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Sample records for lignite fbc ash

  1. Environmental & Health Hazards of Fly Ash & SOx from FBC Power Plant at Khanote

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen Aziz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Lakhra coal reserves are estimated to about 1328 million tones. Most of mined Coal in Pakistan has been used for power generation in addition to some other uses. Lakhra coal (lignite reserves are very high in sulphur content, moisture and ash that not only cause environmental pollution but also cause operational problems. In order to avoid environmental & operational problems, clean coal technology (FBC technology has been used globally because of its merits. In FBC power plant, sulphure is captured by using limestone. In Pakistan, 3x50MW power plant was installed at Khanote to utilize the lakhra coal for the first time. The present study is focused on formation of ash & sulphur. In the FBC power plant at khanote, the generation rate of fly ash & bottom ash was 55680 m3/hr and 16550 m3/hr respectively. Unexpected huge amount of ash causes environmental problem in shape of particulate matter that causes respiratory diseases in the workers. It also affects nearby villages by polluting agricultural land, cattles & habitants. The present research not only indentifies the risks on the basis of extensive experimental analysis, but also proposed solution for its proper disposal.

  2. Utilization of blended fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash in geopolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Rattanasak, Ubolluk

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, synthesis of geopolymer from fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ash was studied in order to effectively utilize both ashes. FBC-fly ash and bottom ash were inter-ground to three different finenesses. The ashes were mixed with as-received PCC-fly ash in various proportions and used as source material for synthesis of geopolymer. Sodium silicate (Na(2)SiO(3)) and 10M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions at mass ratio of Na(2)SiO(3)/NaOH of 1.5 and curing temperature of 65 degrees C for 48h were used for making geopolymer. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), degree of reaction, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed on the geopolymer pastes. Compressive strength was also tested on geopolymer mortars. The results show that high strength geopolymer mortars of 35.0-44.0MPa can be produced using mixture of ground FBC ash and as-received PCC-fly ash. Fine FBC ash is more reactive and results in higher degree of reaction and higher strength geopolymer as compared to the use of coarser FBC ash. Grinding increases reactivity of ash by means of increasing surface area and the amount of reactive phase of the ash. In addition, the packing effect due to fine particles also contributed to increase in strength of geopolymers.

  3. Use of FBC ash and ponded coal-ash in ready-mixed concrete[ACI SP-235

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    Naik, T.R.; Kraus, R.N.; Chun, Y.M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Center for By-Products Utilization; Botha, F.D. [Illinois Clean Coal Inst., Carterville, IL (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Clean coal ash waste from coal-fired power stations is currently under-utilized, as are control technologies for reducing SOx and NOx emissions resulting from fluidized bed combustion (FBC). FBC ash is produced by an FBC boiler in which the coal and limestone mixture is fluidized during the combustion process to allow removal of sulfur gases. This study was conducted to find practical solutions for using the waste product to address environmental concerns and the issue of reduced landfill space. In particular, the study focused on developing a manufacturing technology for the use of FBC and wet-collected, low-lime, coarse coal-ash (WA) in ready-mixed concrete. Nine concrete mixtures and test specimens were made at a ready-mixed concrete plant in Peoria, Illinois. The properties of fresh concrete were tested along with compressive strength, splitting-tensile strength, flexural strength and abrasion resistance for non-entrained, non-air-entrained with high-range water-reducing admixture (HRWRA), and air-entrained admixture (AEA) concrete. The percentage of FBC ash ranged from 22 to 45 per cent in the non-air-entrained concrete and 17 to 27 per cent in the concrete containing AEA. Resistance to salt-scaling of the AEA concrete mixtures exposed to deicing chemicals was also examined. The study showed that the use of normal dosages of AEA was not effective in concrete made with FBC ash. The results also indicated that non-air-entrained concrete mixtures could successfully incorporate up to 22 per cent FBC ash to cementitious material ratio (ash/cm) and a blend of 34 per cent FBC ash/cm and 5 per cent WA/aggregate. Up to 45 per cent FBC ash/cm and 5 per cent of WA/aggregate could also be used in non-air-entrained concrete mixtures using HRWRA for general concrete construction, as could concrete mixtures containing AEA incorporating up to 17 per cent FBC ash/cm with blends of 27 per cent FBC ash/cm and 5 per cent WA/aggregate. 17 refs., 2 tabs., 10 figs.

  4. Low-temperature ashing of Bulgarian lignites

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    Douchanov, D.; Minkova, V.; Martinez-Alonso, A.; Palacios, J.M.; Tascon, J.M.D. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. of Organic Chemistry

    1993-12-01

    The characterization of mineral components of coals requires their isolation from organic matter, which would otherwise interfere with phase identification by means of physico-chemical techniques. Low-temperature ashing (LTA) using a cool oxygen plasma is a prospective method to oxidise coal organic matter at low temperatures while keeping the mineral constituents unaltered. In this work the authors used a microwave-excited plasma apparatus for the LTA treatment of lignite samples from the Maritza-Iztok (M-1-1; M-1-2) and Elhovo basins. Minerals were characterised in the LTA residues using FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. The advantages and disadvantages of the LTA method are discussed. Results indicate that LTA performs well for the isolation of mineral matter, the ensuing methodology being adequate for the characterisation of Bulgarian lignites. The same mineral constituents (principally clay minerals, quartz, pyrite and carbonates) were identified in all the three studied samples, differences being mainly in their particle size, degree of crystallinity and distribution in the organic matter of coals. 43 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Oil shale fueled FBC power plant - ash deposits and fouling problems

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    O. Yoffe; A. Wohlfarth; Y. Nathan; S. Cohen; T. Minster [Geological Survey of Israel, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2007-12-15

    41 MWth oil shale fired demonstration power plant was built in 1989 by PAMA in Mishor Rotem, Negev, Israel. The raw material for the plant is the local 'oil shale', which is in fact organic-rich marl. Since then, and until today, the unit is operated at high reliability and availability. At first, heavy soft fouling occurred due to the Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion (CFBC) mode of operation, which caused a considerable reduction in the heat transfer coefficient of the heat exchangers. By going over to the Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) mode of operation the soft fouling phenomenon stopped at once, the heat transfer coefficient improved, and the power plant could be operated at its designed values. After five months of operation at the FBC mode the boiler had to be shut down because Hard Deposits (HD) blocked physically the passes in the boiler. These deposits could be removed only with the help of mechanical devices. During the first two years the boiler had to be stopped, at least, three times a year for deposit cleaning purposes. Research conducted at the plant and in the laboratories of the Geological Survey of Israel enabled us to understand the mechanism of formation of these deposits. The results showed that the HD are formed in two stages: (1) Deposition of very fine ash particles on the pipes of the boiler, as a result of the impact of larger particles on the pipes. The fine particles adhere to the pipes and to each other, and step by step build the deposit. The growth of the deposit on the pipe surface is always perpendicular to the particles flow direction. (2) The deposits harden due to chemical reactions. 17 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Sulfur removal from lignite by oxydesulfurization using fly ash

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    Yaman, S.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical Engineering Dept.

    1997-01-01

    Since fly ash contains alkaline oxides, it is possible to use its water-extractable components as a desulfurization agent. This was investigated using some high-sulfur Turkish lignites. The effects of the amount of fly ash used, temperature, partial pressure of oxygen and time were studied in the range 5-40 g, 403-498 K, 0.0-1.5 MPa and 15-90 min respectively. The extents of pyritic and organic sulfur removal and recoveries of coal and calorific value were investigated for each of these variables. Reactivity and some combustion characteristics (ignition temperature, end temperature of combustion and combustion rate) of original and desulfurzed lignite samples were compared using combustion curves obtained from thermogravimetric analysis (t.g.a) results. FT-i.r. spectroscopy was used to determine the effects of the desulfurization process on the coal structure. 5 refs., 6 figs.,4 tabs.

  7. Validation of a FBC model for co-firing of hazelnut shell with lignite against experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulah, Gorkem [Middle East Technical University, Department of Chemical Engineering, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-07-15

    Performance of a comprehensive system model extended for modelling of co-firing of lignite and biomass was assessed by applying it to METU 0.3 MW{sub t} Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustor co-firing lignite with hazelnut shell and validating its predictions against on-line temperature and concentration measurements of O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, SO{sub 2} and NO along the same test rig fired with lignite only, lignite with limestone addition and lignite with biomass and limestone addition. The system model accounts for hydrodynamics; volatiles release and combustion, char combustion, particle size distribution for lignite and biomass; entrainment; elutriation; sulfur retention and NO formation and reduction, and is based on conservation equations for energy and chemical species. Special attention was paid to different devolatilization characteristics of lignite and biomass. A volatiles release model based on a particle movement model and a devolatilization kinetic model were incorporated into the system model separately for both fuels. Kinetic parameters for devolatilization were determined via thermogravimetric analysis. Predicted and measured temperatures and concentrations of gaseous species along the combustor were found to be in good agreement. Introduction of biomass to lignite was found to decrease SO{sub 2} emissions but did not affect NO emissions significantly. The system model proposed in this study proves to be a useful tool in qualitatively and quantitatively simulating the processes taking place in a bubbling fluidized bed combustor burning lignite with biomass. (author)

  8. Workability and strength of lignite bottom ash geopolymer mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathonsaowaphak, Apha; Chindaprasirt, Prinya; Pimraksa, Kedsarin

    2009-08-30

    In this paper, the waste lignite bottom ash from power station was used as a source material for making geopolymer. Sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were used as liquid for the mixture and heat curing was used to activate the geopolymerization. The fineness of bottom ash, the liquid alkaline/ash ratio, the sodium silicate/NaOH ratio and the NaOH concentration were studied. The effects of the additions of water, NaOH and napthalene-based superplasticizer on the workability and strength of the geopolymer mortar were also studied. Relatively high strength geopolymer mortars of 24.0-58.0 MPa were obtained with the use of ground bottom ash with 3% retained on sieve no. 325 and mean particle size of 15.7 microm, using liquid alkaline/ash ratios of 0.429-0.709, the sodium silicate/NaOH ratios of 0.67-1.5 and 7.5-12.5M NaOH. The incorporation of water improved the workability of geopolymer mortar more effectively than the use of napthalene-based superplasticizer with similar slight reduction in strengths. The addition of NaOH solution slightly improves the workability of the mix while maintaining the strength of the geopolymer mortars.

  9. Mineralogy and microstructure of sintered lignite coal fly ash

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    Marina Ilic; Christopher Cheeseman; Christopher Sollars; Jonathan Knight [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    2003-02-01

    Lignite coal fly ash from the 'Nikola Tesla' power plant in Yugoslavia has been characterised, milled, compacted and sintered to form monolithic ceramic materials. The effect of firing at temperatures between 1130 and 1190{sup o}C on the density, water accessible porosity, mineralogy and microstructure of sintered samples is reported. This class C fly ash has an initial average particle size of 82 {mu}m and contains siliceous glass together with the crystalline phases quartz, anorthite, gehlenite, hematite and mullite. Milling the ash to an average particle size of 5.6 m, compacting and firing at 1170{sup o}C for 1 h produces materials with densities similar to clay-based ceramics that exhibit low water absorption. Sintering reduces the amount of glass, quartz, gehlenite and anhydrite, but increases formation of anorthite, mullite, hematite and cristobalite. SEM confirms the formation of a dense ceramic at 1170{sup o}C and indicates that pyroplastic effects cause pore formation and bloating at 1190{sup o}C. 23 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Innovative approach to ash radioactivitiy and health impacts of lignite power plants

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    Bosevski, T.; Pop-Jordanova, N. [Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Skopje (Macedonia)

    1998-12-31

    In Macedonia nearly 90% of the present electricity production utilizes domestic low-calorie lignite, and this is likely to continue for the next few decades. Local and global environmental impacts of fossil fuel utilization are considered. Some innovative extensions to standard methodologies of environmental risk assessment and management are considered. They involve ash radioactivity and psychosomatic health impacts from lignite power plants. Two extensions are proposed: one comprising complete radioactive chains when determining committed effective dose from lignite ash; the other by including the psychosomatic diseases, such as peptic ulcer and arterial hypertension, due to chronic stress induced by power plants during normal operation. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Behavior study of trace elements in pulverized lignite, bottom ash, and fly ash of Amyntaio power station, Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megalovasilis, Pavlos; Papastergios, Georgios; Filippidis, Anestis

    2013-07-01

    The Kozani-Ptolemais-Amyntaio basin constitutes the principal coal field of Greece. Approximately 50% of the total power production of Greece is generated by five power stations operating in the area. Lignite samples, together with the corresponding fly ash and bottom ash were collected, over a period of 3 months, from the power plant of Amyntaio and analyzed for their content in 16 trace elements. The results indicate that Y, Nb, U, Rb, Zr, Ni, Pb, Ba, Zn, Sr, Cu, and Th demonstrate an organic affinity during the combustion of lignite, while V has an inorganic affinity. Three elements (Co, Cr, and Sc) show an intermediate affinity.

  12. Synthesis of ZSM-5 zeolite from lignite fly ash and rice husk ash

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    Chareonpanich, Metta; Namto, Teerapong; Kongkachuichay, Paisan [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kasetsart University, 50 Paholyothin Rd., Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Limtrakul, Jumras [Department of Chemistry, Kasetsart University, Chatuchak, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)

    2004-10-15

    The lignite fly ash from the Mae-Moh power plant, Thailand, and rice husk ash were used as raw materials for ZSM-5 zeolite synthesis. Factors affecting the yield of ZSM-5 zeolite synthesized from fly ash, i.e., the SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} mole ratio, the presence of tetrapropyl ammonium bromide (TPABr, the structure-directing material for ZSM-5 zeolite synthesis), the holding temperature and time, and the initial pressure were investigated. It was found that without TPABr only zeolite P could be synthesized at SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} mole ratios of 2.8-200. In order to synthesize ZSM-5 zeolite, sodium silicate solution was added to adjust the SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} mole ratio in raw ash. The yield of ZSM-5 zeolite was as high as 59 wt.% when following conditions were used: SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} mole ratio, 40; the holding temperature, 210 C; the holding time, 4 h and the initial pressure, 4 bar. The catalytic performance for CO{sub 2} hydrogenation reaction of the ZSM-5 zeolite was preliminary tested and compared with that of commercial one. It was observed that there was no significant difference in the catalytic performance between these two catalysts.

  13. Steam hydration-reactivation of FBC ashes for enhanced in situ desulphurization

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    Fabio Montagnaro; Marianna Nobili; Antonio Telesca; Gian Lorenz Valenti; Edward J. Anthony; Piero Salatino [Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, Napoli (Italy). Dipartimento di Chimica

    2009-06-15

    Bed and fly ashes originating from industrial-scale fluidized bed combustors (FBCs) were steam hydrated to produce sorbents suitable for further in situ desulphurization. Samples of the hydrated ash were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy and porosimetry. Bed ashes were hydrated in a pressure bomb for 30 and 60 min at 200{sup o}C and 250{sup o}C. Fly ash was hydrated in an electrically heated tubular reactor for 10 and 60 min at 200{sup o}C and 300{sup o}C. The results were interpreted by considering the hydration process and the related development of accessible porosity suitable for resulphation. The performance of the reactivated bed ash as sulphur sorbent improved with a decrease of both the hydration temperature and time. For reactivated fly ash, more favourable porosimetric features were observed at longer treatment times and lower hydration temperatures. Finally, it was shown that an ashing treatment (at 850{sup o}C for 20 min) promoted a speeding up of the hydration process and an increase in the accessible porosity. 36 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. A comparative study on the recovery of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from fly ash and lignite coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arditsoglou, Anastasia; Terzi, Eleni; Kalaitzoglou, Maria; Samara, Constantini

    2003-01-01

    The recovery of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from lignite coal burnt in Greek power stations and the fly ash produced is examined comparatively using Soxhlet, ultrasonic and accelerated solvent extraction procedures with various organic solvents. Soxhlet using toluene/methanol mixture and accelerated solvent extraction/toluene were found to be the most efficient methods for fly ash PAHs, yielding average recoveries of about 80%. The accelerated solvent extraction/toluene procedure was superior for lignite PAHs, yielding 96% average recovery, whereas ultrasonic and Soxhlet extraction yielded relatively lower recoveries (75% and 67%, respectively).

  15. Synergetic use of lignite fly ash and metallurgical converter slag in geopolymer concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gábor Mucsi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The application and utilization of the industrial wastes and by-products in the construction industry is a key issue from an environmental and economic point of view. The increased use of lignite has substantially increased the available quantities of lignite fired power plant fly ash, which can be mainly classified as class C fly ash. The utilization of such raw material however has some difficulties. In the present paper lignite fired power station fly ash and metallurgical converter slag were used for the production of geopolymer concrete. The fly ash was used as a geopolymer based binder material, and a converter slag as aggregate, thus created a geopolymer concrete which contains mainly industrial wastes. As preliminary test experimental series were carried out using andesite as aggregate. The optimal aggregate/binder ratio was determined. The effect of the amount of alkaline activator solution in the binder, the aggregate type on the geopolymer concretes’ compressive strength and density was investigated. Furthermore, the physical properties - freeze-thaw resistance and particle size distribution - of the applied aggregates were measured as well. As a result of the experiments it was found that physical properties of the andesite and converter slag aggregate was close. Therefore andesite can be replaced by converter slag in the concrete mixture. Additionally, geopolymer concrete with nearly 20 MPa compressive strength was produced from class C fly ash and converter slag.

  16. Ash agglomeration during fluidized bed gasification of high sulphur content lignites

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    Marinov, V.; Marinov, S.P.; Lazarov, L.; Stefanova, M. (SRTI Energydesign, Sofia (Bulgaria))

    1992-09-01

    Intensive ash agglomeration has hampered the fluidized bed gasification of lignites from the Elhovo deposit (Bulgaria) containing 5.9 wt% sulphur in the dry state. Samples of slag and agglomerates from the pilot plant have been examined by means of chemical, X-ray analysis, IR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Pyrrhotite (FeS) and wustite (FeO) have been established in the agglomerates, where junctions between ash particles have been found to consist of magnetite, spinel and garnet grains. The chemical reactions leading to garnet formation have been studied. Centres of sintering and centres of melting during the ash agglomeration process have been distinguished. The pyrite product, an eutectic of FeS and FeO melting at 924[degree]C, is assumed to be responsible for the cessation of lignite gasification with steam and air under pressure at a bed temperature of 930[degree]. 11 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Kinetics of recovering germanium from lignite ash with chlorinating roasting methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Guocai; WANG Jingyan; CHENG Zhuo; ZHAO Yuna

    2008-01-01

    A process of recovering Ge by chlorinating roasting was put forward. GeCl4 was separated and recovered from lignite ash because of its low boiling point. Kinetic analysis indicates that the chlorinating roasting process fits with the unreacted-core shrinking model and the reaction rate equation corresponds to 1-2a/3-(1-a)2/3 =kt. The apparent activation energy Ea is calculated to be 22.36 kJ·mol-1. The diffusion of product layer serves as the rate-controlling step in this process. When the roasting temperature is 250℃, the roasting time is 60 min, the concentration of hydrochloric acid is 10 mol/L, and the ratio of liquid to solid is 10 (mHCl/ash=10), and 90% Ge in lignite ash can be recovered.

  18. Effect of biomass on temperatures of sintering and initial deformation of lignite ash

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    H. Haykiri-Acma; S. Yama; S. Kucukbayrak [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Faculty of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering

    2010-10-15

    Sintering temperatures and the initial deformation temperatures of ashes from Turkish Elbistan lignite, and biomass species such as hazelnut shell and rice husk were investigated up to 1450{sup o}C by Heating Microscope Technique. Sintering temperatures were found 1300, 1269, and 1320{sup o}C for hazelnut shell, rice husk, and lignite, respectively, while the initial deformation temperatures were >1450, 1370, and >1450{sup o}C. Lignite/biomass blends were prepared by adding of biomass into coal in the ratios of 5 or 10 wt.%, and then effects of biomass presence on sintering temperature and the initial deformation temperature were tested. It was determined that the addition of potassium-rich hazelnut shell reduced the sintering temperatures to 919 and 730{sup o}C for the blends of 5 and 10 wt.%, respectively. Also, initial deformation temperature dropped to 788{sup o}C in case of the blend of 10 wt.%. Such a big antagonistic influence of hazelnut shell on the thermal behaviour of ash is attributed to the interaction of potassium from biomass with silicon compounds found in mineral matter of lignite. In addition, concentration of CaO may be another reason for this. On the other hand, the presence of rice husk showed limited effect on the sintering temperature as well the initial deformation temperature. 20 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Using cement, lignite fly ash and baghouse filter waste for solidification of chromium electroplating treatment sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wantawin, C.

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to use baghouse filter waste as a binder mixed with cement and lignite fly ash to solidify sludge from chromium electroplating wastewater treatment. To save cost of solidification, reducing cement in binder and increasing sludge in the cube were focused on. Minimum percent cement in binder of 20 for solidification of chromium sludge was found when controlling lignite fly ash to baghouse filter waste at the ratio of 30:70, sludge to binder ratio of 0.5, water to mixer ratio of 0.3 and curing time of 7 days. Increase of sludge to binder ratio from 0.5 to 0.75 and 1 resulted in increase in the minimum percent cement in binder up to 30 percent in both ratios. With the minimum percent cement in binder, the calculated cement to sludge ratios for samples with sludge to binder ratios of 0.5, 0.75 and 1 were 0.4, 0.4 and 0.3 respectively. Leaching chromium and compressive strength of the samples with these ratios could achieve the solidified waste standard by the Ministry of Industry. For solidification of chromium sludge at sludge to binder ratio of 1, the lowest cost binder ratio of cement to lignite fly ash and baghouse filter waste in this study was 30:21:49. The cost of binder in this ratio was 718 baht per ton dry sludge.

  20. Preparation of low-ash products from Slovak lignitic coals – material balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Zubrík

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A preparation of low-ash coal products was performed with the aim to obtain asuitable charge for the extraction following processes of organic substances. Thus, for this purpose, the coal feeds from two collieries, namely Záhorie and Nováky were washed in the water-only cyclone with a diameter of 150 mm. The vortex finder and apex diameters were 68 mm and 14.6 mm, respectively. The cone consisting of three angle sections 135°-75°-20° was applied. The products obtained on the overflow of the cyclone were decantated to remove the rests of slurries. In such a way, washed coals with the ash content in the dry matter of 5.44 was prepared from lignite of Záhorie. Similarly, as to coal from Nováky the ash content of 9.21 % was achieved.

  1. Acidification - neutralization processes in a lignite mine spoil amended with fly ash or limestone

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    Seoane, S.; Leiros, M.C. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Dept. de Edafologia y Quimica Agricola

    2001-08-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate the long-term effects of amending sulfide-rich lignite mine spoil with fly ash (originating from a coal-fired power station and largely comprised of aluminosilicates) and/or agricultural limestone. The experiment was carried out with soil moisture maintained at field capacity or alternate cycles of wetting and drying. Results obtained suggest that the principal acidification processes were oxidation of sulfide and formation of hydroxysulfate (FeOHSO{sub 4}), whereas the main neutralization processes were weathering of aluminosilicates in fly ash-treated samples. The highest dose of limestone rapidly raised the pH of the spoil, but this increase was not maintained throughout the one-year experiment. In contrast, fly ash-treated samples showed a more sustained increase in pH, attributable to the gradual weathering of aluminosilicates. The best results (i.e., good short- and long-term neutralization) were obtained in samples treated with both fly ash and limestone. The low liming capacity of the fly ash (47.85 cmol kg{sup -1}) means that it must be used in large quantities, an advantage in achieving the further aim of disposing of the fly ash. 33 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Biofunctional characteristics of lignite fly ash modified by humates: a new soil conditioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassapis, Konstantinos; Roulia, Maria; Vrettou, Evangelia; Fili, Despina; Zervaki, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Fly ash superficially modified with humic substances from the Megalopolis lignitic power plant was prepared and evaluated for agricultural uses. UV-vis spectrophotometry and IR spectroscopy revealed that fly ash shows high sorption efficiency towards humic substances. Adsorption proceeds stepwise via strong Coulombic and hydrophophic forces of attraction between guest and host materials. Langmuir, Freundlich, BET, Harkins-Jura, and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm models were employed to evaluate the ongoing adsorption and shed light to the physicochemical properties of the sorbent-adsorbate system. Humic substances desorption and microbial cultivation experiments were also carried out to examine the regeneration of the humates under washing and explore the possibility of this material acclimatizing in real soil conditions, both useful for biofunctional agricultural applications.

  3. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing sites at Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978 authorized the US Department of Energy (DOE) to perform remedial actions at Belfield and Bowman inactive lignite ashing sites in southwestern North Dakota to reduce the potential public health impacts from the residual radioactivity remaining at the sites. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated standards (40 CFR 192) that contain measures to control the residual radioactive materials and other contaminated materials, and proposed standards to protect the groundwater from further degradation. Remedial action at the Belfield and Bowman sites must be performed in accordance with these standards and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the state of North Dakota. The Belfield and Bowman designated sites were used by Union Carbide and Kerr-McGee, respectively, to process uraniferous lignite in the 1960s. Uranium-rich ash from rotary kiln processing of the lignite was loaded into rail cars and transported to uranium mills in Rifle, Colorado, and Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, respectively. As a result of the ashing process, there is a total of 158,400 cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) [121,100 cubic meters (m{sup 3})] of radioactive ash-contaminated soils at the two sites. Windblown ash-contaminated soil covers an additional 21 acres (8.5 ha) around the site, which includes grazing land, wetlands, and a wooded habitat.

  4. VITRIFICATION OF LIGNITE FLY ASH AND METAL SLAGS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF GLASS AND GLASS CERAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Karamberi; A.Moutsatsou

    2006-01-01

    This work focuses on the production of glass and glass-ceramics by using industrial wastes or by-products,e.g., two fly ashes from the combustion of lignite, a slag from the production of Fe-Ni and a slag from the making of steel.Vitrification took place at 1 350°-1 450℃ and crystallization was achieved by heat treatment at 900, 950 and 1 000℃.The capability of the waste to be vitrified and subsequently devitrified was determined by XRD techniques. The crystalline phase depends greatly on the structure of the by-product and the heat treatment. The final products showed low leachability and good hardness.

  5. Management of Lignite Fly Ash for Improving Soil Fertility and Crop Productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Lal C.; Srivastava, Nishant K.; Jha, Sangeet K.; Sinha, Awadhesh K.; Masto, Reginald E.; Selvi, Vetrivel A.

    2007-09-01

    Lignite fly ash (LFA), being alkaline and endowed with excellent pozzolanic properties, a silt loam texture, and plant nutrients, has the potential to improve soil quality and productivity. Long-term field trials with groundnut, maize, and sun hemp were carried out to study the effect of LFA on growth and yield. Before crop I was sown, LFA was applied at various doses with and without press mud (an organic waste from the sugar industry, used as an amendment and source of nutrients). LFA with and without press mud was also applied before crops III and V were cultivated. Chemical fertilizer, along with gypsum, humic acid, and biofertilizer, was applied in all treatments, including the control. With one-time and repeat applications of LFA (with and without press mud), yield increased significantly (7.0-89.0%) in relation to the control crop. The press mud enhanced the yield (3.0-15.0%) with different LFA applications. The highest yield LFA dose was 200 t/ha for one-time and repeat applications, the maximum yield being with crop III (combination treatment). One-time and repeat application of LFA (alone and in combination with press mud) improved soil quality and the nutrient content of the produce. The highest dose of LFA (200 t/ha) with and without press mud showed the best residual effects (eco-friendly increases in the yield of succeeding crops). Some increase in trace- and heavy-metal contents and in the level of γ-emitters in soil and crop produce, but well within permissible limits, was observed. Thus, LFA can be used on a large scale to boost soil fertility and productivity with no adverse effects on the soil or crops, which may solve the problem of bulk disposal of fly ash in an eco-friendly manner.

  6. Investigation of ash deposition in a pilot-scale fluidized bed combustor co-firing biomass with lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogebakan, Z.; Gogebakan, Y.; Selcuk, N.; Seliuk, E. [Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2009-01-15

    This study presents the results from investigation of ash deposition characteristics of a high ash and sulfur content lignite co-fired with three types of biomass (olive residue, 49 wt%; hazelnut shell, 42 wt%; and cotton residue, 41 wt%) in 0.3 MWt Middle East Technical University (METU) Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustion (ABFBC) Test Rig. Deposit samples were collected on all air-cooled probe at a temperature of 500{degree}C. Samples were analyzed by SEM/EDX and XRD methods. The results reveal that co-firing lignite with olive residue, hazelnut shell and cotton residue show low deposition rates. High concentrations of silicon, calcium, sulfur, iron, and aluminum were found in deposit samples. No chlorine was detected in deposits. Calcium sulfate and potassium sulfate were detected as major and minor components of the deposits, respectively. High sulfur and alumina-silicate content of lignite resulted in formation of alkali sulfates instead of alkali chlorides. Therefore, fuel blends under consideration can be denoted to have low-fouling propensity.

  7. Investigation of ash deposition in a pilot-scale fluidized bed combustor co-firing biomass with lignite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogebakan, Zuhal; Gogebakan, Yusuf; Selçuk, Nevin; Selçuk, Ekrem

    2009-01-01

    This study presents the results from investigation of ash deposition characteristics of a high ash and sulfur content lignite co-fired with three types of biomass (olive residue, 49 wt%; hazelnut shell, 42 wt%; and cotton residue, 41 wt%) in 0.3 MW(t) Middle East Technical University (METU) Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustion (ABFBC) Test Rig. Deposit samples were collected on an air-cooled probe at a temperature of 500 degrees C. Samples were analyzed by SEM/EDX and XRD methods. The results reveal that co-firing lignite with olive residue, hazelnut shell and cotton residue show low deposition rates. High concentrations of silicon, calcium, sulfur, iron, and aluminum were found in deposit samples. No chlorine was detected in deposits. Calcium sulfate and potassium sulfate were detected as major and minor components of the deposits, respectively. High sulfur and alumina-silicate content of lignite resulted in formation of alkali sulfates instead of alkali chlorides. Therefore, fuel blends under consideration can be denoted to have low-fouling propensity.

  8. Changes in soil physical properties of forest floor horizons due to long-term deposition of lignite fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, Peter; Fleige, Heiner; Horn, Rainer [Inst. for Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, Christian-Albrechts-Univ. zu Kiel (Germany)

    2010-03-15

    Background, aim, and scope: From the beginning of the twentieth century until the 1990s, energy in Upper Lusatia, Saxony in Eastern Germany was produced at power plants that burnt lignite coals. As a result, alkaline fly ash and aerosols from the combustion of brown coal have accumulated in adjacent areas that are partly under forestry. We ask the question, 'how have these atmospheric depositions of fly ash influenced the soil physical properties (bulk density, particle density, saturated hydraulic conductivity, pore size distribution, and water repellency) of forest floor horizons?' Materials and methods: The experimental sites represented typical soil types and stands of the sylviculturally used areas in the region of Upper Lusatia. Three forest sites were located close to the emission sources, where high amounts of fly ashes accumulated, and three control sites were without fly ash enrichment. Pore size distribution, saturated hydraulic conductivity, and bulk density were examined with undisturbed samples (metal cylinder 100 cm{sup 3}). Disturbed samples were used for the characterization of particle density, texture, and water repellency (Wilhelmy plate method). Additionally, the carbon content was determined. Scanning electron microscopy was used to show fly ash enrichment. Results: The enrichment of mineral fly ash particles could be proven for sites close to the emission source. Using scanning electron microscopy, spherical fly ash particles could be identified. Total quantities of persistent fly ash enrichment amounted to approximately 150-280 Mg ha{sup -1}. The enrichment of fly ash affected the soil-physical characteristics. Close to the emission source (sandy fly ashes), particle density, air capacity, and saturated hydraulic conductivity were significantly increased, whereas the plant available water was significantly reduced. With increasing distance from the emission source (silty fly ashes or no ash enrichment), air capacity and saturated

  9. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-11-01

    This baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing site near Bowman, North Dakota, evaluates the potential impacts to public health or the environment from contaminated ground water at this site. This contamination is a result of the uraniferous lignite ashing process, when coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. Potential risk is quantified only for constituents introduced by the processing activities and not for the constituents naturally occurring in background ground water in the site vicinity. Background ground water, separate from any site-related contamination, imposes a percentage of the overall risk from ground water ingestion in the Bowman site vicinity. The US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is developing plans to address soil and ground water contamination at the site. The UMTRA Surface Project involves the determination of the extent of soil contamination and design of an engineered disposal cell for long-term storage of contaminated materials. The UMTRA Ground Water Project evaluates ground water contamination. Based on results from future site monitoring activities as defined in the site observational work plan and results from this risk assessment, the DOE will propose an approach for managing contaminated ground water at the Bowman site.

  10. Assessing the effects of FBC ash treatments of metal-contaminated soils using life history traits and metal bioaccumulation analysis of the earthworm Eisenia andrei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grumiaux, F.; Demuynck, S.; Schikorski, D.; Lemiere, S.; Lepretre, A. [Universite Lille Nord de France, Villeneuve Dascq (France)

    2010-03-15

    Earthworms (Eisenia andrei) were exposed, in controlled conditions, to metal-contaminated soils previously treated in situ with two types of fluidized bed combustion ashes. Effects on this species were determined by life history traits analysis. Metal immobilizing efficiency of ashes was indicated by metal bioaccumulation. Ashes-treated soils reduced worm mortality compared to the untreated soil. However, these ashes reduced both cocoon hatching success and hatchlings numbers compared to the untreated soil. In addition, sulfo-calcical ashes reduced or delayed worm maturity and lowered cocoon production compared to silico-alumineous ones. Metal immobilizing efficiency of ashes was demonstrated for Zn, Cu and to a lesser extent Pb. Only silico-alumineous ashes reduced Cd bioaccumulation, although Cd was still bioconcentrated. Thus, although ash additions to metal-contaminated soils may help in immobilizing metals, their use might result, depending on the chemical nature of ashes, to severe detrimental effects on earthworm reproduction with possible long term consequences to populations.

  11. Environmental assessment of no remedial action at the inactive uraniferous lignite ashing sites at Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The Belfield and Bowman sites were not included on the original congressional list of processing sites to be designated by the Secretary of Energy. Instead, the sites were nominated for designation by the Dakota Resource Council in a letter to the DOE (September 7, 1979). In a letter to the DOE (September 12, 1979), the state of North Dakota said that it did not believe the sites would qualify as processing sites under the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) because the activities at the sites involved only the ashing of uraniferous lignite coal and the ash was shipped out of state for actual processing. Nevertheless, on October 11, 1979, the state of North Dakota agreed to the designation of the sites because they met the spirit of the law (reduce public exposure to radiation resulting from past uranium operations). Therefore, these sites were designated by the Secretary of Energy for remedial action. Because of the relatively low health impacts determined for these sites, they were ranked as low priority and scheduled to be included in the final group of sites to be remediated.

  12. Effect of biomass-sulfur interaction on ash composition and agglomeration for the co-combustion of high-sulfur lignite coals and olive cake in a circulating fluidized bed combustor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varol, Murat; Atimtay, Aysel T

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of biomass-sulfur interaction on ash composition and agglomeration for the co-combustion of high-sulfur lignite coals and olive cake in a circulating fluidized bed combustor. The tests included co-combustion of 50-50% by wt. mixtures of Bursa-Orhaneli lignite+olive cake and Denizli-Kale lignite+olive cake, with and without limestone addition. Ash samples were subjected to XRF, XRD and SEM/EDS analyses. While MgO was high in the bottom ash for Bursa-Orhaneli lignite and olive cake mixture, Al2O3 was high for Denizli-Kale lignite and olive cake mixture. Due to high Al2O3 content, Muscovite was the dominant phase in the bottom ash of Denizli Kale. CaO in the bottom ash has increased for both fuel mixtures due to limestone addition. K was in Arcanite phase in the co-combustion test of Bursa/Orhaneli lignite and olive cake, however, it mostly appeared in Potassium Calcium Sulfate phase with limestone addition.

  13. Influence of fly-ash produced by lignite power station on humic substances in ectohumus horizons of Podzols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jerzy; Jerzykiewicz, Maria; Jamroz, Elżbieta; Kocowicz, Andrzej; Dębicka, Magdalena; Ćwieląg-Piasecka, Irmina

    2017-04-01

    Literature on fly-ash influence on the environment report mainly on alkalization effect on vegetation and changes in chemistry of forest floor. As far as now soils were examined only for changes in pH in surface horizons, physical properties and heavy metal solubility. Soil properties strongly depend on soil organic matter content and humic substances properties, thus their modification plays a crucial role in soil forming processes and changes in the environment. From the other side, the alkalization effects on podzolization processes and particularly on humic substances have not been recognized. The aim of this paper was to characterize changes in properties of humic substances in ectohumus horizons of Podzols affected by alkali blown out from fly-ash dumping site of power station Bełchatów, central Poland. The objects of the investigation were Podzols derived from loose quartz sand, developed under pine forest. They surround the dumping site, which was established to store wastes from lignite combustion in Bełchatów power station. The samples were collected from ectohumus horizons in direct vicinity of the dumping site (50 m) as well as in the control area (7.3 km away) in five replications. Determination of elemental composition and spectroscopic analysis (EPR, FT-IR, ICP-OES and UV-Vis) were performed for humic acids, fulvic acids and humines extracted with standard IHSS procedure. An increase of pH in ectohumus horizons caused by the influence of fly-ash leads to change in humic substances structure. Obtained results showed that humic and fulvic acids from fly-ash affected Podzols indicated higher contents of nitrogen and sulphur, as well as higher O/C and lower C/N ratios. This points out a higher degree of their humification. Also EPR analyses of humic acids and humins affected by fly-ash indicated higher metal ions concentrations. However, the increase of Mn and Fe ions concentration did not affect the Fe(III) and Mn(II) band intensities of EPR spectra

  14. Baseline risk assessment of ground water contamination at the inactive uriniferous lignite ashing site near Belfield, North Dakota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-08-01

    This Baseline Risk Assessment of Ground Water Contamination at the Inactive Uraniferous Lignite Ashing Site Near Belfield, North Dakota, evaluates potential impacts to public health or the environment resulting from ground water contamination at the site where coal containing uranium was burned to produce uranium. The US Department of Energy`s Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is evaluating plans to remedy soil and ground water contamination at the site. Phase I of the UMTRA Project consists of determining the extent of soil contamination. Phase II of the UMTRA Project consists of evaluating ground water contamination. Under Phase II, results of this risk assessment will help determine what remedial actions may be necessary for contaminated ground water at the site. This risk assessment evaluates the potential risks to human health and the environment resulting from exposure to contaminated ground water as it relates to historic processing activities at the site. Potential risk is quantified for constituents introduced from the processing activities, and not for those constituents naturally occurring in water quality in the site vicinity. Background ground water quality has the potential to cause adverse health effects from exposure through drinking. Any risks associated with contaminants attributable to site activities are incremental to these risks from background ground water quality. This incremental risk from site-related contaminants is quantified in this risk assessment. The baseline risk from background water quality is incorporated only into the assessment of potential chemical interactions and the definition of the overall site condition.

  15. Effect of Lignite Fly Ash on the Growth and Reproduction of Earthworm Eisenia fetida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sarojini

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash is an amorphous ferroalumino silicate, an important solid waste around thermal power plants. It creates problems leading to environmental degradation due to improper utilization or disposal. However, fly ash is a useful ameliorant that may improve the physical, chemical and biological properties of soils and is a source of readily available plant macro and micronutrients when it is used with biosolids. Supply of nutrients from fly ash with biosolids may enhance their agricultural use. The growth and reproduction of Eisenia fetida was studied during vermicomposting of fly ash with cowdung and pressmud in four different proportions (T1,T2,T3 & T4 and one control i.e., cow dung and pressmud alone. The growth, cocoon and hatchlings production were observed at the interval of 15 days over a period of 60 days. The maximum worm growth and reproduction was observed in bedding material alone. Next to that the T1 was observed as the best mixture for vermiculture.

  16. Substitution of the clayey mineral component by lignite fly ash in portland cement clinker synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Nataša

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Fly ash from four power plants in Serbia (PP "Morava" - Svilajnac, PP "Kolubara" - Veliki Grijani, PP "Kostolac" - units B1 and B2 - Kostolac and PP "Nikola Tesla" - units A and B - Obrenovac was utilized as the starting raw component for Portland cement clinker synthesis. Limestone and quartz sand from the "Holcim - Serbia, a.d." cement factory were the other two starting raw components. Based on the chemical composition of the raw components and from the projected cement moduli, the amounts of raw components in the raw mixtures were calculated. Six different raw mixtures were prepared - each one consisted of limestone, sand and different fly ash. A raw mixture from the industrial production of the "Holcim - Serbia, a.d." cement factory was used as the reference material. The prepared raw mixtures were sintered in a laboratory furnace at 1400°C. The chemical and mineralogical compositions of the synthesized clinkers were determined. The characteristics of clinkers, based on fly ash, were compared to the characteristics of the industrial Portland cement clinker from the "Holcim - Serbia, a.d." cement factory. The results of the investigation showed that fly ash from power plants in Serbia can be suitable for Portland cement clinker synthesis.

  17. Optimization of activator solution and heat treatment of ground lignite type fly ash geopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Z.; Szabó, R.; Rácz, Á.; Lakatos, J.; Debreczeni, Á.; Mucsi, G.

    2017-02-01

    Geopolymers are inorganic polymers which can be produced by the reaction between silico aluminate oxides and alkali silicates in alkaline medium. Materialscontaining silica and alumina compounds are suitable for geopolymer production. These can beprimary materials or industrial wastes, i. e. fly ash, metallurgical slag and red mud. In this paper, the results of the systematic experimental series are presented which were carried out in order to optimize the geopolymer preparation process. Fly ash was ground for different residence time (0, 5, 10, 30, 60 min) in order to investigate the optimal specific surface area. NaOH activator solution concentration also varied (6, 8, 10, 12, 14 M). Furthermore, sodium silicate was added to NaOH as a network builder solution. In this last serie different heat curing temperatures (30, 60, 90°C) were also applied. After seven days of ageing the physical properties of the geopolymer(compressive strength and specimen density)were measured. Chemical leaching tests on the rawmaterial and the geopolymers were carried out to determine the elements which can be mobilized by different leaching solutions. It was found that the above mentioned parameters (fly ash fineness, molar concentration and composition of activator solution, heat curing) has great effect on the physical and chemical properties of geopolymer specimens. Optimal conditions were as follows: specific surface area of the fly ash above 2000 cm2/g, 10 M NaOH, 30°C heat curing temperature which resulted in 21 MPa compressive strength geopolymer.

  18. Synergistic Sintering of Lignite Fly Ash and Steelmaking Residues towards Sustainable Compacted Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Karayannis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of value-added ceramic materials deriving only from industrial by-products is particularly interesting from technological, economic, and environmental point of views. In this work, the synergistic sintering of ternary and binary mixtures of fly ash, steelmaking electric arc furnace dust, and ladle furnace slag for the synthesis of compacted ceramics is reported. The sintered specimens’ microstructure and mineralogical composition were characterized by SEM-EDS and XRD, respectively. Moreover, the shrinkage, apparent density, water absorption, and Vickers microhardness (HV were investigated at different sintering temperatures and raw material compositions. The characterization of the sintered compacts revealed the successful consolidation of the ceramic microstructures. According to the experimental findings, the ceramics obtained from fly ash/steel dust mixtures exhibited enhanced properties compared to the other mixtures tested. Moreover, the processing temperature affected the final properties of the produced ceramics. Specifically, a 407% HV increase for EAFD and a 2221% increase for the FA-EAFD mixture were recorded, by increasing the sintering temperature from 1050 to 1150°C. Likewise, a 972% shrinkage increase for EAFD and a 577% shrinkage increase for the FA-EAFD mixture were recorded, by increasing the sintering temperature from 1050 to 1150°C. The research results aim at shedding more light on the development of sustainable sintered ceramics from secondary industrial resources towards circular economy.

  19. The content of chromium and copper in plants and soil fertilized with sewage sludge with addition of various amounts of CaO and lignite ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wysokiński Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The influence of fertilization with fresh sewage sludge with the addition of calcium oxide and lignite ash in the proportions dry mass 6:1, 4:1, 3:1 and 2:1 on the content of chromium and copper in plants and soil and uptake of these elements was investigated in pot experiment. Sewage sludge were taken from Siedlce (sludge after methane fermentation and Łuków (sludge stabilized in oxygenic conditions, eastern Poland. The chromium content in the biomass of the test plants (maize, sunflower and oat was higher following the application of mixtures of sewage sludge with ash than of the mixtures with CaO. The copper content in plants most often did not significantly depend on the type of additives to the sludge. Various amounts of additives to the sewage sludge did not have a significant effect on the contents of either of the studied trace elements in plants. The contents of chromium and copper in soil after 3 years of cultivation of plants were higher than before the experiment, but these amounts were not significantly differentiated depending on the type and the amount of the used additive (i.e. CaO vs. ash to sewage sludge.

  20. Investigation of the chemical composition of ash generated from Kosovo lignite and the possibility for biological land reclamation on ash dumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urosevic, D.; Filipovic, R. [Mining Institute Belgrade, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1997-07-01

    This paper presents the results of investigation of the chemical composition and other properties of ash generated in the coal combustion process in the coal-fired power plants Kosovo, in order to determine the possibilities for biological land reclamation on ash dumps and other degraded soil surfaces. It was established that a certain chemical composition of ash has a beneficial effect on biological land reclamation of ash dumps, thus protecting the environment (i.e. the area surrounding the ash dumps), against pollution. It was concluded that, because of the high percentage of calcium and other earth-alkaline and toxic elements, the ash should not be used as substitution for agricultural production. Ash dumps in Kosovo are not so susceptible to erosion since CaO{sub 3} acts as a binding component. 22 refs., 7 tabs.

  1. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  2. Extraction of lignite coal fly ash for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons: modified and unmodified supercritical fluid extraction, enhanced-fluidity solvents, and accelerated solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, D V; Olesik, S V

    1998-02-01

    A comparison among modified and unmodified supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), enhanced-fluidity liquid extraction, and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) techniques was made for the extraction of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from an aged, spiked lignite coal fly ash. All of the attempted extraction conditions allowed the extraction of the PAHs to some degree, but no single extraction technique proved to be superior for all of the PAHs used. Three groups of PAHs with similar extraction efficiencies were identified. The group with the lowest molecular weights was best recovered using a 90% CO2-10% methanol mixture at 70 degrees C and 238 atm. The group of medium-molecular-weight PAHs was recovered equally well using any of three extraction conditions: SFE (100% CO2, 90 degrees C, and 238 atm), enhanced-fluidity liquid mixture (60% CO2-40% methanol, 70 degrees C, and 238 atm), and a methanol ASE mixture. The group of high-molecular-weight PAHs seemed to be equally well recovered with all of the attempted extraction conditions, but the enhanced-fluidity conditions (60% CO2-40% methanol, 70 degrees C, and 238 atm) had extraction recoveries (> 85%) with the lowest standard deviations (approximately 5%).

  3. Leaching of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from power plant lignite ash--influence of parameters important for environmental pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergal, Miodrag M; Relić, Dubravka; Tešić, Zivoslav Lj; Popović, Aleksandar R

    2014-03-01

    Nikola Tesla B power plant (TENT B), located at the Sava River, in Obrenovac, 50 km west from the Serbian's capital, Belgrade, is the second largest coal-fired power plant in the country, consisting of two blocks, each of 620 MW capacity. In order to investigate the threat polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from deposited coal ash, obtained by coal combustion in this power plant, can represent for the surrounding environment, samples of coal ash were submitted to extraction with river water used for transport of coal ash to the dump, as well as with water of different ionic strength and acidity. It was found that, out of 16 EPA priority PAHs, only naphthalene, acenaphthylene, fluorene, phenantrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene were found in measurable concentrations in the different extracts. Their combined concentration was around 0.1 μg/L, so they do not, in terms of leached concentrations, represent serious danger for the surrounding environment. In all cases of established (and leached) PAH compounds, changes of ionic strength, acidity, or the presence of organic compounds in river water may to some extent influence the leached concentrations. However, under the examined conditions, similar to those present in the environment, leached concentrations were not more than 50 % greater than the concentrations leached by distilled water. Therefore, water desorption is likely the most important mechanism responsible for leaching of PAH compounds from filter coal ash.

  4. Lignite microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulankina, M.A.; Lysak, L.V.; Zvyagintsev, D.G. [Moscow MV Lomonosov State University, Moscow (Russian Federation). Faculty of Soil Science

    2007-03-15

    The first demonstration that samples of lignite at a depth of 10 m are considerably enriched in bacteria is reported. According to direct microscopy, the abundance of bacteria was about 10{sup 7} cells/g. About 70% of cells had intact cell membranes and small size, which points to their anabiotic state. The fungal mycelium length was no more than 1 m. Lignite inoculation onto solid glucose-yeast-peptone medium allowed us to isolate bacteria of the genera Bacillus, Rhodococcus, Arthrobacter, Micrococcus, Spirillum, and Cytophaga. Representatives of the genera Penicillium and Trichoderma were identified on Czapek medium. Moistening of lignite powder increased the microbial respiration rate and microbial and fungal abundance but did not increase their generic diversity. This finding suggests that the studied microorganisms are autochthonous to lignite.

  5. Lignite; Braunkohle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaltenbach, Erwin; Maassen, Uwe [Debriv e.V., Berlin und Koeln (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The domestic lignite is the most important and in the foreseeable future, the only domestic energy resource that is available in large quantities and economically. It makes an essential contribution to secure and competitive energy supply and has a high regional as macroeconomic importance. The required guarantied capacity for the development of renewable energy, the lignite provides under competition conditions. The flexibility of the lignite power plants is in addition to security of supply and competitiveness, a strategic added value for a reliable power supply. [German] Die heimische Braunkohle ist die wichtigste und in ueberschaubarer Zukunft auch die einzige heimische Energieressource, die in grossen Mengen und wirtschaftlich zur Verfuegung steht. Sie leistet einen unverzichtbaren Beitrag zur sicheren und wettbewerbsfaehigen Energieversorgung und hat eine hohe regional- wie gesamtwirtschaftliche Bedeutung. Die fuer den Ausbau der erneuerbaren Energien notwendige gesicherte Leistung stellt die Braunkohle unter Wettbewerbsbedingungen zur Verfuegung. Die Flexibilitaet des Braunkohlenkraftwerksparks ist neben Versorgungssicherheit und Wettbewerbsfaehigkeit ein strategischer Zusatznutzen fuer eine sichere Stromversorgung.

  6. Ash partitioning during the oxy-fuel combustion of lignite and its dependence on the recirculation of flue gas impurities (H{sub 2}O, HCl and SO{sub 2})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facun Jiao; Juan Chen; Lian Zhang; Yajuan Wei; Yoshihiko Ninomiya; Sankar Bhattacharya; Hong Yao [Monash University, Clayton, Vic. (Australia). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2011-06-15

    Oxy-fuel combustion of a brown coal (i.e. lignite) has been carried out at 1000{sup o}C to experimentally examine the vaporisation of organically bound metals and the agglomeration of ash particles as a function of the concentration of gaseous impurities including H{sub 2}O, HCl and SO{sub 2} in about 27% O{sub 2} balanced with CO{sub 2}. The properties of bulk ash and individual metals were investigated intensively. Particularly, attention was paid to Na which is notorious for fouling and to organically bound Al which has been less studied. The results indicate that, the organically bound metals, although possessing a very low content in the raw coal, are vital for the agglomeration of ash particles, which are also highly sensitive to the loading of gas impurities in flue gas. HCl recirculation is the most crucial factor promoting the vaporisation of metals via chlorination. Apart from alkali metals, the organically bound Al and Ti were also vaporised noticeably. Recirculation of SO{sub 2} promoted the sulfation of Na to condense into liquid droplet which increased fine ash yield. Co-existence of bulk HCl and SO{sub 2} played a synergetic role in the sulfation of Na via an initial chlorination of the char-bound Na. In contrast, co-existence of steam with HCl and SO{sub 2} favored the formation of Na alumino-silicates, which are favorable for ash agglomeration. 34 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Thermogravimetric investigation of hydrochar-lignite co-combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhengang; Quek, Augustine; Kent Hoekman, S; Srinivasan, M P; Balasubramanian, R

    2012-11-01

    Co-combustion of hydrochar with lignite was investigated by means of thermogravimetric analysis. Hydrochars were produced from coconut fibers and eucalyptus leaves under hydrothermal conditions at 250°C. The hydrochar was added in varying amounts to lignite for combustion. The results indicated that hydrothermal treatment decreased the volatile matter content and increased the fixed carbon content of the biomaterials. The elevated energy density and decreased ash content of the hydrochar improved its combustion behavior when co-fired with lignite for energy production. The hydrochars derived from coconut fiber and eucalyptus leaves had similar chemical compositions and showed similar influences on lignite combustion. Hydrochar addition increased the burnout and shortened the combustion range of the hydrochar-lignite blends. High combustion efficiency was observed due to the synergistic interactions between hydrochar and lignite during the co-combustion process. A kinetic study showed that the combustion process of hydrochar-lignite blends followed first-order reaction rates.

  8. Evaluation of lignite combustion residues as cement additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirbas, A.; Aslan, A.

    1999-07-01

    In this study the physical and chemical properties of lignite fly ashes obtained from electrostatic precipitator and cyclone, lignite bottom ash, cement + lignite ash mixtures, and their effects on mechanical properties of concrete were investigated. The ashes were classified into two general types based on total silica, alumina, and iron-III oxide: class A and class B. When 25% of the cement was replaced by class A lignite bottom ash (the combined three oxide contents were 30.2%), the 28-day compressive strength increased by 18.9% compared to the control mix, and when 25% of the cement was replaced by class B lignite ash (the combined three oxide contents were 78.1%), the compressive strength decreased by 3.5% compared to the control mix. The results obtained were compared with the Turkish Standards and, in general, were found to be within the limits. As a result, the lignite fly ash and bottom ash samples may be used as cementitious materials.

  9. Processing the Visonta lignite for utilization in power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gimpl, E.

    1985-01-01

    To utilize the Visonta lignite in power plants, laboratory, semi-industrial and industrial experiments were carried out. In the enrichment process, the parameters of the mensual quality fluctuations, the expected grain size distribution of the lignite, and the average ash content are to be known. Different enrichment processes as well as their results are discussed. In harmony with the obtained results the optimal lignite processing technology is described.

  10. An overview of Turkish lignite qualities by logistic analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bulent TUTMEZ; Burak HOZATLI; A.Kemal CENGIZ

    2013-01-01

    As an indispensable energy source,lignite is almost exclusively used in power generation in Turkey.To assess the quality level of Turkish lignite,a multivariate statistical analysis was conducted.The relationship among the lignite quality parameters has been investigated using a response method that is the logistic regression method.The analysis determines the effect of multiple predictor variables such as moisture,ash and sulphur presented simultaneously to predict membership of the two calorific value categories.By this way,a reliable binary response regression structure was constructed considering all the lignite fields in Turkey.Both the experiments on identifying the influential measurements and the measure of goodness of fit indicated that the overall model has a big capability to exhibit the relationship among the parameters of the Turkish lignite.

  11. Drying grain using a hydrothermally treated liquid lignite fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bukurov, Z.; Cvijanovic, P.; Bukurov, M. [Univ. of Novi Sad (Yugoslavia); Ljubicic, B.R. [Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    1995-12-01

    A shortage of domestic oil and natural gas resources in Yugoslavia, particularly for agricultural and industrial purposes, has motivated the authors to explore the possibility of using liquid lignite as an alternate fuel for drying grain. This paper presents a technical and economic assessment of the possibility of retrofitting grain-drying plants currently fueled by oil or natural gas to liquid lignite fuel. All estimates are based on lignite taken from the Kovin deposit. Proposed technology includes underwater mining techniques, aqueous ash removal, hydrothermal processing, solids concentration, pipeline transport up to 120 km, and liquid lignite direct combustion. For the characterization of Kovin lignite, standard ASTM procedures were used: proximate, ultimate, ash, heating value, and Theological analyses were performed. Results from an extensive economic analysis indicate a delivered cost of US$20/ton for the liquid lignite. For the 70 of the grain-drying plants in the province of Vojvodina, this would mean a total yearly saving of about US $2,500,000. The advantages of this concept are obvious: easy to transport and store, nonflammable, nonexplosive, nontoxic, 30%-40% cheaper than imported oil and gas, domestic fuel is at hand. The authors believe that liquid lignite, rather than an alternative, is becoming more and more an imperative.

  12. Erosion in Steam General Tubes in Boiler and ID Fans in Coal Fired FBC Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen Aziz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The FBC (Fluidized Bed Combustion is a technique used to make solid particles behave like fluid and grow very fast for the power generation using low grade coal. Due to its merits, first time this technology has been introduced in Pakistan by installing 3x50 MW power plants at Khanote. Fluidized beds have long been used for the combustion of low-quality, difficult fuels and have become a rapidly developing technology for the clean burning of coal. The FBC Power Plant at Khanote has been facing operational and technical problems, resulting frequently shut down of generation units, consequently facing heavy financial losses. This study reveals that due to the presence of high percentage of silica in the lime stone that are further distributed in the bottom ash, fly ash and re-injection material, the generation tubes in the boiler and wings/blades of ID (Induced Draft fans were eroded. In addition, filter bags were also ruptured; resulting frequent shut down of power plant units.

  13. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) generated from lignite-fired power plants in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasani, F; Shala, F; Xhixha, G; Xhixha, M K; Hodolli, G; Kadiri, S; Bylyku, E; Cfarku, F

    2014-12-01

    The energy production in Kosovo depends primarily on lignite-fired power plants. During coal combustion, huge amounts of fly ash and bottom ash are generated, which may result in enriched natural radionuclides; therefore, these radionuclides need to be investigated to identify the possible processes that may lead to the radiological exposure of workers and the local population. Lignite samples and NORMs of fly ash and bottom ash generated in lignite-fired power plants in Kosovo are analyzed using a gamma-ray spectrometry method for the activity concentration of natural radionuclides. The average activity concentrations of (40)K, (226)Ra and (232)Th in lignite are found to be 36 ± 8 Bq kg(-1), 9 ± 1 Bq kg(-1) and 9 ± 3 Bq kg(-1), respectively. Indications on the occurrence and geochemical behavior of uranium in the lignite matrix are suggested. The activity concentrations of natural radionuclides in fly ash and bottom ash samples are found to be concentrated from 3 to 5 times that of the feeding lignite. The external gamma-ray absorbed dose rate and the activity concentration index are calculated to assess the radiological hazard arising from ash disposal and recycling in the cement industry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. COFIRING BIOMASS WITH LIGNITE COAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darren D. Schmidt

    2002-01-01

    The University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center, in support of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) biomass cofiring program, completed a Phase 1 feasibility study investigating aspects of cofiring lignite coal with biomass relative to utility-scale systems, specifically focusing on a small stoker system located at the North Dakota State Penitentiary (NDSP) in Bismarck, North Dakota. A complete biomass resource assessment was completed, the stoker was redesigned to accept biomass, fuel characterization and fireside modeling tests were performed, and an engineering economic analysis was completed. In general, municipal wood residue was found to be the most viable fuel choice, and the modeling showed that fireside problems would be minimal. Experimental ash deposits from firing 50% biomass were found to be weaker and more friable compared to baseline lignite coal. Experimental sulfur and NO{sub x} emissions were reduced by up to 46%. The direct costs savings to NDSP, from cogeneration and fuel saving, results in a 15- to 20-year payback on a $1,680,000 investment, while the total benefits to the greater community would include reduced landfill burden, alleviation of fees for disposal by local businesses, and additional jobs created both for the stoker system as well as from the savings spread throughout the community.

  15. Evaluation of Kolubara lignite carbon emission characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakić Vukman V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The revised Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC guidelines for national greenhouse gas (GHG inventories recommends that more comprehensive and thus more reliable characteristics of the local fossil fuels should be used for the national GHG inventory calculations. This paper deal with the carbon emission characteristics of low-calorific lignite recovered from the Kolubara open-pit mine. The samples of coal were carefully selected in order to cover the net calorific value, ash and water content of the broad spectrum of the quality of the raw lignite supplied to the Serbian thermal power plants. Correlation analysis of the laboratory analysis data gave a linear dependency of the net calorific value on the combustible content in the coal samples. Also, linear correlation between the carbon content and the net calorific value was found. The regression analysis of experimentally determined coal characteristics implies that the carbon emission factor is dependent on the net calorific value. For the subset of raw lignite samples with the net calorific value Qdr = 6 ÷ 10 MJ/kg, that is most representative for current and near future use for power generation in Serbian thermal power plants, the linear dependency CEFr (tC/TJ = 34.407 - 0.5891×Qdr (MJ/kg was proposed. Regarding the net calorific ranges of samples examined, the raw Kolubara lignite carbon emission factor is considerably higher than those recommended by IPCC Tier 1 method of 27.6 tC/TJ.

  16. Proximate analysis of some Turkish lignites by thermogravimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karatepe, N.; Kucukbayrak, S. (Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Faculty of Chemistry and Meteorological Engineering)

    1993-01-14

    In this study, the moisture, ash, volatile matter and fixed carbon contents of 24 lignite samples from different coal reserves in Turkey were determined by using TGA and results were compared with those obtained by the ASTM standards. The mean differences in moisture, ash, volatile matter and fixed carbon contents between the TGA and ASTM methods are 0.38%, 0.68%, 1.53% and 1.47%, respectively.

  17. Influence of Specific Surface of Lignite Fluidal Ashes on Rheological Properties of Sealing Slurries / Wpływ Powierzchni Właściwej Popiołów Fluidalnych z Węgla Brunatnego na Właściwości Reologiczne Zaczynów Uszczelniających

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryczek, Stanisław; Wiśniowski, Rafał; Gonet, Andrzej; Złotkowski, Albert

    2012-11-01

    New generation fly ashes come from the combustion of coal in fluid-bed furnaces with simultaneous sulphur-removal from gases at ca. 850°C. Accordingly, all produced ashes basically differ in their physicochemical properties from the traditional silica ones. The aim of the laboratory analyses was determining the influence of specific surface and granular composition of fluidal ash on rheological properties of slurries used for sealing up the ground and rock mass media with hole injection methods, geoengineering works and cementing casing pipes in deep boreholes. Fluidal ash from the combustion of lignite contain active Puzzolan appearing in the form of dehydrated clayey minerals and active components activating the process of hydration ashes, i.e. CaO, anhydrite II and CaCO3. The ashes have a weak point, i.e. their high water diment, which the desired rheological properties related with the range of their propagation in the rock mass cannot not be acquired for injection works in the traditional sealing slurries technology. Increasing the water-to-mixture ratio should eliminate this feature of fluidal ashes. Laboratory analyses were performed for slurries based on metallurgical cement CEM III/A 32,5 having water-to-mixture ratios: 0.5; 0.6 ; 0.7 and 0.8; the fluidal ash concentration in the slurries was 30 wt.% (with respect to the mass of dry cement). Basing on the obtained results there were determined optimum recipes of sealing slurries in view of their rheological parameters which could be applied both in drilling technologies (cementing casing pipes, closing of boreholes, plugging) and in geoengineering works related with sealing up and reinforcing ground and rock mass media.

  18. Characteristics of lignite seams in the Visonta opencast mine and analysis of relationships between their qualitative indices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varga, J.

    1985-01-01

    Intercalations among the lignite seams consisting of clays and sandy clays considerably affect the quality indices of lignites themselves. The parameters (calorific value, ash content, etc.) show no homogeneous distribution in the opencast mine, thus their spatial changes should be followed. The analysis of the relationship of these parameters, e.g. the change of density as a function of water content, provides a useful tool to rationalize the lignite production.

  19. Lignite Fuel Enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Bullinger; Nenad Sarunac

    2010-03-31

    Pulverized coal power plants which fire lignites and other low-rank high-moisture coals generally operate with reduced efficiencies and increased stack emissions due to the impacts of high fuel moisture on stack heat loss and pulverizer and fan power. A process that uses plant waste heat sources to evaporate a portion of the fuel moisture from the lignite feedstock in a moving bed fluidized bed dryer (FBD) was developed in the U.S. by a team led by Great River Energy (GRE). The demonstration was conducted with Department of Energy (DOE) funding under DOE Award Number DE-FC26-04NT41763. The objectives of GRE's Lignite Fuel Enhancement project were to demonstrate reduction in lignite moisture content by using heat rejected from the power plant, apply technology at full scale at Coal Creek Station (CCS), and commercialize it. The Coal Creek Project has involved several stages, beginning with lignite drying tests in a laboratory-scale FBD at the Energy Research Center (ERC) and development of theoretical models for predicting dryer performance. Using results from these early stage research efforts, GRE built a 2 ton/hour pilot-scale dryer, and a 75 ton/hour prototype drying system at Coal Creek Station. Operated over a range of drying conditions, the results from the pilot-scale and prototype-scale dryers confirmed the performance of the basic dryer design concept and provided the knowledge base needed to scale the process up to commercial size. Phase 2 of the GRE's Lignite Fuel Enhancement project included design, construction and integration of a full-scale commercial coal drying system (four FBDs per unit) with Coal Creek Units 1 and 2 heat sources and coal handling system. Two series of controlled tests were conducted at Coal Creek Unit 1 with wet and dried lignite to determine effect of dried lignite on unit performance and emissions. Wet lignite was fired during the first, wet baseline, test series conducted in September 2009. The second test series was

  20. Lignite chemical conversion in an indirect heat rotary kiln gasifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatzilyberis Kostas S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The results on the gasification of Greek lignite using two indirect heat (allothermal pilot rotary kiln gasifiers are reported in the present work. The development of this new reactor-gasifier concept intended for solid fuels chemical conversion exploits data and experience gained from the following two pilot plants. The first unit A (about 100 kg/h raw lignite demonstrated the production of a medium heating value gas (12-13 MJ/Nm3 with quite high DAF (dry ash free coal conversions, in an indirect heat rotary gasifier under mild temperature and pressure conditions. The second unit B is a small pilot size unit (about 10 kg/h raw lignite comprises an electrically heated rotary kiln, is an operation flexible and exhibits effective phase mixing and enhanced heat transfer characteristics. Greek lignite pyrolysis and gasification data were produced from experiments performed with pilot plant B and the results are compared with those of a theoretical model. The model assumes a scheme of three consecutive-partly parallel processes (i. e. drying, pyrolysis, and gasification and predicts DAF lignite conversion and gas composition in relatively good agreement with the pertinent experimental data typical of the rotary kiln gasifier performance. Pilot plant B is currently being employed in lime-enhanced gasification studies aiming at the production of hydrogen enriched synthesis gas. Presented herein are two typical gas compositions obtain from lignite gasification runs in the presence or not of lime. .

  1. Pozzolanic Reaction Kinetics of Coal Ashes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Hongwei; WANG Zhijuan; QIAN Jueshi; SONG Yuanming; WANG Zhi

    2009-01-01

    The pozzolanic reactivity was determined by the hydration kinetics of pozzolanic reaction based on the fact that the hydration products of active SiO_2 and Al_2O_3 with lime were soluble in dilute hydrochloric acid.The results show that the pozzolanic reaction of active SiO_2 and Al2O3 of coal ashes follows apparent first-order kinetics.The reaction rate constant of FBC ashes is greater than that of PC ashes,while the activation energy of the former is lower than that of the latter.It is confirmed that the pozzolanic activity of fluidized bed combustion(FBC)ashes is significantly higher than that of PC ashes,and the reaction barrier of the former is lower than that of the latter,because the microstructures of FBC ashes,such as mineralogical composition,morphology and polymerization degree of [SiO_4]and[AlO_6]are more favorable to the pozzolanic activity development than those of PC ashes.

  2. Lignite oxidative desulphurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Volodymyr Gunka; Serhiy Pyshyev

    2014-01-01

    The process of lignite desulphurization via its treatment by an oxidant (air or air–steam mixture) has been studied. The research objective was useful determination of steam application in oxidative lignite desulphurization. It has been proved that the water steam should be included in the oxidant composition to increase the hydrogen sulphide and combustible constituent content in the gases obtained during the processes under research. The impact of factors which affect the reactions between solid (in our case–lignite) and gaseous reagent (oxidant, i.e. air and or air–steam mixture) upon the research process has been investigated, if these reactions occur in the kinetic area. Such factors are linear rate of oxidant movement and coal grain size. The values of oxidant movement linear rate and coal grain size, which the reaction transfer from pyrite sulphur and organic content of lignite from diffusion into kinetic area occurs by, have been determined. Under these‘‘transfer’’ conditions, the values of coefficients of oxidant mass transfer (b, m/s) as well as Sherwood criteria and boiling layer differences have been calculated.

  3. Biosolubilisation of Chinese lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Sudong; Tan, Zhongchao [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Schulich School of Engineering, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Tao, Xiuxiang; Shi, Kaiyi [School of Chemical Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008 (China)

    2009-06-15

    The biosolubilisation of coal is a promising coal processing technology for converting solid coal to liquid oil at ambient conditions. In this study, the biosolubilisation of Chinese lignite was studied using a fungus isolated from decaying wood. The intensity of biosolubilisation was determined by estimating the liquid formation time and by measuring the weight loss of the lignite granules gravimetrically. The biosolubilisation product (black liquid) was characterized by ultraviolet spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, element analysis, and heating value. Results showed that this fungus isolated from the decaying wood solubilised 31.83% (by weight) of Chinese lignite to black liquid within 11 days at 27.5 C. The biosolubilisation product mainly contained aromatic acids and chain hydrocarbons, and had organic function groups of hydroxyl, cyclane, carbonyl, ether linkage and aromatic rings. The heating value of the biosolubilisation product was 14 MJ/kg. Chemical analysis of the biosolubilisation product indicated that side chains of lignite were important structures in the biosolubilisation mechanism. (author)

  4. Combustion of stoker ash in a CFBC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, L.; Anthony, E.J. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). CANMET Energy Technology Centre

    2002-07-01

    The ash generated from petroleum coke fired stokers at Georgia Pacific in Wisconsin has an elevated carbon content and a higher fuel value. This paper presents results of a study in which the stoker ash was test fired at the CANMET Energy Technology Centre in a bench scale circulating fluidized bed combustor (CFBC). The objective was to determine if firing the stoker ash in its 'as received' state (with a 40 per cent moisture content) is a viable fuel option for Georgia Pacific's FBC boiler to save fuel costs, or if it should be co-fired with petroleum coke. Mixtures of the stoker ash and petroleum coke were also test fired. Results indicate that the stoker ash alone cannot sustain combustion. However, good ignition and even bed temperature is possible with premixed coke and 10 per cent less moisture content. Emissions of sulphur dioxides, nitrogen oxides carbon monoxide were the same as for firing petroleum coke alone. In addition, the co-firing of stoker ash and petroleum coke did not negatively affect the tendency to foul, compared to firing coke alone. The amount of ash generated from the FBC boiler was high due to the high ash content. An economic evaluation showed that firing a 20/80 coke/stoker ash mixture can save approximately 22 per cent of the limestone usage compared to coke firing alone, if the Ca/S molar ratio remain the same. 8 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  5. Qualitative and chemical characteristics of mineral matter in the selected lignite deposits in light of their suitability for clean coal technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielowicz Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the variability of ash content and chemical composition of coal ash is crucial when assessing the possibility of using this raw material in clean coal technologies (CCS. The paper focuses on chemical, technological and quality characteristics of ash from the combustion of lignite from Polish deposits. Ash content on a dry ash-free basis for the samples from 9 deposits varies from 1 to 50%. The most commonly observed ash content in the studied samples of lignite is in the range between 10–20%. The measured ash melting temperatures from the collected lignite samples have shown that the sintering, softening, melting and flow temperatures, determined in an oxidizing atmosphere (air, are higher than those determined in a reducing atmosphere. In the majority of Polish lignite deposits, the dominant component of ash was SiO2, followed by CaO. When evaluating the suitability of coal in energy production, with particular emphasis on the combustion and gasification processes, it is also necessary to study the behavior of ash at high temperatures and the impact of ash on the gasification and combustion facilities. Ash fouling and slagging processes, which are heavily dependent on the ash content, composition, melting point and the content of chlorine, phosphorus and sulfur in coal, have a negative effect on the combustion process.

  6. Biodesulfurization of Cayirhan lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guru, M.; Cubuk, M.; Dursun, S.; Demirbas, A. [Gazi University, Maltepe (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2006-04-15

    In this study, the lignite was improved oxidizing sulfur compounds by Thiobacillus thiooxidans and Thiobacillus ferrooxidans bacteria. Experiments in the batch reactors have been carried out 20% aqueous suspension of coal samples. Sugar beet molasses was used as the bacterial substrate. The maximum removal of combustible sulfur was obtained as 78.2% under the following conditions; addition 5% of T. thiooxidans and 5% T. ferrooxidans into coal suspension, 0.2 g molasses/g coal change, pH value of 3, at shaking rate of 70 rpm and at 40{sup o}C for 5 days.

  7. Solvent refined lignite process development. Quarterly technical progress report No. 3, January--March 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severson, D.E.

    1978-07-12

    Six runs, each nominally at one week's duration, M-34 through M-39, were completed; this concludes the PDU experimental program for Project Lignite. The first three runs concluded the series to study the effects of different lignites on plant operability and product yields. Runs M-37 and M-38 were made using two Montana subbituminous coals. It was concluded that coals with the highest ash content, both lignite and subbituminous coals, gave greater overall conversion to gaseous and liquid organic products. The subbituminous coals gave lower gas yields and lower overall conversion while producing similar liquid yields when compared with lignite. Reactor solids build up rapidly during initial operations, then level off and remain constant at 29 pounds per cubic foot of reactor volume as a run proceeds. Reactor solids evidently are composed of clay minerals and large particles of pyridine insoluble organic material when processing either lignites or subbituminous coals; in addition calcium/magnesium carbonate crystals (calcite/dolomite) are present in the case of lignite. Long term, trouble-free operation of the deashing unit was not accomplished. Integration of the unit for several hours of combined operation of the process was achieved, and the product from the deashing unit contained as low as 0.6% ash and pyridine insoluble material. Solids buildup in the solids settling tower was a continuing problem.

  8. Eocene lignites from Cambay basin, Western India: An excellent source of hydrocarbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.K. Singh

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper lignites from the Cambay basin have been studied for their hydrocarbon potential. The samples were collected from three lignite fields–Vastan, Rajpardi and Tadkeshwar, and were investigated by petrography, chemical analyses and Rock-Eval pyrolysis. The results are well comparable with the empirically derived values. The study reveals that these ‘low rank C’ lignites are exceedingly rich in reactive macerals (huminite + liptinite while inertinite occurs in low concentration. These high volatile lignites generally have low ash yield except in few sections. The Rock-Eval data indicates the dominance of kerogen type-III with a little bit of type-II. The study reveals that the lignites of Vastan (lower and upper seams and Tadkeshwar upper seam are more gas-prone while Rajpardi and Tadkeshwar lower seams are oil-prone. Further, the fixed hydrocarbons are several times higher than the free hydrocarbons. The relation between TOC and fixed hydrocarbon indicates that these lignites are excellent source rock for hydrocarbon which could be obtained mainly through thermal cracking. The empirically derived values reveal a high conversion (94–96% and high oil yield (64–66% for these lignites.

  9. Eocene lignites from Cambay basin, Western India:An excellent source of hydrocarbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.K. Singh; V.K. Singh; P.K. Rajak; M.P. Singh; A.S. Naik; S.V. Raju; D. Mohanty

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper lignites from the Cambay basin have been studied for their hydrocarbon potential. The samples were collected from three lignite fieldseVastan, Rajpardi and Tadkeshwar, and were investigated by petrography, chemical analyses and Rock-Eval pyrolysis. The results are well comparable with the empirically derived values. The study reveals that these‘low rank C’ lignites are exceedingly rich in reactive macerals (huminite þ liptinite) while inertinite occurs in low concentration. These high volatile lignites generally have low ash yield except in few sections. The Rock-Eval data indicates the dominance of kerogen type-III with a little bit of type-II. The study reveals that the lignites of Vastan (lower and upper seams) and Tadkeshwar upper seam are more gas-prone while Rajpardi and Tad-keshwar lower seams are oil-prone. Further, the fixed hydrocarbons are several times higher than the free hydrocarbons. The relation between TOC and fixed hydrocarbon indicates that these lignites are excellent source rock for hydrocarbon which could be obtained mainly through thermal cracking. The empirically derived values reveal a high conversion (94e96%) and high oil yield (64e66%) for these lignites.

  10. Trace elements partitioning during co-firing biomass with lignite in a pilot-scale fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogebakan, Zuhal [Department of Chemical Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: zuhalgogebakan@hotmail.com; Selcuk, Nevin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06531 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: selcuk@metu.edu.tr

    2009-03-15

    This study describes the partitioning of 18 trace elements (As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, P, Pb, Sb, Se, Sn, Tl, V, Zn) and 9 major and minor elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, S, Si, Ti) during co-firing of olive residue, hazelnut shell and cotton residue with high sulfur and ash content lignite in 0.3 MW{sub t} Middle East Technical University (METU) Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustor (ABFBC) test rig with limestone addition. Concentrations of trace elements in coal, biomass, limestone, bottom ash, cyclone ash and filter ash were determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission and mass spectroscopy (ICP-OES and ICP-MS). Partitioning of major and minor elements are influenced by the ash split between the bottom ash and fly ash and that the major proportion of most of the trace elements (As, Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Li, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Tl, V and Zn) are recovered in fly ash when firing lignite only. Co-firing lignite with biomass enhances partitioning of these elements to fly ash. Co-firing also shifts the partitioning of Cd, P, Sb and Sn from bottom to fly ash.

  11. Investigation of pre-drying lignite in an existing Greek power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agraniotis Michalis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of lignite pre-drying technologies in next generation of lignite power plants by utilizing low pressure steam as a drying medium instead of hot recirculated flue gas - combined with thermal utilization of the vaporized coal moisture - is expected to bring efficiency increase of 2-4 percentage points in future lignite power plants compared with today’s state of the art. The pre-drying concept is of particular importance in Greek boilers firing lignite with a high water and ash content. The combustion of Greek predried lignite has been investigated experimentally and via numerical simulations in our previous research. This study focuses on the potential integration of a lignite pre-drying system in an existing Greek power plant with dry lignite co-firing thermal share of up to 30%. The radiative and convective heat fluxes to the boiler and the overall boiler heat balance is calculated for reference and dry lignite co-firing conditions by an in-house calculation code. The overall plant’s thermal cycle is then simulated using commercial thermal cycle calculation software. The net plant efficiency is in this way determined for reference and dry coal co-firing conditions. According to the simulation results the integration of a pre-drying system and the implementation of dry lignite co-firing may bring an efficiency increase of about 1.5 percentage points in existing Greek boilers. It is therefore considered as an important measure towards improving plant efficiency and reducing specific CO2 emissions in existing plants.

  12. Fluidized-bed-combustion ash for the solidification and stabilization of a metal-hydroxide sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, K L; Behr-Andres, C

    1998-01-01

    Fluidized-bed-combustion (FBC) ash is a by-product from a developing technology for coal-fired power plants that will economically reduce air emissions to meet requirements of the Clean Air Act. FBC ash has physical and chemical properties similar to Portland cement, but only has moderate success as a pozzolan in concrete applications due to low compressive strengths. However, FBC ash has proven effective for use as a binder for the solidification and stabilization (S/S) of metal-bearing sludges. Physical and chemical characterization procedures were used to analyze FBC ash and a metal-bearing sludge obtained from a hazardous waste treatment facility to develop 12 different S/S mix designs. The mix designs consist of four binder designs to evaluate sludge-to-binder ratios of approximately 0, 0.5, and 1. Portland cement is used as a control binder to compare unconfined compressive strengths and Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) analyses from different ratios of the FBC ash streams: fly ash, char, and spent bed material (SBM). Compressive strengths ranging from 84 lbs per square inch (psi) to 298 psi were obtained from various mix designs containing different sludge-to-ash ratios cured for 28 days. All the mix designs passed the TCLP. Recoveries from leaching for each metal were less than 5% for most mix designs. Results of unconfined compressive strengths, TCLP, and percent recovery calculations indicate that the mix design containing approximately a 1:1 ratio of fly ash to char-and-sludge is the best mix design for the S/S of the metal-bearing sludge.

  13. The problem of enriching the Visonta lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarjan, G.

    1987-01-01

    The technology suggested by the Central Institute for Mining Development is critically analyzed. The minerals accompanying the lignite seams, especially the montmorillonite and its physical peculiarities are evaluated. The Visonta lignites contain inorganic components of about 45% in addition to about 21% clay. The investment costs are much lower in case of building a preparation system for lignite cleaning than the investment costs of the power plant planned only for raw lignite.

  14. Results of core drilling for uranium-bearing lignite, Mendenhall area, Harding County, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, James R.

    1954-01-01

    Core drilling for data on uranium-bearing lignite in the Mendenhall area, Harding County, S. Dak. , was conducted by the U. S. Bureau of Mines during the period October 1952 to July 1953. Forty-two core holes totaling 9, 683 feet drilled in an area of about six square miles indicate a reserve of about 127/000,000 tons of lignite of which about 49,000,000 tons contain an average of 0.005 percent uranium or more. The Mendenhall area is near the center of the Slim Buttes, which are about 30 miles long from north to south. The uranium-bearing lignite averages, 5. 4 feet in thickness and occurs in the Ludlow member of the Fort Union formation of Paleocene age. Fuel analyses of about 130 samples indicate that the lignite contains about 15 percent ash, 36.7 percent moisture, 24r percent fixed carbon, 23.9 percent volatile matter, and 1.5 percent sulfur and has heating values of about 5,800 btu (as received). Uranium analyses of about 700 samples of lignite core indicate that about 2, 790 tons of uranium are present in the Mendenhall area. Inferred uranium reserves of 2,335 and .1. 050 tons are indicated by grade cutoffs of 0. 005 and 0. 01 percent uranium in the lignites, and 2, 065 and l s 35Stons are indicated by grade cutoffs of 0.03 and 0.05 percent uranium in the lignite ash. The above grade cutoffs have been incorporated on maps showing areal distribution:

  15. Cofiring lignite with hazelnut shell and cotton residue in a pilot-scale fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuhal Gogebakan; Nevin Selcuk [Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2008-05-15

    In this study, cofiring of high ash and sulfur content lignite with hazelnut shell and cotton residue was investigated in 0.3 MWt METU Atmospheric Bubbling Fluidized Bed Combustion (ABFBC) Test Rig in terms of combustion and emission performance of different fuel blends. The results reveal that cofiring of hazelnut shell and cotton residue with lignite increases the combustion efficiency and freeboard temperatures compared to those of lignite firing with limestone addition only. CO{sub 2} emission is not found sensitive to increase in hazelnut shell and cotton residue share in fuel blend. Cofiring lowers SO{sub 2} emissions considerably. Cofiring of hazelnut shell reduces NO and N{sub 2}O emissions; on the contrary, cofiring cotton residue results in higher NO and N{sub 2}O emissions. Higher share of biomass in the fuel blend results in coarser cyclone ash particles. Hazelnut shell and cotton residue can be cofired with high ash and sulfur-containing lignite without operational problems. 32 refs., 12 figs., 11 tabs.

  16. Fly ash quality and utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barta, L.E.; Lachner, L.; Wenzel, G.B. [Inst. for Energy, Budapest (Hungary); Beer, M.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The quality of fly ash is of considerable importance to fly ash utilizers. The fly ash puzzolanic activity is one of the most important properties that determines the role of fly ash as a binding agent in the cementing process. The puzzolanic activity, however is a function of fly ash particle size and chemical composition. These parameters are closely related to the process of fly ash formation in pulverized coal fired furnaces. In turn, it is essential to understand the transformation of mineral matter during coal combustion. Due to the particle-to-particle variation of coal properties and the random coalescence of mineral particles, the properties of fly ash particles e.g. size, SiO{sub 2} content, viscosity can change considerably from particle to particle. These variations can be described by the use of the probability theory. Since the mean values of these randomly changing parameters are not sufficient to describe the behavior of individual fly ash particles during the formation of concrete, therefore it is necessary to investigate the distribution of these variables. Examples of these variations were examined by the Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy (CCSEM) for particle size and chemical composition for Texas lignite and Eagel Butte mineral matter and fly ash. The effect of combustion on the variations of these properties for both the fly ash and mineral matter were studied by using a laminar flow reactor. It is shown in our paper, that there are significant variations (about 40-50% around the mean values) of the above-listed properties for both coal samples. By comparing the particle size and chemical composition distributions of the mineral matter and fly ash, it was possible to conclude that for the Texas lignite mineral matter, the combustion did not effect significantly the distribution of these properties, however, for the Eagel Butte coal the combustion had a major impact on these mineral matter parameters.

  17. Effect of fuel properties on the bottom ash generation rate by a laboratory fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozelle, P.L.; Pisupati, S.V.; Scaroni, A.W. [Penn State University, University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Energy & Geoenvironmental Engineering

    2007-06-15

    The range of fuels that can be accommodated by an FBC boiler system is affected by the ability of the fuel, sorbent, and ash-handling equipment to move the required solids through the boiler. Of specific interest is the bottom ash handling equipment, which must have sufficient capacity to remove ash from the system in order to maintain a constant bed inventory level, and must have sufficient capability to cool the ash well below the bed temperature. Quantification of a fuel's bottom ash removal requirements can be useful for plant design. The effect of fuel properties on the rate of bottom ash production in a laboratory FBC test system was examined. The work used coal products ranging in ash content from 20 to 40+ wt. %. The system's classification of solids by particle size into flyash and bottom ash was characterized using a partition curve. Fuel fractions in the size range characteristic of bottom ash were further analyzed for distributions of ash content with respect to specific gravity, using float sink tests. The fuel fractions were then ashed in a fixed bed. In each case, the highest ash content fraction produced ash with the coarsest size consist (characteristic of bottom ash). The lower ash content fractions were found to produce ash in the size range characteristic of flyash, suggesting that the high ash content fractions were largely responsible for the production of bottom ash. The contributions of the specific gravity fractions to the composite ash in the fuels were quantified. The fuels were fired in the laboratory test system. Fuels with higher amounts of high specific gravity particles, in the size ranges characteristic of bottom ash, were found to produce more bottom ash, indicating the potential utility of float sink methods in the prediction of bottom ash removal requirements.

  18. Bio-solubilization of Chinese lignite Ⅱ: protein adsorption onto the lignite surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Su-dong; TAO Xiu-xiang; SHI Kai-yi

    2009-01-01

    Lignite bio-solubilization is a promising technology for converting solid lignite into oil. This study concerns the adsorption of lignite-solubilizing enzymes onto the lignite surface. Adsorption capacity, infrared spectral analysis and driving forces analysis are studied as a way to help understand the bio-solubilization mechanism. The results show that the amount of lignite bio-solubilization is proportional to the amount of adsorbed lignite-solubilizing enzymes. An increase in lignite-solubilizing enzyme adsorption of 10% leads to a 7% increase in lignite bio-solubilization. However, limited amounts of enzymes can be adsorbed by the lignite, thus resulting in low percentages of bio-solubilization. Infrared spectral analysis shows that side chains, such as hydroxyl and carbonyl, of the lignite structure are the main, and necessary, structures where lignite-solubilizing enzymes attachto the lignite. Furthermore, driving force analysis indicates that the electrostatic force between lignite and enzymes is the main adsorption mechanism. The forces are influenced by solution pH levels, the zeta potential of the lignite and the isoelectric points of the enzymes.

  19. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume VI. FBC-Data Base-Management-System (FBC-DBMS) development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    The primary goal of the Fluidized Bed Combustor Data Base, (FBCDB), situated in MIT's Energy laboratory, is to establish a data repository for the express use of designers and research personnel involved in FBC development. DBMS is a software that provides an efficient way of storing, retrieving, updating and manipulating data using an English-like query language. It is anticipated that the FBCDB would play an active and a direct role in the development of FBC technology as well as in the FBC commercial application. After some in-house experience and after a careful and extensive review of commercially available database systems, it was determined that the Model 204 DBMS by Computer Corporation of America was the most suitable to our needs. The setup of a prototype in-house database also allowed us to investigate and understand fully the particular problems involved in coordinating FBC development with a DBMS. Various difficult aspects were encountered and solutions had been sought. For instance, we found that it was necessary to rename the variables to avoid repetition as well as to increase usefulness of our database and, hence, we had designed a classification system for which variables were classified under category to achieve standardization of variable names. The primary content of FBCDB is a collection of data points defined by the value of a number of specific FBC variables. A user may interactively access the database from a computer terminal at any location, retrieve, examine, and manipulate the data as well as produce tables or graphs of the results.

  20. Acid leaching of coal: to produce clean fuels from Turkish lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seferinoglu, Meryem [Mineral Research and Exploration Directorate (Turkey)], email: meryem_seferinoglu66@yahoo.com; Duzenli, Derya [Ankara Central Laboratory (Turkey)

    2011-07-01

    With the increasing concerns about the environment, energy producers and governments are looking at developing clean energy sources. However, Turkey has limited clean energy resources and is using low grade coal which has high sulphur content as an alternative energy source. The aim of this paper is to study the possibility of generating clean fuel from Edirne Lignite and to get a better understanding of chemical mechanisms involved in coal leaching with hydrofluoric acid (HF) solutions. Leaching was conducted on Edirne Lignite with HF solution at ambient temperature and the effects of parameters such as reaction time and concentration of acid solutions on the process were evaluated. The optimum conditions were found and it was shown that ash levels can be reduced from 28.9% to 10.5% and the calorific value increased by 500kcal/kg with the HF leaching method. This study demonstrated that the production of clean fuel from high sulphur lignite is possible.

  1. Reuse of Partially Sulphated CFBC Ash as an SO2 Sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yinghai; Jia, Lufei; Anthony, E.J. [CanmetENERGY, 1 Haanel Drive, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A1M1 (Canada); Nobili, M.; Telesca, A. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Physics, University of Basilicata, Viale dell' Ateneo, Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Montagnaro, F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Naples ' Federico II' , Monte Sant' Angelo, 80126 Naples (Italy)

    2010-06-15

    Ashes produced from fluidized bed combustors (FBC) burning high-sulphur fuels often contain 20-30 % unreacted CaO because of the limestone added to remove SO2 in situ. This paper presents the results from experiments into reactivating partially sulphated FBC ash (both bed ash and fly ash) with liquid water, steam and sodium carbonate. The water- or steam-hydrated ashes were subsequently re-sulphated in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) with simulated flue gas. The TGA results show that, while liquid water and steam successfully hydrate and reactivate the unreacted CaO in the bed ash, the treated ashes sulphated to widely different extents. Attempts to reactivate fly ash with hydration failed, although fly ash by itself is extremely reactive. A pilot-scale mini-circulating FBC (CFBC) was also used to evaluate the results of reactivation on the bed ash by hydrating with liquid water and admixtures of inorganic salt (Na2CO3) in the form of either powder or solution. When the treated ash was re-injected into the combustor with the fuel, the effect on SO2 removal efficiency was negligible if Na2CO3 was added as powder. Doping with aqueous solution resulted in enhanced SO2 removal; however, the extent was lower than the level achieved if only water hydration was employed. Increasing the amount of water (from 10% to 30%) to reactivate the ash did not improve the sulphur capture capacity in the mini-CFBC. Overall, this study suggests that the most practical way for re-use of the partially sulphated bed ash as a sulphur sorbent is reactivation by water. A proposal for utilization of the fly ash in an economically reasonable way is also discussed.

  2. Biomass ash-bed material interactions leading to agglomeration in FBC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, H.J.M.; van Lith, Simone Cornelia; Kiel, J.H.A.

    2008-01-01

    In (bubbling) fluidized-bed combustion and gasification of biomass, several potential problems are associated with the inorganic components of the fuel. A major problem area is defluidization due to bed agglomeration. The most common found process leading to defluidization in commercial-scale ins......In (bubbling) fluidized-bed combustion and gasification of biomass, several potential problems are associated with the inorganic components of the fuel. A major problem area is defluidization due to bed agglomeration. The most common found process leading to defluidization in commercial...... describes a fundamental study on the mechanisms of defluidization. For the studied process of bed defluidization due to sintering of grain-coating layers, it was found that the onset of the process depends on (a) a critical coating thickness, (b) on the fluidization velocity when it is below approximately...... four times the minimum fluidization velocity, and (c) on the viscosity (stickiness) of the outside of the grains (coating)....

  3. Recovery of germanium from lignite by microorganism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The recovery of Ge from lignite by microorganism includes two stages: (1) the breaking-down of Ge complex of humus in lignite into simple compounds assisted by microorganism; (2) the desorption of Ge compounds from the lignite. The recovery rate of Ge has been enhanced by 14% since the discovery of adsorption and desorption of Ge from coal. The effects of pH, leaching agents, and coal size on the recovery of Ge were experimentally investigated, and the optimized process parameters were obtained. The reaction heat of Ge adsorption and desorption in lignite was determined. It is about 23-53 kJ/mol, which reveals that the adsorption belongs to physical process. The recovery rate of Ge from lignite with direct microorganism leaching can reach about 85%, which is higher than that of 60% reported elsewhere. A potential process for leaching Ge in lignite was suggested.

  4. Size fraction characterization of highly-calcareous fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itskos, Grigorios; Koukouzas, Nikolaos [Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Centre for Research and Technology Hellas, 357-359 Mesogeion Avenue, GR-152 31, Halandri, Athens (Greece); Itskos, Socrates [Department of Chemical Technology and the Environment, Steam Electric Station of Amynteon-Filotas, Public Power Corporation of Greece, GR-532 00, Amynteon (Greece)

    2010-11-15

    The chemical and mineralogical composition of lignite fly ash (FA) varies as a function of the prevalent conditions in both the processes of power production and lignite mining. The differentiation of the qualitative and quantitative composition of the highly-calcareous lignite fly ash, as a function of its particle size distribution, is verified in this paper. According to the results of the conducted research, a fine-grained fraction of considerable amount presents properties that obstruct the sustainable exploitation of calcareous lignite fly ash in cement industry applications. On the other hand, the same grain fraction (because of its hydraulic properties) can be utilized in other sort of applications, based on different criteria, i.e. in road constructions. The coarse-grained fraction (which reflects a low proportion to the total fly ash output) presents the same undesired characteristics as well. Rather, the intermediate grain fraction (75-150 {mu}m) presents the highly desirable properties when fly ash is utilized as a pozzolanic additive. In addition, the mechanism of the formation of the intermediate grain fraction strongly prevents the factors that cause the variation of fly ash-quality. It is therefore the optimum part of the whole amount of lignite FA, to be utilized as additive in cement manufacturing. The outcomes of this paper will hopefully contribute towards the crucial goal of the expansion of the utilization of calcareous lignite fly ash by proposing a more effective way of using this material, basically by taking advantage of its fundamental chemical and mineralogical properties. (author)

  5. Reactivation of limestone sorbents in FBC for SO{sub 2} capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.J. Anthony; E.M. Bulewicz; L. Jia [CETC-O/NRCan, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2007-04-15

    Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) has the considerable advantage of being capable of burning high-sulphur fuels while achieving in situ sulphur capture by means of limestone addition. Unfortunately the efficiency of this process is limited, and limestone utilization in the range of 30-45% is not uncommon. In consequence, improving limestone utilization has long been an aim of FBC research. The principal directions this research has taken are the use of water (as liquid or vapour) to reactivate the spent sorbent, or mixing of chemical additives with the limestone to improve its utilization. Despite research stretching over the entire history of FBC combustion, there are still no working commercial applications of reactivation technology noted in the open literature. The paper presents some of the more important research undertaken in this field and explores the major knowledge gaps that still exist in the area of sorbent reactivation. 131 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs. 3 apps.

  6. THE COMBUSTION CHARACTERISTICS OF LIGNITE BLENDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Jun; Zhou Junhu; Cao Xinyu; Cen Kefa

    2000-01-01

    The combustion characteristics of lignite blends were studied with a thermogravimetric analyzer (t.g.a.), at constant heating rate.The characteristic temperatures were determined from the burning profiles.It was found that the characteristic times of combustion reaction moved forward, the ignition temperature dropped and the burnout efficiency slightly changed when blending lignites.The characteristic parameters of blends could not be predicted as a linear function of the average values of the individual lignites.when blending with less reactive coal, the ignition and burnout characteristics of lignite turned worse.

  7. A comparative study of geopolymers synthesized from OXY-combustion and chemical looping combustion bottom ashes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Nkuna, CN

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was performed with a Perkin Elmer 133 spectrum RX FT-IR system, the samples were analyzed using the KBr pellet technique (3mg 134 powder sample mixed with 100mg of KBr) [16]. Thermo-gravimetric analysis... for the blending of a more reactivity material such as metakaolin with 365 FBC, OXY-FBC and CLC bottom ashes in the production of geopolymer for binders in the 366 construction industry. This is due to an incomplete formation of a dense N-A-S-H gel, hence 367 a...

  8. Decomposition and reduction of N2O over Limestone under FBC Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Jensen, Anker; Vaaben, Rikke;

    1997-01-01

    The addition of limestone for sulfur retention in FBC has in many cases been observed to influence the emission of N2O. The catalytic activity of N2O over calcined Stevns Chalk for decomposition of N2O in a laboratory fixed bed quartz reactor was measured. It was found that calcined Stevns Chalk ...

  9. Decomposition and Reduction of N2O over Limestone under FBC Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Jensen, Anker; Vaaben, Rikke;

    1997-01-01

    The addition of limestone for sulfur retention in fluidized bed combustion (FBC) has in many cases been observed to influence the emission of N2O. The catalytic activity of N2O over calcined Stevns Chalk for decomposition of N2O in a laboratory fixed bed quartz reactor was measured. It was found...

  10. Ash transformation during co-firing coal and straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Jensen, Anker Degn;

    2007-01-01

    Co-firing straw with coal in pulverized fuel boilers can cause problems related to fly ash utilization, deposit formation, corrosion and SCR catalyst deactivation due to the high contents of Cl and K in the ash. To investigate the interaction between coal and straw ash and the effect of coal...... quality on fly ash and deposit properties, straw was co-fired with three kinds of coal in an entrained flow reactor. The compositions of the produced ashes were compared to the available literature data to find suitable scaling parameters that can be used to predict the composition of ash from straw...... importantly, by reaction with Al and Si in the fly ash. About 70-80% K in the fly ash appears as alumina silicates while the remainder K is mainly present as sulphate. Lignite/straw co-firing produces fly ash with relatively high Cl content. This is probably because of the high content of calcium...

  11. Characterization of ashes from a 100 kWth pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed with oxy-fuel combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Y.H.; Wang, C.B.; Tan, Y.W.; Jia, L.F.; Anthony, E.J. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Oxy-fuel combustion experiments have been carried out on an oxygen-fired 100 kW(th) mini-circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) facility. Coal and petroleum coke were used as fuel together with different limestones (and fixed Ca:S molar ratios) premixed with the fuel, for in situ SO{sub 2} capture. The bed ash (BA) and fly ash (FA) samples produced from this unit were collected and characterized to obtain physical and chemical properties of the ash samples. The characterization methods used included X-ray fluorescence (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), char carbon and free lime analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and surface analysis. The main purpose of this work is to characterize the CFBC ashes from oxy-fuel firing to obtain a better understanding of the combustion process, and to identify any significant differences from the ash generated by a conventional air-fired CFBC. The primary difference in the sulfur capture mechanism between atmospheric air-fired and oxy-fuel FBC, at typical FBC temperatures (similar to 850{sup o}C), is that, in the air-fired case the limestone sorbents calcine, whereas the partial pressure of CO{sub 2} in oxy-fuel FBC is high enough to prevent calcination, and hence the sulfation process should mimic that seen in pressurized FBC (PFBC). Here, the char carbon content in the fly ash was much higher than that in the bed ash, and was also high by comparison with ash obtained from conventional commercial air-firing CFBC units. In addition, measurements of the free lime content in the bed and fly ash showed that the unreacted Ca sorbent was present primarily as CaCO{sub 3}, indicating that sulfur capture in the oxy-fuel combustor occurred via direct sulfation.

  12. Test results of beneficiation of lignites deriving from opencast mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacskai, G.; Schmied, L.; Szabo, I.

    1987-01-01

    The possible varieties of lignite beneficiation of Hungarian lignites as well as the experiences from abroad are discussed. Improvement of the quality of lignites includes homogenization, pre-sorting, wet sorting and pre-drying. The possibilities of producing cemented lignite briquette, of the thermal benefication are outlined. The anticipated costs and length of time necessary to establish lignite briquetting plants in Hungary under different economic conditions are listed.

  13. Co-pyrolysis of lignite and sugar beet pulp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilgin, M.; Deveci Duranay, N.; Pehlivan, D. [Firat University, Chemical Engineering Department, 23279 Elazig (Turkey)

    2010-05-15

    Today, worldwide studies have been undertaken on the biomass usage and co-conversion of biomass and coal to seek out alternative fuels for supplying energy in an environmental friendly way. The objective of this work is to study co-pyrolysis of lignite and sugar beet pulp in 50/50 (wt./wt.) ratio of blend pellets, to elucidate their thermal behaviour under pyrolysis conditions and to assess major decomposition products in terms of their yields. A special chamber, which has enabled very fast heating rates, was used in the pyrolysis experiments carried at 600 C. The results were interpreted in the light of liquid, solid and gaseous yields, resulting from thermal decomposition, and kinetics of thermogravimetric analysis. Proximate volatile matter and ash contents of the blends were different compared to those found by using individual values. Sugar beet pulp decomposed faster within a relatively narrow temperature range than lignite and underwent a significant shrinkage during pyrolysis. It was found that the chars left behind after the flash pyrolysis of these pellets at 600 C have substantial amounts of volatile matter that would evolve upon further heating. (author)

  14. Uranium-bearing lignite and its relation to the White River and Arikaree formations in northwestern South Dakota and adjacent states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denson, N.M.; Bachman, G.O.; Zeller, H.D.

    1954-01-01

    In northwestern South Dakota and adjacent areas uranium-bearing lignite beds occur at many horizons in the Hell Creek formation of late Cretaceous age and the overlying Ludlow, Tongue River, and Sentinel Butte members of the Fort Union formation of Paleocene age. Uranium analyses of 275 surface and auger samples and about 1,000 core samples show that many of the lignite beds contain 0. 005 to 0. 02 percent uranium with concentrations of 0. 05 to 0.10 percent uranium in the lignite ash. Analytical data indicate that the region contains an aggregate of at least 47,500, 000 tons of lignite with an average grade of slightly more than .0. 008 percent containing 3, 900 tons of uranium. Almost a fifth of the estimated reserves are adapted to strip mining and are in beds averaging about 4 feet in thickness. Uranium concentrations of this magnitude in lignite indicate that these deposits upon the development of proper utilization techniques and processes may be an important future source of uranium. Recent discoveries of ore-grade deposits of autunite-bearing lignite and secondary uranium minerals in carbonaceous sandstone at Cave Hills and Slim Buttes indicate that northwestern South Dakota and adjacent areas may containimportant reserves of uranium-ore. The stratigraphic units containing the uraniferous lignite beds have a combined thickness of about 1, 500 feet and are unconformably overlapped by 300 feet or more of tuffaceous sandstone and bentonitic claystone of the White River and Arikaree formations of Oligocene and Miocene age. The stratigraphically highest lignite beds in the local sequence have the greatest concentration of uranium,, and the uranium content is greatest at the top of thick lignite beds, diminishing progressively downward to a vanishing point in their lower parts. Variations in permeability of the rock overlying the mineralized lignite beds seem to be reflected in the intensity of uranium mineralization. Most of the known uranium-bearing lignite

  15. Separation and analysis of lignite bioconversion products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Jinghua; Xiao Lei; Wang Liqiang

    2012-01-01

    The bioconversion of coal at ambient conditions is a promising technology for coal processing,although the mechanisms of coal degradation are still not understood fully.In this work,the bioconversion of lignite was studied using a fungus isolated from decaying wood.The lignite samples were oxidized with nitric acid under moderate conditions and then the oxidized samples were placed on a potato medium with isolated fungus for lignite bioconversion.Lignite,oxidized lignite and residual products after bioconversion of lignite were sequentially extracted with petroleum ether,CS2.methanol,acetone and tetrahydrofuran (THF),and then each extract was characterized by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS).The differences in composition and structure among the samples were inferred by comparing the differences between the extracts.The results show that aromatics with one or several benzene rings and their derivatives; and some long-chain alkanes containing oxygen decreased in the methanol-,acetone-,and THF-soluble fraction from residual lignite,whereas long chain or a few branched alkanes and small quantities of aromatic compounds increased in petroleum ether and CS2 soluble fractions.

  16. Modeling of fluidized-bed combustion of coal: Phase II, final reports. Volume VII. FBC Data-Base-Management System (FBC-DBMS) users manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, J.F.; Tung, S.E.

    1980-10-01

    The primary goal of the Fluidized Bed Combustor Data Base (FBCDB) is to establish a data repository for the express use of designers and research personnel involved in FBC development. FBCDB is implemented on MIT's 370/168 computer, using the Model 204 Data Base Management System (DBMS) developed by Computer Corporation of America. DBMS is a software that provides an efficient way of storing, retrieving, updating and manipulating data using an English-like query language. The primary content of FBCDB is a collection of data points defined by the value of a number of specific FBC variables. A user may interactively access the data base from a computer terminal at any location, retrieve, examine, and manipulate the data as well as produce tables or graphs of the results. More than 20 program segments are currently available in M204 User Language to simplify the user interface for the FBC design or research personnel. However, there are still many complex and advanced retrieving as well as applications programs to be written for this purpose. Although there are currently 71 entries, and about 2000 groups reposited in the system, this size of data is only an intermediate portion of our selection. The usefulness of the system at the present time is, therefore, limited. This version of FBCDB will be released on a limited scale to obtain review and comments. The document is intended as a reference guide to the use of FBCDB. It has been structured to introduce the user to the basics of FBCDB, summarize what the available segments in FBCDB can do, and give detailed information on the operation of FBCDB. This document represents a preliminary draft of a Users Manual. The draft will be updated when the data base system becomes fully implemented. Any suggestions as to how this manual may be improved will be appreciated.

  17. JV Task - 129 Advanced Conversion Test - Bulgarian Lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Swanson; Everett Sondreal; Daniel Laudal; Douglas Hajicek; Ann Henderson; Brandon Pavlish

    2009-03-27

    The objectives of this Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project were to evaluate Bulgarian lignite performance under both fluid-bed combustion and gasification conditions and provide a recommendation as to which technology would be the most technically feasible for the particular feedstock and also identify any potential operating issues (such as bed agglomeration, etc.) that may limit the applicability of a potential coal conversion technology. Gasification tests were run at the EERC in the 100-400-kg/hr transport reactor development unit (TRDU) on a 50-tonne sample of lignite supplied by the Bulgarian Lignite Power Project. The quality of the test sample was inferior to any coal previously tested in this unit, containing 50% ash at 26.7% moisture and having a higher heating value of 5043 kJ/kg after partial drying in preparation for testing. The tentative conclusion reached on the basis of tests in the TRDU is that oxygen-blown gasification of this high-ash Bulgarian lignite sample using the Kellogg, Brown, and Root (KBR) transport gasifier technology would not provide a syngas suitable for directly firing a gas turbine. After correcting for test conditions specific to the pilot-scale TRDU, including an unavoidably high heat loss and nitrogen dilution by transport air, the best-case heating value for oxygen-blown operation was estimated to be 3316 kJ/m{sup 3} for a commercial KRB transport gasifier. This heating value is about 80% of the minimum required for firing a gas turbine. Removing 50% of the carbon dioxide from the syngas would increase the heating value to 4583 kJ/m{sup 3}, i.e., to about 110% of the minimum requirement, and 95% removal would provide a heating value of 7080 kJ/m{sup 3}. Supplemental firing of natural gas would also allow the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology to be utilized without having to remove CO{sub 2}. If removal of all nitrogen from the input gas streams such as the coal transport air were

  18. Bioprocessing of lignite coals using reductive microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D.L.

    1992-03-29

    In order to convert lignite coals into liquid fuels, gases or chemical feedstock, the macromolecular structure of the coal must be broken down into low molecular weight fractions prior to further modification. Our research focused on this aspect of coal bioprocessing. We isolated, characterized and studied the lignite coal-depolymerizing organisms Streptomyces viridosporus T7A, Pseudomonas sp. DLC-62, unidentified bacterial strain DLC-BB2 and Gram-positive Bacillus megaterium strain DLC-21. In this research we showed that these bacteria are able to solubilize and depolymerize lignite coals using a combination of biological mechanisms including the excretion of coal solublizing basic chemical metabolites and extracellular coal depolymerizing enzymes.

  19. Sedimentary cycles and volcanic ash beds in the Lower Pliocene lacustrine succession of Ptolemais (NW Greece): discrepancy between 40 Ar/39 Ar and astronomical ages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbrink, J.; Vugt, N. van; Hilgen, F.J.; Wijbrans, J.R.; Meulenkamp, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    A high-resolution cyclostratigraphy for the rhythmically bedded lignite-marl sequences of the Lower Pliocene Ptole-mais Formation is combined with 40 Ar= 39 Ar dating results of intercalated volcanic ash beds. Detailed field reconnaissance in three open-pit lignite mines reveals three end-member sed

  20. Water repellency of fly ash-enriched forest soils from eastern Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, P.; Fleige, H.; Horn, R. [Forest Research Institute, Freiburg (Germany). Dept. of Soils & Environment

    2010-12-15

    Fly ash-enriched soils occur widely throughout the industrial regions of eastern Germany and in other heavily industrialized areas. A limited amount of research has suggested that fly ash enrichment alters the water repellency (WR) characteristics of soil. This study concentrates on the influence of fly ash enrichment on WR of forest soils with a focus on forest floor horizons (FFHs). The soils were a Technosol developed from pure lignite fly ash, FFHs with lignite fly ash, and FFHs without lignite fly ash enrichment. Three different methods were used to characterize soil WR. Additionally, carbon composition was determined using {sup 13}C-NMR spectra to interpret the influence of the organic matter. This study showed that the actual WR characteristics of undisturbed, fly ash-enriched soils can be explained in terms of the composition of soil organic matter, with the fly ash content playing only a minimal role. Regardless of the huge amounts of mainly mineral fly ash enrichment, all undisturbed FFHs were comparable in their WR characteristics and their carbon compositions, which were dominated by recently-formed organic substances. The pure fly ash deposit was strongly influenced by lignite remains, with the topsoil having a greater content of recent plant residues. Thus, the undisturbed topsoil was more repellent than the subsoil. When homogenized samples were used, we found a distinct effect of fly ash enrichment and structure on WR. Water repellency of the pure fly ash horizons did not differ distinctly, while the fly ash enrichment in the FFHs caused a significant reduction in WR. These results led to the assumption that water-repellent structures of the topsoils were probably the result of hydrophobic coatings of recently formed organic substances, whereby the initially high wettability of the mainly mineral, hydrophilic fly ash particles was reduced.

  1. A Prognostic Analysis of Male Breast Cancer (MBC) Compared with Post-Menopausal Female Breast Cancer (FBC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xing-Fei; Yang, Hong-Jian; Yu, Yang; Zou, De-Hong; Miao, Lu-Lu

    2015-01-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is known to be rare compared with female breast cancer (FBC) and to account for only 1% of all breast cancers. To date, male patients diagnosed with breast cancer are normally treated based on the guidelines for FBC. Specifically, studies have found that diagnosing and treating MBC patients under the guidelines for the treatment of post-menopausal FBC are more favorable than are those of pre/peri-menopausal FBC from a physiological perspective because MBC and post-menopausal FBC patients show high estrogen receptor (ER) expression in the tumor and low estrogen expression in the body. In this medical study, we aimed to examine whether MBC actually has the same prognosis as post-menopausal FBC. We identified MBC patients who were diagnosed as operable and who completed clinical treatment and we used follow-up data that were collected from January 2001 to January 2011. Each MBC patient was paired with four FBC patients who were diagnosed within the same period (two were pre/peri-menopausal, and two were post-menopausal). We compared disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) among three groups, i.e., pre/peri-menopausal FBC (group A), post-menopausal FBC (group B) and MBC (group M), using the Kaplan-Meier method and a Cox proportional hazards regression model. We also evaluated the clinical characteristics of breast cancer patients using t-tests and chi-square tests. We used ten consecutive years of data that were collected at Zhejiang Provincial Cancer Hospital. We identified 91 MBC cases for group M, 182 FBC cases for group A and 182 FBC cases for group B. The median follow-up period was 112 months. MBC cases were much more frequently ER positive than those of group A and group B (p<0.01); a similar trend was also found for progesterone (PR)-positive cases (p<0.01). The MBC group showed much lower human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2) expression than did the other groups (p<0.01). The 10-year OS rates were 79.1% for

  2. Modeling calcium dissolution from oil shale ash: Part 2.. Continuous washing of the ash layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velts, O.; Kallas, J. [Tallinn University of Technology, Laboratory of Inorganic Materials, 5 Ehitajate Str., Tallinn 19086 (Estonia); Lappeenranta University of Technology, Laboratory of Separation Technology, Skinnarilankatu 34, Lappeenranta 53851 (Finland); Hautaniemi, M.; Kuosa, M. [Lappeenranta University of Technology, Laboratory of Separation Technology, Skinnarilankatu 34, Lappeenranta 53851 (Finland); Kuusik, R. [Tallinn University of Technology, Laboratory of Inorganic Materials, 5 Ehitajate Str., Tallinn 19086 (Estonia)

    2010-05-15

    In the present work a possible approach to the utilization of oil shale ash containing free lime in precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) production is elucidated. This paper investigates the Ca (calcium) dissolution process during continuous washing of pulverized firing (PF) and fluidized bed combustion (FBC) oil shale ash layers in a packed-bed leaching column. The main characteristics of the Ca dissolution process from ash are established. The effect of water flow rate is investigated by conducting leaching experiments of oil shale ashes formed in boilers operating with different combustion technologies. The values of the overall and liquid phase mass transfer coefficients are evaluated based on experiments using the developed ash layer washing model. The model is a set of partial differential equations that describe the changes in Ca content in the stagnant layer of ash and in the water flowing through the ash layer. An example in which the model is applied to environmental assessment and estimation of Ca leaching from industrial oil shale ash fields is provided. (author)

  3. Comparison of leachable trace element levels in coal gasifier ash with levels in power plant ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bombaugh, K.J.; Milosavljevic, M.; Janes, T.K.

    1984-04-01

    The levels of 14 trace elements in leachates from three types of ash of a common origin coal were compared. The study was conducted over a one year period at the Kosovo plant in Obilic, Yugoslavia comparing coal gasifier ash with fly ash and bottom ash from a coal-fired power plant using lignite from the Dobro Solo mine. Results obtained indicate that levels of Sb, As, Be, Cr, Cu, Pb, Mo, Ni and Zn in gasifier ash leachate were similar to those in fly ash leachate. Barium levels in gasifier ash leachate averaged 2.7 times that in fly ash and selenium levels averaged 0.33 times. The average ratio for the total set was 0.99. The set average, relative to bottom ash, was 2.1 with the nickel ratio differing significantly from the average. Metal oxides, CaO, MgO, Na/SUB/2O, K/SUB/2O and MgO; in the Kosovo gasifier ash were found at levels similar to those in Kosovo fly ash, and except for K/SUB/2O, were approximately twice those in bottom ash. Concentration levels of all components showed relatively small variations averaging 50% of their mean annual concentration over the test period. (14 refs.)

  4. Origin and significance of high nickel and chromium concentrations in Pliocene lignite of the Kosovo Basin, Serbia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruppert, L.; Finkelman, R.; Boti, E.; Milosavljevic, M.; Tewalt, S.; Simon, M.; Dulong, F. [US Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Trace element data from 59 Pliocene lignite cores from the lignite field in the Kosovo Basin, southern Serbia, show localized enrichment of Ni and Cr (33-304 ppm and 8-176 ppm, respectively, whole-coal basis). Concentrations of both elements decrease from the western and southern boundaries of the lignite field. Low-temperature ash and polished coal pellets of selected bench and whole-coal samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analyses. These analyses show that most of the Ni and Cr are incorporated in detrital and, to a lesser degree, in authigenic minerals. The Ni- and Cr-bearing detrital minerals include oxides, chromites, serpentine-group minerals and rare mixed-layer clays. Possible authigenic minerals include Ni-Fe sulfates and sulfides. Analyses of three lignite samples by a supercritical fluid extraction technique indicate that some (1-11%) of the Ni is organically bound, Ni- and Cr-bearing oxides, mixed-layer clays, chromites and serpentine-group minerals were also identified in weathered and fresh samples of laterite developed on serpentinized Palaeozoic peridotite at the nearby Glavica and Cikatovo Ni mines. The detrital Ni- and Cr-bearing minerals identified in lignite samples from the western part of the Kosovo Basin may have been transported into the paleoswamp by rivers that drained the two Palaeocene laterites. Some Ni may have been transported directly into the paleoswamp in solution or, alternatively, Ni may have been leached from detrital minerals by acidic peat water and adsorbed onto organic matter and included into authigenic mineral phases. No minable source of Ni and Cr is known in the southern part of the lignite field; however, the mineral and chemical data from the lignite and associated rocks suggest that such a source area may exist. 15 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Operating Experience from two new Biomass Fired FBC-Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolhar-Nordenkampf, M.; Tschanun, I.; Kaiser, S. [Austrian Energy and Environment AG, Vienna (Austria)

    2006-07-15

    The use of renewable fuels in industrial power plants is rising continuously. The driving forces are the Kyoto protocol for CO{sub 2} reduction resulting in government support for green power electricity, substitution of imported primary energy and multi-fuel concepts together with RDF. Biomass fuel exists in various forms, traditionally as wood, bark, harvesting residues sewage sludge and organic waste. A favourable combustion technology is Austrian Energy's 'ECOFLUID' bubbling fluidized bed. Advantageous is the principle of a substoichiometric bed operation which allows bed temperature control in the range between 650 deg C - 850 deg C. Therefore, also fuel with low ash melting temperature can be burned. The applied staged combustion concept results in a homogenous temperature profile in the furnace and first pass of the boiler and thus low NO{sub x} emission. One new plant, owned by Energie AG in Timelkam/Austria has been commissioned in winter 2005. The main fuel of this 57 t/h boiler is bark, wood residues and waste wood up to 30% of the total thermal capacity. Grinding dust and saw dust can be co-fired, too. Optionally, sludge and animal wastes can be fired. The boiler is designed for 42 barg at live steam temperature of 440 deg C. The other new 30 MW{sub th} plant, owned by M-real Hallein AG in Hallein/Austria has been commissioned in winter 2005, too. The boiler is fired with wood chips, bark, rejects and other paper mill residues and furthermore it is able to burn the sludge of the mills own waste water treatment plant. Beside the boiler works as a post combustion system for exhaust gases from a 1 MW Biogas Otto-Engine, or alternatively it is able to burn the biogas directly. The boiler is designed for 61 barg at live steam temperature of 450 deg C.

  6. Co-firing of pine chips with Turkish lignites in 750kWth circulating fluidized bed combustion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atimtay, Aysel T; Kayahan, Ufuk; Unlu, Alper; Engin, Berrin; Varol, Murat; Olgun, Hayati; Atakul, Husnu

    2017-01-01

    Two Turkish lignites which have different sulfur levels (2-2.9% dry) and ash levels (17-25% dry) were combusted with a Turkish forest red pine chips in a 750kW-thermal capacity circulating fluidized bed combustor (CFBC) system. The combustion temperature was held at 850±50°C. Flue gas emissions were measured by Gasmet DX-4000 flue gas analyzer. Two lignites were combusted alone, and then limestone was added to lignites to reduce SO2 emissions. Ca/S=3 was used. 30% percent of red pine chips were added to the lignites for co-firing experiments without limestone in order to see the biomass effects. The results showed that with limestone addition SO2 concentration was reduced below the limit values for all lignites. CO emissions are high at low excess air ratios, gets lower as the excess air ratio increases. During co-firing experiments the temperature in the freeboard was 100-150°C higher as compared to coal combustion experiments.

  7. An investigation of washability characteristics of lignites from Yenicubuk-Gemerek districts by MGS; Yenicubuk gemerek linyit komurlerinin MGS ile yikanabilirliginin arastirilmasi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslan, N.; Canbazoglu, M.; Ulusoy, U. [Cumhuriyet Universitesi, Sivas (Turkey). Maden Muhendisligi Bolumu

    1999-07-01

    Washability and ash removal from Gemerek lignite in a multi gravity separator (MGS) were investigated. Experimental studies were carried out on -0.5 mm coal samples containing 37.75% ash in a laboratory C-900 type MGS. Drum speed, shake amplitude, tilt angle, shake frequency, wash water quantity and feed solid ratio were investigated. Optimum operating conditions were determined. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  8. JV Task - 129 Advanced Conversion Test - Bulgarian Lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Swanson; Everett Sondreal; Daniel Laudal; Douglas Hajicek; Ann Henderson; Brandon Pavlish

    2009-03-27

    The objectives of this Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) project were to evaluate Bulgarian lignite performance under both fluid-bed combustion and gasification conditions and provide a recommendation as to which technology would be the most technically feasible for the particular feedstock and also identify any potential operating issues (such as bed agglomeration, etc.) that may limit the applicability of a potential coal conversion technology. Gasification tests were run at the EERC in the 100-400-kg/hr transport reactor development unit (TRDU) on a 50-tonne sample of lignite supplied by the Bulgarian Lignite Power Project. The quality of the test sample was inferior to any coal previously tested in this unit, containing 50% ash at 26.7% moisture and having a higher heating value of 5043 kJ/kg after partial drying in preparation for testing. The tentative conclusion reached on the basis of tests in the TRDU is that oxygen-blown gasification of this high-ash Bulgarian lignite sample using the Kellogg, Brown, and Root (KBR) transport gasifier technology would not provide a syngas suitable for directly firing a gas turbine. After correcting for test conditions specific to the pilot-scale TRDU, including an unavoidably high heat loss and nitrogen dilution by transport air, the best-case heating value for oxygen-blown operation was estimated to be 3316 kJ/m{sup 3} for a commercial KRB transport gasifier. This heating value is about 80% of the minimum required for firing a gas turbine. Removing 50% of the carbon dioxide from the syngas would increase the heating value to 4583 kJ/m{sup 3}, i.e., to about 110% of the minimum requirement, and 95% removal would provide a heating value of 7080 kJ/m{sup 3}. Supplemental firing of natural gas would also allow the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology to be utilized without having to remove CO{sub 2}. If removal of all nitrogen from the input gas streams such as the coal transport air were

  9. Research on the thermal decomposition of Mongolian Baganuur lignite and Naryn sukhait bituminous coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ariunaa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The technical characteristics, elemental composition of the organic and mineral matters, ash melting behaviors and carbonization and gasification reactivities of coals from Baganuur and Naryn sukhait deposits were investigated. The results of proximate and ultimate analysis confirmed that the coal from Baganuur deposit can be graded as a low rank lignite B2 mark coal and Naryn sukhait coal is a bituminous G mark one. The carbonization and gasification experiments were performed using TGA apparatus and fixed bed quartz reactor. The data obtained with two experimental reactors showed that Baganuur lignite had lower thermal stability and much higher CO2 gasification reactivity at 950°C as compared to those for Naryn sukhait bituminous coal.Mongolian Journal of Chemistry 16 (42, 2015, 22-29

  10. Kinetics of lignite pyrolysis in fixed bed and entrained flow reactors. Technical report No. 17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaroni, A. W.; Walker, Jr., P. L.

    1979-08-01

    A laminar flow isothermal furnace has been constructed and used to study lignite pyrolysis in nitrogen at temperatures between 700/sup 0/ and 1000/sup 0/C. Particles of a Texas lignite (Darco Seam) between 41 and 201 microns in mean diameter, are found to flow down the furnace tube with velocities approximated by the summation of the gas plug-flow velocity and particle free-fall velocities. Some particle shrinkage and density changes occur during pyrolysis. Pyrolysis rate is particle size independent and increases with increase in temperature over the range of operating conditions. Ultimate yield of volatiles in the isothermal furnace, which is calculated from the linear relationship between weight loss and change in proximate volatile matter, is 66% of the original dry-ash-free coal and is particle size independent and relatively temperature independent. Ultimate yields of volatiles from fixed beds of pulverized coal are smaller than for dispersed particles of the same size. Proximate volatile matter for the lignite is, for example, 51% of the original dry-ash-free coal. Heating rates drop from about 10,000/sup 0/C/s in the isothermal furnace to about 20/sup 0/C/s in the proximate volatile matter test. Pyrolysis rates decrease and display particle size dependency in fixed beds. This implication of physical rate control is attributed to heat transfer limitations. It is proposed that pyrolysis rate and therefore residence time of volatiles in the fixed bed are important parameters affecting the preponderance of secondary char forming reactions.Also important is the total particle external surface area in the bed. Secondary char formation is considered responsible for yields of volatiles lower than the true volatile content of the lignite as measured in the isothermal furnace.

  11. Influence of Sorbent Characteristics on Fouling and Deposition in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers Firing High Sulfur Indian Lignite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvakumaran Palaniswamy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 125 MWe circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC boiler experienced severe fouling in backpass of the boiler leading to obstruction of gas flow passage, while using high sulfur lignite with sorbent, calcium carbonate, to capture sulfur dioxide. Optical microscopy of the hard deposits showed mainly anhydrite (CaSO4 and absence of intermediate phases such as calcium oxide or presence of sulfate rims on decarbonated limestone. It is hypothesized that loose unreacted calcium oxides that settle on tubes are subjected to recarbonation and further extended sulfation resulting in hard deposits. Foul probe tests were conducted in selected locations of backpass for five different compositions of lignite, with varied high sulfur and ash contents supplied from the mines along with necessary rates of sorbent limestone to control SO2, and the deposits build-up rate was determined. The deposit build-up was found increasing, with increase in ash content of lignite, sorbent addition, and percentage of fines in limestone. Remedial measures and field modifications to dislodge deposits on heat transfer surfaces, to handle the deposits in ash conveying system, and to control sorbent fines from the milling circuit are explained.

  12. X-ray powder diffraction-based method for the determination of the glass content and mineralogy of coal (co)-combustion fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O. Font; N. Moreno; X. Querol; M. Izquierdo; E. Alvarez; S. Diez; J. Elvira; D. Antenucci; H. Nugteren; F. Plana; A. Lopez; P. Coca; F.G. Pena [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDA-CSIC), Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    The relevance of Al-Si glass in a number of fly ash applications, such as use as a pozzolanic material, zeolite synthesis, and geopolymer production, necessitated research towards investigation of methods for an easy and consistent determination of the glass content in this coal (co)-combustion by-products. A glass standard-addition X-ray powder diffraction (XRD)-based method is proposed in this study as an alternative to the non straightforward procedure of conventional methods for determining the amorphous components, mainly by difference of the total mass and the addition of quantified crystalline species. A >99% Al-Si glass slag sample was selected as a standard for glass. A number of glass standard/fly ash mixtures were performed on Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) and pulverized coal combustion (PCC) fly ashes and subsequently analyzed by XRD. The method provides results closer to quantitative proportions of the Al-Si amorphous material of this (co)-combustion by-product, with a range of values <3% when compared with those obtained by the conventional Reference Intensity Method (RIM) method, demonstrating suitability and consistence of the procedure. The mineralogy of FBC and PCC fly ash was also investigated using the RIM method. The occurrence and proportions of the crystalline components in fly ash are in line with the combustion technology and their inherent operational parameters, especially the (co)-combustion temperature. The FBC fly ash shows the highest content of relic phases from feed coal (quartz, illite, calcite, and feldspars) and lower contents of amorphous components. The PCC fly ash are characterized by the highest proportions of mullite and Al-Si glass and low contents of quartz an other relict phases. The occurrence and distribution of anhydrite and Fe-oxide species appears to be related to the content of Ca and Fe in the feed fuels, showing slightly higher contents in FBC than in PCC fly ash. 26 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Standard procedure for the determination of ash-fusion behavior of biomass fuels; Standardisiertes Verfahren zur Bestimmung des thermischen Ascheverhaltens biogener Brennstoffe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ottmann, M.; Karl, J. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany). Lehrstuhl Thermische Kraftanlagen; Hein, D.

    2004-07-01

    An important property of some bio fuels, particularly at combustion in fluidized bed reactors (FBC), is the very low deformation temperature of its ash. Whereas wood ash is melting at very high temperatures (approx. 1400 C to 1500 C) are ashes of grasses or residues of food industry melting at very low temperatures (<900 C). Low sintering and deformation temperatures cause coating and agglomerating of bed particles of the FBC and fouling of heat exchangers. In order to determinate relevant temperature ranges of different fuels these ashes are melted in laboratory experiments. In these experiments fuels will be burned and the ashes will be pressed to defined forms. Subsequently the ash corpus will be heated up. The change of its form will be watched via microscope and recorded. The procedure for the description of the ash-fusion behavior by ash fusion microscope is fixed in DIN 51730 'Determination of the ash fusion behavior'. This standard was developed for fossil solid fuels. With the last expenditure of this DIN in 1998 some new aspects came up regarding the attempt matrix, form of the sample, and also regarding the analysis procedure for the execution of the attempts. Likewise decisions were necessary regarding the type of ashing, the preparation of ash and the pressing power for the samples. A set of experiments was necessary, in order to place a meaningful, reproducible execution. (orig.)

  14. Technology and use of lignite. Proceedings of the tenth biennial lignite symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kube, W. R.; Gronhovd, G. H. [comps.

    1979-01-01

    The symposium on the technology and use of lignite was sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the University of North Dakota, and held at Grand Forks, North Dakota, May 30-31, 1979. Twenty-one papers from the proceedings of this tenth biennial lignite symposium have been entered into EDB and ERA and three also into EAPA. The papers discuss lignite deposits in the USA, mining plans, gasification and in-situ gasification, and combustion in fossil-fuel power plants. (LTN)

  15. NAFTA opportunities: Bituminous coal and lignite mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) secures and improves market access in Mexico and Canada for the United States bituminous coal and lignite mining sector. Canada is one of the United States' largest export markets for bituminous coal and lignite, with exports of $486.7 million in 1992. Conversely, the Mexican market is one of the smallest export markets for U.S. producers with exports of $1.8 million in 1992. Together, however, Canada and Mexico represent approximately 15 percent of total U.S. coal exports. The report presents a sectoral analysis.

  16. ACTIVATED CARBON FROM LIGNITE FOR WATER TREATMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwin S. Olson; Daniel J. Stepan

    2000-07-01

    High concentrations of humate in surface water result in the formation of excess amounts of chlorinated byproducts during disinfection treatment. These precursors can be removed in water treatment prior to disinfection using powdered activated carbon. In the interest of developing a more cost-effective method for removal of humates in surface water, a comparison of the activities of carbons prepared from North Dakota lignites with those of commercial carbons was conducted. Previous studies indicated that a commercial carbon prepared from Texas lignite (Darco HDB) was superior to those prepared from bituminous coals for water treatment. That the high alkali content of North Dakota lignites would result in favorable adsorptive properties for the very large humate molecules was hypothesized, owing to the formation of larger pores during activation. Since no standard humate test has been previously developed, initial adsorption testing was performed using smaller dye molecules with various types of ionic character. With the cationic dye, methylene blue, a carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite (HSKRC) adsorbed more dye than the Darco HDB. The carbon from the low-sodium lignite was much inferior. With another cationic dye, malachite green, the Darco HDB was slightly better. With anionic dyes, methyl red and azocarmine-B, the results for the HSKRC and Darco HDB were comparable. A humate test was developed using Aldrich humic acid. The HSKRC and the Darco HDB gave equally high adsorption capacities for the humate (138 mg/g), consistent with the similarities observed in earlier tests. A carbon prepared from a high-sodium lignite from a different mine showed an outstanding improvement (201 mg/g). The carbons prepared from the low-sodium lignites from both mines showed poor adsorption capacities for humate. Adsorption isotherms were performed for the set of activated carbons in the humate system. These exhibited a complex behavior interpreted as resulting from two types

  17. 磨细固硫灰渣作为混合材对水泥性能的影响%Performance of Cement Blending Pulverized Ash and Slag from Fluidized Bed Combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛茂威; 谢小莉; 林洲; 张克; 钱觉时

    2013-01-01

    Fluidized bed combustion (FBC) ash and slag with higher anhydrite and f-CaO may cause poor volume stability used as cement mixing materials. By controlling the dosage of the FBC ash and slag, grinding them to different fineness, the standard consistency requirement, linear expansion rate and mortar strength of the cement blended FBC ash and slag were tested, and compared with the ordinary Portland cement. Results show that increasing the fineness of FBC ash and slag, especially for the ash, could reduce the standard consistency requirement of the cement and delay the setting time. Variation in fineness of FBC ash and slag has no significant influence on the shrinkage in air curing, and higher fineness would accelerate the early expansion in moisture curing, which is within a safe range. The increase of the fineness of FBC ash and slag promotes remarkably the strength of the cement. It is suggested that milling is beneficial to utilization of the FBC ash and slag in cement.%  流化床固硫灰渣含有较高无水石膏和f-CaO,作为水泥混合材利用时会存在体积稳定性问题。在控制固硫灰渣掺量前提下,将固硫灰渣粉磨至不同细度,测试了掺加固硫灰渣的水泥标准稠度需水量、线性膨胀率和胶砂强度,并与普通硅酸盐水泥进行对比。结果表明,提高固硫灰渣细度,特别是固硫灰细度,能使水泥标准稠度需水量减少;固硫灰渣细度提高,水泥凝结时间有所延长;自然养护条件下,固硫灰渣细度变化对水泥收缩没有明显影响,潮湿养护下,磨细固硫灰渣早期能够释放较多膨胀,但处于可控范围;固硫灰渣细度增加,水泥强度明显提高。磨细有利于固硫灰渣作为水泥混合材利用。

  18. Usage of fly ash as a coal desulphurization reagent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Kuecuekbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical Univ. (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    1996-12-31

    This paper covers the direct usage of fly ash to remove sulphur from coal. Experiments were carried out on a high sulphur Turkish lignite. 5 g of fly ash was extracted in 200 ml of water under pressure and the dilute solution containing water extractable parts of fly ash was used as desulphurization reagent. Oxygen pressure was created over desulphurization medium during the extraction period by which dissolved oxygen was concentrated in the solution. Effects of temperature, partial pressure of oxygen, and time were investigated in the ranges of 403--498 K, 0.0--1.5 MPa and 15--90 min, respectively.

  19. Advanced power assessment for Czech lignite. Task 3.6, Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sondreal, E.A.; Mann, M.D.; Weber, G.W.; Young, B.C.

    1995-12-01

    The US has invested heavily in research, development, and demonstration of efficient and environmentally acceptable technologies for the use of coal. The US has the opportunity to use its leadership position to market a range of advanced coal-based technologies internationally. For example, coal mining output in the Czech Republic has been decreasing. This decrease in demand can be attributed mainly to the changing structure of the Czech economy and to environmental constraints. The continued production of energy from indigenous brown coals is a major concern for the Czech Republic. The strong desire to continue to use this resource is a challenge. The Energy and Environmental Research Center undertook two major efforts recently. One effort involved an assessment of opportunities for commercialization of US coal technologies in the Czech Republic. This report is the result of that effort. The technology assessment focused on the utilization of Czech brown coals. These coals are high in ash and sulfur, and the information presented in this report focuses on the utilization of these brown coals in an economically and environmentally friendly manner. Sections 3--5 present options for utilizing the as-mined coal, while Sections 6 and 7 present options for upgrading and generating alternative uses for the lignite. Contents include Czech Republic national energy perspectives; powering; emissions control; advanced power generation systems; assessment of lignite-upgrading technologies; and alternative markets for lignite.

  20. Pyrolysis of phenols from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryltsova, S.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Rozental, D.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.; Martynov, V.Y.; Chilachava, K.B.

    2000-07-01

    Pyrolysis of phenols from lignite semicoking tar at 750-900 {degree}C and contact time of 0.5-6.0 s was studied. The yields of pyrocarbon, pyrolysis gas, and liquid products and the group and component composition of the liquid products and pyrolysis gas were determined. The main groups of compounds in liquid products were analysed.

  1. Inorganic constituents of some Turkish lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Taptik, Y.; Yavuz, R.; Kuecuekbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    1996-12-31

    In this study the mineral matter contents of two different Turkish lignite samples from Cayirhan and Tuncbilek regions were isolated by means of mild oxidation of organic matrix applying H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/HCOOH treatment. The isolated minerals were analyzed by XRD and FTIR techniques and constituents of the minerals were investigated qualitatively.

  2. Hydrogeological Issues Concerning the Thar Lignite Prospect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. N. Singh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper is concerned with the hydrogeological appraisal of the proposed mining operations in theThar lignite field in Sindh, Pakistan. The Thar coalfield covers an area of approximately 9000km2 andcontains three lignite seams lying at depth of 130m to 250 m. In the Thar lignite field, the presence ofthree main aquifers induces pore pressure in the rock mass surrounding the lignite seams and makes highwall slopes potentially unsafe. It is, therefore, necessary to dewater the rock mass before commencingmining excavations. The paper describes the proposed mine dewatering scheme to facilitatedepressurising of the rock mass surrounding the mining excavations. Inflow prediction of groundwater tothe surface mining excavation was carried out using a SEEP/W finite element software package. Thesimulation results show that the ground water inflow from the Top aquifer is 114m3/d, from theIntermediate confined aquifer is 141m3/d and from the Bottom confined aquifer is 1.28 x 105 m3 /d. Theseresults were compared with the analytical solutions which indicated that the relative error of estimation ofinflow quantities varies from 3.4 % to 6.4%.

  3. Fuel briquettes from biomass-lignite blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Haykiri-Acma, H.; Sesen, K.; Kuecuekbayrak, S. [Chemical Engineering Department, Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty, Istanbul Technical University, Maslak, 80626 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2001-08-01

    In this study, a western Turkish lignite (Kuetahya-Seyitoemer) was blended with some biomass samples such as molasses, pine cone, olive refuse, sawdust, paper mill waste, and cotton refuse, and these blends was used in the production of fuel briquettes. Blends were subjected to briquetting pressures between 50 and 250 MPa; the ratio of biomass to lignite was changed between 0 and 30 wt.%. The mechanical strength of obtained briquettes was investigated considering shatter index and compressive strength. Effects of the ratio of biomass to lignite and applied pressure on the strength of the briquettes were examined. This study indicated that the mechanical strength of the briquettes produced from Kuetahya-Seyitoemer lignite can be improved by adding some biomass samples. For example, the presence of paper mill waste increased the shatter index of the briquettes obtained. Similarly, sawdust and paper mill waste increased compressive strength of the briquettes. Water resistance of the briquettes can be augmented by adding olive refuse, cotton refuse, pine cone or paper mill waste.

  4. Removal of Gangue Minerals Containing Major Elements from Karlıova-Derinçay (Bingöl) Lignite Using a Reverse Flotation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Halime Abakay

    2015-12-01

    The removal of gangue minerals containing major elements was investigated using a reverse flotation method. Experiments were conducted on lignite samples, with high-ash and low-sulphur contents taken from a lignite field in Karlıova-Derinçay (Bingöl), Turkey. Predominant gangue minerals in the samples were found to be quartz, gypsum, feldspar minerals, mica minerals, and clays (smectite group). Preliminary flotation studies showed that gangue materials are more buoyant than the lignite sample. Some parameters that markedly influence the effectiveness of reverse flotation, such as grinding time, pH, collector type and volume, frother type and volume, and salt, were investigated. Quartz was found to cause a major problem in terms of reverse flotation. Flotation measurements showed that anionic collectors in an acidic medium result in the following element reduction order: sulphur trioxide > ferric oxide > magnesium oxide > calcium oxide > silicon dioxide > aluminium oxide.

  5. Ash chemistry and sintering, verification of the mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupa, M.; Skrifvars, B.J. [Aabo Akademi, Turku (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    In this project four sintering mechanisms have been studied, i.e., partial melting with a viscous liquid, partial melting with a non-viscous liquid, chemical reaction sintering and solid state sintering. The work has aimed at improving the understanding of ash sintering mechanisms and quantifying their role in combustion and gasification. The work has been oriented in particular on the understanding of biomass ash behavior. The work has not directly focused on any specific technical application. However, results can also be applied on other fuels such as brown coal, petroleum coke, black liquor and different types of wastes (PDF, RDF, MSW). In one part of study the melting behavior was calculated for ten biomass ashes and compared with lab measurements of sintering tendencies. The comparison showed that the T{sub 15} temperatures, i.e. those temperatures at which the ashes contained 15 % molten phase, correlated fairly well with the temperature at which the sintering measurements detected sintering. This suggests that partial melting can be predicted fairly accurate for some ashes already with the today existing thermodynamic calculation routines. In some cases, however the melting calculations did not correlate with the detected sintering temperatures. In a second part detailed measurements on ash behavior was conducted both in a semi full scale CFB and a lab scale FBC. Ashes and deposits were collected and analyzed in several different ways. These analyses show that the ash chemistry shifts radically when the fuel is shifted. Fuels with silicate based ashes behaved totally different than those with an oxide or salt based ash. The chemistry was also affected by fuel blending. The ultimate goal has been to be able to predict the ash thermal behavior during biomass thermal conversion, using the fuel and ash elemental analyses and a few operational key parameters as the only input data. This goal has not yet today been achieved. (author)

  6. The spatial distribution of the lignite qualitative parameters and variant estimates of coal reserves: the Czech Part of the Vienna Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínek, Jan; Staněk, František; Vebr, Lukáš; Honěk, Josef

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this article is to inform about the spatial distribution of the lignite qualitative parameters and total lignite reserves in the Czech Part of the Vienna Basin—The South Moravian Lignite Coalfield (SMLC). The total reserves were estimated on the basis of several composed variant digital models of individual seams in four partial area of SMLC. Calculations of the reserves resulted from the identified spatial distribution of chemical-technological parameters obtained from the thousands analysis of samples taken from more than 4,000 exploration works. The basic model of the deposit was so-called geological model characterising genetic evolution of the deposit and defines the spatial positions of the coal seams. Subsequently developed variant economical models spatially define the selected areas by the quality of lignite expressed by the limits of ash yield. Based on the created models, it was found that in the past just 3-7 % (depending on the variant model) of the total lignite reserves SMLC had been extracted. The presented geological reserves are currently using the existing mining technologies only partially mineable.

  7. Inorganic geochemical characterisation of the Velenje lignite in the representative P-9k/92 borehole profile (Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Markič

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The study is based on 30 lignite, 6 footwall and 3 hanging-wall interval samples. Lignite seam of the Pliocene age is 101 m thick in the treated profile.Minorelementgeochemistryis evaluated by the contents of 11 standard oxides, among which SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3 and CaO form the bulk composition. Trace-element characterization is based on contents of 46 elements. Stot., Ctot., Corg. and loss on ignition (LOI at 1000 ˚C were analysed in addition. All analyses (by ICP-AES, ICP-MS, Leco were carried out on the “whole lignite”/“whole rock” samples in the Acme Analytical Laboratories (Canada. Recalculation to the “pure inorganic matter” basis was carried out in order to obtain realistic relations between contentsof minor element oxides. Contents of the minor element oxides in the inorganic matter are dependant on the ash content, and, an ash content of 20-25 % was found out as an important “geochemical threshold”. SiO2 + Al2O3, together with positively corelated K2O and TiO2, increase with increasing ash content. On the contrary, CaO, MgO and Fe2O3, they increase with decreasing ash content. Affinity of organic binding of Ca,Mg,and(probablyof Fe is ascertained by negligible contents of Cinorg. Abundances of the great majority of trace elements are mostly lower and/or normal in comparison to the world coals. However, As, U, and Mo are typomorphic for the treated lignite. In spite of that, they are not critical. Widespread areas of different lithologies with higher contents of these elements are known throughout the world as well as in Slovenia.

  8. Flocculation of the Visonta lignite sludges by polyacrylamides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakatos-Szabo, J.; Lakatos, I.

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory tests on the flocculation of clay-lignite sludges by polyelectrolytes proved the strongly heterodisperse suspensions to be suitable to sedimenting and filtering after the treatment by anionic polyacrylamides. The formation of large-sized flocs of loose structure allows troublefree filtration and dewatering. The specific flocculant consumption of dewatering is 1 to 2 kg per lignite ton. In this manner the preparation costs of lignite can be lowered.

  9. Pyrolysis of hydrocarbons from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryl' tsova, S.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Rozental, D.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.

    2000-07-01

    Pyrolysis of hydrocarbons from lignite semicoking tar in the range 750-900{degree}C at a contact time within 0.5-6.0 s was studied. The yields of pyrocarbons, pyrolysis gas, and liquid products and the group and component compositions of the liquid and gaseous products were determined. The optimal pyrolysis parameters from the viewpoint of obtaining the maximal yield of particular 'secondary' hydrocarbons were recommended.

  10. Pyrolysis of asphaltenes from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryl' tsova, S.V.; Rozental, D.A.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.

    2000-07-01

    Pyrolysis of asphaltenes from lignite semicoking tar in the range 750-900{degree}C at a contact time within 0.5-6.0 s was studied. The yields of pyrocarbons, pyrolysis gas, and liquid products and the group composition of the liquid products were determined. The total analysis of the major groups of compounds present in the liquid products was performed, and the optimal conditions of pyrolysis, from the viewpoint of preparation of particular compounds, were recommended.

  11. (Bioprocessing of lignite coals using reductive microorganisms)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of this report are to: (1) characterize selected aerobic bacterial strains for their abilities to depolymerize lignite coal polymers, and isolate and identify the extracellular enzymes responsible for depolymerization of the coal; (2) characterize selected strictly anaerobic bacteria, that were previously shown to reductively transform coal substructure model compounds, for the ability to similarly transform polymeric coal; and (3) isolate more strains of anaerobic bacteria by enrichment using additional coal substructure model compounds and coal as substrates.

  12. Foraminiferal biostratigraphy of lignite mines of Kutch,India:Age of lignite and fossil vertebrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pratul; Kumar; Saraswati; Sonal; Khanolkar; Dalta; Surya; Narayana; Raju; Suryendu; Dutta; Santanu; Banerjee

    2014-01-01

    The lignite deposits of Kutch, India are stratigraphically referred to the Naredi Formation and considered to be Early Eocene in age. The biostratigraphy of the older mine at Panandhro and a newly opened mine at Matanomadh has constrained the upper age limit of lignite to the early Bartonian. Its lower age may extend to the late Lutetian. Temporally the formation of lignite corresponds to the warming event of the Middle Eocene and suggests a humid climate at the onset of the warming. The previous palynological studies have already suggested dominance of tropical angiospermic pollen. A diverse assemblage of fossil whales and other vertebrates, many of them supposedly the oldest representatives, were reported from Panandhro mine. These were initially assigned to the Early Eocene and later to the Lute? tian age. The present biostratigraphic study revises their age to the Early Bartonian.

  13. Hydrogeological assessment of the Thar lignite prospect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, R.N.; Stace, R. [Nottingham Centre of Geomechanics (United Kingdom). Dept. of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering; Pathan, A.G. [Mehran Univ. of Engineering and Technology, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Faculty of Mining, Petroleum and Geophysics; Atkins, A.S. [Staffordshire Univ., Stafford (United Kingdom). Faculty of Computing, Engineering and Technology

    2010-07-01

    This paper described a hydrogeological appraisal conducted at a proposed mine site in the Thar lignite field in Pakistan. The field contains an estimate 9 billion tonnes of lignite reserves. Three aquifers surrounding the lignite seams are inducing pore pressure in the rock mass and creating hazardous conditions at the site's high wall slopes. Groundwater inflow predictions were conducted using a finite element-based software package. The study was conducted to calculate dewatering quantities in order to ensure stability during excavation activities. Pumping tests conducted in boreholes at the bottom aquifer were used to determine permeability coefficients. Pumping rates from the 3 aquifers were calculated using the equivalent well approach. Results of the simulations were used to predict groundwater inflow from the bottom aquifer to the fully penetrating pit of the mine under steady state flow conditions. Results of the study indicated that 20 pumping out wells equipped with 150 mm diameter motor pumps will be required over a period of 10 years to achieve an overall dewatering rate of 0.6 m{sup 3}/s for the top aquifer. High head borehole pumps are needed for the intermediate and bottom-confined aquifers. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  14. Specific industrial medicine in lignite mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerlett, G.; Toussaint, R.; Hilfert, R.; Koehne, G.

    1986-11-01

    Lignite is almost exclusively mined open-cast in West Germany. Mining is carried out at present in deep open-cast mines (with depths up to 400 m) using modern mining conveyer techniques with large-scale equipment (rotary bucket excavators and thickeners) conveyer belt and railway links as well as earth-moving equipment (accessory equipment). Specific occupational diseases are not known in lignite mining. Occupational diseases in the sense of degenerative processes of the lumbar spine and avulsion fractures of spinous processes of the lower cervical spine in drivers of earth-moving equipment as a result of whole-body vibration stress have been observed. In the context of occupational disease and industrial accident prevention, close collaboration and a division of labor between industrial physicians and safety engineers of ergonomics specialists have proved to be very efficient. Industrial medical preventive examinations based on statutory regulations and the lignite mining ordinance have a long tradition and are given a great deal of space. First aid at work is organized in a largely decentralized manner owing to the extensiveness of the mining area. The industrial medical care of the employees takes place on site in the various sections (open-cast mining, workshops, brickett factories, processing units etc.). The entire medical technical diagnostics is carried out centrally in an industrial medical center.

  15. Environmental assessment of remedial action at the inactive uraniferous lignite processing sites at Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota. [UMTRA Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beranich, S.; Berger, N.; Bierley, D.; Bond, T.M.; Burt, C.; Caldwell, J.A.; Dery, V.A.; Dutcher, A.; Glover, W.A.; Heydenburg, R.J.; Larson, N.B.; Lindsey, G.; Longley, J.M.; Millard, J.B.; Miller, M.; Peel, R.C.; Persson-Reeves, C.H.; Titus, F.B.; Wagner, L.

    1989-09-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 (UMTRCA), to clean up the Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, uraniferous lignite processing sites to reduce the potential health impacts associated with the residual radioactive materials remaining at these sites. Remedial action at these sites must be performed in accordance with the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) standards promulgated for the remedial action and with the concurrence of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the state of North Dakota. The inactive Belfield uraniferous lignite processing site is one mile southeast of Belfield, North Dakota. The inactive Bowman uraniferous lignite processing site at the former town of Griffin, is seven miles northwest of Bowman, North Dakota and 65 road miles south of Belfield. Lignite ash from the processing operations has contaminated the soils over the entire 10.7-acre designated Belfield site and the entire 12.1-acre designated Bowman site. Dispersion of the ash has contaminated an additional 20.6 acres surrounding the Belfield processing site and an additional 59.2 acres surrounding the Bowman processing site. The proposed remedial action is to relocate the contaminated materials at the Belfield processing site to the Bowman processing/disposal site for codisposal with the Bowman contaminated soils. The environmental impacts assessed in this EA were evaluated for the proposed remedial action and the no action alternative and demonstrate that the proposed action would not significantly affect the quality of the human environment and would be performed in compliance with applicable environmental laws. The no action alternative would not be consistent with the intent of Public Law 95-604 and would not comply with the EPA standards. 48 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. FUNDAMENTAL STUDY OF LOW-NOx COMBUSTION FLY ASH UTILIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ERIC M. SUUBERG; ROBERT H. HURT

    1998-10-19

    This study is principally concerned with characterizing the organic part of coal combustion fly ashes. High carbon fly ashes are becoming more common as by-products of low-NOx combustion technology, and there is need to learn more about this fraction of the fly ash. The project team consists of two universities, Brown and Princeton, and an electrical utility, New England Power. A sample suite of over fifty fly ashes has been gathered from utilities across the United States, and includes ashes from a coals ranging in rank from bituminous to lignite. The characterizations of these ashes include standard tests (LOI, Foam Index), as well as more detailed characterizations of their surface areas, porosity, extractability and adsorption behavior. The ultimate goal is, by better characterizing the material, to enable broadening the range of applications for coal fly ash re-use beyond the current main market as a pozzolanic agent for concretes. The potential for high carbon-content fly ashes to substitute for activated carbons is receiving particular attention. The work performed to date has already revealed how very different the surfaces of different ashes produced by the same utility can be, with respect to polarity of the residual carbon. This can help explain the large variations in acceptability of these ashes as concrete additives.

  17. Origin and significance of high nickel and chromium concentrations in pliocene lignite of the Kosovo Basin, Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, L.; Finkelman, R.; Boti, E.; Milosavljevic, M.; Tewalt, S.; Simon, N.; Dulong, F.

    1996-01-01

    Trace element data from 59 Pliocene lignite cores from the lignite field in the Kosovo Basin, southern Serbia, show localized enrichment of Ni and Cr (33-304 ppm and 8-176 ppm, respectively, whole-coal basis). Concentrations of both elements decrease from the western and southern boundaries of the lignite field. Low-temperature ash and polished coal pellets of selected bench and whole-coal samples were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy with energy-dispersive X-ray analyses. These analyses show that most of the Ni and Cr are incorporated in detrital and, to a lesser degree, in authigenic minerals. The Ni- and Cr-bearing detrital minerals include oxides, chromites, serpentine-group minerals and rare mixed-layer clays. Possible authigenic minerals include Ni-Fe sulfates and sulfides. Analyses of three lignite samples by a supercritical fluid extraction technique indicate that some (1-11%) of the Ni is organically bound. Ni- and Cr-bearing oxides, mixed-layer clays, chromites and serpentine-group minerals were also identified in weathered and fresh samples of laterite developed on serpentinized Paleozoic peridotite at the nearby Glavica and C??ikatovo Ni mines. These mines are located along the western and northwestern rim, respectively, of the Kosovo Basin, where Ni contents are highest. The detrital Ni- and Cr-bearing minerals identified in lignite samples from the western part of the Kosovo Basin may have been transported into the paleoswamp by rivers that drained the two Paleocene laterites. Some Ni may have been transported directly into the paleoswamp in solution or, alternatively, Ni may have been leached from detrital minerals by acidic peat water and adsorbed onto organic matter and included into authigenic mineral phases. No minable source of Ni and Cr is known in the southern part of the lignite field; however, the mineral and chemical data from the lignite and associated rocks suggest that such a source area may exist.

  18. Geochemistry of FBC waste-coal slurry solid mixtures. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreher, G.B.; Roy, W.R.; Steele, J.D.; Heidari, M. [Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    The three tasks conducted in this research project were related to understanding the geochemistry and mineralogy of the co-disposal of fluidized bed combustion (FBC) wastes with coal slurry solid (CSS) from a coal preparation plant. During coal cleaning, pyrite, other heavy minerals and rock fragments are separated from the coal and discharged in an aqueous slurry to an impoundment. After dewatering and closure of the impoundment, the pyrite can oxidize and produce acid that can migrate into the underlying groundwater system. The addition of FBC residue to the CSS will buffer the pore water pH to approximately 7.8. In Task 1, soluble components and acid-base react ion products from mixtures of FBC waste and CSS were extracted for 3 to 180 days in aqueous batch experiments. The results of these extractions showed that, eventually, the extracts would attain a pH between 7 and 8. That pH range is characteristic of an aqueous system in equilibrium with calcite, gypsum, and atmospheric carbon dioxide. After 180 days, the mean calcium concentration in all of the extracts was 566{+-}18 mg/L and sulfate concentrations averaged 2420{+-}70 mg/L. In Task 2, three extracts from CSS/FBC residue mixtures were prepared for use in experiments to determine the adsorption/desorption reactions that occur between solutes in the extracts and two common Illinois soils. Time constraints allowed the use of only two of the extracts for adsorption studies. The concentrations of most solutes were not significantly lowered by adsorption at the pH of the extract-soil suspension, nor over a wide range of pH. The results suggest that the type of solutes that were released by the CSS/FBC residue mixture would not be attenuated by adsorption. In a modified Task 3, the literature on the kinetics of pyrite oxidation in near-neutral to alkaline pH was reviewed in preparation for future development of a computer model of pyrite oxidation in CSS/FBC residue codisposal.

  19. A review of the interference of carbon containing fly ash with air entrainment in concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Hougaard; Jensen, Anker Degn; Skjøth-Rasmussen, Martin Skov;

    2008-01-01

    Industrial utilization of fly ash from pulverized coal combustion plays an important role in environmentally clean and cost effective power generation. Today, the primary market for fly ash utilization is as pozzolanic additive in the production of concrete. However, the residual carbon in fly ash...... on the adsorption capacity of AEAs. The type of fuel used in the combustion process influences the amount and properties of the residual carbon. Fly ash derived from bituminous coal has generally higher carbon content compared with fly ash produced from subbituminous coal or lignite, but shows a lower AEA......-treatment methods applied to improve fly ash quality are described in the review. Ozonation, thermal treatment and physical cleaning of carbon have been found to improve the fly ash performance for concrete utilization. Ultimately, recommendations for further work are outlined in the discussion....

  20. Solubilization of Australian lignites by fungi and other microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catcheside, D.E.A.; Mallett, K.J. (Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA (Australia). School of Biological Sciences)

    Lignites (brown coals) from the Latrobe Valley in Victoria are solubilized by {ital Coriolus versicolor}, {ital Phanerochaete chrysosporium}, and five other species known to be active on Leonardite and various acid-treated North America lignites. Run-of-mine coal from Morwell and Loy Yang is refractory but is soluble after pretreatment with acid. A weathered deposit at Loy Yang, like Leonardite, is susceptible to biosolubilization without pretreatment. The white rot fungi {ital Ganoderma applanatum}, {ital Perenniporia tephropora} ({ital Fomes lividus}), {ital Pleurotus ostreatus}, {ital Pycnoporus cinnabarinus}, {ital Rigidoporus ulmarius}, and {ital Xylaria hypoxylon} were found to be capable of solubilizing lignite. In contrast, brown rot fungi were weakly active or inactive under the same test conditions. Lignite-degrading fungi, actinomycetes, and other bacteria, including some active on untreated run-of-mine coal, were isolated from natural lignite exposures and mining sites. 15 refs., 5 tabs.

  1. The utilisation of fly ash in CO2 mineral carbonation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaschik Jolanta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The fixation of CO2 in the form of inorganic carbonates, also known as mineral carbonation, is an interesting option for the removal of carbon dioxide from various gas streams. The captured CO2 is reacted with metal-oxide bearing materials, usually naturally occurring minerals. The alkaline industrial waste, such as fly ash can also be considered as a source of calcium or magnesium. In the present study the solubility of fly ash from conventional pulverised hard coal fired boilers, with and without desulphurisation products, and fly ash from lignite fluidised bed combustion, generated by Polish power stations was analysed. The principal objective was to assess the potential of fly ash used as a reactant in the process of mineral carbonation. Experiments were done in a 1 dm3 reactor equipped with a heating jacket and a stirrer. The rate of dissolution in water and in acid solutions was measured at various temperatures (20 - 80ºC, waste-to-solvent ratios (1:100 - 1:4 and stirrer speeds (300 - 1100 min-1. Results clearly show that fluidised lignite fly ash has the highest potential for carbonation due to its high content of free CaO and fast kinetics of dissolution, and can be employed in mineral carbonation of CO2.

  2. Co - pyrolysis of biomass and Polish lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kordylewski, Wlodzimierz; Stojanowska, Grazyna [Politechnika Wroclawska, Wroclaw (Poland); Jones, Jenny [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom). Energy and Resources Research Inst.

    2006-01-15

    The paper presents results of studies of the chemical decomposition of coal, biomass and their blends during low rate heating gasification in atmosphere of air or nitrogen. Polish lignite (Turow), sawdust of pine and blends of these two fuels have been used in the research and it has been investigated the influence of ion exchanged calcium on their pyrolysis. The primary products of devolatilization provided important information for understanding subsequently the leading to toxic organic compounds and synergistic effects of these fuels. The influence of blending ratio and influence of calcium catalysts was discussed.

  3. Evaluation of ash deposits during experimental investigation of co-firing of Bosnian coal with wooden biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smajevic, Izet; Kazagic, Anes [JP Elektroprivreda BiH d.d., Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina); Sarajevo Univ. (Bosnia and Herzegovina). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering

    2008-07-01

    The paper is addressed to the development and use different criteria for evaluation of ash deposits collected during experimental co-firing of Bosnian coals with wooden biomass. Spruce saw dust was used for the co-firing tests with the Kakanj brown coal and with a lignite blend consisted of the Dubrave lignite and the Sikulje lignite. The coal/biomass mixtures at 93:7 %w and at 80:20 %w were tested. Experimental lab-scale facility PF entrained flow reactor is used for the co-firing tests. The reactor allows examination of fouling/slagging behaviors and emissions at various and infinitely variable process temperature which can be set at will in the range from ambient to 1560 C. Ash deposits are collected on two non-cooled ceramic probes and one water-cooled metal surface. Six different criteria are developed and used to evaluate behavior of the ash deposits on the probes: ash deposit shape, state and structure, which are analyzed visually - photographically and optically by a microscope, rate of adhesion and ash deposit strength, analyzed by physic acting to the ash deposits, and finally deposition rate, determined as a mass of the deposit divided by the collecting area and the time of collecting. Furthermore, chemical composition analysis and AFT of the ash deposits were also done to provide additional information on the deposits. (orig.)

  4. Precise f_{D*,B*} and f_{B_c} from QCD spectral sum rules

    CERN Document Server

    Narison, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Anticipating future precise measurements of the B-like leptonic decays for alternative determinations of the CKM mixing angles or/and for predicting their semi-leptonic and hadronic decays, we pursue our program on the B-like mesons by improving the estimates of f_D* and f_B* [analogue to f_\\pi=130.4(2) MeV] using suitable ratios of the well-established (inverse) Laplace sum rules less affected by the systematics and known to N2LO pQCD and where the full d=6 non-perturbative condensate contributions are included. An estimate of the N3LO terms based on geometric growth of the pQCD series is included in the error calculations. Our optimal results based on stability criteria and on an (in)dependence on the choice of the QCD subtraction point read: f_D*/f_D=1.209(22),f_B*/f_B=1.031(8) which imply : f_D*=246(7) MeV and f_B*=212(8) MeV if we use our recent results in [1] for f_D and f_B. We complete the analysis by a direct estimate of f_Bc using the complete NLO + N2LO for massless m_c pQCD expression and complete...

  5. Results of core drilling for uranium-bearing carbonaceous shale and lignite in the Goose Creek district, Cassia County, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapel, William J.; Hail, William J.

    1954-01-01

    Thirteen core holes, totaling 2,023 feet, were drilled during the fall of 1953 to explore the grade and extent of uranium-bearing beds of carbonaceous shale and lignite in the east-central part of the Goose Creek district, Cassia County, Idaho. The beds tested are interbedded with volcanic ash, bentonite, greenish-gray shale, sandstone, and conglomerate in two fairly well defined zones in the lower part of the Salt Lake formation of lower Pliocene age. Nine holes penetrated carbonaceous shale beds in the Barrett zone, and one hole penetrated carbonaceous shale and lignite beds in zone B, 160 feet stratigraphically below the Barrett zone. The highest concentration of uranium found by drilling is 0.10 percent in the upper part of a 4-foot bed of carbonaceous shale and lignite in zone B. The grade of carbonaceous shale beds in the Barrett zone ranges from 0.044 percent to less than 0.003 percent uranium. Inferred reserves in the district are estimated to be 790,000 tons in beds 1 foot or more thick containing an average of 0.014 percent or 120 tons of uranium.

  6. Emission and combustion behaviour of a raw lignite-fired CFB steam generator with co-combustion of sewage sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambertz, J.; Thomas, G.; Bierbaum, K. [Rheinbraun AG, Koeln (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The present recovery and disposal options for municipal sewage sludge are being seriously restricted and made costlier by new ordinances. This is true of both uses in agriculture and sewage sludge dumping. Against this background, thermal recycling is gaining more and more in importance as a long-term alternative, so that a substantial rise in combustion capacity is becoming necessary. Since sewage sludge drying and monocombustion are highly cost-intensive, it makes ecological and economic sense to use low-polluting combustion capacities at existing power plants for the co-combustion of municipal sewage sludge. In its processing plants Rheinbraun AG operates steam generators which work according to the circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) combustion principle. This low-polluting combustion technique is particularly suitable for fuels having high ash contents. In addition to the major fuel, viz. raw lignite (55-60% moisture content), minor portions of sewage sludge (70% moisture content) are burnt together with the lignite within the scope of this research project. In this process, a solids pump feeds the mechanically dewatered sewage sludge directly into the steam generator. The industrial-scale tests were carried out in the 2nd quarter of 1994. The operating behaviour remains almost unchanged. The influence of co-combustion on emissions corresponds to the range usual for pure lignite operation. 8 figs.

  7. Speciation of selected trace and major elements in lignite Used in "Nikola Tesla A" power plant (Obrenovac, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEKSANDAR POPOVIC

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Four samples of milled lignite used in the “Nikola Tesla A” power plant, located in Obrenovac near Belgrade, were subjected to a five-step sequential extraction, comprising of the following phases: distilled water, 1 M ammonium acetate, 0.2 M ammonium oxalate / 0.2 M oxalic acid, acidic solution of H2O2 and a 6 M solution of HCl. The concentrations of the different elements obtained in the extractions were statistically analysed. The majority of the examined elements were found to be most probably associated with inorganic fractions of lignite, only aluminum, silicon, chromium and arsenic have a larger extractable organic/sulfide fraction than an extractable inorganic fraction. Alumosilicates of magnesium (carriers of arsenic, zinc, lead, copper and chromium, silicates of potassium (scavengers of lead and nickel, mixed aluminates of iron and magnesium (carriers of arsenic, zinc, copper and chromium and compounds of iron that do not contain aluminum and magnesium (scavengers of manganese were dissolved in the fifth phase of the sequential extraction. Copper is a substrate of alumosilicates of potassium and magnesium, while zinc and chromium are substrates of compounds of iron leached in the third phase of the sequential extraction. Interphase correlation revealed that the adsorbed and ion-exchangeable fractions of most of the examined elements do not exhibit preferential binding to the components of the inorganic matrix of lignite ash.

  8. Geochemistry of Kasnau-Matasukh lignites, Nagaur Basin,Rajasthan (India)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prakash K.Singh; Pramod K.Rajak; Mahendra P.Singh; Vijay K.Singh; Amiya S.Naik

    2016-01-01

    The distribution and verticals variation of geochemical components in the Kasnau-Matasukh lignites of Nagaur Basin,Rajasthan,were investigated using microscopy,proximate and ultimate analyses,Rock-Eval Pyrolysis,X-ray diffraction and Fourier Transform Infrared analyses,and major/minor/trace element determination.The relationship of elements with ash content and with macerals have also been discussed.These lignites are stratified,black,dominantly composed of huminite group macerals with subordinated amounts of liptinite and inertinite groups.They are classified as type-Ⅲ kerogen and are mainly gas prone in nature.The concentration (in vol%) of mineral matter is seen to increase towards upper part of seam and so is the concentration (in wt%) of the volatile matter,elemental carbon and sulphur.The common minerals present in these lignitesare mixed clay layer,chlorite,and quartz as identified by X-ray diffraction study.Compared with world average in brown coal,the bulk concentration of Cu is anomalously high in most of the samples while Cd is 2-3 times high and Zn is high in one band.Based on interrelationship,different pyrite forms are noticed to have different preferential enrichment of various elements.The concentration of disseminated pyrite is more than the other pyrite forms and is followed by discrete pyrite grains and massive pyrite.

  9. Relationships proximate analysis results and higher heating values of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirbas, A. [Sila Science, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2008-07-01

    In this study, the higher heating values (HHVs) of 26 lignite samples were calculated by using the proximate and elemental analyses data. The proximate analysis results such as volatile materials (VM), fixed carbon (FC) and HHV and the elemental analysis results such as carbon, hydrogen (H), oxygen (O), nitrogen (N) and sulfur (S) were determined for 26 lignite samples from different areas of Turkey. The lignite samples have been tested with particle size of 0-0.05 mm. The HHVs of 26 lignite samples obtained from different Turkish sources were determined experimentally and calculated from both ultimate and proximate analyses. HHVs of 26 the lignite samples can be calculated from the equation based modeling. The HHVs (MJ/kg) of the lignite samples as a function of fixed carbon (FC, wt%) or volatile materials (VM, %) was calculated from the following equations: HHV = 0.300FC + 11.117 (1) HHV = -0.323VM + 42.223 (2) where the correlation coefficients for Eqs. (1) and (2) were 0.9907 and 0.9862, respectively. The combustion heats calculated from Eqs. (1) and (2) showed mean differences of +3.9% and +0.3%, respectively. The HHVs (MJ/kg) of the lignite samples as a function of C, H, O, N, and S were calculated from a given equation where the correlation coefficients for the equation was 0.9891. HHVs calculated from this equation showed a mean deviation of +0.1.

  10. JV Task 117 - Impact of Lignite Properties on Powerspan's NOx Oxidation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Tolbert; Steven Benson

    2008-02-29

    Powerspan's multipollutant control process called electrocatalytic oxidation (ECO) technology is designed to simultaneously remove SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, PM{sub 2.5}, acid gases (such as hydrogen fluoride [HF], hydrochloric acid [HCl], and sulfur trioxide [SO{sub 3}]), Hg, and other metals from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. The core of this technology is a dielectric barrier discharge reactor composed of cylindrical quartz electrodes residing in metal tubes. Electrical discharge through the flue gas, passing between the electrode and the tube, produces reactive O and OH radicals. The O and OH radicals react with flue gas components to oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} and HNO{sub 3} and a small portion of the SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The oxidized compounds are subsequently removed in a downstream scrubber and wet electrostatic precipitator. A challenging characteristic of selected North Dakota lignites is their high sodium content. During high-sodium lignite combustion and gas cooling, the sodium vaporizes and condenses to produce sodium- and sulfur-rich aerosols. Based on past work, it was hypothesized that the sodium aerosols would deposit on and react with the silica electrodes and react with the silica electrodes, resulting in the formation of sodium silicate. The deposit and reacted surface layer would then electrically alter the electrode, thus impacting its dielectric properties and NO{sub x} conversion capability. The purpose of this project was to determine the impact of lignite-derived flue gas containing sodium aerosols on Powerspan's dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor with specific focus on the interaction with the quartz electrodes. Partners in the project were Minnkota Power Cooperative; Basin Electric Power Cooperative; Montana Dakota Utilities Co.; Minnesota Power; the North Dakota Industrial Commission, the Lignite Energy Council, and the Lignite Research Council; the Energy & Environmental Research Center

  11. New colporate pollen taxa from Neyveli lignite, South India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, A.; Misra, B.K. (Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany, Lucknow (India))

    1991-02-19

    Four new pollen genera: {ital Bacuspinulopollenites} {ital Cuddaloripollis}, {ital Scrobiculatricolporites}, {ital Tamilipollenites} and seven new species from the subsurface lignite samples of the Mine III area of the Neyveli Lignite Field are described. {ital Tricolporopilites} (Kar and Saxena) Kar 1985 is amended and three new species {ital T. uniformis}, {ital T. differentialis} and {ital T. tectatus} are assigned to it. These colporate angiospermous pollen taxa provide additional information on the palynofloral composition of the main lignite seam encountered in three boreholes. 19 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Influence of the co-firing on the leaching of trace pollutants from coal fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maria Izquierdo; Natalia Moreno; Oriol Font; Xavier Querol; Esther Alvarez; Diano Antenucci; Henk Nugteren; Yolanda Luna; Constantino Fernandez-Pereira [Institute of Earth Sciences ' Jaume Almera' (CSIC), Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-08-15

    The (co)-firing of low-cost alternative fuels is expected to increase in the forthcoming years in the EU because of the economic and environmental benefits provided by this technology. This study deals with the impact of the different coal/waste fuel ratio of the feed blend on the mineralogy, the chemical composition and especially on the leaching properties of fly ash. Different blends of coal, petroleum coke, sewage sludge, wood pellets, coal tailings and other minor biomass fuels were tested in PCC (pulverised coal combustion) and FBC (fluidized bed combustion) power plants. The co-firing of the studied blends did not drastically modify the mineralogy, bulk composition or the overall leaching of the fly ash obtained. This suggests that the co-firing process using the alternative fuels studied does not entail significant limitations in the re-use or management strategies of fly ash. 34 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Kinetic analysis on lignite pyrolysis,combustion and gasification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xin; WANG Zhihua; ZHOU Zhijun; YOU Zhuo; ZHOU Junhu; CEN Kefa

    2013-01-01

    Pyrolysis and combustion combined polygeneration system is a more efficient way for lignite utilization,and can also produce variety of valuable pyrolysis products.To explore the feasibility of this polygeneration system,thermo-gravimetric analysis on YM lignite and DT bituminous coal was conducted,and the characteristic parameters for pyrolysis,combustion,and gasification were obtained.Moreover,the activation energy of each reaction was calculated by Coats-Redfern method.The experimental results showed that,compared with DT bituminous coal,YM lignite pyrolysis process starts at a lower temperature,and its semi-coke reactivity during combustion and gasification was better.In addition,activation energy calculation indicated that,the apparent activation energy of gasification of both coals were much higher than that of the pyrolysis.Therefore,for lignite,pyrolysis and combustion combined polygeneration system may achieve higher efficiency and be worthy for further research.

  14. Biosolubilization of lignite by marine soil microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugesh, S.; Manivannan, S.; Mahesh, N.; Mohanasrinivasan, V.; Devi, V.S. [Deemed University, Thanjavur (India). School of Chemical and Biotechnology

    2003-07-01

    Mangrove forest soil samples were collected from different locations. Before starting the experiment, soil pH and EC are analysed. The medium used for cultivation of fungi is Czapek Dox broth. Two different methods are used for extraction of humic acid from fungi culture medium, such as the shakeflask method and the respirometer method. Results from the microbial status production of biosolubilized product humic-acid fungi gives a high amount compared to bacteria and actinomycetes. Hence fungi gave the best result for biosolubilization of lignite to humic acid. In addition to microbial status, physico-chemical parameters, such as nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, and organic carbon of soil were also analyzed. 12 refs., 1 fig., 11 tabs.

  15. Adsorption of an anionic dispersant on lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavuz, R.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Chemical & Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    2001-12-01

    Since coal is not a homogeneous substance but a mixture of carbonaceous materials and mineral matter, it has a variety of surface properties. Therefore, it is not easy to control the properties of coal suspensions by simply adjusting variables, such as pH and/or electrolyte. A chemical agent needs to be added to control the properties of the coal suspensions. The adsorption behavior of an anionic dispersant in the presence of a wetting agent using some Turkish lignite samples was investigated. The effects of dispersant concentration, temperature and pH on the dispersant adsorption were studied systematically, and the experimental results are presented. Pellupur B69 as a dispersant, commercial mixture of formaldehyde condensate sodium salt of naphthalene sulphonic acid, and Texapon N{sub 2}5 as a wetting agent, a sodium lauryl ether sulfate, have been used.

  16. Prediction of SO{sub 2} and NOx emissions for low-grade Turkish lignites in CFB combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gungor, A. [Nigde University, Nigde (Turkey). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2009-02-15

    The CFB technology is widely used for combustion of coal because of its unique ability to handle low quality, high ash, high sulphur and low heating value coals. This paper presents a modeling study of pollutant emissions such as sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitric oxide (NOx) resulting from coal combustion in a CFBC. Using this model, overall SO{sub 2} and NOx emissions are predicted for the combustion of three different kinds of low-grade Turkish lignites. The contents of these lignites are as follows: ash from 23.70% to 45.31%, sulphur from 1.81% to 8.40% and calorific values (LHV) from 10,283 to 15.215 kJ/kg. The data is obtained from two pilot scale CFBCs (50 and 80 kW) and an industrial scale CFBC (160 MW). The present study proves that CFB combustion demonstrated by both experimental data and model predictions produces low and acceptable level of SO{sub 2} and NOx emissions resulting from the combustion of low-grade lignites. Developed model can also investigate the effects of different operational parameters on overall SO{sub 2} and NOx emissions. As a result of this investigation, it is observed that increase of excess air decreases SO{sub 2} and NOx emissions. However, NOx emission increases with the operational bed velocity while SO{sub 2} emission decreases. A bigger inlet bed pressure value results in lower emissions of SO{sub 2} and NOx if other parameters are kept unchanged.

  17. Enhanced-hydrogen gas production through underground gasification of lignite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shu-qin; WANG Yuan-yuan; ZHAO Ke; YANG Ning

    2009-01-01

    Underground coal gasification is one of the clean technologies of in-situ coal utilization. Hydrogen production from underground gasification of lignite was investigated in this study based on simulation experiments. Pyrolysis of lignite, gasification activity, oxygen-steam gasification and the effect of groundwater influx were studied. As well, the advantages of lignite for stable underground gasification were analyzed. The results indicate that lignite has a high activity for gasification. Coal pyrolysis is an important source of hydrogen emission. Under special heating conditions, hydrogen is released from coal seams at temperatures above 350 ℃ and reaches its maximum value between 725 and 825 ℃. Gas with a hydrogen concentration of 40% to 50% can be continuously obtained by oxygen-steam injection at an optimum ratio of steam to oxygen, while lignite properties will ensure stable gasification. Groundwater influx can be utilized for hydrogen preparation under certain geological conditions through pressure control. Therefore, enhanced-hydrogen gas production through underground gasification of lignite has experimentally been proved.

  18. Mercury Control for Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-wet FGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katherine Dombrowski

    2009-12-31

    This report presents the results of a multi-year test program conducted as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-06NT42779, 'Mercury Control for Plants Firing Texas Lignite and Equipped with ESP-wet FGD.' The objective of this program was to determine the level of mercury removal achievable using sorbent injection for a plant firing Texas lignite fuel and equipped with an ESP and wet FGD. The project was primarily funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. EPRI, NRG Texas, Luminant (formerly TXU), and AEP were project co-funders. URS Group was the prime contractor, and Apogee Scientific and ADA-ES were subcontractors. The host site for this program was NRG Texas Limestone Electric Generating Station (LMS) Units 1 and 2, located in Jewett, Texas. The plant fires a blend of Texas lignite and Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Full-scale tests were conducted to evaluate the mercury removal performance of powdered sorbents injected into the flue gas upstream of the ESP (traditional configuration), upstream of the air preheater, and/or between electric fields within the ESP (Toxecon{trademark} II configuration). Phases I through III of the test program, conducted on Unit 1 in 2006-2007, consisted of three short-term parametric test phases followed by a 60-day continuous operation test. Selected mercury sorbents were injected to treat one quarter of the flue gas (e.g., approximately 225 MW equivalence) produced by Limestone Unit 1. Six sorbents and three injection configurations were evaluated and results were used to select the best combination of sorbent (Norit Americas DARCO Hg-LH at 2 lb/Macf) and injection location (upstream of the ESP) for a two-month performance evaluation. A mercury removal rate of 50-70% was targeted for the long-term test. During this continuous-injection test, mercury removal performance and variability were evaluated as the plant operated under normal conditions. Additional evaluations were made to determine any

  19. Arsenic and copper stabilisation in a contaminated soil by coal fly ash and green waste compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Daniel C W; Yip, Alex C K; Olds, William E; Weber, Paul A

    2014-09-01

    In situ metal stabilisation by amendments has been demonstrated as an appealing low-cost remediation strategy for contaminated soil. This study investigated the short-term leaching behaviour and long-term stability of As and Cu in soil amended with coal fly ash and/or green waste compost. Locally abundant inorganic (limestone and bentonite) and carbonaceous (lignite) resources were also studied for comparison. Column leaching experiments revealed that coal fly ash outperformed limestone and bentonite amendments for As stabilisation. It also maintained the As stability under continuous leaching of acidic solution, which was potentially attributed to high-affinity adsorption, co-precipitation, and pozzolanic reaction of coal fly ash. However, Cu leaching in the column experiments could not be mitigated by any of these inorganic amendments, suggesting the need for co-addition of carbonaceous materials that provides strong chelation with oxygen-containing functional groups for Cu stabilisation. Green waste compost suppressed the Cu leaching more effectively than lignite due to the difference in chemical composition and dissolved organic matter. After 9-month soil incubation, coal fly ash was able to minimise the concentrations of As and Cu in the soil solution without the addition of carbonaceous materials. Nevertheless, leachability tests suggested that the provision of green waste compost and lignite augmented the simultaneous reduction of As and Cu leachability in a fairly aggressive leaching environment. These results highlight the importance of assessing stability and remobilisation of sequestered metals under varying environmental conditions for ensuring a plausible and enduring soil stabilisation.

  20. An overview of lithotype associations of Miocene lignite seams exploited in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widera, Marek

    2016-09-01

    Currently, three stratigraphically distinct lignite seams of Early to Middle Miocene age are exploited in Poland, namely the third Ścinawa lignite seam (ŚLS-3), the second Lusatian lignite seam (LLS-2) and the first Mid-Polish lignite seam (MPLS-1). All of these are composed of numerous macroscopically distinguishable layers defined as lignite lithotypes. In the present paper, the lithotypes of Polish lignites are grouped into seven major lithotype associations that originated in various types of mire. Therefore, an approximate reconstruction of mire type can be based on lignite lithotypes. Within the Polish lignite seams examined, the commonest in order of importance are: xylodetritic (XDL), detroxylitic (DXL), detritic (DL) and xylitic (XL) lithotype associations, mostly with a massive (m) or horizontal (h) structure. They are particularly dominant in lignite opencasts belonging to the Konin and Adamów mines. However, in the lowermost seams at the Turów and Bełchatów mines, a substantial part of the seams comprises the bitumen-rich (BL) lithotype association. These seams also lignite lithotypes that in large quantities have a gelified (g) and/or nodular (n) structure. In contrast, lignites from the Sieniawa mine are characterised by an admixture of the best-developed lithotype associations of both fusitic (FL) and weathered (WL) lignites. Moreover, the vast majority of these lignites have a folded (fo) and/or faulted (fa) structure, because they were completely deformed by glaciotectonics.

  1. An overview of lithotype associations of Miocene lignite seams exploited in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widera Marek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, three stratigraphically distinct lignite seams of Early to Middle Miocene age are exploited in Poland, namely the third Ścinawa lignite seam (ŚLS-3, the second Lusatian lignite seam (LLS-2 and the first Mid-Polish lignite seam (MPLS-1. All of these are composed of numerous macroscopically distinguishable layers defined as lignite lithotypes. In the present paper, the lithotypes of Polish lignites are grouped into seven major lithotype associations that originated in various types of mire. Therefore, an approximate reconstruction of mire type can be based on lignite lithotypes. Within the Polish lignite seams examined, the commonest in order of importance are: xylodetritic (XDL, detroxylitic (DXL, detritic (DL and xylitic (XL lithotype associations, mostly with a massive (m or horizontal (h structure. They are particularly dominant in lignite opencasts belonging to the Konin and Adamów mines. However, in the lowermost seams at the Turów and Bełchatów mines, a substantial part of the seams comprises the bitumen-rich (BL lithotype association. These seams also lignite lithotypes that in large quantities have a gelified (g and/or nodular (n structure. In contrast, lignites from the Sieniawa mine are characterised by an admixture of the best-developed lithotype associations of both fusitic (FL and weathered (WL lignites. Moreover, the vast majority of these lignites have a folded (fo and/or faulted (fa structure, because they were completely deformed by glaciotectonics.

  2. Factors of Reclamation Success at the Lignite Strip-Mined Land in Northern Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Panagopoulos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The adverse ecological conditions at the lignite mines of Ptolemaida make the landscape reclamation difficult. The naturally established vegetation and soil properties were studied prior to reclamation. Various forest species were planted to assess the afforestation potential. The natural vegetation was heterogeneous but can be used for the analysis of the site. The soil of the spoil heaps was heterogeneous with unfavourable physicochemical properties. Surface soil temperature was still 24º C higher in bare soil than in soil covered with vegetation. The most successful species of the afforestation trial were Robinia pseudoacacia and Cedrus atlantica. Covering of fly ash spoils with topsoil presented poor results, while sewage sludge gave a favorable amelioration response in areas with high fly ash content. Topsoil from older stands was the suggested method to establish Robinia pseudoacacia. Reclamation success was dependent on appropriate planning; thus, the new landscape had to be designed in harmony with the surrounding landscape before the start of the mining activity.

  3. Investigation of the possibility of binding fly ash particles by elemental sulphur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidojković V.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal power plants in Serbia use lignite for electrical power production The secondary product of coal combustion is fly ash in the amount of 17%. Fly ash causes the pollution of air, water and soil, and also cause many human, especially lung diseases. Secondary sulphur is a product of crude oil refining. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of sulphur as a bonding material in ultra fine particle agglomeration (smaller than 63 μm in fly ash. The agglomeration should make the ash particles larger and heavy enough to fall without flying fractions. The experiments showed that during the homogenization of the ashes and sulphur from 150 to 170 °C in a reactor with intensive mixing, an amount of 15% sulphur was sufficient to bond particles and cause agglomeration without visible flying fractions.

  4. Circulating fluidized bed combustion ash characterization. The case of the Provence 250 MW unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecuyer, I.; Leduc, M. [Electricite de France (EDF), 78 - Chatou (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Lefevre, R.; Ausset, P. [Paris-12 Univ., Creteil (France). Lab. Interuniversitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques

    1997-05-01

    The Provence 250 MW Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion Unit (Gardanne, France) is burning a high sulfur (2 to 4%), high ash content (30%) local lignite. This peculiar fuel already contains about 15% of CaO which allows it to capture the sulfur dioxide in situ without adding any complementary sorbent. The ash chemical composition (bed ash and ESP ash) that reflects the particularities of the coal is presented. SEM and DRX observations confirm the presence of anhydrite CaSO{sub 4}, lime, CaS, quartz and traces of hematite. Most of particles are roughly-shaped but microspheres can also be detected in fly ash. The very high sulfate content may be worrying for the environment in disposals. Hardened samples do not seem to retain compounds from leaching: high quantities of calcium and sulfates are still leached from these crushed samples. (author) 10 refs.

  5. Investigation of pollutant formation of Sweet Sorghum-lignite (Orhaneli) mixtures in fluidised beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cubuk, M.H.; Heperkan, H.A. [Yildiz Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2004-07-01

    Most of the Turkish lignites have undesired fuel properties and they are extremely polluting. In this study, Sweet Sorghum was chosen as the energy plant. Combustion experiments of lignite and lignite-Sweet Sorghum mixtures were carried out in a fluidised bed system. The fuel-feeding ratio was set such that the thermal output of the system remained constant. Addition of Sweet Sorghum to the lignite reduces the pollutant concentration. The results were supported by experimental results.

  6. Synergies in co-pyrolysis of Thai lignite and corncob

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonobe, Taro [The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Uthit Road, Bangmod, Tungkru, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand); Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Worasuwannarak, Nakorn; Pipatmanomai, Suneerat [The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 126 Pracha-Uthit Road, Bangmod, Tungkru, Bangkok, 10140 (Thailand)

    2008-12-15

    The results from TGA experiments at the temperature range of 300-600 C evidently distinguished the different pyrolysis behaviours of lignite and corncob; however, no clear synergistic effects could be observed for the mixture. The investigation of co-pyrolysis in a fixed-bed reactor, however, found significant synergies in both pyrolysis product yields and gas product compositions. The solid yield of the 50:50 lignite/corncob blend was much lower (i.e. 9%) than expected from the calculated value based on individual materials under the range of temperatures studied, and coincided with the higher liquid and gas yield. The synergistic effect in product gas composition was highly pronouncing for CH{sub 4} formation, i.e. three times higher than the calculated value at 400 C. Possible mechanisms were described including the interaction between corncob volatiles and lignite particles, and the effect of the heat profiles of lignite and corncob pyrolysis on the temperature dependent reactions. The enhanced devolatilisation of the blend was explained by the transfer of hydrogen from biomass to coal as well as the promotion of low-temperature thermal decomposition of lignite by exothermic heat released from corncob pyrolysis. Moreover, water, which was one of the major components in corncob volatiles produced mainly at around 200-375 C, can also be expected to act as a reactive agent to promote the secondary tar cracking producing more CH{sub 4}. (author)

  7. Evolution of Çan-Etili (Çanakkale-NW Turkey) lignite basin:Sedimentology, petrology, palynology and lignite characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mustafa Bozcu; Funda Akgün; Gülbin Gürdal; Ayşe Bozcu; Sevinç Kapan Yeşilyurt; Öznur Karaca; M. Serkan Akkiraz

    2015-01-01

    abstract This study examines the development and sedimentology of Çan-Etili lignite basin in Biga Peninsula (NW Turkey) along with the palynologic and petrographic properties of the coals in this region. The Çan-Etili lignite basin discordantly overlies Oligocene-aged Çan volcanics. The basin consists of caldera type sedimentation developed by the combined effects of volcanism and tectonics. The volcanic rocks forming the basement of the basin consist of andesitic, dacitic and basaltic lava flows as well as agglomerates, tuff and silicified tuffs, and kaolin which is their alteration product. The basement volcanic rocks cooled from high potassium and calc-alkaline magma. The trace element geochemistry of different rocks within the volcanics reveals that they are from a volcanic arc. The Çan Formation contains lignites and consists of 6 lithofacies representing alluvial, fluvial, marsh and lacustrine environments. These lithofacies are the lower volcanogenic conglomerate, the claystone, the lignite, the laminated organic claystone, the tuff intercalated sandstone–siltstone and the upper volcanogenic conglomerate. The lignite in the basin is limnic and is formed in a non-fluvial marsh and marsh-lake environment. An abundant percentage of vegetation (Engelhardia, Sapotaceae, Cyrillaceae) is compatible with temperate and subtropical climatic conditions in the basin during sedimentation of lignite.The coals of Çan-Etili basin are humic with high sulfur content (6–6.5%average) mostly containing huminite compounds belonging to the class of lignite-low bituminous (C-A) coal. Their coalification rank is between 0.38%and 0.56%Ro. The coals are formed in limnic-limnotelmatic marsh zones based on their microlithotype components. The inorganic components of the coal mostly consist of pyrite and clay. The trace elements, As, Th, U and V, are higher than international coal standards. The coal quality is adversely affected by high sulfur content and sulfur driven trace

  8. Optimization of desulphurization of Artvin-Yusufeli lignite with acidic hydrogen peroxide solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Levent; O. Kaya; M. Kocakerim; V. Yigit; O. Kucuk [Ataturk University, Erzurum (Turkey). Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering

    2007-05-15

    In this study in which the Taguchi method was used, the optimization of sulphur removal by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions was carried out over lignite with higher content of sulphur from Artvin/Yusufeli, Turkey. In experiments, the ranges of experimental parameters were between 0.25 and 6.0 mol L{sup -1} for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, 0.25-4 mol L{sup -1} for H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentration, 10-60{sup o}C for reaction temperature, 0.01-0.08 g mL{sup -1} for solid-to-liquid ratio, 15-120 min for reaction time, 200-300 rpm for stirring speed and 710-120 {mu}m for particle size. The optimum conditions for these parameters have found to be 60{sup o}C of temperature, 0.06 g mL{sup -1} of solid-to-liquid ratio, 60 min of reaction time, 250 rpm of stirring speed and -250 + 180 {mu}m of particle size. A statistical experimental arrangement, L{sub 25}(5{sup 6}) was prepared to determine optimum sulphur removal and ash removal ratios. The obtained yields were 97.85% in removal of total sulphur, 56.54% in removal of pyritic sulphur, 21.33% in removal of organic sulphur and 61.52% in removal of ash. According to variance analysis, it was seen that all parameters were effective in removal of pyritic and total sulphur, reaction temperature, solid-to-liquid ratio, reaction time, stirring speed, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} concentrations in removal of organic sulphur, and other parameters except acid concentration in removal of ash. 31 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. The increase in lignite production in Southern India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Consejo Superior de Colegios de Ingenieros de Minas

    The first bucket-wheel excavator with a capacity of 50,000 cu.m per day, has just been brought into service at the Neyveli opencast lignite workings, in the state of Tamil- Nadu, Southern India. It is expected that with this machine, annual lignite production will be increased from a figure of 3.5 million to a figure of 6.5 million tons. This increase in production is a significant one in terms of meeting India's energy requirements, since of the 90% of India's commerciably workable coal reserves, some 20,000 m tons are located in the Neyveli area. (In Spanish)

  10. THERMODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION METHODS IN LIGNITE POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koroneos J. Christopher; Sakiltzis Christos; Rovas C. Dimitrios [Laboratory of Heat Transfer and Environmental Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2008-09-30

    The green house effect is a very pressing issue of our times due to the big impact it will have in the future of life in our planet. The temperature increase of the earth which is the major impact of the greenhouse effect may change forever the climate and the way of life in many countries. It may lead to the reduction of agricultural production and at the end to famine, in several nations. The minimization of CO2 emissions and the introduction of new energy sources is the only solution to the catastrophe that is coming if inaction prevails. The objective of this work is to analyze the methods of the CO2 removal from the flue gases of power plants that use solid fuels. It is especially fit to the Greek conditions where the main fuel used is lignite. Three methods have been examined and compared thermodynamically. These are: (a) Removal of CO2 from the flue gas stream by absorption, (b) The combustion of lignite with pure oxygen and (c) The gasification of lignite. The lignite used in the analysis is the Greek lignite, produced at the Western Macedonia mines. The power plant, before carbon sequestration, has an efficiency of 39%, producing 330MW of electric power. After sequestration, the CO2 is compressed to pressures between 80-110 atm, before its final disposal. In the first method, the sequestration of CO2 is done utilizing a catalyst. The operation requires electricity and high thermal load which is received from low pressure steam extracted from the turbines. Additionally, electricity is required for the compression of the CO2 to 100 bars. This leads to a lower efficiency of the power plant by by 13%. In the second method, the lignite combustion is done with pure O2 produced at an air separation unit. The flue gasses are made up of CO2 and water vapor. This method requires electricity for carbon dioxide compression and the Air Separation unit, thus, the power plant efficiency is lowered by 26%. In the lignite gasification method, the products are a mixture of

  11. Influence of oxidation in aqueous medium on the structure and properties of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    2000-05-01

    In this paper, the effect of oxygen uptake on the structure and properties of lignites was investigated using five different Turkish lignites. Lignite samples were oxidised in aqueous medium at 423 K under 1.5 MPa partial pressure of oxygen for 60 min. Relations between the oxygen uptake and the elemental compositions of the lignite samples were investigated. FT-i.r. technique was applied to the original and oxidised lignite samples to investigate functional group analyses. Mercury porosimetry analyses of the samples were carried out up to about 220 MPa. Effect of oxygen uptake on the bulk density, apparent density, porosity, and pore radius of the lignite samples were compared. Differential Thermogravimetry (DTG) technique was performed to compare the thermal reactivity of the original and oxidised lignite samples. 20 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Speciation of selected trace and major elements in lignite used in 'Nikola Tesla A' power plant (Obrenovac, Serbia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleksandar Popovic; Dragana Djordjevic [University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro). Department of Chemistry

    2005-07-01

    Four samples of milled lignite used in the 'Nikola Tesla A' power plant, located in Obrenovac near Belgrade, were subjected to a five-step sequential extraction, comprising of the following phases: distilled water, 1 M ammonium acetate, 0.2 M ammonium oxalate/0.2 M oxalic acid, acidic solution of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and a 6 M solution of HCl. The concentrations of the different elements obtained in the extractions were statistically analysed. The majority of the examined elements were found to be most probably associated with inorganic fractions of lignite, only aluminum, silicon, chromium and arsenic have a larger extractable organic/sulfide fraction than an extractable inorganic fraction. Alumosilicates of magnesium (carriers of arsenic, zinc, lead, copper and chromium), silicates of potassium (scavengers of lead and nickel), mixed aluminates of iron and magnesium (carriers of arsenic, zinc, copper and chromium) and compounds of iron that do not contain aluminum and magnesium (scavengers of manganese) were dissolved in the fifth phase of the sequential extraction. Copper is a substrate of alumosilicates of potassium and magnesium, while zinc and chromium are substrates of compounds of iron leached in the third phase of the sequential extraction. Interphase correlation revealed that the adsorbed and ion-exchangeable fractions of most of the examined elements do not exhibit preferential binding to the components of the inorganic matrix of lignite ash.

  13. Experimental Attempts to Investigate the Influence of Petrographic Properties on Drying Characteristics of Lignite in Superheated Steam Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Sciazko

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A superheated steam fluidized bed dryer (SSFBD in a self-heat recuperative configuration has a great potential of improving thermal efficiency of a lignite-fired power plant by recovering both of latent heat of vaporization of water kept in the fuel and part of sensible heat during the fuel processing. However, the optimal design of the dryer requires the fundamental knowledge of drying characteristics in respect to the individual properties of the utilized fuel. Experimental investigation to determine the correlation between a specific coal properties originated from geological background and its drying characteristics is thus the major concern in this paper. The investigated lignite is a representative of Turoszow deposit in Poland. Experimental attempts unveiling drying kinetics were carried out for 5 mm and 10 mm diameter spherical samples in the superheated steam atmosphere in the temperature range of 110 °C–170 °C. Simultaneous and continuous measurements of changes in weight, surface and interior temperatures and appearance on each tested sample were carried out for describing drying behavior. Analytical investigation was applied to explain the drying characteristics, which are strongly affected by the individual properties of coal and the inherent ash composition.

  14. FBC desulfurization process using coal with low sulfur content, high oxidizing conditions and metamorphic limestones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Bragança

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A metamorphic limestone and a dolomite were employed as SO2 sorbents in the desulfurization of gas from coal combustion. The tests were performed in a fluidized bed reactor on a bench and pilot scale. Several parameters such as bed temperature, sorbent type, and sorbent particle size at different Ca/S molar ratios were analyzed. These parameters were evaluated for the combustion of coal with low-sulfur/high-ash content, experimental conditions of high air excess and high O2 level in fluidization air. Under these conditions, typical of furnaces, few published data can be found. In this work, a medium level of desulfurization efficiency (~60% for Ca/S = 2 was obtained.

  15. FBC desulfurization process using coal with low sulfur content, high oxidizing conditions and metamorphic limestones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braganca, S.R.; Castellan, J.L. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2009-04-15

    A metamorphic limestone and a dolomite were employed as SO{sub 2} sorbents in the desulfurization of gas from coal combustion. The tests were performed in a fluidized bed reactor on a bench and pilot scale. Several parameters such as bed temperature, sorbent type, and sorbent particle size at different Ca/S molar ratios were analyzed. These parameters were evaluated for the combustion of coal with low-sulfur/high-ash content, experimental conditions of high air excess and high O{sub 2} level in fluidization air. Under these conditions, typical of furnaces, few published data can be found. In this work, a medium level of desulfurization efficiency (similar to 60%) for Ca/S = 2 was obtained.

  16. FBC desulfurization process using coal with low sulfur content, high oxidizing conditions and metamorphic limestones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.R. Braganca; J.L. Castellan [Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    A metamorphic limestone and a dolomite were employed as SO{sub 2} sorbents in the desulfurization of gas from coal combustion. The tests were performed in a fluidised bed reactor on a bench and pilot scale. Several parameters such as bed temperature, sorbent type, and sorbent particle size at different Ca/S molar ratios were analyzed. These parameters were evaluated for the combustion of coal with low-sulfur/high-ash content, experimental conditions of high air excess and high O{sub 2} level in fluidization air. Under these conditions, typical of furnaces, few published data can be found. In this work, a medium level of desulfurization efficiency (about 60%) for Ca/S = 2 was obtained. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Characterization of a fluidized-bed combustion ash to determine potential for environmental impact. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassett, D.J.; Henderson, A.K.; Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Mann, M.D.; Eylands, K.E.

    1997-10-01

    A 440-megawatt, circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC), lignite-fired power plant is planned for construction in Choctaw County north of Ackerman, Mississippi. This power plant will utilize Mississippi lignite from the first lignite mine in that state. Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., is working with the power plant developer in the current planning and permitting efforts for this proposed construction project. In order to accommodate Mississippi state regulatory agencies and meet appropriate permit requirements, Malcolm Pirnie needed to provide an indication of the characteristics of the by-products anticipated to be produced at the proposed plant. Since the Mississippi lignite is from a newly tapped mine and the CFBC technology is relatively new, Malcolm Pirnie contacted with the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop and perform a test plan for the production and characterization of ash similar to ash that will be eventually produced at the proposed power plant. The work performed at the EERC included two primary phases: production of by-products in a bench-scale CFBC unit using lignite provided by Malcolm Pirnie with test conditions delineated by Malcolm Pirnie to represent expected operating conditions for the full-scale plant; and an extensive characterization of the by-products produced, focusing on Mississippi regulatory requirements for leachability, with the understanding that return of the by-product to the mine site was an anticipated by-product management plan. The overall focus of this project was the environmental assessment of the by-product expected to be produced at the proposed power plant. Emphasis was placed on the leachability of potentially problematic trace elements in the by-products. The leaching research documented in this report was performed to determine trends of leachability of trace elements under leaching conditions appropriate for evaluating land disposal in monofills, such as returning the by-products to the mine

  18. Mineralogy and geochemistry of density-separated Greek lignite fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iordanidis, A.; Doesburg, van J.D.J.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, lignite samples were collected from the Ptolemais region, northern Greece, homogenized, crushed to less than I nun, and separated in three density fractions using heavy media. The mineralogical investigation of the density fractions showed a predominance of pyrite in the light fractio

  19. Influences of different substrates on simulated lignite biogas production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Aikuan; Qin Yong; Shao Pei

    2015-01-01

    Using lignite samples, selected from Zhaotong basin, Yunnan province, China, as the parent source, sim-ulating experiments of lignite biogas were conducted with 0.1% methanol, 5 mg/L yeast extract and 0.2 mol/L sodium acetate solutions as the exogenous substance respectively. Variation characteristics of gas production, gas composition, VFA content and activity of coenzyme F420 in the simulated process were analyzed to discuss the influence of different substrates on lignite biogas generation. The results show that 0.1%methanol and 5 mg/L yeast extract solutions increase VFA contents in the biogas gener-ation system (p <0.05) and inhibit coenzyme F420 and methanogen activities significantly, so they decrease both gas amounts (p<0.05) and CH4 contents (p<0.05). 0.2 mol/L sodium acetate solution acti-vates coenzyme F420 and methanogen activities and improves the efficiency of enzymatic reaction, so the gas quantity (p<0.05) and the CH4 content (p<0.01) increase significantly. Therefore, sodium acetate can be one kind of good exogenous substance for the generation of lignite biogenic gas.

  20. Kinetic features of pyrolysis of asphaltenes from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Ryl' tsova, S.V.; Rozental, D.A.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.

    2000-07-01

    The kinetic features of accumulation of the main gaseous and some liquid products in pyrolysis of asphaltenes from lignite semicoking tar at 750-900{degree}C (contact time 0.5-6.0 s) were studied. The overall reaction order of accumulation of certain compounds was determined, and possible pathways for their formation were suggested.

  1. Sulfate Reduction at a Lignite Seam: Microbial Abundance and Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detmers, J.; Schulte, U.; Strauss, H.; Kuever, J.

    2001-10-01

    In a combined isotope geochemical and microbiological investigation, a setting of multiple aquifers was characterized. Biologically mediated redox processes were observed in the aquifers situated in marine sands of Tertiary age and overlying Quaternary gravel deposits. Intercalated lignite seams define the aquitards, which separate the aquifers. Bacterial oxidation of organic matter is evident from dissolved inorganic carbon characterized by average carbon isotope values between ?18.4 per thousand and ?15.7 per thousand (PDB). Strongly positive sulfur isotope values of up to +50 per thousand (CTD) for residual sulfate indicate sulfate reduction under closed system conditions with respect to sulfate availability. Both, hydrochemical and isotope data are thus consistent with the recent activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Microbiological investigations revealed the presence of an anaerobic food chain in the aquifers. Most-probable-number (MPN) determinations for SRB and fermenting microorganisms reached highest values at the interface between aquifer and lignite seam (1.5 x 103 cells/g sediment dry mass). Five strains of SRB were isolated from highest MPN dilutions. Spore-forming bacteria appeared to dominate the SRB population. Sulfate reduction rates were determined by the 35S-radiotracer method. A detailed assessment indicates an increase in the reduction rate in proximity to the lignite seam, with a maximum turnover of 8.4 mM sulfate/a, suggesting that lignite-drived compounds represent the substrate for sulfate reduction.

  2. Cheap carbon sorbents produced from lignite by catalytic pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, B.N.; Schchipko, M.L. [Inst. of Chemistry of Natural Organic Materials, Akademgorodok, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-01

    Some data are presented describing the new technology of carbon sorbent production from powdered lignite in the installation with fluidized bed of catalyst. It was shown the different types of char products with extended pore structure and high sorption ability can be produced from cheap and accessible lignite of Kansk-Achinsk coal pit in pilot installation with fluidized bed of Al-Cu-Cr oxide catalyst or catalytically active slag materials. In comparison with the conventional technologies of pyrolysis the catalytic pyrolysis allows to increase by 3-5 times the process productivity and to decrease significantly the formation of harmful compounds. The latter is accomplished by complete oxidation of gaseous pyrolysis products in the presence of catalysts and by avoiding the formation of pyrolysis tars - the source of cancerogenic compounds. The technology of cheap powdered sorbent production from lignites makes possible to obtain from lignite during the time of pyrolysis only a few seconds char products with porosity up to 0.6 cm{sup 3} /g, and specific surface area more than 400 m{sup 3} /g. Some methods of powdered chars molding into carbon materials with the different shape were proved for producing of firmness sorbents. Cheap carbon sorbents obtained by thermocatalytic pyrolysis can be successfully used in purification of different industrial pollutants as one-time sorbent or as adsorbents of long-term application with periodic regeneration.

  3. Mineralogy and geochemistry of density-separated Greek lignite fractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iordanidis, A.; Doesburg, van J.D.J.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, lignite samples were collected from the Ptolemais region, northern Greece, homogenized, crushed to less than I nun, and separated in three density fractions using heavy media. The mineralogical investigation of the density fractions showed a predominance of pyrite in the light fractio

  4. Pyrolysis kinetics of phenols from lignite semicoking tar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Polovetskaya, O.S.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Shavyrina, O.A. [Leo Tolstoy Tula State Pedag University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    2002-11-01

    The features of pyrolysis of phenols from lignite semicoking tar were studied. The activation energy and order of the reactions of accumulation of methane, hydrogen, carbon monoxide and dioxide, naphthalene and its methyl homologs, phenols, and isomeric cresols and dimethylphenols were determined.

  5. Kinetics of Heterogeneous NO and N2O Reduction at FBC Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Jensen, Anker; Nielsen, Jannik Steen

    1999-01-01

    of the combustion chamber and adding secondary air in the top or in the cyclone. The change in reaction pathways for N2O and NO formation and reduction is very complex, and the catalytic activity of the solid material in the boiler may vary with the air staging. Samples of solids taken from large scale tests...... in a 12 MW CFB boiler under different operating conditions (no, severe and reversed air staging) have been tested in small scale laboratory fixed bed reactors. The activity of char and bed material (a mixture of sand, ash and partly sulfated limestone) for decomposition of N2O and simultaneous catalytic...... reduction of N2O and NO was measured. The char was found to be very active compared to bed material under inert conditions. There was no influence of operating conditions on the activity of the char. Pore diffusion influenced the reaction rate for particle sizes above 0.2 mm at 1076 K, and the larger...

  6. Perspectives of the German lignite industry in 2008; Perspektiven der deutschen Braunkohlenindustrie 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartung, M. [RWE Power AG, Koeln (Germany). Ressort Braunkohlengewinnung, -stromerzeugung und -veredlung; Milojcic, G. [Bundesverband Braunkohle (DEBRIV), Koeln (Germany)

    2008-05-15

    Lignite companies, specifically Vattenfall and RWE, have been setting out on this route, but there is still a long way to go. We intend to make the necessary efforts, and the lignite companies have a special motivation. Lignite is an increasingly valuable resource. This is shown by developments on raw-material markets. Our task is to further develop power plant engineering in order to help ensure that this remains the case tomorrow as well. So, the lignite industry's avowal of CCS is underpinned by a very tangible interest. The value of domestic lignite should be retained for the longer term. Happily, lignite extraction in all mining areas enjoys the wide acceptance of the population and regional politicians. (orig.)

  7. The Effects of High Alkaline Fly Ash on Strength Behaviour of a Cohesive Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Binal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporarily, there are 16 coal-burning thermal power plants currently operating in Turkey. This number is expected to rise to 46 in the future. Annually, about 15 million tons of fly ash are removed from the existing thermal power plants in Turkey, but a small proportion of it, 2%, is recyclable. Turkey’s plants are fired by lignite, producing Class C fly ash containing a high percentage of lime. Sulfate and alkali levels are also higher in Class C fly ashes. Therefore, fly ash is, commonly, unsuitable as an additive in cement or concrete in Turkey. In this study, highly alkaline fly ash obtained from the Yeniköy thermal power plants is combined with soil samples in different proportions (5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, and 25% and changes in the geomechanical properties of Ankara clay were investigated. The effect of curing time on the physicomechanical properties of the fly ash mixed soil samples was also analyzed. The soil classification of Ankara clay changed from CH to MH due to fly ash additives. Free swelling index values showed a decrease of 92.6%. Direct shear tests on the cohesion value of Ankara clay have shown increases by multiples of 15.85 and 3.01 in internal friction angle values. The California bearing ratio has seen a more drastic increase in value (68.7 times for 25% fly ash mix.

  8. Genetic relationship of flavenoids from extracts and semicoking tars of lignite with the initial vegetable matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Shrykin, A.Y.; Podshibyakin, S.I.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Shavyrina, O.A. [Lev Tolstoi State Pedagogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    1999-06-01

    A genetic relationship of flavonoids from extracts and semi-coking tars of lignites mined at the near-Moscow and Kansk-Achinsk fields with flavenoids of vegetable origin has been found. Paleoreconstruction of the possible species of the initial vegetable matter from which the organic matter of these lignites had originated was performed. Possible schemes of transformations of the initial natural flavonoids under conditions of lignite formation and in the course of semicoking are presented.

  9. Experimental studies on pulp and paper mill sludge ash behavior in fluidized bed combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latva-Somppi, J. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland). Process Technology

    1998-11-01

    Ash formation during the fluidized bed combustion (FBC) of pulp and paper mill sludges has been experimentally studied on an industrial and bench scale. The methods included aerosol measurements, chemical and crystalline composition analyses, thermogravimetry and electron microscopy. Fly ash mass and number size distributions and elemental enrichment in submicron particles and bottom ash were measured. Fly ash, bottom ash and ash deposits were characterized and their formation mechanisms are discussed. During combustion the fine paper-making additives in sludge, clay minerals and calcite, sintered fanning porous agglomerates. The fly ash mass mean size was 7.5 - 15 lam and the supermicron particles included 93.6 - 97.3 % of the fly ash. Condensation of the volatilized inorganic species formed spherical submicron particles in the fly ash. Their mass concentration was almost negligible when co-firing paper mill sludges and wood. This suggests that the fraction of the volatilized inorganic species in the paper mill sludges was low. Results from pulp mill sludge and bark co-firing were different. A clear mass mode below 0.3 pm, presenting 2.2 - 5.0 weight-% of the fly ash was detected. The condensed species included K, Na, S and Cl. Their mass fraction was higher in the pulp mill sludge than in the paper mill sludge. Evidently this resulted in increased volatilization and formation of condensed particles. The following trace elements were enriched in the submicron ash during pulp mill sludge and wood co-firing: As, Cd, Rb and Pb. The main part of the volatile species was, however, captured in the bulk ash. Presumably, this was due to the high surface area concentration in the bulk ash. Sludge moisture was observed to reduce the inorganic species volatilization. Probably steam vaporization from the wet sludge through the burning layer decreased combustion temperatures on char surface and less char was produced. Hence, the volatilization of ash forming species was

  10. Open-pit mining of lignite in Czechoslovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojdar, J.

    1987-06-01

    The complicated nature of the overburden in Czechoslovakian surface mines poses considerable difficulties to the construction of dumps and the stability of overburden slopes. Operations are further hindered by the extent of the investments required to sufficiently address these problems, and to access the lignite reserves. An example of this arose when it was discovered that the town of Most was situated above a huge deposit of coal. As a result, the entire town had to be demolished, and subsequently rebuilt a few kilometers away, in order to provide access to the 90 Mt of high quality lignite with a low stripping ratio (less than 1 m/sup 3//t). A particularly large expenditure was required to relocate a precious historical monument, a 12,000 t medieval gothic church, to a site 850 m from its original location, without dismantling the building.

  11. Oxydesulfurization of a Turkish lignite using trona solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Kuecuekbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical Univ. (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    1996-06-01

    This article investigates the possibility of using trona minerals in the oxydesulfurization of coal. The experiments were performed on a Turkish lignite having high organic and high pyritic sulfur content from the Gediz area. Oxydesulfurization of the lignite sample using trona minerals was studied at 423--473 K, under 0--1 MPa oxygen partial pressure at 0--0.3 M equivalent alkalinity of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} for 2.5--60 min. Almost all of the pyritic sulfur content and, depending on the working conditions, an important part of the organic sulfur content were removed. Unless the temperature reached 473 K, solid product yield was not negatively affected. Trona minerals were seen as a suitable alkaline to use in oxydesulfurization of coal.

  12. Solubilisation of lignite during oxydesulphurization in alkaline solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Kuecuekbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical Univ., Chemical Engineering Dept. (Turkey)

    1997-12-31

    Some desulphurization processes such as oxydesulphurization in which dissolved oxygen is attached to coal particles are performed usually in alkaline solutions. Therefore, these processes are resulted in not only sulphur removal but also some solubilisation of the coal matrix. In this study three different Turkish lignite samples are subjected to various oxydesulphurization processes in which dilute solutions of NaOH, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, NH{sub 4}OH or Na{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} containing dissolved oxygen under pressure were applied. The experiments were performed in a magnetically stirred and electrically heated Parr autoclave. The extent of the solubilisation is varied depending on the type and concentration of the alkaline used, the applied temperature and the rank of the lignite sample used. (orig.)

  13. Use of Fluidized Bed Combustion Ash and Other Industrial Wastes as Raw Materials for the Manufacture of Calcium Sulphoaluminate Cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marroccoli, M.; Montagnaro, F.; Pace, M. L.; Telesca, A.; Valenti, G. L.

    Calcium sulphoaluminate cements, mainly composed by 4CaO·3Al2O3·SO3 and 2CaO·SiO2, are special hydraulic binders which require limestone, bauxite and gypsum as natural raw materials for their manufacture. In order to save bauxite and natural gypsum, it has been explored the possibility of using, among the raw mix components, FBC waste together with pulverised coal fly ash or anodization mud and, when necessary, flue gas desulphurization gypsum. Mixtures containing limestone (29-39%), FBC waste (30-44%), pulverised coal fly ash (0-13%) or anodization mud (0-32%), bauxite (0-18%) and flue gas desulphurization gypsum (0-8%) were heated for 2 hours in a laboratory electric oven at temperatures ranging from 1150° to 1300°C. The X-ray diffraction patterns on the burnt products generally showed a good conversion of the reactants and a high selectivity degree towards 4CaO·3Al2O3·SO3, particularly at 1250°C.

  14. JV Task 98 - Controlling Mercury Emissions for Utilities Firing Lignites from North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Benson

    2007-06-15

    This project compiled and summarized the findings and conclusions of research, development, and demonstration projects on controlling mercury from lignite coals. A significant amount of work has been conducted since 1994 on mercury in lignite, mercury measurement in flue gases, sorbent, sorbent enhancement additives, oxidation agent development, and full-scale demonstration of mercury control technologies. This report is focused on providing the lignite industry with an understanding of mercury issues associated with the combustion of lignite, as well as providing vital information on the methods to control mercury emissions in coal-fired power plants.

  15. Petrology of Panandhro Lignite deposit, Gujarat in relation to palaeodepositional condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, A.; Singh, B.D. [Birbal Sahni Institute for Paleobotany, Lucknow (India)

    2005-09-01

    Petrological investigations on Early Eocene lignite from two mine sections of Block-1 in Panandhro Lignite field, under both normal incident (white) and fluorescence (blue light excitation) modes, reveal that deposit is rich in maceral huminite content with sub-ordinate amount of liptinite and low inertinite contents. The maceral composition indicates that sub-bituminous C lignites in both the mine sections are more or less similar with minor differences. Gelification and Tissue Preservation Indices suggest the deposition of lignite in lower delta plain environment in lagoonal conditions.

  16. Sulfur removal from Gediz lignite using aqueous sodium hydroxide solutions under mild oxidative conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Kuecuekbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical Univ. (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    1999-11-01

    Sulfur removal from a high-sulfur Turkish lignite (Gediz) using aqueous sodium hydroxide solutions having dissolved oxygen was investigated under mild oxidative conditions. Effects of the parameters such as sodium hydroxide/lignite weight ratio, temperature, and partial pressure of oxygen were investigated within the ranges of 0.05--0.8, 423--498 K, and 1--2 MPa, respectively. Optimum values of these parameters were determined regarding sulfur removal and coal recovery. Influences of dry oxidation of the lignite sample as a pretreatment at 573 K and subsequent washing of some treated lignite samples with 1 N HCl were investigated.

  17. Effect of biomass on burnouts of Turkish lignites during co-firing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Yaman, S. [Istanbul Technical Univ., Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Dept., 34469 Maslak, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2009-09-15

    Co-firing of some low quality Turkish lignites with woody shells of sunflower seed was investigated via non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis method. For this purpose, Yozgat-Sorgun, Erzurum-Askale, Tuncbilek, Gediz, and Afsin-Elbistan lignites were selected, and burnouts of these lignites were compared with those of their blends. Biomass was blended as much as 10 and 20 wt.% of the lignites, and heating was performed up to 900 C at a heating rate of 40 C/min under dry air flow of 40 mL/min. This study revealed that the same biomass species may have different influences on the burnout yields of the lignites. Burnouts of Erzurum-Askale lignite increased at any temperature with the increasing ratio of biomass in the blend, whereas burnout yields of other lignites decreased to some extent. Nevertheless, the blends of Turkish lignites with sunflower seed shell did not behave in very different way, and it can be concluded that they are compatible in terms of burnouts for co-combustion in a combustion system. Although the presence of biomass in the lignite blends caused to some decreases in the final burnouts, the carbon dioxide neutral nature of biomass should be taken into account, and co-combustion is preferable for waste-to-energy-management. (author)

  18. Enzymatic depolymerization of low-rank coal (lignite)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofrichter, M.; Ziegenhagen, D.; Sorge, S.; Bublitz, F.; Fritsche, W. [Jena Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Mikrobiologie

    1997-12-31

    Ligninolytic basidiomycetes (wood and litter decaying fungi) have the ability to degrade low-rank coal (lignite). Extracellular manganese peroxidase (MnP) is the decisive enzyme in the depolymerization process both of coal derived humic substances and native coal. The depolymerization of coal occurred via Mn{sup 3+}-ions acting as primary mediator and can be considerably enhanced by certain thiols acting as secondary mediators. The depolymerization process leads finally to complex mixtures of fulvic acid-like compounds. (orig.)

  19. Microscopical investigation of the transformation (diagenesis) from peat to lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ting, F.T.C.

    1977-01-01

    A silicified Palaeocene peat layer discovered in a lignite bed in western North Dakota, U.S.A., has proved to be excellent material for studying the transformation from peat to lignite. Detailed anatomical structures are well preserved in the peat and similar to the level of preservation of Carboniferous coal balls. A compaction of 4:1 results when the peat is converted to lignite. Loss in volume is primarily caused by the loss of cellular cavities and intergranular spaces and consequent loss of redistribution of moisture. Huminite formed from secondary xylem and phloem sclereids differs in appearance under the microscope from huminite derived from periderms and young cortical tissues. Resinites are formed from fillings of resin canals, secretory cells and sclereids of secondary phloem and may also originate from resinous materials occurring in the palisade and spongy mesophyll of leaves. Cutinite can form from either cuticles or from compressed cortical tissues of young roots. Charred leaves and charred secondary xylem and phloem comprise an important portion of the fusinitic and semifusinitic fractions of the coal. Pyrinite grains tend to occupy the cell cavities of early wood and ray cells. Differences between collinite and telinite developed during the peat stage, while progressive coalification tends to accentuate the lack of structure in the collinite.

  20. Radon concentrations in three underground lignite mines in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cile, S; Altinsoy, N; Celebi, N

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring of radon in underground mines is important in order to assess the radiological hazards to occupational workers. Radon concentration levels in three underground lignite mines (Tunçbilek, Omerler and Eynez) of Turkey were obtained in this study. For this reason, atmospheric radon level measurements were carried out in mines using CR-39 track detectors. Chemical etching of the detector tracks and subsequent counting were performed at Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center. The obtained results were evaluated according to the International Commission of Radiation Protection and the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority whose radon action levels for workplaces are 500-1500 and 1000 Bq(-3), respectively. The radon gas concentrations in the lignite mines were determined to be between 50 +/- 7 and 587 +/- 16 Bq m(-3). The results obtained in these experiments are far under the action levels. The computed radon doses for the mine workers of Tunçbilek, Omerler and Eynez lignite mines are 1.23, 2.44 and 1.47 mSv y(-1), respectively.

  1. Radon concentrations in three underground lignite mines in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cile, S.; Altinsoy, N.; Celebi, N. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Inst. of Energy

    2010-01-15

    Monitoring of radon in underground mines is important in order to assess the radiological hazards to occupational workers. Radon concentration levels in three underground lignite mines (Tuncbilek, Omerler and Eynez) of Turkey were obtained in this study. For this reason, atmospheric radon level measurements were carried out in mines using CR-39 track detectors. Chemical etching of the detector tracks and subsequent counting were performed at Cekmece Nuclear Research and Training Center. The obtained results were evaluated according to the International Commission of Radiation Protection and the Turkish Atomic Energy Authority whose radon action levels for workplaces are 500-1500 and 1000 Bq{sup -3}, respectively. The radon gas concentrations in the lignite mines were determined to be between 50 {+-} 7 and 587 {+-} 16 Bq m{sup -3}. The results obtained in these experiments are far under the action levels. The computed radon doses for the mine workers of Tuncbilek, Omerler and Eynez lignite mines are 1.23, 2.44 and 1.47 mSv y{sup -1}, respectively.

  2. NOx and SO2 emission factors for Serbian lignite Kolubara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Vladimir V.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Emission factors are widely accepted tool for estimation of various pollutants emissions in USA and EU. Validity of emission factors is strongly related to experimental data on which they are based. This paper is a result of an effort to establish reliable NOx and SO2 emission factors for Serbian coals. The results of NOx and SO2 emissions estimations based on USA and EU emission factors from thermal power plants Nikola Tesla Obrenovac A and B utilizing the Serbian lignite Kolubara are compared with experimental data obtained during almost one decade (2000-2008 of emissions measurements. Experimental data are provided from regular annual emissions measurement along with operational parameters of the boiler and coal (lignite Kolubara ultimate and proximate analysis. Significant deviations of estimated from experimental data were observed for NOx, while the results for SO2 were satisfactory. Afterwards, the estimated and experimental data were plotted and linear regression between them established. Single parameter optimization was performed targeting the ideal slope of the regression line. Results of this optimization provided original NOx and SO2 emission factors for Kolubara lignite.

  3. Mercury capture by selected Bulgarian fly ashes: Influence of coal rank and fly ash carbon pore structure on capture efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostova, I.J.; Hower, J.C.; Mastalerz, Maria; Vassilev, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    Mercury capture by fly ash C was investigated at five lignite- and subbituminous-coal-burning Bulgarian power plants (Republika, Bobov Dol, Maritza East 2, Maritza East 3, and Sliven). Although the C content of the ashes is low, never exceeding 1.6%, the Hg capture on a unit C basis demonstrates that the low-rank-coal-derived fly ash carbons are more efficient in capturing Hg than fly ash carbons from bituminous-fired power plants. While some low-C and low-Hg fly ashes do not reveal any trends of Hg versus C, the 2nd and, in particular, the 3rd electrostatic precipitator (ESP) rows at the Republika power plant do have sufficient fly ash C range and experience flue gas sufficiently cool to capture measurable amounts of Hg. The Republika 3rd ESP row exhibits an increase in Hg with increasing C, as observed in other power plants, for example, in Kentucky power plants burning Appalachian-sourced bituminous coals. Mercury/C decreases with an increase in fly ash C, suggesting that some of the C is isolated from the flue gas stream and does not contribute to Hg capture. Mercury capture increases with an increase in Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and micropore surface area. The differences in Hg capture between the Bulgarian plants burning low-rank coal and high volatile bituminous-fed Kentucky power plants suggests that the variations in C forms resulting from the combustion of the different ranks also influence the efficiency of Hg capture. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Genetic relationship of organic bases of the quinoline and isoquinoline series from lignite semicoking tars with the initial biological material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Podshibyakin, S.I.; Domogatskii, V.V.; Shvykin, A.Y.; Shavyrina, O.A.; Chilachava, K.B. [Leo Tolstoy State Pedagog University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    2002-07-01

    The genetic relationship of quinoline and isoquinoline compounds present in semicoking tars of Kimovsk lignites (near-Moscow fields) with the initial vegetable material is discussed. Transformation pathways of the native compounds in the course of lignite formation are suggested.

  5. [Ash Meadows Purchase Proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A proposal sent to the Richard King Mellon Foundation for a loan to fund the purchase of Ash Meadows by the Nature Conservancy. Ash Meadows, set outside of Las Vegas...

  6. Microscopic observations of self-healing products in calcareous fly ash mortars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóźwiak-Niedźwiedzka, Daria

    2015-01-01

    The results of microstructural characterization of mortars containing fly ash class C (High Calcium Fly Ash) from combustion of lignite are presented. The evaluation of the microstructure was performed using scanning electron microscope, optical, and confocal microscope. The tested beams were bent till the crack and microcracks opening, which were healed during the different curing time. The results showed that the replacement of cement with fly ash class C influenced the process of crack healing. The addition of HCFA, at both 30% and 60%, speeds up the self-healing process in cracks and particularly in micro-cracks. In the research, the completely filling up of the cracks by new phases has not been observed, only the beginning of such process has been noticed.

  7. Planning for reliable coal quality delivery considering geological variability: A case study in polish lignite mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naworyta, W.; Sypniowski, S.; Benndorf, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of coal quality control in coal mines is to supply power plants daily with extracted raw material within certain coal quality constraints. On the example of a selected part of a lignite deposit, the problem of quality control for the runof-mine lignite stream is discussed. The main goal is t

  8. Organic geochemistry of Amynteo lignite deposit, northern Greece: a Multi-analytical approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iordanidis, A.; Schwarzbauer, J.; Georgakopoulos, A.; Lagen, van B.

    2012-01-01

    Several lignite samples were collected from boreholes of the Amynteo opencast lignite mine, northern Greece. Organic geochemical characteristics were investigated with the help of various analytical techniques, comprising Gas Chromatography (GC) and Gas-chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), Four

  9. Planning for reliable coal quality delivery considering geological variability: A case study in polish lignite mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naworyta, W.; Sypniowski, S.; Benndorf, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of coal quality control in coal mines is to supply power plants daily with extracted raw material within certain coal quality constraints. On the example of a selected part of a lignite deposit, the problem of quality control for the runof-mine lignite stream is discussed. The main goal is

  10. Growth response of container-grown plants in potting media amended with lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamp, M.

    1983-01-01

    A peat-vermiculite (50/50 v/v) potting medium was amended with 25 or 33% lignite by volume to determine if this could be used as a major media component for the culture of several greenhouse crops. Lignite-amended media did not alter the growth parameters of Pelargonium at 25 and 33% lignite. With 25% lignite Philodendron selloum grew as well as controls but at 33% growth was reduced and the leaves exhibited some phytotoxocity. Ficus benjamina, Ardisia humilis, poinsettias and Chrysanthemum morifolium responded poorly to lignite-amended media and leaf phytotoxicity was observed on plants with reduced growth. Leaf phytotoxicity in Chrysanthemum and Philodendron was not related to an excess of minor element content in the leaves. 3 references.

  11. Photosynthetic pigment concentrations, gas exchange and vegetative growth for selected monocots and dicots treated with two contrasting coal fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yunusa, I.A.M.; Burchett, M.D.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Skilbeck, C.G. [University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Dept. of Environmental Science

    2009-07-15

    There is uncertainty as to the rates of coal fly ash needed for optimum physiological processes and growth. In the current study we tested the hyothesis that photosynthetic pigments concentrations and CO{sub 2} assimilation (A) are more sensitive than dry weights in plants grown on media amended with coal fly ash. We applied the Terrestrial Plant Growth Test (Guideline 208) protocols of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to monocots (barley (Hordeum vulgare) and ryegrass (Secale cereale)) and dicots (canola (Brasica napus), radish (Raphanus sativus), field peas (Pisum sativum), and lucerne (Medicago sativa)) on media amended with fly ashes derived from semi-bituminous (gray ash) or lignite (red ash) coals at rates of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, or 20 Mg ha(-1). The red ash had higher elemental concentrations and salinity than the gray ash. Fly ash addition had no significant effect on germination by any of the six species. At moderate rates ({<=}10 Mg ha{sup -1}) both ashes increased (P < 0.05) growth rates and concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, but reduced carotenoid concentrations. Addition of either ash increased A in radish and transpiration in barley. Growth rates and final dry weights were reduced for all of the six test species when addition rates exceeded 10 Mg ha{sup -1} for gray ash and 5 Mg ha{sup -1} for red ash. We concluded that plant dry weights, rather than pigment concentrations and/or instantaneous rates of photosynthesis, are more consistent for assessing subsequent growth in plants supplied with fly ash.

  12. JV Task 90 - Activated Carbon Production from North Dakota Lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Benson; Charlene Crocker; Rokan Zaman; Mark Musich; Edwin Olson

    2008-03-31

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has pursued a research program for producing activated carbon from North Dakota lignite that can be competitive with commercial-grade activated carbon. As part of this effort, small-scale production of activated carbon was produced from Fort Union lignite. A conceptual design of a commercial activated carbon production plant was drawn, and a market assessment was performed to determine likely revenue streams for the produced carbon. Activated carbon was produced from lignite coal in both laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactors and in a small pilot-scale rotary kiln. The EERC was successfully able to upgrade the laboratory-scale activated carbon production system to a pilot-scale rotary kiln system. The activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite was superior to commercial grade DARCO{reg_sign} FGD and Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product with respect to iodine number. The iodine number of North Dakota lignite-derived activated carbon was between 600 and 800 mg I{sub 2}/g, whereas the iodine number of DARCO FGD was between 500 and 600 mg I{sub 2}/g, and the iodine number of Rheinbraun's HOK activated coke product was around 275 mg I{sub 2}/g. The EERC performed both bench-scale and pilot-scale mercury capture tests using the activated carbon made under various optimization process conditions. For comparison, the mercury capture capability of commercial DARCO FGD was also tested. The lab-scale apparatus is a thin fixed-bed mercury-screening system, which has been used by the EERC for many mercury capture screen tests. The pilot-scale systems included two combustion units, both equipped with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Activated carbons were also tested in a slipstream baghouse at a Texas power plant. The results indicated that the activated carbon produced from North Dakota lignite coal is capable of removing mercury from flue gas. The tests showed that activated carbon with the greatest

  13. Iron mineralogy across the oxycline of a lignite mine lake

    OpenAIRE

    Miot, Jennyfer; Lu, Shipeng; Morin, Guillaume; Adra, Areej,; Benzerara, Karim; Küsel, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Iron-rich pelagic aggregates of microbial origin named “iron snow” are formed in the water column of some acidic lignite mine lakes. We investigated the evolution of Fe mineralogy across the oxycline of the Lusatian lake 77, Germany at two sampling sites differing by their pH and mixing profiles. The central basin (CB) of this lake shows a dimictic water regime with a non-permanent anoxic deep layer and a homogeneous acidic pH all over the water column (pH 3). In contr...

  14. Co-pyrolysis of lignite with hazelnut shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Haykiri-Acma, H. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical Engineering Department

    2005-07-01

    In this study, the formation rates of the apparent pyrolytic products of Elbistan lignite sample from Turkey and Turkish hazelnut shell were investigated. For this purpose, original samples and their blends were subjected to pyrolysis process using a thermogravimetric analyzer under a dynamic nitrogen atmosphere of 40 cc/min. Temperature was increased from ambient to 1173 K with a heating rate of 20 K/min. Derivative thermogravimetric analysis curves were obtained, by which the rates of pyrolysis process at different temperatures were evaluated. 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Oxydesulfurization of a Turkish hard lignite with ammonia solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Kuecuekbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical Univ. (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    1996-09-01

    In this study the desulfurization of a high pyritic and high organic sulfur lignite taken from the Gediz area (western Turkey) was investigated by the oxydesulfurization method using ammonia solutions. The influence of such parameters as the concentration of ammonia solution, partial pressure of oxygen, temperature, and reaction time were studied. The ranges of these parameters were selected as 0--10 M concentration of ammonia solution, 0--1.5 MPa partial pressure of oxygen, 403--473 K temperature, and 10--60 min reaction time. It was concluded that the use of ammonia solution as an extraction solution increased the efficiency of the oxydesulfurization process.

  16. Co-combustion of lignite with hazelnut shell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Yaman, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical Engineering Department

    2005-07-01

    In this study, co-combustion characteristics of a Turkish lignite sample from Elbistan region, which is a low quality coal, with hazelnut shell was investigated. For this purpose, grounded samples (-250 {mu}m) were blended in the ratios of 90/10 and 80/20. Original samples and these blends were burned using a thermogravimetric analyzer from ambient to 1173 K with a heating rate of 20 K/min under dynamic dry air atmosphere of 40 cc/min. Derivative thermogravimetric analysis curves that derived from the results of the thermogravimetric analyses were compared and interpreted. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Natural radioactivity of coal and fly ash at the Nikola Tesla B TPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kisić Dragica M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Serbian thermal power plants (TPPs produce siliceous fly ash from lignite in the quantity of approximately 6 million tons per year. The potential market for the use of fly ash is operational, but for the time being, only used by cement producers. Fly ash radioactivity could be one of the major points of concern when larger use of fly ash is planned, particularly in the Serbian construction industry. Radioactivity measurements have been conducted regularly for decades. This paper presents the results of a ten-year fly ash radioactivity measurements at the Nikola Tesla B TPP located in Obrenovac. In addition, the paper compares the natural radionuclides coal content data combusted by the Nikola Tesla B TPP boilers coming from the Kolubara Basin and ash created during coal combustion. Fly ash created in the Nikola Tesla TPPs boilers is characterised by the increased concentration of the natural radionuclides content compared to coal. This is the so-called technologically enhanced natural radioactivity (Technologically Enhanced Occurring Radioactive Material - TENORM of industrial waste, whereas the average specific activities: 232Th in coal amount to 25.2 Bq/kg, and in fly ash and coal 84.2 Bq/kg and 238U 38.3 Bq/kg, respectively. Following the obtained natural radionuclides content results it may be concluded that the Nikola Tesla B TPP ash may be disposed into the environment. Ash may be used also in the construction industry (civil engineering. In building construction applications, ash share as the additive to other building materials depends from its physical and chemical characteristics, as well as from the radionuclides activity: 266Ra, 232Th and 40K. Unlike the thermal power plants regularly (once a year testing the specific natural radionuclides activity in the combusted coal and boiler fly ash, Electric Power Industry of Serbia has not performed large-scale investigations of the natural radionuclides content in coal within the Kolubara

  18. The immersion freezing behavior of ash particles from wood and brown coal burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grawe, Sarah; Augustin-Bauditz, Stefanie; Hartmann, Susan; Hellner, Lisa; Pettersson, Jan B. C.; Prager, Andrea; Stratmann, Frank; Wex, Heike

    2016-11-01

    It is generally known that ash particles from coal combustion can trigger ice nucleation when they interact with water vapor and/or supercooled droplets. However, data on the ice nucleation of ash particles from different sources, including both anthropogenic and natural combustion processes, are still scarce. As fossil energy sources still fuel the largest proportion of electric power production worldwide, and biomass burning contributes significantly to the global aerosol loading, further data are needed to better assess the ice nucleating efficiency of ash particles. In the framework of this study, we found that ash particles from brown coal (i.e., lignite) burning are up to 2 orders of magnitude more ice active in the immersion mode below -32 °C than those from wood burning. Fly ash from a coal-fired power plant was shown to be the most efficient at nucleating ice. Furthermore, the influence of various particle generation methods on the freezing behavior was studied. For instance, particles were generated either by dispersion of dry sample material, or by atomization of ash-water suspensions, and then led into the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS) where the immersion freezing behavior was examined. Whereas the immersion freezing behavior of ashes from wood burning was not affected by the particle generation method, it depended on the type of particle generation for ash from brown coal. It was also found that the common practice of treating prepared suspensions in an ultrasonic bath to avoid aggregation of particles led to an enhanced ice nucleation activity. The findings of this study suggest (a) that ash from brown coal burning may influence immersion freezing in clouds close to the source and (b) that the freezing behavior of ash particles may be altered by a change in sample preparation and/or particle generation.

  19. Fly ash carbon passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  20. The hydrogasification of lignite and sub-bituminous coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, B.; Fallon, P. T.; Steinberg, M.

    1981-02-01

    A North Dakota lignite and a New Mexico sub-bituminous coal have been hydrogenated at up to 900°C and 2500 psi hydrogen pressure. Yields of gaseous hydrocarbons and aromatic liquids have been studied as a function of temperature, pressure, residence time, feed rates and H2/coal ratio. Coal feed rates in excess of 10 lb/hr have been achieved in the 1 in. I. D.×8 ft reactor and methane concentration as high as 55% have been observed. A four-step reaction model was developed for the production and decomposition of the hydrocarbon products. A single object function formulated from the weighted errors for the four dependent process, variables, CH4, C2H6, BTX, and oil yields, was minimized using a program containing three independent iterative techniques. The results of the nonlinear regression analysis for lignite show that a first-order chemical reaction model with respect to C conversion satisfactorily describes the dilute phase hydrogenation. The activation energy for the initial products formation was estimated to be 42,700 cal/gmole and the power of hydrogen partial pressure was found to be +0.14. The overall correlation coefficient was 0.83. The mechanism, the rate expressions, and the design curves developed can be used for scale-up and reactor design.

  1. Improving the effectiveness of wells for lignite mine dewatering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rude, T.R.; Banning, A. [Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Hydrogeology; Klauder, W.; Roger, S. [Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Hydraulic Engineering and Water Resources Management; Vinzelberg, G. [RWE Power AG, Bergheim (Germany). Dept. of Water Resources Management

    2010-07-01

    Mine dewatering is an important factor in determining the economic feasibility of lignite open cast mining projects. Ochre formation is accelerated in open pit dewatering, as the wells have long filter lengths that allow for high oxygen flux into well screens, gravel packs, and the surrounding aquifer. Ochre formation can reduce the productivity of wells by an estimated 20 percent. This experimental study investigated the formation of ochre in different environments using well screens from the Rhenish lignite mining district in Germany. The influence of oxygen, iron (Fe{sup 2+}), pH, flow velocity, water composition, and microorganisms were considered. Samples from the mine were passed through an apparatus that supplied Fe{sup 2+} and filtered the formed Fe{sup 3+} oxide colloids. The oxygen- and iron-free water was then conditioned and treated with ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Results of the study showed that Fe{sup 3+} hydroxides quickly formed in the screen due to high Fe{sup 2+} concentrations. Results indicated that pH must be kept high in the deoxygenation unit in order to facilitate rapid oxygen consumption. The experimental study will be used to investigate abiotic conditions created by variations in flow velocity, Fe{sup 2+} concentrations, sulfate content and alkalinity. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Kinetic Study and Thermal Decomposition Behavior of Lignite Coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehran Heydari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A thermogravimetric analyzer was employed to investigate the thermal behavior and extract the kinetic parameters of Canadian lignite coal. The pyrolysis experiments were conducted in temperatures ranging from 298 K to 1173 K under inert atmosphere utilizing six different heating rates of 1, 6, 9, 12, 15, and 18 K min−1, respectively. There are different techniques for analyzing the kinetics of solid-state reactions that can generally be classified into two categories: model-fitting and model-free methods. Historically, model-fitting methods are broadly used in solid-state kinetics and show an excellent fit to the experimental data but produce uncertain kinetic parameters especially for nonisothermal conditions. In this work, different model-free techniques such as the Kissinger method and the isoconversional methods of Ozawa, Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose, and Friedman are employed and compared in order to analyze nonisothermal kinetic data and investigate thermal behavior of a lignite coal. Experimental results showed that the activation energy values obtained by the isoconversional methods were in good agreement, but Friedman method was considered to be the best among the model-free methods to evaluate kinetic parameters for solid-state reactions. These results can provide useful information to predict kinetic model of coal pyrolysis and optimization of the process conditions.

  3. Exergy Analysis of Operating Lignite Fired Thermal Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Murugesan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy assessment must be made through the energy quantity as well as the quality. But the usual energy analysisevaluates the energy generally on its quantity only. However, the exergy analysis assesses the energy on quantity as well asthe quality. The aim of the exergy analysis is to identify the magnitudes and the locations of real energy losses, in order toimprove the existing systems, processes or components. The present paper deals with an exergy analysis performed on anoperating 50MWe unit of lignite fired steam power plant at Thermal Power Station-I, Neyveli Lignite Corporation Limited,Neyveli, Tamil Nadu, India. The exergy losses occurred in the various subsystems of the plant and their components havebeen calculated using the mass, energy and exergy balance equations. The distribution of the exergy losses in several plantcomponents during the real time plant running conditions has been assessed to locate the process irreversibility. The Firstlaw efficiency (energy efficiency and the Second law efficiency (exergy efficiency of the plant have also been calculated.The comparison between the energy losses and the exergy losses of the individual components of the plant shows that themaximum energy losses of 39% occur in the condenser, whereas the maximum exergy losses of 42.73% occur in the combustor.The real losses of energy which has a scope for the improvement are given as maximum exergy losses that occurredin the combustor.

  4. Shedding of ash deposits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zbogar, Ana; Frandsen, Flemming; Jensen, Peter Arendt;

    2009-01-01

    Ash deposits formed during fuel thermal conversion and located on furnace walls and on convective pass tubes, may seriously inhibit the transfer of heat to the working fluid and hence reduce the overall process efficiency. Combustion of biomass causes formation of large quantities of troublesome...... ash deposits which contain significant concentrations of alkali, and earth-alkali metals. The specific composition of biomass deposits give different characteristics as compared to coal ash deposits, i.e. different physical significance of the deposition mechanisms, lower melting temperatures, etc....... Low melting temperatures make straw ashes especially troublesome, since their stickiness is higher at lower temperatures, compared to coal ashes. Increased stickiness will eventually lead to a higher collection efficiency of incoming ash particles, meaning that the deposit may grow even faster...

  5. Unburned Carbon Loss in Fly Ash of CFB Boilers Burning Hard Coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Junfu(吕俊复); WANG Qimin(王启民); LI Yong(黎永); YUE Guangxi(岳光溪); Yam Y.Lee; Baldur Eliasson; SHEN Jiezhong(沈解忠); YU Long(于龙)

    2003-01-01

    The unburned carbon loss in fly ash of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers, most of which are burning active fuels such as lignite or peat, is normally very low. However, most CFB boilers in China usually burn hard coals such as anthracite and bituminous coal and coal wastes, so the carbon content in the fly ash from these boilers is higher than expected. This paper investigates the source of unburned carbon in the fly ash of CFB boilers burning hard coal through a series of field tests and laboratory investigations. The char behavior during combustion, including fragmentation and deactivation, which is related to the parent coal, has an important impact on the carbon burnout in CFB boilers. The research shows that char deactivation occurs during char burnout in fluidized bed combustion, especially for large particles of low rank coal. The uneven mixing of solids and air in the core region of the furnace also causes poor burnout of carbon in CFB fly ash. An index describing the volatile content (as dry ash free basis) over the heating value is proposed to present the coal rank. The coal combustion efficiency is shown to be strongly connected with this coal index. Several changes in the CFB boiler design are suggested to reduce the unburned carbon loss in the fly ash.

  6. What are cleats? Preliminary studies from the Konin lignite mine, Miocene of central Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widera, Marek

    2014-03-01

    Cleats (fractures, joints) are discontinuities in coals, including lignites. They are important in mining activity because of their gas and water permeability in hard coal, and mainly because of their water permeability in lignites. As opposed to hard-coal cleats, lignite cleats have not been studied in detail before. The present contribution does so, using as an example the 1st Middle-Polish Lignite Seam (MPLS-1) in the Jóźwin IIB opencast mine in central Poland. It should be mentioned here that any remarks in the present contribution concerning MPLS-1 refer exclusively to this lignite seam in the Jóźwin IIB opencast mine. The investigated discontinuities consist of two sets, i.e. the face and butt cleats, which are roughly oriented NW-SE and NE-SW, respectively. The mean spacing of the face cleats is ~12.4 cm, while the mean spacing of the butt cleats is ~12.8 cm. The maximum average aperture is ~4.9 mm for the face cleats and ~4.1 mm for the butt cleats. The cleat spacing and aperture do not depend on the lignite thickness, but the cleat spacing increases with increasing mineral-matter and xylite content, whereas the aperture increases when the contents decrease. The regional folding and local salt diapirism tentatively explain the formation of the orthogonal system of the lignite cleats, partly because of the parallelism of the face cleats and the major tectonic directions in central Poland.

  7. Comparative study of peat and lignite on the basis of proximate and ultimate analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelkoph, G.M.; Malterer, T.J.; Steadman, E.N.

    1985-01-01

    Ultimate and proximate analytical data was used as the basis for comparisons of selected United States peats and North Dakota lignites that have formed under a variety of depositional environments, in order to better understand the transitional relationships involved in the transformation of peat to lignite. A ternary diagram of the bond-equivalents of C, O, and H can be used to represent relationships among complex chemical compounds. This method was initially developed for Australian brown coals. The rationale for adopting this method was the usefulness of the reaction trajectories in identifying the dominating chemical changes in coalification. The mass percentage of nitrogen and organic sulfur are added to the mass percentage of oxygen. The bond equivalence data implies that a relationship exists between peat and lignite by the cellulose present and the degree of decarboxylation. It has been shown elsewhere that the carboxyl content of Minnesota peat and Yalloun brown coal are greater than that of a North Dakota lignite. Collateral research at UNDERC has found virtually no cellulose in North Dakota lignite, but 5% cellulose (maf) in Minnesota peat. This relationship implies that decellulosation and decarboxylation reactions represented on the ternary diagram are occurring in the diagenesis of peat to lignite. The data further indicates that Australian brown coals are indeed intermediate in coalification between United States peat and North Dakota lignite.

  8. Petrographic composition of lignite from the Szczerców deposit, Polish Lowlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawelec, Sandra; Bielowicz, Barbara

    2016-12-01

    Macroscopic and microscopic composition of lignite from the Szczerców deposit belonging to the Bełchatów Lignite Mine (Polish Lowlands) has been examined. The macroscopic composition was determined according to the newest lithological classification of humic coal. On this basis, it has been shown that the main lithotypes occurring in the Szczerców deposit are the detritic and xylodetritic lignites. The petrographic composition of the investigated lignite was determined microscopically for 11 samples. The examined lignite is predominantly composed of macerals from the huminite group. It is in the range from 75.2 to 86%, including atrinite (23.1-40.7%, averaging 28.9%) and densinite (18.2-41.4 %, averaging 24.9%). It also demonstrated that the statistical variability of the macerals content from the huminite group in the studied lignite is very weak in all samples. In addition, the random reflectance of ulminite was measured traditionally. The results, ranging from 0.247 to 0.282%, with the maximum permissible standard deviation < 0.07, were achieved for all analysed lignite samples.

  9. Study on the comparison of the pyrolysis gas release of lignite and its briquette

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Shi-feng; CHU Mo; ZHAO Fei-xiang

    2012-01-01

    In this experiment,lignite was refined and processed through binderless briquette preparation process from low-rank coal and became briquette.Then,lignite and its briquette were pyrolysed as materials to compare the nature of their pyrolysis.In this study,the experiment was carried out through a lab tube furnace,at a heating rate of 10 ℃/min,and the gas was analyzed and compared,which was collected at different temperatures.The results show that:in the pyrolysis temperature of 550~850 ℃,the semi-coke yield of briquette is 2%~6% higher than lignite,the tar yield of briquette is 2%~3% higher than lignite and the gas yield of briquette is 4%~9% less than lignite.The time required for complete release of the briquette is about 20 min less than lignite.The components in the pyrolysis gas of lignite and its briquette are the same,and their variation with the pyrolysis temperature is similar.

  10. Use of fly ash in backfill at Kidd Creek Mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, T.R.; Counter, D.B. (Kidd Creek Mines Ltd., Timmins, ON (Canada))

    1988-01-01

    In an effort to increase productivity, the use of fly ash from thermal power plants as a binder for consolidated backfill was studied. From laboratory and underground tests for its cementitious properties and environmental effects, it was found that a portion of Portland cement could be replaced by the same amount of type C fly ash (produced from subbituminous coal or lignite) to produce an acceptable consolidated rockfill product for use at an Ontario mine. The environmental concerns in terms of dust control and emanation of radon gas were unfounded from measurements. The dust count was comparable to the use of Portland cement only, or with ground blast furnance slag, and the radiation readings were low, averaging one-seventh the regulation level. Since May 1984, a total of over 100,000 tonnes of fly ash has been consumed as a binder blended with Portland cement, producing over four million tonnes of consolidated rockfill. To date, the fill in the stopes has performed very satisfactorily, while yielding considerable cost savings. 9 refs.

  11. Petrological, geochemical and isotopic characteristics of lignite and calcified lignite from mining area Pesje, Velenje Basin, Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrabec, Mirijam; Markič, Miloš; Vrabec, Marko; Jaćimović, Radojko; Kanduč, Tjaša

    2014-05-01

    Lignite (organic rich) and calcified lignite (inorganic rich) samples from excavation field -50c mining area Pesje, Velenje Basin, Slovenia were investigated. During geological and structural mapping lignite and calcified lignite samples were systematically taken for determination of their petrological, geochemical and isotopic characteristics. Lignite is composed of fine detritical gelified matrix. At least five different types of calcified lignite were recognized forming laminations, calcifications after wood, petrified wood and complete replacements of lignite with carbonate. All measured parameters so far indicate geochemical processes during sedimentation of the Velenej Basin. After macroscopic description samples were split to organic and inorganic component (Ward, 1984) and powdered in an agate mortar for geochemical and isotopic analyses. Major and trace elements (As, B, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Mo, Sb, Se, Th, U, Zn) in these samples were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) using k-0 standardization method (Jaćimović et al, 2002). The isotopic composition of carbon and nitrogen was determined using a Europa 20-20 continuous flow IRMS ANCA-SL preparation module. A 1 mg amount of a sample was weighed in a tin capsule for carbon and 10 mg for nitrogen analysis. Samples for carbon analyses were pretreated with 1 M HCl to remove carbonates. Carbonate samples from carbonate-rich strata and calcified xylite were first roasted at 450 deg C (Krantz et al., 1987). Three miligrams of carbonate sample was transformed into CO2 by reaction with anhydrous H3PO4 at 55 deg C under vacuum (McCrea, 1950) and measured with GV 2003 isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Measured isotopic composition of oxygen as VPDB values was recalculated to the VSMOW reference standard to enable the comparison with data from other coal basins. SEM/EDXS of carbonate rich sediments was performed with JEOL JSM 5800 electron microanalyzer scanning electron microscope

  12. Bioprocessing of lignite coals using reductive microorganisms. Final technical report, September 30, 1988--March 29, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D.L.

    1992-03-29

    In order to convert lignite coals into liquid fuels, gases or chemical feedstock, the macromolecular structure of the coal must be broken down into low molecular weight fractions prior to further modification. Our research focused on this aspect of coal bioprocessing. We isolated, characterized and studied the lignite coal-depolymerizing organisms Streptomyces viridosporus T7A, Pseudomonas sp. DLC-62, unidentified bacterial strain DLC-BB2 and Gram-positive Bacillus megaterium strain DLC-21. In this research we showed that these bacteria are able to solubilize and depolymerize lignite coals using a combination of biological mechanisms including the excretion of coal solublizing basic chemical metabolites and extracellular coal depolymerizing enzymes.

  13. Sulfomethylated lignite salt as a sacrifical agent in oil recovery processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudchadker, M.V.; Weiss, W.J.

    1978-02-07

    A process is described for recovering petroleum from oil reservoirs by secondary recovery methods. The process involves injecting via an injection well into the reservoir an aqueous solution of sulfomethylated lignite salt as a sacrificial agent to inhibit the deposition of surfactant and polymer on the reservoir matrix. The process is conducted by first injecting the lignite salt into the formation through the injection well and following it with either a polymer or a surfactant solution, which also may contain the lignite salt. The polymer or surfactant would then be followed by a drive fluid, such as water, to push the chemicals and oil to the production well. (18 claims)

  14. Effects of pyrolysis on the proximate and ultimate analysis of lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucukbayrak, S.; Kadioglu, E. (Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1989-12-10

    The effect of pyrolysis over the temperature range 300-1000{degree}C on the proximate and ultimate analysis of lignite has been studied and the experimental results are presented here. Seven lignite samples from different reserves in Turkey with particle diameters of 0.1-0.2 mm were subjected to pyrolysis. The volatile matter contents of the lignite samples decreased by about 90%. The fraction of the calorific value remaining in the coke produced varies from 51 to 75%. The oxygen and hydrogen content decrease the most during pyrolysis. 5 refs., 6 tabs., 1 fig.

  15. Rank evaluation of the Neyveli lignite deposit on the basis of reflectance parameter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, A.; Singh, B.D. (Birbal Sahni Institute of Paleobotany, Lucknow (India))

    1994-10-01

    The Neyveli field is well known for Tertiary lignite deposits in India. The reflectance of organic constituents (huminite macerals) has been measured to find out organic maturation level (rank) of the main lignite seam lying either at same time level or at different time levels in space. The deposits are of sub-bituminous C stage (ASTM) with the mean reflectance (R[sub o,max.] in oil) range from 0.34 to 0.42% (average 0.39%). Evidence from rank study indicates that the quality of lignite deteriorates towards southern part of the field

  16. Effects of fly ash fineness on the mechanical properties of concrete

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Şemsi Yazici; Hasan Şahan Arel

    2012-06-01

    The present study reviews the effects of fly ash fineness on the compressive and splitting tensile strength of the concretes. A fly ash of lignite origin with Blaine fineness of 2351 cm2/g was ground in a ball mill. As a consequence of the grinding process, fly ashes with fineness of 3849 cm2/g and 5239 cm2/g were obtained. Fly ashes with three different fineness were used instead of cement of 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15% and ten different types of concrete mixture were produced. In the concrete mixtures, the dosage of binder and water/cement ratio were fixed at 350 kg/m3 and 0.50, respectively. Slump values for the concretes were adjusted to be 100 ± 20 mm. Cubic samples were cast with edges of 100 mm. The specimens were cured in water at 20° C. At the end of curing process, compressive and splitting tensile strengths of the concrete samples were determined at 7, 28, 56, 90, 120 and 180 days. It was observed that compressive and splitting tensile strength of the concretes was affected by fineness of fly ash in short-and long-terms. It was found that compressive and tensile strength of the concretes increased as fly ash fineness increased. It was concluded that Blaine fineness value should be above 3849 cm2/g fineness of fly ash to have positive impact on mechanical properties of concrete. The effects of fly ash fineness on the compressive and splitting tensile strength of the concretes were remarkably seen in the fly ash with FAC code with fineness of 5235 cm2/g.

  17. Trace elements in coal ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deonarine, Amrika; Kolker, Allan; Doughten, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Coal ash is a residual waste product primarily produced by coal combustion for electric power generation. Coal ash includes fly ash, bottom ash, and flue-gas desulfurization products (at powerplants equipped with flue-gas desulfurization systems). Fly ash, the most common form of coal ash, is used in a range of products, especially construction materials. A new Environmental Protection Agency ruling upholds designation of coal ash as a non-hazardous waste under Subtitle D of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, allowing for the continued beneficial use of coal ash and also designating procedures and requirements for its storage.

  18. Lignite zone as an indicator to lost circulation belt: a case study of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lignite zone as an indicator to lost circulation belt: a case study of some locations of Anambra State, ... Eighteen (18) water boreholes were studied for lost circulation. ... Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management Vol.

  19. Combustion of producer gas from gasification of south Sumatera lignite coal using CFD simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fajri Vidian; Novia; Andy Suryatra

    2017-01-01

    .... The process was carried out using producer gas from lignite coal gasification of BA 59 was produced by the updraft gasifier which is located on Energy Conversion Laboratory Mechanical Engineering...

  20. Nonisothermal Thermogravimetric Analysis of Thai Lignite with High CaO Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakamon Pintana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal behaviors and combustion kinetics of Thai lignite with different SO3-free CaO contents were investigated. Nonisothermal thermogravimetric method was carried out under oxygen environment at heating rates of 10, 30, and 50°C min−1 from ambient up to 1300°C. Flynn-Wall-Ozawa (FWO and Kissinger-Akahira-Sunose (KAS methods were adopted to estimate the apparent activation energy (E for the thermal decomposition of these coals. Different thermal degradation behaviors were observed in lignites with low (14% and high (42% CaO content. Activation energy of the lignite combustion was found to vary with the conversion fraction. In comparison with the KAS method, higher E values were obtained by the FWO method for all conversions considered. High CaO lignite was observed to have higher activation energy than the low CaO coal.

  1. Humification processes in reclaimed open-cast lignite mine soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiros, M.C.; Gil-Sotres, F.; Ceccanti, B.; Trasar-Cepeda, M.C.; Gonzales-Sangregorio, M.V. (Facultad de Farmacia de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Departamento de Edafologia y Quimica Agraria)

    1993-10-01

    To identify the principal humification pathways which occur during the initial stages of pedogenesis, organic matter from mine soils of different ages from the Meirama lignite mine in NW Spain was subjected to a series of physicochemical and chemical fractionations. Although humic molecules of molecular weight lower than 10,000 Da were always predominant, the percentage of C associated with molecules of between 50,000 and 200,000 Da increased with soil age, as did the percentage of chemically stabilized humus and the percentage of C associated with immobile complexes. In general, these results suggest that the principal humification pathway in these soils involves abiotic condensation reactions, as in the case of natural soils of this region. The low complexed metal content of the mine soils in comparison with natural soils indicates the low degree of weathering of inorganic fraction which has occurred in the former.

  2. Aliphatic biological markers in Miocene Maritz-Iztok lignite, Bulgaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanova, M.; Magnier, C. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. of Organic Chemistry

    1997-12-31

    Chromatographic separation and mass spectral studies of bitumens extracted from lithotypes (humovitrain, xylain, liptain and humoclarain) from the Miocene Maritza-Iztok lignite reveal the following: (1) A preponderance of the {alpha}-phyllocladane skeleton over the pimaranes/abietanes. The variety of tricyclic diterpanes confirms that the generation biota included gymnosperms; (2) The presence of dicotyledonous angiosperms in the generation biota is indicated by the occurrence of widely distributed des-A-lupane structure; (3) The dominance of terpanes over steranes confirms the prevailing contribution of terrigenous input; (4) The preponderance of C{sub 27{beta}} hopane and the presence {beta}{beta} hopanes indicates a low degree of thermal maturation. 23 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Experimental Study of Hydrogasification of Lignite and Subbituminous Coal Chars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Gil

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental facility for pressure hydrogasification research was adapted to the pressure of 10 MPa and temperature of 1300 K, which ensured repeatability of results and hydrogen heating to the process temperature. A hydrogasification reaction of chars produced from two rank coals was investigated at temperatures up to 1173 K, pressures up to 8 MPa, and the gas flow rates of 0.5–5 dmn3/min. Reactivity of the “Szczerców” lignite char was found to be slightly higher than that of the subbituminous “Janina” coal char produced under the same conditions. A high value of the char reactivity was observed to a certain carbon conversion degree, above which a sharp drop took place. It was shown that, to achieve proper carbon conversion, the hydrogasification reaction must proceed at a temperature above 1200 K.

  4. Melting and Sintering of Ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone Aslaug

    1997-01-01

    The thesis contains an experimental study of the fusion and sintering of ashes collected during straw and coal/straw co-firing.A laboratory technique for quantitative determination of ash fusion has been developed based on Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA). By means of this method the fraction...... of melt in the investigated ashes has been determined as a function of temperature. Ash fusion results have been correlated to the chemical and mineralogical composition of the ashes, to results from a standard ash fusion test and to results from sintering experiments. Furthermore, the ash fusion results......-firing, the model only had a qualitative agreement with the measured ash deposit formation rates.Sintering measurements were carried out by means of compression strength testing of ash pellets. This method showed to not be applicable for the salt rich fly ash derived from straw combustion. For the fly ashes...

  5. The Utilization of Peat, Lignite and Industrial Wastes in the Production of Mineral-Organic Fertilizers

    OpenAIRE

    Krystyna Hoffmann; Józef Hoffmann

    2007-01-01

    The results of chemical analyses of the composition of peat, lignite, turkey droppings and the potato industry effluent are presented. The results indicate that the substances can be used in mineral-organic fertilizer recipes. Although lignite and peat do not contain assimilable nutrients, from the ecology and pedology point of view they are valuable components of mineral-organic fertilizers. In order to determine the optimum turkey droppings and potato industry effluent dose in fertilizer bi...

  6. Preliminary geologic investigation of the West Glendive lignite deposits, Dawson County, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banet, Arthur C.

    1979-01-01

    Four major lignite beds, all in the Fort Union Formation (Paleocene), occur in the West Glendive area, Dawson County, Montana. The Newton Ranch and Poverty Flats beds are in the Lebo Member and the Peuse and Kolberg Ranch beds are in the Tongue River Member. Correlation of the lignite beds across the area shows that the Peuse bed is the thickest and most extensive. Field mapping and drill-hole data indicate that folding and faulting are more common than previously reported.

  7. THE INFLUENCE OF INCREASING RELIABILITY OF BELT CONVEYORS UPON THE PRODUCTIVITY OF LIGNITE QUARRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FLORIN-MIHAI NIȚESCU

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available At present belt conveyors have an important role in the mines of lignite quarries because they contribute decisively to achieving an optimum production. From this point of view the management of mines should be constantly preoccupied with ensuring, in optimal conditions, the operation of these elements of fixed capital and, if it is necessary they should maintain constant reliability. In this context, this paper has as theme the relation between the reliability of conveyors and the productivity within lignite quarries.

  8. REMEDIATION OF POLLUTED SOILS BY UTILIZING HYDROTHERMALLY TREATED CALCAREOUS FLY ASHES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. Moutsatsou; V. Protonotarios

    2006-01-01

    This paper investigates a treated fly ash to act as a synthetic zeolite to remediate soils polluted with heavy metals and metalloids (As, Pb, Cu, Zn, Fe, Cd and Mn). Four types of such 'zeolites' were synthesized by hydrothermal treatment of a calcareous fly ash derived from Greek lignite-fired power plants: two with excess of sodium hydroxide in a a former mining site at Lavrion, Greece. Mobilization and transfer of metals to the retention agents was effected by using HCl aq 1M, with satisfactory results with respect to As, Pb, Cu, Mn and Cd. The great variety of metal complexes in soil was found to be of major importance for the effectiveness of the overall process. The final products were solidified either on their own, or by using additives such as lime and cement.

  9. The effect of lignite on nitrogen mobility in a low-fertility soil amended with biosolids and urea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramashivam, Dharini; Clough, Tim J; Carlton, Anna; Gough, Kelsi; Dickinson, Nicholas; Horswell, Jacqui; Sherlock, Robert R; Clucas, Lynne; Robinson, Brett H

    2016-02-01

    Lignite has been proposed as a soil amendment that reduces nitrate (NO3(-)) leaching from soil. Our objective was to determine the effect of lignite on nitrogen (N) fluxes from soil amended with biosolids or urea. The effect of lignite on plant yield and elemental composition was also determined. Batch sorption and column leaching experiments were followed by a lysimeter trial where a low fertility soil was amended with biosolids (400 kg N/ha equivalent) and urea (200 kg N/ha equivalent). Treatments were replicated three times, with and without lignite addition (20 t/ha equivalent). Lignite did not reduce NO3(-) leaching from soils amended with either biosolids or urea. While lignite decreased NO3(-) leaching from an unamended soil, the magnitude of this effect was not significant in an agricultural context. Furthermore, lignite increased cumulative N2O production from soils receiving urea by 90%. Lignite lessened the beneficial growth effects of adding biosolids or urea to soil. Further work could investigate whether coating urea granules with lignite may produce meaningful environmental benefits.

  10. Surface restructuring of lignite by bio-char of Cuminum cyminum - Exploring the prospects in defluoridation followed by fuel applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msagati, T. A. M.; Mamba, B. B.; Sivasankar, V.; Omine, Kiyoshi

    2014-05-01

    Recently, there has been an interest in the areas of developing new carbon materials for fluoride removal applications. The development of new carbon materials is of recent choice which involves the synthesis of hybrid carbon from various sources. In this context, the present contribution is made to focus on the study the restructured surface of lignite using a bio-material called Cuminum cyminum. The restructured lignite (RSL) was synthesized with an improved carbon content of 13% and its BET surface area was found to be 3.12 times greater than lignite (L). The amorphous nature of lignite and RSL was quite explicable from XRD studies. SEM studies exhibited a fibrous and finer surface of lignite which was well restructured into a semi-melt (5 μm) surface for RSL. Defluoridation potential of Restructured Lignite (15.8 mg g-1) was greater than the lignite (13.8 mg g-1) at pH 7.93 ± 0.03. Kinetic and isotherm parameters derived from various models helped in comprehending the nature and dynamics of fluoride sorption. Both the normal and the restructured lignite were found to be consistent with its fluoride uptake of 57% and 60% respectively even after fifth cycle of regeneration. High heating values of 22.01 MJ kg-1 and 26.90 MJ kg-1 respectively for lignite and RSL deemed their additional application as fuel materials.

  11. A new cost-effective method to mitigate ammonia loss from intensive cattle feedlots: application of lignite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Deli; Sun, Jianlei; Bai, Mei; Dassanayake, Kithsiri B.; Denmead, Owen T.; Hill, Julian

    2015-11-01

    In open beef feedlot systems, more than 50% of dietary nitrogen (N) is lost as ammonia (NH3). Here we report an effective and economically-viable method to mitigate NH3 emissions by the application of lignite. We constructed two cattle pens (20 × 20 m) to determine the effectiveness of lignite in reducing NH3 emissions. Twenty-four steers were fed identical commercial rations in each pen. The treatment pen surface was dressed with 4.5 kg m-2 lignite dry mass while no lignite was applied in the control pen. We measured volatilised NH3 concentrations using Ecotech EC9842 NH3 analysers in conjunction with a mass balance method to calculate NH3 fluxes. Application of lignite decreased NH3 loss from the pen by approximately 66%. The cumulative NH3 losses were 6.26 and 2.13 kg N head-1 in the control and lignite treatment, respectively. In addition to the environmental benefits of reduced NH3 losses, the value of retained N nutrient in the lignite treated manure is more than $37 AUD head-1 yr-1, based on the current fertiliser cost and estimated cost of lignite application. We show that lignite application is a cost-effective method to reduce NH3 loss from cattle feedlots.

  12. Disposal of fluidized bed combustion ash in an underground mine to control acid mine drainage and subsidence - phase II - small scale field demonstration. Topical report, December 1, 1996--February 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziemkiewicz, P.F.; Head, W.J.; Gray, D.D.; Siriwardane, H.J.; Sack, W.A.

    1998-01-01

    It has been proposed that a mix made from fly and bottom ash from atmospheric pressure fluidized bed coal combusters (FBC ash), water, and stabilizers be injected from the surface into abandoned room and pillar coal mines through boreholes. Besides ash disposal, this process would prevent subsidence and acid mine drainage. Such a mix (called `grout`) needs to be an adequately stable and flowable suspension for it to spread and cover large areas in the mine. This is necessary as the drilling of the boreholes will be an expensive operation and the number such holes should be minimized. Addition of bentonite was found to be needed for this purpose. A suitable grout mix was tested rheologically to determine its fluid flow properties. Finding little published information on such materials, tests were performed using a commercial rotational viscometer with a T-bar rotor and a stand which produced a helical rotor path. Existing mixer viscometer test methods were modified and adapted to convert the measurements of torque vs. angular speed to the material properties appearing in several non-Newtonian constitutive equations. Yield stress was measured by an independent test called the vane method. The rheological behavior was a close fit to the Bingham fluid model. Bleed tests were conducted to ascertain the stability of the mixtures. Spread tests were conducted to compare the flowability of various mixes. Using the flow parameters determined in the laboratory, numerical simulations of grout flow were performed and compared with the results of scale model and field tests. A field injection of this grout was performed at the Fairfax mines in Preston county, W.V.. The observations there proved that this FBC ash grout flows as desired, is a very economical way of disposing the environmentally menacing ash, while also preventing the subsidence and acid mine drainage of the mines.

  13. Ash cloud aviation advisories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, T.J.; Ellis, J.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Schalk, W.W.; Nasstrom, J.S. [EG and G, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)

    1992-06-25

    During the recent (12--22 June 1991) Mount Pinatubo volcano eruptions, the US Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC) requested assistance of the US Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) in creating volcanic ash cloud aviation advisories for the region of the Philippine Islands. Through application of its three-dimensional material transport and diffusion models using AFGWC meteorological analysis and forecast wind fields ARAC developed extensive analysis and 12-hourly forecast ash cloud position advisories extending to 48 hours for a period of five days. The advisories consisted of ``relative`` ash cloud concentrations in ten layers (surface-5,000 feet, 5,000--10,000 feet and every 10,000 feet to 90,000 feet). The ash was represented as a log-normal size distribution of 10--200 {mu}m diameter solid particles. Size-dependent ``ashfall`` was simulated over time as the eruption clouds dispersed. Except for an internal experimental attempt to model one of the Mount Redoubt, Alaska, eruptions (12/89), ARAC had no prior experience in modeling volcanic eruption ash hazards. For the cataclysmic eruption of 15--16 June, the complex three-dimensional atmospheric structure of the region produced dramatically divergent ash cloud patterns. The large eruptions (> 7--10 km) produced ash plume clouds with strong westward transport over the South China Sea, Southeast Asia, India and beyond. The low-level eruptions (< 7 km) and quasi-steady-state venting produced a plume which generally dispersed to the north and east throughout the support period. Modeling the sequence of eruptions presented a unique challenge. Although the initial approach proved viable, further refinement is necessary and possible. A distinct need exists to quantify eruptions consistently such that ``relative`` ash concentrations relate to specific aviation hazard categories.

  14. Preliminary assessment of growth and survival of green alder (Alnus viridis), a potential biological stabilizer on fly ash disposal sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marcin Pietrzykowski; Wojciech Krzaklewski; Bartłomiej Wos´

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary assessment of seedling survival and growth of green alder (Alnus viridis (Chaix) DC. in Lam. & DC.) planted on fly ash disposal sites. This kind of post-industrial site is extremely hard to biologically stabilize without top-soiling. The experiment started with surface preparation using NPK start-up mineral fertilizer at 60–36–36 kg ha-1 followed by initial stabil-ization through hydro-seeding with biosolids (sewage sludge 4 Mg ha-1 dry mass) and a mixture of grasses (Dactylis glomerata L. and Lolium multiflorum Lam.) (200 kg ha-1). Subsequently, three-years-old green alder seedlings were planted in plots on two substrate variants:the control (directly on combustion waste) and plots with 3 dm3 lignite culm from a nearby mine introduced into the planting pit. Five years of preliminary monitoring show good survival seedling rates and growth parameters (height (h), average increase in height (△h), number of shoots (Lo) and leaf nitrogen supply in the fly ash disposal habitat. Treatment of the site with a combination of lignite culm in planting pits and preliminary surface preparation by hydro-seeding and mineral fertilization had the most positive effect on green alder seedling parameters. The results indicate that it is possible and beneficial to use green alder for biological stabilization on fly ash disposal sites.

  15. Comparison of Ash from PF and CFB Boilers and Behaviour of Ash in Ash Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arro, H.; Pihu, T.; Prikk, A.; Rootamm, R.; Konist, A.

    Over 90% of electricity produced in Estonia is made by power plants firing local oil shale and 25% of the boilers are of the circulating fluidised bed (CFB) variety. In 2007 approximately 6.5 million tons of ash was acquired as a byproduct of using oil shale for energy production. Approximately 1.5 million tons of that was ash from CFB boilers. Such ash is deposited in ash fields by means ofhydro ash removal.

  16. Fusion characterization of biomass ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Teng; Fan, Chuigang; Hao, Lifang

    2016-01-01

    The ash fusion characteristics are important parameters for thermochemical utilization of biomass. In this research, a method for measuring the fusion characteristics of biomass ash by Thermo-mechanical Analyzer, TMA, is described. The typical TMA shrinking ratio curve can be divided into two...... stages, which are closely related to ash melting behaviors. Several characteristics temperatures based on the TMA curves are used to assess the ash fusion characteristics. A new characteristics temperature, Tm, is proposed to represent the severe melting temperature of biomass ash. The fusion...... characteristics of six types of biomass ash have been measured by TMA. Compared with standard ash fusibility temperatures (AFT) test, TMA is more suitable for measuring the fusion characteristics of biomass ash. The glassy molten areas of the ash samples are sticky and mainly consist of K-Ca-silicates....

  17. Effects of lignite application on ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions from cattle pens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Jianlei, E-mail: su@unimelb.edu.au [Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia); Bai, Mei [Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia); Shen, Jianlin [Institute of Subtropical Agriculture, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changsha 410125 (China); Griffith, David W.T. [Department of Chemistry, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Denmead, Owen T. [Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia); Hill, Julian [Ternes Agricultural Consulting Pty Ltd, Upwey, VIC 3158 (Australia); Lam, Shu Kee; Mosier, Arvin R. [Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia); Chen, Deli, E-mail: delichen@unimelb.edu.au [Faculty of Veterinary and Agricultural Sciences, The University of Melbourne, VIC 3010 (Australia)

    2016-09-15

    Beef cattle feedlots are a major source of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) emissions from livestock industries. We investigated the effects of lignite surface applications on NH{sub 3} and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) emissions from beef cattle feedlot pens. Two rates of lignite, 3 and 6 kg m{sup −2}, were tested in the treatment pen. No lignite was applied in the control pen. Twenty-four Black Angus steers were fed identical commercial rations in each pen. We measured NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2}O concentrations continuously from 4th Sep to 13th Nov 2014 using Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) NH{sub 3} analysers and a closed-path Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy analyser (CP-FTIR) in conjunction with the integrated horizontal flux method to calculate NH{sub 3} and N{sub 2}O fluxes. During the feeding period, 16 and 26% of the excreted nitrogen (N) (240 g N head{sup −1} day{sup −1}) was lost via NH{sub 3} volatilization from the control pen, while lignite application decreased NH{sub 3} volatilization to 12 and 18% of the excreted N, for Phase 1 and Phase 2, respectively. Compared to the control pen, lignite application decreased NH{sub 3} emissions by approximately 30%. Nitrous oxide emissions from the cattle pens were small, 0.10 and 0.14 g N{sub 2}O-N head{sup −1} day{sup −1} (< 0.1% of excreted N) for the control pen, for Phase 1 and Phase 2, respectively. Lignite application increased direct N{sub 2}O emissions by 40 and 57%, to 0.14 and 0.22 g N{sub 2}O-N head{sup −1} day{sup −1}, for Phase 1 and Phase 2, respectively. The increase in N{sub 2}O emissions resulting from lignite application was counteracted by the lower indirect N{sub 2}O emission due to decreased NH{sub 3} volatilization. Using 1% as a default emission factor of deposited NH{sub 3} for indirect N{sub 2}O emissions, the application of lignite decreased total N{sub 2}O emissions. - Graphical abstract: Lignite application substantially decreased NH{sub 3} emissions from cattle feedlots and increased

  18. Chemical and physical properties of opencast lignite minesoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela, C.; Vazquez, C.; Gonzalez-Sangregorio, M.V.; Leiros, M.C.; Gil-Sotres, F. (Facultad de Farmacia de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Dept. de Edafologia y Quimica Agricola)

    1993-09-01

    The evolution of chemical and physical properties in a series of mine soils aged between 0 and 5 years, developed from spoil materials of the Meirama opencast lignite mine in Galicia (NW Spain), was studied. The soils are recovered without use of topsoil and are subject to identical management. In the surface horizon (0-7 cm), total C and N, CEC, and pyrophosphate-extracted Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] increased with soil age. Oxalic-oxalate-extracted Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] and Fe[sub 2]O[sub 3] on the other hand, increased with soil age in all the horizons studied. Rapid recovery in terms of physical properties was also observed: bulk density dropped, while total porosity, percentage of macropores, and hydraulic conductivity increased, and aggregates showed greater stability on immersion in water. The results indicate that mineral weathering and organometallic complexation are the dominant processes at these early stages of edaphogenesis and that properties associated with gas exchange showed more rapid development than those associated with water movement. In spite of the above rapid modifications, the characteristics of the oldest soils in the series were still very different from those of native Galician soils.

  19. Future lignite mines of Serbia; Zukunftsbraunkohletagebaue in Serbien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehna, Ullrich; Schmidt, Uwe [Vattenfall Europe Mining AG, Cottbus (Germany); Pavlovic, Vladimir [Belgrade Univ. (RS). Opencast Mining Dept.

    2010-01-15

    The Pre-feasibility Study on Selection of Limitation and Opening of Open Pit Mines Radljevo and South Field with Comparative Overview of Technical and Economic Aspects of Coal Mining for the Selection of Priority Coal Supplier of CHP Kolubara B has been prepared by Vattenfall Europe Mining Consulting (VEMC) and the University of Belgrade Faculty of Mining and Geology (UB-FMG) as subcontractor. Strategic and development plans of Electric Power Industry of Serbia anticipate the construction of new thermal power plant capacities in the Kolubara region requiring the provision of necessary coal amounts. One of the essential questions which needed to be analysed and defined more precisely by this study was the question of fuel supply to these new capacities as the precondition for finding the strategic partners in the construction of new power capacities. The RB Kolubara mining company produces around 30 Mt/a of lignite mainly from the large opencast mines Field D and Tamnava-West. It supplies most of it to the existing TPP in Kolubara and TPP Nicola Tesla A and B in Obrenovac. (orig.)

  20. Ash Properties of Alternative Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capablo, Joaquin; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Pedersen, Kim Hougaard

    2009-01-01

    The ash behavior during suspension firing of 12 alternative solid biofuels, such as pectin waste, mash from a beer brewery, or waste from cigarette production have been studied and compared to wood and straw ash behavior. Laboratory suspension firing tests were performed on an entrained flow...... analysis into three main groups depending upon their ash content of silica, alkali metal, and calcium and magnesium. To further detail the biomass classification, the relative molar ratio of Cl, S, and P to alkali were included. The study has led to knowledge on biomass fuel ash composition influence...... on ash transformation, ash deposit flux, and deposit chlorine content when biomass fuels are applied for suspension combustion....

  1. Sustainable development of lignite production on open cast mines in Serbia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DANICIC Darko; MITROVIC Slobodan; PAVLOVIC Vladimir; KOVACEV Sava

    2009-01-01

    Energy sector represents a key industrial branch for national, environmental and economic success. With its exclusive access to domestic deposits, lignite industry represents a guarantor of reliable raw materials, offering long-term supply security based on verified reserves. Currently operated coalmines in Serbia (Kolubara and Kostolac) have production around 36 million tons of lignite, and over 108 million m3 of overburden. Consequently, sustainability of lignite production requires cost reduction and environmental protection, as well as capacity increase. In order to rationalise, and increase efficiency of Serbian lignite mines, it is necessary to focus the activities on major issues shown within the triangle of energy policy objectives (security of supply, competi-tive prices and environmental protection). Production process optimisation singled out several special programs. Equipment revi-talization and modernization is necessary taking into account that majority of the currently operated machinery has a life up to 25 years. Production process automation would enable high level of technical operation in the field of open cast mines management. Lack of coal quality uniformity is the permanent problem resulting by great amounts of coal reserves to be used uneconomically. Planning and training at all levels and finally cooperative software for business procedures and work order management. The measures suggested are a key precondition for maintaining competitive position of lignite production on international level.

  2. Influence of wet oxidation on the surface area and the porosity of some lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Karatepe, N.; Kucukbayrak, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    2000-07-01

    Influence of wet oxidation on the surface area and the porosity of lignites was investigated using five different Turkish lignites. Lignite samples were oxidised in aqueous medium in a 1 l Parr autoclave at 423 K under 1.5 MPa partial pressure of oxygen for 60 min. Some physical properties such as surface area, bulk density, apparent density, mean pore radius, and porosity of the original and oxidised lignite samples were determined. For this purpose, BET and mercury intrusion porosimetry techniques were performed. In order to examine the effects of oxidation on the functional groups, FT-IR technique was applied for both original and oxidised lignite samples. On the other hand, some inorganic constituents were eliminated from the samples as a result of in situ formation of sulphuric acid from oxidation of sulphur compounds. The changes taken place in the physical properties were studied considering chemical compositions of the samples and the extent of the interaction between the samples and oxygen. 6 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Evolvement behavior of microstructure and H2O adsorption of lignite pyrolysis☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingyue Teng; Shijun Lian; Quansheng Liu⁎; Yuzhe Liu; Yinmin Song; Runxia He; Keduan Zhi

    2016-01-01

    The effect of pyrolysis on the microstructure and moisture adsorption of lignite was investigated with low field nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Changes in oxygen-containing groups were analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and H2O adsorption mechanism on the surface of lignite pyrolysis was inferred. Two major changes in the pore structure of lignite char were observed as temperature increased in 105–200 °C and 500–700 °C. Pyrolysis temperature is a significant factor in removing carboxyl and phenolic hydroxyl from lignite. Variation of ether bond content can be divided into three stages;the content initially increased, then decreased, and final y increased. The equilibrium adsorption ratio, content of oxygen-containing groups, and variation of pore volume below 700° were closely correlated with each other. The amount of adsorbed water on char pyrolyzed at 700 °C increased. Moreover, the adsorption capacity of the lignite decreased, and the adsorption state changed.

  4. MAT 126 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    stylia

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MAT 126 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 1 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126 Week 1 Written Assignment (Arithmetic and geometric sequence) (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 Assignment Is It Fat Free (Ash) MAT 126 Week 2 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 DQ 1 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 DQ 2 (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 Assignment Quadratic Equations (Ash) MAT 126 Week 3 Quiz (Ash) MAT 126...

  5. Determination of optimal environmental policy for reclamation of land unearthed in lignite mines - Strategy and tactics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batzias, Dimitris F.; Pollalis, Yannis A.

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, optimal environmental policy for reclamation of land unearthed in lignite mines is defined as a strategic target. The tactics concerning the achievement of this target, includes estimation of optimal time lag between each lignite site (which is a segment of the whole lignite field) complete exploitation and its reclamation. Subsidizing of reclamation has been determined as a function of this time lag and relevant implementation is presented for parameter values valid for the Greek economy. We proved that the methodology we have developed gives reasonable quantitative results within the norms imposed by legislation. Moreover, the interconnection between strategy and tactics becomes evident, since the former causes the latter by deduction and the latter revises the former by induction in the time course of land reclamation.

  6. Comparison of artificial maturation of lignite in hydrous and nonhydrous conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, F.; Lewan, M.D.; Lorant, F.; Vandenbroucke, M.

    2003-01-01

    The objectives of the study are to compare product compositions and yields generated from lignite artificially matured by open nonhydrous pyrolysis, closed nonhydrous pyrolysis, and hydrous pyrolysis. The pyrolysis products were fractionated into CO2, H2O, CH4, C2-C5, C8-C14, C14+ saturates, C14+ aromatics and NSOs (resins+asphaltenes). All three methods generated high and similar quantities of water during pyrolysis that ranged between 14.6 and 15.2 wt.% of the original lignite. As a result of this high water content generated by the lignite, the experiments with no added water are referred to as nonhydrous rather than anhydrous. Rock-Eval pyrolysis and elemental analyses were conducted on the recovered lignite after solvent extraction to determine their residual hydrocarbon generation potential and to plot their position in a van Krevelen diagram, respectively. Residual lignite from the closed nonhydrous and hydrous experiments showed relationships between vitrinite reflectance (%Ro) values and atomic H/C ratios that occurred within the fields observed for natural maturation of coal. Although no significant differences in the atomic H/C ratios were observed between closed nonhydrous and hydrous pyrolysis, the vitrinite reflectance values were on the average 0.2% Ro lower in the residual lignite from the nonhydrous experiments. The remaining hydrocarbon generation potential as determined by Rock-Eval pyrolysis of the residual lignite showed that the nonhydrous residuals had on the average 16 mg more hydrocarbon potential per gram of original lignite than the hydrous residuals. This suggests there is a better release of the pyrolysis products from the lignite network in the hydrous experiments once generation occurs. For gas generation, at maximum yields, open nonhydrous pyrolysis generates the most hydrocarbon gas (21.0 mg/g original lignite), which is 20% more than closed nonhydrous pyrolysis and 29% more than hydrous pyrolysis. Closed nonhydrous pyrolysis

  7. Thermogravimetric investigation of the co-combustion between the pyrolysis oil distillation residue and lignite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Xia, Shuqian; Ma, Peisheng

    2016-10-01

    Co-combustion of lignite with distillation residue derived from rice straw pyrolysis oil was investigated by non-isothermal thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The addition of distillation residue improved the reactivity and combustion efficiency of lignite, such as increasing the weight loss rate at peak temperature and decreasing the burnout temperature and the total burnout. With increasing distillation residue content in the blended fuels, the synergistic interactions between distillation residue and lignite firstly increased and then decreased during co-combustion stage. Results of XRF, FTIR, (13)C NMR and SEM analysis indicated that chemical structure, mineral components and morphology of samples have great influence on the synergistic interactions. The combustion mechanisms and kinetic parameters were calculated by the Coats Redfern model, suggesting that the lowest apparent activation energy (120.19kJ/mol) for the blended fuels was obtained by blending 60wt.% distillation residue during main co-combustion stage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Possible linkages between lignite aquifers, pathogenic microbes, and renal pelvic cancer in northwestern Louisiana, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, J.E.; Tatu, C.A.; Bushon, R.N.; Stoeckel, D.M.; Brady, A.M.G.; Beck, M.; Lerch, H.E.; McGee, B.; Hanson, B.C.; Shi, R.; Orem, W.H.

    2006-01-01

    In May and September, 2002, 14 private residential drinking water wells, one dewatering well at a lignite mine, eight surface water sites, and lignite from an active coal mine were sampled in five Parishes of northwestern Louisiana, USA. Using a geographic information system (GIS), wells were selected that were likely to draw water that had been in contact with lignite; control wells were located in areas devoid of lignite deposits. Well water samples were analyzed for pH, conductivity, organic compounds, and nutrient and anion concentrations. All samples were further tested for presence of fungi (cultures maintained for up to 28 days and colonies counted and identified microscopically) and for metal and trace element concentration by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Surface water samples were tested for dissolved oxygen and presence of pathogenic leptospiral bacteria. The Spearman correlation method was used to assess the association between the endpoints for these field/laboratory analyses and incidence of cancer of the renal pelvis (RPC) based on data obtained from the Louisiana Tumor Registry for the five Parishes included in the study. Significant associations were revealed between the cancer rate and the presence in drinking water of organic compounds, the fungi Zygomycetes, the nutrients PO4 and NH3, and 13 chemical elements. Presence of human pathogenic leptospires was detected in four out of eight (50%) of the surface water sites sampled. The present study of a stable rural population examined possible linkages between aquifers containing chemically reactive lignite deposits, hydrologic conditions favorable to the leaching and transport of toxic organic compounds from the lignite into the groundwater, possible microbial contamination, and RPC risk. ?? Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006.

  9. Possible linkages between lignite aquifers, pathogenic microbes, and renal pelvic cancer in northwestern Louisiana, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, Joseph E; Tatu, Calin A; Bushon, Rebecca N; Stoeckel, Donald M; Brady, Amie M G; Beck, Marisa; Lerch, Harry E; McGee, Benton; Hanson, Bradford C; Shi, Runhua; Orem, William H

    2006-12-01

    In May and September, 2002, 14 private residential drinking water wells, one dewatering well at a lignite mine, eight surface water sites, and lignite from an active coal mine were sampled in five Parishes of northwestern Louisiana, USA. Using a geographic information system (GIS), wells were selected that were likely to draw water that had been in contact with lignite; control wells were located in areas devoid of lignite deposits. Well water samples were analyzed for pH, conductivity, organic compounds, and nutrient and anion concentrations. All samples were further tested for presence of fungi (cultures maintained for up to 28 days and colonies counted and identified microscopically) and for metal and trace element concentration by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Surface water samples were tested for dissolved oxygen and presence of pathogenic leptospiral bacteria. The Spearman correlation method was used to assess the association between the endpoints for these field/laboratory analyses and incidence of cancer of the renal pelvis (RPC) based on data obtained from the Louisiana Tumor Registry for the five Parishes included in the study. Significant associations were revealed between the cancer rate and the presence in drinking water of organic compounds, the fungi Zygomycetes, the nutrients PO(4) and NH(3), and 13 chemical elements. Presence of human pathogenic leptospires was detected in four out of eight (50%) of the surface water sites sampled. The present study of a stable rural population examined possible linkages between aquifers containing chemically reactive lignite deposits, hydrologic conditions favorable to the leaching and transport of toxic organic compounds from the lignite into the groundwater, possible microbial contamination, and RPC risk.

  10. Hydration of fly ash cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etsuo Sakai; Shigeyoshi Miyahara; Shigenari Ohsawa; Seung-Heun Lee; Masaki Daimon [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Department of Metallurgy and Ceramics Science, Graduate School of Science and Engineering

    2005-06-01

    It is necessary to establish the material design system for the utilization of large amounts of fly ash as blended cement instead of disposing of it as a waste. Cement blended with fly ash is also required as a countermeasure to reduce the amount of CO{sub 2} generation. In this study, the influences of the glass content and the basicity of glass phase on the hydration of fly ash cement were clarified and hydration over a long curing time was characterized. Two kinds of fly ash with different glass content, one with 38.2% and another with 76.6%, were used. The hydration ratio of fly ash was increased by increasing the glass content in fly ash in the specimens cured for 270 days. When the glass content of fly ash is low, the basicity of glass phase tends to decrease. Reactivity of fly ash is controlled by the basicity of the glass phase in fly ash during a period from 28 to 270 days. However, at an age of 360 days, the reaction ratios of fly ash show almost identical values with different glass contents. Fly ash also affected the hydration of cement clinker minerals in fly ash cement. While the hydration of alite was accelerated, that of belite was retarded at a late stage.

  11. Fusion characterization of biomass ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Teng [State Key Laboratory ofMultiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 1 Zhongguancun North Second Street, Beijing 100190 (China); Sino-Danish Center for Education and Research, Beijing, 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Fan, Chuigang; Hao, Lifang [State Key Laboratory ofMultiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 1 Zhongguancun North Second Street, Beijing 100190 (China); Li, Songgeng, E-mail: sgli@ipe.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory ofMultiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 1 Zhongguancun North Second Street, Beijing 100190 (China); Song, Wenli [State Key Laboratory ofMultiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 1 Zhongguancun North Second Street, Beijing 100190 (China); Lin, Weigang [State Key Laboratory ofMultiphase Complex Systems, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 1 Zhongguancun North Second Street, Beijing 100190 (China); Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, 2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2016-08-20

    Highlights: • A novel method is proposed to analyze fusion characteristics of biomass ash. • T{sub m} can represent the severe melting temperature of biomass ash. • Compared with AFT, TMA is the better choice to analyze the fusion characteristics of biomass ash. - Abstract: The ash fusion characteristics are important parameters for thermochemical utilization of biomass. In this research, a method for measuring the fusion characteristics of biomass ash by Thermo-mechanical Analyzer, TMA, is described. The typical TMA shrinking ratio curve can be divided into two stages, which are closely related to ash melting behaviors. Several characteristics temperatures based on the TMA curves are used to assess the ash fusion characteristics. A new characteristics temperature, T{sub m}, is proposed to represent the severe melting temperature of biomass ash. The fusion characteristics of six types of biomass ash have been measured by TMA. Compared with standard ash fusibility temperatures (AFT) test, TMA is more suitable for measuring the fusion characteristics of biomass ash. The glassy molten areas of the ash samples are sticky and mainly consist of K-Ca-silicates.

  12. Electrodialytic treatment of fly ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland; Pedersen, Anne Juul; Kirkelund, Gunvor Marie

    Heavy metals are removed from the fly ashes by an electrodialytic treatment with the aim of up-grading the ashes for reuse in stead of disposal in landfill.A great potential for upgrading of bio- and waste incineration ashes by electrodialytic treatment exists. In the future, the applicability...

  13. Comparative radiocarbon dating of lignite, pottery, and charcoal samples from Babeldaob Island, Republic of Palau

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, A.; Chappell, J.; Clark, G.; Phear, S. [Australian National University, Canberra, ACT (Australia)

    2005-07-01

    It is difficult to construct archaeological chronologies for Babeldaob, the main island of Palau (western Micronesia), because the saprolitic clays of the dominant terraced-hill sites and associated ceramic sherds often contain old carbon that originated in lignites. This has implications, as well, for chronologies of sedimentary sequences. Comparative analysis of the dating problem using lignite, pottery, and charcoal samples indicates that, in fact, there are both old and young sources of potential contamination. It is concluded that radiocarbon samples from Babeldaob need to be tested for appropriate carbon content rather than relying solely upon material identification.

  14. REMOVAL OF TRICHLOROACETIC ACID FROM THE AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS USING NATURAL AND ACTIVATED LIGNITE COALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin GÜLENSOY

    1998-02-01

    Full Text Available In these studies, a typical lignite coal found near Istanbul (Yeniköy and its activated products were used to adsorb TCA from aqueous solutions. Particle sizes of coal samples and the concentrations of TCA solutions were chosen as parameters against the fixed amount of adsorbent. The maximum efficiency has been obtained for the coal having (-120 + 150 mesh size fraction activated by heating. As a result, it was shown that these kinds of lignite coals could be used as a good adsorbent. In addition, it was also proved that both the removal and recovery of TCA from some waste waters would easily be possible.

  15. A statistical study of equipment operating time in an open pit lignite mine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xerokostas, D.; Polyzos, P.; Galitis, N.; Michiotis, A.; Dalakas, G. (National Technical University, Athens (Greece). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1991-08-01

    The production planning of an open pit lignite mine, as of any mining operation in general, is influenced by a series of factors. Of great importance among these factors is the operating time of the equipment used in the production process. In this paper the authors use applied statistical methods (specially comparison tests) to study the net operating time of some excavation branches of the Ptolemais lignite mining district in Greece. Thus, it is hoped that the paper will contribute to estimating and predicting equipment performance in a more accurate way. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Co-pyrolysis of Chinese lignite and biomass in a vacuum reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Yuan, Chengyong; Xu, Jiao; Zhang, Weijiang

    2014-12-01

    A vacuum fixed bed reactor was applied to pyrolyze lignite, biomass (rice husk) and their blend with high temperature (900 °C) and low heating rate (10 °C/min). Pyrolytic products were kept in the vacuum reactor during the whole pyrolysis process, guaranteeing a long contact time (more than 2 h) for their interactions. Remarkable synergetic effects were observed. Addition of biomass obviously influenced the tar and char yields, gas volume yield, gas composition, char structure and tar composition during co-pyrolysis. It was highly possible that char gasification, gaseous phase interactions, and secondary tar cracking were facilitated when lignite and biomass were co-pyrolyzed.

  17. Germany's lignite industry in 2012; Die deutsche Braunkohlenindustrie im Jahr 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maassen, Uwe [Bundesverband Braunkohle, Statistik der Kohlenwirtschaft e.V., Koeln (Germany); Schiffer, Hans-Wilhelm [RWE Aktiengesellschaft, Essen (Germany). CEA-W Allgemeine Wirtschaftspolitik/Wissenschaft

    2013-05-15

    From 2011 to 2012, Germany's domestic lignite output edged up to 5.1% from 176.5 mill. t to 185.4 mill. t. This figure is equivalent to a net calorific value of 57.2 mill. tce. Of the total output, 166.3 mill. t, or some 90%, was used in utility power plants for the public supply, i.e. 5.7% more than in the previous year. In addition, 15.1 mill. t was input in the factories of the lignite-mining industry to make solid products, while 3.0 mill. t was used to generate electricity in mine-mouth power plants. Other sales of raw lignite and changes in stocks accounted for 1.0 mill. t. Lignite made a 25.7% contribution toward Germany's total power generation in 2012. In 2012, lignite had a 12.1% share in primary-energy consumption balance after mineral oil (33.1%), natural gas (21.6%) and hard coal (12.2%). Renewable resources cover 11.6%, while nuclear energy accounts for 8.0% and other energy sources for 1.4%. With output of 57.2 mill. tce, lignite held a share of 38.4% in Germany's primary-energy production of some 149 mill. tce in 2012. The contributions made by other energy carriers to primary-energy production in 2012 were as follows: 11.1 mill. tce hard coal, 13.3 mill. tce gas, 3.8 mill. tce mineral oil, 54.0 mill. tce renewables, and 9.5 mill. tce other energy sources. Of the total electricity amount that Germany produced in 2012, 25.7% was accounted for by lignite. This means that lignite led the ranking of the most important input energies for electricity generation in 2012, followed by renewables with 22.1%, hard coal with 19.1%, nuclear energy with 16.1% and gas with 11.3%. Other energy sources made a 5.7% contribution to total gross power generation. The most important ratios for the contributions made by the various lignite-mining areas to Germany's energy supply are shown. CO{sub 2} emissions from lignite rose 5.1% from 173.9 mill. t in 2011 to 182.8 mill. t in 2012. In the total period from 1990 to 2012, a decline of 159.4 mill. t, or

  18. Evaluation of excess life time cancer risk due to natural radioactivity of the Lignite samples of the Nichahoma, lignite belt, North Kashmir, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashraf, Mudasir [VIT Univ., Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India). Photonic, Nuclear and Medical Physics Div.; Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Soura, Srinagar (India). Dept. of Radiological Physics and Bio-engineering; Radha, C. Anu; Ramasubramanian, V. [VIT Univ., Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India). Photonic, Nuclear and Medical Physics Div.; Ahmad, Shakeel; Masood, Sajad [Kashmir Univ., Srinagar (India). Dept. of Physics; Dar, Rayees Ahmad [Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, Soura, Srinagar (India). Div. of Biostatistics

    2016-11-01

    Naturally occurring radionuclides of the {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 40}K present in the lignite samples was measured by using a low-background Pb-shielded gamma spectroscopic counting assembly utilizing NaI(Tl) detector for the measurement and to evaluation the radiation hazard indices and excess life time cancer risk. The average values of specific activity concentrations in the investigated lignite samples was found to be 45.36 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, 21.42 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th, 40.51 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K and 79.11 Bq kg{sup -1} for Ra{sub eq} respectively. The average value excess life time cancer risk was found to be relatively higher than the world average. Moreover, the correlation analysis shows the strong dependence of excess lifetime cancer risk on measured dose and the radium equivalent activity.

  19. MGT 330 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    alfoniz

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MGT 330 Week 1 Individual Assignment Functions of Management Paper (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 DQ 3 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 1 Summary (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 Team Assignment External Internal Factors Paper (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 Individual Assignment Delegation (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 Summary (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 330 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 330 W...

  20. Mobilization of iron from coal fly ash was dependent upon the particle size and the source of coal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, K R; Veranth, J M; Lighty, J S; Aust, A E

    1998-12-01

    Particulate air pollution, including coal fly ash, contains iron, and some of the pathological effects after inhalation may be due to reactive oxygen species produced by iron-catalyzed reactions. The objective of this study was to determine whether iron, present in coal fly ash, was mobilized, leading to ferritin induction in human airway epithelial cells, and whether the size of the particles affected the amount of iron mobilized. Three types of coal were used to generate the three size fractions of fly ash collected. The Utah coal fly ash was generated from a bituminous b coal, the Illinois coal fly ash from a bituminous c coal, and the North Dakota coal fly ash from a lignite a coal. Three size fractions were studied to compare the amount of iron mobilized in human airway epithelial (A549) cells and by citrate in cell-free suspensions. The size fractions selected were fine (airborne particulate matter fraction greater than 10 microm. Coal fly ash samples were incubated with 1 mM citrate to determine if iron associated with coal fly ash could be mobilized. Iron was mobilized by citrate from all three size fractions of all three coal types to levels as high as 56.7 nmol of Fe/mg of coal fly ash after 24 h. With all three coal types, more iron was mobilized by citrate from the fraction than from the >2.5 microm fractions. Further, the mobilized iron was in the Fe(III) form. To determine if iron associated with the coal fly ash could be mobilized by A549 cells, cells were treated with coal fly ash, and the amount of the iron storage protein ferritin was determined after 24 h. Ferritin levels were increased by as much as 11.9-fold in cells treated with coal fly ash. With two of the three types of coal studied, more ferritin was induced in cells treated with the fraction than with the >2.5 microm fractions. Further, inhibition of the endocytosis of the coal fly ash by the cells resulted in ferritin levels that were near that of the untreated cells, suggesting that

  1. A study of removal of Pb heavy metal ions from aqueous solution using lignite and a new cheap adsorbent (lignite washing plant tailings)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Ucurum [Nigde University, Nigde (Turkey). Mining Engineering Department

    2009-08-15

    The present study determines the efficiency with which lignite and lignite washing plant tailings can adsorb Pb heavy metal ions. In the first experiment, the effect of size distribution on the absorbance capacity was investigated for the samples. Therefore, lignite sample was ground to five sizes (d{sub 80} = 0.600, 0.355, 0.250, 0.106 and 0.063 mm) under nitrogen (N{sub 2}), and the tailings sample was classified into seven fractions, along with the original state (original state: d{sub 60} = 0.063, -1 + 0.600, -0.600 + 0.355, -0.355 + 0.250, -0.250 + 0.106, -0.106 + 0.063 and -0.063 mm). The test results showed that the optimum size distributions for lignite and tailings were d{sub 80} = 0.063 mm and the original state (d{sub 60} = 0.063 mm), respectively. Simultaneously, the adsorption capacity results of the two optimum sizes were compared with each other, and the tailings sample (d{sub 60} = 0.063 mm) gave the best results, with 9.30 mg/g Pb ions adsorbed value. Therefore, in the second study, a series of laboratory experiments using 23 full factorial designs was conducted to determine the optimum pH, contact time and initial metal concentration using the original tailings sample. The experimental studies showed that pH 9, a 120 min contact time and 300 ppm initial metal concentration gave the best results, namely an adsorption of 29.92 mg Pb ions/g. 43 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Bio-liquefaction/solubilization of low-rank Turkish lignites and characterization of the products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yesim Basaran; Adil Denizli; Billur Sakintuna; Alpay Taralp; Yuda Yurum [Hacettepe University, Ankara (Turkey). Department of Environmental Sciences

    2003-08-01

    The effect of some white-rot fungi on the bio-liquefaction/solubilization of two low-rank Turkish coals and the chemical composition of the liquid products and the microbial mechanisms of coal conversion were investigated. Turkish Elbistan and Beypazari lignites were used in this study. The white-rot fungi received from various laboratories used in the bio-liquefaction/solubilization of the lignites were Pleurotus sajor-caju, Pleurotus sapidus, Pleurotus florida, Pleurotus ostreatus, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, and Coriolus versicolor. FT-IR spectra of raw and treated coal samples were measured, and bio-liquefied/solubilized coal samples were investigated by FT-IR and LC-MS techniques. The Coriolus versicolor fungus was determined to be most effective in bio-liquefying/solubilizing nitric acid-treated Elbistan lignite. In contrast, raw and nitric acid-treated Beypazari lignite seemed to be unaffected by the action of any kind of white-rot fungi. The liquid chromatogram of the water-soluble bio-liquefied/solubilized product contained four major peaks. Corresponding mass spectra of each peak indicated the presence of very complicated structures. 17 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Distribution of various forms of organic nitrogen in a lignite macromolecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S.; Shavyrina, O.A.; Ryl' tsova, S.V. [Lev Tolstoi State Pedalogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    2001-07-01

    The chemical composition of organic bases from tars of stepwise semicoking of lignite was studied. The features of distribution of organic nitrogen in a coal macromolecule and the most probable pathways of thermal degradation of the nitrogen-containing fragments were examined.

  4. Chemical composition of hydrocarbons from semicoking tars of lignites from the near-Moscow fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Antonio, T.Z.; Platonova, M.V. [Lev Tolstoi Pedagogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    1998-09-01

    The chemical composition of hydrocarbons from the semicoking tar of lignites was studied by elemental, functional, emission spectrum, and structural-group analyses, cryoscopy, IR, UV and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, capillary gas chromatography, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A scheme was developed for adsorption liquid chromatography of the hydrocarbons.

  5. Genetic relation of adamantanes from extracts and semicoking tars of lignites with the initial biological material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Shvykin, A.Y.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Podshibyakin, S.I. [Lev Tolstoi State Pedagogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    1999-11-01

    A genetic relation was revealed of adamantanes from extracts and semicoking tars of lignites with the relic terpenoid and steroid compounds. Probable pathways are suggested for transformation of the initial natural structures into adamantanes. The qualitative and quantitative compositions of adamantanes from crude oil and coal are compared.

  6. Dry re-forming of methane to synthesis gas over lignite semicokes catalyst at high pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengbo Guo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Dry re-forming of methane has been carried out in a high temperature–pressure reactor at different pressures, using Hongce lignite semicokes catalyst. The results show that CH4 and CO2 conversions are decreased as the reaction pressure increased, but both of them kept basically stable when the reaction pressure is between 0.3 and 1 MPa. The comparison shows that the effects of the temperature and the flow of reactant gas on dry re-forming of methane are consistent with between high pressure and atmospheric pressure. The ratio of CO/H2 decreased as the ratio of CH4/CO2 increased, yet the value of CO/H2 is always more than 1 at different pressures. Hongce lignite semicokes catalyst is characterized by FTIR, XRD, SEM and BET, and the analysis results reveled that the physical specific adsorption peak of CO2 at 2350 cm−1 is strengthened significantly at different pressures, the micropore area and volume of Hongce lignite semicokes reduced form 40.2 m2  g−1 and 0.019 cm3  g−1 to 34.9 m2  g−1 and 0.017 cm3  g−1, respectively. Hongce lignite semicokes catalyst exhibited better activity and stability within 0.3–1 MPa range.

  7. Possible linkages between lignite aquifers, pathogenic microbes, and renal pelvic cancer in northwestern Louisiana, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bunnell, J.E.; Tatu, C.A.; Bushon, R.N.; Stoeckel, D.M.; Brady, A.M.G.; Beck, M.; Lerch, H.E.; McGee, B.; Hanson, B.C.; Shi, R.H.; Orem, W.H. [USGS, Reston, VA (United States)

    2006-12-15

    In May and September, 2002, 14 private residential drinking water wells, one dewatering well at a lignite mine, eight surface water sites, and lignite from an active coal mine were sampled in five Parishes of northwestern Louisiana, USA. Using a geographic information system (GIS), wells were selected that were likely to draw water that had been in contact with lignite; control wells were located in areas devoid of lignite deposits. Well water samples were analyzed for pH, conductivity, organic compounds, and nutrient and anion concentrations. All samples were further tested for presence of fungi (cultures maintained for up to 28 days and colonies counted and identified microscopically) and for metal and trace element concentration by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Surface water samples were tested for dissolved oxygen and presence of pathogenic leptospiral bacteria. The Spearman correlation method was used to assess the association between the endpoints for these field/laboratory analyses and incidence of cancer of the renal pelvis (RPC) based on data obtained from the Louisiana Tumor Registry for the five Parishes included in the study. Significant associations were revealed between the cancer rate and the presence in drinking water of organic compounds, the fungi Zygomycetes, the nutrients PO{sub 4} and NH{sub 3}, and 13 chemical elements. Presence of human pathogenic leptospires was detected in four out of eight (50%) of the surface water sites sampled.

  8. Pyrolysis characteristics of blends of Thai agricultural residues and woods with lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taro Sonobe; Nakorn Worasuwannarak [King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok (Thailand). Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment (JGSEE)

    2005-07-01

    The pyrolysis characteristics of Thai lignite and biomass as well as lignite/biomass blend have been investigated under slow heating rate condition by use of a TGA and a fixed bed reactor. It was found that the pyrolysis behaviors of biomass can be separated by two steps at the region of cellulose decomposition in biomass: sharp devolatilization region between 300 and 400{sup o}C at the range of cellulose decomposition, and slow devolatilization region between 400 and 600{sup o}C after the cellulose decomposition. For the co-pyrolysis of lignite/corncob blend, we have observed the slight difference between experimental and calculated char yields, which obtained from both the TGA and the fixed bed reactor. This weight loss discrepancy at above 400{sup o}C was accompanied by the significant change in the CH{sub 4} production behavior. Based on these results, synergetic effects between lignite and biomass during the co-pyrolysis were discussed. 12 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Planning for Reliable Coal Quality Delivery Considering Geological Variability: A Case Study in Polish Lignite Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Naworyta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of coal quality control in coal mines is to supply power plants daily with extracted raw material within certain coal quality constraints. On the example of a selected part of a lignite deposit, the problem of quality control for the run-of-mine lignite stream is discussed. The main goal is to understand potential fluctuations and deviations from production targets dependent on design options before an investment is done. A single quality parameter of the deposit is selected for this analysis—the calorific value of raw lignite. The approach requires an integrated analysis of deposit inherent variability, the extraction sequence, and the blending option during material transportation. Based on drill-hole data models capturing of spatial variability of the attribute of consideration are generated. An analysis based on two modelling approaches, Kriging and sequential Gaussian simulation, reveals advantages and disadvantages lead to conclusions about their suitability for the control of raw material quality. In a second step, based on a production schedule, the variability of the calorific value in the lignite stream has been analysed. In a third step the effect of different design options, multiple excavators and a blending bed, was investigated.

  10. Stepwise demineralisation and chemical isolation of the mineral matter of Goynuk lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaman, S.; Yavuz, R.; Kucukbayrak, S.; Taptik, Y. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Chemical & Metallurgical Engineering Faculty

    2001-12-01

    The mineral matter of coal contains a number of inorganic constituents which play an important role in almost all coal utilisation systems. In this study, an alternative method was applied to separate the mineral matter content of a Turkish lignite. Goynuk lignite was treated, in sequence, with acetic acid, ammonia, hydrochloric acid, hydrofluoric acid and nitric acid at 70{sup o}C for 60 min in order to remove individual mineral species. After each stage, the lignite was treated with performic acid, the product of reaction between hydrogen peroxide and formic acid, at 50{sup o}C. The organic coal matrix was decomposed as a result of performic acid oxidation, and consequently, the recovered mineral species were isolated. Ammonia, which has the potential of chemical comminution, was used to increase the effects of the subsequent reagents and enhance the extent of separation between the organic and inorganic phases. In each mineral matter removal stage, the lignite was treated with the reagents of the previous stage, and then, a new reagent was added to investigate whether the last stage has a different effect on the mineral species. FT-IR and X-ray diffractometry techniques were used to determine the constituents of the isolated mineral matter after each stage.

  11. Volcanic ash melting under conditions relevant to ash turbine interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wenjia; Lavallée, Yan; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Kueppers, Ulrich; Cimarelli, Corrado; Dingwell, Donald B

    2016-03-02

    The ingestion of volcanic ash by jet engines is widely recognized as a potentially fatal hazard for aircraft operation. The high temperatures (1,200-2,000 °C) typical of jet engines exacerbate the impact of ash by provoking its melting and sticking to turbine parts. Estimation of this potential hazard is complicated by the fact that chemical composition, which affects the temperature at which volcanic ash becomes liquid, can vary widely amongst volcanoes. Here, based on experiments, we parameterize ash behaviour and develop a model to predict melting and sticking conditions for its global compositional range. The results of our experiments confirm that the common use of sand or dust proxy is wholly inadequate for the prediction of the behaviour of volcanic ash, leading to overestimates of sticking temperature and thus severe underestimates of the thermal hazard. Our model can be used to assess the deposition probability of volcanic ash in jet engines.

  12. Stabilization of ash from combustion of MSW in a fluidised bed boiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steenari, Britt-Marie; Wilewska, Magda [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Environmental Inorganic Chemistry

    2004-06-01

    Due to restrictions against the land filling of combustible waste and directives from authorities that favour energy recovery from the waste, combustion of household waste is becoming more common. Even though combustion of MSW reduces the volume of waste to be handled by approximately 90%, it produces ash residues containing most of the metals present in the original fuel and a number of other species carried through the boiler or formed during combustion. The residues can be divided into three categories: 1. Stable, inert ash that can be utilised in, for example, construction applications 2. Ash that is stable enough to be land filled as nonhazardous waste 3. Ash that contains large amounts of soluble components and potentially toxic metal species. The regulations considering leaching of ash components set limits for the release of soluble salts and toxic metals. Some fly ashes show low leachability for metals but gives a salt release that is too close to the limit for total dissolved solids. Since fly ash from FBC boilers represent the largest volume of ash from these boilers there is a need for a simple and cheap treatment method that reduces the amount of soluble salts, i.e. NaCl, KCl etc, in the ash. After stabilisation, the ash is supposed to go into a more stable category. The aim of this project has been to investigate the applicability of a method to wash such an ash with water. The work included laboratory studies of the ash properties, the water washing process, filtration properties of the ash slurry and also tests of the method in pilot scale at a full scale boiler. This work has been concentrated towards the investigation of cyclone ash from a bubbling fluidised bed boiler in Lidkoeping fired with 100% household waste. Elemental composition of ash samples before and after washing/filtration was determined by AAS or ICP after a suitable dissolution of the sample. The mineralogy of ash samples was analysed using X-ray powder diffractometry. This method

  13. Exploring the impact of reduced hydro capacity and lignite resources on the Macedonian power sector development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taseska-Gjorgievskaa Verica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The reference development pathway of the Macedonian energy sector highlights the important role that lignite and hydro power play in the power sector, each accounting for 40% of total capacity in 2021. In 2030, this dominance continues, although hydro has a higher share due to the retirement of some of the existing lignite plants. Three sensitivity runs of the MARKAL-Macedonia energy system model have been undertaken to explore the importance of these technologies to the system, considering that their resource may be reduced with time: (1 Reducing the availability of lignite from domestic mines by 50% in 2030 (with limited capacity of imports, (2 Removing three large hydro options, which account for 310 MW in the business-as-usual case, and (3 Both of the above restrictions. The reduction in lignite availability is estimated to lead to additional overall system costs of 0.7%, compared to hydro restrictions at only 0.1%. With both restrictions applied, the additional costs rise to over 1%, amounting to 348 M€ over the 25 year planning horizon. In particular, costs are driven up by an increasing reliance on electricity imports. In all cases, the total electricity generation decreases, but import increases, which leads to a drop in capacity requirements. In both, the lignite and the hydro restricted cases, it is primarily gas-fired generation and imports that “fill the gap”. This highlights the importance of an increasingly diversified and efficient supply, which should be promoted through initiatives on renewables, energy efficiency, and lower carbon emissions.

  14. Evolution lignite mesopore structure during drying. Effect of temperature and heating time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salmas, C.E.; Tsetsekou, A.H.; Hatzilyberis, K.S.; Androutsopoulos, G.P. [National Technical University of Athens, Athens (Greece). Chemical Process Engineering Lab.

    2001-07-01

    The knowledge of the intrinsic pore structure of coals is significant in elucidating the kinetics of mass transport and chemical reaction that leads to design of more efficient coal combustion and conversion equipment. The results of pore structure studies of Greek lignite are reported in this work. Isothermal drying of Greek lignite samples, under vacuum, caused mesopore structure evolution despite the severe (similar to 50%) particle size contraction due to heating. Mesopore volume and surface area were increased as the drying temperature was raised to 200{degree}C while further drying up to 250 {degree}C caused a mesopore volume and surface area decrease. Lignite drying at 100{degree}C for up to 3 h resulted in a monotonic increase of the mesopore structure properties while heating for a longer period i.e., 6 h, despite a slight increase of weight loss, caused pore volume and surface area reduction. Nitrogen sorption (77 K) hysteresis data obtained for partially dried samples have been processed to deduce BET surface area and pore size distributions (PSD) by using both the Roberts and a new method based on a Corrugated Pore Structure Model (CPSM-nitrogen) methods. Bimodal PSD have been detected with one peak at 3 nm and the second at 20 nm while surface area varied over the range 2.98-5.30 m{sup 2}/g, Dry Greek lignite has shown a higher mesopore volume than that of several American and Canadian coals of varying rank. Mesopore volume distribution of dry Greek lignite, obtained from nitrogen sorption data, agree well with those deduced from mercury penetration data corrected for coal compressibility.

  15. Ash Management Review—Applications of Biomass Bottom Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpuneet S. Ghuman

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In industrialized countries, it is expected that the future generation of bioenergy will be from the direct combustion of residues and wastes obtained from biomass. Bioenergy production using woody biomass is a fast developing application since this fuel source is considered to be carbon neutral. The harnessing of bioenergy from these sources produces residue in the form of ash. As the demand for bioenergy production increases, ash and residue volumes will increase. Major challenges will arise relating to the efficient management of these byproducts. The primary concerns for ash are its storage, disposal, use and the presence of unburned carbon. The continual increase in ash volume will result in decreased ash storage facilities (in cases of limited room for landfill expansion, as well as increased handling, transporting and spreading costs. The utilization of ash has been the focus of many studies, hence this review investigates the likely environmental and technological challenges that increased ash generation may cause. The presence of alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, chlorine, sulphur and silicon influences the reactivity and leaching to the inorganic phases which may have significant impacts on soils and the recycling of soil nutrient. Discussed are some of the existing technologies for the processing of ash. Unburned carbon present in ash allows for the exploration of using ash as a fuel. The paper proposes sieve fractionation as a suitable method for the separation of unburnt carbon present in bottom ash obtained from a fixed-bed combustion system, followed by the application of the gasification technology to particle sizes of energy importance. It is hoped that this process will significantly reduce the volume of ash disposed at landfills.

  16. MGT 401 ASH Course Tutorial / Tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    kennith

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   MGT 401 Week 1 Individual Assignment Strategic Management Process Paper (Ash) MGT 401 Week 1 Class Activity Week 1 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 1 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 1 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 Learning Team Business Model Comparison Example (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 DQ 1 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 DQ 2 (Ash) MGT 401 Week 2 Class Activity (Ash) MGT 401 Week 3 Individual Assignment Business Plan Evaluation (Ash) ...

  17. Melting Behavior of Volcanic Ash relevant to Aviation Ash Hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Hess, K.; Lavallee, Y.; Cimarelli, C.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic ash is one of the major hazards caused by volcanic eruptions. In particular, the threat to aviation from airborne volcanic ash has been widely recognized and documented. In the past 12 years, more than 60 modern jet airplanes, mostly jumbo jets, have been damaged by drifting clouds of volcanic ash that have contaminated air routes and airport facilities. Seven of these encounters are known to have caused in-flight loss of engine power to jumbo jets carrying a total of more than 2000 passengers. The primary cause of engine thrust loss is that the glass in volcanic ash particles is generated at temperatures far lower than the temperatures in the combustion chamber of a jet engine ( i.e. > 1600 oC) and when the molten volcanic ash particles leave this hottest section of the engine, the resolidified molten volcanic ash particles will be accumulated on the turbine nozzle guide vanes, which reduced the effective flow of air through the engine ultimately causing failure. Thus, it is essential to investigate the melting process and subsequent deposition behavior of volcanic ash under gas turbine conditions. Although few research studies that investigated the deposition behavior of volcanic ash at the high temperature are to be found in public domain, to the best our knowledge, no work addresses the formation of molten volcanic ash. In this work, volcanic ash produced by Santiaguito volcano in Guatemala in November 8, 2012 was selected for study because of their recent activity and potential hazard to aircraft safety. We used the method of accessing the behavior of deposit-forming impurities in high temperature boiler plants on the basis of observations of the change in shape and size of a cylindrical coal ash to study the sintering and fusion phenomena as well as determine the volcanic ash melting behavior by using characteristic temperatures by means of hot stage microscope (HSM), different thermal analysis (DTA) and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) to

  18. Ash in the Soil System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, P.

    2012-04-01

    Ash is the organic and inorganic residue produced by combustion, under laboratory and field conditions. This definition is far away to be accepted. Some researchers consider ash only as the inorganic part, others include also the material not completely combusted as charcoal or biochar. There is a need to have a convergence about this question and define clear "what means ash". After the fire and after spread ash onto soil surface, soil properties can be substantially changed depending on ash properties, that can be different according to the burned residue (e.g wood, coal, solid waste, peppermill, animal residues), material treatment before burning, time of exposition and storage conditions. Ash produced in boilers is different from the produced in fires because of the material diferent propertie and burning conditions. In addition, the ash produced in boilers is frequently treated (e.g pelletization, granulation, self curing) previously to application, to reduce the negative effects on soil (e.g rapid increase of pH, mycorrhiza, fine roots of trees and microfauna). These treatments normally reduce the rate of nutrients dissolution. In fires this does not happen. Thus the implications on soil properties are logically different. Depending on the combustion temperature and/or severity, ash could have different physical (e.g texture, wettability) and chemical properties (e.g amount and type of total and leached nutrients) and this will have implications on soil. Ash can increase and decrease soil aggregation, wettablity and water retention, bulk density, runoff and water infiltration. Normally, ash increases soil pH, Electrical Conductivity, and the amount of some basic nutrients as calcium, magnesium, sodium and potassium. However it is also a potential source of heavy metals, especially if ash pH is low. However the effect of ash on soil in space and time depends especially of the ash amount and characteristics, fire temperature, severity, topography, aspect

  19. Petrochemistry of coal ash slags. I. Formation of melilite and a high temperature glass from a calcium-rich, silica-deficient slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.; Barbie, D.L.; Christensen, O.D.; Kerner, F.R.

    1977-01-01

    Pilot plant studies are being conducted of a fixed-bed slagging coal gasification process. Lignite from the Indianhead mine is reacted with steam and oxygen in a gasifier at hearth zone temperatures over 1650/sup 0/C. Slag samples were subjected to chemical and petrographic analysis. Layers of layered slag modules were analyzed; the inner layers contain abundant melilite while the outer core is a glass. Results show that the characteristics of the coal ash slag can be affected by temperature fluctuations in the gasifier hearth, and that chemical, flow, and heat transfer behavior are all susceptible to change as a result. 8 figs., 3 tables. (DLC)

  20. Rehabilitation project of the Tuncbilek lignite fired power station with retrofitting of indirect to direct firing system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casero, C.; Garibotto, G. [Ansaldo Energia (Italy)

    1996-09-01

    Retrofitting the lignite-fired boilers from indirect to direct firing, with the goal of increasing the availability of the plant and reducing particulate and NOx emissions, is described. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Ash Aggregates in Proximal Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porritt, L. A.; Russell, K.

    2012-12-01

    Ash aggregates are thought to have formed within and been deposited by the eruption column and plume and dilute density currents and their associated ash clouds. Moist, turbulent ash clouds are considered critical to ash aggregate formation by facilitating both collision and adhesion of particles. Consequently, they are most commonly found in distal deposits. Proximal deposits containing ash aggregates are less commonly observed but do occur. Here we describe two occurrences of vent proximal ash aggregate-rich deposits; the first within a kimberlite pipe where coated ash pellets and accretionary lapilli are found within the intra-vent sequence; and the second in a glaciovolcanic setting where cored pellets (armoured lapilli) occur within Diamond Mine, Canada, are the residual deposits within the conduit and vent of the volcano and are characterised by an abundance of ash aggregates. Coated ash pellets are dominant but are followed in abundance by ash pellets, accretionary lapilli and rare cored pellets. The coated ash pellets typically range from 1 - 5 mm in diameter and have core to rim ratios of approximately 10:1. The formation and preservation of these aggregates elucidates the style and nature of the explosive phase of kimberlite eruption at A418 (and other pipes?). First, these pyroclasts dictate the intensity of the kimberlite eruption; it must be energetic enough to cause intense fragmentation of the kimberlite to produce a substantial volume of very fine ash (sustained plume attended by concomitant production of pyroclastic density currents. The size and internal structure of the armoured lapilli provide constraints on the nature of the initial explosive phase of eruption at Kima'Kho. Their proximity to the vent also indicates rapid aggregation within the eruption plume. Within both sequences rapid aggregation of ash particles occurred in proximity to the vent. However, the conditions were substantially different leading to the production of armoured

  2. Dielectric properties of fly ash

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S C Raghavendra; R L Raibagkar; A B Kulkarni

    2002-02-01

    This paper reports the dielectric properties of fly ash. The dielectric measurements were performed as a function of frequency and temperature. The sample of fly ash shows almost similar behaviour in the frequency and temperature range studied. The large value of dielectric constant in the typical frequency range is because of orientation polarization and tight binding force between the ions or atoms in the fly ash. The sample of fly ash is of great scientific and technological interest because of its high value of dielectric constant (104).

  3. Volcanic ash infrared signature: realistic ash particle shapes compared to spherical ash particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kylling

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The reverse absorption technique is often used to detect volcanic clouds from thermal infrared satellite measurements. From these measurements particle size and mass loading may also be estimated using radiative transfer modelling. The radiative transfer modelling usually assumes that the ash particles are spherical. We calculate thermal infrared optical properties of highly irregular and porous ash particles and compare these with mass- and volume-equivalent spherical models. Furthermore, brightness temperatures pertinent to satellite observing geometry are calculated for the different ash particle shapes. Non-spherical shapes and volume-equivalent spheres are found to produce a detectable ash signal for larger particle sizes than mass-equivalent spheres. The assumption of mass-equivalent spheres for ash mass loading estimates will underestimate the mass loading by several tens of percent compared to morphologically complex inhomogeneous ash particles.

  4. Volcanic ash infrared signature: realistic ash particle shapes compared to spherical ash particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylling, A.; Kahnert, M.; Lindqvist, H.; Nousiainen, T.

    2013-10-01

    The reverse absorption technique is often used to detect volcanic clouds from thermal infrared satellite measurements. From these measurements particle size and mass loading may also be estimated using radiative transfer modelling. The radiative transfer modelling usually assumes that the ash particles are spherical. We calculate thermal infrared optical properties of highly irregular and porous ash particles and compare these with mass- and volume-equivalent spherical models. Furthermore, brightness temperatures pertinent to satellite observing geometry are calculated for the different ash particle shapes. Non-spherical shapes and volume-equivalent spheres are found to produce a detectable ash signal for larger particle sizes than mass-equivalent spheres. The assumption of mass-equivalent spheres for ash mass loading estimates will underestimate the mass loading by several tens of percent compared to morphologically complex inhomogeneous ash particles.

  5. Structure and chemical composition of hydrocarbons from semicoking tar of lignites from the near-Moscow fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Antonio, T.Z.; Ryltsova, S.V.; Platonova, M.V.; Shvykin, A.Y. [Lev Tolstoi State Pedagogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    1999-02-01

    Hydrocarbons from semicoking tar of lignites from the near-Moscow fields were separated by thin-layer chromatography and the molecular and hypothetical structural formulae of the components were determined. A genetic relationship between the components and the initial biological material was revealed. A contribution of `primary` hydrocarbons to formation of the qualitative composition of tars obtained by high-temperature processing of lignites was demonstrated.

  6. Potentials and limitations of spatial and demographic development in Kosovo-Metohija lignite basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spasić Nenad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The initial research carried out for the purpose of elaborating the Spatial Plan for Kosovo-Metohija Lignite Basin indicated the need to address numerous conflicts and opposing interests in the area concerned. This required the Plan to focus on harmonizing the economic, social and spatial aspects of developing a mining-energy-industrial system (hereinafter MEIS and its surroundings, devising the new ways for the protection of local population interests and use of novel approaches in dealing with the environmental consequences of lignite exploitation and processing. The area wherein Kosovo-Metohija lignite deposits are found is replete with diverse conflicting interests, including insufficient and uneven development, extremely large overall and especially agrarian population density (among the highest in Europe, unemployment and a sizable portion of the grey economy, low level and quality of services of public interest, ethnic conflicts and polarization, etc. The environmental effects of MEIS activities in a situation of this kind were revealed by the early stages of research in all segments of economic, social and spatial development, along with a high degree of environmental degradation. The main conflict in the Plan area is the one between mining and agriculture, i.e. open pit lignite mining and high-fertility soil covering lignite deposits. The conflict is additionally aggravated by the remarkable density of agricultural population on this territory and high selling prices of the land. Therefore, a substantial part of the Plan’s propositions was related to the conditions of settlement and infrastructure relocation, population resettlement and measures to relieve the tensions and prevent the outbreak of potential conflicts in implementing the Plan. The Spatial Plan is conceived as a complex and comprehensive document defining the framework, basic principles, starting points and measures tackling the numerous development conflicts, spatial

  7. Ecotoxicological relations on a large pig fattening farm located in a lignite mining area and near a solid fuel power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raszyk, J.; Docekalova, H.; Rubes, J.; Gajduskova, V.; Masek, J.; Rodak, L.; Bartos, J. (Veterinary Research Institute, Brno (Czechoslovakia))

    1992-01-01

    Major contaminants identified in 1983-1984 on a pig fattening farm located in a lignite mining area and near a solid fuel power plant, were mercury, cadmium, lead, chromium and aflatoxin B1. Feed samples were collected to assess the contamination load at feed uptake. Permissible concentrations of mercury, chromium, cadmium, aflatoxin B1, lead and atrazin in the feed were exceeded in 56, 50, 31, 19, 6 and 6% samples, respectively. Permissible concentrations of mercury, cadmium and lead in porcine muscles were exceeded in 65, 51, 24% samples, respectively. Pigs fattened in the contaminated environment (i.e. fed contaminated feed mixtures, inspiring contaminated dust and absorbing percutaneously contaminants from dust deposits on the body surface) showed: (1) impairment of the genetic apparatus; (2) a certain degree of immunosuppression; (3) higher feed consumption per 1 kg weight gain and lower average daily weight gain; (4) increased incidence of health disorders. The authors were not allowed to analyse ash and solid emissions from the power plant. Therefore the share of the emissions in the overall environmental contamination on the fattening farm could not be quantified. The personnel, working in the contaminated environment for a prolonged period, are endangered most of all by stable dust, being exposed to its mechanical, chemical, allergic and infectious effects. Consumption of meat and organs from pigs fattened in a contaminated environment is associated with the risk of an increased uptake of various contaminants.

  8. Influence of Bed Ash and Fly Ash Replacement in Mortars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. L. Summoogum-Utchanah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluates the influence of fly ash and bottom ash as partial cement substitutes in mortars by studying the particle size distribution, consistency, flow, fresh density, air content, compressive strength and flexural strength characteristics. The results revealed that fly ash and cement had relatively the same particle size distribution unlike bottom ash. In the fresh state, as the amount of pozzolans increased in the mixtures, the mortars showed an enhancement in workability, were susceptible to water loss by bleeding, and exhibited a decline in fresh density. The early strength gains of the fly ash samples were low but reached higher than the control after 28 days of curing. The flexural strength increased as the fly ash content rose to reach a maximum at 20 % replacement. However, the 2-day compressive strength of bottom ash samples was higher than the control but decreased after 28 days of curing while the flexural strength declined with addition of bottom ash except at 5 % substitution.

  9. Fates and roles of alkali and alkaline earth metal species during the pyrolysis and gasification of a Victorian lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mody, D.; Wu, H.; Li, C. [Monash University, Vic. (Australia). CRC for Clean Power from Lignite, Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2000-07-01

    The transformation of alkali and alkaline earth metal (AAEM) species in a Victorian lignite during the pyrolysis and subsequent gasification in CO{sub 2} was studied in a novel quartz fluidised-bed reactor. Lignite samples prepared by physically adding NaCl and ion-exchanging Na{sup +} and Ca{sup ++} into the lignite were used to investigate the effects of chemical forms and valency of the AAEM species in the substrate lignite on their transformation during pyrolysis and gasification. Carboxyl-bound Na was found to be less volatile than Na present as NaCl, but more volatile than carboxyl-bound Ca during pyrolysis at temperatures between 400 and 900{sup o}C. However, the carboxyl-bound Na was volatilised to a much greater extent than the carboxyl-bound Ca in the same lignite during pyrolysis. It was seen that the loading of NaCl into the lignite did not significantly affect the char reactivity in the fluidised-bed reactor at 900{sup o}C.

  10. Experimental and analytical evaluation of the drying kinetics of Belchatow lignite in relation to the size of particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Y.; Sciazko, A.; Zakrzewski, M.; Fukuda, K.; Tanaka, K.; Hashimoto, A.; Kaneko, S.; Kimijima, S.; Szmyd, JS; Kobayashi, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Water removal is a key technology for enhancing efficient utilization of lignite in power generation. An inherent characteristic of lignite, attributed to the large amount of water kept within the fuel, is the factor decreasing the thermal efficiency of lignite-fired power plants. This paper presents the research results on investigating the drying kinetics of Belchatow lignite excavated in the Central Poland in prior to developing a water removal system. Lignite drying test was conducted in superheated steam atmosphere at the temperature range of 110-170 °C. Spherically shaped samples, of which the diameter is 2.5 mm, was used. The experimental results were then analysed with previously conducted measurements of 5, 10, 30 mm samples to investigate the influence of particle size. The presented analysis shows the agreement of the evaluated drying rate at the CDRP to the experimental data. The obtained experimental results were used to predict the drying behaviour of the group of particles. The proposed investigation clarifies the size dependence of the drying characteristics of the multisize group of lignite particles.

  11. Peat swamps at Giral lignite field of Barmer basin, Rajasthan,Western India: understanding the evolution through petrological modelling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Prakash K.Singh; P.K.Rajak; M.P.Singh; V.K.Singh; A.S.Naik; Alok K.Singh

    2016-01-01

    The lignite samples collected from Giral lignite field of Barmer basin have been subjected to petrological investigation.The data generated has been discussed to understand the evolution of the paleomires of these lignites.The present study reveals that these low rank C coals are chiefly composed of huminite group macerals,mainly telohuminite and detrohuminite,while liptinite and inertinite group macerals occur in subordinate amounts.Not much variation in the maceral composition from Seam-I to Seam-Ⅷ has been observed.Barmer lignites are characterized by a very high GI (>10) and moderate TPI indicating topogenous mire in the basin which was permanently flooded.The GI and TPI values and the petrography-based facies critical models indicate that these lignites originated mostly under wet forest swamp to clastic marsh having telmatic to limno-telmatic conditions with a moderate rate of subsidence and a very slow fall in ground water table.Further,the GWI and VI values are suggestive of mesotrophic to rheotrophic hydrological conditions having the dominance of herbaceous to marginal aquatic vegetation.There were spells of periodic drowning of peat especially during the formation of Seam-Ⅶ.Moderately high concentration of calcium in these lignites along with the presence of framboidal pyrite indicate enhanced sulphate-reducing bacterial activity present in carbonate and sulphate-rich waters in the basin during peat formation.

  12. HIS 103 ASH course tutorial/tutorialoutlet

    OpenAIRE

    NARESH 1

    2015-01-01

    For more course tutorials visit www.tutorialoutlet.com   HIS 103 Week 1 DQ 1 (Transition to Agriculture) (Ash) HIS 103 Week 1 DQ 2 (Early Complex Societies) (Ash) HIS 103 Week 1 Quiz (Ash) HIS 103 Week 1 Assignment (Ash) HIS 103 Week 2 Assignment Greco Roman Influence Paper (Ash) HIS 103 Week 2 DQ 1 Chinese Social and Political Order Systems (Ash) HIS 103 Week 2 DQ 2 Caste System (Ash) HIS 103 Week 2 Quiz (Ash) HIS 103 Week 3 Assignment Black Death Dra...

  13. Emerald Ash Borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is an invasive beetle from Asia that has caused large scale ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in North America. This book chapter reviews the taxonomy, biology, life history of this invasive pest and its associated natural enemies in both its native ...

  14. Leaching from biomass combustion ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2014-01-01

    The use of biomass combustion ashes for fertilizing and liming purposes has been widely addressed in scientific literature. Nevertheless, the content of potentially toxic compounds raises concerns for a possible contamination of the soil. During this study five ash samples generated at four...

  15. Combustion Characteristics of Lignite Char in a Laboratory-scale Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takahiro; Suzuki, Yoshizo

    In a dual fluidized bed gasifier, the residual char after steam gasification is burnt in riser. The objectives of this work are to clarify the effect of parameters (temperature, pressure, and particle size of lignite char) of char combustion using a laboratory-scale pressurized fluidized bed combustor (PFBC). As a result, the burnout time of lignite char can be improved with increasing operating pressure, and temperature. In addition, the decrease in the particle size of char enhanced the effect on burnout time. The initial combustion rate of the char can be increased with increasing operating pressure. The effect was decreased with increasing operating temperature. However, the effect of operating pressure was slightly changed in small particle size, such as 0.5-1.0 mm. It takes about 20 sec to burn 50% of char in the operating pressure of 0.5 MPa and the particle size of 0.5-1.0 mm.

  16. The Utilization of Peat, Lignite and Industrial Wastes in the Production of Mineral-Organic Fertilizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Hoffmann

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of chemical analyses of the composition of peat, lignite, turkey droppings and the potato industry effluent are presented. The results indicate that the substances can be used in mineral-organic fertilizer recipes. Although lignite and peat do not contain assimilable nutrients, from the ecology and pedology point of view they are valuable components of mineral-organic fertilizers. In order to determine the optimum turkey droppings and potato industry effluent dose in fertilizer biological studies using the germination tests were carried out. The demand for nutrients differs between plants. The mineral-organic fertilizer recipes were developed for sugar beet which is a highly demanding plant taking up large quantities of nutrients.

  17. Lignite from South Moravia as a base material to active materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivan Koutnik; Miroslav Kaloc; Katerina Cechlova [VSB - Technical University of Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic). Faculty of Metallurgy and Material Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Lignite from Mikulcice region at South Moravia is in practice today exploited entirely for energy industry purposes. Goal of project is searching South-Moravian lignin using possibilities to sorption of chosen organic compounds contaminating waste water. The property of chosen organic compound sorption has tested in part on dried (at 105{sup o}C) and untreated lignite, in part on samples modified by reagents and by higher temperatures treatment. But no temperature in any case gets over temperature 150{sup o}C, to keep low energy intensity of modifications. Sorptive properties have been tested with phenol aqueous solution and in second phase with chosen tenside model solutions. 4 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Supercritical Water as Nanomedium for Gasification of Lignite-Water Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzh, Raisa; Bortyshevskyi, Valerii

    2016-05-01

    The gasification of an aqueous suspension of lignite from Alexandria coalfield (Ukraine) under the supercritical pressure was studied. The initial rates of the formation of hydrogen, carbon dioxide and methane were evaluated. The mutually stimulating interaction of the components of "brown coal-water-mineral matter" system was shown due to the influence of nanoscaled water medium on the formation of dipole-inductive, dispersive and ionic associates. In the temperature range of 300-450 °C, the oxygen source for gaseous products of the lignite supercritical gasification is mainly ion-associative nanoclustered water. The source of hydrogen at the subcritical temperature is the organic part of brown coal. For the supercritical water, the source of H is the nanoscale medium with ion associates. The last ones were responsible for the further transformation of coal.

  19. Estimation of spatial variability of lignite mine dumping ground soil properties using CPTu results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagińska Irena

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with application of CPTu test results for the probabilistic modeling of dumping grounds. The statistical measures use results from 42 CPT test points located in the lignite mine dumping ground from the region of Central Europe. Both the tip resistance qc as well as local friction fs are tested. Based on the mean values and standard deviations of measured quantities the specific zones in the dumping site profile are distinguished. For three main zones standard deviations of linearly de-trended functions, distributions of normalized de-trended values for qc and fs are examined. Also the vertical scales of fluctuation for both measured quantities are estimated. The obtained result shows that lignite mine dumping site can be successfully described with the Random Field Theory. Additional use of fs values introduces supplementary statistical information.

  20. Paleoenvironmental implications from biomarker and stable isotope investigations on the Pliocene Velenje lignite seam (Slovenia)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel, A.; Sachsenhofer, R.F.; Markic, M.; Gratzer, R.; Lucke, A.; Puttmann, W. [Montan University of Leoben, Leoben (Austria)

    2003-07-01

    A Pliocene lignite seam up to 160 m thick occurs in the Velenje basin (Slovenia). The seam originated in a topogenous mire and evolved within a non-marine, transgressive setting. Differences in soluble organic matter yield and hydrocarbon content of borehole samples from the lignite are related to differences in the composition of free lipids of microbial origin and/or hydrocarbons derived from the biogeochemical degradation of plant tissue. Variations of the redox conditions within the mire are reflected by pristane/phytane ratios. The abundance of terpenoid biomarkers indicates the predominance of gymnosperms over angiosperms, which is consistent with palynomorphic spectra dominated by pollen of the Sequoia-Taxodium-Metasequoia plant community rather than by angiosperms. Evidence is also provided that the content of land plant derived biomarkers and the preservation of plant tissue is controlled by the input of resin-rich, decay-resistant conifers.

  1. COMPLEX LONG TIME MEASUREMENTS CARRIED OUT ON LIGNITE HEAP ON SOKOLOVSKÉ UHELNÉ A.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlastimil MONI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Long time in situ measurements carried out on selected lignite (brown coal heaps in the summer and winter season of 2012 and 2013 are described in this paper. The study was prepared in the frame of the research project TAČR No. TA01020351 “Research of prediction possibilities of infusion occurrence and following brown coal fuel self-ignition” supported in the programme ALFA. The main goal is to inform about the progress in the project focused on the research, development, and verifying of the complex methodology for an early identification of the start of an irreversible infusion state of lignite (brown coal mass tending to its ignition (fire.

  2. Combustion of producer gas from gasification of south Sumatera lignite coal using CFD simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidian Fajri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of gasses from lignite coal gasification is one of alternative fuel for the boiler or gas turbine. The prediction of temperature distribution inside the burner is important for the application and optimization of the producer gas. This research aims to provide the information about the influence of excess air on the temperature distribution and combustion product in the non-premixed burner. The process was carried out using producer gas from lignite coal gasification of BA 59 was produced by the updraft gasifier which is located on Energy Conversion Laboratory Mechanical Engineering Department Universitas Sriwijaya. The excess air used in the combustion process were respectively 10%, 30% and 50%. CFD Simulations was performed in this work using two-dimensional model of the burner. The result of the simulation showed an increase of excess air, a reduction in the gas burner temperature and the composition of gas (carbon dioxide, nitric oxide and water vapor.

  3. Supercritical Water as Nanomedium for Gasification of Lignite-Water Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzh, Raisa; Bortyshevskyi, Valerii

    2016-12-01

    The gasification of an aqueous suspension of lignite from Alexandria coalfield (Ukraine) under the supercritical pressure was studied. The initial rates of the formation of hydrogen, carbon dioxide and methane were evaluated. The mutually stimulating interaction of the components of "brown coal-water-mineral matter" system was shown due to the influence of nanoscaled water medium on the formation of dipole-inductive, dispersive and ionic associates. In the temperature range of 300-450 °C, the oxygen source for gaseous products of the lignite supercritical gasification is mainly ion-associative nanoclustered water. The source of hydrogen at the subcritical temperature is the organic part of brown coal. For the supercritical water, the source of H is the nanoscale medium with ion associates. The last ones were responsible for the further transformation of coal.

  4. Thermal analyses of the lignite combustion in oxygen-enriched atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiangyun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the oxygen-enriched combustion behavior of indigenous lignite was measured by a thermogravimetric analyzer (TG. Combustion tests were carried out in N2/O2 atmosphere with an oxygen content ranging from 21% to 70 vol%.The data show that the calorific value per unit time (CVT of the lignite was improved with increased oxygen concentration. In order to reveal the oxygen-enriched combustion process in detail, a new index of characteristic temperature Tc was defined to indicate the fixed carbon behavior during burning, and the combustibility indexes D’, Rw, and S were calculated to determine the combustion performance. The functional relation between CVT and oxygen concentration was determined by non-linear fitting method. The results indicated that the relationship between CVT and oxygen concentration fit the exponential function exactly.

  5. Kinetics and mechanisms of hydroliquefaction and hydrogasification of lignite. [Cellulose, wood, manure, municipal waste, coal of various ranks, fuel oil and natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, A.H.; Kranich, W.L.; Geureuz, K.

    1981-01-01

    A high pressure, continuous, stirred-tank reactor system has been constructed for the study of the catalytic liquefaction of North Dakota lignite slurried in anthracene oil. The conversion of lignite using a cobalt-molybdenum on alumina catalyst and the distribution of products as preasphaltenes, asphaltenes, oils and gases has been studied at the following conditions: temperature, 375 to 440/sup 0/C; pressure, 1000 to 1600 psig; agitator speed, 800 to 1500 rpm; catalyst concentration, 0 to 10% (based on lignite); initial lignite concentration, 5 to 30%; and space time, 16 to 52 minutes. At reactor pressures above 1500 psig and agitator speeds above 1000 rpm, reaction rate was essentially independent of pressure. At catalyst concentrations above 1% (based on lignite), the conversion of lignite was essentially independent of catalyst concentration. Experiments were conducted above these limits to find the effect on lignite conversion rate, of initial lignite concentration, and space time, or degree of conversion. The results at constant temperature were correlated by an equation which is given in the report. The relationship between the rate constant, K, and temperature, and between the maximum conversion and temperature was established. The effect of reaction conditions on the distribution of products was studied. In the presence of catalyst, the oil yield was increased, even under conditions where the catalyst did not affect overall lignite conversion. Under the most favorable conditions the oil yield was a little better than that obtained by Cronauer in the uncatalyzed hydroliquefaction of subbituminous coal at similar temperature and pressure.

  6. Soil stabilisation using AMD sludge, compost and lignite: TCLP leachability and continuous acid leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Daniel C W; Olds, William E; Weber, Paul A; Yip, Alex C K

    2013-11-01

    Utilising locally available industrial by-products for in situ metal stabilisation presents a low-cost remediation approach for contaminated soil. This study explored the potential use of inorganic (acid mine drainage (AMD) sludge and zero-valent iron) and carbonaceous materials (green waste compost, manure compost, and lignite) for minimising the environmental risks of As and Cu at a timber treatment site. After 9-month soil incubation, significant sequestration of As and Cu in soil solution was accomplished by AMD sludge, on which adsorption and co-precipitation could take place. The efficacy of AMD sludge was comparable to that of zero-valent iron. There was marginal benefit of adding carbonaceous materials. However, in a moderately aggressive environment (Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure), AMD sludge only suppressed the leachability of As but not Cu. Therefore, the provision of compost and lignite augmented the simultaneous reduction of Cu leachability, probably via surface complexation with oxygen-containing functional groups. Under continuous acid leaching in column experiments, combined application of AMD sludge with compost proved more effective than AMD sludge with lignite. This was possibly attributed to the larger amount of dissolved organic matter with aromatic moieties from lignite, which may enhance Cu and As mobility. Nevertheless, care should be taken to mitigate ecological impact associated with short-term substantial Ca release and continuous release of Al at a moderate level under acid leaching. This study also articulated the engineering implications and provided recommendations for field deployment, material processing, and assessment framework to ensure an environmentally sound application of reactive materials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Chemical composition of phenols from tars produced in semicoking of lignite from the near Moscow fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Manuel, A.; Nechaeva, E.A. [Lev Tolstoi State Pedagogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    1998-10-01

    The chemical composition of phenols from semicoking tar produced in low-temperature carbonization of lignite from the near-Moscow fields was studied by elemental, chemical functional, emission spectral, and structural-group analyses, cryoscopy, IR, UV and {sup 1}H, and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, capillary gas chromatography, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A scheme was developed for adsorption liquid chromatography of phenols.

  8. Chemical composition of organic bases from semicoking tar of lignites from the near-Moscow fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Polovetskaya, O.S. [Lev Tolstoi State Pedagogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    1999-02-01

    The chemical composition of organic bases from the semicoking tar of lignite from the near-Moscow fields was studied in detail by chemical functional, emission spectrum, and structural-group analyses, LR, UV and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, cryoscopy, capillary gas chromatography, and chromatography-mass spectrometry. A scheme was developed for separation of the organic bases by adsorption liquid chromatography.

  9. THE COMPARISION OF SOMA LIGNITE COAL AN FUEL-OIL WITH GEOTHERMAL ENERGY FOR HEATING BUILDINGS

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNTÜRKÜN, Rüstü

    2008-01-01

    In this study, a house that has four storeys and one hundred square meters flat was taken sample. Because this house can be heated with three different alternatives Soma lignite coal, fuel oil and geothermal, necessary first investment and annual heating costs were investigated. In addition, at heating building of geothermal energy whether became economic was researched. Economic analysis of used fuels at heating to a flat that is one hundred square meters been done. According to result of...

  10. Synergy in devolatilization characteristics of lignite and hazelnut shell during co-pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Haykiri-Acma; S. Yaman [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey). Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering Faculty, Chemical Engineering Department

    2007-02-15

    Coal/biomass blends were prepared in the lignite/biomass ratios of 98:2, 96:4, 94:6, 92:8, 90:10, and 80:20 using a Turkish lignite from Elbistan region and hazelnut shell. Co-pyrolysis characteristics were investigated in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) from ambient to 1173 K with a linear heating rate of 20 K/min under dynamic nitrogen flow of 40 ml/min. Char products from pyrolysis were investigated using XRD and SEM techniques. Devolatilization yields from the blends were evaluated in a synergistic manner and found that the overall yields for all the blends exceeded the expected yields which calculated from the additive behavior. As regards to devolatilization characteristics in given temperature intervals, it was concluded that there was significant synergy between 400 and 600 K, whereas additive behavior took place beyond 600 K. No evidence of synergy was observed in the activation energies. It was also concluded that the addition of hazelnut shell into lignite contributed to the sulfur fixing potential of char in the form of CaS and CaSO{sub 4}. 21 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. The effect of mixing ratio on co-pyrolysis of lignite and rapeseed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onay, O [Anadolu Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey). Porsuk Vocational School; Usta, C.; Kockar, O.M. [Anadolu Univ., Eskisehir (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the influence of lignite on the yield and chemical structure of bio-oil produced from rapeseed using a fast pyrolysis technique. The rapeseed and lignite mixtures were pyrolyzed in a fixed bed reactor. Heating rates and temperatures were controlled by a PID controller. Char yield after pyrolysis was determined from the overall weight losses of the reactor tube, while the liquid phase was collected in a glass liner. Experiments were conducted using a range of blending ratios. While final pyrolysis temperatures were set at 550 degrees C. An elemental analyzer was used to characterize the rapeseed and pyrolysis bio-oils. Fourier transform infrared analysis (FTIR) was used to conduct functional group compositional analyses. The study showed that conversion degree increased with temperature increases. Yields of both conversion and oil increased with biomass concentration. However, distribution between conversion and oil was influenced by the blending ratio. A maximum yield of oil was obtained with a 5 per cent blending ratio of lignite. It was concluded that the co-pyrolysis of rapeseed and coal at a temperature of 550 degrees C increases production by more than 11 per cent. 14 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs.

  12. Modeling two-dimensional water flow and bromide transport in a heterogeneous lignitic mine soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buczko, U.; Gerke, H.H. [Brandenburg University of Technology, Cottbus (Germany)

    2006-02-15

    Water and solute fluxes in lignitic mine soils and in many other soils are often highly heterogeneous. Here, heterogeneity reflects dumping-induced inclined structures and embedded heterogeneous distributions of sediment mixtures and of lignitic fragments. Such two-scale heterogeneity effects may be analyzed through the application of two-dimensional models for calculating water and solute fluxes. The objective of this study was to gain more insight to what extent spatial heterogeneity of soil hydraulic parameters contributes to preferential flow at a lignitic mine soil. The simulations pertained to the 'Barenbrucker Hohe' site in Germany where previously water fluxes and applied tracers had been monitored with a cell lysimeter, and from where a soil block had been excavated for detailed two-dimensional characterization of the hydraulic parameters using pedotransfer functions. Based on those previous studies, scenarios with different distributions of hydraulic parameters were simulated. The results show that spatial variability of hydraulic parameters alone can hardly explain the observed flow patterns. The observed preferential flow at the site was probably caused by additional factors such as hydrophobicity, the presence of root channels, anisotropy in the hydraulic conductivity, and heterogeneous root distributions. To study the relative importance of these other factors by applying two-dimensional flow models to such sites, the experimental database must be improved. Single-continuum model approaches may be insufficient for such sites.

  13. Comparison of metallurgical coke and lignite coke for power generation in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratanakuakangwan, Sudlop; Tangjitsitcharoen, Somkiat

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents and compares two alternatives of cokes in power generation which are the metallurgical coke with coke oven gas and the coke from lignite under the consideration of the energy and the environment. These alternatives not only consume less fuel due to their higher heat content than conventional coal but also has less SO2 emission. The metallurgical coke and its by-product which is coke oven gas can be obtained from the carbonization process of coking coal. According to high grade coking coal, the result in the energy attitude is not profitable but its sulfur content that directly affects the emission of SO2 is considered to be very low. On the other hand, the coke produced from lignite is known as it is the lowest grade from coal and it causes the high pollution. Regarding to energy profitability, the lignite coke is considered to be much more beneficial than the metallurgical coke in contrast to the environmental concerns. However, the metallurgical coke has the highest heating value. Therefore, a decision making between those choices must be referred to the surrounding circumstances based on energy and environment as well as economic consideration in the further research.

  14. Combustion behavior of different kinds of torrefied biomass and their blends with lignite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toptas, Asli; Yildirim, Yeliz; Duman, Gozde; Yanik, Jale

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the combustion behavior of different kinds of torrefied biomass (lignocellulosic and animal wastes) and their blends with lignite was investigated via non-isothermal thermogravimetric method under air atmosphere. For comparison, combustion characteristics of raw biomasses were also determined. Torrefaction process improved the reactivity of char combustion step of biomasses. Characteristic combustion parameters for blends showed non-additivity behavior. It was found that the mixture of torrefied biomasses and lignite at a ratio of 1:1 had a lower ignition and burnout temperature than the coal-only sample. Although no interactions were observed between the lignite and torrefied biomass at initial step of combustion, a certain degree of interaction between the components occurred at char combustion step. Kinetic parameters of combustion were calculated by using the Coats Redfern model. Overall, this study showed that poultry litters can be used as a substitute fuel in coal/biomass co-firing systems by blending with lignocellulosic biomass. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. NEW DATA ON THE LOWER PLEISTOCENE (GELASIAN LIGNITE BEDS OF CASTEL SAN PIETRO (RIETI, CENTRAL ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LUCA PANDOLFI

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A multiproxy study of the lignite-bearing lacustrine sequence cropping out at Castel San Pietro (CSP (Rieti, central Italy provides new insights on the paleoenvironmental evolution of an extensional basin, located on the Tyrrhenian side of the Apennine range. The CSP fossiliferous levels reflect deposition in a stable lacustrine environment. Mammal remains collected from this locality during the past centuries include Stephanorhinus etruscus, Anancus arvernensis and the beaver Castor fiber. The co-existence of the Etruscan rhinoceros and the mastodont suggests a middle Villafranchian age (Montopoli or Coste San Giacomo Faunal Unit for the lignite beds of CSP. New paleoflora findings are in agreement with an attribution to the Piacenzian or Gelasian age for these deposits whilst the presence of the ostracod Qinghaicypris cf. Q. riojensis suggests a time interval from Zanclean to Gelasian (between ~4.5 and ~1.8 Ma. Accordingly, the lignite beds of CSP most likely were deposited during the Gelasian (from ca. 2.5 to 1.8 Ma; from Montopoli to Coste San Giacomo FUs or possibly to Olivola FU in forested area and warm and humid conditions.

  16. Speciation of Zinc in ash investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy; Zinks foerekomstformer i aska studerade med en roentgenabsorptionsspektrometrisk metod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steenari, Britt-Marie; Noren, Katarina

    2008-06-15

    neighbour, but also about the next scattering shell of atoms surrounding the central zinc atom. The EXAFS data and modelling results showed that the most common zinc species in wood fuel ashes from FBC boilers are silicate, aluminate and to a lesser extent hydroxide. It cannot be ruled out that zinc can be bound as ZnO but this form is not dominant. This is the case for both bottom ashes and fly ashes. In one of the FBC boilers (BFB-bio), elementary sulphur is added in order to abate corrosion problems. Both bottom ash and fly ash from that combustor showed indications of the presence of ZnS or ZnCl{sub 2}. It is difficult to distinguish between Zn-S and Zn-Cl distances be EXAFS, but since zinc chloride is not likely to be stable in a combustor bed the conclusion was drawn that some zinc had been bound as sulphide in the bottom ash. The filter ash, however, might contain both sulphide and chloride in small amounts. Kaolin was used as an anti-sintering additive during a test period in the wood fuelled CFB included in this work. The general results from this test period has been published elsewhere but it is interesting for this investigation to note that the kaolin absorbed potassium that otherwise should have formed gaseous KCl and thus, left some more HCl in the flue gas free to react with other metal species in the burning fuel. In addition, it was noted that the kaolin was concentrated in the fly ash as was potassium and zinc. The EXAFS data for this fly ash showed the presence of ZnCl{sub 2} and/or ZnS. Due to the increased presence of HCl in the flue gas zinc chloride is most likely compound. However, it was only present in a small amount and the main part of the Zn was found as silicate. In the fly ash from normal operation of the boiler no zinc chloride was found. Wood ash that had been moistened and aged was shown to contain zinc in silicate, hydroxide and/or aluminate forms. In one sample of an ash the had been aged outdoors for only 0.5 years indication of minor

  17. Enhancing Carbon Reactivity in Mercury Control in Lignite-Fired Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chad Wocken; Michael Holmes; John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Katie Brandt; Brandon Pavlish; Dennis Laudal; Kevin Galbreath; Michelle Olderbak

    2008-06-30

    This project was awarded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory Program Solicitation DE-PS26-03NT41718-01. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) led a consortium-based effort to resolve mercury (Hg) control issues facing the lignite industry. The EERC team-the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); the URS Corporation; the Babcock & Wilcox Company; ADA-ES; Apogee; Basin Electric Power Cooperative; Otter Tail Power Company; Great River Energy; Texas Utilities; Montana-Dakota Utilities Co.; Minnkota Power Cooperative, Inc.; BNI Coal Ltd.; Dakota Westmoreland Corporation; the North American Coal Corporation; SaskPower; and the North Dakota Industrial Commission-demonstrated technologies that substantially enhanced the effectiveness of carbon sorbents to remove Hg from western fuel combustion gases and achieve a high level ({ge} 55% Hg removal) of cost-effective control. The results of this effort are applicable to virtually all utilities burning lignite and subbituminous coals in the United States and Canada. The enhancement processes were previously proven in pilot-scale and limited full-scale tests. Additional optimization testing continues on these enhancements. These four units included three lignite-fired units: Leland Olds Station Unit 1 (LOS1) and Stanton Station Unit 10 (SS10) near Stanton and Antelope Valley Station Unit 1 (AVS1) near Beulah and a subbituminous Powder River Basin (PRB)-fired unit: Stanton Station Unit 1 (SS1). This project was one of three conducted by the consortium under the DOE mercury program to systematically test Hg control technologies available for utilities burning lignite. The overall objective of the three projects was to field-test and verify options that may be applied cost-effectively by the lignite industry to reduce Hg emissions. The EERC, URS, and other team members tested sorbent injection technologies for plants equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and

  18. Perspectives of the non-energetic use of lignite in Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, D.; Sailer, B. [RWE Power AG, Essen (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    RWE Power AG as integral part of RWE Generation SE has been active in the development and commercialization of coal gasification routes for many years. RWE Generation SE is one of Europe's leading electricity producers and combines the expertise of the power plant specialists Essent (NL), RWE npower (UK) and RWE Power (D). A globally increasing freight traffic and accompanying fuel demand is anticipated in the future. This higher demand will probably result in an increase in crude oil price in the course of the next years. There will also be a disproportionately high increase in fuel prices additionally to the increase in the crude oil price due to an increasing treatment effort within refineries. Therefore the substitution of crude oil becomes more and more attractive in view of economical perspectives and security of supply. Crude oil is not only to be substituted as feedstock for fuels but also for the chemical industry. Coal has been and will be the most important feedstock for this. Especially its gasification enables various routes. In Germany there is also an interesting perspective for Coal-to-Liquids and Coal-to-Gas or CtL/CtG as the non-energetic use of coal is abbreviated. Lignite is available regardless of any market impacts and currently faces a change in its use for power generation due to the increasing use of renewable energies. Hence lignite is an attractive feedstock for CtL/CtG in Germany. The construction of a commercial size CtL/CtG plant means a billion Euro investment. So a reliable economic evaluation is inevitable. Today all CtL/CtG routes miss commercial competitiveness to the conventional production by some ten percents. In case the current upward price trend of crude oil continues CtL/CtG might become viable in the near future. The production of synthetic fuels appears most attractive in view of a substantial market potential. The further commercialization of gasification routes in Germany requires R and D activities especially

  19. Reclamation of abandoned ash pond of Neyveli thermal power plant by enrichment and its effect on growth and yield of gingelly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheela, A.M.; Shanmugasundaram, R.; Sundaram, M.D. [Annamalai Nagar University, Annamalai, Nagar (India). Dept. of Microbiology

    2003-07-01

    Ash ponds are the common disposal sites of ash generated from India's thermal power stations. An attempt was made to enrich the ash pond of Neyveli Lignite Corporation Ltd., Neyveli, using organic amendments and microbial inoculants to promote crop growth. The oil seed crop gingelly was grown in two seasons and more growth and yield was recorded in the second crop, which was enriched in the second time also. The inoculation effect of the crop with VAM fungus Glomus mosseae and the acid-tolerant Azospirillum isolate, A. lipoferum PAI-1 was studied. The co-inoculation of Azospirillum with VAM enhanced the rhizosphere dehydrogenase enzyme activity, growth, yield, N, and P content of the plant in the enriched ash pond. Hence, the nutritionally and biologically poor medium like ash ponds could be enriched successively to increase in the nutrient contents and microbial activity. Prolonged enrichment would be providing favourable conditions for the establishment of vegetation and the environmental pollution is greatly reduced by the vegetative cover on barren land. 30 refs., 6 tabs.

  20. 49 CFR 230.69 - Ash pans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ash pans. 230.69 Section 230.69 Transportation... TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Steam Locomotives and Tenders Ash Pans § 230.69 Ash pans. Ash pans shall be securely supported from mud-rings or frames with no part less than...

  1. Analysis of FBC deterministic chaos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daw, C.S.

    1996-06-01

    It has recently been discovered that the performance of a number of fossil energy conversion devices such as fluidized beds, pulsed combustors, steady combustors, and internal combustion engines are affected by deterministic chaos. It is now recognized that understanding and controlling the chaotic elements of these devices can lead to significantly improved energy efficiency and reduced emissions. Application of these techniques to key fossil energy processes are expected to provide important competitive advantages for U.S. industry.

  2. Reactivity of chars prepared from the pyrolysis of a Victorian lignite under a wide range of conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, H.; Mody, D.; Li, C.; Hayashi, J.; Chiba, T. [Monash University, Vic. (Australia). CRC for Clean Power from Lignite, Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2000-07-01

    A Loy Yang lignite sample was pyrolysed under a wide range of experimental conditions using a wire-mesh reactor, a fluidised-bed reactor, a drop-tube reformer and a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA). The reactivity of these char samples in CO{sub 2} and air was measured in the TGA as well as in the fluidised-bed reactor. A sample prepared by the physical impregnation of NaCl into the lignite was also used in order to investigate the effect of NaCl in the lignite on the reactivity of the resulting char. Our experimental results indicate that, due to the volatilisation of a substantial fraction of Na in the lignite substrate during pyrolysis, the true catalytic activity of the Na in the lignite substrate should be evaluated by measuring the sodium content in the char after pyrolysis. The char reactivity measured in situ in the fluidised-bed reactor was compared with that of the same char measured separately in the TGA after re-heating the char sample to the same temperature as that in the fluidised-bed. It was found that the re-heating of the char in the TGA reduced the char reactivity.

  3. AshMeadowsNaucorid_CH

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify the areas where final critical habitat for the Ash Meadows Naucorid (Ambrysus amargosus) occur. "Nevada, Nye County. Point of Rocks Springs and...

  4. AshMeadowsNaucorid_CH

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify the areas where final critical habitat for the Ash Meadows Naucorid (Ambrysus amargosus) occur. "Nevada, Nye County. Point of Rocks Springs and...

  5. Fly ash. Quality recycling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomster, D.; Leisio, C.

    1996-11-01

    Imatran Voima`s coal-fired power plants not only generate power and heat but also produce fly ash which is suitable raw material for recycling. This material for recycling is produced in the flue gas cleaning process. It is economical and, thanks to close quality control, is suitable for use as a raw material in the building materials industry, in asphalt production, and in earthworks. Structures made from fly ash are also safe from an environmental point of view. (orig.)

  6. Fly ash. Quality recycling material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomster, D.; Leisio, C.

    1996-11-01

    Imatran Voima`s coal-fired power plants not only generate power and heat but also produce fly ash which is suitable raw material for recycling. This material for recycling is produced in the flue gas cleaning process. It is economical and, thanks to close quality control, is suitable for use as a raw material in the building materials industry, in asphalt production, and in earthworks. Structures made from fly ash are also safe from an environmental point of view. (orig.)

  7. ITER helium ash accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogan, J.T.; Hillis, D.L.; Galambos, J.; Uckan, N.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Dippel, K.H.; Finken, K.H. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik); Hulse, R.A.; Budny, R.V. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    Many studies have shown the importance of the ratio {upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E} in determining the level of He ash accumulation in future reactor systems. Results of the first tokamak He removal experiments have been analysed, and a first estimate of the ratio {upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E} to be expected for future reactor systems has been made. The experiments were carried out for neutral beam heated plasmas in the TEXTOR tokamak, at KFA/Julich. Helium was injected both as a short puff and continuously, and subsequently extracted with the Advanced Limiter Test-II pump limiter. The rate at which the He density decays has been determined with absolutely calibrated charge exchange spectroscopy, and compared with theoretical models, using the Multiple Impurity Species Transport (MIST) code. An analysis of energy confinement has been made with PPPL TRANSP code, to distinguish beam from thermal confinement, especially for low density cases. The ALT-II pump limiter system is found to exhaust the He with maximum exhaust efficiency (8 pumps) of {approximately}8%. We find 1<{upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E}<3.3 for the database of cases analysed to date. Analysis with the ITER TETRA systems code shows that these values would be adequate to achieve the required He concentration with the present ITER divertor He extraction system.

  8. Volcanic ash infrared signature: realistic ash particle shapes compared to spherical ash particles

    OpenAIRE

    A. Kylling; Kahnert, M.; Lindqvist, H.; T. Nousiainen

    2013-01-01

    The reverse absorption technique is often used to detect volcanic clouds from thermal infrared satellite measurements. From these measurements particle size and mass loading may also be estimated using radiative transfer modelling. The radiative transfer modelling usually assumes that the ash particles are spherical. We calculate thermal infrared optical properties of highly irregular and porous ash particles and compare these with mass- and volume-equivalent spherical models. Furtherm...

  9. 褐煤及其热解产品利用现状%Utilization status of lignite and pyrolysis products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘军; 邹涛; 初茉; 畅志兵; 林益安

    2014-01-01

    为了提高褐煤利用率,介绍了国内褐煤资源的储量形态、分布。分析了目前褐煤的利用途径,包括共伴生资源的利用、直接燃烧、干燥脱水与成型、气化、液化、制水煤浆与热解。并进一步分析了褐煤热解气、液、固产品的利用方向。提出了褐煤半焦利用的新方法,即利用半焦干法气化,或将半焦和热解废水等制成水煤浆,通过湿法气化制得合成气,再通过甲烷化催化剂将合成气制成甲烷,或将合成气通过费托合成制成汽油柴油。%In order to improve the utilization rate of lignite,the lignite reserves and distribution status was introduced. The utilization ways of lignite,including associated resources utilization,lignite direct combustion,dehydration and briquetting,gasification,liquefaction,py-rolysis and coal water mixture preparation were introduced. Then the using direction of gas,liquid and solid productions of lignite pyrolysis were further investigated. The authors put forward some new utilization methods of lignitic semi-coke, including gasifying the semi-coke by the dry gasification and preparing coal water mixture ( CWM) with semi-coke and pyrolytic waste water. The CWM was gasified to pro-duce syngas by the wet gasification. Then the syngas was used to prepare methane with methanation catalysts, or compound petrol and diesel by Fischer-Tropsch synthesis.

  10. Seismicity with open pit working of a lignite field. [Poland, USA and Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozd, K.; Rybar, J.

    1983-01-01

    Cases are analyzed of oscillations in the Earth's surface associated with lignite quarries near Belkhatuv (Polish People's Republic) and with construction materials quarrels of Wappingers Falls (United States) and with Cerro de Pasco mines (Peru). In the Polish People's Republic, the quarry is located in a tectonically unstable zone. In the detritus and the slope, there are increased horizontal stresses. The slope is represented by strong limestones which are in the overhanging side of the salt overlayers. The factors causing oscillations are: extraction of the sedimentary mass of the basin; overloading of the block of rock massif beyond the edge of the quarry; outflow of a considerable quantity of water from the rock massif. To a considerable degree, similar natural conditions occur in the mentioned quarries of the United States and Peru. In the side of the north Czech lignite basin metamorphites are found and there is no salt overlay; the depth of extraction of the sedimentary mass will be greater (negative factor), the external banks and the water pumped out will be less (positive factors). The danger of the development of induced oscillations in the Earth's surface in the north Czech lignite basin will be less than in the Polish People's Republic. However, it is impossible to exclude completely their development. The following measures are recommended: construction in the basin of 2-3 complex seismic stations; construction near the deep quarries of a network of stations with geoacoustic apparatus; if possible, high external banks are not planned; increased attention is focused on studying the modern tectonic activity.

  11. Characterization of ashes from biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frandsen, F.J.; Hansen, L.A. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. Dept. of Chemical Engineering (Denmark); Soerensen, H.S. [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (Denmark); Hjuler, K. [dk-TEKNIK. Energy and Environment (Denmark)

    1998-02-01

    One motivation for initiating the present project was that the international standard method of estimating the deposit propensity of solid fuels, of which a number of variants exist (e.g. ISO, ASTM, SD, DIN), has shown to be unsuitable for biomass ashes. This goal was addressed by the development of two new methods for the detection of ash fusibility behaviour based on Simultaneous Thermal Analysis (STA) and High Temperature Light Microscopy (HTLM), respectively. The methods were developed specifically for ashes from biofuels, but are suitable for coal ashes as well. They have been tested using simple salt mixtures, geological standards and samples from straw CHP and coal-straw PF combustion plants. All samples were run in a nitrogen atmosphere at a heating rate of 10 deg. C/min. In comparison with the standard method, the new methods are objective and have superior repeatability and sensitivity. Furthermore, the two methods enable the melting behavior to be characterized by a continuous measurement of melt fraction versus temperature. Due to this two-dimensional resolution of the results, the STA and HTLM methods provide more information than the standard method. The study of bottom ash and fly ash as well as deposit samples from straw test firings at the Haslev and Slagelse Combined Heat and Power plants resulted in a better understanding of mineral behaviour during straw grate firing. In these tests a number of straws were fired which had been carefully selected for having different qualities with respect to sort and potassium and chlorine contents. By studying bottom ashes from Slagelse it was found that the melting behaviour correlated with the deposition rate on a probe situated at the outlet part of the combustion zone. (EG)

  12. Computational Chemistry Approach to Interpret the Crystal Violet Adsorption on Golbasi Lignite Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depci, Tolga; Sarikaya, Musa; Prisbrey, Keith A.; Yucel, Aysegul

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, adsorption mechanism of Crystal Violet (CV) dye from the aqueous solution on the activated carbon prepared from Golbasi lignite was explained and interpreted by a computational chemistry approach and experimental studies. Molecular dynamic simulations and Ab initio frontier orbital analysis indicated relatively high energy and electron transfer processes during adsorption, and molecular dynamics simulations showed CV dye molecules moving around on the activated carbon surface after adsorption, facilitating penetration into cracks and pores. The experimental results supported to molecular dynamic simulation and showed that the monolayer coverage occurred on the activated carbon surface and each CV dye ion had equal sorption activation energy.

  13. Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 10. Gasification of Benton lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

    1985-05-01

    A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and governmental agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) Group. This report is the tenth volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report describes the gasification of Benton lignite. The period of gasification test was November 1-8, 1983. 16 refs., 22 figs., 19 tabs.

  14. Aluminium speciation and phytotoxicity in minesoils of a lignite mine in NW Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monterroso, C.; Alvarez, E.; Marcos, M.L.F.; Macias, F. [University of Santiago, Lugo (Spain)

    1998-01-01

    The soil solution composition and the solution aluminium speciation were used to evaluate Al phytotoxicity risks in the reclaimed soils of the lignite mine in As Pontes, NW Spain. The vegetation decline in some soils containing sulphides appears to be related to the high acidity and salinity rising from sulphide oxidation rather than to the high aluminium concentrations. The high concentrations of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and base cations, particularly Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, play a detoxifying role in these environments.

  15. Lignite coke moving bed adsorber for cement plants - BAT or beyond BAT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenberger, H. [European Commission, Seville (Spain). Joint Research Center

    2011-06-15

    The IPPC Directive requires permits which must contain emission limit values and other conditions based on BAT. The BAT are characterised and the terms 'conditional BAT' and 'beyond BAT' are defined and explained. The borderline between BAT and beyond BAT is explained by means of an outstanding example which is the lignite coke moving bed adsorber for the abatement of the waste gas from a cement plant where waste for co-incineration is fed to a considerable extent is described in detail. Worldwide, this technique has been successfully applied at one cement plant for sixteen years.

  16. Chemical structure of asphaltenes of tar semicoked from Kansk-Achinsk lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platanov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Klyavina, O.A. [Ln Tolstoi Tula State Pedagogical Institute, Tula (Russian Federation)

    1994-03-01

    The chemical structure has been studied of asphaltenes of tar semicoked from Kansk-Achinsk lignite and recovered at a temperature less than or equal to 350{degree}C. Asphaltenes have been found to be a complete mixture of aromatic, alicyclic, hydroaromatic, and heterocyclic compounds substituted by alkyl chains and various functional groups. A number of asphaltene compounds originate from steroids and triterpanes, which widely occur in lipid and tar fractions of plants and in the metabolites of microbes. A procedure based on adsorptive liquid chromatography has been developed to separate asphaltenes into a great number of eluates with considerably differing structural parameters and functional compositions.

  17. Diagnostic measurements on the great machines conditions of lignite surface mines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helebrant, F.; Jurman, J.; Fries, J. [Technical University of Ostrava, Ostrava-Poruba (Czech Republic)

    2005-07-01

    An analysis of the diagnosis of loading and service dependability of a rail-mounted excavator used in surface lignite mining is described. Wheel power vibrations in electric motor bearings and electric motor input bearings to the gearbox were measured in situ, in horizontal, vertical, and axial directions. The data were analyzed using a mathematical relationship. The results are presented in a loading diagram that shows the deterioration and the acceptable lower bound of machine conditions over time. Work is continuing. 5 refs., 1 fig.

  18. Analysis of Turkish lignite tar by coupled LC/GC, GC/MS, and capillary SFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, I.L.; Raynor, M.W.; Urwin, D.J.; Bartle, K.D.; Tolay, M.; Ekinci, E.; Schwartz, H.E.

    1988-11-01

    This work describes the analysis of a pyrolysis product of a lignite sample obtained from the Turkish Goynuk reserve. The aliphatic, aromatic and polar compounds present in the tar are separated and identified by various chromatographic techniques: capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS), on-line high performance microbore liquid chromatography/capillary gas chromatography (LC/GC) and capillary supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The suitability of each technique for this particular application is discussed, and semi-quantitative results are presented for the major components detected. 35 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. The treatment of a deposited lignite pyrolysis wastewater by adsorption using activated carbon and activated coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiessner, A.; Remmler, M.; Kuschk, P.; Stottmeister, U. [UFZ-Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Remediation Research

    1998-07-31

    This paper investigated activated carbon and activated coke adsorption for the treatment of highly contaminated discoloured industrial wastewater with a wide molecular size distribution of organic compounds. Lignite pyrolysis wastewater from a filled open-cast coal mine was used for continuous and discontinuous experiments. The investigations were performed using water samples taken from various depths of the deposits ponds. A comparison of the capacities of the adsorption materials used showed, that because of its large number of macro and mesopores, activated coke is more suitable for wastewater treatment and in addition cheaper than activated carbon.

  20. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Cadmium Ion Adsorption onto Lignite-derived Amendments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAO Xiu-li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption kinetics and thermodynamics of cadmium onto lignite-derived humic acid and lignite-derived active carbon were investigated by batch experiments under different temperatures. The adsorption thermodynamic isotherms were fitted using Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin models, the adsorption kinetics were fitted to pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, fractional power and intraparticle diffusion models. Thermodynamic studies showed that Temkin model displayed the most suitable model to describe adsorption of cadmium onto raw lignite, extracted humic acid and active carbon. Thermodynamic parameters indicated the adsorption process were spontaneous, favourable, and endothermic physical adsorption in nature. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of cadmium obtained from the Langmiur model for humic acid, lignite and active carbon was 36.14~44.09, 29.63~38.20 mg·g-1 and 21.04~30.34 mg·g-1 respectively in the temperature range of 294.55~313.15 K, adsorption capacity magnitudes increased with a rise of temperature, indicating more feasible adsorption at high temperature. Adsorption kinetics parameters showed that the pseudo-second-order model was better than the pseudo-first-order, Elovich, fractional power and the intraparticle diffusion models, this indicated that cadmium adsorption might be a physisorption associated with chemisorption process. According to the adsorption characteristics of kinetics, thermodynamics parameters such as change in free energy(△G, change in enthalpy(△H, and change in entropy(△S, it was concluded that the adsorption process of cadmium onto these different adsorbents were spontaneous, endothermic, simultaneous physisorption and accompanied by chemisorption or alternatively physicochemical process. Adsorbents of humic acid had the great adsorption capacity and adsorption intensity. Temkin isotherm model and pseudo-second-order model could be the suitable models with good fitting for describing the

  1. 镧系元素地球化学效应的一个重要应用——以稀土元素的岩石分类和煤燃烧中的迁移富集过程为例%The effect on geochemistry of the Rare Earth Element: an example of important application in the REE classification for petrology and study for migrating of the REE during the burning of lignite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨建业

    2011-01-01

    Form the point of effect on geochiemistry of the REE, the REE distribution of sandstone, coal form ZKA183 - 87 drilling of Dongsheng in Orduos Basin and REE migration law in different ways of buming of lignite which form Xiaolongtan mine in Yunnan, Province were studied by using the date were published. The result shows that, in the REE distribution types of sandstone and coal consistent with previous findings on, at the same time, a new idea about the REE migration duing buming of lignite is put forwarded : whatever the form of combustion, it is same migating way for HREE from lignite to fly and bottom ashes; howere, LREE ,which migrating from lignite to fly and bottom ashes ,is compliant about affected by different combustion: Pulverized coal combustion in power plant, the the larger ionic radius of LREE, the more enriched the fly ash while the larger ionic radius of HREE,the more enriched the bottom ash , and it is easily affected by the combustion of lignite and its burning temperature for REE distribution to fly and bottom ashes in two staged combustion or two non - staged combustion. this study shows that effect on geochemistry of REE, as a new study method, is effective in study REE mode of distribution of various types of geological and it complement the traditional methods for geochemistry of REE.%从镧系元素地球化学效应的角度,探讨了鄂尔多斯盆地东胜ZKA183-87钻孔中砂岩、煤的稀土分布类型和云南小龙潭矿区褐煤不同燃烧方式下的稀土元素迁移和富集规律.研究结果表明,砂岩、煤的稀土分布类型与前人研究结论基本致.发现褐煤燃烧时稀土元素的迁移和富集具有以下特征:无论哪种燃烧方式,褐煤中HREE均以同一种模式向飞灰和底灰中迁移;而LREE向飞灰、底灰迁移富集过程中则要受到燃烧方式的影响,不同的燃烧方式对其迁移模式影响较大;电厂粉煤燃烧时,愈是大离子LREE,愈趋于向飞灰相对富集,愈是大

  2. Computer resource model of the Matra-Bukkalja, Hungary, lignite deposit for production planning, inspection and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fust, A.; Zergi, I.

    1985-01-01

    For the planning of lignite surface mining, a reliable geologic model is needed which can be updated by new survey data and used for the operative control of production. A computer model is proposed to analyze control, planning and inspection of production. The model is composed of two components, one from the geologic survey data, and the other refined by the production data. The half variograms of the Matra-Bukkalja lignite deposits are presented. The model can be used for the checking of forecast data.

  3. Controlling formaldehyde emissions with boiler ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Jennifer; Abu-Daabes, Malyuba; Banerjee, Sujit

    2005-07-01

    Fluidized wood ash reduces formaldehyde in air from about 20 to formaldehyde reduction increases with increasing moisture content of the ash. Sorption of formaldehyde to ash can be substantially accounted for by partitioning to the water contained in the ash followed by rate-controlling binding to the ash solids. Adsorption occurs at temperatures of up to 165 degrees C; oxidation predominates thereafter. It is proposed that formaldehyde could be stripped from an air stream in a fluidized bed containing ash, which could then be returned to a boiler to incinerate the formaldehyde.

  4. The Effect of Applied Organic Fertilizers on the Bioavailability of Heavy Metals in Lolium Perenne, Cultivated on Fly Ash Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smaranda Mâşu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to monitor the capacity of certain organic fertilizers (volcanic tuff and municipal sludge, applied as such and mixed with volcanic rocks with a high content in clinoptilolite, to determine the covering with vegetation of fly ash deposits resulted from the combustion of lignite in thermal plants. Both biosolids (20 t/ha and volcanic rock with high clinoptilolite content (5 t/ha determined the installation of a vegetative layer and diminished the soil metal bioavailability to the Lolium prerenne plant biomass. When using the organic-zeolite mixture, a synergistic effect is recorded of the two components of the treatment agent and an increase of the biomass with 448%. Moreover, the resulted biomass shows the highest reductions of metal bioaccumulations, of 38-46% for Zn and Fe, of 62% for Cu and between 82-89% for Cr, Ni and Pb.

  5. Ash in fire affected ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Jordan, Antonio; Cerda, Artemi; Martin, Deborah

    2015-04-01

    Ash in fire affected ecosystems Ash lefts an important footprint in the ecosystems and has a key role in the immediate period after the fire (Bodi et al., 2014; Pereira et al., 2015). It is an important source of nutrients for plant recover (Pereira et al., 2014a), protects soil from erosion and controls soil hydrological process as runoff, infiltration and water repellency (Cerda and Doerr, 2008; Bodi et al., 2012, Pereira et al., 2014b). Despite the recognition of ash impact and contribution to ecosystems recuperation, it is assumed that we still have little knowledge about the implications of ash in fire affected areas. Regarding this situation we wanted to improve our knowledge in this field and understand the state of the research about fire ash around world. The special issue about "The role of ash in fire affected ecosystems" currently in publication in CATENA born from the necessity of joint efforts, identify research gaps, and discuss future cooperation in this interdisciplinary field. This is the first special issue about fire ash in the international literature. In total it will be published 10 papers focused in different aspects of the impacts of ash in fire affected ecosystems from several parts of the world: • Fire reconstruction using charcoal particles (Burjachs and Espositio, in press) • Ash slurries impact on rheological properties of Runoff (Burns and Gabet, in press) • Methods to analyse ash conductivity and sorbtivity in the laboratory and in the field (Balfour et al., in press) • Termogravimetric and hydrological properties of ash (Dlapa et al. in press) • Effects of ash cover in water infiltration (Leon et al., in press) • Impact of ash in volcanic soils (Dorta Almenar et al., in press; Escuday et al., in press) • Ash PAH and Chemical extracts (Silva et al., in press) • Microbiology (Barreiro et al., in press; Lombao et al., in press) We believe that this special issue will contribute importantly to the better understanding of

  6. Emerald ash borer biocontrol in ash saplings: the potential for early stage recovery of North American ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    In many parts of North America, ash stands have been reduced by the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) invasion to a few surviving mature trees and young basal sprouts, saplings, and seedlings. Without a seed bank, ash tree recovery will require survival and maturation of these younger cohorts...

  7. First year survival of barefoot and containerized hardwood tree seedlings planted in northeast Texas lignite minesoils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, J.; Denman, J. [Texas Utilities Mining Company, Mt. Pleasant, TX (United States); Waxler, M.; Huber, D.A. [Weyerhaeuser, Hot Springs, AK (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Successful regeneration of hardwood tree seedlings is critical to the reclamation of quality wildlife habitat and commercial forests on lignite mines in northeast Texas. Because bareroot hardwood seedlings survival rates have often been lower than desired, the survival of containerized and bareroot hardwood tree seedlings was compared. Seven hardwood species, including six species of oaks, were planted in lignite minesoils on sites classified as bottomland, slope and upland. Three species were planted per site. Containerized seedlings were planted during the fall and winter, whereas bareroot seedlings were planted in the winter only. Survival was determined at the end of the first growing season. Results across all sites indicate that winter-planted containerized seedlings (74%) or bareroot seedlings (76%). Within the sites, the only significant difference was on upland sites where survival of winter-planted containerized seedlings (60%) was lower than bareroot seedlings (77%). Survival among species was not significantly different. There was no significant survival benefit from using more expensive containerized hardwood seedlings. The results also question the practice of planting containerized hardwood seedlings during the typical winter planting season for optimum survival.

  8. Structural degradation of Thar lignite using MW1 fungal isolate: optimization studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Rizwan; Ghauri, Muhammad A.; Jones, Elizabeth J.; Orem, William H.; SanFilipo, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Biological degradation of low-rank coals, particularly degradation mediated by fungi, can play an important role in helping us to utilize neglected lignite resources for both fuel and non-fuel applications. Fungal degradation of low-rank coals has already been investigated for the extraction of soil-conditioning agents and the substrates, which could be subjected to subsequent processing for the generation of alternative fuel options, like methane. However, to achieve an efficient degradation process, the fungal isolates must originate from an appropriate coal environment and the degradation process must be optimized. With this in mind, a representative sample from the Thar coalfield (the largest lignite resource of Pakistan) was treated with a fungal strain, MW1, which was previously isolated from a drilled core coal sample. The treatment caused the liberation of organic fractions from the structural matrix of coal. Fungal degradation was optimized, and it showed significant release of organics, with 0.1% glucose concentration and 1% coal loading ratio after an incubation time of 7 days. Analytical investigations revealed the release of complex organic moieties, pertaining to polyaromatic hydrocarbons, and it also helped in predicting structural units present within structure of coal. Such isolates, with enhanced degradation capabilities, can definitely help in exploiting the chemical-feedstock-status of coal.

  9. Lignite air-steam gasification in the fluidized bed of iron-containing slag catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, B.N.; Shchipko, M.L.; Golovin, Yu. [Inst. of Chemistry of Natural Organic Materials, Academgorodok, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-01

    The influence of fluidized bed of iron-containing slag particles on air-steam gasification of powdered Kansk-Achinsk lignite in entrained flow was studied in pilot installation with productivity about 60 kg per hour. Slag of Martin process and boiler slag were used as catalytic active materials until their complete mechanical attrition. Two following methods of catalytic gasification of lignite were compared: the partial gasification in stationary fluidized bed of slag particles with degree of fuel conversion 40-70% and complete gasification in circulating bed of slag particles. In the first case only the most reactive part of fuel is gasified with the simultaneously formation of porous carbon residue with good sorption ability. It was found the catalytic fluidized bed improves heat transfer from combustion to reduction zone of gas-generator and increases the rate of fuel conversion at the temperature range 900-1000{degrees}C. At these temperatures the degree of conversion is depended considerably on the duration time of fuel particles in the catalytic fluidized bed. The influence of catalytic fluidized bed height and velocity of reaction mixture on the temperature profiles in the gas-generator was studied. The optimal relationship was found between the fluidized bed height and velocity of flow which makes possible to produce the gas with higher calorific value at maximum degree of fuel conversion.

  10. Grass and forb species for revegetation of mixed soil-lignite overburden in East Central Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skousen, J.G.; Call, C.A. (West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV (USA). Division of Plant and Soil Sciences)

    Ten grasses and seven forbs were seeded into mixed soil-lignite overburden in the Post Oak Savannah region of Texas and monitored for establishment and growth over a 3-year period without fertilization. Buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris), green sprangletop (Leptochloa dubia), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), and kleingrass (P. coloratum) developed monotypic stands with sufficent density, aerial cover, and aboveground biomass to stabilize the mixed soil-lignite overburden surface by the end of the first growing season. Plant mortality eliminated buffelgrass and green sprangletop stands by the end of the third growing season. Indiangrass (Sorghastrum nutans) developed a satisfactory stand by the end of the third growing season, while Oldworld bluestem (Bothriochloa X Dicanthium), yellow bluestem (Bothriochloa ischaemum), and sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula) established at a slower rate. Cover and biomass measurements from an adjacent, unfertilized stand of Coastal bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) were compared with those of seeded grasses throughout the study. Partidge pea (Cassia fasciculata) established rapidly and had the greatest cover and biomass of all seeded forbs by the end of the first growing season. Sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata), Illinois bundleflower (Desmanthus illinoensis), and western indigo (Indigofera miniata) developed adequate stands for surface stabilization by the end of the third growing season, while faseanil indigo (Indigofera suffruticosa), virgata lespedeza (Lespedeza virgata), and awnless bushsunflower (Simsia calva) showed slower establishment. 27 refs., 3 tabs.

  11. Hydrologic and geochemical data for the Big Brown Lignite Mine area, Freestone County, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorsey, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    Lignite mining in east and east-central Texas is increasing in response to increased energy needs throughout the State. Associated with the increase in mining activities is a greater need to know the effects of mining activities on the water quantity and quality of near surface aquifers. One of the potential hydrologic effects of surface coal mining is a change in the quality of groundwater associated with replacement of aquifer materials by mine spoils. The purpose of this report is to compile and categorize geologic, mineralogic, geochemical, and hydrologic data for the Big Brown Lignite Mine and surrounding area in east-central Texas. Included are results of paste-extract analyses, constituent concentrations in water from batch-mixing experiments, sulfur analyses, and minerals or mineral groups detected by X-ray diffraction in 12 spoil material samples collected from 3 locations at the mine site. Also, common-constituent and trace-constituent concentrations in water from eight selected wells, located updip and downdip from the mine, are presented. Dissolved solids concentrations in water from batch-mixing experiments vary from 12 to 908 mg/L. Water from selected wells contains dissolved solids concentrations ranging from 75 to 510 mg/L. 10 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  12. Drmno lignite field (Kostolac basin, Serbia: Origin and palaeoenvironmental implications from petrological and organic geochemical studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Ksenija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to determine the origin and to reconstruct the geological evolution of lignites from the Drmno field (Kostolac Basin, Serbia. For this purpose petrological and organic geochemical analyses were used. Coal from the Drmno field is typical humic coal. Peat-forming vegetation dominated by decay of resistant gymnosperm (coniferous plants, followed by prokaryotic organisms and angiosperms. Coal forming plants belonged to the gymnosperm families Taxodiaceae, Podocarpaceae, Cupressaceae, Araucariaceae, Phyllocladaceae and Pinaceae. Peatification was performed in neutral to slightly acidic, fresh water environment. Considering that organic matter of Drmno lignites was deposited at the same time, in the relatively constant climate, it could be supposed that climate probably had only small impact on peatification. Therefore, variations in compositions of macerals and biomarkers indicate changes in the water level, due to seasonal drying of the mire, which caused vegetation differences in the palaeoplant communities and changes of redox conditions (from anoxic to slightly oxic during peatification. Diagenetic transformations of the organic matter were mainly governed by microbial activity, rather than thermal alteration.

  13. Paleogeography and paleoecology of the upper Miocene Zillingdorf lignite deposit (Austria)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel, A.; Reischenbacher, D.; Sachsenhofer, R.F.; Gratzer, R. [Department Angewandte Geowissenschaften und Geophysik, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Peter-Tunner-Str. 5, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Luecke, A. [Institut fuer Chemie und Dynamik der Geosphaere V: Sedimentaere Systeme (ICG V), Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2007-02-01

    The Zillingdorf deposit formed during the late Miocene filling of Lake Pannon and contains Austria's largest lignite reserves. Two lignite seams are present and developed within frequently flooded, low-lying mires in near shore environments. High sulphur contents are due to the influence of the brackish water body of Lake Pannon. During peat accumulation a transgression forced the NW-SE trending shoreline northeastwards. Differences in soluble organic matter (SOM) yield and hydrocarbon content of borehole samples and woody macrofossils are related to differences in the content and composition of free lipids of microbial origin and/or hydrocarbons derived from the biogeochemical degradation of plant tissue. Variations of pristane/phytane ratios are interpreted to reflect differences in the redox conditions of the mire. Peatification in an acidic and aerobic environment is further reflected by the predominance of aromatic over saturated hydrocarbons, the presence of an intense complex mixture in the GC traces due to biodegradation processes, high ratios for diasterenes relative to sterenes, and high concentration ratios of hopanes to hop-17(21)-ene of the respective samples. Gelification of plant tissue is governed by microbial activity, as indicated by the positive relationship between gelification index and hopanoids concentration. The composition of terpenoid biomarkers indicates the predominance of gymnosperms over angiosperms and increasing proportions of angiosperms in the peat-forming vegetation with decreasing depth in the upper seam. From the sesqui- and diterpenoids present in the lignite and fossil wood remnants, a predominant role of species of the Coniferales families Cupressaceae/Taxodiaceae are concluded. The preservation of plant tissue is governed by the presence/absence of decay-resistant gymnosperms. A general influence of the floral assemblage on the isotopic composition of organic carbon of the lignite ({delta}{sup 13}C=-27.2 to -24.6%%) is

  14. Transcriptomic signatures of ash (Fraxinus spp. phloem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Bai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ash (Fraxinus spp. is a dominant tree species throughout urban and forested landscapes of North America (NA. The rapid invasion of NA by emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis, a wood-boring beetle endemic to Eastern Asia, has resulted in the death of millions of ash trees and threatens billions more. Larvae feed primarily on phloem tissue, which girdles and kills the tree. While NA ash species including black (F. nigra, green (F. pennsylvannica and white (F. americana are highly susceptible, the Asian species Manchurian ash (F. mandshurica is resistant to A. planipennis perhaps due to their co-evolutionary history. Little is known about the molecular genetics of ash. Hence, we undertook a functional genomics approach to identify the repertoire of genes expressed in ash phloem. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using 454 pyrosequencing we obtained 58,673 high quality ash sequences from pooled phloem samples of green, white, black, blue and Manchurian ash. Intriguingly, 45% of the deduced proteins were not significantly similar to any sequences in the GenBank non-redundant database. KEGG analysis of the ash sequences revealed a high occurrence of defense related genes. Expression analysis of early regulators potentially involved in plant defense (i.e. transcription factors, calcium dependent protein kinases and a lipoxygenase 3 revealed higher mRNA levels in resistant ash compared to susceptible ash species. Lastly, we predicted a total of 1,272 single nucleotide polymorphisms and 980 microsatellite loci, among which seven microsatellite loci showed polymorphism between different ash species. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The current transcriptomic data provide an invaluable resource for understanding the genetic make-up of ash phloem, the target tissue of A. planipennis. These data along with future functional studies could lead to the identification/characterization of defense genes involved in resistance of ash to A. planipennis

  15. Settling characteristics of some Indian fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, M.K.; Sastry, B.S. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kharapur (India). Dept. of Mining Engineering

    2003-07-01

    The paper examines the aspects of the solid liquid separation (settling characteristics) of some of the fly ash obtained from coal-fired power plants in India. The application of a coagulating or flocculating agent (polymer) to improve the two properties as indicated is a typical industrial practice. The sources for this study comprise of fly ash, pond ash, and bottom ash and the settling characteristics are studied in conjunction with the flocculating agent polyacrylamide. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Gasification of high ash, high ash fusion temperature bituminous coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guohai; Vimalchand, Pannalal; Peng, WanWang

    2015-11-13

    This invention relates to gasification of high ash bituminous coals that have high ash fusion temperatures. The ash content can be in 15 to 45 weight percent range and ash fusion temperatures can be in 1150.degree. C. to 1500.degree. C. range as well as in excess of 1500.degree. C. In a preferred embodiment, such coals are dealt with a two stage gasification process--a relatively low temperature primary gasification step in a circulating fluidized bed transport gasifier followed by a high temperature partial oxidation step of residual char carbon and small quantities of tar. The system to process such coals further includes an internally circulating fluidized bed to effectively cool the high temperature syngas with the aid of an inert media and without the syngas contacting the heat transfer surfaces. A cyclone downstream of the syngas cooler, operating at relatively low temperatures, effectively reduces loading to a dust filtration unit. Nearly dust- and tar-free syngas for chemicals production or power generation and with over 90%, and preferably over about 98%, overall carbon conversion can be achieved with the preferred process, apparatus and methods outlined in this invention.

  17. Gasification of high ash, high ash fusion temperature bituminous coals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guohai; Vimalchand, Pannalal; Peng, WanWang

    2015-11-13

    This invention relates to gasification of high ash bituminous coals that have high ash fusion temperatures. The ash content can be in 15 to 45 weight percent range and ash fusion temperatures can be in 1150.degree. C. to 1500.degree. C. range as well as in excess of 1500.degree. C. In a preferred embodiment, such coals are dealt with a two stage gasification process--a relatively low temperature primary gasification step in a circulating fluidized bed transport gasifier followed by a high temperature partial oxidation step of residual char carbon and small quantities of tar. The system to process such coals further includes an internally circulating fluidized bed to effectively cool the high temperature syngas with the aid of an inert media and without the syngas contacting the heat transfer surfaces. A cyclone downstream of the syngas cooler, operating at relatively low temperatures, effectively reduces loading to a dust filtration unit. Nearly dust- and tar-free syngas for chemicals production or power generation and with over 90%, and preferably over about 98%, overall carbon conversion can be achieved with the preferred process, apparatus and methods outlined in this invention.

  18. Sulfur Distribution during Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Lignite, Wheat Straw and Plastic Waste in Sub-Critical Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Baofeng; Huang Yaru; Zhang Jinjun

    2015-01-01

    The distribution and transformation of sulfur in products during hydrothermal liquefaction of lignite, wheat straw and plastic waste in sub-critical water were investigated in an autoclave. The inlfuence of blending ratio, temperature, initial nitrogen pressure, residence time and additives on sulfur distribution was studied systematically. The results showed that most of sulfur existed as organic sulfur and transferred into the residue, and only a small part of sulfur transferred into oil and gas during hydrothermal liquefaction of lignite, wheat straw and plastic waste in sub-critical water. The results also showed that lower temperature (less than 300℃) was favorable for obtaining oil with low sulfur content. It can be also seen from the results that the best condition to obtain the oil with low sulfur content should be implemented at a lignite/wheat straw/plastic waste blending ratio of 5:4:1, an initial nitrogen pressure of 3 MPa and a residence time of 30 minutes. Fur-thermore, the results indicated that adding tourmaline during hydrothermal liquefaction of lignite, wheat straw and plastic waste was beneifcial to production of oil with low sulfur content.

  19. Chemical structure of asphaltenes from tar produced in semicoking of lignite from the Kansk-Achinsk fields (Berezovka deposit)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, V.V.; Proskuryakov, V.A.; Ryltsova, S.V.; Klyavina, O.A. [Lev Tolstoi State Pedagogical University, Tula (Russian Federation)

    1998-10-01

    The chemical composition of asphaltenes from semicoking tar recovered at 450-600{degree}C from Kansk-Achinsk lignite was studied by a set of physicochemical methods. A liquid adsorption chromatographic scheme was developed for separation of asphaltenes into a large number of subfractions significantly differing in the structural parameters and in the nature and content of functional groups.

  20. PILOT-AND FULL-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF ADVANCED MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR LIGNITE-FIRED POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven A. Benson; Charlene R. Crocker; Kevin C. Galbreath; Jay R. Gunderson; Michael J. Holmes; Jason D. Laumb; Jill M. Mackenzie; Michelle R. Olderbak; John H. Pavlish; Li Yan; Ye Zhuang

    2005-02-01

    The overall objective of the project was to develop advanced innovative mercury control technologies to reduce mercury emissions by 50%-90% in flue gases typically found in North Dakota lignite-fired power plants at costs from one-half to three-quarters of current estimated costs. Power plants firing North Dakota lignite produce flue gases that contain >85% elemental mercury, which is difficult to collect. The specific objectives were focused on determining the feasibility of the following technologies: Hg oxidation for increased Hg capture in dry scrubbers, incorporation of additives and technologies that enhance Hg sorbent effectiveness in electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses, the use of amended silicates in lignite-derived flue gases for Hg capture, and the use of Hg adsorbents within a baghouse. The approach to developing Hg control technologies for North Dakota lignites involved examining the feasibility of the following technologies: Hg capture upstream of an ESP using sorbent enhancement, Hg oxidation and control using dry scrubbers, enhanced oxidation at a full-scale power plant using tire-derived fuel and oxidizing catalysts, and testing of Hg control technologies in the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter.

  1. Research of lignite oxidation kinetic parameters modified by CuSO4 and NaNO3 initiation additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larionov Kirill

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study and subsequent analytical assessment of activation energy change in lignite oxidation process with addition of NaNO3 and CuSO4 mineral salts were conducted. The results showed that injection of catalytic additives leads to reduction of coal activation energy and reaction initial temperature.

  2. Comparative palynology of clastics and lignites from the Manning Formation, Jackson Group, Upper Eocene, Grimes County, TX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gennett, J.A. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The 3500 lignite seam at the Gibbons Creek Mine in Grimes County, TX was sampled for pollen and spores at 10 cm intervals. The majority of samples are dominated (to 60%) by Momipites from the Juglandaceae (walnut family), as is typical of Jackson Group sediments. Other palynomorph taxa vary systematically, with a peak of pollen of the freshwater tree Nyssa (blackgum) and associated Rboipites angustus (to 17%) occurring at the base. Higher in the seam, increase (to 55%) of Cupuliferoipollenites (a chestnut-like grain) and Cyrillaceae-pollenites? ventosus (to 7%) percentages may indicate a higher salinity environment. A Chrysophyllum (satin leaf) peak (to 25%) near the top of the seam suggests relatively shallow fresh-water conditions. Core samples from an interval above the lignites represent a transgressive-regressive cycle in inner shelf clastics. These samples were taken at 40 cm or greater intervals and reveal the regional pollen flora. Although minor changes occur, palynomorph spectra are for the most part homogenous. The dominant grain is again Momipites coryloides, but in general percentages are lower (to 35%). Cupuliferoipollenites (to 17%), Chrysophyllum (to 5%), and Rhoipites angustus (to 3%) are not less important, but do not peak as they do in the lignite spectra. Palm leaf megafossils; in one sample suggest a clastic wetland; in this sample palm pollen (mostly Arecipites, representing the modern saw palmetto) reaches 73%. Another sample contains high (26%) percentages of the fern spore Lygodiumsporites adriennis. High percentages of these two taxa do not occur in the lignite samples.

  3. Combustion characteristics and air pollutant formation during oxy-fuel co-combustion of microalgae and lignite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuan; Tahmasebi, Arash; Dou, Jinxiao; Yu, Jianglong

    2016-05-01

    Oxy-fuel combustion of solid fuels is seen as one of the key technologies for carbon capture to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The combustion characteristics of lignite coal, Chlorella vulgaris microalgae, and their blends under O2/N2 and O2/CO2 conditions were studied using a Thermogravimetric Analyzer-Mass Spectroscopy (TG-MS). During co-combustion of blends, three distinct peaks were observed and were attributed to C. vulgaris volatiles combustion, combustion of lignite, and combustion of microalgae char. Activation energy during combustion was calculated using iso-conventional method. Increasing the microalgae content in the blend resulted in an increase in activation energy for the blends combustion. The emissions of S- and N-species during blend fuel combustion were also investigated. The addition of microalgae to lignite during air combustion resulted in lower CO2, CO, and NO2 yields but enhanced NO, COS, and SO2 formation. During oxy-fuel co-combustion, the addition of microalgae to lignite enhanced the formation of gaseous species.

  4. DURABILITY OF HARDENED FLY ASH PASTE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The mechanical properties and durability ( mainly frost-resistance and carbonation resistance ) of fly ash-CaO-CaSO4 .2H2O hardened paste are studied. The relationship among durability of harden ed fly ash paste, the quantity and distribution of hydrates and the initial p aste texture of hardened fly ash paste is presented.

  5. A method for treating bottom ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rem, P.C.; Van Craaikamp, H.; Berkhout, S.P.M.; Sierhuis, W.; Van Kooy, L.A.

    2007-01-01

    A method for treating bottom ash from a waste incineration plant. The invention relates in particular to a method for treating bottom ash from a domestic waste incineration plant. In accordance with the invention bottom ash having a size ranging up to 2 mm is treated by removing a previously determi

  6. The Adsorption of Phenol by Lignite Activated Carbon%褐煤活性炭吸附苯酚的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕国诚; 郝娇; 刘瑠; 马鸿文; 方勤方; 吴丽梅; 魏铭泉; 张以河

    2011-01-01

    The feasibility and adsorption effect of lignite activated carbon for phenol removal from aqueous solutions were evaluated and investigated. A series of tests were performed to look into the influence of various experimental parameters such as contact time, initial phenol concentration, temperature, and pH value on the adsorption of phenol by lignite activated carbon. The experimental data were fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The adsorption is an endothermic process and conforms to Freundlich thermodynamic model. The results indicate that the lignite activated carbon is suitable to be used as an adsorbent material for adsorption of phenol from aqueous solutions.

  7. Radioactivity of wood ash; Puun tuhkan radioaktiivisuus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rantavaara, A.; Moring, M

    2000-01-01

    STUK (Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority) has investigated natural and artificial radioactivity in wood ash and radiation exposure from radionuclides in ash since 1996. The aim was to consider both handling of ash and different ways of using ash. In all 87 ash samples were collected from 22 plants using entirely or partially wood for their energy production in 1996-1997. The sites studied represented mostly chemical forest industry, sawmills or district heat production. Most plants used fluidised bed combustion technique. Samples of both fly ash and bottom ash were studied. The activity concentrations of radionuclides in samples of, e.g., dried fly ash from fuel containing more than 80% wood were determined. The means ranged from 2000 to less than 50 Bq kg{sup -1}, in decreasing order: {sup 137}Cs, {sup 40}K, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 210}Pb,{sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 235}U. In bott radionuclide contents decreased in the same order as in fly ash, but were smaller, and {sup 210}Pb was hardly detectable. The NH{sub 4}Ac extractable fractions of activities for isotopes of alkaline elements (K, Cs) in bottom ash were lower than in fly ash, whereas solubility of heavier isotopes was low. Safety requirements defined by STUK in ST-guide 12.2 for handling of peat ash were fulfilled at each of the sites. Use of ash for land-filling and construction of streets was minimal during the sampling period. Increasing this type of ash use had often needed further investigations, as description of the use of additional materials that attenuate radiation. Fertilisation of forests with wood ash adds slightly to the external irradiation in forests, but will mostly decrease doses received through use of timber, berries, mushrooms and game meat. (orig.)

  8. Radioactivity of wood ash; Puun tuhkan radioaktiivisuus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rantavaara, A.; Moring, M

    2000-01-01

    STUK (Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority) has investigated natural and artificial radioactivity in wood ash and radiation exposure from radionuclides in ash since 1996. The aim was to consider both handling of ash and different ways of using ash. In all 87 ash samples were collected from 22 plants using entirely or partially wood for their energy production in 1996-1997. The sites studied represented mostly chemical forest industry, sawmills or district heat production. Most plants used fluidised bed combustion technique. Samples of both fly ash and bottom ash were studied. The activity concentrations of radionuclides in samples of, e.g., dried fly ash from fuel containing more than 80% wood were determined. The means ranged from 2000 to less than 50 Bq kg{sup -1}, in decreasing order: {sup 137}Cs, {sup 40}K, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 210}Pb,{sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 235}U. In bott radionuclide contents decreased in the same order as in fly ash, but were smaller, and {sup 210}Pb was hardly detectable. The NH{sub 4}Ac extractable fractions of activities for isotopes of alkaline elements (K, Cs) in bottom ash were lower than in fly ash, whereas solubility of heavier isotopes was low. Safety requirements defined by STUK in ST-guide 12.2 for handling of peat ash were fulfilled at each of the sites. Use of ash for land-filling and construction of streets was minimal during the sampling period. Increasing this type of ash use had often needed further investigations, as description of the use of additional materials that attenuate radiation. Fertilisation of forests with wood ash adds slightly to the external irradiation in forests, but will mostly decrease doses received through use of timber, berries, mushrooms and game meat. (orig.)

  9. Palynostratigraphy, palynofacies and depositional environment of a lignite-bearing succession at Surkha Mine, Cambay Basin, north-western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monga Priyanka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports palynology and palynofacies studies of lignite-bearing sediments exposed in an opencast mine succession at Surkha, Bhavnagar District, in the coastal region of Gujarat, India. The study examined the relationships between the palynoflora, sedimentary organic matter and environment at the time of deposition of lignite and associated sediments. Based on dinoflagellate cyst biostratigraphy, the sedimentary succession is dated as early Eocene (Ypresian. Palynofacies studies helped reveal the palaeoenvironmental fluctuations. The dominance of angiosperm pollen grains, freshwater algae, microthyraceous fungi and a large share of land debris in the lower part of the succession suggests a freshwater swamp environment of deposition for the basal lignite facies. Two cenozones - Matanomadiasulcites maximus and Lakiapollis ovatus - were identified in the lower lignite facies, determined from the dominance of these pollen grains in the palynological assemblages. The presence of angiosperm pollen grains and pteridophyte spores in the carbonaceous shale horizon above the lignite facies indicates a change in the depositional regime from freshwater swamp to lagoonal. This was identified as the Arecipites wodehousei cenozone due to its numerical abundance in the assemblage. Dinoflagellate cyst abundance and diversity, and microforaminiferal test linings along with well-sorted terrestrial debris in the mudstone in the upper part of the succession suggest a more open marine estuarine type of depositional environment. The Homotryblium complex along with Cordospheridium fibrospinosum, Kenleyia sp., and Thalassiphora pelagica dinoflagellate cysts are the main representatives of this zone, determined as the Homotryblium tenuispinosum cenozone. The changing depositional settings (freshwater swamp-lagoonal-estuarine along the vertical succession indicate a marine transgression in this region. Results from palynological studies of early Palaeogene

  10. Vegetation differences and diagenetic changes between two Bulgarian lignite deposits - Insights from coal petrology and biomarker composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zdravkov, A.; Bechtel, A.; Sachsenhofer, R.F.; Kortenski, J.; Gratzer, R. [University of Mining & Geology St Ivan Rilski, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2011-03-15

    In this study, we review the petrographic composition and biomarker assemblage of two adjacent basins in western Bulgaria, i.e. Beli Breg and Staniantsi basins. Both contain lignite formed during late Miocene (c. 6 Ma). Despite similar tectonic settings and depositional environments, the lignite seams possess different petrographic and organic geochemical characteristics, reflecting differences in the peat forming palaeo-communities and fades variations. The peat-forming vegetation in Bell Breg Basin was dominated by decay resistant coniferous plants, as indicated by abundant fossil wood remains, very good tissue preservation and a biomarker assemblage dominated by diterpenoids. In contrast, Staniantsi lignite is poor in fossil wood and contains a significant amount of triterpenoid biomarkers, suggesting the predominance of angiosperm plants in the swamp. The results of the biomarker analyses are consistent with palaeobotanical and palynological data from the literature. The lignite seams in both basins formed under frequently changing Eh conditions, as indicated by the severe degradation of the non-gymnosperm tissues, the low gelification index values and the variations in pristane/phytane ratio, probably as a result of seasonal drying of the swamps and changes of the ground water table. Hopanoid contents in Bell Breg lignite are very low and are consistent with the abundance of decay-resistant vegetation. In contrast, bacterial activity was obviously higher in the Staniantsi swamp, however, resulting only in slightly enhanced gelification of plant tissues. The geochemical data suggest that the diagenetic changes of the organic matter were mainly governed by thermal degradation, rather than bacterial activity.

  11. 1999 international ash utilization symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    112 papers were presented covering various aspects of the utilization of coal and other combustion products. Topics included fundamental chemistry and mineralogy, new products, health and environmental aspects, economic development issues, agricultural and mine reclamation applications, concrete and cement, and fly ash beneficiation technologies. Selected papers will be published in the journal 'Fuel'.

  12. Use of Incineration MSW Ash: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles H. K. Lam

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews the characteristics of municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI ashes, with a main focus on the chemical properties of the ashes. Furthermore, the possible treatment methods for the utilization of ash, namely, separation processes, solidification/stabilization and thermal processes, are also discussed. Seven types of MSWI ash utilization are reviewed, namely, cement and concrete production, road pavement, glasses and ceramics, agriculture, stabilizing agent, adsorbents and zeolite production. The practical use of MSWI ash shows a great contribution to waste minimization as well as resources conservation.

  13. 共热解过程对褐煤焦和生物质焦氧化特性的影响%Effect of co-pyrolysis process on the oxidation reactivity of lignite char and biomass char

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭沛; 赵慧明; 贾挺豪; 王美君; 常丽萍

    2015-01-01

    Ximeng lignite and cornstalk were used as the feedstock to prepare lignite char, biomass char and co-pyrolysis char with different blending ratios in a fixed bed reactor with temperature-programmed pyrolysis. The pore and chemical structure of char samples were characterized and the ash composition was analyzed. The oxidation reactivity of the mixtures of lignite char/cornstalk char with different blending ratios and the co-pyrolysis char of lignite and cornstalk with corresponding blending ratios were investigated by the isothermal thermogravimetry at 450℃, aimed at the effect of co-pyrolysis process on the char reactivity. The results show that there are obvious influences on the char structures through secondary reactions during co-pyrolysis process, leading to the char reactivity decrease. Especially with the cornstalk proportion less than 50%, these influences are more significant due to a large number of volatiles from cornstalk during co-pyrolysis enhancing the secondary reactions between the volatile and nascent char, prompting parts of organic structure less than 5 rings turn into the larger organic structure. For the char samples with cornstalk proportion above 50%, the catalytic effect of alkaline and alkaline earth metal in biomass char plays a dominating role, especially the effect of potassium, resulting in the weaker effects of secondary reactions on the structure and oxidation reactivity of the char samples.%以锡盟褐煤和玉米秸秆为原料,利用固定床程序升温热解的方法制备了褐煤焦、生物质焦以及褐煤和生物质不同混合比例的共热解焦样,并进行了孔结构和化学结构的表征以及其灰成分分析。采用等温热重法在450℃下考察褐煤焦和生物质焦的混合样与其相同比例的共热解焦样的氧化活性,对比分析共热解过程对焦样反应活性的影响。实验结果表明,共热解过程中的二次反应对焦样结构有着明显的影响,进一步导

  14. Lignite Drying and Dewatering Technologies%褐煤干燥脱水技术

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孟顺; 孙绍增; 赵广播

    2013-01-01

    With a high water content, lignite has a low efficiency for direct combustion power generation. The lignite drying and dewatering technology can effectively lower the water content of lignite- and enhance its competitive power. On this basis, the authors studied and analyzed the principles of the following technologies, namely, flue gas drying technology , steam drying technology (tube type drying and fluidized bed steam drying) , hydrothermal dewatering technology, mechanical thermal dehydration (MTE) technology and upgraded brown coal (UBC) technology. Moreover,they also contrasted and analyzed the pressure, temperature, removing state, dewatering effectiveness, pore structure and re-absorption characteristics of various drying and dewatering technologies. The mechanical thermal dehydration technology can change the pore structure of brown coal and prevent from re-absorption, thus achieving a relatively high dewatering efficiency with a low energy consumption rate. It is of major significance for China to develop novel drying and dewatering technologies with due consideration of the brown coal distribution features of China to lower the water content of coal from its source, realize an economic transportation of coal and enhance the power generation efficiency of power plants.%褐煤含水量高,直接燃烧发电效率低.褐煤干燥脱水技术能有效降低褐煤含水量,提高其竞争力.研究介绍了烟气干燥技术、蒸汽干燥(管式干燥,流化床蒸汽干燥)、水热脱水技术、机械热力脱水技术(MTE)和热油干燥技术(UBC)5种褐煤干燥脱水技术的原理;对比分析了不同干燥脱水技术的压力、温度、脱除状态、脱水效率、孔隙结构和重吸收特性;机械热力脱水技术(MTE)可以改变褐煤孔隙结构、防止重吸收、脱水效率较高和能耗低.结合我国褐煤分布特点,开发新型干燥脱水技术,在源头降低煤的水分含量,实现煤的经济运输,提高电厂的发电效率.

  15. An ecosystem approach to evaluate restoration measures in the lignite mining district of Lusatia/Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaaf, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    Lignite mining in Lusatia has a history of over 100 years. Open-cast mining directly affected an area of 1000 km2. Since 20 years we established an ecosystem oriented approach to evaluate the development and site characteristics of post-mining areas mainly restored for agricultural and silvicultural land use. Water and element budgets of afforested sites were studied under different geochemical settings in a chronosequence approach (Schaaf 2001), as well as the effect of soil amendments like sewage sludge or compost in restoration (Schaaf & Hüttl 2006). Since 10 years we also study the development of natural site regeneration in the constructed catchment Chicken Creek at the watershed scale (Schaaf et al. 2011, 2013). One of the striking characteristics of post-mining sites is a very large small-scale soil heterogeneity that has to be taken into account with respect to soil forming processes and element cycling. Results from these studies in combination with smaller-scale process studies enable to evaluate the long-term effect of restoration measures and adapted land use options. In addition, it is crucial to compare these results with data from undisturbed, i.e. non-mined sites. Schaaf, W., 2001: What can element budgets of false-time series tell us about ecosystem development on post-lignite mining sites? Ecological Engineering 17, 241-252. Schaaf, W. and Hüttl, R. F., 2006: Direct and indirect effects of soil pollution by lignite mining. Water, Air and Soil Pollution - Focus 6, 253-264. Schaaf, W., Bens, O., Fischer, A., Gerke, H.H., Gerwin, W., Grünewald, U., Holländer, H.M., Kögel-Knabner, I., Mutz, M., Schloter, M., Schulin, R., Veste, M., Winter, S. & Hüttl, R.F., 2011: Patterns and processes of initial terrestrial-ecosystem development. Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science, 174, 229-239. Schaaf, W., Elmer, M., Fischer, A., Gerwin, W., Nenov, R., Pretsch, H. and Zaplate, M.K., 2013: Feedbacks between vegetation, surface structures and hydrology

  16. Identifying glass compositions in fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine eAughenbaugh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, four Class F fly ashes were studied with a scanning electron microscope; the glassy phases were identified and their compositions quantified using point compositional analysis with k-means clustering and multispectral image analysis. The results showed that while the bulk oxide contents of the fly ashes were different, the four fly ashes had somewhat similar glassy phase compositions. Aluminosilicate glasses (AS, calcium aluminosilicate glasses (CAS, a mixed glass, and, in one case, a high iron glass were identified in the fly ashes. Quartz and iron crystalline phases were identified in each fly ash as well. The compositions of the three main glasses identified, AS, CAS, and mixed glass, were relatively similar in each ash. The amounts of each glass were varied by fly ash, with the highest calcium fly ash containing the most of calcium-containing glass. Some of the glasses were identified as intermixed in individual particles, particularly the calcium-containing glasses. Finally, the smallest particles in the fly ashes, with the most surface area available to react in alkaline solution, such as when mixed with portland cement or in alkali-activated fly ash, were not different in composition than the large particles, with each of the glasses represented. The method used in the study may be applied to a fly ash of interest for use as a cementing material in order to understand its potential for reactivity.

  17. Geotechnical engineering properties of incinerator ash mixes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhunthan, B; Taha, R; Said, J

    2004-08-01

    The incineration of solid waste produces large quantities of bottom and fly ash. Landfilling has been the primary mode of disposal of these waste materials. Shortage in landfill space and the high cost of treatment have, however, prompted the search for alternative uses of these waste materials. This study presents an experimental program that was conducted to determine the engineering properties of incinerator ash mixes for use as construction materials. Incinerator ash mixes were tested as received and around optimum compacted conditions. Compaction curves, shear strength, and permeability values of fly ash, bottom ash, and their various blends were investigated. Bottom ash tends to achieve maximum dry density at much lower water content than does fly ash. The mixes displayed a change in their cohesion and friction angle values when one of the two mix components was altered or as a result of the addition of water. The permeability of bottom ash is quite comparable to that of sand. The permeability of fly ash lies in the range of those values obtained for silts and clays. A 100% bottom ash compacted at the optimum water content has a lower density value and yields a higher friction angle and cohesion values than most construction fills. This would encourage the use of bottom ash as a fill or embankment material because free drainage of water will prevent the buildup of pore water pressures.

  18. Interspecific variation in resistance to emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) among North American and Asian ash (Fraxinus spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebek, Eric J; Herms, Daniel A; Smitley, David R

    2008-02-01

    We conducted a 3-yr study to compare the susceptibility of selected North American ash and an Asian ash species to emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, an invasive wood-boring beetle introduced to North America from Asia. Because of a coevolutionary relationship between Asian ashes and emerald ash borer, we hypothesized an Asian ash species, Manchurian ash, is more resistant to the beetle than its North American congeners. Consistent with our hypothesis, Manchurian ash experienced far less mortality and yielded far fewer adult beetles than several cultivars of North American green and white ash. Surprisingly, a black ash (North American) x Manchurian ash hybrid was highly susceptible to emerald ash borer, indicating this cultivar did not inherit emerald ash borer resistance from its Asian parent. A corollary study investigated the efficacy of soil-applied imidacloprid, a systemic, neonicotinoid insecticide, for controlling emerald ash borer in each of the five cultivars. Imidacloprid had no effect on emerald ash borer colonization of Manchurian ash, which was low in untreated and treated trees. In contrast, imidacloprid did enhance survival of the North American and hybrid cultivars and significantly reduced the number of emerald ash borer adults emerging from green and white ash cultivars. We identify a possible mechanism of resistance of Manchurian ash to emerald ash borer, which may prove useful for screening, selecting, and breeding emerald ash borer-resistant ash trees.

  19. Nitrogen forms in 1- to 7-year-old opencast lignite mine soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil-Sotres, F.; Leiros, M.C.; Trasar-Cepeda, M.C.; Saa, A.; Gonzalez-Sangregorio, M.V. (Facultad de Farmacia, Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Dept. de Edafologia y Quimica Agricola)

    1993-08-01

    The distribution of different forms of N was studied in very young (0- to 7-year-old) soils from the Meirama lignite mine in northwest Spain. Total N increased rapidly with soil age, largely in the humic acid-associated fraction. Acid hydrolysis indicated that amino acid N and a hydrolysable unknown form of N increased with soil age. The fractionation reported by Bettany et al. (1980) indicated that alkali/pyrophosphate-extractable humus increased with soil age. All these data suggest that there is rapid stabilization of organic N during the first few years of evolution of these mine soils, to the extent that distribution of N forms in the 7-year old soil is very similar to that in native soils. 23 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Modifications of the phosphorus cycle with development of lignite mine soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trasar Cepeda, M.C.; Deblas, E.; Garcia Rodeja, I.; Leiros, M.C.; Gil Sotres, F. (Universidad de Santiago, Santiago (Spain). Departamento de Edafologia y Quimica Agricola)

    1993-10-01

    Various aspects of the P cycle in four and seven year old soils from the Meirama lignite mine (northwest Spain) were studied. With increasing soil age, the organic P (P(o)) content increased in parallel with the organic matter content. The observed increase in secondary inorganic P is related to the increase in the retention capacity for P with soil age. The observed increase in the HCl-P fraction can be attributed to a gradual dissolution of the non-extractable forms of P produced from fertilizers added in the course of spoil management. Both the C:P(o) ratio and phosphatase activity also increased with soil age, suggesting that biochemical mineralization processes are taking place and indicating a need for the hydrolysis of phosphate esters to ensure an adequate phosphorus supply to plants. All these findings suggest that in the long term plants may suffer a pronounced P deficiency.

  1. Environmental policy instruments towards lignite-fired power plants in Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    A proposition is made that Turkey considers a pilot emission trading system for SO{sub 2}, Nox and/or PM emissions from its coal and lignite fired power plant in the efforts to comply with the EU Integrated Pollution Prevention Control (IPPC), the Large Combustion Plant (LCP) and the National Emissions Ceiling (NEC) Directives. Model calculations indicate that this could yield substantial cost savings compared to a traditional command and control approach. However, requirements in the IPPC Directive would be a major obstacle against emissions trading. The Turkish emission permitting system needs a major overhaul, including improving monitoring and enforcement practices to comply with the directives and to be able to implement and operate an emission trading system.

  2. Fluid bed drying as upgrading technology for feasible treatment of Kolubara lignite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erić Milić D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview of the current status of low-rank coal upgrading technologies is presented in the paper, particularly with respect to drying and dewatering procedures. In order to calculate the significant parameters of the moisture removal process, a model of convective coal drying in a fluid bed, based on the two-phase (bubbling fluidization model proposed by Kunii and Levenspiel, is developed and presented. Product-specific data (intraparticle mass transfer, gas-solid moisture equilibrium related to the particular coal variety addressed here (Kolubara lignite are obtained through preliminary investigations. Effective thermal conductivity of the packed bed as defined by Zehner/Bauer/Schlünder is used to define heat transfer mechanisms occurring in the suspension phase of the fluid bed. A completely new set of experimental data obtained has been successfully used to validate the model additionally. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR33050 i III42010

  3. Rheological aspects of dense lignite-water suspensions; structure development on consecutive flow loops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudoulas, Thomas B.; Kastrinakis, Eleftherios G.; Nychas, Stavros G. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Department of Chemical Engineering, Univ. Box 453, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2007-01-15

    Aspects of dense lignite-water slurries (LWS) rheology were investigated using controlled stress and controlled strain rheometers with parallel disks and Couette geometries. During the preparation of the slurries, the achieved solids volume fractions were up to 0.425 and the particle size distributions were polydispersed with sizes up to 300 {mu}m. In the ascending parts of consecutive flow loops, a slope transition of the flow curve was observed and studied in relation to the solids volume fraction. The obtained results with the different geometries and rheometers were qualitatively the same. By following the model proposed by Cheng (Rheol Acta 42:372-382, 2003) for thixotropic fluids, and taking into account the yield stress appearance, a suitable correlation for LWS is proposed, which is consistent with the experimental flow curves. (orig.)

  4. Analysis of gas-phase mercury sorption with coke and lignite dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marczak Marta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the problem of mercury emission became a widely discussed topic. Its high impact is caused by its toxicity and ability to accumulate in living organisms, properties that justified the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA to classify mercury as hazardous pollutant. The problem of mercury emission is crucial for countries like Poland, where the most of the emission is caused by coaldepended energy sector. Current technology of mercury removal utilizes adsorption of mercury on the surface of activated carbon. Due to high price of activated carbon, this technological approach seems to be uneconomical and calls for cheaper alternative. One possible solution can be usage of other sorptive materials obtained from thermal processes like coke production. Example of such material is coke dust obtained from dry quenching of coke. The aim of this work was to analyse the sorption potential of lignite and coke dust and determine parameters influencing mercury behaviour during combustion.

  5. Uncertainty estimation by Bayesian approach in thermochemical conversion of walnut hull and lignite coal blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyukada, Musa

    2017-05-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to incorporate the uncertainties in the thermal behavior of walnut hull (WH), lignite coal, and their various blends using Bayesian approach. First of all, thermal behavior of related materials were investigated under different temperatures, blend ratios, and heating rates. Results of ultimate and proximate analyses showed the main steps of oxidation mechanism of (co-)combustion process. Thermal degradation started with the (hemi-)cellulosic compounds and finished with lignin. Finally, a partial sensitivity analysis based on Bayesian approach (Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations) were applied to data driven regression model (the best fit). The main purpose of uncertainty analysis was to point out the importance of operating conditions (explanatory variables). The other important aspect of the present work was the first performance evaluation study on various uncertainty estimation techniques in (co-)combustion literature.

  6. Study on pyrolysis gas in thermal extraction of Bai Yinhua lignite with industrial washing oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y. M.; Lian, X. P.; Zhao, F. Y.; Xu, Y. Q.; Hu, Y. Q.; Yuan, Z. K.; Hao, X. R.

    2016-08-01

    Industrial washing oil as solvent, pyrolysis gas produced from Bai Yinhua lignite during thermal extraction was studied by gas chromatography. The effects of temperature and solvent coal ration on coal pyrolysis gas were investigated. The results showed that: Pyrolysis gas produced mainly in CO, CO2, O2, H2, CH4, and so on, in which the total amount of oxygen containing compounds nearly 40%, significant effects of deoxidation was achieved. The increase of heat extraction temperature can significantly increase the degree of bond breaking and the gas formation rate, the gas yield and the rate of oxygen increase significantly, while the gas yield increases with the decrease of the solvent coal ration.

  7. The flora of the Early Miocene Brandon Lignite, Vermont, USA. 8 Caldesia (Alismastaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haggard, K.K.; Tiffney, B.H. [University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Geological Science

    1997-02-01

    Caldesia, a genus of aquatic monocotyledons, is represented by four living species, which are widely distributed in the temperate and tropical Old World. The genus has an extensive Oligocene through Pleistocene fossil record in Eurasia. This paper surveys the morphology of the extant and fossil fruits of the Alismataceae, and provides a detailed review of the morphology and anatomy of living and fossil Caldesia fruits. The latter exhibit substantial similarity, making the recognition of separate species on the basis of fruit morphology difficult. A new species Caldesia brandoniana is erected from the Early Miocene Brandon Lignite of Vermont primarily on the basis of its geographic isolation; careful revision of all fossil fruiting material of Caldesia might require placement of the Brandon specimens in a more inclusive form species. Together with leaves of Caldesia from the Miocene Clarkia flora of Idaho, this occurrence indicates that Caldesia was in the New World as recently as the Early Miocene.

  8. Raman spectroscopic study of amorphous and crystalline hydrocarbons from soils, peats and lignite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jehlicka, J.; Edwards, H.G.M.; Villar, S.E.J.; Pokorny, J. [Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. for Geochemical Mineral & Mineral Resources

    2005-08-01

    FT-Raman spectra were obtained from the natural hydrocarbon mixtures ozokerite and hatchettite as well as from the terpenoid minerals fichtelite (norabietane) and hartite (alpha-phyllocladane). Some of these hydrocarbons occur in soil and peat environments of Holocene age. However, hartite occurs in lignite, in fossilised Glyptostrobus (Taxodiaceae) trees and in pelosiderites of the Bilina Miocene series (about 20 Ma); it represents the accumulated and crystallised product of diagenetic transformation of precursor biogenic terpenoids. Raman spectra of earth waxes investigated confirm their dominantly aliphatic character and oxidative degradation (related to weathering and/or subaerial alteration in museum cabinets). Vibrational assignments are proposed and differences in Raman spectra of fichtelite and hartite discussed. Some of the individual features can be used for discrimination (e.g., hartite bands at 1480, 1310, 1287, 1041, 729 and 693 cm{sup -1} and fichtelite bands at 1302, 836, 717 and 533 cm{sup -1}).

  9. Analysis of renewable energy sources and electric vehicle penetration into energy systems predominantly based on lignite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dedinec, A.; Jovanovski, B.; Gajduk, A.; Markovska, N.; Kocarev, L.

    2016-05-01

    We consider an integration of renewable energy into transport and electricity sectors through vehicle to grid (V2G) technologies for an energy system that is predominantly based on lignite. The national energy system of Macedonia is modeled using EnergyPLAN which integrates energy for electricity, transport and heat, and includes hourly fluctuations in human needs and the environment. We show that electric-vehicles can provide the necessary storage enabling a fully renewable energy profile for Macedonia that can match the country's growing demand for energy. Furthermore, a large penetration of electric vehicles leads to a dramatic reduction of 47% of small particles and other air pollutants generated by car traffic in 2050.

  10. Analysis of renewable energy sources and electric vehicle penetration into energy systems predominantly based on lignite

    CERN Document Server

    Dedinec, Aleksandar; Gajduk, Andrej; Markovska, Natasa; Kocarev, Ljupco

    2016-01-01

    We consider an integration of renewable energy into transport and electricity sectors through vehicle to grid (V2G) technologies for an energy system that is predominantly based on lignite. The national energy system of Macedonia is modeled using EnergyPLAN which integrates energy for electricity, transport and heat, and includes hourly fluctuations in human needs and the environment. We show that electric-vehicles can provide the necessary storage enabling a fully renewable energy profile for Macedonia that can match the country's growing demand for energy. Furthermore, a large penetration of electric vehicles leads to a dramatic reduction of 47% of small particles and other air pollutants generated by car traffic in 2050.

  11. Palynofloral geochronology of the Brandon Lignite of Vermont, USA. [USA - Vermont

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traverse, A. (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Geosciences)

    1994-07-01

    The palynoflora of the Brandon Lignite and associated sediments of central Vermont are reviewed palynostratigraphically and systematically, reflecting the changes in available information since the original research by the author on this deposit nearly fifty years ago. This study was undertaken because of continued interest in the rich Brandon flora of algal remains, wood, seeds, fruits and palynomorphs. The age of the sediments, based on the contained palynoflora, was originally proposed by the author as latest Oligocene. It is here revised upwards to middle Early Miocene. The fossil palynomorphs are referred to the appropriate form-taxa, including many transfers made by others. Two new form-genera, Parthenopollenites and Gordonipollenitres, are proposed. There are also eight new species: Cupuliferoidaepollenites vermontensis, Cyrillacaepollenites joabthomasii, Ericipites lyonipolliniatus, Ericipites oxydendripolliniatus, Tricolporites novae-angliae, Tricolporoidites forestdalensis, Tricolporopollenites brandonensis and Tricolporopollenites vermontensis. Twenty five new combinations are also proposed.

  12. More efficient cleaning concepts for stepping up availability of lignite-fired power plants (Ligpower)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Wiechers; B. Wessel; S. Goudanis; F. Kluger; G. Riley [RWE Power AG, Koeln (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The quality of lignite extracted in various deposits differs considerably in part. The impact of changed major coal quality parameters on steam generator operation became evident in the form of increased deposit formation on the boiler's heating surfaces. Successful countermeasures were launched, but the bottleneck of the problem continues to be the cleaning of the first convection heating surfaces downstream of the furnace. As the cleaning facilities available so far (soot blowers) have not proved sufficient for these areas of application despite all optimisation efforts made, new processes have to be developed. In contrast to the methods applied so far, these processes do not use the common cleaning medium steam but work on the basis of alternative cleaning media. Within the scope of the Ligpower project, such alternative cleaning methods were selected and subjected to extensive testing on commercial utility boilers. Since a more intensive cleaning of superheater tubes involves increased stress of the tube material, we developed new, more resistant, superheater designs and installed these in a 600 MW unit. The transferability of the findings made was ensured by a comparison of the lignites used. To permit the cleaning device to be controlled as needed, we developed a programme that analyses the degree of fouling of the boiler and generates suggestions for its cleaning. In addition, a tube-fin superheater design was calculated and optimised in terms of fluid dynamics. The extensive tests showed which cleaning methods have suitable approaches to cleaning. By testing them over several years, we gained important information about equipment design. The superheater design could be tested only to a limited degree. Thus, we obtained additional findings in tests using a test heating surface that was mounted on a 300 MW boiler. 77 figs., 5 tabs., 3 apps.

  13. Evaluation of the Arya-Paris model for estimating water retention characteristics of lignitic mine soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buczko, U.; Gerke, H.H. [Brandenburg University of Technology, Cottbus (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Mine soil materials may be viewed as man-made systems that consist of spatially disordered soil and sediment components, which are in an initial stage of soil development. A question is whether methods and approaches developed for natural soils, may also be used for such artificially created soil materials. The applicability of the Arya and Paris pedotransfer function to obtain hydraulic properties from the particle size distribution and bulk density was tested for lignitic mine soil material of the Lusatian Lignite Mining District in eastern Germany. The scaling factor a in this model was evaluated by (I) fitting of the water retention curves estimated with the Arya-Paris model (APM) to measured water retention data and (ii) interpretation of a as a fractal dimension of the pore channels and derivation of this fractal dimension from the fractal dimension of the particle size distribution. The two tested fractal approaches resulted in relatively inaccurate predictions of the water content. The use of a single fitted a value for each depth yielded a values between 1.05 and 1.47. Because of the inability of the APM to account for residual water contents in this sandy soil material, a correction was applied. The cumulative mass fraction fractal method did not improve the estimation in comparison with the retention curves calculated with a constant a value of 1.38. The closest fits with the data were obtained by using a variable a value that depended on the particle size. The accuracy of the predictions of the APM in the higher suction range could be improved (lower mean deviations and root mean square deviations of water content) by using a linear water content-dependent correction factor. Better estimates of water retention in the relatively dry range may be significant for simulation of water budgets of mine spoil sites in the Lusatian Mining District.

  14. Advanced power assessment for Czech lignite task 3.6. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sondreal, E.A.; Mann, M.D.; Weber, G.W.; Young, B.C.

    1995-12-01

    Major reforms in the Czech energy sector have been initiated to reverse 40 years of central planning, subsidized energy pricing, unchecked pollution from coal-fired plants, concerns over nuclear safety and fuel cycle management, and dependence on the former U.S.S.R. for oil, gas, and nuclear fuel processing. Prices for electricity, heat, and natural gas paid by industry are close to western levels, but subsidized prices for households are as much as 40% lower and below economic cost. State control of major energy enterprises is being reduced by moving toward government-regulated, investor-owned companies to raise needed capital, but with a strategic stake retained by the state. Foreign firms will participate in privatization, but they are not expected to acquire a controlling interest in Czech energy companies. Economic conditions in the Czech Republic are now improving after the disruptions caused by restructuring since 1989 and separation of the former Czech and Slovak Federal Republics in January 1993. The downturn in the economy after 1989 was concentrated in energy-intensive heavy industry, and recovery is paced by consumer trade, services, light industry and construction. Energy use in relation to gross domestic product (GDP) has declined, but it is still significantly higher than in OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries. The GDP increased by 2% in 1994 after dropping 22% between 1989 and 1993. A positive balance of payments has been achieved, with foreign investment offsetting a small trade deficit. The government`s external debt is only 4% of GDP. This report studies the application of lignite resources within the newly formulated energy policies of the republic, in light of a move toward privatization and stronger air pollution regulations. Lignite has represented the major energy source for the country.

  15. Ultrasonic ash/pyrite liberation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yungman, B.A.; Buban, K.S.; Stotts, W.F.

    1990-06-01

    The objective of this project was to develop a coal preparation concept which employed ultrasonics to precondition coal prior to conventional or advanced physical beneficiation processes such that ash and pyrite separation were enhanced with improved combustible recovery. Research activities involved a series of experiments that subjected three different test coals, Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Upper Freeport, ground to three different size fractions (28 mesh [times] 0, 200 mesh [times] 0, and 325 mesh [times] 0), to a fixed (20 kHz) frequency ultrasonic signal prior to processing by conventional and microbubble flotation. The samples were also processed by conventional and microbubble flotation without ultrasonic pretreatment to establish baseline conditions. Product ash, sulfur and combustible recovery data were determined for both beneficiation processes.

  16. Utilization Of Rice Husk Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Nagrale

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available India is a major rice producing country, and the husk generated during milling is mostly used as a fuel in the boilers for processing paddy, producing energy through direct combustion and / or by gasification. About 20 million tones of Rice Husk Ash (RHA is produced annually. This RHA is a great environment threat causing damage to the land and the surrounding area in which it is dumped. Lots of ways are being thought of for disposing them by making commercial use of this RHA. RHA can be used as a replacement for concrete (15 to 25%.This paper evaluates how different contents of Rice Husk Ash added to concrete may influence its physical and mechanical properties. Sample Cubes were tested with different percentage of RHA and different w/c ratio, replacing in mass the cement. Properties like Compressive strength, Water absorption and Slump retention were evaluated.

  17. The Ashes of Marci Shore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Kopeć

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses Marci Shore’s social and historical thought, as presented in her books: Caviar and Ashes: A Warsaw Generation’s Life and Death in Marxism, 1918-1968 (2006, The Taste of Ashes (2013, and her essays recently published in Polish translation. The author follows the American historian, presenting her concept of modernity, but focuses on the main theme of her research: the contribution of Jewish writers, poets, artists, and intellectuals to the creation of Marxism. The author acknowledges the great value of Marci Shore’s writings, but argues that her panorama of the 20th century would be fuller if her discussion included a reflection on the religious attitude of many Jewish thinkers to Marxism and the USSR. This topic was discussed by Nikolai Berdyaev and Polish thinkers who published in pre-war social journals.

  18. Geopolymer Mortar with Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saloma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cement industry accounts for about 7% of all CO2 emissions caused by humans. Therefore, it is necessary to find another material in order to support sustainable material. An alternative way is replacing cement material with alternative material as fly ash. Fly ash as binder need to be added alkaline activator in the form of sodium silicate (Na2SiO3 or potassium silicate (K2SiO3 and sodium hydroxide (NaOH or potassium hydroxide (KOH. The purpose of this research is to analyze the effect of activator liquid concentration on geopolymer mortar properties and to know the value of compressive strength. Molarity variation of NaOH are 8, 12, 14, and 16 M with ratio of Na2SiO3/NaOH = 1.0. Ratio of sand/fly ash = 2.75 and ratio of activator/fly ash = 0.8. The cube-shaped specimen 50 × 50 × 50 mm is cured by steam curing with a temperature of 60°C for 48 hours. The experimental result of fresh mortar reported that the molarity of NaOH affect the slump flow and setting time, higher of NaOH produces the smaller value of slump and the faster time of setting. The experimental of density results reported that the increase of specific gravity when the molarity of NaOH increased. The experimental results of the compressive strength are showed that the maximum compressive strength of geopolymer mortar 14 M is 10.06 MPa and the lowest compressive strength produced by geopolymer mortar 8 M is 3.95 MPa. Testing the compressive strength of geopolymer mortar 16 M produces compressive strength lower than 14 M geopolymer mortar is 9.16 MPa.

  19. Vitrification of municipal solid waste incineration fly ash using biomass ash as additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhadj-Mallah, Moussa-Mallaye; Huang, Qunxing; Cai, Xu; Chi, Yong; Yan, JianHua

    2015-01-01

    Thermal melting is an energy-costing solution for stabilizing toxic fly ash discharged from the air pollution control system in the municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plant. In this paper, two different types of biomass ashes are used as additives to co-melt with the MSWI fly ash for reducing the melting temperature and energy cost. The effects of biomass ashes on the MSWI fly ash melting characteristics are investigated. A new mathematical model has been proposed to estimate the melting heat reduction based on the mass ratios of major ash components and measured melting temperature. Experimental and calculation results show that the melting temperatures for samples mixed with biomass ash are lower than those of the original MSWI fly ash and when the mass ratio of wood ash reaches 50%, the deformation temperature (DT), the softening, hemisphere temperature (HT) and fluid temperature (FT) are, respectively, reduced by 189°C, 207°C, 229°C, and 247°C. The melting heat of mixed ash samples ranges between 1650 and 2650 kJ/kg. When 50% wood ash is mixed, the melting heat is reduced by more than 700 kJ/kg for the samples studied in this paper. Therefore, for the vitrification treatment of the fly ash from MSW or other waste incineration plants, wood ash is a potential fluxing assistant.

  20. False deformation temperatures for ash fusibility associated with the conditions for ash preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, T.F.; Gupta, S.K.; Gupta, R.P.; Sanders, R.H.; Creelman, R.A.; Bryant, G.W. [University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW (Australia). Cooperative Research Centre for Black Coal Utilization, Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1999-07-01

    A study was made to investigate the fusibility behaviour of coal ashes of high ash fusion temperatures. Coals and ashes formed in the boiler were sampled in several Australian power stations, with laboratory ashes being prepared from the coals. The laboratory ashes gave lower values for the deformation temperature (DT) than the combustion ashes when the ash had low levels of basic oxide components. Thermo-mechanical analysis, quantitative X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used to establish the mechanisms responsible for the difference. Laboratory ash is finer than combustion ash and it includes unreacted minerals (such as quartz, kaolinite and illite) and anhydrite (CaSO{sub 4}). Fusion events which appear to be characteristic of reacting illite, at temperatures from 900 to 1200{degree}C, were observed for the laboratory ashes, these being associated with the formation of melt phase and substantial shrinkage. The combustion ashes did not contain this mineral and their fusion events were observed at temperatures exceeding 1300{degree}C. The low DTs of coal ashes with low levels of basic oxides are therefore a characteristic of laboratory ash rather than that found in practical combustion systems. These low temperatures are not expected to be associated with slagging in pulverised coal fired systems. 10 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Volcanic ash infrared signature: porous non-spherical ash particle shapes compared to homogeneous spherical ash particles

    OpenAIRE

    A. Kylling; Kahnert, M.; Lindqvist, H.; T. Nousiainen

    2014-01-01

    The reverse absorption technique is often used to detect volcanic ash clouds from thermal infrared satellite measurements. From these measurements effective particle radius and mass loading may be estimated using radiative transfer modelling. The radiative transfer modelling usually assumes that the ash particles are spherical. We calculated thermal infrared optical properties of highly irregular and porous ash particles and compared these with mass- and volume-equivalent sp...

  2. Volcanic ash infrared signature: porous non-spherical ash particle shapes compared to homogeneous spherical ash particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylling, A.; Kahnert, M.; Lindqvist, H.; Nousiainen, T.

    2014-04-01

    The reverse absorption technique is often used to detect volcanic ash clouds from thermal infrared satellite measurements. From these measurements effective particle radius and mass loading may be estimated using radiative transfer modelling. The radiative transfer modelling usually assumes that the ash particles are spherical. We calculated thermal infrared optical properties of highly irregular and porous ash particles and compared these with mass- and volume-equivalent spherical models. Furthermore, brightness temperatures pertinent to satellite observing geometry were calculated for the different ash particle shapes. Non-spherical shapes and volume-equivalent spheres were found to produce a detectable ash signal for larger particle sizes than mass-equivalent spheres. The assumption of mass-equivalent spheres for ash mass loading estimates was found to underestimate mass loading compared to morphologically complex inhomogeneous ash particles. The underestimate increases with the mass loading. For an ash cloud recorded during the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruption, the mass-equivalent spheres underestimate the total mass of the ash cloud by approximately 30% compared to the morphologically complex inhomogeneous particles.

  3. Possibilities of utilizing power plant fly ashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mezencevová Andrea

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The burning of fossil fuels in industrial power stations plays a significant role in the production of thermal and electrical energy. Modern thermal power plants are producing large amounts of solid waste, mainly fly ashes. The disposal of power plant waste is a large environmental problem at the present time. In this paper, possibilities of utilization of power plant fly ashes in industry, especially in civil engineering, are presented. The fly ash is a heterogeneous material with various physical, chemical and mineralogical properties, depending on the mineralogical composition of burned coal and on the used combustion technology. The utilization of fly ashes is determined of their properties. The fineness, specific surface area, particle shape, density, hardness, freeze-thaw resistance, etc. are decisive. The building trade is a branch of industry, which employs fly ash in large quantities for several decades.The best utilization of fluid fly ashes is mainly in the production of cement and concrete, due to the excellent pozzolanic and cementitious properties of this waste. In the concrete processing, the fly ash is utilized as a replacement of the fine aggregate (fine filler or a partial replacement for cement (active admixture. In addition to economic and ecological benefits, the use of fly ash in concrete improves its workability and durability, increases compressive and flexural strength, reduces segregation, bleeding, shrinkage, heat evolution and permeability and enhances sulfate resistance of concrete.The aim of current research is to search for new technologies for the fly ash utilization. The very interesting are biotechnological methods to recovery useful components of fly ashes and unconventional methods of modification of fly ash properties such as hydrothermal zeolitization and mechanochemical modification of its properties. Mechanochemistry deals with physico - chemical transformations and chemical reactions of solids induced by

  4. Volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas M.; Stewart, Carol; Sword-Daniels, Victoria; Leonard, Graham S.; Johnston, David M.; Cole, Jim W.; Wardman, Johnny; Wilson, Grant; Barnard, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Volcanic eruptions can produce a wide range of hazards. Although phenomena such as pyroclastic flows and surges, sector collapses, lahars and ballistic blocks are the most destructive and dangerous, volcanic ash is by far the most widely distributed eruption product. Although ash falls rarely endanger human life directly, threats to public health and disruption to critical infrastructure services, aviation and primary production can lead to significant societal impacts. Even relatively small eruptions can cause widespread disruption, damage and economic loss. Volcanic eruptions are, in general, infrequent and somewhat exotic occurrences, and consequently in many parts of the world, the management of critical infrastructure during volcanic crises can be improved with greater knowledge of the likely impacts. This article presents an overview of volcanic ash impacts on critical infrastructure, other than aviation and fuel supply, illustrated by findings from impact assessment reconnaissance trips carried out to a wide range of locations worldwide by our international research group and local collaborators. ‘Critical infrastructure’ includes those assets, frequently taken for granted, which are essential for the functioning of a society and economy. Electricity networks are very vulnerable to disruption from volcanic ash falls. This is particularly the case when fine ash is erupted because it has a greater tendency to adhere to line and substation insulators, where it can cause flashover (unintended electrical discharge) which can in turn cause widespread and disruptive outages. Weather conditions are a major determinant of flashover risk. Dry ash is not conductive, and heavy rain will wash ash from insulators, but light rain/mist will mobilise readily-soluble salts on the surface of the ash grains and lower the ash layer’s resistivity. Wet ash is also heavier than dry ash, increasing the risk of line breakage or tower/pole collapse. Particular issues for water

  5. Mineral composition of rock in Visonia lignite and Nograd brown coal and its influence on abradability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szalay, Z.

    1984-01-01

    A study is made of the properties of coals when they are reprocessed in a crusher and tubular furnace at the Gagarin heat and electric power plant and the characteristics of the forming fly ash. The coals are distinguished by high percentages (15-28%) of montmorillonite and kaolinite (3-13%). DTA and x-ray structural analysis of the coals and solid residues were conducted. It is shown that the fly ash is mainly formed from clay minerals and consists of an amorphous mass and modifications of free SiO/sub 2/.

  6. COAL ASH RESOURCES RESEARCH CONSORTIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The Coal Ash Resources Research Consortium (CARRC, pronounced �cars�) is the core coal combustion by-product (CCB) research group at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). CARRC focuses on performing fundamental and applied scientific and engineering research emphasizing the environmentally safe, economical use of CCBs. CARRC member organizations, which include utilities and marketers, are key to developing industry-driven research in the area of CCB utilization and ensuring its successful application. CARRC continued the partnership of industry partners, university researchers, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) addressing needs in the CCB industry through technical research and development projects. Technology transfer also continued through distribution and presentation of the results of research activities to appropriate audiences, with emphasis on reaching government agency representatives and end users of CCBs. CARRC partners have evolved technically and have jointly developed an understanding of the layers of social, regulatory, legal, and competition issues that impact the success of CCB utilization as applies to the CCB industry in general and to individual companies. Many CARRC tasks are designed to provide information on CCB performance including environmental performance, engineering performance, favorable economics, and improved life cycle of products and projects. CARRC activities from 1993�1998 included a variety of research tasks, with primary work performed in laboratory tasks developed to answer specific questions or evaluate important fundamental properties of CCBs. The tasks summarized in this report are 1) The Demonstration of CCB Use in Small Construction Projects, 2) Application of CCSEM (computer-controlled scanning electron microscopy) for Coal Combustion By-Product Characterization, 3) Development of a Procedure to Determine Heat of Hydration for Coal Combustion By-Products, 4) Investigation of the Behavior of High

  7. Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae on survival and growth of perennial grasses in lignite overburden in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Call, C.A.; Davies, F.T.

    1988-12-01

    Seedlings of sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula), Indiangrass (Sorghastrum nutans), and kleingrass (Panicum coloratum) were inoculated with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi (Glomus fasciculatum and Gigaspora margarita) in a containerized system and transplanted into lignite overburden in the Post Oak Savannah region of Texas, U.S.A. After three growing seasons without cultural inputs, plants inoculated with VAM fungi had greater survival percentages, basal diameters, and above-ground biomass than noninoculated plants. Inoculated plants had higher levels of nitrogen and phosphorus in above-ground biomass than noninoculated plants. Root colonization percentages of inoculated plants remained fairly stable while noninoculated plants showed low levels of colonization over the 3-year study period. Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae enhanced the survival and growth of the 3 grass species by making effective use of limited resources in the lignite overburden. 31 refs., 3 tabs.

  8. Evaluation of radioactive emissions of lignite-fired power plants in Turkey using the Analytic Hierarchy Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueke, Tayfun [Mugla Sitki Kocman Univ., Mugla (Turkey). Dept. of Energy Systems Engineering

    2013-11-15

    Radioactive emissions of 13 lignite-fired power plants in Turkey are of great concern to the public and to scientists alike. The purpose of this study is to evaluate these power plants, according to their radioactive emissions by using the Analytic Hierarchy Process. Control criteria are in particular {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K and {sup 238}U emissions from the power plants. These control criteria are weighted according to the objective assessment. The calculations are repeated for three different objective assessments of control criteria namely the mortality risk coefficients for inhalation, ingestion, external exposure of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th, {sup 40}K and {sup 238}U. It has been calculated that the Can lignite-fired power plant is ranking first while the Soma-B plant is ranking last according to the radioactive emissions of the power plants when the average of three different objective control criteria are used in the calculations. (orig.)

  9. Co-pyrolysis of pine sawdust and lignite in a thermogravimetric analyzer and a fixed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuyao; Tahmasebi, Arash; Yu, Jianglong

    2014-12-01

    Co-pyrolysis characteristics of lignite and pine sawdust were studied in a TGA and a fixed-bed reactor. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and blending ratio on the yield and composition of pyrolysis products (gas, tar, and char) were investigated. TGA experiments showed that pine sawdust decomposition took place at lower temperatures compared to lignite. With increasing the pine sawdust content in the blend, the DTG peaks shifted towards lower temperatures due to synergetic effect. In fixed-bed experiments, the synergetic effect increased the yield of volatile matter compared to the calculated values. The major gases released at low temperatures were CO2 and CO. However, hydrogen was the primary gaseous product at higher temperatures. During co-pyrolysis, concentrations of benzene, naphthalene, and hydrocarbons in the tar decreased, accompanied by an increase in phenols and guaiacol concentrations. With increasing pyrolysis temperature, the OH, aliphatic CH, CO, and CO functional groups in char decomposed substantially.

  10. Re-evaluation of the age of the Brandon Lignite (Vermont, USA) based on plant megafossils. [USA - Vermont

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiffney, B.H. (University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-07-01

    The Brandon Lignite of west-central Vermont contains the northernmost megafossil flora of Cenozoic angiosperms, and one of the most diverse Cenozoic pollen floras in northeastern North America. While the floristic composition clearly indicates deposition of the Brandon sediments in the warmer parts of the Cenozoic, previous attempts at a more precise stratigraphic placement have been inconclusive, ranging from Cretaceous to Miocene. Re-evaluation of existing and new fruit, seed and wood data from the Brandon flora in the context of other floras in the Northern Hemisphere leads to the conservative conclusion that the deposit could range from earliest Oligocene to Early Miocene. Several lines of potentially weak evidence favor an Early Miocene age, in agreement with recent biostratigraphic data from the associated pollen flora. It is concluded that the Brandon Lignite is Early Miocene.

  11. Rapid toxicity screening of gasification ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Xu; Rong, Le; Ng, Wei Cheng; Ong, Cynthia; Baeg, Gyeong Hun; Zhang, Wenlin; Lee, Si Ni; Li, Sam Fong Yau; Dai, Yanjun; Tong, Yen Wah; Neoh, Koon Gee; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2016-04-01

    The solid residues including bottom ashes and fly ashes produced by waste gasification technology could be reused as secondary raw materials. However, the applications and utilizations of these ashes are very often restricted by their toxicity. Therefore, toxicity screening of ash is the primary condition for reusing the ash. In this manuscript, we establish a standard for rapid screening of gasification ashes on the basis of in vitro and in vivo testing, and henceforth guide the proper disposal of the ashes. We used three different test models comprising human cell lines (liver and lung cells), Drosophila melanogaster and Daphnia magna to examine the toxicity of six different types of ashes. For each ash, different leachate concentrations were used to examine the toxicity, with C0 being the original extracted leachate concentration, while C/C0 being subsequent diluted concentrations. The IC50 for each leachate was also quantified for use as an index to classify toxicity levels. The results demonstrated that the toxicity evaluation of different types of ashes using different models is consistent with each other. As the different models show consistent qualitative results, we chose one or two of the models (liver cells or lung cells models) as the standard for rapid toxicity screening of gasification ashes. We may classify the gasification ashes into three categories according to the IC50, 24h value on liver cells or lung cells models, namely "toxic level I" (IC50, 24h>C/C0=0.5), "toxic level II" (C/C0=0.05gasification plants every day. Subsequently, appropriate disposal methods can be recommended for each toxicity category. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Toxicity of waste gasification bottom ash leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivula, Leena; Oikari, Aimo; Rintala, Jukka

    2012-06-01

    Toxicity of waste gasification bottom ash leachate from landfill lysimeters (112 m(3)) was studied over three years. The leachate of grate incineration bottom ash from a parallel setup was used as reference material. Three aquatic organisms (bioluminescent bacteria, green algae and water flea) were used to study acute toxicity. In addition, an ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) assay was performed with mouse hepatoma cells to indicate the presence of organic contaminants. Concentrations of 14 elements and 15 PAH compounds were determined to characterise leachate. Gasification ash leachate had a high pH (9.2-12.4) and assays with and without pH adjustment to neutral were used. Gasification ash leachate was acutely toxic (EC(50) 0.09-62 vol-%) in all assays except in the algae assay with pH adjustment. The gasification ash toxicity lasted the entire study period and was at maximum after two years of disposal both in water flea (EC(50) 0.09 vol-%) and in algae assays (EC(50) 7.5 vol-%). The grate ash leachate showed decreasing toxicity during the first two years of disposal in water flea and algae assays, which then tapered off. Both in the grate ash and in the gasification ash leachates EROD-activity increased during the first two years of disposal and then tapered off, the highest inductions were observed with the gasification ash leachate. The higher toxicity of the gasification ash leachate was probably related to direct and indirect effects of high pH and to lower levels of TOC and DOC compared to the grate ash leachate. The grate ash leachate toxicity was similar to that previously reported in literature, therefore, confirming that used setup was both comparable and reliable. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. As and Se interactions with fly ashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Díaz-Somoano

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic and selenium are toxic elements present incoal in trace concentrations that may be emitted tothe environment during coal conversion processes.However, it is possible to retain volatile arsenic andselenium compounds in the fly ashes originated bythe process, the proportions retained depending onthe characteristics of the ashes and processconditions. This work is focused on the capture ofthese elements in fly ashes in simulated coalcombustion and gasification atmospheres inlaboratory scale reactors.

  14. Characterization and valorization of biomass ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Nikhilesh S; Mandavgane, Sachin A; Mehetre, Sayaji; Kulkarni, Bhaskar D

    2016-10-01

    In India, farming is the primary source of income for many families. Following each harvest, a huge amount of biomass is generated. These are generally discarded as "agrowaste," but recent reports have indicated several beneficial uses for these biomasses and their ashes. However, before the utilization of biomass ashes (BMAs), their chemical and physical properties need to be investigated (characterized) so as to utilize their potential benefit to the fullest. In this paper, eight different biomass ashes (soybean plant ash, mustard plant ash, maize ash, groundnut plant ash, cotton plant ash, wheat plant ash, pigeon peas ash, and groundnut shell ash) were characterized, and their chemical properties are discussed. Surface chemical composition analysis, proximate analysis, and ultimate analysis were performed on all BMA samples, and properties such as porosity, particle density, bulk density, point of zero charge, BET surface area, water-absorption capacity, and bulk parameters such as surface pH and surface charges were determined. BMAs were characterized by SEM and FTIR. The surface areas of biomass ashes vary from 1.9 to 46 m(2)/g, and point of zero charge for all BMAs exceed 9.8, which confirmed the alkaline nature of these samples. Based on the chemical composition, BMAs are categorized into four types (S, C, K, and CK), and their utilization is proposed based on the type. BMAs find applications in agriculture and construction industries; glass, rubber, and zeolite manufacturing; and in adsorption (as a source of silica/zeolites). The paper also discusses the research challenges and opportunities in utilization of BMAs.

  15. Extraction of bituminous coal fly ash for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons: evaluation of modified and unmodified supercritical fluid extraction, enhanced fluidity solvents, and accelerated solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, D V; Olesik, S V

    1998-02-01

    A comparison among supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), modified SFE, enhanced-fluidity extraction, and accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) techniques was made for the extraction of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from an aged, spiked bituminous coal fly ash. Non-ASE extraction techniques used in this study could not recover PAHs with molecular weights greater than that of pyrene. ASE techniques using methylene chloride (with and without a static step) and toluene were able to recover most of the PAHs studied. None of the ASE techniques could quantitatively extract the low-molecular-weight PAHs from the bituminous fly ash. The medium-molecular-weight PAHs were best recovered with toluene ASE. The high-molecular-weight PAHs were best recovered with the toluene ASE technique (> 80%), but the overall precision of these measurements was low. Methylene chloride ASE with a static step recovered the high-molecular-weight PAHs with the next highest efficiency (approximately 55%) and had standard deviations less than 10% (longer extraction times [> 30 min] with the methylene chloride would increase the recoveries of these analytes.) A comparison of the results from this study with those of a previous study using lignite coal fly ash illustrates the difficulty in developing and adapting analyte-specific extraction methods for analytes that are adsorbed on different matrices.

  16. Estimation of the Required Amount of Hydrological Exploration in Lignite Mining Areas on the Basis of Hypothetical Hydrogeological Models

    OpenAIRE

    Kaden, S.; Reichel, F.; Luckner, L.

    1985-01-01

    Mine drainage is a necessary but very costly precaution for open-pit lignite mining in sandy aquifers. Consequently, the minimization of the number of drainage wells and their optimal operation become important tasks in designing mine drainage systems. Comprehensive groundwater flow models have to be used, both, for the design of drainage wells, and for the analysis of water management strategies in mining areas . The accuracy of computations with such models depends on the precision of the u...

  17. Oxidation of humic acids from an agricultural soil and a lignite deposit: Analysis of lipophilic and hydrophilic products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allard, B.; Derenne, S. [BIOEMCO, Paris (France)

    2007-07-01

    The composition of humic acids (HAs) isolated from an agricultural soil and a lignite deposit was examined via H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and RuO{sub 4} oxidation. The oxidation digests were separated into lipophilic and hydrophilic components. Information with regard to the source, degree of humification and preservation of easily degradable constituents of the HAs was obtained and results were compared with those obtained earlier for base hydrolysates of solvent-extracted fractions. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} oxidation of both HAs afforded lipophilic fractions containing high molecular weight compounds. The composition of the base hydrolysates of the lipophilic fractions strongly differed with the origin of the HA. The lipophilic components of the soil HA derived mainly from the higher plant polyesters cutin and suberin. The lipophilic components of the lignite HA predominantly comprised long chain alkanoic acids and alkanols. The patterns for the hydrophilic components released upon H{sub 2}O{sub 2} oxidation were found to be identical irrespective of the origin of the HA. The hydrophilic fractions comprised aliphatic (poly)carboxylic acids related to carbohydrate moieties and benzene polycarboxylic acids. The relative abundance of benzene polycarboxylic acids increased with the degree of humification. For both HAs, RuO{sub 4} oxidation resulted in a lipophilic fraction containing low molecular weight products identical to those found in the base hydrolysate of the lipophilic fraction released upon H{sub 2}O{sub 2} oxidation. The hydrophilic components released upon RuO{sub 4} oxidation were independent of the HA origin and consisted mainly of monosaccharides and disubstituted aromatic compounds. In agreement with the greater aromaticity of lignite HA, the aromatic compound/carbohydrate ratio was higher for lignite HA than soil HA. The results show that the fused aromatic structures had a small size and that carbohydrates could escape degradation during the humification process.

  18. Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Testing for Lignite-Fired Utilities - Oxidation Systems for Wet FGD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven A. Benson; Michael J. Holmes; Donald P. McCollor; Jill M. Mackenzie; Charlene R. Crocker; Lingbu Kong; Kevin C. Galbreath

    2007-03-31

    Mercury (Hg) control technologies were evaluated at Minnkota Power Cooperative's Milton R. Young (MRY) Station Unit 2, a 450-MW lignite-fired cyclone unit near Center, North Dakota, and TXU Energy's Monticello Steam Electric Station (MoSES) Unit 3, a 793-MW lignite--Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal-fired unit near Mt. Pleasant, Texas. A cold-side electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubber are used at MRY and MoSES for controlling particulate and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions, respectively. Several approaches for significantly and cost-effectively oxidizing elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) in lignite combustion flue gases, followed by capture in an ESP and/or FGD scrubber were evaluated. The project team involved in performing the technical aspects of the project included Babcock & Wilcox, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), the Electric Power Research Institute, and URS Corporation. Calcium bromide (CaBr{sub 2}), calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}), magnesium chloride (MgCl{sub 2}), and a proprietary sorbent enhancement additive (SEA), hereafter referred to as SEA2, were added to the lignite feeds to enhance Hg capture in the ESP and/or wet FGD. In addition, powdered activated carbon (PAC) was injected upstream of the ESP at MRY Unit 2. The work involved establishing Hg concentrations and removal rates across existing ESP and FGD units, determining costs associated with a given Hg removal efficiency, quantifying the balance-of-plant impacts of the control technologies, and facilitating technology commercialization. The primary project goal was to achieve ESP-FGD Hg removal efficiencies of {ge}55% at MRY and MoSES for about a month.

  19. Geochemical and Mineralogical Characteristics of Pleistocene Lignites and Associated Sediments of Marathousa Coal Field,Central Peloponnese,Greece

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.E.KELEPERTSIS; E.KONTIS

    1997-01-01

    The mineralogy and geochemistry data are presented for thirty-seven shales,four concretions,two carbonate sediments and seven lignites from the Marathousa coal field of the Megalopolis Basin in Greece.The argillaceous rocks consist of chlorite,illite,kaolinte,albite,quartz.opal-A,calcite and dolomite;the concretions of aragonite,gypsum and pyrite;and the carbonate rocks of calcite,quartz and illite.The mineral matter in the lignites consists of gypsum,quartz,albite,chlorite,illite,opal-A,dolomite,pyrite,and rarely calcite and kaolinite Athree-factor model explains the total variaition of major and trace elements in the argillaceous sediments.The first factor is an aluminosilicate factor and involves the following elements:Al,Si,Mg,Na,K,Ti,Mn,Nb,Y,Rb,Zn,Cu,Ni,Cr,Nband V,associated with chlorite,albite and illite.The second factor involves the elements Ca,Sr,Ba,Znand Sc and is related to carbonate lithology and mainly the carbonate concretions with gypsum.The third factor involves Fe and Ce with a weak association with Mn.The diagenesis of the Marathousa sediments and lignites was not very advanced as indicated by (a) the total thickness of the sequence (500m),(b) the presence of biogenic silica(opal-A) and (c) the age of the deposit(Pleistocene).FOr these reasons the rpresence of chlorite,illite and kaolinite in the sediments and lignite is due not to diagenetic reactions but to weathering of the flysch and metamorphic rocks at the edges of the Megalopolis Basin and transport of the weathering products(illite,chlorite,kaolinite)into the basin of deposition.The diagenetic minerals of the Marathousa sequence include pyrite,gypsum,dolomite and aragonite.

  20. Emission characteristics of co-combustion of sewage sludge with olive cake and lignite coal in a circulating fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toraman, Oner Yusuf; Topal, Hüseyin; Bayat, Oktay; Atimtay, Aysel T

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) of 125 mm diameter and 1800mm height was used to find the combustion characteristics of sewage sludge (SS) produced in Turkey. Sludge + olive cake, and sludge + lignite coal mixtures were burned separately. Various sludge-to-lignite coal and sludge-to-olive cake ratios (5/95, 10/90, 15/85, 20/80) were tried. On-line concentrations of major components (O2, SO2, CO2, CO, NOx, CmHn) were measured in the flue gas, as well as temperature and pressure distributions along the bed. Combustion efficiencies of sludge + olive cake and sludge + lignite coal mixtures were calculated, and the optimum conditions for operating parameters were discussed. The results have shown that the combustion mainly takes place in the upper regions of the main column where the temperature reaches 900 degrees C. SS + Coal burn in the CFB with an efficiency of 95.14% to 96.18%, which is considered to be quite good. When burning sludge mixed with olive cake, appreciable amounts of CO and unburned hydrocarbons are formed and the combustion efficiency drops to 92.93%. CO and CmHn emissions are lower when lignite coal is mixed with various amounts of SS than the emissions when the coal is burned alone. As the %SS is increased in the fuel mixture, the SO2 emission decreases. NOx emissions are slightly higher. When burning sludge mixed with olive cake, SO2 and NOx emissions are slightly higher. CO and CmHn emissions decrease sharply when SS is mixed with 5%wt. olive cake. With increasing sludge ratio these emissions increase due to the unburned hydrocarbons. As a result of this study, it is believed that SS can be burned effectively in a CFBC together with other fuels, especially with olive cake (OC). OC will be a good additive fuel for the combustion of lower quality fuels.

  1. A realistic EU vision of a lignite-based energy system in transition: Case study of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batas-Bjelić Ilija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Several Contracting Parties to the Treaty establishing the Energy Community of the South East Europe, currently in energy transition, have electricity production dominantly based on lignite which contrasts their new reality. Planning approach to designing a new feasible energy policy is presented in this paper. This novel approach in using EnergyPLAN tool stems from analysis of market operation of lignite thermal power plants on hourly basis, and quantification of the feasibility of the energy policy and its alignment with EU vision, and is presented in few scenarios. It was found out that the Serbian energy system is highly sensitive to the electricity market and CO2 tax increase, because the marginal costs for lignite generation will increase to more than 50€/MWh. Shifting in the merit order will be observed even at lower CO2 tax levels, because of the intensity of the emission of the electricity sector (calculated to be higher than 700gCO2/kWhel, according to current energy policy. Based on the increased use of renewable energy sources and more efficient energy conversion technologies, socio-economic and energy policy feasibility would be increased, while long-term marginal costs would be improved by 2€/MWh and emission intensity by 258 gCO2/kWhel, compared to the current energy policy. These contributions, shown in the Serbian case, are of general importance for other lignite dominated Contracting Parties to Treaty establishing the Energy Community. [Projekat Ministartsva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 42009

  2. Volcanic ash at Santiaguito dome complex, Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornby, Adrian; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; Cimarelli, Corrado; von Aulock, Felix; Rhodes, Emma; Kennedy, Ben; Wadsworth, Fabian

    2015-04-01

    Dome-building volcanoes often suffer episodic explosions. Examination of eruptive activity at Santiaguito dome complex (Guatemala) reveals that gas-and-ash explosions are concordant with rapid inflation/ deflation cycles of the active dome. During these explosions strain is accommodated along marginal faults, where tensional fracture mechanisms and friction dominate, complicating the model of ash generation by bubble rupture in magma. Here, we describe textural features, morphology and petrology of ash collected before, during and after a dome collapse event at Santiaguito dome complex on the 28th November 2012. We use QEM-scan (on more than 35000 grains), laser diffraction granulometry and optical and scanning microscopy to characterise the samples. The ash samples show a bimodal size distribution and a range of textures, crystal content and morphologies. The ash particles are angular to sub-angular and are relatively dense, so do not appear to comprise of pore walls. Instead the ash is generally blocky (>70%), similar to the products of shear magma failure. The ash samples show minor variation before, during and after dome collapse, specifically having a smaller grain size and a higher fraction of phenocrysts fragments before collapse. Textural analysis shows vestiges of chemically heterogeneous glass (melt) filaments originating from the crystals and crosscut by fragmentation during volcanic ash formation. High-velocity friction can induce melting of dome lavas, producing similar disequilibrium melting textures. This work shows the importance of deformation mechanisms in ash generation at lava domes and during Vulcanian activity.

  3. Solidification on fly ash, Yugoslav experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knezevic, D. [Mining Institute, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Popov, S.; Salatic, D. [Faculty of Mining and Geology, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1997-12-31

    A study was performed on ashes produced in the combustion process of coal from the Kosovo coal basin, in order to determine the potential and conditions of ash self-solidification. Investigations showed that the ash properties allows for the transformation into a solid mass through a controlled mixing with water. The optimal concentration of ash is 50 percent and the hydro-mixture is behaving as a Bingham plastic fluid. Solidification is obtained in a relatively short period (within 3 to 5 days) without additives. The resulting solidified mass is very consistent and stable

  4. Effect of co-combustion on the burnout of lignite/biomass blends: A Turkish case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykirl-Acma, H.; Yaman, S. [Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2008-11-15

    Co-combustion of Turkish Elbistan lignite and woody shells of hazelnut was performed in a TGA tip to 1173 K with a heating rate of 20 K/min. SEM images of each fuel revealed the differences in their physical appearances. Hazelnut shell was blended with lignite in the range of 2-20 wt% to observe the co-combustion properties. Maximum burning rates (R{sub max}), temperatures of the maximum burning rates (TR{sub max}), and the final burnout values of the parent samples and the blends were compared. The results were interpreted considering lignite properties and the major biomass ingredients such as cellulosics, hemicellulosics, and lignin. Deviations between the theoretical and experimental burnout values were evaluated at various temperatures. Burnout characteristics of the blends up to 10 wt% were concluded to have a synergistic effect so the addition of hazelnut shell up to 8 wt% provided higher burnouts than the expected theoretical ones, whereas addition of as much as 10 wt% led to a decrease in the burnout. However, the additive effects were more favorable for the blend having a biomass content of 20 wt%. Apparent activation energy, R{sub max} and TR{sub max}, were found to follow the additive behavior for the blend samples.

  5. Evaluation of naturally occurring pigments of the North Bohemian lignite mining area; Bewertung von mineralischen Pigmentvorkommen des nordboehmischen Braunkohlenbeckens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buntenbach, Stephan [TriMin Consulting - Mineral Processing, Ammerthal (Germany); Botula, Jiri [VSB-Technical Univ. of Ostrava (Czech Republic). Mineral Processing Dept.; Leonhardt, Hana

    2010-11-15

    The research project ''Mineral Processing Methods for the Preparation of Naturally Occurring Pigments from Overburden of the Lignite Mines and from Shallow Clay Deposits of the North Bohemian Lignite Basin'', funded by the Deutsche Bundesstiftung Umwelt DBU, was conducted as a collaboration between the AKW Apparate+Verfahren GmbH, Hirschau with the Technical University of Ostrava. Geological, mineralogical and mineral processing studies for the development of a suitable beneficiation method were carried out to investigate the possibilities of the industrial usage of beneficiated pigments of these deposits. It should be demonstrated, that the significant reserves of mineral pigments in the shallow deposits and also in the overburden of the lignite mines can be utilized ecologically and economically. Based on the results of geological prospecting work already carried out, the deposit Horenec was selected as the most important pigment deposits for the production of bolus and ochre earth. The newly carried out geological, mineralogical and chemical studies formed the basis for the following mineral processing test work and the test work for the usage of beneficiated products as colouring paint for plastic, fabric and other materials. (orig.)

  6. Trace elements in the Fontinalis antipyretica from rivers receiving sewage of lignite and glass sand mining industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosior, Grzegorz; Samecka-Cymerman, Aleksandra; Kolon, Krzysztof; Brudzińska-Kosior, Anna; Bena, Waldemar; Kempers, Alexander J

    2015-07-01

    Intensive lignite and glass sand mining and industrial processing release waste which may contain elements hazardous to the aquatic ecosystem and constitute a potential risk to human health. Therefore, their levels must be carefully controlled. As a result, we examined the effects of sewage on the aquatic Fontinalis antipyretica moss in the Nysa Łużycka (lignite industry) and the Kwisa Rivers (glass sand industry). The Nysa Łużycka and the Kwisa Rivers appeared to be heavily polluted with As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, V and Zn, which were reflected in the extremely high concentration of these elements in F. antipyretica along the studied watercourses. In the Nysa Łużycka, trace element composition in the moss species is affected by lignite industry with accumulation in its tissues of the highest concentrations of Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn, while samples from the Kwisa sites influenced by glass sand industry revealed the highest concentrations of As, V and Fe. The principal component and classification analysis classifies the concentration of elements in the aquatic F. antipyretica moss, thus enabling the differentiation of sources of water pollution in areas affected by mining industry.

  7. DEGRADATION OF A CARBON STEEL IN A FBC SYSTEM FIRING COALS CONTAINING SULFUR AND CHLORINE%FBC中含S和Cl煤燃烧下的碳钢退化研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭晓; WP Pan; RT Riley

    2003-01-01

    在实验室规模的流化床(FBC)中分别燃烧低S(0.97 mass%)与低Cl(0.026 mass%),中S(1.68 mass%)与高Cl(0.42 mass%),高S(4.48 mass%)与高Cl(0.41 mass%)三种煤各1000小时后,对放置于接近沸腾床位置的A210-C碳钢管的退化情况进行了研究.结果表明,(1)碳钢退化明显受温度影响,随表面温度的升高显著加快;(2)碳钢退化明显受飞行粒子带来的冲蚀影响;(3)燃烧低S低Cl煤对碳钢的耗损影响最小,而燃烧高S高Cl煤对碳钢耗损影响最大.同时根据对腐蚀产物的观测分析,对不同煤种燃烧产生的环境中碳钢的退化机制进行探讨.

  8. Self hardening property of Botswana fly ash | Sahu | Botswana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Self hardening property of Botswana fly ash. ... In the present investigation, an effort has been made to study the self hardening property of Botswana fly ash by ... This will encourage the use of fly ash economically as a construction material.

  9. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxley, Chett [Park City, UT

    2012-05-15

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with a quantity of spray dryer ash (SDA) and water to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and form a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 40%, and in some cases less than 20%, of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. An optional alkaline activator may be mixed with the fly ash and SDA to facilitate the geopolymerization reaction. The alkaline activator may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  10. Evaluation of the Chemical and Mechanical Properties of Hardening High-Calcium Fly Ash Blended Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Jie Fan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available High-calcium fly ash (FH is the combustion residue from electric power plants burning lignite or sub-bituminous coal. As a mineral admixture, FH can be used to produce high-strength concrete and high-performance concrete. The development of chemical and mechanical properties is a crucial factor for appropriately using FH in the concrete industry. To achieve sustainable development in the concrete industry, this paper presents a theoretical model to systematically evaluate the property developments of FH blended concrete. The proposed model analyzes the cement hydration, the reaction of free CaO in FH, and the reaction of phases in FH other than free CaO. The mutual interactions among cement hydration, the reaction of free CaO in FH, and the reaction of other phases in FH are also considered through the calcium hydroxide contents and the capillary water contents. Using the hydration degree of cement, the reaction degree of free CaO in FH, and the reaction degree of other phases in FH, the proposed model evaluates the calcium hydroxide contents, the reaction degree of FH, chemically bound water, porosity, and the compressive strength of hardening concrete with different water to binder ratios and FH replacement ratios. The evaluated results are compared to experimental results, and good consistencies are found.

  11. Evaluation of the Chemical and Mechanical Properties of Hardening High-Calcium Fly Ash Blended Concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei-Jie; Wang, Xiao-Yong; Park, Ki-Bong

    2015-09-07

    High-calcium fly ash (FH) is the combustion residue from electric power plants burning lignite or sub-bituminous coal. As a mineral admixture, FH can be used to produce high-strength concrete and high-performance concrete. The development of chemical and mechanical properties is a crucial factor for appropriately using FH in the concrete industry. To achieve sustainable development in the concrete industry, this paper presents a theoretical model to systematically evaluate the property developments of FH blended concrete. The proposed model analyzes the cement hydration, the reaction of free CaO in FH, and the reaction of phases in FH other than free CaO. The mutual interactions among cement hydration, the reaction of free CaO in FH, and the reaction of other phases in FH are also considered through the calcium hydroxide contents and the capillary water contents. Using the hydration degree of cement, the reaction degree of free CaO in FH, and the reaction degree of other phases in FH, the proposed model evaluates the calcium hydroxide contents, the reaction degree of FH, chemically bound water, porosity, and the compressive strength of hardening concrete with different water to binder ratios and FH replacement ratios. The evaluated results are compared to experimental results, and good consistencies are found.

  12. Minerals in the Ash and Slag from Oxygen-Enriched Underground Coal Gasification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuqin Liu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Underground coal gasification (UCG is a promising option for the recovery of low-rank and inaccessible coal resources. Detailed mineralogical information is essential to understand underground reaction conditions far from the surface and optimize the operation parameters during the UCG process. It is also significant in identifying the environmental effects of UCG residue. In this paper, with regard to the underground gasification of lignite, UCG slag was prepared through simulation tests of oxygen-enriched gasification under different atmospheric conditions, and the minerals were identified by X-Ray diffraction (XRD and a scanning electron microscope coupled to an energy-dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS. Thermodynamic calculations performed using FactSage 6.4 were used to help to understand the transformation of minerals. The results indicate that an increased oxygen concentration is beneficial to the reformation of mineral crystal after ash fusion and the resulting crystal structures of minerals also tend to be more orderly. The dominant minerals in 60%-O2 and 80%-O2 UCG slag include anorthite, pyroxene, and gehlenite, while amorphous substances almost disappear. In addition, with increasing oxygen content, mullite might react with the calcium oxide existed in the slag to generate anorthite, which could then serve as a calcium source for the formation of gehlenite. In 80%-O2 UCG slag, the iron-bearing mineral is transformed from sekaninaite to pyroxene.

  13. Time-dependent phosphate dynamics in reclaimed lignite-mine soils under Robinia pseudoacacia L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freese, Dirk; Slazak, Anna

    2017-04-01

    As a consequence of the opencast lignite mining activities in Lusatia/Germany, the cultivation of Short Rotation Coppice plantations (SRC) has been considered as a viable option for reclamation purposes. In this region an area of about 1000 km2 has been degraded. Owing to the unfavourable biotic and abiotic properties of the overburden mining substrate, the biogeochemical processes associated with the soil ecosystem development are in the initial phase. The substrate contains very low amount of nutrients, mainly very low total Phosphate (P) content nearly equal to zero. The lack of P is one of the main issues in reclamation of this marginal site. Therefore, the cultivation of perennial SRC with Robinia pseudoacacia L. is considered as a supporting measurement for effective soil reclamation. In this context, it is important to understand the dynamics of P in this "initial substrate" to describe the P availability and P sorption/desorption.. Iron/aluminium oxides and organic matter are the soil constituents most strongly affecting the reactions and rate of P sorption and desorption, also in post-mining soils. Therefore the interaction of these oxides and organic matter with P is essential with regard to developing effective nutrient management strategies for marginal sites. The study focused on P sorption and desorption with regard to different development stages of R. pseudoacacia L. established in a short rotation coppices on the post mining soils. to describe the P availability (Pav) in relation to total P mobility. The hypothesis is that SRC would cause significant changes in soil P dynamics over time in post lignite mining soils. The trees has been planted in between 1995 and 2007, which means that R. pseudoacacia L. was in a range of 2 to 20 years old at different sampling times. Soil was sampled in 2008 and 2015 at three depths of: 0-3cm, 3-10 cm and 10-30 cm. To characterize the P dynamics different P forms and P sorption/desorption kinetics were analysed

  14. Relations of petrographical and geochemical parameters in the middle Miocene Lavanttal lignite (Austria)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bechtel, A. [Department Angewandte Geowissenschaften und Geophysik, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Peter-Tunner-Str. 5, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Mineralogisch-Petrologisches Institut, Universitaet Bonn, Poppelsdorfer Schloss, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Reischenbacher, D.; Sachsenhofer, R.F.; Gratzer, R. [Department Angewandte Geowissenschaften und Geophysik, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Peter-Tunner-Str. 5, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Luecke, A. [Institut fuer Chemie und Dynamik der Geosphaere V: Sedimentaere Systeme (ICG V), Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Puettmann, W. [Institute of Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences, Department of Environmental Chemistry, J. W. Goethe-Universitaet, Georg-Voigt-Str. 14, D-60054 Frankfurt a.M. (Germany)

    2007-05-01

    Samples from two lignite seams (Lower Seam, Upper Seam) of the Lavanttal basin (Austria) and additional xylite were investigated for variations in maceral composition, petrography-based facies indicators, bulk geochemical parameters, and molecular composition of hydrocarbons. Both seams originated in a topogenous mire and evolved within a transgressive setting. The final drowning of the mire is indicated by sapropelic shales. Whereas the sapropelic shale overlying the Lower Seam was deposited in a freshwater lake, the sapropelic shale above the Upper Seam represents a brackish lake. Numerous relationships are found between petrography-based facies indicators and the geochemical composition of organic matter. The contents of macerals of the liptinite group are positively correlated with soluble organic matter (SOM) yields and hydrogen index (HI). Consistent with maceral composition and high HI values, enhanced proportions of short-chain n-alkanes, which are predominantly found in algae and microorganisms, are obtained from samples of the sapropelic shales. The final drowning of the mire is reflected by decreasing pristane/phytane ratios, due to the rise in (ground)water table and the establishment of anaerobic conditions, as well as by decreasing ratios of diasterenes/sterenes, indicating increasing pH values in the mire. The degree of gelification of plant tissue (gelification index) is governed by the microbial activity in the mire, as indicated by the hopanes concentration. The differences in floral assemblage during the formation of the Lavanttal lignite seams are reflected by major differences in tissue preservation. Preservation of plant tissue (TPI) in the Lavanttal lignite is obviously controlled by the presence/absence of decay-resistant gymnosperms in the peat-forming vegetation, and additionally influenced by the relative contribution of wood to coal formation. The results provide evidence that valuable information for coal facies characterization could

  15. 10 Risk to Ash from Emerald Ash Borer: Can Biological Control Prevent the Loss of Ash Stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash trees were once relatively free of serious, major diseases and insect pests in North America until the arrival of EAB, which was first detected in North America in Michigan in 2002. As of February 2014, EAB had been detected in 22 U.S. states and two Canadian provinces, killing millions of ash ...

  16. Emerald ash borer biocontrol in ash saplings: The potential for early stage recovery of North American ash trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian J. Duan; Leah S. Bauer; Roy G. Van Driesche

    2017-01-01

    In many parts of North America, ash (Fraxinus) stands have been reduced by the emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) invasion to a few surviving mature trees, saplings, basal sprouts, and seedlings. Without a soil seed bank for Fraxinus spp., tree recovery will require survival and maturation of these...

  17. State of volcanic ash dispersion prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, Jonas; Palsson, Thorgeir; Weber, Konradin

    2017-04-01

    The Eyjafjallajokull 2010 and Grimsvotn 2011 eruptions created great problems for commercial aviation in Western Europe and in the North Atlantic region. Comparison of satellite images of the visible and predicted ash clouds showed the VAAC prediction to be much larger than the actual ash clouds. No official explanation of this discrepancy exists apart from the definition of the ash cloud boundary. Papers on simulation of the Eyjafjallajökull ash cloud in peer reviewed journals, typically attempted to simulate the VAAC predictions rather than focusing on the satellite pictures. Sporadic measurements made in-situ showed much lower ash concentrations over Europe than the predicted values. Two of the weak points in ash cloud prediction have been studied in airborne measurements of volcanic ash by the Universities in Kyoto Japan, Iceland and Düsseldorf Germany of eruptions in Sakurajima, Japan. It turns out that gravitational deformation of the plume and a streak fallout process make estimated ash content of clouds larger than the actual, both features are not included in the simulation model. Tropospheric plumes tend to ride in stable inversions this causes gravitational flattening (pancaking) of the volcanic plume, while diffusion in the mixing layer is insignificant. New rules from ICAO, effective from November 2014, reiterate that jetliners should avoid visible ash, this makes information on visible ash important. A procedure developed by JMÁs Tokyo VAAC uses satellite images of visible ash to correct the prediction. This and the fact that meteorological data necessary to model gravitational dispersion and streak fallout do not exist in the international database available to the VAAĆs. This shows that close monitoring by airborne measurements and satellite and other photographic surveillance is necessary.

  18. Characteristics of spanish fly ashes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Luxán, M. P.

    1988-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is the characterization of fly ashes produced by Spanish thermoelectric power plants, according to sampling taken in 1981 and 1982. The study takes in the following characteristics: physical characteristics (size distribution of particles, ...; chemical ones (chemical analysis...; and mineralogical ones (application of instrumental techniques of X-ray diffraction and infrared absorption spectroscopy. From a general point of view, it can be said that the samples of Spanish fly ashes are similar to those produced in other countries. The results obtained are a contribution to the knowledge of Spanish fly ashes and form part of the antecedents of investigations carried out in subsequent years.

    Este trabajo tiene por objeto la caracterización de las cenizas volantes producidas en las Centrales Termoeléctricas españolas, según un muestreo realizado entre 1981 y 1982. El estudio comprende las siguientes características: físicas (distribución del tamaño de partículas,...; químicas (análisis químico, …; y mineralógicas (aplicación de las técnicas instrumentales de difracción de rayos X y espectroscopía de absorción infrarroja. Desde un punto de vista general, se puede afirmar que las muestras de ceniza volante estudiadas son semejantes a las producidas en otros países. Los resultados obtenidos son una aportación al conocimiento de las cenizas volantes españolas y forman parte de los antecedentes de las investigaciones llevadas a cabo en años posteriores.

  19. Characterization of fly ash from bio and municipal waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lima, Ana T.; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Pedersen, Anne Juul

    2008-01-01

    Four different fly ashes are characterized in the present paper. The ashes differ in the original fuel type and were sampled at distinct plants. The investigation includes two different ashes from municipal solid waste incineration (with and without sorbents addition), a straw ash and an ash from...... potentiality to be valorized. The main conclusion of this paper regards fly ash’s profound dissimilarity, where each ash should be studied separately....

  20. 固体热载体热解霍林河褐煤实验研究%Experiment study on pyrolysis of Huolinhe lignite with solid heat carrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲旋; 张荣; 孙东凯; 毕继诚

    2011-01-01

    Pyrolysis of Huolinhe lignite with solid heat carrier was carried out in a moving bed reactor with the capacity of 10 kg/h. The solid heat carrier used in the experiment was the circulating ash from a 75 t/h CFB boiler. The effects of pyrolysis temperature, residence time and coal particle size on the yields and composition of products were studied. It is found that the gas yield increases with the increasing pyrolysis temperature. The yield of tar reaches a maximum of 4.94% at 520 ℃. The heating value of pyrolysis gas is from 19.80 MJ/m3 to 23.20 MJ/m3. Some useful compounds, such as BTX and PCX, could be obtained from pyrolysis tar and the contents of them are much higher than those from a bituminous pyrolysis tar. Moreover, the pyrolysis char exhibits good combustion characteristic. The sulfur content of pyrolysis char is notably lower than that in raw coal, which benefits to reduce the desulphurization burden of the CFB boiler.%在处理量为10kg/h的粉煤-固体热载体移动床实验装置上,以循环灰为热载体对其进行了热解特性评价实验.考察了热解温度(460℃~610℃)、反应时间(6min~8min)及煤粒粒径对热解产物产率和组成的影响.结果表明,随着热解温度的升高,气体产率增大;焦油产率在520℃时达到最大值4.94%.热解煤气的热值为19.80MJ/m3~23.20MJ/m3.与淮南烟煤相比,热解焦油中BTX、PCX的含量较高,特别是PCX的含量在反应温度为610℃时达到23.82%.热解半焦具有很好的燃烧特性而且硫含量明显低于原煤,有利于减轻循环流化床锅炉的脱硫负荷.

  1. Evaluating Lignite-Derived Products (LDPs) for Agriculture - Does Research Inform Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patti, Antonio; Rose, Michael; Little, Karen; Jackson, Roy; Cavagnaro, Timothy

    2014-05-01

    Lignite-derived products (LDPs), including humic acids and organo-mineral soil conditioners, are being marketed in many parts of the world. They are promoted as plant growth stimulants, additives that improve plant nutrient uptake as well as providing humic materials to improve soil structure and combat soil degradation. There are mixed views regarding the efficacy of these products and there is a lack of scientific studies that verify the efficacy of these products in the field. Anecdotally, agricultural producers become repeat users of the products when they see economic benefits, such as increases in crop yields, while others abandon repeat use when no benefits were seen. In this paper, we present results from a literature meta-analysis1 and a number of field studies that examine the potential for LDPs to improve soil fertility and plant growth. Our findings suggest that complex interactions between LDPs, soil types, environmental conditions and plant species mean that a 'one-size fits all' product or solution is unlikely; and that changes to soil characteristics brought about by LDPs are more apparent over longer time periods than a single cropping season. Most of these studies have not been undertaken in full field trial conditions, where the crop has been grown to harvest. Limited studies in small plots or glass-house conditions often report early benefits. It is not known if these benefits persist. Moreover, the actual composition of these additives may vary significantly and is rarely specified in full. In a study of our own, a small plot experiment evaluated the effect of a single application of a commercial potassium humate product from Victorian lignite on ryegrass and lucerne grown in a sandy, nutrient deficient, low organic matter soil. Treatment resulted in increased shoot growth (up to 33%) of ryegrass during the pasture establishment phase. Root growth was also improved with a 47% increase at 0-10 cm depth and 122% increase at 10-30 cm depth

  2. Co-gasification of solid waste and lignite - a case study for Western Macedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koukouzas, N; Katsiadakis, A; Karlopoulos, E; Kakaras, E

    2008-01-01

    Co-gasification of solid waste and coal is a very attractive and efficient way of generating power, but also an alternative way, apart from conventional technologies such as incineration and landfill, of treating waste materials. The technology of co-gasification can result in very clean power plants using a wide range of solid fuels but there are considerable economic and environmental challenges. The aim of this study is to present the available existing co-gasification techniques and projects for coal and solid wastes and to investigate the techno-economic feasibility, concerning the installation and operation of a 30MW(e) co-gasification power plant based on integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology, using lignite and refuse derived fuel (RDF), in the region of Western Macedonia prefecture (WMP), Greece. The gasification block was based on the British Gas-Lurgi (BGL) gasifier, while the gas clean-up block was based on cold gas purification. The competitive advantages of co-gasification systems can be defined both by the fuel feedstock and production flexibility but also by their environmentally sound operation. It also offers the benefit of commercial application of the process by-products, gasification slag and elemental sulphur. Co-gasification of coal and waste can be performed through parallel or direct gasification. Direct gasification constitutes a viable choice for installations with capacities of more than 350MW(e). Parallel gasification, without extensive treatment of produced gas, is recommended for gasifiers of small to medium size installed in regions where coal-fired power plants operate. The preliminary cost estimation indicated that the establishment of an IGCC RDF/lignite plant in the region of WMP is not profitable, due to high specific capital investment and in spite of the lower fuel supply cost. The technology of co-gasification is not mature enough and therefore high capital requirements are needed in order to set up a direct

  3. Biomass fly ash in concrete: SEM, EDX and ESEM analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuangzhen Wang; Larry Baxter; Fernando Fonseca [Brigham Young University, Provo, UT (USA). Department of Chemical Engineering

    2008-03-15

    This document summarizes microscopy study of concrete prepared from cement and fly ash (25% fly ash and 75% cement by weight), which covers coal fly ash and biomass fly ash. All the fly ash concrete has the statistical equal strength from one day to one year after mix. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) analysis show that both coal and biomass fly ash particles undergo significant changes of morphology and chemical compositions in concrete due to pozzolanic reaction, although biomass fly ash differs substantially from coal fly ash in its fuel resources. 8 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Electrodialytic removal of heavy metals from fly ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the Ph.D. work was to develop the electrodialytic remediation method for removal of heavy metals from fly ashes. The work was focused on two types of fly ashes: fly ashes from wood combustion and fly ashes from municipal solid waste incineration.......The aim of the Ph.D. work was to develop the electrodialytic remediation method for removal of heavy metals from fly ashes. The work was focused on two types of fly ashes: fly ashes from wood combustion and fly ashes from municipal solid waste incineration....

  5. CHARACTERIZATION AND COMPARISON OF TREATED AND UNTREATED RICH HUSH ASH & FLY ASH FOR METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Pal Singh

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Rice Husk ash and fly ash are agricultural and coal wastes respectively. These are produced in abundance globally and poses risk to health as well as environment. Thus their effective, conducive and eco-friendly utilization has always been a challenge for scientific community. The fly ash has been used as reinforcement for improved mechanical properties of composites (1,3-5,9. Rice husk ash can also be used for similar applications as its composition is almost similar to that of fly ash. This paper mainly deals with identification ofcharacteristics of both the fly ash and rice husk ash using spectroscopic and microscopic analysis. SEM, XRD,XRF and FTIR spectroscopic methods were used for the characterization of treated and untreated ashes. The results were compared and it was observed that both ashes possesses nearly same chemical phases and otherfunctional groups thus proposing the use of rice husk ash as reinforcement like fly ash in Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs specifically for wear resistance applications.

  6. Effects of colemanite waste, coal bottom ash, and fly ash on the properties of cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kula, I.; Olgun, A.; Erdogan, Y.; Sevinc, V. [Celal Bayar University, Manisa (Turkey)

    2001-03-01

    The physical and chemical properties of colemanite ore waste from concentrator, coal bottom ash, fly ash, cement+ash mixtures, cement+colemanite ore waste, and their effects on the mechanical properties of concrete were investigated. These materials with different proportion were substituted with Portland cement. Physical properties such as setting time, volume expansion, and compressive strength were determined and compared to reference mixture and Turkish standards (TS). The results showed that cement replacement materials had clear effects on the mechanical properties. The use of fly ash and bottom ash even at the concentration of 25% showed either comparable or better result compared to reference mixture. Although replacement of Portland cement by 9 wt.% of colemanite ore waste causes reduction in the compressive strength, the values obtained are within the limit of TS. As a result, colemanite ore waste, fly ash, and bottom ash may be used as cementitious materials.

  7. Wet physical separation of MSWI bottom ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muchova, L.

    2010-01-01

    Bottom ash (BA) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) has high potential for the recovery of valuable secondary materials. For example, the MSWI bottom ash produced by the incinerator at Amsterdam contains materials such as non-ferrous metals (2.3%), ferrous metals (8-13%), gold (0.4 ppm),

  8. Wet physical separation of MSWI bottom ash

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muchova, L.

    2010-01-01

    Bottom ash (BA) from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) has high potential for the recovery of valuable secondary materials. For example, the MSWI bottom ash produced by the incinerator at Amsterdam contains materials such as non-ferrous metals (2.3%), ferrous metals (8-13%), gold (0.4 ppm),

  9. Biology of emerald ash borer parasitoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leah S. Bauer; Jian J. Duan; Jonathan P. Lelito; Houping Liu; Juli R. Gould

    2015-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB) (Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive beetle introduced from China (Bray et al., 2011), was identified as the cause of ash (Fraxinus spp.) mortality in southeast Michigan and nearby Ontario in 2002 (Haack et al., 2002; Federal Register, 2003; Cappaert et al., 2005)....

  10. Fly ash-reinforced thermoplastic starch composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, X.F.; Yu, J.G.; Wang, N. [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China). School of Science

    2007-01-02

    As a by-product from the combustion of pulverized coal, fly ash was, respectively, used as the reinforcement for formamide and urea-plasticized thermoplastic starch (FUPTPS) and glycerol-plasticized thermoplastic starch (GPTPS). The introduction of fly ash improved tensile stress from 4.56 MPa to 7.78 MPa and Youngs modulus increased trebly from 26.8 MPa to 84.6 MPa for fly ash-reinforced FUPTPS (A-FUPTPS), while tensile stress increased from 4.55 MPa to 12.86 MPa and Youngs modulus increased six times from 76.4 MPa to 545 MPa for fly ash-reinforced GPTPS (A-GPTPS). X-ray diffractograms illustrated that fly ash destroyed the formation of starch ordered crystal structure, so both A-GPTPS and FUPTPS could resist the starch re-crystallization (retrogradation). Also fly ash improved water resistance of TPS. As shown by rheology, during the thermoplastic processing, the extruder screw speed effectively adjusted the flow behavior of A-FUPTPS, while the increasing of the processing temperature effectively ameliorated the flow behavior of A-GPTPS. However, superfluous ash contents (e.g., 20 wt%) worsened processing fluidity and resulted in the congregation of fly ash in FUPTPS matrix (tested by SEM) rather than in GPTPS matrix. This congregation decreased the mechanical properties and water resistance of the materials.

  11. Physicochemical characterization of Spanish fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Querol, X.; Umana, J.C.; Alastuey, A.; Bertrana, C.; Lopez-Soler, A.; Plana, F.

    1999-12-01

    This article summarizes the results obtained from the physical, chemical, and mineralogical characterization of 14 fly ash samples. Major features that influence the utilization of each fly ash for zeolite synthesis are evidenced, and several fly ash types were selected as potential high-quality starting material for zeolite synthesis and ceramic applications. The main parameters influencing this selection were relatively small grain size; high Al and Si contents; high glass content; low CaO, S, and Fe contents; and relatively low heavy metal concentration. The Compostilla and Cou He fly ashes have high potential applications because of the low content of major impurities (such as Ca, Fe, and S) and the low content of soluble hazardous elements. The Espiel, Escucha, Los Barrios, As Pontes, Soto de Ribera, Meirama, Narcea, and Teruel fly ashes have important application potential, but this potential is slightly limited by the intermediate content of nonreactive impurities, such as Fe and Ca. The La Robla fly ash is of moderate interest, since the relatively high Ca and Fe oxide contents may reduce its potential applications. Finally, the Puertollano fly ash also has limited application because of the very high concentration of some heavy metals such as As, Cd, Ge, Hg, Pb, and Zn. From a mineralogical point of view, the Compostilla, Espiel, and Soto de Ribera fly ashes show the highest aluminum-silicate glass content and, consequently, the highest industrial application potential.

  12. Physiochemical characterization of Spanish fly ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Querol, X.; Umana, J.C.; Alastuey, A.; Bertrana, C.; Lopez Soler, A.; Plana, F.

    1999-12-01

    This article summarizes the results obtained from the physical, chemical, and mineralogical characterization of 14 fly ash samples. Major features that influence the utilization of each fly ash for zeolite synthesis are evidenced, and several fly ash types were selected as potential high-quality starting material for zeolite synthesis and ceramic applications. The main parameters influencing this selection were relatively small grain size; high Al and Si contents; high glass content; low CaO, S, and Fe contents; and relatively low heavy metal concentration. The Compostilla and Dou He fly ashes have high potential applications because of the low content of major impurities (such as Ca, Fe, and S) and the low content of soluble hazardous elements. The Espiel, Escucha, Los Barrios, As Pontes, Soto de Ribera, Meirama, Narcea, and Teruel fly ashes have important application potential, but this potential is slightly limited by the intermediate content of nonreactive impurities, such as Fe and Ca. The La Robla fly ash is of moderate interest, since the relatively high Ca and Fe oxide contents may reduce its potential applications. Finally, the Puertollano fly ash also has limited application because of the very high concentration of some heavy metals such as As, Cd, Ge, Hg, Pb, and Zn. From a mineralogical point of view, the Compostilla, Espiel, and Soto de Ribera fly ashes show the highest aluminum-silicate glass content and, consequently, the highest industrial application potential. (author)

  13. Emerald ash borer biology and invasion history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert A. Haack; Yuri Baranchikov; Leah S. Bauer; Therese M. Poland

    2015-01-01

    The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is native to eastern Asia and is primarily a pest of ash (Fraxinus) trees (Fig. 1). Established populations of EAB were first detected in the United States and Canada in 2002 (Haack et al., 2002), and based on a dendrochronology study by Siegert...

  14. Column leaching from biomass combustion ashes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maresca, Alberto; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of biomass combustion ashes for forest soil liming and fertilizing has been addressed in literature. Though, a deep understanding of the ash chemical composition and leaching behavior is necessary to predict potential benefits and environmental risks related to this practice...

  15. Properties and Leachability of Self-Compacting Concrete Incorporated with Fly Ash and Bottom Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Ikhmal Haqeem Hassan, Mohd; Jamaluddin, Norwati; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al

    2016-06-01

    The process of combustion in coal-fired power plant generates ashes, namely fly ash and bottom ash. Besides, coal ash produced from coal combustion contains heavy metals within their compositions. These metals are toxic to the environment as well as to human health. Fortunately, treatment methods are available for these ashes, and the use of fly ash and bottom ash in the concrete mix is one of the few. Therefore, an experimental program was carried out to study the properties and determine the leachability of selfcompacting concrete incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash. For experimental study, self-compacting concrete was produced with fly ash as a replacement for Ordinary Portland Cement and bottom ash as a replacement for sand with the ratios of 10%, 20%, and 30% respectively. The fresh properties tests conducted were slump flow, t500, sieve segregation and J-ring. Meanwhile for the hardened properties, density, compressive strength and water absorption test were performed. The samples were then crushed to be extracted using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure and heavy metals content within the samples were identified accordingly using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry. The results demonstrated that both fresh and hardened properties were qualified to categorize as self-compacting concrete. Improvements in compressive strength were observed, and densities for all the samples were identified as a normal weight concrete with ranges between 2000 kg/m3 to 2600 kg/m3. Other than that, it was found that incorporation up to 30% of the ashes was safe as the leached heavy metals concentration did not exceed the regulatory levels, except for arsenic. In conclusion, this study will serve as a reference which suggests that fly ash and bottom ash are widely applicable in concrete technology, and its incorporation in self-compacting concrete constitutes a potential means of adding value to appropriate mix and design.

  16. Investigation on Leaching Behaviour of Fly Ash and Bottom Ash Replacement in Self-Compacting Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Aeslina Abdul; Ikhmal Haqeem Hassan, Mohd; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al

    2016-06-01

    Fly ash and bottom ash are some of the waste generated by coal-fired power plants, which contains large quantities of toxic and heavy metals. In recent years, many researchers have been interested in studying on the properties of self-compacting concrete incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash but there was very limited research from the combination of fly ash and bottom ash towards the environmental needs. Therefore, this research was focused on investigating the leachability of heavy metals of SCC incorporated with fly ash and bottom ash by using Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure, Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure and Static Leaching Test. The samples obtained from the coal-fired power plant located at Peninsula, Malaysia. In this study, the potential heavy metals leached out from SCC that is produced with fly ash as a replacement for Ordinary Portland Cement and bottom ash as a substitute for sand with the ratios from 10% to 30% respectively were designated and cast. There are eight heavy metals of concern such as As, Cr, Pb, Zn, Cu, Ni, Mn and Fe. The results indicated that most of the heavy metals leached below the permissible limits from the United States Environmental Protection Agency and World Health Organization limit for drinking water. As a conclusion, the minimum leaching of the heavy metals from the incorporation of fly ash and bottom ash in self-compacting concrete was found in 20% of fly ash and 20% of bottom ash replacement. The results also indicate that this incorporation could minimize the potential of environmental problems.

  17. Construction procedures using self hardening fly ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, S. I.; Parker, D. G.

    1980-07-01

    Fly ash produced in Arkansas from burning Wyoming low sulfur coal is self-hardening and can be effective as a soil stabilizing agent for clays and sands. The strength of soil-self hardening fly ash develops rapidly when compacted immediately after mixing. Seven day unconfined compressive strengths up to 1800 psi were obtained from 20% fly ash and 80% sand mixtures. A time delay between mixing the fly ash with the soil and compaction of the mixture reduced the strength. With two hours delay, over a third of the strength was lost and with four hours delay, the loss was over half. Gypsum and some commercial concrete retarders were effective in reducing the detrimental effect of delayed compaction. Adequate mixing of the soil and fly ash and rapid compaction of the mixtures were found to be important parameters in field construction of stabilized bases.

  18. Future lignite mining in the South and impacts on fish and wildlife under SMCRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haynes, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    Large deposits of recoverable lignite (> 16 billion tons) occur in parts of Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas. Commercial surface mining of these reserves has occurred only in eastern Texas, but additional mining has been proposed for Texas and the other states during the 1980's. Almost all of the new mining would occur in the Southeastern Mixed Forest (Pineywoods) ecoregion, and the Prairie Parkland ecoregion of eastern Texas. Potential impacts on fish and wildlife will be lessened because of the enactment of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (P.L. 95-87) and the permanent program regulations. However, major impacts on fish and wildlife may still occur as a result of habitat destruction and inadequate reclamation strategies. The prevention of significant impacts will depend mostly upon the diligent implementation and enforcement of the requirements of the Act, including evaluation of fish and wildlife impacts by trained and competent biologists. These issues and research and assessment needs are discussed.

  19. Bucket wheel rehabilitation of ERC 1400-30/7 high-capacity excavators from lignite quarries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vîlceanu, Fl; Iancu, C.

    2016-11-01

    The existence of bucket wheel equipment type ERC 1400-30/7 in lignite quarries with lifetime expired, or in the ultimate life period, together with high cost investments for their replacement, makes rational the efforts made to rehabilitation in order to extend their life. Rehabilitation involves checking operational safety based on relevant expertise of metal structures supporting effective resistance but also the replacement (or modernization) of subassemblies that can increase excavation process productivity, lowering energy consumption, reducing mechanical stresses. This paper proposes an analysis of constructive solution of using a part of the classical bucket wheel, on which are located 9 cutting cups and 9 chargers cups and adding a new part so that the new redesigned bucket-wheel will contain 18 cutting-chargers cups, compared to the classical model. On the CAD model of bucket wheel was performed a static and a dynamic FEA, the results being compared with the yield strength of the material of the entire structure, were checked mechanical stresses in the overall distribution map, and were verified the first 4 vibrating modes the structure compared to real loads. Thus was verified that the redesigned bucket-wheel can accomplish the proposed goals respectively increase excavation process productivity, lowering energy consumption and reducing mechanical stresses.

  20. Mercury oxidation and adsorption characteristics of potassium permanganate modified lignite semi-coke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huawei Zhang; Jitao Chen; Peng Liang; Li Wang

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption characteristics of virgin and potassium permanganate modified lignite semi-coke (SC) for gaseous Hg0 were investigated in an attempt to produce more effective and lower price adsorbents for the control of elemental mercury emission.Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements,X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to analyze the surface physical and chemical properties of SC,Mn-SC and Mn-H-SC before and after mercury adsorption.The results indicated that potassium permanganate modification had significant influence on the properties of semi-coke,such as the specific surface area,pore structure and surface chemical functional groups.The mercury adsorption efficiency of modified semi-coke was lower than that of SC at low temperature,but much higher at high temperature.Amorphous Mn7+,Mn6+ and Mn4+ on the surface of Mn-SC and Mn-H-SC were the active sites for oxidation and adsorption of gaseous Hg0,which oxidized the elemental mercury into Hg2+ and captured it.Thermal treatment reduced the average oxidation degree of Mnx+ on the surface of Mn-SC from 3.80 to 3.46.However,due to the formation of amorphous MnOx,the surface oxidation active sites for gaseous Hg0 increased,which gave Mn-H-SC higher mercury adsorption efficiency than that of Mn-SC at high temperature.

  1. Mercury oxidation and adsorption characteristics of potassium permanganate modified lignite semi-coke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huawei; Chen, Jitao; Liang, Peng; Wang, Li

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption characteristics of virgin and potassium permanganate modified lignite semi-coke (SC) for gaseous Hg0 were investigated in an attempt to produce more effective and lower price adsorbents for the control of elemental mercury emission. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to analyze the surface physical and chemical properties of SC, Mn-SC and Mn-H-SC before and after mercury adsorption. The results indicated that potassium permanganate modification had significant influence on the properties of semi-coke, such as the specific surface area, pore structure and surface chemical functional groups. The mercury adsorption efficiency of modified semi-coke was lower than that of SC at low temperature, but much higher at high temperature. Amorphous Mn7+, Mn6+ and Mn4+ on the surface of Mn-SC and Mn-H-SC were the active sites for oxidation and adsorption of gaseous Hg0, which oxidized the elemental mercury into Hg2+ and captured it. Thermal treatment reduced the average oxidation degree of Mn(x+) on the surface of Mn-SC from 3.80 to 3.46. However, due to the formation of amorphous MnOx, the surface oxidation active sites for gaseous Hg0 increased, which gave Mn-H-SC higher mercury adsorption efficiency than that of Mn-SC at high temperature.

  2. Conversion of solvent refined lignite into premium liquid fuels. Annual report, January-December, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltisberger, R.J.; Stenberg, V.I.; Klabunde, K.J.; Woolsey, N.F.

    1981-04-01

    Comparison of three preasphaltene samples separated from three lignite derived samples obtained from GFETC prepared at 404, 460 and 480/sup 0/C shows that increased temperature tends to produce higher molecular weight preasphaltene fractions containing more aromatic carbons with fewer acid (phenolic) sites per molecule. Ether cleavage studies of the model compounds; diphenyl ether, bibenzothiophene, dibenzofuran and anisole, show that partial or complete ether cleavage was obtained with sodium in hexamethyl phosphoramide solvent. Thus a careful consideration of acidity before and after cleavage can now give a measure of the diaryl ether content of a mixture. This reaction may be useful in coal liquid analysis. Denitrification of N,N-Dimethylamine without aromatic ring reduction occurs with CO-H/sub 2/O and H/sub 2/ at 425/sup 0/C in about 13% conversion. The optimum of 21 conditions gave a 19% conversion which occurs at 150 psi H/sub 2/S and 750 psi H/sub 2/. Thus, H/sub 2/S enhances nitrogen removal from this model compound. Using ESR dispersion techniques we have shown the presence of a second CO radical species on MgO, probably CO-.. observed by ESR, treatment of carbon monoxide radical species on both CO and MgO with CO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/O causes a destruction of one of the radical species at a rate greater than that of the other.

  3. Regional Studies Program. Extraction of North Dakota lignite: environmental and reclamation issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFevers, J.R.; Johnson, D.O.; Dvorak, A.J.

    1976-12-01

    This study, sponsored by the U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration, addresses the environmental implications of extraction of coal in North Dakota. These implications are supported by details of the geologic and historical background of the area of focus, the lignite resources in the Fort Union coalfield portion. The particular concentration is on the four-county area of Mercer, Dunn, McLean, and Oliver where substantial coal reserves exist and a potential gasification plant site has been identified. The purposes of this extensive study are to identify the land use and environmental problems and issues associated with extraction; to provide a base of information for assessing the impacts of various levels of extraction; to examine the economics and feasibility of reclamation; and to identify research that needs to be undertaken to evaluate and to improve reclamation practices. The study also includes a description of the physical and chemical soil characteristics and hydrological and climatic factors entailed in extraction, revegetation, and reclamation procedures.

  4. Fast co-pyrolysis of biomass and lignite in a micro fluidized bed reactor analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yebing; Dong, Lei; Dong, Yuping; Liu, Wenping; Chang, Jiafu; Yang, Shuai; Lv, Zhaochuan; Fan, Pengfei

    2015-04-01

    The co-pyrolysis characteristic of biomass and lignite were investigated in a Micro Fluidized Bed Reaction Analyzer under isothermal condition. The synergetic effect was evaluated by comparing the experimental gas yields and distributions with the calculated values, and iso-conversional method was used to calculate the kinetic parameters of formation of each gas component. The results showed that synergetic effect was manifested in co-pyrolysis. For the range of conversion investigated, the activation energies for H2, CH4, CO and CO2 were 72.90 kJ/mol, 43.90 kJ/mol, 18.51 kJ/mol and 13.44 kJ/mol, respectively; the reactions for CH4 and CO2 conformed to 2 order chemical reaction model, and for H2 and CO conformed to 1.5 order chemical reaction model; the pre-exponential factors for CH4, CO2, H2 and CO were 249.0 S(-1), 5.290 S(-1), 237.4 S(-1) and 2.693 S(-1), respectively. The discrepancy of the kinetic parameters implied that there were different pathways for forming the different gas.

  5. Lignitic Humic Acids as Environmentally-Friendly Adsorbent for Heavy Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Klučáková

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Humic acids are a part of humus material, are abundant in nature, and form a substantial pool of natural organic matter. They participate in the transport of both beneficial and harmful species. Due to their structure and properties, they can interact with metal ions and, with them, form relatively stable complexes. These substances are thus responsible for the so-called self-cleaning ability of soils. Lignite as a young coal type contains a relatively high amount of humic acids which can be used as an environmentally-friendly adsorbent for heavy metals. In this work, we compared the adsorption of single Cu2+ ions with the simultaneous adsorption of several different metal ions (Cd2+, Cu2+, Pb2+, and Zn2+. The adsorption efficiency of humic acids was very high, almost 100% in the case of the single adsorption of Cu2+ ions and more than 90% for the adsorption from the mixture of metal ions. The stability of formed complexes, considered on the basis of the leaching in different extraction agents, was higher than 80%; only 9–18% was in the mobile phase. After adsorption, metal ions are contained in humic acids after adsorption in mainly strongly bonded form (60–73% and can be liberated from their structure only in low amounts.

  6. Colonization of spoil benches of an opencast lignite mine in northwest Spain by amphibians and reptiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galan, P. [University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain). Faculty of Biology

    1997-02-01

    This paper discusses the colonization by reptiles and amphibians of the spoil benches of the Meirama opencast lignite mine in northwest Spain over 10 years, following the start of the revegetation process. At Meirama, spoil benches are initially fertilized and hydroseeded with a pasture mix, but are subject to little subsequent management and are gradually colonized by scrub vegetation characteristic of the region. Herpetofauna censuses were carried out yearly on a single 2 ha plot over 6 years following hydroseeding, and in a single year on ten 2 ha plots which had been hydroseeded between 0 and 10 years previously. In addition, censuses were carried out on three undisturbed `control` plots close to the mine. Fifteen species (nine amphibians and six reptiles) were detected in one or more of the spoil-bench plots. Recolonization was particularly rapid after the first 2-3 years post-hydroseeding, and was closely related to habitat development due to revegetation and natural succession. Species composition was most similar to that in control plots in the oldest (ten-year-old) spoil plots.

  7. Abundance, diversity, and vitality of mycorrhizae of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) in lignite recultivation sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzenberger, B; Golldack, J; Ullrich, A; Schmincke, B; Hüttl, R F

    2004-07-01

    Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) stands cover large areas in the Lusatian and the Middle German lignite mining districts. Due to adverse chemical substrate conditions, the root systems of the trees are restricted to the ameliorated top-spoil and the organic forest floor layers. To investigate functioning of fine root systems under the prevailing site factors, we studied mycorrhizal colonization rate and frequency as well as mycorrhizal diversity, vitality and growth phases in Scots pine ecosystems along a chronosequence in both mining districts. Mycorrhizal rate was close to 100% in both districts. Mycorrhizal abundance was higher in the organic forest floor layer than the mineral soil layer. In total, 25 morphotypes were recorded. Diversity differed between the districts. The mycorrhizae of Amphinema byssoides, Tuber puberulum, Pinirhiza discolor, Pinirhiza cf. bicolorata and E-type were present in both mining areas. These morphotypes are typical of nutrient-rich soils with high pH values. Compared with the undisturbed sites, vitality of mycorrhizae was very high at the test sites on spoil substrate, correlating with the high growth dynamics of mycorrhizae at recultivation sites. A relatively high carbon flow to the mycorrhizal root systems at these sites seems likely. Thus, mycorrhizal root systems are able to cope with the ameliorated top-spoil and the organic layer. The main reason for the adaptation is the large number of ectomycorrhizal fungal species available in this area where Pinus sylvestris is indigenous.

  8. Macerals of Shengli Lignite in Inner Mongolia of China and Their Combustion Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Yue Teng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The macerals, including fusinitic coal containing 72.20% inertinite and xyloid coal containing 91.43% huminite, were separated from Shengli lignite using an optical microscope, and their combustion reactivity was examined by thermogravimetric analysis. Several combustion parameters, including ignition and burnout indices, were analyzed, and the combustion kinetics of the samples were calculated by regression. Fusinitic coal presented a porous structure, while xyloid coal presented a compact structure. The specific surface area of fusinitic coal was 2.5 times larger than that of xyloid coal, and the light-off temperature of the former was higher than that of the latter. However, the overall combustion reactivity of fusinitic coal was better than that of xyloid coal. The combustion processes of fusinitic and xyloid coals can be accurately described by both the homogeneous model and the shrinking core model. The features of xyloid coal agree with the shrinking core model when its conversion rate is 10%–90%. The activation energy of fusinitic coal during combustion can be divided into three phases, with the middle phase featuring the highest energy. The activation energy of xyloid coal is lower than that of fusinitic coal in the light-off phase, which may explain the low light-off temperature of this coal.

  9. Laboratory Studies of Ice Nucleation on Volcanic Ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, M. A.; Schill, G. P.; Genareau, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    Ice nucleation on volcanic ash controls both ash aggregation and cloud glaciation, which affect human respiratory health, atmospheric transport, and global climate. We have performed laboratory studies of the depositional and immersion freezing efficiency of three distinct samples of volcanic ash using Raman Microscopy coupled to an environmental cell. Ash from the Fuego (Basaltic Ash, Guatemala), Soufriere Hills (Andesetic Ash, Montserrat), and Taupo (Rhyolitic Ash, New Zealand) volcanoes were chosen to represent different geographical locations and silica content. All ash samples were quantitatively analyzed for both percent crystallinity and mineralogy using X-ray diffraction. We find that all three samples of volcanic ash are excellent depositional ice nuclei, nucleating ice at ice saturation ratios of 1.05 ± 0.1. For immersion freezing, however, only the Taupo ash exhibited efficient heterogeneous ice nucleation activity. Similar to recent studies on mineral dust, we suggest that the mineralogy of volcanic ash may dictate its ice nucleation activity in the immersion mode.

  10. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

    2013-01-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  11. Treatment of fly ash for use in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxley, Chett; Akash, Akash; Zhao, Qiang

    2012-05-08

    A process for treating fly ash to render it highly usable as a concrete additive. A quantity of fly ash is obtained that contains carbon and which is considered unusable fly ash for concrete based upon foam index testing. The fly ash is mixed with an activator solution sufficient to initiate a geopolymerization reaction and for a geopolymerized fly ash. The geopolymerized fly ash is granulated. The geopolymerized fly ash is considered usable fly ash for concrete according to foam index testing. The geopolymerized fly ash may have a foam index less than 35% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash, and in some cases less than 10% of the foam index of the untreated fly ash. The activator solution may contain an alkali metal hydroxide, carbonate, silicate, aluminate, or mixtures thereof.

  12. Preliminary organic geochemical study of lignite from the Smederevsko Pomoravlje field (Kostolac basin, Serbia: Reconstruction of geological evolution and potential for rational utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đoković Nataša

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is aimed to determine the origin and geological evolution of lignites from Smederevsko Pomoravlje field (Kostolac Basin, Serbia. Possible rational utilization of coal is also considered. For this purpose numerous organic geochemical analyses have been applied to representative lignite samples. Obtained results showed that coal from the Smederevsko Pomoravlje field is typical humic coal. Peat-forming vegetation is dominated by gymnosperm plants. Coal forming plants belonged to the gymnosperm families Taxodiaceae, Cupressaceae, Phyllocladaceae and Pinaceae. Other precursors of organic matter (OM were microbial biomass, ferns and angiosperms. It is established that peatification was performed in neutral to slightly acidic, fresh water environment under anoxic to suboxic redox conditions. Maturity of OM is low in the phase of intense diagenetic processes. Biomarker compositions and values of corresponding parameters revealed that Smederevsko Pomoravlje field, Drmno field (Kostolac Basin and “A“ field (Kovin deposit represent a part of the unique lignite basin. Results of this study suggest possible rational utilization of the Smederevsko Pomoravlje lignites in thermal power plants. This is particularly related to samples from coal seam I. Significant amount of gas could be generated from lignites at higher maturities. Eight samples meet basic assumptions for effective gasification. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176006

  13. Mangrove associated lignite beds of Malvan, Konkan: Evidence for higher sea-level during the Late Tertiary (Neogene) along the west coast of India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaran, K.P.N.; Shindikar, M.; Limaye, R.B. [Agharkar Research Inst., Pune (India)

    2004-01-25

    Fossil pneumatophores (breathing roots) of Avicennia are recovered and reported from the lignite beds exposed in Kolamb well-section near Malvan, Konkan area of western Maharashtra. The accrued palynoflora is dominated by mangroves (Avicennia, Aegialitis, Excoecaria, Rhizophora and Sonneratia). The spores of mangrove fern (Acrostichum aureum) an estuarine fungus Cirrenalia indicate that these lignites are autochthonous and deposited in a near-shore environment. Presence of foraminiferal linings (= microforaminifera), dinoflagellate cysts, a few calcareous nannofossils and scolecodonts is an irrefutable proof of marine and brackish water influence during the deposition of lignites under intertidal/tidal swampy condition (mangrove influenced) with fair input from freshwater swamps and hinterland. Freshwater-related forms, viz. Ceratopteris thalictroides, Nymphaeaceae, Ctenolophonaceae and hinterland taxa (Cullenia/Durio) of Bombacaceae along with abundance of microthyriaceous fungi in the palynoflora imply a warm humid tropical climate with high precipitation during the depositional period. The presence of Ctenolophon englerianus (= Ctenolophonidites costatus) in Kolamb lignites suggests the Late Neogene (Late Miocene-Early Pliocene) age. The occurrence of pneumatophores and associated lignite deposits about 37 m above the present mean sea-level, and much inland, clearly indicates the higher sea-level strand during Late Neogene along the west coast of India.

  14. Tertiary lignites of As Pontes (NW-Spain) - an example for the composition of bright coal layers and its implications for formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagemann, H.W.; Pickel, W. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Geologie, Geochemie und Lagerstaetten des Erdoels und der Kohle; Cabrera, L.; Saez, A. [Barcelona Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Geologia Dinamica, Geofisica i Paleontologia

    1997-12-31

    The Tertiary lignite basin of As Pontes is characterized by the frequent occurrence of bright brown coal layers. These layers, macroscopically very similar to those described for example in the Weisselster Basin and various other lignite deposits were studied in detail mainly by means of organic petrography in one seam of the basin and the data were related to the brightness of the coals. The question, if the colour of lignite is mainly influenced by the original plant input or the depositional environment, is under strong controversial discussion up to now. The bright coals of the As Pontes Basin are mineral rich (especially in clay) and/or contain high amounts of lipid rich matter (liptinite), especially coalification products of cork-tissue (suberinite). The results of the study indicate that the bright coal is highly degraded in comparison to the dark coals of the same basin. The formation of bright, litinite/mineral-rich lignite layers occurred especially during early basin evolution stages influenced by water table oscillations. Sedimentological, petrographical and organic geochemical data point to the fact that, although the paleoenvironments, where peat deposition took place, did not experience drastic changes, they were affected by noticable variations in hydrochemistry and groundwater stability, related to the tectonic historical record of the basin and the paleoclimatic conditions. In summary the origin of the bright layers of the As Pontes lignite is mainly related to the depositional environment. (orig.)

  15. Activated-Lignite-Based Super Large Granular Slow-Release Fertilizers Improve Apple Tree Growth: Synthesis, Characterizations, and Laboratory and Field Evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yafu; Wang, Xinying; Yang, Yuechao; Gao, Bin; Wan, Yongshan; Li, Yuncong C; Cheng, Dongdong

    2017-07-26

    In this work, lignite, a low-grade coal, was modified using the solid-phase activation method with the aid of a Pd/CeO2 nanoparticle catalyst to improve its pore structure and nutrient absorption. Results indicate that the adsorption ability of the activated lignite to NO3(-), NH4(+), H2PO4(-), and K(+) was significantly higher than that of raw lignite. The activated lignite was successfully combined with the polymeric slow-release fertilizer, which exhibits typical slow-release behavior, to prepare the super large granular activated lignite slow-release fertilizer (SAF). In addition to the slow-release ability, the SAF showed excellent water-retention capabilities. Soil column leaching experiments further confirmed the slow-release characteristics of the SAF with fertilizer nutrient loss greatly reduced in comparison to traditional and slow-release fertilizers. Furthermore, field tests of the SAF in an orchard showed that the novel SAF was better than other tested fertilizers in improve the growth of young apple trees. Findings from this study suggest that the newly developed SAF has great potential to be used in apple cultivation and production systems in the future.

  16. Disposal of fluidized bed combustion ash in an underground mine to control acid mine drainage and subsidence. Quarterly report, December 1, 1996--February 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This project will evaluate the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of filling abandoned underground mine voids with alkaline, advanced coal combustion wastes (Fluidized Bed Combustion-FBC ash). Success will be measured in terms of technical feasibility of the approach (i.e. % void filling), cost, environmental benefits (acid mine drainage and subsidence control) and environmental impacts (noxious ion release). During Phase 3 the majority of the activity involves completing two full scale demonstration projects. The eleven acre Longridge mine in Preston County will be filled with 53,000 cubic yards of grout during the summer of 1997 and monitored for the following year. The second demonstration involves stowing 2,000 tons of ash into an abandoned mine to demonstrate the newly redesigned Burnett Ejector. This demonstration is anticipated to take place during Summer 1997, as well. This document will report on progress made during Phase 3. The report will be divided into four major sections. The first will be the Hydraulic Injection component. This section of the report will report on progress and milestones associated with the grouting activities of the project. The Phase 3 tasks of Economic Analysis and Regulatory Analysis is covered under this section. The second component is Pneumatic Injection. This section reports on progress made towards completing the demonstration project. The Water Quality component involves background monitoring of water quality and precipitation at the Phase 3 (Longridge) mine site. The last component involves evaluating the migration of contaminants through the grouted mine. A computer model has been developed in earlier phases and will model the flow of water in and around the grouted Longridge mine. The Gantt Chart on the following page details progress by task.

  17. Disposal of fluidized bed combustion ash in an underground mine to control acid mine drainage and subsidence. Quarterly report, December 1, 1996--February 28, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This project will evaluate the technical, economic and environmental feasibility of filling abandoned underground mine voids with alkaline, advanced coal combustion wastes (Fluidized Bed Combustion -- FBC ash). Success will be measured in terms of technical feasibility of the approach (i.e. % void filling), cost, environmental benefits (acid mine drainage and subsidence control) and environmental impacts (noxious ion release). During Phase 3 the majority of the activity involves completing two full scale demonstration projects. The eleven acre Longridge mine in Preston County will be filled with 53,000 cubic yards of grout during the summer of 1997 and monitored for the following year. The second demonstration involves stowing 2,000 tons of ash into an abandoned mine to demonstrate the newly redesigned Burnett Ejector. This demonstration is anticipated to take place during Summer 1997, as well. This document will report on progress made during Phase 3. The report will be divided into four major sections. The first will be the Hydraulic Injection component. This section of the report will report on progress and milestones associated with the grouting activities of the project. The Phase 3 tasks of Economic Analysis and Regulatory Analysis will be covered under this section. The second component is Pneumatic Injection. This section reports on progress made towards completing the demonstration project. The Water Quality component involves background monitoring of water quality and precipitation at the Phase 3 (Longridge) mine site. The last component involves evaluating the migration of contaminants through the grouted mine. A computer model has been developed in earlier phases and will model the flow of water in and around the grouted Longridge mine.

  18. Selective catalytic reduction of NO by ammonia over oil shale ash and fly ash catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Changtao Yue; Shuyuan Li [University of Petroleum, Beijing (China). State Key Lab of Heavy Oil Processing

    2003-07-01

    Acid rain and urban air pollution, produced mainly by pollutants such as SOX and NOX and other volatile organic compounds, has become the most serious environmental problem. The selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH{sub 3} in the presence of oxygen is a wellproven method to limit the NOX emissions. The work in this field has been the subject of much research in recent years. In this paper, NO reduction with NH{sub 3} over oil shale ash or fly ash catalysts was studied. Fe, Cu, V or Ni as active elements was loaded by adding aqueous solutions of the metal nitrate over the oil shale ash or fly ash support. The activities of the catalysts for NO removal were measured in a fixed-bed reactor. According to the results, oil shale ash or fly ash, after pre-treatment, can be reasonably used as the SCR catalyst support to remove NO from flue gas. Cu gave the highest catalytic activity and NO conversion for fly ash while V for oil shale ash. As the support, fly ash is more feasible than oil shale ash. Because of their low cost and high efficiency, the catalysts should be used in the SCR process. Further research on this subject is necessary in the future to understand more details of the SCR system and issue of pollution control. 9 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. The climatic impact of supervolcanic ash blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Morgan T.; Sparks, R.S.J. [University of Bristol, Department of Earth Sciences, Bristol (United Kingdom); Valdes, Paul J. [University of Bristol, School of Geographical Sciences, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Supervolcanoes are large caldera systems that can expel vast quantities of ash, volcanic gases in a single eruption, far larger than any recorded in recent history. These super-eruptions have been suggested as possible catalysts for long-term climate change and may be responsible for bottlenecks in human and animal populations. Here, we consider the previously neglected climatic effects of a continent-sized ash deposit with a high albedo and show that a decadal climate forcing is expected. We use a coupled atmosphere-ocean General Circulation Model (GCM) to simulate the effect of an ash blanket from Yellowstone volcano, USA, covering much of North America. Reflectivity measurements of dry volcanic ash show albedo values as high as snow, implying that the effects of an ash blanket would be severe. The modeling results indicate major disturbances to the climate, particularly to oscillatory patterns such as the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Atmospheric disruptions would continue for decades after the eruption due to extended ash blanket longevity. The climatic response to an ash blanket is not significant enough to investigate a change to stadial periods at present day boundary conditions, though this is one of several impacts associated with a super-eruption which may induce long-term climatic change. (orig.)

  20. The German lignite industry. Historical development, resources, technology, economic structures and environmental impact. Study; Die deutsche Braunkohlenwirtschaft. Historische Entwicklungen, Ressourcen, Technik, wirtschaftliche Strukturen und Umweltauswirkungen. Studie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-05-15

    Lignite has a key role to play in the transformation of the energy system due to its specific structural features in terms of industry, company history, policy, economics, the environment and regional structures. Understanding these structural features of the German lignite industry is an important requirement for classifying the significance of the lignite industry up to now and for the redesigning of this industrial sector. From these environmental, economic and regulatory structural characteristics, which are interwoven in a variety of ways, the incentives arise for the mining and power plant operators to react to energy price signals or energy policy steering. The aim of this research study is to define these structural features, to compile comprehensively the basic data and information that is not always transparently available, to understand the interactions, to enable the navigation of issues that are partly very complex, and to classify into the long-term developments that are especially important for political and social processes. In 2016 approx. 12 percent of German primary energy consumption was met using lignite. At the same time, lignite has the highest carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions of the fossil fuels; it currently accounts for approx. 19 percent of Germany's total greenhouse gas emissions as well as approx. 46 percent of the total CO2 emissions of the electricity sector. As a result of the mining of lignite and its conversion into electricity, substantial adverse impacts beyond the entry of greenhouse gases into the Earth's atmosphere arise for other environmental media. These impacts include half of Germany's mercury emissions, approx. a third of its sulfur dioxide emissions and approx. a tenth of its nitrogen oxide emissions. Lignite mining in open-cast mines takes up a substantial amount of landscape and soil and requires huge interventions in the water balance. Relatively high costs arise for the recultivation and rehabilitation