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Sample records for lignin biosynthesis promotes

  1. Genes encoding enzymes of the lignin biosynthesis pathway in Eucalyptus

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    Ricardo Harakava

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus ESTs libraries were screened for genes involved in lignin biosynthesis. This search was performed under the perspective of recent revisions on the monolignols biosynthetic pathway. Eucalyptus orthologues of all genes of the phenylpropanoid pathway leading to lignin biosynthesis reported in other plant species were identified. A library made with mRNAs extracted from wood was enriched for genes involved in lignin biosynthesis and allowed to infer the isoforms of each gene family that play a major role in wood lignin formation. Analysis of the wood library suggests that, besides the enzymes of the phenylpropanoids pathway, chitinases, laccases, and dirigent proteins are also important for lignification. Colocalization of several enzymes on the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, as predicted by amino acid sequence analysis, supports the existence of metabolic channeling in the phenylpropanoid pathway. This study establishes a framework for future investigations on gene expression level, protein expression and enzymatic assays, sequence polymorphisms, and genetic engineering.

  2. Biosynthesis and incorporation of side-chain-truncated lignin monomers to reduce lignin polymerization and enhance saccharification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eudes, Aymerick; George, Anthe; Mukerjee, Purba; Kim, Jin S; Pollet, Brigitte; Benke, Peter I; Yang, Fan; Mitra, Prajakta; Sun, Lan; Cetinkol, Ozgül P; Chabout, Salem; Mouille, Grégory; Soubigou-Taconnat, Ludivine; Balzergue, Sandrine; Singh, Seema; Holmes, Bradley M; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Keasling, Jay D; Simmons, Blake A; Lapierre, Catherine; Ralph, John; Loqué, Dominique

    2012-06-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is utilized as a renewable feedstock in various agro-industrial activities. Lignin is an aromatic, hydrophobic and mildly branched polymer integrally associated with polysaccharides within the biomass, which negatively affects their extraction and hydrolysis during industrial processing. Engineering the monomer composition of lignins offers an attractive option towards new lignins with reduced recalcitrance. The presented work describes a new strategy developed in Arabidopsis for the overproduction of rare lignin monomers to reduce lignin polymerization degree (DP). Biosynthesis of these 'DP reducers' is achieved by expressing a bacterial hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA hydratase-lyase (HCHL) in lignifying tissues of Arabidopsis inflorescence stems. HCHL cleaves the propanoid side-chain of hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA lignin precursors to produce the corresponding hydroxybenzaldehydes so that plant stems expressing HCHL accumulate in their cell wall higher amounts of hydroxybenzaldehyde and hydroxybenzoate derivatives. Engineered plants with intermediate HCHL activity levels show no reduction in total lignin, sugar content or biomass yield compared with wild-type plants. However, cell wall characterization of extract-free stems by thioacidolysis and by 2D-NMR revealed an increased amount of unusual C₆C₁ lignin monomers most likely linked with lignin as end-groups. Moreover the analysis of lignin isolated from these plants using size-exclusion chromatography revealed a reduced molecular weight. Furthermore, these engineered lines show saccharification improvement of pretreated stem cell walls. Therefore, we conclude that enhancing the biosynthesis and incorporation of C₆C₁ monomers ('DP reducers') into lignin polymers represents a promising strategy to reduce lignin DP and to decrease cell wall recalcitrance to enzymatic hydrolysis. © 2012 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2012 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied

  3. Genetic Augmentation of Syringyl Lignin in Low-lignin Aspen Trees, Final Report

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    Chung-Jui Tsai; Mark F. Davis; Vincent L. Chiang

    2004-11-10

    As a polysaccharide-encrusting component, lignin is critical to cell wall integrity and plant growth but also hinders recovery of cellulose fibers during the wood pulping process. To improve pulping efficiency, it is highly desirable to genetically modify lignin content and/or structure in pulpwood species to maximize pulp yields with minimal energy consumption and environmental impact. This project aimed to genetically augment the syringyl-to-guaiacyl lignin ratio in low-lignin transgenic aspen in order to produce trees with reduced lignin content, more reactive lignin structures and increased cellulose content. Transgenic aspen trees with reduced lignin content have already been achieved, prior to the start of this project, by antisense downregulation of a 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase gene (Hu et al., 1999 Nature Biotechnol 17: 808- 812). The primary objective of this study was to genetically augment syringyl lignin biosynthesis in these low-lignin trees in order to enhance lignin reactivity during chemical pulping. To accomplish this, both aspen and sweetgum genes encoding coniferaldehyde 5-hydroxylase (Osakabe et al., 1999 PNAS 96: 8955-8960) were targeted for over-expression in wildtype or low-lignin aspen under control of either a constitutive or a xylem-specific promoter. A second objective for this project was to develop reliable and cost-effective methods, such as pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry and NMR, for rapid evaluation of cell wall chemical components of transgenic wood samples. With these high-throughput techniques, we observed increased syringyl-to-guaiacyl lignin ratios in the transgenic wood samples, regardless of the promoter used or gene origin. Our results confirmed that the coniferaldehyde 5-hydroxylase gene is key to syringyl lignin biosynthesis. The outcomes of this research should be readily applicable to other pulpwood species, and promise to bring direct economic and environmental benefits to the pulp and paper industry.

  4. Imbalanced lignin biosynthesis promotes the sexual reproduction of homothallic oomycete pathogens.

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    Michaël Quentin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Lignin is incorporated into plant cell walls to maintain plant architecture and to ensure long-distance water transport. Lignin composition affects the industrial value of plant material for forage, wood and paper production, and biofuel technologies. Industrial demands have resulted in an increase in the use of genetic engineering to modify lignified plant cell wall composition. However, the interaction of the resulting plants with the environment must be analyzed carefully to ensure that there are no undesirable side effects of lignin modification. We show here that Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with impaired 5-hydroxyguaiacyl O-methyltransferase (known as caffeate O-methyltransferase; COMT function were more susceptible to various bacterial and fungal pathogens. Unexpectedly, asexual sporulation of the downy mildew pathogen, Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, was impaired on these mutants. Enhanced resistance to downy mildew was not correlated with increased plant defense responses in comt1 mutants but coincided with a higher frequency of oomycete sexual reproduction within mutant tissues. Comt1 mutants but not wild-type Arabidopsis accumulated soluble 2-O-5-hydroxyferuloyl-L-malate. The compound weakened mycelium vigor and promoted sexual oomycete reproduction when applied to a homothallic oomycete in vitro. These findings suggested that the accumulation of 2-O-5-hydroxyferuloyl-L-malate accounted for the observed comt1 mutant phenotypes during the interaction with H. arabidopsidis. Taken together, our study shows that an artificial downregulation of COMT can drastically alter the interaction of a plant with the biotic environment.

  5. Imbalanced lignin biosynthesis promotes the sexual reproduction of homothallic oomycete pathogens.

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    Quentin, Michaël; Allasia, Valérie; Pegard, Anthony; Allais, Florent; Ducrot, Paul-Henri; Favery, Bruno; Levis, Caroline; Martinet, Sophie; Masur, Clarissa; Ponchet, Michel; Roby, Dominique; Schlaich, Nikolaus L; Jouanin, Lise; Keller, Harald

    2009-01-01

    Lignin is incorporated into plant cell walls to maintain plant architecture and to ensure long-distance water transport. Lignin composition affects the industrial value of plant material for forage, wood and paper production, and biofuel technologies. Industrial demands have resulted in an increase in the use of genetic engineering to modify lignified plant cell wall composition. However, the interaction of the resulting plants with the environment must be analyzed carefully to ensure that there are no undesirable side effects of lignin modification. We show here that Arabidopsis thaliana mutants with impaired 5-hydroxyguaiacyl O-methyltransferase (known as caffeate O-methyltransferase; COMT) function were more susceptible to various bacterial and fungal pathogens. Unexpectedly, asexual sporulation of the downy mildew pathogen, Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis, was impaired on these mutants. Enhanced resistance to downy mildew was not correlated with increased plant defense responses in comt1 mutants but coincided with a higher frequency of oomycete sexual reproduction within mutant tissues. Comt1 mutants but not wild-type Arabidopsis accumulated soluble 2-O-5-hydroxyferuloyl-L-malate. The compound weakened mycelium vigor and promoted sexual oomycete reproduction when applied to a homothallic oomycete in vitro. These findings suggested that the accumulation of 2-O-5-hydroxyferuloyl-L-malate accounted for the observed comt1 mutant phenotypes during the interaction with H. arabidopsidis. Taken together, our study shows that an artificial downregulation of COMT can drastically alter the interaction of a plant with the biotic environment.

  6. Lignin biosynthesis in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.): its response to waterlogging and association with hormonal levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tran-Nguyen; Son, SeungHyun; Jordan, Mark C; Levin, David B; Ayele, Belay T

    2016-01-25

    Lignin is an important structural component of plant cell wall that confers mechanical strength and tolerance against biotic and abiotic stressors; however it affects the use of biomass such as wheat straw for some industrial applications such as biofuel production. Genetic alteration of lignin quantity and quality has been considered as a viable option to overcome this problem. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying lignin formation in wheat biomass has not been studied. Combining molecular and biochemical approaches, the present study investigated the transcriptional regulation of lignin biosynthesis in two wheat cultivars with varying lodging characteristics and also in response to waterlogging. It also examined the association of lignin level in tissues with that of plant hormones implicated in the control of lignin biosynthesis. Analysis of lignin biosynthesis in the two wheat cultivars revealed a close association of lodging resistance with internode lignin content and expression of 4-coumarate:CoA ligase1 (4CL1), p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase1 (C3H1), cinnamoyl-CoA reductase2 (CCR2), ferulate 5-hydroxylase2 (F5H2) and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase2 (COMT2), which are among the genes highly expressed in wheat tissues, implying the importance of these genes in mediating lignin deposition in wheat stem. Waterlogging of wheat plants reduced internode lignin content, and this effect is accompanied by transcriptional repression of three of the genes characterized as highly expressed in wheat internode including phenylalanine ammonia-lyase6 (PAL6), CCR2 and F5H2, and decreased activity of PAL. Expression of the other genes was, however, induced by waterlogging, suggesting their role in the synthesis of other phenylpropanoid-derived molecules with roles in stress responses. Moreover, difference in internode lignin content between cultivars or change in its level due to waterlogging is associated with the level of cytokinin. Lodging resistance, tolerance against

  7. Gene expression in the lignin biosynthesis pathway during soybean seed development.

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    Baldoni, A; Von Pinho, E V R; Fernandes, J S; Abreu, V M; Carvalho, M L M

    2013-02-28

    The study of gene expression in plants is fundamental, and understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in important biological processes, such as biochemical pathways or signaling that are used or manipulated in improvement programs, are key for the production of high-quality soybean seeds. Reports related to gene expression of lignin in seeds are scarce in the literature. We studied the expression of the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL), cinnamate 4-hydroxylase, 4-hydroxycinnamate 3-hydroxylase, and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase genes involved in lignin biosynthesis during the development of soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill) seeds. As the endogenous control, the eukaryotic elongation factor 1-beta gene was used in two biological replicates performed in triplicate. Relative quantitative expression of these genes during the R4, R5, R6, and R7 development stages was analyzed. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used for the gene expression study. The analyses were carried out in an ABI PRISM 7500 thermocycler using the comparative Ct method and SYBR Green to detect amplification. The seed samples at the R4 stage were chosen as calibrators. Increased expression of the cinnamate-4-hydroxylase and PAL genes occurred in soybean seeds at the R5 and R6 development stages. The cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase gene was expressed during the final development phases of soybean seeds. In low-lignin soybean cultivars, the higher expression of the PAL gene occurs at development stages R6 and R7. Activation of the genes involved in the lignin biosynthesis pathway occurs at the beginning of soybean seed development.

  8. Manipulation Of Lignin Biosynthesis To Maximize Ethanol Production From Populus Feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Clint Chapple; Dr. Rick Lindroth; Dr. Burce Dien; Dr. Glen Stanosz; Dr. Alex Wiedenhoeft; Dr. Fu Zhao; Dr. Duane Wegener; Dr. Janice Kelly; Dr. Leigh Raymond; Dr. Wallace Tyner

    2012-05-15

    Our research focuses on transgenic strategies for modifying lignification to improve biomass quality, without leading to deleterious effects on plant performance. In order to accomplish this objective, we designed molecular strategies and selected appropriate transgenes for manipulating the expression of lignification-associated genes; we generated poplar engineered for altered lignin content and/or monomer composition, and field-tested them for fitness; we analyzed the impact of these transgenic strategies on metabolism in general and lignin biosynthesis in particular; and evaluated the ease with which cell wall deconstruction can be accomplished using both chemical and enzymatic means using wild-type and high syringyl poplar.

  9. Characterization of novel Brown midrib 6 mutations affecting lignin biosynthesis in sorghum

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    The presence of lignin reduces the quality of lignocellulosic biomass for forage materials and feedstock for biofuels. In C4 grasses, the brown midrib phenotype has been linked to mutations to genes in the monolignol biosynthesis pathway. For example, the Bmr6 gene in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) has b...

  10. Effect of hypergravity on lignin formation and expression of lignin-related genes in inflorescence stems of an ethylene-insensitive Arabidopsis mutant ein3-1

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    Karahara, Ichirou; Kobayashi, Mai; Tamaoki, Daisuke; Kamisaka, Seiichiro

    Our previous studies have shown that hypergravity inhibits growth and promotes lignin forma-tion in inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis thaliana by up-regulation of genes involved in lignin biosynthesis (Tamaoki et al. 2006, 2009). In the present study, we have examined whether ethylene is involved in these responses using an ethylene-insensitive Arabidopsis mutant ein3-1. Our results revealed that hypergravity treatment at 300 G for 24 h significantly inhibited growth of inflorescence stems, promoted both deposition of acetyl bromide extractable lignin and gene expression involved in lignin formation in inflorescence stems of wild type plants. Growth inhibition of inflorescence stems was also observed in ein3-1. However, the effects of hypergravity on the promotion of the deposition of acetyl bromide lignin and the expression of genes involved in lignin formation were not observed in ein3-1, indicating that ethylene sig-naling is involved in the up-regulation of the expression of lignin-related genes as well as the promotion of deposition of lignin by hypergravity in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems.

  11. A novel multifunctional O-methyltransferase implicated in a dual methylation pathway associated with lignin biosynthesis in loblolly pine

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    Li, Laigeng; Popko, Jacqueline L.; Zhang, Xing-Hai; Osakabe, Keishi; Tsai, Chung-Jui; Joshi, Chandrashekhar P.; Chiang, Vincent L.

    1997-01-01

    S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-dependent O-methyltransferases (OMTs) catalyze the methylation of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives for the synthesis of methylated plant polyphenolics, including lignin. The distinction in the extent of methylation of lignins in angiosperms and gymnosperms, mediated by substrate-specific OMTs, represents one of the fundamental differences in lignin biosynthesis between these two classes of plants. In angiosperms, two types of structurally and functionally distinc...

  12. A novel multifunctional O-methyltransferase implicated in a dual methylation pathway associated with lignin biosynthesis in loblolly pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Popko, J L; Zhang, X H; Osakabe, K; Tsai, C J; Joshi, C P; Chiang, V L

    1997-05-13

    S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM)-dependent O-methyltransferases (OMTs) catalyze the methylation of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives for the synthesis of methylated plant polyphenolics, including lignin. The distinction in the extent of methylation of lignins in angiosperms and gymnosperms, mediated by substrate-specific OMTs, represents one of the fundamental differences in lignin biosynthesis between these two classes of plants. In angiosperms, two types of structurally and functionally distinct lignin pathway OMTs, caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferases (CAOMTs) and caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferases (CCoAOMTs), have been reported and extensively studied. However, little is known about lignin pathway OMTs in gymnosperms. We report here the first cloning of a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) xylem cDNA encoding a multifunctional enzyme, SAM:hydroxycinnamic Acids/hydroxycinnamoyl CoA Esters OMT (AEOMT). The deduced protein sequence of AEOMT is partially similar to, but clearly distinguishable from, that of CAOMTs and does not exhibit any significant similarity with CCoAOMT protein sequences. However, functionally, yeast-expressed AEOMT enzyme catalyzed the methylation of CAOMT substrates, caffeic and 5-hydroxyferulic acids, as well as CCoAOMT substrates, caffeoyl CoA and 5-hydroxyferuloyl CoA esters, with similar specific activities and was completely inactive with substrates associated with flavonoid synthesis. The lignin-related substrates were also efficiently methylated in crude extracts of loblolly pine secondary xylem. Our results support the notion that, in the context of amino acid sequence and biochemical function, AEOMT represents a novel SAM-dependent OMT, with both CAOMT and CCoAOMT activities and thus the potential to mediate a dual methylation pathway in lignin biosynthesis in loblolly pine xylem.

  13. A novel multifunctional O-methyltransferase implicated in a dual methylation pathway associated with lignin biosynthesis in loblolly pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Laigeng; Popko, Jacqueline L.; Zhang, Xing-Hai; Osakabe, Keishi; Tsai, Chung-Jui; Joshi, Chandrashekhar P.; Chiang, Vincent L.

    1997-01-01

    S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM)-dependent O-methyltransferases (OMTs) catalyze the methylation of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives for the synthesis of methylated plant polyphenolics, including lignin. The distinction in the extent of methylation of lignins in angiosperms and gymnosperms, mediated by substrate-specific OMTs, represents one of the fundamental differences in lignin biosynthesis between these two classes of plants. In angiosperms, two types of structurally and functionally distinct lignin pathway OMTs, caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferases (CAOMTs) and caffeoyl CoA 3-O-methyltransferases (CCoAOMTs), have been reported and extensively studied. However, little is known about lignin pathway OMTs in gymnosperms. We report here the first cloning of a loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) xylem cDNA encoding a multifunctional enzyme, SAM:hydroxycinnamic Acids/hydroxycinnamoyl CoA Esters OMT (AEOMT). The deduced protein sequence of AEOMT is partially similar to, but clearly distinguishable from, that of CAOMTs and does not exhibit any significant similarity with CCoAOMT protein sequences. However, functionally, yeast-expressed AEOMT enzyme catalyzed the methylation of CAOMT substrates, caffeic and 5-hydroxyferulic acids, as well as CCoAOMT substrates, caffeoyl CoA and 5-hydroxyferuloyl CoA esters, with similar specific activities and was completely inactive with substrates associated with flavonoid synthesis. The lignin-related substrates were also efficiently methylated in crude extracts of loblolly pine secondary xylem. Our results support the notion that, in the context of amino acid sequence and biochemical function, AEOMT represents a novel SAM-dependent OMT, with both CAOMT and CCoAOMT activities and thus the potential to mediate a dual methylation pathway in lignin biosynthesis in loblolly pine xylem. PMID:9144260

  14. Analysis of five rice 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase enzyme activity and stress response for potential roles in lignin and flavonoid biosynthesis in rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Haiyan; Li, Ying; Feng, Shengqiu; Zou, Weihua; Guo, Kai; Fan, Chunfen; Si, Shengli

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► 4CLs play important roles in both lignin and flavonoids biosynthesis. ► PA and FA are the two main substrates of 4CL (Os4CL1/3/4/5) for lignin biosynthesis. ► Os4CL2 is suggested for flavonoid formation in defense against UV radiation. -- Abstract: 4-Coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) catalyzes the conversion of hydroxycinnamates into corresponding CoA esters for biosynthesis of flavonoids and lignin. In this study, five members of the 4CL gene family from rice were cloned and analyzed. Recombinant 4CL data revealed that 4-coumaric acid and ferulic acid were the two main substrates of 4CL (Os4CL1/3/4/5) for monolignol biosynthesis in rice. Os4CL2 was specifically expressed in the anther and was strongly activated by UV irradiation, suggesting its potential involvement in flavonoid formation. Moreover, bioinformatics analysis showed that the existence of valine residue at the substrate-binding pocket may mainly affect rice 4CL activities toward sinapic acid

  15. Analysis of five rice 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase enzyme activity and stress response for potential roles in lignin and flavonoid biosynthesis in rice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Haiyan [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Biomass and Bioenergy Research Centre, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); School of Biology and Food Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); Li, Ying; Feng, Shengqiu; Zou, Weihua [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Biomass and Bioenergy Research Centre, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Guo, Kai [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Biomass and Bioenergy Research Centre, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Fan, Chunfen [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Biomass and Bioenergy Research Centre, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Si, Shengli [National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Biomass and Bioenergy Research Centre, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); and others

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► 4CLs play important roles in both lignin and flavonoids biosynthesis. ► PA and FA are the two main substrates of 4CL (Os4CL1/3/4/5) for lignin biosynthesis. ► Os4CL2 is suggested for flavonoid formation in defense against UV radiation. -- Abstract: 4-Coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL) catalyzes the conversion of hydroxycinnamates into corresponding CoA esters for biosynthesis of flavonoids and lignin. In this study, five members of the 4CL gene family from rice were cloned and analyzed. Recombinant 4CL data revealed that 4-coumaric acid and ferulic acid were the two main substrates of 4CL (Os4CL1/3/4/5) for monolignol biosynthesis in rice. Os4CL2 was specifically expressed in the anther and was strongly activated by UV irradiation, suggesting its potential involvement in flavonoid formation. Moreover, bioinformatics analysis showed that the existence of valine residue at the substrate-binding pocket may mainly affect rice 4CL activities toward sinapic acid.

  16. Transcriptional profiles of hybrid Eucalyptus genotypes with contrasting lignin content reveal that monolignol biosynthesis-related genes regulate wood composition

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    Tomotaka eShinya

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus species constitutes the most widely planted hardwood trees in temperate and subtropical regions. In this study, we compared the transcript levels of genes involved in lignocellulose formation such as cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin biosynthesis in two selected three-year old hybrid Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus urophylla x E. grandis genotypes (AM063 and AM380 that have different lignin content. AM063 and AM380 had 20.2 and 35.5% of Klason lignin content and 59.0% and 48.2%, -cellulose contents, respectively. We investigated the correlation between wood properties and transcript levels of wood formation-related genes using RNA-seq with total RNAs extracted from developing xylem tissues at a breast height. Transcript levels of cell wall construction genes such as cellulose synthase (CesA and sucrose synthase (SUSY were almost the same in both genotypes. However, AM063 exhibited higher transcript levels of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGP and xyloglucan endotransglucoxylase (XTH than those in AM380. Most monolignol biosynthesis- related isozyme genes showed higher transcript levels in AM380. These results indicate monolignol biosynthesis-related genes may regulate wood composition in Eucalyptus. Flavonoids contents were also observed at much higher levels in AM380 as a result of the elevated transcript levels of common phenylpropanoid pathway genes, phenylalanine ammonium lyase (PAL, cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H and 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (4CL. Secondary plant cell wall formation is regulated by many transcription factors. We analyzed genes encoding NAC, WRKY, AP2/ERF and KNOX transcription factors and found higher transcript levels of these genes in AM380. We also observed increased transcription of some MYB and LIM domain transcription factors in AM380 compared to AM063. All these results show that genes related to monolignol biosynthesis may regulate the wood composition and help maintain the ratio of cellulose and lignin contents

  17. AP2/ERF Transcription Factor, Ii049, Positively Regulates Lignan Biosynthesis in Isatis indigotica through Activating Salicylic Acid Signaling and Lignan/Lignin Pathway Genes

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    Ruifang Ma

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lignans, such as lariciresinol and its derivatives, have been identified as effective antiviral ingredients in Isatis indigotica. Evidence suggests that the APETALA2/ethylene response factor (AP2/ERF family might be related to the biosynthesis of lignans in I. indigotica. However, the special role played by the AP2/ERF family in the metabolism and its underlying putative mechanism still need to be elucidated. One novel AP2/ERF gene, named Ii049, was isolated and characterized from I. indigotica in this study. The quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed that Ii049 was expressed highest in the root and responded to methyl jasmonate, salicylic acid (SA and abscisic acid treatments to various degrees. Subcellular localization analysis indicated that Ii049 protein was localized in the nucleus. Knocking-down the expression of Ii049 caused a remarkable reduction of lignan/lignin contents and transcript levels of genes involved in the lignan/lignin biosynthetic pathway. Ii049 bound to the coupled element 1, RAV1AAT and CRTAREHVCBF2 motifs of genes IiPAL and IiCCR, the key structural genes in the lignan/lignin pathway. Furthermore, Ii049 was also essential for SA biosynthesis, and SA induced lignan accumulation in I. indigotica. Notably, the transgenic I. indigotica hairy roots overexpressing Ii049 showed high expression levels of lignan/lignin biosynthetic genes and SA content, resulting in significant accumulation of lignan/lignin. The best-engineered line (OVX049-10 produced 425.60 μg·g−1 lariciresinol, an 8.3-fold increase compared with the wild type production. This study revealed the function of Ii049 in regulating lignan/lignin biosynthesis, which had the potential to increase the content of valuable lignan/lignin in economically significant medicinal plants.

  18. Final Report on Regulation of Guaiacyl and Syringyl Monolignol Biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent L. Chiang

    2006-03-09

    The focus of this research is to understand syringyl monolignol biosynthesis that leads to the formation of syringyl lignin, a type of lignin that can be easily removed during biomass conversion. We have achieved the three originally proposed goals for this project. (1) SAD and CAD genes (enzyme catalytic and kinetic properties) and their functional relevance to CAld5H/AldOMT pathway, (2) spatiotemporal expression patterns of Cald5H, AldOMT, SAD and CAD genes, and (3) functions of CAld5H, AldOMT, and SAD genes in vivo using transgenic aspen. Furthermore, we also found that microRNA might be involved in the upstream regulatory network of lignin biosynthesis and wood formation. The achievements are as below. (1) Based on biochemical and molecular studies, we discovered a novel syringyl-specific alcohol dehydrogenase (SAD) involved in monolignol biosynthesis in angiosperm trees. Through CAld5H/OMT/SAD mediation, syringyl monolignol biosynthesis branches out from guaiacyl pathway at coniferaldehyde; (2) The function of CAld5H gene in this syringyl monolignol biosynthesis pathway also was confirmed in vivo in transgenic Populus; (3) The proposed major monolignol biosynthesis pathways were further supported by the involving biochemical functions of CCR based on a detailed kinetic study; (4) Gene promoter activity analysis also supported the cell-type specific expression of SAD and CAD genes in xylem tissue, consistent with the cell-specific locations of SAD and CAD proteins and with the proposed pathways; (5) We have developed a novel small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated stable gene-silencing system in transgenic plants; (6) Using the siRNA and P. trichocarpa transformation/regeneration systems we are currently producing transgenic P. trichocarpa to investigate the interactive functions of CAD and SAD in regulating guaiacyl and syringyl lignin biosynthesis; (7) We have cloned for the first time from a tree species, P. trichocarpa, small regulatory RNAs termed micro

  19. Morphological and transcript changes in the biosynthesis of lignin in oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) during Ganoderma boninense infections in vitro.

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    Goh, Kar Mun; Dickinson, Matthew; Supramaniam, Christina V

    2018-03-01

    Lignification of the plant cell wall could serve as the first line of defense against pathogen attack, but the molecular mechanisms of virulence and disease between oil palm and Ganoderma boninense are poorly understood. This study presents the biochemical, histochemical, enzymology and gene expression evidences of enhanced lignin biosynthesis in young oil palm as a response to G. boninense (GBLS strain). Comparative studies with control (T1), wounded (T2) and infected (T3) oil palm plantlets showed significant accumulation of total lignin content and monolignol derivatives (syringaldehyde and vanillin). These derivatives were deposited on the epidermal cell wall of infected plants. Moreover, substantial differences were detected in the activities of enzyme and relative expressions of genes encoding phenylalanine ammonia lyase (EC 4.3.1.24), cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (EC 1.14.13.11), caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.68) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD, EC 1.1.1.195). These enzymes are key intermediates dedicated to the biosynthesis of lignin monomers, the guaicyl (G), syringyl (S) and ρ-hydroxyphenyl (H) subunits. Results confirmed an early, biphasic and transient positive induction of all gene intermediates, except for CAD enzyme activities. These differences were visualized by anatomical and metabolic changes in the profile of lignin in the oil palm plantlets such as low G lignin, indicating a potential mechanism for enhanced susceptibility toward G. boninense infection. © 2017 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  20. Toward engineering E. coli with an autoregulatory system for lignin valorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Weihua; Liu, Fang; Singh, Seema

    2018-03-20

    Efficient lignin valorization could add more than 10-fold the value gained from burning it for energy and is critical for economic viability of future biorefineries. However, lignin-derived aromatics from biomass pretreatment are known to be potent fermentation inhibitors in microbial production of fuels and other value-added chemicals. In addition, isopropyl-β-d-1-thiogalactopyranoside and other inducers are routinely added into fermentation broth to induce the expression of pathway enzymes, which further adds to the overall process cost. An autoregulatory system that can diminish the aromatics' toxicity as well as be substrate-inducible can be the key for successful integration of lignin valorization into future lignocellulosic biorefineries. Toward that goal, in this study an autoregulatory system is demonstrated that alleviates the toxicity issue and eliminates the cost of an external inducer. Specifically, this system is composed of a catechol biosynthesis pathway coexpressed with an active aromatic transporter CouP under induction by a vanillin self-inducible promoter, ADH7, to effectively convert the lignin-derived aromatics into value-added chemicals using Escherichia coli as a host. The constructed autoregulatory system can efficiently transport vanillin across the cell membrane and convert it to catechol. Compared with the system without CouP expression, the expression of catechol biosynthesis pathway with transporter CouP significantly improved the catechol yields about 30% and 40% under promoter pTrc and ADH7, respectively. This study demonstrated an aromatic-induced autoregulatory system that enabled conversion of lignin-derived aromatics into catechol without the addition of any costly, external inducers, providing a promising and economically viable route for lignin valorization. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  1. Genetic engineering of syringyl-enriched lignin in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Vincent Lee; Li, Laigeng

    2004-11-02

    The present invention relates to a novel DNA sequence, which encodes a previously unidentified lignin biosynthetic pathway enzyme, sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase (SAD) that regulates the biosynthesis of syringyl lignin in plants. Also provided are methods for incorporating this novel SAD gene sequence or substantially similar sequences into a plant genome for genetic engineering of syringyl-enriched lignin in plants.

  2. Syringyl lignin is unaltered by severe sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase suppression in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakate, Abdellah; Stephens, Jennifer; Goldie, Alison; Hunter, William N; Marshall, David; Hancock, Robert D; Lapierre, Catherine; Morreel, Kris; Boerjan, Wout; Halpin, Claire

    2011-12-01

    The manipulation of lignin could, in principle, facilitate efficient biofuel production from plant biomass. Despite intensive study of the lignin pathway, uncertainty exists about the enzyme catalyzing the last step in syringyl (S) monolignol biosynthesis, the reduction of sinapaldehyde to sinapyl alcohol. Traditional schemes of the pathway suggested that both guaiacyl (G) and S monolignols are produced by a single substrate-versatile enzyme, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD). This was challenged by the discovery of a novel sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase (SAD) that preferentially uses sinapaldehyde as a substrate and that was claimed to regulate S lignin biosynthesis in angiosperms. Consequently, most pathway schemes now show SAD (or SAD and CAD) at the sinapaldehyde reduction step, although functional evidence is lacking. We cloned SAD from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and suppressed it in transgenic plants using RNA interference-inducing vectors. Characterization of lignin in the woody stems shows no change to content, composition, or structure, and S lignin is normal. By contrast, plants additionally suppressed in CAD have changes to lignin structure and S:G ratio and have increased sinapaldehyde in lignin, similar to plants suppressed in CAD alone. These data demonstrate that CAD, not SAD, is the enzyme responsible for S lignin biosynthesis in woody angiosperm xylem.

  3. Lignin biodegradation by the ascomycete Chrysonilia sitophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, J; Ferraz, A; Nogueira, R F; Ferrer, I; Esposito, E; Durán, N

    1997-01-01

    The lignin biodegradation process has an important role in the carbon cycle of the biosphere. The study of this natural process has developed mainly with the use of basidiomycetes in laboratory investigations. This has been a logical approach since most of the microorganisms involved in lignocellulosic degradation belong to this class of fungi. However, other microorganisms such as ascomycetes and also some bacteria, are involved in the lignin decaying process. This work focuses on lignin biodegradation by a microorganism belonging to the ascomycete class, Chrysonilia sitophila. Lignin peroxidase production and characterization, mechanisms of lignin degradation (lignin model compounds and lignin in wood matrix) and biosynthesis of veratryl alcohol are outstanding. Applications of C. sitophila for effluent treatment, wood biodegradation and single-cell protein production are also discussed.

  4. Syringyl Lignin Is Unaltered by Severe Sinapyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase Suppression in Tobacco[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barakate, Abdellah; Stephens, Jennifer; Goldie, Alison; Hunter, William N.; Marshall, David; Hancock, Robert D.; Lapierre, Catherine; Morreel, Kris; Boerjan, Wout; Halpin, Claire

    2011-01-01

    The manipulation of lignin could, in principle, facilitate efficient biofuel production from plant biomass. Despite intensive study of the lignin pathway, uncertainty exists about the enzyme catalyzing the last step in syringyl (S) monolignol biosynthesis, the reduction of sinapaldehyde to sinapyl alcohol. Traditional schemes of the pathway suggested that both guaiacyl (G) and S monolignols are produced by a single substrate-versatile enzyme, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD). This was challenged by the discovery of a novel sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase (SAD) that preferentially uses sinapaldehyde as a substrate and that was claimed to regulate S lignin biosynthesis in angiosperms. Consequently, most pathway schemes now show SAD (or SAD and CAD) at the sinapaldehyde reduction step, although functional evidence is lacking. We cloned SAD from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and suppressed it in transgenic plants using RNA interference–inducing vectors. Characterization of lignin in the woody stems shows no change to content, composition, or structure, and S lignin is normal. By contrast, plants additionally suppressed in CAD have changes to lignin structure and S:G ratio and have increased sinapaldehyde in lignin, similar to plants suppressed in CAD alone. These data demonstrate that CAD, not SAD, is the enzyme responsible for S lignin biosynthesis in woody angiosperm xylem. PMID:22158465

  5. Biosynthesis and incorporation of side-chain-truncated lignin monomers to reduce lignin polymerization and enhance saccharification

    OpenAIRE

    Eudes, Aymerick; George, Anthe; Mukerjee, Purba; Kim, J.S.; Pollet, B.; Bnke, P.I.; Persil Çetinkol, Özgül

    2012-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is utilized as a renewable feedstock in various agro-industrial activities. Lignin is an aromatic, hydrophobic and mildly branched polymer integrally associated with polysaccharides within the biomass, which negatively affects their extraction and hydrolysis during industrial processing. Engineering the monomer composition of lignins offers an attractive option towards new lignins with reduced recalcitrance. The presented work describes a new strategy developed in Arab...

  6. Improved Wood Properties Through Genetic Manipulation: Engineering of Syringyl Lignin in Softwood Species Through Xylem-Specific Expression of Hardwood Syringyl Monolignol Pathway Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandrashekhar P. Joshi; Vincent L. Chiang

    2009-01-29

    Project Objective: Our long-term goal is to genetically engineer higher value raw materials with desirable wood properties to promote energy efficiency, international competitiveness, and environmental responsiveness of the U.S. forest products industry. The immediate goal of this project was to produce the first higher value softwood raw materials engineered with a wide range of syringyl lignin quantities. Summary: The most important wood property affecting directly the levels of energy, chemical and bleaching requirements for kraft pulp production is lignin. Softwoods contain almost exclusively chemically resistant guaiacyl (G) lignin, whereas hardwoods have more reactive or easily degradable lignins of the guaiacyl (G)-syringyl (S) type. It is also well established that the reactive S lignin component is the key factor that permits much lower effective alkali and temperature, shorter pulping time and less bleaching stages for processing hardwoods than for softwoods. Furthermore, our pulping kinetic study explicitly demonstrated that every increase in one unit of the lignin S/G ratio would roughly double the rate of lignin removal. These are clear evidence that softwoods genetically engineered with S lignin are keys to revolutionizing the energy efficiency and enhancing the environmental performance of this industry. Softwoods and hardwoods share the same genetic mechanisms for the biosynthesis of G lignin. However, in hardwoods, three additional genes branch out from the G-lignin pathway and become specifically engaged in regulating S lignin biosynthesis. In this research, we simultaneously transferred aspen S-specific genes into a model softwood, black spruce, to engineer S lignin.

  7. Disruption of Mediator rescues the stunted growth of a lignin-deficient Arabidopsis mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonawitz, Nicholas D; Kim, Jeong Im; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Ciesielski, Peter N; Anderson, Nickolas A; Ximenes, Eduardo; Maeda, Junko; Ralph, John; Donohoe, Bryon S; Ladisch, Michael; Chapple, Clint

    2014-05-15

    Lignin is a phenylpropanoid-derived heteropolymer important for the strength and rigidity of the plant secondary cell wall. Genetic disruption of lignin biosynthesis has been proposed as a means to improve forage and bioenergy crops, but frequently results in stunted growth and developmental abnormalities, the mechanisms of which are poorly understood. Here we show that the phenotype of a lignin-deficient Arabidopsis mutant is dependent on the transcriptional co-regulatory complex, Mediator. Disruption of the Mediator complex subunits MED5a (also known as REF4) and MED5b (also known as RFR1) rescues the stunted growth, lignin deficiency and widespread changes in gene expression seen in the phenylpropanoid pathway mutant ref8, without restoring the synthesis of guaiacyl and syringyl lignin subunits. Cell walls of rescued med5a/5b ref8 plants instead contain a novel lignin consisting almost exclusively of p-hydroxyphenyl lignin subunits, and moreover exhibit substantially facilitated polysaccharide saccharification. These results demonstrate that guaiacyl and syringyl lignin subunits are largely dispensable for normal growth and development, implicate Mediator in an active transcriptional process responsible for dwarfing and inhibition of lignin biosynthesis, and suggest that the transcription machinery and signalling pathways responding to cell wall defects may be important targets to include in efforts to reduce biomass recalcitrance.

  8. Large-Scale Transcriptome Analysis of Two Sugarcane Genotypes Contrasting for Lignin Content.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Vicentini

    Full Text Available Sugarcane is an important crop worldwide for sugar and first generation ethanol production. Recently, the residue of sugarcane mills, named bagasse, has been considered a promising lignocellulosic biomass to produce the second-generation ethanol. Lignin is a major factor limiting the use of bagasse and other plant lignocellulosic materials to produce second-generation ethanol. Lignin biosynthesis pathway is a complex network and changes in the expression of genes of this pathway have in general led to diverse and undesirable impacts on plant structure and physiology. Despite its economic importance, sugarcane genome was still not sequenced. In this study a high-throughput transcriptome evaluation of two sugarcane genotypes contrasting for lignin content was carried out. We generated a set of 85,151 transcripts of sugarcane using RNA-seq and de novo assembling. More than 2,000 transcripts showed differential expression between the genotypes, including several genes involved in the lignin biosynthetic pathway. This information can give valuable knowledge on the lignin biosynthesis and its interactions with other metabolic pathways in the complex sugarcane genome.

  9. Novel seed coat lignins in the Cactaceae: structure, distribution and implications for the evolution of lignin diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Jackson, Lisa; Nakashima, Jin; Ralph, John; Dixon, Richard A

    2013-01-01

    We have recently described a hitherto unsuspected catechyl lignin polymer (C-lignin) in the seed coats of Vanilla orchid and in cacti of one genus, Melocactus (Chen et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 2012, 109, 1772-1777.). We have now determined the lignin types in the seed coats of 130 different cactus species. Lignin in the vegetative tissues of cacti is of the normal guaiacyl/syringyl (G/S) type, but members of most genera within the subfamily Cactoidae possess seed coat lignin of the novel C-type only, which we show is a homopolymer formed by endwise β-O-4-coupling of caffeyl alcohol monomers onto the growing polymer resulting in benzodioxane units. However, the species examined within the genera Coryphantha, Cumarinia, Escobaria and Mammillaria (Cactoideae) mostly had normal G/S lignin in their seeds, as did all six species in the subfamily Opuntioidae that were examined. Seed coat lignin composition is still evolving in the Cactaceae, as seeds of one Mammillaria species (M. lasiacantha) possess only C-lignin, three Escobaria species (E. dasyacantha, E. lloydii and E. zilziana) contain an unusual lignin composed of 5-hydroxyguaiacyl units, the first report of such a polymer that occurs naturally in plants, and seeds of some species contain no lignin at all. We discuss the implications of these findings for the mechanisms that underlie the biosynthesis of these newly discovered lignin types. © 2012 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Engineering Plant Biomass Lignin Content and Composition for Biofuels and Bioproducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassie Marie Welker

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lignin is an aromatic biopolymer involved in providing structural support to plant cell walls. Compared to the other cell wall polymers, i.e., cellulose and hemicelluloses, lignin has been considered a hindrance in cellulosic bioethanol production due to the complexity involved in its separation from other polymers of various biomass feedstocks. Nevertheless, lignin is a potential source of valuable aromatic chemical compounds and upgradable building blocks. Though the biosynthetic pathway of lignin has been elucidated in great detail, the random nature of the polymerization (free radical coupling process poses challenges for its depolymerization into valuable bioproducts. The absence of specific methodologies for lignin degradation represents an important opportunity for research and development. This review highlights research development in lignin biosynthesis, lignin genetic engineering and different biological and chemical means of depolymerization used to convert lignin into biofuels and bioproducts.

  11. Sugarcane expressed sequences tags (ESTs encoding enzymes involved in lignin biosynthesis pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos Rose Lucia Braz

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Lignins are phenolic polymers found in the secondary wall of plant conductive systems where they play an important role by reducing the permeability of the cell wall to water. Lignins are also responsible for the rigidity of the cell wall and are involved in mechanisms of resistance to pathogens. The metabolic routes and enzymes involved in synthesis of lignins have been largely characterized and representative genes that encode enzymes involved in these processes have been cloned from several plant species. The synthesis of lignins is liked to the general metabolism of the phenylpropanoids in plants, having enzymes (e.g. phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL, cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H and caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT common to other processes as well as specific enzymes such as cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD. Some maize and sorghum mutants, shown to have defective in CAD and/or COMT activity, are easier to digest because they have a reduced lignin content, something which has motivated different research groups to alter the lignin content and composition of model plants by genetic engineering try to improve, for example, the efficiency of paper pulping and digestibility. In the work reported in this paper, we have made an inventory of the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (EST coding for enzymes involved in lignin metabolism which are present in the sugarcane EST genome project (SUCEST database. Our analysis focused on the key enzymes ferulate-5-hydroxylase (F5H, caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT, caffeoyl CoA O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT, hydroxycinnamate CoA ligase (4CL, cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD. The comparative analysis of these genes with those described in other species could be used as molecular markers for breeding as well as for the manipulation of lignin metabolism in sugarcane.

  12. Reactivity of lignin and lignin models towards UV-assisted peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Y.P.; Wallis, A.F.A.; Nguyen, K.L.

    1997-01-01

    The comparative reactivities of a series of guaiacyl and syringyl lignin model compounds and their methylated analogues towards alkaline peroxide and UV-alkaline peroxide were investigated. The overall reaction was followed by monitoring the reduction of the substrate as a function of time, and in every case, the reaction showed pseudo-first-order kinetics. The reaction rates of most lignin models having identical sidechains with alkaline peroxide and with UV-alkaline peroxide were in the order syringyl guaiacyl 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl veratryl. Thus phenols react faster than their methyl ethers, and an extra ortho methoxyl group promotes the reaction. Lignin models possessing electron-donating sidechains had generally higher reaction rates than those with electron-withdrawing sidechains. The reaction rates of the series of benzoic acids were 2-4 times higher at pH 11 than at pH 5. UV-peroxide degradation of a eucalypt kraft lignin was faster than that of a pine kraft lignin, and degradation was 1.4-1.6 times faster at pH 11 than at pH 5. The data are consistent with the formation of higher amounts of reactive radicals under alkaline conditions, and aromatic rings with greater electronegativities promoting reactions with the radicals

  13. SbCOMT (Bmr12) is involved in the biosynthesis of tricin-lignin in sorghum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignin in plant biomass represents a target for engineering strategies towards the development of a sustainable bioeconomy. In addition to the conventional lignin monomers, namely p-coumaryl, coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols, tricin has been shown to be part of the native lignin polymer in certain mon...

  14. Syringyl lignin is unaltered by severe sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase suppression in tobacco

    OpenAIRE

    Barakate, Abdellah; Stephens, Jennifer; Goldie, Alison; Hunter, William N.; Marshall, David; Hancock, Robert D.; Lapierre, Catherine; Morreele, Kris; Boerjane, Wout

    2011-01-01

    The manipulation of lignin could, in principle, facilitate efficient biofuel production from plant biomass. Despite intensive study of the lignin pathway, uncertainty exists about the enzyme catalyzing the last step in syringyl (S) monolignol biosynthesis, the reduction of sinapaldehyde to sinapyl alcohol. Traditional schemes of the pathway suggested that both guaiacyl (G) and S monolignols are produced by a single substrate-versatile enzyme, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD). This was cha...

  15. Manipulation of Guaiacyl and Syringyl Monomer Biosynthesis in an Arabidopsis Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase Mutant Results in Atypical Lignin Biosynthesis and Modified Cell Wall Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Nickolas A.; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Ciesielski, Peter N.; Ximenes, Eduardo; Ralph, John; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Ladisch, Michael; Chapple, Clint

    2015-08-01

    Modifying lignin composition and structure is a key strategy to increase plant cell wall digestibility for biofuel production. Disruption of the genes encoding both cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases (CADs), including CADC and CADD, in Arabidopsis thaliana results in the atypical incorporation of hydroxycinnamaldehydes into lignin. Another strategy to change lignin composition is downregulation or overexpression of ferulate 5-hydroxylase (F5H), which results in lignins enriched in guaiacyl or syringyl units, respectively. Here, we combined these approaches to generate plants enriched in coniferaldehyde-derived lignin units or lignins derived primarily from sinapaldehyde. The cadc cadd and ferulic acid hydroxylase1 (fah1) cadc cadd plants are similar in growth to wild-type plants even though their lignin compositions are drastically altered. In contrast, disruption of CAD in the F5H-overexpressing background results in dwarfism. The dwarfed phenotype observed in these plants does not appear to be related to collapsed xylem, a hallmark of many other lignin-deficient dwarf mutants. cadc cadd, fah1 cadc cadd, and cadd F5H-overexpressing plants have increased enzyme-catalyzed cell wall digestibility. Given that these CAD-deficient plants have similar total lignin contents and only differ in the amounts of hydroxycinnamaldehyde monomer incorporation, these results suggest that hydroxycinnamaldehyde content is a more important determinant of digestibility than lignin content.

  16. Manipulation of Guaiacyl and Syringyl Monomer Biosynthesis in an Arabidopsis Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase Mutant Results in Atypical Lignin Biosynthesis and Modified Cell Wall Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Nickolas A; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Ciesielski, Peter N; Ximenes, Eduardo; Ralph, John; Donohoe, Bryon S; Ladisch, Michael; Chapple, Clint

    2015-08-01

    Modifying lignin composition and structure is a key strategy to increase plant cell wall digestibility for biofuel production. Disruption of the genes encoding both cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases (CADs), including CADC and CADD, in Arabidopsis thaliana results in the atypical incorporation of hydroxycinnamaldehydes into lignin. Another strategy to change lignin composition is downregulation or overexpression of ferulate 5-hydroxylase (F5H), which results in lignins enriched in guaiacyl or syringyl units, respectively. Here, we combined these approaches to generate plants enriched in coniferaldehyde-derived lignin units or lignins derived primarily from sinapaldehyde. The cadc cadd and ferulic acid hydroxylase1 (fah1) cadc cadd plants are similar in growth to wild-type plants even though their lignin compositions are drastically altered. In contrast, disruption of CAD in the F5H-overexpressing background results in dwarfism. The dwarfed phenotype observed in these plants does not appear to be related to collapsed xylem, a hallmark of many other lignin-deficient dwarf mutants. cadc cadd, fah1 cadc cadd, and cadd F5H-overexpressing plants have increased enzyme-catalyzed cell wall digestibility. Given that these CAD-deficient plants have similar total lignin contents and only differ in the amounts of hydroxycinnamaldehyde monomer incorporation, these results suggest that hydroxycinnamaldehyde content is a more important determinant of digestibility than lignin content. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional analysis of metabolic channeling and regulation in lignin biosynthesis: a computational approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Lee

    Full Text Available Lignin is a polymer in secondary cell walls of plants that is known to have negative impacts on forage digestibility, pulping efficiency, and sugar release from cellulosic biomass. While targeted modifications of different lignin biosynthetic enzymes have permitted the generation of transgenic plants with desirable traits, such as improved digestibility or reduced recalcitrance to saccharification, some of the engineered plants exhibit monomer compositions that are clearly at odds with the expected outcomes when the biosynthetic pathway is perturbed. In Medicago, such discrepancies were partly reconciled by the recent finding that certain biosynthetic enzymes may be spatially organized into two independent channels for the synthesis of guaiacyl (G and syringyl (S lignin monomers. Nevertheless, the mechanistic details, as well as the biological function of these interactions, remain unclear. To decipher the working principles of this and similar control mechanisms, we propose and employ here a novel computational approach that permits an expedient and exhaustive assessment of hundreds of minimal designs that could arise in vivo. Interestingly, this comparative analysis not only helps distinguish two most parsimonious mechanisms of crosstalk between the two channels by formulating a targeted and readily testable hypothesis, but also suggests that the G lignin-specific channel is more important for proper functioning than the S lignin-specific channel. While the proposed strategy of analysis in this article is tightly focused on lignin synthesis, it is likely to be of similar utility in extracting unbiased information in a variety of situations, where the spatial organization of molecular components is critical for coordinating the flow of cellular information, and where initially various control designs seem equally valid.

  18. How Embryophytic is the Biosynthesis of Phenylpropanoids and their Derivatives in Streptophyte Algae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Jan; de Vries, Sophie; Slamovits, Claudio H; Rose, Laura E; Archibald, John M

    2017-05-01

    The origin of land plants from algae is a long-standing question in evolutionary biology. It is becoming increasingly clear that many characters that were once assumed to be 'embryophyte specific' can in fact be found in their closest algal relatives, the streptophyte algae. One such case is the phenylpropanoid pathway. While biochemical data indicate that streptophyte algae harbor lignin-like components, the phenylpropanoid core pathway, which serves as the backbone of lignin biosynthesis, has been proposed to have arisen at the base of the land plants. Here we revisit this hypothesis using a wealth of new sequence data from streptophyte algae. Tracing the biochemical pathway towards lignin biogenesis, we show that most of the genes required for phenylpropanoid synthesis and the precursors for lignin production were already present in streptophyte algae. Nevertheless, phylogenetic analyses and protein structure predictions of one of the key enzyme classes in lignin production, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD), suggest that CADs of streptophyte algae are more similar to sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenases (SADs). This suggests that the end-products of the pathway leading to lignin biosynthesis in streptophyte algae may facilitate the production of lignin-like compounds and defense molecules. We hypothesize that streptophyte algae already possessed the genetic toolkit from which the capacity to produce lignin later evolved in vascular plants. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. The impact of alterations in lignin deposition on cellulose organization of the plant cell wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiliang; Kim, Jeong Im; Cusumano, Joanne C.; Chapple, Clint; Venugopalan, Nagarajan; Fischetti, Robert F.; Makowski, Lee

    2016-06-17

    Background: Coordination of synthesis and assembly of the polymeric components of cell walls is essential for plant growth and development. Given the degree of co-mingling and cross-linking among cell wall components, cellulose organization must be dependent on the organization of other polymers such as lignin. Here we seek to identify aspects of that codependency by studying the structural organization of cellulose fibrils in stems from Arabidopsis plants harboring mutations in genes encoding enzymes involved in lignin biosynthesis. Plants containing high levels of G-lignin, S-lignin, H-lignin, aldehyde-rich lignin, and ferulic acid-containing lignin, along with plants with very low lignin content were grown and harvested and longitudinal sections of stem were prepared and dried. Scanning X-ray microdiffraction was carried out using a 5-micron beam that moved across the sections in 5-micron steps and complete diffraction patterns were collected at each raster point. Approximately, 16,000 diffraction patterns were analyzed to determine cellulose fibril orientation and order within the tissues making up the stems. Results: Several mutations-most notably those exhibiting (1) down-regulation of cinnamoyl CoA reductase which leads to cell walls deficient in lignin and (2) defect of cinnamic acid 4-hydroxylase which greatly reduces lignin content-exhibited significant decrease in the proportion of oriented cellulose fibrils in the cell wall. Distinctions between tissues were maintained in all variants and even in plants exhibiting dramatic changes in cellulosic order the trends between tissues (where apparent) were generally maintained. The resilience of cellulose to degradative processes was investigated by carrying out the same analysis on samples stored in water for 30 days prior to data collection. This treatment led to significant loss of cellulosic order in plants rich in aldehyde or H-lignin, less change in wild type, and essentially no change in samples with

  20. Overexpression of SbMyb60 impacts phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and alters secondary cell wall composition in sorghum bicolor

    Science.gov (United States)

    The phenylpropanoid biosynthesis pathway that generates lignin subunits represents a significant target to alter the abundance and composition of lignin. The major regulators of phenylpropanoid metabolism are myb transcription factors, which have been shown to modulate secondary cell wall compositi...

  1. Structural Redesigning Arabidopsis Lignins into Alkali-Soluble Lignins through the Expression of p-Coumaroyl-CoA:Monolignol Transferase PMT1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibout, Richard; Le Bris, Philippe; Cézard, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Grass lignins can contain up to 10% to 15% by weight of p-coumaric esters. This acylation is performed on monolignols under the catalysis of p-coumaroyl-coenzyme A monolignol transferase (PMT). To study the impact of p-coumaroylation on lignification, we first introduced the Brachypodium distachyon Bradi2g36910 (BdPMT1) gene into Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) under the control of the constitutive maize (Zea mays) ubiquitin promoter. The resulting p-coumaroylation was far lower than that of lignins from mature grass stems and had no impact on stem lignin content. By contrast, introducing either the BdPMT1 or the Bradi1g36980 (BdPMT2) gene into Arabidopsis under the control of the Arabidopsis cinnamate-4-hydroxylase promoter boosted the p-coumaroylation of mature stems up to the grass lignin level (8% to 9% by weight), without any impact on plant development. The analysis of purified lignin fractions and the identification of diagnostic products confirmed that p-coumaric acid was associated with lignins. BdPMT1-driven p-coumaroylation was also obtained in the fah1 (deficient for ferulate 5-hydroxylase) and ccr1g (deficient for cinnamoyl-coenzyme A reductase) lines, albeit to a lower extent. Lignins from BdPMT1-expressing ccr1g lines were also found to be feruloylated. In Arabidopsis mature stems, substantial p-coumaroylation of lignins was achieved at the expense of lignin content and induced lignin structural alterations, with an unexpected increase of lignin units with free phenolic groups. This higher frequency of free phenolic groups in Arabidopsis lignins doubled their solubility in alkali at room temperature. These findings suggest that the formation of alkali-leachable lignin domains rich in free phenolic groups is favored when p-coumaroylated monolignols participate in lignification in a grass in a similar manner. PMID:26826222

  2. Coordinated transcriptional regulation of two key genes in the lignin branch pathway--CAD and CCR--is mediated through MYB- binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahantamalala, Anjanirina; Rech, Philippe; Martinez, Yves; Chaubet-Gigot, Nicole; Grima-Pettenati, Jacqueline; Pacquit, Valérie

    2010-06-28

    Cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) catalyze the final steps in the biosynthesis of monolignols, the monomeric units of the phenolic lignin polymers which confer rigidity, imperviousness and resistance to biodegradation to cell walls. We have previously shown that the Eucalyptus gunnii CCR and CAD2 promoters direct similar expression patterns in vascular tissues suggesting that monolignol production is controlled, at least in part, by the coordinated transcriptional regulation of these two genes. Although consensus motifs for MYB transcription factors occur in most gene promoters of the whole phenylpropanoid pathway, functional evidence for their contribution to promoter activity has only been demonstrated for a few of them. Here, in the lignin-specific branch, we studied the functional role of MYB elements as well as other cis-elements identified in the regulatory regions of EgCAD2 and EgCCR promoters, in the transcriptional activity of these gene promoters. By using promoter deletion analysis and in vivo footprinting, we identified an 80 bp regulatory region in the Eucalyptus gunnii EgCAD2 promoter that contains two MYB elements, each arranged in a distinct module with newly identified cis-elements. A directed mutagenesis approach was used to introduce block mutations in all putative cis-elements of the EgCAD2 promoter and in those of the 50 bp regulatory region previously delineated in the EgCCR promoter. We showed that the conserved MYB elements in EgCAD2 and EgCCR promoters are crucial both for the formation of DNA-protein complexes in EMSA experiments and for the transcriptional activation of EgCAD2 and EgCCR promoters in vascular tissues in planta. In addition, a new regulatory cis-element that modulates the balance between two DNA-protein complexes in vitro was found to be important for EgCAD2 expression in the cambial zone. Our assignment of functional roles to the identified cis-elements clearly demonstrates the

  3. The last step of syringyl monolignol biosynthesis in angiosperms is regulated by a novel gene encoding sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Cheng, X F; Leshkevich, J; Umezawa, T; Harding, S A; Chiang, V L

    2001-07-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD; EC 1.1.1.195) has been thought to mediate the reduction of both coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde into guaiacyl and syringyl monolignols in angiosperms. Here, we report the isolation of a novel aspen gene (PtSAD) encoding sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase (SAD), which is phylogenetically distinct from aspen CAD (PtCAD). Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based enzyme functional analysis and substrate level-controlled enzyme kinetics consistently demonstrated that PtSAD is sinapaldehyde specific and that PtCAD is coniferaldehyde specific. The enzymatic efficiency of PtSAD for sinapaldehyde was approximately 60 times greater than that of PtCAD. These data suggest that in addition to CAD, discrete SAD function is essential to the biosynthesis of syringyl monolignol in angiosperms. In aspen stem primary tissues, PtCAD was immunolocalized exclusively to xylem elements in which only guaiacyl lignin was deposited, whereas PtSAD was abundant in syringyl lignin-enriched phloem fiber cells. In the developing secondary stem xylem, PtCAD was most conspicuous in guaiacyl lignin-enriched vessels, but PtSAD was nearly absent from these elements and was conspicuous in fiber cells. In the context of additional protein immunolocalization and lignin histochemistry, these results suggest that the distinct CAD and SAD functions are linked spatiotemporally to the differential biosynthesis of guaiacyl and syringyl lignins in different cell types. SAD is required for the biosynthesis of syringyl lignin in angiosperms.

  4. Identifying new lignin bioengineering targets: 1. Monolignol-substitute impacts on lignin formation and cell wall fermentability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Fachuang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent discoveries highlighting the metabolic malleability of plant lignification indicate that lignin can be engineered to dramatically alter its composition and properties. Current plant biotechnology efforts are primarily aimed at manipulating the biosynthesis of normal monolignols, but in the future apoplastic targeting of phenolics from other metabolic pathways may provide new approaches for designing lignins that are less inhibitory toward the enzymatic hydrolysis of structural polysaccharides, both with and without biomass pretreatment. To identify promising new avenues for lignin bioengineering, we artificially lignified cell walls from maize cell suspensions with various combinations of normal monolignols (coniferyl and sinapyl alcohols plus a variety of phenolic monolignol substitutes. Cell walls were then incubated in vitro with anaerobic rumen microflora to assess the potential impact of lignin modifications on the enzymatic degradability of fibrous crops used for ruminant livestock or biofuel production. Results In the absence of anatomical constraints to digestion, lignification with normal monolignols hindered both the rate and extent of cell wall hydrolysis by rumen microflora. Inclusion of methyl caffeate, caffeoylquinic acid, or feruloylquinic acid with monolignols considerably depressed lignin formation and strikingly improved the degradability of cell walls. In contrast, dihydroconiferyl alcohol, guaiacyl glycerol, epicatechin, epigallocatechin, and epigallocatechin gallate readily formed copolymer-lignins with normal monolignols; cell wall degradability was moderately enhanced by greater hydroxylation or 1,2,3-triol functionality. Mono- or diferuloyl esters with various aliphatic or polyol groups readily copolymerized with monolignols, but in some cases they accelerated inactivation of wall-bound peroxidase and reduced lignification; cell wall degradability was influenced by lignin content and the degree

  5. Diesel-soluble lignin oils and methods of their production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    Solvent consumption in supercritical ethanol, propanol or butanol treatment of either refined pre-extracted lignin or comparatively impure lignin-rich solid residual from hydrothermally pretreated lignocellulosic biomass can be minimized by conducting the reaction at very high loading of lignin...... to solvent. Comparatively impure, crude lignin- rich solid residual can be directly converted by supercritical alcohol treatment to significantly diesel-soluble lignin oil without requirement for pre-extraction or pre- solubilisation of lignin or for added reaction promoters such as catalysts, hydrogen donor...... co-solvents, acids, based or H2 gas. O:C ratio of product oil can readily be obtained using crude lignin residual in such a process at levels 0.20 or lower....

  6. Structural Characterization of Lignin in Wild-Type versus COMT Down-Regulated Switchgrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuel, Reichel [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pu, Yunqiao, E-mail: yunqiao.pu@ipst.gatech.edu [BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Institute of Paper Science and Technology, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jiang, Nan [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Fu, Chunxiang [Forage Improvement Division, The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States); Wang, Zeng-Yu [BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Forage Improvement Division, The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation, Ardmore, OK (United States); Ragauskas, Arthur, E-mail: yunqiao.pu@ipst.gatech.edu [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); BioEnergy Science Center, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-01-20

    This study examined the chemical structural characteristics of cellulolytic enzyme lignin isolated from switchgrass focusing on comparisons between wild-type control and caffeic acid 3-O-methyltransferase (COMT) down-regulated transgenic line. Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques including {sup 13}C, {sup 31}P, and two-dimensional {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H heteronuclear single quantum coherence as well as gel permeation chromatography were employed. Compared to the wild-type, the COMT down-regulated transgenic switchgrass lignin demonstrated a decrease in syringyl (S):guaiacyl (G) ratio and p-coumarate:ferulate ratio, an increase in relative abundance of phenylcoumaran unit, and a comparable content of total free phenolic OH groups along with formation of benzodioxane unit. In addition, COMT down-regulation had no significant effects on the lignin molecular weights during its biosynthesis process.

  7. Lignin depletion enhances the digestibility of cellulose in cultured xylem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine I Lacayo

    Full Text Available Plant lignocellulose constitutes an abundant and sustainable source of polysaccharides that can be converted into biofuels. However, the enzymatic digestion of native plant cell walls is inefficient, presenting a considerable barrier to cost-effective biofuel production. In addition to the insolubility of cellulose and hemicellulose, the tight association of lignin with these polysaccharides intensifies the problem of cell wall recalcitrance. To determine the extent to which lignin influences the enzymatic digestion of cellulose, specifically in secondary walls that contain the majority of cellulose and lignin in plants, we used a model system consisting of cultured xylem cells from Zinniaelegans. Rather than using purified cell wall substrates or plant tissue, we have applied this system to study cell wall degradation because it predominantly consists of homogeneous populations of single cells exhibiting large deposits of lignocellulose. We depleted lignin in these cells by treating with an oxidative chemical or by inhibiting lignin biosynthesis, and then examined the resulting cellulose digestibility and accessibility using a fluorescent cellulose-binding probe. Following cellulase digestion, we measured a significant decrease in relative cellulose content in lignin-depleted cells, whereas cells with intact lignin remained essentially unaltered. We also observed a significant increase in probe binding after lignin depletion, indicating that decreased lignin levels improve cellulose accessibility. These results indicate that lignin depletion considerably enhances the digestibility of cellulose in the cell wall by increasing the susceptibility of cellulose to enzymatic attack. Although other wall components are likely to contribute, our quantitative study exploits cultured Zinnia xylem cells to demonstrate the dominant influence of lignin on the enzymatic digestion of the cell wall. This system is simple enough for quantitative image analysis

  8. Fluridone and norflurazon, carotenoid-biosynthesis inhibitors, promote seed conditioning and germination of the holoparasite Orobanche minor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Sang Heon; Yoneyama, Koichi; Takeuchi, Yasutomo; Joel, Daniel M.

    2004-02-01

    Fluridone and norflurazon, two carotenoid-biosynthesis inhibitors, shortened the conditioning period required by seeds of Orobanche minor in order to respond to the germination stimulant strigol. Neither fluridone nor norflurazon alone induced seed germination of O. minor, they promoted strigol-induced germination. In addition, these compounds restored the conditioning and germination of seeds at a supraoptimal temperature (30 degrees C) as well as in the light. Gibberellic acid (GA(3)) showed similar promotive and protective effects on the conditioning and germination of O. minor seeds. Although fluridone and norflurazon are known to prevent abscisic acid (ABA)-biosynthesis, and stresses such as supraoptimal temperatures have been reported to induce ABA accumulation in plants, the amount of ABA in the seeds or that released from the seeds into the conditioning media was not affected by the fluridone treatment and by exposure to the supraoptimal temperature. These results indicate that the promotive and protective effects of fluridone and norflurazon on the conditioning and germination of O. minor seeds would be attributed to other perturbations rather than the inhibition of ABA-biosynthesis.

  9. Studies on the biosynthesis of lignins and their production in plant cell cultures. [Forsythia intermedia; Podophyllum hexandrum; Podophyllum peltatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul-Rahman, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    Phytochemical analysis of Forsythia intermedia tissues has demonstrated the presence of lignins of the dibenzylbutyrolactone and dioxabicyclo(3,3,0)octane classes, together with their O-glucosides. Lignin distribution in different parts of the part, and variation with the season has been recorded. Cell suspension cultures from F. intermedia were developed. These also synthesized lignins, though not the full range as found in the fresh tissues. Culture lines synthesizing either matairesinol 4{prime}-O-glucoside and major lignin components were established. These cultures rapidly metabolized exogenous lignins without producing detectable lignin transformation products. The seasonal variation in aryltetralin lactone levels in young plants Podophyllum hexandrum and P. peltatum has been investigated. Cell cultures of the plants were established, but no lignins were detectable in them. However, a protocol for micropropagation via embryoid production was obtained. Feeding experiments in P. hexandrum plants showed that matairesinol was a precursor of both podophyllotoxin and 4{prime}-demethylpodophyllotoxin, thus indicating it to be a common precursor of the trimethoxy and hydroxydimethoxy series of lignins in this plant. Precursor feeding experiments with {sup 3}H/{sup 14}C-labeled coniferyl alcohol showed an unexpected increase in {sup 3}H/{sup 14}C ratio when incorporated into both Forsythia and Podophyllum lignins.

  10. Evidence supporting dissimilatory and assimilatory lignin degradation in Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, Kristen M.; Sharma, Deepak; Varney, Rebecca; Simmons, Blake A.; Isern, Nancy G.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Taylor, Ronald C.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Robinson, Errol W.

    2013-08-29

    The anaerobic isolate Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 was initially cultivated based on anaerobic growth on lignin as sole carbon source. The source of the isolated bacteria was from tropical forest soils that decompose litter rapidly with low and fluctuating redox potentials, making it likely that bacteria using oxygen-independent enzymes play an important role in decomposition. We have examined differential expression of the anaerobic isolate Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 during growth on lignin. After 48 hours of growth, we used transcriptomics and proteomics to define the enzymes and other regulatory machinery that these organisms use to degrade lignin, as well as metabolomics to measure lignin degradation and monitor the use of lignin and iron as terminal electron acceptors that facilitate more efficient use of carbon. Proteomics revealed accelerated xylose uptake and metabolism under lignin-amended growth, and lignin degradation via the 4-hydroxyphenylacetate degradation pathway, catalase/peroxidase enzymes, and the glutathione biosynthesis and glutathione S-transferase proteins. We also observed increased production of NADH-quinone oxidoreductase, other electron transport chain proteins, and ATP synthase and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Our data shows the advantages of a multi-omics approach, where incomplete pathways identified by genomics were completed, and new observations made on coping with poor carbon availability. The fast growth, high efficiency and specificity of enzymes employed in bacterial anaerobic litter deconstruction makes these soils useful templates for improving biofuel production.

