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Sample records for light-water reactor vessel

  1. Neutron fluence determination for light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.

    1994-01-01

    A general description of limitations that exist in pressure vessel neutron fluence determinations for commercial light water reactors is presented. Complexity factors that arise in light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence calculations are identified and used to analyze calculational limitations. Two broad categories of calculational limitations are introduced, namely benchmark field limitations and deep penetration limitations. Explicit examples of limitations that can arise in each of these two broad categories are presented. These limitations are used to show that the recent draft regulatory guide for the determination of pressure vessel neutron fluence, developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is based upon procedures and assumptions that are not valid. To eliminate the complexity and limitations of calculational methods, it is recommended that the determination of light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence be based upon experiment. Recommendations for improved methods of pressure vessel surveillance neutron dosimetry are advanced

  2. Light-water reactor pressure vessel surveillance standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The master matrix standard describes a series of standard practices, guides, and methods for the prediction of neutron-induced changes in light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel steels throughout a pressure vessel's service life. Some of these are existing American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards, some are ASTM standards that have been modified, and some are newly proposed ASTM standards. The current (1) scope, (2) areas of application, (3) interrelationships, and (4) status and time table of development, improvement, validation, and calibration for a series of 16 ASTM standards are defined. The standard also includes a discussion of LWR pressure vessel surveillance - justification, requirements, and status of work

  3. Standard Practice for Design of Surveillance Programs for Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Power Reactor Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing a surveillance program for monitoring the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties of ferritic materials in light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels. This practice includes the minimum requirements for the design of a surveillance program, selection of vessel material to be included, and the initial schedule for evaluation of materials. 1.2 This practice was developed for all light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels for which the predicted maximum fast neutron fluence (E > 1 MeV) at the end of license (EOL) exceeds 1 × 1021 neutrons/m2 (1 × 1017 n/cm2) at the inside surface of the reactor vessel. 1.3 This practice applies only to the planning and design of surveillance programs for reactor vessels designed and built after the effective date of this practice. Previous versions of Practice E185 apply to earlier reactor vessels. 1.4 This practice does not provide specific procedures for monitoring the radiation induced cha...

  4. Finite element analysis of thermal stresses of the reactor vessel in a severe light water reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovkov, A.I.; Semenov, A.S.; Granovsky, V.S.; Kovtunova, S.V.

    1995-01-01

    The thermal stress and damage analysis of the light water reactor (LWR) vessel is considered in a severe accident conditions. The high temperature corium accumulates on the vessel bottom and necessary condition of its holding is intensive cooling of vessel. External flooding with outside cooling of the LWR vessel is one of the accident management strategies being proposed to ensure the integrity of the vessel after a severe accident. (author). 8 refs., 5 figs

  5. Finite element analysis of thermal stresses of the reactor vessel in a severe light water reactor accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borovkov, A.I.; Semenov, A.S. [St. Petersburg State Technical Univ. (Russian Federation); Granovsky, V.S.; Kovtunova, S.V. [Research Inst. of Technology, Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The thermal stress and damage analysis of the light water reactor (LWR) vessel is considered in a severe accident conditions. The high temperature corium accumulates on the vessel bottom and necessary condition of its holding is intensive cooling of vessel. External flooding with outside cooling of the LWR vessel is one of the accident management strategies being proposed to ensure the integrity of the vessel after a severe accident. (author). 8 refs., 5 figs.

  6. More recent developments for the ultrasonic testing of light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seiger, H.; Engl, G.

    1976-01-01

    The development of an ultrasonic testing method for the inspection from the outside of the areas close to the cladding of the spherical fields of holes of light water reactor pressure vessels is described

  7. Standard Guide for In-Service Annealing of Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Reactor Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers the general procedures to be considered for conducting an in-service thermal anneal of a light-water moderated nuclear reactor vessel and demonstrating the effectiveness of the procedure. The purpose of this in-service annealing (heat treatment) is to improve the mechanical properties, especially fracture toughness, of the reactor vessel materials previously degraded by neutron embrittlement. The improvement in mechanical properties generally is assessed using Charpy V-notch impact test results, or alternatively, fracture toughness test results or inferred toughness property changes from tensile, hardness, indentation, or other miniature specimen testing (1). 1.2 This guide is designed to accommodate the variable response of reactor-vessel materials in post-irradiation annealing at various temperatures and different time periods. Certain inherent limiting factors must be considered in developing an annealing procedure. These factors include system-design limitations; physical constrain...

  8. Proposed rule package on fracture toughness and thermal annealing requirements and guidance for light water reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen Hiser, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    In the framework of updating and clarification of the fracture toughness and thermal annealing requirements and guidance for light water reactor pressure vessels, proposed revisions concerning the pressurized thermal shock rule, fracture toughness requirements and reactor vessel material surveillance program requirements, are described. A new rule concerning thermal annealing requirements and a draft regulatory guide on 'Format and Content of Application for Approval for Thermal Annealing of RPV' are also proposed

  9. Proposed rule package on fracture toughness and thermal annealing requirements and guidance for light water reactor vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen Hiser, J R [UKAEA Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom). Engineering Div.

    1994-12-31

    In the framework of updating and clarification of the fracture toughness and thermal annealing requirements and guidance for light water reactor pressure vessels, proposed revisions concerning the pressurized thermal shock rule, fracture toughness requirements and reactor vessel material surveillance program requirements, are described. A new rule concerning thermal annealing requirements and a draft regulatory guide on `Format and Content of Application for Approval for Thermal Annealing of RPV` are also proposed.

  10. Outline of design, manufacturing and installation experience of pressure vessel structure for the prototype heavy water moderated boiling light water cooled reactor 'FUGEN'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibato, Eizo; Oguchi, Isao; Kishi, Toshikazu; Kitagawa, Yuji

    1977-01-01

    After component installation completed in June 1977 and various functional tests to be conducted later, the prototype heavy water moderated, boiling light water cooled reactor ''FUGEN'' is scheduled to reach first criticality in March 1978. Since the pressure vessel of ''FUGEN'' is completely different from that of a light water reactor in structure and materials, through research and development work was carried out prior to fabrication and construction. Based on these studies, installation of the actual pressure vessel was completed. Functional tests are now under way. This article describes examples in which our research and development results are reflected on design, manufacture, and installation of the pressure vessel. Also it introduces noteworthy achievements relevant to production techniques in manufacture and installation. (auth.)

  11. Detection and characterization of flaws in segments of light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; McClung, R.W.

    1988-01-01

    Studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in segments cut from light water reactor )LWR) pressure vessels as part of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Heavy-Section Steel Technology (H SST) Program. Segments from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessel and the Pilgrim Unit 2 Vessel were purchased from salvage dealers. Hope Creek was a boiling water reactor (BWR) design and Pilgrim was a pressurized water reactor (PWR) design. Neither were ever placed in service. Objectives were to evaluate these LWR segments for flaws with ultrasonic and liquid penetrant techniques. Both objectives were successfully completed. One significant indication was detected in a Hope Creek seam weld by ultrasonic techniques and characterized by further analyses terminating with destructive correlation. This indication [with a through-wall dimension of ∼6 mm (∼0.24 in.)] was detected in only 3 m (10 ft) of weldment and offers extremely limited data when compared to the extent of welding even in a single pressure vessel. However, the detection and confirmation of the flaw in the arbitrarily selected sections implies the Marshall report estimates (and others) are nonconservative for such small flaws. No significant indications were detected in the Pilgrim material by ultrasonic techniques. Unfortunately, the Pilgrim segments contained relatively little weldment; thus, we limited our ultrasonic examinations to the cladding and subcladding regions. Fluorescent liquid penetrant inspection of the cladding surfaces for both LWR segments detected no significant indications [i.e., for a total of approximately 6.8 m 2 (72 ft 2 ) of cladding surface]. (author)

  12. Reactor water spontaneous circulation structure in reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Kazumi

    1998-01-01

    The gap between the inner wall of a reactor pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor and a reactor core shroud forms a down comer in which reactor water flows downwardly. A feedwater jacket to which feedwater at low temperature is supplied is disposed at the outer circumference of the pressure vessel just below a gas/water separator. The reactor water at the outer circumferential portion just below the air/water separator is cooled by the feedwater jacket, and the feedwater after cooling is supplied to the feedwater entrance disposed below the feedwater jacket by way of a feedwater introduction line to supply the feedwater to the lower portion of the down comer. This can cool the reactor water in the down comer to increase the reactor water density in the down comer thereby forming strong downward flows and promote the recycling of the reactor water as a whole. With such procedures, the reactor water can be recycled stably only by the difference of the specific gravity of the reactor water without using an internal pump. In addition, the increase of the height of the pressure vessel can be suppressed. (I.N.)

  13. Light water reactor safety research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markoczy, G.; Aksan, S.N.; Behringer, K.; Prodan, M.; Stierli, F.; Ullrich, G.

    1980-07-01

    The research and development activities for the safety of Light Water Power Reactors carried out 1979 at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research are described. Considerations concerning the necessity, objectives and size of the Safety Research Project are presented, followed by a detailed discussion of the activities in the five tasks of the program, covering fracture mechanics and nondestructive testing, thermal-hydraulics, reactor noise analysis and pressure vessel steel surveillance. (Auth.)

  14. Solid-state track recorder neutron dosimetry in light water reactor pressure vessel surveillance mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Gold, R.; Preston, C.C.

    1984-09-01

    Solid-State Track Recorder (SSTR) measurements of neutron-induced fission rates have been made in several pressure vessel mockup facilities as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Program (LWR-PV-SDIP). The results of extensive physics-dosimetry measurements made at the Pool Critical Assembly (PCA) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, TN are summarized. Included are 235 U, 238 U, 237 Np and 232 Th fission rates in the PCA 12/13, 8/7, and 4/12 SSC configurations. Additional low power measurements have been made in an engineering mockup at the VENUS critical assembly at CEN-SCK, Mol, Belgium. 237 Np and 238 U fission rates were made at selected locations in the VENUS mockup, which models the in-core and near-core regions of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Absolute core power measurements were made at VENUS by exposing solid-state track recorders (SSTRs) to polished fuel pellets within in-core fuel pins. 8 references, 4 figures, 10 tables

  15. Light Water Reactor-Pressure Vessel Surveillance project computer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merriman, S.H.

    1980-10-01

    A dedicated process control computer has been implemented for regulating the metallurgical Pressure Vessel Wall Benchmark Facility (PSF) at the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The purpose of the PSF is to provide reliable standards and methods by which to judge the radiation damage to reactor pressure vessel specimens. Benchmark data gathered from the PSF will be used to improve and standardize procedures for assessing the remaining safe operating lifetime of aging reactors. The computer system controls the pressure vessel specimen environment in the presence of gamma heating so that in-vessel conditions are simulated. Instrumented irradiation capsules, in which the specimens are housed, contain temperature sensors and electrical heaters. The computer system regulates the amount of power delivered to the electrical heaters based on the temperature distribution within the capsules. Time-temperature profiles are recorded along with reactor conditions for later correlation with specimen metallurgical changes

  16. Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Chung, H.M.; Hicks, P.D.; Hins, A.G.; Park, J.Y.; Shack, W.J.

    1991-12-01

    Fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in light water reactors (LWRs) are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. The degradation processes include intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of austenitic stainless steel (SS) piping in boiling water reactors (BWRs), and propagation of fatigue or SCC cracks (which initiate in sensitized SS cladding) into low-alloy ferritic steels in BWR pressure vessels. Similar cracking has also occurred in upper shell-to-transition cone girth welds in pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator vessels. Another concern is failure of reactor-core internal components after accumulation of relatively high fluence, which has occurred in both BWRs and PWRs. Research during the past year focused on (1) fatigue and SCC of ferritic steels used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels, (2) role of chromate and sulfate in simulated BWR water in SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS, and (3) irradiation-assisted SCC in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs. Failure after accumulation of relatively high fluence has been attributed to radiation-induced segregation (RIS) of elements such as Si, P, Ni, and Cr. This document provides a summary of research progress in these areas

  17. Steam explosions in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The report deals with a postulated accident caused by molten fuel falling into the lower plenum of the containment of a reactor. The analysis which is presented in the report shows that the thermal energy released in the resulting steam explosion is not enough to destroy the pressure vessel or the containment. The report was prepared for the Swedish Governmental Committee on steam explosion in light water reactors. It includes statements issued by internationally well-known specialists. (G.B.)

  18. Trends in light water reactor dosimetry programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahn, F.J.; Serpan, C.Z.; Fabry, A.; McElroy, W.N.; Grundl, J.A.; Debrue, J.

    1977-01-01

    Dosimetry programs and techniques play an essential role in the continued assurance of the safety and reliability of components of light water reactors. Primary concern focuses on the neutron irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels and methods by which the integrity of a pressure vessel can be predicted and monitored throughout its service life. Research in these areas requires a closely coordinated program which integrates the elements of the calculational and material sciences, the development of advanced dosimetric techniques and the use of benchmarks and validation of these methods. The paper reviews the status of the various international efforts in the dosimetry area

  19. An assessment of ex-vessel fuel-coolant interaction energetics for advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.G.; Corradini, M.L.

    1997-01-01

    The occurrence of an energetic fuel/coolant interaction (FCI) below the reactor pressure vessel in the cavity of advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) are analyzed to determine the possible hazard to structural walls as a result of dynamic liquid phase pressures. Such analyses are important to demonstrate that these cavity walls will maintain their integrity so that ex-vessel core debris coolability is possible. Past studies that have examined this or related issues are reviewed, and a methodology is proposed to analyze the occurrence of this physical event using the IFCI and TEXAS models for the FCI as well as dynamic shock wave propagation estimates using hand calculations as well as the CTH hydro model. Scenarios for the ALWRs are reviewed, and one severe accident scenario is used as an example to demonstrate the methodology. Such methodologies are recommended for consideration in future safety studies. These methodologies should be verified with direct comparison to energetic FCI data such as that being produced in KROTOS at the Joint Research Centre, Ispra

  20. Reactor vessel pressure transient protection for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zech, G.

    1978-09-01

    During the past few years the NRC has been studying the issue of protection of the reactor pressure vessels at Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) from transients when the vessels are at a relatively low temperature. This effort was prompted by concerns related to the safety margins available to vessel damage as a result of such events. Nuclear Reactor Regulation Category A Technical Activity No. A-26 was established to set forth the NRC plan for resolution of the generic aspects of this safety issue. The purpose of the report is to document the completion of this generic technical activity

  1. Application of advanced irradiation analysis methods to light water reactor pressure vessel test and surveillance programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, R.; Dudey, N.; McElroy, W.; Wullaert, R.; Fabry, A.

    1977-01-01

    Inaccurate characterization and inappropriate application of neutron irradiation exposure variables contribute a substantial amount of uncertainty to embrittlement analysis of light water reactor pressure vessels. Damage analysis involves characterization of the irradiation environment (dosimetry), correlation of test and surveillance metallurgical and dosimetry data, and projection of such data to service conditions. Errors in available test and surveillance dosimetry data are estimated to contribute a factor of approximately 2 to the data scatter. Non-physical (empirical) correlation procedures and the need to extrapolate to the vessel may add further error. Substantial reductions in these uncertainties in future programs can be obtained from a more complete application of available damage analysis tools which have been developed for the fast reactor program. An approach to reducing embrittlement analysis errors is described, and specific examples of potential applications are given. The approach is based on damage analysis techniques validated and calibrated in benchmark environments

  2. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  3. Environmentally assisted cracking in Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.; Ruther, W.E.; Kassner, T.F.; Michaud, W.F.; Park, J.Y.; Sanecki, J.E.; Shack, W.J.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) during the six months from October 1992 to March 1993. Fatigue and EAC of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in LWRs are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. Topics that have been investigated include (1) fatigue of low-alloy steel used in piping, steam generators, and reactor pressure vessels. (2) EAC of cast stainless steels (SSs), (3) radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence, and (4) EAC of low-alloy steels. Fatigue tests were conducted on medium-sulfur-content A106-Gr B piping and A533-Gr B pressure vessel steels in simulated PWR water and in air. Additional crack growth data were obtained on fracture-mechanics specimens of cast austenitic SSs in the as-received and thermally aged conditions and chromium-nickel-plated A533-Gr B steel in simulated boiling-water reactor (BWR) water at 289 degrees C. The data were compared with predictions based on crack growth correlations for ferritic steels in oxygenated water and correlations for wrought austenitic SS in oxygenated water developed at ANL and rates in air from Section XI of the ASME Code. Microchemical and microstructural changes in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath from operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

  4. Next generation light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omoto, Akira

    1992-01-01

    In the countries where the new order of nuclear reactors has ceased, the development of the light water reactors of new type has been discussed, aiming at the revival of nuclear power. Also in Japan, since it is expected that light water reactors continue to be the main power reactor for long period, the technology of light water reactors of next generation has been discussed. For the development of nuclear power, extremely long lead time is required. The light water reactors of next generation now in consideration will continue to be operated till the middle of the next century, therefore, they must take in advance sufficiently the needs of the age. The improvement of the way men and the facilities should be, the simple design, the flexibility to the trend of fuel cycle and so on are required for the light water reactors of next generation. The trend of the development of next generation light water reactors is discussed. The construction of an ABWR was started in September, 1991, as No. 6 plant in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Power Station. (K.I.)

  5. A water inner circulation device for a reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, O.

    1976-01-01

    A water inner circulation device for a reactor vessel comprising a pump mounted in the reactor vessel and driven by a water-cooled electric motor mounted in a housing outside the reactor vessel, the shaft of the pump passing through the reactor-vessel bottom and being coupled to the motor shaft in a member mechanically connected to the bottom of the reactor vessel in the vicinity of the motor housing, the pump shaft being surrounded by a resilient sealing ring, the reactor vessel communicating with the cooling channels of the pump, when the latter is operating, via a slot surrounding the pump hollow cylindrical shaft, characterized in that the slot inner end is used for/forming a circular space surrounding the pump shaft and surrounded by the motorhousing, in which is coaxially mounted a separating cylindral wall, the upper edge of which is tightly applied against the inner wall of the motor-housing to which it is fastened vertically, the inner surface of said wall being turned towards the outer surface of a circular packing-box, the outer surface of said separating wall constituting a separating radical inner surface for a circular chamber through which flow the motor cooling water. (author)

  6. Standard Master Matrix for Light-Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Standards, E706(0)

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This master matrix standard describes a series of standard practices, guides, and methods for the prediction of neutron-induced changes in light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel (PV) and support structure steels throughout a pressure vessel's service life (Fig. 1). Some of these are existing ASTM standards, some are ASTM standards that have been modified, and some are proposed ASTM standards. General requirements of content and consistency are discussed in Section 6 . More detailed writers' and users' information, justification, and specific requirements for the nine practices, ten guides, and three methods are provided in Sections 3-5. Referenced documents are discussed in Section 2. The summary-type information that is provided in Sections 3 and 4 is essential for establishing proper understanding and communications between the writers and users of this set of matrix standards. It was extracted from the referenced documents, Section 2 and references (1-106) for use by individual writers and users. 1...

  7. Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Matlack, Katie [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Light, Glenn [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio

    2012-09-01

    The Department of Energy s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort which works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operations of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods which support these objectives. DOE funded Research and Development (R&D) on emerging NDE techniques to support commercial nuclear reactor sustainability is expected to begin next year. This summer, the MAaD Pathway invited subject matter experts to participate in a series of workshops which developed the basis for the research plan of these DOE R&D NDE activities. This document presents the results of one of these workshops which are the DOE LWRS NDE R&D Roadmap for Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV). These workshops made a substantial effort to coordinate the DOE NDE R&D with that already underway or planned by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) through their representation at these workshops.

  8. Progress in evaluation and improvement in nondestructive examination reliability for inservice inspection of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) and characterize fabrication flaws in reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, S.R.; Bowey, R.E.; Good, M.S.; Friley, J.R.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Taylor, T.T.; Heasler, P.G.; Andersen, E.S.; Diaz, A.A.; Greenwood, M.S.; Hockey, R.L.; Schuster, G.J.; Spanner, J.C.; Vo, T.V.

    1991-10-01

    This paper is a review of the work conducted under two programs. One (NDE Reliability Program) is a multi-year program addressing the reliability of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for the inservice inspection (ISI) of light water reactor components. This program examines the reliability of current NDE, the effectiveness of evolving technologies, and provides assessments and recommendations to ensure that the NDE is applied at the right time, in the right place with sufficient effectiveness that defects of importance to structural integrity will be reliably detected and accurately characterized. The second program (Characterizing Fabrication Flaws in Reactor Pressure Vessels) is assembling a data base to quantify the distribution of fabrication flaws that exist in US nuclear reactor pressure vessels with respect to density, size, type, and location. These programs will be discussed as two separate sections in this report. 4 refs., 7 figs

  9. Surveillance tests for light-water cooled nuclear power reactor vessels in IMEF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Yong-Sun; Ahn, Sang-Bok; Park, Dae-Gyu; Jung, Yang-Hong; Yoo, Byung-Ok; Oh, Wan-Ho; Baik, Seung-Je; Koo, Dae-Seo; Lee, Key-Soon

    1999-01-01

    The surveillance tests for light-water cooled nuclear power reactor vessels were established to monitor the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties of ferritic materials in the beltline according to US NRC 10 CFR 50 App. G, US NRC RG1.99-rev.2, ASTM E185-82 and E185-94 in Irradiated Materials Examination Facility(IMEF). The surveillance capsule was transported from NPPs pool sites to KAERI IMEF by using a shipping cask. The capsule was cut and dismantled by capsule cutting machine and milling machine in M2 hot cell. Charpy tests and tension tests were performed in M5a and M5b hot cells respectively. Especially the EPMA located at hot lab was used to analyze the Ni and Cu wt% composition of base metal and weld for predicting the adjusted reference temperature(ART). The established process and test results were summarized in this paper. (author)

  10. Advanced light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golay, M.W.; Todreas, N.E.

    1990-01-01

    Environmental concerns, economics and the earth's finite store of fossil fuels argue for a resuscitation of nuclear power. The authors think improved light-water reactors incorporating passive safety features can be both safe and profitable, but only if attention is paid to economics, effective management and rigorous training methods. The experience of nearly four decades has winnowed out designs for four basic types of reactor: the heavy-water reactor (HWR), the gas-cooled rector (GCR), the liquid-metal-cooled reactor (LMR) and the light-water reactor (LWR). Each design is briefly described before the paper discusses the passive safety features of the AP-600 rector, so-called because it employs an advanced pressurized water design and generates 600 MW of power

  11. Installation of the Light-Water Breeder Reactor at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massimino, R.J.; Williams, D.A.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes the refueling operations performed to install a Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core into the existing pressurized water reactor vessel at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. Detailed descriptions of the major installation operations (e.g., primary system preconditioning, fuel installation, pressure boundary seal welding) are included as appendices to this report; these operations are of technical interest to any reactor servicing operation, whether the reactor is a breeder or a conventional light water non-breeder core

  12. Installation of the Light-Water Breeder Reactor at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station (LWBR Development Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massimino, R.J.; Williams, D.A.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes the refueling operations performed to install a Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core into the existing pressurized water reactor vessel at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. Detailed descriptions of the major installation operations (e.g., primary system preconditioning, fuel installation, pressure boundary seal welding) are included as appendices to this report; these operations are of technical interest to any reactor servicing operation, whether the reactor is a breeder or a conventional light water non-breeder core.

  13. Light-water-reactor pressure-vessel surveillance dosimetry using solid-state track recorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Gold, R.; Preston, C.C.

    1983-07-01

    The accumulation of neutron dose by the pressure vessel of an operating nuclear power plant results in damage in the form of steel embrittlement. In order to ascertain the safe operating lifetime of the reactor pressure vessel, dosimetric measurements must be made to evaluate the neutron dose to the pressure vessel and relate this dose to the cumulative radiation damage. Advanced dosimetry techniques are being evaluated for surveillance of operating reactors. Solid-state track recorder (SSTR) techniques are included among these advanced dosimetry techniques. Described herein are low neutron fluence calibration and standardization measurements that are being carried out in pressure vessel mockup benchmark neutron fields in the USA, Belgium, and England. In addition, high fluence SSTR dosimetry capsules have been irradiated with metallurgical specimens in a pressure vessel mockup facility. The design and deployment of advances SSTR dosimetry capsules in operating power reactors are also described

  14. Light-water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drevon, G.

    1983-01-01

    This work gives basic information on light-water reactors which is advanced enough for the reader to become familiar with the essential objectives and aspects of their design, their operation and their insertion in the industrial, economic and human environment. In view of the capital role of electric energy in the modern economy a significant place is given to electron-nuclear power stations, particularly those of the type adopted for the French programme. The work includes sixteen chapters. The first chapter relates the history and presents the various applications of light water reactors. The second refers to the general elementary knowledge of reactor physics. The third chapter deals with the high power light-water nuclear power station and thereby introduces the ensuing chapters which, up to and including chapter 13, are devoted to the components and the various aspects of the operation of power stations, in particular safety and the relationship with the environment. Chapter 14 provides information on the reactors adapted to applications other than the generation of electricity on an industrial scale. Chapter 15 shows the extent of the industrial effort devoted to light-water reactors and chapter 16 indicates the paths along which the present work is preparing the future of these reactors. The various chapters have been written to allow for separate consultation. An index of the main technical terms and a bibliography complete the work [fr

  15. Solid State Track Recorder fission rate measurements in low power light water reactor pressure vessel mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Kellogg, L.S.

    1985-01-01

    The results of extensive SSTR measurements made at the Pool Critical Assembly (PCA) facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been reported previously. Measurements were made at key locations in PCA which is an idealized mockup of the water gap, thermal shield, pressure vessel geometry of a light water reactor. Recently, additional SSTR fission rate measurements have been carried out for 237-Np, 238-U, and 235-U in key locations in the NESTOR Shielding and Dosimetry Improvement Program (NESDIP) mockup facility located at Winfrith, England. NESDIP is a replica of the PCA facility, and comparisons will be made between PCA and NESDIP measurements. The results of measurements made at the engineering mockup at the VENUS critical assembly at CEN/SCK, Mol, Belgium will also be reported. Measurements were made at selected radial and azimuthal locations in VENUS, which models the in-core and near-core regions of a pressurized water reactor. Comparisons of absolute SSTR fission rates with absolute fission rates made with the Mol miniature fission chamber will be reported. Absolute fission rate comparisons have also been made between the NBS fission chamber, radiometric fission foils, and SSTRs, and these results will be summarized

  16. Heat insulation device for reactor pressure vessel in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Heiichiro; Tanaka, Yoshimi.

    1993-01-01

    Outer walls of a reactor pressure vessel are covered with water-tight walls made of metals. A heat insulation metal material is disposed between them. The water tight walls are joined by welding and flanges. A supply pipeline for filling gases and a discharge pipeline are in communication with the inside of the water tight walls. Further, a water detector is disposed in the midway of the gas discharge pipeline. With such a constitution, the following advantages can be attained. (1) Heat transfer from the reactor pressure vessel to water of a reactor container can be suppressed by filled gases and heat insulation metal material. (2) Since the pressure at the inside of the water tight walls can be equalized with the pressure of the inside of the reactor container, the thickness of the water-tight walls can be reduced. (3) Since intrusion of water to the inside of the walls due to rupture of the water tight walls is detected by the water detector, reactor scram can be conducted rapidly. (4) The sealing property of the flange joint portion is sufficient and detaching operation thereof is easy. (I.S.)

  17. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L.

    1993-10-01

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response

  18. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1993-10-01

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

  19. Power reactor pressure vessel benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahn, F.J.

    1978-01-01

    A review is given of the current status of experimental and calculational benchmarks for use in understanding the radiation embrittlement effects in the pressure vessels of operating light water power reactors. The requirements of such benchmarks for application to pressure vessel dosimetry are stated. Recent developments in active and passive neutron detectors sensitive in the ranges of importance to embrittlement studies are summarized and recommendations for improvements in the benchmark are made. (author)

  20. Ex-vessel boiling experiments: laboratory- and reactor-scale testing of the flooded cavity concept for in-vessel core retention. Pt. II. Reactor-scale boiling experiments of the flooded cavity concept for in-vessel core retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.Y.; Bentz, J.H.; Slezak, S.E.; Pasedag, W.F.

    1997-01-01

    For pt.I see ibid., p.77-88 (1997). This paper summarizes the results of a reactor-scale ex-vessel boiling experiment for assessing the flooded cavity design of the heavy water new production reactor. The simulated reactor vessel has a cylindrical diameter of 3.7 m and a torispherical bottom head. Boiling outside the reactor vessel was found to be subcooled nucleate boiling. The subcooling mainly results from the gravity head, which in turn results from flooding the side of the reactor vessel. The boiling process exhibits a cyclic pattern with four distinct phases: direct liquid-solid contact, bubble nucleation and growth, coalescence, and vapor mass dispersion. The results show that, under prototypic heat load and heat flux distributions, the flooded cavity will be effective for in-vessel core retention in the heavy water new production reactor. The results also demonstrate that the heat dissipation requirement for in-vessel core retention, for the central region of the lower head of an AP-600 advanced light water reactor, can be met with the flooded cavity design. (orig.)

  1. Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) are compared

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greneche, D.

    2014-01-01

    This article compares the 2 types of light water reactors that are used to produce electricity: the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and the Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). Historically the BWR concept was developed after the PWR concept. Today 80% of light water reactors operating in the world are of PWR-type. This comparison is comprehensive and detailed. First the main technical features are reviewed and compared: reactor architecture, core and fuel design, reactivity control, reactor vessel, cooling systems and reactor containment. Secondly, various aspects concerning reactor operations like reactor control, fuel management, maintenance, inspections, radiation protection, waste generation and reactor reliability are presented and compared for both reactors. As for the issue of safety, it is highlighted that the accidental situations are too different for the 2 reactors to be compared. The main features of reactor safety are explained for both reactors

  2. Cooling of pressurized water nuclear reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curet, H.D.

    1978-01-01

    The improvement of pressurized water nuclear reactor vessels comprising flow dividers providing separate and distinct passages for the flow of core coolant water from each coolant water inlet, the flow dividers being vertically disposed in the annular flow areas provided by the walls of the vessel, the thermal shield (if present), and the core barrel is described. In the event of rupture of one of the coolant water inlet lines, water, especially emergency core coolant water, in the intact lines is thus prevented from by-passing the core by circumferential flow around the outermost surface of the core barrel and is instead directed so as to flow vertically downward through the annulus area between the vessel wall and the core barrel in a more normal manner to increase the probability of cooling of the core by the available cooling water in the lower plenum, thus preventing or delaying thermal damage to the core, and providing time for other appropriate remedial or damage preventing action by the operator

  3. Effects of nickel on irradiation embrittlement of light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    This TECDOC was developed under the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) entitled Effects of Nickel on Irradiation Embrittlement of Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels. This CRP is the sixth in a series of CRPs to determine the influence of the mechanism and quantify the influence of nickel content on the deterioration of irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steels of the Ni-Cr-Mo-V or Mn-Ni-Cr-Mo types. The scientific scope of the programme includes procurement of materials, determination of mechanical properties, irradiation and testing of specimens in power and/or test reactors, and microstructural characterization. Eleven institutes from eight different countries and the European Union participated in this CRP and six institutes conducted the irradiation experiments of the CRP materials. In addition to the irradiation and testing of those materials, irradiation experiments of various national steels were also conducted. Moreover, some institutes performed microstructural investigations of both the CRP materials and national steels. This TECDOC presents and discusses all the results obtained and the analyses performed under the CRP. The results analysed are clear in showing the significantly higher radiation sensitivity of high nickel weld metal (1.7 wt%) compared with the lower nickel base metal (1.2 wt%). These results are supported by other similar results in the literature for both WWER-1000 RPV materials, pressurized water reactor (PWR) type materials, and model alloys. Regardless of the increased sensitivity of WWER-1000 high nickel weld metal (1.7 wt%), the transition temperature shift for the WWER-1000 RPV design fluence is still below the curve predicted by the Russian code (standard for strength calculations of components and piping in NPPs - PNAE G 7-002-86). For higher fluence, no data were available and the results should not be extrapolated. Although manganese content was not incorporated directly in this CRP

  4. Study of radiation damage of steels for light water pressure vessels at UJV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, N.; Stoces, B.

    1980-01-01

    Preoperational determination of radiation resistance of pressure vessel steels is performed at accelerated neutron exposure in a test or materials research reactor. The results obtained at accelerated and operating exposure are not fully identical and surveillance bodies are therefore used manufactured from the pressure vessel material. Currently, the following steels are used for the manufacture of light water reactor pressure vessels: Mn-Mo-Ni (ASTM-A533-B, ASTM-A508), Cr-Mo-V (15Kh2M1FA). At UJV Rez, for irradiation Chanca-M probes imported from France are used featuring electric temperature control. Almost identical radiation embrittlement was measured for all three steels after irradiation with a neutron fluence of 3x10 23 n.m -2 at a temperature of 290 degC. (H.S.)

  5. Safety of light-water reactor pressure vessels against brittle fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.

    1979-01-01

    The results are surveyed of research by SKODA Trust into brittle failure resistance of materials for WWER type reactor pressure vessels and into pressure vessel operating safety. Conditions are discussed in detail decisive for initiation, propagation and arrest of brittle fracture. The tests on the Cr-Mo-V type steel showed high resistance of the steel to the formation and the propagation of brittle fracture. They also confirmed the high operating reliability and the required service life of the steel. (B.S.)

  6. Procedure for operating a heavy water cooled power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, P.; Kumpf, H.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear reactors cooled by heavy water usually have equipment for fuel element exchange during operation, with the primary circuit remaining contained. This fuel element exchange equipment is expensive and complicated in many respects. According to the invention, the heavy water is therefore replaced by light water after a certain time of operation in such way that light water is led in and heavy water is led off. After the replacement, at least a quarter of the fuel elements of the reactor core is exchanged with the reactor pressure vessel being open. Then the light water serving as a shielding is replaced by heavy water, with the reactor pressure vessel being closed. The invention is of interest particularly for high-conversion reactors. (orig.) [de

  7. Impact of radiation embrittlement on integrity of pressure vessel supports for two PWR [pressurized-water-reactor] plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Pennell, W.E.; Robinson, G.C.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1988-01-01

    Recent pressure-vessel surveillance data from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) indicate an embrittlement fluence-rate effect that is applicable to the evaluation of the integrity of light-water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel supports. A preliminary evaluation using the HFIR data indicated increases in the nil ductility transition temperature at 32 effective full-power years (EFPY) of 100 to 130/degree/C for pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) vessel supports located in the cavity at midheight of the core. This result indicated a potential problem with regard to life expectancy. However, an accurate assessment required a detailed, specific-plant, fracture-mechanics analysis. After a survey and cursory evaluation of all LWR plants, two PWR plants that appeared to have a potential problem were selected. Results of the analyses indicate minimum critical flaw sizes small enough to be of concern before 32 EFPY. 24 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs

  8. Non-linear analysis in Light Water Reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, Y.R.; Sharabi, M.N.; Nickell, R.E.; Esztergar, E.P.; Jones, J.W.

    1980-03-01

    The results obtained from a scoping study sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Safety Technology Program at Sandia National Laboratories are presented. Basically, this project calls for the examination of the hypothesis that the use of nonlinear analysis methods in the design of LWR systems and components of interest include such items as: the reactor vessel, vessel internals, nozzles and penetrations, component support structures, and containment structures. Piping systems are excluded because they are being addressed by a separate study. Essentially, the findings were that nonlinear analysis methods are beneficial to LWR design from a technical point of view. However, the costs needed to implement these methods are the roadblock to readily adopting them. In this sense, a cost-benefit type of analysis must be made on the various topics identified by these studies and priorities must be established. This document is the complete report by ANATECH International Corporation

  9. Historical summary of the heavy-section steel technology program and some related activities in light-water reactor pressure vessel safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitman, G.D.

    1986-03-01

    The accomplishments of the Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program and other programs having a close relationship to the development of information used in the assessment of light-water reactor pressure vessel integrity are reviewed. The early Pressure Vessel Research Committee planning, the principals contributing to program formulation, the role of the US Atomic Energy Commission, and the developments under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsorship are identified. The need for major research and development accomplishments in fracture mechanics, heavy-section steel procurement, materials properties, irradiation effects, fatigue crack growth, and structural testing are summarized. The impact of program results on regulatory issues and the development of data used in the preparation of codes, standards, and guides are discussed. Continuing activities and recommendations for future research and development in support of pressure vessel integrity assessments are presented

  10. Advances in light water reactor technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Takehiko; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    ""Advances in Light Water Reactor Technologies"" focuses on the design and analysis of advanced nuclear power reactors. This volume provides readers with thorough descriptions of the general characteristics of various advanced light water reactors currently being developed worldwide. Safety, design, development and maintenance of these reactors is the main focus, with key technologies like full MOX core design, next-generation digital I&C systems and seismic design and evaluation described at length. This book is ideal for researchers and engineers working in nuclear power that are interested

  11. Prestressed concrete pressure vessels for boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, S.

    1979-12-01

    Following a general description of the Scandinavian cooperative project on prestressed concrete pressure vessels for boiling water reactors, detailed discussion is given in four appendices of the following aspects: the verification programme of tests and studies, the development and testing of a liner venting system, a preliminary safety philosophy and comparative assessment of cold and hot liners. Vessel failure probability is briefly discussed and some figures presented. The pressure gradients in the vessel wall resulting from various stipulated linear cracks, with a liner venting system are presented graphically. (JIW)

  12. Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program on irradiation effects in light-water reactor pressure vessel materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Alexander, D.J.; Haggag, F.M.; Iskander, S.K.; McCabe, D.E.; Sokolov, M.A.; Stoller, R.E.

    1995-01-01

    The safety of commercial light-water nuclear plants is highly dependent on the structural integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). In the absence of radiation damage to the RPV, fracture of the vessel is difficult to postulate. Exposure to high energy neutrons can result in embrittlement of radiation-sensitive RPV materials. The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), is assessing the effects of neutron irradiation on RPV material behavior, especially fracture toughness. The results of these and other studies are used by the USNRC in the evaluation of RPV integrity and regulation of overall nuclear plant safety. In assessing the effects of irradiation, prototypic RPV materials are characterized in the unirradiated condition and exposed to radiation under varying conditions. Mechanical property tests are conducted to provide data which can be used in the development of guidelines for structural integrity evaluations, while metallurgical examinations and mechanistic modeling are performed to improve understanding of the mechanisms responsible for embrittlement. The results of these investigations, in conjunction with results from commercial reactor surveillance programs, are used to develop a methodology for the prediction of radiation effects on RPV materials. This irradiation-induced degradation of the materials can be mitigated by thermal annealing, i.e., heating the RPV to a temperature above that of normal operation. Thus, thermal annealing and evaluation of reirradiation behavior are major tasks of the HSSI Program. This paper describes the HSSI Program activities by summarizing some past and recent results, as well as current and planned studies. 30 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  13. Bounding analysis of containment of high pressure melt ejection in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Additon, S.L.; Fontana, M.H.; Carter, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the loadings on containment due to direct containment heating (DCH) as a result of high pressure melt ejection (HPME) in advanced light water reactors (ALWR) which were estimated using conservative, bounding analyses. The purpose of the analyses was to scope the magnitude of the possible loadings and to indicate the performance needed from potential mitigation methods, such as a cavity configuration that limits energy transfer to the upper containment volume. Analyses were performed for three cases which examined the effect of availability of high pressure reactor coolant system water at the time of reactor vessel melt through and the effect of preflooding of the reactor cavity. The amount of core ejected from the vessel was varied from 100% to 0% for all cases. Results indicate that all amounts of core debris dispersal could be accommodated by the containment for the case where the reactor cavity was preflooded. For the worst case, all the energy from in-vessel hydrogen generation and combustion plus that from 45% of the entire molten core would be required to equilibrate with the containment upper volume in order to reach containment failure pressure

  14. High performance light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squarer, D.; Schulenberg, T.; Struwe, D.; Oka, Y.; Bittermann, D.; Aksan, N.; Maraczy, C.; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R.; Souyri, A.; Dumaz, P.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the high performance light water reactor (HPLWR) project is to assess the merit and economic feasibility of a high efficiency LWR operating at thermodynamically supercritical regime. An efficiency of approximately 44% is expected. To accomplish this objective, a highly qualified team of European research institutes and industrial partners together with the University of Tokyo is assessing the major issues pertaining to a new reactor concept, under the co-sponsorship of the European Commission. The assessment has emphasized the recent advancement achieved in this area by Japan. Additionally, it accounts for advanced European reactor design requirements, recent improvements, practical design aspects, availability of plant components and the availability of high temperature materials. The final objective of this project is to reach a conclusion on the potential of the HPLWR to help sustain the nuclear option, by supplying competitively priced electricity, as well as to continue the nuclear competence in LWR technology. The following is a brief summary of the main project achievements:-A state-of-the-art review of supercritical water-cooled reactors has been performed for the HPLWR project.-Extensive studies have been performed in the last 10 years by the University of Tokyo. Therefore, a 'reference design', developed by the University of Tokyo, was selected in order to assess the available technological tools (i.e. computer codes, analyses, advanced materials, water chemistry, etc.). Design data and results of the analysis were supplied by the University of Tokyo. A benchmark problem, based on the 'reference design' was defined for neutronics calculations and several partners of the HPLWR project carried out independent analyses. The results of these analyses, which in addition help to 'calibrate' the codes, have guided the assessment of the core and the design of an improved HPLWR fuel assembly. Preliminary selection was made for the HPLWR scale

  15. 60th Anniversary of electricity production from light water reactors: Historical review of the contribution of materials science to the safety of the pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duysen, J.C. van; Meric de Bellefon, G.

    2017-01-01

    The first light water nuclear reactor dedicated to electricity production was commissioned in Shippingport, Pennsylvania in the United States in 1957. Sixty years after the event, it is clear that this type of reactor will be a major source of electricity and one of the key solutions to limit climate change in the 21st century. This article pays homage to the teams that contributed to this achievement by their involvement in research and development and their determination to push back the frontiers of knowledge. Via a few examples of scientific or technological milestones, it describes the evolution of ideas, models, and techniques during the last 60 years, and gives the current state-of-the-art in areas related to the safety of the reactor pressure vessel. Among other topics, it focuses on vessel manufacturing, steel fracture mechanics analysis, and understanding of irradiation-induced damage.

  16. 60th Anniversary of electricity production from light water reactors: Historical review of the contribution of materials science to the safety of the pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duysen, J.C. van, E-mail: jean-claude.van-duysen@ensc-lille.fr [Department of Nuclear Engineering University of Tennessee Knoxville (United States); Unité Matériaux et Transformation (UMET) CNRS, Université de Lille 1 (France); Meric de Bellefon, G., E-mail: mericdebelle@wisc.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

    2017-02-15

    The first light water nuclear reactor dedicated to electricity production was commissioned in Shippingport, Pennsylvania in the United States in 1957. Sixty years after the event, it is clear that this type of reactor will be a major source of electricity and one of the key solutions to limit climate change in the 21st century. This article pays homage to the teams that contributed to this achievement by their involvement in research and development and their determination to push back the frontiers of knowledge. Via a few examples of scientific or technological milestones, it describes the evolution of ideas, models, and techniques during the last 60 years, and gives the current state-of-the-art in areas related to the safety of the reactor pressure vessel. Among other topics, it focuses on vessel manufacturing, steel fracture mechanics analysis, and understanding of irradiation-induced damage.

  17. Development of light water reactors and subjects for hereafter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murao, Yoshio

    1995-01-01

    As for light water reactors, the structure is relatively simple, and the power plants of large capacity can be realized easily, therefore, they have been used for long period as main nuclear reactors. During that period, the accumulation of experiences on the design, manufacture, operation, maintenance and regulation of light water has become enormous, and in Japan, the social base for maintaining and developing light water reactor technologies has been prepared sufficiently. If the nuclear power generation using seawater uranium is considered, the utilization of uranium for light water reactor technologies can become the method of producing the own energy for Japan. As the factors that threaten the social base of light water reactor technologies, there are a the lowering of the desire to promote light water reactors, the effect of secular deterioration, the price rise of uranium resources, the effect of plutonium accumulation, the effect of the circumstances in developing countries and the sure recruiting of engineers. The construction and the principle of working of light water reactors and the development of light water reactors hereafter, for example, the improvement on small scale and the addition of new technology resulting in cost reduction and the lowering of the quality requirement for engineers, the improvement of core design, the countermeasures by design to serious accidents and others are described. (K.I.)

  18. Method for temporary shielding of reactor vessel internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, N.P.; Sejvar, J.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a method for shielding stored internals for reactor vessel annealing. It comprises removing nuclear fuel from the reactor vessel containment building; removing and storing upper and lower core internals under water in a refueling canal storage area; assembling a support structure in the refueling canal between the reactor vessel and the stored internals; introducing vertical shielding tanks individually through a hatch in the containment building and positioning each into the support structure; introducing horizontal shielding tanks individually through a hatch in the containment building and positioning each above the stored internals and vertical tanks; draining water from the refueling canal to the level of a flange of the reactor vessel; placing an annealing apparatus in the reactor vessel; pumping the remaining water from the reactor vessel; and annealing the reactor vessel

  19. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E.

    1996-07-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from April 1995 to December 1995. Topics that have been investigated include fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, EAC of Alloy 600 and 690, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic steels in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in simulated LWR environments. Effects of fluoride-ion contamination on susceptibility to intergranular cracking of high- and commercial- purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-tensile tests at 288 degrees Centigrade. Microchemical changes in the specimens were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials

  20. Ex-Vessel corium coolability and steam explosion energetics in nordic light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinh, T.N.; Ma, W.M.; Karbojian, A.; Kudinov, P.; Tran, C.T.; Hansson, C.R.

    2008-03-01

    This report presents advances and insights from the KTH's study on corium pool heat transfer in the BWR lower head; debris bed formation; steam explosion energetics; thermal hydraulics and coolability in bottom-fed and heterogeneous debris beds. Specifically, for analysis of heat transfer in a BWR lower plenum an advanced threedimensional simulation tool was developed and validated, using a so-called effective convectivity approach and Fluent code platform. An assessment of corium retention and coolability in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower plenum by means of water supplied through the Control Rod Guide Tube (CRGT) cooling system was performed. Simulant material melt experiments were performed in an intermediate temperature range (1300-1600K) on DEFOR test facility to study formation of debris beds in high and low subcooled water pools characteristic of in-vessel and ex-vessel conditions. Results of the DEFOR-E scoping experiments and related analyses strongly suggest that porous beds formed in ex-vessel from a fragmented high-temperature debris is far from homogeneous. Calculation results of bed thermal hydraulics and dryout heat flux with a two-dimensional thermal-hydraulic code give the first basis to evaluate the extent by which macro and micro inhomogeneity can enhance the bed coolability. The development and validation of a model for two-phase natural circulation through a heated porous medium and its application to the coolability analysis of bottom-fed beds enables quantification of the significant effect of dryout heat flux enhancement (by a factor of 80-160%) due to bottom coolant injection. For a qualitative and quantitative understanding of steam explosion, the SHARP system and its image processing methodology were used to characterize the dynamics of a hot liquid (melt) drop fragmentation and the volatile liquid (coolant) vaporization. The experimental results provide a basis to suggest that the melt drop preconditioning is instrumental to the

  1. Ex-Vessel corium coolability and steam explosion energetics in nordic light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, T.N.; Ma, W.M.; Karbojian, A.; Kudinov, P.; Tran, C.T.; Hansson, C.R. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), (Sweden)

    2008-03-15

    This report presents advances and insights from the KTH's study on corium pool heat transfer in the BWR lower head; debris bed formation; steam explosion energetics; thermal hydraulics and coolability in bottom-fed and heterogeneous debris beds. Specifically, for analysis of heat transfer in a BWR lower plenum an advanced threedimensional simulation tool was developed and validated, using a so-called effective convectivity approach and Fluent code platform. An assessment of corium retention and coolability in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower plenum by means of water supplied through the Control Rod Guide Tube (CRGT) cooling system was performed. Simulant material melt experiments were performed in an intermediate temperature range (1300-1600K) on DEFOR test facility to study formation of debris beds in high and low subcooled water pools characteristic of in-vessel and ex-vessel conditions. Results of the DEFOR-E scoping experiments and related analyses strongly suggest that porous beds formed in ex-vessel from a fragmented high-temperature debris is far from homogeneous. Calculation results of bed thermal hydraulics and dryout heat flux with a two-dimensional thermal-hydraulic code give the first basis to evaluate the extent by which macro and micro inhomogeneity can enhance the bed coolability. The development and validation of a model for two-phase natural circulation through a heated porous medium and its application to the coolability analysis of bottom-fed beds enables quantification of the significant effect of dryout heat flux enhancement (by a factor of 80-160%) due to bottom coolant injection. For a qualitative and quantitative understanding of steam explosion, the SHARP system and its image processing methodology were used to characterize the dynamics of a hot liquid (melt) drop fragmentation and the volatile liquid (coolant) vaporization. The experimental results provide a basis to suggest that the melt drop preconditioning is instrumental to

  2. Supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the latest reactor concepts, single pass core and experimental findings in thermal hydraulics, materials, corrosion, and water chemistry. It highlights research on supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors (SCWRs), one of the Generation IV reactors that are studied around the world. This book includes cladding material development and experimental findings on heat transfer, corrosion and water chemistry. The work presented here will help readers to understand the fundamental elements of reactor design and analysis methods, thermal hydraulics, materials and water

  3. Large-scale testing of in-vessel debris cooling through external flooding of the reactor pressure vessel in the CYBL facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.Y.; Bentz, J.H.; Bergeron, K.D.; Slezak, S.E.; Simpson, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    The possibility of achieving in-vessel core retention by flooding the reactor cavity, or the ''flooded cavity'', is an accident management concept currently under consideration for advanced light water reactors (ALWR), as well as for existing light water reactors (LWR). The CYBL (CYlindrical BoiLing) facility is a facility specifically designed to perform large-scale confirmatory testing of the flooded cavity concept. CYBL has a tank-within-a-tank design; the inner 3.7 m diameter tank simulates the reactor vessel, and the outer tank simulates the reactor cavity. The energy deposition on the bottom head is simulated with an array of radiant heaters. The array can deliver a tailored heat flux distribution corresponding to that resulting from core melt convection. The present paper provides a detailed description of the capabilities of the facility, as well as results of recent experiments with heat flux in the range of interest to those required for in-vessel retention in typical ALWRs. The paper concludes with a discussion of other experiments for the flooded cavity applications

  4. Large-Scale testing of in-vessel debris cooling through external flooding of the reactor pressure vessel in the CYBL facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.Y.; Bentz, J.H.; Bergeron, K.D.; Slezak, S.E.; Simpson, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    The possibility of achieving in-vessel core retention by flooding the reactor cavity, or the open-quotes flooded cavityclose quotes, is an accident management concept currently under consideration for advanced light water reactors (ALWR), as well as for existing light water reactors (LWR). The CYBL (CYlindrical BoiLing) facility is a facility specifically designed to perform large-scale confirmatory testing of the flooded cavity concept. CYBL has a tank-within-a-tank design; the inner 3.7 m diameter tank simulates the reactor vessel, and the outer tank simulates the reactor cavity. The energy deposition on the bottom head is simulated with an array of radiant heaters. The array can deliver a tailored heat flux distribution corresponding to that resulting from core melt convection. The present paper provides a detailed description of the capabilities of the facility, as well as results of recent experiments with heat flux in the range of interest to those required for in-vessel retention in typical ALWRs. The paper concludes with a discussion of other experiments for the flooded cavity applications

  5. Status of advanced technology and design for water cooled reactors: Light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    Water reactors represent a high level of performance and safety. They are mature technology and they will undoubtedly continue to be the main stream of nuclear power. There are substantial technological development programmes in Member States for further improving the technology and for the development of new concepts in water reactors. Therefore the establishment of an international forum for the exchange of information and stimulation of international co-operation in this field has emerged. In 1987 the IAEA established the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR). Within the framework of IWGATWR the IAEA Technical Report on Status of Advanced Technology and Design for Water Cooled Reactors, Part I: Light Water Reactors and Part II: Heavy Water Reactors has been undertaken to document the major current activities and different trends of technological improvements and developments for future water reactors. Part I of the report dealing with LWRs has now been prepared and is based mainly on submissions from Member States. It is hoped that this part of the report, containing the status of advanced light water reactor design and technology of the year 1987 and early 1988 will be useful for disseminating information to Agency Member States and for stimulating international cooperation in this subject area. 93 refs, figs and tabs

  6. Fast neutron spectroscopy by gas proton-recoil methods at the light water reactor pressure vessel simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.W.

