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Sample records for limestone slag clay

  1. Development of engineered cementitious composites with limestone powder and blast furnace slag

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, J.; Qian, S.; Sierra Beltran, M.G.; Ye, G.; Van Breugel, K.; Li, V.C.

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays limestone powder and blast furnace slag (BFS) are widely used in concrete as blended materials in cement. The replacement of Portland cement by limestone powder and BFS can lower the cost and enhance the greenness of concrete, since the production of these two materials needs less energy

  2. Autogenous and drying shrinkage of sodium carbonate activated slag altered by limestone powder incorporation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, B.; Yu, Q.L.; Dainese, E.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper aims to study the shrinkage mechanism of sodium carbonate activated slag containing limestone powder (LP). The workability, pore structure, reaction kinetics and strength development were characterized. The results show that the autogenous shrinkage increases when the dosage of LP is low

  3. Assessing the chemical involvement of limestone powder in sodium carbonate activated slag

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, B.; Yu, Q.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of limestone powder (LP) on the reaction of sodium carbonate activated slag. The results show that the incorporated LP up to 30% improves the strength development, especially at advanced curing ages. A slightly accelerated reaction is observed for samples

  4. Evaluation of steel slag and crushed limestone mixtures as subbase material in flexible pavement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Ebrahim Abu El-Maaty Behiry

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Steel slag is produced as a by-product during the oxidation of steel pellets in an electric arc furnace. This by-product that mainly consists of calcium carbonate is broken down to smaller sizes to be used as aggregates in pavement layers. They are particularly useful in areas where a good-quality aggregate is scarce. This research study was conducted to evaluate the effect of quantity of steel slag on the mechanical properties of blended mixes with crushed limestone aggregates, which used as subbase material in Egypt. Moreover, a theoretical analysis was employed to estimate the resistance for failure factors such as vertical deformations, vertical and radial stresses and vertical strains of subbase under overweight trucks loads. These loads cause severe deterioration to the pavement and thus reduce its life. The results indicated that the mechanical characteristics, and the resistance factors were improved by adding steel slag to the crushed limestone.

  5. Towards Early Age Characterisation of Eco-Concrete Containing Blast-Furnace Slag and Limestone Filler

    OpenAIRE

    Carette, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    It is estimated that concrete represents 5% of the anthropogenic CO2 emissions, mainly originating from the production of cement, the most essential component of concrete. The recent awareness to the environmental challenges facing our civilization has led the cement industry to consider substituting cement by mineral additions, by-products of existing industries. In this work, a combination of limestone filler and blast furnace slag is used to design an “eco-concrete”, defined as a concrete ...

  6. Evaluation of kaolinite clays of Moa for the production of cement based clinker-calcined clay-limestone (LC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger S. Almenares-Reyes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Clay materials from two outcrops of the Moa region were analyzed to determine their potential use as supplementary cementitious material in the production of ternary cements based on limestone-calcined clay. The clays were characterized by atomic absorption spectroscopy (EAA, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and thermogravimetric analysis (ATG. These methods revealed high aluminum in clays, moderate kaolinite content, a disordered structure and the presence of impurities. The solubility of aluminum and silicon in alkali and the compressive strength of LC3 systems is proportional to their content in clay, being higher for the one with higher kaolinite content and greater structural disorder (outcrop D1, although the clay of both outcrops may constitute supplementary cementitious materials in the production of ternary cements based clinker-calcined clay-limestone. The suitable thermal activation range for both clays is between 650 ° C and 850 ° C.

  7. Combination of Slag, Limestone and Sedimentary Apatite in Columns for Phosphorus Removal from Sludge Fish Farm Effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florent Chazarenc

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Laboratory scale studies have repeatedly reported high P-retention in slag, a by-product of the steel manufacturing industry. Thus, it has emerged as a potential material to increase P-removal from constructed wetlands (CWs. However, several limitations were highlighted by field experiments, including the high pH of treated water and clogging. We hypothesized that the addition of sedimentary rocks to slag would preserve P-removal properties while reducing the pH of treated water. Four 2.5 L-columns were filled with 100% apatite (column A; a 50% weight each mixture of limestone with apatite (column B; 10% steel slag located at the inlet, plus 45% limestone mixed with 45% apatite (column C; and a mixture of steel slag (10%, limestone (45% apatite (45% (column D. A synthetic effluent (26 mg P/L and a reconstituted sludge fish farm effluent containing 97 mg/L total suspended solids (TSS, 220 mg/L chemical oxygen demand (COD and 23.5 mg P/L phosphorus (P were applied sequentially during 373 and 176 days, under saturated flow conditions and 12–24 hours hydraulic residence time (HRT, respectively. Treatment performance, P-removal, pH and calcium (Ca2+ were monitored. Results indicated that columns that contained 10% weight steel slag resulted in a higher P retention capacity than the columns without steel slag. The highest P removal was achieved in column C, containing a layer of slag in the inlet zone, 45% apatite and 45% limestone. Feeding the columns with a reconstituted fish farm effluent led to biofilm development, but this had little effect on the P-removal. A combination of slag and sedimentary rocks represents a promising filtration material that could be useful downstream of CWs to further increase P-removal.

  8. Drying shrinkage of mortars with limestone filler and blast-furnace slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrasco, M. F.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available During the 1990's the use of cements made with port land clinker and two mineral admixtures, called ternary or blended cements, has grown considerably. Nowadays, cements containing several combinations of fly ash and silica fume, blast-furnace slag and silica fume or blast-furnace slag and limestone filler are commonly used. There are numerous works on the influence of blended cements on the fresh state and mechanical properties of mortar and concrete, but the their deformations due to drying shrinkage are not so well described. Analysis of drying shrinkage is relevant because this property influences the possibility of cracking occurrence and, hence, the deterioration of mechanical and durable properties of concrete structures. This paper evaluates the influence on the drying shrinkage of mortars of variable contents of limestone filler and/or blast-furnace slag in Portland cement. Additionally, flexion strength and non evaporable water content were evaluated. Test results show that the inclusion of these mineral admixtures, Joint or separately, increments drying shrinkage of mortars at early ages. Despite this fact, mortars made with limestone filler cement are less susceptible to cracking than mortars made with cements incorporating blast-furnace slag or both admixtures.

    Durante los años 90 el uso de cementos fabricados con clínker Portland y dos adiciones suplementarias (cementos ternarios o compuestos se ha incrementado en forma considerable. En la práctica, es cada vez más común el empleo de estos cementos conteniendo combinaciones de ceniza volante y humo de sílice, escoria y humo de sílice o escoria y filler calcáreo. En la actualidad existen numerosos estudios sobre la influencia de los cementos compuestos en las características en estado fresco y las propiedades mecánicas de morteros y hormigones, pero las deformaciones que estos materiales sufren debido a la retracción por secado no son tan conocidas. El análisis de

  9. Effect of by-product steel slag on the engineering properties of clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal I. Shalabi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Clay soils, mainly if they contain swelling minerals such as smectite or illite, may cause severe damage to structures, especially when these soils are subjected to wetting and drying conditions. High expansion and reduction in shear strength and foundation bearing capacity will take place due to the increase in water content of these soils. The engineering properties of these kinds of soils can be improved by using additives and chemical stabilizers. In this work, by-product steel slag was used to improve the engineering properties of clay soils. Lab and field experimental programs were developed to investigate the effect of adding different percentages of steel slag on plasticity, swelling, compressibility, shear strength, compaction, and California bearing ratio (CBR of the treated materials. The results of tests on the clay soil showed that as steel slag content increased, the soil dry density, plasticity, swelling potential, and cohesion intercept decreased and the angle of internal friction increased. For the CBR, the results of the tests showed an increase in the CBR value with the increase in slag content.

  10. Fault architecture and growth in clay-limestone alternations: insights from field observations in the SE Basin, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocher, M.; Roche, V.; Homberg, C.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The Callovo-Oxfordian (COX) clayey formation is currently studied by Andra in 'Meuse/Haute- Marne' (MHM), eastern Paris basin (France), for hosting a disposal of high level and intermediate, long-lived radioactive waste. As an independent organisation performing safety reviews for the Nuclear Safety Authority, IRSN conducts studies in support of the review of this disposal project. This nearly 130 m-thick clayey formation is surrounded by two 250 m-thick limestone formations. In such limestone/clay alternations, tectonic fracturing is often observed within limestones and propagates in some cases to clay layers. Such a propagation through the COX within or close to the disposal area could diminish its containment ability by creating preferential pathways of radioactive solute towards limestones. Nevertheless, minor to moderate fracturing is difficult to investigate in hectometre scale multilayer systems such as COX: seismic reflexion surveys only provide data on major faults, drilling data are too localised and clays have a 'bad-land' aspect at surface. The aim of this study is to provide a model of fracturing across clay-limestone alternations so as to strengthen the assessment of their possible development. We thus investigated fracturing within decametre-sized clay-limestone alternations, located in the South-Eastern Basin (France), to determine the evolution of fault architecture during its growth. After analysis of the possible scale effects using data from other analogous fields, an application to the COX in MHM is presented. We studied minor normal faults that reflect various stages of development, from simple fault planes restricted to limestones to complex fault zones propagated across several clay-limestone layers. The analysis of the fault characteristics, the construction of displacement profiles and the results obtained using numerical models enlighten fault growth processes, i.e. nucleation

  11. Influence of limestone powder on the reaction kinetics and mechanical properties of sodium carbonate activated slag

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, B.; Yu, Q.; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of limestone powder (LP) on the performance of Portland cement based composites have been extensively studied, considering that LP not only acts as nuclei sites, but that it is also chemically involved in the hydration process, which improves the reaction degree at the early age. In high

  12. The recovery of Zn and Pb and the manufacture of lightweight bricks from zinc smelting slag and clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Huiping; Deng, Qiufeng; Li, Chao; Xie, Yue; Dong, Zeqin; Zhang, Wei

    2014-04-30

    Novel lightweight bricks have been produced by sintering mixes of zinc smelting slag and clay. A two-stage sintered process has been proposed to recovery of Zn and Pb and reutilization of the zinc smelting slag. In the first stage of the process, called reduction and volatilization procedure, zinc and lead were reduced by the carbon contained in the zinc smelting slag and volatilized into the dust, and the dust can be used as a secondary zinc resource. In the second stage of the process, called oxidation sintering procedure, a lightweight brick was produced. Samples containing up to 60 wt.% zinc smelting slag and 40 wt.% kaolin clay were reduced at 1050°C for 6h, and then sintered at 1050°C for 4h. The recoveries of Zn and Pb from the brick are 94.5 ± 0.6% and 97.6 ± 0.2%, respectively. Low bulk density (1.42 g cm(-3)) and relatively high compressive strength (2 2MPa) sintered bricks were produced, and the leaching toxicity of the sintered bricks was below the regulatory thresholds of Chinese National Standards. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Integrated Characterization of DNAPL Source Zone Architecture in Clay Till and Limestone Bedrock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Mette Martina; Janniche, Gry Sander; Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives. Characterization of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zone architecture is essential to develop accurate site specific conceptual models, delineate and quantify contaminant mass, perform risk assessment, and select and design remediation alternatives. The activi......Background/Objectives. Characterization of dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zone architecture is essential to develop accurate site specific conceptual models, delineate and quantify contaminant mass, perform risk assessment, and select and design remediation alternatives...... innovative investigation methods and characterize the source zone hydrogeology and contamination to obtain an improved conceptual understanding of DNAPL source zone architecture in clay till and bryozoan limestone bedrock. Approach/Activities. A wide range of innovative and current site investigative tools...... for direct and indirect documentation and/or evaluation of DNAPL presence were combined in a multiple lines of evidence approach. Results/Lessons Learned. Though no single technique was sufficient for characterization of DNAPL source zone architecture, the combined use of membrane interphase probing (MIP...

  14. Study on rich alumina alkali-activated slag clay minerals cementitious materials for immobilization of radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuxiang; Qian Guangren; Yi Facheng; Shi Rongming; Fu Yibei; Li Lihua; Zhang Jun

    1999-01-01

    The composition and some properties of its pastes of rich alumina alkali-activated slag clay minerals (RAAASCM) cementitious materials for immobilization of radioactive waste are studied. Experimental results show that heat activated kaolinite, Xingjiang zeolite, modified attapulgite clay are better constituents of RAAASCM. RAAASCM cementitious materials pastes exhibit high strength, low porosity, fewer harmful pore, and high resistance to sulphate corrosion as well as gamma irradiation. The Sr 2+ , Cs + leaching portion of the simulated radioactive waste forms based on RAAASCM, is low

  15. Influence of composition of the raw materials on phase formation in solid compounds based on slag and clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galkin, A.V.; Tolebaev, T.; Omarova, V.I.; Burkitbaev, M.; Blynskiy, A.P.; Bachilova, N.V.; Matsynina, V.I.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Activation of solidification processes in a compound formed on the basis of slag and clay minerals using sodium hydroxide - the output product from processing the BN-350 sodium coolant it is expedient to form the final product with a phase composition representing (in terms of long term storage) hydro-alumino-silicates incorporating Na-22 and Cs-137 radionuclides, which isomorphly replace other atoms in the crystal lattice sites. Combination of mineral phases, such as alkaline and alkaline-earth hydro-alumino-silicates with zeolite-like structure, providing sorptive properties, and the tobermorite like low-base hydro silicates of calcium defining the physico-mechanical properties of compound is the necessary condition for the compound stability. Investigations of phase formation in the mixtures of Kazakhstan clay, slag materials and alkali have been conducted targeted to control the physico-chemical properties of solid compound. The mixtures of alkali, thermal power plant ashes and clays of various mineralogical genesis (kaolinite, bentonite, Ca-Na-smectite montmorillonite) have been studied. The ashes and phosphorous slag while interacting with alkali are determined to form the non-alkaline hydro-silicates of stavrolite and indianite (anortite) type with free alkali being found in an unbound state. Both alkaline and alkaline-alkaline-earth hydro-silicates of Na 2 Ca 2 Si 2 O 7 H 2 O type are only formed in a compounds containing metallurgical slag. Formation of alkaline hydro-alumino-silicates of NaAlSiO 4 H 2 0 type as well as tomsonite (Na 4 Ca 8 [Al 20S i 20 O 80 ] 24H 2 O) - the zeolite like mineral have been detected in a two-component alkali-clay mixtures. Besides the quantity of tomsonite was determined to be not only dependent on Al 2 O 3 content in clay component but is also defined by stoichiometric composition of the mixture, because zeolite synthesis takes place under conditions of gels co-deposition and high pH value. Maximum quantity of

  16. Quantitative measurements of fly ash, slag, and cement in limestone-based blends by Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebagay, T.V.; Dodd, D.A.; Claghorn, R.D.; Voogd, J.A.

    1991-02-01

    The disposal of the low-level radioactive liquids involves mixing the liquid waste with pozzolanic blend to form grout. Since the long-term performance of the grout depends on the composition of the blend, a rapid and reliable quantitative method to monitor blend compositions is needed. Earlier studies by Westinghouse Hanford Company demonstrated the utility of a Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance method for the analysis of cement blends. A sequential spectral subtraction technique was used to analyze the blend; however, its reproducibility depends on the operator's skill to perform spectral subtractions. A partial-least-squares (PLS) algorithm has replaced spectral subtraction. The PLS method is a statistical quantitative method suitable for analysis of multicomponent systems. Calibration blends are prepared by mixing the blend components in various proportions following a carefully designed calibration model. For the model, limestone content ranges from 30-50 wt%; blast furnace slag from 18-38 wt%; fly ash from 18-38 wt%; and cement from 0-16 wt%. Use of the large concentration range will enhance the chance that the calibration will be useful when target concentration change. The ability of the PLS method to predict limestone, slag, fly ash, and cement values in test blends was assessed. The prediction step of the PLS algorithm required only a few seconds to analyze the test spectra. The best and worst results for each component of the blends calculated by this method are shown in tables. The standard error of prediction of the true value is <2 wt% for limestone, <4 wt% for both fly ash and blast furnace slag, and <10 wt% for cement. 2 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs

  17. Stress state variations among the clay and limestone formations of the molasse basin of Northern Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vietor, Tim; Mueller, Herwig; Frieg, Bernd; Klee, Gerd

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The design of geological repositories for radioactive waste responds to the requirements of technical feasibility and long-term safety in the context of a specific geological setting. An important aspect of the geological setting is the primary stress field. To a large extent the stress state controls repository induced effects such as the excavation damage zone and the associated potential changes in the waste isolation properties of the host rock. Therefore the measurement of the stress state receives some attention where the site selection for geological repositories focuses onto relatively weak host rocks such as clay-stones and marly shales that tend to develop a significant excavation damage zone. Measurements of the minimum stress magnitudes in a recently drilled geothermal well in the Molasse Basin of northern Switzerland have yielded a stress profile reaching from 592 m to 1455 m depth. It straddles several rock units and includes the top of the crystalline basement. The sedimentary sequence consists of Marine limestones, shales and marls unconformably covered by Tertiary rocks of the Molasse. In other parts of the basin the evaporitic rocks of the Triassic Muschelkalk formation at the base of the sedimentary layer served as a regional detachment and enabled thin skinned thrusting and the formation of the Jura Fold and Thrust Belt in the Late Miocene. The stress measurements have been performed in the open hole by Mini-frac tests. The method uses a double packer system to isolate a one meter long interval of the borehole that is then pressurized at high injection rates up to the breakdown of the formation. Repeated pressurization of the interval allows to determine the stress that acts on the newly created fracture. The total injected volume during such a test is in the range of a few litres and the size of the fracture that extends from the borehole normal to the minimum

  18. New aluminium-rich alkali slag matrix with clay minerals for immobilizing simulated radioactive Sr and Cs waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Guangren; Sun, Darren Delai; Tay, Joo Hwa

    2001-01-01

    A new aluminium-rich alkali-activated slag matrix (M-AAS) with clay absorbents has been developed for immobilization of simulated radioactive Sr or Cs waste by introducing metakaolin, natural zeolite and NaOH-treated attapulgite clay minerals into alkali-activated slag matrix (AAS). The results revealed that the additions of metakaolin and clay absorbents into the cementitious matrixes would greatly enhance the distribution ratio, R d , of selective adsorption whether the matrix was OPC matrix or AAS matrix. The new immobilizing matrix M-AAS not only exhibited the strongest selective adsorption for both Sr and Cs ions, but also was characterized by lower porosity and small pore diameter so that it exhibited the lowest leaching rate. Hydration product analyses also demonstrated that (Na+Al)-substituted C-S-H(I) and self-generated zeolite were major hydration products in the M-AAS matrix, which provided this new immobilizing matrix with better selective adsorption on Sr and Cs and lower leaching rate

  19. Faults architecture and growth in clay-limestone alternation. Examples in the S-E Basin alternations (France) and numerical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    The following work has been carried out in the framework of the studies conducted by IRSN in support of its safety evaluation of the geological disposal programme of high and intermediate level, long-lived radioactive waste. Such a disposal is planned to be hosted by the Callovian-Oxfordian indurate clay formation between two limestone formations in eastern Paris basin, France. Hypothetical faults may cross-cut this layered section, decreasing the clay containment ability by creating preferential pathways for radioactive solute towards limestones. This study aims at characterising the fault architecture and the normal fault growth in clay/limestone layered sections. Structural analysis and displacement profiles have been carried out in normal faults crossing several decimetres to metre thick sedimentary alternations in the South-Eastern Basin (France) and petrophysical properties have been determined for each layer. The studied faults are simple fault planes or complex fault zones showing are significantly controlled by the layering. The analysis of the fault characteristics and the results obtained on numerical models enlighten several processes such as fault nucleation, fault restriction, and fault growth through layered section. Some studied faults nucleated in the limestone layers, without using pre-existing fractures such as joints, and according to our numerical analysis, a strong stiffness, a low strength contrast between the limestone and the clay layer, and/or s a greater thickness of the clay layer are conditions which favour nucleation of faults in limestone. The range of mechanical properties leading to the fault nucleation in one layer type or another was investigated using a 3D modelling approach. After its nucleation, the fault propagates within a homogeneous medium with a constant displacement gradient until its vertical propagation is stopped by a restrictor. The evidenced restrictors are limestone-clay interfaces or faults in clays, sub

  20. Characterisation of the sintering behaviour of Waelz slag from electric arc furnace (EAF) dust recycling for use in the clay ceramics industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijorna, N; de Pedro, M; Romero, M; Andrés, A

    2014-01-01

    Waelz slag is an industrial by-product from the recovery of electric arc furnace (EAF) dust which is mainly sent to landfills. Despite the different chemical and mineralogical compositions of Waelz slag compared to traditional clays, previous experiments have demonstrated its potential use as a clay substitute in ceramic processes. Indeed, clayey products containing Waelz slag could improve mechanical and environmental performance, fixing most of the metallic species and moreover decreasing the release of some potential pollutants during firing. However, a deeper understanding of the complex phase transformations during its thermal treatment and the connection of this behaviour with the end properties is desirable in order to explain the role that is played by the Waelz slag and its potential contribution to the ceramic process. For this purpose, in the present study, the chemical, mineralogical, thermal and environmental behaviour of both (i) unfired powdered samples, and (ii) pressed specimen of Waelz slag fired up to different temperatures within the typical range of clay based ceramic production, has been studied. The effect of the heating temperature on the end properties of the fired samples has been assessed. In general, an increase of the firing temperature promotes sintering and densification of the products and decreases the open porosity and water absorption which also contributes to the fixation of heavy metals. On the contrary, an increase in the leaching of Pb, Cr and Mo from the fired specimens is observed. This can be attributed to the creation of Fe and Ca molybdates and chromates that are weakly retained in the alkali matrix. On the other side, at temperature above 950 °C a weight gain related to the emission of evolved gases is observed. In conclusion, the firing temperature of the ceramic process is a key parameter that affects not only the technical properties but also strongly affects the leaching behaviour and the process emissions

  1. Limestone calcined clay cement as a low-carbon solution to meet expanding cement demand in emerging economies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudiesky Cancio Díaz

    Full Text Available This paper aims at assessing the return on investment and carbon mitigation potentials of five investment alternatives for the Cuban cement industry in a long-term horizon appraisal (15 years. Anticipated growing demand for cement, constrained supply and an urgent need for optimisation of limited capital while preserving the environment, are background facts leading to the present study. This research explores the beneficial contribution of a new available technology, LC3 cement, resulting from the combination of clinker, calcined clay and limestone, with a capacity of replacing up to 50% of clinker in cement. Global Warming Potential (GWP is calculated with Life Cycle Assessment method and the economic investment's payback is assessed through Return on Capital Employed (ROCE approach. Main outcomes show that projected demand could be satisfied either by adding new cement plants—at a high environmental impact and unprofitable performance— or by introducing LC3 strategy. The latter choice allows boosting both the return on investment and the production capacity while reducing greenhouse gas (GHG emissions up to 20–23% compared to business-as-usual practice. Overall profitability for the industry is estimated to overcome BAU scenario by 8–10% points by 2025, if LC3 were adopted. Increasing the production of conventional blended cements instead brings only marginal economic benefits without supporting the needed increase in production capacity. The conducted study also shows that, in spite of the extra capital cost required for the calcination of kaolinite clay, LC3 drops production costs in the range of 15–25% compared to conventional solutions. Keywords: Cement, Alternative, ROCE, CO2, LCA, Investment

  2. The setting time of a clay-slag geopolymer matrix: the influence of blast-furnace-slag addition and the mixing method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perná, Ivana; Hanzlíček, Tomáš

    112, Part 1, JAN 20 (2016), s. 1150-1155 ISSN 0959-6526 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : blast-furnace slag * geopolymer * setting time * mixing method * solidification * recycling Subject RIV: DM - Solid Waste and Recycling Impact factor: 5.715, year: 2016

  3. Characterization of DNAPL Source Zone Arcgitecture in Clay Till and Limestone Bedrock by Integrated Site Investigations with Innovative and Current Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Mette Martina; Janniche, Gry Sander; Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann

    facility for perchloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) at the Naverland site near Copenhagen, Denmark, has resulted in PCE and TCE DNAPL impacts to a fractured clay till and an underlying fractured limestone aquifer/bedrock. A range of innovative and current site investigative tools for direct...... with discrete subsampling for quantitative analysis, SudanIV hydrophobic colour test, colour spray test, PID and geologic descriptions; NAPL and FACT FLUTe exposure and discrete FACT subsampling and analysis; liquid sampling from boreholes; and a radon and PCE/TCE soil gas survey. Investigations...

  4. Application of a clay-slag geopolymer matrix for repairing damaged concrete: Laboratory and industrial-scale experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perná, Ivana; Hanzlíček, Tomáš; Boura, P.; Lučaník, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 10 (2017), s. 929-937 ISSN 0025-5300 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : blast-furnace slag * geopolymer * scanning electron microscopy (SEM) * damaged concrete repair * long-term monitoring Subject RIV: JJ - Other Materials OBOR OECD: Composites (including laminates, reinforced plastics, cermets, combined natural and synthetic fibre fabrics Impact factor: 0.418, year: 2016

  5. Basal Ottawa Limestone, Chattanooga Shale, Floyd Shale, Porters Creek Clay, and Yazoo Clay in parts of Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee as potential host rocks for underground emplacement of waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mellen, F.F.

    1976-01-01

    Impermeable rock units, preferably at least 500 feet thick and lying 1000 to 3000 feet below land surface, were sought in the region consisting roughly of the western 3 / 5 ths of Tennessee and the northern 3 / 5 ths of Alabama and Mississippi. All rock sequences, Cambrian through Eocene, were examined in varying detail, except the Cretaceous Selma Chalk and except the diapiric salt. These rocks were studied for their relative impermeable homogeneity, their continuity, their background of structural and seismic stability and their hydrologic associations. The Central Mississippi Ridge of north-central Mississippi is overlain by a long-stable mass of Porters Creek Clay 500-700 feet thick, in an area roughly 50-60 miles wide and about 150 miles long. The Yazoo Clay, where best developed in the west-central and southwest part of Mississippi, is in the 400-500 foot thickness range, but locally exceeds 500 feet. The entire area mapped is underlain by the Louann Salt which has produced many deep-seated salt domes and numerous piercement salt domes. Salt flow has complicated shallow structural geology throughout that area. The Chattanooga Shale rarely exceeds 60 feet in thickness in the region studied and is generally much thinner and is absent in many places. In the lower part of the Middle Ordovician (Ottawa Megagroup), the Murphreesboro and associated dense limestones appear to offer a potential disposal unit 250-400 feet thick, having the advantages of rock competency and freedom from association with prolific aquifers in the overburden or beneath. Other less conspicuous stratigraphic units are reviewed

  6. Efeito da escória de siderurgia e calcário na disponibilidade de fósforo de um Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo cultivado com cana-de-açúcar Effect of slag and limestone on the availability of phosphorus of an Oxisol planted with sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato de Mello Prado

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito da escória de siderurgia e calcário na concentração do P disponível em um Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo, cultivado com cana-de-açúcar (Saccharum spp., em Ituverava, SP. Foram aplicados calcário calcítico e a escória de siderurgia, objetivando elevar a saturação por bases a 50%, 75% e 100%, e usou-se testemunha (sem correção. O efeito linear da escória de siderurgia no P disponível do solo, em contraste com a ausência de relação quando se aplicou calcário, sugere que o efeito positivo da escória de siderurgia se deve mais ao efeito do silicato, de saturar os sítios de adsorção de P, do que ao efeito de aumento do pH.The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of slag and limestone, on the available P concentration of the soil planted with sugarcane. A field experiment was conducted in Ituverava, SP, Brazil, in a Red-Yellow Oxisol. Calcitic limestone and the slag were added in order to increase the base saturation to 50%, 75% and 100%, in addition to the control without correction. The linear effect of the slag on the soil available P, contrasting the lack of relationship when the limestone was applied, suggests that the positive effect of the slag is mainly due to the silicate effect than to the pH effect.

  7. SLAG, LIMESTONE, AND UREA APPLICATION IN LATOSOL CULTIVATED WITH RICE APLICAÇÃO DE ESCÓRIA SIDERÚRGICA, CALCÁRIO E UREIA EM LATOSSOLO CULTIVADO COM ARROZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato de Mello Prado

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Slag is a calcium silicate and silicon source, whose corrective action on soil is similar to the limestone one. Despite its corrective and fertilizing potential, there is little information about its effects on soil chemical attributes. The study evaluated the effects of the slag, limestone, and urea application on the chemical attributes of a Brazilian Oxisol cultivated with rice. The treatments consisted of two corrective agents sources (limestone and slag, with three doses (1.3 g dm-3, 2.6 g dm-3, and 5,2 g dm-3; three N doses (80 mg dm-3, 160 mg dm-3, and 320 mg dm-3, applied as urea; and a control, arranged in randomized blocks, in a factorial scheme, with four replications. Ninety days after the soil incubation and 120 days after planting, soil samples were collected for chemical analysis. The slag was efficient in correcting soil acidity, and nitrogen fertilization contributed to increment acidity in the soil cultivated with rice, decreasing base saturation, as well as the Ca and Mg content. The slag application improved silicon availability, however, when associate to the nitrogen fertilization, the silicon content in the soil did not change.

    A escória de siderurgia é um silicato de cálcio e fonte de silício, que tem ação corretiva da acidez do solo semelhante à do calcário. Apesar do seu grande potencial de uso como corretivo e fertilizante, existem poucas informações sobre seus efeitos nos atributos químicos do solo. O estudo foi realizado com a cultura do arroz, objetivando-se avaliar os efeitos da aplicação da escória de siderurgia, calcário e ureia nas alterações dos atributos químicos de um Latossolo Vermelho distrófico. Os tratamentos constaram da combinação de duas fontes de materiais corretivos (calcário e esc

  8. Influence of clay particles on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles transport and retention through limestone porous media: measurements and mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayat, Ali Esfandyari, E-mail: ali.esfandiari.bayat@gmail.com; Junin, Radzuan [Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Department of Petroleum Engineering, Faculty of Petroleum and Renewable Energy Engineering (Malaysia); Mohsin, Rahmat [Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, UTM-MPRC Institute for Oil and Gas, N29A, Lengkuk Suria (Malaysia); Hokmabadi, Mehrdad [Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Department of Petroleum Engineering, Faculty of Petroleum and Renewable Energy Engineering (Malaysia); Shamshirband, Shahaboddin [University of Malaya, Department of Computer System and Information Technology, Faculty of Computer System and Information Technology (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    Utilization of nanoparticles (NPs) for a broad range of applications has caused considerable quantities of these materials to be released into the environment. Issues of how and where the NPs are distributed into the subsurface aquatic environments are questions for those in environmental engineering. This study investigated the influence of three abundant clay minerals namely kaolinite, montmorillonite, and illite in the subsurface natural aquatic systems on the transport and retention of aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 40 nm) and titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}, 10–30 nm) NPs through saturated limestone porous media. The clay concentrations in porous media were set at 2 and 4 vol% of the holder capacity. Breakthrough curves in the columns outlets were measured using a UV–Vis spectrophotometer. It was found that the maximum NPs recoveries were obtained when there was no clay particle in the porous medium. On the other hand, increase in concentration of clay particles has resulted in the NPs recoveries being significantly declined. Due to fibrous structure of illite, it was found to be more effective for NPs retention in comparison to montmorillonite and kaolinite. Overall, the position of clay particles in the porous media pores and their morphologies were found to be two main reasons for increase of NPs retention in porous media.

  9. Water circulation control on carbonate-δ18O records in a low permeability clay formation and surrounding limestones: The Upper Dogger-Oxfordian sequence from the eastern Paris basin, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavastre, Veronique; Ader, Magali; Buschaert, Stephane; Petit, Eddy; Javoy, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Up. Dog./Oxf. sequence is investigated for radioactive waste disposal feasibilities. → Marine carbonates suffered isotopic exchanges with meteoric water. → Modelling shows that very low W/R ratio can explain isotopic changes in clay layer. → Higher W/R ratio are needed to reach isotopic changes in carbonated layers. → Confirmed barrier property of clay layer was probably reached during early burial. - Abstract: Upper Dogger to Oxfordian Formations in the eastern part of the Paris basin (France) are currently being investigated by the French nuclear waste management agency (Andra), testing the feasibility of long-term deep nuclear waste disposal in the Callovo-Oxfordian claystones. Characterising the hydrogeological behaviour of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystones is, therefore, essential in evaluating its potential as a geological barrier. In order to evaluate and quantify water/rock interactions experienced over geological time by these Formations, bulk carbonate δ 13 C and δ 18 O were measured and calculations of water-rock ratios were used to explain carbonate-δ 18 O changes. Meteoric porewater and a maximum temperature reached of about 40 deg. C were considered. The Jurassic marine carbonate δ 13 C was preserved in the Callovo-Oxfordian claystones and in the overlying limestones (-0.28 per mille to 3.39 per mille/PDB), while the δ 18 O values are lower by 0-5 per mille (-6.25 per mille to -1.32 per mille/PDB). Calculations show that Upper Dogger and Oxfordian Limestone δ 18 O data: (i)have random-like distribution through theoretical δ 18 O-W/R curves and (ii)suggest that water/rock ratios (0.08-0.4) needed to explain δ 18 O changes are higher by a factor of about 2-20 compared to the present-day water/rock ratio. These features indicate advection in both aquifers. According to the history of the Paris basin, this hydrogeological behaviour could have been effective since Jurassic/Cretaceous transition times. Inversely, the

  10. Water circulation control on carbonate-{delta}{sup 18}O records in a low permeability clay formation and surrounding limestones: The Upper Dogger-Oxfordian sequence from the eastern Paris basin, France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavastre, Veronique, E-mail: veronique.lavastre@univ-st-etienne.fr [Universite de Lyon, Universite Jean Monnet, F-42023 Saint Etienne (France)] [CNRS, UMR 6524, LMV, F-42023 Saint Etienne (France)] [Laboratoire de Geochimie des Isotopes Stables, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris and Universite Paris 7 - UMR CNRS 7154, 4, place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Ader, Magali [Laboratoire de Geochimie des Isotopes Stables, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris and Universite Paris 7 - UMR CNRS 7154, 4, place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Buschaert, Stephane [Andra, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 7-8 rue Jean Monnet, 92 298 Chatenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Petit, Eddy; Javoy, Marc [Laboratoire de Geochimie des Isotopes Stables, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris and Universite Paris 7 - UMR CNRS 7154, 4, place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France)

    2011-05-15

    Research Highlights: > Up. Dog./Oxf. sequence is investigated for radioactive waste disposal feasibilities. > Marine carbonates suffered isotopic exchanges with meteoric water. > Modelling shows that very low W/R ratio can explain isotopic changes in clay layer. > Higher W/R ratio are needed to reach isotopic changes in carbonated layers. > Confirmed barrier property of clay layer was probably reached during early burial. - Abstract: Upper Dogger to Oxfordian Formations in the eastern part of the Paris basin (France) are currently being investigated by the French nuclear waste management agency (Andra), testing the feasibility of long-term deep nuclear waste disposal in the Callovo-Oxfordian claystones. Characterising the hydrogeological behaviour of the Callovo-Oxfordian claystones is, therefore, essential in evaluating its potential as a geological barrier. In order to evaluate and quantify water/rock interactions experienced over geological time by these Formations, bulk carbonate {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O were measured and calculations of water-rock ratios were used to explain carbonate-{delta}{sup 18}O changes. Meteoric porewater and a maximum temperature reached of about 40 deg. C were considered. The Jurassic marine carbonate {delta}{sup 13}C was preserved in the Callovo-Oxfordian claystones and in the overlying limestones (-0.28 per mille to 3.39 per mille/PDB), while the {delta}{sup 18}O values are lower by 0-5 per mille (-6.25 per mille to -1.32 per mille/PDB). Calculations show that Upper Dogger and Oxfordian Limestone {delta}{sup 18}O data: (i)have random-like distribution through theoretical {delta}{sup 18}O-W/R curves and (ii)suggest that water/rock ratios (0.08-0.4) needed to explain {delta}{sup 18}O changes are higher by a factor of about 2-20 compared to the present-day water/rock ratio. These features indicate advection in both aquifers. According to the history of the Paris basin, this hydrogeological behaviour could have been

  11. Faults architecture and growth in clay-limestone alternation. Examples in the S-E Basin alternations (France) and numerical modeling; Architecture et croissance des failles dans les alternances argilo-calcaires. Exemples dans les alternances du Bassin du Sud-Est (France) et modelisation numerique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, Vincent

    2011-10-28

    The following work has been carried out in the framework of the studies conducted by IRSN in support of its safety evaluation of the geological disposal programme of high and intermediate level, long-lived radioactive waste. Such a disposal is planned to be hosted by the Callovian-Oxfordian indurate clay formation between two limestone formations in eastern Paris basin, France. Hypothetical faults may cross-cut this layered section, decreasing the clay containment ability by creating preferential pathways for radioactive solute towards limestones. This study aims at characterising the fault architecture and the normal fault growth in clay/limestone layered sections. Structural analysis and displacement profiles have been carried out in normal faults crossing several decimetres to metre thick sedimentary alternations in the South-Eastern Basin (France) and petrophysical properties have been determined for each layer. The studied faults are simple fault planes or complex fault zones showing are significantly controlled by the layering. The analysis of the fault characteristics and the results obtained on numerical models enlighten several processes such as fault nucleation, fault restriction, and fault growth through layered section. Some studied faults nucleated in the limestone layers, without using pre-existing fractures such as joints, and according to our numerical analysis, a strong stiffness, a low strength contrast between the limestone and the clay layer, and/or s a greater thickness of the clay layer are conditions which favour nucleation of faults in limestone. The range of mechanical properties leading to the fault nucleation in one layer type or another was investigated using a 3D modelling approach. After its nucleation, the fault propagates within a homogeneous medium with a constant displacement gradient until its vertical propagation is stopped by a restrictor. The evidenced restrictors are limestone-clay interfaces or faults in clays, sub

  12. Fluids transfer in porous media, the case of carbonates and clay/limestone interfaces. Integrated study of petrophysical, sedimentology and microstructures.The case of two carbonates: the case of two carbonates the Oolithe Blanche from the Paris Basin and the Globigerina Limestone of maltese islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casteleyn, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Geological storage is now considered as a technical solution for CO_2 storage and nuclear waste management (for high-level and intermediate-level long-lived radioactive waste). A geological storage is a long term project which implies a particular protocol in order to better determine and to better understand the host rock, especially in terms of transport mechanisms. The geological formations studied are chosen in function of their storage capacity because gas storage or nuclear waste storage do not need the same requirements. In case of CO_2 storage, the host formation must provide good reservoir properties in order to facilitate the injection. Here, the safety of the storage is guaranteed by traps (structural, residual, mineral) and by the presence of a cap rock. Concerning nuclear waste storage, the host must retain at best the potential radioactive fluids and gas leaks, and this is the reason why storage sites are studied within low porous and low permeable formation, like argillite organelles. The work presented in the PhD thesis is related to two storage projects. The first one is focused on the petrophysical study of a potential host for CO_2 storage in the Paris Basin, the 'Oolithe Blanche' carbonate formation. The second project is an analogue study of the sedimentary structure explored in the Meuse/Haute-Marne laboratory. This laboratory is studied by ANDRA to be the first nuclear waste storage in a deep geological formation in France. The analogue was found in maltese archipelagos, which presents almost the same tabular structure as the one observed in the Meuse/Haute-Marne laboratory: limestone/clay/limestone affected by a weak tectonic deformation. In the first part, the Oolithe Blanche Formation study allowed to determine the reservoir properties of the three principals facies of the formation. This study was realized on plugs sampled on quarries in Burgundy (France). Those facies are characterized by different environmental processes and deposit

  13. Artificial neural network model to predict slag viscosity over a broad range of temperatures and slag compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchesne, Marc A. [Chemical and Biological Engineering Department, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ont. (Canada); CanmetENERGY, 1 Haanel Drive, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Macchi, Arturo [Chemical and Biological Engineering Department, University of Ottawa, 161 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ont. (Canada); Lu, Dennis Y.; Hughes, Robin W.; McCalden, David; Anthony, Edward J. [CanmetENERGY, 1 Haanel Drive, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    Threshold slag viscosity heuristics are often used for the initial assessment of coal gasification projects. Slag viscosity predictions are also required for advanced combustion and gasification models. Due to unsatisfactory performance of theoretical equations, an artificial neural network model was developed to predict slag viscosity over a broad range of temperatures and slag compositions. This model outperforms other slag viscosity models, resulting in an average error factor of 5.05 which is lower than the best obtained with other available models. Genesee coal ash viscosity predictions were made to investigate the effect of adding Canadian limestone and dolomite. The results indicate that magnesium in the fluxing agent provides a greater viscosity reduction than calcium for the threshold slag tapping temperature range. (author)

  14. Dispersão de argila em microagregados de solo incubado com calcário Clay dispersion in microaggregates of soil incubated with limestone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Tulio Spera

    2008-12-01

    incubated with 0, 1.9, 3.8, 5.7, 7.6 and 15.2 Mg ha-1. After the incubation period, the micro and macro porosity, soil density, clay dispersion, hydraulic conductivity and concentration of exchangeable Al, Ca and Mg and soil organic matter were evaluated. Soil density, clay dispersion, pH and Ca and Mg concentration increased with lime application, while macro porosity, hydraulic conductivity, soil organic matter, and Al decreased. The increase of pH and hydraulic conductivity were higher in the sterilized soil. Liming effects were more evident at a rate of 3.8 Mg ha-1. Soil sterilization increased the pH value and decreased the organic matter content and Ca, besides the hydraulic conductivity. Micro- aggregate dispersion in limed soils can, at least partially, contribute to soil compaction.

  15. Facing slag glass and slag glass ceramic produced from thermal power plant ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buruchenko, A.E.; Kolesnikov, A.A.; Lukoyanov, A.G.

    1990-10-01

    Evaluates properties of fly ash and slags from the Krasnoyarsk coal-fired power plants and their utilization for glass and ceramic glass production. Composition of a mixture of fly ash and slag was: silica 40-55%, aluminium oxides 10-40%, ferric trioxide 6-14%, calcium oxides 20-35%, magnesium oxides 3-6%, potassium oxides 0.3-1.5%, sodium oxides 0.2-05%, sulfur trioxide 0.9-5.0%. The analyzed fly ash and slags from the Krasnoyarsk plant were an economic waste material for glass production. Properties of sand, clay and other materials used in glass production and properties of glass and ceramic glass produced on the basis of fly ash and slags are analyzed. Economic aspects of fly ash and slag utilization are also evaluated. 3 refs.

  16. Effect of Limestone Powder on Microstructure of Ternary Cementitious System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Y.; Ye, G.

    2012-01-01

    The pressure to reach sustainability favours the development of ternary composite cement. The synergistic effect on mechanical behaviour at 28 days between limestone powder (LP) and pozzolanic additives, i.e. fly ash (FA) and blast furnace slag (BFS), has been documented. In order to better

  17. Reactivation properties of carbide slag as a CO{sub 2} sorbent during calcination/carbonation cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yingjie; Sun, Rongyue; Liu, Hongling; Lu, Chunmei [Shandong Univ., Jinan (China). School of Energy and Power Engineering

    2013-07-01

    The carbide slag from polyvinyl chloride production as industry hazardous wastes was proposed as CO{sub 2} sorbent at high temperature in calcium looping cycle. The cyclic CO{sub 2} capture behavior and the microstructure characteristics of the carbide slag as one of the typical calcium-based industrial wastes during the multiple calcination/carbonation cycles. Also, the comparisons between the carbide slag and the natural limestone in cyclic CO{sub 2} capture behavior were made. XRD analysis demonstrates that the predominating constituent of the carbide slag is Ca(OH){sub 2}. The carbonation temperature ranging from 650 to 700 C is favourable to cyclic carbonation of the carbide slag. The cyclic carbonation conversions of the carbide slag is lower than that of the limestone before a certain time, but the situation is converse after that time in a thermogravimetric analyzer. The carbide slag has better cyclic CO{sub 2} capture capacity. The carbonation conversion of the carbide slag retains 0.28 after 100 calcination/carbonation cycles, while the two limestones achieve 0.08 and 0.14 respectively at the same reaction conditions in a dual fixed-bed reactor. The microstructure of the carbide slag by SEM reveals the reason why it possesses better CO{sub 2} capture capacity.

  18. Application of aluminum slag incorporated in lightweigh aggregate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Elisa Akiko Nakano

    2006-01-01

    The use of industrial waste materials as additives in the manufacture of ceramic product has been attracting a growing interest in the last few years and is becoming common practice. The main purpose of this work is to evaluate the possibility of incorporation of aluminum slag into clay materials. Expansive clays are obtained from a pyro plastic expansion, and are usually employed like lightweight aggregate in structural concrete as ornamental garden products. The characterization of the aluminum slag and clay materials was carried out by Xray fluorescence spectrometry, Xray diffraction, granulometry, differential thermal analysis, thermal gravimetry (DTA and TG) and scanning electron microscopy. The studied compositions contained 5, 10, 15 and 20 weight % of aluminum slag into clay mass. The linear expansion, mass variation, apparent specific mass and water absorption of all compositions were determined. Leaching and solubilization experiments were also performed. The main results show the viability of using up to 5 wt% aluminum slag for producing expansive clays with characteristics within the accepted standards. (author)

  19. Estudo da potencialidade da aplicação de uma argila contaminada com calcário na produção de placas cerâmicas Study of the potentiality of the application of a contaminated clay with limestone in the production of ceramic plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. L. Soares

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Na região da cidade de Teresina, PI, encontra-se uma grande quantidade de jazidas de argilas de queima vermelha usadas na produção de cerâmica estrutural, sendo o principal motivo da instalação de um pólo cerâmico nesta região. Porém muitas destas jazidas não estão sendo exploradas de forma adequada ou simplesmente abandonadas por causa da contaminação com calcário, sendo este o principal contaminante indesejável pelos ceramistas do pólo teresinense. Assim, esta pesquisa tem como objetivo avaliar a potencialidade de aplicação de uma argila com calcário na produção de placas de revestimento cerâmico de queima vermelha. Para isso foram caracterizadas uma massa cerâmica usada na produção de revestimento semiporoso e uma argila contaminada com calcário. As matérias-primas foram queimadas em forno industrial separadamente e em combinação nas proporções de 25%, 50% e 75% em peso da argila adicionada a massa industrial. Foram realizados nos corpos de prova queimados ensaios tecnológicos de retração linear, absorção de água e resistência mecânica. A microestrutura foi avaliada através de análise por difração de raios X. Os resultados mostraram potencialidade da utilização da argila contaminada com calcário em massa de revestimento cerâmico.In the city of Teresina area, capital of Piauí, Brazil, there is a lot of clay deposits red burning used in the production of structural ceramics, being the main reason for installing a ceramic center in the region. But many of these deposits are not being adequately exploited or simply abandoned because of contamination with limestone, which is the main undesirable contaminant for the ceramic producers pole of Teresina. Thus, this research aims to evaluate the capability of applying some clay with limestone in the production of these plates of red ceramic burning. A ceramic body used in the production of coating semiporous and a contaminated clay with limestone were

  20. Uranium in ancient slag from Rajasthan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeepkumar, T.B.; Fahmi, Sohail; Sharma, S.K.

    2008-01-01

    Anomalous radioactivity was recorded in two ancient slag dumps spread on the surface near Bansda (24 deg 35'N lat., 70 deg 09'E long.) and Dhavadiya (24 deg 30'N lat., 70 deg 05'E long.) villages, Udaipur District, Rajasthan. The slag, with a range of high to low radioactivity levels, is the remnant of ancient smelting in the area, probably for copper. Six samples showing low radioactivity in Bansda contain an average of 0.030% U 3 O 8 , while five moderately radioactive samples analysed contain 0.225% U 3 O 8 and four highly radioactive samples analysed contain 1.15% U 3 O 8 . The 15 samples contain on an average 0.627% copper, 719 ppm zinc, 329 ppm cobalt and 133 ppm vanadium. Fifteen samples from Dhavadiya slag assayed on an average contain 0.040% U 3 O 8 , 0.297% Cu, 292 ppm Zn and 250 ppm Co. The extent of crystallization seen in the slag is intriguing because an over-cooled melt generally forms glass. The high rate of crystal formation may be attributed to high amounts of volatiles, particularly CO 2 and SO 4 , released during the breakdown of limestone (added as flux during smelting) and sulphide minerals in the ore. The high order of radioactivity recorded in the slags of Bansda and Dhavadiya points to the presence of ore-grade uranium concentration associated with sulphide mineralization in the vicinity of the basement Banded Gneissic Complex, intrusive granites and the cover sequence of the Bhinder basin. (author)

  1. Recycling of residual IGCC slags and their benefits as degreasers in ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias Martín, I; Acosta Echeverría, A; García-Romero, E

    2013-11-15

    This work studies the evolution of IGCC slag grains within a ceramic matrix fired at different temperatures to investigate the effect of using IGCC slag as a degreaser. Pressed ceramic specimens from two clay mixtures are used in this study. The M1 mixture is composed of standard clays, whereas the M2 mixture is composed of the same clay mixture as M1 mixture but contains 15% by weight IGCC slag. The amount of IGCC slag added coincides with the amount of slag typically used as a degreaser in the ceramic industry. Specimens are fired at 950 °C, 1000 °C, 1050 °C, 1100 °C and 1150 °C. The mineralogical composition and the IGCC slag grain shape within the ceramic matrix are determined by X-ray diffraction, polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results reveal that the surface of the slag grains is welded to the ceramic matrix while the quartz grains are separated, which causes increased water absorption and reduces the mechanical strength. IGCC slag, however, reduces water absorption. This behaviour is due to the softening temperature of the slag. This property is quite important from an industrial viewpoint because IGCC slag can serve as an alternative to traditional degreasing agents in the ceramic building industry. Additionally, using IGCC slag allows for the transformation of waste into a secondary raw material, thereby avoiding disposal at landfills; moreover, these industrial wastes are made inert and improve the properties of ceramics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. High Resolution Hydraulic Profiling and Groundwater Sampling using FLUTe™ System in a Fractured Limestone Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janniche, Gry Sander; Christensen, Anders G.; Grosen, Bernt

    challeng-ing in deposit types as fractured limestone. The activities of a bulk distribution facility for perchloroe-thene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) at the Naverland site near Copenhagen, Denmark, has resulted in PCE and TCE DNAPL impacts to a fractured clay till and an underlying fractured limestone...

  3. 1st International Conference on Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete

    CERN Document Server

    Favier, Aurélie

    2015-01-01

    This volume focuses on research and practical issues linked to Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete. The main subjects are geology of clays, hydration and performance of blended systems with calcined clays, alkali activated binders, economic and environmental impacts of the use of calcined clays in cement based materials. Topics addressed in this book include the influence of processing on reactivity of calcined clays, influence of clay mineralogy on reactivity, geology of clay deposits, Portland-calcined clay systems, hydration, durability, performance, Portland-calcined clay-limestone systems, hydration, durability, performance, calcined clay-alkali systems, life cycle analysis, economics and environmental impact of use of calcined clays in cement and concrete, and field applications. This book compiles the different contributions of the 1st International Conference on Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete, which took place in Lausanne, Switzerland, June, 23-25, 2015.The papers present the latest  res...

  4. Direct Sulfation of Limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Guilin; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Wedel, Stig

    2007-01-01

    The direct sulfation of limestone was studied in a laboratory fixed-bed reactor. It is found that the direct sulfation of limestone involves nucleation and crystal grain growth of the solid product (anhydrite). At 823 K and at low-conversions (less than about 0.5 %), the influences of SO2, O-2...... and CO2 on the direct sulfation of limestone corresponds to apparent reaction orders of about 0.2, 0.2 and -0.5, respectively. Water is observed to promote the sulfation reaction and increase the apparent reaction orders of SO2 and O-2. The influence of O-2 at high O-2 concentrations (> about 15...... %) becomes negligible. In the temperature interval from 723 K to 973 K, an apparent activation energy of about 104 kJ/mol is observed for the direct sulfation of limestone. At low temperatures and low conversions, the sulfation process is most likely under mixed control by chemical reaction and solid...

  5. Hydrology and geochemistry of a slag-affected aquifer and chemical characteristics of slag-affected ground water, northwestern Indiana and northeastern Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayless, E. Randall; Greeman, T.K.; Harvey, C.C.

    1998-01-01

    ?aquifer interface. The solid-phase analyses indicated that calcite, dolomite, and quartz generally were present throughout the slag?aquifer system; barian celestite, cristobalite, manganese-bearing calcite, and minrecordite were present in fewer samples. Trace elements that are liberated from the slag may be incorporated as impurities during precipitation of major minerals, sorbed onto clays and other grainsize fractions not analyzed as part of this study, or present in low-abundance minerals that were not detected by the X-ray analysis. Mass-balance and speciation programs were used to identify geochemical processes that may be occurring as water infiltrates through the slag, flows into the aquifer, and discharges into Lake George. The geochemical models indicate that precipitation of calcite may be occurring where slag-affected water enters the aquifer. Models also indicate that dolomite precipitation and clay-mineral dissolution may be occurring at the slag?aquifer interface; however, dolomite precipitation is generally believed to require geologically long time periods. Silica may be dissolving where slag-affected ground water enters the aquifer and may be precipitating where slag-affected ground water discharges to the lakebed of Lake George. In addition to the site-specific study, a statistical analysis of regional water quality was done to compare ground water in wells affected and unaffected by slag. When com-pared to wells in background locations in the Calumet aquifer, wells screened in slag across northwestern Indiana and northeastern Illinois generally had relatively higher pH and specific-conductance values and relatively higher concentrations of alkalinity, dissolved solids, suspended solids, total organic carbon, calcium, potassium, sodium, chloride, aluminum, barium, and possibly magnesium, sulfate, chromium, cobalt, copper, cyanide, manganese, mercury, nickel, and vanadium. When compared to wells in slag and wells in background locations, ground water from immediat

  6. Clay Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  7. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the ball clay industry is provided. In 2000, sales of ball clay reached record levels, with sanitary ware and tile applications accounting for the largest sales. Ball clay production, consumption, prices, foreign trade, and industry news are summarized. The outlook for the ball clay industry is also outlined.

  8. Field test on sand compaction pile method with copper slag sand; Dosuisai slag wo mochiita SCP koho no shiken seko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minami, K.; Matsui, H.; Naruse, E.; Kitazume, M. [Port and Harbour Research Inst., Kanagawa (Japan)

    1997-09-20

    This paper describes the sand compaction pile (SCP) method using copper slag sand. The SCP method is a method by which sand compaction piles are constructed in the ground, and improvement can be obtained in a short period. This method has been widely used even in the port areas for enhancing the bearing power of soft clay ground and the lateral resistance of sheet pile. A great deal of sand is required as a material. The sand requires high permeability, proper size distribution with less fine particle fraction content, easy compaction property with enough strength, and easy discharging property from the casing of construction machines as required properties. Recently, it becomes hard to secure proper sand materials. The copper slag sand is obtained from refining process of copper as a by-product which is quenched in water flow and crushed in water. The copper slag sand has higher particle density than that of sand, excellent permeability, and similar size distribution to that of sand. From compaction drainage triaxial compression test and permeability test, it was found that the mechanical properties of copper slag sand did not change by the crushing of grains with keeping excellent permeability. Through the test construction, applicability of the copper slag sand to the SCP method could be confirmed as an alternate material of sand. 17 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  9. Incorporation of ladle furnace slag in ceramic formulations: study of extrusion zones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feitosa, E.F.; Santana, C.M.; Luna, D.S.; Santos, D.M.S.; Silva, G.S.; Noleto, L.T.; Almeida, N.C.; Rabelo, A.A.; Fagury Neto, E.

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of incorporation of ladle furnace slag (LFS) in two clays with higher and lower plasticity, used for the manufacture of structural ceramics. The LFS from a local steel making plant was added to ceramic compositions in proportions of 8 %, 14 % and 16 %. The formulations were tested in appropriate equipment that measures the liquid limit and plastic limit. The property examined was the plasticity index, in order to make a study of the extrusion zones. Results showed that the addition of slag into clay mixtures alters the plasticity; however, the extrusion process was not hampered. (author)

  10. Clay Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  11. Slag recycling of irradiated vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorman, P.K.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental inductoslag apparatus to recycle irradiated vanadium was fabricated and tested. An experimental electroslag apparatus was also used to test possible slags. The testing was carried out with slag materials that were fabricated along with impurity bearing vanadium samples. Results obtained include computer simulated thermochemical calculations and experimentally determined removal efficiencies of the transmutation impurities. Analyses of the samples before and after testing were carried out to determine if the slag did indeed remove the transmutation impurities from the irradiated vanadium

  12. NONEQUILIBRIUM SULFUR CAPTURE & RETENTION IN AN AIR COOLED SLAGGING COAL COMBUSTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bert Zauderer

    2003-04-21

    Calcium oxide injected in a slagging combustor reacts with the sulfur from coal combustion to form sulfur-bearing particles. The reacted particles impact and melt in the liquid slag layer on the combustor wall by the centrifugal force of the swirling combustion gases. Due to the low solubility of sulfur in slag, it must be rapidly drained from the combustor to limit sulfur gas re-evolution. Prior analyses and laboratory scale data indicated that for Coal Tech's 20 MMBtu/hour, air-cooled, slagging coal combustor slag mass flow rates in excess of 400 lb/hr should limit sulfur re-evolution. The objective of this 42-month project was to validate this sulfur-in-slag model in a group of combustor tests. A total of 36 days of testing on the combustor were completed during the period of performance of this project. This was more that double the 16 test days that were required in the original work statement. The extra tests were made possible by cost saving innovations that were made in the operation of the combustor test facility and in additional investment of Coal Tech resources in the test effort. The original project plan called for two groups of tests. The first group of tests involved the injection of calcium sulfate particles in the form of gypsum or plaster of Paris with the coal into the 20 MMBtu/hour-combustor. The second group of tests consisted of the entire two-step process, in which lime or limestone is co-injected with coal and reacts with the sulfur gas released during combustion to form calcium sulfate particles that impact and dissolve in the slag layer. Since this sulfur capture process has been validated in numerous prior tests in this combustor, the primary effort in the present project was on achieving the high slag flow rates needed to retain the sulfur in the slag.

  13. Electrokinetically Enhanced Delivery for ERD Remediation of Chlorinated Ethenes in a Fractured Limestone Aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broholm, Mette Martina; Hyldegaard, Bente Højlund; With Nedergaard, Lærke

    causing very long remediation timeframes. Electrokinetics (EK) offers some unique transport processes, which can potentially overcome the diffusion limitations in the matrix. A novel technology combines ERD and EK for enhanced delivery. The combined technology (EK-BIO) has shown promising results in clay....... Experimental work on EK-BIO in limestone was conducted in a laboratory setup with limestone cores. EK was demonstrated to be promising in establishing enhanced contact between the donor lactate, bacteria, and cis-DCE within the limestone matrix. Complete dechlorination is expected to take place in the matrix......, since back diffusion limitations in the limestone matrix are overcome. This is essential for the overall time perspective of a remediation in limestone aquifers....

  14. Recycling of Malaysia's electric arc furnace (EAF) slag waste into heavy-duty green ceramic tile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Pao-Ter; Anasyida, Abu Seman; Basu, Projjal; Nurulakmal, Mohd Sharif

    2014-12-01

    Recently, various solid wastes from industry such as glass waste, fly ash, sewage sludge and slag have been recycled into various value-added products such as ceramic tile. The conventional solutions of dumping the wastes in landfills or incineration, including in Malaysia are getting obsolete as the annual huge amount of the solid wastes would boost-up disposal cost and may cause permanent damage to the flora and fauna. This recent waste recycling approach is much better and greener as it can resolve problems associated with over-limit storage of industrial wastes and reduce exploration of natural resources for ceramic tile to continuously sustain the nature. Therefore, in this project, an attempt was made to recycle electric arc furnace (EAF) slag waste, obtained from Malaysia's steel making industry, into ceramic tile via conventional powder compaction method. The research work was divided into two stages. The first stage was to evaluate the suitability of EAF slag in ceramic tile by varying weight percentage of EAF slag (40 wt.%, 50 wt.% and 60 wt.%) and ball clay (40 wt.%, 50 wt.% and 60 wt.%), with no addition of silica and potash feldspar. In the second stage, the weight percentage of EAF slag was fixed at 40 wt.% and the percentage of ball clay (30 wt.% and 40 wt.%), feldspar (10 wt.% and 20 wt.%) and silica (10 wt.% and 20 wt.%) added was varied accordingly. Results obtained show that as weight percentage of EAF slag increased up to 60 wt.%, the percentage of apparent porosity and water absorption also rose, with a reduction in tile flexural strength and increased porosity. On the other hand, limiting the weight percentage of EAF slag to 40 wt.% while increasing the weight percentage of ball clay led to a higher total percentage of anorthite and wollastonite minerals, resulting in higher flexural strength. It was found that introduction of silica and feldspar further improved the flexural strength due to optimization of densification process. The highest

  15. Modeling of a self-healing process in blast furnace slag cement exposed to accelerated carbonation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zemskov, S.V.; Ahmad, B.; Copuroglu, O.; Vermolen, F.J.

    2013-01-01

    In the current research, a mathematical model for the post-damage improvement of the carbonated blast furnace slag cement (BFSC) exposed to accelerated carbonation is constructed. The study is embedded within the framework of investigating the effect of using lightweight expanded clay aggregate,

  16. Performance of portland limestone cements: Cements designed to be more sustainable that include up to 15% limestone addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Timothy J.

    where the limestone was blended (i.e., not interground) as needed, enabling variation of the size of the limestone particles. In addition, one of the commercially produced OPCs and PLCs were used with fly ash. A series of standardized tests were run to assess the physical effects of intergrinding limestone in portland cement, the effect of limestone presence and method of inclusion on the hydration reaction, and the associated mechanical and transport properties of concretes made with these limestone cements. The second phase of the study used a commercially produced OPC, a PLC, and a PLC-slag all made from the same parent clinker to quantify the early age shrinkage and cracking potential. The study presents a series of tests that quantify the fundamental origins of shrinkage in cementitious materials to elucidate the differences between PLC and OPC. The bulk shrinkage of these systems is then quantified under free and restrained conditions to provide an assessment of the susceptibility for cracking in portland limestone cements. The results of the first phase of this thesis showed that in general the PLC and OPC systems have similar hydration, set, and mechanical performance. Transport properties in this study show behavior that is +/- 30% of the conventional OPC system depending on the system. Literature has shown similar freeze-thaw resistance when these materials are used in properly air entrained mixtures, and the results for PLC systems with fly ash show added performance. Based on these results it appears that PLC that meets ASTM C595/AASHTO M234 should be able to be used interchangeably with OPC, while it should also be noted that the investigation of the influence of salts and sulfates on PLCs is still ongoing and should be monitored. The results of the second phase of this thesis showed that while the PLCs are finer, this comes primarily by reducing the very large particles (clinker particles greater than 30 microns) using advanced separator technology and

  17. Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part II: Constitutive Modeling of Slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massoudi, Mehrdad [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Wang, Ping

    2013-02-07

    The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport) properties of coal present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1,300 °C and 1,500 °C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa·s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied. We propose a new constitutive model, where the stress tensor not only has a yield stress part, but it also has a viscous part with a shear rate dependency of the viscosity, along with temperature and concentration dependency, while allowing for the possibility of the normal stress effects. In Part I, we reviewed, identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior.

  18. Effects of the dolomite from Irati formation as additive in a refractory clay used as raw material in Santa Gertrudes ceramic cluster (SP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, M.H.O.; Gaspar Junior, L.A.; Moreno, M.M.T.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of addition of carbonates in clays used as floor tiles have been intensively studied, but the focus usually is the pure calcite or calcitic limestone, which has nobler uses in industry, especially for cement production. However, in the important area known as Santa Gertrudes Ceramic Cluster, in Sao Paulo State, occurs mainly the dolomitic limestone, which is little studied as a potential additive which could be used in order to improve the properties of the floor tiles. This work aimed to check out the potentiality of dolomitic limestone as additive in ceramic products, especially floor tiles. Using as ingredients dolomitic limestones and refractory clay collected inside the area of the referred cluster, ceramic bodies were obtained with different dolomitic limestones contents incorporated to the refractory clay, and these ceramic bodies were mineralogically, chemically and physically analyzed. The conclusions are the dolomitic limestone can be particularly useful when incorporated to refractory clays, due to its fluxing properties. (author)

  19. NONEQUILIBRIUM SULFUR CAPTURE AND RETENTION IN AN AIR COOLED SLAGGING COAL COMBUSTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dr. Bert Zauderer

    1999-01-01

    Calcium oxide injected in a slagging combustor reacts with the sulfur from coal combustion to form sulfur-bearing particles. They are deposited on the liquid slag layer on the combustor wall. Due to the low solubility of sulfur in slag, slag must be rapidly drained from the combustor to limit sulfur gas re-evolution. Analysis indicated that slag mass flow rates in excess of 400 lb/hr should limit sulfur re-evolution. The objective of this 42-month project was to perform a series of tests to determine the factors that control the retention of the sulfur in the slag. 36 days of testing on the combustor were completed prior to the end of this reporting period, 12/31/98. This compares with 16 tests required in the original project plan. Combustor tests in early 1997 with high (37%) ash, Indian coal confirmed that high slag mass flow rates of about 500 lb/hr resulted in retention in the slag of up to 20% of the injected sulfur content mineral matter. To further increase the slag flow rate, rice husks, which contain 20% ash, and rice husk char, which contain 70% ash, were co-fired with coal in the combustor. A series of 13 combustor tests were performed in fourth quarter of 1997 and a further 6 tests were performed in January 1998 and in the summer of 1998. The test objective was to achieve slag flow rates between 500 and 1,000 lb/hr. Due to the very low bulk density of rice husk, compared to pulverized coal, almost the entire test effort focused on developing methods for feeding the rice husks into combustor. In the last test of December 1997, a peak mineral matter, injection rate of 592 lb/hr was briefly achieved by injection of coal, rice husk char, gypsum, and limestone into the combustor. However, no significant sulfur concentration was measured in the slag removed from the combustor. The peak injection rate reached with biomass in the 1997 tests was 310 lb/hr with rice husk, and 584 lb/hr with rice husk char

  20. Application of aluminum slag incorporated in lightweigh aggregate; Utilizacao da escoria de aluminio na fabricacao de argila expandida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Elisa Akiko Nakano

    2006-07-01

    The use of industrial waste materials as additives in the manufacture of ceramic product has been attracting a growing interest in the last few years and is becoming common practice. The main purpose of this work is to evaluate the possibility of incorporation of aluminum slag into clay materials. Expansive clays are obtained from a pyro plastic expansion, and are usually employed like lightweight aggregate in structural concrete as ornamental garden products. The characterization of the aluminum slag and clay materials was carried out by Xray fluorescence spectrometry, Xray diffraction, granulometry, differential thermal analysis, thermal gravimetry (DTA and TG) and scanning electron microscopy. The studied compositions contained 5, 10, 15 and 20 weight % of aluminum slag into clay mass. The linear expansion, mass variation, apparent specific mass and water absorption of all compositions were determined. Leaching and solubilization experiments were also performed. The main results show the viability of using up to 5 wt% aluminum slag for producing expansive clays with characteristics within the accepted standards. (author)

  1. Rheological Characterization of Warm-Modified Asphalt Mastics Containing Electric Arc Furnace Steel Slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pasetto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The environmental sustainability of road materials and technologies plays a key role in pavement engineering. In this sense, the use of Warm Mix Asphalt (WMA, that is, a modified asphalt concrete that can be produced and applied at lower temperature, is considered an effective solution leading to environmental and operational benefits. The environmental sustainability of WMA can be further enhanced with the inclusion of steel slag in partial substitution of natural aggregates. Nevertheless, such innovative material applied at lower temperatures containing warm additives and steel slag should be able to guarantee at least the same performance of traditional hot mix asphalts, thus assuring acceptable mechanical properties and durability. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the rheological behaviour of bituminous mastics obtained combining a warm-modified binder and a filler (material passing to 0.063 mm coming from electric arc furnace steel slag. To evaluate the influence of both warm additive and steel slag, a plain binder and limestone filler were also used for comparison purposes. Complex modulus and permanent deformation resistance of bitumens and mastics were assessed using a dynamic shear rheometer. Experimental results showed that steel slag warm mastics assure enhanced performance demonstrating promising applicability.

  2. Overview of Steel Slag Application and Utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant quantities of steel slag are generated as waste material or byproduct every day from steel industries. Slag is produced from different types of furnaces with different operating conditions. Slag contains Ferrous Oxide, Calcium Oxide, Silica etc. Physical and chemical properties of slag are affected by different methods of slag solidification such as air cooled, steam, and injection of additives. Several material characterization methods, such as X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Scanned Electron Microscopy (SEM and Inductive Coupled Plasma (ICP-OES are used to determine elemental composition in the steel slag. Therefore, slags can become one of the promising materials in various applications such as in transportation industry, construction, cement production, waste water and water treatment. The various applications of steel slag indicate that it can be reused and utilized rather than being disposed to the landfill. This paper presents a review of its applications and utilization.

  3. Slag-based saltstone formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    Approximately 400 x 10 6 liters of low-level alkaline salt solution will be treated at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) prior to disposal in concrete vaults at SRP. Treatment involves removal of CS + and Sr +2 followed by solidification and stabilization of potential contaminants in saltstone, a hydrated ceramic waste form. Chromium, technetium, and nitrate releases from saltstone can be significantly reduced by substituting hydraulic blast furnace slag for portland cement in the formulation designs. Slag-based mixes are also compatible with Class F fly ash used in saltstone as a functional extender to control heat of hydration and reduce permeability. A monolithic waste form is produced by the hydration of the slag and fly ash. Soluble ion release (NO 3 - ) is controlled by the saltstone microstructure. Chromium and technetium are less leachable from slag mixes compared to cement-based waste forms because these species are chemically reduced to a lower valence state by ferrous iron in the slag and precipitated as relatively insoluble phases, such as CR(OH) 3 and TcO 2 . 5 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  4. Slag-based saltstone formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.A.

    1987-08-01

    Approximately 400 x 10 6 L of low-level alkaline salt solution will be treated at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) prior to disposal in concrete vaults at SRP. Treatment involves removal of Cs + and Sr +2 , followed by solidification and stabilization of potential contaminants in saltstone, a hydrated ceramic wasteform. Chromium, technetium, and nitrate releases from saltstone can be significantly reduced by substituting hydraulic blast furnace slag for portland cement in the formulation designs. Slag-based mixes are also compatible with the Class F flyash used in saltstone as a functional extender to control heat of hydration and reduce permeability. (Class F flyash is also locally available at SRP.) A monolithic wasteform is produced by the hydration of the slag and flyash. Soluble ion release (NO 3- ) is controlled by the saltstone microstructure. Chromium and technetium are less leachable from slag mixes because these species are chemically reduced to a lower valence state by ferrous iron in the slag and are precipitated as relatively insoluble phases, such as Cr(OH) 3 and TcO 2 . 3 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Geochemistry, environmental and provenance study of the Middle Miocene Leitha limestones (Central Paratethys)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmed; Wagreich, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Mineralogical, major, minor, REE and trace element analyses of rock samples were performed on Middle Miocene limestones (Leitha limestones, Badenian) collected from four localities from Austria (Mannersdorf, Wöllersdorf, Kummer and Rosenberg quarries) and the Fertőrákos quarry in Hungary. Impure to pure limestones (i.e. limited by Al2O3 contents above or below 0.43 wt. %) were tested to evaluate the applicability of various geochemical proxies and indices in regard to provenance and palaeoenvironmental interpretations. Pure and impure limestones from Mannersdorf and Wöllersdorf (southern Vienna Basin) show signs of detrital input (REEs = 27.6 ± 9.8 ppm, Ce anomaly = 0.95 ± 0.1 and the presence of quartz, muscovite and clay minerals in impure limestones) and diagenetic influence (low contents of, e.g., Sr = 221 ± 49 ppm, Na is not detected, Ba = 15.6 ± 8.8 ppm in pure limestones). Thus, in both limestones the reconstruction of original sedimentary palaeoenvironments by geochemistry is hampered. The Kummer and Fertőrákos (Eisenstadt-Sopron Basin) comprise pure limestones (e.g., averages Sr = 571 ± 139 ppm, Na = 213 ± 56 ppm, Ba = 21 ± 4 ppm, REEs = 16 ± 3 ppm and Ce anomaly = 0.62 ± 0.05 and composed predominantly of calcite) exhibiting negligible diagenesis. Deposition under a shallow-water, well oxygenated to intermittent dysoxic marine environment can be reconstructed. Pure to impure limestones at Rosenberg-Retznei (Styrian Basin) are affected to some extent by detrital input and volcano-siliciclastic admixture. The Leitha limestones at Rosenberg have the least diagenetic influence among the studied localities (i.e. averages Sr = 1271 ± 261 ppm, Na = 315 ± 195 ppm, Ba = 32 ± 15 ppm, REEs = 9.8 ± 4.2 ppm and Ce anomaly = 0.77 ± 0.1 and consist of calcite, minor dolomite and quartz). The siliciclastic sources are characterized by immobile elemental ratios (i.e. La/Sc and Th/Co) which apply not only for the siliciclastics, but also for marls and

  6. Geochemistry, environmental and provenance study of the Middle Miocene Leitha limestones (Central Paratethys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ahmed

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Mineralogical, major, minor, REE and trace element analyses of rock samples were performed on Middle Miocene limestones (Leitha limestones, Badenian collected from four localities from Austria (Mannersdorf, Wöllersdorf, Kummer and Rosenberg quarries and the Fertőrákos quarry in Hungary. Impure to pure limestones (i.e. limited by Al2O3 contents above or below 0.43 wt. % were tested to evaluate the applicability of various geochemical proxies and indices in regard to provenance and palaeoenvironmental interpretations. Pure and impure limestones from Mannersdorf and Wöllersdorf (southern Vienna Basin show signs of detrital input (REEs = 27.6 ± 9.8 ppm, Ce anomaly = 0.95 ± 0.1 and the presence of quartz, muscovite and clay minerals in impure limestones and diagenetic influence (low contents of, e.g., Sr = 221 ± 49 ppm, Na is not detected, Ba = 15.6 ± 8.8 ppm in pure limestones. Thus, in both limestones the reconstruction of original sedimentary palaeoenvironments by geochemistry is hampered. The Kummer and Fertőrákos (Eisenstadt–Sopron Basin comprise pure limestones (e.g., averages Sr = 571 ± 139 ppm, Na = 213 ± 56 ppm, Ba = 21 ± 4 ppm, REEs = 16 ± 3 ppm and Ce anomaly = 0.62 ± 0.05 and composed predominantly of calcite exhibiting negligible diagenesis. Deposition under a shallow-water, well oxygenated to intermittent dysoxic marine environment can be reconstructed. Pure to impure limestones at Rosenberg–Retznei (Styrian Basin are affected to some extent by detrital input and volcano-siliciclastic admixture. The Leitha limestones at Rosenberg have the least diagenetic influence among the studied localities (i.e. averages Sr = 1271 ± 261 ppm, Na = 315 ± 195 ppm, Ba = 32 ± 15 ppm, REEs = 9.8 ± 4.2 ppm and Ce anomaly = 0.77 ± 0.1 and consist of calcite, minor dolomite and quartz. The siliciclastic sources are characterized by immobile elemental ratios (i.e. La/Sc and Th/Co which apply not only for the siliciclastics, but also

  7. Properties of slag concrete for low-level waste containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.A.; Wong, P.B.

    1991-01-01

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag was incorporated in the concrete mix used for construction of low-level radioactive waste disposal vaults. The vaults were constructed as six 100 x 100 x 25 ft cells with each cell sharing internal walls with the two adjacent cells. The vaults were designed to contain a low-level radioactive wasteform called saltstone and to isolate the saltstone from the environment until the landfill is closed. Closure involves backfilling with native soil, installation of clay cap, and run-off control. The design criteria for the slag-substituted concrete included compressive strength, 4000 psi after 28 days; slump, 6 inch; permeability, less than 10 -7 cm/sec; and effective nitrate, chromium and technetium diffusivities of 10 -8 , 10 -12 and 10 -12 cm 2 /sec, respectively. The reducing capacity of the slag resulted in chemically reducing Cr +6 to Cr +3 and Tc +7 to Tc +4 and subsequent precipitation of the respective hydroxides in the alkaline pore solution. Consequently, the concrete vault enhances containment of otherwise mobile waste ions and contributes to the overall protection of the groundwater at the disposal site

  8. Limestone valib eetilisi firmasid / Virge Lahe

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lahe, Virge

    2008-01-01

    Endised Hansapanga investeerimisfondide analüütikud hakkavad läbi Limestone fondide pakkuma sotsiaalselt vastutustundlikku investeerimist (Socially Responsible Investing). Kommenteerivad Art Lukas ja Silver Vohu. Vt. samas: Limestone Investment Management AS

  9. clay nanocomposites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present work deals with the synthesis of specialty elastomer [fluoroelastomer and poly (styrene--ethylene-co-butylene--styrene (SEBS)]–clay nanocomposites and their structure–property relationship as elucidated from morphology studies by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray ...

  10. CALCIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION RATE IN LIMESTONE CONTACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rate of carbonate mineral dissolution from limestone was studied using a rotating disk apparatus and samples of limestone of varied composition. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone composition on the kinetics of carbonate mineral dissolution. Th...

  11. performance of steel slag performance of steel slag as fine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Suitability of using steel slag (SS) as substitute for sand in concrete was ... The strength of SS concrete increased with increase in proporti. 10 mm. .... additives used. All other oxides ..... low lime coal fly ash in foamed concrete”, Fuel, Vol. 84,.

  12. Slags in steel making; Kuonat teraeksen valmistuksessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haerkki, J; Paeaetalo, M; Karhu, P; Jauhiainen, A; Alamaeki, P; Koski-Laine, S; Ollila, J [Oulu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Process Engineering

    1997-12-31

    At the first step of the project all stages of the steelmaking processes were viewed from the blast furnace to the continuous casting. Slag knowledge of each processes were collected into a guide, which is meant to help both production and research. At the same time the essential problems caused by slags in steelmaking were focused. At the second step the focus of this slag-project were transferred into the desulphurization, converter, ladle and tundish slags. Wide slag knowledge has been divided into smaller parts and applied versatile into the steelmaking process taking into account the metallurgical, economical and qualitative aspects. (orig.) SULA 2 Research Programme; 13 refs.

  13. Slags in steel making; Kuonat teraeksen valmistuksessa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haerkki, J.; Paeaetalo, M.; Karhu, P.; Jauhiainen, A.; Alamaeki, P.; Koski-Laine, S.; Ollila, J. [Oulu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Process Engineering

    1996-12-31

    At the first step of the project all stages of the steelmaking processes were viewed from the blast furnace to the continuous casting. Slag knowledge of each processes were collected into a guide, which is meant to help both production and research. At the same time the essential problems caused by slags in steelmaking were focused. At the second step the focus of this slag-project were transferred into the desulphurization, converter, ladle and tundish slags. Wide slag knowledge has been divided into smaller parts and applied versatile into the steelmaking process taking into account the metallurgical, economical and qualitative aspects. (orig.) SULA 2 Research Programme; 13 refs.

  14. Study on cementitious properties of steel slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu G.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The converter steel slag chemical and mineral components in China’s main steel plants have been analysed in the present paper. The electronic microscope, energy spectrum analysis, X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the main mineral compositions in the converter slag. Converter slag of different components were grounded to obtain a powder with specific surface area over 400m2/kg, making them to take place some part of the cement in the concrete as the admixture and carry out the standard tests. The results indicate that the converter slag can be used as cementitious materials for construction. Furthermore, physical mechanic and durability tests on the concrete that certain amount of cement be substituted by converter steel slag powder from different steel plants are carried out, the results show that the concrete with partial substitution of steel slag powder has the advantages of higher later period strength, better frost resistance, good wear resistance and lower hydration heat, etc. This study can be used as the technical basis for “Steel Slag Powder Used For Cement And Concrete”, “Steel Slag Portland Cement”, “Low Heat Portland Steel Slag Cement”, “Steel Slag Road Cement” in China, as well as a driving force to the works of steel slag utilization with high-value addition, circular economy, energy conservation and discharge reduction in the iron and steel industry.

  15. Effects of body formulation and firing temperature to properties of ceramic tile incorporated with electric arc furnace (EAF) slag waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Nurulakmal Mohd; Lim, Chi Yang; Teo, Pao Ter; Seman, Anasyida Abu

    2017-07-01

    Significant quantities of sludge and slag are generated as waste materials or by-products from steel industries. One of the by-products is Electric Arc Furnace (EAF) steel slag which consists of oxides such as CaO, Al2O3 and FeO. This makes it possible for slag to partially replace the raw materials in ceramic tile production. In our preliminary assessment of incorporating the EAF slag into ceramic tile, it was revealed that at fixed firing temperature of 1150°C, the tile of composition 40 wt.% EAF slag - 60 wt.% ball clay has comparable properties with commercial ceramic tile. Thus, this current study would focus on effects of body formulation (different weight percentages of K-feldspar and silica) and different firing temperatures to properties of EAF slag added ceramic tile. EAF slag from Southern Steel Berhad (SSB) was crushed into micron size (EAF slag content was 40 wt.%) and milled with ball clay, K-feldspar and silica before compacted and fired at 1125°C and 1150°C. The EAF slag added tile was characterized in terms of water absorption, apparent porosity, bulk density, modulus of rupture (MOR) and phase analysis via X-ray diffraction (XRD). The composition of 40 wt.% EAF slag - 30 wt.% ball clay - 10 wt.% K-feldspar - 20 wt.% silica (10F_20S), fired at 1150°C showed the lowest water absorption, apparent porosity and highest bulk density due to enhancement of densification process during firing. However, the same composition of ceramic tile (10F_20S) had the highest MOR at lower firing temperature of 1125°C, contributed by presence of the highest total amount of anorthite and wollastonite reinforcement crystalline phases (78.40 wt.%) in the tile. Overall, both the water absorption and MOR of all ceramic tiles surpassed the requirement regulated by MS ISO 13006:2014 Standard (Annex G: Dry-pressed ceramic tile with low water absorption, Eb ≤ 0.50 % and minimum MOR of 35 MPa).

  16. Mixture of industrial waste oxidized titanium and reduced slag from electric furnace used as hydraulic material. Denkiro kangen slug to sanka titan kogyo haikibutsu no kongobutsu no suinan zairyo to shiteno riyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honda, A [Osaka City University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Kuwayama, T [Daido Institute of Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Yamada, M; Ikezaki, H [Osaka City University, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1990-10-29

    Slag released from an electric furnace consists mainly of waste steel. There are two types of slag, namely, oxidized slag and reduced slag. Reduced slag, which is generally in the form of powder, is difficult to recycle as compared with oxidized slag. However, with a hydraulicity, some reduced slag is expected to be useful as hydraulic material. Test results obtained here show that the hydraulic properties of reduced slag powder can be improved by mixing it with gypsum and that the resultant mixture can serve to improve the prooperties of soft clay. Another study is made to determine the potential, as hydraulic material, of mixtures of reduced slag powder and waste gypsum material with a high gypsum content released from an oxidized titanium production process. The hydraulicity is found to develop as a result of the formation of a hydrate of calcium aluminate which is contained in the slag. Addition of water to the hydrate and gypsum cause the formation of ettringite, leading to an increased uniaxial compressive strength. These findings indicate that the above-mentioned mixture can be useful to improve the hydraulic properties of coal ash to be disposed of at landfill sites. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Incorporation of ladle furnace slag in ceramic formulations: study of extrusion zones; Incorporacao da escoria do forno panela em formulacao ceramica: estudo das zonas de extrusao

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feitosa, E.F.; Santana, C.M.; Luna, D.S.; Santos, D.M.S.; Silva, G.S.; Noleto, L.T.; Almeida, N.C.; Rabelo, A.A.; Fagury Neto, E., E-mail: edna.fernandes48@gmail.com, E-mail: fagury@unifesspa.edu.br [Universidade Federal do Sul e Sudeste do Para (UNIFESSPA), Maraba, PA (Brazil). Instituto de Geociencias e Engenharias

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of incorporation of ladle furnace slag (LFS) in two clays with higher and lower plasticity, used for the manufacture of structural ceramics. The LFS from a local steel making plant was added to ceramic compositions in proportions of 8 %, 14 % and 16 %. The formulations were tested in appropriate equipment that measures the liquid limit and plastic limit. The property examined was the plasticity index, in order to make a study of the extrusion zones. Results showed that the addition of slag into clay mixtures alters the plasticity; however, the extrusion process was not hampered. (author)

  18. Large scale sodium interactions. Part 3. Chemical phenomena with limestone concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sallach, R.A.

    1977-01-01

    The description of the chemical processes and reaction products resulting from the exposure of concrete to molten sodium metal is important for a thorough, realistic assessment of the safety of CRBR-type reactors. Concretes are in general complex heterogenous substances whose ingredients can be derived from many sources. Consequently a wide variety of reaction processes and products might be anticipated. Initial attention has focused on a concrete in which both the aggregate and sandy components are derived from limestone. Presented are the chemical observations and experimental data from tests in which molten sodium metal at approximately 500 0 C is dropped into cold limestone concrete crucibles. Thermocouples immersed in the sodium pool indicate that the reaction proceeds in two stages. In the first stage which lasts 5 to 8 minutes, the temperature of the reacting mass hovers around 500 0 C. This stage is followed by a second stage of longer duration--greater than 100 minutes--where the temperature is 700 to 800 0 C. The main reaction product is a hard, fused, black slag which contains about 3/4 of the sodium in the initial charge. A secondary product is sodium oxide aerosol which accounts for the remaining 1/4 of the charge. It is significant that no free sodium metal is found in the slag; all sodium has completely reacted

  19. Steel desulphurization with synthetic slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heput, T.

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Generally speaking, sulphur is considered a harmful element for steel quality, reason why all the technological steps are being taken in order to eliminate it from the metal bath. This paper deals with the influence of the chemical composition, on the slag quantity and of the bath stirring condition upon the desulphurization process in the casting ladle by treatment with synthetic slag. The experiments were made at an open-hearth plant with the steel tapping in two ladles (the desulphurization was made with synthetic slag at one ladle while the other one was considered standard and at the electric steel plant and for the synthetic slag formation a mix was used, made, according to several receipts, of: lime (50-75%, fluorine (0-17%, bauxite (0-32% and aluminous slag (8-22%. The data were processed in the calculation programs EXCEL and MATLAB, which resulted in a series of correlations between the desulphurization degree and the chemical composition of the slag, respectively the slag quantity both for the charges bubbled with Argon and the unbubbled ones.

    En general, el azufre es considerado un elemento nocivo para la calidad del acero y, por eso, en la práctica, se toman todas las medidas de orden tecnológico para su eliminación del baño metálico. En este trabajo se analiza la influencia de la composición química, de la cantidad de escoria y del estado de agitación del baño sobre el proceso de desulfuración en la cuchara para fundir por tratamiento con escoria sintética. Los experimentos se han realizado en una acería evacuando el acero en dos ollas (en una cuchara se efectuó la desulfuración con escoria sintética y a la otra se consideró como patrón y en un acería eléctrica y para la formación de la escoria sintética se utilizó una mezcla producida según muchas recetas, formada por: cal (50-75%, fluorina (0-17%, bauxita (0-32% y escoria aluminosa (8-22%. Los datos han sido procesados en los programas de c

  20. NEW TECHNOLOGY OF ASH AND SLAG CONCRETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAVLENKO T. M.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Purpose. Development of scientific-technical bases of manufacture and application of concrete on the basis of ash and slag mixes of thermal power plants. Methods. It is proposed a new technology of preparation of ash and slag concrete mixes. First the ash and slag mix is dispersed through the sieve with meshes 5 mm in a fine-grained fraction and slag. Then, in accordance with the composition of the concrete, obtained fine-grained fraction, slag, cement and tempering water are separately dosed into the mixer. Results. It is proven the high efficiency of the proposed technology of manufacture of ash and slag concretes. It is established that this technological solution allows to increase the strength of concrete by 20...30%, and in the preparation of full-strength concrete to reduce the cement consumption by 15...20%. Scientific novelty. It is developed the new technology of ash and slag mixes application. The concrete mix on the basis of ash and slag mix has an optimal particle size distribution, which ensures the best compaction and, accordingly, the greatest strength of ash and slag concrete with the given cement consumption. Practical significance. The research results promote the mass application of ash and slag mixes of thermal power plants in construction, obtaining of products from the proposed concretes of low cost with high physical-mechanical properties. Conclusion. It is proven the high efficiency of the proposed technology of production of ash and slag concretes. It is established that this technological solution allows increasing concrete strength, and obtaining full-strength concrete to reduce cement consumption. The extensive application of such concrete in construction makes it possible to solve the problem of aggregates for concrete, promotes recycling of TPP waste and consequently the protection of the environment.

  1. Novel sintered ceramic materials incorporated with EAF carbon steel slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannis, V.; Ntampegliotis, K.; Lamprakopoulos, S.; Papapolymerou, G.; Spiliotis, X.

    2017-01-01

    In the present research, novel sintered clay-based ceramic materials containing electric arc furnace carbon steel slag (EAFC) as a useful admixture were developed and characterized. The environmentally safe management of steel industry waste by-products and their valorization as secondary resources into value-added materials towards circular economy have attracted much attention in the last years. EAF Carbon steel slag in particular, is generated during the manufacture of carbon steel. It is a solid residue mainly composed of rich-in- Fe, Ca and Si compounds. The experimental results show that the beneficial incorporation of lower percentages of EAFC up to 6%wt. into ceramics sintered at 950 °C is attained without significant variations in sintering behavior and physico-mechanical properties. Further heating up to 1100 °C strongly enhances the densification of the ceramic microstructures, thus reducing the porosity and strengthening their mechanical performance. On the other side, in terms of thermal insulation behavior as well as energy consumption savings and production cost alleviation, the optimum sintering temperature appears to be 950 °C.

  2. The use of blast furnace slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Václavík

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of experimental research that dealt with the substitution of finely ground blast furnace slag for Portland cement in the course of simple concrete manufacturing. Physical and mechanical properties of experimental concrete mixtures based on finely ground blast furnace slag were observed.

  3. Leaching of heavy metals from steelmaking slags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, J. F. P.; Pino, C. G.

    2006-01-01

    Leaching tests with EAF and Ladle slags were performed, using a flow through tests and the standard batch test DIN 38414-S4. The previous method was used to simulate the leaching behaviour of steel slags under landfill. the chemical analysis of the leachates during this period shows, in general, for both types of slag, and increase of heavy metal releases with ageing. Standard test method DIN 38414-S4 was used to evaluate leachability of heavy metals by water in unprocessed slags. After more than one year of trials, slang samples submitted to these trials presented very low total leaching levels. The most extracted elements are calcium and magnesium. Nevertheless, in flow-though test, calcium and magnesium leached from solid slags are below 0.5% and all other metals below 0.1%. Leachates obtained with DIN 38414-S4 present, as expected, higher leaching values; however, these are inferior to 5% (Ca) and 1% (other elements). (Author) 12 refs

  4. Mechanism of Selenium Loss in Copper Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Bhavin; Tathavadkar, Vilas; Basu, Somnath

    2018-06-01

    During smelting of copper sulfide concentrate, selenium is distributed between silica-saturated iron-silicate slag and copper-iron sulfide matte. The recovery coefficients of selenium between slag and matte were determined as a function of the initial concentration of selenium at 1523 K (1250 °C) under an inert atmosphere in a vertical tubular furnace. The initial concentration of selenium was varied by the addition of metallic selenium as well as selenium dioxide to the mixture of slag and matte. Analysis of the results indicated high affinity of selenium for matte. The apparent loss of selenium with the slag was attributed to the presence of selenium-enriched matte particles entrapped in the slag, rather than dissolved SeO2. The mechanisms proposed by previous investigators were discussed and also compared with the results of the present investigation.

  5. Mechanism of Selenium Loss in Copper Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Bhavin; Tathavadkar, Vilas; Basu, Somnath

    2018-03-01

    During smelting of copper sulfide concentrate, selenium is distributed between silica-saturated iron-silicate slag and copper-iron sulfide matte. The recovery coefficients of selenium between slag and matte were determined as a function of the initial concentration of selenium at 1523 K (1250 °C) under an inert atmosphere in a vertical tubular furnace. The initial concentration of selenium was varied by the addition of metallic selenium as well as selenium dioxide to the mixture of slag and matte. Analysis of the results indicated high affinity of selenium for matte. The apparent loss of selenium with the slag was attributed to the presence of selenium-enriched matte particles entrapped in the slag, rather than dissolved SeO2. The mechanisms proposed by previous investigators were discussed and also compared with the results of the present investigation.

  6. Agronomic Use of Basic Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Oliveiri de Nobile

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern civilization, in recent years, has increased the requirement of products derived from iron and steel, stimulating the growth of the national siderurgical sector and, consequently, the generation of industrial residue called basic slag. In this context, the recycling of residues can contribute to solve problems of the industries that give priority to the excellence of the production with quality. On the other hand, there is a sector of primary production in Brazil, the agriculture, with a great cultivated area in acid ground and with low fertility, being these factors admittedly determinative for vegetal production, under tropical conditions. Thus, there is a scenery of two primary sectors of production, although distinct ones, that present interaction potential, for , on one hand, there is disponibility of a product with similar properties to the liming materials and traditional fertilizers and, on the other hand, a production sector that is highly dependent of these products. And the interaction between these two sectors helps in the preservation of the environment, bringing, thus, a certain sustainability in the production systems of the postmodern civilization that will be the challenge of this new century. Considering the current possibility of recycling these industrial residues in agriculture, three important factors have to be taken into account. The first would be the proper use of the abundant, available and promising industrial residue; the second, in a propitious agricultural environment, acid soil and low fertility; and third, in a responsive and important socio-economic culture, the sugar cane, considering its vast cultivated area. In national literature, few works have dealt with the use of the basic slag and have evaluated the reply of the cultures to its application. Thus, the present work had as its aim to gather information from literature concerning the characterization and production of basic slag in Brazil, as well

  7. Processing and utilization of metallurgical slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Pribulová

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metallurgy and foundry industry create a huge amount of slags that are by-products in production of pig iron, steel and cast iron. Slag is produced in a very large amount in pyrometallurgical processes, and is a huge source of waste if not properly recycled and utilized. With rapid growth of industrialization, land available for land-filling of large quantity of metallurgical slag is being reduced all over the world and disposal cost is becoming increasingly higher. Metallurgical slag from different metallurgical processes treated and utilized in different ways based on different slag characteristics. The most economic and efficient option for reducing metallurgical waste is through recycling, which is a significant contribution to saving natural resources and reducing CO2 emissions. Characteristic of slags as well as its treatment and utilization are given in the paper. Slag from pig iron and steel production is used most frequently in building industry. From experiments using blast furnace slag and granulated blast furnace slag as gravel, and water glass as binder it can be concluded that that the best results – the best values of compression strength and tensile strength were reached by using of 18% of water glass as a solidification activating agent. According to cubic compression strength, mixture from 50% blast furnace gravel, 50% granulated blast furnace slag and 18% water glass falls into C35/45 class of concrete. Such concrete also fulfils strength requirements for road concrete, moreover, it even exceeds them considerably and, therefore, it can find an application in construction of road communications or in production of concrete slabs.

  8. Preparation of novel ceramics with high CaO content from steel slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Lihua; Li, Yu; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Cang, Daqiang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Efficiently utilize such solid waste with high CaO content. • A novel ceramics was put forward by traditional ceramic process. • The novel ceramics attained high strength. • Sintering mechanisms of the novel ceramics were discussed. - Abstract: Steel slag, an industrial waste discharged from steelmaking process, cannot be extensively used in traditional aluminosilicate based ceramics manufacturing for its high content of calcium oxide. In order to efficiently utilize such solid waste, a method of preparing ceramics with high CaO content was put forward. In this paper, steel slag in combination with quartz, talcum, clay and feldspar was converted to a novel ceramic by traditional ceramic process. The sintering mechanism, microstructure and performances were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques, combined experimenting of linear shrinkage, water absorption and flexural strength. The results revealed that all crystal phases in the novel ceramic were pyroxene group minerals, including diopsite ferrian, augite and diopsite. Almost all raw materials including quartz joined the reaction and transformed into pyroxene or glass phase in the sintering process, and different kinds of clays and feldspars had no impact on the final crystal phases. Flexural strength of the ceramic containing 40 wt.% steel slag in raw materials can reach 143 MPa at sintering temperature of 1210 °C and its corresponding water absorption, weight loss, linear shrinkage were 0.02%, 8.8%, 6.0% respectively. Pyroxene group minerals in ceramics would contribute to the excellent physical and mechanical properties

  9. Gravitational segregation of liquid slag in large ladle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The process of gravitational segregation makes liquid steel slag components occur differentiation. And it shows that the upper part slag in the slag ladle contains higher CaO; and the lower part slag contains higher SiO2. The content of MgO (5,48 % in the upper part slag is higher than that of the lower part (2,50 %, and only Al2O3 content of the upper and the lower part slag is close to each other. The difference of chemical compositions in the slag ladle shows that there is gravitational segregation during slow solidification of liquid steel slag, which will has some impact of the steel slag processing on the large slag ladle.

  10. Uranium recovery from slags of metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornarolo, F.; Frajndlich, E.U.C.; Durazzo, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Center of the Nuclear Fuel of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research - IPEN finished the program of attainment of fuel development for research reactors the base of Uranium Scilicet (U 3 Si 2 ) from Hexafluoride of Uranium (UF 6 ) with enrichment 20% in weight of 235 U. In the process of attainment of the league of U 3 Si 2 we have as Uranium intermediate product the metallic one whose attainment generates a slag contend Uranium. The present work shows the results gotten in the process of recovery of Uranium in slags of calcined slags of Uranium metallic. Uranium the metallic one is unstable, pyrophoricity and extremely reactive, whereas the U 3 O 8 is a steady oxide of low chemical reactivity, what it justifies the process of calcination of slags of Uranium metallic. The calcination of the Uranium slag of the metallic one in oxygen presence reduces Uranium metallic the U 3 O 8 . Experiments had been developed varying it of acid for Uranium control and excess, nitric molar concentration gram with regard to the stoichiometric leaching reaction of temperature of the leaching process. The 96,0% income proves the viability of the recovery process of slags of Uranium metallic, adopting it previous calcination of these slags in nitric way with low acid concentration and low temperature of leaching. (author)

  11. A numerical model for chemical reaction on slag layer surface and slag layer behavior in entrained-flow gasifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper concerns with slag layer accumulation, chemical reaction on slag layer surface, and slag layer flow, heat and mass transfer on the wall of entrained-flow coal gasifier. A slag layer model is developed to simulate slag layer behaviors in the coal gasifier. This 3-D model can predict temperature, slag particle disposition rate, disposition particle composition, and syngas distribution in the gasifier hearth. The model is used to evaluate the effects of O2/coal ratio on slag layer behaviors.

  12. Glassy slag from rotary hearth vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschenbach, R.C.; Simpson, M.D.; Paulson, W.S.; Whitworth, C.G.

    1995-01-01

    Use of a Plasma Arc Centrifugal Treatment (PACT) system for treating mixed wastes containing significant quantities of soil results in formation of a glassy slag which melts at significantly higher temperatures than the borosilicate glasses. The slag typically contains mostly crystalline material, frequently in an amorphous matrix, thus the appellation open-quotes glassy slag.close quotes Details of the PACT process are given. The process will be used for treating buried wastes from Pit 9 at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and low-level mixed wastes from nuclear power plants in Switzerland. Properties of the slag after cooling to room temperature are reported, in particular the Product Consistency Test, for a number of different feedstocks. In almost all cases, the results compare favorably with conventional borosilicate glasses. In the PACT system, a transferred arc carries current from the plasma torch to a rotating molten bed of slag, which is the material being heated. Thus this transferred arc adds energy where it is needed - at and near the surface of the molten bath. Material is fed into the furnace through a sealed feeder, and falls into a rotating tub which is heated by the arc. Any organic material is quickly vaporized into the space above the slag bed and burned by the oxygen in the furnace. Metal oxides in the charge are melted into the slag. Metal in the feed tends to melt and collect as a separate phase underneath the slag, but can be oxidized if desired. When oxidized, it unites with other constituents forming a homogeneous slag

  13. Effective stress law for the permeability and deformation of four porous limestones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Meng, F.; Wang, X.; Baud, P.; Wong, T. F.

    2017-12-01

    The effective stress behavior of a rock is related to the geometric of its pore space. In a microscopically homogeneous assemblage, effective stress coefficients for permeability, volumetric strain and porosity change are predicted to be equal to or less than unity. Experimental measurements are in basic agreement with this prediction, with exceptions particularly in clay-rich sandstones, for which effective stress coefficient for permeability up to 7 was documented. Little is known about carbonates, but Ghabezloo et al. [2009] studied the permeability of an oolitic limestone (from Nimes, France) with 17% porosity and reported effective stress coefficients up to 2.4. We investigated this phenomenon in Indiana, Leitha, Purbeck, and Thala limestones with porosities of 13-30%. Measurements were made at room temperature on water-saturated samples at confining and pore pressures of 7-15 MPa and 1-3 MPa, respectively. Unlike previous studies limited to the permeability, we also determined the effective stress coefficients for volumetric strain and porosity change. Indiana limestone is oolitic, and not surprisingly its behaviour was similar to Nimes limestone, with an effective stress coefficient for permeability of 2.5. Our Indiana limestone data showed that whereas the effective stress coefficient for volumetric strain was 1. Measurements on Purbeck and Thala limestones are consistent with these inequalities, with effective stress coefficients for permeability and porosity change >1 and that for volumetric strain <1. Even though Purbeck and Thala limestones are micritic with appreciable amount of quartz and dolomite, microstructural and mercury porosimetry data showed that their pore spaces are similar to the oolitic limestones, in that the pore size distribution is bimodal with significant fractions of both macropores and micropores. Berryman [1992] analyzed theoretically a rock made up of two porous constituents. Our new data are in agreement with inequalities he

  14. Uranium recovery from AVLIS slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Agostino, A.E.; Mycroft, J.R.; Oliver, A.J.; Schneider, P.G.; Richardson, K.L.

    2000-01-01

    Uranium metal for the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) project was to have been produced by the magnesiothermic reduction of uranium tetrafluoride. The other product from this reaction is a magnesium fluoride slag, which contains fine and entrained natural uranium as metal and oxide. Recovery of the uranium through conventional mill leaching would not give a magnesium residue free of uranium but to achieve more complete uranium recovery requires the destruction of the magnesium fluoride matrix and liberation of the entrapped uranium. Alternate methods of carrying out such treatments and the potential for recovery of other valuable byproducts were examined. Based on the process flowsheets, a number of economic assessments were performed, conclusions were drawn and the preferred processing alternatives were identified. (author)

  15. The behavior limestone under explosive load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlov, M. Yu; Orlova, Yu N.; Bogomolov, G. N.

    2016-11-01

    Limestone behavior under explosive loading was investigated. The behavior of the limestone by the action of the three types of explosives, including granular, ammonite and emulsion explosives was studied in detail. The shape and diameter of the explosion craters were obtained. The observed fragments after the blast have been classified as large, medium and small fragments. Three full-scale experiments were carried out. The research results can be used as a qualitative test for the approbation of numerical methods.

  16. Thermal and sintering characterization of IGCC slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta, A.; Iglesias, I.; Aineto, M.; Romero, M.; Rincon, J.M. [University of Castilla La Mancha, Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2002-07-01

    IGCC slag is a vitreous residual product from the new induction gasification combined cycle gasification thermal power plants. In order to characterize this waste as secondary raw material for the production of glasses and glass-ceramics as construction materials, slag from the Puertollano, Ciudad Real, Spain power plants was thermally investigated. After controlled heating this waste gives rise to hematite, anorthite, and cristobalite crystallized materials.

  17. The use of steel slag in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martauz, P.; Vaclavik, V.; Cvopa, B.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the results of a research dealing with the use of unstable steel slag as a 100% substitute for natural aggregate in the production of concrete. Portland cement CEM I 42.5N and alkali activated hybrid cement H-CEMENT were used as the binder. The test results confirm the possibility to use steel slag as the filler in the production of concrete.

  18. Slags from steel production: Properties and their utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vlcek

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available During steel production a considerable amount of slags is produced. In addition to its usual processing, as recycling in device for steel production and preparation of aggregates, it is also possible to apply less common slag processing ways. Depending on cooling mode of the steel slags these may show some binding properties. Geopolymer type binders can be prepared from the slag using alkali activators or the hydraulic properties of the dicalciumsilicate present in the slag can be induced by water. The paper summarizes present state of material utilisation of the steel slags with focus on emphasize of the possible sources of the slag volume instability. The influence of process of slag cooling on its phase composition is documented. It was also found that slags from real sources show different parameters compared to samples obtained for laboratory examination.

  19. Acid slag injection into the blast furnace tuyere zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haerkki, J; Tervola, K [Oulu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Process Engineering

    1997-12-31

    The possibility of acid slag injection and its effect on the slag formation and on the melting behaviour of the charge materials are studied in the present work. The work is partly based on the literature evaluating the slag formation, slag properties and the basic slag injection. The possibility of acid slag injection is first examined by studying changes in the composition of the primary slag if the share of the acid slag component (Kostamus pellet/RR) of the charge material is lowered. Phase diagrams and viscosity charts are used to evaluate the viscosity, and solidus/liquidus temperature in the slag phase. The share of the slag phase of the pellet is evaluated by calculating the amount of the acid slag injection. The injection rate of some injectants is also examined. The primary slag formed of the sinter and the coke ash is in liquid form and its viscosity is close to the viscosity of the blast furnace slag. It is possible that the liquid slag phase can be formed in the blast furnace without the presence of the acid pellet because the melting point and the viscosity of the slag is lowered by alkalies, sulfur and the dissolved ironoxide of the slag. If high SiO{sub 2} content materials alone are used for injection there is a risk that the slag phase of the tuyere zone becomes too viscous. Olivine and some iron containing components such as fayalite are possible injection material. More information is needed to evaluate the effect of acid slag injection on the operation of the blast furnace. (orig.) SULA 2 Research Programme; 2 refs.

  20. Acid slag injection into the blast furnace tuyere zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tervola, K.; Haerkki, J.

    1996-12-31

    The possibility of acid slag injection and its effect on the slag formation and on the melting behaviour of the charge materials are studied in the present work. The work is partly based on the literature evaluating the slag formation, slag properties and the basic slag injection. The possibility of acid slag injection is first examined by studying changes in the composition of the primary slag if the share of the acid slag component (Kostamus pellet/RR) of the charge material is lowered. Phase diagrams and viscosity charts are used to evaluate the viscosity, and solidus/liquids temperature in the slag phase. The share of the slag phase of the pellet is evaluated by calculating the amount of the acid slag injection. The injection rate of some injectants is also examined. The primary slag formed of the sinter and the coke ash is in liquid form and its viscosity is close to the viscosity of the blast furnace slag. It is possible that the liquid slag phase can be formed in the blast furnace without the presence of the acid pellet because the melting point and the viscosity of the slag is lowered by alkalies, sulfur and the dissolved ironoxide of the slag. If high SiO{sub 2} content materials alone are used for injection there is a risk that the slag phase of the tuyere zone becomes too viscous. Olivine and some iron containing components such as fayalite are possible injection material. More information is needed to evaluate the effect of acid slag injection on the operation of the blast furnace. (orig.) (14 refs.)

  1. Acid slag injection into the blast furnace tuyere zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haerkki, J.; Tervola, K. [Oulu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Process Engineering

    1996-12-31

    The possibility of acid slag injection and its effect on the slag formation and on the melting behaviour of the charge materials are studied in the present work. The work is partly based on the literature evaluating the slag formation, slag properties and the basic slag injection. The possibility of acid slag injection is first examined by studying changes in the composition of the primary slag if the share of the acid slag component (Kostamus pellet/RR) of the charge material is lowered. Phase diagrams and viscosity charts are used to evaluate the viscosity, and solidus/liquidus temperature in the slag phase. The share of the slag phase of the pellet is evaluated by calculating the amount of the acid slag injection. The injection rate of some injectants is also examined. The primary slag formed of the sinter and the coke ash is in liquid form and its viscosity is close to the viscosity of the blast furnace slag. It is possible that the liquid slag phase can be formed in the blast furnace without the presence of the acid pellet because the melting point and the viscosity of the slag is lowered by alkalies, sulfur and the dissolved ironoxide of the slag. If high SiO{sub 2} content materials alone are used for injection there is a risk that the slag phase of the tuyere zone becomes too viscous. Olivine and some iron containing components such as fayalite are possible injection material. More information is needed to evaluate the effect of acid slag injection on the operation of the blast furnace. (orig.) SULA 2 Research Programme; 2 refs.

  2. Effects of limestone petrography and calcite microstructure on OPC clinker raw meals burnability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimberti, Matteo; Marinoni, Nicoletta; Della Porta, Giovanna; Marchi, Maurizio; Dapiaggi, Monica

    2017-10-01

    Limestone represents the main raw material for ordinary Portland cement clinker production. In this study eight natural limestones from different geological environments were chosen to prepare raw meals for clinker manufacturing, aiming to define a parameter controlling the burnability. First, limestones were characterized by X-Ray Fluorescence, X-Ray Powder Diffraction and Optical Microscopy to assess their suitability for clinker production and their petrographic features. The average domains size and the microstrain of calcite were also determined by X-Ray Powder Diffraction line profile analysis. Then, each limestone was admixed with clay minerals to achieve the adequate chemical composition for clinker production. Raw meals were thermally threated at seven different temperatures, from 1000 to 1450 °C, to evaluate their behaviour on heating by ex situ X-Ray Powder Diffraction and to observe the final clinker morphology by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Results indicate the calcite microstrain is a reliable parameter to predict the burnability of the raw meals, in terms of calcium silicates growth and lime consumption. In particular, mixtures prepared starting from high-strained calcite exhibit a better burnability. Later, when the melt appears this correlation vanishes; however differences in the early burnability still reflect on the final clinker composition and texture.

  3. The hydration of slag, part 1: reaction models for alkali-activated slag

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2007-01-01

    Reaction models are proposed to quantify the hydration products and to determine the composition of C–S–H from alkali-activated slags (AAS). Products of the slag hydration are first summarized from observations in literature. The main hydration products include C–S–H, hydrotalcite, hydrogarnet, AFm

  4. EPR as a tool for studying slags and slag-like systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slezak, A.; Lech, J. [Institute of Physics, Technical University of Czestochowa, Czestochowa (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    Results of possible applications of the EPR method for studying of steelwork slags properties and sintering processes involving some slag components are presented. Comparative experimental studies have been carried out at X-band both industrial slags and synthetic slag-like systems obtained by sintering mixtures of pure reagents of Ca-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase diagram. Tests of evolution of EPR spectra during sintering process have also been done, including sintering row mixtures currently used in cement industry. EPR spectra of Mn{sup 2+} ions, which have been observed quite resolved in nearly all studied samples, have been established very useful for studying kinetics of sintering process in systems involving the slags and components of the CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} diagram. (author). 20 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab.

  5. Decalcification resistance of alkali-activated slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komljenovic, Miroslav M., E-mail: miroslav.komljenovic@imsi.rs [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, University of Belgrade, Kneza Viseslava 1, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia); Bascarevic, Zvezdana, E-mail: zvezdana@imsi.bg.ac.rs [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, University of Belgrade, Kneza Viseslava 1, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia); Marjanovic, Natasa, E-mail: natasa@imsi.bg.ac.rs [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, University of Belgrade, Kneza Viseslava 1, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia); Nikolic, Violeta, E-mail: violeta@imsi.bg.ac.rs [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, University of Belgrade, Kneza Viseslava 1, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2012-09-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of decalcification on properties of alkali-activated slag were studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decalcification was performed by concentrated NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} solution (accelerated test). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Portland-slag cement (CEM II/A-S 42.5 N) was used as a benchmark material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decalcification led to strength decrease and noticeable structural changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alkali-activated slag showed significantly higher resistance to decalcification. - Abstract: This paper analyses the effects of decalcification in concentrated 6 M NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} solution on mechanical and microstructural properties of alkali-activated slag (AAS). Portland-slag cement (CEM II/A-S 42.5 N) was used as a benchmark material. Decalcification process led to a decrease in strength, both in AAS and in CEM II, and this effect was more pronounced in CEM II. The decrease in strength was explicitly related to the decrease in Ca/Si atomic ratio of C-S-H gel. A very low ratio of Ca/Si {approx}0.3 in AAS was the consequence of coexistence of C-S-H(I) gel and silica gel. During decalcification of AAS almost complete leaching of sodium and tetrahedral aluminum from C-S-H(I) gel also took place. AAS showed significantly higher resistance to decalcification in relation to the benchmark CEM II due to the absence of portlandite, high level of polymerization of silicate chains, low level of aluminum for silicon substitution in the structure of C-S-H(I), and the formation of protective layer of polymerized silica gel during decalcification process. In stabilization/solidification processes alkali-activated slag represents a more promising solution than Portland-slag cement due to significantly higher resistance to decalcification.

  6. Influence of the slags treatment on the heavy metals binding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blahová, L.; Navrátilová, Z.; Mucha, M.; Navrátilová, Eva; Neděla, Vilém

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2018), s. 697-706 ISSN 1735-1472 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : slag * binding * metal cations * slag modification Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.915, year: 2016

  7. Process-integrated slag treatment; Prozessintegrierte Schlackebehandlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koralewska, R.; Faulstich, M. [Technische Univ., Garching (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Wasserguete- und Abfallwirtschaft

    1998-09-01

    The present study compares two methods of washing waste incineration slag, one with water only, and one which uses additives during wet deslagging. The presented aggregate offers ideal conditions for process-integrated slag treatment. The paper gives a schematic description of the integrated slag washing process. The washing liquid serves to wash out the readily soluble constituents and remove the fines, while the additives are for immobilising heavy metals in the slag material. The study is based on laboratory and semi-technical trials on the wet chemical treatment of grate slag with addition of carbon dioxide and phosphoric acid. [Deutsch] Die dargestellten Untersuchungen beziehen sich auf den Vergleich zwischen einer Waesche der Muellverbrennungsschlacke mit Wasser und unter Zugabe von Additiven im Nassentschlacker. In diesem Aggregat bieten sich optimale Voraussetzungen fuer eine prozessintegrierte Schlackebehandlung. Die Durchfuehrung der integrierten Schlackewaesche wird schematisch gezeigt. Durch die Waschfluessigkeit sollen die leichtloeslichen Bestandteile ausgewaschen und die Feinanteile ausgetragen sowie durch die Additive zusaetzlich die Schwermetalle im Schlackematerial immobilisiert werden. Dazu erfolgten Labor- und halbtechnische Versuche zur nasschemischen Behandlung der Rostschlacken unter Zugabe von Kohlendioxid und Phosphorsaeure. (orig./SR)

  8. Mineralogy and environmental geochemistry of historical iron slag, Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatak, Nadine; Seal, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site in southeastern Pennsylvania, which features an Fe smelter that was operational in the 18th and 19th centuries, is dominated by three slag piles. Pile 1 slag, from the Hopewell Furnace, and pile 2 slag, likely from the nearby Cornwall Furnace, were both produced in cold-blast charcoal-fired smelters. In contrast, pile 3 slag was produced in an anthracite furnace. Ore samples from the nearby Jones and Hopewell mines that fed the smelter are mainly magnetite-rich with some sulfides (pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite) and accessory silicates (quartz, garnet, feldspar, and clay minerals). Slag piles 1 and 2 are similar mineralogically containing predominantly skeletal and dendritic aluminian diopside and augite, skeletal forsteritic olivine, glass, rounded blebs of metallic Fe, and exotic quartz. Olivine is a major phase in all samples from pile 2, whereas it occurs in only a few samples from pile 1. Samples of the <2 mm-size fraction of surface composite slag material or crushed slag from at depth in piles 1 and 2 are mineralogically similar to the large surface slag fragments from those piles with the addition of phases such as feldspars, Fe oxides, and clay minerals that are either secondary weathering products or entrained from the underlying bedrock. Pile 3 slag contains mostly skeletal forsteritic olivine and Ti-bearing aluminian diopside, dendritic or fine-grained subhedral melilite, glass, euhedral spinel, metallic Fe, alabandite–oldhamite solid solution, as well as a sparse Ti carbonitride phase. The bulk chemistry of the slag is dominated by Al2O3 (8.5–16.2 wt.%), CaO (8.2–26.2 wt.%), MgO (4.2–24.7 wt.%), and SiO2 (36.4–59.8 wt.%), constituting between 81% and 97% of the mass of the samples. Piles 1 and 2 are chemically similar; pile 1 slag overall contains the highest Fe2O3, K2O and MnO, and the lowest MgO concentrations. Pile 3 slag is high in Al2O3, CaO and S, and low in Fe2O3, K2O and SiO2

  9. Preparing hydraulic cement from oil-shale slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1921-11-19

    A process for the preparation of hydraulic cementing material from oil shale or oil-shale slag according to Patent 411,584 is characterized by the fact that the oil-shale slag is added to burnt marl, blast-furnace slag, and the like, whereupon the mixture is milled to dust in the known way.

  10. Environmental characteristics and utilization potential of metallurgical slag: Chapter 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatak, Nadine; De Vivo, Benedetto; Belkin, Harvey E.; Lima, Annamaria

    2018-01-01

    Slag, an abundant byproduct from the pyrometallurgical processing of ores, can be an environmental liability or a valuable resource. The most common environmental impact of slag is from the leaching of potentially toxic elements, acidity, or alkalinity that may impact nearby soils and surface water and groundwater. Factors that influence its environmental behavior include physical characteristics, such as grain size and porosity, chemical composition with some slag being enriched in certain elements, the mineralogy and partitioning of elements in more or less reactive phases, water-slag interactions, and site conditions. Many of these same factors also influence its resource potential. For example, crystalline ferrous slag is most commonly used as construction aggregate, whereas glassy (i.e., granulated) slag is used in cement. Also, the calcium minerals found in ferrous slag result in useful applications in water treatment. In contrast, the high trace-element content of some base-metal slags makes the slags economically attractive for extraction of residual elements. An evaluation tool is used to help categorize a particular slag as an environmental hazard or valuable byproduct. Results for one type of slag, legacy steelmaking slag from the Chicago area in the USA, suggest the material has potential to be used for treating phosphate-rich or acidic waters; however, the pH and trace-element content of resulting solutions may warrant further examination.

  11. Slag corrosion of gamma aluminium oxynitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xidong; Li Wen Chao [Beijing Univ. of Science and Technology, BJ (China). Dept. of Physical Chemistry of Metals; Sichen Du; Seetharaman, S. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Materials Science and Technology

    2002-03-01

    Corrosion of {gamma}-aluminium oxynitride (AlON) by CaO-MgO-''FeO''-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2} melts corresponding to blast furnace slag was examined from 1693 to 1753 K under static and forced convection conditions. An intermediate layer was observed between the unreacted oxynitride and slag. After a certain time interval, the rate of the growth of this layer was found to be equal to the rate of the dissolution of the layer. Slag corrosion of AlON is a strongly thermally activated process, the overall activation energy being 1002 kJ/mol. The rate of corrosion was found to be significantly enhanced by the addition of ''FeO''. (orig.)

  12. Reaction between Hydrogen Sulfide and Limestone Calcines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Svoboda, Karel; Trnka, Otakar; Čermák, Jiří

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 10 (2002), s. 2392-2398 ISSN 0888-5885 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072711; GA AV ČR IAA4072801 Keywords : hydrogen sulfide * limestone calcines * desulfurization Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.247, year: 2002

  13. Hydrogen Chloride Reaction with Lime and Limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erik Weinell, Claus; Jensen, Peter I.; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1992-01-01

    The capacity of solid slaked lime and limestone for binding HCl from a gas phase has been investigated in the temperature range 60-1000 °C. The binding capacity is largest in the range 500-600 °C. However, for slaked lime in the presence of water, a large binding capacity is observed also below 150...

  14. Neutron activation analysis of limestone objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, P.; Van Zelst, L.

    1977-01-01

    The elemental composition of samples from limestone objects were determined by neutron activation analysis to investigate whether this technique can be used to distinguish between objects made of limestone from different sources. Samples weighing between 0.2-2 grams were obtained by drilling from a series of ancient Egyptian and medieval Spanish objects. Analysis was performed on aliquots varying in weight from 40-100 milligrams. The following elements were determined quantitatively: Na, K, Rb, Cs, Ba, Sc, La, Ce, Sm, Eu, Hf, Th, Ta, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co and Zn. The data on Egyptian limestones indicate that, because of the inhomogeneous nature of the stone, 0.2-2 gram samples may not be representative of an entire object. Nevertheless, multivariate statistical methods produced a clear distinction between objects originating from the Luxor area (ancient Thebes) and objects found north of Luxor. The Spanish limestone studied appeared to be more homogeneous. Samples from stylistically related objects have similar elemental compositions while relative large differences were observed between objects having no relationship other than the common provenance of medieval Spain. (orig.) [de

  15. The use of Limestone Powder as an Alternative Cement Replacement

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    focused on the effects of limestone on the cement ... construction materials in Ethiopia is increasing .... Findings of research works on the strength reveals ... This CEN standard sand is delivered ... control mix made without limestone fines.

  16. Kinetic Study of Calcination of Jakura Limestone Using Power Rate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    National Research Institute for Chemical Technology, P.M. B 1052, Zaria, ... calcination of Jakura limestone was also found to be first order reaction with respect to CaCO3 ... Keywords: Jakura, limestone, calcination, kinetics, power law model.

  17. Common clay and shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The clay and shale market in 1999 is reviewed. In the U.S., sales or use of clay and shale increased from 26.4 million st in 1998 to 27.3 million st in 1999, with an estimated 1999 value of production of $143 million. These materials were used to produce structural clay products, lightweight aggregates, cement, and ceramics and refractories. Production statistics for clays and shales and for their uses in 1999 are presented.

  18. Summary and conclusions of the faults-in-clay project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallam, J.R.; Brightman, M.A.; Jackson, P.D.; Sen, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    This report summarises a research project carried out by the British Geological Survey, in cooperation with ISMES of Italy, into the geophysical detection of faults in clay formations and the determination of the hydrogeological effects of such faults on the groundwater flow regime. Following evaluation of potential research sites, an extensive programme of investigations was conducted at Down Ampney, Gloucester, where the Oxford Clay formation is underlain by the aquifers of the Great Oolite Limestone group. A previously unknown fault of 50 m throw was identified and delineated by electrical resistivity profiling; the subsequent development of a technique utilising measurements of total resistance improved the resolution of the fault 'location' to an accuracy of better than one metre. Marked anisotropy of the clay resistivities complicates conventional geophysical interpretation, but gives rise to a characteristic anomaly across the steeply inclined strata in the fault zone. After exploratory core drilling, an array of 13 boreholes was designed and completed for cross-hole seismic tomography and hydrogeological measurement and testing. The groundwater heads in the clays were found to be in disequilibrium with those in the aquifers, as a result of water supply abstraction. The indication is that the hydraulic conductivity of the fault zone is higher than that of the surrounding clay by between one and two orders of magnitude. Methodologies for the general investigation of faults in clay are discussed. (Author)

  19. Applicability of slags as waste forms for hazardous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Feng, X.; Whitworth, C.; Filius, K.; Battleson, D.

    1994-01-01

    Slags, which are a combination of glassy and ceramic phases, were produced by the Component Development and Integration Facility, using a combination of soil and metal feeds. The slags were tested for durability using accelerated test methods in both water vapor and liquid water for time periods up to 179 days. The results indicated that under both conditions there was little reaction of the slag, in terms of material released to solution, or the reaction of the slag to form secondary mineral phases. The durability of the slags tested exceeded that of current high-level nuclear glass formulations and are viable materials, for waste disposal

  20. Simulation of slag control for the Plasma Hearth Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, M.A.; Carney, K.P.; Peters. G.G.

    1996-01-01

    The goal of the Plasma Hearth Project is to stabilize alpha-emitting radionuclides in a vitreous slag and to reduce the effective storage volume of actinide-containing waste for long-term burial. The actinides have been shown to partition into the vitreous slag phase of the melt. The slag composition may be changed by adding glass-former elements to ensure that this removable slag has the most desired physical and chemical properties for long-term burial. A data acquisition and control system has been designed to regulate the composition of five elements in the slag

  1. Thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao Yanping; Holappa, L.

    1996-12-31

    In this report, the thermodynamic properties of chromium bearing slags and minerals were reviewed based on the available information in the literature. It includes the analysing methods for oxidation state of chromium in slags, oxidation state of chromium and activities of chromium oxides in slags and minerals. The phase diagrams of chromium oxide systems and chromium distributions between slag and metal phases are also covered ill this review. Concerning the analysing methods, it was found that most of the available approaches are limited to iron free slag systems and the sample preparation is very sensitive to the analysing results. In silicate slags under reducing atmosphere, divalent and trivalent chromium co-exist in the slags. It is agreed that the fraction of divalent chromium to total chromium increases with higher temperature, lower slag basicity and oxygen potential. For the slags under oxidising atmosphere, trivalent, pentavalent and hexavalent states were reported to be stable. The activities of CrO and CrO{sub 1.5} were concluded to have positive deviation from ideal solution. Slag basicity has a positive effect and temperature has a negative effect on the activities of chromium oxides. The phase diagrams of the Cr-O, binary, and ternary chromium containing oxide systems have been examined systematically. The analysis shows that the data on the quaternary and quinary systems are insufficient, and require further investigation. The most important features of the chromium containing silicate slags are the large miscibility gaps and the stability of the chromite spinel. (orig.) (76 refs.)

  2. Modelling of slag emulsification and slag reduction in CAS-OB process

    OpenAIRE

    Sulasalmi, P. (Petri)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Composition Adjustment by Sealed argon bubbling – Oxygen Blowing (CAS-OB) process is a ladle treatment process that was developed for chemical heating and alloying of steel. The main stages of the process are heating, (possible) alloying and reduction of slag. The CAS-OB process aims for homogenization and control of the composition and temperature of steel. In this dissertation, a mathematical reaction model was developed for the slag reduction stage of the CAS-OB process. Sl...

  3. Effect of limestone particle size on bone quality characteristics of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine the effect of different limestone particle sizes in layer diets on bone quality characteristics at end-of-lay hens. Calcitic limestone (360 g Ca/kg DM) that is extensively used in commercial poultry diets was obtained from a specific South African source. Limestone particles were graded as ...

  4. Characteristics and environmental aspects of slag: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatak, Nadine M.; Parsons, Michael B.; Seal, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Slag is a waste product from the pyrometallurgical processing of various ores. Based on over 150 published studies, this paper provides an overview of mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of different types of slag and their environmental consequences, particularly from the release of potentially toxic elements to water. This chapter reviews the characteristics of both ferrous (steel and blast furnace Fe) and non-ferrous (Ag, Cu, Ni, Pb, Sn, Zn) slag. Interest in slag has been increasing steadily as large volumes, on the order of hundreds of millions of tonnes, are produced annually worldwide. Research on slag generally focuses on potential environmental issues related to the weathering of slag dumps or on its utility as a construction material or reprocessing for secondary metal recovery. The chemistry and mineralogy of slag depend on the metallurgical processes that create the material and will influence its fate as waste or as a reusable product.

  5. Concrete-Opalinus clay interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenni, A.; Maeder, U.; Lerouge, C.; Gaboreau, S.; Schwyn, B.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Designs for deep geologic disposal of radioactive waste foresee cementitious materials as structural elements, backfill or waste matrix. Therefore, studies of interactions between cement and all other materials involved are important. Interactions are mostly driven by chemical gradients in pore water and might lead to mineralogical alterations in the barrier system, which in turn influence properties like swelling pressure, permeability, or specific retention in case of clay materials. Existing laboratory and in-situ studies using clay-stone revealed significant alteration in both cement and clay-stone. Phase dissolution, precipitation, and carbonation, were found to cause an overall porosity increase in the cement with a possible decrease close to the interface, and clogging in the clay-stone [2]. Most of the work was done on cement pastes rather than concretes to avoid analytical complications caused by aggregates, and the scale of investigation was chosen in the range of centimetres rather than micrometers. The Cement-Clay Interaction (CI) experiment at the Mont Terri Underground Laboratory (St. Ursanne, Switzerland) aims at replicating some of the processes at interfaces to be expected.For this purpose, two vertical cylindrical boreholes (384 mm diameter, up to 10 m length) in Opalinus Clay (OPA) were filled with layers of three different concretes and bentonite. The concrete formulations are based on common aggregate content and grain size distributions, combined with three different cements: Portland cement (OPC), ESDRED cement especially designed for repository applications (40% of cement substituted with silica fume), and low alkali cement (LAC, containing slag and nano-silica).In this study, we present a characterisation of the three concrete-OPA interfaces after two years of alteration and deduce possible mechanisms. Backscattered electron (BE) imaging and energy dispersive spectrum (EDX) element mapping

  6. Preliminary study of tin slag concrete mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Mohd Jamil; Mansor, Ishak; Pauzi Ismail, Mohamad; Sani, Suhairy; Azmi, Azhar; Sayuti, Shaharudin; Zaidi Ibrahim, Mohd; Adli Anuar, Abul; Rahim, Abdul Adha Abdul

    2018-01-01

    The study focuses on practices to facilitate tin smelting industry to reduce radioactive waste product (Tin Slag) by diluting its radioactivity to a safe level and turning it to a safer infrastructural building product. In the process the concrete mix which include Portland cement, sand, tin slag, water and plasticizer are used to produce interlocking brick pavements, piles and other infrastructural products. The mixing method follows DOE (UK) standard method of mixing targeted at in selected compressive strength suitable for its function and durability. A batching machine is used in the mixing and six test cubes are produced for the test. The testing equipment used are a compressional machine, ultrasonic measurement and a Geiger Muller counter to evaluate of the concrete mix to find the lowest emission of radiation surface dose without compromising the strength of concrete mix. The result obtained indicated the radioactivity of tin slag in the mixing process has reduced to background level that is 0.5μSv/h while the strength and workability of the concrete has not been severely affected. In conclusion, the concrete mix with tin slag has shown the potential it can be turned into a safe beneficial infrastructural product with good strength.

  7. Clay Portrait Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to incorporate sculptural elements into her ceramics program, the author decided to try direct plaster casting of the face to make a plaster mold for clay. In this article, the author shares an innovative ceramics lesson that teaches students in making plaster casts and casting the face in clay. This project gives students the…

  8. Columns in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  9. Integrity of clay till aquitards to DNAPL migration: Assessment using current and emerging characterization tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Janniche, Gry Sander; Jørgensen, Torben H.

    2017-01-01

    Field investigations were carried out to determine the occurrence of tetrachloroethene (PCE) dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL), the source zone architecture and the aquitard integrity at a 30-50 year old DNAPL release site. The DNAPL source zone is located in the clay till unit overlying......% of the total PCE mass. The data set, and associated data analysis, supported vertical migration of DNAPL through fractures in the upper part of the clay till, horizontal migration along high permeability features around the redox boundary in the clay till, and to some extent vertical migration through...... the fractures in the reduced part of the clay till aquitard to the underlying limestone aquifer. The aquitard integrity to DNAPL migration was found to be compromised at a thickness of reduced clay till of less than 2 m....

  10. Reatividade de uma escória de siderurgia em um latossolo vermelho distrófico Reactivity of a slag in a distrofic red latosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Prado

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho objetivou estudar a reatividade de uma escória de siderurgia de aciaria, em diferentes frações granulométricas, aplicada em uma amostra de um Latossolo Vermelho distrófico, ácido, em condições de laboratório. Utilizou-se um fatorial 4 x 3 + 2 com quatro repetições, sendo quatro granulometrias (material retido entre as peneiras ABNT 5-10; 10-20; 20-50 e The present study investigated the reactivity of a slag from steelworks in different particle size fractions, applied on an acid dystrophic Red Latosol, under laboratory conditions, in a 4 x 3 + 2 factorial scheme in four replications. Four particle sizes (material retained in the ABNT 5-10; 10-20; 20-50, and < 50 sieves, three doses of slag (0.00, 5.04, and 10.08 t ha-1, corresponding to 0.00, 1.01, and 2.02 g in 0.40 dm³ of soil per cup and two control treatments (slag and dolomitic limestone in the corresponding dose to base saturation (V = 70 %, or either, 1.01 and 0.61 g per cup, respectively. The base saturation method was used for the definition of the doses, considering the CaCO3 equivalent value of slag and limestone, for the corresponding particle size fractions. The soil humidity was maintained at field capacity and incubated for three, six, and nine months. Grain size fractions of the slag affected differently the acidity of the soil. The fraction retained between the ABNT 5-10 sieves proved to be inefficient, while the fraction that passed through ABNT < 50 was the one with the greatest effect on acidity neutralization. The reactivity of retained slag particles in the intermediate sieves (ABNT 10-20 and 20-50 sieves was proportional to the effective values of the Brazilian legislation for lime. Therefore, the reactivity rate obtained for steelwork slag was: ABNT nº 5-10 = 0 %; 10-20 = 22 %; 20-50 = 58 % e < 50= 100 %.

  11. The leaching characteristics of vitrified slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jinlong; Li, Yaojian; Tian, Junguo; Sheng, Hongzhi; Xu, Yongxiang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text: Plasma-arc technology was developed to fix the heavy metal of flying ash by the Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS-IMECH). A direct current (DC) experimental facility of 30 kW with plasma-arc technology was setup to form vitrified slag. The additives (CaO, SiO 2 ) were added into the reactor to form vitrified slag and fix the heavy metal (Cr, Pb), under dissimilar condition (long and short heating-up time, natural and water cooling). Vitrified slag was broken into different particle size, from 0.1 mm to 1 cm. The particles with different specific surface area were used to study the leaching of heavy metals in vitrified slag rate of speed. The pH value of leaching solution are from 2 to 12, the experiment was kept at different external temperature, from 4 degree Celsius to 70 degree celsius, for 1 week to 1 month. Heavy metal leaching concentration was used to measure the chemical stability of vitrified slag. The results show that the higher specific surface area, the higher heavy metal leaching concentration, but when the specific surface area reaches a certain value, little change in leaching concentration. The impact of temperature on leaching concentration was not significant, from 4 degree Celsius to 70 degree Celsius. The leaching concentration increases with decreasing of the pH value of leaching solution when the pH value of leaching solution less than 7, and little change in concentration increases with pH value when the pH value of leaching solution more than 7. Compared with the leaching concentration after 1 month, the leaching concentration after 1 week has not changed significantly. (Author)

  12. Face logging in Copenhagen Limestone, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Lisa; Foged, Niels Nielsen; Erichsen, Lars

    2015-01-01

    tunnel in Copenhagen more than 2.5 km face logs were made in 467 locations at underground stations, shafts, caverns and along bored tunnels. Over 160 geotechnical boreholes, many with geophysical logging were executed prior to construction works. The bedrock consists of Paleogene "Copenhagen limestone......The requirement for excavation support can be assessed from face logging. Face logs can also improve our knowledge of lithological and structural conditions within bedrock and supplement information from boreholes and geophysical logs. During the construction of 8 km metro tunnel and 4 km heating....... The induration degrees recorded in face logs and boreholes are compared and correlated. Distinct geophysical log markers are used to divide the limestone into three units. These marker horizons are correlated between face logs and geotechnical boreholes. A 3D model of the strength variations recorded within...

  13. The Öland limestone - A Swedish stone used for more than one thousand years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouenborg, Björn; Wickström, Linda; Mikaelsson, Jan

    2016-04-01

    landic limestone was intense even during Hanseatic times (14th to 17th centuries) and it can for example be found as floorings, mantel pieces, baptismal fonts in many German castles and manors. The literature tells us that export to Denmark, Poland and even southern Germany was intense during late medieval ages. This is because a lot of churches were built in Northern Europe at that time. However, the modern industrialised production had to wait until the early 20th century. Today, three companies quarry and process the limestones on a regular basis. They are primarily used for flooring, stairs, crazy stones for gardens, table tops, kitchen tops and, in some cases, also external cladding and paving. The latter only with more durable layers free of clay and open stylolites, so called "core stone" (direct translation). The presentation will show that the Öland limestone covers all aspects and requirements for being a Global heritage resource.

  14. Plant Guide: Limestone hawksbeard: Crepis intermedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    L. St. John; D. Tilley

    2012-01-01

    Sunflower family (Asteraceae). Limestone hawksbeard is a native perennial forb with one or two stems arising from a taproot. Plants are 30-70cm tall and basal leaves are 10-40 cm long, pinnatifid, with a fairly broad, undivided midstrip and entire or dentate segments. Plants are densely or sparsely gray-tomentulose. There are 10-60 heads per plant that are 7-12...

  15. Limestone quarrying and quarry reclamation in Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, J.; Bailey, D.

    1993-06-01

    Limestones have been worked for many thousands of years — initially for building stone and agricultural lime and more recently for a wide range of construction and industrial uses. In most industrialized countries limestone quarries represent the most visually obvious and, in both process and landform terms, the most dramatic anthropogenic impact on karst terrain. However, quarrying has, to date, received surprisingly little attention from karst scientists. Research in the English Peak District suggested that the postexcavation evolution of quarried limestone rock faces was in part a result of the methods used in their excavation, and this led to the development of a technique designed to reduce the visual and environmental impacts of modern quarries by “Landform replication. ” This involves the use of controlled “restoration blasting” techniques on quarried rock slopes to construct a landform sequence similar to that in the surrounding natural landscape. The constructed landforms are then partially revegetated using appropriate wildflower, grass, and/or tree species.

  16. Reprocessing of metallurgical slag into materials for the building industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pioro, L.S.; Pioro, I.L.

    2004-01-01

    Several methods of reprocessing metallurgical (blast furnace) slag into materials for the building industry, based on melting aggregates with submerged combustion, were developed and tested. The first method involves melting hot slag with some additives directly in a slag ladle with a submerged gas-air burner, with the objective of producing stabilized slag or glass-ceramic. The second method involves direct draining of melted slag from a ladle into the slag receiver, with subsequent control of the slag draining into the converter where special charging materials are added to the melt, with the objective of producing glass-ceramic. A third method involves melting cold slag with some additives inside a melting converter with submerged gas-air burners, with the objective of producing glass-ceramic fillers for use in road construction. Specific to the melting process is the use of a gas-air mixture with direct combustion inside the melt. This feature provides melt bubbling to help achieve maximum heat transfer from combustion products to the melt, improve mixing (and therefore homogeneity of the melt), and increases the rate of chemical reactions. The experimental data for different aspects of the proposed methods are presented. The reprocessed blast-furnace slag in the form of granules can be used as fillers for concretes, asphalts, and as additives in the production of cement, bricks and other building materials. As well, reprocessed blast-furnace slag can be poured into forms for the production of glass-ceramic tiles

  17. Influences of Steelmaking Slags on Hydration and Hardening of Concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsanova, A. A.; Dildin, A. N.; Maksimov, S. P.

    2017-11-01

    It is shown that the slag of metallurgical production can be used in the construction industry as an active mineral additive for concrete. This approach allows us to solve environmental problems and reduce costs for the production of binder and concrete simultaneously. Most often slag is used in the form of a filler, an active mineral additive or as a part of a binder for artificial conglomerates. The introduction of slag allows one to notice a part of the cement, to obtain concretes that are more resistant to the impact of aggressive sulfate media. The paper shows the possibility of using recycled steel-smelting slags in the construction industry for the production of cement. An assessment was made of their effect on the hydration of the cement stone and hardening of the concrete together with the plasticizer under normal conditions. In the process of work, we used the slag of the Zlatoust Electrometallurgical Factory. Possible limitations of the content of steel-slag slag in concrete because of the possible presence of harmful impurities are shown. It is necessary to enter slag in conjunction with superplasticizers to reduce the flow of water mixing. Slags can be used as a hardening accelerator for cement concrete as they allow one to increase the degree of cement hydration and concrete strength. It is shown that slags can be used to produce fast-hardening concretes and their comparative characteristics with other active mineral additives are given.

  18. Leaching of heavy metals from steelmaking slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes, J. F. P

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Leaching tests with EAF and Ladle slags were performed, using a flow through test and the standard batch test DIN 38414-S4. The previous method was used to simulate the leaching behaviour of steel slags under landfill. The chemical analysis of the leachates during this period shows, in general, for both types of slag, an increase of heavy metal releases with ageing. Standard test method DIN 38414-S4 was used to evaluate leachability of heavy metals by water in unprocessed slags. After more than one year of trials, slag samples submitted to these trials presented very low total leaching levels. The most extracted elements are calcium and magnesium. Nevertheless, in flow-through test, calcium and magnesium leached from solid slags are below 0.5% and all other metals below 0.1%. Leachates obtained with DIN 38414-S4 present, as expected, higher leaching values; however, these are inferior to 5 % (Ca and 1% (other elements.

    Este articulo contiene los resultados obtenidos en ensayos de lixiviación de escorias de acero (horno electrico y cuchara ejecutados siguiendo la metodologia de flujo dinámico así como el ensayo normalizado DIN 38414-S4. El primer ensayo intenta simular el comportamiento de lixiviación de las escorias en vertedero. Para las escorias ensayadas se han complementado los ensayos con el análisis químico de los lixiviados y se ha verificado un aumento de la liberación de metales pesados. El ensayo DIN 38414-S4 se ha utilizado para evaluar la lixiviación por agua de metales pesados, en muestras de escorias originales. Despues de un año de ensayos, se han observado niveles muy bajos de lixiviación. Los elementos mas lixiviados han sido calcio y magnesio. No obstante, en los ensayos de flujo dinámico, el calcio y el magnesio lixiviados de las escorias sólidas era menor de 0,5% y el resto de los otros metales era inferior a 0,1%. Los lixiviados obtenidos con el ensayo DIN 38414-S4 presentan, como era de esperar, valores

  19. Characterization of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz N, C.; Olguin, M.T.; Solache R, M.; Alarcon H, T.; Aguilar E, A.

    2002-01-01

    The natural clays are the more abundant minerals on the crust. They are used for making diverse industrial products. Due to the adsorption and ion exchange properties of these, a great interest for developing research directed toward the use of natural clays for the waste water treatment has been aroused. As part of such researches it is very important to carry out previously the characterization of the interest materials. In this work the results of the mineral and elemental chemical composition are presented as well as the morphological characteristics of clay minerals from different regions of the Mexican Republic. (Author)

  20. HCl removal using cycled carbide slag from calcium looping cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Xin; Li, Yingjie; Wang, Wenjing; Shi, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Cycled carbide slag from calcium looping cycles is used to remove HCl. • The optimum temperature for HCl removal of cycled carbide slag is 700 °C. • The presence of CO 2 restrains HCl removal of cycled carbide slag. • CO 2 capture conditions have important effects on HCl removal of cycled carbide slag. • HCl removal capacity of carbide slag drops with cycle number rising from 1 to 50. - Abstract: The carbide slag is an industrial waste from chlor-alkali plants, which can be used to capture CO 2 in the calcium looping cycles, i.e. carbonation/calcination cycles. In this work, the cycled carbide slag from the calcium looping cycles for CO 2 capture was proposed to remove HCl in the flue gas from the biomass-fired and RDFs-fired boilers. The effects of chlorination temperature, HCl concentration, particle size, presence of CO 2 , presence of O 2 , cycle number and CO 2 capture conditions in calcium looping cycles on the HCl removal behavior of the carbide slag experienced carbonation/calcination cycles were investigated in a triple fixed-bed reactor. The chlorination product of the cycled carbide slag from the calcium looping after absorbing HCl is not CaCl 2 but CaClOH. The optimum temperature for HCl removal of the cycled carbide slag from the carbonation/calcination cycles is 700 °C. The chlorination conversion of the cycled carbide slag increases with increasing the HCl concentration. The cycled carbide slag with larger particle size exhibits a lower chlorination conversion. The presence of CO 2 decreases the chlorination conversions of the cycled carbide slag and the presence of O 2 has a trifling impact. The chlorination conversion of the carbide slag experienced 1 carbonation/calcination cycle is higher than that of the uncycled calcined sorbent. As the number of carbonation/calcination cycles increases from 1 to 50, the chlorination conversion of carbide slag drops gradually. The high calcination temperature and high CO 2

  1. Improving Beneficiation of Copper and Iron from Copper Slag by Modifying the Molten Copper Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengqi Guo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, a new technology was developed to improve the beneficiation of copper and iron components from copper slag, by modifying the molten slag to promote the mineralization of valuable minerals and to induce the growth of mineral grains. Various parameters, including binary basicity, dosage of compound additive, modification temperature, cooling rate and the end point temperature of slow cooling were investigated. Meanwhile, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS was employed to determine the mineralogy of the modified and unmodified slag, as well as to reveal the mechanisms of enhancing beneficiation. The results show that under the proper conditions, the copper grade of rougher copper concentrate was increased from 6.43% to 11.04%, iron recovery of magnetic separation was increased significantly from 32.40% to 63.26%, and other evaluation indexes were changed slightly, in comparison with unmodified copper slag. Moreover, matte and magnetite grains in the modified slag aggregated together and grew obviously to the mean size of over 50 μm, resulting in an improvement of beneficiation of copper and iron.

  2. Investigation and assessment of lead slag concrete as nuclear shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaghloul, Y.R.

    2009-01-01

    The present work is concerned with the efficiency of heavy weight concrete as a shielding material in constructing nuclear installations as well as for radioactive wastes disposal facilities.In this context, lead slag was used as a replacement for fine aggregates in heavy concrete shields that include local heavy weight aggregates (namely; barite and ilmenite) as well as normal concrete includes dolomite and sand as coarse and fine aggregates, as a reference. The effect of different percentages of lead slag was investigated to assess the produced lead slag concrete as a nuclear shielding material. The different properties (physical, mechanical and nuclear) of the produced lead slag concrete were investigated. The results obtained showed that increasing the lead slag percentage improving the investigated properties of the different concrete mixes. In addition, ilmenite concrete with 20% lead slag showed the best results for all the investigated properties.

  3. Moderate Dilution of Copper Slag by Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bao-jing; Zhang, Ting-an; Niu, Li-ping; Liu, Nan-song; Dou, Zhi-he; Li, Zhi-qiang

    2018-01-01

    To enable use of copper slag and extract the maximum value from the contained copper, an innovative method of reducing moderately diluted slag to smelt copper-containing antibacterial stainless steel is proposed. This work focused on moderate dilution of copper slag using natural gas. The thermodynamics of copper slag dilution and ternary phase diagrams of the slag system were calculated. The effects of blowing time, temperature, matte settling time, and calcium oxide addition were investigated. The optimum reaction conditions were identified to be blowing time of 20 min, reaction temperature of 1250°C, settling time of 60 min, CaO addition of 4% of mass of slag, natural gas flow rate of 80 mL/min, and outlet pressure of 0.1 MPa. Under these conditions, the Fe3O4 and copper contents of the residue were 7.36% and 0.50%, respectively.

  4. Nickel recovery from electric arc furnace slag by magnetic separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakaroglou Marianna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available During the pyrometallurgical treatment of the nickel-bearing laterite in the plant of G.M.M. S.A. LARCO, slag is produced after treatment in electric-arc furnace (EAF that contains 0.10 to 0.20 % Ni. Taking into account the great quantity of slag produced per year, the recovery of nickel from the EAF slag will add benefits to the entire process. The target of the current work is to investigate the possibility of nickel recovery from EAF slag by magnetic separation. To meet the target, the effect of the following parameters was studied: grain size, magnetic field intensity, thickness of slag layer, moisture content, and re-grinding of the coarser slag particles. The results show that it is possible to obtain a magnetic product with nickel grade close to that of the primary raw material or even better, with sufficient nickel recovery.

  5. Reduction of chromium oxide from slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez-Paredes, J.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental and theoretical work were performed to estimate the effect of slag basicity and amount of reducing agents on the reduction of chromium oxide from the slag which interacted with molten steel at 1,600 °C. The slag system contained CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 and Cr2O3 together with Fe-alloys (Fe-Si and Fe-Si-Mg. The CaF2 and MgO contents in the slags were 10 mass % each; Cr2O3 was 25%. The amount of the ferroalloys ranged from 12.5 to 50 g per 100 g of slag. The (CaO+MgO/SiO2 ratio was held at 1 and 2. The Cr yield was determined using both Fe-alloys as reducing agents. Some estimations were made to determine the theoretical effect of temperature, slag basicity, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, and amount of reducing agents in the slag on the chromium recovery. The FACT (Facility for the Analysis of Chemical Thermodynamics computational package is used to determine the equilibrium between the slag and molten steel.

    En el presente trabajo se realiza un estudio teórico y experimental para determinar el efecto de la basicidad de la escoria y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducción de óxidos de cromo contenidos en la escoria, la cual está en contacto con acero líquido a 1.600 °C. La escoria se prepara con los reactivos CaO, MgO, SiO2, CaF2 y ferroaleaciones (Fe-Si y Fe-Si-Mg. Los contenidos de CaF2 y MgO en la escoria son de 10 %, cada uno, y el de Cr2O3 es 25 %. La cantidad de la ferroaleación varía de 12,5 a 50 g por cada 100 g de escoria. La relación (CaO+MgO/SiO2 tiene los valores de 1 y 2. Se determina la eficiencia de recuperación de cromo empleando los dos tipos de ferroaleaciones. Se realizaron cálculos para determinar el efecto teórico de la temperatura, la basicidad de la escoria, (CaO+MgO/SiO2, y la cantidad de agentes reductores sobre la reducci

  6. Distribution of Clay Minerals in Light Coal Fractions and the Thermal Reaction Products of These Clay Minerals during Combustion in a Drop Tube Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sida Tian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the contribution of clay minerals in light coal fractions to ash deposition in furnaces, we investigated their distribution and thermal reaction products. The light fractions of two Chinese coals were prepared using a 1.5 g·cm−3 ZnCl2 solution as a density separation medium and were burned in a drop-tube furnace (DTF. The mineral matter in each of the light coal fractions was compared to that of the relevant raw coal. The DTF ash from light coal fractions was analysed using hydrochloric acid separation. The acid-soluble aluminium fractions of DTF ash samples were used to determine changes in the amorphous aluminosilicate products with increasing combustion temperature. The results show that the clay mineral contents in the mineral matter of both light coal fractions were higher than those in the respective raw coals. For the coal with a high ash melting point, clay minerals in the light coal fraction thermally transformed more dehydroxylation products compared with those in the raw coal, possibly contributing to solid-state reactions of ash particles. For the coal with a low ash melting point, clay minerals in the light coal fraction produced more easily-slagging material compared with those in the raw coal, playing an important role in the occurrence of slagging. Additionally, ferrous oxide often produces low-melting substances in coal ash. Due to the similarities of zinc oxide and ferrous oxide in silicate reactions, we also investigated the interactions of clay minerals in light coal fractions with zinc oxide introduced by a zinc chloride solution. The extraneous zinc oxide could react, to a small extent, with clay minerals in the coal during DTF combustion.

  7. Recovery of metal values from copper slag and reuse of residual secondary slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfo, Prince; Das, Avimanyu; Wyss, Gary; Young, Courtney

    2017-12-01

    Resource and environmental factors have become major forces in mining and metallurgy sectors driving research for sustainability purposes. The concept of zero-waste processing has been gaining ground readily. The scant availability of high quality raw materials has forced the researchers to shift their focus to recycling while the exceedingly stringent environmental regulations have forced researchers to explore new frontiers of minimizing/eliminating waste generation. The present work is aimed at addressing both aspects by employing recycling to generate wealth from copper slag and producing utilizable materials at the same time thus restoring the ecosystem. Copper slag was characterized and processed. The pyro-metallurgical processing prospects to generate utilizable materials were arrived at through rigorous thermodynamic analysis. Carbothermal reduction at elevated temperature (near 1440°C) helped recover a majority of the metal values (e.g., Fe, Cu and Mo) into the iron-rich alloy product which can be a feed material for steel making. On the other hand, the non-metallic residue, the secondary slag, can be used in the glass and ceramic industries. Reduction time and temperature and carbon content were shown to be the most important process variables for the reaction which were optimized to identify the most favored operating regime that maximizes the metal recovery and simultaneously maximizes the hardness of the secondary slag and minimizes its density, the two major criteria for the secondary slag product to be utilizable. The flux addition level was shown to have relatively less impact on the process performance if these are maintained at an adequate level. The work established that the copper slag, a waste material, can be successfully processed to generate reusable products through pyrometallurgical processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Thixotropic Properties of Latvian Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Lakevičs, Vitālijs; Stepanova, Valentīna; Ruplis, Augusts

    2015-01-01

    This research studies Latvia originated Devon (Tūja, Skaņkalne), quaternary (Ceplīši), Jurassic, (Strēļi) and Triassic (Vadakste) deposit clays as well as Lithuania originated Triassic (Akmene) deposit clays. Thixotropic properties of clay were researched by measuring relative viscosity of clay in water suspensions. Relative viscosity is measured with a hopper method. It was detected that, when concentration of suspension is increased, clay suspension’s viscosity also increases. It happens un...

  9. Comparative results of copper flotation from smelter slag and granulated smelter slag

    OpenAIRE

    Milanović, Dragan; Stanujkić, Dragiša; Ignjatović, Miroslav R.

    2013-01-01

    Smelter slag is obtained in the process of metallurgical converting of copper concentrate in the Smelter Plant in Bor, Serbia. Today, the reserves of this material are evaluated at about more of a year, with the average copper content of 0.6-0.9%. Production of copper concentrate by flotation of smelter slag has started in 2001. Flotation concentrate goes to the Copper Smelter once more for production of copper cathodes and the rough flotation tailings go to the flotation tailing dump. Copper...

  10. Study of Usage Areas of Clay Samples of Asphaltite Quarries in Sirnak, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Oyku

    2017-12-01

    The asphaltite of Sirnak, Turkey are in the form of 12 veins and their total reserves are anticipated to be approximately 200 million tons in a field of 25.000 hectares. The asphaltites at the Sirnak region are in the form of fault and crack fillings and take place together with clay minerals at their side rock. The main raw materials used in the production of cement are limestone, clay and marn known as sedimentary rocks. Limestone for CaO and clay minerals for SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3, which are the main compounds of clinker production, are the main raw materials. Other materials containing these four oxides like marn are also used as cement raw material. Conformity levels of the raw materials to be used in cement production vary according to their chemical compounds. The rocks to be used as clay mineral are evaluated by taking the rate of silicate and alumina into consideration. The soils suitable for brick-tile productions are named as sandy clay. Their difference from the ceramic clays is that they are richer in terms of iron, silica and carbonate. These soils are also known under the names such as clay, arid, alluvium, silt, loam and argil. Inside these soils, minerals such as quartz, montmorillonite, kaolinite, calcite, limonite, hidromika, sericite, illite, and chlorite are available. Some parts of the soils consist of clays in amorphous structure. Limestone parts, gypsums, organic substances and bulky rock residuals spoil the quality. The soils suitable for brick production may not be suitable for tile production. In this case, their sandy soils should be mixed up with the clays with fine granule structure which is high in plasticity. During asphaltite mining in Sirnak region, clays forming side rock are gathered at dump sites. In this study; SQX analyses of the clay samples taken from Avgamasya, Seridahli and Segürük asphaltite veins run in Sirnak region are carried out and their usage areas are searched.

  11. SRL in-situ tests in the United Kingdom: Part 2, Surface analyses of SRS waste glass buried for one and two years in limestone at Ballidon, UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namboodri, C.G. Jr.; Wicks, G.G.

    1991-01-01

    A multiphase experimental program to assess and understand waste glass behavior under a wide range of conditions has been in progress at the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) for over a decade. An important part of this experimental effort is to assess the effects of repository relevant conditions on performance of SRS waste glass, in both controlled laboratory tests, as well as in actual field experiments. In laboratory test, SRS waste glass, simulated and in many cases also fully radioactive, has been tested in environments of salt, basalt, shale, granite, clay and tuff. In field experiments, there are four joint international programs being conducted in four different countries, involving burial of SRS simulated waste glass in granite, limestone, clay and salt geologies. This report discusses the SRS waste glass studies in limestone at Ballidon, UK

  12. Rock mass characterization for tunnels in the Copenhagen limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels Nielsen; Jakobsen, Lisa; Jackson, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Tunnels in Copenhagen are drilled through highly anisotropic limestone comprising alternating strongly lithified and less lithified parts. The mass quality of the limestone is usually defined from fracture spacing registered in core samples. The deposit is, however, affected destructively by dril...... by drilling activity yielding a low Rock Quality Designation RQD. In-situ observations of the limestone in excavations or televiewer logs reveal only few natural discontinuities compared to core logging, indicating a very good suitability for tunneling....

  13. Mechanical Analysis Of Limestone In Jaya, Lhong, And Lhoknga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raihan .

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Research about mechanical analysis of limestone in District Jaya, Lhong, and Lhoknga has been done from Dec. 2011 to Mei 2012. This study aim is to classify the limestones based on physical and mechanical tests as well as identify opportunities limestone utilization in accordance with the SII 0378-80 as a condition of quality natural stone for building. Research have been done by testing compressive strength, modulus Young, wear, specific gravity, porosity, and absorption. The result shows that the limestones are qualified natural stone for building the foundation, curbstone, stone and ornamental stone or paste.

  14. The Influence of Combustion-derived pollutants on limestone deterioration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, J.B.; Montgomery, Melanie; Thompson, G.E.

    1996-01-01

    The wet deposition of combustion-derived atmospheric pollutant species, on to freshly cut or diesel-smoked Portland and Monks Park limestone and marble samples, was carried out in a laboratory 'wetting and drying' salt spray chamber for 84 days. Along with the effect of CO2-equilibrated de...... limestones, respectively. Thus the water and hydrogen ion loading effects are significant, as well as the limestone type, but the nature of the anion is not, under the given wetting and drying regime. Further work showed that the increased resistance of marble over that of limestone, to calcium loss...

  15. Modeling contaminant plumes in fractured limestone aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosthaf, Klaus; Brauns, Bentje; Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann

    Determining the fate and transport of contaminant plumes from contaminated sites in limestone aquifers is important because they are a major drinking water resource. This is challenging because they are often heavily fractured and contain chert layers and nodules, resulting in a complex transport...... model. The paper concludes with recommendations on how to identify and employ suitable models to advance the conceptual understanding and as decision support tools for risk assessment and the planning of remedial actions....... behavior. Improved conceptual models are needed for this type of site. Here conceptual models are developed by combining numerical models with field data. Several types of fracture flow and transport models are available for the modeling of contaminant transport in fractured media. These include...... the established approaches of the equivalent porous medium, discrete fracture and dual continuum models. However, these modeling concepts are not well tested for contaminant plume migration in limestone geologies. Our goal was to develop and evaluate approaches for modeling the transport of dissolved contaminant...

  16. Rheology, strain localization and stress history in the limestones of Bure (Meuse, France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rolland, A.

    2013-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of a radioactive waste repository (HLW) in clay-stone formation, the french national radioactive waste management agency (Andra) started in 2000 to build an underground research laboratory (URL) at Bure in the south of the Meuse district. The target horizon for the laboratory is a 135 m thick layer of argillaceous rock (Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone) that lies between about 420 and 555 meters below the surface at the URL site. The argillite layer (COX) is surrounded by limestones from the Dogger and the Oxfordian ages (respectively 164,7 to 175,6 Ma and 161,2 to 164,7 Ma). Numerous stylolites were found in these limestones. The aim of this work is to study the rheology of these stylolites-rich horizons and the stylolites as stress gauges in the Dogger and Oxfordian formations. In this work, a wide range of samples with and without stylolites were sampled in the Dogger and Oxfordian formations. Petrophysical measurements and microstructural studies showed that all these limestones have a microporous structure. We showed that the stylolites induced significant variations in some physical properties and in the rock strength. Based on an analytical model, presented here in details, linking a characteristic length associated to the stylolites morphology and the stress associated to the development of that stylolites, a method for the morphology analysis of stylolites is developed, using a Fourier power spectrum technique, by taking into account all the difficulties linked to the use of cores from deep boreholes. We apply this method on stylolites at various depths, starting from the Oxfordian formation at a depth of 158 meters to the Dogger formation at a depth of 800 meters. No stylolites are found in the intermediate Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone formation. We analyze 1D profiles taken on the outer part of the cores. In agreement with theoretical predictions, we always observe two regimes for small and large scales separated by a

  17. Treatment of LF slag to prevent powdering during cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorai S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The polymorphic transformation of the monoclinic β-polymorph to the orthorhombic γ-polymorph of di-calcium silicate at around 500°C during cooling results in disintegration of slag. The slag generated, during the production of thermo mechanically treated steel in ladle furnace at M/s Tata Steel Limited, Jamshedpur, India, behaves in similar manner. An attempt has been made to prevent the crumbling of ladle furnace slag. The experiments were conducted in 10 kg air induction furnace. Various types of silica source were used to prevent the disintegration of ladle furnace slag by reducing the basicity and optimizing the additives amount. Apart from silica sources, other additives like borax and barium carbonate were also used to stabilize the β phase. Present investigation reveals that disintegration of ladle furnace slag can be prevented either by addition of 0.2% boarx or 2% barium carbonate. Dust formation can also be prevented by decreasing the ladle furnace slag basicity to about 1.7. Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure test, of the borax and barium carbonate treated slag samples, indicates that barium carbonate treated slag cannot be used for the dusting prevention as it contains high level of barium.

  18. Steel slag in hot mix asphalt concrete : final report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-04-01

    In September 1994, steel slag test and control sections were constructed in Oregon to evaluate the use of steel slag in hot mix asphalt concrete (HMAC). This report covers the construction and five-year performance of a pavement constructed with 30% ...

  19. ANALYSIS OF KINETICS OF CAST IRON ALLOYING THROUGH SLAG PHASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Komarov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of cast iron alloying through slag phase due to use of nickel and copper oxides is considered and the analysis of kinetics regularity of alloying in case of absence of fuse in the form of milled cast-iron chips in slag and at their presence in it is carried out.

  20. The reaction of slag in cement, theory and computer modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Brouwers, H.J.H.; Fischer, H.B

    2006-01-01

    For a better understanding of the performance of slag in concrete, evaluating the feasibility of using one certain type of slag and possible improvement of its use in practice, fundamental knowledge about its reaction and interaction with other constituents is important. While the researches on

  1. Modified DHTT Equipment for Crystallization Studies of Mold Slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölbl, Nathalie; Harmuth, Harald; Marschall, Irmtraud

    2018-04-01

    The double hot thermocouple technique (DHTT) enables simulations of the temperature gradient at near-service conditions during continuous casting of steel. With the equipment applied so far, a rectangular slag film of even thickness often cannot be achieved. Further, the minimum temperature frequently lies within the slag film. Modified equipment can avoid these disadvantages via the following design features. The entire furnace chamber is heated to the selected temperature of the cold wire, and the minimum temperature is not located within the slag film. Furthermore, the shape of the heating wire is improved, which enables mounting of a thin, rectangular slag film between four platinum wires. This modification allows for investigations on transparent and translucent slags. So far, the results from DHTT investigations were represented via snapshots of the samples at certain experimental times. Therefore, appropriate methods for the graphical representation of the results were suggested: the maximum crystallinity, the time related to certain crystallinities with a dependence on the position within the slag film, and the crystal growth rate. The CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 slag investigated with this equipment was mineralogically examined additionally, and based on thermodynamic calculations, the allocation of temperatures to certain positions within the crystallized slag film was possible.

  2. ENERGY ASPECTS OF STEELMAKING SLAGS APPLICATION IN METALLURGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. L. Naydek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative assessment of energy intensity of converter steel production in different types of smelting with slag processing in the ladle was made. Analysis of the data shows that the use of liquid steel slag in steel production for its refining saves about 2.2 GJ or 75 kg of coal equivalent for each ton of metal.

  3. BRICKS WITH TOTAL REPLACEMENT OF CLAY BY FLY ASH MIXED WITH DIFFERENT MATERIALS

    OpenAIRE

    J.N Akhtar; J.Alam; M.N Akhtar

    2011-01-01

    Fly ash is a powdery substance obtained from the dust collectors in the Thermal power plants that use coal as fuel. From the cement point of view the mineralogy of Fly ash is important as it contains 80% - 90% of glass. The impurities in coal-mostly clays, shale’s, limestone & dolomite; they cannot be burned so they turn up as ash. The Fly ash of class C category was used as a raw material to total replacement of clay for making Fly ash bricks. In present study the effect of Fly ash with high...

  4. STOCHASTIC MODELING OF COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH OF PHOSPHORUS SLAG CONTENT CEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Allahverdi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the common methods for quick determination of compressive strength as one of the most important properties for assessment of cement quality is to apply various modeling approaches. This study is aimed at finding a model for estimating the compressive strength of phosphorus slag content cements. For this purpose, the compressive strengths of chemically activated high phosphorus slag content cement prepared from phosphorus slag (80 wt.%, Portland cement (14 wt.% and a compound chemical activator containing sodium sulfate and anhydrite (6 wt.% were measured at various Blaine finenesses and curing times. Based on the obtained results, a primary stochastic model in terms of curing time and Blaine fineness has been developed. Then, another different dataset was used to incorporate composition variable including weight fractions of phosphorus slag, cement, and activator in the model. This model can be effectively used to predict the compressive strength of phosphorus slag content cements at various Blaine finenesses, curing times, and compositions.

  5. Pyrochemical recovery of plutonium fluoride reduction slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, D.C.; Rayburn, J.A.

    1983-07-01

    A process was developed for the pyrochemical recovery of plutonium from residues resulting from the PuF 4 reduction process. The process involves crushing the CaF 2 slag and dissolving it at 800 0 C in a CaCl 2 solvent. The plutonium, which exists either as finely divided metal or as incompletely reduced fluoride salt, is reduced to metal and/or allowed to coalesce as a massive button in the bottom of the reaction crucible. The recovery of plutonium in a 1-day cycle averaged 96%; all of the resulting residues were discardable

  6. STEAM INJECTION INTO FRACTURED LIMESTONE AT LORING AIR FORCE BASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A research project on steam injection for the remediation of spent chlorinated solvents from fractured limestone was recently undertaken at the former Loring AFB in Limestone, ME. Participants in the project include the Maine Department of Environmental Protection, EPA Region I,...

  7. Catalytic and Gas-Solid Reactions Involving HCN over Limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anker; Johnsson, Jan Erik; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1997-01-01

    In coal-fired combustion systems solid calcium species may be present as ash components or limestone added to the combustion chamber. In this study heterogeneous reactions involving HCN over seven different limestones were investigated in a laboratory fixed-bed quartz reactor at 873-1,173 K...

  8. Effect of limestone particle size on egg production and eggshell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Different limestone particle sizes had no effect on any of the tested egg production and eggshell quality parameters. These results suggested that larger particles limestone are not necessarily essential to provide sufficient Ca2+ to laying hens for egg production and eggshell quality at end-of-lay, provided that the dietary Ca ...

  9. Investigations on steel slag re-utilization in developing countries; Hatten tojokoku ni okeru tekko slag sairiyo ni kansuru chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    In order to promote steel slag re-utilization in developing countries, a possibility was presented for technical cooperation to India, Indonesia and Thailand upon putting the status of slag utilization in Japan into order. Blast furnace slag produced in Japan (having a re-utilization rate of 95%) is re-utilized and processed as cement aggregates and road beds, and converter slag as civil engineering materials and ores. Steel making slag (having a re-utilization rate of 80%) is re-utilized as road, processing and civil engineering materials. Since the steel making slag faces intensifying competition with ash made by incinerating construction and general wastes, it is important to improve its price competitiveness or mixed utilization with other materials. Re-utilization has not advanced to a recognizable level in developing countries because of having no difficulty for availability of lands for wastes. However, growth of full-scale steel industries and elevation in tendency of environment preservation now urge increase in the slag re-utilization rate. Required to achieve the goal would include wider use of re-utilization technologies, quality control on slag, joint use of facilities to produce re-utilization products, and governmental assistance on burdens of transportation cost. Assistance from Japan is expected to help meet these requirements. 25 figs., 31 tabs.

  10. A review of WIPP [Waste Isolation Pilot Plant] repository clays and their relationship to clays of adjacent strata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumhansl, J.L.; Kimball, K.M.; Stein, C.L.

    1990-12-01

    The Salado Formation is a thick evaporite sequence located in the Permian Delaware Basin of southeastern New Mexico. This study focuses on the intense diagenetic alteration that has affected the small amounts of clay, feldspar, and quartz washed into the basin during salt deposition. These changes are of more than academic interest since this formation also houses the WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant). Site characterization concerns warrant compiling a detailed data base describing the clays in and around the facility horizon. An extensive sampling effort was undertaken to address these programmatic issues as well as to provide additional insight regarding diagenetic mechanisms in the Salado. Seventy-five samples were collected from argillaceous partings in halite at the stratigraphic level of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). These were compared with twenty-eight samples from cores of the Vaca Triste member of the Salado, a thin clastic unit at the top of the McNutt potash zone, and with a clay-rich sample from the lower contact of the Culebra Dolomite (in the overlying Rustler Formation). These settings were compared to assess the influence of differences in brine chemistry (i.e., halite and potash facies, normal to hypersaline marine conditions) and sediment composition (clays, sandy silt, dolomitized limestone) on diagenetic processes. 44 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs

  11. Restoration and Preservation of Engraved Limestone Blocks Discovered in Abu Mousa Excavation, Suez - Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil A. Abd El-Tawab BADER

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A lot of engraved limestone blocks were discovered at Awlad Abu Musa (east of Suez, Egypt in 1995/2007 by Supreme Council of Antiquities. The stone blocks were seriously affected by archaeological environments during burial environment in agriculture land. They were covered with thick clay layer with soil particles that disfigured them and hid their inscriptions. Prior to the conservation intervention, the materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Chemical analyses of ground water and microbiological study. After the material characterization, the conservation and restoration of the stone blocks were carried out including cleaning, consolidation, reduction of salts, Re-jointing, restoration and completion of lost parts. After that the blocks were exhibited in Suez museum.

  12. Delineation of a quick clay zone at Smørgrav, Norway, with electromagnetic methods under geotechnical constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalscheuer, Thomas; Bastani, Mehrdad; Donohue, Shane; Persson, Lena; Aspmo Pfaffhuber, Andreas; Reiser, Fabienne; Ren, Zhengyong

    2013-05-01

    In many coastal areas of North America and Scandinavia, post-glacial clay sediments have emerged above sea level due to iso-static uplift. These clays are often destabilised by fresh water leaching and transformed to so-called quick clays as at the investigated area at Smørgrav, Norway. Slight mechanical disturbances of these materials may trigger landslides. Since the leaching increases the electrical resistivity of quick clay as compared to normal marine clay, the application of electromagnetic (EM) methods is of particular interest in the study of quick clay structures. For the first time, single and joint inversions of direct-current resistivity (DCR), radiomagnetotelluric (RMT) and controlled-source audiomagnetotelluric (CSAMT) data were applied to delineate a zone of quick clay. The resulting 2-D models of electrical resistivity correlate excellently with previously published data from a ground conductivity metre and resistivity logs from two resistivity cone penetration tests (RCPT) into marine clay and quick clay. The RCPT log into the central part of the quick clay identifies the electrical resistivity of the quick clay structure to lie between 10 and 80 Ω m. In combination with the 2-D inversion models, it becomes possible to delineate the vertical and horizontal extent of the quick clay zone. As compared to the inversions of single data sets, the joint inversion model exhibits sharper resistivity contrasts and its resistivity values are more characteristic of the expected geology. In our preferred joint inversion model, there is a clear demarcation between dry soil, marine clay, quick clay and bedrock, which consists of alum shale and limestone.

  13. Clay and concrete brick

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dlamini, MN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Brick is one of the most used and versatile building materials in use today. Bricks can be defined as modular units connected by mortar in the formation of a building system or product. Commonly the word brick is used to refer to clay bricks, which...

  14. Clay matrix voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdicakis, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In many countries, it is planned that the long life highly radioactive nuclear spent fuel will be stored in deep argillaceous rocks. The sites selected for this purpose are anoxic and satisfy several recommendations as mechanical stability, low permeability and low redox potential. Pyrite (FeS 2 ), iron(II) carbonate, iron(II) bearing clays and organic matter that are present in very small amounts (about 1% w:w) in soils play a major role in their reactivity and are considered today as responsible for the low redox potential values of these sites. In this communication, we describe an electrochemical technique derived from 'Salt matrix voltammetry' and allowing the almost in-situ voltammetric characterization of air-sensitive samples of soils after the only addition of the minimum humidity required for electrolytic conduction. Figure 1 shows the principle of the developed technique. It consists in the entrapment of the clay sample between a graphite working electrode and a silver counter/quasi-reference electrode. The sample was previously humidified by passing a water saturated inert gas through the electrochemical cell. The technique leads to well-defined voltammetric responses of the electro-active components of the clays. Figure 2 shows a typical voltammogram relative to a Callovo-Oxfordian argillite sample from Bure, the French place planned for the underground nuclear waste disposal. During the direct scan, one can clearly distinguish the anodic voltammetric signals for the oxidation of the iron (II) species associated with the clay and the oxidation of pyrite. The reverse scan displays a small cathodic signal for the reduction of iron (III) associated with the clay that demonstrates that the majority of the previously oxidized iron (II) species were transformed into iron (III) oxides reducible at lower potentials. When a second voltammetric cycle is performed, one can notice that the signal for iron (II

  15. Field trial of a pulsed limestone diversion well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibrell, Philip L.; Denholm, C.; Dunn, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    The use of limestone diversion wells to treat acid mine drainage (AMD) is well-known, but in many cases, acid neutralization is not as complete as would be desired. Reasons for this include channeling of the water through the limestone bed, and the slow reaction rate of the limestone gravel. A new approach to improve the performance of the diversion well was tested in the field at the Jennings Environmental Education Center, near Slippery Rock, PA. In this approach, a finer size distribution of limestone was used so as to allow fluidization of the limestone bed, thus eliminating channeling and increasing particle surface area for faster reaction rates. Also, water flow was regulated through the use of a dosing siphon, so that consistent fluidization of the limestone sand could be achieved. Testing began late in the summer of 2010, and continued through November of 2011. Initial system performance during the 2010 field season was good, with the production of net alkaline water, but hydraulic problems involving air release and limestone sand retention were observed. In the summer of 2011, a finer size of limestone sand was procured for use in the system. This material fluidized more readily, but acid neutralization tapered off after several days. Subsequent observations indicated that the hydraulics of the system was compromised by the formation of iron oxides in the pipe leading to the limestone bed, which affected water distribution and flow through the bed. Although results from the field trial were mixed, it is believed that without the formation of iron oxides and plugging of the pipe, better acid neutralization and treatment would have occurred. Further tests are being considered using a different hydraulic configuration for the limestone sand fluidized bed.

  16. Physical Properties of Latvian Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Jurgelāne, I; Stepanova, V; Ločs, J; Mālers, J; Bērziņa-Cimdiņa, L

    2012-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of clays mostly depends on its mineral and chemical composition, particle size and pH value. The mutual influence of these parameters is complex. Illite is the most abundant clay mineral in Latvia and usually used in building materials and pottery. The viscosity and plasticity of Latvian clays from several deposits were investigated and correlated with mineral composition, particle size and pH value. Fractionated and crude clay samples were used. The p...

  17. To the problem of nonmetallic inclusions assimilation by slags in the course of steel casting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimov, Yu.V.; Krupman, L.I.; Medzhibozhskij, M.Ya.; Povkh, Yu.I.; Belanenko, A.A.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of slag viscosity as well as a method of steel pouring with slag-forming mixtures used upon the slag assimilation of oxide inclusions has been studied with a radioactive tracer method. The inclusions are absorbed by slag primarily in the course of filling casting moulds when a relatively intensive metal circulation occurs. The ensuing decrease of slag viscosity results in better purification of steel from inclusions. In the period of natural convection the inclusions are not removed irrespective of the slag properties. The bottom pouring results in the lowest degree of steel purification from inclusions due to the limited surface of a slag-metal contact

  18. Clay Animals and Their Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Creating clay animals and their habitats with second-grade students has long been one of the author's favorite classroom activities. Students love working with clay and they also enjoy drawing animal homes. In this article, the author describes how the students created a diorama instead of drawing their clay animal's habitat. This gave students…

  19. Mineralogy and environmental geochemistry of historical iron slag, Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatak, Nadine; Seal, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site in southeastern Pennsylvania, which features an Fe smelter that was operational in the 18th and 19th centuries, is dominated by three slag piles. Pile 1 slag, from the Hopewell Furnace, and pile 2 slag, likely from the nearby Cornwall Furnace, were both produced in cold-blast charcoal-fired smelters. In contrast, pile 3 slag was produced in an anthracite furnace. Ore samples from the nearby Jones and Hopewell mines that fed the smelter are mainly magnetite-rich with some sulfides (pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite) and accessory silicates (quartz, garnet, feldspar, and clay minerals). Slag piles 1 and 2 are similar mineralogically containing predominantly skeletal and dendritic aluminian diopside and augite, skeletal forsteritic olivine, glass, rounded blebs of metallic Fe, and exotic quartz. Olivine is a major phase in all samples from pile 2, whereas it occurs in only a few samples from pile 1. Samples of the bearing aluminian diopside, dendritic or fine-grained subhedral melilite, glass, euhedral spinel, metallic Fe, alabandite–oldhamite solid solution, as well as a sparse Ti carbonitride phase. The bulk chemistry of the slag is dominated by Al2O3 (8.5–16.2 wt.%), CaO (8.2–26.2 wt.%), MgO (4.2–24.7 wt.%), and SiO2 (36.4–59.8 wt.%), constituting between 81% and 97% of the mass of the samples. Piles 1 and 2 are chemically similar; pile 1 slag overall contains the highest Fe2O3, K2O and MnO, and the lowest MgO concentrations. Pile 3 slag is high in Al2O3, CaO and S, and low in Fe2O3, K2O and SiO2 compared to the other piles. In general, piles 1 and 2 are chemically similar to each other, whereas pile 3 is distinct – a conclusion that reflects their mineralogy. The similarities and differences among piles in terms of mineralogy and major element chemistry result from the different smelting conditions under which the slag formed and include the fuel source, the composition of the ore and flux, the type of

  20. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has through years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R 466). It states natural clay deposits may be used for membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system may contain at least 95% of all leachate created throughout...... ion transport as well as diffusion.Clay prospection for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island Lolland. The natural clay contains 60 to 75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium-type. The clay material...... has been evaluated using standardised methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15 to 0.3m thick clay membrane have been tested...

  1. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has throughout the years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R4669. It states that natural clay deposits may be used as membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system contains at least 95% of all leachate created...... into account advective ion transport as well as diffusion. Clay prospecting for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island of Lolland. The natural clay contains 60-75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium......-type. The clay material has been evaluated using the standardized methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15-0.3 m thick clay membrane...

  2. Utilizing steel slag in environmental application - An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, J. W.; Chew, L. H.; Choong, T. S. Y.; Tezara, C.; Yazdi, M. H.

    2016-06-01

    Steel slags are generated as waste material or byproduct every day from steel making industries.The potential environmental issues which are related with the slag dump or reprocessing for metal recovery are generally being focused in the research. However the chemistry and mineralogy of slag depends on metallurgical process which is able to determine whether the steel slag can be the reusable products or not. Nowadays, steel slag are well characterized by using several methods, such as X-ray Diffraction, ICP-OES, leaching test and many more. About the industrial application, it is mainly reused as aggregate for road construction, as armour stones for hydraulic engineering constructions and as fertilizers for agricultural purposes. To ensure the quality of steel slag for the end usage, several test methods are developed for evaluating the technical properties of steel slag, especially volume stability and environmental behaviour. In order to determine its environmental behaviour, leaching tests have been developed. The focus of this paper however is on those applications that directly affect environmental issues including remediation, and mitigation of activities that negatively impact the environment.

  3. Calibration-free electrical conductivity measurements for highly conductive slags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macdonald, Christopher J.; Gao, Huang; Pal, Uday B.; Van den Avyle, James A.; Melgaard, David K.

    2000-01-01

    This research involves the measurement of the electrical conductivity (K) for the ESR (electroslag remelting) slag (60 wt.% CaF 2 - 20 wt.% CaO - 20 wt.% Al 2 O 3 ) used in the decontamination of radioactive stainless steel. The electrical conductivity is measured with an improved high-accuracy-height-differential technique that requires no calibration. This method consists of making continuous AC impedance measurements over several successive depth increments of the coaxial cylindrical electrodes in the ESR slag. The electrical conductivity is then calculated from the slope of the plot of inverse impedance versus the depth of the electrodes in the slag. The improvements on the existing technique include an increased electrochemical cell geometry and the capability of measuring high precision depth increments and the associated impedances. These improvements allow this technique to be used for measuring the electrical conductivity of highly conductive slags such as the ESR slag. The volatilization rate and the volatile species of the ESR slag measured through thermogravimetric (TG) and mass spectroscopy analysis, respectively, reveal that the ESR slag composition essentially remains the same throughout the electrical conductivity experiments

  4. Characterization and recovery of copper values from discarded slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Bisweswar; Mishra, Barada Kanta; Angadi, Shivakumar; Pradhan, Siddharth Kumar; Prakash, Sandur; Mohanty, Jayakrushna

    2010-06-01

    In any copper smelter large quantities of copper slag are discarded as waste material causing space and environmental problems. This discarded slag contains important amounts of metallic values such as copper and iron. The recovery of copper values from an Indian smelter slag that contains 1.53% Cu, 39.8% Fe and 34.65% SiO(2) was the focus of the present study. A complete investigation of the different phases present in the slag has been carried out by means of optical microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. It is observed that iron and silica are mostly associated with the fayalite phase whereas copper is present in both oxide and sulfide phases. These oxide and sulfide phases of copper are mostly present within the slag phase and to some extent the slag is also embedded inside the oxide and sulfide phases. The recovery of copper values from the discarded slag has been explored by applying a flotation technique using conventional sodium isopropyl xanthate (SIX) as the collector. The effects of flotation parameters such as pH and collector concentration are investigated. Under optimum flotation conditions, it is possible to achieve 21% Cu with more than 80% recovery.

  5. Alkali-slag cements for the immobilization of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, C.; Day, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Alkali-slag cements consist of glassy slag and an alkaline activator and can show both higher early and later strengths than Type III Portland cement, if a proper alkaline activator is used. An examination of microstructure of hardened alkali-slag cement pastes with the help of XRD and SEM with EDAX shows that the main hydration product is C-S-H (B) with low C/S ratio and no crystalline substances exist such as Ca(OH) 2 , Al (OH) 3 and sulphoaluminates. Mercury intrusion tests indicate that hardened alkali-slag cement pastes have a lower porosity than ordinary Portland cement, and contain mainly gel pores. The fine pore structure of hardened alkali-slag cement pastes will restrict the ingress of deleterious substances and the leaching of harmful species such as radionuclides. The leachability of Cs + from hardened alkali-slag cement pastes is only half of that from hardened Portland cement. From all these aspects, it is concluded that alkali-slag cements are a better solidification matrix than Portland cement for radioactive wastes

  6. Vanadium bioavailability in soils amended with blast furnace slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Maja A., E-mail: maja.larsson@slu.se [Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7014, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Baken, Stijn, E-mail: stijn.baken@ees.kuleuven.be [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Leuven University, Kasteelpark Arenberg 20 bus 2459, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Smolders, Erik, E-mail: erik.smolders@ees.kuleuven.be [Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Leuven University, Kasteelpark Arenberg 20 bus 2459, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Cubadda, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.cubadda@iss.it [Department of Food Safety and Veterinary Public Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena 299, Rome 00161 (Italy); Gustafsson, Jon Petter, E-mail: jon-petter.gustafsson@slu.se [Department of Soil and Environment, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, P.O. Box 7014, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Division of Land and Water Resources Engineering, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Brinellvägen 28, 100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-10-15

    Blast furnace (BF) slags are commonly applied as soil amendments and in road fill material. In Sweden they are also naturally high in vanadium. The aim of this study was to assess the vanadium bioavailability in BF slags when applied to soil. Two soils were amended with up to 29% BF slag (containing 800 mg V kg{sup −1}) and equilibrated outdoors for 10 months before conducting a barley shoot growth assay. Additional soil samples were spiked with dissolved vanadate(V) for which assays were conducted two weeks (freshly spiked) and 10 months (aged) after spiking. The BF slag vanadium was dominated by vanadium(III) as shown by V K-edge XANES spectroscopy. In contrast, results obtained by HPLC-ICP-MS showed that vanadium(V), the most toxic vanadium species, was predominant in the soil solution. Barley shoot growth was not affected by the BF slag additions. This was likely due to limited dissolution of vanadium from the BF slag, preventing an increase of dissolved vanadium above toxic thresholds. The difference in vanadium bioavailability among treatments was explained by the vanadium concentration in the soil solution. It was concluded that the vanadium in BF slag is sparingly available. These findings should be of importance in environmental risk assessment.

  7. Thermodynamic modelling of alkali-activated slag cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Rupert J.; Lothenbach, Barbara; Bernal, Susan A.; Provis, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A thermodynamic modelling analysis of alkali-activated slag cements is presented. • Thermodynamic database describes zeolites, alkali carbonates, C–(N–)A–S–H gel. • Updated thermodynamic model for Mg–Al layered double hydroxides. • Description of phase assemblages in Na 2 SiO 3 - and Na 2 CO 3 -activated slag cements. • Phase diagrams for NaOH-activated and Na 2 SiO 3 -activated slag cements are simulated. - Abstract: This paper presents a thermodynamic modelling analysis of alkali-activated slag-based cements, which are high performance and potentially low-CO 2 binders relative to Portland cement. The thermodynamic database used here contains a calcium (alkali) aluminosilicate hydrate ideal solid solution model (CNASH-ss), alkali carbonate and zeolite phases, and an ideal solid solution model for a hydrotalcite-like Mg–Al layered double hydroxide phase. Simulated phase diagrams for NaOH- and Na 2 SiO 3 -activated slag-based cements demonstrate the high stability of zeolites and other solid phases in these materials. Thermodynamic modelling provides a good description of the chemical compositions and types of phases formed in Na 2 SiO 3 -activated slag cements over the most relevant bulk chemical composition range for these cements, and the simulated volumetric properties of the cement paste are consistent with previously measured and estimated values. Experimentally determined and simulated solid phase assemblages for Na 2 CO 3 -activated slag cements were also found to be in good agreement. These results can be used to design the chemistry of alkali-activated slag-based cements, to further promote the uptake of this technology and valorisation of metallurgical slags

  8. Minimizing lead release levels in secondary smelters slags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenkler, E.S.; Graham, S.; Ghosh, R.; Greenhut, V.A.

    1991-01-01

    Five lead-containing slags and four mattes were analyzed to reveal microstructure, semi-quantitative microchemistry, and phases present. To determine if the slags could be incorporated as a glass so that lead release levels could be stabilized, glass batches were formulated based on slag compositions. Leaching tests showed that all materials that were fritted in a glass batch had lower lead release levels than non-adjusted materials, and all could satisfy EPA test requirements. The mole ratio of glass modifiers to glass formers played an important role in the extent of lead release. Small additions of phosphate to a batch had a significant effect on lowering lead release levels

  9. Moessbauer study of ancient iron smelting slag in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, A.

    2008-01-01

    For an investigation of the ancient iron manufacturing technique, a reproducing experiment was carried out by archaeologists, where ancient type of iron smelting furnace was built and iron sand with high titanium contents was used as the raw material. During the operation of furnace, a large amount of slag flowed away from the furnace. In order to investigate the possibility for the estimation about the operative condition of furnace and the raw material, 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy was applied for characterizing these slags and it was found that these slags mainly consisted of ferropseudobrookite (FeTi 2 O 5 ).

  10. Numerical Investigations on the Slag Eye in Steel Ladles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-He Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A numerical model has been developed to analyze the transient three-dimensional and three-phase flow in a bottom stirring ladle with a centered porous plug, which takes into account the steel, gas, and slag phases; it enables us to predict the fluid flow and heat transfer in the very important steel/slag region. The numerical results of the present model show that the obtained relationship between nondimensional areas of slag eye and the Froude number is in good agreement with the reported data.

  11. Optimizing of Work Arc Furnace to Decopperisation of Flash Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bydałek A.W.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Discusses an attempt to optimize the operation of an electric furnace slag to be decopperisation suspension of the internal recycling process for the production of copper. The paper presents a new method to recover copper from metallurgical slags in arc-resistance electric furnace. It involves the use of alternating current for a first period reduction, constant or pulsed DC in the final stage of processing. Even distribution of the electric field density in the final phase of melting caused to achieve an extremely low content of metallic copper in the slag phase. They achieved by including the economic effects by reducing the time reduction.

  12. Production of precipitated calcium carbonate from industrial byproduct slags; Saostetun kalsiumkarbonaatin tuotanto karbonaattivapaista kuonatuotteista (SLAG2PCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zevenhoven, R. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland). Heat Engineering Lab.; Teir, S.; Eloneva, S.; Savolahti, J. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Espoo (Finland). Energy Technology and Environmental Protection

    2006-12-19

    Production of precipitate calcium carbonate from industrial by- product slags-project, 'SLAG2PCC', is a spin-off from ClimBus technology programme CO{sub 2} Nordic Plus-project, financed by the Finnish Technology Agency Tekes and the Finnish Recovery Boiler Committee. 'SLAG2PCC'-project is financed by Tekes, Ruukki Productions, UPM Kymmene and Waertsilae Finland. The possibility to produce precipitated calcium carbonate, PCC, from carbonate free industrial by-products (slags), combined with binding of carbon dioxide for climate change mitigation is studied in this project. The suitability of a process found from the literature, in which calcium used for carbonation is dissolved from calcium silicates using acetic acid as a solvent, is investigated for the carbonation of slags from the steel industry. During the calcium extraction experiments performed in the CO2 Nordic Plus - project it was found out that calcium is rapidly extracted from blast furnace and basic oxygen furnace slags. Atmospheric carbonation of the solution containing the dissolved slag and acetic acid directly has not succeeded yet due to low pH of the solution. Addition of NaOH, to increase of the solution pH, resulted in calcium carbonate precipitate in atmospheric pressure. The future goal of the project is to optimize process conditions so that the formed calcium carbonate is suitable for use as PCC. (orig.)

  13. Study of glass ceramic material on the base of ash group simulating slag of plasma shaft furnace for high temperature reprocessing of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aloj, A.S.; Dmitriev, S.A.; Stefanovskij, S.V.

    1997-01-01

    Using the methods of X-ray diffraction, differential thermal and micro-probe analysis it is shown that the processes of minerals formation and homogenization in ash residue based charge under the heating up to 1450 deg C take place with a high rate and completely finish during 10 minutes. Homogeneous materials containing besides glassy phase crystalline phases and metallic shots are formed in this process. The products obtained with fluxes (dolomite and clay) additions are more homogeneous than a flux-less fused slag. Losses of α-radioactive nuclides during the melting of ash residue at 1300 deg C do not exceed 1.5% and is likely attributed with the products of uranium decay. Hydrolytic stability of the slags estimated from the rate of α-radioactive elements lixiviation is on the level of (1.4-5.7)x10 -4 g/(cm 2 x day) at 95 deg C

  14. Electrical conductivity of sandstone, limestone, and granite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duba, A.; Piwinskii, A.J.; Santor, M.; Weed, H.C.

    1978-01-01

    The electrical conductivity of cylindrical cores of Westerly granite, Indiana limestone and Nugget, St Peter and Kayenta sandstones was measured at about 25/sup 0/C in vacuo, in air, and after saturation in distilled water, tap water, and 0.1 M NaCl solution. The three-electrode technique with a guard ring and the two-electrode technique without a guard ring were used. Core aspect ratio over the range of 2.00 to 0.25, as well as frequency over the range of 50 Hz to 10 kHz, influences the conductivity of all rocks, especially those measured in vacuo. Measurements from water-saturated samples using a guard ring are not appreciably different from those obtained without a guard ring. The conductivity of rocks saturated in 0.1 M NaCl solution changes least with a change in aspect ratio; for these rocks a linear relationship, known as Archie's Law, exists between log porosity and log conductivity. No simple correlation was found between those factors in rocks saturated with tap or distilled water. Thus, it appears Archie's Law is of questionable value for correlating laboratory data from rocks saturated with low-conductivity fluids.

  15. Residual CO2 trapping in Indiana limestone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Maghraby, Rehab M; Blunt, Martin J

    2013-01-02

    We performed core flooding experiments on Indiana limestone using the porous plate method to measure the amount of trapped CO(2) at a temperature of 50 °C and two pressures: 4.2 and 9 MPa. Brine was mixed with CO(2) for equilibration, then the mixture was circulated through a sacrificial core. Porosity and permeability tests conducted before and after 884 h of continuous core flooding confirmed negligible dissolution. A trapping curve for supercritical (sc)CO(2) in Indiana showing the relationship between the initial and residual CO(2) saturations was measured and compared with that of gaseous CO(2). The results were also compared with scCO(2) trapping in Berea sandstone at the same conditions. A scCO(2) residual trapping end point of 23.7% was observed, indicating slightly less trapping of scCO(2) in Indiana carbonates than in Berea sandstone. There is less trapping for gaseous CO(2) (end point of 18.8%). The system appears to be more water-wet under scCO(2) conditions, which is different from the trend observed in Berea; we hypothesize that this is due to the greater concentration of Ca(2+) in brine at higher pressure. Our work indicates that capillary trapping could contribute to the immobilization of CO(2) in carbonate aquifers.

  16. Mineralogy and environmental geochemistry of historical iron slag, Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site, Pennsylvania, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R.

    2012-01-01

    The Hopewell Furnace National Historic Site in southeastern Pennsylvania, which features an Fe smelter that was operational in the 18th and 19th centuries, is dominated by three slag piles. Pile 1 slag, from the Hopewell Furnace, and pile 2 slag, likely from the nearby Cornwall Furnace, were both produced in cold-blast charcoal-fired smelters. In contrast, pile 3 slag was produced in an anthracite furnace. Ore samples from the nearby Jones and Hopewell mines that fed the smelter are mainly magnetite-rich with some sulfides (pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite) and accessory silicates (quartz, garnet, feldspar, and clay minerals). Slag piles 1 and 2 are similar mineralogically containing predominantly skeletal and dendritic aluminian diopside and augite, skeletal forsteritic olivine, glass, rounded blebs of metallic Fe, and exotic quartz. Olivine is a major phase in all samples from pile 2, whereas it occurs in only a few samples from pile 1. Samples of the 2 O 3 (8.5–16.2 wt.%), CaO (8.2–26.2 wt.%), MgO (4.2–24.7 wt.%), and SiO 2 (36.4–59.8 wt.%), constituting between 81% and 97% of the mass of the samples. Piles 1 and 2 are chemically similar; pile 1 slag overall contains the highest Fe 2 O 3 , K 2 O and MnO, and the lowest MgO concentrations. Pile 3 slag is high in Al 2 O 3 , CaO and S, and low in Fe 2 O 3 , K 2 O and SiO 2 compared to the other piles. In general, piles 1 and 2 are chemically similar to each other, whereas pile 3 is distinct – a conclusion that reflects their mineralogy. The similarities and differences among piles in terms of mineralogy and major element chemistry result from the different smelting conditions under which the slag formed and include the fuel source, the composition of the ore and flux, the type of blast (cold versus hot), which affects the furnace temperature, and other beneficiation methods. The three distinct slag piles at Hopewell are enriched in numerous trace elements, such as As (up to 12 mg/kg), Cd (up to 0.4 mg

  17. A Study of Clay-Epoxy Nanocomposites Consisting of Unmodified Clay and Organo Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Edward

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Clay-epoxy nanocomposites were synthesized from DGEBA resin and montmorillonite clay with an in-situ polymerization. One type of untreated clay and two types of organo clay were used to produce the nanocompsoites. The aims of this study were to examine the nanocomposite structure using different tools and to compare the results between the unmodified clay and modified clays as nanofillers. Although diffractogram in reflection mode did not show any apparent peak of both types of materials, the transmitted XRD (X-Ray Difraction graphs, DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimeter analysis and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope images revealed that the modified clay-epoxy and unmodified clay-epoxy provides different results. Interestingly, the micrographs showed that some of the modified clay layers possessed non-exfoliated layers in the modified clay-epoxy nanocomposites. Clay aggregates and a hackle pattern were found from E-SEM images for both types of nanocomposite materials. It is shown that different tools should be used to determine the nanocomposite structure.

  18. Characterization of ancient Indian iron and entrapped slag ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    year old Indian iron using microprobe techniques (EDS, XRD and PIXE). Several different local locations in the iron matrix and in the entrapped slag inclusions were analyzed. The P content of the metallic iron matrix was very heterogeneous.

  19. Evaluation of Grade 120 Granulated Ground blast Furnace Slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    This study evaluates Grade 120 Granulated Ground Blast Furnace Slag (GGBFS) and its effect on the properties of hydraulic cement concretes used in structural and pavement construction. Several mix designs, structural and pavement, were used for this ...

  20. Brief summary of slag handling options reviewed for the slagging pyrolysis incinerator in the transuranic waste treatment facility (TWIF) at the INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darnell, G.R.

    1980-06-01

    This report summarizes the technical problems associated with molten transuranic waste slag as it flows from the incinerator shaft (gasifier) of the slagging pyrolysis incinerator. It addresses essential gasifier seals, slag casting and pouring technology, and transportation and packaging problems. Areas requiring further study and testing are identified

  1. LUTETIAN LIMESTONES IN THE PARIS REGION: PETROGRAPHIC AND COMPOSITIONAL EXAMINATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BLANC, A.; HOLMES, L.L.; HARBOTTLE, G.

    1998-01-01

    Stone for building and decorating monuments in the Paris Basin from antiquity to the present came from numerous quarries in the Lutetian limestone formations of the region. To identify specific-stone sources used for masonry and sculptures in these monuments, a team of geologists and archaeologists has investigated 300 quarries and collected 2,300 limestone samples for study in a collaborative effort by geologists and chemists. Petrographic and paleontologic examinations of thin sections enable geologists to distinguish the Tertiary Lutetian limestones from similar stone in Jurassic and Cretaceous strata. The methods of the geologist have been supplemented by those of the chemist whose compositional studies by neutron activation analysis can differentiate among the fine-grained upper Lutetian limestones extracted from specific ancient quarries

  2. Improving DMS 9210 requirements for limestone rock asphalt - final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Limestone Rock Asphalt (LRA) mixtures have been produced and placed for several decades using : specification requirements currently listed under DMS 9210. Several districts have had placement issues : and premature failures at the beginning of 2010....

  3. Limestone doses affecting mineral contents in tropical grass forage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armelin, M.J.A.; Saiki, M.

    2005-01-01

    Field trial was performed at the experimental farm of Southeast Embrapa Cattle, Sao Carlos - SP, Brazil, on a 16 year old Brachiaria decumbens pasture, grown on a distrophic Hapludox (Oxisol), recovered by the use of limestone and fertilizer. The experiments were carried out in random blocks, with 6 replications and 5 treatments. The 100 m 2 blocks were established in the pasture. Each block received a sequence of limestone doses of 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8 t/ha. The forage samples were taken one year after limestone application on soil surface. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) followed by gamma-ray spectrometry was the analytical method used to determine mineral contents. The statistical analysis showed a negative linear correlation of Br, Co, Cr, Mn and Zn contents in forage with the limestone doses, while the uptake of Mg was affected in a positive way. (author)

  4. THERMAL AND SINTERING CHARACTERIZATION OF A IGCC SLAG

    OpenAIRE

    Acosta, Anselmo; Iglesias, Isabel; Aineto, Mónica; Romero, Maximina; Rincón López, Jesús María

    2002-01-01

    IGCC slag is a vitreous residual product from the new induction gasification combined cycle gasification thermal power plants. In order to characterize this waste as secondary new material for the production of new glasses and glass-ceramics as construction materials; this slag from the Puertollano, Ciudad Real, Spain power plants has been fully thermally investigated. After controlled heating this waste gives rise to hematite, anorthite, and cristobalite crystallized materials.

  5. Slag Evaluation to Reduce Energy Consumption and EAF Electrical Instability

    OpenAIRE

    Vieira,Deisi; Almeida,Rodolfo Arnaldo Montecinos de; Bielefeldt,Wagner Viana; Vilela,Antônio Cezar Faria

    2016-01-01

    In steel mills that operate with electric arc furnaces (EAF), it is interesting to ensure greater stability to the electric arc to aim at less distortion in the electrical system, with consequent reduction in electric power consumption. The slag foaming increases electric arc stability by reducing the total harmonic distortion (THD) between EAF phases. In this study, information about the chemical composition of the slag and electrical parameters of an EAF were collected. With the composition...

  6. Reuse of steel slag in bituminous paving mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorlini, Sabrina; Sanzeni, Alex; Rondi, Luca

    2012-03-30

    This paper presents a comprehensive study to evaluate the mechanical properties and environmental suitability of electric arc furnace (EAF) steel slag in bituminous paving mixtures. A variety of tests were executed on samples of EAF slag to characterize the physical, geometrical, mechanical and chemical properties as required by UNI EN specifications, focusing additionally on the volumetric expansion associated with hydration of free CaO and MgO. Five bituminous mixtures of aggregates for flexible road pavement were designed containing up to 40% of EAF slag and were tested to determine Marshall stability and indirect tensile strength. The leaching behaviour of slag samples and bituminous mixtures was evaluated according to the UNI EN leaching test. The tested slag showed satisfactory physical and mechanical properties and a release of pollutants generally below the limits set by the Italian code. Tests on volume stability of fresh materials confirmed that a period of 2-3 months is necessary to reduce effects of oxides hydration. The results of tests performed on bituminous mixtures with EAF slag were comparable with the performance of mixtures containing natural aggregates and the leaching tests provided satisfactory results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Stabilization of Black Cotton Soil Using Micro-fine Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Rajesh Prasad; Parihar, Niraj Singh

    2016-09-01

    This work presents the results of laboratory tests conducted on black cotton soil mixed with micro-fine slag. Different proportions of micro-fine slag, i.e., 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 % were mixed with the black cotton soil to improve soil characteristics. The improvement in the characteristics of stabilized soil was assessed by evaluating the changes in the physical and strength parameters of the soil, namely, the Atterberg limits, free swell, the California Bearing Ratio (CBR), compaction parameters and Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS). The mixing of micro-fine slag decreases the liquid limit, plasticity index and Optimum Moisture Contents (OMC) of the soil. Micro-fine slag significantly increases the plastic limit, UCS and CBR of the soil up to 6-7 % mixing, but mixing of more slag led to decrease in the UCS and CBR of the soil. The unsoaked CBR increased by a substantial amount unlike soaked CBR value. The swell potential of the soil is reduced from medium to very low. The optimum amount of micro-fine slag is found to be approximately 6-7 % by the weight of the soil.

  8. Properties and hydration of blended cements with steelmaking slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourounis, S.; Tsivilis, S.; Tsakiridis, P.E.; Papadimitriou, G.D.; Tsibouki, Z.

    2007-01-01

    The present research study investigates the properties and hydration of blended cements with steelmaking slag, a by-product of the conversion process of iron to steel. For this purpose, a reference sample and three cements containing up to 45% w/w steel slag were tested. The steel slag fraction used was the '0-5 mm', due to its high content in calcium silicate phases. Initial and final setting time, standard consistency, flow of normal mortar, autoclave expansion and compressive strength at 2, 7, 28 and 90 days were measured. The hydrated products were identified by X-ray diffraction while the non-evaporable water was determined by TGA. The microstructure of the hardened cement pastes and their morphological characteristics were examined by scanning electron microscopy. It is concluded that slag can be used in the production of composite cements of the strength classes 42.5 and 32.5 of EN 197-1. In addition, the slag cements present satisfactory physical properties. The steel slag slows down the hydration of the blended cements, due to the morphology of contained C 2 S and its low content in calcium silicates

  9. Applicability of Carbonated Electric Arc Furnace Slag to Mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, S; Izaki, M; Arisawa, R; Hisyamudin, M N N; Murakami, K; Maegawa, A

    2012-01-01

    Authors have been studying the absorption of CO 2 in the steelmaking slag. In this study, an application of the electric arc furnace slag after the carbonation to admixture of mortar was investigated with the JIS (A6206-1997) method for ground granulated blast-furnace slag for concrete. The percent flows for the test mortar were smaller than that for the standard mortar. The percent flow of the carbonated slag whose average particle size of more than approximately 4 μm increased with an increase in the average size of the particles. Because the compressive strengths of the test mortar cured for 91 days were almost the same as those cured 28 days, the slag after the carbonation was thought not to have self-hardening property for a medium and long term. The compressive strength for the test mortar was almost unchanged within a range of approximately 2 to 7 μm of the average particle size, and it in this range was highest. The activity indexes for the test mortar prepared with the slag after the carbonation ranged from approximately 40 to 60%.

  10. Stabilization of carbon dioxide and chromium slag via carbonation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xingxing; Yu, Binbin; Xu, Wei; Fan, Zheng; Wu, Zucheng; Zhang, Huimin

    2017-08-01

    As the main greenhouse gas, CO 2 is considered as a threat in the context of global warming. Many available technologies to reduce CO 2 emission was about CO 2 separation from coal combustion and geological sequestration. However, how to deal with the cost-effective storage of CO 2 has become a new challenge. Moreover, chromium pollution, the treatment of which requires huge energy consumption, has attracted people's widespread attention. This study is aimed to develop the sequestration of CO 2 via chromium slag. A dynamic leaching experiment of chromium slag was designed to testify the ability of CO 2 adsorption onto chromium slag and to release Cr(VI) for stabilization. The results showed that the accumulative amounts of Cr(VI) were ca. 2.6 mg/g released from the chromium slag after 24 h of leaching. In addition, ca. 89 mg/g CO 2 was adsorbed by using pure CO 2 in the experiment at 12 h. Calcite is the only carbonate species in the post-carbonated slag analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction and thermal analysis. The approach provides the feasibility of the utilization of chromium slag and sequestration of the carbon dioxide at the same time at ordinary temperatures and pressures.

  11. Influence of slag-seed interaction on MHD generator performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luongo, C.A.; Kruger, C.M.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of past work in the field of slag/seed interaction is presented. The ideal solution model for the slag and its failure to lead to accurate predictions are discussed. The non-ideal solution model is introduced. Data on potassium vapor pressure over slags taken at the National Bureau of Standards and Montana State University were compiled and compared. Large disagreement between these sources was observed. The shortcomings of the complete thermodynamic equilibrium models led to over predictions in the fraction of seed lost to the slag. A model including non-equilibrium effects is introduced. The heat/mass transfer analogy is invoked to calculate the mass transfer rate of potassium towards the slag. Using typical conditions for a large MHD generator, an integral method is used to evaluate the potassium concentration boundary layer thickness. The calculations are performed with the slag runoff (ash rejection) as a parameter. The increase in boundary layer resistance due to potassium depletion is calculated

  12. Long term mechanical properties of alkali activated slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, J.; Zheng, W. Z.; Xu, Z. Z.; Leng, Y. F.; Qin, C. Z.

    2018-01-01

    This article reports a study on the microstructural and long-term mechanical properties of the alkali activated slag up to 180 days, and cement paste is studied as the comparison. The mechanical properties including compressive strength, flexural strength, axis tensile strength and splitting tensile strength are analyzed. The results showed that the alkali activated slag had higher compressive and tensile strength, Slag is activated by potassium silicate (K2SiO3) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions for attaining silicate modulus of 1 using 12 potassium silicate and 5.35% sodium hydroxide. The volume dosage of water is 35% and 42%. The results indicate that alkali activated slag is a kind of rapid hardening and early strength cementitious material with excellent long-term mechanical properties. Single row of holes block compressive strength, single-hole block compressive strength and standard solid brick compressive strength basically meet engineering requirements. The microstructures of alkali activated slag are studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The hydration products of alkali-activated slag are assured as hydrated calcium silicate and hydrated calcium aluminate.

  13. A Metagenomic Survey of Limestone Hill in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Y. W.; Li, K. Y.; Chen, Y. W.; Huang, T. Y.; Chen, W. J.; Shih, Y. J.; Chen, J. S.; Fan, C. W.; Hsu, B. M.

    2016-12-01

    The limestone of Narro-Sky in Tainliao, Taiwan is of Pleistocene reef limestones interbedded in clastic layers that covered the Takangshan anticlines. Understanding how microbial relative abundance was changed in response to changes of environmental factors may contribute to better comprehension of roles that microorganisms play in altering the landscape structures. In this study, microorganisms growing on the wall of limestone, in the water dripping from the limestone wall and of soil underneath the wall were collected from different locations where the environmental factors such as daytime illumination, humidity, or pH are different. Next generation sequencing (NGS) was carried out to examine the compositions and richness of microbial community. The metagenomics were clustered into operational taxonomic units (OTUs) to analyze relative abundance, diversities and principal coordinates analysis (PCoA). Our results showed the soil sample has the highest alpha diversity while water sample has the lowest. Four major phyla, which are Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Cyanobacteria, account for 80 % of total microbial biomass in all groups. Cyanobacteria were found most abundantly in limestone wall instead of water or soil of weathering limestone. The PCoA dimensional patterns of each phylum showed a trace of microbial community dynamic changes, which might be affected by environmental factors. This study provides the insights to understand how environmental factors worked together with microbial community to shape landscape structures.

  14. Converting SDAP into gypsum in a wet limestone scrubber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogh, F [Faelleskemikerne, Elsamprojekt A/S, Fredericia (Denmark)

    1996-12-01

    The ELSAM power pool has an installed electrical capacity of approx. 5 GW{sub e}, mainly firing import coal. The major base load units are equipped with desulphurization units and three different desulphurization technologies are used: the wet limestone gypsum process, the spray dry absorption process and a sulphuric acid process. Gypsum and sulphuric acid are commercialized, whereas it has been difficult to utilize the spray dry absorption product (SDAP). The main constituents of SDAP are calcium sulphide, calcium chloride, hydrated lime and impurities mainly originating from fly ash. Sulphide can be oxidized into sulphate in acidic solution - the reaction is utilized in the wet limestone gypsum process - and the possibility of using any spare capacity in the wet limestone gypsum units to oxidize the sulphide content of SDAP into sulphate and produce usable gypsum has been investigated in the laboratory and in a 400 MW{sub e} equivalent wet limestone unit. The limestone inhibition effect of the addition of SDAP is currently being studied in the laboratory in order to determine the effect of different SDAP types (plant/coal sources) on limestone reactivity before further long-term full-scale tests are performed and permanent use of the process planned. (EG)

  15. Influence of limestone on the hydration of Portland cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lothenbach, Barbara; Le Saout, Gwenn; Gallucci, Emmanuel; Scrivener, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The influence of the presence of limestone on the hydration of Portland cement was investigated. Blending of Portland cement with limestone was found to influence the hydrate assemblage of the hydrated cement. Thermodynamic calculations as well as experimental observations indicated that in the presence of limestone, monocarbonate instead of monosulfate was stable. Thermodynamic modelling showed that the stabilisation of monocarbonate in the presence of limestone indirectly stabilised ettringite leading to a corresponding increase of the total volume of the hydrate phase and a decrease of porosity. The measured difference in porosity between the 'limestone-free' cement, which contained less than 0.3% CO 2 , and a cement containing 4% limestone, however, was much smaller than calculated. Coupling of thermodynamic modelling with a set of kinetic equations which described the dissolution of the clinker, predicted quantitatively the amount of hydrates. The quantities of ettringite, portlandite and amorphous phase as determined by TGA and XRD agreed well with the calculated amounts of these phases after different periods of time. The findings in this paper show that changes in the bulk composition of hydrating cements can be followed by coupled thermodynamic models. Comparison between experimental and modelled data helps to understand in more detail the dominating processes during cement hydration

  16. Modeling the influence of limestone addition on cement hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Ragab Mohamed

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the influence of using Portland limestone cement “PLC” on cement hydration by characterization of its microstructure development. The European Standard EN 197-1:2011 and Egyptian specification ESS 4756-1/2009 permit the cement to contain up to 20% ground limestone. The computational tools assist in better understanding the influence of limestone additions on cement hydration and microstructure development to facilitate the acceptance of these more economical and ecological materials. μic model has been developed to enable the modeling of microstructural evolution of cementitious materials. In this research μic model is used to simulate both the influence of limestone as fine filler, providing additional surfaces for the nucleation and growth of hydration products. Limestone powder also reacts relatively slow with hydrating cement to form monocarboaluminate (AFmc phase, similar to the mono-sulfoaluminate (AFm phase formed in ordinary Portland cement. The model results reveal that limestone cement has accelerated cement hydration rate, previous experimental results and computer model “cemhyd3d” are used to validate this model.

  17. Thermal properties of the Cobourg Limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, Michelle

    The underground storage of used nuclear fuel in Deep Geologic Repositories (DGRs) has been a subject of research in Canada for decades. One important technical aspect of repository design is the accommodation of the mechanical impacts of thermal inputs (heating) from the fuel as it goes through the remainder of its life cycle. Placement room spacing, a major factor in project cost, will be determined by the ability of the host rock to dissipate heat. The thermal conductivity and linear thermal expansion will determine the evolution of the temperature and thermally-induced stress fields. Thermal processes must be well understood to design a successful DGR. This thesis examines the thermal properties of rocks, how they are influenced by factors such as temperature, pressure, mineralogy, porosity, and saturation; and common methods for calculating and/or measuring these properties. A brief overview of thermal and thermally-coupled processes in the context of DGRs demonstrates the degree to which they would impact design, construction, and operation of these critical structures. Several case histories of major in situ heating experiments are reviewed to determine how the lessons learned could be applied to a Canadian Underground Demonstration Facility (UDF). A mineralogy investigation using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) examines samples of the Cobourg Limestone from the Bowmanville and Bruce sites, and demonstrates geographical variability within the Cobourg Formation. The thermal properties of samples from the Bowmanville site are determined. A divided bar apparatus was constructed and used to measure thermal conductivity. The temperature measurement component of the divided bar apparatus was used to measure linear thermal expansion. Finally, the past investigations into the thermal impact of a DGR are reviewed, and the implications of the laboratory testing results on similar analyses are discussed.

  18. Study on the Effect of Straw Fiber on the Performance of Volcanic Slag Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Li-guang; Liu, Xi-xu

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the effects of straw fiber on the working performance, mechanical properties and frost resistance of volcanic slag lightweight aggregate concrete were studied. The experimental results show that the straw fiber is subjected to surface carbonization treatment and mixed into the volcanic slag light aggregate concrete. The flexural strength and fracture pressure ratio of volcanic slag lightweight aggregate concrete are improved obviously Improved volcanic slag lightweight aggregate concrete brittleness improves toughness. Carbonized straw fiber greatly improves the frost resistance of volcanic slag lightweight aggregate concrete. So that the volcanic slag light aggregate concrete freeze-thaw cycle can reach 300 times.

  19. An Investigation into the Mechanics of Windblown Dust Entrainment from Nickel Slag Surfaces Resembling Armoured Desert Pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Robert Steven

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the dynamics of PM 10 emission from a nickel slag stockpile that closely resembles a desert pavement in physical characteristics. In the field, it was observed that slag surfaces develop by natural processes into a well-armoured surface over some period of time. The surface then consists of two distinct layers; a surficial armour layer containing only non-erodible gravel and cobble-sized clasts, and an underlying dust-laden layer, which contains a wide size range of slag particles, from clay-sized to cobble-sized. This surficial armour layer protects the underlying fines from wind entrainment, at least under typical wind conditions; however, particle emissions still do occur under high wind speeds. The dynamics of particle entrainment from within these surfaces are investigated herein. It is shown that the dynamics of the boundary layer flow over these lag surfaces are influenced by the inherent roughness and permeability of the surficial armour layer, such that the flow resembles those observed over and within vegetation canopies, and those associated with permeable gravel-bed river channels. Restriction of air flow within the permeable surface produces a high-pressure zone within the pore spaces, resulting in a Kelvin-Helmholtz shear instability, which triggers coherent motions in the form of repeating burst-sweep cycles. Using Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA), it is demonstrated that the lower boundary layer is characterized by both Q4 sweeping motions and Q2 bursting motions, while the upper boundary layer is dominated by Q2 bursts. Pore air motions within the slag material were measured using buried pressure ports. It is shown that the mean pressure gradient which forms within the slag material results in net upward displacement of air, or wind pumping. However, this net upward motion is a result of rapid oscillatory motions which are directly driven by coherent boundary layer motions. It is also demonstrated that

  20. Research of Deformation of Clay Soil Mixtures Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Romas Girkontas; Tadas Tamošiūnas; Andrius Savickas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to determine clay soils and clay soils mixtures deformations during drying. Experiments consisted from: a) clay and clay mixtures bridges (height ~ 0,30 m, span ~ 1,00 m); b) tiles of clay and clay, sand and straw (height, length, wide); c) cylinders of clay; clay and straw; clay, straw and sand (diameter; height). According to the findings recommendations for clay and clay mixtures drying technology application were presented. During the experiment clay bridge bear...

  1. Chemical durability of slag produced by thermal plasma melting of low-level miscellaneous solid wastes. Effects of slag composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amakawa, Tadashi; Yasui, Shinji

    2001-01-01

    Low-level radioactive miscellaneous solid wastes are generated from commercial operation of nuclear power plants and will be generated from decommissioning of nuclear power plants in future. Static leaching tests were carried out in deionized water of 10degC on slag obtained by thermal plasma melting of simulating materials of the miscellaneous solids wastes with surrogate elements of radionuclides. It is found that logarithm of normalized elemental mass loss from the slag is proportional to the basicity represented by mole fractions of main structural oxides of the slag, such as SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , CaO, FeO and MgO. The range of static leaching rates from the slag is determined based on the above results and the basicity range of the miscellaneous solid wastes. Then we compared the leaching rates form the slag and from high level waste glasses. On these grounds, we concluded that the slag obtained by thermal plasma melting of miscellaneous solid wastes can stabilize radio-nuclides in it by no means inferior to the high level waste glasses. (author)

  2. Alteration of municipal and industrial slags under atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafał Kowalski, Piotr; Michalik, Marek

    2014-05-01

    The Waste Management System in Poland is being consequently built since 1998. After important changes in legislation, local governments have taken over the duty of waste collection. New points of selective collection of wastes have been opened and new sorting and composting plants were built. The last stage of introducing the Waste Management System is construction of waste incineration power plants. From nine installations which were planned, six are now under construction and they will start operating within the next two years. It is assumed that the consumption of raw wastes for these installations will reach 974 thousand tons per year. These investments will result in increased slags and ashes production. Now in Poland several local waste incinerators are operating and predominant amount of produced incineration residues is landfilled. These materials are exposed to atmospheric conditions in time of short term storage (just after incineration) and afterwards for a longer period of time on the landfill site. During the storage of slags low temperature mineral transformations and chemical changes may occur and also some components can be washed out. These materials are stored wet because of the technological processes. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of storage in atmospheric conditions on slags from incineration of industrial and municipal wastes. The experiment started in January 2013. During this period slag samples from incineration of industrial and municipal wastes were exposed to atmospheric conditions. Samples were collected after 6 and 12 months. Within this time the pH value was measured monthly, and during the experimental period remained constant on the level of 9.5. After 6 months of exposure only slight changes in mineral compositions were observed in slags. The results of XRD analysis of municipal slags showed increase in content of carbonate minerals in comparison to the raw slag samples. In industrial slags, a decrease in

  3. UTILIZATION OF LIGHTWEIGHT MATERIALS MADE FROM COAL GASIFICATION SLAGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    None

    1998-01-01

    The integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) process is an emerging technology that utilizes coal for power generation and production of chemical feedstocks. However, the process generates large amounts of solid waste, consisting of vitrified ash (slag) and some unconverted carbon. In previous projects, Praxis investigated the utilization of ''as-generated'' slags for a wide variety of applications in road construction, cement and concrete production, agricultural applications, and as a landfill material. From these studies, we found that it would be extremely difficult for ''as-generated'' slag to find large-scale acceptance in the marketplace even at no cost because the materials it could replace were abundantly available at very low cost. It was further determined that the unconverted carbon, or char, in the slag is detrimental to its utilization as sand or fine aggregate. It became apparent that a more promising approach would be to develop a variety of value-added products from slag that meet specific industry requirements. This approach was made feasible by the discovery that slag undergoes expansion and forms a lightweight material when subjected to controlled heating in a kiln at temperatures between 1400 and 1700 F. These results confirmed the potential for using expanded slag as a substitute for conventional lightweight aggregates (LWA). The technology to produce lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from slag was subsequently developed by Praxis with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI), and internal resources. The major objectives of the subject project are to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of commercial production of LWA and ULWA from slag and to test the suitability of these aggregates for various applications. The project goals are to be accomplished in two phases: Phase I, comprising the production of LWA and ULWA from slag at the large pilot scale, and

  4. An Alternative Quality Control Technique for Mineral Chemistry Analysis of Portland Cement-Grade Limestone Using Shortwave Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrullah Zaini

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Shortwave infrared (SWIR spectroscopy can be applied directly to analyze the mineral chemistry of raw or geologic materials. It provides diagnostic spectral characteristics of the chemical composition of minerals, information that is invaluable for the identification and quality control of such materials. The present study aims to investigate the potential of SWIR spectroscopy as an alternative quality control technique for the mineral chemistry analysis of Portland cement-grade limestone. We used the spectroscopic (wavelength position and depth of absorption feature and geochemical characteristics of limestone samples to estimate the abundance and composition of carbonate and clay minerals on rock surfaces. The depth of the carbonate (CO3 and Al-OH absorption features are linearly correlated with the contents of CaO and Al2O3 in the samples, respectively, as determined by portable X-ray fluorescence (PXRF measurements. Variations in the wavelength position of CO3 and Al-OH absorption features are related to changes in the chemical compositions of the samples. The results showed that the dark gray and light gray limestone samples are better suited for manufacturing Portland cement clinker than the dolomitic limestone samples. This finding is based on the CaO, MgO, Al2O3, and SiO2 concentrations and compositions. The results indicate that SWIR spectroscopy is an appropriate approach for the chemical quality control of cement raw materials.

  5. Creep in buffer clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Adey, R.

    1999-12-01

    The study involved characterization of the microstructural arrangement and molecular forcefields in the buffer clay for getting a basis for selecting suitable creep models. It is concluded that the number of particles and wide range of the particle bond spectrum require that stochastical mechanics and thermodynamics will be considered and they are basic to the creep model proposed for predicting creep settlement of the canisters. The influence of the stress level on creep strain of MX-80 clay is not well known but for the buffer creep is approximately proportional to stress. Theoretical considerations suggest a moderate impact for temperatures up to 90 deg C and this is supported by model experiments. It is believed that the assumption of strain being proportional to temperature is conservative. The general performance of the stochastic model can be illustrated in principle by use of visco-elastic rheological models implying a time-related increase in viscosity. The shear-induced creep settlement under constant volume conditions calculated by using the proposed creep model is on the order of 1 mm in ten thousand years and up to a couple of millimeters in one million years. It is much smaller than the consolidation settlement, which is believed to be on the order of 10 mm. The general conclusion is that creep settlement of the canisters is very small and of no significance to the integrity of the buffer itself or of the canisters

  6. Euroclay 95. Clays and clay materials sciences. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsen, A.; Grobet, P.; Keung, M.; Leeman, H.; Schoonheydt, R.; Toufar, H.

    1995-01-01

    The document contains the abstracts of the invited lecturers (18) and posters (247) presented at EUROCLAY '95. Clays and clay materials sciences. 13 items (4 from the invited lecturers and 12 from posters) have been considered within the INIS Subject Scope and indexed separately

  7. Euroclay 95. Clays and clay materials sciences. Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsen, A; Grobet, P; Keung, M; Leeman, H; Schoonheydt, R; Toufar, H [eds.

    1995-08-20

    The document contains the abstracts of the invited lecturers (18) and posters (247) presented at EUROCLAY `95. Clays and clay materials sciences. 13 items (4 from the invited lecturers and 12 from posters) have been considered within the INIS Subject Scope and indexed separately.

  8. Elemental properties of copper slag and measured airborne exposures at a copper slag processing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugford, Christopher; Gibbs, Jenna L; Boylstein, Randy

    2017-08-01

    In 1974, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health recommended a ban on the use of abrasives containing >1% silica, giving rise to abrasive substitutes like copper slag. We present results from a National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health industrial hygiene survey at a copper slag processing facility that consisted of the collection of bulk samples for metals and silica; and full-shift area and personal air samples for dust, metals, and respirable silica. Carcinogens, suspect carcinogens, and other toxic elements were detected in all bulk samples, and area and personal air samples. Area air samples identified several areas with elevated levels of inhalable and respirable dust, and respirable silica: quality control check area (236 mg/m 3 inhalable; 10.3 mg/m 3 respirable; 0.430 mg/m 3 silica), inside the screen house (109 mg/m 3 inhalable; 13.8 mg/m 3 respirable; 0.686 mg/m 3 silica), under the conveyor belt leading to the screen house (19.8 mg/m 3 inhalable), and inside a conveyor access shack (11.4 mg/m 3 inhalable; 1.74 mg/m 3 respirable; 0.067 mg/m 3 silica). Overall, personal dust samples were lower than area dust samples and did not exceed published occupational exposure limits. Silica samples collected from a plant hand and a laborer exceeded the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienist Threshold Limit Value of 0.025 µg/m 3 . All workers involved in copper slag processing (n = 5) approached or exceeded the Occupational Safety and Health Administration permissible exposure limit of 10 µg/m 3 for arsenic (range: 9.12-18.0 µg/m 3 ). Personal total dust levels were moderately correlated with personal arsenic levels (R s = 0.70) and personal respirable dust levels were strongly correlated with respirable silica levels (R s = 0.89). We identified multiple areas with elevated levels of dust, respirable silica, and metals that may have implications for personal exposure at other facilities if preventive

  9. Analysis of the Optimum Usage of Slag for the Compressive Strength of Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han-Seung; Wang, Xiao-Yong; Zhang, Li-Na; Koh, Kyung-Taek

    2015-03-18

    Ground granulated blast furnace slag is widely used as a mineral admixture to replace partial Portland cement in the concrete industry. As the amount of slag increases, the late-age compressive strength of concrete mixtures increases. However, after an optimum point, any further increase in slag does not improve the late-age compressive strength. This optimum replacement ratio of slag is a crucial factor for its efficient use in the concrete industry. This paper proposes a numerical procedure to analyze the optimum usage of slag for the compressive strength of concrete. This numerical procedure starts with a blended hydration model that simulates cement hydration, slag reaction, and interactions between cement hydration and slag reaction. The amount of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is calculated considering the contributions from cement hydration and slag reaction. Then, by using the CSH contents, the compressive strength of the slag-blended concrete is evaluated. Finally, based on the parameter analysis of the compressive strength development of concrete with different slag inclusions, the optimum usage of slag in concrete mixtures is determined to be approximately 40% of the total binder content. The proposed model is verified through experimental results of the compressive strength of slag-blended concrete with different water-to-binder ratios and different slag inclusions.

  10. Characterization of Ladle Furnace Slag from Carbon Steel Production as a Potential Adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankica Rađenović

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A promising type of steel slag for applications is the ladle furnace (LF slag, which is also known as the basic slag, the reducing slag, the white slag, and the secondary refining slag. The LF slag is a byproduct from further refining molten steel after coming out of a basic oxygen furnace (BOF or an electric arc furnace (EAF. The use of the LF slag in further applications requires knowledge of its characteristics. The LF slag characterization in this paper has been performed using the following analytical methods: chemical analysis by energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS, mineralogical composition by X-ray diffraction (XRD, surface area properties by the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET and the Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH methods, surface chemistry by infrared absorption (FTIR spectroscopy, and morphological analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results showed that the main compounds are calcium, silicon, magnesium, and aluminium oxides, and calcium silicates under their various allotropic forms are the major compounds in the LF slag. Surface area properties have shown that the LF slag is a mesoporous material with relatively great BET surface area. The ladle furnace slag is a nonhazardous industrial waste because the ecotoxicity evaluation by its eluate has shown that the LF slag does not contain constituents which might in any way affect the environment harmfully.

  11. Attrition of limestone by impact loading in fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrizio Scala; Fabio Montagnaro; Piero Salatino [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Napoli (Italy). Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione

    2007-09-15

    The present study addresses limestone attrition and fragmentation associated with impact loading, a process which may occur extensively in various regions of fluidized bed (FB) combustors/gasifiers, primarily the jetting region of the bottom bed, the exit region of the riser, and the cyclone. An experimental protocol for the characterization of the propensity of limestone to undergo attrition/fragmentation by impact loading is reported. The application of the protocol is demonstrated with reference to an Italian limestone whose primary fragmentation and attrition by surface wear have already been characterized in previous studies. The experimental procedure is based on the characterization of the amount and particle size distribution of the debris generated upon the impact of samples of sorbent particles against a target. Experiments were carried out at a range of particle impact velocities between 10 and 45 m/s, consistent with jet velocities corresponding to typical pressure drops across FB gas distributors. The protocol has been applied to either raw or preprocessed limestone samples. In particular, the effect of calcination, sulfation, and calcination/recarbonation cycles on the impact damage suffered by sorbent particles has been assessed. The measurement of particle voidage and pore size distribution by mercury intrusion was also accomplished to correlate fragmentation with the structural properties of the sorbent samples. Fragmentation by impact loading of the limestone is significant. Lime displays the largest propensity to undergo impact damage, followed by the sorbent sulfated to exhaustion, the recarbonated sorbent, and the raw limestone. Fragmentation of the raw limestone and of the sulfated lime follows a pattern typical of the failure of brittle materials. The fragmentation behavior of lime and recarbonated lime better conforms to a disintegration failure mode, with an extensive generation of very fine fragments. 27 refs., 9 figs. 1 tab.

  12. Artificial neural networks application for solid fuel slagging intensity predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakietek Sławomir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Slagging issues present in pulverized steam boilers very often lead to heat transfer problems, corrosion and not planned outages of boilers which increase the cost of energy production and decrease the efficiency of energy production. Slagging especially occurs in regions with reductive atmospheres which nowadays are very common due to very strict limitations in NOx emissions. Moreover alternative fuels like biomass which are also used in combustion systems from two decades in order to decrease CO2 emissions also usually increase the risk of slagging. Thus the prediction of slagging properties of fuels is not the minor issue which can be neglected before purchasing or mixing of fuels. This however is rather difficult to estimate and even commonly known standard laboratory methods like fusion temperature determination or special indexers calculated on the basis of proximate and ultimate analyses, very often have no reasonable correlation to real boiler fuel behaviour. In this paper the method of determination of slagging properties of solid fuels based on laboratory investigation and artificial neural networks were presented. A fuel data base with over 40 fuels was created. Neural networks simulations were carried out in order to predict the beginning temperature and intensity of slagging. Reasonable results were obtained for some of tested neural networks, especially for hybrid feedforward networks with PCA technique. Consequently neural network model will be used in Common Intelligent Boiler Operation Platform (CIBOP being elaborated within CERUBIS research project for two BP-1150 and BB-1150 steam boilers. The model among others enables proper fuel selection in order to minimize slagging risk.

  13. CFD Modelling and Experimental Testing of Thermal Calcination of Kaolinite Rich Clay Particles - An Effort towards Green Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay

    Cement industry is one of the major industrial emitters of greenhouse gases, generating 5-7% of the total anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Consequently, use of supplementary cementitious materials (SCM) to replace part of the CO2-intensive cement clinker is an attractive way to mitigate CO2 emissions...... from cement industry. SCMs based on industrial byproducts like fly ashes and slags are subject to availability problems. Yet clays are the most ubiquitous material on earth's crust. Thus, properly calcined clays are a very promising candidate for SCMs to produce green cements. Calcination...... property of the calcined clay material, among which is the density of calcines. By using the variation in density of calcines, an optimum residence time has been marked. At this time the calcines display a minimum density that corresponds to the most dehydroxylated calcines. The behavior of flash calcined...

  14. High temperature slagging incineration of hazardous waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanbrabant, R.; Van de Voorde, N.

    1987-01-01

    The SCK/CEN, as the treatment center for the low level radioactive waste in Belgium, develops appropriate treatment systems for different kinds of wastes. The technical concept of the high temperature slagging incineration system has been developed and improved. The construction of the first demonstration plant was initiated in 1974. Since then the system has been operated regularly and further developed with the view to industrial operations. Now it handles about 5 tons of waste in a week. The waste which is treated consists of low level beta/gamma and alpha-contaminated radioactive waste. Because of the special characteristics the system is thought to be an excellent incineration system for industrial hazardous waste as well. Recently the SCK/CEN has received the authorization to treat industrial hazardous waste in the same installation. Preliminary tests have been executed on special waste products, such as PCB-contaminated liquids, with excellent incineration results. Incineration efficiency up to 99.9999% could be obtained. The paper presents the state of the art of this original The SCK/CEN-technology and gives the results of the tests done with special hazard

  15. Influence of clay mineralogy on clay based ceramic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radzali Othman; Tuan Besar Tuan Sarif; Zainal Arifin Ahmad; Ahmad Fauzi Mohd Noor; Abu Bakar Aramjat

    1996-01-01

    Clay-based ceramic products can either be produced directly from a suitable clay source without the need further addition or such products can be produced from a ceramic body formulated by additions of other raw materials such as feldspar and silica sand. In either case, the mineralogical make-up of the clay component plays a dominating role in the fabrication and properties of the ceramic product. This study was sparked off by a peculiar result observed in one of five local ball clay samples that were used to reformulate a ceramic body. Initial characterisation tests conducted on the clays indicated that these clays can be classified as kaolinitic. However, one of these clays produced a ceramic body that is distinctively different in terms of whiteness, smoothness and density as compared to the other four clays. Careful re-examination of other characterisation data, such as particle size distribution and chemical analysis, failed to offer any plausible explanation. Consequently, the mineralogical analysis by x-ray diffraction was repeated by paying meticulous attention to specimen preparation. Diffraction data for the clay with anomalous behaviour indicated the presence of a ∼ 10A peak that diminished when the same specimen was re-tested after heating in an oven at 12O degree C whilst the other four clays only exhibit the characteristic kaolinite (Al sub 2 O sub 3. 2SiO sub 2. 2H sub 2 0) and muscovite peaks at ∼ 7A and ∼ 10A before and after heat treatment. This suggests the presence of the mineral halloysite (A1 sub 2 0 sub 3. 2SiO sub 2.4H sub 2 0) in that particular clay. This difference in mineralogy can be attributed to account for the variations in physical properties of the final product. Consequently, this paper reviews in general the precautionary measures that must be adhered to during any mineralogical investigation of clay minerals or clay-based materials. The common pitfalls during specimen preparation, machine settings and interpretation of

  16. Performance of japanese quails fed feeds containing different corn and limestone particle sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DA Berto

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating performance and egg quality of Japanese quails fed feeds containing different corn and limestone particle sizes. A total number of 648 birds in the peak of production was distributed in a random complete block experimental design, using a 2x3 factorial arrangement (2 corn particle sizes and 3 limestone particle sizes. Birds were designated to one of two blocks, with six replicates of 18 birds each. Mean geometric diameter (MGD values used were 0.617mm and 0.723mm (corn fine and coarse particle sizes, respectively, and 0.361mm, 0.721mm, and 0.947mm (limestone fine, intermediate and coarse particle sizes, respectively. The following treatments were applied: T1: fine corn feed, with 100% fine limestone; T2: fine corn feed, with 50% fine limestone and 50% intermediate limestone; T3: fine corn feed, with 50% fine limestone and 50% coarse limestone; T4: coarse corn feed, with 100% fine limestone; T5: coarse corn feed, with 50% fine limestone and 50% intermediate limestone; T6: coarse corn feed, with 50% fine limestone and 50% coarse limestone. The experiment lasted 112 days, consisting of 4 cycles of 28 days. No significant interaction was observed among corn and limestone particle sizes for any of the analyzed parameters. There were no significant effects (p>0.05 of the tested corn particle sizes on quail performance or egg quality. There were significant (p<0.05 isolated effects of limestone particle size only on the percentage of cracked eggs, which was reduced when birds fed 50% coarse limestone (0.947mm and 50% fine limestone (0.361mm as compared to those fed 100% fine limestone. Therefore, the inclusion of 50% coarse limestone (0.947mm is recommended for quail egg production.

  17. Encapsulation of Clay Platelets inside Latex Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorn, D.J.; Ming, W.; Herk, van A.M.; Fernando, R.H.; Sung, Li-Piin

    2009-01-01

    We present our recent attempts in encapsulating clay platelets inside latex particles by emulsion polymerization. Face modification of clay platelets by cationic exchange has been shown to be insufficient for clay encapsulation, leading to armored latex particles. Successful encapsulation of

  18. Use of soil-steel slag-class-C fly ash mixtures in subgrade applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    In Indiana, large quantities of recyclable : materials - such as steel slag, blast furnace : slag and fly ash - are generated each year as : by-products of various industries. Instead of : disposing these by-products into landfills, : we can recycle ...

  19. CALCIUM OXIDE CHARACTERISTICS PREPARED FROM AMBUNTEN’S CALCINED LIMESTONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimatul Munawaroh

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Calcium oxide (CaO and calcium carbonate (CaCO3 are widely used in industry. CaO and CaCO3 can be synthesized or derived from limestone. The purpose of this study to determine the characteristics of CaO calcined limestone from Ambunten Sumenep. Lime in calcined at 850 ° C for 6 hours. Characterization of X-ray fluorescence (XRF was conducted to determine the chemical composition of limestone, X-ray diffraction test (XRD to find the lime crystalline phase and FTIR test to determine the absorption of wave number. XRF test results showed that the limestone chemical composition consisted of Ca of 95.37% as the dominant element, Mg of 4.1%, Fe 0.17% and Y by 0.39%. The XRD test results showed that the limestone crystal phase is ankerite (Ca [Fe, Mg] [CO3] 2 and after the calcined phase calcination is vaterite (Ca [OH] 2, calcite (CaO and calcite (CaCO3. While the FTIR test results show that the CaO spectra are seen at 3741.24, 1417.12 and 874.14 cm-1.

  20. Modifying the properties of finely ground limestone by tumbling granulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, Oliver; Eckert, Maroš; Tomášová, Barbora; Peciar, Peter; Ščasný, Martin; Fekete, Roman; Peciar, Marián

    2016-06-01

    Calcium carbonate in the form of finely ground limestone is a material that has found its application in a wide range of industries, in the chemical, rubber, agricultural, and paper industries, is used for desulfurization of boilers and other. In civil engineering, ground limestone is used for the production of building materials, plaster and mortar mixtures, as a filler in concrete mixtures, in road construction, and as an essential component of mastic asphalt. This paper deals with examining the modification of the properties of finely ground limestone by the tumbling agglomeration method. It has been shown that the components of concrete with a round grain have a positive effect on the pumping of concrete in comparison with an elongated grain or the rough surface of crushed stone. The experiments will be carried out on a granulation plate using a variety of granulation liquid. The agglomerates and their properties were compared with untreated finely ground limestone, with a focus on detecting changes in compressibility, density and particle size. The output of this paper is a description and graphical representation of the changes in the properties of ground limestone before and after the agglomeration process.

  1. Characterization of Limestone as Raw Material to Hydrated Lime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem Hwidi, Rajeb; Nuraiti Tengku Izhar, Tengku; Saad, Farah Naemah Mohd

    2018-03-01

    In Malaysia, limestone is essentially important for the economic growth as raw materials in the industry sector. Nevertheless, a little attention was paid to the physical, chemical, mineralogical, and morphological properties of the limestone using X-ray fluorescence (X-RF), X-ray diffraction (X-RD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and Scanning electron microscopy / energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) respectively. Raw materials (limestone rocks) were collected from Bukit Keteri area, Chuping, Kangar, Perlis, Malaysia. Lab crusher and lab sieved were utilized to prepare five different size of ground limestone at (75 µm, 150 µm, 225 µm, 300, and 425 µm) respectively. It is found that the main chemical composition of bulk limestone was Calcium oxide (CaO) at 97.58 wt.% and trace amount of MnO, Al2O3, and Fe2O3 at 0.02%, 0.35%, and 0.396% respectively. XRD diffractograms showed characteristic peaks of calcite and quartz. Furthermore, main FTIR absorption bands at 1,419, 874.08 and 712.20 cm-1 indicated the presence of calcite. The micrographs showed clearly the difference of samples particle size. Furthermore, EDS peaks of Ca, O, and C elements confirmed the presence of CaCO3 in the samples.

  2. Modifying the properties of finely ground limestone by tumbling granulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macho Oliver

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Calcium carbonate in the form of finely ground limestone is a material that has found its application in a wide range of industries, in the chemical, rubber, agricultural, and paper industries, is used for desulfurization of boilers and other. In civil engineering, ground limestone is used for the production of building materials, plaster and mortar mixtures, as a filler in concrete mixtures, in road construction, and as an essential component of mastic asphalt. This paper deals with examining the modification of the properties of finely ground limestone by the tumbling agglomeration method. It has been shown that the components of concrete with a round grain have a positive effect on the pumping of concrete in comparison with an elongated grain or the rough surface of crushed stone. The experiments will be carried out on a granulation plate using a variety of granulation liquid. The agglomerates and their properties were compared with untreated finely ground limestone, with a focus on detecting changes in compressibility, density and particle size. The output of this paper is a description and graphical representation of the changes in the properties of ground limestone before and after the agglomeration process.

  3. Crystallization characteristics of iron-rich glass ceramics prepared from nickel slag and blast furnace slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-Jie; Ni, Wen; Li, Ke-Qing; Huang, Xiao-Yan; Zhu, Li-Ping

    2011-08-01

    The crystallization process of iron-rich glass-ceramics prepared from the mixture of nickel slag (NS) and blast furnace slag (BFS) with a small amount of quartz sand was investigated. A modified melting method which was more energy-saving than the traditional methods was used to control the crystallization process. The results show that the iron-rich system has much lower melting temperature, glass transition temperature ( T g), and glass crystallization temperature ( T c), which can result in a further energy-saving process. The results also show that the system has a quick but controllable crystallization process with its peak crystallization temperature at 918°C. The crystallization of augite crystals begins from the edge of the sample and invades into the whole sample. The crystallization process can be completed in a few minutes. A distinct boundary between the crystallized part and the non-crystallized part exists during the process. In the non-crystallized part showing a black colour, some sphere-shaped augite crystals already exist in the glass matrix before samples are heated to T c. In the crystallized part showing a khaki colour, a compact structure is formed by augite crystals.

  4. Products of steel slags an opportunity to save natural resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motz, H; Geiseler, J

    2001-01-01

    In Germany, and in the most industrial countries, the use of blast furnace and steel slags as an aggregate for civil engineering, for metallurgical use and as fertiliser has a very long tradition. Since the introduction of the basic oxygen steel making furnace (BOF) process and the electric arc furnace (EAF) process the German steel industry started extensive research on the development of fields of application for BOF and EAF slags. These investigations have been mainly performed by Forschungsgemeinschaft Eisenhüttenschlacken e. V. (FEhS), the Research Association for blast furnace and steel slags. Today steel slags are well characterised and long-term experienced materials mainly used as aggregates for road construction (e.g. asphaltic or unbound layers), as armour-stones for hydraulic engineering constructions (e.g. stabilisation of shores), and as fertiliser for agriculture purposes. These multifarious fields of application could only be achieved because the steelworks influence the quality of slags by a careful selection of raw materials and a suitable process route. Furthermore, subsequent procedures like a treatment of the liquid slag, an appropriate heat treatment and a suitable processing have been developed to ensure that the quality of steel slags is always adequate for the end use. Depending on the respective field of application, the suitability of steel slags has to be proven by determining the technical properties, as well as the environmental compatibility. For this reason test methods have been developed to evaluate the technical properties especially the volume stability and the environmental behaviour. To evaluate the volume stability a suitable test (steam test) has been developed and the results from laboratory tests were compared with the behaviour of steel slags under practical conditions, e.g. in a road. To determine the environmental behaviour leaching tests have been developed. In the meanwhile most of these test methods are drafted or

  5. Nickel, copper and cobalt coalescence in copper cliff converter slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation is to assess the effect of various additives on coalescence of nickel, copper and cobalt from slags generated during nickel extraction. The analyzed fluxes were silica and lime while examined reductants were pig iron, ferrosilicon and copper-silicon compound. Slag was settled at the different holding temperatures for various times in conditions that simulated the industrial environment. The newly formed matte and slag were characterized by their chemical composition and morphology. Silica flux generated higher partition coefficients for nickel and copper than the addition of lime. Additives used as reducing agents had higher valuable metal recovery rates and corresponding partition coefficients than fluxes. Microstructural studies showed that slag formed after adding reductants consisted of primarily fayalite, with some minute traces of magnetite as the secondary phase. Addition of 5 wt% of pig iron, ferrosilicon and copper-silicon alloys favored the formation of a metallized matte which increased Cu, Ni and Co recoveries. Addition of copper-silicon alloys with low silicon content was efficient in copper recovery but coalescence of the other metals was low. Slag treated with the ferrosilicon facilitated the highest cobalt recovery while copper-silicon alloys with silicon content above 10 wt% resulted in high coalescence of nickel and copper, 87 % and 72 % respectively.

  6. BUILDING MATERIALS AND PRODUCTS BASED ON SILICON MANGANESE SLAGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOLSHAKOV V. I.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Raising of problem. Currently of particular relevance was given to the matter of introduction in manufacture of building materials and products, resource-saving techniques and technologies; integrated use of raw materials and materials that prevent or significantly reduce their harmful impact on the environment. This allows you to recycle hundreds of thousands of tons of the fiery liquid slags of silicon manganese and to develop effective structural materials that can replace metals, non-metallic building materials of natural origin, concretes, cast stone, plastics and refractories. Purpose. The study of the structure and properties of building materials and products from electric furnace slag of silicon manganese. Conclusion. Slags from the smelting of silicon manganese are classified as acidic. Their lime factor is in the range of 0.47–0.52. The composition of the slag located in the heterogeneous region SiO2 near the line of separation of cristobalite spread to the crystallization of wollastonite, according to the ternary system MnO-CaO-SiO2, which in consideration of their stability, allows the development of technology of building materials (gravel, sand, granulated slag, etc. and products (foundation blocks, road slabs, containers for transportation and storage of hazardous waste, and others.

  7. Pyrometallurgical slags as a potential source of selected metals recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nowińska

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Complex analysis of concentration and form of occurrence such metals as Zn, Pb, Fe and Cu in slags formed during a current zinc production in the Imperial Smelting Process (ISP is a possible basis for development of optimal recovery technology. For this purpose studies of slags from the current production of the Shaft Furnace Unit and of the Lead Refining of the “Miasteczko Śląskie” Zinc Smelting Plant were carried out. The studies results show that slags includes high concentrations of: Zn from 0,064 % to 1,680 %, Pb from 10,56 % to 50,71 %, Fe from 0,015 % to 2,576 %, Cu from 7,48 % to 64,95 %, and change in a broad range. This slags show significant heterogeneity, caused by intermetallic phases (Zn - Pb, Cu - Zn, Cu - Pb formed on the surface thereof. It is so possible that slag can be a potential source of this metals recovery.

  8. Thixotropic Properties of Latvian Illite Containing Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Lakevičs, Vitālijs; Stepanova, Valentīna; Niedra, Santa; Dušenkova, Inga; Ruplis, Augusts

    2015-01-01

    Thixotropic properties of Latvian Devonian and Quaternary clays were studied. Dynamic viscosity of the water clay suspensions were measured with a rotating viscometer. Influence of concentration, pH and modifiers on the thixotropic clay properties was analyzed. It was found that Latvian clays have thixotropic properties. Stability of clay suspensions is described with the thixotropy hysteresis loop. Increasing the speed of the viscometer rotation, dynamic viscosity of the clay suspension decr...

  9. Viscosity and Plasticity of Latvian Illite Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Jurgelāne, I; Vecstaudža, J; Stepanova, V; Mālers, J; Bērziņa-Cimdiņa, L

    2012-01-01

    Due to viscosity and plasticity, clays and clay minerals are used in civil engineering, pottery and also in cosmetics and medicine as thickening agents and emulsion and suspension stabilizers. The rheological properties of clay suspensions are complex. Mostly it is an interaction between mineral composition, clay particle size and pH value and also depends on clay minerals. Clay-water suspension is non-Newtonian fluid showing thixotropic and pseudoplastic properties. Results showed that plast...

  10. Experimental Study on the Utilization of Fine Steel Slag on Stabilizing High Plastic Subgrade Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Hussien Aldeeky; Omar Al Hattamleh

    2017-01-01

    The three major steel manufacturing factories in Jordan dump their byproduct, steel slag, randomly in open areas, which causes many environmental hazardous problems. This study intended to explore the effectiveness of using fine steel slag aggregate (FSSA) in improving the geotechnical properties of high plastic subgrade soil. First soil and fine steel slag mechanical and engineering properties were evaluating. Then 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25% dry weight of soil of fine steel slag (FSSA) w...

  11. Thermal volume changes in clays and clay-stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delage, P.; Sulem, J.; Mohajerani, M.; Tang, A.M.; Monfared, M.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The disposal of high activity exothermic radioactive waste at great depth in clay host rocks will induce a temperature elevation that has been investigated in various underground research laboratories in Belgium, France and Switzerland through in-situ tests. Thermal effects are better known in clays (in particular Boom clay) than in clay-stone (e.g. Opalinus clay and Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone). In terms of volume changes, Figure 1 confirms the findings of Hueckel and Baldi (1990) that volume changes depend on the over-consolidation ratio (OCR) of the clay. In drained conditions, normally consolidated clays exhibit plastic contraction when heated, whereas over-consolidated clay exhibit elastic dilation. The nature of thermal volume changes in heated clays obviously has a significant effect on thermally induced pore pressures, when drainage is not instantaneous like what occurs in-situ. Compared to clays, the thermal volume change behaviour of clay-stones is less well known than that of clays. clay-stone are a priori suspected to behave like over-consolidated clays. In this paper, a comparison of recent results obtained in the laboratory on the drained thermal volume changes of clay-stones is presented and discussed. It is difficult to run drained mechanical tests in clay-stones like the Opalinus clay and the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone because of their quite low permeability (10 -12 - 10 -13 m/s). This also holds true for thermal tests. Due to the significant difference in thermal expansion coefficient between minerals and water, it is necessary to adopt very slow heating rate (0.5 - 1 C/h) to avoid any thermal pressurization. To do so, a new hollow cylinder apparatus (100 mm external diameter, 60 mm internal diameter) with lateral drainages reducing the drainage length to half the sample thickness (10 mm) has been developed (Monfared et al. 2011). The results of a drained cyclic thermal test carried out on

  12. Initial kinetics of the direct sulfation of limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Guilin; Shang, Lei; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2008-01-01

    The initial kinetics of direct sulfation of Faxe Bryozo, a porous bryozoan limestone was studied in the temperature interval from 873 to 973 K in a pilot entrained flow reactor with very short reaction times (between 0.1 and 0.6 s). The initial conversion rate of the limestone - for conversions...... less than 0.3% - was observed to be significantly promoted by higher SO2 concentrations and lower CO2 concentrations, whereas 02 showed negligible influence. A mathematical model for the sulfation of limestone involving chemical reaction at calcite grain surfaces and solid-state diffusion of carbonate...... ions in calcite grains is established. The validity of the model is limited to the initial sulfation period, in which nucleation of the solid product calcium sulphate is not started. This theoretical reaction-diffusion model gives a good simulation of the initial kinetics of the direct sulfation...

  13. Limestone attrition under simulated oxyfiring Fluidized-Bed combustion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scala, F. [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione - CNR, Napoli (Italy); Salatino, P. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica - Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy)

    2009-03-15

    Limestone attrition by surface wear was studied during the flue gas desulfurization under simulated fluidized-bed (FB) oxyfiring conditions and hindered calcination. Bench-scale experimental tests were carried out using well-established techniques previously developed for the characterization of sulfation and attrition of sorbents in air-blown atmospheric FB combustors. The experimental limestone conversion and attrition results were compared with those previously obtained with the same limestone under simulated air-blown combustion conditions. The differences in the conversion and attrition extents and patterns associated with oxyfiring as compared to air-blown atmospheric combustion were highlighted and related to the different particle morphologies and thicknesses of the sulfate layer. It was noted that attrition could play an important role in practical circulating FB combustor operation, by effectively enhancing particle sulfation under both oxyfiring and air-blown combustion conditions. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Characterization of limestone of region South and Southeast of Para

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinho, A.R.O.; Vieira, J.H.A.; Antunes Junior, L.V.; Medeiros, A.C.; Souza, G.P.

    2014-01-01

    Limestone is used in daily activities, and it is common the use of products containing calcium carbonate in various applications, from construction to food production, air purification to sewage treatment, the sugar refining materials for the toothpaste, the manufacture of glass and steel in the manufacture of paper, plastics, paints, ceramics and many others. The Limestone present in the region of south and southeast of Para is presented in deposits that have not been explored on a large scale, being justified a deepening in characteristics thereof. For the characterization of the material, gross samples were comminuted by crushing and ball mill, sieved and then separated into aliquots. In the end were used fluorescence analysis of X-ray, diffraction X-rays, determination of the moisture and loss on ignition of the material at 950 °C for one hour, obtaining results of a dolomitic limestone. (author)

  15. Slagging Behavior of Straw and Corn Stover and the Fate of Potassium under Entrained-Flow Gasification Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiser, S.; Cieplik, M.K.; Smit, R. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Post Office Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-07-01

    The behavior of straw and corn stover (non-food agricultural residues potentially available for power generation) was studied in a lab-scale reactor under entrained-flow gasification conditions typical for existing integrated gasification combined cycle power systems. This experimental work was assisted by a range of ash-specific analyses and thermodynamic modeling to gain insights into both the physics and chemistry of ash formation and melting behavior. It was observed that, although the major part of the primarily siliceous native ash promptly forms a molten slag, much of the alkalis are evaporated into the syngas. These gas-borne alkalis can potentially cause aerosol formation in the gasifier, gas quench, syngas cooler, and quench systems, resulting in both operating problems (fouling) and emission issues. To minimize the alkali release from straw and corn stover, the addition of an additive (clay) has been proven to be a highly promising method without the negative effects for the melting behavior of the slag.

  16. The hydration of slag, part 2: reaction models for blended cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2007-01-01

    The hydration of slag-blended cement is studied by considering the interaction between the hydrations of slag and Portland cement clinker. Three reaction models for the slag-blended cement are developed based on stoichiometric calculations. These models correlate the compositions of the unhydrated

  17. Determination of natural radionuclide level in industrial waste slags and evaluation of comprehensive utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ruixiang; Liu Xinhua; Gan Lin

    1994-09-01

    Natural radionuclide contents were measured in various industrial waste slags in China by a low background HPGe γ spectrometer and the radiological impact was estimated for some comprehensive utilization of these slags. Most waste slags can be used for building materials except for tailing and waste rock form nuclear industry

  18. ALKALI-ACTIVATED CEMENT MORTARS CONTAINING RECYCLED CLAY-BASED CONSTRUCTION AND DEMOLITION WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Puertas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of clay-based waste as an aggregate for concrete production is an amply studied procedure. Nonetheless, research on the use of this recycled aggregate to prepare alkaline cement mortars and concretes has yet to be forthcoming. The present study aimed to determine: the behaviour of this waste as a pozzolan in OPC systems, the mechanical strength in OPC, alkali-activated slag (AAS and fly ash (AAFA mortars and the effect of partial replacement of the slag and ash themselves with ground fractions of the waste. The pozzolanic behaviour of clay-based waste was confirmed. Replacing up to 20 % of siliceous aggregate with waste aggregate in OPC mortars induced a decline in 7 day strength (around 23 wt. %. The behaviour of waste aggregate in AAMs mortars, in turn, was observed to depend on the nature of the aluminosilicate and the replacement ratio used. When 20 % of siliceous aggregate was replaced by waste aggregate in AAS mortars, the 7 day strength values remained the same (40 MPa. In AAFA mortars, waste was found to effectively replace both the fly ash and the aggregate. The highest strength for AAFA mortars was observed when they were prepared with both a 50 % replacement ratio for the ash and a 20 % ratio for the aggregate.

  19. High-Temperatures Rheometric Analysis Of Selected Heterogeneous Slag Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Migas P.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the dynamic viscosity coefficient of slag – with an increased titanium compounds content in the reducing conditions of the blast furnace - may rapidly change. The products of the reduction reaction, precipitation and separation of titanium compounds are responsible for the thickening effect of the slag and the problems of permeability of blast furnace, causing anomalies in the dipping zone. The presence of solid components (particles in the melts determines the rheological character of the entire system. Identifying the rheological character of semi-solid slag systems provides opportunities for the development of mathematical modeling of liquid phase flows in a dripping zone of the blast furnace, allowing e.g to indentify the unstable parts of a metallurgical aggregate.

  20. Pyrochemical recovery of plutonium from calcium fluoride reduction slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, D.C.

    A pyrochemical method of recovering finely dispersed plutonium metal from calcium fluoride reduction slag is claimed. The plutonium-bearing slag is crushed and melted in the presence of at least an equimolar amount of calcium chloride and a few percent metallic calcium. The calcium chloride reduces the melting point and thereby decreases the viscosity of the molten mixture. The calcium reduces any oxidized plutonium in the mixture and also causes the dispersed plutonium metal to coalesce and settle out as a separate metallic phase at the bottom of the reaction vessel. Upon cooling the mixture to room temperature, the solid plutonium can be cleanly separated from the overlying solid slag, with an average recovery yield on the order of 96 percent.

  1. A Review of Granulation Process for Blast Furnace Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Pengfei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Molten slags of blast furnace is a second resources with great value of 1600~1 800 MJ sensible heat per ton. At present, water-quenching process plays a leading role in recovering waste heat of the molten slags. However, this method not only cost lots of water, but also recover little sensible heat and can pollute the surrounding environment. Dry granulation process, as an environmentally friendly method with high-efficiency heat recovery, have attracted widespread attentions. In this paper, the water quenching and dry granulation processes were discussed in detail. After a thorough comparative analysis of various treatment technologies, it can be concluded that centrifugal granulation affiliated with dry granulation is the optimum process, with smaller slag particle size (about 2mm, more glassy phase and higher recovery rate.

  2. Use of steel slag as a new material for roads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa Díaz, R.; Romero Farfán, M.; Cardenas, J.; Forero, J.

    2017-12-01

    This research paper aims to analyse the behaviour of MDC-19 hot dense asphalt mixtures with steel slag as coarse aggregate, by using asphalt 80-100, in order to verify if this residue has suitable characteristics that allow its use. The physical and mechanical characterization was accomplished using phosphorous slag from the company Acerías Paz del Río S.A. The working formula was then determined for each mixture using the RAMCODES methodology, the briquettes were produced in the laboratory and then, the design verification was performed. Taking into account the results obtained, it is concluded that the use of phosphorous slag as coarse aggregate in asphalt mixtures is workable, since acceptable design parameters and verification are obtained that meet the specifications for use as a rolling layer.

  3. Case cluster of pneumoconiosis at a coal slag processing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Kathleen M; Cropsey, Erin B; Armstrong, Jenna L

    2015-05-01

    During an inspection by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) of a small coal slag processing plant with 12 current workers, four cases of pneumoconiosis were identified among former workers. The OSHA investigation consisted of industrial hygiene sampling, a review of medical records, and case interviews. Some personal sampling measurements exceeded the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) for total dust exposures of 15 mg/m(3), and the measured respirable silica exposure of 0.043 mg/m(3), although below OSHA's current PEL for respirable dust containing silica, was above the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists' Threshold Limit Value (TLV). Chest x-rays for all four workers identified small opacities consistent with pneumoconiosis. This is the first known report of lung disease in workers processing coal slag and raises concerns for workers exposed to coal slag dust. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Effect of SO2 Dry Deposition on Porous Dolomitic Limestones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florica Doroftei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study is concerned with the assessment of the relative resistance of a monumental dolomitic limestone (Laspra – Spain used as building material in stone monuments and submitted to artificial ageing by SO2 dry deposition in the presence of humidity. To investigate the protection efficiency of different polymeric coatings, three commercially available siloxane-based oligomers (Lotexan-N, Silres BS 290 and Tegosivin HL 100 and a newly synthesized hybrid nanocomposite with silsesquioxane units (TMSPMA were used. A comparative assessment of the data obtained in this study underlines that a better limestone protection was obtained when treated with the hybrid nanocomposite with silsesquioxane units.

  5. Novel Hydroxyapatite Coatings for the Conservation of Marble and Limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Sonia

    Marble and limestone are calcite-based materials used in the construction of various structures, many of which have significant artistic and architectural value. Unfortunately, due to calcite's high dissolution rate, these stones are susceptible to chemically-induced weathering in nature. Limestone, due to its inherent porosity, also faces other environmental weathering processes that cause weakening from disintegration at grain boundaries. The treatments presently available are all deficient in one way or another. The aim of this work is to examine the feasibility of using hydroxyapatite (HAP) as a novel protective coating for marble and limestone, with two goals: i) to reduce acid corrosion of marble and ii) to consolidate physically weathered limestone. The motivation for using HAP is its low dissolution rate and structural compatibility with calcite. Mild, wet chemical synthesis routes, in which inorganic phosphate-based solutions were reacted with marble and limestone, alone and with other precursors, were used to produce HAP films. Film nucleation, growth and phase evolution were studied on marble to understand film formation and determine the optimal synthesis route. An acid resistance test was developed to investigate the attack mechanism on marble and quantify the efficacy of HAP-based coatings. Film nucleation and growth were dependent on substrate surface roughness and increased with calcium and carbonate salt additions during synthesis. Acid attack on marble occurred via simultaneous dissolution at grain boundaries, twin boundaries and grain surfaces. HAP provided intermediate protection against acid attack, when compared to two conventional treatments. Its ability to protect the stone from acid was not as significant as predicted from dissolution kinetics and this was attributed to incomplete coverage and residual porosity within the film, arising from its flake-like crystal growth habit, which enabled acid to access the underlying substrate. The

  6. Numerical simulations of slagging dynamics using a meshmeshless strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Losurdo, M.; Spliethoff, H. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Energiesysteme

    2009-07-01

    In pulverized co-firing and gasification facilities such as coal and biomass power plants, ash deposition, fouling and slagging, may significantly affect heat exchange and gasification per-formance Deposit growth dramatically increases production loss and may lead to the shut-down of the facility. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations can be used as a valid 'non-intrusive' investigation tool in an efficient problem solving strategy. At TU Munich, an ongoing project aims to develop a dedicated numerical tool to monitor and predict deposition, deposit growth and slagging dynamics in pulverized solid fuel furnaces and gasifiers. A novel in-house code was developed to track solid particles and predict deposit growth and slag dynamics. The adopted numerical strategy uses a Mesh-Meshless approach combined with a Lagrangian particle tracking. Ash particles are tracked in a Lagrangian frame post-processing CFD gas phase results (RANS or LES). Growth and thermo-mechanical proper-ties of the deposit are simultaneously evaluated. Slag dynamics is computed by using a meshless approach: deposit mesh nodes are considered point-mass particles interacting only with mesh connected node-particle neighbours. Forces are modelled applying a visco-elastic model and calculated by means of a Galerking weight (kernel) function. The final goal is to mathematically describe both particle adhesion and slag dynamics applying visco-elastic models using a mesh-meshless approach aiming to investigate slag/slurry dynamics. Pre-liminary numerical results on one layer encourage further development on this subject. (orig.)

  7. Strength Properties of Aalborg Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kirsten Malte; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    glacial time are characterised by the absence of this mussel. These deposits are named Aalborg Clay and Aalborg Sand. In the city of Aalborg, a fill layer superposes Aalborg Clay. This layer is at some places found to be 6m thick. This fill layer does not provide sufficient bearing capacity, which has...... resulted in many damaged buildings in Aalborg. To provide sufficient bearing capacity it is therefore necessary either to remove the fill or to construct the building on piles. Both methods imply that the strength of Aalborg Clay is important for the construction. This paper evaluates the strength...

  8. Geochemical of clay formations : study of Spanish clay REFERENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turrero, M. J.; Pena, J.

    2003-01-01

    Clay rocks are investigated in different international research programs in order to assess its feasibility for the disposal of high level radioactive wastes. This is because different sepcific aspects: they have low hydraulic conductivity (10''-11-10''-15 m/s), a high sorption capacity, self-sealing capacity of facults and discontinuities and mechanical resistance. Several research programs on clay formations are aimed to study the chemistry of the groundwater and the water-rock reactions that control it: e. g. Boom Clay (Mol, Belgium), Oxford Clay /Harwell, United Kingdom), Toarcian Clay (Tournemire, France), Palfris formation (Wellenberg, Switzerland), Opalinus Clay (Bure, France). Based on these studies, considerable progress in the development of techniques for hydrologic, geochemical and hydrogeochemical characterization of mudstones has been accomplished (e. g. Beaufais et al. 1994, De Windt el al. 1998. Thury and Bossart 1999, Sacchi and Michelot 2000) with important advances in the knowledge of geochemical process in these materials (e. g. Reeder et al. 1993, Baeyens and Brandbury 1994, Beaucaire et al. 2000, Pearson et al., 2003).Furtermore, geochemical modeling is commonly used to simulate the evolution of water chemistry and to understand quantitatively the processes controlling the groundwater chemistry (e. g. Pearson et al. 1998, Tempel and Harrison 2000, Arcos et al., 2001). The work presented here is part of a research program funded by Enresa in the context of its R and D program. It is focused on the characterization of a clay formation (reference Argillaceous Formation, RAF) located within the Duero Basin (north-centralSpain). The characterisation of th ephysical properties,, fluid composition, mineralogy, water-rock reaction processes, geochemical modelling and sorption properties of the clays from the mentioned wells is the main purpose of this work. (Author)

  9. Quality of structural steel melted by single-slag process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, A.M.; Andreev, V.I.; Monastyrskij, A.V.; Drozdova, M.F.; Pashchenko, V.E.; Orzhekh, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    The 40Kh and 12KhN3A steels were used to compare the quality of the metal manufactured according to several variants of a single-slag process with the metal of a conventional melting technology. Investigation results show, that a single-slag process metal has higher sulfides and oxides contents as well as an increased anisotropy of mechanical properties while its tendency to flake formation is weaker due to a less degree of gas saturation. It is marked that anisotropy in the properties and a sulfide content may be decreased by out-of-furnace treatment of steels

  10. High temperature slagging incinerator for alpha contaminated wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Voorde, N.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes the experiences collected by the treatment of plutonium-contaminated wastes, in the High Temperature Slagging Incinerator at the C.E.N./S.C.K. at Mol, with the support of the Commission of the European Communities. The major objective of the exercise is to demonstrate the operability of this facility for the treatment of mixed transuranic (TRU) and beta-gamma solid waste material. The process will substantially reduce the TRU waste volume by burning the combustibles and converting the non-combustibles into a chemically inert and physically stable basalt-like slag product, suitable for safe transport and final disposal. (Auth.)

  11. Attenuation of Gamma Rays by Concrete . Lead Slag Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ismail, I.M.; Sweelam, M.H.; Zaghloul, Y.R.; Aly, H.F.

    2008-01-01

    Using of wastes and industrial by-products as concrete aggregate to be used as structural and radiation shielded material has increased in the recent years. Concrete was mixed with different amounts of lead slag extracted from recycling of the spent automotive batteries as fine aggregates. The lead slag was used as partial replacement of sand in the studied composites. The concrete composites obtained were characterized in terms of density, water absorption, porosity, compressive strength and attenuation of γ- rays with different energies. The attenuation coefficient and the half value thickness of the different matrices were calculated and discussed

  12. Oxic limestone drains for treatment of dilute, acidic mine drainage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cravotta, Charles A.

    1998-01-01

    Limestone treatment systems can be effective for remediation of acidic mine drainage (AMD) that contains moderate concentrations of dissolved O2 , Fe3+ , or A13+ (1‐5 mg‐L‐1 ). Samples of water and limestone were collected periodically for 1 year at inflow, outflow, and intermediate points within underground, oxic limestone drains (OLDs) in Pennsylvania to evaluate the transport of dissolved metals and the effect of pH and Fe‐ and Al‐hydrolysis products on the rate of limestone dissolution. The influent was acidic and relatively dilute (pH 1 mg‐L‐1 ) but was near neutral (pH = 6.2‐7.0); Fe and Al decreased to less than 5% of influent concentrations. As pH increased near the inflow, hydrous Fe and Al oxides precipitated in the OLDs. The hydrous oxides, nominally Fe(OH)3 and AI(OH)3, were visible as loosely bound, orange‐yellow coatings on limestone near the inflow. As time elapsed, Fe(OH)3 and AI(OH)3 particles were transported downflow. During the first 6 months of the experiment, Mn 2+ was transported conservatively through the OLDs; however, during the second 6 months, concentrations of Mn in effluent decreased by about 50% relative to influent. The accumulation of hydrous oxides and elevated pH (>5) in the downflow part of the OLDs promoted sorption and coprecipitation of Mn as indicated by its enrichment relative to Fe in hydrous‐oxide particles and coatings on limestone. Despite thick (~1 mm) hydrous‐oxide coatings on limestone near the inflow, CaCO3 dissolution was more rapid near the inflow than at downflow points within the OLD where the limestone was not coated. The rate of limestone dissolution decreased with increased residence time, pH, and concentrations of Ca2+ and HCO3‐ and decreased PCO2. The following overall reaction shows alkalinity as an ultimate product of the iron hydrolysis reaction in an OLD:Fe2+ + 0.25 O2 +CaCO3 + 2.5 H2O --> Fe(OH)3 + 2 Ca2+ + 2 HCO3-where 2 moles of CaCO3 dissolve for each mole of Fe(OH)3 produced

  13. Comprehensive review of geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, M. Uma; Muthukumar, M.

    2017-11-01

    Human activity inevitably produces waste materials that must be managed. Some waste can be reused. However many wastes that cannot be used beneficially must be disposed of ensuring environmental safety. One of the common methods of disposal is landfilling. The most common problems of the landfill site are environmental degradation and groundwater contamination caused by leachate produced during the decomposition process of organic material and rainfall. Liner in a landfill is an important component which prevent leachate migration and prevent groundwater contamination. Earthen liners have been widely used to contain waste materials in landfill. Liners and covers for municipal and hazardous waste containment facilities are often constructed with the use of fine-grained, low plasticity soils. Because of low permeability geosynthetic clay liners and compacted clay liners are the main materials used in waste disposal landfills. This paper summaries the important geotechnical characteristics such as hydraulic conductivity, liquid limit and free swell index of geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner based on research findings. This paper also compares geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner based on certain criteria such as thickness, availability of materials, vulnerability to damage etc.

  14. Preparation of fly ash-granulated blast furnace slag-carbide slag binder and application in total tailings paste backfill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Hao, Ya-fei; Zhao, Feng-qing

    2018-03-01

    Based on activation and synergistic effect among various materials, a low-cost mine backfill cementing material, FGC binder, was prepared by using fly ash, granulated blast-furnace slag (GBFS), carbide slag and composite activator. The proper proportioning of FGC binder is obtained by response surface experiment optimization method: fly ash 62 %, GBFS 20 %, carbide slag 8 % and compound activators 10 %. Adjusting the material ratio obtains different cementing material which could satisfy requirements of different mined-out areas. With the mass ratio of cementing material and tailings 1:4∼1:8, the concentration of total solid 70 %, the compressive strength values of total tailings filling body at 28 d reaches 1.64∼4.14 MPa, and the backfilling cost is 20 % lower than using OPC cement.

  15. Studies to overcome the manufacturing problems in blast furnace tap hole clay of Integrated Steel Plants: Experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siva kumar, R.; Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    Integrated Steel Plants commonly uses Blast Furnace route for iron production which accounts for over 60 % of the world iron output. Blast Furnace runs for ten to twenty years without repairing hearth walls and Tap Hole (TH). Tap hole is an outlet for hot metal produced in a Blast Furnace and run from the shell of the furnace into the interior allowing access to the molten material. Tapping is the term used for drilling a hole through the tap hole which allows the molten iron and slag to flow out. In Iron making process, removal of liquid iron from furnace and sending it for steel making is known as cast house practice. For tapping liquid iron and operating the tap hole requires a special type of clay. Tap hole clay (THC) used to stop the flow of liquid iron and slag from the blast furnace. Present work deals with the study on manufacturing of THC at Visakhapatnam Steel Plant and problems related to manufacturing. Experiments were conducted to solve the identified problems and results are furnished in detail. The findings can improve the manufacturing process and improve the productivity of tap hole clay.

  16. Influence of lithium slag from lepidolite on the durability of concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Luo; Shaowen, Huang; Yuxuan, Zhou; Jinyang, Li; Weiliang, Peng; Yufeng, Wen

    2017-04-01

    This paper mainly studies the effect of lithium slag from lepidolite on the property of concrete including dry shrinkage, anti-carbonation, wear resistance and chloride ion resistance. Concrete interface structure has been observed with SEM. The results show that adding lithium slag to concrete can improve concrete property including dry shrinkage, wear resistance and chloride ion resistance. However, the wear resistance tends to decrease when the amount of lithium slag reach 20%. Lithium slag also has negative effect on anti-carbonation property. With the increasing amount of lithium slag, anti-carbonation property of concrete decrease gradually.

  17. Steelmaking slag beneficiation by magnetic separator and impacts on sinter quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bölükbaşı Ö.S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic oxygen furnaces (BOF slag is the main problem at all iron and steel factories. About more than 6 million tons/year of BOF slag has been accumulated from the waste stockyards in Turkey. Dumps slags can be revaluated by a processing technology which makes it possible to obtain products that meet the requirements of sintering and blast furnace production. The slags with particle size of -10 mm were enriched by the magnetic separator resulting and increase in Fe grade from 18% to 33%. The use of BOF slag in sinter blend provided additional Mn, CaO, MgO and introduced a good solution to environmental problems.

  18. The electrical characteristics of copper slags in a 270 kVA DC arc furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derin, Bora; Sahin, Filiz Cinar; Yucel, Onuralp

    2003-01-01

    The electrical resistance of slags is the main criteria to determine the design and the operation conditions of slag resistance furnace (SRF) depending on temperature and composition. In this study, a 270 kVA DC electric arc furnace were used to determine the electrical characteristic of molten ancient copper slags. The specific conductivity of the slag was estimated by using furnace geometric factor given in the literature as an empirical formula and by using furnace resistance measured during smelting of the copper slag with or without different additives such as coke, CaO and Al 2 O 3 . (Original)

  19. Sodium sesquicarbonate (Akang) and limestone as catalysts for the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production of monoglycerides from palm and palm kernel oils were carried out using sodium sesquicarbonate (akang) and lime stone as catalysts.The results showed that the maximum monoglyceride formed is in the range of 49–57% of the fatty product for the limestone catalyst and 78 – 92% for the sodium ...

  20. The Solnhofen Limestone: A stony heritage of many uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölbl-Ebert, Martina; Kramar, Sabina; Cooper, Barry J.

    2016-04-01

    High above the valley of the River Altmühl (Bavaria, Germany), between Solnhofen to the west and Kelheim to the east, numerous quarries give access to thinly plated limestone from the Upper Jurassic, some 150 million years before the present. The main quarry areas lie around the town of Eichstätt and between the villages of Solnhofen, Langenaltheim and Mörnsheim. Here limestone slabs have been quarried for several hundred years, some even in Roman times. Solnhofen Limestone is famous worldwide; not only because it is a beautiful building stone of high quality, but also because of the exceptionally well-preserved fossils it contains -among them the early bird Archaeopteryx. The quarry industry between Solnhofen and Eichstätt has shaped a cultural landscape, with old and new quarries sunk into the plain and numerous spoil heaps rising above it, for the rock is not all economically useful. But many of the spoil heaps and the old quarries are environmentally protected as they provide a habitat for some rare plants and animals. It is not necessary to cut the Solnhofen Limestone with a saw: it is split by hand into thin and even slabs or sheets which are used for flagstones and wall covers, which since centuries are sold world-wide. Locally it also serves as roof tiles for traditional houses. Thick slabs of especially fine quality may be found near Solnhofen and Mörnsheim and are used for lithography printing.

  1. Kinetic Study of Calcination of Jakura Limestone Using Power Rate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The calcination of Jakura limestone was also found to be first order reaction with respect to CaCO3 concentration having average regression coefficient of 0.99. The temperature dependent terms were found using Arrhenius law and it was observed that the reaction temperature has a direct effect on the rate of reaction.

  2. Limestone rocks analysis by X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izquierdo M, G.; Ponce R, R.; Vazquez J, J.

    1996-01-01

    By request of a private company, employing basically X-ray fluorescence analysis (X RF), was established a fast and accurate method for the analysis of the major elements in limestone rocks. Additionally, for complementing analysis was determined by ion chromatography, the chlorides appearance and by atomic absorption of sodium. By gravimetry, was determined the losses by ignition and the alpha quartz. (Author)

  3. Hydrate Phase Assemblages in Calcium Sulfoaluminate - Metakaolin - Limestone Blends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Malene Thostrup; Lothenbach, Barbara; Winnefeld, Frank

    2017-01-01

    The combination of a commercial calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cement with metakaolin (MK) and limestone (LS) as supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) is investigated for a CSA replacement level of 20 wt%. In addition to a pure CSA cement, paste samples have been prepared for three blends wit...

  4. Flora of Chihuahuan desertscrub on limestone in northeastern Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas R. Van Devender; Ana Lilia Reina-Guerrero; J. Jesus. Sanchez-Escalante

    2013-01-01

    Transects were done in desertscrub on limestone to characterize the flora of the westernmost Chihuahuan Desert. Most of the sites (15) were in the Municipios of Agua Prieta and Naco in northeastern Sonora, with single sites near Ascensión, northwestern Chihuahua and east of Douglas in southeastern Arizona. A total of 236 taxa were recorded on transects. Dicot perennial...

  5. Innovative Field Investigations in Limestone using a FACT-FLUTe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosthaf, Klaus; Barrett Sørensen, Mie; Broholm, Mette Martina

    2015-01-01

    and the prevailing aqueous pore water concentrations for a range of hydraulic parameters and conditions typical for limestone aquifers. Results and outlook The sorption experiments showed very strong sorption with reasonably linear sorption isotherms over a very large concentration range for individual chlorinated...

  6. Wave liquefaction in soils with clay content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, Özgür; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the influence of clay content (in silt-clay and sand-clay mixtures) on liquefaction beneath progressive waves. The experiments showed that the influence of clay content is very significant. Susceptibility of silt to liquefaction is increa...

  7. What makes a natural clay antibacterial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Port-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (2+ solubility.

  8. 0-6686 : improving DMS 9210 requirements for limestone rock asphalt : [project summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Limestone rock asphalt (LRA) mixtures have : been produced and placed for several decades : using specification requirements currently listed : under DMS 9210, Limestone Rock Asphalt (LRA). : Several Texas Department of Transportation : (TxDOT) distr...

  9. In situ observation of the role of alumina particles on the crystallization behavior of slags

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orrling, C.

    2000-09-01

    The confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) allows crystallization behavior in liquid slags to he observed in situ at high temperatures. Slags in the lime-silica-alumina-magnesia system are easily tinder cooled and it is possible to construct time temperature transformation (TTT) diagrams for this system. The presence of solid alumina particles its these liquid slags was studied to determine if these particles act as heterogeneous nucleation sites that cause she precipitation of solid material within slags. The introduction of alumina particles reduced the incubation time for the onset of crystallization and increased the temperature at which crystallization was observed in the slags to close to the liquidus temperature for the slag. Crystal growth rates are in a good agreement with Ivantsov's solution of the problem of diffusion controlled dendritic growth. Alumina appears to be a potent nucleating agent in the slag systems that were studied. (author)

  10. SBR Brazilian organophilic/clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, Thiago R.; Valenzuela-Diaz, Francisco R.; Morales, Ana Rita; Paiva, Lucilene B.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is the obtaining of SBR composites using a Brazilian raw bentonite and the same bentonite treated with an organic salt. The clays were characterized by XRD. The clay addition in the composites was 10 pcr. The composites were characterized by XRD and had measured theirs tension strength (TS). The composite with Brazilian treated clay showed TS 233% higher than a composite with no clay, 133% higher than a composite with Cloisite 30B organophilic clay and 17% lower than a composite with Cloisite 20 A organophilic clay. XRD and TS data evidence that the composite with Brazilian treated clay is an intercalated nanocomposite. (author)

  11. Assessment of Environmental Impacts of Limestone Quarrying Operations in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittipongvises Suthirat

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Environmental impacts of the mineral extraction have been a public concern. Presently, there is widespread global interest in the area of mining and its sustainability that focused on the need to shift mining industry to a more sustainable framework. The aim of this study was to systematically assess all possible environmental and climate change related impacts of the limestone quarrying operation in Thailand. By considering the life cycle assessment method, the production processes were divided into three phases: raw material extraction, transportation, and comminution. Both IMPACT 2002+ and the Greenhouse Gas Protocol methods were used. Results of IMPACT 2002+ analysis showed that per 1 ton crushed limestone rock production, the total depletion of resource and GHGs emissions were 79.6 MJ and 2.76 kg CO2 eq., respectively. Regarding to the four damage categories, ‘resources’ and ‘climate change’ categories were the two greatest environmental impacts of the limestone rock production. Diesel fuel and electricity consumption in the mining processes were the main causes of those impacts. For climate change, the unit of CO2 eq. was expressed to quantify the total GHGs emissions. Estimated result was about 3.13 kg CO2 eq. per ton limestone rock product. The results obtained by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol were also similar to IMPACT 2002+ method. Electrical energy consumption was considered as the main driver of GHGs, accounting for approximately 46.8 % of total fossil fuel CO2 emissions. A final point should be noted that data uncertainties in environmental assessment over the complete life cycle of limestone quarrying operation have to be carefully considered.

  12. Assessment of Environmental Impacts of Limestone Quarrying Operations in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittipongvises, Suthirat

    2017-11-01

    Environmental impacts of the mineral extraction have been a public concern. Presently, there is widespread global interest in the area of mining and its sustainability that focused on the need to shift mining industry to a more sustainable framework. The aim of this study was to systematically assess all possible environmental and climate change related impacts of the limestone quarrying operation in Thailand. By considering the life cycle assessment method, the production processes were divided into three phases: raw material extraction, transportation, and comminution. Both IMPACT 2002+ and the Greenhouse Gas Protocol methods were used. Results of IMPACT 2002+ analysis showed that per 1 ton crushed limestone rock production, the total depletion of resource and GHGs emissions were 79.6 MJ and 2.76 kg CO2 eq., respectively. Regarding to the four damage categories, `resources' and `climate change' categories were the two greatest environmental impacts of the limestone rock production. Diesel fuel and electricity consumption in the mining processes were the main causes of those impacts. For climate change, the unit of CO2 eq. was expressed to quantify the total GHGs emissions. Estimated result was about 3.13 kg CO2 eq. per ton limestone rock product. The results obtained by the Greenhouse Gas Protocol were also similar to IMPACT 2002+ method. Electrical energy consumption was considered as the main driver of GHGs, accounting for approximately 46.8 % of total fossil fuel CO2 emissions. A final point should be noted that data uncertainties in environmental assessment over the complete life cycle of limestone quarrying operation have to be carefully considered.

  13. Effect of additives in reducing ash sintering and slagging in biomass combustion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liang

    2012-07-01

    marble sludge was considered as the main reason to prevent sintering of two biomass ashes. Addition of sewage sludge enhanced contents of inert minerals and reduced melted fraction in two biomass ashes. These inert minerals are (1) directly from the added sludge and (2) formed due to reaction between aluminosilicates in sludge and K containing species in the biomass ashes. Therefore, sintering degrees of the two biomass ashes were reduced upon sewage sludge addition. Clay sludge addition resulted in more severe sintering behaviors of the wood waste ash, as a result of formation of more Si rich melts upon heating. Effects of additives on ash slagging behaviors were further investigated during combustion of wood waste pellets in an industry scale boiler. It was found that the wood waste ash had a high slagging tendency and silicate-alkali chemistry played a dominating role during the ash sintering process. The addition of marble sludge significantly reduced the slag formation during wood waste pellets combustion. This occurred because marble sludge restrained accumulation of melted ash and contributed to formation of high temperature melting potassium/sodium calcium silicates. The sewage sludge addition gave a less pronounced anti-slagging effect on wood waste pellets combustion. The composition of the formed slag was changed from low temperature melting silicates to high temperature melting mineral phases. In addition, the size and sintering degree of the formed slag decreased considerably, improving the operation conditions of the boiler.(Author)

  14. Concrete with steel furnace slag and fractionated reclaimed asphalt pavement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Steel furnace slag (SFS) is an industrial by-product material that can contain free calcium oxide (CaO) and free magnesium oxide (MgO), both : of which can cause significant expansion when hydrated. SFS aggregates are therefore not commonly used in c...

  15. Design and evaluation of a heat recuperator for steel slags

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutiérrez Trashorras, Antonio J.; Álvarez, Eduardo Álvarez; Río González, José Luis; Suarez Cuesta, José Manuel; Bernat, Jorge Xiberta

    2013-01-01

    New techniques for emissions reduction and energy efficiency are important challenges of the steel industry. Although great advantages have been reached in these fields, there are still new opportunities. One of them is the possible development of systems to recover energy from slags. The recent policies that encourage the use of renewable and alternative energies determine a favorable scenario for the development of new techniques of heat recovering. In this context, this article presents a new heat recuperation system for the slags produced in the factories of Arcelor–Mittal in Asturias (Spain) and study in detail the design of an innovative slags heat exchanger. To adjust its performance and to determine the influence of the geometric and flow design parameters, the heat exchanger has been simulated using numerical analysis software (CFD). -- Highlights: • A new design of a heat recuperator for slags energy recovery is presented. • The effects of the design parameters have been studied with a numerical model. • Refractory materials with high thermal conductivity improve heat recuperation

  16. Environmental and economic implications of slag disposal practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-01-01

    Jan 1, 2003 ... pollution prevention, control or remediation measures. ... Total elimination of the production of slag is impossible at this stage ... issues, for example, relevant usage of the two different methods for classification and ascribing a higher ...... LIDE DR (1994) CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics(75th edn.) ...

  17. Slagging in a pulverised-coal-fired boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devir, G.P.; Pohl, J.H.; Creelman, R.A. [University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld. (Australia). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes a technique to evaluate the severity of slagging of a coal in a pulverised-coal-fired boiler. There are few data in the literature on the nature of in-situ boiler slags, their rate of growth and/or their strength properties relevant to sootblowing. The latter is thought to be of more concern to boiler operators and gives rise to the significance of selecting suitable strength tests. As well as standardised methods for characterising pulverised coal performance in a boiler, several novel and less popular techniques are discussed in detail. A suite of three sub-bituminous coals from the Callide Coalfields, Biloela (600 km north of Brisbane), has been selected for slagging tests in the 350 MW{sub e} units of Callide 'B' power station. Disposable air-cooled mild steel slagging probes have been constructed to simulate the conditions for deposit formation in the boiler region. To date, tests for one of these coals has been completed and preliminary results are presented. Once testing for the remaining coals has been completed, it is anticipated that the differences exhibited in deposit growth and strength may be correlated with typical variations in physical and chemical properties of the pulverised coal.

  18. Utilization of steel slag for Portland cement clinker production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakiridis, P E; Papadimitriou, G D; Tsivilis, S; Koroneos, C

    2008-04-01

    The aim of the present research work is to investigate the possibility of adding steel slag, a by-product of the conversion of iron to steel process, in the raw meal for the production of Portland cement clinker. Two samples of raw meals were prepared, one with ordinary raw materials, as a reference sample ((PC)(Ref)), and another with 10.5% steel slag ((PC)(S/S)). Both raw meals were sintered at 1450 degrees C. The results of chemical and mineralogical analyses as well as the microscopic examination showed that the use of the steel slag did not affect the mineralogical characteristics of the so produced Portland cement clinker. Furthermore, both clinkers were tested by determining the grindability, setting times, compressive strengths and soundness. The hydration products were examined by XRD analysis at 2, 7, 28 and 90 days. The results of the physico-mechanical tests showed that the addition of the steel slag did not negatively affect the quality of the produced cement.

  19. Granulated blast furnace slag – A boon for foundry industry

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Silica sand; Blast Furnace Slag; Mould properties; Ferrous and nonferrous ... raw material for the production of cast components in foundry industries. ... applications for conserving natural resources and reduce the cost of the raw .... in an elevated temperature melting furnace with temperature values of 750 to.

  20. The Interfacial Transition Zone in Alkali-Activated Slag Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rackel eSan Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The interfacial transition zone (ITZ is known to strongly influence the mechanical and transport properties of mortars and concretes. This paper studies the ITZ between siliceous (quartz aggregates and alkali activated slag binders in the context of mortar specimens. Backscattered electron images (BSE generated in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM are used to identify unreacted binder components, reaction products and porosity in the zone surrounding aggregate particles, by composition and density contrast. X-ray mapping is used to exclude the regions corresponding to the aggregates from the BSE image of the ITZ, thus enabling analysis of only the binder phases, which are segmented into binary images by grey level discrimination. A distinct yet dense ITZ region is present in the alkali-activated slag mortars, containing a reduced content of unreacted slag particles compared to the bulk binder. The elemental analysis of this region shows that it contains a (C,N-A-S-H gel which seems to have a higher content of Na (potentially deposited through desiccation of the pore solution and a lower content of Ca than the bulk inner and outer products forming in the main binding region. These differences are potentially important in terms of long-term concrete performance, as the absence of a highly porous interfacial transition zone region is expected to provide a positive influence on the mechanical and transport properties of alkali-activated slag concretes.

  1. ECOLOGICAL AND TECHNOLOGYCAL ASPECTS OF ASH AND SLAG WASTES UTILIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Aleksandrova

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of investigation focused on the utilization of ash and slag wastes (ASW in Russia including investigation of chemical and physical properties of ASW and processing products. Many factors influence the technological properties of ash and slag materials: naturals, processes and environments. The integrated treatment of ash and slag wastes of both stored and re-formed types will allow obtaining the following commercial products: coal concentrate, iron concentrate, aluminosilicate cenospheres, aluminosilicate product. In this study we have analyzed the methods for separation of ASW iron-containing part using the different types of the magnetic separation from the ash and slag material from one of the combined heat and power plant (CHPP in the Russian Far East Federal District. The greatest interest is the dry magnetic separation with travelling electromagnetic field. The subject of research was a sample taken from one of ash dump of CHPP in the Far East. In the study iron concentrate containing Fetotal = 64% was obtained recovery 68% in the low intensity (up to 5 kOe travelling magnetic field.

  2. Copper recovery from slag by indirect bio leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazuelos, A.; Iglesias, N.; Romero, R.; Forcat, O.; Carranza, F.

    2009-01-01

    The main source of copper loss from a smelter is copper in discard slag. Slag can contain Cu in concentrations very much higher than those of many ores. Cu is present in slag entrained in very small drops of matte, white metal and blister copper occluded in fayalitic phase. In this work, the technical viability of the BRISA process, that is based on the indirect bio leaching, for this residue has been proved. A sample of slag, containing 2 % of copper, has been chemical, granulometric and metallographic characterized and it has been leached with ferric sulphate solutions in agitated reactors. The influence of several variables have been investigated. Once the best operating conditions had been selecting and an economic estimation had been done (with very really attractive results), the leaching stage has been designed for a plant of 30 tonnes per hour capacity. Cu extractions higher than 70% can be achieved with a residence time of only five hours. Despite of Cu(II) concentration in fed is as high as 30 g/l, bio oxidation stage can supply Fe(III) demanded by ferric leaching stage. (Author) 17 refs

  3. Aan de slag met honors : praktijklessen uit Europa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolfensberger, Marca; Hogenstijn, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    In de brochure ‘Aan de slag met honors’ worden onderzoeksresultaten van het onderzoeksproject Honors in Europe hertaald naar tips voor succesvol en inspirerend honorsonderwijs. De brochure is grotendeels gebaseerd op het boek Talent Development in European Higher Education – Honors programs in the

  4. Chemical characterization and local dispersion of slag generated by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-05-07

    May 7, 2014 ... Pb from acid batteries includes their rupture, draining of the acid, separation of the components containing Pb and its recovery by smelting (Faé et al., 2011). During the smelting process, a solid material called "slag" is generated. It contains a high concentration of Pb, among other toxic elements (Coya et al.

  5. Kinetics of steel slag leaching: Batch tests and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Windt, Laurent; Chaurand, Perrine; Rose, Jerome

    2011-01-01

    Reusing steel slag as an aggregate for road construction requires to characterize the leaching kinetics and metal releases. In this study, basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steel slag were subjected to batch leaching tests at liquid to solid ratios (L/S) of 10 and 100 over 30 days; the leachate chemistry being regularly sampled in time. A geochemical model of the steel slag is developed and validated from experimental data, particularly the evolution with leaching of mineralogical composition of the slag and trace element speciation. Kinetics is necessary for modeling the primary phase leaching, whereas a simple thermodynamic equilibrium approach can be used for secondary phase precipitation. The proposed model simulates the kinetically-controlled dissolution (hydrolysis) of primary phases, the precipitation of secondary phases (C-S-H, hydroxide and spinel), the pH and redox conditions, and the progressive release of major elements as well as the metals Cr and V. Modeling indicates that the dilution effect of the L/S ratio is often coupled to solubility-controlled processes, which are sensitive to both the pH and the redox potential. A sensitivity analysis of kinetic uncertainties on the modeling of element releases is performed.

  6. Additional Gigantoproductus species from the upper Visean-Namurian limestone of Kotaki, central Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Ibaraki, Yousuke; Tazawa, Jun-ichi; Nakamura, Yukio

    2010-01-01

    A large productid brachiopod species, Gigantoproductus aurita (Bolkhovitinova, 1938), is described from the Tsuchikurazawa Limestone (upper Visean-Namurian), a large limestone block within a Permian accretionary complex of Kotaki, Itoigawa City, Niigata Prefecture, central Japan. This is the fourth described Gigantoproductus species from the Tsuchikurazawa Limestone. The range of G. aurita may extend to late Visean on the basis of the previous fossil records of the limestone.

  7. Biofacies and habitats of Brereton Limestone member (Carbondale Formation, Middle Pennsylvanian), Southwestern Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connell, D.B.; Utgaard, J.

    1983-09-01

    The Brereton Limestone is a shallow-water, open-marine carbonate deposited over peat or delta-plain muds after delta abandonment and a marine transgression. Data on autecology, lithology, insoluble residue content, and thickness were used to interpret the habitats of each biofacies. Biofacies V, a low-diversity biofacies dominated by brachiopods and ostracods, occupied turbid-water, mud- or shelly mud-bottom areas during influxes of detrital clays late in the abandonment of the Herrin delta and, also, early in the construction of the Jamestown delta. Low-relief carbonate mud mounds accumulated within and around baffles provided by thickets of phylloid algae and foraminifers, are capped locally by biofacies VI, a low-diversity biofacies dominated by ostracods. Biofacies VI, occupied the high subtidal to supratidal crests of algal mud mounds which had a stressed (possibly hypersaline) environment. Deeper water mud mounds were occupied by either Biofacies III, a crinoid-mixed fossil biofacies, or by Biofacies IV, which is dominated by fusulinids, strophomenids, and trilobites. Biofacies II, dominated by sponges, mollusks, and impunctate brachiopods, generally occurred on the flanks of the shallow-water mounds. Biofacies I, III, and IV also occurred in broad, muddy intermound areas and Biofacies III in narrow, winnowed intermound areas.

  8. Liquification and soft-sediment deformation in a limestone megabreccia: The Ayabacas giant collapse, Cretaceous, southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callot, Pierre; Odonne, Francis; Sempere, Thierry

    2008-12-01

    In the back-arc basin of southern Peru, the bulk of the mid-Cretaceous carbonate platform collapsed near the Turonian-Coniacian boundary (~ 90-89 Ma), due to slope creation and resulting oversteepening. The resulting mass-wasting deposits, namely the Ayabacas Formation, consist of a megabreccia which is organised from NE to SW in relation with two major fault systems. Facies of sediment reworking (such as brecciation, liquification, sedimentary dykes and soft-sediment deformation) are described and four types of resedimentation facies are define. In the northeastern part of the study area, deposits mainly consist of a mixture of very heterometric clasts and blocks (millimetric to kilometric in size), mainly carbonate but also sandy-marly in nature, floating in sandy-marly matrix that exhibits features of liquification (sedimentary dykes and flows) and plastic deformation. Here, resedimentation facies are characterized by deformations and a brecciated facies at each observation scale (from aerial photographs to thin sections) and are therefore defined as fractal or multi-scale breccias. Some clasts and large amounts of the matrix were derived from the underlying clay-rich sandstones of the Murco Formation. These materials were prone to liquification and plastic deformation, allowing them to act as a sliding sole that facilitated the slides and the downslope movement of large limestone rafts. In the southwestern part of the study area, only limestone breccias are observed, in alternation with well-stratified levels. The sliding sole of plastically deformable siliciclastic sediments that previously acted as a lubricating layer was not present here, as materials were more deeply buried. Variations in the degree of sediment lithification from northeast to southwest are inferred to have existed before the collapse and also within the sedimentary succession in the northeastern part. In particular, limestones were well-cemented at the base of the carbonate succession and

  9. Cold experiments on ligament formation for blast furnace slag granulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Junxiang; Yu Qingbo; Li Peng; Du Wenya

    2012-01-01

    Rotary cup atomization for molten slag granulation is an attractive alternative to water quenching. However, the mechanism of disintegration of molten slag must be assessed. In the present study, a glycerol/water mixture was substituted for molten slag, and the mechanism of ligament formation in a rotary cup was investigated using photos taken by a high-speed camera. The effects of the angular speed and inner depth of the rotary cup on ligament disintegration was investigated. The results showed that one state of disintegration may transform into another state as the angular speed of the rotary cup increases at a given liquid flow rate. During ligament formation, the number of ligaments increased with an increase in the angular speed of the rotary cup, and a decrease in the diameter of ligament and liquid drop was observed. Moreover, the initial point of disintegration of the ligament moved to the lip of the rotary cup as the angular speed increased. An equation describing the relationship between the diameter of the liquid drop and various factors was used to predict the diameter of the liquid drop. A rotary cup with an inner depth of 30 mm was the best choice for granulation. The results of the present study will be useful for designing devices used in molten slag granulation. - Highlights: ►The results can be used in the granulation of molten blast furnace slag. ► The three different states of disintegration occur as the angular speed of rotary cup increases. ► The mechanism of ligament disintegration is analyzed. ► Eq. can be used to predict the diameter of liquid drop. ► A rotary cup with an inner depth of 30 mm is optimal for granulation.

  10. Wetting Behavior of Calcium Ferrite Slags on Cristobalite Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingrui; Lv, Xuewei; Wei, Ruirui; Xu, Jian; Bai, Chenguang

    2018-03-01

    Calcium ferrite (CF) is a significant intermediate adhesive phase in high-basicity sinters. The wettability between calcium ferrite (CF) and gangue plays an important role in the assimilation process. The wettability of CF-based slags, in which a constant amount (2 mass pct.) of Al2O3, MgO, SiO2, and TiO2 was added, on solid SiO2 (cristobalite) substrates at 1523 K (1250 °C) was investigated. The interfacial microstructure and spreading mechanisms were discussed for each sample. All the tested slag samples exhibited good wettability on the SiO2 substrate. The initial apparent contact angles were in the range of 20 to 50 deg, while the final apparent contact angles were 5 deg. The wetting process could be divided into three stages on the basis of the change in diameter, namely the "linear spreading" stage, "spreading rate reduction" stage, and "wetting equilibrium" stage. It was found that the CF-SiO2 wetting system exhibits dissolutive wetting and the dissolution of SiO2 into slag influences its spreading process. The spreading rate increases with a decrease in the ratio of viscosity to interfacial tension, which is a result of the addition of Al2O3, MgO, SiO2, and TiO2. After cooling, a deep corrosion pit was formed in the substrate and a diffusion layer was generated in front of the residual slag zone; further, some SiO2 and Fe2O3 solid solutions precipitated in the slag.

  11. Thermal Behaviour of clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassoni, E.

    1985-01-01

    The programme carried out by ENEA to model the thermal-hydraulic-mechanical behaviour of the clay formations and to measure, in situ and in laboratory, the thermal properties of these rocks, is presented. An in situ heating experiment has been carried out in an open clay quarry in the area of Monterotondo, near Rome. The main goal of the experiment was to know the temperature field and the thermal effects caused by the high level radioactive waste disposed of in a clayey geological formation. The conclusions are as follows: - the thermal conduction codes are sufficiently accurate to forecast the temperature increases caused in the clay by the dissipation of the heat generated by high level radioactive waste; - the thermal conductivity deduced by means of the ''curve fitting'' method ranges from 0.015 to 0.017 W.cm -1 . 0 C -1 - the temperature variation associated with the transport of clay interstitial water caused by temperature gradient is negligible. A laboratory automated method has been designed to measure the thermal conductivity and diffusivity in clay samples. A review of experimental data concerning thermomechanical effects in rocks as well as results of thermal experiments performed at ISMES on clays are presented. Negative thermal dilation has been found both in the elastic and plastic range under constant stress. Thermoplastic deformation appears ten times greater than the thermoelastic one. A mathematical model is proposed in order to simulate the above and other effects that encompass thermal-elastic-plastic-pore water pressure response of clays at high temperature and effective pressure with undrained and transient drainage conditions. Implementation of the two versions into a finite element computer code is described

  12. Characterization of limestone reacted with acid-mine drainage in a pulsed limestone bed treatment system at the Friendship Hill National Historical Site, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammarstrom, J.M.; Sibrell, P.L.; Belkin, H.E.

    2003-01-01

    Armoring of limestone is a common cause of failure in limestone-based acid-mine drainage (AMD) treatment systems. Limestone is the least expensive material available for acid neutralization, but is not typically recommended for highly acidic, Fe-rich waters due to armoring with Fe(III) oxyhydroxide coatings. A new AMD treatment technology that uses CO2 in a pulsed limestone bed reactor minimizes armor formation and enhances limestone reaction with AMD. Limestone was characterized before and after treatment with constant flow and with the new pulsed limestone bed process using AMD from an inactive coal mine in Pennsylvania (pH = 2.9, Fe = 150 mg/l, acidity = 1000 mg/l CaCO3). In constant flow experiments, limestone is completely armored with reddish-colored ochre within 48 h of contact in a fluidized bed reactor. Effluent pH initially increased from the inflow pH of 2.9 to over 7, but then decreased to 6 during operation. Limestone removed from a pulsed bed pilot plant is a mixture of unarmored, rounded and etched limestone grains and partially armored limestone and refractory mineral grains (dolomite, pyrite). The ???30% of the residual grains in the pulsed flow reactor that are armored have thicker (50- to 100-??m), more aluminous coatings and lack the gypsum rind that develops in the constant flow experiment. Aluminium-rich zones developed in the interior parts of armor rims in both the constant flow and pulsed limestone bed experiments in response to pH changes at the solid/solution interface. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Digital model evaluation of the predevelopment flow system of the Tertiary limestone aquifer, Southeast Georgia, Northeast Florida, and South South Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Richard E.

    1982-01-01

    A computer model using finite-difference techniques was used successfully to simulate the predevelopment flow regime within the multilayered Tertiary limestone aquifer system in Southeastern Georgia, Northeastern Florida, and Southern South Carolina as part of the U.S. Geological Survey 's Tertiary Limestone Regional Aquifer System analysis. The aquifer, of early Eocene to Miocene age, ranges from thin interbedded clastics and marl in the updip area to massive limestone and dolomite 1,500 feet thick in the downdip area. The aquifer is confined above by Miocene clay beds, and terminates at depth in low-permeability rocks or the saltwater interface. Model-simulated transmissivity of the upper permeable zone ranged from about 1 x 10 super 3 foot squared per day in the updip area and within parts of the Gulf Trough (a series of alinement basins filled by fine clastic in material) to about 1 x 10 super 6 foot squared per day in South Georgia, and area having large secondarily developed solution channels. The model results indicate that only about 540 cubic feet per second of water flowed through the predeveloped system, from the updip highland area of high altitude and in the areas north of Valdosta and southwest of Jacksonville, to discharge along streams in the updip area and diffuse upward leakage in the downdip area near the coast and offshore. (USGS)

  14. Clay dispersibility and soil friability – testing the soil clay-to-carbon saturation concept

    OpenAIRE

    Schjønning, P.; de Jonge, L.W.; Munkholm, L.J.; Moldrup, P.; Christensen, B.T.; Olesen, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC as a predictor of clay dispersibility and soil friability. Soil was sampled three years in a field varying in clay content (~100 to ~220 g kg-1 soil) and grown with different crop rotations. Clay ...

  15. A novel comprehensive utilization of vanadium slag: As gamma ray shielding material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Mengge [School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liaoning Key Laboratory of Metallurgical Resources Recycling Science, Shenyang 110004 (China); Xue, Xiangxin, E-mail: xuexx@mail.neu.edu.cn [School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liaoning Key Laboratory of Metallurgical Resources Recycling Science, Shenyang 110004 (China); Yang, He; Liu, Dong [School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liaoning Key Laboratory of Metallurgical Resources Recycling Science, Shenyang 110004 (China); Wang, Chao [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Zhefu [Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A novel comprehensive utilization method for vanadium slag is proposed. • Shielding properties of vanadium slag are better than ordinary concrete. • HVL of vanadium slag is between Lead and concrete to shield {sup 60}Co gamma ray. • HVL of composite is higher than concrete when adding amount of vanadium slag is 900. • Composite can be used as injecting mortar for cracks developed in concrete shields. - Abstract: New exploration of vanadium slag as gamma ray shielding material was proposed, the shielding properties of vanadium slag was higher than concrete when the energy of photons was in 0.0001 MeV–100000 MeV. Vanadium slag/epoxy resin composites were prepared, shielding and material properties of materials were tested by {sup 60}Co gamma ray, simultaneous DSC-TGA, electronic universal testing machine and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results showed that the shielding properties of composite would be better with the increase of vanadium slag addition amount. The HVL (half value layer thickness) of vanadium slag was between Lead and concrete while composite was higher than concrete when the addition amount of vanadium slag was 900 used as material to shield {sup 60}Co gamma ray, also the resistance temperature of composite was about 215 °C and the bending strength was over 10 MPa. The composites could be used as injecting mortar for cracks developed in biological concrete shields, coating for the floor of the nuclear facilities, and shielding materials by itself.

  16. Corrosion Behavior of Ceramic Cup of Blast Furnace Hearth by Liquid Iron and Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanglong; Cheng, Shusen; Wang, Zhifeng

    2016-10-01

    Three kinds of sample bricks of ceramic cups for blast furnace hearth were studied by dynamic corrosion tests based on different corrosion systems, i.e., liquid iron system, liquid slag system and liquid iron-slag system. Considering the influence of temperature and sample rotational speed, the corrosion profiles and mass loss of the samples were analyzed. In addition, the microstructure of the corroded samples was observed by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). It was found that the corrosion profiles could be divided into iron corrosion region, slag corrosion region and iron-slag corrosion region via corrosion degree after iron-slag corrosion experiment. The most serious corrosion occurred in iron-slag corrosion region. This is due to Marangoni effect, which promotes a slag film formed between liquid iron and ceramic cup and results in local corrosion. The corrosion of the samples deepened with increasing temperature of liquid iron and slag from 1,623 K to 1,823 K. The variation of slag composition had greater influence on the erosion degree than that of rotational speed in this experiment. Taking these results into account the ceramic cup composition should be close to slag composition to decrease the chemical reaction. A microporous and strong material should be applied for ceramic cup.

  17. A discussion on improving hydration activity of steel slag by altering its mineral compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Yan, Peiyu; Feng, Jianwen

    2011-02-28

    This study aims to investigate the ways to improve the cementitious properties of steel slag. The results show that the cementitious phase of steel slag is composed of silicate and aluminate, but the large particles of these phases make a very small contribution to the cementitious properties of steel slag. RO phase (CaO-FeO-MnO-MgO solid solution), Fe(3)O(4), C(2)F and f-CaO make no contribution to the cementitious properties of steel slag. A new kind of steel slag with more cementitious phase and less RO phase can be obtained by removing some large particles. This new steel slag possesses better cementitious properties than the original steel slag. The large particles can be used as fine aggregates for concrete. Adding regulating agent high in CaO and SiO(2) during manufacturing process of steel slag to increase the cementitious phase to inert phase ratio is another way to improve its cementitious properties. The regulating agent should be selected to adapt to the specific steel slag and the alkalinity should be increased as high as possible on the premise that the f-CaO content does not increase. The cooling rate should be enhanced to improve the hydration activity of the cementitious phase at the early ages and the grindability of steel slag. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Disintegration and size reduction of slags and metals after melt refining of contaminated metallic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heshmatpour, B.; Copeland, G.L.; Heestand, R.L.

    1981-04-01

    Melting under an oxidizing slag is an attractive method of decontaminating and reducing the volume of radioactively contaminated metal scrap. The contaminants are concentrated in a relatively small volume of slag, which leaves the metal essentially clean. A potential method of permanently disposing of the resulting slags (and metals if necessary) is emplacing them into deep shale by grout hydrofracture. Suspension in grout mixtures requires that the slag and metal be granular. The feasibility of size-reducing slags and disintegrating metals and subsequently incorporating both into grout mixtures was demonstrated. Various types of slags were crushed with a small jaw crusher into particles smaller than 3 mm. Several metals were also melted and water-blasted into coarse metal powder or shot ranging in size from 0.05 to 3 mm. A simple low-pressure water atomizer having a multiple nozzle with a converging-line jet stream was developed and used for this purpose. No significant slag dust and steam were generated during slag crushing and liquid-metal water-blasting tests, indicating that contamination can be well contained within the system. The crushed slags and the coarse metal powders were suspendable in group fluids, which indicates probable disposability by shale hydrofracture. The granulation of slags and metals facilitates their containment, transport, and storage

  19. Evaluation of copper slag to catalyze advanced oxidation processes for the removal of phenol in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huanosta-Gutiérrez, T.; Dantas, Renato F.; Ramírez-Zamora, R.M.; Esplugas, S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We evaluate the use of an industrial residue (copper slag) as catalyst in water treatment. ► The copper slag was effective to remove organic pollutants (phenol) from water. ► During experimentation, Cu and Fe leaching were not higher than the acceptable levels. ► Slag/H 2 O 2 /UV and slag/H 2 O 2 treatments promoted biodegradability increment of the contaminated water. ► The control of the reaction time would minimize the environmental impact of the produced effluents in terms of acute toxicity. - Abstract: The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of copper slag to catalyze phenol degradation in water by advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Copper slag was tested in combination with H 2 O 2 (slag/H 2 O 2 ) and H 2 O 2 /UV (slag/H 2 O 2 /UV). The studied methods promoted the complete photocatalytic degradation of phenol. Besides, they were able to reduce about 50% the TOC content in the samples. Slag/H 2 O 2 /UV and slag/H 2 O 2 treatments have favored biodegradability increment along the reaction time. Nevertheless, the irradiated method achieved higher values of the biodegradability indicator (BOD 5 /TOC). The toxicity assessment indicated the formation of more toxic compounds in both treatments. However, the control of the reaction time would minimize the environmental impact of the effluents.

  20. Rheological behavior and constitutive equations of heterogeneous titanium-bearing molten slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Liao, De-ming; Zhou, Mi; Zhang, Qiao-yi; Yue, Hong-rui; Yang, Song-tao; Duan, Pei-ning; Xue, Xiang-xin

    2015-08-01

    Experimental studies on the rheological properties of a CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-MgO-TiO2-(TiC) blast furnace (BF) slag system were conducted using a high-temperature rheometer to reveal the non-Newtonian behavior of heterogeneous titanium-bearing molten slag. By measuring the relationships among the viscosity, the shear stress and the shear rate of molten slags with different TiC contents at different temperatures, the rheological constitutive equations were established along with the rheological parameters; in addition, the non-Newtonian fluid types of the molten slags were determined. The results indicated that, with increasing TiC content, the viscosity of the molten slag tended to increase. If the TiC content was less than 2wt%, the molten slag exhibited the Newtonian fluid behavior when the temperature was higher than the critical viscosity temperature of the molten slag. In contrast, the molten slag exhibited the non-Newtonian pseudoplastic fluid characteristic and the shear thinning behavior when the temperature was less than the critical viscosity temperature. However, if the TiC content exceeded 4wt%, the molten slag produced the yield stress and exhibited the Bingham and plastic pseudoplastic fluid behaviors when the temperature was higher and lower than the critical viscosity temperature, respectively. When the TiC content increased further, the yield stress of the molten slag increased and the shear thinning phenomenon became more obvious.

  1. Effect of Coarse Aggregate and Slag Type on the Mechanical Behavior of High and Normal Weight Concrete Used at Barrage Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Sanaullah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Present study is an effort to assess the composite effect of limestone aggregate and blast furnace slag on the mechanical characteristics of normal and high weight concrete at various structural units (barrage girders, main weir and block apron of New Khanki Barrage Project, Punjab. Mix designs for different concrete classes falling under the domain of high and normal weight concrete were prepared after aggregate quality testing. On attaining satisfactory results of quality testing nine concrete mixes were designed (three for each class: A1, A and B by absolute volume method (ACI- 211.1. The required compressive strength of normal and high strength was set at 6200, 5200 and 4200 Psi for the concrete types A1, A and B respectively after 28 days (ACI -318. For compressive strength assessment, a total 27 concrete cylinders were casted (9-cylinders for each mix and were water cured. The achieved average UCS of cylinder concrete specimens at 3, 7 and 28 days are 5170, 6338 and 7320 Psi for A1 – type, 3210, 4187 and 5602 Psi for A-type and 2650, 3360 and 4408 Psi for B- type mix. It has been found that all concrete mixes for suggested classes attained target strength at age of 7-days. The coarse aggregate (Margala Hill limestone and fine aggregates (from Lawrancepur /Qibla Bandi quarries used in all concrete mix designs have demonstrated a sound mechanical suitability for high and normal weight concrete.

  2. Aplicação superficial de calcário e diferentes resíduos em soja cultivada no sistema plantio direto Surface application of limestone and different residues on soybean grown in no-till system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Corulli Corrêa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A prática da correção da acidez do solo pela aplicação superficial de corretivos sobre a palha no sistema plantio direto se restringe ao calcário, não havendo maiores estudos em relação à escória de aciaria, lama cal e lodo de esgoto centrifugado. O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar os índices de acidez do solo e a produtividade da soja em função da aplicação superficial de lodo de esgoto centrifugado, lama cal, escória de aciaria e calcário dolomítico. O trabalho foi desenvolvido em Latossolo Vermelho distrófico, durante os anos agrícolas de 2002 a 2005, sob sistema plantio direto. Os tratamentos constituíram da aplicação superficial de escória de aciaria (E, lama cal (Lcal, lodo de esgoto centrifugado (LC, calcário dolomítico e sem aplicação de corretivo, em delineamento em blocos ao acaso, com quatro repetições. A aplicação superficial de escória de aciaria, lama cal e lodo de esgoto centrifugado permite a correção da acidez do solo, o deslocamento do Ca2+, o aumento da saturação por bases e redução do Al3+ até 40 cm, e para o calcário, até 20 cm, fatores que condicionaram o aumento da produtividade da soja para os tratamentos LC, E e Lcal em 2003/2004 e 2004/2005 e para LC e E em 2002/2003 no sistema plantio direto.The practice of correcting soil acidity by surface application of pH-correcting materials on crop residues in the no-till system is restricted to limestone. No further studies are available on the use of steel slag, lime mud, and centrifuged sewage sludge. The objective of this study was to evaluate soil acidity and yield of soybean as a function of surface application of centrifuged sewage sludge, lime mud, steel slag, and dolomitic limestone. The study was conducted on a dystrophic Clayey Rhodic Hapludox soil, during the 2002_2005 cropping seasons, under notill system. Treatments consisted on surface application of slag _ E, lime mud _ Lcal, centrifuged sewage sludge _ LC, dolomitic

  3. Fluoride retention by kaolin clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kau, P. M. H.; Smith, D. W.; Binning, Philip John

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the potential effectiveness of kaolin clay liners in storage of fluoride contaminated waste, an experimental study of the sorption and desorption behaviour of fluoride in kaolin clay was conducted. The degree of fluoride sorption by kaolin was found to depend on solution p......H and available fluoride concentration with equilibrium being achieved within 24 h. A site activation process involving the uptake of fluoride was also observed at the initial stages of sorption. This behaviour was attributed to a layer expansion process of the clay during sorption. The maximum fluoride sorption...... capacity was found to be 18.3 meq/100 g at pH 6 and 8.6 meq/100 g at pH 7. A competitive Langmuir sorption isotherm where sorption is dependant on both pH and fluoride concentration is employed to characterise the experimental sorption and desorption data. The sorption and desorption isotherms revealed...

  4. Are the Vinjamur rocks carbonatites or meta-limestones?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subbarao, K V; Bhaskar Rao, B [Indian Institute of Technology, Bombay (India). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Le Bas, M J [Univ. of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geology

    1995-08-01

    New whole-rock rare earth element (REE) data for the metacarbonate rocks inter bedded with schists at Vinjamur in the Nellore schist belt of Andhra Pradesh, show low total REE contents ({sigma}9-128 ppm) that are inconsistent with an igneous carbonatitic origin but which correspond more closely with a sedimentary limestone origin. The REE data of these rocks however, do not give absolute discrimination between marbles of meta-limestone and metacarbonatite origin. Micro-probe analytical data give better discrimination, and the chemical compositions of the calcite, micas, amphibole, plagioclase, apatite, monazite and staurolite in the Vinjamur marbles give strong and consistent evidence of a metamorphosed sedimentary rather than an igneous origin. (author). 35 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs.

  5. The influence of combustion derived pollutants on limestone deterioration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, JB; Montgomery, Melanie; Thompson, GE

    1996-01-01

    This study concerns quantification of the relative chemical degradation effects of dry deposition of combustion-derived atmospheric pollutants, HCl, SO2 and NO2, on Portland and Monks Park limestones, employing laboratory exposure chambers for periods of 30 days. Using presentation rates up to 40 x...... 10(-4) mu g cm(-2) s(-1), the pollutants were assessed individually and in various combinations, along with ozone as oxidant, at 84% RH with dry or water-wetted surfaces. The degradation was followed by analysis of exposed stone, for Cl-, SO42- and NO3-, and of run-off solution for Ca2+, in addition...... to the anions. From these data, the total calcium released from limestone to reaction ions and products and the percentages of each pollutant reacted (and so the deposition velocity (V-D)) in each exposure regime were calculated. HCl acted independently of the presence of other pollutants, showed 40 and 100...

  6. Induration and Biot’s Coefficient of Palaeogene Limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling

    2017-01-01

    In engineering geology and classification of rock masses for civil engineering purposes, the degree of induration for a rock serves as a useful classification parameter. Induration is a measure of how well the grains of a sedimentary rock are cemented together - from loosely cemented/soft rock...... to very competent/slightly metamorphic rock. The Biot coefficient links to the degree of cementation in the capacity of how it relates the elastic deformations with the change in pore pressure. A hypothesis is that the degree of induration could be correlated to the magnitude of the Biot coefficient....... This is tested on 11 Copenhagen Limestone specimens of varying porosity and densities obtained from one borehole with a limestone interval of 30 m. Their induration varies from H2 to H5. Elastic wave propagation measurements are used to establish the Biot coefficient and determination of the mineralogy for H5...

  7. Are the Vinjamur rocks carbonatites or meta-limestones?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subbarao, K.V.; Bhaskar Rao, B.; Le Bas, M.J.

    1995-01-01

    New whole-rock rare earth element (REE) data for the metacarbonate rocks inter bedded with schists at Vinjamur in the Nellore schist belt of Andhra Pradesh, show low total REE contents (σ9-128 ppm) that are inconsistent with an igneous carbonatitic origin but which correspond more closely with a sedimentary limestone origin. The REE data of these rocks however, do not give absolute discrimination between marbles of meta-limestone and metacarbonatite origin. Micro-probe analytical data give better discrimination, and the chemical compositions of the calcite, micas, amphibole, plagioclase, apatite, monazite and staurolite in the Vinjamur marbles give strong and consistent evidence of a metamorphosed sedimentary rather than an igneous origin. (author). 35 refs., 7 figs., 9 tabs

  8. Importance of granulometry on phase evolution and phase-to-phase relationships of experimentally burned impure limestones intended for production of hydraulic lime and/or natural cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovcev, Petr; Přikryl, Richard; Přikrylová, Jiřina

    2015-04-01

    and/or 6 hours. Burned samples were examined by XRD for phase composition and by SEM-EDS for phase-to-phase relationships due to the burning. Based on our data it is evident that larnite-belite (dicalcium-silicate) is dominant phase in burned silica-rich limestones (represented by e.g. Dvorce-Prokop, Přídolí and/or Kopanina Lms.). In clay-rich limestones containing kaolinite and illite, gehlenite and other calcium aluminates and aluminosilicates were detected (represented by Kosoř, Řeporyje, and/or a portion of Dvorce-Prokop Lms.). Due to higher proportion of Fe-oxihydroxides in the Řeporyje Lms., brownmillerite (calcium aluminoferrite) forms as a typical minor phases during burning. Free-lime (plus its hydrated form - portlandite) makes dominant phase in limestones exhibiting low non-carbonate admixture (Kotýs and/or a portion of Kopanina Lms.). These results clearly demonstrate that presence of certain non-carbonate minerals governs formation of certain hydraulic phases in burned product, whilst mutual proportions of individual minerals in raw materials influence amount of newly formed phases.

  9. FUNGISTATIC PROPERTIES OF GRANULATED BLASTFURNACE SLAG AND RELATED SLAG-CONTAINING CEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Strigac

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with studying the antifungal effect of ground granulated blastfurnace slag (GGBS and the cements made from it. Antifungal effects were tested on the fungi using the procedure given in the Czech national standard CSN 72 4310: 1977 - Testing the mould proofness properties of building products and materials. A mixture of the fungi Aspergillus niger, Chaetomium globosum, Penicillium funiculosum, Paecilomyces variotii and Gliocladium virens was used for testing. The scale for evaluating mould proofness properties according to CSN 72 4310: 1977 is from 0 to 5 in degree of fungi growth, where a value of 0 means that no growth of fungi occurs and the building products and materials possess fungistatic properties. The study confirms the fungistatic propeties of GGBS with mould proofness property 0. The addition of GGBS to cements from 65 wt.% to 95 wt.% ensures the achieving of a fungistatic environment, which enables the production of fungistatic blastfurnace cements CEM III/A 32.5 N (with GGBS content of 65 wt.%, CEM III/B 32.5 N and CEM III/C 32.5 N with mould proofness property 0.

  10. Method and Apparatus for Assessing the Properties of Slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biernat S.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A special Slag-Prop Cu database has been developed to archive data from laboratory and industrial tests related to post-reduction slags. In order to enrich the data areas, it was decided to design a system for measuring the temperature of the liquid slag and its viscosity. Objectives of research work are to gather information on the properties of post-slags such as the temperature of liquid slag and its viscosity. The discussed issues are especially important in the foundry practice. Designed research stand and using of database applications can greatly facilitate the work of metallurgists, foundrymen, technologists and scientists. The viscosity measurement was developed and presented earlier. The author’s analytical methodology was supplemented by a thyristor measuring system (described in the article. The system temperature measurement can be performed simultaneously in 3 ways to reduce the measurement error. Measurement of the voltage mV - using the Seebeck effect can be measured throughout the entire range of thermocouple resistance, up to 1300 °C. Direct temperature measurement °C - measurement only below 1000 °C. Additional measurement - the measurement can also be read from the pyrometer set above the bath. The temperature and the reading frequency depend on the device itself. The principle of measurement is that in a molten metal / slag crucible, we put a N-type thermocouple. The thermocouples are hung by means of a tripod above the crucible and placed in a crucible. The thermocouple is connected to a compensating line dedicated to this type of thermocouple. The cable is in turn connected to a special multimeter that has the ability to connect to a computer and upload results. Temperature measurement can be performed simultaneously in 3 ways to reduce the measurement error. The Sn-Pb alloy has been subjected to testing for proper operation of the device. In this foot should be observed the supercooling of the liquid, which initiates

  11. OPTIMALIZATION OF BLASTING IN »LAKOVIĆI« LIMESTONE QUARRY

    OpenAIRE

    Branko Božić; Karlo Braun

    1992-01-01

    The optimalization of exploitation in »Lakovići« limestone quarry is described. Based on determined discontinuities in the rock mass and their densities, the best possible working site have been located in order to obtain the best possible sizes of blasted rocks and work slope stability. Optimal lowest resistance line size for the quarry has been counted and proved experimentally. New blasting parameters have resulted in considerable saving of drilling and explosive (the paper is published in...

  12. Boron enrichment in martian clay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Stephenson

    Full Text Available We have detected a concentration of boron in martian clay far in excess of that in any previously reported extra-terrestrial object. This enrichment indicates that the chemistry necessary for the formation of ribose, a key component of RNA, could have existed on Mars since the formation of early clay deposits, contemporary to the emergence of life on Earth. Given the greater similarity of Earth and Mars early in their geological history, and the extensive disruption of Earth's earliest mineralogy by plate tectonics, we suggest that the conditions for prebiotic ribose synthesis may be better understood by further Mars exploration.

  13. Effects of Design/Operating Parameters and Physical Properties on Slag Thickness and Heat Transfer during Coal Gasification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insoo Ye

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The behaviors of the slag layers formed by the deposition of molten ash onto the wall are important for the operation of entrained coal gasifiers. In this study, the effects of design/operation parameters and slag properties on the slag behaviors were assessed in a commercial coal gasifier using numerical modeling. The parameters influenced the slag behaviors through mechanisms interrelated to the heat transfer, temperature, velocity, and viscosity of the slag layers. The velocity profile of the liquid slag was less sensitive to the variations in the parameters. Therefore, the change in the liquid slag thickness was typically smaller than that of the solid slag. The gas temperature was the most influential factor, because of its dominant effect on the radiative heat transfer to the slag layer. The solid slag thickness exponentially increased with higher gas temperatures. The influence of the ash deposition rate was diminished by the high-velocity region developed near the liquid slag surface. The slag viscosity significantly influenced the solid slag thickness through the corresponding changes in the critical temperature and the temperature gradient (heat flux. For the bottom cone of the gasifier, steeper angles were favorable in reducing the thickness of the slag layers.

  14. Degradation behavior of limestone concrete under limited time sodium exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.K.; Sharma, A.K.; Ramesh, S.S.; Parida, F.C.; Kasinathan, N.; Chellapandi, P.

    2009-01-01

    Adequate safety measures are taken during design, fabrication, construction and operation of liquid sodium cooled fast breeder reactor (FBR). However, possibility of sodium leak from secondary heat transport circuits of FBR has not been completely ruled out. In the areas housing sodium pipelines such as Steam Generator Building (SGB), spilled liquid sodium not only reacts with air causing fire but also interacts with structural concrete resulting in its degradation. The structural concrete can be protected from sodium attack using sodium resistant sacrificial concrete layer or steel/refractory liners. Moreover, design and construction of sloping floor with sodium collection pit helps in minimizing the mass of sodium accumulated on the floor and exposure period. Sacrificial concrete layer on the structural concrete should meet key factors like economy, castability, easy removal of affected concrete in the event of a sodium fire and disposability of debris apart from its good resistance against hot burning sodium. Present study is directed towards testing of limestone concrete blocks (made out of 13% ordinary portland cement, 8% water, 48% coarse limestone and 31 % fine limestone aggregates)

  15. Adsorption of anionic surfactants in limestone medium during oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canbolat, Serhat; Bagci, Suat [Middle East Technical Univ., Dept. of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering, Ankara (Turkey)

    2004-07-15

    Foam-forming surfactant performance was evaluated by several experimental methods (interfacial tension, foam stability, corefloods) using commercial surfactants. There is considerable interest in the use of foam-forming surfactants for mobility control in water flood. To provide effective mobility control, the injected surfactant must propagate from the injection well toward the production well. One of the important parameters affecting propagation of foam-forming surfactant through the reservoir is the retention of surfactant due to its adsorption on reservoir rock. The determination of the adsorption of foam-forming surfactants in limestone reservoirs is important for the residual oil recovery efficiency. Adsorption measurements, recovery efficiencies, and surfactant and alkaline flooding experiments carried out with the representative of the selected surfactants alkaline solutions, linear alkyl benzene sulphonic acid (LABSA), sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES), and NaOH in a limestone medium. These surfactants were selected with respect to their foaming ability. Calibration curves formed by pH measurements were used to determine the correct adsorption amount of the used surfactants and recovery efficiency of these surfactants compared with base waterflooding. The results showed that LABSA adsorbed more than SLES in limestone reservoirs. The recovery efficiency of SLES was higher than the recovery efficiency of LABSA, and they decreased the recovery efficiency with respect to only the water injection case. (Author)

  16. Development of gypsum alteration on marble and limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, E.S.

    1996-01-01

    Blackened alteration crusts of gypsum plus particulates that form on sheltered areas on marble and limestone buildings pose a challenge for rehabilitation and cleaning. Fresh marble and limestone samples exposed at monitored exposure sites present conditions of simple geometry and well-documented exposures but have short exposure histories (one to five years). The gypsum alteration crusts that develop on these samples provide insight into the early stages and rate of alteration crust formation. Alteration crusts from buildings give a longer, but less well known exposure history and present much more complex surfaces for gypsum accumulation. Integrated observations and measurements of alteration crusts from exposure samples and from buildings identify four factors that are important in the formation and development of alteration crusts on marble and limestone: (1) pollution levels, (2) exposure to rain or washing, (3) geometry of exposure of the stone surface, and (4) permeability of the stone. The combination of these factors contributes to both the distribution and the physical characteristics of the gypsum crusts which may affect cleaning decisions.

  17. Biogenic magnetite as a primary remanence carrier in limestone deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shih-Bin R.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Stolz, John F.

    1987-06-01

    Studies on the microbial communities and magnetic phases of samples collected from carbonate oozes at Sugarloaf Key, FL, U.S.A. and calcareous laminated sediments from Laguna Figueroa, Baja California, Mexico have revealed the existence of magnetotactic bacteria and ultrafine-grained single domain magnetite in both environments. Magnetotactic bacteria were identified by light and electron microscopy. The single domain magnetite was detected by coercivity spectra analysis with a SQUID magnetometer and examined under the transmission electron microscope. The similarity, in terms of size and shape, between the single domain magnetite found in these sediments and the magnetite observed in the bacterial magnetosome from enriched cultures indicates the ultrafine-grained magnetite in these two marine environments was biologically formed. These results, combined with the common occurrences of ultrafine-grained magnetite in limestone deposits detected rock magnetically, suggest biogenic magnetite may be present and contribute to the magnetic remanence in these rocks. Several Cambrian limestone samples, separately collected from Siberia, China, and Kazakhstan, were examined for the presence of bacterial magnetite. Samples from the Lower Cambrian Sinskian Formation at Siberia Platform were found to contain both a large amount of apparently bacterial magnetite particles and a very stable primary magnetic component. Post-Cambrian diagenesis does not seem to affect the microgranulometry of these apparently bacterial magnetite crystals or the magnetic remanence carried by them. Assessing the potential role of biogenic magnetite as a primary remanence carrier in other Phanerozoic limestone deposits ought to be further pursued.

  18. The Biot coefficient for a low permeability heterogeneous limestone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvadurai, A. P. S.

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents the experimental and theoretical developments used to estimate the Biot coefficient for the heterogeneous Cobourg Limestone, which is characterized by its very low permeability. The coefficient forms an important component of the Biot poroelastic model that is used to examine coupled hydro-mechanical and thermo-hydro-mechanical processes in the fluid-saturated Cobourg Limestone. The constraints imposed by both the heterogeneous fabric and its extremely low intact permeability [K \\in (10^{-23},10^{-20}) m2 ] require the development of alternative approaches to estimate the Biot coefficient. Large specimen bench-scale triaxial tests (150 mm diameter and 300 mm long) that account for the scale of the heterogeneous fabric are complemented by results for the volume fraction-based mineralogical composition derived from XRD measurements. The compressibility of the solid phase is based on theoretical developments proposed in the mechanics of multi-phasic elastic materials. An appeal to the theory of multi-phasic elastic solids is the only feasible approach for examining the compressibility of the solid phase. The presence of a number of mineral species necessitates the use of the theories of Voigt, Reuss and Hill along with the theories proposed by Hashin and Shtrikman for developing bounds for the compressibility of the multi-phasic geologic material composing the skeletal fabric. The analytical estimates for the Biot coefficient for the Cobourg Limestone are compared with results for similar low permeability rocks reported in the literature.

  19. Preparation of Lime by Roasting the Limestone Deposits of Strezovci (Republic of Kosovo and Its Use for the Aluminothermic Production of Calcium Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda, S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The goal of producing and processing limestone ore (mostly CaCO3 is to obtain high-quality refractory materials based on lime (CaO. Lime is the raw material for obtaining calcium metal as a strategic and fundamental component in lead metallurgy (production of refined lead, Pb-Ca alloys in the battery and cable industry, ferroalloys production with the addition of silicon and calcium, production of alloy steel and high-quality steel. This paper explores the preparation of lime by roasting the limestone deposits of Strezovci (Republic of Kosovo and its use for obtaining calcium through the aluminothermic process. Through research and analysis of the chemical composition of certain types of lime, its suitabi- lity for obtaining calcium metal was determined, and by analyzing the samples of the slag, determined was the possibility of its use in the production of fire-resistant cement for which the evaluation is needed. Based on previous research, the following was chosen: optimal composition of the cast, volume of added reducing agents, and conditions of the reduction process performance: temperature-time and initial vacuum. According to the authors’ knowledge, not one Southeast European country has applied this method, and it includes the use of by-products (slag, which can cause environmental pollution. The goal of this research was to prepare lime by roasting limestone of domestic origin in order to obtain calcium metal through the aluminothermic process. The procedure of calcium metal production includes the following operations: decarbonatization of limestone ore (CaCO3 , grinding of the obtained lime (CaO, homogenization of CaO and alumina, agglomeration, and aluminothermic reduction in vacuum furnaces. For the efficiency of the process, the most important technological operations are decarbonatization and reduction, provided the other operations are performed correctly. The estimated total world capacity for production of calcium metal is 25

  20. Thermal properties of fly ash substituted slag cement waste forms for disposal of Savannah River Plant salt waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, D.M.; Kaushal, S.; Licastro, P.H.; Langton, C.A.

    1985-01-01

    Waste processing at the Savannah River Plant will involve reconstitution of the salts (NaNO 3 , NaNO 2 , NaOH, etc.) into a concentrated solution (32 weight percent salts) followed by solidification in a cement-based waste form for burial. The stability and mechanical durability of such a 'saltstone monolith' will depend largely on the temperature reached due to heat of hydration and the thermal properties of the waste form. Fly ash has been used as an inexpensive constituent and to moderate the hydration and setting processes so as to avoid reaching prohibitively high temperatures which could cause thermal stresses. Both high-calcium and low-calcium fly ashes have been studied for this purpose. Other constituents of these mixes include granulated blast furnace slag and finely crushed limestone. Adiabatic temperature increase and thermal conductivity of these mixes have been studied and related x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy studies carried out to understand the hydration process

  1. X-ray diffractometry of steam cured ordinary Portland and blast-furnace-slag cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camarini, G.; Djanikian, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    This work studies some aspects of the phases produced by hydration of ordinary and blast-furnace-slag cements, at normal conditions and steam cured (60 and 95 0 C), using an X-ray diffraction technique. The blast-furnace-slag cement was a mixture of 50% of ordinary Portland cement and 50% of blast-furnace-slag (separately grinding). After curing the X-ray diffraction reveals that, in relation to ordinary Portland cement, the main phases in blast-furnace-slag cement are hydrated silicates and aluminates, hydro garnet, etringitte and mono sulphate. After steam curing the hydration of blast-furnace-slag cement proceeds. This is a result of the slag activation by the curing temperature. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  2. Utilization of High-Temperature Slags From Metallurgy Based on Crystallization Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongqi; Zhang, Zuotai

    2018-05-01

    Here, following the principle of modifying crystallization behaviors, including avoidance and optimization, we review recent research on the utilization of hot slags. Because of the high-temperature property (1450-1650°C), the utilization of hot slags are much different from that of other wastes. We approach this issue from two main directions, namely, material recycling and heat utilization. From the respect of material recycling, the utilization of slags mainly follows total utilization and partial utilization, whereas the heat recovery from slags follows two main paths, namely, physical granulation and chemical reaction. The effective disposal of hot slags greatly depends on clarifying the crystallization behaviors, and thus, we discuss some optical techniques and their applicable scientific insights. For the purpose of crystallization avoidance, characterizing the glass-forming ability of slags is of great significance, whereas for crystallization modification, the selection of chemical additives and control of crystallization conditions comprise the central routes.

  3. The effect of primary copper slag cooling rate on the copper valorization in the flotation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar Mihajlović

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Technological procedure of slow cooling slag from primary copper production is applied in the purpose of copper recovery in the level of 98.5% to blister. This technological procedure is divided into two phases, first slow cooling of slag on the air for 24 hours, and then accelerated cooling with water for 48 hours. Within the research following methods were used: calculation of nonstationary slag cooling, verification of the calculation using computer simulation of slag cooling in the software package COMSOL Multiphysics and experimental verification of simulation results. After testing of the experimentally gained samples of slowly cooled slag it was found that this technological procedure gives the best results in promoting growth or coagulation of dispersed particles of copper sulfide and copper in the slag, thereby increasing the utilization of the flotation process with a decrease of copper losses through very fine particles.

  4. Effect of Iron Redox Equilibrium on the Foaming Behavior of MgO-Saturated Slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youngjoo; Min, Dong Joon

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the foaming index of CaO-SiO2-FetO and CaO-SiO2-FetO-Al2O3 slags saturated with MgO was measured to understand the relationship between their foaming behavior and physical properties. The foaming index of MgO-saturated slags increases with the FetO content due to the redox equilibrium of FetO. Experimental results indicated that MgO-saturated slag has relatively high ferric ion concentration, and the foaming index increases due to the effect of ferric ion. Therefore, the foaming behavior of MgO-saturated slag is more reasonably explained by considering the effect of ferric ion on the estimation of slag properties such as viscosity, surface tension, and density. Specifically, the estimation of slag viscosity was additionally verified by NBO/T, and this is experimentally obtained through Raman spectroscopy.

  5. Marble waste characterization as a desulfurizing slag component for steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleti, J.L.; Grillo, F.F.; Tenorio, J.A.S.; De Oliveira, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    The current steel market requires from steel plants better quality of its products. As a result, steel plants need to search for improvements and costs reduction in its process. Hence, the residue of marble containing significant quantities of calcium and magnesium carbonates, raw materials of steel refining slag, was characterized in order to replace the conventional lime used. Therefore, it will be possible to reduce the cost and volume of waste produced by the ornamental rock industry. The following methods were applied to test the waste potential: SEM with EDS, x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence (EDX), Thermogravimetry (TG) and analysis of surface area and particle size by the BET method using dispersion leisure. The results indicated the feasibility of waste as raw material in the composition of desulfurizing slags. (author)

  6. Slag processing system for direct coal-fired gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillsbury, Paul W.

    1990-01-01

    Direct coal-fired gas turbine systems and methods for their operation are provided by this invention. The gas turbine system includes a primary zone for burning coal in the presence of compressed air to produce hot combustion gases and debris, such as molten slag. The turbine system further includes a secondary combustion zone for the lean combustion of the hot combustion gases. The operation of the system is improved by the addition of a cyclone separator for removing debris from the hot combustion gases. The cyclone separator is disposed between the primary and secondary combustion zones and is in pressurized communication with these zones. In a novel aspect of the invention, the cyclone separator includes an integrally disposed impact separator for at least separating a portion of the molten slag from the hot combustion gases.

  7. Alkali based slagging: a case study from Leigh Creek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R.A. Creelman; J. Bamberry; L.A. Juniper; C. Ward [University of Western Sydney, Penrith South, NSW (Australia)

    2003-07-01

    A systematic study was undertaken at NRG Port Augusta Power station in South Australia to determine the cause of ash deposition (slagging) in the boilers. Conventional wisdom suggests that iron in the ash is generally a major player in furnace ash deposition; however, mineralogical and chemical analyses of the deposits showed that the binding phase was plagioclase feldspar, dominated by the sodic feldspar albite. The study resulted in recognition that the cause of the formation of ash deposits in the North Flinders furnaces was the result of the ingestion of sodium and calcium into the melt that bound the deposits. This finding was a breakthrough in understanding the deposition process within these furnaces, and emphasises that not all slagging is iron related and that systematic studies of deposits, coal and ash make fundamental contributions to understanding the ash deposition mechanisms. 9 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Simulation of petcoke gasification in slagging moving bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagpal, Soumitro; Sarkar, T.K.; Sen, P.K. [Research and Development Center, Engineers India Limited, Gurgaon 122001 (India)

    2005-03-25

    A mathematical model for simulation of moving bed petcoke gasifiers was developed. The model introduces a new feed characterization method, gas-phase resistance and volatilization models. The model is validated using reported data for a slagging gasifier. Effect of feed oxygen-to-coke and steam-to-coke ratios and feed coke rates on gasification performance was examined. Slagging zone moving bed gasifier operation with very high petcoke fluxes of over 4000 kg/m{sup 2}/h was possible with high petcoke conversion. Peak gas temperatures exceeded 1500 {sup o}C. Fluxes higher than 5000 kg/m{sup 2}/h are limited by an approach to fluidization of small particles in the combustion zone. The moving bed gasifier performance was found superior to performance of an entrained flow gasifier (EFG) with respect to energy efficiency and oxygen consumption.

  9. Control system for high-temperature slagging incinerator plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Yuji

    1986-01-01

    Low-level radioactive wastes generated in the nuclear generating plants are increasing year by year and to dispose them safely constitutes a big problem for the society. A few years ago, as the means of reducing them to as little volume as possible by incinerating and fusing the wastes, a high-temperature slagging incinerating method was developed, and this method is highly assessed. JGC Corp. has introduced that system technology and in order to prove the capacity of disposal and salubrity of the plant, and have constructed a full-sized pilot plant, then obtained the operational record and performance as they had planned. This report introduces the general processing of the wastes from their incineration and fusion as well as process control technology characteristic to high-temperature slagging incinerator furnaces and sensor technology. (author)

  10. Using mineralogy as a guide to understanding slagging: a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Creelman, R.A. [R.A. Creelman & Associates (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    This paper details the mineralogy that accompanied the Callide B Power station slagging investigations. Investigations were made of coal mineral matter, particles collected from the furnace, flyash and the slag deposits. Objectives were to characterise the particles formed from burning Callide coal, to relate them to the slag deposits and flyash, and by applying thermodynamics gain an understanding of the underlying mechanisms that lead to attachment and accumulation of particles in the furnace. 9 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Effects of slag-based silicon fertilizer on rice growth and brown-spot resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Dongfeng; Song, Alin; Fan, Fenliang; Li, Zhaojun; Liang, Yongchao

    2014-01-01

    It is well documented that slag-based silicon fertilizers have beneficial effects on the growth and disease resistance of rice. However, their effects vary greatly with sources of slag and are closely related to availability of silicon (Si) in these materials. To date, few researches have been done to compare the differences in plant performance and disease resistance between different slag-based silicon fertilizers applied at the same rate of plant-available Si. In the present study both steel and iron slags were chosen to investigate their effects on rice growth and disease resistance under greenhouse conditions. Both scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the effects of slags on ultrastructural changes in leaves of rice naturally infected by Bipolaris oryaze, the causal agent of brown spot. The results showed that both slag-based Si fertilizers tested significantly increased rice growth and yield, but decreased brown spot incidence, with steel slag showing a stronger effect than iron slag. The results of SEM analysis showed that application of slags led to more pronounced cell silicification in rice leaves, more silica cells, and more pronounced and larger papilla as well. The results of TEM analysis showed that mesophyll cells of slag-untreated rice leaf were disorganized, with colonization of the fungus (Bipolaris oryzae), including chloroplast degradation and cell wall alterations. The application of slag maintained mesophyll cells relatively intact and increased the thickness of silicon layer. It can be concluded that applying slag-based fertilizer to Si-deficient paddy soil is necessary for improving both rice productivity and brown spot resistance. The immobile silicon deposited in host cell walls and papillae sites is the first physical barrier for fungal penetration, while the soluble Si in the cytoplasm enhances physiological or induced resistance to fungal colonization.

  12. Experimental investigation of basic oxygen furnace slag used as aggregate in asphalt mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yongjie; Wu, Shaopeng; Hou, Haobo; Zha, Jin

    2006-11-16

    Chinese researchers have commenced a great deal of researches on the development of application fields of basic oxygen steel making furnace slag (BOF slag) for many years. Lots of new applications and properties have been found, but few of them in asphalt mixture of road construction engineering. This paper discussed the feasibility of BOF steel slag used as aggregate in asphalt pavement by two points of view including BOF steel slag's physical and micro-properties as well as steel slag asphalt materials and pavement performances. For the former part, this paper mainly concerned the mechanochemistry and physical changes of the steel slag and studied it by performing XRD, SEM, TG and mercury porosimeter analysis and testing method. In the second part, this paper intended to use BOF steel slag as raw material, and design steel slag SMA mixture. By using traditional rutting test, soak wheel track and modified Lottman test, the high temperature stability and water resistance ability were tested. Single axes compression test and indirect tensile test were performed to evaluate the low temperature crack resistance performance and fatigue characteristic. Simultaneously, by observing steel slag SMA pavement which was paved successfully. A follow-up study to evaluate the performance of the experimental pavement confirmed that the experimental pavement was comparable with conventional asphalt pavement, even superior to the later in some aspects. All of above test results and analysis had only one main purpose that this paper validated the opinion that using BOF slag in asphalt concrete is feasible. So this paper suggested that treated and tested steel slag should be used in a more extensive range, especially in asphalt mixture paving projects in such an abundant steel slag resource region.

  13. Stools - pale or clay-colored

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/article/003129.htm Stools - pale or clay-colored To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Stools that are pale, clay, or putty-colored may be due to problems ...

  14. Phosphonium modified clay/polyimide nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceylan, Hatice; Çakmakçi, Emrah; Beyler-Çiǧil, Asli; Kahraman, Memet Vezir

    2014-01-01

    In this study, octyltriphenylphosphonium bromide [OTPP-Br] was prepared from the reaction of triphenylphosphine and 1 -bromooctane. The modification of clay was done by ion exchange reaction using OTPP-Br in water medium. Poly(amic acid) was prepared from the reaction of 3,3',4,4'-Benzophenonetetracarboxylic dianhydride (BTDA) and 4,4'-Oxydianiline (ODA). Polyimide(PI)/clay hybrids were prepared by blending of poly(amic acid) and organically modified clay as a type of layered clays. The morphology of the Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chemical structures of polyimide and Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids were characterized by FTIR. SEM and FTIR results showed that the Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids were successfully prepared. Thermal properties of the Polyimide/ phosphonium modified clay hybrids were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)

  15. Geotechnical properties of Karwar marine clay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.T.; Nayak, B.U.; Naik, R.L.

    Karwar marine clay possesses high plasticity characteristics with natural water content higher than the liquid limit. Liquidity index was as high as 1.7. Predominant clay mineral was kaolinite. Undrained shear strength showed an increasing trend...

  16. Additive to clay drilling muds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voytenko, V.S.; Nekrasova, V.B.; Nikitinskiy, E.L.; Ponomarev, V.N.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to improve the lubricating and strengthening properties of clay drilling muds. This goal is achieved because the lubricating and strengthening additive used is waste from the pulp and paper industry at the stage of reprocessing crude sulfate soap into phytosterol.

  17. Picasso Masks: Cubism in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daddino, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    This article describes an art project developed by the author which provides a way to further the children's understanding of Picasso's Cubism style in 3-D. Through this project, upper-elementary students learn a bit about the life and art of Picasso as they gain a firm understanding of the style of art known as Cubism, and apply clay techniques…

  18. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  19. Organic Synthesis using Clay Catalysts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    cept, though not new, has received enormous attention in recent times. The desire to make ... which they are divided into four main groups such as, illite, smectite .... acid or driving out NH3 by heating the NH4 + ion treated clay. It is clear from ...

  20. Low-Chrome/Chrome Free Refractories for Slagging Gasifiers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, J.P.; Kwong, K.-S.; Powell, C.P.; Thomas, H.; Petty, A.V. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Gasifiers are containment vessels used to react carbon-containing materials with oxygen and water, producing syngas (CO and H2) that is used in chemical and power production. It is also a potential source of H2 in a future hydrogen economy. Air cooled slagging gasifiers are one type of gasifier, operating at temperatures from 1275-1575 C and at pressures of 400 psi or higher. They typically use coal or petroleum coke as the carbon source, materials which contain ash impurities that liquefy at the gasification temperatures, producing liquid slag in quantities of 100 or more tons/day, depending on the carbon fed rate and the percent ash present in the feedstock. The molten slag is corrosive to refractory linings, causing chemical dissolution and spalling. The refractory lining is composed of chrome oxide, alumina, and zirconia; and is replaced every 3-24 months. Gasifier users would like greater on-line availability and reliability of gasifier liners, something that has impacted gasifier acceptance by industry. Research is underway at NETL to improve refractory service life and to develop a no-chrome or low-chrome oxide alternative refractory liner. Over 250 samples of no- or low-chrome oxide compositions have been evaluated for slag interactions by cup testing; with potential candidates for further studies including those with ZrO2, Al2O3, and MgO materials. The development of improved liner materials is necessary if technologies such as IGCC and DOE's Near Zero Emissions Advanced Fossil Fuel Power Plant are to be successful and move forward in the marketplace

  1. Research and development plan for the Slagging Pyrolysis Incinerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedahl, T.G.; McCormack, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    Objective is to develop an incinerator for processing disposed transuranium waste. This R and D plan describes the R and D efforts required to begin conceptual design of the Slagging Pyrolysis Incinerator (Andco-Torrax). The program includes: incinerator, off-gas treatment, waste handling, instrumentation, immobilization analyses, migration studies, regulations, Belgium R and D test plan, Disney World test plan, and remote operation and maintenance

  2. Reducing treatment of coppersmelting slag: Thermodynamic analysis of impurities behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komkov, Alexey; Kamkin, Rostislav

    2011-01-01

    A thermodynamic mathematical model, describing behavior of Pb, Zn, and As during reducing slag cleaning in the Vanyukov furnace has been developed. Using a developed model, the influence of different factors, such as temperature, oxygen partial pressure, the ratio of the formed phases on the behavior of impurities, was analyzed. It was found that arsenic can significantly move to the bottom phase, and zinc can be significantly vaporized under conditions in the Vanyukov furnace.

  3. Water flow in the Oxfordian and Dogger limestone around the Meuse/Haute-Marne underground research laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linard, Y.; Vinsot, A.; Delay, J.; Scholz, E.; Lundy, M.; Garry, B.; La Vaissiere, R. de; Cruchaudet, M.; Dewonck, S.; Vigneron, G.; Vincent, B.; Wechner, S.

    2010-01-01

    water column. Dogger and Oxfordian formation waters were then collected. Sampling was performed by pumping, either at a low flow rate at the level of the water inflow with the 'Diapo' device, or at the end of a Long Term Pumping test (LTP). Several types of deep samplers were also used occasionally. In addition, waters of 7 porous levels in the Oxfordian limestone were sampled during the sinking of the URL main shaft. The geochemical characteristics of the sampled water were used in conjunction with the hydraulic measurements to propose a qualitative description of water flow in the Oxfordian and Dogger limestone on the studied area. Four main origins were identified for the water in the Oxfordian, whereas only two were identified in the Dogger limestone. The Oxfordian geological model reveals a clay-rich layer isolating two superposed aquifers in the North-East part of the studied area. The relationship between Mg 2+ and SO 4 2- concentrations in the water sampled in the upper Oxfordian aquifer and in the unique Oxfordian aquifer in the South-West of the studied area shows that the meteoritic water recharging the upper Oxfordian aquifer in the North-East was enriched in Mg 2+ , SO 4 2- and Na + . The later elements were come from the erosion of the Tithonian Purbeckian type facies. This enriched water mixed to the South-West with meteoritic water coming from the outcrops and/or infiltrating in the diffuse fracture area. Complementary analyses by several laboratories are in progress on the same samples. These further data will allow discussing the proposed water flow model

  4. Blasted copper slag as fine aggregate in Portland cement concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Anjos, M A G; Sales, A T C; Andrade, N

    2017-07-01

    The present work focuses on assessing the viability of applying blasted copper slag, produced during abrasive blasting, as fine aggregate for Portland cement concrete manufacturing, resulting in an alternative and safe disposal method. Leaching assays showed no toxicity for this material. Concrete mixtures were produced, with high aggregate replacement ratios, varying from 0% to 100%. Axial compressive strength, diametrical compressive strength, elastic modulus, physical indexes and durability were evaluated. Assays showed a significant improvement in workability, with the increase in substitution of fine aggregate. With 80% of replacement, the concrete presented lower levels of water absorption capacity. Axial compressive strength and diametrical compressive strength decreased, with the increase of residue replacement content. The greatest reductions of compressive strength were found when the replacement was over 40%. For tensile strength by diametrical compression, the greatest reduction occurred for the concrete with 80% of replacement. After the accelerated aging, results of mechanic properties showed a small reduction of the concrete with blasted copper slag performance, when compared with the reference mixture. Results indicated that the blasted copper slag is a technically viable material for application as fine aggregate for concrete mixtures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The use of activated slags as immobilisation matrices for ILW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milestone, N. B.; Bai, Y.; Yang, C. H.; Shi, Y. J.; Li, X. C.

    2008-01-01

    Composite cements where large amounts of blast furnace slag (BFS) replace Portland cement are currently used for immobilisation of ILW. Hydration of BFS is activated by the small amount of OPC present but the amount of reaction that occurs is limited at ambient temperatures. Increasing the temperature increases the hydration of the BFS but large amounts still remain unreacted, leaving a porous matrix where the capillary pores remain filled with a highly alkaline solution. This solution causes corrosion of reactive metals giving rise to expansive reactions and hydrogen release, and it can destroy the structure of zeolites releasing the adsorbed species. Apart from OPC, BFS hydration can be activated by other compounds such as hydroxides, sulphates, silicates, and calcium aluminate cements. The use of these alternatives gives rise to binders such as ettringite and straetlingite which have a different chemistry where the pore solution has a lower pH. Corrosion of metals does not readily occur in these binders. This may be due to the reduced pH but could also arise from the lack of pore water, as these binders bind more water in their structure so that it is not available for transport of ionic species. This extra water binding also has potential for immobilisation of sludges where high w/s ratios are necessitated by the need to transport the sludge. This paper will review some of the alternative activators for slag hydration and present experimental results on several systems where slag has been activated with compounds other than OPC. (authors)

  6. Estimation of slagging in furnaces; Kuonaavuuden ennustaminen kivihiilen poelypoltossa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, T; Jaeaeskelaeinen, K; Oeini, J; Koskiahde, A; Jokiniemi, J; Pyykkoenen, J [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-10-01

    Understanding and estimation of slagging in furnaces is essential in the design of new power plants with high steam values or in modifications like low-NO{sub x} retrofits in existing furnaces. Major slagging yields poor efficiency, difficult operation and high maintenance costs of the plant. The aim of the project is to develop a computational model for slagging in pulverized coal combustion. The model is based on Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM) analysis of mineral composition of the coal and physical models for behaviour of minerals inside a furnace. The analyzed mineral particles are classified to five composition classes and distributed to calculational coal particles if internal minerals of coal. The calculational coal particles and the external minerals are traced in the furnace to find out the behaviour of minerals inside the furnace. If the particle tracing indicates that the particle hits the heat transfer surface of the furnace the viscosity of the particle is determined to see if particle is sticky. The model will be implemented to 3D computational fluid dynamics based furnace simulation environment Ardemus which predicts the fluid dynamics, heat transfer and combustion in a furnace. (orig.)

  7. Selective Sulfidation of Lead Smelter Slag with Sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Junwei; Liu, Wei; Wang, Dawei; Jiao, Fen; Qin, Wenqing

    2016-02-01

    The selective sulfidation of lead smelter slag with sulfur was studied. The effects of temperature, sulfur dosage, carbon, and Na salts additions were investigated based on thermodynamic calculation. The results indicated that more than 96 pct of zinc in the slag could be converted into sulfides. Increasing temperature, sulfur dosage, or Na salts dosage was conducive to the sulfidation of the zinc oxides in the slag. High temperature and excess Na salts would result in the more consumption of carbon and sulfur. Carbon addition not only promoted the selective sulfidation but reduced the sulfur dosage and eliminated the generation of SO2. Iron oxides had a buffering role on the sulfur efficient utilization. The transformation of sphalerite to wurtzite was feasible under reducing condition at high temperature, especially above 1273 K (1000 °C). The growth of ZnS particles largely depended upon the roasting temperature. They were significantly increased when the temperature was above 1273 K (1000 °C), which was attributed to the formation of a liquid phase.

  8. 21 CFR 186.1256 - Clay (kaolin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Clay (kaolin). 186.1256 Section 186.1256 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1256 Clay (kaolin). (a) Clay (kaolin) Al2O3.2SiO2.nH2O, Cas Reg. No. 1332-58-7) consists of hydrated aluminum silicate. The commercial products of clay (kaolin) contain...

  9. SLAG CHARACTERIZATION AND REMOVAL USING PULSE DETONATION TECHNOLOGY DURING COAL GASIFICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DR. DANIEL MEI; DR. JIANREN ZHOU; DR. PAUL O. BINEY; DR. ZIAUL HUQUE

    1998-07-30

    Pulse detonation technology for the purpose of removing slag and fouling deposits in coal-fired utility power plant boilers offers great potential. Conventional slag removal methods including soot blowers and water lances have great difficulties in removing slags especially from the down stream areas of utility power plant boilers. The detonation wave technique, based on high impact velocity with sufficient energy and thermal shock on the slag deposited on gas contact surfaces offers a convenient, inexpensive, yet efficient and effective way to supplement existing slag removal methods. A slight increase in the boiler efficiency, due to more effective ash/deposit removal and corresponding reduction in plant maintenance downtime and increased heat transfer efficiency, will save millions of dollars in operational costs. Reductions in toxic emissions will also be accomplished due to reduction in coal usage. Detonation waves have been demonstrated experimentally to have exceptionally high shearing capability, important to the task of removing slag and fouling deposits. The experimental results describe the parametric study of the input parameters in removing the different types of slag and operating condition. The experimental results show that both the single and multi shot detonation waves have high potential in effectively removing slag deposit from boiler heat transfer surfaces. The results obtained are encouraging and satisfactory. A good indication has also been obtained from the agreement with the preliminary computational fluid dynamics analysis that the wave impacts are more effective in removing slag deposits from tube bundles rather than single tube. This report presents results obtained in effectively removing three different types of slag (economizer, reheater, and air-heater) t a distance of up to 20 cm from the exit of the detonation tube. The experimental results show that the softer slags can be removed more easily. Also closer the slag to the exit of

  10. X-ray diffraction study of slags forming during corrosion resistant steel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slavov, V.I.; Zadorozhnaya, V.N.; Shurygina, A.V.

    1990-01-01

    Using X-ray diffraction analysis slags, forming during corrosion-resistant 12Kh18N10T grade steel production by two flowsheets, are studied. Standard two-slag technology of steel production does not provide efficient disintegration of chromospinelides in slags, gives high steel contamination with respect to nonmetallic impurities, coarse structure and, as a consequence, presence of macrodefects on rolled products surface. One-slag steel melting technology with titanium alloying of the steel at vacuum causes fast removal of chromospinelides at the beginning of reduction period, promotes titanium absorption by the steel, refines nonmetallic inclusions, provides more fine structure and steel plasticity, removes surface defects

  11. Comparison of possibilities the blast furnace and cupola slag utilization by concrete production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Baricová

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In process of pig iron and cast iron production secondary raw materials and industrial wastes are formed The most abundant secondaryproduct originating in these processes are furnace slag. Blast furnace slag and cupola furnace slag originates from melting of gangue parts of metal bearing materials, slag forming additions and coke ash. In general, slag are compounds of oxides of metallic and non-metallic elements, which form chemical compounds and solutions with each other and also contain small volume of metals, sulfides of metals and gases. Chemical, mineralogical and physical properties of slag determinate their utilisation in different fields of industry.The paper presents results from the research of the blast furnace and cupola furnace slag utilization in the concrete production. Pilotexperiments of the concrete production were performed, by that the blast furnace and cupola furnace slag with a fractions of 0–4mm;4–8mm; 8–16mm were used as a natural substitute. A cupola furnace slag and combination of the blast furnace and cupola furnace slagwere used in the experiments. The analysis results show that such concretes are suitable for less demanding applications.

  12. Visualisation and quantification of heavy metal accessibility in smelter slags: The influence of morphology on availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, Anthony L.; Swierczek, Zofia; Gulson, Brian L.

    2016-01-01

    The Imperial Smelting Furnace (ISF) for producing lead and zinc simultaneously has operated on four continents and in eleven countries from the 1950's. One of the process changes that the ISF introduced was the production of a finely granulated slag waste. Although this slag contained significant amounts of residual lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn), because of its glassy nature it was considered environmentally benign. From the Cockle Creek smelter near Boolaroo at the northern end of Lake Macquarie, NSW, Australia, it is estimated that around 2.1 million tonnes of the fine slag was distributed into the community and most remains where it was originally utilised. Residual tonnages of slag of this magnitude are common worldwide wherever the ISF operated. Studies of base metal smelting slags have concluded that mineralogical and morphological characteristics of the slag play a critical role in moderating environmental release of toxic elements. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microanalysis of the ISF slags has shown that the Pb and associated elements are present as discrete nodules (∼6–22 μm) in the slag and that they are not associated with Zn which is contained in the glass slag phase. Using an automated SEM and analysis technique (QEMSCAN"®) to “map” the mineralogical structure of the particles, it was possible to quantitatively determine the degree of access infiltrating fluids might have to the reaction surface of the Pb phases. The level of access decreases with increasing particle size, but in even the largest sized particles (−3350 + 2000 μm) nearly 80% of the Pb-containing phases were totally or partially accessible. These results provide evidence that the toxic elements in the slags are not contained by the glassy phase and will be vulnerable to leaching over time depending on their individual phase reactivity. - Highlights: • QEMSCAN"® allowed determination of access to infiltrating fluids to Pb in smelter slags. • Pb and associated

  13. Partitioning of heavy metals in a soil contaminated by slag: A redistribution study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunzl, K.; Trautmannsheimer, M.; Schramel, P.

    1999-01-01

    In order to interpret reasonably the partitioning of heavy metals in a contaminated soil as observed from applying a sequential extraction procedure, information on possible redistribution processes of the metals during the various extraction steps is essential. For this purpose, sequential extraction was used to study the chemical partitioning of Ag, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in a soil contaminated wither by a slag from coal firing or by a slag from pyrite roasting. Through additional application of sequential extraction to the pure slags as well as to the uncontaminated soil, it was shown that during the various extraction steps applied to the soil/slag mixtures, substantial redistribution processes of the metals between the slag- and soil particles can occur. In many cases, metals ions released during the extraction with acid hydroxylamine or acid hydrogen peroxide are partially readsorbed by solid constituents of the mixture and will therefore be found in the subsequent fractions extracted. As a result, one has to realize that (1) it will be difficult to predict the chemical partitioning of these metals in contaminated soils by investigating pure slags only, and (2) information on the partitioning of a metal in a slag contaminated soil will not necessarily give any relevant information on the form of this metal in the slag or in the slag/soil mixture, because the redistribution processes during sequential extraction will not be the same as those occurring in the soil solution under natural conditions

  14. An Analysis of the Mechanical Characteristics and Constitutive Relation of Cemented Mercury Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinwei Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on mercury slag in the Tongren area of Guizhou Province, China. Computed tomography (CT is used with uniaxial and triaxial compression tests to examine the mechanical changes in cemented mercury slag and its formation. The CT results for the uniaxial compression test reveal the overall failure process of the mercury slag structure. Based on the coarse-grained soil triaxial test, a modified Duncan-Chang model is compared with the actual monitoring results and is found to be suitable for the analysis of the slag constitutive model.

  15. Reclamation and reuse of MWI slags under the aspect of ground water protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahl, U.; Struth, R.

    1993-01-01

    Some importants aspects of ground water protection are discussed, with regard to MWI-slag reclamation and reuse as construction material. The effects of a treatment process on residual organic compounds of slag material have to be regarded as very positive. Directed chemical influencing of the hydratation process directly after incineration offers new perspectives for generating slag with potentially little and constant elution behaviour. The authors welcome the new, sharpened demands on reuse of MWI-slag in Northrhine-Westfalia. This challenge can be met by the proposed treatment procedure without problems. (orig.) [de

  16. Study of the Mechanism of Liquid Slag Infiltration for Lubrication in Slab Continuous Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaoda; Wang, Qiangqiang; He, Shengping; Wang, Qian

    2018-04-01

    Consistent and uniform lubrication of the solidifying shell, especially in the meniscus, is crucial for the smooth continuous casting operation and production of strands free of surface defects. Thus, the current study established a coupled model to study the inflow behavior of liquid slag to the mold-strand channel, taking the solidification of steel and slag and the periodic oscillation of mold into account. The difficulties and solutions for the simulation were described in detail. The predicted profiles of the slag rim and initial shell were in good agreement with the reports. The main results indicated that liquid slag could be squeezed out and back into the slag pool in a negative strip period while a large amount of liquid slag could infiltrate into the mold-strand channel. Thus, the amount of slag consumed in the negative strip period was relatively small compared with that in the positive strip period. The predicted variation of slag consumption during mold oscillation was periodic, and the average value was 0.274 kg/m2, which agreed well with the slag consumption in industrial practice. The current model can predict and optimize the oscillation parameters aiming at stable lubrication conditions.

  17. generalized constitutive model for stabilized quick clay

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QUICK CLAY. PANCRAS MUGISHAGWE BUJULU AND GUSTAV GRIMSTAD. ABSTRACT. An experimentally-based two yield surface constitutive model for cemented quick clay has been ... Clay Model, the Koiter Rule and two Mapping Rules. .... models, where a mobilization formulation is used, this is independent of q.

  18. Clay Cuffman: A Cool, Calm, Relaxed Guy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Gina

    2010-01-01

    This article describes Clay Cuffman, a simple clay-sculpture project that requires two or three sessions, and works for students from the upper-elementary level through high school. It takes about 1.5 pounds of clay per student--about the size of a small grapefruit. The Cuffman project is a great way for upper-elementary through high-school…

  19. The systems containing clays and clay minerals from modified drug release: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Luís Alberto de Sousa; Figueiras, Ana; Veiga, Francisco; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; da Silva Filho, Edson Cavalcanti; da Silva Leite, Cleide Maria

    2013-03-01

    Clays are materials commonly used in the pharmaceutical industry, either as ingredients or as active ingredients. It was observed that when they are administered concurrently, they may interact with drugs reducing their absorption. Therefore, such interactions can be used to achieve technological and biopharmaceutical advantages, regarding the control of release. This review summarizes bibliographic (articles) and technological (patents) information on the use of systems containing clays and clay minerals in modified drug delivery. In this area, formulations such natural clay, commercial clay, synthetic clay, composites clay-polymers, nanocomposites clay-polymers, films and hidrogels composites clay-polymers are used to slow/extend or vectorize the release of drugs and consequently they increase their bioavailability. Finally, this review summarizes the fields of technology and biopharmaceutical applications, where clays are applied. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Technetium migration in natural clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebke, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The present work was performed within the joint research project ''Retention of repository relevant radionuclides in argillaceous rocks and saline systems'' (contract no.: 02E10981), funded by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi). The aim was to obtain first insights into the interaction of the long-lived fission product technetium and natural clay with regard to a repository for high-level nuclear waste. For this purpose Opalinus Clay from Mont Terri (northern Switzerland) was used as a reference material. The nuclide technetium-99 will contribute to the radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel for more than thousand years due to its long half-live. In case of a leakage of the storage vessels, the geochemistry of technetium is determined by its oxidation state, at which only the oxidation states +IV and +VII are relevant. Because of the high solubility and low affinity to sorption on surfaces of minerals, Tc(VII) is considered to be very mobile and thus the most hazardous species. The focuses of this study therefore are diffusion experiments with this mobile species and investigations of the effect of ferrous iron on the mobility and speciation of technetium.rnThe interaction of technetium and Opalinus Clay was studied in sorption and diffusion experiments varying several parameters (pH value, addition of reducing agents, effect of oxygen, diffusion pathways). In the course of this study spatially resolved investigations of the speciation have been performed on Opalinus Clay thin sections and bore cores for the first time. In addition to the speciation, further information regarding elemental distributions and crystalline phases near technetium enrichments were obtained. Supplementary investigations of powder samples allowed determining the molecular structure of technetium on the clay surface.rnBoth the combination of sorption experiments with spectroscopic investigations and the diffusion experiment exhibit a reduction of Tc

  1. Mineral acquisition from clay by budongo forest chimpanzees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynolds, Vernon; Lloyd, Andrew W.; English, Christopher J.; Lyons, Peter; Dodd, Howard; Hobaiter, Catherine; Newton-Fisher, Nicholas; Mullins, Caroline; Lamon, Noemie; Schel, Anne Marijke; Fallon, Brittany

    2015-01-01

    Chimpanzees of the Sonso community, Budongo Forest, Uganda were observed eating clay and drinking clay-water from waterholes. We show that clay, clay-rich water, and clay obtained with leaf sponges, provide a range of minerals in different concentrations. The presence of aluminium in the clay

  2. Preparation and characterization of bentonite organo clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertagnolli, C.; Almeida Neto, A.F.; Silva, M.G.C.

    2009-01-01

    Bentonite clays organically modified have great potential use for environmental remediation, especially in the separation of organic compounds from the water. The aim of this work was the preparation of organophilic clays from 'Verde-Lodo' bentonite clay with the quaternary ammonium salts cetyl-pyridinium chloride and benzalkonium chloride. The materials obtained were characterized by XRD, thermogravimetric analyses, Helium picnometry, SEM and energy dispersive X-ray techniques. The results show consistently successful synthesis of the organoclay through the increase in the basal spacing, as well as salt elimination picks and presence of carbon and chlorine in the modified clays; they are inexistent elements in the natural clay. (author)

  3. Evaluation of the suitability of tin slag in cementitious materials: Mechanical properties and Leaching behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustandi, Andi; Wafa' Nawawi, Fuad; Pratesa, Yudha; Cahyadi, Agung

    2018-01-01

    Tin slag, a by-product of tin production has been used in cementitious application. The present investigation focuses on the suitability of tin slag as primary component in cement and as component that substitute some amount of Portland Cement. The tin slags studied were taken from Bangka, Indonesia. The main contents of the tin slag are SiO2, Al2O3, and Fe2O3 according to the XRF investigation. The aim of this article was to study the mechanical behaviour (compressive strength), microstructure and leaching behaviour of tin slag blended cement. This study used air-cooled tin slag that had been passed through 400# sieve to replace Portland Cement with ratio 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 by weight. Cement pastes and tin slag blended cement pastes were prepared by using water/cement ratio (W/C) of 0.40 by weight and hydrated for various curing ages of 3, 7, 14 days The microstructure of the raw tin slag was investigated using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The phase composition of each cement paste was investigated using X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The aim of the leachability test was to investigate the environmental impacts of tin slag blended cement product in the range 4-8 pH by using static pH-dependent leaching test. The result show that the increase of the tin slag content decreasing the mortar compressive strength at early ages. The use of tin slag in cement provide economic benefits for all related industries.

  4. Accelerated Carbonation of Steel Slag Compacts: Development of High-Strength Construction Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaghebeur, Mieke; Nielsen, Peter, E-mail: peter.nielsen@vito.be; Horckmans, Liesbeth [Sustainable Materials Management, VITO, Mol (Belgium); Van Mechelen, Dirk [RECMIX bvba, Genk (Belgium)

    2015-12-17

    Mineral carbonation involves the capture and storage of carbon dioxide in carbonate minerals. Mineral carbonation presents opportunities for the recycling of steel slags and other alkaline residues that are currently landfilled. The Carbstone process was initially developed to transform non-hydraulic steel slags [stainless steel (SS) slag and basic oxygen furnace (BOF) slags] in high-quality construction materials. The process makes use of accelerated mineral carbonation by treating different types of steel slags with CO{sub 2} at elevated pressure (up to 2 MPa) and temperatures (20–140°C). For SS slags, raising the temperature from 20 to 140°C had a positive effect on the CO{sub 2} uptake, strength development, and the environmental properties (i.e., leaching of Cr and Mo) of the carbonated slag compacts. For BOF slags, raising the temperature was not beneficial for the carbonation process. Elevated CO{sub 2} pressure and CO{sub 2} concentration of the feed gas had a positive effect on the CO{sub 2} uptake and strength development for both types of steel slags. In addition, the compaction force had a positive effect on the strength development. The carbonates that are produced in situ during the carbonation reaction act as a binder, cementing the slag particles together. The carbonated compacts (Carbstones) have technical properties that are equivalent to conventional concrete products. An additional advantage is that the carbonated materials sequester 100–150 g CO{sub 2}/kg slag. The technology was developed on lab scale by the optimization of process parameters with regard to compressive strength development, CO{sub 2} uptake, and environmental properties of the carbonated construction materials. The Carbstone technology was validated using (semi-)industrial equipment and process conditions.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamic Modeling of Zinc Slag Fuming Process in Top-Submerged Lance Smelting Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, Nazmul; Naser, Jamal; Brooks, Geoffrey; Reuter, Markus A.; Matusewicz, Robert W.

    2012-02-01

    Slag fuming is a reductive treatment process for molten zinciferous slags for extracting zinc in the form of metal vapor by injecting or adding a reductant source such as pulverized coal or lump coal and natural gas. A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model was developed to study the zinc slag fuming process from imperial smelting furnace (ISF) slag in a top-submerged lance furnace and to investigate the details of fluid flow, reaction kinetics, and heat transfer in the furnace. The model integrates combustion phenomena and chemical reactions with the heat, mass, and momentum interfacial interaction between the phases present in the system. A commercial CFD package AVL Fire 2009.2 (AVL, Graz, Austria) coupled with a number of user-defined subroutines in FORTRAN programming language were used to develop the model. The model is based on three-dimensional (3-D) Eulerian multiphase flow approach, and it predicts the velocity and temperature field of the molten slag bath, generated turbulence, and vortex and plume shape at the lance tip. The model also predicts the mass fractions of slag and gaseous components inside the furnace. The model predicted that the percent of ZnO in the slag bath decreases linearly with time and is consistent broadly with the experimental data. The zinc fuming rate from the slag bath predicted by the model was validated through macrostep validation process against the experimental study of Waladan et al. The model results predicted that the rate of ZnO reduction is controlled by the mass transfer of ZnO from the bulk slag to slag-gas interface and rate of gas-carbon reaction for the specified simulation time studied. Although the model is based on zinc slag fuming, the basic approach could be expanded or applied for the CFD analysis of analogous systems.

  6. Kinetic Hydration Heat Modeling for High-Performance Concrete Containing Limestone Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Limestone powder is increasingly used in producing high-performance concrete in the modern concrete industry. Limestone powder blended concrete has many advantages, such as increasing the early-age strength, reducing the setting time, improving the workability, and reducing the heat of hydration. This study presents a kinetic model for modeling the hydration heat of limestone blended concrete. First, an improved hydration model is proposed which considers the dilution effect and nucleation effect due to limestone powder addition. A degree of hydration is calculated using this improved hydration model. Second, hydration heat is calculated using the degree of hydration. The effects of water to binder ratio and limestone replacement ratio on hydration heat are clarified. Third, the temperature history and temperature distribution of hardening limestone blended concrete are calculated by combining hydration model with finite element method. The analysis results generally agree with experimental results of high-performance concrete with various mixing proportions.

  7. Simultaneous removal of several heavy metals from aqueous solution by natural limestones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sdiri A.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Four natural limestone samples, collected from the Campanian-Maastrichtian limestones, Tunisia, were used as adsorbents for the removal of toxic metals in aqueous systems. The results indicated that high removal efficiency could be achieved by the present natural limestones. Among the metal ions studied, Pb2+ was the most preferably removed cation because of its high affinity to calcite surface. In binary system, the presence of Cu2+ effectively depressed the sorption of Cd2+ and Zn2+. Similarly Cu2+ strongly competed with Pb2+ to limestone surface. In ternary system, the removal further decreased, but considerable amount of Pb2+ and Cu2+ still occurred regardless of the limestone sample. The same behavior was observed in quadruple system, where the selectivity sequence was Pb2+ > Cu2+ > Cd2+ > Zn2+. From these results, it was concluded that the studied limestones have the required technical specifications to be used for the removal of toxic metals from wastewaters.

  8. OPTIMALIZATION OF BLASTING IN »LAKOVIĆI« LIMESTONE QUARRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Božić

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available The optimalization of exploitation in »Lakovići« limestone quarry is described. Based on determined discontinuities in the rock mass and their densities, the best possible working site have been located in order to obtain the best possible sizes of blasted rocks and work slope stability. Optimal lowest resistance line size for the quarry has been counted and proved experimentally. New blasting parameters have resulted in considerable saving of drilling and explosive (the paper is published in Croatian.

  9. Penetration of molten core materials into basaltic and limestone concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    In conjunction with the small-scale, melt-concrete interaction tests being conducted at Sandia Laboratories, an acoustic technique has been used to monitor the penetration of molten core materials into basaltic and limestone concrete. Real time plots of the position of the melt/concrete interface have been obtained, and they illustrate that the initial penetration rate of the melt may be of the order of 80 mm/min. Phenomena deduced by the technique include a non-wetted melt/concrete interface

  10. Evaluation of the use of steelmaking slag as an aggregate in concrete mix: A factorial design approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aljbour Salah H.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Slag is investigated towards its potential use as an aggregate in concrete mix production. Full factorial design methodology is applied to study the effect of two process input variables, namely: slag as coarse aggregate and slag as medium aggregate on the properties of concrete mix. Additionally, the interaction between input variables is also examined. Incorporating steel slag aggregate in the concrete mix affected its compressive strength. Enhanced compressive strength concrete mix was obtained with 70 wt.% coarse slag aggregate and 70 wt.% medium slag aggregate. Under these proportions, the 28-days compressive strength was higher than the 28-days compressive strength of a concrete mix prepared from normal aggregate. Strong interaction effect exists between slag aggregate size on the compressive strength at 7-days curing. Lower compressive strength for the concrete mix might be obtained if improper proportions of mixed medium and coarse slag aggregate were employed.

  11. Thermomechanical behaviour of boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sultan, N.; Delage, P.; Cui, Y.J.

    2000-01-01

    Special attention has been recently paid on temperature effects on the behaviour of deep saturated clays, in relation with nuclear deep waste storage. However, few experimental data are presently available, and existing constitutive models need to be completed. This note is aimed at completing, both experimentally and theoretically, the understanding of the effects of the over-consolidation ration on the thermal volume changes of Boom clay (Belgium). The experimental data obtained here are in a good agreement with existing data. As a complement to existing data, they are used to develop a new elastoplastic model. The adoption of a second coupled plastic mechanism provides good simulations on a complex thermo-mechanical path. (authors)

  12. Evaluation of the use of steelmaking slag as an aggregate in concrete mix: A factorial design approach

    OpenAIRE

    Aljbour Salah H.; Tarawneh Sultan A.; Al-Harahsheh Adnan M.

    2017-01-01

    Slag is investigated towards its potential use as an aggregate in concrete mix production. Full factorial design methodology is applied to study the effect of two process input variables, namely: slag as coarse aggregate and slag as medium aggregate on the properties of concrete mix. Additionally, the interaction between input variables is also examined. Incorporating steel slag aggregate in the concrete mix affected its compressive strength. Enhanced compressive strength concrete mix was obt...

  13. Hyperspectral analysis of clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janaki Rama Suresh, G.; Sreenivas, K.; Sivasamy, R.

    2014-11-01

    A study was carried out by collecting soil samples from parts of Gwalior and Shivpuri district, Madhya Pradesh in order to assess the dominant clay mineral of these soils using hyperspectral data, as 0.4 to 2.5 μm spectral range provides abundant and unique information about many important earth-surface minerals. Understanding the spectral response along with the soil chemical properties can provide important clues for retrieval of mineralogical soil properties. The soil samples were collected based on stratified random sampling approach and dominant clay minerals were identified through XRD analysis. The absorption feature parameters like depth, width, area and asymmetry of the absorption peaks were derived from spectral profile of soil samples through DISPEC tool. The derived absorption feature parameters were used as inputs for modelling the dominant soil clay mineral present in the unknown samples using Random forest approach which resulted in kappa accuracy of 0.795. Besides, an attempt was made to classify the Hyperion data using Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM) algorithm with an overall accuracy of 68.43 %. Results showed that kaolinite was the dominant mineral present in the soils followed by montmorillonite in the study area.

  14. Coralgal facies of the Upper Eocene-Lower Oligocene limestones in Letca-Rastoci area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Prica

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are described the coralgal facies identified in the Upper Eocene-Lower Oligocene limestone succession (Cozla Formation outcropping in two quarries at Letca and Rastoci (Sălaj district, Romania. In the studied profiles the coral and algae limestones are interlayered with bioclastic limestones with foraminifera. On the top of relatively deep water deposits, coral and algae crusts and dendritic corals coated by algae were deposited. The environment registered a gradual deepening, the deposits being completely immersed, while bioclastic limestones with foraminifera were recurrently formed. This cycle is repeated, the whole succession being caracterized by several such “parasequences”.

  15. Modelling of Limestone Dissolution in Wet FGD Systems: The Importance of an Accurate Particle Size Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Søren; Johnsson, Jan Erik; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1999-01-01

    Danish limestone types with very different particle size distributions (PSDs). All limestones were of a high purity. Model predictions were found to be qualitatively in good agreement with experimental data without any use of adjustable parameters. Deviations between measurements and simulations were...... attributed primarily to the PSD measurements of the limestone particles, which were used as model inputs. The PSDs, measured using a laser diffrac-tion-based Malvern analyser, were probably not representative of the limestone samples because agglomeration phenomena took place when the particles were...

  16. Accelerated weathering of limestone for CO2 mitigation: Opportunities for the stone and cement industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, William H.; San, Juan A.; Rau, Greg H.; Caldeira, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Large amounts of limestone fines co-produced during the processing of crushed limestone may be useful in the sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Accelerated weathering of limestone (AWL) is proposed as a low-tech method to capture and sequester CO2 from fossil fuel-fired power plants and other point sources such as cement manufacturing. AWL reactants are readily available, inexpensive and environmentally benign. Waste CO2 is hydrated with water to produce carbonic acid. This reacts with and is neutralized by limestone fines, thus converting CO2 gas to dissolved calcium bicarbonate.

  17. Techniques for Source Zone and Plume Characterization of Tetrachloroethene in Fractured Limestone Aquifers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjordbøge, Annika Sidelmann; Mosthaf, Klaus; Janniche, Gry S.

    Characterization of chlorinated solvents in fractured limestone aquifers is essential for proper development of site specific conceptual models and subsequent risk assessment and remediation. High resolution characterization is challenged by the difficulties involved in collection of intact core...... an improved conceptual understanding of contaminant transport. At both sites limestone cores were collected with significant core losses. The discrete quantification of chlorinated solvents in the retrieved limestone cores was compared to different FLUTe technologies at the DNAPL site and passive and active...... distribution compared to the data obtained by quantification of chlorinated solvents in the limestone cores....

  18. Groundwater resources evaluation in calcareous limestone using geoelectrical and VLF-EM surveys (El Salloum Basin, Egypt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarif, Fardous; Slater, Lee; Mabrouk, Mohamed; Youssef, Ahmed; Al-Temamy, Ayman; Mousa, Salah; Farag, Karam; Robinson, Judy

    2018-01-01

    Understanding and developing groundwater resources in arid regions such as El Salloum basin, along the northwestern coast of Egypt, remains a challenging issue. One-dimensional (1D) electrical sounding (ES), two-dimensional (2D) electrical resistivity imaging (ERI), and very low frequency electromagnetic (VLF-EM) measurements were used to investigate the hydrogeological framework of El Salloum basin with the aim of determining the potential for extraction of potable water. 1D resistivity sounding models were used to delineate geoelectric sections and water-bearing layers. 2D ERI highlighted decreases in resistivity with depth, attributed to clay-rich limestone combined with seawater intrusion towards the coast. A depth of investigation (DOI) index was used to constrain the information content of the images at depths up to 100 m. The VLF-EM survey identified likely faults/fractured zones across the study area. A combined analysis of the datasets of the 1D ES, 2D ERI, and VLF-EM methods identified potential zones of groundwater, the extent of seawater intrusion, and major hydrogeological structures (fracture zones) in El Salloum basin. The equivalent geologic layers suggest that the main aquifer in the basin is the fractured chalky limestone middle Miocene) south of the coastal plain of the study area. Sites likely to provide significant volumes of potable water were identified based on relatively high resistivity and thickness of laterally extensive layers. The most promising locations for drilling productive wells are in the south and southeastern parts of the region, where the potential for potable groundwater increases substantially.

  19. Anatomy of a mountain: The Thebes Limestone Formation (Lower Eocene) at Gebel Gurnah, Luxor, Nile Valley, Upper Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Christopher; Dupuis, Christian; Aubry, Marie-Pierre; Berggren, William A.; Knox, Robert O.'B.; Galal, Wael Fathi; Baele, Jean-Marc

    2017-12-01

    We present a detailed geologic study of the Thebes Formation at Gebel Gurnah in its locus typicus on the West Bank (opposite Luxor) of the Nile River in the Upper Nile Valley, Egypt. This is the first detailed measurement and lithologic description of the ∼340 m thick (predominantly) carbonate section. The Thebes Formation is divided into thirteen major lithic units (A to M). We interpret data on the lithologic succession and variations, whole rock/clay mineralogy, and macro/micropaleontology in terms of deposition on a shallow carbonate platform episodically influenced by continental runoff, and describe six depositional sequences that we place in the global framework of Lower Eocene (Ypresian) sequence stratigraphy. We note however significant incompatibilities between the Thebes depositional sequences and the global sequences. We emend the definition of the Thebes Formation by defining its top as corresponding to level 326 m at the top of Nodular Limestone 'L' (NLL), and assigning the overlying beds to the Minia Limestone Formation. New biostratigraphic data and revision of previous studies establish the direct assignment of the Thebes Formation to planktonic foraminiferal Zones E4/P6b (upper part), E5/P7 and (indirectly) Zone E6/P8, and (probably, indirectly) Zone E7a/;P9;, and to calcareous nannofossil Zone NP12 and lower Zone NP13 of the Lower Eocene (Ypresian) and provide a temporal framework spanning ∼ 2.8 Myr from towards the end of the Early Eocene. Dominantly carbonate deposition, with a strongly reduced detrital influx, occurred on a very wide shelf (probably) at least ∼ 100 km from the coastline. The thick sedimentary succession and the marked vertical lithologic variations are interpreted as resulting from sea level fluctuations imprinted on a long-term decrease in sea-level associated with rapid subsidence reflecting tectonic relaxation after the major Late Paleocene tectonic reorganization of the Syrian Arc.

  20. The hydration of slag, part 1: reaction models for blended cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Brouwers, Jos

    2007-01-01

    Reaction models are proposed to quantify the hydration products and to determine the composition of C–S–H from alkali-activated slags (AAS). Products of the slag hydration are first summarized from observations in literature. The main hydration products include C–S–H, hydrotalcite, hydrogarnet, AFm

  1. Slag Treatment Followed by Acid Leaching as a Route to Solar-Grade Silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meteleva-Fischer, Y.V.; Yang, Y.; Boom, R.; Kraaijveld, B.; Kuntzel, H.

    2012-01-01

    Refining of metallurgical-grade silicon was studied using a process sequence of slag treatment, controlled cooling, and acid leaching. A slag of the Na2O-CaO-SiO2 system was used. The microstructure of grain boundaries in the treated silicon showed enhanced segregation of impurities, and the

  2. Design of a continuous process setup for precipitated calcium carbonate production from steel converter slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Hannu-Petteri; Zevenhoven, Ron

    2014-03-01

    A mineral carbonation process "slag2PCC" for carbon capture, utilization, and storage is discussed. Ca is extracted from steel slag by an ammonium salt solvent and carbonated with gaseous CO2 after the separation of the residual slag. The solvent is reused after regeneration. The effects of slag properties such as the content of free lime, fractions of Ca, Si, Fe, and V, particle size, and slag storage on the Ca extraction efficiency are studied. Small particles with a high free-lime content and minor fractions of Si and V are the most suitable. To limit the amount of impurities in the process, the slag-to-liquid ratio should remain below a certain value, which depends on the slag composition. Also, the design of a continuous test setup (total volume ∼75 L) is described, which enables quick process variations needed to adapt the system to the varying slag quality. Different precipitated calcium carbonate crystals (calcite and vaterite) are generated in different parts of the setup. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Behaviour of fibre reinforced concrete using steel slag coarse aggregate produced in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnahhal Wael

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The state of Qatar suffers from the shortage of natural resources needed for concrete production. Therefore, it is essential to investigate the feasibility of using by-product recycled materials as aggregates to maintain the concrete construction industry. Several types of recyclable materials are currently used in concrete. One of the potential resources of recycled concrete is steel slag. Knowing that Steel slag is the most significant solid waste generated by Qatar Steel Company in Qatar, replacing of natural coarse aggregate with steel slag aggregate will have a significant environmental and economic impact to the state of Qatar. This paper presents the compression and flexural test results of different concrete mixes made of steel slag coarse aggregate combined with a newly developed basalt chopped fibres. The parameters investigated included the volume fraction of the fibre used and the type of coarse aggregates (natural aggregates “Gabbro” and steel slag aggregates. Plain concrete specimens containing natural coarse aggregates and steel slag aggregates with no fibres added were also tested to serve as control. Test results showed that adding the basalt chopped fibres to the concrete mixes enhanced their flexural tensile strengths at different percentages. In addition, the compressive strength of concrete made with steel slag aggregate was higher than that made with natural gabbro aggregate. Test results clearly showed that steel slag aggregates can be used as sustainable and eco-friendly alternative materials in concrete structures.

  4. Treatment of metallurgical wastes : recovery of metal values from smelter slags by pressure oxidative leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.; Perederiy, I.; Papangelakis, V.G. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry

    2008-07-01

    Vast quantities of slag are produced and dumped as waste by-products during the production of base metals by smelting operations. These slags contain large amounts of valuable metals which lead to a decrease in metal yield and, combined with the entrapped sulphur, pose a danger to the environment. The dissolution of fayalite is important for the selective recovery of valuable metals and the cleanup of slags in high pressure oxidative leaching. The nature of base metals and iron in solidified slag must be investigated in order to understand the mechanism of the process. This paper discussed the application of powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the characterization of a smelter slag microstructure. The study used leaching tests with the same smelter slag to measure and monitor the results of leaching, including metal extraction levels, the extent of iron dissolution as well as impurity contents. The paper provided information on the experiment with particular reference to slag leaching, chemical analysis, and characterization. It was concluded that slag consists of several solid phases with base metal sulfide and oxide droplets entrapped in the fayalite matrix or silica regions. Therefore, nickel, copper, cobalt, and zinc need to be exposed either chemically or mechanically to promote their recovery. 21 refs., 4 tabs., 5 figs.

  5. Substrate pH and butterfly bush response to dolomitic lime or steel slag amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel slag is a fertilizer amendment with a high concentration of calcium oxide, and thus capable of raising substrate pH similar to dolomitic lime. Steel slag, however, contains higher concentrations of some nutrients, such as iron, manganese, and silicon, compared to dolomitic lime. The objectiv...

  6. Heat Recovery from High Temperature Slags: A Review of Chemical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqi Sun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Waste heat recovery from high temperature slags represents the latest potential way to remarkably reduce the energy consumption and CO2 emissions of the steel industry. The molten slags, in the temperature range of 1723–1923 K, carry large amounts of high quality energy. However, the heat recovery from slags faces several fundamental challenges, including their low thermal conductivity, inside crystallization, and discontinuous availability. During past decades, various chemical methods have been exploited and performed including methane reforming, coal and biomass gasification, and direct compositional modification and utilization of slags. These methods effectively meet the challenges mentioned before and help integrate the steel industry with other industrial sectors. During the heat recovery using chemical methods, slags can act as not only heat carriers but also as catalysts and reactants, which expands the field of utilization of slags. Fuel gas production using the waste heat accounts for the main R&D trend, through which the thermal heat in the slag could be transformed into high quality chemical energy in the fuel gas. Moreover, these chemical methods should be extended to an industrial scale to realize their commercial application, which is the only way by which the substantial energy in the slags could be extracted, i.e., amounting to 16 million tons of standard coal in China.

  7. Industrial Tests to Modify Molten Copper Slag for Improvement of Copper Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhengqi; Zhu, Deqing; Pan, Jian; Zhang, Feng; Yang, Congcong

    2018-04-01

    In this article, to improve the recovery of copper from copper slag by flotation process, industrial tests of the modification process involving addition of a composite additive into molten copper slag were conducted, and the modified slag was subjected to the flotation process to confirm the modification effect. The phase evolution of the slag in the modification process was revealed by thermodynamic calculations, x-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that more copper was transformed and enriched in copper sulfide phases. The magnetite content in the modified slag decreased, and that of "FeO" increased correspondingly, leading to a better fluidity of the molten slag, which improved the aggregation and growth of fine particles of the copper sulfide minerals. Closed-circuit flotation tests of the original and modified slags were conducted, and the results show that the copper recovery increased obviously from 69.15% to 73.38%, and the copper grade of concentrates was elevated slightly from 20.24% to 21.69%, further confirming that the industrial tests of the modification process were successful. Hence, the modification process has a bright future in industrial applications for enhancing the recovery of copper from the copper slag.

  8. Superconducting magnetic separation of ground steel slag powder for recovery of resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, H. W.; Kim, J. J.; Kim, Young Hun [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Ha, D. W. [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, J. H. [Dept. of Environmental Engineering, Catholic University of Pusan, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Steel slag has been considered as an industrial waste. A huge amount of slag is produced as a byproduct and the steel slag usually has been dumped in a landfill site. However the steel slag contains valuable resources such as iron, copper, manganese, and magnesium. Superconducting magnetic separation has been applied on recovery of the valuable resources from the steel slag and this process also has intended to reduce the waste to be dumped. Cryo-cooled Nb-Ti superconducting magnet with 100 mm bore and 600 mm of height was used as the magnetic separator. The separating efficiency was evaluated in the function of magnetic field. A steel slag was ground and analyzed for the composition. Iron containing minerals were successfully concentrated from less iron containing portion. The separation efficiency was highly dependent on the particle size giving higher separating efficiency with finer particle. The magnetic field also effects on the separation ratio. Current study showed that an appropriate grinding of slag and magnetic separation lead to the recovery of metal resources from steel slag waste rather than dumping all of the volume.

  9. The effect of water on the sulphation of limestone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chunbo Wang; Lufei Jia; Yewen Tan; E.J. Anthony [North China Electric Power University, Baoding City (China). School of Energy and Power Engineering

    2010-09-15

    A series of tests was conducted in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) to study the sulphation behaviour of limestone in the presence of water over the temperature range of 800-850{sup o}C. Four different Canadian limestones, all with a particle size range of 75-425 {mu}m, were sulphated using a synthetic flue gas with a composition of 15% CO{sub 2}, 3% O{sub 2}, 0% or 10% H{sub 2}O, 1750 ppm SO{sub 2} and the balance N{sub 2}. Water was shown to have a significant promotional effect on sulphation, especially in the diffusion-controlled stage. However, the effect of water during the kinetic-controlled stage appeared to be much less pronounced. Based on these results, it is proposed that the presence of water leads to the transient formation of Ca(OH){sub 2} as an intermediate, which in turn reacts with SO{sub 2} at a faster rate than CaO does. Alternatively stated, it appears that H{sub 2}O acts as catalyst for the sulphation reaction of CaO. 30 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Laser removal of water repellent treatments on limestone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Heras, Miguel; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Rebollar, Esther; Oujja, Mohamed; Castillejo, Marta; Fort, Rafael

    2003-12-15

    Protective and water repellent treatments are applied on stone materials used on buildings or sculptures of artistic value to reduce water intrusion without limiting the natural permeability to water vapour of the material. The effect of the wavelength associated with the laser removal of two water repellent treatments applied on limestone, Paraloid B-72, a copolymer of methyl acrylate and ethyl methacrylate, and Tegosivin HL-100, a modified polysiloxane resin, was investigated by using the four harmonics of a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm). The modifications induced on the surface of limestone samples by laser irradiation were studied using colorimetry, roughness measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The removal of the treatments was found to be dependent on the laser irradiation conditions and on the characteristics of the coatings. The fundamental laser radiation was effective in removing both treatments, but thermal alteration processes were induced on the constituent calcite crystals. The best results were obtained by irradiation in the near UV at 355 nm.

  11. Rare earths in the Leadville Limestone and its marble derivates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, J.C.; Wildeman, T.R.; Banks, N.G.

    1975-01-01

    Samples of unaltered and metamorphosed Leadville Limestone (Mississippian, Colorado) were analyzed by neutron activation for ten rare-earth elements (REE). The total abundance of the REE in the least-altered limestone is 4-12 ppm, and their distribution patterns are believed to be dominated by the carbonate minerals. The abundances of the REE in the marbles and their sedimentary precursors are comparable but the distribution patterns are not. Eu is enriched over the other REE in the marbles, and stratigraphically upward in the formation (samples located progressively further from the heat source), the light REE become less enriched relative to the heavy REE. The Eu anomaly is attributed to its ability, unique among the REE, to change from the 3+ to 2+ oxidation state. Whether this results in preferential mobilization of the other REE or whether this reflects the composition of the pore fluid during metamorphism is unknown. Stratigraphically selective depletion of the heavy REE may be attributed to more competition for the REE between fluid and carbonate minerals in the lower strata relative to the upper strata. This competition could have been caused by changes in the temperature of the pore fluid or to the greater resistance to solution of the dolomite in the lower parts of the formation than the calcite in the upper parts

  12. Colmenar limestone as a resource for built heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Rafael; Álvarez de Buergo, Mónica; Varas-Muriel, MªJosé; Mercedes Pérez-Monserrat, Elena

    2013-04-01

    The Colmenar stone (or Colmenar limestone) has been used in the construction of significant builidings of the Central area of Spain, such as the Royal Palace of Aranjuez (16th -18th centuries) or the Royal Palace of Madrid (18th century). Nowadays this building stone is still widely used, both for new construction and restoration works, as well as for the indoor ornamentation of emblematic buildings such as the Royal Theater of Madrid (20th century). There are many quarries from where this stone was exploited, being the most prestigious ones those located in Colmenar de Oreja, at 50 km Southeast the city of Madrid. The high quality of the stone in these quarries, its whiteness and pureness, made this locality the most relevant in these stonés extractive activities, concentrating the most relevant exploitations and providing the stone the denomination of the municipality (Colmenar). It was an underground mining extraction until the 20th century in order to reach the highest quality level of the mine, the so called "Banco Gordo" (Thick Bank). Generically known as moorland limestone, this rock belongs to the fluvial-lacustrine carbonates of the Upper Miocene Unit of the Tertiary Madrid's Basin. Its tonality mainly ranges from white to cream and even light grey. Under a petrographic point of view, this limestone is constituted by 40% of bioclasts (characea, ostracods and gasteropods), 20-30% of micritic matrix and 30-40% of sparitic cement. Therefore, it can be classified as a biomicrite/biosparite limestone or as a bioclastic packstone. Some particularities of these limestones regarding their appearance are related to some karstic processes they underwent linked to some dissolution phenomena during the Pliocene. All of this resulted on an abundance of cavities with terra rossa fillings, a non-soluble clayey residue, iron enriched, which is the responsible for the reddish and pinkish color that the Colmenar stone sometimes shows. These petrographic characteristics

  13. Artificial intelligence-based computer modeling tools for controlling slag foaming in electric arc furnaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Eric Lee

    Due to increased competition in a world economy, steel companies are currently interested in developing techniques that will allow for the improvement of the steelmaking process, either by increasing output efficiency or by improving the quality of their product, or both. Slag foaming is one practice that has been shown to contribute to both these goals. However, slag foaming is highly dynamic and difficult to model or control. This dissertation describes an effort to use artificial intelligence-based tools (genetic algorithms, fuzzy logic, and neural networks) to both model and control the slag foaming process. Specifically, a neural network is trained and tested on slag foaming data provided by a steel plant. This neural network model is then controlled by a fuzzy logic controller, which in turn is optimized by a genetic algorithm. This tuned controller is then installed at a steel plant and given control be a more efficient slag foaming controller than what was previously used by the steel plant.

  14. Heavy metal recovery from electric arc furnace steel slag by using hydrochloric acid leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lim Jin; Haan, Ong Teng; Shean Yaw, Thomas Choong; Chuah Abdullah, Luqman; Razak, Mus'ab Abdul; Cionita, Tezara; Toudehdehghan, Abdolreza

    2018-03-01

    Electric Arc Furnace steel slag (EAFS) is the waste produced in steelmaking industry. Environmental problem such as pollution will occur when dumping the steel slag waste into the landfill. These steel slags have properties that are suitable for various applications such as water treatment and wastewater. The objective of this study is to develop efficient and economical chlorination route for EAFS extraction by using leaching process. Various parameters such as concentration of hydrochloric acid, particle size of steel slag, reaction time and reaction temperature are investigated to determine the optimum conditions. As a result, the dissolution rate can be determined by changing the parameters, such as concentration of hydrochloric acid, particle size of steel slag, reaction time and reaction temperature. The optimum conditions for dissolution rates for the leaching process is at 3.0 M hydrochloric acid, particle size of 1.18 mm, reaction time of 2.5 hour and the temperature of 90°C.

  15. Precipitation of metallic chromium during rapid cooling of Cr2O3 slags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Burja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The slag systems of CaO-SiO2- Cr2O3 and Al2O3-CaO-MgO-SiO2- Cr2O3 were analyzed. These slag systems occur in the production of stainless steel and are important from the process metallurgy point of view. Synthetic slag samples with different chromium oxide content were prepared and melted. The melted slag samples where then rapidly cooled on large steel plates, so that the high temperature microstructure was preserved. The samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The precipitation of different chromium oxide phases was studied, but most importantly the precipitation of metallic chromium was observed. These findings help us interpret industrial slag samples.

  16. Research on the compressive strength of basic magnesium salts and cyanide slag solidified body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yubo; Han, Peiwei; Ye, Shufeng; Wei, Lianqi; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Fu, Guoyan; Yu, Bo

    2018-02-01

    The solidification of cyanide slag by using basic magnesium salts could reduce pollution and protect the environment. Experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of age, mixing amount of cyanide slag, water cement ratio and molar ratio of MgO to MgSO4 on the compressive strength of basic magnesium salts and cyanide slag solidified body in the present paper. It was found that compressive strength of solidified body increased with the increase of age, and decreased with the increase of mixing amount of cyanide slag and water cement ratio. The molar ratio of MgO to MgSO4 should be controlled in the range from 9 to 11 when the mixing amount of cyanide slag was larger than 80 mass%.

  17. Strength and Drying Shrinkage of Alkali-Activated Slag Paste and Mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-chieh Chi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the strengths and drying shrinkage of alkali-activated slag paste and mortar. Compressive strength, tensile strength, and drying shrinkage of alkali-activated slag paste and mortar were measured with various liquid/slag ratios, sand/slag ratios, curing ages, and curing temperatures. Experimental results show that the higher compressive strength and tensile strength have been observed in the higher curing temperature. At the age of 56 days, AAS mortars show higher compressive strength than Portland cement mortars and AAS mortars with liquid/slag ratio of 0.54 have the highest tensile strength in all AAS mortars. In addition, AAS pastes of the drying shrinkage are higher than AAS mortars. Meanwhile, higher drying shrinkage was observed in AAS mortars than that observed comparable Portland cement mortars.

  18. Fabrication of slag-glass composite with controlled porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranko Adziski

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and performance of porous ceramics made from waste materials were investigated. Slag from thermal electrical plant Kakanj (Bosnia and Herzegovina with defined granulations: (0.500÷0.250 mm; (0.250÷0.125 mm; (0.125÷0.063 mm; (0.063÷0.045 mm and 20/10 wt.% of the waste TV screen glass with a granulation <0.063 mm were used for obtaining slag-glass composites with controlled porosity. The one produced from the slag powder fraction (0.125÷0.063 mm and 20 wt.% TV screen glass, sintered at 950°C/2h, was considered as the optimal. This system possesses open porosity of 26.8±1.0%, and interconnected pores with the size of 250–400 μm. The values of E-modulus and bending strength of this composite were 10.6±0.6 GPa and 45.7±0.7 MPa, respectively. The coefficient of thermal expansion was 8.47·10-6/°C. The mass loss in 0.1M HCl solution after 30 days was 1.2 wt.%. The permeability and the form coefficient of the porous composite were K0=0.12 Da and C0=4.53·105 m-1, respectively. The porous composite shows great potential to be used as filters, diffusers for water aeration, dust collectors, acoustic absorbers, etc.

  19. Crystallization Kinetics of Precipitating Calcium from Yellow Phosphorus Slag Lixivium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li, G. -B.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The crystallization dynamic parameters of calcium sulphate were determined in the course of the precipitation conversion process of calcium in lixivium. The crystallization dynamic equations of calcium sulphate were achieved by multiple linear regression. The study results indicate that CaSO4 · 2 H2O crystal nucleation-growth kinetics equation in nitric acid leaching liquid of yellow phosphorus slag at room temperature is expressed by B0 = 2.904 · 1011 · G0.83 · MT 0.167.

  20. ESR hollows molten metal/slag interface detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, B.; Klein, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    A system for detecting the location of a molten metal/slag interface during the casting of electroslag remelted hollows includes a gamma ray radiation source and a scintillation counter. The source and counter reside outside the casting mould and are held in fixed spatial relationships with respect to one another and with respect to the mandrel. The radiation from the source is directed chordally through the mould and through the annular casting zone, defined between the sidewalls of the upwardly driven mandrel and the mould without contacting said mandrel. The counter provides an electrical signal responsive to the rate of radiation events detected thereby. (author)

  1. Alkali-activated blast furnace slag-zeolite cements and concretes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakhimov, R.; Rakhimova, N.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work has been the study of alkali-activated slag-zeolite cements and concretes based on them. Various compositions have been tested and some characteristics such as the compressive strength have been measured versus zeolite additions. A table lists the specific surface area and particle size distributions of different cements. The conclusions of the study are the following. First, alkali-activated slag cements and concretes based on them are effective for immobilization of radioactive wastes and the production of building structures, designed for high radiation load. Secondly, zeolite-containing mineral additions are able to increase the immobilization capacity and radiation resistance of alkali-activated blast furnace slag cements and concretes. Thirdly, the efficiency of different zeolite-containing additions - 10% to increase alkali-activated blast furnace slag-zeolite cement strength was established. It is with alkaline components of water-glass, sodium carbonate, sodium sulphate. Fourth, the effective way of introducing zeolite additions in alkali-activated blast furnace slag-zeolite cement is inter-grinding of the slag and addition. Increase in strength of alkali-activated blast furnace slag-zeolite cement stone is 40% higher than that of the stone of a mixture of separately milled components. Fifth, Alkali-activated blast furnace slag-zeolite cements with zeolite-containing additions with a compressive strength of 10.1 to 140 MPa; alkali-activated blast furnace slag-zeolite cements mortars with compressive strength from 35.2 to 97.7 MPa; alkali-activated blast furnace slag-zeolite cements concretes with compressive strength up to 84.5 MPa and frost resistant up to 800 cycles were obtained

  2. Evaluation of copper slag to catalyze advanced oxidation processes for the removal of phenol in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huanosta-Gutierrez, T. [Instituto de Ingenieria, Coordinacion de Ingenieria Ambiental, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacan 04510, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Dantas, Renato F., E-mail: falcao@angel.qui.ub.es [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ramirez-Zamora, R.M. [Instituto de Ingenieria, Coordinacion de Ingenieria Ambiental, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Cd. Universitaria, Coyoacan 04510, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Esplugas, S. [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-04-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We evaluate the use of an industrial residue (copper slag) as catalyst in water treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The copper slag was effective to remove organic pollutants (phenol) from water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer During experimentation, Cu and Fe leaching were not higher than the acceptable levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Slag/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV and slag/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatments promoted biodegradability increment of the contaminated water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The control of the reaction time would minimize the environmental impact of the produced effluents in terms of acute toxicity. - Abstract: The aim of this work was to evaluate the use of copper slag to catalyze phenol degradation in water by advanced oxidation processes (AOPs). Copper slag was tested in combination with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (slag/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV (slag/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV). The studied methods promoted the complete photocatalytic degradation of phenol. Besides, they were able to reduce about 50% the TOC content in the samples. Slag/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/UV and slag/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatments have favored biodegradability increment along the reaction time. Nevertheless, the irradiated method achieved higher values of the biodegradability indicator (BOD{sub 5}/TOC). The toxicity assessment indicated the formation of more toxic compounds in both treatments. However, the control of the reaction time would minimize the environmental impact of the effluents.

  3. Visualisation and quantification of heavy metal accessibility in smelter slags: The influence of morphology on availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Anthony L; Swierczek, Zofia; Gulson, Brian L

    2016-03-01

    The Imperial Smelting Furnace (ISF) for producing lead and zinc simultaneously has operated on four continents and in eleven countries from the 1950's. One of the process changes that the ISF introduced was the production of a finely granulated slag waste. Although this slag contained significant amounts of residual lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn), because of its glassy nature it was considered environmentally benign. From the Cockle Creek smelter near Boolaroo at the northern end of Lake Macquarie, NSW, Australia, it is estimated that around 2.1 million tonnes of the fine slag was distributed into the community and most remains where it was originally utilised. Residual tonnages of slag of this magnitude are common worldwide wherever the ISF operated. Studies of base metal smelting slags have concluded that mineralogical and morphological characteristics of the slag play a critical role in moderating environmental release of toxic elements. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microanalysis of the ISF slags has shown that the Pb and associated elements are present as discrete nodules (∼6-22 μm) in the slag and that they are not associated with Zn which is contained in the glass slag phase. Using an automated SEM and analysis technique (QEMSCAN(®)) to "map" the mineralogical structure of the particles, it was possible to quantitatively determine the degree of access infiltrating fluids might have to the reaction surface of the Pb phases. The level of access decreases with increasing particle size, but in even the largest sized particles (-3350 + 2000 μm) nearly 80% of the Pb-containing phases were totally or partially accessible. These results provide evidence that the toxic elements in the slags are not contained by the glassy phase and will be vulnerable to leaching over time depending on their individual phase reactivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The prediction and representation of phase equilibria and physicochemical properties in complex coal ash slag systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Jak; A. Kondratiev; S. Christie; P.C. Hayes [Centre for Coal in Sustainable Development (CCSD), Brisbane (Australia)

    2003-07-01

    A range of problems in coal utilisation technologies, including ash slag flow in slagging gasifiers, deposit formation, slagging, fouling, fusibility tests, fluxing, blending etc, are related to the melting behaviour of the mineral matter in the coal. To assist with solving these practical issues i) thermodynamic modelling of phase equilibria, and ii) viscosity modelling studies are being undertaken at the Pyrometallurgy Research Centre (The University of Queensland, Australia) with support from the Collaborative Research Centre for Coal in Sustainable Development (CCSD). The thermodynamic modelling has been carried out using the computer system FactSage, which is used for the calculation of multi-phase slag / solid / gas / matte / alloy / salt equilibria in multi-component systems of industrial interest. A modified quasi-chemical solution model is used for the liquid slag phase. New model optimisations have been carried out, which have significantly improved the accuracy of the thermodynamic models for coal combustion processes. Viscosity modelling, using a modified Urbain formalism, is carried out in conjunction with FactSage calculations to predict the viscosities of fully liquid as well as heterogeneous, partly crystallised slags. Custom designed software packages are developed using these fundamental models for wider use by industrial researchers and engineers, and for incorporation as process control modules. The new custom-designed computer software package can be used to produce limiting operability diagrams for slag systems. These diagrams are used to describe phase equilibria and physico-chemical properties in complex slag systems. The approach is illustrated with calculations on the system SiO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-FeO-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CaO at metallic iron saturation, slags produced in coal slagging gasifiers. 28 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  5. INFLUENCE OF CURING TEMPERATURE ON THE PHYSICO-MECHANICAL, CHARACTERISTICS OF CALCIUM ALUMINATE CEMENT WITH AIR-COOLED SLAG OR WATER-COOLED SLAG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Heikal

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The nature, sequence, crystallinity and microstructure of hydrated phases were analyzed using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The results showed that the formation of different hydrated phases was temperature dependence. The physico-mechanical and microstructural characteristics were investigated after curing at 20, 40 and 60° C. The results indicated that for the substitution of calcium aluminate cement (CAC by air-cooled slag (AS or water-cooled slag (WS at 20° C, the compressive strength increases with slag content up to 10 wt.%, then followed by a decrease with further slag substitution up to 25 wt.%; but the values are still higher than those of the neat CAC pastes at different curing ages up to 60 days. After 28 days of hydration at 40-60° C, the compressive strength increases with the slag content. This is attributed to the prevention of the conversion reaction, which was confirmed by XRD, DSC and SEM techniques, and the preferential formation of stratlingite (gehleinte-like phase. The SEM micrographs showed a close texture of hydrated CAC/slag blends made with AS or WS at 40°C due to the formation of C2ASH8 and C-S-H phases.

  6. Influence of slag chemistry on the hydration of alkali-activated blast-furnace slag - Part I: Effect of MgO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Haha, M.; Lothenbach, B.; Le Saout, G.; Winnefeld, F.

    2011-01-01

    The hydration and the microstructure of three alkali activated slags (AAS) with MgO contents between 8 and 13 wt.% are investigated. The slags were hydrated in the presence of two different alkaline activators, NaOH and Na 2 SiO 3 .5H 2 O (WG). Higher MgO content of the slag resulted in a faster reaction and higher compressive strengths during the first days. The formation of C(- A)-S-H and of a hydrotalcite-like phase was observed in all samples by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal analysis (TGA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. Increasing the MgO content of the slag from 8 to 13% increased the amount of hydrotalcite and lowered the Al uptake by C-S-H resulting in 9% higher volume of the hydrates and a 50 to 80% increase of the compressive strength after 28 days and longer for WG activated slag pastes. For NaOH activated slags only a slight increase of the compressive strength was measured.

  7. Impact of steel slag on the ammonium adsorption by zeolite and a new configuration of zeolite-steel slag substrate for constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Pengbo; Jiang, Yingbo; Zhu, Hongtao; Sun, Dezhi

    2017-07-01

    The CaO dissolution from slag, as well as the effects of influencing parameters (i.e. pH and Ca 2+ concentration) on the ammonium adsorption onto zeolite, was systematically studied in this paper. Modeling results of Ca 2+ and OH - release from slag indicated that pseudo-second-order reaction had a better fitness than pseudo-first-order reaction. Changing pH value from 7 to 12 resulted in a drastic reduction of the ammonium adsorption capacity on zeolite, from the peak adsorption capacity at pH 7. High Ca 2+ concentration in solution also inhibited the adsorption of ammonium onto zeolite. There are two proposed mechanisms for steel slag inhibiting the ammonium adsorption capacity of zeolite. On the one hand, OH - released from steel slag can react with ammonium ions to produce the molecular form of ammonia (NH 3 ·H 2 O), which would cause the dissociation of NH 4 + from zeolite. On the other hand, Ca 2+ could replace the NH 4 + ions to adhere onto the surface of zeolite. An innovative substrate filling configuration with zeolite placed upstream of the steel slag was then proposed to eliminate the disadvantageous effects of steel slag. Experimental results showed that this novel filling configuration was superior to two other filling configurations in terms of ammonium removal.

  8. Mineral-produced high-pressure striae and clay polish: Key evidence for nonballistic transport of ejecta from Ries crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, E.C.T.

    1976-01-01

    Recently discovered mineral-produced, deeply incised striae and mirror-like polish on broken surfaces of limestone fragments from the sedimentary ejecta of the Ries impact crater of southern Germany are described. The striae and polish were produced under high confining pressures during high-velocity nonballistic transport of the ejecta mass within the time span of the cratering event (measured in terms of seconds). The striae on these fragments were produced by scouring by small mineral grains embedded in the surrounding clay matrix, and the polish was formed under the same condition, by movements of relatively fragment-free clay against the fragment surfaces. The occurrence of these striae and polish is key evidence for estimating the distribution and determining the relative importance of nonballistic and ballistic transport of ejecta from the shallow Ries stony meteorite impact crater.

  9. From clay bricks to deep underground storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-05-01

    This booklet issued by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste NAGRA takes a look at the use of clay strata for the storage of radioactive wastes in deep-lying repositories. First of all, a geological foray is made concerning the history of the use of clay and its multifarious uses. The characteristics of clay and its composition are examined and its formation in the geological past is explained. In particular Opalinus clay is looked at and the structures to be found are discussed. The clay's various properties and industrial uses are examined and its sealing properties are examined. Also, Bentonite clay is mentioned and work done by Nagra and co-researchers is noted

  10. Organophilization and characterization of commercial bentonite clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, B.B. da; Lima, J.C.C.; Alves, A.M.; Araujo, E.M.; Melo, T.J.A. de

    2012-01-01

    Bentonite clay is a plastic changes resulting from volcanic ash, consisting mostly of montmorillonite. The state of Paraiba is a major source of bentonite clay from Brazil, where the main oil fields are located in Boa Vista and represents the largest national production of raw and beneficiated bentonite. Aimed at the commercial value of this type of clay and its high applicability in the polls, this article aims to make a comparison between two kinds of clay, a national (Brasgel) and other imported (Cloisite) from organophilization of two commercial bentonite, ionic surfactant with Praepagem WB, and characterize them by XRD, FTIR and TG / DTG. We observe that despite getting inferior properties, the clay presents national values very similar to those presented by imported clay. (author)

  11. Compressive strength evolution of thermally-stressed Saint Maximin limestone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, J.; Griffiths, L.; Baud, P.; Wadsworth, F. B.; Heap, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Saint Maximin quarry (Oise, France) opened in the early 1600s, and its limestone has been used extensively as masonry stone, particularly during the classical era of Parisian architecture from the 17th century onwards. Its widespread use has been due to a combination of its regional availability, its high workability, and its aesthetic appeal. Notable buildings completed using this material include sections of the Place de la Concorde and the Louvre in Paris. More recently, however, it has seen increasing use in the construction of large private residences throughout the United States as well as extensions to private institutions such as Stanford University. For any large building, fire hazard can be a substantial concern, especially in tectonically active areas where catastrophic fires may arise following large-magnitude earthquakes. Typically, house fires burn at temperatures of around 600 °C ( 1000 F). Given the ubiquity of this geomaterial as a building stone, it is important to ascertain the influence of heating on the strength of Saint Maximin limestone (SML), and in turn the structural stability of the buildings it is used in. We performed a series of compressive tests and permeability measurements on samples of SML to determine its strength evolution in response to heating to incrementally higher temperatures. We observe that the uniaxial compressive strength of SML decreases from >12 MPa at room temperature to 400 °C). We anticipate that this substantial weakening is in part a result of thermal microcracking, whereby changes in temperature induce thermal stresses due to a mismatch in thermal expansion between the constituent grains. This mechanism is compounded by the volumetric increase of quartz through its alpha - beta transition at 573 °C, and by the thermal decomposition of calcite. To track the formation of thermal microcracks, we monitor acoustic emissions, a common proxy for microcracking, during the heating of an SML sample. The

  12. Mars, clays and the origins of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Hyman

    1989-01-01

    To detect life in the Martian soil, tests were designed to look for respiration and photosynthesis. Both tests (labeled release, LR, and pyrolytic release, PR) for life in the Martian soils were positive. However, when the measurement for organic molecules in the soil of Mars was made, none were found. The interpretation given is that the inorganic constituents of the soil of Mars were responsible for these observations. The inorganic analysis of the soil was best fitted by a mixture of minerals: 60 to 80 percent clay, iron oxide, quartz, and soluble salts such as halite (NaCl). The minerals most successful in simulating the PR and LR experiments are iron-rich clays. There is a theory that considers clays as the first organisms capable of replication, mutation, and catalysis, and hence of evolving. Clays are formed when liquid water causes the weathering of rocks. The distribution of ions such as aluminum, magnesium, and iron play the role of bases in the DNA. The information was stored in the distribution of ions in the octahedral and tetrahedral molecules, but that they could, like RNA and DNA, replicate. When the clays replicated, each sheet of clay would be a template for a new sheet. The ion substitutions in one clay sheet would give rise to a complementary or similar pattern on the clay synthesized on its surface. It was theorized that it was on the surface of replicating iron-rich clays that carbon dioxide would be fixed in the light into organic acids such as formic or oxalic acid. If Mars had liquid water during a warm period in its past, clay formation would have been abundant. These clays would have replicated and evolved until the liquid water was removed due to cooling of Mars. It is entirely possible that the Viking mission detected life on Mars, but it was clay life that awaits the return of water to continue its evolution into life based on organic molecules.

  13. Fracture behavior of polypropylene/clay nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Wang, Ke; Kotaki, Masaya; Hu, Charmaine; He, Chaobin

    2006-12-01

    Polypropylene (PP)/clay nanocomposites have been prepared via a reactive compounding approach with an epoxy based masterbatch. Compared with PP and common PP/organoclay nanocomposites, the PP/clay nanocomposites based on epoxy/clay masterbatch have higher impact strength. The phenomenon can be attributed to the epoxy phase dispersed uniformly in the PP matrix, which may act as impact energy absorber and helps to form a large damage zone, thus a higher impact strength value is achieved.

  14. Multifaceted role of clay minerals in pharmaceuticals

    OpenAIRE

    Khurana, Inderpreet Singh; Kaur, Satvinder; Kaur, Harpreet; Khurana, Rajneet Kaur

    2015-01-01

    The desirable physical and physiochemical properties of clay minerals have led them to play a substantial role in pharmaceutical formulations. Clay minerals like kaolin, smectite and palygorskite-sepiolite are among the world's most valuable industrial minerals and of considerable importance. The elemental features of clay minerals which caused them to be used in pharmaceutical formulations are high specific area, sorption capacity, favorable rheological properties, chemical inertness, swelli...

  15. Oriented nucleation and growth of anhydrite during direct sulfation of limestone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Guilin; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Wedel, Stig

    2008-01-01

    The direct sulfation of limestone (Iceland Spar) was studied at 973 K in a fixed-bed reactor. Scanning electron microscopy examinations of the sulfated limestone particles show that the sulfation process involves oriented nucleation and growth of the solid product, anhydrite. The reason...

  16. Model for the sulfidation of calcined limestone and its use in reactor models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesink, Albertus B.M.; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1998-01-01

    A mathematical model describing the sulfidation of a single calcined limestone particle was developed and experimentally verified. This model, which includes no fitting parameters, assumes a calcined limestone particle to consist of spherical grains of various sizes that react with H2S according to

  17. LATEST TOURNAISIAN (EARLY CARBONIFEROUS CONODONTS FROM THE TABAI LIMESTONE, TIRAH, NORTHWESTERN PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAZL-I-RABBI KHAN

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available A new stratigraphic unit, the Tabai Limestone of the poorly known Tirah area of northwest Pakistan, is one of several Early Carboniferous carbonate units distributed along the North Gondwana margin, some connected with transgressive interludes. The Tabai Limestone has produced latest Tournaisian (Early Carboniferous conodonts indicative of the middle of the anchoralis-latus Zone.

  18. STEAM ENHANCED REMEDIATION RESEARCH FOR DNAPL IN FRACTURED ROCK, LORING AIR FORCE BASE, LIMESTONE, MAINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report details a research project on Steam Enhanced Remediation (SER) for the recovery of volatile organic compounds from fractured limestone that was carried out at the Quarry at the former Loring Air Force Base in Limestone, Maine. This project was carried out by USEPA, Ma...

  19. Holocene limestones of part of the western continental shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, R.R.; Hashimi, N.H.; Guptha, M.V.S.

    , while those on te upper continental slope (130-180 m) are algal bryozoan limestones. The limestones have a radiocarbon age ranging between 9,000 and 11,000 years. Depositional environmental on the continental shelf during the Holocene appears...

  20. Evaluation of the Efficiency of Limestone Powder in Concrete and the Effects on the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo-Jae Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The major environmental impact of concrete comes from the CO2 emissions, produced during the cement manufacturing process. The main goal of this research project is to evaluate the efficiency of limestone powder as a partial cement replacement, in order to reduce energy consumption and CO2 emissions. This study utilizes limestone powders, with different particle sizes, to replace a portion of Portland cement using various ratios. Due to the dilution effect when partially replacing cement, there is a reduction in the concrete’s physical properties. To assess the dilution effect, a modification to Féret’s equation is used to calculate an efficiency factor for the limestone powder when compared to cement. To measure the environmental impact, a life cycle assessment is conducted on concrete made with limestone powder combined with cement. This allows for an evaluation of the various cement/limestone powder ratios that will maximize the environmental benefit, with minimal reduction in concrete strength. Additional microstructural analysis using petrographic examination was completed to provide a visual understanding of the distribution of the limestone particles within the cement paste. The results indicate that the efficiency of limestone powder in partially replacing cement can be achieved by particle packing and particle distribution in the concrete and the benefits of emission reductions exceed the loss in compressive strength when higher levels of limestone powder is used to replace cement.

  1. Semiplanus (Productida, Brachiopoda) from the Carboniferous limestone of Kotaki, Niigata Prefecture, central Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Ibaraki, Yousuke; Sato, Kiichi

    2013-01-01

    An Early Carboniferous large–sized productid brachiopod species, Semiplanus semiplanus (Schwetzow, 1922), is described from the Tsuchikurazawa Limestone (upper Visean–Serpukhovian), a limestone block within a Permian accretionary complex, distributed in the Kotaki area, Itoigawa City, Niigata Prefecture, central Japan. This is the first record of Semipanus species from Japan.

  2. Adsorption and desorption of phosphate on limestone in experiments simulating seawater intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The absorption and desorption of phosphorus on a large block of limestone was investigated using deionized water (DIW) and seawater. The limestone had a high affinity to adsorb phosphorus in DIW. Phosphate adsorption was significantly less in seawater, and more phosphorus was desorbed in the seawate...

  3. Effect of limestone particle size and calcium to non-phytate phosphorus ratio on true ileal calcium digestibility of limestone for broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, M N; Ravindran, V; Morel, P C H; Ravindran, G; Cowieson, A J

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone particle size and calcium (Ca) to non-phytate phosphorus (P) ratio on the true ileal Ca digestibility of limestone for broiler chickens. A limestone sample was passed through a set of sieves and separated into fine (digestibility of Ca was calculated using the indicator method and corrected for basal endogenous losses to determine the true Ca digestibility. The basal ileal endogenous Ca losses were determined to be 127 mg/kg of dry matter intake. Increasing Ca:non-phytate P ratios reduced the true Ca digestibility of limestone. The true Ca digestibility coefficients of limestone with Ca:non-phytate P ratios of 1.5, 2.0 and 2.5 were 0.65, 0.57 and 0.49, respectively. Particle size of limestone had a marked effect on the Ca digestibility, with the digestibility being higher in coarse particles (0.71 vs. 0.43).

  4. Selective Clay Placement Within a Silicate-Clay Epoxy Blend Nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A clay-epoxy nanocomposite may be prepared by dispersing a layered clay in an alkoxy epoxy, such as a polypropylene oxide based epoxide before combining the mixture with an aromatic epoxy to improve the nanocomposite's thermal and mechanical properties.

  5. Atmospheric particulate emissions from dry abrasive blasting using coal slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskar Kura; Kalpalatha Kambham; Sivaramakrishnan Sangameswaran; Sandhya Potana [University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2006-08-15

    Coal slag is one of the widely used abrasives in dry abrasive blasting. Atmospheric emissions from this process include particulate matter (PM) and heavy metals, such as chromium, lead, manganese, nickel. Quantities and characteristics of PM emissions depend on abrasive characteristics and process parameters. Emission factors are key inputs to estimate emissions. Experiments were conducted to study the effect of blast pressure, abrasive feed rate, and initial surface contamination on total PM (TPM) emission factors for coal slag. Rusted and painted mild steel surfaces were used as base plates. Blasting was carried out in an enclosed chamber, and PM was collected from an exhaust duct using U.S. Environment Protection Agency source sampling methods for stationary sources. Results showed that there is significant effect of blast pressure, feed rate, and surface contamination on TPM emissions. Mathematical equations were developed to estimate emission factors in terms of mass of emissions per unit mass of abrasive used, as well as mass of emissions per unit of surface area cleaned. These equations will help industries in estimating PM emissions based on blast pressure and abrasive feed rate. In addition, emissions can be reduced by choosing optimum operating conditions. 40 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. UTYLIZATION METHODS OF SLAGS AND ASH FROM WASTE INCINERATION PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Mikuła

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents modern management methods, solidification and immobilization of ash and slag from waste incineration plants. The innovative technologies for solving this kind of problem were described. Results focused on the most promising technologies of solidification, among others geopolymerization processes. The paper presents examples of the results of solidified ash and slag in the geopolymer matrix. The studies showed that the leachable of heavy metals from the geopolymer matrix containing ashes from the incineration of municipal waste qualifies them for storage in landfills for non-hazardous and inert. Moreover, these studies demonstrated practically 100% effectiveness for immobilization of the elements: bar (Ba, cadmium (Cd, zinc (Zn, mercury (Hg, nickel (Ni, lead (Pb. In the case of chromium III (Cr+3 97% level of effectiveness of the immobilization was achieved. In order to immobilize chromium VI (Cr+6 introduced additions of sulfur compounds. The study confirmed the low efficiency of the immobilization of: arsenic (As, selenium (Se and molybdenum (Mo.

  7. Experimental study on combustion and slagging characteristics of tannery sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chunyu; Jiang, Xuguang; Fei, Zhenwei; Chi, Yong; Yan, Jianhua

    2010-01-01

    Incineration is the most reasonable technique for tannery sludge disposal. The combustion and gaseous products emission characteristics of tannery sludge were investigated in this study. Tendency of slagging for combustion residue was also investigated based on the composition and microscopic scanning analysis. The high content of volatile matters and ash in tannery sludge was discovered. It was shown that the thermal decomposition and combustion of tannery sludge mainly occurs in a temperature frame between 150 degree Celsius and 780 degree Celsius. Organic acid was determined as the most important gaseous pollutant at low temperature combustion. The combustion residue from a specially designed furnace was analyzed by X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and energy dispersion spectroscopy (EDS) microprobe coupled in a scanning electron micro-scope (SEM). There is large amount of Ca in the combustion residue, and CaO was the main inorganic composition in these residues. The tannery sludge studied in this paper has a strong tendency of slagging, and the fusion of the residue began at 900 degree Celsius in combustion. It was further discovered that almost all the zinc (Zn) in tannery sludge is volatilized at 900 degree Celsius. The degree of volatilization for heavy metals at 900 degree Celsius followed the order of Zn > Cd >Cu > Mn > Pb > Cr. Most of Cr in tannery sludge is enriched in the residue during combustion. The present study reveals that it is critical to control the combustion temperature for optimal combustion efficiency and minimization of pollutants emission. (author)

  8. High temperature slagging incinerator for TRU-waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van De Voorde, N.; Hennart, D.; Gijbels, J.; Mergan, L.

    1984-01-01

    Since 1974 the Belgian Nuclear Study Center (SCK/CEN) at Mol, with the support of the European Communities, has developed an ''integral'' system for the treatment and the conditioning of radioactive contaminated wastes. The system converts directly, at high temperature (1500 0 C), mixtures of combustibles (paper, plastics, rubber etc.) and non-combustibles (metals, soil, sludge, concrete.) contaminated with transuranium elements as well as beta-gamma emitting isotopes, into a chemically inert and physically stable slag. More than 4000 hours of successful operation, with wide variety of simulated waste composition as well as real waste, have confirmed the safe operability of the high temperature sl'Gging incinerator and the connected installations, such as sorting cells, waste shredder, off-gas purification train, slag extraction system, remoted control, and the alpha-containment building. During the fall of 1983, a final confirmation of the performance of the installation was given by the successful accomplishment of an incineration campaign of 16 to 17 tons of simulated solid plutonium contaminated wastes

  9. Sintering mechanism of blast furnace slag-kaolin ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostafa, Nasser Y.; Shaltout, Abdallah A.; Abdel-Aal, Mohamed S.; El-maghraby, A.

    2010-01-01

    A general ceramics processing scheme by cold uniaxial pressing and conventional sintering process have been used to prepare ceramics from mixtures of blast furnace slag (BFS) and kaolin (10%, 30% and 50% kaolin). The properties of the ceramics were studied by measuring linear shrinkage, bulk density, apparent porosity and mechanical properties of samples heated at temperatures from 800 o C to 1100 o C. The formed crystalline phases were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Slag melt formed at relatively low temperatures (800-900 o C) modified the sintering process to liquid phase sintering mechanism. Combination of BFS with 10% kaolin gave the highest mechanical properties, densification and shrinkage at relatively low firing temperatures. The crystalline phases were identified as gehlenite (Ca 2 Al 2 SiO 7 ) in both BFS and BFS with 10% kaolin samples. Anorthite (CaAl 2 Si 2 O 8 ) phase increased with increasing kaolin contents. In the case of kaolin-rich mixtures (30% and 50% kaolin), increased expansion took place during firing at temperatures in the range 800-1000 o C. This effect could be attributed to the entrapment of released gases.

  10. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Organic waste treatment with organically modified clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.C.; Pancoski, S.E.; Alther, G.

    1989-01-01

    The use of organically modified clays in hazardous waste management applications offers a significant new and untapped potential. These clays may be used in the stabilization of organic wastes and organically contaminated soils, for waste water treatment, for oil spill control, for liner systems beneath fuel oil storage tanks, and as a component within liner systems of hazardous waste storage treatment and disposal facilities. Organically modified clays (organophilic clays) may be employed in each of these systems to adsorb organic waste constituents, enhancing the performance of the applications

  12. Limestone fragmentation and attrition during fluidized bed oxyfiring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrizio Scala; Piero Salatino [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione - CNR, Napoli (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Attrition/fragmentation of limestone under simulated fluidized bed oxyfiring conditions was investigated by means of an experimental protocol that had been previously developed for characterization of attrition/fragmentation of sorbents in air-blown atmospheric fluidized bed combustors. The protocol was based on the use of different and mutually complementary techniques. The extent and pattern of attrition by surface wear in the dense phase of a fluidized bed were assessed in experiments carried out with a bench scale fluidized bed combustor under simulated oxyfiring conditions. Sorbent samples generated during simulated oxyfiring tests were further characterized from the standpoint of fragmentation upon high velocity impact by means of a purposely designed particle impactor. Results showed that under calcination-hindered conditions attrition and fragmentation patterns are much different from those occurring under air-blown atmospheric combustion conditions. Noteworthy, attrition/fragmentation enhanced particle sulfation by continuously regenerating the exposed particle surface. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Sierra Elvira limestone: petrophysical characteristics of an Andalusian heritage stone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valverde, I.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available “Sierra Elvira stone” is one of the ornamental building stones most widely used in the historical monuments of eastern Andalusia. A Liassic age limestone, it appears in the central section of the Baetic Mountains and more specifically in the Middle Subbaetic domain. While the most common variety is a crinoid limestone, a micritic limestone of the same age has also been quarried, albeit in much smaller quantities. These stones form very thick beds, up to nearly 5 m deep, that run in consistently parallel lines and have a dip angle that facilitates quarrying.With petrographic, physical and mechanical properties that ensure stone strength and durability, it is a high quality building material suitable for both structural and ornamental purposes. These properties can be attributed to the minimal open porosity and concomitant excellent water resistance that characterize the stone, as well as to its high mechanical strength and low textural anisotropy, both elastic and mechanical. With such attributes, the stone can be successfully used for any number of purposes, including decorative stonework (portals, fountains, plinths, structural members (column shafts and bases or urban curbing and paving. Intervention on Sierra de Elvira limestone structures should be limited to cleaning or repair, for consolidating or protective materials are scantly effective.La “Piedra de Sierra Elvira” constituye una de las piedras ornamentales más significativas del Patrimonio Arquitectónico de Andalucía Oriental. Es una roca caliza del Lias que aflora en el Subbético Medio del sector central de las Cordilleras Béticas. El litotipo más explotado es una caliza con crinoides, en bastante menor importancia se ha extraído también otra caliza micrítica de la misma edad. Los bancos son muy potentes, en algunos casos de más de 5 m, con un paralelismo constante y un buzamiento que favorece su explotación en los frentes de cantera.Sus caracter

  14. Limestone-Concentrate-Pellet Roasting in wet Carbon Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1990-01-01

    A roast process for treating chalcopyrite concentrate was developed. The investigation of the reaction of limestone-concentrate-pellet in a wet carbon dioxide flow was carried out by means of a thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to determine at which temperatures the roasting reaction would take place. The thermodynamic calculations on the roast reaction were made by the use of SOLGASMIX-PV program. The TGA curves and thermodynamic calculations indicated that the conversion of chalcopyrite into bornite took place at about 975K, and the conversion of bornite into chalcocite at 1065-1123K. The thermodynamic calculations also showed that the sulfur released was fixed as calcium sulfide within roasted pellets. X-ray diffraction examination identified these phases in products.

  15. Experienced materials in wet limestone-gypsum FGD system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, S. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industry, Hiroshima (Japan). Hiroshima Research and Development Center; Iwashita, K.; Ochi, E.; Higuchi, T. [Mitsubishi heavy Industry, Yokohama (Japan)

    1998-12-31

    This study was made on the corrosion resistivity evaluation method used for material selection in the Wet Limestone-Gypsum FGD system with examples of various process configuration, their corrosion environment, and the materials used in them. The wet limestone-gypsum process FGD plant is broadly divided into two types-ash-separated (dual-loop) process, and ash-mixed (single-loop) process-depending on whether the flue gas is separated from ash before being led into the absorber or led as it is into the absorber mixed with ash. Presently, the single-loop process has become the mainstream process however. The dual -loop process comprises a dedusting tower (quencher) and an absorption tower (absorber). In the quencher ash is removed with sprayed water where most of the HCl, HF etc., and a part of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} contained in the flue gas are also removed with absorption. On the contrary, in the single-loop process which is configured of only the absorber, the flue gas is introduced into it as it is contained with ash, SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, HCl, HF etc. The corrosion environment in these plants largely differs depending on the process type and condition. The absorber recirculated liquid has various ion inclusions among which Cl{sup {minus}} promotes pitting corrosion and crevice corrosion while SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} inhibits these corrosions. Both Cl{sup {minus}} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} cover an extremely large range between 25 to 100,000 ppm and 564 to 73,600 ppm respectively, and their influence on the corrosion is related to their activity which is decided by Ca{sup 2+}, Mg{sup 2+}, Na{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, H{sup +} and liquid temperature. The balance of these ions is decided by the gas composition, limestone composition, make-up water and wastewater mass balance etc., of individual plants. Accordingly, materials of FGD plant are selected on the basis of evaluated results of corrosion resistivity test made under such simulated process conditions of

  16. SLAM: a sodium-limestone concrete ablation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suo-Anttila, A.J.

    1983-12-01

    SLAM is a three-region model, containing a pool (sodium and reaction debris) region, a dry (boundary layer and dehydrated concrete) region, and a wet (hydrated concrete) region. The model includes a solution to the mass, momentum, and energy equations in each region. A chemical kinetics model is included to provide heat sources due to chemical reactions between the sodium and the concrete. Both isolated model as well as integrated whole code evaluations have been made with good results. The chemical kinetics and water migration models were evaluated separately, with good results. Several small and large-scale sodium limestone concrete experiments were simulated with reasonable agreement between SLAM and the experimental results. The SLAM code was applied to investigate the effects of mixing, pool temperature, pool depth and fluidization. All these phenomena were found to be of significance in the predicted response of the sodium concrete interaction. Pool fluidization is predicted to be the most important variable in large scale interactions

  17. Competição entre materiais corretivos (escórias de siderurgia x calcário em solos de várzea do Vale do Paraíba Utilization of two types of blast furnace slag as a soil corrective in the Paraíba Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gentil Gomes

    1962-01-01

    Full Text Available Embora apresentando os solos do Vale do Rio Paraíba, com poucas exceções, acidez de média a elevada, muito pouco uso de corretivos de solos tem sido feito. Êste fato se deve principalmente ao pequeno número de jazidas de calcário existente na região, insuficiente para atender à demanda desse material para a agricultura. Visando colaborar na solução do problema, foram estudadas em seis experimentos instalados em solos de várzea, as possibilidades de utilização de dois tipos de escórias, provenientes da Usina Siderúrgica Nacional de Volta Redonda e da produção de aço em São Caetano e Moji das Cruzes. Nesses ensaios, em culturas de batata e tomate, foram comparados os dois tipos de escórias e um de calcário, em três níveis, tendo como testemunha um tratamento que recebeu apenas a adubação básica, NPK. Os resultados obtidos autorizam a recomendação do emprêgo das escorias. Para sua comercialização, entretanto, necessário se torna alterar o grau de moagem, para que sua granulometria satisfaça às exigências legais.Although the soil in the Paraiba Valley generally presents medium to high acidity, the practice of liming is not yet widespread there. One of the reasons for this is the lack of enough lime sources in its vicinity. As a contribution to the study of the liming problem in the Paraiba Valley, six experiments were carried out on various types of soils in the area, comparing two types of slags with limestone as soil correctives. The slags were obtained from the Usina Siderúrgica Nacional, Volta Redonda and from the São Caetano Steel Plant, São Caetano. They were conducted with the tomato and potato crops. Three levels of each type of slag or limestone, plus a complete fertilizer, were compared. Control plots received only the fertilizer. The results from these experiments indicated that the two types of slag compared favorably with limestone as a calcium source. Both can be recommended as a corrective for

  18. Corrosion Behavior of Carbon Steel in Concrete Material Composed of Tin Slag Waste in Aqueous Chloride Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustandi, Andi; Cahyadi, Agung; Taruli Siallagan, Sonia; Wafa' Nawawi, Fuad; Pratesa, Yudha

    2018-01-01

    Tin slag is a byproduct of tin ore smelting process which is rarely utilized. The main purpose of this work is to investigate the use of tin slag for concrete cement material application compared to the industrial Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC). Tin slag composition was characterized by XRD and XRF analysis. The characterization results showed the similar chemical composition of tin slag and OPC. It also revealed the semi crystalline structure of tin slag sample. Several electrochemical tests were performed to evaluate corrosion behavior of tin slag, OPC and various mixed composition of both materials and the addition of CaO. The corrosion behavior of OPC and tin slag were evaluated by using Cyclic Polarization, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and Electrochemical Frequency Modulation (EFM) methods. Aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) solution with 3.5% w.t concentration which similar to seawater was used as the electrolyte in this work. The steel specimen used as the reinforce bar (rebar) material of the concrete was carbon steel AISI 1045. The rebar was embedded in the concrete cement which composed of OPC and the various composition of tin slag including slag without addition of CaO and slag mixed with addition of 50 % CaO. The electrochemical tests results revealed that tin slag affected its corrosion behavior which becoming more active and increasing the corrosion rate as well as decreasing the electrochemical impedance.

  19. Toxicity of acid mine pit lake water remediated with limestone and phosphorus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neil, L.L.; McCullough, C.D.; Lund, M.A.; Evans, L.H.; Tsvetnenko, Y. [Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA (Australia)

    2009-11-15

    Pit lakes are increasingly common worldwide and have potential to provide many benefits. However, lake water toxicity may require remediation before beneficial end uses can be realised. Three treatments to remediate AMD (pH similar to 4.8) pit lake water containing elevated concentrations of Al and Zn from Collie, Western Australia were tested in mesocosms. Treatments were: (a) limestone neutralisation (L), (b) phosphorus amendment (P), and c) combined limestone neutralisation and phosphorus amendment (L+P). Laboratory bioassays with Ceriodaphnia cf. dubia, Chlorella protothecoides and Tetrahymena thermophila assessed remediation. Limestone neutralisation increased pH and reduced heavy metal concentrations by 98% (Al) to 14% (Mg), removing toxicity to the three test species within 2 months. Phosphorus amendment removed toxicity after 6 months of treatment. However, phosphorus amendment to prior limestone neutralisation failed to reduce toxicity more than limestone neutralisation alone. Low concentrations of both phosphorus and nitrogen appear to limit phytoplankton population growth in all treatments.

  20. Toxicity of acid mine pit lake water remediated with limestone and phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neil, Luke L; McCullough, Clint D; Lund, Mark A; Evans, Louis H; Tsvetnenko, Yuri

    2009-11-01

    Pit lakes are increasingly common worldwide and have potential to provide many benefits. However, lake water toxicity may require remediation before beneficial end uses can be realised. Three treatments to remediate AMD (pH approximately 4.8) pit lake water containing elevated concentrations of Al and Zn from Collie, Western Australia were tested in mesocosms. Treatments were: (a) limestone neutralisation (L), (b) phosphorus amendment (P), and (c) combined limestone neutralisation and phosphorus amendment (L+P). Laboratory bioassays with Ceriodaphnia cf. dubia, Chlorella protothecoides and Tetrahymena thermophila assessed remediation. Limestone neutralisation increased pH and reduced heavy metal concentrations by 98% (Al) to 14% (Mg), removing toxicity to the three test species within 2 months. Phosphorus amendment removed toxicity after 6 months of treatment. However, phosphorus amendment to prior limestone neutralisation failed to reduce toxicity more than limestone neutralisation alone. Low concentrations of both phosphorus and nitrogen appear to limit phytoplankton population growth in all treatments.

  1. Hydration mechanisms of ternary Portland cements containing limestone powder and fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Weerdt, K.; Haha, M. Ben; Le Saout, G.; Kjellsen, K.O.; Justnes, H.; Lothenbach, B.

    2011-01-01

    The effect of minor additions of limestone powder on the properties of fly ash blended cements was investigated in this study using isothermal calorimetry, thermogravimetry (TGA), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques, and pore solution analysis. The presence of limestone powder led to the formation of hemi- and monocarbonate and to a stabilisation of ettringite compared to the limestone-free cements, where a part of the ettringite converted to monosulphate. Thus, the presence of 5% of limestone led to an increase of the volume of the hydrates, as visible in the increase in chemical shrinkage, and an increase in compressive strength. This effect was amplified for the fly ash/limestone blended cements due to the additional alumina provided by the fly ash reaction.

  2. Optimisation of a wet FGD pilot plant using fine limestone and organic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Jan; Kiil, Søren; Johnsson, Jan Erik

    2001-01-01

    , but the residual limestone content in the gypsum increased to somewhere between 19 and 30 wt%, making this pH range unsuitable for use in a full-scale plant. The investigations have shown that both the addition of organic acids and the use of a limestone with a fine PSD can be used to optimise wet FGD plants. (C......The effects of adding an organic acid or using a limestone with a fine particle size distribution (PSD) have been examined in a wet flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) pilot plant. Optimisation of the plant with respect to the degree of desulphurisation and the residual limestone content of the gypsum...... has been the aim of the work. In contrast to earlier investigations with organic acids, all essential process parameters (i.e. gas phase concentration profiles of SO(2), slurry pH profiles. and residual limestone in the gypsum) were considered. Slurry concentrations of adipic acid in the range of 0...

  3. Reproducing ten years of road ageing - Accelerated carbonation and leaching of EAF steel slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suer, Pascal; Lindqvist, Jan-Erik; Arm, Maria; Frogner-Kockum, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Reuse of industrial aggregates is still hindered by concern for their long-term properties. This paper proposes a laboratory method for accelerated ageing of steel slag, to predict environmental and technical properties, starting from fresh slag. Ageing processes in a 10-year old asphalt road with steel slag of electric arc furnace (EAF) type in the subbase were identified by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and leaching tests. Samples from the road centre and the pavement edge were compared with each other and with samples of fresh slag. It was found that slag from the pavement edge showed traces of carbonation and leaching processes, whereas the road centre material was nearly identical to fresh slag, in spite of an accessible particle structure. Batches of moisturized road centre material exposed to oxygen, nitrogen or carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) were used for accelerated ageing. Time (7-14 days), temperature (20-40 o C) and initial slag moisture content (8-20%) were varied to achieve the carbonation (decrease in pH) and leaching that was observed in the pavement edge material. After ageing, water was added to assess leaching of metals and macroelements. 12% moisture, CO 2 and seven days at 40 o C gave the lowest pH value. This also reproduced the observed ageing effect for Ca, Cu, Ba, Fe, Mn, Pb, Ca (decreased leaching) and for V, Si, and Al (increased leaching). However, ageing effects on SO 4 , DOC and Cr were not reproduced.

  4. Fresh and mechanical properties of self compacting concrete containing copper slag as fine aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Sharma

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available An investigation is carried out on the development of Self Compacting Concrete (SCC using copper slag (CS as fine aggregates with partial and full replacement of sand. Six different SCC mixes (60% OPC and 40% Fly Ash with 0% as control mix, 20%, 40%, 60%, 80% and 100% of copper slag substituting sand with constant w/b ratio of 0.45 were cast and tested for fresh properties of SCC. Compressive strength and splitting tensile strength were evaluated at different ages and microstructural analysis was observed at 120 days. It has been observed that the fluidity of SCC mixes was significantly enhanced with the increment of copper slag. The test results showed that the compressive strength increases up to 60% copper slag as replacement of sand, beyond which decrease in strength was observed. The highest compressive strength was obtained at 20% copper slag substitution at different curing ages among all the mixes, except for 7 days curing. The splitting tensile strength of the CS substituted mixes in comparison to control concrete was found to increase at all the curing ages but the remarkable achievement of strength was detected at 60% copper slag replacement. The microscopic view from Scanning electron microscopy (SEM demonstrated more voids, capillary channels, and micro cracks with the increment of copper slag as substitution of sand as compared to the control mix.

  5. Toxicity assessment and geochemical model of chromium leaching from AOD slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bao; Li, Junguo; Zeng, Yanan; Wang, Ziming

    2016-02-01

    AOD (Argon Oxygen Decarburization) slag is a by-product of the stainless steel refining process. The leaching toxicity of chromium from AOD slag cannot be ignored in the recycling process of the AOD slag. To assess the leaching toxicity of the AOD slag, batch leaching tests have been performed. PHREEQC simulations combined with FactSage were carried out based on the detailed mineralogical analysis and petrophysical data. Moreover, Pourbaix diagram of the Cr-H2O system was protracted by HSC 5.0 software to explore the chromium speciation in leachates. It was found that AOD slag leachate is an alkaline and reductive solution. The Pourbaix diagram of the Cr-H2O system indicated that trivalent chromium, such as Cr(OH)4(-), is the major chromium species in the experimental Eh-pH region considered. However, toxic hexavalent chromium was released with maximum concentrations of 30 µg L(-1) and 18 µg L(-1) at L/S 10 and 100, respectively, during the earlier leaching stage. It concluded that the AOD slag possessed a certain leaching toxicity. After 10 d of leaching, trivalent chromium was the dominant species in the leachates, which corresponded to the results of PHREEQC simulation. Leaching toxicity of AOD slag is based on the chromium speciation and its transformation. Great attention should be focused on such factors as aging, crystal form of chromium-enriched minerals, and electrochemical characteristics of the leachates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Reductive-sulfurizing smelting treatment of smelter slag for copper and cobalt recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Y.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recovery of copper and cobalt from smelter slag using reductive-sulfurizing smelting method was performed in this study. The effects of reductive agent (coke, sulfurizing agent (pyrite, slag modifier (CaO and smelting temperature and duration on the extractive efficiencies of Cu, Co and Fe were discussed. The phase compositions and microstructure of the materials, copper-cobalt matte and cleaned slag were determined. The results showed that copper and cobalt contents in cleaned slag could decrease averagely to 0.18% and 0.071% respectively after cleaning. 91.99% Cu and 92.94% Co and less than 38.73% Fe were recovered from the smelter slag under the optimum conditions: 6 wt.% coke, 20 wt.% pyrite and 6 wt.% CaO addition to the smelter slag, smelting temperature of 1350°C and smelting duration of 3h. The addition of CaO can increase the selectivity of Co recovery. The cleaning products were characterized by XRD and SEM-EDS analysis. The results showed that the main phases of copper-cobalt matte were iron sulfide (FeS, geerite (Cu8S5, iron cobalt sulfide (Fe0.92Co0.08S and Fe-Cu-Co alloy. The cleaned slag mainly comprised fayalite (Fe2SiO4, hedenbergite (CaFe(Si2O6 and magnetite (Fe3O4.

  7. Some Insights to the Reuse of Dredged Marine Soils by Admixing with Activated Steel Slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee-Ming Chan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Regular dredging is necessary for the development of coastal regions and the maintenance of shipping channels. The dredging process dislodges sediments from the seabed, and the removed materials, termed dredged marine soils, are generally considered a geowaste for dumping. However, disposal of the dredged soils offshores can lead to severe and irreversible impact on the marine ecosystem, while disposal on land often incurs exorbitant costs with no guarantee of zero-contamination. It is therefore desirable to reuse the material, and one option is solidification with another industrial waste, that is, steel slag. This paper describes the exploratory work of admixing dredged marine soil with activated steel slag for improvement of the mechanical properties. An optimum activation concentration of NaOH was introduced to the soil-slag mixture for uniform blending. Specimens were prepared at different mix ratios then left to cure for up to 4 weeks. The unconfined compressive strength test was conducted to monitor the changes in strength at predetermined intervals. It was found that the strength does not necessarily increase with higher steel slag content, indicating an optimum slag content required for the maximum solidification effect to take place. Also, regardless of the slag content, longer curing time produces greater strength gain. In conclusion, steel slag addition to dredged sediments can effectively strengthen the originally weak soil structure by both the “cementation” and “filler” effects, though the combined effects were not distinguished in the present study.

  8. Synthesis of inorganic polymers using fly ash and primary lead slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisei, S; Pontikes, Y; Van Gerven, T; Angelopoulos, G N; Velea, T; Predica, V; Moldovan, P

    2012-02-29

    The present work reports on the synthesis and properties of inorganic polymers ("geopolymers") made of 100% fly ash from lignite's combustion, 100% primary lead slag and mixtures of the two. In the inorganic polymers with both fly ash and lead slag the main crystalline phases detected are wüstite, magnetite, sodium zinc silicate, quartz, anorthite, and gehlenite; litharge partially dissolves. FTIR analysis in these samples revealed that the main peaks and bands of end members also exist, along with a new amorphous reaction product. In terms of microstructure, both fly ash and lead slag dissolve and contribute in the binding phase whereas the larger particles act as aggregates. For an increasing lead slag in the composition, the binding phase is changing in chemistry and reaches PbO values higher than 50 wt.% for the 100% lead slag inorganic polymer. Regarding the properties of fly ash and lead slag inorganic polymers, compressive strength is higher than 35 MPa in all cases and water absorption diminishes as the lead slag content increases. A comparison of leaching results before and after polymerisation reveals that pH is an important factor as Pb is immobilised in the binding phase, unlike Zn and As. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. STEEL-SLAG AS SUBSTITUTE TO NATURAL AGGREGATES, PROPERTIES AND THE INTERFACIAL TRANSITION ZONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Ay Lie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Steel-slag is a residual product of the steel industry that has potential ability to pollute the ground water and soil containing heavy metals. To overcome this problem, attempts have been made for using the slag as substitute for both coarse and fine aggregates in concrete. The solidification process will prevent the metal components from polluting the water and soil. Test results on the mechanical properties of slag-concrete showed that while the compression strength of slag-concrete increased significantly as a function of slag-to-natural aggregate’s use, the tensile strength dropped accordingly. The substitution of fine-slag to Muntilan sand was even more negative, the compression strength decreased as a function of slag use. Research into the influences of the Interfacial Transition Zone was conducted, since the ITZ itself forms a weak link within the concrete matrix. The SEM tests were performed at the Quarter Laboratory, Department of Geology in Bandung using a Scanning Electron Microscope type JEOL.

  10. Investigation of using steel slag in hot mix asphalt for the surface course of flexible pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hien Q.; Lu, Dai X.; Le, Son D.

    2018-04-01

    The rapid development of heavy industry in Vietnam leads to the establishments of steel industry. Steel slag, a by-product of steelwork industry, under Vietnamese’s law, was considered as a deleterious solid waste which needed to be processed and landfilled. However, this has changed recently, and steel slag is now seen as a normal or non-deleterious solid waste, and has been studied for reuse in the construction industry. In this study, steel slag was used, as a replacement for mineral aggregate, in hot mix asphalt. Two hot mix asphalt mixtures with an equivalent nominal aggregate size of 12.5 (C12.5) and 19 mm (C19) were produced using steel slag. In addition, one conventional hot mix asphalt mixture of C19 was produced using mineral aggregate for comparison purpose. Investigation in laboratory condition and trial sections was carried out on Marshall tests, surface roughness, skid resistance, and modulus of the pavement before and after applying a new surface course of hot mix asphalt. The study showed that all steel slag asphalt mixtures passed the Marshall stability and flow test requirements. The skid resistance of steel slag hot mix asphalt mixtures for the surface course satisfied the Vietnamese specification for asphalt. Moreover, the pavement sections with the surface course of steel slag hot mix asphalt showed a considerable higher modulus than that of the conventional one. Only the roughness of the surface course paved with C19 did not pass the requirement of the specification.

  11. Effect of blast furnace slag on self-healing of microcracks in cementitious materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Haoliang; Ye, Guang; Damidot, Denis

    2014-01-01

    The physico-chemical process of self-healing in blast furnace slag cement paste was investigated in this paper. With a high slag content i.e., 66% in cement paste and saturated Ca(OH) 2 solution as activator, it was found that the reaction products formed in cracks are composed of C-S-H, ettringite, hydrogarnet and OH–hydrotalcite. The fraction of C-S-H in the reaction products is much larger than the other minerals. Large amount of ettringite formed in cracks indicates the leaching of SO 4 2− ions from the bulk paste and consequently the recrystallization. Self-healing proceeds fast within 50 h and then slows down. According to thermodynamic modeling, when the newly formed reaction products are carbonated, the filling fraction of crack increases first and then decreases. Low soluble minerals such as silica gel, gibbsite and calcite are formed. Compared to Portland cement paste, the potential of self-healing in slag cement paste is higher when the percentage of slag is high. - Highlights: • Self-healing reaction products in slag cement paste were characterized. • Self-healing reaction products formed in time were quantified with image analysis. • Self-healing in slag cement paste was simulated with a reactive transport model. • Effect of carbonation on self-healing was investigated by thermodynamic modeling. • Effect of slag on self-healing was discussed based on experiments and simulation

  12. Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part I: Influence of Coal Properties and Gasification Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the entrained-flow gasifiers used in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC plants, the majority of mineral matter transforms to liquid slag on the wall of the gasifier and flows out the bottom. However, a small fraction of the mineral matter is entrained (as fly ash with the raw syngas out of the gasifier to downstream processing. This molten/sticky fly ash could cause fouling of the syngas cooler. To improve gasification availability through better design and operation of the gasification process, a better understanding of slag behavior and the characteristics of the slagging process is needed. Char/ash properties, gas compositions in the gasifier, the gasifier wall structure, fluid dynamics, and plant operating conditions (mainly temperature and oxygen/carbon ratio all affect slagging behavior. Because coal has varying ash content and composition, different operating conditions are required to maintain the slag flow and limit problems downstream. In Part I, we review the main types and the operating conditions of entrained-flow gasifiers and coal properties used in IGCC plants; we identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior; finally, we summarize the coal quality criteria and the operating conditions in entrained-flow gasifiers. In Part II, we discuss the constitutive modeling related to the rheological studies of slag flow.

  13. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-01-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI (aq) ) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. - Highlights: • Iodide sorption experiments were completed with a diverse array of clay minerals. • Iodide uptake trended with CEC and swamping electrolyte identity and concentration. • Results can be explained by considering the formation of ion pairs in clay interlayers

  14. Perspectives regarding the use of metallurgical slags as secondary metal resources - A review of bioleaching approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potysz, Anna; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Kierczak, Jakub

    2018-05-05

    Smelting activity by its very nature produces large amounts of metal-bearing waste, often called metallurgical slag(s). In the past, industry used to dispose of these waste products at dumping sites without the appropriate environmental oversight. Once there, ongoing biogeochemical processes affect the stability of the slags and cause the release of metallic contaminants. Rather than viewing metallurgical slags as waste, however, such deposits should be viewed as secondary metal resources. Metal bioleaching is a "green" treatment route for metallurgical slags, currently being studied under laboratory conditions. Metal-laden leachates obtained at the bioleaching stage have to be subjected to further recovery operations in order to obtain metal(s) of interest to achieve the highest levels of purity possible. This perspective paper considers the feasibility of the reuse of base-metal slags as secondary metal resources. Special focus is given to current laboratory bioleaching approaches and associated processing obstacles. Further directions of research for development of more efficient methods for waste slag treatment are also highlighted. The optimized procedure for slag treatment is defined as the result of this review and should include following steps: i) slag characterization (chemical and phase composition and buffering capacity) following the choice of initial pH, ii) the choice of particle size, iii) the choice of the liquid-to-solid ratio, iv) the choice of microorganisms, v) the choice of optimal nutrient supply (growth medium composition). An optimal combination of all these parameters will lead to efficient extraction and generation of metal-free solid residue. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Study of controlled leaching process of steel slag in Soxhlet extractor aiming employment in pavements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Kissyla Avila; Guimaraes, Antonio Carlos Rodrigues; Reis, Marcelo de Miranda; Santana, Claudeny Simone Alves

    2017-01-01

    This work addresses the characterization of physical, chemical and mechanical properties of steel slag as an alternative aggregation before and after leaching testing controlled Soxhlet extractor. The material it was characterized before going through the natural leaching process and after controlled leaching in different periods of 24, 56, 96, 120 hours. The steel slag was subjected in the laboratory to simulate the precipitation in Soxhlet equipment to evaluate its physical, chemical and mechanical properties after each period described. The study of the process of leaching in steel slag searched to understand the influence of the washing process in a slag behavior in such a process. The physical characterization occurred through traditional testing of coarse aggregates, the chemical characterization through the testing of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) completed by Dispersive Spectroscopy Energy (DSE) and X- ray diffraction and the mechanical characterization through testing of standardized expansion and adapted. The sample virgin, without receiving process of stabilization by controlled leaching, showed satisfactory results in the physics characterization when compared to conventional aggregates, the chemical characterization proved to be a steel slag with high contents of CaO, MgO and FeO, the mechanical characterization demonstrated that, although the degree of expansibility of the slag is low demonstrated that this should not be disregarded in the paving work. After controlled leaching the steel slag showed no significant loss of its physical properties. As the mechanical testing of expansion had decreased the potential of expansibility after leaching periods. It is concluded that the leaching process in a Soxhlet extractor is of importance in the study the properties of steel slag, once covering several days of leaching was reduced potential for expansion, limiting feature in the use of steel slag for paving. (author)

  16. Autoclave-hardening slag-alkali binder with high water content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenevskij, V.V.; Kozyrin, N.A.; Melikhova, N.I.; Narkevich, N.K.; Ryabov, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    The results of investigations into properties of slag-alkali binder, that may be used for concretes of reactor radiation and thermal shieldings, are presented. These concretes have increased chemical stability and mechanical strength, high content of chemically bound water (approximately 14%), that is not lost under heating up to 550 deg C. Dumping and granulated slags of blast-furnace process, sodium-bicarbonate-alkali fusion cake formed at burning of adipic acid residues, technical sodium hydroxide and sodium liquid glass are used as raw material for slag-alkali binder

  17. Recovery of americium from slag and crucible wastes and its purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, K.M.; Dabholkar, G.M.; Vijayan, K.; Ramamoorthy, N.; Narayanan, C.V.; Jambunathan, U.; Kapoor, S.C.

    1990-01-01

    A method of recovery and purification of americium-241 from slag waste streams is described. Extraction of Am from slag solution of 0.16 M HNO 3 was carried out by tri-n-butyl phosphate. After stripping with acetic acid, Am was precipitated at pH 1. This was followed by metathesis to remove Ca. Final separation of Pu from Am solution was achieved by anion exchange method using Dowex 1x4 anion exchange resin. Details of large scale recovery of Am from slag are also described. (author). 12 refs., 11 tabs., 1 fig

  18. Mineralogy and environmental stability of slags from the Tsumeb smelter, Namibia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ettler, Vojtech; Johan, Zdenek; Kribek, Bohdan; Sebek, Ondrej; Mihaljevic, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Three types of smelting slags originating from historically different smelting technologies in the Tsumeb area (Namibia) were studied: (i) slags from processing of carbonate/oxide ore in a Cu-Pb smelter (1907-1948), (ii) slags from Cu and Pb smelting of sulphide ores (1963-1970) and (iii) granulated Cu smelting slags (1980-2000). Bulk chemical analyses of slags were combined with detailed mineralogical investigation using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS) and electron microprobe (EPMA). The slags are significantly enriched in metals and metalloids: Pb (0.97-18.4 wt.%), Cu (0.49-12.2 wt.%), Zn (2.82-12.09 wt.%), Cd (12-6940 mg/kg), As (930-75,870 mg/kg) and Sb (67-2175 mg/kg). Slags from the oldest technology are composed of primary Ca- and Pb-bearing feldspars, spinels, complex Cu-Fe and Cu-Cr oxides, delafossite-mcconnellite phases and Ca-Pb arsenates. The presence of arsenates indicates that these slags underwent long-term alteration. More recent slags are composed of high-temperature phases: Ca-Fe alumosilicates (olivine, melilite), Pb- and Zn-rich glass, spinel oxides and small sulphide/metallic inclusions embedded in glass. XRD and SEM/EDS were used to study secondary alteration products developed on the surface of slags exposed for decades to weathering on the dumps. Highly soluble complex Cu-Pb-(Ca) arsenates (bayldonite, lammerite, olivenite, lavendulan) associated with litharge and hydrocerussite were detected. To determine the mineralogical and geochemical parameters governing the release of inorganic contaminants from slags, two standardized short-term batch leaching tests (European norm EN 12457 and USEPA TCLP), coupled with speciation-solubility modelling using PHREEQC-2 were performed. Arsenic in the leachate exceeded the EU regulatory limit for hazardous waste materials (2.5 mg/L). The toxicity limits defined by USEPA for the TCLP test were exceeded for Cd, Pb and As. The PHREEQC-2 calculation predicted that

  19. Basalt Fiber for Volcanic Slag Lightweight Aggregate Concrete Research on the Impact of Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Li-guang; Li, Gen-zhuang

    2018-03-01

    In order to study the effect of basalt fiber on the mechanical properties and durability of volcanic slag lightweight aggregate concrete, the experimental study on the flexural strength, compressive strength and freeze-thaw resistance of volcanic slag concrete with different basalt fiber content were carried out, the basalt fiber was surface treated with NaOH and water glass, the results show that the surface treatment of basalt fiber can significantly improve the mechanical properties, durability and other properties of volcanic slag lightweight aggregate concrete.

  20. Formulation and characterization of structural lightweight concrete containing residues of porcelain tile polishing, tire rubber and limestone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. L. M. Sampaio

    Full Text Available Abstract The recent increase in the construction industry has transformed concrete into an ideal choice to recycle a number of residues formerly discarded into the environment. Among various products, porcelain tile polishing, limestone and tire rubber residues are potential candidates to replace the fine aggregate of conventional mixtures. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the addition of varying contents of these residues in lightweight concrete where expanded clay replaced gravel. To that end, slump, compressive strength, density, void ratio, porosity and absorption tests were carried out. The densities of all concrete formulations studied were 10% lower to that of lightweight concrete (<1.850 kg/m³. Nevertheless, mixes containing 10 to 15% of combined residues reduced absorption, void ratio and porosity, at least 17% lower compared to conventional concrete. The strength of such formulations reached 27 MPa at 28 days with consistency of 9 to 12 cm, indicating adequate consistency and increased strength. In addition, the combination of low porosity, absorption and voids suggested improved durability.

  1. Sectioning Clay Models Makes Anatomy & Development Tangible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Carina Endres; Howell, James Endres

    2010-01-01

    Clay models have proved to be useful teaching aids for many topics in biology that depend on three-dimensional reasoning. Students studying embryonic development struggle to mentally reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of embryos and larvae by observing prepared slides of cross-sectional slices. Students who build clay models of embryos…

  2. Clay as Thermoluminescence Dosemeter in diagnostic Radiology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports the investigation of the basic thermoluminescence properties of clay at x-rays in the diagnostic radiology range, including dose monitoring in abdominal radiography. Clay sourced from Calabar, Nigeria, was tested for thermoluminescence response after irradiation at diagnostic radiology doses, including ...

  3. Climatic control on clay mineral formation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Many physico-chemical variables like rock-type,climate,topography and exposure age affect weathering environments.In the present study,an attempt is made to understand how the nature of clay minerals formed due to weathering differs in tropical regions receiving high and low rainfall. Clay mineralogy of weathering pro ...

  4. clay nanocomposite by solution intercalation technique

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polymer–clay nanocomposites of commercial polystyrene (PS) and clay laponite were prepared via solution intercalation technique. Laponite was modified suitably with the well known cationic surfactant cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide by ion-exchange reaction to render laponite miscible with hydrophobic PS.

  5. The many ways of making anionic clays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Together with hydrotalcite-like layered double hydroxides, bivalent and trivalent metal hydroxides and their hydroxy salts are actually anionic clays consisting of positively charged hydroxide layers with anions intercalated in the interlayer region. The anionic clays exhibit anion sorption, anion diffusion and exchange ...

  6. Investigations of salt mortar containing saliferous clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, F.

    1992-01-01

    Saliferous clay mortar might be considered for combining individual salt bricks into a dense and tight long-term seal. A specific laboratory program was started to test mortars consisting of halite powder and grey saliferous clay of the Stassfurt from the Bleicherode salt mine. Clay fractions between 0 and 45% were used. The interest focused upon obtaining good workabilities of the mixtures as well as upon the permeability and compression strength of the dried mortar samples. Test results: 1) Without loss of quality the mortar can be mixed using fresh water. Apprx. 18 to 20 weight-% of the solids must be added as mixing water. 2) The porosity and the permeability of the mortar samples increases distinctly when equally coarse-grained salt power is used for mixing. 3) The mean grain size and the grain size distribution of the saliferous clay and the salt powder should be very similar to form a useful mortar. 4) The permeability of the mortar samples decreases with increasing clay fraction from 2 10 -12 m 2 to 2 10 -14 m 2 . The investigated samples, however, were large and dried at 100degC. 5) The uniaxial compressive strength of the clay mortar equals, at an average, only 4 MPa and decreases clearly with increasing clay fraction. Moist mortar samples did not show any measurable compressive strength. 6) Moistened saliferous clay mortar may show little temporary swelling. (orig./HP)

  7. Hygrothermal behavior for a clay brick wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, R.; Issaadi, N.; Belarbi, R.; El-Meligy, M.; Altahrany, A.

    2018-06-01

    In Egypt, the clay brick is the common building materials which are used. By studying clay brick walls behavior for the heat and moisture transfer, the efficient use of the clay brick can be reached. So, this research studies the hygrothermal transfer in this material by measuring the hygrothermal properties and performing experimental tests for a constructed clay brick wall. We present the model for the hygrothermal transfer in the clay brick which takes the temperature and the vapor pressure as driving potentials. In addition, this research compares the presented model with previous models. By constructing the clay brick wall between two climates chambers with different boundary conditions, we can validate the numerical model and analyze the hygrothermal transfer in the wall. The temperature and relative humidity profiles within the material are measured experimentally and determined numerically. The numerical and experimental results have a good convergence with 3.5% difference. The surface boundary conditions, the ground effect, the infiltration from the closed chambers and the material heterogeneity affects the results. Thermal transfer of the clay brick walls reaches the steady state very rapidly than the moisture transfer. That means the effect of using only the external brick wall in the building in hot climate without increase the thermal resistance for the wall, will add more energy losses in the clay brick walls buildings. Also, the behavior of the wall at the heat and mass transfer calls the three-dimensional analysis for the whole building to reach the real behavior.

  8. Hygrothermal behavior for a clay brick wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allam, R.; Issaadi, N.; Belarbi, R.; El-Meligy, M.; Altahrany, A.

    2018-01-01

    In Egypt, the clay brick is the common building materials which are used. By studying clay brick walls behavior for the heat and moisture transfer, the efficient use of the clay brick can be reached. So, this research studies the hygrothermal transfer in this material by measuring the hygrothermal properties and performing experimental tests for a constructed clay brick wall. We present the model for the hygrothermal transfer in the clay brick which takes the temperature and the vapor pressure as driving potentials. In addition, this research compares the presented model with previous models. By constructing the clay brick wall between two climates chambers with different boundary conditions, we can validate the numerical model and analyze the hygrothermal transfer in the wall. The temperature and relative humidity profiles within the material are measured experimentally and determined numerically. The numerical and experimental results have a good convergence with 3.5% difference. The surface boundary conditions, the ground effect, the infiltration from the closed chambers and the material heterogeneity affects the results. Thermal transfer of the clay brick walls reaches the steady state very rapidly than the moisture transfer. That means the effect of using only the external brick wall in the building in hot climate without increase the thermal resistance for the wall, will add more energy losses in the clay brick walls buildings. Also, the behavior of the wall at the heat and mass transfer calls the three-dimensional analysis for the whole building to reach the real behavior.

  9. Geomechanics of clays for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Come, B.

    1989-01-01

    Clay formations have been studied for many years in the European Community as potential disposal media for radioactive waste. This document brings together results of on-going research about the geomechanical behaviour of natural clay bodies, at normal and elevated temperatures. The work is carried out within the third Community R and D programme on Management and storage of radioactive waste

  10. Quick clay and landslides of clayey soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khaldoun, A.; Moller, P.; Fall, A.; Wegdam, G.; de Leeuw, B.; Méheust, Y.; Fossum, J.O.; Bonn, D.

    2009-01-01

    We study the rheology of quick clay, an unstable soil responsible for many landslides. We show that above a critical stress the material starts flowing abruptly with a very large viscosity decrease caused by the flow. This leads to avalanche behavior that accounts for the instability of quick clay

  11. Synthesis of templated carbons starting from clay and clay-derived zeolites for hydrogen storage applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Musyoka, Nicholas M

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available 57 58 59 60 For Peer Review 1 Synthesis of templated carbons starting from clay and clay-derived zeolites for hydrogen storage applications N. M. Musyoka1*, J. Ren1, H. W. Langmi1, D. E. C. Rogers1, B. C. North1, M. Mathe1 and D. Bessarabov2... clear (filtered) extract of cloisite clay, SNC for zeolite from unfiltered cloisite clay extract and SBC for zeolite from unfiltered South African bentonite clay extract. Furfuryl alcohol (Sigma Aldrich, C5H6O2, 98%) and Ethylene gas were used...

  12. Composite cements containing natural pozzolan and granulated blast furnace slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irassar, E. F.

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available For reasons of market demand and Portland cement production,the manufacture of cements with two or more separately ground additions to produce customized cements is becoming common practice.When pozzolan or slag content in this type of cements is high, however, the initial strength of the resulting product may be adversely impacted. This problem can be minimized by activating one or both of the replacement materials. The present study analyzes the effect of Portland cement additions such as physically activated natural pozzolan(up to 20% and/or granulated blast furnace slag (up to 35% on mortar flexural and compressive strength. The results show that higher strength is attained in ternary than binary cements. Initially (2 and 7 days, the highest compressive strengths are reached by mortars with up to 13% natural pozzolan and 5% slag, whereas at later ages mortars with larger proportions of additions are found to perform best.Debido a las exigencias del mercado y de la producción de cemento Portland, es cada vez más frecuente la elaboración de cementos con dos o más adiciones a partir de la molienda separada de sus constituyentes, dando origen a la formulación de los cementos a medida.Cuando el contenido de adiciones es alto, la utilización de puzolana y escoria en este tipo de cementos presenta la peculiaridad de disminuir la resistencia inicial del cemento resultante. Sin embargo, si algunas o ambas adiciones se activan, este problema puede minimizarse. En este trabajo se analiza la influencia de la incorporación al cemento Portland de puzolana natural (hasta 20% activada físicamente y/o escoria granulada de alto horno (hasta 35% sobre la resistencia a flexión y a compresión de morteros. Los resultados indican que los cementos ternarios presentan un mejor comportamiento resistente que los cementos binarios. Las máximas resistencias a compresión en las primeras edades (2 y 7 díasse alcanzan con hasta 13% de puzolana natural y 5% de

  13. Single clay sheets inside electrospun polymer nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhaohui

    2005-03-01

    Nanofibers were prepared from polymer solution with clay sheets by electrospinning. Plasma etching, as a well controlled process, was used to supply electrically excited gas molecules from a glow discharge. To reveal the structure and arrangement of clay layers in the polymer matrix, plasma etching was used to remove the polymer by controlled gasification to expose the clay sheets due to the difference in reactivity. The shape, flexibility, and orientation of clay sheets were studied by transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Additional quantitative information on size distribution and degree of exfoliation of clay sheets were obtained by analyzing electron micrograph of sample after plasma etching. Samples in various forms including fiber, film and bulk, were thinned by plasma etching. Morphology and dispersion of inorganic fillers were studied by electron microscopy.

  14. Treatment for cracked and permeable Houston clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vipulanandan, C.; Leung, M.

    1991-01-01

    In this study, the treatability of a field clay (obtained from Houston, Texas) and a clay-sand mixture to reduce their hydraulic conductivity was evaluated. Remolded field clay and clay-sand mixture with and without methanol contamination were treated to reduce their hydraulic conductivity by permeating very dilute grout solutions. The concentration of sodium silicate in the grout solution was 8%, while the solid content in the cement grout was 0.3%. The hydraulic conductivity of permeable Houston clay (hydraulic conductivity >10 -5 cm/sec) could be reduced to less than 10 -7 cm/sec (U.S. EPA limit for soil barriers) by permeating with a selected combination of grout solutions

  15. Some Tests on Heather Field Moraine Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mogens B.; Jacobsen, Moust

    This report deals with oedometer tests on three samples of moraine clay from the Heather Field in the English part of the North Sea. The tests have been carried out in the very unelastic apparatus used in Denmark and with special test procedures differing from the ones used elsewhere. In Denmark...... Moraine Clay covers a large part of the surface, and it has therefore been investigated extensively in the field and in the laboratories during the last 25 years. It is to day - from a geotechnical point of view - the best known clay in Denmark. It could therefore be of some interest to compare...... the English North Sea moraine clays with the corresponding Danish Moraine Clays. The Danish test procedures are explained in details and some comments are given in the hope that they may not be banalities all of them....

  16. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundie, P.; McLeod, N.

    1997-01-01

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation

  17. Clay Dispersibility and Soil Friability-Testing the Soil Clay-to-Carbon Saturation Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC...... as a predictor of clay dispersibility and soil friability. Soil was sampled 3 yr in a field varying in clay content (∼100 to ∼220 g kg−1 soil) and grown with different crop rotations. Clay dispersibility was measured after end-over-end shaking of field-moist soil and 1- to 2-mm sized aggregates either air......-dried or rewetted to −100 hPa matric potential. Tensile strength of 1- to 2-, 2- to 4-, 4- to 8-, and 8- to 16-mm air-dried aggregates was calculated from their compressive strength, and soil friability estimated from the strength–volume relation. Crop rotation characteristics gave only minor effects on clay...

  18. Influence of slag chemistry on the hydration of alkali-activated blast-furnace slag — Part II: Effect of Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Haha, M.; Lothenbach, B.; Le Saout, G.; Winnefeld, F.

    2012-01-01

    The hydration and microstructural evolution of three alkali activated slags (AAS) with Al 2 O 3 contents between 7 and 17% wt.% have been investigated. The slags were hydrated in the presence of two different alkaline activators, NaOH and Na 2 SiO 3 ·5H 2 O. The formation of C(-A)–S–H and hydrotalcite was observed in all samples by X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy. Higher Al 2 O 3 content of the slag decreased the Mg/Al ratio of hydrotalcite, increased the Al incorporation in the C(-A)-S-H and led to the formation of strätlingite. Increasing Al 2 O 3 content of the slag slowed down the early hydration and a lower compressive strength during the first days was observed. At 28 days and longer, no significant effects of slag Al 2 O 3 content on the degree of hydration, the volume of the hydrates, the coarse porosity or on the compressive strengths were observed.

  19. Modeling of Hydration, Compressive Strength, and Carbonation of Portland-Limestone Cement (PLC Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Limestone is widely used in the construction industry to produce Portland limestone cement (PLC concrete. Systematic evaluations of hydration kinetics, compressive strength development, and carbonation resistance are crucial for the rational use of limestone. This study presents a hydration-based model for evaluating the influences of limestone on the strength and carbonation of concrete. First, the hydration model analyzes the dilution effect and the nucleation effect of limestone during the hydration of cement. The degree of cement hydration is calculated by considering concrete mixing proportions, binder properties, and curing conditions. Second, by using the gel–space ratio, the compressive strength of PLC concrete is evaluated. The interactions among water-to-binder ratio, limestone replacement ratio, and strength development are highlighted. Third, the carbonate material contents and porosity are calculated from the hydration model and are used as input parameters for the carbonation model. By considering concrete microstructures and environmental conditions, the carbon dioxide diffusivity and carbonation depth of PLC concrete are evaluated. The proposed model has been determined to be valid for concrete with various water-to-binder ratios, limestone contents, and curing periods.

  20. Methods and systems for utilizing carbide lime or slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devenney, Martin; Fernandez, Miguel; Chen, Irvin; Calas, Guillaume; Weiss, Michael Joseph; Tester, Chantel Cabrera

    2018-02-27

    Provided herein are methods comprising a) treating a slag solid or carbide lime suspension with an ammonium salt in water to produce an aqueous solution comprising calcium salt, ammonium salt, and solids; b) contacting the aqueous solution with carbon dioxide from an industrial process under one or more precipitation conditions to produce a precipitation material comprising calcium carbonate and a supernatant aqueous solution wherein the precipitation material and the supernatant aqueous solution comprise residual ammonium salt; and c) removing and optionally recovering ammonia and/or ammonium salt using one or more steps of (i) recovering a gas exhaust stream comprising ammonia during the treating and/or the contacting step; (ii) recovering the residual ammonium salt from the supernatant aqueous solution; and (iii) removing and optionally recovering the residual ammonium salt from the precipitation material.