  11. Evidence supporting dissimilatory and assimilatory lignin degradation in Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen M DeAngelis

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic isolate Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 was initially cultivated based on anaerobic growth on lignin as sole carbon source. The source of the isolated bacteria was from tropical forest soils that decompose litter rapidly with low and fluctuating redox potentials, making it likely that bacteria using oxygen-independent enzymes play an important role in decomposition. We have used transcriptomics and proteomics to examine the increased growth of the anaerobic isolate Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 when grown on media amended with lignin compared to unamended growth. Proteomics revealed accelerated xylose uptake and metabolism under lignin-amended growth, and lignin degradation via the 4-hydroxyphenylacetate degradation pathway, catalase/peroxidase enzymes, and the glutathione biosynthesis and glutathione S-transferase proteins. We also observed increased production of NADH-quinone oxidoreductase, other electron transport chain proteins, and ATP synthase and ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. We detected significant lignin degradation over time by absorbance, and also used metabolomics to demonstrate increased xylose utilization in lignin-amended compared to unamended growth. Our data shows the advantages of a multi-omics approach, where incomplete pathways identified by genomics were completed, and new observations made on coping with poor carbon availability. The fast growth, high efficiency and specificity of enzymes employed in bacterial anaerobic litter deconstruction makes these soils useful templates for improving biofuel production.

  12. Advanced Recombinant Manganese Peroxidase for Biosynthesis of Lignin Bioproducts, Phase I Final Report, STTR Grant #: DE-SC0007503.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beatty, Christopher; Kitner, Joshua; Lajoie, Curtis; McClain, Sean; Potochnik, Steve

    2012-12-13

    The core purpose of this Phase I STTR was to evaluate the feasibility of a new method of producing a recombinant version of manganese peroxidase (MnP) enzyme. MnP is a potentially valuable enzyme for producing high value lignin products and also for industrial de-coloring operations such as biobleaching of pulp and color removal from textile dye effluents. This lignin-modifying enzyme is produced in small amounts by the native host, a white rot fungus. Previous work by Oregon State University developed a secreted recombinant version of the enzyme in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Unfortunately, the expression is barely moderate and the enzyme is heavily glycosylated, which inhibits purification. In this work, the gene for the enzyme is given a tag which targets production of the enzyme to the peroxisome. This is a promising approach since this location is also where heme and hydrogen peroxide are sequestered, which are both necessary cofactors for MnP. More than ten recombinant strains were constructed, verified, and expressed in the Pichia system. Constitutive (GAP) and methanol-induced promoters (AOX) were tried for peroxisomal targeted, cytosolic, and secreted versions of MnP. Only the secreted strains showed activity. The amount of expression was not significantly changed. The degree of glycosylation was lessened using the AOX (methanol) promotoer, but the resulting enzyme was still not able to be purified using immobilized metal affinity chromatography. Additional work beyond the scope of the defined Phase I project was undertaken to construct, verify, and express Pichia strains that mutated the MnP glycosylation sites to inhibit this process. These strains did not show significant activity. The cause is not known, but it is possible that these sites are important to the structure of the enzyme. Also beyond the scope proposed for our Phase I STTR, the team collaborated with AbSci, a startup with a new E. coli based expression system focused on the production of

  13. Comparison studies on soda lignin and soda-anthraquinone lignin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, M.N.M; Yusof, N.N.M.; Hashim, A.

    2007-01-01

    Soda lignin and soda anthraquinone lignin were compared in this study. The physico-chemical properties and structural features of the isolated lignin were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Ultraviolet (UV), ash test, Carbon-Hydrogen-Nitrogen (CHN) analyzer, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ( 13 C-NMR) and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Nitrobenzene oxidation was performed on these two types of lignin especially for the HPLC analysis. Based on the CHN, 13 C-NMR and UV results there were no significant differences between soda lignin and soda anthraquinone lignin. The FTIR results also showed that there were no significant differences in terms of functional groups that exist in both lignins. (author)

  14. RNAi down-regulation of cinnamate-4-hydroxylase increases artemisinin biosynthesis in Artemisia annua

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ritesh; Vashisth, Divya; Misra, Amita; Akhtar, Md Qussen; Jalil, Syed Uzma; Shanker, Karuna; Gupta, Madan Mohan; Rout, Prashant Kumar; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Shasany, Ajit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) converts trans-cinnamic acid (CA) to p-coumaric acid (COA) in the phenylpropanoid/lignin biosynthesis pathway. Earlier we reported increased expression of AaCYP71AV1 (an important gene of artemisinin biosynthesis pathway) caused by CA treatment in Artemisia annua. Hence, AaC4H gene was identified, cloned, characterized and silenced in A. annua with the assumption that the elevated internal CA due to knock down may increase the artemisinin yield. Accumulation of t...

  15. Red Xylem and Higher Lignin Extractability by Down-Regulating a Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenase in Poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baucher, M.; Chabbert, B.; Pilate, G.; Van Doorsselaere, J.; Tollier, M. T.; Petit-Conil, M.; Cornu, D.; Monties, B.; Van Montagu, M.; Inze, D.; Jouanin, L.; Boerjan, W.

    1996-12-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) catalyzes the last step in the biosynthesis of the lignin precursors, the monolignols. We have down-regulated CAD in transgenic poplar (Populus tremula X Populus alba) by both antisense and co-suppression strategies. Several antisense and sense CAD transgenic poplars had an approximately 70% reduced CAD activity that was associated with a red coloration of the xylem tissue. Neither the lignin amount nor the lignin monomeric composition (syringyl/guaiacyl) were significantly modified. However, phloroglucinol-HCl staining was different in the down-regulated CAD plants, suggesting changes in the number of aldehyde units in the lignin. Furthermore, the reactivity of the cell wall toward alkali treatment was altered: a lower amount of lignin was found in the insoluble, saponified residue and more lignin could be precipitated from the soluble alkali fraction. Moreover, large amounts of phenolic compounds, vanillin and especially syringaldehyde, were detected in the soluble alkali fraction of the CAD down-regulated poplars. Alkaline pulping experiments on 3-month-old trees showed a reduction of the kappa number without affecting the degree of cellulose degradation. These results indicate that reducing the CAD activity in trees might be a valuable strategy to optimize certain processes of the wood industry, especially those of the pulp and paper industry.

  16. Lignin nanoparticle synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dirk, Shawn M.; Cicotte, Kirsten Nicole; Wheeler, David R.; Benko, David A.

    2015-08-11

    A method including reducing a particle size of lignin particles to an average particle size less than 40 nanometers; after reducing the particle size, combining the lignin particles with a polymeric material; and forming a structure of the combination. A method including exposing lignin to a diazonium precursor including a functional group; modifying the lignin by introducing the functional group to the lignin; and combining the modified lignin with a polymeric material to form a composite. An apparatus including a composite of a polymer and lignin wherein the lignin has an average particle size less than 100 micrometers.

  17. Deciphering the function and regulation of SbCAD2: A key lignin gene to improve sorghum biomass degradability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic modification of lignin biosynthesis in the cell wall of biofuel feedstocks is likely one of the most effective ways to improve the conversion efficiency of cellulosic biomass to biofuel for the bioenergy industry. As a key enzyme that catalyzes the last step of monolignol synthesis, cinnamy...

  18. Primary Metabolism during Biosynthesis of Secondary Wall Polymers of Protoxylem Vessel Elements1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, Keiko; Sawada, Yuji; Sano, Ryosuke; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kurata, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Shiro; Matsuda, Mami; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2016-01-01

    Xylem vessels, the water-conducting cells in vascular plants, undergo characteristic secondary wall deposition and programmed cell death. These processes are regulated by the VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN (VND) transcription factors. Here, to identify changes in metabolism that occur during protoxylem vessel element differentiation, we subjected tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) BY-2 suspension culture cells carrying an inducible VND7 system to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based wide-target metabolome analysis and transcriptome analysis. Time-course data for 128 metabolites showed dynamic changes in metabolites related to amino acid biosynthesis. The concentration of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, an important intermediate of the glycolysis pathway, immediately decreased in the initial stages of cell differentiation. As cell differentiation progressed, specific amino acids accumulated, including the shikimate-related amino acids and the translocatable nitrogen-rich amino acid arginine. Transcriptome data indicated that cell differentiation involved the active up-regulation of genes encoding the enzymes catalyzing fructose 6-phosphate biosynthesis from glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, phosphoenolpyruvate biosynthesis from oxaloacetate, and phenylalanine biosynthesis, which includes shikimate pathway enzymes. Concomitantly, active changes in the amount of fructose 6-phosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate were detected during cell differentiation. Taken together, our results show that protoxylem vessel element differentiation is associated with changes in primary metabolism, which could facilitate the production of polysaccharides and lignin monomers and, thus, promote the formation of the secondary cell wall. Also, these metabolic shifts correlate with the active transcriptional regulation of specific enzyme genes. Therefore, our observations indicate that primary metabolism is actively regulated during protoxylem vessel element differentiation to alter the cell’s metabolic

  19. Chapter 16: Lignin Visualization: Advanced Microscopy Techniques for Lignin Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Yining [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Donohoe, Bryon S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-04-03

    Visualization of lignin in plant cell walls, with both spatial and chemical resolution, is emerging as an important tool to understand lignin's role in the plant cell wall's nanoscale architecture and to understand and design processes intended to modify the lignin. As such, this chapter reviews recent advances in advanced imaging methods with respect to lignin in plant cell walls. This review focuses on the importance of lignin detection and localization for studies in both plant biology and biotechnology. Challenges going forward to identify and delineate lignin from other plant cell wall components and to quantitatively analyze lignin in whole cell walls from native plant tissue and treated biomass are also discussed.

  20. Effects of Down- and Up-regulated Lignin Biosynthesis in Populus of Soil Carbon Transformation and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Vincent, L.; Pregitzer, Kurt, S.

    2010-03-30

    Our objective is to understand how rates of soil C formation and plant biomass are influenced by changes in plant growth and performance resulting from lowered lignin and altered lignin S/G ratios. A greenhouse study of the effects of altered lignin in SOC formation and plant biomass has been completed as of November 2009. Wild-type (control) and three transgenic aspen lines expressing reduced stem lignin concentrations and/or increased syringyl (S) to guaiacyl (G) ratio lignin were grown in greenhouse mesocosms. Soil was collected from the Colorado Central Plains Experimental Range (CPER) northeast of Fort Collins, Colorado. The Colorado soil is an Olney fine sandy loam (fine-loamy, mixed, superactive, mesic Ultic Haplargrid). Plants at the surface mineral soil up to 5 cm depth were removed and the underlying soil was sampled to a depth of 30 cm. Soils were immediately shipped to Reno, NV. This C4 soil was then used to trace belowground C inputs by the C3 plants into the soil using the 13C natural abundance methods as described in the DOE proposal. Transgenic quaking aspen were generated by the Forest Biotechnology Group at North Carolina State University (NCSU) using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation, the seedlings were then shipped to Reno, NV. Rooted seedlings were transferred from sterile agar into small pots with 250 g of C4 grass-dominated soil and kept in mist chambers in a greenhouse for four to six weeks. Plants were arranged randomly in adjacent greenhouse benches, soil blanks were placed randomly among the plants and treated in the same manner as pots with plants. Growth measurements were conducted for all plants in both groups and consisted of height, width at base of stem, number of leaves and length and width of every leaf in every tree. Plants were grown for a period of 120-140 days. At harvest, the aboveground portions of the trees were separated into leaves, litter, and stems. Soils were immediately frozen after harvest and roots were

  1. Trends in lignin modification: a comprehensive analysis of the effects of genetic manipulations/mutations on lignification and vascular integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anterola, Aldwin M.; Lewis, Norman G.

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of lignin configuration in transgenic and mutant plants is long overdue. This review thus undertook the systematic analysis of trends manifested through genetic and mutational manipulations of the various steps associated with monolignol biosynthesis; this included consideration of the downstream effects on organized lignin assembly in the various cell types, on vascular function/integrity, and on plant growth and development. As previously noted for dirigent protein (homologs), distinct and sophisticated monolignol forming metabolic networks were operative in various cell types, tissues and organs, and form the cell-specific guaiacyl (G) and guaiacyl-syringyl (G-S) enriched lignin biopolymers, respectively. Regardless of cell type undergoing lignification, carbon allocation to the different monolignol pools is apparently determined by a combination of phenylalanine availability and cinnamate-4-hydroxylase/"p-coumarate-3-hydroxylase" (C4H/C3H) activities, as revealed by transcriptional and metabolic profiling. Downregulation of either phenylalanine ammonia lyase or cinnamate-4-hydroxylase thus predictably results in reduced lignin levels and impaired vascular integrity, as well as affecting related (phenylpropanoid-dependent) metabolism. Depletion of C3H activity also results in reduced lignin deposition, albeit with the latter being derived only from hydroxyphenyl (H) units, due to both the guaiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) pathways being blocked. Apparently the cells affected are unable to compensate for reduced G/S levels by increasing the amounts of H-components. The downstream metabolic networks for G-lignin enriched formation in both angiosperms and gymnosperms utilize specific cinnamoyl CoA O-methyltransferase (CCOMT), 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL), cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) isoforms: however, these steps neither affect carbon allocation nor H/G designations, this being determined by C4H/C3H

  2. Loss of Arabidopsis GAUT12/IRX8 causes anther indehiscence and leads to reduced G lignin associated with altered matrix polysaccharide deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhangying eHao

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available GAUT12 (GAlactUronosylTransferase12/IRX8 (IRregular Xylem8 is a putative glycosyltransferase involved in Arabidopsis secondary cell wall biosynthesis. Previous work showed that Arabidopsis irregular xylem8 (irx8 mutants have collapsed xylem due to a reduction in xylan and a lesser reduction in a subfraction of homogalacturonan (HG. We now show that male sterility in the irx8 mutant is due to indehiscent anthers caused by reduced deposition of xylan and lignin in the endothecium cell layer. The reduced lignin content was demonstrated by histochemical lignin staining and pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry (pyMBMS and is associated with reduced lignin biosynthesis in irx8 stems. Examination of sequential chemical extracts of stem walls using 2D 13C-1H Heteronuclear Single-Quantum Correlation (HSQC NMR spectroscopy and antibody-based glycome profiling revealed a reduction in G lignin in the 1 M KOH extract and a concomitant loss of xylan, arabinogalactan and pectin epitopes in the ammonium oxalate, sodium carbonate, and 1 M KOH extracts from the irx8 walls compared with wild-type walls. Immunolabeling of stem sections using the monoclonal antibody CCRC-M138 reactive against an unsubstituted xylopentaose epitope revealed a bi-lamellate pattern in wild-type fiber cells and a collapsed bi-layer in irx8 cells, suggesting that at least in fiber cells, GAUT12 participates in the synthesis of a specific layer or type of xylan or helps to provide an architecture framework required for the native xylan deposition pattern. The results support the hypothesis that GAUT12 functions in the synthesis of a structure required for xylan and lignin deposition during secondary cell wall formation.

  3. Downregulation of the UDP-arabinomutase gene in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L. results in increased cell wall lignin while reducing arabinose-glycans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Duran Willis

    2016-10-01

    , cellulose and xyloglucan biosynthesis. A decrease in cell wall-associated arabinose was expected, which was likely caused by fewer Araf residues in the arabinoxylan. The decrease in arabinoxylan may cause a compensation response to maintain cell wall integrity by increasing cellulose and lignin biosynthesis. In cases in which increased lignin is desired, e.g., feedstocks for carbon fiber production, down-regulated UAM1 coupled with altered expression of other arabinoxylan biosynthesis genes might result in even higher production of lignin in biomass.

  4. Lignin Valorization: Emerging Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, Gregg T [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2018-04-03

    Lignin, an aromatic biopolymer found in plant cell walls, is a key component of lignocellulosic biomass and generally utilized for heat and power. However, lignin's chemical composition makes it an attractive source for biological and catalytic conversion to fuels and chemicals. Bringing together experts from biology, catalysis, engineering, analytical chemistry, and techno-economic/life-cycle analysis, Lignin Valorization presents a comprehensive, interdisciplinary picture of how lignocellulosic biorefineries could potentially employ lignin valorization technologies. Chapters will specifically focus on the production of fuels and chemicals from lignin and topics covered include (i) methods for isolating lignin in the context of the lignocellulosic biorefinery, (ii) thermal, chemo-catalytic, and biological methods for lignin depolymerization, (iii) chemo-catalytic and biological methods for upgrading lignin, (iv) characterization of lignin, and (v) techno-economic and life-cycle analysis of integrated processes to utilize lignin in an integrated biorefinery. The book provides the latest breakthroughs and challenges in upgrading lignin to fuels and chemicals for graduate students and researchers in academia, governmental laboratories, and industry interested in biomass conversion.

  5. Effect of Lignin-Containing Media on Growth of Medicinal Mushroom Lentinula Edodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjuškova Nataļja

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of lignocellulose and lignin on growth of mycelium of mushroom Lentinula edodes and laccase activity in cultivation medium was studied. It was shown that cultivation of L. edodes mycelium in liquid nutrient medium with addition of 0.25-0.5% of kraft lignin increased mycelium biomass yield approximately two times compared with reference conditions without addition of lignin. Similar results were obtained in experiments in which 0.5% lignocellulose that remained after obtaining furfural, and 0.5% lignin that remained after obtaining furfural and glucose from wheat straw, were added to the nutrient medium. This effect was greater in the conditions of cultivation with good aeration, compared with static culture. Laccase activity in medium increased after addition of wheat straw lignocellulose or lignin only in the case of mycelium cultivation with aeration. In the case of mushroom cultivation on solid nutrient medium, addition of wheat straw lignocellulose and lignin promoted growth of mycelium only during the first 7 days of cultivation.

  6. Epigallocatechin gallate incorporation into lignin enhances the alkaline delignification and enzymatic saccharification of cell walls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elumalai Sasikumar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lignin is an integral component of the plant cell wall matrix but impedes the conversion of biomass into biofuels. The plasticity of lignin biosynthesis should permit the inclusion of new compatible phenolic monomers such as flavonoids into cell wall lignins that are consequently less recalcitrant to biomass processing. In the present study, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG was evaluated as a potential lignin bioengineering target for rendering biomass more amenable to processing for biofuel production. Results In vitro peroxidase-catalyzed polymerization experiments revealed that both gallate and pyrogallyl (B-ring moieties in EGCG underwent radical cross-coupling with monolignols mainly by β–O–4-type cross-coupling, producing benzodioxane units following rearomatization reactions. Biomimetic lignification of maize cell walls with a 3:1 molar ratio of monolignols and EGCG permitted extensive alkaline delignification of cell walls (72 to 92% that far exceeded that for lignified controls (44 to 62%. Alkali-insoluble residues from EGCG-lignified walls yielded up to 34% more glucose and total sugars following enzymatic saccharification than lignified controls. Conclusions It was found that EGCG readily copolymerized with monolignols to become integrally cross-coupled into cell wall lignins, where it greatly enhanced alkaline delignification and subsequent enzymatic saccharification. Improved delignification may be attributed to internal trapping of quinone-methide intermediates to prevent benzyl ether cross-linking of lignin to structural polysaccharides during lignification, and to the cleavage of ester intra-unit linkages within EGCG during pretreatment. Overall, our results suggest that apoplastic deposition of EGCG for incorporation into lignin would be a promising plant genetic engineering target for improving the delignification and saccharification of biomass crops.

  7. Cell wall composition and lignin biosynthetic gene expression along a developmental gradient in an Australian sugarcane cultivar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William P. Bewg

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane bagasse is an abundant source of lignocellulosic material for bioethanol production. Utilisation of bagasse for biofuel production would be environmentally and economically beneficial, but the recalcitrance of lignin continues to provide a challenge. Further understanding of lignin production in specific cultivars will provide a basis for modification of genomes for the production of phenotypes with improved processing characteristics. Here we evaluated the expression profile of lignin biosynthetic genes and the cell wall composition along a developmental gradient in KQ228 sugarcane. The expression levels of nine lignin biosynthesis genes were quantified in five stem sections of increasing maturity and in root tissue. Two distinct expression patterns were seen. The first saw highest gene expression in the youngest tissue, with expression decreasing as tissue matured. The second pattern saw little to no change in transcription levels across the developmental gradient. Cell wall compositional analysis of the stem sections showed total lignin content to be significantly higher in more mature tissue than in the youngest section assessed. There were no changes in structural carbohydrates across developmental sections. These gene expression and cell wall compositional patterns can be used, along with other work in grasses, to inform biotechnological approaches to crop improvement for lignocellulosic biofuel production.

  8. Depolymerization and hydrodeoxygenation of switchgrass lignin with formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weiyin; Miller, Stephen J; Agrawal, Pradeep K; Jones, Christopher W

    2012-04-01

    Organosolv switchgrass lignin is depolymerized and hydrodeoxygenated with a formic acid hydrogen source, 20 wt % Pt/C catalyst, and ethanol solvent. The combination of formic acid and Pt/C is found to promote production of higher fractions of lower molecular weight compounds in the liquid products. After 4 h of reaction, all of the switchgrass lignin is solubilized and 21 wt % of the biomass is shown to be converted into seven prominent molecular species that are identified and quantified. Reaction time is shown to be an important variable in affecting changes in product distributions and bulk liquid product properties. At 20 h of reaction, the lignin is significantly depolymerized to form liquid products with a 76 % reduction in the weighted average molecular weight. Elemental analysis also shows that the resultant liquid products have a 50 % reduction in O/C and 10 % increase in H/C molar ratios compared to the switchgrass lignin after 20 h. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. 14C-labeled lignins as substrates for the study of lignin biodegradation and transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, R.L.; Robinson, L.E.; Chen, A.M.

    1980-01-01

    Methods, both classical and isotopic, for quantifying lignin degradation are reviewed. Preparation and chemical characterization of 14 C-labeled lignins (both synthetic and plant-synthesized) are reviewed, with emphasis on the utilization of these 14 C-labeled substrates in biodegradation and biotransformation experiments. The scientific literature is reviewed concerning the use of 14 C-lignins to examine the following: microbial groups that are able to degrade lignins; lignin degradation in natural environments; biochemistry and microbial physiology of lignin degradation; biodegradability of industrial lignins and their by-products; and screening for industrially valuable, lignin-modifying microorganisms. Recent results obtained in our laboratory concerning lignin degradation by eubacteria are presented. Future directions for 14 C-methodology are examined

  10. Engineering of plants with improved properties as biofuels feedstocks by vessel-specific complementation of xylan biosynthesis mutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersen Pia Damm

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cost-efficient generation of second-generation biofuels requires plant biomass that can easily be degraded into sugars and further fermented into fuels. However, lignocellulosic biomass is inherently recalcitrant toward deconstruction technologies due to the abundant lignin and cross-linked hemicelluloses. Furthermore, lignocellulosic biomass has a high content of pentoses, which are more difficult to ferment into fuels than hexoses. Engineered plants with decreased amounts of xylan in their secondary walls have the potential to render plant biomass a more desirable feedstock for biofuel production. Results Xylan is the major non-cellulosic polysaccharide in secondary cell walls, and the xylan deficient irregular xylem (irx mutants irx7, irx8 and irx9 exhibit severe dwarf growth phenotypes. The main reason for the growth phenotype appears to be xylem vessel collapse and the resulting impaired transport of water and nutrients. We developed a xylan-engineering approach to reintroduce xylan biosynthesis specifically into the xylem vessels in the Arabidopsis irx7, irx8 and irx9 mutant backgrounds by driving the expression of the respective glycosyltransferases with the vessel-specific promoters of the VND6 and VND7 transcription factor genes. The growth phenotype, stem breaking strength, and irx morphology was recovered to varying degrees. Some of the plants even exhibited increased stem strength compared to the wild type. We obtained Arabidopsis plants with up to 23% reduction in xylose levels and 18% reduction in lignin content compared to wild-type plants, while exhibiting wild-type growth patterns and morphology, as well as normal xylem vessels. These plants showed a 42% increase in saccharification yield after hot water pretreatment. The VND7 promoter yielded a more complete complementation of the irx phenotype than the VND6 promoter. Conclusions Spatial and temporal deposition of xylan in the secondary cell wall of

  11. Evidence for lignin oxidation by the giant panda fecal microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Fang

    Full Text Available The digestion of lignin and lignin-related phenolic compounds from bamboo by giant pandas has puzzled scientists because of the lack of lignin-degrading genes in the genome of the bamboo-feeding animals. We constructed a 16S rRNA gene library from the microorganisms derived from the giant panda feces to identify the possibility for the presence of potential lignin-degrading bacteria. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the phylotypes of the intestinal bacteria were affiliated with the phyla Proteobacteria (53% and Firmicutes (47%. Two phylotypes were affiliated with the known lignin-degrading bacterium Pseudomonas putida and the mangrove forest bacteria. To test the hypothesis that microbes in the giant panda gut help degrade lignin, a metagenomic library of the intestinal bacteria was constructed and screened for clones that contained genes encoding laccase, a lignin-degrading related enzyme. A multicopper oxidase gene, designated as lac51, was identified from a metagenomic clone. Sequence analysis and copper content determination indicated that Lac51 is a laccase rather than a metallo-oxidase and may work outside its original host cell because it has a TAT-type signal peptide and a transmembrane segment at its N-terminus. Lac51 oxidizes a variety of lignin-related phenolic compounds, including syringaldazine, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, ferulic acid, veratryl alcohol, guaiacol, and sinapinic acid at conditions that simulate the physiologic environment in giant panda intestines. Furthermore, in the presence of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS, syringic acid, or ferulic acid as mediators, the oxidative ability of Lac51 on lignin was promoted. The absorbance of lignin at 445 nm decreased to 36% for ABTS, 51% for syringic acid, and 51% for ferulic acid after incubation for 10 h. Our findings demonstrate that the intestinal bacteria of giant pandas may facilitate the oxidation of lignin moieties, thereby clarifying the digestion

  12. Dual role of lignin in plant litter decomposition in terrestrial ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Amy T; Ballaré, Carlos L

    2010-03-09

    Plant litter decomposition is a critical step in the formation of soil organic matter, the mineralization of organic nutrients, and the carbon balance in terrestrial ecosystems. Biotic decomposition in mesic ecosystems is generally negatively correlated with the concentration of lignin, a group of complex aromatic polymers present in plant cell walls that is recalcitrant to enzymatic degradation and serves as a structural barrier impeding microbial access to labile carbon compounds. Although photochemical mineralization of carbon has recently been shown to be important in semiarid ecosystems, litter chemistry controls on photodegradative losses are not understood. We evaluated the importance of litter chemistry on photodegradation of grass litter and cellulose substrates with varying levels of lignin [cellulose-lignin (CL) substrates] under field conditions. Using wavelength-specific light attenuation filters, we found that light-driven mass loss was promoted by both UV and visible radiation. The spectral dependence of photodegradation correlated with the absorption spectrum of lignin but not of cellulose. Field incubations demonstrated that increasing lignin concentration reduced biotic decomposition, as expected, but linearly increased photodegradation. In addition, lignin content in CL substrates consistently decreased in photodegradative incubations. We conclude that lignin has a dual role affecting litter decomposition, depending on the dominant driver (biotic or abiotic) controlling carbon turnover. Under photodegradative conditions, lignin is preferentially degraded because it acts as an effective light-absorbing compound over a wide range of wavelengths. This mechanistic understanding of the role of lignin in plant litter decomposition will allow for more accurate predictions of carbon dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems.

  13. Analytical methodology for sulfonated lignins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brudin, S.; Schoenmakers, P.

    2010-01-01

    There is a significant need to characterize and classify lignins and sulfonated lignins. Lignins have so far received a good deal of attention, whereas this is not true for sulfonated lignins. There is a clear demand for a better understanding of sulfonated lignins on a chemical as well as physical

  14. Comparative transcriptome analysis of oil palm flowers reveals an EAR-motif-containing R2R3-MYB that modulates phenylpropene biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ran; Reddy, Vaishnavi Amarr; Jin, Jingjing; Rajan, Chakaravarthy; Wang, Qian; Yue, Genhua; Lim, Chin Huat; Chua, Nam-Hai; Ye, Jian; Sarojam, Rajani

    2017-11-23

    Oil palm is the most productive oil crop and the efficiency of pollination has a direct impact on the yield of oil. Pollination by wind can occur but maximal pollination is mediated by the weevil E. kamerunicus. These weevils complete their life cycle by feeding on male flowers. Attraction of weevils to oil palm flowers is due to the emission of methylchavicol by both male and female flowers. In search for male flowers, the weevils visit female flowers by accident due to methylchavicol fragrance and deposit pollen. Given the importance of methylchavicol emission on pollination, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis of oil palm flowers and leaves to identify candidate genes involved in methylchavicol production in flowers. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) of male open flowers, female open flowers and leaves was performed using Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Analysis of the transcriptome data revealed that the transcripts of methylchavicol biosynthesis genes were strongly up-regulated whereas transcripts encoding genes involved in lignin production such as, caffeic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT) and Ferulate-5-hydroxylase (F5H) were found to be suppressed in oil palm flowers. Among the transcripts encoding transcription factors, an EAR-motif-containing R2R3-MYB transcription factor (EgMYB4) was found to be enriched in oil palm flowers. We determined that EgMYB4 can suppress the expression of a monolignol pathway gene, EgCOMT, in vivo by binding to the AC elements present in the promoter region. EgMYB4 was further functionally characterized in sweet basil which also produces phenylpropenes like oil palm. Transgenic sweet basil plants showed significant reduction in lignin content but produced more phenylpropenes. Our results suggest that EgMYB4 possibly restrains lignin biosynthesis in oil palm flowers thus allowing enhanced carbon flux into the phenylpropene pathway. This study augments our understanding of the diverse roles that EAR-motif-containing MYBs play to

  15. Biosynthesis of phenolic compounds in hypocotyl callus cultures of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum graecum L. )

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhandapani, M; Antony, A; Subba Rao, P V [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore. Dept. of Biochemistry

    1977-03-01

    Hypocotyl callus cultures of fenugreek were studied to determine their potential for synthesizing phenolics, particularly those which are intermediates in lignin and flavonoid biosynthesis. The cultures were found to be capable of synthesizing an array of phenolic compounds characteristic of higher plants. Both phenylalanine-U-/sup 14/C and cinnamic acid-U-/sup 14/C were found to be efficient precursors of these phenolics.

  16. Development of a genetically programed vanillin-sensing bacterium for high-throughput screening of lignin-degrading enzyme libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sana, Barindra; Chia, Kuan Hui Burton; Raghavan, Sarada S; Ramalingam, Balamurugan; Nagarajan, Niranjan; Seayad, Jayasree; Ghadessy, Farid J

    2017-01-01

    Lignin is a potential biorefinery feedstock for the production of value-added chemicals including vanillin. A huge amount of lignin is produced as a by-product of the paper industry, while cellulosic components of plant biomass are utilized for the production of paper pulp. In spite of vast potential, lignin remains the least exploited component of plant biomass due to its extremely complex and heterogenous structure. Several enzymes have been reported to have lignin-degrading properties and could be potentially used in lignin biorefining if their catalytic properties could be improved by enzyme engineering. The much needed improvement of lignin-degrading enzymes by high-throughput selection techniques such as directed evolution is currently limited, as robust methods for detecting the conversion of lignin to desired small molecules are not available. We identified a vanillin-inducible promoter by RNAseq analysis of Escherichia coli cells treated with a sublethal dose of vanillin and developed a genetically programmed vanillin-sensing cell by placing the 'very green fluorescent protein' gene under the control of this promoter. Fluorescence of the biosensing cell is enhanced significantly when grown in the presence of vanillin and is readily visualized by fluorescence microscopy. The use of fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis further enhances the sensitivity, enabling dose-dependent detection of as low as 200 µM vanillin. The biosensor is highly specific to vanillin and no major response is elicited by the presence of lignin, lignin model compound, DMSO, vanillin analogues or non-specific toxic chemicals. We developed an engineered E. coli cell that can detect vanillin at a concentration as low as 200 µM. The vanillin-sensing cell did not show cross-reactivity towards lignin or major lignin degradation products including vanillin analogues. This engineered E. coli cell could potentially be used as a host cell for screening lignin-degrading enzymes that

  17. The synthesis and analysis of lignin-bound Hibbert ketone structures in technical lignins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles-Barrett, Daniel M; Neal, Andrew R; Hand, Calum; Montgomery, James R D; Panovic, Isabella; Ojo, O Stephen; Lancefield, Christopher S; Cordes, David B; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Lebl, Tomas; Westwood, Nicholas J

    2016-10-25

    Understanding the structure of technical lignins resulting from acid-catalysed treatment of lignocellulosic biomass is important for their future applications. Here we report an investigation into the fate of lignin under acidic aqueous organosolv conditions. In particular we examine in detail the formation and reactivity of non-native Hibbert ketone structures found in isolated organosolv lignins from both Douglas fir and beech woods. Through the use of model compounds combined with HSQC, HMBC and HSQC-TOCSY NMR experiments we demonstrate that, depending on the lignin source, both S and G lignin-bound Hibbert ketone units can be present. We also show that these units can serve as a source of novel mono-aromatic compounds following an additional lignin depolymerisation reaction.

  18. Mechanisms of Lignin Biosynthesis During Xylogenesis in Zinnia elegans. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, Karl-Erik L.; Dean, Jeffrey F.D.

    1999-06-30

    The original plan for this project was to use Zinnia elegans and its xylogenic cell differentiation system to dissect the role(s) played in lignin deposition by the three classes of laccases (p-diphenoloxidases) the authors had previously detected in zinnia stem extracts. The project, was broadly divided into two general areas--biochemistry/enzymology and molecular biology/genetic engineering--each of which was pursued by one of two graduate students. As noted in the attached publication list, DOE funding for this project facilitated the publication of five (5) research papers, and two (2) more papers slated for peer-review publication are currently nearing completion. In addition, our research results were presented at nine(9) national and international scientific meetings over the past four years. Some of the major findings reported in theses papers and presentations are summarized.

  19. Abiotic stress induces change in Cinnamoyl CoA Reductase (CCR) protein abundance and lignin deposition in developing seedlings of Leucaena leucocephala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sameer; Vishwakarma, Rishi K; Arafat, Yasir Ali; Gupta, Sushim K; Khan, Bashir M

    2015-04-01

    Aboitic stress such as drought and salinity are class of major threats, which plants undergo through their lifetime. Lignin deposition is one of the responses to such abiotic stresses. The gene encoding Cinnamoyl CoA Reductase (CCR) is a key gene for lignin biosynthesis, which has been shown to be over-expressed under stress conditions. In the present study, developing seedlings of Leucaena leucocephala (Vernacular name: Subabul, White popinac) were treated with 1 % mannitol and 200 mM NaCl to mimic drought and salinity stress conditions, respectively. Enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) based expression pattern of CCR protein was monitored coupled with Phlorogucinol/HCl activity staining of lignin in transverse sections of developing L. leucocephala seedlings under stress. Our result suggests a differential lignification pattern in developing root and stem under stress conditions. Increase in lignification was observed in mannitol treated stems and corresponding CCR protein accumulation was also higher than control and salt stress treated samples. On the contrary CCR protein was lower in NaCl treated stems and corresponding lignin deposition was also low. Developing root tissue showed a high level of CCR content and lignin deposition than stem samples under all conditions tested. Overall result suggested that lignin accumulation was not affected much in case of developing root however developing stems were significantly affected under drought and salinity stress condition.

  20. Loss of ferulate 5-hydroxylase leads to Mediator-dependent inhibition of soluble phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Nickolas; Bonawitz, Nicholas D.; Nyffeler, Kayleigh E.; Chapple, Clint

    2015-06-05

    Phenylpropanoids are phenylalanine-derived specialized metabolites and include important structural components of plant cell walls, such as lignin and hydroxycinnamic acids, as well as ultraviolet and visible light-absorbing pigments, such as hydroxycinnamate esters (HCEs) and anthocyanins. Previous work has revealed a remarkable degree of plasticity in HCE biosynthesis, such that most Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants with blockages in the pathway simply redirect carbon flux to atypical HCEs. In contrast, the ferulic acid hydroxylase1 (fah1) mutant accumulates greatly reduced levels of HCEs, suggesting that phenylpropanoid biosynthesis may be repressed in response to the loss of FERULATE 5-HYDROXYLASE (F5H) activity. Here, we show that in fah1 mutant plants, the activity of HCE biosynthetic enzymes is not limiting for HCE accumulation, nor is phenylpropanoid flux diverted to the synthesis of cell wall components or flavonol glycosides. We further show that anthocyanin accumulation is also repressed in fah1 mutants and that this repression is specific to tissues in which F5H is normally expressed. Finally, we show that repression of both HCE and anthocyanin biosynthesis in fah1 mutants is dependent on the MED5a/5b subunits of the transcriptional coregulatory complex Mediator, which are similarly required for the repression of lignin biosynthesis and the stunted growth of the phenylpropanoid pathway mutant reduced epidermal fluorescence8. Taken together, these observations show that the synthesis of HCEs and anthocyanins is actively repressed in a MEDIATOR-dependent manner in Arabidopsis fah1 mutants and support an emerging model in which MED5a/5b act as central players in the homeostatic repression of phenylpropanoid metabolism.

  1. Lignin-Furfural Based Adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Dongre, Prajakta; Driscoll, Mark; Amidon, Thomas; Bujanovic, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    Lignin recovered from the hot-water extract of sugar maple ( Acer saccharum ) is used in this study to synthesize adhesive blends to replace phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin. Untreated lignin is characterized by lignin content and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis. The molecular weight distribution of the lignin and the blends are characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). The effect of pH (0.3, 0.65 and 1), ex situ furfural, and curing conditions on the tensile properties of...

  2. Modulating lignin in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

    2013-01-29

    Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

  3. Effect of lignin on water vapor barrier, mechanical, and structural properties of agar/lignin composite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Shiv; Reddy, Jeevan Prasad; Rhim, Jong-Whan

    2015-11-01

    Biodegradable composite films were prepared using two renewable resources based biopolymers, agar and lignin alkali. The lignin was used as a reinforcing material and agar as a biopolymer matrix. The effect of lignin concentration (1, 3, 5, and 10wt%) on the performance of the composite films was studied. In addition, the mechanical, water vapor barrier, UV light barrier properties, FE-SEM, and TGA of the films were analyzed. The agar/lignin films exhibited higher mechanical and UV barrier properties along with lower water vapor permeability compared to the neat agar film. The FTIR and SEM results showed the compatibility of lignin with agar polymer. The swelling ratio and moisture content of agar/lignin composite films were decreased with increase in lignin content. The thermostability and char content of agar/lignin composite films increased with increased lignin content. The results suggested that agar/lignin films have a potential to be used as a UV barrier food packaging material for maintaining food safety and extending the shelf-life of the packaged food. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Expression of brown-midrib in a spontaneous sorghum mutant is linked to a 5'-UTR deletion in lignin biosynthesis gene SbCAD2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown midrib (bmr) mutants in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and several other C4 grasses are associated with reduced lignin concentration, altered lignin composition and improved cell wall digestibility, which are desirable properties in biomass development for the emerging lignocellulosic b...

  5. Advancing Eucalyptus genomics: identification and sequencing of lignin biosynthesis genes from deep-coverage BAC libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudrna David

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eucalyptus species are among the most planted hardwoods in the world because of their rapid growth, adaptability and valuable wood properties. The development and integration of genomic resources into breeding practice will be increasingly important in the decades to come. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries are key genomic tools that enable positional cloning of important traits, synteny evaluation, and the development of genome framework physical maps for genetic linkage and genome sequencing. Results We describe the construction and characterization of two deep-coverage BAC libraries EG_Ba and EG_Bb obtained from nuclear DNA fragments of E. grandis (clone BRASUZ1 digested with HindIII and BstYI, respectively. Genome coverages of 17 and 15 haploid genome equivalents were estimated for EG_Ba and EG_Bb, respectively. Both libraries contained large inserts, with average sizes ranging from 135 Kb (Eg_Bb to 157 Kb (Eg_Ba, very low extra-nuclear genome contamination providing a probability of finding a single copy gene ≥ 99.99%. Libraries were screened for the presence of several genes of interest via hybridizations to high-density BAC filters followed by PCR validation. Five selected BAC clones were sequenced and assembled using the Roche GS FLX technology providing the whole sequence of the E. grandis chloroplast genome, and complete genomic sequences of important lignin biosynthesis genes. Conclusions The two E. grandis BAC libraries described in this study represent an important milestone for the advancement of Eucalyptus genomics and forest tree research. These BAC resources have a highly redundant genome coverage (> 15×, contain large average inserts and have a very low percentage of clones with organellar DNA or empty vectors. These publicly available BAC libraries are thus suitable for a broad range of applications in genetic and genomic research in Eucalyptus and possibly in related species of Myrtaceae

  6. Lignin Macromolecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    plant or a structural component of a mature plant which is detected by certain colour reactions. An enzymologist has termed lignin as the ... a phenyl-propanoid structure. A soil chemist considers lignin to be the residue of .... refer to the hardness of wood, but to the botanical classifications. They are aptly called gymnosperms ...

  7. Lignin blockers and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin [West Lebanon, NH; Wyman, Charles E [Norwich, VT

    2011-01-25

    Disclosed is a method for converting cellulose in a lignocellulosic biomass. The method provides for a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein treatment of high lignin solids. The treatment enhances cellulase availability in cellulose conversion and allows for the determination of optimized pretreatment conditions. Additionally, ethanol yields from a Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation process are improved 5-25% by treatment with a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein. Thus, a more efficient and economical method of processing lignin containing biomass materials utilizes a polypeptide/protein treatment step that effectively blocks lignin binding of cellulase.

  8. Ferricyanide-based analysis of aqueous lignin suspension revealed sequestration of water-soluble lignin moieties

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua, CJ; Simmons, BA; Singer, SW

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry. This study describes the application of a ferricyanide-based assay as a simple and inexpensive assay for rapid analysis of aqueous lignin samples. The assay measures the formation of Prussian blue from the redox reaction between a mixture of potassium ferricyanide and ferric chloride, and phenolic hydroxyl groups of lignin or lignin-derived phenolic moieties. This study revealed that soluble lignin moieties exhibited stronger ferricyanide reactivity than...

  9. Exploring bacterial lignin degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Margaret E; Chang, Michelle C Y

    2014-04-01

    Plant biomass represents a renewable carbon feedstock that could potentially be used to replace a significant level of petroleum-derived chemicals. One major challenge in its utilization is that the majority of this carbon is trapped in the recalcitrant structural polymers of the plant cell wall. Deconstruction of lignin is a key step in the processing of biomass to useful monomers but remains challenging. Microbial systems can provide molecular information on lignin depolymerization as they have evolved to break lignin down using metalloenzyme-dependent radical pathways. Both fungi and bacteria have been observed to metabolize lignin; however, their differential reactivity with this substrate indicates that they may utilize different chemical strategies for its breakdown. This review will discuss recent advances in studying bacterial lignin degradation as an approach to exploring greater diversity in the environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Integrative analysis of transgenic alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. suggests new metabolic control mechanisms for monolignol biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Lee

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The entanglement of lignin polymers with cellulose and hemicellulose in plant cell walls is a major biological barrier to the economically viable production of biofuels from woody biomass. Recent efforts of reducing this recalcitrance with transgenic techniques have been showing promise for ameliorating or even obviating the need for costly pretreatments that are otherwise required to remove lignin from cellulose and hemicelluloses. At the same time, genetic manipulations of lignin biosynthetic enzymes have sometimes yielded unforeseen consequences on lignin composition, thus raising the question of whether the current understanding of the pathway is indeed correct. To address this question systemically, we developed and applied a novel modeling approach that, instead of analyzing the pathway within a single target context, permits a comprehensive, simultaneous investigation of different datasets in wild type and transgenic plants. Specifically, the proposed approach combines static flux-based analysis with a Monte Carlo simulation in which very many randomly chosen sets of parameter values are evaluated against kinetic models of lignin biosynthesis in different stem internodes of wild type and lignin-modified alfalfa plants. In addition to four new postulates that address the reversibility of some key reactions, the modeling effort led to two novel postulates regarding the control of the lignin biosynthetic pathway. The first posits functionally independent pathways toward the synthesis of different lignin monomers, while the second postulate proposes a novel feedforward regulatory mechanism. Subsequent laboratory experiments have identified the signaling molecule salicylic acid as a potential mediator of the postulated control mechanism. Overall, the results demonstrate that mathematical modeling can be a valuable complement to conventional transgenic approaches and that it can provide biological insights that are otherwise difficult to obtain.

  11. RNAi down-regulation of cinnamate-4-hydroxylase increases artemisinin biosynthesis in Artemisia annua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ritesh; Vashisth, Divya; Misra, Amita; Akhtar, Md Qussen; Jalil, Syed Uzma; Shanker, Karuna; Gupta, Madan Mohan; Rout, Prashant Kumar; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Shasany, Ajit Kumar

    2016-05-25

    Cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) converts trans-cinnamic acid (CA) to p-coumaric acid (COA) in the phenylpropanoid/lignin biosynthesis pathway. Earlier we reported increased expression of AaCYP71AV1 (an important gene of artemisinin biosynthesis pathway) caused by CA treatment in Artemisia annua. Hence, AaC4H gene was identified, cloned, characterized and silenced in A. annua with the assumption that the elevated internal CA due to knock down may increase the artemisinin yield. Accumulation of trans-cinnamic acid in the plant due to AaC4H knockdown was accompanied with the reduction of p-coumaric acid, total phenolics, anthocyanin, cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activities but increase in salicylic acid (SA) and artemisinin. Interestingly, feeding trans-cinnamic acid to the RNAi line increased the level of artemisinin along with benzoic (BA) and SA with no effect on the downstream metabolites p-coumaric acid, coniferylaldehyde and sinapaldehyde, whereas p-coumaric acid feeding increased the content of downstream coniferylaldehyde and sinapaldehyde with no effect on BA, SA, trans-cinnamic acid or artemisinin. SA is reported earlier to be inducing the artemisinin yield. This report demonstrates the link between the phenylpropanoid/lignin pathway with artemisinin pathway through SA, triggered by accumulation of trans-cinnamic acid because of the blockage at C4H.

  12. Lignin-degrading enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-ru; Sarkanen, Simo; Wang, Yun-Yan

    2012-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the activities of four kinds of enzyme have been purported to furnish the mechanistic foundations for macromolecular lignin depolymerization in decaying plant cell walls. The pertinent fungal enzymes comprise lignin peroxidase (with a relatively high redox potential), manganese peroxidase, an alkyl aryl etherase, and laccase. The peroxidases and laccase, but not the etherase, are expressed extracellularly by white-rot fungi. A number of these microorganisms exhibit a marked preference toward lignin in their degradation of lignocellulose. Interestingly, some white-rot fungi secrete both kinds of peroxidase but no laccase, while others that are equally effective express extracellular laccase activity but no peroxidases. Actually, none of these enzymes has been reported to possess significant depolymerase activity toward macromolecular lignin substrates that are derived with little chemical modification from the native biopolymer. Here, the assays commonly employed for monitoring the traditional fungal peroxidases, alkyl aryl etherase, and laccase are described in their respective contexts. A soluble native polymeric substrate that can be isolated directly from a conventional milled-wood lignin preparation is characterized in relation to its utility in next-generation lignin-depolymerase assays.

  13. Characterization of promoter of EgPAL1, a novel PAL gene from the oil palm Elaeis guineensis Jacq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Chong Yu Lok; Abdullah, Janna Ong; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Abu Seman, Idris; Abdullah, Mohd Puad

    2018-02-01

    The oil palm EgPAL1 gene promoter and its regulatory region were functional as a promoter in the heterologous system of Arabidopsis according to the cis-acting elements present in that region. The promoter was developmentally regulated, vascular tissue specific and responsive to water stress agents. Phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.24) is the key enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway which plays important roles in plant development and adaptation. To date, there is no report on the study of PAL from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis), an economically important oil crop. In this study, the 5' regulatory sequence of a highly divergent oil palm PAL gene (EgPAL1) was isolated and fused with GUS in Arabidopsis to create two transgenic plants carrying the minimal promoter with (2302 bp) and without its regulatory elements (139 bp). The regulatory sequence contained cis-acting elements known to be important for plant development and stress response including the AC-II element for lignin biosynthesis and several stress responsive elements. The promoter and its regulatory region were fully functional in Arabidopsis. Its activities were characterised by two common fundamental features of PAL which are responsive to plant internal developmental programme and external factors. The promoter was developmentally regulated in certain organs; highly active in young organs but less active or inactive in mature organs. The presence of the AC elements and global activity of the EgPAL1 promoter in all organs resembled the property of lignin-related genes. The existence of the MBS element and enhancement of the promoter activity by PEG reflected the behaviour of drought-responsive genes. Our findings provide a platform for evaluating oil palm gene promoters in the heterologous system of Arabidopsis and give insights into the activities of EgPAL1 promoter in oil palm.

  14. Recovering hydrocarbons with surfactants from lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naae, D.G.; Whittington, L.E.; Ledoux, W.A.; Debons, F.E.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a method of recovering hydrocarbons from an underground hydrocarbon formation penetrated by at least one injection well and at least one production well, which comprises: injecting into the formation through an injection well a surfactant slug comprising about 0.1% to about 10% by weight of surfactants produced from lignin, the surfactants produced by placing lignin in contact with water, converting the lignin into low molecular weight lignin phenols by reducing the lignin in the presence of a reducing agent of carbon monoxide or hydrogen creating a reduction reaction mixture comprising oil soluble lignin phenols, the reduction occurring at a temperature greater than about 200/sup 0/C and a pressure greater than about 100 psi, recovering the oil soluble lignin phenols from the reduction mixture, and converting the lignin phenols into lignin surfactants by a reaction selected from the group consisting of alkoxylation, sulfonation, sulfation, aklylation, sulfomethylation, and alkoxysulfation; injecting into the formation through the injection well a drive fluid to push the surfactant slug towards a production well; and recovering hydrocarbons at the production well.

  15. Polymerization of different lignins by laccase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mattinen, M.L.; Suortti, T.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Argyropoulos, D.S.; Evtuguin, D.; Suurnäkki, A.; Jong, de E.; Tamminen, T.

    2008-01-01

    In this study the oxidative polymerization of different lignins, i.e. Flax Soda lignin, Spruce EMAL, and Eucalyptus Dioxane lignin by Trametes hirsuta laccase was compared. Initially the structures of the different lignins were compared by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The reactivity of

  16. Isolation and screening of rhizobia for auxin biosynthesis and growth promotion of mung bean (Vigna radiata L. seedlings under axenic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ashfaq Anjum, Zahir Ahmad Zahir, Muhammad Arshad and Muhammad Ashraf

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A series of screening experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of rhizobia for producing auxins and improvegrowth and nodulation of mungbean (Vigna radiata L. were carried out under axenic conditions. Forty fouriolatess of rhizobia were isolated using standard procedures. Auxin biosynthesis by these rhizobial isolates wasdetermined in the absence and presence of L-Trp, a physiological precursor of auxins. Rhizobial isolates variedwidely in auxins biosynthesis capabilities. On the basis of auxins biosynthesis, a pouch experiment was conductedfor screening thirty four efficient isolates of rhizobia for the growth promotion of mung bean. Results of pouch studyshowed that inoculation with selected rhizobial isolates increased the root /shoot length, fresh, and dry shoot weightof mung bean up to 33, 59, 71, 148, 107 and 188%, respectively, over untreated control. Further studies are neededunder glasshouse and field conditions for confirmation of these results.

  17. Lignin biodegradation and industrial implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B Fisher

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulose, which comprises the cell walls of plants, is the Earth’s most abundant renewable source of convertible biomass. However, in order to access the fermentable sugars of the cellulose and hemicellulose fraction, the extremely recalcitrant lignin heteropolymer must be hydrolyzed and removed—usually by harsh, costly thermochemical pretreatments. Biological processes for depolymerizing and metabolizing lignin present an opportunity to improve the overall economics of the lignocellulosic biorefinery by facilitating pretreatment, improving downstream cellulosic fermentations or even producing a valuable effluent stream of aromatic compounds for creating value-added products. In the following review we discuss background on lignin, the enzymology of lignin degradation, and characterized catabolic pathways for metabolizing the by-products of lignin degradation. To conclude we survey advances in approaches to identify novel lignin degrading phenotypes and applications of these phenotypes in the lignocellulosic bioprocess.

  18. Towards development of lignin reinforced elastomeric compounds with reduced energy dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Kushal

    spectroscopy and 1H spin-lattice relaxation times confirm pi-pi interactions. The hybrid fillers offer reduction of networking of carbon black particles and viscoelastic dissipation in rubber compounds without sacrificing the mechanical performance. The third part of this study evaluates the performance of polybutadiene- g-polypentafluorostyrene (PB-g-PPFS) as a coupling agent for promotion of interactions between lignin and rubber and to achieve better overall reinforcing performance. The PB domains of PB-g-PPFS are compatible with styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) while the PPFS segments engage in arene-perfluoroarene interactions with lignin. These interactions are confirmed via UV-vis spectroscopy data. The efficacy of PB-g-PPFS as a coupling agent is evaluated for compounds filled with lignin and lignin/carbon black hybrid fillers. The results show that the addition of PB-g-PPFS improves the tensile strength by 33% and reduces the viscoelastic loss in filled SBR compounds by improving filler dispersion. The results presented in this thesis demonstrate that the approaches of surface modification, exploitation of non-covalent interactions, and the use of coupling agents are effective in solving the impending issues associated with the use of lignin, the second most abundant bio-derived material, as effective reinforcing filler for polymer compounds.

  19. Biosynthesis and metabolic fate of phenylalanine in conifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Belén Pascual

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The amino acid phenylalanine (Phe is a critical metabolic node that plays an essential role in the interconnection between primary and secondary metabolism in plants. Phe is used as a protein building block but it is also as a precursor for numerous plant compounds that are crucial for plant reproduction, growth, development and defense against different types of stresses. The metabolism of Phe plays a central role in the channeling of carbon from photosynthesis to the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. The study of this metabolic pathway is particularly relevant in trees, which divert large amounts of carbon into the biosynthesis of Phe-derived compounds, particularly lignin, an important constituent of wood. The trunks of trees are metabolic sinks that consume a considerable percentage of carbon and energy from photosynthesis, and carbon is finally immobilized in wood. This paper reviews recent advances in the biosynthesis and metabolic utilization of Phe in conifer trees. Two alternative routes have been identified: the ancient phenylpyruvate pathway that is present in microorganisms, and the arogenate pathway that possibly evolved later during plant evolution. Additionally, an efficient nitrogen recycling mechanism is required to maintain sustained growth during xylem formation. The relevance of phenylalanine metabolic pathways in wood formation, the biotic interactions and ultraviolet protection is discussed. The genetic manipulation and transcriptional regulation of the pathways are also outlined.

  20. Biosynthesis and Metabolic Fate of Phenylalanine in Conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, María B; El-Azaz, Jorge; de la Torre, Fernando N; Cañas, Rafael A; Avila, Concepción; Cánovas, Francisco M

    2016-01-01

    The amino acid phenylalanine (Phe) is a critical metabolic node that plays an essential role in the interconnection between primary and secondary metabolism in plants. Phe is used as a protein building block but it is also as a precursor for numerous plant compounds that are crucial for plant reproduction, growth, development, and defense against different types of stresses. The metabolism of Phe plays a central role in the channeling of carbon from photosynthesis to the biosynthesis of phenylpropanoids. The study of this metabolic pathway is particularly relevant in trees, which divert large amounts of carbon into the biosynthesis of Phe-derived compounds, particularly lignin, an important constituent of wood. The trunks of trees are metabolic sinks that consume a considerable percentage of carbon and energy from photosynthesis, and carbon is finally immobilized in wood. This paper reviews recent advances in the biosynthesis and metabolic utilization of Phe in conifer trees. Two alternative routes have been identified: the ancient phenylpyruvate pathway that is present in microorganisms, and the arogenate pathway that possibly evolved later during plant evolution. Additionally, an efficient nitrogen recycling mechanism is required to maintain sustained growth during xylem formation. The relevance of phenylalanine metabolic pathways in wood formation, the biotic interactions, and ultraviolet protection is discussed. The genetic manipulation and transcriptional regulation of the pathways are also outlined.

  1. Comparison of the acetyl bromide spectrophotometric method with other analytical lignin methods for determining lignin concentration in forage samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Romualdo S; Hatfield, Ronald D

    2004-06-16

    Present analytical methods to quantify lignin in herbaceous plants are not totally satisfactory. A spectrophotometric method, acetyl bromide soluble lignin (ABSL), has been employed to determine lignin concentration in a range of plant materials. In this work, lignin extracted with acidic dioxane was used to develop standard curves and to calculate the derived linear regression equation (slope equals absorptivity value or extinction coefficient) for determining the lignin concentration of respective cell wall samples. This procedure yielded lignin values that were different from those obtained with Klason lignin, acid detergent acid insoluble lignin, or permanganate lignin procedures. Correlations with in vitro dry matter or cell wall digestibility of samples were highest with data from the spectrophotometric technique. The ABSL method employing as standard lignin extracted with acidic dioxane has the potential to be employed as an analytical method to determine lignin concentration in a range of forage materials. It may be useful in developing a quick and easy method to predict in vitro digestibility on the basis of the total lignin content of a sample.

  2. Cytocompatible cellulose hydrogels containing trace lignin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakasone, Kazuki; Kobayashi, Takaomi

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane bagasse was used as a cellulose resource to prepare transparent and flexible cellulose hydrogel films. On the purification process from bagasse to cellulose, the effect of lignin residues in the cellulose was examined for the properties and cytocompatibility of the resultant hydrogel films. The cellulose was dissolved in lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide solution and converted to hydrogel films by phase inversion. In the purification process, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) treatment time was changed from 1 to 12 h. This resulted in cellulose hydrogel films having small amounts of lignin from 1.62 to 0.68%. The remaining lignin greatly affected hydrogel properties. Water content of the hydrogel films was increased from 1153 to 1525% with a decrease of lignin content. Moreover, lower lignin content caused weakening of tensile strength from 0.80 to 0.43 N/mm"2 and elongation from 45.2 to 26.5%. Also, similar tendency was observed in viscoelastic behavior of the cellulose hydrogel films. Evidence was shown that the lignin residue was effective for the high strength of the hydrogel films. In addition, scanning probe microscopy in the morphological observation was suggested that the trace lignin in the cellulose hydrogel affected the cellulose fiber aggregation in the hydrogel network. The trace of lignin in the hydrogels also influenced fibroblast cell culture on the hydrogel films. The hydrogel film containing 1.68% lignin showed better fibroblast compatibility as compared to cell culture polystyrene dish used as reference. - Highlights: • Cellulose hydrogel films with trace lignin were obtained from sugarcane bagasse. • Lignin content was found to be in the range of 1.62 − 0.68% by UV–Vis spectroscopy. • Higher lignin content strengthened mechanical properties of the hydrogel films. • Trace lignin affected the hydrogel morphology such as roughness and porosity. • High cell proliferation was observed in the hydrogel containing 1.68% lignin.

  3. Cytocompatible cellulose hydrogels containing trace lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakasone, Kazuki; Kobayashi, Takaomi, E-mail: takaomi@nagaoakut.ac.jp

    2016-07-01

    Sugarcane bagasse was used as a cellulose resource to prepare transparent and flexible cellulose hydrogel films. On the purification process from bagasse to cellulose, the effect of lignin residues in the cellulose was examined for the properties and cytocompatibility of the resultant hydrogel films. The cellulose was dissolved in lithium chloride/N,N-dimethylacetamide solution and converted to hydrogel films by phase inversion. In the purification process, sodium hydroxide (NaOH) treatment time was changed from 1 to 12 h. This resulted in cellulose hydrogel films having small amounts of lignin from 1.62 to 0.68%. The remaining lignin greatly affected hydrogel properties. Water content of the hydrogel films was increased from 1153 to 1525% with a decrease of lignin content. Moreover, lower lignin content caused weakening of tensile strength from 0.80 to 0.43 N/mm{sup 2} and elongation from 45.2 to 26.5%. Also, similar tendency was observed in viscoelastic behavior of the cellulose hydrogel films. Evidence was shown that the lignin residue was effective for the high strength of the hydrogel films. In addition, scanning probe microscopy in the morphological observation was suggested that the trace lignin in the cellulose hydrogel affected the cellulose fiber aggregation in the hydrogel network. The trace of lignin in the hydrogels also influenced fibroblast cell culture on the hydrogel films. The hydrogel film containing 1.68% lignin showed better fibroblast compatibility as compared to cell culture polystyrene dish used as reference. - Highlights: • Cellulose hydrogel films with trace lignin were obtained from sugarcane bagasse. • Lignin content was found to be in the range of 1.62 − 0.68% by UV–Vis spectroscopy. • Higher lignin content strengthened mechanical properties of the hydrogel films. • Trace lignin affected the hydrogel morphology such as roughness and porosity. • High cell proliferation was observed in the hydrogel containing 1.68% lignin.

  4. Biotechnological modification of lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    A literature search of organisms capable of degrading lignin was conducted. Four fungi were selected for study and these were Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Chrysosporium pruinosum, Phlebia tremellosus and Trametes versicolor. Other organisms, Pleurotus ostreatus, Pleurotus florida and Lentinus edodes were also tested in preliminary experiments. All cultures were screened for their ability to degrade the lignin component of aspen sawdust and also lignin extracted from steam-exploded wood. This type of screen was followed by analysis of culture filtrates for the presence of ligninase, the marker enzyme for lignin degradation. Phanerochaete chrysosporium and consequently chosen for further studies in fermentors. Considerable efforts were directed to production of ligninase in fermentors. Only when Chrysosporium pruinosum was pre-cultured in a shake flask for 4 days and then transferred to a fermentor could ligninase activity be detected. The enzyme from shake flasks has been concentrated ready for use in bench-scale studies on cell-free depolymerization of lignin. 13 refs., 8 tabs.

  5. Water-Soluble Lignins from Different Bioenergy Crops Stimulate the Early Development of Maize (Zea mays, L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Savy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The molecular composition of water-soluble lignins isolated from four non-food bioenergy crops (cardoon CAR, eucalyptus EUC, and two black poplars RIP and LIM was characterized in detail, and their potential bioactivity towards maize germination and early growth evaluated. Lignins were found to not affect seed germination rates, but stimulated the maize seedling development, though to a different extent. RIP promoted root elongation, while CAR only stimulated the length of lateral seminal roots and coleoptile, and LIM improved only the coleoptile development. The most significant bioactivity of CAR was related to its large content of aliphatic OH groups, C-O carbons and lowest hydrophobicity, as assessed by 31P-NMR and 13C-CPMAS-NMR spectroscopies. Less bioactive RIP and LIM lignins were similar in composition, but their stimulation of maize seedling was different. This was accounted to their diverse content of aliphatic OH groups and S- and G-type molecules. The poorest bioactivity of the EUC lignin was attributed to its smallest content of aliphatic OH groups and largest hydrophobicity. Both these features may be conducive of a EUC conformational structure tight enough to prevent its alteration by organic acids exuded from vegetal tissues. Conversely the more labile conformational arrangements of the other more hydrophilic lignin extracts promoted their bioactivity by releasing biologically active molecules upon the action of exuded organic acids. Our findings indicate that water-soluble lignins from non-food crops may be effectively used as plant biostimulants, thus contributing to increase the economic and ecological liability of bio-based industries.

  6. PpNAC1, a main regulator of phenylalanine biosynthesis and utilization in maritime pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, María Belén; Llebrés, María-Teresa; Craven-Bartle, Blanca; Cañas, Rafael A; Cánovas, Francisco M; Ávila, Concepción

    2018-05-01

    The transcriptional regulation of phenylalanine metabolism is particularly important in conifers, long-lived species that use large amounts of carbon in wood. Here, we show that the Pinus pinaster transcription factor, PpNAC1, is a main regulator of phenylalanine biosynthesis and utilization. A phylogenetic analysis classified PpNAC1 in the NST proteins group and was selected for functional characterization. PpNAC1 is predominantly expressed in the secondary xylem and compression wood of adult trees. Silencing of PpNAC1 in P. pinaster results in the alteration of stem vascular radial patterning and the down-regulation of several genes associated with cell wall biogenesis and secondary metabolism. Furthermore, transactivation and EMSA analyses showed that PpNAC1 is able to activate its own expression and PpMyb4 promoter, while PpMyb4 is able to activate PpMyb8, a transcriptional regulator of phenylalanine and lignin biosynthesis in maritime pine. Together, these results suggest that PpNAC1 is a functional ortholog of the ArabidopsisSND1 and NST1 genes and support the idea that key regulators governing secondary cell wall formation could be conserved between gymnosperms and angiosperms. Understanding the molecular switches controlling wood formation is of paramount importance for fundamental tree biology and paves the way for applications in conifer biotechnology. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Bacteria and lignin degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing LI; Hongli YUAN; Jinshui YANG

    2009-01-01

    Lignin is both the most abundant aromatic (phenolic) polymer and the second most abundant raw material.It is degraded and modified by bacteria in the natural world,and bacteria seem to play a leading role in decomposing lignin in aquatic ecosystems.Lignin-degrading bacteria approach the polymer by mechanisms such as tunneling,erosion,and cavitation.With the advantages of immense environmental adaptability and biochemical versatility,bacteria deserve to be studied for their ligninolytic potential.

  8. Characterization of the effects of lignin and lignin complex particles as filler on a polystyrene film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Zawawy, Waleed K., E-mail: wkzawawy@yahoo.com [Cellulose and Paper Department, National Research Center, El-Tahrir St., Giza (Egypt); Ibrahim, Maha M. [Cellulose and Paper Department, National Research Center, El-Tahrir St., Giza (Egypt); Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur; Dufresne, Alain [Grenoble Institute of Technology (INP) - The International School of Paper, Print Media and Biomaterials (PAGORA), BP 65, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres cedex, Grenoble (France)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have studied the use of Co(II) to form a complex with the lignin. We use first vanillin as the lignin model and we observed a change in color for the produced complex depending on the light wavelength. The use of other transition metals does not give the same observation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The use of the transition metal with the lignin precipitated from the black liquor after pulping of agricultural residues, gave a fluorescent color under fluorescent microscope. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We applied the resulted lignin complex to prepare polymer film that can be used as special polymer packaging which can be color changed under different wavelengths. - Abstract: The work in this research outlines the use of lignin precipitated from lignocellulosic substrate as fillers after modified with transition metal cations, Fe(III), Ni(II) and Co(II), in the production of a polystyrene based composite for polymer packaging applications. Virgin polystyrene was compared with lignin and lignin complex filled composites with loading of 5% by weight prepared using twin screw extrusion. The lignin complexes were first characterized by the UV spectra to identify the new absorption bands occurred due to the complex formation. Moreover, lignin model, namely vanillin, was used to notify the geometric structure of the resulting complexes applying the GC mass spectra. Scanning electron microscopy was used to indicate the change in the morphological structure of the filler particles. On the other hand, the mechanical and thermal analysis for the resulting polymer composites was studied and it was noticed that the type of lignin or lignin complex plays a roll in the results. The inclusion of the Co(II)-lignin complex was observed to increase the tensile strength of the resulting polymer composite and a decrease of the glass transition temperature. Furthermore, light wave lengths and UV fluorescent microscope were used to identify

  9. Characterization of the effects of lignin and lignin complex particles as filler on a polystyrene film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zawawy, Waleed K.; Ibrahim, Maha M.; Belgacem, Mohamed Naceur; Dufresne, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► We have studied the use of Co(II) to form a complex with the lignin. We use first vanillin as the lignin model and we observed a change in color for the produced complex depending on the light wavelength. The use of other transition metals does not give the same observation. ► The use of the transition metal with the lignin precipitated from the black liquor after pulping of agricultural residues, gave a fluorescent color under fluorescent microscope. ► We applied the resulted lignin complex to prepare polymer film that can be used as special polymer packaging which can be color changed under different wavelengths. - Abstract: The work in this research outlines the use of lignin precipitated from lignocellulosic substrate as fillers after modified with transition metal cations, Fe(III), Ni(II) and Co(II), in the production of a polystyrene based composite for polymer packaging applications. Virgin polystyrene was compared with lignin and lignin complex filled composites with loading of 5% by weight prepared using twin screw extrusion. The lignin complexes were first characterized by the UV spectra to identify the new absorption bands occurred due to the complex formation. Moreover, lignin model, namely vanillin, was used to notify the geometric structure of the resulting complexes applying the GC mass spectra. Scanning electron microscopy was used to indicate the change in the morphological structure of the filler particles. On the other hand, the mechanical and thermal analysis for the resulting polymer composites was studied and it was noticed that the type of lignin or lignin complex plays a roll in the results. The inclusion of the Co(II)–lignin complex was observed to increase the tensile strength of the resulting polymer composite and a decrease of the glass transition temperature. Furthermore, light wave lengths and UV fluorescent microscope were used to identify the change of color for the resulting polymer film.

