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Sample records for limited-stage small-cell esophageal

  1. Surgery in limited stage small cell lung cancer

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    Lassen, U; Hansen, H H

    1999-01-01

    The role of surgery in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is controversial. Surgery has several potential advantages because it may reduce the frequency of local relapses, it does not impede the intensity of chemotherapy, it does not affect the bone marrow, and surgical staging may be of prognostic...

  2. Effect of early chemoradiotherapy in patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer

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    Ha, In Bong; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Jeong, Ho Jin; Choi, Hoon Sik; Chai, Gyu Young; Kang, Myoung Hee; Kim, Hoon Gu; Lee, Gyeong Won; Na, Jae Beom; Kang, Ki Mun [Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    We evaluated the effect of early chemoradiotherapy on the treatment of patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC). Between January 2006 and December 2011, thirty-one patients with histologically proven LS-SCLC who were treated with two cycles of chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy and consolidation chemotherapy were retrospectively analyzed. The chemotherapy regimen was composed of etoposide and cisplatin. Thoracic radiotherapy consisted of 50 to 60 Gy (median, 54 Gy) given in 5 to 6.5 weeks. The follow-up period ranged from 5 to 53 months (median, 22 months). After chemoradiotherapy, 35.5% of the patients (11 patients) showed complete response, 61.3% (19 patients) showed partial response, 3.2% (one patient) showed progressive disease, resulting in an overall response rate of 96.8% (30 patients). The 1-, 2-, and 3-year overall survival (OS) rates were 66.5%, 41.0%, and 28.1%, respectively, with a median OS of 21.3 months. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year progression free survival (PFS) rates were 49.8%, 22.8%, and 13.7%, respectively, with median PFS of 12 months. The patterns of failure were: locoregional recurrences in 29.0% (nine patients), distant metastasis in 9.7% (three patients), and both locoregional and distant metastasis in 9.7% (three patients). Grade 3 or 4 toxicities of leukopenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia were observed in 32.2%, 29.0%, and 25.8%, respectively. Grade 3 radiation esophagitis and radiation pneumonitis were shown in 12.9% and 6.4%, respectively. We conclude that early chemoradiotherapy for LS-SCLC provides feasible and acceptable local control and safety.

  3. Prospective study on stereotactic radiotherapy of limited-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

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    Høyer, Morten; Roed, Henrik; Hansen, Anders Traberg

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To test the effect of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in       the treatment of medically inoperable patients with limited-stage       non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a Phase II trial. Methods and       Materials: Forty patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated with SBRT...... resulted in a high       probability of local control and a promising survival rate. The toxicity       after SBRT of lung tumors was moderate. However, deterioration in       performance status, respiratory insufficiency, and other side effects were       observed...

  4. Peripheral blood stem cell harvest in patients with limited stage small-cell lung cancer

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    Katakami, Nobuyuki; Takakura, Shunji; Fujii, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Takashi; Umeda, Bunichi [Kobe City General Hospital (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    Chemotherapy plus granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) induced mobilization of peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) was performed in patients with limited stage small-cell lung cancer. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin/etoposide or cisplatin/adriamycin/etoposide. The amounts of CD34 positive cells and granulocyte-macrophage colony forming units (CFU-GM) collected during 2-3 courses of apheresis were 3.1{+-}2.9 x 10{sup 6}/kg (n=10) and 3.1{+-}1.5 x 10{sup 5}/kg (n=8) , respectively. Adequate amounts of PBSC were also harvested even in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Eight patients were successfully treated with high-dose chemotherapy consisting of ifosfamide, carboplatin and etoposide with PBSC transfusion. The patients'-bone marrow reconstruction was rapid and no treatment-related death was observed. (author)

  5. Thoracic radiation therapy for limited-stage small-cell lung cancer: unanswered questions.

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    Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Lorigan, Paul; West, Catharine; Thatcher, Nick

    2005-07-01

    The role of thoracic radiation therapy (RT; TRT) is now established in the management of limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). There is increasing evidence in the literature in favor of early concurrent chemoradiation therapy, and a gold standard of care for patients with a good performance status is twice-daily TRT (45 Gy in 3 weeks) with concurrent cisplatin/etoposide. Five-year survival rates > 20% can be expected with this combined-modality approach. Although current clinical trials are exploring the efficacy of new chemotherapeutic strategies for the disease, essential questions related to the optimization of TRT remain unanswered. In particular, the optimal RT dose, fractionation, and treatment volume have not been defined. This review highlights the need for well-designed multinational trials aimed at the optimization and standardization of RT for limited-stage SCLC. These trials should integrate translational research studies to investigate the molecular basis of RT resistance and to develop biomarker profiles of prognosis.

  6. Prospective study on stereotactic radiotherapy of limited-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

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    Høyer, Morten; Roed, Henrik; Hansen, Anders Traberg

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To test the effect of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in       the treatment of medically inoperable patients with limited-stage       non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a Phase II trial. Methods and       Materials: Forty patients with Stage I NSCLC were treated with SBRT...... with a       central dose of 15 Gy x 3 within 5-8 days. Results: Eight patients (20%)       obtained a complete response, 15 (38%) had a partial response, and 12       (30%) had no change or could not be evaluated. Only 3 patients had a local       recurrence, and the local control rate 2 years after SBRT was 85...... resulted in a high       probability of local control and a promising survival rate. The toxicity       after SBRT of lung tumors was moderate. However, deterioration in       performance status, respiratory insufficiency, and other side effects were       observed...

  7. A meta-analysis of the Timing of Chest Radiotherapy in Patients with Limited-stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Hui ZHAO

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Although evidence for a significant survival benefit of chest radiotherapy has been proven, no conclusion could be drawn regarding the optimal timing of chest radiation. The aim of this study is to explore whether the timing of chest radiation may influence the survival of the patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LSSCLC by performing a literature-based meta-analysis. Methods By searching Medline, CENTRAL (the Cochrane central register of controlled trials, CBM, and CNKI, et al, we collected both domestic and overseas published documents about randomized trials comparing different timing chest radiotherapy in patients with LS-SCLC. Early chest radiation was regarded as beginning within 30 days after the start of chemotherapy. Random or fixed effect models were applied to conduct meta-analysis on the trials. The combined odds ratio (OR and the 95% confidence interval (CI were calculated to estimate the mortality in 2 or 3 years and toxicity of the two treatments. The statistical heterogeneity was determined by cochran’s Chi-square test (Q test. The Begg’ test was used to determine the publication bias. Results Six trials that included a total of 1 189 patients were analyzed in the meta-analysis 587 patients were in the early radiation group and 602 patients were in the late radiation group. Considering all 6 eligible trials, the overall survival at 2/3 years was not significantly different between early and late chest radiation (OR=0.78, 95%CI: 0.55-1.05, Z=1.68, P=0.093. For the toxicity, no obvious difference was observed for early chest radiotherapy compared with late irradiation in pneumonitis (OR=1.93, 95%CI: 0.97-3.86, P=0.797, esophagitis (OR=1.43, 95%CI: 0.95-2.13, P=0.572 and thrombocytopenia (OR=1.23, 95%CI: 0.88-1.77, P=0.746, respectively. Conclusion No statistical difference was observed in 2/3 years survival and toxicity, including pneumonitis, esophagitis and thrombocytopenia, between

  8. Dosimetric rationale and early experience at UFPTI of thoracic proton therapy and chemotherapy in limited-stage small cell lung cancer

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    Colaco, Rovel J.; Huh, Soon; Nichols, Romaine; Morris, Christopher G.; Flampouri, Stella; Li, Zuofeng; Hoppe, Bradford S. [Univ. of Florida Proton Therapy Inst., Jacksonville (United States)], e-mail: bhoppe@floridaproton.org; D' Agostino, Harry [Dept. of Thoracic Surgery, Univ. of Florida Coll. of Medicine, Gainesville (United States); Pham, Dat C. [Dept. of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Univ. of Florida Coll. of Medicine, Gainesville (United States); Bajwa, Abubakr A. [Dept. of Medicine, Univ. of Florida Coll. of Medicine, Gainesville (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Background: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard of care in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Treatment with conventional x-ray therapy (XRT) is associated with high toxicity rates, particularly acute grade 3+ esophagitis and pneumonitis. We present outcomes for the first known series of limited-stage SCLC patients treated with proton therapy and a dosimetric comparison of lung and esophageal doses with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Material and methods: Six patients were treated; five concurrently and one sequentially. Five patients received 60-66 CGE in 30-34 fractions once daily and one patient received 45 CGE in 30 fractions twice daily. All six patients received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, v3.0, was used to grade toxicity. IMRT plans were also generated and compared with proton plans. Results: The median follow-up was 12.0 months. The one-year overall and progression-free survival rates were 83% and 66%, respectively. There were no cases of acute grade 3+ esophagitis or acute grade 2+ pneumonitis, and no other acute grade 3+ non-hematological toxicities were seen. One patient with a history of pulmonary fibrosis and atrial fibrillation developed worsening symptoms four months after treatment requiring oxygen. Three patients died; two of progressive disease and one after a fall. The latter patient was disease-free at 36 months after treatment. Another patient recurred and is alive, while two patients remain disease-free at 12 months of follow-up. Proton therapy proved superior to IMRT across all esophageal and lung dose volume points. Conclusion. In this small series of SCLC patients treated with proton therapy with radical intent, treatment was well tolerated with no cases of acute grade 3+ esophagitis or acute grade 2+ pneumonitis. Dosimetric comparison showed better sparing of lung and esophagus with proton therapy. Proton therapy merits further

  9. Limited stage small cell carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract: a clinicopathologic and prognostic analysis of 27 cases

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    Xiaoping Zou

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Small cell carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract is a rare and aggressive neuroendocrine tumor. This study aims to analyze the clinical characteristics and potential prognostic factors for patients with limited stage small cell carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract. The records of 27 patients with limited stage small cell carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract, who all received surgery with lymphadenectomy, were retrieved and analyzed retrospectively. The median age of patients was 60 years old (range 38-79. The primary locations of tumor were the esophagus (74.1% and stomach (14.8%. The rate of preoperative accurate diagnosis (16.7% was low for small cell carcinoma of the esophagus and stomach. 40.7% of all the patients had regional lymph node metastases. Five patients underwent surgery alone, and the other 22 were treated with surgery + postoperative chemotherapy. All patients had disease progression or recurrence. The overall median survival time was 10 months and the 1-year survival rate was 37.0%. Patients who received postoperative chemotherapy had a median survival time of 12 months, which was superior to the 5-month survival of for those who only had surgery (P<0.0001. TNM stage (P=0.02 and postoperative chemotherapy (P<0.0001 were considered as two prognostic factors in univariate analysis. Postoperative chemotherapy was a significant independent prognostic factor in multivariate analysis (P=0.01. The prognosis for patients with limited stage small cell carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract remains dismal, however, postoperative chemotherapy may have the potential to improve the outcome for these patients.

  10. Patterns of failure in limited-stage small cell lung cancer: Implications of TNM stage for prophylactic cranial irradiation.

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    Wu, Abraham J; Gillis, Andrea; Foster, Amanda; Woo, Kaitlin; Zhang, Zhigang; Gelblum, Daphna Y; Downey, Robert J; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E; Ong, Leonard; Perez, Carmen A; Pietanza, M Catherine; Krug, Lee; Rudin, Charles M; Rimner, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    The relationship between tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage and patterns of failure in limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) remains unclear. We hypothesized that TNM stage predicts brain metastasis risk, and could inform the use of prophylactic cranial irradiation. We reviewed 283 patients with stage I-IIIB SCLC. Competing-risks regression was used to analyze local, distant, and brain failure. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the effect of treatment and clinical factors on failure and OS. Patients with stage I or II SCLC (35% of cohort) had significantly better survival and lower risk of distant and brain metastasis, compared with stage III patients. The 5-year cumulative incidence of brain metastasis for stage I/II and III were 12% and 26%, respectively. Stage had no correlation with local failure. On multivariate analysis, stage was independently prognostic for survival, distant metastasis risk, and brain metastasis risk. TNM staging predicts likelihood of distant metastasis, brain metastasis, and survival in LS-SCLC. This supports the routine use of TNM staging in clinical practice. The lower risk of brain metastasis in stage I and II SCLC suggests that prophylactic cranial irradiation could play a more limited role in treatment of early-stage disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. [Metastatic characteristics of lymph node in supraclavicular zone and radiotherapy target volume for limited-stage small cell lung cancer].

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    Feng, Zhen-xing; Zhao, Lu-jun; Guan, Yong; Sun, Yao; Ji, Kai; Wang, Ping

    2013-05-21

    To explore the reasonable radiotherapy range by analyzing the characteristics of supraclavicular lymph node metastasis in limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC). From January 2005 to December 2011, patients of LS-SCLC were reviewed. Supraclavicular zone was further divided into five subgroups including para-recurrent laryngeal nerve (region I and region II ), para-internal jugular vein (region III ), supraclavicular region (region IV), as well as the other regions except for the mentioned above (region V). The characteristics of the lymph nodes in each region were analyzed. The supraclavicular lymph node metastasis was found in 60 patients, with a positive rate of 34.5%. In multivariate Logistic regression analysis,intra-thoracic lymph node metastasis in the lymph node stations of level 2 and 3 were found to be the risk factors of supraclavicular lymph node metastasis (P = 0.006,P = 0.000). Our data suggests that the frequencies of metastasis in region I and III were much higher than those in the other areas.Among the sixty patients with supraclavicular lymph node metastasis, 95.0% were found at region I or III while the incidence of skip metastasis was only 5.0%. It is advisable to contain the bilateral supraclavicular nodes in patients with mediastinal lymph nodes metastasis to the level 2 or 3 for elective radiation target volume.The clinical target volume (CTV) exterior margin containing the outer margin of internal jugular vein may be suitable.

  12. A Prospective Randomized Study of the Radiotherapy Volume for Limited-stage Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Preliminary Report

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    Xiao HU

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Controversies exists with regard to target volumes as far as thoracic radiotherapy (TRT is concerned in the multimodality treatment for limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LSCLC. The aim of this study is to prospectively compare the local control rate, toxicity profiles, and overall survival (OS between patients received different target volumes irradiation after induction chemotherapy. Methods LSCLC patients received 2 cycles of etoposide and cisplatin (EP induction chemotherapy and were randomly assigned to receive TRT to either the post- or pre-chemotherapy tumor extent (GTV-T as study arm and control arm, CTV-N included the positive nodal drainage area for both arms. One to 2 weeks after induction chemotherapy, 45 Gy/30 Fx/19 d TRT was administered concurrently with the third cycle of EP regimen. After that, additional 3 cycles of EP consolidation were administered. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI was administered to patients with a complete response. Results Thirty-seven and 40 patients were randomly assigned to study arm and control arm. The local recurrence rates were 32.4% and 28.2% respectively (P=0.80; the isolated nodal failure (INF rate were 3.0% and 2.6% respectively (P=0.91; all INF sites were in the ipsilateral supraclavicular fossa. Medastinal N3 disease was the risk factor for INF (P=0.02, OR=14.13, 95%CI: 1.47-136.13. During radiotherapy, grade I, II weight loss was observed in 29.4%, 5.9% and 56.4%, 7.7% patients respectively (P=0.04. Grade 0-I and II-III late pulmonary injury was developed in 97.1%, 2.9% and 86.4%, 15.4% patients respectively (P=0.07. Median survival time was 22.1 months and 26.9 months respectively. The 1 to 3-year OS were 77.9%, 44.4%, 37.3% and 75.8%, 56.3%, 41.7% respectively (P=0.79. Conclusion The preliminary results of this study indicate that irradiant the post-chemotherapy tumor extent (GTV-T and positive nodal drainage area did not decrease local control and overall

  13. Disease-specific survival for limited-stage small-cell lung cancer affected by statistical method of assessment

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    Yuan Fei

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In general, prognosis and impact of prognostic/predictive factors are assessed with Kaplan-Meier plots and/or the Cox proportional hazard model. There might be substantive differences from the results using these models for the same patients, if different statistical methods were used, for example, Boag log-normal (cure-rate model, or log-normal survival analysis. Methods Cohort of 244 limited-stage small-cell lung cancer patients, were accrued between 1981 and 1998, and followed to the end of 2005. The endpoint was death with or from lung cancer, for disease-specific survival (DSS. DSS at 1-, 3- and 5-years, with 95% confidence limits, are reported for all patients using the Boag, Kaplan-Meier, Cox, and log-normal survival analysis methods. Factors with significant effects on DSS were identified with step-wise forward multivariate Cox and log-normal survival analyses. Then, DSS was ascertained for patients with specific characteristics defined by these factors. Results The median follow-up of those alive was 9.5 years. The lack of events after 1966 days precluded comparison after 5 years. DSS assessed by the four methods in the full cohort differed by 0–2% at 1 year, 0–12% at 3 years, and 0–1% at 5 years. Log-normal survival analysis indicated DSS of 38% at 3 years, 10–12% higher than with other methods; univariate 95% confidence limits were non-overlapping. Surgical resection, hemoglobin level, lymph node involvement, and superior vena cava (SVC obstruction significantly impacted DSS. DSS assessed by the Cox and log-normal survival analysis methods for four clinical risk groups differed by 1–6% at 1 year, 15–26% at 3 years, and 0–12% at 5 years; multivariate 95% confidence limits were overlapping in all instances. Conclusion Surgical resection, hemoglobin level, lymph node involvement, and superior vena cava (SVC obstruction all significantly impacted DSS. Apparent DSS for patients was influenced by the

  14. Analysis of incidental radiation dose to uninvolved mediastinal/supraclavicular lymph nodes in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer treated without elective nodal irradiation.

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    Ahmed, Irfan; DeMarco, Marylou; Stevens, Craig W; Fulp, William J; Dilling, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Classic teaching states that treatment of limited-stage small cell lung cancer (L-SCLC) requires large treatment fields covering the entire mediastinum. However, a trend in modern thoracic radiotherapy is toward more conformal fields, employing positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans to determine the gross tumor volume (GTV). This analysis evaluates the dosimetric results when using selective nodal irradiation (SNI) to treat a patient with L-SCLC, quantitatively comparing the results to standard Intergroup treatment fields. Sixteen consecutive patients with L-SCLC and central mediastinal disease who also underwent pretherapy PET/CT scans were studied in this analysis. For each patient, we created SNI treatment volumes, based on the PET/CT-based criteria for malignancy. We also created 2 ENI plans, the first without heterogeneity corrections, as per the Intergroup 0096 study (ENI(off)) and the second with heterogeneity corrections while maintaining constant the number of MUs delivered between these latter 2 plans (ENI(on)). Nodal stations were contoured using published guidelines, then placed into 4 "bins" (treated nodes, 1 echelon away, >1 echelon away within the mediastinum, contralateral hilar/supraclavicular). These were aggregated across the patients in the study. Dose to these nodal bins and to tumor/normal structures were compared among these plans using pairwise t-tests. The ENI(on) plans demonstrated a statistically significant degradation in dose coverage compared with the ENI(off) plans. ENI and SNI both created a dose gradient to the lymph nodes across the mediastinum. Overall, the gradient was larger for the SNI plans, although the maximum dose to the "1 echelon away" nodes was not statistically different. Coverage of the GTV and planning target volume (PTV) were improved with SNI, while simultaneously reducing esophageal and spinal cord dose though at the expense of modestly reduced dose to anatomically distant lymph nodes

  15. Analysis of Incidental Radiation Dose to Uninvolved Mediastinal/Supraclavicular Lymph Nodes in Patients with Limited-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated Without Elective Nodal Irradiation

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    Ahmed, Irfan; DeMarco, Marylou; Stevens, Craig W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Fulp, William J. [Biostatistics Core, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Dilling, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Dilling@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Classic teaching states that treatment of limited-stage small cell lung cancer (L-SCLC) requires large treatment fields covering the entire mediastinum. However, a trend in modern thoracic radiotherapy is toward more conformal fields, employing positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans to determine the gross tumor volume (GTV). This analysis evaluates the dosimetric results when using selective nodal irradiation (SNI) to treat a patient with L-SCLC, quantitatively comparing the results to standard Intergroup treatment fields. Sixteen consecutive patients with L-SCLC and central mediastinal disease who also underwent pretherapy PET/CT scans were studied in this analysis. For each patient, we created SNI treatment volumes, based on the PET/CT-based criteria for malignancy. We also created 2 ENI plans, the first without heterogeneity corrections, as per the Intergroup 0096 study (ENI{sub off}) and the second with heterogeneity corrections while maintaining constant the number of MUs delivered between these latter 2 plans (ENI{sub on}). Nodal stations were contoured using published guidelines, then placed into 4 'bins' (treated nodes, 1 echelon away, >1 echelon away within the mediastinum, contralateral hilar/supraclavicular). These were aggregated across the patients in the study. Dose to these nodal bins and to tumor/normal structures were compared among these plans using pairwise t-tests. The ENI{sub on} plans demonstrated a statistically significant degradation in dose coverage compared with the ENI{sub off} plans. ENI and SNI both created a dose gradient to the lymph nodes across the mediastinum. Overall, the gradient was larger for the SNI plans, although the maximum dose to the '1 echelon away' nodes was not statistically different. Coverage of the GTV and planning target volume (PTV) were improved with SNI, while simultaneously reducing esophageal and spinal cord dose though at the expense of modestly reduced dose to

  16. Phase 2 Study of Accelerated Hypofractionated Thoracic Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy in Patients With Limited-Stage Small-Cell Lung Cancer

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    Xia, Bing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Cancer Center, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hangzhou Cancer Hospital, Hangzhou (China); Hong, Ling-Zhi [Department of Oncology, Nanjing First Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Cai, Xu-Wei; Zhu, Zheng-Fei; Liu, Qi; Zhao, Kuai-Le; Fan, Min; Mao, Jing-Fang; Yang, Huan-Jun; Wu, Kai-Liang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Cancer Center, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Fu, Xiao-Long, E-mail: xlfu1964@hotmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Chest Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the efficacy and toxicity of accelerated hypofractionated thoracic radiation therapy (HypoTRT) combined with concurrent chemotherapy in the treatment of limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC), with the hypothesis that both high radiation dose and short radiation time are important in this setting. Methods and Materials: Patients with previously untreated LS-SCLC, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 to 2, and adequate organ function were eligible. HypoTRT of 55 Gy at 2.5 Gy per fraction over 30 days was given on the first day of the second or third cycle of chemotherapy. An etoposide/cisplatin regimen was given to 4 to 6 cycles. Patients who had a good response to initial treatment were offered prophylactic cranial irradiation. The primary endpoint was the 2-year progression-free survival rate. Results: Fifty-nine patients were enrolled from July 2007 through February 2012 (median age, 58 years; 86% male). The 2-year progression-free survival rate was 49.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 35.3%-62.7%). Median survival time was 28.5 months (95% CI 9.0-48.0 months); the 2-year overall survival rate was 58.2% (95% CI 44.5%-71.9%). The 2-year local control rate was 76.4% (95% CI 63.7%-89.1%). The severe hematologic toxicities (grade 3 or 4) were leukopenia (32%), neutropenia (25%), and thrombocytopenia (15%). Acute esophagitis and pneumonitis of grade ≥3 occurred in 25% and 10% of the patients, respectively. Thirty-eight patients (64%) received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Conclusion: Our study showed that HypoTRT of 55 Gy at 2.5 Gy per fraction daily concurrently with etoposide/cisplatin chemotherapy has favorable survival and acceptable toxicity. This radiation schedule deserves further investigation in LS-SCLC.

  17. A case of limbic encephalitis presenting as a paraneoplastic manifestation of limited stage small cell lung cancer: a case report

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    Butt Mohammad

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The differential diagnosis of altered mental status and behavioral change is very extensive. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is a rare cause of cognitive impairment, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Case presentation A 64-year-old British Caucasian woman presented to our hospital with a 12-week history of confusion and short-term memory loss. She was hyponatremic with a serum sodium level of 128mmol/L. Moreover, there was evidence of left hilar prominence on the chest radiograph. A thoracic computed tomography scan showed left hilar opacity with confluent lymphadenopathy. A percutaneous biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of small cell lung cancer. There was no radiological evidence of brain metastasis on the computed tomography scan. In view of continued cognitive impairment, which was felt to be disproportionate to hyponatremia, a magnetic resonance imaging scan of the brain was undertaken. It showed hyperintense signals from both hippocampi, highly suggestive of limbic encephalitis presenting as a paraneoplastic manifestation of small cell lung cancer. She had a significant radiological and clinical response following chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Conclusion This case highlights the importance of considering paraneoplastic syndromes in patients with neurological symptoms in the context of lung malignancy. If initial investigations fail to reveal the cause of cognitive impairment in a patient with malignancy, magnetic resonance imaging may be invaluable in the diagnosis of limbic encephalitis. The clinical presentation, diagnostic techniques and management of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis are discussed in this case report.

  18. Survival of patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer treated with individualized chemotherapy selected by in vitro drug sensitivity testing.

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    Cortazar, P; Gazdar, A F; Woods, E; Russell, E; Steinberg, S M; Williams, J; Ihde, D C; Johnson, B E

    1997-05-01

    Our purpose was to study the feasibility of determining individualized chemotherapy regimens by in vitro drug sensitivity testing (DST) for patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and to evaluate patient response and survival. Fifty-four previously untreated patients with limited-stage small cell cancer were studied. Fresh tumor specimens for DST were collected, when possible, from patients' biopsies before the start of treatment. The differential staining cytotoxicity assay was used to determine the in vitro sensitivity of the tumor cells to different drugs. From these results, an in vitro best regimen (IVBR), a three-drug combination of previously proven efficacy of seven active drugs in SCLC, was selected. Patients were initially treated with four cycles of etoposide/cisplatin and concurrent radiotherapy. This was followed by four cycles of either individualized chemotherapy regimens based on the results of DST or, when DST results were not available, four cycles of vincristine, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide. Eighteen patients (33%) underwent biopsy procedures that provided tissue specimens for DST. The biopsy specimens contained tumor cells in 16 of 18 patients. The median duration from diagnosis to start of treatment was 22 days (range, 4-58 days) for the 18 patients who underwent elective thoracic biopsies compared to 21 days (range, 2-74 days) for members of the group that did not (P2 = 0.58). Time from thoracic biopsy to initiation of chemotherapy was a median of 4 days (range, 2-22 days). DST was done in 10 patients, and IVBR was administered to 8 patients. The median actuarial survival of 8 patients treated with their IVBR was 38.5 months compared to 19 months for the 46 patients treated with empiric chemotherapy. Selection of individualized chemotherapy regimens is labor intensive but feasible in limited-stage SCLC. Treatment with an individualized IVBR in our patients was associated with prolonged patient survival; however, because

  19. Early treatment volume reduction rate as a prognostic factor in patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for limited stage small cell lung cancer

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    Lee, Joo Hwan; Lee, Jeong Shin; Lee, Chang Geol; Cho, Jae Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jin Hyun; Kim, Jun Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To investigate the relationship between early treatment response to definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and survival outcome in patients with limited stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC). We retrospectively reviewed 47 patients with LS-SCLC who received definitive CRT between January 2009 and December 2012. Patients were treated with systemic chemotherapy regimen of etoposide/carboplatin (n = 15) or etoposide/cisplatin (n = 32) and concurrent thoracic radiotherapy at a median dose of 54 Gy (range, 46 to 64 Gy). Early treatment volume reduction rate (ETVRR) was defined as the percentage change in gross tumor volume between diagnostic computed tomography (CT) and simulation CT for adaptive RT planning and was used as a parameter for early treatment response. The median dose at adaptive RT planning was 36 Gy (range, 30 to 43 Gy), and adaptive CT was performed in 30 patients (63.8%). With a median follow-up of 27.7 months (range, 5.9 to 75.8 months), the 2-year locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 74.2% and 56.5%, respectively. The mean diagnostic and adaptive gross tumor volumes were 117.9 mL (range, 5.9 to 447 mL) and 36.8 mL (range, 0.3 to 230.6 mL), respectively. The median ETVRR was 71.4% (range, 30 to 97.6%) and the ETVRR >45% group showed significantly better OS (p < 0.0001) and LRPFS (p = 0.009) than the other group. ETVRR as a parameter for early treatment response may be a useful prognostic factor to predict treatment outcome in LS-SCLC patients treated with CRT.

  20. [Prognostic value of AJCC TNM Staging 7th edition in limited-stage small cell lung cancer: validation in 437 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjue; Zhu, Hui; Zhou, Zongmei; Feng, Qinfu; Chen, Dongfu; Zhang, Hongxing; Xiao, Zefen; Wang, Lühua

    2015-12-01

    To explore the impact of AJCC TNM Staging 7th edition on survival outcome of limited stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Four hundred and thirty-seven SCLC patients with completed diagnosis and treatment data treated in our department between January 1996 and December 2006 were reclassified according to the AJCC TNM Staging 7th edition. The patients of stages IA, IB, IIA, IIB, IIIA, IIIB were 8, 44, 7, 64, 192 cases, respectively. Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analysis and log-rank test was used to identify the prognostic factors. The survival rate was determined using chi-square test. The median follow-up time was 64 months. The median survival time was 26.2 months and median progression free survival time was 13.7 months. The 1-, 2- and 5-year overall survival rates were 86.0%, 52.7%, and 29.7%, respectively. The log-rank test showed that TNM stage is a statistically significant prognostic factor for OS in LS-SCLC (PTNM staging system generally allowed a good separation in pairwise comparison for OS between successive stages except there was no significant difference between stages I and II (P=0.061). The 5-year progression free survival rates of patients of stage I, II, IIIA and IIIB were 53.2%, 43.2%, 16.8%, and 10.9%, respectively. TNM stage also was a statistically significant prognostic factor for PFS in LS-SCLC (P0.05 for all). The T staging confirmed significant influence on OS (P0.05 for all), while T stage was not a significant prognostic factor for PFS in the LS-SCLC patients (P=0.194). N stage also had a significant influence on OS (P0.05) except that between the 5-year survival rates of N2 and N3 cases (P=0.013). The cumulative brain metastasis rates of stages I, II, IIIA, and stage IIIB were 17.3%, 28.6%, 33.3%, and 35.8%, respectively(P=0.072), and were 12.8% and 30.8% for pathological stage I and clinical stage I (P=0.203). AJCC TNM Staging 7th edition criteria for LS-SCLC patients have a high prognostic impact and therefore are

  1. Analysis of risk factors for pulmonary complications in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer. A single-centre retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sas-Korczynska, Beata; Kamzol, Wojciech [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Cracow Branch, Clinic of Oncology and Department of Radiotherapy, Cracow (Poland); Luczynska, Elzbieta [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Cracow Branch, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Cracow (Poland); Sokolowski, Andrzej [Cracow University of Economics, Department of Statistics, Cracow (Poland)

    2017-02-15

    The most effective therapy in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS SCLC) seems to be chemotherapy (using platinum-based regimens) and thoracic radiotherapy (TRT), which is followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation. The analysed group comprised 217 patients who received combined treatment for LS SCLC, i.e. chemotherapy (according to cisplatin and etoposide schedule) and TRT (concurrent in 101 and sequential in 116 patients). The influence of chemoradiotherapy (ChT-RT) schedule on treatment results (frequency of complete response, survival rates, and incidence of treatment failure and complications) was evaluated, and the frequency and severity of pulmonary complications were analysed to identify risk factors. The 5-year survival rates in concurrent vs. sequential ChT-RT schedules were 27.3 vs. 11.7% (overall) and 28 vs. 14.3% (disease-free). The frequencies of adverse events in relation to concurrent vs. sequential therapy were 85.1 vs. 9.5% (haematological complications) and 58.4 vs. 38.8% (pulmonary fibrosis), respectively. It was found that concurrent ChT-RT (hazard ratio, HR 2.75), a total dose equal to or more than 54 Gy (HR 2.55), the presence of haematological complications (HR 1.89) and a lung volume receiving a dose equal to or greater than 20 Gy exceeding 31% (HR 1.06) were the risk factors for pulmonary complications. Pulmonary complications after ChT-RT developed in 82% of patients treated for LS SCLC. In comparison to the sequential approach, concurrent ChT-RT had a positive effect on treatment outcome. However, this is a factor that can impair treatment tolerance, which manifests in the appearance of side effects. (orig.) [German] Die wirksamste Therapie bei einem kleinzelligen Lungenkrebs im limitierten Stadium (LS SCLC) scheinen Chemotherapie (platinbasierte Regime) und thorakale Strahlentherapie (TRT) zu sein, begleitet von der prophylaktischen Schaedelbestrahlung. Analysiert wurden 217 Patienten, die eine kombinierte Behandlung

  2. Acute esophagitis for patients with local-regional advanced non small cell lung cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pan, Yi; Brink, Carsten; Knap, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Esophagitis is common in patients treated with definitive radiotherapy for local-regional advanced non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this study was to estimate the dose-effect relationship using clinical and dosimetric parameters in patients receiving intensity modulated...... radiotherapy (IMRT) and concomitant chemotherapy (CCT). METHODS: Between 2009 and 2013, 117 patients with stages IIB-IIIB NSCLC were treated in a multicenter randomized phase II trial with 2 cycles of induction chemotherapy followed by IMRT and CCT. The esophagitis was prospectively scored using the Common...

  3. Predicting Esophagitis After Chemoradiation Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: An Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, David A., E-mail: david.palma@uwo.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oberije, Cary [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO Clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Belderbos, Jose [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute – Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dios, Núria Rodríguez de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Universidad Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Barriger, R. Bryan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Moreno-Jiménez, Marta [Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology Division, Clínica Universidad de Navarra, University of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Kim, Tae Hyun [Center for Proton Therapy, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Gyeonggi (Korea, Republic of); Ramella, Sara [Division of Radiation Oncology, Campus Bio-Medico University, Rome (Italy); Everitt, Sarah [Radiation Therapy Services, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Australia and Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University (Australia); Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); De Ruyck, Kim [Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT) improves survival compared with sequential treatment for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, but it increases toxicity, particularly radiation esophagitis (RE). Validated predictors of RE for clinical use are lacking. We performed an individual-patient-data meta-analysis to determine factors predictive of clinically significant RE. Methods and Materials: After a systematic review of the literature, data were obtained on 1082 patients who underwent CCRT, including patients from Europe, North America, Asia, and Australia. Patients were randomly divided into training and validation sets (2/3 vs 1/3 of patients). Factors predictive of RE (grade ≥2 and grade ≥3) were assessed using logistic modeling, with the concordance statistic (c statistic) used to evaluate the performance of each model. Results: The median radiation therapy dose delivered was 65 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 2.1 years. Most patients (91%) received platinum-containing CCRT regimens. The development of RE was common, scored as grade 2 in 348 patients (32.2%), grade 3 in 185 (17.1%), and grade 4 in 10 (0.9%). There were no RE-related deaths. On univariable analysis using the training set, several baseline factors were statistically predictive of RE (P<.05), but only dosimetric factors had good discrimination scores (c > .60). On multivariable analysis, the esophageal volume receiving ≥60 Gy (V60) alone emerged as the best predictor of grade ≥2 and grade ≥3 RE, with good calibration and discrimination. Recursive partitioning identified 3 risk groups: low (V60 <0.07%), intermediate (V60 0.07% to 16.99%), and high (V60 ≥17%). With use of the validation set, the predictive model performed inferiorly for the grade ≥2 endpoint (c = .58) but performed well for the grade ≥3 endpoint (c = .66). Conclusions: Clinically significant RE is common, but life-threatening complications occur in <1% of patients. Although several factors

  4. Treatment of limited stage small-cell lung cancer: results from a single center; Tratamento do cancer de pequenas celulas de pulmao - doenca limitada: resultados de uma unica instituicao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Michael Jenwei; Faria, Sergio Luis; Souhami, Luis; Niazi, Tamil Mohammed; Duclos, Marie; Guerra, Julio [McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Montreal General Hospital. Dept. de Radio-Oncologia]. E-mail: sergio.faria@muhc.mcgill.ca

    2006-01-15

    Objective: To report the results of the treatment of patients with small-cell lung cancer with limited disease (SCLC-LD) in a single institution during a 10-year period, for quality assurance and comparison with data from the literature. Materials and methods: Between January 1992 and December 2002, 101 patients with SCLC-LD completed treatment at our institution. The outcomes were reviewed and included chemotherapy, radiotherapy, the sequence of the two treatments, and the use of prophylactic cranial irradiation. Radiation was delivered with a median dose of 45 Gy in 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. The median dose of the prophylactic cranial irradiation was 25 Gy in 10 fractions. Results: Average follow-up was of 50.6 months and the average age of the patients was 63 years. There were 85 confirmed deaths, 5 patients were lost to follow up and 11 patients were alive. The median survival time was 11 months, the overall survival at 2 and 5 years was 25.5% and 10% respectively. There were no significant difference in overall survival at 2 or 5 years according to the age and sex of the patients. In addition, there were no statistical difference in overall survival among patients who had prophylactic cranial irradiation or not, or who were treated in two different periods (1997-2002 vs. 1992-1996). Conclusion: The results of the treatment of SCLC-LD patients in our institution reflect the constant changes in the management of SCLC. The 2-year's 25.5% overall survival seen in our institution is similar to reports published from other single institution, but lower than the 47% to 54% recently published results from cooperative groups. (author)

  5. Three-Arm Randomized Trial of Sodium Alginate for Preventing Radiation-Induced Esophagitis in Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Receiving Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: The OLCSG1401 Study Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Kiichiro; Ichihara, Eiki; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Sone, Naoyuki; Murakami, Toshi; Harada, Daijiro; Oze, Isao; Kubo, Toshio; Tanaka, Hisaaki; Kuyama, Shoichi; Kishino, Daizo; Bessho, Akihiro; Harita, Shingo; Katsui, Kuniaki; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2017-03-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is the standard of care for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC). However, this intensive therapy often causes severe esophagitis, which could deteriorate a patient's quality of life (QOL), leading to poor treatment compliance. Sodium alginate, approved in Japan for gastritis, is sufficiently highly viscous to remain in the esophageal mucosa, providing a protective effect in the esophagus. To investigate whether this compound has a preventive effect against severe esophagitis in patients receiving concurrent CRT, we plan a 3-arm randomized trial of sodium alginate with 2 different schedules versus water. The primary endpoint is set as the proportion of patients with grade ≥ 3 esophagitis using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. With stratification by institute, performance status, and percentage of the esophageal volume receiving >35 Gy, the patients will be randomly assigned to 1 of the following groups: sodium alginate initiated concomitantly with CRT (group A), sodium alginate initiated soon after the development of extremely mild esophagitis during CRT (group B), or water administered throughout CRT (group C). Assuming that the proportion of grade ≥ 3 esophagitis would be 8% in groups A and B and 27% in group C, the required sample size would be 200 patients, with 70% power and 5% α. The secondary endpoints include QOL, the frequency of additional prescriptions of analgesics, treatment response, and survival. The results of the present study will clarify whether sodium alginate can prevent esophagitis in patients with LA-NSCLC undergoing CRT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of dose fractionation on overall survival in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer%局限期小细胞肺癌不同剂量分割模式放疗的疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏冰; 陈桂园; 蔡旭伟; 赵建东; 杨焕军; 樊旼; 赵快乐; 傅小龙

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of different dose fractionation on overall survival in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC). Methods LS-SCLC patients treated with radical combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) between January 2001 and Dec 2007 were analyzed retrospectively. According to the dose fractionation schemes, patients were divided into three groups:conventional fractionated RT (1. 8 -2.0 Gy,once daily), hyperfractionated RT (1.4 Gy, twice daily) and hypofractionated RT (2. 5 Gy,once daily). Overall survival, disease free survival and pattern of failures of the three groups were compared. A total of 177 patients were enrolled, including 63 patients in conventional fractionated RT group, 79 in hyperfractionated RT group and 35 in hypofractionated RT group. Results The overall follow-up rate was 96. 6%. The patient numbers with follow-up of more than 2 and 5 years were 153 and 92, respectively. The median survival time of the entire group was 22. 4 months, and the 2-and 5-year survival rates were 43.4% and 23. 5%, respectively. The 2-year survival rates for three groups were 31%, 46% and 59% (x2 =7.94,P=0.019), respectively. The 2-year disease free survival for three groups were 20%, 31% and 40% ( x2 = 4. 86, P = 0. 088 ), respectively. In the pairwise comparisons,patients in hypofractionated RT group have better survival than those in conventional fractionated RT group ( x2 = 7. 81, P = 0. 005 ), the effect of hyperfractionated RT group lies between the hypo-and the conventional fractionated RT groups, but no significant differences were detected ( x2 = 2. 31, P = 0. 128; x2 = 2. 95, P =0. 086). The mildest side effect was found in the hypofractionated RT group. No statistically significant differences were found in the patterns of first failure. Conclusion The hypofractionated RT scheme showed potential survival benefits for patients with LS-SCLC and should be considered in the setting of randomized clinical trials.%目的 比较

  7. Predictors of High-grade Esophagitis After Definitive Three-dimensional Conformal Therapy, Intensity-modulated Radiation Therapy, or Proton Beam Therapy for Non-small cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Martel, Mary K.; Mohan, Radhe; Balter, Peter A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospitales Universitarios Virgen del Rocio, Seville (Spain); Liu Hongmei; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Introduction: We analyzed the ability of various patient- and treatment-related factors to predict radiation-induced esophagitis (RE) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), or proton beam therapy (PBT). Methods and Materials: Patients were treated for NSCLC with 3D-CRT, IMRT, or PBT at MD Anderson from 2000 to 2008 and had full dose-volume histogram (DVH) data available. The endpoint was severe (grade {>=}3) RE. The Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model was used to analyze RE as a function of the fractional esophageal DVH, with clinical variables included as dose-modifying factors. Results: Overall, 652 patients were included: 405 patients were treated with 3D-CRT, 139 with IMRT, and 108 with PBT; corresponding rates of grade {>=}3 RE were 8%, 28%, and 6%, respectively, with a median time to onset of 42 days (range, 11-93 days). A fit of the fractional DVH LKB model demonstrated that the fractional effective dose was significantly different (P=.046) than 1 (fractional mean dose) indicating that high doses to small volumes are more predictive than mean esophageal dose. The model fit was better for 3D-CRT and PBT than for IMRT. Including receipt of concurrent chemotherapy as a dose-modifying factor significantly improved the LKB model (P=.005), and the model was further improved by including a variable representing treatment with >30 fractions. Examining individual types of chemotherapy agents revealed a trend toward receipt of concurrent taxanes and increased risk of RE (P=.105). Conclusions: Fractional dose (dose rate) and number of fractions (total dose) distinctly affect the risk of severe RE, estimated using the LKB model, and concurrent chemotherapy improves the model fit. This risk of severe RE is underestimated by this model in patients receiving IMRT.

  8. Tratamento do câncer de pequenas células de pulmão: doença limitada: resultados de uma única instituição Treatment of limited stage small-cell lung cancer: results from a single center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Jenwei Chen

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Relatar os resultados de tratamento de pacientes com câncer de pulmão de pequenas células com doença limitada (CPPC-DL, num período de dez anos, numa única instituição, para controle de qualidade e comparação com dados de literatura. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Entre janeiro de 1992 e dezembro de 2002, 101 pacientes portadores de CPPC-DL completaram tratamento em nossa instituição. Seus resultados foram revistos e incluíram quimioterapia, radioterapia, a seqüência dos dois tratamentos e o uso de irradiação profilática cerebral (PCI. A radiação foi administrada com dose mediana de 45 Gy em 1,8 a 2 Gy por fração. A dose mediana de PCI foi de 25 Gy em dez frações. RESULTADOS: O seguimento mediano foi de 50,6 meses e a idade mediana dos pacientes foi de 63 anos. Houve 85 mortes confirmadas, 5 pacientes foram perdidos de seguimento e 11 estavam vivos. O tempo de sobrevida mediano foi de 11 meses, a sobrevida global em dois e cinco anos foi de 25,5% e 10%, respectivamente. Não houve diferença significante na sobrevida global em dois ou cinco anos segundo a idade e sexo dos pacientes. Também não houve diferença significante na sobrevida global entre os pacientes que realizaram PCI ou não, ou foram tratados em dois períodos diferentes (1997-2002 vs. 1992-1996. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados de tratamento dos pacientes portadores de CPPC-DL na nossa instituição refletem as constantes mudanças no manuseio do CPPC. Nossa sobrevida global em dois anos de 25,5% é semelhante a outros resultados uni-institucionais publicados, mas menor que os resultados de 47% a 54% recentemente publicados por grupos cooperativos.OBJECTIVE: To report the results of the treatment of patients with small-cell lung cancer with limited disease (SCLC-LD in a single institution during a 10-year period, for quality assurance and comparison with data from the literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between January 1992 and December 2002, 101 patients with

  9. Current therapy of small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, M; Lassen, U; Hansen, H H

    1998-01-01

    This article reviews the most important recent clinical trials on the treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Two randomized studies addressing the timing of thoracic radiotherapy in limited stage SCLC are discussed. In the smaller of the two studies (n = 103), a survival benefit was associated...

  10. Lung cancer - small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  11. Small cell glioblastoma or small cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbrandt, Christine; Sathyadas, Sathya; Dahlrot, Rikke H

    2013-01-01

    was admitted to the hospital with left-sided loss of motor function. A MRI revealed a 6 cm tumor in the right temporoparietal area. The histology was consistent with both glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) but IHC was suggestive of a SCLC metastasis. PET-CT revealed...

  12. Feasibility of Tomotherapy-based image-guided radiotherapy for small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Phong Nguyen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: To assess the tolerance of patients with small cell lung cancer undergoing chemoradiation with tomotherapy-based image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT.Materials and methods: A retrospective review of the toxicity profile for nine patients with small cell lung cancer of the limited stage who underwent chemoradiation delivered with helical tomotherapy (HT has been conducted.Results: Acute grade 3-4 hematologic and esophagitis toxicities developed in two and three patients respectively. One patient developed a pulmonary embolism during radiotherapy. Seven patients had weight loss ranging from 0 to 30 pounds (median: 4 pounds. Three patients had treatment breaks ranging from 2 to 12 days. At a median follow-up of 11 months (range: 2-24 months, no patients developed any radiation related toxicities such as grade 3-4 pneumonitis or other long-term complications. The median survival was estimated to be 15 months. There were 2 local recurrences, 3 mediastinal recurrences, and six distant metastases.Conclusion: Grade 3-4 toxicities remained significant during chemoradiation when radiation was delivered with tomotherapy-based IGRT. However, the absence of grade 3-4 pneumonitis is promising and the use of HT needs to be investigated in future prospective studies.

  13. small Cell Lung Cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment response in a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methodology: A single-center ..... groupings in the forthcoming (7th) edition of the TNM. Classification of ... overall survival in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. J Clin Oncol ...

  14. Extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, E. van der; Heijdra, Y.F.

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews the recent literature on extrapulmonary small cell carcinomas. Until now, only four cases have been published in the English literature, two of those in the Southern Medical Journal. Sharing the information on diagnosis and treatment of these cases is important for better unders

  15. Radiation-induced esophagitis in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baker S

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sarah Baker, Alysa Fairchild Department of Radiation Oncology, Cross Cancer Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada Abstract: Radiation-induced esophagitis is the most common local acute toxicity of radiotherapy (RT delivered for the curative or palliative intent treatment of lung cancer. Although concurrent chemotherapy and higher RT dose are associated with increased esophagitis risk, advancements in RT techniques as well as adherence to esophageal dosimetric constraints may reduce the incidence and severity. Mild acute esophagitis symptoms are generally self-limited, and supportive management options include analgesics, acid suppression, diet modification, treatment for candidiasis, and maintenance of adequate nutrition. Esophageal stricture is the most common late sequela from esophageal irradiation and can be addressed with endoscopic dilatation. Approaches to prevent or mitigate these toxicities are also discussed. Keywords: non–small cell lung cancer, acute, late, toxicity, stricture

  16. Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from your throat to your stomach. Early esophageal cancer usually does not cause symptoms. Later, you may ... You're at greater risk for getting esophageal cancer if you smoke, drink heavily, or have acid ...

  17. Vasculogenic mimicry in small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Stuart C; Metcalf, Robert L; Trapani, Francesca; Mohan, Sumitra; Antonello, Jenny; Abbott, Benjamin; Leong, Hui Sun; Chester, Christopher P E; Simms, Nicole; Polanski, Radoslaw; Nonaka, Daisuke; Priest, Lynsey; Fusi, Alberto; Carlsson, Fredrika; Carlsson, Anders; Hendrix, Mary J C; Seftor, Richard E B; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Rothwell, Dominic G; Hughes, Andrew; Hicks, James; Miller, Crispin; Kuhn, Peter; Brady, Ged; Simpson, Kathryn L; Blackhall, Fiona H; Dive, Caroline

    2016-11-09

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is characterized by prevalent circulating tumour cells (CTCs), early metastasis and poor prognosis. We show that SCLC patients (37/38) have rare CTC subpopulations co-expressing vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin) and cytokeratins consistent with vasculogenic mimicry (VM), a process whereby tumour cells form 'endothelial-like' vessels. Single-cell genomic analysis reveals characteristic SCLC genomic changes in both VE-cadherin-positive and -negative CTCs. Higher levels of VM are associated with worse overall survival in 41 limited-stage patients' biopsies (P<0.025). VM vessels are also observed in 9/10 CTC patient-derived explants (CDX), where molecular analysis of fractionated VE-cadherin-positive cells uncovered copy-number alterations and mutated TP53, confirming human tumour origin. VE-cadherin is required for VM in NCI-H446 SCLC xenografts, where VM decreases tumour latency and, despite increased cisplatin intra-tumour delivery, decreases cisplatin efficacy. The functional significance of VM in SCLC suggests VM regulation may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  18. Long-term survival in small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Osterlind, K; Hansen, M

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe in patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) the characteristics of those who survive for > or = 5 years, to identify long-term prognostic factors, to analyze survival data of 5-year survivors, and to study 10-year survival in patients entered before 1981. PATIENTS AND METH......PURPOSE: To describe in patients with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) the characteristics of those who survive for > or = 5 years, to identify long-term prognostic factors, to analyze survival data of 5-year survivors, and to study 10-year survival in patients entered before 1981. PATIENTS......, liver and bone marrow metastases, and elevated lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and alkaline phosphatase levels were all negative prognostic factors. The 5-year survival rate was 3.5% (limited-stage disease, 4.8%; extensive-stage disease, 2.3%), and the 10-year survival rate was 1.8% (limited-stage disease......, especially tobacco-related cancers and other tobacco-related diseases....

  19. Doxepin Hydrochloride in Treating Esophageal Pain in Patients With Thoracic Cancer Receiving Radiation Therapy to the Thorax With or Without Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-20

    Esophageal Carcinoma; Hypopharyngeal Carcinoma; Laryngeal Carcinoma; Lymphoma; Malignant Mesothelioma; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Spinal Cord; Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Sarcoma; Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoma; Thymoma; Thyroid Gland Carcinoma

  20. Esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Nimish; Affi, Aboud

    2002-07-01

    Despite advances in our knowledge of esophageal cancer, 50% of patients present with incurable disease, and the overall survival after diagnosis is poor. The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus is rising at a rapid rate in developed countries. Recent advances in the epidemiology of esophageal cancer offer insights into preventive strategies in patients who are at risk. New developments in diagnosis may help detect the disease at an early stage. New diagnostic modalities permit more accurate staging procedures and allow appropriate selection of therapy. New studies provide more information on multimodality therapy for esophageal cancer, and new endoscopic techniques allow resection of small lesions without surgery. New stent designs provide better palliation by providing tumor ingrowth. These developments in the treatment of esophageal cancer are the focus of this review.

  1. Esophageal Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the lower part of the esophagus, near the stomach. See the following PDQ summaries for more information about esophageal cancer: Esophageal Cancer Screening Esophageal Cancer Treatment Esophageal cancer is found more ...

  2. Esophageal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Esophageal Cancer Prevention Esophageal Cancer Screening Research Esophageal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go to ... the esophagus and the stomach). Being overweight . Esophageal Cancer Screening Key Points Tests are used to screen for ...

  3. Esophageal replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisaki, Shaun M; Coran, Arnold G

    2017-04-01

    This article focuses on esophageal replacement as a surgical option for pediatric patients with end-stage esophageal disease. While it is obvious that the patient׳s own esophagus is the best esophagus, persisting with attempts to retain a native esophagus with no function and at all costs are futile and usually detrimental to the overall well-being of the child. In such cases, the esophagus should be abandoned, and the appropriate esophageal replacement is chosen for definitive reconstruction. We review the various types of conduits used for esophageal replacement and discuss the unique advantages and disadvantages that are relevant for clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  5. Small Cell Network Topology Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Oppolzer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the essential problems in a mobile network with small cells is that there is only a limited number of (PCIs available. Due to this fact, operators face the inevitable need for reusing (PCIs. In our contribution, we are dealing with a (PCI assignment to FAPs in three different topologies. The first model places FAPs randomly within the network while respecting overlapping defined. The second model places FAPs in a grid without other restrictions. The third model forms a grid as well, although buildings and roads are taken into account and (FAPs are always inside buildings. The proposed models are compared and a conclusion is made based on simulation results.

  6. Esophageal anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Y; Wang, K-N; Chen, L-Q

    2015-01-01

    This review gives an overview of the esophageal anastomosis. The history, various techniques and substitution organs, their advantages and disadvantages, healing mechanism, complications, and actual trend of this essential part of esophageal surgery are described. The history of the esophageal anastomosis extending from the first anastomosis in 1901 to today has undergone more than one century. In the early days, the success rate of the anastomosis was extremely low. As the technology progressed, the anastomosis got significant achievement. Various anastomotic techniques are currently being used. However, controversies exist on the choice of anastomotic method concerning the success rate, postoperative complication and quality of life. How to choose the method, no one can give the best answer. We searched the manuscripts about the esophageal anastomoses in recent years and studied the controversy questions about the anastomosis. Performing an esophageal anastomosis is a technical matter, and suture healing is independent of the patient's biologic situation. Every anastomosis technique has its own merit, but the outcomes were different if it was performed by different surgeons, and we also found that the complication rate of the anastomosis was mainly associated with the surgeons. So the surgeons should learn from their previous experience and others to avoid technical errors.

  7. Eosinophilic esophagitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anand R Gupte; Peter V Draganov

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is increasingly recognized in adults. The diagnosis is based on the presence of both typical symptoms and pathologic findings on esophageal biopsy. Patients usually present with dysphagia, food impaction and/or reflux-like symptoms, and biopsy of the esophagus shows more than 15 eosinophils per high-power field. In addition,it is essential to exclude the presence of known causes of tissue eosinophilia such as gastroesophageal reflux disease, infections, malignancy, collagen vascular diseases, hypersensitivity, and inflammatory bowel disease. There are no standardized protocols for the therapy of eosinophilic esophagitis. A variety of therapeutic approaches including acid suppression, dietary modi f icat ions, topical cor t icosteroids and endoscopic dilation can be used alone or in combination.

  8. Esophageal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. B.

    2007-01-01

    The distribution of adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas in esophageal cancer (EC) has changed, and focus directed towards tumors of the distal esophagus and the esophagogastric junction. The genetic events leading to EC are not fully clarified, but important risk factors have been...

  9. Resectable pancreatic small cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan M. Winter

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary pancreatic small cell carcinoma (SCC is rare, with just over 30 cases reported in the literature. Only 7 of these patients underwent surgical resection with a median survival of 6 months. Prognosis of SCC is therefore considered to be poor, and the role of adjuvant therapy is uncertain. Here we report two institutions’ experience with resectable pancreatic SCC. Six patients with pancreatic SCC treated at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (4 patients and the Mayo Clinic (2 patients were identified from prospectively collected pancreatic cancer databases and re-reviewed by pathology. All six patients underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy. Clinicopathologic data were analyzed, and the literature on pancreatic SCC was reviewed. Median age at diagnosis was 50 years (range 27-60. All six tumors arose in the head of the pancreas. Median tumor size was 3 cm, and all cases had positive lymph nodes except for one patient who only had five nodes sampled. There were no perioperative deaths and three patients had at least one postoperative complication. All six patients received adjuvant therapy, five of whom were given combined modality treatment with radiation, cisplatin, and etoposide. Median survival was 20 months with a range of 9-173 months. The patient who lived for 9 months received chemotherapy only, while the patient who lived for 173 months was given chemoradiation with cisplatin and etoposide and represents the longest reported survival time from pancreatic SCC to date. Pancreatic SCC is an extremely rare form of cancer with a poor prognosis. Patients in this surgical series showed favorable survival rates when compared to prior reports of both resected and unresectable SCC. Cisplatin and etoposide appears to be the preferred chemotherapy regimen, although its efficacy remains uncertain, as does the role of combined modality treatment with radiation.

  10. Clinical and dosimetric factors of radiation-induced esophageal injury: Radiation-induced esophageal toxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Bo Qiao; Yan-Hui Zhao; Yan-Bin Zhao; Rui-Zhi Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the clinical and dosimetric predictive factors for radiation-induced esophageal injury in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during threedimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 208 consecutive patients (146 men and 62 women) with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT. The median age of the patients was 64 years (range 35-87 years). The clinical and treatment parameters including gender, age, performance status, sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemotherapy, presence of carinal or subcarinal lymph nodes, pretreatment weight loss, mean dose to the entire esophagus, maximal point dose to the esophagus, and percentage of volume of esophagus receiving >55 Gy were studied. Clinical and dosimetric factors for radiation-induced acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury were analyzed according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria.RESULTS: Twenty-five (12%) of the two hundred and eight patients developed acute or late grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Among them, nine patients had both acute and late grade 3-5 esophageal injury, two died of late esophageal perforation. Concurrent chemotherapy and maximal point dose to the esophagus ≥60 Gy were significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury. Fifty-four (26%) of the two hundred and eight patients received concurrent chemotherapy. Among them, 25 (46%) developed grade 3-5 esophageal injury (P = 0.0001<0.01). However, nograde 3-5 esophageal injury occurred in patients who received a maximal point dose to the esophagus <60 Gy (P= 0.0001<0.01).CONCLUSION: Concurrent chemotherapy and the maximal esophageal point dose ≥60 Gy are significantly associated with the risk of grade 3-5 esophageal injury in patients with NSCLC treated with 3D-CRT.

  11. Management of small cell carcinoma of esophagus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xu-jing; Luo, Ju-dong; Ling, Yang; Kong, Ying-Ze; Feng, Li-Li; Zhou, Jian; Wang, Feng

    2013-07-01

    Small cell carcinoma of esophagus (SCEC) is characterized by high malignancy and early metastasis. Although the morbidity of SCEC is very low, few studies of patients with SCEC have been conducted in China, there are no sufficient studies of SCEC conducted and reported in the existing published works, and the choices of treatment remain controversial. In this work, we aim to study the clinical characteristics of SCEC, and explore the corresponding treatment and prognosis through retrospective analysis. The original articles were identified through the leading digital libraries in China in which the terms "esophagus or esophageal" and "small cell esophageal carcinoma" appeared from 2005 to 2009, 1,176 eligible cases were reviewed for clinical data. Analysis of survival was conducted using the Kaplan-Meier method, and differences were compared using the log-rank test. One thousand one hundred seventy-six eligible cases were analyzed; the median age of patients was 57 years, with a male-to-female ratio of 2.4:1. The number of SCEC accounted for 1.26 % of esophageal cancer treated in the same period. Of the tumors, 89.7 % were located in mid- and lower thoracic esophagus. The average tumor length was 5.4 cm (0.5-17 cm). The median overall survival was 11.1 months for all patients. The 1-, 2-, 3-, and 5-year average overall survival rates of 469 patients was 51.1, 25.5, 13.2, 7.9 %, respectively. The median survival time for LD patients who received systemic treatment was 16.8 m, whereas for those who received local treatment (surgery), the median survival time was 10.1 m; the median survival time for ED patients who received systemic treatment was 7.4 m, compared with 5.8 m for those who received sole treatment (chemotherapy or radiotherapy). SCEC is a tumor characterized by high malignancy and early metastasis. Although our retrospective analysis cannot provide definitive conclusions on the optimal treatment modality for SCEC, however, our results suggest

  12. Esophageal Mucormycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Boatright

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare invasive fungal infection with high mortality. It usually affects patients with poorly controlled diabetes, immunosuppression, or hematological malignancies. Gastroenterologists need to be aware of this rare infection because endoscopy can facilitate early diagnosis and prompt appropriate therapy. Here we describe a case of invasive esophageal mucormycosis that developed in a 63-year-old man with diabetes, acute promyelocytic leukemia, and prolonged leukopenia after chemotherapy. Upper endoscopy showed distal circumferential esophageal wall thickening with devitalization. The mucosa did not bleed after endoscopic biopsy. Histopathology confirmed mucormycosis. He was treated with various antifungal agents including echinocandins, fluconazole, and liposomal amphotericin B. Despite aggressive antifungal therapy and supportive care, the patient died 24 days later.

