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Sample records for limbic brain inhibition

  1. Methylphenidate attenuates limbic brain inhibition after cocaine-cues exposure in cocaine abusers.

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    Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, G.-J.; Tomasi, D.; Telang, F.; Fowler, J.S.; Pradhan, K.; Jayne, M.; Logan, J.; Goldstein, R.Z.; Alia-Klein, N.; Wong, C.T.

    2010-07-01

    Dopamine (phasic release) is implicated in conditioned responses. Imaging studies in cocaine abusers show decreases in striatal dopamine levels, which we hypothesize may enhance conditioned responses since tonic dopamine levels modulate phasic dopamine release. To test this we assessed the effects of increasing tonic dopamine levels (using oral methylphenidate) on brain activation induced by cocaine-cues in cocaine abusers. Brain metabolism (marker of brain function) was measured with PET and {sup 18}FDG in 24 active cocaine abusers tested four times; twice watching a Neutral video (nature scenes) and twice watching a Cocaine-cues video; each video was preceded once by placebo and once by methylphenidate (20 mg). The Cocaine-cues video increased craving to the same extent with placebo (68%) and with methylphenidate (64%). In contrast, SPM analysis of metabolic images revealed that differences between Neutral versus Cocaine-cues conditions were greater with placebo than methylphenidate; whereas with placebo the Cocaine-cues decreased metabolism (p<0.005) in left limbic regions (insula, orbitofrontal, accumbens) and right parahippocampus, with methylphenidate it only decreased in auditory and visual regions, which also occurred with placebo. Decreases in metabolism in these regions were not associated with craving; in contrast the voxel-wise SPM analysis identified significant correlations with craving in anterior orbitofrontal cortex (p<0.005), amygdala, striatum and middle insula (p<0.05). This suggests that methylphenidate's attenuation of brain reactivity to Cocaine-cues is distinct from that involved in craving. Cocaine-cues decreased metabolism in limbic regions (reflects activity over 30 minutes), which contrasts with activations reported by fMRI studies (reflects activity over 2-5 minutes) that may reflect long-lasting limbic inhibition following activation. Studies to evaluate the clinical significance of methylphenidate's blunting of cue

  2. Methylphenidate attenuates limbic brain inhibition after cocaine-cues exposure in cocaine abusers.

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    Nora D Volkow

    Full Text Available Dopamine (phasic release is implicated in conditioned responses. Imaging studies in cocaine abusers show decreases in striatal dopamine levels, which we hypothesize may enhance conditioned responses since tonic dopamine levels modulate phasic dopamine release. To test this we assessed the effects of increasing tonic dopamine levels (using oral methylphenidate on brain activation induced by cocaine-cues in cocaine abusers. Brain metabolism (marker of brain function was measured with PET and (18FDG in 24 active cocaine abusers tested four times; twice watching a Neutral video (nature scenes and twice watching a Cocaine-cues video; each video was preceded once by placebo and once by methylphenidate (20 mg. The Cocaine-cues video increased craving to the same extent with placebo (68% and with methylphenidate (64%. In contrast, SPM analysis of metabolic images revealed that differences between Neutral versus Cocaine-cues conditions were greater with placebo than methylphenidate; whereas with placebo the Cocaine-cues decreased metabolism (p<0.005 in left limbic regions (insula, orbitofrontal, accumbens and right parahippocampus, with methylphenidate it only decreased in auditory and visual regions, which also occurred with placebo. Decreases in metabolism in these regions were not associated with craving; in contrast the voxel-wise SPM analysis identified significant correlations with craving in anterior orbitofrontal cortex (p<0.005, amygdala, striatum and middle insula (p<0.05. This suggests that methylphenidate's attenuation of brain reactivity to Cocaine-cues is distinct from that involved in craving. Cocaine-cues decreased metabolism in limbic regions (reflects activity over 30 minutes, which contrasts with activations reported by fMRI studies (reflects activity over 2-5 minutes that may reflect long-lasting limbic inhibition following activation. Studies to evaluate the clinical significance of methylphenidate's blunting of cue-induced limbic

  3. Morphological brain measures of cortico-limbic inhibition related to resilience.

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    Gupta, Arpana; Love, Aubrey; Kilpatrick, Lisa A; Labus, Jennifer S; Bhatt, Ravi; Chang, Lin; Tillisch, Kirsten; Naliboff, Bruce; Mayer, Emeran A

    2016-12-28

    Resilience is the ability to adequately adapt and respond to homeostatic perturbations. Although resilience has been associated with positive health outcomes, the neuro-biological basis of resilience is poorly understood. The aim of the study was to identify associations between regional brain morphology and trait resilience with a focus on resilience-related morphological differences in brain regions involved in cortico-limbic inhibition. The relationship between resilience and measures of affect were also investigated. Forty-eight healthy subjects completed structural MRI scans. Self-reported resilience was measured using the Connor and Davidson Resilience Scale. Segmentation and regional parcellation of images was performed to yield a total of 165 regions. Gray matter volume (GMV), cortical thickness, surface area, and mean curvature were calculated for each region. Regression models were used to identify associations between morphology of regions belonging to executive control and emotional arousal brain networks and trait resilience (total and subscales) while controlling for age, sex, and total GMV. Correlations were also conducted between resilience scores and affect scores. Significant associations were found between GM changes in hypothesized brain regions (subparietal sulcus, intraparietal sulcus, amygdala, anterior mid cingulate cortex, and subgenual cingulate cortex) and resilience scores. There were significant positive correlations between resilience and positive affect and negative correlations with negative affect. Resilience was associated with brain morphology of regions involved in cognitive and affective processes related to cortico-limbic inhibition. Brain signatures associated with resilience may be a biomarker of vulnerability to disease. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Oxytocin biotransformation in the rat limbic brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burbach, J.P.H.; Schotman, P.; Kloet, E.R. de

    2006-01-01

    Two peptide fragments of oxytocin were isolated by high-pressure liquid chromatography from digests of oxytocin obtained after exposure to a SPM preparation of the rat limbic brain. The structures of these peptides, being Gln-Asn-Cys(O)x-Pro-Leu-GlyNH2 and Gln-Asn-Cys(-S-S-Cys)-Pro-Leu-GlyNH2, were

  5. Restoring Conscious Arousal During Focal Limbic Seizures with Deep Brain Stimulation.

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    Kundishora, Adam J; Gummadavelli, Abhijeet; Ma, Chanthia; Liu, Mengran; McCafferty, Cian; Schiff, Nicholas D; Willie, Jon T; Gross, Robert E; Gerrard, Jason; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2016-03-03

    Impaired consciousness occurs suddenly and unpredictably in people with epilepsy, markedly worsening quality of life and increasing risk of mortality. Focal seizures with impaired consciousness are the most common form of epilepsy and are refractory to all current medical and surgical therapies in about one-sixth of cases. Restoring consciousness during and following seizures would be potentially transformative for these individuals. Here, we investigate deep brain stimulation to improve level of conscious arousal in a rat model of focal limbic seizures. We found that dual-site stimulation of the central lateral nucleus of the intralaminar thalamus (CL) and the pontine nucleus oralis (PnO) bilaterally during focal limbic seizures restored normal-appearing cortical electrophysiology and markedly improved behavioral arousal. In contrast, single-site bilateral stimulation of CL or PnO alone was insufficient to achieve the same result. These findings support the "network inhibition hypothesis" that focal limbic seizures impair consciousness through widespread inhibition of subcortical arousal. Driving subcortical arousal function would be a novel therapeutic approach to some forms of refractory epilepsy and may be compatible with devices already in use for responsive neurostimulation. Multisite deep brain stimulation of subcortical arousal structures may benefit not only patients with epilepsy but also those with other disorders of consciousness.

  6. Blood-brain barrier changes with kainic acid-induced limbic seizures

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    Zucker, D.K.; Wooten, G.F.; Lothman, E.W.

    1983-02-01

    Rats were treated with kainic acid (KA) i.v. to produce increasingly severe limbic seizures that were monitored with a behavioral rating scale. At various times after the induction of seizures, the animals; blood-brain barriers (B-BB) were studied with alpha-(/sup 14/C)aminoisobutyric acid ((/sup 14/C)AIBA) autoradiography. Using optical density ratios, a coefficient was devised to assess the functional integrity of the B-BB in discrete anatomic regions and to quantitatively compare these measurements among different groups of experimental animals. In animals that exhibited only mild seizures, the B-BB was not different from controls. Animals with severe limbic seizures, however, showed alterations. For as long as 2 h after delivery of KA, the B-BB appeared normal; from 2 to 24 h, the permeability to (/sup 14/C)AIBA was markedly increased throughout the brain, especially in limbic regions; from 24 h to 7 days the B-BB returned to normal except for a small residual change in limbic structures. These findings were confirmed with Evans blue dye studies of the B-BB. A correlation between focal accentuation of B-BB alterations and neuropathologic changes was found. These experiments indicted that recurrent limbic seizures may lead to a breakdown in the B-BB independent of systemic metabolic derangements. Marked focal metabolic and electrical changes, however, occurred in several limbic structures several hours before the blood-brain barrier was altered.

  7. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) exposure could modify the dopaminergic system in several limbic brain regions.

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    Salgado, R; López-Doval, S; Pereiro, N; Lafuente, A

    2016-01-05

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is the most representative of a rising class of persistent organic pollutants perfluorochemicals. In the present study, its neurotoxicity was examined using adult male rats orally treated with 0.5; 1.0; 3.0 and 6.0 mg of PFOS/kg/day for 28 days. At the end of the treatment, the dopamine concentration and its metabolism expressed like the ratio 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC)/dopamine and homovanillic acid (HVA)/dopamine were measured in the amygdala, prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Gene and protein expression of the dopamine receptors D1 and D2 were also determined in these limbic areas. The obtained results suggest that: (1) PFOS can alter the dopamine system by modifying its neuronal activity and/or its D1 and D2 receptors in the studied brain regions; (2) the dopamine concentration and metabolism seem to be more sensitive against PFOS toxicity in the hippocampus than in the other analyzed brain areas; (3) the inhibited gene and protein expression of the D1 receptors induced by PFOS in the amygdala could be related to several changes in the HPA axis activity, and lastly; (4) the observed alterations on the dopamine system induced by PFOS could be a possible neurotoxicity mechanism of PFOS, leading to many neurological diseases.

  8. Gut-brain peptides in corticostriatal-limbic circuitry and alcohol use disorders

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    Chelsea A Vadnie

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Peptides synthesized in endocrine cells in the gastrointestinal tract and neurons are traditionally considered regulators of metabolism, energy intake, and appetite. However, recent work has demonstrated that many of these peptides act on corticostriatal-limbic circuitry and, in turn, regulate addictive behaviors. Given that alcohol is a source of energy and an addictive substance, it is not surprising that increasing evidence supports a role for gut-brain peptides specifically in alcohol use disorders (AUD. In this review, we discuss the effects of several gut-brain peptides on alcohol-related behaviors and the potential mechanisms by which these gut-brain peptides may interfere with alcohol-induced changes in corticostriatal-limbic circuitry. This review provides a summary of current knowledge on gut-brain peptides focusing on five peptides: neurotensin, glucagon-like peptide 1, ghrelin, substance P, and neuropeptide Y. Our review will be helpful to develop novel therapeutic targets for AUD.

  9. Limbic, associative, and motor territories within the targets for deep brain stimulation: potential clinical implications.

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    Sudhyadhom, Atchar; Bova, Frank J; Foote, Kelly D; Rosado, Christian A; Kirsch-Darrow, Lindsey; Okun, Michael S

    2007-07-01

    The use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) has recently been expanding for the treatment of many neurologic disorders such as Parkinson disease, dystonia, essential tremor, Tourette's syndrome, cluster headache, epilepsy, depression, and obsessive compulsive disorder. The target structures for DBS include specific segregated territories within limbic, associative, or motor regions of very small subnuclei. In this review, we summarize current clinical techniques for DBS, the cognitive/mood/motor outcomes, and the relevant neuroanatomy with respect to functional territories within specific brain targets. Future development of new techniques and technology that may include a more direct visualization of "motor" territories within target structures may prove useful for avoiding side effects that may result from stimulation of associative and limbic regions. Alternatively, newer procedures may choose and specifically target non-motor territories for chronic electrical stimulation.

  10. Interactive effects of BDNF Val66Met genotype and trauma on limbic brain anatomy in childhood.

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    Marusak, Hilary A; Kuruvadi, Nisha; Vila, Angela M; Shattuck, David W; Joshi, Shantanu H; Joshi, Anand A; Jella, Pavan K; Thomason, Moriah E

    2016-05-01

    Childhood trauma is a major precipitating factor in psychiatric disease. Emerging data suggest that stress susceptibility is genetically determined, and that risk is mediated by changes in limbic brain circuitry. There is a need to identify markers of disease vulnerability, and it is critical that these markers be investigated in childhood and adolescence, a time when neural networks are particularly malleable and when psychiatric disorders frequently emerge. In this preliminary study, we evaluated whether a common variant in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene (Val66Met; rs6265) interacts with childhood trauma to predict limbic gray matter volume in a sample of 55 youth high in sociodemographic risk. We found trauma-by-BDNF interactions in the right subcallosal area and right hippocampus, wherein BDNF-related gray matter changes were evident in youth without histories of trauma. In youth without trauma exposure, lower hippocampal volume was related to higher symptoms of anxiety. These data provide preliminary evidence for a contribution of a common BDNF gene variant to the neural correlates of childhood trauma among high-risk urban youth. Altered limbic structure in early life may lay the foundation for longer term patterns of neural dysfunction, and hold implications for understanding the psychiatric and psychobiological consequences of traumatic stress on the developing brain.

  11. Methylphenidate and atomoxetine inhibit social play behavior through prefrontal and subcortical limbic mechanisms in rats.

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    Achterberg, E J Marijke; van Kerkhof, Linda W M; Damsteegt, Ruth; Trezza, Viviana; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J

    2015-01-07

    Positive social interactions during the juvenile and adolescent phases of life, in the form of social play behavior, are important for social and cognitive development. However, the neural mechanisms of social play behavior remain incompletely understood. We have previously shown that methylphenidate and atomoxetine, drugs widely used for the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), suppress social play in rats through a noradrenergic mechanism of action. Here, we aimed to identify the neural substrates of the play-suppressant effects of these drugs. Methylphenidate is thought to exert its effects on cognition and emotion through limbic corticostriatal systems. Therefore, methylphenidate was infused into prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortical regions as well as into several subcortical limbic areas implicated in social play. Infusion of methylphenidate into the anterior cingulate cortex, infralimbic cortex, basolateral amygdala, and habenula inhibited social play, but not social exploratory behavior or locomotor activity. Consistent with a noradrenergic mechanism of action of methylphenidate, infusion of the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine into these same regions also reduced social play. Methylphenidate administration into the prelimbic, medial/ventral orbitofrontal, and ventrolateral orbitofrontal cortex, mediodorsal thalamus, or nucleus accumbens shell was ineffective. Our data show that the inhibitory effects of methylphenidate and atomoxetine on social play are mediated through a distributed network of prefrontal and limbic subcortical regions implicated in cognitive control and emotional processes. These findings increase our understanding of the neural underpinnings of this developmentally important social behavior, as well as the mechanism of action of two widely used treatments for ADHD.

  12. Microstructure, length, and connection of limbic tracts in normal human brain development

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    Qiaowen eYu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The cingulum and fornix play an important role in memory, attention, spatial orientation and feeling functions. Both microstructure and length of these limbic tracts can be affected by mental disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, depression, autism, anxiety, and schizophrenia. To date, there has been little systematic characterization of their microstructure, length and functional connectivity in normally developing brains. In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI data from 65 normally developing right-handed subjects from birth to young adulthood was acquired. After cingulate gyrus part of the cingulum (cgc, hippocampal part of the cingulum (cgh and fornix (fx were traced with DTI tractography, absolute and normalized tract lengths and DTI-derived metrics including fractional anisotropy, mean, axial and radial diffusivity were measured for traced limbic tracts. Free water elimination (FWE algorithm was adopted to improve accuracy of the measurements of DTI-derived metrics. The role of these limbic tracts in the functional network at birth and adulthood was explored. We found a logarithmic age-dependent trajectory for FWE-corrected DTI metric changes with fast increase of microstructural integrity from birth to 2-year-old followed by a slow increase to 25-year-old. Normalized tract length of cgc increases with age, while no significant relationship with age was found for normalized tract lengths of cgh and fx. Stronger microstructural integrity on the left side compared to that of right side was found. With integrated DTI and rs-fMRI, the key connectional role of cgc and cgh in the default mode network (DMN was confirmed as early as birth. Systematic characterization of length and DTI metrics after FWE correction of limbic tracts offers insight into their morphological and microstructural developmental trajectories. These trajectories may serve as a normal reference for pediatric patients with

  13. Microstructure, length, and connection of limbic tracts in normal human brain development.

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    Yu, Qiaowen; Peng, Yun; Mishra, Virendra; Ouyang, Austin; Li, Hang; Zhang, Hong; Chen, Min; Liu, Shuwei; Huang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    The cingulum and fornix play an important role in memory, attention, spatial orientation, and feeling functions. Both microstructure and length of these limbic tracts can be affected by mental disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, depression, autism, anxiety, and schizophrenia. To date, there has been little systematic characterization of their microstructure, length, and functional connectivity in normally developing brains. In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) data from 65 normally developing right-handed subjects from birth to young adulthood was acquired. After cingulate gyrus part of the cingulum (cgc), hippocampal part of the cingulum (cgh) and fornix (fx) were traced with DTI tractography, absolute and normalized tract lengths and DTI-derived metrics including fractional anisotropy, mean, axial, and radial diffusivity were measured for traced limbic tracts. Free water elimination (FWE) algorithm was adopted to improve accuracy of the measurements of DTI-derived metrics. The role of these limbic tracts in the functional network at birth and adulthood was explored. We found a logarithmic age-dependent trajectory for FWE-corrected DTI metric changes with fast increase of microstructural integrity from birth to 2 years old followed by a slow increase to 25 years old. Normalized tract length of cgc increases with age, while no significant relationship with age was found for normalized tract lengths of cgh and fx. Stronger microstructural integrity on the left side compared to that of the right side was found. With integrated DTI and rs-fMRI, the key connectional role of cgc and cgh in the default mode network was confirmed as early as birth. Systematic characterization of length and DTI metrics after FWE correction of limbic tracts offers insight into their morphological and microstructural developmental trajectories. These trajectories may serve as a normal reference for pediatric patients with mental

  14. Disruption of TrkB-mediated phospholipase Cgamma signaling inhibits limbic epileptogenesis.

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    He, Xiao Ping; Pan, Enhui; Sciarretta, Carla; Minichiello, Liliana; McNamara, James O

    2010-05-05

    The BDNF receptor, TrkB, is critical to limbic epileptogenesis, but the responsible downstream signaling pathways are unknown. We hypothesized that TrkB-dependent activation of phospholipase Cgamma1 (PLCgamma1) signaling is the key pathway and tested this in trkB(PLC/PLC) mice carrying a mutation (Y816F) that uncouples TrkB from PLCgamma1. Biochemical measures revealed activation of both TrkB and PLCgamma1 in hippocampi in the pilocarpine and kindling models in wild-type mice. PLCgamma1 activation was decreased in hippocampi isolated from trkB(PLC/PLC) compared with control mice. Epileptogenesis assessed by development of kindling was inhibited in trkB(PLC/PLC) compared with control mice. Long-term potentiation of the mossy fiber-CA3 pyramid synapse was impaired in slices of trkB(PLC/PLC) mice. We conclude that TrkB-dependent activation of PLCgamma1 signaling is an important molecular mechanism of limbic epileptogenesis. Elucidating signaling pathways activated by a cell membrane receptor in animal models of CNS disorders promises to reveal novel targets for specific and effective therapeutic intervention.

  15. Acupuncture, the Limbic System, and the Anticorrelated Networks of the Brain

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    Hui, Kathleen K.S.; Marina, Ovidiu; Liu, Jing; Rosen, Bruce R.; Kwong, Kenneth K.

    2013-01-01

    The study of the mechanism of acupuncture action was revolutionized by the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Over the past decade, our fMRI studies of healthy subjects have contributed substantially to elucidating the central effect of acupuncture on the human brain. These studies have shown that acupuncture stimulation, when associated with sensations comprising deqi, evokes deactivation of a limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network, which encompasses the limbic system, as well as activation of somatosensory brain regions. These networks closely match the default mode network and the anti-correlated task-positive network described in the literature. We have also shown that the effect of acupuncture on the brain is integrated at multiple levels, down to the brainstem and cerebellum. Our studies support the hypothesis that the effect of acupuncture on the brain goes beyond the effect of attention on the default mode network or the somatosensory stimulation of acupuncture needling. The amygdala and hypothalamus, in particular, show decreased activation during acupuncture stimulation that is not commonly associated with default mode network activity. At the same time, our research shows that acupuncture stimulation needs to be done carefully, limiting stimulation when the resulting sensations are very strong or when sharp pain is elicited. When acupuncture induced sharp pain, our studies show that the deactivation was attenuated or reversed in direction. Our results suggest that acupuncture mobilizes the functionally anti-correlated networks of the brain to mediate its actions, and that the effect is dependent on the psychophysical response. In this work we also discuss multiple avenues of future research, including the role of neurotransmitters, the effect of different acupuncture techniques, and the potential clinical application of our research findings to disease states including chronic pain, major depression, schizophrenia, autism, and Alzheimer

  16. Lost for emotion words: what motor and limbic brain activity reveals about autism and semantic theory.

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    Moseley, Rachel L; Shtyrov, Yury; Mohr, Bettina; Lombardo, Michael V; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Pulvermüller, Friedemann

    2015-01-01

    Autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are characterised by deficits in understanding and expressing emotions and are frequently accompanied by alexithymia, a difficulty in understanding and expressing emotion words. Words are differentially represented in the brain according to their semantic category and these difficulties in ASC predict reduced activation to emotion-related words in limbic structures crucial for affective processing. Semantic theories view 'emotion actions' as critical for learning the semantic relationship between a word and the emotion it describes, such that emotion words typically activate the cortical motor systems involved in expressing emotion actions such as facial expressions. As ASC are also characterised by motor deficits and atypical brain structure and function in these regions, motor structures would also be expected to show reduced activation during emotion-semantic processing. Here we used event-related fMRI to compare passive processing of emotion words in comparison to abstract verbs and animal names in typically-developing controls and individuals with ASC. Relatively reduced brain activation in ASC for emotion words, but not matched control words, was found in motor areas and cingulate cortex specifically. The degree of activation evoked by emotion words in the motor system was also associated with the extent of autistic traits as revealed by the Autism Spectrum Quotient. We suggest that hypoactivation of motor and limbic regions for emotion word processing may underlie difficulties in processing emotional language in ASC. The role that sensorimotor systems and their connections might play in the affective and social-communication difficulties in ASC is discussed.

  17. Inhibition and Brain Work

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    Buzsáki, György; Kaila, Kai; Raichle, Marcus

    2007-01-01

    The major part of the brain’s energy budget (~60%–80%) is devoted to its communication activities. While inhibition is critical to brain function, relatively little attention has been paid to its metabolic costs. Understanding how inhibitory interneurons contribute to brain energy consumption (brain work) is not only of interest in understanding a fundamental aspect of brain function but also in understanding functional brain imaging techniques which rely on measurements related to blood flow...

  18. Loss of Microstructural Integrity in the Limbic-Subcortical Networks for Acute Symptomatic Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Yanan Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies reported discrepant white matter diffusivity in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI on the base of Glasgow Coma Scale, which are unreliable for some TBI severity indicators and the frequency of missing documentation in the medical record. In the present study, we adopted the Mayo classification system for TBI severity. In this system, the mTBI is also divided into two groups as “probable and symptomatic” TBI. We aimed to investigate altered microstructural integrity in symptomatic acute TBI (<1 week by using tract-based spatial statics (TBSS approach. A total of 12 patients and 13 healthy volunteers were involved and underwent MRI scans including conventional scan, and SWI and DTI. All the patients had no visible lesions by using conventional and SWI neuroimaging techniques, while showing widespread declines in the fractional anisotropy (FA of gray matter and white matter throughout the TBSS skeleton, particularly in the limbic-subcortical structures. By contrast, symptomatic TBI patients showed no significant enhanced changes in FA compared to the healthy controls. A better understanding of the acute changes occurring following symptomatic TBI may increase our understanding of neuroplasticity and continuing degenerative change, which, in turn, may facilitate advances in management and intervention.

  19. Mild traumatic brain injury with social defeat stress alters anxiety, contextual fear extinction, and limbic monoamines in adult rats

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    Daniel eDavies

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI produces symptoms similar to those typifying posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in humans. We sought to determine whether a rodent model of stress concurrent with mTBI produces characteristics of PTSD such as impaired contextual fear extinction, while also examining concurrent alterations to limbic monoamine activity in brain regions relevant to fear and anxiety states. Male rats were exposed to social stress or control conditions immediately prior to mTBI induction, and 6 days later were tested either for anxiety-like behavior using the elevated plus maze (EPM, or for contextual fear conditioning and extinction. Brains were collected 24 hr after EPM testing, and tissue from various limbic regions analyzed for content of monoamines, their precursors and metabolites using HPLC with electrochemical detection. Either social defeat or mTBI alone decreased time spent in open arms of the EPM, indicating greater anxiety-like behavior. However, this effect was enhanced by the combination of treatments. Further, rats exposed to both social defeat and mTBI exhibited greater freezing within extinction sessions compared to all other groups, suggesting impaired contextual fear extinction. Social defeat combined with mTBI also had greater effects on limbic monoamines than either insult alone, particularly with respect to serotonergic effects associated with anxiety and fear learning. The results suggest social stress concurrent with mTBI produces provides a relevant animal model for studying the prevention and treatment of post-concussive psychobiological outcomes.

  20. Disruption of TrkB-mediated PLCγ signaling inhibits limbic epileptogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    He, XP; Pan, E; C. Sciarretta; Minichiello, L.; McNamara, JO

    2010-01-01

    The BDNF receptor, TrkB, is critical to limbic epileptogenesis, but the responsible downstream signaling pathways are unknown. We hypothesized that TrkB-dependent activation of PLCγ1 signaling is the key pathway and tested this in trkBPLC/PLC mice carrying a mutation (Y816F) that uncouples TrkB from PLCγ1. Biochemical measures revealed activation of both TrkB and PLCγ1 in hippocampi in the pilocarpine and kindling models in WT mice. PLCγ1 activation was decreased in hippocampi isolated from t...

  1. The Limbic Degradation of Aging Brain: A Quantitative Analysis with Diffusion Tensor Imaging

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    Hediye Pınar Gunbey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The limbic system primarily responsible for our emotional life and memories is known to undergo degradation with aging and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI is capable of revealing the white matter integrity. The aim of this study is to investigate age-related changes of quantitative diffusivity parameters and fiber characteristics on limbic system in healthy volunteers. Methods. 31 healthy subjects aged 25–70 years were examined at 1,5 TMR. Quantitative fiber tracking was performed of fornix, cingulum, and the parahippocampal gyrus. The fractional anisotropy (FA and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC measurements of bilateral hippocampus, amygdala, fornix, cingulum, and parahippocampal gyrus were obtained as related components. Results. The FA values of left hippocampus, bilateral parahippocampal gyrus, and fornix showed negative correlations with aging. The ADC values of right amygdala and left cingulum interestingly showed negative relation and the left hippocampus represented positive relation with age. The cingulum showed no correlation. The significant relative changes per decade of age were found in the cingulum and parahippocampal gyrus FA measurements. Conclusion. Our approach shows that aging affects hippocampus, parahippocampus, and fornix significantly but not cingulum. These findings reveal age-related changes of limbic system in normal population that may contribute to future DTI studies.

  2. Pre-frontal control of closed-loop limbic neurostimulation by rodents using a brain-computer interface

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    Widge, Alik S.; Moritz, Chet T.

    2014-04-01

    Objective. There is great interest in closed-loop neurostimulators that sense and respond to a patient's brain state. Such systems may have value for neurological and psychiatric illnesses where symptoms have high intraday variability. Animal models of closed-loop stimulators would aid preclinical testing. We therefore sought to demonstrate that rodents can directly control a closed-loop limbic neurostimulator via a brain-computer interface (BCI). Approach. We trained rats to use an auditory BCI controlled by single units in prefrontal cortex (PFC). The BCI controlled electrical stimulation in the medial forebrain bundle, a limbic structure involved in reward-seeking. Rigorous offline analyses were performed to confirm volitional control of the neurostimulator. Main results. All animals successfully learned to use the BCI and neurostimulator, with closed-loop control of this challenging task demonstrated at 80% of PFC recording locations. Analysis across sessions and animals confirmed statistically robust BCI control and specific, rapid modulation of PFC activity. Significance. Our results provide a preliminary demonstration of a method for emotion-regulating closed-loop neurostimulation. They further suggest that activity in PFC can be used to control a BCI without pre-training on a predicate task. This offers the potential for BCI-based treatments in refractory neurological and mental illness.

  3. Increased receptor density of α2 adrenoceptors and GABAA α5 receptors in limbic brain regions in the domoic acid rat model of epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Majken; Lillethorup, Thea Pinholt; Wegener, Gregers

    , fresh frozen and cut into 20 µM thick slices. Autoradiography was performed using tracers of the α5 subtype of the GABAA receptor ([11C]Ro15-4513) and the α2 adrenoceptors ([3H]RX821002) to determine the binding in limbic brain regions. Results: The binding of postsynaptic GABA receptors...

  4. Violence, mental illness, and the brain – A brief history of psychosurgery: Part 2 – From the limbic system and cingulotomy to deep brain stimulation

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    Faria, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of neuroscience flourished during and in the wake of the era of frontal lobotomy, as a byproduct of psychosurgery in the late 1930s and 1940s, revealing fascinating neural pathways and neurophysiologic mechanisms of the limbic system for the formulation of emotions, memory, and human behavior. The creation of the Klüver-Bucy syndrome in monkeys opened new horizons in the pursuit of knowledge in human behavior and neuropathology. In the 1950s specialized functional neurosurgery was developed in association with stereotactic neurosurgery; deep brain electrodes were implanted for more precise recording of brain electrical activity in the evaluation and treatment of intractable mental disorders, including schizophrenia, “pathologic aggression,” and psychomotor seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy. Psychosurgical procedures involved deep brain stimulation of the limbic system, as well as ablative procedures, such as cingulotomy and thalamotomy. The history of these developments up to the 21st century will continue in this three-part essay-editorial, exclusively researched and written for the readers of Surgical Neurology International. PMID:23776761

  5. Violence, mental illness, and the brain - A brief history of psychosurgery: Part 2 - From the limbic system and cingulotomy to deep brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge of neuroscience flourished during and in the wake of the era of frontal lobotomy, as a byproduct of psychosurgery in the late 1930s and 1940s, revealing fascinating neural pathways and neurophysiologic mechanisms of the limbic system for the formulation of emotions, memory, and human behavior. The creation of the Klüver-Bucy syndrome in monkeys opened new horizons in the pursuit of knowledge in human behavior and neuropathology. In the 1950s specialized functional neurosurgery was developed in association with stereotactic neurosurgery; deep brain electrodes were implanted for more precise recording of brain electrical activity in the evaluation and treatment of intractable mental disorders, including schizophrenia, "pathologic aggression," and psychomotor seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy. Psychosurgical procedures involved deep brain stimulation of the limbic system, as well as ablative procedures, such as cingulotomy and thalamotomy. The history of these developments up to the 21(st) century will continue in this three-part essay-editorial, exclusively researched and written for the readers of Surgical Neurology International.

  6. Increased Functional Activation of Limbic Brain Regions During Negative Emotional Processing in Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Louise Wilcox

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Pain is both an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience. This is highly relevant in migraine where cortical hyperexcitability in response to sensory stimuli (including pain, light and sound has been extensively reported. However, migraine may feature a more general enhanced response to aversive stimuli rather than being sensory-specific. To this end we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to assess neural activation in migraineurs interictaly in response to emotional visual stimuli from the International Affective Picture System. Migraineurs, compared to healthy controls, demonstrated increased neural activity in response to negative emotional stimuli. Most notably in regions overlapping in their involvement in both nociceptive and emotional processing including the posterior cingulate, caudate, amygdala and thalamus (cluster corrected, p<0.01. In contrast, migraineurs and healthy controls displayed no and minimal differences in response to positive and neutral emotional stimuli, respectively. These findings support the notion that migraine may feature more generalized altered cerebral processing of aversive/negative stimuli, rather than exclusively to sensory stimuli. A generalized hypersensitivity to aversive stimuli may be an inherent feature of migraine, or a consequential alteration developed over the duration of the disease. This proposed cortical-limbic hypersensitivity may form an important part of the migraine pathophysiology, including psychological comorbidity, and may represent an innate sensitivity to aversive stimuli that underpins attack triggers, attack persistence and (potentially gradual headache chronification.

  7. Divergent projections of catecholaminergic neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract to limbic forebrain and medullary autonomic brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Beverly A S; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J

    2006-10-30

    The nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) is a critical structure involved in coordinating autonomic and visceral activities. Previous independent studies have demonstrated efferent projections from the NTS to the nucleus paragigantocellularis (PGi) and the central nucleus of the amygdala (CNA) in rat brain. To further characterize the neural circuitry originating from the NTS with postsynaptic targets in the amygdala and medullary autonomic targets, distinct green or red fluorescent latex microspheres were injected into the PGi and the CNA, respectively, of the same rat. Thirty-micron thick tissue sections through the lower brainstem and forebrain were collected. Every fourth section through the NTS region was processed for immunocytochemical detection of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), a marker of catecholaminergic neurons. Retrogradely labeled neurons from the PGi or CNA were distributed throughout the rostro-caudal segments of the NTS. However, the majority of neurons containing both retrograde tracers were distributed within the caudal third of the NTS. Cell counts revealed that approximately 27% of neurons projecting to the CNA in the NTS sent collateralized projections to the PGi while approximately 16% of neurons projecting to the PGi sent collateralized projections to the CNA. Interestingly, more than half of the PGi and CNA-projecting neurons in the NTS expressed TH immunoreactivity. These data indicate that catecholaminergic neurons in the NTS are poised to simultaneously coordinate activities in limbic and medullary autonomic brain regions.

  8. Perinatal complications and reduced size of brain limbic structures in familial schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLisi, L E; Dauphinais, I D; Gershon, E S

    1988-01-01

    Both genetic and nongenetic risk factors for schizophrenia have been described. Specifically, perinatal complications have been suggested as a factor in the later development of schizophrenia. These appear to be increased among schizophrenic patients with a clear genetic vulnerability for illness. While reduced brain tissue localized to the temporal lobe is also present in these individuals, it is unknown whether brain structural differences are a consequence of perinatal insults to the developing brain. Initial analyses on magnetic resonance imaging scans from siblings with schizophrenia are presented in an attempt to examine this issue.

  9. Development of the glucocorticoid receptor system in the rat limbic brain. 2. An autoradiographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meaney, M.J.; Sapolsky, R.M.; McEwen, B.S. (Rockefeller Univ., New York (USA))

    1985-02-01

    The authors report the results of an autoradiographic analysis of the postnatal development of the hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor system in the rat brain. Quantitative analysis of the autoradiograms revealed a varied pattern of gradual development towards adult receptor concentrations during the second week of life. Receptor concentrations in the dentate gyrus increased dramatically between Days 9 and 15, while the changes during this period in the pyramidal layers of Ammon's horn seemed to reflect both structural changes in these regions as well as increases in receptor concentrations.

  10. A Sliding Mode Control Using Brain Limbic System Control Strategy for a Robotic Manipulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hak Yi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a robust bio-inspired sliding mode control approach, designed to achieve a favourable tracking performance in a class of robotic manipulators with uncertainties. To this end, brain emotional learning-based intelligent control (BELBIC is applied, to adaptively adjust the control input law in the sliding mode control. The combined form provides an adjustment of the control input law that effectively alleviates the chattering effects of the sliding mode control. Specifically, the online parameters computed from the parameter uncertainties and external disturbances help to improve the system robustness. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed bio-inspired control strategy is very successful at tracking the given trajectories with less chattering, as compared to both the conventional and fuzzy sling mode control schemes.

  11. Fronto-Limbic Brain Dysfunction during the Regulation of Emotion in Schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun M Eack

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is characterized by significant and widespread impairments in the regulation of emotion. Evidence is only recently emerging regarding the neural basis of these emotion regulation impairments, and few studies have focused on the regulation of emotion during effortful cognitive processing. To examine the neural correlates of deficits in effortful emotion regulation, schizophrenia outpatients (N = 20 and age- and gender-matched healthy volunteers (N = 20 completed an emotional faces n-back task to assess the voluntary attentional control subprocess of emotion regulation during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Behavioral measures of emotional intelligence and emotion perception were administered to examine brain-behavior relationships with emotion processing outcomes. Results indicated that patients with schizophrenia demonstrated significantly greater activation in the bilateral striatum, ventromedial prefrontal, and right orbitofrontal cortices during the effortful regulation of positive emotional stimuli, and reduced activity in these same regions when regulating negative emotional information. The opposite pattern of results was observed in healthy individuals. Greater fronto-striatal response to positive emotional distractors was significantly associated with deficits in facial emotion recognition. These findings indicate that abnormalities in striatal and prefrontal cortical systems may be related to deficits in the effortful emotion regulatory process of attentional control in schizophrenia, and may significantly contribute to emotion processing deficits in the disorder.

  12. Differential changes of metabolic brain activity and interregional functional coupling in prefronto-limbic pathways during different stress conditions: Functional imaging in freely behaving rodent pups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joerg eBock

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The trumpet-tailed rat or degu (Octodon degus is an established model to investigate the consequences of early stress on the development of emotional brain circuits and behaviour. The aim of this study was to identify brain circuits, that respond to different stress conditions and to test if acute stress alters functional coupling of brain activity among prefrontal and limbic regions. Using functional imaging (2-Fluoro-deoxyglucose method in 8 day old male degu pups the following stress conditions were compared: (A pups together with parents and siblings (control, (B separation of the litter from the parents, (C individual separation from parents and siblings, (D individual separation and presentation of maternal calls. Condition (B significantly downregulated brain activity in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, nucleus accumbens and sensory areas compared to controls. Activity decrease was even more pronounced during condition (C, where, in contrast to all other regions, activity in the PAG was increased. Interestingly, brain activity in stress-associated brain regions such as the amygdala and habenula was not affected. In condition (D maternal vocalizations reactivated brain activity in the cingulate and precentral medial cortex, nucleus accumbens and striatum and in sensory areas. In contrast, reduced activity was measured in the prelimbic and infralimbic cortex and in the hippocampus and amygdala. Correlation analysis revealed complex, region- and situation-specific changes of interregional functional coupling among prefrontal and limbic brain regions during stress exposure. We show here for the first time that early life stress results in a widespread reduction of brain activity in the infant brain and changes interregional functional coupling. Moreover, maternal vocalizations can partly buffer stress-induced decrease in brain activity in some regions and evoked very different functional coupling patterns compared to the three other

  13. Cognitive control of drug craving inhibits brain reward regions in cocaine abusers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.; Wang, G.J.; Telang, F.; Logan, J.; Jayne, M.; Ma, Y.; Pradhan, K.; Wong, C.T.; Swanson, J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Loss of control over drug taking is considered a hallmark of addiction and is critical in relapse. Dysfunction of frontal brain regions involved with inhibitory control may underlie this behavior. We evaluated whether addicted subjects when instructed to purposefully control their craving responses to drug-conditioned stimuli can inhibit limbic brain regions implicated in drug craving. We used PET and 2-deoxy-2[18F]fluoro-D-glucose to measure brain glucose metabolism (marker of brain function) in 24 cocaine abusers who watched a cocaine-cue video and compared brain activation with and without instructions to cognitively inhibit craving. A third scan was obtained at baseline (without video). Statistical parametric mapping was used for analysis and corroborated with regions of interest. The cocaine-cue video increased craving during the no-inhibition condition (pre 3 {+-} 3, post 6 {+-} 3; p < 0.001) but not when subjects were instructed to inhibit craving (pre 3 {+-} 2, post 3 {+-} 3). Comparisons with baseline showed visual activation for both cocaine-cue conditions and limbic inhibition (accumbens, orbitofrontal, insula, cingulate) when subjects purposefully inhibited craving (p < 0.001). Comparison between cocaine-cue conditions showed lower metabolism with cognitive inhibition in right orbitofrontal cortex and right accumbens (p < 0.005), which was associated with right inferior frontal activation (r = -0.62, p < 0.005). Decreases in metabolism in brain regions that process the predictive (nucleus accumbens) and motivational value (orbitofrontal cortex) of drug-conditioned stimuli were elicited by instruction to inhibit cue-induced craving. This suggests that cocaine abusers may retain some ability to inhibit craving and that strengthening fronto-accumbal regulation may be therapeutically beneficial in addiction.

  14. Psychosurgery and the limbic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Desmond

    1973-01-01

    The limbic system can be considered to consist of a central ‘core’ from which three well-defined circuits emerge. These are the Papez or medial circuit, the basolateral circuit and the defence reaction circuit. The functions of the primitive limbic brain are modulated by a higher order control—the frontal lobe. Emotional responses and physiological changes have been obtained by stimulation of fronto-limbic pathways and limbic circuits and these have been used for location of target sites in psychosurgery. For the relief of intractable depression and anxiety, lesions are generally made in the lower medial quadrant or posteroorbital part of the frontal lobe, where there is a concentration of fronto-limbic connections. In primary obsessional neurosis lesions at this site produce less satisfactory results, but these illnesses may be helped by lesions in the cingulate gyrus, which is part of the Papez circuit. Patients with epilepsy and aggressive outbursts may respond to temporal lobotomy, or to operations, such as amygdalotomy, where lesions are placed in the defence reaction circuit. PMID:4618902

  15. Limbic brain responses in mothers with post-traumatic stress disorder and comorbid dissociation to video clips of their children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Dominik Andreas; Aue, Tatjana; Wang, Zhishun; Rusconi Serpa, Sandra; Favez, Nicolas; Peterson, Bradley Scott; Schechter, Daniel Scott

    2013-09-01

    Maternal dissociative symptoms which can be comorbid with interpersonal violence-related post-traumatic stress disorder (IPV-PTSD) have been linked to decreased sensitivity and responsiveness to children's emotional communication. This study examined the influence of dissociation on neural activation independently of IPV-PTSD symptom severity when mothers watch video-stimuli of their children during stressful and non-stressful mother-child interactions. Based on previous observations in related fields, we hypothesized that more severe comorbid dissociation in IPV-PTSD would be associated with lower limbic system activation and greater neural activity in regions of the emotion regulation circuit such as the medial prefrontal cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). Twenty mothers (of children aged 12-42 months), with and without IPV-PTSD watched epochs showing their child during separation and play while undergoing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Multiple regression indicated that when mothers diagnosed with IPV-PTSD watched their children during separation compared to play, dissociative symptom severity was indeed linked to lowered activation within the limbic system, while greater IPV-PTSD symptom severity was associated with heightened limbic activity. Concerning emotion regulation areas, there was activation associated to dissociation in the right dlPFC. Our results are likely a neural correlate of affected mothers' reduced capacity for sensitive responsiveness to their young child following exposure to interpersonal stress, situations that are common in day-to-day parenting.

  16. Low-frequency stimulation inhibits epileptogenesis by modulating the early network of the limbic system as evaluated in amygdala kindling model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Xu, Zhenghao; Cheng, Hui; Guo, Yi; Xu, Cenglin; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Jianmin; Ding, Meiping; Chen, Zhong

    2014-09-01

    Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) is emerging as a new option for the treatment of epilepsy. The present study was designed to determine whether there is a crucial period for the treatment of epileptogenesis with LFS. LFS was delivered at different time-points to evaluate its anti-epileptogenic effect on amygdala-kindling rats. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose small-animal positron-emission tomography (microPET) and multi-channel EEG recording (MER) were used to investigate the dynamics of brain networks during epileptogenesis and LFS treatment. Interestingly, LFS delivered in the first 7 days significantly retarded the progression of behavioral seizure stages and shortened the afterdischarge duration (ADD), LFS delivered throughout the whole process resulted in similar effects. However, if LFS was delivered at the beginning of seizure stage 2 or 3 (5 ± 0.3 days during kindling acquisition), it had no anti-epileptogenic effect and even prolonged the ADD and enhanced synchronization of the EEGs. MicroPET study revealed a notable hypometabolism in the amygdala, piriform cortex, entorhinal cortex and other regions in the limbic system during the period from seizure stage 0 to stage 2 or 3. The glucose metabolism in those regions was specifically increased by LFS. MER further verified that an early network of afterdischarge spread was formed in those brain regions during kindling acquisition. Thus, we provided direct evidence that modulation of the early network in the limbic system is crucial for the anti-epileptogenic effect of LFS in amygdaloid-kindling rats.

  17. GABA concentration and GABAergic neuron populations in limbic areas are differentially altered by brain serotonin deficiency in Tph2 knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waider, Jonas; Proft, Florian; Langlhofer, Georg; Asan, Esther; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Gutknecht, Lise

    2013-02-01

    While tryptophan hydroxylase-2 (Tph2) null mutant (Tph2(-/-)) mice are completely deficient in brain serotonin (5-HT) synthesis, the formation of serotonergic neurons and pathfinding of their projections are not impaired. However, 5-HT deficiency, during development and in the adult, might affect morphological and functional parameters of other neural systems. To assess the influence of 5-HT deficiency on γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) systems, we carried out measurements of GABA concentrations in limbic brain regions of adult male wildtype (wt), heterozygous (Tph2(+/-)) and Tph2(-/-) mice. In addition, unbiased stereological estimation of GABAergic interneuron numbers and density was performed in subregions of amygdala and hippocampus. Amygdala and prefrontal cortex displayed significantly increased and decreased GABA concentrations, respectively, exclusively in Tph2(+/-) mice while no changes were detected between Tph2(-/-) and wt mice. In contrast, in the hippocampus, increased GABA concentrations were found in Tph2(-/-) mice. While total cell density in the anterior basolateral amygdala did not differ between genotypes, the number and density of the GABAergic interneurons were significantly decreased in Tph2(-/-) mice, with the group of parvalbumin (PV)-immunoreactive (ir) interneurons contributing somewhat less to the decrease than that of non-PV-ir GABAergic interneurons. Major morphological changes were also absent in the dorsal hippocampus, and only a trend toward reduced density of PV-ir cells was observed in the CA3 region of Tph2(-/-) mice. Our findings are the first to document that life-long reduction or complete lack of brain 5-HT transmission causes differential changes of GABA systems in limbic regions which are key players in emotional learning and memory processes. The changes likely reflect a combination of developmental alterations and functional adaptations of emotion circuits to balance the lack of 5-HT, and may underlie altered emotional

  18. Oxytocin biotransformation in the rat limbic brain: Characterization of peptidase activities and significance in the formation of oxytocin fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burbach, J.P.H.; Kloet, E.R. de; Wied, D. de

    1980-01-01

    The enzymatic conversion of oxytocin by brain peptidases has been studied. Oxytocin was incubated with synaptosomal plasma membranes (SPM) isolated from the rat brain. Qualitative studies using a microdansylation technique revealed two types of oxytocin converting peptidases, e.g. aminopeptidase and

  19. Differences in frontal and limbic brain activation in a small sample of monozygotic twin pairs discordant for severe stressful life events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Detre A. Godinez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Monozygotic twin pairs provide a valuable opportunity to control for genetic and shared environmental influences while studying the effects of nonshared environmental influences. The question we address with this design is whether monozygotic twins selected for discordance in exposure to severe stressful life events during development (before age 18 demonstrate differences in brain activation during performance of an emotional word-face Stroop task. In this study, functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess brain activation in eighteen young adult twins who were discordant in exposure to severe stress such that one twin had two or more severe events compared to their control co-twin who had no severe events. Twins who experienced higher levels of stress during development, compared to their control co-twins with lower stress, exhibited significant clusters of greater activation in the ventrolateral and medial prefrontal cortex, basal ganglia, and limbic regions. The control co-twins showed only the more typical recruitment of frontoparietal regions thought to be important for executive control of attention and maintenance of task goals. Behavioral performance was not significantly different between twins within pairs, suggesting the twins with stress recruited additional neural resources associated with affective processing and updating working memory when performing at the same level. This study provides a powerful glimpse at the potential effects of stress during development while accounting for shared genetic and environmental influences.

  20. Systemic injection of kainic acid: Gliosis in olfactory and limbic brain regions quantified with ( sup 3 H)PK 11195 binding autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altar, C.A.; Baudry, M. (Genentech, Inc., South San Francisco, CA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases may result from excessive stimulation of excitatory amino acid receptors by endogenous ligands. Because neuronal degeneration is associated with glial proliferation and hypertrophy, the degenerative changes throughout rat brain following the systemic administration of kainic acid (12 mg/kg) were mapped with quantitative autoradiography of (3H)PK 11195. This radioligand binds to a mitochondrial benzodiazepine binding site (MBBS) on microglia and astrocytes. Analysis of eight horizontal and four coronal brain levels revealed up to 16-fold increases in (3H)PK 11195 binding from 1 to 5 weeks but not 1 day after kainate injection. Increases in (3H)PK 11195 binding were predominantly in ventral limbic brain regions and olfactory projections to neocortical areas, with the olfactory cortex greater than subiculum/CA1 greater than anterior olfactory nucleus, medial thalamic nucleus, and piriform cortex greater than cingulate cortex and rostral hippocampus greater than dentate gyrus, septum, and amygdala greater than entorhinal cortex and temporal cortex. Little or no enhancement of (3H)PK 11195 binding was observed in numerous regions including the caudate-putamen, substantia nigra, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, cerebellum, thalamic nuclei, choroid plexus, medulla, parietal or occipital cortex, or pons. A 2-fold greater extent of neurodegeneration was obtained in ventral portions of the olfactory bulb, entorhinal cortex, temporal cortex, and dentate gyrus compared with the dorsal portions of these structures. The pattern of increase in (3H)PK 11195 binding closely matched the patterns of neuronal degeneration reported following parenteral kainate injection. These findings strengthen the notion that quantitative autoradiography of (3H)PK 11195 is a valuable tool to quantify the extent of neuronal degeneration.

  1. Limbic structures and networks in children and adolescents with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Tonya; Cullen, Kathryn; Rohrer, Lisa Michelle; Karatekin, Canan; Luciana, Monica; Schmidt, Marcus; Hongwanishkul, Donaya; Kumra, Sanjiv; Charles Schulz, S; Lim, Kelvin O

    2008-01-01

    Studies of adults with schizophrenia provide converging evidence for abnormalities in the limbic system. Limbic structures that show consistent patient/control differences in both postmortem and neuroimaging studies include the anterior cingulate and hippocampus, although differences in the amygdala, parahippocampal gyrus, and fornix have also been observed. Studies of white matter in children and adolescents with schizophrenia tend to show findings that are more focal than those seen in adults. Interestingly, these focal abnormalities in early-onset schizophrenia tend to be more localized to limbic regions. While it is unclear if these early limbic abnormalities are primary in the etiology of schizophrenia, there is evidence that supports a developmental progression with early limbic abnormalities evolving over time to match the neuroimaging profiles seen in adults with schizophrenia. Alternatively, the aberrations in limbic structures may be secondary to a more widespread or global pathological processes occurring with the brain that disrupt neural transmission. The goal of this article is to provide a review of the limbic system and limbic network abnormalities reported in children and adolescents with schizophrenia. These findings are compared with the adult literature and placed within a developmental context. These observations from neuroimaging studies enrich our current understanding of the neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia and raise further questions about primary vs secondary processes. Additional research within a developmental framework is necessary to determine the putative etiologic roles for limbic and other brain abnormalities in early-onset schizophrenia.

  2. Amygdala kindling disrupts trace and delay fear conditioning with parallel changes in Fos protein expression throughout the limbic brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botterill, J J; Fournier, N M; Guskjolen, A J; Lussier, A L; Marks, W N; Kalynchuk, L E

    2014-04-18

    Amygdala kindling is well known to increase unconditioned fear and anxiety. However, relatively little is known about whether this form of kindling causes functional changes within the neural circuitry that mediates fear learning and the retrieval of fear memories. To address this issue, we examined the effect of short- (i.e., 30 stimulations) and long-term (i.e., 99 stimulations) amygdala kindling in rats on trace and delay fear conditioning, which are aversive learning tasks that rely predominantly on the hippocampus and amygdala, respectively. After memory retrieval, we analyzed the pattern of neural activity with Fos, the protein product of the immediate early gene c-fos. We found that kindling had no effect on acquisition of the trace fear conditioning task but it did selectively impair retrieval of this fear memory. In contrast, kindling disrupted both acquisition and retrieval of fear memory in the delay fear conditioning task. We also found that kindling-induced impairments in memory retrieval were accompanied by decreased Fos expression in several subregions of the hippocampus, parahippocampus, and amygdala. Interestingly, decreased freezing in the trace conditioning task was significantly correlated with dampened Fos expression in hippocampal and parahippocampal regions whereas decreased freezing in the delay conditioning task was significantly correlated with dampened Fos expression in hippocampal, parahippocampal, and amygdaloid circuits. Overall, these results suggest that amygdala kindling promotes functional changes in brain regions involved in specific types of fear learning and memory. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Limbic system (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... structures which govern emotions and behavior. The limbic system, and in particular the hippocampus and amygdala, is involved in the formation of long-term memory, and is closely associated with the olfactory structures (having to do with the sense of ...

  4. Brain hyaluronan binding protein inhibits tumor growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高锋; 曹曼林; 王蕾

    2004-01-01

    Background Great efforts have been made to search for the angiogenic inhibitors in avascular tissues. Several proteins isolated from cartilage have been proved to have anti-angiogenic or anti-tumour effects. Because cartilage contains a great amount of hyaluronic acid (HA) oligosaccharides and abundant HA binding proteins (HABP), therefore, we speculated that HABP might be one of the factors regulating vascularization in cartilage or anti-angiogenesis in tumours. The purpose of this research was to evaluale the effects of hyaluronan binding protein on inhibiting tumour growth both in vivo and vitro. Methods A unique protein termed human brain hyaluronan (HA) binding protein (b-HABP) was cloned from human brain cDNA library. MDA-435 human breast cancer cell line was chosen as a transfectant. The in vitro underlying mechanisms were investigated by determining the possibilities of MDA-435/b-HABP colony formation on soft agar, the effects of the transfectant on the proliferation of endothelial cells and the expression levels of caspase 3 and FasL from MDA-435/b-HABP. The in vivo study included tumour growth on the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) of chicken embryos and nude mice. Results Colony formation assay revealed that the colonies formed by MDA-435/b-HABP were greatly reduced compared to mock transfectants. The conditioned media from MDA-435/b-HABP inhibited the growth of endothelial cells in culture. Caspase 3 and FasL expressions were induced by MDA-435/b-HABP. The size of tumours of MDA-435/b-HABP in both CAM and nude mice was much smaller than that of MDA-435 alone. Conclusions Human brain hyaluronan binding protein (b-HABP) may represent a new kind of naturally existing anti-tumour substance. This brain-derived glycoprotein may block tumour growth by inducing apoptosis of cancer cells or by decreasing angiogenesis in tumour tissue via inhibiting proliferation of endothelial cells.

  5. Progressive limbic encephalopathy: Problems and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadanandavalli Retnaswami Chandra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It was observed that a good number of patients presenting with psychiatric manifestations when investigated later because of unresponsiveness to treatment or late development of organic features turned out to be treatable limbic syndromes. Introduction: The aim of this study is to assess the patients presenting with new onset neuropsychiatric symptoms satisfying the criteria for probable limbic encephalitis. Patients and Methods: Patients referred to neurology department following a period of treatment for neuropsychiatric symptoms, which did not respond to conventional treatment were analyzed using Electroencephalography (EEG, magnetic resonance imaging, cerebrospinal fluid, screening for malignancy Vasculitic work-up, histopathology and autoantibody done when feasible. Results: There were 22 patients satisfying criteria for probable limbic encephalitis. Their mean age was 34.5 years. Symptoms varied from unexplained anxiety, panic and depression, lack of inhibition, wandering, incontinence, myoclonus, seizures and stroke like episodes. Three had systemic malignancy, 10 had chronic infection, one each with vasculitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, Hashimoto encephalitis and two each with non-convulsive status, cryptogenic and Idiopathic inflammation. Conclusion: All patients who present with new onset neuropsychiatric symptoms need to be evaluated for sub-acute infections, inflammation, autoimmune limbic encephalitis and paraneoplastic syndrome. A repeated 20 minute EEG is a very effective screening tool to detect organicity.

  6. Bilateral limbic system destruction in man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Justin S.; Rudrauf, David; Khalsa, Sahib S.; Cassell, Martin D.; Bruss, Joel; Grabowski, Thomas J.; Tranel, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We report here a case study of a rare neurological patient with bilateral brain damage encompassing a substantial portion of the so-called “limbic system.” The patient, Roger, has been studied in our laboratory for over 14 years and the current article presents his complete neuroanatomical and neuropsychological profiles. The brain damage occurred in 1980 following an episode of herpes simplex encephalitis. The amount of destroyed neural tissue is extensive and includes bilateral damage to core limbic and paralimbic regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, parahippocampal gyrus, temporal poles, orbitofrontal cortex, basal forebrain, anterior cingulate cortex, and insular cortex. The right hemisphere is more extensively affected than the left, although the lesions are largely bilateral. Despite the magnitude of his brain damage, Roger has a normal IQ, average to above average attention, working memory, and executive functioning skills, and very good speech and language abilities. In fact, his only obvious presenting deficits are a dense global amnesia and a severe anosmia and ageusia. Roger's case presents a rare opportunity to advance our understanding of the critical functions underlying the human limbic system, and the neuropsychological and neuroanatomical data presented here provide a critical foundation for such investigations. PMID:19763994

  7. Limbic but not non-limbic kindling impairs conditioned fear and promotes plasticity of NPY and its Y2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botterill, J J; Guskjolen, A J; Marks, W N; Caruncho, H J; Kalynchuk, L E

    2015-11-01

    Epileptic seizures negatively affect cognition. However, the mechanisms that contribute to cognitive impairments after seizures are largely unknown. Here, we examined the effects of long-term kindling (i.e., 99 stimulations) of limbic (basolateral amygdala, dorsal hippocampus) and non-limbic (caudate nucleus) brain sites on conditioned fear and hippocampal plasticity. We first showed that kindling had no effect on acquisition of a hippocampal-dependent trace fear-conditioning task but limbic kindling impaired the retrieval of these fear memories. To determine the relationship between memory and hippocampal neuronal activity, we examined the expression of Fos protein 90 min after memory retrieval (i.e., 4 days after the last kindling stimulation). We found that limbic kindling, but not non-limbic kindling, decreased Fos expression in the granule cell layer, hilus, CA3 pyramidal cell layer, and CA1 pyramidal cell layer. Next, to investigate a mechanism that could contribute to dampen hippocampal neuronal activity in limbic-kindled rats, we focused on the endogenous anticonvulsant neuropeptide Y (NPY), which is expressed in a subset of GABAergic interneurons and can prevent glutamate release through interactions with its Y2 receptor. We found that limbic kindling significantly decreased the number of NPY-immunoreactive cells in several hippocampal subfields despite minimal staining of the neurodegenerative marker Fluoro-Jade B. However, we also noted that limbic kindling enhanced NPY immunoreactivity throughout the mossy fiber pathway. In these same regions, we observed limbic kindling-induced de novo expression of the NPY Y2 receptor. These novel findings demonstrate the site-specific effects of kindling on cognition and NPY plasticity, and they provide evidence that altered hippocampal NPY after limbic seizures coincides with dampened neural activity and cognitive impairments.

  8. Constrained Spherical Deconvolution analysis of the limbic network in human, with emphasis on a direct cerebello-limbic pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eArrigo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The limbic system is part of an intricate network which is involved in several functions like memory and emotion. Traditionally the role of the cerebellum was considered mainly associated to motion control; however several evidences are raising about a role of the cerebellum in learning skills, emotions control, mnemonic and behavioral processes involving also connections with limbic system. In fifteen normal subjects we studied limbic connections by probabilistic Constrained Spherical Deconvolution (CSD tractography. The main result of our work was to prove for the first time in human brain the existence of a direct cerebello-limbic pathway which was previously hypothesized but never demonstrated. We also extended our analysis to the other limbic connections including cingulate fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, uncinated fasciculus, anterior thalamic connections and fornix. Although these pathways have been already described in the tractographic literature we provided reconstruction, quantitative analysis and FA right-left symmetry comparison using probabilistic CSD tractography that is known to provide a potential improvement compared to previously used Diffusion Tensor Imaging techniques. The demonstration of the existence of cerebello-limbic pathway could constitute an important step in the knowledge of the anatomic substrate of non-motor cerebellar functions. Finally the CSD statistical data about limbic connections in healthy subjects could be potentially useful in the diagnosis of pathological disorders damaging this system.

  9. Heritability of the limbic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawadler, Jamie M.; Dell'Acqua, Flavio; Rijsdijk, Frühling V.; Kane, Fergus; Picchioni, Marco; McGuire, Philip; Toulopoulou, Timothea; Georgiades, Anna; Kalidindi, Sridevi; Kravariti, Eugenia; Murray, Robin M.; Murphy, Declan G.; Craig, Michael C.; Catani, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Individual differences in cognitive ability and social behaviour are influenced by the variability in the structure and function of the limbic system. A strong heritability of the limbic cortex has been previously reported, but little is known about how genetic factors influence specific limbic networks. We used diffusion tensor imaging tractography to investigate heritability of different limbic tracts in 52 monozygotic and 34 dizygotic healthy adult twins. We explored the connections that contribute to the activity of three distinct functional limbic networks, namely the dorsal cingulum (‘medial default-mode network’), the ventral cingulum and the fornix (‘hippocampal-diencephalic-retrosplenial network’) and the uncinate fasciculus (‘temporo-amygdala-orbitofrontal network’). Genetic and environmental variances were mapped for multiple tract-specific measures that reflect different aspects of the underlying anatomy. We report the highest heritability for the uncinate fasciculus, a tract that underpins emotion processing, semantic cognition, and social behaviour. High to moderate genetic and shared environmental effects were found for pathways important for social behaviour and memory, for example, fornix, dorsal and ventral cingulum. These findings indicate that within the limbic system inheritance of specific traits may rely on the anatomy of distinct networks and is higher for fronto-temporal pathways dedicated to complex social behaviour and emotional processing. PMID:26714573

  10. Glucose-induced inhibition of the appetitive brain response to visual food cues in polycystic ovary syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vugt, Dean A; Krzemien, Alicja; Alsaadi, Hanin; Frank, Tamar C; Reid, Robert L

    2014-04-16

    We postulate that insulin regulation of food intake is compromised when insulin resistance is present. In order to investigate the effect of insulin sensitivity on appetitive brain responses, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in a group of women diagnosed with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in which insulin sensitivity ranged from normal to resistant. Subjects (n=19) were imaged while viewing pictures of high calorie (HC) foods and low calorie (LC) foods after ingesting either 75 g glucose or an equivalent volume of water. The insulin sensitive group showed reduced blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal in response to food pictures following glucose ingestion in numerous corticolimbic brain regions, whereas the insulin resistant group did not. There was a significant interaction between insulin sensitivity (sensitive vs resistant) and condition (water vs glucose). The largest clusters identified included the left insula, bilateral limbic/parahippocampal gyrus/culmen/midbrain, bilateral limbic lobe/precuneus, and left superior/mid temporal gyrus/parietal for HC and LC stimuli combined, the left parahippocampal gyrus/fusiform/pulvinar/midbrain for HC pictures, and the left superior/mid temporal gyrus/parietal and middle/inferior frontal gyrus/orbitofrontal cortex for LC pictures. Furthermore, BOLD signal in the anterior cingulate, medial frontal gyrus, posterior cingulate/precuneus, and parietal cortex during a glucose challenge correlated negatively with insulin sensitivity. We conclude the PCOS women with insulin resistance have an impaired brain response to a glucose challenge. The inability of postprandial hyperinsulinemia to inhibit brain responsiveness to food cues in insulin resistant subjects may lead to greater non-homeostatic eating.

  11. Synchronous inhibitory potentials precede seizure-like events in acute models of focal limbic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uva, Laura; Breschi, Gian Luca; Gnatkovsky, Vadym; Taverna, Stefano; de Curtis, Marco

    2015-02-18

    Interictal spikes in models of focal seizures and epilepsies are sustained by the synchronous activation of glutamatergic and GABAergic networks. The nature of population spikes associated with seizure initiation (pre-ictal spikes; PSs) is still undetermined. We analyzed the networks involved in the generation of both interictal and PSs in acute models of limbic cortex ictogenesis induced by pharmacological manipulations. Simultaneous extracellular and intracellular recordings from both principal cells and interneurons were performed in the medial entorhinal cortex of the in vitro isolated guinea pig brain during focal interictal and ictal discharges induced in the limbic network by intracortical and brief arterial infusions of either bicuculline methiodide (BMI) or 4-aminopyridine (4AP). Local application of BMI in the entorhinal cortex did not induce seizure-like events (SLEs), but did generate periodic interictal spikes sensitive to the glutamatergic non-NMDA receptor antagonist DNQX. Unlike local applications, arterial perfusion of either BMI or 4AP induced focal limbic SLEs. PSs just ahead of SLE were associated with hyperpolarizing potentials coupled with a complete blockade of firing in principal cells and burst discharges in putative interneurons. Interictal population spikes recorded from principal neurons between two SLEs correlated with a depolarizing potential. We demonstrate in two models of acute limbic SLE that PS events are different from interictal spikes and are sustained by synchronous activation of inhibitory networks. Our findings support a prominent role of synchronous network inhibition in the initiation of a focal seizure. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/353048-08$15.00/0.

  12. Effect of glycolysis inhibition on mitochondrial function in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Ramírez, D; Torres-Vargas, C E; Guerrero-Castillo, S; Uribe-Carvajal, S; Hernández-Pando, R; Pedraza-Chaverri, J; Orozco-Ibarra, M

    2012-05-01

    Inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase enhances the neural vulnerability to excitotoxicity both in vivo and in vitro through an unknown mechanism possibly related to mitochondrial failure. However, as the effect of glycolysis inhibition on mitochondrial function in brain has not been studied, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of glycolysis inhibition induced by iodoacetate on mitochondrial function and oxidative stress in brain. Mitochondria were isolated from brain cortex, striatum and cerebellum of rats treated systemically with iodoacetate (25 mg/kg/day for 3 days). Oxygen consumption, ATP synthesis, transmembrane potential, reactive oxygen species production, lipoperoxidation, glutathione levels, and aconitase activity were assessed. Oxygen consumption and aconitase activity decreased in the brain cortex and striatum, showing that glycolysis inhibition did not trigger severe mitochondrial impairment, but a slight mitochondrial malfunction and oxidative stress were present.

  13. Neuregulin 1 represses limbic epileptogenesis through ErbB4 in parvalbumin-expressing interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Guo-He; Liu, Yuan-Yuan; Hu, Xiao-Ling; Yin, Dong-Min; Mei, Lin; Xiong, Zhi-Qi

    2011-12-11

    Epilepsy is a common and refractory neurological disorder, but the neuronal regulatory mechanisms of epileptogenesis remain largely unclear. Activity-dependent transcription of genes for neurotrophins such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to promote epileptogenesis; however, little is known about factors that may act as intrinsic, homeostatic or counterbalancing mechanisms. Using rodent models, here we show that limbic seizure activity upregulated NRG1-ErbB4 signaling and that epileptogenesis was inhibited by infusing NRG1 intracerebrally but exacerbated by neutralizing endogenous NRG1 with soluble ErbB4 extracellular domain, by inhibiting ErbB4 activation or by deleting the Erbb4 gene. Furthermore, specific depletion of ErbB4 in parvalbumin-expressing interneurons abolished NRG1-mediated inhibition of epileptogenesis and promoted kindling progression, resulting in increased spontaneous seizures and exuberant mossy fiber sprouting. In contrast, depleting ErbB4 in CaMKIIα-positive pyramidal neurons had no effect. Thus, NRG1-induced activation of ErbB4 in parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory interneurons may serve as a critical endogenous negative-feedback mechanism to suppress limbic epileptogenesis.

  14. Functional networks underlying latent inhibition learning in the mouse brain

    OpenAIRE

    Puga, Frank; Barrett, Douglas W.; Bastida, Christel C.; Gonzalez-Lima, F.

    2007-01-01

    The present study reports the first comprehensive map of brain networks underlying latent inhibition learning and the first application of structural equation modeling to cytochrome oxidase data. In latent inhibition, repeated exposure to a stimulus results in a latent form of learning that inhibits subsequent associations with that stimulus. As neuronal energy demand to form learned associations changes, so does the induction of the respiratory enzyme cytochrome oxidase. Therefore, cytochrom...

  15. Prostate cancer may trigger paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jakob Kristian; Zakharia, Elias Raja; Boysen, Anders Kindberg Fossø

    2013-01-01

    -Hu antibody test the patient was diagnosed with paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis related to prostate cancer. The patient died within 6 months. We review the literature on prostate cancer-related paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis. High-risk prostate cancer can trigger paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis...

  16. Alpha oscillatory correlates of motor inhibition in the aged brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene eBoenstrup

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Exerting inhibitory control is a cognitive ability mediated by functions known to decline with age. The goal of this study is to add to the mechanistic understanding of cortical inhibition during motor control in aged brains. Based on behavioral findings of impaired inhibitory control with age we hypothesized that elderly will show a reduced or a lack of EEG alpha-power increase during tasks that require motor inhibition. Since inhibitory control over movements has been shown to rely on prior motor memory formation, we investigated cortical inhibitory processes at two points in time - early after learning and after an overnight consolidation phase and hypothesized an overnight increase of inhibitory capacities. Young and elderly participants acquired a complex finger movement sequence and in each experimental session brain activity during execution and inhibition of the sequence was recorded with multi-channel EEG. We assessed cortical processes of sustained inhibition by means of task-induced changes of alpha oscillatory power. During inhibition of the learned movement, young participants showed a significant alpha power increase at the sensorimotor cortices whereas elderly did not. Interestingly, for both groups, the overnight consolidation phase improved up-regulation of alpha power during sustained inhibition. This points to deficits in the generation and enhancement of local inhibitory mechanisms at the sensorimotor cortices in aged brains. However, the alpha power increase in both groups implies neuroplastic changes that strengthen the network of alpha power generation over time in young as well as elderly brains.

  17. Opposite effect of phencyclidine on activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) in juvenile and adult limbic rat brain regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten S; Hansen, Henrik H; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2010-01-01

    animals. However, schizophrenia is believed to develop in part due to neurodevelopmental dysfunction during adolescence. Therefore, the effects of PCP in juvenile animals may better reflect the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Here, we compare the effect of PCP (5mg/kg/day for 5 days) on activity......-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) and parvalbumin mRNA expression in juvenile and adult rats. Arc is a marker for excitatory neurotransmission. Parvalbumin is a marker for GABAergic neurotransmission, known to be reduced in postmortem brains of schizophrenics. PCP reduced parvalbumin mRNA expression...

  18. Inhibition of neuronal ferroptosis protects hemorrhagic brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Han, Xiaoning; Lan, Xi; Gao, Yufeng; Wan, Jieru; Durham, Frederick; Cheng, Tian; Yang, Jie; Wang, Zhongyu; Jiang, Chao; Ying, Mingyao; Stockwell, Brent R.

    2017-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) causes high mortality and morbidity, but our knowledge of post-ICH neuronal death and related mechanisms is limited. In this study, we first demonstrated that ferroptosis, a newly identified form of cell death, occurs in the collagenase-induced ICH model in mice. We found that administration of ferrostatin-1, a specific inhibitor of ferroptosis, prevented neuronal death and reduced iron deposition induced by hemoglobin in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs). Mice treated with ferrostatin-1 after ICH exhibited marked brain protection and improved neurologic function. Additionally, we found that ferrostatin-1 reduced lipid reactive oxygen species production and attenuated the increased expression level of PTGS2 and its gene product cyclooxygenase-2 ex vivo and in vivo. Moreover, ferrostatin-1 in combination with other inhibitors that target different forms of cell death prevented hemoglobin-induced cell death in OHSCs and human induced pluripotent stem cell–derived neurons better than any inhibitor alone. These results indicate that ferroptosis contributes to neuronal death after ICH, that administration of ferrostatin-1 protects hemorrhagic brain, and that cyclooxygenase-2 could be a biomarker of ferroptosis. The insights gained from this study will advance our knowledge of the post-ICH cell death cascade and be essential for future preclinical studies.

  19. A temperament for learning: The limbic system and myelomeningocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vachha Behroze

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This article was the winner of the triennial Casey Holter Memorial Prize awarded by the Society for Research into Hydrocephalus and Spina Bifida, 2004. Abstract This essay explores the link between the limbic/hypothalamic systems within the complex conditions of hydrocephalus and myelomeningocele. Acknowledging the neuroanatomical and neuroendocrine risks inherent in the developing brains of these individuals, we focus on the converging components of temperament, cognition, and language.

  20. Neuropeptide FF receptors as novel targets for limbic seizure attenuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portelli, Jeanelle; Meurs, Alfred; Bihel, Frederic; Hammoud, Hassan; Schmitt, Martine; De Kock, Joery; Utard, Valerie; Humbert, Jean-Paul; Bertin, Isabelle; Buffel, Ine; Coppens, Jessica; Tourwe, Dirk; Maes, Veronique; De Prins, An; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Massie, Ann; Balasubramaniam, Ambikaipakan; Boon, Paul; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Simonin, Frederic; Smolders, Ilse

    2015-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well established anticonvulsant and first-in-class antiepileptic neuropeptide. In this study, the controversial role of NPY1 receptors in epilepsy was reassessed by testing two highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands and a mixed NPY1/NPFF receptor antagonist BIBP3226 in a rat model for limbic seizures. While BIBP3226 significantly attenuated the pilocarpine-induced seizures, neither of the highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands altered the seizure severity. Administration of the NPFF1/NPFF2 receptor antagonist RF9 also significantly attenuated limbic seizure activity. To further prove the involvement of NPFF receptors in these seizure-modulating effects, low and high affinity antagonists for the NPFF receptors were tested. We observed that the low affinity ligand failed to exhibit anticonvulsant properties while the two high affinity ligands significantly attenuated the seizures. Continuous NPFF1 receptor agonist administration also inhibited limbic seizures whereas bolus administration of the NPFF1 receptor agonist was without effect. This suggests that continuous agonist perfusion could result in NPFF1 receptor desensitization and mimic NPFF1 receptor antagonist administration. Our data unveil for the first time the involvement of the NPFF system in the management of limbic seizures.

  1. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure and withdrawal alters (3α,5α)-3-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one immunostaining in cortical and limbic brain regions of C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Devincci, Antoniette M; Cook, Jason B; O'Buckley, Todd K; Morrow, Danielle H; McKinley, Raechel E; Lopez, Marcelo F; Becker, Howard C; Morrow, A Leslie

    2014-10-01

    The GABAergic neuroactive steroid (3α,5α)-3-hydroxy-pregnan-20-one (3α,5α-THP; allopregnanolone) has been studied during withdrawal from ethanol (EtOH) in humans, rats, and mice. Serum 3α,5α-THP levels decreased, and brain levels were not altered following acute EtOH administration (2 g/kg) in male C57BL/6J mice; however, the effects of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure on 3α,5α-THP levels have not been examined. Given that CIE exposure changes subsequent voluntary EtOH drinking in a time-dependent fashion following repeated cycles of EtOH exposure, we conducted a time-course analysis of CIE effects on 3α,5α-THP levels in specific brain regions known to influence drinking behavior. Adult male C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 4 cycles of CIE to induce EtOH dependence. All mice were sacrificed and perfused at 1 of 2 time points, 8 or 72 hours following the final exposure cycle. Free-floating brain sections (40 μm; 3 to 5 sections/region/animal) were immunostained and analyzed to determine relative levels of cellular 3α,5α-THP. Withdrawal from CIE exposure produced time-dependent and region-specific effects on immunohistochemical detection of 3α,5α-THP levels across cortical and limbic brain regions. A transient reduction in 3α,5α-THP immunoreactivity was observed in the central nucleus of the amygdala 8 hours after withdrawal from CIE (-31.4 ± 9.3%). Decreases in 3α,5α-THP immunoreactivity were observed 72 hours following withdrawal in the medial prefrontal cortex (-25.0 ± 9.3%), nucleus accumbens core (-29.9 ± 6.6%), and dorsolateral striatum (-18.5 ± 6.0%), while an increase was observed in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer of the hippocampus (+42.8 ± 19.5%). Sustained reductions in 3α,5α-THP immunoreactivity were observed at both time points in the lateral amygdala (8 hours -28.3 ± 12.8%; 72 hours -27.5 ± 12.4%) and in the ventral tegmental area (8 hours -26.5 ± 9.9%; 72 hours -31.6 ± 13.8%). These data

  2. LIMBIC ENCEPHALITIS OF HERPESVIRUS ETIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Simonova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the literature data and our personal observations in the article discusses the types of variants of the course of nervous system caused by herpesviruses. In the description of a clinical case demonstrated a classic example of limbic encephalitis infectious etiology. The study involved 36 children with various neurological and infectious diseases: 19 children with the diagnosis - convulsions, 8 children with the diagnosis — epilepsy, 5 children with acute viral encephalitis, 3 children with neuropathies. It was established that in the genesis of diseases such as epilepsy, convulsive syndrome, limbic encephalitis, neuropathy peripheral nerves leading role belongs to of herpes virus infection, in which the dominant role belongs HHV-6 infection. Pathogenetically proved the impact of the virus on the receptor apparatus of glia with the disorder of the functional state of mitochondria of these cells. According to our own observations provided data that result in persistence of HHV-6 variant-in mono or in combination with other herpesviruses growing threat of epilepsy and other neurological disorders. 

  3. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging of the human limbic white matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susumu eMori

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The limbic system mediates memory, behavior, and emotional output in the human brain, and is implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease and a wide spectrum of related neurological disorders. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of structural components comprising the limbic system and their interconnections via white matter pathways in the human brain has helped define current understanding of the limbic model based on the classical circuit proposed by Papez. MRI techniques, including diffusion MR imaging, provide a non-invasive method to characterize white matter tracts of the limbic system, and investigate pathological changes that affect these pathways in clinical settings. This review focuses on delineation of the anatomy of major limbic tracts in the human brain, namely, the cingulum, the fornix and fimbria, and the stria terminalis, based on in vivo MRI contrasts. The detailed morphology and intricate trajectories of these pathways that can be identified using relaxometry-based and diffusion-weighted MRI provide an important anatomical reference for evaluation of clinical disorders commonly associated with limbic pathology.

  4. Brain Plasticity and Disease: A Matter of Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Baroncelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One major goal in Neuroscience is the development of strategies promoting neural plasticity in the adult central nervous system, when functional recovery from brain disease and injury is limited. New evidence has underscored a pivotal role for cortical inhibitory circuitries in regulating plasticity both during development and in adulthood. This paper summarizes recent findings showing that the inhibition-excitation balance controls adult brain plasticity and is at the core of the pathogenesis of neurodevelopmental disorders like autism, Down syndrome, and Rett syndrome.

  5. Acupuncture inhibits cue-induced heroin craving and brain activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinghui Cai; Xiaoge Song; Chuanfu Li; Chunsheng Xu; Xiliang Li; Qi Lu

    2012-01-01

    Previous research using functional MRI has shown that specific brain regions associated with drug dependence and cue-elicited heroin craving are activated by environmental cues.Craving is an important trigger of heroin relapse,and acupuncture may inhibit craving.In this study,we performed functional MRI in heroin addicts and control subjects.We compared differences in brain activation between the two groups during heroin cue exposure,heroin cue exposure plus acupuncture at the Zusanli point(ST36)without twirling of the needle,and heroin cue exposure plus acupuncture at the Zusanli point with twirling of the needle.Heroin cue exposure elicited significant activation in craving-related brain regions mainly in the frontal lobes and callosal gyri.Acupuncture without twirling did not significantly affect the range of brain activation induced by heroin cue exposure,but significantly changed the extent of the activation in the heroin addicts group.Acupuncture at the Zusanli.point with twirling of the needle significantly decreased both the range and extent of activation induced by heroin cue exposure compared with heroin cue exposure plus acupuncture without twirling of the needle.These experimental findings indicate that presentation of heroin cues can induce activation in craving-related brain regions,which are involved in reward,learning and memory,cognition and emotion.Acupuncture at the Zusanli point can rapidly suppress the activation of specific brain regions related to craving,supporting its potential as an intervention for drug craving.

  6. Limbic encephalitis associated with elevated antithyroid antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacohen, Yael; Joseph, Sonia; Kneen, Rachel; Eunson, Paul; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Vincent, Angela; Lim, Ming

    2014-06-01

    Immune-mediated limbic encephalitis affects both adults and children. Patients typically present with seizures, memory problems, and imaging changes in the medial temporal lobes. Both paraneoplastic and nonparaneoplastic forms have been described in which the antibody to the voltage-gated potassium channel-complex associated protein, leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1, is most commonly reported. Elevated antithyroid antibodies have also been reported in a range of neurological syndromes with encephalopathy, such as limbic encephalitis, often collectively termed Hashimoto encephalopathy, a condition whereby corticosteroids responsiveness with a complete recovery is commonly observed. Here we describe 3 children presenting with limbic encephalitis with elevated thyroid antibodies that did not respond to corticosteroids alone and required more aggressive immunotherapy, mirroring the slower treatment response that is more frequently seen in other immune-mediated forms of limbic encephalitis.

  7. Aberrant hippocampal neurogenesis after limbic kindling: Relationship to BDNF and hippocampal-dependent memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botterill, J J; Brymer, K J; Caruncho, H J; Kalynchuk, L E

    2015-06-01

    Seizures dramatically increase the number of adult generated neurons in the hippocampus. However, it is not known whether this effect depends on seizures that originate in specific brain regions or whether it is nonspecific to seizure activity regardless of origin. We used kindling of different brain sites to address this question. Rats received 99 kindling stimulations of the basolateral amygdala, dorsal hippocampus, or caudate nucleus over a 6-week period. After kindling, we counted the number of adult generated hippocampal neurons that were birth-dated with the proliferative marker bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to evaluate cell proliferation and survival under conditions of repeated seizures. Next, we counted the number of doublecortin immunoreactive (DCX-ir) cells and evaluated their dendritic complexity to determine if limbic and nonlimbic seizures have differential effects on neuronal maturation. We also quantified hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophin factor (BDNF) protein levels using an ELISA kit and assessed memory performance using a hippocampal-dependent fear conditioning paradigm. We found that limbic, but not nonlimbic, seizures dramatically increased hippocampal cell proliferation and the number of hilar-CA3 ectopic granule cells. Further, limbic kindling promoted dendritic outgrowth of DCX-ir cells and the number of DCX-ir cells containing basal dendrites. Limbic kindling also enhanced BDNF protein levels throughout the entire hippocampus and impaired the retrieval of fear memories. Collectively, our results suggest a relationship between limbic seizures, neurogenesis, BDNF protein, and cognition.

  8. Robust Brain Hyperglycemia during General Anesthesia: Relationships with Metabolic Brain Inhibition and Vasodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bola, R Aaron; Kiyatkin, Eugene A

    2016-01-01

    Glucose is the main energetic substrate for the metabolic activity of brain cells and its proper delivery into the extracellular space is essential for maintaining normal neural functions. Under physiological conditions, glucose continuously enters the extracellular space from arterial blood via gradient-dependent facilitated diffusion governed by the GLUT-1 transporters. Due to this gradient-dependent mechanism, glucose levels rise in the brain after consumption of glucose-containing foods and drinks. Glucose entry is also accelerated due to local neuronal activation and neuro-vascular coupling, resulting in transient hyperglycemia to prevent any metabolic deficit. Here, we explored another mechanism that is activated during general anesthesia and results in significant brain hyperglycemia. By using enzyme-based glucose biosensors we demonstrate that glucose levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) strongly increase after iv injection of Equthesin, a mixture of chloral hydrate and sodium pentobarbital, which is often used for general anesthesia in rats. By combining electrochemical recordings with brain, muscle, and skin temperature monitoring, we show that the gradual increase in brain glucose occurring during the development of general anesthesia tightly correlate with decreases in brain-muscle temperature differentials, suggesting that this rise in glucose is related to metabolic inhibition. While the decreased consumption of glucose by brain cells could contribute to the development of hyperglycemia, an exceptionally strong positive correlation (r = 0.99) between glucose rise and increases in skin-muscle temperature differentials was also found, suggesting the strong vasodilation of cerebral vessels as the primary mechanism for accelerated entry of glucose into brain tissue. Our present data could explain drastic differences in basal glucose levels found in awake and anesthetized animal preparations. They also suggest that glucose entry into brain tissue could be

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor infusion delays amygdala and perforant path kindling without affecting paired-pulse measures of neuronal inhibition in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osehobo, P; Adams, B; Sazgar, M; Xu, Y; Racine, R J; Fahnestock, M

    1999-01-01

    Kindling is an animal model of human temporal lobe epilepsy in which excitability in limbic structures is permanently enhanced by repeated stimulations. Kindling also increases the expression of nerve growth factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor receptor messenger RNAs in both the hippocampus and cerebral cortex and causes structural changes in the hippocampus including hilar hypertrophy. We have recently shown that intraventricular nerve growth factor infusion enhances the development of kindling, whereas blocking nerve growth factor activity retards amygdaloid kindling. Furthermore, we have shown that nerve growth factor protects against kindling-induced hilar hypertrophy. The physiological role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in kindling is not as clear. Acute injection of brain-derived neurotrophic factor increases neuronal excitability and causes seizures, whereas chronic brain-derived neurotrophic factor infusion in rats slows hippocampal kindling. In agreement with the latter, we show here that intrahilar brain-derived neurotrophic factor infusion delays amygdala and perforant path kindling. In addition, we show that brain-derived neurotrophic factor, unlike nerve growth factor, does not protect against kindling-induced increases in hilar area. To test the hypothesis that brain-derived neurotrophic factor suppresses kindling by increasing inhibition above normal levels, we performed paired-pulse measures in the perforant path-dentate gyrus pathway. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor infused into the hippocampus had no effect on the stimulus intensity function (input/output curves); there was also no significant effect on paired-pulse inhibition. We then kindled the perforant path 10 days after the end of brain-derived neurotrophic factor treatment. Once again, kindling was retarded, showing that the brain-derived neurotrophic factor effect is long-lasting. These results indicate that prolonged in vivo infusion

  10. Olive leaf extract inhibits lead poisoning-induced brain injury**

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Wang; Shengqing Wang; Wenhui Cui; Jiujun He; Zhenfu Wang; Xiaolu Yang

    2013-01-01

    Olive leaves have an antioxidant capacity, and olive leaf extract can protect the blood, spleen and hippocampus in lead-poisoned mice. However, little is known about the effects of olive leaf extract on lead-induced brain injury. This study was designed to determine whether olive leaf extract can inhibit lead-induced brain injury, and whether this effect is associated with antioxidant capacity. First, we established a mouse model of lead poisoning by continuous intragastric administration of lead acetate for 30 days. Two hours after successful model establishment, lead-poisoned mice were given olive leaf extract at doses of 250, 500 or 1 000 mg/kg daily by intragastric administration for 50 days. Under the transmission electron microscope, olive leaf extract attenuated neuronal and capil ary injury and reduced damage to organel es and the matrix around the capil aries in the frontal lobe of the cerebral cortex in the lead-poisoned mice. Olive leaf extract at a dose of 1 000 mg/kg had the greatest protective effect. Spectrophotometry showed that olive leaf extract significantly in-creased the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, alkaline phosphatase and acid phospha-tase, while it reduced malondialdehyde content, in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, im-munohistochemical staining revealed that olive leaf extract dose-dependently decreased Bax pro-tein expression in the cerebral cortex of lead-poisoned mice. Our findings indicate that olive leaf extract can inhibit lead-induced brain injury by increasing antioxidant capacity and reducing apop-tosis.

  11. Histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, E; Werthwein, S; Zentner, J

    1999-01-01

    Stimulation-evoked 3H-noradrenaline release in human cerebrocortical slices was inhibited by histamine (in a manner sensitive to clobenpropit) and by imetit, suggesting H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in human brain.

  12. Evidence for evolutionary specialization in human limbic structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole eBarger

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, functional and evolutionary research has highlighted the important contribution emotion processing makes to complex human social cognition. As such, it may be asked whether neural structures involved in emotion processing, commonly referred to as limbic structures, have been impacted in human brain evolution. To address this question, we performed an extensive evolutionary analysis of multiple limbic structures using modern phylogenetic tools. For this analysis, we combined new volumetric data for the hominoid (human and ape amygdala and 4 amygdaloid nuclei, hippocampus, and striatum, collected using stereological methods in complete histological series, with previously published datasets on the amygdala, orbital and medial frontal cortex, and insula, as well as a non-limbic structure, the dorsal frontal cortex, for contrast. We performed a parallel analysis using large published datasets including many anthropoid species (human, ape, and monkey, but fewer hominoids, for the amygdala and 2 amygdaloid subdivisions, hippocampus, schizocortex, striatum, and septal nuclei. To address evolutionary change, we compared observed human values to values predicted from regressions run through a nonhuman hominoids and b nonhuman anthropoids, assessing phylogenetic influence using phylogenetic generalized least squares regression.Compared with other hominoids, the volumes of the hippocampus, the lateral nucleus of the amygdala, and the orbital frontal cortex were, respectively, 50%, 37%, and 11% greater in humans than predicted for an ape of human hemisphere volume, while the medial and dorsal frontal cortex were, respectively, 26% and 29% significantly smaller. Compared with other anthropoids, only human values for the striatum fell significantly below predicted values. Overall, the data present support for the idea that regions involved in emotion processing are not necessarily conserved or regressive, but may even be enhanced in recent human

  13. Evidence for evolutionary specialization in human limbic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Nicole; Hanson, Kari L; Teffer, Kate; Schenker-Ahmed, Natalie M; Semendeferi, Katerina

    2014-01-01

    Increasingly, functional and evolutionary research has highlighted the important contribution emotion processing makes to complex human social cognition. As such, it may be asked whether neural structures involved in emotion processing, commonly referred to as limbic structures, have been impacted in human brain evolution. To address this question, we performed an extensive evolutionary analysis of multiple limbic structures using modern phylogenetic tools. For this analysis, we combined new volumetric data for the hominoid (human and ape) amygdala and 4 amygdaloid nuclei, hippocampus, and striatum, collected using stereological methods in complete histological series, with previously published datasets on the amygdala, orbital and medial frontal cortex, and insula, as well as a non-limbic structure, the dorsal frontal cortex, for contrast. We performed a parallel analysis using large published datasets including many anthropoid species (human, ape, and monkey), but fewer hominoids, for the amygdala and 2 amygdaloid subdivisions, hippocampus, schizocortex, striatum, and septal nuclei. To address evolutionary change, we compared observed human values to values predicted from regressions run through (a) non-human hominoids and (b) non-human anthropoids, assessing phylogenetic influence using phylogenetic generalized least squares regression. Compared with other hominoids, the volumes of the hippocampus, the lateral nucleus of the amygdala, and the orbital frontal cortex were, respectively, 50, 37, and 11% greater in humans than predicted for an ape of human hemisphere volume, while the medial and dorsal frontal cortex were, respectively, 26 and 29% significantly smaller. Compared with other anthropoids, only human values for the striatum fell significantly below predicted values. Overall, the data present support for the idea that regions involved in emotion processing are not necessarily conserved or regressive, but may even be enhanced in recent human evolution.

  14. The Limbic-Prefrontal Network Modulated by Electroacupuncture at CV4 and CV12

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    Jiliang Fang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available fMRI studies showed that acupuncture could induce hemodynamic changes in brain networks. Many of these studies focused on whether specific acupoints could activate specific brain regions and were often limited to manual acupuncture at acupoints on the limbs. In this fMRI study, we investigated acupuncture's modulation effects on brain functional networks by electroacupuncture (EA at acupoints on the midline of abdomen. Acupoints Guanyuan (CV4 and Zhongwan (CV12 were stimulated in 21 healthy volunteers. The needling sensations, brain activation, and functional connectivity were studied. We found that the limbic-prefrontal functional network was deactivated by EA at CV4 and CV12. More importantly, the local functional connectivity was significantly changed during EA stimulation, and the change persisted during the period after the stimulation. Although minor differences existed, both acupoints similarly modulated the limbic-prefrontal functional network, which is overlapped with the functional circuits associated with emotional and cognitive regulation.

  15. Stereotactic limbic leucotomy: surgical technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Alan

    1973-01-01

    The requirements for modern psychosurgery are safety and accuracy. Stereotactic techniques give the geometric accuracy and stimulation gives physiological information, which is important in determining lesion sites or at least lesion symmetry. The process whereby focal brain destruction is produced is ideally by a freezing probe, but equally effectively by coagulation. A number of small lesions is thus required. This at present is unavoidable if side effects are to be obviated. Careful continuing assessment of results is necessary to validate any surgical procedure. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:4618905

  16. Impaired autonomic responses to emotional stimuli in autoimmune limbic encephalitis

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    Olga eSchröder

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Limbic encephalitis (LE is an autoimmune-mediated disorder that affects structures of the limbic system, in particular the amygdala. The amygdala constitutes a brain area substantial for processing of emotional, especially fear-related signals. The amygdala is also involved in neuroendocrine and autonomic functions, including skin conductance responses (SCRs to emotionally arousing stimuli. This study investigates behavioral and autonomic responses to discrete emotion-evoking and neutral film clips in a patient suffering from LE associated with contactin-associated protein-2 (CASPR2-antibodies as compared to a healthy control group. Results show a lack of SCRs in the patient while watching the film clips, with significant differences compared to healthy controls in the case of fear-inducing videos. There was no comparable impairment in behavioral data (emotion report, valence and arousal ratings. The results point to a defective modulation of sympathetic responses during emotional stimulation in patients with LE, probably due to impaired functioning of the amygdala.

  17. Peripherally Administered Non-peptide Oxytocin Antagonist, L368,899®, Accumulates in Limbic Brain Areas: A New Pharmacological Tool for the Study of Social Motivation in Non-Human Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Maria L.; Goursaud, Anne-Pierre S.; Bachevalier, Jocelyne; Anderson, Kenneth D.; Pedersen, Cort A.

    2009-01-01

    Central administration of oxytocin (OT) antagonists inhibits maternal and sexual behavior in non-primates, providing the strongest experimental evidence that endogenous OT facilitates these behaviors. While there have been a few reports that ICV administration of OT increases social behaviors in monkeys, no studies to date have assessed the effects of OT antagonists. Therefore, we studied in rhesus monkeys whether L368,899®, a non-peptide antagonist produced by Merck that selectively blocks the human uterine OT receptor, penetrates the CNS after peripheral administration and alters female maternal and sexual behavior. In two studies in four male monkeys, L368,899 was injected iv (1 mg/kg) after which (1) CSF samples were collected at intervals over 4 h and (2) brains were collected at 60 min. Assay of samples confirmed that iv-administered L368,899 entered CSF and accumulated in the hypothalamus, septum, orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala and hippocampus, but not other areas. An adult female monkey was tested for interest in either an infant or sexual behavior, receiving a different iv treatment prior to each test (1 or 3 mg/kg of L368,899 or saline) OT antagonist treatment reduced or eliminated interest in the infant and sexual behavior. These results, although preliminary, are the first to directly implicate endogenous OT in activation of primate maternal interest and sexual behavior. While it remains to be empirically demonstrated that peripherally administered L368,899 blocks central OT receptors, our behavioral findings suggest that this non-peptide antagonist may facilitate testing OT involvement in a variety of social and other behaviors in primates. PMID:17583705

  18. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation affects limbic and associative circuits: a PET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Jeune, Florence [Centre Eugene Marquis, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Rennes (France); Universite Rennes 1, Hopital Pontchaillou, CHU de Rennes, Unite de Recherche Universitaire ' ' Comportement et Noyaux Gris Centraux' ' , Rennes (France); Centre Eugene Marquis, Service Medecine Nucleaire, Rennes (France); Peron, Julie [Universite Rennes 1, Hopital Pontchaillou, CHU de Rennes, Unite de Recherche Universitaire ' ' Comportement et Noyaux Gris Centraux' ' , Rennes (France); Hopital Pontchaillou, CHU de Rennes, Clinique Neurologique, Rennes (France); University of Geneva, Neuroscience of Emotion and Affective Dynamics, Department of Psychology and Swiss Center for Affective Sciences, Geneva (Switzerland); Grandjean, Didier [University of Geneva, Neuroscience of Emotion and Affective Dynamics, Department of Psychology and Swiss Center for Affective Sciences, Geneva (Switzerland); Drapier, Sophie; Verin, Marc [Universite Rennes 1, Hopital Pontchaillou, CHU de Rennes, Unite de Recherche Universitaire ' ' Comportement et Noyaux Gris Centraux' ' , Rennes (France); Hopital Pontchaillou, CHU de Rennes, Clinique Neurologique, Rennes (France); Haegelen, Claire [Universite Rennes 1, Hopital Pontchaillou, CHU de Rennes, Unite de Recherche Universitaire ' ' Comportement et Noyaux Gris Centraux' ' , Rennes (France); Hopital Pontchaillou, CHU de Rennes, Service de Neurochirurgie, Rennes (France); Garin, Etienne [Centre Eugene Marquis, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Rennes (France); Millet, Bruno [Universite Rennes 1, Hopital Pontchaillou, CHU de Rennes, Unite de Recherche Universitaire ' ' Comportement et Noyaux Gris Centraux' ' , Rennes (France); S.H.U. Psychiatrie Adulte, CH Guillaume Regnier, Rennes (France)

    2010-08-15

    Although high-frequency deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS) improves motor symptoms in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), clinical studies have reported cognitive, motivational and emotional changes. These results suggest that the STN forms part of a broadly distributed neural network encompassing the associative and limbic circuits. We sought to pinpoint the cortical and subcortical brain areas modulated by STN DBS, in order to assess the STN's functional role and explain neuropsychological modifications following STN DBS in PD. We studied resting state glucose metabolism in 20 PD patients before and after STN DBS and 13 age-matched healthy controls using {sup 18}F-FDG PET. We used statistical analysis (SPM2) first to compare pre-stimulation metabolism in PD patients with metabolism in healthy controls, then to study metabolic modifications in PD patients following STN DBS. The first analysis revealed no pre-stimulation metabolic abnormalities in associative or limbic circuitry. After STN DBS, metabolic modifications were found in several regions known for their involvement in the limbic and associative circuits. These metabolic results confirm the STN's central role in associative and limbic basal ganglia circuits. They will provide information for working hypotheses for future studies investigating neuropsychological changes and metabolic modifications related to STN DBS, with a view to improving our knowledge of this structure's functional role. (orig.)

  19. Prelude to passion: limbic activation by "unseen" drug and sexual cues.

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    Anna Rose Childress

    Full Text Available The human brain responds to recognizable signals for sex and for rewarding drugs of abuse by activation of limbic reward circuitry. Does the brain respond in similar way to such reward signals even when they are "unseen", i.e., presented in a way that prevents their conscious recognition? Can the brain response to "unseen" reward cues predict the future affective response to recognizable versions of such cues, revealing a link between affective/motivational processes inside and outside awareness?We exploited the fast temporal resolution of event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to test the brain response to "unseen" (backward-masked cocaine, sexual, aversive and neutral cues of 33 milliseconds duration in male cocaine patients (n = 22. Two days after scanning, the affective valence for visible versions of each cue type was determined using an affective bias (priming task. We demonstrate, for the first time, limbic brain activation by "unseen" drug and sexual cues of only 33 msec duration. Importantly, increased activity in an large interconnected ventral pallidum/amygdala cluster to the "unseen" cocaine cues strongly predicted future positive affect to visible versions of the same cues in subsequent off-magnet testing, pointing both to the functional significance of the rapid brain response, and to shared brain substrates for appetitive motivation within and outside awareness.These findings represent the first evidence that brain reward circuitry responds to drug and sexual cues presented outside awareness. The results underscore the sensitivity of the brain to "unseen" reward signals and may represent the brain's primordial signature for desire. The limbic brain response to reward cues outside awareness may represent a potential vulnerability in disorders (e.g., the addictions for whom poorly-controlled appetitive motivation is a central feature.

  20. Lesion analysis for cingulotomy and limbic leucotomy: comparison and correlation with clinical outcomes

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    Yang, Jimmy C.; Ginat, Daniel T.; Dougherty, Darin D.

    2014-01-01

    Object Cingulotomy and limbic leucotomy are lesioning surgeries with demonstrated benefit for medically intractable psychiatric illnesses. They represent significant refinements of the prefrontal lobotomy used from the 1930s through the 1950s. However, the associations between anatomical characterization of these lesions and outcome data are not well understood. To elucidate these procedures and associations, the authors sought to define and compare the neuroanatomy of cingulotomy and limbic leucotomy and to test a method that uses neuroanatomical data and voxel-based lesion–symptom mapping (VLSM) to reveal potential refinements to modern psychiatric neurosurgical procedures. Methods T1-weighted MR images of patients who had undergone cingulotomy and limbic leucotomy were segmented and registered onto the Montreal Neurological Institute T1-weighted template brain MNI152. Using an atlas-based approach, the authors calculated, by case, the percentage of each anatomical structure affected by the lesion. Because of the infrequency of modern lesion procedures and the requirement for higher-resolution clinical imaging, the sample size was small. The pilot study correlated cingulotomy and limbic leucotomy lesion characteristics with clinical outcomes for patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder. For this study, preoperative and postoperative Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale scores for 11 cingulotomy patients and 8 limbic leucotomy patients were obtained, and lesion masks were defined and compared anatomically by using an atlas-based method. Statistically significant voxels were additionally calculated by using VLSM techniques that correlated lesion characteristics with postoperative scores. Results Mean lesion volumes were 13.3 ml for cingulotomy and 11.8 ml for limbic leucotomy. As expected, cingulotomy was isolated to the anterior cingulum. The subcaudate tractotomy portion of limbic leucotomy additionally affected Brodmann area 25, the medial orbitofrontal

  1. Common modulation of limbic network activation underlies musical emotions as they unfold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Neomi; Jacoby, Nori; Lin, Tamar; Raz, Gal; Shpigelman, Lavi; Gilam, Gadi; Granot, Roni Y; Hendler, Talma

    2016-11-01

    Music is a powerful means for communicating emotions among individuals. Here we reveal that this continuous stream of affective information is commonly represented in the brains of different listeners and that particular musical attributes mediate this link. We examined participants' brain responses to two naturalistic musical pieces using functional Magnetic Resonance imaging (fMRI). Following scanning, as participants listened to the musical pieces for a second time, they continuously indicated their emotional experience on scales of valence and arousal. These continuous reports were used along with a detailed annotation of the musical features, to predict a novel index of Dynamic Common Activation (DCA) derived from ten large-scale data-driven functional networks. We found an association between the unfolding music-induced emotionality and the DCA modulation within a vast network of limbic regions. The limbic-DCA modulation further corresponded with continuous changes in two temporal musical features: beat-strength and tempo. Remarkably, this "collective limbic sensitivity" to temporal features was found to mediate the link between limbic-DCA and the reported emotionality. An additional association with the emotional experience was found in a left fronto-parietal network, but only among a sub-group of participants with a high level of musical experience (>5years). These findings may indicate two processing-levels underlying the unfolding of common music emotionality; (1) a widely shared core-affective process that is confined to a limbic network and mediated by temporal regularities in music and (2) an experience based process that is rooted in a left fronto-parietal network that may involve functioning of the 'mirror-neuron system'. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Inhibition of lipid peroxidation in rat brain by nifedipine and clorazepate after electrically induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kułak, W; Sobaniec, W; Sobaniec-Lotowska, M

    1993-01-01

    The effect of nifedipine and clorazepate on the concentration of lipid peroxides (LP) in rat brain, and the characteristics of electrically induced seizures were assessed. A significant increase in the concentration of brain LP after electroshock was found. Both nifedipine (1.00 mg/kg per os) and clorazepate (20 mg/kg intraperitoneally) decreased the levels of LP in the rat brain after electroshock. Nifedipine combined with clorazepate brought an inhibition of LP formation and an additive anticonvulsant activity.

  3. Early life stress as an influence on limbic epilepsy: an hypothesis whose time has come?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia S Koe

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE, the most prevalent form of refractory focal epilepsy in adults, is thought to begin in early life, even though seizures may not commence until adolescence or adulthood. Amongst the range of early life factors implicated in MTLE causation (febrile seizures, traumatic brain injury, etc., stress may be one important contributor. Early life stress is an a priori agent deserving study because of the large amount of neuroscientific data showing enduring effects on structure and function in hippocampus and amygdala, the key structures involved in MTLE. An emerging body of evidence directly tests hypotheses concerning early life stress and limbic epilepsy: early life stressors, such as maternal separation, have been shown to aggravate epileptogenesis in both status epilepticus and kindling models of limbic epilepsy. In addition to elucidating its influence on limbic epileptogenesis itself, the study of early life stress has the potential to shed light on the psychiatric disorder that accompanies MTLE. For many years, psychiatric comorbidity was viewed as an effect of epilepsy, mediated psychologically and/or neurobiologically. An alternative – or complementary – perspective is that of shared causation. Early life stress, implicated in the pathogenesis of several psychiatric disorders, may be one such causal factor. This paper aims to critically review the body of experimental evidence linking early life stress and epilepsy; to discuss the direct studies examining early life stress effects in current models of limbic seizures/epilepsy; and to suggest priorities for future research.

  4. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis presenting as a neurological emergency: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Brijesh P

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis remains a challenging clinical diagnosis with poor outcome if it is not recognized and treated early in the course of the disease. Case Presentation A 65-year-old Caucasian woman presented with generalized tonic-clonic seizures and increasing confusion shortly after a lung biopsy that led to the diagnosis of small-cell lung cancer. She had a complicated hospital course, and had recurrent respiratory distress due to aspiration pneumonia, and fluctuating mental status and seizures that were refractory to anti-epileptic drug treatment. Routine laboratory testing, magnetic resonance imaging of the brain, electroencephalogram, lumbar puncture, serum and cerebrospinal fluid tests for paraneoplastic antibodies, and chest computed tomography were performed on our patient. The diagnosis was paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis in the setting of small-cell lung cancer with positive N-type voltage-gated calcium channel antibody titer. Anti-epileptic drugs for seizures, chemotherapy for small-cell lung cancer, and intravenous immunoglobulin and steroids for paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis led to a resolution of her seizures and improved her mental status. Conclusion Early recognition of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis and prompt intervention with immune therapies at the onset of presentation will probably translate into more favorable neurological outcomes.

  5. Subjective Uncertainty and Limbic Hyperactivation in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Emily R.; Welsh, Robert C.; Gonzalez, Richard; Fitzgerald, Kate D.; Abelson, James L.; Taylor, Stephan F.

    2017-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is often associated with pathological uncertainty regarding whether an action has been performed correctly or whether a bad outcome will occur, leading to compulsive “evidence gathering” behaviors aimed at reducing uncertainty. The current study used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate neural functioning in OCD patients and controls as subjective certainty was rated in response to sequential pieces of evidence for a decision. Uncertainty was experimentally manipulated so that some decisions were associated with no “objective” uncertainty (all observed evidence pointed to one correct choice), whereas other decisions contained calculable but varying levels of objective uncertainty based on displayed probabilities. Results indicated that OCD patients differed from controls on decisions that contained no objective uncertainty, such that patients rated themselves as more uncertain. Patients also showed greater activation in a network of brain regions previously associated with internally-focused thought and valuation including ventromedial prefrontal cortex, parahippocampus, middle temporal cortex, as well as amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex/ventral anterior insula. In the patient group, a significantly greater number of positive intersubject correlations were found among several of these brain regions, suggesting that this network is more interconnected in patients. OCD patients did not differ from controls on decisions where task parameters led to uncertainty. These results indicate that OCD is associated with hyperactivation in a network of limbic/paralimbic brain regions when making decisions, which may contribute to the greater subjective experience of doubt that characterizes the disorder. PMID:22461182

  6. A clinical case of pseudotumorous chronic parainfectious limbic encephalitis

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    N. A. Shnaider

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Parainfectous limbic encephalitis (PILE associated with viruses of the Herpesviridae family is one of the forms of chronic herpes encephalitis characterized by limbic system dysfunction and a prolonged course with frequent exacerbations. There are two types of the course of the disease: latent autoimmune limbic encephalitis (LE progressing to mesial temporal sclerosis and pseudotumorous granulomatous LE. The latter (inflammatory pseudotumor or granuloma is characterized by the formation of a polymorphic inflammatory infiltrate with the elements of fibrosis, necrosis, and a granulomatous reaction and by myofibroblast cells. This is a slowly growing benign pseudotumor that contains much more plasma cells than inflammatory ones. The diagnosis of pseudotumorous LE is difficult and requires the participation of a neurologist, an immunologist, an oncologist, and a neurosurgeon. Perfusion computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy give proof to the adequacy of the term inflammatory pseudotumor because it is histologically difficult to characterize the lesion as a tumor or inflammation. When a chronic lesion in the central nervous system is lately diagnosed, the prognosis of the disease may be poor and complicated by the development of resistant symptomatic focal epilepsy and emotional, volitional, and cognitive impairments. It was differentially diagnosed from brain tumors (astrocytic, oligodendroglial, and mixed gliomas, ependymal, neuronal, neuroglial, and embryonal tumors, meningiomas, cholesteatomas, dermoid cysts, teratomas, and cysts, other reactive and inflammatory processes (leukemic infiltrations, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, encephalomyelitis, hypoparathyroidism, Addison's disease, vitamin A intoxication, and the long-term use of glucocorticoids and contraceptives. The authors describe a clinical case of the pseudotumorous course of chronic PILE in a 28-year-old woman

  7. Effect of transporter inhibition on the distribution of cefadroxil in rat brain.

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    Chen, Xiaomei; Loryan, Irena; Payan, Maryam; Keep, Richard F; Smith, David E; Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta

    2014-01-01

    Cefadroxil, a cephalosporin antibiotic, is a substrate for several membrane transporters including peptide transporter 2 (PEPT2), organic anion transporters (OATs), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs), and organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATPs). These transporters are expressed at the blood-brain barrier (BBB), blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB), and/or brain cells. The effect of these transporters on cefadroxil distribution in brain is unknown, especially in the extracellular and intracellular fluids within brain. Intracerebral microdialysis was used to measure unbound concentrations of cefadroxil in rat blood, striatum extracellular fluid (ECF) and lateral ventricle cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The distribution of cefadroxil in brain was compared in the absence and presence of probenecid, an inhibitor of OATs, MRPs and OATPs, where both drugs were administered intravenously. The effect of PEPT2 inhibition by intracerebroventricular (icv) infusion of Ala-Ala, a substrate of PEPT2, on cefadroxil levels in brain was also evaluated. In addition, using an in vitro brain slice method, the distribution of cefadroxil in brain intracellular fluid (ICF) was studied in the absence and presence of transport inhibitors (probenecid for OATs, MRPs and OATPs; Ala-Ala and glycylsarcosine for PEPT2). The ratio of unbound cefadroxil AUC in brain ECF to blood (Kp,uu,ECF) was ~2.5-fold greater during probenecid treatment. In contrast, the ratio of cefadroxil AUC in CSF to blood (Kp,uu,CSF) did not change significantly during probenecid infusion. Icv infusion of Ala-Ala did not change cefadroxil levels in brain ECF, CSF or blood. In the brain slice study, Ala-Ala and glycylsarcosine decreased the unbound volume of distribution of cefadroxil in brain (Vu,brain), indicating a reduction in cefadroxil accumulation in brain cells. In contrast, probenecid increased cefadroxil accumulation in brain cells, as indicated by a greater value for Vu,brain. Transporters

  8. Frontal White Matter Damage Impairs Response Inhibition in Children Following Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Lipszyc, Jonathan; Levin, Harvey; Hanten, Gerri; Hunter, Jill; Dennis, Maureen; Schachar, Russell

    2014-01-01

    Inhibition, the ability to suppress inappropriate cognitions or behaviors, can be measured using computer tasks and questionnaires. Inhibition depends on the frontal cortex, but the role of the underlying white matter (WM) is unclear. We assessed the specific impact of frontal WM damage on inhibition in 29 children with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (15 with and 14 without frontal WM damage), 21 children with orthopedic injury, and 29 population controls. We used the Stop Signal Task to measure response inhibition, the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function to assess everyday inhibition, and T2 fluid-attenuated inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging to identify lesions. Children with frontal WM damage had impaired response inhibition compared with all other groups and poorer everyday inhibition than the orthopedic injury group. Frontal WM lesions most often affected the superior frontal gyrus. These results provide evidence for the critical role of frontal WM in inhibition. PMID:24618405

  9. Pilomotor seizures: an autonomic semiology of limbic encephalitis?

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    Rocamora, Rodrigo; Becerra, Juan L; Fossas, Pilar; Gomez, María; Vivanco-Hidalgo, Rosa M; Mauri, José A; Molins, Albert

    2014-09-01

    Ictal piloerection is an infrequent seizure semiology that is commonly overlooked as an ictal epileptic manifestation. Piloerection is considered to be principally caused by temporal lobe activity although frontal and hypothalamic seizure origins have been reported. The described etiology has shown a wide variety of structural causes such as mesial temporal sclerosis, tumors, posttraumatic, cavernomas and cryptogenic epilepsies. We retrospectively reviewed the incidence of ictal piloerection in the clinical records of patients who underwent video-EEG monitoring (VEEGM) between 2007 and 2013 in a multicenter cooperative study. All patients presented refractory epilepsies and were evaluated with a protocol that included brain MRI, neuropsychology and VEEGM. A total of 766 patients were evaluated in four tertiary centers in Spain. Five patients showed piloerection as principal seizure semiology (prevalence 0.65%). The mean age at seizure onset was 39.6 years and the average epilepsy duration was 5.2 years (range 2-14) before diagnosis. Four patients were additionally examined with FDG-PET and/or SPECT-SISCOM. All presented temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), three right-sided and two left-sided. A typical unilateral hippocampal sclerosis was described in 3 cases. The etiology detected in all cases was limbic encephalitis. Three had LGI1, one anti-Hu, and another Ma2 antibodies. Our series describes a so far not well-recognized autoimmune association of pilomotor seizures to limbic encephalitis. This etiology should be ruled out through a comprehensive diagnostic work-up even in cases of long-lasting TLE with typical hippocampal atrophy on MRI. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Increased cortical-limbic anatomical network connectivity in major depression revealed by diffusion tensor imaging.

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    Peng Fang

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging studies have reported significant functional and structural differences between depressed patients and controls. Little attention has been given, however, to the abnormalities in anatomical connectivity in depressed patients. In the present study, we aim to investigate the alterations in connectivity of whole-brain anatomical networks in those suffering from major depression by using machine learning approaches. Brain anatomical networks were extracted from diffusion magnetic resonance images obtained from both 22 first-episode, treatment-naive adults with major depressive disorder and 26 matched healthy controls. Using machine learning approaches, we differentiated depressed patients from healthy controls based on their whole-brain anatomical connectivity patterns and identified the most discriminating features that represent between-group differences. Classification results showed that 91.7% (patients=86.4%, controls=96.2%; permutation test, p<0.0001 of subjects were correctly classified via leave-one-out cross-validation. Moreover, the strengths of all the most discriminating connections were increased in depressed patients relative to the controls, and these connections were primarily located within the cortical-limbic network, especially the frontal-limbic network. These results not only provide initial steps toward the development of neurobiological diagnostic markers for major depressive disorder, but also suggest that abnormal cortical-limbic anatomical networks may contribute to the anatomical basis of emotional dysregulation and cognitive impairments associated with this disease.

  11. Limbic systems for emotion and for memory, but no single limbic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, Edmund T

    2015-01-01

    The concept of a (single) limbic system is shown to be outmoded. Instead, anatomical, neurophysiological, functional neuroimaging, and neuropsychological evidence is described that anterior limbic and related structures including the orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala are involved in emotion, reward valuation, and reward-related decision-making (but not memory), with the value representations transmitted to the anterior cingulate cortex for action-outcome learning. In this 'emotion limbic system' a computational principle is that feedforward pattern association networks learn associations from visual, olfactory and auditory stimuli, to primary reinforcers such as taste, touch, and pain. In primates including humans this learning can be very rapid and rule-based, with the orbitofrontal cortex overshadowing the amygdala in this learning important for social and emotional behaviour. Complementary evidence is described showing that the hippocampus and limbic structures to which it is connected including the posterior cingulate cortex and the fornix-mammillary body-anterior thalamus-posterior cingulate circuit are involved in episodic or event memory, but not emotion. This 'hippocampal system' receives information from neocortical areas about spatial location, and objects, and can rapidly associate this information together by the different computational principle of autoassociation in the CA3 region of the hippocampus involving feedback. The system can later recall the whole of this information in the CA3 region from any component, a feedback process, and can recall the information back to neocortical areas, again a feedback (to neocortex) recall process. Emotion can enter this memory system from the orbitofrontal cortex etc., and be recalled back to the orbitofrontal cortex etc. during memory recall, but the emotional and hippocampal networks or 'limbic systems' operate by different computational principles, and operate independently of each other except insofar as an

  12. Hippocampal TNFα Signaling Contributes to Seizure Generation in an Infection-Induced Mouse Model of Limbic Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Dipan C.; Wallis, Glenna; Dahle, E. Jill; McElroy, Pallavi B.; Thomson, Kyle E.; West, Peter J.; Smeal, Roy M.; Patel, Manisha; Fujinami, Robert S.; White, H. Steve

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Central nervous system infection can induce epilepsy that is often refractory to established antiseizure drugs. Previous studies in the Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV)-induced mouse model of limbic epilepsy have demonstrated the importance of inflammation, especially that mediated by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), in the development of acute seizures. TNFα modulates glutamate receptor trafficking via TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) to cause increased excitatory synaptic transmission. Therefore, we hypothesized that an increase in TNFα signaling after TMEV infection might contribute to acute seizures. We found a significant increase in both mRNA and protein levels of TNFα and the protein expression ratio of TNF receptors (TNFR1:TNFR2) in the hippocampus, a brain region most likely involved in seizure initiation, after TMEV infection, which suggests that TNFα signaling, predominantly through TNFR1, may contribute to limbic hyperexcitability. An increase in hippocampal cell-surface glutamate receptor expression was also observed during acute seizures. Although pharmacological inhibition of TNFR1-mediated signaling had no effect on acute seizures, several lines of genetically modified animals deficient in either TNFα or TNFRs had robust changes in seizure incidence and severity after TMEV infection. TNFR2–/– mice were highly susceptible to developing acute seizures, suggesting that TNFR2-mediated signaling may provide beneficial effects during the acute seizure period. Taken together, the present results suggest that inflammation in the hippocampus, caused predominantly by TNFα signaling, contributes to hyperexcitability and acute seizures after TMEV infection. Pharmacotherapies designed to suppress TNFR1-mediated or augment TNFR2-mediated effects of TNFα may provide antiseizure and disease-modifying effects after central nervous system infection. PMID:28497109

  13. Blockage of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 inhibits brain edema in middle cerebral artery occlusion mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Pinghui; Tian, Yujing; Hong, Zhiwen; Li, Lin; Zhou, Libin; Chen, Lei; Chen, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Brain edema is an important pathological process during stroke. Activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) causes an up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in lung tissue. MMP can digest the endothelial basal lamina to destroy blood brain barrier, leading to vasogenic brain edema. Herein, we tested whether TRPV4-blockage could inhibit brain edema through inhibiting MMPs in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) mice. We found that the brain water content and Evans blue extravasation at 48 h post-MCAO were reduced by a TRPV4 antagonist HC-067047. The increased MMP-2/9 protein expression in hippocampi of MCAO mice was attenuated by HC-067046, but only the increased MMP-9 activity was blocked by HC-067047. The loss of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) and occludin protein in MCAO mice was also attenuated by HC-067047. Moreover, MMP-2/9 protein expression increased in mice treated with a TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A, but only MMP-9 activity was increased by GSK1016790A. Finally, ZO-1 and occludin protein expression was decreased by GSK1016790A, which was reversed by an MMP-9 inhibitor. We conclude that blockage of TRPV4 may inhibit brain edema in cerebral ischemia through inhibiting MMP-9 activation and the loss of tight junction protein.

  14. Suppression of Brain Mast Cells Degranulation Inhibits Microglial Activation and Central Nervous System Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongquan; Zhang, Xiang; Wang, Yiming; Zhou, Xiqiao; Qian, Yanning; Zhang, Shu

    2017-03-01

    Brain inflammation has a critical role in the pathophysiology of brain diseases. Microglia, the resident immune cells in the brain, play an important role in brain inflammation, while brain mast cells are the "first responder" in the injury rather than microglia. Functional aspects of mast cell-microglia interactions remain poorly understood. Our results demonstrated that site-directed injection of the "mast cell degranulator" compound 48/80 (C48/80) in the hypothalamus induced mast cell degranulation, microglial activation, and inflammatory factor production, which initiated the acute brain inflammatory response. "Mast cell stabilizer" disodium cromoglycate (cromolyn) inhibited this effect, including decrease of inflammatory cytokines, reduced microglial activation, inhibition of MAPK and AKT pathways, and repression of protein expression of histamine receptor 1 (H1R), histamine receptor 4 (H4R), protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2), and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in microglia. We also demonstrated that C48/80 had no effect on microglial activation in mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh/W-sh) mice. These results implicate that activated brain mast cells trigger microglial activation and stabilization of mast cell inhibits microglial activation-induced central nervous system (CNS) inflammation. Interactions between mast cells and microglia could constitute a new and unique therapeutic target for CNS immune inflammation-related diseases.

  15. Is fetal brain monoamine oxidase inhibition the missing link between maternal smoking and conduct disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baler, Ruben D; Volkow, Nora D; Fowler, Joanna S; Benveniste, Helene

    2008-05-01

    Smoking is the leading cause of preventable illness in the world today. Prenatal cigarette smoke exposure (PCSE) is a particularly insidious form because so many of its associated health effects befall the unborn child and produce behavioural outcomes that manifest themselves only years later. Among these are the associations between PCSE and conduct disorders, which have been mostly ascribed to the deleterious effects of nicotine on the fetal brain. Here we hypothesize that inhibition of brain monoamine oxidase (MAO) during fetal brain development, secondary to maternal cigarette smoking and in addition to nicotine, is a likely contributor to this association. MAOs play a central role in monoaminergic balance in the brain, and their inhibition during fetal development - but not during adult life - is known to result in an aggressive phenotype in laboratory animals. This paper provides theoretical and experimental support for the notion that cigarette smoke-induced inhibition of MAO in the fetal brain, particularly when it occurs in combination with polymorphisms in the MAOA gene that lead to lower enzyme concentration in the brain, may result in brain morphologic and functional changes that enhance the risk of irritability, poor self-control and aggression in the offspring. It also encourages research to evaluate whether the interaction of smoking exposure during fetal development and MAOA genotype increases the risk for conduct disorder over that incurred by mere fetal exposure to tobacco smoke.

  16. Inhibition of brain tumor cell proliferation by alternating electric fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Hyesun; Oh, Seung-ick; Hong, Sunghoi, E-mail: shong21@korea.ac.kr, E-mail: radioyoon@korea.ac.kr [School of Biosystem and Biomedical Science, Korea University, Seoul 136-703 (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Jiwon; Jeong, Seonghoon; Yoon, Myonggeun, E-mail: shong21@korea.ac.kr, E-mail: radioyoon@korea.ac.kr [Department of Bio-convergence Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-703 (Korea, Republic of); Koh, Eui Kwan [Seoul Center, Korea Basic Science Institute, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-17

    This study was designed to investigate the mechanism by which electric fields affect cell function, and to determine the optimal conditions for electric field inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Low-intensity (<2 V/cm) and intermediate-frequency (100–300 kHz) alternating electric fields were applied to glioblastoma cell lines. These electric fields inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest and abnormal mitosis due to the malformation of microtubules. These effects were significantly dependent on the intensity and frequency of applied electric fields.

  17. Effect of glutamine synthetase inhibition on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in bile duct ligated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Andreas W; Dadsetan, Sherry; Keiding, Susanne; Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Simonsen, Mette; Ott, Peter; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Sørensen, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Ammonia has a key role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the brain, glutamine synthetase (GS) rapidly converts blood-borne ammonia into glutamine which in high concentrations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction and osmolytic brain edema. In astrocyte-neuron cocultures and brains of healthy rats, inhibition of GS by methionine sulfoximine (MSO) reduced glutamine synthesis and increased alanine synthesis. Here, we investigate effects of MSO on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in sham and bile duct ligated (BDL) rats. Concentrations of glutamine, glutamate, alanine, and aspartate and incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into these amino acids in brain, liver, muscle, kidney, and plasma were similar in sham and BDL rats treated with saline. Methionine sulfoximine reduced glutamine concentrations in liver, kidney, and plasma but not in brain and muscle; MSO reduced incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into glutamine in all tissues. It did not affect alanine concentrations in any of the tissues but plasma alanine concentration increased; incorporation of (15)NH(4)(+) into alanine was increased in brain in sham and BDL rats and in kidney in sham rats. It inhibited GS in all tissues examined but only in brain was an increased incorporation of (15)N-ammonia into alanine observed. Liver and kidney were important for metabolizing blood-borne ammonia.

  18. Neurophysiological responses to stressful motion and anti-motion sickness drugs as mediated by the limbic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, R. L.; Odell, S.

    1982-01-01

    Performance is characterized in terms of attention and memory, categorizing extrinsic mechanism mediated by ACTH, norepinephrine and dopamine, and intrinsic mechanisms as cholinergic. The cholinergic role in memory and performance was viewed from within the limbic system and related to volitional influences of frontal cortical afferents and behavioral responses of hypothalamic and reticular system efferents. The inhibitory influence of the hippocampus on the autonomic and hormonal responses mediated through the hypothalamus, pituitary, and brain stem are correlated with the actions of such anti-motion sickness drugs as scopolamine and amphetamine. These drugs appear to exert their effects on motion sickness symptomatology through diverse though synergistic neurochemical mechanisms involving the septohippocampal pathway and other limbic system structures. The particular impact of the limbic system on an animal's behavioral and hormonal responses to stress is influenced by ACTH, cortisol, scopolamine, and amphetamine.

  19. A case study of voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-related limbic encephalitis with PET/MRI findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian K. Day

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated the significance of inflammation and autoantibodies in epilepsy, and the use of immunotherapies in certain situations has become an established practice. Temporal lobe epilepsy can follow paraneoplastic or nonparaneoplastic limbic encephalitis associated with antibodies directed against brain antigens. Here, we focus on a patient with worsening confusion and temporal lobe seizures despite treatment with antiepileptic medications. Serial brain MRIs did not conclusively reveal structural abnormalities, so the patient underwent brain PET/MRI to simultaneously evaluate brain structure and function, revealing bitemporal abnormalities. The patient was diagnosed with voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-related limbic encephalitis based on clinical presentation, imaging findings, and antibody testing. Treatment included the addition of a second antiepileptic agent and oral steroids. His seizures and cognitive deficits improved and stabilized.

  20. Diurnal cortisol amplitude and fronto-limbic activity in response to stressful stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham-Bussel, Amy C; Root, James C; Butler, Tracy; Tuescher, Oliver; Pan, Hong; Epstein, Jane; Weisholtz, Daniel S; Pavony, Michelle; Silverman, Michael E; Goldstein, Martin S; Altemus, Margaret; Cloitre, Marylene; Ledoux, Joseph; McEwen, Bruce; Stern, Emily; Silbersweig, David

    2009-06-01

    The development and exacerbation of many psychiatric and neurologic conditions are associated with dysregulation of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis as measured by aberrant levels of cortisol secretion. Here we report on the relationship between the amplitude of diurnal cortisol secretion, measured across 3 typical days in 18 healthy individuals, and blood oxygen level dependant (BOLD) response in limbic fear/stress circuits, elicited by in-scanner presentation of emotionally negative stimuli, specifically, images of the World Trade Center (WTC) attack. Results indicate that subjects who secrete a greater amplitude of cortisol diurnally demonstrate less brain activation in limbic regions, including the amygdala and hippocampus/parahippocampus, and hypothalamus during exposure to traumatic WTC-related images. Such initial findings can begin to link our understanding, in humans, of the relationship between the diurnal amplitude of a hormone integral to the stress response, and those neuroanatomical regions that are implicated as both modulating and being modulated by that response.

  1. A Primary Role for Nucleus Accumbens and Related Limbic Network in Vocal Tics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCairn, Kevin W; Nagai, Yuji; Hori, Yukiko; Ninomiya, Taihei; Kikuchi, Erika; Lee, Ju-Young; Suhara, Tetsuya; Iriki, Atsushi; Minamimoto, Takafumi; Takada, Masahiko; Isoda, Masaki; Matsumoto, Masayuki

    2016-01-20

    Inappropriate vocal expressions, e.g., vocal tics in Tourette syndrome, severely impact quality of life. Neural mechanisms underlying vocal tics remain unexplored because no established animal model representing the condition exists. We report that unilateral disinhibition of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) generates vocal tics in monkeys. Whole-brain PET imaging identified prominent, bilateral limbic cortico-subcortical activation. Local field potentials (LFPs) developed abnormal spikes in the NAc and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Vocalization could occur without obvious LFP spikes, however, when phase-phase coupling of alpha oscillations were accentuated between the NAc, ACC, and the primary motor cortex. These findings contrasted with myoclonic motor tics induced by disinhibition of the dorsolateral putamen, where PET activity was confined to the ipsilateral sensorimotor system and LFP spikes always preceded motor tics. We propose that vocal tics emerge as a consequence of dysrhythmic alpha coupling between critical nodes in the limbic and motor networks. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  2. Human primary brain tumor cell growth inhibition in serum-free medium optimized for neuron survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Gregory J; LeRoux, Peter D

    2007-07-09

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumor in adults from which about 15,000 patients die each year in the United States. Despite aggressive surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, median survival remains only 1 year. Here we evaluate growth of primary human brain tumor cells in a defined nutrient culture medium (Neuregen) that was optimized for neuron regeneration. We hypothesized that Neuregen would inhibit tumor cell growth because of its ability to inhibit gliosis in rat brain. Tumor tissue was collected from 18 patients including 10 males and 8 females (mean age 60+/-12 years) who underwent craniotomy for newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed brain tumors. The tissue was shipped overnight in Hibernate transport medium. Tumor cells were isolated and plated in Neurobasal/serum or Neuregen on culture plastic. After 1 week, growth in Neuregen was significantly less in 9/10 glioblastoma multiforme cases, 5/5 meningioma cases and 3/3 cases of brain metastasis. Analysis of deficient formulations of Neuregen and formulations to which selected components were added back implicate no single active component. However, individual cases were sensitive to corticosterone, selenium, ethanolamine, fatty acids and/or antioxidants. Therefore, a defined culture medium that promotes neuron regeneration inhibits the growth of human primary glioblastoma, meningioma and metastatic tumor cells in culture. The possible in vivo efficacy of Neuregen for treatment of brain tumor resections remains to be determined.

  3. Cadmium inhibits neurogenesis in zebrafish embryonic brain development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, Elly Suk Hen [Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, 1200 California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Hui, Michelle Nga Yu; Lin Chunchi [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China); Cheng Shukhan [Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)], E-mail: bhcheng@cityu.edu.hk

    2008-05-01

    Cadmium is a non-essential heavy metal found abundantly in the environment. Children of women exposed to cadmium during pregnancy display lower motor and perceptual abilities. High cadmium body burden in children is also related to impaired intelligence and lowered school achievement. However, little is known about the molecular and cellular basis of developmental neurotoxicity in the sensitive early life stages of animals. In this study, we explore neurological deficits caused by cadmium during early embryonic stages in zebrafish by examining regionalization of the neural tube, pattern formation and cell fate determination, commitment of proneural genes and induction of neurogenesis. We show that cadmium-treated embryos developed a smaller head with unclear boundaries between the brain subdivisions, particularly in the mid-hindbrain region. Embryos display normal anterior to posterior regionalization; however, the commitment of neural progenitor cells was affected by cadmium. We observe prominent reductions in the expression of several proneuronal genes including ngn1 in cell clusters, zash1a in the developing optic tectum, and zash1b in the telencephalon and tectum. Cadmium-treated embryos also have fewer differentiated neurons and glia in the facial sensory ganglia as indicated by decreased zn-12 expression. Also, a lower transcription level of neurogenic genes, ngn1 and neuroD, is observed in neurons. Our data suggest that cadmium-induced neurotoxicity can be caused by impaired neurogenesis, resulting in markedly reduced neuronal differentiation and axonogenesis.

  4. Dynamic brain mapping of behavior change: tracking response initiation and inhibition to changes in reinforcement rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlund, Michael W; Magee, Sandy; Hudgins, Caleb D

    2012-10-01

    Adaptive behavior change is supported by executive control processes distributed throughout a prefrontal-striatal-parietal network. Yet, the temporal dynamics of regions in the network have not been characterized. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we tracked changes brain activation while subjects initiated and inhibited responding in accordance with changes in reinforcement rate. During imaging, subjects completed a free-operant task that involved repeated transitions between fixed-ratio reinforcement and extinction (RF:EXT), where reinforcement rate decreased and responding was inhibited, and between extinction and fixed-ratio reinforcement (EXT:RF), where reinforcement rate increased and responding was initiated. Our whole-brain temporal assessment revealed that transitions which required initiating and inhibiting responding prompted positive phasic responses in a prefrontal-parietal network, the insula and thalamus. However, response initiation prompted by an increase in reinforcement rate during the EXT:RF transition elicited positive phasic responses in reward-sensitive striatal regions. Furthermore, response inhibition prompted by a decrease in reinforcement rate during the RF:EXT transition elicited negative phasic responses in ventral frontal regions sensitive to value and contingency. Our findings highlight the temporal dynamics of a brain network that supports behavioral changes (initiation and inhibition) resulting from changes in local reinforcement rates.

  5. Limbic Encephalitis Driven by a Pleural Mesothelioma: A Paraneoplastic Complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob O. Day

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes have only been described with pleural mesothelioma in five cases. We have described a 72-year-old man who developed anterograde amnesia 27 months after diagnosis of epithelioid pleural mesothelioma. Investigations revealed a limbic encephalitis with no alternative causes identified. Limbic encephalitis is a classical paraneoplastic syndrome and presentation within five years of a cancer with no other causes identified is sufficient to diagnose a paraneoplastic etiology. This is the first case of isolated paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis driven by a pleural mesothelioma.

  6. Novel brain-penetrating oximes for reactivation of cholinesterase inhibited by sarin and VX surrogates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Janice E; Meek, Edward C; Chambers, Howard W

    2016-06-01

    Current oxime reactivators for organophosphate-inhibited cholinesterase (ChE) do not effectively cross the blood-brain barrier and therefore cannot restore brain ChE activity in vivo. Our laboratories have studied highly relevant sarin and VX surrogates, which differ from their respective nerve agents only in the leaving group and thereby leave ChE phosphylated with the same chemical moiety as sarin and VX. Our laboratories have developed novel substituted phenoxyalkyl pyridinium oximes that lead to reduced ChE inhibition in the brains of rats challenged with a high sublethal dosage of the sarin surrogate, whereas 2-PAM did not, using a paradigm designed to demonstrate brain penetration. In addition, treatment of rats with these novel oximes is associated with attenuation of seizure-like behavior compared to rats treated with 2-PAM, providing additional evidence that the oximes penetrate the blood-brain barrier. Further, some of the oximes provided 24-h survival superior to 2-PAM, and shortened the duration of seizure-like behavior when rats were challenged with lethal dosages of the sarin and VX surrogates, providing additional support for the conclusion that these oximes penetrate the brain.

  7. A case of limbic encephalitis presenting as a paraneoplastic manifestation of limited stage small cell lung cancer: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butt Mohammad

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The differential diagnosis of altered mental status and behavioral change is very extensive. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is a rare cause of cognitive impairment, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis. Case presentation A 64-year-old British Caucasian woman presented to our hospital with a 12-week history of confusion and short-term memory loss. She was hyponatremic with a serum sodium level of 128mmol/L. Moreover, there was evidence of left hilar prominence on the chest radiograph. A thoracic computed tomography scan showed left hilar opacity with confluent lymphadenopathy. A percutaneous biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of small cell lung cancer. There was no radiological evidence of brain metastasis on the computed tomography scan. In view of continued cognitive impairment, which was felt to be disproportionate to hyponatremia, a magnetic resonance imaging scan of the brain was undertaken. It showed hyperintense signals from both hippocampi, highly suggestive of limbic encephalitis presenting as a paraneoplastic manifestation of small cell lung cancer. She had a significant radiological and clinical response following chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Conclusion This case highlights the importance of considering paraneoplastic syndromes in patients with neurological symptoms in the context of lung malignancy. If initial investigations fail to reveal the cause of cognitive impairment in a patient with malignancy, magnetic resonance imaging may be invaluable in the diagnosis of limbic encephalitis. The clinical presentation, diagnostic techniques and management of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis are discussed in this case report.

  8. Berberine inhibits inflammatory activation of rat brain microglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kyong Nyon Nam; Jae-Hong Kim; Hoon-Ji Jung; Jung-Mi Park; Sang-Kwan Moon; Young-Suk Kim; Sun Yeou Kim; Eunjoo H.Lee

    2010-01-01

    Chronic activation of microglial cells endangers neuronal survival through the release of various proinflammatory and neurotoxic factors.Berberine,the effective ingredient of Coptidis Rhizoma and Cortex Phellodendri,has a wide range of pharmacological functions,including anti-inflammatory,anti-atherosclerotic and anti-cancer effects.The neuroprotective potential of berberine has previously been demonstrated.The present study aimed to examine whether berberine could repress microglial activation and can be considered a potential therapeutic candidate to target neurodegenerative diseases.Primary microglial cells and BV2 microglial cells were cultured and stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide(LPS).Berberine chloride was treated prior to LPS or simultaneously with LPS stimulation.Results revealed that berberine was effective at inhibiting nitric oxide release from primary microglial cells when cells were exposed to the compound prior to LPS or simultaneously with LPS.It also reduced the LPS-stimulated production of tumor necrosis factor-α,interleukin-1β,prostaglandin E2,and intracellular reactive oxygen species and nuclear factor-kappa activation.Additionally,berberine reduced nitric oxide release from microglia stimulated with interferon-γ and amyloid β.These results suggest that berberine provides neuroprotection by reducing the production of various neurotoxic molecules from activated microglia.

  9. Effects of meclofenamic acid on limbic epileptogenesis in mice kindling models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Miaomiao; Dai, Yunjian; Xu, Cenglin; Wang, Yi; Wang, Shuang; Chen, Zhong

    2013-05-24

    The most avid goal for antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) development today is to discover potential agents to prevent epilepsy or slow the process of epileptogenesis. Accumulating evidence reveals that gap junctions in the brain may be involved in epileptogenesis. Meclofenamic acid (MFA), a gap junction blocker, has not yet been applied in epileptogenic models to test whether it has antiepileptogenic or disease-modifying properties or not. In this study, we investigated the effects of MFA on limbic epileptogenesis in amygdaloid kindling and hippocampus rapid kindling models in mice. We found that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v., 2 μl) administration of either dose of MFA (100 μM, 1mM or 100mM) 15 min prior daily kindling stimulus decreased seizure stage, shortened the after-discharge duration (ADD) and increased the number of stimulations required to elicit stage 5 seizure. MFA also prevented the establishment of post-kindling enhanced amygdala excitability, evident as the increase of afterdischarge threshold (ADT) compared with pre-kindling values. Furthermore, MFA retarded kindling acquisition in mice hippocampus rapid kindling model as well, which demonstrated that the antiepileptogenic effects of MFA were not specific to the amygdala but also occur in other limbic structures such as the hippocampus. Our results confirm that MFA can slow the limbic epileptogenesis in both amygdaloid kindling and hippocampus rapid kindling models, and indicate that MFA may be a potential drug that has antiepileptogenic or disease-modifying properties.

  10. Histone deacetylases control neurogenesis in embryonic brain by inhibition of BMP2/4 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Shakèd

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Histone-modifying enzymes are essential for a wide variety of cellular processes dependent upon changes in gene expression. Histone deacetylases (HDACs lead to the compaction of chromatin and subsequent silencing of gene transcription, and they have recently been implicated in a diversity of functions and dysfunctions in the postnatal and adult brain including ocular dominance plasticity, memory consolidation, drug addiction, and depression. Here we investigate the role of HDACs in the generation of neurons and astrocytes in the embryonic brain. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As a variety of HDACs are expressed in differentiating neural progenitor cells, we have taken a pharmacological approach to inhibit multiple family members. Inhibition of class I and II HDACs in developing mouse embryos with trichostatin A resulted in a dramatic reduction in neurogenesis in the ganglionic eminences and a modest increase in neurogenesis in the cortex. An identical effect was observed upon pharmacological inhibition of HDACs in in vitro-differentiating neural precursors derived from the same brain regions. A reduction in neurogenesis in ganglionic eminence-derived neural precursors was accompanied by an increase in the production of immature astrocytes. We show that HDACs control neurogenesis by inhibition of the bone morphogenetic protein BMP2/4 signaling pathway in radial glial cells. HDACs function at the transcriptional level by inhibiting and promoting, respectively, the expression of Bmp2 and Smad7, an intracellular inhibitor of BMP signaling. Inhibition of the BMP2/4 signaling pathway restored normal levels of neurogenesis and astrogliogenesis to both ganglionic eminence- and cortex-derived cultures in which HDACs were inhibited. CONCLUSIONS: Our results demonstrate a transcriptionally-based regulation of BMP2/4 signaling by HDACs both in vivo and in vitro that is critical for neurogenesis in the ganglionic eminences and that modulates cortical

  11. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase and different ATPases by a novel phosphorothionate (RPR-II) in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M F; Siddiqui, M K; Jamil, K

    2000-10-01

    A novel phosphorothionate (2-butenoic acid-3-(diethoxy phosphinothioyl)-methyl ester (RPR-II), synthesized at the Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad, targets its effect on rat brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and Na(+)-K(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+) ATPases, as evident in this investigation. Three subchronic doses 0.014 (low), 0.028 (medium), and 0.042 (high) mg kg(-1) were administered to rats daily for a period of 90 days RPR-II caused statistically significant dose- and time-dependent inhibition in brain AChE and also in Na(+)-K(+), Mg(2+), and Ca(2+) ATPases in both male and female rats after 45 and 90 days of treatment. The low dose was generally insignificant while the medium and high doses were significantly effective. Females were more susceptible than males with regard to brain AChE, Na(+)-K(+), and Mg(2+) ATPases, which indicates sexual dimorphism in the treated rats. Interestingly, after 28 days post-treatment, recovery of these enzymes was observed. The relative sensitivities of these enzymes indicated that brain AChE was more sensitive than any of the ATPases, but among the ATPases Na(+)-K(+) ATPase was more susceptible than Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) ATPases. This compound, besides inhibiting the target of organophosphates, AChE, also inhibited different ATPases, suggesting both synaptic transmission and nerve conduction were affected.

  12. MIF Maintains the Tumorigenic Capacity of Brain Tumor-Initiating Cells by Directly Inhibiting p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukaya, Raita; Ohta, Shigeki; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Sugihara, Eiji; Okano, Hideyuki; Saya, Hideyuki; Kawakami, Yutaka; Kawase, Takeshi; Yoshida, Kazunari; Toda, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Tumor-initiating cells thought to drive brain cancer are embedded in a complex heterogeneous histology. In this study, we isolated primary cells from 21 human brain tumor specimens to establish cell lines with high tumorigenic potential and to identify the molecules enabling this capability. The morphology, sphere-forming ability upon expansion, and differentiation potential of all cell lines were indistinguishable in vitro However, testing for tumorigenicity revealed two distinct cell types, brain tumor-initiating cells (BTIC) and non-BTIC. We found that macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was highly expressed in BTIC compared with non-BTIC. MIF bound directly to both wild-type and mutant p53 but regulated p53-dependent cell growth by different mechanisms, depending on glioma cell line and p53 status. MIF physically interacted with wild-type p53 in the nucleus and inhibited its transcription-dependent functions. In contrast, MIF bound to mutant p53 in the cytoplasm and abrogated transcription-independent induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, MIF knockdown inhibited BTIC-induced tumor formation in a mouse xenograft model, leading to increased overall survival. Collectively, our findings suggest that MIF regulates BTIC function through direct, intracellular inhibition of p53, shedding light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the tumorigenicity of certain malignant brain cells. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2813-23. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Inhibition of fatty acid binding proteins elevates brain anandamide levels and produces analgesia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kaczocha

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA is an antinociceptive lipid that is inactivated through cellular uptake and subsequent catabolism by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH. Fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs are intracellular carriers that deliver AEA and related N-acylethanolamines (NAEs to FAAH for hydrolysis. The mammalian brain expresses three FABP subtypes: FABP3, FABP5, and FABP7. Recent work from our group has revealed that pharmacological inhibition of FABPs reduces inflammatory pain in mice. The goal of the current work was to explore the effects of FABP inhibition upon nociception in diverse models of pain. We developed inhibitors with differential affinities for FABPs to elucidate the subtype(s that contributes to the antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors. Inhibition of FABPs reduced nociception associated with inflammatory, visceral, and neuropathic pain. The antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors mirrored their affinities for FABP5, while binding to FABP3 and FABP7 was not a predictor of in vivo efficacy. The antinociceptive effects of FABP inhibitors were mediated by cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα and FABP inhibition elevated brain levels of AEA, providing the first direct evidence that FABPs regulate brain endocannabinoid tone. These results highlight FABPs as novel targets for the development of analgesic and anti-inflammatory therapeutics.

  14. MLKL inhibition attenuates hypoxia-ischemia induced neuronal damage in developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yi; Shi, Jing; Tang, Ying; Zhao, Fengyan; Li, Shiping; Meng, Junjie; Tang, Jun; Lin, Xuemei; Peng, Xiaodong; Mu, Dezhi

    2016-05-01

    Mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) is a critical molecule mediating cell necroptosis. However, its role in brain injury remains obscure. We first investigated the functions and mechanisms of MLKL in mediating neuronal damage in developing brain after hypoxia-ischemia. Neuronal necroptosis was induced by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) plus caspase inhibitor zVAD treatment (OGD/zVAD). We found that two important necroptosis related proteins, receptor-interacting protein 1 and 3 (RIP1, RIP3) were upregulated. Furthermore, the interaction of RIP1-RIP3 with MLKL increased. Inhibition of MLKL through siRNA diminished RIP1-RIP3-MLKL interaction and attenuated neuronal death induced by OGD/zVAD. The translocation of oligomerized MLKL to the neuronal membrane leading to the injury of cellular membrane is the possible new mechanism of neuronal necroptosis. Animal experiment with neonatal rats further proved that MLKL inhibition attenuated brain damage induced by hypoxia-ischemia. These findings suggest that MLKL is a target to attenuate brain damage in developing brain.

  15. Spatial Memory Deficit and Tau Hyperphosphorylation Induced by Inhibiting PP2A in Rat Brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Qing; ZHENG Hong-yun; CHEN Juan; LI Hong-lian; GONG Cheng-xin; WANG Jian-zhi

    2005-01-01

    Hyperphosphorylation of Tau in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain appears to be caused by a down-regulation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). In this study, we selectively inhibited PP2A by injection of okadaic acid (OA) into the Meynert nucleus basalis of rats and found that 0.4 pmol of OA injection induced approximately 60% inhibition of PP2A 24 h after injection, 13% inhibition 48 h after injection and no obvious inhibition 72 h after injection. Hyperphosphorylation of Tau at Ser-198/Ser-199/Ser-202 and Ser-396/Ser-404 and spatial memory deficit of rats were induced 24 h after 0.4 pmol of OA injection. This study suggests that a down-regulation of PP2A may underlie abnormal hyperphosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins leading to neurofibrillary degeneration in AD.

  16. Histamine H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of serotonin release in the rat brain cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, E; Betz, R; Göthert, M

    1988-05-01

    Rat brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-serotonin were superfused with physiological salt solution (containing citalopram, an inhibitor of serotonin uptake) and the effect of histamine on the electrically (3 Hz) evoked 3H overflow was studied. Histamine decreased the evoked overflow in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of histamine was antagonized by impromidine and burimamide, but was not affected by pheniramine, ranitidine, metitepine and phentolamine. Given alone, impromidine facilitated the evoked overflow, whereas burimamide, pheniramine and ranitidine had no effect. The results suggest that histamine inhibits serotonin release in the rat brain cortex via histamine H3 receptors, which may be located presynaptically.

  17. Social isolation impairs adult neurogenesis in the limbic system and alters behaviors in female prairie voles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberwirth, Claudia; Liu, Yan; Jia, Xixi; Wang, Zuoxin

    2012-09-01

    Disruptions in the social environment, such as social isolation, are distressing and can induce various behavioral and neural changes in the distressed animal. We conducted a series of experiments to test the hypothesis that long-term social isolation affects brain plasticity and alters behavior in the highly social prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). In Experiment 1, adult female prairie voles were injected with a cell division marker, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU), and then same-sex pair-housed (control) or single-housed (isolation) for 6 weeks. Social isolation reduced cell proliferation, survival, and neuronal differentiation and altered cell death in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and the amygdala. In addition, social isolation reduced cell proliferation in the medial preoptic area and cell survival in the ventromedial hypothalamus. These data suggest that long-term social isolation affects distinct stages of adult neurogenesis in specific limbic brain regions. In Experiment 2, isolated females displayed higher levels of anxiety-like behaviors in both the open field and elevated plus maze tests and higher levels of depression-like behavior in the forced swim test than controls. Further, isolated females showed a higher level of affiliative behavior than controls, but the two groups did not differ in social recognition memory. Together, our data suggest that social isolation not only impairs cell proliferation, survival, and neuronal differentiation in limbic brain areas, but also alters anxiety-like, depression-like, and affiliative behaviors in adult female prairie voles. These data warrant further investigation of a possible link between altered neurogenesis within the limbic system and behavioral changes.

  18. Slit2 inhibits glioma cell invasion in the brain by suppression of Cdc42 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiin, Jia-Jean; Hu, Bo; Jarzynka, Michael J; Feng, Haizhong; Liu, Kui-Wei; Wu, Jane Y; Ma, Hsin-I; Cheng, Shi-Yuan

    2009-12-01

    Acquisition of insidious invasiveness by malignant glioma cells involves multiple genetic alterations in signaling pathways. Slit2, a chemorepulsive factor, controls cell migration of neuronal and glial cells during development and inhibits chemotaxic migration of various types of cells in vitro. However, the role of Slit2 in vitro remains controversial, and the biological significance of Slit2 expression in cancer cell invasion in vivo has not yet been determined. In the present study, we characterized the effects of Slit2 expression on the migration and invasion of invasive glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. By reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses, Slit2 was found to be expressed at lower levels in primary glioma specimens and invasive glioma cells compared with normal human brain cells and astrocytes. Ectopic expression of Slit2 or treatment with recombinant Slit2 on glioma cells attenuates cell migration and invasion through inhibition of Cdc42 activity in vitro. Cellular depletion of Robo1, a cognate receptor for Slit2, prevented Slit2 inhibition of Cdc42 activity and glioma cell migration. In vivo, expression of Slit2 by invasive SNB19 glioma cells markedly inhibited glioma cell infiltration into the brain of mice. Moreover, impediment of glioma cell invasion by Slit2 did not affect the expression of N-cadherin and beta-catenin in glioma cells. These results provide the first evidence demonstrating that Slit2-Robo1 inhibits glioma invasion through attenuating Cdc42 activity in vitro and in the brain. Understanding the mechanisms of Slit2-Robo1 inhibition of glioma cell invasion will foster new treatments for malignant gliomas.

  19. Cerebral activation associated with visually evoked sexual arousal in the limbic system: functional MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eun, Sung Jong; Kong, Gwang Woo; Kim, Hyung Joong; Seo, Jeong Jin; Kang, Heoung Keun; Cho, Ki Hyun; Yoon, Ka Hyun [School of Medicine, Chonnam National Univ., Kwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Yo [Wonkwang Univ., Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-08-01

    To identify the brain centers associated with visually evoked sexual arousal in the human brain, and to investigate the neural mechanism for sexual arousal using functional MRI (fMRI). A total of 20 sexually potent volunteers consisting of 10 males (mean age: 24) and 10 females (mean age: 23) underwent fMRI on a 1.5T MR scanner (GE Signa Horizon). The fMRI data were obtained from 7 slices (10 mm slice thickness) parallel to the AC-PC (anterior commissure and posterior commissure) line, giving a total of 511 MR images. The sexual stimulation consisted of a 1-minute rest with black screen, followed by a 4-minute stimulation by an erotic video film, and concluded with a 2-minute rest. The brain activation maps and their quantification were analyzed by the statistical parametric mapping (SPM 99) program. The brain activation regions associated with visual sexual arousal in the limbic system are the posterior cingulate gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, hypothalamus, medial cingulate gyrus, thalamus, amygdala, anterior cingulate gyrus, insula, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, globus pallidus and putamen. Especially, the parahippocampal gyrus, cingulate gyrus, thalamus and hypothalamus were highly activated in comparison with other areas. The overall activities of the limbic lobe, diencephalon, and basal ganglia were 11.8%, 10.5%, and 3.4%, respectively. In the correlation test between brain activity and sexual arousal, the hypothalamus and thalamus showed positive correlation, but the other brain areas showed no correlation. The fMRI is useful to quantitatively evaluate the cerebral activation associated with visually evoked, sexual arousal in the human brain. This result may be helpful by providing clinically valuable information on sexual disorder in humans as well as by increasing the understanding of the neuroanatomical correlates of sexual arousal.

  20. Bisquaternary oximes as reactivators of tabun-inhibited human brain cholinesterases: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuca, Kamil; Jun, Daniel; Cabal, Jiri; Musilova, Lucie

    2007-07-01

    Intoxications caused by tabun nerve agent are generally very hard to treat by convential acetylcholinesterase (AChE) reactivators. Due to this, new AChE reactivators are still developed. In this study, we have tested three new promising bisquaternary AChE reactivators: K027, K033 and K048. These reactivators were previously tested on rat brain homogenate. To mimic reality, we studied the potency of these new oximes to reactivate tabun-inhibited human brain cholinesterases. As is evident from the results, reactivator K048 (reactivation 40%) surpassed all reactivators tested in this study [including the most promising ones, namely trimedoxime (37%) and obidoxime (33%)]. Moreover, if compared to our previous results from rat brain studies, species differences were demonstrated.

  1. Colony stimulating factor 1 receptor inhibition eliminates microglia and attenuates brain injury after intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Minshu; Li, Zhiguo; Ren, Honglei; Jin, Wei-Na; Wood, Kristofer; Liu, Qiang; Sheth, Kevin N; Shi, Fu-Dong

    2017-07-01

    Microglia are the first responders to intracerebral hemorrhage, but their precise role in intracerebral hemorrhage remains to be defined. Microglia are the only type of brain cells expressing the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor, a key regulator for myeloid lineage cells. Here, we determined the effects of a colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor inhibitor (PLX3397) on microglia and the outcome in the context of experimental mouse intracerebral hemorrhage. We show that PLX3397 effectively depleted microglia, and the depletion of microglia was sustained after intracerebral hemorrhage. Importantly, colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor inhibition attenuated neurodeficits and brain edema in two experimental models of intracerebral hemorrhage induced by injection of collagenase or autologous blood. The benefit of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor inhibition was associated with reduced leukocyte infiltration in the brain and improved blood-brain barrier integrity after intracerebral hemorrhage, and each observation was independent of lesion size or hematoma volume. These results demonstrate that suppression of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor signaling ablates microglia and confers protection after intracerebral hemorrhage.

  2. Halofuginone Inhibits Angiogenesis and Growth in Implanted Metastatic Rat Brain Tumor Model-an MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinat Abramovitch

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Tumor growth and metastasis depend on angiogenesis; therefore, efforts are made to develop specific angiogenic inhibitors. Halofuginone (HF is a potent inhibitor of collagen type α1(I. In solid tumor models, HF has a potent antitumor and antiangiogenic effect in vivo, but its effect on brain tumors has not yet been evaluated. By employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we monitored the effect of HF on tumor progression and vascularization by utilizing an implanted malignant fibrous histiocytoma metastatic rat brain tumor model. Here we demonstrate that treatment with HF effectively and dose-dependently reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis. On day 13, HF-treated tumors were fivefold smaller than control (P < .001. Treatment with HF significantly prolonged survival of treated animals (142%; P = .001. In HF-treated rats, tumor vascularization was inhibited by 30% on day 13 and by 37% on day 19 (P < .05. Additionally, HF treatment inhibited vessel maturation (P = .03. Finally, in HF-treated rats, we noticed the appearance of a few clusters of satellite tumors, which were distinct from the primary tumor and usually contained vessel cores. This phenomenon was relatively moderate when compared to previous reports of other antiangiogenic agents used to treat brain tumors. We therefore conclude that HF is effective for treatment of metastatic brain tumors.

  3. Inhibition of tau hyperphosphorylation and beta amyloid production in rat brain by oral administration of atorvastatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Fen; LI Xu; SUO Ai-qin; ZHANG Jie-wen

    2010-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder and the leading cause of dementia in the elderly. The two hallmark lesions in AD brain are deposition of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs).Hypercholesteremia is one of the risk factors of AD. But its role in the pathogenesis of AD is largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between hypercholesteremia and tau phosphorylation or β-amyloid (Aβ),and evaluate the effect of atorvastatin on the level of tau phosphorylation and Aβ in the brains of rats fed with high cholesterol diet.Methods Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into normal diet control group, high cholesterol diet group,and high cholesterol diet plus atorvastatin (Lipitor, 15 mg·kg-1·d-1) treated group. Blood from caudal vein was collected to measure total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) at the end of the 3th and the 6th months by an enzymatic method. The animals were sacrificed 6 months later and brains were removed. All left brain hemispheres were fixed for immunohistochemistry. Hippocampus and cerebral cortex were separated from right hemispheres and homogenized separately. Tau phosphorylation and Aβ in the brain tissue were determined by Western blotting (using antibodies PHF-1 and Tau-1) and anti-Aβ40/anti-Aβ42, respectively.Results We found that high cholesterol diet led to hypercholesteremia of rats as well as hyperphosphorylation of tau and increased Aβ level in the brains. Treatment of the high cholesterol diet fed rats with atorvastatin prevented the changes of both tau phosphorylation and Aβ level induced by high cholesterol diet.Conclusions Hypercholesteremia could induce tau hyperphosphorylation and Aβ production in rat brain. Atorvastatin could inhibit tau hyperphosphorylation and decrease Aβ generation. It may play a protective role in the patho-process of hypercholesteremia

  4. Kindled non-convulsive behavioral seizures, analogous to primates. A 24th case of 'limbic psychotic trigger reaction': bizarre parental infanticide--might nonvoluntariness during LPTR become objectified by primate model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontius, Anneliese A

    2008-01-01

    Limbic psychotic trigger reaction (LPTR) includes paroxysmal, out-of-character, motiveless, unplanned felonies (or similarly bizarre social misbehavior), all committed during flat affect, autonomic arousal and a fleeting de novo psychosis. A transient limbic hyperactivation is implicated that impairs prefrontal monitoring (judgment, planning, intent, volition, emotional participation) but preserves memory for the acts. It is hypothesized that LPTR implicates an atavistic regression to a limbic 'paleo-consciousness', exemplified by a 24th patient (parental infanticide), presented herein. He had closed head injury and borderline abnormal posterior brain pathology (EEG/CT), which might have contributed to his unusually numerous visual hallucinations.

  5. Brain activation for response inhibition under gaming cue distraction in internet gaming disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gin-Chung; Yen, Ju-Yu; Chen, Chiao-Yun; Yen, Cheng-Fang; Chen, Cheng-Sheng; Lin, Wei-Chen; Ko, Chih-Hung

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated neural substrates related to the loss of control in college students with internet gaming disorder (IGD). We hypothesized that deficit in response inhibition under gaming cue distraction was the possible mechanism for the loss of control internet use. Eleven cases of IGD and 11 controls performed Go/NoGo tasks with/without gaming distraction in the functional magnetic resonance imaging scanner. When the gaming picture was shown as background while individuals were performing Go/NoGo tasks, the IGD group committed more commission errors. The control group increased their brain activations more over the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and superior parietal lobe under gaming cue distraction in comparison with the IGD group. Furthermore, brain activation of the right DLPFC and superior parietal lobe were negatively associated with performance of response inhibition among the IGD group. The results suggest that the function of response inhibition was impaired under gaming distraction among the IGD group, and individuals with IGD could not activate right DLPFC and superior parietal lobe to keep cognitive control and attention allocation for response inhibition under gaming cue distraction. This mechanism should be addressed in any intervention for IGD.

  6. Minocycline inhibits 5-lipoxygenase activation and brain inflammation after focal cerebral ischemia in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-sheng CHU; San-hua FANG; Yu ZHOU; Guo-hang YU; Meng-ling WANG; Wei-ping ZHANG; Er-qing WEI

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To determine whether the anti-inflanunatory effect of minocycline on postis-chemic brain injury is mediated by the inhibition of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) expression and enzymatic activation in rats.Methods: Focal cerebral ischemia was induced for 30 min with middle cerebral artery occlusion, followed by reperfusion. The ischemic injuries, endogenous IgG exudation, the accumulation of neutrophils and macrophage/microglia, and 5-LOX mRNA expression were determined 72 h after reperfusion. 5-LOX metabolites (leukotriene B4 and cysteinyl leukotrienes) were measured 3 h after reperfusion.Results: Minocycline (22.5 and 45 mg/kg, ip, for 3 d) attenuated ischemic injuries, IgG exudation, and the accumulation of neutrophils and macrophage/microglia 72 h after reperfusion. It also inhibited 5-LOX expression 72 h after reperfusion and the production of leukotrienes 3 h after reperfusion.Conclusion: Minocycline inhibited postis-chemic brain inflammation, which might be partly mediated by the inhibition of 5-LOX expression and enzymatic activation.

  7. [Diagnostic significance of the spinal-brain stem polysynaptic reflex and the period of inhibition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanichev, G A

    1985-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of the radial nerve associated with voluntary contraction of the shoulder girdle inhibited bioelectrical activity not only in the muscles of the hypothenar but also in the proximal muscles. In resting muscles, such stimulation elicited a reflex response with a large latent period. With weak voluntary tension stimulation elicited a reflex response while in the presence of considerable contraction the reflex response merged with bioelectrical activity, with a clearly demonstrable subsequent period of inhibition. The current viewpoint about the antidromal blockade of the segmental motoneurons is debated. It is suggested that the polysynaptic reflex and the inhibition period are connected with the same level of realization -- the oral portions of the brain stem.

  8. Growth inhibition in a brain metastasis model by antibody delivery using focused ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobus, Thiele; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K; Zhang, Yongzhi; McDannold, Nathan J

    2016-09-28

    these brain metastases. Interestingly, only some of the rats responded to the treatment. We did not observe a difference in tumor volume at the start of the treatment, nor in HER2 expression or in contrast-enhancement on MRI between the responders and non-responders to explain this. Better understanding of why certain animals respond is needed and will help in translating this technique to the clinic. In conclusion, we demonstrate that BBB disruption using focused ultrasound in combination with antibody therapy can inhibit growth of breast cancer brain metastasis.

  9. Volumetric MRI of the limbic system: anatomic determinants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilir, E.; Craven, W.; Hugg, J.; Gilliam, F.; Martin, R.; Faught, E.; Kuzniecky, R. [UAB Epilepsy Center, Department of Neurology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1998-03-01

    The limbic system comprises the hippocampal formation, fornix, mamillary bodies, thalamus, and other integrated structures. It is involved in complex functions including memory and emotion and in diseases such as temporal lobe epilepsy. Volume measurements of the amygdala and hippocampus have been used reliably to study patients with temporal lobe epilepsy but have not extended to other limbic structures. We performed volume measurements of hippocampus, amygdala, fornix and mamillary bodies in healthy individuals. Measurements of the amygdala, hippocampus, fornix and mamillary bodies revealed significant differences in volume between right and left sides (P < 0.001). The intraclass coefficient of variation for measurements was high for all structures except the mamillary bodies. Qualitative image assessment of the same structures revealed no asymmetries between the hemispheres. This technique can be applied to the study of disorders affecting the limbic system. (orig.) With 4 figs., 2 tabs., 23 refs.

  10. Hypothermia in VGKC antibody-associated limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, S; Irani, S R; Rajabally, Y A; Grubneac, A; Walters, R J; Yazaki, M; Clover, L; Vincent, A

    2008-02-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody (VGKC-Ab)-associated limbic encephalitis (LE) is a recently described syndrome that broadens the spectrum of immunotherapy-responsive central nervous system disorders. Limbic encephalitis is typically characterised by a sub-acute onset of disorientation, amnesia and seizures, but the clinical spectrum is not yet fully defined and the syndrome could be under-diagnosed. We here describe the clinical profile of four patients with VGKC-Ab-associated LE who had intermittent, episodic hypothermia. One of the patients also described a prodrome of severe neuropathic pain preceding the development of limbic symptoms. Both of these novel symptoms responded well to immunosuppressive therapy, with concurrent amelioration of amnesia/seizures.

  11. Sodium butyrate reverses the inhibition of Krebs cycle enzymes induced by amphetamine in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valvassori, Samira S; Calixto, Karen V; Budni, Josiane; Resende, Wilson R; Varela, Roger B; de Freitas, Karolina V; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Streck, Emilio L; Quevedo, João

    2013-12-01

    There is increasing interest in the possibility that mitochondrial impairment may play an important role in bipolar disorder (BD). The Krebs cycle is the central point of oxidative metabolism, providing carbon for biosynthesis and reducing agents for generation of ATP. Recently, studies have suggested that histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors may have antimanic effects. The present study aims to investigate the effects of sodium butyrate (SB), a HDAC inhibitor, on Krebs cycle enzymes activity in the brain of rats subjected to an animal model of mania induced by D-amphetamine (D-AMPH). Wistar rats were first given D-AMPH or saline (Sal) for 14 days, and then, between days 8 and 14, rats were treated with SB or Sal. The citrate synthase (CS), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) were evaluated in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and striatum of rats. The D-AMPH administration inhibited Krebs cycle enzymes activity in all analyzed brain structures and SB reversed D-AMPH-induced dysfunction analyzed in all brain regions. These findings suggest that Krebs cycle enzymes' inhibition can be an important link for the mitochondrial dysfunction seen in BD and SB exerts protective effects against the D-AMPH-induced Krebs cycle enzymes' dysfunction.

  12. Mesoscopic segregation of excitation and inhibition in a brain network model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Malagarriga

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurons in the brain are known to operate under a careful balance of excitation and inhibition, which maintains neural microcircuits within the proper operational range. How this balance is played out at the mesoscopic level of neuronal populations is, however, less clear. In order to address this issue, here we use a coupled neural mass model to study computationally the dynamics of a network of cortical macrocolumns operating in a partially synchronized, irregular regime. The topology of the network is heterogeneous, with a few of the nodes acting as connector hubs while the rest are relatively poorly connected. Our results show that in this type of mesoscopic network excitation and inhibition spontaneously segregate, with some columns acting mainly in an excitatory manner while some others have predominantly an inhibitory effect on their neighbors. We characterize the conditions under which this segregation arises, and relate the character of the different columns with their topological role within the network. In particular, we show that the connector hubs are preferentially inhibitory, the more so the larger the node's connectivity. These results suggest a potential mesoscale organization of the excitation-inhibition balance in brain networks.

  13. Inhibition of Monocyte Adhesion to Brain-Derived Endothelial Cells by Dual Functional RNA Chimeras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Because adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells is the first step of vascular-neuronal inflammation, inhibition of adhesion and recruitment of leukocytes to vascular endothelial cells will have a beneficial effect on neuroinflammatory diseases. In this study, we used the pRNA of bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor to construct a novel RNA nanoparticle for specific targeting to transferrin receptor (TfR on the murine brain-derived endothelial cells (bEND5 to deliver ICAM-1 siRNA. This RNA nanoparticle (FRS-NPs contained a FB4 aptamer targeting to TfR and a siRNA moiety for silencing the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1. Our data indicated that this RNA nanoparticle was delivered into murine brain-derived endothelial cells. Furthermore, the siRNA was released from the FRS-NPs in the cells and knocked down ICAM-1 expression in the TNF-α–stimulated cells and in the cells under oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD/R condition. The functional end points of the study indicated that FRS-NPs significantly inhibited monocyte adhesion to the bEND5 cells induced by TNF-α and OGD/R. In conclusion, our approach using RNA nanotechnology for siRNA delivery could be potentially applied for inhibition of inflammation in ischemic stroke and other neuroinflammatory diseases, or diseases affecting endothelium of vasculature.

  14. Mesenteric hypoperfusion and inflammation induced by brain death are not affected by inhibition of the autonomic storm in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Simas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Brain death is typically followed by autonomic changes that lead to hemodynamic instability, which is likely associated with microcirculatory dysfunction and inflammation. We evaluated the role of the microcirculation in the hemodynamic and inflammatory events that occur after brain death and the effects of autonomic storm inhibition via thoracic epidural blockade on mesenteric microcirculatory changes and inflammatory responses. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were anesthetized and mechanically ventilated. Brain death was induced via intracranial balloon inflation. Bupivacaine (brain death-thoracic epidural blockade group or saline (brain death group infusion via an epidural catheter was initiated immediately before brain death induction. Sham-operated animals were used as controls (SH group. The mesenteric microcirculation was analyzed via intravital microscopy, and the expression of adhesion molecules was evaluated via immunohistochemistry 180 min after brain death induction. RESULTS: A significant difference in mean arterial pressure behavior was observed between the brain death-thoracic epidural blockade group and the other groups, indicating that the former group experienced autonomic storm inhibition. However, the proportion of perfused small vessels in the brain death-thoracic epidural blockade group was similar to or lower than that in the brain death and SH groups, respectively. The expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 was similar between the brain death-thoracic epidural blockade and brain death groups but was significantly lower in the SH group than in the other two groups. The number of migrating leukocytes in the perivascular tissue followed the same trend for all groups. CONCLUSIONS: Although thoracic epidural blockade effectively inhibited the autonomic storm, it did not affect mesenteric hypoperfusion or inflammation induced by brain death.

  15. Effect of Efflux Transporter Inhibition on the Distribution of Fluconazole in the Rat Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zheng, Na; Zhang, Jiatang; Huang, Xusheng; Yu, Shengyuan

    2017-03-24

    Multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) and organic anion transporters (OATs) are expressed on the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB), preventing the entry of or the pumping out of numerous molecules. Fluconazole is widely used to treat fungal meningoencephalitis. The effect of these transporters on the distribution of fluconazole in the brain is unclear. We used microdialysis to compare the distribution of fluconazole in the rat brain with and without co-administration of probenecid, a MRP and OAT inhibitor. Additionally, we also observed the difference in fluconazole distribution between the two barriers. The results showed that probenecid increased the penetration of fluconazole into the BBB but did not alter the penetration of fluconazole into the BCSFB of rats. The penetration of the BBB and BCSFB by fluconazole did not statistically differ according to physiological condition. These results demonstrate that transporters that can be inhibited by probenecid may be involved in fluconazole resistance at the BBB and provide a laboratory basis for predicting brain extracellular fluid (ECF) concentration using the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentration of fluconazole.

  16. General anesthetics inhibit erythropoietin induction under hypoxic conditions in the mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoharu Tanaka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Erythropoietin (EPO, originally identified as a hematopoietic growth factor produced in the kidney and fetal liver, is also endogenously expressed in the central nervous system (CNS. EPO in the CNS, mainly produced in astrocytes, is induced under hypoxic conditions in a hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-dependent manner and plays a dominant role in neuroprotection and neurogenesis. We investigated the effect of general anesthetics on EPO expression in the mouse brain and primary cultured astrocytes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: BALB/c mice were exposed to 10% oxygen with isoflurane at various concentrations (0.10-1.0%. Expression of EPO mRNA in the brain was studied, and the effects of sevoflurane, halothane, nitrous oxide, pentobarbital, ketamine, and propofol were investigated. In addition, expression of HIF-2α protein was studied by immunoblotting. Hypoxia-induced EPO mRNA expression in the brain was significantly suppressed by isoflurane in a concentration-dependent manner. A similar effect was confirmed for all other general anesthetics. Hypoxia-inducible expression of HIF-2α protein was also significantly suppressed with isoflurane. In the experiments using primary cultured astrocytes, isoflurane, pentobarbital, and ketamine suppressed hypoxia-inducible expression of HIF-2α protein and EPO mRNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, our results indicate that general anesthetics suppress activation of HIF-2 and inhibit hypoxia-induced EPO upregulation in the mouse brain through a direct effect on astrocytes.

  17. Motor directional tuning across brain areas: Directional resonance and the role of inhibition for directional accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Yvonne Mahan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Motor directional tuning (Georgopoulos et al., 1982 has been found in every brain area in which it has been sought for during the past 30-odd years. It is typically broad, with widely distributed preferred directions and a population signal that predicts accurately the direction of an upcoming reaching movement or isometric force pulse (Georgopoulos et al., 1992. What is the basis for such ubiquitous directional tuning? How does the tuning come about? What are the implications of directional tuning for understanding the brain mechanisms of movement in space? This review addresses these questions in the light of accumulated knowledge in various sub-fields of neuroscience and motor behavior. It is argued (a that direction in space encompasses many aspects, from vision to muscles, (b that there is a directional congruence among the central representations of these distributed directions arising from rough but orderly topographic connectivities among brain areas, (c that broad directional tuning is the result of broad excitation limited by recurrent and non-recurrent (i.e. direct inhibition within the preferred direction loci in brain areas, and (d that the width of the directional tuning curve, modulated by local inhibitory mechanisms, is a parameter that determines the accuracy of the directional command.

  18. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  19. Telmisartan reduced cerebral edema by inhibiting NLRP3 inflammasome in mice with cold brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; Hu, Chen-Chen; Zhang, Ya-Li; Yao, Shang-Long; Mao, Wei-Ke

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible beneficial role of telmisartan in cerebral edema after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the potential mechanisms related to the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor (NLR) pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation. TBI model was established by cold-induced brain injury. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned into 3, 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h survival groups to investigate cerebral edema development with time and received 0, 5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg telmisartan by oral gavage, 1 h prior to TBI to determine the efficient anti-edemic dose. The therapeutic window was identified by post-treating 30 min, 1 h, 2 h and 4 h after TBI. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, the neurological function and histological injury were assessed, at the same time, the mRNA and protein expression levels of NLRP3 inflammasome, IL-1β and IL-18 concentrations in peri-contused brain tissue were measured 24 h post TBI. The results showed that the traumatic cerebral edema occurred from 6 h, reached the peak at 24 h and recovered to the baseline 72 h after TBI. A single oral dose of 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg telmisartan could reduce cerebral edema. Post-treatment up to 2 h effectively limited the edema development. Furthermore, prophylactic administration of telmisartan markedly inhibited BBB impairment, NLRP3, apoptotic speck-containing protein (ASC) and Caspase-1 activation, as well as IL-1β and IL-18 maturation, subsequently improved the neurological outcomes. In conclusion, telmisartan can reduce traumatic cerebral edema by inhibiting the NLRP3 inflammasome-regulated IL-1β and IL-18 accumulation.

  20. Melatonin modulates permeability transition pore and 5-hydroxydecanoate induced KATP channel inhibition in isolated brain mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem, Mohammad; Tabassum, Heena; Parvez, Suhel

    2016-11-01

    There is increasing recognition of the magnitude of mitochondria in neurodegenerative disorders. Mitochondria play a key role in apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Melatonin (Mel), an indoleamine produced in several organs including the pineal gland has been known for its neuroprotective actions. In our study, we have investigated whether the mitochondrial ATP sensitive potassium (mtKATP) channel blocker 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD) and calcium (Ca(2+)) affects permeability transition pore (PTP) alterations in isolated brain mitochondria treated with melatonin (Mel) and cyclosporin A (CsA). Mitochondrial swelling, mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), ROS measurement and mitochondrial respiration were evaluated in isolated brain mitochondria. In our results, mitochondrial swelling stimulated by exposing Ca(2+) ions and 5-HD associated by mPTP opening as depicted by modulation of CsA and Mel. In addition, Ca(2+) and 5-HD decreased Δψm, depleted intracellular ROS, and inhibition of mitochondrial respiration (state 3 and state 4) in isolated brain mitochondria. Addition of Mel and CsA has shown significant restoration in mitochondrial swelling, Δψm, intracellular ROS measurement and mitochondrial respiration in isolated brain mitochondria. Therefore, we speculate the modulatory effect of Mel and CsA in mitochondria treated with 5-HD and Ca(2+) hinders the mPTP-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular oxidative stress. We conclude that inhibition of mPT is one likely mechanism of CsA's and its neuroprotective actions. Development of neuroprotective agents including Mel targeting the mPTP therefore bears hope for future treatment of severe neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  1. High Grade Glioma Mimicking Voltage Gated Potassium Channel Complex Associated Antibody Limbic Encephalitis

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    Dilan Athauda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Though raised titres of voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC complex antibodies have been occasionally associated with extracranial tumours, mainly presenting as Morvan's Syndrome or neuromyotonia, they have not yet been reported to be associated with an intracranial malignancy. This is especially important as misdiagnosis of these conditions and delay of the appropriate treatment can have important prognostic implications. We describe a patient with a high grade glioma presenting with clinical, radiological, and serological features consistent with the diagnosis of VGKC antibody associated limbic encephalitis (LE. This is the first association between a primary brain tumour and high titre of VGKC complex antibodies. Clinicoradiological progression despite effective immunosuppressive treatment should prompt clinicians to look for alternative diagnoses. Further studies to elucidate a possible association between VGKC complex and other surface antigen antibodies with primary brain tumours should be carried out.

  2. High grade glioma mimicking voltage gated potassium channel complex associated antibody limbic encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athauda, Dilan; Delamont, R S; Pablo-Fernandez, E De

    2014-01-01

    Though raised titres of voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibodies have been occasionally associated with extracranial tumours, mainly presenting as Morvan's Syndrome or neuromyotonia, they have not yet been reported to be associated with an intracranial malignancy. This is especially important as misdiagnosis of these conditions and delay of the appropriate treatment can have important prognostic implications. We describe a patient with a high grade glioma presenting with clinical, radiological, and serological features consistent with the diagnosis of VGKC antibody associated limbic encephalitis (LE). This is the first association between a primary brain tumour and high titre of VGKC complex antibodies. Clinicoradiological progression despite effective immunosuppressive treatment should prompt clinicians to look for alternative diagnoses. Further studies to elucidate a possible association between VGKC complex and other surface antigen antibodies with primary brain tumours should be carried out.

  3. ERK inhibition with PD184161 mitigates brain damage in a mouse model of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladbach, Amadeus; van Eersel, Janet; Bi, Mian; Ke, Yazi D; Ittner, Lars M

    2014-05-01

    Ischemic stroke is a leading cause of death. It has previously been shown that blocking activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) with the MEK inhibitor U0126 mitigates brain damage in rodent models of ischemic stroke. Here we show that the newer MEK inhibitor PD184161 reduces cell death and altered gene expression in cultured neurons and mice undergoing excitotoxicity, and has similar protective effects in a mouse model of stroke. This further supports ERK inhibition as a potential treatment for stroke.

  4. Melatonin Preserves Blood-Brain Barrier Integrity and Permeability via Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 Inhibition.

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    Himakarnika Alluri

    Full Text Available Microvascular hyperpermeability that occurs at the level of the blood-brain barrier (BBB often leads to vasogenic brain edema and elevated intracranial pressure following traumatic brain injury (TBI. At a cellular level, tight junction proteins (TJPs between neighboring endothelial cells maintain the integrity of the BBB via TJ associated proteins particularly, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1 that binds to the transmembrane TJPs and actin cytoskeleton intracellularly. The pro-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β (IL-1β as well as the proteolytic enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 are key mediators of trauma-associated brain edema. Recent studies indicate that melatonin a pineal hormone directly binds to MMP-9 and also might act as its endogenous inhibitor. We hypothesized that melatonin treatment will provide protection against TBI-induced BBB hyperpermeability via MMP-9 inhibition. Rat brain microvascular endothelial cells grown as monolayers were used as an in vitro model of the BBB and a mouse model of TBI using a controlled cortical impactor was used for all in vivo studies. IL-1β (10 ng/mL; 2 hours-induced endothelial monolayer hyperpermeability was significantly attenuated by melatonin (10 μg/mL; 1 hour, GM6001 (broad spectrum MMP inhibitor; 10 μM; 1 hour, MMP-9 inhibitor-1 (MMP-9 specific inhibitor; 5 nM; 1 hour or MMP-9 siRNA transfection (48 hours in vitro. Melatonin and MMP-9 inhibitor-1 pretreatment attenuated IL-1β-induced MMP-9 activity, loss of ZO-1 junctional integrity and f-actin stress fiber formation. IL-1β treatment neither affected ZO-1 protein or mRNA expression or cell viability. Acute melatonin treatment attenuated BBB hyperpermeability in a mouse controlled cortical impact model of TBI in vivo. In conclusion, one of the protective effects of melatonin against BBB hyperpermeability occurs due to enhanced BBB integrity via MMP-9 inhibition. In addition, acute melatonin treatment provides protection against BBB

  5. Heritability of brain activity related to response inhibition: A longitudinal genetic study in adolescent twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anokhin, Andrey P; Golosheykin, Simon; Grant, Julia D; Heath, Andrew C

    2017-05-01

    The ability to inhibit prepotent but context- or goal-inappropriate responses is essential for adaptive self-regulation of behavior. Deficits in response inhibition, a key component of impulsivity, have been implicated as a core dysfunction in a range of neuropsychiatric disorders such as ADHD and addictions. Identification of genetically transmitted variation in the neural underpinnings of response inhibition can help to elucidate etiological pathways to these disorders and establish the links between genes, brain, and behavior. However, little is known about genetic influences on the neural mechanisms of response inhibition during adolescence, a developmental period characterized by weak self-regulation of behavior. Here we investigated heritability of ERPs elicited in a Go/No-Go task in a large sample of adolescent twins assessed longitudinally at ages 12, 14, and 16. Genetic analyses showed significant heritability of inhibition-related frontal N2 and P3 components at all three ages, with 50 to 60% of inter-individual variability being attributable to genetic factors. These genetic influences included both common genetic factors active at different ages and novel genetic influences emerging during development. Finally, individual differences in the rate of developmental changes from age 12 to age 16 were significantly influenced by genetic factors. In conclusion, the present study provides the first evidence for genetic influences on neural correlates of response inhibition during adolescence and suggests that ERPs elicited in the Go/No-Go task can serve as intermediate neurophysiological phenotypes (endophenotypes) for the study of disinhibition and impulse control disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Efficacy of novel phenoxyalkyl pyridinium oximes as brain-penetrating reactivators of cholinesterase inhibited by surrogates of sarin and VX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Janice E; Chambers, Howard W; Funck, Kristen E; Meek, Edward C; Pringle, Ronald B; Ross, Matthew K

    2016-11-25

    Pyridinium oximes are strong nucleophiles and many are effective reactivators of organophosphate-inhibited cholinesterase (ChE). However, the current oxime reactivators are ineffective at crossing the blood-brain barrier and reactivating brain ChE in the intact organism. Our laboratories have developed a series of substituted phenoxyalkyl pyridinium oximes (US patent 9,227,937 B2) with the goal of identifying reactivators effective in crossing the blood-brain barrier. The first 35 of the series were found to have similar in vitro efficacy as reactivators of ChE inhibited by a sarin surrogate (phthalimidyl isopropyl methylphosphonate, PIMP) or a VX surrogate (nitrophenyl ethyl methylphosphonate, NEMP) in bovine brain preparations as previously observed in rat brain preparations. A number of these novel oximes have shown the ability to decrease the level of ChE inhibition in the brains of rats treated with a high sublethal dosage of either a sarin surrogate (nitrophenyl isopropyl methylphosphonate, NIMP) or the VX surrogate NEMP. Levels of reactivation at 2 h after oxime administration were up to 35% while the currently approved therapeutic, 2-PAM, yielded no reduction in brain ChE inhibition. In addition, there was evidence of attenuation of seizure-like behavior with several of the more effective novel oximes, but not 2-PAM. Therefore these novel oximes have demonstrated an ability to reactivate inhibited ChE in brain preparations from two species and in vivo data support their ability to enter the brain and provide a therapeutic action. These novel oximes have the potential to be developed into improved antidotes for nerve agent therapy.

  7. Generalized anxiety modulates frontal and limbic activation in major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlund Michael W

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anxiety is relatively common in depression and capable of modifying the severity and course of depression. Yet our understanding of how anxiety modulates frontal and limbic activation in depression is limited. Methods We used functional magnetic resonance imaging and two emotional information processing tasks to examine frontal and limbic activation in ten patients with major depression and comorbid with preceding generalized anxiety (MDD/GAD and ten non-depressed controls. Results Consistent with prior studies on depression, MDD/GAD patients showed hypoactivation in medial and middle frontal regions, as well as in the anterior cingulate, cingulate and insula. However, heightened anxiety in MDD/GAD patients was associated with increased activation in middle frontal regions and the insula and the effects varied with the type of emotional information presented. Conclusions Our findings highlight frontal and limbic hypoactivation in patients with depression and comorbid anxiety and indicate that anxiety level may modulate frontal and limbic activation depending upon the emotional context. One implication of this finding is that divergent findings reported in the imaging literature on depression could reflect modulation of activation by anxiety level in response to different types of emotional information.

  8. Glioblastoma in the limbic system presenting as sustained central hypopnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota Mashiko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A 71-year-old woman was transferred to our hospital after experiencing an epigastric sensation followed by unconsciousness. On arrival, the patient showed impaired consciousness without convulsive movement, cyanosis and shallow breathing, arterial O2 desaturation, and increased PCO2. Artificial respiration improved CO2 accumulation and consciousness, but interruption of artificial respiration returned the patient to her former state. Computed tomography of the head showed a mass around the left corpus callosum. The patient's hypopnea followed by unconsciousness suggested sustained nonconvulsive epilepsy manifesting in central hypopnea and subsequent unconsciousness due to CO2 narcosis. Intravenous (IV anticonvulsants promptly improved the respiratory condition, and the patient started to regain consciousness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lesion involving the bilateral limbic systems. To our knowledge, limbic seizure manifesting with hypopnea causing unconsciousness due to CO2 narcosis has not previously been reported, despite evidence of a strong relationship between the limbic and respiratory systems. The current case suggests that sustained limbic seizure can manifest as hypopnea. Since emergency EEG can be difficult to perform, IV anticonvulsant treatment is an appropriate diagnostic therapy.

  9. Propofol Inhibits NLRP3 Inflammasome and Attenuates Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Xiao, Wenjing; Wang, Junrui; Wu, Juan; Ren, Jiandong; Hou, Jun; Gu, Jianwen; Fan, Kaihua; Yu, Botao

    2016-12-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that inflammatory response plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of secondary injury following blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). Propofol, a lipid-soluble intravenous anesthetic, has been shown to possess therapeutic benefit during neuroinflammation on various brain injury models. Recent findings have proved that the NOD-like receptor family, pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome involved in the process of the inflammatory response following brain trauma, may probably be a promising target in the treatment of bTBI. Rats were randomly divided into six groups (n = 8): normal group; bTBI-12 and 24 h group; bTBI-12 h and bTBI-24 h group treated with propofol; and bTBI treated with control dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) group. The effect of propofol on the expression and activation of NLRP3 inflammasome and the degree of oxidative stress and inflammatory cascades, as well as the brain trauma biomarkers were evaluated in rats suffering from bTBI. The enhanced expressions and activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in the cerebral cortex of bTBI rats were substantially suppressed by the administration of propofol, which was paralleled with the decreased oxidative stress, cytokines production, and the amelioration of cerebral cortex damage. Our results have, for the first time, revealed that over-activation of NLRP3 inflammasome in the cerebral cortex may be involved in the process of neuroinflammation during the secondary injury of bTBI in rats. Propofol might relieve the inflammatory response and attenuate brain injury by inhibiting ROS and reluctant depressing NLRP3 inflammasome activation and pro-inflammatory cytokines maturation.

  10. Functional brain networks underlying latent inhibition of conditioned disgust in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasalla, Patricia; Begega, Azucena; Soto, Alberto; Dwyer, Dominic Michael; López, Matías

    2016-12-15

    The present experiment examined the neuronal networks involved in the latent inhibition of conditioned disgust by measuring brain oxidative metabolism. Rats were given nonreinforced intraoral (IO) exposure to saccharin (exposed groups) or water (non-exposed groups) followed by a conditioning trial in which the animals received an infusion of saccharin paired (or unpaired) with LiCl. On testing, taste reactivity responses displayed by the rats during the infusion of the saccharin were examined. Behavioral data showed that preexposure to saccharin attenuated the development of LiCl-induced conditioned disgust reactions, indicating that the effects of taste aversion on hedonic taste reactivity had been reduced. With respect to cumulative oxidative metabolic activity across the whole study period, the parabrachial nucleus was the only single region examined which showed differential activity between groups which received saccharin-LiCl pairings with and without prior non-reinforced saccharin exposure, suggesting a key role in the effects of latent inhibition of taste aversion learning. In addition, many functional connections between brain regions were revealed through correlational analysis of metabolic activity, in particular an accumbens-amygdala interaction that may be involved in both positive and negative hedonic responses.

  11. Association of limbic system-associated membrane protein (LSAMP) to male completed suicide

    OpenAIRE

    Maron Eduard; Kõks Sulev; Vasar Eero; Lang Aavo; Tasa Gunnar; Must Anne; Väli Marika

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated volumetric abnormalities in limbic structures of suicide victims. The morphological changes might be caused by some inherited neurodevelopmental defect, such as failure to form proper axonal connections due to genetically determined dysfunction of neurite guidance molecules. Limbic system-associated membrane protein (LSAMP) is a neuronal adhesive molecule, preferentially expressed in developing limbic system neuronal dendrites and som...

  12. Simultaneous high-speed imaging and optogenetic inhibition in the intact mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovetti, Serena; Moretti, Claudio; Zucca, Stefano; Dal Maschio, Marco; Bonifazi, Paolo; Fellin, Tommaso

    2017-01-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators and optogenetic actuators can report and manipulate the activity of specific neuronal populations. However, applying imaging and optogenetics simultaneously has been difficult to establish in the mammalian brain, even though combining the techniques would provide a powerful approach to reveal the functional organization of neural circuits. Here, we developed a technique based on patterned two-photon illumination to allow fast scanless imaging of GCaMP6 signals in the intact mouse brain at the same time as single-photon optogenetic inhibition with Archaerhodopsin. Using combined imaging and electrophysiological recording, we demonstrate that single and short bursts of action potentials in pyramidal neurons can be detected in the scanless modality at acquisition frequencies up to 1 kHz. Moreover, we demonstrate that our system strongly reduces the artifacts in the fluorescence detection that are induced by single-photon optogenetic illumination. Finally, we validated our technique investigating the role of parvalbumin-positive (PV) interneurons in the control of spontaneous cortical dynamics. Monitoring the activity of cellular populations on a precise spatiotemporal scale while manipulating neuronal activity with optogenetics provides a powerful tool to causally elucidate the cellular mechanisms underlying circuit function in the intact mammalian brain. PMID:28053310

  13. Simultaneous high-speed imaging and optogenetic inhibition in the intact mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovetti, Serena; Moretti, Claudio; Zucca, Stefano; Dal Maschio, Marco; Bonifazi, Paolo; Fellin, Tommaso

    2017-01-01

    Genetically encoded calcium indicators and optogenetic actuators can report and manipulate the activity of specific neuronal populations. However, applying imaging and optogenetics simultaneously has been difficult to establish in the mammalian brain, even though combining the techniques would provide a powerful approach to reveal the functional organization of neural circuits. Here, we developed a technique based on patterned two-photon illumination to allow fast scanless imaging of GCaMP6 signals in the intact mouse brain at the same time as single-photon optogenetic inhibition with Archaerhodopsin. Using combined imaging and electrophysiological recording, we demonstrate that single and short bursts of action potentials in pyramidal neurons can be detected in the scanless modality at acquisition frequencies up to 1 kHz. Moreover, we demonstrate that our system strongly reduces the artifacts in the fluorescence detection that are induced by single-photon optogenetic illumination. Finally, we validated our technique investigating the role of parvalbumin-positive (PV) interneurons in the control of spontaneous cortical dynamics. Monitoring the activity of cellular populations on a precise spatiotemporal scale while manipulating neuronal activity with optogenetics provides a powerful tool to causally elucidate the cellular mechanisms underlying circuit function in the intact mammalian brain.

  14. Inhibition of rat brain microsomal cytochrome P450-dependent dealkylation activities by an oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagrange, P; El-Bachá, R D; Netter, P; Minn, A

    2001-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that an oxidative stress not only alters cellular lipids and nucleic acids, but also numerous proteins. This oxidation results in alterations of some cellular functions, either by reversible modifications allowing a post-transcriptional regulation of enzyme activities or receptor affinities, or by irreversible modifications of the protein, triggering its inactivation and destruction. In the present work, we examined the effects of an experimental oxidative stress on rat brain microsomal cytochrome P450-dependent dealkylation activities. For that purpose, superoxide anions were produced either by the NADPH-dependent redox cycling of a quinine, menadione, or by the addition of apomorphine, which produces by autoxidation both superoxide anions and apomorphine-derived quinones. The inhibition of brain cytochrome P450-dependent alkoxyresorufin O-dealkylase activities was dependent on both menadione or apomorphine concentrations. Simultaneously, an increase of microsomal carbonyl groups was recorded. Immunoblotting characterization of brain microsomal oxidized protein was carried out, using antibodies raised against 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine as a reagent of protein carbonyl groups, and a revelation by a chemiluminescence method. We observed an increase in cerebral CYP1A protein oxidation, related to menadione concentration, suggesting that oxidation of cytochrome P450 protein may result in its catalytic inactivation.

  15. Histamine H3A receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the mouse brain cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, E; Behling, A; Lümmen, G; Göthert, M

    1992-04-01

    Mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline were superfused with physiological salt solution containing desipramine plus a drug with alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist properties, and the effects of histamine receptor ligands on the electrically (0.3 Hz) evoked tritium overflow were studied. The evoked overflow (from slices superfused with phentolamine) was inhibited by histamine (pIC35 6.53), the H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine (7.47) and its S-(+)-enantiomer (5.82) but not influenced by the H1 receptor agonist 2-(2-thiazolyl)-ethylamine 3.2 mumol/l and the H2 receptor agonist dimaprit 10 mumol/l. The inhibitory effect of histamine was not affected by the H1 receptor antagonist dimetindene 1 mumol/l and the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine 10 mumol/l. The concentration-response curve of histamine (determined in the presence of rauwolscine) was shifted to the right by the H3 receptor antagonists thioperamide (apparent pA2 8.67), impromidine (7.30) and burimamide (6.82) as well as by dimaprit (6.16). The pA2 values of the four drugs were compared with their affinities for H3A and H3B binding sites in rat brain membranes (West et al. 1990 Mol Pharmacol 38:610); a significant correlation was obtained for the H3A, but not for the H3B sites. The results suggest that noradrenaline release in the mouse brain cortex is inhibited by histamine via H3A receptors and that dimaprit is an H3 receptor antagonist of moderate potency.

  16. Cerebellar brain inhibition in the target and surround muscles during voluntary tonic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyakaew, Pattamon; Cho, Hyun Joo; Srivanitchapoom, Prachaya; Popa, Traian; Wu, Tianxia; Hallett, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Motor surround inhibition is the neural mechanism that selectively favours the contraction of target muscles and inhibits nearby muscles to prevent unwanted movements. This inhibition was previously reported at the onset of a movement, but not during a tonic contraction. Cerebellar brain inhibition (CBI) is reduced in active muscles during tonic activation; however, it has not been studied in the surround muscles. CBI was evaluated in the first dorsal interosseus (FDI) muscle as the target muscle, and the abductor digiti minimi, flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis muscles as surround muscles, during rest and tonic activation of the FDI muscle in 21 subjects. Cerebellar stimulation was performed under magnetic resonance imaging-guided neuronavigation targeting lobule VIII of the cerebellar hemisphere. Stimulus intensities for cerebellar stimulation were based on the resting motor cortex threshold (RMT) and adjusted for the depth difference between the cerebellar and motor cortices. We used 90-120% of the adjusted RMT as the conditioning stimulus intensity during rest. The intensity that generated the best CBI at rest in the FDI muscle was selected for use during tonic activation. During selective tonic activation of the FDI muscle, CBI was significantly reduced only for the FDI muscle, and not for the surround muscles. Unconditioned motor evoked potential sizes were increased in all muscles during FDI muscle tonic activation as compared with rest, despite background electromyography activity increasing only for the FDI muscle. Our study suggests that the cerebellum may play an important role in selective tonic finger movement by reducing its inhibition in the motor cortex only for the relevant agonist muscle.

  17. Spontaneous confabulation, reality monitoring, and the limbic system--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnider, A

    2001-10-01

    Patients with anterior limbic damage may present a distinct syndrome, spontaneous confabulation: they fail in common memory tests, act on the basis of previous habits rather than currently relevant memories, produce confabulations composed of elements of past true events, are disorientated, and are absolutely convinced about the veracity of their perceived reality. Spontaneous confabulation is independent of other false memories, such as, provoked confabulations or illusory recognition. Studies showed that spontaneous confabulators fail to suppress (inactivate) evoked memories that do not pertain to ongoing reality. Rehabilitation differs from other memory failures. Prognosis depends on the lesion site, but recovery is always associated with recovery of this suppression capacity. Lesions typically involve the posterior medial orbitofrontal cortex or its connections in the basal forebrain. Imaging and evoked potential studies in healthy subjects support the idea that the anterior limbic system provides a reality monitoring mechanism which selects memories of current relevance by suppressing (inactivating) currently irrelevant memories. This mechanism appears to adjust the cortical representation of activated memories before their content is recognised and consolidated. Comparison with animal studies suggests that human reality monitoring is a property of the brain's reward system.

  18. Impaired Frontal-Limbic White Matter Maturation in Children at Risk for Major Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yuwen; Saygin, Zeynep M; Biederman, Joseph; Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina; Uchida, Mai; Doehrmann, Oliver; Han, Michelle; Chai, Xiaoqian J; Kenworthy, Tara; Yarmak, Pavel; Gaillard, Schuyler L; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Gabrieli, John D E

    2017-09-01

    Depression is among the most common neuropsychiatric disorders. It remains unclear whether brain abnormalities associated with depression reflect the pathological state of the disease or neurobiological traits predisposing individuals to depression. Parental history of depression is a risk factor that more than triples the risk of depression. We compared white matter (WM) microstructure cross-sectionally in 40 children ages 8-14 with versus without parental history of depression (At-Risk vs. Control). There were significant differences in age-related changes of fractional anisotropy (FA) between the groups, localized in the anterior fronto-limbic WM pathways, including the anterior cingulum and the genu of the corpus callosum. Control children exhibited typical increasing FA with age, whereas At-Risk children exhibited atypical decreasing FA with age in these fronto-limbic regions. Furthermore, dorsal cingulate FA significantly correlated with depressive symptoms for At-Risk children. The results suggest maturational WM microstructure differences in mood-regulatory neurocircuitry that may contribute to neurodevelopmental risk for depression. The study provides new insights into neurodevelopmental susceptibility to depression and related disabilities that may promote early preventive intervention approaches. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel Antibody Paraneoplastic Limbic Encephalitis Associated with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Alcantara

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Among paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS associated with malignant hemopathies, there are few reports of PNS of the central nervous system and most of them are associated with lymphomas. Limbic encephalitis is a rare neurological syndrome classically diagnosed in the context of PNS. We report the case of a 81-year-old man who presented with a relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML with minimal maturation. He was admitted for confusion with unfavorable evolution as he presented a rapidly progressive dementia resulting in death. A brain magnetic resonance imaging, performed 2 months after the onset, was considered normal. An electroencephalogram showed non-specific bilateral slow waves. We received the results of the blood screening of neuronal autoantibodies after the patient's death and detected the presence of anti-voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC antibodies at 102 pmol/l (normal at <30 pmol/l. Other etiologic studies, including the screening for another cause of rapidly progressive dementia, were negative. To our knowledge, this is the first case of anti-VGKC paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis related to AML.

  20. The role of the medial temporal limbic system in processing emotions in voice and music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frühholz, Sascha; Trost, Wiebke; Grandjean, Didier

    2014-12-01

    Subcortical brain structures of the limbic system, such as the amygdala, are thought to decode the emotional value of sensory information. Recent neuroimaging studies, as well as lesion studies in patients, have shown that the amygdala is sensitive to emotions in voice and music. Similarly, the hippocampus, another part of the temporal limbic system (TLS), is responsive to vocal and musical emotions, but its specific roles in emotional processing from music and especially from voices have been largely neglected. Here we review recent research on vocal and musical emotions, and outline commonalities and differences in the neural processing of emotions in the TLS in terms of emotional valence, emotional intensity and arousal, as well as in terms of acoustic and structural features of voices and music. We summarize the findings in a neural framework including several subcortical and cortical functional pathways between the auditory system and the TLS. This framework proposes that some vocal expressions might already receive a fast emotional evaluation via a subcortical pathway to the amygdala, whereas cortical pathways to the TLS are thought to be equally used for vocal and musical emotions. While the amygdala might be specifically involved in a coarse decoding of the emotional value of voices and music, the hippocampus might process more complex vocal and musical emotions, and might have an important role especially for the decoding of musical emotions by providing memory-based and contextual associations.

  1. Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis associated with acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, Marion; Bennani, Omar; Verdure, Pierre; Leprêtre, Stéphane; Tilly, Hervé; Jardin, Fabrice

    2013-05-01

    Among paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) associated with malignant hemopathies, there are few reports of PNS of the central nervous system and most of them are associated with lymphomas. Limbic encephalitis is a rare neurological syndrome classically diagnosed in the context of PNS. We report the case of a 81-year-old man who presented with a relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with minimal maturation. He was admitted for confusion with unfavorable evolution as he presented a rapidly progressive dementia resulting in death. A brain magnetic resonance imaging, performed 2 months after the onset, was considered normal. An electroencephalogram showed non-specific bilateral slow waves. We received the results of the blood screening of neuronal autoanti-bodies after the patient's death and detected the presence of anti-voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) antibodies at 102 pmol/l (normal at <30 pmol/l). Other etiologic studies, including the screening for another cause of rapidly progressive dementia, were negative. To our knowledge, this is the first case of anti-VGKC paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis related to AML.

  2. In vivo inhibition of endogenous brain tumors through systemic interference of Hedgehog signaling in mice.

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    Sanchez, Pilar; Ruiz i Altaba, Ariel

    2005-02-01

    The full spectrum of developmental potential includes normal as well as abnormal and disease states. We therefore subscribe to the idea that tumors derive from the operation of paradevelopmental programs that yield consistent and recognizable morphologies. Work in frogs and mice shows that Hedgehog (Hh)-Gli signaling controls stem cell lineages and that its deregulation leads to tumor formation. Moreover, human tumor cells require sustained Hh-Gli signaling for proliferation as cyclopamine, an alkaloid of the lily Veratrum californicum that blocks the Hh pathway, inhibits the growth of different tumor cells in vitro as well as in subcutaneous xenografts. However, the evidence that systemic treatment is an effective anti-cancer therapy is missing. Here we have used Ptc1(+/-); p53(-/-) mice which develop medulloblastoma to test the ability of cyclopamine to inhibit endogenous tumor growth in vivo after tumor initiation through intraperitoneal delivery, which avoids the brain damage associated with direct injection. We find that systemic cyclopamine administration improves the health of Ptc1(+/-);p53(-/-) animals. Analyses of the cerebella of cyclopamine-treated animals show a severe reduction in tumor size and a large decrease in the number of Ptc1-expressing cells, as a readout of cells with an active Hu-Gli pathway, as well as an impairment of their proliferative capacity, always in comparison with vehicle treated mice. Our data demonstrate that systemic treatment with cyclopamine inhibits tumor growth in the brain supporting its therapeutical value for human HH-dependent tumors. They also demonstrate that even the complete loss of the well-known tumor suppressor p53 does not render the tumor independent of Hh pathway function.

  3. Modulation of NMDA receptor function by inhibition of D-amino acid oxidase in rodent brain.

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    Strick, Christine A; Li, Cheryl; Scott, Liam; Harvey, Brian; Hajós, Mihály; Steyn, Stefanus J; Piotrowski, Mary A; James, Larry C; Downs, James T; Rago, Brian; Becker, Stacey L; El-Kattan, Ayman; Xu, Youfen; Ganong, Alan H; Tingley, F David; Ramirez, Andres D; Seymour, Patricia A; Guanowsky, Victor; Majchrzak, Mark J; Fox, Carol B; Schmidt, Christopher J; Duplantier, Allen J

    2011-01-01

    Observations that N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) antagonists produce symptoms in humans that are similar to those seen in schizophrenia have led to the current hypothesis that schizophrenia might result from NMDA receptor hypofunction. Inhibition of D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO), the enzyme responsible for degradation of D-serine, should lead to increased levels of this co-agonist at the NMDA receptor, and thereby provide a therapeutic approach to schizophrenia. We have profiled some of the preclinical biochemical, electrophysiological, and behavioral consequences of administering potent and selective inhibitors of DAAO to rodents to begin to test this hypothesis. Inhibition of DAAO activity resulted in a significant dose and time dependent increase in D-serine only in the cerebellum, although a time delay was observed between peak plasma or brain drug concentration and cerebellum D-serine response. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling employing a mechanism-based indirect response model was used to characterize the correlation between free brain drug concentration and D-serine accumulation. DAAO inhibitors had little or no activity in rodent models considered predictive for antipsychotic activity. The inhibitors did, however, affect cortical activity in the Mescaline-Induced Scratching model, produced a modest but significant increase in NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents in primary neuronal cultures from rat hippocampus, and resulted in a significant increase in evoked hippocampal theta rhythm, an in vivo electrophysiological model of hippocampal activity. These findings demonstrate that although DAAO inhibition did not cause a measurable increase in D-serine in forebrain, it did affect hippocampal and cortical activity, possibly through augmentation of NMDA receptor-mediated currents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Increased efflux of amyloid-β peptides through the blood-brain barrier by muscarinic acetylcholine receptor inhibition reduces pathological phenotypes in mouse models of brain amyloidosis.

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    Paganetti, Paolo; Antoniello, Katia; Devraj, Kavi; Toni, Nicolas; Kieran, Dairin; Madani, Rime; Pihlgren, Maria; Adolfsson, Oskar; Froestl, Wolfgang; Schrattenholz, André; Liebner, Stefan; Havas, Daniel; Windisch, Manfred; Cirrito, John R; Pfeifer, Andrea; Muhs, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The formation and accumulation of toxic amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) in the brain may drive the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Accordingly, disease-modifying therapies for Alzheimer's disease and related disorders could result from treatments regulating Aβ homeostasis. Examples are the inhibition of production, misfolding, and accumulation of Aβ or the enhancement of its clearance. Here we show that oral treatment with ACI-91 (Pirenzepine) dose-dependently reduced brain Aβ burden in AβPPPS1, hAβPPSL, and AβPP/PS1 transgenic mice. A possible mechanism of action of ACI-91 may occur through selective inhibition of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (AChR) on endothelial cells of brain microvessels and enhanced Aβ peptide clearance across the blood-brain barrier. One month treatment with ACI-91 increased the clearance of intrathecally-injected Aβ in plaque-bearing mice. ACI-91 also accelerated the clearance of brain-injected Aβ in blood and peripheral tissues by favoring its urinal excretion. A single oral dose of ACI-91 reduced the half-life of interstitial Aβ peptide in pre-plaque mhAβPP/PS1d mice. By extending our studies to an in vitro model, we showed that muscarinic AChR inhibition by ACI-91 and Darifenacin augmented the capacity of differentiated endothelial monolayers for active transport of Aβ peptide. Finally, ACI-91 was found to consistently affect, in vitro and in vivo, the expression of endothelial cell genes involved in Aβ transport across the Blood Brain Brain (BBB). Thus increased Aβ clearance through the BBB may contribute to reduced Aβ burden and associated phenotypes. Inhibition of muscarinic AChR restricted to the periphery may present a therapeutic advantage as it avoids adverse central cholinergic effects.

  5. Analysis of the anatomy of the Papez circuit and adjoining limbic system by fiber dissection techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Abhidha; Jhawar, Sukhdeep Singh; Goel, Atul

    2012-02-01

    Fiber dissection techniques were used to study the limbic system, in particular the Papez circuit. The course, length and anatomical relations of the structures that make up the Papez circuit were delineated. Ten previously frozen and formalin-fixed cadaveric human brains were used, and dissected according to the fiber dissection techniques of Klingler et al. (Schweiz Arch Neurol Psychiatry 1935;36:247-56). The primary dissection tools were thin and curved wooden and metallic spatulas with tips of varying sizes. We found that the Papez circuit (mean length: 350 mm) begins in the hippocampus and continues into the fornix to reach the mamillary body. From there, the mamillothalamic tract continues to the anterior nucleus of the thalamus, which in turn connects to the cingulum by means of anterior thalamic radiations (mean length: 30 mm). The cingulum courses around the corpus callosum to end in the entorhinal cortex, which then projects to the hippocampus, thus completing the circuit. The average length and breadth of the mamillothalamic tract was 18 mm and 1.73 mm respectively. The average length of the cingulum was 19.6 cm and that of the fornix was 71 mm. The entire circuit was anatomically dissected first in situ in the hemisphere and was then reconstructed outside after removing its various components using fine fiber dissection under a surgical microscope. We found that fiber dissection elegantly delineates the anatomical subtleties of the Papez circuit and provides a three-dimensional perspective of the limbic system. Intricate knowledge of the anatomy of this part of the brain aids the neurosurgeon while performing epilepsy surgery and while approaching intrinsic brain parenchymal, ventricular and paraventricular lesions.

  6. Inhibition of cerebroside synthesis in the brains of mice treated with L-cycloserine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundaram, K.S.; Lev, M.

    1985-04-01

    Subcutaneous injection of L-cycloserine resulted in a 28% reduction in cerebroside levels in mouse brain but had no effect on the levels of gangliosides. In contrast, intraperitoneal injection results in a reduction of ganglioside as well as cerebroside + sulfatide levels. The route of injection influenced the degree of 3-ketodihydrosphingosine synthase inhibition. Intraperitoneal injection caused a rapid decrease in synthase activity followed by recovery over 48 hr, whereas subcutaneous injection resulted in no inhibition over this time; only after daily injection for a week was synthase activity reduced 35%. One week following cessation of L-cycloserine administration, enzyme activity had recovered, whereas the cerebroside level continued to fall. All lipids and enzymes showed normal levels 3 weeks post-cycloserine administration. L-(/sup 3/H)serine incorporation into glycolipids showed that cerebroside synthesis was most affected, whereas sulfatide synthesis was less affected. One week after cessation of cycloserine treatment, cerebroside synthesis was still severely inhibited, whereas sulfatide levels were near normal. Two weeks after cessation of L-cycloserine administration, synthesis of these glycolipids was similar to that of controls.

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Allosteric Inhibition of Brain Glycogen Phosphorylase by Neurotoxic Dithiocarbamate Chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Cécile; Bui, Linh-Chi; Petit, Emile; Haddad, Iman; Agbulut, Onnik; Vinh, Joelle; Dupret, Jean-Marie; Rodrigues-Lima, Fernando

    2017-02-03

    Dithiocarbamates (DTCs) are important industrial chemicals used extensively as pesticides and in a variety of therapeutic applications. However, they have also been associated with neurotoxic effects and in particular with the development of Parkinson-like neuropathy. Although different pathways and enzymes (such as ubiquitin ligases or the proteasome) have been identified as potential targets of DTCs in the brain, the molecular mechanisms underlying their neurotoxicity remain poorly understood. There is increasing evidence that alteration of glycogen metabolism in the brain contributes to neurodegenerative processes. Interestingly, recent studies with N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate suggest that brain glycogen phosphorylase (bGP) and glycogen metabolism could be altered by DTCs. Here, we provide molecular and mechanistic evidence that bGP is a target of DTCs. To examine this system, we first tested thiram, a DTC pesticide known to display neurotoxic effects, observing that it can react rapidly with bGP and readily inhibits its glycogenolytic activity (kinact = 1.4 × 10(5) m(-1) s(-1)). Using cysteine chemical labeling, mass spectrometry, and site-directed mutagenesis approaches, we show that thiram (and certain of its metabolites) alters the activity of bGP through the formation of an intramolecular disulfide bond (Cys(318)-Cys(326)), known to act as a redox switch that precludes the allosteric activation of bGP by AMP. Given the key role of glycogen metabolism in brain functions and neurodegeneration, impairment of the glycogenolytic activity of bGP by DTCs such as thiram may be a new mechanism by which certain DTCs exert their neurotoxic effects.

  8. Differential susceptibility of mitochondrial complex II to inhibition by oxaloacetate in brain and heart.

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    Stepanova, Anna; Shurubor, Yevgeniya; Valsecchi, Federica; Manfredi, Giovanni; Galkin, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial Complex II is a key mitochondrial enzyme connecting the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and the electron transport chain. Studies of complex II are clinically important since new roles for this enzyme have recently emerged in cell signalling, cancer biology, immune response and neurodegeneration. Oxaloacetate (OAA) is an intermediate of the TCA cycle and at the same time is an inhibitor of complex II with high affinity (Kd~10(-8)M). Whether or not OAA inhibition of complex II is a physiologically relevant process is a significant, but still controversial topic. We found that complex II from mouse heart and brain tissue has similar affinity to OAA and that only a fraction of the enzyme in isolated mitochondrial membranes (30.2±6.0% and 56.4±5.6% in the heart and brain, respectively) is in the free, active form. Since OAA could bind to complex II during isolation, we established a novel approach to deplete OAA in the homogenates at the early stages of isolation. In heart, this treatment significantly increased the fraction of free enzyme, indicating that OAA binds to complex II during isolation. In brain the OAA-depleting system did not significantly change the amount of free enzyme, indicating that a large fraction of complex II is already in the OAA-bound inactive form. Furthermore, short-term ischemia resulted in a dramatic decline of OAA in tissues, but it did not change the amount of free complex II. Our data show that in brain OAA is an endogenous effector of complex II, potentially capable of modulating the activity of the enzyme.

  9. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor mediates the activity-dependent regulation of inhibition in neocortical cultures.

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    Rutherford, L C; DeWan, A; Lauer, H M; Turrigiano, G G

    1997-06-15

    The excitability of cortical circuits is modulated by interneurons that release the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. In primate and rodent visual cortex, activity deprivation leads to a decrease in the expression of GABA. This suggests that activity is able to adjust the strength of cortical inhibition, but this has not been demonstrated directly. In addition, the nature of the signal linking activity to GABA expression has not been determined. Activity is known to regulate the expression of the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and BDNF has been shown to influence the phenotype of GABAergic interneurons. We use a culture system from postnatal rat visual cortex to test the hypothesis that activity is regulating the strength of cortical inhibition through the regulation of BDNF. Cultures were double-labeled against GABA and the neuronal marker MAP2, and the percentage of neurons that were GABA-positive was determined. Blocking spontaneous activity in these cultures reversibly decreased the number of GABA-positive neurons without affecting neuronal survival. Voltage-clamp analysis of inhibitory currents demonstrated that activity blockade also decreased GABA-mediated inhibition onto pyramidal neurons and raised pyramidal neuron firing rates. All of these effects were prevented by incubation with BDNF during activity blockade, but not by neurotrophin 3 or nerve growth factor. Additionally, blockade of neurotrophin signaling mimicked the effects of activity blockade on GABA expression. These data suggest that activity regulates cortical inhibition through a BDNF-dependent mechanism and that this neurotrophin plays an important role in the control of cortical excitability.

  10. Mesenteric hypoperfusion and inflammation induced by brain death are not affected by inhibition of the autonomic storm in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Simas; Ferreira,Sueli G.; Laura Menegat; Zanoni,Fernando L.; Cristiano J. Correia; Silva, Isaac A; Paulina Sannomiya; Moreira,Luiz F.P.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Brain death is typically followed by autonomic changes that lead to hemodynamic instability, which is likely associated with microcirculatory dysfunction and inflammation. We evaluated the role of the microcirculation in the hemodynamic and inflammatory events that occur after brain death and the effects of autonomic storm inhibition via thoracic epidural blockade on mesenteric microcirculatory changes and inflammatory responses. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were anesthetized and me...

  11. Long-Term Effects of Acute Stress on the Prefrontal-Limbic System in the Healthy Adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dongtao; Du, Xue; Zhang, Qinglin; Liu, Guangyuan; Qiu, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Most people are exposed to at least one traumatic event during the course of their lives, but large numbers of people do not develop posttraumatic stress disorders. Although previous studies have shown that repeated and chronic stress change the brain’s structure and function, few studies have focused on the long-term effects of acute stressful exposure in a nonclinical sample, especially the morphology and functional connectivity changes in brain regions implicated in emotional reactivity and emotion regulation. Forty-one months after the 5/12 Wenchuan earthquake, we investigated the effects of trauma exposure on the structure and functional connectivity of the brains of trauma-exposed healthy individuals compared with healthy controls matched for age, sex, and education. We then used machine-learning algorithms with the brain structural features to distinguish between the two groups at an individual level. In the trauma-exposed healthy individuals, our results showed greater gray matter density in prefrontal-limbic brain systems, including the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, amygdala and hippocampus, than in the controls. Further analysis showed stronger amygdala-hippocampus functional connectivity in the trauma-exposed healthy compared to the controls. Our findings revealed that survival of traumatic experiences, without developing PTSD, was associated with greater gray matter density in the prefrontal-limbic systems related to emotional regulation. PMID:28045980

  12. In vitro inhibition by stiripentol of rat brain cytochrome P-450-mediated naphthalene hydroxylation.

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    Mesnil, M; Testa, B; Jenner, P

    1988-09-01

    1. The formation of 1-naphthol from naphthalene was investigated in rat brain 105,000 g particulate fraction. The reaction showed NADPH dependency and was inhibited by carbon monoxide. Michaelis-Menten kinetics were apparent with Vmax = 0.264 pmol/mg protein per min and Km = 22.6 microM. 2. Stiripentol, an antiepileptic drug containing a methylenedioxybenzene moiety, proved to be a potent inhibitor of the reaction, with an IC50 value close to 1 microM under the conditions of study and without preincubation. 3. The inhibitory activity of stiripentol was seen mainly after metabolic activation of the drug. The inhibitory effect appeared progressively when substrate and inhibitor were added together to the incubates, whereas its appearance was more rapid following preincubation of stiripentol.

  13. Ex vivo inhibition of rat brain cytochrome P-450 activity by stiripentol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesnil, M; Testa, B; Jenner, P

    1988-10-01

    Stiripentol is an anti-epileptic drug of novel structure with previously demonstrated strong in vitro inhibitory activity on rat cerebral cytochrome P-450 mediated naphthalene hydroxylation [6]. When administered to rats as a single i.p. dose, the drug is presently shown to have the same in vitro effect. Maximal inhibition is seen 2 hr after administration, but at this time the brain concentrations of intact drug, although peaking, appear too low (ca. 11 micrograms/g tissue) to account for the intensity of the effect seen in vitro. This suggests in vivo activation to a metabolic intermediate forming a complex with cerebral cytochrome P-450, which 2 hr after dosing is fully insensitive to stiripentol added to incubates. Restoration of enzymic activity and of sensitivity to added stiripentol occurs progressively and is practically complete 24 hr after dosing.

  14. Blocking brain-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits injury-induced hyperexcitability of hippocampal CA3 neurons.

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    Gill, Raminder; Chang, Philip K-Y; Prenosil, George A; Deane, Emily C; McKinney, Rebecca A

    2013-12-01

    Brain trauma can disrupt synaptic connections, and this in turn can prompt axons to sprout and form new connections. If these new axonal connections are aberrant, hyperexcitability can result. It has been shown that ablating tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), a receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), can reduce axonal sprouting after hippocampal injury. However, it is unknown whether inhibiting BDNF-mediated axonal sprouting will reduce hyperexcitability. Given this, our purpose here was to determine whether pharmacologically blocking BDNF inhibits hyperexcitability after injury-induced axonal sprouting in the hippocampus. To induce injury, we made Schaffer collateral lesions in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. As reported by others, we observed a 50% reduction in axonal sprouting in cultures treated with a BDNF blocker (TrkB-Fc) 14 days after injury. Furthermore, lesioned cultures treated with TrkB-Fc were less hyperexcitable than lesioned untreated cultures. Using electrophysiology, we observed a two-fold decrease in the number of CA3 neurons that showed bursting responses after lesion with TrkB-Fc treatment, whereas we found no change in intrinsic neuronal firing properties. Finally, evoked field excitatory postsynaptic potential recordings indicated an increase in network activity within area CA3 after lesion, which was prevented with chronic TrkB-Fc treatment. Taken together, our results demonstrate that blocking BDNF attenuates injury-induced hyperexcitability of hippocampal CA3 neurons. Axonal sprouting has been found in patients with post-traumatic epilepsy. Therefore, our data suggest that blocking the BDNF-TrkB signaling cascade shortly after injury may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of post-traumatic epilepsy.

  15. Immunotherapy-responsive limbic encephalitis with antibodies to glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markakis, Ioannis; Alexopoulos, Harry; Poulopoulou, Cornelia; Akrivou, Sofia; Papathanasiou, Athanasios; Katsiva, Vassiliki; Lyrakos, Georgios; Gekas, Georgios; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2014-08-15

    Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) has been recently identified as a target of humoral autoimmunity in a small subgroup of patients with non-paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (NPLE). We present a patient with NPLE and positive anti-GAD antibodies who showed significant improvement after long-term immunotherapy. A 48-year old female was admitted with a two-year history of anterograde amnesia and seizures. Brain MRI revealed bilateral lesions of medial temporal lobes. Screening for anti-neuronal antibodies showed high anti-GAD titers in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with strong evidence of intrathecal production. The patient received treatment with prednisolone and long-term plasma exchange. During a 12-month follow-up, she exhibited complete seizure remission and an improvement in memory and visuo-spatial skills. Anti-GAD antibodies may serve as a useful marker to identify a subset of NPLE patients that respond to immunoregulatory treatment.

  16. Limbic encephalitis. A rare presentation of the small-cell lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hollander, A M; van Hulst, A M; Meerwaldt, J D; Haasjes, J G

    1989-11-01

    Two patients with an acute organic brain syndrome and accompanying neurological symptoms are described. Extensive work up showed that both patients suffered from small-cell lung cancer. Cerebral metastases were absent. Following chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the primary tumor one of the two patients showed a complete remission of psychiatric symptoms for one year. A paraneoplastic origin of this syndrome, in the literature known as limbic encephalitis, is postulated. The exact cause of this syndrome is yet unknown. Recent research reveals data indicating an immunological pathogenesis. The major clinical importance of this (neuro)-psychiatric syndrome is that its appearance may serve as a warning sign for an occult malignancy; furthermore, effective treatment of the primary malignancy can reverse the encephalitis. Thus antitumor therapy can result in a prolonged survival and considerably improved quality of life.

  17. Mephedrone alters basal ganglia and limbic dynorphin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Christopher L; Alburges, Mario E; Hoonakker, Amanda J; Fleckenstein, Annette E; Hanson, Glen R

    2014-08-25

    Mephedrone (4-methymethcathinone) is a synthetic cathinone designer drug that disrupts central nervous system (CNS) dopamine (DA) signaling. Numerous central neuropeptide systems reciprocally interact with dopaminergic neurons to provide regulatory counterbalance, and are altered by aberrant DA activity associated with stimulant exposure. Endogenous opioid neuropeptides are highly concentrated within dopaminergic CNS regions and facilitate many rewarding and aversive properties associated with drug use. Dynorphin, an opioid neuropeptide and kappa receptor agonist, causes dysphoria and aversion to drug consumption through signaling within the basal ganglia and limbic systems, which is affected by stimulants. This study evaluated how mephedrone alters basal ganglia and limbic system dynorphin content, and the role of DA signaling in these changes. Repeated mephedrone administrations (4 × 25 mg/kg/injection, 2-h intervals) selectively increased dynorphin content throughout the dorsal striatum and globus pallidus, decreased dynorphin content within the frontal cortex, and did not alter dynorphin content within most limbic system structures. Pretreatment with D1 -like (SCH-23380) or D2 -like (eticlopride) antagonists blocked mephedrone-induced changes in dynorphin content in most regions examined, indicating altered dynorphin activity is a consequence of excessive DA signaling. Synapse, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Mephedrone alters basal ganglia and limbic neurotensin systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Christopher L; Hoonakker, Amanda H; Fleckenstein, Annette E; Hanson, Glen R

    2014-08-01

    Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) is a synthetic cathinone designer drug that alters pre-synaptic dopamine (DA) activity like many psychostimulants. However, little is known about the post-synaptic dopaminergic impacts of mephedrone. The neuropeptide neurotensin (NT) provides inhibitory feedback for basal ganglia and limbic DA pathways, and post-synaptic D1 -like and D2 -like receptor activity affects NT tissue levels. This study evaluated how mephedrone alters basal ganglia and limbic system NT content and the role of NT receptor activation in drug consumption behavior. Four 25 mg/kg injections of mephedrone increased NT content in basal ganglia (striatum, substantia nigra and globus pallidus) and the limbic regions (nucleus accumbens core), while a lower dosage (5 mg/kg/injection) only increased striatal NT content. Mephedrone-induced increases in basal ganglia NT levels were mediated by D1 -like receptors in the striatum and the substantia nigra by both D1 -like and D2 -like receptors in the globus pallidus. Mephedrone increased substance P content, another neuropeptide, in the globus pallidus, but not in the dorsal striatum or substantia nigra. Finally, the NT receptor agonist PD149163 blocked mephedrone self-administration, suggesting reduced NT release, as indicated by increased tissue levels, likely contributing to patterns of mephedrone consumption.

  19. Clinical study on antibody-associated limbic encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Jia-wei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the antibody-associated limbic encephalitis (LE has attracted attentions of more and more clinicians. The associated antibodies mainly act on neuronal cell surface antigens, including the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor, the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA receptor, the γ-aminobutyric acid B (GABAB receptor, leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1 and contactin-associated protein-like 2 (Caspr2 and so on. The clinical manifestation is primarily defined by the subacute onset of short-term memory loss, seizures, confusion and psychiatric symptoms suggesting the involvement of the limbic system. These severe and protracted disorders can affect children and young adults, occurring with or without tumor association. Routine detection of serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and imaging tests show no specificity, but associated antibodies can be detected in serum and (or CSF. The patients respond well to tumor resection and immunotherapies, including corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg, plasma exchange or combination of them, but may relapse. This article aims to study the clinical features and treatment of antibody-associated limbic encephalitis and to improve the diagnosis and prognosis of these diseases.

  20. Pharmacological doses of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) potentiate histone acetylation in the rat brain by histone deacetylase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Christian; Kemmel, Véronique; Taleb, Omar; Aunis, Dominique; Maitre, Michel

    2009-08-01

    Several small chain fatty acids, including butyrate, valproate, phenylbutyrate and its derivatives, inhibit several HDAC activities in the brain at a several hundred micromolar concentration. Gamma-hydroxy-butyrate (GHB), a natural compound found in the brain originating from the metabolism of GABA, is structurally related to these fatty acids. The average physiological tissue concentration of GHB in the brain is below 50 microM, but when GHB is administered or absorbed for therapeutic or recreative purposes, its concentration reaches several hundred micromolars. In the present scenario, we demonstrate that pharmacological concentrations of GHB significantly induce brain histone H3 acetylation with a heterogeneous distribution in the brain and reduce in vitro HDAC activity. The degree of HDAC inhibition was also different according to the region of the brain considered. Taking into account the multiple physiological and functional roles attributed to the modification of histone acetylation and its consequences at the level of gene expression, we propose that part of the therapeutic or toxic effects of high concentrations of GHB in the brain after therapeutic administration of the drug could be partly due to GHB-induced epigenetic factors. In addition, we hypothesize that GHB, being naturally synthesized in the cytosolic compartment of certain neurons, could penetrate into the nuclei and may reach sufficient levels that could significantly modulate histone acetylation and may participate in the epigenetic modification of gene expression.

  1. Chronic Stress and Limbic-Hypothalamopituitary-Adrenal Axis (LHPA Response in Female Reproductive system

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    Farideh Zafari Zangeneh

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis is a critical adaptive system that maximizes survival potential in the face of physical or psychological challenge. The principal end products of the HPA axis, glucocorticoid hormones, act on multiple organ systems, including the brain, to maintain homeostatic balance. The brain is a target of stress, and the hippocampus is the first brain region, besides the hypothalamus, to be recognized as a target of glucocorticoids. These anatomical areas in brain are limbic system, and in particular the hippocampus, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC and amigdal that have multiple control points in regulation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA axis. The studies show the prefrontal cortex (PFC plays an important role in the regulation of stress-induced hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA activity and regulation of gonadal function in men and women is under the control of the HPA. This regulation is complex and sex steroids are important regulators of GnRH and gonadotropin release through classic feedback mechanisms in the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. Chronic stress can have a deleterious effect on the reproductive axis that, for females, is manifested in reduced pulsatile gonadotropin secretion and increased incidence of ovulatory abnormalities and infertility. The limbic–hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (LHPA axis suggests a functional role for gonadal steroids in the regulation of a female’s response to stress.

  2. Characterizing the Input-Output Function of the Olfactory-Limbic Pathway in the Guinea Pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gian Luca Breschi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the neuroscientific community is taking more and more advantage of the continuous interaction between engineers and computational neuroscientists in order to develop neuroprostheses aimed at replacing damaged brain areas with artificial devices. To this end, a technological effort is required to develop neural network models which can be fed with the recorded electrophysiological patterns to yield the correct brain stimulation to recover the desired functions. In this paper we present a machine learning approach to derive the input-output function of the olfactory-limbic pathway in the in vitro whole brain of guinea pig, less complex and more controllable than an in vivo system. We first experimentally characterized the neuronal pathway by delivering different sets of electrical stimuli from the lateral olfactory tract (LOT and by recording the corresponding responses in the lateral entorhinal cortex (l-ERC. As a second step, we used information theory to evaluate how much information output features carry about the input. Finally we used the acquired data to learn the LOT-l-ERC “I/O function,” by means of the kernel regularized least squares method, able to predict l-ERC responses on the basis of LOT stimulation features. Our modeling approach can be further exploited for brain prostheses applications.

  3. Characterizing the Input-Output Function of the Olfactory-Limbic Pathway in the Guinea Pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breschi, Gian Luca; Ciliberto, Carlo; Nieus, Thierry; Rosasco, Lorenzo; Taverna, Stefano; Chiappalone, Michela; Pasquale, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays the neuroscientific community is taking more and more advantage of the continuous interaction between engineers and computational neuroscientists in order to develop neuroprostheses aimed at replacing damaged brain areas with artificial devices. To this end, a technological effort is required to develop neural network models which can be fed with the recorded electrophysiological patterns to yield the correct brain stimulation to recover the desired functions. In this paper we present a machine learning approach to derive the input-output function of the olfactory-limbic pathway in the in vitro whole brain of guinea pig, less complex and more controllable than an in vivo system. We first experimentally characterized the neuronal pathway by delivering different sets of electrical stimuli from the lateral olfactory tract (LOT) and by recording the corresponding responses in the lateral entorhinal cortex (l-ERC). As a second step, we used information theory to evaluate how much information output features carry about the input. Finally we used the acquired data to learn the LOT-l-ERC "I/O function," by means of the kernel regularized least squares method, able to predict l-ERC responses on the basis of LOT stimulation features. Our modeling approach can be further exploited for brain prostheses applications.

  4. Inhibition of Ptychopetalum olacoides on Acetylcholinesterase Isoforms in Brain of Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FIGUEIR(O) Micheli; POCHMANN Daniela; PORCI(U)NCULA Lisiane Oliveira; NUNES Domingos Sávio; ELISABESTKY Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Objective To further characterize the acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChE-Is) pattern of Ptychopetalum olacoides ethanol extract (POEE) on the cytosolic globular monomer (G1) and membrane bound globular tetramer (G4) AChE isoforms in brain areas relevant for cognition.Methods The G1and G4 AChE isoforms were prepared according to the reported methods and the determination of AChE activity used was adapted from colorimetric method.Results POEE mostly inhibited G1in hippocampus (75%),and G4 in frontal cortex (58%) and striatum (75%) (P < 0.05).Kinetic analysis indicated that POEE-induced AChE inhibition in hippocampus was of a competitive nature for G1but uncompetitive for G4.Conclusion Considering the high density of cholinergic projection to the cortex and striatum,and the usefulness of conserving cytosolic acetylcholine to replenish synaptic vesicles in a highly active cognition site such as hippocampus,we argue that this could be a desirable profile for a clinically relevant AChE-I.

  5. The role of limbic system irritability in linking history of childhood maltreatment and psychiatric outcomes in low-income, high-risk women: moderation by FK506 binding protein 5 haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dackis, Melissa N; Rogosch, Fred A; Oshri, Assaf; Cicchetti, Dante

    2012-11-01

    Childhood maltreatment is associated with lasting changes in neuroendocrine regulation, alterations in brain structure and function, and symptoms of "limbic irritability." Limbic irritability symptoms include somatic, sensory, and behavioral phenomena and may stem from increased excitatory neurotransmission following maltreatment. We tested the hypotheses that child maltreatment is indirectly associated with depressive and dissociative symptomatology via indicators of limbic irritability and that variation within the FK506 binding protein 5 gene (FKBP5), a gene involved in glucorticoid receptor functioning, moderates these effects. The sample consisted of high-risk, low-income women (N = 236) living in an inner-city environment. Child maltreatment, limbic irritability, and symptoms of depression and dissociation were measured cross-sectionally using self-report assessments. Haplotype analyses were conducted across four FKBP5 single nucleotide polymorphisms: rs3800373, rs9296158, rs1360870, and rs9470080. Path analysis using bootstrapping procedures was performed to test hypotheses regarding indirect and conditional indirect effects. We found significant indirect effects of maltreatment on depression (β = 0.088, p limbic irritability. In addition, variation within FKBP5 moderated these significant indirect effects. For individuals with one to two copies of the CATT haplotype, the indirect effects of maltreatment on depression (β = 0.137, p limbic irritability were significant, whereas the indirect paths were not significant for individuals with no copies of this haplotype (depression: β = 0.037, p > .05; dissociation: β = 0.002, p > .05). These results add to the growing evidence that child maltreatment may lead to symptoms of internalizing psychopathology through its impact on the limbic system. In addition, this study revealed a potential role of FKBP5 gene variants in contributing to risk for limbic system dysfunction.

  6. Different inhibition of acetylcholinesterase in selected parts of the rat brain following intoxication with VX and Russian VX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajek, Petr; Bajgar, Jiri; Slizova, Dasa; Krs, Otakar; Kuca, Kamil; Capek, Lukas; Fusek, Josef

    2009-01-01

    Differences between acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition in the brain structures following VX and RVX exposure are not known as well as information on the possible correlation of biochemical and histochemical methods detecting AChE activity. Therefore, inhibition of AChE in different brain parts detected by histochemical and biochemical techniques was compared in rats intoxicated with VX and RVX. AChE activities in defined brain regions 30 min after treating rats with VX and Russian VX intramuscularly (1.0 x LD(50)) were determined by using biochemical and histochemical methods. AChE inhibition was less expressed for RVX, in comparison with VX. Frontal cortex and pontomedullar areas containing ncl. reticularis has been found as the most sensitive areas for the action of VX. For RVX, these structures were determined to be frontal cortex, dorsal septum, and hippocampus, respectively. Histochemical and biochemical results were in good correlation (R(xy) = 0.8337). Determination of AChE activity in defined brain structures was a more sensitive parameter for VX or RVX exposure than the determination of AChE activity in the whole-brain homogenate. This activity represents a "mean" of the activities in different structures. Thus, AChE activity is the main parameter investigated in studies searching for target sites following nerve-agent poisoning contributing to better understanding of toxicodynamics of nerve agents.

  7. Inhibition of brain creatine kinase activity after renal ischemia is attenuated by N-acetylcysteine and deferoxamine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di-Pietro, Priscila B; Dias, Márcia L; Scaini, Giselli; Burigo, Márcio; Constantino, Larissa; Machado, Roberta A; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Streck, Emilio L

    2008-03-21

    Encephalopathy may accompany acute or chronic renal failure, and the mechanisms responsible for neurological complications in patients with renal failure are poorly known. Considering that creatine kinase (CK) is important for brain energy homeostasis and is inhibited by free radicals, and that oxidative stress is probably involved in the pathogenesis of uremic encephalopathy, we measured CK activity (hippocampus, striatum, cerebellum, cerebral cortex and prefrontal cortex) in brain if rats submitted to renal ischemia and the effect of administration of antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine, NAC and deferoxamine, DFX) on this enzyme. We verified that CK activity was not altered in cerebellum and striatum of rats. CK activity was inhibited in prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of rats 12h after renal ischemia. The treatment with antioxidants prevented such effect. Cerebral cortex was also affected, but in this area CK activity was inhibited 6 and 12h after renal ischemia. Moreover, only NAC or NAC plus DFX were able to prevent the inhibition on the enzyme. Although it is difficult to extrapolate our findings to the human condition, the inhibition of brain CK activity after renal failure may be associated to neuronal loss and may be involved in the pathogenesis of uremic encephalopathy.

  8. A single high dose of dexamethasone affects the phosphorylation state of glutamate AMPA receptors in the human limbic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, M W; Leal, R B; Guarnieri, R; Schwarzbold, M L; Hoeller, A; Diaz, A P; Boos, G L; Lin, K; Linhares, M N; Nunes, J C; Quevedo, J; Bortolotto, Z A; Markowitsch, H J; Lightman, S L; Walz, R

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GC) released during stress response exert feedforward effects in the whole brain, but particularly in the limbic circuits that modulates cognition, emotion and behavior. GC are the most commonly prescribed anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant medication worldwide and pharmacological GC treatment has been paralleled by the high incidence of acute and chronic neuropsychiatric side effects, which reinforces the brain sensitivity for GC. Synapses can be bi-directionally modifiable via potentiation (long-term potentiation, LTP) or depotentiation (long-term depression, LTD) of synaptic transmission efficacy, and the phosphorylation state of Ser831 and Ser845 sites, in the GluA1 subunit of the glutamate AMPA receptors, are a critical event for these synaptic neuroplasticity events. Through a quasi-randomized controlled study, we show that a single high dexamethasone dose significantly reduces in a dose-dependent manner the levels of GluA1-Ser831 phosphorylation in the amygdala resected during surgery for temporal lobe epilepsy. This is the first report demonstrating GC effects on key markers of synaptic neuroplasticity in the human limbic system. The results contribute to understanding how GC affects the human brain under physiologic and pharmacologic conditions. PMID:27959333

  9. S100B modulates IL-6 release and cytotoxicity from hypothermic brain cells and inhibits hypothermia-induced axonal outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Katharina R L; Kern, Claudia; Lange, Peter E; Berger, Felix; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Hendrix, Sven

    2007-09-01

    Brain protection is essential during neonatal and pediatric cardiac surgery. Deep hypothermia is still the most important method for achieving neuroprotection during cardiopulmonary bypass. Previously, we could demonstrate that deep hypothermia induces substantial cytotoxicity in brain cells as well as increased release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6), which plays an important role in neuroprotection and neuroregeneration. Deep hypothermia is also associated with increased levels of the astrocytic protein S100B in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of patients. Since S100B may modulate pro-inflammatory cytokines and may stimulate neurite outgrowth, we have tested the hypothesis that nanomolar concentrations of S100B may increase IL-6 release from brain cells and support axonal outgrowth from organotypic brain slices under hypothermic conditions. S100B administration substantially reduced neuronal and glial cytotoxicity under hypothermic conditions. In the presence of S100B hypothermia-induced IL-6 release in primary astrocytes was significantly increased but reduced in BV-2 microglial cells and primary neurons. Surprisingly, deep hypothermia increased axonal outgrowth from brain slices and--in contrast to our hypothesis--this hypothermia-induced neurite outgrowth was inhibited by S100B. These data suggest that S100B differentially influences cytokine release and cytotoxicity from distinct brain cells and may inhibit neuroregeneration by suppressing hypothermia-induced axonal outgrowth.

  10. Propolis attenuates oxidative injury in brain and lung of nitric oxide synthase inhibited rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeliha Selamoglu-Talas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The blocking of nitric oxide synthase (NOS activity may reason vasoconstriction with formation of reactive oxygen species. Propolis has biological and pharmacological properties, such as antioxidant. The aim of this study was to examine the antioxidant effects of propolis which natural product on biochemical parameters in brain and lung tissues of acute nitric oxide synthase inhibited rats by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME.Methods: Rats have been received L-NAME (40 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, NOS inhibitor for 15 days to produce hypertension and propolis (200mg/kg, by gavage the lastest 5 of 15 days.Results: There  were  the  increase  (P<0.001  in  the  malondialdehyde  levels  in  the  L-NAME treatment groups when compared to control rats, but the decrease (P<0.001 in the catalase activities in both brain and lung tissues. There were statistically changes (P<0.001 in these parameters of L-NAME+propolis treated rats as compared with L-NAME-treated group.Conclusion: The application of L-NAME to the Wistar rats resulted in well developed oxidative stress. Also, propolis may influence endothelial NO production. Identification of such compounds and characterisation of their cellular actions may increase our knowledge of the regulation of endothelial NO production and could provide valuable clues for the prevention or treatment of hypertensive diseases and oxidative stress.

  11. Citicoline affects appetite and cortico-limbic responses to images of high-calorie foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgore, William D S; Ross, Amy J; Kamiya, Toshikazu; Kawada, Yoko; Renshaw, Perry F; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A

    2010-01-01

    Cytidine-5'-diphosphocholine (citicoline) has a variety of cognitive enhancing, neuroprotective, and neuroregenerative properties. In cocaine-addicted individuals, citicoline has been shown to increase brain dopamine levels and reduce cravings. The effects of this compound on appetite, food cravings, and brain responses to food are unknown. We compared the effects of treatment with Cognizin citicoline (500 mg/day versus 2,000 mg/day) for 6 weeks on changes in appetite ratings, weight, and cortico-limbic responses to images of high-calorie foods using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). After 6 weeks, there was no significant change in weight status, although significant declines in appetite ratings were observed for the 2,000 mg/day group. The higher dose group also showed significant increases in functional brain responses to food stimuli within the amygdala, insula, and lateral orbitofrontal cortex. Increased activation in these regions correlated with declines in appetite ratings. These preliminary findings suggest a potential usefulness of citicoline in modulating appetite, but further research is warranted.

  12. Citicoline Affects Appetite and Cortico-Limbic Responses to Images of High Calorie Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killgore, William D. S.; Ross, Amy J.; Kamiya, Toshi; Kawada, Yoko; Renshaw, Perry F.; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    Cytidine-5’-diphosphocholine (citicoline) has a variety of cognitive enhancing, neuroprotective, and neuroregenerative properties. In cocaine-addicted individuals, citicoline has been shown to increase brain dopamine levels and reduce cravings. The effects of this compound on appetite, food cravings, and brain responses to food are unknown. We compared the effects of treatment with citicoline (500 mg/day versus 2000 mg/day) for six weeks on changes in appetite ratings, weight, and cortico-limbic responses to images of high calorie foods using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). After six weeks, there was no significant change in weight status, although significant declines in appetite ratings were observed for the 2000 mg/day group. The higher dose group also showed significant increases in functional brain responses to food stimuli within the amygdala, insula, and lateral orbitofrontal cortex. Increased activation in these regions correlated with declines in appetite ratings. These preliminary findings suggest a potential usefulness of citicoline in modulating appetite, but further research is warranted. PMID:19260039

  13. Inhibition of noradrenaline release in the rat brain cortex via presynaptic H3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, E; Fink, K; Hinterthaner, M; Göthert, M

    1989-12-01

    The effects of histamine and related drugs on the evoked tritium overflow from superfused rat brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline were determined. Tritium overflow was stimulated electrically (3 Hz; slices superfused with normal physiological salt solution) or by introduction of CaCl2 1.3 mmol/l (slices superfused with Ca2(+)-free medium containing K+ 20 mmol/l). Histamine slightly decreased the electrically evoked 3H overflow in slices superfused in the presence of desipramine. The degree of inhibition obtained with histamine was doubled when both desipramine and phentolamine were present in the superfusion medium (pIC15 6.46). Under the latter condition, the evoked overflow was inhibited by the H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine and its S-(+) enantiomer (pIC15 7.36 and 5.09, respectively), but was not affected by the H2 receptor agonist dimaprit and the H1 receptor agonist 2-thiazolylethylamine (both at up to 32 mumols/l). The concentration-response curve of histamine was shifted to the right by the H3 receptor antagonists thioperamide, impromidine and burimamide (apparent pA2 8.37, 6.86 and 7.05, respectively), by the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine (apparent pA2 4.27) and was not affected by the H1 receptor antagonist dimetindene (32 mumols/l). The inhibitory effect of R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine on the evoked overflow was also counteracted by thioperamide. Given alone, none of the five histamine receptor antagonists affected the evoked overflow. In the absence of desipramine plus phentolamine, impromidine and burimamide facilitated the electrically evoked 3H overflow whereas thioperamide had no effect. The facilitatory effects of impromidine and burimamide were abolished by phentolamine, but not affected by desipramine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Effect of depression on response inhibition of patients after traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-hong SHAO

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effect of depression on response inhibition of patients after traumatic brain injury (TBI.  Methods Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 Items (HAMD-17 and Activities of Daily Living (ADL were used to assess the severity of trauma, depression and activities of daily living in 104 TBI patients (54 with depression and 50 without depression. Besides, 51 normal controls with matched age, sex and education were enrolled. Stimulus-Response Compatibility (SRC task was employed to record the reaction time (RT of response inhibition of the subjects in 3 groups.  Results Both HAMD-17 and ADL scores in TBI with depression group were significantly higher than those in TBI without depression group (P = 0.000, 0.000 and normal control group (P = 0.000, 0.000. Besides, HAMD-17 and ADL scores in TBI without depression group were significantly higher than those in normal control group (P = 0.000, 0.000. Compared with normal control group, no matter in compatible or incompatible condition, RT was significantly longer in both TBI groups (P = 0.000, 0.000. RT was much longer in TBI with depression group than that in TBI without depression group (P = 0.000.  Conclusions Cognitive dysfunction is a common symptom after TBI, which may exist 6 months after injury or even longer. TBI combined with depression could aggravate the impaired cognitive function, so early identification and timely intervention is very important. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2016.06.004

  15. Restoration of Brain Acid Soluble Protein 1 Inhibits Proliferation and Migration of Thyroid Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Run-Sheng Guo; Yue Yu; Jun Chen; Yue-Yu Chen; Na Shen; Ming Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Background:Brain acid soluble protein 1 (BASP1) is identified as a novel potential tumor suppressor in several cancers.However,its role in thyroid cancer has not been investigated yet.In the present study,the antitumor activities of BASP1 against the growth and migration of thyroid cancer cells were evaluated.Methods:BASP1 expression in thyroid cancer tissues and normal tissues were examined by immunohistochemical staining and the association between its expression and prognosis was analyzed,pcDNA-BASP 1 carrying full length ofBASP1 cDNA was constructed to restore the expression ofBASP 1 in thyroid cancer cell lines (BHT-101 and KMH-2).The cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo was evaluated by WST-1 assay and xenograft tumor models,respectively.Cell cycle distribution after transfection was analyzed using flow cytometry.Cell apoptosis after transfection was examined by annexin V/propidium iodide assay.The migration was examined using transwell assay.Results:BASP 1 expression was abundant in normal tissues while it is significantly decreased in cancer tissues (P =0.000).pcDNA-BASP1 restored the expression of BASP1 and significantly inhibited the growth of BHT-101 and KMH-2 cells as well as xenograft tumors in nude mice (P =0.000).pcDNA-BASP1 induced G1 arrest and apoptosis in BHT-101 and KMH-2 cells.In addition,pcDNA-BASP1 significantly inhibited the cell migration.Conclusions:Downregnlation of BASP1 expression may play a role in the tumorigenesis of thyroid cancer.Restoration of BASP1 expression exerted extensive antitumor activities against growth and migration of thyroid cancer cells,which suggested that BASP1 gene might act as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of thyroid cancer.

  16. Inhibition of Nucleotide Synthesis Targets Brain Tumor Stem Cells in a Subset of Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laks, Dan R; Ta, Lisa; Crisman, Thomas J; Gao, Fuying; Coppola, Giovanni; Radu, Caius G; Nathanson, David A; Kornblum, Harley I

    2016-06-01

    Inhibition of both the de novo (DNP) and salvage (NSP) pathways of nucleoside synthesis has been demonstrated to impair leukemia cells. We endeavored to determine whether this approach would be efficacious in glioblastoma. To diminish nucleoside biosynthesis, we utilized compound DI-39, which selectively targets NSP, in combination with thymidine (dT), which selectively targets DNP. We employed in vitro and ex vivo models to determine the effects of pretreatment with dT + DI-39 on brain tumor stem cells (BTSC). Here, we demonstrate that this combinatorial therapy elicits a differential response across a spectrum of human patient-derived glioblastoma cultures. As determined by apoptotic markers, most cultures were relatively resistant to treatment, although a subset was highly sensitive. Sensitivity was unrelated to S-phase delay and to DNA damage induced by treatment. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that response across cultures was associated with the transcription factor PAX3 (associated with resistance) and with canonical pathways, including the nucleotide excision repair pathway, PTEN (associated with resistance), PI3K/AKT (associated with sensitivity), and ErbB2-ErbB3. Our in vitro assays demonstrated that, in sensitive cultures, clonal sphere formation was reduced upon removal from pretreatment. In contrast, in a resistant culture, clonal sphere formation was slightly increased upon removal from pretreatment. Moreover, in an intracranial xenograft model, pretreatment of a sensitive culture caused significantly smaller and fewer tumors. In a resistant culture, tumors were equivalent irrespective of pretreatment. These results indicate that, in the subset of sensitive glioblastoma, BTSCs are targeted by inhibition of pyrimidine synthesis. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1271-8. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Amino acids inhibit kynurenic acid formation via suppression of kynurenine uptake or kynurenic acid synthesis in rat brain in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Airi; Okamoto, Misaki; Kanatani, Yuka; Sano, Mitsue; Shibata, Katsumi; Fukuwatari, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    The tryptophan metabolite, kynurenic acid (KYNA), is a preferential antagonist of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at endogenous brain concentrations. Recent studies have suggested that increase of brain KYNA levels is involved in psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression. KYNA-producing enzymes have broad substrate specificity for amino acids, and brain uptake of kynurenine (KYN), the immediate precursor of KYNA, is via large neutral amino acid transporters (LAT). In the present study, to find out amino acids with the potential to suppress KYNA production, we comprehensively investigated the effects of proteinogenic amino acids on KYNA formation and KYN uptake in rat brain in vitro. Cortical slices of rat brain were incubated for 2 h in Krebs-Ringer buffer containing a physiological concentration of KYN with individual amino acids. Ten out of 19 amino acids (specifically, leucine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, methionine, tyrosine, alanine, cysteine, glutamine, glutamate, and aspartate) significantly reduced KYNA formation at 1 mmol/L. These amino acids showed inhibitory effects in a dose-dependent manner, and partially inhibited KYNA production at physiological concentrations. Leucine, isoleucine, methionine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine, all LAT substrates, also reduced tissue KYN concentrations in a dose-dependent manner, with their inhibitory rates for KYN uptake significantly correlated with KYNA formation. These results suggest that five LAT substrates inhibit KYNA formation via blockade of KYN transport, while the other amino acids act via blockade of the KYNA synthesis reaction in brain. Amino acids can be a good tool to modulate brain function by manipulation of KYNA formation in the brain. This approach may be useful in the treatment and prevention of neurological and psychiatric diseases associated with increased KYNA levels.

  18. Brainstem and limbic encephalitis with paraneoplastic neuromyelitis optica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussawi, Khaled; Lin, David J; Matiello, Marcelo; Chew, Sheena; Morganstern, Daniel; Vaitkevicius, Henrikas

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of disorders associated with anti-neuromyelitis optica (NMO) antibody is being extended to include infrequent instances associated with cancer. We describe a patient with brainstem and limbic encephalitis from NMO-immunoglobulin G in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in the context of newly diagnosed breast cancer. The neurological features markedly improved with excision of her breast cancer and immune suppressive therapy. This case further broadens the NMO spectrum disorders (NMOSD) by an association between NMOSD and cancer and raises the question of coincidental occurrence and the appropriate circumstances to search for a tumor in certain instances of NMO.

  19. Restoring GM1 ganglioside expression ameliorates axonal outgrowth inhibition and cognitive impairments induced by blast traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubovitch, Vardit; Zilberstein, Yael; Chapman, Joab; Schreiber, Shaul; Pick, Chaim G.

    2017-01-01

    Blast induced traumatic brain injury (B-TBI) may cause various degrees of cognitive and behavioral disturbances but the exact brain pathophysiology involved is poorly understood. It was previously suggested that ganglioside alteration on the axon surface as well as axonal regenerating inhibitors (ARIs) such as myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) were involved in axonal outgrowth inhibition (AOI), leading to brain damage. GM1 ganglioside content in the brain was significantly reduced while GD1 ganglioside was not affected. The axonal regeneration was also reduced as seen by the phosphorylated NF-H expression. Moreover, B-TBI induced a significant elevation in MAG expression in the brains of the injured mice. The blast injured mice exhibited a significant decline in spatial memory as seen by the Y-maze test. In addition, the injured mice showed pronounced damage to the visual memory (as evaluated by the Novel object recognition test). A single low dose of GM1 (2 mg/kg; IP), shortly after the injury, prevented both the cognitive and the cellular changes in the brains of the injured mice. These results enlighten part of the complicated mechanism that underlies the damage induced by B-TBI and may also suggest a potential new treatment strategy for brain injuries. PMID:28112258

  20. Prepulse inhibition of the startle reflex: a window on the brain in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braff, David L

    2010-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle response is an important measure of information processing deficits and inhibitory failure in schizophrenia patients. PPI is especially useful because it occurs in the same lawful manner in all mammals, from humans to rodents, making it an ideal candidate for cross-species translational research. PPI deficits occur across the "schizophrenia spectrum" from schizophrenia patients to their clinically unaffected relatives. Parallel animal model and human brain imaging studies have demonstrated that PPI is modulated by cortico-striato-pallido-thalamic (and pontine) circuitry. This circuitry is also implicated in schizophrenia neuropathology and neurophysiology. The finding of PPI deficits in schizophrenia patients has been replicated by many groups, and these deficits correlate with measures of thought disorder and appear to be "normalized" by second generation antipsychotic (SGA) medications. Consistent pharmacological effects on PPI have been demonstrated; among these, dopamine agonists induce PPI deficits and (in animal models) these are reversed by first and SGA medications. PPI is also significantly heritable in humans and animals and can be used as a powerful endophenotype in studies of families of schizophrenia patients. Genomic regions, including the NRGL-ERBB4 complex with its glutamatergic influences, are strongly implicated in PPI deficits in schizophrenia. PPI continues to hold promise as an exciting translational cross-species measure that can be used to understand the pathophysiology and treatment of the schizophrenias via pharmacological, anatomic, and genetic studies.

  1. Limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies as a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Tomoko; Akamatsu, Naoki; Tsuji, Sadatoshi; Nishizawa, Shigeru

    2014-06-01

    Recently, some reports have indicated that limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies (VGKC-Ab) is a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We report a 53-year-old woman who had her first epileptic seizure at the age of 50 years old. Examination by 3-Tesla brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and swelling on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted imaging at 2 months after her first seizure. The patient received intravenous methylprednisolone and carbamazepine 300 mg/day. One month later, MRI revealed improvement of her left hippocampal abnormalities. Thereafter, she had no seizures, however, three years after her first seizure, EEG revealed a seizure pattern in the left temporal region. Brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and brain fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed hypermetabolism. Her serum VGKC-Ab levels were 118 pM(normal VGKC-Ab levels decreased to 4.4 pM. Remission of the epileptic seizures was also observed. This MTLE in the middle age was considered as limbic encephalitis associated with anti- VGKC-Ab. In cases of unexplained adult-onset MTLE, limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC-Ab, which responds well to immunotherapy, should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  2. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase in CSF versus brain assessed by 11C-PMP PET in AD patients treated with galantamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darreh-Shori, T; Kadir, A; Almkvist, O; Grut, M; Wall, A; Blomquist, G; Eriksson, B; Långström, B; Nordberg, A

    2008-02-01

    The relationship between acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in the CSF and brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) was investigated in 18 mild AD patients following galantamine treatment. The first 3 months of the study had a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled design, during which 12 patients received galantamine (16-24 mg/day) and six patients placebo. This was followed by 9 months galantamine treatment in all patients. Activities and protein levels of both the "read-through" AChE (AChE-R) and the synaptic (AChE-S) variants in CSF were assessed in parallel together with the regional brain AChE activity by (11)C-PMP and PET. The AChE-S inhibition was 30-36% in CSF, which correlated well with the in vivo AChE inhibition in the brain. No significant AChE inhibition was observed in the placebo group. The increased level of the AChE-R protein was 16% higher than that of AChE-S. Both the AChE inhibition and the increased level of AChE-R protein positively correlated with the patient's performance in cognitive tests associated with visuospatial ability and attention. In conclusion, AChE levels in CSF closely mirror in vivo brain AChE levels prior to and after treatment with the cholinesterase inhibitors. A positive cognitive response seems to dependent on the AChE inhibition level, which is balanced by an increased protein level of the AChE-R variant in the patients.

  3. Maturation of the limbic system revealed by MR FLAIR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Jacques F.; Vergesslich, Klara [University Children' s Hospital UKBB, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Basel (Switzerland)

    2007-04-15

    Cortical signal intensity (SI) of the limbic system in adults is known to be higher than in neocortical structures, but time-related changes in SI during childhood have not been described. To detect maturation-related SI changes within the limbic system using a fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MR sequence. Twenty children (10 boys, 10 girls; age 3.5-18 years, mean 11.2 years) with no neurological abnormality and normal MR imaging examination were retrospectively selected. On two coronal FLAIR slices, ten regions of interest (ROI) with a constant area of 10 mm{sup 2} were manually placed in the archeocortex (hippocampus), periarcheocortex (parahippocampal gyrus, subcallosal area, cingulate gyrus) and in the neocortex at the level of the superior frontal gyrus on both sides. Significant SI gradients were observed with a higher intensity in the archeocortex, intermediate intensity in the periarcheocortex and low intensity in the neocortex. Significant higher SI values in hippocampal and parahippocampal structures were detected in children up to 10 years of age. These differences mainly reflected differences in cortical structure and myelination state. Archeocortical structures especially showed significant age-related intensity progression suggesting ongoing organization and/or myelination until early adolescence. (orig.)

  4. Are Onconeural Antibodies a Clinical Phenomenology in Paraneoplastic Limbic Encephalitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongliang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNSs occur in patients with cancer and can cause clinical symptoms and signs of dysfunction of the nervous system that are not due to a local effect of the tumor or its metastases. Most of these clinical syndromes in adults are associated with lung cancer, especially small cell lung cancer (SCLC, lymphoma, and gynecological tumors. The finding of highly specific antibodies directed against onconeural antigens has revolutionized the diagnosis and promoted the understanding of these syndromes and led to the current hypothesis of an autoimmune pathophysiology. Accumulating data strongly suggested direct pathogenicity of these antibodies. The field of PNS has expanded rapidly in the past few years with the discovery of limbic encephalitis associated with glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD 65, the voltage (VGKC-gated potassium channel complex, the methyl (N-NMDA-D-aspartate, alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA, and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA (B receptors, and so forth. Despite this, the clinical spectrum of these diseases has not yet been fully investigated. The clinical importance of these conditions lies in their frequent response to immunotherapies and, less commonly, their association with distinctive tumors. This review provides an overview on the pathogenesis and diagnosis of PNS, with emphasis on the role of antibodies in limbic encephalitis.

  5. [Spatial Cognition and Episodic Memory Formation in the Limbic Cortex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yasushi

    2017-04-01

    The limbic lobe defined by Broca is a cortical region with highly diverse structure and functions, and comprises the paleo-, archi-, and neocortices as well as their transitional zones. In the limbic lobe, Brodmann designated areas 27, 28, 34, 35, and 36 adjacent to the hippocampus, and areas 23, 24, 25, 26, 29, 30, 31, 32, and 33 around the corpus callosum. In the current literature, areas 27 and 28 correspond to the presubiculum and entorhinal cortex, respectively. Area 34 represents the cortico-medial part of the amygdaloid complex. Areas 35 and 36 roughly cover the perirhinal and parahippocampal cortices. Areas 24, 25, 32, and 33 belong to the anterior cingulate gyrus, while areas 23, 26, 29, 30, and 31 to the posterior cingulate gyrus. Areas 25, 32, and the anteroinferior portion of area 24 are deeply involved in emotional responses, particularly in their autonomic functions, through reciprocal connections with the amygdaloid complex, anterior thalamus and projections to the brainstem and spinal visceral centers. Areas 29 and 30 have dense reciprocal connections with areas 23 and 31, the dorsolateral prefrontal areas, and the regions related to the hippocampus. They play pivotal roles in mediating spatial cognition, working memory processing, and episodic memory formation.

  6. Chronic stress disrupts neural coherence between cortico-limbic structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Filipe Oliveira

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stress impairs cognitive function, namely on tasks that rely on the integrity of cortico-limbic networks. To unravel the functional impact of progressive stress in cortico-limbic networks we measured neural activity and spectral coherences between the ventral hippocampus (vHIP and the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC in rats subjected to short term (STS and chronic unpredictable stress (CUS. CUS exposure consistently disrupted the spectral coherence between both areas for a wide range of frequencies, whereas STS exposure failed to trigger such effect. The chronic stress-induced coherence decrease correlated inversely with the vHIP power spectrum, but not with the mPFC power spectrum, which supports the view that hippocampal dysfunction is the primary event after stress exposure. Importantly, we additionally show that the variations in vHIP-to-mPFC coherence and power spectrum in the vHIP correlated with stress-induced behavioral deficits in a spatial reference memory task. Altogether, these findings result in an innovative readout to measure, and follow, the functional events that underlie the stress-induced reference memory impairments.

  7. Assessment of inhibition deficits with the virtual classroom in children with traumatic brain injury: a pilot-study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolin, Pierre; Martin, Cyndie; Bouchard, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the performance of 8 children who have sustained a traumatic brain injury on the traditional VIGIL Continuous Performance Test and the Continuous Performance Test included in the Virtual Classroom. Results supported the hypothesis, showing that the Continuous Performance Test from the Virtual Classroom showed more sensitivity concerning inhibition deficits. More precisely, children showed more commission errors and longer reaction time. These results can be explained by the ecological character of the Virtual Classroom, meaning that this instrument is close to real-life experiences and requires more attention and inhibition resources.

  8. Finasteride inhibits the disease-modifying activity of progesterone in the hippocampus kindling model of epileptogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samba Reddy, Doodipala; Ramanathan, G

    2012-09-01

    Progesterone (P) plays an important role in seizure susceptibility in women with epilepsy. Preclinical and experimental studies suggest that P appears to interrupt epileptogenesis, which is a process whereby a normal brain becomes progressively susceptible to recurrent, unprovoked seizures due to precipitating risk factors. Progesterone has not been investigated widely for its potential disease-modifying activity in epileptogenic models. Recently, P has been shown to exert disease-modifying effects in the kindling model of epileptogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying the protective effects of P against epileptogenesis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of P-derived neurosteroids in the disease-modifying activity of P. It is hypothesized that 5α-reductase converts P to allopregnanolone and related neurosteroids that retard epileptogenesis in the brain. To test this hypothesis, we utilized the mouse hippocampus kindling model of epileptogenesis and investigated the effect of finasteride, a 5α-reductase and neurosteroid synthesis inhibitor. Progesterone markedly retarded the development of epileptogenesis and inhibited the rate of kindling acquisition to elicit stage 5 seizures. Pretreatment with finasteride led to complete inhibition of the P-induced retardation of the limbic epileptogenesis in mice. Finasteride did not significantly influence the acute seizure expression in fully kindled mice expressing stage 5 seizures. Thus, neurosteroids that potentiate phasic and tonic inhibition in the hippocampus, such as allopregnanolone, may mediate the disease-modifying effect of P, indicating a new role of neurosteroids in acquired limbic epileptogenesis and temporal lobe epilepsy.

  9. Effect of glutamine synthetase inhibition on brain and interorgan ammonia metabolism in bile duct ligated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fries, Andreas W; Dadsetan, Sherry; Keiding, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia has a key role in the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In the brain, glutamine synthetase (GS) rapidly converts blood-borne ammonia into glutamine which in high concentrations may cause mitochondrial dysfunction and osmolytic brain edema. In astrocyte-neuron cocultures and brains...

  10. In vitro porcine brain tubulin assembly inhibition by water extract from a Chinese medicinal herb, Tripterygium hypoglaucum Hutch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-Qin Liang; Neng Cao; Zhong-Kui Song; Xu Wang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of Tripterygium hyp-oglaucum Hutch (THH) on the assembly and disassembly process of tubulin and its possible mode of action.METHODS: In vitro porcine brain tubulin assembly assay was employed to analyze the inhibitory effects of THH at different concentrations (0.05 μg/L, 0.07 μg/L, 0.09μg/L). Colchicine (0.0025 mmol/L, 0.0050 mmol/L, 0.0075mmol/L) was used as a positive control.RESULTS: THH could significantly inhibit the assembly of isolated porcine brain tubulin at all tested concentrations.CONCLUSION: THH is capable of inducing aneuploidy in mammals via tubulin polymerization inhibition pathway and may pose a genetic risk to human beings.

  11. Kinetic characters and resistance to inhibition of crude and purified brain acetylcholinesterase of three freshwater fishes by organophosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaonan, Li; Xianchuan, Xie; Guonian, Zhu; Yajun, Tan

    2004-07-14

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) was purified from the brain of three fresh-water fishes, topmouth gudgeon (Pseudorasbora parva), goldfish (Carassius auratus auratus) and rainbow trout (Oncorrhychus mykiss, formerly named Salmo gairdneri) by PEG2000/phosphate-salt two phases extraction, DEAE-Sephadex A-50 and Sephadex G-200 chromatography. Kinetic characters and resistance to inhibition of crude and purified enzymes by organophosphates were then studied. Although the crude enzyme from the trout displayed a different specific activity, kinetic curve, Vmax, and sensitivity to inhibition by oxidized malathion and triazopos compared with the two cyprinoids (i.e. topmouth gudgeon and goldfish), the purified enzymes of all the three species showed no significant difference in all aspects. The result suggested a negligible intrinsic difference of brain AChEs among the tested species.

  12. Decisional impulsivity and the associative-limbic subthalamic nucleus in obsessive-compulsive disorder: stimulation and connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voon, Valerie; Droux, Fabien; Morris, Laurel; Chabardes, Stephan; Bougerol, Thierry; David, Olivier; Krack, Paul; Polosan, Mircea

    2017-02-01

    Why do we make hasty decisions for short-term gain? Rapid decision-making with limited accumulation of evidence and delay discounting are forms of decisional impulsivity. The subthalamic nucleus is implicated in inhibitory function but its role in decisional impulsivity is less well-understood. Here we assess decisional impulsivity in subjects with obsessive compulsive disorder who have undergone deep brain stimulation of the limbic and associative subthalamic nucleus. We show that stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is causally implicated in increasing decisional impulsivity with less accumulation of evidence during probabilistic uncertainty and in enhancing delay discounting. Subthalamic stimulation shifts evidence accumulation in subjects with obsessive-compulsive disorder towards a functional less cautious style closer to that of healthy controls emphasizing its adaptive nature. Thus, subjects with obsessive compulsive disorder on subthalamic stimulation may be less likely to check for evidence (e.g. checking that the stove is on) with no difference in subjective confidence (or doubt). In a separate study, we replicate in humans (154 healthy controls) using resting state functional connectivity, tracing studies conducted in non-human primates dissociating limbic, associative and motor frontal hyper-direct connectivity with anterior and posterior subregions of the subthalamic nucleus. We show lateralization of functional connectivity of bilateral ventral striatum to right anterior ventromedial subthalamic nucleus consistent with previous observations of lateralization of emotionally evoked activity to right ventral subthalamic nucleus. We use a multi-echo sequence with independent components analysis, which has been shown to have enhanced signal-to-noise ratio, thus optimizing visualization of small subcortical structures. These findings in healthy controls converge with the effective contacts in obsessive compulsive disorder patients localized within the

  13. Impact of size and delay on neural activity in the rat limbic corticostriatal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Roesch

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A number of factors influence an animal’s economic decisions. Two most commonly studied are the magnitude of and delay to reward. To investigate how these factors are represented in the firing rates of single neurons, we devised a behavioral task that independently manipulated the expected delay to and size of reward. Rats perceived the differently delayed and sized rewards as having different values and were more motivated under short-delay and big-reward conditions than under long-delay and small-reward conditions as measured by percent choice, accuracy and reaction time. Since the creation of this task, we have recorded from several different brain areas including, orbitofrontal cortex, striatum, amygdala, substantia nigra pars reticulata, and midbrain dopamine neurons. Here, we review and compare those data with a substantial focus on those areas that have been shown to be critical for performance on classic time discounting procedures and provide a potential mechanism by which they might interact when animals are deciding between differently delayed rewards. We found that most brain areas in the cortico-limbic circuit encode both the magnitude and delay to reward delivery in one form or another, but only a few encode them together at the single neuron level.

  14. Impact of Size and Delay on Neural Activity in the Rat Limbic Corticostriatal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Matthew R.; Bryden, Daniel W.

    2011-01-01

    A number of factors influence an animal’s economic decisions. Two most commonly studied are the magnitude of and delay to reward. To investigate how these factors are represented in the firing rates of single neurons, we devised a behavioral task that independently manipulated the expected delay to and size of reward. Rats perceived the differently delayed and sized rewards as having different values and were more motivated under short delay and big-reward conditions than under long delay and small reward conditions as measured by percent choice, accuracy, and reaction time. Since the creation of this task, we have recorded from several different brain areas including, orbitofrontal cortex, striatum, amygdala, substantia nigra pars reticulata, and midbrain dopamine neurons. Here, we review and compare those data with a substantial focus on those areas that have been shown to be critical for performance on classic time discounting procedures and provide a potential mechanism by which they might interact when animals are deciding between differently delayed rewards. We found that most brain areas in the cortico-limbic circuit encode both the magnitude and delay to reward delivery in one form or another, but only a few encode them together at the single neuron level. PMID:22363252

  15. Impact of size and delay on neural activity in the rat limbic corticostriatal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Matthew R; Bryden, Daniel W

    2011-01-01

    A number of factors influence an animal's economic decisions. Two most commonly studied are the magnitude of and delay to reward. To investigate how these factors are represented in the firing rates of single neurons, we devised a behavioral task that independently manipulated the expected delay to and size of reward. Rats perceived the differently delayed and sized rewards as having different values and were more motivated under short delay and big-reward conditions than under long delay and small reward conditions as measured by percent choice, accuracy, and reaction time. Since the creation of this task, we have recorded from several different brain areas including, orbitofrontal cortex, striatum, amygdala, substantia nigra pars reticulata, and midbrain dopamine neurons. Here, we review and compare those data with a substantial focus on those areas that have been shown to be critical for performance on classic time discounting procedures and provide a potential mechanism by which they might interact when animals are deciding between differently delayed rewards. We found that most brain areas in the cortico-limbic circuit encode both the magnitude and delay to reward delivery in one form or another, but only a few encode them together at the single neuron level.

  16. Mutation of Semaphorin-6A disrupts limbic and cortical connectivity and models neurodevelopmental psychopathology.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism are characterised by cellular disorganisation and dysconnectivity across the brain and can be caused by mutations in genes that control neurodevelopmental processes. To examine how neurodevelopmental defects can affect brain function and behaviour, we have comprehensively investigated the consequences of mutation of one such gene, Semaphorin-6A, on cellular organisation, axonal projection patterns, behaviour and physiology in mice. These analyses reveal a spectrum of widespread but subtle anatomical defects in Sema6A mutants, notably in limbic and cortical cellular organisation, lamination and connectivity. These mutants display concomitant alterations in the electroencephalogram and hyper-exploratory behaviour, which are characteristic of models of psychosis and reversible by the antipsychotic clozapine. They also show altered social interaction and deficits in object recognition and working memory. Mice with mutations in Sema6A or the interacting genes may thus represent a highly informative model for how neurodevelopmental defects can lead to anatomical dysconnectivity, resulting, either directly or through reactive mechanisms, in dysfunction at the level of neuronal networks with associated behavioural phenotypes of relevance to psychiatric disorders. The biological data presented here also make these genes plausible candidates to explain human linkage findings for schizophrenia and autism.

  17. P-glycoprotein inhibition increases the brain distribution and antidepressant-like activity of escitalopram in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Fionn E; O'Connor, Richard M; Clarke, Gerard; Dinan, Timothy G; Griffin, Brendan T; Cryan, John F

    2013-10-01

    Despite the clinical prevalence of the antidepressant escitalopram, over 30% of escitalopram-treated patients fail to respond to treatment. Recent gene association studies have highlighted a potential link between the drug efflux transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and response to escitalopram. The present studies investigated pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between P-gp and escitalopram. In vitro bidirectional transport studies revealed that escitalopram is a transported substrate of human P-gp. Microdialysis-based pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that administration of the P-gp inhibitor cyclosporin A resulted in increased brain levels of escitalopram without altering plasma escitalopram levels in the rat, thereby showing that P-gp restricts escitalopram transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in vivo. The tail suspension test (TST) was carried out to elucidate the pharmacodynamic impact of P-gp inhibition on escitalopram effect in a mouse model of antidepressant activity. Pre-treatment with the P-gp inhibitor verapamil enhanced the response to escitalopram in the TST. Taken together, these data indicate that P-gp may restrict the BBB transport of escitalopram in humans, potentially resulting in subtherapeutic brain concentrations in certain patients. Moreover, by verifying that increasing escitalopram delivery to the brain by P-gp inhibition results in enhanced antidepressant-like activity, we suggest that adjunctive treatment with a P-gp inhibitor may represent a beneficial approach to augment escitalopram therapy in depression.

  18. Comparison of several oximes on reactivation of soman-inhibited blood, brain and tissue cholinesterase activity in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shih, T.M.

    1993-12-31

    The ability of three oximes, HI-6, MMB-4 and ICD-467, to reactivate cholinesterase (ChE) inhibited by the organophosphorus compound soman was compared in blood (plasma and erythrocytes), brain regions (including spinal cord) and peripheral tissues of rats. Animals were intoxicated with soman (100 ttg/kg. SC; equivalent to 0.9 x LDs0 dose) and treated 1 min later with one of these oximes (100 or 200 ttmo1/kg, IM). Toxic sign scores and total tissue ChE activities were determined 30 min later. Soman markedly inhibited ChE activity in blood (93 - 96%), brain regions (ranging from 78% to 95%), and all peripheral tissues (ranging from 48.9% to 99.8%) except liver (11.9%). In blood, treatment with HI-6 or ICD-467 resulted in significant reactivation of soman-inhibited ChE. in contrast, MMB-4 was completely ineffective. HI-6 and ICD-467 were equally effective at the high dose. At the low dose ICD-467 treatment resulted in significantly higher plasma ChE than Hl-6 treatment, whereas HI-6 treatment resulted in higher erythrocyte ChE than ICD-467 treatment. However, none of these three oximesreactivated or protected soman-inhibited ChE in the brain. In all peripheral tissues (except liver) studied, MMB-4 was not effective. 111-6 reactivated soman-inhibited ChE in all tis- sues except lung, heart, and skeletal muscle. ICD-467 was highly effective in reactivating ChE in all tissues and afforded a complete recovery of ChE to control levels in Intercostal muscle and salivary gland. Oxime treatments did not modify the toxic scores produced by soman.

  19. Vasopressin inhibits LTP in the CA2 mouse hippocampal area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Chafai

    Full Text Available Growing evidence points to vasopressin (AVP as a social behavior regulator modulating various memory processes and involved in pathologies such as mood disorders, anxiety and depression. Accordingly, AVP antagonists are actually envisaged as putative treatments. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly characterized, in particular the influence of AVP on cellular or synaptic activities in limbic brain areas involved in social behavior. In the present study, we investigated AVP action on the synapse between the entorhinal cortex and CA2 hippocampal pyramidal neurons, by using both field potential and whole-cell recordings in mice brain acute slices. Short application (1 min of AVP transiently reduced the synaptic response, only following induction of long-term potentiation (LTP by high frequency stimulation (HFS of afferent fibers. The basal synaptic response, measured in the absence of HFS, was not affected. The Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapse was not affected by AVP, even after LTP, while the Schaffer collateral-CA2 synapse was inhibited. Although investigated only recently, this CA2 hippocampal area appears to have a distinctive circuitry and a peculiar role in controlling episodic memory. Accordingly, AVP action on LTP-increased synaptic responses in this limbic structure may contribute to the role of this neuropeptide in controlling memory and social behavior.

  20. Apigenin protects blood-brain barrier and ameliorates early brain injury by inhibiting TLR4-mediated inflammatory pathway in subarachnoid hemorrhage rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Su, Jingyuan; Guo, Bingyu; Wang, Kaiwen; Li, Xiaoming; Liang, Guobiao

    2015-09-01

    Early brain injury (EBI) following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Inflammation has been considered as the major contributor to brain damage after SAH. SAH induces a systemic increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB) facilitates the influx of inflammatory cells. It has been reported that the activation of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/NF-κB signaling pathway plays a vital role in the central nervous system diseases. Apigenin, a common plant flavonoid, possesses anti-inflammation effect. In this study, we focused on the effects of apigenin on EBI following SAH and its anti-inflammation mechanism. Our results showed that apigenin (20mg/kg) administration significantly attenuated EBI (including brain edema, BBB disruption, neurological deficient, severity of SAH, and cell apoptosis) after SAH in rats by suppressing the expression of TLR4, NF-κB and their downstream pro-inflammatory cytokines in the cortex and by up-regulating the expression of tight junction proteins of BBB. Double immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that TLR4 was activated following SAH in neurons, microglia cells, and endothelial cells but not in astrocytes. Apigenin could suppress the activation of TLR4 induced by SAH and inhibit apoptosis of cells in the cortex. These results suggested that apigenin could attenuate EBI after SAH in rats by suppressing TLR4-mediated inflammation and protecting against BBB disruption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Domain-general inhibition areas of the brain are involved in language switching: fMRI evidence from trilingual speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruin, Angela; Roelofs, Ardi; Dijkstra, Ton; Fitzpatrick, Ian

    2014-04-15

    The prevailing theory of language switching states that unbalanced bilingual speakers use inhibition to switch between their languages (Inhibitory Control or IC model; Green, 1998). Using fMRI, we examined the brain mechanisms underlying language switching and investigated the role of domain-general inhibition areas such as the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) and the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA). Dutch-English-German trilinguals performed a picture naming task in the MRI scanner in both a blocked-language and a mixed-language context. The rIFG and pre-SMA showed more activation for switches to the second and third language (L2 and L3) compared to non-switch trials and blocked trials. No such difference was found for switches to the first language (L1). Our results indicate that language switching recruits brain areas related to domain-general inhibition. In this way, our study supports the claim that multilinguals use inhibition to switch between their languages.

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits neuromuscular junction maturation in a cAMP-PKA-dependent way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Jin, Xiwan Albert

    2015-03-30

    The development of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is initiated by motor axon's contact with the skeletal muscle cell that is followed by synaptic maturation. Previous studies showed that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhanced motoneurons' survival and growth but significantly inhibited synaptogenesis. Here, we report that chronic application of BDNF resulted in inhibition in the maturation process both physiologically and morphologically. The response to BDNF was mediated by its cognate receptor TrkB as the effects were abolished by Trk receptor inhibitor K252a. Protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor reversed the effects of BDNF in inhibiting NMJ maturation. These results indicate that BDNF suppresses NMJ maturation through cAMP-PKA signaling pathway. Together with the previous studies, these results suggest that BDNF suppresses NMJ formation and maturation despite its effects in enhancing neuronal survival and growth.

  3. Cocaine inhibits store-operated Ca2+ entry in brain microvascular endothelial cells: critical role for sigma-1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brailoiu, G Cristina; Deliu, Elena; Console-Bram, Linda M; Soboloff, Jonathan; Abood, Mary E; Unterwald, Ellen M; Brailoiu, Eugen

    2016-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is an intracellular chaperone protein with many ligands, located at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Binding of cocaine to Sig-1R has previously been found to modulate endothelial functions. In the present study, we show that cocaine dramatically inhibits store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE), a Ca(2+) influx mechanism promoted by depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores, in rat brain microvascular endothelial cells (RBMVEC). Using either Sig-1R shRNA or pharmacological inhibition with the unrelated Sig-1R antagonists BD-1063 and NE-100, we show that cocaine-induced SOCE inhibition is dependent on Sig-1R. In addition to revealing new insight into fundamental mechanisms of cocaine-induced changes in endothelial function, these studies indicate an unprecedented role for Sig-1R as a SOCE inhibitor.

  4. Cognitive Impairments Preceding and Outlasting Autoimmune Limbic Encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Gross

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mild cognitive impairment (MCI can be the initial manifestation of autoimmune limbic encephalitis (ALE, a disorder that at times presents a diagnostic challenge. In addition to memory impairment, clinical features that might suggest this disorder include personality changes, agitation, insomnia, alterations of consciousness, and seizures. Once recognized, ALE typically responds to treatment with immune therapies, but long-term cognitive deficits may remain. We report two cases of patients with MCI who were ultimately diagnosed with ALE with antibodies against the voltage gated potassium channel complex. Months after apparent resolution of their encephalitides, both underwent neuropsychological testing, which demonstrated persistent cognitive deficits, primarily in the domains of memory and executive function, for cases 1 and 2, respectively. A brief review of the literature is included.

  5. Brain activation and inhibition after acupuncture at Taichong and Taixi: resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shao-Qun; Wang, Yan-Jie; Zhang, Ji-Ping; Chen, Jun-Qi; Wu, Chun-Xiao; Li, Zhi-Peng; Chen, Jia-Rong; Ouyang, Huai-Liang; Huang, Yong; Tang, Chun-Zhi

    2015-02-01

    Acupuncture can induce changes in the brain. However, the majority of studies to date have focused on a single acupoint at a time. In the present study, we observed activity changes in the brains of healthy volunteers before and after acupuncture at Taichong (LR3) and Taixi (KI3) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain 15 minutes before acupuncture, then received acupuncture at Taichong and Taixi using the nail-pressing needle insertion method, after which the needle was retained in place for 30 minutes. Fifteen minutes after withdrawal of the needle, the volunteers underwent a further session of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, which revealed that the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation, a measure of spontaneous neuronal activity, increased mainly in the cerebral occipital lobe and middle occipital gyrus (Brodmann area 18/19), inferior occipital gyrus (Brodmann area 18) and cuneus (Brodmann area 18), but decreased mainly in the gyrus rectus of the frontal lobe (Brodmann area 11), inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 44) and the center of the posterior lobe of the cerebellum. The present findings indicate that acupuncture at Taichong and Taixi specifically promote blood flow and activation in the brain areas related to vision, emotion and cognition, and inhibit brain areas related to emotion, attention, phonological and semantic processing, and memory.

  6. Brain activation and inhibition after acupuncture at Taichong andTaixi:resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-qun Zhang; Chun-zhi Tang; Yan-jie Wang; Ji-ping Zhang; Jun-qi Chen; Chun-xiao Wu; Zhi-peng Li; Jia-rong Chen; Huai-liang Ouyang; Yong Huang

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture can induce changes in the brain. However, the majority of studies to date have focused on a single acupoint at a time. In the present study, we observed activity changes in the brains of healthy volunteers before and after acupuncture atTaichong (LR3) andTaixi (KI3) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain 15 minutes before acupuncture, then received acupuncture atTaichong andTaixi using the nail-pressing needle insertion method, after which the needle was retained in place for 30 minutes. Fifteen minutes after withdrawal of the needle, the volunteers underwent a further session of resting-state functional magnetic res-onance imaging, which revealed that the amplitude of low-frequency lfuctuation, a measure of spontaneous neuronal activity, increased mainly in the cerebral occipital lobe and middle occipital gyrus (Brodmann area 18/19), inferior occipital gyrus (Brodmann area 18) and cuneus (Brodmann area 18), but decreased mainly in the gyrus rectus of the frontal lobe (Brodmann area 11), inferi-or frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 44) and the center of the posterior lobe of the cerebellum. The present ifndings indicate that acupuncture atTaichong andTaixi speciifcally promote blood lfow and activation in the brain areas related to vision, emotion and cognition, and inhibit brain areas related to emotion, attention, phonological and semantic processing, and memory.

  7. Brain activation and inhibition after acupuncture at Taichong and Taixi: resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-qun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture can induce changes in the brain. However, the majority of studies to date have focused on a single acupoint at a time. In the present study, we observed activity changes in the brains of healthy volunteers before and after acupuncture at Taichong (LR3 and Taixi (KI3 using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain 15 minutes before acupuncture, then received acupuncture at Taichong and Taixi using the nail-pressing needle insertion method, after which the needle was retained in place for 30 minutes. Fifteen minutes after withdrawal of the needle, the volunteers underwent a further session of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, which revealed that the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation, a measure of spontaneous neuronal activity, increased mainly in the cerebral occipital lobe and middle occipital gyrus (Brodmann area 18/19, inferior occipital gyrus (Brodmann area 18 and cuneus (Brodmann area 18, but decreased mainly in the gyrus rectus of the frontal lobe (Brodmann area 11, inferior frontal gyrus (Brodmann area 44 and the center of the posterior lobe of the cerebellum. The present findings indicate that acupuncture at Taichong and Taixi specifically promote blood flow and activation in the brain areas related to vision, emotion and cognition, and inhibit brain areas related to emotion, attention, phonological and semantic processing, and memory.

  8. Pioneers in CNS inhibition: 1. Ivan M. Sechenov, the first to clearly demonstrate inhibition arising in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Douglas G; Schaefer, Andreas T; Massion, Jean; Graham, Brett A; Callister, Robert J

    2014-02-22

    This article reviews the contributions of Ivan Michailovich Sechenov [1829-1905] to the neurophysiological concept of central inhibition. He first studied this concept in the frog and on himself. Later his trainees extended the study of central inhibition to other mammalian species. Outside his own country, Sechenov is better known for his prescient contributions to physiological psychology. In Russia, however, he is also revered as "the father of Russian physiology," because of his contributions to neurophysiology and other aspects of physiology including blood gases and respiration, the physiology and biomechanics of movement, and general physiology concepts that appeared in his textbooks and later works he helped translate from largely German sources. After graduation from Moscow University Medical School in 1856 he spent 3½ years in Germany and Austria where he attended lectures and conducted research under the direction of several prominent physiologists and biochemists. In his subsequent academic career he held positions at universities in St. Petersburg (1860-1870; 1876-1888), Odessa (1871-1876) and Moscow (1890-1905). From 1860 onwards he was acclaimed as a physiologist in academic circles. He was also well known in Russian society for his public lectures on physiology and his views on physiological psychology. The latter resulted in him being branded "politically unreliable" by the tsarist bureaucracy from 1863 onwards. Sechenov's first (1862) study on central inhibition remains his most memorable. He delayed the withdrawal of a frog's foot from a weak acid solution by chemical or electrical stimulation of selected parts of the central nervous system. He also noted similar effects on his own hand during co-activation of other sensory inputs by tickling or teeth gnashing.

  9. Attenuation of Acute Phase Injury in Rat Intracranial Hemorrhage by Cerebrolysin that Inhibits Brain Edema and Inflammatory Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Zhaotao; Wang, Shanshan; Gao, Mou; Xu, Ruxiang; Liang, Chunyang; Zhang, Hongtian

    2016-04-01

    The outcome of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is mainly determined by the volume of the hemorrhage core and the secondary brain damage to penumbral tissues due to brain swelling, microcirculation disturbance and inflammation. The present study aims to investigate the protective effects of cerebrolysin on brain edema and inhibition of the inflammation response surrounding the hematoma core in the acute stage after ICH. The ICH model was induced by administration of type VII bacterial collagenase into the stratum of adult rats, which were then randomly divided into three groups: ICH + saline; ICH + Cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) and sham. Cerebrolysin or saline was administered intraperitoneally 1 h post surgery. Neurological scores, extent of brain edema content and Evans blue dye extravasation were recorded. The levels of pro-inflammatory factors (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) were assayed by Real-time PCR and Elisa kits. Aquaporin-4 (AQP4) and tight junction proteins (TJPs; claudin-5, occludin and zonula occluden-1) expression were measured at multiple time points. The morphological and intercellular changes were characterized by Electron microscopy. It is found that cerebrolysin (5 ml/kg) improved the neurological behavior and reduced the ipsilateral brain water content and Evans blue dye extravasation. After cerebrolysin treated, the levels of pro-inflammatory factors and AQP4 in the peri-hematomal areas were markedly reduced and were accompanied with higher expression of TJPs. Electron microscopy showed the astrocytic swelling and concentrated chromatin in the ICH group and confirmed the cell junction changes. Thus, early cerebrolysin treatment ameliorates secondary injury after ICH and promotes behavioral performance during the acute phase by reducing brain edema, inflammatory response, and blood-brain barrier permeability.

  10. Inhibition of botulinum toxin's association with rat brain synaptosomes by toosendanin,an antibotulismic triterpenoid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianying Zhou; Yuliang Shi

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Toosendanin(TSN),a triterpenoid derivative extracted from the bark of Melia toosendanin Sieb et Zucc,has been demonstrated to be an effective drug for treatment of experimental botulism.OBJECTIVE:To explore its antibotulismic mechanism by observing the effect of toosendanin on association of botulinum toxin(BoTx)with rat brain synaptosomes under different conditions.DESIGN:A randomized controlled experiment.SETTING:Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences,Chinese Academy of Sciences.MATERIALS:Sprague-Dawley rats,weighing(220±12)g,were involved.TSN was a sample recrystallized in ethanol with a purity>98%.BoTx/A and BoTx/C of 500 ku(1.8x107mouse LD50/mg)were purchased from Wako(Japan),Horse antitoxins to BoTx/A and/C(pdmary antibodies)were purchased from Lanzhou Institute of Biological Products(China).METHODS:Major experiments were finished between March 2005 and October 2005 in key laboratory of neurobiology,Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences,Chinese Academy of Sciences.①Preparation of synaptosome of rats:one aliquot of synaptosome was pre-incubated with TSN(17μmol/L)for 20 minutes at 4℃or 37℃(another aliquot of synaptosome which was untouched was used as control).Then,BoTx was respectively added for another 20-minute incubation.②A homochronous experiment was still Derformed at 37℃.Differently,high level of K+ was used to stimulate synaptosome for 25 minutee.Two aliquots of synaptosomes with or without TSN(17 μmol/L)were preincubated for 15 minutes.Then,30 mmol/L KCl was separately added in two aliquots,5 minutes later,13 nmol/L BoTx/C was separately added followed by 20-minute incubation.[3]The effect of TSN on BoTx binding was observed by Western blot and synchronization method.③ttest was used for comparing the difference of measurement data.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:The gray value of BoTx bands from westem blot was used to estimate the bound amount of BoTx.RESULTS:①Preincubation of synaptosomes with TSN(17 μmol/L)at 4

  11. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis as a cause of new onset of seizures in a patient with non-small cell lung carcinoma: a case report

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    Voutsas Vasileios

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The etiology of seizure disorders in lung cancer patients is broad and includes some rather rare causes of seizures which can sometimes be overlooked by physicians. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is a rather rare cause of seizures in lung cancer patients and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of seizure disorders in this population. Case presentation This case report describes the new onset of seizures in a 64-year-old male patient receiving chemotherapy for a diagnosed stage IV non-small cell lung carcinoma. After three cycles of therapy, he was re-evaluated with a chest computed tomography which showed a 50% reduction in the tumor mass and in the size of the hilar and mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Twenty days after the fourth cycle of chemotherapy, the patient was admitted to a neurological clinic because of the onset of self-limiting complex partial seizures, with motionless stare and facial twitching, but with no signs of secondary generalization. The patient had also recently developed neurological symptoms of short-term memory loss and temporary confusion, and behavioral changes. Laboratory evaluation included brain magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the brain, serum examination for 'anti-Hu' antibodies and stereotactic brain biopsy. Based on the clinical picture, the patient's history of lung cancer, the brain magnetic resonance imaging findings and the results of the brain biopsy, we concluded that our patient had a 'definite' diagnosis of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis and he was subsequently treated with a combination of chemotherapy and oral steroids, resulting in stabilization of his neurological status. Despite the neurological stabilization, a chest computed tomography which was performed after the 6th cycle showed relapse of the disease in the chest. Conclusion Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is a rather rare cause of new onset of seizures in patients with

  12. There Is No Free Won’t: Antecedent Brain Activity Predicts Decisions to Inhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filevich, Elisa; Kühn, Simone; Haggard, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of prepotent action is an important aspect of self-control, particularly in social contexts. Action inhibition and its neural bases have been extensively studied. However, the neural precursors of free decisions to inhibit have hardly been studied. We asked participants to freely choose to either make a rapid key press in response to a visual cue, or to transiently inhibit action, and briefly delay responding. The task required a behavioural response on each trial, so trials involving inhibition could be distinguished from those without inhibition as those showing slower reaction times. We used this criterion to classify free-choice trials as either rapid or inhibited/delayed. For 13 participants, we measured the mean amplitude of the ERP activity at electrode Cz in three subsequent 50 ms time windows prior to the onset of the signal that either instructed to respond or inhibit, or gave participants a free choice. In two of these 50 ms time windows (−150 to −100, and −100 to −50 ms relative to action onset), the amplitude of prestimulus ERP differed between trials where participants ”freely” chose whether to inhibit or to respond rapidly. Larger prestimulus ERP amplitudes were associated with trials in which participants decided to act rapidly as compared to trials in which they decided to delay their responses. Last-moment decisions to inhibit or delay may depend on unconscious preparatory neural activity. PMID:23418420

  13. Decisional impulsivity and the associative-limbic subthalamic nucleus in obsessive-compulsive disorder: stimulation and connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droux, Fabien; Morris, Laurel; Chabardes, Stephan; Bougerol, Thierry; David, Olivier; Krack, Paul; Polosan, Mircea

    2017-01-01

    Why do we make hasty decisions for short-term gain? Rapid decision-making with limited accumulation of evidence and delay discounting are forms of decisional impulsivity. The subthalamic nucleus is implicated in inhibitory function but its role in decisional impulsivity is less well-understood. Here we assess decisional impulsivity in subjects with obsessive compulsive disorder who have undergone deep brain stimulation of the limbic and associative subthalamic nucleus. We show that stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is causally implicated in increasing decisional impulsivity with less accumulation of evidence during probabilistic uncertainty and in enhancing delay discounting. Subthalamic stimulation shifts evidence accumulation in subjects with obsessive-compulsive disorder towards a functional less cautious style closer to that of healthy controls emphasizing its adaptive nature. Thus, subjects with obsessive compulsive disorder on subthalamic stimulation may be less likely to check for evidence (e.g. checking that the stove is on) with no difference in subjective confidence (or doubt). In a separate study, we replicate in humans (154 healthy controls) using resting state functional connectivity, tracing studies conducted in non-human primates dissociating limbic, associative and motor frontal hyper-direct connectivity with anterior and posterior subregions of the subthalamic nucleus. We show lateralization of functional connectivity of bilateral ventral striatum to right anterior ventromedial subthalamic nucleus consistent with previous observations of lateralization of emotionally evoked activity to right ventral subthalamic nucleus. We use a multi-echo sequence with independent components analysis, which has been shown to have enhanced signal-to-noise ratio, thus optimizing visualization of small subcortical structures. These findings in healthy controls converge with the effective contacts in obsessive compulsive disorder patients localized within the

  14. Brain-derived mast cells could mediate histamine-induced inhibition of food intake in neonatal chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, S; Bungo, T; Ohgushi, A; Ando, R; Shimojo, M; Masuda, Y; Denbow, D M; Furuse, M

    2000-02-28

    In the present study, the effect of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of histamine on food intake of neonatal chicks was examined over 2 h. Histamine (100, 200 or 400 nmol, respectively) was injected in the lateral ventricle of 2-day-old chicks, and cumulative food intakes were measured. i.c.v. injection of histamine significantly inhibited food intake in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, compound 48/80, which causes degranulation of mast cells and release of histamine, or thioperamide, which is an antagonist of the histamine H3 autoreceptor and increases histamine release from histaminergic nerve terminals, was injected i.c.v. to clarify whether mast cell- or neuron-derived histamine in the central nervous system of chicks is essential to the feeding inhibition. Central administration of compound 48/80 inhibited food intake with a dose-dependent manner, but thioperamide had no effect on feeding. An inhibitor of mast cell degranulation, sodium cromoglycate, somewhat attenuated food intake inhibited by compound 48/80. These results suggest that brain-derived mast cells could be a major source of histamine in the inhibition of food intake of neonatal chicks.

  15. Hypothermia due to limbic system involvement and longitudinal myelitis in a case of Japanese encephalitis: a case report from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayanan S

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Santhosh Narayanan,1 NK Thulaseedharan,1 Gomathy Subramaniam,2 Geetha Panarkandy,1 VK Shameer,1 Arathi Narayanan1 1Department of General Medicine, 2Department of Radiodiagnosis, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, India Abstract: Japanese encephalitis (JE is an infectious encephalitis prevalent in Asia. It usually presents with fever, headache, convulsions and extrapyramidal symptoms. Limbic system involvement and hypothermia though common in autoimmune encephalitis have never been reported in JE. We report a case of an 18-year-old girl with no previous comorbidities who presented to us with a history of fever and headache for 1 week duration. She developed bilateral lateral rectus palsy and asymmetric flaccid weakness of all four limbs, after 2 days of admission, which was followed by altered sensorium and intermittent hypothermia. Neuroimaging revealed longitudinal myelitis extending from pons till the L1 level along with bilateral thalamic hemorrhage in brain. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF was positive for IgM antibody to JE virus. She was treated with supportive measures, but she developed intractable hypothermia and seizures and succumbed to illness after 2 weeks of admission. Keywords: Japanese encephalitis, hypothermia, limbic system

  16. Anti-Inflammation of Natural Components from Medicinal Plants at Low Concentrations in Brain via Inhibiting Neutrophil Infiltration after Stroke

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    Jiannan Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation after stroke consists of activation of microglia/astrocytes in situ and infiltration of blood-borne leukocytes, resulting in brain damage and neurological deficits. Mounting data demonstrated that most natural components from medicinal plants had anti-inflammatory effects after ischemic stroke through inhibiting activation of resident microglia/astrocytes within ischemic area. However, it is speculated that this classical activity cannot account for the anti-inflammatory function of these natural components in the cerebral parenchyma, where they are detected at very low concentrations due to their poor membrane permeability and slight leakage of BBB. Could these drugs exert anti-inflammatory effects peripherally without being delivered across the BBB? Factually, ameliorating blood-borne neutrophil recruitment in peripheral circulatory system has been proved to reduce ischemic damage and improve outcomes. Thus, it is concluded that if drugs could achieve effective concentrations in the cerebral parenchyma, they can function via crippling resident microglia/astrocytes activation and inhibiting neutrophil infiltration, whereas the latter will be dominating when these drugs localize in the brain at a low concentration. In this review, the availability of some natural components crossing the BBB in stroke will be discussed, and how these drugs lead to improvements in stroke through inhibition of neutrophil rolling, adhesion, and transmigration will be illustrated.

  17. Anti-Inflammation of Natural Components from Medicinal Plants at Low Concentrations in Brain via Inhibiting Neutrophil Infiltration after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiannan; Zhang, Cong; Chen, Rong; Jiao, Honglei; Li, Linlin; Zhang, Lan; Cui, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation after stroke consists of activation of microglia/astrocytes in situ and infiltration of blood-borne leukocytes, resulting in brain damage and neurological deficits. Mounting data demonstrated that most natural components from medicinal plants had anti-inflammatory effects after ischemic stroke through inhibiting activation of resident microglia/astrocytes within ischemic area. However, it is speculated that this classical activity cannot account for the anti-inflammatory function of these natural components in the cerebral parenchyma, where they are detected at very low concentrations due to their poor membrane permeability and slight leakage of BBB. Could these drugs exert anti-inflammatory effects peripherally without being delivered across the BBB? Factually, ameliorating blood-borne neutrophil recruitment in peripheral circulatory system has been proved to reduce ischemic damage and improve outcomes. Thus, it is concluded that if drugs could achieve effective concentrations in the cerebral parenchyma, they can function via crippling resident microglia/astrocytes activation and inhibiting neutrophil infiltration, whereas the latter will be dominating when these drugs localize in the brain at a low concentration. In this review, the availability of some natural components crossing the BBB in stroke will be discussed, and how these drugs lead to improvements in stroke through inhibition of neutrophil rolling, adhesion, and transmigration will be illustrated. PMID:27688603

  18. Halothane, isoflurane, xenon, and nitrous oxide inhibit calcium ATPase pump activity in rat brain synaptic plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, J J; Horn, J L; Janicki, P K; Singh, G

    1995-01-01

    Perturbation of neuronal calcium homeostasis may alter neurotransmission in the brain, a phenomenon postulated to characterize the anesthetic state. Because of the central role of plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) in maintaining Ca2+ homeostasis, the authors examined the effect of several inhalational anesthetics on PMCA function in synaptic plasma membranes (SPM) prepared from rat brain. Ca(2+)-ATPase pumping activity was assessed by measurement of ATP-dependent uptake of Ca2+ by SPM vesicles. ATPase hydrolytic activity was assessed by spectrophotometric measurement of inorganic phosphate (Pi) released from ATP. For studies of anesthetic effects on PMCA activity, Ca2+ uptake or Pi release was measured in SPM exposed to halothane, isoflurane, xenon, and nitrous oxide at partial pressures ranging from 0 to 1.6 MAC equivalents. Halothane and isoflurane exposures were carried out under a gassing hood. For xenon and nitrous oxide exposures, samples were incubated in a pressure chamber at total pressures sufficient to provide anesthetizing partial pressures for each agent. Dose-related inhibition of Ca(2+)-ATPase pumping activity was observed in SPM exposed to increasing concentrations of halothane and isoflurane, confirmed by ANOVA and multiple comparison testing (P Xenon and nitrous oxide also inhibited Ca2+ uptake by SPM vesicles. At partial pressures of these two gases equivalent to 1.3 MAC, PMCA was inhibited approximately 20%. Hydrolysis of ATP by SPM fractions was also inhibited in a dose-related fashion. An additive effect occurred when 1 vol% of halothane was added to xenon or nitrous oxide at partial pressures equivalent to 0-1.6 MAC for the latter two agents. Plasma membranes Ca(2+)-ATPase is significantly inhibited, in a dose-related manner, by clinically relevant partial pressures of halothane, isoflurane, xenon, and nitrous oxide. Furthermore, these anesthetics inhibit PMCA activity in accordance with their known potencies, and an additive effect was

  19. Functional reorganization of motor and limbic circuits after exercise training in a rat model of bilateral parkinsonism.

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    Zhuo Wang

    Full Text Available Exercise training is widely used for neurorehabilitation of Parkinson's disease (PD. However, little is known about the functional reorganization of the injured brain after long-term aerobic exercise. We examined the effects of 4 weeks of forced running wheel exercise in a rat model of dopaminergic deafferentation (bilateral, dorsal striatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions. One week after training, cerebral perfusion was mapped during treadmill walking or at rest using [(14C]-iodoantipyrine autoradiography. Regional cerebral blood flow-related tissue radioactivity (rCBF was analyzed in three-dimensionally reconstructed brains by statistical parametric mapping. In non-exercised rats, lesions resulted in persistent motor deficits. Compared to sham-lesioned rats, lesioned rats showed altered functional brain activation during walking, including: 1. hypoactivation of the striatum and motor cortex; 2. hyperactivation of non-lesioned areas in the basal ganglia-thalamocortical circuit; 3. functional recruitment of the red nucleus, superior colliculus and somatosensory cortex; 4. hyperactivation of the ventrolateral thalamus, cerebellar vermis and deep nuclei, suggesting recruitment of the cerebellar-thalamocortical circuit; 5. hyperactivation of limbic areas (amygdala, hippocampus, ventral striatum, septum, raphe, insula. These findings show remarkable similarities to imaging findings reported in PD patients. Exercise progressively improved motor deficits in lesioned rats, while increasing activation in dorsal striatum and rostral secondary motor cortex, attenuating a hyperemia of the zona incerta and eliciting a functional reorganization of regions participating in the cerebellar-thalamocortical circuit. Both lesions and exercise increased activation in mesolimbic areas (amygdala, hippocampus, ventral striatum, laterodorsal tegmental n., ventral pallidum, as well as in related paralimbic regions (septum, raphe, insula. Exercise, but not lesioning, resulted

  20. Neuroprotective Effects of Kukoamine a against Radiation-induced Rat Brain Injury through Inhibition of Oxidative Stress and Neuronal Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaqiong; Cheng, Zhihua; Wang, Changli; Ma, Hongda; Meng, Weihong; Zhao, Qingchun

    2016-10-01

    Radiation-induced brain injury (RIBI) is a prominent side effect of radiotherapy for cranial tumors. Kukoamine A (KuA) has the ability of anti-oxidative stress and anti-apoptosis in vitro. The aim of this study was to investigate whether KuA would prevent the detrimental effect of ionizing radiation on hippocampal neurons. For this study, male Wistar rats were received either sham irradiation or whole brain irradiation (30 Gy single dose of X-rays) followed by the immediate injection of either KuA or vehicle intravenously. The dose of KuA was 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg respectively. The protective effects of KuA were assessed by Nissl staining. The levels of oxidative stress marker and antioxidants activities were assayed by kits. TUNEL staining was performed to detect the level of apoptosis in hippocampal neurons. The expression of apoptosis-related proteins as well as the brain-derived neurophic factor (BDNF) was evaluated by western blot. Whole brain irradiation led to the neuronal abnormality and it was alleviated by KuA. KuA decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) level, increased glutathione (GSH) level, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities, as well as alleviated neuronal apoptosis by regulating the expression of cleaved caspase-3, cytochrome C, Bax and Bcl-2. Additionally, KuA increased the expression of BDNF. These data indicate that KuA has neuroprotective effects against RIBI through inhibiting neuronal oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  1. Cannabinoid modulation of prefrontal-limbic activation during fear extinction learning and recall in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinak, Christine A; Angstadt, Mike; Lyons, Maryssa; Mori, Shoko; Milad, Mohammed R; Liberzon, Israel; Phan, K Luan

    2014-09-01

    Pre-extinction administration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannibinol (THC) facilitates recall of extinction in healthy humans, and evidence from animal studies suggest that this likely occurs via enhancement of the cannabinoid system within the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) and hippocampus (HIPP), brain structures critical to fear extinction. However, the effect of cannabinoids on the underlying neural circuitry of extinction memory recall in humans has not been demonstrated. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, between-subjects design (N=14/group) coupled with a standard Pavlovian fear extinction paradigm and an acute pharmacological challenge with oral dronabinol (synthetic THC) in healthy adult volunteers. We examined the effects of THC on vmPFC and HIPP activation when tested for recall of extinction learning 24 h after extinction learning. Compared to subjects who received placebo, participants who received THC showed increased vmPFC and HIPP activation to a previously extinguished conditioned stimulus (CS+E) during extinction memory recall. This study provides the first evidence that pre-extinction administration of THC modulates prefrontal-limbic circuits during fear extinction in humans and prompts future investigation to test if cannabinoid agonists can rescue or correct the impaired behavioral and neural function during extinction recall in patients with PTSD. Ultimately, the cannabinoid system may serve as a promising target for innovative intervention strategies (e.g. pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based therapy) in PTSD and other fear learning-related disorders.

  2. Bilobalide inhibits the expression of aquaporin 1, 4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein in rat brain tissue after permanent focal cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiming Qin; Fulin Song; Hongguang Han; Hong Qu; Xingwen Zhai; Bin Qin; Song You

    2011-01-01

    The present results demonstrated that in an adult rat model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO), pretreatment with bilobalide reduced brain water content and infarct area, down-regulated aquaporin 1, 4 mRNA expression in brain edema tissue, then inhibited their synthesis in the striatum, in particular at the early stage of ischemia (at 8 hours after pMCAO), inhibited glial fibrillary acidic protein expression, and lightened reactive gliosis. These data sug-gest that bilobalide attenuates brain edema formation due to reduced expression of aquaporins.

  3. Total Flavone of Hawthorn Leaf inhibits neuronal apoptosis in brain tissue of rat models of chronic cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tan Rong-fang; Xia Ai-hua; Wu Xiao-guang; Cao Na-na; Li Meng-meng; Zhang Tian-ge; Wang Yi-ru; Yue Zhi-ling

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cerebrovascular disease often causes dysfunction of the brain nerve, and nerve cel apoptosis is the important factor of cerebral nerve dysfunction. The excessive expression of c-fos can block the transduction of intracelular signal so that producing some apoptosis-promoting factors, which involve in nerve cel apoptosis process after ischemia injury of brain. Bcl-2 is an inhibited factor. It might to be the key to treat ischemic cerebrovascular disease by inhibiting or reducing the apoptosis of nerve cels after ischemia injury. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the therapeutic effect and mechanism of the Total Flavone of Hawthorn Leaf on chronic cerebral ischemia rats. METHODS: A total of 72 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham surgery group, model group, Total Flavone of Hawthorn Leaf group and ginkgo leaf group. Permanent bilateral carotid artery ligation was used to prepare chronic cerebral ischemia model in the model group, Total Flavone of Hawthorn Leaf group and ginkgo leaf group. Total Flavone of Hawthorn Leaf group and ginkgo leaf group respectively received 140 mg/kg Total Flavone of Hawthorn Leaf and 12.3 mg/kg ginkgo leaf intragastricaly for 36 days from 36 days after model induction. Model group and sham surgery group received 3.5 mL/kg physiological saline intragastricaly. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Compared with the model group, the expression of c-fos protein significantly deceased in the Total Flavone of Hawthorn Leaf group (P 0.05). These data indicated that the protective effect of Total Flavone of Hawthorn Leaf on chronic cerebral ischemia was associated with its inhibition of neuronal apoptosis. Its mechanism of anti-apoptosis might be associated with up-regulating expression of Bcl-2, down-regulating expression of c-fos and decreasing Ca2+ content in brain.

  4. Treatment of VGKC complex antibody-associated limbic encephalitis: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radja, Guirindhra Koumar; Cavanna, Andrea Eugenio

    2013-01-01

    Limbic encephalitis is an autoimmune neuropsychiatric condition characterized by subacute cognitive symptoms, seizures, and affective changes. Although limbic encephalitis is usually caused by an immune reaction secondary to neoplasms, different types of potentially treatable non-paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (nPLE) have recently been described. In particular, published studies have reported variable responses to immunosuppressive therapy in Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel (VGKC) complex antibody-associated nPLE. This systematic literature review found that the most significant improvements were reported by patients presenting with affective symptoms and consistent neuroradiological changes. In these patients, improved clinical outcomes correlated with the largest decreases in antibody titers.

  5. CB2 Receptor Activation Inhibits Melanoma Cell Transmigration through the Blood-Brain Barrier

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    János Haskó

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available During parenchymal brain metastasis formation tumor cells need to migrate through cerebral endothelial cells, which form the morphological basis of the blood-brain barrier (BBB. The mechanisms of extravasation of tumor cells are highly uncharacterized, but in some aspects recapitulate the diapedesis of leukocytes. Extravasation of leukocytes through the BBB is decreased by the activation of type 2 cannabinoid receptors (CB2; therefore, in the present study we sought to investigate the role of CB2 receptors in the interaction of melanoma cells with the brain endothelium. First, we identified the presence of CB1, CB2(A, GPR18 (transcriptional variant 1 and GPR55 receptors in brain endothelial cells, while melanoma cells expressed CB1, CB2(A, GPR18 (transcriptional variants 1 and 2, GPR55 and GPR119. We observed that activation of CB2 receptors with JWH-133 reduced the adhesion of melanoma cells to the layer of brain endothelial cells. JWH-133 decreased the transendothelial migration rate of melanoma cells as well. Our results suggest that changes induced in endothelial cells are critical in the mediation of the effect of CB2 agonists. Our data identify CB2 as a potential target in reducing the number of brain metastastes originating from melanoma.

  6. CB2 Receptor Activation Inhibits Melanoma Cell Transmigration through the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskó, János; Fazakas, Csilla; Molnár, Judit; Nyúl-Tóth, Ádám; Herman, Hildegard; Hermenean, Anca; Wilhelm, Imola; Persidsky, Yuri; Krizbai, István A.

    2014-01-01

    During parenchymal brain metastasis formation tumor cells need to migrate through cerebral endothelial cells, which form the morphological basis of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The mechanisms of extravasation of tumor cells are highly uncharacterized, but in some aspects recapitulate the diapedesis of leukocytes. Extravasation of leukocytes through the BBB is decreased by the activation of type 2 cannabinoid receptors (CB2); therefore, in the present study we sought to investigate the role of CB2 receptors in the interaction of melanoma cells with the brain endothelium. First, we identified the presence of CB1, CB2(A), GPR18 (transcriptional variant 1) and GPR55 receptors in brain endothelial cells, while melanoma cells expressed CB1, CB2(A), GPR18 (transcriptional variants 1 and 2), GPR55 and GPR119. We observed that activation of CB2 receptors with JWH-133 reduced the adhesion of melanoma cells to the layer of brain endothelial cells. JWH-133 decreased the transendothelial migration rate of melanoma cells as well. Our results suggest that changes induced in endothelial cells are critical in the mediation of the effect of CB2 agonists. Our data identify CB2 as a potential target in reducing the number of brain metastastes originating from melanoma. PMID:24815068

  7. Evaluation of a Brain Acetylcholinesterase Extraction Method and Kinetic Constants after Methyl-Paraoxon Inhibition in Three Brazilian Fish Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, A. P.; Santos, C. R.; Sarcinelli, P. N.; Hauser-Davis, R. A.; Lopes, R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an important enzyme in the control of the neuronal action potential and sensitive to organophosphate inhibition. Brain fish AChE is less sensitive to organophosphate inhibition than AChE from terrestrial animals, although this sensitivity is variable among species and has not yet been fully evaluated in fish species. In this setting, inhibition kinetic constants for progressive irreversible inhibition of brain acetylcholinesterase due to methyl-paraoxon exposure were determined in three fish species (Mugil liza, Genidens genidens and Lagocephalus laevigatus) and hen (Gallus domesticus). Enzyme extraction using a detergent was shown to be adequate, and samples presented activity inhibition in high substrate concentrations and suppression of inhibition by methyl-paraoxon in the presence of the substrate, similar to kinetic patterns from purified enzyme preparations. Catfish (G. genidens) AChE presented the highest sensitivity among the evaluated fish species (IC50 = 1031.20 nM ± 63.17) in comparison to M. liza and L. laevigatus (IC50: 2878.83 ± 421.94 and 2842.5 ± 144.63 nM respectively). The lower dissociation constant (Kd = 20.3 ± 2.95 μM) of catfish AChE showed greater enzyme affinity for methyl-paraoxon, explaining this species higher sensitivity to organophosphates. Hen AChE presented higher ki (900.57 ± 65.3 mM-1min-1) and, consequently, greater sensitivity to methyl-paraoxon, explained by a lower Kd (0.6 ± 0.13 μM). Furthermore, hen AChE did not differentiate between the propionylthiocholine and acetylthiocholine substrates, indicating easier access of methyl-paraoxon to the hen enzyme activity site. The results obtained herein indicate a suitable extraction of AChE and, despite different inhibition kinetic constants, demonstrate that fish AChE is less sensitive to methyl-paraoxon, probably due to reduced access to the catalytic center which provides greater enzyme substrate selectivity. PMID:27655611

  8. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition in cognition-relevant brain areas of mice treated with a nootropic Amazonian herbal (Marapuama).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiró, M; Ilha, J; Pochmann, D; Porciúncula, L O; Xavier, L L; Achaval, M; Nunes, D S; Elisabetsky, E

    2010-10-01

    The goal of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEIs) used to treat Alzheimer's patients is an improvement in cholinergic transmission. While currently available AChEIs have limited success, a huge impediment to the development of newer ones is access to the relevant brain areas. Promnesic, anti-amnesic and AChEI properties were identified in a standardized ethanol extract from Ptychopetalum olacoides (POEE), a medicinal plant favored by the elderly in Amazon communities. The purpose of this study was to provide conclusive evidence that orally given POEE induces AChE inhibition in brain areas relevant to cognition. Histochemistry experiments confirmed that the anticholinesterase compound(s) present in POEE are orally bioavailable, inducing meaningful AChE inhibition in the hippocampus CA1 (∼33%) and CA3 (∼20%), and striatum (∼17%). Ellman's colorimetric analysis revealed that G1 and G4 AChE isoforms activities were markedly inhibited (66 and 72%, respectively) in hippocampus and frontal cortex (50 and 63%, respectively), while G4 appeared to be selectively inhibited (72%) in the striatum. Western blotting showed that POEE did not induce significant changes in the AChE immunocontent suggesting that its synthesis is not extensively modified. This study provides definitive proof of meaningful anticholinesterase activity compatible with the observed promnesic and anti-amnesic effects of POEE in mice, reaffirming the potential of this extract for treating neurodegenerative conditions where a hypofunctioning cholinergic neurotransmission is prominent. Adequate assessment of the safety and efficacy of this extract and/or its isolated active compound(s) are warranted.

  9. Tetrahydro-beta-carbolines and corresponding tryptamines: In vitro inhibition of serotonin, dopamine and noradrenaline uptake in rat brain synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komulainen, H; Tuomisto, J; Airaksinen, M M; Kari, I; Peura, P; Pollari, L

    1980-04-01

    The structure activity relationships of tryptolines and some other beta-carbolines and tryptamines as inhibitors of serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) uptake were studied in rat brain synaptosomes. All beta-carbolines inhibited to higher degree the uptake of 5-HT than that of DA or NA(IC50's 5-100 times lower). The most potent tryptoline derivative was 6-hydroxy-tetrahydro-beta-carboline (5-hydroxytryptoline, 6-OH-THBC) with an IC50 of 5.0 x 10(-7) M at a 5-HT concentration of 10(-7) M. 6-Methoxy-tetrahydro-beta-carboline (5-methoxytryptoline) was slightly weaker; the inhibition of 5-HT uptake and DA uptake being competitive. Also tetrahydro-beta-carboline (tryptoline) was more potent than its 1-methylderivative, tetrahydroharmane (methtryptoline) or norharmane (beta-carboline). All of them were, however, weaker inhibitors of 5-HT uptake than the freely rotating indoleamines N-methyl-tryptamine (N-Me-T) or 5-HT itself. N-Me-T and 5-HT were also more potent inhibitors of DA and NA uptake than most of the beta-carbolines, DA uptake, however, was inhibited better by 6-OH-THBC than by 5-HT or N-ME-T. Tetrahydro-beta-carbolines may inhibit 5-HT uptake also in vivo but is unlikely that catecholamine uptake is affected.

  10. Complement inhibition and statins prevent fetal brain cortical abnormalities in a mouse model of preterm birth.

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    Pedroni, Silvia M A; Gonzalez, Juan M; Wade, Jean; Jansen, Maurits A; Serio, Andrea; Marshall, Ian; Lennen, Ross J; Girardi, Guillermina

    2014-01-01

    Premature babies are particularly vulnerable to brain injury. In this study we focus on cortical brain damage associated with long-term cognitive, behavioral, attentional or socialization deficits in children born preterm. Using a mouse model of preterm birth (PTB), we demonstrated that complement component C5a contributes to fetal cortical brain injury. Disruption of cortical dendritic and axonal cytoarchitecture was observed in PTB-mice. Fetuses deficient in C5aR (-/-) did not show cortical brain damage. Treatment with antibody anti-C5, that prevents generation of C5a, also prevented cortical fetal brain injury in PTB-mice. C5a also showed a detrimental effect on fetal cortical neuron development and survival in vitro. Increased glutamate release was observed in cortical neurons in culture exposed to C5a. Blockade of C5aR prevented glutamate increase and restored neurons dendritic and axonal growth and survival. Similarly, increased glutamate levels - measured by (1)HMRS - were observed in vivo in PTB-fetuses compared to age-matched controls. The blockade of glutamate receptors prevented C5a-induced abnormal growth and increased cell death in isolated fetal cortical neurons. Simvastatin and pravastatin prevented cortical fetal brain developmental and metabolic abnormalities -in vivo and in vitro. Neuroprotective effects of statins were mediated by Akt/PKB signaling pathways. This study shows that complement activation plays a crucial role in cortical fetal brain injury in PTL and suggests that complement inhibitors and statins might be good therapeutic options to improve neonatal outcomes in preterm birth. © 2013.

  11. The integrated response of the human cerebro-cerebellar and limbic systems to acupuncture stimulation at ST 36 as evidenced by fMRI.

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    Hui, Kathleen K S; Liu, Jing; Marina, Ovidiu; Napadow, Vitaly; Haselgrove, Christian; Kwong, Kenneth K; Kennedy, David N; Makris, Nikos

    2005-09-01

    Clinical and experimental data indicate that most acupuncture clinical results are mediated by the central nervous system, but the specific effects of acupuncture on the human brain remain unclear. Even less is known about its effects on the cerebellum. This fMRI study demonstrated that manual acupuncture at ST 36 (Stomach 36, Zusanli), a main acupoint on the leg, modulated neural activity at multiple levels of the cerebro-cerebellar and limbic systems. The pattern of hemodynamic response depended on the psychophysical response to needle manipulation. Acupuncture stimulation typically elicited a composite of sensations termed deqi that is related to clinical efficacy according to traditional Chinese medicine. The limbic and paralimbic structures of cortical and subcortical regions in the telencephalon, diencephalon, brainstem and cerebellum demonstrated a concerted attenuation of signal intensity when the subjects experienced deqi. When deqi was mixed with sharp pain, the hemodynamic response was mixed, showing a predominance of signal increases instead. Tactile stimulation as control also elicited a predominance of signal increase in a subset of these regions. The study provides preliminary evidence for an integrated response of the human cerebro-cerebellar and limbic systems to acupuncture stimulation at ST 36 that correlates with the psychophysical response.

  12. [Anti-Ma2, anti-NMDA-receptor and anti-GluRε2 limbic encephalitis with testicular seminoma: short-term memory disturbance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Akihiro; Tajima, Takashi; Narukawa, Shinya; Yamazato, Masamizu; Fukaura, Hikoaki; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Tanaka, Keiko; Shimizu, Jun; Nomura, Kyoichi

    2012-01-01

    A 36-year-old man presented with cognitive impairment and disturbance of short-term memory functions with character change. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed no abnormalities; however, brain MRI revealed high-signal intensity from bilateral hippocampus lesions on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images and T(2) weighted images. The 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET demonstrated high glucose uptake in the bilateral hippocampus lesions. He was diagnosed as limbic encephalitis, and was administered high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone and immune adsorption plasma therapy followed by intravenous immunoglobulin therapy. MRI abnormalities improved after treatment but recent memory disturbance remained. Ma2 antibody, NMDA-receptor antibody, and GluRε2 antibody were positive. Eleven months atter the onset of disease, the tumor was identified in left testicle by ultrasound and removed the tumor. The pathological findings were seminoma. We experienced a case of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis associated with seminoma with short-term memory disturbance. The occurrence of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis with antibodies against cell membrane (NMDA-receptor antibody and GluRε2 antibody) and intracellular (Ma2 antibody) is rare even in the literature.

  13. Inhibition of the prostaglandin receptor EP2 following status epilepticus reduces delayed mortality and brain inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianxiong; Quan, Yi; Ganesh, Thota; Pouliot, Wendy A; Dudek, F Edward; Dingledine, Raymond

    2013-02-26

    Prostaglandin E2 is now widely recognized to play critical roles in brain inflammation and injury, although the responsible prostaglandin receptors have not been fully identified. We developed a potent and selective antagonist for the prostaglandin E2 receptor subtype EP2, TG6-10-1, with a sufficient pharmacokinetic profile to be used in vivo. We found that in the mouse pilocarpine model of status epilepticus (SE), systemic administration of TG6-10-1 completely recapitulates the effects of conditional ablation of cyclooxygenase-2 from principal forebrain neurons, namely reduced delayed mortality, accelerated recovery from weight loss, reduced brain inflammation, prevention of blood-brain barrier opening, and neuroprotection in the hippocampus, without modifying seizures acutely. Prolonged SE in humans causes high mortality and morbidity that are associated with brain inflammation and injury, but currently the only effective treatment is to stop the seizures quickly enough with anticonvulsants to prevent brain damage. Our results suggest that the prostaglandin receptor EP2 is critically involved in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration, and point to EP2 receptor antagonism as an adjunctive therapeutic strategy to treat SE.

  14. P‑glycoprotein inhibition increases the transport of dauricine across the blood‑brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Pei-Liang; Han, Hua; Zhang, Tian-Yu; Yang, Bingyou; Wang, Qiu-Hong; Eerdun, Gao-Wa

    2014-03-01

    Dauricine is the major bioactive component isolated from the roots of Menispermum dauricum D.C. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of P‑glycoprotein in the transport of dauricine across the blood‑brain barrier by pre‑treatment with the P‑glycoprotein inhibitor verapamil. Sprague Dawley rats were divided into a verapamil group (pretreated with verapamil at a dose of 20 mg/kg) and a control group (pretreated with the same volume of normal saline). After 90 min, the animals were injected intravenously with dauricine (10 mg/kg). At 15, 30 and 60 min after dauricine administration, the levels of dauricine in the blood and brain were detected by high‑performance liquid chromatography. Compared with the control group, the dauricine concentration in the brains of the rats in the verapamil group was significantly increased. Furthermore, the brain‑plasma ratio of dauricine in the rats pretreated with verapamil was significantly higher than that of the animals in the control group. However, there was no difference identified between dauricine levels in the plasma of the verapamil and the control groups. The results indicated that dauricine is able to pass the blood‑brain barrier, and that P‑glycoprotein has an important role in the transportation of dauricine across the blood‑brain barrier.

  15. Inhibition of histone deacetylation protects wildtype but not gelsolin-deficient mice from ischemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Ferah; Gertz, Karen; Kronenberg, Golo; Harms, Christoph; Fink, Klaus B; Meisel, Andreas; Endres, Matthias

    2008-04-01

    Acetylation/deactylation of histones is an important mechanism to regulate gene expression and chromatin remodeling. We have previously demonstrated that the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) protects cortical neurons from oxygen/glucose deprivation in vitro which is mediated--at least in part--via the up regulation of gelsolin expression. Here, we demonstrate that TSA treatment dose-dependently enhances histone acetylation in brains of wildtype mice as evidenced by immunoblots of total brain lysates and immunocytochemical staining. Along with increased histone acetylation dose-dependent up regulation of gelsolin protein was observed. Levels of filamentous actin were largely decreased by TSA pre-treatment in brain of wildtype but not gelsolin-deficient mice. When exposed to 1 h filamentous occlusion of the middle cerebral artery followed by reperfusion TSA pre-treated wildtype mice developed significantly smaller cerebral lesion volumes and tended to have improved neurological deficit scores compared to vehicle-treated mice. These protective effects could not be explained by apparent changes in physiological parameters. In contrast to wildtype mice, TSA pre-treatment did not protect gelsolin-deficient mice against MCAo/reperfusion suggesting that enhanced gelsolin expression is an important mechanism by which TSA protects against ischemic brain injury. Our results suggest that HDAC inhibitors such as TSA are a promising therapeutic strategy for reducing brain injury following cerebral ischemia.

  16. Prenatal Brain Damage in Preeclamptic Animal Model Induced by Gestational Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibition

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    Begoña Pellicer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral palsy is a major neonatal handicap with unknown aetiology. There is evidence that prenatal brain injury is the leading cause of CP. Severe placental pathology accounts for a high percentage of cases. Several factors predispose to prenatal brain damage but when and how they act is unclear. The aim of this paper was to determine if hypoxia during pregnancy leads to damage in fetal brain and to evaluate the localization of this injury. An animal model of chronic hypoxia produced by chronic administration of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (L-NAME was used to evaluate apoptotic activity in fetal brains and to localize the most sensitive areas. L-NAME reproduces a preeclamptic-like condition with increased blood pressure, proteinuria, growth restriction and intrauterine mortality. Apoptotic activity was increased in L-NAME brains and the most sensitive areas were the subventricular and pallidum zone. These results may explain the clinical features of CP. Further studies are needed.

  17. PEITC inhibits human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cell migration and invasion through the inhibition of uPA, Rho A, and Ras with inhibition of MMP-2, -7 and -9 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Meng-Ya; Wang, Mei-Jen; Yu, Fu-Shun; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Harnod, Tomor; Hung, Chih-Huang; Lee, Hsu-Tung; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive primary brain malignancy, and the efficacy of multimodality treatments remains unsatisfactory. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), one member of the isothiocyanate family, was found to inhibit the migration and invasion of many types of human cancer cells. In our previous study, PEITC induced the apoptosis of human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells through the extrinsic and intrinsic signaling pathways. In the present study, we first investigated the effects of PEITC on the migration and invasion of GBM 8401 cells. PEITC decreased the migration of GBM 8401 cells in a dose-dependent manner as determined from scratch wound healing and Transwell migration assays. The percentage of inhibition ranged from 46.89 to 15.75%, and from 27.80 to 7.31% after a 48-h treatment of PEITC as determined from the Transwell migration assay and invasion assay, respectively. The western blot analysis indicated that PEITC decreased the levels of proteins associated with migration and invasion, Ras, uPA, RhoA, GRB2, p-p38, p-JNK, p-ERK, p65, SOS1, MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-13, in a dose-dependent manner. Real-time PCR analyses revealed that PEITC reduced the mRNA levels of MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9 and RhoA in a dose- and time-dependent manner. PEITC exhibited potent anticancer activities through the inhibition of migration and invasion in the GBM 8401 cells. Our findings elucidate the possible molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways of the anti-metastatic effects of PEITC on human brain glioblastoma cells, and PEITC may be considered as a therapeutic agent.

  18. Orbitofrontal and limbic signatures of empathic concern and intentional harm in the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez, Sandra; Morales, Juan P; Slachevsky, Andrea; Torralva, Teresa; Matus, Cristian; Manes, Facundo; Ibanez, Agustin

    2016-02-01

    Perceiving and evaluating intentional harms in an interpersonal context engages both cognitive and emotional domains. This process involves inference of intentions, moral judgment, and, crucially, empathy towards others' suffering. This latter skill is notably impaired in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). However, the relationship between regional brain atrophy in bvFTD and deficits in the above-mentioned abilities is not well understood. The present study investigated how gray matter (GM) atrophy in bvFTD patients correlates with the perception and evaluation of harmful actions (attribution of intentionality, evaluation of harmful behavior, empathic concern, and moral judgment). First, we compared the behavioral performance of 26 bvFTD patients and 23 healthy controls on an experimental task (ET) indexing intentionality, empathy, and moral cognition during evaluation of harmful actions. Second, we compared GM volume in patients and controls using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Third, we examined brain regions where atrophy might be associated with specific impairments in the patient group. Finally, we explored whether the patients' deficits in intentionality comprehension and empathic concern could be partially explained by regional GM atrophy or impairments in other relevant factors, such as executive functions (EFs). In bvFTD patients, atrophy of limbic structures (amygdala and anterior paracingulate cortex--APC) was related to impairments in intentionality comprehension, while atrophy of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) was associated with empathic concern deficits. Intentionality comprehension impairments were predicted by EFs and orbitofrontal atrophy predicted deficits in empathic concern. Thus, although the perception and evaluation of harmful actions are variously compromised in bvFTD, deficits in empathic concern may be central to this syndrome as they are associated with one of the earliest atrophied region. More generally, our results

  19. Limbic Encephalitis in Taiwanese Children and Adolescence: A Single Center Study

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    I-Jun Chou

    2013-08-01

    Conclusion: This study provides evidence for a potential association between antibodies and limbic encephalitis. The presence of antibodies, especially antibodies to GAD, may serve as an indicator for immunotherapy.

  20. Some patients with advanced malignancies also have reversible catatonia or limbic encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Martin Alisky

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Two potentially treatable disorders, paraneoplastic catatonia and paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis, may be hidden within the presentation of end stage cancer patients, because catatonia and limbic encephalitis usually feature severely altered mental status, confusion, anorexia, and minimal responsiveness that are also common with people dying of cancer. If catatonia and limbic encephalitis are correctly diagnosed and treated, there should be definite and dramatic improvement that would translate into better quality of life and perhaps even resumption of cancer therapy. This editorial reviews basic features of catatonia and limbic encephalitis, and then presents a strategy to systematically screen for these in end stage cancer patients who are about to enter hospice. A protocol is outlined that could be adapted for clinical practice or for designing clinical studies.

  1. Limbic encephalitis as the presenting symptom of oesophageal adenocarcinoma: another cancer to search?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Renata Barbosa; de Lucena, Adson Freitas; Maia, Fernanda Martins; Marinho, Antônia Rosivalda Teixeira

    2013-04-16

    Limbic encephalitis is a syndrome characterised by irritability, depression, sleeping disturbance, convulsion, hallucination and short-period memory loss that is commonly associated with a malignancy even if there is no evidence of it by the time of presentation. Most reported cases of limbic encephalitis as a paraneoplastic syndrome are associated with small-cell lung cancer and lymphoma. This article is a case report of a patient with limbic encephalitis associated with an oesophageal adenocarcinoma. The patient is a middle-aged man who presented apathy and unstable mood. After months, developed diplopia, reduced visual acuity and involuntary movements. Later, gait disability, disorientation, memory loss and aggressive behaviour were detected, associated with seizures. After investigation, limbic encephalitis was diagnosed and, as the patient developed dysphagia, oesophageal adenocarcinoma was detected. Oesophageal carcinoma usually does not have neurological symptoms associated.

  2. Isolation from bovine brain of substances inhibiting specific binding of imipramine and serotonin uptake

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    Mukhin, A.G.; Kladnitskii, A.V.; Kovaleva, E.S.; Kudryakova, T.B.

    1986-01-01

    The authors search for endogenous ligands of the ''imipramine receptor'' in brain tissue. Binding of tritium-imipramine with the fraction of unpruified bovine brain synaptic membranes was carried out by the method of Raisman et'al. Uptake of tritium-serotonin by synaptosomes of rat cerebral cortex was estimated. The results do not give a final anser to the question of the existence of an endogenous ligand of the ''imipramine receptor'' but they can serve as the basis for research aimed at purifying the active fractions already obtained and identifying the compounds containined in them.

  3. Right fronto-limbic atrophy is associated with reduced empathy in refractory unilateral mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toller, Gianina; Adhimoolam, Babu; Rankin, Katherine P; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Kurthen, Martin; Jokeit, Hennric

    2015-11-01

    Refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) is the most frequent focal epilepsy and is often accompanied by deficits in social cognition including emotion recognition, theory of mind, and empathy. Consistent with the neuronal networks that are crucial for normal social-cognitive processing, these impairments have been associated with functional changes in fronto-temporal regions. However, although atrophy in unilateral MTLE also affects regions of the temporal and frontal lobes that underlie social cognition, little is known about the structural correlates of social-cognitive deficits in refractory MTLE. In the present study, a psychometrically validated empathy questionnaire was combined with whole-brain voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to investigate the relationship between self-reported affective and cognitive empathy and gray matter volume in 55 subjects (13 patients with right MTLE, 9 patients with left MTLE, and 33 healthy controls). Consistent with the brain regions underlying social cognition, our results show that lower affective and cognitive empathy was associated with smaller volume in predominantly right fronto-limbic regions, including the right hippocampus, parahippocampal gyrus, thalamus, fusiform gyrus, inferior temporal gyrus, dorsomedial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, and in the bilateral midbrain. The only region that was associated with both affective and cognitive empathy was the right mesial temporal lobe. These findings indicate that patients with right MTLE are at increased risk for reduced empathy towards others' internal states and they shed new light on the structural correlates of impaired social cognition frequently accompanying refractory MTLE. In line with previous evidence from patients with neurodegenerative disease and stroke, the present study suggests that empathy depends upon the integrity of right fronto-limbic and brainstem regions and highlights the importance of the right mesial temporal lobe and midbrain

  4. MW151 Inhibited IL-1β Levels after Traumatic Brain Injury with No Effect on Microglia Physiological Responses.

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    Bachstetter, Adam D; Zhou, Zhengqiu; Rowe, Rachel K; Xing, Bin; Goulding, Danielle S; Conley, Alyssa N; Sompol, Pradoldej; Meier, Shelby; Abisambra, Jose F; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Watterson, D Martin; Van Eldik, Linda J

    2016-01-01

    A prevailing neuroinflammation hypothesis is that increased production of proinflammatory cytokines contributes to progressive neuropathology, secondary to the primary damage caused by a traumatic brain injury (TBI). In support of the hypothesis, post-injury interventions that inhibit the proinflammatory cytokine surge can attenuate the progressive pathology. However, other post-injury neuroinflammatory responses are key to endogenous recovery responses. Therefore, it is critical that pharmacological attenuation of detrimental or dysregulated neuroinflammatory processes avoid pan-suppression of inflammation. MW151 is a CNS-penetrant, small molecule experimental therapeutic that restores injury- or disease-induced overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines towards homeostasis without immunosuppression. Post-injury administration of MW151 in a closed head injury model of mild TBI suppressed acute cytokine up-regulation and downstream cognitive impairment. Here, we report results from a diffuse brain injury model in mice using midline fluid percussion. Low dose (0.5-5.0 mg/kg) administration of MW151 suppresses interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) levels in the cortex while sparing reactive microglia and astrocyte responses. To probe molecular mechanisms, we used live cell imaging of the BV-2 microglia cell line to demonstrate that MW151 does not affect proliferation, migration, or phagocytosis of the cells. Our results provide insight into the roles of glial responses to brain injury and indicate the feasibility of using appropriate dosing for selective therapeutic modulation of injurious IL-1β increases while sparing other glial responses to injury.

  5. MW151 Inhibited IL-1β Levels after Traumatic Brain Injury with No Effect on Microglia Physiological Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D Bachstetter

    Full Text Available A prevailing neuroinflammation hypothesis is that increased production of proinflammatory cytokines contributes to progressive neuropathology, secondary to the primary damage caused by a traumatic brain injury (TBI. In support of the hypothesis, post-injury interventions that inhibit the proinflammatory cytokine surge can attenuate the progressive pathology. However, other post-injury neuroinflammatory responses are key to endogenous recovery responses. Therefore, it is critical that pharmacological attenuation of detrimental or dysregulated neuroinflammatory processes avoid pan-suppression of inflammation. MW151 is a CNS-penetrant, small molecule experimental therapeutic that restores injury- or disease-induced overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines towards homeostasis without immunosuppression. Post-injury administration of MW151 in a closed head injury model of mild TBI suppressed acute cytokine up-regulation and downstream cognitive impairment. Here, we report results from a diffuse brain injury model in mice using midline fluid percussion. Low dose (0.5-5.0 mg/kg administration of MW151 suppresses interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β levels in the cortex while sparing reactive microglia and astrocyte responses. To probe molecular mechanisms, we used live cell imaging of the BV-2 microglia cell line to demonstrate that MW151 does not affect proliferation, migration, or phagocytosis of the cells. Our results provide insight into the roles of glial responses to brain injury and indicate the feasibility of using appropriate dosing for selective therapeutic modulation of injurious IL-1β increases while sparing other glial responses to injury.

  6. Endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation end-products inhibits amyloid-β1-42 uptake into mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Takahiro; Munesue, Seiichi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Sakurai, Shigeru; Akhter, Nasima; Kitamura, Yoji; Shiba, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Takuo; Yonekura, Hideto; Hayashi, Yasuhiko; Hamada, Jun-Ichiro; Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    The cell-surface receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) has been implicated in the development of diabetic vascular complications and Alzheimer's disease. RAGE has been considered to be involved in amyloid-β1-42 (Aβ1-42) uptake into brain. In the present study, we demonstrate that endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE), a decoy form of RAGE generated by alternative RNA processing, is able to inhibit Aβ1-42 influx into mouse brain. Surface plasmon resonance and competitive binding assays revealed that human Aβ1-42 interacted with human esRAGE within the immunoglobulin V type region. We next examined the uptake and distribution of 125I-labeled human Aβ1-42 in various organs and body fluids of newly created mice overexpressing human esRAGE as well as RAGE-null and wild-type (WT) mice. The transition of the 125I-labeled Aβ1-42 from circulation to brain parenchyma peaked at 30 min after the injection into WT mice, but this was significantly blunted in esRAGE-overexpressing and RAGE-null mice. Significant reduction in 125I-labeled Aβ1-42-derived photo-stimulated luminescence were marked in ventricles, cerebral cortex, hippocampus, especially CA1 and CA3 regions, putamen, and thalamus. The results thus suggest the potential of esRAGE in protection against the development of Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Neuroprotective effects of sevoflurane against electromagnetic pulse-induced brain injury through inhibition of neuronal oxidative stress and apoptosis.

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    Bin Deng

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic pulse (EMP causes central nervous system damage and neurobehavioral disorders, and sevoflurane protects the brain from ischemic injury. We investigated the effects of sevoflurane on EMP-induced brain injury. Rats were exposed to EMP and immediately treated with sevoflurane. The protective effects of sevoflurane were assessed by Nissl staining, Fluoro-Jade C staining and electron microscopy. The neurobehavioral effects were assessed using the open-field test and the Morris water maze. Finally, primary cerebral cortical neurons were exposed to EMP and incubated with different concentration of sevoflurane. The cellular viability, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release, superoxide dismutase (SOD activity and malondialdehyde (MDA level were assayed. TUNEL staining was performed, and the expression of apoptotic markers was determined. The cerebral cortexes of EMP-exposed rats presented neuronal abnormalities. Sevoflurane alleviated these effects, as well as the learning and memory deficits caused by EMP exposure. In vitro, cell viability was reduced and LDH release was increased after EMP exposure; treatment with sevoflurane ameliorated these effects. Additionally, sevoflurane increased SOD activity, decreased MDA levels and alleviated neuronal apoptosis by regulating the expression of cleaved caspase-3, Bax and Bcl-2. These findings demonstrate that Sevoflurane conferred neuroprotective effects against EMP radiation-induced brain damage by inhibiting neuronal oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  8. Nelfinavir inhibits intra-mitochondrial calcium influx and protects brain against hypoxic-ischemic injury in neonatal mice.

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    Irina V Utkina-Sosunova

    Full Text Available Nelfinavir (NLF, an antiretroviral agent, preserves mitochondrial membranes integrity and protects mature brain against ischemic injury in rodents. Our study demonstrates that in neonatal mice NLF significantly limits mitochondrial calcium influx, the event associated with protection of the brain against hypoxic-ischemic insult (HI. Compared to the vehicle-treated mice, cerebral mitochondria from NLF-treated mice exhibited a significantly greater tolerance to the Ca(2+-induced membrane permeabilization, greater ADP-phosphorylating activity and reduced cytochrome C release during reperfusion. Pre-treatment with NLF or Ruthenium red (RuR significantly improved viability of murine hippocampal HT-22 cells, reduced Ca(2+ content and preserved membrane potential (Ψm in mitochondria following oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD. Following histamine-stimulated Ca(2+ release from endoplasmic reticulum, in contrast to the vehicle-treated cells, the cells treated with NLF or RuR also demonstrated reduced Ca(2+ content in their mitochondria, the event associated with preserved Ψm. Because RuR inhibits mitochondrial Ca(2+ uniporter, we tested whether the NLF acts via the mechanism similar to the RuR. However, in contrast to the RuR, in the experiment with direct interaction of these agents with mitochondria isolated from naïve mice, the NLF did not alter mitochondrial Ca(2+ influx, and did not prevent Ca(2+ induced collapse of the Ψm. These data strongly argues against interaction of NLF and mitochondrial Ca(2+ uniporter. Although the exact mechanism remains unclear, our study is the first to show that NLF inhibits intramitochondrial Ca(2+ flux and protects developing brain against HI-reperfusion injury. This novel action of NLF has important clinical implication, because it targets a fundamental mechanism of post-ischemic cell death: intramitochondrial Ca(2+ overload → mitochondrial membrane permeabilization → secondary energy failure.

  9. Inhibition of the thioredoxin system in the brain and liver of zebra-seabreams exposed to waterborne methylmercury.

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    Branco, Vasco; Canário, João; Holmgren, Arne; Carvalho, Cristina

    2011-03-01

    Mercury compounds were recently found to interact in vitro with the thioredoxin system, inhibiting both Thioredoxin (Trx) and Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). In order to evaluate if Trx and TrxR are affected in vivo by methylmercury (MeHg), we exposed juvenile zebra-seabreams to different concentrations of this toxicant in water for 28days followed by a 14-day depuration period. Methylmercury accumulated to a larger extent in the kidney and liver of fishes, but decreased significantly during the depuration. During the exposure, MeHg percentage in the liver reached levels above 90% of total mercury (HgT) decreasing to 60% of HgT by the end of the depuration period. In the kidney, MeHg accounted for 50-70% of HgT. In the brain and muscle, mercury accumulated throughout the exposure with all mercury being MeHg. The total mercury kept increasing in these organs during the depuration period. However, in the brain, this increase in HgT was accompanied by a decrease in the MeHg percentage (~10%). In the liver, both Trx and TrxR activities were significantly reduced (TrxR--40%; Trx--70%) by the end of the exposure, but recovered to control levels (100%) during the depuration. In the brain, both enzymes where inhibited during the depuration period (TrxR--75%; Trx--70%) when some production of inorganic mercury was detected. Activity of glutathione reductase showed increased levels when TrxR activity was low, suggesting complementarity between both systems. These results indicate that in vivo the thioredoxin system is a toxicological target for MeHg with TrxR being particularly affected.

  10. Augmented inhibition from cannabinoid sensitive interneurons diminishes CA1 output after traumatic brain injury

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    Brian Neal Johnson

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The neurological impairments associated with traumatic brain injury include learning and memory deficits and increased risk of seizures. The hippocampus is critically involved in both of these phenomena and highly susceptible to damage by traumatic brain injury. To examine network activity in the hippocampal CA1 region after lateral fluid percussion injury, we used a combination of voltage sensitive dye, field potential and patch clamp recording in mouse hippocampal brain slices. When the stratum radiatum was stimulated in slices from injured mice we found decreased depolarization in stratum radiatum and increased hyperpolarization in stratum oriens, together with a decrease in the percentage of pyramidal neurons firing stimulus-evoked action potentials. Increased hyperpolarization in stratum oriens persisted when glutamatergic transmission was blocked. However, we found no changes in stratum oriens responses when the alveus was stimulated to directly activate stratum oriens. These results suggest that the increased stratum oriens hyperpolarization evoked by stratum radiatum stimulation was mediated by interneurons that have cell bodies and/or axons in stratum radiatum, and form synapses in stratum pyramidale and stratum oriens. A low concentration (100 nM of the synthetic cannabinoid WIN55,212-2,restored CA1 output in slices from injured animals. These findings support the hypothesis that increased GABAergic signaling by cannabinoid sensitive interneurons contributes to the reduced CA1 output following traumatic brain injury.

  11. Inhibition of checkpoint kinase 1 sensitizes lung cancer brain metastases to radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Heekyoung [Department of Neurosurgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Stem Cell Research Center, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Su Jin [Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Jin, Juyoun [Department of Neurosurgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Stem Cell Research Center, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seung Ho [Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Seol, Ho Jun; Lee, Jung-Il [Department of Neurosurgery, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-Dong, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} The most important therapeutic tool in brain metastasis is radiation therapy. {yields} Radiosensitivity of cancer cells was enhanced with treatment of Chk1 inhibitor. {yields} Depletion of Chk1 in cancer cells showed an enhancement of sensitivity to radiation. {yields} Chk1 can be a good target for enhancement of radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: The most important therapeutic tool in brain metastasis is radiation therapy. However, resistance to radiation is a possible cause of recurrence or treatment failure. Recently, signal pathways about DNA damage checkpoints after irradiation have been noticed. We investigated the radiosensitivity can be enhanced with treatment of Chk1 inhibitor, AZD7762 in lung cancer cell lines and xenograft models of lung cancer brain metastasis. Clonogenic survival assays showed enhancement of radiosensitivity with AZD7762 after irradiation of various doses. AZD7762 increased ATR/ATM-mediated Chk1 phosphorylation and stabilized Cdc25A, suppressed cyclin A expression in lung cancer cell lines. In xenograft models of lung cancer (PC14PE6) brain metastasis, AZD7762 significantly prolonged the median survival time in response to radiation. Depletion of Chk1 using shRNA also showed an enhancement of sensitivity to radiation in PC14PE6 cells. The results of this study support that Chk1 can be a good target for enhancement of radiosensitivity.

  12. Metabolic demand stimulates CREB signaling in the limbic cortex: implication for the induction of hippocampal synaptic plasticity by intrinsic stimulus for survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly M Estrada

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction by fasting has been implicated to facilitate synaptic plasticity and promote contextual learning. However, cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the effect of fasting on memory consolidation are not completely understood. We hypothesized that fasting-induced enhancement of synaptic plasticity was mediated by the increased signaling mediated by CREB (c-AMP response element binding protein, an important nuclear protein and the transcription factor that is involved in the consolidation of memories in the hippocampus. In the in vivo rat model of 18 h fasting, the expression of phosphorylated CREB (pCREB was examined using anti-phospho-CREB (Ser133 in cardially-perfused and cryo-sectioned rat brain specimens. When compared with control animals, the hippocampus exhibited up to a two-fold of increase in pCREB expression in fasted animals. The piriform cortex, the entorhinal cortex, and the cortico-amygdala transitional zone also significantly increased immunoreactivities to pCREB. In contrast, the amygdala did not show any change in the magnitude of pCREB expression in response to fasting. The arcuate nucleus in the medial hypothalamus, which was previously reported to up-regulate CREB phosphorylation during fasting of up to 48 h, was also strongly immunoreactive and provided a positive control in the present study. Our findings demonstrate a metabolic demand not only stimulates cAMP-dependent signaling cascades in the hypothalamus, but also signals to various limbic brain regions including the hippocampus by activating the CREB signaling mechanism. The hippocampus is a primary brain structure for learning and memory. It receives hypothalamic and arcuate projections directly from the fornix. The hippocampus is also situated centrally for functional interactions with other limbic cortexes by establishing reciprocal synaptic connections. We suggest that hippocampal neurons and those in the surrounding limbic cortexes are

  13. RhoA-ROCK Inhibition Reverses Synaptic Remodeling and Motor and Cognitive Deficits Caused by Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulherkar, Shalaka; Firozi, Karen; Huang, Wei; Uddin, Mohammad Danish; Grill, Raymond J; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro; Robertson, Claudia; Tolias, Kimberley F

    2017-09-06

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes extensive neural damage, often resulting in long-term cognitive impairments. Unfortunately, effective treatments for TBI remain elusive. The RhoA-ROCK signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic target since it is activated by TBI and can promote the retraction of dendritic spines/synapses, which are critical for information processing and memory storage. To test this hypothesis, RhoA-ROCK signaling was blocked by RhoA deletion from postnatal neurons or treatment with the ROCK inhibitor fasudil. We found that TBI impairs both motor and cognitive performance and inhibiting RhoA-ROCK signaling alleviates these deficits. Moreover, RhoA-ROCK inhibition prevents TBI-induced spine remodeling and mature spine loss. These data argue that TBI elicits pathological spine remodeling that contributes to behavioral deficits by altering synaptic connections, and RhoA-ROCK inhibition enhances functional recovery by blocking this detrimental effect. As fasudil has been safely used in humans, our results suggest that it could be repurposed to treat TBI.

  14. COL-3, a chemically modified tetracycline, inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced microglia activation and cytokine expression in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawan Abdulhameed Edan

    Full Text Available Microglia activation results in release of proinflammatory molecules including cytokines, which contribute to neuronal damage in the central nervous system (CNS if not controlled. Tetracycline antibiotics such as minocycline inhibit microglial activation and cytokine expression during CNS inflammation. In the present study we found that administration of chemically modified tetracycline-3 (COL-3, inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced microglial and p38 MAPK activation, as well as the increase in TNF-α, but not IL-1β expression, in the brains of BALB/c mice. COL-3 has been described to have no antibacterial activity. We observed that COL-3 had no activity against a Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli; however surprisingly, COL-3 had antibacterial activity against a Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 1 mg/ml. Our data show that COL-3 has some antibacterial activity against S. aureus, inhibits LPS-induced neuroinflammation, and displays potential as a therapeutic agent for treatment of conditions involving CNS inflammation.

  15. Inhibition of calcium-permeable and calcium-impermeable AMPA receptors by perampanel in rat brain neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barygin, Oleg I

    2016-10-28

    Perampanel is an antiepileptic drug that is used to treat partial-onset seizures and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. It is a highly selective AMPA receptor allosteric antagonist. However, published data on perampanel activity vary in different studies. In the present work we studied the inhibition of native calcium-permeable and calcium-impermeable AMPA receptors in rat brain neurons by perampanel using whole-cell patch clamp technique. We found that inhibitory activity and kinetics of perampanel action do not differ between calcium-permeable AMPA receptors of rat giant striatum interneurons and calcium-impermeable receptors of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons (the IC50 value about 60nM). Also, perampanel caused the same inhibition of steady-state currents induced by kainate and glutamate. From the other side perampanel-induced inhibition was markedly reduced in the presence of cyclothiazide (IC50 value increased to 1.2±0.2μM). We demonstrated that perampanel competes with GYKI-52466 for binding site. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. COL-3, a chemically modified tetracycline, inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced microglia activation and cytokine expression in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edan, Rawan Abdulhameed; Luqmani, Yunus A; Masocha, Willias

    2013-01-01

    Microglia activation results in release of proinflammatory molecules including cytokines, which contribute to neuronal damage in the central nervous system (CNS) if not controlled. Tetracycline antibiotics such as minocycline inhibit microglial activation and cytokine expression during CNS inflammation. In the present study we found that administration of chemically modified tetracycline-3 (COL-3), inhibits lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced microglial and p38 MAPK activation, as well as the increase in TNF-α, but not IL-1β expression, in the brains of BALB/c mice. COL-3 has been described to have no antibacterial activity. We observed that COL-3 had no activity against a Gram-negative bacteria, Escherichia coli; however surprisingly, COL-3 had antibacterial activity against a Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 1 mg/ml. Our data show that COL-3 has some antibacterial activity against S. aureus, inhibits LPS-induced neuroinflammation, and displays potential as a therapeutic agent for treatment of conditions involving CNS inflammation.

  17. Neuronal inhibition and excitation, and the dichotomic control of brain hemodynamic and oxygen responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Martin; Mathiesen, Claus; Schaefer, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    of metabolic and vascular control explains the gap between the stimulation-induced rises in CMRO(2) and CBF, and in turn the BOLD signal. Activity-dependent rises in CBF and CMRO(2) vary within and between brain regions due to differences in ATP turnover and Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms. Nerve cells produce......, and in turn the amplitude and polarity of the BOLD signal. Therefore, it is not possible based on a negative or positive BOLD signal alone to decide whether the underlying activity goes on in principal or inhibitory neurons.......Brain's electrical activity correlates strongly to changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)). Subthreshold synaptic processes correlate better than the spike rates of principal neurons to CBF, CMRO(2) and positive BOLD signals. Stimulation...

  18. Satiety factor oleoylethanolamide recruits the brain histaminergic system to inhibit food intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provensi, Gustavo; Coccurello, Roberto; Umehara, Hayato; Munari, Leonardo; Giacovazzo, Giacomo; Galeotti, Nicoletta; Nosi, Daniele; Gaetani, Silvana; Romano, Adele; Moles, Anna; Blandina, Patrizio; Passani, Maria Beatrice

    2014-08-01

    Key factors driving eating behavior are hunger and satiety, which are controlled by a complex interplay of central neurotransmitter systems and peripheral stimuli. The lipid-derived messenger oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is released by enterocytes in response to fat intake and indirectly signals satiety to hypothalamic nuclei. Brain histamine is released during the appetitive phase to provide a high level of arousal in anticipation of feeding, and mediates satiety. However, despite the possible functional overlap of satiety signals, it is not known whether histamine participates in OEA-induced hypophagia. Using different experimental settings and diets, we report that the anorexiant effect of OEA is significantly attenuated in mice deficient in the histamine-synthesizing enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC-KO) or acutely depleted of histamine via interocerebroventricular infusion of the HDC blocker α-fluoromethylhistidine (α-FMH). α-FMH abolished OEA-induced early occurrence of satiety onset while increasing histamine release in the CNS with an H3 receptor antagonist-increased hypophagia. OEA augmented histamine release in the cortex of fasted mice within a time window compatible to its anorexic effects. OEA also increased c-Fos expression in the oxytocin neurons of the paraventricular nuclei of WT but not HDC-KO mice. The density of c-Fos immunoreactive neurons in other brain regions that receive histaminergic innervation and participate in the expression of feeding behavior was comparable in OEA-treated WT and HDC-KO mice. Our results demonstrate that OEA requires the integrity of the brain histamine system to fully exert its hypophagic effect and that the oxytocin neuron-rich nuclei are the likely hypothalamic area where brain histamine influences the central effects of OEA.

  19. Inhibition of inflammatory mediator release from microglia can treat ischemic/hypoxic brain injury★

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Huaibo; Guo,Weitao; Liu, Hongliang; Zeng, Rong; Lu, Mingnan; Chen, Ziqiu; Xiao, Qixian

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β aggravate neuronal injury by mediating the inflammatory reaction following ischemic/hypoxic brain injury. It remains unclear whether interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β are released by microglia or astrocytes. This study prepared hippocampal slices that were subsequently subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation. Hematoxylin-eosin staining verified that neurons exhibited hypoxic changes. Results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay found that interleukin-1α a...

  20. Cyclosporine-inhibitable Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Transport Influences Clinical Morphine Pharmacodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Konrad; Avram, Michael J.; Yermolenka, Viktar; Francis, Amber M.; Blood, Jane; Kharasch, Evan D.

    2013-01-01

    Background The blood-brain barrier is richly populated by active influx and efflux transporters influencing brain drug concentrations. Morphine, a drug with delayed clinical onset, is a substrate for the efflux transporter P-glycoprotein in vitro and in animals. This investigation tested whether morphine is a transporter substrate in humans. Methods Fourteen healthy volunteers received morphine (0.1 mg/kg, 1 h intravenous infusion) in a crossover study after nothing (control) or the validated P-glycoprotein inhibitor cyclosporine (5 mg/kg, 2 h infusion). Plasma and urine morphine and morphine glucuronide metabolite concentrations were measured by mass spectrometry. Morphine effects were measured by miosis and analgesia. Results Cyclosporine minimally altered morphine disposition, increasing the area under the plasma morphine concentration versus time curve to 100 ± 21 versus 85 ± 24 ng/ml•hr (p Cyclosporine enhanced (3.2 ± 0.9 vs. 2.5 ± 1.0 mm peak) and prolonged miosis, and increased the area under the miosis-time curve (18 ± 9 vs. 11 ± 5 mm-hr), plasma-effect site transfer rate constant (ke0, median 0.27 vs. 0.17 hr−1), and maximum calculated effect site morphine concentration (11.5 ± 3.7 vs. 7.6 ± 2.9 ng/ml) (all p cyclosporine-related pain. Conclusions Morphine is a transporter substrate at the human blood-brain barrier. Results suggest a role for P-glycoprotein or other efflux transporters in brain morphine access, although the magnitude of the effect is small, and unlikely to be a major determinant of morphine clinical effects. Efflux may explain some variability in clinical morphine effects. PMID:23851346

  1. Inhibition of inflammatory mediator release from microglia can treat ischemic/hypoxic brain injury★

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Huaibo; Guo, Weitao; Liu, Hongliang; Zeng, Rong; Lu, Mingnan; Chen, Ziqiu; Xiao, Qixian

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β aggravate neuronal injury by mediating the inflammatory reaction following ischemic/hypoxic brain injury. It remains unclear whether interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β are released by microglia or astrocytes. This study prepared hippocampal slices that were subsequently subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation. Hematoxylin-eosin staining verified that neurons exhibited hypoxic changes. Results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay found that interleukin-1α a...

  2. Comparison of in vitro potency of oximes (pralidoxime, obidoxime, HI-6) to reactivate sarin-inhibited acetylcholinesterase in various parts of pig brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuca, Kamil; Cabal, Jiri; Kassa, Jiri; Jun, Daniel; Hrabinová, Martina

    2005-01-01

    The potency of currently used oximes to reactivate sarin-inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in various parts of pig brain and whole pig brain was evaluated using in vitro methods. Significant differences in reactivation potency among all tested oximes were observed. At concentrations (10(-4) M) corresponding to recommended doses in vivo, the oxime HI-6 seems to be a more efficacious reactivator of sarin-inhibited AChE in whole pig brain as well as in cerebral hemispheres and cerebellum compared with the other oximes studied. Nevertheless, there are not any differences in the potency of oximes tested to reactivate sarin-inhibited AChE in medulla oblongata. Thus, the oxime HI-6 appears to be the most promising oxime among currently available oximes for the antidotal treatment of acute sarin poisoning, although it is not more efficacious than other currently used oximes in medulla oblongata, whose function is necessary for the vital functions of respiration and circulation.

  3. Estrogen inhibits lipid peroxidation after hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Zhu; Xiao Han; Dafeng Ji; Guangming Lv; Meiyu Xu

    2012-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley neonatal rats within 7 days after birth were used in this study. The left common carotid artery was occluded and rats were housed in an 8% O2 environment for 2 hours to establish a hypoxic-ischemic brain damage model. 17β-estradiol (1 × 10-5 M) was injected into the rat abdominal cavity after the model was successfully established. The left hemisphere was obtained at 12, 24, 48, 72 hours after operation. Results showed that malondialdehyde content in the left brain of neonatal rats gradually increased as modeling time prolonged, while malondialdehyde content of 17β-estrodial-treated rats significantly declined by 24 hours, reached lowest levels at 48 hours, and then peaked at 72 hours after injury. Nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate histochemical staining showed the nitric oxide synthase-positive cells and fibers dyed blue/violet and were mainly distributed in the cortex, hippocampus and medial septal nuclei. The number of nitric oxide synthase-positive cells peaked at 48 hours and significantly decreased after 17β-estrodial treatment. Our experimental findings indicate that estrogen plays a protective role following hypoxic-ischemic brain damage by alleviating lipid peroxidation through reducing the expression of nitric oxide synthase and the content of malondialdehyde.

  4. Cyclosporin A induces hyperpermeability of the blood-brain barrier by inhibiting autocrine adrenomedullin-mediated up-regulation of endothelial barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohgu, Shinya; Sumi, Noriko; Nishioku, Tsuyoshi; Takata, Fuyuko; Watanabe, Takuya; Naito, Mikihiko; Shuto, Hideki; Yamauchi, Atsushi; Kataoka, Yasufumi

    2010-10-10

    Cyclosporin A, a potent immunosuppressant, can often produce neurotoxicity in patients, although its penetration into the brain is restricted by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Brain pericytes and astrocytes, which are periendothelial accessory structures of the BBB, can be involved in cyclosporin A-induced BBB disruption. However, the mechanism by which cyclosporin A causes BBB dysfunction remains unknown. Here, we show that in rodent brain endothelial cells, cyclosporin A decreased transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) by inhibiting intracellular signal transduction downstream of adrenomedullin, an autocrine regulator of BBB function. Cyclosporin A stimulated adrenomedullin release from brain endothelial cells, but did not affect binding of adrenomedullin to its receptors. This cyclosporin A-induced decrease in TEER was attenuated by exogenous addition of adrenomedullin. Cyclosporin A dose-dependently decreased the total cAMP concentration in brain endothelial cells. A combination of cyclosporin A (1microM) with an adenylyl cyclase inhibitor, 9-(tetrahydro-2-furanyl)-9H-purin-6-amine (SQ22536; 10microM), or a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, N-[2-(p-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide dihydrochloride (H89; 1microM), markedly increased sodium fluorescein permeability in brain endothelial cells, whereas each drug alone had no effect. Thus, these data suggest that cyclosporin A inhibits the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/PKA signaling pathway activated by adrenomedullin, leading to impairment of brain endothelial barrier function. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Differences in prefrontal, limbic, and white matter lesion volumes according to cognitive status in elderly patients with first-onset subsyndromal depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Young Lee

    Full Text Available The purpose of this preliminary study was to test the hypothesis that subsyndromal depression is associated with the volume of medial prefrontal regional gray matter and that of white matter lesions (WMLs in the brains of cognitively normal older people. We also explored the relationships between subsyndromal depression and medial prefrontal regional gray matter volume, limbic regional gray matter volume, and lobar WMLs in the brains of patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI and Alzheimer's disease (AD. We performed a cross-sectional study comparing patients with subsyndromal depression and nondepressed controls with normal cognition (n = 59, MCI (n = 27, and AD (n = 27, adjusting for sex, age, years of education, and results of the Mini-Mental State Examination. Frontal WML volume was greater, and right medial orbitofrontal cortical volume was smaller in cognitively normal participants with subsyndromal depression than in those without subsyndromal depression. No volume differences were observed in medial prefrontal, limbic, or WML volumes according to the presence of subsyndromal depression in cognitively impaired patients. The absence of these changes in patients with MCI and AD suggests that brain changes associated with AD pathology may override the changes associated with subsyndromal depression.

  6. A [11C]Ro15 4513 PET study suggests that alcohol dependence in man is associated with reduced α5 benzodiazepine receptors in limbic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingford-Hughes, Anne; Reid, Alastair G; Myers, James; Feeney, Adrian; Hammers, Alexander; Taylor, Lindsay G; Rosso, Lula; Turkheimer, Federico; Brooks, David J; Grasby, Paul; Nutt, David J

    2012-02-01

    Preclinical evidence suggests the α5 subtype of the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor is involved in some of the actions of alcohol and in memory. The positron emission tomography (PET) tracer, [(11)C]Ro15 4513 shows relative selectivity in labelling the α5 subtype over the other GABA-benzodiazepine receptor subtypes in limbic regions of the brain. We used this tracer to investigate the distribution of α5 subtype availability in human alcohol dependence and its relationship to clinical variables. Abstinent (>6 weeks) alcohol-dependent men and healthy male controls underwent an [(11)C]Ro15 4513 PET scan. We report [(11)C]Ro15 4513 brain uptake for 8 alcohol-dependent men and 11 healthy controls. We found a significant reduction in [(11)C]Ro15 4513 binding in the nucleus accumbens, parahippocampal gyri, right hippocampus and amygdala in the alcohol-dependent compared with the healthy control group. Levels of [(11)C]Ro15 4513 binding in both hippocampi were significantly and positively associated with performance on a delayed verbal memory task in the alcohol-dependent but not the control group. We speculate that the reduced limbic [(11)C]Ro15 4513 binding seen here results from the effects of alcohol, though we cannot currently distinguish whether they are compensatory in nature or evidence of brain toxicity.

  7. Positron emission tomography measurement of brain MAO-B inhibition in patients with Alzheimer's disease and elderly controls after oral administration of sembragiline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturm, Stefan [Roche Pharmaceutical Research and Early Development, Roche Innovation Center Basel, Basel (Switzerland); F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Basel (Switzerland); Forsberg, Anton; Stenkrona, Per; Varrone, Andrea; Fazio, Patrik; Nakao, Ryuji; Halldin, Christer [Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Centre for Psychiatric Research, Stockholm (Sweden); Nave, Stephane; Jamois, Candice; Ricci, Benedicte [Roche Pharmaceutical Research and Early Development, Roche Innovation Center Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Seneca, Nicholas [AstraZeneca Translational Science Center, Stockholm (Sweden); Comley, Robert A. [AbbVie, North Chicago, IL (United States); Ejduk, Zbigniew [Miedzyleski Specialistic Hospital, Internal Disease and Gastroenterology, Warsaw (Poland); Al-Tawil, Nabil [Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Trial Alliance Phase 1 Unit, Stockholm (Sweden); Akenine, Ulrika; Andreasen, Niels [Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet Alzheimer Disease Research Centre and Clinical Trial Unit, Geriatric Clinic, Huddinge (Sweden)

    2017-03-15

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), increased metabolism of monoamines by monoamine oxidase type B (MAO-B) leads to the production of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are thought to contribute to disease pathogenesis. Inhibition of the MAO-B enzyme may restore brain levels of monoaminergic neurotransmitters, reduce the formation of toxic ROS and reduce neuroinflammation (reactive astrocytosis), potentially leading to neuroprotection. Sembragiline (also referred as RO4602522, RG1577 and EVT 302 in previous communications) is a potent, selective and reversible inhibitor of MAO-B developed as a potential treatment for AD. This study assessed the relationship between plasma concentration of sembragiline and brain MAO-B inhibition in patients with AD and in healthy elderly control (EC) subjects. Positron emission tomography (PET) scans using [{sup 11}C]-{sub L}-deprenyl-D{sub 2} radiotracer were performed in ten patients with AD and six EC subjects, who received sembragiline each day for 6-15 days. At steady state, the relationship between sembragiline plasma concentration and MAO-B inhibition resulted in an E{sub max} of ∝80-90 % across brain regions of interest and in an EC{sub 50} of 1-2 ng/mL. Data in patients with AD and EC subjects showed that near-maximal inhibition of brain MAO-B was achieved with 1 mg sembragiline daily, regardless of the population, whereas lower doses resulted in lower and variable brain MAO-B inhibition. This PET study confirmed that daily treatment of at least 1 mg sembragiline resulted in near-maximal inhibition of brain MAO-B enzyme in patients with AD. (orig.)

  8. Caffeine/nutrition interaction in the rat brain: Influence on latent inhibition and cortical spreading depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aguiar, Márlison José Lima; de Aguiar, Cilene Rejane Ramos Alves; Guedes, Rubem Carlos Araújo

    2011-01-10

    Caffeine, like malnutrition, can produce behavioral and electrophysiological alterations. However, the interaction of both factors remains unclear. Here this interaction has been studied in male Wistar rats previously malnourished during the lactation period by feeding their dams the "regional basic diet" of Northeast Brazil, containing about 8% protein, predominantly from vegetable sources (RBD(8)). At 70-75days of life, a subset of the pups was treated intraperitoneally with 30mg/kg caffeine for 4days while being tested according to the behavioral model of latent inhibition. Another group was subjected to an electrophysiological recording of the phenomenon known as cortical spreading depression, and the effects of caffeine injected during the recording session were evaluated. Caffeine did not affect cortical spreading depression, but antagonized latent inhibition in both the RBD(8)-malnourished rats and in the well-nourished control group fed a chow diet with 22% protein. This effect of caffeine was not seen in malnourished rats fed a protein-supplemented RBD (protein increased to 22% by increasing the proportion of foodstuffs from vegetable origin; RBD(22) group), suggesting that the amino acid imbalance of this diet may modulate the caffeine effects on latent inhibition. The results indicate a differential effect of caffeine in the latent inhibition behavioral model, as compared to the cortical spreading depression phenomenon, and this effect is influenced by the early nutritional status of the animal. We suggest that caffeine may modulate dopaminergic subcortical receptors participating in attention processes, but does not interact at the cortical level, in a way that would affect cortical spreading depression.

  9. Theory of mind depends on domain-general executive functions of working memory and cognitive inhibition in children with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Maureen; Agostino, Alba; Roncadin, Caroline; Levin, Harvey

    2009-10-01

    Relations among theory of mind (ToM), the executive functions of working memory and cognitive inhibition, and frontal lesions were studied using path analysis in 43 school-aged children with traumatic brain injury. The relation between cognitive inhibition and ToM involved a single mediated path, such that cognitive inhibition predicted ToM through working memory. Frontal injury had a direct impact on working memory, which then separately determined ToM performance, the direct single paths between frontal injury and ToM being nonsignificant. The expression of ToM in school-age children with traumatic brain injury is not domain specific, but instead depends on the domain-general functions of working memory and cognitive inhibition.

  10. TNF signaling inhibition in the CNS: implications for normal brain function and neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tansey Malú G

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF as an immune mediator has long been appreciated but its function in the brain is still unclear. TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1 is expressed in most cell types, and can be activated by binding of either soluble TNF (solTNF or transmembrane TNF (tmTNF, with a preference for solTNF; whereas TNFR2 is expressed primarily by microglia and endothelial cells and is preferentially activated by tmTNF. Elevation of solTNF is a hallmark of acute and chronic neuroinflammation as well as a number of neurodegenerative conditions including ischemic stroke, Alzheimer's (AD, Parkinson's (PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, and multiple sclerosis (MS. The presence of this potent inflammatory factor at sites of injury implicates it as a mediator of neuronal damage and disease pathogenesis, making TNF an attractive target for therapeutic development to treat acute and chronic neurodegenerative conditions. However, new and old observations from animal models and clinical trials reviewed here suggest solTNF and tmTNF exert different functions under normal and pathological conditions in the CNS. A potential role for TNF in synaptic scaling and hippocampal neurogenesis demonstrated by recent studies suggest additional in-depth mechanistic studies are warranted to delineate the distinct functions of the two TNF ligands in different parts of the brain prior to large-scale development of anti-TNF therapies in the CNS. If inactivation of TNF-dependent inflammation in the brain is warranted by additional pre-clinical studies, selective targeting of TNFR1-mediated signaling while sparing TNFR2 activation may lessen adverse effects of anti-TNF therapies in the CNS.

  11. Inhibition of brain tumor growth by intravenous poly (β-L-malic acid) nanobioconjugate with pH-dependent drug release [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Hui; Inoue, Satoshi; Ljubimov, Alexander V; Patil, Rameshwar; Portilla-Arias, Jose; Hu, Jinwei; Konda, Bindu; Wawrowsky, Kolja A; Fujita, Manabu; Karabalin, Natalya; Sasaki, Takako; Black, Keith L; Holler, Eggehard; Ljubimova, Julia Y

    2010-10-19

    Effective treatment of brain neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, or tumors should be possible with drug delivery through blood-brain barrier (BBB) or blood-brain tumor barrier (BTB) and targeting specific types of brain cells with drug release into the cell cytoplasm. A polymeric nanobioconjugate drug based on biodegradable, nontoxic, and nonimmunogenic polymalic acid as a universal delivery nanoplatform was used for design and synthesis of nanomedicine drug for i.v. treatment of brain tumors. The polymeric drug passes through the BTB and tumor cell membrane using tandem monoclonal antibodies targeting the BTB and tumor cells. The next step for polymeric drug action was inhibition of tumor angiogenesis by specifically blocking the synthesis of a tumor neovascular trimer protein, laminin-411, by attached antisense oligonucleotides (AONs). The AONs were released into the target cell cytoplasm via pH-activated trileucine, an endosomal escape moiety. Drug delivery to the brain tumor and the release mechanism were both studied for this nanobiopolymer. Introduction of a trileucine endosome escape unit resulted in significantly increased AON delivery to tumor cells, inhibition of laminin-411 synthesis in vitro and in vivo, specific accumulation in brain tumors, and suppression of intracranial glioma growth compared with pH-independent leucine ester. The availability of a systemically active polymeric drug delivery system that passes through the BTB, targets tumor cells, and inhibits glioma growth gives hope for a successful strategy of glioma treatment. This delivery system with drug release into the brain-specific cell type could be useful for treatment of various brain pathologies.

  12. Reactivation of human brain homogenate cholinesterases inhibited by Tabun using newly developed oximes K117 and K127.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuca, Kamil; Cabal, Jiri; Jung, Yung Sik; Musilek, Kamil; Soukup, Ondrej; Jun, Daniel; Pohanka, Miroslav; Musilova, Lucie; Karasová, Jana; Novotný, Ladislav; Hrabinova, Martina

    2009-09-01

    Newly developed acetylcholinesterase reactivators K117 [1,5-bis(4-hydroxyiminomethylpyridinium)-3-oxapentane dichloride] and K127 [(1-(4-hydroxyiminomethylpyridinium)-5-(4-carbamoylpyridinium)-3-oxapentane dibromide)] were tested for their potency to reactivate tabun-inhibited human brain cholinesterases. Pralidoxime and trimedoxime were chosen as standard reference reactivators. Human tissue was used, as that was closer on the real treatment of human beings. As a result, oxime K127 was found as the best tested reactivator according to the constant k(r), characterizing the overall reactivation process. On the contrary, the maximal reactivation ability expressed as percentage of reactivation was the best for trimedoxime. This differences were caused as a result of using the enzyme from different species. Due to this, experiments on human tissue should be conducted after in vitro and in vivo tests on animals to eliminate such important failures of promising oximes.

  13. Dementia and visual hallucinations associated with limbic pathology in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaitzakis, M E; Christian, L M; Moran, L B; Graeber, M B; Pearce, R K B; Gentleman, S M

    2009-03-01

    The pathological basis of dementia and visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease (PD) is not yet fully understood. To investigate this further we have conducted a clinico-pathological study based on 30 post-mortem PD brains. PD cases were stratified into groups according to clinical characteristics as follows: (1) cognitively intact (n=9); (2) cases with severe dementia and visual hallucinations (n=12); (3) cases with severe dementia and no visual hallucinations (n=4); and (4) cases with severe visual hallucinations and no dementia (n=5). The extent of alpha-synuclein (alphaSyn), tau and amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) deposition was then examined in the CA2 sector of the hippocampus and in neocortical and subcortical areas known to subserve cognitive function. We find that dementia in PD is significantly associated with alphaSyn in the anterior cingulate gyrus, superior frontal gyrus, temporal cortex, entorhinal cortex, amygdaloid complex and CA2 sector of the hippocampus. Abeta in the anterior cingulate gyrus, entorhinal cortex, amygdaloid complex and nucleus basalis of Meynert is also associated with dementia as is tau in the CA2 sector of the hippocampus. alphaSyn burden in the amygdala is strongly related to the presence of visual hallucinations but only in those PD cases with concomitant dementia. Statistical analysis revealed that alphaSyn burden in the anterior cingulate gyrus could differentiate demented from non-demented PD cases with high sensitivity and specificity. We conclude that alphaSyn in limbic regions is related to dementia in PD as well as to visual hallucinations when there is an underlying dementia.

  14. Endogenous cannabinoid release within prefrontal-limbic pathways affects memory consolidation of emotional training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morena, Maria; Roozendaal, Benno; Trezza, Viviana; Ratano, Patrizia; Peloso, Andrea; Hauer, Daniela; Atsak, Piray; Trabace, Luigia; Cuomo, Vincenzo; McGaugh, James L.; Schelling, Gustav; Campolongo, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have provided extensive evidence that administration of cannabinoid drugs after training modulates the consolidation of memory for an aversive experience. The present experiments investigated whether the memory consolidation is regulated by endogenously released cannabinoids. The experiments first examined whether the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) are released by aversive training. Inhibitory avoidance training with higher footshock intensity produced increased levels of AEA in the amygdala, hippocampus, and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) shortly after training in comparison with levels assessed in rats trained with lower footshock intensity or unshocked controls exposed only to the training apparatus. In contrast, 2-AG levels were not significantly elevated. The additional finding that posttraining infusions of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597, which selectively increases AEA levels at active synapses, administered into the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA), hippocampus, or mPFC enhanced memory strongly suggests that the endogenously released AEA modulates memory consolidation. Moreover, in support of the view that this emotional training-associated increase in endocannabinoid neurotransmission, and its effects on memory enhancement, depends on the integrity of functional interactions between these different brain regions, we found that disruption of BLA activity blocked the training-induced increases in AEA levels as well as the memory enhancement produced by URB597 administered into the hippocampus or mPFC. Thus, the findings provide evidence that emotionally arousing training increases AEA levels within prefrontal-limbic circuits and strongly suggest that this cannabinoid activation regulates emotional arousal effects on memory consolidation. PMID:25489086

  15. Limbic encephalitis: Clinical spectrum and long-term outcome from a developing country perspective

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    Sujit Abajirao Jagtap

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Limbic encephalitis (LE is characterized by rapidly progressive short-term memory loss, psychiatric symptoms and seizures. We describe the clinical spectrum, underlying etiology and long-term follow-up of patients with LE from India. Materials and Methods: This prospective study included patients during the period of January 2009 and December 2011 with the clinical features consistent with LE with one or more of the following: (1 Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI evidence of temporal lobe involvement; (2 cerebrospinal fluid inflammatory abnormalities, or (3 detection of antineuronal antibodies. Patients with metastasis, infection, metabolic and nutritional deficits, stroke, were excluded. Results: There were 16 patients (9 females, mean age of presentation was 36.6 years (range 15-69 years. The mean duration of symptoms before presentation was 11 months (range 5 days-2 years. The most common symptom at presentation was short-term memory impairment in 7 patients followed by seizures in 5 and behavioral changes in three. Nine patients had seizures, 11 had change in behavior, language involvement in eight, cerebellar features in 3 and autonomic dysfunction in two. Four patients had associated malignancy, 3 of four presented with neurological symptoms and on investigations found to be have malignancy. Antineuronal antibody testing was done in 6 of 12 non paraneoplastic and two paraneoplastic patients, one positive for N-methyl-D-aspartate and one for anti-Hu antibody. MRI brain showed typical fluid attenuated inversion recovery or T2 bilateral temporal lobe hyperintensities in 50% of patients. At a mean follow-up of 21 months (3-36 months, 10 patients improved, 4 patients remained same and two patients expired. Conclusion: Early recognition of LE is important based upon clinical, MRI data in the absence of antineuronal surface antibody screen in developing nations. Early institution of immunotherapy will help in improvement in outcome of

  16. The vasotocinergic system in the hypothalamus and limbic region of the budgerigar (Melopsittacus undulatus

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    C Fabris

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a morphological and biochemical analysis on the presence, distribution and quantification of vasotocin in the hypothalamus and limbic region of the budgerigar Melopsittacus undulatus, using immunohistochemistry on serial sections and competitive enzyme linked immunoadsorbent assay measurements on tissue extracts. Analysis of the sections showed large vasotocin-immunoreactive neurons in three main regions of the diencephalon, of both male and female specimens. Vasotocinergic cell bodies were located in the ventral and lateral areas of the hypothalamus, dorsal to the lateral thalamus and medial to the nucleus geniculatus lateralis. Immunoreactive neurons were placed also periventricularly, close to the walls of the third ventricle, at the level of the magnocellular paraventricular nucleus.Well evident bundles of immunoreactive fibers were placed ventral to the anterior commissure in the same regions of the hypothalamus and thalamus where vasotocinergic perikarya are localized. Fibers were identified close to the third ventricle, and in the lateral hypothalamic area along the lateral forebrain bundle. In contrast to what reported for other oscine and non-oscine avian species, we were not able to identify immunopositive neurons in any region above the anterior commissure, or detect relevant differences on the distribution of the vasotocin immmunoreactivity between sexes. Competitive enzyme linked immunoadsorption assay and image analysis of the extension of immunoreactivity in the tissue sections were consistent with the qualitative observations and indicated that there is no statistically significant dimorphism in the content of vasotocin or in the location and distribution of vasotocinergic elements in the investigated areas of male and female parrot brains.

  17. Gum Chewing Inhibits the Sensory Processing and the Propagation of Stress-Related Information in a Brain Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbo; Chen, Xi; Liu, Jinting; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2013-01-01

    Stress is prevalent in human life and threatens both physical and mental health; stress coping is thus of adaptive value for individual's survival and well-being. Although there has been extensive research on how the neural and physiological systems respond to stressful stimulation, relatively little is known about how the brain dynamically copes with stress evoked by this stimulation. Here we investigated how stress is relieved by a popular coping behavior, namely, gum chewing. In an fMRI study, we used loud noise as an acute stressor and asked participants to rate their feeling of stress in gum-chewing and no-chewing conditions. The participants generally felt more stressful when hearing noise, but less so when they were simultaneously chewing gum. The bilateral superior temporal sulcus (STS) and the left anterior insula (AI) were activated by noise, and their activations showed a positive correlation with the self-reported feeling of stress. Critically, gum chewing significantly reduced the noise-induced activation in these areas. Psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis showed that the functional connectivity between the left AI and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) was increased by noise to a lesser extent when the participants were chewing gum than when not chewing gum. Dynamic causality modeling (DCM) demonstrated that gum chewing inhibited the connectivity from the STS to the left AI. These findings demonstrate that gum chewing relieves stress by attenuating the sensory processing of external stressor and by inhibiting the propagation of stress-related information in the brain stress network. PMID:23573184

  18. Inhibition of Myosin light-chain kinase attenuates cerebral edema after traumatic brain injury in postnatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Janet L; Todd, Tracey; Bazan, Nicolas G; Belayev, Ludmila

    2013-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children less than 8 years of age leads to decline in intelligence and executive functioning. Neurological outcomes after TBI correlate to development of cerebral edema, which affect survival rates after TBI. It has been shown that myosin light-chain kinase (MLCK) increases cerebral edema and that pretreatment with an MLCK inhibitor (ML-7) reduces cerebral edema. The aim of this study was to determine whether inhibition of MLCK after TBI in postnatal day 24 (PND-24) mice would prevent breakdown of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and development of cerebral edema and improve neurological outcome. We used a closed head injury model of TBI. ML-7 or saline treatment was administered at 4 h and every 24 h until sacrifice or 5 days after TBI. Mice were sacrificed at 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h and 7 days after impact. Mice treated with ML-7 after TBI had decreased levels of MLCK-expressing cells (20.7±4.8 vs. 149.3±40.6), less albumin extravasation (28.3±11.2 vs. 116.2±60.7 mm(2)) into surrounding parenchymal tissue, less Evans Blue extravasation (339±314 vs. 4017±560 ng/g), and showed a significant difference in wet/dry weight ratio (1.9±0.07 vs. 2.2±0.05 g), compared to saline-treated groups. Treatment with ML-7 also resulted in preserved neurological function measured by the wire hang test (57 vs. 21 sec) and two-object novel recognition test (old vs. new, 10.5 touches). We concluded that inhibition of MLCK reduces cerebral edema and preserves neurological function in PND-24 mice.

  19. miR-339-5p inhibits alcohol-induced brain inflammation through regulating NF-κB pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated School of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001 (China); Wei, Guangkuan [Department of Neurology, Heilongjiang Provincial Hospital, Harbin 150036 (China); Di, Zhiyong [Department of Laboratory, Heilongjiang Provincial Hospital, Harbin 150036 (China); Zhao, Qingjie, E-mail: zhaoqingjie2013@163.com [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated School of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2014-09-26

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Alcohol upregulates miR-339-5p expression. • miR-339-5p inhibits the NF-kB pathway. • miR-339-5p interacts with and blocks activity of IKK-beat and IKK-epsilon. • miR-339-5p modulates IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α. - Abstract: Alcohol-induced neuroinflammation is mediated by the innate immunesystem. Pro-inflammatory responses to alcohol are modulated by miRNAs. The miRNA miR-339-5p has previously been found to be upregulated in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. However, little has been elucidated on the regulatory functions of this miRNA in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. We investigated the function of miR-339-5p in alcohol exposed brain tissue and isolated microglial cells using ex vivo and in vitro techniques. Our results show that alcohol induces transcription of miR 339-5p, IL-6, IL-1β and TNF-α in mouse brain tissue and isolated microglial cells by activating NF-κB. Alcohol activation of NF-κB allows for nuclear translocation of the NF-κB subunit p65 and expression of pro-inflammatory mediators. miR-339-5p inhibited expression of these pro-inflammatory factors through the NF-κB pathway by abolishing IKK-β and IKK-ε activity.

  20. The endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor salubrinal inhibits the activation of autophagy and neuroprotection induced by brain ischemic preconditioning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo GAO; Xiang-yang ZHANG; Rong HAN; Tong-tong ZHANG; Cheng CHEN; Zheng-hong QIN; Rui SHENG

    2013-01-01

    Aim:To investigate whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress participates in the neuroprotective effects of ischemic preconditioning (IPC)-induced neuroprotection and autophagy activation in rat brains.Methods:The right middle cerebral artery in SD rats was occluded for 10 min to induce focal cerebral IPC,and was occluded permanently 24 h later to induce permanent focal ischemia (PFI).ER stress inhibitor salubrinal (SAL) was injected via intracerebral ventricle infusion 10 min before the onset of IPC.Infarct volume and motor behavior deficits were examined after the ischemic insult.The protein levels of LC3,p62,HSP70,glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP 78),p-elF2α and caspase-12 in the ipsilateral cortex were analyzed using immunoblotting.LC3 expression pattern in the sections of ipsilateral cortex was observed with immunofluorescence.Results:Pretreatment with SAL (150 pmol) abolished the neuroprotective effects of IPC,as evidenced by the significant increases in mortality,infarct volume and motor deficits after PFI.At the molecular levels,pretreatment with SAL (150 pmol) significantly increased p-elF2α level,and decreased GRP78 level after PFI,suggesting that SAL effectively inhibited ER stress in the cortex.Furthermore,the pretreatment with SAL blocked the IPC-induced upregulation of LC3-Ⅱ and downregulation of p62 in the cortex,thus inhibiting the activation of autophagy.Moreover,SAL blocked the upregulation of HSP70,but significantly increased the cleaved caspase-12 level,thus promoting ER stress-dependent apoptotic signaling in the cortex.Conclusion:ER stress-induced autophagy might contribute to the neuroprotective effect of brain ischemic preconditioning.

  1. Potential contribution of aromatase inhibition to the effects of nicotine and related compounds on the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegon, Anat; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Fowler, Joanna S

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking continues to be a major public health problem, and while smoking rates in men have shown some decrease over the last few decades, smoking rates among girls and young women are increasing. Practically all of the important aspects of cigarette smoking and many effects of nicotine are sexually dimorphic (reviewed by Pogun and Yararbas, 2009). Women become addicted more easily than men, while finding it harder to quit. Nicotine replacement appears to be less effective in women. This may be linked to the observation that women are more sensitive than men to non-nicotine cues or ingredients in cigarettes. The reasons for these sex differences are mostly unknown. Several lines of evidence suggest that many of the reported sex differences related to cigarette smoking may stem from the inhibitory effects of nicotine and other tobacco alkaloids on estrogen synthesis via the enzyme aromatase (cyp19a gene product). Aromatase is the last enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis, catalyzing the conversion of androgens to estrogens. This review provides a summary of experimental evidence supporting brain aromatase as a potential mediator and/or modulator of nicotine actions in the brain, contributing to sex differences in smoking behavior. Additional research on the interaction between tobacco smoke, nicotine, and aromatase may help devise new, sex specific methods for prevention and treatment of smoking addiction.

  2. Potential contribution of aromatase inhibition to the effects of nicotine and related compounds on the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat eBiegon

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking continues to be a major public health problem, and while smoking rates in men have shown some decrease over the last few decades, smoking rates among girls and young women are increasing. Practically all of the important aspects of cigarette smoking are sexually dimorphic. Women become addicted more easily than men, while finding it harder to quit. Nicotine replacement appears to be less effective in women. This may be linked to the observation that women are more sensitive than men to non-nicotine cues or ingredients in cigarettes. The reasons for these sex differences are mostly unknown. Several lines of evidence suggest that many of the reported sex differences related to cigarette smoking may stem from the inhibitory effects of nicotine and other tobacco alkaloids on estrogen synthesis via the enzyme aromatase (cyp19a gene product. Aromatase is the last enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis, catalyzing the conversion of androgens to estrogens. This review provides a summary of experimental evidence supporting brain aromatase as a potential mediator and/or modulator of nicotine actions in the brain, contributing to sex differences in smoking behavior. Additional research on the interaction between tobacco smoke, nicotine and aromatase may help devise new, sex specific methods for prevention and treatment of smoking addiction.

  3. Brain anatomy and sensorimotor gating in Asperger's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlonan, Grainne M; Daly, Eileen; Kumari, Veena; Critchley, Hugo D; van Amelsvoort, Therese; Suckling, John; Simmons, Andrew; Sigmundsson, Thordur; Greenwood, Kathyrn; Russell, Ailsa; Schmitz, Nicole; Happe, Francesca; Howlin, Patricia; Murphy, Declan G M

    2002-07-01

    Asperger's syndrome (an autistic disorder) is characterized by stereotyped and obsessional behaviours, and pervasive abnormalities in socio-emotional and communicative behaviour. These symptoms lead to social exclusion and a significant healthcare burden; however, their neurobiological basis is poorly understood. There are few studies on brain anatomy of Asperger's syndrome, and no focal anatomical abnormality has been reliably reported from brain imaging studies of autism, although there is increasing evidence for differences in limbic circuits. These brain regions are important in sensorimotor gating, and impaired 'gating' may partly explain the failure of people with autistic disorders to inhibit repetitive thoughts and actions. Thus, we compared brain anatomy and sensorimotor gating in healthy people with Asperger's syndrome and controls. We included 21 adults with Asperger's syndrome and 24 controls. All had normal IQ and were aged 18-49 years. We studied brain anatomy using quantitative MRI, and sensorimotor gating using prepulse inhibition of startle in a subset of 12 individuals with Asperger's syndrome and 14 controls. We found significant age-related differences in volume of cerebral hemispheres and caudate nuclei (controls, but not people with Asperger's syndrome, had age-related reductions in volume). Also, people with Asperger's syndrome had significantly less grey matter in fronto-striatal and cerebellar regions than controls, and widespread differences in white matter. Moreover, sensorimotor gating was significantly impaired in Asperger's syndrome. People with Asperger's syndrome most likely have generalized alterations in brain development, but this is associated with significant differences from controls in the anatomy and function of specific brain regions implicated in behaviours characterizing the disorder. We hypothesize that Asperger's syndrome is associated with abnormalities in fronto-striatal pathways resulting in defective sensorimotor

  4. Neuronal damage and functional deficits are ameliorated by inhibition of aquaporin and HIF1α after traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenaq, Mohammed; Kassem, Hassan; Peng, Changya; Schafer, Steven; Ding, Jamie Y; Fredrickson, Vance; Guthikonda, Murali; Kreipke, Christian W; Rafols, José A; Ding, Yuchuan

    2012-12-15

    The present study, using a rodent model of closed-head diffuse traumatic brain injury (TBI), investigated the role of dysregulated aquaporins (AQP) 4 and 9, as well as hypoxia inducible factor -1α(HIF-1α) on brain edema formation, neuronal injury, and functional deficits. TBI was induced in adult (400-425 g), male Sprague-Dawley rats using a modified Marmarou's head impact-acceleration device (450 g weight dropped from 2m height). Animals in each treatment group were administered intravenous anti-AQP4 or -AQP9 antibodies or 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2, an inhibitor of HIF-1α) 30 min after injury. At 24h post-TBI, animals (n=6 each group) were sacrificed to examine the extent of brain edema by water content, as well as protein expression of AQP and HIF-1α by Western immune-blotting. At 48-hours post-TBI, neuronal injury (n=8 each group) was assessed by FluoroJade (FJ) histochemistry. Spatial learning and memory deficits were evaluated by radial arm maze (n=8 each group) up to 21 days post-TBI. Compared to non-injured controls, significant (pTBI was associated with increases (p TBI animals, AQP or HIF-1α inhibition significantly (pTBI. Taken together, the present data supports a causal relation between HIF-AQP mediated cerebral edema, secondary neuronal injury, and tertiary behavioral deficits post-TBI. The data further suggests that upstream modulation of the molecular patho-trajectory effectively ameliorates both neuronal injury and behavioral deficits post-TBI.

  5. Self-Inhibiting Modules Can Self-Organize as a Brain of a Robot: A Conjecture

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    J. Negrete-Martínez

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we describe a new robot control architecture on the basis of self-organization of self-inhibiting modules. The architecture can generate a complex behaviour repertoire. The repertoire can be performance-enhanced or increased by modular poly-functionality and/or by addition of new modules. This architecture is illustrated in a robot consisting of a car carrying an arm with a grasping tool. In the robot, each module drives either a joint motor or a pair of wheel motors. Every module estimates the distance from a sensor placed in the tool to a beacon. If the distance is smaller than a previously measured distance, the module drives its motor in the same direction of its prior movement. If the distance is larger, the next movement will be in the opposite direction; but, if the movement produces no significant change in distance, the module self-inhibits. A self-organization emerges: any module can be the next to take control of the motor activity of the robot once one module self-inhibits. A single module is active at a given time. The modules are implemented as computer procedures and their turn for participation scheduled by an endless program. The overall behaviour of the robot corresponds to a reaching attention behaviour. It is easily switched to a running-away attention behaviour by changing the sign of the same parameter in each module. The addition of a “sensor-gain attenuation reflex” module and of a “light-orientation reflex” module provides an increase of the behavioural attention repertoire and performance enhancement. Since scheduling a module does not necessarily produce its sustained intervention, the architecture of the “brain” is actually providing action induction rather than action selection.

  6. Relationship between glutamate in the limbic system and hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis after middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何明利; 陈漫娥; 王景周; 郭光华; 郑衍平; 蒋晓江; 张猛

    2003-01-01

    Objective To investigate the features of glutamate activity in the limbic system and the effects of glutamate on the activation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis throughout both acute cerebral ischemia and reperfusion.Methods The changes in glutamate content in the nervous cell gap, in corticotrophin releasing hormone (CHR) mRNA expression level in brain tissue, and in adrenocorticotropic hormone in blood plasma at different time-points after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in rats were determined respectively with high-performance liquid chomatography (HPLC) and in situ hybridization.Results Glutamate content in the hippocampus and the hypothalamus increased rapidly at ischemia 15 minutes, and reached peak value (the averages were 21.05 mg/g±2.88 mg/g and 14.20 mg/g±2.58 mg/g, respectively) at 1 hour after middle cerebral artery occlusion. During recirculation, it returned rapidly to the baseline level. At 24 hours after reperfusion, it went up once more, and remained at a relative high level until 48 hours after reperfusion, and then declined gradually. CRH mRNA expression levels in the temporal cortex, hippocampus and hypothalamus were enhanced markedly at 1 hour ischemia and were maintained until 96 hours after reperfusion. At the same time, adrenocorticotropic hormone level in plasma was relatively increased. In the peak stage of reperfusion injury, there was a significantly positive correlation (n=15, r=0.566, P<0.05) of the glutamate contents in the hypothalamus with the number of cells positive for CRH mRNA expression level in the hypothalamus.Conclusion It is probable that the CRH system in the central nervous system is mainly distributed in the limbic system, and glutamate might be one of the trigger factors to induce excessive stress response in the HPA axis.

  7. Right Limbic FDG-PET Hypometabolism Correlates with Emotion Recognition and Attribution in Probable Behavioral Variant of Frontotemporal Dementia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerami, Chiara; Dodich, Alessandra; Iannaccone, Sandro; Marcone, Alessandra; Lettieri, Giada; Crespi, Chiara; Gianolli, Luigi; Cappa, Stefano F; Perani, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    The behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) is a rare disease mainly affecting the social brain. FDG-PET fronto-temporal hypometabolism is a supportive feature for the diagnosis. It may also provide specific functional metabolic signatures for altered socio-emotional processing. In this study, we evaluated the emotion recognition and attribution deficits and FDG-PET cerebral metabolic patterns at the group and individual levels in a sample of sporadic bvFTD patients, exploring the cognitive-functional correlations. Seventeen probable mild bvFTD patients (10 male and 7 female; age 67.8±9.9) were administered standardized and validated version of social cognition tasks assessing the recognition of basic emotions and the attribution of emotions and intentions (i.e., Ekman 60-Faces test-Ek60F and Story-based Empathy task-SET). FDG-PET was analysed using an optimized voxel-based SPM method at the single-subject and group levels. Severe deficits of emotion recognition and processing characterized the bvFTD condition. At the group level, metabolic dysfunction in the right amygdala, temporal pole, and middle cingulate cortex was highly correlated to the emotional recognition and attribution performances. At the single-subject level, however, heterogeneous impairments of social cognition tasks emerged, and different metabolic patterns, involving limbic structures and prefrontal cortices, were also observed. The derangement of a right limbic network is associated with altered socio-emotional processing in bvFTD patients, but different hypometabolic FDG-PET patterns and heterogeneous performances on social tasks at an individual level exist.

  8. Right Limbic FDG-PET Hypometabolism Correlates with Emotion Recognition and Attribution in Probable Behavioral Variant of Frontotemporal Dementia Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Cerami

    Full Text Available The behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD is a rare disease mainly affecting the social brain. FDG-PET fronto-temporal hypometabolism is a supportive feature for the diagnosis. It may also provide specific functional metabolic signatures for altered socio-emotional processing. In this study, we evaluated the emotion recognition and attribution deficits and FDG-PET cerebral metabolic patterns at the group and individual levels in a sample of sporadic bvFTD patients, exploring the cognitive-functional correlations. Seventeen probable mild bvFTD patients (10 male and 7 female; age 67.8±9.9 were administered standardized and validated version of social cognition tasks assessing the recognition of basic emotions and the attribution of emotions and intentions (i.e., Ekman 60-Faces test-Ek60F and Story-based Empathy task-SET. FDG-PET was analysed using an optimized voxel-based SPM method at the single-subject and group levels. Severe deficits of emotion recognition and processing characterized the bvFTD condition. At the group level, metabolic dysfunction in the right amygdala, temporal pole, and middle cingulate cortex was highly correlated to the emotional recognition and attribution performances. At the single-subject level, however, heterogeneous impairments of social cognition tasks emerged, and different metabolic patterns, involving limbic structures and prefrontal cortices, were also observed. The derangement of a right limbic network is associated with altered socio-emotional processing in bvFTD patients, but different hypometabolic FDG-PET patterns and heterogeneous performances on social tasks at an individual level exist.

  9. Electroacupuncture Improved Hippocampal Neurogenesis following Traumatic Brain Injury in Mice through Inhibition of TLR4 Signaling Pathway

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    Yuqin Ye

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The protective role of electroacupuncture (EA treatment in diverse neurological diseases such as ischemic stroke is well acknowledged. However, whether and how EA act on hippocampal neurogenesis following traumatic brain injury (TBI remains poorly understood. This study aims to investigate the effect of EA on hippocampal neurogenesis and neurological functions, as well as its underlying association with toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 signaling in TBI mice. BrdU/NeuN immunofluorescence was performed to label newborn neurons in the hippocampus after EA treatment. Water maze test and neurological severity score were used to evaluate neurological function posttrauma. The hippocampal level of TLR4 and downstream molecules and inflammatory cytokines were, respectively, detected by Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. EA enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis and inhibited TLR4 expression at 21, 28, and 35 days after TBI, but the beneficial effects of EA on posttraumatic neurogenesis and neurological functions were attenuated by lipopolysaccharide-induced TLR4 activation. In addition, EA exerted an inhibitory effect on both TLR4/Myd88/NF-κB and TLR4/TRIF/NF-κB pathways, as well as the inflammatory cytokine expression in the hippocampus following TBI. In conclusion, EA promoted hippocampal neurogenesis and neurological recovery through inhibition of TLR4 signaling pathway posttrauma, which may be a potential approach to improve the outcome of TBI.

  10. [Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis with positive anti-RI antibodies and mediastinal seminoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launay, M; Bozzolo, E; Venissac, N; Delmont, E; Fredenrich, A; Thomas, P

    2008-01-01

    We report the case of a 49-year-old man who was admitted for progressive behaviorial disorders with frontal elements. There was no sensorial nor motor deficiency. Clinical examination revealed android obesity, cutaneous and mucous paleness, pubic and axillary depilation and gynecomastia. Encephalic MRI found a lesion of the left amygdalian region with high T2 intensity and low T1 intensity associated with gadolinium-enhancement. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis showed a lymphocytic meningitis. Panhypopituitarism was found on the endocrine investigations. Anti-RI antibodies were positive, leading to the diagnosis of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis. The CT-scan showed a node of the lower part of the thymic area. Surgical resection revealed an ectopic mediastinal seminoma. The evolution consisted of paraneoplastic fever and crossed-syndrome with right hemiparesia and left common oculomotor nerve paralysis. Treatment was completed by two cycles of carboplatin, corticosteroids and substitutive opotherapy. Paraneoplastic fever disappeared, but behavioral disorders and palsy remain unchanged. The patient died two years later in a bedridden state. This case of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis associated with positive anti-RI antibodies and mediastinal seminoma is exceptional and has not to our knowledge been described in the literature. Cancers usually associated with anti-RI antibody are breast and lung cancer. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is not the classical clinical presentation, which usually is brainstem encephalitis. Hypothalamic involvement, uncommon in paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis is mainly associated with positive antineuronal anti-Ma2 antibodies. Finally, the gadolinium enhancement on encephalic MRI is unusual in paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis.

  11. Cholinesterase inhibition modulates visual and attentional brain responses in Alzheimer's disease and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Paul; Driver, Jon; Dolan, Ray J

    2008-02-01

    Visuo-attentional deficits occur early in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and are considered more responsive to pro-cholinergic therapy than characteristic memory disturbances. We hypothesised that neural responses in AD during visuo-attentional processing would be impaired relative to controls, yet partially susceptible to improvement with the cholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine. We studied 16 mild AD patients and 17 age-matched healthy controls, using fMRI-scanning to enable within-subject placebo-controlled comparisons of effects of physostigmine on stimulus- and attention- related brain activations, plus between-group comparisons for these. Subjects viewed face or building stimuli while performing a shallow judgement (colour of image) or a deep judgement (young/old age of depicted face or building). Behaviourally, AD subjects performed slower than controls in both tasks, while physostigmine benefited the patients for the more demanding age-judgement task. Stimulus-selective (face minus building, and vice versa) BOLD signals in precuneus and posterior parahippocampal cortex were attenuated in patients relative to controls, but increased following physostigmine. By contrast, face-selective responses in fusiform cortex were not impaired in AD and showed decreases following physostigmine for both groups. Task-dependent responses in right parietal and prefrontal cortices were diminished in AD but improved following physostigmine. A similar pattern of group and treatment effects was observed in two extrastriate cortical regions that showed physostigmine-induced enhancement of stimulus-selectivity for the deep versus shallow task. Finally, for the healthy group, physostigmine decreased stimulus and task-dependent effects, partly due to an exaggeration of selectivity during the shallow relative to deep task. The differences in brain activations between groups and treatments were not attributable merely to performance (reaction time) differences. Our results demonstrate

  12. DEPRESSION OF THE PHOTIC AFTER DISCHARGE OF FLASH EVOKED POTENTIALS BY PHYSOSTIGMINE, CARBARYL AND PROPOXUR AND THE RELATIONSHIP TO INHIBITION OF BRAIN CHOLINESTERASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of N-methyl carbamate pesticides on the photic after discharge (PhAD) of flash evoked potentials (FEPs) and the relationship between inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity and the PhAD were evaluated. FEPs were recorded in Long Evans rats treated with physo...

  13. DEPRESSION OF THE PHOTIC AFTER DISCHARGE OF FLASH EVOKED POTENTIALS BY PHYSOSTIGMINE, CARBARYL AND PROPOXUR AND THE RELATIONSHIP TO INHIBITION OF BRAIN CHOLINESTERASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of N-methyl carbamate pesticides on the photic after discharge (PhAD) of flash evoked potentials (FEPs) and the relationship between inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity and the PhAD were evaluated. FEPs were recorded in Long Evans rats treated with physo...

  14. Stable inhibition of brain synaptic plasma membrane calcium ATPase in rats anesthetized with halothane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franks, J J; Horn, J L; Janicki, P K; Singh, G

    1995-01-01

    The authors recently showed that plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) activity in cerebral synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) is diminished in a dose-related fashion during exposure in vitro to halothane, isoflurane, xenon, and nitrous oxide at clinically relevant partial pressures. They have now extended their work to in vivo studies, examining PMCA pumping in SPM obtained from control rats decapitated without anesthetic exposure, from rats decapitated during halothane anesthesia, and from rats decapitated after recovery from halothane anesthesia. Three treatment groups were studied: 1) C, control rats that were decapitated without anesthetic exposure, 2) A, anesthetized rats exposed to 1 minimum effective dose (MED) for 20 min and then decapitated, and 3) R, rats exposed to 1 MED for 20 min and then decapitated after recovery from anesthesia, defined as beginning to groom. Plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase pumping and Ca(2+)-dependent ATPase hydrolytic activity, as well as sodium-calcium exchanger activity and Na+-K+-ATPase hydrolytic activity, were assessed in cerebral SPM. In addition, halothane effect on smooth endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) was examined. Plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase transport of Ca2+ into SPM vesicles from anesthetized rats was reduced to 71% of control (P SPM from rats killed while anesthetized with halothane, compared with rats killed without anesthesia or after recovery from anesthesia. The studies described in this report, in conjunction with previously reported inhibition of PMCA activity in vitro by a wide range of anesthetic agents, indicate a relationship between inhibition of PMCA and action of inhalational anesthetics.

  15. Limbic encephalitis: Potential impact of adaptive autoimmune inflammation on neuronal circuits of the amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico eMelzer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Limbic encephalitis is characterized by adaptive autoimmune inflammation of the gray matter structures of the limbic system. It has recently been identified as major cause of temporal lobe epilepsy accompanied by progressive declarative – mainly episodic – memory disturbance as well as a variety of rather poorly defined emotional and behavioral changes. While autoimmune inflammation of the hippocampus is likely to be responsible for declarative memory disturbance, consequences of autoimmune inflammation of the amygdala are largely unknown. The amygdala is central for the generation of adequate homoeostatic behavioral responses to emotionally significant external stimuli following processing in a variety of parallel neuronal circuits. Here, we hypothesize, that adaptive cellular and humoral autoimmunity may target and modulate distinct inhibitory or excitatory neuronal networks within the amygdala and thereby strongly impact processing of emotional stimuli and corresponding behavioral responses. This may explain some of the rather poorly understood neuropsychiatric symptoms in limbic encephalitis.

  16. The clinical diagnosis and treatment about 22 cases of limbic encephalitis were retrospectively analyzed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Weiping; Zhang, Zhijun; Feng, Laihui; Zhang, Ailing

    2016-03-01

    To summarize and analyze the clinical characteristics and treatment of limbic encephalitis, in order to provide the basis for clinical work. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical characteristics, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and self immune antibody results of 22 patients with limbic encephalitis in Zheng zhou people's Hospital from March 2013 to May 2014. 22 cases of patients with psychiatric disturbance, such as hallucinations being typical clinical manifestations: Memory decline in 18 cases: Seizures in 13 patients: Altered level of consciousness in 10 cases; Movement disorders in 7 cases and 9 cases with febrile.14 cases have relieved after treating with antiviral and immunosuppressive therapy, 5 cases left memory decline, 2 patients left overwhelmingly excited, 1 cases of seizures. The clinical symptoms of patients with limbic encephalitis are complicated changeable and unspecific. so earlier diagnosis and treatment are very important for the prognosis of patients.

  17. Cysteinyl-leukotriene production during limbic seizures triggered by kainic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmet, T; Tippler, B

    1990-05-07

    In rats kainic acid-induced seizures were accompanied by time-dependent cerebral cysteinyl-leukotriene (LT) and prostaglandin (PG) F2 alpha formation. Cysteinyl-LT were identified in the rat brain tissue extracts by their immunoreactive properties and their retention times upon reversed phase HPLC profiling. In perfused blood-free brain tissue contents of LTC4-like material were significantly elevated in cortex, hippocampus, midbrain and hypothalamus at 3 h after kainic acid injection. PGF2 alpha tissue contents were significantly elevated in all brain areas studied with very large amounts in the hippocampus and smaller amounts in the cortex. The cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin significantly inhibited formation of PGF2 alpha in whole brain tissue while leaving unaffected the production of cysteinyl-LT. A dose of indomethacin which nearly completely inhibited cyclooxygenase activity as monitored by cerebral PGF2 alpha contents also tended to aggravate behavioral changes and significantly increased the mortality. Phenidone, a lipoxygenase inhibitor, significantly and dose-dependently inhibited formation of cysteinyl-LT but did not significantly affect PGF2 alpha formation. Seizure activity tended to be attenuated by a higher dose of this compound. Dexamethasone which supposedly inhibits phospholipase A2 activity by induction of lipocortins, did not significantly reduce either cysteinyl-LT or PGF2 alpha biosynthesis. Flunarizine, trifluoperazine and diazepines protected a certain percentage of animals from kainic acid-induced seizures. In rats in which seizures occurred in spite of pretreatment with these compounds, the eicosanoid formation was not inhibited but in the case of flunarizine was even found to be somewhat enhanced.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Deferoxamine inhibits iron induced hippocampal tau phosphorylation in the Alzheimer transgenic mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chuang; Wang, Pu; Zhong, Man-Li; Wang, Tao; Huang, Xue-Shi; Li, Jia-Yi; Wang, Zhan-You

    2013-01-01

    Prior work has shown that iron interacts with hyperphosphorylated tau, which contributes to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in Alzheimer's disease (AD), whereas iron chelator desferrioxamine (DFO) slows down the clinical progression of the cognitive decline associated with this disease. However, the effects of DFO on tau phosphorylation in the presence or absence of iron have yet to be determined. Using amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PS1) double transgenic mouse brain as a model system, we investigated the effects and potential mechanisms of intranasal administration of DFO on iron induced abnormal tau phosphorylation. High-dose iron treatment markedly increased the levels of tau phosphorylation at the sites of Thr205, Thr231 and Ser396, whereas highly induced tau phosphorylation was abolished by intranasal administration of DFO in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Moreover, DFO intranasal administration also decreases Fe-induced the activities of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5) and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), which in turn suppressing tau phosphorylation. Cumulatively, our data show that intranasal DFO treatment exerts its suppressive effects on iron induced tau phosphorylation via CDK5 and GSK3β pathways. More importantly, elucidation of DFO mechanism in suppressing tau phosphorylation may provide insights for developing therapeutic strategies to combat AD.

  19. Recurrent seizures and brain pathology after inhibition of glutamine synthetase in the hippocampus in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Tore; Ghosh, Arko; Wang, Yue; Beckström, Henning; Zaveri, Hitten P; Lee, Tih-Shih W; Lai, James C K; Malthankar-Phatak, Gauri H; de Lanerolle, Nihal C

    2008-08-01

    An excess of extracellular glutamate in the hippocampus has been linked to the generation of recurrent seizures and brain pathology in patients with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). However, the mechanism which results in glutamate excess in MTLE remains unknown. We recently reported that the glutamate-metabolizing enzyme glutamine synthetase is deficient in the hippocampus in patients with MTLE, and we postulated that this deficiency is critically involved in the pathophysiology of the disease. To further explore the role of glutamine synthetase in MTLE we created a novel animal model of hippocampal glutamine synthetase deficiency by continuous (approximately 28 days) microinfusion of methionine sulfoximine (MSO: 0.625 to 2.5 microg/h) unilaterally into the hippocampus in rats. This treatment led to a deficiency in hippocampal glutamine synthetase activity by 82-97% versus saline. The majority (>95%) of the MSO-treated animals exhibited recurrent seizures that continued for several weeks. Some of the MSO-treated animals exhibited neuropathological features that were similar to mesial temporal sclerosis, such as hippocampal atrophy and patterned loss of hippocampal neurons. However, many MSO-treated animals displayed only minimal injury to the hippocampus, with no clear evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis. These findings support the hypothesis that a deficiency in hippocampal glutamine synthetase causes recurrent seizures, even in the absence of classical mesial temporal sclerosis, and that restoration of glutamine synthetase may represent a novel approach to therapeutic intervention in this disease.

  20. Inhibition of inflammatory mediator release from microglia can treat ischemic/hypoxic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huaibo Wang; Weitao Guo; Hongliang Liu; Rong Zeng; Mingnan Lu; Ziqiu Chen; Qixian Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β aggravate neuronal injury by mediating the inflammatory reaction following ischemic/hypoxic brain injury. It remains unclear whether interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β are released by microglia or astrocytes. This study prepared hippocampal slices that were subsequently subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation. Hematoxylin-eosin staining verified that neurons exhibited hypoxic changes. Results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay found that interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β participated in this hypoxic process. Moreover, when hypoxic injury occurred in the hippocampus, the release of interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β was mediated by the P2X4 receptor and P2X7 receptor. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that during ischemia/hypoxia, the P2X4 receptor, P2X7 receptor, interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β expression was detectable in rat hippocampal microglia, but only P2X4 receptor and P2X7 receptor expression was detected in astrocytes. Results suggested that the P2X4 receptor and P2X7 receptor, respectively, mediated interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β released by microglia, resulting in hippocampal ischemic/hypoxic injury. Astrocytes were activated, but did not synthesize or release interleukin-1α and interleukin-1β.

  1. Limbic system perfusion in Alzheimer's disease measured by MRI-coregistered HMPAO SPET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callen, David J.A. [Institute of Medical Science, Research Program in Aging, Imaging, Sunnybrook and Women' s University of Toronto, ON (Canada); Black, Sandra E. [Cognitive Neurology Unit and Research Program in Aging, Sunnybrook and Women' s College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Institute of Medical Science, Research Program in Aging, Imaging, Sunnybrook and Women' s University of Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Medicine (Neurology), University of Toronto, ON (Canada); Caldwell, Curtis B. [Department of Medical Imaging, Sunnybrook and Women' s College Health Sciences Centre and University of Toronto, CN (Canada)

    2002-07-01

    The goal of this study was to perform a systematic, semi-quantitative analysis of limbic perfusion in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) using coregistered single-photon emission tomography (SPET) images aligned to magnetic resonance (MR) images. Limbic perfusion in 40 patients with mild to moderate AD was compared with that of 17 age-, sex-, and education-matched normal controls (NC). HMPAO SPET scans and 3D T1-weighted MR images were acquired for each subject. Structures of the limbic system (i.e. hippocampus, amygdala, anterior thalamus, hypothalamus, mamillary bodies, basal forebrain, septal area and cingulate, orbitofrontal and parahippocampal cortices) were traced on the MR images and transferred to the coregistered SPET scans. Perfusion ratios for all limbic regions were calculated relative to cerebellar perfusion. General linear model multivariate analysis revealed that, overall, limbic structures showed significant hypoperfusion (F=7.802, P<0.00001, {eta}{sup 2}=0.695) in AD patients compared with NC. Greatest differences (d{>=}0.8) were found in the hippocampus, as well as all areas of the cingulate cortex. Significant relative hypoperfusion was also apparent in the parahippocampal cortex, amygdala/entorhinal cortex, septal area and anterior thalamus, all of which showed medium to large effect sizes (d=0.6-0.8). No significant relative perfusion differences were detected in the basal forebrain, hypothalamus, mamillary bodies or orbitofrontal cortex. Logistic regression indicated that posterior cingulate cortex perfusion was able to discriminate AD patients from NC with 93% accuracy (95% sensitivity, 88% specificity). The current results suggest that most, but not all, limbic structures show significant relative hypoperfusion in AD. These findings validate previous post-mortem studies and could be useful in improving diagnostic accuracy, monitoring disease progression and evaluating potential treatment strategies in AD. (orig.)

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor-dependent cdk1 inhibition prevents G2/M progression in differentiating tetraploid neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovejero-Benito, María C; Frade, José M

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegeneration is often associated with DNA synthesis in neurons, the latter usually remaining for a long time as tetraploid cells before dying by apoptosis. The molecular mechanism preventing G2/M transition in these neurons remains unknown, but it may be reminiscent of the mechanism that maintains tetraploid retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in a G2-like state during normal development, thus preventing their death. Here we show that this latter process, known to depend on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), requires the inhibition of cdk1 by TrkB. We demonstrate that a subpopulation of chick RGCs previously shown to become tetraploid co-expresses TrkB and cdk1 in vivo. By using an in vitro system that recapitulates differentiation and cell cycle re-entry of chick retinal neurons we show that BDNF, employed at concentrations specific for the TrkB receptor, reduces the expression of cdk1 in TrkB-positive, differentiating neurons. In this system, BDNF also inhibits the activity of both endogenous cdk1 and exogenously-expressed cdk1/cyclin B1 complex. This inhibition correlates with the phosphorylation of cdk1 at Tyr15, an effect that can be prevented with K252a, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor commonly used to prevent the activity of neurotrophins through their Trk receptors. The effect of BDNF on cdk1 activity is Tyr15-specific since BDNF cannot prevent the activity of a constitutively active form of cdk1 (Tyr15Phe) when expressed in differentiating retinal neurons. We also show that BDNF-dependent phosphorylation of cdk1 at Tyr15 could not be blocked with MK-1775, a Wee1-selective inhibitor, indicating that Tyr15 phosphorylation in cdk1 does not seem to occur through the canonical mechanism observed in proliferating cells. We conclude that the inhibition of both expression and activity of cdk1 through a BDNF-dependent mechanism contributes to the maintenance of tetraploid RGCs in a G2-like state.

  3. Stereotactic multi-target limbic leucotomy for treating intractable psychiatric disease in 30 patients Three-year follow-up of memory, intelligence, and psychiatric symptoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Song; Zheng Wang; Qiang Liang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The biochemical hypothesis of dopamine hyperfunction in the brain can explain the pathological mechanisms of schizophrenia. Surgery is performed based on limbic system circuit theory correspondence to above-mentioned hypothesis. Stereotactic surgery for the treatment of mental disorders is related to stereotactic surgery that influences the Papez circuit.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of stereotactic multi-target limbic leucotomy on the improvements in memory, intelligence and psychiatric symptoms in the treatment of intractable psychiatric disease. DESIGN: Self-control case analysis and follow-up of therapeutic effects. SETTING: Department of Neurosurgery, First Hospital, Hebei Medical University. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty patients with intractable psychiatric disease, who received stereotactic surgery in the Department of Neurosurgery, First Hospital, Hebei Medical University between July 2002 and August 2005, were included in this study. The patients, 21 males and 9 females, all met the diagnostic criteria of intractable psychiatric disease, determined by the national psychosurgery cooperation team in 1998. Informed consents for surgery and clinical follow-up exams were obtained from patients and/or patients' relatives (guardians). METHODS: In 30 patients with intractable psychiatric disease, limbic leucotomy was performed by stereotactic technique. Multi-target radiofrequency hyperthermia was performed in the intracranial amygdaloid nucleus, anterior limb of internal capsule, callosal gyrus, among other regions. The therapeutic effects of patients were evaluated by Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) before surgery, and 6 months, 1, and 3 years after surgery. The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) and Clinical Memory Scale (CMS) were used to assess memory and intelligence before and after surgery. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Memory, intelligence, and psychiatric symptoms of patients before and after operation. RESULTS: Thirty patients were included

  4. Opsoclonus-myoclonus and anti-Hu positive limbic encephalitis in a patient with neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales La Madrid, Andres; Rubin, Charles M; Kohrman, Michael; Pytel, Peter; Cohn, Susan L

    2012-03-01

    Opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome (OMS) is seen in 2-3% of children with neuroblastoma and is believed to be caused by an autoimmune process elicited by the tumor. Although long-term neurologic sequelae are common in children with OMS, limbic encephalitis has not previously been reported. We report a child who developed limbic encephalitis associated with anti-Hu antibodies, 6 years after her initial diagnosis of neuroblastoma and OMS. This case demonstrates that patients with neuroblastoma and OMS are at risk for developing new paraneoplastic symptoms years after their original diagnosis and emphasizes the need for careful long-term follow-up.

  5. In vivo imaging reveals that pregabalin inhibits cortical spreading depression and propagation to subcortical brain structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Stuart M.; Bohnet, Barry; LeDue, Jeffrey; Yung, Andrew C.; Garcia, Esperanza; Tyson, John R.; Alles, Sascha R. A.; Han, Huili; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Kozlowski, Piotr; MacVicar, Brian A.; Snutch, Terrance P.

    2017-01-01

    Migraine is characterized by severe headaches that can be preceded by an aura likely caused by cortical spreading depression (SD). The antiepileptic pregabalin (Lyrica) shows clinical promise for migraine therapy, although its efficacy and mechanism of action are unclear. As detected by diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) in wild-type (WT) mice, the acute systemic administration of pregabalin increased the threshold for SD initiation in vivo. In familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 mutant mice expressing human mutations (R192Q and S218L) in the CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) calcium channel subunit, pregabalin slowed the speed of SD propagation in vivo. Acute systemic administration of pregabalin in vivo also selectively prevented the migration of SD into subcortical striatal and hippocampal regions in the R192Q strain that exhibits a milder phenotype and gain of CaV2.1 channel function. At the cellular level, pregabalin inhibited glutamatergic synaptic transmission differentially in WT, R192Q, and S218L mice. The study describes a DW-MRI analysis method for tracking the progression of SD and provides support and a mechanism of action for pregabalin as a possible effective therapy in the treatment of migraine. PMID:28223480

  6. 颐脑解郁方对脑卒中大鼠模型边缘系统脑源性神经营养因子的影响%Effect of Yinao Jieyu Recipe on Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor of the Limbic System in Post-Stroke Model Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冬梅; 唐启盛; 赵瑞珍; 李小黎; 王戈; 杨歆科

    2015-01-01

    目的 观察脑卒中大鼠边缘系统脑源性神经营养因子(brain derived neurotrophic factor,BDNF)的演变趋势及颐脑解郁方对其干预作用.方法 选择雄性Wistar大鼠,经Open-Field行为学评分后,按随机数字表分为正常组、假手术组、多发脑梗塞(multiple cerebral infarction,MCl)组、卒中后抑郁(post-stroke depression,PSD)组、中药组、西药组,其中正常组6只,假手术组7只,余每组各10只.正常组常规饲养.假手术组经颈外动脉推注0.3 mL生理盐水,并灌胃蒸馏水.其余各组均采用同种系微栓子体外注入法,由颈外动脉推注等剂量同种异体血栓栓子;PSD组术后7日予21日慢性不可预知的温和应激(chronic unpredictable mild stress,CUMS)加孤养复制PSD模型;中药组及西药组在MCI模型制备后,分别予颐脑解郁方、尼莫地平干预4周.于干预第1、2、4周进行动态观察边缘系统(海马、下丘脑、杏仁核)BDNF变化及中药干预效果.结果 BDNF免疫组化染色结果显示,与正常组同期比较,MCI组2、4周海马、下丘脑及杏仁核BDNF表达降低(P<0.01,P<0.05),PSD组1~4周各部位BDNF表达降低(P<0.01).与MCI组同期比较,PSD组1~4周各部位BDNF表达降低(P<0.01).与PSD组同期比较,中药组1~4周各部位BDNF表达升高(P<0.01).结论 脑卒中大鼠存在BDNF改变,颐脑解郁方能减慢此过程的进展.

  7. Nitric oxide synthase activity and inhibition after neonatal hypoxia ischemia in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, K; Sheldon, R A; Black, S M; Täuber, M; Ferriero, D M

    2000-10-28

    Despite the emergence of therapies for hypoxic-ischemic injury to the mature nervous system, there have been no proven efficacious therapies for the developing nervous system. Recent studies have shown that pharmacological blockade of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) activity can ameliorate damage after ischemia in the mature rodent. We have previously shown that elimination of nNOS neurons, either by targeted disruption of the gene or by pharmacological depletion with intraparenchymal quisqualate, can decrease injury after hypoxia-ischemia. Using a simpler pharmacological approach, we studied the efficacy of a systemically administered NOS inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole, a relatively selective inhibitor of nNOS activity. Using multiple doses and concentrations administered after the insult, we found that there was only a trend for protection with higher doses of the drug. A significant decrease in NOS activity was seen at 18 h and 5 days in the cortex, and at 2 h and 18 h in the hippocampus after the hypoxia-ischemia. nNOS expression decreased and remained depressed for at least 18 h after the insult. When nNOS expression was normalized to MAP2 expression, a decrease was seen at 18 h in the cortex and at 2 and 18 h in the hippocampus. These data suggest that further inhibition of NOS activity at early timepoints may not provide substantial benefit. At 5 days after the insult, however, NOS activity and normalized nNOS expression returned to baseline or higher in the hippocampus, the region showing the most damage. These data suggest that delayed administration of nNOS inhibitor after hypoxic-ischemic injury might be beneficial.

  8. Methylphenidate and atomoxetine inhibit social play behavior through prefrontal and subcortical limbic mechanisms in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, E J Marijke; van Kerkhof, Linda W M; Damsteegt, Ruth; Trezza, Viviana; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J

    2015-01-01

    Positive social interactions during the juvenile and adolescent phases of life, in the form of social play behavior, are important for social and cognitive development. However, the neural mechanisms of social play behavior remain incompletely understood. We have previously shown that methylphenidat

  9. NCAN Cross-Disorder Risk Variant Is Associated With Limbic Gray Matter Deficits in Healthy Subjects and Major Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannlowski, Udo; Kugel, Harald; Grotegerd, Dominik; Redlich, Ronny; Suchy, Janina; Opel, Nils; Suslow, Thomas; Konrad, Carsten; Ohrmann, Patricia; Bauer, Jochen; Kircher, Tilo; Krug, Axel; Jansen, Andreas; Baune, Bernhard T; Heindel, Walter; Domschke, Katharina; Forstner, Andreas J; Nöthen, Markus M; Treutlein, Jens; Arolt, Volker; Hohoff, Christa; Rietschel, Marcella; Witt, Stephanie H

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have reported an association between NCAN rs1064395 genotype and bipolar disorder. This association was later extended to schizophrenia and major depression. However, the neurobiological underpinnings of these associations are poorly understood. NCAN is implicated in neuronal plasticity and expressed in subcortical brain areas, such as the amygdala and hippocampus, which are critically involved in dysfunctional emotion processing and regulation across diagnostic boundaries. We hypothesized that the NCAN risk variant is associated with reduced gray matter volumes in these areas. Gray matter structure was assessed by voxel-based morphometry on structural MRI data in two independent German samples (healthy subjects, n=512; depressed inpatients, n=171). All participants were genotyped for NCAN rs1064395. Hippocampal and amygdala region-of-interest analyses were performed within each sample. In addition, whole-brain data from the combined sample were analyzed. Risk (A)-allele carriers showed reduced amygdala and hippocampal gray matter volumes in both cohorts with a remarkable spatial overlap. In the combined sample, genotype effects observed for the amygdala and hippocampus survived correction for entire brain volume. Further effects were also observed in the left orbitofrontal cortex and the cerebellum/fusiform gyrus. We conclude that NCAN genotype is associated with limbic gray matter alterations in healthy and depressed subjects in brain areas implicated in emotion perception and regulation. The present data suggest that NCAN forms susceptibility to neurostructural deficits in the amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal areas independent of disease, which might lead to disorder onset in the presence of other genetic or environmental risk factors. PMID:25801500

  10. The novel anti-neuroblastoma agent PF403, inhibits proliferation and invasion in vitro and in brain xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Li, Yan; Lv, Haining; Li, Shaowu; Tang, Ke; Zhou, Wanqi; Yu, Shishan; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2015-07-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common cancer in infants and the fourth most common cancer in children. Our previous study showed that PF403 had a potent antitumor ability. In the present study, we evaluated the anti-neuroblastoma property of PF403 and investigated the underlying mechanisms. MTT assay, colony formation assay and flow cytometry assay were used to assess cytotoxicity of PF403 on SH-SY5Y cells. Transwell assay was chosen to estimate the anti-invasion ability of PF403 on neuroblastoma cells. The protein expression was detected by western blot analysis. The SH-SY5Y brain xenograft model was used to assess in vivo antitumor activity of PF403. PF403-mediated SH-SY5Y cell death was found to be dose- and time-dependent, and PF403 was able to limit invasion and metastasis of neuroblastoma cells. MRI and pathology analysis proved that the pro-drug of PF403, CAT3, inhibited SH-SY5Y cells in vivo. PF403 decreased expression of phosphorylated FAK, MMP-2 and MMP-9 proteins, and downregulated the activity of PI3K/AKT and Raf/ERK pathways, followed by regulation of the proteins expression of Bcl-2 family, activated caspase-3, -9 and PARP and initiation of apoptosis of neuroblastoma cells. PF403 exerted cytotoxicity against SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell both in vitro and in vivo, and inhibited its invasion ability, suggesting PF403 has potential as a new anticancer drug for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  11. Red photon treatment inhibits apoptosis via regulation of bcl-2 proteins and ROS levels, alleviating hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, W; Chen, L; Zhang, X J; Chen, J; Li, X C; Hou, W S; Xiao, N

    2014-05-30

    Therapeutic options for hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) are scarce and inefficient. Recently, many studies have demonstrated that red photon plays an important role in anti-inflammatory processes as well as apoptosis, the main trait of HIBD. In this study, we investigated whether red photon can protect from HIBD in SD rats and oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) in PC12 cells. Apoptosis, mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MMP), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) rates were assessed in PC12 cells. We found that 6-h irradiation resulted in decreased MMP, ROS and apoptosis rates, although these changes were reversible with prolonged irradiation. Importantly, these effects were sustained for 2-8h upon quenching of the red photon. Similar trends were observed for protein and mRNA expression of bax and bcl-2, with short-term irradiation (6h) inhibiting apoptosis in PC12 Cells. However, long-term (>6h) irradiation caused cell damage. In vivo experiments, bax mRNA and protein levels were reduced after 7days in HIBD model rats treated with red photon, in contrast to bcl-2. Furthermore, we found that bax and bcl-2 were mainly expressed in pyramidal cells of the hippocampus CA1 and CA3. Importantly, Morris Water Maze test results revealed an improvement in learning ability and spatial memory in rats after irradiation. Overall, our data showed that short-term irradiation with red photon in the acute phase inhibits the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway via regulation of bcl-2-related proteins and reduction of ROS levels, thereby decreasing apoptosis in nerve cells and improving the neurological prognosis of HIBD.

  12. A comparison of tabun-inhibited rat brain acetylcholinesterase reactivation by three oximes (HI-6, obidoxime, and K048) in vivo detected by biochemical and histochemical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajgar, Jiri; Hajek, Petr; Zdarova, Jana Karasova; Kassa, Jiri; Paseka, Antonin; Slizova, Dasa; Krs, Otakar; Kuca, Kamil; Jun, Daniel; Fusek, Josef; Capek, Lukas

    2010-12-01

    Tabun belongs to the most toxic nerve agents. Its mechanism of action is based on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition at the peripheral and central nervous systems. Therapeutic countermeasures comprise administration of atropine with cholinesterase reactivators able to reactivate the inhibited enzyme. Reactivation of AChE is determined mostly biochemically without specification of different brain structures. Histochemical determination allows a fine search for different structures but is performed mostly without quantitative evaluation. In rats intoxicated with tabun and treated with a combination of atropine and HI-6, obidoxime, or new oxime K048, AChE activities in different brain structures were determined using biochemical and quantitative histochemical methods. Inhibition of AChE following untreated tabun intoxication was different in the various brain structures, having the highest degree in the frontal cortex and reticular formation and lowest in the basal ganglia and substantia nigra. Treatment resulted in an increase of AChE activity detected by both methods. The highest increase was observed in the frontal cortex. This reactivation was increased in the order HI-6 tabun, reactivation in various parts of the brain is not of the same physiological importance. AChE activity in the pontomedullar area and frontal cortex seems to be the most important for the therapeutic effect of the reactivators. HI-6 was not a good reactivator for the treatment of tabun intoxication.

  13. St. John's Wort increases brain serotonin synthesis by inhibiting hepatic tryptophan 2, 3 dioxygenase activity and its gene expression in stressed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bano, Samina; Ara, Iffat; Saboohi, Kausar; Moattar, Tariq; Chaoudhry, Bushra

    2014-09-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of herbal St. John's Wort (SJW) on transcriptional regulation of hepatic tryptophan 2, 3 - dioxygenase (TDO) enzyme activity and brain regional serotonin (5-HT) levels in rats exposed to forced swim test (FST). TDO mRNA expression was quantified using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain (RT-PCR) reaction and brain regional indoleamines were determined by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to fluorescence detector. Behavioral analysis shows significant reduction in immobility time in SJW (500mg/kg/ml) administered rats. It was found that pretreatment of SJW to rats did not prevent stress-induced elevation in plasma corticosterone levels however it increases serotonin synthesis by virtue of inhibiting hepatic TDO enzyme activity and its gene expression, ascertaining the notion that there exists an inverse relationship between hepatic TDO enzyme activity and brain 5-HT. The drug also decreases serotonin turnover in all the brain areas (hypothalamus, hippocampus amygdala) in stressed rats endorsing its monoamine oxidase inhibition property. Inhibition of TDO enzyme activity and its gene expression by the drug provides new insights for the development of therapeutic interventions for stress related mental illnesses.

  14. Protein kinase C inhibition attenuates vascular ETB receptor upregulation and decreases brain damage after cerebral ischemia in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikman Petter

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein kinase C (PKC is known to be involved in the pathophysiology of experimental cerebral ischemia. We have previously shown that after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, there is an upregulation of endothelin receptors in the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery. The present study aimed to examine the effect of the PKC inhibitor Ro-32-0432 on endothelin receptor upregulation, infarct volume and neurology outcome after middle cerebral artery occlusion in rat. Results At 24 hours after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO, the contractile endothelin B receptor mediated response and the endothelin B receptor protein expression were upregulated in the ipsilateral but not the contralateral middle cerebral artery. In Ro-32-0432 treated rats, the upregulated endothelin receptor response was attenuated. Furthermore, Ro-32-0432 treatment decreased the ischemic brain damage significantly and improved neurological scores. Immunohistochemistry showed fainter staining of endothelin B receptor protein in the smooth muscle cells of the ipsilateral middle cerebral artery of Ro-32-0432 treated rats compared to control. Conclusion The results suggest that treatment with Ro-32-0432 in ischemic stroke decreases the ischemic infarction area, neurological symptoms and associated endothelin B receptor upregulation. This provides a new perspective on possible mechanisms of actions of PKC inhibition in cerebral ischemia.

  15. Silent information regulator 1 modulator resveratrol increases brain lactate production and inhibits mitochondrial metabolism, whereas SRT1720 increases oxidative metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlands, Benjamin D; Lau, Chew Ling; Ryall, James G; Thomas, Donald S; Klugmann, Matthias; Beart, Philip M; Rae, Caroline D

    2015-07-01

    Silent information regulators (SIRTs) have been shown to deacetylate a range of metabolic enzymes, including those in glycolysis and the Krebs cycle, and thus alter their activity. SIRTs require NAD(+) for their activity, linking cellular energy status to enzyme activity. To examine the impact of SIRT1 modulation on oxidative metabolism, this study tests the effect of ligands that are either SIRT-activating compounds (resveratrol and SRT1720) or SIRT inhibitors (EX527) on the metabolism of (13)C-enriched substrates by guinea pig brain cortical tissue slices with (13)C and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Resveratrol increased lactate labeling but decreased incorporation of (13)C into Krebs cycle intermediates, consistent with effects on AMPK and inhibition of the F0/F1-ATPase. By testing with resveratrol that was directly applied to astrocytes with a Seahorse analyzer, increased glycolytic shift and increased mitochondrial proton leak resulting from interactions of resveratrol with the mitochondrial electron transport chain were revealed. SRT1720, by contrast, stimulated incorporation of (13)C into Krebs cycle intermediates and reduced incorporation into lactate, although the inhibitor EX527 paradoxically also increased Krebs cycle (13)C incorporation. In summary, the various SIRT1 modulators show distinct acute effects on oxidative metabolism. The strong effects of resveratrol on the mitochondrial respiratory chain and on glycolysis suggest that caution should be used in attempts to increase bioavailability of this compound in the CNS.

  16. Pro-brain-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits GABAergic neurotransmission by activating endocytosis and repression of GABAA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffault, Baptiste; Medina, Igor; Dumon, Camille; Thalman, Carine; Ferrand, Nadine; Friedel, Perrine; Gaiarsa, Jean-Luc; Porcher, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    GABA is the canonical inhibitory neurotransmitter in the CNS. This inhibitory action is largely mediated by GABA type A receptors (GABAARs). Among the many factors controlling GABAergic transmission, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) appears to play a major role in regulating synaptic inhibition. Recent findings have demonstrated that BDNF can be released as a precursor (proBDNF). Although the role of mature BDNF on GABAergic synaptogenesis and maintenance has been well studied, an important question still unanswered is whether secreted proBDNF might affect GABAergic neurotransmission. Here, we have used 14 d in vitro primary culture of hippocampal neurons and ex vivo preparations from rats to study the function of proBDNF in regulation of GABAAR trafficking and activity. We demonstrate that proBDNF impairs GABAergic transmission by the activation of two distinct pathways: (1) a RhoA-Rock-PTEN pathway that decreases the phosphorylation levels of GABAAR, thus affecting receptor function and triggering endocytosis and degradation of internalized receptors, and (2) a JAK-STAT-ICER pathway leading to the repression of GABAARs synthesis. These effects lead to the diminution of GABAergic synapses and are correlated with a decrease in GABAergic synaptic currents. These results revealed new functions for proBDNF-p75 neurotrophin receptor signaling pathway in the control of the efficacy of GABAergic synaptic activity by regulating the trafficking and synthesis of GABAARs at inhibitory synapses.

  17. Inhibition of Peripheral TNF-α and Downregulation of Microglial Activation by Alpha-Lipoic Acid and Etanercept Protect Rat Brain Against Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Hsiu; Huang, Chao-Ching; Chio, Chung-Ching; Tsai, Kuen-Jer; Chang, Ching-Ping; Lin, Nan-Kai; Lin, Mao-Tsun

    2016-09-01

    Ischemic stroke, caused by obstruction of blood flow to the brain, would initiate microglia activation which contributes to neuronal damage. Therefore, inhibition of microglia-mediated neuroinflammation could be a therapeutic strategy for ischemic stroke. This study was aimed to elucidate the anti-inflammatory effects of alpha-lipoic acid and etanercept given either singly or in combination in rats subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion. Both α-lipoic acid and etanercept markedly reduced cerebral infarct, blood-brain barrier disruption, and neurological motor deficits with the former drug being more effective with the dosage used. Furthermore, when used in combination, the reduction was more substantial. Remarkably, a greater diminution in the serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha as well as the brain levels of microglial activation (e.g., microgliosis, amoeboid microglia, and microglial overexpression of tumor necrosis factor-α) was observed with the combined drug treatment as compared to the drugs given separately. We conclude that inhibition of peripheral tumor necrosis factor-alpha as well as downregulation of brain microglial activation by alpha-lipoic acid or etanercept protect rat brain against ischemic stroke. Moreover, when both drugs were used in combination, the stroke recovery was promoted more extensively.

  18. Cognitive and Emotional Modulation of Brain Default Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallesen, Karen Johanne; Brattico, Elvira; Bailey, Christopher J.; Korvenoja, Antti; Gjedde, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Goal-directed behavior lowers activity in brain areas that include the medial frontal cortex, the medial and lateral parietal cortex, and limbic and paralimbic brain regions, commonly referred to as the "default network." These activity decreases are believed to reflect the interruption of processes that are ongoing when the mind is in a restful…

  19. Dissipation and spontaneous symmetry breaking in brain dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Freeman, Walter J

    2008-01-01

    We compare the predictions of the dissipative quantum model of brain with neurophysiological data collected from electroencephalograms resulting from high-density arrays fixed on the surfaces of primary sensory and limbic areas of trained rabbits and cats. Functional brain imaging in relation to behavior reveals the formation of coherent domains of synchronized neuronal oscillatory activity and phase transitions predicted by the dissipative model.

  20. Fronto-limbic effective connectivity as possible predictor of antidepressant response to SSRI administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vai, Benedetta; Bulgarelli, Chiara; Godlewska, Beata R; Cowen, Philip J; Benedetti, Francesco; Harmer, Catherine J

    2016-12-01

    The timely selection of the optimal treatment for depressed patients is critical to improve remission rates. The detection of pre-treatment variables able to predict differential treatment response may provide novel approaches for treatment selection. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) modulate the fronto-limbic functional response and connectivity, an effect preceding the overt clinical antidepressant effects. Here we investigated whether the cortico-limbic connectivity associated with emotional bias measured before SSRI administration predicts the efficacy of antidepressant treatment in MDD patients. fMRI and Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM) were combined to study if effective connectivity might differentiate healthy controls (HC) and patients affected by major depression who later responded (RMDD, n=21), or failed to respond (nRMDD, n=12), to 6 weeks of escitalopram administration. Sixteen DCMs exploring connectivity between anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), Amygdala (Amy), and fusiform gyrus (FG) were constructed. Analyses revealed that nRMDD had reduced endogenous connectivity from Amy to VLPFC and to ACC, with an increased connectivity and modulation of the ACC to Amy connectivity when processing of fearful emotional stimuli compared to HC. RMDD and HC did not significantly differ among themselves. Pre-treatment effective connectivity in fronto-limbic circuitry could be an important factor affecting antidepressant response, and highlight the mechanisms which may be involved in recovery from depression. These results suggest that fronto-limbic connectivity might provide a neural biomarker to predict the clinical outcome to SSRIs administration in major depression.

  1. Anion-selective channelrhodopsin expressed in neuronal cell culture and in vivo in murine brain: Light-induced inhibition of generation of action potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgikh, D A; Malyshev, A Yu; Salozhin, S V; Nekrasova, O V; Petrovskaya, L E; Roshchin, M V; Borodinova, A A; Feldman, T B; Balaban, P M; Kirpichnikov, M P; Ostrovsky, M A

    2015-01-01

    Anionic channelrhodopsin slow ChloC was expressed in the culture of nerve cells and in vivo in mouse brain. We demonstrated ability of slow ChloC to suppress effectively the activity of the neuron in response to the illumination with the visible light. It has been shown for a first time that slow ChloC works equally efficiently in both neuronal culture and in the whole brain being expressed in vivo. Thus, slow ChloC could be considered as an effective optogenetic tool capable in response to light stimulation to inhibit the generation of action potentials in the neuron.

  2. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS - electroencephalography (EEG based brain-state dependent electrotherapy (BSDE: A computational approach based on excitation-inhibition balance hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snigdha Dagar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of severe chronic disability and the second cause of death worldwide with 15 million new cases and 50 million stroke survivors. The post stroke chronic disability may be ameliorated with early neuro rehabilitation where non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS techniques can be used as an adjuvant treatment to hasten the effects. However, the heterogeneity in the lesioned brain will require individualized NIBS intervention where innovative neuroimaging technologies of portable electroencephalography (EEG and functional-near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS can be leveraged for Brain State Dependent Electrotherapy (BSDE. In this hypothesis and theory article, we propose a computational approach based on excitation-inhibition (E-I balance hypothesis to objectively quantify the post stroke individual brain state using online fNIRS-EEG joint imaging. One of the key events that occurs following Stroke is the imbalance in local excitation-inhibition (that is the ratio of Glutamate/GABA which may be targeted with NIBS using a computational pipeline that includes individual forward models to predict current flow patterns through the lesioned brain or brain target region. The current flow will polarize the neurons which can be captured with excitation-inhibition based brain models. Furthermore, E-I balance hypothesis can be used to find the consequences of cellular polarization on neuronal information processing which can then be implicated in changes in function. We first review evidence that shows how this local imbalance between excitation-inhibition leading to functional dysfunction can be restored in targeted sites with NIBS (Motor Cortex, Somatosensory Cortex resulting in large scale plastic reorganization over the cortex, and probably facilitating recovery of functions. Secondly, we show evidence how BSDE based on inhibition–excitation balance hypothesis may target a specific brain site or network as an adjuvant treatment

  3. The anatomy of extended limbic pathways in Asperger syndrome: a preliminary diffusion tensor imaging tractography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Luca; Catani, Marco; Ameis, Stephanie; Dell'Acqua, Flavio; Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Murphy, Clodagh; Robertson, Dene; Deeley, Quinton; Daly, Eileen; Murphy, Declan G M

    2009-08-15

    It has been suggested that people with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) have altered development (and connectivity) of limbic circuits. However, direct evidence of anatomical differences specific to white matter pathways underlying social behaviour and emotions in ASD is lacking. We used Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography to compare, in vivo, the microstructural integrity and age-related differences in the extended limbic pathways between subjects with Asperger syndrome and healthy controls. Twenty-four males with Asperger syndrome (mean age 23+/-12 years, age range: 9-54 years) and 42 age-matched male controls (mean age 25+/-10 years, age range: 9-54 years) were studied. We quantified tract-specific diffusivity measurements as indirect indexes of microstructural integrity (e.g. fractional anisotropy, FA; mean diffusivity, MD) and tract volume (e.g. number of streamlines) of the main limbic tracts. The dissected limbic pathways included the inferior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior frontal occipital fasciculus, uncinate, cingulum and fornix. There were no significant between-group differences in FA and MD. However, compared to healthy controls, individuals with Asperger syndrome had a significantly higher number of streamlines in the right (p=.003) and left (p=.03) cingulum, and in the right (p=.03) and left (p=.04) inferior longitudinal fasciculus. In contrast, people with Asperger syndrome had a significantly lower number of streamlines in the right uncinate (p=.02). Within each group there were significant age-related differences in MD and number of streamlines, but not FA. However, the only significant age-related between-group difference was in mean diffusivity of the left uncinate fasciculus (Z(obs)=2.05) (p=.02). Our preliminary findings suggest that people with Asperger syndrome have significant differences in the anatomy, and maturation, of some (but not all) limbic tracts.

  4. Compulsive Sexual Behavior: Prefrontal and Limbic Volume and Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Casper; Morris, Laurel S.; Kvamme, Timo L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Compulsive sexual behaviors (CSB) are relatively common and associated with significant personal and social dysfunction. The underlying neurobiology is still poorly understood. The present study examines brain volumes and resting state functional connectivity in CSB compared...... with matched healthy volunteers (HV). Methods: Structural MRI (MPRAGE) data were collected in 92 subjects (23 CSB males and 69 age-matched male HV) and analyzed using voxel-based morphometry. Resting state functional MRI data using multi-echo planar sequence and independent components analysis (ME-ICA) were...... collected in 68 subjects (23 CSB subjects and 45 age-matched HV). Results: CSB subjects showed greater left amygdala gray matter volumes (small volume corrected, Bonferroni adjusted P functional connectivity between the left amygdala seed and bilateral dorsolateral...

  5. Variations in daily expression of the circadian clock protein, PER2, in the rat limbic forebrain during stable entrainment to a long light cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbour, Valerie L; Robinson, Barry; Amir, Shimon

    2011-10-01

    The circadian clock in the mammalian suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) can be entrained by light cycles longer than the normal 24-h light/dark (LD) cycle, but little is known about the effect of such cycles on circadian clocks outside the SCN. Here we examined the effect of exposure to a 26-h T cycle (T26, 1 h:25 h LD) on patterns of expression of the clock protein, PERIOD2 (PER2), in the SCN and in four regions of the limbic forebrain known to exhibit robust circadian oscillations in PER2: the oval nucleus of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNSTov), central nucleus of the amygdala (CEA), basolateral amygdala (BLA), and dentate gyrus (DG). All rats showed stable entrainment of running wheel activity rhythms to the T26 cycle. As previously shown, PER2 expression in the SCN was stably entrained, peaking around the onset of locomotor activity. In contrast, exposure to the T26 cycle uncoupled the rhythms of PER2 expression in the BNSTov and CEA from that of the SCN, whereas PER2 rhythms in the BLA and DG were unaffected. These results show that exposure to long light cycles can uncouple circadian oscillators in select nuclei of the limbic forebrain from the SCN clock and suggest that such cycles may be used to study the functional consequences of coupling and uncoupling of brain circadian oscillators.

  6. Musical Creativity "Revealed" in Brain Structure: Interplay between Motor, Default Mode, and Limbic Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashwiner, David M; Wertz, Christopher J; Flores, Ranee A; Jung, Rex E

    2016-02-18

    Creative behaviors are among the most complex that humans engage in, involving not only highly intricate, domain-specific knowledge and skill, but also domain-general processing styles and the affective drive to create. This study presents structural imaging data indicating that musically creative people (as indicated by self-report) have greater cortical surface area or volume in a) regions associated with domain-specific higher-cognitive motor activity and sound processing (dorsal premotor cortex, supplementary and pre-supplementary motor areas, and planum temporale), b) domain-general creative-ideation regions associated with the default mode network (dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, middle temporal gyrus, and temporal pole), and c) emotion-related regions (orbitofrontal cortex, temporal pole, and amygdala). These findings suggest that domain-specific musical expertise, default-mode cognitive processing style, and intensity of emotional experience might all coordinate to motivate and facilitate the drive to create music.

  7. Inhibition of the membrane attack complex of the complement system reduces secondary neuroaxonal loss and promotes neurologic recovery after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluiter, Kees; Opperhuizen, Anne Loes; Morgan, B Paul; Baas, Frank; Ramaglia, Valeria

    2014-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of disability and death in young adults. The secondary neuroinflammation and neuronal damage that follows the primary mechanical injury is an important cause of disability in affected people. The membrane attack complex (MAC) of the complement system is detected in the traumatized brain early after TBI; however, its role in the pathology and neurologic outcome of TBI has not yet been investigated. We generated a C6 antisense oligonucleotide that blocks MAC formation by inhibiting C6, and we compared its therapeutic effect to that of Ornithodoros moubata complement inhibitor (OmCI), a known inhibitor of C5 activation that blocks generation of the anaphylatoxin C5a and C5b, an essential component of MAC. Severe closed head injury in mice induced abundant MAC deposition in the brain. Treatment with C6 antisense reduced C6 synthesis (85%) and serum levels (90%), and inhibited MAC deposition in the injured brain (91-96%). Treatment also reduced accumulation of microglia/macrophages (50-88%), neuronal apoptosis, axonal loss and weight loss (54-93%), and enhanced neurologic performance (84-92%) compared with placebo-treated controls after injury. These data provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that inhibition of MAC formation in otherwise complement-sufficient animals reduces neuropathology and promotes neurologic recovery after TBI. Given the importance of maintaining a functional complement opsonization system to fight infections, a critical complication in TBI patients, inhibition of the MAC should be considered to reduce posttraumatic neurologic damage. This work identifies a novel therapeutic target for TBI and will guide the development of new therapy for patients.

  8. Rho kinase inhibition following traumatic brain injury in mice promotes functional improvement and acute neuron survival but has little effect on neurogenesis, glial responses or neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, Nicole; Christie, Kimberly J; Turbic, Alisa; Basrai, Harleen S; Turnley, Ann M

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of the Rho/Rho kinase pathway has been shown to be beneficial in a variety of neural injuries and diseases. In this manuscript we investigate the role of Rho kinase inhibition in recovery from traumatic brain injury using a controlled cortical impact model in mice. Mice subjected to a moderately severe TBI were treated for 1 or 4 weeks with the Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632, and functional outcomes and neuronal and glial cell responses were analysed at 1, 7 and 35 days post-injury. We hypothesised that Y27632-treated mice would show functional improvement, with augmented recruitment of neuroblasts from the SVZ and enhanced survival of newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex, with protection against neuronal degeneration, neuroinflammation and modulation of astrocyte reactivity and blood-brain-barrier permeability. While Rho kinase inhibition enhanced recovery of motor function after trauma, there were no substantial increases in the recruitment of DCX(+) neuroblasts or the number of BrdU(+) or EdU(+) labelled newborn neurons in the pericontusional cortex of Y27632-treated mice. Inhibition of Rho kinase significantly reduced the number of degenerating cortical neurons at 1day post-injury compared to saline controls but had no longer term effect on neuronal degeneration, with only modest effects on astrocytic reactivity and macrophage/microglial responses. Overall, this study showed that Rho kinase contributes to acute neurodegenerative processes in the injured cortex but does not play a significant role in SVZ neural precursor cell-derived adult neurogenesis, glial responses or blood-brain barrier permeability following a moderately severe brain injury.

  9. Localization of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor to Distinct Terminals of Mossy Fiber Axons Implies Regulation of Both Excitation and Feedforward Inhibition of CA3 Pyramidal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Danzer, Steve C.; McNamara, James O.

    2004-01-01

    Hippocampal dentate granule cells directly excite and indirectly inhibit CA3 pyramidal cells via distinct presynaptic terminal specializations of their mossy fiber axons. This mossy fiber pathway contains the highest concentration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the CNS, yet whether BDNF is positioned to regulate the excitatory and/or inhibitory pathways is unknown. To localize BDNF, confocal microscopy of green fluorescent protein transgenic mice was combined with BDNF immunoh...

  10. Neuroprotective effect of kaempferol glycosides against brain injury and neuroinflammation by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB and STAT3 in transient focal stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ischemic brain injury is associated with neuroinflammatory response, which essentially involves glial activation and neutrophil infiltration. Transcription factors nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 contribute to ischemic neuroinflammatory processes and secondary brain injury by releasing proinflammatory mediators. Kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside (KRS and kaempferol-3-O- glucoside (KGS are primary flavonoids found in Carthamus tinctorius L. Recent studies demonstrated that KRS protected against ischemic brain injury. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Flavonoids have been reported to have antiinflammatory properties. Herein, we explored the effects of KRS and KGS in a transient focal stroke model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion for 2 hours followed by 22 h reperfusion. An equimolar dose of KRS or KGS was administered i.v. at the beginning of reperfusion. The results showed that KRS or KGS significantly attenuated the neurological deficits, brain infarct volume, and neuron and axon injury, reflected by the upregulation of neuronal nuclear antigen-positive neurons and downregulation of amyloid precursor protein immunoreactivity in the ipsilateral ischemic hemisphere. Moreover, KRS and KGS inhibited the expression of OX-42, glial fibrillary acidic protein, phosphorylated STAT3 and NF-κB p65, and the nuclear content of NF-κB p65. Subsequently, these flavonoids inhibited the expression of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, matrix metallopeptidase 9, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and myeloperoxidase. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that postischemic treatment with KRS or KGS prevents ischemic brain injury and neuroinflammation by inhibition of STAT3 and NF-κB activation and has the therapeutic potential for the neuroinflammation-related diseases, such

  11. Reduced brainstem inhibition during anticipated pelvic visceral pain correlates with enhanced brain response to the visceral stimulus in women with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Steven M; Naliboff, Bruce D; Suyenobu, Brandall; Labus, Jennifer S; Stains, Jean; Ohning, Gordon; Kilpatrick, Lisa; Bueller, Joshua A; Ruby, Kim; Jarcho, Johanna; Mayer, Emeran A

    2008-01-09

    Cognitive factors such as fear of pain and symptom-related anxiety play an important role in chronic pain states. The current study sought to characterize abnormalities in preparatory brain response before aversive pelvic visceral distention in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients and their possible relationship to the consequences of distention. The brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) response to anticipated and delivered mild and moderate rectal distention was recorded from 14 female IBS patients and 12 healthy controls. During cued anticipation of distention, activity decreased in the insula, supragenual anterior cingulate cortex (sACC), amygdala, and dorsal brainstem (DBS) of controls. IBS patients showed less anticipatory inactivation. Group differences were significant in the right posterior insula and bilateral DBS. Self-rated measures of negative affect during scanning were higher in patients than controls (p orbitofrontal cortex and bilateral sACC. Both regions have been associated previously with corticolimbic inhibition and cognitive coping. Deficits in preparatory inhibition of DBS, including the locus ceruleus complex and parabrachial nuclei, may interfere with descending corticolimbic inhibition and contribute to enhanced brain responsiveness and perceptual sensitivity to visceral stimuli in IBS.

  12. Inhibition of lactate production in rat brain extracts and synaptosomes by 3-[4-(reduced 3-pyridine aldehyde-adenine dinucleotide)]-pyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, A J; Lai, J C; Coleman, A E; Pulsinelli, W A

    1987-06-01

    In basic solutions, pyruvate enolizes and reacts (through its 3-carbon) with the 4-carbon of the nicotinamide ring of NAD+, yielding an NAD-pyruvate adduct in which the nicotinamide ring is in the reduced form. This adduct is a strong inhibitor of lactate dehydrogenase, presumably because it binds simultaneously to the NADH and pyruvate sites. The potency of the inhibition, however, is muted by the adduct's tendency to cyclize to a lactam. We prepared solutions of the pyruvate adduct of NAD+ and of NAD+ analogues in which the -C(O)NH2 of NAD+ was replaced with -C(S)NH2, -C(O)CH3, and -C(O)H. Of the four, only the last analogue, 3-[4-(reduced 3-pyridine aldehyde-adenine dinucleotide)]-pyruvate (RAP) cannot cyclize and it was found to be the most potent inhibitor of beef heart and rat brain lactate dehydrogenases. The inhibitor binds very tightly to the NADH site (Ki approximately 1 nM for the A form). Even at high concentrations (20 microM), RAP had little or no effect on rat brain glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, pyruvate, alpha-ketoglutarate, isocitrate, soluble and mitochondrial malate, and glutamate dehydrogenases. The glycolytic enzymes, hexokinase and phosphofructokinase, were similarly unaffected. RAP strongly inhibited lactate production from glucose in rat brain extracts but was less effective in inhibiting lactate production from glucose in synaptosomes.

  13. Reduced GABAergic inhibition in the basolateral amygdala and the development of anxiety-like behaviors after mild traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila P Almeida-Suhett

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major public health concern affecting a large number of athletes and military personnel. Individuals suffering from a TBI risk developing anxiety disorders, yet the pathophysiological alterations that result in the development of anxiety disorders have not yet been identified. One region often damaged by a TBI is the basolateral amygdala (BLA; hyperactivity within the BLA is associated with increased expression of anxiety and fear, yet the functional alterations that lead to BLA hyperexcitability after TBI have not been identified. We assessed the functional alterations in inhibitory synaptic transmission in the BLA and one mechanism that modulates excitatory synaptic transmission, the α7 containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR, after mTBI, to shed light on the mechanisms that contribute to increased anxiety-like behaviors. Seven and 30 days after a mild controlled cortical impact (CCI injury, animals displayed significantly greater anxiety-like behavior. This was associated with a significant loss of GABAergic interneurons and significant reductions in the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous and miniature GABAA-receptor mediated inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs. Decreases in the mIPSC amplitude were associated with reduced surface expression of α1, β2, and γ2 GABAA receptor subunits. However, significant increases in the surface expression and current mediated by α7-nAChR, were observed, signifying increases in the excitability of principal neurons within the BLA. These results suggest that mTBI causes not only a significant reduction in inhibition in the BLA, but also an increase in neuronal excitability, which may contribute to hyperexcitability and the development of anxiety disorders.

  14. NT113, a pan-ERBB inhibitor with high brain penetrance, inhibits the growth of glioblastoma xenografts with EGFR amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yasuyuki; Ozawa, Tomoko; Yao, Tsun-Wen; Shen, Wang; Brown, Dennis; Parsa, Andrew T; Raizer, Jeffrey J; Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Stegh, Alexander H; Mazar, Andrew P; Giles, Francis J; Sarkaria, Jann N; Butowski, Nicholas; Nicolaides, Theodore; James, C David

    2014-12-01

    This report describes results from our analysis of the activity and biodistribution of a novel pan-ERBB inhibitor, NT113, when used in treating mice with intracranial glioblastoma (GBM) xenografts. Approaches used in this investigation include: bioluminescence imaging (BLI) for monitoring intracranial tumor growth and response to therapy; determination of survival benefit from treatment; analysis of tumor IHC reactivity for indication of treatment effect on proliferation and apoptotic response; Western blot analysis for determination of effects of treatment on ERBB and ERBB signaling mediator activation; and high-performance liquid chromatography for determination of NT113 concentration in tissue extracts from animals receiving oral administration of inhibitor. Our results show that NT113 is active against GBM xenografts in which wild-type EGFR or EGFRvIII is highly expressed. In experiments including lapatinib and/or erlotinib, NT113 treatment was associated with the most substantial improvement in survival, as well as the most substantial tumor growth inhibition, as indicated by BLI and IHC results. Western blot analysis results indicated that NT113 has inhibitory activity, both in vivo and in vitro, on ERBB family member phosphorylation, as well as on the phosphorylation of downstream signaling mediator Akt. Results from the analysis of animal tissues revealed significantly higher NT113 normal brain-to-plasma and intracranial tumor-to-plasma ratios for NT113, relative to erlotinib, indicating superior NT113 partitioning to intracranial tissue compartments. These data provide a strong rationale for the clinical investigation of NT113, a novel ERBB inhibitor, in treating patients with GBM.

  15. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor improves proliferation of endometrial epithelial cells by inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress during early pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Whasun; Bae, Hyocheol; Bazer, Fuller W; Song, Gwonhwa

    2017-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin family binds to two transmembrane receptors; neurotrophic receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (NTRK2) with high affinity and p75 with low affinity. Although BDNF-NTRK2 signaling in the central nervous system is known, signaling in the female reproductive system is unknown. Therefore, we determined effects of BDNF on porcine endometrial luminal epithelial (pLE) cells isolated from Day 12 of pregnancy, as well as expression of BDNF and NTRK2 in endometria of cyclic and pregnant pigs. BDNF-NTRK2 genes were expressed in uterine glandular (GE) and luminal (LE) epithelia during early pregnancy. In addition, their expression in uterine GE and LE decreased with increasing parity of sows. Recombinant BDNF increased proliferation in pLE cells in a dose-dependent, as well as expression of PCNA and Cyclin D1 in nuclei of pLE cells. BDNF also activated phosphorylation of AKT, P70S6K, S6, ERK1/2, JNK, P38 proteins in pLE cells. In addition, cell death resulting from tunicamycin-induced ER stress was prevented when pLE cells were treated with the combination of tunicamycin and BDNF which also decreased cells in the Sub-G1 phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, tunicamycin-induced unfolded protein response genes were mostly down-regulated to the basal levels as compared to non-treated pLE cells. Our finding suggests that BDNF acts via NTRK2 to induce development of pLE cells for maintenance of implantation and pregnancy by activating cell signaling via the PI3K and MAPK pathways and by inhibiting ER stress. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Mdivi-1 Alleviates Early Brain Injury After Experimental Subarachnoid Hemorrhage in Rats, Possibly via Inhibition of Drp1-Activated Mitochondrial Fission and Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pei; Li, Yuchen; Zhu, Shiyi; Wang, Chunlei; Dai, Jiaxing; Zhang, Guang; Zheng, Bingjie; Xu, Shancai; Wang, Ligang; Zhang, Tongyu; Zhou, PeiQuan; Zhang, John H; Shi, Huaizhang

    2017-02-16

    Mdivi-1 is a selective inhibitor of mitochondrial fission protein, Drp1, and can penetrate the blood-brain barrier. Previous studies have shown that Mdivi-1 improves neurological outcomes after ischemia, seizures and trauma but it remains unclear whether Mdivi-1 can attenuate early brain injury after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We thus investigated the therapeutic effect of Mdivi-1 on early brain injury following SAH. Rats were randomly divided into four groups: sham; SAH; SAH + vehicle; and SAH + Mdivi-1. The SAH model was induced by standard intravascular perforation and all of the rats were subsequently sacrificed 24 h after SAH. Mdivi-1 (1.2 mg/kg) was administered to rats 30 min after SAH. We found that Mdivi-1 markedly improved neurologic deficits, alleviated brain edema and BBB permeability, and attenuated apoptotic cell death. Mdivi-1 also significantly reduced the expression of cleaved caspase-3, Drp1 and p-Drp1((Ser616)), attenuated the release of Cytochrome C from mitochondria, inhibited excessive mitochondrial fission, and restored the ultra-structure of mitochondria. Furthermore, Mdivi-1 reduced levels of MDA, 3-NT, and 8-OHdG, and improved SOD activity. Taken together, our data suggest that Mdivi-1 exerts neuroprotective effects against cell death induced by SAH and the underlying mechanism may be inhibition of Drp1-activated mitochondrial fission and oxidative stress.

  17. Breviscapine alleviates hepatic injury and inhibits PKC-mRNA and its protein expression in brain-dead BA-Ma mini pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shui-Jun Zhang; Yan Song; Wen-Long Zhai; Ji-Hua Shi; Liu-Shun Feng; Yong-Fu Zhao; Shi Chen

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Brain-dead donors are the main sources for organ transplantation, but many studies show that brain-death affects the organ's function after transplantation. This study was undertaken to investigate liver injury after brain-death in BA-Ma mini pigs and the protective effects of breviscapine on hepatic function and on PKC-α mRNA and its protein expression. METHODS:Fifteen BA-Ma mini pigs were equally divided into 3 groups at random: brain-dead (group B), breviscapine pretreated (group P), and control (group C). The brain-dead model was established by increasing intracranial pressure in a modiifed, slow and intermittent way. At 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 hours after the initial brain-death, the levels of serum AST, ALT, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were determined. The changes in hepatic tissues were assessed, and the expression of PKC-α and PKC-αmRNA was detected by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR, respectively. RESULTS:The levels of AST and ALT in groups B and P began to increase 12 hours after brain-death, while the values in group P were lower than those in group B (P<0.05). The levels of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in groups B and P at 3, 6, 12 and 18 hours were lower than those in group B (P<0.05). At 6, 12 and 24 hours, the expressions of PKC-α mRNA and PKC-α protein in group P were lower than those in group B (P<0.05). The degree of injury to hepatic cells in group P was milder than that in group B.CONCLUSIONS:Breviscapine inhibits the degree of PKC-αmRNA transcription and its protein translation, decreases the release of inlfammatory factors, and thus alleviates hepatic injury during brain-death.

  18. Endosulfan exposure inhibits brain AChE activity and impairs swimming performance in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Vanessa Maynart; Bortolotto, Josiane Woutheres; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Azevedo, Mariana Barbieri de; Fritsch, Rachel Seemann; Oliveira, Renata da Luz; Pereira, Talita Carneiro Brandão; Bonan, Carla Denise; Vianna, Monica Ryff; Bogo, Maurício Reis

    2012-06-01

    Endosulfan is a broad spectrum organochlorine pesticide that is still widely in use in many developing countries. Following application, endosulfan can get to watercourses through surface runoff from agricultural fields and disturb the non-target aquatic animals including freshwater fish species. Given that the activity of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is one of the most recurrently used biomarkers of exposure to pesticides and there are controversial results concerning the effects of endosulfan exposure and AChE activity in fish, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of endosulfan in brain AChE activity and its gene expression pattern using adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) as an animal model. Moreover, we have analyzed the effects of endosulfan exposure in different parameters of zebrafish swimming activity and in long-term memory formation. After 96 h of exposition, fish in the 2.4 μg endosulfan/L group presented a significant decrease in AChE activity (9.44 ± 1.038 μmol SCh h(-1) mg protein(-1); p=0.0205) when compared to the control group (15.87 ± 1.768 μmol SCh h(-1) mg protein(-1); p=0.0205) which corresponds to approximately 40%. The down-regulation of brain AChE activity is not directly related with the transcriptional control as demonstrated by the RT-qPCR analysis. Our results reinforce AChE activity inhibition as a pathway of endosulfan-induced toxicity in brain of fish species. In addition, exposure to 2.4 μg endosulfan/L during 96 h impaired all exploratory parameters evaluated: decreased line crossings (≈21%, 273.7 ± 28.12 number of line crossings compared to the control group 344.6 ± 21.30, p=0.0483), traveled distance (≈20%, 23.44 ± 2.127 m compared to the control group 29.39 ± 1.585, p=0.0281), mean speed (≈25%, 0.03 ± 0.003 m/s compared to the control group 0.04 ± 0.002, p=0.0275) and body turn angle (≈21%, 69,940 ± 4871 absolute turn angle compared to the control group 88,010 ± 4560, p=0.0114). These

  19. Effects of Swimming Exercise on Limbic and Motor Cortex Neurogenesis in the Kainate-Lesion Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasavi R. Gorantla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE is a common neurological disease and antiseizure medication is often inadequate for preventing apoptotic cell death. Aerobic swimming exercise (EX augments neurogenesis in rats when initiated immediately in the postictal period. This study tests the hypothesis that aerobic exercise also augments neurogenesis over the long term. Male Wistar rats (age of 4 months were subjected to chemical lesioning using KA and to an EX intervention consisting of a 30 d period of daily swimming for 15 min, in one experiment immediately after KA lesioning (immediate exposure and in a second experiment after a 60 d period of normal activity (delayed exposure. Morphometric counting of neuron numbers (NN and dendritic branch points and intersections (DDBPI was performed in the CA1, CA3, and dentate regions of hippocampus, in basolateral nucleus of amygdala, and in several areas of motor cortex. EX increased NN and DDBPI in the normal control and the KA-lesioned rats in all four limbic and motor cortex areas studied, after both immediate and 60 d delayed exposures to exercise. These findings suggest that, after temporal lobe epileptic seizures in rats, swimming exercise may improve neural plasticity in areas of the brain involved with emotional regulation and motor coordination, even if the exercise treatment is delayed.

  20. Ropizine concurrently enhances and inhibits ( sup 3 H) dextromethorpan binding to different structures of the guinea pig brain: Autoradiographic evidence for multiple binding sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canoll, P.D.; Smith, P.R.; and Musacchio, J.M. (N.Y.U. Medical Center, New York (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Ropizine produces a simultaneous enhancement and inhibition of ({sup 3}H) dextromethorphan (DM) high-affinity binding to different areas of the guinea pig brain. These results imply that there are two distinct types of high-affinity ({sup 3}H)DM binding sites, which are present in variable proportions in different brain structures. The ropizine-enhances ({sup 3}H)DM binding type was preferentially inhibited by (+)-pentazocine. This is consistent with the presumption that the (+)-pentazocine-sensitive site is identical with the common site for DM and 3-(-3-Hydroxphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine ((+)-3-PPP). The second binding type, which is inhibited by ropizine and is not so sensitive to (+){minus} pentazocine, has not been fully characterized. This study demonstrates that the biphasic effects to ropizine are due, at least in part, to the effects of ropizine on two different types of ({sup 3}H)DM binding sites. However, this study does not rule out that the common DM/(+)-3-PPP site also might be inhibited by higher concentrations of ropizine.

  1. Inhibition of miRNA-210 reverses nicotine-induced brain hypoxic-ischemic injury in neonatal rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Ke, Jun; Li, Yong; Ma, Qinyi; Dasgupta, Chiranjib; Huang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Lubo; Xiao, DaLiao

    2017-01-01

    Maternal tobacco use in pregnancy increases the risk of neurodevelopmental disorders and neurobehavioral deficits in postnatal life. The present study tested the hypothesis that perinatal nicotine exposure exacerbated brain vulnerability to hypoxic-ischemic (HI) injury in neonatal rats through up-regulation of miR-210 expression in the developing brain. Nicotine was administered to pregnant rats via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps. Experiments of HI brain injury were performed in 10-day-old pups. Perinatal nicotine treatment significantly decreased neonatal body and brain weights, but increased the brain to body weight ratio. Perinatal nicotine exposure caused a significant increase in HI brain infarct size in the neonates. In addition, nicotine enhanced miR-210 expression and significantly attenuated brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin-related kinase isoform B (TrkB) protein abundance in the brain. Of importance, intracerebroventricular administration of a miR-210 inhibitor (miR-210-LNA) significantly decreased HI-induced brain infarct size and reversed the nicotine-increased vulnerability to brain HI injury in the neonate. Furthermore, miR-210-LNA treatment also reversed nicotine-mediated down-regulation of BDNF and TrkB protein expression in the neonatal brains. These findings provide novel evidence that the increased miR-210 plays a causal role in perinatal nicotine-induced developmental programming of ischemic sensitive phenotype in the brain. It represents a potential novel therapeutic approach for treatment of brain hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in the neonate-induced by fetal stress. PMID:28123348

  2. Acetaminophen inhibits liver trytophan-2,3-dioxygenase activity with a concomitant rise in brain serotonin levels and a reduction in urinary 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daya, S; Anoopkumar-Dukie, S

    2000-06-08

    The effect of the analgesic agent, acetaminophen was determined on rat forebrain serotonin levels as well as hepatic tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) activity and urinary 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA). The results show that acetaminophen administration (100mg/kg) over three hours does not affect the holoenzyme of tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase but significantly inhibits the apoenzyme. This inhibition is accompanied by a concomitant rise in forebrain serotonin levels. This phenomenon is also accompanied by a reduction in urinary 5-HIAA levels. These results suggest that acetaminophen use is accompanied by changes in brain serotonin levels due to inhibition of hepatic tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase activity. This in turn could explain the possible abuse potential of acetaminophen and its effects on mood at high doses.

  3. A strategy for increasing the brain uptake of a radioligand in animals: use of a drug that inhibits plasma protein binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haradahira, Terushi E-mail: terushi@nirs.go.jp; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Maeda, Jun; Okauchi, Takashi; Kawabe, Kouichi; Kida, Takayo; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2000-05-01

    A positron-emitter labeled radioligand for the glycine-binding site of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, [{sup 11}C]L-703,717, was examined for its ability to penetrate the brain in animals by simultaneous use with drugs having high-affinity separate binding sites on human serum albumin. [{sup 11}C]L-703,717 has poor blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability because it binds tightly to plasma proteins. Co-injection of warfarin (50-200 mg/kg), a drug that binds to albumin and resembles L-703,717 in structure, dose-dependently enhanced the penetration by [{sup 11}C]L-703,717 in mice, resulting in a five-fold increase in the brain radioactivity at 1 min after the injection. Drugs structurally unrelated to L-703,717, salicylate, phenol red, and L-tryptophan, were less effective or ineffective in increasing the uptake of [{sup 11}C]L-703,717. These results suggest that the simultaneous use of a drug that inhibits the binding of a radioligand to plasma proteins is a useful way to overcome the poor BBB permeability of the radioligand triggered by its tight binding to plasma proteins. In brain distribution studies in rodents, it was found that, after the increase in brain uptake with warfarin, much of the glycine site antagonist accumulates in the cerebellum but its pharmacological specificity did not match the glycine site of NMDA receptors.

  4. Multiple autoimmune antibody limbic encephalitis: a case in a pregnant woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meha Goyal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune limbic encephalitis is most commonly associated with antibodies against the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR, among other neuronal cell surface receptors. Here, a case of a pregnant female with limbic encephalitis in the presence of multiple additional autoimmune antibodies is described. The patient was a 36-year-old female who presented with 4 days of confusion, hallucinations, hypersexuality, disinhibition, and pressured speech. The patient's work-up detected the presence of anti-NMDAR antibodies, anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies, and a yet uncharacterized neuronal autoantibody. The patient was also found to be pregnant. No evidence of ovarian or other pelvic malignancy was discovered. Symptomatic control was achieved with plasma exchange.

  5. Actions of dopamine antagonists on stimulated striatal and limbic dopamine release: an in vivo voltammetric study.

    OpenAIRE

    Stamford, J. A.; Kruk, Z L; Millar, J.

    1988-01-01

    1. Fast cyclic voltammetry at carbon fibre microelectrodes was used to study the effects of several dopamine antagonists upon stimulated dopamine release in the rat striatum and nucleus accumbens. 2. In both nuclei, stimulated dopamine release was increased by D2-receptor-selective and mixed D1/D2-receptor antagonists. The D1-selective antagonist SCH 23390 had no effect. 3. Striatal and limbic dopamine release were elevated by cis- but not trans-flupenthixol. 4. The 'atypical' neuroleptics (c...

  6. [Anti-VGKC antibody-associated limbic encephalitis/Morvan syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Tamako; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2010-04-01

    Anti-voltage-gated potassium channel antibodies (anti-VGKC-Ab) cause hyperexcitability of the peripheral nerve and central nervous system. Peripheral nerve hyperexcitability is the chief manifestation of Issacs syndrome and cramp-fasciculation syndrome. Morvan syndrome is characterized by neuromyotonia with autonomic and CNS involvement. Manifestations involving the CNS without peripheral involvement are characteristic of limbic encephalitis and epilepsy. The clinical features of anti-VGKC-Ab-associated limbic encephalitis are subacute onset of episodic memory impairment, disorientation and agitation. Hyponatremia is also noted in most patients. Cortico-steroid therapy, plasma exchange and intravenous immunoglobulin are effective in treating to not only the clinical symptoms but also hyponatremia. Unlike other anti-VGKC-Ab-associated neurological disorders, paraneoplastic cases are rare. Thus, anti-VGKC-Ab-associated limbic encephalopathy is considered to be an autoimmune, non-paraneoplastic, potentially treatable encephalitis. Morvan syndrome is characterized by widespread neurological symptoms involving the peripheral nervous system (neuromyotonia), autonomic system (hyperhidrosis, severe constipation, urinary incontinence, and cardiac arrhythmia) and the CNS (severe insomnia, hallucinations, impairment of short-term memory and epilepsy). Many patients have an underlying tumor, for example thymoma, lung cancer, testicular cancer and lymphoma; this indicates the paraneoplastic nature of the disease. Needle electro-myography reveals myokimic discharge. In nerve conduction study, stimulus-induced repetitive descharges are frequently demonstrated in involved muscles. Plasma exchange is an effective treatment approach, and tumor resection also improves symptoms. Both VGKC-Ab-associated limbic encephalitis and Morvan syndrome can be successfully treated. Therefore, when these diseases are suspected, it's important to measure the anti-VGKC-Ab level.

  7. Annexin A1 restores Aβ1-42 -induced blood-brain barrier disruption through the inhibition of RhoA-ROCK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Chan; Baik, Sung Hoon; Han, Sun-Ho; Cho, Hyun Jin; Choi, Hyunjung; Kim, Haeng Jun; Choi, Heesun; Lee, Wonik; Kim, Dong Kyu; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2017-02-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is composed of brain capillary endothelial cells and has an important role in maintaining homeostasis of the brain separating the blood from the parenchyma of the central nervous system (CNS). It is widely known that disruption of the BBB occurs in various neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Annexin A1 (ANXA1), an anti-inflammatory messenger, is expressed in brain endothelial cells and regulates the BBB integrity. However, its role and mechanism for protecting BBB in AD have not been identified. We found that β-Amyloid 1-42 (Aβ42)-induced BBB disruption was rescued by human recombinant ANXA1 (hrANXA1) in the murine brain endothelial cell line bEnd.3. Also, ANXA1 was decreased in the bEnd.3 cells, the capillaries of 5XFAD mice, and the human serum of patients with AD. To find out the mechanism by which ANXA1 recovers the BBB integrity in AD, the RhoA-ROCK signaling pathway was examined in both Aβ42-treated bEnd.3 cells and the capillaries of 5XFAD mice as RhoA was activated in both cases. RhoA inhibitors alleviated Aβ42-induced BBB disruption and constitutively overexpressed RhoA-GTP (active form of RhoA) attenuated the protective effect of ANXA1. When pericytes were cocultured with bEnd.3 cells, Aβ42-induced RhoA activation of bEnd.3 cells was inhibited by the secretion of ANXA1 from pericytes. Taken together, our results suggest that ANXA1 restores Aβ42-induced BBB disruption through inhibition of RhoA-ROCK signaling pathway and we propose ANXA1 as a therapeutic reagent, protecting against the breakdown of the BBB in AD.

  8. Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH) is predominantly expressed in the brain and negatively regulates hepatopancreatic vitellogenin (VTG) gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ting; Zhang, Lv-Ping; Wong, Nai-Kei; Zhong, Ming; Ren, Chun-Hua; Hu, Chao-Qun

    2014-03-01

    Ovarian maturation in crustaceans is temporally orchestrated by two processes: oogenesis and vitellogenesis. The peptide hormone vitellogenesis-inhibiting hormone (VIH), by far the most potent negative regulator of crustacean reproduction known, critically modulates crustacean ovarian maturation by suppressing vitellogenin (VTG) synthesis. In this study, cDNA encoding VIH was cloned from the eyestalk of Pacific white shrimp, Litopenaeus vannamei, a highly significant commercial culture species. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that L. vannamei VIH (lvVIH) can be classified as a member of the type II crustacean hyperglycemic hormone family. Northern blot and RT-PCR results reveal that both the brain and eyestalk were the major sources for lvVIH mRNA expression. In in vitro experiments on primary culture of shrimp hepatopancreatic cells, it was confirmed that some endogenous inhibitory factors existed in L. vannamei hemolymph, brain, and eyestalk that suppressed hepatopancreatic VTG gene expression. Purified recombinant lvVIH protein was effective in inhibiting VTG mRNA expression in both in vitro primary hepatopancreatic cell culture and in vivo injection experiments. Injection of recombinant VIH could also reverse ovarian growth induced by eyestalk ablation. Furthermore, unilateral eyestalk ablation reduced the mRNA level of lvVIH in the brain but not in the remaining contralateral eyestalk. Our study, as a whole, provides new insights on VIH regulation of shrimp reproduction: 1) the brain and eyestalk are both important sites of VIH expression and therefore possible coregulators of hepatopancreatic VTG mRNA expression and 2) eyestalk ablation could increase hepatopancreatic VTG expression by transcriptionally abolishing eyestalk-derived VIH and diminishing brain-derived VIH.

  9. Glycyrrhiza uralensis flavonoids inhibit brain microglial cell TNF-α secretion, p-IκB expression, and increase brain-derived neurotropic factor (BDNF secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangita P. Patil

    2014-07-01

    Conclusion: ASHMI and its effective flavonoid, isoliquiritigenin, inhibited TNF-α production by LPS stimulated microglial cells and elevated BDNF levels, which may prove to have anti-CNS inflammatory and anti-anxiety effects.

  10. Depression of the photic after discharge of flash evoked potentials by physostigmine, carbaryl and propoxur, and the relationship to inhibition of brain cholinesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwanza, Jean-Claude; Finley, Dana; Spivey, Christopher L; Graff, Jaimie E; Herr, David W

    2008-01-01

    The effects of N-methyl carbamate pesticides on the photic after discharge (PhAD) of flash evoked potentials (FEPs) and the relationship between inhibition of brain cholinesterase (ChE) activity and the PhAD were evaluated. FEPs were recorded in Long Evans rats treated with physostigmine (s.c.) 0, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2 or 0.3mg/kg (free base), in an ascorbic acid/saline vehicle, carbaryl (p.o.) 0, 1, 3, 10, 30, 50 or 75 mg/kg, or propoxur (p.o.) 0, 0.3, 3, 10, 20, 30, or 40 mg/kg in a corn oil vehicle. Physostigmine served as positive control based on literature data. Early (e.g. peak N(36)) and late FEP components (peak N(166) and PhAD) are related to the initial retino-geniculate afferent volley and higher cortical processing of visual information, respectively. Compared to controls, the PhAD duration decreased following treatment with 0.1 and 0.3mg/kg physostigmine, 7 5 mg/kg carbaryl or 30 mg/kg propoxur. Lesser changes were noted in FEP amplitudes or peak latencies. Treatment with 0.2 or 0.3 mg/kg physostigmine increased peak N(36) latency. Peak N(166) latency increased only following exposure to 40 mg/kg propoxur. None of the compounds altered peak N(36) or N(166) amplitudes. Hypothermia was observed at doses greater than 0.05 mg/kg physostigmine, at 30 or 50 mg/kg carbaryl, and after treatment with 10, 20 or 40 mg/kg propoxur. Inhibition of brain ChE activity occurred at dosages greater than 0.05 mg/kg physostigmine, 1mg/kg carbaryl, and 0.3 mg/kg propoxur. Linear regression analysis indicated that the decrease in PhAD duration correlated with decrease in brain ChE activity. The results indicate that at 30 min after treatment, inhibition of brain ChE activity did not affect cortical processing of the input from the retino-geniculate volley (evidenced by unaltered peak N(36) amplitude). However, the data suggest that disruption of cortical processing of visual signals related to FEP late components, as indicated by depression of the PhAD, was related to inhibition

  11. Different sensitivities to competitive inhibition of benzodiazepine receptor binding of {sup 11}C-iomazenil and {sup 11}C-flumazenil in rhesus monkey brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Osamu; Hosoi, Rie; Kobayashi, Kaoru [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Medical School; Itoh, Takashi; Gee, A.; Suzuki, Kazutoshi

    2001-04-01

    The in vivo binding kinetics of {sup 11}C-iomazenil were compared with those of {sup 11}C-flumazenil binding in rhesus monkey brain. The monkey was anesthetized with ketamine and intravenously injected with either {sup 11}C-iomazenil or {sup 11}C-flumazenil in combination with the coadministration of different doses of non-radioactive flumazenil (0, 5 and 20 {mu}g/kg). The regional distribution of {sup 11}C-iomazenil in the brain was similar to that of {sup 11}C-flumazenil, but the sensitivity of {sup 11}C-iomazenil binding to competitive inhibition by non-radioactive flumazenil was much less than that of {sup 11}C-flumazenil binding. A significant reduction in {sup 11}C-flumazenil binding in the cerebral cortex was observed with 20 {mu}g/kg of flumazenil, whereas a relatively smaller inhibition of {sup 11}C-iomazenil binding in the same region was observed with the same dose of flumazenil. These results suggest that {sup 11}C-flumazenil may be a superior radiotracer for estimating benzodiazepine receptor occupancy in the intact brain. (author)

  12. Inhibition by atrial and brain natriuretic peptides of endothelin-1 secretion after stimulation with angiotensin II and thrombin of cultured human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, M; Yasunari, K; Yokokawa, K; Murakawa, K; Horio, T; Takeda, T

    1991-01-01

    We examined the inhibition by atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) of endothelin-1 secretion stimulated by angiotensin II (ANGII) and thrombin using cultured human umbilical-vein endothelial cells. ANGII and thrombin dose-dependently stimulated immunoreactive (ir) endothelin-1 secretion. Human ANP(1-28) and human BNP-32 both inhibited such secretion in a dose-dependent way. Inhibition of this secretion by ANP and BNP was paralleled by an increase in the level of cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP). The addition of a cyclic GMP analogue, 8-bromo cyclic GMP, reduced this stimulated secretion. Rat ANP(5-25) was weaker than human ANP(1-28) at inhibiting ir-endothelin-1 secretion and increasing cyclic GMP in the cells. ir-Endothelin-1 in the medium consisted of two components separated by high pressure liquid chromatography; the major one corresponded to endothelin-1(1-21) and the minor one corresponded to big endothelin-1(1-38). Treatment with ANP and BNP did not affect this profile. These findings suggest that human ANP and BNP inhibit endothelin-1 secretion stimulated by ANGII and thrombin in these cells through a cyclic GMP-dependent process. Taken together with endothelin stimulation of ANP and BNP secretion from the heart, our results suggest the existence of a cardiac-endothelium feedback. PMID:1645748

  13. Sex differences in brain response to anticipated and experienced visceral pain in healthy subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Michiko; Farmer, Adam D.; Aziz, Qasim; Giampietro, Vincent P.; Brammer, Michael J.; Williams, Steven C. R.; Fukudo, Shin

    2013-01-01

    Women demonstrate higher pain sensitivity and prevalence of chronic visceral pain conditions such as functional gastrointestinal disorders than men. The role of sex differences in the brain processing of visceral pain is still unclear. In 16 male and 16 female healthy subjects we compared personality, anxiety levels, skin conductance response (SCR), and brain processing using functional MRI during anticipation and pain induced by esophageal distension at pain toleration level. There was no significant difference in personality scores, anxiety levels, SCR, and subjective ratings of pain between sexes. In group analysis, both men and women demonstrated a similar pattern of brain activation and deactivation during anticipation and pain consistent with previous reports. However, during anticipation women showed significantly greater activation in the cuneus, precuneus, and supplementary motor area (SMA) and stronger deactivation in the right amygdala and left parahippocampal gyrus, whereas men demonstrated greater activation in the cerebellum. During pain, women demonstrated greater activation in the midcingulate cortex, anterior insula, premotor cortex, and cerebellum and stronger deactivation in the caudate, whereas men showed increased activity in the SMA. The pattern of brain activity suggests that, during anticipation, women may demonstrate stronger limbic inhibition, which is considered to be a cognitive modulation strategy for impending painful stimulation. During pain, women significantly activate brain areas associated with the affective and motivation components of pain. These responses may underlie the sex differences that exist in pain conditions, whereby women may attribute more emotional importance to painful stimuli compared with men. PMID:23392235

  14. Alzheimer's Disease Brain-Derived Amyloid-{beta}-Mediated Inhibition of LTP In Vivo Is Prevented by Immunotargeting Cellular Prion Protein.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Andrew E

    2011-05-18

    Synthetic amyloid-β protein (Aβ) oligomers bind with high affinity to cellular prion protein (PrP(C)), but the role of this interaction in mediating the disruption of synaptic plasticity by such soluble Aβ in vitro is controversial. Here we report that intracerebroventricular injection of Aβ-containing aqueous extracts of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) brain robustly inhibits long-term potentiation (LTP) without significantly affecting baseline excitatory synaptic transmission in the rat hippocampus in vivo. Moreover, the disruption of LTP was abrogated by immunodepletion of Aβ. Importantly, intracerebroventricular administration of antigen-binding antibody fragment D13, directed to a putative Aβ-binding site on PrP(C), prevented the inhibition of LTP by AD brain-derived Aβ. In contrast, R1, a Fab directed to the C terminus of PrP(C), a region not implicated in binding of Aβ, did not significantly affect the Aβ-mediated inhibition of LTP. These data support the pathophysiological significance of SDS-stable Aβ dimer and the role of PrP(C) in mediating synaptic plasticity disruption by soluble Aβ.

  15. Kisspeptin modulates sexual and emotional brain processing in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comninos, Alexander N.; Wall, Matthew B.; Demetriou, Lysia; Shah, Amar J.; Clarke, Sophie A.; Narayanaswamy, Shakunthala; Nesbitt, Alexander; Izzi-Engbeaya, Chioma; Prague, Julia K.; Abbara, Ali; Ratnasabapathy, Risheka; Salem, Victoria; Nijher, Gurjinder M.; Jayasena, Channa N.; Tanner, Mark; Bassett, Paul; Mehta, Amrish; Rabiner, Eugenii A.; Hönigsperger, Christoph; Silva, Meire Ribeiro; Brandtzaeg, Ole Kristian; Wilson, Steven Ray; Brown, Rachel C.; Thomas, Sarah A.; Bloom, Stephen R.; Dhillo, Waljit S.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Sex, emotion, and reproduction are fundamental and tightly entwined aspects of human behavior. At a population level in humans, both the desire for sexual stimulation and the desire to bond with a partner are important precursors to reproduction. However, the relationships between these processes are incompletely understood. The limbic brain system has key roles in sexual and emotional behaviors, and is a likely candidate system for the integration of behavior with the hormonal reproductive axis. We investigated the effects of kisspeptin, a recently identified key reproductive hormone, on limbic brain activity and behavior. METHODS. Using a combination of functional neuroimaging and hormonal and psychometric analyses, we compared the effects of kisspeptin versus vehicle administration in 29 healthy heterosexual young men. RESULTS. We demonstrated that kisspeptin administration enhanced limbic brain activity specifically in response to sexual and couple-bonding stimuli. Furthermore, kisspeptin’s enhancement of limbic brain structures correlated with psychometric measures of reward, drive, mood, and sexual aversion, providing functional significance. In addition, kisspeptin administration attenuated negative mood. CONCLUSIONS. Collectively, our data provide evidence of an undescribed role for kisspeptin in integrating sexual and emotional brain processing with reproduction in humans. These results have important implications for our understanding of reproductive biology and are highly relevant to the current pharmacological development of kisspeptin as a potential therapeutic agent for patients with common disorders of reproductive function. FUNDING. National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), Wellcome Trust (Ref 080268), and the Medical Research Council (MRC). PMID:28112678

  16. H2 receptor-mediated facilitation and H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release in the guinea-pig brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, J; Marr, I; Werthwein, S; Elz, S; Schunack, W; Schlicker, E

    1998-03-01

    The effect of histamine and related drugs on the tritium overflow evoked electrically (0.3 Hz) or by introduction of Ca2+ ions into Ca2+-free K+-rich (25 mmol/l) medium containing tetrodotoxin was studied in superfused guinea-pig brain cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus or hypothalamus slices and in mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline. The electrically evoked tritium overflow in guinea-pig cortex slices was inhibited by histamine; the H3 receptor antagonist clobenpropit reversed the effect of histamine to a slight facilitation. The facilitatory effect of histamine (obtained in the presence of clobenpropit) was not affected by the H1 receptor antagonist mepyramine but abolished by the H2 receptor antagonist ranitidine. In the absence of clobenpropit, ranitidine augmented the inhibitory effect of histamine. In slices superfused in the presence of ranitidine, the evoked overflow was inhibited by histamine and, more potently, by the H3 receptor agonist R-alpha-methylhistamine in a concentration-dependent manner (maximum inhibitory effect obtained for both agonists 30-35%). The concentration-response curve of histamine was shifted to the right by the H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide. R-alpha-methylhistamine inhibited the electrically evoked tritium overflow also in guinea-pig cerebellar, hippocampal and hypothalamic slices. In cortex slices superfused in the presence of clobenpropit, the H2 receptor agonists impromidine and, less potently, R-sopromidine facilitated the evoked overflow in a concentration-dependent manner. S-Sopromidine only tended to increase the evoked overflow. The effect of impromidine was counteracted by the H2 receptor antagonists ranitidine and cimetidine. The extent of the maximum facilitatory effect of impromidine (by 15-20%) was about the same when (i) the Ca2+ concentration in the medium was reduced from 1.3 to 0.98 mmol/l, (ii) the time of exposure to impromidine was reduced from 28 to 8 min or (iii) cerebellar

  17. Epileptiform activity and spreading depolarization in the blood-brain barrier-disrupted peri-infarct hippocampus are associated with impaired GABAergic inhibition and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, Kristina; Kamintsky, Lyn; Kim, Soo Young; Lublinsky, Svetlana; Prager, Ofer; Nichtweiss, Julia Friederike; Salar, Seda; Kaufer, Daniela; Heinemann, Uwe; Friedman, Alon

    2017-05-01

    Peri-infarct opening of the blood-brain barrier may be associated with spreading depolarizations, seizures, and epileptogenesis as well as cognitive dysfunction. We aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying neural network pathophysiology in the blood-brain barrier-dysfunctional hippocampus. Photothrombotic stroke within the rat neocortex was associated with increased intracranial pressure, vasogenic edema, and peri-ischemic blood-brain barrier dysfunction that included the ipsilateral hippocampus. Intrahippocampal recordings revealed electrographic seizures within the first week in two-thirds of animals, accompanied by a reduction in gamma and increase in theta frequency bands. Synaptic interactions were studied in parasagittal hippocampal slices at 24 h and seven days post-stroke. Field potential recordings in CA1 and CA3 uncovered multiple population spikes, epileptiform episodes, and spreading depolarizations at 24 h. Input-output analysis revealed that fEPSP-spike coupling was significantly enhanced at seven days. In addition, CA1 feedback and feedforward inhibition were diminished. Slices generating epileptiform activity at seven days revealed impaired bidirectional long-term plasticity following high and low-frequency stimulation protocols. Microarray and PCR data confirmed changes in expression of astrocyte-related genes and suggested downregulation in expression of GABAA-receptor subunits. We conclude that blood-brain barrier dysfunction in the peri-infarct hippocampus is associated with early disinhibition, hyperexcitability, and abnormal synaptic plasticity.

  18. T11TS inhibits Angiopoietin-1/Tie-2 signaling, EGFR activation and Raf/MEK/ERK pathway in brain endothelial cells restraining angiogenesis in glioma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Debanjan; Chaudhuri, Suhnrita; Singh, Manoj Kumar; Chaudhuri, Swapna

    2015-06-01

    Malignant gliomas represent one of the most aggressive and hypervascular primary brain tumors. Angiopoietin-1, the peptide growth factor activates endothelial Tie-2 receptor promoting vessel maturation and vascular stabilization steps of angiogenesis in glioma. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Tie-2 receptor on endothelial cells once activated transmits signals through downstream Raf/MEK/ERK pathway promoting endothelial cell proliferation and migration which are essential for angiogenesis induction. The in vivo effect of sheep erythrocyte membrane glycopeptide T11-target structure (T11TS) on angiopoietin-1/Tie-2 axis, EGFR signaling and Raf/MEK/ERK pathway in glioma associated endothelial cells has not been investigated previously. The present study performed with rodent glioma model aims to investigate the effect of T11TS treatment on angiopoietin-1/Tie-2 signaling, EGFR activity and Raf/MEK/ERK pathway in glioma associated endothelial cells within glioma milieu. T11TS administration in rodent glioma model inhibited angiopoietin-1 expression and attenuated Tie-2 expression and activation in glioma associated brain endothelial cells. T11TS treatment also downregulated total and phosphorylated EGFR expression in glioma associated endothelial cells. Additionally T11TS treatment inhibited Raf-1 expression, MEK-1 and ERK-1/2 expression and phosphorylation in glioma associated brain endothelial cells. Thus T11TS therapy remarkably inhibits endothelial angiopoietin-1/Tie-2 signaling associated with vessel maturation and simultaneously antagonizes endothelial cell proliferation signaling by blocking EGFR activation and components of Raf/MEK/ERK pathway. Collectively, the findings demonstrate a multi-targeted anti-angiogenic activity of T11TS which augments the potential for clinical translation of T11TS as an effective angiogenesis inhibitor for glioma treatment.

  19. Brain-targeted angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 overexpression attenuates neurogenic hypertension by inhibiting cyclooxygenase-mediated inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriramula, Srinivas; Xia, Huijing; Xu, Ping; Lazartigues, Eric

    2015-03-01

    Overactivity of the renin-angiotensin system, oxidative stress, and cyclooxygenases (COX) in the brain are implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension. We previously reported that angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) overexpression in the brain attenuates the development of deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension, a neurogenic hypertension model with enhanced brain renin-angiotensin system and sympathetic activity. To elucidate the mechanisms involved, we investigated whether oxidative stress, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and cyclooxygenase (COX) activation in the brain are modulated by ACE2 in neurogenic hypertension. Deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension significantly increased expression of Nox-2 (+61±5%), Nox-4 (+50±13%), and nitrotyrosine (+89±32%) and reduced activity of the antioxidant enzymes, catalase (-29±4%) and superoxide dismutase (-31±7%), indicating increased oxidative stress in the brain of nontransgenic mice. This increased oxidative stress was attenuated in transgenic mice overexpressing ACE2 in the brain. Deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt-induced reduction of neuronal nitric oxide synthase expression (-26±7%) and phosphorylated endothelial nitric oxide synthase/total endothelial nitric oxide synthase (-30±3%), and enhanced phosphorylation of protein kinase B and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 in the paraventricular nucleus, were reversed by ACE2 overexpression. In addition, ACE2 overexpression blunted the hypertension-mediated increase in gene and protein expression of COX-1 and COX-2 in the paraventricular nucleus. Furthermore, gene silencing of either COX-1 or COX-2 in the brain, reduced microglial activation and accompanied neuroinflammation, ultimately attenuating Deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt hypertension. Together, these data provide evidence that brain ACE2 overexpression reduces oxidative stress and COX-mediated neuroinflammation, improves antioxidant and nitric oxide signaling, and

  20. Pattern classification of response inhibition in ADHD: toward the development of neurobiological markers for ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Heledd; Chantiluke, Kaylita; Cubillo, Ana I; Smith, Anna B; Simmons, Andrew; Brammer, Michael J; Marquand, Andre F; Rubia, Katya

    2014-07-01

    The diagnosis of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is based on subjective measures despite evidence for multisystemic structural and functional deficits. ADHD patients have consistent neurofunctional deficits in motor response inhibition. The aim of this study was to apply pattern classification to task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of inhibition, to accurately predict the diagnostic status of ADHD. Thirty adolescent ADHD and thirty age-matched healthy boys underwent fMRI while performing a Stop task. fMRI data were analyzed with Gaussian process classifiers (GPC), a machine learning approach, to predict individual ADHD diagnosis based on task-based activation patterns. Traditional univariate case-control analyses were also performed to replicate previous findings in a relatively large dataset. The pattern of brain activation correctly classified up to 90% of patients and 63% of controls, achieving an overall classification accuracy of 77%. The regions of the discriminative network most predictive of controls included later developing lateral prefrontal, striatal, and temporo-parietal areas that mediate inhibition, while regions most predictive of ADHD were in earlier developing ventromedial fronto-limbic regions, which furthermore correlated with symptom severity. Univariate analysis showed reduced activation in ADHD in bilateral ventrolateral prefrontal, striatal, and temporo-parietal regions that overlapped with areas predictive of controls, suggesting the latter are dysfunctional areas in ADHD. We show that significant individual classification of ADHD patients of 77% can be achieved using whole brain pattern analysis of task-based fMRI inhibition data, suggesting that multivariate pattern recognition analyses of inhibition networks can provide objective diagnostic neuroimaging biomarkers of ADHD. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Human Brain Mapping published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. In vitro reactivation potency of acetylcholinesterase reactivators--K074 and K075--to reactivate tabun-inhibited human brain cholinesterases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuca, Kamil; Cabal, Jiri; Jun, Daniel; Musilek, Kamil

    2007-02-01

    In this work, two oximes for the treatment of tabun-inhibited acetylcholinesterase (AChE; EC 3.1.1.7), K074 (1,4-bis(4-hydroxyiminomethylpyridinium)butane dibromide) and K075 ((E)-1,4-bis(4-hydroxyiminomethylpyridinium)but-2-en dibromide), were tested in vitro as reactivators of AChE. Comparison was made with currently used AChE reactivators (pralidoxime, HI-6, methoxime and obidoxime). Human brain homogenate was taken as an appropriate source of the cholinesterases. As resulted, oxime K074 appears to be the most potent reactivator of tabun-inhibited AChE, with reactivation potency comparable to that of obidoxime. A second AChE reactivator, K075, does not attain as great a reactivation potency as K074, although its maximal reactivation (17%) was achieved at relevant concentrations for humans.

  2. A Double Blind Trial of Divalproex Sodium for Affective Lability and Alcohol Use Following Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    brain injury (TBI) and alcohol abuse/ dependence (AA/D). This group appears to use alcohol to self-treat fronto-limbic disinhibition, expressed... benzodiazepines may address similar symptoms, yet these drugs introduce addiction and tolerance issues and do not appear to address specific causes of...fronto-limbic disinhibition following the TBI. Alcohol abuse and/or dependence (AA/D) and mood disturbance often co-occur following TBI. (Corrigan

  3. Effect of genetic polymorphism on the inhibition of dopamine formation from p-tyramine catalyzed by brain cytochrome P450 2D6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Toshiro; Shizuku, Marina; Yamano, Kaori

    2017-04-15

    The inhibitory effects of steroid hormones, including glucocorticoids such as cortisol, and related compounds on dopamine formation from p-tyramine, catalyzed by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D6.2 (Arg296Cys, Ser486Thr) and CYP2D6.10 (Pro34Ser, Ser486Thr) were compared with the effects of those catalyzed by CYP2D6.1 (wild type), to investigate the effect of a CYP2D6 polymorphism on neuroactive amine metabolism in the brain. Inhibition constants (Ki) or 50% inhibitory concentrations of six steroid hormones (cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, progesterone, and pregnenolone) and quinidine and quinine-typical potent inhibitors of the human CYP2D6 and rat CYP2D subfamily, respectively-toward dopamine formation catalyzed by CYP2D6.1, CYP2D6.2, and CYP2D6.10 expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli were compared. Although most steroid hormones had no or minor inhibitory effects on the dopamine formation by all CYP2D6 variants, progesterone inhibited the metabolism and Ki value against CYP2D6.10 was approximately twice that for CYP2D6.1 and CYP2D6.2. Quinidine exhibited stronger inhibition than quinine; however, these two compounds inhibited the CYP2D6.10-mediated reaction more weakly than the CYP2D6.1 and CYP2D6.2 reactions. These results suggest that CYP2D6 polymorphism would affect drug interaction through dopamine formation in the brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dissociated functional brain abnormalities of inhibition in boys with pure conduct disorder and in boys with pure attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia, Katya; Halari, Rozmin; Smith, Anna B; Mohammed, Majeed; Scott, Steven; Giampietro, Vincent; Taylor, Eric; Brammer, Michael J

    2008-07-01

    Inhibitory dysfunction may be a transdiagnostic etiopathophysiology of disruptive behavior disorders. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of inhibitory control has only been investigated in patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), including comorbidity with conduct disorder, showing frontal-striatal dysfunction. This study investigates differences and commonalities in functional neural networks mediating inhibitory control between medication-naive adolescents with pure conduct disorder and those with pure ADHD to identify biological markers that distinguish these clinically overlapping disorders. Event-related fMRI was used to compare brain activation of 13 boys with noncomorbid conduct disorder, 20 with noncomorbid ADHD, and 20 normal boys during an individually adjusted tracking stop task that measures the neural substrates of inhibition and stopping failure. During successful inhibition, only patients with ADHD showed reduced activation in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in relation to comparison subjects and patients with conduct disorder. During inhibition failures compared to go responses, both patient groups shared underactivation in the posterior cingulate gyrus in relation to comparison subjects. Patients with conduct disorder showed reduced activation in bilateral temporal-parietal regions compared to the other groups, which did not differ in this measure. Patients with pure ADHD or pure conduct disorder show qualitative differences in their brain abnormality patterns during inhibitory control. Inhibition-mediating prefrontal regions appear to be specifically reduced in ADHD, whereas posterior temporal-parietal, performance monitoring networks are specifically dysfunctional in conduct disorder. The findings provide pioneering evidence that distinct neurobiological abnormalities may be underlying the overlapping behavioral phenotype of the two disruptive disorders.

  5. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor inhibits osmotic swelling of rat retinal glial (Müller) and bipolar cells by activation of basic fibroblast growth factor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, B-A; Vogler, S; Pannicke, T; Kuhrt, H; Garcia, T B; Wiedemann, P; Reichenbach, A; Seeger, J; Bringmann, A

    2015-06-04

    Water accumulation in retinal glial (Müller) and neuronal cells resulting in cellular swelling contributes to the development of retinal edema and neurodegeneration. Intravitreal administration of neurotrophins such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to promote survival of retinal neurons. Here, we show that exogenous BDNF inhibits the osmotic swelling of Müller cell somata induced by superfusion of rat retinal slices or freshly isolated cells with a hypoosmotic solution containing barium ions. BDNF also inhibited the osmotic swelling of bipolar cell somata in retinal slices, but failed to inhibit the osmotic soma swelling of freshly isolated bipolar cells. The inhibitory effect of BDNF on Müller cell swelling was mediated by activation of tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) and transactivation of fibroblast growth factor receptors. Exogenous basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) fully inhibited the osmotic swelling of Müller cell somata while it partially inhibited the osmotic swelling of bipolar cell somata. Isolated Müller cells displayed immunoreactivity of truncated TrkB, but not full-length TrkB. Isolated rod bipolar cells displayed immunoreactivities of both TrkB isoforms. Data suggest that the neuroprotective effect of exogenous BDNF in the retina is in part mediated by prevention of the cytotoxic swelling of retinal glial and bipolar cells. While BDNF directly acts on Müller cells by activation of TrkB, BDNF indirectly acts on bipolar cells by inducing glial release of factors like bFGF that inhibit bipolar cell swelling.

  6. Brain emotional learning based Brain Computer Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Asadi Ghanbari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A brain computer interface (BCI enables direct communication between a brain and a computer translating brain activity into computer commands using preprocessing, feature extraction and classification operations. Classification is crucial as it has a substantial effect on the BCI speed and bit rate. Recent developments of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs bring forward some challenging problems to the machine learning community, of which classification of time-varying electrophysiological signals is a crucial one. Constructing adaptive classifiers is a promising approach to deal with this problem. In this paper, we introduce adaptive classifiers for classify electroencephalogram (EEG signals. The adaptive classifier is brain emotional learning based adaptive classifier (BELBAC, which is based on emotional learning process. The main purpose of this research is to use a structural model based on the limbic system of mammalian brain, for decision making and control engineering applications. We have adopted a network model developed by Moren and Balkenius, as a computational model that mimics amygdala, orbitofrontal cortex, thalamus, sensory input cortex and generally, those parts of the brain thought responsible for processing emotions. The developed method was compared with other methods used for EEG signals classification (support vector machine (SVM and two different neural network types (MLP, PNN. The result analysis demonstrated an efficiency of the proposed approach.

  7. Central nervous action of interleukin-1 mediates activation of limbic structures and behavioural depression in response to peripheral administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konsman, J P; Veeneman, J; Combe, C; Poole, S; Luheshi, G N; Dantzer, R

    2008-12-01

    Although receptors for the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 have long been known to be expressed in the brain, their role in fever and behavioural depression observed during the acute phase response (APR) to tissue infection remains unclear. This may in part be due to the fact that interleukin-1 in the brain is bioactive only several hours after peripheral administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To study the role of cerebral interleukin-1 action in temperature and behavioural changes, and activation of brain structures during the APR, interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra; 100 microg) was infused into the lateral brain ventricle 4 h after intraperitoneal (i.p.) LPS injection (250 microg/kg) in rats. I.p. LPS administration induced interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) production in systemic circulation as well as in brain circumventricular organs and the choroid plexus. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) infusion of IL-1ra 4 h after i.p. LPS injection attenuated the reduction in social interaction, a cardinal sign of behavioural depression during sickness, and c-Fos expression in the amygdala and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. However, LPS-induced fever, rises in plasma corticosterone, body weight loss and c-Fos expression in the hypothalamus and caudal brainstem were not altered by i.c.v. infusion of IL-1ra. These findings, together with our previous observations showing that i.c.v. infused IL-1ra diffuses throughout perivascular spaces, where macrophages express interleukin-1 receptors, can be interpreted to suggest that circulating or locally produced brain IL-1beta acts on these cells to bring about behavioural depression and activation of limbic structures during the APR after peripheral LPS administration.

  8. The Specific Protein Kinase R (PKR) Inhibitor C16 Protects Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia Brain Damages by Inhibiting Neuroinflammation in a Neonatal Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jinglei; Tan, Yongchang; Li, Yinjiao; Luo, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background Brain injuries induced by hypoxia-ischemia in neonates contribute to increased mortality and lifelong neurological dysfunction. The specific PKR inhibitor C16 has been previously demonstrated to exert a neuroprotective role in adult brain injuries. However, there is no recent study available concerning its protective role in hypoxia-ischemia-induced immature brain damage. Therefore, we investigated whether C16 protects against neonatal hypoxia-ischemia injuries in a neonatal rat model. Material/Methods Postnatal day 7 (P7) rats were used to establish classical hypoxia-ischemia animal models, and C16 postconditioning with 100 ug/kg was performed immediately after hypoxia. Western blot analysis was performed to quantify the phosphorylation of the PKR at 0 h, 3 h, 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, and phosphorylation of NF-κB 24h after hypoxia exposure. The TTC stain for infarction area and TUNEL stain for apoptotic cells were assayed 24 h after the brain hypoxia. Gene expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α was performed at 3 h, 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h. Results The level of PKR autophosphorylation was increased dramatically, especially at 3 h (C16 group vs. HI group, P<0.01). Intraperitoneal C16 administration reduced the infarct volume and apoptosis ratio after this insult (C16 group vs. HI group<0.01), and C16 reduced proinflammatory cytokines mRNA expression, partly through inhibiting NF-κB activation (C16 group vs. HI group<0.05). Conclusions C16 can protect immature rats against hypoxia-ischemia-induced brain damage by modulating neuroinflammation. PMID:28008894

  9. Limbic system activation is affected by prenatal predator exposure and postnatal environmental enrichment and further moderated by dam and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korgan, Austin C; Green, Amanda D; Perrot, Tara S; Esser, Michael J

    2014-02-01

    Epilepsy is a relatively common and chronic neurological condition, affecting 1-2% of the population. However, understanding of the underlying pathophysiology remains incomplete. To identify potential factors in the early environment that may increase the risk for experiencing seizures, maternal stress and environmental enrichment (EE) were utilized. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were exposed to an ethologically relevant predator stress (PS) and maternal glucocorticoid (GC) response was assessed across the exposure period. At birth, litters were divided into standard care (SC) and EE groups until postnatal day 14 (PD14) when a model of febrile convulsions was used to determine seizure susceptibility of the various groups. Pup brains were then processed for immunohistochemical detection of FosB from several structures in the limbic system as a measure of neuronal activation. Maternal PS-induced GC levels were elevated early in the exposure period, and pup birth weights, in both sexes, were lower in litters from dams exposed to PS. Seizure scores at PD14 were highly individualized and litter dependent, suggesting a dam-dependent and variable effect of controlled pre- and postnatal environmental factors. Further, analysis of FosB-immunoreactive (-ir) patterns revealed an activity dependent distribution, reflecting individual seizure susceptibility. EE had a varying effect on FosB-ir that was dependent on region. In the hippocampus FosB-ir levels were greater in the EE groups while extra-hippocampal regions showed lower levels of FosB-ir. Our results support the concept that pre- and postnatal environmental influences affect fetal programming and neurodevelopment of processes that could underlie seizure susceptibility, but that the magnitude of these effects appears to be dam- or litter-dependent.

  10. Association of limbic system-associated membrane protein (LSAMP to male completed suicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maron Eduard

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated volumetric abnormalities in limbic structures of suicide victims. The morphological changes might be caused by some inherited neurodevelopmental defect, such as failure to form proper axonal connections due to genetically determined dysfunction of neurite guidance molecules. Limbic system-associated membrane protein (LSAMP is a neuronal adhesive molecule, preferentially expressed in developing limbic system neuronal dendrites and somata. Some evidence for the association between LSAMP gene and behavior has come from both animal as well as human studies but further investigation is required. In current study, polymorphic loci in human LSAMP gene were examined in order to reveal any associations between genetic variation in LSAMP and suicidal behaviour. Methods DNA was obtained from 288 male suicide victims and 327 healthy male volunteers. Thirty SNPs from LSAMP gene and adjacent region were selected by Tagger algorithm implemented in Haploview 3.32. Genotyping was performed using the SNPlex™ (Applied Biosystems platform. Data was analyzed by Genemapper 3.7, Haploview 3.32 and SPSS 13.0. Results Chi square test revealed four allelic variants (rs2918215, rs2918213, rs9874470 and rs4821129 located in the intronic region of the gene to be associated with suicide, major alleles being overrepresented in suicide group. However, the associations did not survive multiple correction test. Defining the haplotype blocks using confidence interval algorithm implemented in Haploview 3.32, we failed to detect any associated haplotypes. Conclusion Despite a considerable amount of investigation on the nature of suicidal behaviour, its aetiology and pathogenesis remain unknown. This study examined the variability in LSAMP gene in relation to completed suicide. Our results indicate that LSAMP might play a role in pathoaetiology of suicidal behaviour but further studies are needed to understand its exact

  11. [A case of acute limbic encephalitis with cerebral salt wasting syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishio, Motonobu; Nishitani, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Keiko

    2014-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman presented with psychiatric symptoms. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed pleocytosis and increased protein. The patient was diagnosed with limbic encephalitis on the basis of the clinical course. However, remarkable hyponatremia was noted throughout the clinical course, leading to a diagnosis of cerebral salt wasting syndrome (CSWS). The hyponatremia was alleviated by supplementation with sodium and water. The findings seen in this case indicate that differentiation between syndrome of inappropriate of antidiuretic hormone and CSWS is important in cases of hyponatremia accompanied by central nervous system disease.

  12. Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting with Paraneoplastic Hallucinations and Cognitive Decline from Limbic Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Joshua W; Cherukuri, Ramesh; Buchan, Debra

    2015-07-01

    We present a 66-year-old woman with 2 months of visual hallucinations, unintentional weight loss, and short-term memory decline, whose clinical presentation and EEG supported a diagnosis of limbic encephalitis. Subsequent evaluation for a paraneoplastic etiology revealed a renal mass, which was resected and identified as clear cell renal carcinoma. The patient's clinical condition improved after resection of the mass. When patients present with incongruous subacute neuropsychiatric symptoms, clinicians should be mindful of paraneoplastic neurological disorders, as early diagnosis and treatment of malignancy may lead to symptomatic improvement.

  13. The prefrontal-limbic system: development, neuroanatomy, function, and implications for socioemotional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Katharina

    2011-12-01

    The knowledge that neonatal emotional experience and associated learning processes are critical in the maturation of prefronto-limbic circuits emphasizes the importance of preterm and neonatal care. The further improvement of care and intervention strategies requires a deeper understanding of epigenetic mechanisms mediating experience-induced synaptic reorganization underlying the emergence of emotional and cognitive behavioral traits. Interdisciplinary research efforts are needed in which pediatricians and developmental biologists and psychologists merge their knowledge, concepts, and methodology. The hope is that the translational relevance of research efforts can be improved through a greater interaction between basic and clinical scientists.

  14. PRO-2-PAM: The First Therapeutic Drug for Reactivation of Organo-Phosphate-Inhibited Central (Brain) and Peripheral Cholinesterases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    the H&E and fluoro-jade stained slides, respectively. The middle lobe of the piriform cortex, a distinct brain region known to be sensitive to OP...U /m g Figure 8. H & E stain of guinea pig brain, 40x magnification of the piriform cortical neuron layer (“A”; see Methods section 2.5). (a...receiving DFP followed by the oxime 2-PAM. Black arrow points to piriform neurons. (a) ControlPiriform cortical neuron layer (b) DFP (c) DFP, then pro-2

  15. Effects of matrix metalloproteinase 9 inhibition on the blood brain barrier and inflammation in rats following cardiopulmonary resuscitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Zhi-jie; HUANG Zi-tong; CHEN Xiao-tong; ZOU Zi-jun

    2009-01-01

    Background Neuroprotective strategies following cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are an important focus in emergency and critical care medicine. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), especially MMP9 attracted much attention because of its function in focal brain ischemia/reperfusion injury. In the focal cerebral ischemia model in rats, SB-3CT can suppress the expression of MMP9, relieving brain edema, and there was no studies on global cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury after CPR.Methods One hundred and twenty rats were randomly assigned to sham-operated (n=40), resuscitation treatment (n= 40), and resuscitation control (n= 40) groups. Sham-operated group rats were anesthetized only and intubated tracheally, while the resuscitation treatment and resuscitation control groups also received cardiac arrest by asphyxiation. In the resuscitation treatment group, SB-3CT was injected intraperitoneally after restoring spontaneous circulation (ROSC), defined as restoration of supraventricular rhythm and mean arterial pressure (MAP) ≥ 60 mm Hg for more than 5 minutes. The resuscitation control group also implemented ROSC without injection of SB-3CT. The rats were executed and samples were taken immediately after death, then at 3, 9, 24, and 48 hours (n=8). Brain tissue expression of MMP9 protein, MMP9 mRNA, water content, Evans blue content, TNF-a, IL-1, and IL-6 was measured, and the brain tissue ultramicrostructure studied with electron microscopy.Results In the resuscitation control group, brain tissue expression of MMP9 protein and mRNA, water content, Evans blue content, TNF-a, IL-1, and IL-6 were significantly elevated at 3 hours, and peaked at 24 hours after resuscitation, when compared with the sham-operated group (P <0.05). Tissue ultramicrostructure also changed in the resuscitation control group. By contrast, although all these indexes were increased in the resuscitation treatment group compared with the sham-operated group (P<0.05), they were lower than in the

  16. Effect of siRNA‑induced inhibition of IL‑6 expression in rat cerebral gliocytes on cerebral edema following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bin; Yu, Dong-Ming; Liu, Fu-Sheng

    2014-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of RNA interference (RNAi) on the inhibition of interleukin (IL)‑6 expression in rat cerebral gliocytes in vitro and rat cerebral traumatic tissues in vivo, as well as the effect of RNAi on cerebral edema. pSUPER vectors containing IL‑6 small hairpin RNA (pSUPER‑IL‑6 1‑5) were designed, constructed and transfected into C6 rat glioma cells using cationic liposomes. ELISA was used to select the plasmid with the strongest interference effect. A freefall method was used to generate a rat brain injury model and rats were randomly divided into treatment, empty plasmid and control groups (n=14/group). IL‑6 levels, water content and sodium content were determined in the brain tissues at 24 and 72 h post‑injury. pSUPER‑IL‑6 was effectively transfected into C6 cells and was found to inhibit the expression of IL‑6 rather than IL‑8. The pSUPER‑IL‑6 1 vector was most effective in inducing RNAi. In vivo, IL‑6 levels were observed to be lowest in the interference group and there were statistically significant differences in water and sodium content among the experimental groups (Pcerebral gliocytes, and the reduction of the IL‑6 levels was found to reduce post‑traumatic cerebral edema.

  17. Brain catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibition by tolcapone counteracts recognition memory deficits in normal and chronic phencyclidine-treated rats and in COMT-Val transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detrait, Eric R; Carr, Greg V; Weinberger, Daniel R; Lamberty, Yves

    2016-08-01

    The critical involvement of dopamine in cognitive processes has been well established, suggesting that therapies targeting dopamine metabolism may alleviate cognitive dysfunction. Catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT) is a catecholamine-degrading enzyme, the substrates of which include dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. The present work illustrates the potential therapeutic efficacy of COMT inhibition in alleviating cognitive impairment. A brain-penetrant COMT inhibitor, tolcapone, was tested in normal and phencyclidine-treated rats and COMT-Val transgenic mice. In a novel object recognition procedure, tolcapone counteracted a 24-h-dependent forgetting of a familiar object as well as phencyclidine-induced recognition deficits in the rats at doses ranging from 7.5 to 30 mg/kg. In contrast, entacapone, a COMT inhibitor that does not readily cross the blood-brain barrier, failed to show efficacy at doses up to 30 mg/kg. Tolcapone at a dose of 30 mg/kg also improved novel object recognition performance in transgenic mice, which showed clear recognition deficits. Complementing earlier studies, our results indicate that central inhibition of COMT positively impacts recognition memory processes and might constitute an appealing treatment for cognitive dysfunction related to neuropsychiatric disorders.

  18. Water Extractable Phytochemicals from Peppers (Capsicum spp. Inhibit Acetylcholinesterase and Butyrylcholinesterase Activities and Prooxidants Induced Lipid Peroxidation in Rat Brain In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omodesola O. Ogunruku

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This study sought to investigate antioxidant capacity of aqueous extracts of two pepper varieties (Capsicum annuum var. accuminatum (SM and Capsicum chinense (RO and their inhibitory effect on acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase activities. Methods. The antioxidant capacity of the peppers was evaluated by the 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS radical scavenging ability and ferric reducing antioxidant property. The inhibition of prooxidant induced lipid peroxidation and cholinesterase activities in rat brain homogenates was also evaluated. Results. There was no significant difference (P>0.05 in the total phenol contents of the unripe and ripe Capsicum spp. extracts. Ripe and unripe SM samples had significantly higher (P<0.05 ABTS* scavenging ability than RO samples, while the ripe fruits had significantly higher (P<0.05 ferric reducing properties in the varieties. Furthermore, the extracts inhibited Fe2+ and quinolinic acid induced lipid peroxidation in rats brain homogenates in a dose-dependent manner. Ripe and unripe samples from SM had significantly higher AChE inhibitory abilities than RO samples, while there was no significant difference in the BuChE inhibitory abilities of the pepper samples. Conclusion. The antioxidant and anticholinesterase properties of Capsicum spp. may be a possible dietary means by which oxidative stress and symptomatic cognitive decline associated with neurodegenerative conditions could be alleviated.

  19. Curcumin inhibits beta-amyloid protein 40/42 expression in the brain in a concentration-and time-dependent manner

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Zhang; Lu Si; Xiaodong Shi; Wenke Yin; Yu Li

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that the amount of beta-amyloid(Aβ)protein in the brain can be lowered by down-regulating Aβ production,promoting Aβ degradation,reducing Aβ oligomerization or deposition,thereby alleviating symptoms of Alzheimer's disease.Curcumin has been known to be a peroxisome proliferator activated receptor gamma(PPARy)agonist and can obviously inhibit Aβ production and oligomerization.This study investigated the effects of curcumin on the β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1(BACE1)activity and PPARy expression in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells,and validated the inhibitory effects of curcumin on Aβ40/42 expression in the brain.Results revealed that PPARy mRNA and protein expression in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells significantly increased with increasing curcumin concentration and time course(P < 0.05);BACE1 mRNA and protein expression and Aβ40/42 production significantly decreased with increasing curcumin concentration and time course(P < 0.05).The changes in PPARY and BACE1expression during Aβ production could be reversed by the PPARy antagonist GW9662.These findings indicate that curcumin reduced Aβ production by activating PPARy expression and inhibiting BACE1 expression in a concentration-and time-dependent manner.

  20. Lipopolysaccharide induces expression of tumour necrosis factor alpha in rat brain : inhibition by methylprednisolone and by rolipram

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttini, M; Mir, A; Appel, K; Wiederhold, KH; Limonta, S; GebickeHaerter, PJ; Boddeke, HWGM

    1997-01-01

    1 We have investigated the effects of the phosphodiesterase (PDE) type TV inhibitor rolipram and of the glucocorticoid methylprednisolone on the induction of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA and protein in brains of rats after peripheral administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). 2 Aft

  1. Lipopolysaccharide induces expression of tumour necrosis factor alpha in rat brain : inhibition by methylprednisolone and by rolipram

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buttini, M; Mir, A; Appel, K; Wiederhold, KH; Limonta, S; GebickeHaerter, PJ; Boddeke, HWGM

    1997-01-01

    1 We have investigated the effects of the phosphodiesterase (PDE) type TV inhibitor rolipram and of the glucocorticoid methylprednisolone on the induction of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA and protein in brains of rats after peripheral administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). 2 Aft

  2. Inhibition of oxidative stress in brain during rat adjuvant arthritis by carnosine, trolox and novel trolox-carnosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poništ, S; Slovák, L; Kuncírová, V; Fedorova, T; Logvinenko, A; Muzychuk, O; Mihalová, D; Bauerová, K

    2015-01-01

    Carnosine (CARN) is an anti-glycating agent able to quench superoxide, and to neutralize 4-hydroxynonenal. Trolox-carnosine (CARN-T) was synthesized because of its resistance against degradation and to improve CARN antioxidant capacity. We evaluated the impact of trolox (TRO), CARN and its derivative CARN-T on oxidative stress (OS) in brain during rat adjuvant arthritis (AA). The experiments were done on healthy, control arthritic and arthritic animals with administration of CARN 150 mg/kg b.w., TRO 41 mg/kg b.w. and CARN-T 75 mg/kg b.w. in a daily dose during 28 days. Antioxidants did not affect the body weight on day 14, but on day 28 TRO enhanced the weight reduction. On day 14 and 28 CARN-T and TRO reduced arthritic score. IL-1beta, MCP-1 and MMP-9 were measured in plasma on day 14. MCP-1 was decreased by CARN-T and TRO. All antioxidants reduced IL-1beta and MMP-9 levels. Malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxynonenal and protein carbonyls were increased in brain. CARN, CARN-T and TRO prevented higher lipid and protein oxidation in brain. CARN and CARN-T caused no weight reduction like TRO that has an advantage in inflammatory arthritis. Moreover the antioxidants administered had a similar therapeutic effects on arthritic score, markers of inflammation in plasma and OS in brain.

  3. Role of aqueous extract of Cynodon dactylon in prevention of carbofuran- induced oxidative stress and acetylcholinesterase inhibition in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, D K; Sharma, R K; Rai, P K; Watal, G; Sharma, B

    2011-02-12

    The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorating effect of aqueous extract of C. dactylon on carbofuran induced oxidative stress (OS) and alterations in the activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the brain of rats. Vitamin C was used as a positive control. Wistar rats were administered with single sub-acute oral dose (1.6 mgkg-1 b.wt.) of carbofuran for 24 h. The OS parameters such as lipid peroxidation (LPO) and the activities of antioxidant enzymes including super oxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and that of AChE were studied in brain. Carbofuran treatment significantly increased the activities of SOD and CAT by 75 and 60%, respectively. It also induced the level of LPO by 113%. In contrast, the activities of GST and AChE were recorded to be diminished by 25 and 33%, respectively. Pretreatment of the rats with aqueous extract of C. dactylon (oral; 500mgkg-1) restored SOD activity completely but CAT activity only partially (7%). Carbofuran induced LPO was moderated by 95% in the brain of C. dactylon treated rats. The observed changes in OS parameters in C. dactylon treated group were comparable to that observed in vitamin C (200 mg-kg-1 b. wt.) treated group. Surprisingly, C. dactylon treatment significantly recovered the activity of AChE to a similar level as observed in the brain of control group. In contrast vitamin C treatment did not cause significant change in the activity of AChE in carbofuran treated group. There were no noticeable changes in the aforementioned study parameters in the brain of rats receiving C. dactylon and vitamin C, only. The results suggest that the study is extremely important in the context of development of new anticholinestesterase and antioxidant antidotes against carbofuran from C. dactylon.

  4. Capgras syndrome associated with limbic encephalitis in a patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herval Ribeiro Soares Neto

    Full Text Available We report the case of a patient with insidious onset and slowly progressive cognitive impairment, behavioral symptoms, temporal lobe seizures and delusional thoughts typical of delusional misidentification syndromes. Clinical presentation along with extensive diagnostic work-up revealed limbic encephalitis secondary to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The patient underwent immunotherapy with high-dose corticosteroid but no significant improvement was observed. No specific treatment for lymphoma was performed because the patient died of septic shock following a nosocomial respiratory infection. Delusional misidentification syndromes are an unusual and unique form of cognitive impairment in which a patient consistently misidentifies persons, places, objects, or events. Capgras syndrome is the most common subtype of this disorder, being defined by the recurrent and transient belief that someone close has been substituted by an imposter. These entities are generally associated with neurodegenerative diseases and psychiatric disturbances. Rare reports of associations between misidentification syndromes and autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis have been published, but no papers address a correlation with limbic encephalitis or lymphoma.

  5. Diffusion tensor imaging in Alzheimer's disease: insights into the limbic-diencephalic network and methodological considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Cabronero, Julio; Nestor, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    Glucose hypometabolism and gray matter atrophy are well known consequences of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Studies using these measures have shown that the earliest clinical stages, in which memory impairment is a relatively isolated feature, are associated with degeneration in an apparently remote group of areas-mesial temporal lobe (MTL), diencephalic structures such as anterior thalamus and mammillary bodies, and posterior cingulate. These sites are thought to be strongly anatomically inter-connected via a limbic-diencephalic network. Diffusion tensor imaging or DTI-an imaging technique capable of probing white matter tissue microstructure-has recently confirmed degeneration of the white matter connections of the limbic-diencephalic network in AD by way of an unbiased analysis strategy known as tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). The present review contextualizes the relevance of these findings, in which the fornix is likely to play a fundamental role in linking MTL and diencephalon. An interesting by-product of this work has been in showing that alterations in diffusion behavior are complex in AD-while early studies tended to focus on fractional anisotropy, recent work has highlighted that this measure is not the most sensitive to early changes. Finally, this review will discuss in detail several technical aspects of DTI both in terms of image acquisition and TBSS analysis as both of these factors have important implications to ensure reliable observations are made that inform understanding of neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Inhibition of aminoacylase 3 protects rat brain cortex neuronal cells from the toxicity of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal mercapturate and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsirulnikov, Kirill; Abuladze, Natalia [Department of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Bragin, Anatol [Department of Neurology, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Brain Research Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Faull, Kym [Brain Research Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Pasarow Mass Spectrometry Laboratory, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Cascio, Duilio [Institute of Genomics and Proteomics, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Damoiseaux, Robert; Schibler, Matthew J. [California NanoSystems Institute, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Pushkin, Alexander, E-mail: apushkin@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Medicine, University of California at Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    4-Hydroxy-2-nonenal (4HNE) and acrolein (ACR) are highly reactive neurotoxic products of lipid peroxidation that are implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Conjugation with glutathione (GSH) initiates the 4HNE and ACR detoxification pathway, which generates the mercapturates of 4HNE and ACR that can be excreted. Prior work has shown that the efficiency of the GSH-dependent renal detoxification of haloalkene derived mercapturates is significantly decreased upon their deacetylation because of rapid transformation of the deacetylated products into toxic compounds mediated by β-lyase. The enzymes of the GSH-conjugation pathway and β-lyases are expressed in the brain, and we hypothesized that a similar toxicity mechanism may be initiated in the brain by the deacetylation of 4HNE- and ACR-mercapturate. The present study was performed to identify an enzyme(s) involved in 4HNE- and ACR-mercapturate deacetylation, characterize the brain expression of this enzyme and determine whether its inhibition decreases 4HNE and 4HNE-mercapturate neurotoxicity. We demonstrated that of two candidate deacetylases, aminoacylases 1 (AA1) and 3 (AA3), only AA3 efficiently deacetylates both 4HNE- and ACR-mercapturate. AA3 was further localized to neurons and blood vessels. Using a small molecule screen we generated high-affinity AA3 inhibitors. Two of them completely protected rat brain cortex neurons expressing AA3 from the toxicity of 4HNE-mercapturate. 4HNE-cysteine (4HNE-Cys) was also neurotoxic and its toxicity was mostly prevented by a β-lyase inhibitor, aminooxyacetate. The results suggest that the AA3 mediated deacetylation of 4HNE-mercapturate may be involved in the neurotoxicity of 4HNE.

  7. Spreading depolarization in the brain of Drosophila is induced by inhibition of the Na+/K+-ATPase and mitigated by a decrease in activity of protein kinase G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Kristin E; Rodríguez, Esteban C; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2016-09-01

    Spreading depolarization (SD) is characterized by a massive redistribution of ions accompanied by an arrest in electrical activity that slowly propagates through neural tissue. It has been implicated in numerous human pathologies, including migraine, stroke, and traumatic brain injury, and thus the elucidation of control mechanisms underlying the phenomenon could have many health benefits. Here, we demonstrate the occurrence of SD in the brain of Drosophila melanogaster, providing a model system, whereby cellular mechanisms can be dissected using molecular genetic approaches. Propagating waves of SD were reliably induced by disrupting the extracellular potassium concentration ([K(+)]o), either directly or by inhibition of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase with ouabain. The disturbance was monitored by recording the characteristic surges in [K(+)]o using K(+)-sensitive microelectrodes or by monitoring brain activity by measuring direct current potential. With the use of wild-type flies, we show that young adults are more resistant to SD compared with older adults, evidenced by shorter bouts of SD activity and attenuated [K(+)]o disturbances. Furthermore, we show that the susceptibility to SD differs between wild-type flies and w1118 mutants, demonstrating that our ouabain model is influenced by genetic strain. Lastly, flies with low levels of protein kinase G (PKG) had increased latencies to onset of both ouabain-induced SD and anoxic depolarization compared with flies with higher levels. Our findings implicate the PKG pathway as a modulator of SD in the fly brain, and given the conserved nature of the signaling pathway, it could likely play a similar role during SD in the mammalian central nervous system.

  8. Disturbed Mental Imagery of Affected Body-Parts in Patients with Hysterical Conversion Paraplegia Correlates with Pathological Limbic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Saj

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients with conversion disorder generally suffer from a severe neurological deficit which cannot be attributed to a structural neurological damage. In two patients with acute conversion paraplegia, investigation with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI showed that the insular cortex, a limbic-related cortex involved in body-representation and subjective emotional experience, was activated not only during attempt to move the paralytic body-parts, but also during mental imagery of their movements. In addition, mental rotation of affected body-parts was found to be disturbed, as compared to unaffected body parts or external objects. fMRI during mental rotation of the paralytic body-part showed an activation of another limbic related region, the anterior cingulate cortex. These data suggest that conversion paraplegia is associated with pathological activity in limbic structures involved in body representation and a deficit in mental processing of the affected body-parts.

  9. Prodigiosin inhibits gp91{sup phox} and iNOS expression to protect mice against the oxidative/nitrosative brain injury induced by hypoxia-ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chia-Che [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Center, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Center of Infectious Disease and Signaling Research, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Wang, Yea-Hwey [Department of Nursing, College of Medicine and Nursing, Hungkuang University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chern, Chang-Ming [Division of Neurovascular Disease, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liou, Kuo-Tong [Department of Chinese Martial Arts, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hou, Yu-Chang [Department of Chinese Medicine, Taoyuan General Hospital, Department of Health, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, Yuanpei University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Bioscience Technology, Chuan-Yuan Christian University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Peng, Yu-Ta [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shen, Yuh-Chiang, E-mail: yuhcs@nricm.edu.tw [National Research Institute of Chinese Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2011-11-15

    This study aimed to explore the mechanisms by which prodigiosin protects against hypoxia-induced oxidative/nitrosative brain injury induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion (MCAo/r) injury in mice. Hypoxia in vitro was modeled using oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) followed by reoxygenation of BV-2 microglial cells. Our results showed that treatment of mice that have undergone MCAo/r injury with prodigiosin (10 and 100 {mu}g/kg, i.v.) at 1 h after hypoxia ameliorated MCAo/r-induced oxidative/nitrosative stress, brain infarction, and neurological deficits in the mice, and enhanced their survival rate. MCAo/r induced a remarkable production in the mouse brains of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a significant increase in protein nitrosylation; this primarily resulted from enhanced expression of NADPH oxidase 2 (gp91{sup phox}), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and the infiltration of CD11b leukocytes due to breakdown of blood-brain barrier (BBB) by activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). All these changes were significantly diminished by prodigiosin. In BV-2 cells, OGD induced ROS and nitric oxide production by up-regulating gp91{sup phox} and iNOS via activation of the NF-{kappa}B pathway, and these changes were suppressed by prodigiosin. In conclusion, our results indicate that prodigiosin reduces gp91{sup phox} and iNOS expression possibly by impairing NF-{kappa}B activation. This compromises the activation of microglial and/or inflammatory cells, which then, in turn, mediates prodigiosin's protective effect in the MCAo/r mice. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prodigiosin ameliorated brain infarction and deficits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prodigiosin protected against hypoxia/reperfusion-induced brain injury. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prodigiosin diminished oxidative/nitrosativestress and leukocytes infiltration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prodigiosin reduced BBB breakdown. Black

  10. Nipping cue reactivity in the bud: baclofen prevents limbic activation elicited by subliminal drug cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Kimberly A; Franklin, Teresa R; Roberts, David C S; Jagannathan, Kanchana; Suh, Jesse J; Wetherill, Reagan R; Wang, Ze; Kampman, Kyle M; O'Brien, Charles P; Childress, Anna Rose

    2014-04-02

    Relapse is a widely recognized and difficult to treat feature of the addictions. Substantial evidence implicates cue-triggered activation of the mesolimbic dopamine system as an important contributing factor. Even drug cues presented outside of conscious awareness (i.e., subliminally) produce robust activation within this circuitry, indicating the sensitivity and vulnerability of the brain to potentially problematic reward signals. Because pharmacological agents that prevent these early cue-induced responses could play an important role in relapse prevention, we examined whether baclofen-a GABAB receptor agonist that reduces mesolimbic dopamine release and conditioned drug responses in laboratory animals-could inhibit mesolimbic activation elicited by subliminal cocaine cues in cocaine-dependent individuals. Twenty cocaine-dependent participants were randomized to receive baclofen (60 mg/d; 20 mg t.i.d.) or placebo. Event-related BOLD fMRI and a backward-masking paradigm were used to examine the effects of baclofen on subliminal cocaine (vs neutral) cues. Sexual and aversive cues were included to examine specificity. We observed that baclofen-treated participants displayed significantly less activation in response to subliminal cocaine (vs neutral) cues, but not sexual or aversive (vs neutral) cues, than placebo-treated participants in a large interconnected bilateral cluster spanning the ventral striatum, ventral pallidum, amygdala, midbrain, and orbitofrontal cortex (voxel threshold p baclofen may inhibit the earliest type of drug cue-induced motivational processing-that which occurs outside of awareness-before it evolves into a less manageable state.

  11. INHIBITION OF BRAIN CHOLINESTERASE AND THE PHOTIC AFTER DISCHARGE OF FLASH EVOKED POTENTIALS PRODUCED BY CARBARYL IN LONG EVANS RATS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbaryl is a widely used N-methyl carbamate pesticide that acts by inhibiting cholinesterases (ChE), which may lead to cholinergic toxicity. Flash evoked potentials (FEPs) are a neurophysiological response often used to detect central nervous system (CNS) changes following expos...

  12. Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin reduces epileptogenesis and blood-brain barrier leakage but not microglia activation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vliet, E.A.; Forte, G.; Holtman, L.; den Burger, J.C.G.; Sinjewel, A.; de Vries, H.E.; Aronica, E.; Gorter, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Previous studies have shown that inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway with rapamycin prevents epileptogenesis after pharmacologically induced status epilepticus (SE) in rat models of temporal lobe epilepsy. Because rapamycin is also known for its immunosuppressant

  13. Memory Disrupting Effects of Nonmuscle Myosin II Inhibition Depend on the Class of Abused Drug and Brain Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Sherri B.; Blouin, Ashley M.; Young, Erica J.; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Miller, Courtney A.

    2017-01-01

    Depolymerizing actin in the amygdala through nonmuscle myosin II inhibition (NMIIi) produces a selective, lasting, and retrieval-independent disruption of the storage of methamphetamine-associated memories. Here we report a similar disruption of memories associated with amphetamine, but not cocaine or morphine, by NMIIi. Reconsolidation appeared…

  14. The pattern recognition molecule deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 (DMBT1) and synthetic mimics inhibit liposomal nucleic acid delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund Hansen, Pernille; Blaich, Stephanie; End, Caroline;

    2011-01-01

    Liposomal nucleic acid delivery is a preferred option for therapeutic settings. The cellular pattern recognition molecule DMBT1, secreted at high levels in various diseases, and synthetic mimics efficiently inhibit liposomal nucleic acid delivery to human cells. These findings may have relevance...

  15. Memory Disrupting Effects of Nonmuscle Myosin II Inhibition Depend on the Class of Abused Drug and Brain Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Sherri B.; Blouin, Ashley M.; Young, Erica J.; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Miller, Courtney A.

    2017-01-01

    Depolymerizing actin in the amygdala through nonmuscle myosin II inhibition (NMIIi) produces a selective, lasting, and retrieval-independent disruption of the storage of methamphetamine-associated memories. Here we report a similar disruption of memories associated with amphetamine, but not cocaine or morphine, by NMIIi. Reconsolidation appeared…

  16. Puerarin protects brain tissue against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injur y by inhibiting the inlfammator y response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Zhou; Liang Wang; Panpan Liu; Weiwei Hu; Xiangdong Zhu; Hong Shen; Yuanyuan Yao

    2014-01-01

    Puerarin, a traditional Chinese medicine, exerts a powerful neuroprotective effect in cerebral isch-emia/reperfusion injury, but its mechanism is unknown. Here, we established rat models of middle cerebral artery ischemia/reperfusion injury using the suture method. Puerarin (100 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally 30 minutes before middle cerebral artery occlusion and 8 hours after reperfusion. Twenty-four hours after reperfusion, we found that puerarin signiifcantly im-proved neurological deifcit, reduced infarct size and brain water content, and notably diminished the expression of Toll-like receptor-4, myeloid differentiation factor 88, nuclear factor kappa B and tumor necrosis factor-αin the ischemic region. These data indicate that puerarin exerts an anti-inlfammatory protective effect on brain tissue with ischemia/reperfusion damage by down-regulating the expression of multiple inlfammatory factors.

  17. Sexually dimorphic effects of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT inhibition on dopamine metabolism in multiple brain regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda M Laatikainen

    Full Text Available The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT enzyme metabolises catecholamines. COMT inhibitors are licensed for the adjunctive treatment of Parkinson's disease and are attractive therapeutic candidates for other neuropsychiatric conditions. COMT regulates dopamine levels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC but plays a lesser role in the striatum. However, its significance in other brain regions is largely unknown, despite its links with a broad range of behavioural phenotypes hinting at more widespread effects. Here, we investigated the effect of acute systemic administration of the brain-penetrant COMT inhibitor tolcapone on tissue levels of dopamine, noradrenaline, and the dopamine metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC and homovanillic acid (HVA. We examined PFC, striatum, hippocampus and cerebellum in the rat. We studied both males and females, given sexual dimorphisms in several aspects of COMT's function. Compared with vehicle, tolcapone significantly increased dopamine levels in the ventral hippocampus, but did not affect dopamine in other regions, nor noradrenaline in any region investigated. Tolcapone increased DOPAC and/or decreased HVA in all brain regions studied. Notably, several of the changes in DOPAC and HVA, particularly those in PFC, were more prominent in females than males. These data demonstrate that COMT alters ventral hippocampal dopamine levels, as well as regulating dopamine metabolism in all brain regions studied. They demonstrate that COMT is of significance beyond the PFC, consistent with its links with a broad range of behavioural phenotypes. Furthermore, they suggest that the impact of tolcapone may be greater in females than males, a finding which may be of clinical significance in terms of the efficacy and dosing of COMT inhibitors.

  18. Inhibition of brain cell excitability by lidocaine, QX314, and tetrodotoxin: a mechanism for analgesia from infused local anesthetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, J; Cole, L; Marlow, G

    1993-07-01

    Local anesthetic infusions have been used to provide analgesia in a variety of painful conditions. The mechanism for this drug effect remains unknown. To better define the electrical effects of lidocaine concentrations comparable to those obtained during analgesic infusions, lidocaine (0.05-3 mmol.l-1), QX314 (an obligatorily charged, quaternary lidocaine derivative applied within the cells), and tetrodotoxin (10 mmol.l-1) were applied to rat hippocampal pyramidal cells. The three drugs, which inhibit Na+ currents by varying mechanisms, produced tonic increases in (firing) current threshold, and decreases in the amplitude of action potentials measured using an intracellular microelectrode technique. Lidocaine inhibited action potential spikes and increased current threshold in a concentration-dependent fashion. Lidocaine 50 and 100 mumol.l-1 did not inhibit action potentials, but increased firing threshold by nearly 100%. Lidocaine 1-3 mmol.l-1 significantly inhibited action potential amplitude and increased threshold by as much as 800%. Similarly, QX314 and tetrodotoxin produced greater increases in current threshold than in action potential amplitude. QX314 produced phasic (or frequency-dependent) block during trains of stimuli at 1 Hz, even when almost no tonic block was present. Lidocaine produced less phasic block than QX314, and required both greater tonic block and more frequent stimulation to produce the phenomenon. Tetrodotoxin demonstrated no phasic block. Increases in current threshold occurred in lidocaine concentrations associated with analgesia and toxicity; inhibition of action potentials occurred scarcely at all at these concentrations. Thus, tonic increases in current threshold may underlie analgesia and supplementation of general anesthesia by intravenous lidocaine.

  19. Inhibition of the alternative complement activation pathway in traumatic brain injury by a monoclonal anti-factor B antibody: a randomized placebo-controlled study in mice

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    Holers V Michael

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The posttraumatic response to traumatic brain injury (TBI is characterized, in part, by activation of the innate immune response, including the complement system. We have recently shown that mice devoid of a functional alternative pathway of complement activation (factor B-/- mice are protected from complement-mediated neuroinflammation and neuropathology after TBI. In the present study, we extrapolated this knowledge from studies in genetically engineered mice to a pharmacological approach using a monoclonal anti-factor B antibody. This neutralizing antibody represents a specific and potent inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway in mice. Methods A focal trauma was applied to the left hemisphere of C57BL/6 mice (n = 89 using a standardized electric weight-drop model. Animals were randomly assigned to two treatment groups: (1 Systemic injection of 1 mg monoclonal anti-factor B antibody (mAb 1379 in 400 μl phosphate-buffered saline (PBS at 1 hour and 24 hours after trauma; (2 Systemic injection of vehicle only (400 μl PBS, as placebo control, at identical time-points after trauma. Sham-operated and untreated mice served as additional negative controls. Evaluation of neurological scores and analysis of brain tissue specimens and serum samples was performed at defined time-points for up to 1 week. Complement activation in serum was assessed by zymosan assay and by murine C5a ELISA. Brain samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL histochemistry, and real-time RT-PCR. Results The mAb 1379 leads to a significant inhibition of alternative pathway complement activity and to significantly attenuated C5a levels in serum, as compared to head-injured placebo-treated control mice. TBI induced histomorphological signs of neuroinflammation and neuronal apoptosis in the injured brain hemisphere of placebo-treated control mice for up to 7 days. In contrast, the

  20. "Cool" inferior frontostriatal dysfunction in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder versus "hot" ventromedial orbitofrontal-limbic dysfunction in conduct disorder: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubia, Katya

    2011-06-15

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder overlap behaviorally, clinically, and cognitively. An important question of potential future clinical relevance is whether these two overlapping disorders are mediated by similar or distinct underlying brain substrates. This article reviews the modern neuroimaging literature on brain structure, function, and connectivity in both disorders, shaping out commonalities and differences. Findings show that ADHD is characterized predominantly by abnormalities in inferior frontal, striatal, parietotemporal, and cerebellar regions and networks that mediate "cool"-cognitive, i.e., inhibitory, attention and timing functions associated with the disorder. Conduct disorder, by contrast, has consistently been associated with abnormalities of the "hot" paralimbic system that regulates motivation and affect, comprising lateral orbital and ventromedial prefrontal cortices, superior temporal lobes, and underlying limbic structures, most prominently the amygdala. Direct comparisons in functional imaging show that these associations of cool inferior fronto-striato-cerebellar dysfunction in ADHD and of hot orbitofrontal-paralimbic dysfunction in conduct disorder are disorder-specific. There is, hence, evidence for dissociated underlying pathophysiologies for these two disorders that may have implications for future anatomy-based differential diagnosis and prevention and intervention.

  1. GBR-12909 and fluspirilene potently inhibited binding of ( sup 3 H) (+) 3-PPP to sigma receptors in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, P.C.; Bremer, M.E.; Rao, T.S. (G. D. Searle Co., Chesterfield, MO (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Fluspirilene and GBR-12909, two compounds structurally similar to BMY-14802 and haloperidol, were assessed for their ability to interact with sigma receptors. Fluspirilene, an antipsychotic agent that interacts potently with dopamine receptors, inhibited the binding of ({sup 3}H)-(+)3-PPP (IC{sub 50} = 380 nM) more potently than rimcazole, a putative sigma antagonist that was tested clinically for antipsychotic activity. GBR-12909, a potent dopamine uptake blocker, also inhibited the binding of ({sup 3}H)-(+)3-PPP with an IC{sub 50} of 48 nM. However, other compounds that block the re-uptake of catecholamines, such as nomifensine, desipramine, imipramine, xylamine, benztropine and cocaine, were much weaker than GBR-12909as sigma ligands. Thus, GBR-12909 and fluspirilene, compounds structurally similar to BMY-14802, are potent sigma ligands.

  2. Expression profiling in APP23 mouse brain: inhibition of Aβ amyloidosis and inflammation in response to LXR agonist treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangelsdorf David

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies demonstrate that in addition to its modulatory effect on APP processing, in vivo application of Liver X Receptor agonist T0901317 (T0 to APP transgenic and non-transgenic mice decreases the level of Aβ42. Moreover, in young Tg2576 mice T0 completely reversed contextual memory deficits. Compared to other tissues, the regulatory functions of LXRs in brain remain largely unexplored and our knowledge so far is limited to the cholesterol transporters and apoE. In this study we applied T0 to APP23 mice for various times and examined gene and protein expression. We also performed a series of experiments with primary brain cells derived from wild type and LXR knockout mice subjected to various LXR agonist treatments and inflammatory stimuli. Results We demonstrate an upregulation of genes related to lipid metabolism/transport, metabolism of xenobiotics and detoxification. Downregulated genes are involved in immune response and inflammation, cell death and apoptosis. Additional treatment experiments demonstrated an increase of soluble apolipoproteins E and A-I and a decrease of insoluble Aβ. In primary LXRwt but not in LXRα-/-β-/- microglia and astrocytes LXR agonists suppressed the inflammatory response induced by LPS or fibrillar Aβ. Conclusion The results show that LXR agonists could alleviate AD pathology by acting on amyloid deposition and brain inflammation. An increased understanding of the LXR controlled regulation of Aβ aggregation and clearance systems will lead to the development of more specific and powerful agonists targeting LXR for the treatment of AD.

  3. Is the spatial distribution of brain lesions associated with closed-head injury in children predictive of subsequent development of posttraumatic stress disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herskovits, Edward H.; Gerring, Joan P.; Davatzikos, Christos; Bryan, R. Nick

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine whether there is an association between the spatial distributions of lesions detected at magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain in children, adolescents, and young adults after closed-head injury (CHI) and development of the reexperiencing symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Data obtained in 94 subjects without a history of PTSD as determined by parental interview were analyzed. MR images were obtained 3 months after CHI. Lesions were manually delineated and registered to the Talairach coordinate system. Mann-Whitney analysis of lesion distribution and PTSD status at 1 year (again, as determined by parental interview) was performed, consisting of an analysis of lesion distribution versus the major symptoms of PTSD: reexperiencing, hyperarousal, and avoidance. RESULTS: Of the 94 subjects, 41 met the PTSD reexperiencing criterion and nine met all three PTSD criteria. Subjects who met the reexperiencing criterion had fewer lesions in limbic system structures (eg, the cingulum) on the right than did subjects who did not meet this criterion (Mann-Whitney, P =.003). CONCLUSION: Lesions induced by CHI in the limbic system on the right may inhibit subsequent manifestation of PTSD reexperiencing symptoms in children, adolescents, and young adults. Copyright RSNA, 2002.

  4. ADVANCED IN VIVO USE OF CRISPR/CAS9 AND ANTI-SENSE DNA INHIBITION FOR GENE MANIPULATION IN THE BRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon J Walters

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene-editing tools are essential for uncovering how genes mediate normal brain-behaviour relationships and contribute to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent progress in gene-editing technology is now allowing neuroscientists unprecedented access to edit the genome efficiently. Although many important tools have been developed, here we focus on approaches that allow for rapid gene-editing in the mature nervous system, particularly CRISPR/Cas9 and anti-sense nucleotide-based techniques. CRISPR/Cas9 is a flexible gene-editing tool, allowing the genome to be manipulated in diverse ways. For instance, CRISPR/Cas9 has been successfully used to knock-out genes, knock-in mutations, overexpress or inhibit gene activity, and provide scaffolding for recruiting specific epigenetic regulators to individual genes and gene regions. Moreover, the CRISPR/Cas9 system may be modified to target multiple genes at one time, affording simultaneous inhibition and overexpression of distinct genetic targets. Although many of the more advanced applications of CRISPR/Cas9 have not been applied to the nervous system, the tool-box is widely-accessible, such that it is poised to help advance neuroscience. Anti-sense nucleotide-based technologies can be used to rapidly knock down genes in the brain and are simple to use. A main advantage of anti-sense based tools is their independence of viral packaging, allowing for rapid gene delivery with minimal technical expertise. Here, we describe the main applications and functions of each of these systems with an emphasis on their many potential applications in neuroscience laboratories.

  5. Hypersexuality or altered sexual preference following brain injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, B.L.; Cummings, J L; McIntyre, H.; Ebers, G; Grode, M

    1986-01-01

    Eight patients are described in whom either hypersexuality (four cases) or change in sexual preference (four cases) occurred following brain injury. In this series disinhibition of sexual activity and hypersexuality followed medial basal-frontal or diencephalic injury. This contrasted with the patients demonstrating altered sexual preference whose injuries involved limbic system structures. In some patients altered sexual behaviour may be the presenting or dominant feature of brain injury.

  6. Inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity in brain and behavioral analysis in adult rats after chronic administration of fenproporex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezin, Gislaine T; Scaini, Giselli; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Cardoso, Mariane R; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Constantino, Larissa S; Deroza, Pedro F; Ghedim, Fernando V; Valvassori, Samira S; Resende, Wilson R; Quevedo, João; Zugno, Alexandra I; Streck, Emilio L

    2012-12-01

    Fenproporex is an amphetamine-based anorectic and it is rapidly converted in vivo into amphetamine. It elevates the levels of extracellular dopamine in the brain. Acetylcholinesterase is a regulatory enzyme which is involved in cholinergic synapses and may indirectly modulate the release of dopamine. Thus, we investigated whether the effects of chronic administration of fenproporex in adult rats alters acquisition and retention of avoidance memory and acetylcholinesterase activity. Adult male Wistar rats received repeated (14 days) intraperitoneal injection of vehicle or fenproporex (6.25, 12.5 or 25 mg/kg i.p.). For behavioral assessment, animals were submitted to inhibitory avoidance (IA) tasks and continuous multiple trials step-down inhibitory avoidance (CMIA). Acetylcholinesterase activity was measured in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, hypothalamus and striatum. The administration of fenproporex (6.25, 12.5 and 25 mg/kg) did not induce impairment in short and long-term IA or CMIA retention memory in rats. In addition, longer periods of exposure to fenproporex administration decreased acetylcholinesterase activity in prefrontal cortex and striatum of rats, but no alteration was verified in the hippocampus and hypothalamus. In conclusion, the present study showed that chronic fenproporex administration decreased acetylcholinesterase activity in the rat brain. However, longer periods of exposure to fenproporex did not produce impairment in short and long-term IA or CMIA retention memory in rats.

  7. Topiramate reduces blood-brain barrier disruption and inhibits seizure activity in hyperthermia-induced seizures in rats with cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürses, Candan; Orhan, Nurcan; Ahishali, Bulent; Yilmaz, Canan Ugur; Kemikler, Gonul; Elmas, Imdat; Cevik, Aydin; Kucuk, Mutlu; Arican, Nadir; Kaya, Mehmet

    2013-02-04

    We investigated the effects of topiramate (TPM), a novel broad spectrum anticonvulsant, on seizure severity, survival rate and blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity during hyperthermic seizures in rats with cortical dysplasia (CD). Offsprings of irradiated mothers were used in this study. To show the functional and morphological alterations in BBB integrity, quantitative analysis of Evans blue (EB) extravasation, immunohistochemistry and electron microscopic assessment of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) permeability were performed. Rats with CD exposed to hyperthermia exhibited seizures with mean Racine's scores of 3.92 ± 1.2. Among the rats with CD pretreated with TPM, 21 of 24 rats showed no sign of seizure activity upon exposure to hyperthermia (pseizures increased BBB permeability to EB in animals with CD, but TPM pretreatment decreased the penetration of the tracer into the brain in these animals (pseizures, and TPM pretreatment prevented the development of HRP reaction products in these animals. The results of this study suggest that TPM inhibits seizure activity and maintains BBB integrity in the course of febrile seizures in the setting of CD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Inhibition of myeloid differentiation factor 88(MyD88) by ST2825 provides neuroprotection after experimental traumatic brain injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua-Sheng; Li, Hua; Zhang, Ding-Ding; Yan, Hui-Ying; Zhang, Zi-Huan; Zhou, Chen-Hui; Ye, Zhen-Nan; Chen, Qiang; Jiang, Tian-Wei; Liu, Jing-Peng; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2016-07-15

    Myeloid differentiation factor 88(MyD88) is an endogenous adaptor protein that plays an important role in coordinating intracellular inflammatory responses induced by agonists of the Toll-like receptor and interleukin-1 receptor families. MyD88 has been reported to be essential for neuronal death in animal models and may represent a therapeutic target for pharmacologic inhibition following traumatic brain injury (TBI). The purpose of the current study was to investigate the neuroprotective effect of MyD88 specific inhibitor ST2825 in an experimental mouse model of TBI. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of high concentration (20μg/μL) ST2825 (15min post TBI) attenuated the development of TBI in mice, markedly improved neurological function and reduced brain edema. Decreased neural apoptosis and increased neuronal survival were also observed. Biochemically, the high concentration of ST2825 significantly reduced the levels of MyD88, further decreased TAK1, p-TAK1, nuclear p65 and increased IκB-α. Additionally, ST2825 significantly reduced the levels of Iba-1 and inflammatory factors TNF-α and IL-1β. These data provide an experimental rationale for evaluation of MyD88 as a drug target and highlight the potential therapeutic implications of ST2825 in TBI.

  9. Pharmacological complement inhibition at the C3 convertase level promotes neuronal survival, neuroprotective intracerebral gene expression, and neurological outcome after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinhase, Iris; Schmidt, Oliver I; Thurman, Joshua M; Hossini, Amir M; Rozanski, Michal; Taha, Mohy E; Scheffler, Alice; John, Thilo; Smith, Wade R; Holers, V Michael; Stahel, Philip F

    2006-06-01

    The complement system represents an important mediator of neuroinflammation in traumatic brain injury. We have previously shown that transgenic mice with central nervous system-targeted overexpression of Crry, a potent murine complement inhibitor at the level of C3 convertases, are protected from complement-mediated neuropathological sequelae in brain-injured mice. This knowledge was expanded in the present study to a pharmacological approach by the use of a recombinant Crry molecule (termed Crry-Ig) which was recently made available in a chimeric form fused to the non-complement fixing mouse IgG1 Fc region. In a standardized model of closed head injury in mice, the systemic injection of 1 mg Crry-Ig at 1 h and 24 h after trauma resulted in a significant neurological improvement for up to 7 days, as compared to vehicle-injected control mice (P complement inhibition represents a promising approach for attenuation of neuroinflammation and secondary neurodegeneration after head injury.

  10. Limb Ischemic Perconditioning Attenuates Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption by Inhibiting Activity of MMP-9 and Occludin Degradation after Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Changhong; Li, Ning; Wang, Brian; Yang, Yong; Gao, Jinhuan; Li, Sijie; Ding, Yuchuan; Jin, Kunlin; Ji, Xunming

    2015-01-01

    Remote ischemic perconditioning (PerC) has been proved to have neuroprotective effects on cerebral ischemia, however, the effect of PerC on the BBB disruption and underlying mechanisms remains largely unknown. To address these issues, total 90 adult male Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were used. The rats underwent 90-min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and the limb remote ischemic PerC was immediately applied after the onset of MCAO. We found that limb remote PerC protected BBB breakdown and brain edema, in parallel with reduced infarct volume and improved neurological deficits, after MCAO. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that MCAO resulted in disrupted continuity of claudin-5 staining in the cerebral endothelial cells with significant gap formation, which was significantly improved after PerC. Western blot analysis demonstrated that expression of tight junction (TJ) protein occludin was significantly increased, but other elements of TJ proteins, claudin-5 and ZO-1, in the BBB endothelial cells were not altered at 48 h after PerC, compared to MCAO group. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9), which was involved in TJ protein degradation, was decreased after PerC. Interestingly, phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (pERK1/2), an upstream of MMP-9 signaling, was significantly reduced in the PerC group. Our data suggest that PerC inhibits MMP-9-mediated occludin degradation, which could lead to decreased BBB disruption and brain edema after ischemic stroke. PMID:26618042

  11. PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway participates in neuroprotection by dexmedetomidine inhibits neuronic autophagy following traumatic brain injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man-He Zhang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dexmedetomidine (Dex has been demonstrated to provide neuroprotective effect against brain injury in the central nervous system. However, the underlying mechanism of this neuroprotection remains unclear. In this study, we explored whether Dex has the protective potential in rat models of traumatic brain injury(TBI. More importantly, our study further investigated the role of neuronic autophagy induced by PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in this neuroprotective action. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a diffuse cortical impact injury caused by a modified weight-drop device and Dex (15ug/kg, i.v. was administered immediately after TBI. Wet-dry weight method was used to evaluate brain edema. Motor function outcome was assessed by Neurologic Severity Score and the spatial learning ability was evaluated in a Morris water maze. The co-localization of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3(LC3 and neuronal nuclei (NeuN, or LC3 and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR were analyzed by immunofluorescence respectively. The expression of LC3, Phosphorylated protein kinase B (p-Akt and p-mTOR were quantified using Western blot analysis. Our results showed treatment of rats exposed to TBI with Dex caused not only marked reduction in cerebral edema, motor and cognitive functions deficits, but also a decrease in LC3 levels and a increase in p-Akt and p-mTOR levels. Taken together, these findings indicated that treatment with Dex after TBI could inhibited neuronic autophagy in the hippocampus mediated by the activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, finally promoting neurological recovery. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(4.000: 1569-1575

  12. Unusual amnesia in a patient with VGKC-Ab limbic encephalitis: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartsounis, Luke D; de Silva, Rajith

    2011-04-01

    We describe the case of a patient with confirmed voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-associated encephalitis (VGKC-Ab). MRI studies revealed bilateral hyper-intensity in the hippocampi, with their volumes preserved. At presentation, the patient's anterograde and retrograde memory skills were found to be impaired and he showed fluctuation in his ability to recall familiar information. Following treatment with immunotherapy, his condition improved considerably and, in a series of follow up assessments, he performed satisfactorily (i.e., within the average range or above) on formal tests of memory, as well as on a range of other cognitive tests, including tests of executive function. By contrast, in the context of contemporaneous unstructured interviews, he showed a strong tendency to confabulate. We argue that the reported case broadens the phenomenology of VGKC-Ab limbic encephalitis and raises important theoretical questions about the aetiology of this patient's most unusual memory disorder.

  13. 副肿瘤性边缘叶脑炎临床特征分析%Clinical Analysis of Paraneoplastic Limbic Encephalitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李波; 闫佳兰; 朱艳霞; 冯连元; 王雪笠

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical features of paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis (PLE) and improve clinical diagnosis and treatment. Methods Clinical data, neural electrophysiological and imaging features of 3 PLE patients were retrospectively analyzed. Results The 3 patients were admitted for cognitive disorders, epilepsy, abnormal mental or behavior disorder and impaired consciousness. Hyponatremia was discovered in 2 patients with difficulty to correct. 1 patient once was ineffectively treated for cerebral infarction and viral encephalitis with antiplatelet aggregation, neurotrophic, anti-atherogenic, anti-free radicals, promoting circulation and antiviral therapy. The 3 patients were diagnosed via cerebrospinal fluid examination, electroencephalogram, lung CT and brain MRI, and they were diagnosed as having PLE. Symptoms were controlled or alleviated following Glucocorticoids and neuroprotection treatment. 1 patient was transferred to the surgical de-partment for treatment. Conclusion Early diagnosis can be made based on special clinical manifestations, brain MRI and tumor-related inspection to prevent misdiagnosis and mistreatment.%目的:探讨副肿瘤性边缘叶脑炎( paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis, PLE)的临床特征,提高诊治水平。方法对收治的PLE 3例的临床资料、神经电生理及影像学特征进行回顾性分析。结果本组3例均因智能障碍、癫痫发作、精神行为异常或意识障碍入院,其中2例表现为顽固性低钠血症,纠正困难;1例曾按脑梗死?脑炎?予抗血小板聚集、营养神经、抗动脉硬化、清除自由基、活血化瘀及抗病毒治疗无效。3例均行腰椎穿刺(腰穿)脑脊液检查、脑电图、肺部CT(占位性病变)及颅脑MRI,明确诊断为PLE。予糖皮质激素及神经保护治疗,症状部分控制或缓解,其中1例转外科行手术治疗后痊愈。结论依据患者特殊临床表现,结合颅脑MRI及肿瘤相关检查有助于PLE的早期确诊,避免误诊误治。

  14. Abnormal effective fronto-limbic connectivity during emotion processing in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Stéphane; Lungu, Ovidiu; Tikàsz, Andràs; Mendrek, Adrianna

    2017-01-04

    Schizophrenia is associated with core emotional dysfunctions. At the neural level, functional neuro-imaging studies have highlighted fronto-limbic alterations during emotion processing in schizophrenia, as well as impaired connectivity between the amygdala and the prefrontal cortex. However, the direction of the impaired fronto-limbic connections remains largely unknown. To clarify this issue, we performed an effective connectivity study on emotion processing in schizophrenia. Forty-one healthy individuals and 39 schizophrenia patients (DSM-IV criteria) viewed negative, positive and neutral images during an fMRI session. Effective connectivity between significantly activated regions was examined using Granger causality and psychophysical interaction analyses. Subjective ratings of emotionally neutral images were higher in schizophrenia patients than in controls. Across groups, significant activations were observed in the dorso-medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) and the bilateral amygdala. The Granger connectivity from the right amygdala to the dmPFC was significantly reduced in schizophrenia patients, relative to controls, during the negative and neutral conditions. The Granger connectivity from the left amygdala to the dmPFC was significantly reduced in schizophrenia patients, relative to controls, during the positive condition. The finding of a reduced lagged connectivity from the bilateral amygdala to the dmPFC in schizophrenia suggests that the bottom-up mechanisms involved in the processing of highly arousing emotional stimuli are impaired in this disorder. The finding of an impaired lagged connectivity from the right amygdala to the dmPFC during the processing of emotionally neutral stimuli in schizophrenia is novel and may explain why these patients tend to confer emotional significance to irrelevant stimuli. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The prefrontal cortex regulates the basal release of dopamine in the limbic striatum : An effect mediated by ventral tegmental area

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karreman, M; Moghaddam, B

    1996-01-01

    The present study examined whether the prefrontal cortex (PFC) exerts a tonic control over the basal release of dopamine in the limbic striatum and whether this control is mediated by glutamatergic afferents to the dopamine cell body or terminal regions. Using intracerebral microdialysis in freely m

  16. Inhibition of misleading heuristics as a core mechanism for typical cognitive development: evidence from behavioural and brain-imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borst, Grégoire; Aïte, Ania; Houdé, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    Cognitive development is generally conceived as incremental with knowledge of increasing complexity acquired throughout childhood and adolescence. However, several studies have now demonstrated not only that infants possess complex cognitive abilities but also that older children, adolescents, and adults tend to make systematic errors even in simple logical reasoning tasks. Therefore, one of the main issues for any theory of typical cognitive development is to provide an explanation of why at some age and in some contexts children, adolescents, and adults do not express a knowledge or cognitive principle that they already acquired when they were younger. In this review, we present convergent behavioural and neurocognitive evidence that cognitive development is more similar to a non-linear dynamic system than to a linear, stage-like system. In this theoretical framework, errors can emerge in problems similar to the ones infants or young children were succeeding when older children, adolescents, and adults rely on a misleading heuristic rather than on the correct logical algorithm to solve such problems. And the core mechanism for overcoming these errors is inhibitory control (i.e. the ability to inhibit the misleading heuristics). Therefore, typical cognitive development relies not only on the ability to acquire knowledge of incremental complexity but also to inhibit previously acquired knowledge.

  17. BIS/BAS sensitivity and emotional modulation in a prepulse-inhibition paradigm: A brain potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Kathrin; van der Molen, Maurits W; De Pascalis, Vilfredo

    2016-02-01

    We investigated whether prepulse inhibition (PPI) is sensitive to emotion modulation vis-à-vis individual differences in the sensitivity of the behavioral inhibition system (BIS) and behavioral activation system (BAS). Participants (n=50) performed a PPI task while recording the eyeblink reflex and auditory evoked potentials (i.e., N100 and P200). The results showed an increase in PPI from positive to negative stimuli at parietal sites, for both the N100 and P200. The N100 wave of the auditory evoked potential was sensitive to emotional valence high in arousal, whereas the P200 wave was sensitive to emotional valence low in arousal. Importantly, individual differences in BAS sensitivity, but not BIS sensitivity, influenced the emotional modulation of the startle response and PPI. This influence was most evident for the N100. Our findings are consistent with previous reports showing that PPI is sensitive to emotion modulation. The current results extent previous findings by highlighting the importance of the combined influence of valence and arousal. The findings indicate that state and trait emotions bias selective encoding of affective stimuli thereby priming behavioral output.

  18. Acupuncture inhibits the decrease in brain catecholamine contents and the impairment of passive avoidance task in ovariectomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriizuka, K; Okumura, M; Iijima, K; Haruyama, K; Cyong, J C

    1999-01-01

    The effects of acupuncture on the disorders elicited by abnormalities of endocrine system were investigated in ovariectomized mice. Female mice (strain; C57BL/6) were ovariectomized (OVX) and acupuncture points, Shenshu ([Japanese pictograph see text] : BL23) on both side of the back were continuously stimulated by subcutaneous needles for 20 days. After completion of experimental sessions, animals were sacrificed and specific brain regions were assayed for catecholamine contents by high performance liquid chromatography with electro chemical detector (ECD-HPLC). The mitogenic activities of splenic lymphocytes were measured by using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTS) assay and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay. Furthermore, the effects of needle stimulation on learning and memory ability were studied by the step-through type passive avoidance test. Norepinephrine and dopamine contents in the frontoparietal cerebral cortex, ventral hippocampus and olfactory bulb were decreased in the OVX group, and both MTS activity and ALP activity were decreased 20 days after ovariectomy. The mean latent period was also shortened in the passive avoidance test in the OVX group. However, applying needle stimulation increased norepinephrine and dopamine contents in the brain regions, and enhanced mitogenic activities of splenic lymphocytes. The stimulation also improved memory-related behavior. It was concluded from this study that after mice were stimulated by subcutaneous needle insertion, overall changes were observed in central nervous system (including retention of memory) and immune functions. The study suggests that acupuncture improves the memory loss and decrease of immune responses accompanying aging and/or menopause, and the that it may have an important role in medical care for the elderly.

  19. A novel mechanism of hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis induced by lupeol via Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Inhibition and Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 beta reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingli; Tu, Yi; He, Wen; Peng, Yan; Qiu, Zhenpeng

    2015-09-05

    Lupeol is a naturally available triterpenoid with selective anticancerous potential on various human cancer cells. The present study shows that lupeol can inhibit cell proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) HCCLM3 cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, through caspase-3 dependent activation and Poly ADP-Ribose Polymerase (PARP) cleavage. Lupeol-induced cell death is associated with a marked decrease in the protein expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and ser-9-phosphoryltion of Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Beta (GSK-3β), with concomitant suppression of Akt1, phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase (PI3K), β-catenin, c-Myc and Cyclin D1 mRNA expression. Suppressing overexpression of BDNF by lupeol results in decreased protein expression of p-Akt and PI3K (p110α), as well as reactivation of GSK-3β function in HepG2 cells. Lupeol treatment also inhibits LiCl-induced activation of Wnt signaling pathway and exerts the in vitro anti-invasive activity in Huh-7 cells. LiCl-triggered high expression of β-catenin, c-Myc and Cyclin D1 protein is reduced followed by lupeol exposure. The findings suggest a mechanistic link between caspase dependent pathway, BDNF secretion and Akt/PI3K/GSK-3β in HCC cells. These results indicate that lupeol can suppress HCC cell proliferation by inhibiting BDNF secretion and phosphorylation of GSK-3β(Ser-9), cooperated with blockade of Akt/PI3K and Wnt signaling pathway.

  20. Protective effect of nitric oxide synthase inhibition or antioxidants on brain oxidative damage caused by intracerebroventricular arginine administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delwing, Débora; Delwing, Daniela; Bavaresco, Caren S; Wyse, Angela T S

    2008-02-08

    We have previously demonstrated that acute arginine administration induces oxidative stress and compromises energy metabolism in rat hippocampus. In the present study, we initially investigated the effect of intracerebroventricular infusion of arginine (0.1, 0.5 and 1.5 mM solution) on Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and on some parameters of oxidative stress, namely thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS) and total radical-trapping antioxidant parameter (TRAP) in the hippocampus of rats. Results showed that 1.5 mM arginine solution significantly increases TBA-RS and reduces Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity and TRAP in the rat hippocampus. We also evaluated the influence of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), and antioxidants, namely alpha-tocopherol plus ascorbic acid, on the effects elicited by arginine on Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, TBA-RS and TRAP. Results showed that treatment with alpha-tocopherol plus ascorbic acid per se did not alter these parameters but prevented these effects. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular infusion of L-NAME prevented the inhibition caused by arginine on Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity, as well as the increased of TBA-RS. Our findings indicate that intracerebroventricular infusion of arginine induces oxidative stress in rat hippocampus and that the inhibition of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity caused by this amino acid was probably mediated by NO and/or its derivatives ONOO(-) and/or other free radicals. Finally, we suggest that the administration of antioxidants should be considered as an adjuvant therapy to specific diets in hyperargininemia.

  1. Personality trait of behavioral inhibition is associated with oscillatory systems reciprocal relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazev, Gennadij G; Slobodskaya, Helena R

    2003-06-01

    The main aim of this paper is to offer a speculative evolutionary based interpretation of brain oscillations. We suppose that delta, theta and alpha oscillations are informational channels of three hierarchical philogenetic systems. Delta oscillations are linked with the most ancient system, which was dominant in reptilian brain. Theta oscillations dominate in lower mammals. Alpha oscillations are manifestation of activity of the newest system, which dominate in adult humans. The three hierarchical phylogenetic systems fulfill parallel processing and their contribution to resulting behavior could differ in different individuals. Relative contribution of each system is regulated by means of descending inhibition (DI), higher systems inhibiting the lower. One of this theory's implications is that the personality trait of behavioral inhibition (behavioral inhibition system, BIS) should be associated with a stronger DI but particular mechanism could be different in children and adults. In order to test this hypothesis in 95 children (11-16 years) and 45 adults (18-37 years) resting EEG recordings were obtained along with BIS scores assessed by the Gray-Wilson Personality Questionnaire. Within subject strength of DI was measured by negative correlations between delta, theta and alpha powers estimated in individually adjusted EEG bands. In adults, BIS was associated with enhanced negative feedback from the alpha to the delta system, indicating a predominantly cortical origin of the adult humans' anxiety. In children, BIS was associated with enhanced negative relation between theta and delta systems, which is similar to the mechanism known in animals where limbic system plays the crucial role in mediating anxiety and fear. Although the presented empirical data partly supported the theory, it remains to be speculative and needs further empirical validation.

  2. Population variation in neuroendocrine activity is associated with behavioral inhibition and hemispheric brain structure in young rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Sarah J; Lubach, Gabriele R; Shirtcliff, Elizabeth A; Styner, Martin A; Gilmore, John H; Coe, Christopher L

    2014-09-01

    Population variation in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) activity and reactivity was assessed in a healthy sample of 48 juvenile rhesus monkeys. Cluster analysis of the HPA profiles revealed four distinct neuroendocrine phenotypes based on six indices of HPA functioning. Behavioral reactivity was also evaluated in response to novel stimuli, and revealed marked differences between animals in the highest- and lowest-cortisol clusters. Specifically, animals in the high-cortisol cluster showed larger stress-induced cortisol responses and blunted feedback sensitivity to dexamethasone. They were also emotionally reactive, displayed more aggressive behaviors, and were less likely to approach novel objects. In contrast, monkeys in the low-cortisol cluster were more likely to approach and explore novel objects. Representative animals with high or low cortisol profiles were scanned with Magnetic Resonance Imaging to evaluate structural differences in global and regional gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) volumes. Monkeys with higher cortisol reactivity evinced less hemispheric brain asymmetry, due to decreased GM in the right hemisphere. Stress reactivity was inversely related to global GM and positively related to total cerebrospinal fluid volume. This inverse relationship was also observed in several stress-sensitive regions, including prefrontal and frontal cortices. Our study demonstrates that population variation in pituitary-adrenal activity is related to behavioral disposition and cerebral structure in this nonhuman primate species.

  3. Pharmacologic inhibition of MLK3 kinase activity blocks the in vitro migratory capacity of breast cancer cells but has no effect on breast cancer brain metastasis in a mouse xenograft model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Hyoe Rhoo

    Full Text Available Brain metastasis of breast cancer is an important clinical problem, with few therapeutic options and a poor prognosis. Recent data have implicated mixed lineage kinase 3 (MLK3 in controlling the in vitro migratory capacity of breast cancer cells, as well as the metastasis of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells from the mammary fat pad to distant lymph nodes in a mouse xenograft model. We therefore set out to test whether MLK3 plays a role in brain metastasis of breast cancer cells. To address this question, we used a novel, brain penetrant, MLK3 inhibitor, URMC099. URMC099 efficiently inhibited the migration of breast cancer cells in an in vitro cell monolayer wounding assay, and an in vitro transwell migration assay, but had no effect on in vitro cell growth. We also tested the effect of URMC099 on tumor formation in a mouse xenograft model of breast cancer brain metastasis. This analysis showed that URMC099 had no effect on the either the frequency or size of breast cancer brain metastases. We conclude that pharmacologic inhibition of MLK3 by URMC099 can reduce the in vitro migratory capacity of breast cancer cells, but that it has no effect on either the frequency or size of breast cancer brain metastases, in a mouse xenograft model.

  4. Luria’s model of the functional units of the brain and the neuropsychology of dreaming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Téllez A.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, neuropsychology has focused on identifying the brain mechanisms of specific psychological processes, such as attention, motor skills, perception, memory, language, and consciousness, as well as their corresponding disorders. However, there are psychological processes that have received little attention in this field, such as dreaming. This study examined the clinical and experimental neuropsychological research relevant to dreaming, ranging from sleep disorders in patients with brain damage, to brain functioning during REM sleep, using different methods of brain imaging. These findings were analyzed within the framework of Luria’s Three Functional Unit Model of the Brain, and a proposal was made to explain certain of the essential characteristics of dreaming. This explanation describes how, during dreaming, an activation of the First Functional Unit occurs, comprising th