  10. Lignin-Furfural Based Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajakta Dongre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lignin recovered from the hot-water extract of sugar maple (Acer saccharum is used in this study to synthesize adhesive blends to replace phenol-formaldehyde (PF resin. Untreated lignin is characterized by lignin content and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR analysis. The molecular weight distribution of the lignin and the blends are characterized by size exclusion chromatography (SEC. The effect of pH (0.3, 0.65 and 1, ex situ furfural, and curing conditions on the tensile properties of adhesive reinforced glass fibers is determined and compared to the reinforcement level of commercially available PF resin. The adhesive blend prepared at pH = 0.65 with no added furfural exhibits the highest tensile properties and meets 90% of the PF tensile strength.

  11. Raman spectra of lignin model compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Richard S. Reiner; Ashok K. Pandey; Sally A. Ralph; Kolby C. Hirth; Rajai H. Atalla

    2005-01-01

    To fully exploit the value of Raman spectroscopy for analyzing lignins and lignin containing materials, a detailed understanding of lignins’ Raman spectra needs to be achieved. Although advances made thus far have led to significant growth in application of Raman techniques, further developments are needed to improve upon the existing knowledge. Considering that lignin...

  12. Lignin from Micro- to Nanosize: Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Beisl

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Micro- and nanosize lignin has recently gained interest due to improved properties compared to standard lignin available today. As the second most abundant biopolymer after cellulose, lignin is readily available but used for rather low-value applications. This review focuses on the application of micro- and nanostructured lignin in final products or processes that all show potential for high added value. The fields of application are ranging from improvement of mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites, bactericidal and antioxidant properties and impregnations to hollow lignin drug carriers for hydrophobic and hydrophilic substances. Also, a carbonization of lignin nanostructures can lead to high-value applications such as use in supercapacitors for energy storage. The properties of the final product depend on the surface properties of the nanomaterial and, therefore, on factors like the lignin source, extraction method, and production/precipitation methods, as discussed in this review.

  13. Fabrication of environmentally biodegradable lignin nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangville, Camille; Rutkevičius, Marius; Richter, Alexander P; Velev, Orlin D; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Paunov, Vesselin N

    2012-12-21

    We developed a method for the fabrication of novel biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) from lignin which are apparently non-toxic for microalgae and yeast. We compare two alternative methods for the synthesis of lignin NPs which result in particles of very different stability upon change of pH. The first method is based on precipitation of low-sulfonated lignin from an ethylene glycol solution by using diluted acidic aqueous solutions, which yields lignin NPs that are stable over a wide range of pH. The second approach is based on the acidic precipitation of lignin from a high-pH aqueous solution which produces NPs stable only at low pH. Our study reveals that lignin NPs from the ethylene glycol-based precipitation contain densely packed lignin domains which explain the stability of the NPs even at high pH. We characterised the properties of the produced lignin NPs and determined their loading capacities with hydrophilic actives. The results suggest that these NPs are highly porous and consist of smaller lignin domains. Tests with microalgae like Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and yeast incubated in lignin NP dispersions indicated that these NPs lack measurable effect on the viability of these microorganisms. Such biodegradable and environmentally compatible NPs can find applications as drug delivery vehicles, stabilisers of cosmetic and pharmaceutical formulations, or in other areas where they may replace more expensive and potentially toxic nanomaterials. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Study of lignin biotransformation by Aspergillus fumigatus and white-rot fungi using 14C-labeled and unlabeled kraft lignins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadam, K.K.; Drew, S.W.

    1986-01-01

    The biodegradation of lignin by fungi was studied in shake flasks using 14 C-labeled kraft lignin and in a deep-tank fermentor using unlabeled kraft lignin. Among the fungi screened, A. fumigatus - isolated in our laboratories - was most potent in lignin biotransformation. Dialysis-type fermentation, designed to study possible accumulation of low MW lignin-derived products, showed no such accumulation. Recalcitrant carbohydrates like microcrystalline cellulose supported higher lignolytic activity than easily metabolized carbohydrates like cellobiose. An assay developed to distinguish between CO 2 evolved from lignin and carbohydrate substrates demonstrated no stoichiometric correlation between the metabolism of the two cosubstrates. The submerged fermentations with unlabeled liqnin are difficult to monitor since chemical assays do not give accurate and true results. Lignolytic efficiencies that allowed monitoring of such fermentations were defined. Degraded lignins were clearly superior to C. versicolor in all aspects of lignin degradation; A fumigatus brought about substantial demethoxylation and dehydroxylation, whereas C. versicolor degraded lignins closely resembled undegraded kraft lignin. There was a good agreement among the different indices of lignin degradation, namely, 14 CO evolution, OCH 3 loss, OH loss, and monomer and dimer yield after permanganate oxidation

  15. Anaerobic biodegradation of the lignin and polysaccharide components of lignocellulose and synthetic lignin by sediment microflora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benner, R.; Maccubbin, A.E.; Hodson, R.E.

    1984-05-01

    Specifically radiolabeled (/sup 14/C-lignin)lignocelluloses and (/sup 14/C-polysaccharide)lignocelluloses were prepared from a variety of marine and freshwater wetland plants including a grass, a sedge, a rush, and a hardwood. These (/sup 14/C)lignocellulose preparations and synthetic (/sup 14/C)lignin were incubated anaerobically with anoxic sediments collected from a salt marsh, a freshwater marsh, and a mangrove swamp. During long-term incubations lasting up to 300 days, the lignin and polysaccharide components of the lignocelluloses were slowly degraded anaerobically to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and /sup 14/CH/sub 4/. Lignocelluloses derived from herbaceous plants were degraded more rapidly than lignocellulose derived from the hardwood. After 294 days, 16.9% of the lignin component and 30.0% of the polysaccharide component of lignocellulose derived from the grass used (Spartina alterniflora) were degraded to gaseous end products. In contrast, after 246 days, only 1.5% of the lignin component and 4.1% of the polysaccharide component of lignocellulose derived from the hardwood used (Rhizophora mangle) were degraded to gaseous end products. Synthetic (/sup 14/C) lignin was degraded anaerobically faster than the lignin component of the hardwood lignocellulose; after 276 days 3.7% of the synthetic lignin was degraded to gaseous end products. Contrary to previous reports, these results demonstrate that lignin and lignified plant tissues are biodegradable in the absence of oxygen. Although lignocelluloses are recalcitrant to anaerobic biodegradation, rates of degradation measured in aquatic sediments are significant and have important implications for the biospheric cycling of carbon from these abundant biopolymers. 31 references.

  16. Effect of lignin content on a GH11 endoxylanase acting on glucuronoarabinoxylan-lignin nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukari, Imen; Rémond, Caroline; O'Donohue, Michael; Chabbert, Brigitte

    2012-06-20

    The effects of lignin content on the activity and action pattern of GH11 endoxylanase from Thermobacillus xylanilyticus were investigated using in vitro reconstituted non-covalent glucuronoarabinoxylan-model lignin (GAX-DHP) nanocomposites. Four types of nanocomposites were prepared, each displaying different lignin contents. Variations in the DHP (model lignin) polymerization process were induced by increasing the coniferyl alcohol concentration. Examination of the morphology of the nanocomposites revealed globular particles enrobed in a matrix. The size of these particles increased in line with the lignin concentration. Physicochemical characterization of the in vitro reconstituted GAX-DHPs strongly suggested that increased particle size is directly related to the solubility and reactivity of coniferyl alcohol, as reflected by changes in the amount of β-O-4 linkages. Evaluation of the impact of the GH11 endoxylanase on the GAX-DHP nanocomposites revealed a negative correlation between the proportion and organization patterns of DHP in the nanocomposites and enzyme activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Advanced Model Compounds for Understanding Acid-Catalyzed Lignin Depolymerization: Identification of Renewable Aromatics and a Lignin-Derived Solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahive, Ciaran W; Deuss, Peter J; Lancefield, Christopher S; Sun, Zhuohua; Cordes, David B; Young, Claire M; Tran, Fanny; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; de Vries, Johannes G; Kamer, Paul C J; Westwood, Nicholas J; Barta, Katalin

    2016-07-20

    The development of fundamentally new approaches for lignin depolymerization is challenged by the complexity of this aromatic biopolymer. While overly simplified model compounds often lack relevance to the chemistry of lignin, the direct use of lignin streams poses significant analytical challenges to methodology development. Ideally, new methods should be tested on model compounds that are complex enough to mirror the structural diversity in lignin but still of sufficiently low molecular weight to enable facile analysis. In this contribution, we present a new class of advanced (β-O-4)-(β-5) dilinkage models that are highly realistic representations of a lignin fragment. Together with selected β-O-4, β-5, and β-β structures, these compounds provide a detailed understanding of the reactivity of various types of lignin linkages in acid catalysis in conjunction with stabilization of reactive intermediates using ethylene glycol. The use of these new models has allowed for identification of novel reaction pathways and intermediates and led to the characterization of new dimeric products in subsequent lignin depolymerization studies. The excellent correlation between model and lignin experiments highlights the relevance of this new class of model compounds for broader use in catalysis studies. Only by understanding the reactivity of the linkages in lignin at this level of detail can fully optimized lignin depolymerization strategies be developed.

  18. Lignin recovery. A resource to value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimbardi, P.; Cardinale, G.; Demichele, M.; Nanna, F.; Viggiano, D.; Bonini, C.; D'Alessio, L.; D'Auria, M.; Teghil, R.; Tofani, D.

    1999-01-01

    In the present paper, the effects of the steam explosion (ES) pretreatment conditions on recovery and chemical structure of wheat straw lignin are reported. The experimental data of lignin recovery by caustic extraction, followed by acid precipitation, have been interpolated to obtain the dependence on the time and temperature of SE. The lignin has been characterised by using several methods. Preliminary results on the synthesis of copolymers lignin-styrene are also reported [it

  19. Advances in the chemical utilization of alkali lignin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Klashorst, G.H.

    1985-06-01

    Large quantities of alkali lignin are produced as by-products by the South African pulping industry. The potential utilization of industrial soda/anthraquinone (soda/AQ) eucalyptus, kraft pine and soda bagasse lignin was subsequently investigated. The molecular mass distributions of the three lignins were similar when determined by high pressure gel permeation chromatography (HP-GPC). The quantitative and quanlitative occurrence of various low molecular mass lignin fragments in the different spent liquors, on the other hand, indicated that the three lignins have substantial chemical differences. Analysis of the purified degraded lignins by NMR, methoxyl content determinations, elemental analysis, carbohydrate content determinations etc., quantified various of the chemical properties of the lignin. The properties of the three lignins were ultimately used to make recommendations regarding the potential use of each lignin. One such application was investigated and it was shown that soda bagasse lignin can be used successfully in phenol formaldehyde resin applications. The reaction of formaldehyde with lignin model compounds in acidic medium was also investigated. This reaction was shown to give fast crosslinking of alkyl substituted phenolic and etherified phenolic lignin model compounds at positions meta to the aromatic hydroxy groups

  20. Polymerization reactivity of sulfomethylated alkali lignin modified with horseradish peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongjie; Wu, Xiaolei; Qiu, Xueqing; Chang, Yaqi; Lou, Hongming

    2014-03-01

    Alkali lignin (AL) was employed as raw materials in the present study. Sulfomethylation was conducted to improve the solubility of AL, while sulfomethylated alkali lignin (SAL) was further polymerized by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). HRP modification caused a significant increase in molecular weight of SAL which was over 20 times. It was also found to increase the amount of sulfonic and carboxyl groups while decrease the amount of phenolic and methoxyl groups in SAL. The adsorption quantity of self-assembled SAL film was improved after HRP modification. Sulfonation and HRP modification were mutually promoted. The polymerization reactivity of SAL in HRP modification was increased with its sulfonation degree. Meanwhile, HRP modification facilitated SAL's radical-sulfonation reaction. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. On-Off Switches for Secondary Cell Wall Biosynthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan-Zhong Wang; Richard A.Dixon

    2012-01-01

    Secondary cell walls provide plants with rigidity and strength to support their body weight and ensure water and nutrient transport.They also provide textiles,timber,and potentially second-generation biofuels for human use.Genes responsible for synthesis of the different cell wall components,namely cellulose,hemicelluloses,and lignin,are coordinately expressed and under transcriptional regulation.In the past several years,cell wall-related NAC and MYB transcription factors have been intensively investigated in different species and shown to be master switches of secondary cell wall biosynthesis.Positive and negative regulators,which function upstream of NAC master switches,have also been identified in different plant tissues.Further elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms of cell wall synthesis will facilitate the engineering of plant feedstocks suitable for biofuel production.

  2. Lignin pyrolysis for profitable lignocellulosic biorefineries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wild, de P.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Huijgen, W.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Bio-based industries (pulp and paper and biorefineries) produce > 50 Mt/yr of lignin that results from fractionation of lignocellulosic biomass. Lignin is world's second biopolymer and a major potential source for production of performance materials and aromatic chemicals. Lignin valorization is

  3. Studies on Lignin-Based Adhesives for Particleboard Panels

    OpenAIRE

    ÇETİN, Nihat Sami; ÖZMEN, Nilgül

    2003-01-01

    The ultimate aim of this work was to develop a phenolic resin for partially replacing phenol with modified organosolv lignin in phenol-formaldehyde (PF) resin production. The lignin-formaldehyde relationship was determined in a reactivity test. Organosolv lignin-phenol-formaldehyde (LPF) resins were produced in a two-step preparation with different additions of lignin. The method selected for the manufacture of lignin resins dealt with modification of the lignin by the methylolation route. Th...

  4. Effective Release of Lignin Fragments from Lignocellulose by Lewis Acid Metal Triflates in the Lignin-First Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaoming; Zhu, Jiadong; Korányi, Tamás I; Boot, Michael D; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2016-12-08

    Adding value to lignin, the most complex and recalcitrant fraction in lignocellulosic biomass, is highly relevant to costefficient operation of biorefineries. We report the use of homogeneous metal triflates to rapidly release lignin from biomass. Combined with metal-catalyzed hydrogenolysis, the process separates woody biomass into few lignin-derived alkylmethoxyphenols and cellulose under mild conditions. Model compound studies show the unique catalytic properties of metal triflates in cleaving lignin-carbohydrate interlinkages. The lignin fragments can then be disassembled by hydrogenolysis. The tandem process is flexible and allows obtaining good aromatic monomer yields from different woods (36-48 wt %, lignin base). The cellulose-rich residue is an ideal feedstock for established biorefining processes. The highly productive strategy is characterized by short reaction times, low metal triflate catalyst requirement, and leaving cellulose largely untouched. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Complex Binding of the FabR Repressor of Bacterial Unsaturated Fatty Acid Biosynthesis to its Cognate Promoters

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Youjun; Cronan, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Two transcriptional regulators, the FadR activator and the FabR repressor control biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in Escherichia coli. FabR represses expression of the two genes, fabA and fabB, required for unsaturated fatty acid synthesis and has been reported to require the presence of an unsaturated thioester (of either acyl carrier protein or CoA) in order to bind the fabA and fabB promoters in vitro. We report in vivo experiments in which unsaturated fatty acid synthesis was bloc...

  6. Peroxidase enzymes regulate collagen extracellular matrix biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeNichilo, Mark O; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Rayner, Timothy E; Borowicz, Romana A; Greenwood, John E; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase are heme-containing enzymes often physically associated with fibrotic tissue and cancer in various organs, without any direct involvement in promoting fibroblast recruitment and extracellular matrix (ECM) biosynthesis at these sites. We report herein novel findings that show peroxidase enzymes possess a well-conserved profibrogenic capacity to stimulate the migration of fibroblastic cells and promote their ability to secrete collagenous proteins to generate a functional ECM both in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistic studies conducted using cultured fibroblasts show that these cells are capable of rapidly binding and internalizing both myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase. Peroxidase enzymes stimulate collagen biosynthesis at a post-translational level in a prolyl 4-hydroxylase-dependent manner that does not require ascorbic acid. This response was blocked by the irreversible myeloperoxidase inhibitor 4-amino-benzoic acid hydrazide, indicating peroxidase catalytic activity is essential for collagen biosynthesis. These results suggest that peroxidase enzymes, such as myeloperoxidase and eosinophil peroxidase, may play a fundamental role in regulating the recruitment of fibroblast and the biosynthesis of collagen ECM at sites of normal tissue repair and fibrosis, with enormous implications for many disease states where infiltrating inflammatory cells deposit peroxidases. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Chapter 1: A Brief Introduction to Lignin Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katahira, Rui [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Beckham, Gregg T [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Elder, Thomas J. [USDA-Forest Service

    2018-04-03

    Lignin is an alkyl-aromatic polymer found in the cell walls of terrestrial plants. Lignin provides structure and rigidity to plants, is a natural, highly effective barrier against microbial attack, and enables water and nutrient transport through plant tissues. Depending on the plant species, the constituents of lignin can vary considerably, leading to substantial diversity in lignin chemistry and structure. Despite nearly a century of research and development attempting to convert lignin into valuable products, lignin in most current and planned biorefinery contexts remains underutilized, most often being burned to generate heat and power. However, the drive towards effective lignin valorization processes has witnessed a significant resurgence in the past decade, catalyzed by advances in improved understanding of lignin chemistry, structure, and plasticity in parallel with new catalytic and biological approaches to valorize this important, prevalent biopolymer. As a preface to the subsequent chapters in this book, this chapter briefly highlights the known aspects of lignin structure.

  8. Reprogramming of gene expression during compression wood formation in pine: Coordinated modulation of S-adenosylmethionine, lignin and lignan related genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Transcript profiling of differentiating secondary xylem has allowed us to draw a general picture of the genes involved in wood formation. However, our knowledge is still limited about the regulatory mechanisms that coordinate and modulate the different pathways providing substrates during xylogenesis. The development of compression wood in conifers constitutes an exceptional model for these studies. Although differential expression of a few genes in differentiating compression wood compared to normal or opposite wood has been reported, the broad range of features that distinguish this reaction wood suggest that the expression of a larger set of genes would be modified. Results By combining the construction of different cDNA libraries with microarray analyses we have identified a total of 496 genes in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster, Ait.) that change in expression during differentiation of compression wood (331 up-regulated and 165 down-regulated compared to opposite wood). Samples from different provenances collected in different years and geographic locations were integrated into the analyses to mitigate the effects of multiple sources of variability. This strategy allowed us to define a group of genes that are consistently associated with compression wood formation. Correlating with the deposition of a thicker secondary cell wall that characterizes compression wood development, the expression of a number of genes involved in synthesis of cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin and lignans was up-regulated. Further analysis of a set of these genes involved in S-adenosylmethionine metabolism, ammonium recycling, and lignin and lignans biosynthesis showed changes in expression levels in parallel to the levels of lignin accumulation in cells undergoing xylogenesis in vivo and in vitro. Conclusions The comparative transcriptomic analysis reported here have revealed a broad spectrum of coordinated transcriptional modulation of genes involved in biosynthesis of

  9. Reprogramming of gene expression during compression wood formation in pine: Coordinated modulation of S-adenosylmethionine, lignin and lignan related genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villalobos David P

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcript profiling of differentiating secondary xylem has allowed us to draw a general picture of the genes involved in wood formation. However, our knowledge is still limited about the regulatory mechanisms that coordinate and modulate the different pathways providing substrates during xylogenesis. The development of compression wood in conifers constitutes an exceptional model for these studies. Although differential expression of a few genes in differentiating compression wood compared to normal or opposite wood has been reported, the broad range of features that distinguish this reaction wood suggest that the expression of a larger set of genes would be modified. Results By combining the construction of different cDNA libraries with microarray analyses we have identified a total of 496 genes in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster, Ait. that change in expression during differentiation of compression wood (331 up-regulated and 165 down-regulated compared to opposite wood. Samples from different provenances collected in different years and geographic locations were integrated into the analyses to mitigate the effects of multiple sources of variability. This strategy allowed us to define a group of genes that are consistently associated with compression wood formation. Correlating with the deposition of a thicker secondary cell wall that characterizes compression wood development, the expression of a number of genes involved in synthesis of cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin and lignans was up-regulated. Further analysis of a set of these genes involved in S-adenosylmethionine metabolism, ammonium recycling, and lignin and lignans biosynthesis showed changes in expression levels in parallel to the levels of lignin accumulation in cells undergoing xylogenesis in vivo and in vitro. Conclusions The comparative transcriptomic analysis reported here have revealed a broad spectrum of coordinated transcriptional modulation of genes

  10. Expression of a bacterial 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase reduces lignin content and improves biomass saccharification efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eudes, Aymerick; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Baidoo, Edward E K; George, Anthe; Liang, Yan; Yang, Fan; Singh, Seema; Keasling, Jay D; Simmons, Blake A; Loqué, Dominique

    2015-12-01

    Lignin confers recalcitrance to plant biomass used as feedstocks in agro-processing industries or as source of renewable sugars for the production of bioproducts. The metabolic steps for the synthesis of lignin building blocks belong to the shikimate and phenylpropanoid pathways. Genetic engineering efforts to reduce lignin content typically employ gene knockout or gene silencing techniques to constitutively repress one of these metabolic pathways. Recently, new strategies have emerged offering better spatiotemporal control of lignin deposition, including the expression of enzymes that interfere with the normal process for cell wall lignification. In this study, we report that expression of a 3-dehydroshikimate dehydratase (QsuB from Corynebacterium glutamicum) reduces lignin deposition in Arabidopsis cell walls. QsuB was targeted to the plastids to convert 3-dehydroshikimate - an intermediate of the shikimate pathway - into protocatechuate. Compared to wild-type plants, lines expressing QsuB contain higher amounts of protocatechuate, p-coumarate, p-coumaraldehyde and p-coumaryl alcohol, and lower amounts of coniferaldehyde, coniferyl alcohol, sinapaldehyde and sinapyl alcohol. 2D-NMR spectroscopy and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (pyro-GC/MS) reveal an increase of p-hydroxyphenyl units and a reduction of guaiacyl units in the lignin of QsuB lines. Size-exclusion chromatography indicates a lower degree of lignin polymerization in the transgenic lines. Therefore, our data show that the expression of QsuB primarily affects the lignin biosynthetic pathway. Finally, biomass from these lines exhibits more than a twofold improvement in saccharification efficiency. We conclude that the expression of QsuB in plants, in combination with specific promoters, is a promising gain-of-function strategy for spatiotemporal reduction of lignin in plant biomass. © 2015 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The

  11. Cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, David; Bowman, Mark P; Zawacky, Steven R; Van Buskirk, Ellor J; Kamarchik, Peter

    2013-07-30

    A cationic electrodepositable coating composition is disclosed. The present invention in directed to a cationic electrodepositable coating composition comprising a lignin-containing cationic salt resin, that comprises (A) the reaction product of: lignin, an amine, and a carbonyl compound; (B) the reaction product of lignin, epichlorohydrin, and an amine; or (C) combinations thereof.

  12. Systematic Parameterization of Lignin for the CHARMM Force Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vermaas, Joshua; Petridis, Loukas; Beckham, Gregg; Crowley, Michael

    2017-07-06

    Plant cell walls have three primary components, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, the latter of which is a recalcitrant, aromatic heteropolymer that provides structure to plants, water and nutrient transport through plant tissues, and a highly effective defense against pathogens. Overcoming the recalcitrance of lignin is key to effective biomass deconstruction, which would in turn enable the use of biomass as a feedstock for industrial processes. Our understanding of lignin structure in the plant cell wall is hampered by the limitations of the available lignin forcefields, which currently only account for a single linkage between lignins and lack explicit parameterization for emerging lignin structures both from natural variants and engineered lignin structures. Since polymerization of lignin occurs via radical intermediates, multiple C-O and C-C linkages have been isolated , and the current force field only represents a small subset of lignin the diverse lignin structures found in plants. In order to take into account the wide range of lignin polymerization chemistries, monomers and dimer combinations of C-, H-, G-, and S-lignins as well as with hydroxycinnamic acid linkages were subjected to extensive quantum mechanical calculations to establish target data from which to build a complete molecular mechanics force field tuned specifically for diverse lignins. This was carried out in a GPU-accelerated global optimization process, whereby all molecules were parameterized simultaneously using the same internal parameter set. By parameterizing lignin specifically, we are able to more accurately represent the interactions and conformations of lignin monomers and dimers relative to a general force field. This new force field will enables computational researchers to study the effects of different linkages on the structure of lignin, as well as construct more accurate plant cell wall models based on observed statistical distributions of lignin that differ between

  13. Selective lignin downregulation leads to constitutive defense response expression in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Giraldo, Lina; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Kamiya, Yuji; Tang, Yuhong; Dixon, Richard A

    2011-05-01

    • Downregulation of hydroxycinnamoyl CoA: shikimate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT) in alfalfa (Medicago sativa) reduces lignin levels and improves forage quality and saccharification efficiency for bioethanol production. However, the plants have reduced stature. It was previously reported that HCT-down-regulated Arabidopsis have impaired auxin transport, but this has recently been disproved. • To address the basis for the phenotypes of lignin-modified alfalfa, we measured auxin transport, profiled a range of metabolites including flavonoids and hormones, and performed in depth transcriptome analyses. • Auxin transport is unaffected in HCT antisense alfalfa despite increased flavonoid biosynthesis. The plants show increased cytokinin and reduced auxin levels, and gibberellin levels and sensitivity are both reduced. Levels of salicylic, jasmonic and abscisic acids are elevated, associated with massive upregulation of pathogenesis and abiotic stress-related genes and enhanced tolerance to fungal infection and drought. • We suggest that HCT downregulated alfalfa plants exhibit constitutive activation of defense responses, triggered by release of bioactive cell wall fragments and production of hydrogen peroxide as a result of impaired secondary cell wall integrity. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Lignin Biodegradation with Laccase-Mediator Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christopher, Lew Paul; Yao, Bin; Ji, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Lignin has a significant and largely unrealized potential as a source for the sustainable production of fuels and bulk high-value chemicals. It can replace fossil-based oil as a renewable feedstock that would bring about socio-economic and environmental benefits in our transition to a biobased economy. The efficient utilization of lignin however requires its depolymerization to low-molecular weight phenolics and aromatics that can then serve as the building blocks for chemical syntheses of high-value products. The ability of laccase to attack and degrade lignin in conjunction with laccase mediators is currently viewed as one of the potential “breakthrough” applications for lignin valorization. Here, we review the recent progress in lignin biodegradation with laccase-mediator systems, and research needs that need to be addressed in this field.

  15. Lignin Biodegradation with Laccase-Mediator Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher, Lew Paul, E-mail: lew.christopher@sdsmt.edu [Center for Bioprocessing Research and Development, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States); Yao, Bin [Center for Bioprocessing Research and Development, South Dakota School of Mines & Technology, Rapid City, SD (United States); Ji, Yun [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

    2014-03-31

    Lignin has a significant and largely unrealized potential as a source for the sustainable production of fuels and bulk high-value chemicals. It can replace fossil-based oil as a renewable feedstock that would bring about socio-economic and environmental benefits in our transition to a biobased economy. The efficient utilization of lignin however requires its depolymerization to low-molecular weight phenolics and aromatics that can then serve as the building blocks for chemical syntheses of high-value products. The ability of laccase to attack and degrade lignin in conjunction with laccase mediators is currently viewed as one of the potential “breakthrough” applications for lignin valorization. Here, we review the recent progress in lignin biodegradation with laccase-mediator systems, and research needs that need to be addressed in this field.

  16. Advanced Model Compounds for Understanding Acid-Catalyzed Lignin Depolymerization : Identification of Renewable Aromatics and a Lignin-Derived Solvent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lahive, Ciaran W; Deuss, Peter J; Lancefield, Christopher S; Sun, Zhuohua; Cordes, David B; Young, Claire; Tran, Fanny; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; de Vries, Johannes G; Kamer, Paul C J; Westwood, Nicholas J; Barta, Katalin

    2016-01-01

    The development of fundamentally new approaches for lignin depolymerization is challenged by the complexity of this aromatic biopolymer. While overly simplified model compounds often lack relevance to the chemistry of lignin, the direct use of lignin streams poses significant analytical challenges

  17. Liquid Fuels from Lignins: Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chum, H. L.; Johnson, D. K.

    1986-01-01

    This task was initiated to assess the conversion of lignins into liquid fuels, primarily of lignins relevant to biomass-to-ethanol conversion processes. The task was composed of a literature review of this area and an experimental part to obtain pertinent data on the conversion of lignins germane to biomass-to-ethanol conversion processes.

  18. Radical nature of C- lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura Berstis; Thomas Elder; Michael Crowley; Gregg T. Beckham

    2016-01-01

    The recently discovered lignin composed of caffeoyl alcohol monolignols or C-lignin is particularly intriguing given its homogeneous, linear polymeric structure and exclusive benzodioxane linkage between monomers. By virtue of this simplified chemistry, the potential emerges for improved valorization strategies with C-lignin relative to other natural heterogeneous...

  19. Dissolution of lignin in green urea aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingyu; Li, Ying; Qiu, Xueqing; Liu, Di; Yang, Dongjie; Liu, Weifeng; Qian, Yong

    2017-12-01

    The dissolution problem is the main obstacle for the value-added modification and depolymerization of industrial lignin. Here, a green urea aqueous solution for complete dissolution of various lignin is presented and the dissolution mechanism is analyzed by AFM, DLS and NMR. The results show that the molecular interaction of lignin decreases from 32.3 mN/m in pure water to 11.3 mN/m in urea aqueous solution. The immobility of 1H NMR spectra and the shift of 17O NMR spectra of urea in different lignin/urea solutions indicate that the oxygen of carbonyl in urea and the hydrogen of hydroxyl in lignin form new hydrogen bonds and break the original hydrogen bonds among lignin molecules. The shift of 1H NMR spectra of lignin and the decrease of interactions in model compound polystyrene indicate that urea also breaks the π-π interactions between aromatic rings of lignin. Lignin dissolved in urea aqueous has good antioxidant activity and it can scavenge at least 63% free radicals in 16 min.

  20. Lignin derivatives from desilicated rice straw soda black liquor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Taraboulsi, M A; Nasser, M M

    1979-01-01

    Carboxymethyl lignin, cyanoethyl lignin, carboxyethyl lignin, and aminopropyl lignin were prepared from alkali lignin of rice straw black liquor (after disilication by storage for 1 wk to 1 yr) and used as sizes for paper, drilling fluid additives and flocculants.

  1. Lignin poly(lactic acid) copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Johan Vilhelm; Chung, Yi-Lin; Li, Russell Jingxian; Waymouth, Robert; Sattely, Elizabeth; Billington, Sarah; Frank, Curtis W.

    2017-02-14

    Provided herein are graft co-polymers of lignin and poly(lactic acid) (lignin-g-PLA copolymer), thermoset and thermoplastic polymers including them, methods of preparing these polymers, and articles of manufacture including such polymers.

  2. Lignin solubilisation and gentle fractionation in liquid ammonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strassberger, Z.; Prinsen, P.; Klis, van der F.; Es, van D.S.; Tanase, S.; Rothenberg, G.

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple method for solubilising lignin using liquid ammonia. Unlike water, which requires harsh conditions, ammonia can solubilise technical lignins, in particular kraft lignin. A commercial pine wood Kraft lignin (Indulin AT) was solubilized instantaneously at room temperature and 7–11

  3. Application of mesoporous Al-MCM-48 material to the conversion of lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung Won; Lee, In-Gu; Park, Sung Hoon; Jeon, Jong-Ki; Suh, Dong Jin; Jung, Jinho; Park, Young-Kwon

    2014-04-01

    Al-MCM-48 was applied to the catalytic pyrolysis of lignin for the first time. The pyrolysis reaction and in-situ product were analyzed by pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The main products of the non-catalytic pyrolysis of lignin were phenols. The use of Al-MCM-48 increased the production of light phenols considerably. The yields of high-value-added compounds, such as hydrocarbons and aromatics, were also increased by catalytic upgrading. Al-MCM-48 is believed to promote cracking, aromatization and deoxygenation, such as decarbonylation. On the other hand, Si-MCM-48, which has no acid sites, showed lower deoxygenation efficiency than Al-MCM-48. Al-MCM-48 could be regenerated by calcining in air.

  4. Hydroxide catalysts for lignin depolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckham, Gregg T; Biddy, Mary J.; Kruger, Jacob S.; Chmely, Stephen C.; Sturgeon, Matthew

    2017-10-17

    Solid base catalysts and their use for the base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of lignin to compounds such as aromatics are presented herein. Exemplary catalysts include layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for BCD of lignin.

  5. Hydroxide catalysts for lignin depolymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, Gregg T.; Biddy, Mary J.; Chmely, Stephen C.; Sturgeon, Matthew

    2017-04-25

    Solid base catalysts and their use for the base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of lignin to compounds such as aromatics are presented herein. Exemplary catalysts include layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for BCD of lignin.

  6. Reactions of Lignin Model Compounds in Ionic Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holladay, John E.; Binder, Joseph B.; Gray, Michel J.; White, James F.; Zhang, Z. Conrad

    2009-09-15

    Lignin, a readily available form of biomass, awaits novel chemistry for converting it to valuable aromatic chemicals. Recent work has demonstrated that ionic liquids are excellent solvents for processing woody biomass and lignin. Seeking to exploit ionic liquids as media for depolymerization of lignin, we investigated reactions of lignin model compounds in these solvents. Using Brønsted acid catalysts in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium triflate at moderate temperatures, we obtained up to 11.6% yield of the dealkylation product guaiacol from the model compound eugenol and cleaved phenethyl phenyl ether, a model for lignin ethers. Despite these successes, acid catalysis failed in dealkylation of the unsaturated model compound 4-ethylguaiacol and did not produce monomeric products from organosolv lignin, demonstrating that further work is required to understand the complex chemistry of lignin depolymerization.

  7. Lignin Formation and the Effects of Gravity: A New Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Norman G.

    1997-01-01

    Two aspects of considerable importance in the enigmatic processes associated with lignification have made excellent progress. The first is that, even in a microgravity environment, compression wood formation, and hence altered lignin deposition, can be induced upon mechanically bending the stems of woody gymnosperms. It now needs to be established if an organism reorientating its woody stem tissue will generate this tissue in microgravity, in the absence of externally applied pressure. If it does not, then gravity has no effect on its formation, and instead it results from alterations in the stress gradient experienced by the organism impacted. The second area of progress involves establishing how the biochemical pathway to lignin is regulated, particularly with respect to selective monolignol biosynthesis. This is an important question since individual monomer deposition occurs in a temporally and spatially specific manner. In this regard, the elusive metabolic switch between E-p-coumaryl alcohol and E-coniferyl alcohol synthesis has been detected, the significance of which now needs to be defined at the enzyme and gene level. Switching between monolignol synthesis is important, since it is viewed to be a consequence of different perceptions by plants in the gravitational load experienced, and thus in the control of the type of lignification response. Additional experiments also revealed the rate-limiting processes involved in monolignol synthesis, and suggest that a biological system (involving metabolite concentrations, as well as enzymatic and gene (in)activation processes) is involved, rather than a single rate-limiting step.

  8. Improved lignin polyurethane properties with Lewis acid treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hoyong; Washburn, Newell R

    2012-06-27

    Chemical modification strategies to improve the mechanical properties of lignin-based polyurethanes are presented. We hypothesized that treatment of lignin with Lewis acids would increase the concentration of hydroxyl groups available to react with diisocyanate monomers. Under the conditions used, hydrogen bromide-catalyzed modification resulted in a 28% increase in hydroxyl group content. Associated increases in hydrophilicity of solvent-cast thin films were also recorded as evidenced by decreases in water contact angle. Polyurethanes were then prepared by first preparing a prepolymer based on mixtures of toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI) and unmodified or modified lignin, then polymerization was completed through addition of polyethylene glycol (PEG), resulting in mass ratios of TDI:lignin:PEG of 43:17:40 in the compositions investigated here. The mixture of TDI and unmodified lignin resulted in a lignin powder at the bottom of the liquid, suggesting it did not react directly with TDI. However, a homogeneous solution resulted when TDI and the hydrogen bromide-treated lignin were mixed, suggesting demethylation indeed increased reactivity and resulted in better integration of lignin into the urethane network. Significant improvements in mechanical properties of modified lignin polyurethanes were observed, with a 6.5-fold increase in modulus, which were attributed to better integration of the modified lignin into the covalent polymer network due to the higher concentration of hydroxyl groups. This research indicates that chemical modification strategies can lead to significant improvements in the properties of lignin-based polymeric materials using a higher fraction of an inexpensive lignin monomer from renewable resources and a lower fraction an expensive, petroleum-derived isocyanate monomer to achieve the required material properties.

  9. Syringyl-Rich Lignin Renders Poplars More Resistant to Degradation by Wood Decay Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyba, Oleksandr; Douglas, Carl J.

    2013-01-01

    In order to elucidate the effects of lignin composition on the resistance of wood to degradation by decay fungi, wood specimens from two transgenic poplar lines expressing an Arabidopsis gene encoding ferulate 5-hydroxylase (F5H) driven by the cinnimate-4-hydroxylase promoter (C4H::F5H) that increased syringyl/guaiacyl (S/G) monolignol ratios relative to those in the untransformed control wood were incubated with six different wood decay fungi. Alterations in wood weight and chemical composition were monitored over the incubation period. The results showed that transgenic poplar lines extremely rich in syringyl lignin exhibited a drastically improved resistance to degradation by all decay fungi evaluated. Lignin monomer composition and its distribution among cell types and within different cell layers were the sole wood chemistry parameters determining wood durability. Since transgenic poplars with exceedingly high syringyl contents were recalcitrant to degradation, where wood durability is a critical factor, these genotypes may offer improved performance. PMID:23396333

  10. Decoding how a soil bacterium extracts building blocks and metabolic energy from ligninolysis provides road map for lignin valorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varman, Arul M.; He, Lian; Follenfant, Rhiannon; Wu, Weihua; Wemmer, Sarah; Wrobel, Steven A.; Tang, Yinjie J.; Singh, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Sphingobium sp. SYK-6 is a soil bacterium boasting a well-studied ligninolytic pathway and the potential for development into a microbial chassis for lignin valorization. An improved understanding of its metabolism will help researchers in the engineering of SYK-6 for the production of value-added chemicals through lignin valorization. We used 13C-fingerprinting, 13C metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA), and RNA-sequencing differential expression analysis to uncover the following metabolic traits: (i) SYK-6 prefers alkaline conditions, making it an efficient host for the consolidated bioprocessing of lignin, and it also lacks the ability to metabolize sugars or organic acids; (ii) the CO2 release (i.e., carbon loss) from the ligninolysis-based metabolism of SYK-6 is significantly greater than the CO2 release from the sugar-based metabolism of Escherichia coli; (iii) the vanillin catabolic pathway (which is the converging point of majority of the lignin catabolic pathways) is coupled with the tetrahydrofolate-dependent C1 pathway that is essential for the biosynthesis of serine, histidine, and methionine; (iv) catabolic end products of lignin (pyruvate and oxaloacetate) must enter the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle first and then use phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase to initiate gluconeogenesis; and (v) 13C-MFA together with RNA-sequencing differential expression analysis establishes the vanillin catabolic pathway as the major contributor of NAD(P)H synthesis. Therefore, the vanillin catabolic pathway is essential for SYK-6 to obtain sufficient reducing equivalents for its healthy growth; cosubstrate experiments support this finding. This unique energy feature of SYK-6 is particularly interesting because most heterotrophs rely on the transhydrogenase, the TCA cycle, and the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway to obtain NADPH. PMID:27634497

  11. Lignin-based cement fluid loss control additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, P.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a hydraulic cement slurry composition. It comprises: a hydraulic cement, and the following expressed as parts by weight per 100 parts of the hydraulic cement, water from about 25 to 105 parts, and from abut 0.5 to 2.5 parts of a compound selected from the group consisting of a sulfonated lignin and a sulfomethylated lignin, wherein the lignin has been sequentially crosslinked by reacting the lignin with a member of the group consisting of formaldehyde and epichlorohydrin and alkoxylated with between about 2 to about 6 moles of a compound selected from the group consisting of ethylene oxide, propylene oxide, butylene oxide and a combination thereof per 1000 g of the lignin.

  12. Transcription Factor SmWRKY1 Positively Promotes the Biosynthesis of Tanshinones in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzhi Cao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Tanshinones, one group of bioactive diterpenes, were widely used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. WRKYs play important roles in plant metabolism, but their regulation mechanism in Salvia miltiorrhiza remains elusive. In this study, one WRKY transcription factor SmWRKY1 was isolated and functionally characterized from S. miltiorrhiza. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree analysis showed SmWRKY1 shared high homology with other plant WRKYs such as CrWRKY1. SmWRKY1 was found predominantly expressed in leaves and stems, and was responsive to salicylic acid (SA, methyl jasmonate (MeJA, and nitric oxide (NO treatment. Subcellular localization analysis found that SmWRKY1 was localized in the nucleus. Over-expression of SmWRKY1 significantly elevated the transcripts of genes coding for enzymes in the MEP pathway especially 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (SmDXS and 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (SmDXR, resulted in over fivefold increase in tanshinones production in transgenic lines (up to 13.7 mg/g DW compared with the control lines. A dual-luciferase (Dual-LUC assay showed that SmWRKY1 can positively regulate SmDXR expression by binding to its promoter. Our work revealed that SmWRKY1 participated in the regulation of tanshinones biosynthesis and acted as a positive regulator through activating SmDXR in the MEP pathway, thus provided a new insight to further explore the regulation mechanism of tanshinones biosynthesis.

  13. Enzymatic Synthesis of Lignin-Based Concrete Dispersing Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, Dagmara; Heck, Tobias; Schubert, Mark; Yerlikaya, Alpaslan; Weymuth, Christophe; Rentsch, Daniel; Schober, Irene; Richter, Michael

    2018-03-15

    Lignin is the most abundant aromatic biopolymer, functioning as an integral component of woody materials. In its unmodified form it shows limited water solubility and is relatively unreactive, so biotechnological lignin valorisation for high-performance applications is greatly underexploited. Lignin can be obtained from the pulp and paper industry as a by-product. To expand its application, a new synthesis route to new dispersing agents for use as concrete additives was developed. The route is based on lignin functionalisation by enzymatic transformation. Screening of lignin-modifying systems resulted in functionalised lignin polymers with improved solubility in aqueous systems. Through grafting of sulfanilic acid or p-aminobenzoic acid by fungal laccases, lignin became soluble in water at pH≤4 or pH≤7, respectively. Products were analysed and evaluated in miniaturised application tests in cement paste and mortar. Their dispersing properties match the performance criteria of commercially available lignosulfonates. The study provides examples of new perspectives for the use of lignin. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Lignin Contribution to the Global Carbon Pool: Investigating the Abiotic Modification of Lignin by Reactive Oxygen Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, Derek Charles

    Evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species (ROS), largely generated through photochemical processes, are important in transforming the chemical composition of the large pool of terrestrially-derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) exported from land to water annually. However, due to the challenges inherent in isolating the effects of individual ROS on DOM composition, the role of ROS in the photochemical alteration of DOM remains poorly characterized. The main focus of the studies within this dissertation aim to more thoroughly characterize the alterations to lignin, used as an analog for terrestrial DOM, resulting from reactions with ROS. To investigate the possibility that the alteration of lignin, through reactions involving ROS, could lead to the production of compounds not recognized as having terrestrial origin, lignin-derived DOM was prepared from a sample of Atlantic white cedar (Chamaecyparis thyoides) and used for a number of studies. Lignin-derived DOM was independently exposed to hydroxyl radical (•OH) generated by Fenton reaction, singlet oxygen (1O2) produced using the photosensitizer Rose Bengal, and superoxide (O2-•) via stable potassium superoxide solution, under controlled laboratory conditions to accentuate how each ROS is responsible for the alteration of lignin. Advanced analytical techniques including high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS), were employed to characterize alteration to lignin taking place following various ROS treatments. Results of these studies have shown distinct differences in the types of new compounds observed from exposure to each ROS as well as ROS reactivity. The alteration of lignin to compounds not typically associated with terrestrial DOM has been demonstrated upon exposure to ROS. It is also suggested that ROS could selectively react with different fractions of lignin like compounds based

  15. Quantification of Lignin and Its Structural Features in Plant Biomass Using 13C Lignin as Internal Standard for Pyrolysis-GC-SIM-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Erven, Gijs; de Visser, Ries; Merkx, Donny W H; Strolenberg, Willem; de Gijsel, Peter; Gruppen, Harry; Kabel, Mirjam A

    2017-10-17

    Understanding the mechanisms underlying plant biomass recalcitrance at the molecular level can only be achieved by accurate analyses of both the content and structural features of the molecules involved. Current quantification of lignin is, however, majorly based on unspecific gravimetric analysis after sulfuric acid hydrolysis. Hence, our research aimed at specific lignin quantification with concurrent characterization of its structural features. Hereto, for the first time, a polymeric 13 C lignin was used as internal standard (IS) for lignin quantification via analytical pyrolysis coupled to gas chromatography with mass-spectrometric detection in selected ion monitoring mode (py-GC-SIM-MS). In addition, relative response factors (RRFs) for the various pyrolysis products obtained were determined and applied. First, 12 C and 13 C lignin were isolated from nonlabeled and uniformly 13 C labeled wheat straw, respectively, and characterized by heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and py-GC/MS. The two lignin isolates were found to have identical structures. Second, 13 C-IS based lignin quantification by py-GC-SIM-MS was validated in reconstituted biomass model systems with known contents of the 12 C lignin analogue and was shown to be extremely accurate (>99.9%, R 2 > 0.999) and precise (RSD corn stover, and sugar cane bagasse), and lignin contents were in good agreement with the total gravimetrically determined lignin contents. Our robust method proves to be a promising alternative for the high-throughput quantification of lignin in milled biomass samples directly and simultaneously provides a direct insight into the structural features of lignin.

  16. Converting lignin to aromatics: step by step

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strassberger, Z.I.

    2014-01-01

    Lignin, the glue that holds trees together, is the most abundant natural resource of aromatics. In that respect, it is a far more advanced resource than crude oil. This is because lignin already contains the aromatic functional groups. Thus, catalytic conversion of lignin to high-value aromatics is

  17. Iron addition to soil specifically stabilized lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven J. Hall; Whendee L. Silver; Vitaliy I. Timokhin; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2016-01-01

    The importance of lignin as a recalcitrant constituent of soil organic matter (SOM) remains contested. Associations with iron (Fe) oxides have been proposed to specifically protect lignin from decomposition, but impacts of Fe-lignin interactions on mineralization rates remain unclear. Oxygen (O2) fluctuations characteristic of humid tropical...

  18. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Enzymatic Hydrolysis Lignin: Biomass Pretreatment Severity Affects Lignin Valorization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads M.; Djajadi, Demi T.; Torri, Cristian

    2018-01-01

    Alkalinehydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of lignin-rich enzymatichydrolysis residues (EnzHR) from wheat straw and Miscanthusx giganteus was performed at 255, 300, and 345 °C to investigate valorization of this side-stream from second-generation bioethanol production. The EnzHR were from biomass...... contributed with additional chemical information as well as confirming trends seen from quantified monomers. This work is relevant for future lignin valorization in biorefineries based on current second-generation bioethanol production....

  19. Noncatalytic Direct Liquefaction of Biorefinery Lignin by Ethanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim Bachmann; Jensen, Anders; Madsen, Line Riis

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing interest in lignin valorization to biofuels and chemicals. Here, we propose a novel and simple noncatalytic process to directly liquefy lignin rich solid residual from second generation bioethanol production by solvolysis with ethanol. Through an extensive parameter study...... in batch autoclaves assessing the effects of varying reaction temperature, reaction time, and solvent:lignin ratio, it is shown that hydrothermally pretreated enzymatic hydrolysis lignin solvolysis in supercritical ethanol can produce a heptane soluble bio-oil without the need for exhaustive deoxygenation....... The process does not require addition of catalyst or a reducing agent such as hydrogen. The process is advantageously carried out with a low reaction period ((ethanol:lignin (w/w) ratio of 2:1) which is a previously unexplored domain for lignin...

  20. Lignin depolymerization by fungal secretomes and a microbial sink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvachúa, Davinia; Katahira, Rui; Cleveland, Nicholas S.; Khanna, Payal; Resch, Michael G.; Black, Brenna A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Zink, Erika M.; Prieto, Alicia; Martínez, María J.; Martínez, Angel T.; Simmons, Blake A.; Gladden, John M.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-08-25

    In Nature, powerful oxidative enzymes secreted by white rot fungi and some bacteria catalyze lignin depolymerization and some microbes are able to catabolize the resulting aromatic compounds as carbon and energy sources. Taken together, these two processes offer a potential route for microbial valorization of lignin. However, many challenges remain in realizing this concept, including that oxidative enzymes responsible for lignin depolymerization also catalyze polymerization of low molecular weight (LMW) lignin. Here, multiple basidiomycete secretomes were screened for ligninolytic enzyme activities in the presence of a residual lignin solid stream from a corn stover biorefinery, dubbed DMR-EH (Deacetylation, Mechanical Refining, and Enzymatic Hydrolysis) lignin. Two selected fungal secretomes, with high levels of laccases and peroxidases, were utilized for DMR-EH lignin depolymerization assays. The secretome from Pleurotus eryngii, which exhibited the highest laccase activity, reduced the lignin average molecular weight by 63% and 75% at pH 7 compared to the Mw of the control treated at the same conditions and the initial DMR-EH lignin, respectively, and was applied in further depolymerization assays as a function of time. As repolymerization was observed after 3 days of incubation, an aromatic-catabolic microbe (Pseudomonas putida KT2440) was incubated with the fungal secretome and DMR-EH lignin. These experiments demonstrated that the presence of the bacterium enhances lignin depolymerization, likely due to bacterial catabolism of LMW lignin, which may partially prevent repolymerization. In addition, proteomics was also applied to the P. eryngii secretome to identify the enzymes present in the fungal cocktail utilized for the depolymerization assays, which highlighted a significant number of glucose/ methanol/choline (GMC) oxidoreductases and laccases. Overall, this study demonstrates that ligninolytic enzymes can be used to partially depolymerize a solid, high

  1. Solvothermal conversion of technical lignins over NiMo catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghafarnejad Parto, Soheila; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Pedersen, Lars Saaby

    Scope: Lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose are the main constituents of plants cell walls. Lignin is an aromatic rich compound, composed of phenolic building blocks. Depending on the method used for isolation of lignin from cellulose and hemicellulose, several types of technical lignin are availa......Scope: Lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose are the main constituents of plants cell walls. Lignin is an aromatic rich compound, composed of phenolic building blocks. Depending on the method used for isolation of lignin from cellulose and hemicellulose, several types of technical lignin...... of the range of available technical lignins. In this work, catalytic conversion of different types of lignin using an alumina supported NiMo catalyst (provided by Haldor Topsøe A/S) is conducted in ethanol at 310 ˚C with initial hydrogen pressure of 25 barg. The reaction time was set to 3 hours. Proton......, attributed as ‘bio-oil’. GC-MS-FID analysis was used for identification and quantification of the bio-oil and ethanol rich light fraction. The molecular weight of the oil fraction was determined by size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Elemental analysis (Eurovector EuroEA3000) was conducted for measuring...

  2. Oxidative polymerization of lignins by laccase in water-acetone mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiţigău, Ionița Firuța; Peter, Francisc; Boeriu, Carmen Gabriela

    2013-01-01

    The enzymatic oxidative polymerization of five technical lignins with different molecular properties, i.e. Soda Grass/Wheat straw Lignin, Organosolv Hardwood Lignin, Soda Wheat straw Lignin, Alkali pretreated Wheat straw Lignin, and Kraft Softwood was studied. All lignins were previously fractionated by acetone/water 50:50 (v/v) and the laccase-catalyzed polymerization of the low molecular weight fractions (Mw Reactivity of lignin substrates in laccase-catalyzed reactions was determined by monitoring the oxygen consumption. The oxidation reactions in 50% acetone in water mixture proceed with high rate for all tested lignins. Polymerization products were analyzed by size exclusion chromatography, FT-IR, and (31)P-NMR and evidence of important lignin modifications after incubation with laccase. Lignin polymers with higher molecular weight (Mw up to 17500 g/mol) were obtained. The obtained polymers have potential for applications in bioplastics, adhesives and as polymeric dispersants.

  3. Theoretical Approaches to Lignin Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Shevchenko, Sergey M.

    1994-01-01

    A critical review is presented of the applications of theoretical methods to the studies of the structure and chemical reactivity of lignin, including simulation of macromolecular properties, conformational calculations, quantum chemical analyses of electronic structure, spectra and chemical reactivity. Modern concepts of spatial organization and chemical reactivity of lignins are discussed.

  4. Enzymatic synthesis of lignin-siloxane hybrid functional polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetyo, Endry Nugroho; Kudanga, Tukayi; Fischer, Roman; Eichinger, Reinhard; Nyanhongo, Gibson S; Guebitz, Georg M

    2012-02-01

    This study combines the properties of siloxanes and lignin polymers to produce hybrid functional polymers that can be used as adhesives, coating materials, and/or multifunctionalized thin-coating films. Lignin-silica hybrid copolymers were synthesized by using a sol-gel process. Laccases from Trametes hirsuta were used to oxidize lignosulphonates to enhance their reactivity towards siloxanes and then were incorporated into siloxane precursors undergoing a sol-gel process. In vitro copolymerization studies using pure lignin monomers with aminosilanes or ethoxytrimethylsilane and analysis by ²⁹Si NMR spectroscopy revealed hybrid products. Except for kraft lignin, an increase in lignin concentration positively affected the tensile strength in all samples. Similarly, the viscosity generally increased in all samples with increasing lignin concentration and also affected the curing time. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Lignin-blocking treatment of biomass and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin [Hanover, NH; Wyman, Charles E [Norwich, VT

    2009-10-20

    Disclosed is a method for converting cellulose in a lignocellulosic biomass. The method provides for a lignin-blocking polypeptide and/or protein treatment of high lignin solids. The treatment enhances cellulase availability in cellulose conversion. Cellulase efficiencies are improved by the protein or polypeptide treatment. The treatment may be used in combination with steam explosion and acid prehydrolysis techniques. Hydrolysis yields from lignin containing biomass are enhanced 5-20%, and enzyme utilization is increased from 10% to 50%. Thus, a more efficient and economical method of processing lignin containing biomass materials utilizes a polypeptide/protein treatment step that effectively blocks lignin binding of cellulase.

  6. Promoter library-based module combination (PLMC) technology for optimization of threonine biosynthesis in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liang; Xu, Ning; Wang, Yiran; Zhou, Wei; Han, Guoqiang; Ma, Yanhe; Liu, Jun

    2018-05-01

    Due to the lack of efficient control elements and tools, the fine-tuning of gene expression in the multi-gene metabolic pathways is still a great challenge for engineering microbial cell factories, especially for the important industrial microorganism Corynebacterium glutamicum. In this study, the promoter library-based module combination (PLMC) technology was developed to efficiently optimize the expression of genes in C. glutamicum. A random promoter library was designed to contain the putative - 10 (NNTANANT) and - 35 (NNGNCN) consensus motifs, and refined through a three-step screening procedure to achieve numerous genetic control elements with different strength levels, including fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) screening, agar plate screening, and 96-well plate screening. Multiple conventional strategies were employed for further precise characterizations of the promoter library, such as real-time quantitative PCR, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, FACS analysis, and the lacZ reporter system. These results suggested that the established promoter elements effectively regulated gene expression and showed varying strengths over a wide range. Subsequently, a multi-module combination technology was created based on the efficient promoter elements for combination and optimization of modules in the multi-gene pathways. Using this technology, the threonine biosynthesis pathway was reconstructed and optimized by predictable tuning expression of five modules in C. glutamicum. The threonine titer of the optimized strain was significantly improved to 12.8 g/L, an approximate 6.1-fold higher than that of the control strain. Overall, the PLMC technology presented in this study provides a rapid and effective method for combination and optimization of multi-gene pathways in C. glutamicum.

  7. Preparation of lignin-based carbon aerogels as biomaterials for nano-supercapacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bong Suk; Kang, Kyu-Young; Jeong, Myung-Joon

    2017-10-01

    Kraft and organosolv lignins, generally produced in chemical pulping and bio-refinery processes of lignocellulosic biomass, were used to prepare lignin-based carbon aerogels for supercapacitors as raw materials. The difference between lignins and lignin-based aerogels were compared by analyzing physical and chemical properties, including molecular weight, polydispersity, and reactivity with formaldehyde. Also, density, shrinkage, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the lignin-based aerogel were investigated. Kraft lignin consisting of coniferyl alcohol (G) and p-coumaryl alcohol (H) increased the reactivity of formaldehyde, formed a hydrogel well (porosity > 0.45), and specific surface area higher than organosolv lignin. In the case of kraft lignin, there were irregular changes such as oxidation and condensation in the pulping process. However, reaction sites with aromatic rings in lignin impacted the production of aerogel and required a long gelation period. The molecular weight of lignin influences the gelation time in producing lignin-based aerogel, and lignin composition affects the BET surface area and pore structures of the lignin-based carbon aerogels.

  8. Formic-acid-induced depolymerization of oxidized lignin to aromatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Alireza; Ulbrich, Arne; Coon, Joshua J.; Stahl, Shannon S.

    2014-11-01

    Lignin is a heterogeneous aromatic biopolymer that accounts for nearly 30% of the organic carbon on Earth and is one of the few renewable sources of aromatic chemicals. As the most recalcitrant of the three components of lignocellulosic biomass (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin), lignin has been treated as a waste product in the pulp and paper industry, where it is burned to supply energy and recover pulping chemicals in the operation of paper mills. Extraction of higher value from lignin is increasingly recognized as being crucial to the economic viability of integrated biorefineries. Depolymerization is an important starting point for many lignin valorization strategies, because it could generate valuable aromatic chemicals and/or provide a source of low-molecular-mass feedstocks suitable for downstream processing. Commercial precedents show that certain types of lignin (lignosulphonates) may be converted into vanillin and other marketable products, but new technologies are needed to enhance the lignin value chain. The complex, irregular structure of lignin complicates chemical conversion efforts, and known depolymerization methods typically afford ill-defined products in low yields (that is, less than 10-20wt%). Here we describe a method for the depolymerization of oxidized lignin under mild conditions in aqueous formic acid that results in more than 60wt% yield of low-molecular-mass aromatics. We present the discovery of this facile C-O cleavage method, its application to aspen lignin depolymerization, and mechanistic insights into the reaction. The broader implications of these results for lignin conversion and biomass refining are also considered.

  9. Chemical factors that control lignin polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Amandeep K; Davison, Brian H; Standaert, Robert F; Davis, Mark F; Smith, Jeremy C; Parks, Jerry M

    2014-01-09

    Lignin is a complex, branched polymer that reinforces plant tissue. Understanding the factors that govern lignin structure is of central importance to the development of technologies for converting lignocellulosic biomass into fuels because lignin imparts resistance to chemical, enzymatic, and mechanical deconstruction. Lignin is formed by enzymatic oxidation of phenolic monomers (monolignols) of three main types, guaiacyl (G), syringyl (S), and p-hydroxyphenyl (H) subunits. It is known that increasing the relative abundance of H subunits results in lower molecular weight lignin polymers and hence more easily deconstructed biomass, but it is not known why. Here, we report an analysis of frontier molecular orbitals in mono-, di-, and trilignols, calculated using density functional theory, which points to a requirement of strong p-electron density on the reacting phenolic oxygen atom of the neutral precursor for enzymatic oxidation to occur. This model is consistent with a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism and for the first time explains why H subunits in certain linkages (β-β or β-5) react poorly and tend to "cap" the polymer. In general, β-5 linkages with either a G or H terminus are predicted to inhibit elongation. More broadly, the model correctly accounts for the reactivity of the phenolic groups in a diverse set of dilignols comprising H and G subunits. Thus, we provide a coherent framework for understanding the propensity toward growth or termination of different terminal subunits in lignin.

  10. Understanding the fast pyrolysis of lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, Pushkaraj R; Brown, Robert C; Shanks, Brent H

    2011-11-18

    In the present study, pyrolysis of corn stover lignin was investigated by using a micro-pyrolyzer coupled with a GC-MS/FID (FID=flame ionization detector). The system has pyrolysis-vapor residence times of 15-20 ms, thus providing a regime of minimal secondary reactions. The primary pyrolysis product distribution obtained from lignin is reported. Over 84 % mass balance and almost complete closure on carbon balance is achieved. In another set of experiments, the pyrolysis vapors emerging from the micro-pyrolyzer are condensed to obtain lignin-derived bio-oil. The chemical composition of the bio-oil is analyzed by using GC-MS and gel permeation chromatography techniques. The comparison between results of two sets of experiments indicates that monomeric compounds are the primary pyrolysis products of lignin, which recombine after primary pyrolysis to produce oligomeric compounds. Further, the effect of minerals (NaCl, KCl, MgCl(2), and CaCl(2)) and temperature on the primary pyrolysis product distribution is investigated. The study provides insights into the fundamental mechanisms of lignin pyrolysis and a basis for developing more descriptive models of biomass pyrolysis. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Brassica napusGLABRA3-1 promotes anthocyanin biosynthesis and trichome formation in true leaves when expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, C; Guo, Y; Wang, J; Li, D; Liu, K; Qi, S; Jin, C; Duan, S; Gong, J; Li, Z; Chen, M

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that GLABRA3 (AtGL3), a bHLH transcription factor, plays essential roles in anthocyanin biosynthesis and trichome formation in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, there have been no such studies of a homologue, BnGL3, from the closely related crop, Brassica napus. Here, we analysed the BnGL3-1 coding domain sequence from the B. napus cultivar QINYOU Seven, identified conserved protein domains and performed a phylogenetic analysis to elucidate its relationship with homologues form a range of plant species. When expressed in tobacco leaves as a fusion protein with green fluorescent protein, BnGL3-1 accumulated in the nucleus, consistent with its predicted function as a transcription factor. Ectopic expression of the BnGL3-1 gene in the A. thaliana gl3-3 mutant resulted in levels of anthocyanins and numbers of trichomes in true leaves that were higher than in wild-type plants. Moreover, overexpression of BnGL3-1 in gl3-3 compensated for the promotion and repression of genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis and trichome formation, respectively, that has been reported in gl3-3 young shoots and expanding true leaves. This study provides new insights into GL3 function in anthocyanin biosynthesis and trichome formation in crucifers, and represents a promising target for genetic manipulation of B. napus. © 2017 German Society for Plant Sciences and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  12. Mn(II) regulation of lignin peroxidases and manganese-dependent peroxidases from lignin-degrading white rot fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnarme, P.; Jeffries, T.W.

    1990-01-01

    Two families of peroxidases-lignin peroxidase (LiP) and manganese-dependent lignin peroxidase (MnP)-are formed by the lignin-degrading white rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium and other white rot fungi. Isoenzymes of these enzyme families carry out reactions important to the biodegradation of lignin. This research investigated the regulation of LiP and MnP production by Mn(II). In liquid culture, LiP titers varied as an inverse function of and MnP titers varied as a direct function of the Mn(II) concentration. The extracellular isoenzyme profiles differed radically at low and high Mn(II) levels, whereas other fermentation parameters, including extracellular protein concentrations, the glucose consumption rate, and the accumulation of cell dry weight, did not change significantly with the Mn(II) concentration. In the absence of Mn(II), extracellular LiP isoenzymes predominated, whereas in the presence of Mn(II), MnP isoenzymes were dominant. The release of 14 CO 2 from 14 C-labeled dehydrogenative polymerizate lignin was likewise affected by Mn(II). The rate of 14 CO 2 release increased at low Mn(II) and decreased at high Mn(II) concentrations. This regulatory effect of Mn(II) occurred with five strains of P. chrysosporium, two other species of Phanerochaete, three species of Phlebia, Lentinula edodes, and Phellinus pini

  13. A comparative study for the organic byproducts from hydrothermal carbonizations of sugarcane bagasse and its bio-refined components cellulose and lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Fang-Li; Du, Qi-Shi; Dai, Jun; Tang, Pei-Duo; Li, Yan-Ming; Long, Si-Yu; Xie, Neng-Zhong; Wang, Qing-Yan; Huang, Ri-Bo

    2018-01-01

    Sugarcane bagasse was refined into cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin using an ethanol-based organosolv technique. The hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) reactions were applied for bagasse and its two components cellulose and lignin. Based on GC-MS analysis, 32 (13+19) organic byproducts were derived from cellulose and lignin, more than the 22 byproducts from bagasse. Particularly, more valuable catechol products were obtained from lignin with 56.8% share in the total GC-MS integral area, much higher than the 2.263% share in the GC-MS integral areas of bagasse. The organic byproducts from lignin make up more than half of the total mass of lignin, indicating that lignin is a chemical treasure storage. In general, bio-refinery and HTC are two effective techniques for the valorization of bagasse and other biomass materials from agriculture and forest industry. HTC could convert the inferior biomass to superior biofuel with higher energy quantity of combustion, at the same time many valuable organic byproducts are produced. Bio-refinery could promote the HTC reaction of biomass more effective. With the help of bio-refinery and HTC, bagasse and other biomass materials are not only the sustainable energy resource, but also the renewable and environment friendly chemical materials, the best alternatives for petroleum, coal and natural gas.

  14. Effect of lignin chemistry on the enzymatic hydrolysis of woody biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiying; Gwak, Ki-Seob; Treasure, Trevor; Jameel, Hasan; Chang, Hou-min; Park, Sunkyu

    2014-07-01

    The impact of lignin-derived inhibition on enzymatic hydrolysis is investigated by using lignins isolated from untreated woods and pretreated wood pulps. A new method, biomass reconstruction, for which isolated lignins are precipitated onto bleached pulps to mimic lignocellulosic biomass, is introduced, for the first time, to decouple the lignin distribution issue from lignin chemistry. Isolated lignins are physically mixed and reconstructed with bleached pulps. Lignins obtained from pretreated woods adsorb two to six times more cellulase than lignins obtained from untreated woods. The higher adsorption of enzymes on lignin correlates with decreased carbohydrate conversion in enzymatic hydrolysis. In addition, the reconstructed softwood substrate has a lower carbohydrate conversion than the reconstructed hardwood substrate. The degree of condensation of lignin increases significantly after pretreatment, especially with softwood lignins. In this study, the degree of condensation of lignin (0.02 to 0.64) and total OH groups in lignin (1.7 to 1.1) have a critical impact on cellulase adsorption (9 to 70%) and enzymatic hydrolysis (83.2 to 58.2%); this may provide insights into the more recalcitrant nature of softwood substrates. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Preparation and Characterization of Modified Soda Lignin with Polyethylene Glycol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangda Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Soda lignin does not have thermal flowing characteristics and it is impossible for it to be further thermally molded. To achieve the fusibility of soda lignin for fiber preparation by melt-spinning, an effective method for soda lignin modification was conducted by cooking it with polyethylene glycol (PEG 400 at various ratios. The higher the ratio of PEG that was used, the more PEG molecular chains were grafted at the alpha carbon of the soda lignin through ether bonds, resulting in lower thermal transition temperatures and more excellent fusibility. The modified soda lignin with a weight ratio of lignin to PEG of 1:4 exhibited a relative thermal stability of molten viscosity at selected temperatures. Thereafter, the resultant fusible soda lignin was successfully melt-spun into filaments with an average diameter of 33 ± 5 μm, which is smaller than that of some industrial lignins. Accordingly, it is possible to utilize soda lignin to produce fibrous carbonaceous materials.