  13. Multi-User MIMO Across Small Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finn, Danny; Ahmadi, Hamed; Cattoni, Andrea Fabio

    2014-01-01

    The main contribution of this work is the proposal and assessment of the MU-MIMO across Small Cells concept. MU-MIMO is the spatial multiplexing of multiple users on a single time-frequency resource. In small cell networks, where the number of users per cell is low, finding suitable sets of users...

  14. Small cell undifferentiated carcinoma in the epididymis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jia-wei; YUAN Lin; Hu Hong-hui

    2005-01-01

    @@ Small cell undifferentiated carcinoma is a special type of tumor which is usually found in the lungs. However, it is very rare in extra pulmonary tissues, especially in epididymis. One case of small cell undifferentiated carcinoma in the right epididymis, with partial differentiation to adenocarcinoma and neuroendocrine carcinoma is reported as follows.

  15. Small cell carcinoma of the appendix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey Declan P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma is a rare condition. It has similar histological features to pulmonary small cell carcinoma and is equally aggressive. Case presentation We present the case of a 60-year-old woman who presented with right upper quadrant pain. Computerised tomography revealed an appendiceal lesion and multiple liver metastases. Exploratory laparotomy and right hemicolectomy was performed with histopathological analysis confirming a primary small cell carcinoma of her appendix. Conclusion This is the first reported case of a pure extrapulmonary carcinoma arising from the appendix.

  16. Risks of Esophageal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Esophageal Cancer Prevention Esophageal Cancer Screening Research Esophageal Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go to ... the esophagus and the stomach). Being overweight . Esophageal Cancer Screening Key Points Tests are used to screen for ...

  17. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure in histologic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, R W; Luckmann, K; Ricks, P; Drake, S T; Bannayan, G; Owensby, L

    1980-06-01

    The fasting lower esophageal sphincter pressure of 18 normal volunteers was compared to 22 patients with symptoms and objective evidence of gastroesophageal reflux. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure was measured by rapid pull-through using an 8-lumen radially perfused catheter that sampled pressure every45 degrees around the circumference of the sphincter. The 22 reflux patients were subdivided for analysis into two groups, those with an acute inflammatory infiltrate on biopsy and those without inflammation. Those patients without inflammatory esophagitis had normal sphincter pressures. Those with a definite inflammatory infiltrate had pressures significantly less than normal. The least reliable separation between normals and those with inflammatory esophagitis occurred in the anterior orientations. We conclude that while basal lower esophageal sphincter pressure measurement may identify patients with reflux and inflammatory esophagitis, it is of no help in identifying those patients with reflux unassociated with inflammation. Decreased basal fasting LESP does not appear to be the most important primary determinant of gastroesophageal reflux.

  18. Esophageal atresia and tracheo-esophageal fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zee, David C; Tytgat, Stefaan H A; van Herwaarden, Maud Y A

    2017-04-01

    Management of esophageal atresia has merged from correction of the anomaly to the complete spectrum of management of esophageal atresia and all its sequelae. It is the purpose of this article to give an overview of all aspects involved in taking care of patients with esophageal atresia between January 2011 and June 2016, as well as the patients who were referred from other centers. Esophageal atresia is a complex anomaly that has many aspects that have to be dealt with and complications to be solved. By centralizing these patients in centers of expertise it is believed that the best care can be given. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Esophageal Strictures in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Bazrafshan

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: Anastomotic stricture after surgical repair of esophageal atresia comprised the most common cause of esophageal stricture. Proximal esophagus was the most common site of stricture. Most of the patients recovered with dilatation, surgery, or a combination of the two.

  20. Familial small cell carcinoma of the ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Borges, Anibal R; Petty, John K; Hurt, Gail; Stribling, Jennifer T; Press, Joshua Z; Castellino, Sharon M

    2009-12-15

    Ovarian tumors have a low incidence in childhood, accounting for 1% of malignancies within the ages of 0-17 years. Small cell carcinoma of the ovary is a rare histology and historically has a poor prognosis. We report a case of an 11-year-old female diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the ovary and hypercalcemia (SCCOHT). There was a strong family history of the disease, a reduction in the age of onset in the proband, and the absence of BRCA mutations. This case suggests the phenomenon of genetic anticipation in an ovarian cancer.

  1. Esophageal duplication and congenital esophageal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappey, A Francois; Hirose, Shinjiro

    2017-04-01

    Esophageal duplication and congenital esophageal stenosis (CES) may represent diseases with common embryologic etiologies, namely, faulty tracheoesophageal separation and differentiation. Here, we will re-enforce definitions for these diseases as well as review their embryology, diagnosis, and treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Gastric metastasis by lung small cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giovanni Casella; Camillo Di Bella; Antonino Roberto Cambareri; Carmelo Antonio Buda; Gianluigi Corti; Filippo Magri; Stefano Crippa; Vittorio Baldini

    2006-01-01

    Metastatic tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are rare. We describe a case of gastric metastasis due to primary lung cancer, revealed by an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE). Haematogenous metastases to the stomach are a rare event. To our knowledge, only 55 cases have been described in the international literature. In these patients, the prognosis is very poor. We report herein a case of gastric metastasis by lung small cell carcinoma,with a review of the literature about this rare entity.

  3. Gastric metastasis by lung small cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Giovanni; Bella, Camillo Di; Cambareri, Antonino Roberto; Buda, Carmelo Antonio; Corti, Gianluigi; Magri, Filippo; Crippa, Stefano; Baldini, Vittorio

    2006-01-01

    Metastatic tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are rare. We describe a case of gastric metastasis due to primary lung cancer, revealed by an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE). Haematogenous metastases to the stomach are a rare event. To our knowledge, only 55 cases have been described in the international literature. In these patients, the prognosis is very poor. We report herein a case of gastric metastasis by lung small cell carcinoma, with a review of the literature about this rare entity. PMID:16810769

  4. Esophageal lichen planus

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira,Janine Pichler de; Uribe, Natalia Caballero; Abulafia,Luna Azulay; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the skin, mucous membranes, nails and scalp. Esophageal lichen planus is a rarely reported manifestation of lichen planus, presenting itself commonly in middle-aged women, with symptoms such as dysphagia. We report a case of esophageal lichen planus in a 54-year-old woman associated with oral, cutaneous and ungual lichen planus. Although lichen planus is a disorder well known by dermatologists, reports of esophageal lichen ...

  5. Esophageal lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Janine Pichler de; Uribe, Natalia Caballero; Abulafia, Luna Azulay; Quintella, Leonardo Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Lichen planus is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the skin, mucous membranes, nails and scalp. Esophageal lichen planus is a rarely reported manifestation of lichen planus, presenting itself commonly in middle-aged women, with symptoms such as dysphagia. We report a case of esophageal lichen planus in a 54-year-old woman associated with oral, cutaneous and ungual lichen planus. Although lichen planus is a disorder well known by dermatologists, reports of esophageal lichen planus are rare in dermatologic literature. The esophageal lichen planus is little known and underdiagnosed, with a significant delay between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis.

  6. Esophageal capsule endoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ignacio Fernandez-Urien; Cristina Carretero; Raul Armendariz; Miguel Mu(n)oz-Navas

    2008-01-01

    Capsule endoscopy is now considered as the first imaging tool for small bowel examination.Recently,new capsule endoscopy applications have been developed,such as esophageal capsule endoscopy and colon capsule endoscopy.Esophageal capsule endoscopy in patients with suspected esophageal disorders is feasible and safe,and could be also an alternative procedure in those patients refusing upper endoscopy.Although large-scale studies are needed to confirm its utility in GERD and cirrhotic patients,current results are encouraging and open a new era in esophageal examination.

  7. Morphometric Characterization of Small Cell Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chisoi Anca

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The morphometry in histopathology is used to characterize cell populations belonging to different tissues and to identify differences in their parameters with prognostic implications. To achieve morphometric examination were selected 6 of 24 cases identified as small cell lymphocytic lymphoma. For each case analysis was done on five fields, for each field measuring the parameters of 20 cells. The studied parameters were for cytoplasm: cytoplasmic area, maximum and minimum cytoplasmic diameter, cytoplasmic perimeter; for nucleus were measured: nuclear area, minimum and maximum nuclear diameter, nuclear perimeter, nuclear contour index, nuclear ellipticity index, nuclear irregularity index. Also the nucleocytoplasmic ratio was calculated in all studied cases. Small cell lymphocytic lymphoma is characterized in morphometric terms having a small cytoplasmic area (average 29.206 and also a small nuclear area (mean 28.939 having a nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio appearance suggestive for adult lymphocyte. A nuclear contour index small value (3.946, ellipticity index value also small (3.521 and small nuclear irregularity index (3.965. Standard deviations, in any of the studied morphometric categories, is around or below 1 suggesting monomorphic cell appearance. These morphometric and microscopic features characterized mainly by a small population of adult lymphocytes, monomorphic, with rounded hipercromic nuclei, dense chromatin, support the framing into indolent lymphoma group in terms of clinical outcome.

  8. Brain metastasis from esophageal carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almasi Saeid

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastasis from esophageal carcinoma is rare. In our center, among 301 cases of esophageal cancer referred for radiotherapy during a 14-year period, brain metastasis from esophageal carcinoma was detected in one case. An unusual case of esophageal carcinoma that presented with brain metastasis is reported.

  9. Synchronous sporadic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and small-cell carcinoma of lung: A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manigreeva Krishnatreya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synchronous medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and small-cell carcinoma of the lung is a rare phenomenon and both these tumors are characterized by poor treatment outcome and prognosis. A 45-year-old woman presented with a progressive swelling in front and side of the neck of 3-month duration without any pulmonary symptoms. The tumor of the lung was an incidental finding on routine chest radiological examination. The diagnosis of synchronous primary cancers of the thyroid and the lung were made after cytopathological examination of both the lesions. We report here a case of loco-regional sporadic medullary carcinoma of the thyroid associated with limited stage small-cell carcinoma of the lung and its therapeutic challenges.

  10. MET and Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelsomino, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.gelsomino@istitutotumori.mi.it [Medical Oncology Unit 1, Medical Oncology Department, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Via G. Venezian 1, 20133 Milano (Italy); Rossi, Giulio [Operative Unit of Pathology, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Policlinico, Via del Pozzo 71, 41124 Modena (Italy); Tiseo, Marcello [Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria, Viale A. Gramsci 14, 43126 Parma (Italy)

    2014-10-13

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is one of the most aggressive lung tumors. The majority of patients with SCLC are diagnosed at an advanced stage. This tumor type is highly sensitive to chemo-radiation treatment, with very high response rates, but invariably relapses. At this time, treatment options are still limited and the prognosis of these patients is poor. A better knowledge of the molecular biology of SCLC allowed us to identify potential druggable targets. Among these, the MET/HGF axis seems to be one of the most aberrant signaling pathways involved in SCLC invasiveness and progression. In this review, we describe briefly all recent literature on the different molecular profiling in SCLC; in particular, we discuss the specific alterations involving c-MET gene and their implications as a potential target in SCLC.

  11. MET and Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Gelsomino

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC is one of the most aggressive lung tumors. The majority of patients with SCLC are diagnosed at an advanced stage. This tumor type is highly sensitive to chemo-radiation treatment, with very high response rates, but invariably relapses. At this time, treatment options are still limited and the prognosis of these patients is poor. A better knowledge of the molecular biology of SCLC allowed us to identify potential druggable targets. Among these, the MET/HGF axis seems to be one of the most aberrant signaling pathways involved in SCLC invasiveness and progression. In this review, we describe briefly all recent literature on the different molecular profiling in SCLC; in particular, we discuss the specific alterations involving c-MET gene and their implications as a potential target in SCLC.

  12. Breast metastasis from small cell lung carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-ping LUH; Chih KUO; Thomas Chang-yao TSAO

    2008-01-01

    Breast metastases from extramammary neoplasms are very rare. We presented a 66 year-old female with metastasis of small cell lung carcinoma to the breast. She presented with consolidation over the left upper lobe of her lung undetermined after endobronchial or video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) biopsy, and this was treated effectively after antibiotic therapy at initial stage. The left breast lumps were noted 4 months later, and she underwent a modified radical mastectomy under the impression of primary breast carcinoma. However, the subsequent chest imaging revealed re-growing mass over the left mediastinum and hilum, and cells with the same morphological and staining features were found from specimens of transbronchial brushing and biopsy. An accurate diagnosis to distinguish a primary breast carcinoma from metastatic one is very important because the therapeutic planning and the outcome between them are different.

  13. Small-cell network downlink interference suppression method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Daoxu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to control the level of interference among adjacent small-cells effectively,in this paper,we suppress the interference between adjacent small-cells through controlling the small-cell downlink transmission power.Meanwhile,we use a low complexity subcarrier allocation scheme,making small-cell downlink rate be improved as much as possible.In small cell downlink transmission power control,we use a generalized water-filling algorithm which gives the optimal solution of downlink transmission power.Simulation results show that subcarrier allocation scheme and power allocation algorithm can improve small-cell downlink transmission rate and control the level of interference between adjacent small-cell effectively.

  14. Sirolimus and Auranofin in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer or Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-25

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  15. Radiation Therapy, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-14

    Adenocarcinoma of the Gastroesophageal Junction; Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIB Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIA Esophageal Cancer; Stage IIIB Esophageal Cancer

  16. Methylation in esophageal carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-Long Wu; Feng-Ying Sui; Xiao-Ming Jiang; Xiao-Hong Jiang

    2006-01-01

    Genetic abnormalities of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes have been demonstrated to be changes that are frequently involved in esophageal cancer pathogenesis. However, hypermethylation of CpG islands, an epigenetic event, is coming more and more into focus in carcinogenesis of the esophagus. Recent studies have proved that promoter hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes is frequently observed in esophageal carcinomas and seems to play an important role in the pathogenesis of this tumor type. In this review, we will discuss current research on genes that are hypermethylated in human esophageal cancer and precancerous lesions of the esophagus. We will also discuss the potential use of hypermethylated genes as targets for detection, prognosis and treatment of esophageal cancer.

  17. Bleeding esophageal varices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000268.htm Bleeding esophageal varices To use the sharing features on ... veins in the esophagus to balloon outward. Heavy bleeding can occur if the veins break open. Any ...

  18. Oral and esophageal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyer, C M; Simon, D

    1997-06-01

    This article focused on the approach to oral and esophageal disorders in patients with AIDS. Most of these disorders respond to various therapeutic regimens. Some of the oral complications can be prevented with dental prophylaxis, whereas recurrent esophageal disease in some patients may require long-term suppressive therapy. As patients with AIDS live longer with lower CD4 counts, gastroenterologists need to become familiar with the approach to and management of the more common lesions of the mouth and esophagus.

  19. Energy Efficiency Challenges of 5G Small Cell Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiaohu; Yang, Jing; Gharavi, Hamid; Sun, Yang

    2017-05-01

    The deployment of a large number of small cells poses new challenges to energy efficiency, which has often been ignored in fifth generation (5G) cellular networks. While massive multiple-input multiple outputs (MIMO) will reduce the transmission power at the expense of higher computational cost, the question remains as to which computation or transmission power is more important in the energy efficiency of 5G small cell networks. Thus, the main objective in this paper is to investigate the computation power based on the Landauer principle. Simulation results reveal that more than 50% of the energy is consumed by the computation power at 5G small cell base stations (BSs). Moreover, the computation power of 5G small cell BS can approach 800 watt when the massive MIMO (e.g., 128 antennas) is deployed to transmit high volume traffic. This clearly indicates that computation power optimization can play a major role in the energy efficiency of small cell networks.

  20. Long-Term Clinical Outcome of Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Inoperable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: The MD Anderson Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang Zhiqin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai (China); Yang Kunyu [Cancer Centre, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Komaki, Ritsuko; Wei Xiong [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tucker, Susan L. [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhuang Yan; Martel, Mary K.; Vedam, Sastray; Balter, Peter [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhu Guangying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peking University School of Oncology, Beiijng Cancer Hospital and Institute, Beijing (China); Gomez, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Lu, Charles [Department of Thoracic Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Liao Zhongxing, E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: In 2007, we published our initial experience in treating inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The current report is an update of that experience with long-term follow-up. Methods and Materials: Patients in this retrospective review were 165 patients who began definitive radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy, for newly diagnosed, pathologically confirmed NSCLC to a dose of {>=}60 Gy from 2005 to 2006. Early and late toxicities assessed included treatment-related pneumonitis (TRP), pulmonary fibrosis, esophagitis, and esophageal stricture, scored mainly according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events 3.0. Other variables monitored were radiation-associated dermatitis and changes in body weight and Karnofsky performance status. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compute survival and freedom from radiation-related acute and late toxicities as a function of time. Results: Most patients (89%) had Stage III to IV disease. The median radiation dose was 66 Gy given in 33 fractions (range, 60-76 Gy, 1.8-2.3 Gy per fraction). Median overall survival time was 1.8 years; the 2-year and 3-year overall survival rates were 46% and 30%. Rates of Grade {>=}3 maximum TRP (TRP{sub max}) were 11% at 6 months and 14% at 12 months. At 18 months, 86% of patients had developed Grade {>=}1 maximum pulmonary fibrosis (pulmonary fibrosis{sub max}) and 7% Grade {>=}2 pulmonary fibrosis{sub max}. The median times to maximum esophagitis (esophagitis{sub max}) were 3 weeks (range, 1-13 weeks) for Grade 2 and 6 weeks (range, 3-13 weeks) for Grade 3. A higher percentage of patients who experienced Grade 3 esophagitis{sub max} later developed Grade 2 to 3 esophageal stricture. Conclusions: In our experience, using IMRT to treat NSCLC leads to low rates of pulmonary and esophageal toxicity, and favorable clinical outcomes in terms of survival.

  1. Assessing esophageal dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Danielle

    2014-05-01

    Dysphagia, or difficulty swallowing, is a common problem. Although most cases are attributable to benign disease processes, dysphagia is also a key symptom in several malignancies, making it an important symptom to evaluate. The differential diagnosis of dysphagia requires an understanding of deglutition, in particular the oropharyngeal versus esophageal stages. Stroke is the leading cause of oropharyngeal dysphagia, which is common in older adults and frequently presents as part of a broader complex of clinical manifestations. In esophageal dysphagia, difficulty swallowing is often the main complaint and is caused by localized neuromuscular disorders or obstructive lesions.

  2. Histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma in non-small cell lung carcinoma tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorantes-Heredia, Rita; Ruiz-Morales, José Manuel; Cano-García, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer is the principal cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The use of targeted therapies, especially tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), in specific groups of patients has dramatically improved the prognosis of this disease, although inevitably some patients will develop resistance to these drugs during active treatment. The most common cancer-associated acquired mutation is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) Thr790Met (T790M) mutation. During active treatment with targeted therapies, histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) can occur in 3-15% of patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tumors. By definition, SCLC is a high-grade tumor with specific histological and genetic characteristics. In the majority of cases, a good-quality hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain is enough to establish a diagnosis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is used to confirm the diagnosis and exclude other neoplasia such as sarcomatoid carcinomas, large-cell carcinoma, basaloid squamous-cell carcinoma, chronic inflammation, malignant melanoma, metastatic carcinoma, sarcoma, and lymphoma. A loss of the tumor-suppressor protein retinoblastoma 1 (RB1) is found in 100% of human SCLC tumors; therefore, it has an essential role in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Other genetic pathways probably involved in the histopathological transformation include neurogenic locus notch homolog (NOTCH) and achaete-scute homolog 1 (ASCL1). Histological transformation to SCLC can be suspected in NSCLC patients who clinically deteriorate during active treatment. Biopsy of any new lesion in this clinical setting is highly recommended to rule out a SCLC transformation. New studies are trying to assess this histological transformation by noninvasive measures such as measuring the concentration of serum neuron-specific enolase.

  3. Strategies to eradicate minimal residual disease in small cell lung cancer: high-dose chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, and BEC2 plus BCG vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, L M; Grant, S C; Miller, V A; Ng, K K; Kris, M G

    1999-10-01

    In the last 25 years, treatment for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) has improved with advances in chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Standard chemotherapy regimens can yield 80% to 90% response rates and some cures when combined with thoracic irradiation in limited-stage patients. Nonetheless, small cell lung cancer has a high relapse rate due to drug resistance; this has resulted in poor survival for most patients. Attacking this problem requires a unique approach to eliminate resistant disease remaining after induction therapy. This review will focus on three potential strategies: high-dose chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplantation, matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors, and BEC2 plus BCG vaccination.

  4. Treatment and survival outcomes of small cell carcinoma of the esophagus: an analysis of the National Cancer Data Base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Andrew T; Shao, Meng; Rineer, Justin; Osborn, Virginia; Schwartz, David; Schreiber, David

    2016-11-09

    Given the paucity of esophageal small cell carcinoma (SCC) cases, there are few large studies evaluating this disease. In this study, the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) was utilized to analyze the clinical features, treatment, and survival of patients with esophageal SCC in a large, population-based dataset. We selected patients diagnosed with esophageal SCC from 1998 to 2011. Patients were identified as having no treatment, chemotherapy alone, radiation ± sequential chemotherapy, concurrent chemoradiation, and esophagectomy ± chemotherapy and/or radiation. Overall survival (OS) was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Multivariate Cox regression analysis was conducted to identify factors associated with OS. A total of 583 patients were identified. Most patients had stage IV disease (41.7%). Regarding treatment selection, chemoradiation was the most commonly utilized for patients with nonmetasatic disease, whereas chemotherapy alone was most common for metastatic patients. Esophagectomy (median survival 44.9 months with 3 year OS 50.5%) was associated with the best OS for patients with localized (node-negative) disease compared with chemotherapy alone (p < 0.001) or chemoradiation (p = 0.01). For locoregional (node-positive) disease, treatment with chemoradiation resulted in a median survival of 17.8 months and a 3 year OS 31.6%. On multivariate analysis, treatment with chemotherapy alone (p = 0.003) was associated with worse OS while esophagectomy (p = 0.04) was associated with improved OS compared to chemoradiation. Esophageal SCC is an aggressive malignancy with most patients presenting with metastatic disease. Either esophagectomy or chemoradiation as part of multimodality treatment appear to improve OS for selected patients with nonmetastatic disease.

  5. Treatment Options by Stage (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small ... clinical trials before, during, or after starting their cancer treatment. Some clinical trials only include patients who have ...

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lung Cancer Screening Research Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Non-Small ... clinical trials before, during, or after starting their cancer treatment. Some clinical trials only include patients who have ...

  7. Ovarian Small Cell Carcinoma Hypercalcemic Type: A Case Report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rahma, M B.

    2016-09-01

    A 31-year-old female was diagnosed with small cell carcinoma of the ovary hypercalcaemic type (OSCCHT) post left oophorectomy. This is a rare aggressive ovarian tumour of which less than 300 cases were reported.

  8. [Small cell prostatic carcinoma detected at the stage of metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabii, Redouane; Meziane, Anas; Taha, Abdelatif; Joual, Abdenabi; El Mrini, Mohamed

    2004-09-01

    Small cell prostatic carcinoma is rare, with a poor prognosis. The authors report a case of small cell prostatic carcinoma in a 30-year-old patient diagnosed at the stage of metastases. Immunohistochemistry showed positive anti-neuron-specific enolase (NSE.) and anti-synaptophysin antibodies, while serum PSA was normal (1.2 ng/ml). The patient was treated by cisplatin-etoposide combination chemotherapy, but died 20 days after the first course.

  9. Treatment Options by Stage (Esophageal Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prevention Esophageal Cancer Screening Research Esophageal Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Esophageal Cancer ... Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. The prognosis (chance of recovery ) and treatment ...

  10. Management of primary small cell carcinoma of the esophagus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ke-lin; HE Jie; CHENG Gui-yu; CHAI Li-xun

    2007-01-01

    Background Primary small cell carcinoma of the esophagus is rare. Although surgery is successful in eradicating local tumor, the five-year survival rate of patients with primary small cell carcinoma of the esophagus after resection is lower than that of patients with primary squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. The purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical manifestations, pathological features and treatment of primary small cell carcinoma of the esophagus.Methods A total of 73 patients with primary small cell carcinoma of the esophagus who had been treated by surgery from 1984 to 2003 were analyzed retrospectively.Results In this series, the overall resection rate was 94.5% (69/73), the radical resection rate 89.0% (65/73) and the operative mortality 1.4% (1/73). The 1-, 3- and 5-year survival rates of patients were 50.7%, 13.7% and 8.2%,respectively.Conclusions Primary small cell carcinoma of the esophagus is rare with a poor prognosis. Surgical resection is the leading method for patients with stage Ⅰ or Ⅱ primary small cell carcinoma of the esophagus. Postoperative chemotherapy is beneficial to these patients. The patients of stage Ⅲ or Ⅳ should be given chemotherapy and radiation therapy.

  11. Esophageal combined carcinomas: Immunohoistochemical and molecular genetic studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tadashi Terada; Hirotoshi Maruo

    2012-01-01

    Primary esophageal combined carcinoma is very rare.The authors herein report 2 cases.Case 1 was a combined squamous cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma,and case 2 was a combined squamous cell carcinoma,adenocarcinoma,and small cell carcinoma.Case 1 was a 67-year-old man with complaints of dysphagia.Endoscopic examination revealed an ulcerated tumor in the middle esophagus,and 6 biopsies were obtained.All 6 biopsies revealed a mixture of squamous cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma.Both elements were positive for cytokeratin,epithelial membrane antigen,and p53 protein,and had high Ki-67 labeling.The small cell carcinoma element was positive for synaptophysin,CD56,KIT,and platelet-derived growth factor-α (PDG-FRA),while the squamous cell carcinoma element was not.Genetically,no mutations of KIT and PDGFRA were recognized.The patient died of systemic carcinomatosis 15 mo after presentation.Case 2 was a 74-year-old man presenting with dysplasia.Endoscopy revealed a polypoid tumor in the distal esophagus.Seven biopsies were taken,and 6 showed a mixture of squamous cell carcinoma,small cell carcinoma,and adenocarcinoma.The 3 elements were positive for cytokeratins,epithelial membrane antigen,and p53 protein,and had high Ki-67 labeling.The adenocarcinoma element was positive for mucins.The small cell carcinoma element was positive for CD56,synaptophysin,KIT,and PDGFRA,but the other elements were not.Mutations of KIT and PDGFRA were not recognized.The patient died of systemic carcinomatosis 7 mo after presentation.These combined carcinomas may arise from enterochromaffin cells or totipotential stem cell in the esophagus or transdifferentiation of one element to another.A review of the literature was performed.

  12. Esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Haruma, Ken; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal diverticulum, a relatively rare condition, has been considered to be associated with motor abnormalities such as conditions that cause a lack of coordination between the distal esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. We herein report a case of esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. A 73-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and regurgitation. Imaging examinations revealed a right-sided esophageal diverticulum located about 10cm above the esophagogastric junction. High-resolution manometry revealed normal esophageal motility. However, 24-h pH monitoring revealed continuous acidity due to pooling of residue in the diverticulum. An esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum was diagnosed and resected thoracoscopically. Her dysphagia recurred 2 years later. High-resolution manometry revealed diffuse esophageal spasm. The diverticulum in the present case was considered to have been associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. The motility disorder was likely not identified at the first evaluation. In this case, the patient's symptoms spontaneously resolved without any treatment; however, longer-term follow-up is needed. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Hideo; Kubota, Hisako; Higashida, Masaharu; Manabe, Noriaki; Haruma, Ken; Hirai, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Esophageal diverticulum, a relatively rare condition, has been considered to be associated with motor abnormalities such as conditions that cause a lack of coordination between the distal esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter. Presentation of case We herein report a case of esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. A 73-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and regurgitation. Imaging examinations revealed a right-sided esophageal diverticulum located about 10 cm above the esophagogastric junction. High-resolution manometry revealed normal esophageal motility. However, 24-h pH monitoring revealed continuous acidity due to pooling of residue in the diverticulum. An esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum was diagnosed and resected thoracoscopically. Her dysphagia recurred 2 years later. High-resolution manometry revealed diffuse esophageal spasm. Discussion The diverticulum in the present case was considered to have been associated with diffuse esophageal spasm. The motility disorder was likely not identified at the first evaluation. Conclusion In this case, the patient’s symptoms spontaneously resolved without any treatment; however, longer-term follow-up is needed. PMID:26143577

  14. Atrio-esophageal fistula complicating esophageal achalasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achouh, Paul; Pouly, Julia; Azarine, Arshid; Fabiani, Jean-Noël

    2011-08-01

    A 75-year-old male, known to have achalasia, was admitted to the intensive care unit with massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding and sepsis. He had a history of purulent pericarditis 18 months earlier. He also presented with atrial fibrillation associated with a cerebral transient ischemic accident two months earlier. A contrast computed tomography scan showed an atrio-esophageal fistula with active extravasation of contrast. He was operated on via a median sternotomy, and the defects in the atrial wall, inferior vena cava and diaphragm were closed using pericardial patches. An esophagectomy was to be performed 24 hours later, but the patient died from septic shock and multiple organ failure before his second procedure.

  15. Long-gap esophageal atresia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shieh, Hester F; Jennings, Russell W

    2017-04-01

    The management of long-gap esophageal atresia remains challenging with limited consensus on the definition, evaluation, and surgical approach to treatment. Efforts to preserve the native esophagus have been successful with delayed primary anastomosis and tension-based esophageal growth induction processes. Esophageal replacement is necessary in a minority of cases, with the conduit of choice and patient outcomes largely dependent on institutional expertise. Given the complexity of this patient population with significant morbidity, treatment and long-term follow-up are best done in multidisciplinary esophageal and airway treatment centers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Esophagitis Induced by Doxycycline Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin Şenel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Esophagitis is the most common disease of the esophagus. Drug use is one of the reasons of chemical esophagitis. Herein, we report two male patients of 17 and 18 years of age who developed esophagitis in acne treatment with doxycycline. Both patients took doxycycline capsules for approximately one week. Ulcerations were detected at upper and mid-esophagus of the 17-year-old patient. Circular ulcerations were found at mid-esophagus of the 18-year-old case. Doxycycline induced esophagitis is a preventable disease with the physician giving appropriate medication ingestion advice to the patient.

  17. Epidemiological investigation of esophageal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Zhang; Shao-Hua Chen; You-Ming Li

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To review the characteristics of esophageal carcinoma in recent 30 years in the epidemiological investigation.METHODS: A total of 1 520 cases of esophageal carcinoma in the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University Medical College admitted from 1970 until now were reviewed. Their age, gender, position of carcinoma and histological type were analyzed.RESULTS: The morbidity of esophageal carcinoma was increasing during the observation period. Compared with the 1970s (9.5%), the ratio of adenocarcinoma significantly increased after the 1980s (19.1%). The difference was significant (P≤0.05).CONCLUSION: The morbidity of esophageal adenocarcinoma was increasing and advanced clinical study should be strengthened.

  18. Extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma. An indication for prophylactic cranial irradiation? A single center experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frueh, Martin; Cerny, Thomas [Kantonsspital St. Gallen (Switzerland). Dept. of Oncology/Hematology; Kacsir, Bela; Plasswilm, Ludwig [Kantonsspital St. Gallen (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Ess, Silvia [Cancer Registry, Canton of St. Gallen, Appenzell (Switzerland); Rodriguez, Regulo [Kantonsspital St. Gallen (Switzerland). Dept. of Pathology

    2011-09-15

    Information about extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma (EPSCC) is limited and the role of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) is unknown. Disease presentation and outcome of all EPSCC at our hospital between 1990 and 2009 were retrospectively analyzed. Of 30 EPSCC, the male:female ratio was 58%:42%; 83% had a performance status of 0-2. Median age was 71 years (32-80). Seventeen (57%) had limited stage (LS), 13 (43%) extensive stage (ES). The location of the primary tumor was gastrointestinal (n = 8), unknown (6), gynecological (6), urogenital (5), and ear nose throat (5). Four (13%) developed brain metastases (2 ES, 2 LS). In ES, first line chemotherapy (CT) was given in 85%, mostly platinum-etoposide (64%). Response rate was 90%. In LS, CT and radiotherapy (RT) {+-} resection resulted in persistent remissions in 67% of patients. Median survival was 16 months (1-107 months), 18 months (1-107 months), and 9 months (0.4-25 months) for LS + ES, LS, and ES, respectively. Weight loss {>=}5 % and ECOG performance status 3 + 4 were associated with poorer survival (p < 0.001 and p < 0.01, respectively). The incidence of brain metastases was relatively low (13%). More studies are necessary, before routinely offering PCI to patients with EPSCC. Best survival outcomes in LS were achieved with multimodality treatment including CT and RT. Prognosis was poor in patients with ES. (orig.)

  19. [Giant esophageal fibrovascular polyp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Fernando; Contardo, Carlos; Guevara, Jorge; Vera, Augusto; Aguilar, Luis; Huamán, Manuel; Palomino, Américo; Yabar, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    Fibrovascular polyps are extremely rare benign neoplasias of the esophagus, which usually originate in the lower cricoid area. They do not produce any discomfort in the patient for a long time, however it may make itself evident by the patient's regurgitation of the polyp, producing asphyxia or, more frequently, dysphagia. The case of a 58 year old male patient is presented herein, with a 9 month record of dysphagia, weight loss and intermittent melena. The barium x-ray showed a distended esophagus, with a tumor running from the upper esophageal sphincter to the cardia. The endoscopy confirmed the presence of a pediculated tumor, implanted in the cervical esophagus. Surgeons suspected the potential malignancy of the tumor and performed a transhiatal esophagectomy. The final pathologic diagnosis was giant fibrovascular esophageal polyp.

  20. Clinicopathologic Observations on Small Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaolingWang; ShuongLiu; GuoxiangWu; XionliMeng; MingGuo; HuichaiYang

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the histogenesis and biological characteristics and factors influencing prognosis of small cell carcinoma of the esophagus(ESCC).METHODS The expression of CK, NSE, Syn, CHr-A and CD56 proteins were detected immunohistochemically in 63 cases of small cell carcinoma of the esophagus.RESULTS The ESCC cases were divided into two groups as follows: a puresmall cell group (28/63) and compound small cell group (35/63). Theimmunohistochemistry results were positive for: CK in 41.3%, NSE in 36.5%,Syn in 90.5%, CHr-A in 60.3% and CD56 in 50.8%. The difference betweenstaining of the pure small cell carcinoma and compound small cellcarcinoma was not statistically significant. The size and depth of tumorinvasion, the positive residual incision edge and lymph node metastasiswere the major factors influencing long-term survival.CONCLUSION Small cell carcinoma of the esophagus is a highly malignanttumor, which expresses neuroendocrine antigens. The histophathologicorigin is still unknown but the non-neuroepithelial origin was accepted in thisstudy.

  1. Energy Efficiency Challenges of 5G Small Cell Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiaohu; Yang, Jing; Gharavi, Hamid; Sun, Yang

    2017-01-01

    The deployment of a large number of small cells poses new challenges to energy efficiency, which has often been ignored in fifth generation (5G) cellular networks. While massive multiple-input multiple outputs (MIMO) will reduce the transmission power at the expense of higher computational cost, the question remains as to which computation or transmission power is more important in the energy efficiency of 5G small cell networks. Thus, the main objective in this paper is to investigate the computation power based on the Landauer principle. Simulation results reveal that more than 50% of the energy is consumed by the computation power at 5G small cell base stations (BSs). Moreover, the computation power of 5G small cell BS can approach 800 watt when the massive MIMO (e.g., 128 antennas) is deployed to transmit high volume traffic. This clearly indicates that computation power optimization can play a major role in the energy efficiency of small cell networks. PMID:28757670

  2. Esophageal Inlet Patch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Behrens

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An inlet patch is a congenital anomaly consisting of ectopic gastric mucosa at or just distal to the upper esophageal sphincter. Most inlet patches are largely asymptomatic, but in problematic cases complications related to acid secretion such as esophagitis, ulcer, web and stricture may occur. The diagnosis of inlet patch is strongly suggested on barium swallow where the most common pattern consists of two small indentations on the wall of the esophagus. The diagnosis of inlet patch is confirmed via endoscopy with biopsy. At endoscopy, the lesion appears salmon-coloured and velvety and is easily distinguished from the normal grey-white squamous epithelium of the esophagus. The prominent margins correlate with the radiological findings of indentations and rim-like shadows on barium swallow. Histopathology provides the definitive diagnosis by demonstrating gastric mucosa adjacent to normal esophageal mucosa. No treatment is required for asymptomatic inlet patches. Symptomatic cases are treated with proton pump inhibitors to relieve symptoms related to acid secretion. Strictures and webs are treated with serial dilatation and should be biopsied to rule out malignancy.

  3. Hypnotherapy for Esophageal Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehl, Megan E.; Keefer, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    Hypnotherapy is an evidence based intervention for the treatment of functional bowel disorders, particularly irritable bowel syndrome. While similar in pathophysiology, less is known about the utility of hypnotherapy in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Esophageal disorders, most of which are functional in nature, cause painful and uncomfortable symptoms that impact patient quality of life and are difficult to treat from a medical perspective. After a thorough medical workup and a failed trial of proton pump inhibitor therapy, options for treatment are significantly limited. While the pathophysiology is likely multifactorial, two critical factors are believed to drive esophageal symptoms—visceral hypersensitivity and symptom hypervigilance. The goal of esophageal directed hypnotherapy is to promote a deep state of relaxation with focused attention allowing the patient to learn to modulate physiological sensations and symptoms that are not easily addressed with conventional medical intervention. Currently, the use of hypnosis is suitable for dysphagia, globus, functional chest pain/non-cardiac chest pain, dyspepsia, and functional heartburn. In this article the authors will provide a rationale for the use of hypnosis in these disorders, presenting the science whenever available, describing their approach with these patients, and sharing a case study representing a successful outcome. PMID:26046715

  4. esophageal cancer: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Maddah Safaei

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Dysphagia is a common initial presentation in locally advanced esophageal cancer and negatively impacts patient quality of life and treatment compliance. To induce fast relief of dysphagia in patients with potentially operable esophageal cancer high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy was applied prior to definitive radiochemotherapy. Material and methods : In this single arm phase II clinical trial between 2013 to 2014 twenty patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer (17 squamous cell and 3 adenocarcinoma were treated with upfront 10 Gy HDR brachytherapy, followed by 50.4 Gy external beam radiotherapy (EBRT and concurrent chemotherapy with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil. Results : Tumor response, as measured by endoscopy and/or computed tomography scan, revealed complete remission in 16 and partial response in 4 patients (overall response rate 100%. Improvement of dysphagia was induced by brachytherapy within a few days and maintained up to the end of treatment in 80% of patients. No differences in either response rate or dysphagia resolution were found between squamous cell and adenocarcinoma histology. The grade 2 and 3 acute pancytopenia or bicytopenia reported in 4 patients, while sub-acute adverse effects with painful ulceration was seen in five patients, occurring after a median of 2 months. A perforation developed in one patient during the procedure of brachytherapy that resolved successfully with immediate surgery. Conclusions : Brachytherapy before EBRT was a safe and effective procedure to induce rapid and durable relief from dysphagia, especially when combined with EBRT.

  5. Combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon Kyung; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil; Lim Do Hoon; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Dae Yong; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Kyu Chan; Kwon, O Jung [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-01

    This is a retrospective study to evaluate the response rate, acute toxicity, and survival rate of a combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy in limited disease small cell lung cancer. Forty six patients with limited disease small-cell lung cancer who underwent combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy between October 1994 and April 1998 were evaluated. Six cycles of chemotherapy were planned either using a VIP regimen (etoposide, ifosfamide, and cis-platin) or a EP regimen (etoposide and cis-platin). Thoracic radiation therapy was planned to deliver 44 Gy using 10MV X-ray, starting concurrently with chemotherapy. Response was evaluated 4 weeks after the completion of the planned chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and the prophylactic cranial irradiation was planned only for the patients with complete responses. Acute toxicity was evaluated using the SWOG toxicity criteria, and the overall survival and disease-free survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier Method. The median follow-up period was 16 months (range:2 to 41 months). Complete response was achieved in 30 (65%) patients, of which 22 patients received prophylactic cranial irradiations. Acute toxicities over grade III were granulocytopenia in 23 (50%), anemia in 17 (37%), thrombo-cytopenia in nine (20%), alopecia in nine (20%), nausea/vomiting in five (11%), and peripheral neuropathy in one (2%). Chemotherapy was delayed in one patient, and the chemotherapy doses were reduced in 58 (24%) out of the total 246 cycles. No radiation esophagitis over grade III was observed, while interruption during radiation therapy for a mean of 8.3 days occurred in 21 patients. The local recurrences were observed in 8 patients and local progressions were in 6 patients, and the distant metastases in 17 patients. Among these, four patients had both the local relapse and the distant metastasis. Brain was the most common metastatic site (10 patients), followed by the liver as the next common site (4 patients). The

  6. Current status of radiation therapy. Evidence-based medicine (EBM) of radiation therapy. Current management of patients with esophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Kenji [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-03-01

    The best management for small mucosal esophageal cancer is generally endoscopic mucosal resection. However, for submucosal cancer and extensive mucosal caner, either radical surgery or radiation seems to be an equally efficacious option. Radiation therapy concurrent with chemotherapy is more effective than radiation therapy alone for patients with unresectable esophageal cancer. The key drugs are cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil. However, for patients with poor performance status or for aged patients, radiation therapy alone is still a choice of treatment. Surgery has generally been indicated for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. However, outcomes of concurrent chemoradiation therapy may be comparable with those of surgery. Therefore, a prospective randomized study should be performed to determine the best management for patients with resectable esophageal cancer. The usefulness of intra-cavitary irradiation for esophageal cancer has not been clarified. A prospective randomized trial with a large number of patients is necessary to determine the effectiveness of intra-cavitary irradiation. The best management for patients with loco-regionally recurrent esophageal cancer after surgery has not been determined. Intensive therapy should be considered if the site of recurrence is limited and the time interval from surgery to recurrence is long. Chemotherapy is essential in the management of patients with small cell esophageal cancer. However, the best local therapy has not been determined. (author)

  7. Small cell carcinoma of the cervix: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korcum, Aylin Fidan; Aksu, Gamze; Bozcuk, Hakan; Pestereli, Elif; Simsek, Tayup

    2008-04-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix accounts for 1-3% of all cervix cancers. It is an aggressive disease with a poor prognosis. To date, no effective treatment protocol has been determined. Surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy have been used either alone or in combination. Recent data suggests that survival in patients with early staged small cell carcinoma of the cervix is better with surgery combined with chemo-radiotherapy. Here, we presented two patients with stage IB1 small cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix. For both patients, definitive surgery was performed with pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. Subsequently, they were treated with pelvic external radiotherapy and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy with concurrent cisplatin based chemotherapy. They were alive with no evidence of disease at 91 and 65 months, respectively.

  8. A case of small cell carcinoma of the vagina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Tamura

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary small cell carcinoma of the vagina is quite rare, and a standard treatment has not been established yet. Herein, we report a case of an 81-year-old woman who was diagnosed with a vaginal tumor without continuity with the uterine cervix. Histopathological diagnosis indicated alveolar solid growth of nuclear chromatin-rich atypical cells with a high N/C ratio and a partially recognized rosette-like structure, suggesting a differentiated neuroendocrine system. Chromogranin A and synapto- physin were positive. Stage I vaginal small cell carcinoma localized to the vagina was diagnosed. The tumor disappeared by radiation monotherapy with external beam irradiation and endocavitary irradiation. The patient remains alive without any disease 1 year and 8 months after the treatment, suggesting the efficacy of radiotherapy in small cell carcinoma of the vagina.

  9. Small cell extraskeletal osteosarcoma: a rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Sood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extraskeletal osteosarcoma is a rare malignant mesenchymal neoplasm and its small cell variant is one among the rarest variant. This article describes a 60-year-old woman presenting with a large, lobulated, painful mass in left thigh with associated history of trauma since 18 months. Her magnetic resonance imaging showed a variegated mixed intensity lesion with associated cystic degeneration, necrosis and matrix arborizing nearby muscles. Fine needle aspiration cytology showed a small cell lesion with very scant osteoid. Tumor was excised and histopathological diagnosis was small cell osteosarcoma involving adjacent muscles and fat with sparing of lymph nodes. The aim of this article is to present the clinical, radiological, cyto-histological and immunohistochemical features of this extremely rare lesion.

  10. Small cell cervical cancer: an unusual finding at cholecystectomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, Emily

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Small cell carcinoma of the cervix is a rare cancer, comprising less than 3% of all cervical neoplasms. It uniformly has a poor prognosis, and has a high mortality even with early stage disease. It can metastasise rapidly and metastatic sites include lung, liver, brain, bone, pancreas and lymph nodes. CASE: Here, we report the case of a 60-year-old woman with no symptoms of cervical pathology who developed post-renal failure following a laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The cause was bilateral ureteric obstruction from metastatic small cell cervical cancer and metastases were subsequently found on her gallbladder specimen. CONCLUSION: This is an unusual presentation of small cell cervical cancer and demonstrates the aggressive nature of this disease.

  11. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Shimokata, Kaoru; Nomura, Fumio; Saka, Hideo (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Horio, Yoshitsugu; Minami, Hironobu; Iwahara, Tsuyoshi; Shibagaki, Tomohisa; Sakai, Shuzo

    1991-02-01

    Eleven cases of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy consisted of 1.6 Gy per fraction, 2 fractions a day with 6 hours between fractions, 5 days a week for a total of 60.8 Gy. After 38.4 Gy of irradiation to the primary tumor, hilar, and mediastinal lymph nodes, an additional 22.4 Gy was given to primary lesion. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin, 80 mg/m{sup 2} day 1, mitomycin C, 10 mg/m{sup 2} day 1, and vinblastine, 5 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1 and 15. At least 2 courses were administered. The combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy was sequential. Of 6 patients in whom hyperfractionated radiotherapy was performed first, 5 achieved partial response (PR). Of 5 patients in whom chemotherapy was performed first, 2 achieved PR. Median survival time was 300 days. Nine of the eleven patients experienced esophagitis, but in all patients this was controlled easily by oral antacids and/or H{sub 2} blockers. In regard to radiation pneumonitis, fibrosis occurred in seven of nine cases, but they did not require corticosteroids. Levels of hematological toxicity were similar to previous reports, but were somewhat severe in cases receiving chemotherapy after irradiation. We conclude that hyperfractionated radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy including cisplatin is safe, but further evaluation to determine optimal dose and combination methods is necessary. (author).

  12. Small Cell Lung Cancer: The Influence of Dose and Treatment Volume on Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichter; Turrisi

    1995-01-01

    The treatment of small cell lung cancer is clearly enhanced by the addition of radiation therapy. Survival increases modestly while local thoracic failure as first site of progression is reduced from approximately 60% when chemotherapy alone is used to 30% after combined modality therapy. The variables of radiation dose and treatment volume seem to be important in the successful management of this disease. Local chest control appears to increase as doses are escalated from low levels (25 Gy) to moderate levels (45 to 50 Gy(. With about one third of patients experiencing local chest progression, one can speculate that higher radiation doses might be of value. However, at this time there is no proof that increased dose or dose intensity bears out this promise. Indeed, increasing dose intensity of radiotherapy, eg, twice-daily treatment, increases esophagitis, perhaps reduces local failure, but has not improved overall survival. Using larger total doses or altered fraction schemes must still be considered to be under investigation. To increase dose in a safe manner, reduction in the volume covered by radiation portals will likely need to take place. Modern trials suggest that prophylactic treatment of the radiographically or clinically negative contralateral hilum and/or supraclavicular nodal regions may not be necessary for survival or local control. Importantly, reducing treatment volumes may permit increasing doses without exceding normal tissue tolerance. Also, reduced volumes pave the way for further clinical trials that improve radiation dose delivery by better target definition and more conformal therapy.

  13. Isolated pancreatic metastases from a bronchogenic small cell carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walshe, T

    2012-01-31

    We describe the case of a 60 year old female smoker who presented with a three month history of weight loss (14 Kg), generalized abdominal discomfort and malaise. Chest radiography demonstrated a mass projected inferior to the hilum of the right lung. Computed Tomography of thorax confirmed a lobulated lesion in the right infrahilar region and subsequent staging abdominal CT demonstrated a low density lesion in the neck of the pancreas. Percutaneous Ultrasound guided pancreatic biopsy was performed, histology of which demonstrated pancreatic tissue containing a highly necrotic small cell undifferentiated carcinoma consistent with metastatic small cell carcinoma of the bronchus.

  14. Chemoradiotherapy for a patient with a giant esophageal fistula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takuma Nomiya; Kazuhide Teruyama; Hitoshi Wada; Kenji Nemoto

    2007-01-01

    We describe our experience of treatment for a giant esophageal malignant fistula, which has not been reported previously. A 36-year-old woman who was diagnosed as having massive esophageal small cell carcinoma with metastases was treated with chemoradiotherapy.However, a giant esophagomediastinal fistula appeared due to shrinkage of the massive tumor, and all anti-cancer treatment was suspended. However, chemoradiotherapy was restarted at the request of the patient despite the presence of the fistula. After restarting treatment, the giant esophageal fistula was naturally closed despite intensive chemoradiotherapy, and the patient became able to eat and drink. Although the patient finally died,her QOL and prognosis seemed to be improved by the chemoradiotherapy. Anti-cancer treatment could be safely performed despite the presence of a giant fistula.The giant fistula closed while intensive chemotherapy was administered to the patient. Therefore, the presence of a fistula may not be a contraindication for curative chemoradiotherapy. Completion of treatment with proper management and maintenance of patients would be of benefit to patients with fistula.

  15. Dietary habits and esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino-Davis, A G; Mendez, B M; Fisichella, P M; Davis, C S

    2015-01-01

    Cancer of the esophagus is an underestimated, poorly understood, and changing disease. Its overall 5-year survival is less than 20%, even in the United States, which is largely a function of a delay in diagnosis until its more advanced stages. Additionally, the epidemiologic complexities of esophageal cancer are vast, rendering screening and prevention limited at best. First, the prevalence of esophageal cancer is unevenly distributed throughout the world. Second, the two histological forms (squamous cell and adenocarcinoma) vary in terms of their geographic prevalence and associated risk factors. Third, some populations appear at particular risk for esophageal cancer. And fourth, the incidence of esophageal cancer is in continuous flux among groups. Despite the varied prevalence and risks among populations, some factors have emerged as consistent associations while others are only now becoming more fully recognized. The most prominent, scientifically supported, and long-regarded risk factors for esophageal cancer are tobacco, alcohol, and reflux esophagitis. Inasmuch as the above are regarded as important risk factors for esophageal cancer, they are not the sole contributors. Dietary habits, nutrition, local customs, and the environment may be contributory. Along these lines, vitamins, minerals, fruits, vegetables, meats, fats, salted foods, nitrogen compounds, carcinogens, mycotoxins, and even the temperature of what we consume are increasingly regarded as potential etiologies for this deadly although potentially preventable disease. The goal of this review is to shed light on the less known role of nutrition and dietary habits in esophageal cancer.

  16. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  17. Gender effects on esophageal motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dantas R.O.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that there are no gender effects on esophageal motility. However, in previous studies the subjects did not perform multiple swallows and the quantitative features of esophageal contractions were not evaluated. In order to investigate the gender effects on esophageal motility we studied 40 healthy normal volunteers, 20 men aged 37 ± 15 years (mean ± SD, and 20 women aged 38 ± 14 years. We used the manometric method with an eight-lumen polyvinyl catheter and continuous perfusion. The upper and lower esophageal sphincter pressures were measured by the rapid pull-through method. With the catheter positioned with one lumen opening in the lower esophageal sphincter, and the others at 5, 10 and 15 cm above the sphincter, ten swallows of a 5-ml water bolus alternated with ten dry swallows were performed. Statistical analysis was done by the Student t-test and Mann-Whitney test. Gender differences (P<0.05 were observed for wet swallows in the duration of contractions 5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter (men: 3.7 ± 0.2 s, women: 4.5 ± 0.3 s, mean ± SEM, and in the velocity of contractions from 15 to 10 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter (men: 4.7 ± 0.3 cm/s, women: 3.5 ± 0.2 cm/s. There was no difference (P>0.05 in sphincter pressure, duration and percentage of complete lower esophageal sphincter relaxation, amplitude of contractions, or in the number of failed, multipeaked and synchronous contractions. We conclude that gender may cause some differences in esophageal motility which, though of no clinical significance, should be taken into consideration when interpreting esophageal motility tests.

  18. Double primary non-small cell lung cancer with synchronous small cell lung cancer N2 nodes: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Gogakos, Apostolos S; Paliouras, Dimitrios; Rallis, Thomas; Chatzinikolaou, Fotios; Xirou, Persefoni; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Tsavlis,Drosos; Sachpekidis,Nikos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andreas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Barbetakis, Nikolaos

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous multiple primary lung cancer (SMPLC) is rare and very hard to distinguish from metastatic disease. Recent studies indicate the presence of this entity in the lung, with no mention to the involvement of the mediastinum. An extremely rare case of a 68-year-old male with double primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the left upper lobe and N2 positive nodes for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is presented. Modern diagnostic criteria as well as aggressive curative strategies are ...

  19. Double primary non-small cell lung cancer with synchronous small cell lung cancer N2 nodes: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogakos, Apostolos S; Paliouras, Dimitrios; Rallis, Thomas; Chatzinikolaou, Fotios; Xirou, Persefoni; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Tsavlis, Drosos; Sachpekidis, Nikos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andreas; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Barbetakis, Nikolaos

    2015-07-01

    Synchronous multiple primary lung cancer (SMPLC) is rare and very hard to distinguish from metastatic disease. Recent studies indicate the presence of this entity in the lung, with no mention to the involvement of the mediastinum. An extremely rare case of a 68-year-old male with double primary non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in the left upper lobe and N2 positive nodes for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is presented. Modern diagnostic criteria as well as aggressive curative strategies are encouraged, in order to achieve better survival rates for such patients.

  20. Distributed Initial Synchronization for 5G small cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berardinelli, Gilberto; Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão; Tirkkonen, Olav

    2014-01-01

    Time synchronization in a large network of small cells enables efficient interference management as well as advanced transmission techniques which can boost the network throughput. In this paper, we focus on the distributed initial synchronization problem and propose different solutions aiming at...

  1. Third-line chemotherapy for small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, WK; ten Hacken, NHT; Groen, HJM

    2006-01-01

    Efficacy of third-line chemotherapy treatment for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is unknown. We present our experience with third-tine chemotherapy for recurrent SCLC. Between January 1996 and July 2004 all. consecutive patients treated for SCLC were retrospectively studied. We recorded patient chara

  2. ORAL-THERAPY FOR SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POSTMUS, PE; SMIT, EF

    After a remarkable improvement of the very poor prognosis of small cell lung cancer with very simple therapy such as iv and oral cyclophosphamide the role of oral therapy has become minimal. However, since more than a decade results of combination chemotherapy are at a plateau and it is necessary to

  3. Tracking the Evolution of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Wilson, Gareth A.; McGranahan, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Background Among patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), data on intratumor heterogeneity and cancer genome evolution have been limited to small retrospective cohorts. We wanted to prospectively investigate intratumor heterogeneity in relation to clinical outcome and to determine...... as a prognostic predictor. (Funded by Cancer Research UK and others; TRACERx ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01888601 .)....

  4. Seasonal variation in detection of esophageal eosinophilia and eosinophilic esophagitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Elizabeth T.; Shah, Neil D.; Hoffman, Kate; Sonnenberg, Amnon; Genta, Robert M.; Dellon, Evan S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Seasonal variation has been reported in diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), but results are not consistent across studies and there are no national-level data in the United States. Aim To determine if there is seasonal variation in diagnosis of esophageal eosinophilia and EoE in the U.S., while accounting for factors such as climate zone and geographic variation. Methods This was a cross-sectional study using a U.S. national pathology database. Patients with esophageal eosinophilia (≥15 eosinophils per high-power field) comprised the primary case definition and were compared to those with normal esophageal biopsies. We calculated the crude and adjusted odds of esophageal eosinophilia by season, as well as by day of the year. Sensitivity analyses were performed using more restrictive case definitions of EoE, and after stratification by climate zone. Results 14,524 cases with esophageal eosinophilia and 90,459 normal controls were analyzed. The adjusted odds of esophageal eosinophilia were higher in the late spring and summer months, with the highest odds in July (aOR 1.13; 95%CI: 1.03–1.24). These findings persisted with increasing levels of esophageal eosinophilia, as well as across EoE case definitions. Seasonal variation was strongest in temperate and cold climates, and peak diagnosis varied by climate zone. Conclusions There is a mild but consistent seasonal variation in the diagnosis of esophageal eosinophilia and EoE, with cases more frequently diagnosed during summer months. These findings take into account climate and geographic differences, suggesting that aeroallergens may contribute to disease development or flare. PMID:26059636

  5. [Prevalence of erosive esophagitis and peptic esophageal strictures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilevskiĭ, D I; Skurikhin, S S; Luft, A V; Mednikov, S N; Silant'ev, D S; Kulagin, V I; Dvoretskiĭ, S Iu; Bagnenko, S F

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a widespread among population in economically developed countries including Russia. It was analyzed the results of 34 903 endoscopic examinations of upper gastrointestinal tract in ethnically and socially homogeneous population of Leningrad region with symptoms of gastric dispepsia. Procedures were performed for the period 2007-2013. Prevalence of erosive esophagitis was 4.9%. Peptic esophageal strictures due to chronic reflux-associated inflammation were revealed in 0.2% of examined patients (3.7% of patients with erosive esophagitis). Obtained data allow to considergastroesophageal reflux disease as a socially significant problem in Russia requiring close attention and further study.

  6. Endoscopic appearance of esophageal hematomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rodica Ouatu-Lascar; Gayatri Bharadhwaj; George Triadafilopoulos

    2000-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION Esophageal hematomas develop from the dissection of the mucosa from the muscular layers of the esophageal wall and represent an uncommon condition affecting all ages[t-3]. Although the most common cause of esophageal hematomas is iatrogenic mechanical injury-induced by prolonged nasogastric intubation, difficult or forceful endoscopic intubation, or the result of variceal injection sclerotherapy- some may be spontaneous,particularly in patients receiving anticoagulants[3-6]. Presenting symptoms most commonly include dysphagia, hematemesis, and sub-sternal or epigastric pain[5,9].

  7. DNA Methylation and Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youwei ZHANG

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Genomic DNA methylation is a major form of epigenetic modification. Hypermethylation could affect the binding of transcription factors to DNA and change the structure of chromatin resulting in silence of tumor suppressor genes, which plays an important role in cancer initiation and progression. In recent years, the study of DNA methylation in lung cancer, mostly in non-small cell lung cancer, has made great progress and become a new target for early detection, risk assessment, prognosis and cancer therapy.

