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilley, J.J.; Malmud, L.S.; Fisher, R.S.; Applegate, G.; DeVegvar, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Esophageal scintigraphy was developed in order to quantitatively evaluate esophageal transit in patients with a variety of esophageal disorders. The study is performed with orally administered technetium-99m sulfur colloid in water, using a gamma camera on-line to a digital computer. Esophageal transit is expressed as the percent emptying for each of the first 15-sec intervals for 10 min after an initial swallow and at 15-sec intervals after serial swallows. Esophageal transit is significantly decreased in patients with motor disorders of the esophagus, compared to normal controls. In patients with reflux esophagitis, esophageal transit was abnormal when the reflux disease was accompanied by abnormal motor function. The technique we describe is the first quantitative test of esophageal function; it is a useful, sensitive, scintigraphic technique for evaluation of esophageal transit

  9. MET and Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gelsomino

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC is one of the most aggressive lung tumors. The majority of patients with SCLC are diagnosed at an advanced stage. This tumor type is highly sensitive to chemo-radiation treatment, with very high response rates, but invariably relapses. At this time, treatment options are still limited and the prognosis of these patients is poor. A better knowledge of the molecular biology of SCLC allowed us to identify potential druggable targets. Among these, the MET/HGF axis seems to be one of the most aberrant signaling pathways involved in SCLC invasiveness and progression. In this review, we describe briefly all recent literature on the different molecular profiling in SCLC; in particular, we discuss the specific alterations involving c-MET gene and their implications as a potential target in SCLC.

  10. Genetic variant of miR-4293 rs12220909 is associated with susceptibility to non-small cell lung cancer in a Chinese Han population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixia Fan

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer is one of the most common cancers and the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Genetic variants in regulatory regions of some miRNAs might be involved in non-small cell lung cancer susceptibility and survival. rs12220909 (G/C genetic polymorphism in miR-4293 has been shown to be associated with decreased risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. However, the influence of rs12220909 genetic variation on non-small cell lung cancer susceptibility has not been reported. In order to evaluate the potential association between miR-4293 rs12220909 and non-small cell lung cancer risk in a Chinese population, we performed a case-control study among 998 non-small cell lung cancer cases and 1471 controls. The data shows that miR-4293 rs12220909 was significantly associated with decreased susceptibility to non-small cell lung cancer (GC vs.GG: OR = 0.681, 95%CI = 0.555-0.835, P = 2.19E-4; GG vs. GC+CC: OR = 0.687, 95%CI = 0.564-0.837, P = 1.95E-4, which indicates that rs12220909 in miR-4293 may play a significant role in the development of non-small cell lung cancer.

  11. The management of patients with limited-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gospodarowicz, Mary K; Meyer, Ralph M

    2006-01-01

    The term limited-stage Hodgkin lymphoma refers to those patients with stage I-II disease and an absence of bulky disease. Among those patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma, approximately one-third of patients will fall into this category. As long-term disease control can now be anticipated in more than 90% of these patients, management strategies must increasingly address the need to reduce the long-term treatment-related risks. Current treatment options include use of combined modality therapy that includes an abbreviated course of chemotherapy and involved-field radiation or treatment with chemotherapy, currently consisting of ABVD, as a single modality. The choice of treatment between these two options involves specific trade-offs that must balance issues of disease control against long-term risk of late effects.

  12. Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Dose-Escalation Planning Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lievens, Yolande; Nulens, An; Gaber, Mousa Amr; Defraene, Gilles; De Wever, Walter; Stroobants, Sigrid; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the potential for dose escalation with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in positron emission tomography-based radiotherapy planning for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). Methods and Materials: For 35 LA-NSCLC patients, three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and IMRT plans were made to a prescription dose (PD) of 66 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Dose escalation was performed toward the maximal PD using secondary endpoint constraints for the lung, spinal cord, and heart, with de-escalation according to defined esophageal tolerance. Dose calculation was performed using the Eclipse pencil beam algorithm, and all plans were recalculated using a collapsed cone algorithm. The normal tissue complication probabilities were calculated for the lung (Grade 2 pneumonitis) and esophagus (acute toxicity, grade 2 or greater, and late toxicity). Results: IMRT resulted in statistically significant decreases in the mean lung (p <.0001) and maximal spinal cord (p = .002 and 0005) doses, allowing an average increase in the PD of 8.6-14.2 Gy (p ≤.0001). This advantage was lost after de-escalation within the defined esophageal dose limits. The lung normal tissue complication probabilities were significantly lower for IMRT (p <.0001), even after dose escalation. For esophageal toxicity, IMRT significantly decreased the acute NTCP values at the low dose levels (p = .0009 and p <.0001). After maximal dose escalation, late esophageal tolerance became critical (p <.0001), especially when using IMRT, owing to the parallel increases in the esophageal dose and PD. Conclusion: In LA-NSCLC, IMRT offers the potential to significantly escalate the PD, dependent on the lung and spinal cord tolerance. However, parallel increases in the esophageal dose abolished the advantage, even when using collapsed cone algorithms. This is important to consider in the context of concomitant chemoradiotherapy schedules using IMRT.

  13. COMPARISON OF CONVENTIONAL RADIATIOTHERAPY AND ACCELERATED HYPERFRACTIONATED RADIATIOTHERAPY IN CHEMORADIATION TREATMENT FOR SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Gulidov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The 5-year treatment outcomes of 69 patients with stage IIA–IIIA locally advanced small cell lung cancer have been presented. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy was administered in the uneven daily dose fractionation (single dose of 1 + 1,5 Gy with a 5–6hour interval to a total dose of 60–70 Gy depending on the health status and lung function. The complete response was achieved in 13 (42 % patients, the median survival was 28 months and the 5-year survival rate was 26,2 %. Grade III lung and pericardium toxicities (according to RTOG toxicity scale were observed in 3,2 % and 6,5 % of patients, respectively. No grade III–IV radiation-induced blood and esophageal damages were found.

  14. Esophageal heterotopic gastric mucosa in esophageal atresia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachlan J.R. Harrison

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Heterotopic gastric mucosa (HGM is occasionally found at endoscopy in the proximal esophagus of adults and children, when it manifests as an asymptomatic small island of reddish pink mucosa just below the upper esophageal sphincter. There are few reports of esophageal HGM detected by endoscopy after repair of esophageal atresia (EA with tracheo-esophageal fistula (TEF. We report a child with multiple patches of HGM in the proximal and distal esophagus seen at endoscopy after EA/TEF repair. No obvious symptoms were related to the HGM and she remains under endoscopic surveillance. The incidence of esophageal HGM may be increased in patients with EA and its distribution can be more extensive than a simple “inlet patch”. There is evidence to suggest that esophageal HGM increases the risk of developing Barrett's esophagus and has a malignant potential. Heterotopic gastric mucosa extends the spectrum of potential pathologies affecting the esophagus in patients with EA/TEF and supports current international guidelines for endoscopic surveillance of these patients. Keywords: Tracheo-esophageal fistula, Ectopic mucosa, Esophageal malignancy

  15. Recent advances in the treatment of non-small cell and small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Recent presentations at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting from 30 May to 3 June, 2014, will impact routine clinical care and the development of clinical trials in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and extensive stage small cell lung cancer (ES-SCLC). Patients with activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, defined as exon 19 and exon 21 L858R point mutations, experience a high objective response rate and prolonged progression-free survival with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. However, inevitably, patients experience disease progression and the most common mechanism of acquired resistance is an EGFR exon 20 T790M mutation. Several agents (AZD9291, CO-1686 and HM61713) have demonstrated impressive activity in patients with T790M resistance mutations. Additional data on the efficacy of first-line therapy with afatinib and the combination of erlotinib and bevacizumab for patients with EGFR mutant NSCLC were presented. The results of a phase III trial of crizotinib compared to platinum-pemetrexed in the first-line setting, and a phase I trial and expansion cohort of ceritinib, provided additional efficacy and toxicity data for patients with anaplastic lymphoma kinase rearranged NSCLC. A phase III trial of cisplatin and gemcitabine, with and without necitumumab, revealed an improvement in overall survival with the addition of necitumumab in patients with squamous NSCLC. In the second-line setting, a phase III trial of docetaxel with ramucirumab or placebo revealed an improvement in overall survival with the addition of ramucirumab. In extensive stage small cell lung cancer phase III trials of consolidative thoracic radiation therapy and prophylactic cranial radiation failed to reveal an improvement in overall survival.

  16. Do elderly people at more severe activity of daily living limitation stages fall more?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry-Sánchez, John T; Kurichi, Jibby E; Xie, Dawei; Pan, Qiang; Stineman, Margaret G

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how activity of daily living (ADL) stages and the perception of unmet needs for home accessibility features associate with a history of falling. Participants were from a nationally representative sample from the Second Longitudinal Survey of Aging conducted in 1994. The sample included 9250 community-dwelling persons 70 yrs or older. The associations of ADL stage and perception of unmet needs for home accessibility features with a history of falling within the past year (none, once, or multiple times) were explored after accounting for sociodemographic characteristics and comorbidities using a multinomial logistic regression model. The adjusted relative risk of falling more than once peaked at 4.30 (95% confidence interval, 3.29-5.61) for persons with severe limitation (ADL-III) compared those with no limitation (ADL-0) then declined for those at complete limitation (ADL-IV). The adjusted relative risks of falling once and multiple times were 1.42 (95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.87) and 1.85 (95% confidence interval, 1.44-2.36), respectively, for those lacking home accessibility features. Risk of falling appeared greatest for those whose homes lacked accessibility features and peaked at intermediate ADL limitation stages, presumably at a point when people have significant disabilities but sufficient function to remain partially active.

  17. Cognitive small cell networks: energy efficiency and trade-offs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildemeersch, M.; Wildemeersch, Matthias; Quek, T.Q.S.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Rabbachin, A.

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneous networks using a mix of macrocells and small cells are foreseen as one of the solutions to meet the ever increasing mobile traffic demand. Nevertheless, a massive deployment of small cell access points (SAPs) leads also to a considerable increase in energy consumption. Spurred by

  18. Neuroendocrine small cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reig Castillejo, Anna; Membrive Conejo, Ismael; Foro Arnalot, Palmira; Rodríguez de Dios, Nuria; Algara López, Manuel

    2010-07-01

    Neuroendocrine small cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix (SCC) is a rare disease that mixes clinical and biological characteristics of both cervical neoplasms and neuroendocrine small cell cancer. The prognosis is poor and the optimal treatment has not yet been clarified. Multimodality treatment, with surgery and concurrent chemoradiation has recently been shown to improve local control and survival rates.

  19. Esophagitis dissecans associated with eosinophilic esophagitis in an adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie-Anne R. Guerra

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Esophagitis dissecans superficialis and eosinophilic esophagitis are distinct esophageal pathologies with characteristic clinical and histologic findings. Esophagitis dissecans superficialis is a rare finding on endoscopy consisting of the peeling of large fragments of esophageal mucosa. Histology shows sloughing of the epithelium and parakeratosis. Eosinophilic esophagitis is an allergic disease of the esophagus characterized by eosinophilic inflammation of the epithelium and symptoms of esophageal dysfunction. Both of these esophageal processes have been associated with other diseases, but there is no known association between them. We describe a case of esophagitis dissecans superficialis and eosinophilic esophagitis in an adolescent patient. To our knowledge, this is the first case describing an association between esophageal dissecans superficialis and eosinophilic esophagitis.

  20. Esophageal pH monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    pH monitoring - esophageal; Esophageal acidity test ... Esophageal pH monitoring is used to check how much stomach acid is entering the esophagus. It also checks how well the acid is cleared downward into the ...

  1. Treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer and limited-disease small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Sharouni, S.Y.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concerns the treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and limited disease small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). We described a systematic review on the clinical results of radiotherapy, combined or not with chemotherapy, for inoperable NSCLC stage III with the aim to define the

  2. Radioisotope esophageal transit test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazono, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Kazuo; Toyonaga, Atsushi

    1982-01-01

    A new technique employed sup(99m)Tc-MAA for the study of esophageal dysfunction and its clinical implication were evaluated in the patients with achalasia, progressive systemic sclerosis, reflux esophagitis and 10 normal controls. To investigate esophageal emptying and gastroesophageal reflux, a homogeneous bolus of sup(99m)Tc-MAA in 15ml of water was swallowed in the upright and supine positions under the collimeter of a gamma camera linked to nuclear medicine data analyser (Shimazu Scinti Pack 1200). This radionuclide transit studies made a quantitative evaluation of the esophageal dysfunction possible in all cases. Comparing the conventional esophageal function test procedures, this test is a safe, noninvasive and more physiological and sensitive in detecting abnormal esophageal emptying and gastroesophageal reflux. (author)

  3. Esophageal lichen planus

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Janine Pichler de; Uribe, Natalia Caballero; Abulafia, Luna Azulay; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the skin, mucous membranes, nails and scalp. Esophageal lichen planus is a rarely reported manifestation of lichen planus, presenting itself commonly in middle-aged women, with symptoms such as dysphagia. We report a case of esophageal lichen planus in a 54-year-old woman associated with oral, cutaneous and ungual lichen planus. Although lichen planus is a disorder well known by dermatologists, reports of esophageal lichen ...

  4. Erlotinib in previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smrdel, U.; Kovac, V.

    2006-01-01

    Background. Erlotinib is a novel biological anti-tumour agent in the treatment of advanced non small cell lung cancer. It represents the molecularly-targeted therapy which has been studied extensively. Case report. We present a case of a patient who suffered from advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. After the progress of disease following a prior chemotherapy he was treated with erlotinib with remarkable effect which was shown at chest x ray and symptoms were quite reduced. Conclusions. In selected patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer Erlotinib improves survival and symptom control as it results in presented case. (author)

  5. Esophageal lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Janine Pichler de; Uribe, Natalia Caballero; Abulafia, Luna Azulay; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the skin, mucous membranes, nails and scalp. Esophageal lichen planus is a rarely reported manifestation of lichen planus, presenting itself commonly in middle-aged women, with symptoms such as dysphagia. We report a case of esophageal lichen planus in a 54-year-old woman associated with oral, cutaneous and ungual lichen planus. Although lichen planus is a disorder well known by dermatologists, reports of esophageal lichen planus are rare in dermatologic literature. The esophageal lichen planus is little known and underdiagnosed, with a significant delay between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis.

  6. small cell lung cancer in a Chinese population

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    clinical significance in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in Hubei province ... diagnosis, tumor stage, treatment, progression .... Table 4: Association between EGFR mutation, gender and histologic type in 138 NSCLC patients.

  7. Primary Small Cell Carcinoma of the Upper Urinary Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Ka-Siong Kho

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of primary extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma of the distal ureter, with a synchronous small cell carcinoma of the ipsilateral renal pelvis. These tumors, rarely reported in the urinary tract, are locally aggressive and have a poor prognosis. A 77-year-old male bedridden patient presented with fever and chills with left side-flank pain for 3 days. Following a diagnosis of ureteral urothelial carcinoma, hand-assisted laparoscopic nephroureterectomy with bladder cuff excision was carried out. Adjuvant chemotherapy was given after pathologic report of primary small cell carcinoma of the distal ureter and a synchronous small cell carcinoma of the ipsilateral renal pelvis. After 3 cycles of combination chemotherapy, the patient died 4 months postoperatively due to sepsis.

  8. Ovarian Small Cell Carcinoma Hypercalcemic Type: A Case Report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rahma, M B.

    2016-09-01

    A 31-year-old female was diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the ovary hypercalcaemic type (OSCCHT) post left oophorectomy. This is a rare aggressive ovarian tumour of which less than 300 cases were reported.

  9. Full-Duplex MIMO Small-Cell Networks: Performance Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Atzeni, Italo; Kountouris, Marios

    2015-01-01

    Full-duplex small-cell relays with multiple antennas constitute a core element of the envisioned 5G network architecture. In this paper, we use stochastic geometry to analyze the performance of wireless networks with full-duplex multiple-antenna small cells, with particular emphasis on the probability of successful transmission. To achieve this goal, we additionally characterize the distribution of the self-interference power of the full-duplex nodes. The proposed framework reveals useful ins...

  10. Effect of Increased Radiotoxicity on Survival of Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Curatively Intended Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holgersson, Georg; Bergström, Stefan; Liv, Per; Nilsson, Jonas; Edlund, Per; Blomberg, Carl; Nyman, Jan; Friesland, Signe; Ekman, Simon; Asklund, Thomas; Henriksson, Roger; Bergqvist, Michael

    2015-10-01

    To elucidate the impact of different forms of radiation toxicities (esophagitis, radiation pneumonitis, mucositis and hoarseness), on the survival of patients treated with curatively intended radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Data were individually collected retrospectively for all patients diagnosed with NSCLC subjected to curatively intended radiotherapy (≥50 Gy) in Sweden during the time period 1990 to 2000. Esophagitis was the only radiation-induced toxicity with an impact on survival (hazard ratio=0.83, p=0.016). However, in a multivariate model, with clinical- and treatment-related factors taken into consideration, the impact of esophagitis on survival was no longer statistically significant (hazard ratio=0.88, p=0.17). The effect on survival seen in univariate analysis may be related to higher radiation dose and to the higher prevalence of chemotherapy in this group. The results do not suggest that the toxicities examined have any detrimental effect on overall survival. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  11. Strategies to eradicate minimal residual disease in small cell lung cancer: high-dose chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, and BEC2 plus BCG vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, L M; Grant, S C; Miller, V A; Ng, K K; Kris, M G

    1999-10-01

    In the last 25 years, treatment for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has improved with advances in chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Standard chemotherapy regimens can yield 80% to 90% response rates and some cures when combined with thoracic irradiation in limited-stage patients. Nonetheless, small cell lung cancer has a high relapse rate due to drug resistance; this has resulted in poor survival for most patients. Attacking this problem requires a unique approach to eliminate resistant disease remaining after induction therapy. This review will focus on three potential strategies: high-dose chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, and BEC2 plus BCG vaccination.

  12. Long-Term Clinical Outcome of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: The MD Anderson Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Zhiqin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Yang Kunyu [Cancer Centre, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Komaki, Ritsuko; Wei Xiong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhuang Yan; Martel, Mary K.; Vedam, Sastray; Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhu Guangying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University School of Oncology, Beiijng Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing (China); Gomez, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lu, Charles [Department of Thoracic Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liao Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In 2007, we published our initial experience in treating inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The current report is an update of that experience with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: Patients in this retrospective review were 165 patients who began definitive radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy, for newly diagnosed, pathologically confirmed NSCLC to a dose of {>=}60 Gy from 2005 to 2006. Early and late toxicities assessed included treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP), pulmonary fibrosis, esophagitis, and esophageal stricture, scored mainly according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Other variables monitored were radiation-associated dermatitis and changes in body weight and Karnofsky performance status. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compute survival and freedom from radiation-related acute and late toxicities as a function of time. Results: Most patients (89%) had Stage III to IV disease. The median radiation dose was 66 Gy given in 33 fractions (range, 60-76 Gy, 1.8-2.3 Gy per fraction). Median overall survival time was 1.8 years; the 2-year and 3-year overall survival rates were 46% and 30%. Rates of Grade {>=}3 maximum TRP (TRP{sub max}) were 11% at 6 months and 14% at 12 months. At 18 months, 86% of patients had developed Grade {>=}1 maximum pulmonary fibrosis (pulmonary fibrosis{sub max}) and 7% Grade {>=}2 pulmonary fibrosis{sub max}. The median times to maximum esophagitis (esophagitis{sub max}) were 3 weeks (range, 1-13 weeks) for Grade 2 and 6 weeks (range, 3-13 weeks) for Grade 3. A higher percentage of patients who experienced Grade 3 esophagitis{sub max} later developed Grade 2 to 3 esophageal stricture. Conclusions: In our experience, using IMRT to treat NSCLC leads to low rates of pulmonary and esophageal toxicity, and favorable clinical outcomes in terms of survival.

  13. Esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Haruma, Ken; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Esophageal diverticulum, a relatively rare condition, has been considered to be associated with motor abnormalities such as conditions that cause a lack of coordination between the distal esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. Presentation of case: We herein report a case of esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. A 73-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and regurgitation. Imaging examinations revealed a right-sided esophageal diver...

  14. Esophageal trachealization: A feature of eosinophilic esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlHussaini, Abdulrahman A; Semaan, Toufic; ElHag, Imad A

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is an inflammatory condition characterized by intense eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus. EE is frequently misdiagnosed as gastroesophageal reflux disease. Here, we present a child with EE and a characteristic endoscopic finding, r inged esophagus . An 11-year-old Saudi boy presented with dysphagia for 1 year. He had experienced an intermittent sensation of solid food sticking in his chest, which was relieved by drinking liquids. A barium swallow excluded anatomical causes of dysphagia, but revealed multiple-ringed esophagus. Endoscopy showed a furrowing and trachealizing appearance of the entire esophagus. Hisologically, extensive eosinophilic infiltration was a feature in biopsies obtained from the esophagus. The child responded well to a 2-month course of inhaled fluticasone. Symptoms recurred 3 months after discontinuation of therapy, which necessitated resumption of inhaled fluticasone. The endoscopic appearance of multiple esophageal rings should raise suspicion of EE and be confirmed by esophageal biopsies. (author)

  15. Treatment and survival outcomes of small cell carcinoma of the esophagus: an analysis of the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Andrew T; Shao, Meng; Rineer, Justin; Osborn, Virginia; Schwartz, David; Schreiber, David

    2017-02-01

    Given the paucity of esophageal small cell carcinoma (SCC) cases, there are few large studies evaluating this disease. In this study, the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) was utilized to analyze the clinical features, treatment, and survival of patients with esophageal SCC in a large, population-based dataset. We selected patients diagnosed with esophageal SCC from 1998 to 2011. Patients were identified as having no treatment, chemotherapy alone, radiation ± sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemoradiation, and esophagectomy ± chemotherapy and/or radiation. Overall survival (OS) was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was conducted to identify factors associated with OS. A total of 583 patients were identified. Most patients had stage IV disease (41.7%). Regarding treatment selection, chemoradiation was the most commonly utilized for patients with nonmetasatic disease, whereas chemotherapy alone was most common for metastatic patients. Esophagectomy (median survival 44.9 months with 3 year OS 50.5%) was associated with the best OS for patients with localized (node-negative) disease compared with chemotherapy alone (p < 0.001) or chemoradiation (p = 0.01). For locoregional (node-positive) disease, treatment with chemoradiation resulted in a median survival of 17.8 months and a 3 year OS 31.6%. On multivariate analysis, treatment with chemotherapy alone (p = 0.003) was associated with worse OS while esophagectomy (p = 0.04) was associated with improved OS compared to chemoradiation. Esophageal SCC is an aggressive malignancy with most patients presenting with metastatic disease. Either esophagectomy or chemoradiation as part of multimodality treatment appear to improve OS for selected patients with nonmetastatic disease. © 2016 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  16. Single fraction prophylactic cranial irradiation for small cell carcinoma of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewster, A.E.; Hopwood, P.; Stout, R.; Burt, P.A.; Thatcher, N.

    1995-01-01

    The effectiveness of a single 8-Gy fraction prophylactic cranial irradiation regime was assessed in 106 patients with small-cell carcinoma of the lung. All patients had limited stage disease and received combination chemotherapy consisting of either cisplatin or carboplatin with ifosfamide, etoposide, and vincristine (VICE). Cranial irradiation was administered 48 h after the first cycle of chemotherapy and was well tolerated. Actual 2-year survival was 35% and cranial relapse occurred in 22% of those patients who achieved complete remission. This compares favourably with a cranial relapse rate of 45% incomplete remitters previously reported with the same chemotherapy regime after a minimum follow-up of 2 years where PCI was not used. Formal psychometric testing was performed retrospectively on a series of 25 long-term survivors of whom 14 were taken from this reported series. Whilst 75% of patients were impaired on at least one test with 68% performing badly in the most complex task, this was not associated with clinically detectable neurological damage and the patients did not complain of memory or concentration difficulties. In conclusion, single fraction PCI, when used with platinum based combination chemotherapy, appears to be equally effective but may be less neurotoxic than the more standard fractionated regimes

  17. The Prognosis of Small Cell Lung Cancer in Patients with Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yoko; Ohara, Sayaka; Furukawa, Ryutaro; Usui, Kazuhiro

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prognosis of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) based on the underlying pulmonary disease. A total of 204 patients with SCLC were reviewed and categorized into three groups: normal, emphysema and fibrosis. The median overall survival duration (OS) in patients with normal lungs (n=57), with emphysema (n=105) and fibrosis (n=42) was 21.3, 16.4 and 10.8 months (p=0.063). In limited-stage disease (LD), the median OS in patients with fibrosis (7.4 months) was shorter than normal (52.7 months) or emphysema patients (26.4 months) (p=0.034). In extensive-stage disease (ED), the median OS in patients with fibrosis (12.7 months) was not significantly different from normal (11.4 months) or emphysema patients (13.5 months) (p=0.600). Patients with fibrosis had a poorer prognosis than normal or emphysema patients in LD-SCLC, but the coexistence of pulmonary fibrosis did not affect the prognostic outcomes in ED-SCLC. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  18. Small cell extraskeletal osteosarcoma: a rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Sood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extraskeletal osteosarcoma is a rare malignant mesenchymal neoplasm and its small cell variant is one among the rarest variant. This article describes a 60-year-old woman presenting with a large, lobulated, painful mass in left thigh with associated history of trauma since 18 months. Her magnetic resonance imaging showed a variegated mixed intensity lesion with associated cystic degeneration, necrosis and matrix arborizing nearby muscles. Fine needle aspiration cytology showed a small cell lesion with very scant osteoid. Tumor was excised and histopathological diagnosis was small cell osteosarcoma involving adjacent muscles and fat with sparing of lymph nodes. The aim of this article is to present the clinical, radiological, cyto-histological and immunohistochemical features of this extremely rare lesion.

  19. Small cell cervical cancer: an unusual finding at cholecystectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, Emily

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Small cell carcinoma of the cervix is a rare cancer, comprising less than 3% of all cervical neoplasms. It uniformly has a poor prognosis, and has a high mortality even with early stage disease. It can metastasise rapidly and metastatic sites include lung, liver, brain, bone, pancreas and lymph nodes. CASE: Here, we report the case of a 60-year-old woman with no symptoms of cervical pathology who developed post-renal failure following a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The cause was bilateral ureteric obstruction from metastatic small cell cervical cancer and metastases were subsequently found on her gallbladder specimen. CONCLUSION: This is an unusual presentation of small cell cervical cancer and demonstrates the aggressive nature of this disease.

  20. Diffuse esophageal spasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Chen, Y.M.; Hewson, E.G.; Richter, J.E.; Wu, W.C.; Gelfand, D.W.; Castell, D.O.

    1988-01-01

    Radiologic and manometric findings were correlated in 17 patients with diffuse esophageal spasm (DES). All patients initially had chest pain and/or dysphagia and had a manometric diagnosis of DES. Mean percentage of normal peristalsis manometrically was 46% (range, 20%-80%). Based on radiologic examination, an esophageal motor disorder consistent with DES was diagnosed in 12 of 17 patients, and there was one misinterpretation of achalasia. Radiologic detection was not related significantly to the percentage of peristalsis seen on manometric examination. Mean esophageal wall thickness as measured radiographically in patients with DES was 2.6 mm, compared with 2.5 mm in 17 individuals with normal results of manometry

  1. Prevalence of lung abnormalities in 55 patients with esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zan, Tiago Alves de Brito; Cordeiro, Jose Antonio; Franca, Fabricio Correa de; Muniz, Marcos Pontes; Borim, Aldenis Albenese; Cury, Patricia Maluf

    2001-01-01

    The objective was to identify lung abnormalities in patients with esophageal cancer, to compare the obtained data and to demonstrate its relationship with smoking. This was a series of cases type of cross-sectional study. We studied 55 patients with esophageal carcinoma diagnosed between 1998 and 2001 at Hospital de Base de Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil. Chest plain films and computed tomography scans were analyzed. The frequency of the tumors and other lung abnormalities in two groups of patients were compared: smokers and non-smokers. The results showed that forty-six (83%) patients had spinous cell carcinoma, seven (13%) adenocarcinomas, one (2%) carcinoma of small cells and one (2%) non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Forty-eight (87%) patients were smokers and seven (13%) were non-smokers. In the smokers group, 89% had spinous cell carcinoma, 9% adenocarcinoma and 2% small cells carcinoma. In the non-smokers group, 57% had adenocarcinoma, 28% spinous cell carcinoma and 15% non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Metastases were identified in four smokers and in two non-smokers. The prevalence of the lung abnormalities (interstitial infiltration, emphysema and pneumonia) was higher in the smokers group (73%) than in the non-smokers group (27%) (p = 0.03). We concluded that this fact reinforces the importance of evaluation of the lungs in patients with esophageal neoplasms. (author)

  2. Extrapulmonary small-cell carcinoma series in a single-institution experience. With a case report of small cell carcinoma in the hypopharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monobe, Hiroko; Kagoya, Ryoji; Tojima, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Extrapulmonary small-cell carcinoma (EPSCC) is clinically underrecognized and optimal management remains illusive. Although head and neck EPSCC tends to involve early widespread dissemination and poor prognosis, recently reported favorable outcomes have used concurrent chemoradiotherapy in limited-stage disease. We report an EPSCC case of arising in the hypopharynx successfully treated by induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy. To clarify EPSCC clinically, we retrospectively reviewed clinical courses of all EPSCC records between 1999 and 2008 in a single-institution series. The 14 subjects identified had primary sites at the gastrointestinal tract in 5, uterine cervix in 3, genitourinary system in 2 and at the gallbladder, liver, hypopharynx, and an unidentified primary lymph node in one case each. Of the 14, 2 cases had stage I, 2 cases had stage II, 4 cases had stage III, 5 cases had stage IV in tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) classification. Stage IV subjects usually underwent platinum-based chemotherapy, to which 25% showed partial response (PR) and 75% progressive disease (PD) with median overall survival (OS) of 114.0 days, or 16 weeks. Of stage III or lower subjects, 75% underwent surgery and 62.5% chemotherapy. OS was 1244.0 days or 3.7 years and 2-year survival rates was estimated at 87.5%. Survival duration differed significantly between those in stage III or lower and those in group IV. Age significantly affected survival time in the Cox proportional hazard regression model. Brain metastasis was uncommon in this series, despite the absence of prophylactic cranial radiation. Further studies are needed to improve and clarify the clinical EPSCC course. (author)

  3. Isolated pancreatic metastases from a bronchogenic small cell carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walshe, T

    2012-01-31

    We describe the case of a 60 year old female smoker who presented with a three month history of weight loss (14 Kg), generalized abdominal discomfort and malaise. Chest radiography demonstrated a mass projected inferior to the hilum of the right lung. Computed Tomography of thorax confirmed a lobulated lesion in the right infrahilar region and subsequent staging abdominal CT demonstrated a low density lesion in the neck of the pancreas. Percutaneous Ultrasound guided pancreatic biopsy was performed, histology of which demonstrated pancreatic tissue containing a highly necrotic small cell undifferentiated carcinoma consistent with metastatic small cell carcinoma of the bronchus.

  4. Combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon Kyung; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil; Lim Do Hoon; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Dae Yong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Kyu Chan; Kwon, O Jung [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    This is a retrospective study to evaluate the response rate, acute toxicity, and survival rate of a combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small cell lung cancer. Forty six patients with limited disease small-cell lung cancer who underwent combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy between October 1994 and April 1998 were evaluated. Six cycles of chemotherapy were planned either using a VIP regimen (etoposide, ifosfamide, and cis-platin) or a EP regimen (etoposide and cis-platin). Thoracic radiation therapy was planned to deliver 44 Gy using 10MV X-ray, starting concurrently with chemotherapy. Response was evaluated 4 weeks after the completion of the planned chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and the prophylactic cranial irradiation was planned only for the patients with complete responses. Acute toxicity was evaluated using the SWOG toxicity criteria, and the overall survival and disease-free survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier Method. The median follow-up period was 16 months (range:2 to 41 months). Complete response was achieved in 30 (65%) patients, of which 22 patients received prophylactic cranial irradiations. Acute toxicities over grade III were granulocytopenia in 23 (50%), anemia in 17 (37%), thrombo-cytopenia in nine (20%), alopecia in nine (20%), nausea/vomiting in five (11%), and peripheral neuropathy in one (2%). Chemotherapy was delayed in one patient, and the chemotherapy doses were reduced in 58 (24%) out of the total 246 cycles. No radiation esophagitis over grade III was observed, while interruption during radiation therapy for a mean of 8.3 days occurred in 21 patients. The local recurrences were observed in 8 patients and local progressions were in 6 patients, and the distant metastases in 17 patients. Among these, four patients had both the local relapse and the distant metastasis. Brain was the most common metastatic site (10 patients), followed by the liver as the next common site (4 patients). The

  5. Combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Moon Kyung; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil; Lim Do Hoon; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Dae Yong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Kyu Chan; Kwon, O Jung

    1999-01-01

    This is a retrospective study to evaluate the response rate, acute toxicity, and survival rate of a combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small cell lung cancer. Forty six patients with limited disease small-cell lung cancer who underwent combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy between October 1994 and April 1998 were evaluated. Six cycles of chemotherapy were planned either using a VIP regimen (etoposide, ifosfamide, and cis-platin) or a EP regimen (etoposide and cis-platin). Thoracic radiation therapy was planned to deliver 44 Gy using 10MV X-ray, starting concurrently with chemotherapy. Response was evaluated 4 weeks after the completion of the planned chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and the prophylactic cranial irradiation was planned only for the patients with complete responses. Acute toxicity was evaluated using the SWOG toxicity criteria, and the overall survival and disease-free survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier Method. The median follow-up period was 16 months (range:2 to 41 months). Complete response was achieved in 30 (65%) patients, of which 22 patients received prophylactic cranial irradiations. Acute toxicities over grade III were granulocytopenia in 23 (50%), anemia in 17 (37%), thrombo-cytopenia in nine (20%), alopecia in nine (20%), nausea/vomiting in five (11%), and peripheral neuropathy in one (2%). Chemotherapy was delayed in one patient, and the chemotherapy doses were reduced in 58 (24%) out of the total 246 cycles. No radiation esophagitis over grade III was observed, while interruption during radiation therapy for a mean of 8.3 days occurred in 21 patients. The local recurrences were observed in 8 patients and local progressions were in 6 patients, and the distant metastases in 17 patients. Among these, four patients had both the local relapse and the distant metastasis. Brain was the most common metastatic site (10 patients), followed by the liver as the next common site (4 patients). The

  6. Prevalence of Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    multiruka1

    Esophageal cancer is one of the common malignancies worldwide, with ... similar changes in the incidence in Kenyan populations, especially .... low socioeconomic status and the cost of investigation ... thus it is difficult to explain its impact on.

  7. Bleeding esophageal varices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000268.htm Bleeding esophageal varices To use the sharing features on ... veins in the esophagus to balloon outward. Heavy bleeding can occur if the veins break open. Any ...

  8. Functional Esophageal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Qasim; Fass, Ronnie; Gyawali, C Prakash; Miwa, Hiroto; Pandolfino, John E; Zerbib, Frank

    2016-02-15

    Functional esophageal disorders consist of a disease category that present with esophageal symptoms (heartburn, chest pain, dysphagia, globus) not explained by mechanical obstruction (stricture, tumor, eosinophilic esophagitis), major motor disorders (achalasia, EGJ outflow obstruction, absent contractility, distal esophageal spasm, jackhammer esophagus), or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). While mechanisms responsible are unclear, it is theorized that visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance play an important role in symptom generation, in the context of normal or borderline function. Treatments directed at improving borderline motor dysfunction or reducing reflux burden to sub-normal levels have limited success in symptom improvement. In contrast, strategies focused on modulating peripheral triggering and central perception are mechanistically viable and clinically meaningful. However, outcome data from these treatment options are limited. Future research needs to focus on understanding mechanisms underlying visceral hypersensitivity and hypervigilance so that appropriate targets and therapies can be developed. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Esophageal intramural pseudoverticulosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, S.R.; Sanders, M.M.; Turner, M.A.; Liu, C.I.

    1981-01-01

    Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis (EIP) is a rare condition of unknown etiology. It is characterized by multiple, small, flaskshaped outpouchings in the esophageal wall. Involvement may be segmental or diffuse. Since this entity was first reported in 1960, there have been 43 cases described in the English literature. These cases are reviewed and six additional cases are reported with emphasis on clinical and radiographic parameters of this entity. (orig.) [de

  10. Functional esophageal disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Clouse, R; Richter, J; Heading, R; Janssens, J; Wilson, J

    1999-01-01

    The functional esophageal disorders include globus, rumination syndrome, and symptoms that typify esophageal diseases (chest pain, heartburn, and dysphagia). Factors responsible for symptom production are poorly understood. The criteria for diagnosis rest not only on compatible symptoms but also on exclusion of structural and metabolic disorders that might mimic the functional disorders. Additionally, a functional diagnosis is precluded by the presence of a pathology-based motor disorder or p...

  11. Genetics of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    disease of the esophagus that affects at least 4 in 10,000 persons.1 Although symptomatically resembling gastroe - sophageal reflux disease, EE is...clinically defined as esophageal eosinophilia (>_15 intraepithelial eosinophils per high-powered field) in the absence of abnormal acid reflux disease...that distinguish eosin- ophilic esophagitis (EoE) from other inflammatory disorders, including gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). As the prev

  12. Esophageal motility disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannig, C.; Rummeny, E.; Wuttge-Hannig, A.

    2007-01-01

    For the better understanding of esophageal motility, the muscle texture and the distribution of skeletal and smooth muscle fibers in the esophagus are of crucial importance. Esophageal physiology will be shortly mentioned as far as necessary for a comprehensive understanding of peristaltic disturbances. Besides the pure depiction of morphologic criteria, a complete esophageal study has to include an analysis of the motility. New diagnostic tools with reduced radiation for dynamic imaging (digital fluoroscopy, videofluoroscopy) at 4-30 frames/s are available. Radiomanometry is a combination of a functional pressure measurement and a simultaneous dynamic morphologic analysis. Esophageal motility disorders are subdivided by radiologic and manometric criteria into primary, secondary, and nonclassifiable forms. Primary motility disorders of the esophagus are achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, and the hypertonic lower esophageal sphincter. The secondary motility disorders include pseudoachalasia, reflux-associated motility disorders, functionally caused impactions, Boerhaave's syndrome, Chagas' disease, scleroderma, and presbyesophagus. The nonclassificable motility disorders (NEMD) are a very heterogeneous collective. (orig.) [de

  13. Detection of cytoskeletal proteins in small cell lung carcinoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hložánková, M.; Lukáš, Z.; Viklický, Vladimír

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 18, - (1999), s. 47-49 ISSN 0231-5882 Grant - others:MŠk1(CZ) OE10a/EU1450 Keywords : cytoskeletal proteins * small cell lung carcinoma Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 0.400, year: 1999

  14. Tracking the Evolution of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Wilson, Gareth A.; McGranahan, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Background Among patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), data on intratumor heterogeneity and cancer genome evolution have been limited to small retrospective cohorts. We wanted to prospectively investigate intratumor heterogeneity in relation to clinical outcome and to determine...... as a prognostic predictor. (Funded by Cancer Research UK and others; TRACERx ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01888601 .)....

  15. Long-term survival in small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Osterlind, K; Hansen, M

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe in patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) the characteristics of those who survive for > or = 5 years, to identify long-term prognostic factors, to analyze survival data of 5-year survivors, and to study 10-year survival in patients entered before 1981. PATIENTS......, especially tobacco-related cancers and other tobacco-related diseases....

  16. Cellular radiosensitivity of small-cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, M; Poulsen, H S; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: The objective of this study was to determine the radiobiological characteristics of a panel of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines by use of a clonogenic assay. In addition, we tested whether comparable results could be obtained by employing a growth extrapolation method based...

  17. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.

    2009-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous...

  18. Distributed Initial Synchronization for 5G small cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berardinelli, Gilberto; Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão; Tirkkonen, Olav

    2014-01-01

    Time synchronization in a large network of small cells enables efficient interference management as well as advanced transmission techniques which can boost the network throughput. In this paper, we focus on the distributed initial synchronization problem and propose different solutions aiming at...

  19. ORAL-THERAPY FOR SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POSTMUS, PE; SMIT, EF

    After a remarkable improvement of the very poor prognosis of small cell lung cancer with very simple therapy such as iv and oral cyclophosphamide the role of oral therapy has become minimal. However, since more than a decade results of combination chemotherapy are at a plateau and it is necessary to

  20. Iris metastasis in small-cell lung carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roenhorst, Anke W. J.; van den Bergh, Alphons C. M.; van Putten, John W. G.; Smit, Egbert F.

    2007-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is characterized by rapid growth and early metastasis. Despite its sensitivity to cytotoxic treatment, until now treatments have failed to control or cure this disease in most patients. Here, we describe a patient with SCLC in which symptoms caused by iris metastasis

  1. Value of brain computed tomography in small cell lung cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernet, M.; Breau, J.L.; Goldlust, D.; Israel, L.

    1988-01-01

    88 patients with small cell lung cancer were studied. Brain scans were performed first at initial staging and repeated at regular intervals during the survey. The results confirm the limited value of brain scans in the detection of metastases in neurologically asymptomatic patients [fr

  2. [Randomized clinical trial of IEP and EP regimens in the treatment of patients with small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui; Wang, Anlan; Huang, Zhihua; Zhou, Wenwei

    2004-06-20

    To observe and compare the efficacy and safety of IEP and EP regimens for small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Sixty-four patients with SCLC pathologically proved were randomly divided into IEP group ( n =32) and EP group ( n =32). All the 64 patients were evaluable for response and toxicity. In IEP group, the total responsive rate, responsive rates of limited-stage patients and extensive-stage patients were 84.4%(27/32), 100.0%(15/15) and 70.6%(12/17) respectively; while in EP group, those were 75.0%(24/32), 85.7%(12/14) and 66.7% (12/18) respectively. The median duration of remission was 6 months and 1-year survival rate was 62.5% in IEP group, and 5 months and 56.2% in EP group. There was no significant difference in response rate, median duration of remission and 1-year survival between the two groups ( P > 0.05). The main toxicity was myelosuppression. Incidences of leukopenia at grade III-IV, nausea, vomiting and alopecia were significantly higher in the IEP arm than those in the EP arm ( P IEP and EP. IEP regimen shows a similar response rate compared with EP regimen. They might be considered as relevant regimens in initial patients with small cell lung cancer.

  3. Risks of Esophageal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alcohol use, and Barrett esophagus can affect the risk of developing esophageal cancer. Anything that increases the ... tissue gives off less light than normal tissue. Risks of Esophageal Cancer Screening Key Points Screening tests ...

  4. Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... specific responses in allergy? » Dietary Therapy and Nutrition Management of Eosinophilic Esophagitis: A Work Group Report of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology » Eosinophilic esophagitis can ...

  5. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Improving Lung Function in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-12

    Cachexia; Fatigue; Pulmonary Complications; Radiation Toxicity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  6. Esophageal Cancer—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    The most common types of esophageal cancer are adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma. These forms of esophageal cancer develop in some parts of the esophagus and are driven by genetic changes. Start here to find information on esophageal cancer treatment, causes and prevention, screening, research, and statistics.

  7. Scintigraphy in esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shishkina, V.V.; Piperkova, E.N.; Okulov, L.V.

    1987-01-01

    Esophagoscintigraphy with labelled liquid and solid food was performed in 34 patients disease of the esophagus in the patient history permitting the determination of quantitative and qualitive characteristics of normal motor-evacuatory function of the esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter (LES). A total of 46 patients with esophageal cancer and stomach cancer with the envolvement of the esophagus before treatment were examined. In cancer of the esophagus its function depended on a tumor site and stage. In order to raise diagnostic sensitivity dynamic esophagoscintigraphy should be performed using liquid and solid food because during liquid passage a study with a hard bolus of patients with severe esophageal disfunction showed that in 36.9% of the patients the quantitative and qualitative indices were within normal. Radionuclide methods permit the determination of the level of a pathological focus, a degree of esophageal permeability, quantitative characterization of a degree of disorder of esophageal function in order to raise the functional diagnosis of the esophaeous and LES, and the determination of motor disorders at the earliest stages of tumor development

  8. Approach for oligometastasis in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hidemi; Yoshino, Ichiro

    2016-04-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring a limited number of distant metastases, referred to as the oligometastatic state, has been indicated for surgery for the past several decades. However, whether the strategy of surgical treatment results in a survival benefit for such patients remains controversial. Experientially, however, thoracic surgeons often encounter long-term survivors among surgically resected oligometastatic NSCLC patients. In this article, the current situation of surgical approach and potential future perspective for oligometastatic NSCLC are reviewed.

  9. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Study in the Esophageal Motility Disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae Gol; Lee, Min Jae; Song, Chi Wook [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-07-15

    Esophageal motility was evaluated from the analysis of 10 consecutive swallows using liquid bolus containing 0.5 mCi of {sup 99m}Tc tin colloid. We have reviewed our experience of esophageal transit study in the 20 normal volunteers and 55 patients with dysphagia that was not related to mechanical obstruction. The purpose of this study is to measure the esophageal transit in normal subjects and in patients with various esophageal motility disorders. The overall sensitivity and specificity of radionuclide esophageal transit study in detecting esophageal motor abnormality were compared with manometric results as a gold standard, which were 80% and 100% respectively. Radionuclide transit study is a safe, rapid, noninvasive test and suitable as a screening test for esophageal motor disorders.

  10. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Study in the Esophageal Motility Disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jae Gol; Lee, Min Jae; Song, Chi Wook

    1993-01-01

    Esophageal motility was evaluated from the analysis of 10 consecutive swallows using liquid bolus containing 0.5 mCi of 99m Tc tin colloid. We have reviewed our experience of esophageal transit study in the 20 normal volunteers and 55 patients with dysphagia that was not related to mechanical obstruction. The purpose of this study is to measure the esophageal transit in normal subjects and in patients with various esophageal motility disorders. The overall sensitivity and specificity of radionuclide esophageal transit study in detecting esophageal motor abnormality were compared with manometric results as a gold standard, which were 80% and 100% respectively. Radionuclide transit study is a safe, rapid, noninvasive test and suitable as a screening test for esophageal motor disorders.

  11. Definitive Radiotherapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Young; Park, Kyung Ran

    1995-01-01

    Purpose : The effect of dose escalation of up to 6500 cGy on local control and survival was investigated in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Materials and Methods : Ninety eight patients with biopsy-proven unresectable non-small cell lung cancer without distant metastases or medically inoperable patients with lower-stage were treated with definitive radiotherapy alone. Group A were treated by thoracic irradiation, 6000 cGy or less in total tumor dose with daily fractions of 180 to 200 cGy: and group B was treated with 6500 cGy of same daily fractions. Results : The actuarial overall survival rate for the entire group was 54% at 1 year, 26.6% at 2 years and 16.4% at 3 years with a median survival time of 13 months. Statistically significant prognostic factors that affect survival rate were stage and N-stage. However, no improvement in local control and survival has been seen with higher dose radiotherapy(group B). Conclusion : Dose escalation of up to 6500 cGy was no effect on local control and survival rate. To increase the survival rate of non-small cell lung cancer hyperfractionated radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy should be considered

  12. Small cell carcinoma of the larynx: results of therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sole, J.; Juergens, A.; Musulen, E.; Lacasta, A.; Guedea, F.; Quer, M.; Leon, X.; Lopez Pousa, A.; Lerma, E.

    1994-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma is a rare malignant tumor of the larynx. Since this lesion was first described, only 58 cases have been reported in the literature. Between December 1985 and March 1992, five patients with small cell carcinoma of the larynx were treated at the Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau in Barcelona, Spain. One patient was treated with radiation therapy alone, three patients with chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and one patient with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Local and distant control was achieved in only one patient who was observed for 12 months after radiation therapy. Four patients died, one of local disease without distant metastasis at 6 months following treatment, one of local and distant disease at 53 months after radiation therapy, and two of distant metastasis without local disease at 22 and 36 months following treatment. In spite of the fact that only one of the five patients presented in this series is alive and free of disease 12 months following treatment, recent published information suggests that chemotherapy and radiotherapy are currently the most effective form of therapy for small cell carcinoma of the larynx. 16 Refs

  13. A rare bladder cancer - small cell carcinoma: review and update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaili Nabil

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Small cell carcinoma of the bladder (SCCB is rare, highly aggressive and diagnosed mainly at advanced stages. Hematuria is the main symptom of this malignancy. The origin of the disease is unknown; however the multipotent stem cell theory applies best to this case. Histology and immunohistochemistry shows a tumour which is indistinguishable from small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC. Coexistence of SCCB with other types of carcinoma is common. The staging system used is the TNM-staging of bladder transitional cell carcinoma. The treatment is extrapolated from that of SCLC. However, many patients with SCCB undergo radical resection which is rarely performed in SCLC. Patients with surgically resectable disease ( or = cT4bN+M+ should be managed with palliative chemotherapy based on neuroendocrine type regimens comprising a platinum drug (cisplatin in fit patients. The prognosis of the disease is poor mainly in the case of pure small cell carcinoma. Other research programs are needed to improve the outcome of SCCB.

  14. Epiphrenic esophageal diverticula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolghani Abdollahimohammad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epiphrenic esophageal diverticula (EED are rare. The estimated incidence is about 1:500,000/year. EED usually result from a combination of esophageal obstruction, functional or mechanical and a point of weakness of the muscularis propria. Most of the symptoms are unspecific, but dysphagia is most common. Chest radiograph, barium esophagogram, endoscopy and manometry are diagnostic tools. The treatment methods are conservative medical therapy, myotomy, diverticulectomy and fundoplication. In addition, endoscopic pneumatic dilation and botulinum toxin injection are a good alternative for symptomatic patients with motility disorders who are unfit for or unwilling to undergo surgery.

  15. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huan-Wen; Du, Ming

    2016-07-01

    Esophageal achalasia is due to the esophagus of neuromuscular dysfunction caused by esophageal functional disease. Its main feature is the lack of esophageal peristalsis, the lower esophageal sphincter pressure and to reduce the swallow's relaxation response. Lower esophageal muscular dissection is one of the main ways to treat esophageal achalasia. At present, the period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection is one of the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Combined with our experience in minimally invasive esophageal surgery, to improved incision and operation procedure, and adopts the model of the complete period of muscular layer under the thoracoscope esophagus dissection in the treatment of esophageal achalasia.

  16. Three-times-daily radiotherapy with induction chemotherapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Feasibility and toxicity study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalano, G.; Jereczek-Fossa, B.A.; Pas, T. de; Leon, M.E.; Cattani, F.; Spaggiari, L.; Veronesi, G.; Braud, F. de; Orecchia, R.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the feasibility and toxicity of three-times-daily radiotherapy (3tdRT), preceded by induction chemotherapy (iCT), in stage IIIA-IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and methods: iCT consisted of three cycles of cisplatin and gemcitabine. Surgery was considered for stage IIIA patients responsive to iCT; definitive or postoperative 3tdRT was planned. Doses of 54.4 Gy and 64.6 Gy in postoperative and definitive treatments, respectively, were delivered in three daily fractions. Results: from February 1998 to October 2000, 37 patients received 3tdRT as definitive (n = 18) or postoperative treatment (n = 19). Toxicity was limited to RTOG grade 2 (25 patients, 67.6%) and grade 3 (four patients, 10.8%) acute esophagitis; no grade 3 late esophagitis occurred. Late lung toxicity was represented by one grade 3 pneumonitis. No correlation emerged between acute esophageal toxicity and irradiated esophageal volume or disease- and treatment-related factors. A significant correlation was found for stage (IIIA vs. IIIB; p = 0.03) and a trend for the N-class (N2 vs. N3; p = 0.08). Conclusion: in this experience of 3tdRT preceded by iCT, the low toxicity profile confirmed the feasibility of this combination. The limited statistical power does not permit a definition of predictors for radiation-induced esophagitis incidence and severity; additional studies are required to clarify the impact of volumetric and dosimetric parameters. Failure patterns and survival results are warranted to confirm the efficacy of this approach in locally advanced NSCLC. (orig.)

  17. A randomized trial of chest irradiation alone versus chest irradiation plus Lentinan in squamous cell lung cancer in limited stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Ikuro; Ohnoshi, Taisuke; Konno, Kiyoshi

    1993-01-01

    In an attempt to evaluate the effect of Lentinan, polysaccharides from Lentinusedodes, in combination with chest irradiation for limited-stage squamous cell lung cancer, we conducted a randomized trial between January 1987 and July 1989. Patients were randomly allocated to receive either a definitive chest irradiation of 60 Gy alone (RT) or the chest irradiation plus Lentinan (RT+L). Patients allocated to the RT+L group received iv infusion of Lentinan, 1 mg twice a week or 2 mg once a week, as long as possible. Of 201 patients enrolled, 183 (94 for RT, and 89 for RT+L) were eligible for analysis of survival time, and 169 (86 for RT, and 83 for RT+L) were evaluated for tumor response, survival time and quality of life. The response rate to the treatments showed a trend favoring the RT+L group (65% vs. 51%, p=0.142). The median survival time was 455 days for the RT+L group and 371 days for the RT group. The difference was not statistically significant. In the subset of patients with cancer of hilar origin, however, RT+L group patients lived significantly longer than RT group patients: Progression-free interval from symptoms and quality of life were evaluated for the both groups based on manual records of an individual patient. RT+L group patients had a significantly longer progression-free interval from dyspneic feeling than the RT group patients. The RT+L group tended to have a feeling of well-being. We conclude that Lentinan in combination with chest irradiation is useful for patients with limited-stage squamous cell lung cancer in terms of prolongation of life and maintenance of a favorable quality of life as well. (author)

  18. Survival benefit of radiotherapy to patients with small cell esophagus carcinoma: an analysis of Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yaqi; Wang, Wanwei; Tao, Guangzhou; Zhu, Weiguo; Zhou, Xilei; Pan, Peng

    2016-03-29

    Small cell esophageal carcinoma (SCEC) is a rare malignant tumor. So far, few studies are found to research the effect of radiotherapy (RT) to it. This study is designed to explore the prognostic factors, and analyze survival benefit of RT to patients with SCEC. Patients with SCEC were more likely to be in female, older, higher disease stage than those with non-small cell esophageal carcinoma. RT was used in more than 50% SCEC patients. RT tended be reduced as the disease stage raise in SCEC. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that age, year, disease stage, and RT were the prognostic factors of survival (P 0.05) and nearly 30% risks of death in distant stage (P > 0.05). SCEC patients between 1973 and 2012 were searched from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data. Clinical factors including age, year, sex, race, stage, surgery, and RT were summarized. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to explore the independent prognostic factors of SCEC. Cox regression survival analysis was performed to evaluate the effect of RT to SCEC based on different stages. Stage, age, year, and RT are independent prognostic factors of SCEC. Survival benefit of RT exists in any disease stage, but is only statistically significant in localized stage of SCEC.

  19. Esophageal Foreign Bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Cobanoglu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal foreign body aspiration is a common event which can cause serious morbidity and mortality in the children and adult population. For that reason, early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for preventing these life threateining complications. Children most often ingest coins and toys whereas adults commonly tend to have problems with meat and bones. Esophageal foreign bodies are located at the cricopharyngeus muscle level in 70%, the thoracic esophagus in 15% and the gastroesophageal junction in the remaining 15%. Symptoms can vary according to the shape and structure of the ingested object, type of location, patient%u2019s age and complications caused by the foreign body. Delay in treatment, esophageal perforation and an underlying esophageal disease are poor prognostic factors. In treatment, observation, foley catheter, rigid or flexible esophagoscopy and removing the foreign body with a Magill forceps, pushing the foreign body into the stomach, giving intravenous glucagon and surgical treatment methods can be used. Rigid esophagoscopy is an effective and safe procedure for foreign body diagnosis and removal. Improved endoscopic experience and clinical management of thoracic surgeons led to reduced morbidity and mortality in recent years. Most of those emergencies of childhood are preventable. Family education is very important.

  20. Radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, T.A.; Ajani, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    These proceedings contain 33 papers grouped under the headings of: Heath memorial award lecture; Large bowel cancer; Esophageal cancer; Pancreatic, Endocrime, and Hepatobiliary cancer; Gastric cancer; Joanne Vandenberge hill award and William O. Russell lectureship in anatomic pathology; and Jeffrey A. Gottlieb memorial lecture

  1. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Aftab, Blake T. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Rudin, Charles M. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hales, Russell K., E-mail: rhales1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  2. Advances in esophageal motor disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smout, André Jpm

    2008-07-01

    Esophageal motor disorders, often leading to dysphagia and chest pain, continue to pose diagnostic and therapeutic problems. In the past 12 months important new information regarding esophageal motor disorders was published. This information will be reviewed in this paper. A number of studies have addressed the issue of heterogeneity in achalasia, the best defined esophageal motility disorder. The spastic esophageal motility disorders nutcracker esophagus and diffuse esophageal spasm may coexist with gastroesophageal reflux disease, which has consequences for the management of patients with these disorders. The entity labelled ineffective esophageal motility is associated with reflux esophagitis, but also with morbid obesity. For the detection of disordered transit caused by ineffective esophageal motility, application of intraluminal impedance monitoring in conjunction with manometry leads to improved diagnosis. New data on the effect of Nissen fundoplication on esophageal motility were published during the last year. Recent knowledge on the heterogeneity of achalasia and the association of spastic esophageal motor disorders and ineffective motility with reflux disease will help the clinician in the management of patients with these disorders.

  3. Interference-robust Air Interface for 5G Small Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão

    the existing wireless network infrastructure to the limit. Mobile network operators must invest in network expansion to deal with this problem, but the predicted network requirements show that a new Radio Access Technology (RAT) standard will be fundamental to reach the future target performance. This new 5th...... to the fundamental role of inter-cell interference in this type of networks, the inter-cell interference problem must be addressed since the beginning of the design of the new standard. This Ph.D. thesis deals with the design of an interference-robust air interface for 5G small cell networks. The interference...

  4. Local therapy for small cell carcinoma of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, C.; Chen, Y.; DuBeshter, B.; Angel, C.; Dawson, A.; Casey, W.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: Small cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix is a rare and aggressive tumor. This tumor is similar to small cell carcinoma of the lung with a tendency to metastasize early. While there has been an increasing interest in the use of chemotherapy regimens similar to those used for small cell carcinoma of the lung, the optimum local therapy for small cell carcinoma of the cervix remains unknown. We reviewed the treatment outcome of patients with small cell carcinoma of the cervix diagnosed in our cancer center with an emphasis on the local/regional disease control. Material and Methods: Between 1983 and 1993, medical records of patients diagnosed with carcinoma of the uterine cervix were reviewed. There were 281 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix referred to our department for radiation treatment. Seven patients had pathologic diagnosis of either small cell or neuroendocrine histology. Details of the treatments and follow-up information of these patients were reviewed with a medium follow-up period of three years (range - 1 to 4 years). Results: Five patients had pure small cell histology. Two patients had mixed histology: one with mixed small cell anaplastic neuroendocrine cells and a small foci of adenocarcinoma, the other had mixed small cell and squamous cell histology. Four patients had clinical stage IB disease. The others had IIA, IIB, and IIIB disease, respectively. All patients received either irradiation (XRT) alone or as part of the local therapy. Three patients received XRT alone, one received surgery followed by XRT, one received XRT followed by surgery, and the remaining two had triple modality treatment (chemotherapy, surgery, and XRT). Three patients were alive without evidence of disease recurrence at the last follow-up. Two of these received adjuvant chemotherapy in addition to local therapy. The third patient, whose tumor was smaller than one cm at the time of diagnosis, received XRT alone. Four patients died with disease

  5. Multidisciplinary management of the locally advanced unresectable non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Kwan Ho

    2004-01-01

    Locally advanced (Stage III) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately one third of all cases of NSCLC. Few patients with locally advanced NSCLC present with disease amenable to curative surgical resection. Historically, these patients were treated with primary thoracic radiation therapy (RT) and had poor long term survival rates, due to both progression of local disease and development of distant metastases. Over the last two decades, the use of multidisciplinary approach has improved the outcome for patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Combined chemoradiotherapy is the most favored approach for treatment of locally advanced unresectable NSCLC. There are two basic treatment protocols for administering combined chemotherapy and radiation, sequential versus concurrent. The rationale for using chemotherapy is to eliminate subclinical metastatic disease while improving local control. Sequential use of chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy has improved median and long term survival compared to radiation therapy alone. This approach appears to decrease the risk of distant metastases, but local failure rates remain the same as radiation alone. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy has been studied extensively. The potential advantages of this approach may include sensitization of tumor cells to radiation by the administration of chemotherapy, and reduced overall treatment time compared to sequential therapy; which is known to be important for improving local control in radiation biology. This approach improves survival primarily as a result of improved local control. However, it doesn't seem to decrease the risk of distant metastases probably because concurrent chemoradiation requires dose reductions in chemotherapy due to increased risks of acute morbidity such as acute esophageal toxicity. Although multidisciplinary therapy has led to improved survival rates compared to radiation therapy alone and has become the new standard of care, the optimal therapy of

  6. Long term outcomes after salvage radiotherapy for postoperative locoregionally recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ji; Song, Chang Hoon; Kim, Jae Sung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi Young [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The outcomes and toxicities of locoregionally recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with curative radiotherapy were evaluated in the modern era. Fifty-seven patients receiving radical radiotherapy for locoregionally recurrent NSCLC without distant metastasis after surgery from 2004 to 2014 were reviewed. Forty-two patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), and 15 patients with radiotherapy alone. The median radiation dose was 66 Gy (range, 45 to 70 Gy). Lung function change after radiotherapy was evaluated by comparing pulmonary function tests before and at 1, 6, and 12 months after radiotherapy. Median follow-up was 53.6 months (range, 12.0 to 107.5 months) among the survivors. The median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 54.8 months (range, 3.0 to 116.9 months) and 12.2 months (range, 0.8 to 100.2 months), respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that single locoregional recurrence focus and use of concurrent chemotherapy were significant prognostic factors for OS (p = 0.048 and p = 0.001, respectively) and PFS (p = 0.002 and p = 0.026, respectively). There was no significant change in predicted forced expiratory volume in one second after radiotherapy. Although diffusing lung capacity for carbon monoxide decreased significantly at 1 month after radiotherapy (p < 0.001), it recovered to pretreatment levels within 12 months. Acute grade 3 radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis were observed in 3 and 2 patients, respectively. There was no chronic complication observed in all patients. Salvage radiotherapy showed good survival outcomes without severe complications in postoperative locoregionally recurrent NSCLC patients. A single locoregional recurrent focus and the use of CCRT chemotherapy were associated with improved survival. CCRT should be considered as a salvage treatment in patients with good prognostic factors.

  7. Preliminary results of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yingjie; Wang Luhua; Wang Xin; Feng Qinfu; Zhang Hongxing; Xiao Zefen; Yin Weibo

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effects and complications of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Between March 1999 and September 2003, 91 NSCLC patients treated with 3DCRT were reviewed at the Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences. This patient cohort consisted of 73 men and 18 women. The median age was 66 years. Radio-therapy was delivered at 2 Gy fraction, 5 fractions per week. The median total dose was 60 Gy. Results: With a median follow-up time of 17 months, the response rate after 3DCRT was 57.1%, with complete remission 11.0% (10/91) and partial remission 46.2%(42/91). The median survival time (MST) was 16 months, with 1- and 2- year overall survivals (OS) of 67.0% and 32.6%, 1- and 2-year local progression free survivals (LPFS) of 82.6% and 53.0%, respectively. The independent adverse prognostic factors by univariate analysis and multivariate analysis was weight loss ≥5%. Grade 2 acute radiation pneumonitis was observed in 2 patients and grade 3 in 4 patients. Late lung injury developed in 1 patient with grade 2, 1 patient with grade 3, respectively. Acute radiation esophagitis was observed in 8 patients with grade 2. Acute grade 2 hematologic toxicity developed in 5 patients. Conclusions: 3DCRT was feasible in the treatment of NSCLC with good immediate tumor response and acceptable normal tissue complication. The total dose may potentially be increased. (authors)

  8. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of small-cell lung cancer: current results and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reboul, F.; Vincent, P.; Brewer, Y.; Chauvet, B.; Taulelle, M.

    1995-01-01

    The prognosis of small cell carcinoma of the lung is reportedly poor, even in limited disease. However, new modalities of combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy may actually result in improved survival in these patients. First-line chemotherapy regimens with cisplatin and etoposide are effective and allow early and concurrent administration of thoracic radiotherapy, without overwhelming toxicity. Radiosensitizing properties of cisplatin and etoposide have been demonstrated, and concurrent delivery of radiotherapy results in a high complete response rate on the primary tumor, and improved long-term local control, which is a prerequisite for cure. In addition, a reduction of the irradiated volume, restricted to the macroscopic tumor, appears feasible without compromising local control and results in a reduced long-term complication rate of the combined treatment. Acute toxicities of these concurrent regiments are mainly hematological and esophageal, but are reversible and without late effect in the majority of the patients. The potential benefit of a twice-daily over standard once-daily irradiation has not been conclusively demonstrated in recent trials. However, these trials have demonstrated excellent outcome after short duration chemotherapy (four courses) with early concurrent radiotherapy (45 Gy), resulting in a 40 % survival at 2 years, which appears substantially higher than that obtained with the sequential or alternating regimens. The benefit of prophylactic cranial irradiation has also been confirmed in a large trial in terms of reduction of brain relapses, but with only marginal benefit upon survival. Further improvement of the prognosis of these patients may result form an early intensification of chemotherapy with the support of hematopoietic growth factors and from a dose escalation of radiotherapy with the support of three dimensional computerized dosimetry. (authors). 53 refs., 1 tab

  9. Impact of Users Identities and Access Conditions on Downlink Performance in Closed Small-Cell Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Radaydeh, Redha; Gaaloul, Fakhreddine; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the effect of various operation parameters on the downlink user performance in overlaid small-cell networks. The case study considers closed-access small cells (e.g., femtocells), wherein only active authorized user

  10. Esophageal motor disorders in adults with eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moawad, Fouad J; Maydonovitch, Corinne L; Veerappan, Ganesh R; Bassett, John T; Lake, Jason M; Wong, Roy K H

    2011-05-01

    An association between eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and esophageal motility disorders has been described in small studies. The aim of this study was to describe the prevalence of esophageal motor disorders in a large cohort of adults with EoE and examine whether an association exists between esophageal dysmotility and dysphagia. A retrospective review of esophageal manometry studies in adult EoE patients was performed. Tracings were reviewed for abnormalities including nutcracker esophagus and ineffective swallows, defined as low amplitude peristalsis (esophagus was found in three patients. There was no significant difference in eosinophil count among the motility groups: normal 46.5 ± 3.1, mild IEM 56.9 ± 36.9, moderate IEM 45.5 ± 23.7, severe IEM 34.3 ± 12.6 (P = 0.157). In this cohort of EoE patients, the majority had normal esophageal motility studies, although a subset of these patients had some esophageal dysmotility. It is unlikely that esophageal dysmotility is a major contributing factor to dysphagia, although it is reasonable to consider esophageal manometry testing in EoE patients to identify potential abnormalities of the smooth muscle esophagus.

  11. Esophageal bypass after failed chemoradiotherapy for unresectable esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matono, Satoru; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Mori, Naoki; Nagano, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiromasa; Shirouzu, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal stenosis and/or fistula often occur after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for unresectable esophageal cancer. In such patients, an esophageal stent can help achieve oral intake. However an esophageal stent cannot be inserted where there is complete stenosis or where the tumor is located. In such cases, esophageal bypass surgery may be necessary. Here, we investigated the clinical characteristics and outcomes in patients who underwent esophageal bypass surgery in our institution. We reviewed 10 cases of esophageal bypass surgery (gastric tube in 8 cases, colon in 2 cases) after CRT for unresectable esophageal cancer, between 2001 and 2009. There were 5 of stenosis-only cases, 4 fistula-only cases, and 1 case of stenosis and fistula. There were postoperative complications in 5 cases (50%), and all these were treated conservatively and healed. The median survival from surgery to peroral intake was 20 days (range 9-90 days), and the median survival after starting peroral intake was 130 days (range 48-293 days). Esophageal bypass surgery can achieve good performance status and improve peroral intake. (author)

  12. Esophageal Rupture as a Primary Manifestation in Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Vernon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE is a chronic inflammatory process characterized by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and, histologically, by eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus. In adults, it commonly presents with dysphagia, food impaction, and chest or abdominal pain. Chronic inflammation can lead to diffuse narrowing of the esophageal lumen which may cause food impaction. Endoscopic procedures to relieve food impaction may lead to complications such as esophageal perforation due to the friability of the esophageal mucosa. Spontaneous transmural esophageal rupture, also known as Boerhaave’s syndrome, as a primary manifestation of EoE is rare. In this paper, we present two adult patients who presented with esophageal perforation as the initial manifestation of EoE. This rare complication of EoE has been documented in 13 other reports (11 adults, 2 children and only 1 of the patients had been previously diagnosed with EoE. A history of dysphagia was present in 1 of our patients and in the majority of previously documented patients. Esophageal perforation is a potentially severe complication of EoE. Patients with a history of dysphagia and patients with spontaneous esophageal perforation should warrant an evaluation for EoE.

  13. Esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Haruma, Ken; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal diverticulum, a relatively rare condition, has been considered to be associated with motor abnormalities such as conditions that cause a lack of coordination between the distal esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. We herein report a case of esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. A 73-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and regurgitation. Imaging examinations revealed a right-sided esophageal diverticulum located about 10cm above the esophagogastric junction. High-resolution manometry revealed normal esophageal motility. However, 24-h pH monitoring revealed continuous acidity due to pooling of residue in the diverticulum. An esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum was diagnosed and resected thoracoscopically. Her dysphagia recurred 2 years later. High-resolution manometry revealed diffuse esophageal spasm. The diverticulum in the present case was considered to have been associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. The motility disorder was likely not identified at the first evaluation. In this case, the patient's symptoms spontaneously resolved without any treatment; however, longer-term follow-up is needed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Oligometastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: current treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard PJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Patrick J Richard, Ramesh Rengan Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: The oligometastatic disease theory was initially described in 1995 by Hellman and Weichselbaum. Since then, much work has been performed to investigate its existence in many solid tumors. This has led to subclassifications of stage IV cancer, which could redefine our treatment approaches and the therapeutic outcomes for this historically “incurable” entity. With a high incidence of stage IV disease, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC remains a difficult cancer to treat and cure. Recent work has proven the existence of an oligometastatic state in NSCLC in terms of properly selecting patients who may benefit from aggressive therapy and experience long-term overall survival. This review discusses the current treatment approaches used in oligometastatic NSCLC and provides the evidence and rationale for each approach. The prognostic factors of many trials are discussed, which can be used to properly select patients for aggressive treatment regimens. Future advances in both molecular profiling of NSCLC to find targetable mutations and investigating patient selection may increase the number of patients diagnosed with oligometastatic NSCLC. As this disease entity increases, it is of utmost importance for oncologists treating NSCLC to be aware of the current treatment strategies that exist and the potential advantages/disadvantages of each. Keywords: oligometastatic, non-small-cell lung cancer, oligoprogressive, treatment

  15. [Small-cell lung cancer: epidemiology, diagnostics and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pešek, Miloš; Mužík, Jan

    Authors present actual overview of information on diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). This highly aggressive type of lung cancer is diagnosed in 14.8 % of Czech lung cancer patients. Vast majority of those patients (87 %) suffer from advanced and metastatic disease in the time of diagnosis. In this issue are presented prognostic factors, staging diagnostic procedures and therapeutic recommendations. The backbone of actual SCLC treatment is combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy and less frequently, carefully in selected cases, surgical procedures. SCLC should be have as chemosensitive, chemoresistent or chemorefractory disease. Actual cytostatic combinations used in 1st line treatment, different schedules of chemoradiotherapy, drugs used in second line treatment and schedules and timing of prophylactic brain irradiation are presented. In near future, perspectively, there are some promissible data on antitumour immunotherapy based on anti CTLA-4 and anti PD-1/PE-L1 antibodies also in SCLC patients.Key words: cancer immunotherapy - concomitant chemoradiotherapy - chemotherapy - chest radiotherapy - lung resections - prophylactic brain irradiation - small cell lung cancer.

  16. PDGFR-Β expression in small cell lung cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinohara, Eric T.; Gonzalez, Adriana; Massion, Pierre P.; Olson, Sandra J.; Albert, Jeffrey M.; Shyr, Yu; Carbone, David P.; Johnson, David H.; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Lu Bo

    2007-01-01

    Background: Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) and PDGFR-β are expressed and have been found to have prognostic value in several human cancers. Data in non-small-cell cancer cell lines have suggested that PDGFR is a therapeutic target for drug development. In the current study PDGFR-β expression and prognostic value in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) was investigated. Methods and Materials: Paraffin-embedded tissue blocks from 53 patients with limited and extensive stage SCLC were obtained for immunohistochemical staining. Tumors from each patient were sampled 3 times and stained with PDGFR-β specific antibody. Patients were divided into low and high staining groups based on intensity. Results: There was high intensity PDGFR-β staining in 20 patients with SCLC. Another 29 expressed low intensity PDGFR-β staining, with only 4 patients showing no PDGFR-β staining. There was no statistically significant difference in 5 year overall survival between patients with low levels of PDGFR-β staining vs. those with high level staining SCLC tumors (p = 0.538). Conclusions: The present study found that the majority of SCLC patients express, at least, a low level of PDGF-β. However, the level of PDGFR-β expression was not a statistically significant predictor of 5 year overall survival in SCLC

  17. An overview of mortality & predictors of small-cell and non-small cell lung cancer among Saudi patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim I. Alghamdi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer ranks as the top cancer worldwide in terms of incidence and constitutes a major health problem. About 90% of lung cancer cases are diagnosed at advance stage where treatment is not available. Despite evidence that lung cancer screening improves survival, guidelines for lung cancer screening are still a subject for debate. In Saudi Arabia, only 14% of lung cancers are diagnosed at early stage and researches on survival and its predictors are lacking. This overview analysis was conducted on predictors of lung cancer mortality according to the two major cancer types, small-cell lung cancers (SCLCs and non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs in Saudi Arabia. A secondary data analysis was performed on small-cell lung cancers (SCLCs and Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs registered in the Saudi Cancer Registry (SCR for the period 2009–2013 to estimate predictors of mortality for both lung cancer types. A total of 404 cases (197 SCLC and 207 NSCLC were included in the analysis, all Saudi nationals. A total of 213 (52.75% deaths occurred among lung cancer patients, 108 (54.82% among SCLCs and 105 (50.72% among NCSLCs. Three quarter of patients are diagnosis with advance stage for both SCLC & NSCLC. Univariate analysis revealed higher mean age at diagnosis in dead patients compared to alive patients for SCLCs (p = 0.04; but not NSCLCs, a lower mortality for NSCLCs diagnosed in 2013 (p = 0.025 and a significant difference in stage of tumor (p = 0.006 and (p = 0.035 for both SCLC and NSCLC respectively. In multiple logistic regression, stage of tumor was a strong predictor of mortality, where distant metastasis increased morality by 6-fold (OR = 5.87, 95% CI: 2.01 – 17.19 in SCLC and by 3-fold (OR = 3.29, 95% CI: 1.22 – 8.85 in NSCLC, compared to localized tumors. Those with NSCLC who were diagnosed in 2013 were less likely to die by 64% compared to NSCLC diagnosed in 2009 (OR = 0.36, 95% CI: 0.14 – 0.93. Age, sex, topography

  18. An overview of mortality & predictors of small-cell and non-small cell lung cancer among Saudi patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Hatim I; Alshehri, Ali F; Farhat, Ghada N

    2018-03-01

    Lung cancer ranks as the top cancer worldwide in terms of incidence and constitutes a major health problem. About 90% of lung cancer cases are diagnosed at advance stage where treatment is not available. Despite evidence that lung cancer screening improves survival, guidelines for lung cancer screening are still a subject for debate. In Saudi Arabia, only 14% of lung cancers are diagnosed at early stage and researches on survival and its predictors are lacking. This overview analysis was conducted on predictors of lung cancer mortality according to the two major cancer types, small-cell lung cancers (SCLCs) and non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) in Saudi Arabia. A secondary data analysis was performed on small-cell lung cancers (SCLCs) and Non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) registered in the Saudi Cancer Registry (SCR) for the period 2009-2013 to estimate predictors of mortality for both lung cancer types. A total of 404 cases (197 SCLC and 207 NSCLC) were included in the analysis, all Saudi nationals. A total of 213 (52.75%) deaths occurred among lung cancer patients, 108 (54.82%) among SCLCs and 105 (50.72%) among NCSLCs. Three quarter of patients are diagnosis with advance stage for both SCLC & NSCLC. Univariate analysis revealed higher mean age at diagnosis in dead patients compared to alive patients for SCLCs (p=0.04); but not NSCLCs, a lower mortality for NSCLCs diagnosed in 2013 (p=0.025) and a significant difference in stage of tumor (p=0.006) and (p=0.035) for both SCLC and NSCLC respectively. In multiple logistic regression, stage of tumor was a strong predictor of mortality, where distant metastasis increased morality by 6-fold (OR=5.87, 95% CI: 2.01 - 17.19) in SCLC and by 3-fold (OR=3.29, 95% CI: 1.22 - 8.85) in NSCLC, compared to localized tumors. Those with NSCLC who were diagnosed in 2013 were less likely to die by 64% compared to NSCLC diagnosed in 2009 (OR=0.36, 95% CI: 0.14 - 0.93). Age, sex, topography and laterality were not associated with

  19. Balloon catheter dilatation of esophageal strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeung Sook; Yoon, Yup; Sung, Dong Yook; Choi, Woo Suk; Nam, Kyung Jin; Lim, Jae Hoon [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    The authors performed 27 fluoroscopically guided balloon dilatation in 12 patients of esophageal stricture during recent 3 years. The causes of esophageal stricture were corrosive esophagitis (N=2) and congenital narrowing (N=1), including postoperative narrowing in achalasia (N=3), esophageal varix (N=3), lye stricture (N=2) and esophageal cancer (N=1). Successful dilatation of the stricture was achieved during the procedure in 10 patients(83%). Major complication such as esophageal rupture was not found. The authors conclude that fluoroscopically guided esophageal balloon dilatation is a safe and effective method for treatment of symptomatic esophageal strictures.

  20. Balloon catheter dilatation of esophageal strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeung Sook; Yoon, Yup; Sung, Dong Yook; Choi, Woo Suk; Nam, Kyung Jin; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1990-01-01

    The authors performed 27 fluoroscopically guided balloon dilatation in 12 patients of esophageal stricture during recent 3 years. The causes of esophageal stricture were corrosive esophagitis (N=2) and congenital narrowing (N=1), including postoperative narrowing in achalasia (N=3), esophageal varix (N=3), lye stricture (N=2) and esophageal cancer (N=1). Successful dilatation of the stricture was achieved during the procedure in 10 patients(83%). Major complication such as esophageal rupture was not found. The authors conclude that fluoroscopically guided esophageal balloon dilatation is a safe and effective method for treatment of symptomatic esophageal strictures

  1. Pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) Non-Small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyu Chan; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil

    1999-01-01

    This is to evaluate the acute complication, resection rate, and tumor down-staging after pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) non-small cell lung cancer. Fifteen patients with non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled in this study from May 1997 to June 1998 in Samsung Medical Center. The median age of the patients was 61 (range, 45-67) years and male to female ratio was 12:3. Pathologic types were squamous cell carcinoma (11) and adenocarcinoma (4). Pre-operative clinical tumor stages were cT1 in 2 patients, cT2 in 12, and cT3 in 1 and all were N2. Ten patients were proved to be N2 with mediastinoscopic biopsy and five had clinically evident mediastinal lymph node metastases on the chest CT scans. Pre-operative radiation therapy field included the primary tumor, the ipsilateral hilum, and the mediastinum. Total radiation dose was 45 Gy over 5 weeks with daily dose of 1.8 Gy. Pre-operative concurrent chemotherapy consisted of two cycles of intraventous cis-Platin (100 mg/m 2 ) on day 1 and oral Etoposide (50 mg/m 2 /day) on days 1 through 14 with 4 weeks' interval. Surgery was followed after the pre-operative re-evaluation including chest CT scan in 3 weeks of the completion of the concurrent chemoradiotherapy if there was no evidence of disease progression. Full dose radiation therapy was administered to all the 15 patients. Planned two cycles of chemotherapy was completed in 11 patients and one cycle was given to four. One treatment related death of acute respiratory distress syndrome occurred in 15 days of surgery. Hospital admission was required in three patients including one with radiation pneumonitis and two with neutropenic fever. Hematologic complications and other acute complications including esophagitis were tolerable. Resection rate was 92.3% (12/13) in 13 patients excluding two patients who refused surgery. Pleural seeding was found in one patient after thoracotomy and tumor resection was not feasible. Post-operative tumor

  2. Pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) Non-Small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyu Chan; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1999-06-01

    This is to evaluate the acute complication, resection rate, and tumor down-staging after pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) non-small cell lung cancer. Fifteen patients with non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled in this study from May 1997 to June 1998 in Samsung Medical Center. The median age of the patients was 61 (range, 45-67) years and male to female ratio was 12:3. Pathologic types were squamous cell carcinoma (11) and adenocarcinoma (4). Pre-operative clinical tumor stages were cT1 in 2 patients, cT2 in 12, and cT3 in 1 and all were N2. Ten patients were proved to be N2 with mediastinoscopic biopsy and five had clinically evident mediastinal lymph node metastases on the chest CT scans. Pre-operative radiation therapy field included the primary tumor, the ipsilateral hilum, and the mediastinum. Total radiation dose was 45 Gy over 5 weeks with daily dose of 1.8 Gy. Pre-operative concurrent chemotherapy consisted of two cycles of intraventous cis-Platin (100 mg/m{sup 2}) on day 1 and oral Etoposide (50 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on days 1 through 14 with 4 weeks' interval. Surgery was followed after the pre-operative re-evaluation including chest CT scan in 3 weeks of the completion of the concurrent chemoradiotherapy if there was no evidence of disease progression. Full dose radiation therapy was administered to all the 15 patients. Planned two cycles of chemotherapy was completed in 11 patients and one cycle was given to four. One treatment related death of acute respiratory distress syndrome occurred in 15 days of surgery. Hospital admission was required in three patients including one with radiation pneumonitis and two with neutropenic fever. Hematologic complications and other acute complications including esophagitis were tolerable. Resection rate was 92.3% (12/13) in 13 patients excluding two patients who refused surgery. Pleural seeding was found in one patient after thoracotomy and tumor resection was not feasible. Post

  3. Treatment of advanced esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsen, D.

    1982-01-01

    When radiation therapy is used for palliation of obstruction in patients with advanced esophageal carcinoma, an improvement in dysphagia can be expected in approximately 50% of patients. Major objective responses have rarely been quantitied but, in one study, were seen in 33% patients. Recurrence of dysphagia is usually seen within 2-6 months of treatment. Radiation toxicities and complications, even when used with palliative intent, can be substantial and include esophagitis, tracheoesophageal or esophageal-aortic fistula, mediastinitis, hemorrhage, pneumonitis, and myelosuppression

  4. IDEAL-CRT: A Phase 1/2 Trial of Isotoxic Dose-Escalated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Stage II/III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landau, David B., E-mail: david.landau@kcl.ac.uk [Guy' s & St. Thomas' NHS Trust, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Hughes, Laura [Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London (United Kingdom); Baker, Angela [Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Bebington (United Kingdom); Bates, Andrew T. [Southampton General Hospital, Southampton (United Kingdom); Bayne, Michael C. [Poole Hospital, Poole (United Kingdom); Counsell, Nicholas [Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London (United Kingdom); Garcia-Alonso, Angel [North Wales Cancer Centre, Rhyl (United Kingdom); Harden, Susan V. [Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hicks, Jonathan D. [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Hughes, Simon R. [Guy' s & St. Thomas' NHS Trust, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Illsley, Marianne C. [Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guilford (United Kingdom); Khan, Iftekhar [Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London (United Kingdom); Laurence, Virginia [Poole Hospital, Poole (United Kingdom); Malik, Zafar; Mayles, Helen; Mayles, William Philip M. [Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Bebington (United Kingdom); Miles, Elizabeth [Mount Vernon Hospital, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Mohammed, Nazia [Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Ngai, Yenting [Cancer Research UK and UCL Cancer Trials Centre, London (United Kingdom); Parsons, Emma [Mount Vernon Hospital, Middlesex (United Kingdom); and others

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To report toxicity and early survival data for IDEAL-CRT, a trial of dose-escalated concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) for non-small cell lung cancer. Patients and Methods: Patients received tumor doses of 63 to 73 Gy in 30 once-daily fractions over 6 weeks with 2 concurrent cycles of cisplatin and vinorelbine. They were assigned to 1 of 2 groups according to esophageal dose. In group 1, tumor doses were determined by an experimental constraint on maximum esophageal dose, which was escalated following a 6 + 6 design from 65 Gy through 68 Gy to 71 Gy, allowing an esophageal maximum tolerated dose to be determined from early and late toxicities. Tumor doses for group 2 patients were determined by other tissue constraints, often lung. Overall survival, progression-free survival, tumor response, and toxicity were evaluated for both groups combined. Results: Eight centers recruited 84 patients: 13, 12, and 10, respectively, in the 65-Gy, 68-Gy, and 71-Gy cohorts of group 1; and 49 in group 2. The mean prescribed tumor dose was 67.7 Gy. Five grade 3 esophagitis and 3 grade 3 pneumonitis events were observed across both groups. After 1 fatal esophageal perforation in the 71-Gy cohort, 68 Gy was declared the esophageal maximum tolerated dose. With a median follow-up of 35 months, median overall survival was 36.9 months, and overall survival and progression-free survival were 87.8% and 72.0%, respectively, at 1 year and 68.0% and 48.5% at 2 years. Conclusions: IDEAL-CRT achieved significant treatment intensification with acceptable toxicity and promising survival. The isotoxic design allowed the esophageal maximum tolerated dose to be identified from relatively few patients.

  5. Brain Abscess after Esophageal Dilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaïni, S; Grand, M; Michelsen, J

    2007-01-01

    Brain abscess formation is a serious disease often seen as a complication to other diseases and to procedures. A rare predisposing condition is dilatation therapy of esophageal strictures. A case of brain abscess formation after esophageal dilatations is presented. A 59-year-old woman was admitted...... with malaise, progressive lethargy, fever, aphasia and hemiparesis. Six days before she had been treated with esophageal dilatation for a stricture caused by accidental ingestion of caustic soda. The brain abscess was treated with surgery and antibiotics. She recovered completely. This clinical case...... illustrates the possible association between therapeutic esophageal dilatation and the risk of brain abscess formation....

  6. Two cases of esophageal eosinophilia: eosinophilic esophagitis or gastro-esophageal reflux disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Yilmaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE and gastro-esophageal reflux disease are among the major causes of isolated esophageal eosinophilia. Isolated esophageal eosinophilia meeting criteria for EoE may respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI treatment. This entity is termed proton pumps inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE. Gastro-esophageal reflux is thought to comprise a subgroup of patients with PPI-REE. According to the latest guidelines, PPI responsiveness distinguishes people with PPI-REE from patients having EoE (non-responders. In this report, two unusual cases with findings belonging to both EoE and PPI-REE are discussed with known and unknown facts.

  7. Radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshitani, Takashi; Kuwata, Yoichiro; Kano, Kyoko

    1988-01-01

    Esophageal carcinoma were treated by high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation using specially designed balloon application at Hyogo medical Center for Adults. 32 patients were treated from January 1982 through July 1986. According to the stage of UICC (1978), 10 patients were classified into stage I, 7 into II, 13 into III and 2 into IV. Acturial 5 year survival rate was 17.9 % in all 32 patients and that of 23 patients who received radical radiotherapy was 24 %. Local CR rate was 66 %. However, since 9 (53 %) of 17 CR patients were relapsed, local control rate for 2 years was 25 %. Mild adverse effects were experienced in 9 (47 %) of 19 CR patients. Our balloon applicator was easily fixed, could have an adequate space from esophageal mucosa and clarify the tumor site by filling with 20 % gastrografin. It is concluded that high-dose-rate intracavitary irradiation with our balloon applicator is an effective boost therapy and decline a lethal adverse effect in radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. (author)

  8. esophageal cancer: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Maddah Safaei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Dysphagia is a common initial presentation in locally advanced esophageal cancer and negatively impacts patient quality of life and treatment compliance. To induce fast relief of dysphagia in patients with potentially operable esophageal cancer high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy was applied prior to definitive radiochemotherapy. Material and methods : In this single arm phase II clinical trial between 2013 to 2014 twenty patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (17 squamous cell and 3 adenocarcinoma were treated with upfront 10 Gy HDR brachytherapy, followed by 50.4 Gy external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil. Results : Tumor response, as measured by endoscopy and/or computed tomography scan, revealed complete remission in 16 and partial response in 4 patients (overall response rate 100%. Improvement of dysphagia was induced by brachytherapy within a few days and maintained up to the end of treatment in 80% of patients. No differences in either response rate or dysphagia resolution were found between squamous cell and adenocarcinoma histology. The grade 2 and 3 acute pancytopenia or bicytopenia reported in 4 patients, while sub-acute adverse effects with painful ulceration was seen in five patients, occurring after a median of 2 months. A perforation developed in one patient during the procedure of brachytherapy that resolved successfully with immediate surgery. Conclusions : Brachytherapy before EBRT was a safe and effective procedure to induce rapid and durable relief from dysphagia, especially when combined with EBRT.

  9. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl, Megan E; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-07-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms--visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome.

  10. Doxycycline induced Esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Karakus Yilmaz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Esophagitis is a hazardous condition such as acid reflux of esophageal mucosa, infection, systemic diseases, radiation, drugs and trauma. Drug- induced esophagial injury (DIEI is a disease with the use of variety of drugs that caused serious damage and ulcer in the mucosa of the esophagus. The most commonly implicated drugs are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, chloride and especially antibiotics. Thirty-six year-old female patient presented to the emergency department with odynophagia during swallowing and complaining of retrosternal pain. One week before 100 mg doxycycline (2x1 PO for therapeutic abortion were prescribed. It was learned that in the third day of the initiation of medication, the patient\\'s symptoms began and stopped using drug by the fourth day due to advers effect of drugs, but her symptoms didn’t regressed although she didn’t use them. Endoscopy appointment was taken, proton pump inhibitor and antiacid treatment was given, than patient was discharged from the emergency department. In the endoscopy, 20 mm segment esophageal ulcer was seen approximately in the 30.th cm of the esophagius. DIEI is a relatively common, although under-recognized, so this case was presented for remainding DIEI to emergency medicine personals and reweiving its diagnosis, treatment and follow-up.

  11. Management of non-small cell lung cancer with oligometastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaruz, Liza C; Kubicek, Gregory J; Socinski, Mark A

    2012-08-01

    Patients with oligometastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) present a potential opportunity for curative therapy; however, the challenge remains the definitive treatment of their localized disease and ablation of their limited overt metastatic sites of disease. In selecting patients with oligometastatic NSCLC for definitive therapy, proper staging through radiographic studies, including PET and brain MRI, and the pathologic staging of the mediastinal lymph nodes and potential sites of metastatic disease, are critical. With that in mind, the available literature suggests that in highly selected patients with solitary metastases to the brain, adrenals and other organs, long term survival may be achieved with combined definitive therapy of both the primary lung tumor and the solitary metastatic site.

  12. Massive MIMO meets small cell backhaul and cooperation

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Howard H

    2017-01-01

    This brief explores the utilization of large antenna arrays in massive multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) for both interference suppression, where it can improve cell-edge user rates, and for wireless backhaul in small cell networks, where macro base stations can forward data to small access points in an energy efficient way. Massive MIMO is deemed as a critical technology for next generation wireless technology. By deploying an antenna array that has active elements in excess of the number of users, massive MIMO not only provides tremendous diversity gain but also powers new aspects for network design to improve performance. This brief investigates a better utilization of the excessive spatial dimensions to improve network performance. It combines random matrix theory and stochastic geometry to develop an analytical framework that accounts for all the key features of a network, including number of antenna array, base station density, inter-cell interference, random base station deployment, and network tra...

  13. 'Dancing eyes, dancing feet syndrome' in small cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Chandramohan; Acharya, Mihir; Kumawat, Bansi Lal; Kochar, Abhishek

    2014-04-23

    A 60-year-old man presented with a 25-day history of acute onset instability of gait, tremulousness of limbs and involuntary eye movements. Examination revealed presence of opsoclonus, myoclonus and ataxia, without any loss of motor power in the limbs. Prompt investigations were directed towards identifying an underlying malignancy which is often associated with this type of clinical scenario. CT of the brain was normal and cerebrospinal fluid examination showed lymphocytic pleocytosis. A cavitatory lesion was found in the right lung base on the high-resolution CT of the chest and histopathological examination of this lung mass showed small cell lung carcinoma. The patient was managed symptomatically with levetiracetam and baclofen and referred to oncology department for resection of the lung mass.

  14. Advances of Immunotherapy in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing LIU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Small cell lung cancer (SCLC is complex heterogeneous due to unclear biological characteristics in terms of cell origin, pathogenesis and driver genes etc. Diagnosis and treatment of SCLC has been slowly improved and few breakthroughs have been discovered up to now. Therefore new strategies are urgently needed to improve the efficacy of SCLC treatment. Tumor immunotherapy has potential to restore and trigger the immune system to recognize and eliminate tumor cells, notably it has only minimal adverse impact on normal tissue. Cancer vaccine, adoptive immunotherapy, cytokines and checkpoint inhibitors have now been launched for clinical treatment of SCLC. Ipilimumab is the most promising medicine of immunotherapy. Immunotherapy is expected to bring new vision to the treatment of SCLC. And further researches are needed on such problems affecting efficacy of immunotherapy as the heterogeneity of SCLC, the uncertainty of target for immunotherapy, the immune tolerance, etc.

  15. Intercalated radio-chemotherapy in small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskin, P.J.; Parton, D.; Yarnold, J.R.; Cherryman, G.; Smith, I.E.

    1991-01-01

    36 patients with small cell lung cancer have been treated using chemotherapy comprising carboplatin, ifosphamide and etoposide. A total of 6 cycles of chemotherapy was given. In 15 patients with limited disease intercalated radio-chemotherapy was used in which two 5-day courses of hyperfractionated radiotherapy were given to the thorax after the 1st and 2nd cycles of chemotherapy. Each course of thoracic radiotherapy delivered 15 Gy in 15 fractions over 5 days. Oesophagitis occurred in 7 patients (40 percent), in 5 of whom this was severe (WHO grade 3). Radiological pneumonitis developed in 6 patients (40 percent) with subsequent fibrosis in 2 patients. These effects are greater than would be expected with this dose of radiation alone and reflect marked enhancement of normal tissue toxicity. (author). 11 refs.; 1 fig.; 1 tab

  16. Full Duplex Communications in 5G Small Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Nurul Huda; Gatnau, Marta; Berardinelli, Gilberto

    2017-01-01

    Full duplex communication promises system performance improvement over conventional half duplex communication by allowing simultaneous transmission and reception. However, such concurrent communication results in strong self interference and an increase in the overall network interference, and can...... only be exploited when traffic is available in both directions. The potential throughput gains of full duplex communication over conventional half duplex transmission in a small cell network with asymmetric traffic conditions is investigated in this contribution. The throughput performance gains...... are analysed using tools from stochastic geometry, and further confirmed through extensive system level simulations. Our findings explicitly quantify how the gains from full duplex communication depend on the traffic profile and the inter-cell interference coupling. The demonstrated throughput gains and delay...

  17. Treatment of initially metastatic small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohutek, F.; Bystricky, B.; Tamasova, M.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer (LC) is the most common cause of death associated with neoplasms. The incidence of LC in 2007 was 71.3/100,000 men and 18.6/100,000 women in Slovakia. Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) includes 15 - 18% of all cases. The diagnosis of LC is based on patient's history, physical examination, basic laboratory tests, x-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) imaging and histology. The material required for histology can be obtained by means of endoscopy or surgery. Ultrasonography (USG) and/or CT of abdomen is commonly performed as a part of staging process, along with CT or MRI of brain. Bone scan is performed in case of suspicion of bone involvement. According to TNM classification, seventh edition, the same classification can be used for SCLC and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are available for treatment of initially metastatic SCLC. First-line chemotherapy regimen should be based on combination of cisplatin or carboplatin with etoposide (PE). Alternatively, CAV regimen (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine) can be used. Newer regimens did not provide benefit when compared to standard regimens. If progression occurs later than 3 months after finishing first-line chemotherapy, the same regimen may be used in second-line chemotherapy. If progression occurs earlier than 3 months after finishing first-line chemotherapy, topotecan-based regimen is an option for second-line line chemotherapy. Despite promising outcomes of amrubicin-based second-line chemotherapy in Japan, amrubicin is not available in countries of E U. Standard therapy schedules do not include radiotherapy targeted on primary tumor and affected lymph-nodes. According to American and European guidelines, prophylactic cranial irradiation is recommended for patients with extensive disease-SCLC with good performance status after achieving complete or partial response to first-line chemotherapy. (author)

  18. Topotecan in the treatment of relapsed small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Quoix

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Elisabeth QuoixService de Pneumologie, Hôpitaux Universitaires, Strasbourg, FranceAbstract: Small cell lung cancer (SCLC represents about 15% to 20% of all lung cancers. Chemotherapy is the cornerstone of the treatment, cisplatin–etoposide combination being the most used combination as first-line therapy. Despite high initial chemosensitivity, most SCLC patients will experience relapse sooner or later. Unfortunately, second-line chemotherapy does not result in a high response rate like first-line therapy, most patients having developed wide chemoresistance. This chemoresistance is far more important in refractory patients, ie, those who never responded to first-line therapy or who relapsed within 3 months after the end of chemotherapy, than in sensitive patients, ie, those who relapse more than 3 months after the end of chemotherapy. Topotecan, a topoisomerase I inhibitor, is the most studied drug in this second-line setting and has proved its efficacy as a single agent and in combination. A phase III trial comparing oral topotecan to best supportive care (BSC in relapsed SCLC demonstrated a significant survival benefit as well as a better quality of life. Although the usual schedule is 1.5 mg/m2, days 1–5 intravenously, it is not convenient for patients with relapsed SCLC, especially those who are refractory because of their short survival expectation. Oral topotecan is of similar efficacy and much more convenient with limited stay in a treatment unit and has a comparable toxicity profile for these patients with short expected survival. Combination of topotecan with platinum salts or taxanes does not seem to improve further the outcome of the patients and thus single-agent therapy with topotecan is the standard treatment for relapsed SCLC.Keywords: topotecan, small cell lung cancer, chemoresistance

  19. The 'grey area' between small cell and non-small cell lung carcinomas. Light and electron microscopy versus clinical data in 14 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooi, W. J.; van Zandwijk, N.; Dingemans, K. P.; Koolen, M. G.; Wagenvoort, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    We studied 14 lung tumours which on light microscopy had posed difficulties on classification as either small cell or non-small cell carcinomas. The light and electron microscopical features were compared with patient follow-up data. Electron microscopy showed neuroendocrine granules in 12 cases,

  20. The Role of Esophageal Hypersensitivity in Functional Esophageal Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Adam D; Ruffle, James K; Aziz, Qasim

    2017-02-01

    The Rome IV diagnostic criteria delineates 5 functional esophageal disorders which include functional chest pain, functional heartburn, reflux hypersensitivity, globus, and functional dysphagia. These are a heterogenous group of disorders which, despite having characteristic symptom profiles attributable to esophageal pathology, fail to demonstrate any structural, motility or inflammatory abnormalities on standard clinical testing. These disorders are associated with a marked reduction in patient quality of life, not least considerable healthcare resources. Furthermore, the pathophysiology of these disorders is incompletely understood. In this narrative review we provide the reader with an introductory primer to the structure and function of esophageal perception, including nociception that forms the basis of the putative mechanisms that may give rise to symptoms in functional esophageal disorders. We also discuss the provocative techniques and outcome measures by which esophageal hypersensitivity can be established.

  1. SUNSET: Stereotactic Radiation for Ultracentral Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer-A Safety and Efficacy Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Meredith; Mathew, Ashwathy S; Bahig, Houda; Bratman, Scott V; Filion, Edith; Glick, Daniel; Louie, Alexander V; Raman, Srinivas; Swaminath, Anand; Warner, Andrew; Yau, Vivian; Palma, David

    2018-04-18

    Lung stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) is considered a standard curative treatment for medically inoperable early stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients with ultracentral tumors (signifying tumors whose planning target volume touches or overlaps the central bronchial tree, esophagus, or pulmonary artery) may be at higher risk of serious toxicities such as bronchial stricture and collapse, esophageal strictures, tracheal-esophageal fistula, and hemorrhage. The primary objective of the study is to determine the maximum tolerated dose of radiotherapy for ultracentral NSCLC. This multicenter phase 1 dose-escalation study will use a time-to-event continual reassessment method (TITE-CRM). Accrual will start at level 1 (60 Gy in 8 fractions delivered daily). The model will use all available information from previously accrued patients to assign the highest dose with a predicted risk of grade 3-5 toxicity of 30% or less. All patients with newly diagnosed stage T1-3 N0M0 NSCLC (International Union Against Cancer, 8th edition) with tumor size ≤ 6 cm and meeting the criteria for ultracentral location (ie, tumors whose planning target volume touches or overlaps the central bronchial tree, esophagus, pulmonary vein, or pulmonary artery) will be eligible for this study. It is important to identify a safe dose-fractionation regimen for treating ultracentral tumors with SBRT. In addition, the data from this study may be informative in guiding future studies on the use of SBRT in treating malignancies within the mediastinum-for example, for salvage treatment of mediastinal lymph nodes for recurrent NSCLC or mediastinal oligometastases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tumors Mediastinal Tumors Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders Pleural Diseases Mesothelioma Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders Overview The esophagus (ĕ-sof´ah-gus) is the hollow, muscular tube that moves food and liquid from your mouth to your stomach. If the ...

  3. Esophageal involvement in eosinophilic gastroenteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matzinger, M A; Daneman, A

    1983-02-01

    The radiologic appearance of esophageal involvement due to eosinophilic gastroenteritis in a 15-year-old boy is presented. The lower two thirds of the esophagus was narrowed and the peristalsis diminished. The mucosa appeared smooth. This is the fourth reported case of esophageal involvement in eosinophilic gastroenteritis.

  4. Advances in esophageal motor disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smout, André Jpm

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Esophageal motor disorders, often leading to dysphagia and chest pain, continue to pose diagnostic and therapeutic problems. In the past 12 months important new information regarding esophageal motor disorders was published. This information will be reviewed in this paper. RECENT

  5. Advances in esophageal motor disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smout, Andre J. P. M.

    Purpose of review Esophageal motor disorders, often leading to dysphagia and chest pain, continue to pose diagnostic and therapeutic problems. In the past 12 months important new information regarding esophageal motor disorders was published. This information will be reviewed in this paper. Recent

  6. Treatment results of radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Li; Wang Lvhua; Zhang Hongxing; Chen Dongfu; Xiao Zefen; Wang Mei; Feng Qinfu; Liang Jun; Zhou Zongmei; Ou Guangfei; Lv Jima; Yin Weibo

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze treatment results of radiotherapy for medically inoperable stage I/II non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: Between Jan. 2000 and Dec. 2005, fifty-eight such patients were enrolled into the database analysis, including 37 with clinical stage I and 21 with stage II disease. Fifty patients received radiotherapy alone and eight with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Forty- three patients were treated with 3-D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and 15 with conventional radiotherapy. Results: The 1-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 85%, 54% and 30%, and the median survival time was 26.2 months for the whole group. The corresponding figures were 88%, 60%, 36% and 30.8 months for cancer-specific survival; 84%, 64%, 31% and 30.8 months for Stage I disease; 81%, 47%, 28% and 18.8 months for Stage II disease; 95%, 57%, 33% and 30.8 months for 3D-CRT group and 53%, 44%, 24% and 15.3 months for conventional radiotherapy group. By logrank test, tumor volume, pneumonitis of Grade II or higher and weight loss more than 5% showed statistically significant impact on overall survival. Tumor volume was the only independent prognostic factor in Cox multivariable regression. Pneumonitis and esophagitis of Grade II or higher were 16% and 2%, respectively. Age and lung function before treatment had a significant relationship with pneumonitis. Failure included the local recurrence (33%) and distant metastasis (21%). There was no difference between the treatment modalities and failure sites. Conclusions: For medically inoperable early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients, tumor volume is the most important prognostic factor for overall survival. The conformal radiotherapy marginally improves the survival. The age and pulmonary function are related to the incidence of treatment induced pneumonitis. (authors)

  7. Primary Esophageal Motility Disorders: Beyond Achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G.

    2017-01-01

    The best-defined primary esophageal motor disorder is achalasia. However, symptoms such as dysphagia, regurgitation and chest pain can be caused by other esophageal motility disorders. The Chicago classification introduced new manometric parameters and better defined esophageal motility disorders. Motility disorders beyond achalasia with the current classification are: esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, major disorders of peristalsis (distal esophageal spasm, hypercontractile esoph...

  8. Differences in practice patterns and costs between small cell and non-small cell lung cancer patients in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwabara, Kazuaki; Matsuda, Shinya; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Anan, Makoto; Ishikawa, Koichi B.; Horiguchi, Hiromasa; Hayashida, Kenshi; Fujimori, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Many reports exist regarding the economic evaluation of evolving chemotherapeutic regimens or diagnostic images for lung cancer (LC) patients. However, it is not clear whether clinical information, such as pathological diagnosis or cancer stage, should be considered as a risk adjustment in lung cancer. This study compared the cost and practice patterns between small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) and non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients. 6,060 LC patients treated at 58 academic hospitals and 14,507 at 257 community hospitals were analyzed. Study variables included demographic variables, comorbid status, cancer stage, use of imaging and surgical procedures, type of adjuvant therapy (chemotherapy, radiation or chemoradiation), use of ten chemotherapeutic agents, length of stay (LOS), and total charges (TC; US$1=100 yen) in SCLC and NSCLC patients. The impact of pathological diagnosis on LOS and TC was investigated using multivariate analysis. We identified 3,571 SCLC and 16,996 NSCLC patients. The proportion of demographic and practice-process variables differed significantly between SCLC and NSCLC patients, including diagnostic imaging, adjuvant therapy and surgical procedures. Median LOS and TC were 20 days and US$6,015 for SCLC and 18 days and US$6,993 for NSCLC patients, respectively (p<0.001 for each variable). Regression analysis revealed that pathological diagnosis was not correlated with TC. Physicians should acknowledge that pathological diagnosis dose not accounts for any variation in cost of LC patients but that should remain as an indicator of appropriate care like selection of chemotherapeutic agents. (author)

  9. Early detection of response in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma by changes in serum concentrations of creatine kinase, neuron specific enolase, calcitonin, ACTH, serotonin and gastrin releasing peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, E; Hansen, M; Urdal, P

    1988-01-01

    Creatine kinase (CK-BB), neuron specific enolase (NSE), ACTH, calcitonin, serotonin and gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) were measured in serum or plasma before and immediately after initiation of treatment in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCC). Pretherapeutic elevated concentrations of CK...... stage patients and 71% in limited stage patients. Frequent initial monitoring of the substances showed an increase in the concentrations of pretherapeutic elevated CK-BB and NSE on day 1 or 2 followed by a sharp decrease within 1 week. These changes were correlated to objective clinical response...... determined within 4-8 weeks. The results indicate that serum CK-BB and NSE are potential markers for SCC at the time of diagnosis and that changes in the concentrations during the first course of cytostatic therapy are promising as biochemical tests for early detection of response to chemotherapy....

  10. Evaluation of cognitive function in patients with limited small cell lung cancer prior to and shortly following prophylactic cranial irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaki, Ritsuko; Meyers, Christina A; Shin, Dong M; Garden, Adam S; Byrne, Kevin; Nickens, Judy A; Cox, James D

    1995-08-30

    Purpose: Cognitive deficits after treatment for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) have been attributed to prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI). A prospective study of neuropsychological function was undertaken to document the evolution and magnitude of neuropsychologic deficits. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with limited stage SCLC who responded well (29 complete response (CR), 1 partial response (PR)) to combination chemotherapy plus thoracic irradiation or resection were studied with neuropsychological tests in the cognitive domains of intelligence, frontal lobe function, language, memory, visual-perception, and motor dexterity prior to a planned course of PCI. Nine patients had a neurologic history that could influence testing. Results: An unexpected 97% (29 out of 30) of patients had evidence of cognitive dysfunction prior to PCI. The most frequent impairment was verbal memory, followed by frontal lobe dysfunction, and fine motor incoordination. Of the patients with no prior neurologic or substance abuse history, 20 out of 21 (95%) had impairments on neuropsychological assessment. This neurologically normal group was just as impaired as the group with such a history with respect to delayed verbal memory and frontal lobe executive function. Eleven patients had neuropsychological testing 6 to 20 months after PCI; no significant differences were found from their pretreatment tests. Conclusions: A high proportion of neurologically normal patients with limited SCLC and favorable responses to combination chemotherapy have specific cognitive deficits before receiving PCI. Short-term (6 to 20 months) observations after PCI have shown no significant deterioration.

  11. Evaluation of cognitive function in patients with limited small cell lung cancer prior to and shortly following prophylactic cranial irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komaki, Ritsuko; Meyers, Christina A.; Shin, Dong M.; Garden, Adam S.; Byrne, Kevin; Nickens, Judy A.; Cox, James D.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Cognitive deficits after treatment for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) have been attributed to prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI). A prospective study of neuropsychological function was undertaken to document the evolution and magnitude of neuropsychologic deficits. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with limited stage SCLC who responded well (29 complete response (CR), 1 partial response (PR)) to combination chemotherapy plus thoracic irradiation or resection were studied with neuropsychological tests in the cognitive domains of intelligence, frontal lobe function, language, memory, visual-perception, and motor dexterity prior to a planned course of PCI. Nine patients had a neurologic history that could influence testing. Results: An unexpected 97% (29 out of 30) of patients had evidence of cognitive dysfunction prior to PCI. The most frequent impairment was verbal memory, followed by frontal lobe dysfunction, and fine motor incoordination. Of the patients with no prior neurologic or substance abuse history, 20 out of 21 (95%) had impairments on neuropsychological assessment. This neurologically normal group was just as impaired as the group with such a history with respect to delayed verbal memory and frontal lobe executive function. Eleven patients had neuropsychological testing 6 to 20 months after PCI; no significant differences were found from their pretreatment tests. Conclusions: A high proportion of neurologically normal patients with limited SCLC and favorable responses to combination chemotherapy have specific cognitive deficits before receiving PCI. Short-term (6 to 20 months) observations after PCI have shown no significant deterioration

  12. NASA Alternative Orion Small Cell Battery Design Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Chuck

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Orion Crew Module Reference Design was produced to address large scale thermal runaway (TR) hazard with specific safety controls for the Orion Spacecraft. The design presented provides the description of a full scale battery design reference for implementation as a drop in replacement to meet all spacecraft energy requirements with compatible 120 Vdc electrical and mechanical interface using small cell technology (18650) packaging. The 32V SuperBrick incorporates unique support features and an electrical bus bar arrangement that allows cells negative can insertion into heat sink that is compressively coupled to the battery enclosure to promote good thermal management. The housing design also provides an internal flame suppression "filter tray" and positive venting path internal to the enclosure to allow hot effluent ejecta to escape in the event of single cell TR. Virtual cells (14P Banks) that are supported to provide cell spacing with interstitial materials to prevent side can failures that can produce cell to cell TR propagation. These features were successfully test in four separate TR run with the full scale DTA1 test article in February 2016. Successfully Completed Test Objectives - Four separate TR test runs with Full-Scale DTA1 housing with Two SuperBricks, Two SuperBrick Emulators All Tests resulted in "clean" gas with less than 6 C rise at Battery vent All Tests resulted in less than 2 C temperature rise on cold-plate outlet All Tests resulted in less than 6 psi pressure rise in the battery housing Test Run 1 -One neighbor cell TR, highest remaining neighbor 139 C. Ejecta shorted to bus caused prolonged additional heating, One shorted cell did experience TR after 12 minutes, remaining cells had adequate thermal margin Test Run 2 - No cell to cell propagation, highest neighbor cell 112 C; Test Run 3 - No cell to cell propagation, highest neighbor cell 96 C; Test Run 4 - No cell to cell propagation, highest neighbor cell 101 C; Primary TR testing

  13. Esophageal scintigraphy: Applications and limitations in the study of esophageal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, M.K.; Byrne, P.J.; Keeling, P.; Hennessy, T.P.

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the scintigraphic transit pattern in a variety of esophageal disorders. Scintigraphy was performed with a semi solid bolus and the patient in an upright position. Condensed esophageal images were obtained from which we derived the esophageal transit time. The pattern of bolus transit was graded by the duration of transit and by the presence of hold up or retrograde motion. Scintigrams were performed in 11 volunteers and 88 patients whose esophageal function had been confirmed by conventional gastroesophageal techniques. Esophageal disorders examined included achalasia, scleroderma, esophageal carcinoma, Barrett esophagus, and reflux esophagitis. We also examined the effects of gastroesophageal surgery on esophageal function. Transit times distinguished grossly abnormal esophageal function from normal but did not distinguish between different esophageal disorders. Graded transit patterns were a more sensitive indicator of esophageal function and permitted some differentiation between esophageal disorders and allowed evaluation of the effects of gastroesophageal surgery. (orig.)

  14. Esophageal scintigraphy: Applications and limitations in the study of esophageal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connor, M.K.; Byrne, P.J.; Keeling, P.; Hennessy, T.P.

    1988-06-01

    This study examines the scintigraphic transit pattern in a variety of esophageal disorders. Scintigraphy was performed with a semi solid bolus and the patient in an upright position. Condensed esophageal images were obtained from which we derived the esophageal transit time. The pattern of bolus transit was graded by the duration of transit and by the presence of hold up or retrograde motion. Scintigrams were performed in 11 volunteers and 88 patients whose esophageal function had been confirmed by conventional gastroesophageal techniques. Esophageal disorders examined included achalasia, scleroderma, esophageal carcinoma, Barrett esophagus, and reflux esophagitis. We also examined the effects of gastroesophageal surgery on esophageal function. Transit times distinguished grossly abnormal esophageal function from normal but did not distinguish between different esophageal disorders. Graded transit patterns were a more sensitive indicator of esophageal function and permitted some differentiation between esophageal disorders and allowed evaluation of the effects of gastroesophageal surgery.

  15. [Primary esophageal motility disorders; especially about esophageal achalasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Tatsuya; Sohda, Makoto; Sakai, Makoto; Tanaka, Naritaka; Suzuki, Shigemasa; Yokobori, Takehiko; Inose, Takanori; Nakajima, Masanobu; Fukuchi, Minoru; Kato, Hiroyuki; Kusano, Motoyasu; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2011-07-01

    Esophageal motility disorders are classified primary and secondary, and primary esophageal motility disorders are classified esophageal achalasia and other diseases by manometry. An esophageal emptying disorder associated with insufficient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and elimination of peristaltic waves on the esophageal body is the major abnormality of achalasia. Esophagogram, endoscopy, and manometry are used for diagnosis. As pharmacological therapy, administration of a calcium channel blocker or nitrate is useful. The pharmacological therapy is not recommended as long-term basic therapy but as a temporary treatment. At 1st, the balloon dilation method is chosen in treatment of achalasia Surgical treatment is indicated in the following cases: (1) Patients uneffected by balloon dilation, (2) Flask type with grade II to III dilation, and sigmoid type, (3) the gradual progression to the pathophysiological stage, (4) young patients, (5) complicated with esophageal cancer. Laparoscopic Heller-Dor procedure is the most popular surgical procedure, recently. It is somewhat difficult to perform surgical treatment for this functional disease. We should select the most suitable individualized treatment with efficient comprehension of the pathophysiological situation.

  16. Transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation and esophageal motor response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Joachim H; Küper, Markus A; Königsrainer, Alfred; Brücher, Björn L D M

    2010-04-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is caused by transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) in healthy individuals and in most patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Refluxate is normally propelled by pharyngeally induced swallowing events, but TLESRs may also be accompanied by retrograde esophageal motor responses (EMRs). These contractions have not previously been investigated and their effect on esophageal clearance is not known. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of EMRs after TLESR in healthy individuals and GERD patients and to develop an animal model for further investigation of EMRs. The frequency of TLESRs and esophageal body contractions after TLESRs was assessed using ambulatory manometry in five healthy individuals and five GERD patients. An animal model was developed for reproducible provocation of TLESRs and subsequent EMRs. Patients with GERD have significantly more TLESRs than healthy individuals. However, post-TLESR EMRs were not more frequent in the GERD group. All post-TLESR EMRs presented as simultaneous contractions of the esophagus. The feline model allowed reproducible initiation of the esophageal motor response after TLESR, showing that EMRs can be induced by external mechanoreceptor stimulation simultaneously with LES relaxation. This experimental design imitates the conditions after fundoplication in humans. The study demonstrated that GERD patients have significantly more TLESRs in comparison with healthy individuals, but these were only incidental to EMRs. Further research is needed to improve our understanding of esophageal motility disorders. The animal model presented offers a feasible tool for investigating TLESR-induced esophageal motility.

  17. Gastro-esophageal reflux time parameters and esophagitis in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baulieu, F.; Baulieu, J.; Maurage, C.; Casset, D.; Itti, R.

    1985-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the correlation between the reflux timing and the presence of esophagitis, an inconstant but serious complication of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER). The hypothesis was that reflux occurring late after meal can be incriminated more than early reflux in esophagitis genesis. 32 children with GER (mean age = 10.5 months, 2 to 30 months) had esophagoscopy and scintigraphy in the same week. The children were classified in two groups according to esophagoscopy: group 1 (n = 18) no esophagitis, group 2 (n = 14) esophaqgitis. The scintigraphy involved the ingestion of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid milk mixture, followed by esophageal and gastric activity recording (one image per minute for 1 hour). The reflux was assessed from contrast enhanced images and esophageal time activity curves. Reflux intensity was quantitated by reflux index (Re). Mean reflux time was calculated as the mean esophageal activity peaks time (t-bar). Finally a composite parameter was calculated as the mean reflux time weighted by the relative intensity of each reflux peak (t-barw). Re was not found to be different between the two groups. t-bar was significantly higher in group 2: t-bar = 29.6 +- 3.0 mn (mean +- SD) than in group 1: t-bar = 24.5 +- 6.8 mn; rho <0.02. The difference between the two groups was enhanced by intensity weighting: group 1: t-barw = 16.6 +- 6.3 mn, group 2: t-barw = 33.5 +- 7.1 mn rho <0.001. t-barw value was not correlated to esophagitis grade. These results suggest that late reflux is more likely responsible of esophagitis

  18. Imaging of Esophageal Tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagi, B.; Kochhar, R.; Bhasin, D.K.; Singh, K.; Lal, A.; Gulati, M.; Suri, S.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the various radiological abnormalities in patients with proven esophageal tuberculosis. Material and Methods: The case records of 23 patients with proven esophageal tuberculosis were evaluated retrospectively for various radiological abnormalities. Twenty-two patients had secondary involvement of esophagus in the form of direct extension of mediastinal and pulmonary tuberculosis or spinal tuberculosis. Only 1 patient had primary involvement of the esophagus with no evidence of disease elsewhere. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopic and CT-guided biopsy/aspiration cytology in 7 and 6 cases, respectively. Diagnosis was made on the basis of surgical biopsy of lymph node and autopsy in 1 patient each. In the remaining 8 patients the diagnosis was based on radiological and endoscopic findings and the response to antituberculous treatment. Results: Chest radiography (CXR) was abnormal in 65% patients. While the findings were non-conclusive for esophageal tuberculosis, characteristic lesions of tuberculosis in lungs or spine were suggestive of tuberculous etiology. In 15 patients, CT of the chest confirmed the corresponding CXR findings and also showed additional findings of mediastinal lymphadenopathy when CXR was normal. Fourteen patients showed mediastinal lymphadenopathy on CT of the chest. In all these patients, more than one group of lymph nodes was involved. The characteristic hypodense center of lymph nodes suggestive of tuberculosis was seen in 12 patients. Radiological abnormalities seen in barium swallow examination were extrinsic compression, traction diverticula, strictures, sinus/fistulous tracts, kinking and pseudotumor mass of esophagus in decreasing order of frequency. The middle third of the esophagus was found to be the most frequent site of involvement

  19. Esophageal diverticula and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbella, F A M; Dubecz, A; Patti, M G

    2012-02-01

    Esophageal diverticula are rare. The association of cancer and diverticula has been described. Some authors adopt a conservative non-surgical approach in selected patients with diverticula whereas others treat the symptoms by diverticulopexy or myotomy only, leaving the diverticulum in situ. However, the risk of malignant degeneration should be may be taken in account if the diverticulum is not resected. The correct evaluation of the possible risk factors for malignancy may help in the decision making process. We performed a literature review of esophageal diverticula and cancer. The incidence of cancer in a diverticulum is 0.3-7, 1.8, and 0.6% for pharyngoesophageal, midesophageal, and epiphrenic diverticula, respectively. Symptoms may mimic those of the diverticulum or underlying motor disorder. Progressive dysphagia, unintentional weight loss, the presence of blood in the regurgitated material, regurgitation of peaces of the tumor, odynophagia, melena, hemathemesis, and hemoptysis are key symptoms. Risk factors for malignancy are old age, male gender, long-standing history, and larger diverticula. A carcinoma may develop in treated diverticula, even after resection. Outcomes are usually quoted as dismal because of a delayed diagnosis but several cases of superficial carcinoma have been described. The treatment follows the same principals as the therapy for esophageal cancer; however, diverticulectomy is enough in cases of superficial carcinomas. Patients must be carefully evaluated before therapy and a long-term follow-up is advisable. © 2011 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  20. Esophageal stent implantation for the treatment of esophageal strictures: its current situation and research progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Haidong; Guo Jinhe; Teng Gaojun

    2011-01-01

    Esophageal stent implantation has been the most common therapy for the treatment of malignant and benign esophageal stenosis. At present, this technique is widely used in treating advanced esophageal cancerous stricture, refractory esophageal benign stricture and all kinds of esophageal fistulae or perforation. This paper aims to make a comprehensive review of the current situation and research progress of the esophageal stent implantation in clinical practice. (authors)

  1. Cellular radiosensitivity of small-cell lung cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krarup, Marianne; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard; Spang-Thomsen, Mogens

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to determine the radiobiological characteristics of a panel of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines by use of a clonogenic assay. In addition, we tested whether comparable results could be obtained by employing a growth extrapolation method based on the construction of continuous exponential growth curves. Methods and Materials: Fifteen SCLC cell lines were studied, applying a slightly modified clonogenic assay and a growth extrapolation method. A dose-survival curve was obtained for each experiment and used for calculating several survival parameters. The multitarget single hit model was applied to calculate the cellular radiosensitivity (D 0 ), the capacity for sublethal damage repair (D q ), and the extrapolation number (n). Values for α and β were determined from best-fit curves according to the linear-quadratic model and these values were applied to calculate the surviving fraction after 2-Gy irradiation (SF 2 ). Results: In our investigation, the extrapolation method proved to be inappropriate for the study of in vitro cellular radiosensitivity due to lack of reproducibility. The results obtained by the clonogenic assay showed that the cell lines studied were radiobiologically heterogeneous with no discrete features of the examined parameters including the repair capacity. Conclusion: The results indicate that SCLC tumors per se are not generally candidates for hyperfractionated radiotherapy

  2. Personalizing Therapy in Advanced Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaruz, Liza C.; Burns, Timothy F.; Ramfidis, Vasilis S.; Socinski, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The recognition that non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is not a single disease entity, but rather a collection of distinct molecularly driven neoplasms, has permanently shifted the therapeutic landscape of NSCLC to a personalized approach. This personalization of NSCLC therapy is typified by the dramatic response rates seen in EGFR mutant NSCLC when treated with targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy and in ALK translocation–driven NSCLC when treated with ALK inhibitors. Targeted therapeutic approaches in NSCLC necessitate consideration of more invasive biopsy techniques aimed at providing sufficient tissue for both histological determination and molecular profiling in all patients with stage IV disease both at the time of diagnosis and at the time of disease progression. Comprehensive genotyping efforts have identified oncogenic drivers in 62% lung adenocarcinomas and an increasing proportion of squamous cell carcinomas of the lung. The identification of these oncogenic drivers and the triage of patients to clinical trials evaluating novel targeted therapeutic approaches will increasingly mold a landscape of personalized lung cancer therapy where each genotype has an associated targeted therapy. This review outlines the state of personalized lung cancer therapy as it pertains to individual NSCLC genotypes. PMID:24258572

  3. Prophylactic cranial irradiation in patients with small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramlov, Anne; Tietze, Anna; Khalil, Azza Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prophylactic cerebral irradiation (PCI) is a standard treatment for all small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients with response to chemotherapy. The aims of this study were: to evaluate patients undergoing PCI with regard to cerebral recurrence rate, site of recurrence, and overall...... retrospectively with regard to disease stage, treatment, date of PCI, steroid dose during PCI, toxicity, time to recurrence, site of recurrence and time of death. The median follow up time was 16.6months (range 3-54months). RESULTS: Of the 118 patients undergoing PCI, 74 had limited disease (LD-SCLC) and 44 had...... extensive disease (ED-SCLC). The median age was 65years (range 46-80years). The median overall survival of all patients from the time of diagnosis was 16.0months (CI 95% 13.0-19.0), in LD-SCLC it was 24.0months (CI 95% 19.6-28.3), and in ED-SCLC it was 12.0months (CI 95% 9.6-14.4). Twenty-one patients (17...

  4. Cetuximab and biomarkers in non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil N

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitin Patil, Mohammed Abba, Heike AllgayerDepartment of Experimental Surgery, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg and Molecular Oncology of Solid Tumors Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ, Heidelberg, GermanyAbstract: Cancer progression is a highly complex process that is driven by a constellation of deregulated signaling pathways and key molecular events. In non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, as in several other cancer types, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and its downstream signaling components represent a key axis that has been found not only to trigger cancer progression but also to support advanced disease leading to metastasis. Two major therapeutic approaches comprising monoclonal antibodies and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors have so far been used to target this pathway, with a combination of positive, negative, and inconsequential results, as judged by patient survival indices. Since these drugs are expensive and not all patients derive benefits from taking them, it has become both pertinent and paramount to identify biomarkers that can predict not only beneficial response but also resistance. This review focuses on the chimeric monoclonal antibody, cetuximab, its application in the treatment of NSCLC, and the biomarkers that may guide its use in the clinical setting. A special emphasis is placed on the EGFR, including its structural and mechanistic attributes.Keywords: NSCLC, cetuximab, biomarker, cancer progression

  5. Cetuximab for treating non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzarella, Luca; Guida, Alessandro; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2018-04-01

    Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)-dependent signaling plays a crucial role in epithelial cancer biology, and dictated the development of several targeting agents. The mouse-human chimeric antibody Cetuximab was among the first to be developed. After about two decades of clinical research it has gained a significant place in the management of advanced colorectal and head and neck cancers, whereas its development in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has not led to a place in routine clinical practice, because of marginal clinical benefit despite statistically significant Phase III trials. Recent data from ongoing trials suggest that more careful selection based on molecular markers may identify good responders. Areas covered: In this article, the authors review the literature concerning basic science studies identifying EGFR as a therapeutic target, pharmacological development of Cetuximab, its pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics, and clinical trials on Cetuximab in NSCLC, focusing on recent findings on putative predictive biomarkers. Expert opinion: Cetuximab currently has no role in NSCLC treatment outside of research settings. We argue that failure to identify a predictive biomarker early on has hampered its chances to enter routine practice. Although recent research suggests benefit in highly selected patient subsets, its potential impact is severely dampened by lack of regulatory body approval and the emergence of competitors for the same niches.

  6. Non small cell carcinoma of the lung: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, G.; Firth, I.

    1992-01-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken in 1990 of 188 patients with the diagnosis of non small cell carcinoma of the lung referred to the Department of Radiation Oncology in 1984. Most patients (178 out of 188) received a course of radiotherapy. This was definitive in 23, palliative in 148 (primary site in 113, metastases in 16, primary plus metastases in 19) and postoperative in 7. This report is a 5 year follow-up of the 171 patients treated by radiation alone, to assess factors that influence survival. Palliative intent of treatment and poorer performance status were related significantly to increasing stage of disease. The effects of palliative treatment were recorded in 79 cases: in 71 there was a reduction in symptoms. The median survival from diagnosis was 8 months. Using univariate and multi-variate analyses, significant and independent prognostic factors for improved survival were good performance status, absence of systemic symptoms, lower tumour stage and curative intent of treatment (higher radiation dose). However the 5-year survival was only 2%. Long-term survival was associated predominantly with early stage disease but not with the type or intent of treatment. Age, sex, histology and apical site did not influence survival. These results are comparable to those found in the literature and emphasize the need to select patients carefully for either palliative or aggressive treatment. 29 refs., 4 tabs., 3 figs

  7. MEK inhibition in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Johnson, Gary L

    2014-11-01

    KRAS mutations are the most common mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with adenocarcinoma histology. KRAS mutations result in the activation of the RAF-MEK-ERK pathway, and agents that target RAF-MEK-ERK pathways have been investigated in KRAS mutant NSCLC. The two agents furthest in development are selumetinib and trametinib. Trametinib has greater binding for the MEK1/2 allosteric site, and generally has superior pharmacokinetics. A randomized phase II trial of docetaxel with and without selumetinib revealed that the combination resulted numerically superior overall survival, and a statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival and objective response rate. However, a concerning rate of hospital admission, grade 3 or 4 neutropenia, and febrile neutropenia was observed with the combination. Trials have investigated MEK inhibitors as single agents and in combination with erlotinib, and the data do not support the further development. The activity of MEK inhibitors appears to be similar in patients with KRAS mutant and wild-type NSCLC suggesting KRAS mutation status is not a reliable biomarker for efficacy. It is possible that mutations of genes in addition to KRAS mutations impact the activity of MEK inhibitors, or specific subsets of KRAS mutations may be resistant or susceptible to MEK inhibition. Other potential explanations are gene amplifications, alternative RNA splicing of genes resulting in activation of their protein products, and deregulation of noncoding RNAs and consequent altered protein expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Primary small cell carcinoma of the lesser omentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Feng Feng

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Although pulmonary small cell carcinoma (SCC is seen frequently, SCC that originates from the extrapulmonary organs is extremely rare. We herein report a case of a SCC located in the lesser omentum. A 61-year-old male was admitted to our department due to intermittent epigastralgia for 2 months. Ultrasonography (US revealed an irregular hypoechoic mass measuring about 58 mm × 50 mm × 45 mm under the left lobe of the liver. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was performed to verify the irregular mass with T1- and T2- weighted images between the left lobe of liver and the stomach. At laparotomy, the well-circumscribed neoplasm was found in the lesser omentum, and the fundus of the neoplasm was located in the root of left gastric artery. Intraoperative microscopic evaluation of frozen sections revealed malignancy of the lesser omentum. Resection of the neoplasm was performed, and the combined resection of the vagal nerve was also performed for the partial adhesion. Pyloroplasty was performed for avoiding delayed gastric emptying caused by combined resection of vagal nerve. The lymph nodes dissection at lesser curvature and right cardia was also performed with a negative result. Based on the histological findings, the final diagnosis of primary lesser omental SCC was confirmed. The pathologic staging showed locoregional disease.

  9. Refractory Lactic Acidosis in Small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Oh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Elevated lactate levels in critically ill patients are most often thought to be indicative of relative tissue hypoxia or type A lactic acidosis. Shock, severe anemia, and thromboembolic events can all cause elevated lactate due to tissue hypoperfusion, as well as the mitochondrial dysfunction thought to occur in sepsis and other critically ill states. Malignancy can also lead to elevation in lactate, a phenomenon described as type B lactic acidosis, which is much less commonly encountered in the critically ill. Case Presentation. We present the case of a 73-year-old Caucasian woman with type 2 diabetes and hypertension who presented with abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, nonbloody diarrhea, and weight loss over five weeks and was found to have unexplained refractory lactic acidosis despite fluids and antibiotics. She was later diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the lung. Conclusions. In this case report, we describe a critically ill patient whose elevated lactate was incorrectly attributed to her acute illness, when in truth it was an indicator of an underlying, as yet undiagnosed, malignancy. We believe this case is instructive to the critical care clinician as a reminder of the importance of considering malignancy on the differential diagnosis of a patient presenting with elevated lactate out of proportion to their critical illness.

  10. Gemcitabine, cisplatin, and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwitter, Matjaz; Kovac, Viljem; Smrdel, Uros; Strojan, Primoz

    2006-09-01

    Due to potent radiosensitization and potential serious or fatal toxicity, concurrent gemcitabine and irradiation should only be applied within clinical trials. We here present experience from a phase I-II clinical trial for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy and concurrent low-dose gemcitabine. Eligible patients had locally advanced inoperable NSCLC without pleural effusion, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0-1, were chemotherapy naïve and had no previous radiotherapy to the chest, and had adequate hematopoietic, liver, and kidney function. Routine brain computed tomography was not performed, and positron emission tomography/computed tomography was not available. Treatment consisted of three parts: induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin in standard doses, local treatment with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and consolidation chemotherapy. Patients were irradiated with opposed AP-PA and oblique fields, using 2.5-D treatment planning. Although corrections for inhomogeneous tissue were made, volume of total lung receiving > or =20 Gy (V20) could not be determined. The trial started as phase I, aimed to determine the dose-limiting toxicity and maximal tolerated dose (MTD) for concurrent hyperfractionated radiotherapy (1.4 Gy twice daily) and gemcitabine 55 mg/m twice weekly as a radiosensitizer. Phase II of the trial then continued at the level of MTD. Twenty-eight patients with NSCLC, nine patients with stage IIIA, 16 patients with IIIB, and three patients with an inoperable recurrence after previous surgery, entered the trial. The first 12 patients entered Phase I of the trial at the initial level of 42 Gy in 30 fractions in 3 weeks. Dose-limiting toxicity was acute esophagitis; 47.6 Gy in 34 fractions in 3.5 weeks was the MTD for this regimen of concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In phase II of the trial, this dose was applied

  11. Esophageal hypermotility: cause or effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespin, O M; Tatum, R P; Yates, R B; Sahin, M; Coskun, K; Martin, A V; Wright, A; Oelschlager, B K; Pellegrini, C A

    2016-07-01

    Nutcracker esophagus (NE), Jackhammer esophagus (JHE), distal esophageal spasm (DES), and hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter (HTLES) are defined by esophageal manometric findings. Some patients with these esophageal motility disorders also have abnormal gastroesophageal reflux. It is unclear to what extent these patients' symptoms are caused by the motility disorder, the acid reflux, or both. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) on esophageal motility disorders, gastroesophageal reflux, and patient symptoms. Between 2007 and 2013, we performed high-resolution esophageal manometry on 3400 patients, and 221 patients were found to have a spastic esophageal motility disorder. The medical records of these patients were reviewed to determine the manometric abnormality, presence of gastroesophageal symptoms, and amount of esophageal acid exposure. In those patients that underwent LNF, we compared pre- and postoperative esophageal motility, gastroesophageal symptom severity, and esophageal acid exposure. Of the 221 patients with spastic motility disorders, 77 had NE, 2 had JHE, 30 had DES, and 112 had HTLES. The most frequently reported primary and secondary symptoms among all patients were: heartburn and/or regurgitation, 69.2%; respiratory, 39.8%; dysphagia, 35.7%; and chest pain, 22.6%. Of the 221 patients, 192 underwent 24-hour pH monitoring, and 103 demonstrated abnormal distal esophageal acid exposure. Abnormal 24-hour pH monitoring was detected in 62% of patients with heartburn and regurgitation, 49% of patients with respiratory symptoms, 36.8 % of patients with dysphagia, and 32.6% of patients with chest pain. Sixty-six of the 103 patients with abnormal 24-hour pH monitoring underwent LNF. Thirty-eight (13NE, 2JHE, 6 DES, and 17 HTLES) of these 66 patients had a minimum of 6-month postoperative follow-up that included clinical evaluation, esophageal manometry, and 24-hour pH monitoring

  12. Esophageal motor disorders: recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Ibrahim; Mittal, Ravinder K

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this article is to highlight literature published during the last year in the context of previous knowledge. A number of novel techniques - high-resolution manometry, esophageal electrical impedance and intra-luminal ultrasound imaging - have improved our understanding of esophageal function in health and disease. Several studies address the function of longitudinal muscle layer of the esophagus in normal subjects and patients with motor disorders of the esophagus. Esophageal electrical impedance recordings reveal abnormal transit in patients with diffuse esophageal spasm, achalasia and patients with normal manometry. Loss of the mammalian Sprouty2 gene leads to enteric neuronal hyperplasia and esophageal achalasia. Several studies showed excellent long-term results of medical and surgical treatment of achalasia of the esophagus. For the first time, mechanisms of gastroesophageal reflux in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients are reported. Novel pharmacologic strategies in the treatment of reflux disease are highlighted. Several novel techniques, perfected during recent years, have improved our understanding of esophageal function and dysfunction. A number of important observations, reviewed here, provide important insight into the pathogenesis of esophageal motor disorders and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  13. High-incidence of PTEN mutations in Chinese patients with primary small cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zhimin; Wang, Ge; Xiao, Hualiang; Xie, Fei; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Chuan; Xiao, He; Yang, Zhenzhou; Wang, Dong; Li, Zengpeng

    2014-01-01

    Primary small cell carcinoma of the esophagus (PSCCE) is a rare and aggressive tumor with poor prognosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the existence of EGFR, KRAS, PIK3CA and PTEN mutations in PSCCE. Clinical–pathological data and paraffin-embedded specimens were collected from 38 patients. Exons 18 to 21 of EGFR, KRAS and PIK3CA status were analyzed by real-time PCR based on ARMS and Scorpion technology in all patients, and the PTEN gene was also screened using real-time PCR and high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRMA). Only 1 (2.63%) out of 38 patients had EGFR mutations in L858R missense, and KRAS and PIK3CA were not found in the mutational spot in all patients. However, PTEN mutations presented in 14 (36.84%) out of 38 patients, including exon 5 coding for PTEN missense mutation (n =4, 10.53%), exon 6 (n =7, 18.42%), concurrent exon 5 and exon 6 (n =2, 5.26%), and exon 8 (n =1, 2.63%). Concurrent mutations of these genes were not detected in all samples. No statistically significant associations were found between the clinicopathological features and the mutation status of PTEN. The incidence of PTEN mutations in Chinese patients with PSCCE was higher than that of previous reports in other histological subtypes of esophageal cancer

  14. Gender difference in treatment outcomes in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer receiving concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo; Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori; Tanai, Chiharu; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Kunitoh, Hideo; Ohe, Yuichiro; Tamura, Tomohide

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify any gender differences in the outcomes of concurrent platinum-based chemotherapy and thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). A comparative retrospective review of the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes between female and male NSCLC patients receiving chemoradiotherapy. Of a total of 204 patients, 44 (22%) were females and 160 (78%) were males. There was no difference in age, body weight loss, performance status or disease stage between the sexes, whereas never-smokers and adenocarcinoma were more common in female patients (55% vs. 3%, P 80% of the patients, respectively, of both sexes. Grade 3-4 neutropenia was observed in 64% of the female patients and 63% of the male patients. Severe esophagitis was encountered in <10% of the patients, irrespective of the sex. The response rate was higher in the female than in the male patients (93% vs. 79%, P=0.028), but the median progression-free survival did not differ between the sexes. The median survival time in the female and male patients was 22.3 and 24.3 months, respectively (P=0.64). This study failed to show any gender differences in the survival or toxicity among patients treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy. These results contrast with the better survival in female patients undergoing surgery for localized disease or chemotherapy for metastatic disease. (author)

  15. A Meta Analysis of Radiosensitivity on Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 
by Metronidazole Amino Acidum Natrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei REN

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The efficacy and safety of radiosensitivity on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC using metronidazole amino acidum natrium (CMNa are yet to be proven. This study evaluates the efficacy and safety of radiosensitivity on NSCLC by CMNa to provide references for further clinical practice and research. Methods Relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs were obtained from the Cochrane library, Pubmed, EMbase, CBM, CNKI, VIP, and Wan Fang databases. Dates were searched through other means. RCTs of radiosensitivity on NSCLC by CMNa were included. The data included in the study were evaluated and analyzed using the Cochrane Collaboration's RevMan 5.1 software. Results A total of 21 RCTs were included. The results of the meta-analyses showed that the total effective rate of the test group that received CMNa plus radiotherapy was higher than that of the control group that received radiotherapy alone (OR=3.29, 95%CI: 2.47-4.39, P<0.000,01 or radiotherapy plus placebo (OR=3.65, 95%CI: 2.25-5.92, P<0.000,01, respectively. No significant differences were found in the quality of life between one and two-year survival rates (P>0.05. No significant differences were found among radiation pneumonitis, radiation esophagitis, hematological toxicity, and cardiotoxicity (P>0.05. Conclusion CMNa plus radiotherapy elicit beneficial effects in the treatment of NSCLC and produce fewer adverse effects. Therefore, this technique can be recommended and applied in clinics.

  16. Combination of bronchial artery infusion chemotherapy and radiation therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuping; Cai Yuecheng; Wang Xiangming; Luo Jianyun; Lian Yingni; Ouyang Mingxin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy between bronchial artery infusion (BAI) chemotherapy plus radiation therapy and systemic chemotherapy plus radiation for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: One hundred and twenty-one patients with stage III NSCLC were randomized into treatment group (58 cases) and control group (63 cases). In the treatment group, all patients were administered with BAI for 2-3 sessions, followed by irradiation 4-7 days after BAI. In the control group, altogether 4-6 cycles of standard systemic chemotherapy were given. Radiation was delivered alternately between the cycles of chemotherapy. Results: The short-term, long-term survival, median response duration and median survival time were similar between the two groups, except patients with stage IIIb who had a higher distant metastasis rate in the treatment group. The major side effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy were hematological, gastrointestinal toxicities, pneumonitis, mediastinitis, and esophagitis, respectively. The side effects were milder, better tolerated and did not influence the regimen schedule in the treatment group, as compared with the control group. Seven patients withdrew from the control group, and in 28 patients, the scheduled chemotherapy and radiation was delayed or canceled. Conclusions: Bronchial artery infusion plus radiation is more advantageous over systemic chemotherapy plus radiation in less toxicities, better compliance, shorter treatment courses and more cost-effectiveness

  17. Radiation induced esophageal ulcer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Tatsuyuki; Endo, Mitsuo; Yamazaki, Shigeru

    1990-01-01

    A 77-year-old woman was referred to us on Dec. 22, 1986 because of dysphagia and esophageal ulcer. She had a previous history of left radical mastectomy for breast cancer, followed by postoperative 60 Co irradiation to parasternal and supraclavicular regions with 50 Gy about 15 years before. UGIs and endoscopy showed a small ulcer surrounded by submucosal tumor-like protrusion in the esophagus at the thoracic inlet. Examination one month later revealed the ulcer which became larger despite medical treatment, now measuring 1 cm in diameter. Severe dysphagia continued. Right thoractomy and subtotal esophagectomy were performed on Jan 13, 1987. Histological examination revealed nonspecific ulcer, 5 cm in diameter, surrounded by fibrous granulation tissue. Proliferation of dilated capillary vessels was also seen in the bottom of the ulcer, the surrounding wall of which was free from remarkable infiltration of inflammatory cells. Based on these findings and previous medical history, the patient was diagnosed as having a postirradiation ulcer which appeared 15 years after irradiation. Dysphagia was considered due to esophageal dysfunction caused by severe fibrosis of the proper muscle layer. (author)

  18. Nuclear medicine and esophageal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taillefer, R.; Beauchamp, G.; Duranceau, A.C.; Lafontaine, E.

    1986-06-01

    The principal radionuclide procedures involved in the evaluation of esophageal disorders that are amenable to surgery are illustrated and briefly described. The role of the radionuclide esophagogram (RE) in the diagnosis and management of achalasia, oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy and its complications, tracheoesophageal fistulae, pharyngeal and esophageal diverticulae, gastric transposition, and fundoplication is discussed. Detection of columnar-lined esophagus by Tc-99m pertechnetate imaging and of esophageal carcinoma by Ga-67 citrate and Tc-99m glucoheptonate studies also is presented. 37 references.

  19. Acute myelocytic leukemia and plasmacytoma secondary to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in a long-term survivor of small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunishi, Keiichi; Kurokawa, Teruo; Takeshita, Atsushi

    1999-01-01

    A 68 year-old man was given a diagnosis of lung cancer of the right upper lobe (small cell carcinoma, T 4 N 2 M 0, stage IIIB) in February 1991. The tumor diminished after chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In February 1992, a partial resection of the lower lobe of the right lung was performed because of the appearance of a metastatic tumor. In September 1994, squamous cell carcinoma developed in the lower part of the esophagus, but disappeared after radiotherapy. In February 1998, a diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome was made. Two months later, the patient had an attack of acute myelocytic leukemia and died of cardiac tamponade. An autopsy determined that both the lung cancer and esophageal cancer had disappeared. Acute myelocytic leukemia and plasmacytoma of lymph nodes in the irradiated area were confirmed. These were regarded as secondary malignancies induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. (author)

  20. Acute myelocytic leukemia and plasmacytoma secondary to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in a long-term survivor of small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukunishi, Keiichi; Kurokawa, Teruo; Takeshita, Atsushi [Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan)] [and others

    1999-05-01

    A 68 year-old man was given a diagnosis of lung cancer of the right upper lobe (small cell carcinoma, T 4 N 2 M 0, stage IIIB) in February 1991. The tumor diminished after chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In February 1992, a partial resection of the lower lobe of the right lung was performed because of the appearance of a metastatic tumor. In September 1994, squamous cell carcinoma developed in the lower part of the esophagus, but disappeared after radiotherapy. In February 1998, a diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome was made. Two months later, the patient had an attack of acute myelocytic leukemia and died of cardiac tamponade. An autopsy determined that both the lung cancer and esophageal cancer had disappeared. Acute myelocytic leukemia and plasmacytoma of lymph nodes in the irradiated area were confirmed. These were regarded as secondary malignancies induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. (author)

  1. Esophageal dilations in eosinophilic esophagitis: A single center experience

    OpenAIRE

    Ukleja, Andrew; Shiroky, Jennifer; Agarwal, Amitesh; Allende, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To diagnose the clinical and histologic features that may be associated with or predictive of the need for dilation and dilation related complications; examine the safety of dilation in patients with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE).

  2. Pure primary small cell carcinoma of urinary bladder: A rare diagnostic entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Gon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small cell carcinoma of the bladder is a rare, aggressive, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasm accounting for only 0.3-0.7% of all bladder tumors. Since the tumor is very rare, pathogenesis is uncertain. Small cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder are mixed with classic urothelial carcinomas or adenocarcinomas of the bladder in 68% cases, making pure primary small cell carcinoma even a rarer entity. The unknown etiology and natural history of small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder represent a challenge both to the pathologist and urologists for its diagnosis and treatment, respectively.

  3. Surgical management of oligometastatic non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, Nuria M; Varela, Gonzalo; Jiménez, Marcelo F

    2016-11-01

    The oligometastatic stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) offers a new surgical opportunity. New reported data is showing that surgery can offer a reasonable benefit, in terms of long-term survival, to some patients. The advantages of surgical treatment rely on a more adequate patient selection and a better understanding of the biology of these tumors. Currently, mediastinal involvement of the primary tumor can be identified as the most important prognostic variable after curative-intent of synchronous or metachronous metastasis. It seems clear that the routine use of combined FDG-PET and CT will help to detect the more favorable cohort of oligometastatic patients. As expected, pathological T staging of the primary tumor and the completeness of its resection are also crucial factors influencing final results. The real benefit of the local treatment over synchronous or metachronous metastasis is controversial with series showing better outcomes for metachronous lesions than for synchronous and others offering equal results. Also non conclusive results appear when analyzing different sites of metastasis. Retrospective series tend to show different outcomes depending on the affected organ while usually no differences are found in prospective ones. Most of the current evidence is based on retrospective studies on patients collected along extended periods of time. That represents a great limitation to the knowledge on this topic. Some prospective analyses have added some insight, but still the quality of the evidence is too low to allow drawing robust conclusions. As frequently concluded, prospective well designed investigation is requested to ascertain the value of surgery in this specific population of patients with extended NSCLC.

  4. Non-Small Cell Carcinoma Biomarker Testing: The Pathologist's Perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eBrega

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Biomarker testing has become standard of care for patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer. Although it can be successfully performed in circulating tu-mor cells, at present, the vast majority of investigations are carried out using di-rect tumor sampling, either through aspiration methods, which render most often isolated cells, or tissue sampling, that could range from minute biopsies to large resections. Consequently, pathologists play a central role in this process. Recent evidence suggests that refining NSCLC diagnosis might be clinically signifi-cant, particularly in cases of lung adenocarcinomas (ADC, which in turn, has prompted a new proposal for the histologic classification of such pulmonary neo-plasms. These changes, in conjunction with the mandatory incorporation of biomarker testing in routine NSCLC tissue processing, have directly affected the pathologist’s role in lung cancer work-up. This new role pathologists must play is complex and demanding, and requires a close interaction with surgeons, oncologists, radiologists and molecular pathologists. Pathologists often find themselves as the central figure in the coordination of a process, that involves assuring that the tumor samples are properly fixed, but without disruption of the DNA structure, obtaining the proper diagnosis with a minimum of tissue waste, providing pre-analytical evaluation of tumor samples selected for biomarker testing, which includes assessment of the proportion of tumor to normal tissues, as well as cell viability, and assuring that this entire pro-cess happens in a timely fashion. Therefore, it is part of the pathologist’s respon-sibilities to assure that the samples received in their laboratories, be processed in a manner that allows for optimal biomarker testing. This article goal is to discuss the essential role pathologists must play NSCLC bi-omarker testing, as well as to provide a summarized review of the main NSCLC bi-omarkers of

  5. [Principles of radiotherapy of non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esik, Olga; Horváth, Akos; Bajcsay, András; Hideghéty, Katalin; Agócs, László; Pikó, Béla; Lengyel, Zsolt; Petrányi, Agota; Pisch, Julianna

    2002-01-01

    The long-term survival probability for Hungarian lung cancer patients is 10% worse than the best results published in the most highly developed countries (the mean 5-year survival probability in Hungary is 5%, in contrast with the 15% survival probability in the USA). On the basis of the international recommendations and personal experience, an attempt was made to formulate the guidelines for radiotherapy as one of the fundamental non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment modalities for national use. An expert panel was set up comprising physicians from 6 radiotherapeutic centers (the National Institute of Oncology / Semmelweis University, Budapest; the Beth Israel Medical Center, New York; the University of Kaposvár; the University of Essen; the University of Debrecen; and the County Hospital of Gyula). Experts in two important medical fields closely related to radiotherapy (surgery and diagnostic imaging) were also engaged in the elaboration of the manuscript. Discussion of the most important principles of the radiotherapy and an overview of the prognostic factors was followed by a critical analysis of the protocols applied in the radiotherapy of Hungarian NSCLC patients during recent decades. The new guidelines suggested for the radiotherapy of NSCLC are presented separately for the postoperative period, marginally resectable tumors, and the aggressive or non-aggressive radiotherapy of inoperable tumors. Detailed accounts are given of the techniques of external irradiation and brachytherapy, and of the acute and late radiation-induced damage of normal tissues. The authors believe that this document may be instrumental in improving the survival index of Hungarian NSCLC patients in the near future.

  6. Combination chemotherapy and radiotherapy of small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Yasuo; Chohtoh, Shuichi; Nishijima, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Akihiko; Hirose, Jin-ichiro; Kamimura, Ryoichi; Takashima, Tsutomu; Konishi, Hideo; Miyata, Samon.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment results of 49 patients (25, limited disease, LD, 24, extensive disease, ED) with small cell lung cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Fifteen patients received chemotherapy with Cyclophosphamide (CPM) and Vincristine (VCR) following thoracic radiotherapy (RT). Twenty-two patients were given induction chemotherapy with CPM, Adriamycin (ADM), and VCR and were followed by thoracic RT. Other chemotherapy consisted of CPM, VCR, Methotrexate, and ADM in 2 patients, 5-FU, CPM, Mitomycin C, and Toyomycin in 1 patient. The remaining 9 patients (2, LD, 7, ED) were treated with RT alone. The response rate was 80 % (64 % CR; 16 % PR) for LD patients and 33 % (4 % CR; 29 % PR) for ED patients (P < 0.001). The three-year survival (Kaplan-Meier's product) of all patients was 14 %, with a median survival time (MST) of 8 months. For patients with LD, the 3-year survival was 27 % (MST 15 months). Survival of patients with ED was 14 % at 1 year, 0 % at 2 year (MST 5.5 months). The difference between these figures was statistically significant (P < 0.0003). The 3-year survival and relapse-free survival for complete responders with LD were 43 % (MST 21 months) and 36 % (median CR duration, 11.5 months) respectively. Six of 16 complete responders with LD are alive and well at over 2 years. Local recurrence rate of the complete responders with LD was 28.8 %. None of the 7 complete responders given more than 48 Gy relapsed within the radiation field. We believe that the addition of thoracic RT to patients with LD is necessary for the control of the primary tumors and for long-term disease-free survival. (author)

  7. Treatment of Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Tracey; Gettinger, Scott; Hensing, Thomas A.; VanDam Sequist, Lecia; Ireland, Belinda; Stinchcombe, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a treatable, but not curable, clinical entity in patients given the diagnosis at a time when their performance status (PS) remains good. Methods: A systematic literature review was performed to update the previous edition of the American College of Chest Physicians Lung Cancer Guidelines. Results: The use of pemetrexed should be restricted to patients with nonsquamous histology. Similarly, bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy (and as continuation maintenance) should be restricted to patients with nonsquamous histology and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) PS of 0 to 1; however, the data now suggest it is safe to use in those patients with treated and controlled brain metastases. Data at this time are insufficient regarding the safety of bevacizumab in patients receiving therapeutic anticoagulation who have an ECOG PS of 2. The role of cetuximab added to chemotherapy remains uncertain and its routine use cannot be recommended. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors as first-line therapy are the recommended treatment of those patients identified as having an EGFR mutation. The use of maintenance therapy with either pemetrexed or erlotinib should be considered after four cycles of first-line therapy in those patients without evidence of disease progression. The use of second- and third-line therapy in stage IV NSCLC is recommended in those patients retaining a good PS; however, the benefit of therapy beyond the third-line setting has not been demonstrated. In the elderly and in patients with a poor PS, the use of two-drug, platinum-based regimens is preferred. Palliative care should be initiated early in the course of therapy for stage IV NSCLC. Conclusions: Significant advances continue to be made, and the treatment of stage IV NSCLC has become nuanced and specific for particular histologic subtypes and clinical patient characteristics and according to the

  8. Selectins mediate small cell lung cancer systemic metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Heidemann

    Full Text Available Metastasis formation is the major reason for the extremely poor prognosis in small cell lung cancer (SCLC patients. The molecular interaction partners regulating metastasis formation in SCLC are largely unidentified, however, from other tumor entities it is known that tumor cells use the adhesion molecules of the leukocyte adhesion cascade to attach to the endothelium at the site of the future metastasis. Using the human OH-1 SCLC line as a model, we found that these cells expressed E- and P-selectin binding sites, which could be in part attributed to the selectin binding carbohydrate motif sialyl Lewis A. In addition, protein backbones known to carry these glycotopes in other cell lines including PSGL-1, CD44 and CEA could be detected in in vitro and in vivo grown OH1 SCLC cells. By intravital microscopy of murine mesenterial vasculature we could capture SCLC cells while rolling along vessel walls demonstrating that SCLC cells mimic leukocyte rolling behavior in terms of selectin and selectin ligand interaction in vivo indicating that this mechanism might indeed be important for SCLC cells to seed distant metastases. Accordingly, formation of spontaneous distant metastases was reduced by 50% when OH-1 cells were xenografted into E-/P-selectin-deficient mice compared with wild type mice (p = 0.0181. However, as metastasis formation was not completely abrogated in selectin deficient mice, we concluded that this adhesion cascade is redundant and that other molecules of this cascade mediate metastasis formation as well. Using several of these adhesion molecules as interaction partners presumably make SCLC cells so highly metastatic.

  9. Indications and interpretation of esophageal function testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, C Prakash; de Bortoli, Nicola; Clarke, John; Marinelli, Carla; Tolone, Salvatore; Roman, Sabine; Savarino, Edoardo

    2018-05-12

    Esophageal symptoms are common, and can arise from mucosal, motor, functional, and neoplastic processes, among others. Judicious use of diagnostic testing can help define the etiology of symptoms and can direct management. Endoscopy, esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM), ambulatory pH or pH-impedance manometry, and barium radiography are commonly used for esophageal function testing; functional lumen imaging probe is an emerging option. Recent consensus guidelines have provided direction in using test findings toward defining mechanisms of esophageal symptoms. The Chicago Classification describes hierarchical steps in diagnosing esophageal motility disorders. The Lyon Consensus characterizes conclusive evidence on esophageal testing for a diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and establishes a motor classification of GERD. Taking these recent advances into consideration, our discussion focuses primarily on the indications, technique, equipment, and interpretation of esophageal HRM and ambulatory reflux monitoring in the evaluation of esophageal symptoms, and describes indications for alternative esophageal tests. © 2018 New York Academy of Sciences.

  10. High-resolution esophageal pressure topography for esophageal motility disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Hashem Fakhre Yaseri; Gholamreza Hamsi; Tayeb Ramim

    2016-01-01

    Background: High-resolution manometer (HRM) of the esophagus has become the main diagnostic test in the evaluation of esophageal motility disorders. The development of high-resolution manometry catheters and software displays of manometry recordings in color-coded pressure plots have changed the diagnostic assessment of esophageal disease. The first step of the Chicago classification described abnormal esophagogastric junction deglutitive relaxation. The latest classification system, proposed...

  11. Esophageal tissue engineering: a new approach for esophageal replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totonelli, Giorgia; Maghsoudlou, Panagiotis; Fishman, Jonathan M; Orlando, Giuseppe; Ansari, Tahera; Sibbons, Paul; Birchall, Martin A; Pierro, Agostino; Eaton, Simon; De Coppi, Paolo

    2012-12-21

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement. Various surgical techniques, such as gastric and colonic interposition, are standards of treatment, but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems. Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function. We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering, discuss its implications, compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future. Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms: stem cell and esophagus, esophageal replacement, esophageal tissue engineering, esophageal substitution. Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information. All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed. Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation. When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality. Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration, whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit. Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds, but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution. Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly suggest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds

  12. Sirolimus and Gold Sodium Thiomalate in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  13. Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... excluded usually include dairy, egg, wheat, soy, peanut, tree nuts and fish/shellfish. These diets have been ... minorities » IgE ab to minor milk proteins may identify the proteins that are relevant to eosinophilic esophagitis » ...

  14. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  15. Prevention of Esophageal Variceal Rebleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gin-Ho Lo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The rate of rebleeding of esophageal varices remains high after cessation of acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage. Many measures have been developed to prevent the occurrence of rebleeding. When considering their effectiveness in reduction of rebleeding, the associated complications cannot be neglected. Due to unavoidable high incidence of complications, shunt surgery and endoscopic injection sclerotherapy are now rarely used. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt was developed to replace shunt operation but is now reserved for rescue therapy. Nonselective beta-blockers alone or in combination with isosorbide mononitrate and endoscopic variceal ligation are currently the first choices in the prevention of variceal rebleeding. The combination of nonselective beta-blockers and endoscopic variceal ligation appear to enhance the efficacy. With the advent of newly developed measures, esophageal variceal rebleeding could be greatly reduced and the survival of cirrhotics with bleeding esophageal varices could thereby be prolonged.

  16. Caustic ingestion and esophageal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadranel, S.; Di Lorenzo, C.; Rodesch, P.; Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R. (Children University Hospital, Brussels (Belgium))

    1990-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate esophageal motor function by means of krypton-81m esophageal transit scintigraphy and to compare the results with the functional and morphological data obtained by means of triple lumen manometry and endoscopy. In acute and subacute stages of the disease, all clinical, anatomical, and functional parameters were in good agreement, revealing significant impairment. In chronic stages, the severity of the dysphagia was not correlated to the importance of the residual stenosis. Conversely, 81mKr esophageal transit and manometric's findings were in good agreement with the clinical symptoms, during the entire follow-up period ranging between 3 months to 7 years. The 81mKr test is undoubtedly the easiest and probably the most physiological technique currently available for long-term functional evaluation of caustic esophagitis.

  17. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Symptoms and Causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to GERD medication Failure to thrive (poor growth, malnutrition and weight loss) When to see a doctor ... Originally, eosinophilic esophagitis was thought to be a childhood disease, but now it is known to be ...

  18. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Diagnosis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as fatty or fried foods, tomato sauce, alcohol, chocolate, mint, garlic, onion, and caffeine, may make heartburn ... the waist up. Alternative medicine No alternative medicine therapies have been proved to treat eosinophilic esophagitis. Still, ...

  19. Primary Esophageal Motility Disorders: Beyond Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G

    2017-06-30

    The best-defined primary esophageal motor disorder is achalasia. However, symptoms such as dysphagia, regurgitation and chest pain can be caused by other esophageal motility disorders. The Chicago classification introduced new manometric parameters and better defined esophageal motility disorders. Motility disorders beyond achalasia with the current classification are: esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, major disorders of peristalsis (distal esophageal spasm, hypercontractile esophagus, absent contractility) and minor disorders of peristalsis (ineffective esophageal motility, fragmented peristalsis). The aim of this study was to review the current diagnosis and management of esophageal motility disorders other than achalasia.

  20. Understanding the sensory irregularities of esophageal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Adam D; Brock, Christina; Frøkjaer, Jens Brøndum; Gregersen, Hans; Khan, Sheeba; Lelic, Dina; Lottrup, Christian; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2016-08-01

    Symptoms relating to esophageal sensory abnormalities can be encountered in the clinical environment. Such sensory abnormalities may be present in demonstrable disease, such as erosive esophagitis, and in the ostensibly normal esophagus, such as non-erosive reflux disease or functional chest pain. In this review, the authors discuss esophageal sensation and the esophageal pain system. In addition, the authors provide a primer concerning the techniques that are available for investigating the autonomic nervous system, neuroimaging and neurophysiology of esophageal sensory function. Such technological advances, whilst not readily available in the clinic may facilitate the stratification and individualization of therapy in disorders of esophageal sensation in the future.

  1. High-resolution esophageal pressure topography for esophageal motility disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem Fakhre Yaseri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-resolution manometer (HRM of the esophagus has become the main diagnostic test in the evaluation of esophageal motility disorders. The development of high-resolution manometry catheters and software displays of manometry recordings in color-coded pressure plots have changed the diagnostic assessment of esophageal disease. The first step of the Chicago classification described abnormal esophagogastric junction deglutitive relaxation. The latest classification system, proposed by Pandolfino et al, includes contraction patterns and peristalsis integrity based on integrated relaxation pressure 4 (IRP4. It can be discriminating the achalasia from non-achalasia esophageal motility disorders. The aim of this study was to assessment of clinical findings in non-achalasia esophageal motility disorders based on the most recent Chicago classification. Methods: We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study of 963 patients that had been referred to manometry department of Gastrointestinal and Liver Research Center, Firozgar Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from April, 2012 to April, 2015. They had upper GI disorder (Dysphasia, non-cardiac chest pain, regurgitation, heartburn, vomiting and asthma and weight loss. Data were collected from clinical examinations as well as patient questionnaires. Manometry, water-perfused, was done for all patients. Manometry criteria of the patients who had integrated relaxation pressure 4 (IRP4 ≤ 15 mmHg were studied. Results: Our finding showed that the non-achalasia esophageal motility disorders (58% was more common than the achalasia (18.2%. Heartburn (68.5%, regurgitation (65.4% and non-cardiac chest pain (60.6% were the most common clinical symptoms. Although, vomiting (91.7% and weight loss (63% were the most common symptoms in referring patients but did not discriminate this disorders from each other’s. Borderline motor function (67.2% was the most common, absent peristalsis (97% and the hyper

  2. Long-term outcomes after proton therapy, with concurrent chemotherapy, for stage II–III inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Quynh-Nhu; Ly, Ngoc Bui; Komaki, Ritsuko; Levy, Lawrence B.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Chang, Joe Y.; Allen, Pamela K.; Mehran, Reza J.; Lu, Charles; Gillin, Michael; Liao, Zhongxing; Cox, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We report long-term disease control, survival, and toxicity for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer prospectively treated with concurrent proton therapy and chemotherapy on a nonrandomized case-only observational study. Methods: All patients received passive-scatter proton therapy, planned with 4D-CT–based simulation; all received proton therapy concurrent with weekly chemotherapy. Endpoints were local and distant control, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: The 134 patients (21 stage II, 113 stage III; median age 69 years) had a median gross tumor volume (GTV) of 70 cm 3 (range, 5–753 cm 3 ); 77 patients (57%) received 74 Gy(RBE), and 57 (42%) received 60–72 Gy(RBE) (range, 60–74.1 Gy(RBE)). At a median follow-up time of 4.7 years, median OS times were 40.4 months (stage II) and 30.4 months (stage III). Five-year DFS rates were 17.3% (stage II) and 18.0% (stage III). OS, DFS, and local and distant control rates at 5 years did not differ by disease stage. Age and GTV were related to OS and DFS. Toxicity was tolerable, with 1 grade 4 esophagitis and 16 grade 3 events (2 pneumonitis, 6 esophagitis, 8 dermatitis). Conclusion: This report of outcomes after proton therapy for 134 patients indicated that this regimen produced excellent OS with tolerable toxicity

  3. Small cell ovarian carcinoma: genomic stability and responsiveness to therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamwell, Lisa F; Gambaro, Karen; Merziotis, Maria; Crane, Colleen; Arcand, Suzanna L; Bourada, Valerie; Davis, Christopher; Squire, Jeremy A; Huntsman, David G; Tonin, Patricia N; Vanderhyden, Barbara C

    2013-02-21

    The biology of small cell ovarian carcinoma of the hypercalcemic type (SCCOHT), which is a rare and aggressive form of ovarian cancer, is poorly understood. Tumourigenicity, in vitro growth characteristics, genetic and genomic anomalies, and sensitivity to standard and novel chemotherapeutic treatments were investigated in the unique SCCOHT cell line, BIN-67, to provide further insight in the biology of this rare type of ovarian cancer. The tumourigenic potential of BIN-67 cells was determined and the tumours formed in a xenograft model was compared to human SCCOHT. DNA sequencing, spectral karyotyping and high density SNP array analysis was performed. The sensitivity of the BIN-67 cells to standard chemotherapeutic agents and to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and the JX-594 vaccinia virus was tested. BIN-67 cells were capable of forming spheroids in hanging drop cultures. When xenografted into immunodeficient mice, BIN-67 cells developed into tumours that reflected the hypercalcemia and histology of human SCCOHT, notably intense expression of WT-1 and vimentin, and lack of expression of inhibin. Somatic mutations in TP53 and the most common activating mutations in KRAS and BRAF were not found in BIN-67 cells by DNA sequencing. Spectral karyotyping revealed a largely normal diploid karyotype (in greater than 95% of cells) with a visibly shorter chromosome 20 contig. High density SNP array analysis also revealed few genomic anomalies in BIN-67 cells, which included loss of heterozygosity of an estimated 16.7 Mb interval on chromosome 20. SNP array analyses of four SCCOHT samples also indicated a low frequency of genomic anomalies in the majority of cases. Although resistant to platinum chemotherapeutic drugs, BIN-67 cell viability in vitro was reduced by > 75% after infection with oncolytic viruses. These results show that SCCOHT differs from high-grade serous carcinomas by exhibiting few chromosomal anomalies and lacking TP53 mutations. Although BIN-67 cells are

  4. Genetics of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottyan, L C; Rothenberg, M E

    2017-05-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic, allergic disease associated with marked mucosal eosinophil accumulation. EoE disease risk is multifactorial and includes environmental and genetic factors. This review will focus on the contribution of genetic variation to EoE risk, as well as the experimental tools and statistical methodology used to identify EoE risk loci. Specific disease-risk loci that are shared between EoE and other allergic diseases (TSLP, LRRC32) or unique to EoE (CAPN14), as well as Mendellian Disorders associated with EoE, will be reviewed in the context of the insight that they provide into the molecular pathoetiology of EoE. We will also discuss the clinical opportunities that genetic analyses provide in the form of decision support tools, molecular diagnostics, and novel therapeutic approaches.

  5. Should patients with extrapulmonary small-cell carcinoma receive prophylactic cranial irradiation?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naidoo, Jarushka

    2013-09-01

    Extrapulmonary small-cell carcinoma (EPSCC) is a rare disease. Management is based on small-cell lung carcinoma. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) is not routinely administered in EPSCC. This study investigates the role of PCI in EPSCC, by analyzing the incidence, treatment, and survival of patients with brain metastases in a national cohort. Disease biology and epidemiology are also investigated.

  6. Primary Small Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of Vagina: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jignasa N. Bhalodia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of vagina is an extremely rare disease. There have been only 26 previously reported cases in literature. Here, we report a case of primary small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of vagina. Immunohistochemistry (IHC showed tumor cells positive for synaptophysin, chromogranin, and neuron-specific enolase (NSE.

  7. On the problem of roentgenological semiotics of small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarycheva, R.I.; Shchukina, O.P.; Gertner, K.; Vetrova, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    The study was concerned with description of roentgenologic semiotics of central and peripheral small cell lung cancer in 141 patients receiving chemoradiation therapy. The frequency of carcinoma metastatic spreading into intrathoracic lymph nodes was high. Small cell lung cancer showed a good response to conservative treatment, which, in particular, manifested itself in regression of metastases into intrathoracic lymph nodes

  8. Preliminary results in combined therapy (polychemotherapy and radiotherapy) of small cell bronchial cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaertner, C.; Rjabuchin, J.S.; Michina, Z.P.; Motorina, L.I.

    1984-01-01

    The effective therapy of small cell lung cancer is the combination of polychemotherapy and radiation treatment. A randomized small cell lung cancer study of 141 patients revealed that with an agressive treatment more than 50 % complete remissions and nearly 90 % complete and partial remissions can be achieved by corresponding selection of patients. (author)

  9. MRI findings of small cell neuroendocrime carcinoma of the uterine cervix: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, You Sun; Yi, Boem Ha; Lee, Hae Kyung; Lee, Min Hee; Choi, Seo Youn; Kwak, Jeong Ja [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the uterine cervix is a rare primary neoplasm, accounting for less than 5% of all uterine cervical cancers. The tumor is known to have an aggressive behavior and poor prognosis. In this article, we present the MRI findings of 5 cases of pathologically-proven small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the uterine cervix, including diffusion-weighted images.

  10. Gemcitabine concurrent with thoracic radiotherapy after induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine/vinorelbine in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. A phase I study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagel, B.; Piroth, M.; Pinkawa, M.; Fischedik, K.; Asadpour, B.; Schmachtenberg, A.; Eble, M.J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Reinartz, P.; Zimny, M.; Buell, U. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Stanzel, S. [Inst. for Medical Statistics, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Breuer, C.; Skobel, E. [Dept. of Internal Medicine I, RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Purpose: to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of gemcitabine every 2 weeks to a concurrent radiotherapy administered during an aggressive program of sequential and simultaneous radio-/chemotherapy for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and methods: ten patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were observed and treated in accordance with a combined radio-/chemotherapy protocol. This included two cycles of induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine (1,200 mg/m{sup 2}) and vinorelbine (30 mg/m{sup 2}) at days 1, 8 and 22, 29, followed by concurrent radiotherapy including [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-(FDG-PET-) based target volume definition (2.0 Gy/d; total dose 66.0 Gy) and chemotherapy with gemcitabine every 2 weeks at days 43, 57, and 71. The initial dose was 300 mg/m{sup 2}. The dose of gemcitabine was increased by 100 mg/m{sup 2} until the MTD was realized. Three patients were enrolled for each dose level. Results: dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was identified for the patient group receiving gemcitabine 500 mg/m{sup 2}, due to grade 2 esophagitis (next to grade 3) in all patients. 6 weeks after the completion of radio-/chemotherapy, most patients still presented treatment-induced esophagitis. In accordance with expected complications, such as esophagitis, dysphagia and odynophagia, the MTD was defined at this dose level, although no DLT grade 3 was reached. Conclusion: after induction chemotherapy, the MTD and frequency of gemcitabine in locally advanced NSCLC is 500 mg/m{sup 2} every 2 weeks during a maximum of 7 weeks of thoracic radiotherapy. (orig.)

  11. Systemic Chemotherapy for Progression of Brain Metastases in Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagla Abdel Karim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related mortality in men and women. Approximately 15% of lung cancers are small cell type. Chemotherapy and radiation are the mainstay treatments. Currently, the standard chemotherapy regimen includes platinum/etoposide. For extensive small cell lung cancer, irinotecan and cisplatin have also been used. Patients with relapsed small cell lung cancer have a very poor prognosis, and the morbidity increases with brain metastases. Approximately 10%–14% of small cell lung cancer patients exhibit brain metastases at the time of diagnosis, which increases to 50%–80% as the disease progresses. Mean survival with brain metastases is reported to be less than six months, thus calling for improved regimens. Here we present a case series of patients treated with irinotecan for progressive brain metastases in small cell lung cancer, which serves as a reminder of the role of systemic chemotherapy in this setting.

  12. The Inter-Cell Interference Dilemma in Dense Outdoor Small Cell Deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polignano, Michele; Mogensen, Preben; Fotiadis, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    The deployment of low-power small cells is envisaged as the main driver to accommodate the mobile broadband traffic growth in cellular networks. Depending on the spatial distribution of the user traffic, a densification of the small cells may be required in confined areas. However, deploying more...... and more cells in given areas may imply an increase of the inter-cell interference among the small cells. This study aims at investigating if the inter-cell interference among outdoor small cells may represent an impairment to the user experience, and evaluates if and in what conditions the interference...... coordination is worthwhile compared to the universal frequency reuse. Results show that the inter-cell interference depends on the small cell deployment in the urban environment (e.g. streets and squares) and on the network load condition. In case of deployment along urban streets, the inter-cell interference...

  13. Palliative Care Intervention in Improving Symptom Control and Quality of Life in Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Their Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-16

    Caregiver; Psychological Impact of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  14. Study of efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated thoracic radiotherapy 17 gray in 2 fractions for palliation in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arif, S.; Rasul, S.; Haider, N.; Mahmood, A.; Syed, A.S.; Nadeem, M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine the efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated thoracic radiotherapy 17 Gray (Gy) in 2 fractions for palliation in advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma. Study design: A quasi-experimental study. Place and duration of study: Oncology department, Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpindi, from 4th July 2008 to 4th Nov 2009. Material and Methods: Fifty four patients with histologically and/or cytologically confirmed unresectable stages III and IV non small cell lung cancer, with performance status 2 or 3 and expected survival > 2 months were treated with megavoltage radiation therapy 17 Gy in 2 fractions one week apart, with symptoms due to intrathoracic disease (cough, dyspnea and hemoptysis) and toxicity due to radiation therapy (dysphagia secondary to esophagitis) assessed as per common toxicity criteria adverse event version 3.0 on day 0 before treatment and day 30 after start of treatment. Results: Grades of cough, hemoptysis and dyspnea showed significant improvement after treatment (p<0.001). A total of 42.68% patients showed an improvement in grade of cough (23 out of 54 patients), 85.7% of patients showed improvement in grade of hemoptysis (36 out of 42 patients) and 55.65% patients showed improvement in grade of dyspnea (30 out of 54 patients). Twenty two point two percent patients (12 out of 54) showed increase in grade of dysphagia. Although, there was a statistically significant increase in grade of dysphagia after treatment but it was limited to grade 1 and 2 only. Considering that no patient had grade 3 or 4 dysphagia, this toxicity was acceptable. Conclusion: Based on our results hypofractionated thoracic radiotherapy, 17 Gy in 2 fractions, is effective with acceptable toxicity in palliation in advanced non small cell lung cancer and is recommended as it will result in shorter duration of hospital stay and low hospital stay charges. (author)

  15. Endoscopic Assessment of Children with Esophageal Atresia: Lack of Relationship of Esophagitis and Esophageal Metaplasia to Symptomatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Castilloux

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Late complications of esophageal atresia (EA, particularly esophagitis and Barrett’s esophagus, are increasingly being recognized. With the exception of patients with dysphagia associated with esophageal stricture, it is unknown whether patient symptomatology can predict endoscopic findings.

  16. Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease) Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal ... What symptoms are displayed by a child with GERD? While GER and EER in children often cause ...

  17. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Esophagitis (EoE) (American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology) Also in Spanish Latest News Eosinophilic Esophagitis May ... Pediatric and Adolescent Patients (American College of Gastroenterology) Topic Image Related Health Topics Eosinophilic Disorders Esophagus Disorders ...

  18. Esophageal Cancer—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    The incidence of esophageal cancer has risen in recent decades, coinciding with a shift in histologic type and primary tumor location. Find evidence-based information on esophageal cancer treatment, causes and prevention, screening, research, and statistics.

  19. 21 CFR 876.5365 - Esophageal dilator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and weighted with mercury or a metal olive-shaped weight that slides on a guide, such as a string or... esophageal or gastrointestinal bougies and the esophageal dilator (metal olive). (b) Classification. Class II...

  20. Histopathologic profile of esophageal atresia and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dUMAss Memorial Pathology, UMass Memorial Medical Center, Worcester, ..... 2 Yokoi A, Nishijima E. Long-term complications of esophageal atresia. Nihon ... long upper esophageal pouch and short gap, associated with left congenital.

  1. Severe Erosive Pill Esophagitis Induced by Crizotinib Therapy: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Jung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous case reports have described esophagitis thought to be secondary to crizotinib, an oral tyrosine-kinase inhibitor used in the treatment of anaplastic lymphoma kinase- (ALK- positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. In those reports, the interval development of esophagitis was between two days and three months after initiating or reinitiating crizotinib therapy. We present a woman who developed ulcerative esophagitis ten months after beginning crizotinib therapy, which is highly unusual. We believe the provoking factor was a change in her medication administration routine, done to accommodate religious practices during the period of Ramadan. This case illustrates the mechanism of pill esophagitis and reinforces the importance of patient education when it comes to medication administration. Clinicians may consider early imaging or investigations in patients with concerning symptomatology in the context of crizotinib therapy or other offending medications. Future research may help to uncover additional risk factors for this exceedingly rare diagnosis in this patient population. Most importantly, this case highlights nonpharmacologic ways to improve tolerability and decrease adverse effects of a highly effective chemotherapeutic agent.

  2. Esophageal perforation during or after conformal radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haiyan; Ma Xiumei; Ye Ming; Hou Yanli; Xie Huaying; Bai Yongrui

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the risk factors and prognosis for patients with esophageal perforation occurring during or after radiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed 322 patients with esophageal carcinoma. These patients received radiotherapy for unresectable esophageal tumors, residual tumors after operation, or local recurrence. Of these, 12 had radiotherapy to the esophagus before being admitted, 68 patients had concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT), and 18 patients had esophageal perforation after RT (5.8%). Covered self-expandable metallic stents were placed in 11 patients. Two patients continued RT after stenting and control of infection; one of these suffered a new perforation, and the other had a massive hemorrhage. The median overall survival was 2 months (0-3 months) compared with 17 months in the non-perforation group. In univariate analysis, the Karnofsky performance status (KPS) being ≤ 70, age younger than 60, T4 stage, a second course of radiotherapy to the esophagus, extracapsular lymph nodes (LN) involving the esophagus, a total dose > 100 Gy (biologically effective dose -10 ), and CRT were risk factors for perforation. In multivariate analysis, age younger than 60, extracapsular LN involving the esophagus, T4 stage, and a second course of radiotherapy to the esophagus were risk factors. In conclusion, patients with T4 stage, extracapsular LN involving the esophagus, and those receiving a second course of RT should be given particular care to avoid perforation. The prognosis after perforation was poor. (author)

  3. Investigating Esophageal Stent-Placement Outcomes in Patients with Inoperable Non-Cervical Esophageal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Forootan, Mojgan; Tabatabaeefar, Morteza; Mosaffa, Nariman; Ashkalak, Hormat Rahimzadeh; Darvishi, Mohammad

    2018-01-01

    Background: Esophageal stent insertion in patients with inoperable esophageal cancer is usually accompanied with relatively high adverse symptoms and even mortality. The current study aims at investigating the outcomes of esophageal stenting in patients with inoperable non-cervical esophageal cancer. Materials and Methods: The current descriptive-analytical research evaluates 25 patients with esophageal cancer. The stent was placed in esophagus based upon endoscopy analysis with or without fl...

  4. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Bonavina, Luigi

    2006-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is the most commonly diagnosed primary esophageal motor disorder and the second most common functional esophageal disorder. Current therapy of achalasia is directed toward elimination of the outflow resistance caused by failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax completely upon swallowing. The advent of minimally invasive surgery has nearly replaced endoscopic pneumatic dilation as the first-line therapeutic approach. In this editorial, the rationale and the evide...

  5. 21 CFR 868.1910 - Esophageal stethoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal stethoscope. 868.1910 Section 868.1910...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 868.1910 Esophageal stethoscope. (a) Identification. An esophageal stethoscope is a nonpowered device that is inserted into a patient's esophagus to...

  6. Gallium-67 imaging in candidal esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rundback, J.H.; Goldfarb, C.R.; Ongseng, F.

    1990-01-01

    Ga-67 scanning has been used to evaluate esophageal carcinoma. It has demonstrated candidal infection in other body sites and, in one previous case, in the esophagus. The authors present a case of diffuse esophageal uptake of Ga-67 in esophageal candidiasis

  7. Gallium-67 imaging in candidal esophagitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundback, J.H.; Goldfarb, C.R.; Ongseng, F. (Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Ga-67 scanning has been used to evaluate esophageal carcinoma. It has demonstrated candidal infection in other body sites and, in one previous case, in the esophagus. The authors present a case of diffuse esophageal uptake of Ga-67 in esophageal candidiasis.

  8. Management of congenital esophageal stenosis associated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim The aim of this work was to study the incidence, management of congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) associated with esophageal atresia (EA) and tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF), and its impact on esophageal stricture (ES) after primary repair. Patients and methods From January 2006 to December 2014, ...

  9. The Kagoshima consensus on esophageal achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Triadafilopoulos, G.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.; Gullo, R.; Patti, M. G.; Pandolfino, J. E.; Kahrilas, P. J.; Duranceau, A.; Jamieson, G.; Zaninotto, G.

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder characterized by lack of peristalsis and a lower esophageal sphincter that fails to relax appropriately in response to swallowing. This article summarizes the most salient issues in the diagnosis and management of achalasia as discussed

  10. Congenital esophageal atresia with tracheo-esophageal fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Chung Sik

    1970-01-01

    Three cases of esophageal atresia with tracheo-esophageal fistula. 1). Case 1: A female infant birth Wt. 1.95 kg , Apgar Score 10, Skeletal anomalies, was delivered after a pregnancy compeicated by hydroamnious on Aug. 17, 1970. The family history was not contributory. 2) Case 2: A male infant birth Wt. 2.8 kg , Apgar Score 8, was forcep delivered after a pregnancy on Feb. 8, 1970. This infant is twin. The family history was not contributory. 3) Case 3: A female infant birth Wt. 2.22 kg , Apgar Score 10, was C-section after a pregnancy on May, 16. 1970. The family history was not contributory. All cases: After 24 hours 5% glucose solution was given and immediately vomited and some of it regurgitating through the nose and mouth with associated cyanosis and dyspnea. A catheter was inserted through the nose into the esophagus under diagnosis of the esophageal atresia

  11. The Resource Mapping Algorithm of Wireless Virtualized Networks for Saving Energy in Ultradense Small Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Zou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the current network is designed for peak loads, it results in insufficient resource utilization and energy waste. Virtualized technology makes it possible that intelligent energy perception network could be deployed and resource sharing could become an effective energy saving technology. How to make more small cells into sleeping state for energy saving in ultradense small cell system has become a research hot spot. Based on the mapping feature of virtualized network, a new wireless resource mapping algorithm for saving energy in ultradense small cells has been put forward when wireless resource amount is satisfied in every small cell. First of all, the method divides the virtual cells. Again through the alternate updating between small cell mapping and wireless resource allocation, least amount of small cells is used and other small cells turn into sleeping state on the premise of guaranteeing users’ QoS. Next, the energy consumption of the wireless access system, wireless resource utilization, and the convergence of the proposed algorithm are analyzed in theory. Finally, the simulation results demonstrate that the algorithm can effectively reduce the system energy consumption and required wireless resource amount under the condition of satisfying users’ QoS.

  12. Outcome of 289 locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer treated with radiotherapy alone and radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou Guangfei; Wang Lvhua; Zhang Hongxing; Chen Dongfu; Xiao Zefen; Feng Qinfu; Zhou Zongmei; Lv Jima; Liang Jun; Wang Mei; Yin Weibo

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To retrospectively analyze the outcome of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy. Methods: 289 patients who were treated either by radiotherapy alone (168 patients) or radiotherapy plus chemotherapy (121 patients) from Dec. 1999 to Dec. 2002 were entered into the database for analysis. Pathological types: squamous cancer (152), adenocarcinoma(74), squamoadenocarcinoma(2) and other types (2). 24 showed cancer unclassificable and 35 were diagnosed without pathological proof. Stages: 74 had III A and 215 III B stage disease. Among the 121 patients treated with combined modality, 24 were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy, 78 radiotherapy after chemotherapy(C + R), and 19 radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy(R + C). In patients treated by concurrent chemoradiotherapy or C + R, 38 received consolidation chemotherapy after induction treatment. Results: The 1-, 3-, 5-year overall survival, and the median survival were: 45% , 16% , 8%, and 16.2 months for all patients; 57%, 27%, 11%, and 21.7 months for stage IIIA; 41%, 12%, 7%, and 15.3 months for IIIB. By logrank test, clinical stage, KPS performance, tumor volume, hemoglobin level before treatment, consolidation chemotherapy, radiation dose, and response to treatment showed statistically dramatic impact on overall survival. The overall survival rate and median survival time were slightly higher in the combined group than in the radiotherapy alone group, but the difference is statistically insignificant. In Cox multivariable regression, stage and consolidation chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors; KPS performance, radiation dose, and response to treatment were at the margin of statistical significance. Esophagitis and pneumonitis of Grade II or higher were 24% and 8%, respectively. Failure sites included in the thorax(41%), outside of thorax(48%), and both in and outside the thorax(11%). There was no difference between the

  13. The Pathophysiology of Eosinophilic Esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Avi Lemberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE is an emerging disease characterised by esophageal eosinophilia (>15eos/hpf, lack of responsiveness to acid-suppressive medication and is managed by allergen elimination and anti-allergy therapy. Although the pathophysiology of EoE is currently unsubstantiated, evidence implicates food and aeroallergen hypersensitivity in genetically predisposed individuals as contributory factors. Genome-wide expression analyses have isolated a remarkably conserved gene-expression profile irrespective of age and gender, suggesting a genetic contribution. EoE has characteristics of mainly TH2 type immune responses but also some TH1 cytokines, which appear to strongly contribute to tissue fibrosis, with esophageal epithelial cells providing a hospitable environment for this inflammatory process. Eosinophil-degranulation products appear to play a central role in tissue remodeling in EoE. This remodeling and dysregulation predisposes to fibrosis. Mast cell-derived molecules such as histamine may have an effect on enteric nerves and may also act in concert with TGF-β to interfere with esophageal musculature. Additionally, the esophageal epithelium may facilitate the inflammatory process under pathogenic contexts such as in EoE. This article aims to discuss the contributory factors in the pathophysiology of EoE.

  14. Esophageal tissue engineering: A new approach for esophageal replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgia Totonelli; Panagiotis Maghsoudlou; Jonathan M Fishman; Giuseppe Orlando; Tahera Ansari; Paul Sibbons; Martin A Birchall

    2012-01-01

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement.Various surgical techniques,such as gastric and colonic interposition,are standards of treatment,but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems.Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function.We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering,discuss its implications,compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future.Medline,Embase,the Cochrane Library,National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms:stem cell and esophagus,esophageal replacement,esophageal tissue engineering,esophageal substitution.Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information.All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed.Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation.When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality.Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration,whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit.Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds,but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution.Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly suggest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds prior to implantation is a

  15. Refractory benign esophageal strictures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Goyal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Refractory benign esophageal stricture (RBES is a frequently encountered problem worldwide. These strictures arise from various causes such as corrosive injury, radiation therapy, peptic origin, ablative therapy, and after surgery. Most strictures can be treated successfully with endoscopic dilatation using bougies or balloons, with only a few complications. Those patients who fail after serial dilatation with bougies or balloons will come to the category of refractory strictures. Dilatation combined with intralesional steroid injections can be considered for peptic strictures, whereas incisional therapy has been demonstrated to be effective for short anastomotic strictures. When these therapeutic options do not resolve the stenosis, stent placement should be considered. Self-bougienage can be proposed to a selected group of patients with a proximal stenosis. Most of the patients of RBES respond to above-mentioned treatment and occasional patient may require surgery as the final treatment option. This review aims to provide a comprehensive approach toward endoscopic management of RBESs based on current literature and personal experience.

  16. Esophageal cancer in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Samawi, Abdullah S; Aulaqi, Saleh M

    2014-03-01

    To document the age and gender distribution, histopathologic type as well as grading characteristics of Esophageal Cancer (EC) in Yemen. A case series. Department of Pathology, Sana'a University, Sana'a, Yemen, from January 2005 to December 2011. Three hundred twenty five cases of EC were included for review. The diagnoses were made on hematoxylin and eosin stained sections and the cases were categorized into Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (ADC). Out of the 325 EC cases, 163 (50%) were SCC (females 67%, males 33%) and 158 (49%) were ADC (females 30%, males 70%). The rest of the cases were 2 adenosquamous carcinoma and 2 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The mean age, for SCC was 60 years while the mean age for ADC was 65 years. The peak incidence for SCC was found in the age groups of fifth and sixth decades for females and in fifth and seventh decades for males. The maximum number of patients with ADC was seen in sixth and seventh decades for both gender. Well-differentiated histological grading accounted for 247 (77%) for both genders and types. The moderately differentiated and poorly differentiated accounted, for 17% and 6% respectively. The EC in Yemen had a predominance of SCC in female patients and predominance of ADC in male patients which was usually of a well-differentiated grade.

  17. Esophageal cancer in yemen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samawi, A.S.A.; Aulaqi, S.M.

    2014-01-01

    To document the age and gender distribution, histopathologic type as well as grading characteristics of Esophageal Cancer (EC) in Yemen. Study Design: A case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Pathology, Sana'a University, Sana'a, Yemen, from January 2005 to December 2011. Methodology: Three hundred twenty five cases of EC were included for review. The diagnoses were made on hematoxylin and eosin stained sections and the cases were categorized into Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) and adenocarcinoma (ADC). Results: Out of the 325 EC cases, 163 (50%) were SCC (females 67%, males 33%) and 158 (49%) were ADC (females 30%, males 70%). The rest of the cases were 2 adenosquamous carcinoma and 2 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The mean age, for SCC was 60 years while the mean age for ADC was 65 years. The peak incidence for SCC was found in the age groups of fifth and sixth decades for females and in fifth and seventh decades for males. The maximum number of patients with ADC was seen in sixth and seventh decades for both gender. Well-differentiated histological grading accounted for 247 (77%) for both genders and types. The moderately differentiated and poorly differentiated accounted, for 17% and 6% respectively. Conclusion: The EC in Yemen had a predominance of SCC in female patients and predominance of ADC in male patients which was usually of a well-differentiated grade. (author)

  18. Gastroesophageal reflux after esophageal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Osamu; Yokoi, Hideki; Maebeya, Shinji

    1989-01-01

    By means of esophageal transit scintigram using 99m Tc-DTPA, 15 patients (13 esophageal carcinomas and 2 cardia carcinomas) were studied, in whom esophagogastric anastomosis was done according to the posterior invagination anastomosis technique we had devised. In all 8 patients with anastomosis at cervical region, gastroesophageal reflux was not seen on both scintigrams before and after meals, and the average pressure gradient of high pressure zone at anastomosis was 39.8 cmH 2 O. In 2 of 7 patients with intrathoracic anastomosis, the scintigram before meals showed severe reflux. and the endoscopic findings showed diffuse and moderate erosion in the esophageal mucosa. The average pressure gradient across the anastomosis was 6.5 cmH 2 O. In these 2 patients, the new fornix with a sharp angle of His was not formed. In the remaining 5 patients with intrathoracic anastomosis, reflux was not seen on the scintigram before meals. However, in 2 of them, the scintigram after meal and endoscopic examination revealed mild reflux and mild esophagitis respectively. Furthermore in one patient very mild reflux was observed only on the scintigram after meals but the endoscopic findings showed the normal esophageal mucosa. In these 5 patients, the average pressure gradient across the anastomosis was 17.0 cmH 2 O, which was significantly higher (p<0.01) than that in 2 patients with severe reflux and was significantly lower (p<0.01) than the mean value of high pressure zone in 8 patients with cervical anastomosis. In conclusion, it is presumed that the formation of a large fornix enough to store food and a sharp angle of His are important factors in maintaining an anti-reflux mechanism. The esophageal transit scintigram was proved to be an excellent technique in detecting and evaluating quantitatively gastroesophageal reflux. (author)

  19. Balloon dilatations of esophageal strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Hyon De

    1990-01-01

    Most benign esophageal strictures can be successfully dilated with conventional bougienage technique. But occasionally strictures are so tight, lengthy, or sometimes irregular that this technique fail, and surgical intervention is required. Since 1974 Gruentzig balloon catheter has succeed when used for strictures in the cardiac and peripheral vasculatures, the biliary and urinary tracts, the colon of neonates after inflammatory disease and also in the esophagus. Fluoroscopically guided balloon catheters were used to dilate 30 esophageal strictures in 30 patients over 3 years at Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chonnam University, College of Medicine. The distribution of age was from 7 years to 71 days and the ratio of male to female was 15:15. The causes of benign stricture (23 cases) were post-operative strictures (13), chemical (4), achalasia (3), chronic inflammation (2), esophageal rupture (1) and those of malignant stricture (7 cases) were post-radiation stricture of primary esophageal cancer (6) and metastatic esophageal cancer (1). The success rate of procedure was 93% (28/30). The causes of failure were the failure of passage of stricture due to markedly dilated proximal segment of esophagus (1 case) and too long segment of stricture (1 case). Complication of procedure was the diverticular-formation of esophagus in 3 cases, but has no clinical significance in follow-up esophagography. In conclusion, fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation of esophageal stricture appears to be safe, effective treatment and may be have theoretical advantages over conventional bougienage and also should be considered before other methods of treatment are used

  20. Balloon dilatations of esophageal strictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jeong Jin; Juhng, Seon Kwan; Kim, Jae Kyu; Chung, Hyon De [Chonnam National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-04-15

    Most benign esophageal strictures can be successfully dilated with conventional bougienage technique. But occasionally strictures are so tight, lengthy, or sometimes irregular that this technique fail, and surgical intervention is required. Since 1974 Gruentzig balloon catheter has succeed when used for strictures in the cardiac and peripheral vasculatures, the biliary and urinary tracts, the colon of neonates after inflammatory disease and also in the esophagus. Fluoroscopically guided balloon catheters were used to dilate 30 esophageal strictures in 30 patients over 3 years at Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Chonnam University, College of Medicine. The distribution of age was from 7 years to 71 days and the ratio of male to female was 15:15. The causes of benign stricture (23 cases) were post-operative strictures (13), chemical (4), achalasia (3), chronic inflammation (2), esophageal rupture (1) and those of malignant stricture (7 cases) were post-radiation stricture of primary esophageal cancer (6) and metastatic esophageal cancer (1). The success rate of procedure was 93% (28/30). The causes of failure were the failure of passage of stricture due to markedly dilated proximal segment of esophagus (1 case) and too long segment of stricture (1 case). Complication of procedure was the diverticular-formation of esophagus in 3 cases, but has no clinical significance in follow-up esophagography. In conclusion, fluoroscopically guided balloon dilation of esophageal stricture appears to be safe, effective treatment and may be have theoretical advantages over conventional bougienage and also should be considered before other methods of treatment are used.

  1. Tumor cavitation in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy: incidence and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phernambucq, Erik C J; Hartemink, Koen J; Smit, Egbert F; Paul, Marinus A; Postmus, Pieter E; Comans, Emile F I; Senan, Suresh

    2012-08-01

    Commonly reported complications after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) include febrile neutropenia, radiation esophagitis, and pneumonitis. We studied the incidence of tumor cavitation and/or "tumor abscess" after CCRT in a single-institutional cohort. Between 2003 and 2010, 87 patients with stage III NSCLC underwent cisplatin-based CCRT and all subsequent follow-up at the VU University Medical Center. Diagnostic and radiotherapy planning computed tomography scans were reviewed for tumor cavitation, which was defined as a nonbronchial air-containing cavity located within the primary tumor. Pulmonary toxicities scored as Common Toxicity Criteria v3.0 of grade III or more, occurring within 90 days after end of radiotherapy, were analyzed. In the entire cohort, tumor cavitation was observed on computed tomography scans of 16 patients (18%). The histology in cavitated tumors was squamous cell (n = 14), large cell (n = 1), or adenocarcinoma (n = 1). Twenty patients (23%) experienced pulmonary toxicity of grade III or more, other than radiation pneumonitis. Eight patients with a tumor cavitation (seven squamous cell carcinoma) developed severe pulmonary complications; tumor abscess (n = 5), fatal hemorrhage (n = 2), and fatal embolism (n = 1). Two patients with a tumor abscess required open-window thoracostomy post-CCRT. The median overall survival for patients with or without tumor cavitation were 9.9 and 16.3 months, respectively (p = 0.09). With CCRT, acute pulmonary toxicity of grade III or more developed in 50% of patients with stage III NSCLC, who also had radiological features of tumor cavitation. The optimal treatment of patients with this presentation is unclear given the high risk of a tumor abscess.

  2. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy after concomitant chemoradiotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer: A TITE-CRM phase 1 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyen, Jérôme; Poudenx, Michel; Gal, Jocelyn; Otto, Josiane; Guerder, Caroline; Naghavi, Arash O; Gérard, Anais; Leysalle, Axel; Cohen, Charlotte; Padovani, Bernard; Ianessi, Antoine; Schiappa, Renaud; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Bondiau, Pierre-Yves

    2018-05-01

    Platinum based chemoradiotherapy is the standard of care for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). With evidence that NSCLC can have a dose dependent response with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR), we hypothesize that a SABR boost on residual tumor treated with chemoradiotherapy could increase treatment efficacy. The purpose of this study was to determine feasibility of such an approach. A prospective phase I trial was performed including 26 patients. Time-to-event continual reassessment method (TITE-CRM) was used for dose escalation which ranged from 3 × 7 to 3 × 12 Gy for the stereotactic boost, after 46 Gy (2 Gy per day) of chemoradiotherapy. Median follow-up was of 37.1 months (1.7-60.7), and 3, 4, 3, 3, 9 and 4 patients were included at the dose levels 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, respectively. During chemoradiotherapy, 9 patients experienced grade 3 toxicity. After stereotactic radiotherapy, 1 patient experienced an esophageal fistula (with local relapse) at the 3 × 11 Gy level, and 1 patient died from hemoptysis at the 3 × 12 Gy level. The 2-year rate of local control, locoregional free survival, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival was 70.3%, 55.5%, 44.5% and 50.8%, respectively. In the treatment of NSCLC with chemoradiotherapy followed by a stereotactic boost, the safe recommended dose in our protocol was a boost dose of 3 × 11 Gy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Phase I study of cisplatin, vinorelbine, and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    To determine the recommended phase II dose of vinorelbine in combination with cisplatin and thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) in patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 18 patients received cisplatin (80 mg/m 2 ) on day 1 and vinorelbine (20 mg/m 2 in level 1, and 25 mg/m 2 in level 2) on days 1 and 8 every 4 weeks for 4 cycles. TRT consisted of a single dose of 2 Gy once daily for 3 weeks followed by a rest of 4 days, and then the same TRT for 3 weeks to a total dose of 60 Gy. Fifteen (83%) patients received 60 Gy of TRT and 14 (78%) patients received 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Ten (77%) of 13 patients at level 1 and all 5 patients at level 2 developed grade 3-4 neutropenia. Four (31%) patients at level 1 and 3 (60%) patients at level 2 developed grade 3-4 infection. None developed ≥grade 3 esophagitis or lung toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicity was noted in 33% of the patients in level 1 and in 60% of the patients in level 2. The overall response rate (95% confidence interval) was 83% (59-96%) with 15 partial responses. The median survival time was 30.4 months, and the 1-year, 2-year, and 3-year survival rates were 72%, 61%, and 50%, respectively. In conclusion, the recommended dose is the level 1 dose, and this regimen is feasible and promising in patients with stage III NSCLC. (author)

  4. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy for limited-disease small cell lung cancer in elderly patients aged 75 years or older

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Toshio; Sekine, Ikuo; Sumi, Minako

    2007-01-01

    The optimal treatment for limited-disease small cell lung cancer (LD-SCLC) in patients aged 75 years or older remains unknown. Elderly patients with LD-SCLC who were treated with chemoradiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed to evaluate their demographic characteristics and the treatment delivery, drug toxicities and antitumor efficacy. Of the 94 LD-SCLC patients treated with chemotherapy and thoracic radiotherapy at the National Cancer Center Hospital between 1998 and 2003, seven (7.4%) were 75 years of age or older. All of the seven patients were in good general condition, with a performance status of 0 or 1. Five and two patients were treated with early and late concurrent chemoradiotherapy, respectively. While the four cycles of chemotherapy could be completed in only four patients, the full dose of radiotherapy was completed in all of the patients. Grade 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were noted in seven and three patients, respectively. Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor support was used in five patients, red blood cell transfusion was administered in two patients and platelet transfusion was administered in one patient. Grade 3 or more severe esophagitis, pneumonitis and neutropenic fever developed in one, two and three patients, respectively, and one patient died of radiation pneumonitis. Complete response was achieved in six patients and partial response in one patient. The median survival time was 24.7 months, with three disease-free survivors for more than 5 years. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy promises to provide long-term benefit with acceptable toxicity for selected patients of LD-SCLC aged 75 years or older. (author)

  5. Individualized Dose Prescription for Hypofractionation in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Radiotherapy: An in silico Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Troost, Esther G.C.; Huizenga, Henk; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bussink, Johan, E-mail: j.bussink@rther.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Local tumor control and outcome remain poor in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by external beam radiotherapy. We investigated the therapeutic gain of individualized dose prescription with dose escalation based on normal tissue dose constraints for various hypofractionation schemes delivered with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: For 38 Stage III NSCLC patients, the dose level of an existing curative treatment plan with standard fractionation (66 Gy) was rescaled based on dose constraints for the lung, spinal cord, esophagus, brachial plexus, and heart. The effect on tumor total dose (TTD) and biologic tumor effective dose in 2-Gy fractions (TED) corrected for overall treatment time (OTT) was compared for isotoxic and maximally tolerable schemes given in 15, 20, and 33 fractions. Rescaling was accomplished by altering the dose per fraction and/or the number of fractions while keeping the relative dose distribution of the original treatment plan. Results: For 30 of the 38 patients, dose escalation by individualized hypofractionation yielded therapeutic gain. For the maximally tolerable dose scheme in 33 fractions (MTD{sub 33}), individualized dose escalation resulted in a 2.5-21% gain in TTD. In the isotoxic schemes, the number of fractions could be reduced with a marginal increase in TED. For the maximally tolerable dose schemes, the TED could be escalated up to 36.6%, and for all patients beyond the level of the isotoxic and the MTD{sub 33} schemes (range, 3.3-36.6%). Reduction of the OTT contributed to the therapeutic gain of the shortened schemes. For the maximally tolerable schemes, the maximum esophageal dose was the dominant dose-limiting constraint in most patients. Conclusions: This modeling study showed that individualized dose prescription for hypofractionation in NSCLC radiotherapy, based on scaling of existing treatment plans up to normal tissue dose constraints, enables dose

  6. Large volume unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: acute toxicity and initial outcome results with rapid arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogliata Antonella

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report acute toxicity, initial outcome results and planning therapeutic parameters in radiation treatment of advanced lung cancer (stage III with volumetric modulated arcs using RapidArc (RA. Methods Twenty-four consecutive patients were treated with RA. All showed locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer with stage IIIA-IIIB and with large volumes (GTV:299 ± 175 cm3, PTV:818 ± 206 cm3. Dose prescription was 66Gy in 33 fractions to mean PTV. Delivery was performed with two partial arcs with a 6 MV photon beam. Results From a dosimetric point of view, RA allowed us to respect most planning objectives on target volumes and organs at risk. In particular: for GTV D1% = 105.6 ± 1.7%, D99% = 96.7 ± 1.8%, D5%-D95% = 6.3 ± 1.4%; contra-lateral lung mean dose resulted in 13.7 ± 3.9Gy, for spinal cord D1% = 39.5 ± 4.0Gy, for heart V45Gy = 9.0 ± 7.0Gy, for esophagus D1% = 67.4 ± 2.2Gy. Delivery time was 133 ± 7s. At three months partial remission > 50% was observed in 56% of patients. Acute toxicities at 3 months showed 91% with grade 1 and 9% with grade 2 esophageal toxicity; 18% presented grade 1 and 9% with grade 2 pneumonia; no grade 3 acute toxicity was observed. The short follow-up does not allow assessment of local control and progression free survival. Conclusions RA proved to be a safe and advantageous treatment modality for NSCLC with large volumes. Long term observation of patients is needed to assess outcome and late toxicity.

  7. Radiation Treatment of Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, W. Y.; Suh, C. O.; Kim, G. E.

    1985-01-01

    63 patients who were irradiated with a goal of long term control among 101 patients with esophageal cancer seen during an 11 years period between Jan, 1970 and Dec, 1980 at Yonsei Cancer Center in Seoul, Korea have retrospectively analysed. 52(82.5%) among the 63 patients were confirmed to have epidermoid carcinoma in the histology. The actuarial 3 and 5 years survival rates of 17 cased of T1, esophageal cancer were 24.7% and 20.8%. Statistically, there was no significant difference in survival rate according to tumor location (p>0.05)

  8. Reflux esophagitis revisited: Prospective analysis of radiologic accuracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    A prospective radiologic-endoscopic study of the esophagogastric region in 266 patients, including 206 normals and 60 with esophagitis, is reported. The endoscopic classification grading severity of esophagitis was grade 1-normal; grades 2. 3. and 4-mild, moderate, and severe esophagitis, respectively. Radiology detected 22% of patient with mild esophagitis, 83% with moderate esophagitis, and 95% with severe esophagitis. Although hiatal hernia was present in 40% of normals and 89% with esophagitis, absence of radiographic hiatal hernia excluded esophagitis with 95% accuracy. The implications of this study regarding the role of radiology in evaluating patient with suspected reflux esophagitis are discussed. (orig.) [de

  9. Additional Survival Benefit of Involved-Lesion Radiation Therapy After R-CHOP Chemotherapy in Limited Stage Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jeanny [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Il Han, E-mail: ihkim@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byoung Hyuck [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Min; Heo, Dae Seog [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of involved-lesion radiation therapy (ILRT) after rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) chemotherapy in limited stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) by comparing outcomes of R-CHOP therapy alone with R-CHOP followed by ILRT. Methods and Materials: We identified 198 patients treated with R-CHOP (median, 6 cycles) for pathologically confirmed DLBCL of limited stage from July 2004 to December 2012. Clinical characteristics of these patients were 33% with stage I and 66.7% with stage II; 79.8% were in the low or low-intermediate risk group; 13.6% had B symptoms; 29.8% had bulky tumors (≥7 cm); and 75.3% underwent ≥6 cycles of R-CHOP therapy. RT was given to 43 patients (21.7%) using ILRT technique, which included the prechemotherapy tumor volume with a median margin of 2 cm (median RT dose: 36 Gy). Results: After a median follow-up of 40 months, 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 85.8% and 88.9%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed ≥6 cycles of R-CHOP (PFS, P=.004; OS, P=.004) and ILRT (PFS, P=.021; OS, P=.014) were favorable prognosticators of PFS and OS. A bulky tumor (P=.027) and response to R-CHOP (P=.012) were also found to be independent factors of OS. In subgroup analysis, the effect of ILRT was prominent in patients with a bulky tumor (PFS, P=.014; OS, P=.030) or an elevated level of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; PFS, P=.004; OS, P=.012). Conclusions: Our results suggest that ILRT after R-CHOP therapy improves PFS and OS in patients with limited stage DLBCL, especially in those with bulky disease or an elevated serum LDH level.

  10. Additional survival benefit of involved-lesion radiation therapy after R-CHOP chemotherapy in limited stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jeanny; Kim, Il Han; Kim, Byoung Hyuck; Kim, Tae Min; Heo, Dae Seog

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of involved-lesion radiation therapy (ILRT) after rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) chemotherapy in limited stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) by comparing outcomes of R-CHOP therapy alone with R-CHOP followed by ILRT. We identified 198 patients treated with R-CHOP (median, 6 cycles) for pathologically confirmed DLBCL of limited stage from July 2004 to December 2012. Clinical characteristics of these patients were 33% with stage I and 66.7% with stage II; 79.8% were in the low or low-intermediate risk group; 13.6% had B symptoms; 29.8% had bulky tumors (≥ 7 cm); and 75.3% underwent ≥ 6 cycles of R-CHOP therapy. RT was given to 43 patients (21.7%) using ILRT technique, which included the prechemotherapy tumor volume with a median margin of 2 cm (median RT dose: 36 Gy). After a median follow-up of 40 months, 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 85.8% and 88.9%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed ≥ 6 cycles of R-CHOP (PFS, P=.004; OS, P=.004) and ILRT (PFS, P=.021; OS, P=.014) were favorable prognosticators of PFS and OS. A bulky tumor (P=.027) and response to R-CHOP (P=.012) were also found to be independent factors of OS. In subgroup analysis, the effect of ILRT was prominent in patients with a bulky tumor (PFS, P=.014; OS, P=.030) or an elevated level of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; PFS, P=.004; OS, P=.012). Our results suggest that ILRT after R-CHOP therapy improves PFS and OS in patients with limited stage DLBCL, especially in those with bulky disease or an elevated serum LDH level. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. {sup 18}F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography Can Quantify and Predict Esophageal Injury During Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niedzielski, Joshua S., E-mail: jsniedzielski@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Houston, Texas (United States); Yang, Jinzhong [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing; Gomez, Daniel R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Stingo, Francesco [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mohan, Radhe; Martel, Mary K.; Briere, Tina M.; Court, Laurence E. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); University of Texas Houston Graduate School of Biomedical Science, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: We sought to investigate the ability of mid-treatment {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) studies to objectively and spatially quantify esophageal injury in vivo from radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study was approved by the local institutional review board, with written informed consent obtained before enrollment. We normalized {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET uptake to each patient's low-irradiated region (<5 Gy) of the esophagus, as a radiation response measure. Spatially localized metrics of normalized uptake (normalized standard uptake value [nSUV]) were derived for 79 patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer. We used nSUV metrics to classify esophagitis grade at the time of the PET study, as well as maximum severity by treatment completion, according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, using multivariate least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) logistic regression and repeated 3-fold cross validation (training, validation, and test folds). This 3-fold cross-validation LASSO model procedure was used to predict toxicity progression from 43 asymptomatic patients during the PET study. Dose-volume metrics were also tested in both the multivariate classification and the symptom progression prediction analyses. Classification performance was quantified with the area under the curve (AUC) from receiver operating characteristic analysis on the test set from the 3-fold analyses. Results: Statistical analysis showed increasing nSUV is related to esophagitis severity. Axial-averaged maximum nSUV for 1 esophageal slice and esophageal length with at least 40% of axial-averaged nSUV both had AUCs of 0.85 for classifying grade 2 or higher esophagitis at the time of the PET study and AUCs of 0.91 and 0.92, respectively, for maximum grade 2 or higher by treatment completion

  12. Immune-based Therapies for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafei, Hind; El-Bahesh, Ehab; Finianos, Antoine; Nassereddine, Samah; Tabbara, Imad

    2017-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Treatment of non-small cell lung cancer has evolved tremendously over the past decade. Specifically, immune checkpoint inhibitors have become an increasingly interesting target of pharmacological blockade. These immune inhibitors have shown promising results in front-line therapy and after failure of multiple lines, as well as in monotherapy and combination with other therapies. Vaccination in non-small cell lung cancer is also an emerging field of research that holds promising results for the future of immunotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer. This review presents a concise update on the most recent data regarding the role of checkpoint inhibitors as well as vaccination in non-small cell lung cancer. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  13. Experimental Evaluation of Interference Rejection Combining for 5G small cells,

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assefa, Dereje; Berardinelli, Gilberto; Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão

    2015-01-01

    The Interference Rejection Combining (IRC) receiver can significantly boost the network throughput in scenarios characterized by dense uncoordinated deployment of small cells, as targeted by future 5th generation (5G) radio access technology. This paper presents an experimental study...

  14. Analysis of the EGFR gene mutation in patients with non- small cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research August 2016; 15 (8): 1637-1641 ... Keywords: Non-small cell lung cancer, Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), Targeted therapy, ... inhibitors can be identified by molecular analysis of lung ...

  15. Esophageal Replacement for Long-Gap Esophageal Atresia in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    humility to know when to consider a replacement procedure (3). To replace the esophagus of a baby is a major decision in many pediatric surgical units world over. Fortunately, the need for this procedure has decreased in the recent years due to the increase in the variety of techniques of lengthening the upper esophageal ...

  16. Esophageal Dysmotility in Patients following Total Laryngectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Maclean, Julia; Szczesniak, Michal; Bertrand, Paul P; Quon, Harry; Tsang, Raymond K; Wu, Peter I; Graham, Peter; Cook, Ian J

    2018-02-01

    Objectives Dysphagia is common in total laryngectomees, with some symptoms suggesting esophageal dysmotility. Tracheoesophageal (TE) phonation requires effective esophagopharyngeal air passage. Hence, esophageal dysmotility may affect deglutition or TE phonation. This study aimed to determine (1) the characteristics of esophageal dysmotility in laryngectomees, (2) whether clinical history is sensitive in detecting esophageal dysmotility, and (3) the relationship between esophageal dysmotility and TE prosthesis dysfunction. Study Design Multidisciplinary cross-sectional study. Setting Tertiary academic hospital. Subjects and Methods For 31 participants undergone total laryngectomy 1 to 12 years prior, clinical histories were taken by a gastroenterologist and a speech pathologist experienced in managing dysphagia. Esophageal high-resolution manometry was performed and analyzed using Chicago Classification v3.0. Results Interpretable manometric studies were obtained in 23 (1 normal manometry). Esophageal dysmotility patterns included achalasia, esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction, diffuse esophageal spasm, and other major (30%) and minor (50%) peristaltic disorders. The sensitivity of predicting any esophageal dysmotility was 28%, but it is noteworthy that patients with achalasia and diffuse esophageal spasm (DES) were predicted. Two of 4 participants with TE puncture leakage had poor esophageal clearance. Of 20 TE speakers, 12 had voice problems, no correlation between poor voice, and any dysmotility pattern. Conclusions Peristaltic and lower esophageal sphincter dysfunction are common in laryngectomees. Clinical history, while not predictive of minor motor abnormalities, predicted correctly cases with treatable spastic motor disorders. Dysmotility was not associated with poor phonation, although TE puncture leakage might be linked to poor esophageal clearance. Esophageal dysmotility should be considered in the laryngectomees with persisting dysphagia or

  17. Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants of Lung Cancer Subtype: Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    reported in other contexts including breast cancer and bladder cancer . While beyond the scope of this grant, and not funded by this mechanism, we...have participated in a recent collaborative analysis of common genomic alterations in small cell bladder cancer vs. small cell lung cancer . A paper...of the project is to study drug resistance mechanisms in vitro and using tumors from lung cancer patients with epidermal growth factor receptor

  18. Eosinophilic esophagitis in patients with esophageal atresia and chronic dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassabian, Sirvart; Baez-Socorro, Virginia; Sferra, Thomas; Garcia, Reinaldo

    2014-12-21

    Esophageal atresia (EA) is defined as a discontinuity of the lumen of the esophagus repaired soon after birth. Dysphagia is a common symptom in these patients, usually related to stricture, dysmotility or peptic esophagitis. We present 4 cases of patients with EA who complained of dysphagia and the diagnosis of Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) was made, ages ranging from 9 to 16 years. Although our patients were on acid suppression years after their EA repair, they presented with acute worsening of dysphagia. Esophogastroduodenoscopy and/or barium swallow did not show stricture and biopsies revealed elevated eosinophil counts consistent with EoE. Two of 4 patients improved symptomatically with the topical steroids. It is important to note that all our patients have asthma and 3 out of 4 have tested positive for food allergies. One of our patients developed recurrent anastomotic strictures that improved with the treatment of the EoE. A previous case report linked the recurrence of esophageal strictures in patients with EA repair with EoE. Once the EoE was treated the strictures resolved. On the other hand, based on our observation, EoE could be present in patients without recurrent anastomotic strictures. There appears to be a spectrum in the disease process. We are suggesting that EoE is a frequent concomitant problem in patients with history of congenital esophageal deformities, and for this reason any of these patients with refractory reflux symptoms or dysphagia (with or without anastomotic stricture) may benefit from an endoscopic evaluation with biopsies to rule out EoE.

  19. The results of definitive radiation therapy and the analysis of prognostic factors for non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Seung Hee; Lee, Kyung Ja; Lee, Soon Nam

    1998-01-01

    of local control. And then, treatment failure occurred in 14 patients (58%): local relapse in 6 patients (43%), distant metastasis in 6 patients (43%) and local relapse with distant metastasis in 2 patients (14%). Therefore 16 patients (23%) were controlled of disease of primary site with or without distant metastases. Twenty three patients (46%) among 50 patients who were possible to follow-up had distant metastasis. The overall 1-year survival rate according to the treatment modalities was 59% in radiotherapy alone and 66% in chemoirradiation group. The overall 1-year survival rates for stage III patients only was 51% in radiotherapy alone and 68% In chemoirradiation group which was significant different. The significant prognostic factors affecting survival rate were the stage and the achievement of local control for all patients at univariate- analysis. Use of neoadjuvant or concurrent chemotherapy use of chemotherapy and the achievement of local control for stage III patients only were also prognostic factors. The stage, pretreatment performance status, use of neoadjuvant or concurrent chemotherapy, total radiation dose and the achievement of local control were significant at multivariate analysis. The treatment-related toxicities were esophagitis, radiation pneumonitis, hematologic toxicity and dermatitis which were spontaneously improved, but 2 patients were died with radiation pneumonitis. The conventional radiation therapy was not sufficient therapy for achievement of long-term survival in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Therefore, aggressive treatment including the addition of appropriate chemotherapeutic drug to decrease distant metastasis and preoperative radiotherapy combined with surgery, hyperfractionation radiotherapy or 3-D conformal radiation therapy for increase local control are needed

  20. Esophageal transit scintigraphy and structured questionnaire in patients with systemic sclerosis with endoscopically proven reflux esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Kenichi; Inaki, Anri; Hiramatsu, Takashi; Hasegawa, Minoru; Fujimoto, Manabu; Takehara, Kazuhiko; Kinuya, Seigo

    2009-01-01

    Esophageal complications are common in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). The relationship between gastroesophageal reflux (GER) symptoms and dysmotility was examined in endoscopically confirmed patients suspected of having reflux esophagitis. A total of 32 patients with limited and diffuse type SSc (lSSc, dSSc) were examined based on a structured questionnaire score (QS) of GER symptoms, retention fraction of esophageal scintigraphy at 90 s (R 90 ) and gastric emptying time. The QS was significantly higher in the reflux esophagitis group than in the non-esophagitis group (5.4±3.5, 1.4±2.9, P=0.003). When the non-esophagitis group was further divided into lSSc and dSSc groups, R 90 was higher in the reflux esophagitis group (31±18%) and the non-esophagitis group with dSSc (34±32%) than in the non-esophagitis group with lSSc (8±3%, P=0.02). Both high R 90 ≥15% and QS≥4 indicated reflux esophagitis. Conversely, both normal R 90 and QS indicated no reflux esophagitis. A combination of esophageal scintigraphy and structured questionnaire demonstrated different aspects of esophageal dysfunction, namely dysmotility and GER. Patients with high QS and dysmotility may be indicated for further evaluation including endoscopic examination and medical treatment.(author)

  1. Physiology of Normal Esophageal Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Raj K; Chaudhury, Arun

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus consists of two different parts. In humans, the cervical esophagus is composed of striated muscles and the thoracic esophagus is composed of phasic smooth muscles. The striated muscle esophagus is innervated by the lower motor neurons and peristalsis in this segment is due to sequential activation of the motor neurons in the nucleus ambiguus. Both primary and secondary peristaltic contractions are centrally mediated. The smooth muscle of esophagus is phasic in nature and is innervated by intramural inhibitory (nitric oxide releasing) and excitatory (acetylcholine releasing) neurons that receive inputs from separate sets of preganglionic neurons located in the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus. The primary peristalsis in this segment involves both central and peripheral mechanisms. The primary peristalsis consist of inhibition (called deglutitive inhibition) followed by excitation. The secondary peristalsis is entirely due to peripheral mechanisms and also involves inhibition followed by excitation. The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is characterized by tonic muscle that is different from the muscle of the esophageal body. The LES, like the esophageal body smooth muscle, is also innervated by the inhibitory and excitatory neurons. The LES maintains tonic closure due to its myogenic property. The LES tone is modulated by the inhibitory and the excitatory nerves. Inhibitory nerves mediate LES relaxation and the excitatory nerves mediate reflex contraction or rebound contraction of the LES. Clinical disorders of esophageal motility can be classified on the basis of disorders of the inhibitory and excitatory innervations and the smooth muscles. PMID:18364578

  2. Chemoradiation therapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohira, Masaichi; Yamashita, Yoshito; Matsumura, Yumiko; Yamazaki, Masanao; Kubo, Naoshi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2002-01-01

    The current status and future prospects of chemoradiation therapy (CRT) for esophageal cancer are reviewed herein. In Western countries, CRT is performed for every stage of esophageal cancer and it has been reported that in definitive CRT series the complete response rate is 30 to 50%, the mean survival rate more than twelve months, and the in 2-year survival rate about 30%, while in neoadjuvant CRT series the pathological response rate is 20 to 50%, the mean survival period more than twenty months, and the 3-year survival 30 to 40%. On the other hand, as esophageal cancer is treated mainly by surgery in Japan, CRT is applied in patients with tumors invading adjacent organs, and a high pathological complete response rate is reported in some neoadjuvant studies. Although both definitive and neoadjuvant CRT increases the response rate and improves local tumor control, CRT is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity, especially in neoadjuvant series. More effective and less toxic CRT regimens, using new chemotherapeutic agents such as nedaplatin and paclitaxel and new irradiation protocol such as accelated hyperfractionation, are needed to improve the prognosis of patients with advanced esophageal cancer. (author)

  3. Esophageal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing esophageal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  4. Esophageal manifestations of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucendo, A J

    2011-09-01

    Celiac disease (CD) may often be associated with various motor disorders affecting the different segments of the digestive tract, including the esophagus. Although it has not been universally reported, some available evidences indicate that pediatric and adult celiac patients could manifest a higher frequency of esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease-related symptoms compared to nonceliac patients. In addition, several published studies have consistently shown the efficacy of a gluten-free diet in rapidly controlling esophageal symptoms and in preventing their recurrence. Since the participation of gluten in the esophageal symptoms of CD seems clear, its intimate mechanisms have yet to be elucidated, and several hypothesis have been proposed, including the specific immune alterations characterizing CD, the reduction in nutrient absorption determining the arrival of intact gluten to distal gastrointestinal segments, and various dysregulations in the function of gastrointestinal hormones and peptides. Recent studies have suggested the existence of a possible relationship between CD and eosinophilic esophagitis, which should be more deeply investigated. © 2011 Copyright the Author. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  5. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Scintigraphy in Primary Hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shoukat H; P, Madhu Vijay; Rather, Tanveer A; Laway, Bashir A

    2017-01-30

    Esophageal dysmotility is associated with gastrointestinal dysmotility in various systemic and neuroregulatory disorders. Hypothyroidism has been reported to be associated with impaired motor function in esophagus due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycan hyaluronic acid in its soft tissues, leading to changes in various contraction and relaxation parameters of esophagus, particularly in the lower esophageal sphincter. In this study we evaluated esophageal transit times in patients of primary hypothyroidism using the technique of radionuclide esophageal transit scintigraphy. Thirty-one patients of primary hypothyroidism and 15 euthyroid healthy controls were evaluated for esophageal transit time using 15-20 MBq of Technetium-99m sulfur colloid diluted in 10-15 mL of drinking water. Time activity curve was generated for each study and esophageal transit time was calculated as time taken for clearance of 90% radioactive bolus from the region of interest encompassing the esophagus. Esophageal transit time of more than 10 seconds was considered as prolonged. Patients of primary hypothyroidism had a significantly increased mean esophageal transit time of 19.35 ± 20.02 seconds in comparison to the mean time of 8.25 ± 1.71 seconds in healthy controls ( P < 0.05). Esophageal transit time improved and in some patients even normalized after treatment with thyroxine. A positive correlation ( r = 0.39, P < 0.05) albeit weak existed between the serum thyroid stimulating hormone and the observed esophageal transit time. A significant number of patients with primary hypothyroidism may have subclinical esophageal dysmotility with prolonged esophageal transit time which can be reversible by thyroxine treatment. Prolonged esophageal transit time in primary hypothyroidism may correlate with serum thyroid stimulating hormone levels.

  6. Chicago classification criteria of esophageal motility disorders defined in high resolution esophageal pressure topography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bredenoord, A. J.; Fox, M.; Kahrilas, P. J.; Pandolfino, J. E.; Schwizer, W.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Conklin, Jeffrey L.; Cook, Ian J.; Gyawali, C. Prakash; Hebbard, Geoffrey; Holloway, Richard H.; Ke, Meiyun; Keller, Jutta; Mittal, Ravinder K.; Peters, Jeff; Richter, Joel; Roman, Sabine; Rommel, Nathalie; Sifrim, Daniel; Tutuian, Radu; Valdovinos, Miguel; Vela, Marcelo F.; Zerbib, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Background The Chicago Classification of esophageal motility was developed to facilitate the interpretation of clinical high resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT) studies, concurrent with the widespread adoption of this technology into clinical practice. The Chicago Classification has been

  7. [Esophageal motor disorders in cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices non-submitted to endoscopic treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Priscila Pollo; Lemme, Eponina Maria de Oliveira; Coelho, Henrique Sérgio Moraes

    2005-01-01

    The hepatic cirrhosis has as one of the main morbid-mortality causes, the portal hypertension with the development of esophageal varices, the possibility of a digestive hemorrhage and worsening of hepatic insufficiency. It is important to identify causal predictive or aggravating factors and if possible to prevent them. In the last years, it has been observed the association of esophageal motor disorders and gastro-esophageal reflux in cirrhotic patients with esophageal varices. To study the prevalence of the esophageal motility disorders and among them, the ineffective esophageal motility, in patients with hepatic cirrhosis and esophageal varices, without previous endoscopic therapeutic and the predictive factors. Prospectively, it has been evaluate 74 patients suffering from liver cirrhosis and esophagic varices, without previous endoscopic treatment. All of them were submitted to a clinical protocol, esophageal manometry and 55 patients also held the ambulatory esophageal pHmetry. Esophageal motility disorders have been found in 44 patients (60%). The most prevalent was the ineffective esophageal motility, observed in 28%. The abnormal reflux disease was diagnosed through the pHmetry in 35% of the patients. There were no correlation between the manometrical abnormality in general and the ineffective esophageal motility in particular and the esophageal or gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms, the abnormal reflux, the disease seriousness, the ascites presence and the gauge of the varices. The majority of cirrhotic patients with non-treated esophageal varices present esophageal motor disorders. No predictive factor was found. The clinical relevance of these findings need more researches in the scope to define the real meaning of theses abnormalities.

  8. The Role of Esophageal PH-metri Test on Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Setyawati, Katharina; Abdullah, Murdani; Syam, Ari Fahrial; Fauzi, Achmad; Makmun, Dadang; Simadibrata, Marcellus; Manan, Chudahman; Rani, Abdul Aziz

    2008-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a pathological condition of esophagus which is caused by gastric content reflux into esophagus. There is an increased prevalence of gastro-esophageal reflux disease. The roles of esophageal pH-metry in clinical application include looking for abnormal acid exposure on esophagus with no abnormality found in endoscopy; evaluating patients following the anti-reflux surgery who are being suspected for abnormal esophageal reflux; evaluating patients with normal ...

  9. Presence of urokinase plasminogen activator, its inhibitor and receptor in small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pappot, H.; Pfeiffer, P.; Grøndahl Hansen, J.

    1997-01-01

    Spreading of cancer cells is dependent on the combined action of several proteolytic enzymes, such as serine proteases, comprising the urokinase pathway of plasminogen activation. Previous studies of lung cancer indicate that expression, localization and prognostic impact of the components...... of the plasminogen activation system differ in the different non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) types, whereas the expression of the components in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has only sparingly been investigated. In the present study we investigate the presence of the components of the plasminogen activation...... that the plasminogen activation system could play a role in this type of cancer during invasion. In addition a difference in the levels of the components of the plasminogen activation system in NSCLC and SCLC is found, which could contribute to the differences in biology....

  10. Opportunistic esophagitis in AIDS: Radiographic diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, M.S.; Woldenberg, R.; Herlinger, H.; Laufer, I.

    1987-01-01

    Between 1983 and 1986, 35 of 90 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) had double-contrast esophagograms to rule out opportunistic esophagitis. The radiographs were reviewed without knowledge of the clinical or endoscopic findings. Candida esophagitis was diagnosed radiographically in 17 patients who had varying degrees of plaque formation and viral esophagitis in three who had discrete ulcers without plaques. All three patients with viral esophagitis (herpes in 2 and cytomegalo virus in one) and 15 of 17 with Candida esophagitis had endoscopic and/or clinical corroboration of the radiographic diagnosis. Thus, the authors' experience suggests that fungal and viral esophagitis can often be differentiated on double-contrast esophagography, so that appropriate antifungal or antiviral therapy can be instituted without need for endoscopic intervention

  11. The Changing Face of Esophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Melhado

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The two main histological esophageal cancer types, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, differ in incidence, geographic distribution, ethnic pattern and etiology. This article focuses on epidemiology with particular reference to geographic and temporal variations in incidence, along with a review of the evidence supporting environmental and genetic factors involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus remains predominantly a disease of the developing world. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma is mainly a disease of western developed societies, associated with obesity and gastro-esophageal reflux disease. There has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma in developed countries in parallel with migration of both esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas towards the gastro-esophageal junction.

  12. The Changing Face of Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melhado, Rachel E., E-mail: raye732001@yahoo.co.uk; Alderson, Derek; Tucker, Olga [Academic Department of Surgery, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospitals Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-28

    The two main histological esophageal cancer types, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, differ in incidence, geographic distribution, ethnic pattern and etiology. This article focuses on epidemiology with particular reference to geographic and temporal variations in incidence, along with a review of the evidence supporting environmental and genetic factors involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus remains predominantly a disease of the developing world. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma is mainly a disease of western developed societies, associated with obesity and gastro-esophageal reflux disease. There has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma in developed countries in parallel with migration of both esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas towards the gastro-esophageal junction.

  13. The Changing Face of Esophageal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melhado, Rachel E.; Alderson, Derek; Tucker, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The two main histological esophageal cancer types, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, differ in incidence, geographic distribution, ethnic pattern and etiology. This article focuses on epidemiology with particular reference to geographic and temporal variations in incidence, along with a review of the evidence supporting environmental and genetic factors involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus remains predominantly a disease of the developing world. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma is mainly a disease of western developed societies, associated with obesity and gastro-esophageal reflux disease. There has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma in developed countries in parallel with migration of both esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas towards the gastro-esophageal junction

  14. Clinical Application of Esophageal High-resolution Manometry in the Diagnosis of Esophageal Motility Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hoeij, Froukje B.; Bredenoord, Albert J.

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) is replacing conventional manometry in the clinical evaluation of patients with esophageal symptoms, especially dysphagia. The introduction of HRM gave rise to new objective metrics and recognizable patterns of esophageal motor function, requiring a new

  15. Impaired Upper Esophageal Sphincter Reflexes in Patients with Supra-Esophageal Reflux Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaei, Arash; Venu, Mukund; Naini, Sohrab Rahimi; Gonzaga, Jason; Lang, Ivan; Massey, Benson; Jadcherla, Sudarshan; Shaker, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Normal responses of the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) and esophageal body to liquid reflux events prevent esophagopharyngeal reflux and its complications, but abnormal responses have not been characterized. We investigated whether patients with supra-esophageal reflux disease (SERD) have impaired UES and esophageal body responses to simulated reflux events. Methods We performed a prospective study of 25 patients with SERD (19–82 y old, 13 female) and complaints of regurgitation and supra-esophageal manifestations of reflux. We also included 10 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD; 32–60 y old, 7 female) without troublesome regurgitation and supra-esophageal symptoms and 24 healthy asymptomatic individuals (controls; 19–49 y old, 13 female). UES and esophageal body pressure responses, along with luminal distribution of infusate during esophageal rapid and slow infusion of air or liquid, were monitored by concurrent high-resolution manometry and intraluminal impedance. Results A significantly smaller proportion of patients with SERD had UES contractile reflexes in response to slow esophageal infusion of acid than controls or patients with GERD. Only patients with SERD had abnormal UES relaxation responses to rapid distension with saline. Diminished esophageal peristaltic contractions resulted in esophageal stasis in patients with GERD or SERD. Conclusions Patients with SERD and complaints of regurgitation have impaired UES and esophageal responses to simulated liquid reflux events. These patterns could predispose them to esophagopharyngeal reflux. PMID:26188682

  16. Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) vs. involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): A comparative analysis of toxicities and clinical outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Annemarie T.; Shen, Jason; Finlay, Jarod; Mitra, Nandita; Evans, Tracey; Stevenson, James; Langer, Corey; Lin, Lilie; Hahn, Stephen; Glatstein, Eli; Rengan, Ramesh

    2010-01-01

    Background: Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) and involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) are definitive radiotherapeutic approaches used to treat patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ENI delivers prophylactic radiation to clinically uninvolved lymph nodes, while IFRT only targets identifiable gross nodal disease. Because clinically uninvolved nodal stations may harbor microscopic disease, IFRT raises concerns for increased nodal failures. This retrospective cohort analysis evaluates failure rates and treatment-related toxicities in patients treated at a single institution with ENI and IFRT. Methods: We assessed all patients with stage III locally advanced or stage IV oligometastatic NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy from 2003 to 2008. Each physician consistently treated with either ENI or IFRT, based on their treatment philosophy. Results: Of the 108 consecutive patients assessed (60 ENI vs. 48 IFRT), 10 patients had stage IV disease and 95 patients received chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 18.9 months. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, patients treated with IFRT demonstrated a significantly lower risk of high grade esophagitis (Odds ratio: 0.31, p = 0.036). The differences in 2-year local control (39.2% vs. 59.6%), elective nodal control (84.3% vs. 84.3%), distant control (47.7% vs. 52.7%) and overall survival (40.1% vs. 43.7%) rates were not statistically significant between ENI vs. IFRT. Conclusions: Nodal failure rates in clinically uninvolved nodal stations were not increased with IFRT when compared to ENI. IFRT also resulted in significantly decreased esophageal toxicity, suggesting that IFRT may allow for integration of concurrent systemic chemotherapy in a greater proportion of patients.

  17. Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) vs. involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC): A comparative analysis of toxicities and clinical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Annemarie T; Shen, Jason; Finlay, Jarod; Mitra, Nandita; Evans, Tracey; Stevenson, James; Langer, Corey; Lin, Lilie; Hahn, Stephen; Glatstein, Eli; Rengan, Ramesh

    2010-05-01

    Elective nodal irradiation (ENI) and involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) are definitive radiotherapeutic approaches used to treat patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). ENI delivers prophylactic radiation to clinically uninvolved lymph nodes, while IFRT only targets identifiable gross nodal disease. Because clinically uninvolved nodal stations may harbor microscopic disease, IFRT raises concerns for increased nodal failures. This retrospective cohort analysis evaluates failure rates and treatment-related toxicities in patients treated at a single institution with ENI and IFRT. We assessed all patients with stage III locally advanced or stage IV oligometastatic NSCLC treated with definitive radiotherapy from 2003 to 2008. Each physician consistently treated with either ENI or IFRT, based on their treatment philosophy. Of the 108 consecutive patients assessed (60 ENI vs. 48 IFRT), 10 patients had stage IV disease and 95 patients received chemotherapy. The median follow-up time for survivors was 18.9 months. On multivariable logistic regression analysis, patients treated with IFRT demonstrated a significantly lower risk of high grade esophagitis (Odds ratio: 0.31, p = 0.036). The differences in 2-year local control (39.2% vs. 59.6%), elective nodal control (84.3% vs. 84.3%), distant control (47.7% vs. 52.7%) and overall survival (40.1% vs. 43.7%) rates were not statistically significant between ENI vs. IFRT. Nodal failure rates in clinically uninvolved nodal stations were not increased with IFRT when compared to ENI. IFRT also resulted in significantly decreased esophageal toxicity, suggesting that IFRT may allow for integration of concurrent systemic chemotherapy in a greater proportion of patients. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Results of induction chemotherapy followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and concurrent weekly paclitaxel for stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weihua; Bao Yong; Chen Ming; Zhang Li; Xu Guangchuan; Li Kaixin

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of induction chemotherapy (ICT) followed by three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) plus concurrent weekly paclitaxel for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Patients with stage III NSCLC in favorable conditions were treated with 2 to 4 cycles of carboplatin (AUC=5-6, d1) combined with paclitaxel (175 mg/m 2 , d1), then followed by weekly paclitaxel (40 mg/m 2 ) and concurrent 3DCRT within 34 weeks. The prescription dose of radiotherapy was given as high as possible while total lung V 20 ≤31% and total dose of the spinal cord ≤50 Gy. Results: ICT was well tolerated. During the concurrent chemoradiotherapy,the treatment of 4 patients was ended ahead of the schedule because of severe pulmonary and cardiac toxicities; the treatment of 2 patients was delayed for 7 and 12 days because of fatigue. Leucopenia(33/56) was in grade 1-2 except 1 patient in grade 3. Lymphocytopenia was severe (54/56,42 in grade 3). Three patients developed grade 3 acute radiation-induced esophagitis, and 3 developed grade 3-4 radiation-induced pneumonitis. There was one patients each who developed grade 2,3, and 4 late esophageal damage, respectively. Nine developed grade 2 pulmonary fibrosis. The overall response rate was 69.7%. The 1-year overall survival rate was 72.3%. The 1-year local progression-free survival rate was 62.7%. Conclusions: The schedule of ICT followed by weekly paclitaxel and concurrent 3DCRT can be well tolerated by most of the favorable patients with stage III NSCLC, and the toxicity is tolerable. Results of this study are encouraging, though long-term results should be followed up. (authors)

  19. Treatment adherence in concurrent chemoradiation in patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung carcinoma: Results of daily intravenous prehydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uyterlinde, Wilma; Chen, Chun; Nijkamp, Jasper; Obbink, Marieke Groot; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Belderbos, Jose; Heuvel, Michel van den

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that daily intravenous pre-hydration decreases renal toxicity and improves chemotherapy adherence in patients receiving daily cisplatin to concurrent radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and methods: Patients with locally advanced NSCLC were treated between 2008 and August 2012 with daily 6 mg/m 2 cisplatin as a bolus injection in 10 ml; of saline and 66 Gy/24 fr radiotherapy in 32 days. Since January 2011, the administration of cisplatin was routinely preceded by intravenous pre-hydration with 1 L of natriumchloride 0.9%. Patients were divided in a pre-hydrated (PH) and non-pre-hydrated (NPH) cohort. Serum-creatinine and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were assessed twice weekly during treatment. Retrospectively, baseline data, toxicity, treatment adherence and efficacy data were compared. Results: Of the 356 patients 232 NPH patients and 100 PH patients were eligible. Patient-and treatment characteristics compared equally. The median of the maximum decrease in GFR was 24% and 8% for NPH and PH (p < 0.01), respectively. Sixty-nine percent of the patients in the NPH group completed the 24 administrations of cisplatin, as compared to 83% of the PH group (p < 0.01). Nineteen percent vs. 2% of the patients in the NPH and PH group discontinued cisplatin treatment because of renal toxicity. Surprisingly, the incidence of acute esophageal toxicity grade ⩾2 decreased following prehydration: 62% vs. 34% (p < 0.001) for the NPH and PH groups, respectively. The one-year survival was comparable between groups (75% for NPH and 71% for PH). Conclusion: Daily pre-hydration was associated with a reduced rate of both renal and acute esophageal toxicity and an increased chemotherapy adherence in patients receiving daily dose of cisplatin and concurrent radiotherapy for locally advanced NSCLC

  20. Phase I Trial of Radiation With Concurrent and Consolidation Pemetrexed and Cisplatin in Patients With Unresectable Stage IIIA/B Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brade, Anthony; Bezjak, Andrea; MacRae, Robert; Laurie, Scott; Sun, Alex; Cho, John; Leighl, Natasha; Pearson, Shannon; Southwood, Bernadette; Wang, Lisa; McGill, Shauna; Iscoe, Neill; Shepherd, Frances A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of concurrent pemetrexed/cisplatin/thoracic radiotherapy followed by consolidation pemetrexed/cisplatin for unresectable Stage IIIA/B non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with 2 on Days 1 and 22 for Dose Levels 1, 2, and 3/4, respectively) and cisplatin (25 mg/m 2 Days 1-3 for Dose Levels 1-3; 20 mg/m 2 Days 1-5 for Dose Level 4) concurrent with thoracic radiation (61-66 Gy in 31-35 fractions). Consolidation consisted of two cycles of pemetrexed/cisplatin (500 mg/m 2 , 75 mg/m 2 ) 21 days apart, after concurrent therapy. Results: Between January 2006 and October 2007, 16 patients entered the study. Median follow-up was 17.2 months. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. Median radiation dose was 64 Gy (range, 45-66 Gy). Rates of significant Grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity were 38% and 7%, respectively. One patient experienced Grade 3 acute esophagitis, and 2 experienced late (Grade 3) esophageal stricture, successfully managed with dilation. One patient experienced Grade 3 pneumonitis. The overall response rate was 88%. One-year overall survival was 81%. Conclusions: Full systemic dose pemetrexed seems to be safe with full-dose cisplatin and thoracic radiation in Stage IIIA/B NSCLC. Pemetrexed is the first third-generation cytotoxic agent tolerable at full dose in this setting. A Phase II study evaluating Dose Level 4 is ongoing.

  1. Selective Nodal Irradiation on Basis of 18FDG-PET Scans in Limited-Disease Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Prospective Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loon, Judith van; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Wanders, Rinus; Boersma, Liesbeth; Simons, Jean; Oellers, Michel; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C.; Hochstenbag, Monique; Bootsma, Gerben; Geraedts, Wiel; Pitz, Cordula; Teule, Jaap; Rhami, Ali; Thimister, Willy; Snoep, Gabriel; Dehing-Oberije, Cary; Lambin, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of selective nodal irradiation on basis of 18 F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) scans in patients with limited-disease small-cell lung cancer (LD-SCLC) on isolated nodal failure. Methods and Materials: A prospective study was performed of 60 patients with LD-SCLC. Radiotherapy was given to a dose of 45 Gy in twice-daily fractions of 1.5 Gy, concurrent with carboplatin and etoposide chemotherapy. Only the primary tumor and the mediastinal lymph nodes involved on the pretreatment PET scan were irradiated. A chest computed tomography (CT) scan was performed 3 months after radiotherapy completion and every 6 months thereafter. Results: A difference was seen in the involved nodal stations between the pretreatment 18 F-deoxyglucose PET scans and computed tomography scans in 30% of patients (95% confidence interval, 20-43%). Of the 60 patients, 39 (65%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 52-76%) developed a recurrence; 2 patients (3%, 95% CI, 1-11%) experienced isolated regional failure. The median actuarial overall survival was 19 months (95% CI, 17-21). The median actuarial progression-free survival was 14 months (95% CI, 12-16). 12% (95% CI, 6-22%) of patients experienced acute Grade 3 (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) esophagitis. Conclusion: PET-based selective nodal irradiation for LD-SCLC resulted in a low rate of isolated nodal failures (3%), with a low percentage of acute esophagitis. These findings are in contrast to those from our prospective study of CT-based selective nodal irradiation, which resulted in an unexpectedly high percentage of isolated nodal failures (11%). Because of the low rate of isolated nodal failures and toxicity, we believe that our data support the use of PET-based SNI for LD-SCLC.

  2. New data for venous thromboembolism in patients with small cell lung cancer: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimakakos, Evangelos; Livanios, Konstantinos; Gkiozos, Ioannis; Charpidou, Adriani; Ntalakou, Eleutheria; Kainis, Llias; Syrigos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Malignancy is an important predisposing factor for thromboembolic disease. Patients with malignancy display 4 to 10 times greater risk than the general population. As for lung cancer, that risk seems to further increase and become up to 20 times higher. The aim of this article is to review the International literature in order to highlight for the first time, the correlation between thromboembolic disease and small cell lung cancer. PubMed, Medline and Embase databases were searched from 1990 up to 2016, for retrospective and prospective studies that investigate the correlation between thromboembolic disease and small cell lung cancer. The incidence rate of thromboembolic disease found in these studies ranged between 6.8% and 11.5%. Thromboembolic disease is associated with a reduced survival in patients with small cell lung cancer and six factors seemed to increase the risk of thromboembolism: chemotherapy, cisplatin treatment, smoking, extensive disease, the infiltration of the superior vena cava and multiple concomitant diseases. Thromboembolic disease shows an increased incidence in patients with small cell lung cancer and more research with well-designed studies is required in order to study in detail the anticoagulation treatment and the survival in small cell lung cancer patients.

  3. Primary Small Cell Carcinoma of the Stomach Successfully Treated With Cisplatin and Etoposide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Chen Kuo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a 44-year-old man with primary gastric small cell carcinoma who showed a remarkable response to chemotherapy specific for pulmonary small cell carcinoma. The patient had been admitted to another local hospital because of intermittent epigastralgia. An upper gastrointestinal examination there revealed an ulcerative tumor, 5 cm in diameter, on the lesser curvature side of the cardia, and endoscopic biopsy reported adenocarcinoma. Computed tomography revealed a mass over the lesser curvature of the stomach and some enlarged regional lymph nodes. Radical total gastrectomy, lymph node dissection, Roux-en-Y esophagojejunostomy and splenectomy were performed at our hospital. Pathology revealed gastric mucosa infiltrated by small-sized tumor cells with scanty cytoplasm and hyperchromatic nuclei. Immunohisto- chemically, the tumor cells were positive for synaptophysin, chromogranin A, and CD56. Primary gastric small cell carcinoma was diagnosed. The postoperative course, complicated by shock due to bleeding, wound infection and intra-abdominal abscess, took more than 2 months to resolve. Follow-up computed tomography showed tumor recurrence with multiple enlarged lymph nodes in the aortocaval region and hepatic hilum. The patient received palliative chemotherapy consisting of cisplatin 80 mg/m2 on day 1 and etoposide 80 mg/m2 on days 1–3 every 28 days, and had partial response to the chemotherapy, with a progression-free survival of 10 months. Chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide used for small cell carcinoma of the lung is a good treatment for gastric small cell carcinoma.

  4. Urinary bladder carcinoma with divergent differentiation featuring small cell carcinoma, sarcomatoid carcinoma, and liposarcomatous component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Mariko; Morikawa, Teppei; Nakagawa, Tohru; Miyakawa, Jimpei; Maeda, Daichi; Homma, Yukio; Fukayama, Masashi

    2016-09-01

    Both small cell carcinoma and sarcomatoid carcinoma of the urinary bladder are highly aggressive tumors, and a concurrence of these tumors is extremely rare. We report a case of urinary bladder cancer with small cell carcinoma as a predominant component, accompanied by sarcomatoid carcinoma and conventional urothelial carcinoma (UC). Although the small cell carcinoma component had resolved on receiving chemoradiotherapy, rapid growth of the residual tumor led to a fatal outcome. A 47-year-old man presented with occasional bladder irritation and had a 2-year history of asymptomatic hematuria. Cystoscopy revealed a huge mass in the urinary bladder, and transurethral resection was performed. Microscopically, small cell carcinoma was detected as the major tumor component. Spindle-shaped sarcomatoid cells were also observed that were intermingled with small cell carcinoma and conventional UC. In addition, a sheet-like growth of the lipoblast-like neoplastic cells was observed focally. Initially, by providing chemoradiotherapy, we achieved a marked tumor regression; however, the tumor rapidly regrew after the completion of chemoradiotherapy, and the patient underwent radical cystectomy. Only conventional UC and sarcomatoid carcinoma were identified in the cystectomy specimen. The patient died of the disease 4 months after cystectomy. Urinary bladder cancer may include a combination of multiple aggressive histologies as in the present case. Because the variation in the tumor components may affect the efficacy of therapy, a correct diagnosis of every tumor component is necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Scintigraphy in Primary Hypothyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Shoukat H; Madhu, Vijay P; Rather, Tanveer A; Laway, Bashir A

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Esophageal dysmotility is associated with gastrointestinal dysmotility in various systemic and neuroregulatory disorders. Hypothyroidism has been reported to be associated with impaired motor function in esophagus due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycan hyaluronic acid in its soft tissues, leading to changes in various contraction and relaxation parameters of esophagus, particularly in the lower esophageal sphincter. In this study we evaluated esophageal transit times in pati...

  6. Intramural esophageal pseudodiverticulosis: report of a case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnero, M.; Martinez, M.I.; Sanchez, D.; Sanjurjo, E.

    1997-01-01

    Intramural esophageal pseudodiverticulosis (IEP)is a very uncommon disorder, with only a hundred or so cases reported in the literature. It is characterized by the distension of the esophageal mucous glands. This results in the development of a great number of saccular structures, distributed segmentally or diffusely throughout the esophageal wall. We present a case of this lesion, describing the radiological findings. (Author) 4 refs

  7. Balloon Dilatation of Esophageal Strictures/Achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Sabharwal, Tarun; Adam, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Achalasia is an esophageal motor disorder characterized by increased lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, diminished-to-absent peristalsis in the distal portion of the esophagus composed of smooth muscle, and lack of a coordinated LES relaxation in response to swallowing. These abnormalities are recognized radiographically by aperistalsis, esophageal dilatation, and decreased opening of the LES, with a characteristic “bird-beak” appearance. The principal symptom of this disorder is dysp...

  8. Phase I study of cisplatin analogue nedaplatin, paclitaxel, and thoracic radiotherapy for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, Ikuo; Sumi, Minako; Ito, Yoshinori

    2007-01-01

    The standard treatment of unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer is concurrent chemoradiotherapy in patients in good general condition, but where the optimal chemotherapeutic regimen has not been determined. Patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer received nedaplatin (80 mg/m 2 ) and paclitaxel on day 1 every 4 weeks for 3-4 cycles and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy (60 Gy/30 fractions for 6 weeks) starting on day 1. The dose of paclitaxel was escalated from 120 mg/m 2 in level 1, 135 mg/m 2 in level 2 to 150 mg/m 2 in level 3. A total of 18 patients (14 males and 4 females, with a median age of 62.5 years) were evaluated in this study. Full cycles of chemotherapy were administered in 83% of patients in level 1, and in 50% of patients in levels 2 and 3. No more than 50% of patients developed grade 4 neutropenia. Transient grade 3 esophagitis and infection were noted in one patient, and unacceptable pneumonitis was noted in three (17%) patients, two of whom died of the toxicity. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), evaluated in 15 patients, noted in one of the six patients in level 1, three of the six patients in level 2 and one of the three patients in level 3. One DLT at level 2 developed later as radiation pneumonitis. Thus, the maximum tolerated dose was determined to be level 1. The overall response rate (95% confidence interval) was 67% (41-87%) with 12 partial responses. The doses of paclitaxel and nedaplatin could not be escalated as a result of severe pulmonary toxicity. (author)

  9. A phase ii study of concurrent accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy and carboplatin/oral etoposide for elderly patients with stage iii non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeremic, Branislav; Shibamoto, Yuta; Milicic, Biljana; Milisavljevic, Slobodan; Nikolic, Nebojsa; Dagovic, Aleksandar; Aleksandrovic, Jasna; Radosavljevic-Asic, Gordana

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate feasibility, toxicity, and efficacy of accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy and concurrent carboplatin/oral etoposide in elderly (> 70 years) patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1988 and June 1993, a total of 58 patients entered a phase II study. Carboplatin (400 mg/m 2 ) was given intravenously on days 1 and 29, and etoposide (50 mg/m 2 ) was given orally on days 1-21 and 29-42. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy was administered starting on day 1, with a total dose of 51 Gy in 34 fractions over 3.5 weeks. Results: In 55 evaluable patients, the complete response rate was 27% and the overall response rate was 65%. For the 55 patients, the median survival time was 10 months, and the 1-, 2-, and 5-year survival rates were 45%, 24%, and 9.1%, respectively. The median time until relapse was 8 months and the 1-, 2-, and 5-year relapse-free survival rates were 45%, 20%, and 9.1%, respectively. The median time to local recurrence was 14 months and the 5-year local control rate was 13%; the median time to distant metastasis was 18 months and the 5-year distant metastasis-free rate was 15%. Hematological, esophageal, and bronchopulmonary acute grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed in 22%, 7%, and 4% of the patients, respectively. There was no grade 5 toxicity or late grade ≥ 3 toxicity. Conclusion: Concurrent accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy and carboplatin/oral etoposide produced relatively low and acceptable toxicity. The survival results appeared to be comparable to those obtained in nonelderly patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer treated by full-dose radiation

  10. A Phase I Study of Chemoradiotherapy With Use of Involved-Field Conformal Radiotherapy and Accelerated Hyperfractionation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: WJTOG 3305

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Takuhito, E-mail: tada@msic.med.osaka-cu.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Department of Radiology, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Izumi (Japan); Chiba, Yasutaka [Department of Environmental Medicine and Behavioural Science, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Tsujino, Kayoko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Fukuda, Haruyuki [Department of Radiology, Osaka Prefectural Medical Center for Respiratory and Allergic Diseases, Habikino (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Division of Radiation Oncology, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Negoro, Shunichi [Department of Medical Oncology, Hyogo Cancer Center, Akashi (Japan); Kudoh, Shinzoh [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Fukuoka, Masahiro [Department of Medical Oncology, Izumi Municipal Hospital, Izumi (Japan); Nakagawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Medical Oncology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-sayama (Japan); Nakanishi, Yoichi [Research Institute for Disease of the Chest, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyusyu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine a recommended dose of thoracic radiotherapy using accelerated hyperfractionation for unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer was conducted. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer were treated intravenously with carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 2) and paclitaxel (40 mg/m{sup 2}) on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22 with concurrent twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.5 Gy per fraction) beginning on Day 1 followed by two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy using carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 5) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m{sup 2}). Total doses were 54 Gy in 36 fractions, 60 Gy in 40 fractions, 66 Gy in 44 fractions, and 72 Gy in 48 fractions at Levels 1 to 4. The dose-limiting toxicity, defined as Grade {>=}4 esophagitis and neutropenic fever and Grade {>=}3 other nonhematologic toxicities, was monitored for 90 days. Results: Of 26 patients enrolled, 22 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. When 4 patients entered Level 4, enrollment was closed to avoid severe late toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 3 patients. They were Grade 3 neuropathy at Level 1 and Level 3 and Grade 3 infection at Level 1. However, the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The median survival time was 28.6 months for all patients. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, although the dose of radiation was escalated to 72 Gy in 48 fractions. However, a dose of 66 Gy in 44 fractions was adopted for this study because late toxicity data were insufficient.

  11. A Phase I Study of Chemoradiotherapy With Use of Involved-Field Conformal Radiotherapy and Accelerated Hyperfractionation for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: WJTOG 3305

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Takuhito; Chiba, Yasutaka; Tsujino, Kayoko; Fukuda, Haruyuki; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Kokubo, Masaki; Negoro, Shunichi; Kudoh, Shinzoh; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A Phase I study to determine a recommended dose of thoracic radiotherapy using accelerated hyperfractionation for unresectable non–small-cell lung cancer was conducted. Methods and Materials: Patients with unresectable Stage III non–small-cell lung cancer were treated intravenously with carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 2) and paclitaxel (40 mg/m 2 ) on Days 1, 8, 15, and 22 with concurrent twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.5 Gy per fraction) beginning on Day 1 followed by two cycles of consolidation chemotherapy using carboplatin (area under the concentration curve 5) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m 2 ). Total doses were 54 Gy in 36 fractions, 60 Gy in 40 fractions, 66 Gy in 44 fractions, and 72 Gy in 48 fractions at Levels 1 to 4. The dose-limiting toxicity, defined as Grade ≥4 esophagitis and neutropenic fever and Grade ≥3 other nonhematologic toxicities, was monitored for 90 days. Results: Of 26 patients enrolled, 22 patients were assessable for response and toxicity. When 4 patients entered Level 4, enrollment was closed to avoid severe late toxicities. Dose-limiting toxicities occurred in 3 patients. They were Grade 3 neuropathy at Level 1 and Level 3 and Grade 3 infection at Level 1. However, the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The median survival time was 28.6 months for all patients. Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was not reached, although the dose of radiation was escalated to 72 Gy in 48 fractions. However, a dose of 66 Gy in 44 fractions was adopted for this study because late toxicity data were insufficient.

  12. Consolidation chemotherapy improves progression-free survival in stage III small-cell lung cancer following concurrent chemoradiotherapy: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen XR

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Xin-Ru Chen,1,* Jian-Zhong Liang,2,* Shu-Xiang Ma,1 Wen-Feng Fang,1 Ning-Ning Zhou,1 Hai Liao,1 De-Lan Li,1 Li-Kun Chen1 1Department of Medical Oncology, 2Department of Pathology, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT is the standard treatment for limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LD-SCLC. However, the efficacy of consolidation chemotherapy (CCT in LD-SCLC remains controversial despite several studies that were performed in the early years of CCT use. The aim of this study was to reevaluate the effectiveness and toxicities associated with CCT. Methods: This retrospective analysis evaluated 177 patients with stage IIIA and IIIB small-cell lung cancer (SCLC who underwent CCRT from January 2001 to December 2013 at Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center (SYSUCC. Overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS were analyzed using Kaplan–Meier methods. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to analyze patient prognosis factors. Results: Among the 177 patients, 72 (41% received CCT and 105 (59% did not receive CCT. PFS was significantly better for patients in the CCT group compared to that for patients in the non-CCT group (median PFS: 17.0 vs 12.9 months, respectively, P=0.031, whereas the differences in OS were not statistically significant (median OS: 31.6 vs 24.8 months, respectively, P=0.118. The 3- and 5-year OS rates were 33.3% and 20.8% for patients in the CCT group and 27.6% and 6.7% for patients in the non-CCT group, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that having a pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen level <5 ng/mL (P=0.035, having undergone prophylactic cranial irradiation (P<0.001, and having received CCT (P=0.002 could serve as favorable independent prognostic factors

  13. Laboratory animal models for esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanya Venugopalan Nair

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of esophageal cancer is rapidly increasing especially in developing countries. The major risk factors include unhealthy lifestyle practices such as alcohol consumption, smoking, and chewing tobacco to name a few. Diagnosis at an advanced stage and poor prognosis make esophageal cancer one of the most lethal diseases. These factors have urged further research in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease. Animal models not only aid in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of esophageal cancer but also help in developing therapeutic interventions for the disease. This review throws light on the various recent laboratory animal models for esophageal cancer.

  14. Pediatric esophageal scintigraphy. Results of 200 studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillet, J.; Wynchank, S.; Basse-Cathalinat, B.; Christophe, E.; Ducassou, D.; Blanquet, P.

    1983-01-01

    Esophageal transit of a small volume of watery liquid has been observed scintigraphically in 200 studies performed on patients aged between 6 days and 16 years. Qualitative information concerning esophageal morphology and function in the various phases of deglutition, and scintigraphic features of achalasia, stenosis, and other pathologies are described. Measured esophageal transit time and its normal variation, its relevance to the diagnosis of esophagitis, and the monitoring of treatment are discussed. This technique observing distinct deglutitions has proven a useful diagnostic tool. Its advantages and limitations are discussed in comparison with other methods

  15. Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis Followed by Duodenal Necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hierro, Piedad Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis is an uncommon pathology, characterized by endoscopic finding of diffuse black coloration in esophageal mucosa and histological presence of necrosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The first case of acute necrotizing esophagitis followed by duodenal necrosis, in 81 years old woman with a positive history of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, and usual intake of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs, is reported. Although its etiology remains unknown, the duodenal necrosis suggests that ischemia could be the main cause given that the branches off the celiac axis provide common blood supply to the distal esophageal and duodenal tissue. The massive gastroesophagic reflux and NSAID intake could be involved. PMID:27957030

  16. Pediatric esophageal scintigraphy. Results of 200 studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillet, J.; Wynchank, S.; Basse-Cathalinat, B.; Christophe, E.; Ducassou, D.; Blanquet, P.

    1983-09-01

    Esophageal transit of a small volume of watery liquid has been observed scintigraphically in 200 studies performed on patients aged between 6 days and 16 years. Qualitative information concerning esophageal morphology and function in the various phases of deglutition, and scintigraphic features of achalasia, stenosis, and other pathologies are described. Measured esophageal transit time and its normal variation, its relevance to the diagnosis of esophagitis, and the monitoring of treatment are discussed. This technique observing distinct deglutitions has proven a useful diagnostic tool. Its advantages and limitations are discussed in comparison with other methods.

  17. Esophageal Stenosis Associated With Tumor Regression in Radiotherapy for Esophageal Cancer: Frequency and Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atsumi, Kazushige [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: shioyama@radiol.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Arimura, Hidetaka [Department of Health Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Terashima, Kotaro [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Matsuki, Takaomi [Department of Health Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Ohga, Saiji; Yoshitake, Tadamasa; Nonoshita, Takeshi; Tsurumaru, Daisuke; Ohnishi, Kayoko; Asai, Kaori; Matsumoto, Keiji [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Nakamura, Katsumasa [Department of Radiology, Kyushu University Hospital at Beppu, Oita (Japan); Honda, Hiroshi [Department of Clinical Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To determine clinical factors for predicting the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 109 patients with esophageal cancer of T1-4 and Stage I-III who were treated with definitive radiotherapy and achieved a complete response of their primary lesion at Kyushu University Hospital between January 1998 and December 2007. Esophageal stenosis was evaluated using esophagographic images within 3 months after completion of radiotherapy. We investigated the correlation between esophageal stenosis after radiotherapy and each of the clinical factors with regard to tumors and therapy. For validation of the correlative factors for esophageal stenosis, an artificial neural network was used to predict the esophageal stenotic ratio. Results: Esophageal stenosis tended to be more severe and more frequent in T3-4 cases than in T1-2 cases. Esophageal stenosis in cases with full circumference involvement tended to be more severe and more frequent than that in cases without full circumference involvement. Increases in wall thickness tended to be associated with increases in esophageal stenosis severity and frequency. In the multivariate analysis, T stage, extent of involved circumference, and wall thickness of the tumor region were significantly correlated to esophageal stenosis (p = 0.031, p < 0.0001, and p = 0.0011, respectively). The esophageal stenotic ratio predicted by the artificial neural network, which learned these three factors, was significantly correlated to the actual observed stenotic ratio, with a correlation coefficient of 0.864 (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Our study suggested that T stage, extent of involved circumference, and esophageal wall thickness of the tumor region were useful to predict the frequency and severity of esophageal stenosis associated with tumor regression in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer.

  18. The role of radiation therapy for stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer. Impact of clinical nodal stage on survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Kazushige; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Furuta, Masaya; Saito, Yoshihiro; Nakayama, Yuko; Katano, Susumu; Ohno, Tatsuya; Niibe, Hideo

    1996-01-01

    From 1976 through 1989, 46 patients with stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) without malignant effusion were treated with definitive radiation therapy (RT) at Gunma University Hospital. All patients were treated with 10 MV x-rays using antero posterior parallel opposed fields. The total dose ranged from 60 Gy to 70 Gy (mean dose; 66 Gy) with once daily standard fractionation. The actuarial two and five-year survival rates of the entire group were 22% and 10% respectively with a median survival time (MST) of 10 months. The survival of 18 patients with stage N0-2 disease was significantly better than the 28 patients with stage N3 disease (MST 21 versus 9 months; p<0.05). There were no significant differences in survival based on age and sex. However, there was a borderline difference in survival rates between patients with a performance status of 0-1 and those with status of 2-3 (p=0.06). Three patients with squamous cell carcinoma were alive after 5 years and were without disease progression. No patients with non-squamous cell carcinoma were free of disease after 5 years. These results provide support for the use of definitive RT to manage those patients with limited stage IIIB squamous cell carcinoma not extending to N3 stage. (author)

  19. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Ovary of Hypercalcemic Type: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zaied

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The small cell carcinoma of hypercalcemic type of ovary is a very aggressive tumor. It is associated with two-thirds of cases with hypercalcemia most often asymptomatic. It occurs mostly for young women. The treatment combines surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Case Presentation. We report a case of small cell carcinoma of the ovary hypercalcemic type in a young Tunisian woman aged 25 years after a severe abdominal pain syndrome and a large ovarian mass discovered in scanner; a laparotomy was performed by radical surgery. The pathological examination of the specimen confirmed the diagnosis. The radiological assessment performed after surgery showed a continuing evolution. Palliative chemotherapy was established, and the patient had died two months after diagnosis. Conclusion. The hypercalcemic small cell carcinoma of the ovary is a rare disease of poor prognosis.

  20. Primary Small-Cell Carcinoma of the Palate with Cushing’s Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingqiu Song

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 24-year-old woman presenting with a relapsed soy-bean-size tender mass at the junction of the soft and hard palate and a history of palatine tumor of small cell carcinoma. Reexcision surgery was performed and histopathological features were consistent. The patient was treated with six cycles of chemotherapy consisting of etoposide and cisplatin. After one year, the patient developed bone metastases and Cushing's syndrome, and successfully recovered with subsequent chemotherapy with irinotecan and cisplatin plus radiotherapy. There was no evidence of recurrence or metastasis for more than three years. Small cell carcinoma originating in the head and neck region has been reported to be highly aggressive and has a poor prognosis. This is the first case report of a patient with relapsed primary small cell carcinoma of the palate and successfully treated with second-line chemotherapy and local radiotherapy.

  1. Elective brain irradiation in patients with small-cell carcinoma of the lung: preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsenis, A.T.; Karpasitis, N.; Giannakakis, D.; Maragoudakis, N.; Kiparissiadis, P.

    1982-01-01

    The brain is a common site of metastases in small-cell carcinoma of the lung. Prophylactic brain irradiation with doses of 4000-4500 rads in 3-4 weeks appears to decrease the occurrence of brain metastases although it does not prevent this completely. In a group of patients with small-cell carcinoma of the lung and without evidence of brain metastases, the authors review the site and extent of the primary, the methods of treatment, the techniques of brain irradiation, and the relapses rate in relation to the status of the primary and the rate of brain metastases in another group without prophylactic brain irradiation. They further attempt to investigate combined modalities of treatment which would prolong life and prevent neurological complications in the small number of long survivors with small-cell carcinoma of the lung. (Auth.)

  2. Enhanced recovery after esophageal resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorwald, Peter; Bruna Esteban, Marcos; Ortega Lucea, Sonia; Ramírez Rodríguez, Jose Manuel

    2018-03-21

    ERAS is a multimodal perioperative care program which replaces traditional practices concerning analgesia, intravenous fluids, nutrition, mobilization as well as a number of other perioperative items, whose implementation is supported by evidence-based best practices. According to the RICA guidelines published in 2015, a review of the literature and the consensus established at a multidisciplinary meeting in 2015, we present a protocol that contains the basic procedures of an ERAS pathway for resective esophageal surgery. The measures involved in this ERAS pathway are structured into 3areas: preoperative, perioperative and postoperative. The consensus document integrates all the analyzed items in a unique time chart. ERAS programs in esophageal resection surgery can reduce postoperative morbidity, mortality, hospitalization and hospital costs. Copyright © 2018 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. 2011 update on esophageal achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Chuah, Seng-Kee; Hsu, Pin-I; Wu, Keng-Liang; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Tai, Wei-Chen; Changchien, Chi-Sin

    2012-01-01

    There have been some breakthroughs in the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal achalasia in the past few years. First, the introduction of high-resolution manometry with pressure topography plotting as a new diagnostic tool has made it possible to classify achalasia into three subtypes. The most favorable outcome is predicted for patients receiving treatment for type II achalasia (achalasia with compression). Patients with typeI(classic achalasia) and type III achalasia (spastic achalasia) e...

  4. Spontaneous esophageal-pleural fistula

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas, Sameer; Prakash, Mahesh; Kaman, Lileshwar; Bhardwaj, Nidhi; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous esophageal-pleural fistula (EPF) is a rare entity. We describe a case in a middle-aged female who presented with severe retrosternal chest pain and shortness of breadth. Chest computed tomography showed right EPF and hydropneumothorax. She was managed conservatively keeping the chest tube drainage and performing feeding jejunostomy. A brief review of the imaging finding and management of EPF is discussed.

  5. Spontaneous esophageal-pleural fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Sameer; Prakash, Mahesh; Kaman, Lileshwar; Bhardwaj, Nidhi; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2011-10-01

    Spontaneous esophageal-pleural fistula (EPF) is a rare entity. We describe a case in a middle-aged female who presented with severe retrosternal chest pain and shortness of breadth. Chest computed tomography showed right EPF and hydropneumothorax. She was managed conservatively keeping the chest tube drainage and performing feeding jejunostomy. A brief review of the imaging finding and management of EPF is discussed.

  6. Vitiligo associated with esophageal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asilian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo is a disease that results in depigmented areas in the skin. It may develop at any age but the average age at onset is 20 years. Association of vitiligo and melanoma has been commonly reported, but malignancies other than melanoma have been rarely associated with vitiligo. We report a 73-year-old patient with new onset vitiligo who developed esophageal adenocarcinoma in the following years.

  7. Spontaneous esophageal-pleural fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Vyas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous esophageal-pleural fistula (EPF is a rare entity. We describe a case in a middle-aged female who presented with severe retrosternal chest pain and shortness of breadth. Chest computed tomography showed right EPF and hydropneumothorax. She was managed conservatively keeping the chest tube drainage and performing feeding jejunostomy. A brief review of the imaging finding and management of EPF is discussed.

  8. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M

    2011-01-01

    , the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas as follows: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to be addressed through......The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference...

  9. Metabolic and hemodynamic evaluation of brain metastases from small cell lung cancer with positron emission tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Andersen, P; Daugaard, G

    1998-01-01

    for studies of metabolic and hemodynamic features. This study was performed to determine regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (rCMRglu), regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and regional cerebral blood volume (rCBV) in brain metastases from small cell lung cancer and the surrounding brain. Tumor r......Brain metastases from small cell lung cancer respond to chemotherapy, but response duration is short and the intracerebral concentration of chemotherapy may be too low because of the characteristics of the blood-brain barrier. Positron emission tomography has been applied in a variety of tumors...

  10. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M

    2011-01-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference......, the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas as follows: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to be addressed through...

  11. [Small cell neuroendocrine tumour of the bladder: with reference to a case and bibliographical revision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoz Tornos, A; Marrón Penón, Maria C; Pardo López, Maria L; Nogueras Gimeno, M A; Pujol Obis, E; Del Villar Sordo, V

    2006-09-01

    The small cell neuroendocrine tumour is an infrecuent neoplasia, with inmunohistochemistry being the key to diagnosis. We present a new case making reference to treatment and its evolution there after. The clinic, diagnosis and treatment of this tumour is described. Bibliographical revision follours. The neuroendocrine tumour of small cell is an infrecuent neoplasia, in which the inmunohistochemistry study is key in the diagnosis. The differential diagnosis includes the high degree diferentiation transitionals cells carcinoma and primary and secondary linfoma. The standard treatment is based on chemotherapy plus surgery.

  12. Small-cell comb does not control Varroa mites in colonies of honeybees of European origin

    OpenAIRE

    Seeley , Thomas; Griffin , Sean

    2011-01-01

    International audience; We tested the idea that Varroa destructor can be controlled in colonies of the European subspecies of Apis mellifera by providing them with combs built of small cells, in which immature mites might have difficulty developing for lack of space. We established seven pairs of equal-size colonies that started out equally infested with mites. In each pair, one hive contained only standard-cell (5.4 mm) comb, and the other contained only small-cell (4.8 mm) comb. We measured...

  13. Case report 331: Small cell osteosarcoma of the tibia with diffuse metastatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roessner, A.; Miebs, T.; Grundmann, E.; Immenkamp, M.; Hiddemann, W.; Althoff, J.

    1985-01-01

    In summary, the case is presented of a 29-year-old woman who developed a sclerosing small-cell osteosarcoma in the upper end of the tibia. The unique features in this case are reflected both in its morphology and protracted clinical course, while its histological pattern resembles in some features a small cell variant of the highly malignant osteosarcoma described by Sim and Martin. In addition to the unusual clinical course, the failure in response to chemotherapy underscores that this tumor differed in its biological behavior from other highly malignant types of osteosarcoma. The importance of DNA analysis is stressed. (orig./WU)

  14. A multi-institutional phase II study of hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy for unresectable non-small cell lung cancer: initial report of ECOG 4593

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannehill, Scott P.; Froseth, Carrie; Wagner, Henry; Petereit, Dan P.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility, acute toxicity, response and survival in a trial of hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy for unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using a t.i.d. regimen 5 days a week in an 8 hour schedule. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients (pts) from 6 institutions were enrolled in this pilot trial. Pt characteristics: 24 male, 6 female; median age 67 yrs (range 47-84); ECOG PS 0 in 22 pts, 1 in 8 pts; weight loss >5% in 7 pts. Stage was II (inoperable) in 1 pt, IIIA in 12 pts, and IIIB in 17 pts. Radiation therapy (total 57.6 Gy/36 fx) encompassing gross disease and draining lymphatics to 36 Gy (1.5 Gy b.i.d., 8 hours apart) with daily off-cord concomitant boost to 21.6 Gy (1.8 Gy 4 hours after first fraction) was given over 12 treatment days (15 elapsed days). Results: (28(30)) (93%) pts completed radiation therapy on schedule without toxicity-related treatment interruptions. Two pts did not complete radiation therapy; 1 due to in-field progression and 1 due to fatal acute gastric bleed unrelated to therapy. Two additional pts died in the first 6 weeks: 1 due to a presumed acute cardiovascular event and another due to complications of pre-existing cardiovascular disease. The major treatment-related toxicities were esophagitis in 6 pts (18%: 5 Grade 3 and 1 Grade 4) scored using a study specific esophagitis grading tool and 2 grade 3 dermatitis, in a total of 6 pts. Only 1 pt (3%) required hospitalization for IV hydration (Grade 4 esophagitis). Median weight loss at 6 weeks was 3 kg. Response data are pending in 2 pts and unavailable in 2 due to early death. Of the remaining 26 pts, local response analysis showed CR in 4, PR in 14, stable in 7 and progressive disease in 1 for an overall response rate of (18(26)) (69%). With a median potential follow-up of 13 months, the median survival has not yet been reached. The 1-yr actuarial survival is 63%. Exclusion of the 3 pts experiencing early death (in

  15. Glycomic Expression in Esophageal Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Mohanty

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Glycosylation is among the most common post translation modifications of proteins in humans. Decades of research have demonstrated that aberrant glycosylation can lead to malignant degeneration. Glycoproteomic studies in the past several years have identified techniques that can successfully characterize a glycan or glycan profile associated with a high-grade dysplastic or malignant state. This review summarizes the current glycomic and glycoproteomic literature with specific reference to esophageal cancer. Esophageal adenocarcinoma represents a highly morbid and mortal cancer with a defined progression from metaplasia (Barrett's esophagus to dysplasia to neoplasia. This disease is highlighted because (1 differences in glycan profiles between the stages of disease progression have been described in the glycoproteomic literature; (2 a glycan biomarker that identifies a given stage may be used as a predictor of disease progression and thus may have significant influence over clinical management; and (3 the differences in glycan profiles between disease and disease-free states in esophageal cancer are more dramatic than in other cancers.

  16. Radionuclide transit in esophageal varices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, S.H.; Wang, S.J.; Wu, L.C.; Liu, R.S.; Tsai, Y.T.; Chiang, T.T.

    1985-01-01

    This study assessed esophageal motility in patients with esophageal varices by radionuclide transit studies. Data were acquired in list mode after an oral dose of 0.5 mCi Tc-99m sulfur colloid in 10 ml of water in the supine position above a low-energy all-purpose collimator of a gamma camera. The condensed image (CI) superimposed with a centroid curve was also produced in each case. Twenty-five normal subjects (N) and 32 patients (pts) with esophageal varices by endoscopy (large varices in Grades IV and V in 8 and small varices in Grade III or less in 24) were studied. TMTT, RTT, RF, and RI were all significantly increased in pts as compared to N. Especially, the transit time for the middle third (6.7 +- 2.6 sec vs 3.5 +- 0.9 sec in N, rho < 0.005) had the optimal sensitivy and specificity of 88% each at the cutoff value of 4.2 sec as determined by ROC analysis. In summary, radionuclide transit disorders occur in the majority of pts with esopageal varices. The middle RTT and CI are both optimal in sensitivity and specificity for detecting the abnormalities

  17. Pharmacologic influence on esophageal varices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunderquist, A.; Owman, T.

    1983-01-01

    Selective catherization of the left gastric vein was performed after percutaneous transhepatic portography (PTP) in patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Following the hypothesis that drugs increasing the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure may obstruct the variceal blood flow throught the lower esophagus, the effect of different drugs (i.e., intravenous injection of vasopressin, pentagastrin, domperidone and somatostatin and subcutaneous injection of metacholine) on the variceal blood flow was examined. Vasopressin did not change the variceal blood flow; pentagastrine, with its known effect of increasing the LES pressure produced a total interruption of the flow in four of eight patients; domperiodone, also known to increase the LES pressure obstructed the variceal blood flow in the only patient examined with this drug; somatostatin has no reported action on the LES but blocked the flow in one of two patients; and metacholine, reported to increase the LES pressure did not produce any change in the flow in the three patients examined. LES pressure was recorded before and during vasopressin infusion in seven patients with portal hypertension and esophageal varices. No reaction on the pressure was found. The patient number in the study is small and the results are nonuniform but still they suggest that drugs increasing the LES tonus might be useful to control variceal blood flow. (orig.)

  18. Novel device to sample the esophageal microbiome--the esophageal string test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie A Fillon

    Full Text Available A growing number of studies implicate the microbiome in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. Previous work has shown that adults with esophagitis related to gastroesophageal reflux disease have altered esophageal microbiota compared to those who do not have esophagitis. In these studies, sampling of the esophageal microbiome was accomplished by isolating DNA from esophageal biopsies obtained at the time of upper endoscopy. The aim of the current study was to identify the esophageal microbiome in pediatric individuals with normal esophageal mucosa using a minimally invasive, capsule-based string technology, the Enterotest™. We used the proximal segment of the Enterotest string to sample the esophagus, and term this the "Esophageal String Test" (EST. We hypothesized that the less invasive EST would capture mucosal adherent bacteria present in the esophagus in a similar fashion as mucosal biopsy. EST samples and mucosal biopsies were collected from children with no esophageal inflammation (n = 15 and their microbiome composition determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Microbiota from esophageal biopsies and ESTs produced nearly identical profiles of bacterial genera and were different from the bacterial contents of samples collected from the nasal and oral cavity. We conclude that the minimally invasive EST can serve as a useful device for study of the esophageal microbiome.

  19. Clinical Application of Esophageal High-resolution Manometry in the Diagnosis of Esophageal Motility Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-01-31

    Esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) is replacing conventional manometry in the clinical evaluation of patients with esophageal symptoms, especially dysphagia. The introduction of HRM gave rise to new objective metrics and recognizable patterns of esophageal motor function, requiring a new classification scheme: the Chicago classification. HRM measurements are more detailed and more easily performed compared to conventional manometry. The visual presentation of acquired data improved the analysis and interpretation of esophageal motor function. This led to a more sensitive, accurate, and objective analysis of esophageal motility. In this review we discuss how HRM changed the way we define and categorize esophageal motility disorders. Moreover, we discuss the clinical applications of HRM for each esophageal motility disorder separately.

  20. Concomitant boost radiation therapy for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer: preliminary report of a prospective randomized study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, L.-M.; Leung, Stephen Wan; Wang, C.-J.; Chen, H.-C.; Fang, F.-M.; Huang, E.-Y.; Hsu, H.-C.; Yeh, S.-A.; Hsiung, C.-Y.; Huang, David T.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The radiation therapy results for patients with inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have been disappointing. Tumor dose escalation using concomitant boost technique (CBT) has been shown to improve local control in a few prospective studies. This trial was carried out to prospectively assess the radiation response and acute toxicity of CBT in comparison to the conventional treatment technique (CTT). Methods and Materials: Ninety-seven consecutive eligible patients were entered in this prospective clinical trial between November 1994 and February 1998. Patients were randomized to receive either CBT (43 patients) or CTT (54 patients) radiation therapy. These patients either refused chemotherapy or were judged as unsuitable for chemotherapy. Patients in the CBT group received 46.8 Gy in 26 fractions using large fields that encompassed the gross and occult disease. A concomitant boost of 18.2 Gy (0.7 Gy per fraction) was delivered to the gross disease using small fields with 1.5-cm margins. The small fields were treated concurrently with the large fields and the total dose to the tumor area was 65 Gy in 26 fractions. Patients in the CTT group received 70.8 Gy in 38 fractions. The acute toxicity between each group was compared. The response rate was analyzed and compared by treatment group, gender, age, stage, histology, initial Karnofsky performance score (KPS), severity of acute toxicity, and maximum body weight loss (MBWL) during treatment course. Results: The demographic parameters such as sex, age, and stage were evenly distributed in each treatment group. The majority of these patients had Stage IIIA and IIIB disease. Overall median treatment times were 39 days for the CBT group of patients and 62 days for the CTT group. No treatment-related mortality was found. There were 2 patients in the CTT group with acute RTOG Grade 3 lung toxicity, and no Grade 3 lung or esophageal toxicity was observed in CBT group. The response rates, assessed by

  1. Precision Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in Poor Performing Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Phase 1 Dose Escalation Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westover, Kenneth D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Loo, Billy W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Gerber, David E. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Iyengar, Puneeth; Choy, Hak [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Diehn, Maximilian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Hughes, Randy; Schiller, Joan; Dowell, Jonathan [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Wardak, Zabi [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Sher, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Christie, Alana; Xie, Xian-Jin [Department of Clinical Science, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Corona, Irma [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Sharma, Akanksha [School of Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Wadsworth, Margaret E. [Radiation Oncology of Mississippi, Jackson, Mississippi (United States); Timmerman, Robert, E-mail: Robert.Timmerman@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: Treatment regimens for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) give suboptimal clinical outcomes. Technological advancements such as radiation therapy, the backbone of most treatment regimens, may enable more potent and effective therapies. The objective of this study was to escalate radiation therapy to a tumoricidal hypofractionated dose without exceeding the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) in patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage II to IV or recurrent NSCLC and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2 or greater and not candidates for surgical resection, stereotactic radiation, or concurrent chemoradiation were eligible. Highly conformal radiation therapy was given to treat intrathoracic disease in 15 fractions to a total of 50, 55, or 60 Gy. Results: Fifty-five patients were enrolled: 15 at the 50-Gy, 21 at the 55-Gy, and 19 at the 60-Gy dose levels. A 90-day follow-up was completed in each group without exceeding the MTD. With a median follow-up of 12.5 months, there were 93 grade ≥3 adverse events (AEs), including 39 deaths, although most AEs were considered related to factors other than radiation therapy. One patient from the 55- and 60-Gy dose groups developed grade ≥3 esophagitis, and 5, 4, and 4 patients in the respective dose groups experienced grade ≥3 dyspnea, but only 2 of these AEs were considered likely related to therapy. There was no association between fraction size and toxicity (P=.24). The median overall survival was 6 months with no significant differences between dose levels (P=.59). Conclusions: Precision hypofractionated radiation therapy consisting of 60 Gy in 15 fractions for locally advanced NSCLC is generally well tolerated. This treatment regimen could provide patients with poor performance status a potent alternative to chemoradiation. This study has implications for the cost effectiveness of lung cancer therapy. Additional studies of long

  2. Palliation of Dysphagia from Esophageal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.Y.V. Homs (Marjolein)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe prognosis of esophageal cancer is poor with a 5-year survival of 10-15%. In addition, over 50% of patients with esophageal cancer already have an inoperable disease at presentation. The majority of these patients require palliative treatment to relieve progressive dysphagia. Metal

  3. PET-CT manifestation of Candida esophagitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Yong Whee [Sung-Ae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); O, Joo Hyun [Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, Catholic University Medical School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Candida esophagitis (moniliasis) is the most common infection of the gullet and has generally been attributed to as a complication of immune suppressed state. However, as the current case. Holt found the disease to occur in 3 of his 13 patients without predisposing condition. Predisposing factors other than immune deficient conditions include aplastic anemia, alcoholism and Parkinson's disease and age, diabetes mellitus, and disruption of mucosal integrity. Growing prevalence of Candida esophagitis in recent years is accounted for by an increase in the number of patients with organ transplantation, malignancy and AIDS as well as populrization of endoscopy. Microorganisms that reached the esophagus in oral secretions are rarely cultured from the esophageal surface. Of many species C. albicans is the most common offender although C. tropicalis has also been isolated with high prevalence, particularly in the patients with cancer and disseminated candidiasis. Clinically, the patients with Candida esophagitis seek medical care for esophageal or retrosternal pain, dysphagia or distress. Candida esophagitis may be the extension from oropharyngeal infection but in the majority the esophagus is the sole site of infection. The middle and lower thirds of the esophagus are more typically affected than the upper third. Diagnosis can be indicated by double contrast esophagography or endoscopy and confirmed by potassium hydroxide (KOH) stain or biopsy. It is to be noted that the more presence of Candida in smear or cultured specimen cannot indict Candida as definitive offender. Differential diagnosis includes herpes simplex infection, cytomegalovirus infection, reflux esophagitis or radiation esophagitis.

  4. Esophageal cancer awareness in Bomet district, Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Background: Esophageal cancer is the most common malignancy in Western ... 47% did not think that family history is a risk factor. ... 40% thought that herbal therapy is the optimal treatment for esophageal cancer. ... 2643 patients presenting to this hospital with cancer ..... they approach screening and treatment of this.

  5. PET-CT manifestation of Candida esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahk, Yong Whee; O, Joo Hyun

    2007-01-01

    Candida esophagitis (moniliasis) is the most common infection of the gullet and has generally been attributed to as a complication of immune suppressed state. However, as the current case. Holt found the disease to occur in 3 of his 13 patients without predisposing condition. Predisposing factors other than immune deficient conditions include aplastic anemia, alcoholism and Parkinson's disease and age, diabetes mellitus, and disruption of mucosal integrity. Growing prevalence of Candida esophagitis in recent years is accounted for by an increase in the number of patients with organ transplantation, malignancy and AIDS as well as populrization of endoscopy. Microorganisms that reached the esophagus in oral secretions are rarely cultured from the esophageal surface. Of many species C. albicans is the most common offender although C. tropicalis has also been isolated with high prevalence, particularly in the patients with cancer and disseminated candidiasis. Clinically, the patients with Candida esophagitis seek medical care for esophageal or retrosternal pain, dysphagia or distress. Candida esophagitis may be the extension from oropharyngeal infection but in the majority the esophagus is the sole site of infection. The middle and lower thirds of the esophagus are more typically affected than the upper third. Diagnosis can be indicated by double contrast esophagography or endoscopy and confirmed by potassium hydroxide (KOH) stain or biopsy. It is to be noted that the more presence of Candida in smear or cultured specimen cannot indict Candida as definitive offender. Differential diagnosis includes herpes simplex infection, cytomegalovirus infection, reflux esophagitis or radiation esophagitis

  6. Feeding Difficulties in Children with Esophageal Atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Lisa; Rosen, Rachel

    2016-06-01

    The current available literature evaluating feeding difficulties in children with esophageal atresia was reviewed. The published literature was searched through PubMed using a pre-defined search strategy. Feeding difficulties are commonly encountered in children and adults with repaired esophageal atresia [EA]. The mechanism for abnormal feeding includes both esophageal and oropharyngeal dysphagia. Esophageal dysphagia is commonly reported in patients with EA and causes include dysmotility, anatomic lesions, esophageal outlet obstruction and esophageal inflammation. Endoscopic evaluation, esophageal manometry and esophograms can be useful studies to evaluate for causes of esophageal dysphagia. Oropharyngeal dysfunction and aspiration are also important mechanisms for feeding difficulties in patients with EA. These patients often present with respiratory symptoms. Videofluoroscopic swallow study, salivagram, fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing and high-resolution manometry can all be helpful tools to identify aspiration. Once diagnosed, management goals include reduction of aspiration during swallowing, reducing full column reflux into the oropharynx and continuation of oral feeding to maintain skills. We review specific strategies which can be used to reduce aspiration of gastric contents, including thickening feeds, changing feeding schedule, switching formula, trialing transpyloric feeds and fundoplication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Esophageal diverticula in Parma wallabies (Macropus parma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeson, Danelle M; Esterline, Meredith L; Coke, Rob L

    2009-03-01

    Four adult, wild caught Parma wallabies (Macropus parma) presented with intermittent, postprandial, midcervical swellings. Esophageal diverticula were discovered in the four animals. One of two wallabies was managed successfully with surgery. A third animal died of other causes. The fourth animal died with possible complications from the diverticulum. This is the first published report of esophageal diverticula in macropods.

  8. Candidial esophagitis - A marker for HIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Kumar

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of AIDS manifested as candidial esophagitis. In addition , he had genital herpes, frequent diarrhoea, loss of weight and generalized lymphadenopathy. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopy. The patient died in 3 months due to unremitting diarrhoea. This importance of candidial esophagitis in a person at risk for developing AIDS is highlighted.

  9. The effect of adenovirus-mediated gene expression of FHIT in small cell lung cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zandi, Roza; Xu, Kai; Poulsen, Hans S

    2011-01-01

    The candidate tumor suppressor fragile histidine traid (FHIT) is frequently inactivated in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Mutations in the p53 gene also occur in the majority of SCLC leading to the accumulation of the mutant protein. Here we evaluated the effect of FHIT gene therapy alone...

  10. Decision support systems for incurable non-small cell lung cancer : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Révész, D; Engelhardt, E G; Tamminga, J J; Schramel, Franz M N H; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.; van de Garde, E M W; Steyerberg, E.W.; Jansma, E P; de Vet, Henrica C W; Coupé, V.M.H.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Individually tailored cancer treatment is essential to ensure optimal treatment and resource use. Treatments for incurable metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are evolving rapidly, and decision support systems (DSS) for this patient population have been developed to balance

  11. Outcome of combination chemotherapy in extensive stage small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U N; Hirsch, F R; Osterlind, K

    1998-01-01

    During the past two decades many different treatment regimens of combination chemotherapy have been applied in extensive stage small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). This study was carried out to identify whether these modifications have resulted in an improved overall survival for extensive stage during...

  12. Breviscapine suppresses the growth of non-small cell lung cancer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Breviscapine (BVP) has previously been shown to inhibit the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.However, little is known about the effects of BVP on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) growth. Here, we aimedto study the effects of BVP on human NSCLC growth. We employed A549, NCL-H460 and A549 cells ...

  13. Results of surgical treatment of T4 non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitz, CCM; de la Riviere, AB; van Swieten, HA; Westermann, CJJ; Lammers, JWJ; van den Bosch, JMM

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Because of location and invasion of surrounding structures, the role of surgical treatment for T4 tumors remains unclear. Extended resections carry a high mortality and should be restricted for selected patients. This study clarifies the selection process in non-small cell T4 tumors with

  14. Decision support systems for incurable non-small cell lung cancer: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Révész, D. (D.); Engelhardt, E.G. (E. G.); Tamminga, J.J. (J. J.); F.M.N.H. Schramel (Franz); B.D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen (Bregje); E.M.W. van de Garde (Ewoudt); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); Jansma, E.P. (E. P.); H.C. de Vet (Henrica C); V.M.H. Coupé (Veerle)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Individually tailored cancer treatment is essential to ensure optimal treatment and resource use. Treatments for incurable metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are evolving rapidly, and decision support systems (DSS) for this patient population have been developed to

  15. Role of free radicals in an adriamycin-resistant human small cell lung cancer cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, C.; Mulder, N H; Timmer-Bosscha, H; Zijlstra, J G; de Vries, E G

    1987-01-01

    In two Adriamycin (Adr) resistant sublines (GLC4-Adr1 and GLC4-Adr2) of a human small cell lung carcinoma cell line, GLC4, cross-resistance for radiation was found. GLC4-Adr1 has an acquired Adr resistance factor of 44 after culturing without Adr for 20 days and GLC4-Adr2, the same subline cultured

  16. Effects of concomitant cisplatin and radiotherapy on inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaake-Koning, C.; van den Bogaert, W.; Dalesio, O.; Festen, J.; Hoogenhout, J.; van Houtte, P.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Koolen, M.; Maat, B.; Nijs, A.

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND METHODS: Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum) has been reported to enhance the cell-killing effect of radiation, an effect whose intensity varies with the schedule of administration. We randomly assigned 331 patients with nonmetastatic inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer to one

  17. Integrative genome analyses identify key somatic driver mutations of small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peifer, Martin; Fernandez-Cuesta, Lynnette; Sos, Martin L.; George, Julie; Seidel, Danila; Kasper, Lawryn H.; Plenker, Dennis; Leenders, Frauke; Sun, Ruping; Zander, Thomas; Menon, Roopika; Koker, Mirjam; Dahmen, Ilona; Mueller, Christian; Di Cerbo, Vincenzo; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Altmueller, Janine; Baessmann, Ingelore; Becker, Christian; de Wilde, Bram; Vandesompele, Jo; Boehm, Diana; Ansen, Sascha; Gabler, Franziska; Wilkening, Ines; Heynck, Stefanie; Heuckmann, Johannes M.; Lu, Xin; Carter, Scott L.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Banerji, Shantanu; Getz, Gad; Park, Kwon-Sik; Rauh, Daniel; Gruetter, Christian; Fischer, Matthias; Pasqualucci, Laura; Wright, Gavin; Wainer, Zoe; Russell, Prudence; Petersen, Iver; Chen, Yuan; Stoelben, Erich; Ludwig, Corinna; Schnabel, Philipp; Hoffmann, Hans; Muley, Thomas; Brockmann, Michael; Engel-Riedel, Walburga; Muscarella, Lucia A.; Fazio, Vito M.; Groen, Harry; Timens, Wim; Sietsma, Hannie; Thunnissen, Erik; Smit, Egbert; Heideman, Danielle A. M.; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Cappuzzo, Federico; Ligorio, Claudia; Damiani, Stefania; Field, John; Solberg, Steinar; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Saenger, Joerg; Clement, Joachim H.; Soltermann, Alex; Moch, Holger; Weder, Walter; Solomon, Benjamin; Soria, Jean-Charles; Validire, Pierre; Besse, Benjamin; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Brambilla, Christian; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Lorimier, Philippe; Schneider, Peter M.; Hallek, Michael; Pao, William; Meyerson, Matthew; Sage, Julien; Shendure, Jay; Schneider, Robert; Buettner, Reinhard; Wolf, Juergen; Nuernberg, Peter; Perner, Sven; Heukamp, Lukas C.; Brindle, Paul K.; Haas, Stefan; Thomas, Roman K.

    2012-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive lung tumor subtype with poor prognosis(1-3). We sequenced 29 SCLC exomes, 2 genomes and 15 transcriptomes and found an extremely high mutation rate of 7.4 +/- 1 protein-changing mutations per million base pairs. Therefore, we conducted integrated

  18. Early death during chemotherapy in patients with small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U N; Osterlind, K; Hirsch, F R

    1999-01-01

    Based on an increased frequency of early death (death within the first treatment cycle) in our two latest randomized trials of combination chemotherapy in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), we wanted to identify patients at risk of early non-toxic death (ENTD) and early toxic death (ETD). Data were s...

  19. A phase II study of gemcitabine in the treatment of non small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LeChevalier, T; Gottfried, M; Gatzemeier, U; Shepherd, F; Weynants, P; Cottier, B; Groen, HJM; Rosso, R; Mattson, K; CortesFunes, H; Tonato, M; Burkes, RL; Voi, M; Ponzio, A

    Gemcitabine is a novel pyrimidine nucleoside whose activity has been demonstrated on solid tumors. We report here the results of a multicentre phase II trial of gemcitabine in chemonaive patients with inoperable non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Gemcitabine was given weekly at a dose of 1,250

  20. PD-L1 expression in non-small cell lung cancer : Correlations with genetic alterations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheel, Andreas H.; Ansen, Sascha; Schultheis, Anne M.; Scheffler, Matthias; Fischer, Rieke N.; Michels, Sebastian; Hellmich, Martin; George, Julie; Zander, Thomas; Brockmann, Michael; Stoelben, Erich; Groen, Harry; Timens, Wim; Perner, Sven; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael; Buettner, Reinhard; Wolf, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may induce anticancer immune responses in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two PD-L1 immunohistochemistry (IHC) assays have been approved as companion diagnostic tests for therapeutic anti-PD-1 antibodies. However, many aspects of PD-L1 prevalence and

  1. First-Line Nivolumab in Stage IV or Recurrent Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbone, D.P.; Reck, M.; Paz-Ares, L.; Creelan, B.; Horn, L.; Steins, M.; Felip, E.; Heuvel, M. van den; Ciuleanu, T.E.; Badin, F.; Ready, N.; Hiltermann, T.J.N.; Nair, S.; Juergens, R.; Peters, S.; Minenza, E.; Wrangle, J.M.; Rodriguez-Abreu, D.; Borghaei, H.; umenschein GR, J.r. Bl; Villaruz, L.C.; Havel, L.; Krejci, J.; rral Jaime, J. Co; Chang, H.; Geese, W.J.; Bhagavatheeswaran, P.; Chen, A.C.; Socinski, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nivolumab has been associated with longer overall survival than docetaxel among patients with previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In an open-label phase 3 trial, we compared first-line nivolumab with chemotherapy in patients with programmed death ligand 1

  2. First-Line Nivolumab in Stage IV or Recurrent Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carbone, D. P.; Reck, M.; Paz-Ares, L.; Creelan, B.; Horn, L.; Steins, M.; Felip, E.; van den Heuvel, M. M.; Ciuleanu, T. -E.; Badin, F.; Ready, N.; Hiltermann, T. J. N.; Nair, S; Juergens, R.; Peters, S.; Minenza, E.; Wrangle, J. M.; Rodriguez-Abreu, D.; Borghaei, H.; Blumenschein, G. R.; Villaruz, L. C.; Havel, L.; Krejci, J.; Corral Jaime, J.; Chang, C. -H.; Geese, W. J.; Bhagavatheeswaran, P.; Chen, Alexander C.; Socinski, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Nivolumab has been associated with longer overall survival than docetaxel among patients with previously treated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In an open-label phase 3 trial, we compared first-line nivolumab with chemotherapy in patients with programmed death ligand 1

  3. A Distributed Taxation Based Rank Adaptation Scheme for 5G Small Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catania, Davide; Cattoni, Andrea Fabio; Mahmood, Nurul Huda

    2015-01-01

    The further densification of small cells impose high and undesirable levels of inter-cell interference. Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) systems along with advanced receiver techniques provide us with extra degrees of freedom to combat such a problem. With such tools, rank adaptation...

  4. Prognostic classification with laboratory parameters or imaging techniques in small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Wouter K.; Fidler, Vaclav; Groen, Harry J. M.

    PURPOSE: Our aim in this study was to compare prognostic models based on laboratory tests with a model including imaging information in small-cell lung cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A retrospective analysis was performed on 156 consecutive patients. Three existing models based on laboratory tests

  5. Should patients with laryngeal small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma receive prophylactic cranial irradiation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coca-Pelaz, Andres; Devaney, Kenneth O.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Halmos, Gyorgy B.; Strojan, Primoz; Mendenhall, William M.; Eisbruch, Avraham; Smee, Robert; Kusafuka, Kimihide; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2016-01-01

    While small cell neuroendocrine carcinomas (SCNCs) most often arise in the lung, extrapulmonary SCNCs arise in a variety of locations-including the head and neck region. In particular, laryngeal SCNCs-while rare tumors-are nevertheless recognized as distinct lesions. The rarity of laryngeal SCNC

  6. Changes in epidermal growth factor receptor expression during chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibodies targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), such as cetuximab, may potentially improve outcome in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with high EGFR expression. The EGFR expression may be heterogeneously distributed within tumors, and small biopsies may thus...

  7. On the Potential of Full Duplex Communication in 5G Small Cell Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Nurul Huda; Berardinelli, Gilberto; Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão

    2015-01-01

    , the potential throughput gain may not be 100% as promised. In this study, we evaluate the performance of full duplex communication in a dense small cell scenario as targeted by future 5th Generation (5G) radio access technology under the ideal assumptions of a full buffer, always active traffic model...

  8. Full Duplex Communication Under Traffic Constraints for 5G Small Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gatnau, Marta; Catania, Davide; Berardinelli, Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    the framework of 5th generation (5G) small cell systems in order to address its effective gain in such specific scenarios. The factors that affect FD performance are analysed, and its performance is evaluated against a traditional HD communication. System level simulations show that the gain of FD over HD...

  9. Interference-Robust Air Interface for 5G Ultra-dense Small Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão; Berardinelli, Gilberto; Mahmood, Nurul Huda

    2016-01-01

    An ultra-dense deployment of small cells is foreseen as the solution to cope with the exponential increase of the data rate demand targeted by the 5th Generation (5G) radio access technology. In this article, we propose an interference-robust air interface built upon the usage of advanced receivers...

  10. A Stochastic Geometry Framework for LOS/NLOS Propagation in Dense Small Cell Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galiotto, Carlo; Kiilerich Pratas, Nuno; Marchetti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The need to carry out analytical studies of wireless systems often motivates the usage of simplified models which, despite their tractability, can easily lead to an overestimation of the achievable performance. In the case of dense small cells networks, the standard single slope path-loss model h...

  11. Melittin exerts an antitumor effect on non‑small cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Su-Fang; Chen, Zhe

    2017-09-01

    Lung cancer accounts for a significant percentage of all cancer‑associated mortalities in men and women, with non‑small cell lung cancer being the most frequently occurring type of lung cancer. Melittin is the principal active component of apitoxin (bee venom) that has been reported to exert anti‑chronic inflammatory and anti‑cancer effects. In the present study, the antitumor effect of melittin was evaluated using in vivo and in vitro analyses. The results demonstrated that melittin significantly inhibited the epidermal growth factor‑induced invasion and migration of non‑small cell lung cancer cells. Subcutaneous injection of melittin at doses of 1 and 10 mg/kg significantly suppressed non‑small cell lung cancer tumor growth by 27 and 61%, respectively. In addition, melittin significantly inhibited the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in non‑small cell lung cancer cells. Furthermore, melittin decreased the protein expression of VEGF and hypoxia‑inducible factor 1‑α. Therefore, the antitumor activity of melittin may be associated with the anti‑angiogenic actions of inhibiting the VEGF and hypoxia‑inducible factor signaling pathways.

  12. Intra-abdominal desmoplastic small cell tumor in a girl : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Seok

    1998-01-01

    Desmoplastic small cell tumor is a rare primary intra-abdominal disease with a predilection for the adolescent boy. This aggressive tumor involved multiple intraperitoneal organs, peritoneal, mesentery and omental seedings, and sometimes retroperitoneal extension. The author reports a case of this rare tumor, demonstrated by CT, MRI and US, in a 14-year-old girl. (author). 9 refs., 2 figs

  13. An Experimental Study of Advanced Receivers in a Practical Dense Small Cells Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assefa, Dereje; Berardinelli, Gilberto; Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão

    2016-01-01

    leads to significant limitations on the network throughput in such deployments. In addition, network densification introduces difficulty in network deployment. This paper presents a study on the benefits of advanced receiver in a practical uncoordinated dense small cells deployment. Our aim is to show...

  14. Small cell foams and blends and a process for their preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedstrand, D.M.; Tomalia, D.A.

    1995-02-07

    Dense star polymers or dendrimers, modified by capping with a hydrophobic group capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell, act as molecular nucleating agents. These modified dense star polymers or dendrimers are particularly effective for the production of small cell foams.

  15. A Case of Primary Gastric Small-Cell Carcinoma in an Elderly Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa-Chang Yu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of primary small-cell carcinoma of the stomach in a 75-year-old man. The patient was admitted to our hospital with a 1-week history of intermittent tarry stool. An upper gastrointestinal examination revealed a large stage A2 ulcer in the greater curvature of the body of the stomach, and pathological findings from biopsy specimens revealed small-cell carcinoma. The tumor cells were small-sized, composed of hyperchromatic nuclei with scant cytoplasm, and stained positive for cytokeratin, synaptophysin, and chromogranin A. The patient was diagnosed with primary small-cell carcinoma of the stomach. He declined further evaluation and received palliative management. This is a rare carcinoma of the stomach, with aggressive manifestations and a poor prognosis. The mean survival of patients with primary gastric small-cell carcinoma is reported to be 7 months. The choice of treatment for this disease is still controversial. This rare gastric tumor should be listed in the differential diagnosis of gastric carcinoma in the elderly.

  16. Abnormal diffusion-weighted MRI in medulloblastoma: does it reflect small cell histology?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotsenas, A.L.; Roth, T.C.; Manness, W.K.; Faerber, E.N.

    1999-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy presented with the classic CT and MRI findings of medulloblastoma and the unusual finding of increased signal on diffusion MRI. The small-cell histology of medulloblastoma may account for the increased signal seen on diffusion MRI. Diffusion MRI with echoplanar technique may be useful in evaluation of these tumors and metastatic disease. (orig.)

  17. Spectral and energy efficiency analysis of uplink heterogeneous networks with small-cells on edge

    KAUST Repository

    Shakir, Muhammad Zeeshan

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a tractable mathematical framework to analyze the spectral and energy efficiency of an operator initiated deployment of the small-cells (e.g., femtocells) where the small-cell base stations are deliberately positioned around the edge of the macrocell. The considered deployment facilitates the cell-edge mobile users in terms of their coverage, spectral, and energy efficiency and is referred to as cell-on-edge (COE) configuration. The reduction in energy consumption is achieved by considering fast power control where the mobile users transmit with adaptive power to compensate the path loss, shadowing and fading. In particular, we develop a moment generating function (MGF) based approach to derive analytical bounds on the area spectral efficiency and exact expressions for the energy efficiency of the mobile users in the considered COE configuration over generalized-K fading channels. Besides the COE configuration, the derived bounds are also shown to be useful in evaluating the performance of random small-cell deployments, e.g., uniformly distributed small-cells. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the improvements in spectral and energy efficiency of the COE configuration with respect to macro-only networks and other unplanned deployment strategies. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical impact of ki-67 labeling index in non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2013-01-01

    The ki-67 index is a marker of proliferation in malignant tumors. Studies from the period 2000 to 2012 on the prognostic and predictive value of ki-67 labeling index (LI) in non-small cell cancer (NSCLC) are reviewed. Twenty-eight studies reported on the prognostic value of ki-67 index with various...

  19. Evaluation of esophageal motor function in clinical practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gyawali, C. P.; Bredenoord, A. J.; Conklin, J. L.; Fox, M.; Pandolfino, J. E.; Peters, J. H.; Roman, S.; Staiano, A.; Vaezi, M. F.

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal motor function is highly coordinated between central and enteric nervous systems and the esophageal musculature, which consists of proximal skeletal and distal smooth muscle in three functional regions, the upper and lower esophageal sphincters, and the esophageal body. While upper

  20. Three cases of radiation esophagitis controlled with proton pump inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murakami, Ryuji; Saito, Ryuichi; Miyazaki, Toshiyuki [Kumamoto Red Cross Hospital (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    Radiation esophagitis sometimes interrupts the radiation therapy due to swallowing pain and dysplasia. We experienced three cases of radiation-induced esophagitis controlled with proton pump inhibitor (PPI). These cases suggested etiologic relationship radiation esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We should consider PPI as treatment option for radiation esophagitis. (author)

  1. A phase II study of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) after induction cisplatin (CDDP) and vinorelbine (VNR) for stage III Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikura, Satoshi; Ohe, Yuichiro; Nihei, Keiji; Kubota, Kaoru; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Goto, Koichi; Niho, Seiji; Nishiwaki, Yutaka; Ogino, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to assess the feasibility and efficacy of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy (HART) after induction chemotherapy for Stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and materials: Treatment consisted of 2 cycles of cisplatin 80 mg/m 2 on Day 1 and vinorelbine 25 mg/m 2 on Days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks followed by HART, 3 times a day (1.5, 1.8, 1.5 Gy, 4-h interval) for a total dose of 57.6 Gy. Results: Thirty patients were eligible. Their median age was 64 years (range, 46-73 years), 24 were male, 6 were female, 8 had performance status (PS) 0, 22 had PS 1, 9 had Stage IIIA, and 21 had Stage IIIB. All but 1 patient completed the treatment. Common grade ≥3 toxicities during the treatment included neutropenia, 25; infection, 5; esophagitis, 5; and radiation pneumonitis, 3. The overall response rate was 83%. The median survival was 24 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 13-34 months), and the 2-year overall survival was 50% (95% CI, 32-68%). The median progression-free survival was 10 months (95% CI, 8-20 months). Conclusion: Hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy after induction of cisplatin and vinorelbine was feasible and promising. Future investigation employing dose-intensified radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy is needed

  2. Endoscopic Management of Benign Esophageal Strictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravich, William J

    2017-08-24

    This paper presents the author's approach to esophageal dilation. It offers a tailored approach to the application of dilation to specific types of esophageal stenotic lesions. In patients with inflammatory stricture, recent studies confirm the importance of treating the underlying inflammatory condition in order to decrease the rate of recurrence. The paper reviews some of the novel techniques that have been suggested for the treatment of refractory benign esophageal strictures, including incisional therapy, stenting, or the injection steroids or antifibrotic agents. The endoscopist who treats esophageal strictures must be familiar with the tools of the dilation and how they are best applied to specific types of stenotic lesions. If inflammation is present, effective management requires treatment of the inflammatory process in addition to mechanical dilation of the stenotic lesion. Controlled trials of novel approaches to treatment of refractory benign esophageal strictures are limited and will be necessary to determine efficacy.

  3. [Effect of nasogastric tube on esophageal mucosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barinagarrementeria, R; Blancas Valencia, J M; Teramoto Matsubara, O; de la Garza González, S

    1991-01-01

    We studied 30 patients. 20 were males and 10 females. Mean age was 48 year old. Esophageal disease was not present neither gastro-esophageal reflux. Biopsy was taken between 24 hours and 25 days after nasogastric tube (NG) was put into place. Endoscopic findings were: hyperemic mucosa, submucosal hemorrhage, clots, erosions and ulcers near Esophago-gastric junction. Intraepithelial edema, vessel congestion, polymorphonuclear infiltration, fibrin thrombosis of submucosal vessels, ischemia, epithelial regeneration and ulcer were common histologic findings. All endoscopic and histologic alterations were related to the length of time of NG tube contact with the esophageal mucosa. We concluded that NG tube damages the esophageal mucosa by two mechanisms: a) Local irritation that favors b) gastric reflux by decreasing lower esophageal sphincter pressure.

  4. Gastro-Esophageal Reflux in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rybak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-esophageal reflux (GER is common in infants and children and has a varied clinical presentation: from infants with innocent regurgitation to infants and children with severe esophageal and extra-esophageal complications that define pathological gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD. Although the pathophysiology is similar to that of adults, symptoms of GERD in infants and children are often distinct from classic ones such as heartburn. The passage of gastric contents into the esophagus is a normal phenomenon occurring many times a day both in adults and children, but, in infants, several factors contribute to exacerbate this phenomenon, including a liquid milk-based diet, recumbent position and both structural and functional immaturity of the gastro-esophageal junction. This article focuses on the presentation, diagnosis and treatment of GERD that occurs in infants and children, based on available and current guidelines.

  5. Gastro-Esophageal Reflux in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybak, Anna; Pesce, Marcella; Thapar, Nikhil; Borrelli, Osvaldo

    2017-08-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) is common in infants and children and has a varied clinical presentation: from infants with innocent regurgitation to infants and children with severe esophageal and extra-esophageal complications that define pathological gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Although the pathophysiology is similar to that of adults, symptoms of GERD in infants and children are often distinct from classic ones such as heartburn. The passage of gastric contents into the esophagus is a normal phenomenon occurring many times a day both in adults and children, but, in infants, several factors contribute to exacerbate this phenomenon, including a liquid milk-based diet, recumbent position and both structural and functional immaturity of the gastro-esophageal junction. This article focuses on the presentation, diagnosis and treatment of GERD that occurs in infants and children, based on available and current guidelines.

  6. Esophageal strictures during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    Esophageal stricture is a rare complication of paediatric cancer treatment that usually occurs after esophageal exposure to radiotherapy. We describe 4 cases of esophageal stricture during chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. All patients presented with refractory vomiting and were diagnosed with radiologic contrast studies. None of the patients had received radiotherapy. Esophageal candidiasis was seen in 2 patients but the remaining 2 patients had earlier systemic candidiasis. High-dose dexamethasone may predispose these children to both esophageal candidiasis and peptic esophagitis. The etiology of esophageal strictures during treatment for acute leukemia is likely to be multifactorial but systemic candidiasis may play a significant role.

  7. Drug development for breast, colorectal, and non-small cell lung cancers from 1979 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Nancy A; Khan, Omar F; Imam, Hasiba; Tang, Patricia A; Monzon, Jose; Li, Haocheng; Sun, Gavin; Ezeife, Doreen; Parimi, Sunil; Dowden, Scot; Tam, Vincent C

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the drug development pathway is critical for streamlining the development of effective cancer treatments. The objective of the current study was to delineate the drug development timeline and attrition rate of different drug classes for common cancer disease sites. Drugs entering clinical trials for breast, colorectal, and non-small cell lung cancer were identified using a pharmaceutical business intelligence database. Data regarding drug characteristics, clinical trials, and approval dates were obtained from the database, clinical trial registries, PubMed, and regulatory Web sites. A total of 411 drugs met the inclusion criteria for breast cancer, 246 drugs met the inclusion criteria for colorectal cancer, and 315 drugs met the inclusion criteria for non-small cell lung cancer. Attrition rates were 83.9% for breast cancer, 87.0% for colorectal cancer, and 92.0% for non-small cell lung cancer drugs. In the case of non-small cell lung cancer, there was a trend toward higher attrition rates for targeted monoclonal antibodies compared with other agents. No tumor site-specific differences were noted with regard to cytotoxic chemotherapy, immunomodulatory, or small molecule kinase inhibitor drugs. Drugs classified as "others" in breast cancer had lower attrition rates, primarily due to the higher success of hormonal medications. Mean drug development times were 8.9 years for breast cancer, 6.7 years for colorectal cancer, and 6.6 years for non-small cell lung cancer. Overall oncologic drug attrition rates remain high, and drugs are more likely to fail in later-stage clinical trials. The refinement of early-phase trial design may permit the selection of drugs that are more likely to succeed in the phase 3 setting. Cancer 2017;123:4672-4679. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  8. EGFR T790M mutation after chemotherapy for small cell lung cancer transformation of EGFR-positive non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoaki Sonoda

    Full Text Available In non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC with an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation, 50%–65% of cases acquire resistance after treatment with EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs because of an EGFR T790M point mutation and 3%–14% of these cases transformed to small cell lung cancer (SCLC. Generally, the EGFR T790M secondary mutation develops with ongoing ATP competitive inhibition. We present a case of a 76-year-old woman with lung adenocarcinoma harboring an EGFR-L858R mutation who received first-line gefitinib and developed SCLC transformation. She was administered several chemotherapy agents, including a platinum doublet. The primary lesion that showed SCLC transformation had reconverted to adenocarcinoma with EGFR L858R and T790M mutations at the time of a second re-biopsy. Therefore, she was administered osimertinib, which resulted in clinical remission. This case suggested that serial biopsies are necessary even after SCLC transformation. Keywords: NSCLC, EGFR mutation, SCLC transformation, T790M, Osimertinib

  9. Identification of Gene Biomarkers for Distinguishing Small-Cell Lung Cancer from Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using a Network-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Long

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer consists of two main subtypes: small-cell lung cancer (SCLC and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC that are classified according to their physiological phenotypes. In this study, we have developed a network-based approach to identify molecular biomarkers that can distinguish SCLC from NSCLC. By identifying positive and negative coexpression gene pairs in normal lung tissues, SCLC, or NSCLC samples and using functional association information from the STRING network, we first construct a lung cancer-specific gene association network. From the network, we obtain gene modules in which genes are highly functionally associated with each other and are either positively or negatively coexpressed in the three conditions. Then, we identify gene modules that not only are differentially expressed between cancer and normal samples, but also show distinctive expression patterns between SCLC and NSCLC. Finally, we select genes inside those modules with discriminating coexpression patterns between the two lung cancer subtypes and predict them as candidate biomarkers that are of diagnostic use.

  10. Molecular biologic study about the non-small cell lung carcinoma (2) : p53 gene alteration in non-small cell lung carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Ho; Zo, Jae Ill; Paik, Hee Jong; Kim, Mi Hee

    1996-12-01

    The main purpose of this research was to identify of the p53 and 3p gene alteration in non-small cell lung cancer patients residing in Korea. Furthermore, we analyzed the relationship between the p53 and 3p gene alterations and the clinicopathologic results of lung cancer patients. And we have investigated the role of PCR-LOH in analyzing tumor samples for LOH of defined chromosomal loci. We have used the 40 samples obtained from the lung cancer patients who were diagnosed and operated curatively at Korea Cancer Center Hospital. We have isolated the high molecular weight. DNA from the tumors and normal tissues. And we have amplified the DNA with PCR method and used the microsatellite assay method to detect the altered p53 and 3p gene. The conclusions were as follow: 1) The 3p gene alteration was observed in 9/39 (23.1%) and p53 gene alteration was observed in 15/40 (37.5%) of resected non-small cell lung cancer. 2) There was no correlations between the 3p or p53 gene alterations and prognosis of patients, but further study is necessary. 3) PCR-LOH is a very useful tool for analyzing small amount of tumor samples for loss of heterozygosity of defined chromosomal loci. (author). 10 refs

  11. Drug Combination Synergy in Worm-like Polymeric Micelles Improves Treatment Outcome for Small Cell and Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaomeng; Min, Yuanzeng; Bludau, Herdis; Keith, Andrew; Sheiko, Sergei S; Jordan, Rainer; Wang, Andrew Z; Sokolsky-Papkov, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V

    2018-03-27

    Nanoparticle-based systems for concurrent delivery of multiple drugs can improve outcomes of cancer treatments, but face challenges because of differential solubility and fairly low threshold for incorporation of many drugs. Here we demonstrate that this approach can be used to greatly improve the treatment outcomes of etoposide (ETO) and platinum drug combination ("EP/PE") therapy that is the backbone for treatment of prevalent and deadly small cell lung cancer (SCLC). A polymeric micelle system based on amphiphilic block copolymer poly(2-oxazoline)s (POx) poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline- block-2-butyl-2-oxazoline- block-2-methyl-2-oxazoline) (P(MeOx- b-BuOx- b-MeOx) is used along with an alkylated cisplatin prodrug to enable co-formulation of EP/PE in a single high-capacity vehicle. A broad range of drug mixing ratios and exceptionally high two-drug loading of over 50% wt. drug in dispersed phase is demonstrated. The highly loaded POx micelles have worm-like morphology, unprecedented for drug loaded polymeric micelles reported so far, which usually form spheres upon drug loading. The drugs co-loading in the micelles result in a slowed-down release, improved pharmacokinetics, and increased tumor distribution of both drugs. A superior antitumor activity of co-loaded EP/PE drug micelles compared to single drug micelles or their combination as well as free drug combination was demonstrated using several animal models of SCLC and non-small cell lung cancer.

  12. Esophagectomy for Superficial Esophageal Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Thomas J

    2017-07-01

    Endoscopic therapies have become the standard of care for most cases of Barrett's esophagus with high-grade dysplasia or intramucosal adenocarcinoma. Despite a rapid and dramatic evolution in treatment paradigms, esophagectomy continues to occupy a place in the therapeutic armamentarium for superficial esophageal neoplasia. The managing physician must remain cognizant of the limitations of endoscopic approaches and consider surgical resection when they are exceeded. Esophagectomy, performed at experienced centers for appropriately selected patients with early-stage disease can be undertaken with the expectation of cure as well as low mortality, acceptable morbidity, and good long-term quality of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Radiation therapy for esophageal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatani, Masashi; Matayoshi, Yoshinobu; Masaki, Norie

    1992-01-01

    From 1977 through 1989, 149 patients with esophageal carcinoma were treated with external irradiation (EI) with or without high-dose rate intraluminal irradiation (HDRII) using remote afterloading system. Concerning complete response group EI alone showed higher local control rate than EI + HDRII, especially in ulcerative type. Another problem is the EI field. Fourteen of 22 patients who were salvaged by surgery due to local recurrence after EI showed marginal or out-field metastasis of the lymph node. These preliminary results suggest that HDRII is not effective for the local control of the ulcerative lesion as a boost therapy, EI should be given for the entire regional lymph nodes. (author)

  14. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy in esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calais, G.

    1998-01-01

    Radiation therapy with concomitant chemotherapy is the standard treatment for non resectable esophageal carcinoma. For patients with operable tumors, surgery is the traditional treatment. However several data could improve therapeutic results. At the present time, no randomized trial has demonstrated, except for adenocarcinoma of the cardia, the benefit of preoperative treatment. Other randomized trials are needed to determine the role and the optimal modalities of these treatments. This is a review of the literature data in concomitant chemotherapy and radiation in the management of esophagus. (author)

  15. Thoracoscopic Surgery in a Patient with Multiple Esophageal Carcinomas after Surgery for Esophageal Achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Yuki; Tsukada, Tomoya; Aoki, Tatsuya; Haba, Yusuke; Hirano, Katsuhisa; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Kaji, Masahide; Shimizu, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    We present a case in which we used a thoracoscopic approach for resection of multiple esophageal carcinomas diagnosed 33 years after surgery for esophageal achalasia. A 68-year-old Japanese man had been diagnosed with esophageal achalasia and underwent surgical treatment 33 years earlier. He was examined at our hospital for annual routine checkup in which upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a "0-IIb+IIa" lesion in the middle esophagus. Iodine staining revealed multiple irregularly shaped iodine-unstained areas, the diagnosis of which was esophageal carcinoma. Thoracoscopic subtotal esophagectomy was performed. Esophageal carcinoma may occur many years after surgery for esophageal achalasia, even if the passage symptoms have improved. So, long-term periodic follow-up is necessary for detection of carcinoma at an earlier stage.

  16. Thoracoscopic Surgery in a Patient with Multiple Esophageal Carcinomas after Surgery for Esophageal Achalasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Yamasaki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case in which we used a thoracoscopic approach for resection of multiple esophageal carcinomas diagnosed 33 years after surgery for esophageal achalasia. A 68-year-old Japanese man had been diagnosed with esophageal achalasia and underwent surgical treatment 33 years earlier. He was examined at our hospital for annual routine checkup in which upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a “0-IIb+IIa” lesion in the middle esophagus. Iodine staining revealed multiple irregularly shaped iodine-unstained areas, the diagnosis of which was esophageal carcinoma. Thoracoscopic subtotal esophagectomy was performed. Esophageal carcinoma may occur many years after surgery for esophageal achalasia, even if the passage symptoms have improved. So, long-term periodic follow-up is necessary for detection of carcinoma at an earlier stage.

  17. Radioisotope esophageal transit test. A new technique for esophageal emptying and gastroesophageal reflux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazono, K.; Fukuda, K.; Toyonaga, A. (Kurume Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1982-06-01

    A new technique employed sup(99m)Tc-MAA for the study of esophageal dysfunction and its clinical implication were evaluated in the patients with achalasia, progressive systemic sclerosis, reflux esophagitis and 10 normal controls. To investigate esophageal emptying and gastroesophageal reflux, a homogeneous bolus of sup(99m)Tc-MAA in 15ml of water was swallowed in the upright and supine positions under the collimeter of a gamma camera linked to nuclear medicine data analyser (Shimazu Scinti Pack 1200). This radionuclide transit study made a quantitative evaluation of the esophageal dysfunction possible in all cases. Comparing the conventional esophageal function test procedures, this test is a safe, noninvasive and more physiological and sensitive in detecting abnormal esophageal emptying and gastroesophageal reflux.

  18. Recent developments in esophageal motor disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Hanneke; Boeckxstaens, Guy

    2007-07-01

    Every year more insight into the pathogenesis and treatment of esophageal motor disorders is obtained. This review highlights some interesting literature published in this area during the last year. Longitudinal and circular muscle contractions act in a well coordinated fashion to allow normal peristalsis. Techniques such as intraluminal impedance, high-resolution manometry and intraluminal ultrasound provide useful additional information on esophageal function both in the normal and abnormal situation. The dynamics of the gastroesophageal junction can be studied with a newly developed probe, and the mechanism behind transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations is still being unravelled. New manometric criteria for nutcracker esophagus have been proposed, whereas further evidence is reported supporting an association between diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease and esophageal dysmotility and spasm, respectively. Finally, several long-term follow-up results of surgical myotomy and pneumodilatation have been reported. Due to the perfection of esophageal measuring techniques, our knowledge of esophageal function continues to increase. The studies reviewed here provide interesting information on the pathogenesis and treatment of several esophageal motor disorders.

  19. [Esophageal motor function of gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Tian, Yuan; Ding, Yan

    2010-08-01

    To study the relationship between esophageal motor functional disorder [decreased lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP)and ineffective motility (IEM)] and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Totally 89 patients with GERD were enrolled in this study. All of them underwent 24-hour pH monitoring with dual-channel probe and stationary esophageal manometry. In addition, 77 of these patients underwent upper endoscopy. IEM and LES, 10 mmHg were common disturbances in patients with GERD (54% and 48%, respectively). The number of the acid reflux events of distal esophagus and prevalence of moderate or severe erosive esophagitis (EE) were significantly higher in patients with low LESP and IEM than patients without low LESP ( Pesophagus was significantly correlated with the severity of esophagitis, distal esophagus amplitude, and LESP, while no such correlation was found between IEM and degree of esophageal acid exposure or esophagitis. The pathophysiology of GERD is probably multifactorial. Lower LESP or IEM is not a independent pathophysiological factor for GERD. However,one single factor is insufficient to explain all the pathogenic mechanism of GERD.

  20. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett’s esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted. PMID:24868489

  1. A clinical assessment of esophageal scintigraphy in patients with esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsutsui, Shigeharu; Shibatsuji, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi

    1987-01-01

    In patients with esophageal cancer who were treated with radiation therapy, esophageal motility was quantitatively analyzed by comparing the findings from esophageal scintigraphy with subjective symptoms and fluoroscopic findings. The subjects of this study were 5 healthy adults and 10 patients with esophageal cancer. Patients with esophageal cancer underwent radiation therapy (exposure to 50 or 60 Gy irradiation). Each subject swallowed 2 mCi of 99m Tc-DTPA, diluted in 20 ml of water, in a sitting position. The upper esophagus, the lower esophagus, the whole esophagus and the cardia were designated as regions of interest (ROI). A time activity curve was obtained for each ROI, followed by calculation of peak transit time (PTT), esophageal emptying time (EET) and gastric peak time (GPT). In healthy adults, PTT, EET and GPT averaged 0.6, 0.6 and 2.9 seconds, respectively. In patients with esophageal cancer, PTT, EET and GPT averaged 1.9, 1.8 and 6.5 seconds, respectively. Thus, mean PTT, EET and GPT were higher in the cancer patients than in the volunteers. In patients who were treated with radiation therapy, the value of the parameters determined by esophageal scintigraphy agreed well with the changes in symptoms. In patients, the smoothness of passage through the esophagus correlated better with the minimum bore of the esophagus than with the length of the narrowed area of the esophageal cancer. The results of this study indicate that esophageal scintigraphy is a useful means of esophageal examination, which allows changes in esophageal motility to be quantitatively assessed easily and physiologically. (author)

  2. The potential of photodynamic therapy to treat esophageal candidiasis coexisting with esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Haixia; Mao, Yongping; Gu, Ying; Zhu, Jianguo; Wang, Ying; Zeng, Jing; Huang, Naiyan; Liu, Qingsen; Yang, Yunsheng

    2014-01-05

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been used in recent years to deal with fungal infections because of the prevalence of fungi resistance to drugs. However, PDT for gastrointestinal fungal infection has not been reported. This study was conducted to assess the potential of PDT to deal with esophageal candidiasis. Two male patients with histological evidence of esophageal candidiasis coexisting with esophageal cancer were included in this retrospective study. Both patients were treated with PDT. This treatment was repeated at least 1month after the initial PDT if the patient still had residual cancer or esophageal candidiasis. Short-term efficacy was evaluated on the basis of endoscopy and histology findings. Further follow-up data were obtained from endoscopy results or telephone conversation. The esophageal candidiasis located 21-24cm and 25-28cm from the incisors of case 1 reached complete remission after one and two PDT sessions, respectively. The esophageal cancer coexisting with esophageal candidiasis located 21-24cm from the incisors reached complete remission after two PDT sessions. No recurrence was found at a 14-month follow-up. The esophageal cancer located 30-35cm from the incisors reached partial response after three PDT sessions. Both of the esophageal candidiasis and the coexisting esophageal cancer at 23-26cm from the incisors of case 2 reached complete remission and the esophageal cancer at 34-37cm from the incisors reached complete remission after one PDT session. No recurrence was found at a 24-month follow-up. There were no serious adverse events found in either of the two cases. Results of this preliminary study indicate that PDT may be a potential method to deal with esophageal candidiasis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical Application of Esophageal High-resolution Manometry in the Diagnosis of Esophageal Motility Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal high-resolution manometry (HRM) is replacing conventional manometry in the clinical evaluation of patients with esophageal symptoms, especially dysphagia. The introduction of HRM gave rise to new objective metrics and recognizable patterns of esophageal motor function, requiring a new classification scheme: the Chicago classification. HRM measurements are more detailed and more easily performed compared to conventional manometry. The visual presentation of acquired data improved th...

  4. Thoracoscopic Surgery in a Patient with Multiple Esophageal Carcinomas after Surgery for Esophageal Achalasia

    OpenAIRE

    Yamasaki, Yuki; Tsukada, Tomoya; Aoki, Tatsuya; Haba, Yusuke; Hirano, Katsuhisa; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Kaji, Masahide; Shimizu, Koichi

    2017-01-01

    We present a case in which we used a thoracoscopic approach for resection of multiple esophageal carcinomas diagnosed 33 years after surgery for esophageal achalasia. A 68-year-old Japanese man had been diagnosed with esophageal achalasia and underwent surgical treatment 33 years earlier. He was examined at our hospital for annual routine checkup in which upper gastrointestinal endoscopy showed a “0-IIb+IIa” lesion in the middle esophagus. Iodine staining revealed multiple irregularly shaped ...

  5. Feasibility of abbreviated cycles of immunochemotherapy for completely resected limited-stage CD20+ diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (CISL 12-09).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Dok Hyun; Sohn, Byeong Seok; Oh, Sung Yong; Lee, Won-Sik; Lee, Sang Min; Yang, Deok-Hwan; Huh, Jooryung; Suh, Cheolwon

    2017-02-21

    The appropriate number of chemotherapy cycles for limited stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients without gross residual lesions after complete resection, has not been specifically questioned. We performed a multicenter, single-arm, phase 2 study to investigate the feasibility of 3 cycles of abbreviated R-CHOP chemotherapy in low-risk patients with completely resected localized CD20+ DLBCL. Between December 2010 and May 2013, we recruited 23 patients. One was excluded due to ineligibility, and hence, 22 were included in the final analysis. The primary sites comprised the intestine (n = 15), cervical lymph nodes (n = 4), stomach (n = 1), tonsil (n = 1), and spleen (n = 1). All patients successfully completed the 3 cycles of planned R-CHOP chemotherapy. Over a median follow-up of 39.5 months (95% confidence interval, 29.9-47.1 months), both the estimated 2-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates was 95% confidence interval, 85.9-104.1%. Only one patient with an international prognostic index of 2 experienced relapse and died. The most common grade 3 or 4 toxicity condition included neutropenia (n = 8, 36.4%). Three patients experienced grade 3 febrile neutropenia, but no grade 3 or 4 non-hematologic toxicity was observed. DLBCL patients without residual lesions after resection were enrolled and R-CHOP chemotherapy was repeated at 3-week-intervals over 3 cycles. The primary endpoint was 2-year disease-free survival. Three cycles of abbreviated R-CHOP immunochemotherapy is feasible for completely resected low risk localized DLBCL.

  6. Illness perceptions and quality of life in Japanese and Dutch patients with non-small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaptein, Ad A.; Yamaoka, Kazue; Snoei, Lucia; Kobayashi, Kunihiko; Uchida, Yuka; van der Kloot, Willem A.; Tabei, Toshio; Kleijn, Wim Chr; Koster, Mariska; Wijnands, Giel; Kaajan, Hans; Tran, Tommy; Inoue, Kenichi; van Klink, Rik; van Dooren-Coppens, Eva; Dik, Hans; Hayashi, Fumi; Willems, Luuk; Annema-Schmidt, Dunja; Annema, Jouke; van der Maat, Bas; van Kralingen, Klaas; Meirink, Corrie; Ogoshi, Kyoji; Aaronson, Neil; Nortier, Hans; Rabe, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    This study examined quality of life (QOL) and illness perceptions in Dutch and Japanese patients with non-small-cell lung cancer, thereby extending the body of knowledge on cultural differences and psychosocial aspects of this illness. 24 Dutch and 22 Japanese patients with non-small-cell lung

  7. Management guidelines of eosinophilic esophagitis in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadopoulou, A; Koletzko, S; Heuschkel, R

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) represents a chronic, immune/antigen-mediated esophageal disease characterized clinically by symptoms related to esophageal dysfunction and histologically by eosinophil-predominant inflammation. With few exceptions, 15 eosinophils per high-power field...... was obtained during 3 face-to-face meetings of the Gastroenterology Committee and 1 teleconference. RESULTS: The cornerstone of treatment is an elimination diet (targeted or empiric elimination diet, amino acid-based formula) and/or swallowed, topical corticosteroids. Systemic corticosteroids are reserved...

  8. Esophageal Metastasis From Occult Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Kuei Hsu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A 66-year-old man with dysphagia was found to have a poorly differentiated esophageal carcinoma by incision biopsy. Following esophagectomy, reconstruction with a gastric tube was performed. Pathological examination and immunohisto-chemistry showed infiltration of adenocarcinoma cells with positive thyroid transcription factor 1-staining in the submucosal layer, which indicated metastatic esophageal carcinoma. Although no pulmonary lesion could be visualized by imaging or bronchoscopy, pulmonary origin was highly suspected as a result of positive thyroid transcription factor 1-staining. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of metastatic esophageal carcinoma from occult lung cancer (AJCC TNM stage TX.

  9. The Kagoshima consensus on esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triadafilopoulos, G; Boeckxstaens, G E; Gullo, R; Patti, M G; Pandolfino, J E; Kahrilas, P J; Duranceau, A; Jamieson, G; Zaninotto, G

    2012-05-01

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder characterized by lack of peristalsis and a lower esophageal sphincter that fails to relax appropriately in response to swallowing. This article summarizes the most salient issues in the diagnosis and management of achalasia as discussed in a symposium that took place in Kagoshima, Japan, in September 2010 under the auspices of the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. © 2011 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  10. Esophageal scintigraphy: A comparison with esophagoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjellen, G.; Andersson, P.; Sandstroem, S.

    1987-01-01

    Fifty consecutive patients with different esophageal symtoms were investigated with esophageal endoscopy, transit scintigraphy, and gastroesophageal (GE) scintigraphy with extra-abdominal compression. Scintigraphic findings were abnormal in 27 of those 31 patients (87%) who were classified as abnormal at endoscopy. A prolonged transit time was the commonest finding, but hiatal hernia and GE reflux were also found. However, the scintigraphic procedure showed abnormalities in 6 of 19 (31%) patients who were classified as normal at endoscopy. Esophageal scintigraphy is recommended as a screening test before endoscopy is decided on. 20 refs.

  11. Diagnosis of esophageal disorders in carnivorous animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenyves, B.; Korodi, P.

    1997-01-01

    The esophagus serves to carry food, water and saliva from the pharynx to the stomach. Interruption of this function results in severe consequences for the animal, and complications of the esophageal disorders (e.g. pneumonia, mediastinitis, pleuritis, pyothorax, pneumothorax) can cause similarly serious problems. Clinical signs of esophageal disorders are similar to that of other gastrointestinal diseases. Diagnosis (based on the patient's medical history and clinical signs) is confirmed by supplementary examination. Radiology, possibly including contrast studies, is the primary in the home practice in consequence of the limited financial possibilities. The article reviews radiology, complications, prognosis and some treatment methods of esophageal disorders

  12. A case of squamous cell lung cancer after treating with radiation for small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Toshinari; Ide, Hiroshi; Siomi, Katsuhiko; Nakamura, Yukinobu; Tada, Shinya; Kageyama, Hiroshi; Kido, Masamitsu

    1999-01-01

    A 77-year-old man was admitted due to an abnormal shadow on a chest X-ray film in September 1993. Small cell lung cancer was diagnosed by transbronchial lung biopsy of left S 3 . Because of his pulmonary and renal dysfunction, he received only 40 Gy irradiation alone, and the tumor shadow disappeared. After 38 months' observation, a new nodular shadow was detected in the left upper lung field in March 1997. A tumor was found in left B 3 by bronchoscopy, and biopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma. Because of his advanced age and hypoxia, he has had no active treatment. This was a rare case of small cell lung cancer with long term survival, treated only by radiation, in which a different histologic type of carcinoma appeared in the same radiation field. (author)

  13. Metastatic Small Cell Carcinoma of the Breast from Cancer of the Uterine Cervix: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom Seok Kwak

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report here on a case of 51-year-old woman with metastatic small cell carcinoma of the breast that came from her cancer of the uterine cervix. She underwent radical hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy due to small cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix, and adjuvant radiotherapy was administered to the pelvis. Breast metastasis with a palpable mass then occurred 3 months after the primary surgery. Simple mastectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy were performed. She initially showed a good response to the therapy, yet she ultimately died of multiple metastases with a fulminating disease course. This is an extremely rare case, and only 1 similar case has been reported earlier, so we report on this case along with a review of the relevant literature.

  14. Small cell lung cancer with metastasis to the thyroid in a patient with toxic multinodular goiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgu, Eylem Sercan; Gen, Ramazan; Ilvan, Ahmet; Ozge, Cengiz; Polat, Ayşe; Vayisoglu, Yusuf

    2012-11-01

    Thyroid metastasis of lung cancer is rarely observed in clinical practice. The primary cancers which metastasize to the thyroid gland are mostly renal cell carcinoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer. Transient destructive thyrotoxicosis is caused by massive metastasis of extrathyroid tumors. We herein present a case report of a patient with small cell carcinoma of lung with metastasis to the thyroid and thyrotoxicosis due to toxic multinodular goiter. A 66-year-old man complained of swelling around the right side of the neck, dyspnea, progressive weight loss, and palpitation starting since 3 months before his admission. The patient was diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of lung with metastasis to the thyroid and thyrotoxicosis due to toxic multinodular goiter. The case report presented here illustrates the challenge of making a definitive and adequate diagnosis, particularly if the patient presents with 2 potential causes of thyrotoxicosis. Thyroid scintigraphy is an important tool for differential diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis.

  15. Primary Gastric Small Cell Carcinoma in Elderly Patients: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Han Lai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of an 86-year-old man with primary gastric small cell carcinoma (SmCC. He was admitted to our hospital owing to gastrointestinal bleeding complicated by anemia. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examination revealed a large, irregularly ulcerated tumor on the upper to middle body of the stomach. Small cell carcinoma was diagnosed based on the results of histologic and immunohistochemical studies of an endoscopic biopsy specimen. According to previous reports of gastric SmCC, only one-sixth of cases have been correctly diagnosed preoperatively. In our case, it was an aggressive malignancy that had an extremely poor prognosis. We believe that careful endoscopic examination including immunohistochemical investigation is necessary to accurately diagnose gastric SmCC in clinical practice.

  16. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder diverticulum: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xu Dong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is very rare. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a mass with swiftly aggressive and metastatic, and with a poor prognosis. Due to its scarcity, no forward-looking researches assessing the most effective treatment have been issued in the medical literature. It can happen either in connection with urothelial (transitional cell carcinoma or in a pure form. Its treatment should include surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this article,we report a case occurring in a mixed form in the urinary bladder diverticulum and we concisely review the published literature with respect to the clinical manifestation, pathology,differential diagnosis, treatment and prognosis.

  17. [Construction of 2-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype in non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-kang; Wang, Xiao-yi; Xiong, Zeng; Zhou, Hui; Zhou, Jian-hua; Fu, Chun-yan; Li, Bo

    2008-08-01

    To construct a technological platform of 2-dimensional tumor microvascular architecture phenotype (2D-TAMP) expression. Thirty samples of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were collected after surgery. The corresponding sections of tumor tissue specimens to the slice of CT perfusion imaging were selected. Immunohistochemical staining,Gomori methenamine silver stain, and electron microscope observation were performed to build a technological platform of 2D-TMAP expression by detecting the morphology and the integrity of basement membrane of microvasculature, microvascular density, various microvascular subtype, the degree of the maturity and lumenization of microvasculature, and the characteristics of immunogenetics of microvasculature. The technological platform of 2D-TMAP expression was constructed successfully. There was heterogeneity in 2D-TMAP expression of non-small cell lung cancer. The microvascular of NSCLC had certain characteristics. 2D-TMAP is a key technology that can be used to observe the overall state of micro-environment in tumor growth.

  18. Small cell type neuroendocrine carcinoma colliding with squamous cell carcinoma at esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Luoluo; Sun, Xun; Zou, Yabin; Meng, Xiangwei

    2014-01-01

    Collision tumor is an extremely rare tumor which defined as the concrescence of two distinct primaries neoplasms. We report here a case of collision tumor at lower third esophagus composed of small cell type neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC), which is an very rare, highly aggressive and poorly prognostic carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC). In our case, pathologically, the small cell carcinoma display the characteristic of small, round, ovoid or spindle-shaped tumor cells with scant cytoplasm, which colliding with a moderately differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated positive activities for CD56, synaptophysin, 34βE12, CK 5/6, ki-67 (70%-80%), but negative for CD99, chromogranin A, and TTF-1. Accurate diagnosis was made base on these findings. PMID:24817981

  19. PET/CT imaging in response evaluation of patients with small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Barbara M; Mortensen, Jann; Langer, Seppo W

    2006-01-01

    UNLABELLED: There is an increasing amount of evidence on the usability of PET in response evaluation of non-small cell lung cancer. However, data on SCLC is scarce and mainly retrospective. This prospective study assesses the use of PET (positron emission tomography) and PET/CT in response...... evaluation of patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). METHODS: Assignment of early and final response was compared between PET, PET/CT, and CT in 20 patients with SCLC. Final response as assigned by CT (RECIST) served as reference. RESULTS: At response evaluation after one cycle of chemotherapy major...... by PET/CT is feasible, but it is uncertain whether it adds further information to evaluation by RECIST, thus further studies and standardization of methods are needed....

  20. Evaluation of esophageal peristalsis in patients with esophageal tumors. Initial experience with cine MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Takashi; Kobayashi, Ari; Hiraga, Akira; Umeoka, Shigeaki; Saga, Tsuneo; Watanabe, Go; Tamai, Ken; Shimada, Yutaka; Togashi, Kaori

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated esophageal peristalsis in patients with esophageal tumors by cine MR using steady-state free precession (SSFP) sequence and correlated the alteration of the esophageal peristalsis with clinical symptoms and tumor stages. Thirteen patients with pathologically proven esophageal tumors, including 12 esophageal cancers and one submucosal leiomyoma, underwent cine MRI using true fast imaging with steady precession (trueFISP) sequence, which is one SSFP sequence, after contrast-enhanced MR scanning for clinical purposes. A total of 120 serial images were obtained within 60 s through the plane along the long axis of the esophagus while patients chewed gum. The serial trueFISP images were evaluated for the presence, frequency, speed of progression, and passage of peristalsis through the tumor. The data from cine MRI were compared with clinical symptoms and tumor stages. Peristalsis was clearly identified in all patients. Seven patients with complete interruption of peristalsis had dysphagia; one with partially impaired peristalsis could intake solid foods with discomfort; and two with partially impaired peristalsis and three with preserved peristalsis remained asymptomatic. Patients with complete or partial interruption of peristalsis had Stage T3 or T4 esophageal cancer. In conclusion, trueFISP cine MR imaging enables direct visualization of esophageal peristalsis in relation to esophageal tumors. Complete interruption of peristalsis causes dysphagia, whereas partial interruption of and preserved peristalsis usually do not cause digestive problems. Interruption of peristalsis may indicate impaired muscle function caused by invasion of advanced esophageal cancers. (author)

  1. Esophageal scintigraphy to quantitate esophageal transit of the achalasia patients after heller's myotomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Junfeng; Wang Qizhang; Li Wenqi

    1995-01-01

    To quantitate esophageal transit of the achalasia patients after Heller's myotomy using scintigraphic technique. After a bolus ingestion of 10 ml orange juice containing 185 MBq 99m Tc-DTPA, radioactivity was measured on the esophagus for 5 minutes by SPECT, and esophageal clearance rate was calculated. Forty-two patients and 10 normal controls were included. Esophageal transit was increased significantly after Heller's operation, but it was still lower than normal value. Heller's myotomy can significantly improve esophageal transit in the patients with achalasia, although it does not reach normal level

  2. Non-small cell lung cancer in never smokers: a clinical entity to be identified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Ilka Lopes; Ramos, Roberta Pulcheri; Franceschini, Juliana; Jamnik, Sergio; Fernandes, Ana Luisa Godoy

    2011-01-01

    It has been recognized that patients with non-small cell lung cancer who are lifelong never-smokers constitute a distinct clinical entity. The aim of this study was to assess clinical risk factors for survival among never-smokers with non-small cell lung cancer. All consecutive non-small cell lung cancer patients diagnosed (n = 285) between May 2005 and May 2009 were included. The clinical characteristics of never-smokers and ever-smokers (former and current) were compared using chi-squared or Student's t tests. Survival curves were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and log-rank tests were used for survival comparisons. A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was evaluated by adjusting for age (continuous variable), gender (female vs. male), smoking status (never- vs. ever-smoker), the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale (continuous variable), histological type (adenocarcinoma vs. non-adenocarcinoma), AJCC staging (early vs. advanced staging), and treatment (chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy vs. the best treatment support). Of the 285 non-small cell lung cancer patients, 56 patients were never-smokers. Univariate analyses indicated that the never-smoker patients were more likely to be female (68% vs. 32%) and have adenocarcinoma (70% vs. 51%). Overall median survival was 15.7 months (95% CI: 13.2 to 18.2). The never-smoker patients had a better survival rate than their counterpart, the ever-smokers. Never-smoker status, higher Karnofsky Performance Status, early staging, and treatment were independent and favorable prognostic factors for survival after adjusting for age, gender, and adenocarcinoma in multivariate analysis. Epidemiological differences exist between never- and ever-smokers with lung cancer. Overall survival among never-smokers was found to be higher and independent of gender and histological type.

  3. Non-small cell lung cancer in never smokers: a clinical entity to be identified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilka Lopes Santoro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: It has been recognized that patients with non-small cell lung cancer who are lifelong never-smokers constitute a distinct clinical entity. The aim of this study was to assess clinical risk factors for survival among neversmokers with non-small cell lung cancer. METHODS: All consecutive non-small cell lung cancer patients diagnosed (n = 285 between May 2005 and May 2009 were included. The clinical characteristics of never-smokers and ever-smokers (former and current were compared using chi-squared or Student's t tests. Survival curves were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and log-rank tests were used for survival comparisons. A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was evaluated by adjusting for age (continuous variable, gender (female vs. male, smoking status (never- vs. ever-smoker, the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale (continuous variable, histological type (adenocarcinoma vs. non-adenocarcinoma, AJCC staging (early vs. advanced staging, and treatment (chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy vs. the best treatment support. RESULTS: Of the 285 non-small cell lung cancer patients, 56 patients were never-smokers. Univariate analyses indicated that the never-smoker patients were more likely to be female (68% vs. 32% and have adenocarcinoma (70% vs. 51%. Overall median survival was 15.7 months (95% CI: 13.2 to 18.2. The never-smoker patients had a better survival rate than their counterpart, the ever-smokers. Never-smoker status, higher Karnofsky Performance Status, early staging, and treatment were independent and favorable prognostic factors for survival after adjusting for age, gender, and adenocarcinoma in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Epidemiological differences exist between never- and ever-smokers with lung cancer. Overall survival among never-smokers was found to be higher and independent of gender and histological type.

  4. Effects of icotinib on advanced non-small cell lung cancer with different EGFR phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Huiyun; Liu, Rong; Li, Shengjie; Fang, Hui; Wang, Ziwei; Huang, Sheng; Zhou, Jianying

    2014-09-01

    Icotinib is the first oral epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor, which has been proven to exert significant inhibitory effects on non-small cell lung cancer in vitro. Clinical evidence has showed that the efficacy of Icotinib on retreating advanced non-small cell lung cancer is comparable to Gefitinib. However, different phenotypes of EGFR can affect the therapeutic outcomes of EGFR tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitor. Therefore, our study focused on efficacy and safety of Icotinib in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer of different EGPR phenotypes. Clinical data of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer who received Icotinib treatment from August, 2011 to May, 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used for survival analysis and comparison. 18 wild-type EGFR and 51 mutant type were found in a total of 69 patients. Objective response rate of patients with mutant type EGFR was 54.9 % and disease control rate was 86.3 %. Objective response rate of wild-type patients was 11.1 % (P = 0.0013 vs mutant type), disease control rate was 50.0 % (P = 0.0017). Median progression-free survival (PFS) of mutant type and wild-type patients were 9.7 and 2.6 months, respectively (P Icotinib included rash, diarrhea, itching skin with occurrence rates of 24.6 % (17/69), 13.0 % (9/69), and 11.6 % (8/69), respectively. Most adverse reactions were grade I-II. Icotinib has great efficacy in EGFR mutated patients, making it an optimal regimen to treat EGFR mutated patients. Furthermore, most of adverse reactions associated with Icotinib treatment were tolerable.

  5. Tumourigenic non-small-cell lung cancer mesenchymal circulating tumour cells: a clinical case study

    OpenAIRE

    Morrow, C. J.; Trapani, F.; Metcalf, R. L.; Bertolini, G.; Hodgkinson, C. L.; Khandelwal, G.; Kelly, P.; Galvin, M.; Carter, L.; Simpson, K. L.; Williamson, S.; Wirth, C.; Simms, N.; Frankliln, L.; Frese, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Over the past decade, numerous reports describe the generation and increasing utility of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patient-derived xenografts (PDX) from tissue biopsies. While PDX have proven useful for genetic profiling and preclinical drug testing, the requirement of a tissue biopsy limits the available patient population, particularly those with advanced oligometastatic disease. Conversely, ?liquid biopsies? such as circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are minimally invasive...

  6. Effect of cryoablation sequential chemotherapy on patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Hui Yao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of cryoablation sequential chemotherapy on patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Methods: A total of 39 cases with advanced non-small cell lung cancer who received cryoablation sequential chemotherapy and 39 cases with advanced non-small cell lung cancer who received chemotherapy alone were selected and enrolled in sequential group and control group, disease progression and survival of two groups were followed up, and contents of tumor markers and angiogenesis molecules in serum as well as contents of T-lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood were detected. Results: Progressionfree survival and median overall survival (mOS of sequential group were longer than those of control group, and cumulative cases of tumor progression at various points in time were significantly less than those of control group (P<0.05; 1 month after treatment, serum tumor markers CEA, CYFRA21-1 and NSE contents, serum angiogenesis molecules PCDGF, VEGF and HDGF contents as well as CD3+CD4-CD8+CD28-T cell content in peripheral blood of sequential group were significantly lower than those of control group (P<0.05, and contents of CD3+CD4+CD8-T cell and CD3+CD4-CD8+CD28+T cell in peripheral blood were higher than those of control group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Cryoablation sequential chemotherapy can improve the prognosis of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, delay disease progression, prolong survival time, inhibit angiogenesis and improve immune function.

  7. Association of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in limited small cell lung cancers: interest of alternating protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Chevalier, T.; Arriagada, R.; Ruffie, P.; Cremoux, H. de; Douillard, J.Y.; Tuchais, C.; Chomy, P.; Riviere, A.; Tarayre, M.

    1992-01-01

    From 1980, alternating protocols of chemotherapy and thorax radiotherapy in limited small cell lung cancers have been elaborated in order to control locally the disease, to improve the total survival and to reduce the toxicity that are bound the simultaneous treatments of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Thanks to these protocols, the two-year survival rate is 27% and the five-year survival rate, 16%

  8. Small cell carcinoma of the gynecologic tract: a multifaceted spectrum of lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atienza-Amores, Maria; Guerini-Rocco, Elena; Soslow, Robert A; Park, Kay J; Weigelt, Britta

    2014-08-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SmCC) of the female genital tract constitutes a diagnostic and clinical challenge given its rarity and the lack of standardized therapeutic approaches. Here we review the morphological, clinical and molecular features of gynecologic SmCCs and discuss potential areas for future research. Data for this review article were identified by searches of PubMed, EMBASE and the Internet using the search terms "small cell carcinoma" or "neuroendocrine carcinoma" and "gynecologic", "uterine cervix", "cervix", "uterus", "endometrium", "ovary", "vagina", "fallopian tube" or "vulva", and research articles published in English between 1972 and February 2014 were included. SmCCs arising from different organs within the gynecologic tract share the same histopathologic characteristics, which closely resemble those of small cell lung carcinoma. The expression of at least one immunohistochemical neuroendocrine marker is a common finding. The uterine cervix is the most frequent site of SmCC in the female genital tract. HPV infection seems to play a role in the development of cervical SmCC but not in cancers of other gynecologic sites. FIGO stage is an established prognostic factor, in particular in SCCs of the cervix. Irrespective of the site, SmCCs of the gynecologic tract display an aggressive clinical behavior with few reported long-term survivors. The therapeutic management includes surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Despite the potential differences in etiology and risk factors, SmCCs from different sites of the gynecologic tract have similar morphologic appearances and clinical behavior. Recent genomic analyses of small cell carcinoma of the lung have revealed potential driver genomic alterations. We posit that the comprehensive genomic characterization of gynecologic SmCCs may lead to the identification of markers that result in an improvement of diagnostic reproducibility of SmCCs of the gynecologic tract, and of molecular aberrations that may be

  9. Local control rate and prognosis after sequential chemoradiation for small cell carcinoma of the bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijer, Richard P.; Meinhardt, Wim; Poel, Henk G. van der; Rhijn, Bas W. van; Kerst, J. Martijn; Pos, Floris J.; Horenblas, Simon; Bex, Axel

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the long-term outcome and the risk for local recurrence of patients with small cell carcinoma of the bladder (SCCB) treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by external beam radiotherapy (sequential chemoradiation). All consecutive patients with primary small cell carcinoma of the bladder (n=66), treated in our institution between 1993 and 2011 were retrospectively evaluated from an institutional database. Only patients with limited disease (Tx-4N0-1M0) small cell carcinoma of the bladder treated with sequential chemoradiation (n=27) were included in this study. Recurrence rates, overall survival and cancer-specific survival were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Median time to recurrence was 20 months, median overall survival 26 months, 5-year overall survival 22.2%, median cancer-specific survival 47 months and 5-year cancer-specific survival 39.6%. For complete responders after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (n=19), median cancer-specific survival was 52 months with a 5-year cancer-specific survival 45.9% versus a median cancer-specific survival of 22 months and 5-year cancer-specific survival 0.0% for incomplete responders (n=8; P=0.034). Eight patients (29.6%) underwent transurethral resections (TUR-BT) for local recurrences in the bladder. At the end of follow up, four patients had undergone cystectomy for recurrence of disease resulting in a bladder-preservation rate of 85.2%. Median time to local recurrence was 29 months and median time to distant recurrence was 10 months. Sequential chemoradiation for limited disease small cell carcinoma of the bladder results in a reasonable outcome with a high bladder preservation rate. Response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy represents a significant prognostic factor in this patient population. (author)

  10. Living with a diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer: patients' lived experiences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Ita

    2012-01-31

    The aim of this study was to explore patients\\' experience of living with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients diagnosed with NSCLC know that their treatment is not with curative intent and can expect distressing symptoms. In this phenomenological study, six adults with a diagnosis of NSCLC were interviewed. Data was analysed guided by van Manen\\'s six-step process. Four main themes were interpreted: \\'Maintaining my life\\'; \\'The enemy within\\'; \\'Staying on the train\\

  11. Superior Vena Cava Syndrome in a Patient with Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Christina Brzezniak; Bryan Oronsky; Corey A. Carter; Bennett Thilagar; Scott Caroen; Karen Zeman

    2017-01-01

    Superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome, a potential oncologic emergency, is closely associated with malignancy and right-sided lung cancer in particular. A case of SVC syndrome presenting with facial swelling, neck distension, and enlarged veins of the upper chest, which developed over a period of 5 weeks in a 46-year-old patient on a clinical trial with small-cell lung cancer, is reported. Computed tomography scan of the chest revealed slight enlargement of a superior conglomerate mediastinal lym...

  12. Impact of mobility on call block, call drops and optimal cell size in small cell networks

    OpenAIRE

    Ramanath , Sreenath; Voleti , Veeraruna Kavitha; Altman , Eitan

    2011-01-01

    We consider small cell networks and study the impact of user mobility. Assuming Poisson call arrivals at random positions with random velocities, we discuss the characterization of handovers at the boundaries. We derive explicit expressions for call block and call drop probabilities using tools from spatial queuing theory. We also derive expressions for the average virtual server held up time. These expressions are used to derive optimal cell sizes for various profile of velocities in small c...

  13. Centralized Radio Resource Management for 5G small cells as LSA enabler

    OpenAIRE

    Carrasco, Oscar; Miatton, Federico; Diaz, Salva; Herzog, Uwe; Frascolla, Valerio; Fitch, Michael; Briggs, Keith; Miscopein, Benoit; de Domenico, Antonio; Georgakopoulos, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The stringent requirements defined for 5G systems drive the need to promote new paradigms to the existing cellular networks. Dense and ultra-dense networks based on small cells, together with new spectrum sharing schemes seem to be key enabling technologies for emerging 5G mobile networks. This article explores the vision of the SPEED-5G project, analyzing the ability of a Centralized Radio Resource Management entity to support the Licensed Shared Access spectrum sharing framework in a deploy...

  14. Successful delivery of chemotherapy to treat small-cell prostate cancer in a patient undergoing haemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    McPartlin, Andrew; Grimaldo, Claudia; Lyons, Jeanette; Burke, Daniel; Mitra, Sandip; Choudhury, Ananya

    2014-01-01

    We report on the successful treatment of small-cell prostate cancer in a patient undergoing haemodialysis. The therapeutic regimen included 300 mg/m2 of carboplatin and 50 mg/m2 of etoposide coupled with radical radiotherapy. Adjustments to the patient's haemodialysis prescription included the use of high flux, a larger dialyser surface area and an increased dialysis time. The parameters used aided tolerance to the drug, allowing the delivery of safe, effective treatment. At an interval of ov...

  15. Small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the endometrium, a rare aggressive tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajab, Khalil E.; Sandhu, Amarjit K.; Rajeswari, Mangla S.; Malik, A.

    2005-01-01

    This is a report of a young infertile woman with a history of 8 years amenorrhea, who presented with history of vaginal bleeding of 2 months duration. Investigations revealed a small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the endometrium, which penetrated half of the thickness of uterine wall. We have described the clinical progress and management of this rare and highly malignant cancer. A review of the pathological types and behavior of clear cell neuroendocrine carcinoma is presented. (author)

  16. In vitro evaluation of a new nitrosourea, TCNU, against human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, H; Vindeløv, L L; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1987-01-01

    The cytotoxic activity of a new nitrosourea, TCNU, was compared with that of BCNU in five human small cell lung cancer cell lines in vitro. TCNU was found to be equivalent or inferior to BCNU when compared on a microgram to microgram basis. If the potential of in vitro phase II trials for selection...... of new drugs can be validated, it can be concluded that TCNU is not superior to other nitrosoureas for the treatment of SCCL....

  17. Traffic-Adaptive and Energy-Efficient Small Cell Networks-Energy, Delay and Throughput

    OpenAIRE

    Nazrul Alam, Mirza

    2016-01-01

    The low power small cell network has emerged as a promising and feasible solution to address the massive wireless traffic resulting from the aggressive growth of wireless applications. It is also estimated that Internet of things (IoT) will consist of around 50 billion physical objects by 2020. As a result, besides capacity enhancement, other challenges, e.g., energy efficiency, dynamic addressing of UL/DL traffic asymmetry, low latency, multi-hop communications, reliability and coverage have...

  18. Optimal Therapeutic Strategy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer with Mutated Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong SHI

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs have been widely used in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients, it is still controversial about how to combine EGFR-TKI with chemotherapy and other targeted drugs. We have made a summary on the current therapeutic models of EGFR-TKI combined with chemotherapy/bevacizumab in this review and aimed to find the optimal therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients with EGFR mutation.

  19. The role of maintenance pemetrexed in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Rafii, S

    2010-01-01

    Saeed Rafii, Michael H CullenDepartment of Medical Oncology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospital Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TH, United KingdomAbstract: Until recently, the weight of evidence has supported the discontinuation of ­chemotherapy in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after 4–6 cycles of induction therapy. This allows patients with limited life expectancy a “treatment holiday.” A minority of cases then go on to r...

  20. Randomized study: small cell anaplastic lung cancer treated by combination chemotherapy and adjuvant radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, R.M.; Woods, R.L.; Brodie, G.N.; Tattersall, M.H.N.

    1980-01-01

    Chemotherapy and primary site radiation therapy were compared to chemotherapy alone in a randomized study of 125 patients with small cell cancer of the lung. The sites of initial relapse, as well as disease free and overall survival were analyzed. Radiotherapy to the primary site reduced the rate of local relapse, but median survival was not prolonged in patients with either limited or extensive disease, when the radiation therapy-chemotherapy group was compared to the group that received chemotherapy alone

  1. Survival outcomes for oligometastasis in resected non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Yoshihisa; Saji, Hisashi; Kakihana, Masatoshi; Kajiwara, Naohiro; Ohira, Tatsuo; Ikeda, Norihiko

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the factors associated with post-recurrence survival and the treatment for non-small-cell lung cancer patients with postoperative distant recurrence, especially oligometastasis. We reviewed the data of 272 patients with distant recurrence who underwent resection of non-small-cell lung cancer from January 2000 through December 2011. The type of distant recurrence was classified as oligometastasis (n = 76, 28%) or polymetastasis (n = 196, 72%). Forty-seven (62%) patients with oligometastasis received local therapy (surgery 5, radiotherapy 9, sequential local and systemic therapy 28, chemoradiotherapy 5). Multivariate analysis revealed older age, non-adenocarcinoma, shorter disease-free interval, no pulmonary metastasis, liver metastases, bone metastases, and polymetastasis had significant associations with unfavorable post-recurrence survival. Subgroup analysis of patients with oligometastasis showed histology and disease-free interval had a great impact on survival. Smoking history and histology were associated with survival in patients with lung oligometastasis, whereas systemic treatment and longer disease-free interval were related to increased post-recurrence survival in those with brain oligometastasis. This study showed that an oligometastatic state per se was a significant favorable factor. Optimization of personalized systemic treatment and adding local treatment are important in the management of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and oligometastasis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Current concepts of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, T.J.; Bunn, P.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) was projected to account for 20%-25% of the greater than 140,000 newly diagnosed lung cancers in 1985. If considered a separate disease entity, it would be the fourth leading cause of death by cancer. Previous studies have demonstrated distinct clinical and biologic features of small cell lung cancer, and early therapeutic trial results have demonstrated a high sensitivity to both chemotherapy and radiotherapy. More recent results demonstrated a marked survival improvement with the use of combination chemotherapy, which potentially cured a small minority of patients. Unfortunately, in most patients, drug resistance usually develops, as do chronic, often debilitating toxicities in the few long-term survivors. Although therapeutic advances have plateaued, new and important insights into the basic biology of the disease made the last several years offer the possibility of exciting new treatment approaches within the next decade. This chapter addresses our current understanding of therapy for small cell lung cancer, the current therapy questions under investigation, and potential future directions in clinical research

  3. Psychogenic fever in a patient with small cell lung cancer: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Mengdan; Zhang, Xiaoye; Xu, Zhaoguo; Cui, Guoyuan; Yu, Li; Qi, Xiaoying; Lin, Jia; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Fever is common in malignant tumors. We report an exceptional case of psychogenic fever in a patient with small cell lung cancer. This is the first case report of psychogenic fever in a patient with small cell lung cancer. A 61-year-old Chinese man diagnosed with small cell carcinoma on June 30, 2012, came to our department with a complaint of fever lasting more than 1 month. He had undergone chemoradiotherapy for lung cancer 6 months previously. After admission, his body temperature fluctuated in the range of 37 °C to 39 °C. Somatic symptoms associated with anxiety were obvious. A 24-item Hamilton Anxiety Scale was used to assess the patient’s condition. A score of 32 confirmed a diagnosis of severe anxiety. After a week of antianxiety treatment, the patient’s temperature returned to normal. Psychogenic fever is common in cancer patients and deserves more attention. Patients with psychogenic fever must be distinguished from patients with infectious fever (including neutropenic fever), and tumor fever. Additionally, antianxiety or antidepression treatment should be provided. A concern is that continual anxiety may adversely affect anticancer therapy

  4. Chemotherapy related toxicity in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahl Amit

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: For inoperable non-small cell lung cancer combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy plays an important role as a therapeutic modality. The aim of the present study was to analyze neoadjuvant chemotherapy related acute toxicity in locally advanced lung cancer (stage IIIA and IIIB in Indian patients using Cisplatin and Etoposide combination chemotherapy. Material and methods: Forty patients of locally advanced Non small cell lung cancer received three cycles neoadjuvant chemotherapy using Injection Cisplatin and Etoposide. The patients were taken for Radical radiotherapy to a dose of 60 Gray over 30 fractions in conventional fractionation after completing chemotherapy. Chemotherapy associated toxicity was assessed using common toxicity criteria (CTC v2.0 Results: Forty patients were available for final evaluation. Median age of presentation of patients was fifty-six years. Thirteen patients had Non small cell lung cancer stage IIIA while twenty-seven patients had Stage IIIB disease. Anemia was the most common hematological toxicity observed (seen in 81% of patients. Nausea and vomiting were the most common non -hematological toxicity seen. Sensory neuropathy was seen in 38%of patients. 88% patients developed alopecia. Seven patients developed febrile neutropenias. Conclusion: Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy using Cisplatin and Etoposide continues to be a basic regimen in the Indian set up despite availability of higher molecules, since it is cost effective, well tolerated and therapeutically effective. Blood transfusions, growth factors and supportive care can be used effectively to over come toxicity associated with this regimen.

  5. [Efficacy of MVP chemotherapy combined with concurrent radiotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Tiankui; Zhou, Daoan; Chen, Wei; Wang, Xianglian

    2004-12-20

    To observe the effects of MVP chemotherapy combined with concurrent radiotherapy for stage IIIB-IV non-small cell lung cancer. Sixty-two patients with stage IIIB-IV non-small cell lung cancer were randomized into two groups, concurrent radiochemotherapy group and MVP che-motherapy group. All patients in two groups were treated with MVP regimen (mitomycin C 6 mg/m² on day 1, vindesine 2 mg/m² on days 1, 8, and cisplatin 80-100 mg/m²). Patients in concurrent radiochemotherapy group received concurrent radiotherapy (46-56 Gy in 5-6 weeks). All patients received 2-4 cycles of MVP chemotherapy. The response rate was 48.4% and 19.4% in concurrent radiochemotherapy group and MVP group respectively (P MVP group.. The results show that efficacy of MVP chemotherapy combined with concurrent radiotherapy is significantly higher than that of MVP chemotherapy alone for advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  6. A dural metastatic small cell carcinoma of the gallbladder as the first manifestation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonomura, Shuichi; Kitaichi, Tomoko; Onishi, Rina; Kakehi, Yoshiaki; Shimizu, Hisao; Shimada, Keiji; Kanemasa, Kazuyuki; Fukusumi, Akio; Takahashi, Nobuyuki

    2018-03-16

    A dural metastasis is one of the essential differential diagnoses of meningioma. In general, carcinomas of the breast and lung in females and prostate in males have been the most commonly reported primary lesions of dural metastases. However, dural metastasis of gallbladder carcinoma is extremely rare. Here, we report a unique case of a dural matter metastasis of gallbladder carcinoma as the first manifestation, which was autopsy-defined as small cell carcinoma. A 78-year-old man came to our hospital complaining of left hemianopia. Brain computed tomography (CT) revealed a sizeable parasagittal dural-based extra-axial tumor. However, the findings for meningioma were atypical by magnetic resonance imaging, suggesting a meningioma mimic. A contrast-enhanced CT scan of the abdomen revealed a large gallbladder carcinoma. The patient opted for the best supportive care and died 2 months later. The post-mortem examination revealed small cell carcinoma in gallbladder carcinoma. Moreover, an immunologically similar carcinoma was detected in the dural metastasis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a dural metastasis of gallbladder small cell carcinoma. A systemic examination is essential for clinicians when atypical findings of meningioma are observed, suggesting a meningioma mimic. We present this rare case with a review of the literature.

  7. Interference Mitigation and Sum Rate Optimization for MIMO Downlink Small Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. Kha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses interference issues in multiuser multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO downlink heterogeneous networks in which multiple small cells are deployed in macrocell coverage. With the higher priority to access the frequency bands, the macro base station (MBS will exploit eigenmode transmission along with water-filling based power allocation to maximize its data rate. To avoid harmful interference to macro users, we propose structures of the precoders at the small cell BSs (SBSs as cascades of two precoding matrices. In addition, to mitigate intra-tier inference in small cells, the SBSs exploit the user scheduling schemes for their associated users. We investigate two user scheduling schemes using the minimum interference leakage and maximum signal to noise ratio criteria. The sum rate of the selected users can be further improved by power allocation. We develop an iterative algorithm using difference of convex functions (d.c. programming to tackle the mathematical challenges of the nonconvex power allocation problem, Numerical simulation results show that the proposed strategy outperforms the conventional methods in terms of the achievable sum rate.

  8. Selection of radioresistant cells by vitamin A deficiency in a small cell lung cancer cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terasaki, Takeo; Shimosato, Yukio; Wada, Makio; Yokota, Jun; Terada, Masaaki

    1990-01-01

    Radiation sensitivity of a human small cell lung cancer cell line, Lu-134-B cells, cultured in serum-supplemented medium and of cells transferred to and cultured in delipidized serum-supplemented (vitamin A-deficient) medium was studied. The cells cultured in serum-supplemented medium showed the phenotype of classic small cell lung cancer sensitive to radiation, while cells transferred to delipidized serum-supplemented medium showed partial squamous cell differentiation and became resistant to radiation. These results suggest that some small cell lung cancer cells in vitro change their morphology and radiosensitivity depending on the culture conditions. The change in radiosensitivity was reproducible, and was not reversible by culture of the radioresistant cells in delipidized serum-supplemented medium with addition of retinoic acid (vitamin A-sufficient medium) for two months, although squamous cells disappeared. Acquisition of radioresistancy was considered to occur as the result of clonal selective growth in delipidized medium of a minor cell population in the original cell culture, based on a study of chromosome number. It was also found that there was no association of myc-family oncogenes with the changes of radiosensitivity in this cell line. (author)

  9. Immune checkpoint inhibitors: the new frontier in non–small cell lung cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Osta HE

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hazem El-Osta, Kamran Shahid, Glenn M Mills, Prakash Peddi Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA, USA Abstract: Lung cancer is the major cause for cancer-related death in the US. Although advances in chemotherapy and targeted therapy have improved the outcome of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer, its prognosis remains dismal. A deeper understanding of the complex interaction between the immune system and tumor microenvironment has identified immune checkpoint inhibitors as new avenue of immunotherapy. Rather than acting directly on the tumor, these therapies work by removing the inhibition exerted by tumor cell or other immune cells on the immune system, promoting antitumoral immune response. To date, two programmed death-1 inhibitors, namely nivolumab and pembrolizumab, have received the US Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer that failed platinum-based chemotherapy. This manuscript provides a brief overview of the pathophysiology of cancer immune evasion, summarizes pertinent data on completed and ongoing clinical trials involving checkpoint inhibitors, discusses the different strategies to optimize their function, and outlines various challenges that are faced in this promising yet evolving field. Keywords: checkpoint inhibitors, immunotherapy, nivolumab, non-small-cell lung cancer, pembrolizumab, programmed death-1, programmed death ligand-1

  10. D2D-Enabled Small Cell Network Control Scheme Based on the Dynamic Stackelberg Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungwook Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For current and future cellular networks, small cell structure with licensed and unlicensed bandwidth, caching content provisioning, and device-to-device (D2D communications is seen as a necessary architecture. Recently, a series of control methods have been developed to address a myriad of challenges in next-generation small cell networks. In this study, we focus on the design of novel D2D-enabled small cell network control scheme by allowing caching and unlicensed D2D communications. Motivated by game theory and learning algorithm, the proposed scheme adaptively selects caching contents and splits the available bandwidth for licensed and unlicensed communications. Under dynamically changing network environments, we capture the dynamics of the network system and design a new dynamic Stackelberg game model. Based on a hierarchical and feedback based control manner, small base stations and users can be leaders or followers dynamically while improving 5G network performance. Simulations and performance analysis verify the efficiency of the proposed scheme, showing that our approach can outperform existing schemes by about 5%~15% in terms of bandwidth utilization, cache hit ratio, and system throughput.

  11. Evaluation of esophageal motor function in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyawali, C P; Bredenoord, A J; Conklin, J L; Fox, M; Pandolfino, J E; Peters, J H; Roman, S; Staiano, A; Vaezi, M F

    2013-02-01

    Esophageal motor function is highly coordinated between central and enteric nervous systems and the esophageal musculature, which consists of proximal skeletal and distal smooth muscle in three functional regions, the upper and lower esophageal sphincters, and the esophageal body. While upper endoscopy is useful in evaluating for structural disorders of the esophagus, barium esophagography, radionuclide transit studies, and esophageal intraluminal impedance evaluate esophageal transit and partially assess motor function. However, esophageal manometry is the test of choice for the evaluation of esophageal motor function. In recent years, high-resolution manometry (HRM) has streamlined the process of acquisition and display of esophageal pressure data, while uncovering hitherto unrecognized esophageal physiologic mechanisms and pathophysiologic patterns. New algorithms have been devised for analysis and reporting of esophageal pressure topography from HRM. The clinical value of HRM extends to the pediatric population, and complements preoperative evaluation prior to foregut surgery. Provocative maneuvers during HRM may add to the assessment of esophageal motor function. The addition of impedance to HRM provides bolus transit data, but impact on clinical management remains unclear. Emerging techniques such as 3-D HRM and impedance planimetry show promise in the assessment of esophageal sphincter function and esophageal biomechanics. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Advanced esophageal cancer and esophageal stenosis endoscopic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piazze, A. E mail: apiazze@hc.edu.uy

    2005-01-01

    Advanced esophageal cancer (AEC) is diagnosed during those stages in which surgery is possible, it is palliative for disphagia, with high morbimortality.In inoperable or irresectable cases, resorting to alternative treatment such as radiotherapy or endoscopy may palliate dsphagia.Endoscopically it is possible to place a transtumoral nasogastric catheter (NGC) for preoperative nutrition or branchial therapy (intratumoral iridium).It is possible to dilate the tumor and place and indwelling plastic or auto expandable prosthesis or to inject absolute intratumoral alcohol.There is and evaluation of results and morbimortality of personal case material through the retrospective study of 54 patients in whom 120 procedures such as those referred to above were carried out.The series includes 41 men and 13 women (3-1), 79.5% of which were of ages between 61 and 90.Optic fiber endoscopes or video endoscopes, coaxial dilators, hydro-pneumatic balloons, metallic guides and non industrial and autoexpandable plastic prosthesis were used; 34.1% of procedures were performed under used; 34.1% of procedures were performed under radioscopy.Eleven patient (8 for nutritional purposes and 3 for brachiotherapy)form part of Groups 1 and 2 of NGC.Group 3 consist of:dilations of radicular stenosis with or without neopasic recurrence, or neoplasic infiltration of esophagus, 6 patient; Group 4: 14 patients for the purpose of dilation of esophageal neoplasm; Group 5:prosthesis, 12 patients; Group 6: 11 patients with anastomotic stenosis.In patients in Group 1-2-3 solution was achieved.In Group 3 there was 1 perforation.In Group 4, out of 14 patient 13 were dilated.In Group 5 it proved impossible to place prosthesis in 2 patient, (3.7%).The conclusion arrived at is that various endoscopic techniques may palliate disphagia in patient with AEC, collaborate with preoperative nutrition through enteral path, with brachioterapy or by treating post surgical stenosis, with low mortality

  13. The radiology of early esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, S.

    1988-01-01

    The radiographic diagnosis of early esophageal cancer is described based on 25 cases in which depth of invasion was limited to not more than the submucosal layer. It is emphasized that double contrast radiography should be designed to delineate the subtle abnormalities of the esophageal mucosa and margins of lesions which are characteristic of early cancer, and that further investigation should be directed to improving the method of examination so that the detection of ep- and mm-cancer which has a better prognosis than sm cancer can be detected more readily. A macroscopic classification of early esophageal cancer (elevated, flat, depressed and mixed type) which is useful for both endoscopic and radiographic diagnosis is proposed. The 5-year survival rate of esophageal cancer which was limited to the submucosal layer or less (ep-, mm- and sm-cancer) was 50%

  14. Esophageal achalasia: current diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G

    2018-05-27

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder of unknown origin, characterized by lack of peristalsis and by incomplete or absent relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter in response to swallowing. The goal of treatment is to eliminate the functional obstruction at the level of the gastroesophageal junction Areas covered: This comprehensive review will evaluate the current literature, illustrating the diagnostic evaluation and providing an evidence-based treatment algorithm for this disease Expert commentary: Today we have three very effective therapeutic modalities to treat patients with achalasia - pneumatic dilatation, per-oral endoscopic myotomy and laparoscopic Heller myotomy with fundoplication. Treatment should be tailored to the individual patient, in centers where a multidisciplinary approach is available. Esophageal resection should be considered as a last resort for patients who have failed prior therapeutic attempts.

  15. Diffuse Esophageal leiomyomatosis: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Dong Wook; Chang, Suk Ki; Park, Seoung jin; Yoon, Yup; Kim, Youn hwa [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-09-01

    Leiomyomas are the most common benign tumors found in the esophagus. They are mostly solitary and multiple diffuse lesions are rare, occurring in only 2.4% of cases (1). We describe the case of a 13-year-old boy with a history of Alport syndrome who complained of progressive dysphagia and postprandial vomiting, and in whom diffuse leiomyomatosis of the esophagus was diagnosed. Chest PA showed mediastinal widening, and a barium study revealed diffuse esophageal wall thickening with dilatation, and obstruction at the level of the distal esophagus. Manometry showed increased pressure in the lower esophagus, and CT demonstrated diffuse thickening of the entire esophageal wall and an intraluminal mass in the distal esophagus, Follow-up CT three years later showed further esophageal wall thickening, as well as luminal narrowing. By means of distal esophagectomy, diffuse leiomyomatosis involving the entire esophageal wall and intraluminal mass was diagnosed. (author)

  16. Esophageal function testing: Billing and coding update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A; Massey, B; Rao, S; Pandolfino, J

    2018-01-01

    Esophageal function testing is being increasingly utilized in diagnosis and management of esophageal disorders. There have been several recent technological advances in the field to allow practitioners the ability to more accurately assess and treat such conditions, but there has been a relative lack of education in the literature regarding the associated Common Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes and methods of reimbursement. This review, commissioned and supported by the American Neurogastroenterology and Motility Society Council, aims to summarize each of the CPT codes for esophageal function testing and show the trends of associated reimbursement, as well as recommend coding methods in a practical context. We also aim to encourage many of these codes to be reviewed on a gastrointestinal (GI) societal level, by providing evidence of both discrepancies in coding definitions and inadequate reimbursement in this new era of esophageal function testing. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Esophageal transit scintigraphy in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Chojnowski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis is a rare connective tissue disease, distinctive features of which are fibrosis and microangiopathy. The esophagus is one of the most commonly involved internal organs. Most patients experience dysphagia, difficulties in swallowing and gastro-esophageal reflux. However, in up to one third of cases, the initial onset of esophageal disease may be clinically silent. There are several diagnostic modalities available for assessing both morphological and functional abnormalities of the esophagus. If structural abnormalities are suspected, endoscopy is the method of choice. Functional evaluation is best achieved with manometry. Both endoscopy and manometry are invasive techniques, with low patient acceptance. Barium-contrast study is well tolerated, but qualitative assessment of functional abnormalities is imprecise. Esophageal scintigraphy is an easy, non-invasive, sensitive and specific diagnostic modality. It can detect esophageal dysfunction even in asymptomatic patients. In patients already diagnosed with systemic sclerosis, scintigraphy is useful in evaluating severity and progression of the disease.

  18. CT findings of esophageal schwannoma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Man Ho; Ryu, Dae Shick; Eom, Dae Woon; Shin, Dong Rock; Choi, Soo Jung; Ahn, Jae Hong; Park, Man Soo; Yoo, Dong Kon [Gangneung Asan Hospital, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Esophageal schwannomas are a relative rare benign neoplasm that usually occurs in the upper esophagus, in the middle aged women. We report a case of a 67-year-old man with a lower esophageal schwannoma. This lesion was composed of homogenous density, iso-attenuating with the chest wall muscle on pre- and post-contrast chest computed tomography (CT). The CT findings of the esophageal schwannoma are similar to those of esophageal leiomyoma. Hense, esophageal schwannoma may be a differential diagnosis with esophageal leiomyoma.

  19. Radiological evaluation of esophageal motility and gastroesophageal reflux disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schima, W.; Pokieser, P.; Schober, E.

    1995-01-01

    Radiological evaluation of esophageal motility and the lower esophageal sphincter has gained increased attention in recent years. Videofluoroscopic investigation of esophageal motor function is superior to static film radiography, as repeated analysis of the videotaped recordings is possible. With emphasis on radiological techniques, normal esophagel physiology and motility and a variety of esophageal motor disorders are discussed in this review paper. Radiological evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux and reflux esophagitis is described. Clinical and radiological findings in esophageal motility disorders and gastroesophageal reflux disease and the radiological efficacy compared to that of manometry and pH-metry are discussed. (orig.) [de

  20. Clinical application of endoscopic ultrasonography for esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hitomi; Inoue, Haruhiro; Isomoto, Hajime; Urabe, Shigetoshi; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-04-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has been widely used for evaluating the nature of diseases of various organs. The possibility of applying EUS for esophageal motility diseases has not been well discussed despite its versatility. At present, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for esophageal achalasia and related diseases has brought new attention to esophageal diseases because POEM provides a more direct approach to the inner structures of the esophageal wall. In the present study, we discuss the clinical utility of EUS in evaluating and treating esophageal motility diseases such as esophageal achalasia and related diseases. © 2015 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2015 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.