  16. New techniques for the characterization of lignins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javor, T.

    2001-09-01

    In the present work new techniques for the characterization of lignins, ligninsulfonates as well as lignin degradation products with capillary electrophoresis (CE), size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and mass spectrometry (ESI-MS, APCI-MS and MALDI-MS) are described. After an overview on wood and wood pulping the development of microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) for the investigation of low-molecular-mass lignin degradation compounds is described. This method is suited for the analysis of phenolic compounds as well as for non-phenolic compounds in this kind of samples. Using a carrier electrolyte system consisting of 1-butanol/n-heptane/sodiumdodeylsulfate (SDS)/20 mM borate (6.61/0.81/1.66/90,29 % (w/w)) pH 9.2 it was possible to separate 14 lignin degradation compounds (2-methoxyphenol, 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenol, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol, 3,4-dimethoxybenzaldehyde, 3,4-dimethoxyacetophenone, 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzaldehyde, 3,4,5-trimethoxyacetophenone, 3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2-propen-1-ol, 4-methoxyacetophenone, 3,5-Dimethoxy-4-hydroxyacetophenone, acetovanillone, syringaldehyde, vanillin, 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and 1-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-ethanol). In addition the advantages and disadvantages of microemulsions are discussed in comparison with carrier electrolytes containing micelles. Subsequently, the results from size exclusion chromatographic measurements are presented. SEC using modern high-performance poly(styrene-divinylbenzene) gels as stationary phase and 0.1 M NaOH as mobile phase allows efficient separations and good characterization of lignins and ligninsulfonates. Adsorption effects are practical negligible. SEC yields results which are independent of the charge of lignins or ligninsulfonates, so that this technique looks complementary to capillary electrophoresis. For the characterization of intact lignins and ligninsulfonates by capillary zone electrophoretic techniques, carrier electrolytes in the the pH range 10

  17. Characterization and genomic analysis of kraft lignin biodegradation by the beta-proteobacterium Cupriavidus basilensis B-8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lignin materials are abundant and among the most important potential sources for biofuel production. Development of an efficient lignin degradation process has considerable potential for the production of a variety of chemicals, including bioethanol. However, lignin degradation using current methods is inefficient. Given their immense environmental adaptability and biochemical versatility, bacterial could be used as a valuable tool for the rapid degradation of lignin. Kraft lignin (KL is a polymer by-product of the pulp and paper industry resulting from alkaline sulfide treatment of lignocellulose, and it has been widely used for lignin-related studies. Results Beta-proteobacterium Cupriavidus basilensis B-8 isolated from erosive bamboo slips displayed substantial KL degradation capability. With initial concentrations of 0.5–6 g L-1, at least 31.3% KL could be degraded in 7 days. The maximum degradation rate was 44.4% at the initial concentration of 2 g L-1. The optimum pH and temperature for KL degradation were 7.0 and 30°C, respectively. Manganese peroxidase (MnP and laccase (Lac demonstrated their greatest level of activity, 1685.3 U L-1 and 815.6 U L-1, at the third and fourth days, respectively. Many small molecule intermediates were formed during the process of KL degradation, as determined using GC-MS analysis. In order to perform metabolic reconstruction of lignin degradation in this bacterium, a draft genome sequence for C. basilensis B-8 was generated. Genomic analysis focused on the catabolic potential of this bacterium against several lignin-derived compounds. These analyses together with sequence comparisons predicted the existence of three major metabolic pathways: β-ketoadipate, phenol degradation, and gentisate pathways. Conclusion These results confirmed the capability of C. basilensis B-8 to promote KL degradation. Whole genomic sequencing and systematic analysis of the C. basilensis B-8 genome

  18. Analytical methods for lignin characterization - Differential scanning calorimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koullas, D.P.; Koukios, E.G.; Avgerinos, E.; Abaecherli, A.; Gosselink, R.; Vasile, C.; Lehnen, R.; Saake, B.; Suren, J.

    2006-01-01

    Results of a round robin on lignin thermal analyses are reported. Six laboratories have conducted thermal analyses of four lignin types to determine their cp values and softening points, and to study the thermal behaviour, materials endo- and exotherms included. The lignin types examined were wood

  19. Catalytic Oxidation and Depolymerization of Lignin in Aqueous Ionic Liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Lalitendu [Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Xu, Siquan [Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); College of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing Forestry University, Nanjing (China); Shi, Jian, E-mail: j.shi@uky.edu [Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2017-08-10

    Lignin is an integral part of the plant cell wall, which provides rigidity to plants, also contributes to the recalcitrance of the lignocellulosic biomass to biochemical and biological deconstruction. Lignin is a promising renewable feedstock for aromatic chemicals; however, an efficient and economic lignin depolymerization method needs to be developed to enable the conversion. In this study, we investigated the depolymerization of alkaline lignin in aqueous 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate [C{sub 2}C{sub 1}Im][OAc] under oxidizing conditions. Seven different transition metal catalysts were screened in presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as oxidizing agent in a batch reactor. CoCl{sub 2} and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} proved to be the most effective catalysts in degrading lignin to aromatic compounds. A central composite design was used to optimize the catalyst loading, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, and temperature for product formation. Results show that lignin was depolymerized, and the major degradation products found in the extracted oil were guaiacol, syringol, vanillin, acetovanillone, and homovanillic acid. Lignin streams were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography to determine effects of the experimental parameters on lignin depolymerization. The weight-average molecular weight (M{sub w}) of liquid stream lignin after oxidation, for CoCl{sub 2} and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalysts were 1,202 and 1,520 g mol{sup −1}, respectively, lower than that of Kraft lignin. Polydispersity index of the liquid stream lignin increased as compared with Kraft lignin, indicating wide span of the molecular weight distribution as a result of lignin depolymerization. Results from this study provide insights into the role of oxidant and transition metal catalysts and the oxidative degradation reaction sequence of lignin toward product formation in presence of aqueous ionic liquid.

  20. Catalytic Oxidation and Depolymerization of Lignin in Aqueous Ionic Liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Lalitendu; Xu, Siquan; Shi, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Lignin is an integral part of the plant cell wall, which provides rigidity to plants, also contributes to the recalcitrance of the lignocellulosic biomass to biochemical and biological deconstruction. Lignin is a promising renewable feedstock for aromatic chemicals; however, an efficient and economic lignin depolymerization method needs to be developed to enable the conversion. In this study, we investigated the depolymerization of alkaline lignin in aqueous 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate [C 2 C 1 Im][OAc] under oxidizing conditions. Seven different transition metal catalysts were screened in presence of H 2 O 2 as oxidizing agent in a batch reactor. CoCl 2 and Nb 2 O 5 proved to be the most effective catalysts in degrading lignin to aromatic compounds. A central composite design was used to optimize the catalyst loading, H 2 O 2 concentration, and temperature for product formation. Results show that lignin was depolymerized, and the major degradation products found in the extracted oil were guaiacol, syringol, vanillin, acetovanillone, and homovanillic acid. Lignin streams were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography to determine effects of the experimental parameters on lignin depolymerization. The weight-average molecular weight (M w ) of liquid stream lignin after oxidation, for CoCl 2 and Nb 2 O 5 catalysts were 1,202 and 1,520 g mol −1 , respectively, lower than that of Kraft lignin. Polydispersity index of the liquid stream lignin increased as compared with Kraft lignin, indicating wide span of the molecular weight distribution as a result of lignin depolymerization. Results from this study provide insights into the role of oxidant and transition metal catalysts and the oxidative degradation reaction sequence of lignin toward product formation in presence of aqueous ionic liquid.

  1. Characteristics of Lignin from Flax Shives as Affected by Extraction Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kelly; Mazza, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Lignin, a polyphenolic molecule, is a major constituent of flax shives. This polyphenolic molecular structure renders lignin a potential source of a variety of commercially viable products such as fine chemicals. This work compares the performance of different lignin isolation methods. Lignin from flax shive was isolated using both conventional alkaline extraction method and a novel experimental pressurized low polarity water (PLPW) extraction process. The lignin yields and chemical composition of the lignin fractions were determined. The conventional alkali treatment with 1.25 M NaOH, heated at 80 °C for 5 h, extracted 92 g lignin per kg flax shives, while lignin yields from the PLPW extracts ranged from 27 to 241 g lignin per kg flax shives. The purity and monomeric composition of the lignins obtained from the different extraction conditions was assessed via UV spectroscopy and alkaline nitrobenzene oxidation. Lignin obtained from conventional alkali treatment with 1.25 M NaOH, heated at 80 °C for 5 h was of low purity and exhibited the lowest yields of nitrobenzene oxidation products. With respect to alkali assisted PLPW extractions, temperature created an opposing effect on lignin yield and nitrobenzene oxidation products. More lignin was extracted as temperature increased, yet the yield of nitrobenzene oxidation products decreased. The low yield of nitrobenzene oxidation products may be attributed to either the formation of condensed structures or the selective dissolution of condensed structures of lignin during the pressurized alkaline high temperature treatment. Analytical pyrolysis, using pyroprobe GC-MS, was used to investigate the molecular composition of the lignin samples. The total yield of pyrolysis lignin products was 13.3, 64.7, and 30.5% for the 1.25 M NaOH extracted lignin, alkaline assisted PLPW extracted lignin, and the unprocessed flax shives, respectively. Key lignin derived compounds such as guaiacol, 4-vinyl guaiacol, 4-methyl guaiacol

  2. Reinforcing styrene butadiene rubber with lignin-novolac epoxy resin networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Yu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, lignin-novolac epoxy resin networks were fabricated in the styrene butadiene rubber (SBR matrix by combination of latex compounding and melt mixing. Firstly, SBR/lignin compounds were co-coagulated by SBR latex and lignin aqueous solution. Then the novolac epoxy resin (F51 was added in the SBR/lignin compounds by melt compounding method. F51 was directly cured by lignin via the ring-opening reaction of epoxy groups of F51 and OH groups (or COOH groups of lignin during the curing process of rubber compounds, as was particularly evident from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR studies and maximum torque of the curing analysis. The existence of lignin-F51 networks were also detected by scanning electron microscope (SEM and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA. The structure of the SBR/lignin/F51 was also characterized by rubber process analyzer (RPA, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and determination of crosslinking density. Due to rigid lignin-F51 networks achieved in SBR/lignin/F51 composites, it was found that the hardness, modulus, tear strength, crosslinking density, the temperature of 5 and 10% weight-loss were significantly enhanced with the loading of F51.

  3. Environmental economics of lignin derived transport fuels

    OpenAIRE

    Obydenkova, SV; Kouris, P Panagiotis; Hensen, EJM Emiel; Heeres, Hero J; Boot, MD Michael

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the environmental and economic aspects of fast pyrolytic conversion of lignin, obtained from 2G ethanol plants, to transport fuels for both the marine and automotive markets. Various scenarios are explored, pertaining to aggregation of lignin from several sites, alternative energy carries to replace lignin, transport modalities, and allocation methodology. The results highlight two critical factors that ultimately determine the economic and/or environmental fuel viability....

  4. A Novel Soybean Dirigent Gene GmDIR22 Contributes to Promotion of Lignan Biosynthesis and Enhances Resistance to Phytophthora sojae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ninghui Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora root and stem rot caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora sojae is a destructive disease of soybean worldwide. Plant dirigent proteins (DIR are proposed to have roles in biosynthesis of either lignan or lignin-like molecules, and are important for defense responses, secondary metabolism, and pathogen resistance. In the present work, a novel DIR gene expressed sequence tag is identified as up-regulated in the highly resistant soybean cultivar ‘Suinong 10’ inoculated with P. sojae. The full length cDNA is isolated using rapid amplification of cDNA ends, and designated GmDIR22 (GenBank accession no. HQ_993047. The full length GmDIR22 is 789 bp and contains a 567 bp open reading frame encoding a polypeptide of 188 amino acids. The sequence analysis indicated that GmDIR22 contains a conserved dirigent domain at amino acid residues 43–187. The quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR demonstrated that soybean GmDIR22 mRNA is expressed most highly in stems, followed by roots and leaves. The treatments with stresses demonstrated that GmDIR22 is significantly induced by P. sojae and gibberellic acid (GA3, and also responds to salicylic acid, methyl jasmonic acid, and abscisic acid. The GmDIR22 is targeted to the cytomembrane when transiently expressed in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Moreover, The GmDIR22 recombinant protein purified from Escherichia coli could effectively direct E-coniferyl alcohol coupling into lignan (+-pinoresinol. Accordingly, the overexpression of GmDIR22 in transgenic soybean increased total lignan accumulation. Moreover, the lignan extracts from GmDIR22 transgenic plants effectively inhibits P. sojae hyphal growth. Furthermore, the transgenic overexpression of GmDIR22 in the susceptible soybean cultivar ‘Dongnong 50’ enhances its resistance to P. sojae. Collectively, these data suggested that the primary role of GmDIR22 is probably involved in the regulation of lignan biosynthesis, and which

  5. Characterization of the lignin polymer in Brassicaceae family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hemmati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Residues of medicinal plants after extraction and weeds are suitable candidates for bioethanol production. Significant barriers exist to make the conversion of lignocellulosic feedstock to biofuel cost effective and environmentally friendly; one of which is the lignin polymer. Brassicaceae family is one of the potential targets for biofuel production. The structural characteristics of lignin from Hirschfeldia incana, Sisymbrium altissimum and Cardaria draba were studied in comparison to that of Brassica napus. Methods: Lignin deposition was observed by phloroglucinol and Mäule staining. The total lignin content was determined by Klason method. Maximum UV absorbance and FT-IR spectra were compared. Ratio of syringyl to guaiacyl lignin (S/G ratio as a metric of lignin digestibility was determined by DFRC followed by GC-MS analysis. 1H-NMR spectra of the total lignin was compared with other spectroscopic methods. Results: Staining of thestem cross sections of C. draba showed higher G units in contrast to the higher S units in S. altissimum which was in agreement with 1H-NMR analysis. Total lignin content for H. incana, C. draba and S. altissimum was 27.10%, 23.8% and 24.5%, respectively. The specific maximum UV absorbance appeared between 230-260 nm. FT-IR analysis confirmed the presence of more aromatic structures in the seed maturation stage than the flowering stage. S/G ratio was 0.26, 0.10 and 0.22 for H. incana, C. draba and S. altissimum, respectively.  Conclusion: Except Cardaria draba with the predominance of G subunits in lignin polymer, Hirschfeldia incana and Sisymbrium altissimum are suitable candidates for bioethanol production.

  6. Alkali-treated kraft lignin as a component in flakeboard eesins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mon-Lin Kuo; Chung-Yun Hse; Dee-Hua Huang

    1991-01-01

    Southern pine kraft lignin was reacted with NaOH (15 and 20% based on dry lignin) at 170, 200, and 250°C for 30 and 60 min. Sweetgum flake boards bonded with phenolic resins containing 50% hydroxymethylated lignin prepared from some of the alkali treated lignins were compared with boards bonded with a neat PF resin. Results indicate that boards bonded with lignin-...

  7. Bacterial enzymes involved in lignin degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Colpa, Dana I; Habib, Mohamed H M; Fraaije, Marco W

    2016-01-01

    Lignin forms a large part of plant biomass. It is a highly heterogeneous polymer of 4-hydroxyphenylpropanoid units and is embedded within polysaccharide polymers forming lignocellulose. Lignin provides strength and rigidity to plants and is rather resilient towards degradation. To improve the

  8. Effective release of lignin fragments from lignocellulose by lewis acid metal triflates in the lignin-first approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, X.; Zhu, J.; Koranyi, T.I.; Boot, M.D.; Hensen, E.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Adding value to lignin, the most complex and recalcitrant fraction in lignocellulosic biomass, is highly relevant to costefficient operation of biorefineries. We report the use of homogeneous metal triflates to rapidly release lignin from biomass. Combined with metal-catalyzed hydrogenolysis, the

  9. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of isolated, synthetic and degraded lignins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz-Jimenez, C.; De Leeuw, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Curie-point pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was applied to study the chemical structure of sound and fungus degraded, industrial and synthetic lignins. Pyrolysis products reflected in some detail the structural units present in the lignin polymer. Thus, sound spruce lignin yielded trans-isoeugenol coniferaldehyde and trans-coniferyl alcohol as major pyrolysis products. Biodegraded lignin yielded oxidized units, including vanillin, acetoguaiacone, methyl vanillate, propioguaiacone, vanilloyl methyl ketone and vanillic acid as major products. Kraft lignin also showed evidence of oxidation, although not as much as the biodegraded lignin. Major products from this industrial lignin were guaiacol, methylguaiacol, vinylguaiacol and homovanillic acid. Results indicated that synthetic lignin duplicates fairly well the structure of natural lignin. However, coniferylaldehyde and trans-coniferyl alcohol were the dominant products only from the synthetic lignin, indicating the presence of large amounts of coniferyl alcohol and coniferylaldehyde end groups. 21 references.

  10. Jasmonate mediates salt-induced nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Jasmonate (JA, as an important signal, plays a key role in multiple processes of plant growth, development and stress response. Nicotine and related pyridine alkaloids in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. are essential secondary metabolites. Whether environmental factors control nicotine biosynthesis and the underlying mechanism remains previously unreported. Here, we applied physiological and biochemical approaches to investigate how salt stress affects nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco. We found that salt stress induced the biosynthesis of JA, which subsequently triggered the activation of JA-responsive gene expression and, ultimately, nicotine synthesis. Bioinformatics analysis revealed the existence of many NtMYC2a-recognized G-box motifs in the promoter regions of NtLOX, NtAOS, NtAOC and NtOPR genes. Applying exogenous JA increased nicotine content, while suppressing JA biosynthesis reduced nicotine biosynthesis. Salt treatment could not efficiently induce nicotine biosynthesis in transgenic anti-COI1 tobacco plants. These results demonstrate that JA acts as the essential signal which triggers nicotine biosynthesis in tobacco after salt stress.

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Gramineae and Fabaceae Soda Lignins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Robles, Juan; Sánchez, Rafael; Espinosa, Eduardo; Savy, Davide; Mazzei, Pierluigi; Piccolo, Alessandro; Rodríguez, Alejandro

    2017-02-04

    Some agricultural residues such as wheat or barley straw, as well as certain fast-growing plants like Leucaena leucocephala and Chamaecytisus proliferus , could be used as raw materials for the paper industry as an alternative to traditional plants (eucalyptus, pine, etc.). In the present study, four types of lignin obtained from the spent liquors produced by the pulping processes using the abovementioned feedstocks were isolated and characterized. Lignin samples were acquired through an acid precipitation from these spent liquors. The characterization of the precipitated lignin samples were performed using a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and both liquid- and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) to analyse the chemical structure, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for determining the thermal properties. Additionally, chemical composition of lignin fractions was also measured. Even though they were of different botanical origin, all the studied samples except for wheat straw lignin had a similar chemical composition and thermal behaviour, and identical chemical structure. Wheat straw lignin showed a greater amount of Klason lignin and lower carbohydrate content. Furthermore, this lignin sample showed a higher thermal stability and significantly different cross-peak patterns in the 2D-NMR experiments. The molecular structures corresponding to p -coumarate (PCA), ferulate (FA) and cinnamyl aldehyde end-groups (J) were only detected in wheat isolated lignin.

  12. Isolation and Characterization of Gramineae and Fabaceae Soda Lignins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Robles, Juan; Sánchez, Rafael; Espinosa, Eduardo; Savy, Davide; Mazzei, Pierluigi; Piccolo, Alessandro; Rodríguez, Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Some agricultural residues such as wheat or barley straw, as well as certain fast-growing plants like Leucaena leucocephala and Chamaecytisus proliferus, could be used as raw materials for the paper industry as an alternative to traditional plants (eucalyptus, pine, etc.). In the present study, four types of lignin obtained from the spent liquors produced by the pulping processes using the abovementioned feedstocks were isolated and characterized. Lignin samples were acquired through an acid precipitation from these spent liquors. The characterization of the precipitated lignin samples were performed using a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and both liquid- and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) to analyse the chemical structure, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for determining the thermal properties. Additionally, chemical composition of lignin fractions was also measured. Even though they were of different botanical origin, all the studied samples except for wheat straw lignin had a similar chemical composition and thermal behaviour, and identical chemical structure. Wheat straw lignin showed a greater amount of Klason lignin and lower carbohydrate content. Furthermore, this lignin sample showed a higher thermal stability and significantly different cross-peak patterns in the 2D-NMR experiments. The molecular structures corresponding to p-coumarate (PCA), ferulate (FA) and cinnamyl aldehyde end-groups (J) were only detected in wheat isolated lignin. PMID:28165411

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Gramineae and Fabaceae Soda Lignins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Domínguez-Robles

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Some agricultural residues such as wheat or barley straw, as well as certain fast-growing plants like Leucaena leucocephala and Chamaecytisus proliferus, could be used as raw materials for the paper industry as an alternative to traditional plants (eucalyptus, pine, etc.. In the present study, four types of lignin obtained from the spent liquors produced by the pulping processes using the abovementioned feedstocks were isolated and characterized. Lignin samples were acquired through an acid precipitation from these spent liquors. The characterization of the precipitated lignin samples were performed using a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and both liquid- and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR to analyse the chemical structure, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA for determining the thermal properties. Additionally, chemical composition of lignin fractions was also measured. Even though they were of different botanical origin, all the studied samples except for wheat straw lignin had a similar chemical composition and thermal behaviour, and identical chemical structure. Wheat straw lignin showed a greater amount of Klason lignin and lower carbohydrate content. Furthermore, this lignin sample showed a higher thermal stability and significantly different cross-peak patterns in the 2D-NMR experiments. The molecular structures corresponding to p-coumarate (PCA, ferulate (FA and cinnamyl aldehyde end-groups (J were only detected in wheat isolated lignin.

  14. Biodegradation of alkaline lignin by Bacillus ligniniphilus L1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Daochen; Zhang, Peipei; Xie, Changxiao; Zhang, Weimin; Sun, Jianzhong; Qian, Wei-Jun; Yang, Bin

    2017-02-21

    Background: Lignin is the most abundant aromatic biopolymer in the biosphere and it comprises up to 30% of plant biomass. Although lignin is the most recalcitrant component of the plant cell wall, still there are microorganisms able to decompose it or degrade it. Fungi are recognized as the most widely used microbes for lignin degradation. However, bacteria have also been known to be able to utilize lignin as a carbon or energy source. Bacillus ligniniphilus L1 was selected in this study due to its capability to utilize alkaline lignin as a single carbon or energy source and its excellent ability to survive in extreme environments. Results: To investigate the aromatic metabolites of strain L1 decomposing alkaline lignin, GC-MS analyze was performed and fifteen single phenol ring aromatic compounds were identified. The dominant absorption peak included phenylacetic acid, 4-hydroxy-benzoicacid, and vanillic acid with the highest proportion of metabolites resulting in 42%. Comparison proteomic analysis were carried out for further study showed that approximately 1447 kinds of proteins were produced, 141 of which were at least 2-fold up-regulated with alkaline lignin as the single carbon source. The up-regulated proteins contents different categories in the biological functions of protein including lignin degradation, ABC transport system, environmental response factors, protein synthesis and assembly, etc. Conclusions: GC-MS analysis showed that alkaline lignin degradation of strain L1 produced 15 kinds of aromatic compounds. Comparison proteomic data and metabolic analysis showed that to ensure the degradation of lignin and growth of strain L1, multiple aspects of cells metabolism including transporter, environmental response factors, and protein synthesis were enhanced. Based on genome and proteomic analysis, at least four kinds of lignin degradation pathway might be present in strain L1, including a Gentisate pathway, the benzoic acid pathway and the

  15. Characterization of electrospun lignin based carbon fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poursorkhabi, Vida; Mohanty, Amar; Misra, Manjusri

    2015-01-01

    The production of lignin fibers has been studied in order to replace the need for petroleum based precursors for carbon fiber production. In addition to its positive environmental effects, it also benefits the economics of the industries which cannot take advantage of carbon fiber properties because of their high price. A large amount of lignin is annually produced as the byproduct of paper and growing cellulosic ethanol industry. Therefore, finding high value applications for this low cost, highly available material is getting more attention. Lignin is a biopolymer making about 15 – 30 % of the plant cell walls and has a high carbon yield upon carbonization. However, its processing is challenging due to its low molecular weight and also variations based on its origin and the method of separation from cellulose. In this study, alkali solutions of organosolv lignin with less than 1 wt/v% of poly (ethylene oxide) and two types of lignin (hardwood and softwood) were electrospun followed by carbonization. Different heating programs for carbonization were tested. The carbonized fibers had a smooth surface with an average diameter of less than 5 µm and the diameter could be controlled by the carbonization process and lignin type. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study morphology of the fibers before and after carbonization. Thermal conductivity of a sample with amorphous carbon was 2.31 W/m.K. The electrospun lignin carbon fibers potentially have a large range of application such as in energy storage devices and water or gas purification systems

  16. Characterization of electrospun lignin based carbon fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poursorkhabi, Vida; Mohanty, Amar; Misra, Manjusri [School of Engineering, Thornbrough Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, N1G 2W1, Ontario (Canada); Bioproducts Discovery and Development Centre, Department of Plant Agriculture, Crop Science Building, University of Guelph, Guelph, N1G 2W1, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-05-22

    The production of lignin fibers has been studied in order to replace the need for petroleum based precursors for carbon fiber production. In addition to its positive environmental effects, it also benefits the economics of the industries which cannot take advantage of carbon fiber properties because of their high price. A large amount of lignin is annually produced as the byproduct of paper and growing cellulosic ethanol industry. Therefore, finding high value applications for this low cost, highly available material is getting more attention. Lignin is a biopolymer making about 15 – 30 % of the plant cell walls and has a high carbon yield upon carbonization. However, its processing is challenging due to its low molecular weight and also variations based on its origin and the method of separation from cellulose. In this study, alkali solutions of organosolv lignin with less than 1 wt/v% of poly (ethylene oxide) and two types of lignin (hardwood and softwood) were electrospun followed by carbonization. Different heating programs for carbonization were tested. The carbonized fibers had a smooth surface with an average diameter of less than 5 µm and the diameter could be controlled by the carbonization process and lignin type. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to study morphology of the fibers before and after carbonization. Thermal conductivity of a sample with amorphous carbon was 2.31 W/m.K. The electrospun lignin carbon fibers potentially have a large range of application such as in energy storage devices and water or gas purification systems.

  17. NMR analysis of lignins in CAD-deficient plants. Part 1. Incorporation of hydroxycinnamaldehydes and hydroxybenzaldehydes into lignins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoon; Ralph, John; Lu, Fachuang; Ralph, Sally A; Boudet, Alain M; MacKay, John J; Sederoff, Ronald R; Ito, Takashi; Kawai, Shingo; Ohashi, Hideo; Higuchi, Takayoshi

    2003-01-21

    Peroxidase/H2O2-mediated radical coupling of 4-hydroxycinnamaldehydes produces 8-O-4-, 8-5-, and 8-8-coupled dehydrodimers as has been documented earlier, as well as the 5-5-coupled dehydrodimer. The 8-5-dehydrodimer is however produced kinetically in its cyclic phenylcoumaran form at neutral pH. Synthetic polymers produced from mixtures of hydroxycinnamaldehydes and normal monolignols provide the next level of complexity. Spectral data from dimers, oligomers, and synthetic polymers have allowed a more substantive assignment of aldehyde components in lignins isolated from a CAD-deficient pine mutant and an antisense-CAD-downregulated transgenic tobacco. CAD-deficient pine lignin shows enhanced levels of the typical benzaldehyde and cinnamaldehyde end-groups, along with evidence for two types of 8-O-4-coupled coniferaldehyde units. The CAD-downregulated tobacco also has higher levels of hydroxycinnamaldehyde and hydroxybenzaldehyde (mainly syringaldehyde) incorporation, but the analogous two types of 8-O-4-coupled products are the dominant features. 8-8-Coupled units are also clearly evident. There is clear evidence for coupling of hydroxycinnamaldehydes to each other and then incorporation into the lignin, as well as for the incorporation of hydroxycinnamaldehyde monomers into the growing lignin polymer. Coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde (as well as vanillin and syringaldehyde) co-polymerize with the traditional monolignols into lignins and do so at enhanced levels when CAD-deficiency has an impact on the normal monolignol production. The implication is that, particularly in angiosperms, the aldehydes behave like the traditional monolignols and should probably be regarded as authentic lignin monomers in normal and CAD-deficient plants.

  18. Suppression of CCR impacts metabolite profile and cell wall composition in Pinus radiata tracheary elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Armin; Tobimatsu, Yuki; Goeminne, Geert; Phillips, Lorelle; Flint, Heather; Steward, Diane; Torr, Kirk; Donaldson, Lloyd; Boerjan, Wout; Ralph, John

    2013-01-01

    Suppression of the lignin-related gene cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) in the Pinus radiata tracheary element (TE) system impacted both the metabolite profile and the cell wall matrix in CCR-RNAi lines. UPLC-MS/MS-based metabolite profiling identified elevated levels of p-coumaroyl hexose, caffeic acid hexoside and ferulic acid hexoside in CCR-RNAi lines, indicating a redirection of metabolite flow within phenylpropanoid metabolism. Dilignols derived from coniferyl alcohol such as G(8-5)G, G(8-O-4)G and isodihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol (IDDDC) were substantially depleted, providing evidence for CCR's involvement in coniferyl alcohol biosynthesis. Severe CCR suppression almost halved lignin content in TEs based on a depletion of both H-type and G-type lignin, providing evidence for CCR's involvement in the biosynthesis of both lignin types. 2D-NMR studies revealed minor changes in the H:G-ratio and consequently a largely unchanged interunit linkage distribution in the lignin polymer. However, unusual cell wall components including ferulate and unsaturated fatty acids were identified in TEs by thioacidolysis, pyrolysis-GC/MS and/or 2D-NMR in CCR-RNAi lines, providing new insights into the consequences of CCR suppression in pine. Interestingly, CCR suppression substantially promoted pyrolytic breakdown of cell wall polysaccharides, a phenotype most likely caused by the incorporation of acidic compounds into the cell wall matrix in CCR-RNAi lines.

  19. Structural characterization of lignin from grape stalks (Vitis vinifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prozil, Sónia O; Evtuguin, Dmitry V; Silva, Artur M S; Lopes, Luísa P C

    2014-06-18

    The chemical structure of lignin from grape stalks, an abundant waste of winemaking, has been studied. The dioxane lignin was isolated from extractive- and protein-free grape stalks (Vitis vinifera L.) by modified acidolytic procedure and submitted to a structural analysis by wet chemistry (nitrobenzene and permanganate oxidation (PO)) and spectroscopic techniques. The results obtained suggest that grape stalk lignin is an HGS type with molar proportions of p-hydroxyphenyl (H), guaiacyl (G) and syringyl (S) units of 3:71:26. Structural analysis by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy and PO indicates the predominance of β-O-4' structures (39% mol) in grape stalk lignin together with moderate amounts of β-5', β-β, β-1', 5-5', and 4-O-5' structures. NMR studies also revealed that grape lignin should be structurally associated with tannins. The condensation degree of grape stalks lignin is higher than that of conventional wood lignins and lignins from other agricultural residues.

  20. Reductive Catalytic Fractionation of Corn Stover Lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Eric M.; Katahira, Rui; Reed, Michelle; Resch, Michael G.; Karp, Eric M.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-12-05

    Reductive catalytic fractionation (RCF) has emerged as an effective biomass pretreatment strategy to depolymerize lignin into tractable fragments in high yields. We investigate the RCF of corn stover, a highly abundant herbaceous feedstock, using carbon-supported Ru and Ni catalysts at 200 and 250 degrees C in methanol and, in the presence or absence of an acid cocatalyst (H3PO4 or an acidified carbon support). Three key performance variables were studied: (1) the effectiveness of lignin extraction as measured by the yield of lignin oil, (2) the yield of monomers in the lignin oil, and (3) the carbohydrate retention in the residual solids after RCF. The monomers included methyl coumarate/ferulate, propyl guaiacol/syringol, and ethyl guaiacol/syringol. The Ru and Ni catalysts performed similarly in terms of product distribution and monomer yields. The monomer yields increased monotonically as a function of time for both temperatures. At 6 h, monomer yields of 27.2 and 28.3% were obtained at 250 and 200 degrees C, respectively, with Ni/C. The addition of an acid cocatalysts to the Ni/C system increased monomer yields to 32% for acidified carbon and 38% for phosphoric acid at 200 degrees C. The monomer product distribution was dominated by methyl coumarate regardless of the use of the acid cocatalysts. The use of phosphoric acid at 200 degrees C or the high temperature condition without acid resulted in complete lignin extraction and partial sugar solubilization (up to 50%) thereby generating lignin oil yields that exceeded the theoretical limit. In contrast, using either Ni/C or Ni on acidified carbon at 200 degrees C resulted in moderate lignin oil yields of ca. 55%, with sugar retention values >90%. Notably, these sugars were amenable to enzymatic digestion, reaching conversions >90% at 96 h. Characterization studies on the lignin oils using two-dimensional heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance and gel permeation chromatrography revealed

  1. Selective Oxidation of Lignin Model Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ruili; Li, Yanding; Kim, Hoon; Mobley, Justin K; Ralph, John

    2018-05-02

    Lignin, the planet's most abundant renewable source of aromatic compounds, is difficult to degrade efficiently to welldefined aromatics. We developed a microwave-assisted catalytic Swern oxidation system using an easily prepared catalyst, MoO 2 Cl 2 (DMSO) 2 , and DMSO as the solvent and oxidant. It demonstrated high efficiency in transforming lignin model compounds containing the units and functional groups found in native lignins. The aromatic ring substituents strongly influenced the selectivity of β-ether phenolic dimer cleavage to generate sinapaldehyde and coniferaldehyde, monomers not usually produced by oxidative methods. Time-course studies on two key intermediates provided insight into the reaction pathway. Owing to the broad scope of this oxidation system and the insight gleaned with regard to its mechanism, this strategy could be adapted and applied in a general sense to the production of useful aromatic chemicals from phenolics and lignin. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A cell wall-bound anionic peroxidase, PtrPO21, is involved in lignin polymerization in Populus trichocarpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chien-Yuan; Li, Quanzi; Tunlaya-Anukit, Sermsawat; Shi, Rui; Sun, Ying-Hsuan; Wang, Jack P.; Liu, Jie; Loziuk, Philip; Edmunds, Charles W.; Miller, Zachary D.; Peszlen, Ilona; Muddiman, David C.; Sederoff, Ronald R.; Chiang, Vincent L.

    2016-03-11

    Class III peroxidases are members of a large plant-specific sequence-heterogeneous protein family. Several sequence-conserved homologs have been associated with lignin polymerization in Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa, Nicotiana tabacum, Zinnia elegans, Picea abies, and Pinus sylvestris. In Populus trichocarpa, a model species for studies of wood formation, the peroxidases involved in lignin biosynthesis have not yet been identified. To do this, we retrieved sequences of all PtrPOs from Peroxibase and conducted RNA-seq to identify candidates. Transcripts from 42 PtrPOs were detected in stem differentiating xylem (SDX) and four of them are the most xylem-abundant (PtrPO12, PtrPO21, PtrPO42, and PtrPO64). PtrPO21 shows xylem-specific expression similar to that of genes encoding the monolignol biosynthetic enzymes. Using protein cleavage-isotope dilution mass spectrometry, PtrPO21 is detected only in the cell wall fraction and not in the soluble fraction. Downregulated transgenics of PtrPO21 have a lignin reduction of ~20% with subunit composition (S/G ratio) similar to wild type. The transgenics show a growth reduction and reddish color of stem wood. The modulus of elasticity (MOE) of the stems of the downregulated PtrPO21-line 8 can be reduced to ~60% of wild type. Differentially expressed gene (DEG) analysis of PtrPO21 downregulated transgenics identified a significant overexpression of PtPrx35, suggesting a compensatory effect within the peroxidase family. No significant changes in the expression of the 49 P. trichocarpa laccases (PtrLACs) were observed.

  3. Formation of aromatic products at radiation-thermal destruction of lignin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metreveli, P.K.; Bludenko, A.V.; Ponomarev, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Influence of electron irradiation on lignin destruction is studied. Hydrolyzed lignin and mixture of fatty acid triglycerides (FATG) have been irradiated by 8.5 MeV electrons. Comparative study of four variants of lignin destruction is carried out, they are pyrogenic distillation, post-radiation dry distillation, electron-beam distillation (EBD) and EBD at combined heating. The mechanism of lignin radiation-thermal transformation with guaiacol and creosol formation is considered. Lignin EBD is investigated depending on dose rate, absorbed dose, electroheating power and addition (FATG and chitin) content. It is pointed out, that lignin stimulates radiation-thermal conversion of FATG into low-viscosity diesel fuel. The conclusion is made, that lignin EBD at radiation and combined heating can be perspective effective method of vegetal polyphenols conversion into liquid phenols [ru

  4. Characterization of Trapped Lignin-Degrading Microbes in Tropical Forest Soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, Kristen; Allgaier, Martin; Chavarria, Yaucin; Fortney, Julian; Hugenholtz, Phillip; Simmons, Blake; Sublette, Kerry; Silver, Whendee; Hazen, Terry

    2011-07-14

    Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

  5. Characterization of trapped lignin-degrading microbes in tropical forest soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeAngelis, K.M.; Allgaier, M.; Chavarria, Y.; Fortney, J.L.; Hugenholz, P.; Simmons, B.; Sublette, K.; Silver, W.L.; Hazen, T.C.

    2011-03-01

    Lignin is often the most difficult portion of plant biomass to degrade, with fungi generally thought to dominate during late stage decomposition. Lignin in feedstock plant material represents a barrier to more efficient plant biomass conversion and can also hinder enzymatic access to cellulose, which is critical for biofuels production. Tropical rain forest soils in Puerto Rico are characterized by frequent anoxic conditions and fluctuating redox, suggesting the presence of lignin-degrading organisms and mechanisms that are different from known fungal decomposers and oxygen-dependent enzyme activities. We explored microbial lignin-degraders by burying bio-traps containing lignin-amended and unamended biosep beads in the soil for 1, 4, 13 and 30 weeks. At each time point, phenol oxidase and peroxidase enzyme activity was found to be elevated in the lignin-amended versus the unamended beads, while cellulolytic enzyme activities were significantly depressed in lignin-amended beads. Quantitative PCR of bacterial communities showed more bacterial colonization in the lignin-amended compared to the unamended beads after one and four weeks, suggesting that the lignin supported increased bacterial abundance. The microbial community was analyzed by small subunit 16S ribosomal RNA genes using microarray (PhyloChip) and by high-throughput amplicon pyrosequencing based on universal primers targeting bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic communities. Community trends were significantly affected by time and the presence of lignin on the beads. Lignin-amended beads have higher relative abundances of representatives from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria and Proteobacteria compared to unamended beads. This study suggests that in low and fluctuating redox soils, bacteria could play a role in anaerobic lignin decomposition.

  6. Production of Jet Fuel-Range Hydrocarbons from Hydrodeoxygenation of Lignin over Super Lewis Acid Combined with Metal Catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hongliang; Wang, Huamin; Kuhn, Eric; Tucker, Melvin P.; Yang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Super Lewis acids containing the triflate anion [e.g., Hf(OTf) 4 , Ln(OTf) 3 , In(OTf) 3 , Al(OTf) 3 ] and noble metal catalysts (e.g., Ru/C, Ru/Al2O 3 ) formed efficient catalytic systems to generate saturated hydrocarbons from lignin in high yields. In such catalytic systems, the metal triflates mediated rapid ether bond cleavage through selective bonding to etheric oxygens while the noble metal catalyzed subsequent hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reactions. Near theoretical yields of hydrocarbons were produced from lignin model compounds by the combined catalysis of Hf(OTf)4 and ruthenium-based catalysts. When a technical lignin derived from a pilot-scale biorefinery was used, more than 30 wt % of the hydrocarbons produced with this catalytic system were cyclohexane and alkylcyclohexanes in the jet fuel range. Super Lewis acids are postulated to strongly interact with lignin substrates by protonating hydroxyl groups and ether linkages, forming intermediate species that enhance hydrogenation catalysis by supported noble metal catalysts. Meanwhile, the hydrogenation of aromatic rings by the noble metal catalysts can promote oxygenation reactions catalyzed by super Lewis acids.

  7. Production of Jet Fuel-Range Hydrocarbons from Hydrodeoxygenation of Lignin over Super Lewis Acid Combined with Metal Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongliang [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University, Richland WA 99354 USA; Current address: Center of Biomass Engineering/College of Agronomy and Biotechnology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 PR China; Wang, Huamin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Kuhn, Eric [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Tucker, Melvin P. [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Yang, Bin [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University, Richland WA 99354 USA

    2017-11-14

    Super Lewis acids containing the triflate anion (e.g. Hf(OTf)4, Ln(OTf)3, Al(OTf)3) and noble metal catalysts (e.g. Ru/C, Ru/Al2O3) formed efficient catalytic systems to generate saturated hydrocarbons from lignin in high yields. In such catalytic systems, the metal triflates mediated rapid ether bond cleavage via selective bonding to etheric oxygens while the noble metal catalysed subsequent hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reactions. Near theoretical yields of hydrocarbons were produced from lignin model compounds by the combined catalysis of Hf(OTf)4 and ruthenium-based catalysts. When a technical lignin derived from a pilot-scale biorefinery was used, more than 30 wt% of the hydrocarbons produced with this catalytic system were cyclohexane and alkylcyclohexanes in the jet fuel range. Super Lewis acids are postulated to strongly interact with lignin substrates via protonating hydroxyls and ether linkages, forming intermediate species that enhance hydrogenation catalysis by supported noble metal catalysts. Meanwhile, the hydrogenation of aromatic rings by the noble metal catalysts can promote oxygenation reactions catalysed by super Lewis acids.

  8. Kraft Lignin Depolymerization in an Ionic Liquid without a Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amadou Diop

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the depolymerization of lignin was successfully achieved by the thermal treatment of kraft lignin in butyl-1,8-diazabicyclo[5.4.0]undec-7-enium chloride ([DBUC4+][Cl-] without a catalyst. The thermal treatment experiments were performed in an oven at 150, 200, and 250 °C for 1 h. The changes in kraft lignin structure over the course of depolymerization were characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, and 1H / 31P NMR analyses. GPC chromatograms indicated that the retention time of the original kraft lignin had shifted toward higher values after the thermal treatment, which indicated lignin depolymerization. The average molecular weight of the lignin obtained after 1 h reaction time decreased by 23, 70, and 58 wt% for the treatment at 150, 200, and 250 °C, respectively. FTIR spectra indicated the cleavage of β-O-4 bonds of kraft lignin. The 1H NMR spectra showed demethylation of all treated kraft lignins. Moreover, the 31P NMR analysis demonstrated that the demethylation phenomenon of the treated kraft lignin contributed to the formation of catechol groups.

  9. Muscle type-specific responses to NAD+ salvage biosynthesis promote muscle function in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrablik, Tracy L; Wang, Wenqing; Upadhyay, Awani; Hanna-Rose, Wendy

    2011-01-15

    Salvage biosynthesis of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) from nicotinamide (NAM) lowers NAM levels and replenishes the critical molecule NAD(+) after it is hydrolyzed. This pathway is emerging as a regulator of multiple biological processes. Here we probe the contribution of the NAM-NAD(+) salvage pathway to muscle development and function using Caenorhabditis elegans. C. elegans males with mutations in the nicotinamidase pnc-1, which catalyzes the first step of this NAD(+) salvage pathway, cannot mate due to a spicule muscle defect. Multiple muscle types are impaired in the hermaphrodites, including body wall muscles, pharyngeal muscles and vulval muscles. An active NAD(+) salvage pathway is required for optimal function of each muscle cell type. However, we found surprising muscle-cell-type specificity in terms of both the timing and relative sensitivity to perturbation of NAD(+) production or NAM levels. Active NAD(+) biosynthesis during development is critical for function of the male spicule protractor muscles during adulthood, but these muscles can surprisingly do without salvage biosynthesis in adulthood under the conditions examined. The body wall muscles require ongoing NAD(+) salvage biosynthesis both during development and adulthood for maximum function. The vulval muscles do not function in the presence of elevated NAM concentrations, but NAM supplementation is only slightly deleterious to body wall muscles during development or upon acute application in adults. Thus, the pathway plays distinct roles in different tissues. As NAM-NAD(+) biosynthesis also impacts muscle differentiation in vertebrates, we propose that similar complexities may be found among vertebrate muscle cell types. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fabrication of Environmentally Biodegradable Lignin Nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frangville, C.; Rutkevicius, M.; Richter, A.P.; Velev, O.D.; Stoyanov, S.D.; Paunov, V.N.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a method for the fabrication of novel biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) from lignin which are apparently non-toxic for microalgae and yeast. We compare two alternative methods for the synthesis of lignin NPs which result in particles of very different stability upon change of pH. The

  11. Tomato strigolactones are derived from carotenoids and their biosynthesis is promoted by phosphate starvation

    OpenAIRE

    López-Ráez, Juan A.; Charnikhova, Tatsiana;; Gómez-Roldán,Victoria;; Matusova, Radoslava;; Kohlen, Wouter;; De Vos, Ric;; Verstappe, Francel;; Puech-Pages, Virginie;; Bécard, Guillaume;; Mulder, Patrick;; Bouwmeester, Harro;

    2008-01-01

    Strigolactones are rhizosphere signalling compounds that mediate host location in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and parasitic plants. Here, the regulation of the biosynthesis of strigolactones is studied in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). * Strigolactone production under phosphate starvation, in the presence of the carotenoid biosynthesis inhibitor fluridone and in the abscisic acid (ABA) mutant notabilis were assessed using a germination bioassay with seeds of Orobanche ramosa; a hyphal b...

  12. Biological and Catalytic Conversion of Sugars and Lignin Publications |

    Science.gov (United States)

    biorefinery lignins, ACS Sust. Chem. Eng. Lignin depolymerization with nitrate-intercalated hydrotalcite catalysts, ACS Catalysis Pyrolysis reaction networks for lignin model compounds: Unraveling thermal Free Energy, J. Amer. Chem. Soc. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic

  13. Nitroxyl-mediated oxidation of lignin and polycarboxylated products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, Shannon S.; Rafiee, Mohammad

    2018-02-27

    Methods of selectively modifying lignin, polycarboxylated products thereof, and methods of deriving aromatic compounds therefrom. The methods comprise electrochemically oxidizing lignin using stable nitroxyl radicals to selectively oxidize primary hydroxyls on .beta.-O-4 phenylpropanoid units to corresponding carboxylic acids while leaving the secondary hydroxyls unchanged. The oxidation results in polycarboxylated lignin in the form of a polymeric .beta.-hydroxy acid. The polymeric .beta.-hydroxy acid has a high loading of carboxylic acid and can be isolated in acid form, deprotonated, and/or converted to a salt. The .beta.-hydroxy acid, anion, or salt can also be subjected to acidolysis to generate various aromatic monomers or oligomers. The initial oxidation of lignin to the polycarboxylated form renders the lignin more susceptible to acidolysis and thereby enhances the yield of aromatic monomers and oligomers obtained through acidolysis.

  14. Production of Flocculants, Adsorbents, and Dispersants from Lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiachuan; Eraghi Kazzaz, Armin; AlipoorMazandarani, Niloofar; Hosseinpour Feizi, Zahra; Fatehi, Pedram

    2018-04-10

    Currently, lignin is mainly produced in pulping processes, but it is considered as an under-utilized chemical since it is being mainly used as a fuel source. Lignin contains many hydroxyl groups that can participate in chemical reactions to produce value-added products. Flocculants, adsorbents, and dispersants have a wide range of applications in industry, but they are mainly oil-based chemicals and expensive. This paper reviews the pathways to produce water soluble lignin-based flocculants, adsorbents, and dispersants. It provides information on the recent progress in the possible use of these lignin-based flocculants, adsorbents, and dispersants. It also critically discusses the advantages and disadvantages of various approaches to produce such products. The challenges present in the production of lignin-based flocculants, adsorbents, and dispersants and possible scenarios to overcome these challenges for commercial use of these products in industry are discussed.

  15. Impact of lignins isolated from pretreated lignocelluloses on enzymatic cellulose saccharification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsberg, Søren; Selig, Michael Joseph; Felby, Claus

    2013-02-01

    Lignins were enzymatically isolated from corn stover and wheat straw samples and subjected to hydrothermal or wet oxidation pretreatments for enzyme adsorption experimentations. Lignin contents of the isolates ranged from 26 to 71 % (w/w); cellulose ranged from 3 to 22 % (w/w); xylan from 0.7 to 6 % (w/w) and ash was from 5.8 to 30 % (w/w). ATR-IR analyses indicated significant and similar levels of calcium in all lignin isolates. Commercial cellulase adsorption studies showed that the presence of these lignins had no significant impact on the total amount of adsorbed enzyme in cellulose and cellulose-lignin systems. Consequently, the presence of the lignins had minimal effect, if any, on enzymatic cellulose conversion. Furthermore, this result, coupled with significant calcium levels in the isolated lignins, supports previous work suggesting lignin-calcium complexes reduce enzyme-lignin interactions.

  16. Revealing the fate of the phenylcoumaran linkage during lignin oxidation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahive, Ciaran W; Lancefield, Christopher S; Codina, Anna; Kamer, Paul C J; Westwood, Nicholas J

    2018-03-14

    The fate of most lignin linkages, other than the β-O-4, under selective oxidation conditions is largely unknown. In this work we use advanced β-5 lignin model compounds to identify the fate of phenylcoumaran units in a softwood lignin during oxidation with DDQ. By using model compounds combined with detailed characterisation of the oxidised lignin polymer using HSQC and HMBC NMR we show that phenylcoumarones are a major product, and therefore constitute a novel non-native β-5 linkage in oxidised lignins. Additionally, the reactivity of these units in lignin led us to further investigate their connectivity in lignin, showing that they are found as both phenolic and etherified units. The findings and approach developed here will help improve the efficiency of selective oxidative lignin depolymerisation processes, particularly those aimed at the upgrading of softwood lignin in which phenylcoumarans are a major linkage.

  17. Unique low-molecular-weight lignin with high purity extracted from wood by deep eutectic solvents (DES): a source of lignin for valorization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez-Vasco, Carlos; Ma, Ruoshui; Quintero, Melissa; Guo, Mond; Geleynse, Scott; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Wolcott, Michael; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a new method of applying Deep Eutectic Solvents (DES) for extracting lignin from woody biomass with high yield and high purity. DES mixtures prepared from Choline Chloride (ChCl) and four hydrogen-bond donors–acetic acid, lactic acid, levulinic acid and glycerol–were evaluated for treatment of hardwood (poplar) and softwood (D. fir). It was found that these DES treatments can selectively extract a significant amount of lignin from wood with high yields: 78% from poplar and 58% from D. fir. The extracted lignin has high purity (95%) with unique structural properties. We discover that DES can selectively cleave ether linkages in wood lignin and facilitate lignin removal from wood. The mechanism of DES cleavage of ether bonds between phenylpropane units was investigated. The results from this study demonstrate that DES is a promising solvent for wood delignification and the production of a new source of lignin with promising potential applications.

  18. Hydroxycinnamate Conjugates as Potential Monolignol Replacements: In vitro Lignification and Cell Wall Studies with Rosmarinic Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuki, Tobimatsu; Sasikumar, Elumalai; Grabber, John H.; Davidson, Christy L.; Xuejun, Pan; John, Ralph

    2012-04-01

    The plasticity of lignin biosynthesis should permit the inclusion of new compatible phenolic monomers, such as rosmarinic acid (RA) and analogous catechol derivatives, into cell-wall lignins that are consequently less recalcitrant to biomass processing. In vitro lignin polymerization experiments revealed that RA readily underwent peroxidase-catalyzed copolymerization with monolignols and lignin oligomers to form polymers with new benzodioxane inter-unit linkages. Incorporation of RA permitted extensive depolymerization of synthetic lignins by mild alkaline hydrolysis, presumably by cleavage of ester intra-unit linkages within RA. Copolymerization of RA with monolignols into maize cell walls by in situ peroxidases significantly enhanced alkaline lignin extractability and promoted subsequent cell wall saccharification by fungal enzymes. Incorporating RA also improved cell wall saccharification by fungal enzymes and by rumen microflora even without alkaline pretreatments, possibly by modulating lignin hydrophobicity and/or limiting cell wall cross-linking. Consequently, we anticipate that bioengineering approaches for partial monolignol substitution with RA and analogous plant hydroxycinnamates would permit more efficient utilization of plant fiber for biofuels or livestock production.

  19. Optimization of RT-PCR reactions in studies with genes of lignin biosynthetic route in Saccharum spontaneum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN P.P. LLERENA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Saccharum spontaneum has been used for the development of energy cane a crop aimed to be used for the production of second-generation ethanol, or lignocellulosic ethanol. Lignin is a main challenge in the conversion of cell wall sugars into ethanol. In our studies to isolate the genes the lignin biosynthesis in S. spontaneum we have had great difficulty in RT-PCR reactions. Thus, we evaluated the effectiveness of different additives in the amplification of these genes. While COMT and CCoAOMT genes did not need any additives for other genes there was no amplification (HCT, F5H, 4CL and CCR or the yield was very low (CAD and C4H. The application of supplementary cDNA was enough to overcome the non-specificity and low yield for C4H and C3H, while the addition of 0.04% BSA + 2% formamide was effective to amplify 4CL, CCR, F5H and CCR. HCT was amplified only by addition of 0.04% BSA + 2% formamide + 0.1 M trehalose and amplification of PAL was possible with addition of 2% of DMSO. Besides optimization of expression assays, the results show that additives can act independently or synergistically.

  20. Chemical reactivity of alkali lignin modified with laccase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yong; Qiu, Xueqing; Liu, Yunquan

    2013-01-01

    The modification of alkali lignin with laccase was investigated. The structural change of lignin was analyzed. The sulfonation reactivity was measured by the content of sulfonic group. The results showed the sulfonation reactivity increased to some extent under the condition of atmosphere pressure, but decreased under the condition of 0.3 MPa oxygen pressure. The analysis of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) showed the cleavage of various ether linkages and demethylation took place in the structure of lignin to certain extent during modification with laccase, which contributed to the improvement of sulfonation reactivity. Under the condition of 0.3 MPa oxygen pressure, the ratio of s/g (guaiacyl/syringyl) increased after modification, which reduced the sulfonation reactivity of lignin. Simultaneously partial polymerization reaction, such as 4-O-5′, β-5, 5-5 and other reaction in the aromatic ring decreased the activity sites of C 2 , C 5 and C 6 . Abundant polymerization reaction of α-O increased steric hindrance of C 2 and C 6 in aromatic ring, resulting in low sulfonation reactivity of lignin. -- Highlights: ► The modification of alkali lignin with laccase was investigated. ► The sulfonation reactivity increased under the condition of atmosphere pressure. ► More content of guaiacyl and hydroxy, the less content of methoxyl, syringyl can enhance the sulfonation reactivity of lignin. ► Partial moieties polymerized each other with α-O linkgages during treatment with laccase under oxygen pressure. ► The steric hindrance on C 2 and C 6 in aromatic ring resulted in low sulfonation reaction reactivity of lignin

  1. Pyrolysis - gas chromatography - mass spectrometry of lignins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, F; Saiz-Jimenez, C; Gonzalez-Vila, F J

    1979-01-01

    Milled wood lignins from spruce, beech and bamboo were pyrolysed. The high-boiling products of pyrolysis were studied by GLC and mass spectrometry. The forty-three products identified provide information on the structural units of lignin.

  2. The Use of Esterified Lignin for Synthesis of Durable Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. Olsson; E. Ostmark; R.E. Ibach; C.M. Clemons; K.B. Segerholm; F. Englund

    2011-01-01

    Lignin is a natural polymer and one of the most abundant materials on earth. Despite this fact, lignin is often viewed as a by-product in chemical pulp processing and the use of lignin as a sustainable material is low. However, research and public awareness of sustainability have opened up new possibilities for using lignin as a material.

  3. Production of Flocculants, Adsorbents, and Dispersants from Lignin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiachuan Chen

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, lignin is mainly produced in pulping processes, but it is considered as an under-utilized chemical since it is being mainly used as a fuel source. Lignin contains many hydroxyl groups that can participate in chemical reactions to produce value-added products. Flocculants, adsorbents, and dispersants have a wide range of applications in industry, but they are mainly oil-based chemicals and expensive. This paper reviews the pathways to produce water soluble lignin-based flocculants, adsorbents, and dispersants. It provides information on the recent progress in the possible use of these lignin-based flocculants, adsorbents, and dispersants. It also critically discusses the advantages and disadvantages of various approaches to produce such products. The challenges present in the production of lignin-based flocculants, adsorbents, and dispersants and possible scenarios to overcome these challenges for commercial use of these products in industry are discussed.

  4. Influence of Reaction Conditions on Lignin Hydrothermal Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdocia, Xabier; Prado, Raquel; Corcuera, M. Ángeles; Labidi, Jalel, E-mail: jalel.labidi@ehu.es [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, University of the Basque Country, San Seabastian (Spain)

    2014-04-01

    Organosolv lignin, obtained from olive tree pruning under optimized conditions, was subjected to a hydrothermal depolymerization process catalyzed by sodium hydroxide. The depolymerization of lignin was carried out at 300°C using different reaction times (20, 40, 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100 min) in order to study the influence of this parameter on lignin depolymerization. The resulting products (oil and residual lignin) were measured and analyzed by different techniques (GC/MS, high-performance size-exclusion chromatography, and pyrolysis–GC/MS) in order to determine their nature and composition. Coke was also formed, at a lower quantity, uncompetitive repolymerization reactions during the lignin hydrothermal treatment. The maximum oil yield and concentration of monomeric phenolic compounds was obtained after 80 min of reaction time. The highest reaction time studied (100 min) had the worst results with the lowest oil yield and highest coke production.

  5. Impact of lignins isolated from pretreated lignocelluloses on enzymatic cellulose saccharification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barsberg, Søren Talbro; Selig, Michael Joseph; Felby, Claus

    2013-01-01

    and cellulose-lignin systems. Consequently, the presence of the lignins had minimal effect, if any, on enzymatic cellulose conversion. Furthermore, this result, coupled with significant calcium levels in the isolated lignins, supports previous work suggesting lignin-calcium complexes reduce enzyme......Lignins were enzymatically isolated from corn stover and wheat straw samples and subjected to hydrothermal or wet oxidation pretreatments for enzyme adsorption experimentations. Lignin contents of the isolates ranged from 26 to 71 % (w/w); cellulose ranged from 3 to 22 % (w/w); xylan from 0.7 to 6...

  6. Trehalose biosynthesis promotes Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djonović, Slavica; Urbach, Jonathan M; Drenkard, Eliana; Bush, Jenifer; Feinbaum, Rhonda; Ausubel, Jonathan L; Traficante, David; Risech, Martina; Kocks, Christine; Fischbach, Michael A; Priebe, Gregory P; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2013-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 is a multi-host pathogen that infects plants, nematodes, insects, and vertebrates. Many PA14 factors are required for virulence in more than one of these hosts. Noting that plants have a fundamentally different cellular architecture from animals, we sought to identify PA14 factors that are specifically required for plant pathogenesis. We show that synthesis by PA14 of the disaccharide trehalose is required for pathogenesis in Arabidopsis, but not in nematodes, insects, or mice. In-frame deletion of two closely-linked predicted trehalose biosynthetic operons, treYZ and treS, decreased growth in Arabidopsis leaves about 50 fold. Exogenously co-inoculated trehalose, ammonium, or nitrate, but not glucose, sulfate, or phosphate suppressed the phenotype of the double ΔtreYZΔtreS mutant. Exogenous trehalose or ammonium nitrate does not suppress the growth defect of the double ΔtreYZΔtreS mutant by suppressing the plant defense response. Trehalose also does not function intracellularly in P. aeruginosa to ameliorate a variety of stresses, but most likely functions extracellularly, because wild-type PA14 rescued the in vivo growth defect of the ΔtreYZΔtreS in trans. Surprisingly, the growth defect of the double ΔtreYZΔtreS double mutant was suppressed by various Arabidopsis cell wall mutants that affect xyloglucan synthesis, including an xxt1xxt2 double mutant that completely lacks xyloglucan, even though xyloglucan mutants are not more susceptible to pathogens and respond like wild-type plants to immune elicitors. An explanation of our data is that trehalose functions to promote the acquisition of nitrogen-containing nutrients in a process that involves the xyloglucan component of the plant cell wall, thereby allowing P. aeruginosa to replicate in the intercellular spaces in a leaf. This work shows how P. aeruginosa, a multi-host opportunistic pathogen, has repurposed a highly conserved "house-keeping" anabolic pathway (trehalose

  7. Trehalose biosynthesis promotes Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavica Djonović

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA14 is a multi-host pathogen that infects plants, nematodes, insects, and vertebrates. Many PA14 factors are required for virulence in more than one of these hosts. Noting that plants have a fundamentally different cellular architecture from animals, we sought to identify PA14 factors that are specifically required for plant pathogenesis. We show that synthesis by PA14 of the disaccharide trehalose is required for pathogenesis in Arabidopsis, but not in nematodes, insects, or mice. In-frame deletion of two closely-linked predicted trehalose biosynthetic operons, treYZ and treS, decreased growth in Arabidopsis leaves about 50 fold. Exogenously co-inoculated trehalose, ammonium, or nitrate, but not glucose, sulfate, or phosphate suppressed the phenotype of the double ΔtreYZΔtreS mutant. Exogenous trehalose or ammonium nitrate does not suppress the growth defect of the double ΔtreYZΔtreS mutant by suppressing the plant defense response. Trehalose also does not function intracellularly in P. aeruginosa to ameliorate a variety of stresses, but most likely functions extracellularly, because wild-type PA14 rescued the in vivo growth defect of the ΔtreYZΔtreS in trans. Surprisingly, the growth defect of the double ΔtreYZΔtreS double mutant was suppressed by various Arabidopsis cell wall mutants that affect xyloglucan synthesis, including an xxt1xxt2 double mutant that completely lacks xyloglucan, even though xyloglucan mutants are not more susceptible to pathogens and respond like wild-type plants to immune elicitors. An explanation of our data is that trehalose functions to promote the acquisition of nitrogen-containing nutrients in a process that involves the xyloglucan component of the plant cell wall, thereby allowing P. aeruginosa to replicate in the intercellular spaces in a leaf. This work shows how P. aeruginosa, a multi-host opportunistic pathogen, has repurposed a highly conserved "house-keeping" anabolic

  8. Directional synthesis of ethylbenzene through catalytic transformation of lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Minghui; Jiang, Peiwen; Bi, Peiyan; Deng, Shumei; Yan, Lifeng; Zhai, Qi; Wang, Tiejun; Li, Quanxin

    2013-09-01

    Transformation of lignin to ethylbenzene can provide an important bulk raw material for the petrochemical industry. This work explored the production of ethylbenzene from lignin through the directional catalytic depolymerization of lignin into the aromatic monomers followed by the selective alkylation of the aromatic monomers. For the first step, the aromatics selectivity of benzene derived from the catalytic depolymerization of lignin reached about 90.2 C-mol% over the composite catalyst of Re-Y/HZSM-5 (25). For the alkylation of the aromatic monomers in the second step, the highest selectivity of ethylbenzene was about 72.3 C-mol% over the HZSM-5 (25) catalyst. The reaction pathway for the transformation of lignin to ethylbenzene was also addressed. Present transformation potentially provides a useful approach for the production of the basic petrochemical material and development of high-end chemicals utilizing lignin as the abundant natural aromatic resource. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Biodegradation of lignin by Shiitake Lentinus edodes (berk. ) sing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, T.; Watanabe, H.; Ishikawa, H.

    1981-01-01

    Each strain of L. edodes destroyed all of the structural components of wood (Fagus crenata) at almost the same rate during the loss of approximately 30% of the total weight of wood. The activities of the extracellular enzymes, i.e. peroxidase, laccase, and polyphenol oxidase, in the wood powder and lignin-containing cultures increased during the early period of mycelial growth, and then declined rapidly, while the activity of Beta-glucosidase increased gradually throughout the growth period. Functional group analysis, nitrobenzene oxidation, and spectroscopic characterization showed that dioxane lignin from F. crenata degraded by L. edodes or in crude enzyme solution isolated from wood-containing culture had a higher content of carboxyl groups than the sound dioxane lignin, whereas the content of methoxyl group was lower in the degraded dioxane lignin than in sound dioxane lignin. The building units of dioxane lignin, which yield aromatic aldehydes on nitrobenzene oxidation, were attacked preferentially by L. edodes under the above conditions.

  10. Lignin biomass conversion into chemicals and fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melián Rodríguez, Mayra

    Second-generation biomass or lignocellulosic biomass, which is mainly composed of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, is a very important and promising feedstock for the renewable production of fuels and chemicals of the future. Lignin is the second most abundant natural polymer, representing 30...... and show similar, although simplified, characteristics to the natural biopolymer. Among them, the most abundant structural unit is the β-O-4, representing approximately 60% of the bonds in hardwood and 45-50% of those in softwood. Oxidative depolymerization is one of the most viable methods for lignin...... valorization. It involves the cleavage of ether bonds, such as β-O-4 and other linkages present in lignin and its model compounds, giving aldehydes or carboxylic acids as products, depending on the reaction conditions used. In Chapter 2 of this thesis, the preparation, characterization and catalytic...

  11. The Effect of Plant Source on the Properties of Lignin-Based Polyurethanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Lang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This work increases our understanding of the effect of plant source on the mechanical and morphological properties of lignin-based polyurethanes (PUs. Lignin is a polymer that is synthesized inside the plant cell wall and can be used as a polyol to synthesize PUs. The specific aromatic structure of the lignin is heavily reliant on the plant source from which it is extracted. These results show that the mechanical properties of lignin-based PUs differ based on lignin’s plant source. The morphology of lignin-based PUs was examined using atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy and the mechanical properties of lignin-based PU samples were measured using dynamic mechanical analysis and shore hardness (Type A. The thermal analysis and morphology studies demonstrate that all PUs prepared form a multiphase morphology. In these PUs, better mixing was observed in the wheat straw lignin PU samples leading to higher moduli than in the hardwood lignin and softwood lignin PUs whose morphology was dominated by larger aggregates. Independent of the type of the lignin used, increasing the fraction of lignin increased the rigidity of PU. Among the different types of lignin studied, PU with wheat straw soda lignin exhibited storage moduli ~2-fold higher than those of PUs incorporating other lignins. This study also showed that during synthesis all hydroxyl groups in the lignin are not available to react with isocyanates, which alters the number of cross-links formed within the PU and impacts the mechanical properties of the material.

  12. Can laccases catalyze bond cleavage in lignin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Line; Sitarz, Anna Katarzyna; Kalyani, Dayanand

    2015-01-01

    illustrations of the putative laccase catalyzed reactions, including the possible reactions of the reactive radical intermediates taking place after the initial oxidation of the phenol-hydroxyl groups, we show that i) Laccase activity is able to catalyze bond cleavage in low molecular weight phenolic lignin......-substituted phenols, benzenethiols, polyphenols, and polyamines, which may be oxidized. In addition, the currently available analytical methods that can be used to detect enzyme catalyzed changes in lignin are summarized, and an improved nomenclature for unequivocal interpretation of the action of laccases on lignin...

  13. Lignin decomposition and microbial community in paddy soils: effects of alternating redox conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerli, Chiara; Liu, Qin; Hanke, Alexander; Kaiser, Klaus; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    Paddy soils are characterised by interchanging cycles of anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Such fluctuations cause continuous changes in soil solution chemistry as well as in the composition and physiological responses of the microbial community. Temporary deficiency in oxygen creates conditions favourable to facultative or obligates anaerobic bacteria, while aerobic communities can thrive in the period of water absence. These alterations can strongly affect soil processes, in particular organic matter (OM) accumulation and mineralization. In submerged soils, lignin generally constitutes a major portion of the total OM because of hampered degradation under anoxic conditions. The alternating redox cycles resulting from paddy soil management might promote both degradation and preservation of lignin, affecting the overall composition and reactivity of total and dissolved OM. We sampled soils subjected to cycles of anoxic (rice growing period) and oxic (harvest and growth of other crops) conditions since 700 and 2000 years. We incubated suspended Ap material, sampled from the two paddy plus two corresponding non-paddy control soils under oxic and anoxic condition, for 3 months, interrupted by a short period of three weeks (from day 21 to day 43) with reversed redox conditions. At each sampling time (day 2, 21, 42, 63, 84), we determined lignin-derived phenols (by CuO oxidation) as well as phospholipids fatty acids contents and composition. We aimed to highlight changes in lignin decomposition as related to the potential rapid changes in microbial community composition. Since the studied paddy soils had a long history of wet rice cultivation, the microbial community should be well adapted to interchanging oxic and anoxic cycles, therefore fully expressing its activity at both conditions. In non-paddy soil changes in redox conditions caused modification of quantity and composition of the microbial community. On the contrary, in well-established paddy soils the microbial

  14. Producing a True Lignin Depolymerase for Biobleaching Softwood Kraft Pulp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simo Sarkanen

    2002-02-04

    This project constituted an intensive effort devoted to producing, from the white-rot fungus Tramets Cingulata, a lignin degrading enzyme (lignin depolymerase) that is directly able to biobleach or delignify softwood kraft pulp brownstock. To this end, the solutions in which T. cingulata was grown contained dissolved kraft lignin which fulfilled two functions; it behaved as a lignin deploymerase substrate and it also appeared to act as an inducer of enzyme expression. However, the lignin depolymerase isoenzymes (and other extracellular T. cingulata enzymes) interacted very strongly with both the kraft lignin components and the fungal hypae, so the isolating these proteins from the culture solutions proved to be unexpectedly difficult. Even after extensive experimentation with a variety of protein purification techniques, only one approach appeared to be capable of purifying lignin depolymerases to homogeneity. Unfortunately the procedure was extremely laborious; it involved the iso electric focusing of concentrated buffer-exchanged culture solutions followed by electro-elution of the desired protein bands from the appropriate polyacrylamide gel segments

  15. Progress in lignin hydrogels and nanocomposites for water purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamulevicius, Sigitas; Thakur, Sourbh; Govender, Penny P.