  8. Gallbladder small cell carcinoma: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Toshiyuki; Haraguchi, Masashi; Irie, Junji; Yoshimoto, Tomoko; Uehara, Ryohei; Ito, Shinichiro; Tokai, Hirotaka; Noda, Kazumasa; Tada, Nobuhiro; Hirabaru, Masataka; Inoue, Keiji; Minami, Shigeki; Eguchi, Susumu

    2016-12-01

    Gallbladder small cell carcinoma (SCC) comprises only 0.5 % of all gallbladder cancer and consists of aggressive tumors with poor survival outcomes against current treatments. These tumors are most common in elderly females, particularly those with cholecystolithiasis. We report the case of a 79-year-old woman with gallbladder small cell carcinoma. The patient had intermittent right upper quadrant abdominal pain and was admitted to our hospital due to suspected acute cholecystitis. She regularly received medical treatment for diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. On initial laboratory evaluation, the levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total bilirubin, and C-reactive protein (CRP) were markedly elevated. She underwent computed tomography (CT) for screening. CT images showed a thick-walled gallbladder containing multiple stones and multiple 3-cm-sized round nodular lesions, which were suggestive of metastatic lymph nodes. After percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage was performed, endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of enlarged lymph nodes resulted in a diagnosis of small cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma. However, we could not identify the primary lesion before the surgery because of no decisive factors. We performed cholecystectomy because there was a possibility of cholecystitis recurrence risk and also partial liver resection because we suspected tumor invasion. The final pathological diagnosis was neuroendocrine carcinoma of the gallbladder, small cell type. The tumor stage was IVb, T3aN1M1. The patient died 13 weeks after the surgery. In the present paper, we review the current available English-language literature of gallbladder SCC.

  9. Energy Harvesting Small Cell Networks: Feasibility, Deployment and Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Yuyi; Luo, Yaming; Zhang, Jun; Letaief, Khaled B.

    2015-01-01

    Small cell networks (SCNs) have attracted great attention in recent years due to their potential to meet the exponential growth of mobile data traffic and the increasing demand for better quality of service and user experience in mobile applications. Nevertheless, a wide deployment of SCNs has not happened yet because of the complexity in the network planning and optimization, as well as the high expenditure involved in deployment and operation. In particular, it is difficult to provide grid ...

  10. A rare bladder cancer - small cell carcinoma: review and update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaili Nabil

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Small cell carcinoma of the bladder (SCCB is rare, highly aggressive and diagnosed mainly at advanced stages. Hematuria is the main symptom of this malignancy. The origin of the disease is unknown; however the multipotent stem cell theory applies best to this case. Histology and immunohistochemistry shows a tumour which is indistinguishable from small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC. Coexistence of SCCB with other types of carcinoma is common. The staging system used is the TNM-staging of bladder transitional cell carcinoma. The treatment is extrapolated from that of SCLC. However, many patients with SCCB undergo radical resection which is rarely performed in SCLC. Patients with surgically resectable disease ( or = cT4bN+M+ should be managed with palliative chemotherapy based on neuroendocrine type regimens comprising a platinum drug (cisplatin in fit patients. The prognosis of the disease is poor mainly in the case of pure small cell carcinoma. Other research programs are needed to improve the outcome of SCCB.

  11. Concomitant Small Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of Gallbladder and Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Aiello

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The neuroendocrine carcinoma is defined as a high-grade malignant neuroendocrine neoplasm arising from enterochromaffin cells, usually disposed in the mucosa of gastric and respiratory tracts. The localization in the gallbladder is rare. Knowledge of these gallbladder tumors is limited and based on isolated case reports. We describe a case of an incidental finding of small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the gallbladder, observed after cholecystectomy for cholelithiasis, in a 55-year-old female, who already underwent quadrantectomy and sentinel lymph-node biopsy for breast cancer. The patient underwent radiotherapy for breast cancer and six cycles of chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide. Eighteen months after surgery, the patient was free from disease. Small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the gallbladder has poor prognosis. Because of the rarity of the reported cases, specific prognostic factors have not been identified. The coexistence of small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the gallbladder with another malignancy has been reported only once. The contemporary presence of the two neoplasms could reflect that bioactive agents secreted by carcinoid can promote phenotypic changes in susceptible cells and induce neoplastic transformation.

  12. Prevention of Esophageal Variceal Rebleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gin-Ho Lo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The rate of rebleeding of esophageal varices remains high after cessation of acute esophageal variceal hemorrhage. Many measures have been developed to prevent the occurrence of rebleeding. When considering their effectiveness in reduction of rebleeding, the associated complications cannot be neglected. Due to unavoidable high incidence of complications, shunt surgery and endoscopic injection sclerotherapy are now rarely used. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt was developed to replace shunt operation but is now reserved for rescue therapy. Nonselective beta-blockers alone or in combination with isosorbide mononitrate and endoscopic variceal ligation are currently the first choices in the prevention of variceal rebleeding. The combination of nonselective beta-blockers and endoscopic variceal ligation appear to enhance the efficacy. With the advent of newly developed measures, esophageal variceal rebleeding could be greatly reduced and the survival of cirrhotics with bleeding esophageal varices could thereby be prolonged.

  13. Drugs Approved for Esophageal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for esophageal cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  14. Esophageal ulceration complicating doxycycline therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad A. Al-Mofarreh; Ibrahim A. Al Mofleh

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To report present state of iatrogenic drug-induced esophageal injury (DIEI) induced by medications in a private clinic.METHODS: Iatrogenic drug-induced esophageal injury (DIEI) induced by medications has been more frequently reported. In a private clinic we encountered 36 cases of esophageal ulcerations complicating doxycycline therapy in a mainly younger Saudi population (median age 29 years).RESULTS: The most frequent presenting symptoms were oclynophagia, retrostemal burning pain and dysphagia (94 %,75 % and 56 %, respectively). The diagnosis was according to medical history and confirmed by endoscopy in all patients.Beside withdrawal of doxycycline, when feasible, all patients were treated with a proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) and a prokinetic. Thirty patients who reported to the clinic after treatment were improved within 1-7 (median 1.7) days.CONCLUSION: Esophageal ulceration has to be suspected in younger patients with odynophagia, retrosternal burning pain and/or clysphagia during the treatment with doxycycline.

  15. Caustic ingestion and esophageal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadranel, S.; Di Lorenzo, C.; Rodesch, P.; Piepsz, A.; Ham, H.R. (Children University Hospital, Brussels (Belgium))

    1990-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate esophageal motor function by means of krypton-81m esophageal transit scintigraphy and to compare the results with the functional and morphological data obtained by means of triple lumen manometry and endoscopy. In acute and subacute stages of the disease, all clinical, anatomical, and functional parameters were in good agreement, revealing significant impairment. In chronic stages, the severity of the dysphagia was not correlated to the importance of the residual stenosis. Conversely, 81mKr esophageal transit and manometric's findings were in good agreement with the clinical symptoms, during the entire follow-up period ranging between 3 months to 7 years. The 81mKr test is undoubtedly the easiest and probably the most physiological technique currently available for long-term functional evaluation of caustic esophagitis.

  16. Esophageal malignancy: A growing concern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianyuan Chai; M Mazen Jamal

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is mainly found in Asia and east Africa and is one of the deadliest cancers in the world.However,it has not garnered much attention in the Western world due to its low incidence rate.An increasing amount of data indicate that esophageal cancer,particularly esophageal adenocarcinoma,has been rising by 6-fold annually and is now becoming the fastest growing cancer in the United States.This rise has been associated with the increase of the obese population,as abdominal fat puts extra pressure on the stomach and causes gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).Long standing GERD can induce esophagitis and metaplasia and,ultimately,leads to adenocarcinoma.Acid suppression has been the main strategy to treat GERD; however,it has not been proven to control esophageal malignancy effectively.In fact,its side effects have triggered multiple warnings from regulatory agencies.The high mortality and fast growth of esophageal cancer demand more vigorous efforts to look into its deeper mechanisms and come up with better therapeutic options.

  17. Cutaneous Metastases From Esophageal Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllou, Stamatina; Georgia, Doulami; Gavriella-Zoi, Vrakopoulou; Dimitrios, Mpistarakis; Stulianos, Katsaragakis; Theodoros, Liakakos; Georgios, Zografos; Dimitrios, Theodorou

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to present 2 rare cases of cutaneous metastases originated from adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction, thus, underline the need for early diagnosis and possible treatment of suspicious skin lesions among patients with esophageal malignancy. Metastatic cancer to the skin originated from internal malignancies, mostly lung cancer, breast cancer, and colorectal cancer, constitute 0.5 to 9% of all metastatic cancers.5,8,15 Skin metastases, mainly from squamous cell carcinomas of the esophagus, are rarely reported. Cutaneous metastasis is a finding indicating progressiveness of the disease.17 More precisely, median survival is estimated approximately 4.7 months.2,14 This study is a retrospective review of 2 cases of patients with adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and a review of the literature. Two patients aged 60 and 32 years old, respectively, underwent esophagectomy. Both pathologic reports disclosed adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophageal junction staged T3 N2 M0 (stage IIIB). During follow-up time, the 2 patients were diagnosed with cutaneous metastases originated from the primary esophageal tumor 11 and 4 months after surgery, respectively. The first patient is alive 37 months after diagnosis, while the second one died 16 months after surgery. Cutaneous metastasis caused by esophageal adenocarcinoma is possible. Therefore, follow-up of patients who were diagnosed with esophageal malignancy and underwent esophagectomy is mandatory in order to reveal early surgical stages. PMID:25785344

  18. Ultrasonographic findings of esophageal varices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hyo Seouk; Seol, Byeong Ryong; Rha, Seung Woon [Shilla General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-05-01

    To demonstrate the clinical usefulness of ultrasonography for detecting esophageal varices. In 20 cases of esophaged varix, the authors analysed the transabdominal ultrasonographic findings of the esophagogastric junction and compared mural thickness, the anteroposterior diameter of the esophagus, and the echogenic nature of the esophageal mucosal layer with those of 78 normal patients. The anterior and posterior mural thickeness of normal esophagus was 2.2{+-}0.7 and 2.4{+-}0.8mm respectively, but for variceal esophagus, the corresponding readings were 5.9{+-}1.3 and 5.2{+-}1.3mm respectively. The anteroposterior diameter of normal esophagus was 7.9{+-}2.1mm and that of variceal esophagus was 14.0{+-}1.8mm. There was a stastically significant difference (p<0.01) in mural thickness and anteroposterior diameter of the esophagus between a normal and variceal patient with regard to change of echogenic nature at the esphagogastric junction. Normal esophageal mucosa showed a thin and uniform echogenic line, but for variceal mucosa, the echogenic pattern was irregular, tortuous and thick. The athors believe that transabdominal US is helpful for detecting esophageal varices in patients with liver cirrhosis and UGI bleeding. Important clinically useful sonographic findings in diagnosing esophageal varix are as follows:1) mural thickness more than 6mm; 2) anteroposterior diameter of the esophagus of more than 15mm;3) irregular, tortuous and thickened echogenic mucosa.

  19. Radiation dose is associated with prognosis of small cell lung cancer with superior vena cava syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen-Bo; Ning, Fang-Ling; Wang, Xiao-Le; Cheng, Yu-Feng; Dong, Xin-Jun; Liu, Chang-Min; Chen, Shao-Shui

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 10% of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cases develop superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS). Many SCLC patients with SVCS have relatively limited disease, requiring curative rather than palliative treatment. Besides chemotherapy, radiotherapy is important for treating SCLC with SVCS. We retrospectively evaluated the influence of radiotherapy dose on the prognosis of 57 patients with SCLC with SVCS treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. The mean biological equivalent radiation dose was 71.5 Gy. We administered etoposide/cisplatin as sequential and concurrent chemotherapy. All patients received at least one cycle of concurrent chemotherapy. All patients had partial or complete response; SVCS-associated symptoms were reduced in 87.7% (50/57) of patients within 3-10 days after treatment. Radiation dose did not affect 2-year local control (74.2% vs. 80.8%). Patients who received high-dose radiation had a lower 2-year overall survival rate than those who received low-dose radiation (11.6 vs. 33%; P = 0.024). The high dose group median survival was 15.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.2-19.0) compared with 18.7 months (95% CI: 13.9-23.6) in the low dose group. Grade 3/4 neutropenia occurred in 22/26 high dose patients (84.6%) and 21/31 low dose patients (67.7%). In the high dose group, 30.8% of patients had grade 3/4 esophagitis compared with 19.4% of low dose patients. Only 29.0% of low dose patients received < 4 cycles of chemotherapy in the first 12 weeks after treatment began compared with 46.2% of high dose patients. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is a tolerable modality for treating stage IIIA/IIIB SCLC with SVCS. Moderate-dose radiotherapy is preferable. PMID:26064339

  20. Long term outcomes after salvage radiotherapy for postoperative locoregionally recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ji; Song, Chang Hoon; Kim, Jae Sung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Mi Young [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    The outcomes and toxicities of locoregionally recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with curative radiotherapy were evaluated in the modern era. Fifty-seven patients receiving radical radiotherapy for locoregionally recurrent NSCLC without distant metastasis after surgery from 2004 to 2014 were reviewed. Forty-two patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT), and 15 patients with radiotherapy alone. The median radiation dose was 66 Gy (range, 45 to 70 Gy). Lung function change after radiotherapy was evaluated by comparing pulmonary function tests before and at 1, 6, and 12 months after radiotherapy. Median follow-up was 53.6 months (range, 12.0 to 107.5 months) among the survivors. The median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were 54.8 months (range, 3.0 to 116.9 months) and 12.2 months (range, 0.8 to 100.2 months), respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that single locoregional recurrence focus and use of concurrent chemotherapy were significant prognostic factors for OS (p = 0.048 and p = 0.001, respectively) and PFS (p = 0.002 and p = 0.026, respectively). There was no significant change in predicted forced expiratory volume in one second after radiotherapy. Although diffusing lung capacity for carbon monoxide decreased significantly at 1 month after radiotherapy (p < 0.001), it recovered to pretreatment levels within 12 months. Acute grade 3 radiation pneumonitis and esophagitis were observed in 3 and 2 patients, respectively. There was no chronic complication observed in all patients. Salvage radiotherapy showed good survival outcomes without severe complications in postoperative locoregionally recurrent NSCLC patients. A single locoregional recurrent focus and the use of CCRT chemotherapy were associated with improved survival. CCRT should be considered as a salvage treatment in patients with good prognostic factors.

  1. Prevention and Treatment of Esophageal Stenosis after Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection for Early Esophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Wen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD for the treatment of esophageal mucosal lesions is associated with a risk of esophageal stenosis, especially for near-circumferential or circumferential esophageal mucosal defects. Here, we review historic and modern studies on the prevention and treatment of esophageal stenosis after ESD. These methods include prevention via pharmacological treatment, endoscopic autologous cell transplantation, endoscopic esophageal dilatation, and stent placement. This short review will focus on direct prevention and treatment, which may help guide the way forward.

  2. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Aftab, Blake T. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Rudin, Charles M. [Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tran, Phuoc T. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hales, Russell K., E-mail: rhales1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  3. [Esophageal atresia type I. Is impossible possible?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Temiño, M; Esteban, J A; Elías, J; González, N; Gracia, J; Romeo, M; Escartín, R; Burgués, P; Sainz, A; Pueyo, C

    2006-01-01

    Treatment of esophageal atresia with "long gap" remains difficult and controversial. According to the idea that esophageal anastomosis is imposible in most cases, several esophageal substitution methods have been proposed, as esophagocoloplasty, gastric transposition or reversed gastric tube. Nevertheless reconstruction of native esophagus is accepted as the best option if posible. "Long gap" definition is imprecise, expressed by variability in percent of these cases in total esophageal atresias reported in different series in literature. We report our experience in seven cases type I esophageal atresia with long gap and the different therapeutic options used, with attention to delayed or early esophageal anastomosis feasibility and outcome. We have treated 121 patients with esophageal atresia from whom we analized 7 cases with pure esophageal atresia with "long gap" (5.8%). Six patients underwent gastrostomy and two gastrostomy and esophagostomy. Five patient underwent primary repair with esophageal anastomosis, delayed between 14 days and 4 months in 4 cases. One patient underwent esophageal anastomosis in the first day without gastrostomy. Retroesternal esophagocoloplasty was performed in 2 patients about their first year of life. Esophagogram was done in first month after surgery and pH monitoring of gastroesophageal reflux. Follow-up ranged from 6 months to 28 years. Esophageal anastomosis was feasible in all 5 patients in whom it was tried. Stricture occurred in two patients, one patient underwent anastomotic resection and new esophageal anastomosis. Esophageal reflux was present in two patients, one of them required funduplication. One patient was dead by complications of cardiac malformation. Remaining patients have normal swallowing and are in normal growth curves. Patients with esophagocoloplasty had not relevant early or late complications. In most pure esophageal atresia, delayed or even early esophageal anastomosis is feasible, making use of surgical

  4. 21 CFR 878.3610 - Esophageal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Esophageal prosthesis. 878.3610 Section 878.3610...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3610 Esophageal prosthesis. (a) Identification. An esophageal prosthesis is a rigid, flexible, or expandable tubular device...

  5. Gallium-67 imaging in candidal esophagitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rundback, J.H.; Goldfarb, C.R.; Ongseng, F. (Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Ga-67 scanning has been used to evaluate esophageal carcinoma. It has demonstrated candidal infection in other body sites and, in one previous case, in the esophagus. The authors present a case of diffuse esophageal uptake of Ga-67 in esophageal candidiasis.

  6. Pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) Non-Small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyu Chan; Ahn, Yong Chan; Park, Keun Chil [College of Medicine, Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1999-06-01

    This is to evaluate the acute complication, resection rate, and tumor down-staging after pre-operative concurrent chemoradiotherapy for stage IIIA (N2) non-small cell lung cancer. Fifteen patients with non-small cell lung cancer were enrolled in this study from May 1997 to June 1998 in Samsung Medical Center. The median age of the patients was 61 (range, 45-67) years and male to female ratio was 12:3. Pathologic types were squamous cell carcinoma (11) and adenocarcinoma (4). Pre-operative clinical tumor stages were cT1 in 2 patients, cT2 in 12, and cT3 in 1 and all were N2. Ten patients were proved to be N2 with mediastinoscopic biopsy and five had clinically evident mediastinal lymph node metastases on the chest CT scans. Pre-operative radiation therapy field included the primary tumor, the ipsilateral hilum, and the mediastinum. Total radiation dose was 45 Gy over 5 weeks with daily dose of 1.8 Gy. Pre-operative concurrent chemotherapy consisted of two cycles of intraventous cis-Platin (100 mg/m{sup 2}) on day 1 and oral Etoposide (50 mg/m{sup 2}/day) on days 1 through 14 with 4 weeks' interval. Surgery was followed after the pre-operative re-evaluation including chest CT scan in 3 weeks of the completion of the concurrent chemoradiotherapy if there was no evidence of disease progression. Full dose radiation therapy was administered to all the 15 patients. Planned two cycles of chemotherapy was completed in 11 patients and one cycle was given to four. One treatment related death of acute respiratory distress syndrome occurred in 15 days of surgery. Hospital admission was required in three patients including one with radiation pneumonitis and two with neutropenic fever. Hematologic complications and other acute complications including esophagitis were tolerable. Resection rate was 92.3% (12/13) in 13 patients excluding two patients who refused surgery. Pleural seeding was found in one patient after thoracotomy and tumor resection was not feasible. Post

  7. Congenital esophageal atresia with tracheo-esophageal fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Chung Sik [Ewha Womans University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1970-10-15

    Three cases of esophageal atresia with tracheo-esophageal fistula. 1). Case 1: A female infant birth Wt. 1.95 kg , Apgar Score 10, Skeletal anomalies, was delivered after a pregnancy compeicated by hydroamnious on Aug. 17, 1970. The family history was not contributory. 2) Case 2: A male infant birth Wt. 2.8 kg , Apgar Score 8, was forcep delivered after a pregnancy on Feb. 8, 1970. This infant is twin. The family history was not contributory. 3) Case 3: A female infant birth Wt. 2.22 kg , Apgar Score 10, was C-section after a pregnancy on May, 16. 1970. The family history was not contributory. All cases: After 24 hours 5% glucose solution was given and immediately vomited and some of it regurgitating through the nose and mouth with associated cyanosis and dyspnea. A catheter was inserted through the nose into the esophagus under diagnosis of the esophageal atresia.

  8. [Esophageal diseases: GERD, Barrett, achalasia and eosinophilic esophagitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Xavier; Villoria, Albert

    2014-09-01

    At Digestive Disease Week (DDW) 2014, developments in esophageal disease were presented. Highlights include: the usefulness of impedancemetry to diagnose reflux disease, or the effectiveness of PPIs for treating non-cardiac chest pain. Concerning Barrett's esophagus, its prevalence is identical in patients with and without reflux symptoms, Barrett segments less than 1cm probably do not require follow-up, and in older patients with long-segment Barrett, initial endoscopies overlooked up to 2% of significant lesions. Regarding achalasia, surgical myotomy is no more effective than endoscopic dilation and may even be less effective than peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). In terms of eosinophilic esophagitis, it is important to systematically take biopsies in patients with dysphagia so that cases of eosinophilic esophagitis are not overlooked. In addition, for this condition, routine endoscopic dilations not only do not seem useful in improving the course of the disease, but could also worsen the response to medical treatment.

  9. Cetuximab in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carillio, Guido; Montanino, Agnese; Costanzo, Raffaele; Sandomenico, Claudia; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; Di Maio, Massimo; Daniele, Gennaro; Giordano, Pasqualina; Bryce, Jane; Normanno, Nicola; Rocco, Gaetano; Perrone, Francesco; Morabito, Alessandro

    2012-02-01

    Cetuximab is a chimeric human-mouse anti-EGF receptor monoclonal antibody. In Phase I studies, no dose-limiting toxicities were observed with cetuximab as a single agent or combined with chemotherapy; pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses supported 250 mg/m(2) weekly administration. Skin toxicity, diarrhea and fatigue were the most common toxicities. The positive results obtained in Phase II trials in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer prompted two randomized Phase III trials evaluating cetuximab in addition to first-line chemotherapy. Both trials showed a small benefit in overall survival for the experimental treatment, which was considered insufficient by the EMA for marketing approval. However, a subgroup analysis of the FLEX Phase III trial recently demonstrated a larger survival benefit from the experimental treatment in patients with high immunohistochemical EGF receptor expression. This finding, if confirmed prospectively, could represent a new opportunity for positioning cetuximab into the standard treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma.

  10. Oligometastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: current treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard PJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Patrick J Richard, Ramesh Rengan Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: The oligometastatic disease theory was initially described in 1995 by Hellman and Weichselbaum. Since then, much work has been performed to investigate its existence in many solid tumors. This has led to subclassifications of stage IV cancer, which could redefine our treatment approaches and the therapeutic outcomes for this historically “incurable” entity. With a high incidence of stage IV disease, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC remains a difficult cancer to treat and cure. Recent work has proven the existence of an oligometastatic state in NSCLC in terms of properly selecting patients who may benefit from aggressive therapy and experience long-term overall survival. This review discusses the current treatment approaches used in oligometastatic NSCLC and provides the evidence and rationale for each approach. The prognostic factors of many trials are discussed, which can be used to properly select patients for aggressive treatment regimens. Future advances in both molecular profiling of NSCLC to find targetable mutations and investigating patient selection may increase the number of patients diagnosed with oligometastatic NSCLC. As this disease entity increases, it is of utmost importance for oncologists treating NSCLC to be aware of the current treatment strategies that exist and the potential advantages/disadvantages of each. Keywords: oligometastatic, non-small-cell lung cancer, oligoprogressive, treatment

  11. Ovarian small cell carcinoma complicated by carcinomatous meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terukazu Ishii

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Meningeal metastasis is rare in the clinical course of ovarian carcinoma and its prognosis is extremely poor. We experienced a case of carcinomatous meningitis from metastatic ovarian small cell carcinoma. A 33-year-old woman with atypical genital bleeding, was diagnosed with a right ovarian tumor and referred to our department. She underwent a total abdominal hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, omentectomy, and lymphadenectomy. It was an optimal debulking surgery. She was diagnosed with ovarian carcinoma classified as Stage IIIc according to the Féderation Internationale de Gynécologie et d’Obstétrique classification system. Histological findings showed small cell carcinoma of the pulmonary type. The tumor was bilateral with paraaortic lymph node involvement. The patient was treated with irinotecan and cisplatin (CPT-P therapy. After 4 courses of CPTP therapy, multiple liver metastases and Virchow’s lymph node metastases were found. She was treated with amrubicin as a secondline chemotherapy, but the treatment was ineffective. Five months after surgery, the patient complained of severe headache and nausea. Lumbar puncture was performed and cytology was positive. Magnetic resonance brain imaging indicated meningeal thickening. The patient was diagnosed with meningeal metastasis and received 19-Gy whole cranial irradiation. In spite of these treatments, her disease progressed rapidly and she was often drowsy. She died of aspiration pneumonia 6 months after surgery.

  12. Esophageal tissue engineering: A new approach for esophageal replacement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giorgia Totonelli; Panagiotis Maghsoudlou; Jonathan M Fishman; Giuseppe Orlando; Tahera Ansari; Paul Sibbons; Martin A Birchall

    2012-01-01

    A number of congenital and acquired disorders require esophageal tissue replacement.Various surgical techniques,such as gastric and colonic interposition,are standards of treatment,but frequently complicated by stenosis and other problems.Regenerative medicine approaches facilitate the use of biological constructs to replace or regenerate normal tissue function.We review the literature of esophageal tissue engineering,discuss its implications,compare the methodologies that have been employed and suggest possible directions for the future.Medline,Embase,the Cochrane Library,National Research Register and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were searched with the following search terms:stem cell and esophagus,esophageal replacement,esophageal tissue engineering,esophageal substitution.Reference lists of papers identified were also examined and experts in this field contacted for further information.All full-text articles in English of all potentially relevant abstracts were reviewed.Tissue engineering has involved acellular scaffolds that were either transplanted with the aim of being repopulated by host cells or seeded prior to transplantation.When acellular scaffolds were used to replace patch and short tubular defects they allowed epithelial and partial muscular migration whereas when employed for long tubular defects the results were poor leading to an increased rate of stenosis and mortality.Stenting has been shown as an effective means to reduce stenotic changes and promote cell migration,whilst omental wrapping to induce vascularization of the construct has an uncertain benefit.Decellularized matrices have been recently suggested as the optimal choice for scaffolds,but smart polymers that will incorporate signalling to promote cell-scaffold interaction may provide a more reproducible and available solution.Results in animal models that have used seeded scaffolds strongly suggest that seeding of both muscle and epithelial cells on scaffolds prior to implantation is a

  13. Transformation from non-small-cell lung cancer to small-cell lung cancer: molecular drivers and cells of origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oser, Matthew G; Niederst, Matthew J; Sequist, Lecia V; Engelman, Jeffrey A

    2015-04-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The two broad histological subtypes of lung cancer are small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), which is the cause of 15% of cases, and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which accounts for 85% of cases and includes adenocarcinoma, squamous-cell carcinoma, and large-cell carcinoma. Although NSCLC and SCLC are commonly thought to be different diseases owing to their distinct biology and genomic abnormalities, the idea that these malignant disorders might share common cells of origin has been gaining support. This idea has been supported by the unexpected findings that a subset of NSCLCs with mutated EGFR return as SCLC when resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors develops. Additionally, other case reports have described the coexistence of NSCLC and SCLC, further challenging the commonly accepted view of their distinct lineages. Here, we summarise the published clinical observations and biology underlying tumours with combined SCLC and NSCLC histology and cancers that transform from adenocarcinoma to SCLC. We also discuss pre-clinical studies pointing to common potential cells of origin, and speculate how the distinct paths of differentiation are determined by the genomics of each disease.

  14. Reflux esophagitis revisited: Prospective analysis of radiologic accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, D.J.; Gelfand, D.W.; Wu, W.C.

    1981-01-15

    A prospective radiologic-endoscopic study of the esophagogastric region in 266 patients, including 206 normals and 60 with esophagitis, is reported. The endoscopic classification grading severity of esophagitis was grade 1-normal; grades 2. 3. and 4-mild, moderate, and severe esophagitis, respectively. Radiology detected 22% of patient with mild esophagitis, 83% with moderate esophagitis, and 95% with severe esophagitis. Although hiatal hernia was present in 40% of normals and 89% with esophagitis, absence of radiographic hiatal hernia excluded esophagitis with 95% accuracy. The implications of this study regarding the role of radiology in evaluating patient with suspected reflux esophagitis are discussed.

  15. Dosimetric comparison of carbon ion and X-ray radiotherapy for Stage IIIA non–small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Nobuteru; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Shimada, Hirofumi; Shirai, Katsuyuki; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The present study compared the dose–volume histograms of patients with Stage IIIA non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with carbon ion radiotherapy with those of patients treated with X-ray radiotherapy. Patients with Stage IIIA NSCLC (n = 10 patients for each approach) were enrolled. Both radiotherapy plans were calculated with the same targets and organs at risk on the same CT. The treatment plan for the prophylactic lymph node and primary tumor (PTV1) delivered 40 Gy for X-ray radiotherapy and 40 Gy (relative biological effectiveness; RBE) for carbon ion radiotherapy. The total doses for the primary tumor and clinically positive lymph nodes (PTV2) were 60 Gy for X-ray radiotherapy and 60 Gy (RBE) for carbon ion radiotherapy. The homogeneity indexes for PTV1 and PTV2 were superior for carbon ion radiotherapy in comparison with X-ray radiotherapy (PTV1, 0.57 vs 0.65, P = 0.009; PTV2, 0.07 vs 0.16, P = 0.005). The normal lung mean dose, V5, V10 and V20 for carbon ion radiotherapy were 7.7 Gy (RBE), 21.4%, 19.7% and 17.0%, respectively, whereas the corresponding doses for X-ray radiotherapy were 11.9 Gy, 34.9%, 26.6% and 20.8%, respectively. Maximum spinal cord dose, esophageal maximum dose and V50, and bone V10, V30 and V50 were lower with carbon ion radiotherapy than with X-ray radiotherapy. The present study indicates that carbon ion radiotherapy provides a more homogeneous target dose and a lower dose to organs at risk than X-ray radiotherapy for Stage IIIA non–small cell lung cancer. PMID:27242341

  16. Early detection of response in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma by changes in serum concentrations of creatine kinase, neuron specific enolase, calcitonin, ACTH, serotonin and gastrin releasing peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, E; Hansen, M; Urdal, P;

    1988-01-01

    determined within 4-8 weeks. The results indicate that serum CK-BB and NSE are potential markers for SCC at the time of diagnosis and that changes in the concentrations during the first course of cytostatic therapy are promising as biochemical tests for early detection of response to chemotherapy.......Creatine kinase (CK-BB), neuron specific enolase (NSE), ACTH, calcitonin, serotonin and gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) were measured in serum or plasma before and immediately after initiation of treatment in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCC). Pretherapeutic elevated concentrations of CK...... stage patients and 71% in limited stage patients. Frequent initial monitoring of the substances showed an increase in the concentrations of pretherapeutic elevated CK-BB and NSE on day 1 or 2 followed by a sharp decrease within 1 week. These changes were correlated to objective clinical response...

  17. Prophylactic cranial irradiation in patients with small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramlov, Anne; Tietze, Anna; Khalil, Azza Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prophylactic cerebral irradiation (PCI) is a standard treatment for all small cell lung cancer (SCLC) patients with response to chemotherapy. The aims of this study were: to evaluate patients undergoing PCI with regard to cerebral recurrence rate, site of recurrence, and overall...... retrospectively with regard to disease stage, treatment, date of PCI, steroid dose during PCI, toxicity, time to recurrence, site of recurrence and time of death. The median follow up time was 16.6months (range 3-54months). RESULTS: Of the 118 patients undergoing PCI, 74 had limited disease (LD-SCLC) and 44 had.......8%) were diagnosed with cerebral recurrence. Five of these presented with metastatic disease within the limbic system. Of these five patients, four had miliary cerebral disease and one had non-oligometastatic disease. The time from PCI to cerebral recurrence ranged from 4 to 27months. Prednisolone...

  18. Specifically targeted gene therapy for small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, C.L.; Zandi, R.; Gjetting, T.

    2009-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly malignant disease with poor prognosis. Hence, there is great demand for new therapies that can replace or supplement the current available treatment regimes. Gene therapy constitutes a promising strategy and relies on the principle of introducing exogenous....... This review describes and discusses the current status of the application of gene therapy in relation to SCLC Udgivelsesdato: 2009/4...... DNA into malignant cells causing them to die. Since SCLC is a highly disseminated malignancy, the gene therapeutic agent must be administered systemically, obligating a high level of targeting of tumor tissue and the use of delivery vehicles designed for systemic circulation of the therapeutic DNA...

  19. Interference-robust Air Interface for 5G Small Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão

    . To meet these challenging network capacity expansion requirements, the design of the new 5G RAT standard will make use of three main strategies: more antennas, more spectrum and more cells. All these strategies will have important roles in the new system, but the deployment of a massive number of small...... cells, especially indoors, is expected to provide the largest improvement in network capacity. However, the benefits of this type of ultra-dense deployment do not come for free; strong inter-cell interference, an inherent problem of dense networks, has the potential to limit the expected gains. Due...... robustness is achieved by the clever design of the radio frame structure in such a way that interference suppression receivers can efficiently and effectively mitigate the effects of inter-cell interference. A detailed receiver model is derived (including also receiver imperfections, such as estimation...

  20. Massive MIMO meets small cell backhaul and cooperation

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Howard H

    2017-01-01

    This brief explores the utilization of large antenna arrays in massive multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) for both interference suppression, where it can improve cell-edge user rates, and for wireless backhaul in small cell networks, where macro base stations can forward data to small access points in an energy efficient way. Massive MIMO is deemed as a critical technology for next generation wireless technology. By deploying an antenna array that has active elements in excess of the number of users, massive MIMO not only provides tremendous diversity gain but also powers new aspects for network design to improve performance. This brief investigates a better utilization of the excessive spatial dimensions to improve network performance. It combines random matrix theory and stochastic geometry to develop an analytical framework that accounts for all the key features of a network, including number of antenna array, base station density, inter-cell interference, random base station deployment, and network tra...

  1. Targeted therapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shou-Ching Tang

    2004-01-01

    @@ 1 Introduction Recent progress in molecular biology has enabled us to better understand the molecular mechanism underlying pathogenesis of human malignancy including lung cancer. Sequencing of human genome has identified many oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes,giving us a better understanding of the molecular events leading to the formation, progression, metastasis, and the development of drug resistance in human lung cancer. In addition, many signal transduction pathways have been discovered that play important roles in lung cancer. Novel strategy of anti-cancer drug development now involves the identification and development of targeted therapy that interrupts one or more than one pathways or cross-talk among different signal transduction pathways. In addition, efforts are underway that combine the traditional cytotoxic (non-targeted) agents with the biological (targeted) therapy to increase the response rate and survival in patients with lung cancer, especially advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

  2. Immunotherapy for small-cell lung cancer: emerging evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reck, Martin; Heigener, David; Reinmuth, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Treatment for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) has changed little over the past few decades; available therapies have failed to extend survival in advanced disease. In recent years, immunotherapy with treatments such as interferons, TNFs, vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors has advanced and shown promise in the treatment of several tumor types. Immune checkpoint inhibitors such as ipilimumab, nivolumab, pembrolizumab, durvalumab, tremelimumab and ulocuplumab are at the forefront of immunotherapy and have achieved approvals for certain cancer types, including melanoma (ipilimumab, nivolumab and pembrolizumab), non-SCLC (nivolumab and pembrolizumab) and renal cell carcinoma (nivolumab). Clinical trials are investigating different immunotherapies in patients with other solid and hematologic malignancies, including SCLC. We review emerging evidence supporting the use of immunotherapy in SCLC patients.

  3. Advances of Immunotherapy in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing LIU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Small cell lung cancer (SCLC is complex heterogeneous due to unclear biological characteristics in terms of cell origin, pathogenesis and driver genes etc. Diagnosis and treatment of SCLC has been slowly improved and few breakthroughs have been discovered up to now. Therefore new strategies are urgently needed to improve the efficacy of SCLC treatment. Tumor immunotherapy has potential to restore and trigger the immune system to recognize and eliminate tumor cells, notably it has only minimal adverse impact on normal tissue. Cancer vaccine, adoptive immunotherapy, cytokines and checkpoint inhibitors have now been launched for clinical treatment of SCLC. Ipilimumab is the most promising medicine of immunotherapy. Immunotherapy is expected to bring new vision to the treatment of SCLC. And further researches are needed on such problems affecting efficacy of immunotherapy as the heterogeneity of SCLC, the uncertainty of target for immunotherapy, the immune tolerance, etc.

  4. Advances in Immunotherapies for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan HE

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Globally, Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death of high morbidity and mortality with poor prognosis, which needs some more effective and less toxic therapies. The immunotherapies offer a novel approach for the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC in both the adjuvant and palliative disease settings. A number of promising immunotherapies based on different mechanism have now been evaluated showing an increasing response rate. Moreover, further phase II/III clinical trials will be indicated to explore its value. These include checkpoint inhibitors (anti-CTLA4 antibody, anti-PD-1 antibody, anti-PD-L1 antibody, active vaccination (L-BLP25 liposome vaccine, Belagenpumatucel-L vaccine, MAGE-A3 protein vaccine and adoptive vaccination (CIK cells. The purpose of this paper will draw a summary on the theory, clinical trials, toxicity and problems to be solved of the immunotherapies in NSCLC.

  5. A Deterministic Equivalent for the Analysis of Small Cell Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Wen, Chao-Kai; Chen, Jung-Chieh; Guo, Mei-Hui

    2011-01-01

    A general wireless channel model motivated by recent interest in cooperative small cell networks (SCNs) is considered in the current paper. In this system, several densely deployed base stations (BSs) cooperatively serve multiple user equipment (UE) with multiple transmit antennas. For the considered SCNs, correlation effects and line-of-sight components should be included, which occur due to the space limitation of UEs and the lower antenna heights, respectively. The large random matrix theory (RMT) is an efficient analytical tool to deal with such wireless channel models and to aid in the design of wireless communication systems. However, for previous studies via a large RMT, either the transmit correlation matrix is restricted to be a diagonal matrix or the propagation channel matrix is assumed to be Gaussian. The question now is how to deal with the problem when the transmit correlation matrices are non-negative definite matrices and when the channel entries are non-Gaussian. To fill this literature gap, ...

  6. Primary small cell carcinoma of skin. Histogenetical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachaza, J A; Garcia del Moral, R; López Caballero, J; Caracuel Ruiz, M; Caballero Morales, T

    1986-06-01

    Four cases of primary small cell carcinoma of the skin (PSCCS) are presented (ages ranging from 60 to 68 years). Ultrastructurally, two cell types were identified, with both presenting electron-dense secretory granules and paranuclear intermediate filaments. Argyrophylia was positive in one case. Intense solar elastosis in two cases and actinic keratosis in one case suggest a possible role from solar damage in the pathogenesis of this tumor. According to comparative ultrastructural features, different histogenetic possibilities in Merkel cells (MC), peripheral neuroblastic tissue, and totipotential cells are discussed. Some neurosecretory-like granules were observed in basal cell carcinoma (BCC). We consider that PSCCS reproduces cells similar to MC and probably originates in stem cells with totipotential capacity.

  7. Merkel cell carcinoma versus metastatic small cell primary bronchogenic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katya Lisette Velasquez Cantillo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC of the skin is a rare, aggressive, malignant neuroendocrine neoplasm. The tumor classically demonstrates positive immunohistochemistry (IHC staining for chromogranin A(ChrA, cytokeratin 20 (CK20, neuron specific enolase (NSE and/or achaete-acute complex-like 1 (MASH1. The newly identified Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV has been found to be associated with most MCC cases. The primary histologic differential diagnoses of cutaneous MCC is small cell primary bronchogenic carcinoma (SCLC; moreover, both are of neuroendocrine origin. SCLC accounts for approximately 10-15% of all primary lung cancer cases; this histologic subtype is a distinct entity with biological and oncological features distinct from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. In contradistinction to MCC, SCLC is classically IHC positive for cytokeratin 7 (CK7 and transcription factor (TTF-1. Similar to SCLC, MCC cell lines may be classified into two different biochemical subgroups designated as Classic and Variant. In our review and case report, we aim to emphasize the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to the approach to this difficult differential diagnosis. We also aim to comment about features of the cells of origin of MCC and SCLC; to summarize the microscopic features of both tumors; and to review their respective epidemiologic, clinical, prognostic and treatment features. We want to emphasize the initial workup study of the differential diagnosis patient, including evaluating clinical lymph nodes, a clinical history of any respiratory abnormality, and chest radiogram. If a diagnosis of primary cutaneous MCC is confirmed, classic treatment includes excision of the primary tumor with wide margins, excision of a sentinel lymph node, and computed tomography, positron emission tomography and/or Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scan studies

  8. Esophageal wall dose-surface maps do not improve the predictive performance of a multivariable NTCP model for acute esophageal toxicity in advanced stage NSCLC patients treated with intensity-modulated (chemo-)radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankers, Frank; Wijsman, Robin; Troost, Esther G. C.; Monshouwer, René; Bussink, Johan; Hoffmann, Aswin L.

    2017-05-01

    In our previous work, a multivariable normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) model for acute esophageal toxicity (AET) Grade  ⩾2 after highly conformal (chemo-)radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was developed using multivariable logistic regression analysis incorporating clinical parameters and mean esophageal dose (MED). Since the esophagus is a tubular organ, spatial information of the esophageal wall dose distribution may be important in predicting AET. We investigated whether the incorporation of esophageal wall dose-surface data with spatial information improves the predictive power of our established NTCP model. For 149 NSCLC patients treated with highly conformal radiation therapy esophageal wall dose-surface histograms (DSHs) and polar dose-surface maps (DSMs) were generated. DSMs were used to generate new DSHs and dose-length-histograms that incorporate spatial information of the dose-surface distribution. From these histograms dose parameters were derived and univariate logistic regression analysis showed that they correlated significantly with AET. Following our previous work, new multivariable NTCP models were developed using the most significant dose histogram parameters based on univariate analysis (19 in total). However, the 19 new models incorporating esophageal wall dose-surface data with spatial information did not show improved predictive performance (area under the curve, AUC range 0.79-0.84) over the established multivariable NTCP model based on conventional dose-volume data (AUC  =  0.84). For prediction of AET, based on the proposed multivariable statistical approach, spatial information of the esophageal wall dose distribution is of no added value and it is sufficient to only consider MED as a predictive dosimetric parameter.

  9. Treatment of small cell lung cancer with TRA-8 in combination with cisplatin and radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, James A; Willey, Christopher D; Yang, Eddy S; Dobelbower, Michael C; Sanford, Leisa L; Bright, Sheila J; Buchsbaum, Donald J; Raisch, Kevin P

    2011-10-01

    Limited stage small cell lung cancer (SCLC) represents a minority of SCLC. Despite extensive clinical trials, standard treatment remains cisplatin-based chemotherapy and thoracic irradiation (TI). This study focused on the interaction of cisplatin/radiation with the anti-human DR5 monoclonal antibody TRA-8 in SCLC cells. TRA-8 binds specifically to DR5 and has been shown to activate apoptosis. Four human SCLC cell lines were utilized for experimentation (SCLC-41, SCLC-58, SCLC-68, and SCLC-74). Immunoblot analysis was used to determine relative protein levels of DR5, DR4 and pro-caspase 8 for each cell line. Using a tetrazolium-based assay (XTT), the IC(50) values for cisplatin with or without TRA-8 were determined for the SCLC cell lines. Four SCLC lines were assayed with a combination of TRA-8 (10 μg/ml), 2 Gy radiation and various concentrations of cisplatin. Apoptosis was evaluated using Annexin V-FITC and cleaved caspase immunoblotting. Using a SCLC-58 subcutaneous xenograft model, treatment began 21 d after tumor cell injection. Treatment included weekly cisplatin (4 mg/kg) and radiation of 1 Gy (24 h after cisplatin) and TRA-8 (200 μg) was administered i.p. twice weekly for three weeks. Immunoblot analysis showed similar levels of DR5 for all cell lines with variable levels of DR4. Various concentrations of TRA-8 antibody (≤ 10 μg/ml) induced no significant cytotoxicity in the SCLC cell lines. The in vitro combination treatment with TRA-8 (10 μg/ml), 1.25 μg/ml cisplatin and 2 Gy radiation showed increased cytotoxicity when compared to combinations without TRA-8. Furthermore, the triple combination demonstrated the greatest amount of apoptosis as measured by Annexin V staining. The in vivo studies showed the combination of 1G y, cisplatin and TRA-8 extended the tumor doubling time to 44 d as compared to any doublet treatment groups that ranged from 12 to 20 d. Analysis of survival data showed 100% of the combination group (RT+cisplatin+TRA-8) were

  10. Efficacy of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Early Stage of Esophageal Carcinoma;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-30

    Esophageal Neoplasm; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T2; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Primary Tumor (T) T3; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Regional Lymph Nodes (N) N0; Esophageal Cancer TNM Staging Distal Metastasis (M) M0

  11. Distal esophageal spasm: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achem, Sami R; Gerson, Lauren B

    2013-09-01

    Distal esophageal spasm (DES) is an esophageal motility disorder that presents clinically with chest pain and/or dysphagia and is defined manometrically as simultaneous contractions in the distal (smooth muscle) esophagus in ≥20% of wet swallows (and amplitude contraction of ≥30 mmHg) alternating with normal peristalsis. With the introduction of high resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT) in 2000, the definition of DES was modified. The Chicago classification proposed that the defining criteria for DES using EPT should be the presence of at least two premature contractions (distal latencylong acting), calcium-channel blockers, anticholinergic agents, 5-phosphodiesterase inhibitors, visceral analgesics (tricyclic agents or SSRI), and esophageal dilation. Acid suppression therapy is frequently used, but clinical outcome trials to support this approach are not available. Injection of botulinum toxin in the distal esophagus may be effective, but further data regarding the development of post-injection gastroesophageal reflux need to be assessed. Heller myotomy combined with fundoplication remains an alternative for the rare refractory patient. Preliminary studies suggest that the newly developed endoscopic technique of per oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) may also be an alternative treatment modality.

  12. Esophageal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing esophageal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  13. Brain Abscess after Esophageal Dilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaïni, S; Grand, M; Michelsen, J

    2007-01-01

    with malaise, progressive lethargy, fever, aphasia and hemiparesis. Six days before she had been treated with esophageal dilatation for a stricture caused by accidental ingestion of caustic soda. The brain abscess was treated with surgery and antibiotics. She recovered completely. This clinical case...

  14. Molecular Biology of Esophageal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuanXi; JanBrabender; RalfMetzger; PaulM.Schneider

    2004-01-01

    There have been many new developments in our understanding of esophageal carcinoma biology over the past several years. Information regarding both of the major forms of this disease, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, has accumulated in conjunction with data on precursor conditions such as Barrett's esophagus. Interesting and promising findings have included overexpression of proto-oncogenes,loss of heterozygosity at multiple chromosomal loci, tumor suppressor gene inactivation, epigenetic silencing by DNA methylation, and mutations and deletions involving the tumor suppressor gene p53. Important cancer pathways, the cyclin kinase inhibitor cascade and the DNA mismatch repair process, implicated in the genesis of multiple tumor types have also been inculpated in esophageal carcinogenesis. Alterations in the p16 and p15 cyclin kinase inhibitors including point mutations and homozygous deletions have been reported in primary esophageal tumors. Further developments in the field of molecular carcinogenesis of esophageal malignancies promise to yield improvements in prevention, early detection, prognostic categorization, and perhaps gene-based therapy of this deadly disease.

  15. Radionuclide Esophageal Transit Scintigraphy in Primary Hypothyroidism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shoukat H; Madhu, Vijay P; Rather, Tanveer A; Laway, Bashir A

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aims Esophageal dysmotility is associated with gastrointestinal dysmotility in various systemic and neuroregulatory disorders. Hypothyroidism has been reported to be associated with impaired motor function in esophagus due to accumulation of glycosaminoglycan hyaluronic acid in its soft tissues, leading to changes in various contraction and relaxation parameters of esophagus, particularly in the lower esophageal sphincter. In this study we evaluated esophageal transit times in patients of primary hypothyroidism using the technique of radionuclide esophageal transit scintigraphy. Methods Thirty-one patients of primary hypothyroidism and 15 euthyroid healthy controls were evaluated for esophageal transit time using 15–20 MBq of Technetium-99m sulfur colloid diluted in 10–15 mL of drinking water. Time activity curve was generated for each study and esophageal transit time was calculated as time taken for clearance of 90% radioactive bolus from the region of interest encompassing the esophagus. Esophageal transit time of more than 10 seconds was considered as prolonged. Results Patients of primary hypothyroidism had a significantly increased mean esophageal transit time of 19.35 ± 20.02 seconds in comparison to the mean time of 8.25 ± 1.71 seconds in healthy controls (P < 0.05). Esophageal transit time improved and in some patients even normalized after treatment with thyroxine. A positive correlation (r = 0.39, P < 0.05) albeit weak existed between the serum thyroid stimulating hormone and the observed esophageal transit time. Conclusions A significant number of patients with primary hypothyroidism may have subclinical esophageal dysmotility with prolonged esophageal transit time which can be reversible by thyroxine treatment. Prolonged esophageal transit time in primary hypothyroidism may correlate with serum thyroid stimulating hormone levels. PMID:27444283

  16. Clinical Study of Time Optimizing of Endoscopic Photodynamic Therapy on Esophageal and/or Gastric Cardiac Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Stage I Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Adenocarcinoma; Stage I Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage II Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  17. Acute myelocytic leukemia and plasmacytoma secondary to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in a long-term survivor of small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukunishi, Keiichi; Kurokawa, Teruo; Takeshita, Atsushi [Osaka Medical Coll., Takatsuki (Japan)] [and others

    1999-05-01

    A 68 year-old man was given a diagnosis of lung cancer of the right upper lobe (small cell carcinoma, T 4 N 2 M 0, stage IIIB) in February 1991. The tumor diminished after chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In February 1992, a partial resection of the lower lobe of the right lung was performed because of the appearance of a metastatic tumor. In September 1994, squamous cell carcinoma developed in the lower part of the esophagus, but disappeared after radiotherapy. In February 1998, a diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome was made. Two months later, the patient had an attack of acute myelocytic leukemia and died of cardiac tamponade. An autopsy determined that both the lung cancer and esophageal cancer had disappeared. Acute myelocytic leukemia and plasmacytoma of lymph nodes in the irradiated area were confirmed. These were regarded as secondary malignancies induced by chemotherapy and radiotherapy. (author)

  18. A Meta Analysis of Radiosensitivity on Non-small Cell Lung Cancer 
by Metronidazole Amino Acidum Natrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei REN

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The efficacy and safety of radiosensitivity on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC using metronidazole amino acidum natrium (CMNa are yet to be proven. This study evaluates the efficacy and safety of radiosensitivity on NSCLC by CMNa to provide references for further clinical practice and research. Methods Relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs were obtained from the Cochrane library, Pubmed, EMbase, CBM, CNKI, VIP, and Wan Fang databases. Dates were searched through other means. RCTs of radiosensitivity on NSCLC by CMNa were included. The data included in the study were evaluated and analyzed using the Cochrane Collaboration's RevMan 5.1 software. Results A total of 21 RCTs were included. The results of the meta-analyses showed that the total effective rate of the test group that received CMNa plus radiotherapy was higher than that of the control group that received radiotherapy alone (OR=3.29, 95%CI: 2.47-4.39, P<0.000,01 or radiotherapy plus placebo (OR=3.65, 95%CI: 2.25-5.92, P<0.000,01, respectively. No significant differences were found in the quality of life between one and two-year survival rates (P>0.05. No significant differences were found among radiation pneumonitis, radiation esophagitis, hematological toxicity, and cardiotoxicity (P>0.05. Conclusion CMNa plus radiotherapy elicit beneficial effects in the treatment of NSCLC and produce fewer adverse effects. Therefore, this technique can be recommended and applied in clinics.

  19. Clinical Research on Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baolin Yuan; Tao Zhang; Jianqi Luo; Liang Zhang; Suqun Chen; Lina Yang; Yong Wu; Yuying Ma

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the clinical efficacy and toxic effect of the 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).METHODS Fifty-two patients with the Stage-I and W NSCLC were treated with 3DCRT. Cross analysis of the clinical data was conducted in the comparison between the 52 cases with 3DCRT and the other 50 cases with the conventional radiation therapy (CRT). In the 3DCRT group, only the primary tumor and positive lymph-node draining area were included in the clinical target area, setting 4 to 6 coplanar or non-coplanar irradiation fields, with 2 Gy or 3 Gy/fraction, 1 fraction a day and 5 fractions per week.The total dose ranged from a test dose (DT) of 66 Gy to 72 Gy. In the CRT group, the field area contained the primary tumor plus the homolateral hilum of the lung, the mediastinum superior or hol-mediastinum, and opposed anteroposterior irradiation. When the dosage reached DT 36~40 Gy, an oblique portal administered radiation was conducted in order to avoid injuring the spinal cord.The DT was 1.8~2.0 Gy/fraction, 1 fraction a day, 5 fractions per week, with a total dose of 60 Gy to 70 Gy.RESULTS The therapeutic effect (CR + PR) was 90.4% in the 3DCRT group, and was 72% in the CRT group. There was statistically significant difference between the two groups, P 0.05. The toxic reaction was 12.5% and 23.7% respectively in the 3DCRT and CRT groups.Acute radioactive esophagitis and leucopenia were markedly lower in the 3DCRT group than in the CRT group. There was a statistically significant difference between the groups, P <0.05. Notoxic reaction of Stage-Ⅲ and over was found in the 3DCRT group during radiation therapy.CONCLUSION The 3DCRT method has a satisfactory short-term efficacy and improvement of clinical symptoms in treating NSCLC, with a mild toxic reaction and good tolerance in patients.It can be used for enhancing the tumor-control rate and bettering the quality of life.

  20. NASA Alternative Orion Small Cell Battery Design Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Chuck

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Orion Crew Module Reference Design was produced to address large scale thermal runaway (TR) hazard with specific safety controls for the Orion Spacecraft. The design presented provides the description of a full scale battery design reference for implementation as a drop in replacement to meet all spacecraft energy requirements with compatible 120 Vdc electrical and mechanical interface using small cell technology (18650) packaging. The 32V SuperBrick incorporates unique support features and an electrical bus bar arrangement that allows cells negative can insertion into heat sink that is compressively coupled to the battery enclosure to promote good thermal management. The housing design also provides an internal flame suppression "filter tray" and positive venting path internal to the enclosure to allow hot effluent ejecta to escape in the event of single cell TR. Virtual cells (14P Banks) that are supported to provide cell spacing with interstitial materials to prevent side can failures that can produce cell to cell TR propagation. These features were successfully test in four separate TR run with the full scale DTA1 test article in February 2016. Successfully Completed Test Objectives - Four separate TR test runs with Full-Scale DTA1 housing with Two SuperBricks, Two SuperBrick Emulators All Tests resulted in "clean" gas with less than 6 C rise at Battery vent All Tests resulted in less than 2 C temperature rise on cold-plate outlet All Tests resulted in less than 6 psi pressure rise in the battery housing Test Run 1 -One neighbor cell TR, highest remaining neighbor 139 C. Ejecta shorted to bus caused prolonged additional heating, One shorted cell did experience TR after 12 minutes, remaining cells had adequate thermal margin Test Run 2 - No cell to cell propagation, highest neighbor cell 112 C; Test Run 3 - No cell to cell propagation, highest neighbor cell 96 C; Test Run 4 - No cell to cell propagation, highest neighbor cell 101 C; Primary TR testing

  1. Therapeutic vaccines in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Socola F

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Francisco Socola,1 Naomi Scherfenberg,2 Luis E Raez3 1Division of Hematology/Oncology, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Leonard M Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA; 2University of Miami Leonard M Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA; 3Thoracic Oncology Program, Memorial Cancer Institute, Memorial Health Care System, Pembroke Pines, Florida, USA Abstract: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC unfortunately carries a very poor prognosis. Patients usually do not become symptomatic, and therefore do not seek treatment, until the cancer is advanced and it is too late to employ curative treatment options. New therapeutic options are urgently needed for NSCLC, because even current targeted therapies cure very few patients. Active immunotherapy is an option that is gaining more attention. A delicate and complex interplay exists between the tumor and the immune system. Solid tumors utilize a variety of mechanisms to evade immune detection. However, if the immune system can be stimulated to recognize the tumor as foreign, tumor cells can be specifically eliminated with little systemic toxicity. A number of vaccines designed to boost immunity against NSCLC are currently undergoing investigation in phase III clinical trials. Belagenpumatucel-L, an allogeneic cell vaccine that decreases transforming growth factor (TGF-β in the tumor microenvironment, releases the immune suppression caused by the tumor and it has shown efficacy in a wide array of patients with advanced NSCLC. Melanoma-associated antigen A3 (MAGE-A3, an antigen-based vaccine, has shown promising results in MAGE-A3+ NSCLC patients who have undergone complete surgical resection. L-BLP25 and TG4010 are both antigenic vaccines that target the Mucin 1 protein (MUC-1, a proto-oncogene that is commonly mutated in solid tumors. CIMAVax is a recombinant human epidermal growth factor (EGF vaccine that induces anti-EGF antibody production and prevents EGF

  2. The Changing Face of Esophageal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Melhado

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The two main histological esophageal cancer types, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, differ in incidence, geographic distribution, ethnic pattern and etiology. This article focuses on epidemiology with particular reference to geographic and temporal variations in incidence, along with a review of the evidence supporting environmental and genetic factors involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus remains predominantly a disease of the developing world. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma is mainly a disease of western developed societies, associated with obesity and gastro-esophageal reflux disease. There has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma in developed countries in parallel with migration of both esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas towards the gastro-esophageal junction.

  3. The Changing Face of Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melhado, Rachel E., E-mail: raye732001@yahoo.co.uk; Alderson, Derek; Tucker, Olga [Academic Department of Surgery, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospitals Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-28

    The two main histological esophageal cancer types, adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, differ in incidence, geographic distribution, ethnic pattern and etiology. This article focuses on epidemiology with particular reference to geographic and temporal variations in incidence, along with a review of the evidence supporting environmental and genetic factors involved in esophageal carcinogenesis. Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus remains predominantly a disease of the developing world. In contrast, esophageal adenocarcinoma is mainly a disease of western developed societies, associated with obesity and gastro-esophageal reflux disease. There has been a dramatic increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma in developed countries in parallel with migration of both esophageal and gastric adenocarcinomas towards the gastro-esophageal junction.

  4. Small cell lung cancer: where do we go from here?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Lauren Averett; Rudin, Charles M

    2015-03-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive disease that accounts for approximately 14% of all lung cancers. In the United States, approximately 31,000 patients are diagnosed annually with SCLC. Despite numerous clinical trials, including at least 40 phase 3 trials since the 1970s, systemic treatment for patients with SCLC has not changed significantly in the past several decades. Consequently, the 5-year survival rate remains low at <7% overall, and most patients survive for only 1 year or less after diagnosis. Unlike nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC), in which major advances have been made using targeted therapies, there are still no approved targeted drugs for SCLC. Significant barriers to progress in SCLC include 1) a lack of early detection modalities, 2) limited tumor tissue for translational research (eg, molecular profiling of DNA, RNA, and/or protein alterations) because of small diagnostic biopsies and the rare use of surgical resection in standard treatment, and 3) rapid disease progression with poor understanding of the mechanisms contributing to therapeutic resistance. In this report, the authors review the current state of SCLC treatment, recent advances in current understanding of the underlying disease biology, and opportunities to advance translational research and therapeutic approaches for patients with SCLC.