    1980-10-01

    Fast neutron spectrum measurements were made in a Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessel Simulator (PVS) to provide neutron spectral definition required to appropriately perform and interpret neutron dosimetry measurements related to fast neutron damage in LWR-PV steels. Proton-recoil proportional counter methods using hydrogen and methane gas-filled detectors were applied to obtain the proton spectra from which the neutron spectra were derived. Cylindrical and spherical geometry detectors were used to cover the neutron energy range between 50 keV and 2 MeV. Results show that the neutron spectra shift in energy distribution toward lower energy between the front and back of a PVS. The relative neutron flux densities increase in this energy range with increasing thickness of the steel. Neutron spectrum fine structure shapes and changes are observed. These results should assist in the generation of more accurate effective cross sections and fluences for use in LWR-PV fast neutron dosimetry and materials damage analyses

  7. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method for sealing the cold leg nozzles of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location during maintenance and inspection of associated steam generators and pumps while the pressure vessel and refueling canal are filled with water. The apparatus includes a sealing plug for mechanically sealing the cold leg nozzle from the inside of a reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plugs include a primary and a secondary O-ring. An installation tool is suspended within the reactor vessel and carries the sealing plug. The tool telescopes to insert the sealing plug within the cold leg nozzle, and to subsequently remove the plug. Hydraulic means are used to activate the sealing plug, and support means serve to suspend the installation tool within the reactor vessel during installation and removal of the sealing plug

  8. Environmentally assisted cracking in Light Water Reactors: Semiannual report, April 1993--September 1993. Volume 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Karlsen, T.; Kassner, T.F.; Michaud, W.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Sanecki, J.E.; Shack, W.J.; Soppet, W.K.

    1994-06-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRS) during the six months from April 1993 to September 1993. EAC and fatigue of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in LWRs are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of low-alloy steel used in piping, steam generators, and reactor pressure vessels; (b) EAC of cast stainless steels (SSs); and (c) radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence. Fatigue tests were conducted on medium-sulfur-content A106-Gr B piping and A533-Gr B pressure vessel steels in simulated PWR water and in air. Additional crack growth data were obtained on fracture-mechanics specimens of cast austenitic SSs in the as-received and thermally aged conditions in simulated boiling-water reactor (BWR) water at 289 degree C. The data were compared with predictions based on crack growth correlations for wrought austenitic SS in oxygenated water developed at ANL and rates in air from Section 11 of the ASME Code. Microchemical and microstructural changes in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath from operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

  9. Reactor pressure vessel status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strosnider, J.; Wichman, K.; Elliot, B.

    1994-12-01

    This report gives a brief description of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), followed by a discussion of the radiation embrittlement of RPV beltline materials and the two indicators for measuring embrittlement, the end-of-license (EOL) reference temperature and the EOL upper-shelf energy. It also summarizes the GL 92-01 effort and presents, for all 37 boiling water reactor plants and 74 pressurized water reactor plants in the United States, the current status of compliance with regulatory requirements related to ensuring RPV integrity. The staff has evaluated the material data needed to predict neutron embrittlement of the reactor vessel beltline materials. These data will be stored in a computer database entitled the reactor vessel integrity database (RVID). This database will be updated annually to reflect the changes made by the licensees in future submittals and will be used by the NRC staff to assess the issues related to vessel structural integrity

  10. Nondestructive examination (NDE) reliability for inservice inspection of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, S.R.; Deffenbaugh, J.D.; Good, M.S.; Green, E.R.; Heasler, P.G.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.

    1989-10-01

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvement that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to ASME Code and Regulatory requirements based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE capabilities and uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other inspected components. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from October 1987 through March 1988. 21 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Nondestructive examination (NDE) reliability for inservice inspection of light waters reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, S.R.; Deffenbaugh, J.D.; Good, M.S.; Green, E.R.; Heasler, P.G.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.

    1989-11-01

    Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to ASME Code and Regulatory requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other inspected components. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from April 1988 through September 1988. 33 refs., 70 figs., 12 tabs

  12. Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, S.R.; Diaz, A.A.; Friley, J.R.

    1993-09-01

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to ASME Code and Regulatory requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from October 1991 through March 1992

  13. Effect of radiation damage on operating safety of steel pressure vessels of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacek, M.; Havel, S.; Stoces, B.; Brumovsky, M.

    1980-01-01

    The effects are assessed of the environment upon mechanical properties of steel used generally for pressure vessels of light water nuclear reactors. Changes caused by radiation affect the reliability of vessels. Deterioration of steel properties is mainly due to neutron radiation. The article deals with factors bearing upon damage and with methods allowing to evaluate the reliability of vessels and predict their service life. Operating reliability of vessels is very unfavourably affected by planned and accidental reactor transients. (author)

  14. Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

    2013-03-19

    The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

  15. Nuclear reactor vessel decontamination systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuire, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    There is disclosed in the present application, a decontamination system for reactor vessels. The system is operatable without entry by personnel into the contaminated vessel before the decontamination operation is carried out and comprises an assembly which is introduced into the vertical cylindrical vessel of the typical boiling water reactor through the open top. The assembly includes a circular track which is centered by guideways permanently installed in the reactor vessel and the track guides opposed pairs of nozzles through which water under very high pressure is directed at the wall for progressively cutting and sweeping a tenacious radioactive coating as the nozzles are driven around the track in close proximity to the vessel wall. The whole assembly is hoisted to a level above the top of the vessel by a crane, outboard slides on the assembly brought into engagement with the permanent guideways and the assembly progressively lowered in the vessel as the decontamination operation progresses. The assembly also includes a low pressure nozzle which forms a spray umbrella above the high pressure nozzles to contain radioactive particles dislodged during the decontamination

  16. Sub-critical crack growth and clad integrity in a PWR reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tice, D.R.; Foreman, A.J.E.; Sharples, J.K.

    1987-10-01

    The possibility of in-service growth of sub-critical defects in a PWR reactor pressure vessel to a critical size which could result in vessel failure was addressed in both the 1976 and 1982 reports of the Light Water Reactor Study Group (LWRSG), under the Chairmanship of Dr W Marshall (now Lord Marshall). An addendum to this report was published by UKAEA in April 1987. The section of the addendum dealing with subcritical crack growth and the related issue of integrity of the stainless steel cladding on the inner vessel surface is reproduced in this report. This section of the LWRSG addendum provides a review of the current status of fatigue crack growth and environmentally assisted cracking research for pressure vessel steels in light water reactor environments, as well as a review of developments in crack growth assessment methods. The review concludes that the alternative assessment procedures now being developed give a more realistic prediction of in service crack growth than the ASME Section XI Appendix A fatigue crack growth curves. (author)

  17. The use of ferritic materials in light water reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marston, T.V.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reviews the use of ferritic materials in LWR power plant components. The two principal types of LWR systems, the boiling water reactor (BWR) and the pressurized water reactor (PWR) are described. The evolution of the construction materials, including plates and forgings, is presented. The fabrication process for both reactors constructed with plates and forgings are described in detail. Typical mechanical properties of the reactor vessel materials are presented. Finally, one critical issue radiation embrittlement dealing with ferritic materials is discussed. This has been one of the major issues regarding the use of ferritic material in the construction of LWR pressure vessels

  18. Ex-vessel coolability and energetics of steam explosions in nordic light water reactors - EXCOOLSE project report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.S.; Nayak, A.K.; Hansson, R.C.; Sehgal, B.R.

    2005-10-01

    Beyond-the-design-basis accidents, i.e. severe accidents, involve melting of the nuclear reactor core and release of radioactivity. Intensive research has been performed for years to evaluate the consequence of the postulated severe accidents. Severe accidents posed, to the reactor researchers, a most interesting and most difficult set of phenomena to understand, and to predict the consequences, for the various scenarios that could be contemplated. The complexity of the interactions, occurring at such high temperatures (∼ 2500 deg. C), between different materials, which are changing phases and undergoing chemical reactions, is simply indescribable with the accuracy that one may desire. Thus, it is a wise approach to pursue research on SA phenomena until the remaining uncertainty in the predicted consequence, or the residual risk, can be tolerated. In the PRE-DELI-MELT project at NKS, several critical issues on the core melt loadings in the BWR and PWR reactor containments were identified. Many of Nordic nuclear power plants, particularly in boiling water reactors, adopted the Severe Accident Management Strategy (SAMS) which employed the deep subcooled water pool in lower dry-well. The success of this SAMS largely depends on the issues of steam explosions and formation of debris bed and its coolability. From the suggestions of the PRE-DELI-MELT project, a series of research plan was proposed to investigate the remaining issues specifically on the ex-vessel coolability of corium during severe accidents; (a) ex-vessel coolability of the melt or particulate debris, and (b) energetics and debris characteristics of fuel-coolant interactions endangering the integrity of the reactor containments. (au)

  19. Ex-vessel coolability and energetics of steam explosions in nordic light water reactors - EXCOOLSE project report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H.S.; Nayak, A.K.; Hansson, R.C.; Sehgal, B.R. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Div. of Nuclear Power Safety (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Beyond-the-design-basis accidents, i.e. severe accidents, involve melting of the nuclear reactor core and release of radioactivity. Intensive research has been performed for years to evaluate the consequence of the postulated severe accidents. Severe accidents posed, to the reactor researchers, a most interesting and most difficult set of phenomena to understand, and to predict the consequences, for the various scenarios that could be contemplated. The complexity of the interactions, occurring at such high temperatures ({approx} 2500 deg. C), between different materials, which are changing phases and undergoing chemical reactions, is simply indescribable with the accuracy that one may desire. Thus, it is a wise approach to pursue research on SA phenomena until the remaining uncertainty in the predicted consequence, or the residual risk, can be tolerated. In the PRE-DELI-MELT project at NKS, several critical issues on the core melt loadings in the BWR and PWR reactor containments were identified. Many of Nordic nuclear power plants, particularly in boiling water reactors, adopted the Severe Accident Management Strategy (SAMS) which employed the deep subcooled water pool in lower dry-well. The success of this SAMS largely depends on the issues of steam explosions and formation of debris bed and its coolability. From the suggestions of the PRE-DELI-MELT project, a series of research plan was proposed to investigate the remaining issues specifically on the ex-vessel coolability of corium during severe accidents; (a) ex-vessel coolability of the melt or particulate debris, and (b) energetics and debris characteristics of fuel-coolant interactions endangering the integrity of the reactor containments. (au)

  20. Conjugate heat transfer analysis for in-vessel retention with external reactor vessel cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong-Woon; Bae, Jae-ho; Song, Hyuk-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A conjugate heat transfer analysis method is applied for in-vessel corium retention. • 3D heat diffusion has a formidable effect in alleviating focusing heat load from metallic layer. • The focusing heat load is decreased by about 2.5 times on the external surface. - Abstract: A conjugate heat transfer analysis method for the thermal integrity of a reactor vessel under external reactor vessel cooling conditions is developed to resolve light metal layer focusing effect issue for in-vessel retention. The method calculates steady-state three-dimensional temperature distribution of a reactor vessel using coupled conjugate heat transfer between in-vessel three-layered stratified corium (metallic pool, oxide pool and heavy metal and polar-angle dependent boiling heat transfer at the outer surface of a reactor vessel). The three-layer corium heat transfer model is utilizing lumped-parameter thermal-resistance circuit method. For the ex-vessel boiling boundary conditions, nucleate, transition and film boiling are considered. The thermal integrity of a reactor vessel is addressed in terms of heat flux at the outer-most nodes of the vessel and remaining thickness profile. The vessel three-dimensional heat conduction is validated against a commercial code. It is found that even though the internal heat flux from the metal layer goes far beyond critical heat flux (CHF) the heat flux from the outermost nodes of the vessel may be maintained below CHF due to massive vessel heat diffusion. The heat diffusion throughout the vessel is more pronounced for relatively low heat generation rate in an oxide pool. Parametric calculations are performed considering thermal conditions such as peak heat flux from a light metal layer, heat generation in an oxide pool and external boiling conditions. The major finding is that the most crucial factor for success of in-vessel retention is not the mass of the molten light metal above the oxide pool but the heat generation rate

  1. A design study of high electric power for fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2000-03-01

    In order to evaluate the possibility to achieve high electric power by a fast reactor with supercritical light water, the design study was carried out on a large fast reactor core with high coolant outlet temperature (SCFR-H). Since the reactor coolant circuit uses once-through direct cycle where all feedwater flows through the core to the turbine at supercritical pressure, it is possible to design much simpler and more compact reactor systems and to achieve higher thermal efficiency than those of current light water reactors. The once-through direct cycle system is employed in current fossil-fired power plants. In the present study, three types of core were designed. The first is SCFR-H with blankets cooled by ascending flow, the second is SCFR-H with blankets cooled by descending flow and the third is SCFR-H with high thermal power. Every core was designed to achieve the thermal efficiency over 43%, positive coolant density reactivity coefficient and electric power over 1600 MW. Core characteristics of SCFR-Hs were compared with those of SCLWR-H (electric power: 1212 MW), which is a thermal neutron spectrum reactor cooled and moderated by supercritical light water, with the same diameter of the reactor pressure vessel. It was shown that SCFR-H could increase the electric power about 1.7 times maximally. From the standpoint of the increase of a reactor thermal power, a fast reactor has advantages as compared with a thermal neutron reactor, because it can increase the power density by adopting tight fuel lattices and eliminating the moderator region. Thus, it was concluded that a reactor cooled by supercritical light water could further improve the cost competitiveness by using a fast neutron spectrum and achieving a higher thermal power. (author)

  2. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the decommissioning of the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R.; Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will detail (1) a brief overview of the current status of the EBWR D ampersand D Project, and (2) the results of a study performed to evaluate the metal cutting technologies available to size reduce the EBWR reactor vessel. The techniques evaluated were: Plasma arc, Arc saw, Oxyacetylene, Electric arc gouging, Mechanical cladding removal/flame cutting, Exothermic reaction, Diamond wire, Water jet, Laser, Mechanical milling, Controlled explosives, and Electrical discharge. After a detailed review of these 12 techniques, the decision was made by ANL that the most appropriate method for segmenting the EBWR reactor vessel would be to rift the vessel from the vessel cavity and use an abrasive water jet positioned on the main floor to perform the cutting of the reactor vessel

  3. A new book : 'light-water reactor materials'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olander, Donald R.; Motta, Arthur T.

    2005-01-01

    The contents of a new book currently in preparation are described. The dearth of books in the field of nuclear materials has left both students in nuclear materials classes and professionals in the same field without a resource for the broad fundamentals of this important sub-discipline of nuclear engineering. The new book is devoted entirely to materials problems in the core of light-water reactors, from the pressure vessel into the fuel. Key topics deal with the UO 2 fuel, zircaloy cladding, stainless steel, and of course, water. The restriction to LWR materials does not mean a short monograph; the enormous quantity of experimental and theoretical work over the past 50 years on these materials presents a challenge of culling the most important features and explaining them in the simplest quantitative fashion. Moreover, LWRs will probably be the sole instrument of the return of nuclear energy in electric power production for the next decade or so. By that time, a new book will be needed

  4. Design features of the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) which improve fuel utilization in light water reactors (LWBR development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecker, H.C.; Freeman, L.B.

    1981-08-01

    This report surveys reactor core design features of the Light Water Breeder Reactor which make possible improved fuel utilization in light water reactor systems and breeding with the uranium-thorium fuel cycle. The impact of developing the uranium-thorium fuel cycle on utilization of nuclear fuel resources is discussed. The specific core design features related to improved fuel utilization and breeding which have been implemented in the Shippingport LWBR core are presented. These design features include a seed-blanket module with movable fuel for reactivity control, radial and axial reflcetor regions, low hafnium Zircaloy for fuel element cladding and structurals, and a closely spaced fuel rod lattice. Also included is a discussion of several design modifications which could further improve fuel utilization in future light water reactor systems. These include further development of movable fuel control, use of Zircaloy fuel rod support grids, and fuel element design modifications

  5. Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, S.R.; Diaz, A.A.; Friley, J.R.; Good, M.S.; Greenwood, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Hockey, R.L.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.; Vo, T.V.

    1992-07-01

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWR's); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from April 1991 through September 1991

  6. Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, S.R.; Diaz, A.A.; Friley, J.R.; Greenwood, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Vo, T.V.

    1993-11-01

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs);using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a programs report covering the programmatic work from April 1992 through September 1992

  7. Nondestructive examination (NDE) reliability for inservice inspection of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, S.R.; Good, M.S.; Green, E.R.; Heasler, P.G.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.; Vo, T.V.

    1991-08-01

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to ASME Code and Regulatory requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other components inspected in accordance with Section 6 of the ASME Code. This is a progress report covering the pro grammatic work from April 1989 through September 1989. 12 refs., 4 figs. 5 tabs

  8. Results of the mid-term assessment of the 'High Performance Light Water Reactor Phase 2' project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starflinger, J.; Schulenberg, T.; Marsault, P.

    2009-01-01

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is a Light Water Reactor (LWR) operating at supercritical pressure (p>22.1 MPa). In Europe, investigations on the HPLWR have been integrated into a joint research project, called High Performance Light Water Reactor Phase 2 (HPLWR Phase 2), which is co-funded by the European Commission. Within the second year of the project, the design of the reactor core, the pressure vessel and its internals have been analysed in detail by means of advanced codes and methods. The mechanical design has been assessed and shows that stresses inside components and possible deformations keep within acceptable limits. The neutronics and the flow inside the core have been investigated. The addition of a water layer in the reflector helps to flatten the radial power profile. The moderator flow path must be changed because of possible reverse flow in the gaps between the assemblies (downward flow). First calculations of transients showed an acceptable behaviour of the cladding temperatures. Material oxidation experiments were successfully performed. The auxiliary loop of the Supercritical Water Loop has been constructed. Heat transfer has been investigated numerically analysing heat transfer deterioration (HTD) and flow around fuel pins with wire wrap spacers. (author)

  9. RPV-1: A Virtual Test Reactor to simulate irradiation effects in light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jumel, Stephanie; Van-Duysen, Jean Claude

    2005-01-01

    Many key components in commercial nuclear reactors are subject to neutron irradiation which modifies their mechanical properties. So far, the prediction of the in-service behavior and the lifetime of these components has required irradiations in so-called 'Experimental Test Reactors'. This predominantly empirical approach can now be supplemented by the development of physically based computer tools to simulate irradiation effects numerically. The devising of such tools, also called Virtual Test Reactors (VTRs), started in the framework of the REVE Project (REactor for Virtual Experiments). This project is a joint effort among Europe, the United States and Japan aimed at building VTRs able to simulate irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels and internal structures of LWRs. The European team has already built a first VTR, called RPV-1, devised for pressure vessel steels. Its inputs and outputs are similar to those of experimental irradiation programs carried out to assess the in-service behavior of reactor pressure vessels. RPV-1 is made of five codes and two databases which are linked up so as to receive, treat and/or convey data. A user friendly Python interface eases the running of the simulations and the visualization of the results. RPV-1 is sensitive to its inputs (neutron spectrum, temperature, ...) and provides results in conformity with experimental ones. The iterative improvement of RPV-1 has been started by the comparison of simulation results with the database of the IVAR experimental program led by the University of California Santa Barbara. These first successes led 40 European organizations to start developing RPV-2, an advanced version of RPV-1, as well as INTERN-1, a VTR devised to simulate irradiation effects in stainless steels, in a large effort (the PERFECT project) supported by the European Commission in the framework of the 6th Framework Program

  10. Design of a supercritical water-cooled reactor. Pressure vessel and internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Kai

    2008-08-15

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is a light water reactor with supercritical steam conditions which has been investigated within the 5th Framework Program of the European Commission. Due to the supercritical pressure of 25 MPa, water, used as moderator and as coolant, flows as a single phase through the core and can be directly fed to the turbine. Using the technology of coal fired power plants with supercritical steam conditions, the heat-up in the core is done in several steps to achieve the targeted high steam outlet temperature of 500.C without exceeding available cladding material limits. Based on a first design of a fuel assembly cluster for a HPLWR with a single pass core, the surrounding internals and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) are dimensioned for the first time, following the safety standards of the nuclear safety standards commission in Germany. Furthermore, this design is extended to the incorporation of core arrangements with two and three passes. The design of the internals and the RPV are verified using mechanical or, in the case of large thermal deformations, combined mechanical and thermal stress analyses. Additionally, a passive safety component for the feedwater inlet of the RPV of the HPLWR is designed. Its purpose is the reduction of the mass flow rate in case of a LOCA for a feedwater line break until further steps are executed. Starting with a simple vortex diode, several steps are executed to enhance the performance of the diode and adapt it to this application. Then, this first design is further optimized using combined 1D and 3D flow analyses. Parametric studies determine the performance and characteristic for changing mass flow rates for this backflow limiter. (orig.)

  11. Light and heavy water replacing system in reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, Keiji.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To enable to determine the strength of a reactor container while neglecting the outer atmospheric pressure upon evacuation, by evacuating the gap between the reactor container and a biological thermal shield, as well as the container simultaneously upon light water - heavy water replacement. Method: Upon replacing light water with heavy water by vacuum evaporation system in a nuclear reactor having a biological thermal shield surrounding the reactor container incorporating therein a reactor core by way of a heat expansion absorbing gap, the reactor container and the havy water recycling system, as well as the inside of heat expansion absorbing gap are evacuated simultaneously. This enables to neglect the outer atmospheric outer pressure upon evacuation in the determination of the container strength, and the thickness of the container can be decreased by so much as the external pressure neglected. (Moriyama, K.)

  12. The analysis of reactor vessel surveillance program data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, E.B.

    1979-01-01

    Commercial nuclear power reactor vessel surveillance programs are provided by the reactor supplier and are designed to meet the requirements of ASTM Method E 185. (3). Each surveillance capsule contains sets of Charpy V-notch (Csub(v)) specimens representing selected materials from the vessel beltline region and some reference steel, tension test specimens machined from selected beltline materials, temperature monitors, and neutron flux dosimeters. Surveillance capsules may also contain fracture mechanics specimens machined from selected vessel beltline materials. The major steps in the conduct of a surveillance program include (1) the testing of the surveillance specimens to determine the exposure conditions at the capsule location and the resulting embrittlement of the vessel steel, (2) the extrapolation of the capsule results to the pressure vessel wall, and (3) the determination of the heatup and cooldown limits for normal, upset, and test operation. This paper will present data obtained from commercial light water reactor surveillance programs to illustrate the methods of analysis currently in use at Southwest Research Institute and to demonstrate some of the limitations imposed by the data available. Details concerning the procedures for testing the surveillance capsule specimens will not be included because they are considered to be outside of the scope of this paper

  13. Integrated conjugate heat transfer analysis method for in-vessel retention with external reactor vessel cooling - 15477

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.W.; Bae, J.H.; Seol, W.C.

    2015-01-01

    An integrated conjugate heat transfer analysis method for the thermal integrity of a reactor vessel under external reactor vessel cooling conditions is developed to resolve light metal layer focusing effect issue. The method calculates steady-state 3-dimensional temperature distribution of a reactor vessel using coupled conjugate heat transfer between in-vessel 3-layered stratified corium (metallic pool, oxide pool and heavy metal) and polar-angle dependent boiling heat transfer at the outer surface of a reactor vessel. The 3-layer corium heat transfer model is utilizing lumped-parameter thermal-resistance circuit method and ex-vessel boiling regimes are parametrically considered. The thermal integrity of a reactor vessel is addressed in terms of un-molten thickness profile. The vessel 3-dimensional heat conduction is validated against a commercial code. It is found that even though the internal heat flux from the metal layer goes far beyond critical heat flux (CHF) the heat flux from the outermost nodes of the vessel may be maintained below CHF due to massive vessel heat diffusion. The heat diffusion throughout the vessel is more pronounced for relatively low heat generation rate in an oxide pool. Parametric calculations are performed considering thermal conditions such as peak heat flux from a light metal layer, heat generation in an oxide pool and external boiling conditions. The major finding is that the most crucial factor for success of in-vessel retention is not the mass of the molten light metal above the oxide pool but the heat generation rate inside the oxide pool and the 3-dimensional vessel heat transfer provides a much larger minimum vessel wall thickness. (authors)

  14. Comparison of Standard Light Water Reactor Cross-Section Libraries using the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Boiling Water Reactor Benchmark Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulesza Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a comparison of contemporary and historical light water reactor shielding and pressure vessel dosimetry cross-section libraries for a boiling water reactor calculational benchmark problem. The calculational benchmark problem was developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory by the request of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The benchmark problem was originally evaluated by Brookhaven National Laboratory using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discrete ordinates code DORT and the BUGLE-93 cross-section library. In this paper, the Westinghouse RAPTOR-M3G three-dimensional discrete ordinates code was used. A variety of cross-section libraries were used with RAPTOR-M3G including the BUGLE93, BUGLE-96, and BUGLE-B7 cross-section libraries developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and ALPAN-VII.0 developed at Westinghouse. In comparing the calculated fast reaction rates using the four aforementioned cross-section libraries in the pressure vessel capsule, for six dosimetry reaction rates, a maximum relative difference of 8% was observed. As such, it is concluded that the results calculated by RAPTOR-M3G are consistent with the benchmark and further that the different vintage BUGLE cross-section libraries investigated are largely self-consistent.

  15. New lineup of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Kiyoshi; Oshima, Koichiro; Kitsukawa, Keisuke

    2007-01-01

    Toshiba is promoting technical studies for upcoming nuclear power plants based on its large accumulation of experience in boiling water reactor (BWR) design, manufacturing, construction, and maintenance. Our goal is to achieve higher reliability, lower life-cycle costs, and better competitiveness for nuclear power plants compared with other energy sources. In addition, we are developing a new light water reactor (LWR) lineup featuring the safest and most economical LWRs in the world as next-generation reactors almost at new construction and replacement in the Japanese and international markets expected to start from the 2020s. We are committed not only to developing BWRs with the world's highest performance but also to participating in the pressurized water reactor (PWR) market, taking advantage of the synergistic effect of both Toshiba's and Westinghouse's experience. (author)

  16. Insights for aging management of light water reactor components: Metal containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Sinha, U.P.; Smith, S.K.

    1994-03-01

    This report evaluates the available technical information and field experience related to management of aging damage to light water reactor metal containments. A generic aging management approach is suggested for the effective and comprehensive aging management of metal containments to ensure their safe operation. The major concern is corrosion of the embedded portion of the containment vessel and detection of this damage. The electromagnetic acoustic transducer and half-cell potential measurement are potential techniques to detect corrosion damage in the embedded portion of the containment vessel. Other corrosion-related concerns include inspection of corrosion damage on the inaccessible side of BWR Mark I and Mark II containment vessels and corrosion of the BWR Mark I torus and emergency core cooling system piping that penetrates the torus, and transgranular stress corrosion cracking of the penetration bellows. Fatigue-related concerns include reduction in the fatigue life (a) of a vessel caused by roughness of the corroded vessel surface and (b) of bellows because of any physical damage. Maintenance of surface coatings and sealant at the metal-concrete interface is the best protection against corrosion of the vessel

  17. Integrity of pressurized water electronuclear reactor vessels. The case of French reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This document aims at identifying elements related to design, manufacturing and control during operation of reactor vessels of the French electronuclear fleet, and more precisely as far as vessel ferrule is concerned. It briefly describes the typical design and elements of most of French PWR vessels with respect to the reactor type (900 MWe, 1300 MWe, 1450 MWe, EPR). It recalls some measures regarding design (for embrittlement assessment) and manufacturing processes (forging operations for shell fabrication, coatings). It discusses the different manufacturing defects which have been noticed (under the coatings, due to hydrogen, and intergranular loss of cohesion due to re-heating). It more particularly comments defects noticed on a Belgium power station reactor in Doel, defects due to hydrogen and some other defects noticed in the French reactor fleet. It presents the different types of control which are performed on vessel shells during operation

  18. Developmental Light-Water Reactor Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1989-12-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Developmental Light-Water Reactor (DLWR) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in FY 1989. It also includes (1) a brief description of the program, (2) definition of goals, (3) earlier achievements, and (4) proposed future activities

  19. Preliminary risk assessment of the Integral Inherently-Safe Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarroll, Kellen R.; Lee, John C.; Manera, Annalisa; Memmott, Matthew J.; Ferroni, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    The Integral, Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I 2 S-LWR) concept seeks to significantly increase nuclear power plant safety. The project implements a safety-by-design philosophy, eliminating several initiating events and providing novel, passive safety systems at the conceptual phase. Pursuit of unparalleled safety employs an integrated development process linking design with deterministic and probabilistic safety analyses. Unique aspects of the I 2 S-LWR concept and design process present challenges to the probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), particularly regarding overall flexibility, auditability and resolution of results. Useful approaches to initiating events and conditional failures are presented. To exemplify the risk-informed design process using PRA, a trade-off study of two safety system configurations is presented. Although further optimization is required, preliminary results indicate that the I 2 S-LWR can achieve a core damage frequency (CDF) from internal events less than 1.01 × 10 −8 /ry, including reactor vessel ruptures. Containment bypass frequency due to primary heat exchanger rupture is found to be comparable to non-vessel rupture CDF.

  20. SCDAP: a light water reactor computer code for severe core damage analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marino, G.P.; Allison, C.M.; Majumdar, D.

    1982-01-01

    Development of the first code version (MODO) of the Severe Core Damage Analysis Package (SCDAP) computer code is described, and calculations made with SCDAP/MODO are presented. The objective of this computer code development program is to develop a capability for analyzing severe disruption of a light water reactor core, including fuel and cladding liquefaction, flow, and freezing; fission product release; hydrogen generation; quenched-induced fragmentation; coolability of the resulting geometry; and ultimately vessel failure due to vessel-melt interaction. SCDAP will be used to identify the phenomena which control core behavior during a severe accident, to help quantify uncertainties in risk assessment analysis, and to support planning and evaluation of severe fuel damage experiments and data. SCDAP/MODO addresses the behavior of a single fuel bundle. Future versions will be developed with capabilities for core-wide and vessel-melt interaction analysis

  1. Materials surveillance program for C-E NSSS reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koziol, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    Irradiation surveillance programs for light water NSSS reactor vessels provide the means by which the utility can assess the extent of neutron-induced changes in the reactor vessel materials. These programs are conducted to verify, by direct measurement, the conservatism in the predicted radiation-induced changes and hence the operational parameters (i.e., heat-up, cooldown, and pressurization rates). In addition, such programs provide assurance that the scheduled adjustments in the operational parameters are made with ample margin for safe operation of the plant. During the past 3 years, several documents have been promulgated establishing the criteria for determining both the initial properties of the reactor vessel materials as well as measurement of changes in these initial properties as a result of irradiation. These documents, ASTM E-185-73, ''Recommended Practice for Surveillance Tests for Nuclear Reactor Vessels,'' and Appendix H to 10 CFR 50, ''Reactor Vessel Material Surveillance Program Requirements,'' are complementary to each other. They are the result of a change in the basic philosophy regarding the design and analysis of reactor vessels. In effect, the empirical ''transition temperature approach,'' which was used for design, was replaced by the ''analytical fracture mechanics approach.'' The implementation of this technique was described in Welding Research Council Bulletin 1975 and Appendix G to ASME Code Section III. Further definition of requirements appears in Appendix G to 10 CFR 50 published in July 1973. It is the intent of this paper to describe (1) a typical materials surveillance program for the reactor vessel of a Combustion Engineering NSSS, and (2) how the results of such programs, as well as experimental programs provide feed-back for improvement of materials to enhance their radiation resistance and thereby further improve the safety and reliability of future plants. (author)

  2. Utility requirements for advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machiels, A.; Gray, S.; Mulford, T.; Rodwell, E.

    1996-01-01

    The nuclear energy industry is actively engaged in developing advanced light water reactor (ALWR) designs for the next century. The new designs take advantage of the thousands of reactor-years of experience that have been accumulated by operating over 400 plants worldwide. The EPRI effort began in the early 1980's, when a survey of utility executives was conducted to determine their prerequisites for ordering nuclear power plants. The results were clear: new plants had to be simpler and safer, and have greater design margins, i.e., be more forgiving. The utility executives also supported making improvements to the established light water reactor technology, rather than trying to develop new reactor concepts. Finally, they wanted the option to build mid-size plants (∼600 MWe) in addition to full-size plants of more than 1200 MWe. 4 refs

  3. Investigation of flow stabilization in a compact reactor vessel of a FBR. Flow visualization in a reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Hiroyuki; Igarashi, Minoru; Kimura, Nobuyuki; Kamide, Hideki

    2002-01-01

    In the feasibility studies of Commercialized Fast Breeder Reactor Cycle System, a compact reactor vessel is considered from economical improvement point of a sodium cooled loop type fast reactor. The flow field was visualized by water experiment for a reactor vessel with 'a column type UIS (Upper Internal Structure)', which has a slit for fuel handling mechanism and is useful for a compact fast reactor. In this research, the 1/20 scale test equipment using water was made to understand coolant flow through a slit of a column type UIS' and fundamental behavior of reactor upper plenum flow. In the flow visualization tests, tracer particles were added in the water, and illuminated by the slit-shaped pulse laser. The flow visualization image was taken with a CCD camera. We obtained fluid velocity vectors from the visualization image using the Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). The results are as follows. 1. Most of coolant flow through a slit of 'column type UIS' arrived the dip plate directly. In the opposite side of a slit, most of coolant flowed toward reactor vessel wall before it arrived the dip plate. 2. The PIV was useful to measure the flow field in the reactor vessel. The obtained velocity field was consistent with the flow visualization result. 3. The jet through the UIS slit was dependent on the UIS geometry. There is a possibility to control the jet by the UIS geometry. (author)

  4. Development and investigation of the prestressed reinforced concrete vessels for the water cooled reactors in the FRG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medovikov, A.I.; Bogopol'skij, V.G.; Nikolaev, Yu.B.; Konevskij, V.N.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of calculation results for characteristics of stress-strained state of reactor vessel made of prestressed reinforced concrete is presented. Experimental data obtained during the investigation into a model of reactor vessel top cover are given. Thermal shielding system both for boiling water and pressurized-water reactors has been considered and its working capacity has been evaluated. An analysis of experimental data show correctness of the method assumed for calculation of the reactor top cover which permits to exactly determine its stressed-strained state as well as the nature of crack propagation in the vessel and the structure supporting power. Ceramics is suggested to be used as a heat-insulating material

  5. German Light-Water-Reactor Safety-Research Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seipel, H.G.; Lummerzheim, D.; Rittig, D.

    1977-01-01

    The Light-Water-Reactor Safety-Research Program, which is part of the energy program of the Federal Republic of Germany, is presented in this article. The program, for which the Federal Minister of Research and Technology of the Federal Republic of Germany is responsible, is subdivided into the following four main problem areas, which in turn are subdivided into projects: (1) improvement of the operational safety and reliability of systems and components (projects: quality assurance, component safety); (2) analysis of the consequences of accidents (projects: emergency core cooling, containment, external impacts, pressure-vessel failure, core meltdown); (3) analysis of radiation exposure during operation, accident, and decommissioning (project: fission-product transport and radiation exposure); and (4) analysis of the risk created by the operation of nuclear power plants (project: risk and reliability). Various problems, which are included in the above-mentioned projects, are concurrently studied within the Heiss-Dampf Reaktor experiments

  6. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Weaver, Kevan Dean

    2002-01-01

    The use of supercritical temperature and pressure light water as the coolant in a direct-cycle nuclear reactor offers potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to 46%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type recirculation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If a tight fuel rod lattice is adopted, it is possible to significantly reduce the neutron moderation and attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions. In this project a supercritical water reactor concept with a simple, blanket-free, pancake-shaped core will be developed. This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain the hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity.

  7. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production, 3rd Quarterly Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

    2002-06-01

    The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed.

  8. LIGHT WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, R.F.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1957-09-17

    A uranium fuel reactor designed to utilize light water as a moderator is described. The reactor core is in a tank at the bottom of a substantially cylindrical cross-section pit, the core being supported by an apertured grid member and comprised of hexagonal tubes each containing a pluralily of fuel rods held in a geometrical arrangement between end caps of the tubes. The end caps are apertured to permit passage of the coolant water through the tubes and the fuel elements are aluminum clad to prevent corrosion. The tubes are hexagonally arranged in the center of the tank providing an amulus between the core and tank wall which is filled with water to serve as a reflector. In use, the entire pit and tank are filled with water in which is circulated during operation by coming in at the bottom of the tank, passing upwardly through the grid member and fuel tubes and carried off near the top of the pit, thereby picking up the heat generated by the fuel elements during the fission thereof. With this particular design the light water coolant can also be used as the moderator when the uranium is enriched by fissionable isotope to an abundance of U/sup 235/ between 0.78% and 2%.

  9. Evaluation for In-Vessel Retention Capabilities with In-Vessel Injection and External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Seong; Ryu, In Chul; Moon, Young Tae

    2016-01-01

    If the accident has not progressed to the point of substantial changes in the core geometry, establishing adequate cooling is as straightforward as re-establishing flow through the reactor core. However, if the accident has progressed to the point where the core geometry is substantially altered as a result of material melting and relocation, as was the case in the TMI-2 accident, the means of cooling the debris are not as straightforward. From this time on, the reactor core was either completely or nearly covered by water, with high pressure injection flow initiated shortly after three hours into the accident. However, the core debris was not coolable in this configuration and a substantial quantity of molten core material drained into the bypass region, with approximately twenty metric tons of molten debris draining into the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head. Hence, the core configuration developed at approximately three hours into the accident was not coolable, even submerged in water. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate in-vessel retention capabilities with in-vessel injection (IVI) and external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) available in a reactor application by using the integrated severe accident analysis code. The MAAP5 models were improved to facilitate evaluation of the in-vessel retention capability of APR1400. In-vessel retention capabilities have been analyzed for the APR1400 using the MAAP5.03 code. The results show that in-vessel retention is feasible when in-vessel injection is initiated within a relatively short time frame under the simulation condition used in the present study

  10. Evaluation for In-Vessel Retention Capabilities with In-Vessel Injection and External Reactor Vessel Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Seong; Ryu, In Chul; Moon, Young Tae [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Co. Ltd., Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    If the accident has not progressed to the point of substantial changes in the core geometry, establishing adequate cooling is as straightforward as re-establishing flow through the reactor core. However, if the accident has progressed to the point where the core geometry is substantially altered as a result of material melting and relocation, as was the case in the TMI-2 accident, the means of cooling the debris are not as straightforward. From this time on, the reactor core was either completely or nearly covered by water, with high pressure injection flow initiated shortly after three hours into the accident. However, the core debris was not coolable in this configuration and a substantial quantity of molten core material drained into the bypass region, with approximately twenty metric tons of molten debris draining into the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head. Hence, the core configuration developed at approximately three hours into the accident was not coolable, even submerged in water. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate in-vessel retention capabilities with in-vessel injection (IVI) and external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) available in a reactor application by using the integrated severe accident analysis code. The MAAP5 models were improved to facilitate evaluation of the in-vessel retention capability of APR1400. In-vessel retention capabilities have been analyzed for the APR1400 using the MAAP5.03 code. The results show that in-vessel retention is feasible when in-vessel injection is initiated within a relatively short time frame under the simulation condition used in the present study.

  11. Core design concepts for high performance light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulenberg, T.; Starflinger, J.

    2007-01-01

    Light water reactors operated under supercritical pressure conditions have been selected as one of the promising future reactor concepts to be studied by the Generation IV International Forum. Whereas the steam cycle of such reactors can be derived from modern fossil fired power plants, the reactor itself, and in particular the reactor core, still need to be developed. Different core design concepts shall be described here to outline the strategy. A first option for near future applications is a pressurized water reactor with 380 .deg. C core exit temperature, having a closed primary loop and achieving 2% pts. higher net efficiency and 24% higher specific turbine power than latest pressurized water reactors. More efficiency and turbine power can be gained from core exit temperatures around 500 .deg. C, which require a multi step heat up process in the core with intermediate coolant mixing, achieving up to 44% net efficiency. The paper summarizes different core and assembly design approaches which have been studied recently for such High Performance Light Water Reactors

  12. Safety of light water reactors. Risks of nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veser, Anke; Schlueter, Franz-Hermann; Raskob, Wolfgang; Landman, Claudia; Paesler-Sauer, Juergen; Kessler, Guenter

    2012-01-01

    The book on the safety of light-water reactors includes the following chapters: Part I: Physical and technical safety concept of actual German and future European light-water reactors: (1) Worldwide operated nuclear power plants in 2011, (2) Some reactor physical fundamentals. (3) Nuclear power plants in Germany. (4) Radioactive exposure due to nuclear power plants. (5) Safety concept of light-water reactors. (6) Probabilistic analyses and risk studies. (7) Design of light-water reactors against external incidents. (8) Risk comparison of nuclear power plants and other energy systems. (9) Evaluation of risk studies using the improved (new) safety concept for LWR. (19) The severe reactor accidents of Three Mile Island, Chernobyl and Fukushima. Part II: Safety of German LWR in case of a postulated aircraft impact. (11) Literature. (12) Review of requirements and actual design. (13) Incident scenarios. (14) Load approach for aircraft impact. (15) Demonstration of the structural behavior in case of aircraft impact. (16) Special considerations. (17) Evaluation of the safety state of German and foreign nuclear power plants. Part III: ROSOS as example for a computer-based decision making support system for the severe accident management. (19) Literature. (20) Radiological fundamentals, accident management, modeling of the radiological situation. (21) The decision making support system RODOS. (22) RODOS and the Fukushima accident. (23) Recent developments in the radiological emergency management in the European frame.

  13. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual progress report, January 1996--June 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from January 1996 to June 1996. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels (SSs) used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS, and (c) EAC of Alloys 600 and 690. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic and austenitic SSs in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during various portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Slow-strain-rate-tensile tests were conducted in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water at 288 degrees C on SS specimens irradiated to a low fluence in the Halden reactor and the results were compared with similar data from a control-blade sheath and neutron-absorber tubes irradiated in BWRs to the same fluence level. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in air and high-purity, low-DO water. 83 refs., 60 figs., 14 tabs

  14. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual progress report, January 1996--June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E. [and others

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from January 1996 to June 1996. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels (SSs) used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS, and (c) EAC of Alloys 600 and 690. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic and austenitic SSs in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during various portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Slow-strain-rate-tensile tests were conducted in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water at 288{degrees}C on SS specimens irradiated to a low fluence in the Halden reactor and the results were compared with similar data from a control-blade sheath and neutron-absorber tubes irradiated in BWRs to the same fluence level. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in air and high-purity, low-DO water. 83 refs., 60 figs., 14 tabs.

  15. Evaluation of the integrity of reactor vessels designed to ASME Code, Sections I and/or VIII

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoge, K.G.

    1976-01-01

    A documented review of nuclear reactor pressure vessels designed to ASME Code, Sections I and/or VIII is made. The review is primarily concerned with the design specifications and quality assurance programs utilized for the reactor vessel construction and the status of power plant material surveillance programs, pressure-temperature operating limits, and inservice inspection programs. The following ten reactor vessels for light-water power reactors are covered in the report: Indian Point Unit No. 1, Dresden Unit No. 1, Yankee Rowe, Humboldt Bay Unit No. 3, Big Rock Point, San Onofre Unit No. 1, Connecticut Yankee, Oyster Creek, Nine Mile Point Unit No. 1, and La Crosse

  16. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual report July 1996 - December 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gavenda, D.J.

    1997-10-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from July 1996 to December 1996. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels (SSs) used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS, (c) EAC of Alloy 600, and (d) characterization of residual stresses in welds of boiling water reactor (BWR) core shrouds by numerical models. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic and austenitic SSs in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during various portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Slow-strain-rate-tensile tests were conducted in simulated BWR water at 288 C on SS specimens irradiated to a low fluence in the Halden reactor and the results were compared with similar data from a control-blade sheath and neutron-absorber tubes irradiated in BWRs to the same fluence level. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from a low-carbon content heat of Alloy 600 in high-purity oxygenated water at 289 C. Residual stresses and stress intensity factors were calculated for BWR core shroud welds

  17. Environmentally assisted cracking in light-water reactors: Semi-annual report, January - June 1997. Volume 24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E.

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from January 1997 to June 1997. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels (SSs) used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Types 304 and 304L SS, and (c) EAC of Alloys 600 and 690. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic and austenitic SSs in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during various portions of a tensile-loading cycle is equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Slow-strain-rate-tensile tests were conducted in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water at 288 C on SS specimens irradiated to a low fluence in the Halden reactor and the results were compared with similar data from a control-blade sheath and neutron-absorber tubes irradiated in BWRs to the same fluence level. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in low-DO, simulated pressurized water reactor environments

  18. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual report, October 1993--March 1994. Volume 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.; Erck, R.A.; Kassner, T.F.; Michaud, W.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Sanecki, J.E.; Shack, W.J.; Soppet, W.K.

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) during the six months from October 1993 to March 1994. EAC and fatigue of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in LWRs are important concerns in operating plants and as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of low-alloy steel used in piping, steam generators, and reactor pressure vessels, (b) EAC of wrought and cast austenitic stainless steels (SSs), and (c) radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence. Fatigue tests have been conducted on A302-Gr B low-alloy steel to verify whether the current predictions of modest decreases of fatigue life in simulated pressurized water reactor water are valid for high-sulfur heats that show environmentally enhanced fatigue crack growth rates. Additional crack growth data were obtained on fracture-mechanics specimens of austenitic SSs to investigate threshold stress intensity factors for EAC in high-purity oxygenated water at 289 degrees C. The data were compared with predictions based on crack growth correlations for wrought austenitic SS in oxygenated water developed at ANL and rates in air from Section XI of the ASME Code. Microchemical and microstructural changes in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath from operating boiling water reactors were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements, which are not specified in the ASTM specifications, may contribute to IASCC of solution-annealed materials

  19. The Effective Convectivity Model for Simulation and Analysis of Melt Pool Heat Transfer in a Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Lower Head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tran, Chi Thanh

    2009-09-01

    Severe accidents in a Light Water Reactor (LWR) have been a subject of intense research for the last three decades. The research in this area aims to reach understanding of the inherent physical phenomena and reduce the uncertainties in their quantification, with the ultimate goal of developing models that can be applied to safety analysis of nuclear reactors, and to evaluation of the proposed accident management schemes for mitigating the consequences of severe accidents. In a hypothetical severe accident there is likelihood that the core materials will be relocated to the lower plenum and form a decay-heated debris bed (debris cake) or a melt pool. Interactions of core debris or melt with the reactor structures depend to a large extent on the debris bed or melt pool thermal hydraulics. In case of inadequate cooling, the excessive heat would drive the structures' overheating and ablation, and hence govern the vessel failure mode and timing. In turn, threats to containment integrity associated with potential ex-vessel steam explosions and ex-vessel debris uncoolability depend on the composition, superheat, and amount of molten corium available for discharge upon the vessel failure. That is why predictions of transient melt pool heat transfer in the reactor lower head, subsequent vessel failure modes and melt characteristics upon the discharge are of paramount importance for plant safety assessment. The main purpose of the present study is to develop a method for reliable prediction of melt pool thermal hydraulics, namely to establish a computational platform for cost-effective, sufficiently-accurate numerical simulations and analyses of core Melt-Structure-Water Interactions in the LWR lower head during a postulated severe core-melting accident. To achieve the goal, an approach to efficient use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has been proposed to guide and support the development of models suitable for accident analysis. The CFD method, on the one hand, is

  20. Coupled thermo-mechanical creep analysis for boiling water reactor pressure vessel lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanueva, Walter; Tran, Chi-Thanh; Kudinov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We consider a severe accident in a BWR with melt pool formation in the lower head. ► We study the influence of pool depth on vessel failure mode with creep analysis. ► There are two modes of failure; ballooning of vessel bottom and a localized creep. ► External vessel cooling can suppress creep and subsequently prevent vessel failure. - Abstract: In this paper we consider a hypothetical severe accident in a Nordic-type boiling water reactor (BWR) at the stage of relocation of molten core materials to the lower head and subsequent debris bed and then melt pool formation. Nordic BWRs rely on reactor cavity flooding as a means for ex-vessel melt coolability and ultimate termination of the accident progression. However, different modes of vessel failure may result in different regimes of melt release from the vessel, which determine initial conditions for melt coolant interaction and eventually coolability of the debris bed. The goal of this study is to define if retention of decay-heated melt inside the reactor pressure vessel is possible and investigate modes of the vessel wall failure otherwise. The mode of failure is contingent upon the ultimate mechanical strength of the vessel structures under given mechanical and thermal loads and applied cooling measures. The influence of pool depth and respective transient thermal loads on the reactor vessel failure mode is studied with coupled thermo-mechanical creep analysis. Efficacy of control rod guide tube (CRGT) cooling and external vessel wall cooling as potential severe accident management measures is investigated. First, only CRGT cooling is considered in simulations revealing two different modes of vessel failure: (i) a ‘ballooning’ of the vessel bottom and (ii) a ‘localized creep’ concentrated within the vicinity of the top surface of the melt pool. Second, possibility of in-vessel retention with CRGT and external vessel cooling is investigated. We found that the external vessel

  1. Development of neutron irradiation embrittlement correlation of reactor pressure vessel materials of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soneda, Naoki; Dohi, Kenji; Nomoto, Akiyoshi; Nishida, Kenji; Ishino, Shiori

    2007-01-01

    A large amount of surveillance data of the RPV embrittlement of the Japanese light water reactors have been compiled since the current Japanese embrittlement correlation has been issued in 1991. Understanding on the mechanisms of the embrittlement has also been greatly improved based on both experimental and theoretical studies. CRIEPI and the Japanese electric power utilities have started research project to develop a new embrittlement correlation method, where extensive study of the microstructural analyses of the surveillance specimens irradiated in the Japanese commercial reactors has been conducted. The new findings obtained from the experimental study are that the formation of solute-atom clusters with little or no copper is responsible for the embrittlement in low-copper materials, and that the flux effect exists especially in high-copper materials and this is supported by the difference in the microstructure of the high-copper materials irradiated at different fluxes. Based on these new findings, a new embrittlement correlation method is formulated using rate equations. The new methods has higher prediction capability than the current Japanese embrittlement correlation in terms of smaller standard deviation as well as smaller mean value of the prediction error. (author)

  2. Research and development of the supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    The concept of high temperature reactor cooled by light water (SCR) has been developed at the University of Tokyo since 1989. Major elements of reactor conceptual design and safety were studied. It includes fuel rod design, core design of thermal and fast reactors, plant heat balance, safety design, accident and transient analysis, LOCA, PSA, plant control, start-up and stability. The big advantage of the SCR concept is that the temperatures of major components such as reactor pressure vessel, control rod drive mechanisms, containments, coolant pumps, main steam piping and turbines are within the temperatures of the components of LWR and supercritical FPP in spite of the high outlet coolant temperature. The experience of these components of LWR and supercritical fossil Fired Power Plants (FPP) will be fully utilized for SCR. Although the concept was developed at the University of Tokyo mostly with our own funds and resources, four funding was/is provided for the research in Japan so far. Those are TEPCO studies with Japanese vendors in 1994 and 1995. JSPS (Monbusho) funding of pulse radiolysis of supercritical water to the University of Tokyo, Japanese-NERI program of METI to Toshiba team on thermal hydraulics, corrosion and plant system and Japanese-NERI program of MEXT on water chemistry to the University of Tokyo. The concept was taken as the reference of HPLWR study in Europe with funding of EU in 2000 and 2001. The concept was evaluated in the Generation 4 reactor program in USA. It was selected as only one water-cooled Generation 4 reactor. This paper describes the overview of the conceptual design at the University of Tokyo and R and D in the world

  3. Nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharbaugh, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes an improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction comprising: (a) a nuclear reactor core having a bottom platform support structure; (b) a reactor vessel for holding a large pool of low pressure liquid metal coolant and housing the core; (c) a containment structure surrounding the reactor vessel and having a sidewall spaced outwardly from the reactor vessel side wall and having a base mat spaced below the reactor vessel bottom end wall; (d) a central small diameter post anchored to the containment structure base mat and extending upwardly to the reactor vessel to axially fix the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and provide a center column support for the lower end of the reactor core; (e) annular support structure disposed in the reactor vessel on the bottom end wall and extending about the lower end of the core; (f) structural support means disposed between the containment structure base mat and bottom end of the reactor vessel wall and cooperating for supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall on the containment structure base mat to allow the reactor vessel to expand radially but substantially prevent any lateral motions that might be imposed by the occurrence of a seismic event; (g) a bed of insulating material disposed between the containment structure base mat and the bottom end wall of the reactor vessel and uniformly supporting the reactor vessel at its bottom end wall; freely expand radially from the central post as it heats up while providing continuous support thereof; (h) a deck supported upon the wall of the containment vessel above the top open end of the reactor vessel; and (i) extendible and retractable coupling means extending between the deck and the top open end of the reactor vessel and flexibly and sealably interconnecting the reactor vessel at its top end to the deck

  4. Light-water reactor accident classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washburn, B.W.

    1980-02-01

    The evolution of existing classifications and definitions of light-water reactor accidents is considered. Licensing practice and licensing trends are examined with respect to terms of art such as Class 8 and Class 9 accidents. Interim definitions, consistent with current licensing practice and the regulations, are proposed for these terms of art

  5. A seismic performance and cost comparison of top and bottom supported liquid metal reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, T.M.; Kiciman, O.K.; Petrozelli, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    It is the premise of this paper that the revision of a pool LMR from a TSRV configuration to a specific bottom supported reactor vessel (BSRV) configuration can resolve the above TSRV disadvantages related to load path length and diversity, thereby improving seismic performance and simultaneously reducing RV block costs by reducing weights. This paper demonstrates this premise by comparing a reference TSRV block with a specific BSRV block design. Recent capital cost estimates ($/kWe) for U.S. liquid metal reactor (LMR) plant designs reveal that the balance of plant costs could be reduced below that of the balance of plant costs for a comparable light water reactor plant. However, in regions of high seismicity, non-seismically isolated LMR nuclear steam supply system weights are costs per kWe are two to three times the weights and costs of light water reactor nuclear steam supply systems. While all portions of the LMR nuclear steam supply system require examination for potential cost reductions, the focus of this paper is the reactor vessel (RV) block for a large pool plant

  6. Research and development of super light water reactors and super fast reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Y.; Morooka, S.; Yamakawa, M.; Ishiwatari, Y.; Ikejiri, S.; Katsumura, Y.; Muroya, Y.; Terai, T.; Sasaki, K.; Mori, H.; Hamamoto, Y.; Okumura, K.; Kugo, T.; Nakatsuka, T.; Ezato, K.; Akasaka, N.; Hotta, A.

    2011-01-01

    Super Light Water Reactors (Super LWR) and Super Fast Reactors (Super FR) are the supercritical- pressure light water cooled reactors (SCWR) that are developed by the research group of University of Tokyo since 1989 and now jointly under development with the researchers of Waseda University, University of Tokyo and other organizations in Japan. The principle of the reactor concept development, the results of the past Super LWR and Super FR R&D as well as the R&D program of the Super FR second phase project are described. (author)

  7. Some aspects of reactor pressure vessel integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korosec, D.; Vojvodic, G.J.

    1996-01-01

    Reactor pressure vessel of the pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant is the subject of extreme interest due to the fact that presents the pressure boundary of the reactor coolant system, which is under extreme thermal, mechanical and irradiation effects. Reactor pressure vessel by itself prevents the release of fission products to the environment. Design, construction and in-service inspection of such component is governed by strict ASME rules and other forms of administrative control. The reactor pressure vessel in nuclear power plant Kriko is designed and constructed in accordance with related ASME rules. The in-service inspection program includes all requests presented in ASME Code section XI. In the present article all major requests for the periodic inspections of reactor pressure vessel and fracture mechanics analysis are discussed. Detailed and strict fulfillment of all prescribed provisions guarantee the appropriate level of nuclear safety. (author)

  8. Head spray nozzle in reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Shun-ichi.

    1990-01-01

    In a reactor pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor, a head spray nozzle is used for cooling the head of the pressure vessel and, in view of the thermal stresses, it is desirable that cooling is applied as uniformly as possible. A conventional head spray is constituted by combining full cone type nozzles. Since the sprayed water is flown down upon water spraying and the sprayed water in the vertical direction is overlapped, the flow rate distribution has a high sharpness to form a shape as having a maximum value near the center and it is difficult to obtain a uniform flow rate distribution in the circumferential direction. Then, in the present invention, flat nozzles each having a spray water cross section of laterally long shape, having less sharpness in the circumferential distribution upon spraying water to the inner wall of the pressure vessel and having a wide angle of water spray are combined, to make the flow rate distribution of spray water uniform in the inner wall of the pressure vessel. Accordingly, the pressure vessel can be cooled uniformly and thermal stresses upon cooling can be decreased. (N.H.)

  9. The development of reactor vessel internal heavy forging for 1000 MW pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhifeng; Chen Yongbo; Ding Xiuping; Zhang Lingfang

    2012-01-01

    This Paper introduced the development of Reactor Vessel Internal (RVI) heavy forgings for 1000 MW Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant, analyzed the manufacture difficulties and technical countermeasures. The testing result of the product indicated that the performance of RVI heavy forgings manufactured by Shanghai Heavy Machinery Plant Ld. (SHMP) is outstanding and entirely satisfy the technical requirements for RVI product. (authors)

  10. Advanced light water reactors for the nineties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, F.A.; Sugnet, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    The EPRI/Industry advanced light water reactor (ALWR) program and the US Department of Energy ALWR program are closely coordinated to meet the common objective which is the availability of improved and simplified light water reactor plants that may be ordered in the next decade to meet new or replacement capacity requirements. The EPRI/Industry objectives, program participants, and foreign participants, utility requirements document, its organization and content, small plant conceptual design program, the DOE ALWR program, design verification program, General Electric ABWR design features, Combustion Engineering system design, mid-size plant development, General Electric SBWR objectives, Westinghouse/Burns and Roe design objectives, construction improvement, and improved instrumentation and control are discussed in the paper

  11. Elements of Design Consideration of Once-Through Cycle, Supercritical-Pressure Light Water Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshiaki Oka; Sei-ichi Koshizuka; Yuki Ishiwatari; Akifumi Yamaji

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes elements of design consideration of supercritical-pressure, light water cooled reactors as well as the status and prospects of the research and development. It summarizes the results of the conceptual design study at the University of Tokyo from 1989. The research and development started in Japan, Europe and USA. The major advantages of the reactors are 1. Compact reactor and turbines due to high specific enthalpy of supercritical water 2.Simple plant system because of the once-through coolant cycle 3.Use of the experience of LWR and fossil-fired power plants. The temperatures of the major components such as reactor pressure vessel, coolant pipes, pumps and turbines are within the experience, in spite of the high outlet coolant temperature. 4.Similarity to LWR safety design and criteria, but no burnout phenomenon 5.Potential cost reduction due to smaller material expenditure and short construction period 6.The smallest reactor not in power rating, but in plant sizes. 7.High-thermal efficiency and low coolant flow rate because of high enthalpy rise. 8.Water cooled reactors potentially free from SCC (stress corrosion cracking) problems. 9.Compatibility of tight-fuel-lattice fast reactor core due to small coolant flow rate, potentially easy shift to fast breeder reactor without changing coolant technology. 10.Potential of producing energy products such as hydrogen and high quality hydro carbons. (authors)

  12. Reactor water sampling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamaki, Kazuo.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns a reactor water sampling device for sampling reactor water in an in-core monitor (neutron measuring tube) housing in a BWR type reactor. The upper end portion of a drain pipe of the reactor water sampling device is attached detachably to an in-core monitor flange. A push-up rod is inserted in the drain pipe vertically movably. A sampling vessel and a vacuum pump are connected to the lower end of the drain pipe. A vacuum pump is operated to depressurize the inside of the device and move the push-up rod upwardly. Reactor water in the in-core monitor housing flows between the drain pipe and the push-up rod and flows into the sampling vessel. With such a constitution, reactor water in the in-core monitor housing can be sampled rapidly with neither opening the lid of the reactor pressure vessel nor being in contact with air. Accordingly, operator's exposure dose can be reduced. (I.N.)

  13. Evaluation and improvement in nondestructive examination (NDE) reliability for inservice inspection of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, S.R.; Deffenbaugh, J.D.; Good, M.S.; Green, E.R.; Heasler, P.G.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.

    1988-01-01

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the NRC to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to ASME Code and Regulatory requirements, based on material properties, service conditions and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other inspected components. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from October 1986 through September 1987. (author)

  14. Evaluation and improvement in nondestructive examination (NDE) reliability for inservice inspection of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, S.R.; Deffenbaugh, J.D.; Good, M.S.; Green, E.R.; Heasler, P.G.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.

    1988-01-01

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactor (NDE Reliability) program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the NRC to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to ASME Code and Regulatory requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other inspected components. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from October 1986 through September 1987

  15. Materials technologies of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begley, R.

    1984-01-01

    Satisfactory materials performance is a key element in achieving reliable operation of light water reactors. Outstanding performance under rigorous operational conditions has been exhibited by pressure boundary components, core internals, fuel cladding, and other critical components of these systems. Corrosion and stress corrosion phenomena have, however, had an impact on plant availability, most notably relating to pipe cracking in BWR systems and steam generator corrosion in PWR systems. These experiences have stimulated extensive development activities by the nuclear industry in improved NDE techniques, investigation of corrosion phenomena, as well as improved materials and repair processes. This paper reviews key materials performance aspects of light water reactors with particular emphasis on the progress which has been made in modeling of corrosion phenomena, control of the plant operating environment, advanced material development, and application of sophisticated repair procedures. Implementation of this technology provides the basis for improved plant availability

  16. Analysis of an accelerator-driven subcritical light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruijf, W.J.M. de; Wakker, P.H.; Wetering, T.F.H. van de; Verkooijen, A.H.M.

    1997-01-01

    An analysis of the basic characteristics of an accelerator-driven light water reactor has been made. The waste in the nuclear fuel cycle is considerably less than in the light water reactor open fuel cycle. This is mainly caused by the use of equilibrium nuclear fuel in the reactor. The accelerator enables the use of a fuel composition with infinite multiplication factor k ∞ < 1. The main problem of the use of this type of fuel is the strongly peaked flux distribution in the reactor core. A simple analytical model shows that a large core is needed with a high peak power factor in order to generate net electric energy. The fuel in the outer regions of the reactor core is used very poorly. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  17. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Chung, H.M.; Hicks, P.D.; Hins, A.G.; Park, J.Y.; Soppet, W.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in high water reactors during the six months from April 1991 through September 1991. Topics that have been investigated during this period include (1) fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of low-alloy steel used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels; (2) role of chromate and sulfate in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water on SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS; and (3) radiation-induced segregation (RIS) and irradiation-assisted SCC of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence. Fatigue data were obtained on medium-S-content A533-Gr B and A106-Gr B steels in high-purity (HP) deoxygenated water, in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) water, and in air. Crack-growth-rates (CGRs) of composite specimens of A533-Gr B/Inconel-182/Inconel-600 (plated with nickel) and homogeneous specimens of A533-Gr B were determined under small- amplitude cyclic loading in HP water with ∼ 300 ppb dissolved oxygen. CGR tests on sensitized Type 304 SS indicate that low chromate concentrations in BWR water (25--35 ppb) may actually have a beneficial effect on SCC if the sulfate concentration is below a critical level. Microchemical and microstructural changes in HP and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and slow-strain,rate- tensile tests were conducts on tubular specimens in air and in simulated BWR water at 289 degrees C

  18. Light-water reactor research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-05-01

    This report on the national program of research and development on light water reactors is the second of two reports requested in 1982 by W. Kenneth Davis, Deputy Secretary of the Department of Energy. A first report, published in September 1983, treated the needs for safety-related R and D. In this second report, the Energy Research Advisory Board finds that, although many light water reactors are providing reliable and economic electricity, it appears unlikely that U.S. utilities will order additional reactors until the currently unacceptable economic risk, created by the regulatory climate and uncertain demand, is reduced. Thus it is unlikely that the private sector alone will fund major LWR design improvements. However, nuclear power will continue on its current course of expansion overseas. DOE participation is vitally needed to support the national interest in LWR technology. The report outlines R and D needs for a program to improve the safety, reliability, and economics of the present generation of plants; to develop evolutionary improved designs to be ready when needed; and to explore innovative longer-term concepts for deployment after the year 2000. The respective roles of government and the private sector are discussed

  19. Supercritical-pressure, once-through cycle light water cooled reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop new reactor concepts for the innovation of light water reactors (LWR) and fast reactors. Concept of the once-through coolant cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor was developed. Major aspects of reactor design and safety were analysed by the computer codes which were developed by ourselves. It includes core design of thermal and fast reactors, plant system, safety criteria, accident and transient analysis, LOCA, PSA, plant control, start up and stability. High enthalpy rise as supercritical boiler was achieved by evaluating the cladding temperature directly during transients. Fundamental safety principle of the reactor is monitoring coolant flow rate instead of water level of LWR. The reactor system is compact and simple because of high specific enthalpy of supercritical water and the once-through cycle. The major components are similar to those of LWR and supercritical thermal plant. Their temperature are within the experiences in spite of the high outlet coolant temperature. The reactor is compatible with tight fuel lattice fast reactor because of the high head pumps and low coolant flow rate. The power rating of the fast reactor is higher than the that of thermal reactor because of the high power density. (author)

  20. Radiation embrittlement of Spanish nuclear reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bros, J.; Ballesteros, A.; Lopez, A.

    1993-01-01

    Commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plants contain a series of pressure vessel steel surveillance capsules as the principal means of monitoring radiation effects on the pressure vessel. Changes in fracture toughness are more severe in surveillance capsules than in reactor vessel materials because of their proximity of the reactor core. Therefore, it is possible to predict changes in fracture toughness of the reactor vessel materials. This paper describes the status of the reactor vessel surveillance program relating to Spanish nuclear power plants. To date, twelve capsules have been removed and analyzed from seven of the nine Spanish reactors in operation. The results obtained from the analysis of these capsules are compared with the predictions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.99, Rev. 2, by means of measured and expected increase of the nil-ductility transition reference temperature (RT NDT ). The comparison is made considering the different variables normally included in the studies of radiation response of reactor pressure vessel materials, such as copper content of steel, level of neutron fluence above 1 MeV, base metal or weld metal, and so forth. The surveillance data have been used for determining the adjusted reference temperatures and upper shelf energies at any time. The results have shown that the seven pressure vessels are in excellent condition to continue operating with safety against brittle fracture beyond the design life, without the need to recuperate the degraded properties of the materials by annealing of the vessel

  1. Method and device for forecasting remaining lifetime for material constituting light water reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anzai, Hideya; Nakada, Kiyotomo; Shimanuki, Sei; Kida, Toshitaka; Fuse, Motomasa; Shigenaka, Naoto; Kuniya, Jiro; Izumiya, Masakiyo; Hattori, Shigeo; Saito, Takashi.

    1994-01-01

    A pressure vessel of a light water type reactor comprises a crack development sensor at the inside and a crack development monitor at the outside to monitor the development of cracks detected by the crack progress sensor. In addition, the reactor also comprises, at the outside thereof, a dissolved oxygen meter, a dissolved hydrogen peroxide meter and a conductivity meter for reactor water. A computer is connected, on line, to the crack development monitor, the dissolved oxygen meter, the dissolved hydrogen peroxide meter and the conductivity meter. A crack development rate measured by the crack development monitor, as well as the dissolved oxygen concentration, the dissolved peroxide hydrogen concentration and the conductivity of reactor water measured at the outside of the reactor by the dissolved oxygen meter, the dissolved hydrogen peroxide meter and the conductivity meter are inputted to the computer. The computer calculates the effective dissolved oxygen concentration for each portion of the plant based on these measured values. Further, the period of time till the crack reaches a predetermined limit value is calculated based on the measured values. Then, the period of time is displayed as a remaining life time of the materials due to stress corrosion crackings. (I.N.)

  2. Reactor Vessel and Reactor Vessel Internals Segmentation at Zion Nuclear Power Station - 13230

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, Conrad; Spann, Holger [Siempelkamp Nuclear Services: 5229 Sunset Blvd., (Suite M), West Columbia, SC, 29169 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Zion Nuclear Power Station (ZNPS) is a dual-unit Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant located on the Lake Michigan shoreline, in the city of Zion, Illinois approximately 64 km (40 miles) north of Chicago, Illinois and 67 km (42 miles) south of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Each PWR is of the Westinghouse design and had a generation capacity of 1040 MW. Exelon Corporation operated both reactors with the first unit starting production of power in 1973 and the second unit coming on line in 1974. The operation of both reactors ceased in 1996/1997. In 2010 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved the transfer of Exelon Corporation's license to ZionSolutions, the Long Term Stewardship subsidiary of EnergySolutions responsible for the decommissioning of ZNPS. In October 2010, ZionSolutions awarded Siempelkamp Nuclear Services, Inc. (SNS) the contract to plan, segment, remove, and package both reactor vessels and their respective internals. This presentation discusses the tools employed by SNS to remove and segment the Reactor Vessel Internals (RVI) and Reactor Vessels (RV) and conveys the recent progress. SNS's mechanical segmentation tooling includes the C-HORCE (Circumferential Hydraulically Operated Cutting Equipment), BMT (Bolt Milling Tool), FaST (Former Attachment Severing Tool) and the VRS (Volume Reduction Station). Thermal segmentation of the reactor vessels will be accomplished using an Oxygen- Propane cutting system. The tools for internals segmentation were designed by SNS using their experience from other successful reactor and large component decommissioning and demolition (D and D) projects in the US. All of the designs allow for the mechanical segmentation of the internals remotely in the water-filled reactor cavities. The C-HORCE is designed to saw seven circumferential cuts through the Core Barrel and Thermal Shield walls with individual thicknesses up to 100 mm (4 inches). The BMT is designed to remove the bolts that fasten the Baffle

  3. Light water reactor safeguards system evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varnado, G.B.; Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Bennett, H.A.; Hulme, B.L.; Daniel, S.L.

    1978-01-01

    A methodology for assessing the effectiveness of safeguards systems was developed in this study and was applied to a typical light water reactor plant. The relative importance of detection systems, barriers, response forces and other safeguards system components was examined in extensive parameter variation studies. (author)

  4. The reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilous, W.; Hajewska, E.; Szteke, W.; Przyborska, M.; Wasiak, J.; Wieczorkowski, M.

    2005-01-01

    In the paper the fundamental steels using in the construction of pressure vessel water reactor are discussed. The properties of these steels as well as the influence of neutron irradiation on its degradation in the time of exploitation are also done. (authors)

  5. Proposal for Dual Pressurized Light Water Reactor Unit Producing 2000 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Kyoung Min; Noh, Sang Woo; Suh, Kune Yull

    2009-01-01

    The Dual Unit Optimizer 2000 MWe (DUO2000) is put forward as a new design concept for large power nuclear plants to cope with economic and safety challenges facing the 21 st century green and sustainable energy industry. DUO2000 is home to two nuclear steam supply systems (NSSSs) of the Optimized Power Reactor 1000 MWe (OPR1000)-like pressurized water reactor (PWR) in single containment so as to double the capacity of the plant. The idea behind DUO may as well be extended to combining any number of NSSSs of PWRs or pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs), or even boiling water reactors (BWRs). Once proven in water reactors, the technology may even be expanded to gas cooled, liquid metal cooled, and molten salt cooled reactors. With its in-vessel retention external reactor vessel cooling (IVR-ERVC) as severe accident management strategy, DUO can not only put the single most querulous PWR safety issue to an end, but also pave the way to very promising large power capacity while dispensing with the huge redesigning cost for Generation III+ nuclear systems. Five prototypes are presented for the DUO2000, and their respective advantages and drawbacks are considered. The strengths include, but are not necessarily limited to, reducing the cost of construction by decreasing the number of containment buildings from two to one, minimizing the cost of NSSS and control systems by sharing between the dual units, and lessening the maintenance cost by uniting the NSSS, just to name the few. The latent threats are discussed as well

  6. Mechanical design of a light water breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauth, W.L. Jr.; Jones, D.S.; Kolsun, G.J.; Erbes, J.G.; Brennan, J.J.; Weissburg, J.A.; Sharbaugh, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    In a light water reactor system using the thorium-232--uranium-233 fuel system in a seed-blanket modular core configuration having the modules arranged in a symmetrical array surrounded by a reflector blanket region, the seed regions are disposed for a longitudinal movement between the fixed or stationary blanket region which surrounds each seed region. Control of the reactor is obtained by moving the inner seed region thus changing the geometry of the reactor, and thereby changing the leakage of neutrons from the relatively small seed region into the blanket region. The mechanical design of the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core includes means for axially positioning of movable fuel assemblies to achieve the neutron economy required of a breeder reactor, a structure necessary to adequately support the fuel modules without imposing penalties on the breeding capability, a structure necessary to support fuel rods in a closely packed array and a structure necessary to direct and control the flow of coolant to regions in the core in accordance with the heat transfer requirements. 4 claims, 24 drawing figures

  7. Flooding of a large, passive, pressure-tube light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejzlar, P.; Todreas, N.E.; Driscoll, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    A reactor concept has been developed which can survive loss of coolant accidents without scram and without replenishing primary coolant inventory, while maintaining safe temperature limits on the fuel and pressure tubes. The proposed concept is a pressure tube type reactor of similar design to CANDU reactors, but differing in three key aspects. First, a solid SiC-coated graphite fuel matrix is used in place of fuel pin bundles to enable the dissipation of decay heat from the fuel in the absence of primary coolant. Second, the heavy water coolant in the pressure tubes is replaced by light water, which also serves as the moderator. Finally, the calandria tank, surrounded by a graphite reflector, contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator, and this normally-voided calandria is connected to a light water heat sink. The cover gas displaces the light water from the calandria during normal operation, while during loss of coolant or loss of heat sink accidents it allows passive calandria flooding. Calandria flooding also provides redundant and diverse reactor shutdown. This paper describes the thermal hydraulic characteristics of the passively initiated, gravity driven calandria flooding process. Flooding the calandria space with light water is a unique and very important feature of the proposed pressure-tube light water reactor (PTLWR) concept. The flooding of the top row of fuel channels must be accomplished fast enough so that in the total loss of coolant, none of the critical components of the fuel channel, i.e. the pressure tube, the calandria tube, the matrix and the fuel, exceed their design limits. The flooding process has been modeled and shown to be rapid enough to maintain all components within their design limits. (orig.)

  8. OECD - HRP Summer School on Light Water Reactor Structural Materials. August 26th - 30th, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on Light Water Reactor Structural Materials in the period August 26 - 30, 2002. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with materials-related subjects and issues without being experts. It is especially hoped that the summer school served to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear. Experts from Halden Project member organisations were solicited for the following programme: (1) Overview of The Nuclear Community and Current Issues, (2) Regulatory Framework for Ensuring Structural Integrity, (3) Non-Destructive Testing for Detection of Cracks, (4) Part I - Basics of Radiation and Radiation Damage, (5) Part II - Radiation Effects on Reactor Internal Materials, (6) Water Chemistry and Radiolysis Effects in LWRs, (7) PWR and Fast Breeder Reactor Internals, (8) PWR and Fast Breeder Reactor Internals, (9) Secondary Side Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubes, (10) BWR Materials and Their Interaction with the Environment, (11) Radiation Damage in Reactor Pressure Vessels.

  9. OECD - HRP Summer School on Light Water Reactor Structural Materials. August 26th - 30th, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on Light Water Reactor Structural Materials in the period August 26 - 30, 2002. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with materials-related subjects and issues without being experts. It is especially hoped that the summer school served to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear. Experts from Halden Project member organisations were solicited for the following programme: (1) Overview of The Nuclear Community and Current Issues, (2) Regulatory Framework for Ensuring Structural Integrity, (3) Non-Destructive Testing for Detection of Cracks, (4) Part I - Basics of Radiation and Radiation Damage, (5) Part II - Radiation Effects on Reactor Internal Materials, (6) Water Chemistry and Radiolysis Effects in LWRs, (7) PWR and Fast Breeder Reactor Internals, (8) PWR and Fast Breeder Reactor Internals, (9) Secondary Side Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubes, (10) BWR Materials and Their Interaction with the Environment, (11) Radiation Damage in Reactor Pressure Vessels

  10. Improved nuclear reactor construction with bottom supported reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharbaugh, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    An improved liquid metal nuclear reactor construction has a reactor core and a generally cylindrical reactor vessel for holding liquid metal coolant and housing the core within the pool. A generally cylindrical concrete containment structure surrounds the reactor vessel and a central support pedestal is anchored to the containment structure base mat and supports the bottom wall of the reactor vessel and the reactor core. The periphery of the reactor vessel bore is supported by an annular structure which allows thermal expansion but not seismic motion of the vessel, and a bed of thermally insulating material uniformly supports the vessel base whilst allowing expansion thereof. A guard ring prevents lateral seismic motion of the upper end of the reactor vessel. The periphery of the core is supported by an annular structure supported by the vessel base and keyed to the vessel wall so as to be able to expand but not undergo seismic motion. A deck is supported on the containment structure above the reactor vessel open top by annular bellows, the deck carrying the reactor control rods such that heating of the reactor vessel results in upward expansion against the control rods. (author)

  11. In-vessel Retention Strategy for High Power Reactors - K-INERI Final Report (includes SBLB Test Results for Task 3 on External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) Boiling Data and CHF Enhancement Correlations)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. B. Cheung; J. Yang; M. B. Dizon; J. Rempe

    2005-01-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for some advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). If there were inadequate cooling during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. If it is possible to ensure that the vessel head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel, the enhanced safety associated with these plants can reduce concerns about containment failure and associated risk. For example, the enhanced safety of the Westinghouse Advanced 600 MWe PWR (AP600), which relied upon External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) for IVR, resulted in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) approving the design without requiring certain conventional features common to existing LWRs. However, it is not clear that currently proposed external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) without additional enhancements could provide sufficient heat removal for higher-power reactors (up to 1500 MWe). Hence, a collaborative, three-year, U.S. - Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) project was completed in which the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Seoul National University (SNU), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) investigated the performance of ERVC and an in-vessel core catcher (IVCC) to determine if IVR is feasible for reactors up to 1500 MWe.

  12. FFTF and CRBRP reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactor vessel and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) reactor vessel each serve to enclose a fast spectrum reactor core, contain the sodium coolant, and provide support and positioning for the closure head and internal structure. Each vessel is located in its reactor cavity and is protected by a guard vessel which would ensure continued decay heat removal capability should a major system leak develop. Although the two plants have significantly different thermal power ratings, 400 megawatts for FFTF and 975 megawatts for CRBRP, the two reactor vessels are comparable in size, the CRBRP vessel being approximately 28% longer than the FFTF vessel. The FFTF vessel diameter was controlled by the space required for the three individual In-Vessel Handling Machines and Instrument Trees. Utilization of the triple rotating plug scheme for CRBRP refueling enables packaging of the larger CRBRP core in a vessel the same diameter as the FFTF vessel

  13. IRIS - Generation IV Advanced Light Water Reactor for Countries with Small and Medium Electricity Grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carelli, M. D.

    2002-01-01

    An international consortium of industry, laboratory, university and utility establishments, led by Westinghouse, is developing a Generation IV Reactor, International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS). IRIS is a modular, integral, light water cooled, low-to-medium power (100-350 MWe) reactor which addresses the requirements defined by the US DOE for Generation IV reactors, i.e., fuel cycle sustainability, enhanced reliability and safety, and improved economics. It features innovative, advanced engineering, but it does not require new technology development since it relies on the proven technology of light water reactors. This paper presents the current reference IRIS design, which features a 1000 MWt thermal core with proven 5%-enriched uranium oxide fuel and four-year long straight burn fuel cycle, integral reactor vessel housing helical tube steam generators and immersed spool pumps. Other major contributors to the high level of safety and economic attractiveness are the safety by design and optimized maintenance approaches, which allow elimination of some classes of accidents, lower capital cost, long operating cycle, and high capacity factors. The path forward for possible future extension to a eight-year cycle will be also discussed. IRIS has a large potential worldwide market because of its proven technology, modularity, low financing, compatibility with existing grids and very limited infrastructure requirements. It is especially appealing to developing countries because of ease of operation and because its medium power is more adaptable to smaller grids. (author)

  14. Current status of light water reactor and Hitachi's technical improvements for BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miki, Minoru; Ohki, Arahiko.

    1984-01-01

    Gradual technical improvements in Japan over the years has improved the reliability of light water reactors, and has achieved the highest capacity factor level in the world. Commercial operation of Fukushima 2-2 (1,100 MW) of the Tokyo Electric Power Co. was started in February, 1984, as the first standardized BWR base plant, ushering in a new age of domestic light water reactor technology. The ABWR (1,300 MW class) has been developed as Japan's next generation light water reactor, with construction aimed at the latter half of the 1980's. Hitachi's extensive efforts range from key nuclear equipment to various related robots, directed at improving safety, reliability, and the capacity factor, while reducing radiation exposure. This paper presents an outline of Hitachi's participation in the light water reactor's improvement and standardization, and the current status of our role in the international cooperation plan for the ABWR. (author)

  15. High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor steam-cycle/cogeneration lead plant reactor vessel: system design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The Reactor Vessel System contains the primary coolant inventory within a gas-tight pressure boundary, and provides the necessary flow paths and overpressure protection for this pressure boundary. The Reactor Vessel System also houses the components of the Reactor System, the Heat Transport System, and the Auxiliary Heat Removal System. The scope of the Reactor Vessel System includes the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) structure with its reinforcing steel and prestressing components; liners, penetrations, closures, and cooling water tubes attached to the concrete side of the liner; the thermal barrier (insulation) on the primary coolant side of the liner; instrumentation for structural monitoring; and a pressure relief system. Specifications are presented

  16. Evaluation and improvement in nondestructive examination (NDE) reliability for inservice inspection of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, S.R.; Andersen, E.S.; Bowey, R.E.; Diaz, A.A.; Good, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Hockey, R.L.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.; Vo, T.V.

    1991-01-01

    This program is intended to establish the effectiveness, reliability and adequacy of inservice inspection of reactor pressure vessels and primary piping systems and the impact of ISI reliability on system integrity. The objectives of the program include: (a) determine the effectiveness and reliability of ultrasonic inservice inspection (ISI) performed on commercial, light water reactor pressure vessels and piping; (b) recommend Code changes to the inspection procedures to improve the reliability of ISI; (c) using fracture mechanics analysis, determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety and determine the level of inspection reliability required to assure a suitably low failure probability; (d) evaluate the degree of reliability improvement which could be achieved using improved NDE techniques; and (e) based on importance of component to safety, material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties, formulate improved inservice inspection criteria (including sampling plan, frequency, and reliability of inspection) for revisions to ASME Section XI and regulatory requirements needed to assure suitably low failure probabilities

  17. Water level monitoring device in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Kiyohide; Otake, Tomohiro.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To monitor the water level in a pressure vessel of BWR type nuclear reactors at high accuracy by improving the compensation functions. Constitution: In the conventional water level monitor in a nuclear reactor, if the pressure vessel is displaced by the change of the pressure in the reactor or the temperature of the reactor water, the relative level of the reference water head in a condensation vessel is changed to cause deviation between the actual water level and the indicated water level to reduce the monitoring accuracy. According to the invention, means for detecting the position of the reference water head and means for detection the position in the condensation vessel are disposed to the pressure vessel. Then, relative positional change between the condensation vessel and the reference water head is calculated based on detection sinals from both of the means. The water level is compensated and calculated by water level calculation means based on the relative positional change, water level signals from the level gage and the pressure signals from the pressure gage. As a result, if the pressure vessel is displaced due to the change of the temperature or pressure, it is possible to measure the reactor water level accurately thereby remakably improve the reliability for the water level control in the nuclear reactor. (Horiuchi, T.)

  18. Comparison of rate theory based modeling calculations with the surveillance test results of Korean light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gyeong Geun; Lee, Yong Bok; Kim, Min Chul; Kwon, Junh Yun

    2012-01-01

    Neutron irradiation to reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels causes a decrease in fracture toughness and an increase in yield strength while in service. It is generally accepted that the growth of point defect cluster (PDC) and copper rich precipitate (CRP) affects radiation hardening of RPV steels. A number of models have been proposed to account for the embrittlement of RPV steels. The rate theory based modeling mathematically described the evolution of radiation induced microstructures of ferritic steels under neutron irradiation. In this work, we compared the rate theory based modeling calculation with the surveillance test results of Korean Light Water Reactors (LWRs)

  19. NEPTUNE: a modular system for light-water reactor calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchard, J.; Kanevoky, A.; Reuss, P.

    1975-01-01

    A complete modular system of light water reactor calculations has been designed. It includes basic nuclear data processing, the APOLLO phase: transport calculations for cells, multicells, fuel assemblies or reactors, the NEPTUNE phase: reactor calculations. A fuel management module, devoted to the automatic determination of the best shuffling strategy is included in NEPTUNE [fr

  20. Penn State advanced light water reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, J.A.; Smith, K.A.; Edwards, R.M.; Robinson, G.E.; Schultz, M.A.; Klevans, E.H.

    1987-01-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island heightened concerns over the safety of nuclear power. In response to these concerns, a research group at the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) undertook the conceptual design of an advanced light water reactor (ALWR) under sponsorship of the US Dept. of Energy (DOE). The design builds on the literally hundreds of years worth of experience with light water reactor technology. The concept is a reconfigured pressurized water reactor (PWR) with the capability of being shut down to a safe condition simply by removing all ac power, both off-site and on-site. Using additional passively activated heat sinks and replacing the pressurizer with a pressurizing pump system, the concept essentially eliminates the concerns of core damage associated with a total station blackout. Evaluation of the Penn State ALWR concept has been conducted using the EPRI Modular Modeling System (MMS). Results show that a superior response to normal operating transients can be achieved in comparison to the response with a conventional PWR pressurizer. The DOE-sponsored Penn State ALWR concept has evolved into a significant reconfiguration of a PWR leading to enhanced safety characteristics. The reconfiguration has touched a number of areas in overall plant design including a shutdown turbine in the secondary system, additional passively activated heat sinks, a unique primary side pressurizing concept, a low pressure cleanup system, reactor building layout, and a low power density core design

  1. Facilitation of decommissioning light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, E.B. Jr.

    1979-12-01

    Information on design features, special equipment, and construction methods useful in the facilitation of decommissioning light water reactors is presented. A wide range of facilitation methods - from improved documentation to special decommissioning tools and techniques - is discussed. In addition, estimates of capital costs, cost savings, and radiation dose reduction associated with these facilitation methods are given

  2. Pressure vessel for a BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Yoshiharu.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent the retention of low temperature water and also prevent the thermal fatigue of the pressure vessel by making large the curvature radius of a pressure vessel of a feed water sparger fitting portion and accelerating the mixing of low-temperature water at the feed water sparger base and in-pile hot water. Constitution: The curvature radius of the corner of the feed water sparger fitting portion in a pressure vessel is formed largely. In-pile circulating water infiltrates up to the base portion of the feed water sparger to carry outside low-temperature water at the base part, which is mixed with in-pile hot water. Accordingly, low temperature water does not stay at the base portion of the feed water sparger and generation of thermal fatigue in the pressure vessel can be prevented and the safety of the BWR type reactor can be improved. (Yoshino, Y.)

  3. US Advanced Light Water Reactor Program; overall objective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klug, N.

    1989-01-01

    The overall objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) program is to perform coordinated programs of the nuclear industry and DOE to insure the availability of licensed, improved, and simplified light water reactor standard plant designs that may be ordered in the 1990's to help meet the US electrical power demand. The discussion includes plans to meet program objectives and the design certification program. DOE is currently supporting the development of conceptual designs, configurations, arrangements, construction methods/plans, and proof test key design features for the General Electric ASBWR and the Westinghouse AP600. Key features of each are summarized. Principal milestones related to licensing of large standard plants, simplified mid-size plant development, and plant lifetime improvement are noted

  4. Reactor vessel nozzle cracks: a photoelastic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    A method consisting of a marriage between the ''frozen stress'' photoelastic approach and the local stress field equations of linear elastic fracture mechanics for estimating stress intensity factor distributions in three dimensional, finite cracked body problems is reviewed and extensions of the method are indicated. The method is then applied to the nuclear reactor vessel nozzle corner crack problem for both Intermediate Test Vessel and Boiling Water Reactor geometries. Results are compared with those of other investigators. 35 refs

  5. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual report, April 1994--September 1994, Volume 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gavenda, D.J.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from April to September 1994. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in piping and reactor pressure vessels, (b) EAC of austenitic stainless steels (SSs) and Alloy 600, and (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests have been conducted on A106-Gr B and A533-Gr B steels in oxygenated water to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Crack growth data were obtained on fracture-mechanics specimens of SSs and Alloy 600 to investigate EAC in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor environments at 289 degrees C. The data were compared with predictions from crack growth correlations developed at ANL for SSs in water and from rates in air from Section XI of the ASME Code. Microchemical changes in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath from operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials

  6. Stress analyses for reactor pressure vessels by the example of a product line '69 boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mkrtchyan, Lilit; Schau, Henry; Wolf, Werner; Holzer, Wieland; Wernicke, Robert; Trieglaff, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    The reactor pressure vessels (RPV) of boiling water reactors (BWR) belonging to the product line '69 have unusually designed heads. The spherical cap-shaped bottom head of the vessel is welded directly to the support flange of the lower shell course. This unusual construction has led repeatedly to controversial discussions concerning the limits and admissibility of stress intensities arising in the junction of the bottom head to the cylindrical shell. In the present paper, stress analyses for the design conditions are performed with the finite element method in order to determine and categorize the occurring stresses. The procedure of stress classification in accordance with the guidelines of German KTA 3201.2 and Section III of the ASME Code (Subsection NB) is described and subsequently demonstrated by the example of a typical BWR vessel. The accomplished investigations yield allowable stress intensities in the considered area. Additionally, limit load analyses are carried out to verify the obtained results. Complementary studies, performed for a torispherical head, prove that the determined maximum peak stresses in the junction between the bottom head and the cylindrical shell are not unusual also for pressure vessels with regular bottom head constructions. (orig.)

  7. Pressurized water reactor with a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werres, L.

    1979-01-01

    The core barrel is suspended from a flange by means of a grid. The coolant enters the barrel from below through the grid. In order to get a uniform flow over the reactor core there is provided for a guiding device below the grid. It consists of a cylindrical shell with borings uniformly distributed around the shell as well as fins on the inner surface of the shell and slots at the bottom facing the pressure vessel. (GL) [de

  8. Effectiveness of External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) strategy for APR1400 and issues of phenomenological uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, S.J.; Kim, H.T.

    2007-01-01

    The APR1400(Advanced Power Reactor 1400) is an evolutionary advanced light water reactor with rated thermal power of 4000 MWt. For APR1400, External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) is adopted as a primary severe accident management strategy for in-vessel retention (IVR) of corium. The ERVC is a method of IVR by submerging the reactor vessel exterior. At the early stage of the APR1400 design, only ex-vessel cooling, cooling of the core melt outside the vessel after vessel is breached, is considered based on the EPRI Utility Requirement Document for Evolutionary LWR. However, based on the progress in implementation of Severe Accident Management Guidance (SAMG) for operating plants, as well as the research findings related to ERVC, ERVC strategy is adopted as a part of key severe accident management strategies. To improve its success, the strategy is reviewed and we implemented necessary design arrangement to increase its usefulness in managing the severe accident. In this paper, we examine the evolution of ERVC concept and its implementation in APR1400. Then, we review possible approach, including Risk-Oriented Accident Analysis Methodology (ROAAM), to evaluate the effectiveness of the strategy. (authors)

  9. A GASFLOW analysis of a steam explosion accident in a typical light-water reactor confinement building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, J.R.; Wilson, T.L.; Spore, J.W.; Lam, K.L.; Rao, D.V.

    1994-01-01

    Steam over-pressurization resulting from ex-vessel steam explosion (fuel-coolant interaction) may pose a serious challenge to the integrity of a typical light-water reactor confinement building. If the steam generation rate exceeds the removal capacity of the Airborne Activity Confinement System, confinement overpressurization occurs. Thus, there is a large potential for an uncontrolled and unfiltered release of fission products from the confinement atmosphere to the environment at the time of the steam explosion. The GASFLOW computer code was used to analyze the effects of a hypothetical steam explosion and the transport of steam and hydrogen throughout a typical light-water reactor confinement building. The effects of rapid pressurization and the resulting forces on the internal structures and the heat exchanger service bay hatch covers were calculated. Pressurization of the ventilation system and the potential damage to the ventilation fans and high-efficiency particulate air filters were assessed. Because of buoyancy forces and the calculated confinement velocity field, the hydrogen diffuses and mixes in the confinement atmosphere but tends to be transported to its upper region. (author). 2 refs., 14 figs

  10. A GASFLOW analysis of a steam explosion accident in a typical light-water reactor confinement building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travis, J.R.; Wilson, T.L.; Spore, J.W.; Lam, K.L.; Rao, D.V.

    1994-01-01

    Steam over-pressurization resulting from ex-vessel steam explosion (fuel-coolant interaction) may pose a serious challenge to the integrity of a typical light-water reactor confinement building. If the steam generation rate exceeds the removal capacity of the Airborne Activity Confinement System, confinement over pressurization occurs. Thus, there is a large potential for an uncontrolled and unfiltered release of fission products from the confinement atmosphere to the environment at the time of the steam explosion. The GASFLOW computer code was used to analyze the effects of a hypothetical steam explosion and the transport of steam and hydrogen throughout a typical light-water reactor confinement building. The effects of rapid pressurization and the resulting forces on the internal structures and the heat exchanger service bay hatch covers were calculated. Pressurization of the ventilation system and the potential damage to the ventilation fans and high-efficiency particulate air filters were assessed. Because of buoyancy forces and the calculated confinement velocity field, the hydrogen diffuses and mixes in the confinement atmosphere but tends to be transported to its upper region

  11. Evaluation and improvement in nondestructive examination (NDE) reliability for in-service inspection of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deffenbaugh, J.D.; Good, M.S.; Green, E.R.; Heasler, P.G.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.

    1988-01-01

    The evaluation and improvement of NDE Reliability for In-service Inspection (ISI) of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was established to determine the reliability of current ISI techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this NRC program are to: determine the reliability of ultrasonic ISI performed on commercial light-water reactor (LWR) primary systems; determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety and determine the level of inspection reliability required to ensure a suitably low failure probability using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis; evaluate the degree of reliability improvement that could be achieved using improved and advanced NDE technique; and recommend revisions to ASME Code, Section XI, and Regulatory Requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties, that will ensure suitably low failure probabilities. The program consists of three basic tasks: a Piping task, a Pressure Vessel task, and an Evaluation and Improvement in NDE Reliability task. The major efforts were concentrated in the Piping task and the Evaluation and Improvement in NDE Reliability task

  12. Proceedings of the twenty-fourth water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement and thermal annealing; Reactor vessel lower head integrity; Evaluation and projection of steam generator tube condition and integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteleone, S. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-02-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Fourth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 21--23, 1996. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Czech Republic, Finland, France, Japan, Norway, Russia and United Kingdom. This volume is divided into the following sections: reactor pressure vessel embrittlement and thermal annealing; reactor vessel lower head integrity; and evaluation and projection of steam generator tube condition and integrity. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. Proceedings of the twenty-fourth water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement and thermal annealing; Reactor vessel lower head integrity; Evaluation and projection of steam generator tube condition and integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteleone, S.

    1997-02-01

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Fourth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, October 21--23, 1996. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Czech Republic, Finland, France, Japan, Norway, Russia and United Kingdom. This volume is divided into the following sections: reactor pressure vessel embrittlement and thermal annealing; reactor vessel lower head integrity; and evaluation and projection of steam generator tube condition and integrity. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  14. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production Progress Report for Year 1, Quarter 2 (January - March 2002)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Weaver, Kevan Dean

    2002-03-01

    The use of light water at supercritical pressures as the coolant in a nuclear reactor offers the potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to about 45%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type re-circulation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel and smaller containment building than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed.

  15. A methodology for determining fabrication flaws in a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, G.J.; Doctor, S.R.; Simonen, F.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a program with the major objective of estimating the rate of occurrence of fabrication flaws in US light-water reactor pressure vessels (RPVs). In this study, RPV mate4rial was examined using the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique for Ultrasonic Testing (SAFT-UT) to detect and characterize flaws created during fabrication. The inspection data obtained in this program has been analyzed to address the rates of flaw occurrence

  16. Analysis of thermal fatigue events in light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuda, Yasunori [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Seika, Kyoto (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    Thermal fatigue events, which may cause shutdown of nuclear power stations by wall-through-crack of pipes of RCRB (Reactor Coolant Pressure Boundary), are reported by licensees in foreign countries as well as in Japan. In this paper, thermal fatigue events reported in anomalies reports of light water reactors inside and outside of Japan are investigated. As a result, it is clarified that the thermal fatigue events can be classified in seven patterns by their characteristics, and the trend of the occurrence of the events in PWRs (Pressurized Water Reactors) has stronger co-relation to operation hours than that in BWRs (Boiling Water Reactors). Also, it is concluded that precise identification of locations where thermal fatigue occurs and its monitoring are important to prevent the thermal fatigue events by aging or miss modification. (author)

  17. Overview of environmental materials degradation in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaaban, H.I.; Wu, P.

    1986-08-01

    This report provides a brief overview of analyses and conclusions reported in published literature regarding environmentally induced degradation of materials in operating light-water reactors. It is intended to provide a synopsis of subjects of concern rather than to address a licensing basis for any newly discovered problems related to reactor materials

  18. On Monte Carlo estimation of radiation damage in light water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, Edward A.; Oliveira, Cassiano R.E. de

    2010-01-01

    There has been a growing need in recent years for the development of methodologies to calculate damage factors, namely displacements per atom (dpa), of structural components for Light Water Reactors (LWRs). The aim of this paper is discuss and highlight the main issues associated with the calculation of radiation damage factors utilizing the Monte Carlo method. Among these issues are: particle tracking and tallying in complex geometries, dpa calculation methodology, coupled fuel depletion and uncertainty propagation. The capabilities of the Monte Carlo code Serpent such as Woodcock tracking and burnup are assessed for radiation damage calculations and its capability demonstrated and compared to those of the MCNP code for dpa calculations of a typical LWR configuration involving the core vessel and the downcomer. (author)

  19. Aging management of major light water reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Sinha, U.P.; Ware, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    Review of technical literature and field experience has identified stress corrosion cracking as one of the major degradation mechanisms for the major light water reactor components. Three of the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms of current concern are (a) primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in pressurized water reactors, and (b) intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in boiling water reactors. Effective aging management of stress corrosion cracking mechanisms includes evaluation of interactions between design, materials, stressors, and environment; identification and ranking of susceptible sites; reliable inspection of any damage; assessment of damage rate; mitigation of damage; and repair and replacement using corrosion-resistant materials. Management of PWSCC includes use of lower operating temperatures, reduction in residual tensile stresses, development of reliable inspection techniques, and use of Alloy 690 as replacement material. Management of IGSCC of nozzle and attachment welds includes use of Alloy 82 as weld material, and potential use of hydrogen water chemistry. Management of IASCC also includes potential use of hydrogen water chemistry

  20. Fuel cycle options for light water reactors and heavy water reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    In the second half of the 20th century nuclear power has evolved from the research and development environment to an industry that supplies 16% of the world's electricity. By the end of 1997, over 8500 reactor-years of operating experience had been accumulated. Global environmental change, and the continuing increase in global energy supply required to provide increasing populations with an improving standard of living, make the contribution from nuclear energy even more important for the next century. For nuclear power to achieve its full potential and make its needed contribution, it must be safe, economical, reliable and sustainable. All of these factors can be enhanced by judicious choice and development of advanced fuel cycle options. The Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on Fuel Cycle Options for Light Water Reactors and Heavy Water Reactors was hosted by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) on behalf of the Canadian Government and was jointly conducted within the frame of activities of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (IWG-LWR) and the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Heavy Water Reactors (IWG-HWR). The TCM provided the opportunity to have in-depth discussions on important technical topics which were highlighted in the International Symposium on Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Reactor Strategies: Adjusting to New Realities, held in Vienna, 3-6 June 1997. The main results and conclusions of the TCM were presented as input for discussion at the first meeting of the IAEA newly formed International Working Group on Fuel Cycle Options

  1. Leakage detecting method and device for water tight vessel of wet-type container apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yoshimi.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of and a device for detecting leakage of a water tight vessel of a wet-type container apparatus for containing a reactor pressure vessel while immersing it water in a reactor container. Namely, in the wet-type container apparatus, the periphery of the pressure vessel is coated with a heat insulation material and the periphery of the heat insulation material is coated with a water tight vessel. The water tight vessel is immersed under water in the reactor container. As a method of detecting leakage of the wet-type container apparatus, gases mixed with helium are supplied into the water tight vessel at a pressure higher than the inner pressure of the reactor container at a lowest position of the reactor pressure vessel. A water level in the reactor container is determined so as to form a space at the top portion of the inside of the reactor container. The helium at the top portion is detected to monitor the leakage of the water tight vessel. With such procedures, even if the water tight vessel is ruptured at any position, helium mixed to the gases is released to water in the reactor container and rise up to the top space and detected by a helium leakage detection device. (I.S.)

  2. A study on the irradiation embrittlement and recovery characteristics of light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Jong Myung; Song, Sook Hyang; Milan, Brumovsky

    1999-03-01

    The neutron irradiation embrittlement phenomenon of light water RPV steels greatly affects the life span for safe operation of a reactor. Reliable evaluation and prediction of the embrittlement of RPV steels, especially of aged reactors, are of importance to the safe operation of a reactor. In addition, the thermal recovery of embrittled RPV has been recognized as an option for life extension. This study aimed to tracer/refine available technologies for embrittlement characterization and prediction, to prepare relevant materials for several domestic RPV steels of the embrittlement and recovery, and to find out possible remedy for steel property betterment. Small specimen test techniques, magnetic measurement techniques, and the Meechan and Brinkmann's recovery curve analysis method were examined/applied as the evaluation techniques. Results revealed a high irradiation sensitivity in YG 3 RPV steel. Further extended study may be urgently needed. Both the small specimen test technique for the direct determination of fracture toughness, and the magnetic measurement technique for embrittlement evaluation appeared to be continued for the technical improvement and data base preparation. Manufacturing process relevant to the heat treatment appeared to be improved in lowering the irradiation sensitivity of the steel. Further study is needed especially in applying the present techniques to the new structural materials under new irradiation environment of advanced reactors. (author)

  3. Aerosol behavior and light water reactor source terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbey, F.; Schikarski, W.O.

    1988-01-01

    The major developments in nuclear aerosol modeling following the accident to pressurized water reactor Unit 2 at Three Mile Island are briefly reviewed and the state of the art summarized. The importance and implications of these developments for severe accident source terms for light water reactors are then discussed in general terms. The treatment is not aimed at identifying specific source term values but is intended rather to illustrate trends, to assess the adequacy of the understanding of major aspects of aerosol behavior for source term prediction, and demonstrate in qualitative terms the effect of various aspects of reactor design. Areas where improved understanding of aerosol behavior might lead to further reductions in current source terms predictions are also considered

  4. Stress analyses for reactor pressure vessels by the example of a product line '69 boiling water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mkrtchyan, Lilit; Schau, Henry [TUEV SUED Energietechnik GmbH, Mannheim (Germany). Abt. Strukturverhalten; Wolf, Werner; Holzer, Wieland [TUEV SUED Industrie Service GmbH, Muenchen (Germany). Abt. Behaelter und Turbosatz; Wernicke, Robert; Trieglaff, Ralf [TUEV NORD SysTec GmbH und Co. KG, Hamburg (Germany). Abt. Festigkeit und Konstruktion

    2011-08-15

    The reactor pressure vessels (RPV) of boiling water reactors (BWR) belonging to the product line '69 have unusually designed heads. The spherical cap-shaped bottom head of the vessel is welded directly to the support flange of the lower shell course. This unusual construction has led repeatedly to controversial discussions concerning the limits and admissibility of stress intensities arising in the junction of the bottom head to the cylindrical shell. In the present paper, stress analyses for the design conditions are performed with the finite element method in order to determine and categorize the occurring stresses. The procedure of stress classification in accordance with the guidelines of German KTA 3201.2 and Section III of the ASME Code (Subsection NB) is described and subsequently demonstrated by the example of a typical BWR vessel. The accomplished investigations yield allowable stress intensities in the considered area. Additionally, limit load analyses are carried out to verify the obtained results. Complementary studies, performed for a torispherical head, prove that the determined maximum peak stresses in the junction between the bottom head and the cylindrical shell are not unusual also for pressure vessels with regular bottom head constructions. (orig.)

  5. Light-water reactor safety analysis codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.F.; Ransom, V.H.; Ybarrondo, L.J.; Liles, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    A brief review of the evolution of light-water reactor safety analysis codes is presented. Included is a summary comparison of the technical capabilities of major system codes. Three recent codes are described in more detail to serve as examples of currently used techniques. Example comparisons between calculated results using these codes and experimental data are given. Finally, a brief evaluation of current code capability and future development trends is presented

  6. Technology Implementation Plan. Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Commercial Light Water Reactor Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Terrani, Kurt A.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; Worrall, Andrew; Robb, Kevin R.; Snead, Mary A.

    2015-01-01

    This report is an overview of the implementation plan for ORNL's fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) light water reactor fuel. The fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles embedded inside a fully dense SiC matrix and is intended for utilization in commercial light water reactor application.

  7. Technology Implementation Plan. Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Commercial Light Water Reactor Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, Lance Lewis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Snead, Mary A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This report is an overview of the implementation plan for ORNL's fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) light water reactor fuel. The fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles embedded inside a fully dense SiC matrix and is intended for utilization in commercial light water reactor application.

  8. A powerful methodology for reactor vessel pressurized thermal shock analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucau, J.; Mager, T.

    1994-01-01

    The recent operating experience of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Industry has focused increasing attention on the issue of reactor vessel pressurized thermal shock (PTS). More specifically, the review of the old WWER-type of reactors (WWER 440/230) has indicated a sensitive behaviour to neutron embrittlement. This led already to some remedial actions including safety injection water preheating or vessel annealing. Such measures are usually taken based on the analysis of a selected number of conservative PTS events. Consideration of all postulated cooldown events would draw attention to the impact of operator action and control system effects on reactor vessel PTS. Westinghouse has developed a methodology which couples event sequence analysis with probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses, to identify those events that are of primary concern for reactor vessel integrity. Operating experience is utilized to aid in defining the appropriate event sequences and event frequencies of occurrence for the evaluation. Once the event sequences of concern are identified, detailed deterministic thermal-hydraulic and structural evaluations can be performed to determine the conditions required to minimize the extension of postulated flaws or enhance flaw arrest in the reactor vessel. The results of these analyses can then be used to better define further modifications in vessel and plant system design and to operating procedures. The purpose of the present paper will be to describe this methodology and to show its benefits for decision making. (author). 1 ref., 3 figs

  9. Superheated steam annealing of pressurized water reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porowski, J.S.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal annealing of an embrittled Reactor Pressure Shell is the only recognized means for recovering material properties lost due to long-term exposure of the reactor walls to radiation. Reduced toughness of the material during operation is a major concern in evaluations of structural integrity of older reactors. Extensive studies performed within programs related to life extension of nuclear plants have confirmed that the thermal treatment of 850 deg. F for 168 hours on irradiated material essentially recovers material properties lost due to neutron exposure. Dry and wet annealing methods have been considered. Wet annealing involves operating the reactor at near design temperatures and pressures. Since the temperature of wet annealing must be limited to vessel design temperature of 650 deg. F, only partial recovery of the lost properties is achieved. Thus dry annealing was selected as an alternative for future development and industrial implementation to extend the safe life of reactors. Dry thermal annealing consists of heating portions of the reactor vessel at a specific temperature for a given period of time using a high temperature heat source. The use of spent fuel assemblies, induction heating and resistance heating elements as well as the circulation of heated fluid were investigated as potential candidate methods. To date the use of resistance heating elements which are lowered into a dry empty reactor was considered to be the preferred method. In-depth research in the United States and practical applications of such a method in Russia have confirmed feasibility of the method. The method of using circulating superheated steam to anneal the vessel at 850 deg. F without complete removal of the reactor internals is described herein. After removing the reactor head and fuel, the core barrel along with the upper and lower core in PWRs is lifted to open an annular space between the reactor shell flange and the core barrel flange. The thermal shield can remain

  10. Tritium formation and elimination in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolle, L.; Briec, M.; Miquel, P.

    1976-01-01

    Light-water reactors have a tritium balance which should be considered from both the working constraint and environmental pollution aspects. The formation of tritium in the primary circuit and in the fuel, the elimination and enrichment processes are considered [fr

  11. Dual pressurized light water reactor producing 2000 M We

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-10-15

    The dual unit optimizer 2000 M We (Duo2000) is proposed as a new design concept for large nuclear power plant. Duo is being designed to meet economic and safety challenges facing the 21 century green and sustainable energy industry. Duo2000 has two nuclear steam supply systems (NSSS) of the unit nuclear optimizer (Uno) pressurized water reactor (PWR) in a single containment so as to double the capacity of the plant. Uno is anchored to the optimized power reactor 1000 M We (OPR1000) of the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. The concept of Duo can be extended to any number of PWRs or pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWR s), or even boiling water reactor (BWRs). Once proven in water reactors, the technology may even be expanded to gas cooled, liquid metal cooled, and molten salt cooled reactors. In particular, since it is required that the small and medium sized reactors (SMRs) be built as units, the concept of Duo2000 will apply to SMRs as well. With its in-vessel retention as severe accident management strategy, Duo can not only put the single most querulous PWR safety issue to end, but also pave ways to most promising large power capacity dispensing with huge redesigning cost for generation III + nuclear systems. The strengths of Duo2000 include reducing the cost of construction by decreasing the number of containment buildings from two to one, minimizing the cost of NSSS and control systems by sharing between the dual units, and lessening the maintenance cost by uniting NSSS. The technology can further be extended to coupling modular reactors as dual, triple, or quadruple units to increase their economics, thus accelerating the commercialization as well as the customization of SMRs. (Author)

  12. RETRAN sensitivity studies of light water reactor transients. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, N.S.; Gose, G.C.; Harrison, J.F.; Sawtelle, G.R.

    1977-06-01

    This report presents the results of sensitivity studies performed using the RETRAN/RELAP4 transient analysis code to identify critical parameters and models which influence light water reactor transient predictions. Various plant transients for both boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors are examined. These studies represent the first detailed evaluation of the RETRAN/RELAP4 transient code capability in predicting a variety of plant transient responses. The wide range of transients analyzed in conjunction with the parameter and modeling studies performed identify several sensitive areas as well as areas requiring future study and model development

  13. Issues affecting advanced passive light-water reactor safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beelman, R.J.; Fletcher, C.D.; Modro, S.M.

    1992-01-01

    Next generation commercial reactor designs emphasize enhanced safety through improved safety system reliability and performance by means of system simplification and reliance on immutable natural forces for system operation. Simulating the performance of these safety systems will be central to analytical safety evaluation of advanced passive reactor designs. Yet the characteristically small driving forces of these safety systems pose challenging computational problems to current thermal-hydraulic systems analysis codes. Additionally, the safety systems generally interact closely with one another, requiring accurate, integrated simulation of the nuclear steam supply system, engineered safeguards and containment. Furthermore, numerical safety analysis of these advanced passive reactor designs wig necessitate simulation of long-duration, slowly-developing transients compared with current reactor designs. The composite effects of small computational inaccuracies on induced system interactions and perturbations over long periods may well lead to predicted results which are significantly different than would otherwise be expected or might actually occur. Comparisons between the engineered safety features of competing US advanced light water reactor designs and analogous present day reactor designs are examined relative to the adequacy of existing thermal-hydraulic safety codes in predicting the mechanisms of passive safety. Areas where existing codes might require modification, extension or assessment relative to passive safety designs are identified. Conclusions concerning the applicability of these codes to advanced passive light water reactor safety analysis are presented

  14. Uranium utilization of light water cooled reactors and fast breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojadinovic, Timm

    1991-08-01

    The better uranium utilization of fast breeder reactors as compared with water cooled reactors is one argument in favour of the breeder introduction. This report tries to quantify this difference. It gives a generally valid formalism for the uranium utilization as a function of the fuel burnup, the conversion rate, fuel cycle losses and the fuel enrichment. On the basis of realistic assumptions, the ratio between the utilizations of breeder reactors to that of light water cooled reactors (LWR) amounts to 180 for the open LWR cycle and 100 in case of plutonium recycling in LWRs

  15. Programme of research and development on plutonium recycling in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This is the third annual progress report concerning the programme on plutonium recycling in light-water reactors (indirect action) of the Commission of the European Communities. It covers the year 1978 and follows the annual reports for 1977 (EUR 6002 EN) and 1976 (EUR 5780). The preliminary results obtained under the 1975-79 programme indicate that: (a) assuming that plutonium recycling in light-water reactors is industrially developed by the end of the century, the foreseeable radiological impact on both workers and the general public can be maintained within the limits of current radiation protection standards; (b) on the whole, there is a good knowledge and mastery of the specific aspects involved in the plutonium recycling in light-water reactors and in particular they indicate that plutonium fuels have a similar behaviour to uranium fuels

  16. COMSORS: A light water reactor chemical core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.

    1997-01-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate lightwater reactor (LWR) core-melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass made of lead oxide (PbO) and boron oxide (B 2 O 3 ) is placed under the reactor vessel. If molten core debris is released onto the glass, the following sequence happens: (1) the glass absorbs decay heat as its temperature increases and the glass softens; (2) the core debris dissolves into the molten glass; (3) molten glass convective currents create a homogeneous high-level waste (HLW) glass; (4) the molten glass spreads into a wider pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or transfer to water on top of the molten glass; and (5) the glass solidifies as increased surface cooling area and decreasing radioactive decay heat generation allows heat removal to exceed heat generation

  17. Nuclear reactor pressure vessel flaw distribution development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, E.L.; Foulds, J.R.; Basin, S.L.

    1991-12-01

    Previous attempts to develop flaw distributions for probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses of pressurized water reactor (PWR) vessels have aimed at the estimation of a ''generic'' distribution applicable to all PWR vessels. In contrast, this report describes (1) a new flaw distribution development analytic methodology that can be applied to the analysis of vessel-specific inservice inspection (ISI) data, and (2) results of the application of the methodology to the analysis of flaw data for each vessel case (ISI data on three PWR vessels and laboratory inspection data on sections of the Midland reactor vessel). Results of this study show significant variation among the flaw distributions derived from the various data sets analyzed, strongly suggesting than a vessel-specific flaw distribution (for vessel integrity prediction under pressurized thermal shock) is preferred over a ''generic'' distribution. In addition, quantitative inspection system flaw sizing accuracy requirements have been identified for developing a flaw distribution from vessel ISI data. The new flaw data analysis methodology also permits quantifying the reliability of the flaw distribution estimate. Included in the report are identified needs for further development of several aspects of ISI data acquisition and vessel integrity prediction practice

  18. Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illum, D.B.; Olson, G.L.; McCardell, R.K.

    1999-01-01

    The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was a small water cooled, U-233/Th-232 cycle breeder reactor developed by the Pittsburgh Naval Reactors to improve utilization of the nation's nuclear fuel resources in light water reactors. The LWBR was operated at Shippingport Atomic Power Station (APS), which was a Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly Atomic Energy Commission)-owned reactor plant. Shippingport APS was the first large-scale, central-station nuclear power plant in the United States and the first plant of such size in the world operated solely to produce electric power. The Shippingport LWBR was operated successfully from 1977 to 1982 at the APS. During the five years of operation, the LWBR generated more than 29,000 effective full power hours (EFPH) of energy. After final shutdown, the 39 core modules of the LWBR were shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) at Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). At ECF, 12 of the 39 modules were dismantled and about 1000 of more than 17,000 rods were removed from the modules of proof-of-breeding and fuel performance testing. Some of the removed rods were kept at ECF, some were sent to Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in Idaho and some to ANL-East in Chicago for a variety of physical, chemical and radiological examinations. All rods and rod sections remaining after the experiments were shipped back to ECF, where modules and loose rods were repackaged in liners for dry storage. In a series of shipments, the liners were transported from ECF to Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The 47 liners containing the fully-rodded and partially-derodded core modules, the loose rods, and the rod scraps, are now stored in underground dry wells at CPP-749

  19. Nuclear reactor vessel inspection apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstone, E.G.; Lofy, R.A.; Williams, L.P.

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus for the in situ inspection of a nuclear reactor vessel to detect the location and character of flaws in the walls of the vessel, in the welds joining the various sections of the vessel, in the welds joining attachments such as nozzles, elbows and the like to the reactor vessel and in such attachments wherein an inspection head carrying one or more ultrasonic transducers follows predetermined paths in scanning the various reactor sections, welds and attachments

  20. Perspectives on phenomenology and simulation of severe accident in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Severe accident phenomena in light water reactors (LWRs) are generally characterized by their physically and chemically complex processes involved with high temperature core melt, multi-component and multi-phase flows, transport of radioactive materials and sometimes highly non-equilibrium state. Severe accident phenomenology is usually categorized into four phases; (1) fuel degradation, (2) in-vessel phenomena, (3) ex-vessel phenomena and (4) fission product release and transport. Among these, ex-vessel phenomena consist of five subcategories; 1) direct containment heating, 2) fuel coolant interaction (steam explosion), 3) molten core concrete interaction, 4) hydrogen behaviour and control and 5) containment failure/leakage. In the field of simulation of severe accident, severe accident analytical codes have been developed in the United States, EU and Japan, such as MAAP, MELCOR, ASTEC, THALES and SAMPSON. Many different kinds of analytical codes for the specific severe accident phenomena have also been developed worldwide. After the accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, review of severe accident research issues has been conducted and several issues are reconsidered, such as effects of BWR core degradation behaviors, sea water injection, pool scrubbing under rapid depressurization, containment failure/leakage and re-criticality. Some new experimental and analytical efforts have been started after the Fukushima accident. The present paper describes the perspectives on phenomenology and simulation of severe accident in LWRs, with the emphasis of insights obtained in the review of Fukushima accident. (author)

  1. Development of next-generation light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Fumihiko; Yasuoka, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    The Next-Generation Light Water Reactor Development Program, a national project in Japan, was inaugurated in April 2008. The primary objective of this program is to meet the need for the replacement of existing nuclear power plants in Japan after 2030. With the aim of setting a global standard design, the reactor to be developed offers greatly improved safety, reliability, and economic efficiency through several innovative technologies, including a reactor core system with uranium enrichment of 5 to 10%, a seismic isolation system, long-life materials, advanced water chemistry, innovative construction techniques, optimized passive and active safety systems, innovative digital technologies, and so on. In the first three years, a plant design concept with these innovative features is to be established and the effectiveness of the program will be reevaluated. The major part of the program will be completed in 2015. Toshiba is actively engaged in both design studies and technology development as a founding member of this program. (author)

  2. Large-scale experiments on aerosol behavior in light water reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schock, W.; Bunz, H.; Adams, R.E.; Tobias, M.L.; Rahn, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    Recently, three large-scale experimental programs were carried out dealing with the behavior of aerosols during core-melt accidents in light water reactors (LWRs). In the Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant (NSPP) program, the principal behaviors of different insoluble aerosols and of mixed aerosols were measured in dry air atmospheres and in condensing steam-air atmospheres contained in a 38-m/sup 3/ steel vessel. The Demonstration of Nuclear Aerosol Behavior (DEMONA) program used a 640-m/sup 3/ concrete containment model to simulate typical accident sequence conditions, and measured the behavior of different insoluble aerosols and mixed aerosols in condensing and transient atmospheric conditions. Part of the LWR Aerosol Containment Experiments (LACE) program was also devoted to aerosol behavior in containment; and 852-m/sup 3/ steel vessel was used, and the aerosols were composed of mixtures of insoluble and soluble species. The results of these experiments provide a suitable data base for validation of aerosol behavior codes. Fundamental insight into details of aerosol behavior in condensing environments has been gained through the results of the NSPP tests. Code comparisons have been and are being performed in the DEMONA and LACE experiments

  3. Flaw evaluation of thermally aged cast stainless steel in light-water reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.; Kuo, P.T.; Wichman, K.; Chopra, O.

    1997-01-01

    Cast stainless steel may be used in the fabrication of the primary loop piping, fittings, valve bodies, and pump casings in light-water reactors. However, this material is subject to embrittlement due to thermal aging at the reactor temperature, that is 290 o C (550 o F). The Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) recently completed a research program and the results indicate that the lower-bound fracture toughness of thermally aged cast stainless steel is similar to that of submerged arc welds (SAWs). Thus, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has accepted the use of SAW flaw evaluation procedures in IWB-3640 of Section XI of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code to evaluate flaws in thermally aged cast stainless steel for a license renewal evaluation. Alternatively, utilities may estimate component-specific fracture toughness of thermally aged cast stainless steel using procedures developed at ANL for a case-by-case flaw evaluation. (Author)

  4. High temperature and high performance light water cooled reactors operating at supercritical pressure, research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.; Katsumura, Y.; Yamada, K.; Shiga, S.; Moriya, K.; Yoshida, S.; Takahashi, H.

    2003-01-01

    The concept of supercritical-pressure, once-through coolant cycle nuclear power plant (SCR) was developed at the University of Tokyo. The research and development (R and D) started worldwide. This paper summarized the conceptual design and R and D in Japan. The big advantage of the SCR concept is that the temperatures of major components such as reactor pressure vessel, control rod drive mechanisms, containments, coolant pumps, main steam piping and turbines are within the temperatures of the components of LWR and supercritical fossil fired power plants (FPP) in spite of the high outlet coolant temperature. The experience of these components of LWR and supercritical fossil fired power plants will be fully utilized for SCR. The high temperature, supercritical-pressure light water reactor is the logical evolution of LWR. Boiling evolved from circular boilers, water tube boilers and once-through boilers. It is the reactor version of the once-through boiler. The development from LWR to SCR follows the history of boilers. The goal of the R and D should be the capital cost reduction that cannot be achieved by the improvement of LWR. The reactor can be used for hydrogen production either by catalysis and chemical decomposition of low quality hydrocarbons in supercritical water. The reactor is compatible with tight lattice fast core for breeders due to low outlet coolant density, small coolant flow rate and high head coolant pumps

  5. Safety considerations concerning light water reactors in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, T.

    1977-01-01

    In 1975 the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate was commissioned by the Government to perform a Reactor Safety Study concerning commercial light water reactors. The study will contain an account of: - rules and regulations for reactor designs; - operation experience of the Swedish nuclear power plants with international comparisons; - the development of reactor designs during the last 10 years; - demands and conditions for inspection and inspection methods; - nuclear power plant operation organization; - training of operators; and - the results of research into nuclear safety. The study is scheduled for completion by July 1st, 1977, however, this paper gives a summary of the results of the Reactor Safety Study already available. The paper contains detailed statistics concerning safety related occurrences and reactor scrams in Sweden from July 1st, 1974 until the beginning of 1977

  6. Investigation and evaluation of stress-corrosion cracking in piping of light water reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    In 1975, a Pipe Cracking Study Group, established by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), reviewed intergranular stress-corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in Bioling Water Reactors (BWRs) and issued a report. During 1978, IGSCC was reported for the first time in large-diameter piping (> 20 in.) in a BWR in Germany. This discovery, together with the reported questions concerning the interpretation of ultrasonic inspections, led to the activation of a new Pipe Crack Study Group (PCSG) by USNRC. The charter of the new PCSG was expanded: (1) to include review of potential for stress-corrosion cracking in Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) as well as BWRs, (2) to examine operating experience in foreign reactors relevant to IGSCC, and (3) to study five specific questions. The PCSG limited the scope of the study to BWR and PWR piping runs and safe ends attached to the reactor pressure vessel. Not considered were components such as the reactor pressure vessel, pumps, valves, steam generators, large steam turbines, etc. Throughout this report, as well as in the title, the safe ends are arbitrarily defined as piping

  7. SBWR: A simplified boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, J.D.; Sawyer, C.D.; Lagache, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    An advanced light water reactor concept is being developed for possible application in the 1990's. The concept, known as SBWR is a boiling water reactor which uses natural circulation to provide flow to the reactor core. In an emergency, a gravity driven core cooling system is used. The reactor is depressurized and water from an elevated suppression pool flows by gravity to the reactor vessel to keep the reactor core covered. The concept also features a passive containment cooling system in which water flows by gravity to cool the suppression pool wall. No operator action is required for a period of at least three days. Use of these and other passive systems allows the elimination of emergency diesel generators, core cooling pumps and heat removal pumps which is expected to simplify the plant design, reduce costs and simplify licensing. The concept is being developed by General Electric, Bechtel and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology supported by the Electric Power Research Institute and the United States Department of Energy in the United States. In Japan, The Japan Atomic Power Company has a great interest in this concept

  8. Development of a method for detecting nuclear fuel debris and water leaks at a nuclear reactor/containment vessel by flow visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umezawa, Shuichi; Tanaka, Katsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    It is the important issue to fill up each nuclear reactor/containment vessel with water and to take out debris of damaged fuel from them for decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants. It is necessary to detect the debris and water leaks at a nuclear reactor/containment vessel for the purpose. However, the method is not completely developed in the present stage. Accordingly, we have developed a method for detecting debris and water leaks at a nuclear reactor/containment vessel by flow visualization. Experiments of the flow visualization were conducted using two types of water tanks. An optical fiber and a collimator lens were employed for modifying a straight laser beam into a sheet projection. Some visualized images were obtained through the experiments. Particle Image Velocimetry, i.e. PIV, analysis was applied to the images for quantitative flow rate analysis. Consequently, it is considered that the flow visualization method has a possibility for the practical use. (author)

  9. Thermal Load Analysis of Multilayered Corium in the Lower Head of Reactor Pressure Vessel during Severe Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whang, Seok Won; Park, Hyun Sun [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Tae Suk [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In-Vessel Retention (IVR) is one of the severe accident management strategies to terminate or mitigate the severe accident which is also called 'core-melt accident'. The reactor vessel would be cooled by flooding the cavity with water. The molten core mixture is divided into two or three layers due to the density difference. Light metal layer which contains Fe and Zr is on the oxide layer which is consist of UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}. Heavy metal layer which contains U, Fe and Zr is located under the oxide layer. In oxide layer, the crust which is solidified material is formed along the boundary. The assessment of IVR for nuclear power plant has been conducted with lumped parameter method by Theofanous, Rempe and Esmaili. In this paper, the numerical analysis was performed and verified with the Esmaili's work to analyze thermal load of multilayered corium in pressurized reactor vessel and also to examine the condition of in-vessel corium characteristic before the vessel failure that lead to ex-vessel severe accident progression for example, ex-vessel debris bed cooling. The in-vessel coolability analysis for several scenarios is conducted for the plant which has higher power than AP1000. Two sensitivity analyses are conducted, the first is emissivity of light metal layer and the second is the heat transfer coefficient correlations of oxide layer. The effect of three layered system also investigated. In this paper, the numerical analysis was performed and verified with Esmaili's model to analyze thermal load of multilayered corium in pressurized reactor vessel. For two layered system, thermal load was analyzed according to the severe accident scenarios, emissivity of the light metal layer and heat transfer correlations of the.

  10. Analysis of aging mechanism and management for HTR-PM reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yunxue; Shao Jin

    2015-01-01

    Reactor pressure vessel is an important part of the reactor pressure boundary, its important degree ranks high in ageing management and life assessment of nuclear power plant. Carrying out systematic aging management to ensure reactor pressure vessel keeping enough safety margins and executing design functions is one of the key factors to guarantee security and stability operation for nuclear power plant during the whole lifetime and prolong life. This paper briefly introduces the structure and aging mechanism of reactor pressure vessel in pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant, and introduces the design principle and structure characteristics of HTR-PM. At the same time, this paper carries out preliminary analysis and exploration. and discusses aging management of HTR-PM reactor pressure vessel. Finally, the advice of carring out aging management for HTR-PM reactor pressure vessel is proposed. (authors)

  11. Experimental study of the effect of neutron radiation on pressurised water reactor vessel steel resilience - First part

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdeau, Jean-Jacques

    1969-12-01

    After having outlined the importance of the embrittlement of vessel steels by neutrons during the exploitation of pressurised water reactors, the author reports a set of tests which aimed at determining the effect of neutron irradiation on vessel steel resilience for operated, under construction or projected pressurized water reactors. He also tries to highlight the influence of irradiation temperature and of initial thermal treatments, and to look for a restoration thermal treatment of neutron-induced damages which could be applied to the considered vessels. Tests were performed on V Charpy resilience samples. Some samples have been irradiated by the Pile Department of the Grenoble CEN and then broken by the Laboratory of very high activity, whereas other samples have been irradiated in a prototype vessel and broken by a Cadarache department. The author presents characteristics of the studied steels (chemical compositions, thermal treatments), describes sample irradiation conditions, and the method of assessment of the transition temperature after irradiation, presents experimental results, discusses their interpretation, and presents future tests to be performed [fr

  12. A study on the irradiation embrittlement and recovery characteristics of light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Se Hwan; Hong, Jun Hwa; Lee, Bong Sang; Oh, Jong Myung; Song, Sook Hyang; Milan, Brumovsky [NRI Czech (Czech Republic)

    1999-03-01

    The neutron irradiation embrittlement phenomenon of light water RPV steels greatly affects the life span for safe operation of a reactor. Reliable evaluation and prediction of the embrittlement of RPV steels, especially of aged reactors, are of importance to the safe operation of a reactor. In addition, the thermal recovery of embrittled RPV has been recognized as an option for life extension. This study aimed to tracer/refine available technologies for embrittlement characterization and prediction, to prepare relevant materials for several domestic RPV steels of the embrittlement and recovery, and to find out possible remedy for steel property betterment. Small specimen test techniques, magnetic measurement techniques, and the Meechan and Brinkmann's recovery curve analysis method were examined/applied as the evaluation techniques. Results revealed a high irradiation sensitivity in YG 3 RPV steel. Further extended study may be urgently needed. Both the small specimen test technique for the direct determination of fracture toughness, and the magnetic measurement technique for embrittlement evaluation appeared to be continued for the technical improvement and data base preparation. Manufacturing process relevant to the heat treatment appeared to be improved in lowering the irradiation sensitivity of the steel. Further study is needed especially in applying the present techniques to the new structural materials under new irradiation environment of advanced reactors. (author)

  13. Conceptual mechanical design for a pressure-tube type supercritical water-cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yetisir, M.; Diamond, W.; Leung, L.K.H.; Martin, D.; Duffey, R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents a conceptual mechanical design for a heavy-water-moderated pressure-tube supercritical water (SCW) reactor, which has evolved from the well-established CANDU nuclear reactor. As in the current designs, the pressure-tube SCW reactor uses a calandria vessel and, as a result, many of today's technologies (such as the shutdown safety systems) can readily be adopted with small changes. Because the proposed concept uses a low-pressure moderator, it does not require a pressure vessel that is subject to the full SCW pressure and temperature conditions. The proposed design uses batch refueling and hence, the reactor core is orientated vertically. Significant simplifications result in the design with the elimination of on line fuelling systems, fuel channel end fittings and fuel channel closure seals and thus utilize the best features of Light Water Reactor (LWR) and Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) technologies. The safety goal is based on achieving a passive 'no core melt' configuration for the channels and core, so the mechanical features and systems directly reflect this desired attribute. (author)

  14. Conceptual mechanical design for a pressure-tube type supercritical water-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yetisir, M.; Diamond, W.; Leung, L.K.H.; Martin, D.; Duffey, R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a conceptual mechanical design for a heavy-water-moderated pressure-tube supercritical water (SCW) reactor, which has evolved from the well-established CANDU nuclear reactor. As in the current designs, the pressure-tube SCW reactor uses a calandria vessel and, as a result, many of today's technologies (such as the shutdown safety systems) can readily be adopted with small changes. Because the proposed concept uses a low-pressure moderator, it does not require a pressure vessel that is subject to the full SCW pressure and temperature conditions. The proposed design uses batch refueling and hence, the reactor core is orientated vertically. Significant simplifications result in the design with the elimination of on line fuelling systems, fuel channel end fittings and fuel channel closure seals and thus utilize the best features of Light Water Reactor (LWR) and Heavy Water Reactor (HWR) technologies. The safety goal is based on achieving a passive 'no core melt' configuration for the channels and core, so the mechanical features and systems directly reflect this desired attribute. (author)

  15. Electrochemistry in light water reactors reference electrodes, measurement, corrosion and tribocorrosion issues

    CERN Document Server

    Bosch, R -W; Celis, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    There has long been a need for effective methods of measuring corrosion within light water nuclear reactors. This important volume discusses key issues surrounding the development of high temperature reference electrodes and other electrochemical techniques. The book is divided into three parts with part one reviewing the latest developments in the use of reference electrode technology in both pressurised water and boiling water reactors. Parts two and three cover different types of corrosion and tribocorrosion and ways they can be measured using such techniques as electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Topics covered across the book include in-pile testing, modelling techniques and the tribocorrosion behaviour of stainless steel under reactor conditions. Electrochemistry in light water reactors is a valuable reference for all those concerned with corrosion problems in this key technology for the power industry. Discusses key issues surrounding the development of high temperature reference eletrodes A valuab...

  16. Current status of restoration work for obstacle and upper core structure in reactor vessel of experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'. 2. Replacement of upper core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushiki, Hiroshi; Ito, Hiromichi; Okuda, Eiji; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Sasaki, Jun; Oota, Katsu; Kawahara, Hirotaka; Takamatsu, Misao; Nagai, Akinori; Okawa, Toshikatsu

    2015-01-01

    In the experimental fast reactor Joyo, it was confirmed that the top of the irradiation test sub-assembly of MARICO-2 (material testing rig with temperature control) had bent onto the in-vessel storage rack as an obstacle and had damaged the upper core structure (UCS) in 2007. As a part of the restoration work, UCS replacement was begun at March 24, 2014 and was completed at December 17. In-vessel repair (including observation) for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) is distinct from that for light water reactors and necessitates independent development. Application of developed in-vessel repair techniques to operation and maintenance of SFRs enhanced their safety and integrity. There is little UCS replacement experience in the world and this experience and insights, which were accumulated in the replacement work of in-vessel large structure (UCS) used for more than 30 years, are expected to improve the in-vessel repair techniques in SFRs. (author)

  17. Towards intrinsically safe light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannerz, K.

    1983-02-01

    The reactor-safety issue is one of the principal problems threatening the future of the nuclear option, at least in participatory democracies. It has contributed to widespread public distrust and is the direct cause of the escalation in design complexity and quality assurance requirements that are rapidly eroding the competitive advantage of nuclear power. Redesign of the light-water reactor can eliminate those features that leave it open to public distrust and obstructive intervention. This redesign appears feasible within the realm of proven technology in those fields (fuels, materials, water chemistry, waste technology, etc.) in which extended operating experience is essential for confidence in system performance. A pressurized water reactor outline design developed to achieve the above goal is presented. The key feature is the design of the primary system extracting heat from the core so that the latter is protected from damage caused by any credible system failure or any destructive intervention from the outside by either violent means (up to and including nonnuclear warfare) or by mistaken or malicious use of the plant control systems. Such a design objective can be achieved by placing the entire primary circulation system in a large pressurized pool of cold water with a high boric acid content. Enough water is provided in the pool to allow core-decay-heat removal by evaporation for at least one week following any incident with no cooling systems operating. Subsequently it is assumed that a supply of further water (a few cubic meters per hour) from the outside can be arranged, even without the presence of the plant operating personnel

  18. External Reactor Vessel Cooling Evaluation for Severe Accident Mitigation in NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihalina, M.; Spalj, S.; Glaser, B.

    2016-01-01

    The In-Vessel corium Retention (IVR) through the External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) is mean for maintaining the reactor vessel integrity during a severe accident, by cooling and retaining the molten material inside the reactor vessel. By doing this, significant portion of severe accident negative phenomena connected with reactor vessel failure could be avoided. In this paper, analysis of NPP Krsko applicability for IVR strategy was performed. It includes overview of performed plant related analysis with emphasis on wet cavity modification, plant's site specific walk downs, new applicable probabilistic and deterministic analysis, evaluation of new possibilities for ERVC strategy implementation regarding plant's post-Fukushima improvements and adequacy with plant's procedures for severe accident mitigation. Conclusion is that NPP Krsko could perform in-vessel core retention by applying external reactor vessel cooling strategy with reasonable confidence in success. Per probabilistic and deterministic analysis, time window for successful ERVC strategy performance for most dominating plant damage state scenarios is 2.5 hours, when onset of core damage is observed. This action should be performed early after transition to Severe Accident Management Guidance's (SAMG). For loss of all AC power scenario, containment flooding could be initiated before onset of core damage within related emergency procedure. To perform external reactor vessel cooling, reactor water storage tank gravity drain with addition of alternate water is needed to be injected into the containment. ERVC strategy will positively interfere with other severe accident strategies. There are no negative effects due to ERVC performance. New flooding level will not threaten equipment and instrumentation needed for long term SAMGs performance and eventually diluted containment sump borated water inventory will not cause return to criticality during eventual recirculation phase due to the

  19. Environmentally assisted cracking in Light Water Reactors: Semiannual report, October 1994--March 1995. Volume 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.; Gavenda, D.J.; Hins, A.G.; Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Shack, W.J.; Soppet, W.K.

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRS) from October 1994 to March 1995. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, (b) EAC of Alloy 600 and 690, and (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic steels in water with several dissolvedoxygen (DO) concentrations to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Tensile properties and microstructures of several heats of Alloy 600 and 690 were characterized for correlation with EAC of the alloys in simulated LWR environments. Effects of DO and electrochemical potential on susceptibility to intergranular cracking of high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath irradiated in boiling water reactors were determined in slow-strain-rate-tensile tests at 289 degrees C. Microchemical changes in the specimens were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials

  20. Neutron disadvantage factors in heavy water and light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanov, J.

    1966-01-01

    A number od heavy water and light water reactor cells are analyzed in this paper by applying analytical methods of neutron thermalization. Calculations done according to the one-group Amouyal-Benoist method are included in addition. Computer codes for ZUSE Z-23 computer were written by applying both methods. The obtained results of disadvantage factors are then compared to results obtained by one-group P 3 approximation and by multigroup K7-THERMOS code [sr

  1. Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Program. PSF Blind Test workshop minutes. Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, G.L.; Lippincott, E.P.; McGarry, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    A ''Blind Test'' workshop was held on April 9-11, 1984, at the Holiday Inn in Richland, WA. At the workshop, participant groups compared ''Blind'' calculations with existing data which was unavailable to them at the time the calculations were made. The purpose of the exercise was to allow each participant group to test the group's ability to predict ''in-wall'' mechanical property degradation for a simulated nuclear reactor pressure vessel irradiation

  2. Leak detection device for nuclear reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Jun.

    1988-01-01

    Purpose: To test the leakage of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel during stopping for a short period of time with no change to the pressure vessel itself. Constitution: The device of the present invention comprises two O-rings disposed on the flange surface that connects a pressure vessel main body and an upper cover, a leak-off pipeway derived from the gap of the O-rings at the flange surface to the outside of the pressure vessel, a pressure detection means connected to the end of the pipeway, a humidity detection means disposed to the lead-off pipeway, a humidity detection means disposed to the lead-off pipeway, and gas supply means and gas suction means disposed each by way of a check valve to a side pipe branched from the pipeway. After stopping the operation of the nuclear reactor and pressurizing the pressure vessel by filling water, gases supplied to the gap between the O-rings at the flange surface by opening the check valve. In a case where water in the pressure vessel should leak to the flange surface, when gas suction is applied by properly opening the check valve, increase in the humidity due to the steams of leaked water diffused into the gas is detected to recognize the occurrence of leakage. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. WATER BOILER REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, L.D.P.

    1960-11-22

    As its name implies, this reactor utilizes an aqueous solution of a fissionable element salt, and is also conventional in that it contains a heat exchanger cooling coil immersed in the fuel. Its novelty lies in the utilization of a cylindrical reactor vessel to provide a critical region having a large and constant interface with a supernatant vapor region, and the use of a hollow sleeve coolant member suspended from the cover assembly in coaxial relation with the reactor vessel. Cool water is circulated inside this hollow coolant member, and a gap between its outer wall and the reactor vessel is used to carry off radiolytic gases for recombination in an external catalyst chamber. The central passage of the coolant member defines a reflux condenser passage into which the externally recombined gases are returned and condensed. The large and constant interface between fuel solution and vapor region prevents the formation of large bubbles and minimizes the amount of fuel salt carried off by water vapor, thus making possible higher flux densities, specific powers and power densities.

  4. Prospects for and problems of using light-water supercritical-pressure coolant in nuclear reactors in order to increase the efficiency of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, P. N.; Semchenkov, Yu. M.; Sedov, A. A.; Subbotin, S. A.; Chibinyaev, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    Trends in the development of the power sector of the Russian and world power industries both at present time and in the near future are analyzed. Trends in the rise of prices for reserves of fossil and nuclear fuels used for electricity production are compared. An analysis of the competitiveness of electricity production at nuclear power plants as compared to the competitiveness of electricity produced at coal-fired and natural-gas-fired thermal power plants is performed. The efficiency of the open nuclear fuel cycle and various versions of the closed nuclear fuel cycle is discussed. The requirements on light-water reactors under the scenario of dynamic development of the nuclear power industry in Russia are determined. Results of analyzing the efficiency of fuel utilization for various versions of vessel-type light-water reactors with supercritical coolant are given. Advantages and problems of reactors with supercritical-pressure water are listed.

  5. Termination of light-water reactor core-melt accidents with a chemical core catcher: the core-melt source reduction system (COMSORS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Kenton, M.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate light-water reactor core melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass is placed under the reactor vessel. If core debris is released onto the glass, the glass melts and the debris dissolves into the molten glass, thus creating a homogeneous molten glass. The molten glass, with dissolved core debris, spreads into a wide pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or by transfer to water on top of the molten glass. Expected equilibrium glass temperatures are approximately 600 degrees C. The creation of a low-temperature, homogeneous molten glass with known geometry permits cooling of the glass without threatening containment integrity. This report describes the technology, initial experiments to measure key glass properties, and modeling of COMSORS operations

  6. Revised accident source terms for light-water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soffer, L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    This paper presents revised accident source terms for light-water reactors incorporating the severe accident research insights gained in this area over the last 15 years. Current LWR reactor accident source terms used for licensing date from 1962 and are contained in Regulatory Guides 1.3 and 1.4. These specify that 100% of the core inventory of noble gases and 25% of the iodine fission products are assumed to be instantaneously available for release from the containment. The chemical form of the iodine fission products is also assumed to be predominantly elemental iodine. These assumptions have strongly affected present nuclear air cleaning requirements by emphasizing rapid actuation of spray systems and filtration systems optimized to retain elemental iodine. A proposed revision of reactor accident source terms and some im implications for nuclear air cleaning requirements was presented at the 22nd DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference. A draft report was issued by the NRC for comment in July 1992. Extensive comments were received, with the most significant comments involving (a) release fractions for both volatile and non-volatile species in the early in-vessel release phase, (b) gap release fractions of the noble gases, iodine and cesium, and (c) the timing and duration for the release phases. The final source term report is expected to be issued in late 1994. Although the revised source terms are intended primarily for future plants, current nuclear power plants may request use of revised accident source term insights as well in licensing. This paper emphasizes additional information obtained since the 22nd Conference, including studies on fission product removal mechanisms, results obtained from improved severe accident code calculations and resolution of major comments, and their impact upon the revised accident source terms. Revised accident source terms for both BWRS and PWRS are presented.

  7. POST: a postprocessor computer code for producing three-dimensional movies of two-phase flow in a reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taggart, K.A.; Liles, D.R.

    1977-08-01

    The development of the TRAC computer code for analysis of LOCAs in light-water reactors involves the use of a three-dimensional (r-theta-z), two-fluid hydrodynamics model to describe the two-phase flow of steam and water through the reactor vessel. One of the major problems involved in interpreting results from this code is the presentation of three-dimensional flow patterns. The purpose of the report is to present a partial solution to this data display problem. A first version of a code which produces three-dimensional movies of flow in the reactor vessel has been written and debugged. This code (POST) is used as a postprocessor in conjunction with a stand alone three-dimensional two-phase hydrodynamics code (CYLTF) which is a test bed for the three-dimensional algorithms to be used in TRAC

  8. Earthquake-proof supporting structure in reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Akio; Sekine, Katsuhisa; Madokoro, Manabu; Katoono, Shin-ichi; Konno, Mutsuo; Suzuki, Takuro.

    1990-01-01

    Conventional earthquake-proof structure comprises a vessel vibration stopper integrated to a reactor vessel, powder for restricting the horizontal displacements, a safety vessel surrounds the outer periphery of the reactor vessel and a safety vessel vibration stopper integrated therewith, which are fixed to buildings. However, there was a problem that a great amount of stresses are generated in the base of the reactor vessel vibration stopper due to reaction of the powders which restrict thermal expansion. In order to remarkably reduce the reaction of the powers, powders are charged into a spaces formed between each of the reactor vessel vibration stopper, the safety vessel vibration stopper and the flexible member disposed between them. According to this constitution, the reactor vessel vibration stopper does not undergo a great reaction of the powers upon thermal expansion of the reactor vessel to moderate the generated stresses, maintain the strength and provide earthquake-proof supporting function. (N.H.)

  9. Guide to the periodic inspection of nuclear reactor steel pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    This Guide is intended to provide general information and guidance to reactor owners or operators, inspection authorities, certifying authorities or regulatory bodies who are responsible for establishing inspection procedures for specific reactors or reactor types, and for the preparation of national codes or standards. The recommendations of the Guide apply primarily to water-cooled steel reactor vessels which are at a sufficiently early stage of design so that recommendations to provide accessibility for inspection can be incorporated into the early stages of design and inspection planning. However, much of the contents of the Guide are also applicable in part to vessels for other reactor types, such as gas-cooled, pressure-tube, or liquid-metal-cooled reactors, and also to some existing water-cooled reactors and reactors which are in advanced stage of design or construction. 46 refs, figs, 1 tab

  10. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilard, Ronaldo; Zhang, Hongbin; Kothe, Douglas; Turinsky, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  11. Reactor core of light water-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miwa, Jun-ichi; Aoyama, Motoo; Mochida, Takaaki.

    1996-01-01

    In a reactor core of a light water cooled reactor, the center of the fuel rods or moderating rods situated at the outermost circumference among control rods or moderating rods are connected to divide a lattice region into an inner fuel region and an outer moderator region. In this case, the area ratio of the moderating region to the fuel region is determined to greater than 0.81 for every cross section of the fuel region. The moderating region at the outer side is increased relative to the fuel rod region at the inner side while keeping the lattice pitch of the fuel assembly constant, thereby suppressing the increase of an absolute value of a void reactivity coefficient which tends to be caused when using MOX fuels as a fuel material, by utilizing neutron moderation due to a large quantity of coolants at the outer side of the fuel region. The void reactivity coefficient can be made substantially equal with that of uranium fuel assembly without greatly reducing a plutonium loading amount or without greatly increasing linear power density. (N.H.)

  12. Survey on Cooled-Vessel Designs in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min-Hwan; Lee, Won-Jae

    2006-01-01

    The core outlet temperature of the coolant in the high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) has been increased to improve the overall efficiency of their electricity generation by using the Brayton cycle or their nuclear hydrogen production by using thermo-chemical processes. The increase of the outlet temperature accompanies an increase of the coolant inlet temperature. A high coolant inlet temperature results in an increase of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) operation temperature. The conventional steels, proven vessel material in light water reactors, cannot be used as materials for the RPV in the elevated temperatures which necessitate its design to account for the creep effects. Some ferritic or martensitic steels like 2 1/4Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-1Mo-V are very well established creep resistant materials for a temperature range of 400 to 550 C. Although these materials have been used in a chemical plant, there is limited experience with using these materials in nuclear reactors. Even though the 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel was used to manufacture the RPV for HTR-10 of Japan Atomic Energy Agency(JAEA), a large RPV has not been manufactured by using this material or 9Cr-1Mo-V steel. Due to not only its difficulties in manufacturing but also its high cost, the JAEA determined that they would exclude these materials from the GTHTR design. For the above reasons, KAERI has been considering a cooled-vessel design as an option for the RPV design of a NHDD plant (Nuclear Hydrogen Development and Demonstration). In this study, we surveyed several HTGRs, which adopt the cooled-vessel concept for their RPV design, and discussed their design characteristics. The survey results in design considerations for the NHDD cooled-vessel design

  13. Provision of reliable core cooling in vessel-type boiling reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alferov, N.S.; Balunov, B.F.; Davydov, S.A.

    1987-01-01

    Methods for providing reliable core cooling in vessel-type boiling reactors with natural circulation for heat supply are analysed. The solution of this problem is reduced to satisfaction of two conditions such as: water confinement over the reactor core necessary in case of an accident and confinement of sufficient coolant flow rate through the bottom cross section of fuel assemblies for some time. The reliable fuel element cooling under conditions of a maximum credible accident (brittle failure of a reactor vessel) is shown to be provided practically in any accident, using the safety vessel in combination with the application of means of standard operation and minimal composition and capacity of ECCS

  14. A quantitative methodology for reactor vessel pressurized thermal shock decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerson, D.S.; Balkey, K.R.; Meyer, T.A.; Ofstun, R.P.; Rupprecht, S.D.; Sharp, D.R.

    1983-01-01

    The recent operating experience of the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Industry has focused increasing attention on the issue of reactor vessel pressurized thermal shock (PTS). Previous reactor vessel integrity concerns have led to changes in vessel and plant system design and to operating procedures, and increased attention to the PTS issue is causing consideration of further modifications. Events such as excess feedwater, loss of normal feedwater, and steam generator tube rupture have led to significant primary system cooldowns. Each of these cooldown transients occurred concurrently with a relatively high primary system pressure. Considerations of these and other postulated cooldown events has drawn attention to the impact of operator action and control system effects on reactor vessel PTS. A methodology, which couples event sequence analysis with probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses, was developed to identify those events that are of primary concern for reactor vessel integrity. Operating experience is utilized to aid in defining the appropriate event sequences and event frequencies of occurrence for the evaluation. (orig./RW)

  15. Mobile nuclear reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, R.E.; Spurrier, F.R.; Jones, A.R.

    1978-01-01

    A containment vessel for use in mobile nuclear reactor installations is described. The containment vessel completely surrounds the entire primary system, and is located as close to the reactor primary system components as is possible in order to minimize weight. In addition to being designed to withstand a specified internal pressure, the containment vessel is also designed to maintain integrity as a containment vessel in case of a possible collision accident

  16. Transmutation of Americium in Light and Heavy Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyland, B.; Dyck, G.R.; Edwards, G.W.R. [Chalk River Laboratories, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (Canada); Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Maldonado, G.I. [University of Tennessee (Knoxville)/ORNL, Tennessee (United States)

    2009-06-15

    There is interest worldwide in reducing the burden on geological nuclear fuel disposal sites. In most disposal scenarios the decay heat loading of the surrounding rock limits the capacity of these sites. On the long term, this decay heat is generated primarily by actinides, and a major contributor 100 to 1000 years after discharge from the reactor is {sup 241}Am. One possible approach to reducing the decay-heat burden is to reprocess spent reactor fuel and use thermal spectrum reactors to 'burn' the Am nuclides. The viability of this approach is dependent upon the detailed changes in chemical and isotopic composition of actinide-bearing fuels after irradiation in thermal reactor spectra. The currently available thermal spectrum reactor options include light water-reactors (LWRs) and heavy-water reactors (HWRs) such as the CANDU{sup R} designs. In addition, as a result of the recycle of spent LWR fuel, there would be a considerable amount of potential recycled uranium (RU). One proposed solution for the recycled uranium is to use it as fuel in Candu reactors. This paper investigates the possibilities of transmuting americium in 'spiked' bundles in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and in boiling water reactors (BWRs). Transmutation of Am in Candu reactors is also examined. One scenario studies a full core fuelled with homogeneous bundles of Am mixed with recycled uranium, while a second scenario places Am in an inert matrix in target channels in a Candu reactor, with the rest of the reactor fuelled with RU. A comparison of the transmutation in LWRs and HWRs is made, in terms of the fraction of Am that is transmuted and the impact on the decay heat of the spent nuclear fuel. CANDU{sup R} is a registered trademark of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). (authors)

  17. Nuclear powerplant standardization: light water reactors. Volume 2. Appendixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-06-01

    This volume contains working papers written for OTA to assist in preparation of the report, NUCLEAR POWERPLANT STANDARDIZATION: LIGHT WATER REACTORS. Included in the appendixes are the following: the current state of standardization, an application of the principles of the Naval Reactors Program to commercial reactors; the NRC and standardization, impacts of nuclear powerplant standardization on public health and safety, descriptions of current control room designs and Duke Power's letter, Admiral Rickover's testimony, a history of standardization in the NRC, and details on the impact of standardization on public health and safety

  18. System for cooling the containment vessel of a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costes, Didier.

    1982-01-01

    The invention concerns a post-accidental cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. This system includes in series a turbine fed by the moist air contained in the vessel, a condenser in which the air is dried and cooled, a compressor actuated by the turbine and a cooling exchanger. The cold water flowing through the condenser and in the exchanger is taken from a tank outside the vessel and injected by a pump actuated by the turbine. The application is for nuclear reactors under pressure [fr

  19. Advantages of liquid fluoride thorium reactor in comparison with light water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahri, Che Nor Aniza Che Zainul, E-mail: anizazainul@gmail.com; Majid, Amran Ab.; Al-Areqi, Wadeeah M. [Nuclear Science Program, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor (LFTR) is an innovative design for the thermal breeder reactor that has important potential benefits over the traditional reactor design. LFTR is fluoride based liquid fuel, that use the thorium dissolved in salt mixture of lithium fluoride and beryllium fluoride. Therefore, LFTR technology is fundamentally different from the solid fuel technology currently in use. Although the traditional nuclear reactor technology has been proven, it has perceptual problems with safety and nuclear waste products. The aim of this paper is to discuss the potential advantages of LFTR in three aspects such as safety, fuel efficiency and nuclear waste as an alternative energy generator in the future. Comparisons between LFTR and Light Water Reactor (LWR), on general principles of fuel cycle, resource availability, radiotoxicity and nuclear weapon proliferation shall be elaborated.

  20. Light-water-reactor hydrogen manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, A.L.; Cummings, J.C.; Sherman, M.P.; Kupiec, C.F.; Healy, R.J.; Caplan, J.S.; Sandhop, J.R.; Saunders, J.H.

    1983-06-01

    A manual concerning the behavior of hydrogen in light water reactors has been prepared. Both normal operations and accident situations are addressed. Topics considered include hydrogen generation, transport and mixing, detection, and combustion, and mitigation. Basic physical and chemical phenomena are described, and plant-specific examples are provided where appropriate. A wide variety of readers, including operators, designers, and NRC staff, will find parts of this manual useful. Different sections are written at different levels, according to the most likely audience. The manual is not intended to provide specific plant procedures, but rather, to provide general guidance that may assist in the development of such procedures

  1. Dual-purpose light water reactor supplying heat for desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waplington, G.; Fichtner, H.

    1978-01-01

    The technical as well as the economic aspects of using a large commercial light water reactor for the production of both electricity and potable water have been examined. For the basis of the study, the multistage flash distillation process was selected, in conjunction with a reactor rated at not less than 2100 MW (thermal). Combined use of a condensing and a back-pressure turbine (the latter matched to distillation plant steam requirements) represents a convenient method for supplying process heat. Overall costs can be fairly allocated to the two products using the ''power credit'' method. A sample economic evaluation indicates highly favorable water costs as compared with more conventional distillation schemes based on fossil fuel

  2. Fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiwatari, Yuki; Mukouhara, Tami; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Oka, Yoshiaki [Tokyo Univ., Nuclear Engineering Research Lab., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    This report introduces the result of a feasibility study of a fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water (SCFR) with once-through cooling system. It is characterized by (1) no need of steam separator, recirculation system, or steam generator, (2) 1/7 of core flow rate compared with BWR or PWR, (3) high temperature and high pressure permits small turbine and high efficiency exceeding 44%, (4) structure and operation of major components are already experienced by LWRs or thermal power plants. Modification such as reducing blanket fuels and increasing seed fuels are made to achieve highly economic utilization of Pu and high power (2 GWe). The following restrictions were satisfied. (1) Maximum linear heat rate 39 kW/m, (2) Maximum surface temperature of Inconel cladding 620degC, (3) Negative void reactivity coefficient, (4) Fast neutron irradiation rate at the inner surface of pressure vessel less than 2.0x10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}. Thus the high power density of 167 MW/m{sup 3} including blanket is thought to contributes economy. The high conversion is attained to be 0.99 Pu fission residual rate by the outer radius of fuel rod of 0.88 mm. The breeding of 1.034 by Pu fission residual rate can be achieved by using briquette (tube-in-shell) type fuel structure. (K. Tsuchihashi)

  3. 10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section 50.46 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... reactors. (a)(1)(i) Each boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor fueled with uranium oxide... evaluation model. This section does not apply to a nuclear power reactor facility for which the...

  4. Process and apparatus for adjusting a new upper reactor internals in a reactor vessel of a PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frizot, A.; Cadaureille, G.; Lalere, C.; Machuron, J.Y.

    1987-01-01

    On the new upper reactor internals is mounted devices for alignment and clearances, before introducing in the reactor vessel. After introducing alignment and clearances are measured. Adjustment pieces are provided for optimum clearances and alignment and fixed after removal from vessel. Decontamination is made by using water jets prior to fitting recess parts [fr

  5. Automated ultrasonic examination of light water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    An automated ultrasonic examination system has been developed to meet the pre- and inservice inspection requirements of light water reactors. This system features remotely-controlled travelling instrument carriers, computerized collection and storage or inspection data in a manner providing real time comparison against code standards, and computer control over the positioning of the instrument carriers to provide precise location data. The system is currently being utilized in the field for a variety of reactor inspections. The principal features of the system and the recent inspection experience are discussed. (author)

  6. The industry/EPRI advanced light water reactor program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahlkopf, K.E.; Noble, D.M.; Sugnet, W.R.; Bilan, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    For the United States nuclear power industry to remain viable, it must be prepared to meet the expected need for new generating capacity in the late 1990s with an improved reactor system. The best hope of meeting this requirement is with evolutionary changes in current LWR systems through system simplification and reevaluation of safety and operational design margins. The grid characteristics and the difficulty in raising capital for large projects indicate that smaller light water reactors (400 to 600 MWe) may play an important role the next generation

  7. Safety analysis of a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled and moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Y.; Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    2002-01-01

    A safety analysis code for a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled reactor (SCLWR-H) with water rods cooled by descending flow, SPRAT-DOWN, is developed. The hottest channel, a water rod, down comer, upper and lower plenums, feed pumps, etc. are modeled as junction of nodes. Partial of the feed water flows downward from the upper dome of the reactor pressure vessel to the water rods. The accidents analyzed here are total loss of feed water flow, feed water pump seizure, and control rods ejection. All the accidents satisfy the criteria. The accident event at which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is total loss of feedwater flow. The transients analyzed here are loss of feed water heating, inadvertent start-up of an auxiliary water supply system, partial loss of feed water flow, loss of offsite power, loss of load, and abnormal withdrawal of control rods. All the transients satisfied the criteria. The transient event for which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is control rod withdrawal at normal operation. The behavior of loss of load transient is different from that of BWR. The power does not increase because loss of flow occurs and the density change is small. The sensitivities of the system behavior to various parameters during transients and accidents are analyzed. The parameters having strong influence are the capacity of the auxiliary water supply system, the coast down time of the main feed water pumps, and the time delay of the main feed water pumps trip. The control rod reactivity also has strong influence. (authors)

  8. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY11 Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary report for Fiscal Year 2011 activities associated with the Constellation Pilot Project. The project is a joint effor between Constellation Nuclear Energy Group (CENG), EPRI, and the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The project utilizes two CENG reactor stations: R.E. Ginna and Nine Point Unit 1. Included in the report are activities associate with reactor internals and concrete containments.

  9. Development of in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism for a innovative small reactor (Contract research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoritsune, Tsutomu; Ishida, Toshihisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Although the control rod drive mechanism of an existing large scale light water reactor is generally installed outside the reactor vessel, an in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism (INV-CRDM) is installed inside the reactor vessel. The INV-CRDM contributes to compactness and simplicity of the reactor system, and it can eliminate the possibility of a rod ejection accident. Therefore, INV-CRDM is an important technology adopted in an innovative small reactor. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has developed this type of CRDM driven by an electric motor, which can work under high temperature and high pressure water for the advanced marine reactor. On the basis of this research result, a driving motor coil and a bearing were developed to be used under the high temperature steam, severe condition for an innovative small reactor. About the driving motor, we manufactured the driving motor available for high temperature steam and carried out performance test under room temperature atmosphere to confirm the electric characteristic and coolability of the driving coil. With these test results and the past test results under high temperature water, we analyzed and evaluated the electric performance and coolability of the driving coil under high temperature steam. Concerning bearing, we manufactured the test pieces using some candidate material for material characteristic test and carried out the rolling wear test under high temperature steam to select the material. Consequently, we confirmed that performance of the driving coil for the advanced type driving motor, is enough to be used under high temperature steam. And, we evaluated the performance of the bearing and selected the material of the bearing, which can be used under high temperature steam. From these results, we have obtained the prospect that the INV-CRDM can be used for an innovative small reactor under steam atmosphere could be developed. (author)

  10. Fracture risk assessment for the pressurized water reactor pressure vessel under pressurized thermal shock events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Hsoung-Wei; Huang, Chin-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Highlight: • The PTS loading conditions consistent with the USNRC's new PTS rule are applied as the loading condition for a Taiwan domestic PWR. • The state-of-the-art PFM technique is employed to analyze a reactor pressure vessel. • Novel flaw model and embrittlement correlation are considered in the study. • The RT-based regression formula of NUREG-1874 was also utilized to evaluate the failure risks of RPV. • For slightly embrittled RPV, the SO-1 type PTSs play more important role than other types of PTS. - Abstract: The fracture risk of the pressurized water reactor pressure vessel of a Taiwan domestic nuclear power plant has been evaluated according to the technical basis of the U.S.NRC's new pressurized thermal shock (PTS) screening criteria. The ORNL's FAVOR code and the PNNL's flaw models were employed to perform the probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis associated with plant specific parameters of the domestic reactor pressure vessel. Meanwhile, the PTS thermal hydraulic and probabilistic risk assessment data analyzed from a similar nuclear power plant in the United States for establishing the new PTS rule were applied as the loading conditions. Besides, an RT-based regression formula derived by the U.S.NRC was also utilized to verify the through-wall cracking frequencies. It is found that the through-wall cracking of the analyzed reactor pressure vessel only occurs during the PTS events resulted from the stuck-open primary safety relief valves that later reclose, but with only an insignificant failure risk. The results indicate that the Taiwan domestic PWR pressure vessel has sufficient structural margin for the PTS attack until either the current license expiration dates or during the proposed extended operation periods.

  11. Aging assessment and mitigation for major LWR [light water reactor] components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Y.N.; Ware, A.G.; Conley, D.A.; MacDonald, P.E.; Burns, J.J. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This paper summarizes some of the results of the Aging Assessment and Mitigation Project sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objective of the project is to develop an understanding of the aging degradation of the major light water reactor (LWR) structures and components and to develop methods for predicting the useful life of these components so that the impact of aging on the safe operation of nuclear power plants can be evaluated and addressed. The research effort consists of integrating, evaluating, and updating the available aging-related information. This paper discusses current accomplishments and summarizes the significant degradation processes active in two major components: pressurized water reactor pressurizer surge and spray lines and nozzles, and light water reactor primary coolant pumps. This paper also evaluates the effectiveness of the current inservice inspection programs and presents conclusions and recommendations related to aging of these two major components. 37 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement: Insights from neural network modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, J.; Parfitt, D.; Wilford, K.; Riddle, N.; Alamaniotis, M.; Chroneos, A.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.

    2018-04-01

    Irradiation embrittlement of steel pressure vessels is an important consideration for the operation of current and future light water nuclear reactors. In this study we employ an ensemble of artificial neural networks in order to provide predictions of the embrittlement using two literature datasets, one based on US surveillance data and the second from the IVAR experiment. We use these networks to examine trends with input variables and to assess various literature models including compositional effects and the role of flux and temperature. Overall, the networks agree with the existing literature models and we comment on their more general use in predicting irradiation embrittlement.

  13. Research on physical and chemical parameters of coolant in Light-Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Isabela C.; Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: icr@cdtn.br, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEM-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The coolant radiochemical monitoring of light-water reactors, both power reactor as research reactors is one most important tasks of the system safe operation. The last years have increased the interest in the coolant chemical studying to optimize the process, to minimize the corrosion, to ensure the primary system materials integrity, and to reduce the workers exposure radiation. This paper has the objective to present the development project in Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN), which aims to simulate the primary water physical-chemical parameters of light-water-reactors (LWR). Among these parameters may be cited: the temperature, the pressure, the pH, the electric conductivity, and the boron concentration. It is also being studied the adverse effects that these parameters can result in the reactor integrity. The project also aims the mounting of a system to control and monitoring of temperature, electric conductivity, and pH of water in the Installation of Test in Accident Conditions (ITCA), located in the Thermal-Hydraulic Laboratory at CDTN. This facility was widely used in the years 80/90 for commissioning of several components that were installed in Angra 2 containment. In the test, the coolant must reproduce the physical and chemical conditions of the primary. It is therefore fundamental knowledge of the main control parameters of the primary cooling water from PWR reactors. Therefore, this work is contributing, with the knowledge and the reproduction with larger faithfulness of the reactors coolant in the experimental circuits. (author)

  14. 77 FR 15812 - Initial Test Program of Condensate and Feedwater Systems for Light-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... Systems for Light-Water Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft regulatory guide... Feedwater Systems for Light- Water Reactors.'' DG-1265 is proposed revision 2 of Regulatory Guide 1.68.1... Plants,'' dated January 1977. This regulatory guide is being revised to: (1) expand the scope of the...

  15. Underwater laser beam welding technology for reactor vessel nozzles of PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoda, Masaki; Tamura, Masataka; Tamura, Masataka

    2010-01-01

    Toshiba has developed an underwater laser beam welding technology for the maintenance of reactor vessel nozzles of pressurized water reactors (PWRs), which eliminates the need for the drainage of water from the reactor vessel. The new welding system makes it possible to both reduce the work period and minimize the radiation exposure of workers compared with conventional technologies for welding in ambient air. We have confirmed the effectiveness of this technology through experiments in which stress corrosion cracking (SCC) was mitigated on the inner surfaces of nozzles. We are promoting its practical application in Japan and overseas in cooperation with Westinghouse Electric Company, a group company of Toshiba. (author)

  16. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R.; Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W.

    1989-12-01

    Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs

  17. An evaluation of alternative reactor vessel cutting technologies for the experimental boiling water reactor at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boing, L.E.; Henley, D.R. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Manion, W.J.; Gordon, J.W. (Nuclear Energy Services, Inc., Danbury, CT (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Metal cutting techniques that can be used to segment the reactor pressure vessel of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) have been evaluated by Nuclear Energy Services. Twelve cutting technologies are described in terms of their ability to perform the required task, their performance characteristics, environmental and radiological impacts, and cost and schedule considerations. Specific recommendations regarding which technology should ultimately be used by ANL are included. The selection of a cutting method was the responsibility of the decommissioning staff at ANL, who included a relative weighting of the parameters described in this document in their evaluation process. 73 refs., 26 figs., 69 tabs.

  18. Study on in-vessel thermohydraulics phenomena of sodium-cooled fast reactors. 4. Numerical analysis of 1/10 scaled water experiment with the AQUA code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatu, Toshiharu; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2004-01-01

    A large-scale sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor in the feasibility studies on commercialized fast reactors has a feature of consideration of thorough simplified and compacted systems and components design to realize drastic economical improvements. Therefore, special attentions should be paid to thermohydraulic designs for gas entrainment behavior from free surface, flow-induced vibration of in-vessel components, thermal stratification in the plenum, thermal shock for various structures due to high-speed coolant flows, nonsymmetrical coolant flows, etc. in the reactor vessel. A numerical analysis was carried out with a multi-dimensional code AQUA to confirm an applicability to the evaluations for the in-vessel thermohydraulic phenomena using a 1/10 scaled water experiment simulating the large-scale fast breeder reactor in the feasibility studies. From the analysis, the following results were obtained. (1) In-vessel thermohydraulics characterized by a radiated flow pattern to the reactor vessel wall and a strong upward flow through a slit of the upper core structures were evaluated. These characteristics agreed approximately with the water experiment. (2) The upward velocity values at the slit agreed well with the experimental data under a condition of γ z = 0.3 and ξ z = 0.5, though overall evaluations of the in-vessel thermohydraulics were failed to predict quantitatively. (3) The AQUA code is applicable to the in-vessel thermohydraulics evaluations in the feasibility studies, though it is necessary to make further modifications of the calculational models for accurate evaluations. On the one hand, it was confirmed that calculated results for the 1/10 water experimental model and the 1/1 actual-scaled model agreed quantitatively for the in-vessel thermohydraulics characteristics indicated above. (author)

  19. In-Vessel Retention via External Reactor Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachrata, Andrea [CTU in Prague, Faculty of nuclear sciences and physical engineering, V Holesovickach 2 180 00, Prague 8 (Czech republic)

    2008-07-01

    In-vessel (corium) retention (IVR) via external reactor pressure vessel (RPV) cooling is considered to be an effective severe accident management strategy for corium localisation and stabilisation. The main idea of IVR strategy consists in flooding the reactor cavity and transferring the decay heat through the wall of RPV to the recirculating water and than to the atmosphere of the containment of nuclear power plant. The aim of this strategy is to localise and to stabilise the corium inside the RPV. Not using this procedure could destroy the integrity of RPV and might cause the interaction of the corium with the concrete at the bed of the reactor cavity. Several experimental facilities and computer codes (MVITA, ASTEC module DIVA and CFD codes) were applied to simulate the IVR strategy for concrete reactor designs. The necessary technical modifications concerning the implementation of IVR concept were applied at the Loviisa NPP (VVER-440/V213). This strategy is also an important part of the advanced reactor designs AP600 and AP1000. (authors)

  20. Nuclear safety in light water reactors severe accident phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Sehgal, Bal Raj

    2011-01-01

    This vital reference is the only one-stop resource on how to assess, prevent, and manage severe nuclear accidents in the light water reactors (LWRs) that pose the most risk to the public. LWRs are the predominant nuclear reactor in use around the world today, and they will continue to be the most frequently utilized in the near future. Therefore, accurate determination of the safety issues associated with such reactors is central to a consideration of the risks and benefits of nuclear power. This book emphasizes the prevention and management of severe accidents to teach nuclear professionals

  1. Reactor-vessel-sectioning demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundgren, R.A.

    1981-07-01

    A successful technical demonstration of simulated reactor vessel sectioning was completed using the combined techniques of air arc gouging and flame cutting. A 4-ft x 3-ft x 9-in. thick sample was fabricated of A36 carbon steel to simulate a reactor vessel wall. A 1/4-in layer of stainless steel (SS) was tungsten inert gas (TIG)-welded to the carbon steel. Several techniques were considered to section the simulated reactor vessel: an air arc gouger was chosen to penetrate the stainless steel, and flame cutting was selected to sever the carbon steel. After the simulated vessel was successfully cut from the SS side, another cut was made, starting from the carbon steel side. This cut was also successful. Cutting from the carbon steel side has the advantages of cost reduction since the air arc gouging step is eliminated and contamination controlled because the molten metal is blown inward

  2. Fast-neutron nuclear reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presciuttini, L.

    1984-01-01

    The reactor vessel comprises a cylindrical shell, of which axis is vertical, coupled at its lower part with a dished bottom. The reactor core rests on a support plate bearing on the bottom of the vessel. The above dished bottom comprises a spherical sector having the same radius and the same axis as the cylindrical shell and joining the lower part of the shell, and a spherical head of which radius is a little more important than the spherical sector one. A cylindrical support for the reactor core is attached to the vessel at the joint between the two dished sections. The invention applies more particularly to integrated type reactors cooled by liquid sodium [fr

  3. Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busby, Jeremy T; Nanstad, Randy K; Stoller, Roger E; Feng, Zhili; Naus, Dan J

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear reactors present a very harsh environment for components service. Components within a reactor core must tolerate high temperature water, stress, vibration, and an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. A recent EPRI-led study interviewed 47 US nuclear utility executives to gauge perspectives on long-term operation of nuclear reactors. Nearly 90% indicated that extensions of reactor lifetimes to beyond 60 years were likely. When polled on the most challenging issues facing further life extension, two-thirds cited plant reliability as the key issue with materials aging and cable/piping as the top concerns for plant reliability. Materials degradation within a nuclear power plant is very complex. There are many different types of materials within the reactor itself: over 25 different metal alloys can be found with can be found within the primary and secondary systems, not to mention the concrete containment vessel, instrumentation and control, and other support facilities. When this diverse set of materials is placed in the complex and harsh environment coupled with load, degradation over an extended life is indeed quite complicated. To address this issue, the USNRC has developed a Progressive Materials Degradation Approach (NUREG/CR-6923). This approach is intended to develop a foundation for appropriate actions to keep materials degradation from adversely impacting component integrity and safety and identify materials and locations where degradation can reasonably be expected in the future. Clearly, materials degradation will impact reactor reliability, availability, and potentially, safe operation. Routine surveillance and component replacement can mitigate these factors, although failures still occur. With reactor life extensions to 60 years or beyond or power uprates, many components must tolerate the reactor environment for even longer times. This may increase

  4. General design and main problems of a gas-heavy-water power reactor contained in a pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, R.; Gaudez, J.C.

    1964-01-01

    In the framework of research carried out on a CO 2 -cooled power reactor moderated by heavy water, the so-called 'pressure vessel' solution involves the total integration of the core, of the primary circuit (exchanges and blowers) and of the fuel handling machine inside a single, strong, sealed vessel made of pre-stressed concrete. A vertical design has been chosen: the handling 'attic' is placed above the core, the exchanges being underneath. This solution makes it possible to standardize the type of reactor which is moderated by heavy-water or graphite and cooled by a downward stream of carbon dioxide gas; it has certain advantages and disadvantages with respect to the pressure tube solution and these are considered in detail in this report. Extrapolation presents in particular.problems due specifically to the heavy water (for example its cooling,its purification, the balancing of the pressures of the heavy water and of the gas, the assembling of the internal structures, the height of the attic, etc. (authors) [fr

  5. Once-through cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S. [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab

    2001-07-01

    Concept of once-through cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors was developed. The research covered major aspects of conceptual design such as cores of thermal and fast reactors, plant system and heat balance, safety system and criteria, accident and transient analysis, LOCA, PSA, plant control and start-up. The advantages of the reactor lie in the compactness of the plant from high specific enthalpy of supercritical water, the simplicity of the once-through cycle and the experiences of major component technologies which are based on supercritical fossil-fired power plants and LWRs. The operating temperatures of the major components are within the experience in spite of high coolant outlet temperature. The once-through cycle is compatible with the tight fuel lattice fast reactor because of high head pumps and small coolant flow rate. (author)

  6. Once-through cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    2001-01-01

    Concept of once-through cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors was developed. The research covered major aspects of conceptual design such as cores of thermal and fast reactors, plant system and heat balance, safety system and criteria, accident and transient analysis, LOCA, PSA, plant control and start-up. The advantages of the reactor lie in the compactness of the plant from high specific enthalpy of supercritical water, the simplicity of the once-through cycle and the experiences of major component technologies which are based on supercritical fossil-fired power plants and LWRs. The operating temperatures of the major components are within the experience in spite of high coolant outlet temperature. The once-through cycle is compatible with the tight fuel lattice fast reactor because of high head pumps and small coolant flow rate. (author)

  7. Historical perspective of thermal reactor safety in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levy, S.

    1986-01-01

    A brief history of thermal reactor safety in U.S. light water reactors is provided in this paper. Important shortcomings in safety philosophy evolution versus time are identified and potential corrective actions are suggested. It should be recognized, that this analysis represents only one person's opinion and that most historical accountings reflect the author's biases and specific areas of knowledge. In that sense, many of the examples used in this paper are related to heat transfer and fluid flow safety issues, which explains why it has been included in a Thermal Hydraulics session. One additional note of caution: the value of hindsight and the selective nature of human memory when looking at the past cannot be overemphasized in any historical perspective

  8. European supercritical water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulenberg, T.; Starflinger, J.; Marsault, P.; Bittermann, D.; Maraczy, C.; Laurien, E.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, J.A.; Anglart, H.; Andreani, M.; Ruzickova, M.; Toivonen, A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The HPLWR reactor design is an example of a supercritical water cooled reactor. → Cladding material tests have started but materials are not yet satisfactory. → Numerical heat transfer predictions are promising but need further validation. → The research project is most suited for nuclear education and training. - Abstract: The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), how the European Supercritical Water Cooled Reactor is called, is a pressure vessel type reactor operated with supercritical water at 25 MPa feedwater pressure and 500 o C average core outlet temperature. It is designed and analyzed by a European consortium of 10 partners and 3 active supporters from 8 Euratom member states in the second phase of the HPLWR project. Most emphasis has been laid on a core with a thermal neutron spectrum, consisting of small fuel assemblies in boxes with 40 fuel pins each and a central water box to improve the neutron moderation despite the low coolant density. Peak cladding temperatures of the fuel rods have been minimized by heating up the coolant in three steps with intermediate coolant mixing. The containment design with its safety and residual heat removal systems is based on the latest boiling water reactor concept, but with different passive high pressure coolant injection systems to cause a forced convection through the core. The design concept of the steam cycle is indicating the envisaged efficiency increase to around 44%. Moreover, it provides the constraints to design the components of the balance of the plant. The project is accompanied by numerical studies of heat transfer of supercritical water in fuel assemblies and by material tests of candidate cladding alloys, performed by the consortium and supported by additional tests of the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission. Besides the scientific and technical progress, the HPLWR project turned out to be most successful in training the young generation of nuclear engineers

  9. LWR-WIMS, a computer code for light water reactor lattice calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsall, M.J.

    1982-06-01

    LMR-WIMS is a comprehensive scheme of computation for studying the reactor physics aspects and burnup behaviour of typical lattices of light water reactors. This report describes the physics methods that have been incorporated in the code, and the modifications that have been made since the code was issued in 1972. (U.K.)

  10. Status of advanced light water reactor designs 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-05-01

    The report is intended to be a source of reference information for interested organizations and individuals. Among them are decision makers of countries considering implementation of nuclear power programmes. Further, the report is addressed to government officials with an appropriate technical background and to research institutes of countries with existing nuclear programmes that wish to be informed on the global status in order to plan their nuclear power programmes including both research and development efforts and means for meeting future. The future utilization of nuclear power worldwide depends primarily on the ability of the nuclear community to further improve the economic competitiveness of nuclear power plants while meeting stringent safety requirements. The IAEA's activities in nuclear power technology development include the preparation of status reports on advanced reactor designs to provide all interested IAEA Member States with balanced and objective information on advances in nuclear plant technology. In the field of light water reactors, the last status report published by the IAEA was 'Status of Advanced Light Water Cooled Reactor Designs: 1996' (IAEA-TECDOC-968). Since its publication, quite a lot has happened: some designs have been taken into commercial operation, others have achieved significant steps toward becoming commercial products, including certification from regulatory authorities, some are in a design optimization phase to reduce capital costs, development for other designs began after 1996, and a few designs are no longer pursued by their promoters. With this general progress in mind, on the advice and with the support of the IAEA Department of Nuclear Energy's Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (LWRs), the IAEA has prepared this new status report on advanced LWR designs that updates IAEA-TECDOC-968, presenting the various advanced LWR designs in a balanced way according to a common outline

  11. Modeling the electrochemistry of the primary circuits of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertuch, A.; Macdonald, D.D.; Pang, J.; Kriksunov, L.; Arioka, K.

    1994-01-01

    To model the corrosion behaviors of the heat transport circuits of light water reactors, a mixed potential model (NTM) has been developed and applied to both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Using the data generated by the GE/UKEA-Harwell radiolysis model, electrochemical potentials (ECPs) have been calculated for the heat transport circuits of eight BWRs operating under hydrogen water chemistry (HWC). By modeling the corrosion behaviors of these reactors, the effectiveness of HWC at limiting IGSCC and IASCC can be determined. For simulating PWR primary circuits, a chemical-radiolysis model (developed by the authors) was used to generate input parameters for the MPM. Corrosion potentials of Type 304 and 316 SSs in PWR primary environments were calculated using the NTM and were found to be in good agreement with the corrosion potentials measured in the laboratory for simulated PWR primary environments

  12. Reactor Vessel Surveillance Program for Advanced Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kyeong-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Wan; Lee, Gyu-Mahn; Kim, Jong-Wook; Park, Keun-Bae; Kim, Keung-Koo

    2008-10-15

    This report provides the design requirements of an integral type reactor vessel surveillance program for an integral type reactor in accordance with the requirements of Korean MEST (Ministry of Education, Science and Technology Development) Notice 2008-18. This report covers the requirements for the design of surveillance capsule assemblies including their test specimens, test block materials, handling tools, and monitors of the surveillance capsule neutron fluence and temperature. In addition, this report provides design requirements for the program for irradiation surveillance of reactor vessel materials, a layout of specimens and monitors in the surveillance capsule, procedures of installation and retrieval of the surveillance capsule assemblies, and the layout of the surveillance capsule assemblies in the reactor.

  13. Modeling of heat and mass transfer processes during core melt discharge from a reactor pressure vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, T.N.; Bui, V.A.; Nourgaliev, R.R. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The objective of the paper is to study heat and mass transfer processes related to core melt discharge from a reactor vessel is a severe light water reactor accident. The phenomenology of the issue includes (1) melt convection in and heat transfer from the melt pool in contact with the vessel lower head wall; (2) fluid dynamics and heat transfer of the melt flow in the growing discharge hole; and (3) multi-dimensional heat conduction in the ablating lower head wall. A program of model development, validation and application is underway (i) to analyse the dominant physical mechanisms determining characteristics of the lower head ablation process; (ii) to develop and validate efficient analytic/computational methods for estimating heat and mass transfer under phase-change conditions in irregular moving-boundary domains; and (iii) to investigate numerically the melt discharge phenomena in a reactor-scale situation, and, in particular, the sensitivity of the melt discharge transient to structural differences and various in-vessel melt progression scenarios. The paper presents recent results of the analysis and model development work supporting the simulant melt-structure interaction experiments.

  14. Advanced light water reactor plants System 80+trademark design certification program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1994 - September 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+trademark during the US government's 1995 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design covers an essentially complete plant. It is based on EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) improvements to the Standardized System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2, and 3. The NSSS is a traditional two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs, each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard design houses the NSSS in a spherical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual barrier to radioactivity release. Other major features include an all-digital, human-factors-engineered control room, an alternate electrical AC power source, an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), and plant arrangements providing complete separation of redundant trains in safety systems

  15. Advanced light water reactor plants System 80+trademark design certification program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1995 - September 30, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+trademark during the US government's 1996 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design covers an essentially complete plant. It is based on EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) improvements to the Standardized System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2 and 3. The NSSS is a traditional two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs, each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard design houses the NSSS in a spherical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual barrier to radioactivity release. Other major features include an all-digital, human-factors-engineered control room, an alternate electrical AC power source, an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), and plant arrangements providing complete separation of redundant trains in safety systems

  16. Is light water reactor technology sustainable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothwell, G.; Van der Zwaan, B.

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes criteria for determining ''intermediate sustainability'' over a 500-year horizon. We apply these criteria to Light Water Reactor (LWR) technology and the LWR industry. We conclude that LWR technology does not violate intermediate sustainability criteria for (1) environmental externalities, (2) worker and public health and safety, or (3) accidental radioactive release. However, it does not meet criteria to (1) efficiently use depleted uranium and (2) avoid uranium enrichment technologies that can lead to nuclear weapons proliferation. Finally, current and future global demand for LWR technology might be below the minimum needed to sustain the current global LWR industry. (author)

  17. Development of Next-Generation LWR (Light Water Reactor) in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, T.; Kasai, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Next-Generation Light Water Reactor development program was launched in Japan in April 2008. The primary objective of the program is to cope with the need to replace existing nuclear power plants in Japan after 2030. The reactors to be developed are also expected to be a global standard design. Several innovative features are envisioned, including a reactor core system with uranium enrichment above 5%, a seismic isolation system, the use of long-life materials and innovative water chemistry, innovative construction techniques, safety systems with the best mix of passive and active concepts, and innovative digital technologies to further enhance reactor safety, reliability, economics, etc. In the first 3 years, a plant design concept with these innovative features is established and the effectiveness of the program is reevaluated. The major part of the program will be completed in 2015. (author)

  18. Natural uranium fueled light water moderated breeding hybrid power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Schneider, A.; Misolovin, A.; Gilai, D.; Levin, P.

    The feasibility of fission-fusion hybrid reactors based on breeding light water thermal fission systems is investigated. The emphasis is on fuel-self-sufficient (FSS) hybrid power reactors that are fueled with natural uranium. Other LWHRs considered include FSS-LWHRs that are fueled with spent fuel from LWRs, and LWHRs which are to supplement LWRs to provide a tandem LWR-LWHR power economy that is fuel-self-sufficient

  19. Safety aspects of designs for future light water reactors (evolutionary reactors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    The main purpose of this document is to describe the major innovations of proposed designs of future light water reactors, to describe specific safety characteristics and safety analysis methodologies, and to give a general overview of the most important safety aspects related to future reactors. The reactors considered in this report are limited to those intended for fixed station electrical power production, excluding most revolutionary concepts. More in depth discussion is devoted to those designs that are in a more advanced state of completion and have been more extensively described and analysed in the open literature. Other designs will be briefly described, as evidence of the large spectrum of new proposals. Some designs are similar; others implement unique features and require specific discussion (not all aspects of designs with unique features are fully discussed in this document). 131 refs, 22 figs

  20. Advanced Light Water Reactor Plants System 80+trademark Design Certification Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+trademark during the US government's 1993 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW t (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design consists of an essentially complete plant. It is based on evolutionary improvements to the Standardized System 80 nuclear steam supply system in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2, and 3, and the Duke Power Company P-81 balance-of-plant (BOP) that was designed and partially constructed at the Cherokee plant site. The System 80/P-81 original design has been substantially enhanced to increase conformance with the EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD). Some design enhancements incorporated in the System 80+ design are included in the four units currently under construction in the Republic of Korea. These units form the basis of the Korean standardization program. The full System 80+ standard design has been offered to the Republic of China, in response to their recent bid specification. The ABB-CE Standard Safety Analysis Report (CESSAR-DC) was submitted to the NRC and a Draft Safety Evaluation Report was issued by the NRC in October 1992. CESSAR-DC contains the technical basis for compliance with the EPRI URD for simplified emergency planning. The Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) is the standard ABB-Combustion Engineering two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard plant includes a sperical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual containment

  1. Loose parts monitoring in light water reactor cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A.; Alma, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    The work related to loose monitoring system for light water reactor, developed at GRS - Munique, are described. The basic problems due to the exact localization and detection of the loose part as well the research activities and development necessary aiming to obtain the best techniques in this field. (E.G.) [pt

  2. Reactor containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochiai, Kanehiro; Hayagumo, Sunao; Morikawa, Matsuo.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To safety and simplify the structure in a reactor containment vessel. Constitution: Steam flow channels with steam jetting ports communicating to coolants are provided between a communication channel and coolants in a pressure suppression chamber. Upon loss of coolant accidents, pressure in a dry well will increase, then force downwards water in an annulus portion and further flow out the water through steam jetting ports into a suppression pool. Thus, the steam flow channel is filled with steams or airs present in the dry well, which are released through the steam jetting ports into the pressure suppression chamber. Even though water is violently vibrated owing to the upward movement of air bubbles and condensation of steam bubbles, the annular portion and the steam jetting ports are filled with steams or the like, direct dynamic loads onto the structures such as communication channels can be avoided. (J.P.N.)

  3. Leak detector for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morimoto, Mikio.

    1991-01-01

    A branched pipe is disposed to a leak off pipeline led from a flange surface which connects the main body and the upper lid of a reactor pressure vessel. An exhaust pump is disposed to the branched pipe and a moisture gage is disposed on the side of the exhaustion and a dry air supplier is connected to the branched pipe. Upon conducting a pressure-proof leak test for the reactor pressure vessel, the exhaust pump is operated and an electromagnet valve disposed at the upstream of the dry air supplier is opened and closed repeatedly. The humidity of air sucked by the exhaust pump is detected by the moisture gage. If leaks should be caused in the joining surface of the flange, leaked water is diffused as steams. Accordingly, occurrence of leak can be detected instantly based on the comparison with the moisture level of the dry air as a standard. In this way, a leak test can be conducted reliably in a short period of time with no change of for the reactor pressure container itself. (I.N.)

  4. Flaw density examinations of a clad boiling water reactor pressure vessel segment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, K.V.; McClung, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Flaw density is the greatest uncertainty involved in probabilistic analyses of reactor pressure vessel failure. As part of the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program, studies have been conducted to determine flaw density in a section of reactor pressure vessel cut from the Hope Creek Unit 2 vessel [nominally 0.7 by 3 m (2 by 10 ft)]. This section (removed from the scrapped vessel that was never in service) was evaluated nondestructively to determine the as-fabricated status. We had four primary objectives: (1) evaluate longitudinal and girth welds for flaws with manual ultrasonics, (2) evaluate the zone under the nominal 6.3-mm (0.25-in.) clad for cracking (again with manual ultrasonics), (3) evaluate the cladding for cracks with a high-sensitivity fluorescent penetrant method, and (4) determine the source of indications detected

  5. Life extension of the St. Lucie unit 1 reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowan, G.A.; Sun, J.B.; Mott, S.L.

    1991-01-01

    In late 1989, Florida Power and Light Company (FP and L) established the policy that St. Lucie unit 1 should not be prevented from achieving a 60-yr operating life by reactor vessel embrittlement. A 60-yr operating life means that the plant would be allowed to operate until the year 2036, which is 20 years beyond the current license expiration date of 2016. Since modifications to the reactor vessel and its components are projected to be expensive, the desire of FP and L management was to achieve this lifetime extension through the use of fuel management and proven technology. The following limitations were placed on any acceptable method for achieving this lifetime extension capability: low fuel cycle cost; low impact on safety parameters; very little or no operations impact; and use of normal reactor materials. A task team was formed along with the Advanced Nuclear Fuels Company (ANF) to develop a vessel-life extension program

  6. Measuring device for water quality at reactor bottom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urata, Hidehiro; Takagi, Jun-ichi

    1995-10-27

    The present invention concerns measurement for water quality at the bottom of a reactor of a BWR type plant, in which reactor water is sampled and analyzed in a state approximate to conditions in a pressure vessel. Based on the result, hydrogen injection amount is controlled during hydrogen injection operation. Namely, a monitor for water quality is disposed to a sampling line in communication with the bottom of a pressure vessel. A water quality monitor is disposed to a drain sampling line in communication with the bottom of the pressure vessel. A corrosion potentiometer is disposed to the pressure sampling line or the drain sampling line. A dissolved oxygen measuring device is disposed to the pressure vessel sampling line or the drain sampling line. With such a constitution, the reactor water can be sampled and analyzed in a state approximate to the conditions in the pressure vessel. In addition, signals from the water quality monitor are inputted to a hydrogen injection amount control device. As a result, the amount of hydrogen injected to primary coolants can be controlled in a state approximate to the conditions in the pressure vessel. (I.S.).

  7. Measuring device for water quality at reactor bottom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urata, Hidehiro; Takagi, Jun-ichi.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention concerns measurement for water quality at the bottom of a reactor of a BWR type plant, in which reactor water is sampled and analyzed in a state approximate to conditions in a pressure vessel. Based on the result, hydrogen injection amount is controlled during hydrogen injection operation. Namely, a monitor for water quality is disposed to a sampling line in communication with the bottom of a pressure vessel. A water quality monitor is disposed to a drain sampling line in communication with the bottom of the pressure vessel. A corrosion potentiometer is disposed to the pressure sampling line or the drain sampling line. A dissolved oxygen measuring device is disposed to the pressure vessel sampling line or the drain sampling line. With such a constitution, the reactor water can be sampled and analyzed in a state approximate to the conditions in the pressure vessel. In addition, signals from the water quality monitor are inputted to a hydrogen injection amount control device. As a result, the amount of hydrogen injected to primary coolants can be controlled in a state approximate to the conditions in the pressure vessel. (I.S.)

  8. Stability analysis of supercritical-pressure light water-cooled reactor in constant pressure operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhwan, JI; Shirahama, H.; Koshizuka, S.; Oka, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic and the thermal-nuclear coupled stabilities of a supercritical pressure light water-cooled reactor. A stability analysis code at supercritical pressure is developed. Using this code, stabilities of full and partial-power reactor operating at supercritical pressure are investigated by the frequency-domain analysis. Two types of SCRs are analyzed; a supercritical light water reactor (SCLWR) and a supercritical water-cooled fast reactor (SCFR). The same stability criteria as Boiling Water Reactor are applied. The thermal-hydraulic stability of SCLWR and SCFR satisfies the criteria with a reasonable orifice loss coefficient. The decay ratio of the thermal-nuclear coupled stability in SCFR is almost zero because of a small coolant density coefficient of the fast reactor. The evaluated decay ratio of the thermal-nuclear coupled stability is 3,41 ∼ 10 -V at 100% power in SCFR and 0,028 at 100% power in SCLWR. The sensitivity is investigated. It is found that the thermal-hydraulic stability is sensitive to the mass flow rate strongly and the thermal-nuclear coupled stability to the coolant density coefficient. The bottom power peak distribution makes the thermal-nuclear stability worse and the thermal-nuclear stability better. (author)

  9. Water level measurement system in reactor pressure vessel of BWR and hydrogen concentration monitoring system for severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroda, Hidehiko; Okazaki, Koki; Shiraishi, Fujio; Kenjyo, Hiroaki; Isoda, Koichiro

    2013-01-01

    TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Accident caused severe accident to lose functions of many instrumentation systems. As a result, many important plant parameters couldn't be monitored. In order to monitor plant parameters in the case of severe accident, new instrumentation systems available in the severe conditions are being developed. Water level in reactor pressure vessel and hydrogen concentration in primary containment vessel are one of the most important parameters. Performance test results about water level measurement sensor and hydrogen sensor in severe environmental conditions are described. (author)

  10. The safety of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershagen, B.

    1986-04-01

    The book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The central part of the book is devoted to methods and results of safety analysis. Some significant events are described, notably the Three Mile Island accident. The book concludes with a chapter on the PIUS principle of inherent reactor safety as applied to the SECURE type of reactor developed in Sweden. (G.B.)

  11. Nondestructive examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, S.R.; Good, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Hockey, R.L.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.; Vo, T.V.

    1992-07-01

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties

  12. Radioactivity, radiation protection and monitoring during dismantling of light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummel, L.; Zech, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Based on the radioactivity inventory in the systems and components of light-water reactors observed during operation, the impact of actions during plant emptying after the conclusion of power operation and possible subsequent long-term safe enclosure concerning the composition of the nuclide inventory of the plant to be dismantled will be described. Derived from this will be the effects on radioactivity monitoring in the plant, physical radiation protection monitoring, and the measured characterization of the residual materials resulting from the dismantling. The impact of long-term interim storage will also be addressed in the discussion. The talk should provide an overview of the interrelationships between source terms, decay times and the radioactivity monitoring requirements of the various dismantling concepts for commercial light-water reactors. (orig.)

  13. Stress corrosion cracking studies of reactor pressure vessel steels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Der Sluys, W.A.

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this project was to perform a critical review of the information available in open literature on stress corrosion cracking of reactor pressure vessel materials in simulated light-water-reactor (LWR) conditions, develop a test procedure for conducting stress corrosion crack growth experiments in simulated LWR environments, and conduct a test program in an effort to duplicate some of the data available from the literature. The authors concluded that stress corrosion crack growth has been observed in pressure vessel steels under laboratory test conditions. The composition of the water in most cases where growth was observed is outside of the composition specified for operating conditions. Crack growth was observed in the experiments performed in this program, and it was intermittent. The cracking would start and stop for no apparent reason. In most instances, it would not restart without the change of some external variable. In a few instances, it restarted on its own. Crack growth rates as high as 3.6 x 10 -9 m/sec were observed in pressure vessel steels in high-purity water with 8 ppm oxygen. These high crack growth rates were observed for extremely short bursts in crack extension. They could not be sustained for crack growth extensions greater than a few tenths of a millimeter. From the results of this project it appears highly unlikely that stress corrosion cracking will be observed in operating nuclear plants where the coolant composition is maintained within water chemistry guidelines. However, more work is needed to better define the contaminations that cause crack growth. The crack growth rates are so high and the threshold values for crack nucleation are so low that the conditions causing them need to be well defined and avoided

  14. Technical specification: Mixed-oxide pellets for the light-water reactor irradiation demonstration test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowell, B.S.

    1997-06-01

    This technical specification is a Level 2 Document as defined in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light-Water Reactor Mixed-oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan. It is patterned after the pellet specification that was prepared by Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited, for use by Los Alamos National Laboratory in fabrication of the test fuel for the Parallex Project, adjusted as necessary to reflect the differences between the Canadian uranium-deuterium reactor and light-water reactor fuels. This specification and the associated engineering drawing are to be utilized only for preparation of test fuel as outlined in the accompanying Request for Quotation and for additional testing as directed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory or the Department of Energy

  15. Water injection device for reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaki, Isao.

    1996-01-01

    A pressure vessel incorporating a reactor core is placed and secured on a pedestal in a dry well of a reactor container. A pedestal water injection line is disposed opened at one end in a pedestal cavity passing through the side wall of the pedestal and led at the other end to the outside of the reactor container. A substitution dry well spray line is connected to a spray header disposed at the upper portion of the dry well. When the pressure vessel should be damaged by a molten reactor core and the molten reactor core should drop to the dry well upon occurrence of an accident, the molten reactor core on the floor of the pedestal is cooled by water injection from the pedestal water injection line. At the same time, the elevation of the pressure and the temperature in the reactor container is suppressed by the water injection of the substitution dry well spray line. This can avoid large scaled release of radioactive materials to the environmental circumference. (I.N.)

  16. Neutron Fluence And DPA Rate Analysis In Pebble-Bed HTR Reactor Vessel Using MCNP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzah, Amir; Suwoto; Rohanda, Anis; Adrial, Hery; Bakhri, Syaiful; Sunaryo, Geni Rina

    2018-02-01

    In the Pebble-bed HTR reactor, the distance between the core and the reactor vessel is very close and the media inside are carbon and He gas. Neutron moderation capability of graphite material is theoretically lower than that of water-moderated reactors. Thus, it is estimated much more the fast neutrons will reach the reactor vessel. The fast neutron collisions with the atoms in the reactor vessel will result in radiation damage and could be reducing the vessel life. The purpose of this study was to obtain the magnitude of neutron fluence in the Pebble-bed HTR reactor vessel. Neutron fluence calculations in the pebble-bed HTR reactor vessel were performed using the MCNP computer program. By determining the tally position, it can be calculated flux, spectrum and neutron fluence in the position of Pebble-bed HTR reactor vessel. The calculations results of total neutron flux and fast neutron flux in the reactor vessel of 1.82x108 n/cm2/s and 1.79x108 n/cm2/s respectively. The fast neutron fluence in the reactor vessel is 3.4x1017 n/cm2 for 60 years reactor operation. Radiation damage in stainless steel material caused by high-energy neutrons (> 1.0 MeV) will occur when it has reached the neutron flux level of 1.0x1024 n/cm2. The neutron fluence results show that there is no radiation damage in the Pebble-bed HTR reactor vessel, so it is predicted that it will be safe to operate at least for 60 years.

  17. Nuclear fuel for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etemad, A.

    1976-01-01

    The goal of the present speech is to point out some of the now-a-day existing problems related to the fuel cycle of light water reactors and to foresee their present and future solutions. Economical aspects of nuclear power generation have been considerably improving, partly through technological advancements and partly due to the enlargement of unit capacity. The fuel cycle, defined in the course of this talk, discusses the exploration, mining, ore concentration, purification, conversion, enrichment, manufacturing of fuel elements, their utilization in a reactor, their discharge and subsequent storage, reprocessing, and their re-use or disposal. Uranium market in the world and the general policy of several uranium owning countries are described. The western world requirement for uranium until the year 2000, uranium resources and the nuclear power programs in the United States, Australia, Canada, South Africa, France, India, Spain, and Argentina are discussed. The participation of Iran in a large uranium enrichment plant based on French diffusion technology is mentioned

  18. Reactor vessel decommissioning project. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoonen, D.H.

    1984-09-01

    This report describes a reactor vessel decommissioning project; it documents and explains the project objectives, scope, performance results, and sodium removal process. The project was successfully completed in FY-1983, within budget and without significant problems or adverse impact on the environment. Waste generated by the operation included the reactor vessel, drained sodium, and liquid, solid, and gaseous wastes which were significantly less than project estimates. Personnel radiation exposures were minimized, such that the project total was one-half the predicted exposure level. Except for the sodium removed, the material remaining in the reactor vessel is essentially the same as when the vessel arrived for processing

  19. Overview of the US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, K.A.; Williams, D.L.; Reister, R.

    2012-01-01

    The US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is focused on enabling the long-term operation of US commercial power plants. Decisions on life extension will be made by commercial power plant owners - the information provided by the research and development activities in the LWRS Program will reduce the uncertainty (and therefore the risk) associated with making those decisions. The LWRS Program encompasses two facets of long-term operation: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the nuclear industry that support implementation of performance improvement technologies. An important aspect of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is partnering with industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to support and conduct the long-term research needed to inform major component refurbishment and replacement strategies, performance enhancements, plant license extensions, and age-related regulatory oversight decisions. The Department of Energy research, development, and demonstration role focuses on aging phenomena and issues that require long-term research and/or unique Department of Energy laboratory expertise and facilities and are applicable to all operating reactors. This paper provides an overview of the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, including vision, goals, and major deliverables. (author)

  20. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of light water reactor flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzanos, C.P.; Weber, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    Advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), turbulence simulation, and parallel computing have made feasible the development of three-dimensional (3-D) single-phase and two-phase flow CFD codes that can simulate fluid flow and heat transfer in realistic reactor geometries with significantly reduced reliance, especially in single phase, on empirical correlations. The objective of this work was to assess the predictive power and computational efficiency of a CFD code in the analysis of a challenging single-phase light water reactor problem, as well as to identify areas where further improvements are needed

  1. Neutron collar calibration for assay of LWR [light-water reactor] fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O.; Pieper, J.E.

    1987-03-01

    The neutron-coincidence collar is used for the verification of the uranium content in light-water reactor fuel assemblies. An AmLi neutron source is used to give an active interrogation of the fuel assembly to measure the 235 U content, and the 238 U content is verified from a passive neutron-coincidence measurement. This report gives the collar calibration data of pressurized-water reactor and boiling-water reactor fuel assemblies. Calibration curves and correction factors are presented for neutron absorbers (burnable poisons) and different fuel assembly sizes. The data were collected at Exxon Nuclear, Franco-Belge de Fabrication de Combustibles, ASEA-Atom, and other nuclear fuel fabrication facilities

  2. Improvement to reactor vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    The vessel described includes a prestressed concrete vessel containing a chamber and a removable cover closing this chamber. The cover is in concrete and is kept in its closed position by main and auxiliary retainers, comprising fittings integral with the concrete of the vessel. The auxiliary retainers pass through the concrete of the cover. This improvement may be applied to BWR, PWR and LMFBR type reactor vessel [fr

  3. Reactor pressure vessel design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foehl, J.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. In chapter 2, the general principles of reactor pressure vessel design are elaborated. Crack and fracture initiation and propagation are treated in some detail

  4. Development trends in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fogelstroem, L.; Simon, M.

    1988-01-01

    The present market for new nuclear power plants is weak, but is expected to pick up again, which is why great efforts are being made to further develop the light water reactor line for future applications. There is both a potential and a need for further improvement, for instance with respect to even higher cost efficiency, a simplified operating permit procedure, shorter construction periods, and increased operational flexibility to meet rising demands in load following behavior and in better cycle data of fuel elements. However, also public acceptance must not be forgotten when deciding about the line to be followed in the development of LWR technology. (orig.) [de

  5. Is light water reactor technology sustainable?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothwell, G. [Stanford Univ., Dept. of Economics, CA (United States); Van der Zwaan, B. [Vrije Univ., Amsterdam, Inst. for Environmental Studies (Netherlands)

    2001-07-01

    This paper proposes criteria for determining ''intermediate sustainability'' over a 500-year horizon. We apply these criteria to Light Water Reactor (LWR) technology and the LWR industry. We conclude that LWR technology does not violate intermediate sustainability criteria for (1) environmental externalities, (2) worker and public health and safety, or (3) accidental radioactive release. However, it does not meet criteria to (1) efficiently use depleted uranium and (2) avoid uranium enrichment technologies that can lead to nuclear weapons proliferation. Finally, current and future global demand for LWR technology might be below the minimum needed to sustain the current global LWR industry. (author)

  6. Instrumentation and control strategies for an integral pressurized water reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belle R. Upadhyaya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Several vendors have recently been actively pursuing the development of integral pressurized water reactors (iPWRs that range in power levels from small to large reactors. Integral reactors have the features of minimum vessel penetrations, passive heat removal after reactor shutdown, and modular construction that allow fast plant integration and a secure fuel cycle. The features of an integral reactor limit the options for placing control and safety system instruments. The development of instrumentation and control (I&C strategies for a large 1,000 MWe iPWR is described. Reactor system modeling—which includes reactor core dynamics, primary heat exchanger, and the steam flashing drum—is an important part of I&C development and validation, and thereby consolidates the overall implementation for a large iPWR. The results of simulation models, control development, and instrumentation features illustrate the systematic approach that is applicable to integral light water reactors.

  7. Review of in-service thermal annealing of nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Server, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation embrittlement of ferritic pressure vessel steels increases the ductile-brittle transition temperature and decreases the upper-shelf level of toughness as measured by Charpy impact tests. A thermal anneal cycle well above the normal operating temperature of the vessel can restore most of the original Charpy V-notch energy properties. A test reactor pressure vessel has been wet annealed at less than 343 0 C (650 0 F), and annealing of the Belgian BR-3 reactor vessel has recently taken place. An industry survey indicates that dry annealing a reactor vessel in-place is feasible, but solvable engineering problems do exist. The materials with highest radiation sensitivity in the older reactor vessels are submerged-arc weld metals with high copper and nickel concentrations. The limited Charpy V-notch and fracture toughness data available for five such welds were reviewed. The review suggested that significant recovery results from annealing at 454 0 C (850 0 F) for one week. Two of the main concerns with a localized heat treatment at 454 0 C (850 0 F) are the degree of distortion that may occur after the annealing cycle and the extent of residual stresses. A thermal and structural analysis of a reactor vessel for distortions and residual stresses found no problems with the reactor vessel itself but did indicate a rotation at the nozzle region of the vessel that would plastically deform the attached primary piping. Further analytical studies are needed. An American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) task group is upgrading and revising the ASTM Recommended Guide for In-Service Annealing of WaterCooled Nuclear Reactor Vessels (E 509-74) with emphasis on the materials and surveillance aspects of annealing rather than system engineering problems. System safety issues are the province of organizations other than ASTM (for example, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code body)

  8. Design features to facilitate IAEA safeguards at light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasternak, T.; Glancy, J.; Goldman, L.; Swartz, J.

    1981-01-01

    Several studies have been performed recently to identify and analyze light water reactor (LWR) features that, if incorporated into the facility design, would facilitate the implementation of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards. This paper presents results and conclusions of these studies. 2 refs

  9. Study on external reactor vessel cooling capacity for advanced large size PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin Di; Liu Xiaojing; Cheng Xu; Li Fei

    2014-01-01

    External reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) is widely adopted as a part of in- vessel retention (IVR) in severe accident management strategies. In this paper, some flow parameters and boundary conditions, eg., inlet and outlet area, water inlet temperature, heating power of the lower head, the annular gap size at the position of the lower head and flooding water level, were considered to qualitatively study the effect of them on natural circulation capacity of the external reactor vessel cooling for an advanced large size PWR by using RELAP5 code. And the calculation results provide some basis of analysis for the structure design and the following transient response behavior of the system. (authors)

  10. Reactor-vessel-sectioning demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundgren, R.A.

    1981-09-01

    A technical demonstration was successfully completed of simulated reactor vessel sectioning using the combined techniques of air arc gouging and flame cutting. A 4-ft x 3-ft x 9-in. thick sample was fabricated of A36 carbon steel to simulate a reactor vessel wall. A 1/4-in. layer of stainless steel (SS) was tungsten inert gas (TIG)-welded to the carbon steel. Several techniques were considered to section the simulated reactor vessel; air arc gouging was selected to penetrate the stainless steel, and flame cutting was selected to sever the carbon steel. Three sectioning operations were demonstrated. For all three, the operating parameters were the same; but the position of the sample was varied. For the first cut, the sample was placed in a horizontal position, and it was successfully severed from the SS side. For the second cut, the sample was turned over and cut from the carbon steel side. Cutting from the carbon steel side has the advantages of cost reduction

  11. RPV-1: a first virtual reactor to simulate irradiation effects in light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jumel, St.

    2005-01-01

    The presented work was aimed at building a first VTR (virtual test reactor) to simulate irradiation effects in pressure vessel steels of nuclear reactor. It mainly consisted in: - modeling the formation of the irradiation induced damage in such steels, as well as their plasticity behavior - selecting codes and models to carry out the simulations of the involved mechanisms. Since the main focus was to build a first tool (rather than a perfect tool), it was decided to use, as much as possible, existing codes and models in spite of their imperfections. - developing and parameterizing two missing codes: INCAS and DUPAIR. - proposing an architecture to link the selected codes and models. - constructing and validating the tool. RPV-1 is made of five codes and two databases which are linked up so as to receive, treat and/or transmit data. A user friendly Python interface facilitates the running of the simulations and the visualization of the results. RPV-1 relies on many simplifications and approximations and has to be considered as a prototype aimed at clearing the way. According to the functionalities targeted for RPV-1, the main weakness is a bad Ni and Mn sensitivity. However, the tool can already be used for many applications (understanding of experimental results, assessment of effects of material and irradiation conditions,....). (O.M.)

  12. Mechanical behaviour of the reactor vessel support of a pressurized water reactor: tests and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolvin, M.; L'huby, Y.; Quillico, J.J.; Humbert, J.M.; Thomas, J.P.; Hugenschmitt, R.

    1985-08-01

    The PWR reactor vessel is supported by a steel ring laying on the reactor pit. This support has to ensure a good behaviour of the vessel in the event of accidental conditions (earthquake and pipe rupture). A new evolution of the evaluation methods of the applied forces has shown a significant increase in the design loads used until now. In order to take into account these new forces, we carried out a test on a representative mock-up of the vessel support (scale 1/6). This test was performed by CEA, EDF and FRAMATOME. Several static equivalent forces were applied on the experimental mock-up. Displacements and strains were simultaneously recorded. The results of the test have enabled to justify the design of the pit and the ring, to show up a wide safety margin until the collapse of the structures and to check our hypothesis about the transmission of the forces between the ring and the pit

  13. Controllability studies for an advanced CANDU boiling light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepp, R.M.; Hinds, H.W.

    1976-12-01

    Bulk controllability studies carried out as part of a conceptual design study of a 1200 MWe CANDU boiling-light-water reactor fuelled with U 235 - or Pu-enriched uranium oxide are outlined. The concept, the various models developed for its simulation on a hybrid computer and the perturbations used to test system controllability, are described. The results show that this concept will have better bulk controllability than similar CANDU-BLW reactors fuelled with natural uranium. (author)

  14. Fuel utilization potential in light water reactors with once-through fuel irradiation (AWBA Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampolla, D.S.; Conley, G.H.; Candelore, N.R.; Cowell, G.K.; Estes, G.P.; Flanery, B.K.; Duncombe, E.; Dunyak, J.; Satterwhite, D.G.

    1979-07-01

    Current commercial light water reactor cores operate without recylce of fuel, on a once-through fuel cycle. To help conserve the limited nuclear fuel resources, there is interest in increasing the energy yield and, hence, fuel utilization from once-through fuel irradiation. This report evaluates the potential increase in fuel utilization of light water reactor cores operating on a once-through cycle assuming 0.2% enrichment plant tails assay. This evaluation is based on a large number of survey calculations using techniques which were verified by more detailed calculations of several core concepts. It is concluded that the maximum fuel utilization which could be achieved by practical once-through pressurized light water reactor cores with either uranium or thorium is about 17 MWYth/ST U 3 O 8 (Megawatt Years Thermal per Short Ton of U 3 O 8 ). This is about 50% higher than that of current commercial light water reactor cores. Achievement of this increased fuel utilization would require average fuel burnup beyond 50,000 MWD/MT and incorporation of the following design features to reduce parasitic losses of neutrons: reflector blankets to utilize neutrons that would otherwise leak out of the core; fuel management practices in which a smaller fraction of the core is replaced at each refueling; and neutron economic reactivity control, such as movable fuel control rather than soluble boron control. For a hypothetical situation in which all neutron leakage and parasitic losses are eliminated and fuel depletion is not limited by design considerations, a maximum fuel utilization of about 20 MWYth/ST U 3 O 8 is calculated for either uranium or thorium. It is concluded that fuel utilization for comparable reactor designs is better with uranium fuel than with thorium fuel for average fuel depletions of 30,000 to 35,000 MWD/MT which are characteristic of present light water reactor cores

  15. Nuclear reactor with a suspended vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemercier, Guy.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a nuclear reactor with a suspended vessel and applies in particular when this is a fast reactor, the core or active part of the reactor being inside the vessel and immersed under a suitable volume of flowing liquid metal to cool it by extracting the calories released by the nuclear fission in the fuel assemblies forming this core [fr

  16. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Support of Non-light Water Reactor Technologies: Capabilities Assessment for NRC Near-term Implementation Action Plans for Non-light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jain, Prashant K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a rich history of support for light water reactor (LWR) and non-LWR technologies. The ORNL history involves operation of 13 reactors at ORNL including the graphite reactor dating back to World War II, two aqueous homogeneous reactors, two molten salt reactors (MSRs), a fast-burst health physics reactor, and seven LWRs. Operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has been ongoing since 1965. Expertise exists amongst the ORNL staff to provide non-LWR training; support evaluation of non-LWR licensing and safety issues; perform modeling and simulation using advanced computational tools; run laboratory experiments using equipment such as the liquid salt component test facility; and perform in-depth fuel performance and thermal-hydraulic technology reviews using a vast suite of computer codes and tools. Summaries of this expertise are included in this paper.

  17. Research on waterhammer caused by a rapid gas production in the severe accident of a light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inasaka, Fujio; Adachi, Masaki; Shiozaki, Kohki; Aya, Izuo; Nariai, Hideki

    2004-01-01

    In the severe accident of an LWR (Light Water Reactor), it is supposed that a large quantity of gas is generated in a water pool of the containment vessel due to a water-metal reaction or a steam explosion. A rapid bubble growth, if the water mass is pushed up having a coherency in time and direction in its movement, would give a severe waterhammer to the structure. In this study, we conducted experiments using two cylindrical model containment vessels with 1.0 and 0.428 m diameters, and investigated the behavior of water mass pushed up by a growing bubble and the scale effect of this phenomenon. In addition, we also closely observed the heavier of a growing bubble. In these experiments, a rapid bubble growth was simulated by injecting high-pressure air into a water pool. It was observed that the water mass was pushed up without an air penetration until the water level reached a certain elevation. On the basis of all data, experimental correlations which gave a rise distance or velocity of the water mass with coherency were proposed and the waterhammer pressure which affected the structure was quantitatively evaluated. The applicability of the existing two-phase flow numerical analysis code, RELAP5-3D to the waterhammer phenomenon caused by a rapid gas production was also verified. (author)

  18. Qualification issues for advanced light-water reactor protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsah, K.; Clark, R.L.; Antonescu, C.

    1993-01-01

    The instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) systems in advanced reactors will make extensive use of digital controls, microprocessors, multiplexing, and fiber optic transmission. Elements of these advances in I ampersand C have been implemented on some current operating plants. However, the widespread use of the above technologies, as well as the use of artificial intelligence with minimum reliance on human operator control of reactors, highlights the need to develop standards for qualifying the I ampersand C used in the next generation of nuclear power plants. As a first step in this direction, the protection system I ampersand C for present-day plants was compared to that proposed for advanced light-water reactors (ALWRs). An evaluation template was developed by assembling a configuration of a safety channel instrument string for a generic ALWR, then comparing the impact of environmental stressors on that string to their effect on an equivalent instrument string from an existing light-water reactor. The template was then used to suggest a methodology for the qualification of microprocessor-based protection systems. The methodology identifies standards/regulatory guides (or lack thereof) for the qualification of microprocessor-based safety I ampersand C systems. This approach addresses in part issues raised in NRC policy document SECY-91-292, which recognizes that advanced I ampersand C systems for the nuclear industry are ''being developed without consensus standards. as the technology available for design is ahead of the technology that is well understood through experience and supported by application standards.''

  19. Controlling hydrogen behavior in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullingford, H.S.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1981-01-01

    In the aftermath of the incident at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2), a new and different treatment of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) risks is needed for public safety because of the specific events involving hydrogen generation, transport, and behavior following the core damage. Hydrogen behavior in closed environments such as the TMI-2 containment building is a complex phenomenon that is not fully understood. Hence, an engineering approach is presented for prevention of loss of life, equipment, and environment in case of a large hydrogen generation in an LWR. A six-level defense strategy is described that minimizes the possibility of ignition of released hydrogen gas and otherwise mitigates the consequences of hydrogen release. Guidance is given to reactor manufacturers, utility companies, regulatory agencies, and research organizations committed to reducing risk factors and insuring safety of life, equipment, and environment

  20. Computerized reactor pressure vessel materials information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strosnider, J.; Monserrate, C.; Kenworthy, L.D.; Tether, C.D.

    1980-10-01

    A computerized information system for storage and retrieval of reactor pressure vessel materials data was established, as part of Task Action Plan A-11, Reactor Vessel Materials Toughness. Data stored in the system are necessary for evaluating the resistance of reactor pressure vessels to flaw-induced fracture. This report includes (1) a description of the information system; (2) guidance on accessing the system; and (3) a user's manual for the system

  1. Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modro, S.M.; Fisher, J.E.; Weaver, K.D.; Reyes, J.N.; Groome, J.T.; Babka, P.; Carlson, T.M.

    2003-01-01

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) project was conducted under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary project objectives were to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate the technical feasibility by testing in an integral test facility. This report presents the results of the project. After an initial exploratory and evolutionary process, as documented in the October 2000 report, the project focused on developing a modular reactor design that consists of a self-contained assembly with a reactor vessel, steam generators, and containment. These modular units would be manufactured at a single centralized facility, transported by rail, road, and/or ship, and installed as a series of self-contained units. This approach also allows for staged construction of an NPP and ''pull and replace'' refueling and maintenance during each five-year refueling cycle. Development of the baseline design concept has been sufficiently completed to determine that it complies with the safety requirements and criteria, and satisfies the major goals already noted. The more significant features of the baseline single-unit design concept include: (1) Thermal Power--150 MWt; (2) Net Electrical Output--35 MWe; (3) Steam Generator Type--Vertical, helical tubes; (4) Fuel UO 2 , 8% enriched; (5) Refueling Intervals--5 years; (6) Life-Cycle--60 years. The economic performance was assessed by designing a power plant with an electric generation capacity in the range of current and advanced evolutionary systems. This approach allows for direct comparison of economic performance and forms a basis for further evaluation, economic and technical, of the proposed design and for the design evolution towards a more cost competitive concept. Applications such as cogeneration

  2. Dismantling id the reactor pressure vessel insulation and dissecting of the MZFR reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeb, Andreas; Stanke, Dieter; Thoma, Markus; Eisenmann, Beata; Prechtl, Erwin; Dehnke, Burckhard

    2008-01-01

    The MZFR reactor was decommissioned in 1984. The authors describe the dismantling of the reactor pressure vessel insulation that consists of asbestos containing mineral fiber wool. The appropriate remote handling and cutting tools had to be adapted with respect to the restrained space in the containment. The dismantling of the reactor pressure vessel has been completed, the dissected parts have been packaged into 200 containers for the final repository Konrad. During the total project time no reportable events and no damage to persons occurred.

  3. Guidance for Developing Principal Design Criteria for Advanced (Non-Light Water) Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holbrook, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinsey, Jim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    In July 2013, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a joint initiative to address a key portion of the licensing framework essential to advanced (non-light water) reactor technologies. The initiative addressed the “General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants,” Appendix A to10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 50, which were developed primarily for light water reactors (LWRs), specific to the needs of advanced reactor design and licensing. The need for General Design Criteria (GDC) clarifications in non-LWR applications has been consistently identified as a concern by the industry and varied stakeholders and was acknowledged by the NRC staff in their 2012 Report to Congress1 as an area for enhancement. The initiative to adapt GDC requirements for non-light water advanced reactor applications is being accomplished in two phases. Phase 1, managed by DOE, consisted of reviews, analyses and evaluations resulting in recommendations and deliverables to NRC as input for NRC staff development of regulatory guidance. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed this technical report using technical and reactor technology stakeholder inputs coupled with analysis and evaluations provided by a team of knowledgeable DOE national laboratory personnel with input from individual industry licensing consultants. The DOE national laboratory team reviewed six different classes of emerging commercial reactor technologies against 10 CFR 50 Appendix A GDC requirements and proposed guidance for their adapted use in non-LWR applications. The results of the Phase 1 analysis are contained in this report. A set of draft Advanced Reactor Design Criteria (ARDC) has been proposed for consideration by the NRC in the establishment of guidance for use by non-LWR designers and NRC staff. The proposed criteria were developed to preserve the underlying safety bases expressed by the original GDC, and recognizing that advanced reactors may take

  4. Status of advanced technology and design for water cooled reactors: Heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    In 1987 the IAEA established the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR). Within the framework of the IWGATWR the IAEA Technical Report on Status of Advanced Technology and Design for Water Cooled Reactors, Part I: Light Water Reactors and Part II: Heavy Water Reactors, has been undertaken to document the major current activities and trends of technological improvement and development for future water reactors. Part I of the report dealing with Light Water Reactors (LWRs) was published in 1988 (IAEA-TECDOC-479). Part II of the report covers Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs) and has now been prepared. This report is based largely upon submissions from Member States. It has been supplemented by material from the presentations at the IAEA Technical Committee and Workshop on Progress in Heavy Water Reactor Design and Technology held in Montreal, Canada, December 6-9, 1988. It is hoped that this part of the report, containing the status of advanced heavy water reactor technology up to 1988 and ongoing development programmes will aid in disseminating information to Member States and in stimulating international cooperation. Refs, figs and tabs

  5. The 1500 MW fast breeder reactor the double envelope-vessel anchored in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolvin, M.

    1981-01-01

    This paper givers an account of EDF investigations to reduce the investment costs of the 1500 MW Fast Reactor (RNR 1500) without prejudice to the safety requirements. It deals with the double envelope-vessel, designed to minimize radiation consequences in the event of accidental leakage in the main vessel. In the Fast Reactors in operation (PHOENIX), under construction (CRYS-MALVILLE), and under project (NR 1500), the double envelope-steel vessel hangs down from the upper part of the reactor block, its weight being approximately 300 t. In the new design, the vessel is fixed into the concrete which supports the main vessel, by means of steel anchors. A thermal insulation isolates it from the main vessel. The installation of coils in the concrete, next to the lining, allows for water circulation to cool the concrete. (orig./GL)

  6. Problems in manufacturing and transport of pressure vessels of integral reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kralovec, J.

    1997-01-01

    Integral water-cooled reactors are typical with eliminating large-diameter primary pipes and placing primary components, i.e. steam generators and pressurizers in reactor vessels. This arrangement leads to reactor pressure vessels of large dimensions: diameters, heights and thick walls and subsequently to great weights. Thus, even medium power units have pressure vessels which are on the very limit of present manufacturing capabilities. Principal manufacturing and inspection operations as well as pertinent equipment are concerned: welding, cladding, heat treatment, machining, shop-handling, non-destructive testing, hydraulic pressure tests etc. Tile transport of such a large and heavy component makes a problem which effects its design as well as the selection of the plant site. Railway, road and ship are possible ways of transport each of them having its advantages and limitations. Specific features and limits of the manufacture and transport of large pressure vessels are discussed in the paper. (author)

  7. Safety vessels for explosive fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mineev, V.

    1994-01-01

    The failure of several types of geometrically similar cylindrical and spherical steel and glass fibers vessels filled with water or air was investigated when an explosive charge of TNT was detonated in the center. Vessels had radius 50-1000 mm, thickness of walls 2-20%. The detonation on TNT imitated energy release. The parameter: K = M/mf is a measure of the strength of the vessel where M is the mass of the vessel, and mf is the mass of TNT for which the vessel fails. This demanded 2-4 destroyed and nondestroyed shots. It may be showed that: K=A/σ f where σ f is the fracture stress of the material vessel, and A = const = F(energy TNT, characteristic of elasticity of vessel material). The chief results are the following: (1) A similar increase in the geometrical dimensions of steel vessels by a factor of 10 leads to the increase of parameter K in about 5 times and to decrease of failure deformation in 7 times (scale effect). (2) For glass fibers, scale effect is absent. (3) This problem is solved in terms of theory energetic scale effect. (4) The concept of TNT equivalent explosive makes it possible to use these investigations to evaluate the response of safety vessels for explosive fusion reactor

  8. Advanced light water reactor plants System 80+{trademark} design certification program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the status of the progress that was made towards Design Certification of System 80+{trademark} during the US government`s 1995 fiscal year. The System 80+ Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) is a 3931 MW (1350 MWe) Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). The design covers an essentially complete plant. It is based on EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document (URD) improvements to the Standardized System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) in operation at Palo Verde Units 1, 2, and 3. The NSSS is a traditional two-loop arrangement with two steam generators, two hot legs and four cold legs, each with a reactor coolant pump. The System 80+ standard design houses the NSSS in a spherical steel containment vessel which is enclosed in a concrete shield building, thus providing the safety advantages of a dual barrier to radioactivity release. Other major features include an all-digital, human-factors-engineered control room, an alternate electrical AC power source, an In-Containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST), and plant arrangements providing complete separation of redundant trains in safety systems.

  9. Additional Stress And Fracture Mechanics Analyses Of Pressurized Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, Matthew; Yin, Shengjun; Stevens, Gary; Sommerville, Daniel; Palm, Nathan; Heinecke, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP

  10. The manufacture of plutonium fuels for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebastard, G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the agreement concluded between COGEMA and BELGONUCLEAIRE, reflected in the creation of the COMMOX group which has been made reponsible for promoting and marketing plutonium fuel rods for light water reactors. One then analyses the main aspects of manufacturing this type of fuel and the resources deployed. Finally one indicates the sales prospects scheduled to meet requirements (MELOX plant) [fr

  11. Boiling water reactor life extension monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancavage, P.

    1991-01-01

    In 1991 the average age of GE-supplied Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) reached 15 years. The distribution of BWR ages range from three years to 31 years. Several of these plants have active life extension programmes, the most notable of which is the Monticello plant in Minnesota which is the leading BWR plant for license renewal in the United States. The reactor pressure vessel and its internals form the heart of the boiling water reactor (BWR) power plant. Monitoring the condition of the vessel as it operates provides a continuous report on the structural integrity of the vessel and internals. Monitors for fatigue, stress corrosion and neutron effects can confirm safety margins and predict residual life. Every BWR already incorporates facilities to track the key aging mechanisms of fatigue, stress corrosion and neutron embrittlement. Fatigue is measured by counting the cycles experienced by the pressure vessel. Stress corrosion is gauged by periodic measurements of primary water conductivity and neutron embrittlement is tracked by testing surveillance samples. The drawbacks of these historical procedures are that they are time consuming, they lag the current operation, and they give no overall picture of structural integrity. GE has developed an integrated vessel fitness monitoring system to fill the gaps in the historical, piecemetal monitoring of the BWR vessel and internals and to support plant life extension. (author)

  12. Some local dilution transient in a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, S.

    1989-01-01

    Reactivity accidents are important in the safety analysis of a pressurized water reactor. In this anlysis ejected control rod, steam line break, start of in-active loop and boron dilution accidents are usually dealt with. However, in the analysis is not included what reactivity excursions might happen when a zone,depleted of boron passes the reactor core. This thesis investigates during what operation and emergency conditions diluted zones might exist in a pressurized water reactor and what should be the maximum volumes for then. The limiting transport means are also established in terms of reactivty addition, for the depleted zones. In order to describe the complicated mixing process in the reactor vessel during such a transportation, a typical 3-loop reactor vessel has been modulated by means of TRAC-PF1's VESSEL component. Three cases have been analysed. In the first case the reactor is in a cold condition and the ractor coolant has boron concentration of 2000 ppm. To the reactor vessel is injected an clean water colume of 14 m 3 . In the two other cases the reactor is close to hot shutdown and borated to 850 ppm. To the reactor vessel is added 41 and 13 m 3 clean water, respectively. In the thesis is shown what spatial distribution the depleted zone gets when passing through the reactor vessel in the three cases. The boron concentration in the first case did not decrease the values which would bring the reactor to critical condition. For case two was shown by means of TRAC's point kinetics model that the reactor reaches prompt criticality after 16.03 seconds after starting of the reactor coolant pump. Another prompt criticality occured two seconds later. The total energy developed during the two power escalations were about 55 GJ. A comparision with the criteria used to evaluate the ejected control rod reactivity transient showed that none of these criteria were exceeded. (64 figs.)

  13. In- and ex-vessel flooding as part of the severe accident strategy in the KERENA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levi, P.; Fischer, M.

    2011-01-01

    Currently, AREVA NP is finalizing the basic design of the KERENA reactor, an advanced boiling water reactor with a net electric output of about 1250 MWe. The safety concept in the KERENA reactor is founded on reliable active and passive systems for water supply and heat removal. The passive systems are based on simple physics and do not require operator action. Therefore, a severe accident (SA) with core damage, caused by the subsequent and multiple failures of the safety systems, has an extremely low probability. Despite this, the KERENA design is intended to involve measures that can limit and stop the progression of the severe accident which further reduces the frequency and extent of radioactive releases into the environment. These additional measures include in-vessel and ex-vessel flooding. Flooding is intended to remove the heat from the core or from the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and transfer it into the containment. There the heat is removed by the active RHR (residual heat removal) system or by the passive CCCs (containment cooling condensers). Both flooding measures are passive and actuated independent of each other by different signals. The study shows that the in-vessel flooding is capable of arresting the core melt progression before a large molten pool can develop. In the unlikely event that the passive in-vessel flooding cannot be actuated or fails, the core will melt and relocate into the lower head of the RPV. In this case, as a further line of defense, decay heat removal can be achieved through the RPV wall into the water in the cavity. In order to assess whether the ex-vessel cooling can ensure RPV wall integrity a dedicated thermodynamics code has been developed which considers heat transfer from the molten corium pool into the RPV wall and the resulting wall ablation. As an input for the code the stratification behavior of the oxidic and metallic phase of the molten pool is examined. In the case of a light metallic phase on top, high heat

  14. Investigation of the failure of a reactor pressure vessel by plastic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laemmer, H.; Ritter, B.

    1994-01-01

    A possible consequence of a core meltdown accident in a pressurized water reactor is the failure of the reactor pressure vessel under high internal pressure. With the aid of the finite element program ABAQUS and using a material model of the thermo-plasticity for large deformation, the failure of the reactor pressure vessel due to plastic instability was examined. It was apparent from the finite element calculations that solely due to reduction in strength of the material, even for internal wall temperatures clearly below the core melt; of about 2000 C, the critical internal pressure can fall to values which are lower than the working pressure. With the aid of simplified geometry, a lower limit for the pressure at failure of the reactor pressure vessel can be calculated. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Pressure vessel for nuclear reactor plant consisting of several pre-stressed cast pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodmann, E.

    1984-01-01

    Several cylindrical pressure vessel components made of pressure castings are arranged on a sector of a circle around the cylindrical cast pressure vessel for accommodating the helium cooled HTR. Each component pressure vessel is connected to the reactor vessel by a horizontal gas duct. The contact surfaces between reactor and component pressure vessel are in one plane. In the spaces between the individual component pressure vessels, there are supporting blocks made of cast iron, which are hollow and also have flat surfaces. With the reactor vessel and the component pressure vessels they form a disc-shaped connecting part below and above the gas ducts. (orig./PW)

  16. Irradiation embrittlement of reactor vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bros, J.

    2000-01-01

    From the historical decision of closing the Yankee Rowe NPP because of the uncertainties on the level of reactor pressure vessel neutron embrittlement, this paper reviews the technical-scientist bases of the degradation phenomena, and refers to the evolution of reactor pressure vessel radiation surveillance programs. (Author)

  17. Radiation Protection at Light Water Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Prince, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This book is aimed at Health Physicists wishing to gain a better understanding of the principles and practices associated with a light water reactor (LWR) radiation protection program. The role of key program elements is presented in sufficient detail to assist practicing radiation protection professionals in improving and strengthening their current program. Details related to daily operation and discipline areas vital to maintaining an effective LWR radiation protection program are presented. Programmatic areas and functions important in preventing, responding to, and minimizing radiological incidents and the importance of performing effective incident evaluations and investigations are described. Elements that are integral in ensuring continuous program improvements are emphasized throughout the text.

  18. Light water breeder reactor using a uranium-plutonium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radkowsky, A.; Chen, R.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a light water receptor (LWR) for breeding fissile material using a uranium-plutonium cycle. It comprises: a prebreeder section having plutonium fuel containing a Pu-241 component, the prebreeder section being operable to produce enriched plutonium having an increased Pu-241 component; and a breeder section for receiving the enriched plutonium from the prebreeder section, the breeder section being operable for breeding fissile material from the enriched plutonium fuel. This patent describes a method of operating a light water nuclear reactor (LWR) for breeding fissile material using a uranium-plutonium cycle. It comprises: operating the prebreeder to produce enriched plutonium fuel having an increased Pu-241 component; fueling a breeder section with the enriched plutonium fuel to breed the fissile material

  19. Simulation of In-Vessel Corium Retention through External Reactor Vessel Cooling for SMART using SIMPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Jin-Sung; Son, Donggun; Park, Rae-Joon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Thermal load analysis from the corium pool to the outer reactor vessel in the lower plenum of the reactor vessel is necessary to evaluate the effect of the IVR-ERVC during a severe accident for SMART. A computational code called SIMPLE (Sever Invessel Melt Progression in Lower plenum Environment) has been developed for analyze transient behavior of molten corium in the lower plenum, interaction between corium and coolant, and heat-up and ablation of reactor vessel wall. In this study, heat load analysis of the reactor vessel for SMART has been conducted using the SIMPLE. Transient behavior of the molten corium in the lower plenum and IVR-ERVC for SMART has been simulated using SIMPLE. Heat flux from the corium pool to the outer reactor vessel is concentrated in metallic layer by the focusing effect. As a result, metallic layer shows higher temperature than the oxidic layer. Also, vessel wall of metallic layer has been ablated by the high in-vessel temperature. Ex-vessel temperature of the metallic layer was maintained 390 K and vessel thickness was maintained 14 cm. It means that the reactor vessel integrity is maintained by the IVR-ERVC.

  20. Development status and application prospect of supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Manchang; Wang Mingli

    2006-01-01

    The Supercritical-pressure Light Water Cooled Reactor (SCWR) is selected by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) as one of the six Generation IV nuclear systems that will be developed in the future, and it is an innovative design based on the existing technologies used in LWR and supercritical coal-fired plants. Technically, SCWR may be based on the design, construction and operation experiences in existing PWR and supercritical coal-fired plants, which means that there is no insolvable technology difficulties. Since PWR technology will be adopted in the near term and medium term projects in China, and considering the sustainable development of the technology, it is an inevitable choice to research and develop the nuclear system of supercritical light water cooled reactor. (authors)

  1. Safety aspects of water chemistry in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    The goals of the water chemistry control programmes are to maximize operational safety and the availability and operating life of primary system components, to maximize fuel integrity, and to control radiation buildup. To achieve these goals an effective corporate policy should be developed and implemented. Essential management responsibilities are: Recognizing of the long-term benefits of avoiding or minimizing: a) system corrosion; b) fuel failure; and c) radiation buildup. The following control or diagnostic parameters are suitable performance indicators: for PWR primary coolant circuits: pH of reactor water (by operating temperature); Concentration of chlorides in reactor water; Hydrogen (or oxygen) in reactor water. For PWR secondary coolant circuits: pH in feedwater; Cation productivity in steam generator blowdown; Iron concentration in feedwater; Oxygen concentration in condensate. And BWR coolant circuits: Conductivity of reactor water; Concentration of chlorides in reactor water; Iron concentration in feedwater; Copper concentration in feedwater. The present document represents a review of the developments in some Member States on how to implement a reasonable water chemistry programme and how to assess its effectiveness through numerical indicators. 12 figs, 20 tabs

  2. Flow-induced vibration for light-water reactors. Progress report, April 1978-December 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schardt, J.F.

    1980-03-01

    Flow-Induced vibration for Light Water Reactors (FIV for LWRs) is a four-year program designed to improve the FIV performance of light water reactors through the development of design criteria, analytical models for predicting behavior of components, general scaling laws to improve the accuracy of reduced-scale tests, and the identification of high FIV risk areas. The program commenced December 1, 1976, but was suspended on September 30, 1978, due to a shift in Department of Energy (DOE) priorities away from LWR productivity/availability. It was reinitiated as of August 1, 1979. This progress report summarizes the accomplishments achieved during the period from April 1978 to December 1979

  3. PWR reactor vessel in-service-inspection according to RSEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algarotti, Marc; Dubois, Philippe; Hernandez, Luc; Landez, Jean Paul

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear services experience Framatome ANP (an AREVA and Siemens company) has designed and constructed 86 Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) around the world including the three units lately commissioned at Ling Ao in the People's Republic of China and ANGRA 2 in Brazil; the company provided general and specialized outage services supporting numerous outages. Along with the American and German subsidiaries, Framatome ANP Inc. and Framatome ANP GmbH, Framatome ANP is among the world leading nuclear services providers, having experience of over 500 PWR outages on 4 continents, with current involvement in more than 50 PWR outages per year. Framatome ANP's experience in the examinations of reactor components began in the 1970's. Since then, each unit (American, French and German companies) developed automated NDT inspection systems and carried out pre-service and ISI (In-Service Inspections) using a large range of NDT techniques to comply with each utility expectations. These techniques have been validated by the utilities and the safety authorities of the countries where they were implemented. Notably Framatome ANP is fully qualified to provide full scope ISI services to satisfy ASME Section XI requirements, through automated NDE tasks including nozzle inspections, reactor vessel head inspections, steam generator inspections, pressurizer inspections and RPV (Reactor Pressure Vessel) inspections. Intercontrole (Framatome ANP subsidiary dedicated in supporting ISI) is one of the leading NDT companies in the world. Its main activity is devoted to the inspection of the reactor primary circuit in French and foreign PWR Nuclear Power Plants: the reactor vessel, the steam generators, the pressurizer, the reactor internals and reactor coolant system piping. NDT methods mastered by Intercontrole range from ultrasonic testing to eddy current and gamma ray examinations, as well as dye penetrant testing, acoustic monitoring and leak testing. To comply with the high requirements of

  4. European community light water reactor safety research projects. Experimental issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Research programs on light water reactor safety currently carried out in the European Community are presented. They cover: accident conditions (LOCA, ECCS, core meltdown, external influences, etc...), fault and accident prevention and means of mitigation, normal operation conditions, on and off site implications and equipment under severe accident conditions, and miscellaneous subjects

  5. Long term review of research on light water reactor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumiya, Yutaka

    1982-01-01

    In Japan, 24 nuclear power plants of 17.18 million kWe capacity are in operation, and their rate of operation has shown the good result of more than 60% since 1980. One of the research on the development of light water reactors is the electric power common research, which was started in 1976, and 272 researches were carried out till 1982. It contributed to the counter-measures to stress corrosion cracking, thermal fatigue and the thinning of steam generator tubes, to the reduction of crud generation and the remote control and automation of inspection and maintenance, and to the verification of safety. The important items for the future are the cost down of nuclear power plant construction, the development of robots for nuclear power plants, the improvement of the ability to follow load variation, and the development of light water reactors of new types. It is necessary to diversify the types of reactors to avoid the effect of a serious trouble which may occur in one type of reactors. Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., thinks that the Japanese type PWRs having the technical features of KWU type PWRs are desirable for the future development. The compatibility with the condition of installation permission in Japan, the required design change and the economy of the standard design PWRs of KWU (1.3 million kW) have been studied since October, 1981, by KWU and three Japanese manufacturers. (Kako, I.)

  6. Reactor water level measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuroki, Reiji; Asano, Tamotsu.

    1996-01-01

    A condensation vessel is connected to the upper portion of a reactor pressure vessel by way of a pipeline. The lower portion of the condensation vessel is connected to a low pressure side of a differential pressure transmission device by way of a reference leg pipeline. The high pressure side of the differential pressure transmission device is connected to the lower portion of the pressure vessel by way of a pipeline. The condensation vessel is equipped with a temperature sensor. When a temperature of a gas phase portion in the condensation vessel is lowered below a predetermined level, and incondensible gases in the condensation vessel starts to be dissolved in water, signals are sent from the temperature sensor to a control device and a control valve is opened. With such a constitution, CRD driving water flows into the condensation vessel, and water in which gases at the upper portion of the condensation vessel is dissolved flows into the pressure vessel by way of a pipeline. Then, gases dissolved in a reference water column in the reference leg pipeline are eliminated and the value of a reference water pressure does not change even upon abrupt lowering of pressure. (I.N.)

  7. Control Rod Drive Mechanism Installed in the Internal of Reactor Pressure Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, M. H.; Choi, S.; Park, J. S.; Lee, J. S.; Kim, D. O.; Hur, N. S.; Hur, H.; Yu, J. Y

    2008-09-15

    This report describes the review results and important technologies related to the in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism. Generally, most of the CRDMs used in the PWR are attached outside of the reactor pressure vessel, and the pernetration of the vessel head can not avoid. However, in-vessel type CRDMs, which are installed inside the reactor vessel, can eliminate the possibility of rod ejection accidents and the penetration of the vessel head, and provide a compact design of the reactor vessel and containment. There are two kinds of in-vessel type CRDM concerning the driving force-driven by a driving motor and by a hydraulic force. Motor driven CRDMs have been mainly investigated in Japan(MRX, IMR, DRX, next generation BWR etc.), and developed the key components such as a canned motor, an integrated rod position indicator, a separating ball-nut and a ball bearing that can operate under the water conditions of a high temperature and pressure. The concept of hydraulically driven CRDMs have been first reported by KWU and Siemens for KWU 200 reactor, and Argentina(CAREM) and China(NHR-5, NHR-200) have been developed the internal CRDM with the piston and cylinder of slightly different geometries. These systems are driven by the hydraulic force which is produced by pumps outside of the reactor vessel and transmitted through a pipe penetrating the reactor vessel, and needs complicated control and piping systems including pumps, valves and pipes etc.. IRIS has been recently decided the internal CRDMs as the reference design, and an analytical and experimental investigations of the hydraulic drive concept are performed by POLIMI in Italy. Also, a small French company, MP98 has been developed a new type of control rods, called 'liquid control rods', where reactivity is controlled by the movement of a liquid absorber in a manometer type device.

  8. Radiological control aspects of the fabrication of the Light Water Breeder Reactor core (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, B.G.

    1979-05-01

    A description is presented of the radiological control aspects of the fabrication of the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core. Included are the radiological control criteria applied for the design and use of fabrication facilities, the controls and limits imposed to minimize radiaion exposure to personnel, and an evaluation of the applied radiological program in meeting the program objectives. The goal of the LWBR program is to develop the technology to breed in light water reactors so that nuclear fuel may be used significantly more efficiently in these reactors. This technology is being developed by designing and fabricating a breeder reactor core, utilizing thoria (ThO 2 ) and binary thoria--urania (ThO 2 - 233 UO 2 ) fuel, to be operated in the existing pressurized water reactor plant owned by the Department of Energy at Shippingport, Pennsylvania

  9. Light-water-reactor coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    An overview is presented of computer codes that model light water reactor cores with coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics. This includes codes for transient analysis and codes for steady state analysis which include fuel depletion and fission product buildup. Applications in nuclear design, reactor operations and safety analysis are given and the major codes in use in the USA are identified. The neutronic and thermal-hydraulic methodologies and other code features are outlined for three steady state codes (PDQ7, NODE-P/B and SIMULATE) and four dynamic codes (BNL-TWIGL, MEKIN, RAMONA-3B, RETRAN-02). Speculation as to future trends with such codes is also presented

  10. Three core concepts for producing uranium-233 in commercial pressurized light water reactors for possible use in water-cooled breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, G.H.; Cowell, G.K.; Detrick, C.A.; Kusenko, J.; Johnson, E.G.; Dunyak, J.; Flanery, B.K.; Shinko, M.S.; Giffen, R.H.; Rampolla, D.S.

    1979-12-01

    Selected prebreeder core concepts are described which could be backfit into a reference light water reactor similar to current commercial reactors, and produce uranium-233 for use in water-cooled breeder reactors. The prebreeder concepts were selected on the basis of minimizing fuel system development and reactor changes required to permit a backfit. The fuel assemblies for the prebreeder core concepts discussed would occupy the same space envelope as those in the reference core but contain a 19 by 19 array of fuel rods instead of the reference 17 by 17 array. An instrument well and 28 guide tubes for control rods have been allocated to each prebreeder fuel assembly in a pattern similar to that for the reference fuel assemblies. Backfit of these prebreeder concepts into the reference reactor would require changes only to the upper core support structure while providing flexibility for alternatives in the type of fuel used

  11. Evaluation of a cavity flooding strategy for the prevention of reactor vessel failure in a severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Rae Joon; Je, Moo Sung; Park, Chang Kyoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, TaeJon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-10-01

    As a part of the evaluation of accident management strategies for severe accident prevention or mitigation in a station blackout scenario for YGN 3 and 4, an external vessel cooling strategy for the prevention of reactor vessel failure has been estimated using the MAAP4 computer code. The sensitivity studies have been performed such as actuating timings and the number of spray pumps used. To explore external vessel cooling strategies, containment spray pumps were actuated by varying time spanning core uncovery, core melting and relocation of molten core material. It was shown that flooding of the reactor cavity using the containment spray system may prevent reactor vessel failure but may not prevent the failure of the relocation of molten core material during the station blackout sequence of YGN 3 and 4. Reactor vessel failure can be prevented by external vessel cooling using condensed water from the operation of two containment spray pumps at the time of core melting and using water from the operation of one containment spray pumps at the time of core melting and using water from the operation of one containment spray pump at the time of core uncovery. (Author) 46 refs., 26 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Reactor vessel stud closure system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegelman, S.R.; Salton, R.B.; Beer, R.W.; Malandra, L.J.; Cognevich, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    A quick-acting stud tensioner apparatus for enabling the loosening or tightening of a stud nut on a reactor vessel stud. The apparatus is adapted to engage the vessel stud by closing a gripper around an upper end of the vessel stud when the apparatus is seated on the stud. Upon lifting the apparatus, the gripper releases the vessel stud so that the apparatus can be removed

  13. A model for structural analysis of nuclear reactor pressure vessel flanges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.A. de.

    1987-01-01

    Due to the recent Brazilian advances in the nuclear technology area, it has been necessary the development of design and analysis methods for pressurized water reactor components, also as other components of a nuclear plant. This work proposes a methodology for the structural analysis of large diameter nuclear reactor pressure vessel flanges. In the analysis the vessel is divided into shell-of-revolution elements, the flanges are represented by rigid rings, and the bolts are treated as beams. The flexibility method is used for solving the problem. A computer program is shown, and the given results (displacements and stresses) are compared with results obtained by the finite element method. Although developed for nuclear reactor pressure vessel calculations, the program is more general, being possible its use for the analysis of any structure composed by shells of revolution. (author)

  14. Systems design of direct-cycle supercritical-water-cooled fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi; Jevremovic, Tatjana; Okano, Yashushi

    1995-01-01

    The system design of a direct-cycle supercritical-water-cooled fast reactor is presented. The supercritical water does not exhibit a change of phase. the recirculation system, steam separator, and dryer of a boiling water reactor (BWR) are unnecessary. Roughly speaking, the reactor pressure vessel and control rods are similar to those of a pressurized water reactor, the containment and emergency core cooling system are similar to a BWR, and the balance of plant is similar to a supercritical-pressure fossil-fired power plant (FPP). the electric power of the fast converter is 1,508 MW(electric). The number of coolant loops is only two because of the high coolant enthalpy. Containment volume is much reduced. The thermal efficiency is improved 24% over a BWR. The coolant void reactivity is negative by placing thin zirconium-hydride layers between seeds and blankets. The power costs would be much reduced compared with those of a light water reactor (LWR) and a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor. The concept is based on the huge amount of experience with the water coolant technology of LWRs and FPPs. The oxidation of stainless steel cladding is avoided by adopting a much lower coolant temperature than that of the FPP

  15. End-of-life destructive examination of light water breeder reactor fuel rods (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, K.D.

    1987-10-01

    Destructive examination of 12 representative Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods was performed following successful operation in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station for 29,047 effective full power hours, about five years. Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods were unique in that the thorium oxide and uranium-233 oxide fuel was contained within Zircaloy-4 cladding. Destructive examinations included analysis of released fission gas; chemical analysis of the fuel to determine depletion, iodine, and cesium levels; chemical analysis of the cladding to determine hydrogen, iodine, and cesium levels; metallographic examination of the cladding, fuel, and other rod components to determine microstructural features and cladding corrosion features; and tensile testing of the irradiated cladding to determine mechanical strength. The examinations confirmed that Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rod performance was excellent. No evidence of fuel rod failure was observed, and the fuel operating temperature was low (below 2580 0 F at which an increased percentage of fission gas is released). 21 refs., 80 figs., 20 tabs

  16. The risks of nuclear energy technology. Safety concepts of light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raskob, Wolfgang; Landman, Claudia; Paesler-Sauer, Juergen [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany). Inst. fuer Kern- und Energietechnk (IKET); Kessler, Guenter; Veser, Anke; Schlueter, Franz-Hermann

    2014-11-01

    Analyses the risks of nuclear power stations. Discusses the security concept of reactors. Analyzes possible crash of air planes on a reactor containment. Presents measures against the spread of radioactivity after a severe accident. Written in engaging style for professionals and policy makers. The book analyses the risks of nuclear power stations. The security concept of reactors is explained. Measures against the spread of radioactivity after a severe accident, accidents of core melting and a possible crash of an air plane on a reactor containment are discussed. The book covers three scientific subjects of the safety concepts of Light Water Reactors: - A first part describes the basic safety design concepts of operating German Pressurized Water Reactors and Boiling Water Reactors including accident management measures introduced after the reactor accidents of Three Mile Island and Chernobyl. These safety concepts are also compared with the experiences of the Fukushima accidents. In addition, the safety design concepts of the future modern European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) and of the future modern Boiling Water Reactor SWR-1000 (KERENA) are presented. These are based on new safety research results of the past decades. - In a second, part the possible crash of military or heavy commercial air planes on a reactor containment is analyzed. It is shown that reactor containments can be designed to resist to such an airplane crash. - In a third part, an online decision system is presented. It allows to analyze the distribution of radioactivity in the atmosphere and to the environment after a severe reactor accident. It provides data for decisions to be taken by authorities for the minimization of radiobiological effects to the population. This book appeals to readers who have an interest in save living conditions and some understanding for physics or engineering.

  17. Development of ball bearing in high temperature water for in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism of advanced marine reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunokawa, Hiroshi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Yoritsune, Tsutomu; Imayoshi, Shou; Ochiai, Masa-aki; Ishida, Toshihisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Kasahara, Yoshiyuki [Advanced Reactor Technology Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    An advanced marine reactor MRX designed by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) adopts an in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism, which is installed inside the reactor vessel. Since the in-vessel type control rod drive mechanism should work at a severe condition of a high temperature and high pressure water - 310degC and 12 MPa -, the JAERI has developed the components, a ball bearing of which especially is one of key technologies for realization of this type mechanism. The present report describes the development of the ball bearing containing a survey of materials, material screening tests on oxidation in an autoclave and rolling wear by a small facility, a trial fabrication of the full size ball bearing, and endurance test of it in the high temperature water. As a result, it was found from the development that the materials of cobalt alloy for both of the inner and outer races, cermet for the ball, and graphite for the retainer can satisfy the design condition of the ball bearing. (author)

  18. Technology programs in support of advanced light water reactor plants: Construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichen, E.P.

    1989-10-01

    Stone ampersand Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC) is conducting several independent, yet interrelated, studies of light water reactor plants to improve constructibility and quality, to reduce costs and schedule duration, and to simplify design. This document discusses construction approaches. 77 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs

  19. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.E.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1990-12-01

    Topics that have been investigated during this year include (1) SCC of A533-Gr B steel used in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels, (2) fatigue of Type 316NG SS, and (3) SCC of Type 347 and CF-3 cast duplex stainless steels in simulated BWR water. Crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests were performed on a composite A533-Gr B/Inconel-182 specimen in which the stress corrosion crack in the Inconel-182 weld metal penetrated and grew into the A533-Gr B steel. CGR tests were also conducted on conventional (unplated) and nickel- or gold-plated A533-Gr B specimens to provide insight into whether the nature of the surface layer on the low-alloy steel, either oxide corrosion products or a noble metal, influences the overall SCC process. CGR data on the A533-Gr B specimens were compared with the fatigue crack reference curves in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI, Appendix A. Fatigue tests were conducted on Type 316NG SS in air and simulated BWR water at low strain ranges and frequencies to better establish margins in the ASME Code Section III Fatigue Design Curves. CGR tests were also conducted on specimens of Type 347 SS with different heat-treatment conditions, and a specimen of CF-3 cast stainless steel with a ferrite content of 15.6%. The results were compared with previous data on another heat of Type 347 SS, which was very resistant to SCC, and a CF-3M steel with a ferrite content of 5%. 37 refs., 15 figs., 8 tabs

  20. Assembly homogenization techniques for light water reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    Recent progress in development and application of advanced assembly homogenization methods for light water reactor analysis is reviewed. Practical difficulties arising from conventional flux-weighting approximations are discussed and numerical examples given. The mathematical foundations for homogenization methods are outlined. Two methods, Equivalence Theory and Generalized Equivalence Theory which are theoretically capable of eliminating homogenization error are reviewed. Practical means of obtaining approximate homogenized parameters are presented and numerical examples are used to contrast the two methods. Applications of these techniques to PWR baffle/reflector homogenization and BWR bundle homogenization are discussed. Nodal solutions to realistic reactor problems are compared to fine-mesh PDQ calculations, and the accuracy of the advanced homogenization methods is established. Remaining problem areas are investigated, and directions for future research are suggested. (author)

  1. RELAP5-3D Code for Supercritical-Pressure Light-Water-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riemke, Richard Allan; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Schultz, Richard Raphael

    2003-04-01

    The RELAP5-3D computer program has been improved for analysis of supercritical-pressure, light-water-cooled reactors. Several code modifications were implemented to correct code execution failures. Changes were made to the steam table generation, steam table interpolation, metastable states, interfacial heat transfer coefficients, and transport properties (viscosity and thermal conductivity). The code modifications now allow the code to run slow transients above the critical pressure as well as blowdown transients (modified Edwards pipe and modified existing pressurized water reactor model) that pass near the critical point.

  2. Contribution to the interpretation of explosive phenomena in research light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Berre, Francois.

    1975-08-01

    The study allows the prediction of the transient behavior of a light-water reactor that undergoes a power excursion due to a step reactivity insertion. In particular, a film-model for boiling is developed, which takes into account fast heat transfers, and permits the description of the water-hammer phenomena. The latter is due to the sudden contact between the liquid coolant and the fuel plates, which results from the vanishing of the vapor film. It is shown in which conditions this phenomena may initiate a reactor explosion [fr

  3. Load bearing capacities and elastic-plastic behavior of reactor vessel internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Keita; Nagase, Ryuichi

    2017-01-01

    Radial Support Keys (RSKs) are installed at the bottom of Reactor Vessel Internal (RVI) of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and fit into Core Support Lugs of Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). This structure provides reactor core horizontal support and transmits the loads between RVI and RPV. RSK is one of the critical parts of RVI from the view point of earthquake-proof safety. In order to assure the structural integrity of Nuclear Reactor in case of massive earthquake, load bearing capacities of RSK are confirmed by static loading tests with reduced-scale mockups. In addition, collapse loads of actual components calculated by Limit Analyses are conservative enough compared to the load bearing capacities confirmed by the test. Thus, the methodology to calculate collapse load by Limit Analysis is applicable to evaluation of structural integrity for RSK. (author)

  4. Procurement of replacement pressure vessels for MURR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, W.A. Jr.; Edwards, C.B. Jr.; McKibben, J.C.; Schoone, A.R.

    1989-01-01

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor Facility (MURR) located in Columbia, Missouri, is the highest powered, highest steady-state flux university research reactor in the United States. The reactor is a 10-MW pressurized loop, in-pool-type, light-water-moderated, beryllium-reflected, flux trap reactor. MURR has a compact core (0.033 m 3 ) composed of eight fuel elements of the materials test reactor type arranged as an annular right circular cylinder between the inner and outer aluminum pressure vessels. Conservative engineering judgment resulted in the decision in 1988 to purchase new inner and outer pressure vessels. This paper details the difficulties encountered in procuring replacements for aluminum pressure vessels built to standards that are no longer applicable in attempting to meet nuclear standards that are not applicable to nonferrous material

  5. Waste disposal from the light water reactor fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costello, J.M.; Hardy, C.J.

    1981-05-01

    Alternative nuclear fuel cycles for support of light water reactors are described and wastes containing naturally occurring or artificially produced radioactivity reviewed. General principles and objectives in radioactive waste management are outlined, and methods for their practical application to fuel cycle wastes discussed. The paper concentrates upon management of wastes from upgrading processes of uranium hexafluoride manufacture and uranium enrichment, and, to a lesser extent, nuclear power reactor wastes. Some estimates of radiological dose commitments and health effects from nuclear power and fuel cycle wastes have been made for US conditions. These indicate that the major part of the radiological dose arises from uranium mining and milling, operation of nuclear reactors, and spent fuel reprocessing. However, the total dose from the fuel cycle is estimated to be only a small fraction of that from natural background radiation

  6. Segmentation and packaging reactor vessels internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucau, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only, full text follows: With more than 25 years of experience in the development of reactor vessel internals and reactor vessel segmentation and packaging technology, Westinghouse has accumulated significant know-how in the reactor dismantling market. The primary challenges of a segmentation and packaging project are to separate the highly activated materials from the less-activated materials and package them into appropriate containers for disposal. Since disposal cost is a key factor, it is important to plan and optimize waste segmentation and packaging. The choice of the optimum cutting technology is also important for a successful project implementation and depends on some specific constraints. Detailed 3-D modeling is the basis for tooling design and provides invaluable support in determining the optimum strategy for component cutting and disposal in waste containers, taking account of the radiological and packaging constraints. The usual method is to start at the end of the process, by evaluating handling of the containers, the waste disposal requirements, what type and size of containers are available for the different disposal options, and working backwards to select a cutting method and finally the cut geometry required. The 3-D models can include intelligent data such as weight, center of gravity, curie content, etc, for each segmented piece, which is very useful when comparing various cutting, handling and packaging options. The detailed 3-D analyses and thorough characterization assessment can draw the attention to material potentially subject to clearance, either directly or after certain period of decay, to allow recycling and further disposal cost reduction. Westinghouse has developed a variety of special cutting and handling tools, support fixtures, service bridges, water filtration systems, video-monitoring systems and customized rigging, all of which are required for a successful reactor vessel internals

  7. Technology programs in support of advanced light water reactor plants: Construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichen, E.P.

    1987-12-01

    Stone ampersand Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC) is conducting several independent, yet interrelated, studies of light water reactor plants to improve constructibility and quality, to reduce costs and schedule durations, and to simplify design. This document discusses successes and problems in construction. 49 refs., 16 figs., 8 tabs

  8. Hydrogen behavior in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, M.; Cummings, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The Three Mile Island accident resulted in the generation of an estimated 150 to 600 kg of hydrogen, some of which burned inside the containment building, causing a transient pressure rise of roughly 200 kPa (2 atm). With this accident as the immediate impetus and the improved safety of reactors as the long-term goal, the nuclear industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission initiated research programs to study hydrogen behavior and control during accidents at nuclear plants. Several fundamental questions and issues arise when the hydrogen problem for light-water-reactor plants is examined. These relate to four aspects of the problem: hydrogen production; hydrogen transport, release, and mixing; hydrogen combustion; and prevention or mitigation of hydrogen combustion. Although much has been accomplished, some unknowns and uncertainties still remain, for example, the rate of hydrogen production during a degraded-core or molten-core accident, the rate of hydrogen mixing, the effect of geometrical structures and scale on combustion, flame speeds, combustion completeness, and mitigation-scheme effectiveness. This article discusses the nature and extent of the hydrogen problem, the progress that has been made, and the important unresolved questions

  9. Topic 1. Steels for light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Brynda, J.; Kepka, M.; Barackova, L.; Vacek, M.; Havel, S.; Cukr, B.; Protiva, K.; Petrman, I.; Tvrdy, M.; Hyspecka, L.; Mazanec, K.; Kupca, L.; Brezina, M.

    1980-01-01

    Part 1 of the Proceedings consists of papers on the criteria for the selection and comparison of the properties of steel for pressure vessels and on the metallurgy of the said steels, the selection of suitable material for internal tubing systems, the manufacture of high-alloy steels for WWER components, the mechanical and metallurgical properties of steel 22K for WWER 440 pressure components, and of steel 10MnNi2Mo for the WWER primary coolant circuit, and the metallographic assessment of steel 0Kh18N10T. (J.P.)

  10. Containment vessel construction for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulzer, H.D.; Coletti, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    A nuclear containment vessel houses an inner reactor housing structure whose outer wall is closely spaced from the inner wall of the containment vessel. The inner reactor housing structure is divided by an intermediate floor providing an upper chamber for housing the reactor and associated steam generators and a lower chamber directly therebeneath containing a pressure suppression pool. Communication between the upper chamber and the pressure suppression pool is established by conduits extending through the intermediate floor which terminate beneath the level of the pressure suppression pool and by inlet openings in the reactor housing wall beneath the level of the pressure suppression pool which communicate with the annulus formed between the outer wall of the reactor housing structure and the inner wall of the containment vessel. (Official Gazette)

  11. Thermophysical properties database of materials for light water reactors and heavy water reactors. Final report of a coordinated research project 1999-2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    The IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Establishment of a Thermo-physical Properties Database for Light Water Reactors (LWRs) and Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs) started in 1999. It was included in the IAEA's Nuclear Power Programme following endorsement in 1997 by the IAEA's Technical Working Groups on Advanced Technologies for LWRs and HWRs (the TWG-LWR and the TWG-HWR). Furthermore, the TWG on Fuel Performance and Technology (TWG-FPT) also expressed its support. This CRP was conducted as a joint task within the IAEA's project on technology development for LWRs and HWRs in its nuclear power programme. Improving the technology for nuclear reactors through better computer codes and more accurate materials property data can contribute to improved economics of future plants by helping to remove the need for large design margins, which are currently used to account for limitations of data and methods. Accurate representations of thermo-physical properties under relevant temperature and neutron fluence conditions are necessary for evaluating reactor performance under normal operation and accident conditions. The objective of this CRP was to collect and systematize a thermo-physical properties database for light and heavy water reactor materials under normal operating, transient and accident conditions and to foster the exchange of non-proprietary information on thermo-physical properties of LWR and HWR materials. An internationally available, peer reviewed database of properties at normal and severe accident conditions has been established on the Internet. This report is intended to serve as a useful source of information on thermo-physical properties data for water cooled reactor analyses. The properties data have been initially stored in the THERSYST data system at the University of Stuttgart, Germany, which was subsequently developed into an internationally available Internet database named THERPRO at Hanyang University, Republic of Korea

  12. Results of reactor pressure vessels ISI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cepcek, S.

    1994-01-01

    To find out the possible influence of the annealing process to reactor pressure vessel integrity, a large in-service inspection programme has been implemented as an associated activity to reactor pressure vessel annealing. In this paper the approach to the RPV in-service inspection is shown. Also, the main results and conclusions following in-service inspection are presented. (author). 3 refs, 1 fig

  13. Potential of light water reactors for future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueldner, R.

    2003-01-01

    Energy consumption worldwide is going to increase further in the next few decades. Reliable supplies of electricity can be achieved only by centralized power plant structures. In this scenario, nuclear power plants are going to play a leading role as reliable and competitive plants, also under deregulated market conditions. Today, light water reactors have achieved a leading position, both technically and economically, contributing 85% to worldwide electricity generation in nuclear plants. They will continue to be a proven technology in power generation. In many countries, activities therefore are concentrated on extending the service life of plants beyond a period of forty years. New nuclear generating capacities are expected to be created and added from the end of this decade onward. Most of this capacity will be in light water reactors. The concepts of third-generation reactors will meet all economic and technical safety requirements of the 21st century and will offer considerable potential for further development. Probably some thirty years from now, fourth-generation nuclear power plants will be ready for commercial application. These plants will penetrate especially new sectors of the energy markets. Public acceptance of new nuclear power plants is not a matter of reactor lines, provided that safety requirements are met. The important issue is the management of radioactive waste. The construction of new nuclear power plants in Western Europe and North America mainly hinges on the ability to explain to the public that there is a need for new plants and that nuclear power is fundamental to assuring sustainable development. (orig.)

  14. Major outage trends in light water reactors. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, E.T.

    1978-04-01

    The report is a summary of the major outages which occurred in light water reactor plants during the period January 1971 through June 1977. Only those outages greater than 100 hours duration (exclusive of refueling outages) are included in the report. The trends in outages related to various reactor systems and components are presented as a function of plant age, and alternatively, calendar year. The principal contributors to major outages are ranked by their effect on the overall outage time for PWRs and BWRs. In addition, the outage history of each operating nuclear plant greater than 150 MWe is presented, along with a brief summary of those outages greater than two months duration

  15. Emergency cooling system with hot-water jet pumps for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinsch, A.O.W.

    1977-01-01

    The ECCS for a PWR or BWR uses hot-water jet pumps to remove the thermal energy generated in the reactor vessel and stored in the water. The hot water expands in the nozzle part (Laval nozzle) of the jet pump and sucks in coolant (borated water) coming from a storage tank containing subcooled water. This water is mixing with the hot water/steam mixture from the Laval nozzle. The steam is condensed. The kinetic energy of the water is converted into a pressure increase which is sufficient to feed the water into the reactor vessel. The emergency cooling may further be helped by a jet condenser also operating according to the principle of a jet pump and condensing the steam generated in the reactor vessel. (DG) [de

  16. The application of probabilistic fracture analysis to residual life evaluation of embrittled reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, T.L.; Simonen, F.A.

    1992-01-01

    Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis is a major element of the comprehensive probabilistic methodology on which current NRC regulatory requirements for pressurized water reactor vessel integrity evaluation are based. Computer codes such as OCA-P and VISA-11 perform probabilistic fracture analyses to estimate the increase in vessel failure probability that occurs as the vessel material accumulates radiation damage over the operating life of the vessel. The results of such analyses, when compared with limits of acceptable failure probabilities, provide an estimation of the residual life of a vessel. Such codes can be applied to evaluate the potential benefits of plant-specific mitigating actions designed to reduce the probability of failure of a reactor vessel

  17. The application of probabilistic fracture analysis to residual life evaluation of embrittled reactor vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, T.L.; Simonen, F.A.

    1992-01-01

    Probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis is a major element of comprehensive probabilistic methodology on which current NRC regulatory requirements for pressurized water reactor vessel integrity evaluation are based. Computer codes such as OCA-P and VISA-II perform probabilistic fracture analyses to estimate the increase in vessel failure probability that occurs as the vessel material accumulates radiation damage over the operating life of the vessel. The results of such analyses, when compared with limits of acceptable failure probabilities, provide an estimation of the residual life of a vessel. Such codes can be applied to evaluate the potential benefits of plant-specific mitigating actions designed to reduce the probability of failure of a reactor vessel. 10 refs

  18. Effect of in-core instrumentation mounting location on external reactor vessel cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Jungsoo; Ha, Huiun

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Numerical simulations were conducted for the evaluation of an IVR-ERVC application. • The ULPU-V experiment was simulated for the validation of numerical method. • The effect of ICI mounting location on an IVR-ERVC application was investigated. • TM-ICI is founded to be superior to BM-ICI for successful application of IVR-ERVC. - Abstract: The effect of in-core instrumentation (ICI) mounting location on the application of in-vessel corium retention through external reactor vessel cooling (IVR-ERVC), used to mitigate severe accidents in which the nuclear fuel inside the reactor vessel becomes molten, was investigated. Numerical simulations of the subcooled boiling flow within an advanced pressurized-water reactor (PWR) in IVR-ERVC applications were conducted for the cases of top-mounted ICI (TM-ICI) and bottom-mounted ICI (BM-ICI), using the commercially available computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software ANSYS-CFX. Shear stress transport (SST) and the RPI model were used for turbulence closure and subcooled flow boiling, respectively. To validate the numerical method for IVR applications, numerical simulations of ULPU-V experiments were also conducted. The BM-ICI reactor vessel was modeled using a simplified design of an advanced PWR with BM-ICI; the TM-ICI counterpart was modeled by removing the ICI parts from the original geometry. It was found that TM-ICI was superior to BM-ICI for successful application of IVR-ERVC. For the BM-ICI case, the flow field was complicated because of the existence of ICIs and a significant temperature gradient was observed near the ICI nozzles on the lower part of the reactor vessel, where the ICIs were attached. These observations suggest that the existence of ICI below the reactor vessel hinders reactor vessel cooling.

  19. Development of Safety Review Guide for the Periodic Safety Review of Reactor Vessel Internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeongsoon; Ko, Hanok; Kim, Seonjae; Jhung, Myungjo

    2013-01-01

    Aging management of the reactor vessel internals (RVIs) is one of the important issues for long-term operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs). Safety review on the assessment and management of the RVI aging is conducted through the process of a periodic safety review (PSR). The regulatory body should check that reactor facilities sustain safety functions in light of degradation due to aging and that the operator of a nuclear power reactor establishes and implements management program to deal with degradation due to aging in order to guarantee the safety functions and the safety margin as a result of PSR. KINS(Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety) has utilized safety review guides (SRG) which provide guidance to KINS staffs in performing safety reviews in order to assure the quality and uniformity of staff safety reviews. The KINS SRGs for the continued operation of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) published in 2006 contain areas of review regarding aging management of RVIs in chapter 2 (III.2.15, Appendix 2.0.1). However unlike the SRGs for the continued operation, KINS has not officially published the SRGs for the PSR of PWRs, but published them as a form of the research report. In addition to that, the report provides almost same review procedures for aging assessment and management of RVIs with the ones provided in the SRGs for the continued operation, it cannot provide review guidance specific to PSRs. Therefore, a PSR safety review guide should be developed for RVIs in PWRs. In this study, a draft PSR safety review guide for reactor vessel internals in PWRs is developed and provided. In this paper, a draft PSR safety review guide for reactor vessel internals (PSR SRG-RVIs) in PWRs is introduced and main contents of the draft are provided. However, since the PSR safety review guides for areas other than RVIs in the pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are expected to be developed in the near future, the draft PSR SRG-RVIs should be revisited to be compatible with

  20. Water simulation of sodium reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grewal, S.S.; Gluekler, E.L.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal hydraulic simulation of a large sodium reactor by a scaled water model is examined. The Richardson Number, friction coefficient and the Peclet Number can be closely matched with the water system at full power and the similarity is retained for buoyancy driven flows. The simulation of thermal-hydraulic conditions in a reactor vessel provided by a scaled water experiment is better than that by a scaled sodium test. Results from a correctly scaled water test can be tentatively extrapolated to a full size sodium system

  1. Comparative evaluation of recent water hammer events in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    House, R.K.; Sursock, J.P.; Kim, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Water hammer events that occurred in commercial U.S. light water reactors in the five-year period from 1981 to 1985 were surveyed, and a preliminary evaluation of the events was conducted. The information developed supplements a previous study which evaluated water hammer events in the twelve-year period from 1969 to 1981. The current study of water hammer events in the 1980's confirms that the rate of events remains relatively constant (less than 0.25 events per plant year) in both PWRs and BWRs. Although water hammer events are not normally considered a safety issue, the economic impact of the events on plant operations can be significant. One particular severe water hammer event is estimated to have cost the plant owner $10 million for repair and evaluation alone. A variety of key characteristics of the recent water hammer events are summarized to establish a basis for further study of preventative methods

  2. Stainless steel clad for light water reactor fuels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, J.E.; Meyer, J.E.

    1980-07-01

    Proper reactor operation and design guidelines are necessary to assure fuel integrity. The occurrence of fuel rod failures for operation in compliance with existing guidelines suggests the need for more adequate or applicable operation/design criteria. The intent of this study is to develop such criteria for light water reactor fuel rods with stainless steel clad and to indicate the nature of uncertainties in its development. The performance areas investigated herein are: long term creepdown and fuel swelling effects on clad dimensional changes and on proximity to clad failure; and short term clad failure possibilities during up-power ramps

  3. A study of reactor vessel integrity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Hoon [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Kyung; Shin, Chang Ho; Seo, Bo Kyun [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-02-15

    The fast neutron fluence at the Reactor Pressure Vessel(RPV) of KNGR designed for 60 years lifetime was calculated by full-scope Monte Carlo simulation for reactor vessel integrity assessment. KNGR core geometry was modeled on a three-dimensional representation of the one-sixteenth of the reactor in-vessel component. Each fuel assemblies were modeled explicitly, and each fuel pins were axially divided into 5 segments. The maximum flux of 4.3 x 10{sup 10} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. sec at the RPV was obtained by tallying neutrons crossing the beltline of inner surface of the RPV.

  4. Comparison of two thorium fuel cycles for use in light water prebreeder/breeder reactor systems (AWBA Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merriman, F.C.; McCoy, D.F.; Boyd, W.A.; Dwyer, J.R.

    1983-05-01

    Light water prebreeder/breeder conceptual reactor systems have been developed which have the potential to significantly improve the fuel utilization of present generation light water reactors. The purpose of this study is to describe and compare two possible types of thorium fuel cycles for use in these light water prebreeder and breeder concepts. The two types of thorium fuel cycles basically differ in the fuel rod design used in the prebreeder cores and the uranium isotopic concentration of fuel supplied to the breeder cores

  5. Debris interactions in reactor vessel lower plena during a severe accident. II. Integral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, K.Y.; Henry, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    For pt.I see ibid., p.147-63, 1996. The integral physico-numerical model for the reactor vessel lower head response has been exercised for the TMI-2 accident and possible severe accident scenarios in PWR and BWR designs. The proposed inherent cooling mechanism of the reactor material creep and subsequent water ingression implemented in this predictive model provides a consistent representation of how the debris was finally cooled in the TMI-2 accident and how the reactor lower head integrity was maintained during the course of the incident. It should be recalled that in order for this strain to occur, the vessel lower head had to achieve temperatures in excess of 1000 C. This is certainly in agreement with the temperatures determined by metallographic examinations during the TMI-2 vessel inspection program. The integral model was also applied to typical PWR and BWR lower plena with and without structures under pressurized conditions spanning the first relocation of core material to the reactor vessel failure due to creep without recovery actions. The design application results are presented with particular attention being focused on water ingression into the debris bed through the gap formed between the debris and the vessel wall. As an illustration of the accident management application, the lower plenum with structures was recovered after an extensive amount of creep had damaged the vessel wall. The computed lower head temperatures were found to be significantly lower (by more than 300 K in this particular example) with recovery relative to the case without recovery. This clearly demonstrates the potential for in-vessel cooling of the reactor vessel without a need to externally submerge the lower head should such a severe accident occur as core melting and relocation. (orig.)

  6. Energy Research Advisory Board, Civilian Nuclear Power Panel: Subpanel 1 report, Light water reactor utilization and improvement: Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    The Secretary of Energy requested that the Office of Nuclear Energy prepare a strategic national plan that outlines the Department's role in the future development of civilian nuclear power and that the Energy Research Advisory Board establish an ad hoc panel to review and comment on this plan. The Energy Research Advisory Board formed a panel for this review and three subpanels were formed. One subpanel was formed to address the institutional issues surrounding nuclear power, one on research and development for advanced nuclear power plants and a third subpanel on light water reactor utilization and improvement. The subpanel on light water reactors held two meetings at which representatives of the DOE, the NRC, EPRI, industry and academic groups made presentations. This is the report of the subpanel on light water reactor utilization and improvement. This report presents the subpanel's assessment of initiatives which the Department of Energy should undertake in the national interest, to develop and support light water reactor technologies

  7. Comparative economics of the breeder and light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, B.G.

    1980-01-01

    The issue of breeder timing is studied in this article via a breakeven analysis in which the key driving variables are conveniently segregated into two groups, with uranium price providing the linkage. In one group, the technical and cost characteristics of reactors and fuel cycles determine the uranium breakeven price. In the other group, nuclear demand projections and the uranium supply schedule determine the time paths of uranium price for a given composition of reactor types. The author finds that, even if proliferation risk is ignored, the breeder is not economically competitive with a 30%-improved once-through light water reactor before the year 2030 in the USA and in the world outside communist areas as a whole in 90% of the cases examined. In the exceptional cases, the penalty of delaying commercial breeder introduction to 2030 is small and well within the noise level of long-term energy planning. (author)

  8. Multiphase flow in ex-vessel coolability: development of an innovative concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, Michael L.

    2006-01-01

    The interaction and mixing of high-temperature melt and water is the important technical issue in the safety assessment of water-cooled reactors to achieve ultimate core coolability. For specific Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) designs, deliberate mixing of the core-melt and water is being considered as a mitigative measure, to assure ex-vessel core coolability. The paper provides the background of past experiments as well as key fundamentals that are needed for melt-water interfacial transport phenomena, thus enabling the development of innovative safety technologies for advanced LWRs that will assure ex-vessel core coolability

  9. Anticipated transients without scram for light water reactors: implications for liquid metal fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, W.E.; Solomon, K.A.

    1979-07-01

    In the design of light water reactors (LWRs), protection against anticipated transients (e.g., loss of normal electric power and control rod withdrawal) is provided by a highly reliable scram, or shutdown system. If this system should become inoperable, however, the transient could lead to a core meltdown. The Nuclar Regulatory Commission (NRC) has proposed, in NUREG-0460 [1], new requirements (or acceptance criteria) for anticipated transients without scram (ATWS) events and the manner in which they could be considered in the design and safety evaluation of LWRs. This note assesses the potential impact of the proposed LWR-ATWS criteria on the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) safety program as represented by the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant

  10. Dynamic operator actions analysis for inherently safe fast reactors and light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, V.; Apostolakis, G.

    1988-01-01

    A comparative dynamic human actions analysis of inherently safe fast reactors (ISFRs) and light water reactors (LWRs) in terms of systems response and estimated human error rates is presented. Brief overviews of the ISFR and LWR systems are given to illustrate the design differences. Key operator actions required by the ISFR reactor shutdown and decay heat removal systems are identified and are compared with those of the LWR. It is observed that, because of the passive nature of the ISFR safety-related systems, a large time window is available for operator actions during transient events. Furthermore, these actions are fewer in number, are less complex, and have lower error rates and less severe consequences than those of the LWRs. We expect the ISFR operator errors' contribution to risk is smaller (at least in the context of the existing human reliability models) than that of the LWRs. (author)

  11. Feedback from Westinghouse experience on segmentation of reactor vessel internals - 59013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreitman, Paul J.; Boucau, Joseph; Segerud, Per; Fallstroem, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    With more than 25 years of experience in the development of reactor vessel internals segmentation and packaging technology, Westinghouse has accumulated significant know-how in the reactor dismantling market. Building on tooling concepts and cutting methodologies developed decades ago for the successful removal of nuclear fuel from the damaged Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor (TMI-2), Westinghouse has continuously improved its approach to internals segmentation and packaging by incorporating lessons learned and best practices into each successive project. Westinghouse has developed several concepts to dismantle reactor internals based on safe and reliable techniques, including plasma arc cutting (PAC), abrasive water-jet cutting (AWJC), metal disintegration machining (MDM), or mechanical cutting. Westinghouse has applied its technology to all types of reactors covering Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR's), Boiling Water Reactors (BWR's), Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR's) and sodium reactors. The primary challenges of a segmentation and packaging project are to separate the highly activated materials from the less-activated materials and package them into appropriate containers for disposal. Since space is almost always a limiting factor it is therefore important to plan and optimize the available room in the segmentation areas. The choice of the optimum cutting technology is important for a successful project implementation and depends on some specific constraints like disposal costs, project schedule, available areas or safety. Detailed 3-D modeling is the basis for tooling design and provides invaluable support in determining the optimum strategy for component cutting and disposal in waste containers, taking account of the radiological and packaging constraints. Westinghouse has also developed a variety of special handling tools, support fixtures, service bridges, water filtration systems, video-monitoring systems and customized rigging, all of which are required for a

  12. Reactor vessel supported by flexure member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J.D.; Pankow, B.

    1977-01-01

    According to the present invention there is provided an improved arrangement for supporting a reactor vessel within a containment structure against static and dynamic vertical loadings capable of being imposed as a result of a serious accident as well as during periods of normal plant operation. The support arrangement of the invention is, at the same time, capable of accommodating radial displacements that normally occur between the reactor vessel and the containment structure due to operational transients. The arrangement comprises a plurality of vertical columns connected between the reactor vessel and a support base within the containment structure. The columns are designed to accommodate relative displacements between the vessel and the containment structure by flexing. This eliminates the need for relative sliding movements and thus enables the columns to be securely fixed to the vessel. This elimination of a provision for relative sliding movements avoids the spaces or gaps between the retention members and the retained elements as occurred in prior art arrangements and, concomitantly, the danger of establishing impact forces on the retention members in the event of an accident is reduced. (author)

  13. Inquiry into the radiological consequences of power uprates at light-water reactors worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilic Zabric, Tea; Tomic, Bojan; Lundgren, Klas; Sjoeberg, Mats

    2007-05-01

    the controlled areas is especially important. Leadership, composition and organization of the large demanding tasks are critical for successful implementation of power uprate and keeping received doses at a minimum. Good planning and preparation, which reflects experience from similar projects elsewhere, adherence to procedures and supervision from plant personnel as well as consequential application of ALARA principles and good practices are important factors. It has not been found a direct relationship between the uprates and the occupational exposures. The occupational doses on some plants seem to be higher after the uprate, while on others seem to be lower. However the general trend in light-water reactors worldwide is gradually reduced occupational exposures. There is no obvious correlation of the power uprate and fuel failures. However, performance of fuel for PWRs and BWRs went in opposing directions, improving for PWRs and deteriorating for BWRs. For BWRs investment in the condensate cleanup efficiency results in favourable water chemistry conditions that can be maintained, or even improved, after the power uprate. The higher steam velocity after a power uprate can increase the radiation levels around main steam lines and other turbine components due to a considerable increase in steam moisture content. This problem can be overcome with a recent design and installation of new steam dryers in the reactor pressure vessel to reduce steam moisture. Issues of relevance for PWRs include: Increase in the rate of production of H-3 due to higher boron concentration and power level, especially for longer fuel cycles; Control of pH and Lithium as an essential means of controlling the corrosion level and thus radiation levels. Fuel related corrosion problems are shown to be less visible with good pH control and shorter fuel cycles

  14. Inquiry into the radiological consequences of power uprates at light-water reactors worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilic Zabric, Tea; Tomic, Bojan; Lundgren, Klas; Sjoeberg, Mats

    2007-05-15

    the controlled areas is especially important. Leadership, composition and organization of the large demanding tasks are critical for successful implementation of power uprate and keeping received doses at a minimum. Good planning and preparation, which reflects experience from similar projects elsewhere, adherence to procedures and supervision from plant personnel as well as consequential application of ALARA principles and good practices are important factors. It has not been found a direct relationship between the uprates and the occupational exposures. The occupational doses on some plants seem to be higher after the uprate, while on others seem to be lower. However the general trend in light-water reactors worldwide is gradually reduced occupational exposures. There is no obvious correlation of the power uprate and fuel failures. However, performance of fuel for PWRs and BWRs went in opposing directions, improving for PWRs and deteriorating for BWRs. For BWRs investment in the condensate cleanup efficiency results in favourable water chemistry conditions that can be maintained, or even improved, after the power uprate. The higher steam velocity after a power uprate can increase the radiation levels around main steam lines and other turbine components due to a considerable increase in steam moisture content. This problem can be overcome with a recent design and installation of new steam dryers in the reactor pressure vessel to reduce steam moisture. Issues of relevance for PWRs include: Increase in the rate of production of H-3 due to higher boron concentration and power level, especially for longer fuel cycles; Control of pH and Lithium as an essential means of controlling the corrosion level and thus radiation levels. Fuel related corrosion problems are shown to be less visible with good pH control and shorter fuel cycles.

  15. Concept of a Prestressed Cast Iron Pressure Vessel for a Modular High Temperature Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinwarz, Wolfgang; Bounin, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    High Temperature Reactors (HTR) are representing one of the most interesting solutions for the upcoming generation of nuclear technology, especially with view to their inherent safety characteristics. To complete the safety concept of such plants already in the first phase of the technical development, Prestressed Cast Iron Pressure Vessels (PCIV) instead of the established forged steel reactor pressure vessels have been considered under the aspect of safety against bursting. A longterm research and development work, mainly performed in Germany, showed the excellent features of this technical solution. Diverse prototypic vessels were tested and officially proven. Design studies confirmed the feasibility of such a vessel concept also for Light Water Reactor types, too. The main concept elements of such a burst-proof vessel are: Strength and tightness functions are structurally separated. The tensile forces are carried by the prestressing systems consisting of a large number of independent wires. Compressive forces are applied to the vessel walls and heads. These are segmented into blocks of ductile cast iron. All cast iron blocks are prestressed to high levels of compression. The sealing function is assigned to a steel liner fixed to the cast iron blocks. The prestressing system is designed for an ultimate pressure of 2.3 times the design pressure. The prestress of the lids is designed for gapping at a much smaller pressure. Therefore, a drop of pressure will always occur before loss of strength (“leakage before failure”). In addition to these safety features further technical as well as economic aspects generate favorable assessment criteria: high design flexibility, feasibility of large vessel diameters; advantageous conditions for transport, assembly and decommissioning due to the segmented construction; advantage of workshop manufacturing; high-level quality control of components. Nowadays, considering the globally newly standardized safety requirements

  16. Guidebook on quality control of mixed oxides and gadolinium bearing fuels for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    Under the coverage of an efficient quality assurance system, quality control in nuclear fuel fabrication is an essential element to assure the reliable performance of all its components in service. Incentives to increase fuel performance, by extending reactor cycles or achieving higher burnups and, in some countries to use recycled plutonium in light water reactors (LWRs) necessitated the development of new types of fuels. In the first case, due to higher uranium enrichments, a burnable neutron absorber was integrated to the fuel pellets. Gadolinia was found to form a solid solution with Uranium dioxide and, to present a burnup rate which matches fissile uranium depletion. (U,Gd)O 2 fuels which have been successfully used since the seventies, in boiling water reactors have more recently found an increased utilization, in pressurized water reactors. This amply justifies the publication of this TECDOC to encourage authorities, designers and manufacturers of these types of fuel to establish a more uniform, adapted and effective system of control, thus promoting improved materials reliability and good performance in advanced fuel for light water reactors. The Guidebook is subdivided into four chapters written by different authors. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these chapters. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. Monitoring PWR reactor vessel liquid level with SPNDs during LOCAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    Data from in-core self-powered neutron detectors taken during two nuclear loss-of-coolant accident simulations have been correlated with core moderator density changes. The detector current attenuation has been calculated during blowdown and reflood phases of the simulation. Based on these data, it is concluded that these detectors could be used to monitor reactor vessel liquid level during loss-of-coolant accidents in pressurized water reactors

  18. Certifying the decommissioned Shippingport reactor vessel for transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towell, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The decommissioned Shippingport reactor pressure vessel with its concentric neutron shield tank was shipped to Hanford, WA as part of the effort to restore the Shippingport Station to its original condition. The metal walls of the reactor vessel had become radioactive from neutron bombardment while the reactor was operating so it had to be shipped under the regulations for transporting radioactive material. Because of the large amount of radioactivity in the walls, 16,467 Curies, and because the potentially dispersible corrosion layer on the inner walls of both tanks was also radioactive, the Shippingport reactor vessel was transported under the most stringent of the regulations, those for a type B package. Compliance with the packaging regulations was confirmed via independent analysis by the staff of the Department of Energy certifying official and the Shippingport reactor vessel was shipped under DOE Certificate of Compliance USA/9515/B(U)

  19. Technology programs in support of advanced light water reactor plants: Construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichen, E.P.

    1989-01-01

    Under Contract No. AC03-86SF16565, Stone ampersand Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC) is conducting several independent, yet interrelated, studies of light water reactor plants to improve constructibility and quality, to reduce costs and schedule durations, and to simplify design. This document discusses design requirements. 36 refs., 57 figs., 56 tabs

  20. Dismantling method for reactor pressure vessel and system therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Makoto; Enomoto, Kunio; Kurosawa, Koichi; Saito, Hideyo.

    1994-01-01

    Upon dismantling of a reactor pressure vessel, a containment building made of concretes is disposed underground and a spent pressure vessel is contained therein, and incore structures are contained in the spent pressure vessel. Further, a plasma-welder and a pressing machine are disposed to a pool for provisionally placing reactor equipments in the reactor building for devoluming the incore structures by welding and compression. An overhead-running crane and rails therefor are disposed on the roof and the outer side of the reactor building for transporting the pressure vessel from the reactor building to the containment building. They may be contained in the containment building after incorporation of the incore structures into the pressure vessel at the outside of the reactor building. For the devoluming treatment, a combination of cutting, welding, pressing and the like are optically conducted. A nuclear power plant can be installed by using a newly manufactured nuclear reactor, with no requirement for a new site and it is unnecessary to provide a new radioactive waste containing facility. (N.H.)

  1. Recent performance experience with US light water reactor self-actuating safety and relief valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, C.G.

    1996-12-01

    Over the past several years, there have been a number of operating reactor events involving performance of primary and secondary safety and relief valves in U.S. Light Water Reactors. There are several different types of safety and relief valves installed for overpressure protection of various safety systems throughout a typical nuclear power plant. The following discussion is limited to those valves in the reactor coolant systems (RCS) and main steam systems of pressurized water reactors (PWR) and in the RCS of boiling water reactors (BWR), all of which are self-actuating having a setpoint controlled by a spring-loaded disk acting against system fluid pressure. The following discussion relates some of the significant recent experience involving operating reactor events or various testing data. Some of the more unusual and interesting operating events or test data involving some of these designs are included, in addition to some involving a number of similar events and those which have generic applicability.

  2. Recent advances in severe accident technology - direct containment heating in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, M.H.

    1993-01-01

    The issues affecting high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) and the consequential containment pressurization from direct containment heating (DCH), as they affect advanced light water reactors (ALWRs), specifically advanced pressurized water reactors (APWRs), were reviewed by the U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Reactor Severe Accident Program (ARSAP). Recommendations from ARSAP regarding the design of APWRs to minimize DCH are embodied within the Electric Power Research Institute ALWR Utility Requirements Document, which specifies (a) a large, strong containment; (b) an in-containment refueling water storage tank; (c) a reactor cavity configuration that minimizes energy transport to the containment atmosphere; and (d) a reactor coolant system depressurization system. Experimental and analytical efforts, which have focused on current-generation plants, and analyses for APWRs were reviewed. Although DCH is a subject of continuous research and considerable uncertainties remain, it is the judgment of the ARSAP that reactors complying with the recommended design requirements would have a low probability of early containment failure due to HPME and DCH

  3. Reactor pressure vessel support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butti, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    A link and pin support system provides the primary vertical and lateral support for a nuclear reactor pressure vessel without restricting thermally induced radial and vertical expansion and contraction. (Auth.)

  4. Aging of reactor vessels in LWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Briceno, D.; Lapena, J.; Serrano, M.

    2004-01-01

    Most of the degradation mechanisms of nuclear components were not included on the design so they have to be treated a posteriori, and that imply a loss of capacity. In this paper the state of the art on the reactor pressure vessel neutron embrittlement and on the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking that affects internal components, are explained. Special attention is devoted on the influence of the neutron fluence on IASCC process, on the material alterations promoted by irradiation and their consequences on the susceptibility to this phenomenon. Regarding the reactor pressure vessel degradation, this paper discuss the application of the Master Curve on the structural integrity evaluation of the vessel. Other aspects related to further developments are also mentioned and the importance of a good materials ageing management on the operation of the plant is pointed out. (Author) 12 refs

  5. Performance demonstration experience for reactor pressure vessel shell ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zado, V.

    1998-01-01

    The most ultrasonic testing techniques used by many vendors for pressurized water reactor (PWR) examinations were based on American Society of Mechanical Engineers 'Boiler and Pressurized Vessel Code' (ASME B and PV Code) Sections XI and V. The Addenda of ASME B and PV Code Section XI, Edition 1989 introduced Appendix VIII - 'Performance Demonstration for Ultrasonic Examination Systems'. In an effort to increase confidence in performance of ultrasonic testing of the operating nuclear power plants in United States, the ultrasonic testing performance demonstration examination of reactor vessel welds is performed in accordance with Performance Demonstration Initiative (PDI) program which is based on ASME Code Section XI, Appendix VIII requirements. This article provides information regarding extensive qualification preparation works performed prior EPRI guided performance demonstration exam of reactor vessel shell welds accomplished in January 1997 for the scope of Appendix VIII, Supplements IV and VI. Additionally, an overview of the procedures based on requirements of ASME Code Section XI and V in comparison to procedure prepared for Appendix VIII examination is given and discussed. The samples of ultrasonic signals obtained from artificial flaws implanted in vessel material are presented and results of ultrasonic testing are compared to actual flaw sizes. (author)

  6. Prestressed reactor vessel for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoening, J.; Schwiers, H.G.

    1982-01-01

    With usual pressure vessels for nuclear reactor plants, especially for gas-cooled nuclear reactors, the load occurring due to the inner overpressure, especially the tensile load affecting the vessel top and/or bottom, their axis of inertia being horizontal, shall be compensated without a supplementary modification in design of the top and/or the bottom. This is attained by choosing an appropriate prestressing system of the vessel wall in the field the top and/or the bottom, so that the top and/or the bottom form a tension vault directed towards the interior of the vessel. (orig.) [de

  7. Advanced reactor design study. Assessing nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischman, R.M.; Goldsmith, S.; Newman, D.F.; Trapp, T.J.; Spinrad, B.I.

    1981-09-01

    The objective of the Advanced Reactor Design Study (ARDS) is to identify and evaluate nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in light water reactors (LWRs). The results of this study provide a basis for selecting and demonstrating specific nonbackfittable concepts that have good potential for implementation. Lead responsibility for managing the study was assigned to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in LWRs on the once-through fuel cycle were selected separately for PWRs and BWRs due to basic differences in the way specific concepts apply to those plants. Nonbackfittable concepts are those that are too costly to incorporate in existing plants, and thus, could only be economically incorporated in new reactor designs or plants in very early stages of construction. Essential results of the Advanced Reactor Design Study are summarized

  8. Reactor vessel supported by flexure member

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, J.D.; Pankow, B.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a reactor pressure vessel which is provided with vertical support means in the form of circumferentially spaced columns upon which the vessel is mounted. The columns are adapted to undergo flexure in order to accommodate the thermally induced displacements experienced by the vessel during operational transients

  9. The economics of the fuel cycle (light water reactors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepine, J.

    1979-01-01

    The economical characteristics of the fuel cycle (of light water reactors) as well as the definition and calculation method for the average updated cost of the kWh are recalled. The evolution followed by the unit prices of the different operations of the cycle, their total cost and the part taken by this cost in the overall cost of nuclear kWh are described. The effects on the cost of fuel of certain hypotheses, operating requirements and additional cost factors are considered [fr

  10. Light water reactors fuel assembly mechanical design and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This standard establishes a procedure for performing an evaluation of the mechanical design of fuel assemblies for light water-cooled commercial power reactors. It does not address the various aspects of neutronic or thermalhydraulic performance except where these factors impose loads or constraints on the mechanical design of the fuel assemblies. This standard also includes a set of specific requirements for design, various potential performance problems and criteria aimed specifically at averting them. This standard replaces ANSI/ANS-57.5-1978

  11. Spent fuel data base: commercial light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauf, M.J.; Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1979-12-01

    As a consequence of this country's non-proliferation policy, the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been delayed indefinitely. This has resulted in spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel being considered as a potential waste form for disposal. Since the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is currently developing methodologies for use in the regulation of the management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes, a comprehensive data base describing LWR fuel technology must be compiled. This document provides that technology baseline and, as such, will support the development of those evaluation standards and criteria applicable to spent nuclear fuel

  12. GENERIC, COMPONENT FAILURE DATA BASE FOR LIGHT WATER AND LIQUID SODIUM REACTOR PRAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. A. Eide; S. V. Chmielewski; T. D. Swantz

    1990-02-01

    A comprehensive generic component failure data base has been developed for light water and liquid sodium reactor probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) . The Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) and the Centralized Reliability Data Organization (CREDO) data bases were used to generate component failure rates . Using this approach, most of the failure rates are based on actual plant data rather than existing estimates .

  13. Under Water Thermal Cutting of the Moderator Vessel and Thermal Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeb, A.; Sokcic-Kostic, M.; Eisenmann, B.; Prechtl, E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the segmentation of the in 8 meter depth of water and for cutting through super alloyed moderator vessel and of the thermal shield of the MZFR stainless steel up to 130 mm wall thickness. Depending on the research reactor by means of under water plasma and contact arc metal cutting. The moderator vessel and the thermal shield are the most essential parts of the MZFR reactor vessel internals. These components have been segmented in 2005 by means of remotely controlled under water cutting utilizing a special manipulator system, a plasma torch and CAMC (Contact Arc Metal Cutting) as cutting tools. The engineered equipment used is a highly advanced design developed in a two years R and D program. It was qualified to cut through steel walls of more than 100 mm thickness in 8 meters water depth. Both the moderator vessel and the thermal shield had to be cut into such size that the segments could afterwards be packed into shielded waste containers each with a volume of roughly 1 m 3 . Segmentation of the moderator vessel and of the thermal shield was performed within 15 months. (author)

  14. Development of a Remotely-operated Visual Inspection System for Reactor Vessel Bottommounted Instrument Penetrations of KSNP and Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kyungmin; Choi, Youngsu; Lee, Sunguk; Seo, Yongchil; Kang, Jong Gyu; Kim, Seungho; Jung, Seungho

    2006-01-01

    In April 2003, South Texas Project Unit 1 made a surprising discovery of boron acid leakage from two nozzles from a bare-metal examination of the reactor vessel bottom-mounted instrument penetrations during a routine refueling outage. A small powdery substance about 150mg was found on the outside of two instrument guide penetration nozzles on the bottom of the reactor. The primary coolant water of pressurized water reactors has caused cracking in penetrations with Alloy 600 through a process called primary water stress corrosion cracking. In South Korea, it is required to conduct 100% visual inspection of the outside of instrument guide penetration nozzles on the bottom of PWRs to confirm the integrity of reactor vessel. This paper describes the remotely-operated visual inspection systems for reactor vessel bottom-mounted instrument penetrations dispatched two times to Youngkwang NPPs and discusses the lessons learned

  15. Automated procedure for selection of optimal refueling policies for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, B.I.; Zolotar, B.; Weisman, J.

    1979-01-01

    An automated procedure determining a minimum cost refueling policy has been developed for light water reactors. The procedure is an extension of the equilibrium core approach previously devised for pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Use of 1 1/2-group theory has improved the accuracy of the nuclear model and eliminated tedious fitting of albedos. A simple heuristic algorithm for locating a good starting policy has materially reduced PWR computing time. Inclusion of void effects and use of the Haling principle for axial flux calculations extended the nuclear model to boiling water reactors (BWRs). A good initial estimate of the refueling policy is obtained by recognizing that a nearly uniform distribution of reactivity provides low-power peaking. The initial estimate is improved upon by interchanging groups of four assemblies and is subsequently refined by interchanging individual assemblies. The method yields very favorable results, is simpler than previously proposed BWR fuel optimization schemes, and retains power cost as the objective function

  16. Manipulator arm for a nuclear reactor vessel inspection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A manipulator arm for a reactor vessel in-service inspection apparatus is adapted to transport a transducer array for ultrasonic examination of welds at any point in the vessel. The removal of the inspection device from the reactor vessel in an emergency presents a problem where a relatively long manipulator arm is used. This invention provides an improved arm with means for changing the normal orientation of the arm to a shorter one to permit safe removal of the inspection device from the reactor vessel. (author)

  17. Evaluation of actinide partitioning and transmutation in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, Emory D.; Renier, John-Paul

    2004-01-01

    Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) studies were made to evaluate the feasibility of multicycle transmutation of plutonium and the minor actinides (MAs) in light-water reactors (LWRs). Results showed that significant repository benefits, cost reductions, proliferation resistance, and effective use of facilities can be obtained. Key advantages are shown to be made possible by processing 30-year-decayed spent fuel rather than the more traditional 5-year-decayed fuel. (authors)

  18. Ultrasound periodic inspections of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haniger, L.

    1980-01-01

    Two versions are described of ultrasonic equipment for periodic inspections of reactor pressure vessels. One uses the principle of exchangeable programmators with solid-state logic while the other uses programmable logic with semiconductor memories. The equipment is to be used for inspections of welded joints on the upper part of the V-1 reactor pressure vessel. (L.O.)

  19. Latest feedback from a major reactor vessel dismantling project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boucau, J.; Segerud, P.; Sanchez, M.; Garcia, R.

    2015-01-01

    Westinghouse performed two large segmentation projects in 2010-2013 and then 2013-2015 at the Jose Cabrera nuclear power plant in Spain. The power plant is located in Almonacid de Zorita, 43 miles east of Madrid, Spain and was in operation between 1968 and 2006. This paper will describe the sequential steps required to prepare, segment, separate, and package the individual component segments using under water mechanical techniques. The paper will also include experiences and lessons learned that Westinghouse has collected from the activities performed during the reactor vessel and vessel internals segmentation projects. (authors)

  20. Energetics of semi-catalyzed-deuterium, light-water-moderated, fusion-fission toroidal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jassby, D.L.; Towner, H.H.; Greenspan, E.; Schneider, A.; Misolovin, A.; Gilai, D.

    1978-07-01

    The semi-catalyzed-deuterium Light-Water Hybrid Reactor (LWHR) comprises a lithium-free light-water-moderated blanket with U 3 Si fuel driven by a deuterium-based fusion-neutron source, with complete burn-up of the tritium but almost no burn-up of the helium-3 reaction product. A one-dimensional model for a neutral-beam-driven tokamak plasma is used to determine the operating modes under which the fusion energy multiplication Q/sub p/ can be equal to or greater than 0.5. Thermonuclear, beam-target, and energetic-ion reactions are taken into account. The most feasible operating conditions for Q/sub p/ approximately 0.5 are tau/sub E/ = 2 to 4 x 10 14 cm -3 s, = 10 to 20 keV, and E/sub beam/ = 500 to 1000 keV, with approximately 40% of the fusion energy produced by beam-target reactions. Illustrative parameters of LWHRs are compared with those of an ignited D-T reactor

  1. Flow-induced vibration for light water reactors. Progress report, January-June 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Coster, M.A.

    1981-02-01

    Flow-Induced Vibration for Light Water Reactors (FIV for LWRs) is a four-year program designed to improve the FIV performance of light water reactors through the development of design criteria, analytical models for predicting behavior of components, general scaling laws to improve the accuracy of reduced-scale tests, and the identification of high FIV risk areas. The program is managed by the General Electric Nuclear Power Systems Engineering Department and has three major contributors: General Electric Nuclear Power Systems Engineering Department (NPSED), General Electric Corporate Research and Development (CR and D) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The program commenced December 1, 1976, but was suspended on September 30, 1978, due to a shift in Department of Energy (DOE) priorities away from LWR productivity/availability. It was reinitiated as of August 1, 1979. A second program suspension occurred from March 29, 1980 through May 16, 1980, due to funding limits. This progress report summarizes the accomplishments achieved during the period from Janury 1980 to June 1980

  2. Passive and inherent safety technologies for light-water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1990-07-01

    Passive/inherent safety implies a technical revolution in our approach to nuclear power safety. This direction is discussed herein for light-water reactors (LWRs) -- the predominant type of power reactor used in the world today. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) the approach to the development of passive/inherent safety for LWRs consists of four steps: identify and quantify safety requirements and goals; identify and quantify the technical functional requirements needed for safety; identify, invent, develop, and quantify technical options that meet both of the above requirements; and integrate safety systems into designs of economic and reliable nuclear power plants. Significant progress has been achieved in the first three steps of this program. The last step involves primarily the reactor vendors. These activities, as well as related activities worldwide, are described here. 27 refs., 7 tabs

  3. Reactor vessel dismantling at the high flux materials testing reactor Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tas, A.; Teunissen, G.

    1986-01-01

    The project of replacing the reactor vessel of the high flux materials testing reactor (HFR) originated in 1974 when results of several research programs confirmed severe neutron embrittlement of aluminium alloys suggesting a limited life of the existing facility. This report describes the dismantling philosophy and organisation, the design of special underwater equipment, the dismantling of the reactor vessel and thermal column, and the conditioning and shielding activities resulting in a working area for the installation of the new vessel with no access limitations due to radiation. Finally an overview of the segmentation, waste disposal and radiation exposure is given. The total dismantling, segmentation and conditioning activities resulted in a total collective radiation dose of 300 mSv. (orig.) [de

  4. Crack growth behaviour of low-alloy steels for pressure boundary components under transient light water reactor operating conditions - CASTOC, Part I: BWR/NWC conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P.; Devrient, B.; Roth, A.; Ehrnsten, U.; Ernestova, M.; Zamboch, M.; Foehl, J.; Weissenberg, T.; Gomez-Briceno, D.; Lapena, J.

    2004-01-01

    One of the ageing phenomena of pressure boundary components of light water reactors (LWR) is environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC). The project CASTOC (5. Framework Programme of the EU) was launched September 2000 with six European partners and terminated August 2003. It was focused in particular on the EAC behaviour of low-alloy steels (LAS) and to some extent to weld metal, heat affected zone and the influence of an austenitic cladding. The main objective was directed to the clarification of EAC crack growth behaviour/mechanism of LAS in high-temperature water under steady-state power operation (constant load) and transient operating conditions (e.g., start-up/shut-down, transients in water chemistry and load). Autoclave tests were performed with Western and Russian type reactor pressure vessel steels under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR)/normal water chemistry (NWC) and pressurised water reactor (VVER) conditions. The investigations were performed with fracture mechanics specimens of different sizes and geometries. The applied loading comprised cyclic loads, static loads and load spectra where the static load was periodically interrupted by partial unloading. With regard to water chemistry, the oxygen content (VVER) and impurities of sulphate and chlorides (BWR) were varied beyond allowable limits for continuous operation. The current paper summarises the most important crack growth results obtained under simulated BWR/NWC conditions. The results are discussed in the context of the current crack growth rate curves in the corresponding nuclear codes. (authors)

  5. Crack growth behaviour of low-alloy steels for pressure boundary components under transient light water reactor operating conditions - CASTOC, Part I: BWR/NWC conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, S.; Seifert, H.P. [Paul Scherrer Institute, PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Devrient, B.; Roth, A. [Framatome ANP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Ehrnsten, U. [VTT Industrial Systems, Espoo (Finland); Ernestova, M.; Zamboch, M. [Nuclear Research Institute, NRI, Rez (Czech Republic); Foehl, J.; Weissenberg, T. [Staatliche Materialpruefungsanstalt, MPA, Stuttgart (Germany); Gomez-Briceno, D.; Lapena, J. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    One of the ageing phenomena of pressure boundary components of light water reactors (LWR) is environmentally-assisted cracking (EAC). The project CASTOC (5. Framework Programme of the EU) was launched September 2000 with six European partners and terminated August 2003. It was focused in particular on the EAC behaviour of low-alloy steels (LAS) and to some extent to weld metal, heat affected zone and the influence of an austenitic cladding. The main objective was directed to the clarification of EAC crack growth behaviour/mechanism of LAS in high-temperature water under steady-state power operation (constant load) and transient operating conditions (e.g., start-up/shut-down, transients in water chemistry and load). Autoclave tests were performed with Western and Russian type reactor pressure vessel steels under simulated boiling water reactor (BWR)/normal water chemistry (NWC) and pressurised water reactor (VVER) conditions. The investigations were performed with fracture mechanics specimens of different sizes and geometries. The applied loading comprised cyclic loads, static loads and load spectra where the static load was periodically interrupted by partial unloading. With regard to water chemistry, the oxygen content (VVER) and impurities of sulphate and chlorides (BWR) were varied beyond allowable limits for continuous operation. The current paper summarises the most important crack growth results obtained under simulated BWR/NWC conditions. The results are discussed in the context of the current crack growth rate curves in the corresponding nuclear codes. (authors)

  6. Materials Inventory Database for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazi Ahmed; Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

    2013-08-01

    Scientific research involves the purchasing, processing, characterization, and fabrication of many sample materials. The history of such materials can become complicated over their lifetime – materials might be cut into pieces or moved to various storage locations, for example. A database with built-in functions to track these kinds of processes facilitates well-organized research. The Material Inventory Database Accounting System (MIDAS) is an easy-to-use tracking and reference system for such items. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS), which seeks to advance the long-term reliability and productivity of existing nuclear reactors in the United States through multiple research pathways, proposed MIDAS as an efficient way to organize and track all items used in its research. The database software ensures traceability of all items used in research using built-in functions which can emulate actions on tracked items – fabrication, processing, splitting, and more – by performing operations on the data. MIDAS can recover and display the complete history of any item as a simple report. To ensure the database functions suitably for the organization of research, it was developed alongside a specific experiment to test accident tolerant nuclear fuel cladding under the LWRS Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels Pathway. MIDAS kept track of materials used in this experiment from receipt at the laboratory through all processes, test conduct and, ultimately, post-test analysis. By the end of this process, the database proved to be right tool for this program. The database software will help LWRS more efficiently conduct research experiments, from simple characterization tests to in-reactor experiments. Furthermore, MIDAS is a universal tool that any other research team could use to organize their material inventory.

  7. Guiding device for a manipulator mast for internal inspection of a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, W.; Schlueter, H.

    1977-01-01

    A remote-controlled supporting device centering a manipulator mast is described which is mounted and operated above a reactor pressure vessel under water in such a way that rotations and vertical movements necessary for the internal inspection of the pressure vessel remain possible. (RW) [de

  8. Environmentally-assisted cracking in austenitic light water reactor structural materials. Final report of the KORA-I project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, H.-P.; Ritter, S

    2009-03-15

    The following document is the final report of the KORA-I project, which was performed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) between 2006 and 2008 and was funded by the Swiss Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI). The three sub-projects of KORA-I covered the experimental characterisation of the effect of the reactor coolant environment on fatigue initiation and crack growth in austenitic stainless steels under boiling and pressurised water reactor conditions, the experimental evaluation of the potential and limits of the electrochemical noise measurement technique for the early detection of stress corrosion cracking initiation in austenitic stainless steels under boiling water reactor/normal water chemistry conditions, as well as the characterisation of the stress corrosion crack growth behaviour in the fusion line region of an Alloy 182-low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steel dissimilar metal weld. The main scientific results and major conclusions of the three sub-projects are discussed in three independent parts of this report. (author)

  9. Environmentally-assisted cracking in austenitic light water reactor structural materials. Final report of the KORA-I project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, H.-P.; Ritter, S.

    2009-03-01

    The following document is the final report of the KORA-I project, which was performed at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) between 2006 and 2008 and was funded by the Swiss Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI). The three sub-projects of KORA-I covered the experimental characterisation of the effect of the reactor coolant environment on fatigue initiation and crack growth in austenitic stainless steels under boiling and pressurised water reactor conditions, the experimental evaluation of the potential and limits of the electrochemical noise measurement technique for the early detection of stress corrosion cracking initiation in austenitic stainless steels under boiling water reactor/normal water chemistry conditions, as well as the characterisation of the stress corrosion crack growth behaviour in the fusion line region of an Alloy 182-low-alloy reactor pressure vessel steel dissimilar metal weld. The main scientific results and major conclusions of the three sub-projects are discussed in three independent parts of this report. (author)

  10. Nuclear power station with a water-cooled reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, R.; Brunner, G.; Jost, N.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear radiation produces radiolysis gases, which are undesirable for corrosion and oxyhydrogen gas reasons. To limit the proportion of this radiolysis gas, the invention provides that catalytic surfaces should be introduced into the primary circuit, to produce recombination of hydrogen and oxygen. These surfaces can be accommodated in the upper part of the reactor pressure vessel. The live steam screen can also have a catalytic surface. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Pressure Tube and Pressure Vessel Reactors; certain comparisons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margen, P H; Ahlstroem, P E; Pershagen, B

    1961-04-15

    In a comparison between pressure tube and pressure vessel type reactors for pressurized D{sub 2}O coolant and natural uranium, one can say that reactors of these two types having the same net electrical output, overall thermal efficiency, reflected core volume and fuel lattice have roughly the same capital cost. In these circumstances, the fuel burn-up obtainable has a significant influence on the relative economics. Comparisons of burn-up values made on this basis are presented in this report and the influence on the results of certain design assumptions are discussed. One of the comparisons included is based on the dimensions and ratings proposed for CANDU. Moderator temperature coefficients are compared and differences in kinetic behaviour which generally result in different design philosophies for the two types are mentioned, A comparison of different methods of obtaining flux flattening is presented. The influence of slight enrichment and other coolants, (boiling D{sub 2}O and gases) on the comparison between pressure tube and pressure vessel designs is discussed and illustrated with comparative designs for 400 MW electrical output. This paper was presented at the EAES Enlarged Symposium on Heterogeneous Heavy Water Power Reactors, Mallorca, October 10 - 14, 1960.

  12. Pressure Tube and Pressure Vessel Reactors; certain comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margen, P.H.; Ahlstroem, P.E.; Pershagen, B.

    1961-04-01

    In a comparison between pressure tube and pressure vessel type reactors for pressurized D 2 O coolant and natural uranium, one can say that reactors of these two types having the same net electrical output, overall thermal efficiency, reflected core volume and fuel lattice have roughly the same capital cost. In these circumstances, the fuel burn-up obtainable has a significant influence on the relative economics. Comparisons of burn-up values made on this basis are presented in this report and the influence on the results of certain design assumptions are discussed. One of the comparisons included is based on the dimensions and ratings proposed for CANDU. Moderator temperature coefficients are compared and differences in kinetic behaviour which generally result in different design philosophies for the two types are mentioned, A comparison of different methods of obtaining flux flattening is presented. The influence of slight enrichment and other coolants, (boiling D 2 O and gases) on the comparison between pressure tube and pressure vessel designs is discussed and illustrated with comparative designs for 400 MW electrical output. This paper was presented at the EAES Enlarged Symposium on Heterogeneous Heavy Water Power Reactors, Mallorca, October 10 - 14, 1960

  13. Feasibility of underwater welding of highly irradiated in-vessel components of boiling-water reactors: A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, A.L.

    1997-11-01

    In February 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES), initiated a literature review to assess the state of underwater welding technology. In particular, the objective of this literature review was to evaluate the viability of underwater welding in-vessel components of boiling water reactor (BWR) in-vessel components, especially those components fabricated from stainless steels that are subjected to high neutron fluences. This assessment was requested because of the recent increased level of activity in the commercial nuclear industry to address generic issues concerning the reactor vessel and internals, especially those issues related to repair options. This literature review revealed a preponderance of general information about underwater welding technology, as a result of the active research in this field sponsored by the U.S. Navy and offshore oil and gas industry concerns. However, the literature search yielded only a limited amount of information about underwater welding of components in low-fluence areas of BWR in-vessel environments, and no information at all concerning underwater welding experiences in high-fluence environments. Research reported by the staff of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and researchers from the DOE fusion reactor program proved more fruitful. This research documented relevant experience concerning welding of stainless steel materials in air environments exposed to high neutron fluences. It also addressed problems with welding highly irradiated materials, and primarily attributed those problems to helium-induced cracking in the material. (Helium is produced from the neutron irradiation of boron, an impurity, and nickel.) The researchers found that the amount of helium-induced cracking could be controlled, or even eliminated, by reducing the heat input into the weld and applying a compressive stress perpendicular to the weld path

  14. An improved water cooled nuclear reactor and pressuriser assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, F.J.; Strong, R.

    1991-01-01

    A water cooled nuclear reactor is described which comprises a reactor core, a primary water coolant circuit and a pressuriser arranged as an integral unit in a pressure vessel. The pressure vessel is divided into an upper and a lower chamber by a casing. The reactor core and primary water coolant circuit are arranged in the lower chamber and the pressuriser is arranged in the upper chamber. A plurality of spray pipes interconnect a steam space of the pressuriser with the downcomer of the primary water coolant circuit below a heat exchanger. A plurality of surge ports interconnect a water space of the pressuriser with the primary water coolant circuit. The surge ports have hydraulic diodes so that there is a low flow resistance for water from the water space of the pressuriser to the primary water coolant circuit and high flow resistance in the opposite direction. The spray pipes provide a desuperheating spray of cooled water into the pressuriser during positive volume surges of the primary water coolant. The pressuriser arrangement may also be applied to integral water cooled reactors with separate pressurisers and to dispersed pressurised water reactors. The surge ports also allow water to flow by gravity to the core in an emergency. (author)

  15. Secondary flows in the cooling channels of the high-performance light-water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurien, E.; Wintterle, Th. [Stuttgart Univ., Institute for Nuclear Technolgy and Energy Systems (IKE) (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The new design of a High-Performance Light-Water Reactor (HPLWR) involves a three-pass core with an evaporator region, where the compressed water is heated above the pseudo-critical temperature, and two superheater regions. Due to the strong dependency of the supercritical water density on the temperature significant mass transfer between neighboring cooling channels is expected if the temperature is unevenly distributed across the fuel element. An inter-channel flow is then superimposed to the secondary flow vortices induced by the non-isotropy of turbulence. In order to gain insight into the resulting flow patterns as well as into temperature and density distributions within the various subchannels of the fuel element CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) calculations for the 1/8 fuel element are performed. For simplicity adiabatic boundary conditions at the moderator box and the fuel element box are assumed. Our investigation confirms earlier results obtained by subchannel analysis that the axial mass flux is significantly reduced in the corner subchannel of this fuel element resulting in a net mass flux towards the neighboring subchannels. Our results provide a first estimation of the magnitude of the secondary flows in the pseudo-critical region of a supercritical light-water reactor. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that CFD is an efficient tool for investigations of flow patterns within nuclear reactor fuel elements. (authors)

  16. Neutron absorption profile in a reactor moderated by different mixtures of light and heavy waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Mohamed E.; Aly, Mohamed N.; Gaber, Fatma A.; Dorrah, Mahmoud E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We studied neutron absorption spectra in a mixed water moderated reactor. • Changing D 2 O% in moderator induced neutron energy spectral shift. • Most of the neutrons absorbed in control rods were epithermal. • Control rods worth changes were not proportional to changes of D 2 O% in moderator. • Control rod arrangement influenced the neutronic behavior of the reactor. - Abstract: A Monte-Carlo parametric study was carried out to investigate the neutron absorption profile in a model of LR-0 reactor when it is moderated by different mixtures of heavy/light waters at molecular ratios ranging from 0% up to 100% D 2 O at increments of 10% in D 2 O. The tallies included; neutron absorption profiles in control rods and moderator, and neutron capture profile in 238 U. The work focused on neutron absorption in control rods entailing; total mass of control rods needed to attain criticality, neutron absorption density and total neutron absorption in control rods at each of the studied mixed water moderators. The aim was to explore whether thermal neutron poisons are the most suitable poisons to be used in control rods of nuclear reactors moderated by mixed heavy/light water moderators

  17. Thermal annealing of an embrittled reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mager, T.R.; Dragunov, Y.G.; Leitz, C.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of the popularity of the Agencies report 'Neutron Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels' of 1975, it was decided that another report on this broad subject would be of use. In this report, background and contemporary views on specially identified areas of the subject are considered as self-contained chapters, written by experts. Chapter 11 deals with thermal annealing of an embrittled reactor pressure vessel. Anneal procedures for vessels from both the US and the former USSR are mentioned schematically, wet anneals at lower temperature and dry anneals above RPV design temperatures are investigated. It is shown that heat treatment is a means of recovering mechanical properties which were degraded by neutron radiation exposure, thus assuring reactor pressure vessel compliance with regulatory requirements

  18. Thorium Fuel Performance in a Tight-Pitch Light Water Reactor Lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taek Kyum; Downar, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    Research on the utilization of thorium-based fuels in the intermediate neutron spectrum of a tight-pitch light water reactor (LWR) lattice is reported. The analysis was performed using the Studsvik/Scandpower lattice physics code HELIOS. The results show that thorium-based fuels in the intermediate spectrum of tight-pitch LWRs have considerable advantages in terms of conversion ratio, reactivity control, nonproliferation characteristics, and a reduced production of long-lived radiotoxic wastes. Because of the high conversion ratio of thorium-based fuels in intermediate spectrum reactors, the total fissile inventory required to achieve a given fuel burnup is only 11 to 17% higher than that of 238 U fertile fuels. However, unlike 238 U fertile fuels, the void reactivity coefficient with thorium-based fuels is negative in an intermediate spectrum reactor. This provides motivation for replacing 238 U with 232 Th in advanced high-conversion intermediate spectrum LWRs, such as the reduced-moderator reactor or the supercritical reactor

  19. Review of the American Physical Society light water reactor safety study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budnitz, R.J.

    1975-11-01

    The issue of light-water reactor (LWR) safety has been the subject of a part-time, year-long study sponsored by the American Physical Society and supported by the National Science Foundation and the former Atomic Energy Commission. The 1974-1975 study produced a Report by the Study Group to the Society. The Report's ''Summary of Conclusions and Major Recommendations'' section is presented

  20. Testing of the multi-application small light water reactor (MASLWR) passive safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes, Jose N.; Groome, John; Woods, Brian G.; Young, Eric; Abel, Kent; Yao, You; Yoo, Yeon Jong

    2007-01-01

    Experimental thermal hydraulic research has been conducted at Oregon State University for the purpose of assessing the performance of a new reactor design concept, the multi-application small light water reactor (MASLWR). The MASLWR is a pressurized light water reactor design with a net output of 35 MWe that uses natural circulation in both normal and transient operation. Due to its small size, portability and modularity, the MASLWR design is well suited to help fill the potential need for grid appropriate reactor designs for smaller electricity grids as may be found in developing or remote regions. The purpose of the OSU MASLWR test facility is to assess the operation of the MASLWR under normal full operating pressure and full temperature conditions and to assess the passive safety systems under transient conditions. The data generated by the testing program will be used to assess computer code calculations and to provide a better understanding of the thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the design of the MASLWR NSSS. During this testing program, four tests were conducted at the OSU MASLWR test facility. These tests included one design basis accident and one beyond design basis accident. During the performance of these tests, plant operations to include start up, normal operation and shut down evolutions were demonstrated successfully

  1. Transmutation of waste actinides in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorrell, T.C.

    1979-04-01

    Actinide recycle and transmutation calculations were made for three irradiation options of a light water reactor (LWR). The cases considered were: all actinides recycled in regular uranium fuel assemblies; transuranic actinides recycled in separate MOX assemblies with 235 U enrichment of uranium; and transuranic actinides recycled in separate MOX assemblies with plutonium enrichment of natural uranium. When all actinides were recycled in a uniform lattice, the transuranic inventory after ten recycles was 38% of the inventory accumulated without recycle. When the transuranics from two regular uranium assemblies were combined with those recycled from a MOX assembly, the transuranic inventory was reduced 50% after five recycles

  2. How to replace a reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, R.

    1996-01-01

    A potential life extending procedure for a nuclear reactor after, say, 40 years of service life, might in some circumstances be the replacement of the reactor pressure vessel. Neutron induced degradation of the vessel might make replacement by one of a different material composition desirable, for example. Although the replacement of heavy components, such as steam generators, has been possible for many years, the pressure vessel presents a much more demanding task if only because it is highly irradiated. Some preliminary feasibility studies by Siemens are reported for the two removal strategies that might be considered. These are removal of the entire pressure vessel in one piece and dismantling it into sections. (UK)

  3. Fluid-structure-interaction analyses of reactor vessel using improved hybrid Lagrangian Eulerian code ALICE-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.Y.

    1993-06-01

    This paper describes fluid-structure-interaction and structure response analyses of a reactor vessel subjected to loadings associated with postulated accidents, using the hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian code ALICE-II. This code has been improved recently to accommodate many features associated with innovative designs of reactor vessels. Calculational capabilities have been developed to treat water in the reactor cavity outside the vessel, internal shield structures and internal thin shells. The objective of the present analyses is to study the cover response and potential for missile generation in response to a fuel-coolant interaction in the core region. Three calculations were performed using the cover weight as a parameter. To study the effect of the cavity water, vessel response calculations for both wet- and dry-cavity designs are compared. Results indicate that for all cases studied and for the design parameters assumed, the calculated cover displacements are all smaller than the bolts` ultimate displacement and no missile generation of the closure head is predicted. Also, solutions reveal that the cavity water of the wet-cavity design plays an important role of restraining the downward displacement of the bottom head. Based on these studies, the analyses predict that the structure integrity is maintained throughout the postulated accident for the wet-cavity design.

  4. Fluid-structure-interaction analyses of reactor vessel using improved hybrid Lagrangian Eulerian code ALICE-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, C.Y.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes fluid-structure-interaction and structure response analyses of a reactor vessel subjected to loadings associated with postulated accidents, using the hybrid Lagrangian-Eulerian code ALICE-II. This code has been improved recently to accommodate many features associated with innovative designs of reactor vessels. Calculational capabilities have been developed to treat water in the reactor cavity outside the vessel, internal shield structures and internal thin shells. The objective of the present analyses is to study the cover response and potential for missile generation in response to a fuel-coolant interaction in the core region. Three calculations were performed using the cover weight as a parameter. To study the effect of the cavity water, vessel response calculations for both wet- and dry-cavity designs are compared. Results indicate that for all cases studied and for the design parameters assumed, the calculated cover displacements are all smaller than the bolts' ultimate displacement and no missile generation of the closure head is predicted. Also, solutions reveal that the cavity water of the wet-cavity design plays an important role of restraining the downward displacement of the bottom head. Based on these studies, the analyses predict that the structure integrity is maintained throughout the postulated accident for the wet-cavity design.

  5. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    An apparatus is described for sealing a cold leg nozzle of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location comprising: at least one sealing plug for mechanically sealing the nozzle from the inside of the reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plug includes a plate and a cone assembly having an end part receptive in the nozzle, the plate being axially moveable relative to the cone assembly. The plate and cone assembly have confronting bevelled edges defining an opening therebetween. A primary O-ring is disposed about the opening and is supported on the bevelled edges, the plate being guidably mounted to the cone assembly for movement toward the cone assembly to radially expand the primary O-ring into sealing engagement with the nozzle. A means is included for providing relative movement between the outer plate and the cone assembly

  6. Examination of VVER-1000 Reactor Pressure Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matokovic, A.; Picek, E.; Markulin, K.

    2008-01-01

    The increasing demand of a higher level of safety in the operation of the nuclear power plants requires the utilisation of more precise automated equipment to perform in-service inspections. That has been achieved by technological advances in computer technology, in robotics, in examination probe technology with the development of the advanced inspection technique and has also been due to the considerable and varied experience gained in the performance of such inspections. In-service inspection of reactor pressure vessel, especially Russian-designed WWER-1000 presents one of the most important and extensive examination of nuclear power plants primary circuit components. Such examination demand high standards of inspection technology, quality and continual innovation in the field of non-destructive testing advanced technology. A remote underwater contact ultrasonic technique is employed for the examination of the base metal of vessel and reactor welds, whence eddy current method is applied for clad surface examinations. Visual testing is used for examination of the vessel interior. The movement of inspection probes and data positioning are assured by using new reactor pressure vessel tool concept that is fully integrated with inspection systems. The successful performance of reactor pressure vessel is attributed thorough pre-outage planning, training and successful performance demonstration qualification of chosen non-destructive techniques on the specimens with artificial and/or real defects. Furthermore, use of advanced approach of inspection through implementation the state-of-the-art examination equipment significantly reduced the inspection time, radiation exposure to examination personnel, shortening nuclear power plant outage and cutting the total inspection costs. This paper presents advanced approach in the reactor pressure vessel in-service inspections and it is especially developed for WWER-1000 nuclear power plants.(author)

  7. Standard Guide for Benchmark Testing of Light Water Reactor Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers general approaches for benchmarking neutron transport calculations in light water reactor systems. A companion guide (Guide E2005) covers use of benchmark fields for testing neutron transport calculations and cross sections in well controlled environments. This guide covers experimental benchmarking of neutron fluence calculations (or calculations of other exposure parameters such as dpa) in more complex geometries relevant to reactor surveillance. Particular sections of the guide discuss: the use of well-characterized benchmark neutron fields to provide an indication of the accuracy of the calculational methods and nuclear data when applied to typical cases; and the use of plant specific measurements to indicate bias in individual plant calculations. Use of these two benchmark techniques will serve to limit plant-specific calculational uncertainty, and, when combined with analytical uncertainty estimates for the calculations, will provide uncertainty estimates for reactor fluences with ...

  8. Research towards ultrasonic systems to assist in-vessel manipulations in liquid metal cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierckx, Marc; Van-Dyck, Dries

    2013-06-01

    We describe the state of the art of the research towards ultrasonic measurement methods for use in lead-bismuth cooled liquid metal reactors. Our current research activities are highly focused on specific tasks in the MYRRHA system, which is a fast spectrum research reactor cooled with the eutectic mixture of lead and bismuth (LBE) and is conceived as an accelerator driven system capable of operating in both sub-critical and critical mode. As liquid metal is opaque to light, normal visual feedback during fuel manipulations in the reactor vessel is not available and must therefore be replaced by a system that is not hindered by the opacity of the coolant. In this respect ultrasonic measurement techniques have been proposed and even developed in the past for operation in sodium cooled reactors. To our knowledge, no such systems have ever been deployed in lead based reactors and we are the first to have a research program in this direction as will be detailed in this paper. We give an overview of the acoustic properties of LBE and compare them with the properties of sodium and water to theoretically show the feasibility of ultrasonic systems operating in LBE. In the second part of the paper we discuss the results of the validation experiments in water and LBE. A typical scene is ultrasonically probed by a mechanical scanning system while the signals are processed to render a 3D visualization on a computer screen. It will become clear that mechanical scanning is capable of producing acceptable images but that it is a time consuming process that is not fit to solve the initial task to providing feedback during manipulations in the reactor vessel. That is why we propose to use several dedicated ultrasonic systems each adapted to a specific task and capable to provide real-time feedback of the ongoing manipulations, as is detailed in the third and final part of the paper. (authors)

  9. Guideline for examination concerning the evaluation of safety in light water power reactor installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This guideline was drawn up as the guide for examination when the safety evaluation of nuclear reactors is carried out at the time of approving the installation of light water power reactors. Accordingly in case of the examination of safety, it must be confirmed that the contents of application are in conformity with this guideline. If they are in conformity, it is judged that the safety evaluation of the policy in the basic design of a reactor facility is adequate, and also that the evaluation concerning the separation from the public in surroundings is adequate as the condition of location of the reactor facility. This guideline is concerned with light water power reactors now in use, but the basic concept may be the reference for the examination of the other types of reactors. If such a case occurs that the safety evaluation does not conform to this guideline, it is not excluded when the appropriate reason is clarified. The purpose of safety evaluation, the scope to be evaluated, the selection of the events to be evaluated, the criteria for judgement, the matters taken into consideration at the time of analysis, the concrete events of abnormal transient change and accident in operation, and the concrete events of serious accident and hypothetic accident are stipulated. The explanation and two appendices are attached. (Kako, I.)

  10. Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Acquisition Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizia, Ronald Eugene [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2008-04-01

    The Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. The purpose of this report is to address the acquisition strategy for the NGNP Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). This component will be larger than any nuclear reactor pressure vessel presently in service in the United States. The RPV will be taller, larger in diameter, thicker walled, heavier and most likely fabricated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site of multiple subcomponent pieces. The pressure vessel steel can either be a conventional materials already used in the nuclear industry such as listed within ASME A508/A533 specifications or it will be fabricated from newer pressure vessel materials never before used for a nuclear reactor in the US. Each of these characteristics will present a

  11. Functional systems of a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzel, V.

    1982-01-01

    The main topics, discussed in the present paper, are: - Principle design of the reactor coolant system - reactor pressure vessel with internals - containment design - residual heat removal and emergency cooling systems - nuclear component cooling systems - emergency feed water systems - plant electric power supply system. (orig./RW)

  12. Reactor Structural Materials: Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaouadi, R.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on Rector Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels are:(1) to complete the fracture toughness data bank of various reactor pressure vessel steels by using precracked Charpy specimens that were tested statically as well as dynamically; (2) to implement the enhanced surveillance approach in a user-friendly software; (3) to improve the existing reconstitution technology by reducing the input energy (short cycle welding) and modifying the stud geometry. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported

  13. Dual shell pressure balanced reactor vessel. Final project report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertus, R.J.; Fassbender, A.G.

    1994-10-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research (OER) has previously provided support for the development of several chemical processes, including supercritical water oxidation, liquefaction, and aqueous hazardous waste destruction, where chemical and phase transformations are conducted at high pressure and temperature. These and many other commercial processes require a pressure vessel capable of operating in a corrosive environment where safety and economy are important requirements. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) engineers have recently developed and patented (U.S. patent 5,167,930 December 1, 1992) a concept for a novel Dual Shell Pressure Balanced Vessel (DSPBV) which could solve a number of these problems. The technology could be immediately useful in continuing commercialization of an R ampersand D 100 award-winning technology, Sludge-to-oil Reactor System (STORS), originally developed through funding by OER. Innotek Corporation is a small business that would be one logical end-user of the DSPBV reactor technology. Innotek is working with several major U.S. engineering firms to evaluate the potential of this technology in the disposal of wastes from sewage treatment plants. PNL entered into a CRADA with Innotek to build a bench-scale demonstration reactor and test the system to advance the economic feasibility of a variety of high pressure chemical processes. Hydrothermal processing of corrosive substances on a large scale can now be made significantly safer and more economical through use of the DSPBV. Hydrothermal chemical reactions such as wet-air oxidation and supercritical water oxidation occur in a highly corrosive environment inside a pressure vessel. Average corrosion rates from 23 to 80 miles per year have been reported by Rice (1994) and Latanision (1993)

  14. Minimization of radioactive material deposition in water-cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, C.P.; Blaies, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    This patent describes the method for inhibiting the deposition of radioactive cobalt in a water-bearing vessel of a water-cooled nuclear reactor which comprises adding zinc ion to water entering the water-bearing vessel. The improvement contains a substantially lower proportion of the /sup 64/Zn isotope than naturally occurring zinc

  15. Reactor vessel assessment and the development of a reactor vessel life extension program for Calvert Cliffs Units One and Two

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, B.; Hijeck, P.J.

    1988-01-01

    A study has been undertaken to provide a general assessment of the life extension capabilities for the Calvert Cliffs Units One and Two reactor pressure vessels. The purpose of the study is to assess the general life extension capabilities for the Calvert Cliffs reactor pressure vessels based upon an extension and variation of the Surry pilot plant life extension study. This assessment provided a detailed reactor vessel surveillance program for plant life extension along with a hierarchy of specific tasks necessary for attaining maximum useful life. The assessment identified a number of critical issues which may impact life attainment and extension along with potential solutions to address these issues to ensure the life extension option is not precluded

  16. Computational study of the mixed cooling effects on the in-vessel retention of a molten pool in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung Seok; Sohn, Chang Hyun; Ahn, Kwang Il

    2004-01-01

    The retention of a molten pool vessel cooled by internal vessel reflooding and/or external vessel reactor cavity flooding has been considered as one of severe accident management strategies. The present numerical study investigates the effect of both internal and external vessel mixed cooling on an internally heated molten pool. The molten pool is confined in a hemispherical vessel with reference to the thermal behavior of the vessel wall. In this study, our numerical model used a scaled-down reactor vessel of a KSNP (Korea Standard Nuclear Power) reactor design of 1000 MWe (a pressurized water reactor with a large and dry containment). Well-known temperature-dependent boiling heat transfer curves are applied to the internal and external vessel cooling boundaries. Radiative heat transfer has been considered in the case of dry internal vessel boundary condition. Computational results show that the external cooling vessel boundary conditions have better effectiveness than internal vessel cooling in the retention of the melt pool vessel failure

  17. Application of material databases for improved reliability of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griesbach, T.J.; Server, W.L.; Beaudoin, B.F.; Burgos, B.N.

    1994-01-01

    A vital part of reactor vessel Life Cycle Management program must begin with an accurate characterization of the vessel material properties. Uncertainties in vessel material properties or use of bounding values may result in unnecessary conservatisms in vessel integrity calculations. These conservatisms may be eliminated through a better understanding of the material properties in reactor vessels, both in the unirradiated and irradiated conditions. Reactor vessel material databases are available for quantifying the chemistry and Charpy shift behavior of individual heats of reactor vessel materials. Application of the databases for vessels with embrittlement concerns has proven to be an effective embrittlement management tool. This paper presents details of database development and applications which demonstrate the value of using material databases for improving material chemistry and for maximizing the data from integrated material surveillance programs

  18. Results and analysis of reactor-material experiments on ex-vessel corium quench and dispersal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.W.; McUmber, L.M.; Sienicki, J.J.; Squarer, D.

    1984-01-01

    Results of reactor-material experiments and related analysis are described in which molten corium is injected into a mock-up of the reactor cavity region of a PWR. The experiments address ex-vessel interactions such as steam generation (for those cases in which water is present), water and corium dispersal from the cavity, hydrogen generation, direct atmosphere heating by dispersed corium, and debris characterization. Test results indicate efficiencies of steam generation by corium quench ranging up to 65%. Corium sweepout of up to 62% of the injected material was found for those conditions in which steam generation flowrate was augmented by vessel blowdown. The dispersed corium caused very little direct heating of the atmosphere for the configuration employing a trap at the exit of the cavity-to-containment pathway. Corium sweepout phenomena were modeled for high-pressure blowdown conditions, and the results applied to the full-size reactor system predict essentially complete sweepout of corium from the reactor cavity

  19. Prestressed concrete pressure vessels for nuclear reactors - 1973

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    This standard deals with the design, construction, inspection and testing of prestressed concrete pressure vessels for nuclear reactors. Such pressure vessels serve the dual purpose of shielding and containing gas cooled nuclear reactors and are a form of civil engineering structure requiring particularly high integrity, and ensured leak tightness. (Metric)

  20. The coolability limits of a reactor pressure vessel lower head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Syri, S. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Configuration II of the ULPU experimental facility is described, and from a comprehensive set of experiments are provided. The facility affords full-scale simulations of the boiling crisis phenomenon on the hemispherical lower head of a reactor pressure vessel submerged in water, and heated internally. Whereas Configuration I experiments (published previously) established the lower limits of coolability under low submergence, pool-boiling conditions, with Configuration II we investigate coolability under conditions more appropriate to practical interest in severe accident management; that is, heat flux shapes (as functions of angular position) representative of a core melt contained by the lower head, full submergence of the reactor pressure vessel, and natural circulation. Critical heat fluxes as a function of the angular position on the lower head are reported and related the observed two-phase flow regimes.

  1. Neutronic and Thermal-hydraulic Modelling of High Performance Light Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppaelae, Malla [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O.Box 1000, FI02044 VTT (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), which is studied in EU project 'HPLWR2', uses water at supercritical pressures as coolant and moderator to achieve higher core outlet temperature and thus higher efficiency compared to present reactors. At VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, functionality of the thermal-hydraulics in the coupled reactor dynamics code TRAB3D/ SMABRE was extended to supercritical pressures for the analyses of HPLWR. Input models for neutronics and thermal-hydraulics were made for TRAB3D/ SMABRE according to the latest HPLWR design. A preliminary analysis was performed in which the capability of SMABRE in the transition from supercritical pressures to subcritical pressures was demonstrated. Parameterized two-group cross sections for TRAB3D neutronics were received from Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute together with a subroutine for handling them. PSG, a new Monte Carlo transport code developed at VTT, was also used to generate two-group constants for HPLWR and comparisons were made with the KFKI cross sections and MCNP calculations. (author)

  2. Neutronic and Thermal-hydraulic Modelling of High Performance Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppaelae, Malla

    2008-01-01

    High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), which is studied in EU project 'HPLWR2', uses water at supercritical pressures as coolant and moderator to achieve higher core outlet temperature and thus higher efficiency compared to present reactors. At VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, functionality of the thermal-hydraulics in the coupled reactor dynamics code TRAB3D/ SMABRE was extended to supercritical pressures for the analyses of HPLWR. Input models for neutronics and thermal-hydraulics were made for TRAB3D/ SMABRE according to the latest HPLWR design. A preliminary analysis was performed in which the capability of SMABRE in the transition from supercritical pressures to subcritical pressures was demonstrated. Parameterized two-group cross sections for TRAB3D neutronics were received from Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute together with a subroutine for handling them. PSG, a new Monte Carlo transport code developed at VTT, was also used to generate two-group constants for HPLWR and comparisons were made with the KFKI cross sections and MCNP calculations. (author)

  3. Advanced Light Water Reactor Program: Program management and staff review methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, D.H.

    1986-12-01

    This report summarizes the NRC/EPRI coordinated effort to develop design requirements for a standardized advanced light water reactor (ALWR) and the procedures for screening and applying new generic safety issues to this program. The end-product will be an NRC-approved ALWR Requirements Document for use by the nuclear industry in generating designs of LWRs to be constructed for operation in the 1990s and beyond

  4. Prospects for plutonium recycling in light-water reactors in the European Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haijtink, B.

    1977-01-01

    On the basis of a forecast on nuclear power installation programmes and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing capacities in the European Community, an assessment has been made of the developmnt of the plutonium handling industry up to the year 1990. Data on plutonium recovered in the reprocessing plants, requirements for fuelling the fast-breeder reactors and the remaining stockpile have been evaluated. A possible strategy for recycling the plutonium surplus in light-water reactors has been developed and its effects as regards saving on requirements for natural uranium and enrichment services have been estimated

  5. Reactor pressure vessel embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-07-01

    Within the framework of the IAEA extrabudgetary programme on the Safety of WWER-440/230 NPPs, a list of safety issues requiring broad studies of generic interest have been agreed upon by an Advisory Group who met in Vienna in September 1990. The list was later revised in the light of the programme findings. The information on the status of the issues, and on the amount of work already completed and under way in the various countries, needs to be compiled. Moreover, an evaluation of what further work is required to resolve each one of the issues is also necessary. In view of this, the IAEA has started the preparation of a series of status reports on the various issues. This report on the generic safety issue ''Reactor Pressure Vessel Embrittlement'' presents a comprehensive survey of technical information available in the field and identifies those aspects which require further investigation. 39 refs, 21 figs, 4 tabs

  6. Boiling in the presence of boron compounds in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakath, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The scope of the thesis on boiling in the presence of boron compounds in light water reactors was to study the effects of the boron compound addition on the heat removal from the fuel elements. For an effective cooling of the fuel elements in case of boiling processes a high heat transfer coefficient is of importance. Up to now experimental studies were not performed under reactor specific conditions, for instance with respect to the geometry of the flow conditions, high temperature and pressure levels were not represented. Therefore the experiments in the frame of the thesis were using reactor specific parameters. The test facility SECA (study into the effects of coolant additives) was designed and constructed. The experiments simulated the conditions of normal PWR operation, accidental PWR and accidental BWR conditions.

  7. The United States Advanced Light Water reactor (USALWR) development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahlkopf, K.E.; Noble, D.M.; Devine, Jr.J.C.; Sugnet, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    For the United States Nuclear power industry to remain viable, it must be prepared to meet the expected need for a new generation capacity in the late 90s with an improved reactor system. The best hope of meeting this requirement is with revolutionary changes to current LWR systems through simplification and re-evaluation of safety and operational design margins. In addition, the grid characteristics and the difficulty in raising capital for large projects indicate the smaller light water reactors (600 MWe) may play an important role in the next generation. A cooperative and coordinated program between EPRI, U.S. DOE, the major architect engineers, nuclear steam supply vendors, and the NRC in the U.S. has been undertaken with four major goals in mind. (author)

  8. The United States advanced light water reactor (USALWR) development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahlkopf, K.E.; Noble, D.M.; Devine, J.C. Jr.; Sugnet, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    For the United States Nuclear Power industry to remain viable, it must be prepared to meet the expected need for a new generation capacity in the late 90s with an improved reactor system. The best hope of meeting this requirement is with revolutionary changes to current LWR systems through simplification and re-evaluation of safety and operational design margins. In addition, the grid characteristics and the difficulty in raising capital for large projects indicate the smaller light water reactors (600 MWe) may play an important role in the next generation. A cooperative and coordinated program between EPRI, U.S. DOE, the major architect engineers, nuclear steam supply vendors, and the NRC in the U.S. has been undertaken with four major goals in mind

  9. Safety of the pressure vessels of water reactors. Prevention of sudden failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrequin, P.; Barrachin, B.

    1975-01-01

    From the safety view point the primary circuit is considered as the essential barrier against the diffusion of radioactive products in the event of fuel element failure. The safety of the vessel itself, the failure of which is not accounted for in accident analyses, is based chiefly on a series of preventive measures such as the suitable choice of materials and manufacturing process, compliances with detailed specifications concerning tests and defect tolerances, supervision in service. All these points are examined in detail when the safety analysis is performed. In this context the Service de Recherches Metallurgiques Appliquees assists the Department de Surete Nucleaire in the study of special problems such as the prevention of sudden failure and the characterisation of steels as a function of working conditions, particularly neutron irradiation. The report is thus devoted mainly to the presentation of methods to prevent sudden failure, with special emphasis on the limits of application. Some results obtained at the Service de Recherches Metallurgiques Appliquees on steels typical of those used for water reactor vessels (A533 and A508Cl.3) are given by way of example. Part two concentrates on the role of various factors influencing embrittlement by irradiation [fr

  10. Study on Material Selection of Reactor Pressure Vessel of SCWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuli; Luo, Ying; Yin, Qinwei; Li, Changxiang; Xie, Guofu

    This paper first analyzes the feasibility of SA-508 Grade 3 Class 1 Steel as an alternative material for Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR) Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). This kind of steel is limited to be applied in SCWR RPV due to its quenching property, though large forging could be accomplished by domestic manufacturers in forging aspect. Therefore, steels with higher strength and better quenching property are needed for SWCR RPV. The chemical component of SA-508 Gr.3 Cl.2 steel is similar to that of SA-508 Gr.3 Cl.1 steel, and more appropriate matching of strength and toughness could be achieved by the adjusting the elements contents, as well as proper control of tempering temperature and time. In light of the fact that Cl.2 steel has been successfully applied to steam generator, it could be an alternative material for SWCR RPV. SA-508 Gr.4N steel with high strength and good toughness is another alternative material for SCWR RPV. But large amount of research work before application is still needed for the lack of data on welding and irradiation etc.

  11. Wastes and waste management in the uranium fuel cycle for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costello, J.M.

    1975-08-01

    The manufacturing processes in the uranium fuel cycle for light water reactors have been described with particular reference to the chemical and radiological wastes produced and the waste management procedures employed. The problems and possible solutions of ultimate disposal of high activity fission products and transuranium elements from reprocessing of irradiated fuel have been reviewed. Quantities of wastes arising in each stage of the fuel cycle have been summarised. Wastes arising from reactor operation have been described briefly. (author)

  12. Impact of different moderator ratios with light and heavy water cooled reactors in equilibrium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    As an issue of sustainable development in the world, energy sustainability using nuclear energy may be possible using several different ways such as increasing breeding capability of the reactors and optimizing the fuel utilization using spent fuel after reprocessing as well as exploring additional nuclear resources from sea water. In this present study the characteristics of light and heavy water cooled reactors for different moderator ratios in equilibrium states have been investigated. The moderator to fuel ratio (MFR) is varied from 0.1 to 4.0. Four fuel cycle schemes are evaluated in order to investigate the effect of heavy metal (HM) recycling. A calculation method for determining the required uranium enrichment for criticality of the systems has been developed by coupling the equilibrium fuel cycle burn-up calculation and cell calculation of SRAC 2000 code using nuclear data library from the JENDL 3.2. The results show a thermal spectrum peak appears for light water coolant and no thermal peak for heavy water coolant along the MFR (0.1 ≤ MFR ≤ 4.0). The plutonium quality can be reduced effectively by increasing the MFR and number of recycled HM. Considering the effect of increasing number of recycled HM; it is also effective to reduce the uranium utilization and to increase the conversion ratio. trans-Plutonium production such as americium (Am) and curium (Cm) productions are smaller for heavy water coolant than light water coolant. The light water coolant shows the feasibility of breeding when HM is recycled with reducing the MFR. Wider feasible area of breeding has been obtained when light water coolant is replaced by heavy water coolant

  13. Probabilistic Fracture Mechanics of Reactor Pressure Vessels with Populations of Flaws

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Backman, Marie [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Williams, Paul [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hoffman, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dickson, Terry [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bass, B. Richard [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Klasky, Hilda [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report documents recent progress in developing a tool that uses the Grizzly and RAVEN codes to perform probabilistic fracture mechanics analyses of reactor pressure vessels in light water reactor nuclear power plants. The Grizzly code is being developed with the goal of creating a general tool that can be applied to study a variety of degradation mechanisms in nuclear power plant components. Because of the central role of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a nuclear power plant, particular emphasis is being placed on developing capabilities to model fracture in embrittled RPVs to aid in the process surrounding decision making relating to life extension of existing plants. A typical RPV contains a large population of pre-existing flaws introduced during the manufacturing process. The use of probabilistic techniques is necessary to assess the likelihood of crack initiation at one or more of these flaws during a transient event. This report documents development and initial testing of a capability to perform probabilistic fracture mechanics of large populations of flaws in RPVs using reduced order models to compute fracture parameters. The work documented here builds on prior efforts to perform probabilistic analyses of a single flaw with uncertain parameters, as well as earlier work to develop deterministic capabilities to model the thermo-mechanical response of the RPV under transient events, and compute fracture mechanics parameters at locations of pre-defined flaws. The capabilities developed as part of this work provide a foundation for future work, which will develop a platform that provides the flexibility needed to consider scenarios that cannot be addressed with the tools used in current practice.

  14. Catalogue and classification of technical safety rules for light-water reactors and reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloser, M.; Fichtner, N.; Neider, R.

    1975-08-01

    This report on the cataloguing and classification of technical rules for land-based light-water reactors and reprocessing plants contains a list of classified rules. The reasons for the classification system used are given and discussed

  15. Reactors with pressure vessel in pre-stressed concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devillers, Christian; Lafore, Pierre

    1964-12-01

    After having proposed a general description of the evolution of the general design of reactors with a vessel in pre-stressed concrete, this report outlines the interest of this technical solution of a vessel in pre-stressed concrete with integrated exchangers, which is to replace steel vessel. This solution is presented as much safer. The authors discuss the various issues related to protection: inner and outer biological protection of the vessel, material protection (against heating, steel irradiation, Wigner effect, and moderator radiolytic corrosion). They report the application of calculation methods: calculation of vessel concrete heating, study of the intermediate zone in integrated reactors, neutron spectrum and flows in the core of a graphite pile

  16. Development of pre-startup equipment for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ram, Rajit; Borkar, S.P.; Dixit, M.Y.; Das, Debashis; Patil, R.K.

    2010-01-01

    Light water reactor (LWR) core typically has high excess reactivity as compared to Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR). Unlike PHWR, where online refueling is done, LWR is operated for a long period to achieve maximum fuel burn-up before refueling. Since the reactivity is always reducing with burn-up of the core, the positions of control rods at criticality are always changing in a single direction, i.e. away from the core. Therefore it is possible to start the LWR even if the nuclear instrumentation is not online, provided the criticality position of control rods is known for previous operation. However, for the very first startup, the criticality position of control rods is required to be determined. A special nuclear instrumentation system, called Pre-startup equipment (PSE) is developed using two numbers of in-core detectors along with the processing electronics. The PSE enables operators to determine the criticality position of control rods for the first startup at zero power. The same equipment can also be used during loading of fuel assemblies. This paper discusses the features and architecture of PSE, its individual circuit blocks and specifications. (author)

  17. Preventive protection device and method for bottom of reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Eisaku; Kurosawa, Koichi; Furukawa, Hideyasu; Morinaka, Ren; Enomoto, Kunio; Otaka, Masahiro; Yoshikubo, Fujio; Chiba, Noboru; Sato, Kazunori.

    1995-01-01

    In a preventive protection device for improving stresses in reactor structural components by jetting highly pressurized water with cavitation bubbles from a jetting nozzle toward structural components in a reactor pressure vessel, a fixed structure to a CRD housing is provided with a rotational body attached to the structure, a multi joint arm and a jetting nozzle supported to the multi joint arm. The jetting nozzle is disposed at a position where the center of the jetting deviates from the center of the CRD housing. In addition, a monitoring camera is disposed for displaying the target for preventive protection. The state of stresses on a plurality of targets for preventive protection can be improved by the preventive protection device at a fixed position in the bottom of a reactor pressure vessel where housings stand densely, thereby enabling to attain the preventive protection operation easily and rapidly. (N.H.)

  18. Thermo hydraulic analysis of narrow channel effect in supercritical-pressure light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Tao; Chen Juan; Cheng Wanxu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Detailed thermal analysis with different narrow gaps between fuel rods is given. ► Special characteristics of narrow channels effect on heat transfer in supercritical pressure are shown. ► Reasonable size selection of gaps between fuel rods is proposed for SCWR. - Abstract: The size of the gap between fuel rods has important effects on flow and heat transfer in a supercritical-pressure light water reactor. Based on thermal analysis at different coolant flow rates, the reasonable value range of gap size between fuel rods is obtained, for which the maximum cladding temperature safety limits and installation technology are comprehensively considered. Firstly, for a given design flow rate of coolant, thermal hydraulic analysis of supercritical pressure light water reactor with different gap sizes is provided by changing the fuel rod pitch only. The results show that, by means of reducing the gap size between fuel rods, the heat transfer coefficients between coolant and fuel rod, as well as the heat transfer coefficient between coolant and water rod, would both increase noticeably. Furthermore, the maximum cladding temperature will significantly decrease when the moderator temperature is decreased but coolant temperature remains essentially constant. Meanwhile, the reduction in the maximum cladding temperature in the inner assemblies is much larger than that in the outer assemblies. In addition, the maximum cladding temperature could be further reduced by means of increasing coolant flow rate for each gap size. Finally, the characteristics of narrow channels effect are proposed, and the maximum allowable gap between fuel rods is obtained by making full use of the enhancing narrow channels effect on heat transfer, and concurrently considering installation. This could provide a theoretical reference for supercritical-pressure light water reactor design optimization, in which the effects of gap size and flow rate on heat transfer are both considered.

  19. Conceptual design of a pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachamin, R.; Fridman, E.; Galperin, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the development of innovative pressure tube light water reactor with variable moderator control. The core layout is derived from a CANDU line of reactors in general, and advanced ACR-1000 design in particular. It should be stressed however, that while some of the ACR-1000 mechanical design features are adopted, the core design basics of the reactor proposed here are completely different. First, the inter fuel channels spacing, surrounded by the calandria tank, contains a low pressure gas instead of heavy water moderator. Second, the fuel channel design features an additional/external tube (designated as moderator tube) connected to a separate moderator management system. The moderator management system is design to vary the moderator tube content from 'dry' (gas) to 'flooded' (light water filled). The dynamic variation of the moderator is a unique and very important feature of the proposed design. The moderator variation allows an implementation of the 'breed and burn' mode of operation. The 'breed and burn' mode of operation is implemented by keeping the moderator tube empty ('dry' filled with gas) during the breed part of the fuel depletion and subsequently introducing the moderator by 'flooding' the moderator tube for the 'burn' part. This paper assesses the conceptual feasibility of the proposed concept from a neutronics point of view. (authors)

  20. Thermal-hydraulic evaluation study of the effectiveness of emergency core cooling system for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobajima, Makoto

    1985-08-01

    In order to evaluate the core cooling capability of the emergeny core cooling system, which is a safety guard system of light water reactors for a loss-of-coolant accident, a variety of large scale test were performed. Through the results, many phenomena were investigated and the predictabity of analytical codes were examined. The tests conducted were a single-vessel blowdown test, emergency core cooling test in a PWR simulation facility, spray cooling test for a BWR, large scale reflood test and a separate effect test on countercurrent flow. These test results were examined to clarify thermal-hydraulic phenomena and the effect of various test parameters and were utilized to improve predictability of the analytical codes. Some models for flow behavior in the upper core were also developed. By evaluating the effectiveness of various emergency core cooling system configurations, more effective cooling system than the current one was proposed and demonstrated. (author)

  1. Generic environmental impact statement on handling and storage of spent light water power reactor fuel. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    Detailed appendices are included with the following titles: light water reactor fuel cycle, present practice, model 1000MW(e) coal-fired power plant, increasing fuel storage capacity, spent fuel transshipment, spent fuel generation and storage data (1976-2000), characteristics of nuclear fuel, and ''away-from-reactor'' storage concept

  2. International academic program in technologies of light-water nuclear reactors. Phases of development and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraskin, N I; Glebov, V B

    2017-01-01

    The results of implementation of European educational projects CORONA and CORONA II dedicated to preserving and further developing nuclear knowledge and competencies in the area of technologies of light-water nuclear reactors are analyzed. Present article addresses issues of design and implementation of the program for specialized training in the branch of technologies of light-water nuclear reactors. The systematic approach has been used to construct the program for students of nuclear specialties, which corresponding to IAEA standards and commonly accepted nuclear principles recognized in the European Union. Possibilities of further development of the international cooperation between countries and educational institutions are analyzed. Special attention is paid to e-learning/distance training, nuclear knowledge preservation and interaction with European Nuclear Education Network. (paper)

  3. Preliminary concepts: safeguards for spent light-water reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, D.D.; Dayem, H.A.; Dietz, R.J.

    1979-06-01

    The technology available for safeguarding spent nuclear fuels from light-water power reactors is reviewed, and preliminary concepts for a spent-fuel safeguards system are presented. Essential elements of a spent-fuel safeguards system are infrequent on-site inspections, containment and surveillance systems to assure the integrity of stored fuel between inspections, and nondestructive measurements of the fuel assemblies. Key safeguards research and development activities necessary to implement such a system are identified. These activities include the development of tamper-indicating fuel-assembly identification systems and the design and development of nondestructive spent-fuel measurement systems

  4. Development of the fuel-cycle costs in nuclear power stations with light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brosch, R.; Moraw, G.; Musil, G.; Schneeberger, M.

    1976-01-01

    The authors investigate the fuel-cycle costs in nuclear power stations with light-water reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany in the years 1966 to 1976. They determine the effect of the price development for the individual components of the nuclear fuel cycle on the fuel-cycle costs averaged over the whole power station life. Here account is taken also of inflation rates and the change in the DM/US $ parity. In addition they give the percentage apportionment of the fuel-cycle costs. The authors show that real fuel-cycle costs for nuclear power stations with light-water reactors in the Federal Republic of Germany have risen by 11% between 1966 and 1976. This contradicts the often repeated reproach that fuel costs in nuclear power stations are rising very steeply and are no longer competitive. (orig.) [de

  5. Experimental investigation of creep behavior of reactor vessel lower head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.Y.; Pilch, M.; Bentz, J.H.; Behbahani, A.

    1998-03-01

    The objective of the USNRC supported Lower Head Failure (LHF) Experiment Program at Sandia National Laboratories is to experimentally investigate and characterize the failure of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) lower head due to the thermal and pressure loads of a severe accident. The experimental program is complemented by a modeling program focused on the development of a constitutive formulation for use in standard finite element structure mechanics codes. The problem is of importance because: lower head failure defines the initial conditions of all ex-vessel events; the inability of state-of-the-art models to simulate the result of the TMI-II accident (Stickler, et al. 1993); and TMI-II results suggest the possibility of in-vessel cooling, and creep deformation may be a precursor to water ingression leading to in-vessel cooling

  6. Conceptual design of a quasi-homogeneous pressurized heavy water reactor to be operated in the closed Th-U233 fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    This paper deals with the heavy water reactor, which, from the neutron economy point of view, offers advantages over the light water reactor. Its capability to be fuelled with natural uranium has also been considered a desirable nuclear option by various countries with sufficient domestic uranium resources not wishing to be dependent on the import of enrichment and other fuel cycle services which, in addition, would draw on the foreign exchange reserves. Pressurized heavy water reactors have been designed and built according to two somewhat different versions. While the Canadian CANDU-PHWR concept uses pressure tubes in a nearly unpressurized moderator tank (calandria), the German development line takes advantage of the established and well proven LWR technology, and, thus, uses a pressure vessel design where coolant channels and the surrounding moderator are held at equal pressure. This pressure vessel type heavy water reactor which has been built on a commercial demonstration plant level at ATUCHA in Argentina is described in a companion paper where also a conceptual design for a 685 MWsub(e) PHWR is discussed

  7. Concept of a nuclear powered submersible research vessel and a compact reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Tsuyoshi; Odano, Naoteru; Yoritsune, Tsutomu; Ishida, Toshihisa; Nishimura, Hajime; Tokunaga, Sango

    2001-07-01

    A conceptual design study of a submersible research vessel navigating in 600 m depth and a compact nuclear reactor were carried out for the expansion of the nuclear power utilization. The mission of the vessel is the research of mechanism of the climate change to predict the global environment. Through conditions of the Arctic Ocean and the sea at high latitude have significant impacts on the global environmental change, it is difficult to investigate those areas by ordinary ships because of thick ice or storm. Therefore the research vessel is mainly utilized in the Arctic Ocean and the sea at high latitude. By taking account of the research mission, the basic specifications of the vessel are decided; the total weight is 500 t, the submersible depth is 600 m, the maximum speed is 12 knots (22.2 km/h), and the number of crews is 16. Nuclear power has an advantage in supplying large power of electricity in the sea for long period. Based on the requirements, it has been decided that two sets of submersible compact reactor, SCR, which is light-weighted and of enhanced safety characteristics of supply the total electricity of 500 kW. (author)

  8. Pressure vessel for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The invention applies to a pressure vessel for nuclear reactors whose shell, made of cast metal segments, has a steel liner. This liner must be constructed to withstand all operational stresses and to be easily repairable. The invention solves this problem by installing the liner at a certain distance from the inner wall of the pressure vessel shell and by filling this clearance with supporting concrete. Both the concrete and the steel liner must have a lower prestress than the pressure vessel shell. In order to avoid damage to the liner when prestressing the pressure vessel shell, special connecting elements are provided which consist of welded-on fastening elements projecting into recesses in the cast metal segments of the pressure vessel. Their design is described in detail. (TK) [de

  9. Effect of fuel assembly mechanical design changes on dynamic response of reactor pressure vessel system under extreme loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandari, D.R.; Hankinson, M.F.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study to assess the effect of fuel assembly mechanical design changes on the dynamic response of a pressurized water reactor vessel and reactor internals under Loss-Of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) conditions. The results of this study show that the dynamic response of the reactor vessel internals and the core under extreme loadings, such as LOCA, is very sensitive to fuel assembly mechanical design changes. (author)

  10. Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, Bojan; Memmott, Matthew; Boy, Guy; Charit, Indrajit; Manera, Annalisa; Downar, Thomas; Lee, John; Muldrow, Lycurgus; Upadhyaya, Belle; Hines, Wesley; Haghighat, Alierza

    2017-01-01

    This final report summarizes results of the multi-year effort performed during the period 2/2013- 12/2016 under the DOE NEUP IRP Project ''Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactors (I 2 S-LWR)''. The goal of the project was to develop a concept of a 1 GWe PWR with integral configuration and inherent safety features, at the same time accounting for lessons learned from the Fukushima accident, and keeping in mind the economic viability of the new concept. Essentially (see Figure 1-1) the project aimed to implement attractive safety features, typically found only in SMRs, to a larger power (1 GWe) reactor, to address the preference of some utilities in the US power market for unit power level on the order of 1 GWe.

  11. Power generation versus fuel production in light water hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    1977-06-01

    The economic potentials of fissile-fuel-producing ligh