    2017-01-01

    -based hydrogels have shown excellent performance for removal of various pollutants from water. The adsorption properties of lignin based hydrogels can further be improved by using a combination of nanomaterials and lignin that results in promising hydrogel nanocomposites. In nature, the most abundant structures...... are formed by the combination of lignin, cellulose and hemicelluloses. In this article, we have attempted to comprehensively review the research work carried out in the direction of usage of lignin-based hydrogel for removal of toxic pollutants including metal ions and dyes....

  16. Solid-state 29Si NMR and FTIR analyses of lignin-silica coprecipitates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabrera Orozco, Yohanna; Cabrera, Andrés; Larsen, Flemming Hofmann

    2016-01-01

    When agricultural residues are processed to ethanol, lignin and silica are some of the main byproducts. Separation of these two products is difficult and the chemical interactions between lignin and silica are not well described. In the present study, the effect of lignin-silica complexing has been...... investigated by characterizing lignin and silica coprecipitates by FTIR and solid state NMR. Silica particles were coprecipitated with three different lignins, three lignin model compounds, and two silanes representing silica-in-lignin model compounds. Comparison of 29Si SP/MAS NMR spectra revealed differences...

  17. Insights into lignin degradation and its potential industrial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hamid, Ahmed M; Solbiati, Jose O; Cann, Isaac K O

    2013-01-01

    Lignocellulose is an abundant biomass that provides an alternative source for the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. The depolymerization of the carbohydrate polymers in lignocellulosic biomass is hindered by lignin, which is recalcitrant to chemical and biological degradation due to its complex chemical structure and linkage heterogeneity. The role of fungi in delignification due to the production of extracellular oxidative enzymes has been studied more extensively than that of bacteria. The two major groups of enzymes that are involved in lignin degradation are heme peroxidases and laccases. Lignin-degrading peroxidases include lignin peroxidase (LiP), manganese peroxidase (MnP), versatile peroxidase (VP), and dye-decolorizing peroxidase (DyP). LiP, MnP, and VP are class II extracellular fungal peroxidases that belong to the plant and microbial peroxidases superfamily. LiPs are strong oxidants with high-redox potential that oxidize the major non-phenolic structures of lignin. MnP is an Mn-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of various phenolic substrates but is not capable of oxidizing the more recalcitrant non-phenolic lignin. VP enzymes combine the catalytic activities of both MnP and LiP and are able to oxidize Mn(2+) like MnP, and non-phenolic compounds like LiP. DyPs occur in both fungi and bacteria and are members of a new superfamily of heme peroxidases called DyPs. DyP enzymes oxidize high-redox potential anthraquinone dyes and were recently reported to oxidize lignin model compounds. The second major group of lignin-degrading enzymes, laccases, are found in plants, fungi, and bacteria and belong to the multicopper oxidase superfamily. They catalyze a one-electron oxidation with the concomitant four-electron reduction of molecular oxygen to water. Fungal laccases can oxidize phenolic lignin model compounds and have higher redox potential than bacterial laccases. In the presence of redox mediators, fungal laccases can oxidize non

  18. Redox Fluctuations Increase the Contribution of Lignin to Soil Respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, S. J.; Silver, W. L.; Timokhin, V.; Hammel, K.

    2014-12-01

    Lignin mineralization represents a critical flux in the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle, yet little is known about mechanisms and environmental factors controlling lignin breakdown in mineral soils. Hypoxia has long been thought to suppress lignin decomposition, yet variation in oxygen (O2) availability in surface soils accompanying moisture fluctuations could potentially stimulate this process by generating reactive oxygen species via coupled biotic and abiotic iron (Fe) redox cycling. Here, we tested the impact of redox fluctuations on lignin breakdown in humid tropical forest soils during ten-week laboratory incubations. We used synthetic lignins labeled with 13C in either of two positions (aromatic methoxyl and propyl Cβ) to provide highly sensitive and specific measures of lignin mineralization not previously employed in soils. Four-day redox fluctuations increased the percent contribution of methoxyl C to soil respiration, and cumulative methoxyl C mineralization was equivalent under static aerobic and fluctuating redox conditions despite lower total C mineralization in the latter treatment. Contributions of the highly stable Cβ to mineralization were also equivalent in static aerobic and fluctuating redox treatments during periods of O2 exposure, and nearly doubled in the fluctuating treatment after normalizing to cumulative O2 exposure. Oxygen fluctuations drove substantial net Fe reduction and oxidation, implying that reactive oxygen species generated during abiotic Fe oxidation likely contributed to the elevated contribution of lignin to C mineralization. Iron redox cycling provides a mechanism for lignin breakdown in soils that experience conditions unfavorable for canonical lignin-degrading organisms, and provides a potential mechanism for lignin depletion in soil organic matter during late-stage decomposition. Thus, close couplings between soil moisture, redox fluctuations, and lignin breakdown provide potential a link between climate variability and

  19. Isolation, identification and characterization of lignin-degrading bacteria from Qinling, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C-X; Wang, T; Gao, L-N; Yin, H-J; Lü, X

    2017-12-01

    Lignin is an aromatic heteropolymer forming a physical barrier and it is a big challenge in biomass utilization. This paper first investigated lignin-degradation bacteria from rotten wood in Qinling Mountain. Nineteen potential strains were selected and ligninolytic enzyme activities were determined over 84 h. Strains that had higher enzyme activities were selected. Further, the biodegradation of wheat straw lignin and alkali lignin was evaluated indicating that Burkholderia sp. H1 had the highest capability. It was confirmed by gel permeation chromatography and field emission scanning electron microscope that alkali lignin was depolymerized into small fragments. The degraded products were analysed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The total ion chromatograph of products treated for 7 days showed the formation of aromatic compounds, an important intermediate from lignin degradation. Interestingly, they disappeared in 15 days while the aldehyde and ester compounds increased. The results suggest that the lignin-degrading bacteria are abundant in rotten wood and strain H1 has high potential to break down lignin. The diversity of lignin-degrading bacteria in Qinling Mountain is revealed. The study of Burkholderia sp. H1 expands the range of bacteria for lignin degradation and provides novel bacteria for application to lignocellulosic biomass. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Development and characterization of an oat TILLING-population and identification of mutations in lignin and β-glucan biosynthesis genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivekanand Vivekanand

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oat, Avena sativa is the sixth most important cereal in the world. Presently oat is mostly used as feed for animals. However, oat also has special properties that make it beneficial for human consumption and has seen a growing importance as a food crop in recent decades. Increased demand for novel oat products has also put pressure on oat breeders to produce new oat varieties with specific properties such as increased or improved β-glucan-, antioxidant- and omega-3 fatty acid levels, as well as modified starch and protein content. To facilitate this development we have produced a TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes population of the spring oat cultivar SW Belinda. Results Here a population of 2600 mutagenised M2 lines, producing 2550 M3 seed lots were obtained. The M2 population was initially evaluated by visual inspection and a number of different phenotypes were seen ranging from dwarfs to giants, early flowering to late flowering, leaf morphology and chlorosis. Phloroglucinol/HCl staining of M3 seeds, obtained from 1824 different M2 lines, revealed a number of potential lignin mutants. These were later confirmed by quantitative analysis. Genomic DNA was prepared from the M2 population and the mutation frequency was determined. The estimated mutation frequency was one mutation per 20 kb by RAPD-PCR fingerprinting, one mutation per 38 kb by MALDI-TOF analysis and one mutation per 22.4 kb by DNA sequencing. Thus, the overall mutation frequency in the population is estimated to be one mutation per 20-40 kb, depending on if the method used addressed the whole genome or specific genes. During the investigation, 6 different mutations in the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (AsPAL1 gene and 10 different mutations in the cellulose synthase-like (AsCslF6 β-glucan biosynthesis gene were identified. Conclusion The oat TILLING population produced in this work carries, on average, hundreds of mutations in every individual

  1. Valorization of lignin from biorefineries for fuels and chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Joachim Bachmann

    Direct lignin liquefaction is a promising process for lignin valorization in which ligninis treated in a solvent at elevated temperature and pressure. Liquefaction of sulfur freelignin obtained as a waste product from 2nd generation bio-ethanol production canprovide a sulfur free bio-oil which may...... substitute fossil fuel.In this Ph.D. study the direct liquefaction of a biorefinery lignin (hydrothermallypretreated enzymatic hydrolysis lignin) is explored. The goal is to provide a bio-crude which can substitute marine diesel as the engines found aboard large ships are adapted to more crude fuels. A novel...

  2. Environmental economics of lignin derived transport fuels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obydenkova, Svetlana V.; Kouris, Panos D.; Hensen, Emiel J. M.; Heeres, Hero J.; Boot, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the environmental and economic aspects of fast pyrolytic conversion of lignin, obtained from 2G ethanol plants, to transport fuels for both the marine and automotive markets. Various scenarios are explored, pertaining to aggregation of lignin from several sites, alternative

  3. CHARACTERIZATION OF ALKALINE LIGNINS FOR USE IN PHENOL-FORMALDEHYDE AND EPOXY RESINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour Eddine El Mansouri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Besides polyurethanes and polyesters, phenolic and epoxy resins are the most prominent applications for technical lignins in thermosetting materials. To evaluate the potential application of lignin raw materials in phenol formaldehyde and epoxy resins, three types of alkaline lignins were characterized in terms of their structures and thermal properties. The lignin samples analyzed were kraft lignin (LIG-1, soda–rice straw lignin (LIG-2, and soda-wheat straw lignin (LIG-3. FTIR and 1H-NMR methods were used to determine their structure. Gel permeation chromatography (GPC was used to determine the molecular weight distribution (MWD. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC was used to measure the glass transition temperature (Tg, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA to determine the thermal stability of lignin samples. Results showed that kraft lignin (LIG-1 has moderate hydroxyl-group content, is rich in G-type units, and has good thermal stability. These properties make it more suitable for direct use in phenol formaldehyde resins, and it is therefore a good raw material for this purpose. The alkaline soda-rice straw lignin (LIG-2 with a high hydroxyl-group content and excellent thermal stability is most suited to preparing lignin-based epoxy resins.

  4. NMR characterization of lignins isolated from fruit and vegetable insoluble dietary fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunzel, Mirko; Ralph, John

    2006-10-18

    Compositional information for lignins in food is rare and concentrated on cereal grains and brans. As lignins are suspected to have important health roles in the dietary fiber complex, the confusing current information derived from nonspecific lignin determination methods needs to be augmented by diagnostic structural studies. For this study, lignin fractions were isolated from kiwi, pear, rhubarb, and, for comparison, wheat bran insoluble dietary fiber. Clean pear and kiwi lignin isolates allowed for substantive structural profiling, but it is suggested that the significance of lignin in wheat has been overestimated by reliance on nonspecific analytical methods. Volume integration of NMR contours in two-dimensional (13)C-(1)H correlation spectra shows that pear and wheat lignins have comparable guaiacyl and syringyl contributions and that kiwi lignins are particularly guaiacyl-rich (approximately 94% guaiacyl) and suggest that rhubarb lignins, which could not be isolated from contaminating materials, are as syringyl-rich (approximately 96% syringyl) as lignins from any known natural or transgenic fiber source. Typical lignin structures, including those newly NMR-validated (glycerols, spirodienones, and dibenzodioxocins), and resinols implicated as possible mammalian lignan precursors in the gut are demonstrated via their NMR correlation spectra in the fruit and vegetable samples. A novel putative benzodioxane structure appears to be associated with the kiwi lignin. It is concluded that the fruits and vegetables examined contain authentic lignins and that the detailed structural analysis exposes limitations of currently accepted analytical methods.

  5. Metal Triflates for the Production of Aromatics from Lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuss, Peter J; Lahive, Ciaran W; Lancefield, Christopher S; Westwood, Nicholas J; Kamer, Paul C J; Barta, Katalin; de Vries, Johannes G

    2016-10-20

    The depolymerization of lignin into valuable aromatic chemicals is one of the key goals towards establishing economically viable biorefineries. In this contribution we present a simple approach for converting lignin to aromatic monomers in high yields under mild reaction conditions. The methodology relies on the use of catalytic amounts of easy-to-handle metal triflates (M(OTf) x ). Initially, we evaluated the reactivity of a broad range of metal triflates using simple lignin model compounds. More advanced lignin model compounds were also used to study the reactivity of different lignin linkages. The product aromatic monomers were either phenolic C2-acetals obtained by stabilization of the aldehyde cleavage products by reaction with ethylene glycol or methyl aromatics obtained by catalytic decarbonylation. Notably, when the method was ultimately tested on lignin, especially Fe(OTf) 3 proved very effective and the phenolic C2-acetal products were obtained in an excellent, 19.3±3.2 wt % yield. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Production of Jet Fuel-Range Hydrocarbons from Hydrodeoxygenation of Lignin over Super Lewis Acid Combined with Metal Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongliang; Wang, Huamin; Kuhn, Eric; Tucker, Melvin P; Yang, Bin

    2018-01-10

    Super Lewis acids containing the triflate anion [e.g., Hf(OTf) 4 , Ln(OTf) 3 , In(OTf) 3 , Al(OTf) 3 ] and noble metal catalysts (e.g., Ru/C, Ru/Al 2 O 3 ) formed efficient catalytic systems to generate saturated hydrocarbons from lignin in high yields. In such catalytic systems, the metal triflates mediated rapid ether bond cleavage through selective bonding to etheric oxygens while the noble metal catalyzed subsequent hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reactions. Near theoretical yields of hydrocarbons were produced from lignin model compounds by the combined catalysis of Hf(OTf) 4 and ruthenium-based catalysts. When a technical lignin derived from a pilot-scale biorefinery was used, more than 30 wt % of the hydrocarbons produced with this catalytic system were cyclohexane and alkylcyclohexanes in the jet fuel range. Super Lewis acids are postulated to strongly interact with lignin substrates by protonating hydroxyl groups and ether linkages, forming intermediate species that enhance hydrogenation catalysis by supported noble metal catalysts. Meanwhile, the hydrogenation of aromatic rings by the noble metal catalysts can promote deoxygenation reactions catalyzed by super Lewis acids. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Role of paramagnetic polyconjugated clusters in lignin antioxidant activity (in vitro)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dizhbite, T; Ponomarenko, J; Andersone, A; Dobele, G; Lauberts, M; Krasilnikova, J; Telysheva, G; Mironova-Ulmane, N

    2012-01-01

    Using physico-chemical methods (EPR, SEC, Py-GC/MS and UV/VIS spectroscopy) and wet chemical analysis, the characteristics of 6 hardwood lignins in terms of functionality, molecular weight and composition of lignin substructures were determined and considered together with the results of DPPH., ABTS. + and O 2 . − antioxidant assays with the aim to understand the relationships governing antioxidant properties of lignin. The strong positive linear correlation between lignin antioxidant capacity in the three assays used and the extent of conjugation of paramagnetic polyconjugated clusters in lignin macromolecules was found. The biological activity of the most active alkaline lignins was assessed by in vitro experiment with human blood.

  8. Animal bioavailability of defined xenobiotic lignin metabolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandermann, H. Jr.; Arjmand, M.; Gennity, I.; Winkler, R.; Struble, C.B.; Aschbacher, P.W.

    1990-01-01

    Lignin has been recognized as a major component of bound pesticide residues in plants and is thought to be undigestible in animals. Two defined ring-U- 14 C-labeled chloroaniline/lignin metabolites have now been fed to rats, where a release of ∼66% of the bound xenobiotic occurred in the form of simple chloroaniline derivatives. The observed high degree of bioavailability indicates that bound pesticidal residues may possess ecotoxicological significance. In parallel studies, the white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium was more efficient, and a soil system was much less efficient, in the degradation of the [ring-U- 14 C]chloroaniline/lignin metabolites

  9. Lignin-Retaining Transparent Wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Fu, Qiliang; Rojas, Ramiro; Yan, Min; Lawoko, Martin; Berglund, Lars

    2017-09-11

    Optically transparent wood, combining optical and mechanical performance, is an emerging new material for light-transmitting structures in buildings with the aim of reducing energy consumption. One of the main obstacles for transparent wood fabrication is delignification, where around 30 wt % of wood tissue is removed to reduce light absorption and refractive index mismatch. This step is time consuming and not environmentally benign. Moreover, lignin removal weakens the wood structure, limiting the fabrication of large structures. A green and industrially feasible method has now been developed to prepare transparent wood. Up to 80 wt % of lignin is preserved, leading to a stronger wood template compared to the delignified alternative. After polymer infiltration, a high-lignin-content transparent wood with transmittance of 83 %, haze of 75 %, thermal conductivity of 0.23 W mK -1 , and work-tofracture of 1.2 MJ m -3 (a magnitude higher than glass) was obtained. This transparent wood preparation method is efficient and applicable to various wood species. The transparent wood obtained shows potential for application in energy-saving buildings. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  10. Characterisation and application of NovaFiber lignin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosselink, R.J.A.; Snijder, M.H.B.; Kranenbarg, A.; Keijsers, E.R.P.; Jong, de E.; Stigsson, L.L.

    2004-01-01

    Sulphur-free lignin coming from a novel alkaline-pulping process called NovaFiber, which has been developed by KIRAM AB, has been characterised and evaluated for potential applications. A Kraft lignin has been used for comparison. Considering the characterisation results of a NovaFiber softwood and

  11. Characterisation of Authentic Lignin Biorefinery Samples by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Determination of the Chemical Formula for Lignin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, Duy Michael; Damgaard Nielsen, Anders; Sørensen, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    samples in situ with no prior purification and minimal sample preparation. Lignin chemical formulas and lignin Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra were extracted from mixed spectra by filtering out signals from residual carbohydrates and minerals. From estimations of C, H and O and adjustment...

  12. Alkaline and Organosolv Lignins from Furfural Residue: Structural Features and Antioxidant Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Fei Cao

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Furfural residue (FR, composed mainly of cellulose and lignin, is an industrial waste produced during furfural manufacture. In this study, dioxane, alkali, ethanol, alkali-ethanol, and alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP were used to extract lignins from FR. The structural features of these lignins obtained were characterized by sugar analysis, GPC, UV, FT-IR, and HSQC spectra. As compared to dioxane lignin (DL, other lignins showed lower molecular weights (Mw owing to the partial cleavage of the linkages between lignin units. Results from HSQC spectra revealed that β-O-4' and β-5' were still the major linkages of the FR lignin. Moreover, p-coumaric and ferulic acids were released and co-precipitated in the lignin preparations extracted with alkali and AHP, whereas part of the esters in DL were preserved during the dioxane extraction. Antioxidant activity investigation indicated that the antioxidant property of the alkali and alkali-ethanol lignins was higher than that of the commercial antioxidant, butylated hydroxytoluene.

  13. Environmental economics of lignin derived transport fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obydenkova, Svetlana V; Kouris, Panos D; Hensen, Emiel J M; Heeres, Hero J; Boot, Michael D

    2017-11-01

    This paper explores the environmental and economic aspects of fast pyrolytic conversion of lignin, obtained from 2G ethanol plants, to transport fuels for both the marine and automotive markets. Various scenarios are explored, pertaining to aggregation of lignin from several sites, alternative energy carries to replace lignin, transport modalities, and allocation methodology. The results highlight two critical factors that ultimately determine the economic and/or environmental fuel viability. The first factor, the logistics scheme, exhibited the disadvantage of the centralized approach, owing to prohibitively expensive transportation costs of the low energy-dense lignin. Life cycle analysis (LCA) displayed the second critical factor related to alternative energy carrier selection. Natural gas (NG) chosen over additional biomass boosts well-to-wheel greenhouse gas emissions (WTW GHG) to a level incompatible with the reduction targets set by the U.S. renewable fuel standard (RFS). Adversely, the process' economics revealed higher profits vs. fossil energy carrier. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Self-enhancement of hepatitis C virus replication by promotion of specific sphingolipid biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Hirata

    Full Text Available Lipids are key components in the viral life cycle that affect host-pathogen interactions. In this study, we investigated the effect of HCV infection on sphingolipid metabolism, especially on endogenous SM levels, and the relationship between HCV replication and endogenous SM molecular species. We demonstrated that HCV induces the expression of the genes (SGMS1 and 2 encoding human SM synthases 1 and 2. We observed associated increases of both total and individual sphingolipid molecular species, as assessed in human hepatocytes and in the detergent-resistant membrane (DRM fraction in which HCV replicates. SGMS1 expression had a correlation with HCV replication. Inhibition of sphingolipid biosynthesis with a hepatotropic serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT inhibitor, NA808, suppressed HCV-RNA production while also interfering with sphingolipid metabolism. Further, we identified the SM molecular species that comprise the DRM fraction and demonstrated that these endogenous SM species interacted with HCV nonstructural 5B polymerase to enhance viral replication. Our results reveal that HCV alters sphingolipid metabolism to promote viral replication, providing new insights into the formation of the HCV replication complex and the involvement of host lipids in the HCV life cycle.

  15. Self-enhancement of hepatitis C virus replication by promotion of specific sphingolipid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Yuichi; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Sudoh, Masayuki; Tokunaga, Yuko; Suzuki, Akemi; Weng, Leiyun; Ohta, Masatoshi; Tobita, Yoshimi; Okano, Ken; Ozeki, Kazuhisa; Kawasaki, Kenichi; Tsukuda, Takuo; Katsume, Asao; Aoki, Yuko; Umehara, Takuya; Sekiguchi, Satoshi; Toyoda, Tetsuya; Shimotohno, Kunitada; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Nishijima, Masahiro; Taguchi, Ryo; Kohara, Michinori

    2012-01-01

    Lipids are key components in the viral life cycle that affect host-pathogen interactions. In this study, we investigated the effect of HCV infection on sphingolipid metabolism, especially on endogenous SM levels, and the relationship between HCV replication and endogenous SM molecular species. We demonstrated that HCV induces the expression of the genes (SGMS1 and 2) encoding human SM synthases 1 and 2. We observed associated increases of both total and individual sphingolipid molecular species, as assessed in human hepatocytes and in the detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) fraction in which HCV replicates. SGMS1 expression had a correlation with HCV replication. Inhibition of sphingolipid biosynthesis with a hepatotropic serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) inhibitor, NA808, suppressed HCV-RNA production while also interfering with sphingolipid metabolism. Further, we identified the SM molecular species that comprise the DRM fraction and demonstrated that these endogenous SM species interacted with HCV nonstructural 5B polymerase to enhance viral replication. Our results reveal that HCV alters sphingolipid metabolism to promote viral replication, providing new insights into the formation of the HCV replication complex and the involvement of host lipids in the HCV life cycle.

  16. Selective aerobic alcohol oxidation method for conversion of lignin into simple aromatic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Shannon S; Rahimi, Alireza

    2015-03-03

    Described is a method to oxidize lignin or lignin sub-units. The method includes oxidation of secondary benzylic alcohol in the lignin or lignin sub-unit to a corresponding ketone in the presence of unprotected primarily aliphatic alcohol in the lignin or lignin sub-unit. The optimal catalyst system consists of HNO.sub.3 in combination with another Bronsted acid, in the absence of a metal-containing catalyst, thereby yielding a selectively oxidized lignin or lignin sub-unit. The method may be carried out in the presence or absence of additional reagents including TEMPO and TEMPO derivatives.

  17. A radioimmunoassay for lignin in plant cell walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawley, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Lignin detection and determination in herbaceous tissue requires selective, specific assays which are not currently available. A radioimmunoassay (RIA) was developed to study lignin metabolism in these tissues. A β-aryl ether lignin model compound was synthesized, linked to keyhole limpet hemocyanin using a water-soluble carbodiimide, and injected into rabbits. The highest titer of the antiserum obtained was 34 ηg/mL of model derivatized BSA. An in vitro system was developed to characterize the RIA. The model compound was linked to amino activated polyacrylamide beads to mimic lignin in the cell walls. 125 I Radiolabelled protein A was used to detect IgG antibody binding. The RIA was shown in the in vitro system to exhibit saturable binding. The amount of antibody bound decreased when the serum was diluted. Immunoelectrophoresis and competitive binding experiments confirmed that both aromatic rings of the lignin model compound had been antigenic. Chlorogenic acid, a phenolic known to be present in plant cells, did not compete for antibody binding. The RIA was used to measure lignin in milled plant samples and barley seedlings. Antiserum binding to wheat cell walls and stressed barley segments was higher than preimmune serum binding. Antibody binding to stressed barley tissue decreased following NaClO 2 delignification. The RIA was found to be less sensitive than expected, so several avenues for improving the method are discussed

  18. Signatures of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase deficiency in poplar lignins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapierre, Catherine; Pilate, Gilles; Pollet, Brigitte; Mila, Isabelle; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Jouanin, Lise; Kim, Hoon; Ralph, John

    2004-02-01

    A series of transgenic poplars down-regulated for cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) was analyzed by thioacidolysis. Among the lignin-derived monomers, the indene compounds that were recently shown to originate from sinapaldehyde incorporated into lignins through 8-O-4-cross-coupling, were found to increase as a function of CAD deficiency level. While these syringyl markers were recovered in substantial amounts in the most severely depressed lines, the markers for coniferaldehyde incorporation were recovered in only low amounts. In conjunction with these additional sinapaldehyde units and relative to the control samples, lignins in CAD-deficient poplar lines had less conventional syringyl-units and beta-O-4-bonds and more free phenolic groups. We found that almost half of the polymers in the most deficient lines could be solubilized in alkali and at room temperature. This unusual behavior suggests that lignins in CAD-deficient poplars occur as small, alkali-leachable lignin domains. That mainly sinapaldehyde incorporates into the lignins of CAD-deficient poplars suggests that the recently identified sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase (SAD), which is structurally distinct from the CAD enzyme targeted herein, does not play any substantial role in constitutive lignification in poplar.

  19. Development of C-lignin with G/S-lignin and lipids in orchid seed coats – an unexpected diversity exposed by ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barsberg, Søren Talbro; Lee, Y.-I.; Rasmussen, Hanne Nina

    2018-01-01

    Cite this article: Barsberg ST, Lee Y-I, Rasmussen HN. Development of C-lignin with G/S-lignin and lipids in orchid seed coats – an unexpected diversity exposed by ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy. Seed Science Research https:// doi.org/10.1017/S0960258517000344......Cite this article: Barsberg ST, Lee Y-I, Rasmussen HN. Development of C-lignin with G/S-lignin and lipids in orchid seed coats – an unexpected diversity exposed by ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy. Seed Science Research https:// doi.org/10.1017/S0960258517000344...

  20. Adsorption of cellulase on cellulolytic enzyme lignin from lodgepole pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Maobing; Pan, Xuejun; Saddler, Jack N

    2009-09-09

    Enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulosic materials is significantly affected by cellulase adsorption onto the lignocellulosic substrates and lignin. The presence of lignin plays an important role in lignocellulosic hydrolysis and enzyme recycling. Three cellulase preparations (Celluclast, Spezyme CP, and MSUBC) were evaluated to determine their adsorption onto cellulolytic enzyme lignin (CEL) from steam-exploded Lodgepole pine (SELP) and ethanol (organosolv)-pretreated Lodgepole pine (EPLP). The adsorption affinity of cellulase (Celluclast) onto isolated lignin (CEL-EPLP and CEL-SELP) was slightly higher than that from corresponding EPLP and SELP substrates on the basis of the Langmuir constants. Effects of temperature, ionic strength, and surfactant on cellulase adsorption onto isolated lignin were also explored in this study. Thermodynamic analysis of enzyme adsorption onto isolated lignin (Gibbs free energy change DeltaG(0) approximately -30 kJ/mol) indicated this adsorption was a spontaneous process. The addition of surfactant (0.2% w/v) could reduce the adsorption of cellulase onto CEL-SELP by 60%. Two types of adsorption isotherm were compared for cellulase adsorption onto isolated lignin. A Langmuir adsorption isotherm showed better fit for the experimental data than a Freundlich adsorption isotherm.

  1. Process for conversion of lignin to reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabtai, Joseph S.; Zmierczak, Wlodzimierz W.; Chornet, Esteban

    1999-09-28

    A process for converting lignin into high-quality reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline compositions in high yields is disclosed. The process is a two-stage, catalytic reaction process that produces a reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product with a controlled amount of aromatics. In the first stage, a lignin material is subjected to a base-catalyzed depolymerization reaction in the presence of a supercritical alcohol as a reaction medium, to thereby produce a depolymerized lignin product. In the second stage, the depolymerized lignin product is subjected to a sequential two-step hydroprocessing reaction to produce a reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product. In the first hydroprocessing step, the depolymerized lignin is contacted with a hydrodeoxygenation catalyst to produce a hydrodeoxygenated intermediate product. In the second hydroprocessing step, the hydrodeoxygenated intermediate product is contacted with a hydrocracking/ring hydrogenation catalyst to produce the reformulated hydrocarbon gasoline product which includes various desirable naphthenic and paraffinic compounds.

  2. Ionic liquid [OMIm][OAc] directly inducing oxidation cleavage of the β-O-4 bond of lignin model compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingying; Fan, Honglei; Meng, Qinglei; Zhang, Zhaofu; Yang, Guanying; Han, Buxing

    2017-08-03

    We explored the oxidation reactions of lignin model compounds directly induced by ionic liquids under metal-free conditions. In this work, it was found that ionic liquid 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate as a solvent could promote the aerobic oxidation of lignin model compound 2-phenoxyacetophenone (1) and the yields of phenol and benzoic acid from 1 could be as high as 96% and 86%, respectively. A possible reaction pathway was proposed based on a series of control experiments. An acetate anion from the ionic liquid attacked the hydrogen from the β-carbon thereby inducing the cleavage of the C-O bond of the aromatic ether. Furthermore, it was found that 2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-1-phenylethanone (4) with a methoxyl group could also be transformed into aromatic products in this simple reaction system and the yields of phenol and benzoic acid from 4 could be as high as 98% and 85%, respectively. This work provides a simple way for efficient transformation of lignin model compounds.

  3. Isolation and characterization of new lignin streams derived from extractive-ammonia (EA) pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    da Costa Sousa, Leonardo [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Foston, Marcus [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Bokade, Vijay [National Chemical Lab., Pune (India); Azarpira, Ali [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Lu, Fachuang [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Ragauskas, Arthur J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Ralph, John [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Dale, Bruce [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Balan, Venkatesh [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2016-05-05

    One of the key challenges facing lignin conversion to fuels and chemicals is related to the level of carbohydrate and ash impurities found in extracted lignin. Structural modifications of lignin may also occur as a result of biomass pretreatment and harsh lignin extraction protocols. Extractive-Ammonia (EA) is a new pretreatment technology that uses liquid ammonia to cleave lignin–carbohydrate complexes, decrystallize cellulose, solubilize lignin, and selectively extract lignin from lignocellulosic biomass, enabling better utilization of both lignin and carbohydrate components in a biorefinery. The EA-based biorefinery produces two different lignin-rich streams, with different properties, that could potentially be upgraded to fuels and chemicals using green processes. Here, a water/ethanol-based fractionation method was developed to enrich the ammonia-soluble extractives, resulting in a major product stream containing 92% lignin. Detailed characterization of the various streams resulting from EA treatment, including compositional analysis, structural characterization by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry, elemental analysis, molecular weight analysis, and thermo-gravimetric analysis provides a broad evaluation of the EA-derived lignin product stream structures and properties, assessing their potential for commercial applications. In conclusion, EA-derived lignins preserve much of lignin's functionality, including the sensitive β-aryl ether units. Furthermore, we observed nitrogen incorporation in the lignin-rich streams, notably due to the presence of hydroxycinnamoyl amides formed during ammonia pretreatment.

  4. Identification of lignin genes and regulatory sequences involved in secondary cell wall formation in Acacia auriculiformis and Acacia mangium via de novo transcriptome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cannon Charles H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acacia auriculiformis × Acacia mangium hybrids are commercially important trees for the timber and pulp industry in Southeast Asia. Increasing pulp yield while reducing pulping costs are major objectives of tree breeding programs. The general monolignol biosynthesis and secondary cell wall formation pathways are well-characterized but genes in these pathways are poorly characterized in Acacia hybrids. RNA-seq on short-read platforms is a rapid approach for obtaining comprehensive transcriptomic data and to discover informative sequence variants. Results We sequenced transcriptomes of A. auriculiformis and A. mangium from non-normalized cDNA libraries synthesized from pooled young stem and inner bark tissues using paired-end libraries and a single lane of an Illumina GAII machine. De novo assembly produced a total of 42,217 and 35,759 contigs with an average length of 496 bp and 498 bp for A. auriculiformis and A. mangium respectively. The assemblies of A. auriculiformis and A. mangium had a total length of 21,022,649 bp and 17,838,260 bp, respectively, with the largest contig 15,262 bp long. We detected all ten monolignol biosynthetic genes using Blastx and further analysis revealed 18 lignin isoforms for each species. We also identified five contigs homologous to R2R3-MYB proteins in other plant species that are involved in transcriptional regulation of secondary cell wall formation and lignin deposition. We searched the contigs against public microRNA database and predicted the stem-loop structures of six highly conserved microRNA families (miR319, miR396, miR160, miR172, miR162 and miR168 and one legume-specific family (miR2086. Three microRNA target genes were predicted to be involved in wood formation and flavonoid biosynthesis. By using the assemblies as a reference, we discovered 16,648 and 9,335 high quality putative Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs in the transcriptomes of A. auriculiformis and A. mangium

  5. Formation of a tyrosine adduct involved in lignin degradation by Trametopsis cervina lignin peroxidase: a novel peroxidase activation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuta Miki; Rebecca Pogni; Sandra Acebes; Fatima Lucas; Elena Fernandez-Fueyo; Maria Camilla Baratto; Maria I. Fernandez; Vivian De Los Rios; Francisco J. Ruiz-duenas; Adalgisa Sinicropi; Riccardo Basosi; Kenneth E. Hammel; Victor Guallar; Angel T. Martinez

    2013-01-01

    LiP (lignin peroxidase) from Trametopsis cervina has an exposed catalytic tyrosine residue (Tyr181) instead of the tryptophan conserved in other lignin-degrading peroxidases. Pristine LiP showed a lag period in VA (veratryl alcohol) oxidation. However, VA-LiP (LiP after treatment with H2O2...

  6. Esterification and characterization of lignin aiming the synthesis of polymeric composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Victor, Priscilla A.; Machado, Fabricio

    2015-01-01

    Lignin is a natural polymer derived from lignocellulosic materials with high availability, presenting a huge potential for production of new materials. Due to its complex macromolecular structure, and its low compatibility with styrene, eucalyptus wood-extracted lignin method was esterified with methacrylic anhydride - exhibiting a yield of 64% - in order to ensure homogeneity in the organic phase into the reaction medium. The evaluation of both the natural and esterified lignin through infrared (IR) spectroscopy showed a decrease of the hydroxyl band, characteristic of natural lignin (3200-3400 cm"-"1) and an increase of the characteristic ester band (1720 to 1740 cm"-"1). According to nuclear magnetic resonance ("1H NMR) analysis on esterified lignin, intense peaks were observed in the range from 1.7 to 2.05 ppm (-CH_3) and 5.4 ppm to 6.2 ppm (=CH_2), related to methacrylic anhydride. According to the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), the esterified lignin showed a decrease in its thermal stability when compared to natural lignin, exhibiting two main weight losses between 200 °C and 300 °C and in the interval from 550 °C to 800 °C. Comparatively, the esterified lignin also displayed an increase in its glass transition temperature (Tg = 98 °C) for, when compared to natural lignin, whose Tg value was determined to be equal to 91 °C. (author)

  7. Genetic loci simultaneously controlling lignin monomers and biomass digestibility of rice straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen; Zhang, Guifen; Muhammad, Ali; Samad, Rana Abdul; Wang, Youmei; Walton, Jonathan D; He, Yuqing; Peng, Liangcai; Wang, Lingqiang

    2018-02-26

    Lignin content and composition are crucial factors affecting biomass digestibility. Exploring the genetic loci simultaneously affecting lignin-relevant traits and biomass digestibility is a precondition for lignin genetic manipulation towards energy crop breeding. In this study, a high-throughput platform was employed to assay the lignin content, lignin composition and biomass enzymatic digestibility of a rice recombinant inbred line population. Correlation analysis indicated that the absolute content of lignin monomers rather than lignin content had negative effects on biomass saccharification, whereas the relative content of p-hydroxyphenyl unit and the molar ratio of p-hydroxyphenyl unit to guaiacyl unit exhibited positive roles. Eight QTL clusters were identified and four of them affecting both lignin composition and biomass digestibility. The additive effects of clustered QTL revealed consistent relationships between lignin-relevant traits and biomass digestibility. Pyramiding rice lines containing the above four positive alleles for increasing biomass digestibility were selected and showed comparable lignin content, decreased syringyl or guaiacyl unit and increased molar percentage of p-hydroxyphenyl unit, the molar ratio of p-hydroxyphenyl unit to guaiacyl unit and sugar releases. More importantly, the lodging resistance and eating/cooking quality of pyramiding lines were not sacrificed, indicating the QTL information could be applied to select desirable energy rice lines.

  8. Dissolved Vanillin as Tracer for Estuarine Lignin Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelkraut, F.

    1996-12-01

    Lignin is produced only by vascular plants and therefore can be used as a tracer for terrestrial organic carbon input to the estuarine and marine environments. Lignin measurements have been done by analyses of the oxidation products such as vanillin or 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde. In the Elbe Estuary, free dissolved vanillin was analysed in order to test whether such measurements yield information on terrestrial carbon inputs into the Estuary and on the vanillin derived from lignin oxidation. In the period 1990-1992, concentrations of dissolved vanillin in the Elbe ranged from 0 to 60 μ g l -1(mean: 8 μg l -1). Higher values were found in areas of increased microbial activity such as the turbidity zone and the river mouth where the water chemistry is influenced by large tidal flats. No correlation was found between dissolved vanillin and suspended matter concentrations, although lignin is normally associated with suspended particulate matter, nor was a covariance seen between dissolved vanillin and the terrestrial carbon inputs into the Estuary. Apparently, biological conversion of lignin was faster than the transport processes, and local sources were more dominant for the vanillin concentration than riverine sources. The dissolved vanillin turnover was fast and, consequently, a significant amount of lignin may be converted within an estuary. In sediments from the Estuary, the concentrations of dissolved vanillin were similar to those found in the water phase and showed no clear vertical profile. The sediment is unlikely to be the source for vanillin.

  9. Abundance and reactivity of dibenzodioxocins in softwood lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyropoulos, Dimitris S; Jurasek, Lubo; Kristofová, Lívia; Xia, Zhicheng; Sun, Yujun; Palus, Ernest

    2002-02-13

    To define the abundance and comprehend the reactivity of dibenzodioxocins in lignin, model compound studies, specific degradation experiments on milled wood lignin, and molecular modeling calculations have been performed. Quantitative (31)P NMR measurements of the increase of biphenolic hydroxyl groups formed after a series of alkaline degradations in the presence of hydrosulfide anions (kraft conditions) showed the presence of 3.7 dibenzodioxocin rings/100 C9 units in milled wood lignin. The DFRC degradation protocol (Derivatization Followed by Reductive Cleavage) was chosen as an independent means to estimate their abundance. Initial experiments with a dibenzodioxocin model compound, trans-6,7-dihydro-7-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-4,9-dimethoxy-2,11-dipropyldibenzo[e,g][1,4]dioxocin-6-ylmethanol, showed that it is not cleaved under DFRC conditions, but rather it isomerizes into a cyclic oxepine structure. Steric effects precluded this isomerization from occurring when DFRC was applied to milled wood lignin. Instead, monoacetylated biphenolic moieties were released and quantified by (31)P NMR, at 4.3 dibenzodioxocin rings/100 C9 units. The dibenzodioxocin content in residual lignins isolated from kraft pulps delignified to various degrees showed that during pulp delignification, the initial rate of dibenzodioxocin removal was considerably greater than the cleavage rate of arylglycerol-beta-aryl ether bonds. The activation energy for the degradation of dibenzodioxocins under kraft conditions in milled wood lignin was 96 +/- 9 kJ/mol, similar to that of arylglycerol-beta-aryl ether bond cleavage.

  10. Fast Pyrolysis of Four Lignins from Different Isolation Processes Using Py-GC/MS

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Xiaona; Sui, Shujuan; Tan, Shun; Pittman, Charles; Sun, Jianping; Zhang, Zhijun

    2015-01-01

    Pyrolysis is a promising approach that is being investigated to convert lignin into higher value products including biofuels and phenolic chemicals. In this study, fast pyrolysis of four types of lignin, including milled Amur linden wood lignin (MWL), enzymatic hydrolysis corn stover lignin (EHL), wheat straw alkali lignin (AL) and wheat straw sulfonate lignin (SL), were performed using pyrolysis gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) showed that the...

  11. Lignins : natural polymers from oxidative coupling of 4-hydroxyphenyl-propanoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Ralph; Knut Lundquist; Gosta Brunow; Fachuang Lu; Hoon Kim; Paul F. Schatz; Jane M. Marita; Ronald D. Hatfield; Sally A. Ralph; Jorgen Holst Christensen; Wout Boerjan

    2004-01-01

    Lignins are complex natural polymers resulting from oxidative coupling of, primarily, 4-hydroxyphenylpropanoids. An understanding of their nature is evolving as a result of detailed structural studies, recently aided by the availability of lignin-biosynthetic-pathway mutants and transgenics. The currently accepted theory is that the lignin polymer is formed by...

  12. Lignin-solubilizing ability of actinomycetes isolated from termite (Termitidae) gut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasti, M.B.; Crawford, D.L.; Pometto, A.L. III; Nuti, M.P.

    1990-01-01

    The lignocellulose-degrading abilities of 11 novel actinomycete strains isolated from termite gut were determined and compared with that of the well-characterized actinomycete, Streptomyces viridosporus T7A. Lignocellulose bioconversion was followed by (i) monitoring the degradation of [ 14 C]lignin- and [ 14 C]cellulose-labeled phloem of Abies concolor to 14 CO 2 and 14 C-labeled water-soluble products, (ii) determining lignocellulose, lignin, and carbohydrate losses resulting from growth on a lignocellulose substrate prepared from corn stalks (Zea mays), and (iii) quantifying production of a water-soluble lignin degradation intermediate (acid-precipitable polymeric lignin). Of the assays used, total lignocellulose weight loss was most useful in determining overall bioconversion ability but not in identifying the best lignin-solubilizing strains. A screening procedure based on 14 CO 2 evolution from [ 14 C-lignin]lignocellulose combined with measurement of acid-precipitable polymeric lignin yield was the most effective in identifying lignin-solubilizing strains. For the termite gut strains, the pH of the medium showed no increase after 3 weeks of growth on lignocellulose. This is markedly different from the pattern observed with S. viridosporus T7A, which raises the medium pH considerably. Production of extracellular peroxidases by the 11 strains and S. viridosporus T7A was followed for 5 days in liquid cultures. On the basis of an increase of specific peroxidase activity in the presence of lignocellulose in the medium, the actinomycetes could be placed into the same three groups

  13. Lignin Modification for Biopolymer/Conjugated Polymer Hybrids as Renewable Energy Storage Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Ting Yang; Wagner, Michal; Inganäs, Olle

    2015-12-07

    Lignin derivatives, which arise as waste products from the pulp and paper industry and are mainly used for heating, can be used as charge storage materials. The charge storage function is a result of the quinone groups formed in the lignin derivative. Herein, we modified lignins to enhance the density of such quinone groups by covalently linking monolignols and quinones through phenolation. The extra guaiacyl, syringyl, and hydroquinone groups introduced by phenolation of kraft lignin derivatives were monitored by (31) P nuclear magnetic resonance and size exclusion chromatography. Electropolymerization in ethylene glycol/tetraethylammonium tosylate electrolyte was used to synthesize the kraft lignin/polypyrrole hybrid films. These modifications changed the phenolic content of the kraft lignin with attachment of hydroquinone units yielding the highest specific capacity (around 70 mA h g(-1) ). The modification of softwood and hardwood lignin derivatives yielded 50 % and 23 % higher charge capacity than the original lignin, respectively. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Lignin transformations and reactivity upon ozonation in aqueous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khudoshin, A. G.; Mitrofanova, A. N.; Lunin, V. V.

    2012-03-01

    The reaction of ozone with lignin in aqueous acidic solutions is investigated. The Danckwerst model is used to describe the kinetics of gas/liquid processes occurring in a bubble reactor. The efficient ozonation rate of a soluble lignin analog, sodium lignosulfate, is determined. The main lines of the reaction between ozone and lignin are revealed on the basis of kinetic analysis results and IR and UV spectroscopy data.

  15. Electron-beam mediated dry distillation of lignin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chulkov, V.N.; Bludenko, A.V.; Ponomarev, A.V.

    2007-01-01

    Radiation heating was studied for its application in dry distillation of lignin under high absorbed-dose irradiation with no supplementary heating device used. Commercial preparation Polyphepan containing lignin (90 wt.%) and cellulose (10 wt.%), dried at 102 deg C, was used. The test samples were exposed to 8 MeV electron beams on U-003 linear accelerator under atmospheric pressure, with dose rates of 3.6 and 4.8 kGy/s. It is demonstrated that an increased yield of liquid products of dry lignin distillation is observed under conditions studied with a two-fold decrease in energy consumption due to more favorable heating conditions and intensification of free-radical reactions [ru

  16. Membrane Technology for the Recovery of Lignin: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Humpert

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Utilization of renewable resources is becoming increasingly important, and only sustainable processes that convert such resources into useful products can achieve environmentally beneficial economic growth. Wastewater from the pulp and paper industry is an unutilized resource offering the potential to recover valuable products such as lignin, pigments, and water [1]. The recovery of lignin is particularly important because it has many applications, and membrane technology has been investigated as the basis of innovative recovery solutions. The concentration of lignin can be increased from 62 to 285 g∙L−1 using membranes and the recovered lignin is extremely pure. Membrane technology is also scalable and adaptable to different waste liquors from the pulp and paper industry.

  17. Membrane Technology for the Recovery of Lignin: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humpert, Daniel; Ebrahimi, Mehrdad; Czermak, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Utilization of renewable resources is becoming increasingly important, and only sustainable processes that convert such resources into useful products can achieve environmentally beneficial economic growth. Wastewater from the pulp and paper industry is an unutilized resource offering the potential to recover valuable products such as lignin, pigments, and water [1]. The recovery of lignin is particularly important because it has many applications, and membrane technology has been investigated as the basis of innovative recovery solutions. The concentration of lignin can be increased from 62 to 285 g∙L−1 using membranes and the recovered lignin is extremely pure. Membrane technology is also scalable and adaptable to different waste liquors from the pulp and paper industry. PMID:27608047

  18. Structural Changes of Lignin from Wheat Straw by Steam Explosion and Ethanol Pretreatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Pan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Effects of the pretreatment of wheat straw by steam explosion and ethanol were evaluated relative to the structural changes of lignin from the pretreated pulp. The lignin from steam explosion pulp (LS, lignin from steam blasting residual liquid (LL, lignin from ethanol pretreatment pulp (LE, lignin from black liquor (LB, and lignin from wheat straw (LW were separated, and the structural characteristics of the lignin fractions were compared based on analyses of Fourier transform-infrared, ultraviolet, thermogravimetric, and 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. The proportions of the three structural units in all lignin fractions clearly changed during the pretreatment process because of inter-conversion reactions. The conjugated structure of lignin was destroyed in the pretreatment process and was also affected by the alkali extraction process. The alcoholic hydroxyl links on the aliphatic side chain were partly transformed into carbonyl groups during ethanol pretreatment. Demethoxylation occurred in all lignin fractions during the ethanol pretreatment and steam explosion process. The thermal stability of the LB fraction was relatively high because of the condensation reaction.

  19. Identification of the primary mechanism for fungal lignin degradation. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    Many lignin-degrading fungi appear to lack lignin peroxidase (LiP), an enzyme generally thought important for fungal ligninolysis. The authors are working with one of these fungi, Ceriporiopsis subvermispora, an aggressive white-rotter that selectively removes lignin from wood. During this project period, they have obtained the following principal results: new polymeric lignin model compounds were developed to assist in the elucidation of fungal ligninolytic mechanisms; experiments with one of the polymeric lignin models showed that C. subvermispora cultures which express no detectable LiP activity are nevertheless able to degrade nonphenolic lignin structures, this result is significant because LiPs were previously considered essential for fungal attack on these recalcitrant structures, which constitute about 90% of lignin; manganese peroxidases (MnPs), which C. subvermispora does produce, catalyze the peroxidation of unsaturated fatty acids to give fatty acid hydroperoxides, fatty acid hydroperoxides are also used by MnP as oxidants (in place of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) that support the MnP catalytic cycle, these results indicate that MnP turnover in the presence of unsaturated lipids generates reactive lipid oxyradicals that could act as oxidant of other molecules; MnP-mediated lipid peroxidation results in the co-oxidative cleavage of nonphenolic lignin structures, the MnP/lipid peroxidation system may therefore provide C. subvermispora and other LiP-negative fungi with a mechanism to degrade the principal structures of lignin.

  20. Recent Progress in Producing Lignin-Based Carbon Fibers for Functional Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Ryan [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.; Burwell, Deanna [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.; Dai, Xuliang [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.; Naskar, Amit [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Gallego, Nidia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Akato, Kokouvi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2015-10-29

    Lignin, a biopolymer, has been investigated as a renewable and low-cost carbon fiber precursor since the 1960s. Although successful lab-scale production of lignin-based carbon fibers has been reported, there are currently not any commercial producers. This paper will highlight some of the known challenges with converting lignin-based precursors into carbon fiber, and the reported methods for purifying and modifying lignin to improve it as a precursor. Several of the challenges with lignin are related to its diversity in chemical structure and purity, depending on its biomass source (e.g. hardwood, softwood, grasses) and extraction method (e.g. organosolv, kraft). In order to make progress in this field, GrafTech and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are collaborating to develop lignin-based carbon fiber technology and to demonstrate it in functional applications, as part of a cooperative agreement with the DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office. The progress made to date with producing lignin-based carbon fiber for functional applications, as well as developing and qualifying a supply chain and value proposition, are also highlighted.

  1. Characterization of anaerobic consortia coupled lignin depolymerization with biomethane generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Rui; He, Jianzhong

    2013-07-01

    Two sediment-free microbial consortia (LI3 and LP3) were established to depolymerize lignin under anaerobic conditions. During depolymerizing high molecular weight lignin to low molecular weight molecules, the two cultures produced biomethane up to 151.7 and 113.0 mL g(-1) total lignin. Furthermore, LI3 and LP3 could also utilize the biomass - oil palm empty fruit bunch fiber (OPEFB) to produce 190.6 and 195.6 mL methaneg(-1) total lignin in OPEFB, and at the same time improve the bioavailability of lignocellulosic matters for further enzymatic hydrolysis. The microbial community analysis by denature gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and the high-density 16S rDNA gene microarray (PhyloChip) exhibited that Methanomethylovorans sp. (LI3) and Methanoculleus sp. (LP3) were the main methanogens present, and phylum Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes were mainly involved in the lignin depolymerization. The established microbial consortia with both lignin depolymerization and biomethane production provide profound application on the environmental friendly pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Coconut coir pith lignin: A physicochemical and thermal characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asoka Panamgama, L; Peramune, P R U S K

    2018-07-01

    The structural and thermal features of coconut coir pith lignin, isolated by three different extraction protocols incorporating two different energy supply sources, were characterized by different analytical tools. The three different chemical extraction protocols were alkaline - 7.5% (w/v) NaOH, organosolv - 85% (v/v) formic and acetic acids at 7:3 (v/v) ratio and polyethylene glycol (PEG): water ratio at 80:20wt%. The two sources of energy were thermal or microwave. Raw lignins were modified by epichlorohydrin to enhance reactivity, and the characteristics of raw and modified lignins were comparatively analysed. Using the thermal energy source, the alkaline and organosolv processes obtained the highest and lowest lignin yields of 26.4±1.5wt% and 3.4±0.2wt%, respectively, as shown by wet chemical analysis. Specific functional group analysis by Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR) revealed that significantly different amounts of hydroxyl and carbonyl groups exist in alkaline, organosolv and PEG lignins. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) illustrated that the lowest degradation onset temperature was recorded for organosolv lignin, and the overall order was organosolvlignin extraction from coir pith can be performed efficiently with several protocols and that those methods offer practical value to industry. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Lignin biopolymer based triboelectric nanogenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yukai; Wang, Ruoxing; Lu, Yunmei; Wu, Wenzhuo

    2017-07-01

    Ongoing research in triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) focuses on increasing power generation, but obstacles concerning economical and eco-friendly utilization of TENGs continue to prevail. Being the second most abundant biopolymer on earth, lignin offers a valuable opportunity for low-cost TENG applications in biomedical devices, benefitting from its biodegradability and biocompatibility. Here, we develop for the first time a lignin biopolymer based TENGs for harvesting mechanical energy in the environment, which shows great potential for self-powered biomedical devices among other applications and opens doors to new technologies that utilize otherwise wasted materials for economically feasible and ecologically friendly production of energy devices.

  4. Lignin nanotubes as vehicles for gene delivery into human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten, Elena; Ling, Chen; Wang, Yuan; Srivastava, Arun; Dempere, Luisa Amelia; Vermerris, Wilfred

    2014-01-13

    Lignin nanotubes (LNTs) synthesized from the aromatic plant cell wall polymer lignin in a sacrificial alumina membrane template have as useful features their flexibility, ease of functionalization due to the availability of many functional groups, label-free detection by autofluorescence, and customizable optical properties. In this report we show that the physicochemical properties of LNTs can be varied over a wide range to match requirements for specific applications by using lignin with different subunit composition, a function of plant species and genotype, and by choosing the lignin isolation method (thioglycolic acid, phosphoric acid, sulfuric acid (Klason), sodium hydroxide lignin), which influences the size and reactivity of the lignin fragments. Cytotoxicity studies with human HeLa cells showed that concentrations of up to 90 mg/mL are tolerated, which is a 10-fold higher concentration than observed for single- or multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Confocal microscopy imaging revealed that all LNT formulations enter HeLa cells without auxiliary agents and that LNTs made from NaOH-lignin penetrate the cell nucleus. We further show that DNA can adsorb to LNTs. Consequently, exposure of HeLa cells to LNTs coated with DNA encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP) leads to transfection and expression of GFP. The highest transfection efficiency was obtained with LNTs made from NaOH-lignin due to a combination of high DNA binding capacity and DNA delivery directly into the nucleus. These combined features of LNTs make LNTs attractive as smart delivery vehicles of DNA without the cytotoxicity associated with CNTs or the immunogenicity of viral vectors.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of biodegradable lignin nanoparticles with tunable surface properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richter, Alexander P.; Bharti, Bhuvnesh; Armstrong, Hinton B.; Brown, Joseph S.; Plemmons, Dayne; Paunov, Vesselin N.; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Velev, Orlin D.

    2016-01-01

    Lignin nanoparticles can serve as biodegradable carriers of biocidal actives with minimal environmental footprint. Here we describe the colloidal synthesis and interfacial design of nanoparticles with tunable surface properties using two different lignin precursors, Kraft (Indulin AT) lignin and

  6. Structural characterization of alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreated grasses exhibiting diverse lignin phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background For cellulosic biofuels processes, suitable characterization of the lignin remaining within the cell wall and correlation of quantified properties of lignin to cell wall polysaccharide enzymatic deconstruction is underrepresented in the literature. This is particularly true for grasses which represent a number of promising bioenergy feedstocks where quantification of grass lignins is particularly problematic due to the high fraction of p-hydroxycinnamates. The main focus of this work is to use grasses with a diverse range of lignin properties, and applying multiple lignin characterization platforms, attempt to correlate the differences in these lignin properties to the susceptibility to alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic deconstruction. Results We were able to determine that the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose to to glucose (i.e. digestibility) of four grasses with relatively diverse lignin phenotypes could be correlated to total lignin content and the content of p-hydroxycinnamates, while S/G ratios did not appear to contribute to the enzymatic digestibility or delignification. The lignins of the brown midrib corn stovers tested were significantly more condensed than a typical commercial corn stover and a significant finding was that pretreatment with alkaline hydrogen peroxide increases the fraction of lignins involved in condensed linkages from 88–95% to ~99% for all the corn stovers tested, which is much more than has been reported in the literature for other pretreatments. This indicates significant scission of β-O-4 bonds by pretreatment and/or induction of lignin condensation reactions. The S/G ratios in grasses determined by analytical pyrolysis are significantly lower than values obtained using either thioacidolysis or 2DHSQC NMR due to presumed interference by ferulates. Conclusions It was found that grass cell wall polysaccharide hydrolysis by cellulolytic enzymes for grasses exhibiting a diversity of

  7. Structural characterization of alkaline hydrogen peroxide pretreated grasses exhibiting diverse lignin phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Muyang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For cellulosic biofuels processes, suitable characterization of the lignin remaining within the cell wall and correlation of quantified properties of lignin to cell wall polysaccharide enzymatic deconstruction is underrepresented in the literature. This is particularly true for grasses which represent a number of promising bioenergy feedstocks where quantification of grass lignins is particularly problematic due to the high fraction of p-hydroxycinnamates. The main focus of this work is to use grasses with a diverse range of lignin properties, and applying multiple lignin characterization platforms, attempt to correlate the differences in these lignin properties to the susceptibility to alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP pretreatment and subsequent enzymatic deconstruction. Results We were able to determine that the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose to to glucose (i.e. digestibility of four grasses with relatively diverse lignin phenotypes could be correlated to total lignin content and the content of p-hydroxycinnamates, while S/G ratios did not appear to contribute to the enzymatic digestibility or delignification. The lignins of the brown midrib corn stovers tested were significantly more condensed than a typical commercial corn stover and a significant finding was that pretreatment with alkaline hydrogen peroxide increases the fraction of lignins involved in condensed linkages from 88–95% to ~99% for all the corn stovers tested, which is much more than has been reported in the literature for other pretreatments. This indicates significant scission of β-O-4 bonds by pretreatment and/or induction of lignin condensation reactions. The S/G ratios in grasses determined by analytical pyrolysis are significantly lower than values obtained using either thioacidolysis or 2DHSQC NMR due to presumed interference by ferulates. Conclusions It was found that grass cell wall polysaccharide hydrolysis by cellulolytic enzymes for grasses

  8. Combinatorial pretreatment and fermentation optimization enabled a record yield on lignin bioconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-Hua; Xie, Shangxian; Lin, Furong; Jin, Mingjie; Yuan, Joshua S

    2018-01-01

    Lignin valorization has recently been considered to be an essential process for sustainable and cost-effective biorefineries. Lignin represents a potential new feedstock for value-added products. Oleaginous bacteria such as Rhodococcus opacus can produce intracellular lipids from biodegradation of aromatic substrates. These lipids can be used for biofuel production, which can potentially replace petroleum-derived chemicals. However, the low reactivity of lignin produced from pretreatment and the underdeveloped fermentation technology hindered lignin bioconversion to lipids. In this study, combinatorial pretreatment with an optimized fermentation strategy was evaluated to improve lignin valorization into lipids using R. opacus PD630. As opposed to single pretreatment, combinatorial pretreatment produced a 12.8-75.6% higher lipid concentration in fermentation using lignin as the carbon source. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis showed that combinatorial pretreatment released more aromatic monomers, which could be more readily utilized by lignin-degrading strains. Three detoxification strategies were used to remove potential inhibitors produced from pretreatment. After heating detoxification of the lignin stream, the lipid concentration further increased by 2.9-9.7%. Different fermentation strategies were evaluated in scale-up lipid fermentation using a 2.0-l fermenter. With laccase treatment of the lignin stream produced from combinatorial pretreatment, the highest cell dry weight and lipid concentration were 10.1 and 1.83 g/l, respectively, in fed-batch fermentation, with a total soluble substrate concentration of 40 g/l. The improvement of the lipid fermentation performance may have resulted from lignin depolymerization by the combinatorial pretreatment and laccase treatment, reduced inhibition effects by fed-batch fermentation, adequate oxygen supply, and an accurate pH control in the fermenter. Overall, these results demonstrate that combinatorial

  9. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ruoshui [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Guo, Mond [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Lin, Kuan-ting [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Hebert, Vincent R. [Food and Environmental Laboratory, Washington State, University-TriCities, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Zhang, Jinwen [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Wolcott, Michael P. [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Quintero, Melissa [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K. [Chemical and Biological Process Development Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Chen, Xiaowen [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Lab, 1617 Cole Blvd Golden CO 80127 USA; Zhang, Xiao [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA

    2016-07-04

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high-value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) including 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPC yields obtained were 18 and 22 % based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL, respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47 %. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  10. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ruoshui [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Guo, Mond [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Lin, Kuan-ting [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Hebert, Vincent R. [Food and Environmental Laboratory, Washington State, University-TriCities, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Zhang, Jinwen [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Wolcott, Michael P. [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Quintero, Melissa [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K. [Chemical and Biological Process Development Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Chen, Xiaowen [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Lab, 1617 Cole Blvd Golden CO 80127 USA; Zhang, Xiao [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA

    2016-07-04

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer as well as its complex side chain structures, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) inclduing 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPCs yields obtained were 18% and 22% based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47%. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  11. Chemicals from lignin: an interplay of lignocellulose fractionation, depolymerisation, and upgrading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutyser, W; Renders, T; Van den Bosch, S; Koelewijn, S-F; Beckham, G T; Sels, B F

    2018-02-05

    In pursuit of more sustainable and competitive biorefineries, the effective valorisation of lignin is key. An alluring opportunity is the exploitation of lignin as a resource for chemicals. Three technological biorefinery aspects will determine the realisation of a successful lignin-to-chemicals valorisation chain, namely (i) lignocellulose fractionation, (ii) lignin depolymerisation, and (iii) upgrading towards targeted chemicals. This review provides a summary and perspective of the extensive research that has been devoted to each of these three interconnected biorefinery aspects, ranging from industrially well-established techniques to the latest cutting edge innovations. To navigate the reader through the overwhelming collection of literature on each topic, distinct strategies/topics were delineated and summarised in comprehensive overview figures. Upon closer inspection, conceptual principles arise that rationalise the success of certain methodologies, and more importantly, can guide future research to further expand the portfolio of promising technologies. When targeting chemicals, a key objective during the fractionation and depolymerisation stage is to minimise lignin condensation (i.e. formation of resistive carbon-carbon linkages). During fractionation, this can be achieved by either (i) preserving the (native) lignin structure or (ii) by tolerating depolymerisation of the lignin polymer but preventing condensation through chemical quenching or physical removal of reactive intermediates. The latter strategy is also commonly applied in the lignin depolymerisation stage, while an alternative approach is to augment the relative rate of depolymerisation vs. condensation by enhancing the reactivity of the lignin structure towards depolymerisation. Finally, because depolymerised lignins often consist of a complex mixture of various compounds, upgrading of the raw product mixture through convergent transformations embodies a promising approach to decrease the

  12. Chemicals from Lignin: An Interplay of Lignocellulose Fractionation, Depolymerisation, and Upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, Gregg T [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Schutyser, Wouter [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Renders, Tom [KU Leuven; Van den Bosch, Sander [KU Leuven; Koelewijn, Steven-Friso [KU Leuven; Sels, Bert F. [KU Leuven

    2018-01-01

    In pursuit of more sustainable and competitive biorefineries, the effective valorisation of lignin is key. An alluring opportunity is the exploitation of lignin as a resource for chemicals. Three technological biorefinery aspects will determine the realisation of a successful lignin-to-chemicals valorisation chain, namely (i) lignocellulose fractionation, (ii) lignin depolymerisation, and (iii) upgrading towards targeted chemicals. This review provides a summary and perspective of the extensive research that has been devoted to each of these three interconnected biorefinery aspects, ranging from industrially well-established techniques to the latest cutting edge innovations. To navigate the reader through the overwhelming collection of literature on each topic, distinct strategies/topics were delineated and summarised in comprehensive overview figures. Upon closer inspection, conceptual principles arise that rationalise the success of certain methodologies, and more importantly, can guide future research to further expand the portfolio of promising technologies. When targeting chemicals, a key objective during the fractionation and depolymerisation stage is to minimise lignin condensation (i.e. formation of resistive carbon-carbon linkages). During fractionation, this can be achieved by either (i) preserving the (native) lignin structure or (ii) by tolerating depolymerisation of the lignin polymer but preventing condensation through chemical quenching or physical removal of reactive intermediates. The latter strategy is also commonly applied in the lignin depolymerisation stage, while an alternative approach is to augment the relative rate of depolymerisation vs. condensation by enhancing the reactivity of the lignin structure towards depolymerisation. Finally, because depolymerised lignins often consist of a complex mixture of various compounds, upgrading of the raw product mixture through convergent transformations embodies a promising approach to decrease the

  13. Catalytic Reforming of Lignin-Derived Bio-Oil Over a Nanoporous Molecular Sieve Silicoaluminophosphate-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y K; Kang, Hyeon Koo; Jang, Hansaem; Suh, Dong Jin; Park, Sung Hoon

    2016-05-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of lignin, a major constituent of biomass, was performed. A nanoporous molecular sieve silicoaluminophosphate-11 (SAPO-11) was selected as catalyst. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that 500 degrees C was the optimal pyrolysis temperature. Pyrolyzer-gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy was used to investigate the pyrolysis product distribution. Production of phenolics, the dominant product from the pyrolysis of lignin, was promoted by the increase in the catalyst dose. In particular, low-molecular-mass phenolics were produced more over SAPO-11, while high-molecular-mass phenolics and double-bond-containing phenolics were produced less. The fraction of aromatic compounds, including benzene, toluene, xylene, and ethylbenzene, was also increased by catalytic reforming. The catalytic effects were more pronounced when the catalyst/biomass ratio was increased. The enhanced production of aromatic compounds by an acidic catalyst obtained in this study is in good agreement with the results of previous studies.

  14. Cellulase-lignin interactions in the enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahikainen, J.

    2013-11-01

    Today, the production of transportation fuels and chemicals is heavily dependent on fossil carbon sources, such as oil and natural gas. Their limited availability and the environmental concerns arising from their use have driven the search for renewable alternatives. Lignocellulosic plant biomass is the most abundant, but currently underutilised, renewable carbon-rich resource for fuel and chemical production. Enzymatic degradation of structural polysaccharides in lignocellulose produces soluble carbohydrates that serve as ideal precursors for the production of a vast amount of different chemical compounds. The difficulty in full exploitation of lignocellulose for fuel and chemical production lies in the complex and recalcitrant structure of the raw material. Lignocellulose is mainly composed of structural polysaccharides, cellulose and hemicellulose, but also of lignin, which is an aromatic polymer. Enzymatic degradation of cellulose and hemicellulose is restricted by several substrate- and enzyme-related factors, among which lignin is considered as one of the most problematic issues. Lignin restricts the action of hydrolytic enzymes and enzyme binding onto lignin has been identified as a major inhibitory mechanism preventing efficient hydrolysis of lignocellulosic feedstocks. In this thesis, the interactions between cellulase enzymes and lignin-rich compounds were studied in detail and the findings reported in this work have the potential to help in controlling the harmful cellulase-lignin interactions, and thus improve the biochemical processing route from lignocellulose to fuels and chemicals.

  15. Bifunctional Molybdenum Polyoxometalates for the Combined Hydrodeoxygenation and Alkylation of Lignin-Derived Model Phenolics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eric; Crisci, Anthony; Murugappan, Karthick; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2017-05-22

    Reductive catalytic fractionation of biomass has recently emerged as a powerful lignin extraction and depolymerization method to produce monomeric aromatic oxygenates in high yields. Here, bifunctional molybdenum-based polyoxometalates supported on titania (POM/TiO 2 ) are shown to promote tandem hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and alkylation reactions, converting lignin-derived oxygenated aromatics into alkylated benzenes and alkylated phenols in high yields. In particular, anisole and 4-propylguaiacol were used as model compounds for this gas-phase study using a packed-bed flow reactor. For anisole, 30 % selectivity for alkylated aromatic compounds (54 % C-alkylation of the methoxy groups by methyl balance) with an overall 72 % selectivity for HDO at 82 % anisole conversion was observed over H 3 PMo 12 O 40 /TiO 2 at 7 h on stream. Under similar conditions, 4-propylguaiacol was mainly converted into 4-propylphenol and alkylated 4-propylphenols with a selectivity to alkylated 4-propylphenols of 42 % (77 % C-alkylation) with a total HDO selectivity to 4-propylbenzene and alkylated 4-propylbenzenes of 4 % at 92 % conversion (7 h on stream). Higher catalyst loadings pushed the 4-propylguaiacol conversion to 100 % and resulted in a higher selectivity to propylbenzene of 41 %, alkylated aromatics of 21 % and alkylated phenols of 17 % (51 % C-alkylation). The reactivity studies coupled with catalyst characterization revealed that Lewis acid sites act synergistically with neighboring Brønsted acid sites to simultaneously promote alkylation and hydrodeoxygenation activity. A reaction mechanism is proposed involving activation of the ether bond on a Lewis acid site, followed by methyl transfer and C-alkylation. Mo-based POMs represent a versatile catalytic platform to simultaneously upgrade lignin-derived oxygenated aromatics into alkylated arenes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Thermochemical Conversion of Lignin for Fuels and Chemicals: A Review Conversion thermochimique de la lignine en carburants et produits chimiques : une revue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joffres B.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Lignin is one of the biomass components potentially usable as renewable resource to produce fuels or chemicals. After separation from the lignocellulosic matrix, this macromolecule is nowadays essentially valorized by combustion in paper mills. If second generation ethanol is produced in the future from lignocellulosic biomass, some increasing reserves of lignin will be available in addition to the ones coming from the paper industry. The main thermochemical ways such as pyrolysis, solvolysis, hydrothermal conversion and hydroconversion considered for the valorization of the lignin are reviewed in this article. La lignine est une des composantes de la biomasse lignocellulosique potentiellement valorisable comme ressource renouvelable pour la production de carburants ou de produits chimiques. Après séparation de la matrice lignocellulosique, cette macromolécule est de nos jours essentiellement utilisée comme combustible dans l’industrie papetière. Outre cette filière papetière, la production d’éthanol de seconde génération à partir de la cellulose aura comme conséquence la mise à disponibilité d’encore plus grandes quantités de lignine. De nouvelles applications pourront donc être proposées pour l’utilisation de cette bio-ressource. Les différentes voies thermochimiques : pyrolyse, solvolyse, conversion hydrothermale et hydroconversion envisagées pour la valorisation de la lignine sont décrites dans cet article.

  17. Modified lignin: Preparation and use in reversible gel via Diels-Alder reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wanpeng; Zhang, Hui; Chen, Fangeng

    2018-02-01

    In this study, popular soda lignin was modified with either furan or maleimide ring, and the modified lignins were subjected to reversible Diels-Alder reaction. A new process was proposed to prepare the functionalized lignin. A long chain was introduced to the hydroxyl groups of lignin, and then either the furan or maleimide ring was added to the other end of the chain. The test results confirmed that either the furan ring or the maleimide ring was bound to lignin. Furan- and maleimide-functionalized lignins were also combined to generate crosslinking via Diels-Alder [4+2] cycloaddition reaction. Under appropriate conditions, the formation of a gel was identified, which reverted to liquid state after retro Diels-Alder reaction upon heating at 120°C. This study reveals the significant versatility and potential of the developed strategy for the utilization of lignin-based recyclable networks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. EFFECT OF LIGNIN CONTENT ON ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS OF FURFURAL RESIDUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxin Jiang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The enzymatic saccharification of pretreated furfural residues with different lignin content was studied to verify the effect of lignin removal in the hydrolysis process. The results showed that the glucose yield was improved by increasing the lignin removal. A maximum glucose yield of 96.8% was obtained when the residue with a lignin removal of 51.4% was hydrolyzed for 108 h at an enzyme loading of 25 FPU/g cellulose. However, further lignin removal did not increase the hydrolysis. The effect of enzyme loading on the enzymatic hydrolysis was also explored in this work. It was concluded that a high glucose yield of 90% was achieved when the enzyme dosage was reduced from 25 to 15 FPU/g cellulose, which was cost-effective for the sugar and ethanol production. The structures of raw material and delignified samples were further characterized by XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM.

  19. Tunable Thermosetting Epoxies Based on Fractionated and Well-Characterized Lignins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, Claudio; Lo Re, Giada; Lawoko, Martin; Berglund, Lars

    2018-03-21

    Here we report the synthesis of thermosetting resins from low molar mass Kraft lignin fractions of high functionality, refined by solvent extraction. Such fractions were fully characterized by 31 P NMR, 2D-HSQC NMR, SEC, and DSC in order to obtain a detailed description of the structures. Reactive oxirane moieties were introduced on the lignin backbone under mild reaction conditions and quantified by simple 1 H NMR analysis. The modified fractions were chemically cross-linked with a flexible polyether diamine ( M n ≈ 2000), in order to obtain epoxy thermosets. Epoxies from different lignin fractions, studied by DSC, DMA, tensile tests, and SEM, demonstrated substantial differences in terms of thermo-mechanical properties. For the first time, strong relationships between lignin structures and epoxy properties could be demonstrated. The suggested approach provides unprecedented possibilities to tune network structure and properties of thermosets based on real lignin fractions, rather than model compounds.

  20. Fast Pyrolysis of Lignin Using a Pyrolysis Centrifuge Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh, Ngoc Trung; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Sárossy, Zsuzsa

    2013-01-01

    Fast pyrolysis of lignin from an ethanol plant was investigated on a lab scale pyrolysis centrifuge reactor (PCR) with respect to pyrolysis temperature, reactor gas residence time, and feed rate. A maximal organic oil yield of 34 wt % dry basis (db) (bio-oil yield of 43 wt % db) is obtained...... at temperatures of 500−550 °C, reactor gas residence time of 0.8 s, and feed rate of 5.6 g/min. Gas chromatography mass spectrometry and size-exclusion chromatography were used to characterize the Chemical properties of the lignin oils. Acetic acid, levoglucosan, guaiacol, syringols, and p-vinylguaiacol are found...... components and molecular mass distribution of the lignin oils. The obtained lignin oil has a very different components composition when compared to a beech wood oil....

  1. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruoshui; Guo, Mond; Lin, Kuan-Ting; Hebert, Vincent R; Zhang, Jinwen; Wolcott, Michael P; Quintero, Melissa; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K; Chen, Xiaowen; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-07-25

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high-value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) including 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPC yields obtained were 18 and 22 % based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL, respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47 %. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Fast Pyrolysis of Four Lignins from Different Isolation Processes Using Py-GC/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaona Lin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pyrolysis is a promising approach that is being investigated to convert lignin into higher value products including biofuels and phenolic chemicals. In this study, fast pyrolysis of four types of lignin, including milled Amur linden wood lignin (MWL, enzymatic hydrolysis corn stover lignin (EHL, wheat straw alkali lignin (AL and wheat straw sulfonate lignin (SL, were performed using pyrolysis gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA showed that the four lignins exhibited widely different thermolysis behaviors. The four lignins had similar functional groups according to the FTIR analysis. Syringyl, guaiacyl and p-hydroxyphenylpropane structural units were broken down during pyrolysis. Fast pyrolysis product distributions from the four lignins depended strongly on the lignin origin and isolation process. Phenols were the most abundant pyrolysis products from MWL, EHL and AL. However, SL produced a large number of furan compounds and sulfur compounds originating from kraft pulping. The effects of pyrolysis temperature and time on the product distributions from corn stover EHL were also studied. At 350 °C, EHL pyrolysis mainly produced acids and alcohols, while phenols became the main products at higher temperature. No obvious influence of pyrolysis time was observed on EHL pyrolysis product distributions.

  3. Demonstration of Lignin-to-Peroxidase Direct Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Jiménez, Verónica; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Pogni, Rebecca; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Santos, José Ignacio; Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Versatile peroxidase (VP) is a high redox-potential peroxidase of biotechnological interest that is able to oxidize phenolic and non-phenolic aromatics, Mn2+, and different dyes. The ability of VP from Pleurotus eryngii to oxidize water-soluble lignins (softwood and hardwood lignosulfonates) is demonstrated here by a combination of directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic techniques, among others. In addition, direct electron transfer between the peroxidase and the lignin macromolecule was kinetically characterized using stopped-flow spectrophotometry. VP variants were used to show that this reaction strongly depends on the presence of a solvent-exposed tryptophan residue (Trp-164). Moreover, the tryptophanyl radical detected by EPR spectroscopy of H2O2-activated VP (being absent from the W164S variant) was identified as catalytically active because it was reduced during lignosulfonate oxidation, resulting in the appearance of a lignin radical. The decrease of lignin fluorescence (excitation at 355 nm/emission at 400 nm) during VP treatment under steady-state conditions was accompanied by a decrease of the lignin (aromatic nuclei and side chains) signals in one-dimensional and two-dimensional NMR spectra, confirming the ligninolytic capabilities of the enzyme. Simultaneously, size-exclusion chromatography showed an increase of the molecular mass of the modified residual lignin, especially for the (low molecular mass) hardwood lignosulfonate, revealing that the oxidation products tend to recondense during the VP treatment. Finally, mutagenesis of selected residues neighboring Trp-164 resulted in improved apparent second-order rate constants for lignosulfonate reactions, revealing that changes in its protein environment (modifying the net negative charge and/or substrate accessibility/binding) can modulate the reactivity of the catalytic tryptophan. PMID:26240145

  4. Structure variations of carbonizing lignin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, C.; Polidoro, H.A.; Otani, S.; Craievich, A.F.

    1984-01-01

    The studied lignin is a by-product of the process of ethanol production from eucaliptus. It was heat-treated under inert atmosphere conditions at increasing temperatures from 300C up to 2400C. The structural variations were studied by wide-angle X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The bulk and 'real' density of the compacted materials have also been determined as functions of the final temperature. These experimental results enabled us to establish a mechanism of structure variation based on the formation of a turbostratic graphite-like and porous structure within the initially amorphous lignin matrix. (Author) [pt

  5. Effects of lignin and surfactant on adsorption and hydrolysis of cellulases on cellulose

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yanfei; Sun, Zongping; Ge, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Junhua

    2016-01-01

    Background Considerable works have been reported concerning the obstruction of enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency by lignin. However, there is a lack of information about the influence of lignin on the adsorption of cellulases on cellulose, along with the hydrolytic activity of the cellulases adsorbed on lignin. In addition, limited discovery has been reported about the influence of additives on cellulase desorption from lignin and lignocellulosic materials. In this work, the effects of lignin o...

  6. Unravelling Some of the Key Transformations in the Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Matthew Y; Chan, Bun; Yuen, Alexander K L; Masters, Anthony F; Montoya, Alejandro; Maschmeyer, Thomas

    2017-05-22

    Using both experimental and computational methods, focusing on intermediates and model compounds, some of the main features of the reaction mechanisms that operate during the hydrothermal processing of lignin were elucidated. Key reaction pathways and their connection to different structural features of lignin were proposed. Under neutral conditions, subcritical water was demonstrated to act as a bifunctional acid/base catalyst for the dissection of lignin structures. In a complex web of mutually dependent interactions, guaiacyl units within lignin were shown to significantly affect overall lignin reactivity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Modification of lignin for the production of new compounded materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüttermann, A; Mai, C; Kharazipour, A

    2001-05-01

    The cell walls of woody plants are compounded materials made by in situ polymerization of a polyphenolic matrix (lignin) into a web of fibers (cellulose), a process that is catalysed by polyphenoloxidases (laccases) or peroxidases. The first attempt to transform the basic strategy of this natural process for use in human craftsmanship was the ancient lacquer method. The sap of the lacquer tree (Rhus verniciflua) contains large amounts of a phenol (urushiol), a polysaccharide and the enzyme laccase. This oil-in-water emulsion solidifies in the presence of oxygen. The Chinese began using this phenomenon for the production of highly creative artwork more than 6,000 years ago. It was the first example of an isolated enzyme being used as a catalyst to create an artificial plastic compound. In order to apply this process to the production of products on an industrial scale, an inexpensive phenol must be used, which is transferred by an enzyme to active radicals that react with different components to form a compounded material. At present, the following approaches have been studied: (1) In situ polymerization of lignin for the production of particle boards. Adhesive cure is based on the oxidative polymerization of lignin using phenoloxidases (laccase) as radical donors. This lignin-based bio-adhesive can be applied under conventional pressing conditions. The resulting particle boards meet German performance standards. By this process, 80% of the petrochemical binders in the wood-composite industry can be replaced by materials from renewable resources. (2) Enzymatic copolymerization of lignin and alkenes. In the presence of organic hydroperoxides, laccase catalyses the reaction between lignin and olefins. Detailed studies on the reaction between lignin and acrylate monomers showed that chemo-enzymatic copolymerization offers the possibility to produce defined lignin-acrylate copolymers. The system allows control of the molecular weights of the products in a way that has

  8. Aktivitas Ligninolitik Beberapa Jamur Aphyllophorales dan Kemampuannya Mendegradasi Lignin pada Lindi Hitam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atria Martina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen local isolate Aphyllophorales fungi were screened their ligninolytic activity. The isolate with highest ligninolytic activity was tested it capability to degrade kraft blackliquor lignin. The biodegradability of black liquor is low because the presence of lignin and lignin derivative in the wastewater. These fungal were screened for ligninolytic activity by decolorization on solid mediacontaining RBBR dye. The ability of the fungal strains to biodegrade kraft black liquor lignin was performed by submerged fermentation condition with agitation and incubation time as treatment. The solid culture result in 3 isolates had ligninolytic activity and Ganoderma sp.BTA1 gave the highest ligninolytic. Agitation and incubation time influenced ligninbiodegradation of blackliquor significantly. Optimum condition for lignin biodegradation was at 200 rpm during 25 days with lignin reduction was 45,786%.

  9. Characterisation of lignins isolated from sugarcane bagasse pretreated with acidified ethylene glycol and ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moghaddam, Lalehvash; Zhang, Zhanying; Wellard, R. Mark; Bartley, John P.; O'Hara, Ian M.; Doherty, William O.S.

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane bagasse pretreatment processes using acidified aqueous ethylene glycol (EG) and ionic liquids (ILs) have been reported recently. In this study, recovery of lignins from these processes was conducted, as well as determination of their physico-chemical properties. The amount of lignins recovered from 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([bmim]Cl) with HCl as a catalyst and [bmim][CH 3 SO 3 ] was ∼42%, and ∼35%–36% by EG with HCl or H 2 SO 4 as a catalyst, respectively. The isolated lignins were characterised using wet chemistry, spectroscopy and thermogravimetry analysis (TGA), and the results compared to soda lignin from NaOH pretreatment of bagasse. The IL and EG lignins contained no or trace amounts of carbohydrates, slightly lower hydrogen content but slightly higher oxygen contents than soda lignin. The IL and EG lignins contained more C-3 and C-5 reactive sites for Mannich reaction and had more p-hydroxypheny propane unit structures than soda lignin. Two-dimensional heteronuclear single quantum coherence (2D HSQC) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) identified the major substructural units in the lignins, and allowed differences among them to be studied. As EG lignins were extracted in very reactive environment, intermediate enol ethers were formed and led to cleavage reactions which were not apparent in the other lignins. 31 P NMR and infra-red spectroscopy results showed that IL and EG lignins had lower total hydroxyl content than soda lignin, probably indicating that a higher degree of self-polymerisation occurred during bagasse pretreatment, despite the use of lower temperature and shorter reaction time. On the basis of the salient features of these lignins, potential applications were proposed. - Highlights: • Lignins were recovered from ethylene glycol (EG) and ionic liquid (IL) processes. • IL and EG lignins contained no or trace amounts of carbohydrates. • IL and EG lignin had more C-3 and C-5 sites for Mannich reaction than soda

  10. Isolation and characterization of lignin from the oak wood bioethanol production residue for adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Jung; Kim, Hyun Joo; Cho, Eun Jin; Song, Younho; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Lignin was isolated from the residue of bioethanol production with oak wood via alkaline and catalyzed organosolv treatments at ambient temperature to improve the purity of lignin for the materials application. The isolated lignins were analyzed for their chemical composition by nitrobenzene oxidation method and their functionality was characterized via wet chemistry method, element analysis, (1)H NMR, GPC and FTIR-ATR. The isolated lignin by acid catalyzed organosolv treatment (Acid-OSL) contained a higher lignin content, aromatic proton, phenolic hydroxyl group and a lower nitrogen content that is more reactive towards chemical modification. The lignin-based adhesives were prepared and the bond strength was measured to evaluate the enhanced reactivity of lignin by the isolation. Two steps of phenolation and methylolation were applied for the modification of the isolated lignins and their tensile strengths were evaluated for the use as an adhesive. The acid catalyzed organosolv lignin-based adhesives had comparable bond strength to phenol-formaldehyde adhesives. The analysis of lignin-based adhesives by FTIR-ATR and TGA showed structural similarity to phenol adhesive. The results demonstrate that the reactivity of lignin was enhanced by isolation from hardwood bioethanol production residues at ambient temperature and it could be used in a value-added application to produce lignin-based adhesives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ultra violet resonance Raman spectroscopy in lignin analysis: determination of characteristic vibrations of p-hydroxyphenyl, guaiacyl, and syringyl lignin structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saariaho, Anna-Maija; Jääskeläinen, Anna-Stiina; Nuopponen, Mari; Vuorinen, Tapani

    2003-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy of wood and lignin samples is preferably carried out in the near-infrared region because lignin produces an intense laser-induced fluorescence background at visible excitation wavelengths. However, excitation of aromatic and conjugated lignin structures with deep ultra violet (UV) light gives resonance-enhanced Raman signals while the overlapping fluorescence is eliminated. In this study, ultra violet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy was used to define characteristic vibration bands of model compounds of p-hydroxyphenyl, guaiacyl, and syringyl lignin structures at three excitation wavelengths (229, 244, and 257 nm). The intensities of each band, relative to the intensity of the aromatic vibration band at 1600 cm-1, were defined and the most suitable excitation wavelength was suggested for each structure. p-Hydroxyphenyl structures showed intensive characteristic bands at 1217-1214 and 1179-1167 cm-1 with excitation at 244 nm, whereas the bands of guaiacyl structures were more intensive with 257 nm excitation. Most intensive characteristic bands of guaiacyl structures were found at 1289-1279, 1187-1185, 1158-1155, and 791-704 cm-1. Syringyl structures had almost identical spectra with 244 and 257 nm excitations with characteristic bands at 1514-1506, 1333-1330, and 981-962 cm-1. The characteristic bands of the three structural units were also found from the compression wood, softwood, and hardwood samples, indicating that UVRR spectroscopy can be applied for the determination of chemical structures of lignin.

  12. Apple (Malus domestica) MdERF2 negatively affects ethylene biosynthesis during fruit ripening by suppressing MdACS1 transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tong; Jiang, Zhongyu; Zhang, Lichao; Tan, Dongmei; Wei, Yun; Yuan, Hui; Li, Tianlai; Wang, Aide

    2016-12-01

    Ripening in climacteric fruit requires the gaseous phytohormone ethylene. Although ethylene signaling has been well studied, knowledge of the transcriptional regulation of ethylene biosynthesis is still limited. Here we show that an apple (Malus domestica) ethylene response factor, MdERF2, negatively affects ethylene biosynthesis and fruit ripening by suppressing the transcription of MdACS1, a gene that is critical for biosynthesis of ripening-related ethylene. Expression of MdERF2 was suppressed by ethylene during ripening of apple fruit, and we observed that MdERF2 bound to the promoter of MdACS1 and directly suppressed its transcription. Moreover, MdERF2 suppressed the activity of the promoter of MdERF3, a transcription factor that we found to bind to the MdACS1 promoter, thereby increasing MdACS1 transcription. We determined that the MdERF2 and MdERF3 proteins directly interact, and this interaction suppresses the binding of MdERF3 to the MdACS1 promoter. Moreover, apple fruit with transiently downregulated MdERF2 expression showed higher ethylene production and faster ripening. Our results indicate that MdERF2 negatively affects ethylene biosynthesis and fruit ripening in apple by suppressing the transcription of MdACS1 via multiple mechanisms, thereby acting as an antagonist of positive ripening regulators. Our findings offer a deep understanding of the transcriptional regulation of ethylene biosynthesis during climacteric fruit ripening. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Fiber and lignin analysis in concentrate, forage, and feces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindrichsen, I.K.; Kreuzer, M.; Madsen, Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    Hemicelluloses, cellulose, and lignin contents of contrasting feeds, with emphasis on concentrate ingredients and complete concentrates, were analyzed using the Van Soest detergent procedure (analyzing neutral detergent fiber, acid detergent fiber, and acid detergent lignin) and the enzymatic...

  14. Lignin-solubilizing ability of actinomycetes isolated from termite (Termitidae) gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasti, M B; Pometto, A L; Nuti, M P; Crawford, D L

    1990-01-01

    The lignocellulose-degrading abilities of 11 novel actinomycete strains isolated from termite gut were determined and compared with that of the well-characterized actinomycete, Streptomyces viridosporus T7A. Lignocellulose bioconversion was followed by (i) monitoring the degradation of [14C]lignin- and [14C]cellulose-labeled phloem of Abies concolor to 14CO2 and 14C-labeled water-soluble products, (ii) determining lignocellulose, lignin, and carbohydrate losses resulting from growth on a lignocellulose substrate prepared from corn stalks (Zea mays), and (iii) quantifying production of a water-soluble lignin degradation intermediate (acid-precipitable polymeric lignin). The actinomycetes were all Streptomyces strains and could be placed into three groups, including a group of five strains that appear superior to S. viridosporus T7A in lignocellulose-degrading ability, three strains of approximately equal ability, and three strains of lesser ability. Strain A2 was clearly the superior and most effective lignocellulose decomposer of those tested. Of the assays used, total lignocellulose weight loss was most useful in determining overall bioconversion ability but not in identifying the best lignin-solubilizing strains. A screening procedure based on 14CO2 evolution from [14C-lignin]lignocellulose combined with measurement of acid-precipitable polymeric lignin yield was the most effective in identifying lignin-solubilizing strains. For the termite gut strains, the pH of the medium showed no increase after 3 weeks of growth on lignocellulose. This is markedly different from the pattern observed with S. viridosporus T7A, which raises the medium pH considerably. Production of extracellular peroxidases by the 11 strains and S. viridosporus T7A was followed for 5 days in liquid cultures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2167628

  15. Treatment of Lignin Precursors to Improve their Suitability for Carbon Fibers: A Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Ryan [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.; Naskar, Amit [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Gallego, Nidia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Dai, Xuliang [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.; Hausner, Andrew [GrafTech International Holdings Inc.

    2015-04-17

    Lignin has been investigated as a carbon fiber precursor since the 1960s. Although there have been a number of reports of successful lignin-based carbon fiber production at the lab scale, lignin-based carbon fibers are not currently commercially available. This review will highlight some of the known challenges, and also the reported methods for purifying and modifying lignin to improve it as a precursor. Lignin can come from different sources (e.g. hardwood, softwood, grasses) and extraction methods (e.g. organosolv, kraft), meaning that lignin can be found with a diversity of purity and structure. The implication of these conditions on lignin as carbon fiber precursor is not comprehensively known, especially as the lignin landscape is evolving. The work presented in this review will help guide the direction of a project between GrafTech and ORNL to develop lignin carbon fiber technology, as part of a cooperative agreement with the DOE Advanced Manufacturing Office.

  16. Sulfur-free lignins from alkaline pulping tested in mortar for use as mortar additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadif, A; Hunkeler, D; Käuper, P

    2002-08-01

    Sulfur-free lignin, obtained through the acid precipitation of black liquor from the soda pulping process, has been tested as water reducer in mortar. It has also been compared to existing commercial additives such as naphthalene sulfonates and lignosulfonates. The ash content and sugar content of these lignins are low in comparison to lignosulfonates, conferring on them higher purity. A procedure for small scale testing derived from the industrial norms SN-EN196 and ASTM (Designation C230-90) is presented. Specifically, all the sulfur-free lignins tested improved the flow of the mortar. Selected flax lignins performed better than lignosulfonates though still less than naphthalene sulfonates. Furthermore, certain hemp lignins gave comparable results to the lignosulfonates. Overall, the straw lignin prepared herein is comparable in performance to commercially available lignins, such as Organocell, Alcell and Curan 100. The plant from which the lignin was isolated, and the process of the pulp mill are the primary influences on the performance of the lignin.

  17. NMR of lignins

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Ralph; Larry L. Landucci

    2010-01-01

    This chapter will consider the basic aspects and findings of several forms of NMR spectroscopy, including separate discussions of proton, carbon, heteronuclear, and multidimensional NMR. Enhanced focus will be on 13C NMR, because of its qualitative and quantitative importance, followed by NMR’s contributions to our understanding of lignin...

  18. Coupling and reactions of 5- hydroxyconiferyl alcohol in lignin formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Elder; Laura Berstis; Gregg T. Beckham; Michael F. Crowley

    2016-01-01

    The catechol alcohols, caffeyl and 5-hydroxyconiferyl alcohol, may be incorporated into lignin either naturally or through genetic manipulation. Due to the presence of o-OH groups, these compounds form benzodioxanes, a departure from the interunit connections found in lignins derived from the cinnamyl alcohols. In nature, lignins composed of caffeyl and 5-...

  19. Survey of Lignin-Structure Changes and Depolymerization during Ionic Liquid Pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Tanmoy; Isern, Nancy G.; Sun, Jian; Wang, Eileen; Hull, Sarah; Cort, John R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Singh, Seema

    2017-09-26

    A detailed study of chemical changes in lignin structure during the ionic liquid (IL) pretreatment process is not only pivotal for understanding and overcoming biomass recalcitrance during IL pretreatment, but also is necessary for designing new routes for lignin valorization. Chemical changes in lignin were systematically studied as a function of pretreatment temperature, time and type of IL used. Kraft lignin was used as the lignin source and common pretreatment conditions were employed using three different ILs of varying chemical structure in terms of acidic or basic character. The chemical changes in the lignin structure due to IL pretreatment processes were monitored using 1H-13C HSQC NMR, 31P NMR, elemental analysis, GPC, FT-IR, and the depolymerized products were analyzed using GC-MS. Although pretreatment in acidic IL, triethylammonium hydrogensulfate ([TEA][HSO4]) results in maximum decrease in β-aryl ether bond, maximum dehydration and recondensation pathways were also evident, with the net process showing a minimum decrease in the molecular weight of regenerated lignin. However, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2C1Im][OAc]) pretreatment yields a smaller decrease in the β-aryl ether content along with minimum evidence of recondensation, resulting in the maximum decrease in the molecular weight. Cholinium lysinate ([Ch][Lys]) pretreatment shows an intermediate result, with moderate depolymerization, dehydration and recondensation observed. The depolymerization products after IL pretreatment are found to be a function of the pretreatment temperature and the specific chemical nature of the IL used. At higher pretreatment temperature, [Ch][Lys] pretreatment yields guaiacol, [TEA][HSO4] yields guaiacylacetone, and [C2C1Im][OAc] yields both guaiacol and guaiacylacetone as major products. These results clearly indicate that the changes in lignin structure as well as the depolymerized product profile depend on the pretreatment conditions and the nature

  20. The chemistry of subcritical water reactions of a hardwood derived lignin and lignin model compounds with nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill Bembenic, Meredith A.

    Biofuels, like cellulosic ethanol, may only be cost effective if the lignin byproduct is upgraded to value-added products. However, lignin's inherent aromatic structure and interunit crosslinkages hinder effective conversion. High temperature H2O is considered for lignin conversion, because H2O exhibits unusual properties at higher temperatures (particularly at its supercritical point of 374°C and 3205 psi) including a decreased ion product and a decreased static dielectric constant (similar to those of polar organic solvents at room temperature) such that there is a high solubility for organic compounds, like lignin. Much of the research concerning lignin and supercritical H2O has focused on further decomposition to gases (e.g., H2, CH4, and CO2) where nearly no char formation is expected in the presence of a catalyst. However, the conditions required for supercritical H2O are difficult to maintain, catalysts can be expensive, and gases are not favorable to the current liquid fuel infrastructure. Reactions using Organosolv lignin, subcritical H2O (365°C) and various industrial gases (N2, H2, CO, and CO2 at an initial pressure of 500 psi) for 30 min. were examined to determine both lignin's potential to generate value-added products (e.g., monomer compounds and methanol) and the role (if any) of the H2O and the gases during the reactions. The behavior of H2O at reaction temperature and pressure is expected to be similar to the behavior of supercritical H 2O without the need to maintain supercritical conditions. Different characterization techniques were used for the products collected including primarily GC/FID-TCD of the evolved gases, GC/MS analysis of the organic liquids, solid phase microextraction analysis of the water, and solid state 13C-NMR analysis of the residues. The reactor pressure at temperature was shown to influence the reactivity of the H2O and lignin, and the highest conversions (≈54--62%) were obtained when adding a gas. However, the

  1. Synthesis of novel ionic liquids from lignin-derived compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socha, Aaron; Singh, Seema; Simmons, Blake A.; Bergeron, Maxime

    2017-09-19

    Methods and compositions are provided for synthesizing ionic liquids from lignin derived compounds comprising: contacting a starting material comprising lignin with a depolymerization agent to depolymerize the lignin and form a mixture of aldehyde containing compounds; contacting the mixture of aldehyde containing compounds with an amine under conditions suitable to convert the mixture of aldehyde containing compounds to a mixture of amine containing compounds; and contacting the mixture of amine containing compounds with an acid under conditions suitable to form an ammonium salt, thereby preparing the ionic liquid.

  2. Understanding the chemical and structural transformations of lignin macromolecule during torrefaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen, Jia-Long; Sun, Shao-Long; Yuan, Tong-Qi; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The terrified bamboo has a high energy yield of 85.7% and a HHV of 20.13 MJ/kg. • The structural changes of hemicelluloses, cellulose, and lignin were investigated. • First study on the structural transformations of lignin during torrefaction. • The mechanism of structural changes of lignin has been proposed. - Abstract: Torrefaction is an efficient method to recover energy from biomass. Herein, the characteristics (mass yield, energy yield, physical, and chemical characteristics) of torrefied bamboo at diverse temperatures (200–300 °C) were firstly evaluated by elemental analysis, XRD, and CP–MAS 13 C NMR methodologies. Under an optimal condition the terrified bamboo has a relative high energy yield of 85.7% and a HHV of 20.13 MJ/kg. The chemical and structural transformations of lignin induced by thermal treatment were thoroughly investigated by FT-IR and solution-state NMR techniques (quantitative 13 C NMR, 2D-HSQC, and 31 P-NMR methodologies). The results highlighted the chemical reactions of the native bamboo lignins towards severe torrefaction treatments occurred, such as depolymerization, demethoxylation, bond cleavage, and condensation reactions. NMR results indicated that aryl-ether bonds (β-O-4) and p-coumaric ester in lignin were cleaved during the torrefaction process at mild conditions. The severe treatments of bamboo (275 °C and 300 °C) induced a dramatic enrichment in lignin content together with the almost complete disappearance of β-O-4, β-β, and β-5 linkages. Further analysis of the molecular weight of milled wood lignin (MWL) indicated that the average molecular weights of “torrefied MWL” were lower than those of control MWL. It is believed that understanding of the reactivity and chemical transformations of lignin during torrefaction will contribute to the integrated torrefaction mechanism

  3. Lignin conversion to high-octane fuel additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shabtai, J.; Zmierczak, W.; Kadangode, S. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City (United States); Chornet, E.; Johnson, D.K. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1999-07-01

    Continuing previous studies on the conversion of lignin to reformulated gasoline compositions, new lignin upgrading processes were developed that allow preferential production of specific high-octane fuel additives of two distinct types: (1) C{sub 7}-C{sub 10} alkylbenzenes; and (2) aryl methyl ethers, where aryl mostly = phenyl, 2-methylphenyl, 4-methylphenyl, and dimethylphenyl. Process (1) comprises base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) and simultaneous partial ({approx} 50%) deoxygenation of lignin at 270 - 290{sup o}C, in the presence of supercritical methanol as reaction medium, followed by exhaustive hydrodeoxygenation and attendant mild hydrocracking of the BCD product with sulfided catalysts to yield C{sub 8}-C{sub 10} alkylbenzenes as main products. Process (2) involves mild BCD at 250 - 270{sup o}C with preservation of the lignin oxygen, followed by selective C-C hydrocracking with solid superacid catalysts. This method preferentially yields a mixture of alkylated phenols, which upon acid-catalyzed etherification with methanol are converted into corresponding aryl methyl ethers (see above) possessing blending octane numbers in the range of 142-166. In a recent extension of this work, a greatly advantageous procedure for performing the BCD stage of processes (1) and (2) in water as reaction medium was developed. (author)

  4. Influence of lignin on biochemical methane potential of biomass for biogas production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triolo, Jin Mi; Sommer, Sven G.; Møller, Henrik Bjarne

    2011-01-01

    model for these two biomass groups. Validation of the combined model was carried out using datasets from the literature. This study showed that lignin was not degraded during anaerobic digestion. Furthermore, lignin concentration in organic materials was the strongest predictor of BMP for all...... the biomass groups. The square of the sample correlation coefficient (R2) from the BMP versus lignin was 0.908 (P lignin concentration could be used to predict...

  5. Bio-based polyurethane prepared from Kraft lignin and modified castor oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. B. Tavares

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Current challenges highlight the need for polymer research using renewable natural sources as a substitute for petroleum-based polymers. The use of polyols obtained from renewable sources combined with the reuse of industrial residues such as lignin is an important agent in this process. Different compositions of polyurethane-type materials were prepared by combining technical Kraft lignin (TKL with castor oil (CO or modified castor oil (MCO1 and MCO2 to increase their reactivity towards diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI. The results indicate that lignin increases the glass transition temperature, the crosslinking density and improves the ultimate stress especially for those prepared from MCO2 and 30% lignin content from 8.2 MPa (lignin free to 23.5 MPa. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM micrographs of rupture surface after uniaxial tensile tests show ductile-to-brittle transition. The results show the possibility to develop polyurethane-type materials, varying technical grade Kraft lignin content, which cover a wide range of mechanical properties (from large elastic/low Young modulus to brittle/high Young modulus polyurethanes.

  6. Structural characterization of lignin isolated from coconut (Cocos nucifera) coir fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rencoret, Jorge; Ralph, John; Marques, Gisela; Gutiérrez, Ana; Martínez, Ángel T; del Río, José C

    2013-03-13

    The structure of the isolated milled "wood" lignin from coconut coir has been characterized using different analytical methods, including Py-GC/MS, 2D NMR, DFRC, and thioacidolysis. The analyses demonstrated that it is a p-hydroxyphenyl-guaiacyl-syringyl (H-G-S) lignin, with a predominance of G units (S/G ratio 0.23) and considerable amounts of associated p-hydroxybenzoates. Two-dimensional NMR indicated that the main substructures present in this lignin include β-O-4' alkyl aryl ethers followed by phenylcoumarans and resinols. Two-dimensional NMR spectra also indicated that coir lignin is partially acylated at the γ-carbon of the side chain with p-hydroxybenzoates and acetates. DFRC analysis showed that acetates preferentially acylate the γ-OH in S rather than in G units. Despite coir lignin's being highly enriched in G-units, thioacidolysis indicated that β-β' resinol structures are mostly derived from sinapyl alcohol. Finally, we find evidence that the flavone tricin is incorporated into the coconut coir lignin, as has been recently noted for various grasses.

  7. Lignin: an adhesive raw material of the future or waste of research energy?

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmilä, Venla; Trischler, Johann; Sandberg, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Lignin has been studied as an adhesive for more than 100 years, but there are only a few industrial applications. The reason for the current interest is the high availability and low price of lignin. Lignin is the main by-product of paper pulping processes and is typically burned as fuel. Being the natural glue in plants and having a phenolic nature makes lignins an attractive replacement for wood adhesives.An adhesive system for wood composites consisting mainly of lignin has yet to be devel...

  8. Arabidopsis miR171-Targeted Scarecrow-Like Proteins Bind to GT cis-Elements and Mediate Gibberellin-Regulated Chlorophyll Biosynthesis under Light Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhaoxue; Hu, Xupeng; Cai, Wenjuan; Huang, Weihua; Zhou, Xin; Luo, Qian; Yang, Hongquan; Wang, Jiawei; Huang, Jirong

    2014-01-01

    An extraordinarily precise regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis is essential for plant growth and development. However, our knowledge on the complex regulatory mechanisms of chlorophyll biosynthesis is very limited. Previous studies have demonstrated that miR171-targeted scarecrow-like proteins (SCL6/22/27) negatively regulate chlorophyll biosynthesis via an unknown mechanism. Here we showed that SCLs inhibit the expression of the key gene encoding protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR) in light-grown plants, but have no significant effect on protochlorophyllide biosynthesis in etiolated seedlings. Histochemical analysis of β-glucuronidase (GUS) activity in transgenic plants expressing pSCL27::rSCL27-GUS revealed that SCL27-GUS accumulates at high levels and suppresses chlorophyll biosynthesis at the leaf basal proliferation region during leaf development. Transient gene expression assays showed that the promoter activity of PORC is indeed regulated by SCL27. Consistently, chromatin immunoprecipitation and quantitative PCR assays showed that SCL27 binds to the promoter region of PORC in vivo. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that SCL27 is directly interacted with G(A/G)(A/T)AA(A/T)GT cis-elements of the PORC promoter. Furthermore, genetic analysis showed that gibberellin (GA)-regulated chlorophyll biosynthesis is mediated, at least in part, by SCLs. We demonstrated that SCL27 interacts with DELLA proteins in vitro and in vivo by yeast-two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation analysis and found that their interaction reduces the binding activity of SCL27 to the PORC promoter. Additionally, we showed that SCL27 activates MIR171 gene expression, forming a feedback regulatory loop. Taken together, our data suggest that the miR171-SCL module is critical for mediating GA-DELLA signaling in the coordinate regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis and leaf growth in light. PMID:25101599

  9. Metal Triflates for the Production of Aromatics from Lignin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deuss, Peter J.; Lahive, Ciaran W.; Lancefield, Christopher S.; Westwood, Nicholas J.; Kamer, Paul C. J.; Barta, Katalin; de Vries, Johannes G.

    2016-01-01

    The depolymerization of lignin into valuable aromatic chemicals is one of the key goals towards establishing economically viable biorefineries. In this contribution we present a simple approach for converting lignin to aromatic monomers in high yields under mild reaction conditions. The methodology

  10. Efficient, environmentally-friendly and specific valorization of lignin: promising role of non-radical lignolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenya; Zhang, Chao; Sun, Xinxiao; Su, Sisi; Li, Qiang; Linhardt, Robert J

    2017-06-01

    Lignin is the second most abundant bio-resource in nature. It is increasingly important to convert lignin into high value-added chemicals to accelerate the development of the lignocellulose biorefinery. Over the past several decades, physical and chemical methods have been widely explored to degrade lignin and convert it into valuable chemicals. Unfortunately, these developments have lagged because of several difficulties, of which high energy consumption and non-specific cleavage of chemical bonds in lignin remain the greatest challenges. A large number of enzymes have been discovered for lignin degradation and these are classified as radical lignolytic enzymes and non-radical lignolytic enzymes. Radical lignolytic enzymes, including laccases, lignin peroxidases, manganese peroxidases and versatile peroxidases, are radical-based bio-catalysts, which degrade lignins through non-specific cleavage of chemical bonds but can also catalyze the radical-based re-polymerization of lignin fragments. In contrast, non-radical lignolytic enzymes selectively cleave chemical bonds in lignin and lignin model compounds and, thus, show promise for use in the preparation of high value-added chemicals. In this mini-review, recent developments on non-radical lignolytic enzymes are discussed. These include recently discovered non-radical lignolytic enzymes, their metabolic pathways for lignin conversion, their recent application in the lignin biorefinery, and the combination of bio-catalysts with physical/chemical methods for industrial development of the lignin refinery.

  11. [Phenolic foam prepared by lignin from a steam-explosion derived biorefinery of corn stalk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanhua; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-06-01

    To increase the integral economic effectiveness, biorefineries of lignocellulosic materials should not only utilize carbohydrates hydrolyzed from cellulose and hemicellulose but also use lignin. We used steam-exploded corn stalk as raw materials and optimized the temperature and alkali concentration in the lignin extraction process to obtain lignin liquor with higher yield and purity. Then the concentrated lignin liquor was used directly to substitute phenol for phenolic foam preparation and the performances of phenolic foam were characterized by microscopic structure analysis, FTIR, compression strength and thermal conductivity detection. The results indicated that, when steam-exploded corn stalk was extracted at 120 degrees C for 2 h by 1% NaOH with a solid to liquid ratio of 1:10, the extraction yield of lignin was 79.67%. The phenolic foam prepared from the concentrated lignin liquor showed higher apparent density and compression strength with the increasing substitution rate of lignin liquor. However, there were not significant differences of thermal conductivity and flame retardant properties by the addition of lignin, which meant that the phenolic foam substituted by lignin liquor was approved for commercial application. This study, which uses alkali-extracted lignin liquor directly for phenolic foam preparation, provides a relatively simple way for utilization of lignin and finally increases the overall commercial operability ofa lignocellulosic biorefinery derived by steam explosion.

  12. Nano-lignin filled natural rubber composites: Preparation and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Jiang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel strategy to prepare nano-lignin and its composites with natural rubber. The nanolignin was ontained by fabricating colloidal lignin-Poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDADMAC complexes (LPCs via self-assembly technology. The characteristics of LPCs were investigated by zeta potential, dynamic light scattering (DLS, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and ultraviolet – visible (UV-vis absorption measurements. The results indicated that PDADMAC intensively interacted with lignin by cation-π and π-π interactions, and lignin particles were stable in aqueous solution with an average particle size less than 100 nm. LPCs accelerated the vulcanization of NR/LPCs nanocomposites. Morphological studies and Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA showed the homogeneous dispersion of LPCs in the NR matrix and the strong interfacial adhesion between them. The nanoscale dispersion of LPCs significantly enhanced the thermal stability and mechanical properties of NR/LPCs nanocomposites.

  13. System analyse cellulose ethanol in combines - Combustion characterisation of lignin from cellulose based ethanol production; Systemanalys foer cellulosabaserad etanol i kombinat - Foerbraenningskarakterisering av lignin fraan cellulosabaserad etanolproduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstedt, Jan; Wingren, Anders; Magnusson, Staffan; Wiinikka, Henrik; Westbom, Urban; Lidman, Marcus; Groenberg, Carola

    2012-02-15

    In this work 3 different hydrolysed lignin fractions produced from Sugarcane Bagasse, Spruce and Wheat Straw were burned in a 150 kW horizontal furnace equipped with a powder burner to assess the combustion behaviour of hydrolysed lignin fuels. The combustion experiments showed that the feeding properties of all three lignin fractions were better compared to ordinary wood powder

  14. Comparison of Effect of Brassinosteroid and Gibberellin Biosynthesis Inhibitors on Growth of Rice Seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Matusmoto, Tadashi; Yamada, Kazuhiro; Yoshizawa, Yuko; Oh, Keimei

    2016-01-01

    Brassinosteroid (BR) and gibberellin (GA) are two predominant plant hormones that regulate plant cell elongation. Mutants disrupt the biosynthesis of these hormones and display different degrees of dwarf phenotypes in rice. Although the role of each plant hormone in promoting the longitudinal growth of plants has been extensively studied using genetic methods, their relationship is still poorly understood. In this study, we used two specific inhibitors targeting BR and GA biosynthesis to inve...

  15. Lignin as a Binder Material for Eco-Friendly Li-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huiran; Cornell, Ann; Alvarado, Fernando; Behm, Mårten; Leijonmarck, Simon; Li, Jiebing; Tomani, Per; Lindbergh, Göran

    2016-01-01

    The industrial lignin used here is a byproduct from Kraft pulp mills, extracted from black liquor. Since lignin is inexpensive, abundant and renewable, its utilization has attracted more and more attention. In this work, lignin was used for the first time as binder material for LiFePO4 positive and graphite negative electrodes in Li-ion batteries. A procedure for pretreatment of lignin, where low-molecular fractions were removed by leaching, was necessary to obtain good battery performance. The lignin was analyzed for molecular mass distribution and thermal behavior prior to and after the pretreatment. Electrodes containing active material, conductive particles and lignin were cast on metal foils, acting as current collectors and characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and galvanostatic charge-discharge cycles. Good reversible capacities were obtained, 148 mAh·g−1 for the positive electrode and 305 mAh·g−1 for the negative electrode. Fairly good rate capabilities were found for both the positive electrode with 117 mAh·g−1 and the negative electrode with 160 mAh·g−1 at 1C. Low ohmic resistance also indicated good binder functionality. The results show that lignin is a promising candidate as binder material for electrodes in eco-friendly Li-ion batteries. PMID:28773252

  16. A structured understanding of cellobiohydrolase I binding to poplar lignin fractions after dilute acid pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lan; Yoo, Chang Geun; Meng, Xianzhi; Li, Mi; Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Yang, Haitao

    2018-01-01

    Cellulase adsorption to lignin is considered a cost barrier for bioethanol production; however, its detailed association mechanism is still not fully understood. In this study, two natural poplar variants with high and low sugar release performance were selected as the low and high recalcitrant raw materials (named L and H , respectively). Three different lignin fractions were extracted using ethanol, followed by p -dioxane and then cellulase treatment from the dilute acid pretreated poplar solids (fraction 1, 2, and 3, respectively). Each lignin fraction had different physicochemical properties. Ethanol-extracted lignin had the lowest weight average molecular weight, while the molecular weights for the other two lignin fractions were similar. 31 P NMR analysis revealed that lignin fraction with higher molecular weight contained more aliphatic hydroxyl groups and less phenolic hydroxyl groups. Semi-quantitative analysis by 2D HSQC NMR indicated that the lignin fractions isolated from the natural variants had different contents of syringyl (S), guaiacyl (G) and interunit linkages. Lignin extracted by ethanol contained the largest amount of S units, the smallest amounts of G and p -hydroxybenzoate (PB) subunits, while the contents of these lignin subunits in the other two lignin fractions were similar. The lignin fraction obtained after cellulase treatment was primarily comprised of β- O -4 linkages with small amounts of β-5 and β-β linkages. The binding strength of these three lignin fractions obtained by Langmuir equations were in the order of L 1  >  L 3  >  L 2 for the low recalcitrance poplar and H 1  >  H 2  >  H 3 for the high recalcitrance poplar. Overall, adsorption ability of lignin was correlated with the sugar release of poplar. Structural features of lignin were associated with its binding to CBH. For natural poplar variants, lignin fractions with lower molecular weight and polydispersity index (PDI) exhibited more CBH adsorption

  17. Bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of lignin: Effects of process and upgrading parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Liangliang; Zhang, Yaning; Liu, Shiyu; Zhou, Nan; Chen, Paul; Cheng, Yanling; Addy, Min; Lu, Qian; Omar, Muhammad Mubashar; Liu, Yuhuan; Wang, Yunpu; Dai, Leilei; Anderson, Erik; Peng, Peng; Lei, Hanwu; Ruan, Roger

    2017-10-01

    Effects of process parameters on the yield and chemical profile of bio-oil from fast pyrolysis of lignin and the processes for lignin-derived bio-oil upgrading were reviewed. Various process parameters including pyrolysis temperature, reactor types, lignin characteristics, residence time, and feeding rate were discussed and the optimal parameter conditions for improved bio-oil yield and quality were concluded. In terms of lignin-derived bio-oil upgrading, three routes including pretreatment of lignin, catalytic upgrading, and co-pyrolysis of hydrogen-rich materials have been investigated. Zeolite cracking and hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) treatment are two main methods for catalytic upgrading of lignin-derived bio-oil. Factors affecting zeolite activity and the main zeolite catalytic mechanisms for lignin conversion were analyzed. Noble metal-based catalysts and metal sulfide catalysts are normally used as the HDO catalysts and the conversion mechanisms associated with a series of reactions have been proposed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Structure of Thermobifida fusca DyP-type peroxidase and activity towards Kraft lignin and lignin model compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmanpour, Rahman; Rea, Dean; Jamshidi, Shirin; Fülöp, Vilmos; Bugg, Timothy D H

    2016-03-15

    A Dyp-type peroxidase enzyme from thermophilic cellulose degrader Thermobifida fusca (TfuDyP) was investigated for catalytic ability towards lignin oxidation. TfuDyP was characterised kinetically against a range of phenolic substrates, and a compound I reaction intermediate was observed via pre-steady state kinetic analysis at λmax 404 nm. TfuDyP showed reactivity towards Kraft lignin, and was found to oxidise a β-aryl ether lignin model compound, forming an oxidised dimer. A crystal structure of TfuDyP was determined, to 1.8 Å resolution, which was found to contain a diatomic oxygen ligand bound to the heme centre, positioned close to active site residues Asp-203 and Arg-315. The structure contains two channels providing access to the heme cofactor for organic substrates and hydrogen peroxide. Site-directed mutant D203A showed no activity towards phenolic substrates, but reduced activity towards ABTS, while mutant R315Q showed no activity towards phenolic substrates, nor ABTS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification and thermochemical analysis of high-lignin feedstocks for biofuel and biochemical production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendu Venugopal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lignin is a highly abundant biopolymer synthesized by plants as a complex component of plant secondary cell walls. Efforts to utilize lignin-based bioproducts are needed. Results Herein we identify and characterize the composition and pyrolytic deconstruction characteristics of high-lignin feedstocks. Feedstocks displaying the highest levels of lignin were identified as drupe endocarp biomass arising as agricultural waste from horticultural crops. By performing pyrolysis coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, we characterized lignin-derived deconstruction products from endocarp biomass and compared these with switchgrass. By comparing individual pyrolytic products, we document higher amounts of acetic acid, 1-hydroxy-2-propanone, acetone and furfural in switchgrass compared to endocarp tissue, which is consistent with high holocellulose relative to lignin. By contrast, greater yields of lignin-based pyrolytic products such as phenol, 2-methoxyphenol, 2-methylphenol, 2-methoxy-4-methylphenol and 4-ethyl-2-methoxyphenol arising from drupe endocarp tissue are documented. Conclusions Differences in product yield, thermal decomposition rates and molecular species distribution among the feedstocks illustrate the potential of high-lignin endocarp feedstocks to generate valuable chemicals by thermochemical deconstruction.

  20. Bio-inspired MOF-based Catalysts for Lignin Valorization.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Stavila, Vitalie; Ramakrishnan, Parthasarathi; Davis, Ryan Wesley

    2014-09-01

    Lignin is a potentially plentiful source of renewable organics, with %7E50Mtons/yr produced by the pulp/paper industry and 200-300 Mtons/yr projected production by a US biofuels industry. This industry must process approximately 1 billion tons of biomass to meet the US Renewable Fuel goals. However, there are currently no efficient processes for converting lignin to value-added chemicals and drop-in fuels. Lignin is therefore an opportunity for production of valuable renewable chemicals, but presents staggering technical and economic challenges due to the quantities of material involved and the strong chemical bonds comprising this polymer. Aggressive chemistries and high temperatures are required to degrade lignin without catalysts. Moreover, chemical non-uniformity among lignins leads to complex product mixtures that tend to repolymerize. Conventional petrochemical approaches (pyrolysis, catalytic cracking, gasification) are energy intensive (400-800 degC), require complicated separations, and remove valuable chemical functionality. Low-temperature (25-200 degC) alternatives are clearly desirable, but enzymes are thermally fragile and incompatible with liquid organic compounds, making them impractical for large-scale biorefining. Alternatively, homogeneous catalysts, such as recently developed vanadium complexes, must be separated from product mixtures, while many heterogenous catalysts involve costly noble metals. The objective of this project is to demonstrate proof of concept that an entirely new class of biomimetic, efficient, and industrially robust synthetic catalysts based on nanoporous Metal- Organic Frameworks (MOFs) can be developed. Although catalytic MOFs are known, catalysis of bond cleavage reactions needed for lignin degradation is completely unexplored. Thus, fundamental research is required that industry and most sponsoring agencies are currently unwilling to undertake. We introduce MOFs infiltrated with titanium and nickel species as catalysts

  1. Final Report: Investigation of Catalytic Pathways for Lignin Breakdown into Monomers and Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluckstein, Jeffrey A [ORNL; Hu, Michael Z. [ORNL; Kidder, Michelle [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar [ORNL; Sturgeon, Matthew R [ORNL

    2010-12-01

    Lignin is a biopolymer that comprises up to 35% of woody biomass by dry weight. It is currently underutilized compared to cellulose and hemicellulose, the other two primary components of woody biomass. Lignin has an irregular structure of methoxylated aromatic groups linked by a suite of ether and alkyl bonds which makes it difficult to degrade selectively. However, the aromatic components of lignin also make it promising as a base material for the production of aromatic fuel additives and cyclic chemical feed stocks such as styrene, benzene, and cyclohexanol. Our laboratory research focused on three methods to selectively cleave and deoxygenate purified lignin under mild conditions: acidolysis, hydrogenation and electrocatalysis. (1) Acidolysis was undertaken in CH2Cl2 at room temperature. (2) Hydrogenation was carried out by dissolving lignin and a rhodium catalyst in 1:1 water:methoxyethanol under a 1 atm H2 environment. (3) Electrocatalysis of lignin involved reacting electrically generated hydrogen atoms at a catalytic palladium cathode with lignin dissolved in a solution of aqueous methanol. In all of the experiments, the lignin degradation products were identified and quantified by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy and flame ionization detection. Yields were low, but this may have reflected the difficulty in recovering the various fractions after conversion. The homogeneous hydrogenation of lignin showed fragmentation into monomers, while the electrocatalytic hydrogenation showed production of polyaromatic hydrocarbons and substituted benzenes. In addition to the experiments, promising pathways for the conversion of lignin were assessed. Three conversion methods were compared based on their material and energy inputs and proposed improvements using better catalyst and process technology. A variety of areas were noted as needing further experimental and theoretical effort to increase the feasibility of lignin conversion to fuels.

  2. Developing lignin-based bio-nanofibers by centrifugal spinning technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanovska, Elena; Kurtulus, Mustafa; Abdelgawad, Abdelrahman; Candan, Zeki; Kilic, Ali

    2018-07-01

    Lignin-based nanofibers were produced via centrifugal spinning from lignin-thermoplastic polyurethane polymer blends. The most suitable process parameters were chosen by optimization of the rotational speed, nozzle diameter and spinneret-to-collector distance using different blend ratios of the two polymers at different total polymer concentrations. The basic characteristics of polymer solutions were enlightened by their viscosity and surface tension. The morphology of the fibers produced was characterized by SEM, while their thermal properties by DSC and TG analysis. Multiply regression was used to determine the parameters that have higher impact on the fiber diameter. It was possible to obtain thermally stable lignin/polyurethane nanofibers with diameters below 500nm. From the aspect of spinnability, 1:1 lignin/TPU contents were shown to be more feasible. On the other side, the most suitable processing parameters were found to be angular velocity of 8500rpm for nozzles of 0.5mm diameter and working distance of 30cm. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of syringyl and guaiacyl (S/G) ratio in lignin

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Spark, A

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available the acidolysis products – Validate the new S/G ratio method Why are S/G ratios important? Gives a good indication of the reactivity of the lignin Experimental design Literature Review Establishing Acidolysis conditions Permanganate oxidation Lignin...-method is quick • Permanganate oxidation-method is slow but it is the standard method used at present • Nitrobenzene Oxidation, Pyrolysis, Cupric Oxidation and Thioacidolysis Lignin can be broken down to syringyl and guaiacyl subunits: OCH3 OH OCH3 OH...

  4. Laccase catalyzed grafting of-N-OH type mediators to lignin via radical-radical coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Line; Punt, A. M.; Kabel, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    Lignin is an underexploited resource in biomass refining. Laccases (EC 1.10.3.2) catalyze oxidation of phenolic hydroxyls using O2 as electron acceptor and may facilitate lignin modification in the presence of mediators. This study assessed the reactivity of four different synthetic mediators...... better than HBT (1-hydroxybenzotriazole). Three different mechanisms are suggested to explain the grafting of HPI and HBT, all involving radical-radical coupling to produce covalent bonding to lignin. Lignin from exhaustive cellulase treatment of wheat straw was more susceptible to grafting than beech...... organosolv lignin with the relative abundance of grafting being 35% vs. 11% for HPI and 5% vs. 1% for HBT on these lignin substrates. The data imply that lignin can be functionalized via laccase catalysis with-N-OH type mediators....

  5. Methylene blue as a lignin surrogate in manganese peroxidase reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goby, Jeffrey D; Penner, Michael H; Lajoie, Curtis A; Kelly, Christine J

    2017-11-15

    Manganese peroxidase (MnP) is associated with lignin degradation and is thus relevant to lignocellulosic-utilization technologies. Technological applications require reaction mixture optimization. A surrogate substrate can facilitate this if its susceptibility to degradation is easily monitored and mirrors that of lignin. The dye methylene blue (MB) was evaluated in these respects as a surrogate substrate by testing its reactivity in reaction mixtures containing relevant redox mediators (dicarboxylic acids, fatty acids). Relative rates of MB degradation were compared to available literature reports of lignin degradation under similar conditions, and suggest that MB can be a useful lignin surrogate in MnP systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Thermoplastic Starch with Improved Properties by Blending with Lignins and Radiation Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, D.; Baumberger, S.; Mikus, P.-Y.; Dole, P.; Soulestin, J.; Lacrampe, M.F.; Bliard, C.; Coqueret, X.

    2010-01-01

    The biorefinery of lignocellulosics generates lignin-rich fractions, which are potential source of phenolic molecules for chemistry and polymeric materials. The LignoStarch project aims at using such fractions to functionalize a renewable material, starch, by a clean physical grafting process, without any synthetic chemical additive and without any by-products generation. Previous works suggested that the low-molar-mass phenolic compounds in technical lignin could be responsible for the reactivity of starch-lignin system under electron-beam irradiation and improvement of starch water resistance. A particular aspect of the current studies is focused on the role of lignin phenolic extractables and to investigate the different chemical and physical parameters likely to impact the surface properties of starch-lignin materials. (author)

  7. Impact of Different Lignin Fractions on Saccharification Efficiency in Diverse Species of the Bioenergy Crop Miscanthus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijde, van der Tim; Torres Salvador, Andres Francisco; Dolstra, Oene; Dechesne, Annemarie; Visser, Richard G.F.; Trindade, Luisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Lignin is a key factor limiting saccharification of lignocellulosic feedstocks. In this comparative study, various lignin methods—including acetyl bromide lignin (ABL), acid detergent lignin (ADL), Klason lignin (KL), and modified ADL and KL determination methods—were evaluated for their

  8. Base-catalyzed depolymerization of lignin : separation of monomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigneault, A. [Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Johnson, D.K. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Chornet, E. [Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Biofuels produced from residual lignocellulosic biomass range from ethanol to biodiesel. The use of lignin for the production of alternate biofuels and green chemicals has been studied with particular emphasis on the structure of lignin and its oxyaromatic nature. In an effort to fractionate lignocellulosic biomass and valorize specific constitutive fractions, the authors developed a strategy for the separation of 12 added value monomers produced during the hydrolytic base catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of a Steam Exploded Aspen Lignin. The separation strategy was similar to vanillin purification to obtain pure monomers, but combining more steps after the lignin depolymerization such as acidification, batch liquid-liquid-extraction (LLE), followed by vacuum distillation, liquid chromatography (LC) and crystallization. The purpose was to develop basic data for an industrial size process flow diagram, and to evaluate both the monomer losses during the separation and the energy requirements. Experimentally testing of LLE, vacuum distillation and flash LC in the laboratory showed that batch vacuum distillation produced up to 4 fractions. Process simulation revealed that a series of 4 vacuum distillation columns could produce 5 distinct monomer streams, of which 3 require further chromatography and crystallization operations for purification. 22 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs.

  9. Chlorogenic Acid Biosynthesis Appears Linked with Suberin Production in Potato Tuber (Solanum tuberosum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiñas, Matías Ariel; Lanteri, María Luciana; ten Have, Arjen; Andreu, Adriana Balbina

    2015-05-20

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is a good source of dietary antioxidants. Chlorogenic acid (CGA) and caffeic acid (CA) are the most abundant phenolic acid antioxidants in potato and are formed by the phenylpropanoid pathway. A number of CGA biosynthetic routes that involve hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) and/or hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT) have been proposed, but little is known about their path in potato. CA production requires a caffeoyl shikimate esterase (CSE), and CA serves as a substrate of lignin precursor ferulic acid via the action of caffeic/5-hydroxyferulic acid O-methyltransferase (COMT I). CGA is precursor of caffeoyl-CoA and, via caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase (CCoAOMT), of feruloyl-CoA. Feruloyl-CoA is required for lignin and suberin biosynthesis, crucial for tuber development. Here, metabolite and transcript levels of the mentioned and related enzymes, such as cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H), were determined in the flesh and skin of fresh and stored tubers. Metabolite and transcript levels were higher in skin than in flesh, irrespective of storage. CGA and CA production appear to occur via p-coumaroyl-CoA, using HQT and CSE, respectively. HCT is likely involved in CGA remobilization toward suberin. The strong correlation between CGA and CA, the correspondence with C4H, HQT, CCoAOMT2, and CSE, and the negative correlation of HCT and COMT I in potato tubers suggest a major flux toward suberin.

  10. Production of lignin peroxidase by Ganoderma leucidum using solid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objectives of this study were to optimize the culture conditions for the production of lignin peroxidase by Ganoderma leucidum, economic utilization of waste corn cobs as inducers substrate by pollution free fermentation technology and to optimize the solid state fermentation (SSF) process for lignin peroxidase ...

  11. Effect of periodate on lignin for wood adhesive application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosselink, R.J.A.; Dam, van J.E.G.; Jong, de E.; Gellerstedt, G.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Development of eco-friendly binders with no harmful emission during its complete life cycle is of high interest for the wood-based industry. In this paper, a fully renewable binder based on activated lignin and poly-furfuryl alcohol and a partly renewable lignin based phenol-formaldehyde (PF) binder

  12. Lewis acid-catalyzed depolymerization of soda lignin in supercritical ethanol/water mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Güvenatam, Burcu; Heeres, Erik H.J.; Pidko, Evgeny A.; Hensen, Emiel J M

    2016-01-01

    The depolymerization of lignin model compounds and soda lignin by super Lewis acidic metal triflates has been investigated in a mixture of ethanol and water at 400 °C. The strong Lewis acids convert representative model compounds for the structure-forming linkages in lignin, namely α-O-4, 5-O-4

  13. Enhancement of Lignin Biopolymer Isolation from Hybrid Poplar by Organosolv Pretreatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass is an abundant renewable resource that has the potential to displace petroleum in the production of biomaterials and biofuels. In the present study, the fractionation of different lignin biopolymers from hybrid poplar based on organosolv pretreatments using 80% aqueous methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol at 220°C for 30 min was investigated. The isolated lignin fractions were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, high-performance anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC, 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (2D NMR, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The results showed that the lignin fraction obtained with aqueous ethanol (EOL possessed the highest yield and the strongest thermal stability compared with other lignin fractions. In addition, other lignin fractions were almost absent of neutral sugars (1.16–1.46% though lignin preparation extracted with 1-butanol (BOL was incongruent (7.53%. 2D HSQC spectra analysis revealed that the four lignin fractions mainly consisted of β-O-4′ linkages combined with small amounts of β-β′ and β-5′ linkages. Furthermore, substitution of Cα in β-O-4′ substructures had occurred due to the effects of dissolvent during the autocatalyzed alcohol organosolv pretreatments. Therefore, aqueous ethanol was found to be the most promising alcoholic organic solvent compared with other alcohols to be used in noncatalyzed processes for the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass in biorefinery.

  14. Lignin-enriched Fermentation Residues from Bioethanol Production of Fast-growing Poplar and Forage Sorghum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José I Santos

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The current challenges in developing a cost-effective bioethanol industry include the production of not only high-volume, low cost biofuels but also high-value products with minimal downstream waste. The up-grading of side-stream lignins from bioethanol production plants to novel high-value products will improve the profitability of the bioethanol industry; to do that, a precise understanding of lignin is required. In the present study, lignin-enriched fermentation residues from bioethanol production (steam explosion pretreatment, saccharification, and fermentation of fast-growing poplar and forage sorghum were characterized. In addition to the purity and composition, lignin structure (syringyl/guaiacyl (S/G ratio, inter-unit linkages was also analyzed with spectroscopy techniques such as Fourier transform infrared and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance. Bioethanol processing and feedstock origins seemed to be the main factors determining the purity, composition, and structure of lignins. Residual lignins from poplar and forage sorghum contained significant amounts of sugar and protein impurities. Poplar lignin showed a very high S/G ratio associated with p-hydroxybenzoate. A lower S/G ratio together with H lignin units and p-hydroxycinnamates (p-coumarate and ferulate was observed for forage sorghum lignin. The main inter-unit linkages present in both lignins were β-O-4´ aryl ether followed by resinols and phenylcoumarans.

  15. Fast Curing Bio-Based Phenolic Resins via Lignin Demethylated under Mild Reaction Condition

    OpenAIRE

    Jiongjiong Li; Jizhi Zhang; Shifeng Zhang; Qiang Gao; Jianzhang Li; Wei Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Demethylation technique has been used to enhance lignin reactivity for preparation of phenolic resins. However, the demethylation efficiency and the demethylated lignin (DL) reactivity were still unsatisfactory. To improve the demethylation efficiency, alkali lignin was demethylated under different mild conditions using sodium sulfite as a catalyst. Lignin and DL were characterized by 1H-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy to determine the deme...

  16. Enzymatic cellulose oxidation is linked to lignin by long-range electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westereng, Bjorge; Cannella, David; Wittrup Agger, Jane

    2015-01-01

    in biological systems are only partly understood. We show here that insoluble high molecular weight lignin functions as a reservoir of electrons facilitating LPMO activity. The electrons are donated to the enzyme by long-range electron transfer involving soluble low molecular weight lignins present in plant...... cell walls. Electron transfer was confirmed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy showing that LPMO activity on cellulose changes the level of unpaired electrons in the lignin. The discovery of a long-range electron transfer mechanism links the biodegradation of cellulose and lignin and sheds...

  17. Catalytic hydrotreating of lignin with water-soluble molybdenum catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osmaa, A.; Johansson, A. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland). Lab. of Fuel and Process Technology)

    High yields (61% of the original lignin) of low molecular weight oil (84% of the oil eluted through GC) have been obtained by hydrotreating kraft pine lignin with a water-soluble molybdenum catalyst at 430[degree]C for 60 min. The main compounds in the product oil were phenols (8.7% of the original lignin), cyclohexanes (5.0%), benzenes (3.8%), naphthalenes (4.0%), and phenanthrenes (1.2%). The degree of hydrodeoxygenation was 98%. The quality (measured by GPC and GC) of the product was as good as when using more expensive solid NiMo-CR[sub 2]O[sub 3] catalysts. 30 refs., 6 tabs.

  18. Radiolysis of lignin: Prospective mechanism of high-temperature decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    The range of the radiation-thermal processes resulting in conversion of lignin into monomeric phenols is considered. Statistically the most probable places of macromolecule ionization are aromatic units. Release of phenolic products from a lignin macromolecule is the multistage process beginning via fragmentation of primary cation-radicals. Reactions of electrons and small radicals with macromolecules, also as degradation of cation-radicals, result in formation of phenoxyl radicals. Macroradicals possess lower heat stability in comparison with macromolecules. Thermal decomposition of macroradicals leads to release of monohydric and dihydric phenols. The probability of benzenediols formation increases in the presence of alkanes. As noted, partial transformation of lignin into charcoal is inevitable.

  19. Structural Changes of Lignin after Liquid Hot Water Pretreatment and Its Effect on the Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During liquid hot water (LHW pretreatment, lignin is mostly retained in the pretreated biomass, and the changes in the chemical and structural characteristics of lignin should probably refer to re-/depolymerization, solubilization, or glass transition. The residual lignin could influence the effective enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. The pure lignin was used to evaluate the effect of LHW process on its structural and chemical features. The surface morphology of LHW-treated lignin observed with the scanning electron microscopy (SEM was more porous and irregular than that of untreated lignin. Compared to the untreated lignin, the surface area, total pore volume, and average pore size of LHW-treated lignin tested with the Brunner-Emmet-Teller (BET measurement were increased. FTIR analysis showed that the chemical structure of lignin was broken down in the LHW process. Additionally, the impact of untreated and treated lignin on the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose was also explored. The LHW-treated lignin had little impact on the cellulase adsorption and enzyme activities and somehow could improve the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose.