  5. Comprehensive genomic profiles of small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Julie; Lim, Jing Shan; Jang, Se Jin; Cun, Yupeng; Ozretić, Luka; Kong, Gu; Leenders, Frauke; Lu, Xin; Fernández-Cuesta, Lynnette; Bosco, Graziella; Müller, Christian; Dahmen, Ilona; Jahchan, Nadine S.; Park, Kwon-Sik; Yang, Dian; Karnezis, Anthony N.; Vaka, Dedeepya; Torres, Angela; Wang, Maia Segura; Korbel, Jan O.; Menon, Roopika; Chun, Sung-Min; Kim, Deokhoon; Wilkerson, Matt; Hayes, Neil; Engelmann, David; Pützer, Brigitte; Bos, Marc; Michels, Sebastian; Vlasic, Ignacija; Seidel, Danila; Pinther, Berit; Schaub, Philipp; Becker, Christian; Altmüller, Janine; Yokota, Jun; Kohno, Takashi; Iwakawa, Reika; Tsuta, Koji; Noguchi, Masayuki; Muley, Thomas; Hoffmann, Hans; Schnabel, Philipp A.; Petersen, Iver; Chen, Yuan; Soltermann, Alex; Tischler, Verena; Choi, Chang-min; Kim, Yong-Hee; Massion, Pierre P.; Zou, Yong; Jovanovic, Dragana; Kontic, Milica; Wright, Gavin M.; Russell, Prudence A.; Solomon, Benjamin; Koch, Ina; Lindner, Michael; Muscarella, Lucia A.; la Torre, Annamaria; Field, John K.; Jakopovic, Marko; Knezevic, Jelena; Castaños-Vélez, Esmeralda; Roz, Luca; Pastorino, Ugo; Brustugun, Odd-Terje; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Thunnissen, Erik; Köhler, Jens; Schuler, Martin; Botling, Johan; Sandelin, Martin; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Salvesen, Helga B.; Achter, Viktor; Lang, Ulrich; Bogus, Magdalena; Schneider, Peter M.; Zander, Thomas; Ansén, Sascha; Hallek, Michael; Wolf, Jürgen; Vingron, Martin; Yatabe, Yasushi; Travis, William D.; Nürnberg, Peter; Reinhardt, Christian; Perner, Sven; Heukamp, Lukas; Büttner, Reinhard; Haas, Stefan A.; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Peifer, Martin; Sage, Julien; Thomas, Roman K.

    2016-01-01

    We have sequenced the genomes of 110 small cell lung cancers (SCLC), one of the deadliest human cancers. In nearly all the tumours analysed we found bi-allelic inactivation of TP53 and RB1, sometimes by complex genomic rearrangements. Two tumours with wild-type RB1 had evidence of chromothripsis leading to overexpression of cyclin D1 (encoded by the CCND1 gene), revealing an alternative mechanism of Rb1 deregulation. Thus, loss of the tumour suppressors TP53 and RB1 is obligatory in SCLC. We discovered somatic genomic rearrangements of TP73 that create an oncogenic version of this gene, TP73Δex2/3. In rare cases, SCLC tumours exhibited kinase gene mutations, providing a possible therapeutic opportunity for individual patients. Finally, we observed inactivating mutations in NOTCH family genes in 25% of human SCLC. Accordingly, activation of Notch signalling in a pre-clinical SCLC mouse model strikingly reduced the number of tumours and extended the survival of the mutant mice. Furthermore, neuroendocrine gene expression was abrogated by Notch activity in SCLC cells. This first comprehensive study of somatic genome alterations in SCLC uncovers several key biological processes and identifies candidate therapeutic targets in this highly lethal form of cancer. PMID:26168399

  6. Paraneoplastic neurologic disorders in small cell lung carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhall, Mark; Chapman, Caroline; Nibber, Anjan; Waters, Patrick; Vincent, Angela; Lang, Bethan; Maddison, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency and range of paraneoplastic neurologic disorders (PNDs) and neuronal antibodies in small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). Methods: Two hundred sixty-four consecutive patients with biopsy-proven SCLC were recruited at the time of tumor diagnosis. All patients underwent full neurologic examination. Serum samples were taken prior to chemotherapy and analyzed for 15 neuronal antibodies. Thirty-eight healthy controls were analyzed in parallel. Results: PNDs were quite prevalent (n = 24, 9.4%), most frequently Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (3.8%), sensory neuronopathy (1.9%), and limbic encephalitis (1.5%). Eighty-seven percent of all patients with PNDs had antibodies to SOX2 (62.5%), HuD (41.7%), or P/Q VGCC (50%), irrespective of their syndrome. Other neuronal antibodies were found at lower frequencies (GABAb receptor [12.5%] and N-type VGCC [20.8%]) or very rarely (GAD65, amphiphysin, Ri, CRMP5, Ma2, Yo, VGKC complex, CASPR2, LGI1, and NMDA receptor [all <5%]). Conclusions: The spectrum of PNDs is broader and the frequency is higher than previously appreciated, and selected antibody tests (SOX2, HuD, VGCC) can help determine the presence of an SCLC. PMID:26109714

  7. Research progress in the treatment of small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yan-fang; Liu, Zhi-gang; Yang, Wen-juan; Zhao, Yu; Tang, Jiao; Tang, Wei-zhi; Jin, Yi; Li, Fang; Zhong, Rui; Wang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounts for approximately 10-15% of all lung cancers. No significant improvement has been made for patients with SCLC in the past several decades. The main progresses were the thoracic radiation and prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) that improved the patient survival rate. For patients with limited disease and good performance status (PS), concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) followed by PCI should be considered. For extensive disease, the combination of etoposide and platinum-based chemotherapy remains the standard treatment and consolidative thoracic radiotherapy is beneficial for patients who have a significant respond to initial chemotherapy. However, the prognosis still remains poor. Recently, efforts have been focused on molecular targets and immunotherapy. But numerous molecular targets methods have failed to show a significant clinical benefit in patients with SCLC. It is anticipated that further development of research will depend on the on-going trials for molecular targeted therapy and immunotherapy which are promising and may improve the outcomes for SCLC in the next decade.

  8. Bilateral Choroidal Metastasis from Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Namad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast and lung cancers are the most common primary neoplasms to manifest with choroidal metastases. The incidence of choroidal metastases from metastatic lung cancer was reported to be 2–6.7%. We report a case of bilateral choroidal metastasis from non-small cell lung cancer. A 59-year-old Caucasian female patient, never a smoker, was diagnosed with stage IV lung adenocarcinoma metastatic to the pleura, bones, and the brain. Her initial scan of the chest showed innumerable soft tissue nodules and mediastinal adenopathy compatible with metastatic disease. Her initial brain MRI showed numerous small enhancing lesions consistent with extensive disease. Unfortunately, during her follow-up visits, she presented with bulge on her left eye. Simultaneously, her follow-up chest scan showed increase in the size of the lung nodules. She continued to have a reasonable performance status at that time, except for mild increase in her dyspnea. The choroidal metastases require a multidisciplinary care and should be among the differential patients with malignancy who present with ocular symptoms.

  9. Cetuximab and biomarkers in non-small-cell lung carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil N

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitin Patil, Mohammed Abba, Heike AllgayerDepartment of Experimental Surgery, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg and Molecular Oncology of Solid Tumors Unit, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ, Heidelberg, GermanyAbstract: Cancer progression is a highly complex process that is driven by a constellation of deregulated signaling pathways and key molecular events. In non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC, as in several other cancer types, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and its downstream signaling components represent a key axis that has been found not only to trigger cancer progression but also to support advanced disease leading to metastasis. Two major therapeutic approaches comprising monoclonal antibodies and small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors have so far been used to target this pathway, with a combination of positive, negative, and inconsequential results, as judged by patient survival indices. Since these drugs are expensive and not all patients derive benefits from taking them, it has become both pertinent and paramount to identify biomarkers that can predict not only beneficial response but also resistance. This review focuses on the chimeric monoclonal antibody, cetuximab, its application in the treatment of NSCLC, and the biomarkers that may guide its use in the clinical setting. A special emphasis is placed on the EGFR, including its structural and mechanistic attributes.Keywords: NSCLC, cetuximab, biomarker, cancer progression

  10. Unexpected esophageal diseases appeared in thyroid resections

    OpenAIRE

    Ye-huan, Liu; Shi-xu, Lyu; Yi-li, Zhou; Ou-chen, Wang; Xiao-hua, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective In order to avoid the misdiagnosis of thyroid diseases, we need to discuss the clinical features and diagnostic methods of cervical esophageal cancer and Zenker’s diverticulum. Methods The clinical and laboratory data of seven cases were reviewed retrospectively, and in all cases, esophageal-related diseases were misdiagnosed as thyroid diseases preoperatively. Among them, two cases were cervical esophageal cancer metastasized to thyroids but initially, they were misdiagnosed as thy...

  11. Oral blastomycosis, laryngeal papillomatosis and esophageal tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Montoya, Manuel; Hospital Regional del Cusco. Cusco, Perú. Universidad Nacional de San Antonio Abad del Cusco. Cusco, Perú. Médico infectólogo.; Chumbiraico, Robert; Hospital Regional del Cusco. Cusco, Perú. Universidad Nacional de San Antonio Abad del Cusco. Cusco, Perú. médico internista.; Ricalde, Melvin; Hospital Regional del Cusco. Cusco, Perú. Universidad Nacional de San Antonio Abad del Cusco. Cusco, Perú. médico neumólogo.; Cazorla, Ernesto; Hospital Regional del Cusco. Cusco, Perú. Universidad Nacional de San Antonio Abad del Cusco. Cusco, Perú. médico gastroenterólogo.; Hernández-Córdova, Gustavo; Universidad Nacional de San Antonio Abad del Cusco. Cusco, Perú. Estudiante de medicina.

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal involvement is an extremely rare complication of tuberculosis even in countries with high prevalence of infection. We report the case of a 57 year-old hiv-seronegative patient with simultaneous diagnoses of oral blastomycosis and laryngeal papillomatosis. Both were confirmed by anatomopathological analysis. The esophageal biopsy revealed granulomatous esophagitis with necrosis and ziehl–neelsen stain showed acid-fast alcohol resistant bacilli suggestive of tuberculosis. The pat...

  12. Gemcitabine concurrent with thoracic radiotherapy after induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine/vinorelbine in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. A phase I study

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    Gagel, B.; Piroth, M.; Pinkawa, M.; Fischedik, K.; Asadpour, B.; Schmachtenberg, A.; Eble, M.J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Reinartz, P.; Zimny, M.; Buell, U. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Stanzel, S. [Inst. for Medical Statistics, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Breuer, C.; Skobel, E. [Dept. of Internal Medicine I, RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2006-05-15

    Purpose: to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of gemcitabine every 2 weeks to a concurrent radiotherapy administered during an aggressive program of sequential and simultaneous radio-/chemotherapy for locally advanced, unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and methods: ten patients with histologically confirmed NSCLC were observed and treated in accordance with a combined radio-/chemotherapy protocol. This included two cycles of induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine (1,200 mg/m{sup 2}) and vinorelbine (30 mg/m{sup 2}) at days 1, 8 and 22, 29, followed by concurrent radiotherapy including [{sup 18}F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-(FDG-PET-) based target volume definition (2.0 Gy/d; total dose 66.0 Gy) and chemotherapy with gemcitabine every 2 weeks at days 43, 57, and 71. The initial dose was 300 mg/m{sup 2}. The dose of gemcitabine was increased by 100 mg/m{sup 2} until the MTD was realized. Three patients were enrolled for each dose level. Results: dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was identified for the patient group receiving gemcitabine 500 mg/m{sup 2}, due to grade 2 esophagitis (next to grade 3) in all patients. 6 weeks after the completion of radio-/chemotherapy, most patients still presented treatment-induced esophagitis. In accordance with expected complications, such as esophagitis, dysphagia and odynophagia, the MTD was defined at this dose level, although no DLT grade 3 was reached. Conclusion: after induction chemotherapy, the MTD and frequency of gemcitabine in locally advanced NSCLC is 500 mg/m{sup 2} every 2 weeks during a maximum of 7 weeks of thoracic radiotherapy. (orig.)

  13. Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis Followed by Duodenal Necrosis.

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    Del Hierro, Piedad Magdalena

    2011-12-01

    Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis is an uncommon pathology, characterized by endoscopic finding of diffuse black coloration in esophageal mucosa and histological presence of necrosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The first case of acute necrotizing esophagitis followed by duodenal necrosis, in 81 years old woman with a positive history of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, and usual intake of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs, is reported. Although its etiology remains unknown, the duodenal necrosis suggests that ischemia could be the main cause given that the branches off the celiac axis provide common blood supply to the distal esophageal and duodenal tissue. The massive gastroesophagic reflux and NSAID intake could be involved.

  14. Doxycycline-induced ulceration mimicking esophageal cancer

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    Tahan, Veysel; Sayrak, Hakan; Bayar, Nevzat; Erer, Burak; Tahan, Gulgun; Dane, Faysal

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Doxycycline-induced esophageal ulcer patients are mostly young persons with no history of esophageal dysfunction. Heartburn, midsternal pain and dysphagia are the most common symptoms. It has generally a benign course. The present case is the first report of doxycycline-induced extensive ulcerations, mimicking esophageal cancer in two esophageal segments alongside, in the literature. Case presentation This report describes a 16-year-old Caucasian girl who, while taking doxycycline capsules100 mg twice a day for acne vulgaris for 3 months, developed these symptoms. An upper endoscopy revealed multiple circumferential deep ulcerations surrounding fragile, irregular, hyperemic and hypertrophic mucosa at the level of the mid-esophagus and concomitantly in the lower esophageal sphincter. The lesions were biopsied to exclude esophageal carcinoma because of the suspicious appearance in the endoscopic examination. The histopathological examination, haematoxylin and eosin stained sections showed ulceration with a mixed inflammatory infiltrate. Doxycycline was discontinued and she was given sucralfate 1 g qid and omeprazole 20 mg bid orally. All symptoms of the patient were resolved on the third day of the treatment. After 4 weeks of the therapy, an upper endoscopic control examination demonstrated normal findings. Conclusion The present case has been an uncommon presentation of doxycycline-induced extensive ulcerations, mimicking esophageal cancer in two esophageal segments, concomitantly. Even the lesions were biopsied to exclude esophageal carcinoma. A modification on the behavior of taking drugs can prevent these unpleasant complications. PMID:18778470

  15. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal achalasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luigi Bonavina

    2006-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is the most commonly diagnosed primary esophageal motor disorder and the second most common functional esophageal disorder. Current therapy of achalasia is directed toward elimination of the outflow resistance caused by failure of the lower esophageal sphincter to relax completely upon swallowing. The advent of minimally invasive surgery has nearly replaced endoscopic pneumatic dilation as the first-line therapeutic approach. In this editorial, the rationale and the evidence supporting the use of laparoscopic Heller myotomy combined with fundoplication as a primary treatment of achalasia are reviewed.

  16. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-05-06

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted.

  17. Laboratory animal models for esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanya Venugopalan Nair

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of esophageal cancer is rapidly increasing especially in developing countries. The major risk factors include unhealthy lifestyle practices such as alcohol consumption, smoking, and chewing tobacco to name a few. Diagnosis at an advanced stage and poor prognosis make esophageal cancer one of the most lethal diseases. These factors have urged further research in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease. Animal models not only aid in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of esophageal cancer but also help in developing therapeutic interventions for the disease. This review throws light on the various recent laboratory animal models for esophageal cancer.

  18. Prevalence of lung abnormalities in 55 patients with esophageal cancer; Prevalencia de achados pulmonares em 55 pacientes com neoplasias esofagianas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zan, Tiago Alves de Brito; Cordeiro, Jose Antonio [Faculdade de Medicina do Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil); Franca, Fabricio Correa de [Hospital de Base de Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia; Muniz, Marcos Pontes [Fundacao Faculdade Regional de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FUNFARME), SP (Brazil). Servico de Radiologia; Borim, Aldenis Albenese [Fundacao Faculdade Regional de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FUNFARME), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Cirurgia; Cury, Patricia Maluf [Fundacao Faculdade Regional de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FUNFARME), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Patologia]. E-mail: pmcury@famerp.br

    2001-02-01

    The objective was to identify lung abnormalities in patients with esophageal cancer, to compare the obtained data and to demonstrate its relationship with smoking. This was a series of cases type of cross-sectional study. We studied 55 patients with esophageal carcinoma diagnosed between 1998 and 2001 at Hospital de Base de Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil. Chest plain films and computed tomography scans were analyzed. The frequency of the tumors and other lung abnormalities in two groups of patients were compared: smokers and non-smokers. The results showed that forty-six (83%) patients had spinous cell carcinoma, seven (13%) adenocarcinomas, one (2%) carcinoma of small cells and one (2%) non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Forty-eight (87%) patients were smokers and seven (13%) were non-smokers. In the smokers group, 89% had spinous cell carcinoma, 9% adenocarcinoma and 2% small cells carcinoma. In the non-smokers group, 57% had adenocarcinoma, 28% spinous cell carcinoma and 15% non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Metastases were identified in four smokers and in two non-smokers. The prevalence of the lung abnormalities (interstitial infiltration, emphysema and pneumonia) was higher in the smokers group (73%) than in the non-smokers group (27%) (p = 0.03). We concluded that this fact reinforces the importance of evaluation of the lungs in patients with esophageal neoplasms. (author)

  19. Small Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Urinary Tract Successfully Managed with Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mustapha Ahsaini; Omar Riyach; Mohammed Fadl Tazi; Mohammed Jamal El Fassi; My Hassan Farih; Hind Elfatmi; Afaf Amarti

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Small cell neuroendocrine carcinomas of the urinary tract is an extremely rare entity and very few cases have been reported in the literature. Small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the urinary tract (SCC-UT) is the association between bladder and urinary upper tract-small cell carcinoma (UUT-SCC). It characterized by an aggressive clinical course. The prognosis is poor due to local or distant metastases, and usually the muscle of the bladder is invaded. Case Presentation. We...

  20. Pradaxa-induced esophageal ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Michele; Shaw, Paul

    2015-10-09

    Pradaxa (dabigatran) is a direct thrombin inhibitor approved for prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. We describe a case of esophageal ulceration associated with Pradaxa administration in a 75-year-old man. The patient reported difficulty swallowing and a burning sensation after taking his first dose of Pradaxa. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) revealed linear ulcerations in the mid-esophagus. Pradaxa was held beginning the day before the EGD. The patient reported that his pain and difficulty swallowing resolved on stopping Pradaxa. Pradaxa is formulated with a tartaric acid excipient to reduce variability in absorption. We hypothesise that the capsule lodged in the patient's esophagus and the tartaric acid may have caused local damage resulting in an esophageal ulcer. It is important to educate patients on proper administration of Pradaxa, to decrease the risk of this rare, but potentially serious adverse event.

  1. Pure primary small cell carcinoma of urinary bladder: A rare diagnostic entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Gon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small cell carcinoma of the bladder is a rare, aggressive, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasm accounting for only 0.3-0.7% of all bladder tumors. Since the tumor is very rare, pathogenesis is uncertain. Small cell carcinomas of the urinary bladder are mixed with classic urothelial carcinomas or adenocarcinomas of the bladder in 68% cases, making pure primary small cell carcinoma even a rarer entity. The unknown etiology and natural history of small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder represent a challenge both to the pathologist and urologists for its diagnosis and treatment, respectively.

  2. Selectins mediate small cell lung cancer systemic metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Heidemann

    Full Text Available Metastasis formation is the major reason for the extremely poor prognosis in small cell lung cancer (SCLC patients. The molecular interaction partners regulating metastasis formation in SCLC are largely unidentified, however, from other tumor entities it is known that tumor cells use the adhesion molecules of the leukocyte adhesion cascade to attach to the endothelium at the site of the future metastasis. Using the human OH-1 SCLC line as a model, we found that these cells expressed E- and P-selectin binding sites, which could be in part attributed to the selectin binding carbohydrate motif sialyl Lewis A. In addition, protein backbones known to carry these glycotopes in other cell lines including PSGL-1, CD44 and CEA could be detected in in vitro and in vivo grown OH1 SCLC cells. By intravital microscopy of murine mesenterial vasculature we could capture SCLC cells while rolling along vessel walls demonstrating that SCLC cells mimic leukocyte rolling behavior in terms of selectin and selectin ligand interaction in vivo indicating that this mechanism might indeed be important for SCLC cells to seed distant metastases. Accordingly, formation of spontaneous distant metastases was reduced by 50% when OH-1 cells were xenografted into E-/P-selectin-deficient mice compared with wild type mice (p = 0.0181. However, as metastasis formation was not completely abrogated in selectin deficient mice, we concluded that this adhesion cascade is redundant and that other molecules of this cascade mediate metastasis formation as well. Using several of these adhesion molecules as interaction partners presumably make SCLC cells so highly metastatic.

  3. Afatinib treatment in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurwitz JL

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Jane L Hurwitz, Paula Scullin, Lynn CampbellDepartment of Medical Oncology, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast, UKAbstract: Despite some recent advances in the management of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, prognosis for these patients remains poor. Small molecule epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs have however provided a new therapeutic option in this disease setting and EGFR mutation testing is now routine practice for newly diagnosed NSCLC patients. A proportion of patients will not respond to first-generation EGFR-TKIs however, and those who do will ultimately develop resistance and disease relapse. Next-generation EGFR-TKIs which inhibit multiple members of the EGFR family are being developed in order to increase sensitivity and overcome resistance to existing agents. Afatinib (BIBW 2992 is an oral, irreversible inhibitor of EGFR and HER2 tyrosine kinases and is the most advanced of these agents in clinical development. Pre-clinical and early-phase clinical trials have demonstrated a favorable safety profile as a single agent and in combination with other anti-cancer agents, and provide evidence of clinical activity in advanced NSCLC. The LUX-Lung trials suggest that for selected patients, afatinib offers symptomatic improvement and prolonged progression-free survival, although this has not yet translated into improved overall survival. This article aims to review the use of EGFR-TKIs in the management of advanced NSCLC and the mechanisms underlying resistance to these agents. We will discuss the current pre-clinical and clinical data regarding afatinib, its potential to overcome resistance to first-generation TKIs, and its emerging role in advanced NSCLC treatment.Keywords: EGFR, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, mutation, LUX-lung

  4. Non-Small Cell Carcinoma Biomarker Testing: The Pathologist's Perspective.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eBrega

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Biomarker testing has become standard of care for patients diagnosed with non-small cell lung cancer. Although it can be successfully performed in circulating tu-mor cells, at present, the vast majority of investigations are carried out using di-rect tumor sampling, either through aspiration methods, which render most often isolated cells, or tissue sampling, that could range from minute biopsies to large resections. Consequently, pathologists play a central role in this process. Recent evidence suggests that refining NSCLC diagnosis might be clinically signifi-cant, particularly in cases of lung adenocarcinomas (ADC, which in turn, has prompted a new proposal for the histologic classification of such pulmonary neo-plasms. These changes, in conjunction with the mandatory incorporation of biomarker testing in routine NSCLC tissue processing, have directly affected the pathologist’s role in lung cancer work-up. This new role pathologists must play is complex and demanding, and requires a close interaction with surgeons, oncologists, radiologists and molecular pathologists. Pathologists often find themselves as the central figure in the coordination of a process, that involves assuring that the tumor samples are properly fixed, but without disruption of the DNA structure, obtaining the proper diagnosis with a minimum of tissue waste, providing pre-analytical evaluation of tumor samples selected for biomarker testing, which includes assessment of the proportion of tumor to normal tissues, as well as cell viability, and assuring that this entire pro-cess happens in a timely fashion. Therefore, it is part of the pathologist’s respon-sibilities to assure that the samples received in their laboratories, be processed in a manner that allows for optimal biomarker testing. This article goal is to discuss the essential role pathologists must play NSCLC bi-omarker testing, as well as to provide a summarized review of the main NSCLC bi-omarkers of

  5. Neonatal and pediatric esophageal perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentea, Rebecca M; St Peter, Shawn D

    2017-04-01

    Esophageal perforation (EP) is a rare complication that is often iatrogenic in origin. In contrast with adult patients in whom surgical closure of the defect is preferred, nonoperative treatment has become a common therapeutic approach for EP in neonates and children. Principles of management pediatric EP includes rapid diagnosis, appropriate hemodynamic monitoring and support, antibiotic therapy, total parenteral nutrition, control of extraluminal contamination, and restoration of luminal integrity either through time or operative approaches. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Vitiligo associated with esophageal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asilian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vitiligo is a disease that results in depigmented areas in the skin. It may develop at any age but the average age at onset is 20 years. Association of vitiligo and melanoma has been commonly reported, but malignancies other than melanoma have been rarely associated with vitiligo. We report a 73-year-old patient with new onset vitiligo who developed esophageal adenocarcinoma in the following years.

  7. Optimal lymphadenectomy for esophageal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oezcelik, A

    2013-08-01

    Recently published data have shown that an extended lymphadenectomy during the en bloc esophagectomy leads to a significant increased long-term survival for esophageal adenocarcinoma. On the other hand some studies indicate that the increased survival is based on stage migration and that the surgical complication rate is increased after extended lymphadenectomy. The aim of this review was to give an overview about all aspects of an extended lymphadenectomy in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. The review of the literature shows clearly that the number of involved lymph nodes is an independent prognostic factor in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma. Furthermore, an extended lymphadenectomy leads to an increased long-term survival. Some studies describe that 23 lymph nodes should be removed to predict survival; other studies 18 lymph nodes or 15 lymph nodes. Opponents indicate that the survival benefit is based on stage migration. The studies with a large study population have performed a Cox regression analyzes and identified the number of lymph nodes removed as an independent factor for improved survival, which means it is significant independently from other parameters. Under these circumstances is stage migration not an option to explain the survival benefit. An important difficulty is, that there is no standardized definition of an extended lymphadenectomy, which means the localization and number of removed lymph nodes differ depending from the performing centre. The controversies regarding the survival benefit of the lymphadenectomy is based on the lack of standardisation of the lymphadenectomy. The main goal of further studies should be to generate a clear definition of an extended lymphadenectomy in patients with esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  8. Current knowledge on esophageal atresia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paulo Fernando Martins Pinheiro; Ana Cristina Sim(o)es e Silva; Regina Maria Pereira

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal atresia (EA) with or without tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) is the most common congenital anomaly of the esophagus.The improvement of survival observed over the previous two decades is multifactorial and largely attributable to advances in neonatal intensive care,neonatal anesthesia,ventilatory and nutritional support,antibiotics,early surgical intervention,surgical materials and techniques.Indeed,mortality is currently limited to those cases with coexisting severe life-threatening anomalies.The diagnosis of EA is most commonly made during the first 24 h of life but may occur either antenatally or may be delayed.The primary surgical correction for EA and TEF is the best option in the absence of severe malformations.There is no ideal replacement for the esophagus and the optimal surgical treatment for patients with long-gap EA is still controversial.The primary complications during the postoperative period are leak and stenosis of the anastomosis,gastro-esophageal reflux,esophageal dysmotility,fistula recurrence,respiratory disorders and deformities of the thoracic wall.Data regarding long-term outcomes and follow-ups are limited for patients following EA/TEF repair.The determination of the risk factors for the complicated evolution following EA/TEF repair may positively impact long-term prognoses.Much remains to be studied regarding this condition.This manuscript provides a literature review of the current knowledge regarding EA.

  9. Additional Survival Benefit of Involved-Lesion Radiation Therapy After R-CHOP Chemotherapy in Limited Stage Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jeanny [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Il Han, E-mail: ihkim@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Medical Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byoung Hyuck [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Min; Heo, Dae Seog [Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of involved-lesion radiation therapy (ILRT) after rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) chemotherapy in limited stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) by comparing outcomes of R-CHOP therapy alone with R-CHOP followed by ILRT. Methods and Materials: We identified 198 patients treated with R-CHOP (median, 6 cycles) for pathologically confirmed DLBCL of limited stage from July 2004 to December 2012. Clinical characteristics of these patients were 33% with stage I and 66.7% with stage II; 79.8% were in the low or low-intermediate risk group; 13.6% had B symptoms; 29.8% had bulky tumors (≥7 cm); and 75.3% underwent ≥6 cycles of R-CHOP therapy. RT was given to 43 patients (21.7%) using ILRT technique, which included the prechemotherapy tumor volume with a median margin of 2 cm (median RT dose: 36 Gy). Results: After a median follow-up of 40 months, 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 85.8% and 88.9%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed ≥6 cycles of R-CHOP (PFS, P=.004; OS, P=.004) and ILRT (PFS, P=.021; OS, P=.014) were favorable prognosticators of PFS and OS. A bulky tumor (P=.027) and response to R-CHOP (P=.012) were also found to be independent factors of OS. In subgroup analysis, the effect of ILRT was prominent in patients with a bulky tumor (PFS, P=.014; OS, P=.030) or an elevated level of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH; PFS, P=.004; OS, P=.012). Conclusions: Our results suggest that ILRT after R-CHOP therapy improves PFS and OS in patients with limited stage DLBCL, especially in those with bulky disease or an elevated serum LDH level.

  10. Proteomic profiling of fetal esophageal epithelium, esophageal cancer, and tumor-adjacent esophageal epithelium and immunohistochemical characterization of a representative differential protein, PRX6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun-Hui; Xing, Guo-Lan; Fang, Xin-Hui; Wu, Hui-Fang; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Jin-Zhong; Fan, Zong-Min; Wang, Li-Dong

    2017-01-01

    AIM To understand the molecular mechanism of esophageal cancer development and provide molecular markers for screening high-risk populations and early diagnosis. METHODS Two-dimensional electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometry were adopted to screen differentially expressed proteins in nine cases of fetal esophageal epithelium, eight cases of esophageal cancer, and eight cases of tumor-adjacent normal esophageal epithelium collected from fetuses of different gestational age, or esophageal cancer patients from a high-risk area of esophageal cancer in China. Immunohistochemistry (avidin-biotin-horseradish peroxidase complex method) was used to detect the expression of peroxiredoxin (PRX)6 in 91 cases of esophageal cancer, tumor-adjacent normal esophageal tissue, basal cell hyperplasia, dysplasia, and carcinoma in situ, as well as 65 cases of esophageal epithelium from fetuses at a gestational age of 3-9 mo. RESULTS After peptide mass fingerprint analysis and search of protein databases, 21 differential proteins were identified; some of which represent a protein isoform. Varying degrees of expression of PRX6 protein, which was localized mainly in the cytoplasm, were detected in adult and fetal normal esophageal tissues, precancerous lesions, and esophageal cancer. With the progression of esophageal lesions, PRX6 protein expression showed a declining trend (P PRX6 protein expression showed a declining trend with age (P PRX6 protein expression was significantly higher in well-differentiated esophageal cancer tissues than in poorly differentiated esophageal cancer tissues (P PRX6 protein is associated with fetal esophageal development and cancer differentiation. PMID:28293090

  11. Novel device to sample the esophageal microbiome--the esophageal string test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie A Fillon

    Full Text Available A growing number of studies implicate the microbiome in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. Previous work has shown that adults with esophagitis related to gastroesophageal reflux disease have altered esophageal microbiota compared to those who do not have esophagitis. In these studies, sampling of the esophageal microbiome was accomplished by isolating DNA from esophageal biopsies obtained at the time of upper endoscopy. The aim of the current study was to identify the esophageal microbiome in pediatric individuals with normal esophageal mucosa using a minimally invasive, capsule-based string technology, the Enterotest™. We used the proximal segment of the Enterotest string to sample the esophagus, and term this the "Esophageal String Test" (EST. We hypothesized that the less invasive EST would capture mucosal adherent bacteria present in the esophagus in a similar fashion as mucosal biopsy. EST samples and mucosal biopsies were collected from children with no esophageal inflammation (n = 15 and their microbiome composition determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Microbiota from esophageal biopsies and ESTs produced nearly identical profiles of bacterial genera and were different from the bacterial contents of samples collected from the nasal and oral cavity. We conclude that the minimally invasive EST can serve as a useful device for study of the esophageal microbiome.

  12. Treatment of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Using CT in Combination with a PET Examination to Minimize the Clinical Target Volume of the Mediastinum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yusheng Shi; Xiaogang Deng; Longhua Chen

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To decrease radiation injury of the esophagus and lungs by utilizing a CT scan in combination with PET tumor imaging in order to minimize the clinical target area of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, without preventive radiation on the lymphatic drainage area. METHODS Of 76 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 32 received a PET examination before radiotherapy. Preventive radiation was not conducted in the mediastinum area without lymphatic metastasis, which was confirmed by CT and PET. For the other 44 patients, preventive radiation was performed in the lymphatic drainage area. PET examinations showed that the clinical target volume of the patients was decreased on average to about one third. The radiation therapy for patients of the two groups was the same, I.e. The dose for accelerated fractionated irradiation was 3 Gy/time and 5 time/week. The preventive dose was 42 to 45 Gy/time, 14 to 15 time/week, with 3-week treatment, and the therapeutic dose was 60 to 63 Gy/time, 20 to 21 time/week, with a period of 4 to 5 weeks.RESULTS The rate of missed lymph nodes beyond the irradiation field was 6.3% and 4.5% respectively in the group with and without PET examination (P = 0.831). The incidence of acute radioactive esophagitis was 15.6 % and 45.5% in the two groups respectively (P = 0.006). The incidence of acute radiation pneumonia and long-term pulmonary fibrosis in the two groups was 6.3% and 9.1%, and 68.8% and 75.0%, respectively (P = 0.982 and P = 0.547).CONCLUSION The recurrence rate in the lymph nodes beyond the target area was not increased after minimizing the clinical target volume (CTV), whereas radioactive injury to the lungs and esophageal injury was reduced, and especially with a significant decrease in the rate of acute radioactive esophagitis. The method of CT in combination with PET for minimizing the mediastinal CTV is superior to the conventional preventive radiation of the mediastinum.

  13. Sirolimus and Gold Sodium Thiomalate in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  14. Management guidelines of eosinophilic esophagitis in childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Papadopoulou, A; Koletzko, S; Heuschkel, R

    2014-01-01

    (peak value) in ≥1 biopsy specimens are considered a minimum threshold for a diagnosis of EoE. The disease is restricted to the esophagus, and other causes of esophageal eosinophilia should be excluded, specifically proton pump inhibitor-responsive esophageal eosinophilia. This position paper aims...

  15. Iatrogenic esophageal perforation in a newborn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Mi; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Park, Won Soon; Choi, Jung Hwan [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1990-07-15

    Esophagus and pharyngeal structures of newborn are very week and so vulnerable. When a parallel longitudinal tubular structure around (especially behind) the esophagus is seen, traumatic esophageal perforation must be differentiated. We report a case of esophageal perforation in a premature twin baby by nasogastric tube insertion.

  16. PET-CT manifestation of Candida esophagitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahk, Yong Whee [Sung-Ae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); O, Joo Hyun [Kangnam St. Mary' s Hospital, Catholic University Medical School, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Candida esophagitis (moniliasis) is the most common infection of the gullet and has generally been attributed to as a complication of immune suppressed state. However, as the current case. Holt found the disease to occur in 3 of his 13 patients without predisposing condition. Predisposing factors other than immune deficient conditions include aplastic anemia, alcoholism and Parkinson's disease and age, diabetes mellitus, and disruption of mucosal integrity. Growing prevalence of Candida esophagitis in recent years is accounted for by an increase in the number of patients with organ transplantation, malignancy and AIDS as well as populrization of endoscopy. Microorganisms that reached the esophagus in oral secretions are rarely cultured from the esophageal surface. Of many species C. albicans is the most common offender although C. tropicalis has also been isolated with high prevalence, particularly in the patients with cancer and disseminated candidiasis. Clinically, the patients with Candida esophagitis seek medical care for esophageal or retrosternal pain, dysphagia or distress. Candida esophagitis may be the extension from oropharyngeal infection but in the majority the esophagus is the sole site of infection. The middle and lower thirds of the esophagus are more typically affected than the upper third. Diagnosis can be indicated by double contrast esophagography or endoscopy and confirmed by potassium hydroxide (KOH) stain or biopsy. It is to be noted that the more presence of Candida in smear or cultured specimen cannot indict Candida as definitive offender. Differential diagnosis includes herpes simplex infection, cytomegalovirus infection, reflux esophagitis or radiation esophagitis.

  17. Palliation of Dysphagia from Esophageal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.Y.V. Homs (Marjolein)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThe prognosis of esophageal cancer is poor with a 5-year survival of 10-15%. In addition, over 50% of patients with esophageal cancer already have an inoperable disease at presentation. The majority of these patients require palliative treatment to relieve progressive dysphagia. Metal

  18. Palliative Endoscopic Therapy of Esophageal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.Schaefer; A.H.Hoelscher

    2004-01-01

    Patients with locally unresectable esophageal cancer or distant metastasis are usually treated with definite radiotherapy or radiochemotherapy. Dysphagia of these patients should further be treated by endoscopic therapy in order to maintain swallowing and oral food intake as long as possible. The same situation is present in patients with local recurrence of esophageal cancer after surgery or radiochemotherapy.

  19. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Irene; Martinucci; Nicola; de; Bortoli; Maria; Giacchino; Giorgia; Bodini; Elisa; Marabotto; Santino; Marchi; Vincenzo; Savarino; Edoardo; Savarino

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophagealmotility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from nonerosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett’s esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted.

  20. Comparative genomic analysis of esophageal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caygill, Christine P J; Gatenby, Piers A C; Herceg, Zdenko; Lima, Sheila C S; Pinto, Luis F R; Watson, Anthony; Wu, Ming-Shiang

    2014-09-01

    The following, from the 12th OESO World Conference: Cancers of the Esophagus, includes commentaries on comparative genomic analysis of esophageal cancers: genomic polymorphisms, the genetic and epigenetic drivers in esophageal cancers, and the collection of data in the UK Barrett's Oesophagus Registry.

  1. Esophageal diverticula in Parma wallabies (Macropus parma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeson, Danelle M; Esterline, Meredith L; Coke, Rob L

    2009-03-01

    Four adult, wild caught Parma wallabies (Macropus parma) presented with intermittent, postprandial, midcervical swellings. Esophageal diverticula were discovered in the four animals. One of two wallabies was managed successfully with surgery. A third animal died of other causes. The fourth animal died with possible complications from the diverticulum. This is the first published report of esophageal diverticula in macropods.

  2. Image Guided Hypofractionated 3-Dimensional Radiation Therapy in Patients With Inoperable Advanced Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osti, Mattia Falchetto [Institute of Radiation Oncology, La Sapienza University, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Agolli, Linda, E-mail: lindaagolli@yahoo.it [Institute of Radiation Oncology, La Sapienza University, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy); Valeriani, Maurizio; Falco, Teresa; Bracci, Stefano; De Sanctis, Vitaliana; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi [Institute of Radiation Oncology, La Sapienza University, Sant' Andrea Hospital, Rome (Italy)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (HypoRT) can potentially improve local control with a higher biological effect and shorter overall treatment time. Response, local control, toxicity rates, and survival rates were evaluated in patients affected by inoperable advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received HypoRT. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with advanced NSCLC were enrolled; 27% had stage IIIA, 50% had stage IIIB, and 23% had stage IV disease. All patients underwent HypoRT with a prescribed total dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions of 3 Gy each. Radiation treatment was delivered using an image guided radiation therapy technique to verify correct position. Toxicities were graded according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity score. Survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: The median follow-up was 13 months (range, 4-56 months). All patients completed radiation therapy and received the total dose of 60 Gy to the primary tumor and positive lymph nodes. The overall response rate after radiation therapy was 83% (3 patients with complete response and 22 patients with partial response). The 2-year overall survival and progression-free survival rates were 38.1% and 36%, respectively. Locoregional recurrence/persistence occurred in 11 (37%) patients. Distant metastasis occurred in 17 (57%) patients. Acute toxicities occurred consisting of grade 1 to 2 hematological toxicity in 5 patients (17%) and grade 3 in 1 patient; grade 1 to 2 esophagitis in 12 patients (40%) and grade 3 in 1 patient; and grade 1 to 2 pneumonitis in 6 patients (20%) and grade 3 in 2 patients (7%). Thirty-three percent of patients developed grade 1 to 2 late toxicities. Only 3 patients developed grade 3 late adverse effects: esophagitis in 1 patient and pneumonitis in 2 patients. Conclusions: Hypofractionated curative radiation therapy is a feasible and well-tolerated treatment for patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Randomized

  3. Systemic complications of esophageal lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, R; Garcovich, S; Giovinale, M; Marinaro, A; Manganelli, C; Zampetti, A; Feliciani, C

    2013-01-01

    Lichen planus is an uncommon inflammatory mucocutaneous disorder affecting the skin and its appendages, as well as oral and genital mucosa. Involvement of the esophageal mucosa is rare and causes significant morbidity, with dysphagia and risk of long-term complications, such as esophageal strictures and stenosis. Esophageal lichen planus is an underreported condition in the spectrum of lichenoid tissue reactions, presenting the risk of systemic manifestations. We describe a patient with severe, long-standing esophageal lichen planus, which had led to marked weight-loss, malnutrition syndrome and chronic respiratory distress due to recurrent aspiration pneumonia. Diagnosis was confirmed by the presence of concomitant muco-cutaneous lesions and characteristic endoscopic and histological findings. Systemic therapy with cyclosporine A and micronutrient supplementation led to rapid clinical improvement. Early diagnosis of esophageal lichen planus as well as effective systemic immunosuppressive treatment is crucial in order to prevent short- and long-term complications.

  4. [Endoscopic surgery for benign esophageal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Soji

    2006-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and esophageal achalasia are common benign esophageal diseases. Today minimally invasive surgery is recommended to treat these diseases. Surgical indications for GERD are failure of medical management, medical complications attributable to a large hiatal hernia, 'atypical' symptoms (asthma, hoarseness, cough, chest pain, aspiration), etc. according to the Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) guidelines. Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication has emerged as the most widely accepted procedure for GERD patients with normal esophageal motility. Partial fundoplication (e.g., Toupet fundoplication) is also considered to decrease the possibility of postoperative dysphagia. Although pneumatic dilatation has been the first line treatment for esophageal achalasia, laparoscopic Heller myotomy and partial fundoplication (e.g., Dor fundoplication) to prevent reflux is preferred by most gastroenterologists and surgeons as the primary treatment modality. Laparoscopic surgery for GERD and esophageal achalasia are effective in most patients and safe in all patients. Finally, laparoscopic surgery should be performed only by skilled surgeons.

  5. Should patients with extrapulmonary small-cell carcinoma receive prophylactic cranial irradiation?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Naidoo, Jarushka

    2013-09-01

    Extrapulmonary small-cell carcinoma (EPSCC) is a rare disease. Management is based on small-cell lung carcinoma. Prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) is not routinely administered in EPSCC. This study investigates the role of PCI in EPSCC, by analyzing the incidence, treatment, and survival of patients with brain metastases in a national cohort. Disease biology and epidemiology are also investigated.

  6. MRI findings of small cell neuroendocrime carcinoma of the uterine cervix: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, You Sun; Yi, Boem Ha; Lee, Hae Kyung; Lee, Min Hee; Choi, Seo Youn; Kwak, Jeong Ja [Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the uterine cervix is a rare primary neoplasm, accounting for less than 5% of all uterine cervical cancers. The tumor is known to have an aggressive behavior and poor prognosis. In this article, we present the MRI findings of 5 cases of pathologically-proven small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the uterine cervix, including diffusion-weighted images.

  7. Urokinase receptor forms in serum from non-small cell lung cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almasi, Charlotte Elberling; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Høyer-Hansen, Gunilla;

    2011-01-01

    To study the prognostic impact of the different forms of the receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR) in serum from 171 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.......To study the prognostic impact of the different forms of the receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR) in serum from 171 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients....

  8. Mutation of the BRAF Genes in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhimin HUANG

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available BRAF mutations have been found to be a driver mutation and maybe a therapy target in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. This article reviews the current understanding of BRAF gene, its structure, expression, the signal pathway, as well as its relationship with cancer especially the targeted therapies for non-small cell lung cancer.

  9. Lichenoid esophagitis: clinicopathologic overlap with established esophageal lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaria, Safia N; Abu Alfa, Amer K; Cruise, Michael W; Wood, Laura D; Montgomery, Elizabeth A

    2013-12-01

    Lichen planus (LP) affects mucocutaneous surfaces and is characterized by intraepithelial and lamina propria lymphocytosis and squamous cell apoptosis (Civatte bodies). Lichen planus esophagitis (LPE) is underrecognized; concurrent cutaneous disease is present in some patients, but LPE alone is more common. We diagnose patients with characteristic pathologic findings of LPE and known correlation with skin disease or immunofluorescence (IF) results as LPE but use descriptive terminology ("lichenoid esophagitis pattern" [LEP]) when confirmation is unavailable. We reviewed clinicopathologic features of patients diagnosed at our institution with LPE or LEP. There were 88 specimens with LPE or LEP from 65 patients. Most patients were female. Seventeen patients had LPE confirmed by IF. Five patients had both esophageal (1 with IF) and skin LP. Strictures were a prominent presenting feature in LPE patients, with disease distribution more frequent in the upper and lower esophagus. Dysphagia was a common reason for endoscopy in LEP patients. Rheumatologic diseases are more common in patients with LPE compared with LEP. Viral hepatitides and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections are associated with LEP. We defined polypharmacy as patients taking >3 medications; this finding was present in both LPE and LEP cohorts; however, this is a prominent feature in those with established LPE. Progression to dysplasia was noted in both cohorts. About 5% of LPE patients have tandem skin manifestations. LPE is more likely than LEP to arise in women, result in stricture formation, and be associated with rheumatologic disorders and polypharmacy, whereas LEP is associated with viral hepatitis and HIV. Both can progress to neoplasia. As the risk of stricture formation is high in patients with LPE, it is worth performing pertinent IF studies to confirm LPE, although knowledge of the clinical association of LEP with viral hepatitis, HIV, and use of multiple medications is of value in

  10. Esophageal strictures during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    Esophageal stricture is a rare complication of paediatric cancer treatment that usually occurs after esophageal exposure to radiotherapy. We describe 4 cases of esophageal stricture during chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. All patients presented with refractory vomiting and were diagnosed with radiologic contrast studies. None of the patients had received radiotherapy. Esophageal candidiasis was seen in 2 patients but the remaining 2 patients had earlier systemic candidiasis. High-dose dexamethasone may predispose these children to both esophageal candidiasis and peptic esophagitis. The etiology of esophageal strictures during treatment for acute leukemia is likely to be multifactorial but systemic candidiasis may play a significant role.

  11. Identification of risk factors and characteristics of supraclavicular lymph node metastasis in patients with small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhen-Xing; Zhao, Lu-Jun; Guan, Yong; Sun, Yao; Meng, Mao-Bin; Ji, Kai; Wang, Ping

    2013-03-01

    Thoracic radiotherapy provides a survival benefit in patients with limited-stage disease of small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC), but inclusion and exclusion of prophylactic irradiation of the supraclavicular area are still controversial. This study analyses the risk factors and characteristics of lymph node metastases in the supraclavicular area of LS-SCLC patients, which could help in developing a better radiotherapy for the patients. A total of 239 patients with LS-SCLC were included in this retrospective analysis. Clinical characteristics and mediastinal lymph node metastasis were analyzed for association with SCM, and the SCM pattern was further analyzed based on the treatment planning CT scans. The SCM incidence was 34.7 % (83 of 239). The multivariate analysis showed that only the mediastinal level 2 (OR = 16.101, P = 0.000) and level 3 (OR = 5.597, P = 0.000) lymph node metastases were significantly associated with SCM. As the most frequently involved region, supraclavicular level I lymph node metastases were identified in 61 of 83 patients (73.5 %), followed by level III, level IV, level V, and level II lymph node metastases, accounting a total of 95.2 % for level I and/or III lymph node metastases, whereas the incidence of skip metastasis was only 4.8 %. SCLC patients with mediastinal level 2 and level 3 lymph node metastasis were at high risk of SCM. If prophylactic irradiation therapy is considered, the nodal clinical target volume of irradiation should include bilateral lower para-recurrent laryngeal neural region (level I) and the para-internal jugular venous region (level III).

  12. Management of small-cell lung cancer with radiotherapy—a pan-Canadian survey of radiation oncologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, J.; Wright, J.R.; Gabos, Z.; Swaminath, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of small-cell lung cancer (sclc) with radiotherapy (rt) varies, with many treatment regimens having been described in the literature. We created a survey to assess patterns of practice and clinical decision-making in the management of sclc by Canadian radiation oncologists (ros). Methods A 35-item survey was sent by e-mail to Canadian ros. The questions investigated the role of rt, the dose and timing of rt, target delineation, and use of prophylactic cranial irradiation (pci) in limited-stage (ls) and extensive-stage (es) sclc. Results Responses were received from 52 eligible ros. For ls-sclc, staging (98%) and simulation or dosimetric (96%) computed tomography imaging were key determinants of rt suitability. The most common dose and fractionation schedule was 40–45 Gy in 15 once-daily fractions (40%), with elective nodal irradiation performed by 31% of ros. Preferred management of clinical T1/2aN0 sclc favoured primary chemoradiotherapy (64%). For es-sclc, consolidative thoracic rt was frequently offered (88%), with a preferred dose and fractionation schedule of 30 Gy in 10 once-daily fractions (70%). Extrathoracic consolidative rt would not be offered by 23 ros (44%). Prophylactic cranial irradiation was generally offered in ls-sclc (100%) and es-sclc (98%) after response to initial treatment. Performance status, baseline cognition, and pre-pci brain imaging were important patient factors assessed before an offer of pci. Conclusions Canadian ros show practice variation in sclc management. Future clinical trials and national treatment guidelines might reduce variability in the treatment of early-stage disease, optimization of dose and targeting in ls-sclc, and definition of suitability for pci or consolidative rt. PMID:27330347

  13. Phase II Study of Accelerated High-Dose Radiotherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Limited Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0239

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaki, Ritsuko, E-mail: rkomaki@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Paulus, Rebecca [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ettinger, David S. [Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Videtic, Gregory M.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Glisson, Bonnie S. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Langer, Corey J. [Thoracic Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sause, William T. [Radiation Center, LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Choy, Hak [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether high-dose thoracic radiation given twice daily during cisplatin-etoposide chemotherapy for limited small-cell lung cancer (LSCLC) improves survival, acute esophagitis, and local control rates relative to findings from Intergroup trial 0096 (47%, 27%, and 64%). Patients and Methods: Patients were accrued over a 3-year period from 22 US and Canadian institutions. Patients with LSCLC and good performance status were given thoracic radiation to 61.2 Gy over 5 weeks (daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 1-22, then twice-daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 23-33). Cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} IV) was given on day 1 and etoposide (120 mg/m{sup 2} IV) on days 1-3 and days 22-24, followed by 2 cycles of cisplatin plus etoposide alone. Patients who achieved complete response were offered prophylactic cranial irradiation. Endpoints included overall and progression-free survival; severe esophagitis (Common Toxicity Criteria v 2.0) and treatment-related fatalities; response (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors); and local control. Results: Seventy-two patients were accrued from June 2003 through May 2006; 71 were evaluable (median age 63 years; 52% female; 58% Zubrod 0). Median survival time was 19 months; at 2 years, the overall survival rate was 36.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 25.6%-47.7%), and progression-free survival 19.7% (95% CI 11.4%-29.6%). Thirteen patients (18%) experienced severe acute esophagitis, and 2 (3%) died of treatment-related causes; 41% achieved complete response, 39% partial response, 10% stable disease, and 6% progressive disease. The local control rate was 73%. Forty-three patients (61%) received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Conclusions: The overall survival rate did not reach the projected goal; however, rates of esophagitis were lower, and local control higher, than projected. This treatment strategy is now one of three arms of a prospective trial of chemoradiation for LSCLC (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0538

  14. Systemic Chemotherapy for Progression of Brain Metastases in Extensive-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagla Abdel Karim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related mortality in men and women. Approximately 15% of lung cancers are small cell type. Chemotherapy and radiation are the mainstay treatments. Currently, the standard chemotherapy regimen includes platinum/etoposide. For extensive small cell lung cancer, irinotecan and cisplatin have also been used. Patients with relapsed small cell lung cancer have a very poor prognosis, and the morbidity increases with brain metastases. Approximately 10%–14% of small cell lung cancer patients exhibit brain metastases at the time of diagnosis, which increases to 50%–80% as the disease progresses. Mean survival with brain metastases is reported to be less than six months, thus calling for improved regimens. Here we present a case series of patients treated with irinotecan for progressive brain metastases in small cell lung cancer, which serves as a reminder of the role of systemic chemotherapy in this setting.

  15. A comparative analysis by SAGE of gene expression profiles of esophageal adenocarcinoma and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baal, Jantine W. P. M.; Milana, Francesco; Rygiel, Agnieszka M.; Sondermeijer, Carine M. T.; Spek, C. Arnold; Bergman, Jacques J. G. H. M.; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Krishnadath, Kausilia K.

    2008-01-01

    Esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) are the two main types of esophageal cancer. Despite extensive research the exact molecular basis of these cancers is unclear. Therefore we evaluated the transcriptome of EA in comparison to non-dysplastic Barrett's esophag

  16. Palliative Care Intervention in Improving Symptom Control and Quality of Life in Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Their Family Caregivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-13

    Caregiver; Psychological Impact of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  17. PET-Adjusted Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-23

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  18. Giant mid-esophageal diverticulum. Conservative treatment of postoperative leakage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallatomasina, S; Casaccia, M; Chessa, M; Serrano, J; Nardi, I; Troilo, B; Miggino, M; Valente, U

    2009-01-01

    Mid-esophageal diverticula are rare entities. Only symptomatic patients usually receive surgical treatment. Esophageal leakage is one of the most common complications after these procedures. Though in literature, operative management is the preferred treatment for esophageal fistula, conservative approach is described in case of small leaks. We report a case of an operated giant mid-esophageal diverticulum complicated with an esophageal fistula. The patient underwent a surgical treatment and recovered completely.

  19. Activity assessment of eosinophilic esophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepfer, Alain; Safroneeva, Ekaterina

    2014-01-01

    The activity of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) can be assessed with patient-reported outcomes and biologic measures. Patient-reported outcomes include symptoms and quality of life, whereas biologic measures refer to endoscopic, histologic, and biochemical activity (e.g. blood biomarkers). So far, a validated tool to assess EoE activity in the above-mentioned dimensions is lacking. Given the lack of a standardized way to assess EoE activity in the various dimensions, the results of different clinical trials may be difficult to compare. For symptom assessment in adult patients, the symptom 'dysphagia' should be evaluated according to different standardized food consistencies. Furthermore, symptom assessment should take into account the following items: avoidance of specific food categories, food modification, and time to eat a regular meal. A distinct symptom recall period (e.g. 2 weeks) has to be defined for symptom assessment. Performing an 'esophageal stress test' with ingestion of a standardized meal to measure symptom severity bears the potential risk of acute food bolus impaction and should therefore be avoided. The description of endoscopic findings in EoE has meanwhile been standardized. Histologic evaluation of EoE activity should report either the size of the high-power field used or count the eosinophils per mm(2). There is a current lack of blood biomarkers demonstrating a good correlation with histologic activity in esophageal biopsies. The development and validation of an adult and pediatric EoE activity index is urgently needed not only for clinical trials and observational studies, but also for daily practice.

  20. The histone demethylase PHF8 is an oncogenic protein in human non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yuzhou; Pan, Xufeng; Zhao, Heng, E-mail: hengzhao1966@sina.com

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • PHF8 overexpresses in human NSCLC and predicts poor survival. • PHF8 regulates lung cancer cell growth and transformation. • PHF8 regulates apoptosis in human lung cancer cells. • PHF8 promotes miR-21 expression in human lung cancer. • MiR-21 is critically essential for PHF8 function in human lung cancer cells. - Abstract: PHF8 is a JmjC domain-containing protein and erases repressive histone marks including H4K20me1 and H3K9me1/2. It binds to H3K4me3, an active histone mark usually located at transcription start sites (TSSs), through its plant homeo-domain, and is thus recruited and enriched in gene promoters. PHF8 is involved in the development of several types of cancer, including leukemia, prostate cancer, and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Herein we report that PHF8 is an oncogenic protein in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). PHF8 is up-regulated in human NSCLC tissues, and high PHF8 expression predicts poor survival. Our in vitro and in vivo evidence demonstrate that PHF8 regulates lung cancer cell proliferation and cellular transformation. We found that PHF8 knockdown induces DNA damage and apoptosis in lung cancer cells. PHF8 promotes miR-21 expression in human lung cancer, and miR-21 knockdown blocks the effects of PHF8 on proliferation and apoptosis of lung cancer cells. In summary, PHF8 promotes lung cancer cell growth and survival by regulating miR-21.

  1. Dosimetric Feasibility of Dose Escalation Using SBRT Boost for Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T.; Peter, Justin; Hiatt, Jessica R.; Patel, Salil; Osibanjo, Oluwademilade; Safran, Howard; Curran, Bruce; DiPetrillo, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Standard chemoradiation therapy for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLCa) results in suboptimal outcomes with a high rate of local failure and poor overall survival. We hypothesize that dose escalation using stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) boost could improve upon these results. We present here a study evaluating the dosimetric feasibility of such an approach. Methods: Anonymized CT data sets from five randomly selected patients with stage III NSCLCa undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy in our department with disease volumes appropriate for SBRT boost were selected. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) plans to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions were generated follow by SBRT plans to two dose levels, 16 Gy in two fractions and 28 Gy in two fractions. SBRT plans and total composite (3D-CRT and SBRT) were optimized and evaluated for target coverage and dose to critical structures; lung, esophagus, cord, and heart. Results: All five plans met predetermined target coverage and normal tissue dose constraints. PTV V95 was equal to or greater than 95% in all cases. The cumulative lung V20 and V5 of the combined 3D-CRT and SBRT plans were less than or equal to 30 and 55%, respectively. The 5 cc esophageal dose was less than 12 Gy for all low and high dose SBRT plans. The cumulative dose to the esophagus was also acceptable with less than 10% of the esophagus receiving doses in excess of 50 Gy. The cumulative spinal cord dose was less than 33 Gy and heart V25 was less than 5%. Conclusion: The combination of chemoradiation to 50.4 Gy followed by SBRT boost to gross disease at the primary tumor and involved regional lymph nodes is feasible with respect to normal tissue dose constraints in this dosimetric pilot study. A phase I/II trial to evaluate the clinical safety and efficacy of this approach is being undertaken. PMID:23057009

  2. Absence of toxicity with hypofractionated 3-dimensional radiation therapy for inoperable, early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuong Te

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Hypofractionated radiotherapy may overcome repopulation in rapidly proliferating tumors such as lung cancer. It is more convenient for the patients and reduces health care costs. This study reports our results on patients with medically inoperable, early stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treated with hypofractionation. Materials and methods Stage T1-2N0 NSCLC patients were treated with hypofractionation alone, 52.5 Gy/15 fractions, in 3 weeks, with 3-dimensional conformal planning. T1-2N1 patients with the hilar lymphnode close to the primary tumor were also eligible for this treatment. We did not use any approach to reduce respiratory motion, but it was monitored in all patients. Elective nodal radiotherapy was not performed. Routine follow up included assessment for acute and late toxicity and radiological tumor response. Median follow up time was 29 months for the surviving patients. Results Thirty-two patients with a median age of 76 years, T1 = 15 and T2 = 17, were treated. Median planning target volume (PTV volume was 150cc and median V16 of both lungs was 13%. The most important finding of this study is that toxicity was minimal. Two patients had grade ≤ 2 acute pneumonitis and 3 had mild (grade 1 acute esophagitis. There was no late toxicity. Actuarial 1 and 2-year overall survival rates are 78% and 56%, cancer specific survival rates (CSS are 90% and 74%, and local relapse free survival rates are 93% and 76% respectively. Conclusion 3-D planning, involved field hypofractionation at a dose of 52.5 Gy in 15 daily fractions is safe, well tolerated and easy radiation treatment for medically inoperable lung cancer patients. It shortens by half the traditional treatment. Results compare favorably with previously published studies. Further studies are needed to compare similar technique with other treatments such as surgery and stereotactic radiotherapy.

  3. Individualized Dose Prescription for Hypofractionation in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Radiotherapy: An in silico Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Troost, Esther G.C.; Huizenga, Henk; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bussink, Johan, E-mail: j.bussink@rther.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Local tumor control and outcome remain poor in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by external beam radiotherapy. We investigated the therapeutic gain of individualized dose prescription with dose escalation based on normal tissue dose constraints for various hypofractionation schemes delivered with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: For 38 Stage III NSCLC patients, the dose level of an existing curative treatment plan with standard fractionation (66 Gy) was rescaled based on dose constraints for the lung, spinal cord, esophagus, brachial plexus, and heart. The effect on tumor total dose (TTD) and biologic tumor effective dose in 2-Gy fractions (TED) corrected for overall treatment time (OTT) was compared for isotoxic and maximally tolerable schemes given in 15, 20, and 33 fractions. Rescaling was accomplished by altering the dose per fraction and/or the number of fractions while keeping the relative dose distribution of the original treatment plan. Results: For 30 of the 38 patients, dose escalation by individualized hypofractionation yielded therapeutic gain. For the maximally tolerable dose scheme in 33 fractions (MTD{sub 33}), individualized dose escalation resulted in a 2.5-21% gain in TTD. In the isotoxic schemes, the number of fractions could be reduced with a marginal increase in TED. For the maximally tolerable dose schemes, the TED could be escalated up to 36.6%, and for all patients beyond the level of the isotoxic and the MTD{sub 33} schemes (range, 3.3-36.6%). Reduction of the OTT contributed to the therapeutic gain of the shortened schemes. For the maximally tolerable schemes, the maximum esophageal dose was the dominant dose-limiting constraint in most patients. Conclusions: This modeling study showed that individualized dose prescription for hypofractionation in NSCLC radiotherapy, based on scaling of existing treatment plans up to normal tissue dose constraints, enables dose

  4. Large volume unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: acute toxicity and initial outcome results with rapid arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogliata Antonella

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report acute toxicity, initial outcome results and planning therapeutic parameters in radiation treatment of advanced lung cancer (stage III with volumetric modulated arcs using RapidArc (RA. Methods Twenty-four consecutive patients were treated with RA. All showed locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer with stage IIIA-IIIB and with large volumes (GTV:299 ± 175 cm3, PTV:818 ± 206 cm3. Dose prescription was 66Gy in 33 fractions to mean PTV. Delivery was performed with two partial arcs with a 6 MV photon beam. Results From a dosimetric point of view, RA allowed us to respect most planning objectives on target volumes and organs at risk. In particular: for GTV D1% = 105.6 ± 1.7%, D99% = 96.7 ± 1.8%, D5%-D95% = 6.3 ± 1.4%; contra-lateral lung mean dose resulted in 13.7 ± 3.9Gy, for spinal cord D1% = 39.5 ± 4.0Gy, for heart V45Gy = 9.0 ± 7.0Gy, for esophagus D1% = 67.4 ± 2.2Gy. Delivery time was 133 ± 7s. At three months partial remission > 50% was observed in 56% of patients. Acute toxicities at 3 months showed 91% with grade 1 and 9% with grade 2 esophageal toxicity; 18% presented grade 1 and 9% with grade 2 pneumonia; no grade 3 acute toxicity was observed. The short follow-up does not allow assessment of local control and progression free survival. Conclusions RA proved to be a safe and advantageous treatment modality for NSCLC with large volumes. Long term observation of patients is needed to assess outcome and late toxicity.

  5. Toxicity of concurrent radiochemotherapy for locally advanced non--small-cell lung cancer: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Caro C; Wouterse, Sanne J; Daams, Joost G; Uitterhoeve, Lon L; van den Heuvel, Michel M; Belderbos, José S

    2013-09-01

    Concurrent radiochemotherapy (RCT) is the treatment of choice for patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two meta-analyses were inconclusive in an attempt to define the optimal concurrent RCT scheme. Besides efficacy, treatment toxicity will influence the appointed treatment of choice. A systematic review of the literature was performed to record the early and late toxicities, as well as overall survival, of concurrent RCT regimens in patients with NSCLC. The databases of PubMed, Ovid, Medline, and the Cochrane Library were searched for articles on concurrent RCT published between January 1992 and December 2009. Publications of phase II and phase III trials with ≥ 50 patients per treatment arm were selected. Patient characteristics, chemotherapy regimen (mono- or polychemotherapy, high or low dose) and radiotherapy scheme, acute and late toxicity, and overall survival data were compared. Seventeen articles were selected: 12 studies with cisplatin-containing regimens and 5 studies using carboplatin. A total of 13 series with mono- or polychemotherapy schedules--as single dose or double or triple high-dose or daily cisplatin-containing (≤ 30 mg/m(2)/wk) chemotherapy were found. Acute esophagitis ≥ grade 3 was observed in up to 18% of the patients. High-dose cisplatin regimens resulted in more frequent and severe hematologic toxicity, nausea, and vomiting than did other schemes. The toxicity profile was more favorable in low-dose chemotherapy schedules. From phase II and III trials published between 1992 and 2010, it can be concluded that concurrent RCT with monochemotherapy consisting of daily cisplatin results in favorable acute and late toxicity compared with concurrent RCT with single high-dose chemotherapy, doublets, or triplets.

  6. Successful treatment of corrosive esophageal strictures after failed esophageal reconstructions with colon and jejunum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jing-hai; JIANG Yao-guang; WANG Ru-wen; ZHAO Yun-ping; GONG Tai-qian; TAN Qun-you; MA Zheng; LIN Yi-dan; DENG Bo

    2006-01-01

    Dense and extensive esophageal strictures after caustic agent ingestion require surgical treatment. Colon, stomach and jejunum can be used to reconstruct esophagus. Here, we report an unusual patient with corrosive esophageal stricture who had received unsuccessful esophageal replacements twice at other hospitals. Colon interposition had been first performed 6 months after corrosive esophageal burn,but the colon graft necrosis occurred. Esophageal reconstruction had been carried out 10 years later in another hospital. However, the graft necrosis developed again 5 months later. A salvage operation was performed to remove the necrotic transplant in our hospital. Then as much food as possible had been given to expand the stomach through the gastrostomy since the procedure. The patient underwent esophagectomy and concomitant gastroesophagostomy in the neck 1.5 years later. Esophageal dilations had been performed to prevent recurrent anastomotic stricture for 1 year. He has eaten a normal diet since being discharged.

  7. The Resource Mapping Algorithm of Wireless Virtualized Networks for Saving Energy in Ultradense Small Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Zou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the current network is designed for peak loads, it results in insufficient resource utilization and energy waste. Virtualized technology makes it possible that intelligent energy perception network could be deployed and resource sharing could become an effective energy saving technology. How to make more small cells into sleeping state for energy saving in ultradense small cell system has become a research hot spot. Based on the mapping feature of virtualized network, a new wireless resource mapping algorithm for saving energy in ultradense small cells has been put forward when wireless resource amount is satisfied in every small cell. First of all, the method divides the virtual cells. Again through the alternate updating between small cell mapping and wireless resource allocation, least amount of small cells is used and other small cells turn into sleeping state on the premise of guaranteeing users’ QoS. Next, the energy consumption of the wireless access system, wireless resource utilization, and the convergence of the proposed algorithm are analyzed in theory. Finally, the simulation results demonstrate that the algorithm can effectively reduce the system energy consumption and required wireless resource amount under the condition of satisfying users’ QoS.

  8. Dual Connectivity in Heterogeneous Small Cell Networks with mmWave Backhauls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooseong Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultradense Network (UDN with small cells is a key feature to begin a new era of 5G communication, which provides higher data rate, and accommodate explosive mobile traffic. Recently, mmWave-based wireless backhauls accelerate deployment of the UDN by reducing cost of fiber-optic cabling to small cells. The small cells can deliver user data to macro enhanced NodeBs (eNBs using multihop relay in wireless backhaul mesh that consists of small and macro cell eNBs connected by the mmWave links. For such a heterogeneous small cell network (HetNet, 3GPP introduced dual connectivity (i.e., dual connections to macro and small cell eNBs, which is an attractive standard feature to manage user mobility and network access in the small cells. In this paper, we exploit dual connectivity scheme in a HetNet with the mmWave-based backhaul mesh which introduces two main challenges for throughput maximization, multihop routing from small to macro cell, and selection of a small cell eNB for user equipment (UE. We establish an optimization model and find an optimal solution in terms of throughput and fairness using an IBM CPLEX solver. Additionally, we propose a heuristic algorithm for complexity reduction and compare it with the optimal results in evaluation.

  9. [Laparoscopic surgery for esophageal achalasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, S; Ando, N; Ohgami, M; Kitagawa, Y; Kitajima, M

    2000-04-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for esophageal achalasia was first reported by Shimi et al. in 1991. Subsequently the procedure has been performed all over the world and laparoscopic Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication (Heller and Dor operation) is now thought to be the operation of first choice. It is indicated for patients who are resistant to medical therapy (calcium blocker etc.) or have pneumatic dilatation and those with frequent aspiration at night. As Csendes et al. reported that surgical treatment was better than pneumatic dilatation and as laparoscopic surgery is less invasive, the indications for the laparoscopic Heller and Dor operation can include all achalasia patients except those who respond to medical therapy, do not accept surgery, or cannot tolerate surgery. We successfully performed the laparoscopic Heller and Dor operation on 22 patients, all of whom had an uneventful postoperative course. Manometric evaluation, endoscopic examination, and 24-hour pH monitoring showed good results. There are six important technical points: 1) flexible laparoscopy; 2) pneumoperitoneum; 3) gauze in the abdominal cavity to absorb blood; 4) laparosonic coagulating shears; 5) extracorporeal knot-tying technique; and 6) intracorporeal knot-tying technique. If an experienced surgeon is in charge, the laparoscopic Heller and Dor operation is an ideal, minimally invasive treatment for esophageal achalasia.

  10. Updates on esophageal and gastric cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amy Gallo; Charles Cha

    2006-01-01

    Esophageal and gastric cancers are both common and deadly. Patients present most often after disease progression and survival is therefore poor. Due to demographic variability and recent changes in disease incidence, much emphasis has been placed on studying risk factors for both esophageal and gastric cancers.However, with increasing understanding of these diseases, low survival rates persist and continued intensive studies are necessary to optimize treatment plans. This review article discusses updates in the evolving epidemiology, clinical presentation, risk factors,and diagnostic and treatment modalities of esophageal and gastric cancers.

  11. Esophageal scintigraphy: A comparison with esophagoscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjellen, G.; Andersson, P.; Sandstroem, S.

    1987-01-01

    Fifty consecutive patients with different esophageal symtoms were investigated with esophageal endoscopy, transit scintigraphy, and gastroesophageal (GE) scintigraphy with extra-abdominal compression. Scintigraphic findings were abnormal in 27 of those 31 patients (87%) who were classified as abnormal at endoscopy. A prolonged transit time was the commonest finding, but hiatal hernia and GE reflux were also found. However, the scintigraphic procedure showed abnormalities in 6 of 19 (31%) patients who were classified as normal at endoscopy. Esophageal scintigraphy is recommended as a screening test before endoscopy is decided on. 20 refs.

  12. A STUDY ON CYCLOOXYGENASE -2 PROTEIN EXPRESSION IN ESOPHAGEAL CAICONOGENESIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立峰; 张伟; 王吾如; 王洪平; 韩双廷; 曲平; 刘义; 李茉; 刘伯齐; 林培中

    2001-01-01

    To investigate cyclooxygenase- 2(Cox-2) protein expression in esophageal cancer and precancerous lesions. Methods: One hundred twenty biopsy specimens from esophageal carcinoma and 113 from patients with esophageal premalingnant lesions, 27 from individuals with normal esophageal mucosa and 3 from Barrett's esophagus were examined for Cox-2 protein expression by immunohistochemistry. Results: Cox-2 protein was not observed in normal esophageal squamous and glandular epithelium, hyperplasia from mild to severe dysplasia lesions and carcinoma in situ. Positive Cox-2 protein expression was found in 4 of 60 specimens of invasive squamous-cell carcinomas, 21 of 30 specimens of esophageal adenocarcinomas and in 3 of 3 Barret's esophageal tissues. Conclusion: The Cox-2 protein expression may be associated with the development of the esophageal adenocarcinomas but not esophageal squamous-cell carcinomas.

  13. Experimental Evaluation of Interference Rejection Combining for 5G small cells,

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assefa, Dereje; Berardinelli, Gilberto; Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão

    2015-01-01

    The Interference Rejection Combining (IRC) receiver can significantly boost the network throughput in scenarios characterized by dense uncoordinated deployment of small cells, as targeted by future 5th generation (5G) radio access technology. This paper presents an experimental study...

  14. Genetic polymorphisms and non-small-cell lung cancer: future paradigms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Ramon Andrade Bezerra de [Serviço de Oncologia Médica, Instituto Português de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Ciências Biomédicas e Medicina, Universidade do Algarve, Faro (Portugal)

    2014-07-01

    This article addresses some current issues about genetic polymorphisms studied in the non-small-cell lung cancer translational field. Furthermore, it discusses about new potential biomarkers regarding lung cancer risk and prognosis.

  15. TENIPOSIDE FOR MENINGEAL CARCINOMATOSIS OF SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERGRAAF, WTA; HAAXMAREICHE, H; BURGHOUTS, JTM; POSTMUS, PE

    1993-01-01

    A female patient with small cell lung cancer and extensive bone marrow metastases achieved a complete response after combination chemotherapy including etoposide. During maintenance therapy meningeal carcinomatosis was diagnosed. After intravenous administration of teniposide she improved dramatical

  16. Acute onset paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration in a patient with small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatia R

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available A patient with small cell lung cancer presented with a rare presentation of an acute onset pancerebellar dysfunction. His clinical condition markedly improved following the surgical removal of the tumor and chemo- and radiotherapy.

  17. TENIPOSIDE FOR MENINGEAL CARCINOMATOSIS OF SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERGRAAF, WTA; HAAXMAREICHE, H; BURGHOUTS, JTM; POSTMUS, PE

    1993-01-01

    A female patient with small cell lung cancer and extensive bone marrow metastases achieved a complete response after combination chemotherapy including etoposide. During maintenance therapy meningeal carcinomatosis was diagnosed. After intravenous administration of teniposide she improved dramatical

  18. Impact of a small cell on the RF-EMF exposure in a train.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, Sam; Plets, David; Thielens, Arno; Martens, Luc; Joseph, Wout

    2015-02-27

    The deployment of a miniature mobile-phone base station or small cell in a train car significantly improves the coverage and the capacity of a mobile network service on the train. However, the impact of the small cell on the passengers' exposure to radio-frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) is unknown. In this study, we assessed experimentally the RF-EMF exposure of a mobile-phone user who is either connected to the outdoor macrocell network or to an in-train small cell, while traveling on the train, by means of the absorbed-dose concept, which combines the base station downlink exposure with the mobile-phone uplink exposure. For Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) technology at 1800 MHz, we found that by connecting to a small cell, the brain exposure of the user could realistically be reduced by a factor 35 and the whole-body exposure by a factor 11.

  19. PET for Staging of Esophageal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.H.Hoelscher

    2004-01-01

    FDG-PET is of clinical value especially for detection of distant metastases or recurrent esophageal cancer. For the staging of primary tumor or locoregional lymph node metastasis PET is currently not suitable.

  20. Morbidity and mortality in esophageal atresia and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background The outcome of newborns with esophageal atresia (EA) ... Their mean birth weight was 2.4 kg. (700–3800 ... weight, gestational age, associated anomalies, method of diagnosis .... the risk classification of patients with EA/TEF and.

  1. Prevalence of reflux esophagitis among patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ahmed Gado

    2013-10-25

    Oct 25, 2013 ... Age, male sex, obesity, and hiatus hernia (HH) were the purported risk factors for ... esophagus observed to rise proximally from the gastric plica- tions and intestinal .... No case of esophageal cancer was reported in this study.

  2. Esophageal transit scintigraphy in systemic sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnowski, Marek; Kobylecka, Małgorzata; Olesińska, Marzena

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis is a rare connective tissue disease, distinctive features of which are fibrosis and microangiopathy. The esophagus is one of the most commonly involved internal organs. Most patients experience dysphagia, difficulties in swallowing and gastro-esophageal reflux. However, in up to one third of cases, the initial onset of esophageal disease may be clinically silent. There are several diagnostic modalities available for assessing both morphological and functional abnormalities of the esophagus. If structural abnormalities are suspected, endoscopy is the method of choice. Functional evaluation is best achieved with manometry. Both endoscopy and manometry are invasive techniques, with low patient acceptance. Barium-contrast study is well tolerated, but qualitative assessment of functional abnormalities is imprecise. Esophageal scintigraphy is an easy, non-invasive, sensitive and specific diagnostic modality. It can detect esophageal dysfunction even in asymptomatic patients. In patients already diagnosed with systemic sclerosis, scintigraphy is useful in evaluating severity and progression of the disease.

  3. Qualitative and Quantitative Studies of Polygene Proteins Expression in Esophageal Precancerous Lesions and Esophageal Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chao-xia; WU Ming-yao; KUANG Li-ping

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine the expressions of MDM2, P53 and P27 proteins in chronic esophagitis, para-cancer mucosa and esophageal carcinoma. Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the expressions of MDM2, P53 and P27 proteins in forty-seven patients suffering from chronic esophagitis and eighty-five cases of esophageal carcinoma and corresponding para-cancer mucosa. Flow cytometry((FCM) was applied to detect the quantities of these proteins expressed in fresh tissues of 48 cases of esophageal cancer and their para-cancer tissues and 24 cases of relative normal mucosa at the surface of cutting edge. Results: Immunohistochemistry results showed that the expressions of the three studied proteins were very similar in the epithelia of chronic esophagitis and para-cancer mucosa (P>0.05). Both the qualitative and quantitative studies displayed that the P53 protein had no expression and its accumulations would appear only in the early stages of esophagus canceration while the MDM2 and P27 proteins had different degrees of expressions in cases of normal esophageal mucosa. MDM2 protein markedly increased in the advanced stages of esophageal canceration. A quantitative study showed that the expression of P27 protein had a linearity of decreasing tendency (F=9.132,P=0.002) in the course of esophageal canceration. Conclusion: Chronic esophagitis may be a precancerous lesion. Owing to the changes of the P53 and P27 proteins, we can also conclude that these occur in the early stages of esophagus oncogenesis, however the changes of MDM2 expression may occur in the advanced stage of esophageal canceration.

  4. CT findings of esophageal schwannoma: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Man Ho; Ryu, Dae Shick; Eom, Dae Woon; Shin, Dong Rock; Choi, Soo Jung; Ahn, Jae Hong; Park, Man Soo; Yoo, Dong Kon [Gangneung Asan Hospital, College of Medicine, University of Ulsan, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Esophageal schwannomas are a relative rare benign neoplasm that usually occurs in the upper esophagus, in the middle aged women. We report a case of a 67-year-old man with a lower esophageal schwannoma. This lesion was composed of homogenous density, iso-attenuating with the chest wall muscle on pre- and post-contrast chest computed tomography (CT). The CT findings of the esophageal schwannoma are similar to those of esophageal leiomyoma. Hense, esophageal schwannoma may be a differential diagnosis with esophageal leiomyoma.

  5. Coexistence of Wi-Fi and heterogeneous small cell networks sharing unlicensed spectrum

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, H.; Chu, X.; Guo, W; Wang, S.

    2015-01-01

    As two major players in terrestrial wireless communications, Wi-Fi systems and cellular networks have different origins and have largely evolved separately. Motivated by the exponentially increasing wireless data demand, cellular networks are evolving towards a heterogeneous and small cell network architecture, wherein small cells are expected to provide very high capacity. However, due to the limited licensed spectrum for cellular networks, any effort to achieve capacity growth through netwo...

  6. Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants of Lung Cancer Subtype: Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    anticancer drug sensitivity. Nature 483, 603–607 (2012). 21. Shoemaker, A. R. et al. Activity of the Bcl-2 family inhibitor ABT-263 in a panel of small cell...calendar LUNGevity Foundation, Inc. $ 260,869 Molecular mechanisms of acquired drug resistance is small cell lung cancer This mentored award...potency, selectivity, and pharmacological properties that will enable their use in cellular and in vivo models; Aim 3: To develop and evaluate in vivo

  7. Development of Antidepressants as Novel Agents To Treat Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    in culture at the drug concentrations used ( Fig. 1C ; Supplementary Fig. S1B; and data not shown) or in the lung epithelium of mice treated daily...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine subtype of lung cancer with high mortality. We...SCLC, small cell lung cancer, tri-cyclic anti-depressants, tricycl 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF

  8. Overview of KRAS-Driven Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Clare; Downward, Julian

    2015-01-01

    KRAS, the most frequently mutated oncogene in non-small cell lung cancer, has been utilized extensively to model human lung adenocarcinomas. The results from such studies have enhanced considerably an understanding of the relationship between KRAS and the development of lung cancer. Detailed in this overview are the features of various KRAS-driven genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of non-small cell lung cancer, their utilization, and the potential of these models for the study of lung cancer biology.

  9. Performance Analysis of Small Cells' Deployment under Imperfect Traffic Hotspot Localization

    OpenAIRE

    Jaziri, Aymen; Nasri, Ridha; Chahed, Tijani

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneous Networks (HetNets), long been considered in operators' roadmaps for macrocells' network improvements, still continue to attract interest for 5G network deployments. Understanding the efficiency of small cell deployment in the presence of traffic hotspots can further draw operators' attention to this feature. In this context, we evaluate the impact of imperfect small cell positioning on the network performances. We show that the latter is mainly impacted by the position of the ho...

  10. Dysphagia due to Multiple Esophageal Rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen N Sullivan

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old Saudi man with dysphagia due to multiple esophageal rings is reported and the literature reviewed. Dysphagia due to multiple esophageal rings is very rare. Only 15 cases have been reported. The patient is usually male and has had dysphagia for many years when presenting. The cause of the rings is unknown. Theories to explain dysphagia are that the rings are either congenital or an unusual manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux.

  11. Successful tubes treatment of esophageal fistula

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Ning; Chen, Wei-Xing; Li, You-ming; Xiang, Zhun; Gao, Ping; Fang, Ying

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To discuss the merits of “tubes treatment” for esophageal fistula (EF). Methods: A 66-year-old female who suffered from a bronchoesophageal and esophagothoratic fistula underwent a successful “three tubes treatment” (close chest drainage, negative pressure suction at the leak, and nasojejunal feeding tube), combination of antibiotics, antacid drugs and nutritional support. Another 55-year-old male patient developed an esophagopleural fistula (EPF) after esophageal carcinoma operation. He...

  12. Herpetic Esophagitis in Immunocompetent Medical Student

    OpenAIRE

    Andréia Vidica Marinho; Vinícius Mendes Bonfim; Luciana Rodrigues De Alencar; Sebastião Alves Pinto; João Alves de Araújo Filho

    2014-01-01

    Esophagitis caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV) is often documented during periods of immunosuppression in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); it is rare in immunocompetent diagnosed patients. Case reports of herpetic esophagitis in students of health sciences are extremely rare. The disease presents with a clinical picture characterized by acute odynophagia and retrosternal pain without obvious causes and ulcers, evidenced endoscopically in the middistal esophagus. Di...

  13. Definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy for clinical stage T4N0-1 non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Joo; Song, Si Yeol; Jeong, Seong Yun; Kim, Sang We; Lee, Jung Shin; Kim, Su Ssan; Choi, Eun Kyung [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Sik [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gangneung Asan Hospital, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    To determine failure patterns and survival outcomes of T4N0-1 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with definitive radiotherapy. Ninety-five patients with T4N0-1 NSCLC who received definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy from May 2003 to October 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The standard radiotherapy scheme was 66 Gy in 30 fractions. The main concurrent chemotherapy regimen was 50 mg/m2 weekly paclitaxel combined with 20 mg/m2 cisplatin or AUC 2 carboplatin. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes were failure patterns and toxicities. The median age was 64 years (range, 34 to 90 years). Eighty-eight percent of patients (n = 84) had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0-1, and 42% (n = 40) experienced pretreatment weight loss. Sixty percent of patients (n = 57) had no metastatic regional lymph nodes. The median radiation dose was EQD2 67.1 Gy (range, 56.9 to 83.3 Gy). Seventy-one patients (75%) were treated with concurrent chemotherapy; of these, 13 were also administered neoadjuvant chemotherapy. At a median follow-up of 21 months (range, 1 to 102 months), 3-year OS was 44%. The 3-year cumulative incidences of local recurrence and distant recurrence were 48.8% and 36.3%, respectively. Pretreatment weight loss and combined chemotherapy were significant factors for OS. Acute esophagitis over grade 3 occurred in three patients and grade 3 chronic esophagitis occurred in one patient. There was no grade 3-4 radiation pneumonitis. Definitive radiotherapy for T4N0-1 NSCLC results in favorable survival with acceptable toxicity rates. Local recurrence is the major recurrence pattern. Intensity modulated radiotherapy and radio-sensitizing agents would be needed to improve local tumor control.

  14. Induction chemotherapy with carboplatin-paclitaxel followed by standard radiotherapy with concurrent daily low-dose cisplatin plus weekly paclitaxel for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardizzoni, Andrea; Scolaro, Tindaro; Mereu, Carlo; Cafferata, Mara Argenide; Tixi, Lucia; Bacigalupo, Almalina; Tiseo, Marcello; Monetti, Francesco; Rosso, Riccardo

    2005-02-01

    Both induction chemotherapy and concurrent platinating agents have been shown to improve results of thoracic irradiation in the treatment of locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This phase II study investigated activity and feasibility of a novel chemoradiation regimen, including platinum and paclitaxel, both as induction chemotherapy and concurrently with thoracic radiotherapy. Previously untreated patients with histologically/cytologically proven unresectable stage I-III NSCLC were eligible. Induction chemotherapy consisted of 2 courses of 200 mg/m2 paclitaxel and carboplatin at AUC of 6 mg/mL/min every 3 weeks. From day 43, continuous thoracic irradiation (60 Gy in 30 fractions radiotherapy for 6 weeks) was given concurrently with daily cisplatin at a dose of 5 mg/m2 intravenously and weekly paclitaxel at a dose of 45 mg/m2 for 6 weeks. Fifteen patients were accrued in the first stage of the trial. According to the previous statistical considerations, accrual at the second stage of the study was halted as a result of the achievement an insufficient number of successes. Major toxicity of combined chemoradiation was grade III-IV esophagitis requiring hospitalization for artificial nutrition, which occurred in 58% of patients. Other toxicities included grade II-IV fatigue in 75% of patients and grade I-IV neuromuscular toxicity in 67%. Only 7 patients completed the treatment program as scheduled. Eight patients (53.3%; 95% confidence interval, 26.5-78.7%) had a major response (5 partial response, 3 complete response), 2 patients had disease progression, and 1 was stable at the end of treatment. Four patients died early. With a median follow up of 38 months, the median survival was 12 months. A combined chemoradiation program, including platinum and paclitaxel, appears difficult to deliver at full dose as a result of toxicity, mainly esophagitis. More active and less toxic combined modality treatments need to be developed for inoperable NSCLC.

  15. Genetic variants in inflammation-related genes are associated with radiation-induced toxicity following treatment for non-small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle A T Hildebrandt

    Full Text Available Treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy is often accompanied by the development of esophagitis and pneumonitis. Identifying patients who might be at increased risk for normal tissue toxicity would help in determination of the optimal radiation dose to avoid these events. We profiled 59 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from 37 inflammation-related genes in 173 NSCLC patients with stage IIIA/IIIB (dry disease who were treated with definitive radiation or chemoradiation. For esophagitis risk, nine SNPs were associated with a 1.5- to 4-fold increase in risk, including three PTGS2 (COX2 variants: rs20417 (HR:1.93, 95% CI:1.10-3.39, rs5275 (HR:1.58, 95% CI:1.09-2.27, and rs689470 (HR:3.38, 95% CI:1.09-10.49. Significantly increased risk of pneumonitis was observed for patients with genetic variation in the proinflammatory genes IL1A, IL8, TNF, TNFRSF1B, and MIF. In contrast, NOS3:rs1799983 displayed a protective effect with a 45% reduction in pneumonitis risk (HR:0.55, 95% CI:0.31-0.96. Pneumonitis risk was also modulated by polymorphisms in anti-inflammatory genes, including genetic variation in IL13. rs20541 and rs180925 each resulted in increased risk (HR:2.95, 95% CI:1.14-7.63 and HR:3.23, 95% CI:1.03-10.18, respectively. The cumulative effect of these SNPs on risk was dose-dependent, as evidenced by a significantly increased risk of either toxicity with an increasing number of risk genotypes (P<0.001. These results suggest that genetic variations among inflammation pathway genes may modulate the development of radiation-induced toxicity and, ultimately, help in identifying patients who are at an increased likelihood for such events.

  16. Phase I study of celecoxib with concurrent irinotecan, cisplatin, and radiation therapy for patients with unresectable locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritsuko eKomaki

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Preclinical findings suggest that adding targeted therapies to combination radiation-chemotherapy can enhance treatment efficacy; however, this approach may enhance normal tissue toxicity. We investigated the maximum tolerated dose, dose-limiting toxicities, and response rate when the selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib is added to concurrent irinotecan, cisplatin, and radiation therapy for patients with inoperable stage II-III non-small cell lung cancer. Methods and materials: Eighteen patients were analyzed in a phase I clinical dose-escalation trial. Celecoxib was given daily beginning 5 days before radiation followed by maintenance doses for 12 weeks. Toxicity was graded with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events V3.0 and response with the World Health Organization system. Primary endpoints were maximum tolerated dose of celecoxib and treatment toxicity; secondary endpoints were response and survival rates. Results: The maximum tolerated dose of celecoxib was not reached, in part owing to discontinuation of the drug supply. At doses of 200 or 400 mg/day, no patients experienced any dose-limiting toxicity (acute grade ≥4 esophagitis or pneumonitis, neutropenic fever or thrombocytopenia requiring transfusion, or acute grade ≥3 diarrhea. Grade 3 toxicities were leukopenia (5 patients, fatigue (3, pneumonitis (2, dyspnea (1, pain (1, and esophageal stricture (1. Interestingly, pulmonary fibrosis (a late toxicity was no more severe in the higher-dose (400-mg group and may have been less common than in the lower-dose group. The clinical response rate was 100% (8 complete, 10 partial. Two-year rates were: overall survival 65%; local-regional control 69%; distant metastasis-free survival 71%; and disease-free survival 64%. Conclusions: Although preliminary, our results suggest that adding celecoxib to concurrent chemoradiation for inoperable NSCLC is safe and can improve outcome without increasing normal tissue

  17. The Inter-Cell Interference Dilemma in Dense Outdoor Small Cell Deployment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polignano, Michele; Mogensen, Preben; Fotiadis, Panagiotis

    2014-01-01

    The deployment of low-power small cells is envisaged as the main driver to accommodate the mobile broadband traffic growth in cellular networks. Depending on the spatial distribution of the user traffic, a densification of the small cells may be required in confined areas. However, deploying more...... does not effect the user throughput and no interference coordination is required. On the other hand, if deployed in open areas (e.g. city squares) the interference coordination enhances both average and coverage user throughput in case of high network load condition.......The deployment of low-power small cells is envisaged as the main driver to accommodate the mobile broadband traffic growth in cellular networks. Depending on the spatial distribution of the user traffic, a densification of the small cells may be required in confined areas. However, deploying more...... and more cells in given areas may imply an increase of the inter-cell interference among the small cells. This study aims at investigating if the inter-cell interference among outdoor small cells may represent an impairment to the user experience, and evaluates if and in what conditions the interference...

  18. Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Clinical Management and Unmet Needs New Perspectives for an Old Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Macerelli, Marianna; Platania, Marco; Zilembo, Nicoletta; Vitali, Milena; Signorelli, Diego; Proto, Claudia; Ganzinelli, Monica; Gallucci, Rosaria; Agustoni, Francesco; Fasola, Gianpiero; de Braud, Filippo; Garassino, Marina Chiara

    2017-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer is a highly aggressive, difficult to treat neoplasm. Among all lung tumors, small cell lung cancers account for about 20%. Patients typically include heavy smokers in 70s age group, presenting with symptoms such as intrathoracic tumors growth, distant spread or paraneoplastic syndromes at the time of diagnosis. A useful and functional classification divides small cell lung cancers into limited disease and extensive disease. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy is the standard treatment for limited disease, with improved survival when combined with prophylactic cranial irradiation. Platinum compounds (cisplatin/carboplatin) plus etoposide remain the cornerstone for extensive disease. Nevertheless, despite high chemo- and radio-sensitivity of this cancer, nearly all patients relapse within the first two years and the prognosis is extremely poor. A deeper understanding about small cell lung cancer carcinogenesis led to develop and test a considerable number of new and targeted agents but the results are currently weak or insufficient. To date, small cell lung cancer is still a challenge for researchers. In this review, key aspects of small cell lung cancer management and controversial points of standard and new treatments will be discussed.

  19. Laryngopharyngeal reflux in patients with reflux esophagitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yung-Chih Lai; Pa-Chun Wang; Jun-Chen Lin

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To assess the prevalence of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) in patients with reflux esophagitis and dis-close factors contributing to the development of LPR.METHODS: A total of 167 patients who proved to have reflux esophagitis by endoscopy were enrolled.ings for the diagnosis of LPR. We used validated ques-tionnaires to identify the presence of laryngopharyn-geal symptoms, and stringent criteria of inclusion to increase the specificity of laryngoscopic findings. The data of patients were analyzed statistically to find out factors related to LPR.RESULTS: The prevalence rate of LPR in studied sub-jects with reflux esophagitis was 23.9%. Age, hoarse-ness and hiatus hernia were factors significantly as-sociated with LPR. In 23 patients with a hiatus hernia,the group with LPR was found to have a lower trend of esophagitis grading.CONCLUSION: Laryngopharyngeal reflux is present in patients with reflux esophagitis, and three predicting factors were identified. However, the development of LPR might be different from that of reflux esophagi-tis. The importance of hiatus hernia deserves further study.

  20. Metabolic syndrome is associated with erosive esophagitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jung Ho Park; Dong IL Park; Hong Joo Kim; Yong Kyun Cho; Chong IL Sohn; Woo Kyu Jeon; Byung Ik Kim

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To clarify whether insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome are risk factors for erosive esophagitis.METHODS: A case-control study was performed using the database of the Kangbuk Semsung Hospital Medical Screening Center.RESULTS: A total of 1679 cases of erosive esophagitis and 3358 randomly selected controls were included.Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed in 21% of the cases and 12% of the controls (P<0.001).Multiple logistic regressions confirmed the association between erosive esophagitis and metabolic syndrome (Odds ratio,1.25; 95% CI,1.04-1.49).Among the components of metabolic syndrome,increased waist circumference,elevated serum triglyceride levels and hypertension were significant risk factors for erosive esophagitis (allP<0.01).Furthermore,increased insulin resistance (Odds ratio,0.91; 95% CI,0.85-0.98)and fatty liver,as diagnosed by ultrasonography (odds ratio,1.39; 95% CI,1.20-1.60),were also related to erosive esophagitis even after adjustment for a series of confounding factors.CONCLUSION: Metabolic syndrome and increased insulin resistance are associated with an increased risk of developing erosive esophagitis.

  1. Erlotinib Hydrochloride and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, or Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Colon; Adenocarcinoma of the Rectum; Advanced Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Carcinoma of the Appendix; Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Adult Primary Liver Cancer; Recurrent Anal Cancer; Recurrent Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Esophageal Cancer; Recurrent Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Recurrent Gallbladder Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Inverted Papilloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Lymphoepithelioma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Metastatic Squamous Neck Cancer With Occult Primary; Recurrent Midline Lethal Granuloma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Mucoepidermoid Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Salivary Gland Cancer; Recurrent Small Intestine Cancer; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Hypopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Nasopharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Larynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Small Intestine Adenocarcinoma; Small Intestine Leiomyosarcoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Stage IV Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IV Anal Cancer; Stage IV Basal Cell Carcinoma of the Lip; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Esophageal Cancer; Stage IV Esthesioneuroblastoma of the Paranasal Sinus and Nasal Cavity; Stage IV Gastric Cancer

  2. 77 FR 24717 - Scientific Information Request on Local Therapies for the Treatment of Stage I Non-Small Cell...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-25

    ... Therapies for the Treatment of Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Endobronchial Obstruction Due to... for the Treatment of Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and Endobronchial Obstruction Due to Advanced... effectiveness review of the evidence for local therapies for the treatment of stage I non-small cell lung...

  3. Esophageal and Small Intestinal Mucosal Integrity in Eosinophilic Esophagitis and Response to an Elemental Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warners, Marijn J; Vlieg-Boerstra, Berber J; Verheij, Joanne; van Hamersveld, Patricia H P; van Rhijn, Bram D; Van Ampting, Marleen T J; Harthoorn, Lucien F; de Jonge, Wouter J; Smout, Andreas J P M; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2017-07-01

    The esophageal mucosal integrity is impaired in eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) and it has been suggested that the duodenal permeability is increased. The absence of food allergens may restore the integrity. The aims of this study were to assess duodenal permeability in EoE and to evaluate the effect of an elemental diet on the esophageal and duodenal integrity. In this prospective study 17 adult EoE patients and 8 healthy controls (HC) were included. Esophageal biopsy specimens were sampled before and after 4 weeks of elemental diet to measure eosinophil counts and gene expression of tight junction and barrier integrity proteins. Esophageal and duodenal impedance were measured by electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and Ussing chambers were used to measure transepithelial resistance (TER) and transepithelial molecule flux. Small intestinal permeability was measured using a test, measuring lactulose/mannitol (L/M) ratios. In EoE patients, the esophageal but not the duodenal integrity was impaired, compared with HC. We observed no significant difference between L/M ratios of HC and EoE patients. After diet, eosinophil counts decreased significantly, which was paralleled by normalization of esophageal impedance and transepithelial molecule flux. The esophageal TER improved significantly, but did not reach values seen in HC. Esophageal expression of genes encoding for barrier integrity proteins filaggrin and desmoglein-1 was impaired at baseline and restored after diet. An elemental diet restores esophageal integrity, suggesting that it is at least partly secondary to allergen exposure. Duodenal integrity seems not to be affected in EoE, and possibly plays a minor role in its pathophysiology.

  4. Personal Experience in TCM Treatment of Reflux Esophagitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪流

    2003-01-01

    @@ Reflux esophagitis falls into the category of reflux gastroesophagopathy. It is characterized by inflammation, erosion, ulcer formation and fibrosis of the esophageal mucous membrane due to reflux of the content of the stomach and duodenum into the esophagus.

  5. Nutrition in peri-operative esophageal cancer management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenhagen, E.; Vulpen, J.K. van; Hillegersberg, R. van; May, A.M.; Siersema, P.D.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Nutritional status and dietary intake are increasingly recognized as essential areas in esophageal cancer management. Nutritional management of esophageal cancer is a continuously evolving field and comprises an interesting area for scientific research. Areas covered: This review

  6. Genetics Home Reference: esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions EA/TEF esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... the expand/collapse boxes. Description Esophageal atresia/tracheoesophageal fistula ( EA/TEF ) is a condition resulting from abnormal ...

  7. Consolidation chemotherapy improves progression-free survival in stage III small-cell lung cancer following concurrent chemoradiotherapy: a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen XR

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Xin-Ru Chen,1,* Jian-Zhong Liang,2,* Shu-Xiang Ma,1 Wen-Feng Fang,1 Ning-Ning Zhou,1 Hai Liao,1 De-Lan Li,1 Li-Kun Chen1 1Department of Medical Oncology, 2Department of Pathology, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT is the standard treatment for limited-stage small-cell lung cancer (LD-SCLC. However, the efficacy of consolidation chemotherapy (CCT in LD-SCLC remains controversial despite several studies that were performed in the early years of CCT use. The aim of this study was to reevaluate the effectiveness and toxicities associated with CCT. Methods: This retrospective analysis evaluated 177 patients with stage IIIA and IIIB small-cell lung cancer (SCLC who underwent CCRT from January 2001 to December 2013 at Sun Yat-Sen University Cancer Center (SYSUCC. Overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS were analyzed using Kaplan–Meier methods. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to analyze patient prognosis factors. Results: Among the 177 patients, 72 (41% received CCT and 105 (59% did not receive CCT. PFS was significantly better for patients in the CCT group compared to that for patients in the non-CCT group (median PFS: 17.0 vs 12.9 months, respectively, P=0.031, whereas the differences in OS were not statistically significant (median OS: 31.6 vs 24.8 months, respectively, P=0.118. The 3- and 5-year OS rates were 33.3% and 20.8% for patients in the CCT group and 27.6% and 6.7% for patients in the non-CCT group, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that having a pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen level <5 ng/mL (P=0.035, having undergone prophylactic cranial irradiation (P<0.001, and having received CCT (P=0.002 could serve as favorable independent prognostic factors

  8. [Current status and perspectives of radiotherapy for esophageal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S X; Wang, L H

    2016-09-23

    Esophageal cancer is one of the most common cancers in China. More than 80% of esophageal cancer patients are diagnosed at a late stage and are not eligible for surgery. Radiotherapy is one of the most important modalities in esophageal cancer treatment. Here we reviewed the advances in esophageal cancer radiotherapy and radiotherapy-based combined-modality therapy, such as optimization of radiation dose and target volume, application of precise radiotherapy technique and the integration of radiotherapy with chemotherapy and targeted therapy.

  9. Migrated esophageal stent posing a challenge for ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nita D'souza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-expandable esophageal stents are being commonly used for palliative treatment in advanced esophageal cancer patients to relieve dysphagia, prevent tracheoesophageal fistula, and facilitate symptomatic betterment. The modern covered stents reduce the ingrowth of the tumor but have seen an increase in the incidence of stent migrations. We report a rather complicated presentation of an esophageal stent for esophageal dilatation and a challenging management of a difficult tracheostomy.

  10. Effects of anti-hypertensive drugs on esophageal body contraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koichi; Yoshida; Kenji; Furuta; Kyoichi; Adachi; Shunji; Ohara; Terumi; Morita; Takashi; Tanimura; Shuji; Nakata; Masaharu; Miki; Kenji; Koshino; Yoshikazu; Kinoshita

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To clarify the effects of anti-hypertensive drugs on esophageal contraction and determine their possi-ble relationship with gastro-esophageal reflux disease.METHODS:Thirteen healthy male volunteers were enrolled. Esophageal body peristaltic contractions and lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure were measured using high resolution manometry. All subjects were randomly examined on four separate occasions following administrations of nifedipine,losartan,and atenolol,as well as without any drug administ...

  11. Spectrum of esophageal abnormality seen on thoracic CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu; Jeon, Yong Sun; Jeong, Seok [Inha university Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Jin [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    A variety of diseases involve the esophagus including esophagitis, benign or malignant tumors, varices, and esophageal perforation. We reviewed the thoracic CT of these various esophageal diseases, and classified them by similar CT findings. The CT findings were circumferential wall thickening, nodular wall thickening, abnormal luminal dilatation, fistula formation, and mass or mass like lesion. Although CT alone has limited diagnostic ability in esophageal disease, it may have an important role in diagnosing submucosal dissection, fistula, perforation, and intramural abscess.

  12. Combined laparoscopic and thoracoscopic Ivor Lewis esophagectomy for esophageal cancer: initial experience from China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui; HU Bin; YOU Bin; MIAO Jin-bai; FU Yi-li; CHEN Qi-rui

    2012-01-01

    Background Minimally invasive lvor Lewis esophagectomy was usually performed with either hand-sewn or circular stapler anastomosis through a small thoracotomy or using a side-to-side stapler anastomotic technique.This study aimed to present our initial results of lvor Lewis esophagectomy using a circular-stapled anastomosis with transoral anvil technique.Methods Six patients with esophageal cancer underwent minimally invasive lvor Lewis esophagectomy with an intrathoracic circular-stapled end-to-end anastomosis.The abdominal portion was operated on laparoscopically,and the thoracic portion was done using thoracoscopic techniques.A 25 mm anvil connected to a 90 cm long delivery tube was introduced transorally to the esophageal stump in a tilted position,the anvil head was then connected to circular stapler.The anastomosis was completed under direct thoracoscopic view.Results A total of six patients in this report successfully underwent total laparoscopic and thoracoscopic lvor Lewis esophagectomy with a circular-stapled anastomosis using a transoral anvil.They were five male and one female patients,and had a mean age of 55 years (range,38-69 years).The thoracic and abdominal operations were successfully performed without any intraoperative complications or conversion to laparotomy or thoracotomy.The passage of the anvil head was technically easy and successful in all six cases.The mean overall operative time was (260±42) minutes (range,220-300 minutes),and the mean estimated blood loss was (520±160) ml (range,130-800 ml).Patients resumed a liquid oral diet on postoperative day seven.The median length of hospital stay was 17 days (range,9-25 days).The postoperative pathological diagnosis was esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in five patients and esophageal small cell carcinoma in one patient.Tumors were staged as T2N0M0 in three cases,T2N1M0 in one case,and T3N0M0 in two cases.During the mean follow-up of 2.5 months (range,2-4months),there were no intraoperative

  13. Black esophagus (acute esophageal necrosis) after spinal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román Fernández, A; López Álvarez, A; Fossati Puertas, S; Areán González, I; Varela García, O; Viaño López, P M

    2014-01-01

    Acute esophagic necrosis or black esophagus is an uncommon clinical entity that owes its name to the endoscopic view of the necrotic esophageal mucosa. It is always related with a critical medical condition and usually has an ischemic etiology. We report the first case of acute esophageal necrosis after a spinal anesthetic for partial hip joint arthroplasty. We discuss the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms.

  14. Eosinophilic esophagitis: A newly established cause of dysphagia

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Brian M; Shaffer, Eldon A.

    2006-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis has rapidly become a recognized entity causing dysphagia in young adults. This review summarizes the current knowledge of eosinophilic esophagitis including the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnostic criteria, pathophysiology, treatment, and prognosis. An extensive search of PubMed/Medline (1966-December 2005) for available English literature in humans for eosinophilic esophagitis was completed. Appropriate articles listed in the bibliographies were also atta...

  15. Strategies to improve the outcome of esophagectomy for esophageal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.

    2009-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the 8th most common type of malignancy in the world. For the past decades the incidence of esophageal cancer has rapidly increased, particularly due to a rise in adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. Yet, worldwide the incidence of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is highest

  16. Translational Research on Esophageal Cancer: From Cell Line to Clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Boonstra (Jurjen)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWorldwide esophageal cancer is a signifi cant and an increasing health problem. In 2005, there were 497,700 new cases, and the prevalence is expected to increase by approximately 140% by 2025. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) accounts for most of the cases of esophageal cancer w

  17. Parotid small cell carcinoma presenting with long-term survival after surgery alone: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanazawa Takeharu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Primary involvement of the salivary glands in small cell carcinoma is rare, and has one of the worst prognoses of salivary gland neoplasms. However, it has been reported that some cases have a favorable outcome, although the prognostic factors are still under consideration. Multidisciplinary therapy was usually required to achieve long-term survival. Recently, a resemblance of some small cell carcinomas of the salivary gland to cutaneous Merkel cell carcinoma was suggested; the latter have the potential for spontaneous regression, which is related to a favorable clinical outcome. Case presentation We present a locoregional advanced parotid small cell carcinoma with multiple lymph node metastases in an 87-year-old Asian woman. The tumor was controlled by surgery alone, and nine-year disease-free survival was achieved without any adjunctive therapy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the longest reported follow-up of head and neck small cell carcinoma. Conclusion We believe this to be the first case of small cell carcinoma with involvement of the salivary glands reported in the literature with a good outcome after surgery alone without any adjunctive therapy.

  18. Reverse Auction Based Green Offloading Scheme for Small Cell Heterogeneous Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The small cell is treated as a promising proposition to provide hot spot capacity and higher data rates. However, even with dense small cell deployment scenario, the heavy traffic load pressure and low energy efficiency in the small cell heterogeneous network (HetNet still exist. Therefore, how to make the best use of densely deployed small cells under HetNet environments becomes the focus of researches. Offloading provides a feasible solution to promote cooperation between macrocells and small cells for user traffic supporting. In this paper, we propose the reverse auction based Green Offloading (GO scheme for energy efficiency improvements. The proposed GO scheme employs the reverse auction theory to handle the offloading decision process, aiming at maximizing the system energy efficiency under the constraints of user Quality of Service (QoS requirements, bandwidth, and transmission power limitations. Moreover, the reverse auction model gives the facility of multicell coordination transmissions with multiple winners situation. The energy efficiency optimization problem with constraints is solved by Dynamic Programming method with Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT conditions. The Individual Rationality and Truthfulness of the reverse auction model are also proved. By comparing the energy efficiency performances of the proposed GO scheme with current works within the Long Term Evolution-Advanced (LTE-A system downlink scenario, simulation results show the improvements of the proposed GO scheme.

  19. EXPRESSION OF P120ctn IN NON-SMALL-CELL LUNG CANCER: A CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL STUDY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志坤; 林东; 王恩华; 关奕

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of p120ctn in non-small-cell lungcancer (NSCLC) and its relationship with clinicopathological factors and prognosis. Methods: p120ctn expression was tested by immunohistochemistry for 80 tumors from patients with non-small-cell lung cancer. Correlations were investigated between p120ctn immunostaining in primary tumors and clinicopathological characteristics and survival. Results: Abnormal expression of p120ctn was found in 68/80(85%) tumors in which 43 cases had cytoplasmic staining. Abnormal staining of p120ctn was related with high TNM stage (P=0.003) and nodal metastasis (P=0.024).However, there was no correlation between altered expression with poor differentiation and histological type. According to Kaplan-Meier survival estimate, the expression of p120ctn was related to the poor survival (P=0.015) of patients. A Cox regression analysis revealed that p120ctn expression was a significant independent factor in the prediction of survival for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (P=0.008). Conclusion: altered expression of p120ctn was found in non-small-cell lung cancers and was correlated with lymph node metastasis and prognosis. From a practical point of view, the expression of p120ctn can be of prognostic value for patients with non-small-cell lung cancer.

  20. Small Cell Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Urinary Tract Successfully Managed with Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha Ahsaini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Small cell neuroendocrine carcinomas of the urinary tract is an extremely rare entity and very few cases have been reported in the literature. Small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the urinary tract (SCC-UT is the association between bladder and urinary upper tract-small cell carcinoma (UUT-SCC. It characterized by an aggressive clinical course. The prognosis is poor due to local or distant metastases, and usually the muscle of the bladder is invaded. Case Presentation. We report a rare case of a 54-year-old Arab male native of moroccan; he is a smoker and was referred to our institution for intermittent hematuria. Following a diagnosis of small cell neuroendocrine carcinomas of the ureter and the bladder, thoracoabdominal-pelvic CT was done, and the staging of the tumor was done in the bladder (T2N0M0 and (T1N0M0 in the ureter. Neoadjuvant alternating doublet chemotherapy with ifosfamide/doxorubicin and etoposide/cisplatin was realized, and nephroureterectomy associated to a cystoprostatectomy was carried out. After 24 months of followup, no local or distant metastasis was detected. Conclusion. The purpose of this review is to present a rare case of pure small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the urinary tract and review the literature about the place of neoadjuvant chemotherapy in this rare tumors.

  1. Small cell carcinoma of vulva. Curative multimodal treatment in face of resistance to initial standard chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckert, Franziska; Bamberg, Michael; Mueller, Arndt-Christian [Dept. of Radiooncology, Eberhard Karls Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany); Fehm, Tanja [Gynecologic Clinic, Eberhard Karls Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    Background and Purpose: Extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma (EPSCC) is a rare disease, which has a slightly better prognosis than small cell lung cancer, but still dismal. Gynecologic small cell malignancies tend to show a better survival than similar histologies of other regions. However, of five reported cases of vulvar manifestation only one patient was disease-free at the time of publication with limited follow-up. Case Report: The authors describe a case of locally advanced small cell vulva carcinoma infiltrating the anal sphincter and urethra with spread to inguinal lymph nodes treated by radiochemotherapy and regional hyperthermia. After three cycles of carboplatin/etoposide, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging indicated only little regressive transformations but overall stable disease. Surgical options were excluded. Therefore, curative radiotherapy to a total dose of > 65 Gy to macroscopic tumor, chemotherapy with cisplatin weekly, and regional hyperthermia were performed. Acute severe toxicity was limited to skin reactions. Despite the disadvantageous situation with inguinal lymph node metastases and chemoresistance, the multimodal therapy yielded a 5-year disease-free survival. Conclusion: Thus, the trimodal regimen of radiochemotherapy plus regional hyperthermia offered a curative chance in spite of resistance to the standard chemotherapy for irresectable, locally advanced small cell carcinoma of the vulva. Therefore, this approach merits further evaluation for limited disease of EPSCC. (orig.)

  2. Denture mis-swallowing in the sliding esophageal hiatal hernia mimics esophageal perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao-Yang; Lee, Shih-Chun; Chen, Chun-Wen; Chen, Jen-Chih

    2008-08-01

    Mis-swallowing of a foreign body in the esophagus coexisting with sliding hernia might be misdiagnosed as esophageal perforation with mediastinal abscess. We report an 89-year-old woman, bedridden for a long period in a nursing home after a previous cerebrovascular accident, who was sent to our emergency department in a state of sepsis because she had swallowed a radio-opaque partial denture. The retention of the denture as an esophageal foreign body was complicated with mediastinitis and bilateral pleural effusion. The inability of the patient to give a reliable clinical history delayed the diagnosis. This report highlights the difficulty in precisely locating a partial denture because of conflicting radiologic findings and the coexistence of esophageal sliding hernia, all of which led to a misdiagnosis of possible esophageal perforation. A right posterolateral thoracotomy with gastrostomy was performed to remove the lower esophageal foreign body after esophagoscopy failed. The surgical finding of a coincidental sliding esophageal hiatal hernia correlated well with the clinical presentation. Managing such a complicated esophageal foreign body in this elderly patient was challenging.

  3. Esophageal surgery in minimally invasive era

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    The widespread popularity of new surgical technologiessuch as laparoscopy, thoracoscopy and robotics has ledmany surgeons to treat esophageal diseases with thesemethods. The expected benefits of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) mainly include reductions of postoperativecomplications, length of hospital stay, and pain andbetter cosmetic results. All of these benefits couldpotentially be of great interest when dealing with theesophagus due to the potentially severe complicationsthat can occur after conventional surgery. Moreover,robotic platforms are expected to reduce many of thedifficulties encountered during advanced laparoscopicand thoracoscopic procedures such as anastomoticreconstructions,accurate lymphadenectomies, andvascular sutures. Almost all esophageal diseases areapproachable in a minimally invasive way, includingdiverticula, gastro-esophageal reflux disease, achalasia,perforations and cancer. Nevertheless, while the limitsof MIS for benign esophageal diseases are mainlytechnical issues and costs, oncologic outcomes remainthe cornerstone of any procedure to cure malignancies,for which the long-term results are critical. Furthermore,many of the minimally invasive esophageal operationsshould be compared to pharmacologic interventionsand advanced pure endoscopic procedures; such acomparison requires a difficult literature analysis andleads to some confounding results of clinical trials. Thisreview aims to examine the evidence for the use of MISin both malignancies and more common benign diseaseof the esophagus, with a particular emphasis on futuredevelopments and ongoing areas of research.

  4. The esophageal microbiota in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pilato, Vincenzo; Freschi, Giancarlo; Ringressi, Maria Novella; Pallecchi, Lucia; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Bechi, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    The esophageal mucosa is among the sites colonized by human microbiota, the complex microbial ecosystem that colonizes various body surfaces and is increasingly recognized to play roles in several physiological and pathological processes. Our understanding of the composition of the esophageal microbiota in health and disease is challenged by the need for invasive sampling procedures and by the dynamic nature of the esophageal environment and remains limited in comparison with the information available for other body sites. Members of the genus Streptococcus appear to be the major components of the microbiota of the healthy esophagus, although the presence of several other taxa has also been reported. Dysbiosis, consisting of enrichment in some Gram-negative taxa (including Veillonella, Prevotella, Haemophilus, Neisseria, Campylobacter, and Fusobacterium), has been reported in association with gastroesophageal reflux disease and is hypothesized to contribute to the evolution of this condition toward Barrett's esophagus (which is the most common esophageal precancerous lesion) and, eventually, adenocarcinoma. Some Campylobacter species (mostly C. concisus) are also putatively involved in the progression of disease toward adenocarcinoma. However, variable findings have recently been reported in additional studies. Causative relationships between dysbiosis or specific bacterial species and esophageal diseases remain controversial and warrant further investigations. © 2016 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. Multidisciplinary approach for patients with esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Victoria M Villaflor; Marco E Allaix; Bruce Minsky; Fernando A Herbella; Marco G Patti

    2012-01-01

    Patients with esophageal cancer have a poor prognosis because they often have no symptoms until their disease is advanced.There are no screening recommendations for patients unless they have Barrett's esophagitis or a significant family history of this disease.Often,esophageal cancer is not diagnosed until patients present with dysphagia,odynophagia,anemia or weight loss.When symptoms occur,the stage is often stage Ⅲ or greater.Treatment of patients with very early stage disease is fairly straight forward using only local treatment with surgical resection or endoscopic mucosal resection.The treatment of patients who have locally advanced esophageal cancer is more complex and controversial.Despite multiple trials,treatment recommendations are still unclear due to conflicting data.Sadly,much of our data is difficult to interpret due to many of the trials done have included very heterogeneous groups of patients both histologically as well as anatomically.Additionally,studies have been underpowered or stopped early due to poor accrual.In the United States,concurrent chemoradiotherapy prior to surgical resection has been accepted by many as standard of care in the locally advanced patient.Patients who have metastatic disease are treated palliatively.The aim of this article is to describe the multidisciplinary approach used by an established team at a single high volume center for esophageal cancer,and to review the literature which guides our treatment recommendations.

  6. Analysis of Clinicopathologic Features of Esophageal Carcinoma Patients Undergoing Surgery-a Report of 4,329 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Liu; Liyun Guan; Yumin Ping; Xianli Meng; Rui Wang; Junfeng Liu; Xiaoling Wang; Xishan Hao; Ying Jin; Haixin Li; Linan Song; Shijie Wang; Peizhong Wang; Yong Chen; Qian Fan

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the clinicopathological features of esophageal carcinoma (EC) patients, and to analyze epidemiologic characteristics and the current situation of esophageal cancioma in the southern area of Hebei Province.METHODS A total of 4329 patients with esophageal cancinoma,undergoing surgery in the Fourth Hospital of Hebei Medical University during a period from January 1996 to December 2005,were selected. Collection and statistical analysis of the pathologic data were performed using a SAS 6.0 software package.RESULTS Over the past ten years, there has been a tendency for an increase in the mean age of EC onset (P < 0.05), a downtrend in the percentage of squamous cancer (SqCa) (P < 0.05) and an uptrend in the frequency of small cell carcinoma (P < 0.05). In clinical stages, there was a drop in the percentage of Stage-Ⅱsquamous EC patients (P < 0.05), and an increase in that of Stage-Ⅳ patients (P < 0.05). There were statistical differences in sex, age,pathologic types, depth of infiltration, ratio of stages and lymph node metastasis, etc. Among the superior, middle and inferior segments of the EC diseased region (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION It was relatively late for the EC patients from this area to see a doctor, resulting in a drop in the ratio of SqCa and an ascensus in that of small cell cancer. However, due to a low incidence of adenocarcinoma, no obvious ascending tendency was found in the frequency of this carcinoma over the past ten years.