  20. Biobased alkylphenols from lignins via a two-step pyrolysis - Hydrodeoxygenation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wild, P J; Huijgen, W J J; Kloekhorst, A; Chowdari, R K; Heeres, H J

    2017-04-01

    Five technical lignins (three organosolv, Kraft and soda lignin) were depolymerised to produce monomeric biobased aromatics, particularly alkylphenols, by a new two-stage thermochemical approach consisting of dedicated pyrolysis followed by catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of the resulting pyrolysis oils. Pyrolysis yielded a mixture of guaiacols, catechols and, optionally, syringols in addition to alkylphenols. HDO with heterogeneous catalysts (Ru/C, CoMo/alumina, phosphided NiMO/C) effectively directed the product mixture towards alkylphenols by, among others, demethoxylation. Up to 15wt% monomeric aromatics of which 11wt% alkylphenols was obtained (on the lignin intake) with limited solid formation (<3wt% on lignin oil intake). For comparison, solid Kraft lignin was also directly hydrotreated for simultaneous depolymerisation and deoxygenation resulting in two times more alkylphenols. However, the alkylphenols concentration in the product oil is higher for the two-stage approach. Future research should compare direct hydrotreatment and the two-stage approach in more detail by techno-economic assessments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of common lignin methods and modifications on forage and lignocellulosic biomass materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Ben M; Murphy, Patrick T; Moore, Kenneth J

    2012-03-15

    A variety of methods have been developed for estimating lignin concentration within plant materials. The objective of this study was to compare the lignin concentrations produced by six methods on a diverse population of forage and biomass materials and to examine the relationship between these concentrations and the portions of these materials that are available for utilisation by livestock or for ethanol conversion. Several methods produced lignin concentrations that were highly correlated with the digestibility of the forages, but there were few relationships between these methods and the available carbohydrate of the biomass materials. The use of Na₂SO₃ during preparation of residues for hydrolysis resulted in reduced lignin concentrations and decreased correlation with digestibility of forage materials, particularly the warm-season grasses. There were several methods that were well suited for predicting the digestible portion of forage materials, with the acid detergent lignin and Klason lignin method giving the highest correlation across the three types of forage. The continued use of Na₂SO₃ during preparation of Van Soest fibres needs to be evaluated owing to its ability to reduce lignin concentrations and effectiveness in predicting the utilisation of feedstuffs and feedstocks. Because there was little correlation between the lignin concentration and the biomass materials, there is a need to examine alternative or develop new methods to estimate lignin concentrations that may be used to predict the availability of carbohydrates for ethanol conversion. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. OsLOL1, a C2C2-type zinc finger protein, interacts with OsbZIP58 to promote seed germination through the modulation of gibberellin biosynthesis in Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiahe; Zhu, Chuanfeng; Pang, Jinhuan; Zhang, Xiangrong; Yang, Chunlin; Xia, Guixian; Tian, Yingchuan; He, Chaozu

    2014-12-01

    Seed germination is a key developmental process in the plant life cycle that is influenced by various environmental cues and phytohormones through gene expression and a series of metabolism pathways. In the present study, we investigated a C2C2-type finger protein, OsLOL1, which promotes gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis and affects seed germination in Oryza sativa (rice). We used OsLOL1 antisense and sense transgenic lines to explore OsLOL1 functions. Seed germination timing in antisense plants was restored to wild type when exogenous GA3 was applied. The reduced expression of the GA biosynthesis gene OsKO2 and the accumulation of ent-kaurene were observed during germination in antisense plants. Based on yeast two-hybrid and firefly luciferase complementation analyses, OsLOL1 interacted with the basic leucine zipper protein OsbZIP58. The results from electrophoretic mobility shift and dual-luciferase reporter assays showed that OsbZIP58 binds the G-box cis-element of the OsKO2 promoter and activates LUC reporter gene expression, and that interaction between OsLOL1 and OsbZIP58 activates OsKO2 gene expression. In addition, OsLOL1 decreased SOD1 gene expression and accelerated programmed cell death (PCD) in the aleurone layer of rice grains. These findings demonstrate that the interaction between OsLOL1 and OsbZIP58 influences GA biosynthesis through the activation of OsKO2 via OsbZIP58, thereby stimulating aleurone PCD and seed germination. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Microwave-assisted acid pretreatment of alkali lignin: Effect on characteristics and pyrolysis behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Dengle; Ruan, Roger; Wang, Yunpu; Liu, Yuhuan; Dai, Leilei; Zhao, Yunfeng; Zhou, Yue; Wu, Qiuhao

    2018-03-01

    This study performed microwave-assisted acid pretreatment on pure lignin. The effects of microwave temperature, microwave time, and hydrochloric acid concentration on characteristics and pyrolysis behavior of lignin were examined. Results of ultimate analysis revealed better properties of all pretreated samples than those of raw lignin. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis showed breakage of βO4 bond and aliphatic side chain, decrease in OH groups, and formation of CO groups in pretreatment. Microwave temperature exerted more significant influence on lignin structure. Thermal stability of treated lignin was improved and insensitive to short microwave time and acid concentration under mild conditions. Resulting from improved alkyl-phenols and decreased alkoxy-phenols, microwave-assisted acid pretreatment of lignin yielded bio-oil with excellent quality. Total yield of phenols in pyrolysis vapors (200 °C) improved to 14.15%, whereas that of guaiacols decreased to 22.36%. This study shows that microwave-assisted acid pretreatment is a promising technology for lignin conversion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Production of Micro- and Nanoscale Lignin from Wheat Straw Using Different Precipitation Setups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisl, Stefan; Loidolt, Petra; Miltner, Angela; Harasek, Michael; Friedl, Anton

    2018-03-11

    Micro- and nanosize lignin has recently gained interest due to its improved properties compared to standard lignin available today. As the second most abundant biopolymer after cellulose, lignin is readily available but used for rather low-value applications. Applications for lignin in micro- to nanoscale however, ranging from improvement of mechanical properties of polymer nanocomposites, have bactericidal and antioxidant properties and impregnations to hollow lignin drug carriers for hydrophobic and hydrophilic substances. This research represents a whole biorefinery process chain and compares different precipitation setups to produce submicron lignin particles from lignin containing an organosolv pretreatment extract from wheat straw. A batch precipitation in a stirred vessel was compared with continuous mixing of extract and antisolvent in a T-fitting and mixing in a T-fitting followed by a static mixer. The precipitation in the combination of T-fitting and static mixer with improved precipitation parameters yields the smallest particle size of around 100 nm. Furthermore, drying of particles did not influence the particle sizes negatively by showing decreased particle diameters after the separation process.

  5. Enzymes in Commercial Cellulase Preparations Bind Differently to Dioxane Extracted Lignins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; Katahira, Rui; Mansfield, Elisabeth; Taylor, Larry E.; Decker, Stephen R.; Himmel, Michael E.; Vinzant, Todd

    2017-04-24

    Commercial fungal cellulases used in biomass-to-biofuels processes can be grouped into three general classes: native, augmented, and engineered. To evaluate lignin binding affinities of different enzyme activities in various commercial cellulase formulations in order to determine if enzyme losses due to lignin binding can be modulated by using different enzymes of the same activity We used water:dioxane (1:9) to extract lignin from pretreated corn stover. Commercial cellulases were incubated with lignin and the unbound supernatants were evaluated for individual enzyme loss by SDS=PAGE and these were correlated with activity loss using various pNP-sugar substrates. Colorimetric assays for general glycosyl hydrolase activities showed distinct differences in enzyme binding to lignin for each enzyme activity. Native systems demonstrated low binding of endo- and exo-cellulases, high binding of xylanase, and moderate ..beta..-glucosidase binding. Engineered cellulase mixtures exhibited low binding of exo-cellulases, very strong binding of endocellulases and ..beta..- glucosidase, and mixed binding of xylanase activity. The augmented cellulase had low binding of exocellulase, high binding of endocellulase and xylanase, and moderate binding of ..beta..-glucosidase activities. Bound and unbound activities were correlated with general molecular weight ranges of proteins as measured by loss of proteins bands in bound fractions on SDS-PAGE gels. Lignin-bound high molecular weight bands correlated with binding of ..beta..-glucosidase activity. While ..beta..-glucosidases demonstrated high binding in many cases, they have been shown to remain active. Bound low molecular weight bands correlated with xylanase activity binding. Contrary to other literature, exocellulase activity did not show strong lignin binding. The variation in enzyme activity binding between the three classes of cellulases preparations indicate that it is certainly possible to alter the binding of specific

  6. Exploring the antioxidant potential of lignin isolated from black liquor of oil palm waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Rajeev; Khalil, H P S A; Karim, A A

    2009-09-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the potential antioxidant activity of lignin obtained from black liquor, a hazardous waste product generated during the extraction of palm oil. Antioxidant potential of the extracted lignin was evaluated by dissolving the extracted samples in 2 different solvent systems, namely, 2-methoxy ethanol and DMSO. Results revealed high percent inhibition of the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical in the lignin sample dissolved in 2-methoxy ethanol over DMSO (concentration range of 1-100 microg/ml). Lignin extracted in 2-methoxy ethanol exhibited higher inhibition percentage (at 50 microg/ml, 84.2%), whereas a concentration of 100 microg/ml was found to be effective in the case of the DMSO solvent (69.8%). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometry revealed that the functional groups from the extracted lignin and commercial lignin were highly similar, indicating the purity of the lignin extracted from black liquor. These results provide a strong basis for further applications of lignin in the food industry and also illustrate an eco-friendly approach to utilize oil palm black liquor.

  7. Conversion of kraft lignin over hierarchical MFI zeolite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong-Soo; Lee, Hyung Won; Ryoo, Ryong; Kim, Wookdong; Park, Sung Hoon; Jeon, Jong-Ki; Park, Young-Kwon

    2014-03-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of kraft lignin was carried out using pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Hierarchical mesoporous MFI was used as the catalyst and another mesoporous material Al-SBA-15 was also used for comparison. The characteristics of mesoporous MFI were analyzed by X-ray diffraction patterns, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms, and temperature programmed desorption of NH3. Two catalyst/lignin mass ratios were tested: 5/1 and 10/1. Aromatics and alkyl phenolics were the main products of the catalytic pyrolysis of lignin over mesoporous MFI. In particular, the yields of mono-aromatics such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene were increased substantially by catalytic upgrading. Increase in the catalyst dose enhanced the production of aromatics further, which is attributed to decarboxylation, decarbonlyation, and aromatization reactions occurring over the acid sites of mesoporous MFI.

  8. Properties and Possible Applications for Lignin Streams Obtained from Rice Straw Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mussatto, Solange I.

    This study aimed to evaluate the chemical and physical properties of lignin streams recovered from rice straw processing and to study the extraction of antioxidant phenolic compounds from these materials. The evaluated samples included two different cellulignin fermentation residues (FR’s) and an......This study aimed to evaluate the chemical and physical properties of lignin streams recovered from rice straw processing and to study the extraction of antioxidant phenolic compounds from these materials. The evaluated samples included two different cellulignin fermentation residues (FR......’s) and an acid-precipitated lignin from alkaline-deacetylated black liquor (DBLL). For comparison, a standard lignin sample (Kraft lignin, from Sigma-Aldrich) was also assayed. Besides providing a better understanding about such materials, the obtained results made also possible to propose some potential...

  9. Structural changes of corn stover lignin during acid pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxley, Geoffrey; Gaspar, Armindo Ribeiro; Higgins, Don; Xu, Hui

    2012-09-01

    In this study, raw corn stover was subjected to dilute acid pretreatments over a range of severities under conditions similar to those identified by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in their techno-economic analysis of biochemical conversion of corn stover to ethanol. The pretreated corn stover then underwent enzymatic hydrolysis with yields above 70 % at moderate enzyme loading conditions. The enzyme exhausted lignin residues were characterized by ³¹P NMR spectroscopy and functional moieties quantified and correlated to enzymatic hydrolysis yields. Results from this study indicated that both xylan solubilization and lignin degradation are important for improving the enzyme accessibility and digestibility of dilute acid pretreated corn stover. At lower pretreatment temperatures, there is a good correlation between xylan solubilization and cellulose accessibility. At higher pretreatment temperatures, lignin degradation correlated better with cellulose accessibility, represented by the increase in phenolic groups. During acid pretreatment, the ratio of syringyl/guaiacyl functional groups also gradually changed from less than 1 to greater than 1 with the increase in pretreatment temperature. This implies that more syringyl units are released from lignin depolymerization of aryl ether linkages than guaiacyl units. The condensed phenolic units are also correlated with the increase in pretreatment temperature up to 180 °C, beyond which point condensation reactions may overtake the hydrolysis of aryl ether linkages as the dominant reactions of lignin, thus leading to decreased cellulose accessibility.

  10. Enzymatically and chemically oxidized lignin nanoparticles for biomaterial applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattinen, Maija-Liisa; Valle-Delgado, Juan José; Leskinen, Timo; Anttila, Tuomas; Riviere, Guillaume; Sipponen, Mika; Paananen, Arja; Lintinen, Kalle; Kostiainen, Mauri; Österberg, Monika

    2018-04-01

    Cross-linked and decolorized lignin nanoparticles (LNPs) were prepared enzymatically and chemically from softwood Kraft lignin. Colloidal lignin particles (CLPs, ca. 200 nm) in a non-malodorous aqueous dispersion could be dried and redispersed in tetrahydrofuran (THF) or in water retaining their stability i.e. spherical shape and size. Two fungal laccases, Trametes hirsuta (ThL) and Melanocarpus albomyces (MaL) were used in the cross-linking reactions. Reactivity of ThL and MaL on Lignoboost™ lignin and LNPs was confirmed by high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) and oxygen consumption measurements with simultaneous detection of red-brown color due to the formation of quinones. Zeta potential measurements verified oxidation of LNPs via formation of surface-oriented carboxylic acid groups. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed minor changes in the particle size distributions of LNPs after laccase catalyzed radicalization, indicating preferably covalent intraparticular cross-linking over polymerization. Changes in the surface morphology of laccase treated LNPs were imaged by atomic force (AFM) and transmission emission (TEM) microscopy. Furthermore, decolorization of LNPs without degradation was obtained using ultrasonication with H 2 O 2 in alkaline reaction conditions. The research results have high impact for the utilization of Kraft lignin as nanosized colloidal particles in advanced bionanomaterial applications in medicine, foods and cosmetics including different sectors from chemical industry. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Aromatic chemicals by iron-catalyzed hydrotreatment of lignin pyrolysis vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcese, Roberto Nicolas; Lardier, George; Bettahar, Mohammed; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Fontana, Sébastien; Carré, Vincent; Aubriet, Frédéric; Petitjean, Dominique; Dufour, Anthony

    2013-08-01

    Lignin is a potential renewable material for the production of bio-sourced aromatic chemicals. We present the first hydrotreatment of lignin pyrolysis vapors, before any condensation, using inexpensive and sustainable iron-silica (Fe/SiO2 ) and iron-activated carbon (Fe/AC) catalysts. Lignin pyrolysis was conducted in a tubular reactor and vapors were injected in a fixed bed of catalysts (673 K, 1 bar) with stacks to investigate the profile of coke deposit. More than 170 GC-analyzable compounds were identified by GCxGC (heart cutting)/flame ionization detector mass spectrometry. Lignin oligomers were analyzed by very high resolution mass spectrometry, called the "petroleomic" method. They are trapped by the catalytic fixed bed and, in particular, by the AC. The catalysts showed a good selectivity for the hydrodeoxygenation of real lignin vapors to benzene, toluene, xylenes, phenol, cresols, and alkyl phenols. The spent catalysts were characterized by temperature-programmed oxidation, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and N2 sorption. Micropores in the Fe/AC catalyst are completely plugged by coke deposits, whereas the mesoporous structure of Fe/SiO2 is unaffected. TEM images reveal two different types of coke deposit: 1) catalytic coke deposited in the vicinity of iron particles and 2) thermal coke (carbonaceous particles ≈1 μm in diameter) formed from the gas-phase growth of lignin oligomers. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Tomato strigolactones are derived from carotenoids and their biosynthesis is promoted by phosphate starvation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez Raez, J.A.; Charnikhova, T.; Gomez-Roldan, M.V.; Matusova, R.; Kohlen, W.; Vos, de C.H.; Verstappen, F.W.A.; Puech-Pages, V.; Becard, G.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Bouwmeester, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Strigolactones are rhizosphere signalling compounds that mediate host location in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and parasitic plants. Here, the regulation of the biosynthesis of strigolactones is studied in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Strigolactone production under phosphate starvation, in

  13. Oxidative degradation of lignin by photochemical and chemical radical generating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, M.H.; Kutsuki, H.; Morgan, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    Oxidation of specifically radiolabeled 14 C-lignins by UV/H 2 O 2 , Fenton's reagent, photosensitizing riboflavin, UV- and γ-irradiation was examined. In the presence of UV/H 2 O 2 , a hydroxyl radical (radicalOH) generating system, 14 C-methoxy, 2-[ 14 C-sidechain] and 14 C-ring labeled lignin were rapidly and extensively degraded as measured by gel filtration of the reaction products on Sephadex LH-20. This suggested that exposure to radicalOH leads to rapid, nonspecific lignin degradation. Rapid degradation of 14 C-methoxy, 2-[ 14 C-sidechain] and 14 C-ring labeled lignin also occurred in the presence of the radicalOH generating system, Fenton's reagent, confirming the primary role of radicalOH in these reactions. Photosensitizing riboflavin, also capable of effecting transformation of organic compounds via Type I hydrogen radical abstractions, caused extensive oxidative degradation of 14 C-methoxy labeled lignin and significant degradation of 2-[ 14 C-sidechain] and 14 C-ring labeled lignin. In addition, UV- and γ-irradiation caused slower but extensive degradation of the polymers, probably via radical type mechanisms. All of these results indicate that radicalOH as well as organic radical generating systems are effective agents for the purpose of degrading this heterogeneous, optically inactive and random biopolymer. (author)

  14. Expression Pattern of Two Paralogs Encoding Cinnamyl Alcohol Dehydrogenases in Arabidopsis. Isolation and Characterization of the Corresponding Mutants1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibout, Richard; Eudes, Aymerick; Pollet, Brigitte; Goujon, Thomas; Mila, Isabelle; Granier, Fabienne; Séguin, Armand; Lapierre, Catherine; Jouanin, Lise

    2003-01-01

    Studying Arabidopsis mutants of the phenylpropanoid pathway has unraveled several biosynthetic steps of monolignol synthesis. Most of the genes leading to monolignol synthesis have been characterized recently in this herbaceous plant, except those encoding cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD). We have used the complete sequencing of the Arabidopsis genome to highlight a new view of the complete CAD gene family. Among nine AtCAD genes, we have identified the two distinct paralogs AtCAD-C and AtCAD-D, which share 75% identity and are likely to be involved in lignin biosynthesis in other plants. Northern, semiquantitative restriction fragment-length polymorphism-reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and western analysis revealed that AtCAD-C and AtCAD-D mRNA and protein ratios were organ dependent. Promoter activities of both genes are high in fibers and in xylem bundles. However, AtCAD-C displayed a larger range of sites of expression than AtCAD-D. Arabidopsis null mutants (Atcad-D and Atcad-C) corresponding to both genes were isolated. CAD activities were drastically reduced in both mutants, with a higher impact on sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity (6% and 38% of residual sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activities for Atcad-D and Atcad-C, respectively). Only Atcad-D showed a slight reduction in Klason lignin content and displayed modifications of lignin structure with a significant reduced proportion of conventional S lignin units in both stems and roots, together with the incorporation of sinapaldehyde structures ether linked at Cβ. These results argue for a substantial role of AtCAD-D in lignification, and more specifically in the biosynthesis of sinapyl alcohol, the precursor of S lignin units. PMID:12805615

  15. Expression pattern of two paralogs encoding cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases in Arabidopsis. Isolation and characterization of the corresponding mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibout, Richard; Eudes, Aymerick; Pollet, Brigitte; Goujon, Thomas; Mila, Isabelle; Granier, Fabienne; Séguin, Armand; Lapierre, Catherine; Jouanin, Lise

    2003-06-01

    Studying Arabidopsis mutants of the phenylpropanoid pathway has unraveled several biosynthetic steps of monolignol synthesis. Most of the genes leading to monolignol synthesis have been characterized recently in this herbaceous plant, except those encoding cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD). We have used the complete sequencing of the Arabidopsis genome to highlight a new view of the complete CAD gene family. Among nine AtCAD genes, we have identified the two distinct paralogs AtCAD-C and AtCAD-D, which share 75% identity and are likely to be involved in lignin biosynthesis in other plants. Northern, semiquantitative restriction fragment-length polymorphism-reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and western analysis revealed that AtCAD-C and AtCAD-D mRNA and protein ratios were organ dependent. Promoter activities of both genes are high in fibers and in xylem bundles. However, AtCAD-C displayed a larger range of sites of expression than AtCAD-D. Arabidopsis null mutants (Atcad-D and Atcad-C) corresponding to both genes were isolated. CAD activities were drastically reduced in both mutants, with a higher impact on sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity (6% and 38% of residual sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activities for Atcad-D and Atcad-C, respectively). Only Atcad-D showed a slight reduction in Klason lignin content and displayed modifications of lignin structure with a significant reduced proportion of conventional S lignin units in both stems and roots, together with the incorporation of sinapaldehyde structures ether linked at Cbeta. These results argue for a substantial role of AtCAD-D in lignification, and more specifically in the biosynthesis of sinapyl alcohol, the precursor of S lignin units.

  16. The simultaneous repression of CCR and CAD, two enzymes of the lignin biosynthetic pathway, results in sterility and dwarfism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thévenin, Johanne; Pollet, Brigitte; Letarnec, Bruno; Saulnier, Luc; Gissot, Lionel; Maia-Grondard, Alessandra; Lapierre, Catherine; Jouanin, Lise

    2011-01-01

    Cinnamoyl CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) catalyze the last steps of monolignol biosynthesis. In Arabidopsis, one CCR gene (CCR1, At1g15950) and two CAD genes (CAD C At3g19450 and CAD D At4g34230) are involved in this pathway. A triple cad c cad d ccr1 mutant, named ccc, was obtained. This mutant displays a severe dwarf phenotype and male sterility. The lignin content in ccc mature stems is reduced to 50% of the wild-type level. In addition, stem lignin structure is severely affected, as shown by the dramatic enrichment in resistant inter-unit bonds and incorporation into the polymer of monolignol precursors such as coniferaldehyde, sinapaldehyde, and ferulic acid. Male sterility is due to the lack of lignification in the anther endothecium, which causes the failure of anther dehiscence and of pollen release. The ccc hypolignified stems accumulate higher amounts of flavonol glycosides, sinapoyl malate and feruloyl malate, which suggests a redirection of the phenolic pathway. Therefore, the absence of CAD and CCR, key enzymes of the monolignol pathway, has more severe consequences on the phenotype than the individual absence of each of them. Induction of another CCR (CCR2, At1g80820) and another CAD (CAD1, At4g39330) does not compensate the absence of the main CCR and CAD activities. This lack of CCR and CAD activities not only impacts lignification, but also severely affects the development of the plants. These consequences must be carefully considered when trying to reduce the lignin content of plants in order to facilitate the lignocellulose-to-bioethanol conversion process.

  17. Improved Lignin Polyurethane Properties with Lewis Acid Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Hoyong; Washburn, Newell R.

    2012-01-01

    Chemical modification strategies to improve the mechanical properties of lignin-based polyurethanes are presented. We hypothesized that treatment of lignin with Lewis acids would increase the concentration of hydroxyl groups available to react with diisocyanate monomers. Under the conditions used, hydrogen bromide-catalyzed modification resulted in a 28% increase in hydroxyl group content. Associated increases in hydrophilicity of solvent-cast thin films were also recorded as evidenced by ...

  18. The pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) genome and the genomics of punicalagin biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Gaihua; Xu, Chunyan; Ming, Ray; Tang, Haibao; Guyot, Romain; Kramer, Elena M; Hu, Yudong; Yi, Xingkai; Qi, Yongjie; Xu, Xiangyang; Gao, Zhenghui; Pan, Haifa; Jian, Jianbo; Tian, Yinping; Yue, Zhen; Xu, Yiliu

    2017-09-01

    Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) is a perennial fruit crop grown since ancient times that has been planted worldwide and is known for its functional metabolites, particularly punicalagins. We have sequenced and assembled the pomegranate genome with 328 Mb anchored into nine pseudo-chromosomes and annotated 29 229 gene models. A Myrtales lineage-specific whole-genome duplication event was detected that occurred in the common ancestor before the divergence of pomegranate and Eucalyptus. Repetitive sequences accounted for 46.1% of the assembled genome. We found that the integument development gene INNER NO OUTER (INO) was under positive selection and potentially contributed to the development of the fleshy outer layer of the seed coat, an edible part of pomegranate fruit. The genes encoding the enzymes for synthesis and degradation of lignin, hemicelluloses and cellulose were also differentially expressed between soft- and hard-seeded varieties, reflecting differences in their accumulation in cultivars differing in seed hardness. Candidate genes for punicalagin biosynthesis were identified and their expression patterns indicated that gallic acid synthesis in tissues could follow different biochemical pathways. The genome sequence of pomegranate provides a valuable resource for the dissection of many biological and biochemical traits and also provides important insights for the acceleration of breeding. Elucidation of the biochemical pathway(s) involved in punicalagin biosynthesis could assist breeding efforts to increase production of this bioactive compound. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Valorisation of lignin – Achievements of the LignoValue project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosselink, R.J.A.; Dam, van J.E.G.; Wild, de P.; Huijgen, W.; Bridgwater, T.; Heeres, H.J.; Kloekhorst, A.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biorefinery for production of biofuels, materials and chemicals requires valorization of all fractions including lignin. As a consequence of its poly-aromatic structure, lignin potentially serves as a source for aromatic chemicals. The developed biorefinery concept of the LignoValue

  20. Arabidopsis ATP A2 peroxidase. Expression and high-resolution structure of a plant peroxidase with implications for lignification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, L; Teilum, K; Mirza, O

    2000-01-01

    Lignins are phenolic biopolymers synthesized by terrestrial, vascular plants for mechanical support and in response to pathogen attack. Peroxidases have been proposed to catalyse the dehydrogenative polymerization of monolignols into lignins, although no specific isoenzyme has been shown...... to be involved in lignin biosynthesis. Recently we isolated an extracellular anionic peroxidase, ATP A2, from rapidly lignifying Arabidopsis cell suspension culture and cloned its cDNA. Here we show that the Atp A2 promoter directs GUS reporter gene expression in lignified tissues of transgenic plants. Moreover......-coumaryl and coniferyl alcohols are preferred by ATP A2, while the oxidation of sinapyl alcohol will be sterically hindered in ATP A2 as well as in all other plant peroxidases due to an overlap with the conserved Pro-139. We suggest ATP A2 is involved in a complex regulation of the covalent cross-linking in the plant...

  1. Lignin monomer composition affects Arabidopsis cell-wall degradability after liquid hot water pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladisch Michael

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lignin is embedded in the plant cell wall matrix, and impedes the enzymatic saccharification of lignocellulosic feedstocks. To investigate whether enzymatic digestibility of cell wall materials can be improved by altering the relative abundance of the two major lignin monomers, guaiacyl (G and syringyl (S subunits, we compared the degradability of cell wall material from wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana with a mutant line and a genetically modified line, the lignins of which are enriched in G and S subunits, respectively. Results Arabidopsis tissue containing G- and S-rich lignins had the same saccharification performance as the wild type when subjected to enzyme hydrolysis without pretreatment. After a 24-hour incubation period, less than 30% of the total glucan was hydrolyzed. By contrast, when liquid hot water (LHW pretreatment was included before enzyme hydrolysis, the S-lignin-rich tissue gave a much higher glucose yield than either the wild-type or G-lignin-rich tissue. Applying a hot-water washing step after the pretreatment did not lead to a further increase in final glucose yield, but the initial hydrolytic rate was doubled. Conclusions Our analyses using the model plant A. thaliana revealed that lignin composition affects the enzymatic digestibility of LHW pretreated plant material. Pretreatment is more effective in enhancing the saccharification of A. thaliana cell walls that contain S-rich lignin. Increasing lignin S monomer content through genetic engineering may be a promising approach to increase the efficiency and reduce the cost of biomass to biofuel conversion.

  2. A NEW PROCESS DEVELOPED FOR SEPARATION OF LIGNIN FROM AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE PRETREATMENT SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, S.; Gorensek, M.; Milliken, C.

    2010-12-14

    A method is described for separating lignin from liquid solutions resulting from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials such as switchgrass with ammonium hydroxide. The method involves a sequence of steps including acidification, evaporation, and precipitation or centrifugation that are performed under defined conditions, and results in a relatively pure, solid lignin product. The method is tested on ammonium hydroxide solutions containing lignin extracted from switchgrass. Experimental results show that the method is capable of recovering between 66-95% of dissolved lignin as a precipitated solid. Cost estimates of pilot-scale and industrial-scale expressions of the process indicate that breakeven lignin prices of $2.36/kg and $0.78/kg, respectively, may be obtainable with this recovery method.

  3. Paving the Way for Lignin Valorisation : Recent Advances in Bioengineering, Biorefining and Catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rinaldi, Roberto; Jastrzebski, Robin|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338017747; Clough, Matthew T; Ralph, John; Kennema, Marco; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/33799529X; Weckhuysen, Bert M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2016-01-01

    Lignin is an abundant biopolymer with a high carbon content and high aromaticity. Despite its potential as a raw material for the fuel and chemical industries, lignin remains the most poorly utilised of the lignocellulosic biopolymers. Effective valorisation of lignin requires careful fine-tuning of

  4. Fast Curing Bio-Based Phenolic Resins via Lignin Demethylated under Mild Reaction Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiongjiong Li

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Demethylation technique has been used to enhance lignin reactivity for preparation of phenolic resins. However, the demethylation efficiency and the demethylated lignin (DL reactivity were still unsatisfactory. To improve the demethylation efficiency, alkali lignin was demethylated under different mild conditions using sodium sulfite as a catalyst. Lignin and DL were characterized by 1H-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy to determine the demethylation mechanism. With the demethylation of lignin, the methoxyl group content decreased from 1.93 m mol/g to 1.09 m mol/g, and the phenolic hydroxyl group content increased from 0.56 m mol/g to 0.82 m mol/g. These results revealed that methoxyl groups were attacked by SO32−, and some methoxyl groups were converted to phenolic hydroxyl groups by a nucleophilic substitution reaction, generating DL with high reactivity. The chemical properties of lignin-based phenolic resins were studied by 13C-NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy, and their physical properties were also investigated. The results indicated that lignin-based phenolic resins exhibited faster curing rate and shorter gel time. In addition, the bonding strength increased from 0.92 MPa to 1.07 MPa, and the formaldehyde emission decreased from 0.58 mg/L to 0.22 mg/L after lignin demethylated at the optimum condition.

  5. Structural changes in lignin during organosolv pretreatment of Liriodendron tulipifera and the effect on enzymatic hydrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Bon-Wook; Min, Byeong-Cheol; Gwak, Ki-Seob; Lee, Soo-Min; Choi, Joon-Weon; Yeo, Hwanmyeong; Choi, In-Gyu

    2012-01-01

    Although organosolv pretreatment removed substantial amounts of lignin and xylan, the yield of glucan which is a major sugar source for fermentation to ethanol is more than 90% in most conditions of the organosolv pretreatment. Relative lignin contents of all pretreated biomass were more than 200 g kg −1 , however enzymatic conversions were increased dramatically comparing to untreated biomass. Therefore the correlation between lignin and enzymatic hydrolysis could not be explained just by lignin content, and other changes resulting from lignin removal affected enzymatic hydrolysis. Results on enzymatic conversion and sugar recovery suggested that the critical temperature improving enzymatic hydrolysis significantly was between 120 °C and 130 °C. Microscopic analysis using Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) showed that structural lignin changes happened through organosolv pretreatment. Lignins were isolated from lignin carbohydrate complex (LCC) at the initial stage and then migrated to the surface of biomass. The isolated and migrated lignins were finally redistributed onto surface. These structural changes formed droplets on surface and increased pore volume in pretreated biomass. The increase in pore volume also increased available surface area and enzyme adsorption at initial stage, and thus enzymatic conversion increased significantly through organosolv pretreatment. It was verified that the droplets were mainly composed of lignin and the lignin droplets inhibited enzymatic hydrolysis through adsorption with cellulase. -- Highlights: ► Just lignin contents cannot explain a correlation with enzymatic hydrolysis. ► Several changes resulted from lignin removal must affect enzymatic hydrolysis. ► Droplets are formed by structural changes in lignin during organosolv pretreatment. ► Formation of the lignin droplet increases the pore volume in biomass. ► The increase in pore volume enhances the enzymatic hydrolysis.

  6. Probing the interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides using atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jingyu; Qian, Yong, E-mail: qianyong86@163.com; Deng, Yonghong; Liu, Di; Li, Hao; Qiu, Xueqing, E-mail: xueqingqiu66@163.com

    2016-12-30

    Graphical abstract: The interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides are quantitatively probed by atomic force microscopy, which is fundamental but beneficial for understanding and optimizing the absorption-dispersion and catalytic degradation processes of lignin. - Highlights: • The interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides are measured using AFM. • The adhesion forces between lignin and metal oxides are larger than that in nonmetal systems. • Hydrogen bond plays an important role in lignin-inorganic oxides system. - Abstract: Understanding the interactions between lignin and inorganic oxides has both fundamental and practical importance in industrial and energy fields. In this work, the specific interactions between alkali lignin (AL) and three inorganic oxide substrates in aqueous environment are quantitatively measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show that the average adhesion force between AL and metal oxide such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or MgO is nearly two times bigger than that between AL and nonmetal oxide such as SiO{sub 2} due to the electrostatic difference and cation-π interaction. When 83% hydroxyl groups of AL is blocked by acetylation, the adhesion forces between AL and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MgO and SiO{sub 2} decrease 43, 35 and 75% respectively, which indicate hydrogen bonds play an important role between AL and inorganic oxides, especially in AL-silica system.

  7. Improved lignin pyrolysis for phenolics production in a bubbling bed reactor--Effect of bed materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongbing; Briens, Cedric; Berruti, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Lignin pyrolysis was studied in a bubbling fluidized bed reactor equipped with a fractional condensation train, using nitrogen as the fluidization gas. The effect of different bed materials (silica sand, lignin char, activated lignin char, birch bark char, and foamed glass beads) on bio-oil yield and quality was investigated for a pyrolysis temperature of 550 °C. Results how that a bed of activated lignin char is preferable to the commonly used silica sand: pyrolysis of Kraft lignin with a bed of activated lignin char not only provides a pure char product, but also a higher dry bio-oil yield (with a relative increase of 43%), lower pyrolytic water production, and better bio-oil quality. The bio-oil obtained from Kraft lignin pyrolysis with a bed of activated lignin char has a lower average molecular weight, less tar, more phenolics, and less acidity than when sand is used as bed material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Connecting tropical river DOM and POM to the landscape with lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernes, Peter J.; Dyda, Rachael Y.; McDowell, William H.

    2017-12-01

    Tropical rivers account for two thirds of global fluxes of terrigenous organic matter to the oceans, yet because of their remote locations relative to most industrialized countries, they are poorly studied compared to temperate and even Arctic rivers. Further, most tropical river research has focused on large rivers like the Amazon or Congo, yet more than half of organic matter fluxes from tropical rivers comes from much smaller rivers. This study focuses on two such rivers in the Luquillo Experimental Forest of Puerto Rico, namely the Rio Mameyes and Rio Icacos, and uses time-series measurements of lignin biomarkers to put them in context with much bigger tropical rivers in the literature. Although lignin concentrations and carbon-normalized yields offer some distinction between mountainous vs. floodplain tropical river reaches, compositional differences appear to offer greater potential, including S:V vs. C:V plots that may capture the poorly-studied influence of palm trees, and (Ad:Al)s vs. (Ad:Al)v plots that may reflect differences in underlying mineralogy and degradation in soils. Even though dissolved and particulate lignin ultimately come from the same vegetation sources, comparison of dissolved and particulate lignin parameters within the two Puerto Rican rivers indicate that the pathways by which they end up in the same parcel of river water are largely decoupled. Across several particulate lignin studies in tropical rivers, mineral composition and concentration appears to exert a strong control on particulate lignin compositions and concentrations. Finally, the time-series nature of this study allows for new ways of analyzing dissolved lignin endmember compositions and degradation within the catchment. Plots of dissolved lignin parameters vs. lignin concentration reveal both the composition of "fresh" DOM that is likely mobilized from organic-rich soil surface layers along with the extent and trajectory of degradation of that signature that is possible

  9. Analysis of Structural Units and Their Influence on Thermal Degradation of Alkali Lignins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Hua

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The chemical structures of four alkali lignins isolated from poplar, fir, straw, and bagasse were investigated. To explore the relationship between the structural units and the thermal decomposition behavior, the system was tested by elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS. The results indicated that the carbon content of poplar lignin (PL was higher than that of others. Fir lignin (FL exhibited the highest guaiacol units, while the other three lignins were abundant in syringol units. The thermal decomposition characteristics and pyrolysis products of the four lignins were influenced by the material structural and composition. The DTG curves showed that the initial temperatures and major degradation temperatures of woody lignins(FL and PL) with complex inherent structures were shifted to the high temperature zoom compared with that of non-woody (BL and SL)lignins. Py-GC/MS analysis showed that guaiacol-type phenolic compounds were predominant pyrolysis products derived from the four lignins. The yield of guaiacol-type phenols could reach 82.87%. Moreover, the BL had selectively on phenol-type compounds with yield of 27.89%.

  10. Removal of oil palm trunk lignin in ammonium hydroxide pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Az-Zahraa, Balqis; Zakaria, Sarani; Daud, Muhammad F. B.; Jaafar, Sharifah Nabihah Syed

    2018-04-01

    Alkaline pretreatment using ammonium hydroxide, NH4OH serves as one of a process to remove lignin from lignocellulosic biomass such as oil palm trunk fiber. In this study, the effect of NH4OH pretreatment on removal of oil palm trunk lignin was investigated. The oil palm trunk fiber was dissolved in NH4OH with different concentrations (6, 8 and 10 %), different duration (3, 5 and 7 h) and temperatures (60, 80 and 100 °C). The samples were analyzed by using UV-Vis to estimate the concentration of extracted lignin. The result indicates that the optimum conditions to gain maximum extracted lignin were 8% NH4OH, 100 °C and 5 h with concentration of 64 mgL-1 while the lowest was at 6% NH4OH, 100 °C and 5 h with concentration of 62.5 mgL-1.

  11. Structural variations and physical properties of lignin coke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, C.

    1986-01-01

    The studied lignin is a by-product of the process of ethanol production from eucaliptus. It was heat-treated under inert atmosphere conditions at increasing temperatures from 300 0 C up to 2600 0 C. This material has about 35 weight % of carbon yield and low ash content (0.70 w %). The structural variations were studied by wide-angle X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering and infra-red spectroscopy. The bulk and the ''real'' density of the samples have also been determined as a function of the heat treatment temperatures. These experimental results enabled us to establish a mechanism of structure variation based on the formation of a graphite-like and porous structure within the initially amorphous lignin matrix. It has been possible to specify the adequate heat treatment temperature based upon the lignin coke applications. (author) [pt

  12. Regulation of Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Purple Leaves of Zijuan Tea (Camellia sinensis var. kitamura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingxia Wang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant anthocyanin biosynthesis is well understood, but the regulatory mechanism in purple foliage tea remains unclear. Using isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ, 815 differential proteins were identified in the leaves of Zijuan tea, among which 20 were associated with the regulation of anthocyanin metabolism. We found that the abundances of anthocyanin synthesis-related enzymes such as chalcone synthase, chalcone isomerase, dihydroflavonol 4-reductase and anthocyanin synthetase, as well as anthocyanin accumulation-related UDP-glucosyl transferase and ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters in the purple leaves were all significantly higher than those in the green leaves. The abundances of the transcription factors bHLH and HY5, regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis at transcriptional level were also obviously higher in purple leaves than those in green leaves. In addition, bifunctional 3-dehydroquinate dehydratase and chorismate mutase in purple leaves were distinctly higher in abundance compared to green leaves, which provided sufficient phenylalanine substrate for anthocyanin synthesis. Furthermore, lignin synthesis was found to be reduced due to the lower abundances of cinnamoyl-CoA reductase 1, peroxidase 15 and laccase-6, which resulted in increase of intermediates flow into anthocyanin synthesis pathway. The physiological data were consistent with proteomic results. These four aspects of biosynthetic regulation contribute to anthocyanin accumulation in purple leaves of Zijuan tea.

  13. Reactivity of lignin and problems of its oxidative destruction with peroxy reagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demin, Valerii A; Shereshovets, Valerii V; Monakov, Yurii B

    1999-01-01

    Published data on reactivity and oxidation of lignin and model compounds with hydrogen peroxide, ozone and chlorine dioxide as well as on oxidative destruction of the sulfate pulp lignin with various reagents during bleaching are systematised and generalised. Concepts of lignin activation towards its selective oxidation and kinetic features of sulfate pulp oxidative delignification are considered. The bibliography includes 157 references.

  14. The Paleozoic Origin of Enzymatic Lignin Decomposition Reconstructed from 31 Fungal Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrios Floudas; Manfred Binder; Robert Riely; Kerrie Barry; Robert A. Blanchette; Bernard Henrissat; Angel T. Martínez; Robert Otillar; Joseph W. Spatafora; Jagjit S. Yadav; Andrea Aerts; Isabelle Benoit; Alex Boyd; Alexis Carlson; Alex Copeland; Pedro M. Coutinho; Ronald P. deVries; Patricia Ferreira; Keisha Findley; Brian Foster; Jill Gaskell; Dylan Glotzer; Pawe³ Górecki; Joseph Heitman; Cedar Hesse; Chiaki Hori; Kiyohiko Igarashi; Joel A. Jurgens; Nathan Kallen; Phil Kersten; Annegret Kohler; Ursula Kües; T. K. ArunKumar; Alan Kuo; Kurt LaButti; Luis F. Larrondo; Erika Lindquist; Albee Ling; Vincent Lombard; Susan Lucas; Taina Lundell; Rachael Martin; David J. McLaughlin; Ingo Morgenstern; Emanuelle Morin; Claude Murat; Laszlo G. Nagy; Matt Nolan; Robin A. Ohm; Aleksandrina Patyshakuliyeva; Antonis Rokas; Francisco J. Ruiz-Dueñas; Grzegorz Sabat; Asaf Salamov; Masahiro Samejima; Jeremy Schmutz; Jason C. Slot; Franz St. John; Jan Stenlid; Hui Sun; Sheng Sun; Khajamohiddin Syed; Adrian Tsang; Ad Wiebenga; Darcy Young; Antonio Pisabarro; Daniel C. Eastwood; Francis Martin; Dan Cullen; Igor V. Grigoriev; David S. Hibbett

    2012-01-01

    Wood is a major pool of organic carbon that is highly resistant to decay, owing largely to the presence of lignin. The only organisms capable of substantial lignin decay are white rot fungi in the Agaricomycetes, which also contains non–lignin-degrading brown rot and ectomycorrhizal species. Comparative analyses of 31 fungal genomes (12 generated for this study)...

  15. Lignin properties in topsoils of a beech/oak forest after 8 years of manipulated litter fall: relevance of altered input and oxidation of lignin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klotzbücher, T.; Strohmeier, S.; Kaiser, K.; Bowden, R.D.; Lajtha, K.; Ohm, H.; Kalbitz, K.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims We studied the response of lignin oxidation in soils of a beech/oak forest to changes in litter fall. Additionally we considered possible factors in lignin oxidation, including altered (i) input of fresh organic matter and (ii) fungi-to-bacteria ratios. Methods The field-based

  16. Stone formation in peach fruit exhibits spatial coordination of the lignin and flavonoid pathways and similarity to Arabidopsis dehiscence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piagnani M Claudia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lignification of the fruit endocarp layer occurs in many angiosperms and plays a critical role in seed protection and dispersal. This process has been extensively studied with relationship to pod shatter or dehiscence in Arabidopsis. Dehiscence is controlled by a set of transcription factors that define the fruit tissue layers and whether or not they lignify. In contrast, relatively little is known about similar processes in other plants such as stone fruits which contain an extremely hard lignified endocarp or stone surrounding a single seed. Results Here we show that lignin deposition in peach initiates near the blossom end within the endocarp layer and proceeds in a distinct spatial-temporal pattern. Microarray studies using a developmental series from young fruits identified a sharp and transient induction of phenylpropanoid, lignin and flavonoid pathway genes concurrent with lignification and subsequent stone hardening. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction studies revealed that specific phenylpropanoid (phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and cinnamate 4-hydroxylase and lignin (caffeoyl-CoA O-methyltransferase, peroxidase and laccase pathway genes were induced in the endocarp layer over a 10 day time period, while two lignin genes (p-coumarate 3-hydroxylase and cinnamoyl CoA reductase were co-regulated with flavonoid pathway genes (chalcone synthase, dihydroflavanol 4-reductase, leucoanthocyanidin dioxygen-ase and flavanone-3-hydrosylase which were mesocarp and exocarp specific. Analysis of other fruit development expression studies revealed that flavonoid pathway induction is conserved in the related Rosaceae species apple while lignin pathway induction is not. The transcription factor expression of peach genes homologous to known endocarp determinant genes in Arabidopsis including SHATTERPROOF, SEEDSTCK and NAC SECONDARY WALL THICENING PROMOTING FACTOR 1 were found to be specifically expressed in the endocarp while the

  17. Influence of alkaline hydrothermal pretreatment on shrub wood Tamarix ramosissima: Characteristics of degraded lignin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Ling-Ping; Bai, Yuan-Yuan; Shi, Zheng-Jun; Lu, Qiang; Sun, Run-Cang

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the influence of alkaline hydrothermal (AH) pretreatment on the physicochemical properties of the degraded lignins, attempt to upgrade the potential of lignin for value-added chemicals and fuel production. For this purpose, shrub wood Tamarix ramosissima lignin was fractionated using a two-stage process based on an AH pretreatment followed by an alkaline ethanol post-treatment. The recovered lignin fractions were investigated by comparison with milled wood lignin (MWL) in terms of fractionation yield, carbohydrate composition, gel permeation chromatography, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, 13 C and 2D heteronuclear single quantum correlation nuclear magnetic resonance, as well as pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The result showed that AH pretreatment led to the degradation of β-O-4 linkages and consequently the increased severity caused a release of more S-units lignin fractions with molecular weights between 1300 and 2500 g/mol in the liquid but higher molecular weights (3000–4400 g/mol) in the residues. Moreover, it was found that the lignin syringyl-to-guaiacyl (S/G) ratios from analytical pyrolysis slightly changed after AH pretreatment (S/G, 1.8–2.3) but higher than those of MWL (S/G, 1.7). Overall, the present study demonstrates that these lignins dissolved during AH pretreatment and those recovered from the solid residues isolated with alkaline ethanol post-treatment could be profitably exploited as feedstock in integrated forest biorefineries, rather than traditional use as low-value energy sources.- Highlights: • Alkaline hydrothermal pretreatment and alkaline ethanol post-treatment were proposed. • The influence of AH pretreatment on the lignin structural changes was characterized. • Aryl-O-ether linkages of lignin were extensively cleaved. • Lignin recovered from solid residue is a potential resource for the production of value-added chemicals

  18. Selective production of arenes via direct lignin upgrading over a niobium-based catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yi; Xia, Qineng; Dong, Lin; Liu, Xiaohui; Han, Xue; Parker, Stewart F.; Cheng, Yongqiang; Daemen, Luke L.; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J.; Yang, Sihai; Wang, Yanqin

    2017-07-01

    Lignin is the only large-volume renewable source of aromatic chemicals. Efficient depolymerization and deoxygenation of lignin while retaining the aromatic functionality are attractive but extremely challenging. Here we report the selective production of arenes via direct hydrodeoxygenation of organosolv lignin over a porous Ru/Nb2O5 catalyst that enabled the complete removal of the oxygen content from lignin. The conversion of birch lignin to monomer C7-C9 hydrocarbons is nearly quantitative based on its monomer content, with a total mass yield of 35.5 wt% and an exceptional arene selectivity of 71 wt%. Inelastic neutron scattering and DFT calculations confirm that the Nb2O5 support is catalytically unique compared with other traditional oxide supports, and the disassociation energy of Caromatic-OH bonds in phenolics is significantly reduced upon adsorption on Nb2O5, resulting in its distinct selectivity to arenes. This one-pot process provides a promising approach for improved lignin valorization with general applicability.

  19. A process for producing lignin and volatile compounds from hydrolysis liquor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazraie, Tooran; Zhang, Yiqian; Tarasov, Dmitry; Gao, Weijue; Price, Jacquelyn; DeMartini, Nikolai; Hupa, Leena; Fatehi, Pedram

    2017-01-01

    Hot water hydrolysis process is commercially applied for treating wood chips prior to pulping or wood pellet production, while it produces hydrolysis liquor as a by-product. Since the hydrolysis liquor is dilute, the production of value-added materials from it would be challenging. In this study, acidification was proposed as a viable method to extract (1) furfural and acetic acid from hot water hydrolysis liquor and (2) lignin compounds from the liquor. The thermal properties of the precipitates made from the acidification of hydrolysis liquor confirmed the volatile characteristics of precipitates. Membrane dialysis was effective in removing inorganic salts associated with lignin compounds. The purified lignin compounds had a glass transition temperature (Tg) of 180-190 °C, and were thermally stable. The results confirmed that lignin compounds present in hot water hydrolysis liquor had different characteristics. The acidification of hydrolysis liquor primarily removed the volatile compounds from hydrolysis liquor. Based on these results, a process for producing purified lignin and precipitates of volatile compounds was proposed.

  20. Reactivity improvement of cellulolytic enzyme lignin via mild hydrothermal modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhuoming; Tang, Jiafa; Li, Shujun; Suo, Enxiang

    2017-12-01

    Isolated by the cellulolytic enzyme lignin (CEL) process, water-alcohol (1:1, v/v) was introduced as co-solvent in the process of the hydrothermal treatment. The modification parameters such as reaction temperature and time, solid-to-liquid ratio, and catalysts (NaOH and NaOAlO 2 ) have been investigated in terms of the specific lignin properties, such as the phenolic hydroxyl content (OH phen ), DPPH free radical scavenging rate, and formaldehyde value. The CELs were also characterized by GPC, FT-IR and 1 H NMR spectroscopy, and Py-GC/MS. The key data are under optimal lignin modification conditions (solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:10 (w/v) and a temperature of 250°C for 60min) are: OH phen content: 2.50mmol/g; half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC 50 ) towards DPPH free radicals: 88.2mg/L; formaldehyde value: 446.9g/kg). Both base catalysts decrease the residue rate, but phenol reactivities of the products were also detracted. Py-GC/MS results revealed that modified lignin had a higher phenolic composition than the CEL did, especially the modified lignin without catalyst (ML), which represented 74.51% phenolic content. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Purification and characterization of lignin peroxidases from Penicillium decumbens P6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.S.; Yuan, H.L.; Wang, H.X.; Chen, W.X. [China Agricultural University, Beijing (China). College of Biological Science

    2005-06-01

    Peroxidases are essential enzymes in biodegradation of lignin and lignite which have been investigated intensively in the white-rot fungi. This is the first report of purification and characterization of lignin peroxidase from Penicillium sp. P6 as lignite degradation fungus. The results indicated that the lignin peroxidase of Penicillium decumbens P6 had physical and chemical properties and a N-terminal amino acid sequence different from the lignin peroxidases of white-rot fungi. The lignin peroxidase was isolated from a liquid culture of P. decumbens P6. This enzyme had a molecular weight of 46.3 KDa in SDS-PAGE and exhibited greater activity, temperature stability and wider pH range than those previously reported. The isolation procedure involved (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}SO{sub 4} precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and CM-cellulose, gel filtration on Sephadex G-100, and non-denaturing, discontinuous polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The K{sub m} and V{sub max} values of this enzyme using veratryl alcohol as substrate were 0.565 mmol L{sup -1} and 0.088 mmol (mg protein){sup -1} min{sup -1} respectively. The optimum pH of P6 lignin peroxidase was 4.0, and 70.6% of the relative activity was remained at pH 9.0. The optimum temperature of the enzyme was 45{sup o}C.

  2. Kraft lignin chain extension chemistry via propargylation, oxidative coupling, and Claisen rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sanghamitra; Sadeghifar, Hasan; Argyropoulos, Dimitris S

    2013-10-14

    Despite its aromatic and polymeric nature, the heterogeneous, stochastic, and reactive characteristics of softwood kraft lignin seriously limit its potential for thermoplastic applications. Our continuing efforts toward creating thermoplastic lignin polymers are now focused at exploring propargylation derivatization chemistry and its potential as a versatile novel route for the eventual utilization of technical lignins with a significant amount of molecular control. To do this, we initially report the systematic propargylation of softwood kraft lignin. The synthesized derivatives were extensively characterized with thermal methods (DSC, TGA), (1)H, (13)C, and quantitative (31)P NMR and IR spectroscopies. Further on, we explore the versatile nature of the lignin pendant propargyl groups by demonstrating two distinct chain extension chemistries; the solution-based, copper-mediated, oxidative coupling and the thermally induced, solid-state, Claissen rearrangement polymerization chemistries. Overall, we show that it is possible to modulate the reactivity of softwood kraft lignin via a combination of methylation and chain extension providing a rational means for the creation of higher molecular weight polymers with the potential for thermoplastic materials and carbon fibers with the desired control of structure-property relations.

  3. Comparison of Effect of Brassinosteroid and Gibberellin Biosynthesis Inhibitors on Growth of Rice Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Matusmoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brassinosteroid (BR and gibberellin (GA are two predominant plant hormones that regulate plant cell elongation. Mutants disrupt the biosynthesis of these hormones and display different degrees of dwarf phenotypes in rice. Although the role of each plant hormone in promoting the longitudinal growth of plants has been extensively studied using genetic methods, their relationship is still poorly understood. In this study, we used two specific inhibitors targeting BR and GA biosynthesis to investigate the roles of BR and GA in growth of rice seedlings. Yucaizol, a specific inhibitor of BR biosynthesis, and Trinexapac-ethyl, a commercially available inhibitor of GA biosynthesis, were used. The effect of Yucaizol on rice seedlings indicated that Yucaizol significantly retarded stem elongation. The IC50 value was found to be approximately 0.8 μmol/L. Yucaizol also induced small leaf angle phenocopy in rice seedlings, similarly to BR-deficient rice, while Trinexapac-ethyl did not. When Yucaizol combined with Trinexapac-ethyl was applied to the rice plants, the mixture of these two inhibitors retarded stem elongation of rice at lower doses. Our results suggest that the use of a BR biosynthesis inhibitor combined with a GA biosynthesis inhibitor may be useful in the development of new technologies for controlling rice plant height.

  4. Optimizing Noncovalent Interactions Between Lignin and Synthetic Polymers to Develop Effective Compatibilizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Nathan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Harper, David [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK), Center for Renewable Carbon; Dadmun, Mark D [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Experiments are designed and completed to identify an effective polymeric compatibilizer for lignin polystyrene blends. Copolymers of styrene and vinylphenol are chosen as the structure of the compatibilizer as the VPh unit can readily form intermolecular hydrogen bonds with the lignin molecule. Electron microscopy, thermal analysis, and neutron refl ectivity results demonstrate that among these compatibilizers, a copolymer of styrene and VPh with 20% 30% VPh most readily forms intermolecular interactions with the lignin molecule and results in the most well-dispersed blends with lignin. This behavior is explained by invoking the competition of intra- and intermolecular hydrogen bonding and functional group accessibility in forming intermolecular interactions.

  5. Metabolic regulation at the tricarboxylic acid and glyoxylate cycles of the lignin-degrading basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium against exogenous addition of vanillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Motoyuki; Yuda, Naoki; Nakamura, Tomofumi; Tanaka, Hiroo; Wariishi, Hiroyuki

    2005-10-01

    A proteomic differential display technique was utilized to study cellular responses of Phanerochaete chrysosporium exposed to vanillin, one of the key intermediates found during lignin biodegradation. Intracellular proteins were resolved by 2-DE and target protein spots were identified using MALDI-MS after in-gel tryptic digestions. Upon addition of vanillin to P. chrysosporium, up-regulation of homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, 1,4-benzoquinone reductases, aldehyde dehydrogenase, and aryl-alcohol dehydrogenase, which seem to play roles in vanillin metabolism, was observed. Furthermore, enzymes involved in glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the pentose-phosphate cycle, and heme biosynthesis were also activated. Up-regulation of extracellular peroxidase was also observed. One of the most unique phenomena against exogenous vanillin was a switch from the glyoxylate cycle to the tricarboxylic acid cycle, where a drastic increase in isocitrate dehydrogenase activity was observed. The exogenous addition of other aromatic compounds also caused an increase in its activity, which in turn triggered NAD(P)H production via the action of dehydrogenases in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, heme biosynthesis via the action of aminolevulinic acid synthase on succinyl-CoA, and energy production via activation of the mitochondrial electron transfer system. These metabolic shifts seem to be required for activating a metabolic system for aromatic compounds.

  6. The investigation of wood hydrolysis lignin ability for uranium sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachkova, N.G.; Shuktomova, I.I.; Taskaev, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    The uranium are sorbed in wood hydrolysis lignin efficacious and very strong both in uranyl nitrate solutions and in podsolic soil. It may well be that formation of complexes are possible mechanism of irreversible sorption. The static capacity of lignin are 2.7 mg/g. (author)

  7. Lignin decomposition is sustained under fluctuating redox conditions in humid tropical forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven J. Hall; Whendee L. Silver; Vitaliy I. Timokhin; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2015-01-01

    Lignin mineralization represents a critical flux in the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle, yet little is known about mechanisms and environmental factors controlling lignin breakdown in mineral soils. Hypoxia is thought to suppress lignin decomposition, yet potential effects of oxygen (O2) variability in surface soils have not been explored. Here, we...

  8. Porous core-shell carbon fibers derived from lignin and cellulose nanofibrils

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xuezhu

    2013-10-01

    This letter reports a method to produce lignin and cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) based porous core-shell carbon fibers via co-electrospinning followed by controlled carbonization. Lignin formed the shell of the fiber while CNF network formed the porous core. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was added to the lignin solution to increase its electrospinability. CNFs were surface acetylated and dispersed in silicon oil to obtain a homogenous dispersion for electrospinning the porous core. Hollow lignin fibers were also electrospun using glycerin as the core material. FT-IR measurements confirmed the CNF acetylation. SEM micrographs showed the core-shell and hollow fiber nanostructures before and after carbonization. The novel carbon fibers synthesized in this study exhibited increased surface area and porosity that are promising for many advanced applications. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Porous core-shell carbon fibers derived from lignin and cellulose nanofibrils

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xuezhu; Zhou, Jian; Jiang, Long; Lubineau, Gilles; Chen, Ye; Wu, Xiangfa; Piere, Robert

    2013-01-01

    This letter reports a method to produce lignin and cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs) based porous core-shell carbon fibers via co-electrospinning followed by controlled carbonization. Lignin formed the shell of the fiber while CNF network formed the porous core. Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) was added to the lignin solution to increase its electrospinability. CNFs were surface acetylated and dispersed in silicon oil to obtain a homogenous dispersion for electrospinning the porous core. Hollow lignin fibers were also electrospun using glycerin as the core material. FT-IR measurements confirmed the CNF acetylation. SEM micrographs showed the core-shell and hollow fiber nanostructures before and after carbonization. The novel carbon fibers synthesized in this study exhibited increased surface area and porosity that are promising for many advanced applications. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  10. Preparation of Silk Sericin/Lignin Blend Beads for the Removal of Hexavalent Chromium Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Hyo Won; Shin, Munju; Yun, Haesung; Lee, Ki Hoon

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, novel adsorbents having high adsorption capability and reusability were prepared using agricultural by-products: silk sericin and lignin. Silk sericin and lignin blend beads were successfully prepared using simple coagulation methods for the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) from aqueous solution. A 1 M lithium chloride (LiCl)/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) solvent system successfully dissolved both sericin and lignin and had sufficient viscosity for bead preparation. Compared to the conventional sericin bead adsorbent, sericin/lignin blend beads showed higher Cr(VI) adsorption capacity. The amount of lignin added to the adsorbent greatly affected the adsorption capacity of the beads, and a 50:50 sericin/lignin blend ratio was optimal. Adsorption behavior followed the Freundlich isotherm, which means the adsorption of Cr(VI) occurred on the heterogeneous surface. Cr(VI) adsorption capability increased with temperature because of thermodynamic-kinetic effects. In addition, over 90% of Cr(VI) ions were recovered from the Cr(VI) adsorbed sericin/lignin beads in a 1 M NaOH solution. The adsorption-desorption recycling process was stable for more than seven cycles, and the recycling efficiency was 82%. It is expected that the sericin/lignin beads could be successfully applied in wastewater remediation especially for hazardous Cr(VI) ions in industrial wastewater. PMID:27598142

  11. Preparation of Silk Sericin/Lignin Blend Beads for the Removal of Hexavalent Chromium Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyo Won Kwak

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, novel adsorbents having high adsorption capability and reusability were prepared using agricultural by-products: silk sericin and lignin. Silk sericin and lignin blend beads were successfully prepared using simple coagulation methods for the removal of hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI from aqueous solution. A 1 M lithium chloride (LiCl/dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO solvent system successfully dissolved both sericin and lignin and had sufficient viscosity for bead preparation. Compared to the conventional sericin bead adsorbent, sericin/lignin blend beads showed higher Cr(VI adsorption capacity. The amount of lignin added to the adsorbent greatly affected the adsorption capacity of the beads, and a 50:50 sericin/lignin blend ratio was optimal. Adsorption behavior followed the Freundlich isotherm, which means the adsorption of Cr(VI occurred on the heterogeneous surface. Cr(VI adsorption capability increased with temperature because of thermodynamic-kinetic effects. In addition, over 90% of Cr(VI ions were recovered from the Cr(VI adsorbed sericin/lignin beads in a 1 M NaOH solution. The adsorption-desorption recycling process was stable for more than seven cycles, and the recycling efficiency was 82%. It is expected that the sericin/lignin beads could be successfully applied in wastewater remediation especially for hazardous Cr(VI ions in industrial wastewater.

  12. Comparative studies on anthraquinone retention following the soda/anthraquinone process using 14C-labelled anthraquinone, and mode of action of anthraquinone on lignins and lignin model components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfuetze, E.

    1982-01-01

    This dissertation contributes to the clarification of the following questions: how much of the additive is retained in cellulose following soda/anthraquinone-wood pulping; how much anthraquinone can be detected after extraction studies and after a conventional CEHD-bleaching treatment; can differences be detected between soda lignins and soda/anthraquinone lignins with respect to analytical data, spectroscopie characteristics and macromolecular properties; and how do dimeric lignin models with #betta#-arylether structure behave in decomposition studies using the soda/anthraquinone process. (orig./MG) [de

  13. Anti-HCV effect of Lentinula edodes mycelia solid culture extracts and low-molecular-weight lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuhisa, Koji; Yamane, Seiji; Okamoto, Toru; Watari, Akihiro; Kondoh, Masuo; Matsuura, Yoshiharu; Yagi, Kiyohito

    2015-06-19

    Lentinula edodes mycelia solid culture extract (MSCE) contains several bioactive molecules, including some polyphenolic compounds, which exert immunomodulatory, antitumor, and hepatoprotective effects. In this study, we examined the anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) activity of MSCE and low-molecular-weight lignin (LM-lignin), which is the active component responsible for the hepatoprotective effect of MSCE. Both MSCE and LM-lignin inhibited the entry of two HCV pseudovirus (HCVpv) types into Huh7.5.1 cells. LM-lignin inhibited HCVpv entry at a lower concentration than MSCE and inhibited the entry of HCV particles in cell culture (HCVcc). MSCE also inhibited HCV subgenome replication. LM-lignin had no effect on HCV replication, suggesting that MSCE contains additional active substances. We demonstrate here for the first time the anti-HCV effects of plant-derived LM-lignin and MSCE. The hepatoprotective effect of LM-lignin suggests that lignin derivatives, which can be produced in abundance from existing plant resources, may be effective in the treatment of HCV-related diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Thermochemical properties of cellulose acetate blends with acetosolv and sawdust lignin: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peredo, Karol; Escobar, Danilo; Vega-Lara, Johana; Berg, Alex; Pereira, Miguel

    2016-02-01

    Sawdust (SD) and cotton-lignin blends (CLB) were acetylated and the effect of lignin type and content on thermoplastic properties of the acetate produced was studied. The lignin in samples did not significantly affect the degree of acetylation. An increase in acetyl groups of 1-3% was observed in acetylated SD (ASD) unlike acetylated CLB (ACLB). Thermogravimetric analysis showed two thermal degradation zones; one at 190-200°C and the other at 330-370°C. The early degradation in ASD corresponds to galactoglucomannans while that in ACLB corresponds to the low-molecular-weight lignin. The second degradation is due to decomposition of cellulose acetate and high-molecular-weight lignin. DSC analysis showed homogeneous behaviour in ASD with only one glass transition temperature (Tg) at 170-180°C, unlike ACLB that showed two Tgs at 170-180°C. Sawdust acetylation, taking advantage of its residual lignin, showed higher reactivity and miscibility as compared to the same material produced by adding previously extracted lignin on cotton. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Inhibition of lignin-derived phenolic compounds to cellulase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lei; Li, Wen-Chao; Liu, Li; Zhu, Jia-Qing; Li, Xia; Li, Bing-Zhi; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Lignin-derived phenolic compounds are universal in the hydrolysate of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass. The phenolics reduce the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis and increase the cost of ethanol production. We investigated inhibition of phenolics on cellulase during enzymatic hydrolysis using vanillin as one of the typical lignin-derived phenolics and Avicel as cellulose substrate. As vanillin concentration increased from 0 to 10 mg/mL, cellulose conversion after 72-h enzymatic hydrolysis decreased from 53 to 26 %. Enzyme deactivation and precipitation were detected with the vanillin addition. The enzyme concentration and activity consecutively decreased during hydrolysis, but the inhibition degree, expressed as the ratio of the cellulose conversion without vanillin to the conversion with vanillin (A 0 /A), was almost independent on hydrolysis time. Inhibition can be mitigated by increasing cellulose loading or cellulase concentration. The inhibition degree showed linear relationship with the vanillin concentration and exponential relationship with the cellulose loading and the cellulase concentration. The addition of calcium chloride, BSA, and Tween 80 did not release the inhibition of vanillin significantly. pH and temperature for hydrolysis also showed no significant impact on inhibition degree. The presence of hydroxyl group, carbonyl group, and methoxy group in phenolics affected the inhibition degree. Besides phenolics concentration, other factors such as cellulose loading, enzyme concentration, and phenolic structure also affect the inhibition of cellulose conversion. Lignin-blocking agents have little effect on the inhibition effect of soluble phenolics, indicating that the inhibition mechanism of phenolics to enzyme is likely different from insoluble lignin. The inhibition of soluble phenolics can hardly be entirely removed by increasing enzyme concentration or adding blocking proteins due to the dispersity and multiple binding sites of phenolics

  16. Designer biomass for next-generation biorefineries: leveraging recent insights into xylan structure and biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter J; Wang, Hsin-Tzu; York, William S; Peña, Maria J; Urbanowicz, Breeanna R

    2017-01-01

    Xylans are the most abundant noncellulosic polysaccharides in lignified secondary cell walls of woody dicots and in both primary and secondary cell walls of grasses. These polysaccharides, which comprise 20-35% of terrestrial biomass, present major challenges for the efficient microbial bioconversion of lignocellulosic feedstocks to fuels and other value-added products. Xylans play a significant role in the recalcitrance of biomass to degradation, and their bioconversion requires metabolic pathways that are distinct from those used to metabolize cellulose. In this review, we discuss the key differences in the structural features of xylans across diverse plant species, how these features affect their interactions with cellulose and lignin, and recent developments in understanding their biosynthesis. In particular, we focus on how the combined structural and biosynthetic knowledge can be used as a basis for biomass engineering aimed at developing crops that are better suited as feedstocks for the bioconversion industry.

  17. Acid-catalysed xylose dehydration into furfural in the presence of kraft lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamminpää, Kaisa; Ahola, Juha; Tanskanen, Juha

    2015-02-01

    In this study, the effects of kraft lignin (Indulin AT) on acid-catalysed xylose dehydration into furfural were studied in formic and sulphuric acids. The study was done using D-optimal design. Three variables in both acids were included in the design: time (20-80 min), temperature (160-180°C) and initial lignin concentration (0-20 g/l). The dependent variables were xylose conversion, furfural yield, furfural selectivity and pH change. The results showed that the xylose conversion and furfural yield decreased in sulphuric acid, while in formic acid the changes were minor. Additionally, it was showed that lignin has an acid-neutralising capacity, and the added lignin increased the pH of reactant solutions in both acids. The pH rise was considerably lower in formic acid than in sulphuric acid. However, the higher pH did not explain all the changes in conversion and yield, and thus lignin evidently inhibits the formation of furfural. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. New insights into the structure and composition of technical lignins : A comparative characterisation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constant, Sandra|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/374650519; Wienk, Hans L J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/203884884; Frissen, Augustinus E.; Peinder, Peter De|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325810818; Boelens, Rolf|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070151407; Van Es, Daan S.; Grisel, Ruud J H; Weckhuysen, Bert M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397; Huijgen, Wouter J J; Gosselink, Richard J A; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/33799529X

    2016-01-01

    Detailed insight into the structure and composition of industrial (technical) lignins is needed to devise efficient thermal, bio- or chemocatalytic valorisation strategies. Six such technical lignins covering three main industrial pulping methods (Indulin AT Kraft, Protobind 1000 soda lignin and

  19. New insights into the structure and composition of technical lignins: a comparative characterisation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constant, Sandra; Wienk, Hans L.J.; Frissen, A.E.; Peinder, de Peter; Boelens, Rolf; Es, van D.S.; Grisel, Ruud J.H.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.; Huijgen, W.J.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Bruijnincx, Pieter C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Detailed insight into the structure and composition of industrial (technical) lignins is needed to devise efficient thermal, bio- or chemocatalytic valorisation strategies. Six such technical lignins covering three main industrial pulping methods (Indulin AT Kraft, Protobind 1000 soda lignin and

  20. Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids as Efficient Reagents for the C-O Bond Cleavage of Lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierry, Marina; Majira, Amel; Pégot, Bruce; Cezard, Laurent; Bourdreux, Flavien; Clément, Gilles; Perreau, François; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Diter, Patrick; Vo-Thanh, Giang; Lapierre, Catherine; Ducrot, Paul-Henri; Magnier, Emmanuel; Baumberger, Stéphanie; Cottyn, Betty

    2018-01-23

    The demethylation of lignin in ionic liquids (ILs) was investigated by using pure lignin model monomers and dimers together with dioxane-isolated lignins from poplar, miscanthus, and maize. Different methylimidazolium ILs were compared and the samples were treated with two different heating processes: microwave irradiation and conventional heating in a sealed tube. The conversion yield and influence of the treatment on the lignin structure were assessed by 31 P NMR spectroscopy, size-exclusion chromatography, and thioacidolysis. The acidic methylimidazolium IL [HMIM]Br was shown to be an effective combination of solvent and reagent for the demethylation and depolymerization of lignin. The relatively mild reaction conditions, the clean work-up, and the ability to reuse the IL makes the described procedure an attractive and new green method for the conversion of lignin to produce phenol-rich lignin oligomers. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Lignin phenols used to infer organic matter sources to Sepetiba Bay - RJ, Brasil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, C. E.; Pfeiffer, W. C.; Martinelli, L. A.; Tsamakis, E.; Hedges, J. I.; Keil, R. G.

    2010-04-01

    Lignin phenols were measured in the sediments of Sepitiba Bay, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil and in bedload sediments and suspended sediments of the four major fluvial inputs to the bay; São Francisco and Guandu Channels and the Guarda and Cação Rivers. Fluvial suspended lignin yields (Σ8 3.5-14.6 mgC 10 g dw -1) vary little between the wet and dry seasons and are poorly correlated with fluvial chlorophyll concentrations (0.8-50.2 μgC L -1). Despite current land use practices that favor grassland agriculture or industrial uses, fluvial lignin compositions are dominated by a degraded leaf-sourced material. The exception is the Guarda River, which has a slight influence from grasses. The Lignin Phenol Vegetation Index, coupled with acid/aldehyde and 3.5 Db/V ratios, indicate that degraded leaf-derived phenols are also the primary preserved lignin component in the bay. The presence of fringe Typha sp. and Spartina sp. grass beds surrounding portions of the Bay are not reflected in the lignin signature. Instead, lignin entering the bay appears to reflect the erosion of soils containing a degraded signature from the former Atlantic rain forest that once dominated the watershed, instead of containing a significant signature derived from current agricultural uses. A three-component mixing model using the LPVI, atomic N:C ratios, and stable carbon isotopes (which range between -26.8 and -21.8‰) supports the hypothesis that fluvial inputs to the bay are dominated by planktonic matter (78% of the input), with lignin dominated by leaf (14% of the input) over grass (6%). Sediments are composed of a roughly 50-50 mixture of autochthonous material and terrigenous material, with lignin being primarily sourced from leaf.

  2. Drivers of lignin composition in boreal forest organic soils across a climate gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers-Pigg, A.; Kaiser, K.; Benner, R. H.; Ziegler, S. E.

    2017-12-01

    Lignin diagenesis in soils, including the cumulative effects of degradation and leaching, increases with experimental warming, signifying a potentially important change relevant to soil organic matter accumulation and fate. However, decadal to centennial climatic effects including changes in precipitation, litterfall inputs, and understory sources, on lignin composition are poorly constrained. We examined the lignin content and composition, via cupric oxide oxidation (CuO), within the organic layers of podzolic soils under similar balsam fir forests across a latitudinal climate gradient in Atlantic Canada. By exploring variation in lignin by both soil depth and climate region, this study informs on the climate drivers of lignin stability within boreal forest soil. A two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed significant variations in common signatures of CuO by-products with depth and/or site, indicating source and/or diagenetic controllers. Importantly, none of these signatures, with the exception of p-hydroxyphenols, exhibited a site by depth interaction indicating a similar degree of diagenetic alternation with depth across climates. The site by depth interaction for p-hydroxyphenols is a result of greater moss input in the northernmost site. To better elucidate this climate-induced source variation on our interpretation of lignin diagenesis, a principle component (PCA) model was built using signatures varying by site (pforest soils. A lignin diagenesis PCA model was built using (1) all non-moss related signatures identified in the first PCA model, and (2) scores for additional sites within each region, calculated from modeled lignin composition based on 13C-NMR spectra. The combined results indicate that the lignin diagenetic states among soils is similar, despite the large increase in soil C turnover with climate warming across this transect. Thus our results indicate that shifts in moss contribution, and not increased diagenesis, controls CuO by

  3. Lignin-Based Materials Through Thiol-Maleimide "Click" Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Pietro; Duval, Antoine; Averous, Luc; Habibi, Youssef

    2017-03-09

    In the present report an environmentally friendly approach to transforming renewable feedstocks into value-added materials is proposed. This transformation pathway was conducted under green conditions, without the use of solvents or catalyst. First, controlled modification of lignin, a major biopolymer present in wood and plants, was achieved by esterification with 11-maleimidoundecylenic acid (11-MUA), a derivative from castor oil that contains maleimide groups, following its transformation into 11-maleimidoundecanoyl chloride (11-MUC). Different degrees of substitution were achieved by using various amounts of the 11-MUC, leading to an efficient conversion of lignin hydroxy groups, as demonstrated by 1 H and 31 P NMR analyses. These fully biobased maleimide-lignin derivatives were subjected to an extremely fast (ca. 1 min) thiol-ene "click" polymerization with thiol-containing linkers. Aliphatic and aromatic thiol linkers bearing two to four thiol groups were used to tune the reactivity and crosslink density. The properties of the resulting materials were evaluated by swelling tests and thermal and mechanical analyses, which showed that varying the degree of functionality of the linker and the linker structure allowed accurate tailoring of the thermal and mechanical properties of the final materials, thus providing interesting perspectives for lignin in functional aromatic polymers. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Biobased alkylphenols from lignins via a two-step pyrolysis - Hydrodeoxygenation approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wild, P. J.; Huijgen, W.J.J.; Kloekhorst, A.; Chowdari, R. K.; Heeres, H. J.

    Five technical lignins (three organosolv, Kraft and soda lignin) were depolymerised to produce monomeric biobased aromatics, particularly alkylphenols, by a new two-stage thermochemical approach consisting of dedicated pyrolysis followed by catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of the resulting

  5. Structural characterization of guaiacyl-rich lignins in flax (Linum usitatissimum) fibers and shives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Río, José C; Rencoret, Jorge; Gutiérrez, Ana; Nieto, Lidia; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Martínez, Ángel T

    2011-10-26

    The structural characteristics of the lignins from flax (Linum usitatissimum) fibers and shives were studied. Significant differences in the content and composition of the lignin from both parts were observed. The lignin contents were 3.8% in the fibers and 29.0% in the shives. Analysis by Py-GC/MS indicated a H:G:S molar ratio of 13:72:15 in the milled wood lignin (MWL) isolated from flax fibers and a molar ratio of 5:87:8 in the MWL isolated from flax shives. In addition, 2D-NMR showed a predominance of β-O-4' aryl ether linkages, followed by β-5' phenylcoumaran and β-β' resinol-type linkages in both MWLs, with a higher content of condensed linkages in flax shives. Thioacidolysis (followed by Raney nickel desulfurization) gave further information on the lignin units involved in the different linkages and confirmed the enrichment of G units. The thioacidolysis dimers released were similar from both lignins, with a predominance of the β-5' followed by β-1' and 5-5' structures.

  6. From gene to biorefinery: microbial β-etherases as promising biocatalysts for lignin valorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere ePicart

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The set-up of biorefineries for the valorization of lignocellulosic biomass will be core in the future to reach sustainability targets. In this area, biomass-degrading enzymes are attracting significant research interest for their potential in the production of chemicals and biofuels from renewable feedstock. Gluthatione-dependent β-etherases are emerging enzymes for the biocatalytic depolymerization of lignin, a heterogeneous aromatic polymer abundant in Nature. They selectively catalyze the reductive cleavage of β-O-4 aryl-ether bonds which account for 45-60% of linkages present in lignin. Hence, application of β-etherases in lignin depolymerization would enable a specific lignin breakdown, selectively yielding (valuable low-molecular-mass aromatics. Albeit β-etherases have been biochemically known for decades, only very recently novel β-etherases have been identified and thoroughly characterized for lignin valorization, expanding the enzyme toolbox for efficient β-O-4 aryl-ether bond cleavage. Given their emerging importance and potential, this mini-review discusses recent developments in the field of β-etherase biocatalysis covering all aspects from enzyme identification to biocatalytic applications with real lignin samples.

  7. From gene to biorefinery: microbial β-etherases as promising biocatalysts for lignin valorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picart, Pere; de María, Pablo Domínguez; Schallmey, Anett

    2015-01-01

    The set-up of biorefineries for the valorization of lignocellulosic biomass will be core in the future to reach sustainability targets. In this area, biomass-degrading enzymes are attracting significant research interest for their potential in the production of chemicals and biofuels from renewable feedstock. Glutathione-dependent β-etherases are emerging enzymes for the biocatalytic depolymerization of lignin, a heterogeneous aromatic polymer abundant in nature. They selectively catalyze the reductive cleavage of β-O-4 aryl-ether bonds which account for 45-60% of linkages present in lignin. Hence, application of β-etherases in lignin depolymerization would enable a specific lignin breakdown, selectively yielding (valuable) low-molecular-mass aromatics. Albeit β-etherases have been biochemically known for decades, only very recently novel β-etherases have been identified and thoroughly characterized for lignin valorization, expanding the enzyme toolbox for efficient β-O-4 aryl-ether bond cleavage. Given their emerging importance and potential, this mini-review discusses recent developments in the field of β-etherase biocatalysis covering all aspects from enzyme identification to biocatalytic applications with real lignin samples.

  8. Lignin valorization through integrated biological funneling and chemical catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Vardon, Derek R.; Guarnieri, Michael T.; Karp, Eric M.; Hunsinger, Glendon B.; Franden, Mary Ann; Johnson, Christopher W.; Chupka, Gina; Strathmann, Timothy J.; Pienkos, Philip T.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is an energy-dense, heterogeneous polymer comprised of phenylpropanoid monomers used by plants for structure, water transport, and defense, and it is the second most abundant biopolymer on Earth after cellulose. In production of fuels and chemicals from biomass, lignin is typically underused as a feedstock and burned for process heat because its inherent heterogeneity and recalcitrance make it difficult to selectively valorize. In nature, however, some organisms have evolved metabolic pathways that enable the utilization of lignin-derived aromatic molecules as carbon sources. Aromatic catabolism typically occurs via upper pathways that act as a “biological funnel” to convert heterogeneous substrates to central intermediates, such as protocatechuate or catechol. These intermediates undergo ring cleavage and are further converted via the β-ketoadipate pathway to central carbon metabolism. Here, we use a natural aromatic-catabolizing organism, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, to demonstrate that these aromatic metabolic pathways can be used to convert both aromatic model compounds and heterogeneous, lignin-enriched streams derived from pilot-scale biomass pretreatment into medium chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHAs). mcl-PHAs were then isolated from the cells and demonstrated to be similar in physicochemical properties to conventional carbohydrate-derived mcl-PHAs, which have applications as bioplastics. In a further demonstration of their utility, mcl-PHAs were catalytically converted to both chemical precursors and fuel-range hydrocarbons. Overall, this work demonstrates that the use of aromatic catabolic pathways enables an approach to valorize lignin by overcoming its inherent heterogeneity to produce fuels, chemicals, and materials. PMID:25092344

  9. The chemical oxidation of lignin found in Sappi Saiccor dissolving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sappi Saiccor (situated in Durban, South Africa) dissolving pulp mill effluent, produced from an acid bisulphite pulping process, uses acacia and eucalyptus hardwoods to produce a unique and different blend of lignin that has not been previously studied. The chemical oxidation of lignin found in Sappi Saiccor's effluent has ...

  10. The Paleozoic origin of enzymatic mechanisms for lignin degradation reconstructed using 31 fungal genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Binder, Manfred; Riley, Robert; Barry, Kerrie; Blanchette, Robert A; Henrissat, Bernard; Martinez, Angel T.; Otillar, Robert; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Yadav, Jagit S.; Aerts, Andrea; Benoit, Isabelle; Boyd, Alex; Carlson, Alexis; Copeland, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Wood is a major pool of organic carbon that is highly resistant to decay, owing largely to the presence of lignin. The only organisms capable of substantial lignin decay are white rot fungi in the Agaricomycetes, which also contains non?lignin-degrading brown rot and ectomycorrhizal species. Comparative analyses of 31 fungal genomes (12 generated for this study) suggest that lignin-degrading peroxidases expanded in the lineage leading to the ancestor of the Agaricomycetes, which is reconstruc...

  11. Conditions for selective degradation of lignin by the fungus Ganoderma australis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios, S.; Eyzaguirre, J. (Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Lab. de Bioquimica)

    1992-08-01

    The white-rot fungus Ganoderma australis selectively degrades lignin in the ecosystem 'palo podrido'. Using conditions that simulate those of 'palo podrido' in the laboratory, it was found that low nitrogen content and low O{sub 2} tension stimulate the production of manganese peroxidase and lignin degradation, and depress cellulose degradation and cellulase production. The inverse is found at high nitrogen concentration and high O{sub 2} tension. This agrees with previous results indicating that low O{sub 2} tension and low nitrogen stimulate selective lignin degradation by this fungus. (orig.).

  12. In silico identification of transcription factors associated with the biosynthesis of carotenoids in corn ( Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Zinati

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Carotenoids, a diverse group of colorful pigments, contribute to the development, light harvesting and photoprotection in plants as well as human health. Due to the interesting properties of carotenoids, enhanced carotenoid biosynthesis has been of ongoing interest. Recent advances in computational biology and bioinformatics make it more feasible to understand the transcriptional regulatory network underlying carotenoid biosynthesis. Studies on carotenoid biosynthesis in corn ( Zea mays L. have indicated the pivotal role of the phytoene synthase gene PSY1 (accession: GRMZM2G300348 in endosperm color and carotenoid accumulation in corn kernels. Computational approaches such as Genomatix, PlantPAN, PlantCARE, PlantTFDB and IGDE6 have been used for promoter prediction, regulatory features and transcription factor identification, as well as pairwise promoter comparisons. Four transcripts have been identified for the PSY1 gene. Based on Genomatix and PlantPAN, the promoter predicted for GRMZM2G300348_T01 was different from that predicted for the other three transcripts (GRMZM2G300348_T02, GRMZM2G300348_T03 and GRMZM2G300348_T04. The results indiated that the promoter of GRMZM2G300348_T01 has more diverse motifs involved in hormonal/environmental stress responses. The most significant result obtained from this study is the discovery of two transcription factors belonging to the HB family that are co-expressed with all four transcripts of PSY1 under environmental stresses. It is, therefore, likely that these transcription factors may act as critical regulators of PSY1 gene expression in corn. Identification of the proteins acting upstream of PSY1 within corn will shed light on the fine tuning of PSY1 expression regulation. Such an understanding would also contribute to metabolic engineering aimed at enhanced carotenoid biosynthesis.

  13. Influence of lignin on morphology, structure and thermal behavior of polylactic acid-based biocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canetti, Maurizio; Cacciamani, Adriana; Bertini, Fabio

    2016-05-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) is a thermoplastic biodegradable polymer that can be made from annually renewable resources. Lignin is a natural amorphous polyphenolic macromolecule inexpensive and easily available. In the present study PLA and acetylated lignin biocomposites were prepared by casting from chloroform solution. PLA can crystallize from the melt in the α and α' forms, depending on the adopted crystallization conditions. The presence of the lignin in the biocomposites can interfere with the crystal formation process. Isothermal crystallizations were performed at different temperatures, the presence of lignin causes an increase of the time of crystallization, while the overall crystallization rate and the spherulite radial growth rate decrease with enhancing the lignin content in the biocomposites.

  14. Temperature and pH influence adsorption of cellobiohydrolase onto lignin by changing the protein properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xianqin; Wang, Can; Li, Xuezhi; Zhao, Jian

    2017-12-01

    Non-productive adsorption of cellulase onto lignin restricted the movement of cellulase and also hindered the cellulase recycling in bioconversion of lignocellulose. In this study, effect of temperature and pH on adsorption and desorption of cellobiohydrolase (CBH) on lignin and its possible mechanism were discussed. It found that pH value and temperature influenced the adsorption and desorption behaviors of CBH on lignin. Different thermodynamic models suggested that the action between lignin and CBH was physical action. More CBH was adsorbed onto lignin, but lower initial adsorption velocity was detected at 50°C comparing with 4°C. Elevating pH value could improve desorption of cellulase from lignin. The changes of hydrophobicity and electric potential on protein surface may partially explain the impact of environmental conditions on the adsorption and desorption behaviors of CBH on lignin, and comparing to electrical interaction, the hydrophobicity may be the dominating factor influencing the behaviors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Interactive forces between lignin and cellulase as determined by atomic force microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Chengrong; Clarke, Kimberley; Li, Kecheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Lignin is a complex polymer which inhibits the enzymatic conversion of cellulose to glucose in lignocellulose biomass for biofuel production. Cellulase enzymes irreversibly bind to lignin, deactivating the enzyme and lowering the overall activity of the hydrolyzing reaction solution. Within this study, atomic force microscopy (AFM) is used to compare the adhesion forces between cellulase and lignin with the forces between cellulase and cellulose, and to study the moiety groups invo...

  16. Enzymatic Transesterification of Kraft Lignin with Long Acyl Chains in Ionic Liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Hulin, Lise; Husson, Eric; Bonnet, Jean-Pierre; Stevanovic, Tatjana; Sarazin, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Valorization of lignin is essential for the economic viability of the biorefinery concept. For example, the enhancement of lignin hydrophobicity by chemical esterification is known to improve its miscibility in apolar polyolefin matrices, thereby helping the production of bio-based composites. To this end and due to its many reactive hydroxyl groups, lignin is a challenging macromolecular substrate for biocatalyzed esterification in non-conventional media. The present work describes for the f...

  17. Use of Agave tequilana-lignin and zinc oxide nanoparticles for skin photoprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Hernández, José Manuel; Escalante, Alfredo; Murillo-Vázquez, Raquel Nalleli; Delgado, Ezequiel; González, Francisco Javier; Toríz, Guillermo

    2016-10-01

    The use of sunscreens is essential for preventing skin damage and the potential appearance of skin cancer in humans. Inorganic active components such as zinc oxide (ZnO) have been used commonly in sunscreens due to their ability to block UVA radiation. This ultraviolet (UV) protection might be enhanced to cover the UVB and UVC bands when combined with other components such as titanium dioxide (TiO2). In this work we evaluate the photoprotection properties of organic nanoparticles made from lignin in combination with ZnO nanoparticles as active ingredients for sunscreens. Lignin nanoparticles were synthesized from Agave tequilana lignin. Two different pulping methods were used for dissolving lignin from agave bagasse. ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized by the precipitation method. All nanoparticles were characterized by SEM, UV-Vis and FT-IR spectroscopy. Nanoparticles were mixed with a neutral vehicle in different concentrations and in-vitro sun protection factor (SPF) values were calculated. Different sizes of spherical lignin nanoparticles were obtained from the spent liquors of two different pulping methods. ZnO nanoparticles resulted with a flake shape. The mixture of all components gave SPF values in a range between 4 and 13. Lignin nanoparticles showed absorption in the UVB and UVC regions which can enhance the SPF value of sunscreens composed only of zinc oxide nanoparticles. Lignin nanoparticles have the added advantage of being of organic nature and its brown color can be used to match the skin tone of the person using it. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mixture Design Approach on the Physical Properties of Lignin-Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Xerogels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris D. Castro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Organic xerogels were functionalized by incorporating sugarcane bagasse lignin from soda pulping black liquor, not used so far in this materials, with the aim of introducing new functional groups on traditional gels that could improve its adsorptive capacity. Two mixing designs were applied to identify the reactive combinations that allow a well gel formation and to adjust models that predict physical properties. The designs study five components: resorcinol (R, 0.04–0.3, lignin (L, 0.004–0.14, formaldehyde (F, 0.08–0.17, water (W, 0.45–0.8, and NaOH (C, 0.0003–0.0035. The first experimental design was an extreme vertices design and its results showed shrinkage between 4.3 and 59.7 and a bulk density from 0.54 to 1.3; a mass ratio LR/F near 1.5 was required for gel formation. In the second design a D-Optimal was used to achieve better adjusted coefficients and incorporate the largest possible amount of lignin in the gels. Bulk density varies from 0.42 to 0.9, shrinkage varies from 3.42 to 25.35, and specific surface area reaches values of 451.86 m2/g with 13% lignin and 270 m2/g with 27% lignin. High catalyst content improves lignin dissolution and increase shrinkage and bulk density of xerogels and bulk density. Lignin contributes to reducing shrinkage and specific surface area due to his compact and rigid structure.

  19. Application of bioethanol derived lignin for improving physico-mechanical properties of thermoset biocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Dilpreet S; Wang, Xinnan; Sitz, Evan; Loll, Tyler; Bhattacharjee, Sujal

    2016-08-01

    Lignin is the most abundant of renewable polymers next to cellulose with a global annual production of 70million tons, largely produced from pulping and second generation biofuel industries. Low value of industrial lignin makes it an attractive biomaterial for wide range of applications. The study investigated the application of wheat straw and corn stover based lignin derived from ethanol production for use in thermoset biocomposites. The biocomposite matrix constituted a two component low viscosity Araldite(®)LY 8601/Aradur(®) 8602 epoxy resin system and the lignin content varied from 0 to 25% by weight fraction. The analysis of the physical and mechanical properties of the biocomposites show bioethanol derived lignin can improve selective properties such as impact strength, and thermal stability without compromising the modulus and strength attributes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Regulation of anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin biosynthesis by Medicago truncatula bHLH transcription factor MtTT8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Penghui; Chen, Beibei; Zhang, Gaoyang; Chen, Longxiang; Dong, Qiang; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Zhao, Jian

    2016-05-01

    The MYB- basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-WD40 complexes regulating anthocyanin and proanthocyanidin (PA) biosynthesis in plants are not fully understood. Here Medicago truncatula bHLH MtTT8 was characterized as a central component of these ternary complexes that control anthocyanin and PA biosynthesis. Mttt8 mutant seeds have a transparent testa phenotype with reduced PAs and anthocyanins. MtTT8 restores PA and anthocyanin productions in Arabidopsis tt8 mutant. Ectopic expression of MtTT8 restores anthocyanins and PAs in mttt8 plant and hairy roots and further enhances both productions in wild-type hairy roots. Transcriptomic analyses and metabolite profiling of mttt8 mutant seeds and M. truncatula hairy roots (mttt8 mutant, mttt8 mutant complemented with MtTT8, or MtTT8 overexpression lines) indicate that MtTT8 regulates a subset of genes involved in PA and anthocyanin biosynthesis. MtTT8 is genetically regulated by MtLAP1, MtPAR and MtWD40-1. Combinations of MtPAR, MtLAP1, MtTT8 and MtWD40-1 activate MtTT8 promoter in yeast assay. MtTT8 interacts with these transcription factors to form regulatory complexes. MtTT8, MtWD40-1 and an MYB factor, MtPAR or MtLAP1, interacted and activated promoters of anthocyanidin reductase and anthocyanidin synthase to regulate PA and anthocyanin biosynthesis, respectively. Our results provide new insights into the complex regulation of PA and anthocyanin biosynthesis in M. truncatula. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Characterisation of structure-dependent functional properties of lignin with infrared spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boeriu, C.G.; Bravo, D.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Dam, van J.E.G.

    2004-01-01

    Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) was evaluated as an analytical technique for the estimation of the chemical composition and functional properties of lignin. A sample set containing various non-wood, hardwood and softwood lignins isolated by different processing technologies was

  2. Properties of Lignin from Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch and Its Application for Plywood Adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucky Risanto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Lignin from lignocellulosic biomass is a potential biopolymer for wood adhesive. The aims of this study were to characterize lignin isolated from the black liquor of oil palm empty fruit bunch fiber pretreated with steam explosion in alkaline conditions and to examine the bond quality of aqueous polymer isocyanate (API adhesive prepared from lignin, natural rubber latex (NRL, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA as base polymers with isocyanate crosslinkers. Lignin was precipitated from the black liquor by adding hydrochloric acid; then the precipitate was separated by filtration, thoroughly washed with water up to pH 2 and pH 5, and dried. The isolated lignin was characterized by ultimate analysis, UV spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, and thermal analysis. Three-layer plywood samples were prepared, and the bond strengths of the plywood samples were determined in dry conditions and after cyclic boiling. The lignin isolates with different pH values did not have significantly different chemical and thermal properties. Both lignin isolates had similar C, H, and O contents, identical functional groups in the FTIR spectra, similar absorption in the UV spectra, and high decomposition temperatures. The base polymers composition that could produce API adhesive for exterior applications was NRL/PVA/lignin (4/4/2. The use of more lignin in the adhesive formulation decreased the bond strength of the plywood.

  3. Preparation of Lignin/Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate Composite Nanoparticles and Their Application in Pickering Emulsion Template-Based Microencapsulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yuxia; Wang, Shengwen; Qiu, Xueqing; Luo, Yanling; Lou, Hongming; Huang, Jinhao

    2017-12-20

    Lignin is a vastly underutilized biomass resource. The preparation of water-dispersed lignin nanoparticles is an effective way to realize the high-value utilization of lignin. However, the currently reported preparation methods of lignin nanoparticles still have some drawbacks, such as the requirement for toxic organic solvent or chemical modification, complicated operation process, and poor dispersibility. Here, lignin/sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) composite nanoparticles (LSNPs) with outstanding water dispersibility and a size range of 70-200 nm were facilely prepared via acidifying the mixed basic solution of alkaline lignin and SDS. No harsh chemical was needed. The formation mechanism was systematically studied. Results indicated that the LSNPs were obtained by acid precipitation of the mixed micelles formed by the self-assembly of lignin and SDS. In addition, on the basis of the LSNP-stabilized Pickering emulsions, lignin/polyurea composite microcapsules combining the excellent chemical stability of a synthetic polyurea shell with the fantastic antiphotolysis and antioxidant properties of lignin were successfully prepared.

  4. Characteristics of Lignin Fractions from Dilute Acid Pretreated Switchgrass and Their Effect on Cellobiohydrolase from Trichoderma longibrachiatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Yao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the interactions between acid pretreated switchgrass lignin and cellobiohydrolase (CBH, three different lignin fractions were isolated from dilute acid pretreated switchgrass by (i ethanol extraction, followed by (ii dioxane/H2O extraction, and (iii cellulase treatment, respectively. Structural properties of each lignin fraction were elucidated by GPC, 13C-NMR, and 2D-HSQC NMR analyses. The adsorptions of CBH to the isolated lignin fractions were also studied by Langmuir adsorption isotherms. Ethanol-extractable lignin fraction, mainly composed of syringyl (S and guaiacyl (G units, had the lowest molecular weight, while dioxane/H2O-extracted lignin fraction had the lowest S/G ratio with higher content of p-coumaric acid (pCA unit. The residual lignin fraction after enzymatic treatment had the highest S/G ratio without hydroxyphenyl (H unit. Strong associations were found between lignin properties such as lignin composition and S/G ratio and its non-productive enzyme adsorption factors including the maximum adsorption capacity and binding strength.

  5. Structural elucidation and antioxidant activity of lignin isolated from rice straw and alkali‑oxygen black liquor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Yu; Gu, Lihui; Wu, Wenjuan; Zhao, Huifang; Jin, Yongcan

    2018-05-17

    Alkali‑oxygen cooking of lignocellulose offers lignin many structural properties and bioactivities for biorefinery. In this work, milled wood lignin (MWL) and alkali‑oxygen lignin (AOL) were isolated from rice straw and alkali‑oxygen black liquor, respectively. The lignin structure was characterized by spectroscopy and wet chemistry. Antioxidant activity of lignins was assessed by DPPH·and ABTS scavenging ability assay. Results showed the oxidization and condensation of lignin occurred during alkali‑oxygen cooking. The p-hydroxyphenyl was more easily removed from rice straw than guaiacyl and syringyl units. The ester or ether linkages derived from hydroxycynnamic acids, and the main interunit linkages, i.e. β-O-4' bonds, were mostly cleaved. Lignin-xylan complex had high reactivity under alkali‑oxygen condition. Tricin, incorporated into lignin, was detected in MWL but was absent in AOL. Nitrobenzene oxidation showed MWL can well represent the protolignin of rice straw, and the products yield decreased dramatically after alkali‑oxygen cooking. AOL had higher radical scavenging ability than MWL indicating alkali‑oxygen cooking was an effective pathway for the enhancement of antioxidant activity of lignin. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Chemical composition and enzymatic digestibility of sugarcane clones selected for varied lignin content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masarin Fernando

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recalcitrance of lignocellulosic materials is a major limitation for their conversion into fermentable sugars. Lignin depletion in new cultivars or transgenic plants has been identified as a way to diminish this recalcitrance. In this study, we assessed the success of a sugarcane breeding program in selecting sugarcane plants with low lignin content, and report the chemical composition and agronomic characteristics of eleven experimental hybrids and two reference samples. The enzymatic digestion of untreated and chemically delignified samples was evaluated to advance the performance of the sugarcane residue (bagasse in cellulosic-ethanol production processes. Results The ranges for the percentages of glucan, hemicellulose, lignin, and extractive (based on oven-dry biomass of the experimental hybrids and reference samples were 38% to 43%, 25% to 32%, 17% to 24%, and 1.6% to 7.5%, respectively. The samples with the smallest amounts of lignin did not produce the largest amounts of total polysaccharides. Instead, a variable increase in the mass of a number of components, including extractives, seemed to compensate for the reduction in lignin content. Hydroxycinnamic acids accounted for a significant part of the aromatic compounds in the samples, with p-coumaric acid predominating, whereas ferulic acid was present only in low amounts. Hydroxycinnamic acids with ester linkage to the hemicelluloses varied from 2.3% to 3.6%. The percentage of total hydroxycinnamic acids (including the fraction linked to lignin through ether linkages varied from 5.0% to 9.2%, and correlated to some extent with the lignin content. These clones released up to 31% of glucose after 72 hours of digestion with commercial cellulases, whereas chemically delignified samples led to cellulose conversion values of more than 80%. However, plants with lower lignin content required less delignification to reach higher efficiencies of cellulose conversion during

  7. GUN4-Porphyrin Complexes Bind the ChlH/GUN5 Subunit of Mg-Chelatase and Promote Chlorophyll Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Neil D.; Froehlich, John E.; Strand, Deserah D.; Buck, Stephanie M.; Kramer, David M.; Larkin, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    The GENOMES UNCOUPLED4 (GUN4) protein stimulates chlorophyll biosynthesis by activating Mg-chelatase, the enzyme that commits protoporphyrin IX to chlorophyll biosynthesis. This stimulation depends on GUN4 binding the ChlH subunit of Mg-chelatase and the porphyrin substrate and product of Mg-chelatase. After binding porphyrins, GUN4 associates more stably with chloroplast membranes and was proposed to promote interactions between ChlH and chloroplast membranes—the site of Mg-chelatase activity. GUN4 was also proposed to attenuate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by binding and shielding light-exposed porphyrins from collisions with O2. To test these proposals, we first engineered Arabidopsis thaliana plants that express only porphyrin binding–deficient forms of GUN4. Using these transgenic plants and particular mutants, we found that the porphyrin binding activity of GUN4 and Mg-chelatase contribute to the accumulation of chlorophyll, GUN4, and Mg-chelatase subunits. Also, we found that the porphyrin binding activity of GUN4 and Mg-chelatase affect the associations of GUN4 and ChlH with chloroplast membranes and have various effects on the expression of ROS-inducible genes. Based on our findings, we conclude that ChlH and GUN4 use distinct mechanisms to associate with chloroplast membranes and that mutant alleles of GUN4 and Mg-chelatase genes cause sensitivity to intense light by a mechanism that is potentially complex. PMID:21467578

  8. Chemoselective Methylation of Phenolic Hydroxyl Group Prevents Quinone Methide Formation and Repolymerization During Lignin Depolymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwang Ho; Dutta, Tanmoy; Walter, Eric D.; Isern, Nancy G.; Cort, John R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Singh, Seema

    2017-03-30

    Chemoselective blocking of the phenolic hydroxyl (Ar-OH) group by methylation was found to suppress secondary repolymerization and charring during lignin depolymerization. Methylation of Ar-OH prevents formation of reactive quinone methide intermediates, which are partly responsible for undesirable secondary repolymerization reactions. Instead, this structurally modified lignin produces more relatively low molecular weight products from lignin depolymerization compared to unmodified lignin. This result demonstrates that structural modification of lignin is desirable for production of low molecular weight phenolic products. This approach could be directed toward alteration of natural lignification processes to produce biomass more amenable to chemical depolymerization.

  9. New Insights Toward Quantitative Relationships between Lignin Reactivity to Monomers and Their Structural Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruoshui; Zhang, Xiumei; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Xiao

    2018-04-27

    The heterogeneous and complex structural characteristics of lignin present a significant challenge to predict its processability (e.g. depolymerization, modifications etc) to valuable products. This study provides a detailed characterization and comparison of structural properties of seven representative biorefinery lignin samples derived from forest and agricultural residues, which were subjected to representative pretreatment methods. A range of wet chemistry and spectroscopy methods were applied to determine specific lignin structural characteristics such as functional groups, inter-unit linkages and peak molecular weight. In parallel, oxidative depolymerization of these lignin samples to either monomeric phenolic compounds or dicarboxylic acids were conducted, and the product yields were quantified. Based on these results (lignin structural characteristics and monomer yields), we demonstrated for the first time to apply multiple-variable linear estimations (MVLE) approach using R statistics to gain insight toward a quantitative correlation between lignin structural properties and their conversion reactivity toward oxidative depolymerization to monomers. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Relationship between lignin structure and delignification degree in Pinus pinaster kraft pulps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, C; Robert, D; Duarte, A P

    2008-05-01

    This study examines the structure of residual and dissolved lignins from Pinus pinaster pulps obtained at different degrees of delignification by laboratory conventional kraft pulping. The cooking H factor was varied from 85 to 8049. The residual and dissolved lignin samples were characterised by elemental analysis, residual carbohydrate content, permanganate oxidation and 13C NMR spectroscopy. The reflectance factor of the pulps was also determined in order to tentatively correlate the delignification degree and residual lignin structure with the pulp colour. The obtained results confirmed that the delignification degree increases the condensation of the lignin structure, which might have an influence upon the observed increased pulp colour. The lack of selectivity of kraft pulping process in the case of more delignified pulps was also shown.

  11. EFFECT OF LIGNIN CONTENT OF Eucalyptus globulus WOOD IN KRAFT PULPING PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Valim Cardoso

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this research, it was analyzed the lignin content effect of Eucalyptus globulus wood in kraft pulping optimization. Seventy-two laboratory cooking were made with wood chips obtained from six Eucalyptus globulus trees selected from a group of 50 trees. The wood chips from three trees with the lowest lignin content, with average 20,53%, were mixed proportionally based on the tree weights, obtaining the sample of low lignin content wood. The same was made to obtain the sample for wood chips with the highest lignin content, with average 23,02%. The two lignin levels were statistically different. The two wood samples had basic densities statistically not different. Using three maximum temperatures levels (160, 165 and 170ºC, and three active alkali charged (17, 18,5 and 20%, the wood chips were converted to kraft pulps. The pulps were then characterized to analyze the influence of the distinct treatments employed in the cooking on their properties. The effect of the cooking conditions was expressed by mathematical models in order to determine the optimum points for each of the evaluated properties. The optimization process indicated maximum temperature of 168ºC, and active alkali of 19%, for maximum kraft pulping yield to achieve kappa number 18; this result was for woods with low lignin content. For woods containing the high lignin content, the optimization showed maximum cooking temperature of 169ºC and active alkali of 19% for kappa number of 18. The average reduction of 2,49% in wood lignin content resulted a correspondent gain of 2,2% in the kraft yield (o.d. basis and a reduction on the active alkali charge of 1,2% (o.d. basis to achieve kappa numbers from 16 to 19, preserving pulp properties. If the option is to work with kappa number 19 instead of 16, the gain in kraft yield is approximately 2%. Therefore, when working with low lignin content wood and kappa number 19 instead of 16, a substantial gain of approximately 4,2% is obtained

  12. Density functional theory study of spirodienone stereoisomers in lignin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Elder; Laura Berstis; Gregg T. Beckham; Michael F. Crowley

    2017-01-01

    The spirodienone structure in lignin is a relatively recent discovery, and it has been found to occur in lignin of various plant species at concentrations of ∼3%, which is sufficiently high to be important for better understanding of its properties and reactivity. The cyclic structure, with a β-1 bond, has been proposed to be a precursor for acyclic β-1 linkages in...

  13. Retention of lignin in seagrasses: angiosperms that returned to the sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klap, V.A.; Hemminga, M.A.; Boon, J.J.

    2000-01-01

    Using Curie-point Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py-GCMS) and Direct Temperature-resolved Mass Spectrometry (DT-MS), lignin was detected in highly purified preparations (Milled Wood Lignin = MWL) of various tissues of the seagrasses Zostera marina and Posidonia oceanica. The results

  14. Enrichment of Bacteria From Eastern Mediterranean Sea Involved in Lignin Degradation via the Phenylacetyl-CoA Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah L. Woo

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The degradation of allochthonous terrestrial organic matter, such as recalcitrant lignin and hemicellulose from plants, occurs in the ocean. We hypothesize that bacteria instead of white-rot fungi, the model organisms of aerobic lignin degradation within terrestrial environments, are responsible for lignin degradation in the ocean due to the ocean’s oligotrophy and hypersalinity. Warm oxic seawater from the Eastern Mediterranean Sea was enriched on lignin in laboratory microcosms. Lignin mineralization rates by the lignin-adapted consortia improved after two sequential incubations. Shotgun metagenomic sequencing detected a higher abundance of aromatic compound degradation genes in response to lignin, particularly phenylacetyl-CoA, which may be an effective strategy for marine microbes in fluctuating oxygen concentrations. 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing detected a higher abundance of Gammaproteobacteria and Alphaproteobacteria bacteria such as taxonomic families Idiomarinaceae, Alcanivoraceae, and Alteromonadaceae in response to lignin. Meanwhile, fungal Ascomycetes and Basidiomycetes remained at very low abundance. Our findings demonstrate the significant potential of bacteria and microbes utilizing the phenylacetyl-CoA pathway to contribute to lignin degradation in the Eastern Mediterranean where environmental conditions are unfavorable for fungi. Exploring the diversity of bacterial lignin degraders may provide important enzymes for lignin conversion in industry. Enzymes may be key in breaking down high molecular weight lignin and enabling industry to use it as a low-cost and sustainable feedstock for biofuels or other higher-value products.

  15. Lignin solubilization and aqueous phase reforming for the production of aromatic chemicals and hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zakzeski, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326160256; Weckhuysen, B.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/285484397

    2011-01-01

    The solubilization and aqueous phase reforming of lignin, including kraft, soda, and alcell lignin along with sugarcane bagasse, at low temperatures (T≤498 K) and pressures (P≤29 bar) is reported for the first time for the production of aromatic chemicals and hydrogen. Analysis of lignin model

  16. Control of lignin solubility and particle formation modulates its antioxidant efficiency in lipid medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barsberg, Søren Talbro; Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Sanadi, Anand Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Lignin is an abundant plant polymer usually regarded as waste material. In the present work, antioxidant properties of lignin preparations with differing lipid solubility were studied using biodiesel as a convenient lipid test substrate. In place of formerly used assays, we used attenuated total...... reflectance (ATR) FT-IR spectroscopy to follow in situ biodiesel autoxidation on a heated ATR crystal as a function of time. The study demonstrates that a complex balance between intrinsic (chemical) efficiency, solubility, and particle formation controls the antioxidant efficiency of differently prepared...... lignin fractions. It was found that solubility and particle formation of lignin preparations strongly modulate its antioxidant efficiency and that these properties might depend on the presence of lipid components within the original lignin source....

  17. The Paleozoic origin of enzymatic mechanisms for lignin degradation reconstructed using 31 fungal genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floudas, Dimitrios; Binder, Manfred; Riley, Robert; Barry, Kerrie; Blanchette, Robert A; Henrissat, Bernard; Martinez, Angel T.; Otillar, Robert; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Yadav, Jagit S.; Aerts, Andrea; Benoit, Isabelle; Boyd, Alex; Carlson, Alexis; Copeland, Alex; Coutinho, Pedro M.; de Vries, Ronald P.; Ferreira, Patricia; Findley, Keisha; Foster, Brian; Gaskell, Jill; Glotzer, Dylan; Gorecki, Pawel; Heitman, Joseph; Hesse, Cedar; Hori, Chiaki; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Jurgens, Joel A.; Kallen, Nathan; Kersten, Phil; Kohler, Annegret; Kues, Ursula; Kumar, T. K. Arun; Kuo, Alan; LaButti, Kurt; Larrondo, Luis F.; Lindquist, Erika; Ling, Albee; Lombard, Vincent; Lucas, Susan; Lundell, Taina; Martin, Rachael; McLaughlin, David J.; Morgenstern, Ingo; Morin, Emanuelle; Murat, Claude; Nagy, Laszlo G.; Nolan, Matt; Ohm, Robin A.; Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Rokas, Antonis; Ruiz-Duenas, Francisco J.; Sabat, Grzegorz; Salamov, Asaf; Samejima, Masahiro; Schmutz, Jeremy; Slot, Jason C.; John, Franz; Stenlid, Jan; Sun, Hui; Sun, Sheng; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Tsang, Adrian; Wiebenga, Ad; Young, Darcy; Pisabarro, Antonio; Eastwood, Daniel C.; Martin, Francis; Cullen, Dan; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Hibbett, David S.

    2012-03-12

    Wood is a major pool of organic carbon that is highly resistant to decay, owing largely to the presence of lignin. The only organisms capable of substantial lignin decay are white rot fungi in the Agaricomycetes, which also contains non?lignin-degrading brown rot and ectomycorrhizal species. Comparative analyses of 31 fungal genomes (12 generated for this study) suggest that lignin-degrading peroxidases expanded in the lineage leading to the ancestor of the Agaricomycetes, which is reconstructed as a white rot species, and then contracted in parallel lineages leading to brown rot and mycorrhizal species. Molecular clock analyses suggest that the origin of lignin degradation might have coincided with the sharp decrease in the rate of organic carbon burial around the end of the Carboniferous period.

  18. Catalytic biorefining of plant biomass to non-pyrolytic lignin bio-oil and carbohydrates through hydrogen transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrini, Paola; Rinaldi, Roberto

    2014-08-11

    Through catalytic hydrogen transfer reactions, a new biorefining method results in the isolation of depolymerized lignin--a non-pyrolytic lignin bio-oil--in addition to pulps that are amenable to enzymatic hydrolysis. Compared with organosolv lignin, the lignin bio-oil is highly susceptible to further hydrodeoxygenation under low-severity conditions and therefore establishes a unique platform for lignin valorization by heterogeneous catalysis. Overall, the potential of a catalytic biorefining method designed from the perspective of lignin utilization is reported. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. A model for evolution and regulation of nicotine biosynthesis regulon in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajikawa, Masataka; Sierro, Nicolas; Hashimoto, Takashi; Shoji, Tsubasa

    2017-06-03

    In tobacco, the defense alkaloid nicotine is produced in roots and accumulates mainly in leaves. Signaling mediated by jasmonates (JAs) induces the formation of nicotine via a series of structural genes that constitute a regulon and are coordinated by JA-responsive transcription factors of the ethylene response factor (ERF) family. Early steps in the pyrrolidine and pyridine biosynthesis pathways likely arose through duplication of the polyamine and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthetic pathways, respectively, followed by recruitment of duplicated primary metabolic genes into the nicotine biosynthesis regulon. Transcriptional regulation of nicotine biosynthesis by ERF and cooperatively-acting MYC2 transcription factors is implied by the frequency of cognate cis-regulatory elements for these factors in the promoter regions of the downstream structural genes. Indeed, a mutant tobacco with low nicotine content was found to have a large chromosomal deletion in a cluster of closely related ERF genes at the nicotine-controlling NICOTINE2 (NIC2) locus.

  20. The effect of altered lignin composition on mechanical properties of CINNAMYL ALCOHOL DEHYDROGENASE (CAD) deficient poplars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özparpucu, Merve; Gierlinger, Notburga; Burgert, Ingo; Van Acker, Rebecca; Vanholme, Ruben; Boerjan, Wout; Pilate, Gilles; Déjardin, Annabelle; Rüggeberg, Markus

    2018-04-01

    CAD-deficient poplars enabled studying the influence of altered lignin composition on mechanical properties. Severe alterations in lignin composition did not influence the mechanical properties. Wood represents a hierarchical fiber-composite material with excellent mechanical properties. Despite its wide use and versatility, its mechanical behavior has not been entirely understood. It has especially been challenging to unravel the mechanical function of the cell wall matrix. Lignin engineering has been a useful tool to increase the knowledge on the mechanical function of lignin as it allows for modifications of lignin content and composition and the subsequent studying of the mechanical properties of these transgenics. Hereby, in most cases, both lignin composition and content are altered and the specific influence of lignin composition has hardly been revealed. Here, we have performed a comprehensive micromechanical, structural, and spectroscopic analysis on xylem strips of transgenic poplar plants, which are downregulated for cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) by a hairpin-RNA-mediated silencing approach. All parameters were evaluated on the same samples. Raman microscopy revealed that the lignin of the hpCAD poplars was significantly enriched in aldehydes and reduced in the (relative) amount of G-units. FTIR spectra indicated pronounced changes in lignin composition, whereas lignin content was not significantly changed between WT and the hpCAD poplars. Microfibril angles were in the range of 18°-24° and were not significantly different between WT and transgenics. No significant changes were observed in mechanical properties, such as tensile stiffness, ultimate stress, and yield stress. The specific findings on hpCAD poplar allowed studying the specific influence of lignin composition on mechanics. It can be concluded that the changes in lignin composition in hpCAD poplars did not affect the micromechanical tensile properties.

  1. Laccase/Mediator Systems: Their Reactivity toward Phenolic Lignin Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgers, Roelant; Vincken, Jean-Paul; Gruppen, Harry; Kabel, Mirjam A

    2018-02-05

    Laccase-mediator systems (LMS) have been widely studied for their capacity to oxidize the nonphenolic subunits of lignin (70-90% of the polymer). The phenolic subunits (10-30% of the polymer), which can also be oxidized without mediators, have received considerably less attention. Consequently, it remains unclear to what extent the presence of a mediator influences the reactions of the phenolic subunits of lignin. To get more insight in this, UHPLC-MS was used to study the reactions of a phenolic lignin dimer (GBG), initiated by a laccase from Trametes versicolor , alone or in combination with the mediators HBT and ABTS. The role of HBT was negligible, as its oxidation by laccase occurred slowly in comparison to that of GBG. Laccase and laccase/HBT oxidized GBG at a comparable rate, resulting in extensive polymerization of GBG. In contrast, laccase/ABTS converted GBG at a higher rate, as GBG was oxidized both directly by laccase but also by ABTS radical cations, which were rapidly formed by laccase. The laccase/ABTS system resulted in Cα oxidation of GBG and coupling of ABTS to GBG, rather than polymerization of GBG. Based on these results, we propose reaction pathways of phenolic lignin model compounds with laccase/HBT and laccase/ABTS.

  2. Lignin preparation from oil palm empty fruit bunches by sequential acid/alkaline treatment--A biorefinery approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Jesus David Coral; Woiciechowski, Adenise; Zandona Filho, Arion; Noseda, Miguel D; Kaur, Brar Satinder; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2015-10-01

    Lignin is an important raw material for the sustainable biorefineries and also the forerunner of high-value added products, such as biocomposite for chemical, pharmaceutical and cement industries. Oil palm empty fruit bunches (OPEFB) were used for lignin preparation by successive treatment with 1% (w/w) H2SO4 at 121°C for 60 min and 2.5% NaOH at 121°C for 80 min resulting in the high lignin yield of 28.89%, corresponding to 68.82% of the original lignin. The lignin obtained was characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The results indicated a lignin with molecular masses ramping from 4500 kDa to 12,580 kDa. FTIR and NMR of these lignins showed more syringyl and p-hydroxyphenyl than guaiacyl units. Moderate acid/alkaline treatment provided lignin with high industrial potential and acid hydrolyzates rich in fermentable sugars and highly porous cellulosic fibers. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Lignin Sulfonation - A different Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørkmann, Anders

    2001-01-01

    The research on sulfite pulping has been characterized by the attempts to explain its chemistry. The. different approach presented is incited by perceptions about the (still) unsolved problem of the ultrastructural features of lignin in wood. A simple kinetic model has been chosen to describe the...

  4. Lignin- and Hemicellulose-derived Biomass Recalcitrance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deralia, Parveen Kumar

    technology bringing the multitude of chemical and physical changes, which govern the level of biomass recalcitrance. The lignocellulosic biomasses in question are wheat straw and poplar and the hydrothermal pretreatment is used as pretreatment technology. The 2D HSQC NMR and wet chemistry chemical...... degree to the biomass surface, giving a proportional increase in the specific surface area opposite to wheat straw, which has a marked increase in the specific surface area. The distinctly different chemistry of lignin and hemicellulose and different lignin migration and reorganization appear...... to be correlative, helping explain differences in enzymatic saccharification performance across the pretreatment severities and between two biomasses. The main contribution of this work to the current state-of-the-art in the field is the revelation of distinct behaviors of generation of different repolymerized...

  5. BIOSYNTHESIS AND ACTION OF JASMONATES IN PLANTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creelman, Robert A.; Mullet, John E.

    1997-06-01

    Jasmonic acid and its derivatives can modulate aspects of fruit ripening, production of viable pollen, root growth, tendril coiling, and plant resistance to insects and pathogens. Jasmonate activates genes involved in pathogen and insect resistance, and genes encoding vegetative storage proteins, but represses genes encoding proteins involved in photosynthesis. Jasmonic acid is derived from linolenic acid, and most of the enzymes in the biosynthetic pathway have been extensively characterized. Modulation of lipoxygenase and allene oxide synthase gene expression in transgenic plants raises new questions about the compartmentation of the biosynthetic pathway and its regulation. The activation of jasmonic acid biosynthesis by cell wall elicitors, the peptide systemin, and other compounds will be related to the function of jasmonates in plants. Jasmonate modulates gene expression at the level of translation, RNA processing, and transcription. Promoter elements that mediate responses to jasmonate have been isolated. This review covers recent advances in our understanding of how jasmonate biosynthesis is regulated and relates this information to knowledge of jasmonate modulated gene expression.

  6. Animated sulfonated or sulformethylated lignins as cement fluid loss control additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, P.

    1991-05-07

    This patent describes a method of cementing a zone in a well penetrating a subterranean formation comprising injecting down the well and positioning in the zone to be cemented a hydraulic aqueous cement slurry composition. It comprises: a hydraulic cement, and the following expressed as parts by weight per 100 parts of the hydraulic cement, water from about 25 to 105 parts, and a fluid loss control additive comprising from about 0.5 to 2.5 parts of a compound selected from the group consisting of a sulfonated lignin and a sulfomethylated lignin, wherein the lignin has been aminated by reacting it with between about 2-5 moles of a polyamine and 2-5 moles of an aldehyde per 1,000g of the lignin, and 0.1 to 1.5 parts of a compound selected from the group consisting of sodium carbonate, sodium metasilicate, sodium phosphate, sodium sulfite and sodium naphthalene sulfonate and a combination thereof.

  7. Inhibitory effect of luteolin on estrogen biosynthesis in human ovarian granulosa cells by suppression of aromatase (CYP19).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dan-feng; Yang, Li-juan; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Guo-lin

    2012-08-29

    Inhibition of aromatase, the key enzyme in estrogen biosynthesis, is an important strategy in the treatment of breast cancer. Several dietary flavonoids show aromatase inhibitory activity, but their tissue specificity and mechanism remain unclear. This study found that the dietary flavonoid luteolin potently inhibited estrogen biosynthesis in a dose- and time-dependent manner in KGN cells derived from human ovarian granulosa cells, the major source of estrogens in premenopausal women. Luteolin decreased aromatase mRNA and protein expression in KGN cells. Luteolin also promoted aromatase protein degradation and inhibited estrogen biosynthesis in aromatase-expressing HEK293A cells, but had no effect on recombinant expressed aromatase. Estrogen biosynthesis in KGN cells was inhibited with differing potencies by extracts of onion and bird chili and by four other dietary flavonoids: kaempferol, quercetin, myricetin, and isorhamnetin. The present study suggests that luteolin inhibits estrogen biosynthesis by decreasing aromatase expression and destabilizing aromatase protein, and it warrants further investigation as a potential treatment for estrogen-dependent cancers.

  8. Lignin-based polyoxyethylene ether enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocelluloses by dispersing cellulase aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xuliang; Qiu, Xueqing; Yuan, Long; Li, Zihao; Lou, Hongming; Zhou, Mingsong; Yang, Dongjie

    2015-06-01

    Water-soluble lignin-based polyoxyethylene ether (EHL-PEG), prepared from enzymatic hydrolysis lignin (EHL) and polyethylene glycol (PEG1000), was used to improve enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency of corn stover. The glucose yield of corn stover at 72h was increased from 16.7% to 70.1% by EHL-PEG, while increase in yield with PEG4600 alone was 52.3%. With the increase of lignin content, EHL-PEG improved enzymatic hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose more obvious than PEG4600. EHL-PEG could reduce at least 88% of the adsorption of cellulase on the lignin film measured by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D), while reduction with PEG4600 was 43%. Cellulase aggregated at 1220nm in acetate buffer analyzed by dynamic light scattering. EHL-PEG dispersed cellulase aggregates and formed smaller aggregates with cellulase, thereby, reduced significantly nonproductive adsorption of cellulase on lignin and enhanced enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocelluloses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Lignin based controlled release coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W.J.; Gosselink, R.J.A.; Vingerhoeds, M.H.; Harmsen, P.F.H.; Eastham, D.

    2011-01-01

    Urea is a commonly used fertilizer. Due to its high water-solubility, misuse easily leads to excess nitrogen levels in the soil. The aim of this research was to develop an economically feasible and biodegradable slow-release coating for urea. For this purpose, lignin was selected as coating

  10. Effect of alkali lignins with different molecular weights from alkali pretreated rice straw hydrolyzate on enzymatic hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Qi, Benkun; Luo, Jianquan; Wan, Yinhua

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of alkali lignins with different molecular weights on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocellulose. Different alkali lignins fractions, which were obtained from cascade ultrafiltration, were added into the dilute acid pretreated (DAP) and alkali pretreated (AP) rice straws respectively during enzymatic hydrolysis. The results showed that the addition of alkali lignins enhanced the hydrolysis and the enhancement for hydrolysis increased with increasing molecular weights of alkali lignins, with maximum enhancement being 28.69% for DAP and 20.05% for AP, respectively. The enhancement was partly attributed to the improved cellulase activity, and filter paper activity increased by 18.03% when adding lignin with highest molecular weight. It was found that the enhancement of enzymatic hydrolysis was correlated with the adsorption affinity of cellulase on alkali lignins, and the difference in surface charge and hydrophobicity of alkali lignins were responsible for the difference in affinity between cellulase and lignins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Multi-time series RNA-seq analysis of Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 during growth in lignin-amended medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orellana, Roberto; Chaput, Gina; Markillie, Lye Meng; Mitchell, Hugh; Gaffrey, Matt; Orr, Galya; DeAngelis, Kristen M.; Yang, Shihui

    2017-10-19

    The production of lignocellulosic-derived biofuels is a highly promising source of alternative energy, but it has been constrained by the lack of a microbial platform capable to efficiently degrade this recalcitrant material and cope with by-products that can be toxic to cells. Species that naturally grow in environments where carbon is mainly available as lignin are promising for finding new ways of removing the lignin that protects cellulose for improved conversion of lignin to fuel precursors. Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 is a facultative anaerobic Gammaproteobacteria isolated from tropical rain forest soil collected in El Yunque forest, Puerto Rico under anoxic growth conditions with lignin as sole carbon source. Whole transcriptome analysis of SCF1 during E.lignolyticus SCF1 lignin degradation was conducted on cells grown in the presence (0.1%, w/w) and the absence of lignin, where samples were taken at three different times during growth, beginning of exponential phase, midexponential phase and beginning of stationary phase. Lignin-amended cultures achieved twice the cell biomass as unamended cultures over three days, and in this time degraded 60% of lignin. Transcripts in early exponential phase reflected this accelerated growth. A complement of laccases, aryl-alcohol dehydrogenases, and peroxidases were most up-regulated in lignin amended conditions in mid-exponential and early stationary phases compared to unamended growth. The association of hydrogen production by way of the formate hydrogenlyase complex with lignin degradation suggests a possible value added to lignin degradation in the future.

  12. Multi-time series RNA-seq analysis of Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 during growth in lignin-amended medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orellana, Roberto; Chaput, Gina; Markillie, Lye Meng; Mitchell, Hugh; Gaffrey, Matt; Orr, Galya; DeAngelis, Kristen M

    2017-01-01

    The production of lignocellulosic-derived biofuels is a highly promising source of alternative energy, but it has been constrained by the lack of a microbial platform capable to efficiently degrade this recalcitrant material and cope with by-products that can be toxic to cells. Species that naturally grow in environments where carbon is mainly available as lignin are promising for finding new ways of removing the lignin that protects cellulose for improved conversion of lignin to fuel precursors. Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 is a facultative anaerobic Gammaproteobacteria isolated from tropical rain forest soil collected in El Yunque forest, Puerto Rico under anoxic growth conditions with lignin as sole carbon source. Whole transcriptome analysis of SCF1 during E.lignolyticus SCF1 lignin degradation was conducted on cells grown in the presence (0.1%, w/w) and the absence of lignin, where samples were taken at three different times during growth, beginning of exponential phase, mid-exponential phase and beginning of stationary phase. Lignin-amended cultures achieved twice the cell biomass as unamended cultures over three days, and in this time degraded 60% of lignin. Transcripts in early exponential phase reflected this accelerated growth. A complement of laccases, aryl-alcohol dehydrogenases, and peroxidases were most up-regulated in lignin amended conditions in mid-exponential and early stationary phases compared to unamended growth. The association of hydrogen production by way of the formate hydrogenlyase complex with lignin degradation suggests a possible value added to lignin degradation in the future.

  13. Adsorption of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution using lignin from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption of lead(II) ions from aqueous solution onto alkali lignin extracted from Hagenia abyssinica was investigated by electrochemical methods. The effect of solution pH, lignin dosage and contact time were investigated at room temperature in a batch system. Adsorption equilibrium was approached within 80 min.

  14. Valorization of lignin and cellulose in acid-steam-exploded corn stover by a moderate alkaline ethanol post-treatment based on an integrated biorefinery concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng; Zhang, Yue; Yue, Wen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yun-Yan; Yuan, Tong-Qi; Sun, Run-Cang

    2016-01-01

    Due to the unsustainable consumption of fossil resources, great efforts have been made to convert lignocellulose into bioethanol and commodity organic compounds through biological methods. The conversion of cellulose is impeded by the compactness of plant cell wall matrix and crystalline structure of the native cellulose. Therefore, appropriate pretreatment and even post-treatment are indispensable to overcome this problem. Additionally, an adequate utilization of coproduct lignin will be important for improving the economic viability of modern biorefinery industries. The effectiveness of moderate alkaline ethanol post-treatment on the bioconversion efficiency of cellulose in the acid-steam-exploded corn stover was investigated in this study. Results showed that an increase of the alcoholic sodium hydroxide (NaOH) concentration from 0.05 to 4% led to a decrease in the lignin content in the post-treated samples from 32.8 to 10.7%, while the cellulose digestibility consequently increased. The cellulose conversion of the 4% alcoholic NaOH integrally treated corn stover reached up to 99.3% after 72 h, which was significantly higher than that of the acid steam exploded corn stover without post-treatment (57.3%). In addition to the decrease in lignin content, an expansion of cellulose I lattice induced by the 4% alcoholic NaOH post-treatment played a significant role in promoting the enzymatic hydrolysis of corn stover. More importantly, the lignin fraction (AL) released during the 4% alcoholic NaOH post-treatment and the lignin-rich residue (EHR) remained after the enzymatic hydrolysis of the 4% alcoholic NaOH post-treated acid-steam-exploded corn stover were employed to synthesize lignin-phenol-formaldehyde (LPF) resins. The plywoods prepared with the resins exhibit satisfactory performances. An alkaline ethanol system with an appropriate NaOH concentration could improve the removal of lignin and modification of the crystalline structure of cellulose in acid

  15. Glucose Sensor MdHXK1 Phosphorylates and Stabilizes MdbHLH3 to Promote Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Apple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Da-Gang; Zhang, Quan-Yan; An, Jian-Ping; You, Chun-Xiang; Hao, Yu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Glucose induces anthocyanin accumulation in many plant species; however, the molecular mechanism involved in this process remains largely unknown. Here, we found that apple hexokinase MdHXK1, a glucose sensor, was involved in sensing exogenous glucose and regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis. In vitro and in vivo assays suggested that MdHXK1 interacted directly with and phosphorylated an anthocyanin-associated bHLH transcription factor (TF) MdbHLH3 at its Ser361 site in response to glucose. Furthermore, both the hexokinase_2 domain and signal peptide are crucial for the MdHXK1-mediated phosphorylation of MdbHLH3. Moreover, phosphorylation modification stabilized MdbHLH3 protein and enhanced its transcription of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes, thereby increasing anthocyanin biosynthesis. Finally, a series of transgenic analyses in apple calli and fruits demonstrated that MdHXK1 controlled glucose-induced anthocyanin accumulation at least partially, if not completely, via regulating MdbHLH3. Overall, our findings provide new insights into the mechanism of the glucose sensor HXK1 modulation of anthocyanin accumulation, which occur by directly regulating the anthocyanin-related bHLH TFs in response to a glucose signal in plants. PMID:27560976

  16. Glucose Sensor MdHXK1 Phosphorylates and Stabilizes MdbHLH3 to Promote Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Apple.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Gang Hu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Glucose induces anthocyanin accumulation in many plant species; however, the molecular mechanism involved in this process remains largely unknown. Here, we found that apple hexokinase MdHXK1, a glucose sensor, was involved in sensing exogenous glucose and regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis. In vitro and in vivo assays suggested that MdHXK1 interacted directly with and phosphorylated an anthocyanin-associated bHLH transcription factor (TF MdbHLH3 at its Ser361 site in response to glucose. Furthermore, both the hexokinase_2 domain and signal peptide are crucial for the MdHXK1-mediated phosphorylation of MdbHLH3. Moreover, phosphorylation modification stabilized MdbHLH3 protein and enhanced its transcription of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes, thereby increasing anthocyanin biosynthesis. Finally, a series of transgenic analyses in apple calli and fruits demonstrated that MdHXK1 controlled glucose-induced anthocyanin accumulation at least partially, if not completely, via regulating MdbHLH3. Overall, our findings provide new insights into the mechanism of the glucose sensor HXK1 modulation of anthocyanin accumulation, which occur by directly regulating the anthocyanin-related bHLH TFs in response to a glucose signal in plants.

  17. Isolation of Thermophilic Lignin Degrading Bacteria from Oil-Palm Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB) Compost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, C. M. T.; Chua, H. B.; Danquah, M. K.; Saptoro, A.

    2017-06-01

    Empty Fruit Bunch (EFB) is a potential and sustainable feedstock for bioethanol production due to its high cellulosic content and availability in Malaysia. Due to high lignin content of EFB and the lack of effective delignification process, commercial bioethanol production from EFB is presently not viable. Enzymatic delignification has been identified as one of the key steps in utilising EFB as a feedstock for bioethanol conversion. To date, limited work has been reported on the isolation of lignin degrading bacteria. Hence, there is a growing interest to search for new lignin degrading bacteria with greater tolerance to temperature and high level of ligninolytic enzymes for more effective lignin degradation. This study aimed to isolate and screen thermophilic ligninolytic microorganisms from EFB compost. Ten isolates were successfully isolated from EFB compost. Although they are not capable of decolorizing Methylene Blue (MB) dye under agar plate assay method, they are able to utilize lignin mimicked compound - guaiacol as a sole carbon on the agar plate assay. This infers that there is no correlation of ligninolytic enzymes with dye decolourization for all the isolates that have been isolated. However, they are able to produce ligninolytic enzymes (Lignin peroxidase, Manganese peroxidase, Laccase) in Minimal Salt Medium with Kraft Lignin (MSM-KL) with Lignin Peroxidase (LiP) as the predominant enzyme followed by Manganese Peroxidase (MnP) and Laccase (Lac). Among all the tested isolates, CLMT 29 has the highest LiP production up to 8.7673 U/mL following 24 h of growth.

  18. Quantitative analysis of detailed lignin monomer composition by pyrolysis-gas chromatography combined with preliminary acetylation of the samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, T; Ona, T; Yokoi, H; Ishida, Y; Ohtani, H; Tsuge, S

    2001-11-15

    Detailed quantitative analysis of lignin monomer composition comprising p-coumaryl, coniferyl, and sinapyl alcohol and p-coumaraldehyde, coniferaldehyde, and sinapaldehyde in plant has not been studied from every point mainly because of artifact formation during the lignin isolation procedure, partial loss of the lignin components inherent in the chemical degradative methods, and difficulty in the explanation of the complex spectra generally observed for the lignin components. Here we propose a new method to quantify lignin monomer composition in detail by pyrolysis-gas chromatography (Py-GC) using acetylated lignin samples. The lignin acetylation procedure would contribute to prevent secondary formation of cinnamaldehydes from the corresponding alcohol forms during pyrolysis, which are otherwise unavoidable in conventional Py-GC process to some extent. On the basis of the characteristic peaks on the pyrograms of the acetylated sample, lignin monomer compositions in various dehydrogenative polymers (DHP) as lignin model compounds were determined, taking even minor components such as cinnamaldehydes into consideration. The observed compositions by Py-GC were in good agreement with the supplied lignin monomer contents on DHP synthesis. The new Py-GC method combined with sample preacetylation allowed us an accurate quantitative analysis of detailed lignin monomer composition using a microgram order of extractive-free plant samples.

  19. Biosynthesis and function of simple amides in Xenorhabdus doucetiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Edna; He, Yue; Vo, Tien Duy; Schultz, Roland; Kaiser, Marcel; Bode, Helge B

    2017-11-01

    Xenorhabdus doucetiae, the bacterial symbiont of the entomopathogenic nematode Steinernema diaprepesi produces several different fatty acid amides. Their biosynthesis has been studied using a combination of analysis of gene deletions and promoter exchanges in X. doucetiae and heterologous expression of candidate genes in E. coli. While a decarboxylase is required for the formation of all observed phenylethylamides and tryptamides, the acyltransferase XrdE encoded in the xenorhabdin biosynthesis gene cluster is responsible for the formation of short chain acyl amides. Additionally, new, long-chain and cytotoxic acyl amides were identified in X. doucetiae infected insects and when X. doucetiae was grown in Galleria Instant Broth (GIB). When the bioactivity of selected amides was tested, a quorum sensing modulating activity was observed for the short chain acyl amides against the two different quorum sensing systems from Chromobacterium and Janthinobacterium. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Biobleaching chemistry of laccase-mediator systems on high-lignin-content kraft pulps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakar, F.S.; Ragauskas, A.J.

    2004-01-01

    A high-lignin-content softwood kraft pulp was reacted with laccase in the presence of 1-hydroxybenzotriazole (HBT), N-acetyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine (NHA), and violuric acid (VA). The biodelignification response with violuric acid was superior to both 1-hydroxybenzotriazole and N-acetyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine. NMR analysis of residual lignins isolated before and after the biobleaching treatments revealed that the latter material was highly oxidized and that the magn