  7. Airway and esophageal stenting in patients with advanced esophageal cancer and pulmonary involvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Paganin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Most inoperable patients with esophageal-advanced cancer (EGC have a poor prognosis. Esophageal stenting, as part of a palliative therapy management has dramatically improved the quality of live of EGC patients. Airway stenting is generally proposed in case of esophageal stent complication, with a high failure rate. The study was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of scheduled and non-scheduled airway stenting in case of indicated esophageal stenting for EGC. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The study is an observational study conducted in pulmonary and gastroenterology endoscopy units. Consecutive patients with EGC were referred to endoscopy units. We analyzed the outcome of airway stenting in patients with esophageal stent indication admitted in emergency or with a scheduled intervention. Forty-four patients (58+/-\\-8 years of age with esophageal stenting indication were investigated. Seven patients (group 1 were admitted in emergency due to esophageal stent complication in the airway (4 fistulas, 3 cases with malignant infiltration and compression. Airway stenting failed for 5 patients. Thirty-seven remaining patients had a scheduled stenting procedure (group 2: stent was inserted for 13 patients with tracheal or bronchial malignant infiltration, 12 patients with fistulas, and 12 patients with airway extrinsic compression (preventive indication. Stenting the airway was well tolerated. Life-threatening complications were related to group 1. Overall mean survival was 26+/-10 weeks and was significantly shorter in group 1 (6+/-7.6 weeks than in group 2 (28+/-11 weeks, p<0.001. Scheduled double stenting significantly improved symptoms (95% at day 7 with a low complication rate (13%, and achieved a specific cancer treatment (84% in most cases. CONCLUSION: Stenting the airway should always be considered in case of esophageal stent indication. A multidisciplinary approach with initial airway evaluation improved prognosis and decreased

  8. Small cell osteosarcoma of a toe phalanx: a case report and review of literature

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    Bras Johannes

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This report describes the radiological and histological findings of a small cell osteosarcoma of a toe phalanx in a 38 year old man. This man presented with pain, swelling and redness of the left third toe. Medical history revealed an osteomyelitis of this toe eight years prior. Based on clinical findings and medical history the lesion was diagnosed as an osteomyelitis. However, peroperatively the lesion had a malignant aspect. Histological examination revealed a small cell osteosarcoma of the proximal phalanx. Osteosarcoma of the foot and especially of the tubular bones is rare. Moreover small cell osteosarcoma is a rare subtype of osteosarcoma. This case demonstrates that medical history and clinical examination can be misleading. In patients with apparent bone destruction, a malignancy must always be excluded prior to treatment. It emphasises the care that should be taken in the process of formulating a diagnosis.

  9. Next-generation anthracycline for the management of small cell lung cancer: focus on amrubicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiko Yamamoto

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Michiko Yamamoto, Akira Takakura, Noriyuki MasudaDepartment of Respiratory Medicine, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Kitasato, JapanAbstract: Amrubicin is a totally synthetic anthracycline anticancer agent that acts as a potent topoisomerase II inhibitor. Amrubicin has been approved in Japan for the treatment of lung cancer, and the results from clinical studies of amrubicin as a single agent or as part of combination regimens for lung cancer, particularly for small cell lung cancer, conducted in Japan and overseas have been promising. Amrubicin should be included among new treatment strategies especially for chemoresistant patients. Here, preclinical, pharmacological, and clinical data on the use of amrubicin for the treatment of small cell lung cancer are reviewed.Keywords: amrubicin, anthracycline, small-cell lung cancer, extensive disease

  10. Subcuteneous swelling as the first clinical manifestation of small cell carcinoma of lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Subcutaneous swelling as first clinical presentation of small cell lung carcinoma is uncommon and rarely reported in literature. This case highlights a rare presentation in which subcutaneous swelling was the first clinical manifestation of a small cell carcinoma of lung which also had metastasis to rib bone, muscle and pleural involvement as pleural effusion. We describe the case of a 64-year-old male patient who presented with dyspnea, pleuritic pain, loss of weight and nodule on his anterior chest, back and left arm suspicious of lipoma. Biopsies revealed small cell carcinoma of lung. This case demonstrates the meticulous work up of subcutaneous swelling in the clinical scenario of breathlessness, chest pain and loss of weight.

  11. Photodynamic therapy for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simone, Charles B; Friedberg, Joseph S; Glatstein, Eli; Stevenson, James P; Sterman, Daniel H; Hahn, Stephen M; Cengel, Keith A

    2012-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy is increasingly being utilized to treat thoracic malignancies. For patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer, photodynamic therapy is primarily employed as an endobronchial therapy to definitely treat endobronchial, roentgenographically occult, or synchronous primary carcinomas. As definitive monotherapy, photodynamic therapy is most effective in treating bronchoscopically visible lung cancers ≤1 cm with no extracartilaginous invasion. For patients with advanced-stage non-small cell lung cancer, photodynamic therapy can be used to palliate obstructing endobronchial lesions, as a component of definitive multi-modality therapy, or to increase operability or reduce the extent of operation required. A review of the available medical literature detailing all published studies utilizing photodynamic therapy to treat at least 10 patients with non-small cell lung cancer is performed, and treatment recommendations and summaries for photodynamic therapy applications are described.

  12. Concurrent pemetrexed and radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with inoperable stage III non-small cell lung cancer: a systematic review of completed and ongoing studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Hak; Gerber, David E; Bradley, Jeffrey D; Iyengar, Puneeth; Monberg, Matthew; Treat, Joseph; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Koustensis, Andrew; Barker, Scott; Obasaju, Coleman

    2015-03-01

    Current standard for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is combined concurrent therapy with a platinum-based regimen. Preclinical synergistic activity of pemetrexed with radiation therapy (RT) and favorable toxicity profile has led to clinical trials evaluating pemetrexed in chemoradiation regimens. This literature search of concurrent pemetrexed and RT treatment of patients with stage III NSCLC included MEDLINE database, meeting abstracts, and the clinical trial registry database. Nineteen unique studies were represented across all databases including 11 phase I studies and eight phase II studies. Of the six phase II trials with mature data available, median overall survival ranged from 18.7 to 34 months. Esophagitis and pneumonitis occurred in 0-16% and 0-23% of patients, respectively. Of the ongoing trials, there is one phase III and four phase II trials with pemetrexed in locally advanced NSCLC. Pemetrexed can be administered safely at full systemic doses with either cisplatin or carboplatin concomitantly with radical doses of thoracic radiation therapy. While results from the ongoing phase III PROCLAIM trial are needed to address definitively the efficacy of pemetrexed-cisplatin plus RT in stage III NSCLC, available results from phase II trials suggest that this regimen has promising activity with an acceptable toxicity profile.

  13. A phase I study of S-1 with concurrent thoracic radiotherapy in elderly patients with localized advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takigawa, Nagio; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Hosokawa, Shinobu; Nogami, Naoyuki; Aoe, Keisuke; Gemba, Kenichi; Fujiwara, Keiichi; Harita, Shingo; Takemoto, Mitsuhiro; Himei, Kengo; Shinkai, Tetsu; Fujiwara, Yoshirou; Takata, Saburo; Tabata, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Susumu; Tanimoto, Mitsune

    2011-01-01

    S-1, an oral 5-fluorouracil derivative, is effective against advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with mild toxicity and synergistic effects with radiation in preclinical trials. In this phase I study, we evaluated the dose-limiting toxicity and recommended dose of S-1 for a future phase II study when administered concurrently with thoracic radiation (total dose of 60 Gy at 2 Gy per daily fraction) in elderly patients (>75 years old) with localized advanced NSCLC. S-1 was administered on days 1-14 and 29-42 at the following dosages: 60, 70, and 80 mg/m(2)/day. Twenty-two previously untreated patients were enrolled in this study. Dose-limiting toxicity included febrile neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, stomatitis, and pneumonitis. One patient had grade 5 radiation pneumonitis. No other patient experienced radiation pneumonitis or esophagitis exceeding grade 2. The recommended dose for S-1 was determined to be 80 mg/m(2)/day, which produced an overall response rate of 75% (n=12). The median progression-free survival time was 11.5 months (95% confidence interval: 7.1-15.8 months) with a median follow-up time of 27.9 months. These results indicate that concurrent treatment with S-1 and thoracic radiation is a feasible option for NSCLC in the elderly. A phase II study is currently under way.

  14. Clinical efficacy of concurrent carboplatin, etoposide, and definitive radiotherapy for stage III non-small-cell lung cancer. Consideration as to therapeutic outcomes and morbidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kodaira, Takeshi; Yamakawa, Kouji; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki [Tosei General Hospital, Seto, Aichi (Japan); Matsubara, Kazuhito; Ishigaki, Takeo

    1998-08-01

    To improve the therapeutic outcome for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer, we applied definitive thoracic radiotherapy combined with concurrent administration of carboplatin and etoposide. We retrospectively analyzed 55 eligible patients with Stage III disease. The one-year rate of overall survival (OAS) and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) of the total group were 46.1% and 36.1%, respectively. Twenty-nine patients developed thoracic failures (52.7%) and 23 (41.8%) distant failures. Using univariate and multivariate analyses, radiation dose, performance status and LDH were revealed as significant prognostic factors of OAS, and LDH had a strong adverse effect on DMFS. Leucopenia of Grade 3 or higher was noted in 75.9%, anemia in 55.6%, thrombocytopenia in 59.3%, esophagitis in 20.4%, and lung injury in 10.9%. Sufficient gain was not obtained by out strategy, and higher morbidity, especially of lung, was noted than was expected. It was suspected that simultaneous use of oral etoposide might increase radiation pneumonitis, so one should take special care of unexpected toxicity in concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Both the hyperfractionated technique of radiotherapy and the time-dose modification of anti-tumor drugs should be considered in further steps. (author)

  15. Clinical Application of Adjuvant Treatment after Operation in Patients with Stage IIIa Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

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    Yajie GAO

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The efficacy of complete resection of the cancer for patients with stage IIIa non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC is limited. Synthetic therapy is taken the lead in advocating at present. However, the value of post-operative radiotherapy is not still clear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the survival time and side effects of postoperative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of stage IIIa NSCLC. Methods Between December 2003 and June 2007, 52 cases that have completed followed-up data with stage IIIa of NSCLC received in the First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University. Twenty-three patients received postoperative chemoradiotherapy (group A and 29 patients received postoperative chemotherapy combined with radiotherapy (group B. Group A adopted platinum-based combination chemotherapy for 4-6 cycles. The chemotherapeutics included gemcitabine, vinorelbine and docetaxel. Group B used chemotherapy for 2-4 cycles and then received 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT. The prescribe dose of target volume was 50 Gy. The chemotherapy was same as for group A and needed 4 cycles in all. The impact of postoperative adjuvant treatment on survival and toxicity was observed in patients with stage IIIa NSCLC and the reason of disease progression was analyzed. Results The median survival was 32.5 months in group A and 31.9 months in group B (P=0.371. Progression-free survival extended about 6 months (P=0.044. The survival rate was 87% at 1 year, 0.1% at 2 year, 33% at 3 year for group A compared with 93%, 69%, 45% for group B. The major side effects were hematological and gastrointestinal toxicities, including nausea, vomiting and neutropenia. There was no significant difference in these toxicities between the two groups (P>0.05. Radioactiv esophageal infection occurred in 17.2% of the patients. Acute and late radioactive lung infection occurred in 13.8% and 27.6% of the patients. All these toxicities

  16. Precision Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in Poor Performing Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Phase 1 Dose Escalation Trial

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    Westover, Kenneth D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Loo, Billy W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Gerber, David E. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Iyengar, Puneeth; Choy, Hak [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Diehn, Maximilian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Hughes, Randy; Schiller, Joan; Dowell, Jonathan [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Wardak, Zabi [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Sher, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Christie, Alana; Xie, Xian-Jin [Department of Clinical Science, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Corona, Irma [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Sharma, Akanksha [School of Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Wadsworth, Margaret E. [Radiation Oncology of Mississippi, Jackson, Mississippi (United States); Timmerman, Robert, E-mail: Robert.Timmerman@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: Treatment regimens for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) give suboptimal clinical outcomes. Technological advancements such as radiation therapy, the backbone of most treatment regimens, may enable more potent and effective therapies. The objective of this study was to escalate radiation therapy to a tumoricidal hypofractionated dose without exceeding the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) in patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage II to IV or recurrent NSCLC and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2 or greater and not candidates for surgical resection, stereotactic radiation, or concurrent chemoradiation were eligible. Highly conformal radiation therapy was given to treat intrathoracic disease in 15 fractions to a total of 50, 55, or 60 Gy. Results: Fifty-five patients were enrolled: 15 at the 50-Gy, 21 at the 55-Gy, and 19 at the 60-Gy dose levels. A 90-day follow-up was completed in each group without exceeding the MTD. With a median follow-up of 12.5 months, there were 93 grade ≥3 adverse events (AEs), including 39 deaths, although most AEs were considered related to factors other than radiation therapy. One patient from the 55- and 60-Gy dose groups developed grade ≥3 esophagitis, and 5, 4, and 4 patients in the respective dose groups experienced grade ≥3 dyspnea, but only 2 of these AEs were considered likely related to therapy. There was no association between fraction size and toxicity (P=.24). The median overall survival was 6 months with no significant differences between dose levels (P=.59). Conclusions: Precision hypofractionated radiation therapy consisting of 60 Gy in 15 fractions for locally advanced NSCLC is generally well tolerated. This treatment regimen could provide patients with poor performance status a potent alternative to chemoradiation. This study has implications for the cost effectiveness of lung cancer therapy. Additional studies of long

  17. Is there a role for surgery in stage Ⅲ A-N2 non-small cell lung cancer?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul E. VAN SCHIL; Michèle DE WAELE; Jeroen M. HENDRIKS; Patrick R. LAUWERS

    2008-01-01

    The role of surgery in stage Ⅲ A-N2 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains controversial.Most important prognostic factors are mediastinal downstaging and complete surgical resection. Different restaging techniques exist to evaluate response after induction therapy and these are subdivided into non-invasive, invasive and alternative or minimally invasive techniques. In contrast to imaging or functional studies, remediastinoscopy provides pathological evidence of response after induction therapy. Although technically more challenging than a first procedure,remediastinoscopy can select patients for subsequent thoracotomy and provides prognostic information. An alternative approach consists of the use of minimally invasive staging procedures as endobronchial or endoscopic esophageal ultrasound to obtain an initial proof of mediastinal nodal involvement. Mediastinoscopy is subsequently performed after induction therapy to evaluate response. In this way, a technically more difficult remediastinoscopy can be avoided. Stage ⅢA-N2 NSCLC represents a heterogenous spectrum of locally advanced disease and different subsets exist. When N2 disease is discovered during thoracotomy after negative, careful preoperative staging a resection should be performed if this can be complete. Postoperative radiotherapy will decrease local recurrence rate but not overall survival. Adjuvant chemotherapy increases survival and is presently recommended in these cases. Most patients with pathologically proven N2 disease detected during preoperative work-up will be treated by induction therapy followed by surgery or radiotherapy.In two large, recently completed, phase Ill trials there was no difference in overall survival between the surgical and radiotherapy arm, but in one trial there was a difference in progression-free survival in favor of the surgical arm. In the surgery ann the rate of local recurrences was also lower in beth trials. Surgical resection may be recommended in those

  18. Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy with Biweekly Gemcitabine and Cisplatin in Patients with Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oak, Chul Ho; Kim, Ja Kyung; Jang, Lee La; Moon, Dae Sung; Jang, Tae Won; Jung, Maan Hong; Cho, Sung Whan; Jeung, Tae Sig [Kosin University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    In cases of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is the leading therapeutic modality. However, much controversy exists about the chemotherapeutic regimens and radiation methods. Materials and Methods: During concurrent chemoradiotherapy, three or four cycles of gemcitabine (500 mg/m2) and cisplatin (30 mg/m2) were administered every two weeks while 50.4 Gy of irradiation was administered in 28 fractions (once/day, 5 treatment days/week) to the tumor site, mediastinum, and the involved lymph node region. In addition, a booster irradiation dose of 18 Gy in 10 fractions was administered to the primary tumor site unless the disease progressed. Two or three cycles of consolidation chemotherapy were performed with gemcitabine (1,200 mg/m2, 1st and 8th day) and cisplatin (60 mg/m2) every three weeks. Results: A total of 29 patients were evaluable for modality response. Response and treatment toxicities were assessed after concurrent chemoradiotherapy and consolidation chemotherapy, respectively. One patient (4%) achieved a complete response; whereas 20 patients (69%) achieved a partial response after concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Following the consolidation chemotherapy, three patients (10.3%) achieved complete responses and 21 patients (72.4%) achieved partial responses. The median follow-up period was 20 months (range 3-39 months) and the median survival time was 16 months (95% CI; 2.4-39.2 months). The survival rates in one, two, and three years after the completion of treatment were 62.7%, 43.9%, and 20%, respectively. Complications associated to this treatment modality included grade 3 or 4 esophagitis, which occurred in 15 patients (51.7%). In addition, an incidence of 24% for grade 3 and 14% for grade 4 neutropenia. Lastly, grade 2 radiation pneumonitis occurred in 6 patients (22%). Conclusion: The response rate and survival time of concurrent chemoradiotherapy with biweekly gemcitabine (500 mg/m2) and cisplatin

  19. Induction of premature senescence by hsp90 inhibition in small cell lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian J Restall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The molecular chaperone Hsp90 is a promising new target in cancer therapy and selective Hsp90 inhibitors are currently in clinical trials. Previously these inhibitors have been reported to induce either cell cycle arrest or cell death in cancer cells. Whether the cell cycle arrest is reversible or irreversible has not generally been assessed. Here we have examined in detail the cell cycle arrest and cell death responses of human small cell lung cancer cell lines to Hsp90 inhibition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In MTT assays, small cell lung cancer cells showed a biphasic response to the Hsp90 inhibitors geldanamycin and radicicol, with low concentrations causing proliferation arrest and high concentrations causing cell death. Assessment of Hsp90 intracellular activity using loss of client protein expression showed that geldanamycin concentrations that inhibited Hsp90 correlated closely with those causing proliferation arrest but not cell death. The proliferation arrest induced by low concentrations of geldanamycin was not reversed for a period of over thirty days following drug removal and showed features of senescence. Rare populations of variant small cell lung cancer cells could be isolated that had additional genetic alterations and no longer underwent irreversible proliferation arrest in response to Hsp90 inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that: (1 Hsp90 inhibition primarily induces premature senescence, rather than cell death, in small cell lung cancer cells; (2 small cell lung cancer cells can bypass this senescence through further genetic alterations; (3 Hsp90 inhibitor-induced cell death in small cell lung cancer cells is due to inhibition of a target other than cytosolic Hsp90. These results have implications with regard to how these inhibitors will behave in clinical trials and for the design of future inhibitors in this class.

  20. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder--a new case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Amelia; Berdan, Gabriela; Hulea, Ionela; Gaitanidis, Raluca; Ambert, V; Jinga, V; Damian, D; Codreanu, O; Andrei, F; Niculescu, L

    2007-01-01

    Primary pure small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is an extremely rare and highly aggressive tumor with an average five-year survival rate of less than 10% as cited by multiple case reports. It accounts for about 0.5-1% of all bladder tumors. We present the case of a 44-years-old man, smoker (10 cigarettes/day) hospitalized in the Department of Urology, from the "Prof. dr. Th. Burghele" Hospital, Bucharest, for one month intermittent hematuria. Ultrasonography showed a sessile tumoral mass, sized 37/30mm. Transurethral resection of the tumor mass was performed and tissue fragments were sent to the pathologic lab to establish the histologic type, the degree of differentiation and invasion. Fragments of the tumor were fixed in 10% formaldehyde, paraffin embedded and processed as standard technique; the sections were stained with HE, VG and immunohistochemically with: CROMO, EMA, NSE, CD56, NK1, p53 and betaHCG. The microscopic examination reveled a tumor proliferation composed of two distinct components: extensive small cells areas and foci of typical low grade (G2) papillary urothelial carcinoma. The small cell are uniformly, round, with increased nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio, eosinophyl cytoplasm, hyperchromatic nuclei, finely granular chromatin and inconspicuous nucleoli. Immunohistochemical stains showed diffuse positive staining of the small cell component for CROMO, EMA, NSE, CD56, NK1 and urothelial carcinoma component stained focally for betaHCG. The rate of cell proliferation was increased (p53 - 80% positive reaction). Conclusions. A diagnosis of small cell carcinoma coexisting with low-grade urothelial carcinoma was established. Because of aggressive behavior and distinct treatment, the pathologist should watch out for the presence of small cell carcinoma component.

  1. 2011 update on esophageal achalasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seng-Kee Chuah; Pin-I Hsu; Keng-Liang Wu; Deng-Chyang Wu; Wei-Chen Tai; Chi-Sin Changchien

    2012-01-01

    There have been some breakthroughs in the diagnosis and treatment of esophageal achalasia in the past few years.First,the introduction of high-resolution manometry with pressure topography plotting as a new diagnostic tool has made it possible to classify achalasia into three subtyPes.The most favorable outcome is predicted for patients receiving treatment for type Ⅱ achalasia (achalasia with compression).Patients with type I (classic achalasia) and type Ⅲ achalasia (spastic achalasia) experience a less favorable outcome.Second,the first multicenter randomized controlled trial published by the European Achalasia Trial group reported 2-year follow-up results indicating that laparoscopic Heller myotomy was not superior to endoscopic pneumatic dilation (PD).Although the follow-up period was not long enough to reach a convincing conclusion,it merits the continued use of PD as a generally available technique in gastroenterology.Third,the novel endoscopic technique peroral endoscopic myotomy is a promising option for treating achalasia,but it requires increased experience and cautious evaluation.Despite all this good news,the bottom line is a real breakthrough from the basic studies to identify the actual cause of achalasia that may impede treatment success is still anticipated.

  2. Neoadjuvant Treatment for Esophageal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PaulM.Schneider; HuanXi; StephanE.Baldus; JanBrabender; RalfMetzger

    2004-01-01

    Because the conflicting data currently available from the performed randomized trials it is very difficult to provide strict guidelines for the treatment of patients with locoregional advanced esophageal cancers. Surgery however, remains the standard of care for potentially resectable disease. Preoperative chemotherapy is still controversial with two large randomized trials resulting in two different conclusions regarding the survival benefit. Preoperative chemoradiation is also controversial since only one randomized trial showed a clear survival benefit however, the patients treated with surgery alone in this trial had an unusually poor outcome. And the study by Urba et al was not powered enough to show a clear survival benefit for patients treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiation. The results of three metaanalysis of these randomized studies show lower rate of resection, higher rate of R0-resection, more often postoperative mortality and better prognosis for patients with neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy. As a consequence one may consider offering neoadjuvant chemotherapy or neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy to patients with locallyadvanced disease under the premise that patients have a good performance status and understand the controversies about this therapeutic option. Larger trials with sufficient power to clearly detect survival benefits for patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy or radiochemotherapy are necessary before this therapeutic option will be the standard of care.

  3. [Dosimetric comparison of non-small cell lung cancer treatment with multi fields dynamic-MLC IMRT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Longying; Wang, Delin; Cao, Yujuan; Du, Fang; Cao, Feng; Liu, Chengwei

    2015-05-19

    We compared the dosimetric differences between the target and surrounding tissues/organs of the 5-field and 7,9-field (Hereinafter referred to as F5, F7, F9) treatment plan in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by the dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (dIMRT), to provide reference for clinical application. Using Varian planning system (Eclipse 7.3), we randomly selected 30 cases of patients who received dIMRT to study, all patients were 5, 7, 9 fixed field dynamics intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans to meet the target prescription requirements (95% dose curve enveloping 100% of the PTV), by comparing dose-volume histogram DVH evaluation, and the maximum dose D(max), the minimum dose D(min), and the mean dose D(mean), and conformal index CI of PTV,organs at risk of spinal cord the maximum dose D(max), lung V(5), V(10), V(20), V(30), heart V(30) and esophageal V(50), V(60) of F5,F7 and F9 dIMRT plans,and compare the mu of the three treatment programs. The D(max), D(min) and D(mean) values of F5's PTV are (7 203 ± 128), (5 493 ± 331), (6 900 ± 138) cGy respectively; the D(max), D(min) and D(mean) values of F7's PTV are (7 304 ± 96), (5 526 ± 296), (6 976 ± 130) cGy respectively; and the D(max), D(min) and D(mean) values of F9's PTV are (7 356 ± 54), (5 578 ± 287), (7 019 ± 56) cGy respectively. The data shows that while we increased the numbers of fields, the isodose line surrounding the target area would also promote slightly. The conformity index CI of target became better with the increase of radiation fields. The whole lung V(5) and V(10) slightly became larger with increase of fields and the V(20) showed no significant difference in three models, V(30) of double lungs slightly decreased with the increase of fields. The above date was statistically meaningless (P > 0.05). With the increase of fields esophagus V(50) were reduced by 3% and 5% respectively, V(60) of the esophagus were reduced by 6% and 11%, the average dose reduced by 5% and 10

  4. Synchronous multifocal osteosarcoma with small cell histological variant: A double rarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Gon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multifocal osteosarcoma (MFOS, osteosarcoma involving multiple sites, is a rare variant of osteosarcoma. When the lesions appear within 6 months of initial presentation of the tumor, it is known as synchronous MFOS. Synchronous MFOS has an incidence of 1%–3% only. Moreover, the histological variant of small cell osteosarcoma is even rarer. A case of 14-year-old male with synchronous MFOS of small cell type involving frontal and mandibular bone simultaneously is being reported here. It poses a dilemma to both the clinician and the pathologist to diagnose whether it represents multiple primary tumor or metastatic disease.

  5. Interference characterization and mitigation benefit analysis for LTE-A macro and small cell deployments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez, Victor Fernandez; Pedersen, Klaus I.; Soret, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    are densely deployed. Thus, the main interference characteristics of the macro layer and the dense small cell layer are studied separately. Moreover, the potential benefit of mitigating the dominant interferer in such scenarios is quantified as an upper bound gain and its time variability is discussed...... is such that 30% of the users could achieve at least a 50% throughput gain if said interferer were mitigated, with some users reaching a 300% improvement during certain time intervals. All the mentioned metrics are remarkably similar in the macro and small cell deployments, which suggests that densification does...

  6. Coexistence of small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and villous adenoma in the ampulla of Vater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Hong Sun; Ming Chao; Shi-Zheng Zhang; Guang-Qiang Zhang; Bin Li; Jian-Jun Wu

    2008-01-01

    Small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater is extremely rare and different from the common ampullary adenocarcinoma. The ampullary adenoma is also a rare neoplasm and has the potential to develop an adenocarcinoma. Their coexistence has been rarely reported in the literature. We herein describe an unusual case of a small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma associated with a villous adenoma in the ampulla of Vater with emphasis on computed tomography (CT)and histopathological findings. We also discuss their clinical, histopathological and radiological features as well as possible histogenesis.

  7. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M;

    2011-01-01

    , the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas as follows: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to be addressed through......The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference...

  8. PET/CT imaging in response evaluation of patients with small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Barbara M; Mortensen, Jann; Langer, Seppo W;

    2006-01-01

    UNLABELLED: There is an increasing amount of evidence on the usability of PET in response evaluation of non-small cell lung cancer. However, data on SCLC is scarce and mainly retrospective. This prospective study assesses the use of PET (positron emission tomography) and PET/CT in response...... evaluation of patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). METHODS: Assignment of early and final response was compared between PET, PET/CT, and CT in 20 patients with SCLC. Final response as assigned by CT (RECIST) served as reference. RESULTS: At response evaluation after one cycle of chemotherapy major...

  9. Reproducibility of esophageal scintigraphy using semi-solid yoghurt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, Yukinori; Kinoshita, Manabu; Asakura, Yasushi; Kakinuma, Tohru; Shimoji, Katsunori; Fujiwara, Kenji; Suzuki, Kenji; Miyamae, Tatsuya [Saitama Medical School, Moroyama (Japan)

    1999-10-01

    Esophageal scintigraphy is a non-invasive method which evaluate esophageal function quantitatively. We applied new technique using semi-solid yoghurt, which can evaluate esophageal function in a sitting position. To evaluate the reproducibility of this method, scintigraphy were performed in 16 healthy volunteers. From the result of four swallows except the first one, the mean coefficients of variation in esophageal transit time and esophageal emptying time were 12.8% and 13.4% respectively (interday variation). As regards the interday variation, this method had also good reproducibility from the result on the 2 separate days. (author)

  10. Minimally invasive surgery for esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santillan, Alfredo A; Farma, Jeffrey M; Meredith, Kenneth L; Shah, Nilay R; Kelley, Scott T

    2008-10-01

    Esophageal cancer represents a major public health problem worldwide. Several minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE) techniques have been described and represent a safe alternative for the surgical management of esophageal cancer in selected centers with high volume and expertise in them. This article reviews the most recent and largest series evaluating MIE techniques. Recent larger series have shown MIE to be equivalent in postoperative morbidity and mortality rates to conventional surgery. MIE has been associated with less blood loss, less postoperative pain, and decreased intensive care unit and hospital length of stay compared with conventional surgery. Despite limited data, conventional surgery and MIE have shown no significant difference in survival, stage for stage. The myriad of MIE techniques complicates the debate of defining the optimal surgical approach for treating esophageal cancer. Randomized controlled trials comparing MIE with conventional open esophagectomy are needed to clarify the ideal procedure with the lowest postoperative morbidity, best quality of life after surgery, and long-term survival.

  11. Herpetic esophagitis: a diagnosis to remember

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Pinheiro

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Herpetic esophagitis is a well-recognized infection in immunocompromised hosts, having been rarely described in immunocompetent individuals. Case report: The authors describe a case of a 16-year-old female adolescent admitted to the emergency room with a threeday history of fever, odynophagia, dysphagia for liquid and solid food and retrosternal pain. The upper endoscopy revealed linear and round erosions in the distal esophagus and the histologic findings were compatible with herpetic esophagitis. Discussion/conclusion: Herpetic esophagitis is an underdiagnosed condition in immunocompetent children and adolescents, but it should not be overlooked. An esophagoscopy is required to make a definitive diagnosis. It is usually a selflimited infection and the mainstay of treatment is supportive care. The use of acyclovir is still controversial but its early initiation may shorten the clinical course of the disease.

  12. Esophageal stent migration leads to intestinal obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguzhan Karatepe

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-expanding metallic stents are the devices of choice in the treatment of malign or benign strictures of esophagus. Stent migration is a well-known complication of this procedure. Aims: We report a case of intestinal obstruction caused by esophageal stent migration, in which surgical intervention was used. Methods: A 65-year-old woman, who had a medical history of gastric cancer operation and esophageal stent application admitted to our emergeny department with a 48-hour history of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. An emergeny laparotomy was performed and the migrated stent leading to intestinal obstruction was removed. Results: The patient recovered without incident and was discharged on postoperative day 3. Conclusion: This case illustrates that esophageal stent migration has to be considered as a potential life-threatening complication.

  13. Herpetic Esophagitis in Immunocompetent Medical Student

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Vidica Marinho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophagitis caused by herpes simplex virus (HSV is often documented during periods of immunosuppression in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV; it is rare in immunocompetent diagnosed patients. Case reports of herpetic esophagitis in students of health sciences are extremely rare. The disease presents with a clinical picture characterized by acute odynophagia and retrosternal pain without obvious causes and ulcers, evidenced endoscopically in the middistal esophagus. Diagnosis depends on endoscopy, biopsies for pathology studies, and immunohistochemistry techniques. The disease course is often benign; however, treatment with acyclovir speeds the disappearance of symptoms and limits the severity of infection. In this report, we present a case of herpetic esophagitis in an immunocompetent medical student, with reference to its clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment. The disease may have manifested as a result of emotional stress experienced by the patient.

  14. Acute esophageal necrosis: a rare syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurvits, Grigoriy E; Shapsis, Alexander; Lau, Nancy; Gualtieri, Nicholas; Robilotti, James G

    2007-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis, which presents as a black esophagus on endoscopy, is a rare disorder that is poorly described in the medical literature. In this study, we analyze all cases reported to date to define risk factors, clinical presentation, endoscopic features, histologic appearance, treatment, complications, outcome and etiopathogenesis of the disease and to describe a distinct medical syndrome and propose a staging system. We searched Medline and PubMed from January 1965 to February 2006 for English-language articles using the key words "acute esophageal necrosis," "necrotizing esophagitis," and "black esophagus." A total of 88 patients were reported in the literature during the 40 years, 70 men and 16 women with an average age of 67 years. Patients were generally admitted for gastrointestinal bleeding and cardiovascular event/shock. Patients presented with hematemesis and melena in more than 70% of the cases. Upper endoscopy showed black, diffusely necrotic esophageal mucosa predominantly affecting the distal third of the organ. Necrosis was confirmed histologically in most cases. Complications included strictures or stenoses, mediastinitis/abscesses, and perforations. Overall mortality was 31.8%. This study provides a structured approach to identifying risk factors, diagnosis, and pathogenesis of the acute esophageal necrosis. Risk factors include age, male sex, cardiovascular disease, hemodynamic compromise, gastric outlet obstruction, alcohol ingestion, malnutrition, diabetes, renal insufficiency, hypoxemia, hypercoagulable state, and trauma. Mechanism of damage is usually multifactorial secondary to ischemic compromise, acute gastric outlet obstruction, and malnutrition. Overall, acute esophageal necrosis should be viewed as a poor prognostic factor, associated with high mortality from the underlying clinical disease.

  15. Avoiding complications in esophageal cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Michael Bau

    2013-01-01

    Modern handling of esophageal cancer patients is based on a multidisciplinary concept, but surgery remains the primary curative treatment modality. Improvements in the perioperative care have reduced the overall morbidity and mortality, but 2-7% of the patients may still die within 30 days...... as a direct consequence of complications related to the esophagectomy procedure. Primarily based on results from randomized studies published after 2000 this review describes some of the factors that may contribute to the development of postoperative complications following esophageal cancer surgery as well...

  16. Esophageal web in Plummer-Vinson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, H; Tsutsumi, S; Inaki, S; Mori, T

    1988-09-01

    In Plummer-Vinson syndrome, esophagography often reveals a web at the anterior wall of the cervical esophagus. The pathogenesis of the esophageal web and the cause of dysphagia in this syndrome were investigated radiographically, endoscopically, manometrically, and histologically. It was considered that the web seen in the esophagogram may have been formed due to the restriction of dilation of the esophageal wall, which results from repetitive inflammation and the subsequent healing process. Dysphagia in this syndrome may be explained by a decrease in swallowing power. Iron deficiency anemia may play the main role in the above histological changes and the resulting decrease in swallowing power.

  17. Esophageal papilloma: Flexible endoscopic ablation byradiofrequency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gianmattia del Genio; Federica del Genio; Pietro Schettino; Paolo Limongelli; Salvatore Tolone; Luigi Brusciano; Manuela Avellino; Chiara Vitiello; Giovanni Docimo; Angelo Pezzullo; Ludovico Docimo

    2015-01-01

    Squamous papilloma of the esophagus is a rare benignlesion of the esophagus. Radiofrequency ablation is anestablished endoscopic technique for the eradication ofBarrett esophagus. No cases of endoscopic ablation ofesophageal papilloma by radiofrequency ablation (RFA)have been reported. We report a case of esophagealpapilloma successfully treated with a single sessionof radiofrequency ablation. Endoscopic ablation ofthe lesion was achieved by radiofrequency using anew catheter inserted through the working channelof endoscope. The esophageal ablated tissue wasremoved by a specifically designed cup. Completeablation was confirmed at 3 mo by endoscopy withbiopsies. This case supports feasibility and safety of asa new potential indication for BarrxTM RFA in patientswith esophageal papilloma.

  18. Eosinophilic esophagitis in adults: An update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Monjur Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis is a worldwide chronic allergic disease of the esophagus.In the last decade,there is an epidemic of this entity in the western world.Mostly seen in children and young adults,patients present with dysphagia or food impaction in the emergency room.Characteristic endoscopic findings,esophageal eosinophilia and non-responsiveness to proton pump inhibitors help make the diagnosis.Avoidance of foodallergens,administration of steroidal anti-inflammatory medications and dilation of the esophagus are the mainstays of treatment.Investigations are ongoing for mucosal healing and optimum maintenance treatment.

  19. Asymptomatic Esophageal Varices Should Be Endoscopically Treated

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nib Soehendra

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoscopic treatment has generally been accepted in the management of bleeding esophageal varices. Both the control of acute variceal bleeding and elective variceal eradication to prevent recurrent bleeding can be achieved via endoscopic methods. In contrast to acute and elective treatment, the role of endoscopic therapy in asymptomatic patients who have never had variceal bleeding remains controversial because of the rather disappointing results obtained from prophylactic sclerotherapy. Most published randomized controlled trials showed that prophylactic sclerotherapy had no effect on survival. In some studies, neither survival rate nor bleeding risk was improved. In this article, the author champions the view that asymptomatic esophageal varices should be endoscopically treated.

  20. Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia mimicking esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in a patient with lye-induced esophageal stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jang Soo; Lee, Sang Woo; Suh, Kang Heum; Kim, Seung Young; Hyun, Jong Jin; Jung, Sung Woo; Koo, Ja Seol; Yim, Hyung Joon

    2014-06-01

    Pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia is a benign condition that may be caused by prolonged inflammation, chronic infection, and/or neoplastic conditions of the mucous membranes or skin. Due to its histological resemblance to well-differentiated squamous cell carcinoma, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia may occasionally be misdiagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma. The importance of pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia is that it is a self-limited condition that must be distinguished from squamous cell carcinoma before invasive treatment. We report here on a rare case of esophageal pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in a 67-year-old Korean woman with a lye-induced esophageal stricture. Although esophageal pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia is infrequently encountered, pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of esophageal lesions.

  1. Expression of heat shock protein 27 in the esophageal tissue of rats with reflux esophagitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Chao-xu; WANG Zhuo-qing; LIN Wei-bin; CHU Zhong-hua; CHEN Liu-hua; JI Zhuang-qi

    2011-01-01

    Background Little attention has been paid to the expression of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) in patients with reflux esophagitis (RE), and few studies of the importance of HSP27 in esophagitis have been carried out in animal models.This study aimed to explore the expression of HSP27 in the esophageal tissue of rats with RE. Methods Eighty female Wistar rats were randomly divided into experimental groups A and B and control groups C and D (n=20 in each group). To establish RE, rats in the two experimental groups received pylorus and forestomach ligations,while rats in the control group received gastrostomy and gastric perforation repair. The rats in groups A and C were sacrificed 7 days after surgery, and the rats in groups B and D were sacrificed 14 days after surgery. In groups A and B,10 and 8 rats were diagnosed with RE by pathological examination, respectively (they were included in groups A' and B',respectively). The histopathological diagnosis of all the lower esophageal tissues in groups C and D was normal and 20normal specimens were randomly selected for groups C and D' with 10 specimens in each group. Macroscopic and microscopic esophagitis scores were assessed for the specimens in groups A' and B'. Lower esophageal tissues were collected from groups A', B', C, and D', and paraffin-embedded slices were made using part of the tissues. The expression of HSP27 in the tissues was detected using the two-step streptavidin-peroxidase immunohistochemical method. Some collected tissues were frozen, and expressions of HSP27 mRNA were detected using fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (FQ-PCR). Results Median macroscopic and microscopic esophagitis scores in groups A' (n=10) and B' (n=8) were 1.0 and 1.5,and 2.0 and 2.5, respectively. There were no significant differences in the macroscopic or microscopic esophagitis scores between the two groups (Z=-0.330, P=0.741; Z=-0.142, P=0.887, respectively). Immunohistochemical staining showed that HSP27 was

  2. Diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders: esophageal pressure topography vs. conventional line tracing

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Enhanced characterization of esophageal peristaltic and sphincter function provided by esophageal pressure topography (EPT) offers a potential diagnostic advantage over conventional line tracings (CLT). However, high-resolution manometry (HRM) and EPT require increased equipment costs over conventional systems and evidence demonstrating a significant diagnostic advantage of EPT over CLT is limited. Our aim was to investigate whether the inter-rater agreement and/or accuracy of eso...

  3. A Distributed Taxation Based Rank Adaptation Scheme for 5G Small Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catania, Davide; Cattoni, Andrea Fabio; Mahmood, Nurul Huda

    2015-01-01

    The further densification of small cells impose high and undesirable levels of inter-cell interference. Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) systems along with advanced receiver techniques provide us with extra degrees of freedom to combat such a problem. With such tools, rank adaptation algorit...

  4. Phase II study of ACNU in non-small-cell lung cancer: EORTC study 08872

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.S.Th. Planting (André); A. Ardizzoni (A.); J. Estapé (J.); G. Giaccone (Giuseppe); G.V. Scagliotti (Giorgio); T.A.W. Splinter (Ted); A. Kirkpatrick (A.); O. Dalesio (O.); J.G. Mcvie (John Gordon)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractA total of 62 patients with metastatic or locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer were entered in a phase II study of ACNU. Initially, the drug was given i. v. at a dose of 100 mg/m2 every 6 weeks, but due to observed haematological side effects in chemotherapy-pretreated patients,

  5. A phase II study of paclitaxel in heavily pretreated patients with small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, EF; Fokkema, E; Biesma, B; Groen, HJM; Snoek, W; Postmus, PE

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to delineate the efficacy and toxicity of paclitaxel (Taxol, Bristol Myers Squibb) in the treatment of drug resistant small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Patients with SCLC relapsing within 3 months of cytotoxic therapy received paclitaxel 175 mg m(-2) intravenously over 3 h

  6. A Stochastic Geometry Framework for LOS/NLOS Propagation in Dense Small Cell Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galiotto, Carlo; Kiilerich Pratas, Nuno; Marchetti, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The need to carry out analytical studies of wireless systems often motivates the usage of simplified models which, despite their tractability, can easily lead to an overestimation of the achievable performance. In the case of dense small cells networks, the standard single slope path-loss model h...

  7. Interference-Robust Air Interface for 5G Ultra-dense Small Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão; Berardinelli, Gilberto; Mahmood, Nurul Huda

    2016-01-01

    An ultra-dense deployment of small cells is foreseen as the solution to cope with the exponential increase of the data rate demand targeted by the 5th Generation (5G) radio access technology. In this article, we propose an interference-robust air interface built upon the usage of advanced receivers...

  8. Experimental Verification of Interference Mitigation Techniques for 5G Small Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assefa, Dereje; Berardinelli, Gilberto; Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão

    2015-01-01

    Inter-cell interference is the main performance limiting factor in the dense deployment of small cells targeted by the upcoming 5th Generation (5G) radio access technology. In this paper, we present an experimental evaluation of inter-cell interference mitigation techniques in a real indoor office...

  9. Full Duplex Communication Under Traffic Constraints for 5G Small Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gatnau, Marta; Catania, Davide; Berardinelli, Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    the framework of 5th generation (5G) small cell systems in order to address its effective gain in such specific scenarios. The factors that affect FD performance are analysed, and its performance is evaluated against a traditional HD communication. System level simulations show that the gain of FD over HD...

  10. On the Potential of Full Duplex Communication in 5G Small Cell Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Nurul Huda; Berardinelli, Gilberto; Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão

    2015-01-01

    , the potential throughput gain may not be 100% as promised. In this study, we evaluate the performance of full duplex communication in a dense small cell scenario as targeted by future 5th Generation (5G) radio access technology under the ideal assumptions of a full buffer, always active traffic model...

  11. Fulminant hepatic failure resulting from small-cell lung cancer and dramatic response of chemotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyoichi Kaira; Atsushi Takise; Rieko Watanabe; Masatomo Mori

    2006-01-01

    Prompt treatment in tumor-associated encephalopathy may prolong survival. We describe a 69-year-old male patient who was presented with fulminant hepatic failure, secondary to small-cell lung carcinoma with rapidly progressing encephalopathy. Both symptoms remitted following chemotherapy, suggesting swift diagnosis and administration of chemotherapy to be effective in treatment of fulminant hepatic failure and encephalopathy.

  12. Loss of the retinoblastoma protein-related p130 protein in small cell lung carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Holm, K; Niebuhr, A

    1997-01-01

    been described in a variety of human tumors, including retinoblastomas, osteosarcomas, and small cell lung carcinomas. Despite the structural and functional similarity between pRB, p107, and p130, alterations in the latter two proteins have not been identified in human tumors. We have screened a panel...

  13. New serum markers for small-cell lung cancer. II. The neural cell adhesion molecule, NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsted, A; Drivsholm, L; Andersen, E;

    1994-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) was recently suggested as a marker for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of the NCAM in 78% of SCLC patients and in 25% of patients with other cancer forms. NCAM was proposed to be the most sensitive marker...

  14. A prospective study of PET/CT in initial staging of small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, B M; Mortensen, J; Langer, S W

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounts for 15%-20% of all lung cancer cases. Accurate and fast staging is mandatory when choosing treatment, but current staging procedures are time consuming and lack sensitivity. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A prospective study was designed to examine the ro...

  15. Exosomal proteins as prognostic biomarkers in non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Birgitte Sandfeld; Aggerholm-Pedersen, N; Bæk, R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Use of exosomes as biomarkers in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is an intriguing approach in the liquid-biopsy era. Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles with membrane-bound proteins that reflect their originating cell. Prognostic biomarkers are needed to improve patient selection...

  16. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: Virtual CT cystoscopic findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsili A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A 74-year-old man underwent multidetector CT virtual cystoscopy due to macroscopic hematuria. A large, irregularly-surfaced, solid bladder mass was detected, infiltrating the perivesical fat, the seminal vesicles and the prostate. CT examination of the chest and abdomen showed no distant metastases. Radical cystectomy was performed and pathology reported pure small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

  17. A Preliminary Analysis of Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Biomarkers in Serum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE-YUAN XIAO; YING TANG; XIU-PING WEI; DA-CHENG HE

    2003-01-01

    Objective To identify potential serum biomarkers that could be used to discriminate lungcancers from normal. Methods Proteomic spectra of twenty-eight serum samples from patientswith non-small cell lung cancer and twelve from normal individuals were generated by SELDI(Surfaced Enhanced Laser Desorption/Ionization) Mass Spectrometry. Anion-exchange columns wereused to fractionate the sera into 6 designated pH groups. Two different types of protein chip arrays,IMAC-Cu and WCX2, were employed. Samples were examined in PBSII Protein Chip Reader(Ciphergen Biosystem Inc) and the discriminatory profiling between cancer and normal samples wasanalyzed with Biomarker Pattern software. Results Five distinct potential lung cancer biomarkerswith higher sensitivity and specificity were found, with four common biomarkers in both IMAC-Cuand WCX2 chip; the remaining biomarker occurred only in WCX2 chip. Two biomarkers wereup-regulated while three biomarkers were down-regulated in the serum samples from patients withnon-small cell lung cancer. The sensitivities provided by the individual biomarkers were 75%-96.43%and specificities were 75%-100%. Conclusions The preliminary results suggest that serum is acapable resource for detecting specific non-small cell lung cancer biomarkers. SELDI massspectrometry is a useful tool for the detection and identification of new potential biomarker ofnon-small cell lung cancer in serum.

  18. Promoter Methylation Primarily Occurs in Tumor Cells of Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Wouter K.; Verpooten, Gonda F.; Kramer, Henk; Louwagie, Joost; Groen, Harry J. M.

    Background: The distribution of promoter methylation throughout the lungs of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unknown. In this explorative study, we assessed the methylation status of the promoter region of 11 genes in brush samples of 3 well-defined endobronchial locations in

  19. Carcinomatous meningitis in non-small cell lung cancer: Palliation with intrathecal treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Santhosh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carcinomatous meningitis or meningeal carcinomatosis is seen in up to 5% of patients of metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. However, isolated carcinomatous meningitis without brain parenchymal metastasis is less common. Patients with carcinomatous meningitis have limited treatment options. However, intrathecal therapy if used optimally along with targeted therapy when indicated result in good palliation with improvement in survival.

  20. PD-L1 expression in non-small cell lung cancer : Correlations with genetic alterations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheel, Andreas H.; Ansen, Sascha; Schultheis, Anne M.; Scheffler, Matthias; Fischer, Rieke N.; Michels, Sebastian; Hellmich, Martin; George, Julie; Zander, Thomas; Brockmann, Michael; Stoelben, Erich; Groen, Harry; Timens, Wim; Perner, Sven; von Bergwelt-Baildon, Michael; Buettner, Reinhard; Wolf, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway may induce anticancer immune responses in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Two PD-L1 immunohistochemistry (IHC) assays have been approved as companion diagnostic tests for therapeutic anti-PD-1 antibodies. However, many aspects of PD-L1 prevalence and associat

  1. New serum markers for small-cell lung cancer. I. The ganglioside fucosyl-GM1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsted, A; Drivsholm, L; Andersen, E

    1994-01-01

    The ganglioside fucosyl-GM1 (FucGM1) has been suggested as a marker for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Immunohistochemical analyses have shown the expression of the ganglioside in tumors in 75 to 90% of patients with SCLC. We have demonstrated that the ganglioside is shedded from SCLC cells both...

  2. Accelerated regrowth of non-small-cell lung tumours after induction chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El Sharouni, SY; Kal, HB; Battermann, JJ

    2003-01-01

    Induction chemotherapy of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) stage III with gemcitabine and cisplatin for downstaging of the tumour with the aim for further treatment with ionising radiation is one of the treatments for lung cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence

  3. Outcome of combination chemotherapy in extensive stage small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U N; Hirsch, F R; Osterlind, K

    1998-01-01

    During the past two decades many different treatment regimens of combination chemotherapy have been applied in extensive stage small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). This study was carried out to identify whether these modifications have resulted in an improved overall survival for extensive stage during...

  4. Small cell carcinoma of the lung and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma interobserver variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Bakker, Michael A.; Willemsen, Sten; Gruenberg, Katrien; Noorduijn, L. Arnold; van Oosterhout, Matthijs F. M.; van Suylen, Robert J.; Timens, Wim; Vrugt, Bart; Wiersma-van Tilburg, Anne; Thunnissen, Frederik B. J. M.

    2010-01-01

    Aims: To test the hypothesis that the published morphological criteria permit reliable segregation of small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCLC) and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC) cases by determining the interobserver variation. Methods and results: One hundred and seventy cases of SCLC,

  5. LONG-TERM SURVIVAL OF SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER PATIENTS AFTER CHEMOTHERAPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERGAAST, A; POSTMUS, PE; BURGHOUTS, J; VANBOLHUIS, C; STAM, J; SPLINTER, TAW

    1993-01-01

    Eighty-one patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with a survival Of more than 2 years start of chemotherapy were studied. Twenty-six of the 28 patients who died of relapsed SCLC had in relapsed before two years and of the 55 who had not then only two (4%) relapsed subsequently. It is stressed

  6. Clinical impact of ki-67 labeling index in non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2013-01-01

    The ki-67 index is a marker of proliferation in malignant tumors. Studies from the period 2000 to 2012 on the prognostic and predictive value of ki-67 labeling index (LI) in non-small cell cancer (NSCLC) are reviewed. Twenty-eight studies reported on the prognostic value of ki-67 index with various...

  7. Changes in epidermal growth factor receptor expression during chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Santoni-Rugiu, Eric; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Antibodies targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), such as cetuximab, may potentially improve outcome in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with high EGFR expression. The EGFR expression may be heterogeneously distributed within tumors, and small biopsies may thus...

  8. SURGICAL RESECTION FOR SMALL-CELL CARCINOMA OF THE LUNG - A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SMIT, EF; GROEN, HJM; TIMENS, W; POSTMUS, PE

    1994-01-01

    Background - A retrospective review was undertaken of the survival of 21 patients with histologically proven small cell carcinoma of the lung resected between 1977 and 1991. Methods - Twenty one patients (20 men) of median age 60 (range 44-73) years underwent surgical resection. Patients were subjec

  9. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of non-small cell lung carcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.H. Carvalho (Rejane Hughes); V. Haberle (Vanja); J. Hou (Jun); T. van Gent (Teus); S. Thongjuea (Supat); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); C. Kockx (Christel); R.W.W. Brouwer (Rutger); E.J. Rijkers; A.M. Sieuwerts (Anieta); J.A. Foekens (John); M. van Vroonhoven (Mirjam); J.G.J.V. Aerts (Joachim); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); B. Lenhard (Boris); J.N.J. Philipsen (Sjaak)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is a complex malignancy that owing to its heterogeneity and poor prognosis poses many challenges to diagnosis, prognosis and patient treatment. DNA methylation is an important mechanism of epigenetic regulation involved in normal developm

  10. Treatment Advances in Locally Advanced and Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.M.F. Surmont (Veerle)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractLung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States and Europe. Approximately 85% of the patients with lung cancer have non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which can be classified into squamous, adeno, large cell and not otherwise specified (NOS) histologies. The mo

  11. Integrative genome analyses identify key somatic driver mutations of small-cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peifer, Martin; Fernandez-Cuesta, Lynnette; Sos, Martin L.; George, Julie; Seidel, Danila; Kasper, Lawryn H.; Plenker, Dennis; Leenders, Frauke; Sun, Ruping; Zander, Thomas; Menon, Roopika; Koker, Mirjam; Dahmen, Ilona; Mueller, Christian; Di Cerbo, Vincenzo; Schildhaus, Hans-Ulrich; Altmueller, Janine; Baessmann, Ingelore; Becker, Christian; de Wilde, Bram; Vandesompele, Jo; Boehm, Diana; Ansen, Sascha; Gabler, Franziska; Wilkening, Ines; Heynck, Stefanie; Heuckmann, Johannes M.; Lu, Xin; Carter, Scott L.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Banerji, Shantanu; Getz, Gad; Park, Kwon-Sik; Rauh, Daniel; Gruetter, Christian; Fischer, Matthias; Pasqualucci, Laura; Wright, Gavin; Wainer, Zoe; Russell, Prudence; Petersen, Iver; Chen, Yuan; Stoelben, Erich; Ludwig, Corinna; Schnabel, Philipp; Hoffmann, Hans; Muley, Thomas; Brockmann, Michael; Engel-Riedel, Walburga; Muscarella, Lucia A.; Fazio, Vito M.; Groen, Harry; Timens, Wim; Sietsma, Hannie; Thunnissen, Erik; Smit, Egbert; Heideman, Danielle A. M.; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Cappuzzo, Federico; Ligorio, Claudia; Damiani, Stefania; Field, John; Solberg, Steinar; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Lund-Iversen, Marius; Saenger, Joerg; Clement, Joachim H.; Soltermann, Alex; Moch, Holger; Weder, Walter; Solomon, Benjamin; Soria, Jean-Charles; Validire, Pierre; Besse, Benjamin; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Brambilla, Christian; Lantuejoul, Sylvie; Lorimier, Philippe; Schneider, Peter M.; Hallek, Michael; Pao, William; Meyerson, Matthew; Sage, Julien; Shendure, Jay; Schneider, Robert; Buettner, Reinhard; Wolf, Juergen; Nuernberg, Peter; Perner, Sven; Heukamp, Lukas C.; Brindle, Paul K.; Haas, Stefan; Thomas, Roman K.

    2012-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive lung tumor subtype with poor prognosis(1-3). We sequenced 29 SCLC exomes, 2 genomes and 15 transcriptomes and found an extremely high mutation rate of 7.4 +/- 1 protein-changing mutations per million base pairs. Therefore, we conducted integrated analys

  12. Spectral and energy efficiency analysis of uplink heterogeneous networks with small-cells on edge

    KAUST Repository

    Shakir, Muhammad Zeeshan

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a tractable mathematical framework to analyze the spectral and energy efficiency of an operator initiated deployment of the small-cells (e.g., femtocells) where the small-cell base stations are deliberately positioned around the edge of the macrocell. The considered deployment facilitates the cell-edge mobile users in terms of their coverage, spectral, and energy efficiency and is referred to as cell-on-edge (COE) configuration. The reduction in energy consumption is achieved by considering fast power control where the mobile users transmit with adaptive power to compensate the path loss, shadowing and fading. In particular, we develop a moment generating function (MGF) based approach to derive analytical bounds on the area spectral efficiency and exact expressions for the energy efficiency of the mobile users in the considered COE configuration over generalized-K fading channels. Besides the COE configuration, the derived bounds are also shown to be useful in evaluating the performance of random small-cell deployments, e.g., uniformly distributed small-cells. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the improvements in spectral and energy efficiency of the COE configuration with respect to macro-only networks and other unplanned deployment strategies. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Surgical treatment of T3 and T4 non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitz, Cordula Catharina Maria

    2004-01-01

    The primary goal of lung cancer therapy is complete eradication of the disease. Surgery remains the most curative modality for non-small cell lung cancer. The goal of surgical treatment is to perform a complete resection. Resectability is closely related to the stage of the disease. The thesis focu

  14. GENETIC ALTERRATIONS OF MICROSATELLITE MARKERS AT CHROMOSOME 17 IN NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; Xue-jun

    2001-01-01

    [1]Froudarakis ME, Bouros D, Spandidos DA, et al. Microsatellite instability and loss of heterozygosity at chromosomes 17 in non-small cell lung cancer [J]. Chest 1998; 113:1091.[2]Fong KM, Zimmerman PV, Smith PJ. Microsatellite instability and other molecular abnormalities in non-small cell lung cancer [J]. Cancer Res 1994; 54:2098.[3]Mountain CF. A new international staging system for lung cancer [J]. Chest 1986; 89(suppl):225.[4]Shridhar V, Siegfried J, Hunt J, et al. Genetic instability of microsatellite sequences in many non-small cell lung carcinomas [J]. Cancer Res 1994; 54:2084.[5]Loeb LA. Microsatellite instability: Marker of a mutator phenotype in cancer [J]. Cancer Res 1994; 54:5059.[6]Sanchez CM, Monzo M, Rosell R, et al. Detection of chromosome 3p alterations in serum DNA of non-small cell lung cancer patients [J]. Ann Oncol 1989; 113.

  15. Can Full Duplex Boost Throughput and Delay of 5G Ultra-Dense Small Cell Networks?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gatnau, Marta; Berardinelli, Gilberto; Mahmood, Nurul Huda;

    2016-01-01

    Given the recent advances in system and antenna design, practical implementation of full duplex (FD) communication is becoming increasingly feasible. In this paper, the potential of FD in enhancing the performance of 5th generation (5G) ultra-dense small cell networks is investigated. The goal...

  16. Surgical Treatment for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Patients with Synchronous Solitary Brain Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao BAI

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Brain metastases are common in non-small cell lung cancer. Usual treatments include radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, these methods result in poor patient prognosis. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness of surgical resection in the multimodality management of non-small cell lung cancer patients with synchronous solitary brain metastasis. Methods The clinical data of 46 non-small cell lung cancer patients with synchronous solitary brain metastasis were retrospectively reviewed. All patients underwent surgical resection of primary lung tumor, followed by whole brain radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In addition, 13 out of the 46 patients underwent resection of brain metastasis, whereas the remaining 33 patients received stereotactic radiosurgery. Results The median survival time of the enrolled patients was 16.8 months. The 1-, 2-, and 3-year survival rates were 76.1%, 20.9%, and 4.7%, respectively. The median survival times of the patients with brain metastasis resection or stereotactic radiosurgery were 18.3 and 15.8 months, respectively (P=0.091,2. Conclusion Surgical resection of primary lung tumor and brain metastasis may improve prognosis of non-small cell lung cancer patients with synchronous solitary brain metastasis. However, the survival benefit of surgical resection over brain metastasis resection or stereotactic radiosurgery is uncertain.

  17. LONG-TERM SURVIVAL OF SMALL-CELL LUNG-CANCER PATIENTS AFTER CHEMOTHERAPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERGAAST, A; POSTMUS, PE; BURGHOUTS, J; VANBOLHUIS, C; STAM, J; SPLINTER, TAW

    Eighty-one patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with a survival Of more than 2 years start of chemotherapy were studied. Twenty-six of the 28 patients who died of relapsed SCLC had in relapsed before two years and of the 55 who had not then only two (4%) relapsed subsequently. It is stressed

  18. Two Cases of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Intravenous Cultivated Wild Ginseng Pharmacopuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Hwi Bang

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : To investigate the therapeutic effects of intravenous cultivated wild ginseng(Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer pharmacopuncture(CWGP in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC. Design : Prospective case series. Setting : This study was conducted at the East-West Cancer Center of Dunsan Oriental Hospital, Daejeon University. Patients : Two non-small cell lung cancer patients. Intervention : Two non-small cell lung cancer patients were injected CWGP(20mL/day mixed with 0.9% normal saline(100mL intravenously. Each patient received a total of 16 and 9 cycles, respectively. One cycle is composed of 14 days. Outcome Measures : The effect of intravenous CWGP was measured by scanning with computed tomography(CT after every 2 cycle and Positron emission tomography- computed tomography(PET/CT after every 6 cycles. Response and progression was evaluated using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors(RECIST Committee classification of complete response(CR, partial response(PR, progressive disease(PD and stable disease(SD. Results : They were treated with intravenous CWGP for 8 and 5 months respectively. time later, each tumor remains stable disease(SD Conclusion : These cases may give us a possibility that intravenous CWGP offers potential benefits for non-small cell lung cancer patients.

  19. Esophageal Granular Cell Tumor and Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Two Interesting Entities Identified in the Same Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo J. Lucendo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We illustrate the case of a 41-year-old male with allergic manifestations since childhood. He sought medical attention for intermittent, progressive dysphagia from which he had been suffering for a number of years, having felt the sensation of a retrosternal lump and a self-limited obstruction to the passage of food. Endoscopy detected a submucosal tumor in the upper third of the esophagus, which was typified, via biopsy, as a granular cell tumor with benign characteristics and probably responsible for the symptoms. Two years later, the patient sought medical attention once again as these symptoms had not abated, hence digestive endoscopy was repeated. This revealed stenosis of the junction between the middle and lower thirds of the organ which had not been detected previously but was passable under gentle pressure. Eosinophilic esophagitis was detected after biopsies were taken. Esophageal manometry identified a motor disorder affecting the esophageal body. Following three months of treatment using fluticasone propionate applied topically, the symptoms went into remission, esophageal stenosis disappeared and the esophageal biopsies returned to normal. This is the first documented case of the link between granular cell tumors and Eosinophilic esophagitis, two different disorders which could cause dysphagia in young patients.

  20. Conversion of Prostate Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Carcinoma-Like by Reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Gisely T; Vêncio, Eneida F; Quek, Sue-Ing; Chen, Adeline; Salvanha, Diego M; Vêncio, Ricardo Z N; Nguyen, Holly M; Vessella, Robert L; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Ware, Carol B; Troisch, Pamela; Liu, Alvin Y

    2016-09-01

    The lineage relationship between prostate adenocarcinoma and small cell carcinoma was studied by using the LuCaP family of xenografts established from primary neoplasm to metastasis. Expression of four stem cell transcription factor (TF) genes, LIN28A, NANOG, POU5F1, SOX2, were analyzed in the LuCaP lines. These genes, when force expressed in differentiated cells, can reprogram the recipients into stem-like induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Most LuCaP lines expressed POU5F1, while LuCaP 145.1, representative of small cell carcinoma, expressed all four. Through transcriptome database query, many small cell carcinoma genes were also found in stem cells. To test the hypothesis that prostate cancer progression from "differentiated" adenocarcinoma to "undifferentiated" small cell carcinoma could involve re-expression of stem cell genes, the four TF genes were transduced via lentiviral vectors into five adenocarcinoma LuCaP lines-70CR, 73CR, 86.2, 92, 105CR-as done in iPS cell reprogramming. The resultant cells from these five transductions displayed a morphology of small size and dark appearing unlike the parentals. Transcriptome analysis of LuCaP 70CR* ("*" to denote transfected progeny) revealed a unique gene expression close to that of LuCaP 145.1. In a prostate principal components analysis space based on cell-type transcriptomes, the different LuCaP transcriptome datapoints were aligned to suggest a possible ordered sequence of expression changes from the differentiated luminal-like adenocarcinoma cell types to the less differentiated, more stem-like small cell carcinoma types, and LuCaP 70CR*. Prostate cancer progression can thus be molecularly characterized by loss of differentiation with re-expression of stem cell genes. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2040-2047, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Small cell cancer of the bladder: The Leon-Berard cancer centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil Ismaili

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Small cell bladder carcinoma is an uncommon tumor. In this retrospective study we report our experience dealing with this disease at the Leon-Berard Cancer Centre. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed various characteristics of small cell bladder carcinoma: patient demographics, histological diagnosis, disease stage, treatment effects and outcome, in 14 non-metastatic small cell bladder carcinoma patients treated at our institution between 1995 and 2006. Results: The mean age at diagnosis was 60 years (range, 45-77. All patients were male. Seventy-five per cent were smokers. All had locally advanced disease. Ten patients (71.4% were treated by cystoprostatectomy and bilateral pelvic lymph node resection, one by cystoprostatectomy alone. Two patients received neoadjuvant chemotherapy and four received adjuvant chemotherapy. One patient was treated by radiotherapy with concomitant cisplatin after transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT. One patient refused surgery and was treated by chemotherapy alone. One patient was lost to follow-up after TURBT. After 49-month median follow-up, 12 patients had relapsed. Disease-free survival was 5.7 months. The most frequent sites of relapse were the retroperitoneal lymph node (seven patients and the liver (three patients. Nine patients died of metastasis. Median overall survival was 29.5 months. Survival probability at two years was 58%. Median overall survival was 34 months in the mixed small carcinoma group, as compared with 9.5 months in the pure small cell carcinoma group (P=0.01. Mean overall survival was 27.2 months for all patients and 38.6 months for patients treated with cystectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusion: To date, the optimal treatment for locally advanced small cell bladder carcinoma is not clear. Cystectomy with neoadjuvant or adjuvant chemotherapy appears as a viable option.

  2. Drug development for breast, colorectal, and non-small cell lung cancers from 1979 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Nancy A; Khan, Omar F; Imam, Hasiba; Tang, Patricia A; Monzon, Jose; Li, Haocheng; Sun, Gavin; Ezeife, Doreen; Parimi, Sunil; Dowden, Scot; Tam, Vincent C

    2017-08-17

    Understanding the drug development pathway is critical for streamlining the development of effective cancer treatments. The objective of the current study was to delineate the drug development timeline and attrition rate of different drug classes for common cancer disease sites. Drugs entering clinical trials for breast, colorectal, and non-small cell lung cancer were identified using a pharmaceutical business intelligence database. Data regarding drug characteristics, clinical trials, and approval dates were obtained from the database, clinical trial registries, PubMed, and regulatory Web sites. A total of 411 drugs met the inclusion criteria for breast cancer, 246 drugs met the inclusion criteria for colorectal cancer, and 315 drugs met the inclusion criteria for non-small cell lung cancer. Attrition rates were 83.9% for breast cancer, 87.0% for colorectal cancer, and 92.0% for non-small cell lung cancer drugs. In the case of non-small cell lung cancer, there was a trend toward higher attrition rates for targeted monoclonal antibodies compared with other agents. No tumor site-specific differences were noted with regard to cytotoxic chemotherapy, immunomodulatory, or small molecule kinase inhibitor drugs. Drugs classified as "others" in breast cancer had lower attrition rates, primarily due to the higher success of hormonal medications. Mean drug development times were 8.9 years for breast cancer, 6.7 years for colorectal cancer, and 6.6 years for non-small cell lung cancer. Overall oncologic drug attrition rates remain high, and drugs are more likely to fail in later-stage clinical trials. The refinement of early-phase trial design may permit the selection of drugs that are more likely to succeed in the phase 3 setting. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  3. Identification of Gene Biomarkers for Distinguishing Small-Cell Lung Cancer from Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Using a Network-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Long

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer consists of two main subtypes: small-cell lung cancer (SCLC and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC that are classified according to their physiological phenotypes. In this study, we have developed a network-based approach to identify molecular biomarkers that can distinguish SCLC from NSCLC. By identifying positive and negative coexpression gene pairs in normal lung tissues, SCLC, or NSCLC samples and using functional association information from the STRING network, we first construct a lung cancer-specific gene association network. From the network, we obtain gene modules in which genes are highly functionally associated with each other and are either positively or negatively coexpressed in the three conditions. Then, we identify gene modules that not only are differentially expressed between cancer and normal samples, but also show distinctive expression patterns between SCLC and NSCLC. Finally, we select genes inside those modules with discriminating coexpression patterns between the two lung cancer subtypes and predict them as candidate biomarkers that are of diagnostic use.

  4. Molecular biologic study about the non-small cell lung carcinoma (2) : p53 gene alteration in non-small cell lung carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Ho; Zo, Jae Ill; Paik, Hee Jong; Kim, Mi Hee [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    The main purpose of this research was to identify of the p53 and 3p gene alteration in non-small cell lung cancer patients residing in Korea. Furthermore, we analyzed the relationship between the p53 and 3p gene alterations and the clinicopathologic results of lung cancer patients. And we have investigated the role of PCR-LOH in analyzing tumor samples for LOH of defined chromosomal loci. We have used the 40 samples obtained from the lung cancer patients who were diagnosed and operated curatively at Korea Cancer Center Hospital. We have isolated the high molecular weight. DNA from the tumors and normal tissues. And we have amplified the DNA with PCR method and used the microsatellite assay method to detect the altered p53 and 3p gene. The conclusions were as follow: (1) The 3p gene alteration was observed in 9/39 (23.1%) and p53 gene alteration was observed in 15/40 (37.5%) of resected non-small cell lung cancer. (2) There was no correlations between the 3p or p53 gene alterations and prognosis of patients, but further study is necessary. (3) PCR-LOH is a very useful tool for analyzing small amount of tumor samples for loss of heterozygosity of defined chromosomal loci. (author). 10 refs.

  5. Stent placement for esophageal strictures : an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirdes, Meike Madeleine Catharine; Vleggaar, Frank Paul; Siersema, Peter Derk

    2011-01-01

    The use of stents for esophageal strictures has evolved rapidly over the past 10 years, from rigid plastic tubes to flexible self-expanding metal (SEMS), plastic (SEPS) and biodegradable stents. For the palliative treatment of malignant dysphagia both SEMS and SEPS effectively provide a rapid relief

  6. Acute esophageal necrosis caused by alcohol abuse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tetsu Endo; Juichi Sakamoto; Ken Sato; Miyako Takimoto; Koji Shimaya; Tatsuya Mikami; Akihiro Munakata; Tadashi Shimoyama; Shinsaku Fukuda

    2005-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN) is extremely rare and the pathogenesis of this is still unknown. We report a case of AEN caused by alcohol abuse. In our case, the main pathogenesis could be accounted for low systemic perfusion caused by severe alcoholic lactic acidosis. After the healing of AEN, balloon dilatation was effective to manage the stricture.

  7. Esophageal achalasia in adolescence - two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Vaz Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Achalasia is a rare disorder, particularly in pediatrics, characterized by esophageal aperistalsis and inadequate relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. Its etiology remains unclear. Cases: We describe two adolescents with dysphagia for solids and liquids, vomiting, weight loss and nocturnal cough for a few months. Initially it was considered to be an eating disorder, and the diagnosis of achalasia was reached later by esophageal manometry in one case and by intraoperative biopsy in another. The patients were submitted to Heller myotomy with an antireflux procedure, laparoscopically in one case, and by laparotomy in another, both with a favorable outcome. Discussion/Conclusions: We emphasize the rarity and diagnostic challenge of these cases. The nonspecific symptoms often lead to the diagnosis of an eating disorder, delaying the correct treatment. If symptoms persist achalasia must be considered and the esophageal manometry is the diagnostic test of choice. The gold standard in treatment is surgical, and we highlight the effectiveness of the techniques applied.

  8. Esophageal cancer awareness in Bomet district, Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Objective: To determine baseline level of knowledge of esophageal cancer in Bomet District in order to develop targeted ... malignancy in men and the third most common in .... Breast. 8. 10. Colon. 5. 6. “Leg” (as proposed. 4. 5 by interviewee).

  9. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Flemming H Gravesen; Peter Funch-Jensen; Hans Gregersen; Asbjφrn Mohr Drewes

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the "golden standard" for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method.

  10. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-14

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the "golden standard" for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method.

  11. [R1 resection of esophageal carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gockel, I; Wittekind, C

    2017-08-02

    The microscopic identification of residual tumor tissue in the oral or aboral resection margins (R1 resection) of esophageal specimens following oncologic esophageal resection, increases the risk of tumor recurrence and disease-related morbidity. Esophageal resection with its associated risks is only meaningful, if an R0 situation can be safely achieved. The relevance of microscopic involvement of the circumferential resection margin (CRM) in esophageal carcinoma in its different definitions by the British and the American Societies of Pathology has up to now never been investigated in a prospective study. According to the German S3 guideline, radiochemotherapy should be performed in a postoperatively proven R1 situation, which cannot be converted by a curative extended re-resection into an R0 situation or in unfavorable conditions for an extended re-resection, independent of neoadjuvant therapy. In the case of an R1 situation in the region of the CRM, an extended re-resection is not simply possible on account of the anatomical conditions with corresponding limitations by the aorta and the spinal column, in contrast to extensions of the re-resection orally or aborally.

  12. Esophageal testing: What we have so far

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a commondisorder of the gastrointestinal tract. In the last fewdecades, new technologies have evolved and havebeen applied to the functional study of the esophagus,allowing for the improvement of our knowledge of thepathophysiology of GERD. High-resolution manometry(HRM) permits greater understanding of the function ofthe esophagogastric junction and the risks associatedwith hiatal hernia. Moreover, HRM has been found tobe more reproducible and sensitive than conventionalwater-perfused manometry to detect the presenceof transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation.Esophageal 24-h pH-metry with or without combinedimpedance is usually performed in patients withnegative endoscopy and reflux symptoms who havea poor response to anti-reflux medical therapy toassess esophageal acid exposure and symptom-refluxcorrelations. In particular, esophageal 24-h impedanceand pH monitoring can detect acid and non-acid refluxevents. EndoFLIP is a recent technique poorly appliedin clinical practice, although it provides a large amountof information about the esophagogastric junction.In the coming years, laryngopharyngeal symptomscould be evaluated with up and coming non-invasive orminimally invasive techniques, such as pepsin detectionin saliva or pharyngeal pH-metry. Future studies arerequired of these techniques to evaluate their diagnostic accuracy and usefulness, although the available dataare promising.

  13. Esophageal testing: What we have so far.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bortoli, Nicola; Martinucci, Irene; Bertani, Lorenzo; Russo, Salvatore; Franchi, Riccardo; Furnari, Manuele; Tolone, Salvatore; Bodini, Giorgia; Bolognesi, Valeria; Bellini, Massimo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Edoardo Vincenzo

    2016-02-15

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disorder of the gastrointestinal tract. In the last few decades, new technologies have evolved and have been applied to the functional study of the esophagus, allowing for the improvement of our knowledge of the pathophysiology of GERD. High-resolution manometry (HRM) permits greater understanding of the function of the esophagogastric junction and the risks associated with hiatal hernia. Moreover, HRM has been found to be more reproducible and sensitive than conventional water-perfused manometry to detect the presence of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. Esophageal 24-h pH-metry with or without combined impedance is usually performed in patients with negative endoscopy and reflux symptoms who have a poor response to anti-reflux medical therapy to assess esophageal acid exposure and symptom-reflux correlations. In particular, esophageal 24-h impedance and pH monitoring can detect acid and non-acid reflux events. EndoFLIP is a recent technique poorly applied in clinical practice, although it provides a large amount of information about the esophagogastric junction. In the coming years, laryngopharyngeal symptoms could be evaluated with up and coming non-invasive or minimally invasive techniques, such as pepsin detection in saliva or pharyngeal pH-metry. Future studies are required of these techniques to evaluate their diagnostic accuracy and usefulness, although the available data are promising.

  14. Early detection and determinants of esophageal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, P.

    2014-01-01

    Barrett’s esophagus (BE) is a premalignant condition of the esophagus and characterized by the metaplastic replacement of esophageal squamous epithelium by specialized intestinal-type columnar epithelium. A BE diagnosis is based on endoscopy and histological examination of biopsies taken during endo

  15. Histomorphological and Immunophenotypic Features of Pill-Induced Esophagitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Won Kim

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate histomorphological and immunophenotypic features in pill-induced esophagitis. We comparatively evaluated the histomorphological, immunophenotypic features of pill-induced esophagitis vs. reflux esophagitis, as well as clinical information and endoscopic findings. Fifty-two tissue pieces from 22 cases of pill-induced esophagitis, 46 pieces from 20 reflux esophagitis, and 16 pieces from 14 control samples were subjected to immunohistochemistry for inflammatory infiltrates (CD3 for T lymphocyte, CD20 for B lymphocyte, CD56 for NK cell, CD68 for macrophage, CD117 for mast cell and eosinophil chemotaxis-associated proteins (Erk, leptin, leptin receptor, pSTAT3, phospho-mTOR. As a result, Histomorphology showed that a diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis, while reactive atypia and subepithelial papillary elongation were more often found in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively. Interestingly, intraepithelial eosinophilic microabscess, intraepithelial pustule and diffuse pattern of dilated intercellular spaces were observed in 14% (3 cases, 9% (2 cases and 32% (7 cases of pill-induced esophagitis, respectively, but in no cases of reflux esophagitis. Regarding intraepithelial inflammatory infiltrates in pill-induced esophagitis, T lymphocytes were the most common cells, followed by eosinophil; 11 and 7 in one x400 power field, respectively. Intraepithelial pSTAT3-positive pattern was more frequently observed in pill-induced esophagitis than in reflux esophagitis, at 45% (10 cases versus 10% (2 cases, respectively (P < 0.05. Considering the distal esophageal lesion only, intraepithelial pustule, diffuse dilated intercellular spaces and stromal macrophages were more frequently found in distal pill-induced esophagitis, whereas reactive atypia and intraepithelial mast cells in reflux esophagitis (P < 0.05, respectively. In conclusion, diffuse

  16. Restenosis following balloon dilation of benign esophageal stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Sheng Cheng; Ming-Hua Li; Ren-Jie Yang; Hui-Zhen Zhang; Zai-Xian Ding; Qi-Xin Zhuang; Zhi-Ming Jiang; Ke-Zhong Shang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the mechanism of restenosis following balloon dilation of benign esophageal stenosis.METHODS: A total of 49 rats with esophageal stenosis were induced in 70 rats using 5 ml of 50 % sodium hydroxide solution and the double-balloon method, and an esophageal restenosis (RS) model was developed by esophageal stenosis using dilation of a percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) balloon catheter. These 49 rats were divided into two groups: rats with benign esophageal stricture caused by chemical burn only (control group, n=21) and rats with their esophageal stricture treated with balloon catheter dilation (experimental group, n=28). Imaging analysis and immunohistochemistry were used for both quantitative and qualitative analyses of esophageal stenosis and RS formation in the rats, respectively.RESULTS: Cross-sectional areas and perimeters of the esophageal mucosa layer, muscle layer, and the entire esophageal layers increased significantly in the experimental group compared with the control group. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was expressed on the 5th day after dilation, and was still present at 1 month. Fibronectin (FN)was expressed on the 1st day after dilation, and was still present at 1 month.CONCLUSION: Expression of PCNA and FN plays an important role in RS after balloon dilation of benign esophageal stenosis.

  17. DIAGNOSTIC VALUE OF MINIPROBE ULTRASONOGRAPHY IN ESOPHAGEAL PROTRUDING LESIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the diagnostic value of miniprobe ultrasonography (MPS) in the protruding lesions of esophagus. Methods Sixty-two patients with protruding lesions of esophagus were examined with MPS. Results The MPS examination showed diseases of esophageal polyp, inflammatory protruding, esophageal leiomyoma, esophageal leiomyosarcoma, esophageal venous aneurysm, esophageal lipoma, esophageal cyst, esophageal carcinoma, and extra esophageal compression including aorta compression, lung tumor compression and spina compression. Fourteen patients were verified by surgical operations and pathological examinations, resulting in 92.86% (13/14) diagnosis accuracy rate. Forty-eight cases had results of gastroscope examination consistent with that of MPS. Twelve cases had results of CT and MRI examination consistent with that of MPS. Follow-up was completed on 22 patients. Conclusion Besides imaging the esophageal layer, MPS can precisely locate the histological layer of the esophageal protruding lesions and predict their characters. This indicates its value in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of the protruding lesions of esophagus. Furthermore, the miniature probe used in MPS examination can pass the structured esophagus, enabling wider application of the examination.

  18. Effect of age on proximal esophageal response to swallowing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Oliveira Dantas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: It has been demonstrated that the ageing process affects esophageal motility. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of the age on the proximal esophageal response to wet swallows. METHOD: We measured the proximal esophageal response to swallows of a 5 mL bolus of water in 69 healthy volunteers, 20 of them aged 18-30 years (group I, 27 aged 31-50 years (group II, and 22 aged 51-74 years (group III. We used the manometric method with continuous perfusion. The proximal esophageal contractions were recorded 5 cm from a pharyngeal recording site located 1 cm above the upper esophageal sphincter. The time between the onset of the pharyngeal and of the proximal esophageal recording (pharyngeal-esophageal time and the amplitude, duration and area under the curve of the proximal esophageal contraction were measured. RESULTS: The pharyngeal-esophageal time was shorter in group I subjects than in group II and III subjects (P<0.05. The duration of proximal esophageal contractions was longer in group I than in groups II and III (P<0.001. There was no differences between groups in the amplitude or area under the curve of contractions. There were no differences between groups II and III for any of the measurements. CONCLUSION: We conclude that the age may affects the response of the proximal esophagus to wet swallows.

  19. Magnetic compression anastomosis as a nonsurgical treatment for esophageal atresia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaritzky, Mario [Hospital de Ninos de La Plata, Department of Radiology, Buenos Aires (Argentina); University of Chicago Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Ben, Ricardo [Hospital de Ninos de La Plata, Department of Gastroenterology, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Zylberg, Gaston I.; Yampolsky, Brian [Hospital de Ninos de La Plata, Department of Radiology, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-09-15

    We describe a unique technique to promote a nonsurgical esophageal anastomosis with magnets in children with esophageal atresia. To evaluate the efficacy of magnetic lengthening of atretic esophageal ends to produce an anastomosis and to communicate our results after more than 2 years of follow-up. Between September 2001 and March 2004, five children were selected for treatment. Two of the children had esophageal atresia without fistula (type A) and three had atresia with fistula converted to type A surgically; however, surgeons failed to achieve an anastomosis because of the width of the gap. Neodymium-iron-boron magnets were used. Daily chest radiographs were taken until union of the magnets was observed. They were then replaced with an orogastric tube. Anastomosis was achieved in all patients in an average of 4.8 days. One patient, with signs of early sepsis, was successfully treated with antibiotics. In four of the five patients, esophageal stenosis developed. At the time of this report, two patients were free of treatment and on an oral diet (after 26 months), two patients required periodic balloon dilatation, and one patient had recently undergone surgery due to recurrent esophageal stenosis not amenable to balloon dilatation. Magnetic esophageal anastomosis is a feasible method in selected patients with esophageal atresia. Esophageal anastomosis was achieved in all patients. The only observed complication of significance was esophageal stenosis. One patient needed surgery because of stenosis. (orig.)

  20. Esophageal Cancer in Iran: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavosh Nasseri-Moghaddam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal cancer is the second and third most common malignancy in Iranian malesand females, respectively, claiming lives of approximately 5800 Iranians each year.Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is presently the most common type accounting forabout 90% of all esophageal cancers in Iran. Recent studies have shown that there isa gradual increase in the incidence of adenocarcinoma of the distal esophagus alongwith gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Thirty-five years ago, the age standardizied rate (ASR of esophageal SCC in thecity of Gonbad (Golestan Province, northeast of Iran was found to be one of the highestrates for any single cancer that had been reported worldwide (ASR >100/105/year.Recent studies have shown that the incidence of SCC in Gonbad has declined to lessthan half of what it was in the past. This decline in the incidence of esophageal SCCparallels an improvement in the socioeconomic situation of people living in thisregion. According to recent cancer registry data in Iran there is still an obviousintracountry variability between the incidence of esophageal cancer in the south withan ASR of 3 for males and 2 for females in Kerman and 43 and 36 in the northeasternprovince of Golestan. The reasons for this very high rate of SCC in northeastern Iranhave been the subject of several studies during the past 35 years. According to resultsof these studies the suspected risk factors are: low intake of fruits and vegetables, drinkinghot tea, consumption of opium products and tobacco, H.pyloriinfection in the stomach,using unhealthy drinking water from cisterns and genetic susceptibility. The mainsuspected mutagens are polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH and N-nitrosocompounds. In order to embark primary and secondary prevention of this fatal cancer,further prospective studies are presently underway in the region. The Golestanesophageal cancer cohort study which follows of 50,000 subjects is on going. We expectsimple and feasible evidence based

  1. Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy With or Without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-17

    Adenosquamous Lung Carcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  2. with esophageal squamous cell cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to retrospectively observe and analyze the long-term treatment outcomes of 191 elderly patients with esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC who were treated with californium-252 (252Cf neutron brachytherapy (NBT in combination with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT. Material and methods : From January 2002 to November 2012, 191 patients with ESCC underwent NBT in combination with EBRT. The total radiation dose to the reference point via NBT was 8-25 Gy-eq in two to five fractions with one fraction per week. The total dose via EBRT was 50-60 Gy, which was delivered over a period of 5 to 6 weeks with normal fractionation. Results : The median survival time for the 191 patients was 23.6 months, and the 5-year rates for overall survival (OS and local-regional control (LRC were 28.7% and 54.2%, respectively. The patients’ age was a factor that was significantly associated with OS (p = 0.010, according to univariate analysis. The 5-year OS (LRC was 37.3% (58.6% for patients aged 70-74 years and 14.5% (47.9% for patients aged > 74 years (p = 0.010 and p = 0.038. In multivariate analysis, age and clinical N stage were associated with OS and LRC (p = 0.011 [0.041] and p = 0.005 [0.005]. From the time of treatment completion to the development of local-regional recurrence or death, 5 (2.6% patients experienced fistula and 15 (7.9% experienced massive bleeding. The incidence of severe late complications was related to older age (p = 0.027, higher NBT dose/fraction (20-25 Gy/5 fractions, and higher total dose (> 66 Gy. Conclusions : The clinical data indicated that NBT in combination with EBRT produced favorable local control and long-term survival rates for elderly patients with ESCC, and that the side effects were tolerable. Patient’s age, clinical stage N status, and radiation dose could be used to select the appropriate treatment for elderly patients.

  3. Esophageal Manometry in Patients with Chest Pain and Normal Coronary Arteriogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, S C; Hodges, K; Hersh, T; Jinich, H

    1981-02-01

    Evaluation of the esophagus is helpful in determining the source of chest pain. Eighteen per cent of 72 patients with a normal coronary angiogram had esophageal disease as a source of chest pain. Eight had diffuse esophageal spasm, four had reflux esophagitis and one had an esophageal ulcer. Five of eight patients with diffuse esophageal spasm had relief of symptoms with nitroglycerin. Despite normal coronary arteriogram and normal esophageal manometry 42 of 49 other patients had relief of chest pain with nitroglycerin.

  4. Influence of oral glutamine supplementation on survival outcomes of patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Topkan Erkan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamine (Gln supplementation during concurrent chemoradiotherapy (C-CRT effectively reduces the incidence and severity of acute radiation-induced esophagitis (RIE. However, there are concerns that Gln might stimulate tumor growth, and therefore negatively impact the outcomes of anticancer treatment. We retrospectively investigated the effect of co-administration of oral Gln during C-CRT on survival outcomes of patients with stage IIIB non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. We additionally evaluated role of oral Gln in preventing C-CRT-induced weight change, acute and late toxicities. Methods The study included 104 patients: 56 (53.8% received prophylactic powdered Gln (Gln+ orally at a dose of 10 g/8 h and 48 (46.2% did not receive Gln (Gln- and served as controls. The prescribed radiation dose to the planning target volume was 66 Gy in 2-Gy fractions. Primary endpoints of progression-free survival (PFS, local/regional progression-free survival (LRPFS, and overall survival (OS were correlated with status of Gln supplementation. Results Oral Gln was well tolerated except for mild nausea/vomiting in 14 (25.0% patients. There was no C-CRT-related acute or late grade 4–5 toxicity. Administration of Gln was associated with a decrease in the incidence of grade 3 acute radiation-induced esophagitis (RIE (7.2% vs. 16.7% for Gln+ vs. Gln-; p=0.02 and late-RIE (0% vs. 6.3%; p=0.06, a reduced need for unplanned treatment breaks (7.1% vs. 20.8%; p=0.04, and reduced incidence of weight loss (44.6% vs. 72.9%; p=0.002. At a median follow-up of 24.2 months (range 9.2-34.4 the median OS, LRPFS, and PFS for Gln+ vs. Gln- cohorts were 21.4 vs. 20.4 (p=0.35, 14.2 vs.11.3 (p=0.16, and 10.2 vs. 9.0 months (p=0.11, respectively. Conclusion In our study, supplementation with Gln during C-CRT had no detectable negative impact on tumor control and survival outcomes in patients with Stage IIIB NSCLC. Furthermore, Gln appeared to have a beneficial

  5. Epidemiologic differences in esophageal cancer between Asian and Western populations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han-Ze Zhang; Guang-Fu Jin; Hong-Bing Shen

    2012-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is a common cancer worldwide and has a poor prognosis.The incidence of esophageal squamous cell cancer has been decreasing,whereas the incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has been increasing rapidly,particularly in Western men.Squamous cell cancer continues to be the major type of esophageal cancer in Asia,and the main risk factors include tobacco smoking,alcohol consumption,hot beverage drinking,and poor nutrition.In contrast,esophageal adenocarcinoma predominately affects the whites,and the risk factors include smoking,obesity,and gastroesophageal reflux disease.In addition,Asians and Caucasians may have different susceptibilities to esophageal cancer due to different heritage backgrounds.However,comparison studies between these two populations are limited and need to be addressed in the near future.Ethnic differences should he taken into account in preventive and clinical practices.

  6. Detection of esophageal ulcerations with technetium-99m albumin sucralfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goff, J.S.; Adcock, K.A.; Schmelter, R.

    1986-07-01

    Technetium-99m albumin-sucralfate ((/sup 99m/Tc)Su) can be used to demonstrate peptic ulcer disease in man and animals. We evaluated the usefulness of (/sup 99m/Tc)Su for detecting various grades of esophagitis. (/sup 99m/Tc)Su adhered to the distal esophagus for up to 3 hr in five of six patients with esophageal ulcers but adhered to only two of nine with lesser degrees of esophagitis. No adherence was seen in five patients without esophagitis. Thus, (/sup 99m/Tc)Su may not be useful for detecting any but the most severe grade of esophagitis. Based on these results, we speculate that the previously documented beneficial effects of sucralfate on mild to moderate esophagitis may be due to other mechanisms besides adherence to the ulcerated mucosa.

  7. Esophageal clearance scintigraphy in, diabetic patients; A preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karayalcin, B.; Karayalcin, U.; Aburano, Tamio; Nakajima, Kenichi; Hisada, Kinichi; Morise, Toshio; Okada, Toshihide; Takeda, Ryoyu (Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-05-01

    The aim of this preliminary study was to evaluate the predictive value of esophageal clearance scintigraphy (ECS) in the diagnosis of esophageal autonomic neuropathy in diabetic patients without any esophageal symptoms. A single swallon ECS was performed in 12 diabetic patients and 15 normal volunteers, and esophageal transit time (ETT) and esophageal (Es) T 1/2 values were calculated. ETT and Es 1/2 were found to be significantly prolonged in the diabetic group (p<0.01 and p<0.05, respectively). In this preliminary study, our results strongly suggest that ECS may be an important noninvasive diagnostic tool in the evaluation of diabetic patients with asymptomatic esophageal autonomic neuropathy. (author).

  8. Polymorphisms in miRNA binding site: new insight into small cell lung cancer susceptibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-yu LIU; Jun CHEN

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause in cancer-related deaths with less than 15% five-year survival worldwide.Small cell lung cancer (SCLC),which accounts for about 15%-18% of lung cancer,carries the worst prognosis within the lung cancer patients.SCLC differs from other lung cancers,so called non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs),in the specifically clinical and biologic characteristics.It exhibits aggressive behavior,with rapid growth,early spread to distant sites.Although exquisite sensitive to chemotherapy and radiation,SCLC recurs rapidly with only 5% of patients surviving five years and frequent association with distinct paraneoplastic syndromes[1].

  9. Challenges in optimizing chemoradiation in locally advanced non small-cell lung cancers in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Agrawal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Data supporting use of concurrent chemoradiation in locally advanced lung cancers comes from clinical trials from developed countries. Applicability and outcomes of such schedules in developing countries is not widely reported. There are various challenges in delivering chemoradiation in locally advanced non small cell lung cancer in developing countries which is highlighted by an audit of patients treated with chemoradiation in our center. This article deals with the challenges in the context of a developing country. We conclude that sequential chemoradiotherapy is better tolerated than concurrent chemoradiation in Indian patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancers. Patients with stage IIIa, normal weight or overweight, and adequate baseline pulmonary function should be offered concurrent chemoradiation.

  10. Synergistic effect of phenformin in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) ionizing radiation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jia; Xia, Shi'an; Zhu, Zhizhen

    2015-03-01

    Biguanides, used for anti-diabetic drugs, bring more attention in cancer research for their beneficial effects. Phenformin is more potent than metformin. However its potential application as a anti-cancer regent is far behind metformin. In order to investigate any beneficial effect of combination of Phenformin and radiotherapy, non-small cell lung cancer cell lines A549 and H1299 were exposure under different dose of ionizing radiation with or without Phenformin. Results indicated Phenformin showed synergistic effect and could induce more cancer cell apoptosis and inhibition of tumor growth compared with ionizing radiation alone. Furthermore, this synergistic effect may be through different pathway according to cancer cell genotype background. Our results showed Phenformin induced AMPK activation in A549 but not H1299. However, Phenformin activated eIF2α in both cell lines. Our findings implicated Phenformin may be used as radiosensitizer for non-small cell lung cancer therapy.

  11. Uplink Inter-Site Carrier Aggregation Between Macro and Small Cells in Heterogeneous Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Hua; Rosa, Claudio; Pedersen, Klaus I.

    2014-01-01

    With uplink inter-site carrier aggregation (CA), it is possible to configure a user equipment (UE) to transmit on multiple layers (macro and small cells) simultaneously, each of which may exhibit different radio channel characteristics. This introduces new challenging issues such as how to config......With uplink inter-site carrier aggregation (CA), it is possible to configure a user equipment (UE) to transmit on multiple layers (macro and small cells) simultaneously, each of which may exhibit different radio channel characteristics. This introduces new challenging issues such as how...... deciding whether UEs should be configured with uplink inter-site CA or not. Simulation results show that with proper configuration of UEs to operate with uplink inter-site CA, good user throughput gain compared to the case without inter-site CA can be achieved at low load due to larger bandwidth...

  12. Primary Gastric Small Cell Carcinoma in Elderly Patients: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Han Lai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of an 86-year-old man with primary gastric small cell carcinoma (SmCC. He was admitted to our hospital owing to gastrointestinal bleeding complicated by anemia. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examination revealed a large, irregularly ulcerated tumor on the upper to middle body of the stomach. Small cell carcinoma was diagnosed based on the results of histologic and immunohistochemical studies of an endoscopic biopsy specimen. According to previous reports of gastric SmCC, only one-sixth of cases have been correctly diagnosed preoperatively. In our case, it was an aggressive malignancy that had an extremely poor prognosis. We believe that careful endoscopic examination including immunohistochemical investigation is necessary to accurately diagnose gastric SmCC in clinical practice.

  13. [Suppression of WIFI transcript and protein in non-small cell lung carcinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobko, E V; Kalinichenko, S V; Shepelev, M V; Zborovskaia, I B; Allakhverdiev, A K; Zinov'eva, M V; Vinogradova, T V; Sverdlov, E D; Korobko, I V

    2007-01-01

    Changes in WIFI expression, an extracellular inhibitor of Wnt pathway, in non-small cell lung carcinomas were analyzed. Frequent (67% cases) suppression of WIFI transcript in non-small cell lung carcinomas were found. Our results, together with previously published data, suggest that inhibition of WIFI expression often occurs in squamous cell carcinomas and is less typical of adenocarcinomas. It was also found that a decrease in the WIFI transcript in tumors is parallel to concomitant suppression of the WIFI protein level. Our results provide further evidence that the WIFI suppression is a frequent event in the lung carcinogenesis, which might lead to disregulation of Wnt signaling pathway and contribute to tumor progression.

  14. Long Non-coding RNAs and Their Roles in Non-small-cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Ming Wei; Guang-Biao Zhou

    2016-01-01

    As a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, lung cancer is a collection of diseases with diverse etiologies which can be broadly classified into small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Lung cancer is characterized by genomic and epigenomic alter-ations; however, mechanisms underlying lung tumorigenesis remain to be elucidated. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a group of non-coding RNAs that consist of P200 nucleotides but possess low or no protein-coding potential. Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormal expres-sion of lncRNAs is associated with tumorigenesis of various cancers, including lung cancer, through multiple biological mechanisms involving epigenetic, transcriptional, and post-transcriptional alter-ations. In this review, we highlight the expression and roles of lncRNAs in NSCLC and discuss their potential clinical applications as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers, as well as therapeutic targets.

  15. From Uniplex to Multiplex Molecular Profiling in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ileana, Ecaterina E; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Izzo, Julie G

    2015-01-01

    Non-small cell lung carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Understanding the molecular biology of survival and proliferation of cancer cells led to a new molecular classification of lung cancer and the development of targeted therapies with promising results. With the advances of image-guided biopsy techniques, tumor samples are becoming smaller, and the molecular testing techniques have to overcome the challenge of integrating the characterization of a panel of abnormalities including gene mutations, copy-number changes, and fusions in a reduced number of assays using only a small amount of genetic material. This article reviews the current knowledge about the most frequent actionable molecular abnormalities in non-small cell lung carcinoma, the new approaches of molecular analysis, and the implications of these findings in the context of clinical practice.

  16. Small cell carcinoma of the submandibular gland: a rare small round blue cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, David M; Little, Stewart C; Hessler, Richard B; Gourin, Christine G

    2007-01-01

    The presence of small cell carcinoma within the submandibular gland is an uncommon clinical entity. However, other small round blue cell tumors are encountered in the head and neck with greater frequency. These include lymphoma, Ewing's sarcoma, melanoma, esthesioneuroblastoma, and neuroblastoma. A basic knowledge of the immunohistochemical studies available to distinguish each these tumors from one another significantly improves the frequency of accurate and timely initial diagnosis. We report a case of small cell carcinoma of the submandibular gland and review the other common small round blue cell tumors that occur within the head and neck. We utilize an acronym, LEMONS, to organize our review and facilitate improved retention of the differential diagnosis for small round blue cell tumors of the head and neck.

  17. Managing inter-cell interference with advanced receivers and rank adaptation in 5G small cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Fernando Menezes Leitão; Berardinelli, Gilberto; Catania, Davide;

    2015-01-01

    The use of receivers with interference suppression capabilities is expected to be a significant performance booster in 5th Generation (5G) ultra-dense small cell networks. In this respect, they could represent an alternative to traditional frequency reuse techniques, facilitating the inter-cell...... interference management. In this paper, we evaluate whether it is possible to rely on such advanced receivers as the main tool to deal with the inter-cell interference problem. We present a system-level performance evaluation in three different dense indoor small cell scenarios using a receiver model...... that includes both interference rejection combining (IRC) and successive interference cancellation (SIC) principles, as well as different rank adaptation strategies. Our results confirm that interference suppression receivers with a supportive system design can indeed represent a valid alternative to frequency...

  18. Migration Suppression of Small Cell Lung Cancer by Polysaccharides from Nostoc commune Vaucher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Min; Ding, Guo-Bin; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Lichao; Wu, Haili; Li, Hanqing; Li, Zhuoyu

    2016-08-17

    Nostoc commune Vauch., classified into cyanobacteria, has been always well appreciated as a healthy food and medicine worldwide owing to its rich nutrition and potent bioactivities. Nevertheless, the inhibitory effect of polysaccharides from N. commune Vauch. (NVPS) against cancer cell progression and metastasis is still being unraveled. The results in this study showed that NVPS remarkably suppressed cell migration through blocking the epithelial-mesenchymal transition program in NCI-H446 and NCI-H1688 human small cell lung cancer cells. The inhibitory effects were attributed to the suppression of integrin β1/FAK signaling through regulating cell-matrix adhesion. Furthermore, NVPS treatment could increase E-cadherin expression, but down-regulate N-cadherin, Vimentin, and MMP-9 expression, which resulted in the blockage of STAT3 nuclear translocation and JAK1 signaling. These findings suggest that NVPS may be a good candidate for development as a possible antitumor agent against small cell lung cancer.

  19. Bronchial resection margin and long-term survival in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poullis, Michael; McShane, James; Shaw, Mathew; Page, Richard; Woolley, Steve; Shackcloth, Michael; Mediratta, Neeraj

    2012-08-01

    Clear resection margins are necessary for long-term survival of patients undergoing surgical resection. We aimed to determine whether bronchial resection margin is a factor determining long-term survival in patients undergoing R0 resections for non-small-cell lung cancer. There were 2695 consecutive pulmonary resections performed between October 2001 and September 2011 in our institution; 1795 were R0 resections for non-small-cell lung cancer and bronchial margin length data were available. Benchmarking against the 7th International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer dataset was performed. Cox multivariate and neuronal network analysis was undertaken. Benchmarking failed to reveal any significant differences between our data and the 7th International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer dataset. Cox regression demonstrated that age (pNeuronal network analysis confirmed these findings. Bronchial resection margin length has no impact on long-term survival.

  20. Developing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jeffrey Engelman MD PhD CONTRACTING...SUBTITLE Developiing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and 5b...biomarkers. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Small cell lung cancer (SCLC), Genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM), BH3 mimetic, TORC inhibitor, Apoptosis

  1. Brain-only metastases of small cell lung cancer; efficacy of whole brain radiotherapy. An EORTC phase II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postmus, PE; Haaxma-Reiche, H; Gregor, A; Groen, HJM; Lewinski, T; Scolard, T; Kirkpatrick, A; Curran, D; Sahmoud, T; Giaccone, G

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of WBRT as a single treatment modality in patients with brain metastases of small cell lung cancer. Patients and methods: The patients had brain metastases of small cell lung cancer without any sign of tumour outside the brain and were treated with 10

  2. Multidrug resistance and retroviral transduction potential in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, M D; Gram, G J; Jensen, P B;

    1999-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major problem in the successful treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). New treatment strategies are needed, such as gene therapy specifically targeting the MDR cells in the tumor. Retroviral LacZ gene-containing vectors that were either pseudotyped...... cells, and that MLV-A as well as GALV-1 retroviral vectors are suitable for further development of gene therapy in SCLC....

  3. Health-related quality of life in patients surviving non-small cell lung cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grutters, Janneke P. C.; Joore, Manuela A.; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; de Ruysscher, Dirk; Hochstenbag, Monique; Botterweck, Anita; Lambin, Philippe; Pijls-Johannesma, Madelon

    2010-01-01

    Background and aims The EuroQol 5D (EQ-5D) is a standardised instrument for measuring health-related quality of life (HRQoL). It provides a utility score for health, and a self-rating of HRQoL (EQ-VAS). In this study, the EQ-5D was used to assess HRQoL in survivors of non-small cell lung cancer

  4. Gefitinib-induced disseminated intravascular coagulation in a patient with non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Guang-jin; KE Qin-hua; XU Xi-ming; YANG Ji-yuan; SU Xiao-yan

    2010-01-01

    @@ In February 2005, Gefitinib (Iressa), a small-molecular epidermal growth factor receptor and tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was approved in China as an anticancer agent for patients with advanced (local or metastatic) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who failed prior chemotherapy. The common adverse events of the drug include acne-like skin rash, paronychia, pruritus, diarrhea, nausea/vomiting, anorexia, hepatitis, and hyperbilirubinemia.~1

  5. Optimal Therapeutic Strategy for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer with Mutated Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong SHI

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Although epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs have been widely used in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients, it is still controversial about how to combine EGFR-TKI with chemotherapy and other targeted drugs. We have made a summary on the current therapeutic models of EGFR-TKI combined with chemotherapy/bevacizumab in this review and aimed to find the optimal therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients with EGFR mutation.

  6. Effect of cryoablation sequential chemotherapy on patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Hui Yao

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effect of cryoablation sequential chemotherapy on patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.Methods:A total of 39 cases with advanced non-small cell lung cancer who received cryoablation sequential chemotherapy and 39 cases with advanced non-small cell lung cancer who received chemotherapy alone were selected and enrolled in sequential group and control group, disease progression and survival of two groups were followed up, and contents of tumor markers and angiogenesis molecules in serum as well as contents of T-lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood were detected.Results:Progression-free survival and median overall survival (mOS) of sequential group were longer than those of control group, and cumulative cases of tumor progression at various points in time were significantly less than those of control group (P<0.05); 1 month after treatment, serum tumor markers CEA, CYFRA21-1 and NSE contents, serum angiogenesis molecules PCDGF, VEGF and HDGF contents as well as CD3+CD4-CD8+CD28-T cell content in peripheral blood of sequential group were significantly lower than those of control group (P<0.05), and contents of CD3+CD4+CD8-T cell and CD3+CD4-CD8+CD28+T cell in peripheral blood were higher than those of control group (P<0.05).Conclusions:Cryoablation sequential chemotherapy can improve the prognosis of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer, delay disease progression, prolong survival time, inhibit angiogenesis and improve immune function.

  7. Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants of Lung Cancer Subtype: Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    disease progression in colorectal cancer patients. 5 R01 CA182587-02 (PI: Solit) 1/1/2014 - 12/31/2018 0.60 calendar...patients with muscle invasive and metastatic bladder cancer the prevalence of PI3 kinase alterations, the pattern of co-mutational events, their...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0223 TITLE: Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants of Lung Cancer Subtype: Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Conversion

  8. Living with a diagnosis of non-small cell lung cancer: patients' lived experiences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Ita

    2012-01-31

    The aim of this study was to explore patients\\' experience of living with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients diagnosed with NSCLC know that their treatment is not with curative intent and can expect distressing symptoms. In this phenomenological study, six adults with a diagnosis of NSCLC were interviewed. Data was analysed guided by van Manen\\'s six-step process. Four main themes were interpreted: \\'Maintaining my life\\'; \\'The enemy within\\'; \\'Staying on the train\\

  9. Small-Cell Carcinoma of Prostate: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Sun; Chun-lin Chen; Rong-jian Chen; Ai-e Liu; Ling Ding; Xiao-zhe Cao

    2010-01-01

    One case of small-cell carcinoma(SCC)of prostate was identified at Shangyu people's hospital.This 70-year-old male had a prior diagnosis of prostatic adenocarcinoma when he was first admitted to the hospital and received anti-androgen treatment.9 months later,he was readmitted to the hospital and was diagnosed as SCC through biopsy.The article was written to evaluate the clinical and pathological characteristics and treatment of SCC of prostate.

  10. Non-small cell lung cancer in never smokers: a clinical entity to be identified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilka Lopes Santoro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: It has been recognized that patients with non-small cell lung cancer who are lifelong never-smokers constitute a distinct clinical entity. The aim of this study was to assess clinical risk factors for survival among neversmokers with non-small cell lung cancer. METHODS: All consecutive non-small cell lung cancer patients diagnosed (n = 285 between May 2005 and May 2009 were included. The clinical characteristics of never-smokers and ever-smokers (former and current were compared using chi-squared or Student's t tests. Survival curves were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and log-rank tests were used for survival comparisons. A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was evaluated by adjusting for age (continuous variable, gender (female vs. male, smoking status (never- vs. ever-smoker, the Karnofsky Performance Status Scale (continuous variable, histological type (adenocarcinoma vs. non-adenocarcinoma, AJCC staging (early vs. advanced staging, and treatment (chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy vs. the best treatment support. RESULTS: Of the 285 non-small cell lung cancer patients, 56 patients were never-smokers. Univariate analyses indicated that the never-smoker patients were more likely to be female (68% vs. 32% and have adenocarcinoma (70% vs. 51%. Overall median survival was 15.7 months (95% CI: 13.2 to 18.2. The never-smoker patients had a better survival rate than their counterpart, the ever-smokers. Never-smoker status, higher Karnofsky Performance Status, early staging, and treatment were independent and favorable prognostic factors for survival after adjusting for age, gender, and adenocarcinoma in multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Epidemiological differences exist between never- and ever-smokers with lung cancer. Overall survival among never-smokers was found to be higher and independent of gender and histological type.

  11. Progesterone and estrogen receptor expression and activity in human non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality in male and female patients in the US. Although it is clear that tobacco smoking is a major cause of lung cancer, about half of all women with lung cancer worldwide are never-smokers. Despite a declining smoking population, the incidence of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), the predominant form of lung cancer, has reached epidemic proportions particularly in women. Emerging data suggest that factors other than tobacco, namely endogeno...

  12. Small-Cell Carcinoma of Prostate: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Sun; Chun-lin Chen; Rong-jian Chen; Ai-e Liu; Ling Ding; Xiao-zhe Cao

    2011-01-01

    One case of small-cell carcinoma(SCC) of prostate was identified at Shangyu people's hospital.This 70-year-old male had a prior diagnosis of prostatic adenocarcinoma when he was first admitted to the hospital and received anti-androgen treatment.9 months later,he was readmitted to the hospital and was diagnosed as SCC through biopsy.The article was written to evaluate the clinical and pathological characteristics and treatment of SCC of prostate.

  13. CCDC106 promotes non-small cell lung cancer cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiupeng; Zheng, Qin; Wang, Chen; Zhou, Haijing; Jiang, Guiyang; Miao, Yuan; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Yang; Li, Qingchang; Qiu, Xueshan; Enhua WANG

    2017-01-01

    Coiled-coil domain containing (CCDC) family members enhance tumor cell proliferation, and high CCDC protein levels correlate with unfavorable prognoses. Limited research demonstrated that CCDC106 may promote the degradation of p53/TP53 protein and inhibit its transactivity. The present study demonstrated that CCDC106 expression correlates with advanced TNM stage (P = 0.008), positive regional lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001), and poor overall survival (P < 0.001) in 183 non-small cell lung c...

  14. Novel small molecule EGFR inhibitors as candidate drugs in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berardi R

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Rossana Berardi, Matteo Santoni, Francesca Morgese, Zelmira Ballatore, Agnese Savini, Azzurra Onofri, Paola Mazzanti, Mirco Pistelli, Chiara Pierantoni, Mariagrazia De Lisa, Miriam Caramanti, Silvia Pagliaretta, Chiara Pellei, Stefano CascinuMedical Oncology Unit, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti Umberto I – GM Lancisi – G Salesi, Ancona, ItalyAbstract: In the last decade, better understanding of the role of epidermal growth factor receptor in the pathogenesis and progression of non-small cell lung cancer has led to a revolution in the work-up of these neoplasms. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as erlotinib and gefitinib, have been approved for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer, demonstrating an improvement in progression-free and overall survival, particularly in patients harboring activating EGFR mutations. Nevertheless, despite initial responses and long-lasting remissions, resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors invariably develops, most commonly due to the emergence of secondary T790M mutations or to the amplification of mesenchymal–epithelial transition factor (c-Met, which inevitably leads to treatment failure. Several clinical studies are ongoing (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/, aimed to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of combined approaches and to develop novel irreversible or multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors and mutant-selective inhibitors to overcome such resistance. This review is an overview of ongoing Phase I, II, and III trials of novel small molecule epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors and combinations in non-small cell lung cancer patients.Keywords: clinical trials, combined targeted therapy, epidermal growth factor receptor, non-small cell lung cancer, novel targeted agents, tyrosine kinase inhibitors

  15. Molecular-targeted therapy for elderly patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Antonelli,Giovanna; Libra, Massimo; PANEBIANCO, VINCENZO; Russo,Alessia Erika; Vitale, Felice Vito; COLINA, PAOLO; D'Angelo,Alessandro; ROSSELLO, ROSALBA; Ferraù, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related mortality in men and women. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) represents close to 90% of all lung cancers. When diagnosed, >50% of patients are >65 years old. Through an improved understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in lung oncogenesis, molecular-targeted approaches have become an essential element for the treatment of patients with NSCLC. As the toxicity profiles of the techniques are definitely more favorable compared wit...

  16. In vitro evaluation of a new nitrosourea, TCNU, against human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, H; Vindeløv, L L; Spang-Thomsen, M;

    1987-01-01

    The cytotoxic activity of a new nitrosourea, TCNU, was compared with that of BCNU in five human small cell lung cancer cell lines in vitro. TCNU was found to be equivalent or inferior to BCNU when compared on a microgram to microgram basis. If the potential of in vitro phase II trials for selecti...... of new drugs can be validated, it can be concluded that TCNU is not superior to other nitrosoureas for the treatment of SCCL....

  17. Effect and Significance of BIM on Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingfang WANG

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available B-cell lymphoma 2 interacting mediator of cell death (BIM plays an important role in the progress of cell apoptosis. The lowering expression level or functional defect of which may have an negative effect on the efficacy of anticancer drugs and the prognosis of postoperative patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. This review aims to summarize the structure and function of BIM, as well as the relationship between BIM and the therapeutic efficacy of NSCLC.

  18. Unusual cause of ectopic secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone: Cushing syndrome attributable to small cell prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshaikh, Omalkhaire M; Al-Mahfouz, Abdulraof A; Al-Hindi, Hindi; Mahfouz, Ali Bin; Alzahrani, Ali S

    2010-01-01

    To report a rare cause of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion leading to severe Cushing syndrome. We describe the clinical presentation and management of a case of Cushing syndrome attributable to ectopic ACTH secretion from small cell cancer of the prostate. In a 70-year-old man with hypertension and diabetes, congestive heart failure developed. He was found to have severe hypokalemia (serum potassium, 1.7 mEq/L) and a huge pelvic mass on a computed tomographic scan performed because of a complaint of urinary retention. Transurethral biopsy of the prostate showed features of small cell prostate cancer. Hormonal evaluation revealed a high urine free cortisol excretion of 6,214.5 microg/d (reference range, 36 to 137), confirming the diagnosis of Cushing syndrome. A serum ACTH level was elevated at 316 ng/dL (reference range, 10 to 52). An overnight high-dose (8 mg orally) dexamethasone suppression test was positive (serum cortisol levels were 43.2 and 41 microg/dL before and after suppression, respectively), and magnetic resonance imaging of the pituitary gland disclosed no abnormalities. A prostate biopsy specimen showed small cell prostate cancer with positive staining for ACTH. The tumor was found to be unresectable, and the poor condition of the patient did not allow for bilateral adrenalectomy. He was treated with ketoconazole and metyrapone, which yielded good temporary control of his Cushing syndrome (24-hour urine free cortisol decreased to 55.2 microg/d). He received 1 cycle of chemotherapy (etoposide and cisplatin), but he died 6 months later as a result of sepsis. Small cell prostate cancer is a rare subtype that can be associated with ectopic secretion of ACTH and severe Cushing syndrome. With this subtype of prostate cancer, Cushing syndrome should be considered and appropriately managed.

  19. GreenDelivery: Proactive Content Caching and Push with Energy-Harvesting-based Small Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Sheng; Gong, Jie; ZHOU, Zhenyu; Chen, Wei; Niu, Zhisheng

    2015-01-01

    The explosive growth of mobile multimedia traffic calls for scalable wireless access with high quality of service and low energy cost. Motivated by the emerging energy harvesting communications, and the trend of caching multimedia contents at the access edge and user terminals, we propose a paradigm-shift framework, namely GreenDelivery, enabling efficient content delivery with energy harvesting based small cells. To resolve the two-dimensional randomness of energy harvesting and content requ...

  20. Notch signaling and EMT in non-small cell lung cancer: biological significance and therapeutic application

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Xun; Wu, Hua; Han, Na; Xu, Hanxiao; Chu, Qian; Yu, Shiying; Chen, Yuan; Wu, Kongming

    2014-01-01

    Through epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), cancer cells acquire enhanced ability of migration and invasion, stem cell like characteristics and therapeutic resistance. Notch signaling regulates cell-cell connection, cell polarity and motility during organ development. Recent studies demonstrate that Notch signaling plays an important role in lung cancer initiation and cross-talks with several transcriptional factors to enhance EMT, contributing to the progression of non-small cell lung c...

  1. Targeting Transcriptional Addictions in Small Cell Lung Cancer with a Covalent CDK7 Inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Camilla L; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Abraham, Brian J;

    2014-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive disease with high mortality, and the identification of effective pharmacological strategies to target SCLC biology represents an urgent need. Using a high-throughput cellular screen of a diverse chemical library, we observe that SCLC is sensitive to ...... to THZ1 treatment. We propose that downregulation of these transcription factors contributes, in part, to SCLC sensitivity to transcriptional inhibitors and that THZ1 represents a prototype drug for tailored SCLC therapy....

  2. Diagnostic procedures for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC): recommendations of the European Expert Group

    OpenAIRE

    Dietel, Manfred; Bubendorf, Lukas; Dingemans, Anne-Marie C; Dooms, Christophe; Elmberger, Göran; García, Rosa Calero; Keith M Kerr; Lim, Eric; López-Ríos, Fernando; Thunnissen, Erik; Van Schil, Paul E.; von Laffert, Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    Background There is currently no Europe-wide consensus on the appropriate preanalytical measures and workflow to optimise procedures for tissue-based molecular testing of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). To address this, a group of lung cancer experts (see list of authors) convened to discuss and propose standard operating procedures (SOPs) for NSCLC. Methods Based on earlier meetings and scientific expertise on lung cancer, a multidisciplinary group meeting was aligned. The aim was to inc...

  3. Simulating non-small cell lung cancer with a multiscale agent-based model

    OpenAIRE

    Deisboeck Thomas S; Sagotsky Jonathan; Zhang Le; Wang Zhihui

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently overexpressed in many cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In silico modeling is considered to be an increasingly promising tool to add useful insights into the dynamics of the EGFR signal transduction pathway. However, most of the previous modeling work focused on the molecular or the cellular level only, neglecting the crucial feedback between these scales as well as the interaction with the hete...

  4. Advances in Treatment of Brain Metastases 
from Primary Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gen LIN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic tumors involving the brain are an important complication in the overall management of non-small cell lung cancers. Surgery and radiation remain the cornerstones of the therapy, however, the burgeoning knowledge of tumor biology has facilitated the entry of systemically administered therapies into the clinic. This review mainly summarizes the current applications of these data to surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy and targeted therapy.

  5. Gene expression-based classification of non-small cell lung carcinomas and survival prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current clinical therapy of non-small cell lung cancer depends on histo-pathological classification. This approach poorly predicts clinical outcome for individual patients. Gene expression profiling holds promise to improve clinical stratification, thus paving the way for individualized therapy. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A genome-wide gene expression analysis was performed on a cohort of 91 patients. We used 91 tumor- and 65 adjacent normal lung tissue samples. We defined sets of predictor genes (probe sets with the expression profiles. The power of predictor genes was evaluated using an independent cohort of 96 non-small cell lung cancer- and 6 normal lung samples. We identified a tumor signature of 5 genes that aggregates the 156 tumor and normal samples into the expected groups. We also identified a histology signature of 75 genes, which classifies the samples in the major histological subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer. Correlation analysis identified 17 genes which showed the best association with post-surgery survival time. This signature was used for stratification of all patients in two risk groups. Kaplan-Meier survival curves show that the two groups display a significant difference in post-surgery survival time (p = 5.6E-6. The performance of the signatures was validated using a patient cohort of similar size (Duke University, n = 96. Compared to previously published prognostic signatures for NSCLC, the 17 gene signature performed well on these two cohorts. CONCLUSIONS: The gene signatures identified are promising tools for histo-pathological classification of non-small cell lung cancer, and may improve the prediction of clinical outcome.

  6. Simultaneous Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Adenocarcinoma: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Maleki, Iradj; Shekarriz, Ramin; Nosrati, Anahita; Orang, Elahe

    2015-01-01

    Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma is a rather common cancer in northern Iran. Incidence of adenocarcinoma of esophagus has an increasing trend in Iran. Co-existence of both cancers in one patient is very rare. We report a middle age woman from northern Iran with a typical presentation of esophageal cancer, who was found to have a dual esophageal cancer. The disease was found in the advanced stage with pulmonary metastasis at the presentation. Palliative chemo-radiotherapy induced partial cli...

  7. Esophageal space-occupying lesion caused by Ascaris lumbricoides

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng,Ping-Ping; Wang, Bing-Yuan; Wang, Fei(Physics Department, Zhengzhou University, Henan, 450001, China); Ao, Ran; Wang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Ascaris lumbricoides is the largest intestinal nematode parasite of man, which can lead to various complications because of its mobility. As the esophagus is not normal habitat of Ascaris, the report of esophageal ascariasis is rare. An old female presented with dysphagia after an intake of several red bean buns and haw jellies. The barium meal examination revealed a spherical defect in the lower esophagus. Esophageal bezoar or esophageal carcinoma was considered at the beginning. The patient...

  8. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for nutritional palliation of upper esophageal cancer unsuitable for esophageal stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Grilo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Esophageal cancer is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and has a poor prognosis. Most patients with advanced esophageal cancer have significant dysphagia that contributes to weight loss and malnutrition. Esophageal stenting is a widespread palliation approach, but unsuitable for cancers near the upper esophageal sphincter, were stents are poorly tolerated. Generally, guidelines do not support endoscopic gastrostomy in this clinical setting, but it may be the best option for nutritional support. OBJECTIVE: Retrospective evaluation of patients with dysphagia caused advanced esophageal cancer, no expectation of resuming oral intake and with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy for comfort palliative nutrition. METHOD: We selected adult patients with unresecable esophageal cancer histological confirmed, in whom stenting was impossible due to proximal location, and chemotherapy or radiotherapy were palliative, using gastrostomy for enteral nutrition. Clinical and nutritional data were evaluated, including success of gastrostomy, procedure complications and survival after percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, and evolution of body mass index, albumin, transferrin and cholesterol. RESULTS: Seventeen males with stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Mean age was 60.9 years. Most of the patients had toxic habits. All underwent palliative chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Gastrostomy was successfully performed in all, but nine required prior dilatation. Most had the gastrostomy within 2 months after diagnosis. There was a buried bumper syndrome treated with tube replacement and four minor complications. There were no cases of implantation metastases or procedure related mortality. Two patients were lost and 12 died. Mean survival of deceased patients was 5.9 months. Three patients are alive 6, 14 and 17 months after the gastrostomy procedure, still increasing the mean survival. Mean body mass index and laboratory

  9. Whole-body metabolic tumour volume of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT improves the prediction of prognosis in small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Jong-Ryool; Chong, Ari; Min, Jung-Joon; Song, Ho-Chun; Bom, Hee-Seung [Chonnam National University Medical School and Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Ji-Hyoung [Daegu Fatima Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young-Chul [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Hwasun-gun (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    We investigated whether the whole-body metabolic tumour volume (WBMTV) measured by {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can improve the prediction of prognosis in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). We reviewed 106 consecutive patients (mean age 67 years, range 42-89 years, limited stage 45 patients, extensive stage 61 patients) with pathologically proven SCLC who underwent pretreatment FDG PET/CT. WBMTV and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) were measured in all malignant lesions. The Cox proportional hazards model was used with age, sex, performance status, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), treatment, stage, SUV{sub max} and WBMTV to predict overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Subgroup analysis was performed using WBMTV combined with conventional staging and tumour node metastasis (TNM) staging. The uni- and multivariate analyses showed that both stage and WBMTV were independent prognostic factors for death and progression. Patients with high WBMTV were associated with poor prognosis compared with patients with low WBMTV [hazard ratio = 2.11 (95% confidence interval 1.31-3.39) for death (p = 0.002) and 1.80 (95% confidence interval 1.16-2.80) for progression (p = 0.009)]. Incorporation of conventional staging and WBMTV could classify four subgroups with different prognoses (log-rank test, p < 0.001). Incorporation of TNM staging and WBMTV could classify six subgroups with different prognoses (log-rank test, p < 0.001). WBMTV is an independent predictor for progression and death in patients with SCLC. Incorporation of WBMTV with TNM staging can provide a more detailed prediction of prognosis than WBMTV with conventional staging as well as tumour staging alone. (orig.)

  10. Association of GWAS-identified lung cancer susceptibility loci with survival length in patients with small-cell lung cancer treated with platinum-based chemotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Li

    Full Text Available Genetic variants have been shown to affect length of survival in cancer patients. This study explored the association between lung cancer susceptibility loci tagged by single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs identified in the genome-wide association studies and length of survival in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC. Eighteen SNPs were genotyped among 874 SCLC patients and Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine the effects of genotype on survival length under an additive model with age, sex, smoking status and clinical stage as covariates. We identified 3 loci, 20q13.2 (rs4809957G >A, 22q12.2 (rs36600C >T and 5p15.33 (rs401681C >T, significantly associated with the survival time of SCLC patients. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR for patients with the rs4809957 GA or AA genotype was 0.80 (95% CI, 0.66-0.96; P = 0.0187 and 0.73 (95% CI, 0.55-0.96; P = 0.0263 compared with the GG genotype. Using the dominant model, the adjusted HR for patients carrying at least one T allele at rs36600 or rs401681 was 0.78 (95% CI, 0.63-0.96; P = 0.0199 and 1.29 (95% CI, 1.08-1.55; P = 0.0047, respectively, compared with the CC genotype. Stratification analyses showed that the significant associations of these 3 loci were only seen in smokers and male patients. The rs4809957 SNP was only significantly associated with length of survival of patients with extensive-stage but not limited-stage tumor. These results suggest that some of the lung cancer susceptibility loci might also affect the prognosis of SCLC.

  11. Esophageal motility disorders; Motilitaetsstoerungen des Oesophagus

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    Hannig, C.; Rummeny, E. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Muenchen (Germany); Wuttge-Hannig, A. [Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Strahlentherapie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    For the better understanding of esophageal motility, the muscle texture and the distribution of skeletal and smooth muscle fibers in the esophagus are of crucial importance. Esophageal physiology will be shortly mentioned as far as necessary for a comprehensive understanding of peristaltic disturbances. Besides the pure depiction of morphologic criteria, a complete esophageal study has to include an analysis of the motility. New diagnostic tools with reduced radiation for dynamic imaging (digital fluoroscopy, videofluoroscopy) at 4-30 frames/s are available. Radiomanometry is a combination of a functional pressure measurement and a simultaneous dynamic morphologic analysis. Esophageal motility disorders are subdivided by radiologic and manometric criteria into primary, secondary, and nonclassifiable forms. Primary motility disorders of the esophagus are achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, and the hypertonic lower esophageal sphincter. The secondary motility disorders include pseudoachalasia, reflux-associated motility disorders, functionally caused impactions, Boerhaave's syndrome, Chagas' disease, scleroderma, and presbyesophagus. The nonclassificable motility disorders (NEMD) are a very heterogeneous collective. (orig.) [German] Zum Verstaendnis der Motilitaet des Oesophagus sind muskulaere Architektur und Verteilung der quergestreiften und glatten Muskelfasern von Bedeutung. Die Physiologie des Oesophagus wird in soweit kurz dargestellt, als sie fuer das Verstaendnis von peristaltischen Stoerungen notwendig ist. Neben der Erfassung rein morphologischer Kriterien ist bei der Untersuchung der Speiseroehre eine diagnostische Bewertung der Motilitaet erforderlich. Es stehen uns heute strahlungsarme dynamische Aufzeichnungsverfahren (digitale dynamische Aufzeichnung, Videofluoroskopie) mit Bildsequenzen von 4-30 Bildern/s zur Verfuegung. Die Kombination einer funktionellen Methode zur Darstellung der Morphologie und der

  12. Small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: KIT and PDGFRA gene mutations

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    Nuket Eliyakin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is very rare. A 72-year-old was admitted to our hospital because of hematuria and dysuria. Cystoscopy revealed a bladder full of multiple, solid and papillary tumors. Biopsies from the deep and papillary tumors were taken. Histologically, tumor was pure small cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin, chromogranin, synaptophysin, neuron-specific enolase, CD56, CD117 and Ki67 (labeling 70%. The tumor cells were negative for CK7, CK20, CD3, CD20, LCA, CDX2, uroplakin, thyroid transcription factor 1, PSA and p63. Metastatic workup was performed an no primary or metastatic lung lesions were noted. Due to the clinical, radiologic and immunohistochemical findings, the patient was diagnosed as primary small cell carcinoma of bladder. A molecular genetic analysis for KIT (exons 9, 11, 13 and 17 and PDGFRA (exons 12 and 18 genes was performed, in paraffin micro dissection specimens, by the PCR-direct sequencing method. According to the sequencing analyses, two mutations were found at positions 558 (p.K558N and 562 (p.E562D in KIT gene exon 11 in our case. The another hand the same case presented two mutations in PDGFRA gene exon 14 at position 631 (p.P631A and 638 (p.638Q_639AinsC. The disease process was fulminant and the patient was lost due to several complications prior to any chemotherapy.

  13. A Rare Case of Non-Small Cell Carcinoma of Lung Presenting as Miliary Mottling

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    Ballaekere Jayaram Subhashchandra

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Miliary mottling on chest radiography is seen in miliary tuberculosis, certain fungal infections, sarcoidosis, coal miner’s pneumoconiosis, silicosis, hemosiderosis, fibrosing alveolitis, acute extrinsic allergic alveolitis, pulmonary eosinophilic syndrome, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, and rarely in hematogenous metastases from the primary cancers of the thyroid, kidney, trophoblasts, and some sarcomas. Although very infrequent, miliary mottling can be seen in primary lung cancers. Herein, we report the case of a 28-year-old female with chest X-ray showing miliary mottling. Thoracic computed tomography (CT features were suggestive of tuberculoma with miliary tuberculosis. CT-guided fine needle aspiration cytology confirmed the diagnosis as lower-lobe, left lung non-small cell carcinoma (adenocarcinoma. It is rare for the non-small cell carcinoma of the lung to present as miliary mottling. The rarity of our case lies in the fact that a young, non-smoking female with miliary mottling was diagnosed with non-small cell carcinoma of the lung.

  14. Small Cell Lung Cancer Presenting as Severe Thrombocytopenia and Refractory Hypokalemia

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    Rohan Mandaliya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old female with a history of mild cirrhosis was referred by her primary care provider for a platelet count of 36,000/μL which had dropped from 47,000/μL in a week along with mild pain in extremities. Serum potassium was low (2.9 mEq/L in spite of the patient being recently started on potassium supplement on outpatient for hypokalemia. Initially thrombocytopenia was attributed to cirrhosis. However, platelet counts continued to drop to a nadir of 9000/μL in spite of several platelet transfusions. Hypokalemia was refractory to potassium supplements. Subsequent bone marrow biopsy revealed extensive marrow necrosis with a focus of small cell tumor cells of pulmonary origin. CT scan of the chest showed a spiculated left lung mass. The ACTH level was high, with normal rennin and aldosterone levels. The patient likely had ectopic ACTH syndrome from small cell lung cancer. She died within few days of diagnosis. Severe thrombocytopenia and refractory hypokalemia can rarely be initial presentations of small cell lung cancer. Thrombocytopenia should prompt an evaluation for bone marrow metastases and a search for undiagnosed systemic malignancy. In severe cases of metastases, bone marrow necrosis can be present. Refractory hypokalemia can be the sole presentation of ectopic ACTH production.

  15. Secondary osteosarcoma developing 10 years after chemoradiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagishita, Shigehiro; Horinouchi, Hidehito; Yorozu, Takashi; Kitazono, Satoru; Mizugaki, Hidenori; Kanda, Shintaro; Fujiwara, Yutaka; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Noboru; Mori, Taisuke; Tsuta, Koji; Sumi, Minako; Tamura, Tomohide

    2014-02-01

    A 53-year-old female patient was admitted with pain and a progressively enlarging mass in the right upper chest. Chest computed tomography revealed a mass lesion in the region of the right upper ribs. Ten years prior to this admission, the patient had undergone right lobectomy for lung adenocarcinoma. One year after the surgery, follow-up computed tomography had revealed tumor recurrence in the mediastinal and supraclavicular lymph nodes, and the patient had been treated by chemoradiotherapy. Thereafter, regular follow-up had revealed no evidence of recurrence of the non-small-cell lung cancer. Histopathological findings revealed proliferation of spindle-shaped malignant tumor cells in a background of osteoid, consistent with the diagnosis of osteosarcoma. The location of the tumor was consistent with the radiation field. Based on the clinicopathological findings, the patient was diagnosed as having secondary osteosarcoma occurring as a result of the chemoradiotherapy administered previously for the recurrent non-small-cell lung cancer. Unfortunately, the patient died of rapid progression of the osteosarcoma within a week of admission to the hospital. The autopsy revealed contiguous invasion by the tumor of the heart, with massive thrombus formation. The peripheral pulmonary arteries were diffusely occluded by metastatic tumors. Our case serves to highlight the risk of development of secondary sarcoma as a life-threatening late complication after chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, even after complete cure of the primary tumor.

  16. Immune checkpoint inhibitors: the new frontier in non–small cell lung cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Osta HE

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hazem El-Osta, Kamran Shahid, Glenn M Mills, Prakash Peddi Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology-Oncology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA, USA Abstract: Lung cancer is the major cause for cancer-related death in the US. Although advances in chemotherapy and targeted therapy have improved the outcome of metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer, its prognosis remains dismal. A deeper understanding of the complex interaction between the immune system and tumor microenvironment has identified immune checkpoint inhibitors as new avenue of immunotherapy. Rather than acting directly on the tumor, these therapies work by removing the inhibition exerted by tumor cell or other immune cells on the immune system, promoting antitumoral immune response. To date, two programmed death-1 inhibitors, namely nivolumab and pembrolizumab, have received the US Food and Drug Administration approval for the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer that failed platinum-based chemotherapy. This manuscript provides a brief overview of the pathophysiology of cancer immune evasion, summarizes pertinent data on completed and ongoing clinical trials involving checkpoint inhibitors, discusses the different strategies to optimize their function, and outlines various challenges that are faced in this promising yet evolving field. Keywords: checkpoint inhibitors, immunotherapy, nivolumab, non-small-cell lung cancer, pembrolizumab, programmed death-1, programmed death ligand-1

  17. Interference Mitigation and Sum Rate Optimization for MIMO Downlink Small Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. Kha

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses interference issues in multiuser multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO downlink heterogeneous networks in which multiple small cells are deployed in macrocell coverage. With the higher priority to access the frequency bands, the macro base station (MBS will exploit eigenmode transmission along with water-filling based power allocation to maximize its data rate. To avoid harmful interference to macro users, we propose structures of the precoders at the small cell BSs (SBSs as cascades of two precoding matrices. In addition, to mitigate intra-tier inference in small cells, the SBSs exploit the user scheduling schemes for their associated users. We investigate two user scheduling schemes using the minimum interference leakage and maximum signal to noise ratio criteria. The sum rate of the selected users can be further improved by power allocation. We develop an iterative algorithm using difference of convex functions (d.c. programming to tackle the mathematical challenges of the nonconvex power allocation problem, Numerical simulation results show that the proposed strategy outperforms the conventional methods in terms of the achievable sum rate.

  18. Photodynamic Therapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. Narrative Review and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafirstein, Gal; Battoo, Athar; Harris, Kassem; Baumann, Heinz; Gollnick, Sandra O; Lindenmann, Joerg; Nwogu, Chukwumere E

    2016-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an established treatment modality for non-small cell lung cancer. Phototoxicity, the primary adverse event, is expected to be minimized with the introduction of new photosensitizers that have shown promising results in phase I and II clinical studies. Early-stage and superficial endobronchial lesions less than 1 cm in thickness can be effectively treated with external light sources. Thicker lesions and peripheral lesions may be amenable to interstitial PDT, where the light is delivered intratumorally. The addition of PDT to standard-of-care surgery and chemotherapy can improve survival and outcomes in patients with pleural disease. Intraoperative PDT has shown promise in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer with pleural spread. Recent preclinical and clinical data suggest that PDT can increase antitumor immunity. Crosslinking of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 molecules is a reliable biomarker to quantify the photoreaction induced by PDT. Randomized studies are required to test the prognosis value of this biomarker, obtain approval for the new photosensitizers, and test the potential efficacy of interstitial and intraoperative PDT in the treatment of patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

  19. Photodynamic Therapy of Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer. Narrative Review and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battoo, Athar; Harris, Kassem; Baumann, Heinz; Gollnick, Sandra O.; Lindenmann, Joerg; Nwogu, Chukwumere E.

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an established treatment modality for non–small cell lung cancer. Phototoxicity, the primary adverse event, is expected to be minimized with the introduction of new photosensitizers that have shown promising results in phase I and II clinical studies. Early-stage and superficial endobronchial lesions less than 1 cm in thickness can be effectively treated with external light sources. Thicker lesions and peripheral lesions may be amenable to interstitial PDT, where the light is delivered intratumorally. The addition of PDT to standard-of-care surgery and chemotherapy can improve survival and outcomes in patients with pleural disease. Intraoperative PDT has shown promise in the treatment of non–small cell lung cancer with pleural spread. Recent preclinical and clinical data suggest that PDT can increase antitumor immunity. Crosslinking of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 molecules is a reliable biomarker to quantify the photoreaction induced by PDT. Randomized studies are required to test the prognosis value of this biomarker, obtain approval for the new photosensitizers, and test the potential efficacy of interstitial and intraoperative PDT in the treatment of patients with non–small cell lung cancer. PMID:26646726

  20. Successful treatment of cranial metastases of extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma with chemotherapy alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, B; Yalçin, S; Evrensel, T; Yerci, O; Manavoğlu, O

    1998-04-01

    Extrapulmonary small cell carcinoma (EPSCC) is a distinct clinical and pathological entity other than small cell carcinoma of the lung. We present a case with EPSCC, with neurologic impairment due to brain metastases at initial diagnosis, which showed a complete response to combination chemotherapy. A 55-year-old male patient was first admitted with a mass of 6 x 6 cm in diameter in the right cervical region. The diagnosis of small cell carcinoma was entertained with immunohistopathologic and light microscopic findings. During the period of investigation the tumor showed rapid progression and the patient had neurologic dysfunction with right hemiparesia, and papilla oedema in fundoscopy. Cranial CT showed supratentorial multiple cranial metastases and peritumoral oedema. Since the patient refused radiotherapy, combination chemotherapy was started (Etoposide 100 mg/sq m i.v., days 1,3,5 and cisplatin 80 mg/sq m i.v., day 1). A fast response to the chemotherapy was observed with rapid disappearance of the cervical mass. Following six cycles of the chemotherapy the patient recovered fully and all the lesions disappeared with CT.

  1. Medical treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer: progress in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong SONG

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer is the most common pathological type of lung cancer. Along with the rising incidence in recent years, lung cancer has been the leading cause of death due to malignancies both in our country and worldwide. Due to simplistic therapeutic approach for lung cancer decades ago, those patients suffering from advanced lung cancer had short lifetime, and it was difficult to ensure their life quality. In recent years, many molecular targeted drugs, such as Gefitinib, Erlotinib and Crizotinib etc., have been successively applied in clinical use, and they bring about a substantial prolongation of survival life and improvement in life quality of those patients with advanced lung cancer. In 2014, there was a number of important reports concerning the diagnosis and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer in the annual meetings of either American Society of Clinical Oncology or European Society for Medical Oncology. On the basis of the relevant reports delivered in the conferences, it is our attempt to summarize the recent advances in regard to chemotherapy, molecular targeted therapy, measures to treat TKI therapy resistant cases, and immune therapy, followed by a comment regarding recent advances in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer in 2014. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.01.03

  2. Esophageal Motor Disorders in Terms of High-Resolution Esophageal Pressure Topography: What Has Changed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahrilas, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The concept of high-resolution manometry (HRM) is to use sufficient pressure sensors such that intraluminal pressure can be monitored as a continuum along luminal length much as time is viewed as a continuum in conventional manometry. When HRM is coupled with pressure topography plots, pressure amplitude is transformed into spectral colors with isobaric conditions indicated by same-colored regions on the display. Together, these technologies are called high-resolution esophageal pressure topography (HREPT). HREPT has several advantages compared with conventional manometry, the technology that it was designed to replace. (i) The contractility of the entire esophagus can be viewed simultaneously in a uniform format, (ii) standardized objective metrics can be systematically applied for interpretation, and (iii) topographic patterns of contractility are more easily recognized and have greater reproducibility than with conventional manometry. Compared with conventional manometry, HREPT has improved sensitivity for detecting achalasia, largely due to the objectivity and accuracy with which it identifies impaired esophagogastric junction (EGJ) relaxation. In addition, it has led to the subcategorization of achalasia into three clinically relevant subtypes based on the contractile function of the esophageal body: classic achalasia, achalasia with esophageal compression, and spastic achalasia. Headway has also been made in understanding hypercontractile conditions, including diffuse esophageal spasm and a newly described entity, spastic nutcracker. Ultimately, clinical experience will be the judge, but it seems likely that HREPT data, along with its well-defined functional implications, will improve the clinical management of esophageal motility disorders. PMID:20179690

  3. Whole greater than the parts: integrated esophageal centers (IEC) and advanced training in esophageal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triadafilopoulos, G; Clarke, J; Hawn, M

    2017-10-01

    An integrated esophageal center (IEC) is a multidisciplinary team with expertise, skill, range, and facilities necessary to achieve optimal outcomes in patients with esophageal diseases efficiently and expeditiously. Within IEC, patients presenting with esophageal symptoms undergo a detailed clinical, functional and structural evaluation of their esophagus prior to implementation of tailored medical, endoscopic or surgical therapy. Serving as a core, the IEC clinical practice also supports research and innovation in esophageal diseases as well as public and physician education. Referrals to the unit may be primary, either from primary care or self-initiated, or secondary from other specialty practices, to reassess patients who have previously failed therapies and to manage complex or complicated cases. The fundamental goals of the IEC are to provide value for patients with esophageal diseases, streamlining complex diagnostic investigations and expediting therapies aiming at reducing costs while improving clinical outcomes, and to accelerate knowledge generation through robust interaction and cross-training across disciplines. The organization of the IEC goes beyond traditional academic and clinical silos and involves a director and administrative team coordinating faculty and fellows from both medical and surgical disciplines and supported by other clinical lines, such as radiology, pathology, etc., while it interfaces with physicians, the public, basic, translational and clinical research groups, and related industry partners. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Two-Stage Explantation of a Magnetic Lower Esophageal Sphincter Augmentation Device Due to Esophageal Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Abhishek D; Tessler, Robert A; Chang, Howard Y; Svahn, Jonathan D

    2017-08-01

    Implanting a magnetic lower esophageal sphincter augmentation device (LINX, Torax Medical) has become an increasingly common option in the surgical management of gastroesophageal reflux disease. As the enthusiasm for placing this device increases, experience in the management of device-related complications-including erosion-is necessary. We report a staged approach to LINX removal in a 64-year-old female with symptoms of odynophagia secondary to partial erosion of a LINX device into the esophagus. The patient had a 12-bead LINX device placed in 2011 at an outside, international facility. In late 2013, she began experiencing symptoms of odynophagia. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy at our institution in October 2015 demonstrated two metallic beads eroding through the distal esophageal lumen. An elective endoscopic removal of the two visible beads was performed. A postoperative esophagram confirmed that there was no resulting esophageal perforation. The patient noted mild improvement in her symptoms. After a 12-week period to allow for complete healing, the remaining 10 beads of the LINX device were explanted laparoscopically without complication. No further procedures were undertaken. At 2 months' follow-up, the patient noted complete resolution of her symptoms. Transmural erosion of the LINX device into the esophageal lumen is a rare occurrence, with only five such complications reported in the published literature. We present the first account of LINX explantation for esophageal erosion in the United States. We demonstrated that a staged laparoendoscopic approach to LINX removal in these cases is feasible with minimal morbidity.

  5. Sarcopenia and Visceral Obesity in Esophageal and Gastric Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-17

    Esophageal Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Sarcopenia; Sarcopenic Obesity; Obesity; Visceral Obesity; Quality of Life; Surgery; Complication of Treatment; Chemotherapeutic Toxicity; Physical Activity; Oncology

  6. Congenital esophageal stenosis in 3 children: A case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mackenzie C. Lees

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Congenital esophageal stenosis (CES is rare condition found in 1 per 25,000 to 50,000 live births. It is characterized by intrinsic narrowing of the esophagus secondary to congenital malformation of the esophageal wall architecture. Diagnosis is often difficult to definitively establish as the symptoms are often initially attributed to esophageal strictures secondary to reflux, or occur within the context of a tracheo-esophageal fistula (TEF in the newborn. Endoscopic dilation and surgical repair are the mainstays of treatment. We report a series of three cases seen recently at our institution, the University of Alberta/Stollery Children's Hospital.

  7. [A case of esophageal achalasia followed by Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Maki; Kawamoto, Kunihiko; Funakawa, Itaru; Jinnai, Kenji

    2005-08-01

    In 1992, a 63 year-old woman complained of dysphagia and chest pain, and was diagnosed with esophageal achalasia. Three years later, she developed resting tremor, cog-wheel rigidity, and retro-pulsion, and was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease and given appropriate medication. Several years later, intractable vomitting and aspiration pneumonia developed, and the lower esophageal sphincter was dilated using a pneumatic balloon dilator under gastroscopic guidance in 2004. That procedure improved her symptoms and the esophageal dilation was visualized on chest CT images. Herein, we report this rare case of esophageal achalasia followed by Parkinson's disease and discuss the relationship between the two diseases.

  8. Antipsychotic-induced life-threatening 'esophageal dyskinesia'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiguchi, J; Shingu, T; Hayashi, T; Kagaya, A; Yamawaki, S; Horikawa, Y; Kitadai, Y; Inoue, M; Nishikawa, T

    1999-03-01

    We report two patients with lingual dyskinesia and complaints of food regurgitation following long-term antipsychotic therapy. Esophageal contrast radiography revealed dyskinetic movements extending from the pharynx to the upper portion of the esophagus. The elevation of intraesophageal pressure was confirmed by esophageal manometry. The dyskinetic movements almost disappeared along with improvement of lingual dyskinesia following the administration of sulpiride in one patient. Another patient suddenly died due to asphyxiation of foods before the beginning of treatment. We termed this life-threatening movement, 'esophageal dyskinesia'. It should be emphasized that 'esophageal dyskinesia' associated with lingual dyskinesia is a potentially fatal adverse reaction to antipsychotic therapy.

  9. Aortic Pseudoaneurysm Secondary to Mediastinitis due to Esophageal Perforation

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    Claudia Patricia Zuluaga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal perforation is a condition associated with high morbidity and mortality rates; it requires early diagnosis and treatment. The most common complication of esophageal rupture is mediastinitis. There are several case reports in the literature of mediastinitis secondary to esophageal perforation and development of aortic pseudoaneurysm as a complication. We report the case of a patient with an 8-day history of esophageal perforation due to foreign body (fishbone with mediastinitis and aortic pseudoaneurysm. The diagnosis was made using Computed Tomography (CT with intravenous and oral water-soluble contrast material. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy did not detect the perforation.

  10. Dangers to Children at Home: Corrosive esophageal burn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Guven

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Inappropriate storage of cleaners which excessively used in daily is hazardous to children. Ingestion of potent corrosive agents, especially alkaline solutions may lead to acute esophageal burns, esophageal or stomach perforation, and even to death. Early of these injuries may be associated with esophageal strictures in later and the treatment of strictures might be and take long follow-up. This article reviews related issues on the diagnosis and management of esophageal burns, strictures and preventive medicine in children. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(6.000: 535-540

  11. Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis characterized by barium esophagography: a case report

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Owen J

    2010-05-21

    Abstract Introduction Esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis is a rare condition characterized by the dilatation of the submucosal glands. Case presentation We present a case of esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis in a 72-year-old Caucasian man who presented with dysphagia and with a background history of alcohol abuse. An upper gastrointestinal endoscopy of our patient showed an esophageal stricture with abnormal mucosal appearances, but no malignant cells were seen at biopsy. Appearances on a barium esophagram were pathognomonic for esophageal intramural pseudodiverticulosis. Conclusion We demonstrate the enduring usefulness of barium esophagography in the characterization of abnormal mucosal appearances at endoscopy.

  12. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with low-dose weekly docetaxel followed by consolidation chemotherapy with docetaxel and cisplatin in the treatment of stage III non-small cell lung cancer

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    Tianlin XIAO

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Concurrent chemoradiotherapy is regarded as the standard care for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer at present. This paper is designed to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of low-dose weekly docetaxel (DTX with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by consolidation chemotherapy with DTX and cisplatin for unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC. Methods 44 previously untreated patients with stage III NSCLC were randomized into low-dose weekly DTX group and control group concomitant with radiotherapy. Both groups were treated by the standard fractionation schedule with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. An involved-field irradiation technique was performed. Gross tumor and metastatic lymph nodes were irradiated to a total dose of 66 Gy~70 Gy. Patients in the former group received chemotherapy with DTX 20mg. m-2.w-1,and the other group patients received DTX 60 mg/m2 on day 1 and DDP 30 mg/m2 on day 1~3 every 21 days. All patients received consolidation chemotherapy with DP regime after chemoradiotherapy for no more than 4 cycles. Results The overall response rates of patients in the low-dose weekly DTX group and control group were 81.8% with 27.3% CR(complete response and 86.4% with 27.3% CR respectively (Chisquare=0.120, P=0.942. After a median follow-up of 20months, the median survival time was 20 months and 17 months respectively. The 1-, 2- year survival rates of patients in low-dose weekly DTX group and control group were 69.8%, 48.1% versus 66.5%, 40.2% respectively;there was no difference between two groups. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia and esophagitis occurred in 26.3%, 14.3% and 15.8%, 28.6% respectively (Chiquare=0.765,P =0.382(Chiquare=1.108,P =0.292.Grade 3 and 4 pulmonary toxicity was unusual.Conclusion Concurrent chemoradiotherapy with low-dose weekly docetaxel followed by consolidation chemotherapy with docetaxel and cisplatin is highly active with manageable toxicity in patients

  13. Investigation of intra-esophageal air kinetics and esophageal sphincters in patients with total laryngectomy during esophageal speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozan, Aykut; Vardar, Rukiye; Akyildiz, Serdar; Kirazli, Tayfun; Ogut, Fatih; Yildirim, Esra; Bor, Serhat

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the air kinetics of well- and poor-speaking patients and their upper (UES) and lower (LES) esophageal sphincter pressures . The esophageal speech capability of 23 total laryngectomy patients was assessed with the Wepman scale. LES and UES points and pressures were measured, and air kinetics were compared. All patients were male, with an average age of 58 years. Both the LES and UES pressures were not statistically different between good-speaking and poor-speaking patients (p > 0.05). The ability to speak was estimated only by looking at tracings. Good speakers are able to retain air successfully and on a long-term basis between the upper and lower esophageal sphincters. During short and/or rapid speech, these patients are able to rapidly suck and then expel the air from their upper esophagus. During long speeches, after sucking the air into their distal esophagus, they used the air in the upper part of the esophagus during the speech, only later seeming to fill the lower esophagus with the air as a possible reserve in the stomach. It has been shown that the basic requirement for speaking is the capacity to suck and store the air within the esophagus. For successful speech, the air should be stored inside the esophagus. MII technology contributes to our understanding of speech kinetics and occupies an important place in patient training as a biofeedback technique.

  14. Eosinophilic esophagitis-endoscopic distinguishing findings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ana Célia Caetano; Raquel Gon(c)alves; Carla Rolanda

    2012-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is the most frequent condition found in a group of gastrointestinal disorders called eosinophilic gastrointestinal diseases.The hypothetical pathophysiological mechanism is related to a hypersensitivity reaction.Gastroesophageal reflux disease-like complaints not ameliorated by acid blockade or occasional symptoms of dysphagia or food impaction are likely presentations of EE.Due to its unclear pathogenesis and unspecific symptoms,it is difficult to diagnose EE without a strong suspicion.Although histological criteria are necessary to diagnosis EE,there are some characteristic endoscopic features.We present the case of a healthy 55-year-old woman with dysphagia and several episodes of esophageal food impaction over the last six months.This case report stresses the most distinguishing endoscopic findings-mucosa rings,white exudative plaques and linear furrows-that can help in the prompt recognition of this condition.

  15. Thoracoscopic esophagectomy for intrathoracic esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osugi, Harushi; Takemura, Masashi; Lee, Sigeru; Nishikawa, Takayuki; Fukuhara, Kennichirou; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Higashino, Masayuki

    2005-08-01

    Thoracoscopic approaches for esophageal cancer are still disparate. Complete scopic technique is feasible for esophagectomy. Mini-thoracotomy is effective for excellent exposure of the mediastinum for lymph node dissection. The magnifying effect of a video, by keeping the camera in close proximity to the dissection is essential to perform the same quality of dissection as open surgery. The benefit, for respiratory morbidity, remains to be studied in a large number of patients. Minimizing the chest wall injury contributed, to the reduction of constrictive pulmonary damage. Survival after the thoracoscopic approach was favorably compared with open surgery, when extensive lymphadenectomy was performed. Because the efficacy improves with the surgeon's experience, satisfactory outcome will only be obtained in a center performing a sufficient volume of esophageal surgery to provide the surgeon with opportunities to refine his necessary skills. Improvements in technique and instrumentation should make the procedure more accessible and steepen the learning curve.

  16. [Surgery in esophageal carcinoma: risks and results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Flüe, M; Ackermann, C; Tondelli, P

    1990-04-07

    Surgical treatment of esophageal cancer is largely palliative. To clarify the indication it is necessary to assess the effectiveness of the palliation in relief of dysphagia and the operative risks. In a retrospective study we analyzed the perioperative morbidity and follow-up in 25 patients with carcinoma of the esophagus treated between 1984 and 1988 (5 years). With combined anesthesia, early extubation and intensive pulmonary therapy, no perioperative respiratory insufficiency was observed. Perioperative mortality was 0%. An anastomotic leak in 2 patients with a cervical anastomosis was healed in both cases by conservative management. On hospital discharge all patients were able to eat normally. 13 patients died after 1 year on average (4 months to 3 years). 12 patients are alive 6 months to 4 years after operation, 10 of them without symptoms. Our results show that with optimal perioperative management of esophageal carcinoma low morbidity is possible and good palliation of dysphagia is feasible.

  17. Successful tubes treatment of esophageal fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ning; Chen, Wei-xing; Li, You-ming; Xiang, Zhun; Gao, Ping; Fang, Ying

    2007-10-01

    To discuss the merits of "tubes treatment" for esophageal fistula (EF). A 66-year-old female who suffered from a bronchoesophageal and esophagothoratic fistula underwent a successful "three tubes treatment" (close chest drainage, negative pressure suction at the leak, and nasojejunal feeding tube), combination of antibiotics, antacid drugs and nutritional support. Another 55-year-old male patient developed an esophagopleural fistula (EPF) after esophageal carcinoma operation. He too was treated conservatively with the three tubes strategy as mentioned above towards a favorable outcome. The two patients recovered with the tubes treatment, felt well and became able to eat and drink, presenting no complaint. Tubes treatment is an effective basic way for EF. It may be an alternative treatment option.

  18. Radiation-Induced Esophagitis Exacerbated by Everolimus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Miura

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Everolimus, a potent mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR inhibitor, has shown anticancer activity against various types of cancer, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC; however, little information is available on the efficacy and safety of the combination of everolimus and radiotherapy. We report a case of radiation-induced esophagitis that might have been exacerbated by the sequential administration of everolimus. Case Presentation: A 63-year-old Japanese man with RCC complained of back pain, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed vertebral metastases. He received radiotherapy (30 Gy/10 fractions to the T6-10 vertebrae. Everolimus was administered immediately after the completion of radiotherapy. One week later, he complained of dysphagia, nausea and vomiting. An endoscopic examination of the esophagus showed erosive esophagitis in the middle to lower portions of his thoracic esophagus, corresponding to the irradiation field. Conclusion: Clinicians should be aware that everolimus might lead to the unexpected exacerbation of radiation toxicities.

  19. Etiological study on isolated esophageal atresia

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    Szendrey, T.; Danyi, G.; Czeizel, A.

    1985-01-01

    A study group of 160 index patients with isolated esophageal atresia, a control group of 160 matched healthy controls, and the first-degree relatives of patients and controls were examined; epidemiological, family planning, teratological, and genetic data were obtained by personal interview in the study and control groups. One half of the index patients were male. Intrauterine growth retardation, a higher proportion of mothers under 19 or over 30 years of age, and less skilled professions of the parents were found in the study group. There were more extramarital conceptions, more pregnancies in spite of the use of contraceptive pills, and more delayed conceptions in index patients mothers. The teratogens studied did not have an obvious pathological effect here. The sib occurrence of isolated esophageal atresia was 0.43%, which did not correspond well to the expected figure of 1.34% based on the polygenic model.

  20. Esophageal Foreign Body Causing Direct Aortic Injury

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    ECS Lam

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Foreign bodies in the esophagus are uncommon causes of esophageal perforation. Many nonperforating cases are successfully managed by flexible gastroscopy. However, complicated foreign bodies such as those that result in esophageal perforation and vascular injury are best managed surgically. Gastroscopy remains the primary method of diagnosis. A case of a 59-year-old woman who developed retrosternal and intrascapular pain, odynophagia and hematemesis after eating fish is reported. Flexible gastroscopy showed arterial bleeding from the midthoracic esophagus. Computed tomography scan localized a 3 cm fish bone perforating the esophagus with surrounding hematoma. An aortogram did not reveal an actively bleeding aortoesophageal fistula. The fish bone was surgically removed and the patient recovered with no postoperative complications. This case illustrates the importance of early consideration for surgical intervention when confronted with a brisk arterial bleed from the esophagus with suggestive history of foreign body ingestion.

  1. Successful tubes treatment of esophageal fistula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To discuss the merits of "tubes treatment" for esophageal fistula (EF). Methods: A 66-year-old female who suffered from a bronchoesophageal and esophagothoratic fistula underwent a successful "three tubes treatment" (close chest drainage, negative pressure suction at the leak, and nasojejunal feeding tube), combination of antibiotics, antacid drugs and nutritional support. Another 55-year-old male patient developed an esophagopleural fistula (EPF) after esophageal carcinoma operation. He too was treated conservatively with the three tubes strategy as mentioned above towards a favorable outcome. Results:The two patients recovered with the tubes treatment, felt well and became able to eat and drink, presenting no complaint. Conclusion: Tubes treatment is an effective basic way for EF. It may be an alternative treatment option.

  2. Eosinophilic Esophagitis in Brazilian Pediatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Mayra Isabel Correia; de Góes Cavalcanti, Luciano Pamplona; Honório, Rodrigo Schuler; de Alencar Moreno, Luís Hélder; Fortes, Mayara Carvalho; da Silva, Carlos Antônio Bruno

    2013-01-01

    We examined 11 pediatric patients with eosinophilic esophagitis with a tardy diagnosis. The symptoms were initially thought to be related to other diseases, leading to the use of inadequate therapeutic approaches. The patients were between 3 and 17 years old (mean 7.8 ± 3.8 years), and 8 of the patients were male. Common symptoms included abdominal pain, regurgitation, difficulty in gaining weight, vomiting, dysphagia, and coughing. The mean age for the onset of symptoms was 4.3 ± 2.9 years. Endoscopic findings included normal mucosa in five (45%) patients, thickening of the mucosa with longitudinal grooves in three (27%), erosive esophagitis in two (18%), and a whitish stippling in one (9%) patient. Treatment included the use of a topical corticosteroid for 10 patients. In eight (73%) cases, the treatment made the symptoms disappear. Ten patients underwent histopathological management after treatment, with a decrease in the number of eosinophils. PMID:24106430

  3. Giant esophageal epiphrenic diverticulum: presentation and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Marcelo Protásio Dos; Akerman, Denise; Santos, Caio Pasquali Dias Dos; Santos, Paulo Vicente Dos; Radtke, Marcos Claudio; Beraldo, Fernando Bray; Gonçalves, José Eduardo

    2017-09-21

    Epiphrenic diverticulum is a rare disease associated with esophageal motor disorders that is usually asymptomatic and has a well-established surgical indication. We report a case of giant epiphrenic diverticulum in a 59-year-old symptomatic woman who was diagnosed after underwent complementary exams. Because of her symptoms, the surgical treatment was chosen, and esophageal diverticulectomy was performed along with laparoscopic cardiomyotomy and anterior partial fundoplication. RESUMO O divertículo epifrênico é uma patologia rara associada a distúrbios motores esofágicos e, frequentemente, assintomática, tendo indicações cirúrgicas bem estabelecidas. Relatamos um caso de divertículo epifrênico gigante em paciente de 59 anos, sexo feminino, sintomática, diagnosticada por exames complementares. Devido à sintomatologia, optou-se por tratamento cirúrgico, sendo realizada a diverticulectomia esofágica com cardiomiotomia e fundoplicatura parcial anterior laparoscópica.

  4. Fatal hemorrhage in irradiated esophageal cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Kenji; Takai, Yoshihiro; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Kakuto, Yoshihisa; Ariga, Hisanori; Matsushita, Haruo; Wada, Hitoshi; Yamada, Shogo [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Dept. of Radiology

    1998-09-01

    Between 1980 and 1994, 423 patients with esophageal cancer were given curative radiation therapy. Of these patients, 31 died of massive hemorrhage and were used as the subjects of analysis in this study. The incidence of massive hemorrhage in all patients was 7% (31/423). In the 31 patients who died of massive hemorrhage, 27 had local tumors and two had no tumors at hemorrhage (two unknown cases). The mean time interval from the start of radiation to hemorrhage was 9.2 months. In 9 autopsy cases the origin of hemorrhage was a tear of the aorta in 5 cases, necrotic local tumor in 3 cases and esophageal ulcer in 1 case. The positive risk factors for this complication seemed to be excess total dose, infection, metallic stent, and tracheoesophageal fistula. Chest pain or sentinel hemorrhage proceeding to massive hemorrhage was observed in about half of the patients. (orig.)

  5. Management of proton pump inhibitor responsive-esophageal eosinophilia and eosinophilic esophagitis: controversies in treatment approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochar, Bharati; Dellon, Evan S

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune-mediated clinicopathologic disease. The prevalence of EoE is approximately 1/2000 persons, EoE is now the most common cause of food impactions, with healthcare expenditures approaching US$ 1 billion annually. This article will discuss challenges related to proton pump inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia, including distinguishing this condition from EoE and understanding the mechanisms behind the PPI response. For EoE, we will review multiple ongoing debates about treatment and monitoring strategies, including selecting treatment outcomes, optimizing medication formulations, approaching the steroid-refractory patient, conducting dietary elimination, prescribing long-term maintenance therapy and performing esophageal dilation.

  6. “Layer-to-Layer” Esophagogastric Anastomosis Combined with Intrathoracic Esophageal Mucosal Extention in Patients with Esophageal and Cardia Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIZhongqi; CAIPing; YANYu; CHENYinchun; LIUJunhua; YOUQinshen; CAIJixiang; XIZhongxia

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of intrathoracic esophagogastric “layer-to-layer” anastomosis with esophageal mucosa extended varied in plane and to study the effective methods to prevent anastomotic leaking or stricture postoperatively. Methods: From May 1985 to December 2002, 2 240 esophageal and stomach cardia cancer patients treated by intrathoracic esophagogastric “layer-to-layer”anastomosis with esophageal mucosa extended varied in plane were retrospectively analyzed. Results:There was no anastomotic leaking and severe stricture in all above cases. Conclusion: Intrathoracic esophagogastric “layer-to-layer” anastomosis with esophageal mucosal extended varied in plane is an effective method to prevent anastomotic leaking and stricture postoperatively.

  7. Non-surgical treatment of esophageal achalasia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vito Annese; Gabrio Bassotti

    2006-01-01

    Esophageal achalasia is an infrequent motility disorder characterized by a progressive stasis and dilation of the oesophagus; with subsequent risk of aspiration,weight loss, and malnutrition. Although the treatment of achalasia has been traditionally based on a surgical approach, especially with the introduction of laparoscopic techniques, there is still some space for a medical approach. The present article reviews the non-surgical therapeutic options for achalasia.

  8. Black esophagus: Acute esophageal necrosis syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Grigoriy; E; Gurvits

    2010-01-01

    Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), commonly referred to as "black esophagus", is a rare clinical entity arising from a combination of ischemic insult seen in hemodynamic compromise and low-flow states, corrosive injury from gastric contents in the setting of esophago-gastroparesis and gastric outlet obstruction, and decreased function of mucosal barrier systems and reparative mechanisms present in malnourished and debilitated physical states. AEN may arise in the setting of multiorgan dysfunction, hypoperfusi...

  9. Radiotherapy of double primary esophageal carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ze Fen Xiao; Zong Yi Yang; Zong Mei Zhou; Wei Bo Yin; Xian Zhi Gu

    2000-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTION Double primary esophageal carcinoma is defined as having two foci of squamous cell cancer simultaneously or consecutively developing in different sites of esophagus. This rare disease appears mostly in the literature as case reports[1-4],reports about its treatment are even more infrequent. Here we present our experiences of radiation therapy in 37 patients with this disease and focus the discussion on the optimum method of treatment and complications.

  10. Medicolegal aspects of esophageal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giorgio, Fabio

    2005-01-01

    Forensic implications of esophageal cancer surgery are varied and complex depending on the field of specialization involved i.e. civil law, criminal law, insurance or social security and for the distinct probative requirements related to each field. The aim of this article is to reconstruct the logical procedure of a forensic doctor who actually examines a practical case to establish the profiles of professional responsibility in particular in civil or criminal law.

  11. Technological advances in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milan; Vosmik; Jiri; Petera; Igor; Sirak; Miroslav; Hodek; Petr; Paluska; Jiri; Dolezal; Marcela; Kopacova

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy and surgery represent the main treatment modalities in esophageal cancer.The goal of modern radiotherapy approaches,based on recent technological advances,is to minimize post-treatment complications by improving the gross tumor volume definition (positron emission tomography-based planning),reducing interfraction motion (image-guided radiotherapy) and intrafraction motion (respiratory-gated radiotherapy),and by better dose delivery to the precisely defined planning ...

  12. Multidisciplinary management for esophageal and gastric cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boniface MM

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Megan M Boniface,1 Sachin B Wani,2 Tracey E Schefter,3 Phillip J Koo,4 Cheryl Meguid,1 Stephen Leong,5 Jeffrey B Kaplan,6 Lisa J Wingrove,7 Martin D McCarter1 1Section of Surgical Oncology, Division of GI, Tumor and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, 2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Therapeutic and Interventional Endoscopy, 3Department of Radiation Oncology, 4Division of Radiology-Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, 5Division of Medical Oncology, 6Department of Pathology, University of Colorado Denver, 7Department of Food and Nutrition Services, University of Colorado Hospital Cancer Center, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: The management of esophageal and gastric cancer is complex and involves multiple specialists in an effort to optimize patient outcomes. Utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach starting from the initial staging evaluation ensures that all members are in agreement with the plan of care. Treatment selection for esophageal and gastric cancer often involves a combination of chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, and palliative interventions (endoscopic and surgical, and direct communication between specialists in these fields is needed to ensure appropriate clinical decision making. At the University of Colorado, the Esophageal and Gastric Multidisciplinary Clinic was created to bring together all experts involved in treating these diseases at a weekly conference in order to provide patients with coordinated, individualized, and patient-centered care. This review details the essential elements and benefits of building a multidisciplinary program focused on treating esophageal and gastric cancer patients. Keywords: tumor board, upper gastrointestinal malignancies, patient centered

  13. Long-term outcome of phase I/II prospective study of dose-escalated proton therapy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joe Y; Zhang, Wencheng; Komaki, Ritsuko; Choi, Noah C; Chan, Shen; Gomez, Daniel; O'Reilly, Michael; Jeter, Melenda; Gillin, Michael; Zhu, Xiaorong; Zhang, Xiaodong; Mohan, Radhe; Swisher, Stephen; Hahn, Stephen; Cox, James D

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this phase I/II study was to assess the long-term clinical benefits and toxicities of proton beam therapy for medically inoperable early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). From June 2006 to September 2011, 35 patients with medically inoperable T1N0M0 (central or superior location, 12 patients) or T2-3N0M0 (any location, 23 patients) NSCLC were treated with 87.5Gy at 2.5Gy/fraction of proton therapy. Toxicities were scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The median follow-up time was 83.1months (95% CI: 69.2-97.1months). For all 35 patients, the 1, 3, and 5-year overall survival rates were 85.7%, 42.9%, and 28.1%, respectively. The 5-year local recurrence-free, regional recurrence-free, and distant metastasis-free survival rates were 85.0%, 89.2%, and 54.4%, respectively. Different T stages had no effect on local and regional recurrence (p=0.499, p=1.00). However, with the increase in T stages, the distant metastasis rate increased significantly (p=0.006). The most common adverse effects were dermatitis (grade 2, 51.4%; grade 3, 2.9%) and radiation pneumonitis (grade 2, 11.4%; grade 3, 2.9%). Other grade 2 toxicities included esophagitis (2.9%), rib fracture (2.9%), heart toxicities (5.7%), and chest wall pain (2.9%). According to our long-term follow-up data, proton therapy with ablative doses is well tolerated and effective in medically inoperable early-stage NSCLC. Systemic therapy should be considered to reduce the rate of distant metastasis in cases of T2 and T3 lesions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Weight Gain in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients During Treatment With Split-Course Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Is Associated With Superior Survival

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    Gielda, Benjamin T., E-mail: Benjamin_gielda@rush.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Mehta, Par [Department of Radiation Oncology at Rush Copley Medical Center, Aurora, IL (United States); Khan, Atif [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Marsh, James C.; Zusag, Thomas W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Warren, William H. [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Fidler, Mary Jo [Section of Medical Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Abrams, Ross A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Bonomi, Philip [Section of Medical Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Liptay, Michael; Faber, L. Penfield [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Background: Preoperative concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is an accepted treatment for potentially resectable, locally advanced, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We reviewed a decade of single institution experience with preoperative split-course CRT followed by surgical resection to evaluate survival and identify factors that may be helpful in predicting outcome. Methods and Materials: All patients treated with preoperative split-course CRT and resection at Rush University Medical Center (RUMC) between January 1999 and December 2008 were retrospectively analyzed. Endpoints included overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), local-regional progression-free survival (LRPFS), and distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS). Patient and treatment related variables were assessed for correlation with outcomes. Results: A total of 54 patients were analyzed, 76% Stage IIIA, 18% Stage IIIB, and 6% oligometastatic. The pathologic complete response (pCR) rate was 31.5%, and the absence of nodal metastases (pN0) was 64.8%. Median OS and 3-year actuarial survival were 44.6 months and 50%, respectively. Univariate analysis revealed initial stage (p < 0.01) and percent weight change during CRT (p < 0.01) significantly correlated with PFS/OS. On multivariate analysis initial stage (HR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.18-4.90; p = 0.02) and percent weight change (HR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.67-0.93; p < 0.01) maintained significance with respect to OS. There were no cases of Grade 3+ esophagitis, and there was a single case of Grade 3 febrile neutropenia. Conclusions: The strong correlation between weight change during CRT and OS/PFS suggests that this clinical parameter may be useful as a complementary source of predictive information in addition to accepted factors such as pathological response.

  15. Surgical treatment of giant esophageal leiomyoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bang-Chang Cheng; Sheng Chang; Zhi-Fu Mao; Mao-Jin Li; Jie Huang; Zhi-Wei Wang; Tu-Sheng Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To summarize the operative experiences for giant leiomyoma of esophagus.METHODS: Eight cases of giant esophageal leiomyoma (GEL) whose tumors were bigger than 10 cm were treated surgically in our department from June 1980 to March 2004.and esophagoscopy. Leiomyoma located in upper thirds of the esophagus in one case, middle thirds of the esophagus in five cases, lower thirds of the esophagus in two cases. Resection of tumors was performed successfully in all of these cases. Operative methods included transthoracic extramucosal enucleation and buttressing the muscular defect with pedicled great omental flap (one case), esophagectomy and esophagogastrostomy above the arch of aorta (three cases), total esophagectomy and esophageal replacement with colon (four cases). Histological examination confirmed that all of these cases were leiomyoma.RESULTS: All of the eight patients recovered approvingly with no mortality and resumed normal diet after operation. Vomiting during meals occurred in one patient with esophagogastrostomy, and remained 1 mo. Reflux esophagitis occurred in one patient with esophagogastrostomy and was alleviated with medication. Thoracic colon syndrome (TCS) occurred in one patient with colon replacement at 15 mo postoperatively. No recurrence occurred in follow-up from 6 mo to 8 years.CONCLUSION: Surgical treatment for GEL is both safe and effective. The choices of operative methods mainly depend on the location and range of lesions. We prefer to treat GEL via esophagectomy combined with esophagogastrostomy or esophagus replacement with colon. The long-time quality of life is better in the latter.

  16. [Minimally Invasive Treatment of Esophageal Benign Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Haruhiro

    2016-07-01

    As a minimally invasive treatment of esophageal achalasia per-oral endoscopic myotomy( POEM) was developed in 2008. More than 1,100 cases of achalasia-related diseases received POEM. Success rate of the procedure was more than 95%(Eckerdt score improvement 3 points and more). No serious( Clavian-Dindo classification III b and more) complication was experienced. These results suggest that POEM becomes a standard minimally invasive treatment for achalasia-related diseases. As an off-shoot of POEM submucosal tumor removal through submucosal tunnel (per-oral endoscopic tumor resection:POET) was developed and safely performed. Best indication of POET is less than 5 cm esophageal leiomyoma. A novel endoscopic treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was developed. Anti-reflux mucosectomy( ARMS) is nearly circumferential mucosal reduction of gastric cardia mucosa. ARMS is performed in 56 consecutive cases of refractory GERD. No major complications were encountered and excellent clinical results. Best indication of ARMS is a refractory GERD without long sliding hernia. Longest follow-up case is more than 10 years. Minimally invasive treatments for esophageal benign diseases are currently performed by therapeutic endoscopy.

  17. Herpes simplex ulcerative esophagitis in healthy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman A Al-Hussaini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus is a common cause of ulcerative esophagitis in the immunocompromised or debilitated host. Despite a high prevalence of primary and recurrent Herpes simplex virus infection in the general population, Herpes simplex virus esophagitis (HSVE appears to be rare in the immunocompetent host. We report three cases of endoscopically-diagnosed HSVE in apparently immunocompetent children; the presentation was characterized by acute onset of fever, odynophagia, and dysphagia. In two cases, the diagnosis was confirmed histologically by identification of herpes viral inclusions and culture of the virus in the presence of inflammation. The third case was considered to have probable HSVE based on the presence of typical cold sore on his lip, typical endoscopic finding, histopathological evidence of inflammation in esophageal biopsies and positive serologic evidence of acute Herpes simplex virus infection. Two cases received an intravenous course of acyclovir and one had self-limited recovery. All three cases had normal immunological workup and excellent health on long-term follow-up.

  18. Eosinophilic esophagitis: From pathophysiology to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Alessandra; Esposito, Dario; Pesce, Marcella; Cuomo, Rosario; De Palma, Giovanni Domenico; Sarnelli, Giovanni

    2015-11-15

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic immune disease, characterized by a dense eosinophilic infiltrate in the esophagus, leading to bolus impaction and reflux-like symptoms. Traditionally considered a pediatric disease, the number of adult patients with EoE is continuously increasing, with a relatively higher incidence in western countries. Dysphagia and food impaction represent the main symptoms complained by patients, but gastroesophageal reflux-like symptoms may also be present. Esophageal biopsies are mandatory for the diagnosis of EoE, though clinical manifestations and proton pump inhibitors responsiveness must be taken into consideration. The higher prevalence of EoE in patients suffering from atopic diseases suggests a common background with allergy, however both the etiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. Elimination diets are considered the first-line therapy in children, but this approach appears less effective in adults patients, who often require steroids; despite medical treatments, EoE is complicated in some cases by esophageal stricture and stenosis, that require additional endoscopic treatments. This review summarizes the evidence on EoE pathophysiology and illustrates the safety and efficacy of the most recent medical and endoscopic treatments.

  19. Surgical Treatment of Perforation Esophageal Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Depu Duan; Jihua Zou; Zhigang Cai; Shengyong Wu; Haibo Xiao; Yiyong Zhou; Xiang Liang; Dekui Sun; Songchang Wu

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the ideal method of surgical preoperative treatment for perforation with esophageal carcinoma.METHODS 36 cases of perforation with esophageal carcinoma were treated surgically in this series.Perforations occurred into the right lung in14 cases ,the mediastinum in 17 cases and trachea in 5 cases.Open thoracic surgery was performed in 34 cases,in which the right thoracic approach using a 3-incision method was applied in 16 cases,and operation by stages in 15 cases.Of the 34 cases,retrosternal substitution of the esophagus with stomach or colon was performed in 26 cases.RESULTS Surgery was successful in 31 cases and operative death occurred in 3 cases.The postoperative follow up study was from 3~72months.Of these cases 15 wree alive at 7~12 months, 2 at 24 months,and 1 at 72 months. The results can be considered satisfactory.CONCLUSION The therapeutic results of surgical treatment of perforation with esophageal carcinoma were markedly superior to that of conventional conservative treatment. The authors suggest that surgical intervention without delay should be undertaken for patients having a perforation with carcinoma of the esophagus. A right thoracic approach with a 3-incision method (retrosternal replacement of esophagus with stomach or colon) or operation by stages is preferable.

  20. Esophageal button battery ingestion in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şencan, Arzu; Genişol, İncinur; Hoşgör, Münevver

    2017-07-01

    Button battery lodged in the esophagus carries a high risk of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to present cases of patients with esophageal button battery ingestion treated at our clinic and to emphasize the importance of early diagnosis and treatment. Records of patients admitted to our hospital for foreign body ingestion between January 2010 and May 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Cases with button battery lodged in the esophagus were included in the study. Patient data regarding age, sex, length of time after ingestion until admission, presenting clinical symptoms, type and localization of the battery, management, and prognosis were analyzed. Among 1891 foreign body ingestions, 71 were localized in the esophagus, and 8 of those (11.2%) were cases of button battery ingestion. Mean age was 1.7 years. Admission was within 6 hours of ingestion in 5 cases, after 24 hours had elapsed in 2, and 1 month after ingestion in 1 case. All patients but 1 knew the history of ingestion. Prompt endoscopic removal was performed for all patients. Three patients developed esophageal stricture, which responded to dilatation. Early recognition and timely endoscopic removal is mandatory in esophageal button battery ingestion. It should be suspected in the differential diagnosis of patients with persistent respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms.