WorldWideScience

Sample records for light muonic atoms

  1. Update on nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez, Oscar Javier; Ji, Chen; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2016-01-01

    We present calculations of the nuclear structure corrections to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms, using state-of-the-art nuclear potentials. We outline updated results on finite nucleon size contributions.

  2. Update on nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Oscar Javier; Dinur, Nir Nevo; Ji, Chen; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2016-12-01

    We present calculations of the nuclear structure corrections to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms, using state-of-the-art nuclear potentials. We outline updated results on finite nucleon size contributions.

  3. Update on nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, Oscar Javier, E-mail: javierh@triumf.ca; Dinur, Nir Nevo; Ji, Chen; Bacca, Sonia [TRIUMF (Canada); Barnea, Nir [The Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics (Israel)

    2016-12-15

    We present calculations of the nuclear structure corrections to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms, using state-of-the-art nuclear potentials. We outline updated results on finite nucleon size contributions.

  4. Lamb Shift in Light Muonic Atoms - Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Borie, E

    2011-01-01

    In connection with recent and proposed experiments, and new theoretical results, my previous calculations of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen will be reviewed and compared with other work. In addition, numerical results for muonic deuterium and helium will be presented.

  5. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Chen; Dinur, Nir Nevo; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2015-01-01

    We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  6. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  7. The $\\alpha^2(Z\\alpha)^4m$ contributions to the Lamb shift and the fine structure in light muonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Korzinin, Evgeny Yu; Karshenboim, Savely G

    2013-01-01

    Corrections to energy levels in light muonic atoms are investigated in order $\\alpha^2(Z\\alpha)^4m$. We pay attention to corrections which are specific for muonic atoms and include the electron vacuum polarization loop. In particular, we calculate relativistic and relativistic-recoil two-loop electron vacuum polarization contributions. The results are obtained for the levels with $n=1,2$ and in particular for the Lamb shift ($2p_{1/2}-2s_{1/2}$) and fine-structure intervals ($2p_{3/2}-2p_{1/2}$) in muonic hydrogen, deuterium, and muonic helium ions.

  8. Limitations on detecting Higgs in the Lamb shift of light muonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Krivec, Rajmund

    2016-01-01

    In light of the known Higgs mass, the current presumed range of the quark-lepton Higgs coupling, and the large allowed range of the coupling modifier of the Standard Model electron-Higgs coupling, a recent work has proposed to test the Higgs term in heavy atoms. This approach is on the verge of experimentally possible and hinges on electron coupling modifier remaining orders of magnitude larger than 1, and the availability of only limited-precision electron wave functions. We instead revisit the feasibility of the decades old idea of deducing limits on muon-nucleus Higgs coupling from measurements on light muonic atoms or ions for which locally and globally precise solutions of the three body-problem can be obtained, and the muon-nucleus Higgs coupling is enhanced by about $10^7$ due to larger muon wave function at origin. It turns out that due to the large Higgs mass, and the currently equal experimental limits on electron-Higgs and muon-Higgs couplings placing the muon coupling modifier close to 1, even an ...

  9. Laser Spectroscopy of Muonic Atoms and Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, Randolf; Fernandes, Luis M P; Ahmed, Marwan Abdou; Amaro, Fernando D; Amaro, Pedro; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M R; Covita, Daniel S; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Diepold, Marc; Franke, Beatrice; Galtier, Sandrine; Giesen, Adolf; Gouvea, Andrea L; Götzfried, Johannes; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hildebrandt, Malte; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Kirch, Klaus; Knecht, Andreas; Knowles, Paul; Kottmann, Franz; Krauth, Julian J; Bigot, Eric-Olivier Le; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A M; Ludhova, Livia; Machado, Jorge; Monteiro, Cristina M B; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Rabinowitz, Paul; Santos, Joaquim M F dos; Santos, José Paulo; Schaller, Lukas A; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Szabo, Csilla I; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F C A; Voss, Andreas; Weichelt, Birgit; Antognini, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy of the Lamb shift (2S-2P energy difference) in light muonic atoms or ions, in which one negative muon $\\mu^-$ is bound to a nucleus, has been performed. The measurements yield significantly improved values of the root-mean-square charge radii of the nuclei, owing to the large muon mass, which results in a vastly increased muon wave function overlap with the nucleus. The values of the proton and deuteron radii are 10 and 3 times more accurate than the respective CODATA values, but 7 standard deviations smaller. Data on muonic helium-3 and -4 ions is being analyzed and will give new insights. In future, the (magnetic) Zemach radii of the proton and the helium-3 nuclei will be determined from laser spectroscopy of the 1S hyperfine splittings, and the Lamb shifts of muonic Li, Be and B can be used to improve the respective charge radii.

  10. Nuclear polarization effects in muonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Chen; Bacca, Sonia; Barnea, Nir

    2013-01-01

    We illustrate how nuclear polarization corrections in muonic atoms can be formally connected to inelastic response functions of a nucleus. We first discuss the point-nucleon approximation and then include finite-nucleon-size corrections. As an example, we compare our ab-initio calculation of the third Zemach moment in the muonic Helium-4 ion to previous phenomenological results.

  11. Deuteron properties from muonic atom spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkar, N. G.; Bedoya Fierro, D.

    2017-09-01

    Leading order (α4) finite size corrections in muonic deuterium are evaluated within a few body formalism for the μ- pn system in muonic deuterium and found to be sensitive to the input of the deuteron wave function. We show that this sensitivity, taken along with the precise deuteron charge radius determined from muonic atom spectroscopy can be used to determine the elusive deuteron D-state probability, PD, for a given model of the nucleon-nucleon (NN) potential. The radius calculated with a PD of 4.3% in the chiral NN models and about 5.7% in the high precision NN potentials is favoured most by the μ- d data.

  12. Resonant Scattering of Muonic Hydrogen Atoms and Dynamics of Muonic Molecular Complex

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, M C; Bailey, J M; Beer, G A; Beveridge, J L; Faifman, M P; Huber, T M; Kammel, P; Kim, S K; Knowles, P E; Kunselman, A R; Maier, M; Markushin, V E; Marshall, G M; Martoff, C J; Mason, G R; Mulhauser, F; Olin, A; Petitjean, C; Porcelli, T A; Wozniak, J; Zmeskal, J

    2001-01-01

    Resonant scattering of muonic hydrogen atoms via back decay of molecular complex, a key process in the understanding of epithermal muonic molecular formation, is analyzed. The limitations of the effective rate approximation are discussed and the importance of the explicit treatment of the back decay is stressed. An expression of the energy distribution for the back-decayed atoms is given.

  13. Lamb shift in the muonic deuterium atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutov, A. A.; Martynenko, A. P. [Samara State University, Pavlov street 1, 443011, Samara (Russian Federation); Samara State University, Pavlov Street 1, 443011, Samara, Russia and Samara State Aerospace University named after academician S.P. Korolyov, Moskovskoye Shosse 34, 443086, Samara (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-15

    We present an investigation of the Lamb shift (2P{sub 1/2}-2S{sub 1/2}) in the muonic deuterium ({mu}D) atom using the three-dimensional quasipotential method in quantum electrodynamics. The vacuum polarization, nuclear-structure, and recoil effects are calculated with the account of contributions of orders {alpha}{sup 3}, {alpha}{sup 4}, {alpha}{sup 5}, and {alpha}{sup 6}. The results are compared with earlier performed calculations. The obtained numerical value of the Lamb shift at 202.4139 meV can be considered a reliable estimate for comparison with forthcoming experimental data.

  14. Lamb shift in muonic deuterium atom

    CERN Document Server

    Krutov, A A

    2011-01-01

    We present new investigation of the Lamb shift (2P_{1/2}-2S_{1/2}) in the muonic deuterium (mu d) atom using the three-dimensional quasipotential method in quantum electrodynamics. The vacuum polarization, nuclear structure and recoil effects are calculated with the account of contributions of orders alpha^3, alpha^4, alpha^5 and alpha^6. The results are compared with earlier performed calculations. The obtained numerical value of the Lamb shift 202.3616 meV can be considered as a reliable estimate for the comparison with forthcoming experimental data.

  15. Muonium/muonic hydrogen formation in atomic hydrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V S Kulhar

    2004-09-01

    The muonium/muonic hydrogen atom formation in ± –H collisions is investigated, using a two-state approximation in a time dependent formalism. It is found that muonium cross-section results are similar to the cross-section results obtained for positronium formation in + –H collision. Muonic hydrogen atom formation cross-sections in - –H collision are found to be significant in a narrow range of energy (5 eV–25 eV).

  16. Time-of-flight spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, M.C. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]|[Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Science, Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Adamczak, A. [Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Bailey, J.M. [Chester Technology, Chester (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A.; Mason, G.R. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Victoria, BC (Canada); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Olin, A. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Faifman, M.P. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Huber, T.M. [Dept. of Physics, Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States); Kammel, P. [Dept. of Physics and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Kim, S.K. [Dept. of Physics, Jeonbuk National Univ., Jeonju City (Korea); Knowles, P.E.; Mulhauser, F. [Inst. of Physics, Univ. of Fribourg (Switzerland); Kunselman, A.R. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Markushin, V.E.; Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Porcelli, T.A. [Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Northern British Columbia, Prince George, BC (Canada); Zmeskal, J. [Inst. for Medium Energy Physics, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Vienna (Austria)

    2001-07-01

    Studies of muonic hydrogen atoms and molecules have been performed traditionally in bulk targets of gas, liquid or solid. At TRIUMF, Canada's meson facility, we have developed a new type of target system using multilayer thin films of solid hydrogen, which provides a beam of muonic hydrogen atoms in vacuum. Using the time-of-flight of the muonic atoms, the energy-dependent information of muonic reactions are obtained in direct manner.We discuss some unique measurements enabled by the new technique, with emphasis on processes relevant to muon catalyzed fusion.

  17. Time-of-Flight Spectroscopy of Muonic Hydrogen Atoms and Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, M C; Bailey, J M; Beer, G A; Beveridge, J L; Faifman, M P; Huber, T M; Kammel, P; Kim, S K; Knowles, P E; Kunselman, A R; Markushin, V E; Marshall, G M; Mason, G R; Mulhauser, F; Olin, A; Petitjean, C; Porcelli, T A; Zmeskal, J

    2001-01-01

    Studies of muonic hydrogen atoms and molecules have been performed traditionally in bulk targets of gas, liquid or solid. At TRIUMF, Canada's meson facility, we have developed a new type of target system using multilayer thin films of solid hydrogen, which provides a beam of muonic hydrogen atoms in vacuum. Using the time-of-flight of the muonic atoms, the energy-dependent information of muonic reactions are obtained in direct manner. We discuss some unique measurements enabled by the new technique, with emphasis on processes relevant to muon catalyzed fusion.

  18. Vacuum polarization in the ground states of bi-muonic helium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Alexei M.

    2004-11-01

    The energies and bound-state properties of the bi-muonic helium-3 and helium-4 atoms in their ground 11(S = 0)-states are determined to very high accuracy. It is shown that the lowest order QED (and relativistic) effects play a significantly larger role in the case of bi-muonic 3Heμ2 and 4Heμ2 atoms than in the two-electron He-atoms. In particular, the effect of vacuum polarization and corresponding energy shifts for the ground 11(S = 0)-states in the bi-muonic helium-3 and helium-4 atoms have been evaluated.

  19. Muonic atoms in super-intense laser fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahbaz, Atif

    2009-01-28

    Nuclear effects in hydrogenlike muonic atoms exposed to intense high-frequency laser fields have been studied. Systems of low nuclear charge number are considered where a nonrelativistic description applies. By comparing the radiative response for different isotopes we demonstrate characteristic signatures of the finite nuclear mass, size and shape in the high-harmonic spectra. Cutoff energies in the MeV domain can be achieved, offering prospects for the generation of ultrashort coherent {gamma}-ray pulses. Also, the nucleus can be excited while the laser-driven muon moves periodically across it. The nuclear transition is caused by the time-dependent Coulomb field of the oscillating charge density of the bound muon. A closed-form analytical expression for electric multipole transitions is derived within a fully quantum mechanical approach and applied to various isotopes. The excitation probabilities are in general very small. We compare the process with other nuclear excitation mechanisms through coupling with atomic shells and discuss the prospects to observe it in experiment. (orig.)

  20. Vacuum polarization in the ground states of bi-muonic helium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frolov, Alexei M [Department of Chemistry, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2004-11-28

    The energies and bound-state properties of the bi-muonic helium-3 and helium-4 atoms in their ground 1{sup 1}(S = 0)-states are determined to very high accuracy. It is shown that the lowest order QED (and relativistic) effects play a significantly larger role in the case of bi-muonic {sup 3}He{mu}{sub 2} and {sup 4}He{mu}{sub 2} atoms than in the two-electron He-atoms. In particular, the effect of vacuum polarization and corresponding energy shifts for the ground 1{sup 1}(S 0)-states in the bi-muonic helium-3 and helium-4 atoms have been evaluated.

  1. Test of quantum-electrodynamical corrections in muonic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Walter, H K; Böhm, F; Engfer, R; Link, R; Michaelsen, R; Petitjean, C; Schellenberg, L; Schneuwly, H; Schröder, W U; Von Gunten, A H; Vuilleumier, J H; Zehnder, A

    1972-01-01

    Energies of the 5f-4f muonic X-rays have been measured in /sup nat/Hg and /sup 203/Tl with an accuracy of about 25 eV. They are found to be smaller than theoretical energies including recently revised calculations of higher-order vacuum polarization, by about two standard deviations. (10 refs).

  2. Muon transfer from muonic hydrogen to heavier atoms; Transfert de charge muonique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupays, A

    2004-06-01

    This work concerns muon transfer from muonic hydrogen to heavier atoms. Recently, a method of measurement of the hyperfine structure of ground-state muonic hydrogen based on the collision energy dependence of the muon transfer rate to oxygen has been proposed. This proposal is based on measurements which where performed at the Paul Scherrer Institute in the early nineties which indicate that the muon transfer from muonic hydrogen to oxygen increases by a factor of 4 going from thermal to 0.12 eV energies. The motivation of our calculations was to confirm this behaviour. To study the collision energy dependence of the muon transfer rate, we have used a time-independent close-coupling method. We have set up an hyperspherical elliptic formalism valid for nonzero total angular momentum which allows accurate computations of state-to-state reactive and charge exchange processes. We have applied this formalism to muon-transfer process to oxygen and neon. The comparison with experimental results is in both cases excellent. Finally, the neon transfer rate dependence with energy suggests to use neon instead of oxygen to perform a measurement of the hyperfine structure of muonic hydrogen. The results of accurate calculations of the muon transfer rates from muonic protium and deuterium atoms to nitrogen, oxygen and neon are also reported. Very good agreement with measured rates is obtained and for the three systems, the isotopic effect is perfectly reproduced. (author)

  3. Using Thin Film Targets for Muonic Atoms and Muon Catalyzed Fusion Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, M C; Bailey, J M; Beer, G A; Beveridge, J L; Faifman, M P; Huber, T M; Kammel, P; Kim, S K; Knowles, P E; Kunselman, A R; Markushin, V E; Marshall, G M; Martoff, C J; Mason, G R; Mulhauser, F; Olin, A; Petitjean, C; Porcelli, T A; Zmeskal, J

    2000-01-01

    Studies of muonic atoms and muon catalyzed fusion have been conventionally done in a bulk target of gas, liquid or solid hydrogen isotopes. The use of thin film targets developed at TRIUMF have notable advantages in tackling some of the most important questions in the field, which could be further exploited at future high intensity muon sources. We review the technique of the thin film method with emphasis on recent results and a future proposal.

  4. Scattering of p$\\mu$ muonic atoms in solid hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Wozniak, J; Beer, G A; Bystritsky, V M; Filipowicz, M; Fujiwara, M C; Huber, T M; Huot, O; Jacot-Guillarmod, R; Kammel, P; Knowles, P E; Kunselman, A R; Marshall, G M; Mulhauser, F; Olin, A; Petitjean, C; Porcelli, T A; Schaller, L A; Stolupin, V A; Zmeskal, J

    2002-01-01

    We present the results of experimental and theoretical study of the scattering of low energy p$\\mu$ atoms in solid hydrogen cooled to 3 K. The resulting emission of low energy p$\\mu$ atoms from the hydrogen layer into the adjacent vacuum was much higher than that predicted by calculations which ignored the solid nature of the hydrogen. New differential scattering cross sections have been calculated for the collisions of p$\\mu$ atoms on solid hydrogen to acount for its quantum crystalline nature. Analysis of the experimental data performed using such cross sections shows the important role of the coherent scattering in p$\\mu$ atom diffusion. For p$\\mu$ energies lower than the Bragg cutoff limit (2 meV) the elastic Bragg scattering vanishes which makes the total scattering cross section fall by several orders of magnitude, and thus the hydrogen target becomes transparent allowing the emission of cold p$\\mu$ atoms to occur.

  5. Isotope effects in the harmonic response from hydrogenlike muonic atoms in strong laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Shahbaz, Atif; Müller, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    High-harmonic generation from hydrogenlike muonic atoms exposed to ultraintense high-frequency laser fields is calculated. Systems of low nuclear charge number Z are considered where a nonrelativistic description applies. By comparing the radiative response for different isotopes we demonstrate characteristic signatures of the finite nuclear mass and size in the harmonic spectra. In particular, for Z>1, an effective muon charge appears in the Schr\\"odinger equation for the relative particle motion, which influences the position of the harmonic cutoff. Cutoff energies in the MeV domain can be achieved, offering prospects for the generation of ultrashort coherent gamma-ray pulses.

  6. Theory of the Lamb shift in muonic tritium and the muonic 3He ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karshenboim, Savely G.; Korzinin, Evgeny Yu.; Shelyuto, Valery A.; Ivanov, Vladimir G.

    2017-08-01

    Due to recent experimental efforts on light muonic atoms, we consider the quantum electrodynamics (QED) theory of two-body muonic atoms, namely, of those with A =3 . Here we present the results for the Lamb shift and fine structure up to the order α5m for the n =2 levels, which in particular include (1) pure QED contributions, (2) the coefficient to the rN2 term with QED corrections (where rN is the rms nuclear charge radius), and (3) the general expressions for the nuclear-structure contributions consistent with the presented QED theory. We revisit theory for the muonic helium-3 ion by rechecking all the relevant theoretical contributions and develop a theory of muonic tritium. We also reestimate the uncertainty of the nuclear-structure contribution.

  7. Hydrogen and muonic-Hydrogen Atomic Spectra in Non-commutative Space-Time

    CERN Document Server

    Haghighat, M

    2014-01-01

    Comparing electronic Hydrogen with muonic Hydrogen shows that the discrepancy in measurement of the Lamb shift in the both systems are relatively of order of $(\\frac{m_\\mu}{m_e})^{4-5}$. We explore the spectrum of Hydrogen atom in noncommutative $QED$ to compare the noncommutative effects on the both bound states. We show that in the Lorentz violating noncommutative QED the ratio of NC-corrections is $(\\frac{m_\\mu}{m_e})^3$ while in the Lorentz conserving NCQED is $(\\frac{m_\\mu}{m_e})^5$. An uncertainty about $1 \\,Hz\\ll 3\\,kHz$ in the Lamb shift of Hydrogen atom leads to an NC correction about $10 \\,MHz$ in the Lorentz violating noncommutative QED and about $400 \\,GHz$ in the Lorentz conserving noncommutative QED.

  8. Vacuum polarization in muonic atoms: the Lamb shift at low and medium Z

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karshenboim, S.G.; Ivanov, V.G.; Korzinin, E.Y. [D.I. Mendeleev Institute for Metrology (VNIIM), Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Karshenboim, S.G. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik, Garching (Germany); Ivanov, V.G. [Pulkovo Observatory, Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2006-09-15

    In muonic atoms the Uehling potential (an effect of a free electronic vacuum polarization loop) is responsible for the leading contribution to the Lamb shift causing the splitting of states with {delta}n = 0 and {delta}l {ne} 0. Here we consider the Lamb shift in the leading non-relativistic approximation, i.e., within an approach based on a certain Schroedinger equation. That is valid for low and medium Z as long as (Z{alpha}){sup 2} << 1. The results is a function of a few parameters, including {kappa} Z{alpha}m{sub {mu}}/m{sub e}, n and l. We present various asymptotics and in particular we study a region of validity of asymptotics with large and small {kappa}. Special attention is paid to circular states, which are considered in a limit of n >> 1. (authors)

  9. Hyperspherical elliptic coordinates treatment of muon transfer from muonic hydrogen to atomic oxygen

    CERN Document Server

    Dupays, A; Beswick, J A; Rizzo, C; Bakalov, D; Dupays, Arnaud; Lepetit, Bruno; Rizzo, Carlo; Bakalov, Dimitar

    2003-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical calculations of muon transfer between muonic hydrogen and an oxygen nuclei for $s$ waves and collision energies in the range $10^{-3} - 10^3$ eV, are presented. Close-coupling time-independent Schr\\"odinger equations, written in terms of hyperspherical elliptic coordinates were integrated along the hyper-radius to obtain the partial and total muon-transfer probabilities. The results show the expected Wigner-Bethe threshold behavior up to collision energies of the order of $10^{-2}$ eV and pronounced maxima at $10^2$ eV which can be interpreted in terms of crossings between potential energy curves corresponding to the entrance channel state $(\\mu p)_{1s} + \\mO$ and two product channels which asymptotically correlate to $p + (\\mO\\mu)_{n=5,6}$. The population of the final states with different orbital angular momenta is found to be essentially independent of energy in the range considered in this work. This can be attributed to a strong selection rule for the conservation of the quantum number...

  10. Non-relativistic contributions in order $\\alpha^5m_\\mu c^2$ to the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen, deuterium and helium ion

    CERN Document Server

    Karshenboim, S G; Korzinin, E Yu; Shelyuto, V A

    2010-01-01

    Contributions to the energy levels in light muonic atoms and, in particular, to the Lamb shift fall into a few well-distinguished classes. The related diagrams are calculated using different approaches. In particular, there is a specific kind of non-relativistic contributions. Here we consider such corrections to the Lamb shift in order $\\alpha^5m_\\mu$. These contributions are due to free vacuum polarization loops as well as to various effects of light-by-light scattering. The closed loop in the related diagrams is an electronic one, which allows a non-relativistic consideration of the muon. Both kinds of contributions have been known for a while, however, the results obtained up to date are only partial ones. We complete a calculation of the $\\alpha^5m_\\mu$ contributions for muonic hydrogen. The results are also adjusted for muonic deuterium and muonic helium ion.

  11. Muonic Chemistry in Condensed Matter

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    When polarized muons (@m|+) stop in condensed matter, muonic atoms are formed in the final part of their range, and direct measurements of the @m|+-spin polarization are possible via the asymmetric decay into positrons. The hyperfine interaction determines the characteristic precession frequencies of the @m|+ spin in muonium, @w(Mu). Such frequencies can be altered by the interactions of the muonium's electron spin with the surrounding medium. The measurement of @w(Mu) in a condensed system is known often to provide unique information regarding the system. \\\\ \\\\ In particular, the use of muonium atoms as a light isotope of the simple reactive radical H|0 allows the investigation of fast reactions of radicals over a typical time scale 10|-|9~@$<$~t~@$<$~10|-|5~sec, which is determined by the instrumental resolution at one end and by the @m|+ lifetime at the other. \\\\ \\\\ In biological macromolecules transient radicals, such as the constituents of DNA itself, exist on a time scale of sub-microseconds, acco...

  12. News from the muonic helium lamb-shift experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diepold, Marc [Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics, Garching (Germany); Collaboration: The CREMA Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    Our ongoing experiment located at Paul-Scherrer-Institute (Switzerland) recently succeeded to measure the 2S{sub 1/2}-2P{sub 3/2} transition in the muonic Helium-4-ion, and will continue to measure the remaining 2S-2P transitions in μ4He{sup +} and μ3He{sup +} later this summer. Due to its sensitivity to finite size effects, the Lamb-shift in muonic atoms is an excellent tool to determine nuclear rms charge radii, important input parameters in both nuclear models and atomic theory. With our result, we will be able to provide a ten times more accurate value for the absolute nuclear charge radius of the alpha particle, together with the respective 3He, 6He and 8He values that can be extracted via already measured isotope shifts. Furthermore, our data sheds interesting new light on the so-called ''proton size puzzle'', created by the 7-sigma discrepancy between the muonic hydrogen value of the proton radius and other experiments.

  13. Development of elemental analysis by muonic X-ray measurement in J-PARC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, K.; Nagatomo, T.; Kubo, K. M.; Strasser, P.; Kawamura, N.; Shimomura, K.; Miyake, Y.; Saito, T.; Higemoto, W.

    2010-04-01

    Muon irradiation and muonic X-ray detection can be applied to non-destructive elemental analysis. In this study, in order to develop the elemental analysis by muonic X-ray measurement we constructed a new X-ray measuring system in J-PARC muon facility. We performed muon irradiation for Tempo-koban (Japanese old coin) for test experiment of elemental analysis. Muonic X-rays originating from muon transition in muonic silver and gold atoms were identified. The contents of Tempo-koban (Au:56%) was determined by muonic X-ray intensities.

  14. Atom-Light Hybrid Interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Qiu, Cheng; Chen, Shuying; Guo, Jinxian; Chen, L Q; Ou, Z Y; Zhang, Weiping

    2015-07-24

    A new type of hybrid atom-light interferometer is demonstrated with atomic Raman amplification processes replacing the beam splitting elements in a traditional interferometer. This nonconventional interferometer involves correlated optical and atomic waves in the two arms. The correlation between atoms and light developed with the Raman process makes this interferometer different from conventional interferometers with linear beam splitters. It is observed that the high-contrast interference fringes are sensitive to the optical phase via a path change as well as the atomic phase via a magnetic field change. This new atom-light correlated hybrid interferometer is a sensitive probe of the atomic internal state and should find wide applications in precision measurement and quantum control with atoms and photons.

  15. Atomic precision tests and light scalar couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brax, Philippe [CEA, IPhT, CNRS, URA 2306, Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Inst. de Physique Theorique; Burrage, Clare [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Geneve Univ. (Switzerland). Dept. de Physique Theorique

    2010-10-15

    We calculate the shift in the atomic energy levels induced by the presence of a scalar field which couples to matter and photons. We find that a combination of atomic measurements can be used to probe both these couplings independently. A new and stringent bound on the matter coupling springs from the precise measurement of the 1s to 2s energy level difference in the hydrogen atom, while the coupling to photons is essentially constrained by the Lamb shift. Combining these constraints with current particle physics bounds we find that the contribution of a scalar field to the recently claimed discrepancy in the proton radius measured using electronic and muonic atoms is negligible. (orig.)

  16. The muonic helium lamb shift experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetzfried, Johannes; Krauth, Julian [Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics, Garching (Germany); Collaboration: CREMA collaboration

    2014-07-01

    Because of its high sensitivity on finite size effects of the nucleus, the measurement of the Lamb shift in exotic atoms has been on the wish-list of atomic and nuclear physics for a long time. Our previous experiment allowed to determine the proton radius with an order of magnitude higher precision compared to spectroscopic measurements of ordinary hydrogen. The successor experiment in muonic helium is currently performed at the Paul-Scherrer-Institute in Switzerland. Using a low energy muon beam line muons are stopped within low pressure helium gas, where exotic atoms are created. Here we measure the 2S-2P transition frequency of muonic helium illuminated by a pulsed TiSa-laser system pumped with a newly developed Yb-YAG thin disk laser. This measurement will ultimately improve the values of the charge radii of {sup 3}He{sup +} and {sup 4}He{sup +} by an order of magnitude.

  17. Strong-Field Quantum Electrodynamics and Muonic Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Jentschura, U D

    2014-01-01

    We explore the possibility of a breakdown of perturbative quantum electrodynamics in light muonic bound systems, notably, muonic hydrogen. The average electric field seen by a muon orbiting a proton is shown to be comparable to hydrogenlike Uranium and, notably, larger than the electric field achievable using even the most advanced strong-laser facilities. Following Maltman and Isgur who have shown that fundamental forces such as the meson exchange force may undergo a qualitative change in the strong-coupling regime, we investigate a concomitant possible existence of muon-proton and electron-proton contact interactions, of nonperturbative origin, and their influence on transition frequencies in light one-muon ions.

  18. Hyperfine structure of P-states in muonic deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Faustov, R N; Martynenko, G A; Sorokin, V V

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of quasipotential approach to the bound state problem in quantum electrodynamics we calculate hyperfine structure intervals Delta E^{hfs}(2P_{1/2}) and Delta E^{hfs}(2P_{3/2}) for P-states in muonic deuterium. The tensor method of projection operators for the calculation of the hyperfine structure of P-states with definite quantum numbers of total atomic momentum F and total muon momentum j in muonic deuterium is formulated. We take into account vacuum polarization, relativistic, quadruple and structure corrections of orders alpha^4, alpha^5 and alpha^6. The obtained numerical values of hyperfine splittings are useful for the analysis of new experimental data of the CREMA collaboration regarding to muonic deuterium.

  19. Search for Muonic Dark Forces at BABAR

    CERN Document Server

    Godang, Romulus

    2016-01-01

    Many models of physics beyond Standard Model predict the existence of light Higgs states, dark photons, and new gauge bosons mediating interactions between dark sectors and the Standard Model. Using a full data sample collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II $e^+e^-$ collider, we report searches for a light non-Standard Model Higgs boson, dark photon, and a new muonic dark force mediated by a gauge boson ($Z'$) coupling only to the second and third lepton families. Our results significantly improve upon the current bounds and further constrain the remaining region of the allowed parameter space.

  20. Lamb shift in muonic deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Carboni, G

    1973-01-01

    The author has calculated the various contributions to 2s-2p splitting for muonic deuterium. An instantaneous potential is constructed between the muon and the nucleus. Except for the Coulomb potential, all the remaining terms are treated as a perturbation. The effects taken into account are fine structure, magnetic and electric hyperfine structure, muonic Lamb shift, vacuum polarisation, nuclear polarisation and nuclear size. (11 refs).

  1. Muonic vacuum polarization correction to the bound-electron $g$-factor

    CERN Document Server

    Belov, N A; Weis, R; Yerokhin, V A; Sturm, S; Blaum, K; Keitel, C H; Harman, Z

    2016-01-01

    The muonic vacuum polarization contribution to the $g$-factor of the electron bound in a nuclear potential is investigated theoretically. The electric as well as the magnetic loop contributions are evaluated. We found these muonic effects to be observable in planned trapped-ion experiments with light and medium-heavy highly charged ions. The enhancement due to the strong Coulomb field boosts these contributions much above the corresponding terms in the free-electron $g$-factor. Due to their magnitude, muonic vacuum polarization terms are also significant in planned determinations of the fine-structure constant from the bound-electron $g$-factor.

  2. Introduction to light forces, atom cooling, and atom trapping

    OpenAIRE

    Savage, Craig,

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces and reviews light forces, atom cooling and atom trapping. The emphasis is on the physics of the basic processes. In discussing conservative forces the semi-classical dressed states are used rather than the usual quantized field dressed states.

  3. Stationary Light Pulses in Cold Atomic Media

    CERN Document Server

    Liao, Wen-Te; Peters, Thorsten; Chou, Hung-Chih; Wang, Jian-Siung; Kuan, Pei-Chen; Yu, Ite A

    2008-01-01

    Stationary light pulses (SLPs), i.e., light pulses without motion, are formed via the retrieval of stored probe pulses with two counter-propagating coupling fields. We show that there exist non-negligible hybrid Raman excitations in media of cold atoms that prohibit the SLP formation. We experimentally demonstrate a method to suppress these Raman excitations and realize SLPs in laser-cooled atoms. Our work opens the way to SLP studies in cold as well as in stationary atoms and provides a new avenue to low-light-level nonlinear optics.

  4. Eliminating light shifts for single atom trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutzler, Nicholas R.; Liu, Lee R.; Yu, Yichao; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2017-02-01

    Microscopically controlled neutral atoms in optical tweezers and lattices have led to exciting advances in the study of quantum information and quantum many-body systems. The light shifts of atomic levels from the trapping potential in these systems can result in detrimental effects such as fluctuating dipole force heating, inhomogeneous detunings, and inhibition of laser cooling, which limits the atomic species that can be manipulated. In particular, these light shifts can be large enough to prevent loading into optical tweezers directly from a magneto-optical trap. We implement a general solution to these limitations by loading, as well as cooling and imaging the atoms with temporally alternating beams, and present an analysis of the role of heating and required cooling for single atom tweezer loading. Because this technique does not depend on any specific spectral properties, it should enable the optical tweezer platform to be extended to nearly any atomic or molecular species that can be laser cooled and optically trapped.

  5. Transitions between hyperfine-structure states of the 2s metastable muonic hydrogen in collision processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czaplinski, W.

    1992-12-31

    Hyperfine effects in the symmetric collisions of the 2s metastable muonic hydrogen with hydrogen atoms: (p{mu}){sub 2s} + H, (d{mu}){sub 2s} + D, (t{mu}){sub 2s} + t are presented. Elastic and spin-flip cross sections for the scattering of The 2s muonic atoms are calculated in the two-level approximation as a function of collision energy. The corresponding formulae are derived with inclusion of electron screening and Lamb-shift between 2s and 2p energy levels of the muonic atom. The obtained spin-flip cross sections are about two orders of magnitude higher than their ground state counterparts and are much more influenced by electron screening. The rates of the spin-flip transitions are also calculated and are found to be about three orders of magnitude higher than the decay rate of the 2s state. (author). 65 refs, 15 figs, 4 tabs.

  6. Spontaneous Crystallization of Light and Ultracold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostermann, S.; Piazza, F.; Ritsch, H.

    2016-04-01

    Coherent scattering of light from ultracold atoms involves an exchange of energy and momentum introducing a wealth of nonlinear dynamical phenomena. As a prominent example, particles can spontaneously form stationary periodic configurations that simultaneously maximize the light scattering and minimize the atomic potential energy in the emerging optical lattice. Such self-ordering effects resulting in periodic lattices via bimodal symmetry breaking have been experimentally observed with cold gases and Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) inside an optical resonator. Here, we study a new regime of periodic pattern formation for an atomic BEC in free space, driven by far off-resonant counterpropagating and noninterfering lasers of orthogonal polarization. In contrast to previous works, no spatial light modes are preselected by any boundary conditions and the transition from homogeneous to periodic order amounts to a crystallization of both light and ultracold atoms breaking a continuous translational symmetry. In the crystallized state the BEC acquires a phase similar to a supersolid with an emergent intrinsic length scale whereas the light field forms an optical lattice allowing phononic excitations via collective backscattering, which are gapped due to the infinte-range interactions. The system we study constitutes a novel configuration allowing the simulation of synthetic solid-state systems with ultracold atoms including long-range phonon dynamics.

  7. Light Propagation in Ultracold Atomic Gases

    OpenAIRE

    Bariani, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of light through an ultracold atomic gas is the main topic of the present work. The thesis consists of two parts. In Part I (Chapters 1,2,3), we give a complete description of the 1D photonic bands of a MI of two-level atoms paying attention to both band diagrams and reflectivity spectra. The role of regular periodicity of the system is addressed within a polariton formalism. The scattering on defects inside lattices of three-level atoms is also studied in view of optica...

  8. The Lamb shift measurement in muonic helium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diepold, Marc [Max-Planck-Institute of Quantum Optics, Garching (Germany); Collaboration: The CREMA Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    In 2013, the CREMA collaboration measured the 2S-2P transition frequencies (Lamb shift) in μ{sup 4}He {sup +} and μ{sup 3}He{sup +} using laser spectroscopy. This measurement achieved ten times more accurate values for the absolute nuclear charge radii of the lightest helium isotopes, as well as evaluate the μ{sup 3}He{sup +} hyperfine structure to determine the magnetic moment distribution of the {sup 3}He nucleus. Charge radii provided by this experiment will serve as a benchmark for few-nucleon nuclear models and as the basis for stringent tests of higher order bound-state QED contributions. In addition, the muonic helium measurements should be able to shed new light on the ''proton size puzzle'', i.e. the seven sigma discrepancy of our charge radius determination in muonic hydrogen and the 2009 CODATA value.

  9. Deuteron D-state probability from finite size effects in muonic deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Kelkar, N G

    2016-01-01

    Recent analyses of the Lamb shift data in muonic deuterium ($\\mu^- d$) have shown that precision atomic spectroscopy determines a more accurate radius of the deuteron than scattering experiments do. This precision can be used to determine the D-state probability, $P_D$, in deuteron accurately. To demonstrate the method, we evaluate the nuclear structure corrections of order $\\alpha^4$ within a few body formalism for the $\\mu^- p n$ system in muonic deuterium using different values of $P_D$ and find $P_D$ close to 2\\% to be most favoured by the $\\mu^-d$ data.

  10. Ponderomotive light squeezing with atomic cavity optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, Daniel W C; Brahms, Nathan; Purdy, Thomas P; Schreppler, Sydney; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2011-01-01

    Accessing distinctly quantum aspects of the interaction between light and the position of a mechanical object has been an outstanding challenge to cavity-optomechanical systems. Only cold-atom implementations of cavity optomechanics have indicated effects of the quantum fluctuations in the optical radiation pressure force. Here we use such a system, in which quantum photon-number fluctuations significantly drive the center of mass of an atomic ensemble inside a Fabry-Perot cavity. We show that the optomechanical response both amplifies and ponderomotively squeezes the quantum light field. We also demonstrate that classical optical fluctuations can be attenuated by 26 dB or amplified by 20 dB with a weak input pump power of < 40 pW, and characterize the optomechanical amplifier's frequency-dependent gain and phase response in both the amplitude and phase-modulation quadratures.

  11. Second-order corrections to the wave function at origin in muonic hydrogen and pionium

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, Vladimir G; Karshenboim, Savely G

    2009-01-01

    Non-relativisitic second-order corrections to the wave function at origin in muonic and exotic atoms are considered. The corrections are due to the electronic vacuum polarization. Such corrections are of interest due to various effective approaches, which take into account QED and hadronic effects. The wave function at origin plays a key role in the calculation of the pionium lifetime, various finite nuclear size effects and the hyperfine splitting. The results are obtained for the $1s$ and $2s$ states in pionic and muonic hydrogen and deuterium and in pionium, a bound system of $\\pi^+$ and $\\pi^-$. Applications to the hyperfine structure and the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen are also considered.

  12. Atoms and Molecules Interacting with Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Straten, Peter; Metcalf, Harold

    2016-02-01

    Part I. Atom-Light Interaction: 1. The classical physics pathway; Appendix 1.A. Damping force on an accelerating charge; Appendix 1.B. Hanle effect; Appendix 1.C. Optical tweezers; 2. Interaction of two-level atoms and light; Appendix 2.A. Pauli matrices for motion of the bloch vector; Appendix 2.B. The Ramsey method; Appendix 2.C. Echoes and interferometry; Appendix 2.D. Adiabatic rapid passage; Appendix 2.E Superposition and entanglement; 3. The atom-light interaction; Appendix 3.A. Proof of the oscillator strength theorem; Appendix 3.B. Electromagnetic fields; Appendix 3.C. The dipole approximation; Appendix 3.D. Time resolved fluorescence from multi-level atoms; 4. 'Forbidden' transitions; Appendix 4.A. Higher order approximations; 5. Spontaneous emission; Appendix 5.A. The quantum mechanical harmonic oscillator; Appendix 5.B. Field quantization; Appendix 5.C. Alternative theories to QED; 6. The density matrix; Appendix 6.A. The Liouville-von Neumann equation; Part II. Internal Structure: 7. The hydrogen atom; Appendix 7.A. Center-of-mass motion; Appendix 7.B. Coordinate systems; Appendix 7.C. Commuting operators; Appendix 7.D. Matrix elements of the radial wavefunctions; 8. Fine structure; Appendix 8.A. The Sommerfeld fine-structure constant; Appendix 8.B. Measurements of the fine structure 9. Effects of the nucleus; Appendix 9.A. Interacting magnetic dipoles; Appendix 9.B. Hyperfine structure for two spin =2 particles; Appendix 9.C. The hydrogen maser; 10. The alkali-metal atoms; Appendix 10.A. Quantum defects for the alkalis; Appendix 10.B. Numerov method; 11. Atoms in magnetic fields; Appendix 11.A. The ground state of atomic hydrogen; Appendix 11.B. Positronium; Appendix 11.C. The non-crossing theorem; Appendix 11.D. Passage through an anticrossing: Landau-Zener transitions; 12. Atoms in electric fields; 13. Rydberg atoms; 14. The helium atom; Appendix 14.A. Variational calculations; Appendix 14.B. Detail on the variational calculations of the ground state

  13. Lamb shift in muonic deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Vanderhaeghen, Marc [Institut für Kernphysik, Universität Mainz, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Carlson, Carl E. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States)

    2013-11-07

    We consider the two-photon exchange contribution to the 2P-2S Lamb shift in muonic deuterium in the framework of forward dispersion relations. The dispersion integrals are evaluated with minimal model dependence using experimental data on elastic deuteron form factors and inelastic electron-deuteron scattering, both in the quasielastic and hadronic range. The subtraction constant that is required to ensure convergence of the dispersion relation for the forward Compton amplitude T{sub 1} (ν,Q{sup 2}) is related to the deuteron magnetic polarizability β(Q{sup 2}) and represents the main source of uncertainty in our analysis. We obtain for the Lamb shift ΔE{sub 2P-2S} = 1.620±0.190 meV and discuss ways to further reduce this uncertainty.

  14. Lifetime and population of the 2S state in muonic protium and deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Diepold, Marc; Antognini, Aldo; Biraben, François; Cardoso, João M R; Covita, Daniel S; Dax, Andreas; Dhawan, Satish; Fernandes, Luis M P; Giesen, Adolf; Gouvea, Andrea L; Graf, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W; Indelicato, Paul; Julien, Lucile; Kao, Cheng-Yang; Knowles, Paul; Kottmann, Franz; Bigot, Eric-Olivier Le; Liu, Yi-Wei; Lopes, José A M; Ludhova, Livia; Monteiro, Cristina M B; Mulhauser, Françoise; Nebel, Tobias; Nez, François; Rabinowitz, Paul; Santos, Joaquim M F dos; Schaller, Lukas A; Schuhmann, Karsten; Schwob, Catherine; Taqqu, David; Veloso, João F C A; Vogelsang, Jan; Pohl, Randolf

    2013-01-01

    Radiative deexcitation (RD) of the metastable 2S state of muonic protium and deuterium atoms has been observed. In muonic protium, we improve the precision on lifetime and population (formation probability) values for the short-lived {\\mu}p(2S) component, and give an upper limit for RD of long-lived {\\mu}p(2S) atoms. In muonic deuterium at 1 hPa, 3.1 +-0.3 % of all stopped muons form {\\mu}d(2S) atoms. The short-lived 2S component has a population of 1.35 +0.57 -0.33 % and a lifetime of {\\tau}_short({\\mu}d) = 138 +32 -34 ns. We see evidence for RD of long-lived {\\mu}d(2S) with a lifetime of {\\tau}_long({\\mu}d) = 1.15 +0.75 -0.53 {\\mu}s. This is interpreted as formation and decay of excited muonic molecules.

  15. Cooperativity in light scattering by cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Bienaime, Tom; Piovella, Nicola; Kaiser, Robin

    2012-01-01

    A cloud of cold N two-level atoms driven by a resonant laser beam shows cooperative effects both in the scattered radiation field and in the radiation pressure force acting on the cloud center-of-mass. The induced dipoles synchronize and the scattered light presents superradiant and/or subradiant features. We present a quantum description of the process in terms of a master equation for the atomic density matrix in the scalar, Born-Markov approximations, reduced to the single-excitation limit. From a perturbative approach for weak incident field, we derive from the master equation the effective Hamiltonian, valid in the linear regime. We discuss the validity of the driven timed Dicke ansatz and of a partial wave expansion for different optical thicknesses and we give analytical expressions for the scattered intensity and the radiation pressure force on the center of mass. We also derive an expression for collective suppression of the atomic excitation and the scattered light by these correlated dipoles.

  16. Atomically thin quantum light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Berraquero, Carmen; Barbone, Matteo; Kara, Dhiren M.; Chen, Xiaolong; Goykhman, Ilya; Yoon, Duhee; Ott, Anna K.; Beitner, Jan; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Ferrari, Andrea C.; Atatüre, Mete

    2016-09-01

    Transition metal dichalcogenides are optically active, layered materials promising for fast optoelectronics and on-chip photonics. We demonstrate electrically driven single-photon emission from localized sites in tungsten diselenide and tungsten disulphide. To achieve this, we fabricate a light-emitting diode structure comprising single-layer graphene, thin hexagonal boron nitride and transition metal dichalcogenide mono- and bi-layers. Photon correlation measurements are used to confirm the single-photon nature of the spectrally sharp emission. These results present the transition metal dichalcogenide family as a platform for hybrid, broadband, atomically precise quantum photonics devices.

  17. The Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebel, Tobias

    2010-06-25

    The subject of this thesis is the first measurement of the 2S-2P Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen ({mu}p). In this project, which has been performed at the proton-accelerator facility of the Paul-Scherrer-Institute in Switzerland, the exotic analogon to the classical Lamb shift in hydrogen has been examined by laser spectroscopy. Negative muons are produced at a specially developed low-energy muon beam at a rate of 330 s{sup -1} and are stopped in 1 hPa of H{sub 2} gas. In the gas, highly excited {mu}p atoms are formed, most of which promptly cascade to the ground state within {proportional_to}100 ns. Only a fraction of 1.1% forms {mu}p atoms in the long-lived 2S state with a lifetime of 1.0 {mu}s. An elaborate laser system triggered on every incoming muon delivers 0.2 mJ laser pulses at {lambda}{approx_equal}6 {mu}m with 500 s{sup -1} repetition rate. The laser illuminates the {mu}p atoms 900 ns after the prompt muon cascade inducing the 2S-2P transition when on resonance. A 1.9 keV K{sub {alpha}} X-ray is emitted in the subsequent deexcitation to the 1S ground state and is recorded by large area avalanche photodiodes. The laser induced K{sub {alpha}} events are clearly distinguishable from the exponential background. For the 2S{sub 1/2}{sup F=1} - 2P{sub 3/2}{sup F=2} transition in {mu}p, it is given by {nu}{sub 2S-2P}=49 881 695 (711)MHz with a relative accuracy of 1.4 x 10{sup -5}. Assuming the correctness of the bound-state QED calculations of the Lamb shift in {mu}p, a new value for the rms proton charge radius r{sub p} can be derived: r{sub p}=0:84192(65) fm. Using the precisely measured 1S-2S transition frequency in hydrogen (relative accuracy of 1.4 parts in 10{sup 14}) and combining it with our new value of r{sub p}, a new value for the Rydberg constant R{sub {infinity}} can be derived with a relative accuracy of 1.5 parts in 10{sup 12}: R{sub {infinity}}=10 973 731.568 161(16)m{sup -1}. Beside the 2S{sub 1/2}{sup F=1}-2P{sub 3/2}{sup F=2} transition in {mu

  18. Sub-Angstrom Atomic-Resolution Imaging of Heavy Atoms to Light Atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2003-05-23

    Three decades ago John Cowley and his group at ASU achieved high-resolution electron microscope images showing the crystal unit cell contents at better than 4Angstrom resolution. Over the years, this achievement has inspired improvements in resolution that have enabled researchers to pinpoint the positions of heavy atom columns within the cell. More recently, this ability has been extended to light atoms as resolution has improved. Sub-Angstrom resolution has enabled researchers to image the columns of light atoms (carbon, oxygen and nitrogen) that are present in many complex structures. By using sub-Angstrom focal-series reconstruction of the specimen exit surface wave to image columns of cobalt, oxygen, and lithium atoms in a transition metal oxide structure commonly used as positive electrodes in lithium rechargeable batteries, we show that the range of detectable light atoms extends to lithium. HRTEM at sub-Angstrom resolution will provide the essential role of experimental verification for the emergent nanotech revolution. Our results foreshadow those to be expected from next-generation TEMs with Cs-corrected lenses and monochromated electron beams.

  19. Switching of light with light using cold atoms inside a hollow optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajcsy, Michal; Hofferberth, S.; Peyronel, Thibault

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a fiber-optical switch that operates with a few hundred photons per switching pulse. The light-light interaction is mediated by laser-cooled atoms. The required strong interaction between atoms and light is achieved by simultaneously confining photons and atoms inside the microscopic...

  20. Theory of Lamb Shift in Muonic Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karshenboim, Savely G., E-mail: savely.karshenboim@mpq.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik, Garching 85748, Germany and Pulkovo Observatory, St. Petersburg 196140 (Russian Federation); Korzinin, Evgeny Yu.; Shelyuto, Valery A. [D. I. Mendeleev Institute for Metrology, St. Petersburg 190005 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Vladimir G. [Pulkovo Observatory, St. Petersburg 196140 (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    There has been for a while a large discrepancy between the values of the proton charge radius measured by the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen and by other methods. It has already been clear that theory of muonic hydrogen is reliable at the level of this discrepancy and an error there cannot be a reason for the contradiction. Still the status of theory at the level of the uncertainty of the muonic-hydrogen experiment (which is two orders of magnitude below the discrepancy level) requires an additional clarification. Here, we revisit theory of the 2p − 2s Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen. We summarize all the theoretical contributions in order α{sup 5}m, including pure quantum electrodynamics (QED) ones as well as those which involve the proton-structure effects. Certain enhanced higher-order effects are also discussed. We basically confirm former QED calculations of other authors, present a review of recent calculations of the proton-structure effects, and treat self-consistently higher-order proton-finite-size corrections. We also overview theory of the 2p states. Eventually, we derive a value of the root-mean-square proton charge radius. It is found to be 0.840 29(55) fm, which is slightly different from that previously published in the literature (0.840 87(39) fm [Antognini et al., Science 339, 417 (2013)])

  1. Nuclear fusion in muonic molecules and in deuterated metals

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanova, L N

    2008-01-01

    Study of the fusion reactions between hydrogen isotopes in muonic molecules is the first example of the accurate accounting of the nucleus charge screening by a muon in the fusion process. At LUNA installation the measurements of astrophysical reaction cross sections were extended down to collision energies of a few keV. The screening by atomic electrons of the target became substantial. The possibility to look over screening from unbound electrons is given by metal-hydrides used as targets in dd reaction measurements. The classical Debye screening in plasma, applied to quasi-free electrons in metal, provides an explanation of unexpectedly large screening potentials found for some metals in the research through the Periodic table of elements.

  2. Cooling of rubidium atoms in pulsed diffuse laser light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Hua-Dong; Wang Xu-Cheng; Xiao Ling; Zhang Wen-Zhuo; Liu Liang; Wang Yu-Zhu

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports an experiment on laser cooling of 87Rb atoms in pulsed diffuse light, which is the key step towards a compact cold atom clock. It deduces an empirical formula to simulate the pulse cooling process based on the loading of cold atoms in cooling time and the loss in the dead time, which is in agreement with the experimental data. The formula gives a reference to select the parameters for the cold atom clock.

  3. Coherent Backscattering of Light Off One-Dimensional Atomic Strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, H. L.; Béguin, J.-B.; Kluge, K. W.; Iakoupov, I.; Sørensen, A. S.; Müller, J. H.; Polzik, E. S.; Appel, J.

    2016-09-01

    We present the first experimental realization of coherent Bragg scattering off a one-dimensional system—two strings of atoms strongly coupled to a single photonic mode—realized by trapping atoms in the evanescent field of a tapered optical fiber, which also guides the probe light. We report nearly 12% power reflection from strings containing only about 1000 cesium atoms, an enhancement of 2 orders of magnitude compared to reflection from randomly positioned atoms. This result paves the road towards collective strong coupling in 1D atom-photon systems. Our approach also allows for a straightforward fiber connection between several distant 1D atomic crystals.

  4. Coherent backscattering of light off one-dimensional atomic strings

    CERN Document Server

    Sørensen, H L; Kluge, K W; Iakoupov, I; Sørensen, A S; Müller, J H; Polzik, E S; Appel, J

    2016-01-01

    Bragg scattering, well known in crystallography, has become a powerful tool for artificial atomic structures such as optical lattices. In an independent development photonic waveguides have been used successfully to boost quantum light-matter coupling. We combine these two lines of research and present the first experimental realisation of coherent Bragg scattering off a one-dimensional (1D) system - two strings of atoms strongly coupled to a single photonic mode - realised by trapping atoms in the evanescent field of a tapered optical fibre (TOF), which also guides the probe light. We report nearly 12% power reflection from strings containing only about one thousand caesium atoms, an enhancement of more than two orders of magnitude compared to reflection from randomly positioned atoms. This result paves the road towards collective strong coupling in 1D atom-photon systems. Our approach also allows for a straightforward fibre connection between several distant 1D atomic crystals.

  5. Muonic hydrogen as a quantum gravimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Onofrio, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    High precision spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen has recently led to an anomaly in the Lamb shift, which has been parametrized in terms of a proton charge radius differing by seven standard deviations from the CODATA value. We show how this anomaly may be explained, within about a factor of three, in the framework of an effective Yukawian gravitational potential related to charged weak interactions, without additional free parameters with respect to the ones of the standard model. The residual discrepancy from the experimental result in this model should be attributable to the approximations introduced in the calculation, the uncertainty in the exact value of the Fermi scale relevant to the model and the lack of detailed knowledge on the gravitational radius of the proton. The latter cannot be inferred with electromagnetic probes due to the unknown gluonic contribution to the proton mass distribution. In this context, we argue that muonic hydrogen acts like a microscopic gravimeter suitable for testing a possib...

  6. Muonic footprint of simulated extensive air showers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erfani, Mona; Risse, Markus; Yushkov, Alexey [University of Siegen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The number of muons at ground is one of the major parameters in extensive air showers to discriminate hadronic showers from photon ones. There are already numerous studies focusing on this matter and on using the muon content in combination with other parameters. In our study, we use CORSIKA showers for photon and proton primaries at E=10{sup 18} eV without thinning of shower muons to analyze the structure of the muonic footprint at different core distances.

  7. Atom-Light Interactions in Photonic Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Goban, A; Yu, S -P; Hood, J D; Muniz, J A; Lee, J H; Martin, M J; McClung, A C; Choi, K S; Chang, D E; Painter, O; Kimble, H J

    2013-01-01

    The integration of nanophotonics and atomic physics has been a long-sought goal that would open new frontiers for optical physics. Here, we report the development of the first integrated optical circuit with a photonic crystal capable of both localizing and interfacing atoms with guided photons in the device. By aligning the optical bands of a photonic crystal waveguide (PCW) with selected atomic transitions, our platform provides new opportunities for novel quantum transport and many-body phenomena by way of photon-mediated atomic interactions along the PCW. From reflection spectra measured with average atom number N = 1.1$\\pm$0.4, we infer that atoms are localized within the PCW by Casimir-Polder and optical dipole forces. The fraction of single-atom radiative decay into the PCW is $\\Gamma_{\\rm 1D}/\\Gamma'$ = 0.32$\\pm$0.08, where $\\Gamma_{1D}$ is the rate of emission into the guided mode and $\\Gamma'$ is the decay rate into all other channels. $\\Gamma_{\\rm 1D}/\\Gamma'$ is quoted without enhancement due to a...

  8. New results in atomic physics at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlachter, A.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Light Source is the world's first low-energy third-generation synchrotron radiation source. It has been running reliably and exceeding design specifications since it began operation in October 1993. It is available to a wide community of researchers in many scientific fields, including atomic and molecular science and chemistry. Here, new results in atomic physics at the Advanced Light Source demonstrate the opportunities available in atomic and molecular physics at this synchrotron light source. The unprecedented brightness allows experiments with high flux, high spectral resolution, and nearly 100% linear polarization.

  9. Light-shift measurement and suppression in atomic spin gyroscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wan, Shuangai; Chen, Yao; Li, Rujie

    2012-11-01

    We present a method to determine and suppress the light shift in an atomic spin gyroscope. This method doesn't require additional drive source or frequency modulation, and it is based on the dynamics of an atomic spin gyroscope to determine a clean curve as a function of the frequency of the pump beam that predicts the zero light shift. We experimentally validate the method in a Cs-(129)Xe atomic spin gyroscope and verify the results through numerical simulations. This method can also be applied to an atomic spin magnetometer based on the spin-exchange relaxation-free exchange that experiences light shift. The method is useful for atomic spin devices because it can improve long-term performance and reduce the influence of the laser.

  10. Deterministically Entangling Two Remote Atomic Ensembles via Light-Atom Mixed Entanglement Swapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanhong; Yan, Zhihui; Jia, Xiaojun; Xie, Changde

    2016-05-11

    Entanglement of two distant macroscopic objects is a key element for implementing large-scale quantum networks consisting of quantum channels and quantum nodes. Entanglement swapping can entangle two spatially separated quantum systems without direct interaction. Here we propose a scheme of deterministically entangling two remote atomic ensembles via continuous-variable entanglement swapping between two independent quantum systems involving light and atoms. Each of two stationary atomic ensembles placed at two remote nodes in a quantum network is prepared to a mixed entangled state of light and atoms respectively. Then, the entanglement swapping is unconditionally implemented between the two prepared quantum systems by means of the balanced homodyne detection of light and the feedback of the measured results. Finally, the established entanglement between two macroscopic atomic ensembles is verified by the inseparability criterion of correlation variances between two anti-Stokes optical beams respectively coming from the two atomic ensembles.

  11. Single-atom electron energy loss spectroscopy of light elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senga, Ryosuke; Suenaga, Kazu

    2015-01-01

    Light elements such as alkali metal (lithium, sodium) or halogen (fluorine, chlorine) are present in various substances and indeed play significant roles in our life. Although atomic behaviours of these elements are often a key to resolve chemical or biological activities, they are hardly visible in transmission electron microscope because of their smaller scattering power and higher knock-on probability. Here we propose a concept for detecting light atoms encaged in a nanospace by means of electron energy loss spectroscopy using inelastically scattered electrons. In this method, we demonstrate the single-atom detection of lithium, fluorine, sodium and chlorine with near-atomic precision, which is limited by the incident probe size, signal delocalization and atomic movement in nanospace. Moreover, chemical shifts of lithium K-edge have been successfully identified with various atomic configurations in one-dimensional lithium compounds. PMID:26228378

  12. Single-atom electron energy loss spectroscopy of light elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senga, Ryosuke; Suenaga, Kazu

    2015-07-31

    Light elements such as alkali metal (lithium, sodium) or halogen (fluorine, chlorine) are present in various substances and indeed play significant roles in our life. Although atomic behaviours of these elements are often a key to resolve chemical or biological activities, they are hardly visible in transmission electron microscope because of their smaller scattering power and higher knock-on probability. Here we propose a concept for detecting light atoms encaged in a nanospace by means of electron energy loss spectroscopy using inelastically scattered electrons. In this method, we demonstrate the single-atom detection of lithium, fluorine, sodium and chlorine with near-atomic precision, which is limited by the incident probe size, signal delocalization and atomic movement in nanospace. Moreover, chemical shifts of lithium K-edge have been successfully identified with various atomic configurations in one-dimensional lithium compounds.

  13. Single-atom electron energy loss spectroscopy of light elements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Senga, Ryosuke; Suenaga, Kazu

    2015-01-01

    ... scattering power and higher knock-on probability. Here we propose a concept for detecting light atoms encaged in a nanospace by means of electron energy loss spectroscopy using inelastically scattered electrons...

  14. Cooperatively enhanced light transmission in cold atomic matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kemp, Kasie; Havey, M D; Sokolov, I M; Kupriyanov, D V

    2014-01-01

    We report enhanced transmission in measurements of the spectral dependence of forward light scattering by a high-density and cold ensemble of 87Rb atoms. This phenomenon, which is a result of dipole-dipole interaction induced cooperative light scattering in the atomic sample, implies a significant departure from the traditional density dependence of the transmitted light as embodied in the Beer-Lambert Law. Absolute values of the density-dependent forward light scattering cross-section are extracted from the measurements.

  15. Atom probe tomography of a commercial light emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, D. J.; Prosa, T. J.; Olson, D.; Lefebvre, W.; Lawrence, D.; Clifton, P. H.; Kelly, T. F.

    2013-11-01

    The atomic-scale analysis of a commercial light emitting diode device purchased at retail is demonstrated using a local electrode atom probe. Some of the features are correlated with transmission electron microscopy imaging. Subtle details of the structure that are revealed have potential significance for the design and performance of this device.

  16. Storing light with correlations in arrays of atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Facchinetti, G; Ruostekoski, J

    2016-01-01

    We show how strong light-mediated resonant dipole-dipole interactions between atoms can be utilized in a control and storage of light. The method is based on a high-fidelity preparation of a collective atomic excitation in a single correlated subradiant eigenmode in a lattice. We demonstrate how a simple phenomenological model captures the qualitative features of the dynamics and scattering resonances.

  17. Light-pulse atom interferometric device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Grant; McGuinness, Hayden James Evans; Rakholia, Akash; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Schwindt, Peter; Wheeler, David R.

    2016-03-22

    An atomic interferometric device useful, e.g., for measuring acceleration or rotation is provided. The device comprises at least one vapor cell containing a Raman-active chemical species, an optical system, and at least one detector. The optical system is conformed to implement a Raman pulse interferometer in which Raman transitions are stimulated in a warm vapor of the Raman-active chemical species. The detector is conformed to detect changes in the populations of different internal states of atoms that have been irradiated by the optical system.

  18. Interaction between atoms and slow light: a design study

    CERN Document Server

    Zang, Xiaorun; Faggiani, Rémi; Gill, Christopher; Petrov, Plamen G; Hugonin, Jean-Paul; Bernon, Simon; Bouyer, Philippe; Boyer, Vincent; Lalanne, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The emerging field of on-chip integration of nanophotonic devices and cold atoms offers extremely-strong and pure light-matter interaction schemes, which may have profound impact on quantum information science. In this context, a longstanding obstacle is to achieve strong interaction between single atoms and single photons, while at the same time trap atoms in vacuum at large separation distances from dielectric surfaces. In this letter, we study new waveguide geometries that challenge these conflicting objectives. The designed photonic crystal waveguide is expected to offer a good compromise, which additionally allow for easy manipulation of atomic clouds around the structure.

  19. Measurement of the Formation Rate of Muonic Hydrogen Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Andreev, V A; Carey, R M; Case, T A; Clayton, S M; Crowe, K M; Deutsch, J; Egger, J; Freedman, S J; Ganzha, V A; Gorringe, T; Gray, F E; Hertzog, D W; Hildebrandt, M; Kammel, P; Kiburg, B; Knaack, S; Kravtsov, P A; Krivshich, A G; Lauss, B; Lynch, K R; Maev, E M; Maev, O E; Mulhauser, F; Petitjean, C; Petrov, G E; Prieels, R; Schapkin, G N; Semenchuk, G G; Soroka, M A; Tishchenko, V; Vasilyev, A A; Vorobyov, A A; Vznuzdaev, M E; Winter, P

    2015-01-01

    Background: The rate \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ characterizes the formation of pp\\mu\\ molecules in collisions of muonic p\\mu\\ atoms with hydrogen. In measurements of the basic weak muon capture reaction on the proton to determine the pseudoscalar coupling g_P, capture occurs from both atomic and molecular states. Thus knowledge of \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ is required for a correct interpretation of these experiments. Purpose: Recently the MuCap experiment has measured the capture rate \\Lambda_S from the singlet p\\mu\\ atom, employing a low density active target to suppress pp\\mu\\ formation (PRL 110, 12504 (2013)). Nevertheless, given the unprecedented precision of this experiment, the existing experimental knowledge in \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ had to be improved. Method: The MuCap experiment derived the weak capture rate from the muon disappearance rate in ultra-pure hydrogen. By doping the hydrogen with 20 ppm of argon, a competing process to pp\\mu\\ formation was introduced, which allowed the extraction of \\lambda_pp\\mu\\ from the observed t...

  20. Eliminating light shifts in single-atom optical traps

    CERN Document Server

    Hutzler, Nicholas R; Yu, Yichao; Ni, Kang-Kuen

    2016-01-01

    Microscopically controlled neutral atoms in optical tweezers and lattices have led to exciting advances in the study of quantum information and quantum many-body systems. The light shifts of atomic levels from the trapping potential in these systems can result in detrimental effects such as fluctuating dipole force heating, inhomogeneous detunings, and inhibition of laser cooling, which limits the atomic species that can be manipulated. In particular, these light shifts can be large enough to prevent loading into optical tweezers directly from a magneto-optical trap. We present a general solution to these limitations by loading, cooling, and imaging single atoms with temporally alternating beams. Because this technique does not depend on any specific spectral properties, we expect it to enable the optical tweezer method to control nearly any atomic or molecular species that can be laser cooled and optically trapped. Furthermore, we present an analysis of the role of heating and required cooling for single ato...

  1. Single-atom detection of light elements: Imaging or spectroscopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senga, Ryosuke; Suenaga, Kazu

    2017-09-01

    Single-atom imaging and spectroscopy at a lower accelerating voltage (~60kV) has been largely facilitated by the development of aberration correctors for transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/ scanning TEM (STEM). Such an STEM condition will reduce beam damage and has therefore been demonstrated capable of detecting individual atoms of light elements including B, C, and N in mono-layered materials. However, other light elements such as Li, O, or F are still difficult to visualise as individual atoms by using conventional STEM/TEM imaging because their extremely weak contrast can be often smeared out by the other atoms nearby. In this paper, we demonstrate the successful detection of these 'hardly visible' atoms in the spectroscopy mode. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Transferring orbital and spin angular momenta of light to atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picon, A; Benseny, A; Mompart, J [Departament de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Vazquez de Aldana, J R; Plaja, L [Servicio Laser, Universidad de Salamanca, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain); Calvo, G F [Mathematics Department and IMACI-Institute of Applied Mathematics in Science and Engineering, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, E-13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Roso, L, E-mail: antonio.picon@uab.ca [Centro de Laseres Pulsados, CLPU, Patio de Escuelas 1, E-37008 Salamanca (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    Light beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM), such as Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beams, give rise to the violation of the standard dipolar selection rules during interaction with matter, yielding, in general, an exchange of angular momentum larger than {h_bar} per absorbed photon. By means of ab initio three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations, we investigate in detail the interaction of a hydrogen atom with intense Gaussian and LG light pulses. We analyze the dependence of the angular momentum exchange with the polarization, the OAM and the carrier-envelope phase of light, as well as with the relative position between the atom and the light vortex. In addition, a quantum-trajectory approach based on the de Broglie-Bohm formulation of quantum mechanics is used to gain physical insight into the absorption of angular momentum by the hydrogen atom.

  3. Hybrid ion, atom and light trap

    CERN Document Server

    Jyothi, S; Ram, N Bhargava; Rangwala, S A

    2013-01-01

    We present an unique experimental arrangement which permits the simultaneous trapping and cooling of ions and neutral atoms, within a Fabry-Perot (FP) cavity. The versatility of this hybrid trap experiment enables a variety of studies with trapped mixtures. The motivations behind the production of such a hybrid trap system are explained, followed by details of how the experiment is put together. Several experiments that have been performed with this system are presented and some opportunities with this system are discussed. However the primary emphasis is focussed on the aspects that pertain to the trapped ions, in this hybrid system.

  4. Lamb shift in muonic helium ion

    CERN Document Server

    Martynenko, A P

    2006-01-01

    The Lamb shift (2P_{1/2}-2S_{1/2}) in the muonic helium ion (mu ^4_2He)^+ is calculated with the account of contributions of orders alpha^3, alpha^4, alpha^5 and alpha^6. Special attention is given to corrections of the electron vacuum polarization, the nuclear structure and recoil effects. The obtained numerical value of the Lamb shift 1381.716 meV can be considered as a reliable estimate for the comparison with experimental data.

  5. Nonrelativistic Lamb shift for muonic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowski, Robert; Jeziorski, Bogumil

    1993-03-01

    A recently developed formula [R. Bukowski and B. Jeziorski, Phys. Rev. A46 (1992) 5437]. has been applied to estimate the soft-photon Lamb shift contribution to the energies of the muonic molecules ppμ, ddμ, ttμ, pdμ, ptμ and dtμ. The corresponding corrections to the dissociation energies for the excited P states of ddμ and dtμ have been found to be almost identical and equal to 0.048 meV. The magnitude of this stabilizing effect is too small to affect seriously the formation rates predictions.

  6. 2S Hyperfine splitting of muonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Martynenko, A P

    2004-01-01

    Corrections of orders alpha^5, alpha^6 are calculated in the hyperfine splitting of the 2S state in the muonic hydrogen. The nuclear structure effects are taken into account in the one- and two-loop Feynman amplitudes by means of the proton electromagnetic form factors. Total numerical value of the 2S state hyperfine splitting 22.8148 meV in the (\\mu p) can be considered as reliable estimation for the corresponding experiment with the accuracy 10^{-5}. The value of the Sternheim's hyperfine splitting interval [8\\Delta E^{HFS}(2S)-\\Delta E^{HFS}(1S)] is obtained with the accuracy 10^{-6}.

  7. Trapping of light pulses in ensembles of stationary Lambda atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Kristian Rymann; Molmer, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical description of the generation of stationary light pulses by standing wave electromagnetically induced transparency in media comprised of stationary atoms. We show that, contrary to thermal gas media, the achievable storage times are limited only by the ground state dephasing rate of the atoms, making such media ideally suited for nonlinear optical interactions between stored pulses. Furthermore, we find significant quantitative and qualitative differences bet...

  8. Imaging and dynamics of light atoms and molecules on graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jannik C; Girit, C O; Crommie, M F; Zettl, A

    2008-07-17

    Observing the individual building blocks of matter is one of the primary goals of microscopy. The invention of the scanning tunnelling microscope revolutionized experimental surface science in that atomic-scale features on a solid-state surface could finally be readily imaged. However, scanning tunnelling microscopy has limited applicability due to restrictions in, for example, sample conductivity, cleanliness, and data acquisition rate. An older microscopy technique, that of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), has benefited tremendously in recent years from subtle instrumentation advances, and individual heavy (high-atomic-number) atoms can now be detected by TEM even when embedded within a semiconductor material. But detecting an individual low-atomic-number atom, for example carbon or even hydrogen, is still extremely challenging, if not impossible, via conventional TEM owing to the very low contrast of light elements. Here we demonstrate a means to observe, by conventional TEM, even the smallest atoms and molecules: on a clean single-layer graphene membrane, adsorbates such as atomic hydrogen and carbon can be seen as if they were suspended in free space. We directly image such individual adatoms, along with carbon chains and vacancies, and investigate their dynamics in real time. These techniques open a way to reveal dynamics of more complex chemical reactions or identify the atomic-scale structure of unknown adsorbates. In addition, the study of atomic-scale defects in graphene may provide insights for nanoelectronic applications of this interesting material.

  9. Light assisted collisions in ultra cold Tm atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimov, Alexey; Cojocaru, Ivan; Pyatchenkov, Sergey; Snigirev, Stepan; Luchnokov, Ilia; Sukachev, Denis; Kalganova, Elena; Sorokin, Vadim

    2016-05-01

    Recently laser cooled rare earth elements attracted considerable attention due to the high orbital and magnetic moments. Such a systems allow low-field Feshabach resonances enabling tunable in wide range interactions. In particular, thulium atom has one hole in 4f shell therefore having orbital moment of 3 in the ground state, magnetic moment of 4 Bohr magnetons in ground state. While magnetic moment of the thulium atom is less than that of Erbium or Dysprosium simpler level structure, possibility to capture thulium atoms and the dipole trap at 532 nm make thulium atom an extremely attractive subject for quantum simulations. Nevertheless collisional properties of thulium atom are not yet explored in details, in particular light assisted collision of thulium atom were not yet investigated. In this contribution, we performed studies of light assisted collisions near in Magneto optical trap operating on narrow 530.7 nm transition. We found, that light assisted inelastic binary collisions losses rate is around β ~10-9cm3cm3s s . Possible mechanism of losses from the trap are discussed

  10. Atoms and molecules interacting with light atomic physics for the laser era

    CERN Document Server

    Straten, Peter van der

    2016-01-01

    This in-depth textbook with a focus on atom-light interactions prepares students for research in a fast-growing and dynamic field. Intended to accompany the laser-induced revolution in atomic physics, it is a comprehensive text for the emerging era in atomic, molecular and optical science. Utilising an intuitive and physical approach, the text describes two-level atom transitions, including appendices on Ramsey spectroscopy, adiabatic rapid passage and entanglement. With a unique focus on optical interactions, the authors present multi-level atomic transitions with dipole selection rules, and M1/E2 and multiphoton transitions. Conventional structure topics are discussed in some detail, beginning with the hydrogen atom and these are interspersed with material rarely found in textbooks such as intuitive descriptions of quantum defects. The final chapters examine modern applications and include many references to current research literature. The numerous exercises and multiple appendices throughout enable advanc...

  11. Nanoscale light-matter interactions in atomic cladding waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Liron; Desiatov, Boris; Goykhman, Ilya; Levy, Uriel

    2013-01-01

    Alkali vapours, such as rubidium, are being used extensively in several important fields of research such as slow and stored light nonlinear optics quantum computation, atomic clocks and magnetometers. Recently, there is a growing effort towards miniaturizing traditional centimetre-size vapour cells. Owing to the significant reduction in device dimensions, light-matter interactions are greatly enhanced, enabling new functionalities due to the low power threshold needed for nonlinear interactions. Here, taking advantage of the mature platform of silicon photonics, we construct an efficient and flexible platform for tailored light-vapour interactions on a chip. Specifically, we demonstrate light-matter interactions in an atomic cladding waveguide, consisting of a silicon nitride nano-waveguide core with a rubidium vapour cladding. We observe the efficient interaction of the electromagnetic guided mode with the rubidium cladding and show that due to the high confinement of the optical mode, the rubidium absorption saturates at powers in the nanowatt regime.

  12. Evanescent light-matter Interactions in Atomic Cladding Wave Guides

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Liron; Goykhman, Ilya; Levy, Uriel

    2012-01-01

    Alkali vapors, and in particular rubidium, are being used extensively in several important fields of research such as slow and stored light non-linear optics3 and quantum computation. Additionally, the technology of alkali vapors plays a major role in realizing myriad industrial applications including for example atomic clocks magentometers8 and optical frequency stabilization. Lately, there is a growing effort towards miniaturizing traditional centimeter-size alkali vapor cells. Owing to the significant reduction in device dimensions, light matter interactions are greatly enhanced, enabling new functionalities due to the low power threshold needed for non-linear interactions. Here, taking advantage of the mature Complimentary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) compatible platform of silicon photonics, we construct an efficient and flexible platform for tailored light vapor interactions on a chip. Specifically, we demonstrate light matter interactions in an atomic cladding wave guide (ACWG), consisting of CMOS ...

  13. Hyperine transitions rates and capture rates in muonic F, Na, and Cl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorringe, T.P.; Johnson, B. Bauer, J. [and others

    1993-04-01

    From the time spectrum of {gamma}-rays following muon capture the authors have measured hyperfine transitions rates on muonic F, Na, and Cl, and the hyperfine dependence of the reaction {mu}{sup {minus}} {sup 23}Na(3/2{sup +},0) {r_arrow} {nu}{sup 23}Ne({1/2}{sup +},1017). They obtained hyperfine transition rates of 4.9{+-}1.2 {mu}s{sup {minus}1}, 8.4{+-}1.9 {mu}s{sup {minus}1}, and 6.5{+-}0.9 {mu}s{sup {minus}1}, for muonic F, Na, and Cl, respectively. The pattern of rates is in agreement with the calculations of Winston which indicate a general increase in rate with atomic number but a decrease at Cl where the emission of L shell electrons becomes forbidden. However, the authors` measured rates are systematically lower than the calculations of Winston (by 15 to 40 %), perhaps due to incomplete refilling of the muonic atom`s electron shells after formation. The hyperfine dependence of the reaction {mu}{sup {minus}} {sup 23}Na (3/2{sup +},0) {r_arrow} {nu} {sup 23}Ne({1/2}{sup +},1017) is dependent on the weak pseudoscalar coupling (g{sub p}) of the proton, and in an initial measurement at the TRIUMF laboratory gave a hyperfine dependence, {Lambda}{sub +}/{Lambda}{sub {minus}} = 0.18 {+-} 0.10, and a weak pseudoscalar coupling 5 {le} g{sub p}/g{sub e} {le} 15. A more recent measurement will determine g{sub p} to about 10 %, and will probe modifications of the coupling in the nuclear medium.

  14. Population of collective modes in light scattering by many atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, William; Kaiser, Robin

    2017-05-01

    The interaction of light with an atomic sample containing a large number of particles gives rise to many collective (or cooperative) effects, such as multiple scattering, superradiance, and subradiance, even if the atomic density is low and the incident optical intensity weak (linear optics regime). Tracing over the degrees of freedom of the light field, the system can be well described by an effective atomic Hamiltonian, which contains the light-mediated dipole-dipole interaction between atoms. This long-range interaction is at the origin of the various collective effects, or of collective excitation modes of the system. Even though an analysis of the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of these collective modes does allow distinguishing superradiant modes, for instance, from other collective modes, this is not sufficient to understand the dynamics of a driven system, as not all collective modes are significantly populated. Here, we study how the excitation parameters, i.e., the driving field, determines the population of the collective modes. We investigate in particular the role of the laser detuning from the atomic transition, and demonstrate a simple relation between the detuning and the steady-state population of the modes. This relation allows understanding several properties of cooperative scattering, such as why superradiance and subradiance become independent of the detuning at large enough detuning without vanishing, and why superradiance, but not subradiance, is suppressed near resonance. We also show that the spatial properties of the collective modes allow distinguishing diffusive modes, responsible for radiation trapping, from subradiant modes.

  15. Single mode quadrature entangled light from room temperature atomic vapour

    CERN Document Server

    Wasilewski, W; Jensen, K; Madsen, L S; Krauter, H; Polzik, E S

    2009-01-01

    We analyse a novel squeezing and entangling mechanism which is due to correlated Stokes and anti-Stokes photon forward scattering in a multi-level atom vapour. Following the proposal we present an experimental demonstration of 3.5 dB pulsed frequency nondegenerate squeezed (quadrature entangled) state of light using room temperature caesium vapour. The source is very robust and requires only a few milliwatts of laser power. The squeezed state is generated in the same spatial mode as the local oscillator and in a single temporal mode. The two entangled modes are separated by twice the Zeeman frequency of the vapour which can be widely tuned. The narrow-band squeezed light generated near an atomic resonance can be directly used for atom-based quantum information protocols. Its single temporal mode characteristics make it a promising resource for quantum information processing.

  16. Propagation of light through small clouds of cold interacting atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Jennewein, S; Greffet, J -J; Browaeys, A

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that a cloud of cold atoms with a size comparable to the wavelength of light can induce large group delays on a laser pulse when the laser is tightly focused on it and is close to an atomic resonance. Delays as large as -10 ns are observed, corresponding to "superluminal" propagation with negative group velocities as low as -300 m/s. Strikingly, this large delay is associated with a moderate extinction owing to the very small size of the cloud and to the light-induced interactions between atoms. It implies that a large phase shift is imprinted on the continuous laser beam, and opens interesting perspectives for applications to quantum technologies.

  17. Two-photon exchange correction to $2S$-$2P$ splitting in muonic helium

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, Carl E; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the two-photon exchange correction to the Lamb shift in muonic helium atoms within the dispersion relations framework. Part of the effort entailed making analytic fits to the electron-$^3$He quasielastic scattering data set, for purposes of doing the dispersion integrals. Our result is that the energy of the 2$S$ state is shifted downwards by two-photon exchange effects by 15.14(49) meV, in good accord with the result obtained from a potential model and effective field theory calculation.

  18. Energy levels of light atoms in strong magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Thirumalai, Anand

    2014-01-01

    In this review article we provide an overview of the field of atomic structure of light atoms in strong magnetic fields. There is a very rich history of this field which dates back to the very birth of quantum mechanics. At various points in the past significant discoveries in science and technology have repeatedly served to rejuvenate interest in atomic structure in strong fields, broadly speaking, resulting in three eras in the development of this field; the historical, the classical and the modern eras. The motivations for studying atomic structure have also changed significantly as time progressed. The review presents a chronological summary of the major advances that occurred during these eras and discusses new insights and impetus gained. The review is concluded with a description of the latest findings and the future prospects for one of the most remarkably cutting-edge fields of research in science today.

  19. Manipulating scattering of ultracold atoms with light-induced dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that pairs of atoms can form metastable bonds due to non-conservative forces induced by dissipation [Lemeshko&Weimer, Nature Comm. 4, 2230 (2013)]. Here we study the dynamics of interaction-induced coherent population trapping - the process responsible for the formation of dissipatively bound molecules. We derive the effective dissipative potentials induced between ultracold atoms by laser light, and study the time evolution of the scattering states. We demonstrate that binding occurs on short timescales of ~10 microseconds, even if the initial kinetic energy of the atoms significantly exceeds the depth of the dissipative potential. Dissipatively-bound molecules with preordained bond lengths and vibrational wavefunctions can be created and detected in current experiments with ultracold atoms.

  20. Coherent inelastic backscattering of laser light from three isotropic atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ketterer, Andreas; Shatokhin, Vyacheslav N

    2014-01-01

    We study the impact of double and triple scattering contributions on coherent backscattering of laser light from saturated isotropic atoms, in the helicity preserving polarization channel. Using the recently proposed diagrammatic pump-probe approach, we analytically derive single-atom spectral responses to a classical polychromatic driving field, combine them self-consistently to double and triple scattering processes, and numerically deduce the corresponding elastic and inelastic spectra, as well as the total backscattered intensities. We find that account of the triple scattering contribution leads to a faster decay of phase-coherence with increasing saturation of the atomic transition as compared to double scattering alone, and to a better agreement with the experiment on strontium atoms.

  1. Shrinking light to allow forbidden transitions on the atomic scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Nicholas; Kaminer, Ido; Zhen, Bo; Joannopoulos, John D.; Soljačić, Marin

    2016-07-01

    The diversity of light-matter interactions accessible to a system is limited by the small size of an atom relative to the wavelength of the light it emits, as well as by the small value of the fine-structure constant. We developed a general theory of light-matter interactions with two-dimensional systems supporting plasmons. These plasmons effectively make the fine-structure constant larger and bridge the size gap between atom and light. This theory reveals that conventionally forbidden light-matter interactions—such as extremely high-order multipolar transitions, two-plasmon spontaneous emission, and singlet-triplet phosphorescence processes—can occur on very short time scales comparable to those of conventionally fast transitions. Our findings may lead to new platforms for spectroscopy, sensing, and broadband light generation, a potential testing ground for quantum electrodynamics (QED) in the ultrastrong coupling regime, and the ability to take advantage of the full electronic spectrum of an emitter.

  2. A Waveguide Platform for Collective Light-Atom Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Heidi Lundgaard

    In this work a tapered optical fiber is studied as a waveguide platform for efficient collective light-atom interaction. We present an allcomputer controlled heat-and-pull setup with which a standard optical fiber can reproducible be tapered down to sub-micron waist size. The resulting fiber shape...... is compared against a prediction derived from a numerical model build upon an easy experimental calibration of the viscosity profile within the heater. Very good agreement between the modeled and measured fiber shape is found. We next study the coherent back-scattering off atoms confined as two one......-dimensional strings in the evanescent field of a tapered optical fiber. By applying a near-resonant standing wave field, the atoms are arranged into a periodic Bragg structure in close analogy to a photo-refractive medium with a refractive index grating. We observe more than 10% power reflection off about 1000...

  3. Control of atomic transition rates via laser light shaping

    CERN Document Server

    Jauregui, R

    2015-01-01

    A modular systematic analysis of the feasibility of modifying atomic transition rates by tailoring the electromagnetic field of an external coherent light source is presented. The formalism considers both the center of mass and internal degrees of freedom of the atom, and all properties of the field: frequency, angular spectrum, and polarization. General features of recoil effects for internal forbidden transitions are discussed. A comparative analysis of different structured light sources is explicitly worked out. It includes spherical waves, Gaussian beams, Laguerre-Gaussian beams, and propagation invariant beams with closed analytical expressions. It is shown that increments in the order of magnitude of the transition rates for Gaussian and Laguerre-Gaussian beams, with respect to those obtained in the paraxial limit, requires waists of the order of the wavelength, while propagation invariant modes may considerably enhance transition rates under more favorable conditions. For transitions that can be natura...

  4. Accuracy of the Faddeev Random Phase Approximation for Light Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Barbieri, C; Degroote, M

    2010-01-01

    The accuracy of the Faddeev random phase approximation (FRPA) method is tested by calculating the total and ionization energies of a set of light atoms up to Ar. Comparisons are made with the results of coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD), third-order algebraic diagrammatic construction [ADC(3)], and with the experiment. It is seen that even for two-electron systems, He and Be-2+, the inclusion of RPA effects leads to satisfactory results and therefore it does not over-correlate the ground state. The FRPA becomes progressively better for larger atomic numbers where it gives about 5 mH more correlation energy and it shifts ionization potentials by 2-10 mH, with respect to its sister method ADC(3). The corrections for ionization potentials consistently reduce the discrepancies with the experiment.

  5. Propagation of light through small clouds of cold interacting atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennewein, S.; Sortais, Y. R. P.; Greffet, J.-J.; Browaeys, A.

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that a dense cloud of cold atoms with a size comparable to the wavelength of light can induce large group delays on a laser pulse when the laser is tightly focused on it and is close to an atomic resonance. Delays as large as -10 ns are observed, corresponding to "superluminal" propagation with negative group velocities as low as -300 m /s . Strikingly, this large delay is associated with a moderate extinction owing to the very small size of the dense cloud. It implies that a large phase shift is imprinted on the continuous laser beam. Our system may thus be useful for applications to quantum technologies, such as variable delay line for individual photons or phase imprint between two beams at the single-photon level.

  6. Atomic-Layer-Confined Doping for Atomic-Level Insights into Visible-Light Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Fengcai; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Yongfu; Liang, Liang; Liu, Katong; Xu, Jiaqi; Zhang, Qun; Pan, Bicai; Luo, Yi; Xie, Yi

    2015-08-03

    A model of doping confined in atomic layers is proposed for atomic-level insights into the effect of doping on photocatalysis. Co doping confined in three atomic layers of In2S3 was implemented with a lamellar hybrid intermediate strategy. Density functional calculations reveal that the introduction of Co ions brings about several new energy levels and increased density of states at the conduction band minimum, leading to sharply increased visible-light absorption and three times higher carrier concentration. Ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy reveals that the electron transfer time of about 1.6 ps from the valence band to newly formed localized states is due to Co doping. The 25-fold increase in average recovery lifetime is believed to be responsible for the increased of electron-hole separation. The synthesized Co-doped In2S3 (three atomic layers) yield a photocurrent of 1.17 mA cm(-2) at 1.5 V vs. RHE, nearly 10 and 17 times higher than that of the perfect In2S3 (three atomic layers) and the bulk counterpart, respectively.

  7. Observation of Long-Lived Muonic Hydrogen in the 2S State

    CERN Document Server

    Pohl, R; Hartmann, F J; Hauser, P; Kottmann, F; Markushin, V E; Mühlbauer, M; Petitjean, C; Schott, W; Taqqu, D; Wojciechowski-Grosshauser, P; Daniel, Herbert; Hauser, Peter; Kottmann, Franz; M\\"uhlbauer, Markus; Markushin, Valery E.; Petitjean, Claude; Pohl, Randolf; Schott, Wolfgang; Taqqu, David; Wojciechowski-Grosshauser, Peter

    2006-01-01

    The kinetic energy distribution of ground state muonic hydrogen atoms mu-p(1S) is determined from time-of-flight spectra measured at 4, 16, and 64 hPa H2 room-temperature gas. A 0.9 keV-component is discovered and attributed to radiationless deexcitation of long-lived mu-p(2S) atoms in collisions with H2 molecules. The analysis reveals a relative population of about 1%, and a pressure-dependent lifetime (e.g. (30.4 +21.4 -9.7) ns at 64 hPa) of the long-lived mu-p(2S) population, equivalent to a 2S-quench rate in mu-p(2S) + H2 collisions of (4.4 +2.1 -1.8) 10^11 s^-1 at liquid hydrogen density.

  8. Light interacting with atomic ensembles: collective, cooperative and mesoscopic effects

    CERN Document Server

    Guerin, W; Kaiser, R

    2016-01-01

    Cooperative scattering has been the subject of intense research in the last years. In this article, we discuss the concept of cooperative scattering from a broad perspective. We briefly review the various collective effects that occur when light interacts with an ensemble of atoms. We show that some effects that have been recently discussed in the context of "single-photon superradiance", or cooperative scattering in the linear-optics regime, can also be explained by "standard optics", i.e., using macroscopic quantities such as the susceptibility or the diffusion coefficient. We explain why some collective effects depend on the atomic density, and others on the optical depth. In particular, we show that, for a large and dilute atomic sample driven by a far-detuned laser, the decay of the fluorescence, which exhibits superradiant and subradiant dynamics, depends only on the on-resonance optical depth. We also discuss the link between concepts that are independently studied in the quantum-optics community and i...

  9. Stochastic methods for light propagation and recurrent scattering in saturated and nonsaturated atomic ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Mark D; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2016-01-01

    We derive equations for the strongly coupled system of light and dense atomic ensembles. The formalism includes an arbitrary internal level structure for the atoms and is not restricted to weak excitation of atoms by light. In the low light intensity limit for atoms with a single electronic ground state, the full quantum field-theoretical representation of the model can be solved exactly by means of classical stochastic electrodynamics simulations for stationary atoms that represent cold atomic ensembles. Simulations for the optical response of atoms in a quantum degenerate regime require one to synthesize a stochastic ensemble of atomic positions that generates the corresponding quantum statistical position correlations between the atoms. In the case of multiple ground levels or at light intensities where saturation becomes important, the classical simulations require approximations that neglect quantum fluctuations between the levels. We show how the model is extended to incorporate corrections due to quant...

  10. Quantum manipulation and enhancement of deterministic entanglement between atomic ensemble and light via coherent feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhihui; Jia, Xiaojun

    2017-06-01

    A quantum mechanical model of the non-measurement based coherent feedback control (CFC) is applied to deterministic atom-light entanglement with imperfect retrieval efficiency, which is generated based on Raman process. We investigate the influence of different experimental parameters on entanglement property of CFC Raman system. By tailoring the transmissivity of coherent feedback controller, it is possible to manipulate the atom-light entanglement. Particularly, we show that CFC allows atom-light entanglement enhancement under appropriate operating conditions. Our work can provide entanglement source between atomic ensemble and light of high quality for high-fidelity quantum networks and quantum computation based on atomic ensemble.

  11. Entanglement of light-shift compensated atomic spin waves with telecom light

    CERN Document Server

    Dudin, Y O; Zhao, R; Blumoff, J Z; Kennedy, T A B; Kuzmich, A

    2010-01-01

    Entanglement of a 795 nm light polarization qubit and an atomic Rb spin wave qubit for a storage time of 0.1 s is observed by measuring the violation of Bell's inequality (S = 2.65 \\pm 0.12). Long qubit storage times are achieved by pinning the spin wave in a 1064 nm wavelength optical lattice, with a magic-valued magnetic field superposed to eliminate lattice-induced dephasing. Four-wave mixing in a cold Rb gas is employed to perform light qubit conversion between near infra red (795 nm) and telecom (1367 nm) wavelengths, and after propagation in a telecom fiber, to invert the conversion process. Observed Bell inequality violation (S = 2.66 \\pm 0.09), at 10 ms storage, confirms preservation of memory/light entanglement through the two stages of light qubit frequency conversion.

  12. Light-mediated non-Gaussian entanglement of atomic ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Olov; Byrnes, Tim

    2017-04-01

    We analyze a similar scheme for producing light-mediated entanglement between atomic ensembles, as first realized by Julsgaard, Kozhekin, and Polzik [Nature (London) 413, 400 (2001), 10.1038/35096524]. In the standard approach to modeling the scheme, a Holstein-Primakoff approximation is made, where the atomic ensembles are treated as bosonic modes, and is only valid for short interaction times. In this paper, we solve the time evolution without this approximation, which extends the region of validity of the interaction time. For short entangling times, we find that this produces a state with characteristics similar to those of a two-mode squeezed state, in agreement with standard predictions. For long entangling times, the state evolves into a non-Gaussian form, and the characteristics of the two-mode squeezed state start to diminish. This is attributed to more exotic types of entangled states being generated. We characterize the states by examining the Fock-state probability distributions, Husimi Q distributions, and nonlocal entanglement between the ensembles. We compare and connect several quantities obtained by using the Holstein-Primakoff approach and our exact time evolution methods.

  13. Alignment dynamics of slow light diffusion in ultracold atomic $^{85}$Rb

    CERN Document Server

    Balik, S; Sukenik, C I; Havey, M D; Datsyuk, V M; Sokolov, I M; Kupriyanov, D V

    2014-01-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical investigation of time- and alignment-dependent propagation of light in an ultracold atomic gas of atomic $^{85}$Rb is reported. Coherences among the scattering amplitudes for light scattering off excited hyperfine levels produce strong variations of the light polarization in the vicinity of atomic resonance. Measurements are in excellent agreement with Monte-Carlo simulations of the multiple scattering process.

  14. Deciphering the "chemical" nature of the exotic isotopes of Hydrogen by the MC-QTAIM analysis: Positive Muon and Muonic Helium as new members of The Periodic Table

    CERN Document Server

    Goli, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    This report is a primarily survey on the chemical nature of the positively charged muon and muonic Helium (negatively charged muon plus Helium nucleus), as exotic isotopes of hydrogen, using the newly developed multi-component quantum theory of atoms in molecules (MC-QTAIM) analysis. To perform the analysis, the non-Born-Oppenhiemer (non-BO) ab initio methodology termed the fully variational multi-component molecular orbital method (FV-MC_MO) is used to deduce non-BO wavefunctions of various three and four-component molecular systems, as isotopomers of the orthodox hydrogen molecule, replacing proton(s) with muon, deuterium, tritium and muonic Helium. The derived three-component non-BO wavefunctions then are used for the "atoms in molecules" analysis within the context of the MC-QTAIM framework. Using various asymmetric isotopomers of hydrogen molecule, it is demonstrated that both the positively charged muon and muonic Helium are capable to form atoms in molecules in the considered molecules; thus, they reta...

  15. Stochastic methods for light propagation and recurrent scattering in saturated and nonsaturated atomic ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mark D.; Jenkins, Stewart D.; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2016-06-01

    We derive equations for the strongly coupled system of light and dense atomic ensembles. The formalism includes an arbitrary internal-level structure for the atoms and is not restricted to weak excitation of atoms by light. In the low-light-intensity limit for atoms with a single electronic ground state, the full quantum field-theoretical representation of the model can be solved exactly by means of classical stochastic electrodynamics simulations for stationary atoms that represent cold atomic ensembles. Simulations for the optical response of atoms in a quantum degenerate regime require one to synthesize a stochastic ensemble of atomic positions that generates the corresponding quantum statistical position correlations between the atoms. In the case of multiple ground levels or at light intensities where saturation becomes important, the classical simulations require approximations that neglect quantum fluctuations between the levels. We show how the model is extended to incorporate corrections due to quantum fluctuations that result from virtual scattering processes. In the low-light-intensity limit, we illustrate the simulations in a system of atoms in a Mott-insulator state in a two-dimensional optical lattice, where recurrent scattering of light induces strong interatomic correlations. These correlations result in collective many-atom subradiant and superradiant states and a strong dependence of the response on the spatial confinement within the lattice sites.

  16. The muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and the proton radius

    CERN Document Server

    Peset, Clara

    2014-01-01

    We obtain a model independent expression for the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift up to $\\mathcal O (m_\\mu \\alpha^6, m_\\mu \\alpha^5 \\frac{m_\\mu^2}{m_\\rho^2})$. The hadronic effects are controlled by the chiral theory, which allows for their model independent determination. We give their complete expression including the pion and Delta particles. Out of this analysis and the experimental measurement of the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift we determine the electromagnetic proton radius: $r_p$=0.8412(15) fm. This number is at 6.8$\\sigma$ variance with respect to the CODATA value. The parametric control of the uncertainties allows us to obtain a model independent determination of the error, which is dominated by hadronic effects.

  17. Nuclear structure contribution to the Lamb shift in muonic deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, Carl E; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We consider the two-photon exchange contribution to the $2P-2S$ Lamb shift in muonic deuterium in the framework of forward dispersion relations. The dispersion integrals are evaluated using experimental data on elastic deuteron form factors and inelastic electron-deuteron scattering, both in the quasielastic and hadronic range. The subtraction constant that is required to ensure convergence of the dispersion relation for the forward Compton amplitude $T_1(\

  18. Hadronic deuteron polarizability contribution the hyperfine structure in muonic deuterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eskin A.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The calculation of the contribution to the polarizability of the nucleus to hyperfine structure of muonic hydrogen is carried out within the unitary isobar model and on the basis of experimental data on the structure functions of deep inelastic lepton-proton and lepton-deuteron scattering. The calculation of virtual absorption cross sections of transversely and longitudinally polarized photons by nucleons in the resonance region is performed in the framework of the program MAID.

  19. Single pion contribution to the hyperfine splitting in muonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Huong, Nguyen Thu; Moussallam, Bachir

    2015-01-01

    We consider the simple one-pion exchange (Yukawa potential) contribution to the 2S hyperfine splitting in muonic hydrogen which had, until recently, been disregarded. We evaluate the relevant vertex amplitudes, in particular $\\pi^0\\mu^+\\mu^-$, combining low energy chiral expansions together with experimental data on $\\pi^0$ and $\\eta$ decays. The result for the 2S HFS is found to be small but not irrelevant.

  20. Collisional Cooling of Light Ions by Cotrapped Heavy Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Sourav; Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S A

    2017-03-17

    We experimentally demonstrate cooling of trapped ions by collisions with cotrapped, higher-mass neutral atoms. It is shown that the lighter ^{39}K^{+} ions, created by ionizing ^{39}K atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT), when trapped in an ion trap and subsequently allowed to cool by collisions with ultracold, heavier ^{85}Rb atoms in a MOT, exhibit a longer trap lifetime than without the localized ^{85}Rb MOT atoms. A similar cooling of trapped ^{85}Rb^{+} ions by ultracold ^{133}Cs atoms in a MOT is also demonstrated in a different experimental configuration to validate this mechanism of ion cooling by localized and centered ultracold neutral atoms. Our results suggest that the cooling of ions by localized cold atoms holds for any mass ratio, thereby enabling studies on a wider class of atom-ion systems irrespective of their masses.

  1. Fidelity of quantum state for interacting system of light field and atomic Bose-Einstein condensate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunjia Huang; Ming Zhou; Fanzhi Kong; Jiayuan Fang; Kewei Mo

    2005-01-01

    @@ The evolution characteristics of quantum state fidelity in an interacting system of single-mode light field and atomic Bose-Einstein condensate have been studied and the influence of the initial light field intensity and the interaction among atoms of Bose-Einstein condensate on the quantum state fidelity respectively have been discussed.

  2. Resonance-Radiation Force Exerted by a Circularly Polarized Light on an Atomic Wave Packet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Yong-Hua; ZENG Gao-Jian; LI Jin-Hui

    2006-01-01

    We study the behaviour of an atomic wave packet in a circularly polarized light, and especially give the calculation of the radiative force exerted by the circularly polarized light on the atomic wave packet under the resonance condition. A general method of the calculation is presented and the result is interesting. For example, under the condition that the wave packet is very narrow or/and the interaction is very strong, no matter whether the atom is initially in its ground state or excited state, as time approaches to infinity, the resonance-radiation force exerted by the light on the atom approaches to zero. If the atom is initially in its ground state and excited state with the probability 1/2 respectively, and if the momentum density is a even function, then the resonance-radiation force exerted by the light on the atom is equal to zero.

  3. Non-perturbative evaluation of some QED contributions to the muonic hydrogen $\\bm{n=2}$ Lamb shift and hyperfine structure

    CERN Document Server

    Indelicato, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The largest contributions to the $n=2$ Lamb-shift, fine structure interval and $2s$ hyperfine structure of muonic hydrogen are calculated by exact numerical evaluations of the Dirac equation, rather than by a perturbation expansion in powers of $1/c$, in the framework of non-relativistic quantum electrodynamics. Previous calculations and the validity of the perturbation expansion for light elements are confirmed. The dependence of the various effects on the nuclear size and model are studied

  4. Comparative Sensitivities of Gravitational Wave Detectors Based on Atom Interferometers and Light Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.; Thorpe, J. I.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, non-inertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe. Whether this potential advantage outweighs the additional complexity associated with including atom interferometers will require further study.

  5. Atomic Interaction Effects on Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Slow Light in Ultracold Bose Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡正峰; 杜春光; 李代军; 李师群

    2002-01-01

    We investigate electromagnetically induced transparency and slow group velocity of light in ultracold Bose gas with a two-photon Raman process. The properties of electromagnetically induced transparency and light speed can be changed by controlling the atomic interaction. Atomic interaction can be used as a knob to control the optical properties of atomic media. This can be realized in experiment by using the Feshbach resonance technique.

  6. QUANTUM STATISTICS OF AN ATOM LASER IN THEPRESENCE OF A STRONG INPUT LIGHT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING HUI; MIAO YUAN-XIU; HAN YI-ANG

    2001-01-01

    Within the framework of quantum dynamical theory, we present a new method to control the quantum statistics of an atom laser by applying a powerful input light. Differing from the case in the rotating wave approximation, the non-classical properties can appear in the output atom laser beam with the evolution of time. By choosing a suitable phase of the input light, it is capable of realizing a steady and brighter output of coherent atom laser.

  7. Atom-light interactions in quasi-one-dimensional nanostructures: A Green's-function perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asenjo-Garcia, A.; Hood, J. D.; Chang, D. E.; Kimble, H. J.

    2017-03-01

    Based on a formalism that describes atom-light interactions in terms of the classical electromagnetic Green's function, we study the optical response of atoms and other quantum emitters coupled to one-dimensional photonic structures, such as cavities, waveguides, and photonic crystals. We demonstrate a clear mapping between the transmission spectra and the local Green's function, identifying signatures of dispersive and dissipative interactions between atoms. We also demonstrate the applicability of our analysis to problems involving three-level atoms, such as electromagnetically induced transparency. Finally we examine recent experiments, and anticipate future observations of atom-atom interactions in photonic band gaps.

  8. Stimulated Emission of an Atom in Circularly Polarized Light

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李锦茴; 曾高坚; 叶永华

    2003-01-01

    We study the stimulated emission of a two-level atom in an electromagnetic wave of circular polarization. The correlation function G(r1t, r2t) = of atom radiation fields at dipole approximation are computed. Under the resonance condition, the atom stimulated emission is influenced by the circularly polarized electromagnetic wave discussed. We have found that the time-averaged value of energy density does not depend on the initial conditions. We have also deduced the relation between the emission power of an atom and the Rabi frequency Ω.

  9. Observing random walks of atoms in buffer gas through resonant light absorption

    CERN Document Server

    Aoki, Kenichiro

    2016-01-01

    Using resonant light absorption, random walk motions of rubidium atoms in nitrogen buffer gas are observed directly. The transmitted light intensity through atomic vapor is measured and its spectrum is obtained, down to orders of magnitude below the shot noise level to detect fluctuations caused by atomic motions. To understand the measured spectra, the spectrum for atoms performing random walks in a gaussian light beam is computed and its analytical form is obtained. The spectrum has $1/f^2$ ($f$: frequency) behavior at higher frequencies, crossing over to a different, but well defined behavior at lower frequencies. The properties of this theoretical spectrum agree excellently with the measured spectrum. This understanding also enables us to obtain the diffusion constant, the photon cross section of atoms in buffer gas and the atomic number density, from a single spectral measurement. We further discuss other possible applications of our experimental method and analysis.

  10. Theory of light-matter interactions in cascade and diamond type atomic ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Jen, Hsiang-Hua

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigate the quantum mechanical interaction of light with matter in the form of a gas of ultracold atoms: the atomic ensemble. We present a theoretical analysis of two problems, which involve the interaction of quantized electromagnetic fields (called signal and idler) with the atomic ensemble (i) cascade two-photon emission in an atomic ladder configuration, and (ii) photon frequency conversion in an atomic diamond configuration. The motivation of these studies comes from potential applications in long-distance quantum communication where it is desirable to generate quantum correlations between telecommunication wavelength light fields and ground level atomic coherences. We develop a theory of correlated signal-idler pair correlation. The analysis is complicated by the possible generation of multiple excitations in the atomic ensemble. An analytical treatment is given in the limit of a single excitation assuming adiabatic laser excitations. The analysis predicts superradiant timescales ...

  11. Collisional cooling of light ions by co-trapped heavy atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Sourav; Rangwala, S A

    2015-01-01

    The most generic cooling and thermalization pathway at the lowest temperatures is via elastic collisions. In hybrid ion-atom traps, ion cooling to temperatures where low partial wave collisions dominate require the collisional cooling mechanism to be well understood and controlled. There exists great uncertainty on whether cooling of light ions by heavier neutral atoms is possible. Here we experimentally demonstrate the cooling of light ions by co-trapped heavy atoms for the first time. We show that trapped 39K+ ions are cooled by localized ultracold neutral 85Rb atoms for an ion-atom mass ratio where most theoretical models predict ion heating. We demonstrate, based on detailed numerical simulation of our ion-cooling model, which is in excellent agreement with experiments, that cooling of ions by localized cold atoms is possible for any mass ratio. Our result opens up the possibility of studying quantum collisions and chemistry in trapped atom-ion systems.

  12. Comparison of Atom Interferometers and Light Interferometers as Space-Based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2012-01-01

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, non-inertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g. multiple arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe.

  13. Comparison of atom interferometers and light interferometers as space-based gravitational wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G; Thorpe, J I

    2012-05-25

    We consider a class of proposed gravitational-wave detectors based on multiple atomic interferometers separated by large baselines and referenced by common laser systems. We compute the sensitivity limits of these detectors due to intrinsic phase noise of the light sources, noninertial motion of the light sources, and atomic shot noise and compare them to sensitivity limits for traditional light interferometers. We find that atom interferometers and light interferometers are limited in a nearly identical way by intrinsic phase noise and that both require similar mitigation strategies (e.g., multiple-arm instruments) to reach interesting sensitivities. The sensitivity limit from motion of the light sources is slightly different and, in principle, favors the atom interferometers in the low-frequency limit, although the limit in both cases is severe.

  14. Optical-bistability-enabled control of resonant light transmission for an atom-cavity system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Rahul; Rangwala, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    The control of light transmission through a standing-wave Fabry-Pérot cavity containing atoms is theoretically and numerically investigated, when the cavity mode beam and an intersecting control beam are both close to specific atomic resonances. A four-level atomic system is considered and its interaction with the cavity mode is studied by solving for the cavity field and atomic state populations. The conditions for optical bistability of the atom-cavity system are obtained. The response of the intracavity intensity to an intersecting beam on atomic resonance is understood in the presence of stationary atoms (closed system) and nonstatic atoms (open system) in the cavity. The nonstatic system of atoms is modelled by adjusting the atomic state populations to represent the exchange of atoms in the cavity mode, which corresponds to a thermal environment where atoms are moving in and out of the cavity mode volume. The control behavior with three- and two-level atomic systems is also studied, and the rich physics arising out of these systems for closed and open atomic systems is discussed. The solutions to the models are used to interpret the steady-state and transient behavior observed by Sharma et al. [Phys. Rev. A 91, 043824 (2015)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.91.043824.

  15. Trapping of Atoms by the Counter-Propagating Stochastic Light Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Romanenko, Victor I

    2016-01-01

    We show that the field of counter-propagating stochastic light waves, one of which repeats the other, can form an one-dimension trap for atoms. The confinement of an ensemble of atoms in the trap and their simultaneous cooling can be achieved without using auxiliary fields. The temperature of the atomic ensemble depends on the autocorrelation time of the waves, their intensity and the detuning of the carrier frequency of the waves from the atomic transition frequency. The numerical simulation is carried out for sodium atoms.

  16. Lamb shift in muonic ions of lithium, beryllium, and boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutov, A. A.; Martynenko, A. P.; Martynenko, F. A.; Sukhorukova, O. S.

    2016-12-01

    We present a precise calculation of the Lamb shift (2 P1 /2-2 S1 /2) in muonic ions (μ36Li) 2 +,(μ37Li) 2 + , (μ49Be) 3 +,(μ410Be) 3 + , (μ510B) 4 +,(μ511B) 4 + . The contributions of orders α3÷α6 to the vacuum polarization, nuclear structure and recoil, and relativistic effects are taken into account. Our numerical results are consistent with previous calculations and improved by additional corrections. The obtained results can be used for the comparison with future experimental data, and extraction more accurate values of nuclear charge radii.

  17. Hyperfine structure of S-states of muonic tritium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martynenko F.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of quasipotential method in quantum electrodynamics we carry out a precise calculation of hyperfine splitting of S-states in muonic tritium. The one-loop and two-loop vacuum polarization corrections, relativistic effects, nuclear structure corrections in first and second orders of perturbation theory are taken into account. The contributions to hyperfine structure are obtained in integral form and calculated analytically and numerically. Obtained results for hyperfine splitting can be used for a comparison with future experimental data of CREMA collaboration.

  18. Optical bistability enabled control of resonant light transmission for an atom-cavity system

    CERN Document Server

    Sawant, Rahul

    2015-01-01

    The control of light transmission through a Fabry-Perot cavity containing atoms is theoretically investigated, when the cavity mode beam and an intersecting control beam are both close to specific atomic resonances. A four-level atomic system is considered and its interaction with the cavity mode is studied by solving for the time dependent cavity field and atomic state populations. The conditions for optical bistability of the atom-cavity system are obtained in steady state limit. For an ensemble of atoms in the cavity mode, the response of the intra-cavity light intensity to the intersecting resonant beam is understood for stationary atoms (closed system) and non-static atoms (open system). The open system is modelled by adjusting the atomic state populations to represent the exchange of atoms in the cavity mode, with the thermal environment. The solutions to the model are used to qualitatively explain the observed steady state and transient behaviour of the light in the cavity mode, in Sharma et. al. [1]. ...

  19. Interference and dynamics of light from a distance-controlled atom pair in an optical cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Neuzner, Andreas; Morin, Olivier; Ritter, Stephan; Rempe, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Interference is central to quantum physics and occurs when indistinguishable paths exist, like in a double-slit experiment. Replacing the two slits with two single atoms introduces optical non-linearities for which nontrivial interference phenomena are predicted. Their observation, however, has been hampered by difficulties in preparing the required atomic distribution, controlling the optical phases and detecting the faint light. Here we overcome all of these experimental challenges by combining an optical lattice for atom localisation, an imaging system with single-site resolution, and an optical resonator for light steering. We observe resonator-induced saturation of resonance fluorescence for constructive interference of the scattered light and nonzero emission with huge photon bunching for destructive interference. The latter is explained by atomic saturation and photon pair generation. Our experimental setting is scalable and allows one to realize the Tavis-Cummings model for any number of atoms and pho...

  20. Momentum Exchange between Light and a Single Atom: Abraham or Minkowski?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, E A; Barnett, Stephen M

    2009-02-06

    We consider forces on an atom due to a plane-wave light pulse. The standard view of the optical dipole force indicates that red-detuned light should attract the atom towards high intensity. While the atom is inside the pulse, this would increase the average momentum per photon from p_{0} to p_{0}n, where n is the average refractive index due to the presence of the atom. We show, however, that this is the wrong conclusion and that the dispersive forces repel the atom from the light in this particular case, giving the photons a momentum p_{0}/n. This leads us to identify Abraham's optical momentum with the kinetic momentum transfer. The form due to Minkowski is similarly associated with the canonical momentum. We consider the possibility of demonstrating this in the laboratory, and we note an unexpected connection with the Aharonov-Casher effect.

  1. Fluid description of the cooperative scattering of light by spherical atomic clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Piovella, N; Courteille, Ph W

    2013-01-01

    When a cold atomic gas is illuminated by a quasi-resonant laser beam, light-induced dipole-dipole correlations make the scattering of light a cooperative process. Once a fluid description is adopted for the atoms, many scattering properties are captured by the definition of a complex refractive index. The solution of the scattering problem is here presented for spherical atomic clouds of arbitrary density profiles, such as parabolic densities characteristic of ultra-cold clouds. A new solution for clouds with infinite boundaries is derived, that is particularly useful for the Gaussian densities of thermal atomic clouds. The presence of Mie resonances, a signature of the cloud acting as a cavity for the light, is discussed. These resonances leave their fingerprint in various observables such as the scattered intensity or in the radiation pressure force, and can be observed by tuning the frequency of the incident laser field or the atom number.

  2. Development of Laser Light Sources for Trapping Radioactive Francium Atoms Toward Tests of Fundamental Symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Ken-ichi; Ezure, Saki; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Kato, Ko; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Inoue, Takeshi; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aoki, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Aiko; Itoh, Masatoshi; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takatoshi; Hatakeyama, Atsushi; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Imai, Kenichi; Murakami, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Sato, Tomoya; Wakasa, Tomotsugu; Yoshida, Hidetomo P.; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    We have developed laser light sources and a magneto-optical trap system for cooling and trapping radioactive francium (Fr) atoms. Because Fr is the heaviest alkali element, a Fr atom exhibits high sensitivity to symmetry violation effects such as atomic parity nonconservation (APNC) and the electron electric dipole moment (eEDM). A laser cooling and trapping technique reduces the systematic errors due to the Doppler effect and the motion-induced magnetic field effect caused by the velocity of atoms. Thus, optically cooled and trapped Fr atoms are among a few promising candidates considered for APNC and eEDM measurements. Frequency stabilization of laser light is required for any stable measurement involving trapped radioactive atoms, including Fr. Since the hyperfine splitting in iodine molecules (127I2) is close to the resonance frequency of the Fr D2 line, we performed frequency modulation spectroscopy of hyperfine structures of I2.

  3. Light-induced gauge fields for ultracold atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, N; Juzeliūnas, G; Öhberg, P; Spielman, I B

    2014-12-01

    Gauge fields are central in our modern understanding of physics at all scales. At the highest energy scales known, the microscopic universe is governed by particles interacting with each other through the exchange of gauge bosons. At the largest length scales, our Universe is ruled by gravity, whose gauge structure suggests the existence of a particle-the graviton-that mediates the gravitational force. At the mesoscopic scale, solid-state systems are subjected to gauge fields of different nature: materials can be immersed in external electromagnetic fields, but they can also feature emerging gauge fields in their low-energy description. In this review, we focus on another kind of gauge field: those engineered in systems of ultracold neutral atoms. In these setups, atoms are suitably coupled to laser fields that generate effective gauge potentials in their description. Neutral atoms 'feeling' laser-induced gauge potentials can potentially mimic the behavior of an electron gas subjected to a magnetic field, but also, the interaction of elementary particles with non-Abelian gauge fields. Here, we review different realized and proposed techniques for creating gauge potentials-both Abelian and non-Abelian-in atomic systems and discuss their implication in the context of quantum simulation. While most of these setups concern the realization of background and classical gauge potentials, we conclude with more exotic proposals where these synthetic fields might be made dynamical, in view of simulating interacting gauge theories with cold atoms.

  4. Light-induced gauge fields for ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, N.; Juzeliūnas, G.; Öhberg, P.; Spielman, I. B.

    2014-12-01

    Gauge fields are central in our modern understanding of physics at all scales. At the highest energy scales known, the microscopic universe is governed by particles interacting with each other through the exchange of gauge bosons. At the largest length scales, our Universe is ruled by gravity, whose gauge structure suggests the existence of a particle—the graviton—that mediates the gravitational force. At the mesoscopic scale, solid-state systems are subjected to gauge fields of different nature: materials can be immersed in external electromagnetic fields, but they can also feature emerging gauge fields in their low-energy description. In this review, we focus on another kind of gauge field: those engineered in systems of ultracold neutral atoms. In these setups, atoms are suitably coupled to laser fields that generate effective gauge potentials in their description. Neutral atoms ‘feeling’ laser-induced gauge potentials can potentially mimic the behavior of an electron gas subjected to a magnetic field, but also, the interaction of elementary particles with non-Abelian gauge fields. Here, we review different realized and proposed techniques for creating gauge potentials—both Abelian and non-Abelian—in atomic systems and discuss their implication in the context of quantum simulation. While most of these setups concern the realization of background and classical gauge potentials, we conclude with more exotic proposals where these synthetic fields might be made dynamical, in view of simulating interacting gauge theories with cold atoms.

  5. Calculating the Finite-Speed-of-Light Effect in Atom Gravimeters with General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Yu-Jie

    2016-01-01

    This work mainly presents a relativistic analytical calculating method for the finite speed-of-light effect in atom gravimeters, which can simplify the deriva- tion and give a more complete expression for the associated correction.

  6. Dispersion relations for stationary light in one-dimensional atomic ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakoupov, Ivan; Ott, Johan R.; Chang, Darrick E.; Sørensen, Anders S.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the dispersion relations for light coupled to one-dimensional ensembles of atoms with different level schemes. The unifying feature of all the considered setups is that the forward and backward propagating quantum fields are coupled by the applied classical drives such that the group velocity can vanish in an effect known as "stationary light." We derive the dispersion relations for all the considered schemes, highlighting the important differences between them. Furthermore, we show that additional control of stationary light can be obtained by treating atoms as discrete scatterers and placing them at well-defined positions. For the latter purpose, a multimode transfer matrix theory for light is developed.

  7. Atom-light interactions in quasi-1D nanostructures: a Green's function perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Asenjo-Garcia, A; Chang, D E; Kimble, H J

    2016-01-01

    Based on a formalism that describes atom-light interactions in terms of the classical electromagnetic Green's function, we study the optical response of atoms and other quantum emitters coupled to one-dimensional photonic structures, such as cavities, waveguides, and photonic crystals. We demonstrate a clear mapping between the transmission spectra and the local Green's function that allows to identify signatures of dispersive and dissipative interactions between atoms, gaining insight into recent experiments.

  8. Controlling quantum coherence of atom laser by light with strong strength

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING; Hui(景辉); GE; Molin(葛墨林); GE; Molin(葛墨林)

    2002-01-01

    A new method for controlling the quantum coherence of atom laser by applying input light with strong strength is presented within the framework of quantum dynamical theory. Unlike the case of rotating wave approximation(RWA), we show that the non-classical properties, such as sub-Poisson distribution and quadrature squeezed effect, can appear in the output atom laser beam with time. By choosing suitable initial RF phase, a steady and brighter output of squeezed coherent atom laser is also available.

  9. Excitation of a single atom with exponentially rising light pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Aljunid, Syed Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the interaction between a single atom and optical pulses in a coherent state with a controlled temporal envelope. In a comparison between a rising exponential and a square envelope, we show that the rising exponential envelope leads to a higher excitation probability for fixed low average photon numbers, in accordance to a time-reversed Weisskopf-Wigner model. We characterize the atomic transition dynamics for a wide range of the average photon numbers, and are able to saturate the optical transition of a single atom with ~50 photons in a pulse by a strong focusing technique. For photon numbers of ~1000 in a 15ns long pulse, we clearly observe Rabi oscillations.

  10. Dynamics of spontaneous radiation of atoms scattered by a resonance standing light wave

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fedorov, MV; Efremov, MA; Yakovlev, VP; Schleich, WP

    2003-01-01

    The scattering of atoms by a resonance standing light wave is considered under conditions when the lower of two resonance levels is metastable, while the upper level rapidly decays due to mainly spontaneous radiative transitions to the nonresonance levels of an atom. The diffraction scattering regim

  11. Classical-field description of the quantum effects in the light-atom interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Rashkovskiy, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    In this paper I show that light-atom interaction can be described using purely classical field theory without any quantization. In particular, atom excitation by light that accounts for damping due to spontaneous emission is fully described in the framework of classical field theory. I show that three well-known laws of the photoelectric effect can also be derived and that all of its basic properties can be described within classical field theory.

  12. Light assisted collisions with cold metastable neon atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, R D; Laban, D E; Sang, R T, E-mail: R.Sang@griffith.edu.a [Centre for Quantum Dynamics, Griffith University, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia)

    2009-11-01

    Control of the combined Penning and associative ionization cross section is demonstrated with cold ({approx}1mK) metastable Ne (3s{sup 3}P{sub 2}) atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). By illuminating the trapped atoms with a near resonant probe laser beam, increased ionization rates are observed at several detunings. The probe beam is swept through a region from +500MHz to -500MHz. The increase in the Penning and associative ionization cross section is observed in both the red and blue regions of the spectrum.

  13. Muonic hydrogen cascade time and lifetime of the short-lived $2S$ state

    CERN Document Server

    Ludhova, L; Antognini, A; Biraben, F; Cardoso, J M R; Conde, C A N; Dax, A; Dhawan, S; Dos Santos, J M F; Fernandes, L M P; Hughes, V W; Hänsch, T W; Indelicato, P J; Julien, L; Knowles, P E; Kottmann, F; Liu, Y W; Lopes, J A M; Monteiro, C M B; Mulhauser, F; Nez, F; Pohl, R; Rabinowitz, P; Schaller, L A; Schwob, C; Taqqu, D; Veloso, J F C A

    2006-01-01

    Metastable ${2S}$ muonic-hydrogen atoms undergo collisional ${2S}$-quenching, with rates which depend strongly on whether the $\\mu p$ kinetic energy is above or below the ${2S}\\to {2P}$ energy threshold. Above threshold, collisional ${2S} \\to {2P}$ excitation followed by fast radiative ${2P} \\to {1S}$ deexcitation is allowed. The corresponding short-lived $\\mu p ({2S})$ component was measured at 0.6 hPa $\\mathrm{H}_2$ room temperature gas pressure, with lifetime $\\tau_{2S}^\\mathrm{short} = 165 ^{+38}_{-29}$ ns (i.e., $\\lambda_{2S}^\\mathrm{quench} = 7.9 ^{+1.8}_{-1.6} \\times 10^{12} \\mathrm{s}^{-1}$ at liquid-hydrogen density) and population $\\epsilon_{2S}^\\mathrm{short} = 1.70^{+0.80}_{-0.56}$ % (per $\\mu p$ atom). In addition, a value of the $\\mu p$ cascade time, $T_\\mathrm{cas}^{\\mu p} = (37\\pm5)$ ns, was found.

  14. 2S-2P Lamb shift and 2S hyperfine splitting in muonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Antognini, Aldo; Biraben, François; Indelicato, Paul; Nez, François; Pohl, Randolf

    2012-01-01

    The 7 standard deviations between the proton rms charge radius from muonic hydrogen and the CODATA-10 value from hydrogen spectroscopy and electron-scattering has caused considerable discussions. Here, we review the theory of the 2S-2P Lamb shift and 2S hyperfine splitting in muonic hydrogen combining the published contributions and theoretical approaches. The prediction of these quantities is necessary for the determination of both proton charge and Zemach radii from the two 2S-2P transition frequencies measured in muonic hydrogen.

  15. Light-Shifts of an Integrated Filter-Cell Rubidium Atomic Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-25

    rubidium atomic clock and basic research, Phys. Today , 60(11), 33-39 (2007). 2. R. T. Dupuis, T. J. Lynch, and J. R. Vaccaro, Rubidium frequency...AEROSPACE REPORT NO. TOR-2015-02236 Light-Shifts of an Integrated Filter-Cell Rubidium Atomic Clock May 25, 2015 James C. Camparo...COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Light-Shifts of an Integrated Filter-Cell Rubidium Atomic Clock 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8802-14-C-0001 5b

  16. Correlations in light propagation in one-dimensional waveguides for classical and quantum degenerate atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Ruostekoski, Janne

    2016-01-01

    We study the transmission of light through a one-dimensional waveguide that confines strongly coupled classical or quantum degenerate fermionic atomic ensembles. The emergence of light-induced correlation effects between the atoms is analyzed by using stochastic Monte-Carlo simulations and transfer matrix methods of transport theory. The conditions of the correlated collective response are identified in terms of the atom density, thermal broadening, and photon losses. We also calculate the "cooperative Lamb shift" for the waveguide transmission resonance, and discuss line shifts that are specific to effectively one-dimensional waveguide systems.

  17. Magnetic-field-driven localization of light in a cold-atom gas

    CERN Document Server

    Skipetrov, S E

    2014-01-01

    We discover a transition from extended to localized quasi-modes for light in a gas of immobile two-level atoms in a magnetic field. The transition takes place either upon increasing the number density of atoms in a strong field or upon increasing the field at a high enough density. It has many characteristic features of a disorder-driven (Anderson) transition but is strongly influenced by near-field interactions between atoms and the anisotropy of the atomic medium induced by the magnetic field.

  18. Cold-atom physics using ultrathin optical fibers: light-induced dipole forces and surface interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagué, G; Vetsch, E; Alt, W; Meschede, D; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2007-10-19

    The strong evanescent field around ultrathin unclad optical fibers bears a high potential for detecting, trapping, and manipulating cold atoms. Introducing such a fiber into a cold-atom cloud, we investigate the interaction of a small number of cold cesium atoms with the guided fiber mode and with the fiber surface. Using high resolution spectroscopy, we observe and analyze light-induced dipole forces, van der Waals interaction, and a significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate of the atoms. The latter can be assigned to the modification of the vacuum modes by the fiber.

  19. Effects of losses in the atom-light hybrid SU(1,1) interferometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhao-Dan; Yuan, Chun-Hua; Ma, Hong-Mei; Li, Dong; Chen, L Q; Ou, Z Y; Zhang, Weiping

    2016-08-08

    Collective atomic excitation can be realized by the Raman scattering. Such a photon-atom interface can form an SU(1,1)-typed atom-light hybrid interferometer, where the atomic Raman amplification processes take the place of the beam splitting elements in a traditional Mach-Zehnder interferometer. We numerically calculate the phase sensitivities and the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of this interferometer with the method of homodyne detection and intensity detection, and give their differences of the optimal phase points to realize the best phase sensitivities and the maximal SNRs from these two detection methods. The difference of the effects of loss of light field and atomic decoherence on measure precision is analyzed.

  20. 75 FR 54400 - Florida Power and Light Company; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... COMMISSION Florida Power and Light Company; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Pursuant to...), and the Commission's regulations, see 10 CFR 2.104, 2.300, 2.303, 2.309, 2.311, 2.318, and 2.321... over the following proceeding: Florida Power & Light Company (Turkey Point Units 6 and 7)...

  1. Optical meta-atom for localization of light with quantized energy

    CERN Document Server

    Lannebère, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    The capacity to confine light into a small region of space is of paramount importance in many areas of modern science. Here, we suggest a mechanism to store a quantized "bit" of light - with a very precise amount of energy - in an open core-shell plasmonic structure ("meta-atom") with a nonlinear optical response. Notwithstanding the trapped light state is embedded in the radiation continuum, its lifetime is not limited by the radiation loss. Interestingly, it is shown that the interplay between the nonlinear response and volume plasmons enables breaking fundamental reciprocity restrictions, and coupling very efficiently an external light source to the meta-atom. The collision of an incident optical pulse with the meta-atom may be used to release the trapped radiation "bit".

  2. Electromagnetically induced transparency and nonlinear pulse propagation in a combined tripod and Λ atom-light coupling scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, H. R.; Ruseckas, J.; Juzeliūnas, G.

    2017-09-01

    We consider propagation of a probe pulse in an atomic medium characterized by a combined tripod and Lambda (Λ) atom-light coupling scheme. The scheme involves three atomic ground states coupled to two excited states by five light fields. It is demonstrated that dark states can be formed for such an atom-light coupling. This is essential for formation of the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and slow light. In the limiting cases the scheme reduces to conventional Λ- or N-type atom-light couplings providing the EIT or absorption, respectively. Thus, the atomic system can experience a transition from the EIT to the absorption by changing the amplitudes or phases of control lasers. Subsequently the scheme is employed to analyze the nonlinear pulse propagation using the coupled Maxwell-Bloch equations. It is shown that a generation of stable slow light optical solitons is possible in such a five-level combined tripod and Λ atomic system.

  3. Theoretical Study of the Effects of Di-Muonic Molecules on Muon-Catalyzed Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    MOLECULES ON MUON -CATALYZED FUSION DISSERTATION Eugene V. Sheely, Lieutenant Colonel, USA DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR UNIVERSITY...THEORETICAL STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF DI-MUONIC MOLECULES ON MUON -CATALYZED FUSION DISSERTATION Presented to the Faculty...potential of enhancing the muon -catalyzed fusion reaction rate. In order to study these di-muonic molecules a method of non-adiabatic quantum mechanics

  4. A search for effects on chemical isomerism in muonic X-ray spectra of propyl alcohol

    CERN Document Server

    Brandão d'Oliveira, A; Von Egidy, T

    1974-01-01

    The intensities of muonic X-ray transitions in n-propyl alcohol and isopropyl alcohol were measured. The experiment was performed at the muon channel of the 600 MeV synchrocyclotron at CERN. The spectra were evaluated by means of a standard computer program and by a technique to observe small differences between the propyl-alcohol spectra. No differences in the muonic spectra were observed within rather small experimental errors. (16 refs).

  5. Graphene-like optical light field and its interaction with two-level atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lembessis, V. E.; Courtial, Johannes; Radwell, N.; Selyem, A.; Franke-Arnold, S.; Aldossary, O. M.; Babiker, M.

    2015-12-01

    The theoretical basis leading to the creation of a light field with a hexagonal honeycomb structure resembling graphene is considered along with its experimental realization and its interaction with atoms. It is argued that associated with such a light field is an optical dipole potential which leads to the diffraction of the atoms, but the details depend on whether the transverse spread of the atomic wave packet is larger than the transverse dimensions of the optical lattice (resonant Kapitza-Dirac effect) or smaller (optical Stern-Gerlach effect). Another effect in this context involves the creation of gauge fields due to the Berry phase acquired by the atom moving in the light field. The experimental realization of the light field with a honeycomb hexagonal structure is described using holographic methods and we proceed to explore the atom diffraction in the Kapitza-Dirac regime as well as the optical Stern-Gerlach regime, leading to momentum distributions with characteristic but different hexagonal structures. The artificial gauge fields too are shown to have the same hexagonal spatial structure and their magnitude can be significantly large. The effects are discussed with reference to typical parameters for the atoms and the fields.

  6. Steps towards the hyperfine splitting measurement of the muonic hydrogen ground state: pulsed muon beam and detection system characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Adamczak, A; Bakalov, D; Baldazzi, G; Bertoni, R; Bonesini, M; Bonvicini, V; Campana, G; Carbone, R; Cervi, T; Chignoli, F; Clemenza, M; Colace, L; Curioni, A; Danailov, M; Danev, P; D'Antone, I; De, A; De, C; De, M; Furini, M; Fuschino, F; Gadejisso-Tossou, K; Guffanti, D; Iaciofano, A; Ishida, K; Iugovaz, D; Labanti, C; Maggi, V; Margotti, A; Marisaldi, M; Mazza, R; Meneghini, S; Menegolli, A; Mocchiutti, E; Moretti, M; Morgante, G; Nardò, R; Nastasi, M; Niemela, J; Previtali, E; Ramponi, R; Rachevski, A; P., L; Rossella, M; Rossi, P L; Somma, F; Stoilov, M; Stoychev, L; Tomaselli, A; Tortora, L; Vacchi, A; Vallazza, E; Zampa, G; Zuffa, M

    2016-01-01

    The high precision measurement of the hyperfine splitting of the muonic-hydrogen atom ground state with pulsed and intense muon beam requires careful technological choices both in the construction of a gas target and of the detectors. In June 2014, the pressurized gas target of the FAMU experiment was exposed to the low energy pulsed muon beam at the RIKEN RAL muon facility. The objectives of the test were the characterization of the target, the hodoscope and the X-ray detectors. The apparatus consisted of a beam hodoscope and X-rays detectors made with high purity Germanium and Lanthanum Bromide crystals. In this paper the experimental setup is described and the results of the detector characterization are presented.

  7. Lamb shift in muonic ions of lithium, beryllium and boron

    CERN Document Server

    Krutov, A A; Martynenko, F A; Sukhorukova, O S

    2016-01-01

    We present a precise calculation of the Lamb shift $(2P_{1/2}-2S_{1/2})$ in muonic ions $(\\mu ^6_3Li)^{2+},~(\\mu ^7_3Li)^{2+}$, $(\\mu ^9_4Be)^{3+},~(\\mu ^{10}_4Be)^{3+}$, $(\\mu ^{10}_5B)^{4+},~(\\mu ^{11}_5B)^{4+}$. The contributions of orders $\\alpha^3\\div\\alpha^6$ to the vacuum polarization, nuclear structure and recoil, relativistic effects are taken into account. Our numerical results are consistent with previous calculations and improve them due to account of new corrections. The obtained results can be used for the comparison with future experimental data, and extraction more accurate values of nuclear charge radii.

  8. Proton Polarizability Contribution: Muonic Hydrogen Lamb Shift and Elastic Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Gerald A

    2012-01-01

    The uncertainty in the computed contribution to the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen, DeltaE(subt) arising from proton polarizability effects entering in the two-photon exchange diagram at large virtual photon momenta is shown to be large enough to account for the proton radius puzzle. This is because the integral that determines DeltaE(subt) contains a logarithmic divergence. We evaluate this integral using a chosen form factor and also by using the dimensional regularization procedure which makes explicit the need for a low energy constant. The consequences of this new contribution to two photon exchange are approximately independent of the method of calculation and should be observable in a planned low energy lepton-proton scattering experiment planned to run at PSI.

  9. Theory of the Lamb shift in muonic helium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krutov, A. A.; Martynenko, A. P., E-mail: a.p.martynenko@samsu.ru; Martynenko, G. A. [Samara State University (Russian Federation); Faustov, R. N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Dorodnitsyn Computer Center (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-15

    The Lamb shift (2P{sub 1/2}-2S{sub 1/2}) in muonic helium ions (μ{sub 2}{sup 3}){sup +}, (μ{sup 2/4}He){sup +} is calculated taking into account the contributions of the order of α{sup 3}, α{sup 4}, α{sup 5}, and α{sup 6}. Special attention is paid to corrections for the polarization of the vacuum, as well as the structure and recoil of the nucleus. Numerical values 1259.8583 meV ((μ{sub 2}{sup 3}He){sup +}) and 1379.1107 meV ((μ{sub 2}{sup 4}He){sup +}) obtained for the shifts can be considered reliable estimates when compared to the experimental data of the CREMA collaboration.

  10. Proton polarizability contribution: Muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and elastic scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Gerald A., E-mail: miller@phys.washington.edu [Department of Physics, Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-3560 (United States)

    2013-01-08

    The uncertainty in the contribution to the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen, {Delta}E{sup subt} arising from proton polarizability effects in the two-photon exchange diagram at large virtual photon momenta is shown large enough to account for the proton radius puzzle. This is because {Delta}E{sup subt} is determined by an integrand that falls very slowly with very large virtual photon momenta. We evaluate the necessary integral using a set of chosen form factors and also a dimensional regularization procedure which makes explicit the need for a low energy constant. The consequences of our two-photon exchange interaction for low-energy elastic lepton-proton scattering are evaluated and could be observable in a planned low energy lepton-proton scattering experiment planned to run at PSI.

  11. Chiral perturbation theory of muonic hydrogen Lamb shift: polarizability contribution

    CERN Document Server

    Alarcón, Jose Manuel; Pascalutsa, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    The proton polarizability effect in the muonic-hydrogen Lamb shift comes out as a prediction of baryon chiral perturbation theory at leading order and our calculation yields for it: $\\Delta E^{(\\mathrm{pol})} (2P-2S) = 8^{+3}_{-1}\\, \\mu$eV. This result is consistent with most of evaluations based on dispersive sum rules, but is about a factor of two smaller than the recent result obtained in {\\em heavy-baryon} chiral perturbation theory. We also find that the effect of $\\Delta(1232)$-resonance excitation on the Lamb-shift is suppressed, as is the entire contribution of the magnetic polarizability; the electric polarizability dominates. Our results reaffirm the point of view that the proton structure effects, beyond the charge radius, are too small to resolve the `proton radius puzzle'.

  12. Multiple scattering of light in cold atomic clouds with a magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Sigwarth, Olivier; Delande, Dominique; Miniatura, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Starting from a microscopic theory for atomic scatterers, we describe the scattering of light by a single atom and study the coherent propagation of light in a cold atomic cloud in the presence of a magnetic field B in the mesoscopic regime. Non-pertubative expressions in B are given for the magneto-optical effects and optical anisotropy. We then consider the multiple scattering regime and address the fate of the coherent backscattering (CBS) effect. We show that, for atoms with nonzero spin in their ground state, the CBS interference contrast can be increased compared to its value when B=0, a result at variance with classical samples. We validate our theoretical results by a quantitative comparison with experimental data.

  13. Control of light trapping in a large atomic system by a static magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Skipetrov, S E; Havey, M D

    2016-01-01

    We propose to control light trapping in a large ensemble of cold atoms by an external, static magnetic field. For an appropriate choice of frequency and polarization of the exciting pulse, the field is expected to speed up the fluorescence of a dilute atomic system but can significantly slow it down in a dense ensemble. The slowing down of fluorescence is due to the excitation of spatially localized collective atomic states that appear only under a strong magnetic field and have exponentially long lifetimes. The control of fluorescence by the magnetic field may be of interest for use in future quantum-information processing devices. It also paves a way towards the experimental observation of the disorder-induced localization of light in cold atomic systems.

  14. Control of light trapping in a large atomic system by a static magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipetrov, S. E.; Sokolov, I. M.; Havey, M. D.

    2016-07-01

    We propose to control light trapping in a large ensemble of cold atoms by an external, static magnetic field. For an appropriate choice of frequency and polarization of the exciting pulse, the field is expected to speed up the fluorescence of a dilute atomic system. In a dense ensemble, the field does not affect the early-time superradiant signal but amplifies intensity oscillations at intermediate times and induces a very slow, nonexponential long-time decay. The slowing down of fluorescence is due to the excitation of spatially localized collective atomic states that appear only under a strong magnetic field and have exponentially long lifetimes. Our results therefore pave a way towards experimental observation of the disorder-induced localization of light in cold atomic systems.

  15. Coherence effects in scattering order expansion of light by atomic clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Rouabah, Mohamed-Taha; Bachelard, Romain; Courteille, Philippe W; Kaiser, Robin; Piovella, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    We interpret cooperative scattering by a collection of cold atoms as a multiple scattering process. Starting from microscopic equations describing the response of $N$ atoms to a probe light beam, we represent the total scattered field as an infinite series of multiple scattering events. As an application of the method, we obtain analytical expressions of the coherent intensity in the double scattering approximation for Gaussian density profiles. In particular, we quantify the contributions of coherent backward and forward scattering.

  16. Coherent and dynamic beam splitting based on light storage in cold atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Kwang-Kyoon Park; Tian-Ming Zhao; Jong-Chan Lee; Young-Tak Chough; Yoon-Ho Kim

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a coherent and dynamic beam splitter based on light storage in cold atoms. An input weak laser pulse is first stored in a cold atom ensemble via electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT). A set of counter-propagating control fields, applied at a later time, retrieves the stored pulse into two output spatial modes. The high visibility interference between the two output pulses clearly demonstrates that the beam splitting process is coherent. Furthermore, by manipulating the...

  17. Coherence effects in scattering order expansion of light by atomic clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouabah, Mohamed-Taha; Samoylova, Marina; Bachelard, Romain; Courteille, Philippe W; Kaiser, Robin; Piovella, Nicola

    2014-05-01

    We interpret cooperative scattering by a collection of cold atoms as a multiple-scattering process. Starting from microscopic equations describing the response of N atoms to a probe light beam, we represent the total scattered field as an infinite series of multiple-scattering events. As an application of the method, we obtain analytical expressions of the coherent intensity in the double-scattering approximation for Gaussian density profiles. In particular, we quantify the contributions of coherent backward and forward scattering.

  18. State-insensitive trapping of Rb atoms: linearly versus circularly polarized lights

    CERN Document Server

    Arora, Bindiya

    2012-01-01

    We study the cancellation of differential ac Stark shifts in the 5s and 5p states of rubidium atom using the linearly and circularly polarized lights by calculating their dynamic polarizabilities. Matrix elements were calculated using a relativistic coupled-cluster method at the single, double and important valence triple excitations approximation including all possible non-linear correlation terms. Some of the important matrix elements were further optimized using the experimental results available for the lifetimes and static polarizabilities of atomic states. "Magic wavelengths" are determined from the differential Stark shifts and results for the linearly polarized light are compared with the previously available results. Possible scope of facilitating state-insensitive optical trapping schemes using the magic wavelengths for circularly polarized light are discussed. Using the optimized matrix elements, the lifetimes of the 4d and 6s states of this atom are ameliorated.

  19. Multimode Raman light-atom interface in warm atomic ensemble as multiple three-mode quantum operations

    CERN Document Server

    Parniak, Michał; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the properties of a Raman quantum light-atom interface in long atomic ensemble and its applications as a quantum memory or two-mode squeezed state generator. We include both Stokes and anti-Stokes scattering and the effects of Doppler broadening in buffer gas assuming frequent velocity-averaging collisions. We find the Green functions describing multimode transformation from input to output fields of photons and atomic excitations. Proper mode basis is found via singular value decomposition. It reveals that triples of modes are coupled by a transformation equivalent to a combination of two beamsplitters and a two-mode squeezing operation. We analyze the possible transformations on an example of warm rubidium-87 vapor. We find that the fidelity of the mapping of a single excitation between the memory and light is strictly limited by the fractional contribution of the Stokes scattering in predominantly anti-Stokes process. The model we present bridges the gap between the Stokes only and anti-Stokes o...

  20. Independent-particle models for light negative atomic ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganas, P. S.; Talman, J. D.; Green, A. E. S.

    1980-01-01

    For the purposes of astrophysical, aeronomical, and laboratory application, a precise independent-particle model for electrons in negative atomic ions of the second and third period is discussed. The optimum-potential model (OPM) of Talman et al. (1979) is first used to generate numerical potentials for eight of these ions. Results for total energies and electron affinities are found to be very close to Hartree-Fock solutions. However, the OPM and HF electron affinities both depart significantly from experimental affinities. For this reason, two analytic potentials are developed whose inner energy levels are very close to the OPM and HF levels but whose last electron eigenvalues are adjusted precisely with the magnitudes of experimental affinities. These models are: (1) a four-parameter analytic characterization of the OPM potential and (2) a two-parameter potential model of the Green, Sellin, Zachor type. The system O(-) or e-O, which is important in upper atmospheric physics is examined in some detail.

  1. Cooling atomic ions with visible and infra-red light

    CERN Document Server

    Lindenfelser, F; Negnevitsky, V; Ragg, S; Home, J P

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the ability to load, cool and detect singly-charged calcium ions in a surface electrode trap using only visible and infrared lasers for the trapped-ion control. As opposed to the standard methods of cooling using dipole-allowed transitions, we combine power broadening of a quadrupole transition at 729 nm with quenching of the upper level using a dipole allowed transition at 854 nm. By observing the resulting 393 nm fluorescence we are able to perform background-free detection of the ion. We show that this system can be used to smoothly transition between the Doppler cooling and sideband cooling regimes, and verify theoretical predictions throughout this range. We achieve scattering rates which reliably allow recooling after collision events and allow ions to be loaded from a thermal atomic beam. This work is compatible with recent advances in optical waveguides, and thus opens a path in current technologies for large-scale quantum information processing. In situations where dielectric materials...

  2. A One-Dimensional Quantum Interface between a Few Atoms and Weak Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Béguin, Jean-Baptiste Sylvain

    the ability to explore spin-squeezing and quantum state tomography of non-classical states with negative Wigner functions, using a nanofiber. Finally, we report preliminary observations of collective atomic Bragg scattering in this extreme one-dimensional geometry, in view to realize a switchable atomic......Quantum interfaces between light and the collective degrees of freedom of an ensemble of identical atoms have been proposed as a valuable and promising alternative to cavity quantum electrodynamics enhanced interaction with single particles. Many features of the quantum world (e. g. multipartite...... entanglement, squeezed states), which are central to the future developments of Quantum Information Science and Metrology, can be explored with mesoscopic collective states of atoms. An efficient quantum interface needs a high optical depth for the atomic ensemble and a measurement sensitivity limited by both...

  3. Atom Transfer Radical Addition to Unactivated Alkenes Employing Heterogeneous Visible Light Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Liang-Liang; Cong, Huan

    2017-09-09

    Heterogeneous visible light photocatalysis represents an important direction toward the development of sustainable organic synthesis. In this Communication, we report visible light-induced, heavy metal-free atom transfer radical addition to unactivated terminal olefins using the combination of heterogeneous titanium dioxide as photocatalyst and a hypervalent iodine(III) reagent as co-initiator. The reaction can be applied to a range of substrates with good functional group tolerance under very mild condition. In addition to a number of commonly used atom transfer reagents, the relatively challenging chloroform is also suitable. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Coupling of effective one-dimensional two-level atoms to squeezed light

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, S; Clark, Stephen; Parkins, Scott

    2002-01-01

    A cavity QED system is analyzed which duplicates the dynamics of a two-level atom in free space interacting exclusively with broadband squeezed light. We consider atoms in a three or four-level Lambda-configuration coupled to a high-finesse optical cavity which is driven by a squeezed light field. Raman transitions are induced between a pair of stable atomic ground states via the squeezed cavity mode and coherent driving fields. An analysis of the reduced master equation for the atomic ground states shows that a three-level atomic system has insufficient parameter flexibility to act as an effective two-level atom interacting exclusively with a squeezed reservoir. However, the inclusion of a fourth atomic level, coupled dispersively to one of the two ground states by an auxiliary laser field, introduces an extra degree of freedom and enables the desired interaction to be realised. As a means of detecting the reduced quadrature decay rate of the effective two-level system, we examine the transmission spectrum o...

  5. Multi-wavelength holography with a single spatial light modulator for ultracold atom experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, David; Ireland, Philip; Bruce, Graham D; Cassettari, Donatella

    2015-04-06

    We demonstrate a method to independently and arbitrarily tailor the spatial profile of light of multiple wavelengths and we show possible applications to ultracold atoms experiments. A single spatial light modulator is programmed to create a pattern containing multiple spatially separated structures in the Fourier plane when illuminated with a single wavelength. When the modulator is illuminated with overlapped laser beams of different wavelengths, the position of the structures is wavelength-dependent. Hence, by designing their separations appropriately, a desired overlap of different structures at different wavelengths is obtained. We employ regional phase calculation algorithms and demonstrate several possible experimental scenarios by generating light patterns with 670 nm, 780 nm and 1064 nm laser light which are accurate to the level of a few percent. This technique is easily integrated into cold atom experiments, requiring little optical access.

  6. Opportunities and problems in determining proton and light nuclear radii

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N G Kelkar; M Nowakowski; D Bedoya Fierro

    2014-11-01

    We briefly review the so-called `proton puzzle’, i.e., the disagreement of the newly extracted value of the proton charge radius $r_p$ from muonic hydrogen spectroscopy with other extractions, its possible significance and related problems. After describing the conventional theory to extract the proton radius from atomic spectroscopy we focus on a novel consistent approach based on the Breit equation. With this new tool, we confirm that the radius has indeed become smaller compared to the value extracted from scattering experiments, but the existence of different theoretical approaches casts some doubt on the accuracy of the new value. Precision measurements in atomic physics do provide the opportunity to extract light nuclear radii but the accuracy is limited by the methods of incorporating the nuclear structure effects.

  7. Light scattering studies of solids and atomic vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, T.C.

    1978-09-01

    The general technique of light scattering and luminescence was used to study the properties of a number of material systems. First, multi-phonon resonant Raman scattering up to four phonons in GaSe and one- and two-phonon resonant Raman scattering in the mixed GaS/sub x/Se/sub 1-x/ crystals with x < or = 0.23 were investigated. Second, the observation of one-phonon resonant Raman scattering in HfS/sub 2/ is reported. The result is used to determine the position of the direct gap of HfS/sub 2/. Third, the first observation of the ..pi..-polarized one-magnon luminescence sideband of the /sup 4/T/sub lg/ (/sup 4/G) ..-->.. /sup 6/A/sub lg/(/sup 6/S) excitonic transition in antiferromagnetic MnF/sub 2/ is presented. An effective temperature of the crystal is deduced from the simultaneously observed anti-Stokes sideband emission. Multi-magnon (< or = 7) excitonic luminescence sidebands were also observed in MnF/sub 2/, KMnF/sub 2/, and RbMnF/sub 3/ using pulsed excitation and detection. A simple model based on two-ion local exchange is proposed to explain the results qualitatively. Fourth, the first observation of two-magnon resonant Raman scattering in MnF/sub 2/ around the magnon sidebands is reported. A simple theoretical description explains the experimental observations. Fifth, a detailed theory of exciton-exciton interaction in MnF/sub 2/ is developed to explain and to predict the experimental results on two-exciton absorption, high level excitation, and exciton--exciton scattering. Sixth, Brillouin scattering was used to obtain the five independent elastic constants of the layered compound GaSe. The results show clear elastic anisotropy of the crystal. Resonant Brillouin scattering near the absorption edge was also studied, but no resonant enhancement was found. Seventh, two-photon parametric scattering in sodium vapor was studied. Phase matching angles and scattering cross sections are calculated for a given set of experimental conditions.

  8. Detecting and locating light atoms from high-resolution STEM images: The quest for a single optimal design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonnissen, J; De Backer, A; den Dekker, A J; Sijbers, J; Van Aert, S

    2016-11-01

    In the present paper, the optimal detector design is investigated for both detecting and locating light atoms from high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (HR STEM) images. The principles of detection theory are used to quantify the probability of error for the detection of light atoms from HR STEM images. To determine the optimal experiment design for locating light atoms, use is made of the so-called Cramér-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB). It is investigated if a single optimal design can be found for both the detection and location problem of light atoms. Furthermore, the incoming electron dose is optimised for both research goals and it is shown that picometre range precision is feasible for the estimation of the atom positions when using an appropriate incoming electron dose under the optimal detector settings to detect light atoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Probing the energy flow in Bessel light beams using atomic photoionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surzhykov, A.; Seipt, D.; Fritzsche, S.

    2016-09-01

    The growing interest in twisted light beams also requires a better understanding of their complex internal structure. Particular attention is currently being given to the energy circulation in these beams as usually described by the Poynting vector field. In the present study we propose to use the photoionization of alkali-metal atoms as a probe process to measure (and visualize) the energy flow in twisted light fields. Such measurements are possible since the angular distribution of photoelectrons, emitted from a small atomic target, appears sensitive to and is determined by the local direction of the Poynting vector. To illustrate the feasibility of the proposed method, detailed calculations were performed for the ionization of sodium atoms by nondiffractive Bessel beams.

  10. Quantum field entropy of the system with interaction between moving Bell-state atoms and coherent light field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Cai-hua; Sachuerfu; Gerile

    2011-01-01

    The field entropy of the system with two moving atoms interacting with the coherent state is investigated by means of the full quantum theory.Under the different initial states with two atoms,the influences of the light field intensity and the atomic motion on the field entropy are discussed.The results indicate that the motion of the atoms leads to strict periodicity in the field entropy evolution.When the two atoms are in the Bell state initially,the system is in a completely disentangled state.For the atoms initially at other Bell states,the field periodically entangles with the atoms.

  11. Demonstration of atomic frequency comb memory for light with spin-wave storage

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    We present a light-storage experiment in a praseodymium-doped crystal where the light is mapped onto an inhomogeneously broadened optical transition shaped into an atomic frequency comb. After absorption of the light the optical excitation is converted into a spin-wave excitation by a control pulse. A second control pulse reads the memory (on-demand) by reconverting the spin-wave excitation to an optical one, where the comb structure causes a photon-echo type rephasing of the dipole moments a...

  12. A compact 3.5-dB squeezed light source with atomic ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Bao, Guzhi; Chen, Bing; Guo, Jinxian; Shen, Heng; Chen, Liqing; Zhang, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    We reported a compact squeezed light source consisting of an diode laser near resonant on 87Rb optical D1 transition and an warm Rubidium vapor cell. The -4dB vacuum squeezing at 795 nm via nonlinear magneto-optical rotation was observed when applying the magnetic field orthogonal to the propagation direction of the light beam. This compact squeezed light source can be potentially utilized in the quantum information protocols such as quantum repeater and memory, and quantum metrology such as atomic magnetometer.

  13. The Saga of Light-Matter Interaction and Magneto-optical Effects Applications to Atomic Magnetometry, Laser-cooled Atoms, Atomic Clocks, Geomagnetism, and Plant Bio-magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsini, Eric P.

    The quest to expand the limited sensorial domain, in particular to bridge the inability to gauge magnetic fields near and far, has driven the fabrication of remedial tools. The interaction of ferromagnetic material with a magnetic field had been the only available technique to gauge that field for several millennium. The advent of electricity and associated classical phenomena captured in the four Maxwell equations, were a step forward. In the early 1900s, the model of quantum mechanics provided a two-way leap forward. One came from the newly understood interaction of light and matter, and more specifically the three-way coupling of photons, atoms' angular momenta, and magnetic field, which are the foundations of atomic magnetometry. The other came from magnetically sensitive quantum effects in a fabricated energy-ladder form of matter cooled to a temperature below that of the energy steps; these quantum effects gave rise to the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Research using atomic magnetometers and SQUIDs has resulted in thousands of publications, text books, and conferences. The current status in each field is well described in Refs. [48,49,38,42] and all references therein. In this work we develop and investigate techniques and applications pertaining to atomic magnetometry. [Full text: eric.corsini gmail.com].

  14. Dispersion relations for stationary light in one-dimensional atomic ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lakoupov, Ivan; Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Chang, Darrick E

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the dispersion relations for light coupled to one-dimensional ensembles of atoms with different level schemes. The unifying feature of all the considered setups is that the forward and backward propagating quantum fields are coupled by the applied classical drives such that the gro...... and placing them at well-defined positions. For the latter purpose, a multimode transfer matrix theory for light is developed.......We investigate the dispersion relations for light coupled to one-dimensional ensembles of atoms with different level schemes. The unifying feature of all the considered setups is that the forward and backward propagating quantum fields are coupled by the applied classical drives such that the group...... velocity can vanish in an effect known as “stationary light.” We derive the dispersion relations for all the considered schemes, highlighting the important differences between them. Furthermore, we show that additional control of stationary light can be obtained by treating atoms as discrete scatterers...

  15. Spectral dependence of diffuse light dynamics in ultracold atomic 85Rb

    CERN Document Server

    Balik, S; Sukenik, C I; Havey, M D; Datsuk, V M; Kupriyanov, D V; Sokolov, I M

    2015-01-01

    We report a combined experimental and theoretical simulation of multiply scattered light dynamics in an ultracold gas of 85Rb atoms. Measurements of the spectral dependence of the time-decay of the scattered light intensity, following pulsed excitation with near resonance radiation, reveals that the decay for long times is nearly exponential, with a decay constant that is largely independent of detuning from resonance. Monte Carlo simulations of the multiple scattering process show that, for large detunings, near resonance scattering of Fourier components of the excitation pulse plays a significant role in the effect. This interpretation is supported by the observations, and successful modelling, of beating between Rayleigh scattered light at the excitation carrier frequency with the Fourier components of the excitation pulse that overlap significantly with the atomic resonance.

  16. Demonstration of a Tunable-Bandwidth White Light Interferometer using Anomalous Dispersion in Atomic Vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Pati, G S; Salit, M; Shahriar, M S

    2006-01-01

    The concept of the 'white-light cavity' has recently generated considerable research interest in the context of gravitational wave detection. Cavity designs are proposed using negative (or anomalous) dispersion in an intracavity medium to make the cavity resonate over a large range of frequencies and still maintain a high cavity build-up. This paper presents the first experimental attempt and demonstration of white-light effect in a meter long ring cavity using an intracavity atomic medium. The medium's negative dispersion is caused by bi-frequency Raman gain in an atomic vapor cell. Although the white light condition was not perfectly achieved and improvements in experimental control are still desirable, significantly broad cavity response over bandwidth greater than 20 MHz has been observed. These devices will have potential applications in new generation laser interferometer gravitational wave detectors.

  17. Enhanced Deflection of Light Ray by Atomic Ensemble on Coherent Population Oscillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Jing; ZHOU Lan; KUANG Le-Man

    2009-01-01

    In recent experiments [e.g., Nature Physics 2 (2006) 332], the enhanced light deflection in an atomic ensemble due to inhomogeneous fields is demonstrated by the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) based mechanism. In this paper, we explore a different mechanism for the similar phenomenon of the enhanced light deflection.This mechanism is based on the coherent population oscillation, which leads to the hole burning in the absorption spectrum. The medium causing the deflection of probe light is an ensemble of two-level atoms manipulated by a strong controlled field on the two photon resonances. In the large detuning condition, the response of the medium to the pump field and signal field is obtained with steady state approximation. And it is found that after the probe field travels across the medium, the signal ray bends due to the spatial-dependent profile of the control beam.

  18. Propagation of light in low pressure ionised and atomic hydrogen. Application to astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Moret-Bailly, J

    2003-01-01

    The "Impulsive Stimulated Raman Scattering" (ISRS) performed using ultrashort laser pulses shifts the light frequencies. Tried using ordinary incoherent light, it keeps its qualitative properties except the nonlinearity due to the power of the laser pulses. The relative frequency shifts of the "Coherent Raman Effect on Incoherent Light" (CREIL) which is obtained do not depend on the intensity and, in a first approximation, on the frequency of the light. As CREIL does not blur the images and the spectra, its shifts may be confused with Doppler shifts. ISRS and CREIL are parametric effects which do not excite the matter, transferring energy from hot beams to cold beams; for CREIL, the cold light is thermal radiation which is heated. CREIL requires low pressure gases acting as catalysts. These gases must have Raman transitions in the radiofrequencies range: for instance H2+ or excited atomic hydrogen in a magnetic field. The spectral lines resulting from a simultaneous absorption (or emission) and CREIL have a w...

  19. Electromagnetically induced transparency for guided light in an atomic array outside an optical nanofiber

    CERN Document Server

    Kien, Fam Le

    2015-01-01

    We study the propagation of guided light along an array of three-level atoms in the vicinity of an optical nanofiber under the condition of electromagnetically induced transparency. We examine two schemes of atomic levels and field polarizations where the guided probe field is quasilinearly polarized along the major or minor principal axis, which is parallel or perpendicular, respectively, to the radial direction of the atomic position. Our numerical calculations indicate that 200 cesium atoms in a linear array with a length of 100 $\\mu$m at a distance of 200 nm from the surface of a nanofiber with a radius of 250 nm can slow down the speed of guided probe light by a factor of about $3.5\\times 10^6$ (the corresponding group delay is about 1.17 $\\mu$s). In the neighborhood of the Bragg resonance, a significant fraction of the guided probe light can be reflected back with a negative group delay. The reflectivity and the group delay of the reflected field do not depend on the propagation direction of the probe f...

  20. Storage and retrieval of a light in telecomband in a cold atomic ensemble

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Dong-Sheng; Shi, Bao-Sen; Zou, Xu-Bo; Guo, Guang-Can

    2012-01-01

    A telecom photon is a suitable information carrier in a fiber-based quantum network due to its lower transmission loss in fiber. Because of the paucity of suitable atomic system, usually the photon connecting different memories is in near infrared band, therefore the frequency conversion of the photon in and out of telecomband has to be required to realize the interface between the atomic-based memory and the photon-based carrier. In order for that, two atomic or other systems which could realize the frequency conversion have to be taken into account, and besides, one more atomic system as a storing media is need. So the ability of storing a photon in telecomband is an interesting and exciting topic. In this work, we give a first experimental proof of principle of storing a light in telecomband. The telecom light is directly stored and retrieved later through two nonlinear processes via an inverted-Y configuration in a cold atomic ensemble, therefore the interface between the memory and photon in other propos...

  1. Atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘洪毓

    2007-01-01

    Atoms(原子)are all around us.They are something like the bricks (砖块)of which everything is made. The size of an atom is very,very small.In just one grain of salt are held millions of atoms. Atoms are very important.The way one object acts depends on what

  2. Magic frequencies in atom-light interaction for precision probing of the density matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Givon, Menachem; Waxman, Amir; David, Tal; Groswasser, David; Japha, Yonathan; Folman, Ron

    2013-01-01

    We analyze theoretically and experimentally the existence of a {\\it magic frequency} for which the absorption of a linearly polarized light beam by vapor alkali atoms is independent of the population distribution among the Zeeman sub-levels and the angle between the beam and a magnetic field. The phenomenon originates from a peculiar cancelation of the contributions of higher moments of the atomic density matrix, and is described using the Wigner-Eckart theorem and inherent properties of Clebsch-Gordan coefficients. One important application is the robust measurement of the hyperfine population.

  3. Muon cycling rate in D/T mixture including doubly muonic molecule formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Eskandari

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available   In the present work, the fundamental behavior of four body molecule formations of pt μμ , pd μμ , dt μμ , tt μμ , and pp μμ in a D/T fusion are considered. Their higher fusion rate, specially the available data for dt μμ , encouraged us to study the muon cycling rate in D/T fusion in the temperature range of (100-1400 K, density and deuterium-tritium concentration ratio. For this purpose, various values for the doubly muonic molecule formation are chosen and with the comparison to the experimental results, the doubly muonic formation rate of 109 s-1 is predicted theoretically. Our calculated cycling rate has shown that having not considered the doubly muonic formation in previous calculations had made no serious changes in the previously calculated values.

  4. Lamb Shift in Muonic Hydrogen. II. Analysis of the Discrepancy of Theory and Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Jentschura, U D

    2010-01-01

    Currently, both the g factor measurement of the muon as well as the Lamb shift 2S-2P measurement in muonic hydrogen are in disagreement with theory. Here, we investigate possible theoretical explanations, including proton structure effects and small modifications of the vacuum polarization potential. In particular, we investigate a conceivable small modification of the spectral function of vacuum polarization in between the electron and muon energy scales due to a virtual millicharged particle and due to an unstable vector boson originating from a hidden sector of an extended standard model. We find that a virtual millicharged particle which could explain the muonic Lamb shift discrepancy alters theoretical predictions for the muon anomalous magnetic moment by many standard deviations and therefore is in conflict with experiment. Also, we find no parameterizations of an unstable virtual vector boson which could simultaneously explain both "muonic" discrepancies without significantly altering theoretical predi...

  5. The hadronic corrections to muonic hydrogen Lamb shift from ChPT and the proton radius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peset, Clara [Grup de Física Teòrica, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-01-22

    We obtain a model independent expression for the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift. The leading hadronic effects are controlled by the chiral theory, which allows for their model independent determination. We give their complete expression including the pion and Delta particles. Out of this analysis and the experimental measurement of the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift we determine the electromagnetic proton radius: r{sub p} = 0.8412(15) fm. This number is at 6.8σ variance with respect to the CODATA value. The parametric control of the uncertainties allows us to obtain a model independent determination of the error, which is dominated by hadronic effects.

  6. Brief review of the theory of the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and the proton radius

    CERN Document Server

    Pineda, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Recently the muonic hydrogen lamb shift has been measured with unprecedented accuracy, allowing for a precise determination of the proton radius. This determination is 5 sigma away from the previous CODATA value obtained from (mainly) the hydrogen lamb shift and the electron-proton scattering. Within an effective field theory formalism, I will define the proton radius and briefly review some aspects of the theoretical prediction for the muonic hydrogen lamb shift, studying both the pure QED-like computation and the hadronic effects.

  7. Optical control of resonant light transmission for an atom-cavity system

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Arijit; Sawant, Rahul V; Sheikholeslami, G; Budker, D; Rangwala, S A

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the manipulation of transmitted light through an optical Fabry-Perot cavity, built around a spectroscopy cell containing enriched rubidium vapor. Light resonant with the $^{87}$Rb D$_{2}$ ($F=2/F=1$) $\\leftrightarrow F'$ manifold, is controlled by transverse intersection of the cavity mode by another resonant light beam. The cavity transmission can be suppressed or enhanced depending on the coupling of atomic states due to the intersecting beams. The extreme manifestation of cavity mode control is the precipitious destruction (negative logic switching) or buildup (positive logic switching) of the transmitted light intensity, on intersection of the transverse control beam with the cavity mode. Both the steady state and transient response are experimentally investigated. The mechanism behind the change in cavity transmission is discussed in brief.

  8. Demonstration of atomic frequency comb memory for light with spin-wave storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afzelius, Mikael; Usmani, Imam; Amari, Atia; Lauritzen, Björn; Walther, Andreas; Simon, Christoph; Sangouard, Nicolas; Minár, Jirí; de Riedmatten, Hugues; Gisin, Nicolas; Kröll, Stefan

    2010-01-29

    We present a light-storage experiment in a praseodymium-doped crystal where the light is mapped onto an inhomogeneously broadened optical transition shaped into an atomic frequency comb. After absorption of the light, the optical excitation is converted into a spin-wave excitation by a control pulse. A second control pulse reads the memory (on-demand) by reconverting the spin-wave excitation to an optical one, where the comb structure causes a photon-echo-type rephasing of the dipole moments and directional retrieval of the light. This combination of photon-echo and spin-wave storage allows us to store submicrosecond (450 ns) pulses for up to 20 mus. The scheme has a high potential for storing multiple temporal modes in the single-photon regime, which is an important resource for future long-distance quantum communication based on quantum repeaters.

  9. Isotopic effects in scattering and kinetics of the atomic cascade of excited μ-p and μ-d atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, V. P.; Pomerantsev, V. N.

    2017-02-01

    The quantum-mechanical calculations of the differential and integrated cross sections of the elastic scattering, Stark transitions, and Coulomb deexcitation at collisions of excited μ-p and μ-d atoms with hydrogen isotope atoms in the ground state are performed. The scattering processes are treated in a unified manner in the framework of the close-coupling approach. The basis used includes both open and closed channels corresponding to all exotic-atom states with principal quantum numbers from n =1 up to nmax=20 . The energy shifts of n s states due to electron vacuum polarization and finite nuclear size are taken into account. The kinetics of the atomic cascade of μ-p and μ-d atoms are studied in a wide range of relative target densities (φ =10-8-1 ) within the improved version of the extended cascade model, in which the results of the numerical quantum-mechanical calculations of the cross sections for quantum numbers and kinetic energies of muonic atoms that are of interest for the detailed cascade calculations, are used as input data. Initial (n ,l ,E ) distributions of muonic atoms at the instant of their formation and the target motion are taken into account explicitly in present cascade calculations. The comparison of the calculated cross sections, the kinetic-energy distributions of muonic atoms at the instant of their n p →1 s radiative transitions, as well as the absolute and relative x-ray yields for both muonic hydrogen and muonic deuterium reveals the isotopic effects, which, in principal, may be observed experimentally. The present results are mainly in very good agreement with experimental data available in the literature.

  10. Strong spin-orbit interaction of light on the surface of atomically thin crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengxia; Cai, Liang; Chen, Shizhen; Liu, Yachao; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2017-06-01

    The photonic spin Hall effect (SHE) can be regarded as a direct optical analogy of the SHE in electronic systems where a refractive index gradient plays the role of an electric potential. However, it has been demonstrated that the effective refractive index fails to adequately explain the light-matter interaction in atomically thin crystals. In this paper, we examine the spin-orbit interaction on the surface of the freestanding atomically thin crystals. We find that it is not necessary to involve the effective refractive index to describe the spin-orbit interaction and the photonic SHE in the atomically thin crystals. The strong spin-orbit interaction and giant photonic SHE are predicted, which can be explained as the large polarization rotation of plane-wave components in order to satisfy the transversality of photon polarization.

  11. Cooperative resonances in light scattering from two-dimensional atomic arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Shahmoon, Ephraim; Lukin, Mikhail D; Yelin, Susanne F

    2016-01-01

    We consider light scattering off a two-dimensional (2D) dipolar array and show how it can be tailored by properly choosing the lattice constant of the order of the incident wavelength. In particular, we demonstrate that such arrays can operate as nearly perfect mirrors for a wide range of incident angles and frequencies close to the individual atomic resonance. These results can be understood in terms of the cooperative resonances of the surface modes supported by the 2D array. Experimental realizations are discussed, using ultracold arrays of trapped atoms and excitons in 2D semiconductor materials, as well as potential applications ranging from atomically thin metasurfaces to single photon nonlinear optics and nanomechanics.

  12. Off-axis retrieval of orbital angular momentum of light stored in cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    de Oliveira, R A; Barbosa, P S; Martins, W S; Barreiro, S; Felinto, D; Bloch, D; Tabosa, J W R

    2014-01-01

    We report on the storage of orbital angu- lar momentum (OAM) of light of a Laguerre-Gaussian mode in an ensemble of cold cesium atoms and its re- trieval along an axis different from the incident light beam. We employed a time-delayed four-wave mixing configuration to demonstrate that at small angle (2o), after storage, the retrieved beam carries the same OAM as the one encoded in the input beam. A calculation based on mode decomposition of the retrieved beam over the Laguerre-Gaussian basis is in agreement with the experimental observations done at small angle values. However, the calculation shows that the OAM retrieving would get lost at larger angles, reducing the fidelity of such storing-retrieving process. In addition, we have also observed that by applying an external magnetic field to the atomic ensemble the retrieved OAM presents Larmor oscillations, demonstrating the possibility of its manipulation and off-axis retrieval.

  13. Quantum physics of light and matter photons, atoms, and strongly correlated systems

    CERN Document Server

    Salasnich, Luca

    2017-01-01

    This compact but exhaustive textbook, now in its significantly revised and expanded second edition, provides an essential introduction to the field quantization of light and matter with applications to atomic physics and strongly correlated systems. Following an initial review of the origins of special relativity and quantum mechanics, individual chapters are devoted to the second quantization of the electromagnetic field and the consequences of light field quantization for the description of electromagnetic transitions. The spin of the electron is then analyzed, with particular attention to its derivation from the Dirac equation. Subsequent topics include the effects of external electric and magnetic fields on the atomic spectra and the properties of systems composed of many interacting identical particles. The book also provides a detailed explanation of the second quantization of the non-relativistic matter field, i.e., the Schrödinger field, which offers a powerful tool for the investigation of many-body...

  14. Redistribution of light frequency by multiple scattering in a resonant atomic vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, J C de A; Oriá, M; Chevrollier, M; de Silans, T Passerat

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of light in a resonant atomic vapor can \\textit{a priori} be thought of as a multiple scattering process, in which each scattering event redistributes both the direction and the frequency of the photons. Particularly, the frequency redistribution may result in L\\'evy flights of photons, directly affecting the transport properties of light in a resonant atomic vapor and turning this propagation into a superdifusion process. Here, we report on a Monte-Carlo simulation developed to study the evolution of the spectrum of the light in a resonant thermal vapor. We observe the gradual change of the spectrum and its convergence towards a regime of Complete Frequency Redistribution as the number of scattering events increases. We also analyse the probability density function of the step length of photons between emissions and reabsorptions in the vapor, which governs the statistics of the light diffusion. We observe two different regime in the light transport: superdiffusive when the vapor is excited n...

  15. Slow light enhanced atomic frequency comb quantum memories in photonic crystal waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Chenzhi; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong; Peng, Jiangde

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a slow light-enhanced quantum memory with high efficiency based on atomic frequency comb (AFC) in ion-doped photonic crystal waveguide (PCW). The performance of the quantum memory is investigated theoretically, considering the impact of the signal bandwidth. Both the forward and backward retrieval schemes are analyzed. In the forward retrieval scheme, the analysis shows that a moderate slow light effect can improve the retrieval efficiency to above 50% with very high fidelity, even when the intrinsic optical depth is very low and the signal bandwidth is comparable with the AFC bandwidth. In the backward retrieval scheme, retrieval efficiency larger than 90% can be obtained and fidelity can remain above 90% for signal with bandwidth much narrower than AFC bandwidth, when moderate slow light is introduced into waveguide with low intrinsic optical depth. Although the phase mismatching effect limits the slow light enhancement on retrieval efficiency and decreases the fidelity for signal with bandwidth approaching AFC bandwidth, we design a modified atomic frequency comb structure (MAFC) based on which a moderate slow light can make the retrieval efficiency larger than 85% and keep the fidelity above 80%. Our calculations show that the proposed scheme provides a promising way to realize high efficiency on-chip quantum memory.

  16. X-ray spectroscopy of light kaonic atoms – new results and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marton, J. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Bazzi, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Beer, G. [Dep. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O.Box 3055, Victoria B.C. Canada V8W3P6 (Canada); Berucci, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Bombelli, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. di Elettronica e Informazione, Piazza L. da Vinci, 32 I-20133 Milano (Italy); Bragadireanu, A.M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); IFIN-HH, P.O. box MG-6, R76900 Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Cargnelli, M. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Curceanu, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); D' Uffizi, A.; Fiorini, C.; Frizzi, T. [Politecnico di Milano, Dip. di Elettronica e Informazione, Piazza L. da Vinci, 32 I-20133 Milano (Italy); Ghio, F. [INFN Sez. di Roma I and Instituto Superiore di Sanita I-00161, Roma (Italy); Guaraldo, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Hayano, R. [University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Iliescu, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, C.P. 13, Via E. Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Ishiwatari, T. [Stefan-Meyer-Institut für subatomare Physik, Boltzmanngasse 3, 1090 Wien (Austria); Iwasaki, M. [RIKEN, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Saitama (Japan); and others

    2012-12-15

    The antikaon interaction on nucleons and nuclei in the low-energy regime is neither simple nor well understood. Rather direct access to this field is provided by x-ray spectroscopy of light kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen, deuterium and helium isotopes. A series of precision measurements on kaonic atoms was performed very successfully by the SIDDHARTA Collaboration at the DAΦNE electron-positron collider at LNF-INFN (Frascati, Italy). Consequently, new precision data on the strong interaction observables (i.e. energy shift and broadening of low-lying atomic states) were delivered having an important impact on the theory of low-energy QCD with strangeness. Presently, the follow-up experiment, SIDDHARTA-2, is in preparation, aiming at a determination of the strong interaction observables in kaonic deuterium as the highest priority; other type of measurements (light and heavier kaonic atoms) are as well foreseen. With the kaonic deuterium data the antikaon-nucleon isospin-resolved scattering lengths can be extracted for the first time. An overview of the progress and present status of experimental studies and an outlook to future perspectives in this fascinating research field is given.

  17. Two-photon ionization of atomic hydrogen with elliptically polarized light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassaee, A.; Rustgi, M. L.; Long, S. A. T.

    1988-01-01

    The theory of two-photon ionization of a hydrogenic state in the nonrelativistic dipole approximation is generalized for elliptically polarized light. An application to the metastable 2S state of atomic hydrogen is made. Significant differences in the angular distribution of the outgoing electrons are found depending upon the polarization of the photons. It is claimed that two-photon ionization employing elliptically polarized photons from lasers may provide an additional test for the theories of multiphoton ionization.

  18. Solar-energy conversion and light emission in an atomic monolayer p-n diode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospischil, Andreas; Furchi, Marco M; Mueller, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    The limitations of the bulk semiconductors currently used in electronic devices-rigidity, heavy weight and high costs--have recently shifted the research efforts to two-dimensional atomic crystals such as graphene and atomically thin transition-metal dichalcogenides. These materials have the potential to be produced at low cost and in large areas, while maintaining high material quality. These properties, as well as their flexibility, make two-dimensional atomic crystals attractive for applications such as solar cells or display panels. The basic building blocks of optoelectronic devices are p-n junction diodes, but they have not yet been demonstrated in a two-dimensional material. Here, we report a p-n junction diode based on an electrostatically doped tungsten diselenide (WSe2) monolayer. We present applications as a photovoltaic solar cell, a photodiode and a light-emitting diode, and obtain light-power conversion and electroluminescence efficiencies of ∼ 0.5% and ∼ 0.1%, respectively. Given recent advances in the large-scale production of two-dimensional crystals, we expect them to profoundly impact future developments in solar, lighting and display technologies.

  19. Delivering pulsed and phase stable light to atoms of an optical clock

    CERN Document Server

    Falke, Stephan; Sterr, Uwe; Lisdat, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In optical clocks, transitions of ions or neutral atoms are interrogated using pulsed ultra-narrow laser fields. Systematic phase chirps of the laser or changes of the optical path length during the measurement cause a shift of the frequency seen by the interrogated atoms. While the stabilization of cw-optical links is now a well established technique even on long distances, phase stable links for pulsed light pose additional challanges and have not been demonstrated so far. In addition to possible temperature or pressure drift of the laboratory, which may lead to a Doppler shift by steadily changing the optical path length, the pulsing of the clock laser light calls for short settling times of stabilization locks. Our optical path length stabilization uses retro-reflected light from a mirror that is fixed with respect to the interrogated atoms and synthetic signals during the dark time. Length changes and frequency chirps are compensated for by the switching AOM. For our strontium optical lattice clock we ha...

  20. The Lamb-shift experiment in Muonic helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nebel, T., E-mail: tbn@mpq.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik (Germany); Amaro, F. D. [Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); Antognini, A. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule Zuerich, Institut fuer Teilchenphysik (Switzerland); Biraben, F. [CNRS and Universite P. et M. Curie, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Superieure (France); Cardoso, J. M. R. [Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); Covita, D. S. [Universidade de Aveiro, I3N, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); Dax, A. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Fernandes, L. M. P.; Gouvea, A. L. [Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); Graf, T. [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institut fuer Strahlwerkzeuge (Germany); Haensch, T. W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik (Germany); Hildebrandt, M. [Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland); Indelicato, P.; Julien, L. [CNRS and Universite P. et M. Curie, Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Superieure (France); Kirch, K.; Kottmann, F. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule Zuerich, Institut fuer Teilchenphysik (Switzerland); Liu, Y.-W. [National Tsing Hua University, Physics Department (China); Monteiro, C. M. B. [Universidade de Coimbra, Departamento de Fisica (Portugal); and others

    2012-12-15

    We propose to measure several transition frequencies between the 2S and the 2P states (Lamb shift) in muonic helium ions ({mu}{sup 4}He{sup + } and {mu}{sup 3}He{sup + }) by means of laser spectroscopy, in order to determine the alpha-particle and helion root-mean-square (rms) charge radius. In addition, the fine and hyperfine structure components will be revealed, and the magnetic moment distribution radius will be determined. The contribution of the finite size effect to the Lamb shift (2S - 2P energy difference) in {mu}He{sup + } is as high as 20 %. Therefore a measurement of the transition frequencies with a moderate (for laser spectroscopy) precision of 50 ppm (corresponding to 1/20 of the linewidth) will lead to a determination of the nuclear rms charge radii with a relative accuracy of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup - 4} (equivalent to 0.0005 fm). The limiting factor for the extraction of the radii from the Lamb shift measurements is given by the uncertainty of the nuclear polarizability contribution. Combined with an ongoing experiment at MPQ aiming to measure the 1S - 2S transition frequency in the helium ion, the Lamb shift measurement in {mu}He{sup + } will lead to a sensitive test of problematic and challenging bound-state QED terms. This measurement will also help to clarify the discrepancy found in our previous {mu}{sub p} experiment. Additionally, a precise knowledge of the absolute nuclear radii of the He isotopes and the hyperfine splitting of {mu}{sup 3}He{sup + } provide a relevant test of few-nucleon theories.

  1. Non—conservation of energy arising from atomic dipole interactions and its effects on light field and coupled atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DongChuan-Hua

    2003-01-01

    The interactions between coulpled atoms and a single mode of a quantized electromagnetic field, which involve the terms originating from the dipole interactions, are discussed. In the usual Jaynes-Cummings model for coupled atoms, the terms of non-conservation of energy originating from dipole interactions are neglected, however, we take them into consideration in this paper. The effects of these terms on the evolutions of quantum statistic properties and squeezing of the field, the squeezing of atomic dipole moments and atomic population inversion are investigated. It has been shown that the coupling between atoms modulates these evolutions of fields and atoms. The terms of non-conservation of energy affect these evolutions of field and atoms slightly. They also have effects on the squeezing of the field, the squeezing of atomic dipole and atomic population inversions. The initial states of atoms also affect these properties.

  2. Non-conservation of energy arising from atomic dipole interactions and its effects on light field and coupled atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董传华

    2003-01-01

    The interactions between coupled atoms and a single mode of a quantized electromagnetic field, which involve the terms originating from the dipole interactions, are discussed. In the usual Jaynes Cummings model for coupled atoms,the terms of non-conservation of energy originating from dipole interactions are neglected, however, we take them into consideration in this paper. The effects of these terms on the evolutions of quantum statistic properties and squeezing of the field, the squeezing of atomic dipole moments and atomic population inversion are investigated. It has been shown that the coupling between atoms modulates these evolutions of fields and atoms. The terms of non-conservation of energy affect these evolutions of fields and atoms slightly. They also have effects on the squeezing of the field, the squeezing of atomic dipole and atomic population inversions. The initial states of atoms also affect these properties.

  3. Measurement of the charged pion mass using a low-density target of light atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trassinelli M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new evaluation of the negatively charged pion mass based on the simultaneous spectroscopy of pionic nitrogen and muonic oxygen transitions using a gaseous target composed by a N2/O2 mixture at 1.4 bar. We present the experimental set-up and the methods for deriving the pion mass value from the spatial separation from the 5g − 4f πN transition line and the 5g − 4f μO transition line used as reference. Moreover, we discuss the importance to use dilute targets in order to minimize the influence of additional spectral lines from the presence of remaining electrons during the radiative emission. The occurrence of possible satellite lines is investigated via hypothesis testing methods using the Bayes factor.

  4. Measurement of the charged pion mass using a low-density target of light atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Trassinelli, M; Borchert, G; Dax, A; Egger, J -P; Gotta, D; Hennebach, M; Indelicato, P; Liu, Y -W; Manil, B; Nelms, N; Simons, L M; Wells, A

    2016-01-01

    We present a new evaluation of the negatively charged pion mass based on the simultaneous spec-troscopy of pionic nitrogen and muonic oxygen transitions using a gaseous target composed by a N 2 /O 2 mixture at 1.4 bar. We present the experimental setup and the methods for deriving the pion mass value from the spatial separation from the 5g -- 4 f $\\pi$N transition line and the 5g -- 4 f $\\mu$O transition line used as reference. Moreover, we discuss the importance to use dilute targets in order to minimize the influence of additional spectral lines from the presence of remaining electrons during the radiative emission. The occurrence of possible satellite lines is investigated via hypothesis testing methods using the Bayes factor.

  5. Strong light-matter coupling in two-dimensional atomic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xiaoze; Sun, Zheng; Xia, Fengnian; Lin, Erh-chen; Lee, Yi-Hsien; Kéna-Cohen, Stéphane; Menon, Vinod M

    2014-01-01

    Two dimensional (2D) atomic crystals of graphene, and transition metal dichalcogenides have emerged as a class of materials that show strong light-matter interaction. This interaction can be further controlled by embedding such materials into optical microcavities. When the interaction is engineered to be stronger than the dissipation of light and matter entities, one approaches the strong coupling regime resulting in the formation of half-light half-matter bosonic quasiparticles called microcavity polaritons. Here we report the evidence of strong light-matter coupling and formation of microcavity polaritons in a two dimensional atomic crystal of molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) embedded inside a dielectric microcavity at room temperature. A Rabi splitting of 46 meV and highly directional emission is observed from the MoS2 microcavity owing to the coupling between the 2D excitons and the cavity photons. Realizing strong coupling effects at room temperature in a disorder free potential landscape is central to the ...

  6. Self-assembly based plasmonic arrays tuned by atomic layer deposition for extreme visible light absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägglund, Carl; Zeltzer, Gabriel; Ruiz, Ricardo; Thomann, Isabell; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram; Brongersma, Mark L; Bent, Stacey F

    2013-07-10

    Achieving complete absorption of visible light with a minimal amount of material is highly desirable for many applications, including solar energy conversion to fuel and electricity, where benefits in conversion efficiency and economy can be obtained. On a fundamental level, it is of great interest to explore whether the ultimate limits in light absorption per unit volume can be achieved by capitalizing on the advances in metamaterial science and nanosynthesis. Here, we combine block copolymer lithography and atomic layer deposition to tune the effective optical properties of a plasmonic array at the atomic scale. Critical coupling to the resulting nanocomposite layer is accomplished through guidance by a simple analytical model and measurements by spectroscopic ellipsometry. Thereby, a maximized absorption of light exceeding 99% is accomplished, of which up to about 93% occurs in a volume-equivalent thickness of gold of only 1.6 nm. This corresponds to a record effective absorption coefficient of 1.7 × 10(7) cm(-1) in the visible region, far exceeding those of solid metals, graphene, dye monolayers, and thin film solar cell materials. It is more than a factor of 2 higher than that previously obtained using a critically coupled dye J-aggregate, with a peak width exceeding the latter by 1 order of magnitude. These results thereby substantially push the limits for light harvesting in ultrathin, nanoengineered systems.

  7. Deciphering the "chemical" nature of the exotic isotopes of hydrogen by the MC-QTAIM analysis: the positively charged muon and the muonic helium as new members of the periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goli, Mohammad; Shahbazian, Shant

    2014-04-14

    This report is a primarily survey on the chemical nature of some exotic species containing the positively charged muon and the muonic helium, i.e., the negatively charged muon plus helium nucleus, as exotic isotopes of hydrogen, using the newly developed multi-component quantum theory of atoms in molecules (MC-QTAIM) analysis, employing ab initio non-Born-Oppenhiemer wavefunctions. Accordingly, the "atoms in molecules" analysis performed on various asymmetric exotic isotopomers of the hydrogen molecule, recently detected experimentally [Science, 2011, 331, 448], demonstrates that both the exotic isotopes are capable of forming atoms in molecules and retaining the identity of hydrogen atoms. Various derived properties of atomic basins containing the muonic helium cast no doubt that apart from its short life time, it is a heavier isotope of hydrogen while the properties of basins containing the positively charged muon are more remote from those of the orthodox hydrogen basins, capable of appreciable donation of electrons as well as large charge polarization. However, with some tolerance, they may also be categorized as hydrogen basins though with a smaller electronegativity. All in all, the present study also clearly demonstrates that the MC-QTAIM analysis is an efficient approach to decipher the chemical nature of species containing exotic constituents, which are difficult to elucidate by experimental and/or alternative theoretical schemes.

  8. Hadronic deuteron polarizability contribution to the Lamb shift in muonic deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskin, A. V.; Faustov, R. N.; Martynenko, A. P.; Martynenko, F. A.

    2016-06-01

    Hadronic deuteron polarizability correction to the Lamb shift of muonic deuterium is calculated on the basis of unitary isobar model and modern experimental data on the structure functions of deep inelastic lepton-deuteron scattering and their parametrizations in the resonance and nonresonance regions.

  9. Hadronic deuteron polarizability contribution to the Lamb shift in muonic deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Eskin, A V; Martynenko, A P; Martynenko, F A

    2015-01-01

    Hadronic deuteron polarizability correction to the Lamb shift of muonic deuterium is calculated on the basis of unitary isobar model and modern experimental data on the structure functions of deep inelastic lepton-deuteron scattering and their parameterizations in the resonance and nonresonance regions.

  10. Nuclear radiative recoil corrections to the hyperfine structure of S-states in muonic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustov, R. N.; Martynenko, A. P.; Martynenko, F. A.; Sorokin, V. V.

    2017-09-01

    Nuclear radiative recoil corrections of order α( Zα)5 to the hyperfine splitting of S-states in muonic hydrogen are calculated on the basis of quasipotential method in quantum electrodynamics. The calculation is performed in the infrared safe Fried-Yennie gauge. Modern experimental data on the proton form factors are used.

  11. Light-induced atom desorption from glass surfaces characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Ryo; Hatakeyama, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    We analyzed the surfaces of vitreous silica (quartz) and borosilicate glass (Pyrex) substrates exposed to rubidium (Rb) vapor by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to understand the surface conditions of alkali metal vapor cells. XPS spectra indicated that Rb atoms adopted different bonding states in quartz and Pyrex. Furthermore, Rb atoms in quartz remained in the near-surface region, while they diffused into the bulk in Pyrex. For these characterized surfaces, we measured light-induced atom desorption (LIAD) of Rb atoms. Clear differences in time evolution, photon energy dependence, and substrate temperature dependence were found; the decay of LIAD by continuous ultraviolet irradiation for quartz was faster than that for Pyrex, a monotonic increase in LIAD with increasing photon energy from 1.8 to 4.3 eV was more prominent for quartz, and LIAD from quartz was more efficient at higher temperatures in the range from 300 to 580 K, while that from Pyrex was almost independent of temperature.

  12. Light-Assisted Cold Chemical Reactions of Barium Ions with Rubidium Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Felix H J; Raoult, Maurice; Dulieu, Olivier; Willitsch, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Light-assisted reactive collisions between laser-cooled Ba+ ions and Rb atoms were studied in an ion-atom hybrid trap. The reaction rate was found to strongly depend on the electronic state of the reaction partners with the largest rate constant (7(2) x 10^-11 cm^3 s^-1) obtained for the excited Ba+(6s)+Rb(5p) reaction channel. Similar to the previously studied Ca+ + Rb system, charge transfer and radiative association were found to be the dominant reactive processes. The generation of molecular ions by radiative association could directly be observed by their sympathetic cooling into a Coulomb crystal. Potential energy curves up to the Ba+(6s)+Rb(5p) asymptote and reactive-scattering cross sections for the radiative processes were calculated. The theoretical rate constant obtained for the lowest reaction channel Ba+(6s)+Rb(5s) is compatible with the experimental estimates obtained thus far.

  13. Visible light emission in collisions between O5+ ions and He atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李大万; 潘广炎; 杨锋; 刘占稳; 周嗣信; 张文; 张雪珍; 郭晓虹; 王友德; 杨治虎; 马新文; 刘惠萍; 赵孟春

    1997-01-01

    Visible light emission spectra during collisions between O5 + ions and He atoms in the range of 200-800 nm at different projectile energies (4.06-5.31 keV·u 1) have been measured. Emission spectra show that there arc three channels of excitation in the O5+ -He collision system; (i) single-electron capture into excited states; (ii) double-electron capture into excited states; (iii) direct excitation of target atoms. There are transitions between states with comparably high quantum numbers nl The absolute emission cross-sections of every spectral line are calculated. The relations of these cross-sect ions with the energy of the projectiles are studied.

  14. Quantum and Semiclassical Calculations of Cold Atom Collisions in Light Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Suominen, K A; Tuvi, I; Burnett, K; Julienne, P S

    1998-01-01

    We derive and apply an optical Bloch equation (OBE) model for describing collisions of ground and excited laser cooled alkali atoms in the presence of near-resonant light. Typically these collisions lead to loss of atoms from traps. We compare the results obtained with a quantum mechanical complex potential treatment, semiclassical Landau-Zener models with decay, and a quantum time-dependent Monte-Carlo wave packet (MCWP) calculation. We formulate the OBE method in both adiabatic and diabatic representations. We calculate the laser intensity dependence of collision probabilities and find that the adiabatic OBE results agree quantitatively with those of the MCWP calculation, and qualitatively with the semiclassical Landau-Zener model with delayed decay, but that the complex potential method or the traditional Landau-Zener model fail in the saturation limit.

  15. Coherent and dynamic beam splitting based on light storage in cold atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwang-Kyoon; Zhao, Tian-Ming; Lee, Jong-Chan; Chough, Young-Tak; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2016-09-28

    We demonstrate a coherent and dynamic beam splitter based on light storage in cold atoms. An input weak laser pulse is first stored in a cold atom ensemble via electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT). A set of counter-propagating control fields, applied at a later time, retrieves the stored pulse into two output spatial modes. The high visibility interference between the two output pulses clearly demonstrates that the beam splitting process is coherent. Furthermore, by manipulating the control lasers, it is possible to dynamically control the storage time, the power splitting ratio, the relative phase, and the optical frequencies of the output pulses. With further improvements, the active beam splitter demonstrated in this work might have applications in photonic photonic quantum information and in all-optical information processing.

  16. Coherent and dynamic beam splitting based on light storage in cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwang-Kyoon; Zhao, Tian-Ming; Lee, Jong-Chan; Chough, Young-Tak; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a coherent and dynamic beam splitter based on light storage in cold atoms. An input weak laser pulse is first stored in a cold atom ensemble via electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT). A set of counter-propagating control fields, applied at a later time, retrieves the stored pulse into two output spatial modes. The high visibility interference between the two output pulses clearly demonstrates that the beam splitting process is coherent. Furthermore, by manipulating the control lasers, it is possible to dynamically control the storage time, the power splitting ratio, the relative phase, and the optical frequencies of the output pulses. With further improvements, the active beam splitter demonstrated in this work might have applications in photonic photonic quantum information and in all-optical information processing. PMID:27677457

  17. Berry phases in the three-level atoms driven by quantized light fields

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mai-Lin Liang; Zong-Cheng Xu; Bing Yuan

    2008-03-01

    A theoretical analysis of Berry's phases is given for the three-level atoms interacting with external one-mode and two-mode quantized light fields. Three main results are obtained: (i) There is a Berry phase which vanishes in the classical limit or this Berry phase is completely induced by the field quantization; (ii) Berry's phases for the one-mode field and the two-mode field can be equal so long as the photon numbers of the two-mode field are properly chosen; (iii) In the two-mode case, Berry phases of the atom interacting with one mode is affected by the other mode even if the photon number of the other mode is zero.

  18. Representation-free description of light-pulse atom interferometry including non-inertial effects

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinert, Stephan; Roura, Albert; Schleich, Wolfgang P

    2015-01-01

    Light-pulse atom interferometers rely on the wave nature of matter and its manipulation with coherent laser pulses. They are used for precise gravimetry and inertial sensing as well as for accurate measurements of fundamental constants. Reaching higher precision requires longer interferometer times which are naturally encountered in microgravity environments such as drop-tower facilities, sounding rockets and dedicated satellite missions aiming at fundamental quantum physics in space. In all those cases, it is necessary to consider arbitrary trajectories and varying orientations of the interferometer set-up in non-inertial frames of reference. Here we provide a versatile representation-free description of atom interferometry entirely based on operator algebra to address this general situation. We show how to analytically determine the phase shift as well as the visibility of interferometers with an arbitrary number of pulses including the effects of local gravitational accelerations, gravity gradients, the ro...

  19. THE EXACT SOLUTION OF A TWO-LEVEL ATOM MOVING IN A QUANTIZED TRAVELLING LIGHT FIELD AND A GRAVITATIONAL FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹旭波; 许晶波; 高孝纯; 符建

    2001-01-01

    We adopt a dynamical algebraic approach to study the system of a two-level atom moving in a quantized travelling light field and a gravitational field with a multiphoton interaction. The exact solution of the system is obtained and used to discuss the influence of the gravitational field on the collapses and revivals of atomic population, sub-Poissonian statistics.

  20. Formation of two-dimensional nonspreading atomic wave packets in the field of two standing light waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efremov, MA; Petropavlovsky, SV; Fedorov, MV; Schleich, WP; Yakovlev, VP

    2005-01-01

    The formation of two-dimensional nonspreading atomic wave packets produced in the interaction of a beam of two-level atoms with two standing light waves polarised in the same plane is considered. The mechanism providing a dispersionless particle dynamics is the balance of two processes: a rapid deca

  1. Room temperature strong light-matter coupling in 3D THz meta-atoms (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulillo, Bruno; Manceau, Jean-Michel; Li, Lianhe; Linfield, Edmund; Colombelli, Raffaele

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate strong light-matter coupling at room temperature in the terahertz (THz) spectral region using 3D meta-atoms with extremely sub-wavelength volumes. Using an air-bridge fabrication scheme, we have implemented sub-wavelength 3D THz micro-resonators that rely on suspended loop antennas connected to semiconductor-filled patch cavities. We have experimentally shown that they possess the functionalities of lumped LC resonators: their frequency response can be adjusted by independently tuning the inductance associated the antenna element or the capacitance provided by the metal-semiconductor-metal cavity. Moreover, the radiation coupling and efficiency can be engineered acting on the design of the loop antenna, similarly to conventional RF antennas. Here we take advantage of this rich playground in the context of cavity electrodynamics/intersubband polaritonics. In the strong light-matter coupling regime, a cavity and a two-level system exchange energy coherently at a characteristic rate called the vacuum Rabi frequency ΩR which is dominant with respect to all other loss mechanisms involved. The signature, in the frequency domain, is the appearance of a splitting between the bare cavity and material system resonances: the new states are called upper and a lower polariton branches. So far, most experimental demonstrations of strong light-matter interaction between an intersubband transition and a deeply sub-wavelength mode in the THz or mid-infrared ranges rely on wavelength-scale or larger resonators such as photonic crystals, diffractive gratings, dielectric micro-cavities or patch cavities. Lately, planar metamaterials have been used to enhance the light-matter interaction and strongly reduce the interaction volume by engineering the electric and magnetic resonances of the individual subwavelength constituents. In this contribution we provide evidence of strong coupling between a THz intersubband transition and an extremely sub-wavelength mode (≈λ/10

  2. Amplified light storage with high fidelity based on electromagnetically induced transparency in rubidium atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Gang; Tang, Guoyu; Xue, Yan

    2016-06-01

    By using slow and stored light based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), we theoretically realize the storage of optical pulses with enhanced efficiency and high fidelity in ensembles of warm atoms in 85Rb vapor cells. The enhancement of storage efficiency is achieved by introducing a pump field beyond three-level configuration to form a N-type scheme, which simultaneously inhibits the undesirable four-wave mixing effect while preserves its fidelity. It is shown that the typical storage efficiency can be improved from 29% to 53% with the application of pump field. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this efficiency decreases with storage time and increases over unity with optical depth.

  3. Analytical Solutions of Temporal Evolution of Populations in Optically-Pumped Atoms with Circularly Polarized Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heung-Ryoul Noh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We present an analytical calculation of temporal evolution of populations for optically pumped atoms under the influence of weak, circularly polarized light. The differential equations for the populations of magnetic sublevels in the excited state, derived from rate equations, are expressed in the form of inhomogeneous second-order differential equations with constant coefficients. We present a general method of analytically solving these differential equations, and obtain explicit analytical forms of the populations of the ground state at the lowest order in the saturation parameter. The obtained populations can be used to calculate lineshapes in various laser spectroscopies, considering transit time relaxation.

  4. Temporal intensity correlation of light scattered by a hot atomic vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Dussaux, A; Guerin, W; Alibart, O; Tanzilli, S; Vakili, F; Kaiser, R

    2016-01-01

    We present temporal intensity correlation measurements of light scattered by a hot atomic vapor. Clear evidence of photon bunching is shown at very short time-scales (ns) imposed by the Doppler broadening of the hot vapor. Moreover, we demonstrate that some relevant information about the scattering process, such as the ratio of single to multiple scattering, can be deduced from the measured intensity correlation function. These measurements confirm the interest of temporal intensity correlation measurements to access non-trivial spectral features, with potential applications in astrophysics.

  5. Atom-Generated Spatial Multi-Mode Structure of Squeezed Light

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Mi; Xiao, Zhihao; Dowling, Jonathan P; Novikova, Irina; Mikhailov, Eugeniy E

    2015-01-01

    We generate a squeezed vacuum field via an interaction between a laser beam and an atomic ensemble. A measurement of the quantum noise of a spatially modified squeezed field is conducted. We find the noise suppression to be greatly affected by the transverse profile of the spatial mask and its position along the propagation direction. We have developed a multimode model to describe the mode structure of the light fields which qualitatively explains the quadrature noise behavior in terms of higher-order Laguerre-Gauss modes.

  6. Excitation of heavy hydrogen-like ions by light atoms in relativistic collisions with large momentum transfers

    CERN Document Server

    Najjari, B

    2012-01-01

    We present a theory for excitation of heavy hydrogen-like projectile-ions by light target-atoms in collisions where the momentum transfers to the atom are very large on the atomic scale. It is shown that in this process the electrons and the nucleus of the atom behave as (quasi-) free particles with respect to each other and that their motion is governed by the field of the nucleus of the ion. The effect of this field on the atomic particles can be crucial for the contribution to the excitation of the ion caused by the electrons of the atom. Due to comparatively very large nuclear mass, however, this field can be neglected in the calculation of the contribution to the excitation due to the nucleus of the atom.

  7. Strong light-matter coupling from atoms to solid-state systems

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The physics of strong light-matter coupling has been addressed in different scientific communities over the last three decades. Since the early eighties, atoms coupled to optical and microwave cavities have led to pioneering demonstrations of cavity quantum electrodynamics, Gedanken experiments, and building blocks for quantum information processing, for which the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded in 2012. In the framework of semiconducting devices, strong coupling has allowed investigations into the physics of Bose gases in solid-state environments, and the latter holds promise for exploiting light-matter interaction at the single-photon level in scalable architectures. More recently, impressive developments in the so-called superconducting circuit QED have opened another fundamental playground to revisit cavity quantum electrodynamics for practical and fundamental purposes. This book aims at developing the necessary interface between these communities, by providing future researchers with a robust conceptu...

  8. Room temperature strong light-matter coupling in three dimensional terahertz meta-atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulillo, B.; Manceau, J.-M.; Li, L. H.; Davies, A. G.; Linfield, E. H.; Colombelli, R.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate strong light-matter coupling in three dimensional terahertz meta-atoms at room temperature. The intersubband transition of semiconductor quantum wells with a parabolic energy potential is strongly coupled to the confined circuital mode of three-dimensional split-ring metal-semiconductor-metal resonators that have an extreme sub-wavelength volume (λ/10). The frequency of these lumped-element resonators is controlled by the size and shape of the external antenna, while the interaction volume remains constant. This allows the resonance frequency to be swept across the intersubband transition and the anti-crossing characteristic of the strong light-matter coupling regime to be observed. The Rabi splitting, which is twice the Rabi frequency (2ΩRabi), amounts to 20% of the bare transition at room temperature, and it increases to 28% at low-temperature.

  9. Cold Atom Physics Using Ultra-Thin Optical Fibers: Light-Induced Dipole Forces and Surface Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Sagu'e, G; Meschede, D; Rauschenbeutel, A; Vetsch, E

    2007-01-01

    The strong evanescent field around ultra-thin unclad optical fibers bears a high potential for detecting, trapping, and manipulating cold atoms. Introducing such a fiber into a cold atom cloud, we investigate the interaction of a small number of cold Caesium atoms with the guided fiber mode and with the fiber surface. Using high resolution spectroscopy, we observe and analyze light-induced dipole forces, van der Waals interaction, and a significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate of the atoms. The latter can be assigned to the modification of the vacuum modes by the fiber.

  10. Entropy evolvement properties in a system of Schr(o)dinger cat state light field interacting with two entangled atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Tang-Kun

    2006-01-01

    The field entropy can be regarded as a measurement of the degree of entanglement between the light field and the atoms of a system which is composed of two-level atoms initially in an entangled state interacting with the Schr(o)dinger cat state. The influences of the strength of light field and the phase angle between the two coherent states on the field entropy are discussed by using numerical calculations. The result shows that when the strength of light field is large enough the field entropy is not zero and the degrees of entanglement between the atoms and the three different states of the light fields are equal. When the strength of the light field is small, the degree of entanglement is maximum in a system of the two entangled atoms interacting with an odd coherent state; it is intermediate for a system of the two entangled atoms interacting with the Yurke-Stoler coherent state, and it is minimum in a system of the two entangled atoms interacting with an even coherent state.

  11. Development of a Hybrid Atomic Force Microscopic Measurement System Combined with White Light Scanning Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotang Hu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid atomic force microscopic (AFM measurement system combined with white light scanning interferometry for micro/nanometer dimensional measurement is developed. The system is based on a high precision large-range positioning platform with nanometer accuracy on which a white light scanning interferometric module and an AFM head are built. A compact AFM head is developed using a self-sensing tuning fork probe. The head need no external optical sensors to detect the deflection of the cantilever, which saves room on the head, and it can be directly fixed under an optical microscopic interferometric system. To enhance the system’s dynamic response, the frequency modulation (FM mode is adopted for the AFM head. The measuring data can be traceable through three laser interferometers in the system. The lateral scanning range can reach 25 mm × 25 mm by using a large-range positioning platform. A hybrid method combining AFM and white light scanning interferometry is proposed to improve the AFM measurement efficiency. In this method, the sample is measured firstly by white light scanning interferometry to get an overall coarse morphology, and then, further measured with higher resolution by AFM. Several measuring experiments on standard samples demonstrate the system’s good measurement performance and feasibility of the hybrid measurement method.

  12. Enhanced light element imaging in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Findlay, S.D., E-mail: scott.findlay@monash.edu [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Kohno, Y. [JEOL Ltd., Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Cardamone, L.A. [School of Physics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Ikuhara, Y. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nanostructures Research Laboratory, Japan Fine Ceramics Center, Nagoya 456-8587 (Japan); WPI Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Shibata, N. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    We show that an imaging mode based on taking the difference between signals recorded from the bright field (forward scattering region) in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy provides an enhancement of the detectability of light elements over existing techniques. In some instances this is an enhancement of the visibility of the light element columns relative to heavy element columns. In all cases explored it is an enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio of the image at the light column site. The image formation mechanisms are explained and the technique is compared with earlier approaches. Experimental data, supported by simulation, are presented for imaging the oxygen columns in LaAlO{sub 3}. Case studies looking at imaging hydrogen columns in YH{sub 2} and lithium columns in Al{sub 3}Li are also explored through simulation, particularly with respect to the dependence on defocus, probe-forming aperture angle and detector collection aperture angles. - Author-Highlights: • We present a method for enhancing the visibility and reliability of imaging light elements in STEM. • The method involves taking the difference between signals on separate bright field detectors. • Experimental data for LaAlO{sub 3} are presented, and are shown to compare favourably with simulation. • Optimum imaging parameters are explored through simulation.

  13. Optimal experimental design for the detection of light atoms from high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gonnissen, J.; De Backer, A.; Den Dekker, A.J.; Martinez, G.T.; Rosenauer, A.; Sijbers, J.; Van Aert, S.

    2014-01-01

    We report an innovative method to explore the optimal experimental settings to detect light atoms from scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. Since light elements play a key role in many technologically important materials, such as lithium-battery devices or hydrogen storage

  14. Dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy techniques for size determination of polyurethane nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giehl Zanetti-Ramos, Betina [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil)], E-mail: betinagzramos@pq.cnpq.br; Beddin Fritzen-Garcia, Mauricia [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil); Schweitzer de Oliveira, Cristian; Avelino Pasa, Andre [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos e Superficie, Departamento de Fisica (Brazil); Soldi, Valdir [Grupo de Estudos em Materiais Polimericos, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Borsali, Redouane [Centre de Recherche sur les Macromolecules Vegetales CERMAV/CNRS, 38041 - Grenoble (France); Creczynski-Pasa, Tania Beatriz [Laboratorio de Bioenergetica e Bioquimica de Macromoleculas, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas (Brazil)

    2009-03-01

    Nanoparticles have applications in various industrial fields principally in drug delivery. Nowadays, there are several processes for manufacturing colloidal polymeric systems and methods of preparation as well as of characterization. In this work, Dynamic Light Scattering and Atomic Force Microscopy techniques were used to characterize polyurethane nanoparticles. The nanoparticles were prepared by miniemulsion technique. The lipophilic monomers, isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and natural triol, were emulsified in water containing surfactant. In some formulations the poly(ethylene glycol) was used as co-monomer to obtain the hydrophilic and pegylated nanoparticles. Polyurethane nanoparticles observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) were spherical with diameter around 209 nm for nanoparticles prepared without PEG. From AFM imaging two populations of nanoparticles were observed in the formulation prepared with PEG (218 and 127 nm) while dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements showed a monodisperse size distribution around 250 nm of diameters for both formulations. The polydispersity index of the formulations and the experimental procedures could influence the particle size determination with these techniques.

  15. Interface between light coupled to excited-states transition and ground-state coherence of rubidium atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Parniak, Michał; Wasilewski, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an interface between light coupled to transition between excited states of rubidium and long-lived ground-state atomic coherence. In our proof-of-principle experiment a non-linear process of four-wave mixing in an open-loop configuration is used to achieve light emission proportional to independently prepared ground-state atomic coherence. We demonstrate strong correlations between Raman light heralding generation of ground-state coherence and the new four-wave mixing signal. Dependance of the efficiency of the process on laser detunings is studied.

  16. Light-induced changes in an alkali metal atomic vapor cell coating studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibberd, A. M.; Bernasek, S. L. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Seltzer, S. J. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Balabas, M. V. [Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Morse, M. [Department of Materials Science Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho 83725 (United States); Budker, D. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States); Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2013-09-07

    The light-induced desorption of Rb atoms from a paraffin coating is studied with depth-profiling X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) using tunable synchrotron radiation. Following Rb exposure, shifts of the C1s signal to higher binding energies, as well as the appearance of lower binding energy components in the O1s region, were observed. These effects were diminished after irradiation with desorbing light. Additionally, following desorbing-light irradiation, changes in the depth-dependent concentration of carbon were observed. These observations offer an insight into the microscopic changes that occur during light-induced atomic desorption and demonstrate the utility of XPS in understanding atom-coating interactions.

  17. Optimal experimental design for the detection of light atoms from high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    OpenAIRE

    Gonnissen, J.; De Backer, A.; Den Dekker, A.J.; Martinez, G. T.; Rosenauer, A.; Sijbers, J.; Van Aert, S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: We report an innovative method to explore the optimal experimental settings to detect light atoms from scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) images. Since light elements play a key role in many technologically important materials, such as lithium-battery devices or hydrogen storage applications, much effort has been made to optimize the STEM technique in order to detect light elements. Therefore, classical performance criteria, such as contrast or signal-to-noise ratio, a...

  18. Atomic spectroscopy on fusion relevant ions and studies of light impurities in the JET tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunklev, M

    1999-03-01

    The spectrum and energy levels of C IV and the 3l-4l system of the Mg-like ions in the iron group elements have been investigated. This has led to several hundred identified transitions, many of them previously unknown. Using the Charge Exchange Diagnostic system at JET, ion temperatures, rotation velocities and densities have been derived from visible spectroscopic measurements on fully ionised light impurities, such as He, C, N and Ne. The existence of plume contribution from beam produced hydrogen-like ions has been proven beyond any doubt to affect the deduction of the active charge exchange signal of He II. In the case of C VI the plume signal was estimated to be at least a factor of five lower than the active charge exchange signal. Line integrated passive charge exchange emission between neutral background atoms and fully stripped impurity ions has been investigated and modelled. When the synthetic spectrum is fitted into the experimentally detected spectra the neutral background density can be deduced. The importance of including background atoms (H, D and T) as charge exchange donors, not only in state 2s, but also in state 1s, has shown to be crucial in high temperature shots. Transport of light impurities has been studied with gas puff injections into steady state H-mode plasmas. The results suggest that light impurities are transported as described by the neo-classical Pfirsch-Schlueter regime at the edge, whilst in the centre, sawtoothing, preferably to Banana transport, is mixing the plasma and increases the measured values on the diffusion. For the peaking of impurities in a steady state plasma an anomalous treatment was more in agreement with the experimental data. Certain confinement information, previously predicted theoretically as a part of the peaking equation, has been experimentally verified

  19. Measurement of 238U muonic x-rays with a germanium detector setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esch, Ernst I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jason, Andrew [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Miyadera, Haruo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoteling, Nathan J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Heffner, Robert H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adelmann, Andreas [PAUL SCHERRER INSTITUT; Stocki, Trevor [HEALTH CANADA; Mitchell, Lee [NAVAL RESEARCH LAB

    2009-01-01

    In the field of nuclear non-proliferation muon interactions with materials are of great interest. This paper describes an experiment conducted at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Switzerland where a muon beam is stopped in a uranium target. The muons produce characteristic muonic x-rays. Muons will penetrate shielding easily and the produced characteristic x-rays can be used for positive isotope identification. Furthermore, the x-rays for uranium isotopes lie in the energy range of 6-7 MeV, which allows them to have an almost optimal mean free path in heavy shielding such as lead or steel. A measurement was conducted at PSI to prove the feasibility of detecting muonic x-rays from a large sample of depleted uranium (several kilograms) with a germanium detector. In this paper, the experimental setup and analysis of the measurement itself is presented.

  20. The two-photon exchange contribution to muonic hydrogen from chiral perturbation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Peset, Clara

    2014-01-01

    We compute the spin-dependent and spin-independent structure functions of the forward virtual-photon Compton tensor of the proton at one loop using heavy baryon effective theory including the Delta particle. We compare with previous results when existing. Using these results we obtain the leading hadronic contributions, associated to the pion and Delta particles, to the Wilson coefficients of the lepton-proton four fermion operators in NRQED. The spin-independent coefficient yields a pure prediction for the two-photon exchange contribution to the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift, $\\Delta E_{\\rm TPE}(\\pi\\&\\Delta)=34(13)$ $\\mu$eV. We also compute the charge, $\\langle r^n \\rangle$, and Zemach, $\\langle r^n \\rangle_{(2)}$, moments for $n \\geq 3$. Finally, we discuss the spin-dependent case, for which we compute the difference between the four-fermion Wilson coefficients relevant for hydrogen and muonic hydrogen.

  1. Theory of the hyperfine structure of the S states of muonic tritium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynenko, A. P.; Martynenko, F. A.; Faustov, R. N.

    2017-06-01

    The hyperfine structure of the energy spectrum of the S levels of muonic tritium has been calculated using the quasi-potential method in quantum electrodynamics (QED). The α5- and α6-order effects on the polarization of vacuum, the structure and recoil of the nucleus, and relativistic corrections have been taken into account. The obtained numerical values of hyperfine splittings of 239.819 meV (1S state) and 29.965 meV (2 S state) can be treated as reliable estimates for comparing with future experimental data of the CREMA collaboration, and hyperfine structure interval Δ12 = 8Δ E hfs (2 S)-Δ E hfs (1 S) =-0.100 meV can be used for verifying the QED predictions. The resultant precision values of hyperfine splitting are also important for calculating the rates of formation of (μ dt) mesomolecules in muonic catalysis reactions.

  2. Sixth-Order Vacuum-Polarization Contribution to the Lamb Shift of the Muonic Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Kinoshita, T

    1999-01-01

    The sixth-order electron-loop vacuum-polarization contribution to the $2P_{1/2} - 2S_{1/2}$ Lamb shift of the muonic hydrogen ($\\mu^{-} p^+$ bound state) has been evaluated numerically. Our result is 0.005295(1) meV. This eliminates the largest uncertainty in the theoretical calculation. Combined with the proposed precision measurement of the Lamb shift it will lead to a very precise determination of the proton charge radius.

  3. Vacuum polarization and quadrupole corrections to the hyperfine splitting of P-states in muonic deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Martynenko, A P

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of quasipotential approach in quantum electrodynamics we calculate vacuum polarization and quadrupole corrections in first and second orders of perturbation theory in hyperfine structure of P-states in muonic deuterium. All corrections are presented in integral form and evaluated analytically and numerically. The obtained results can be used for the improvement of the transition frequencies between levels 2P and 2S.

  4. Light intensity stabilization based on the second harmonic of the photoelastic modulator detection in the atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lihong; Fang, Jiancheng; Li, Rujie; Jiang, Liwei; Ding, Ming; Wang, Wei

    2015-12-14

    The fluctuations of the probe light intensity seriously affect the performance of the sensitive atomic magnetometer. Here we propose a novel method for the intensity stabilization based on the second harmonic component of the photoelastic modulator (PEM) detection in the atomic magnetometer. The method not only could be used to eliminate the intensity fluctuations of the laser source, but also remove the fluctuations from the optical components caused by the environment. A relative fluctuation of the light intensity of 0.035% was achieved and the corresponding fluctuation of the output signal of the atomic magnetometer has decreased about two orders of magnitude from 4.06% to 0.041%. As the scheme proposed here only contains optical devices and does not require additional feedback controlled equipments, it is especially suitable for the integration of the atomic magnetometer.

  5. Nonlocal Response of Metallic Nanospheres Probed by Light, Electrons, and Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Yan, Wei; Raza, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by recent measurements on individual metallic nanospheres that cannot be explained with traditional classical electrodynamics, we theoretically investigate the effects of nonlocal response by metallic nanospheres in three distinct settings: atomic spontaneous emission, electron energy loss...... spectroscopy, and light scattering. These constitute two near-field and one far-field measurements, with zero-, one-, and two-dimensional excitation sources, respectively. We search for the clearest signatures of hydrodynamic pressure waves in nanospheres. We employ a linearized hydrodynamic model, and Mie......–Lorenz theory is applied for each case. Nonlocal response shows its mark in all three configurations, but for the two near-field measurements, we predict especially pronounced nonlocal effects that are not exhibited in far-field measurements. Associated with every multipole order is not only a single...

  6. Emission Channeling Studies on the Behaviour of Light Alkali Atoms in Wide-Band-Gap Semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Recknagel, E; Quintel, H

    2002-01-01

    % IS342 \\\\ \\\\ A major problem in the development of electronic devices based on diamond and wide-band-gap II-VI compound semiconductors, like ZnSe, is the extreme difficulty of either n- or p-type doping. The only reports of successful n-type doping of diamond involves ion implanted Li, which was found to be an intersititial donor. Recent theoretical calculations suggest that Na, P and N dopant atoms are also good candidates for n-type doping of diamond. No experimental evidence has been obtained up to now, mainly because of the complex and partly unresolved defect situation created during ion implantation, which is necessary to incorporate potential donor atoms into diamond. \\\\ \\\\In the case of ZnSe, considerable effort has been invested in trying to fabricate pn-junctions in order to make efficient, blue-light emitting diodes. However, it has proved to be very difficult to obtain p-type ZnSe, mainly because of electrical compensation related to background donor impurities. Li and Na are believed to be ampho...

  7. Representation-free description of light-pulse atom interferometry including non-inertial effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinert, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.kleinert@uni-ulm.de [Institut für Quantenphysik and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology (IQST), Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Kajari, Endre; Roura, Albert [Institut für Quantenphysik and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology (IQST), Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Schleich, Wolfgang P. [Institut für Quantenphysik and Center for Integrated Quantum Science and Technology (IQST), Universität Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 11, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Texas A& M University Institute for Advanced Study (TIAS), Institute for Quantum Science and Engineering (IQSE) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A& M University College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States)

    2015-12-30

    Light-pulse atom interferometers rely on the wave nature of matter and its manipulation with coherent laser pulses. They are used for precise gravimetry and inertial sensing as well as for accurate measurements of fundamental constants. Reaching higher precision requires longer interferometer times which are naturally encountered in microgravity environments such as drop-tower facilities, sounding rockets and dedicated satellite missions aiming at fundamental quantum physics in space. In all those cases, it is necessary to consider arbitrary trajectories and varying orientations of the interferometer set-up in non-inertial frames of reference. Here we provide a versatile representation-free description of atom interferometry entirely based on operator algebra to address this general situation. We show how to analytically determine the phase shift as well as the visibility of interferometers with an arbitrary number of pulses including the effects of local gravitational accelerations, gravity gradients, the rotation of the lasers and non-inertial frames of reference. Our method conveniently unifies previous results and facilitates the investigation of novel interferometer geometries.

  8. Storage and retrieval of (3+1)-dimensional weak-light bullets and vortices in a coherent atomic gas

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Zhiming; Li, Hui-jun; Hang, Chao; Huang, Guoxiang

    2016-01-01

    A robust light storage and retrieval (LSR) in high dimensions is highly desirable for light and quantum information processing. However, most schemes on LSR realized up to now encounter problems due to not only dissipation, but also dispersion and diffraction, which make LSR with a very low fidelity. Here we propose a scheme to achieve a robust storage and retrieval of weak nonlinear high-dimensional light pulses in a coherent atomic gas via electromagnetically induced transparency. We show that it is available to produce stable (3+1)-dimensional light bullets and vortices, which have very attractive physical property and are suitable to obtain a robust LSR in high dimensions.

  9. The Quantum World of Ultra-Cold Atoms and Light - Book 1: Foundations of Quantum Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Crispin; Zoller, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Abstract The Table of Contents is as follows: * I - THE PHYSICAL BACKGROUND * 1. Controlling the Quantum World * 1.1 Quantum Optics * 1.2 Quantum Information * 2. Describing the Quantum World * 2.1 Classical Stochastic Processes * 2.2. Theoretical Quantum Optics * 2.3. Quantum Stochastic Methods * 2.4. Ultra-Cold Atoms * II - CLASSICAL STOCHASTIC METHODS * 3. Physics in a Noisy World * 3.1. Brownian Motion and the Thermal Origin of Noise * 3.2. Brownian Motion, Friction, Noise and Temperature * 3.3. Measurement in a Fluctuating System * 4. Stochastic Differential Equations * 4.1. Ito Stochastic Differential Equation * 4.2. The Fokker-Planck Equation * 4.3. The Stratonovich Stochastic Differential Equation * 4.4. Systems with Many Variables * 4.5. Numerical Simulation of Stochastic Differential Equations * 5. The Fokker-Planck Equation * 5.1. Fokker-Planck Equation in One Dimension * 5.2. Eigenfunctions of the Fokker-Planck Equation * 5.3. Many-Variable Fokker-Planck Equations * 6. Master Equations and Jump Processes * 6.1. The Master Equation * 7. Applications of Random Processes * 7.1. The Ornstein-Uhlenbeck Process * 7.2. Johnson Noise * 7.3. Complex Variable Oscillator Processes * 8. The Markov Limit * 8.1. The White Noise Limit * 8.2. Interpretation and Generalizations of the White Noise Limit * 8.3. Linear Non-Markovian Stochastic Differential Equations * 9. Adiabatic Elimination of Fast Variables * 9.1 Slow and Fast Variables * 9.2. Other Applications of the Adiabatic Elimination Method * III - FIELDS, QUANTA AND ATOMS * 10. Ideal Bose and Fermi Systems * 10.1. The Quantum Gas * 10.2. Thermal States * 10.3. Fluctuations in the Ideal Bose Gas * 10.4. Bosonic Quantum Gaussian Systems * 10.5. Coherent States * 10.6. Fluctuations in Systems of Fermions * 10.7. Two-Level Systems and Pauli Matrices * 11. Quantum Fields * 11.1 Kinds of Quantum Field * 11.2 Coherence and Correlation Functions * 12. Atoms, Light and their Interaction * 12.1. Interaction with the

  10. Superior visible light hydrogen evolution of Janus bilayer junctions via atomic-level charge flow steering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jie; Zhan, Guangming; Yu, Ying; Zhang, Lizhi

    2016-05-09

    Although photocatalytic hydrogen evolution (PHE) is ideal for solar-to-fuel conversion, it remains challenging to construct a highly efficient PHE system by steering the charge flow in a precise manner. Here we tackle this challenge by assembling 1T MoS2 monolayers selectively and chemically onto (Bi12O17) end-faces of Bi12O17Cl2 monolayers to craft two-dimensional (2D) Janus (Cl2)-(Bi12O17)-(MoS2) bilayer junctions, a new 2D motif different from van der Waals heterostructure. Electrons and holes from visible light-irradiated Bi12O17Cl2 are directionally separated by the internal electric field to (Bi12O17) and (Cl2) end-faces, respectively. The separated electrons can further migrate to MoS2 via Bi-S bonds formed between (Bi12O17) and MoS2 monolayers. This atomic-level directional charge separation endows the Janus bilayers with ultralong carrier lifetime of 3,446 ns and hence a superior visible-light PHE rate of 33 mmol h(-1) g(-1). Our delineated Janus bilayer junctions on the basis of the oriented assembly of monolayers presents a new design concept to effectively steer the charge flow for PHE.

  11. Quantum Zeno Effect and Light-Dark Periods for a Single Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Beige, A; Beige, Almut; Hegerfeldt, Gerhard C.

    1996-01-01

    The quantum Zeno effect (QZE) predicts a slow-down of the time development of a system under rapidly repeated ideal measurements, and experimentally this was tested for an ensemble of atoms using short laser pulses for non-selective state measurements. Here we consider such pulses for selective measurements on a single system. Each probe pulse will cause a burst of fluorescence or no fluorescence. If the probe pulses were strictly ideal measurements, the QZE would predict periods of fluorescence bursts alternating with periods of no fluorescence (light and dark periods) which would become longer and longer with increasing frequency of the measurements. The non-ideal character of the measurements is taken into account by incorporating the laser pulses in the interaction, and this is used to determine the corrections to the ideal case. In the limit, when the time between the laser pulses goes to zero, no freezing occurs but instead we show convergence to the familiar macroscopic light and dark periods of the co...

  12. Double resonance fequency light shift compensation in optically oriented laser-pumped alkali atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranov, A. A., E-mail: lexusbar@gmail.com; Ermak, S. V.; Sagitov, E. A.; Smolin, R. V.; Semenov, V. V. [St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    The contributions of the vector and scalar components to the magnetically dependent microwave transition frequency light shift are analyzed and the compensation of these components is experimentally demonstrated for the {sup 87}Rb atoms optically oriented by a laser tuned to the D{sub 2} line of the head doublet. The Allan variance is studied as a function of the averaging time for a tandem of optically pumped quantum magnetometers (OPQMs), one of which is based on a low-frequency spin oscillator while another is based on a quantum microwave discriminator with a resonance frequency that corresponds to magnetically dependent transitions between HFS sublevels with the extremal value of the magnetic quantum number. It is shown that the compensation of the scalar and vector components of the light shift in OPQMs reduces the Allan variance at averaging times that exceed hundreds of seconds compared to a quantum discriminator based on the magnetically independent 0–0 transition. In this case, the minimal Allan variance in OPQMs at the end resonance is achieved at considerably longer averaging times than in the case of the quantum discriminator that is tuned to the 0–0 transition frequency.

  13. Shining Light on Copper: Unique Opportunities for Visible-Light-Catalyzed Atom Transfer Radical Addition Reactions and Related Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Oliver

    2016-09-20

    Visible-light photoredox catalysis offers exciting opportunities to achieve challenging carbon-carbon bond formations under mild and ecologically benign conditions. Desired features of photoredox catalysts are photostability, long excited-state lifetimes, strong absorption in the visible region, and high reduction or oxidation potentials to achieve electron transfer to substrates, thus generating radicals that can undergo synthetic organic transformations. These requirements are met in a convincing way by Ru(II)(phenanthroline)3- and Ir(III)(phenylpyridine)3-type complexes and, as a low-cost alternative, by organic dyes that offer a metal-free catalyst but suffer in general from lower photostability. Cu(I)(phenanthroline)2 complexes have been recognized for more than 30 years as photoresponsive compounds with highly negative Cu(I)* → Cu(II) oxidation potentials, but nevertheless, they have not been widely considered as suitable photoredox catalysts, mainly because their excited lifetimes are shorter by a factor of 5 to 10 compared with Ru(II) and Ir(III) complexes, their absorption in the visible region is weak, and their low Cu(II) → Cu(I) reduction potentials might impede the closure of a catalytic cycle for a given process. Contrasting again with Ru(II)L3 and Ir(III)L3 complexes, Cu(I)L2 assemblies undergo more rapid ligand exchange in solution, thus potentially reducing the concentration of the photoactive species. Focusing on atom transfer radical addition (ATRA) reactions and related processes, we highlight recent developments that show the utility of Cu(I)(phenanthroline)2 complexes as photoredox catalysts, demonstrating that despite their short excited-state lifetimes and weak absorption such complexes are efficient at low catalyst loadings. Moreover, some of the inherent disadvantages stated above can even be turned to advantages: (1) the low Cu(II) → Cu(I) reduction potential might efficiently promote reactions via a radical chain pathway, and (2

  14. Measurements of atomic splittings in atomic hydrogen and the proton charge radius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessels, E. A.

    2016-09-01

    The proton charge radius can be determined from precise measurements of atomic hydrogen spectroscopy. A review of the relevant measurements will be given, including an update on our measurement of the n=2 Lamb shift. The values obtained from hydrogen will be compared to those obtained from muonic hydrogen and from electron-proton elastic scattering measurements. This work is funded by NSERC, CRC and CFI.

  15. Methods and apparatus of spatially resolved electroluminescence of operating organic light-emitting diodes using conductive atomic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersam, Mark C. (Inventor); Pingree, Liam S. C. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A conductive atomic force microscopy (cAFM) technique which can concurrently monitor topography, charge transport, and electroluminescence with nanometer spatial resolution. This cAFM approach is particularly well suited for probing the electroluminescent response characteristics of operating organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) over short length scales.

  16. Atomic Force Microscopy of Red-Light Photoreceptors Using PeakForce Quantitative Nanomechanical Property Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeger, Marie E.; Sorenson, Blaire A.; Thomas, J. Santoro; Stojković, Emina A.; Tsonchev, Stefan; Nicholson, Kenneth T.

    2014-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) uses a pyramidal tip attached to a cantilever to probe the force response of a surface. The deflections of the tip can be measured to ~10 pN by a laser and sectored detector, which can be converted to image topography. Amplitude modulation or “tapping mode” AFM involves the probe making intermittent contact with the surface while oscillating at its resonant frequency to produce an image. Used in conjunction with a fluid cell, tapping-mode AFM enables the imaging of biological macromolecules such as proteins in physiologically relevant conditions. Tapping-mode AFM requires manual tuning of the probe and frequent adjustments of a multitude of scanning parameters which can be challenging for inexperienced users. To obtain high-quality images, these adjustments are the most time consuming. PeakForce Quantitative Nanomechanical Property Mapping (PF-QNM) produces an image by measuring a force response curve for every point of contact with the sample. With ScanAsyst software, PF-QNM can be automated. This software adjusts the set-point, drive frequency, scan rate, gains, and other important scanning parameters automatically for a given sample. Not only does this process protect both fragile probes and samples, it significantly reduces the time required to obtain high resolution images. PF-QNM is compatible for AFM imaging in fluid; therefore, it has extensive application for imaging biologically relevant materials. The method presented in this paper describes the application of PF-QNM to obtain images of a bacterial red-light photoreceptor, RpBphP3 (P3), from photosynthetic R. palustris in its light-adapted state. Using this method, individual protein dimers of P3 and aggregates of dimers have been observed on a mica surface in the presence of an imaging buffer. With appropriate adjustments to surface and/or solution concentration, this method may be generally applied to other biologically relevant macromolecules and soft materials. PMID

  17. Nonlocal response of metallic nanospheres probed by light, electrons, and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Thomas; Yan, Wei; Raza, Søren; Jauho, Antti-Pekka; Mortensen, N Asger; Wubs, Martijn

    2014-02-25

    Inspired by recent measurements on individual metallic nanospheres that cannot be explained with traditional classical electrodynamics, we theoretically investigate the effects of nonlocal response by metallic nanospheres in three distinct settings: atomic spontaneous emission, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and light scattering. These constitute two near-field and one far-field measurements, with zero-, one-, and two-dimensional excitation sources, respectively. We search for the clearest signatures of hydrodynamic pressure waves in nanospheres. We employ a linearized hydrodynamic model, and Mie-Lorenz theory is applied for each case. Nonlocal response shows its mark in all three configurations, but for the two near-field measurements, we predict especially pronounced nonlocal effects that are not exhibited in far-field measurements. Associated with every multipole order is not only a single blueshifted surface plasmon but also an infinite series of bulk plasmons that have no counterpart in a local-response approximation. We show that these increasingly blueshifted multipole plasmons become spectrally more prominent at shorter probe-to-surface separations and for decreasing nanosphere radii. For selected metals, we predict hydrodynamic multipolar plasmons to be measurable on single nanospheres.

  18. Chiral Nematic Structure of Cellulose Nanocrystal Suspensions and Films; Polarized Light and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek G. Gray

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cellulosic liquid crystalline solutions and suspensions form chiral nematic phases that show a rich variety of optical textures in the liquid crystalline state. These ordered structures may be preserved in solid films prepared by evaporation of solvent or suspending medium. Film formation from aqueous suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals (CNC was investigated by polarized light microscopy, optical profilometry and atomic force microscopy (AFM. An attempt is made to interpret qualitatively the observed textures in terms of the orientation of the cellulose nanocrystals in the suspensions and films, and the changes in orientation caused by the evaporative process. Mass transfer within the evaporating droplet resulted in the formation of raised rings whose magnitude depended on the degree of pinning of the receding contact line. AFM of dry films at short length scales showed a radial orientation of the CNC at the free surface of the film, along with a radial height variation with a period of approximately P/2, ascribed to the anisotropic shrinkage of the chiral nematic structure.

  19. Hyperfine spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen and the PSI Lamb shift experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczak, Andrzej [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Bakalov, Dimitar, E-mail: dbakalov@inrne.bas.bg [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tsarigradsko chaussee 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Stoychev, Lyubomir [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, Via A. Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); The Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, 34014 Trieste (Italy); Vacchi, Andrea [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, Via A. Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2012-06-15

    The recent Lamb shift experiment at PSI and the discussions about the incompatibility of the proton radii extracted using different methods have revived the interest in the measurement of the hyperfine splitting of the ground state in muonic hydrogen. We summarize the existing experimental ideas for this measurement and analyze quantitatively the main methodological difficulties, expected to be related to the required power of the IR laser source, the signal-to-noise ratio and other systematic factors. An elaborate model is developed to estimate the statistical uncertainty of the experimental value of the hyperfine splitting.

  20. The effect of light soaking on crystalline silicon surface passivation by atomic layer deposited Al2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Baochen; Stangl, Rolf; Mueller, Thomas; Lin, Fen; Bhatia, Charanjit S.; Hoex, Bram

    2013-01-01

    The effect of light soaking of crystalline silicon wafer lifetime samples surface passivated by thermal atomic layer deposited (ALD) Al2O3 is investigated in this paper. Contrary to other passivation materials used in solar cell applications (i.e., SiO2, SiNx), using thermal ALD Al2O3, an increase in effective carrier lifetime after light soaking under standard testing conditions is observed for both p-type (˜45%) and n-type (˜60%) FZ c-Si lifetime samples. After light soaking and storing the samples in a dark and dry environment, the effective lifetime decreases again and practically returns to the value before light soaking. The rate of lifetime decrease after light soaking is significantly slower than the rate of lifetime increase by light soaking. To investigate the underlying mechanism, corona charge experiments are carried out on p-type c-Si samples before and after light soaking. The results indicate that the negative fixed charge density Qf present in the Al2O3 films increases due to the light soaking, which results in an improved field-effect passivation. Numerical calculations also confirm that the improved field-effect passivation is the main contributor for the increased effective lifetime after light soaking. To further understand the light soaking phenomenon, a kinetic model—a charge trapping/de-trapping model—is proposed to explain the time dependent behavior of the lifetime increase/decrease observed under/after light soaking. The trap model fits the experimental results very well. The observed light enhanced passivation for ALD Al2O3 passivated c-Si is of technological relevance, because solar cell devices operate under illumination, thus an increase in solar cell efficiency due to light soaking can be expected.

  1. Nobel Prize in Physics 1997 "for development of methods to cool and trap atoms with laser light" : Steven Chu, Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and William D. Phillips

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    Prof.S. Chu presents "the manipulation of atoms and bio-molecules by laser light" : a brief history of the laser cooling and trapping of atoms developed over the past 15 years will be presented. The cooling and trapping technology is already being applied in numerous areas of science and engineering. Applications to be discussed include atomic clocks, atom interferometers, as well as studies in polymer dynamics and protein motion.

  2. Search for light scalar dark matter with atomic gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Hogan, Jason M; Rajendran, Surjeet; Van Tilburg, Ken

    2016-01-01

    We show that gravitational wave detectors based on a type of atom interferometry are sensitive to ultralight scalar dark matter. Such dark matter can cause temporal oscillations in fundamental constants with a frequency set by the dark matter mass, and amplitude determined by the local dark matter density. The result is a modulation of atomic transition energies. This signal is ideally suited to a type of gravitational wave detector that compares two spatially separated atom interferometers referenced by a common laser. Such a detector can improve on current searches for electron-mass or electric-charge modulus dark matter by up to 10 orders of magnitude in coupling, in a frequency band complementary to that of other proposals. It demonstrates that this class of atomic sensors is qualitatively different from other gravitational wave detectors, including those based on laser interferometry. By using atomic-clock-like interferometers, laser noise is mitigated with only a single baseline. These atomic sensors ca...

  3. The manipulation of atoms and bio-molecules by laser light

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, S

    1998-01-01

    A brief history of the laser cooling and trapping of atoms developed over the past 15 years will be presented. The cooling and trapping technology is already being applied in numerous areas of science and engineering. Applications to be discussed include atomic clocks, atom interferometers, as well as studies in polymer dynamics and protein motion. The talk also includes a video tape of DNA molecules being moved with optical tweezers.

  4. Precise atomic-scale investigations of material sputtering process by light gas ions in pre-threshold energy region

    CERN Document Server

    Suvorov, A L

    2002-01-01

    Foundation and prospects of the new original technique of the sputtering yield determination of electro-conducting materials and sub-atomic layers on their surface by light gas ions the pre-threshold energy region (from 10 to 500 eV) are considered. The technique allows to identify individual surface vacancies, i.e., to count individual sputtered atoms directly. A short review of the original results obtained by using the developed techniques is given. Data are presented and analyzed concerning energy thresholds of the sputtering onset and energy dependences of sputtering yield in the threshold energy region for beryllium, tungsten, tungsten oxide, alternating tungsten-carbon layers, three carbon materials as well as for sub-atomic carbon layers on surface of certain metals at their bombardment by hydrogen, deuterium and/or helium ions

  5. Model independent determination of the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and proton radius

    CERN Document Server

    Peset, Clara

    2014-01-01

    We obtain a model independent expression for the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift. This expression includes the leading logarithmic ${\\cal O}(m_{\\mu}\\alpha^6)$ terms, as well as the leading ${\\cal O}(m_{\\mu}\\alpha^5 \\frac{m_{\\mu}^2}{m_{\\rho}^2})$ hadronic effects. The latter are controlled by the chiral theory, which allows for their model independent determination. In this paper we give the missing piece for their complete expression including the pion and Delta particles. Out of this analysis and the experimental measurement of the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift we determine the electromagnetic proton radius: $r_p=0.8433(17)$ fm. This number is at 6.4$\\sigma$ variance with respect to the CODATA value. The accuracy of our result is limited by uncomputed terms of ${\\cal O}(m_{\\mu}\\alpha^5\\frac{m_{\\mu}^3}{m_{\\rho}^3},m_{\\mu}\\alpha^6)$. This parametric control of the uncertainties allows us to obtain a model independent determination of the error, which is dominated by hadronic effects.

  6. Model-independent determination of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen and the proton radius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peset, Clara; Pineda, Antonio [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Dept. of Physics and IFAE, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-03-01

    We obtain a model-independent expression for the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen. This expression includes the leading logarithmic O(m{sub μ}α{sup 6}) terms, as well as the leading O(m{sub μ}α{sup 5}(m{sub μ}{sup 2})/(m{sub ρ}{sup 2})) hadronic effects. The latter are controlled by the chiral theory, which allows for their model-independent determination. In this paper we give the missing piece for their complete expression including the pion and Delta particles. Out of this analysis, and the experimental measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen, we determine the electromagnetic proton radius: r{sub p}=0.8412(15) fm. This number is at 6.8σ variance with respect to the CODATA value. The accuracy of our result is limited by uncomputed terms of O(m{sub μ}α{sup 5}(m{sub μ}{sup 3})/(m{sub ρ}{sup 3}),m{sub μ}α{sup 6}). This parametric control of the uncertainties allows us to obtain a model-independent estimate of the error, which is dominated by hadronic effects. (orig.)

  7. Geneva University - Measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen: the proton radius puzzle

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY École de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 GENEVA 4 Tel: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Wednesday 12 May 2010 PARTICLE PHYSICS SEMINAR at 17.00 hrs – Stückelberg Auditorium Measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen: the proton radius puzzle Dr Aldo Antogninia , CREMA Collaboration, Max Planck Institute, Germany At the Paul Scherrer Institut, Switzerland, we have measured several 2S-2P transition frequencies in muonic hydrogen (µp) and deuterium (µd) by means of laser spectroscopy. This results in an order of magnitude improvement on the rms charge radius values of the proton and the deuteron. Additionally the Zemach radii and the deuteron polarizability are also inferred. The new proton radius value is deduced with a relative accuracy of 0.1% but strongly disagrees from CODATA. The origin of this discrepancy is not yet known. It may come from theo...

  8. Quantum physics of light and matter a modern introduction to photons, atoms and many-body systems

    CERN Document Server

    Salasnich, Luca

    2014-01-01

    The book gives an introduction to the field quantization (second quantization) of light and matter with applications to atomic physics. The first chapter briefly reviews the origins of special relativity and quantum mechanics and the basic notions of quantum information theory and quantum statistical mechanics. The second chapter is devoted to the second quantization of the electromagnetic field, while the third chapter shows the consequences of the light field quantization in the description of electromagnetic transitions.In the fourth chapter it is analyzed the spin of the electron, and in particular its derivation from the Dirac equation, while the fifth chapter investigates the effects of external electric and magnetic fields on the atomic spectra (Stark and Zeeman effects). The sixth chapter describes the properties of systems composed by many interacting identical particles by introducing the Hartree-Fock variational method, the density functional theory, and the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Finally,...

  9. Sensitive determination of the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms using near-resonant light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhichao; Long, Xingwu; Yuan, Jie; Fan, Zhenfang; Luo, Hui

    2016-09-01

    A new method to measure the spin polarization of optically pumped alkali-metal atoms is demonstrated. Unlike the conventional method using far-detuned probe light, the near-resonant light with two specific frequencies was chosen. Because the Faraday rotation angle of this approach can be two orders of magnitude greater than that with the conventional method, this approach is more sensitive to the spin polarization. Based on the results of the experimental scheme, the spin polarization measurements are found to be in good agreement with the theoretical predictions, thereby demonstrating the feasibility of this approach.

  10. Slow and stored light under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency and four wave mixing in an atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Nathaniel Blair

    The recent prospect of efficient, reliable, and secure quantum communication relies on the ability to coherently and reversibly map nonclassical states of light onto long-lived atomic states. A promising technique that accomplishes this employs Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT), in which a strong classical control field modifies the optical properties of a weak signal field in such a way that a previously opaque medium becomes transparent to the signal field. The accompanying steep dispersion in the index of refraction allows for pulses of light to be decelerated, then stored as an atomic excitation, and later retrieved as a photonic mode. This dissertation presents the results of investigations into methods for optimizing the memory efficiency of this process in an ensemble of hot Rb atoms. We have experimentally demonstrated the effectiveness of two protocols for yielding the best memory efficiency possible at a given atomic density. Improving memory efficiency requires operation at higher optical depths, where undesired effects such as four-wave mixing (FWM) become enhanced and can spontaneously produce a new optical mode (Stokes field). We present the results of experimental and theoretical investigations of the FWM-EIT interaction under continuous-wave (cw), slow light, and stored light conditions. In particular, we provide evidence that indicates that while a Stokes field is generated upon retrieval of the signal field, any information originally encoded in a seeded Stokes field is not independently preserved during the storage process. We present a simple model that describes the propagation dynamics and provides an intuitive description of the EIT-FWM process.

  11. Atomic physics with hard X-rays from high brilliance synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, S.; Gemmell, D.

    1996-08-01

    A century after the discovery of x rays, the experimental capability for studying atomic structure and dynamics with hard, bright synchrotron radiation is increasing remarkably. Tempting opportunities arise for experiments on many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interaction processes, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. Some of these possibilities are surveyed in general terms.

  12. New theoretical approaches to atomic and molecular dynamics triggered by ultrashort light pulses on the atto- to picosecond time scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pabst, Stefan Ulf

    2013-04-15

    The concept of atoms as the building blocks of matter has existed for over 3000 years. A revolution in the understanding and the description of atoms and molecules has occurred in the last century with the birth of quantum mechanics. After the electronic structure was understood, interest in studying the dynamics of electrons, atoms, and molecules increased. However, time-resolved investigations of these ultrafast processes were not possible until recently. The typical time scale of atomic and molecular processes is in the picosecond to attosecond realm. Tremendous technological progress in recent years makes it possible to generate light pulses on these time scales. With such ultrashort pulses, atomic and molecular dynamics can be triggered, watched, and controlled. Simultaneously, the need rises for theoretical models describing the underlying mechanisms. This doctoral thesis focuses on the development of theoretical models which can be used to study the dynamical behavior of electrons, atoms, and molecules in the presence of ultrashort light pulses. Several examples are discussed illustrating how light pulses can trigger and control electronic, atomic, and molecular motions. In the first part of this work, I focus on the rotational motion of asymmetric molecules, which happens on picosecond and femtosecond time scales. Here, the aim is to align all three axes of the molecule as well as possible. To investigate theoretically alignment dynamics, I developed a program that can describe alignment motion ranging from the impulsive to the adiabatic regime. The asymmetric molecule SO{sub 2} is taken as an example to discuss strategies of optimizing 3D alignment without the presence of an external field (i.e., field-free alignment). Field-free alignment is particularly advantageous because subsequent experiments on the aligned molecule are not perturbed by the aligning light pulse. Wellaligned molecules in the gas phase are suitable for diffraction experiments. From the

  13. Frequency Redistribution of Polarized Light in the Lambda-Type Multi-Term Polarized Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Casini, R

    2016-01-01

    We study the formation of polarized spectral lines in a Lambda-type multi-term atom, via both resonance and Raman scattering. We fully take into account the effects of partial redistribution of the frequency of the incident radiation, and the presence of atomic polarization in the lower states of the atomic model. Problems that can be modeled with this formalism include, for example, the formation of the Ca II H-K and IR triplet, the analogous system of Ba II, and the Ly{\\beta}-H{\\alpha} system of hydrogenic ions.

  14. Bound states of a light atom and two heavy dipoles in two dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosa, D. S.; Bellotti, F. F.; Jensen, Aksel Stenholm

    2016-01-01

    We study a three-body system, formed by a light particle and two identical heavy dipoles, in two dimensions in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. We present the analytic light-particle wave function resulting from an attractive zero-range potential between the light and each of the heavy particl...

  15. Accelerometer for Space Applications Based on Light-Pulse Atom Interferometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to build a compact, high-precision single-axis accelerometer based on atom interferometry that is applicable to operation in space environments. Based on...

  16. Accelerometer for Space Applications Based on Light-Pulse Atom Interferometry Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to design a compact, high-precision, single-axis accelerometer based on atom interferometry that is applicable to operation in space environments. Our...

  17. Prospect for detecting squeezed states of light created by a single atom in free space

    OpenAIRE

    Stobińska, Magdalena; Sondermann, Markus; Leuchs, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the possibilities of studying in detail the dynamics of spontaneous emission of a single photon by a single atom and measuring the transient degree of squeezing by means of full solid angle fluorescence detection.

  18. Near-field light detection of a photo induced force by atomic force microscopy with frequency modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Nobuo; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrated near-field light detection using a non contact-mode atomic force microscope (nc-AFM). This system obtains molecular-level resolution by reducing noise in the displacement detection of a Si cantilever. The Si cantilever probe tip was brought close to a glass with a patterned chromium film on a dove prism. The backside of the prism was irradiated by an intensity-modulated laser light to create an evanescent field at the glass surface. We obtained a near-field optical image of the chromium-patterned glass by detecting the amplitude modulation induced by the near-field light while the tip-sample distance was regulated by the frequency modulation method under atmospheric conditions.

  19. Nanowire photonic crystal waveguides for single-atom trapping and strong light-matter interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, S -P; Muniz, J A; Martin, M J; Norte, Richard; Hung, C -L; Meenehan, Seán M; Cohen, Justin D; Painter, Oskar; Kimble, H J

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of dispersion-engineered nanowire photonic crystal waveguides suitable for experiments in quantum optics and atomic physics with optically trapped atoms. Detailed design methodology and specifications are provided, as are the processing steps used to create silicon nitride waveguides of low optical loss in the near-IR. Measurements of the waveguide optical properties and power-handling capability are also presented.

  20. Interplay between radiation pressure force and scattered light intensity in the cooperative scattering by cold atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Bienaime, Tom; Chabe, Julien; Rouabah, Mohamed-Taha; Bellando, Louis; Courteille, Philippe W; Piovella, Nicola; Kaiser, Robin

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between the superradiant emission of a cloud of cold two-level atoms and the radiation pressure force is discussed. Using a microscopic model of coupled atomic dipoles driven by an external laser, the radiation field and the average radiation pressure force are derived. A relation between the far-field scattered intensity and the force is derived, using the optical theorem. Finally, the scaling of the sample scattering cross section with the parameters of the system is studied.

  1. Nobel Prize in Physics 1997 "for development of methods to cool and trap atoms with laser light" : Steven Chu, Claude Cohen-Tannoudji and William D. Phillips

    CERN Multimedia

    Audiovideo service

    1998-01-01

    Prof. C. Cohen-Tannoudji presents "manipulating atoms with light" . By using quasi-resonant exchanges of energy, linear and angular momentum between atoms and photons, it is possible to polarize atoms, to displace their energy levels and to control their position and their velocity. A few physical mechanisms allowing one to trap atoms and to cool them in the microKelvin, and even in the nanoKelvin range, will be described. Various possible applications of such ultracold atoms will be also reviewed.

  2. Tunable electronic structures of germanium monochalcogenide nanosheets via light non-metallic atom functionalization: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Wang, Yanli

    2016-08-17

    Germanium monochalcogenides, i.e. GeS and GeSe sheets, are isoelectronic analogues of phosphorene, which have been synthesized in recent experiments (P. Ramasamy et al., J. Mater. Chem. C, 2016, 4, 479). Utilizing first-principles calculations, we have investigated their tunable electronic and magnetic properties via light non-metallic atom (B, C, N, O, Si, P, S) functionalization. We find that on these GeS and GeSe sheets O and S adatoms prefer to locate at the top site above the Ge atom, while the other ones like to occupy the anion site, which push the original S/Se atom to the hollow site instead. O and S adatoms slightly affect the semiconducting behaviour of the doped systems, while B, C, N, Si, P ones will drastically modify their band structures and induce versatile spintronic properties. Through the supercell calculations, B and C adatoms are found to induce a bipolar semiconducting behaviour in the decorated systems, while the N/P adatom will cause a spin-gapless-semiconducting/nearly-half-metallic feature in them. The B/C/N/Si/P-substituted GeS/GeSe sheet can be formed by removing the hollow-site S/Se atom from the adatom-decorated structures, which exhibit an opposite semiconducting/metallic behaviour to their phosphorene counterparts. A general odd-even rule is proposed for this phenomenon, which shows that an odd (even) number of valence electron difference between the substitution and host atoms would cause a metallic (semiconducting) feature in the substituted systems. Our study demonstrates that atom functionalization is an efficient way to tailor the properties of GeS and GeSe nanosheets, which have adaptable electronic properties for potential applications in nanoelectronics and spintronics.

  3. The Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen and the proton radius from effective field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peset, Clara; Pineda, Antonio [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Grup de Fisica Teorica, Dept. Fisica and IFAE, Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain)

    2015-12-15

    We comprehensively analyse the theoretical prediction for the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen, and the associated determination of the proton radius. We use effective field theories. This allows us to relate the proton radius with well-defined objects in quantum field theory, eliminating unnecessary model dependence. The use of effective field theories also helps us to organize the computation so that we can clearly state the parametric accuracy of the result. In this paper we review all (and check several of) the contributions to the energy shift of order α{sup 5}, as well as those that scale like α{sup 6} x logarithms in the context of non-relativistic effective field theories of QED. (orig.)

  4. Chiral perturbation theory of muonic-hydrogen Lamb shift: polarizability contribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alarcon, Jose Manuel; Pascalutsa, Vladimir [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, Cluster of Excellence PRISMA Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Lensky, Vadim [University of Manchester, Theoretical Physics Group, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester (United Kingdom); Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-15

    The proton polarizability effect in the muonic-hydrogen Lamb shift comes out as a prediction of baryon chiral perturbation theory at leading order and our calculation yields ΔE{sup (pol)}(2P - 2S) = 8{sub -1}{sup +3}μeV. This result is consistent with most of evaluations based on dispersive sum rules, but it is about a factor of 2 smaller than the recent result obtained in heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory.We also find that the effect of Δ(1232)-resonance excitation on the Lamb shift is suppressed, as is the entire contribution of the magnetic polarizability; the electric polarizability dominates. Our results reaffirm the point of view that the proton structure effects, beyond the charge radius, are too small to resolve the 'proton radius puzzle'. (orig.)

  5. The Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen and the proton radius from effective field theories

    CERN Document Server

    Peset, Clara

    2015-01-01

    We comprehensively analyse the theoretical prediction for the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen, and the associated determination of the proton radius. We use effective field theories. This allows us to relate the proton radius with well-defined objects in quantum field theory, eliminating unnecessary model dependence. The use of effective field theories also helps us to organize the computation so that we can clearly state the parametric accuracy of the result. In this paper we review all (and check several of) the contributions to the energy shift of order $\\alpha^5$, as well as those that scale like $\\alpha^6\\times$logarithms in the context of non-relativistic effective field theories of QED.

  6. Bound-state field theory approach to proton structure effects in muonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Mohr, Peter J; Sapirstein, J

    2013-01-01

    A bound-state field theory approach to muonic hydrogen is set up using a variant of the Furry representation in which the lowest-order Hamiltonian describes a muon in the presence of a point Coulomb field, but the origin of the binding field is taken to be three charged quarks in the proton which are modeled as Dirac particles that move freely within a spherical well. Bound-state field theory techniques are used to evaluate one- and two-photon effects. Particular attention is paid to two-photon exchange diagrams, which include the effect of proton polarizability. In addition the modification of the electromagnetic self energy of the proton by the electric field of the muon is examined. Finally, the model is used to carry out a calculation of the static electric polarizability of the proton.

  7. Lamb Shift in Muonic Hydrogen. I. Verification and Update of Theoretical Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Jentschura, U D

    2010-01-01

    In view of the recently observed discrepancy of theory and experiment for muonic hydrogen [R. Pohl et al., Nature vol. 466, p. 213 (2010)], we reexamine the theory on which the quantum electrodynamic (QED) predictions are based. In particular, we update the theory of the 2P-2S Lamb shift, by calculating the self-energy of the bound muon in the full Coulomb+vacuum polarization (Uehling) potential. We also investigate the relativistic two-body corrections to the vacuum polarization shift, and we analyze the influence of the shape of the nuclear charge distribution on the proton radius determination. The uncertainty associated with the third Zemach moment _2 in the determination of the proton radius from the measurement is estimated. An updated theoretical prediction for the 2S-2P transition is given.

  8. Creating fractional quantum Hall states with atomic clusters using light-assisted insertion of angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junyi; Beugnon, Jérôme; Nascimbene, Sylvain

    2016-10-01

    We describe a protocol to prepare clusters of ultracold bosonic atoms in strongly interacting states reminiscent of fractional quantum Hall states. Our scheme consists in injecting a controlled amount of angular momentum to an atomic gas using Raman transitions carrying orbital angular momentum. By injecting one unit of angular momentum per atom, one realizes a single-vortex state, which is well described by mean-field theory for large enough particle numbers. We also present schemes to realize fractional quantum Hall states, namely, the bosonic Laughlin and Moore-Read states. We investigate the requirements for adiabatic nucleation of such topological states, in particular comparing linear Landau-Zener ramps and arbitrary ramps obtained from optimized control methods. We also show that this protocol requires excellent control over the isotropic character of the trapping potential.

  9. Two-color above threshold ionization of atoms and ions in XUV Bessel beams and combined with intense laser light

    CERN Document Server

    Seipt, D; Surzhykov, A; Fritzsche, S

    2016-01-01

    The two-color above-threshold ionization (ATI) of atoms and ions is investigated for a vortex Bessel beam in the presence of a strong near-infrared (NIR) light field. While the photoionization is caused by the photons from the weak but extreme ultra-violet (XUV) vortex Bessel beam, the energy and angular distribution of the photoelectrons and their sideband structure are affected by the plane-wave NIR field. We here explore the energy spectra and angular emission of the photoelectrons in such two-color fields as a function of the size and location of the target (atoms) with regard to the beam axis. In addition, analogue to the circular dichroism in typical two-color ATI experiments with circularly polarized light, we define and discuss seven different dichroism signals for such vortex Bessel beams that arise from the various combinations of the orbital and spin angular momenta of the two light fields. For localized targets, it is found that these dichroism signals strongly depend on the size and position of t...

  10. Ladder-type electromagnetically induced transparency using nanofiber-guided light in a warm atomic vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, D E; Pittman, T B

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate ladder-type electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) using an optical nanofiber suspended in a warm rubidium vapor. The signal and control fields are both guided along the nanofiber, which enables strong nonlinear interactions with the surrounding atoms at relatively low powers. Transit-time broadening is found to be a significant EIT decoherence mechanism in this tightly-confined waveguiding geometry. Nonetheless, we observe significant EIT and controlled polarization rotation using control-field powers of only a few microWatts in this relatively robust warm-atom nanofiber system.

  11. Magneto-optical trap formed by elliptically polarised light waves for Mg atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudnikov, O. N.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.; Goncharov, A. N.

    2016-07-01

    We consider a magneto-optical trap (MOT) formed by elliptically polarised waves for 24Mg atoms on a closed optical 3P2 → 3D3 (λ = 383.8 nm) transition in the ɛ - θ - ɛ¯ configuration of the field. Compared with a known MOT formed by circularly polarised waves (σ+ - σ- configuration), the suggested configuration of the trap formed by fields of ɛ - θ - ɛ¯ configuration allows deeper sub-Doppler cooling of trapped 24Mg atoms, which cannot be implemented in a conventional trap formed by fields of σ+ - σ- configuration.

  12. Engineering an atom-interferometer with modulated light-induced $3 \\pi$ spin-orbit coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Olson, Abraham J; Blasing, David B; Niffenegger, Robert J; Chen, Yong P

    2015-01-01

    We have developed an experimental method to modify the single-particle dispersion using periodic modulation of Raman beams which couple two spin-states of an ultracold atomic gas. The modulation introduces a new coupling between Raman-induced spin-orbit-coupled dressed bands, creating a second generation of dressed-state eigenlevels that feature both a novel 3{\\pi} spin-orbit coupling and a pair of avoided crossings, which is used to realize an atomic interferometer. The spin polarization and energies of these eigenlevels are characterized by studying the transport of a Bose-Einstein condensate in this system, including observing a Stueckelberg interference.

  13. Transmission enhancement of ultraslow light in an atom shelved model of spectral hole burning solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Byoung S; Hahn, Joonsung

    2009-05-25

    We present transmission enhancement of ultraslow light in an inhomogeneously broadened spectral hole-burning solid medium by using precedent dummy light. The function of the dummy light is to burn a half-depth narrow spectral hole in an optically shelved solid system and to maintain the system optically transparent to the probe light, where the probe must experiences ultraslow group velocity due to the narrow spectral hole. The observed transmission increase is as high as 7 times compared with self-induced ultraslow light [J. Hahn and B. S. Ham, Opt. Express 16, 16723 (2008)], where the transmission enhancement is equivalent to 10(5) amplification considering an optical depth of d = 10.

  14. The excitation of a two-level atom by a propagating light pulse

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yimin; Scarani, Valerio

    2010-01-01

    State mapping between atoms and photons, and photon-photon interactions play an important role in scalable quantum information processing. We consider the interaction of a two-level atom with a quantized \\textit{propagating} pulse in free space and study the probability $P_e(t)$ of finding the atom in the excited state at any time $t$. This probability is expected to depend on (i) the quantum state of the pulse field and (ii) the overlap between the pulse and the dipole pattern of the atomic spontaneous emission. In the full three-dimensional vector model for the field, we show that the second effect is captured by a single parameter $\\Lambda\\in[0,8\\pi/3]$, obtained by weighing the numerical aperture with the dipole pattern. Then $P_e(t)$ can be obtained by solving time-dependent Heisenberg-Langevin equations. We provide detailed solutions for both single-photon states and coherent states and for various shapes of the pulse.

  15. Inelastic scattering of light by a cold trapped atom: Effects of the quantum center-of-mass motion

    CERN Document Server

    Bienert, M; Morigi, G; Bienert, Marc; Merkel, Wolfgang; Morigi, Giovanna

    2005-01-01

    The light scattered by a cold trapped ion, which is in the stationary state of laser cooling, presents features due to the mechanical effects of atom-photon interaction. These features appear as additional peaks (sidebands) in the spectrum of resonance fluorescence. Among these sidebands the literature has discussed the Stokes and anti-Stokes components, namely the sidebands of the elastic peak. In this manuscript we show that the motion also gives rise to sidebands of the inelastic peaks. These are not always visible, but, as we show, can be measured in parameter regimes which are experimentally accessible.

  16. Bound states of a light atom and two heavy dipoles in two dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Rosa, D S; Jensen, A S; Krein, G; Yamashita, M T

    2016-01-01

    We study a three-body system, formed by a light particle and two identical heavy dipoles, in two dimensions in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. We present the analytic light-particle wave function resulting from an attractive zero-range potential between the light and each of the heavy particles. It expresses the large-distance universal properties which must be reproduced by all realistic short-range interactions. We calculate the three-body spectrum for zero heavy-heavy interaction as function of light to heavy mass ratio. We discuss the relatively small deviations from Coulomb estimates and the degeneracies related to radial nodes and angular momentum quantum numbers. We include a repulsive dipole-dipole interaction and investigate the three-body solutions as functions of strength and dipole direction. Avoided crossings occur between levels localized in the emerging small and large-distance minima, respectively. The characteristic exchange of properties like mean square radii are calculated. Simulation ...

  17. Proton polarisability contribution to the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen at fourth order in chiral perturbation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Birse, Michael C

    2012-01-01

    We calculate the amplitude T_1 for forward doubly-virtual Compton scattering in heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory, to fourth order in the chiral expansion and with the leading contribution of the gammaNDelta form factor. This provides a model-independent expression for the amplitude in the low-momentum region, which is the dominant one for its contribution to the Lamb shift. It allows us to significantly reduce the theoretical uncertainty in the proton polarisability contributions to the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen. We also stress the importance of consistency between the definitions of the Born and structure parts of the amplitude. Our result leaves no room for any effect large enough to explain the discrepancy between proton charge radii as determined from muonic and normal hydrogen.

  18. The $\\sigma$ exchange effect in the Lamb shift of muonic hydrogen by two photons and two pions exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Hai-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Based on the simple phenomenological $\\sigma \\pi \\pi$, $\\sigma N N$ and $\\pi \\pi \\gamma$ interactions, we estimate the $\\sigma$ exchange effect in the Lamb shift of muonic hydrogen. We at first calculate the effective couplings of $\\sigma\\mu\\mu$ by two photons and two pions exchange, then calculate the corresponding corrections to the energy shift of the 2S/2P states of muonic hydrogen. We find the correction to the energy shift of 2S state is about -14$\\mu$eV by the current used parameters, which is about $44\\%$ of the usual two photons exchange contribution, and is larger than the current experimental precision, and should be considered in the experimental analysis.

  19. Proton polarisability contribution to the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen at fourth order in chiral perturbation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birse, M.C.; McGovern, J.A. [University of Manchester, Theoretical Physics Division, School of Physics and Astronomy, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-15

    We calculate the amplitude T{sub 1} for forward doubly virtual Compton scattering in heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory, to fourth order in the chiral expansion and with the leading contribution of the {gamma}N{Delta} form factor. This provides a model-independent expression for the amplitude in the low-momentum region, which is the dominant one for its contribution to the Lamb shift. It allows us to significantly reduce the theoretical uncertainty in the proton polarisability contributions to the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen. We also stress the importance of consistency between the definitions of the Born and structure parts of the amplitude. Our result leaves no room for any effect large enough to explain the discrepancy between proton charge radii as determined from muonic and normal hydrogen. (orig.)

  20. Experimental study of muonic x-ray transitions in mercury isotopes. [Fermi distribution, B(E2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, A.A.; Miller, J.P.; Powers, R.J.; Zehnder, A.; Rushton, A.M.; Welsh, R.E.; Kunselman, A.R.; Roberson, P.; Walter, H.K.

    1978-01-01

    Muonic x-ray spectra were measured for /sup 198/ /sup 199/ /sup 200/ /sup 201/ /sup 202/ and /sup 204/Hg. These data were interpreted in terms of a two parameter Fermi distribution for the charge density. The spectroscopic quadrupole moments (Q/sub s/) of some of the 2/sup +/ nuclear states were inferred. For /sup 199/Hg the spectroscopic quadrupole moments of the first two excited states and the B(E2)'s connecting these states to the ground state were determined. For /sup 201/Hg the ground state quadrupole moment was obtained as well as several other E2 moments but the interpretation of the data was hampered by a possible incomplete knowledge of the nuclear scheme of this nucleus. The muonic isotope shifts were measured and interpreted in terms of deltaR/sub k/ and are compared to electronic x-ray and optical isotope shift measurements. 41 references

  1. Informal proposal for an Atomic Physics Facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.W.; Johnson, B.M.; Meron, M.

    1986-01-01

    An Atomic Physics Facility (APF) for experiments that will use radiation from a superconducting wiggler on the NSLS X-13 port is described. The scientific justification for the APF is given and the elements of the facility are discussed. It is shown that it will be possible to conduct a uniquely varied set of experiments that can probe most aspects of atomic physics. A major component of the proposal is a heavy-ion storage ring capable of containing ions with energies of about 10 MeV/nucleon. The ring can be filled with heavy ions produced at the BNL MP Tandem Laboratory or from independent ion-source systems. A preliminary cost estimate for the facility is presented.

  2. Light-Induced Hofstadter's Butterfly Spectrum of Ultracold Atoms on the Two-Dimensional Kagome Lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Jing-Min

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the energy spectrum of ultracold atoms on the two-dimensional Kagome optical lattice under an effective magnetic field,which can be realized with laser beams.We derive the generalized Harper's equations from the Schr(o)dinger equation.The energy spectrum with a fractal band structure is obtained by numerically solving the generalized Harper's equations.We analyze the properties of the Hofstadter's butterfly spectrum and discuss its observability.

  3. A self-consistent value of the electric radius of the proton from the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Karshenboim, Savely G

    2014-01-01

    Recently a high-precision measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen has been performed. An accurate value of the proton charge radius can be extracted from this datum with a high accuracy. To do that a sufficient accuracy should be achieved also on the theoretical side, including an appropriate treatment of higher-order proton-structure effects. Here we consider a higher-order contribution of the finite size of the proton to the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen. Only model-dependent results for this correction have been known up to date. Meantime, the involved models are not consistent either with the existing experimental data on the electron-proton scattering or with the value for the electric charge radius of the proton extracted from the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen. We consider the higher-order contribution of the proton finite size in a model-independent way and eventually derive a self-consistent value of the electric radius of the proton. The re-evaluated value of the proton charge radius is foun...

  4. The recoil correction to the proton-finite-size contribution to the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Karshenboim, Savely G; Ivanov, Vladimir G; Shelyuto, Valery A

    2015-01-01

    The Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen was measured some time ago to a high accuracy. The theoretical prediction of this value is very sensitive to the proton-finite-size effects. The proton radius extracted from muonic hydrogen is in contradiction with the results extracted from elastic electron-proton scattering. That creates a certain problem for the interpretation of the results from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift. For the latter we need also to take into account the two-photon-exchange contribution with the proton finite size involved. The only way to describe it relies on the data from the scattering, which may produce an internal inconsistency of theory. Recently the leading proton-finite-size contribution to the two-photon exchange was found within the external field approximation. The recoil part of the two-photon-exchange has not been considered. Here we revisit calculation of the external-field part and take the recoil correction to the finite-size effects into account.

  5. The effective electronic Hartree-Fock equations for the muonic molecules: Toward a muon-specific electronic structure theory

    CERN Document Server

    Rayka, Milad; Shahbazian, Shant

    2016-01-01

    In this communication, an effective set of the Hartree-Fock equations are derived only for electrons of the muonic systems, i.e., molecules containing a positively charged muon, conceiving the muon as a quantum oscillator. In these equations, a non-Coulombic potential is added to the orthodox coulomb and exchange potential energy terms, which describes the interaction of the muon and electrons effectively. The explicit form of the effective potential depends on the nature of muon vibrations and is derived for a combination of Cartesian Gaussian functions that are used to expand the muonic spatial orbital. The resulting effective Hartree-Fock equations are implemented computationally and used successfully, as a proof of concept, in the case of MuCN molecule, which results from replacing the proton of HCN molecule with a muon. The developed effective Hartree-Fock theory is quite general and in principle can be used for any muonic system while it is the starting point for a general effective electronic structure...

  6. Atom waveguide and 1D optical lattice using a two-color evanescent light field around an optical micro/nano-fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Fu; Xiang Yin; Ningyuan Li; Limin Tong

    2008-01-01

    We propose a two-color scheme of atom waveguides and one-dimensional(1D)optical lattices using evanescent wave fields of different transverse modes around an optical micro/nano-fiber.The atom guide potential can be produced when the optical fiber carries a red-detuned light with TE01 mode and a blue-detuned light with HE11 mode,and the 1D optical lattice potential can be produced when the red-detuned light is transformed to the superposition of the TE01 mode and HE11 mode.The two trapping potentials can be transformed to each other for accurately controlling mode transformation for the red-detuned light.This might provide a new approach to realize flexible transition between the guiding and trapping states of atoms.

  7. Light storage in a cold atomic ensemble with a high optical depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwang-Kyoon; Chough, Young-Tak; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2017-06-01

    A quantum memory with a high storage efficiency and a long coherence time is an essential element in quantum information applications. Here, we report our recent development of an optical quantum memory with a rubidium-87 cold atom ensemble. By increasing the optical depth of the medium, we have achieved a storage efficiency of 65% and a coherence time of 51 μs for a weak laser pulse. The result of a numerical analysis based on the Maxwell-Bloch equations agrees well with the experimental results. Our result paves the way toward an efficient optical quantum memory and may find applications in photonic quantum information processing.

  8. Light and/or atomic beams to detect ultraweak gravitational effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tartaglia Angelo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We shall review the opportunities lent by ring lasers and atomic beams interferometry in order to reveal gravitomagnetic effects on Earth. Both techniques are based on the asymmetric propagation of waves in the gravitational field of a rotating mass; actually the times of flight for co- or counter-rotating closed paths turn out to be different. After discussing properties and limitations of the two approaches we shall describe the proposed GINGER experiment which is being developed for the Gran Sasso National Laboratories in Italy. The experimental apparatus will consist of a three-dimensional array of square rings, 6m × 6m, that is planned to reach a sensitivity in the order of 1prad/√Hertz or better. This sensitivity would be one order of magnitude better than the best existing ring, which is the G-ring in Wettzell, Bavaria, and would allow for the terrestrial detection of the Lense-Thirring effect and possibly of deviations from General Relativity. The possibility of using either the ring laser approach or atomic interferometry in a space mission will also be considered. The technology problems are under experimental study using both the German G-ring and the smaller G-Pisa ring, located at the Gran Sasso.

  9. Nuclear recoil effect in the Lamb shift of light hydrogen-like atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Yerokhin, V A

    2015-01-01

    We report high-precision calculations of the nuclear recoil effect to the Lamb shift of hydrogen-like atoms to the first order in the electron-nucleus mass ratio and to all orders in the nuclear binding strength parameter $Z\\alpha$. The results are in excellent agreement with the known terms of the $Z\\alpha$ expansion and allow an accurate identification of the nonperturbative higher-order remainder. For hydrogen, the higher-order remainder was found to be much larger than anticipated. This result resolves the long-standing disagreement between the numerical all-order and the analytical $Z\\alpha$-expansion approaches to the recoil effect and completely removes the second-largest theoretical uncertainty in the hydrogen Lamb shift of the $1S$ and $2S$ states.

  10. Adiabatic approximation for a two-level atom in a light beam

    CERN Document Server

    Aftalion, Amandine

    2011-01-01

    Following the recent experimental realization of synthetic gauge magnetic forces, Jean Dalibard adressed the question whether the adiabatic ansatz could be math- ematically justified for a model of an atom in 2 internal states, shun by a quasi resonant laser beam. In this paper, we derive rigorously the asymptotic model guessed by the physicists, and show that this asymptotic analysis contains the in- formation about the presence of vortices. Surprisingly the main difficulties do not come from the nonlinear part but from the linear Hamiltonian. More precisely, the analysis of the nonlinear minimization problem and its asymptotic reduction to simpler ones, relies on an accurate partition of low and high frequencies (or mo- menta). This requires to reconsider carefully previous mathematical works about the adiabatic limit. Although the estimates are not sharp, this asymptotic analysis provides a good insight about the validity of the asymptotic picture, with respect to the size of the many parameters initially ...

  11. Reversible storage of multiple light pulses in the EIT atomic medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuguang Zhu (祝曙光); Anshi Xu (徐安士); Yu Zhang (张宇); Hong Guo (郭弘); Xuzong Chen (陈徐宗); Deming Wu (吴德明)

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we first present a full numerical simulation for the trapping and retrieval procedure of eight continuing "1" Guassian pulses (i.e., "11111111") in the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT)medium. This simulation shows that an EIT medium has the ability to store multiple light pulses in a shape-preserving way. And we also, for the first time, give the formula evaluating the maximum number of pulses that can be stored by an EIT medium at one time. This work reveals a new possible way to the reversible storage of the photonic information.

  12. Weak-light rogue waves, breathers, and their active control in a cold atomic gas via electromagnetically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junyang; Hang, Chao; Huang, Guoxiang

    2016-06-01

    We propose a scheme to demonstrate the existence of optical Peregrine rogue waves and Akhmediev and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers and realize their active control via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT). The system we suggest is a cold, Λ -type three-level atomic gas interacting with a probe and a control laser fields and working under EIT condition. We show that, based on EIT with an incoherent optical pumping, which can be used to cancel optical absorption, (1+1)-dimensional optical Peregrine rogue waves, Akhmediev breathers, and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers can be generated with very low light power. In addition, we demonstrate that the Akhmediev and Kuznetsov-Ma breathers in (2+1)-dimensions obtained can be actively manipulated by using an external magnetic field. As a result, these breathers can display trajectory deflections and bypass obstacles during propagation.

  13. Thin film encapsulation for organic light-emitting diodes using inorganic/organic hybrid layers by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Ding, He; Wei, Mengjie; Li, Chunya; Wei, Bin; Zhang, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid nanolaminates consisting of Al2O3/ZrO2/alucone (aluminum alkoxides with carbon-containing backbones) grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) were reported for an encapsulation of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The electrical Ca test in this study was designed to measure the water vapor transmission rate (WVTR) of nanolaminates. We found that moisture barrier performance was improved with the increasing of the number of dyads (Al2O3/ZrO2/alucone) and the WVTR reached 8.5 × 10(-5) g/m(2)/day at 25°C, relative humidity (RH) 85%. The half lifetime of a green OLED with the initial luminance of 1,500 cd/m(2) reached 350 h using three pairs of the Al2O3 (15 nm)/ZrO2 (15 nm)/alucone (80 nm) as encapsulation layers.

  14. Influence of Virtual Photon Process on the Generation of Squeezed Light from Atoms in an Optical Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aranya B. Bhattacherjee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We show that a collection of two-level atoms in an optical cavity beyond the rotating wave approximation and in the dispersive-adiabatic and non-dispersive adiabatic regime constitutes a nonlinear medium and is capable of generating squeezed state of light. It is found that squeezing produced in the non-dispersive adiabatic regime is significantly high compared to that produced in the dispersive-adiabatic limit. On the other hand, we also show that it could be possible to observe the Dicke superradiant quantum phase transition in the dispersive-adiabatic regime where the Ã2 term is negligible. Such a system can be an essential component of a larger quantum-communication system.

  15. Cu2O quantum dots emitting visible light grown by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Young; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Park, Il-Kyu

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports the fabrication of the Cu2O quantum dots (QDs) emitting a controlled wavelength in the visible spectral range prepared by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Cu2O thin film layers formed on the Al2O3 surface showed large density of islands via Volmer-Weber growth mode, which resulting in QD formation. As the number of ALD cycles was increased from 60 to 480, the spatial density and mean diameter of the Cu2O QDs increased systematically from 4.02 × 1011/cm2 to 2.56×1012/cm2 and from 2.1 to 3.2 nm, respectively. The absorption spectral results indicated that the electron energy transition in the Cu2O QDs was a direct process with the optical band gaps decreasing from 2.71 to 2.15 eV with increasing QD size from 2.1 to 3.2 nm because of the quantum confinement effect. The Cu2O QDs showed broad emission peaks composed of multiple elementary emission spectra corresponding to the Cu2O QD ensembles with a different size distribution. As the size of Cu2O QDs decreased, the shoulder peaks at the higher energy side developed due to the quantum confinement effect.

  16. Measurements of the muonic component of air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Jeff

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Several methods have been developed by the Pierre Auger Collaboration to estimate the muon content of air showers from ultra-high energy cosmic rays. The data of the Pierre Auger Observatory will be compared with predictions based upon EPOS 1.99 and QGSJET-II-3 hadronic interaction models. In addition to the direct measures of the muonic content, the combination of a fluorescence detector and a muon sensitive surface array allows for a direct test of air shower simulations which is sensitive to both the shower core and large distances from the core. These methods reveal a deficit of muons in air shower simulations with proton primaries and that the energy assignment basedupon simulations of the surface array signal is systematically higher than that derived from the florescence detector. Summary: I will discuss the deficit in the number of muons currently predicted by simulations when compared to the data of the Pierre Auger Observatory. I will describe the methods used to measure the muon content, including sources of systematic uncertainty, and give their current results. Finally, I will present the Collaborations current understanding of the nature of the discrepancy, which could arise from an energy scale problem, composition, or deficiencies in the hadronic interaction models. See references [1, 2].

  17. Observation of electric quadrupole X-ray transitions in muonic thallium, lead and bismuth

    CERN Document Server

    Schneuwly, H; Engfer, R; Jahnke, U; Kankeleit, E; Lindenberger, K H; Pearce, R M; Petitjean, C; Schellenberg, L; Schröder, W U; Walter, H K; Zehnder, A

    1972-01-01

    Electric quadrupole X-ray transitions (5g to 3d, 4f to 2p, and 3d to 1s) have been observed in muonic Tl, Pb and Bi. From the 3 to 1 transitions, energy splittings of the n=3 levels were deduced. From a comparison of the relative intensities of E1 and E2 transitions the population ratios 5g/5f, 4f/4d, and 3d/3p were deduced. These ratios are well reproduced by a cascade calculation assuming a statistical initial population at n=20, including K, L and M shell conversion. In the case of /sup 205/Tl discrepancies between the experimental and the calculated 3d-1s/3p-is intensity ratio can be explained by nuclear excitation. From the 3p/sub 3/2/ to 1s/sub 1/2/ intensity in /sup 209 /Bi one can deduce the ratio of the radiationless to the X-ray transition width and give limits for prompt neutron emission from the 3d level. (23 refs).

  18. Enhanced light-vapor interactions and all optical switching in a chip scale micro-ring resonator coupled with atomic vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Stern, Liron; Mazurski, Noa; Levy, Uriel

    2016-01-01

    The coupling of atomic and photonic resonances serves as an important tool for enhancing light-matter interactions and enables the observation of multitude of fascinating and fundamental phenomena. Here, by exploiting the platform of atomic-cladding wave guides, we experimentally demonstrate the resonant coupling of rubidium vapor and an atomic cladding micro ring resonator. Specifically, we observed cavity-atom coupling in the form of Fano resonances having a distinct dependency on the relative frequency detuning between the photonic and the atomic resonances. Moreover, we were able to significantly enhance the efficiency of all optical switching in the V-type pump-probe scheme. The coupled system of micro-ring resonator and atomic vapor is a promising building block for a variety of light vapor experiments, as it offers a very small footprint, high degree of integration and extremely strong confinement of light and vapor. As such it may be used for important applications, such as all optical switching, disp...

  19. Spectral anomalies of the effect of light-induced drift of caesium atoms caused by the velocity dependence of transport collision frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkhomenko, A I [Institute of Automation and Electrometry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Shalagin, A M [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-31

    The spectral features of the light-induced drift (LID) velocity of caesium atoms in inert buffer gases are studied theoretically. A strong temperature dependence of the spectral LID line shape of Cs atoms in Ar or Kr atmosphere in the vicinity of T ∼ 1000 K is predicted. It is shown that the anomalous LID of Cs atoms in binary buffer mixtures of two different inert gases can be observed at virtually any (including ambient) temperature, depending on the content of the components in these mixtures. The results obtained make it possible to precisely test the interatomic interaction potentials in the experiments on the anomalous LID. (quantum optics)

  20. Strong light-matter interactions in heterostructures of atomically thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britnell, L; Ribeiro, R M; Eckmann, A; Jalil, R; Belle, B D; Mishchenko, A; Kim, Y-J; Gorbachev, R V; Georgiou, T; Morozov, S V; Grigorenko, A N; Geim, A K; Casiraghi, C; Castro Neto, A H; Novoselov, K S

    2013-06-14

    The isolation of various two-dimensional (2D) materials, and the possibility to combine them in vertical stacks, has created a new paradigm in materials science: heterostructures based on 2D crystals. Such a concept has already proven fruitful for a number of electronic applications in the area of ultrathin and flexible devices. Here, we expand the range of such structures to photoactive ones by using semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs)/graphene stacks. Van Hove singularities in the electronic density of states of TMDC guarantees enhanced light-matter interactions, leading to enhanced photon absorption and electron-hole creation (which are collected in transparent graphene electrodes). This allows development of extremely efficient flexible photovoltaic devices with photoresponsivity above 0.1 ampere per watt (corresponding to an external quantum efficiency of above 30%).

  1. Deterministic tuning of slow-light in photonic-crystal waveguides through the C and L bands by atomic layer deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Charlton J; Meric, Inanc; Shepard, Ken L; Wong, Chee Wei; Green, William M J; Vlasov, Yurii A; Assefa, Solomon

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate digital tuning of the slow-light regime in silicon photonic-crystal waveguides by performing atomic layer deposition of hafnium oxide. The high group-index regime was deterministically controlled (red-shift of 140 +/- 10 pm per atomic layer) without affecting the group-velocity dispersion and third-order dispersion. Additionally, differential tuning of 110 +/- 30 pm per monolayer of the slow-light TE-like and TM-like modes was observed. This passive post-fabrication process has potential applications including the tuning of chip-scale optical interconnects, as well as Raman and parametric amplification.

  2. Radiative nonrecoil nuclear finite size corrections of order α(Zα)5 to the hyperfine splitting of S-states in muonic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustov, R. N.; Martynenko, A. P.; Martynenko, G. A.; Sorokin, V. V.

    2014-06-01

    On the basis of quasipotential method in quantum electrodynamics we calculate nuclear finite size radiative corrections of order α(Zα)5 to the hyperfine structure of S-wave energy levels in muonic hydrogen and muonic deuterium. For the construction of the particle interaction operator we employ the projection operators on the particle bound states with definite spins. The calculation is performed in the infrared safe Fried-Yennie gauge. Modern experimental data on the electromagnetic form factors of the proton and deuteron are used.

  3. Radiative nonrecoil nuclear finite size corrections of order $\\alpha(Z\\alpha)^5$ to the hyperfine splitting of S-states in muonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Faustov, R N; Martynenko, G A; Sorokin, V V

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of quasipotential method in quantum electrodynamics we calculate nuclear finite size radiative corrections of order $\\alpha(Z\\alpha)^5$ to the hyperfine structure of S-wave energy levels in muonic hydrogen and muonic deuterium. For the construction of the particle interaction operator we employ the projection operators on the particle bound states with definite spins. The calculation is performed in the infrared safe Fried-Yennie gauge. Modern experimental data on the electromagnetic form factors of the proton and deuteron are used.

  4. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  5. Padé-Approximation to the $\\alpha^{3}$ Vacuum-Polarization Function and the Lamb Shift of the Muonic Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Kinoshita, T

    1999-01-01

    The contribution of the $\\alpha^3$ single electron-loop vacuum-polarization diagrams to the Lamb shift of the muonic hydrogen has been evaluated recently by two methods. One uses the exact parametric representation of the vacuum-polarization function while the other relies on the Padé approximation method. High numerical precision of these calculations enables us to examine the accuracy of the Monte-Carlo integration as well as that of the Padé method applied to the Lamb shift problem.

  6. Visible light generation of iodine atoms and I-I bonds: sensitized I(-) oxidation and I(3)(-) photodissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, James M; Abrahamsson, Maria; Farnum, Byron H; Meyer, Gerald J

    2009-11-11

    Direct 355 or 532 nm light excitation of TBAI(3), where TBA is tetrabutyl ammonium, in CH(3)CN at room temperature yields an iodine atom, I(*), and an iodine radical anion, I(2)(-*). In the presence of excess iodide, the iodine atom reacts quantitatively to yield a second equivalent of I(2)(-*) with a rate constant of k = 2.5 +/- 0.4 x 10(10) M(-1) s(-1). The I(2)(-*) intermediates are unstable with respect to disproportionation and yield initial reactants, k = 3.3 +/- 0.1 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). The coordination compound Ru(bpz)(2)(deeb)(PF(6))(2), where bpz is 2,2'-bipyrazine and deeb is 4,4'-(C(2)H(5)CO(2))(2)-2,2'-bipyridine, was prepared and characterized for mechanistic studies of iodide photo-oxidation in acetonitrile at room temperature. Ru(bpz)(2)(deeb)(2+) displayed a broad metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) absorption band at 450 nm with epsilon = 1.7 x 10(4) M(-1) cm(-1). Visible light excitation resulted in photoluminescence with a corrected maximum at 620 nm, a quantum yield phi = 0.14, and an excited state lifetime tau = 1.75 micros from which k(r) = 8.36 x 10(4) s(-1) and k(nr) = 5.01 x 10(5) s(-1) were abstracted. Arrhenius analysis of the temperature dependent excited state lifetime revealed an activation energy of approximately 2500 cm(-1) and a pre-exponential factor of 10(10) s(-1), assigned to activated surface crossing to a ligand field or MLCT excited state. Steady state light excitation of Ru(bpz)(2)(deeb)(2+) in a 20 mM TBAI acetonitrile solution resulted in ligand loss photochemistry with a quantum yield of 5 x 10(-5). The MLCT excited state was dynamically quenched by iodide with K(sv) = 1.1 x 10(5) M(-1) and k(q) = 6.6 +/- 0.3 x 10(10) M(-1) s(-1), a value consistent with diffusion-limited electron transfer. Excited state hole transfer to iodide was quantitative but the product yield was low due to poor cage escape yields, phi(CE) = 0.042 +/- 0.001. Nanosecond transient absorption was used to quantify the appearance of two

  7. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  8. Surface Plasmon-Assisted Excitation of Atomic Visible Light Spectral Lines in the Impact of Highly Charged Ions 126Xeq+ on Solid Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小安; 赵永涛; 李福利; 杨治虎; 肖国青; 詹文龙

    2003-01-01

    We measured the visible light spectral lines of sputtering atoms from solid surfaces of Al, Ti, Ni, Ta and Au which are impacted by 150keV126Xeq+ (6≤q≤30). It is found that intensities of the light spectral lines are greatly and suddenly enhanced when the charge state of the ion is raised up to a critical value. If assuming that potential energy released from the incidention due to capturing one electron is enough to excite a surface plasmon, we can estimate the critical charge states and obtain the results very well consistent with the measurements for the above-mentioned target materials. This means that a surface plasmon induced by one electron capture can enhance the excitation of atomic visible light spectral lines in the impact of a highly charged ion on a solid surface.

  9. Fidelity of quantum information for Ⅴ-type three-level atom interacting with a number state light field in Kerr medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Su-Mei; He An-Zhi; Ji Yun-Jing

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the evolution characteristics of the fidelity of quantum information for the Ⅴ-type three-level atom interacting with number state light field in Kerr medium are investigated. It shows that the periodicity of the evolutions of fidelity of quantum information is influenced by the Kerr coefficient, the photon number of the initial field and intensity of light. The evolutions of the fidelity of quantum information are modulated by the initial number state field. The Rabi oscillation frequency and the modulation frequency of fidelity for the field and the system vary with the value of the Kerr coefficient. The evolutions of fidelity of quantum information obviously show the quantum collapse and revival behaviours in the system of atom interacting with light field.

  10. Comparative analysis of clastogen-induced chromosome aberrations observed with light microscopy and by means of atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleva, Vanya Petrova; Dragoeva, Asya Pencheva; Andreeva, Andreana Ivanova; Burova, Marina Todorova; Georgiev, Sevdalin; Enchev, Dobromir Dimitrov

    2013-04-30

    Different types of chromosome aberration were observed in mouse bone-marrow cells after treatment with 4-bromo-N,N-diethyl-5,5-dimethyl-2,5-dihydro-1,2-oxaphosphol-2-amine 2-oxide (Br-oxaphosphole, Br-oxph) in a previous study. The aim of the present study is to perform a comparative analysis of these chromosomal damages observed with light microscopy (LM) and by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). The kinds of aberrations scored by LM were substantially corrected by images at the ultrastructural level. The AFM analysis excluded 29.0% of gaps and 33.3% of fusion-type aberrations. On the other hand, AFM revealed the presence of aberrations that were not visible under the LM. This indicates that only AFM images would provide precise information about the real nature of chromosomal damages. The results of our study revealed that the 'real gaps' represented about 50% of all the gaps visible under LM. Excluded 'false gaps' were detected via AFM as breaks or decondensed chromosome regions. These results would support the statement that gaps must be included when testing genotoxicity. The ultrastructural analysis also confirmed the validity of using LM in the mouse bone-marrow chromosome aberration test, as a tool for detecting genotoxicity of chemicals in routine studies. When there is a need for precise evaluation of chromosome damage, only AFM images can provide information on specific genotoxic effects.

  11. Seeing the Light: Visibility of the July '45 Trinity Atomic Bomb Test from the Inner Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2006-01-01

    In his "The Making of the Atomic Bomb," Richard Rhodes remarks of the July 16, 1945, Trinity atomic bomb test in New Mexico that "had astronomers been watching they could have seen it reflected from the moon, literal moonshine," an allusion to Ernest Rutherford's famous dismissal of the prospect of atomic energy. Investigating…

  12. Seeing the Light: Visibility of the July '45 Trinity Atomic Bomb Test from the Inner Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, B. Cameron

    2006-01-01

    In his "The Making of the Atomic Bomb," Richard Rhodes remarks of the July 16, 1945, Trinity atomic bomb test in New Mexico that "had astronomers been watching they could have seen it reflected from the moon, literal moonshine," an allusion to Ernest Rutherford's famous dismissal of the prospect of atomic energy. Investigating…

  13. Atom interferometer gyroscope with spin-dependent phase shifts induced by light near a tune-out wavelength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubko, Raisa; Greenberg, James; Germaine, Michael T St; Gregoire, Maxwell D; Holmgren, William F; Hromada, Ivan; Cronin, Alexander D

    2015-04-10

    Tune-out wavelengths measured with an atom interferometer are sensitive to laboratory rotation rates because of the Sagnac effect, vector polarizability, and dispersion compensation. We observed shifts in measured tune-out wavelengths as large as 213 pm with a potassium atom beam interferometer, and we explore how these shifts can be used for an atom interferometer gyroscope.

  14. Atom Interferometer Gyroscope with Spin-Dependent Phase Shifts Induced by Light near a Tune-Out Wavelength

    CERN Document Server

    Trubko, Raisa; Germaine, Michael T St; Gregoire, Maxwell D; Holmgren, William F; Hromada, Ivan; Cronin, Alexander D

    2015-01-01

    Tune-out wavelengths measured with an atom interferometer are sensitive to laboratory rotation rates because of the Sagnac effect, vector polarizability, and dispersion compensation. We observed shifts in measured tune-out wavelengths as large as 213 pm with a potassium atom beam interferometer, and we explore how these shifts can be used for an atom interferometer gyroscope.

  15. Pegram Nuclear Physics Laboratories Progress Report for January 1969 through December 1969 to the United States Atomic Energy Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-12-01

    4 m N4 P 0Ca 40 V’ - ) 0 ein M Y Cd 116 Sternheimer (I) corrections are an example, considerably decrease the confidence and precision with which...interaction with this distribution can be accurately calculated. This suggests that muonic atoms may provide a means of testing Sternheimer as well as...and the first excited states. A satisfactory fit to the experimental data has IR. M. Sternheimer , Phys. Rev. 105, 158 (1957 and earlier papers. 2H. L

  16. Measurement of topological muonic branching ratios of charmed hadrons produced in neutrino-induced charged-current interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kayis-Topaksu, A; Van Dantzig, R; De Jong, M; Oldeman, R G C; Güler, M; Köse, U; Tolun, P; Catanesi, M G; Muciaccia, M T; Winter, Klaus; Van de Vyver, B; Vilain, P; Wilquet, G; Saitta, B; Di Capua, E; Ogawa, S; Shibuya, H; Hristova, I R; Kawamura, T; Kolev, D; Meinhard, H; Panman, J; Rozanov, A; Tsenov, R V; Uiterwijk, J W E; Zucchelli, P; Goldberg, J; Chikawa, M; Song, J S; Yoon, C S; Kodama, K; Ushida, N; Aoki, S; Hara, T; Delbar, T; Favart, D; Grégoire, G; Kalinin, S; Makhlyoueva, I V; Artamonov, A V; Gorbunov, P; Khovanskii, V D; Shamanov, V V; Tsukerman, I; Bruski, N; Frekers, D; Hoshino, K; Kawada, J; Komatsu, M; Myanishi, M; Nakamura, M; Nakano, T; Narita, K; Niu, K; Niwa, K; Nonaka, N; Sato, O; Toshito, T; Buontempo, S; Cocco, A G; D'Ambrosio, N; De Lellis, G; De Rosa, G; Di Capua, F; Fiorillo, G; Marotta, A; Messina, M; Migliozzi, P; Scotto-Lavina, L; Strolin, P; Tioukov, V; Okusawa, T; Dore, U; Loverre, P F; Ludovici, L; Rosa, G; Santacesaria, R; Satta, A; Spada, F R; Barbuto, E; Bozza, C; Grella, G; Romano, G; Sirignano, C; Sorrentino, S; Sato, Y; Tezuka, I

    2005-01-01

    From 1994 to 1997, the emulsion target of the CHORUS detector was exposed to the wideband neutrino beam of the CERN SPS. In total about 100 000 charged-current neutrino interactions were located in the nuclear emulsion target and fully reconstructed. From this sample of events based on the data acquired by new automatic scanning systems, 2013 charm-decay events were selected by a pattern recognition program. They were confirmed as decays through visual inspection. Based on these events, the effective branching ratio of charmed particles into muons was determined to be Bμ = [7.3 ± 0.8 (stat) ± 0.2 (syst)] × 10âˆ'2. In addition, the muonic branching ratios are presented for dominating charm decay topologies. Normalization of the muonic decays to chargedcurrent interactions provides _μâˆ'μ+/_cc = [3.16 ± 0.34 (stat) ± 0.09 (syst)] × 10âˆ'3. Selecting only events with visible energy greater than 30 GeV gives a value of Bμ that is less affected by the charm production threshold ...

  17. Visible Light Generation of Iodine Atoms and I-ˆ’I Bonds : Sensitized I-ˆ’ Oxidation and I3-ˆ’ Photodissociation

    OpenAIRE

    Gardner, James M.; Abrahamsson, Maria; Farnum, Byron H.; Meyer, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    Direct 355 or 532 nm light excitation of TBAI3, where TBA is tetrabutyl ammonium, in CH3CN at room temperature yields an iodine atom, I?, and an iodine radical anion, I2??. In the presence of excess iodide, the iodine atom reacts quantitatively to yield a second equivalent of I2?? with a rate constant of k = 2.5 ± 0.4 ? 1010 M?1 s?1. The I2?? intermediates are unstable with respect to disproportionation and yield initial reactants, k = 3.3 ± 0.1 ? 109 M?1 s?1. The coordination compound Ru(b...

  18. Coherent generation and dynamic manipulation of double stationary light pulses in a five-level double-tripod system of cold atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao Qianqian; Zhang Xiaohang; Gao Junyan; Zhang Yan; Cui Cuili; Wu Jinhui [College of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2011-12-15

    We study a five-level double-tripod system of cold atoms for efficiently manipulating the dynamic propagation and evolution of a quantum probe field by modulating four classical control fields. Our numerical results show that it is viable to transform the quantum probe field into a pair of two-color stationary light pulses mutually coupled through two wave packets of atomic spin coherence. The pair of stationary light pulses can be released either from the sample entrance and exit synchronously or just from the sample exit with a controlled time delay. In addition, the two-color stationary light pulses are immune to the fast decay originating from the higher-order Fourier components of atomic spin and optical coherence, and may exhibit the quantum limited beating signals with their characteristic frequency determined by detunings of the four classical control fields. These results could be explored to design novel photonic devices, such as optical routing, beam splitter, and beat generator, for manipulating a quantum light field.

  19. Atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwindt, Peter [Albuquerque, NM; Johnson, Cort N [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-07-03

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which uses a pump light beam at a D1 or D2 transition of an alkali metal vapor to magnetically polarize the vapor in a heated cell, and a probe light beam at a different D2 or D1 transition to sense the magnetic field via a polarization rotation of the probe light beam. The pump and probe light beams are both directed along substantially the same optical path through an optical waveplate and through the heated cell to an optical filter which blocks the pump light beam while transmitting the probe light beam to one or more photodetectors which generate electrical signals to sense the magnetic field. The optical waveplate functions as a quarter waveplate to circularly polarize the pump light beam, and as a half waveplate to maintain the probe light beam linearly polarized.

  20. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Why is left right and right left in the mirror? Baffled by the basics of reflection and refraction? Wondering just how the eye works? If you have trouble teaching concepts about light that you don t fully grasp yourself, get help from a book that s both scientifically accurate and entertaining with Light. By combining clear explanations, clever drawings, and activities that use easy-to-find materials, this book covers what science teachers and parents need to know to teach about light with confidence. It uses ray, wave, and particle models of light to explain the basics of reflection and refraction, optical instruments, polarization of light, and interference and diffraction. There s also an entire chapter on how the eye works. Each chapter ends with a Summary and Applications section that reinforces concepts with everyday examples. Whether you need a deeper understanding of how light bends or a good explanation of why the sky is blue, you ll find Light more illuminating and accessible than a college textbook...

  1. Inclusive production of the /η and /ω mesons in Z decays, and the muonic branching ratio of the /ω

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEPH Collaboration; Heister, A.; Schael, S.; Barate, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J. M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Graugés, E.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Buchmüller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T. C.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, L.; Schlatter, D.; Schneider, O.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.; Badaud, F.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Wäänänen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.-C.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Spagnolo, P.; Halley, A.; Lynch, J. G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Thompson, A. S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Thompson, J. C.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C. K.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Pearson, M. R.; Robertson, N. A.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.-G.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Leroy, O.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Hüttmann, K.; Lütjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Settles, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Jacholkowska, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Veillet, J.-J.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, G.; Boccali, T.; Foà, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Norton, P. R.; Tomalin, I. R.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M.-C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A. M.; Taylor, G.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C. N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L. F.; Affholderbach, K.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S. R.; Berkelman, K.; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; Gao, Y.; González, S.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P. A.; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y. B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.; Dissertori, G.

    2002-02-01

    The inclusive production of the /η and /ω(782) mesons is measured in the π+π-π0 decay mode in hadronic Z decays and compared to model predictions. The analysis is based on 4 million hadronic Z decays recorded by the ALEPH detector between 1991 and 1995. The /η production rate for xp=pmeson/pbeam>0.10 is found to be 0.355+/-0.011stat+/-0.024sys per event, and the /ω production rate for xp>0.05 is measured as 0.585+/-0.019stat+/-0.033sys per event. The branching ratio for ω-->μ+μ- is investigated. A total of /18.1+/-5.9 events are observed, from which the muonic branching ratio is measured for the first time to be BR(ω-->μ+μ-)=(9.0+/- 2.9stat+/-1.1sys)×10-5.

  2. Proton form-factor dependence of the finite-size correction to the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Carroll, J D; Rafelski, J; Miller, G A

    2011-01-01

    The measurement of the 2P^{F=2}_{3/2} to 2S^{F=1}_{1/2} transition in muonic hydrogen by Pohl et al. and subsequent analysis has led to the conclusion that the rms radius of the proton differs from the accepted (CODATA) value by approximately 4%, corresponding to a 4.9 sigma discrepancy. We investigate the finite-size effects - in particular the dependence on the shape of the proton electric form-factor - relevant to this transition using bound-state QED with nonperturbative, relativistic Dirac wave-functions for a wide range of idealised charge-distributions and a parameterization of experimental data in order to comment on the extent to which the perturbation-theory analysis which leads to the above conclusion can be confirmed. We find no statistically significant dependence of this correction on the shape of the proton form-factor.

  3. New x-ray measurements in Helium-like Atoms increase discrepancy between experiment and theoretical QED

    CERN Document Server

    Chantler, Christopher T; Gillaspy, John D; Hudson, Lawrence T; Smale, Lucas F; Henins, Albert; Kimpton, Justin A; Takacs, Endre

    2014-01-01

    A recent 15 parts-per-million (ppm) experiment on muonic hydrogen found a major discrepancy with QED and independent nuclear size determinations. Here we find a significant discrepancy in a different type of exotic atom, a medium-Z nucleus with two electrons. Investigation of the data collected is able to discriminate between available QED formulations and reveals a pattern of discrepancy of almost 6 standard errors of experimental results from the most recent theoretical predictions with a functional dependence proportional to Z^n where n=4. In both the muonic and highly charged systems, the sign of the discrepancy is the same, with the measured transition energy higher than predicted. Some consequences are possible or probable, and some are more speculative. This may give insight into effective nuclear radii, the Rydberg, the fine-structure constant or unexpectedly large QED terms.

  4. Residual degeneracy from non-degenerate Landau levels of ultracold atoms in light-induced gauge potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, B.; Melo, J. Lemos de; Furtado, C.

    2016-10-01

    We study non-degenerate Landau levels of ultracold trapped atoms in two dimensions, subject to an U (1) × U(1) Abelian gauge field and a lateral confining potential along a specific direction. The Landau-level degeneracy is removed due to the presence of the lateral confining potential that makes the single-particle energy spectrum explicitly dependent on the transverse momentum. The effect of the finite size of the atomic cloud on the energy spectrum is to split each Landau level into a set of sub-levels, once the transverse momentum becomes quantized. We show that under appropriate conditions some energy sub-levels overlap leading to a residual degeneracy of the system. Through numerical calculations, we map the residual degeneracy as a function of the effective magnetic field strength. Finally, we briefly discuss future studies on the transport properties of this atomic system that can be considered an optically induced atomic waveguide.

  5. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Ditchburn, R W

    2011-01-01

    This classic study, available for the first time in paperback, clearly demonstrates how quantum theory is a natural development of wave theory, and how these two theories, once thought to be irreconcilable, together comprise a single valid theory of light. Aimed at students with an intermediate-level knowledge of physics, the book first offers a historical introduction to the subject, then covers topics such as wave theory, interference, diffraction, Huygens' Principle, Fermat's Principle, and the accuracy of optical measurements. Additional topics include the velocity of light, relativistic o

  6. Storage and conversion of quantum-statistical properties of light in resonant quantum memory on a tripod atomic configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losev, A. S.; Tikhonov, K. S.; Golubeva, T. Yu; Golubev, Yu M.

    2016-10-01

    We have considered theoretically the feasibility of broadband quantum memory based on the resonant tripod-type atomic configuration. In this case, the writing of a signal field is carried out simultaneously into two channels, and characterized by an excitation of two spin waves of the atomic ensemble. With simultaneous read out from both channels, quantum properties of the original signal are mapped onto the retrieval pulse no worse than in the case of memory based on a Λ-type atomic configuration. At the same time new possibilities are opened up for the manipulation of quantum states associated with sequential reading out (and/or sequential writing) of signal pulses. For example, a pulse in the squeezed state is converted into two partially entangled pulses with partially squeezed quadratures. Alternatively, two independent signal pulses with orthogonally squeezed quadratures can be converted into two entangled pulses.

  7. Control of Spontaneous Emission via a Single Elliptically Polarized Light in a Five-Level Atomic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Duo; LI Jia-Hua; DING Chun-Ling; YANG Xiao-Xue

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the features of the spontaneous emission spectra in a cold five-level atomic system coupled by a single elliptically polarized control field.We use wave function approach to derive the explicit and analytical expressions of atomic spontaneous emission spectra.It is shown that some interesting phenomena such as spectralline enhancement,spectral-line suppression,spectral-line narrowing,spectral-line splitting and dark fluorescence can be observed in the spectra by appropriately modulating the phase difference between the right-hand circularly (LHC) and left-hand circularly (RHC) polarized components of the elliptically polarized control field and the intensity of external magnetic field.The number of emission peaks,the positions of fluorescence-quenching points can be also controlled.Eurthermore,we propose an ultracold 87Rb atomic system for experimental observation.These investigations may find applications in high-precision spectroscopy.

  8. New Directions in X-Ray Light Sources or Fiat Lux: what's under the dome and watching atoms with x-rays (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcone, Roger

    2008-07-15

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: Molecular movies of chemical reactions and material phase transformations need a strobe of x-rays, the penetrating light that reveals how atoms and molecules assemble in chemical and biological systems and complex materials. Roger Falcone, Director of the Advanced Light Source,will discuss a new generation of x ray sources that will enable a new science of atomic dynamics on ultrafast timescales.

  9. The effective atomic number revisited in the light of modern photon-interaction cross-section databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manohara, S.R.; Hanagodimath, S.M.; Thind, K. S.

    2010-01-01

    The effective atomic number, Z(eff), has been calculated for fatty acids and cysteine. It is shown that Z(eff) is a useful parameter for low-Z materials at any energy above 1 key. Absorption edges of medium-Z elements may complicate the energy dependence of Z(eff) below 10 key. The notion of Z(ef...

  10. Coupled cavity QED for coherent control of photon transmission (II): Slowing light in coupled resonator waveguide doped with $\\Lambda $ Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, L; Sun, C P; Lu, Jing; Zhou, Lan

    2006-01-01

    In the first paper of our series of articles on photon transmission in the coupled resonator optical waveguide (CROW), we used the two time Green function approach to study the physical mechanism for the coherent control by doping two-level atoms. In present paper, we propose and study a hybrid mechanism for photon transmission in the CROW by incorporating the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) effect in the doping artificial atoms and the band structure of the CROW. Here, the configuration setup of system, similar to that in the first paper, consists of a CROW with homogeneous couplings and the artificial atoms with $\\Lambda$-type three levels doped in each cavity. Unlike the stimulated Raman process used in the first paper to reduce the three level systems into the two level ones, the roles of three levels are completely considered based on a kind of mean field approach where the collection of three-level atoms collectively behave as two-mode spin waves. Then the total system is reduced into an ...

  11. Understanding the Atomic-Level Chemistry and Structure of Oxide Deposits on Fuel Rods in Light Water Nuclear Reactors Using First Principles Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Zs.; O'Brien, C. J.; Brenner, D. W.; Andersson, D. A.; Stanek, C. R.

    2016-09-01

    The results of recent studies are discussed in which first principles calculations at the atomic level have been used to expand the thermodynamic database for science-based predictive modeling of the chemistry, composition and structure of unwanted oxides that deposit on the fuel rods in pressurized light water nuclear reactors. Issues discussed include the origin of the particles that make up deposits, the structure and properties of the deposits, and the forms by which boron uptake into the deposits can occur. These first principles approaches have implications for other research areas, such as hydrothermal synthesis and the stability and corrosion resistance of other materials under other extreme conditions.

  12. Super color purity green organic light-emitting diodes with ZrO2/zircone nanolaminates as a distributed Bragg reflector deposited by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianhua; Zhang, Hao; Zheng, Yanqiong; Wei, Mengjie; Ding, He; Wei, Bin; Zhang, Zhilin

    2017-01-01

    ZrO2/zircone nanolaminate thin films fabricated by atomic layer deposition were used for a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) in green organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). It is found that the novel ZrO2/zircone DBR structure significantly improves the light purity of green OLEDs without interfering with intrinsic electroluminescence properties. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the EL spectral band for the green OLEDs decreases with respect to increasing the ZrO2/zircone pairs. The FWHMs of OLEDs with 0, 2, 4, and 6 pairs of ZrO2/zircone layers are 72 nm, 48 nm, 24 nm, and 12 nm, respectively. A super-narrow FWHM of 12 nm is achieved by using six pairs of the DBR structure. The EQE is increased from 10.7% to 16.1% with four pairs of ZrO2/zircone layers.

  13. Analysis of Radiation Damage in Light Water Reactors: Comparison of Cluster Analysis Methods for the Analysis of Atom Probe Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Jonathan M; DaCosta, Gérald; Hatzoglou, Constantinos; Weekes, Hannah; Radiguet, Bertrand; Styman, Paul D; Vurpillot, Francois; Pareige, Cristelle; Etienne, Auriane; Bonny, Giovanni; Castin, Nicolas; Malerba, Lorenzo; Pareige, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Irradiation of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels causes the formation of nanoscale microstructural features (termed radiation damage), which affect the mechanical properties of the vessel. A key tool for characterizing these nanoscale features is atom probe tomography (APT), due to its high spatial resolution and the ability to identify different chemical species in three dimensions. Microstructural observations using APT can underpin development of a mechanistic understanding of defect formation. However, with atom probe analyses there are currently multiple methods for analyzing the data. This can result in inconsistencies between results obtained from different researchers and unnecessary scatter when combining data from multiple sources. This makes interpretation of results more complex and calibration of radiation damage models challenging. In this work simulations of a range of different microstructures are used to directly compare different cluster analysis algorithms and identify their strengths and weaknesses.

  14. Effects of ultraviolet light on B-doped CdS thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis method using perfume atomizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novruzov, V.D. [Department of Physics, Recep Tayyip Erdogan University, Rize (Turkey); Keskenler, E.F., E-mail: keskenler@gmail.com [Department of Nanotechnology Engineering, Recep Tayyip Erdogan University, Rize (Turkey); Tomakin, M. [Department of Physics, Recep Tayyip Erdogan University, Rize (Turkey); Kahraman, S. [Department of Physics, Mustafa Kemal University, Hatay (Turkey); Gorur, O. [Department of Physics, Abant Izzet Baysal University, Bolu (Turkey)

    2013-09-01

    Boron doped CdS thin films were deposited by spray pyrolysis method using perfume atomizer. The effects of ultraviolet light on the structural, optical and electrical properties of B-doped CdS thin films were investigated as a function of dopant concentration (B/Cd). X-ray diffraction studies showed that all samples were polycrystalline nature with hexagonal structure. It was determined that the preferred orientation of non-illuminated samples changes from (1 0 1) to (0 0 2) with B concentration. The c lattice constant of films decreases from 6.810 Å to 6.661 Å with boron doping. The XRD peak intensity increased with the illumination for almost all the samples. The lattice parameters of B-doped samples remained nearly constant after illumination. It was found that the optical transmittance, photoluminescence spectra, resistivity and carrier concentration of the B-doped samples are stable after the illumination with UV light. Also the effects of UV light on B-doped CdS/Cu{sub 2}S solar cell were investigated and it was determined that photoelectrical parameters of B-doped solar cell were more durable against the UV light.

  15. Effects of ultraviolet light on B-doped CdS thin films prepared by spray pyrolysis method using perfume atomizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novruzov, V. D.; Keskenler, E. F.; Tomakin, M.; Kahraman, S.; Gorur, O.

    2013-09-01

    Boron doped CdS thin films were deposited by spray pyrolysis method using perfume atomizer. The effects of ultraviolet light on the structural, optical and electrical properties of B-doped CdS thin films were investigated as a function of dopant concentration (B/Cd). X-ray diffraction studies showed that all samples were polycrystalline nature with hexagonal structure. It was determined that the preferred orientation of non-illuminated samples changes from (1 0 1) to (0 0 2) with B concentration. The c lattice constant of films decreases from 6.810 Å to 6.661 Å with boron doping. The XRD peak intensity increased with the illumination for almost all the samples. The lattice parameters of B-doped samples remained nearly constant after illumination. It was found that the optical transmittance, photoluminescence spectra, resistivity and carrier concentration of the B-doped samples are stable after the illumination with UV light. Also the effects of UV light on B-doped CdS/Cu2S solar cell were investigated and it was determined that photoelectrical parameters of B-doped solar cell were more durable against the UV light.

  16. A dead-zone free ⁴He atomic magnetometer with intensity-modulated linearly polarized light and a liquid crystal polarization rotator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T; Peng, X; Lin, Z; Guo, H

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate an all-optical (4)He atomic magnetometer experimental scheme based on an original Bell-Bloom configuration. A single intensity-modulated linearly polarized laser beam is used both for generating spin polarization within a single (4)He vapor and probing the spin precessing under a static magnetic field. The transmitted light signal from the vapor is then phase-sensitively detected at the modulation frequency and its harmonics, which lead to the atomic magnetic resonance signals. Based on this structure, a liquid crystal is added in our magnetometer system and constitutes a polarization rotator. By controlling the voltage applied on the liquid crystal, the light linear polarization vector can be kept perpendicular with the ambient magnetic field direction, which in turn provides the maximum resonance signal amplitude. Moreover, the system exhibits a magnetic-field noise floor of about 2pT/√Hz, which is not degraded due to the presence of the liquid crystal and varying magnetic field direction. The experiment results prove that our method can eliminate the dead-zone effect, improve the system spatial isotropy, and thus be suitable in mobile applications.

  17. Implications of Br(\\mu -> e \\gamma) and \\Delta a_\\mu on Muonic Lepton Flavor Violating Processes

    CERN Document Server

    Chua, Chun-Khiang

    2012-01-01

    We study the implications of the experimental results on the \\mu -> e\\gamma decay rate and the muon anomalous magnetic moment, on muonic lepton flavor violating processes, such as \\mu -> 3 e and \\mu N -> e N. We use a model independent approach in this analysis, where these processes are considered to be loop induced by exchanging spin 1/2 and spin 0 particles. We explore two complementary cases, which has no or has an internal (built-in) cancellation mechanism in amplitudes. Our main results are as following. (a) Bounds from rates are used to constrain parameters, such as coupling constants and masses. These constraints can be easily updated by simple scalings, if the experimental situations change. (b) The muon g-2 data favors non-chiral interactions. (c) In \\mu -> 3 e and \\mu N -> e N processes, Z-penguin diagrams may play some role, while box diagrams contributions are highly constrained. (d) In the first case (without any built-in cancellation mechanism), using the recent \\mu -> e\\gamma bound, we find th...

  18. Inclusive Production of the $\\omega$ and $\\eta$ Mesons in Z Decays, and the Muonic Branching Ratio of the $\\omega$

    CERN Document Server

    Heister, A.; Barate, R.; De Bonis, I.; Decamp, D.; Goy, C.; Lees, J.P.; Merle, E.; Minard, M.N.; Pietrzyk, B.; Boix, G.; Bravo, S.; Casado, M.P.; Chmeissani, M.; Crespo, J.M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, L.; Grauges, E.; Martinez, M.; Merino, G.; Miquel, R.; Mir, L.M.; Pacheco, A.; Ruiz, H.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Azzurri, P.; Buchmuller, O.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Clerbaux, B.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R.W.; Frank, M.; Gianotti, F.; Greening, T.C.; Hansen, J.B.; Harvey, J.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kado, M.; Mato, P.; Moutoussi, A.; Ranjard, F.; Rolandi, Gigi; Schlatter, D.; Schneider, O.; Sguazzoni, G.; Tejessy, W.; Teubert, F.; Valassi, A.; Videau, I.; Ward, J.; Badaud, F.; Falvard, A.; Gay, P.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, P.H.; Nilsson, B.S.; Waananen, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Vayaki, A.; Zachariadou, K.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J.-C.; Rouge, A.; Rumpf, M.; Swynghedauw, M.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Ciulli, V.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Antonelli, A.; Antonelli, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Chiarella, V.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G.P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Spagnolo, P.; Halley, A.; Lynch, J.G.; Negus, P.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Thompson, A.S.; Wasserbaech, S.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dhamotharan, S.; Geweniger, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E.E.; Putzer, A.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D.M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P.J.; Girone, M.; Marinelli, N.; Sedgbeer, J.K.; Thompson, J.C.; Ghete, V.M.; Girtler, P.; Kneringer, E.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.; Bowdery, C.K.; Finch, A.J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Pearson, M.R.; Robertson, N.A.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Sander, H.G.; Wachsmuth, H.; Zeitnitz, C.; Bonissent, A.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Leroy, O.; Payre, P.; Rousseau, D.; Talby, M.; Ragusa, F.; David, A.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Huttmann, K.; Lutjens, G.; Mannert, C.; Manner, W.; Moser, H.G.; Settles, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.F.; Heusse, P.; Jacholkowska, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Veillet, J.J.; Yuan, C.; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, T.; Foa, L.; Giammanco, A.; Giassi, A.; Ligabue, F.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciaba, A.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P.G.; Blair, G.A.; Cowan, G.; Green, M.G.; Medcalf, T.; Misiejuk, A.; Strong, J.A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Clifft, R.W.; Edgecock, T.R.; Norton, P.R.; Tomalin, I.R.; Bloch-Devaux, Brigitte; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lancon, E.; Lemaire, M.C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Konstantinidis, N.; Litke, A.M.; Taylor, G.; Beddall, A.; Booth, C.N.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Lehto, M.; Thompson, L.F.; Affholderbach, K.; Boehrer, Armin; Brandt, S.; Grupen, C.; Ngac, A.; Prange, G.; Sieler, U.; Giannini, G.; Rothberg, J.; Armstrong, S.R.; Berkelman, Karl; Cranmer, K.; Ferguson, D.P.S.; Gao, Y.; Gonzalez, S.; Hayes, O.J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; Kile, J.; McNamara, P.A., III; Nielsen, J.; Pan, Y.B.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J.H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wu, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Zobernig, G.

    2002-01-01

    The inclusive production of the omega(782) vector meson in hadronic Z decays is measured and compared to model predictions. The analysis is based on 4 million hadronic Z decays recorded by the ALEPH detector between 1991 and 1995. The production rate for x_p = p_meson/p_beam > 0.05 is measured in the omega -> pi^+ pi^- pi^0 decay mode and found to be 0.585 +- 0.019_stat +- 0.033_sys per event. Inclusive eta meson production is also measured in the same decay channel for x_p > 0.10, obtaining 0.355 +- 0.011_stat +- 0.024_sys per event. The branching ratio for omega -> mu^+ mu^- is investigated. A total of 18.1 +- 5.9 events are observed, from which the muonic branching ratio is measured for the first time to be BR(omega -> mu^+ mu^-) = (9.0 +- 2.9_stat +- 1.1_sys)*10^-5.

  19. The Software Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Javanainen, Juha

    2016-01-01

    By putting together an abstract view on quantum mechanics and a quantum-optics picture of the interactions of an atom with light, we develop a corresponding set of C++ classes that set up the numerical analysis of an atom with an arbitrary set of angular-momentum degenerate energy levels, arbitrary light fields, and an applied magnetic field. As an example, we develop and implement perturbation theory to compute the polarizability of an atom in an experimentally relevant situation.

  20. The Software Atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanainen, Juha

    2017-03-01

    By putting together an abstract view on quantum mechanics and a quantum-optics picture of the interactions of an atom with light, we develop a corresponding set of C++ classes that set up the numerical analysis of an atom with an arbitrary set of angular-momentum degenerate energy levels, arbitrary light fields, and an applied magnetic field. As an example, we develop and implement perturbation theory to compute the polarizability of an atom in an experimentally relevant situation.

  1. Visible Light-Induced Metal Free Surface Initiated Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of Methyl Methacrylate on SBA-15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Ma

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP is one of the most versatile techniques to modify the surface properties of materials. Recent developed metal-free SI-ATRP makes such techniques more widely applicable. Herein photo-induced metal-free SI-ATRP of methacrylates, such as methyl methacrylate, N-isopropanyl acrylamide, and N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate, on the surface of SBA-15 was reported to fabricate organic-inorganic hybrid materials. A SBA-15-based polymeric composite with an adjustable graft ratio was obtained. The structure evolution during the SI-ATRP modification of SBA-15 was monitored and verified by FT-IR, XPS, TGA, BET, and TEM. The obtained polymeric composite showed enhanced adsorption ability for the model compound toluene in aqueous conditions. This procedure provides a low-cost, readily available, and easy modification method to synthesize polymeric composites without the contamination of metal.

  2. Grain boundary atomic structures and light-element visualization in ceramics: combination of Cs-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuhara, Yuichi

    2011-01-01

    Grain boundaries and interfaces of crystals have peculiar electronic structures, caused by the disorder in periodicity, providing the functional properties, which cannot be observed in a perfect crystal. In the vicinity of the grain boundaries and interfaces, dopants or impurities are often segregated, and they play a crucial role in deciding the properties of a material. Spherical aberration (Cs)-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), allowing the formation of sub-angstrom-sized electron probes, can directly observe grain boundary-segregated dopants. On the other hand, ceramic materials are composed of light elements, and these light elements also play an important role in the properties of ceramic materials. Recently, annular bright-field (ABF)-STEM imaging has been proposed, which is now known to be a very powerful technique in producing images showing both light- and heavy-element columns simultaneously. In this review, the atomic structure determination of ceramic grain boundaries and direct observation of grain boundary-segregated dopants and light elements in ceramics were shown to combine with the theoretical calculations. Examples are demonstrated for well-defined grain boundaries in rare earth-doped Al(2)O(3) and ZnO ceramics, CeO(2) and SrTiO(3) grain boundary, lithium battery materials and metal hydride, which were characterized by Cs-corrected high-angle annular dark-field and ABF-STEM. It is concluded that the combination of STEM characterization and first-principles calculation is very useful in interpreting the structural information and in understanding the origin of the properties in various ceramics.

  3. Bottom production cross section from double muonic decays of b-Flavoured hadrons in 920 GeV proton-nucleus collision

    CERN Document Server

    Abt, I; Agari, M; Albrecht, H; Aleksandrov, A; Amaral, V S; Amorim, A; Aplin, S J; Aushev, V; Bagaturia, Yu S; Balagura, V; Bargiotti, M; Barsukova, O; Bastos, J; Batista, J; Bauer, C; Bauer, T S; Belkov, A; Belkov, Ar; Belotelov, I; Bertin, A; Bobchenko, B M; Bogatyrev, A; Brauer, M; Bruinsma, M; Bruschi, M; Buchholz, P; Buran, T; Böcker, M; Böhm, G; Carvalho, J; Conde, P; Cruse, C; Dam, M; Danielsen, K M; Danilov, M; De Castro, S; Deppe, H; Dong, X; Dreis, H B; Egorytchev, V; Ehret, K; Eisele, F; Emeliyanov, D; Essenov, S; Fabbri, L; Faccioli, P; Feuerstack-Raible, M; Flammer, J; Fominykh, B; Funcke, M; Garrido, L; Gellrich, A; Giacobbe, B; Giovannini, P; Glass, J; Goloubkov, D; Golubkov, Y; Golutvin, A; Golutvin, I A; Gorbounov, I; Gorisek, A; Gouchtchine, O; Goulart, D C; Gradl, S; Gradl, W; Grimaldi, F; Groth-Jensen, J; Guilitsky, Yu; Hansen, J D; Hernández, J M; Hofmann, W; Hohlmann, M; Hott, T; Hulsbergen, W; Husemann, U; Igonkina, O; Ispiryan, M; Jagla, T; Jiang, C; Kapitza, H; Karabekyan, S; Karpenko, N; Keller, S; Kessler, J; Khasanov, F; Kiryushin, Yu T; Kisel, I; Klinkby, E; Knöpfle, K T; Kolanoski, H; Korpar, S; Krauss, C; Kreuzer, P; Krizan, P; Krücker, D; Kupper, S; Kvaratskheliia, T; Lanyov, A; Lau, K; Lewendel, B; Lohse, T; Lomonosov, B; Mankel, R; Masciocchi, S; Massa, I; Matchikhilian, I; Medin, G; Medinnis, M; Mevius, M; Michetti, A; Mikhailov, Yu; Mizuk, R; Muresan, R; Männer, R; Negodaev, M; Nowak, S; Nörenberg, M; Núñez-Pardo de Vera, M T; Ouchrif, M; Ould-Saada, F; Padilla, C; Peralta, D; Pernack, R; Pestotnik, R; Petersen, B AA; Piccinini, M; Pleier, M A; Poli, M; Popov, V; Pose, D; Prystupa, S; Pugatch, V; Pylypchenko, Y; Pyrlik, J; Reeves, K; Reing, D; Rick, H; Riu, I; Robmann, P; Rostovtseva, I; Rybnikov, V; Sbrizzi, A; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schreiner, A; Schröder, H; Schwanke, U; Schwartz, A J; Schwarz, A S; Schwenninger, B; Schwingenheuer, B; Sciacca, F; Semprini-Cesari, N; Shuvalov, S; Silva, L; Solunin, S; Somov, A; Somov, S; Sozuer, L; Spengler, J; Spighi, R; Spiridonov, A A; Stanovnik, A; Staric, M; Stegmann, C; Subramanian, H S; Symalla, M; Sánchez, F; Tikhomirov, I; Titov, M; Tsakov, I; Uwer, U; Van Eldik, C; Vasilev, Yu; Villa, M; Vitale, A; Vukotic, I; Wahlberg, H; Walenta, A H; Walter, M; Wang, J J; Wegener, D; Werthenbach, U; Wolters, H; Wurth, R; Wurz, A; Xella, S M; Zaitsev, Yu; Zavertyaev, M; Zeuner, T; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Z; Zimmermann, R; Zivko, T; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; al, et

    2007-01-01

    The b-bbar production cross section in 920 GeV proton-nucleus fixed target collisions is measured by observing double muonic decays of b-flavored hadrons in the kinematic region $-0.3<\\xF(\\mu)<0.15$. A total number of $76\\pm12$ b-bbar events is obtained with a likelihood fit of the signal and background simulated events to the data. The resulting cross section is $\\sigbb = 16.2 \\pm 2.5_{stat} \\pm 2.8_{sys} \

  4. Optical atomic magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budker, Dmitry; Higbie, James; Corsini, Eric P

    2013-11-19

    An optical atomic magnetometers is provided operating on the principles of nonlinear magneto-optical rotation. An atomic vapor is optically pumped using linearly polarized modulated light. The vapor is then probed using a non-modulated linearly polarized light beam. The resulting modulation in polarization angle of the probe light is detected and used in a feedback loop to induce self-oscillation at the resonant frequency.

  5. Influence of PEDOT:PSS on the effectiveness of barrier layers prepared by atomic layer deposition in organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegler, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.wegler@siemens.com [Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, Guenther-Scharowsky-Strasse 1, 91058 Erlangen, Germany and Center for Medical Physics and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Henkestrasse 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Schmidt, Oliver [Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, Guenther-Scharowsky-Strasse 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Hensel, Bernhard [Center for Medical Physics and Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Henkestrasse 91, 91052 Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) are well suited for energy saving lighting applications, especially when thinking about highly flexible and large area devices. In order to avoid the degradation of the organic components by water and oxygen, OLEDs need to be encapsulated, e.g., by a thin sheet of glass. As the device is then no longer flexible, alternative coatings are required. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a very promising approach in this respect. The authors studied OLEDs that were encapsulated by 100 nm Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposited by ALD. The authors show that this coating effectively protects the active surface area of the OLEDs from humidity. However, secondary degradation processes still occur at sharp edges of the OLED stack where the extremely thin encapsulation layer does not provide perfect coverage. Particularly, the swelling of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) mixed with poly(styrenesulfonate), which is a popular choice for the planarization of the bottom electrode and at the same time acts as a hole injection layer, affects the effectiveness of the encapsulation layer.

  6. Surface grafting of Eu(3+) doped luminescent hydroxyapatite nanomaterials through metal free light initiated atom transfer radical polymerization for theranostic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Guangjian; Liu, Meiying; Jiang, Ruming; Heng, Chunning; Huang, Qiang; Mao, Liucheng; Hui, Junfeng; Deng, Fengjie; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-08-01

    We reported a simple and efficient method to prepare the hydrophilic luminescent HAp polymer nanocomposites through the combination of ligand exchange and metal free light initiated surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) using 10-phenylphenothiazine (PTH) as organic catalyst and 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and itaconic acid (IA) as monomers. The biological imaging and drug delivery performance of HAp-poly(MPC-IA) nanorods were examined to evaluate their potential for biomedical applications. Results suggested that hydrophilic HAp-poly(MPC-IA) nanorods can be successfully prepared. More importantly, the HAp-poly(MPC-IA) exhibited excellent water dispersibility, desirable biocompatibility and good performance for biological imaging and controlled drug delivery applications. As compared with other controlled living polymerization reactions, the metal free light initiated SI-ATRP displayed many advantages such as easy for handle, mild reaction conditions, toxicity and fluorescence quenching from metal catalysts. Therefore, we believe that this strategy should be a useful and effective strategy for preparation of HAp nanomaterials for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Co3O4-modified TiO2 nanotube arrays via atomic layer deposition for improved visible-light photoelectrochemical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Yang, Wenjuan; Wen, Yanwei; Shan, Bin; Chen, Rong

    2015-01-14

    Composite Co3O4/TiO2 nanotube arrays (NTs) were fabricated via atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Co3O4 thin film onto well-aligned anodized TiO2 NTs. The microscopic morphology, composition, and interfacial plane of the composite structure were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion mapping, X-ray photoelectron spectra, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the ultrathin Co3O4 film uniformly coat onto the inner wall of the high aspect ratio (>100:1) TiO2 NTs with film thickness precisely controlled by the number of ALD deposition cycles. The composite structure with ∼4 nm Co3O4 coating revealed optimal photoelectrochemical (PEC) performance in the visible-light range (λ > 420 nm). The photocurrent density reaches as high as 90.4 μA/cm(2), which is ∼14 times that of the pristine TiO2 NTs and 3 times that of the impregnation method. The enhanced PEC performance could be attributed to the finely controlled Co3O4 coating layer that enhances the visible-light absorption, maintains large specific surface area to the electrolyte interface, and facilitates the charge transfer.

  8. Atom Lithography with a Chromium Atomic Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen-Tao; LI Tong-Bao

    2006-01-01

    @@ Direct write atom lithography is a new technique in which resonant light is used to pattern an atomic beam and the nanostructures are formed when the atoms deposit on the substrate. We design an experiment setup to fabricate chromium nanolines by depositing an atomic beam of 52 Cr through an off-resonant laser standing wave with the wavelength of 425.55 nm onto a silicon substrate. The resulting nanolines exhibit a period of 215 ± 3 nm with height of 1 nm.

  9. UV light induced insulator-metal transition in ultra-thin ZnO/TiOx stacked layer grown by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, D.; Misra, P.; Joshi, M. P.; Kukreja, L. M.

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, atomic layer deposition has been used to grow a series of Ti incorporated ZnO thin films by vertically stacking different numbers (n = 1-7) of ZnO/TiOx layers on (0001) sapphire substrates. The effects of defect states mediated chemisorption of O2 and/OH groups on the electrical properties of these films have been investigated by illuminating the samples under UV light inside a high vacuum optical cryostat. The ultra-thin film having one stacked layer (n = 1) did not show any change in its electrical resistance upon UV light exposure. On the contrary, marginal drop in the electrical resistivity was measured for the samples with n ≥ 3. Most surprisingly, the sample with n = 2 (thickness ˜ 12 nm) showed an insulator to metal transition upon UV light exposure. The temperature dependent electrical resistivity measurement on the as grown film (n = 2) showed insulating behaviour, i.e., diverging resistivity on extrapolation to T→ 0 K. However, upon UV light exposure, it transformed to a metallic state, i.e., finite resistivity at T → 0 K. Such an insulator-metal transition plausibly arises due to the de-trapping of conduction electrons from the surface defect sites which resulted in an upward shift of the Fermi level above the mobility edge. The low-temperature electron transport properties on the insulating film (n = 2) were investigated by a combined study of zero field electrical resistivity ρ(T) and magnetoresistance (MR) measurements. The observed negative MR was found to be in good agreement with the magnetic field induced suppression of quantum interference between forward-going paths of tunnelling electrons. Both ρ(T) and MR measurements provided strong evidence for the Efros-Shklovskii type variable range hopping conduction in the low-temperature (≤40 K) regime. Such studies on electron transport in ultra-thin n-type doped ZnO films are crucial to achieve optimum functionality with long term reliability of ZnO based transparent

  10. Evolution of the field quantum entropy and entanglement in a system of multimode light field interacting resonantly with a two-level atom through N_j-degenerate N~Σ-photon process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The time evolution of the field quantum entropy and entanglement in a system of multi-mode coherent light field resonantly interacting with a two-level atom by de-generating the multi-photon process is studied by utilizing the Von Neumann re-duced entropy theory,and the analytical expressions of the quantum entropy of the multimode field and the numerical calculation results for three-mode field inter-acting with the atom are obtained. Our attention focuses on the discussion of the influences of the initial average photon number,the atomic distribution angle and the phase angle of the atom dipole on the evolution of the quantum field entropy and entanglement. The results obtained from the numerical calculation indicate that: the stronger the quantum field is,the weaker the entanglement between the quan-tum field and the atom will be,and when the field is strong enough,the two sub-systems may be in a disentangled state all the time; the quantum field entropy is strongly dependent on the atomic distribution angle,namely,the quantum field and the two-level atom are always in the entangled state,and are nearly stable at maximum entanglement after a short time of vibration; the larger the atomic dis-tribution angle is,the shorter the time for the field quantum entropy to evolve its maximum value is; the phase angles of the atom dipole almost have no influences on the entanglement between the quantum field and the two-level atom. Entangled states or pure states based on these properties of the field quantum entropy can be prepared.

  11. Evolution of the field quantum entropy and entanglement in a system of multimode light field interacting resonantly with a two-level atom through Nj-degenerate NΣ-photon process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU WangYun; YANG ZhiYong; AN YuYing

    2008-01-01

    The time evolution of the field quantum entropy and entanglement in a system of multi-mode coherent light field resonantly interacting with a two-level atom by de-generating the multi-photon process is studied by utilizing the Von Neumann re-duced entropy theory, and the analytical expressions of the quantum entropy of the multimode field and the numerical calculation results for three-mode field inter-acting with the atom are obtained. Our attention focuses on the discussion of the influences of the initial average photon number, the atomic distribution angle and the phase angle of the atom dipole on the evolution of the quantum field entropy and entanglement. The results obtained from the numerical calculation indicate that: the stronger the quantum field is, the weaker the entanglement between the quan-tum field and the atom will be, and when the field is strong enough, the two sub-systems may be in a disentangled state all the time; the quantum field entropy is strongly dependent on the atomic distribution angle, namely, the quantum field and the two-level atom are always in the entangled state, and are nearly stable at maximum entanglement after a short time of vibration; the larger the atomic dis-tribution angle is, the shorter the time for the field quantum entropy to evolve its maximum value is; the phase angles of the atom dipole almost have no influences on the entanglement between the quantum field and the two-level atom. Entangled states or pure states based on these properties of the field quantum entropy can be prepared.

  12. Superluminal light propagation in a bi-chromatically Raman-driven and Doppler-broadened N-type 4-level atomic system

    CERN Document Server

    Bacha, Bakht Amin; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the behavior of fast light pulse propagation in an N-type Doppler-broadened 4-level atomic system using double Raman gain processes. This system displays novel and interesting results of two controllable pairs of the double gain lines profile with a control field. The detailed physics of the processes are explored having multiple controllable anomalous regions in the medium. In this set up, the system exhibits significant enhancement in the probing Gaussian pulse through the medium as compared with Ref. [L. J. Wang, A. Kuzmich, and A. Dogariu, Nature \\textbf{406}, 227(2000)]. The advance time of the retrieved Gaussian pulse is always greater than the advance time studied in the above said experiment. We analyzed that the pulse propagating through the medium with larger negative group index, $7.32\\times10^8$, leaves the medium almost undistorted and sooner by time $76.12 \\ ms$ than the pulse which leaves the medium of Wang \\emph{et al.}. The Gaussian pulse always remains almost undistorted at ou...

  13. Low-temperature remote plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition of ZrO2/zircone nanolaminate film for efficient encapsulation of flexible organic light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zheng; Wang, Haoran; Wang, Xiao; Chen, Ping; Liu, Yunfei; Zhao, Hongyu; Zhao, Yi; Duan, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Encapsulation is essential to protect the air-sensitive components of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) such as active layers and cathode electrodes. In this study, hybrid zirconium inorganic/organic nanolaminates were fabricated using remote plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) and molecular layer deposition at a low temperature. The nanolaminate serves as a thin-film encapsulation layer for OLEDs. The reaction mechanism of PEALD process was investigated using an in-situ quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and in-situ quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS). The bonds present in the films were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The primary reaction byproducts in PEALD, such as CO, CO2, NO, H2O, as well as the related fragments during the O2 plasma process were characterized using the QMS, indicating a combustion-like reaction process. The self-limiting nature and growth mechanisms of the ZrO2 during the complex surface chemical reaction of the ligand and O2 plasma were monitored using the QCM. The remote PEALD ZrO2/zircone nanolaminate structure prolonged the transmission path of water vapor and smooth surface morphology. Consequently, the water barrier properties were significantly improved (reaching 3.078 × 10‑5 g/m2/day). This study also shows that flexible OLEDs can be successfully encapsulated to achieve a significantly longer lifetime.

  14. Laser manipulation of atoms and nanofabrication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurdík, Erich

    2001-01-01

    Fundamental interaction processes between atoms and photons are exploited to control external degrees of freedom of the atoms. Laser light, when properly tuned near an atomic resonance, exerts such forces that the atoms are repelled from or attracted to the regions with low light intensities. We use

  15. Optical angular momentum and atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke-Arnold, Sonja

    2017-02-28

    Any coherent interaction of light and atoms needs to conserve energy, linear momentum and angular momentum. What happens to an atom's angular momentum if it encounters light that carries orbital angular momentum (OAM)? This is a particularly intriguing question as the angular momentum of atoms is quantized, incorporating the intrinsic spin angular momentum of the individual electrons as well as the OAM associated with their spatial distribution. In addition, a mechanical angular momentum can arise from the rotation of the entire atom, which for very cold atoms is also quantized. Atoms therefore allow us to probe and access the quantum properties of light's OAM, aiding our fundamental understanding of light-matter interactions, and moreover, allowing us to construct OAM-based applications, including quantum memories, frequency converters for shaped light and OAM-based sensors.This article is part of the themed issue 'Optical orbital angular momentum'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  16. Hadronic Light by Light Contributions to the Muon Anomalous Magnetic Moment With Physical Pions

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Luchang; Christ, Norman; Hayakawa, Masashi; Izubuchi, Taku; Lehner, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The current measurement of muonic $g - 2$ disagrees with the theoretical calculation by about 3 standard deviations. Hadronic vacuum polarization (HVP) and hadronic light by light (HLbL) are the two types of processes that contribute most to the theoretical uncertainty. The current value for HLbL is still given by models. I will describe results from a first-principles lattice calculation with a 139 MeV pion in a box of 5.5 fm extent. Our current numerical strategies, including noise reduction techniques, evaluating the HLbL amplitude at zero external momentum transfer, and important remaining challenges, in particular those associated with finite volume effects, will be discussed.

  17. Atom lens without chromatic aberrations

    CERN Document Server

    Efremov, Maxim A; Schleich, Wolfgang P

    2012-01-01

    We propose a lens for atoms with reduced chromatic aberrations and calculate its focal length and spot size. In our scheme a two-level atom interacts with a near-resonant standing light wave formed by two running waves of slightly different wave vectors, and a far-detuned running wave propagating perpendicular to the standing wave. We show that within the Raman-Nath approximation and for an adiabatically slow atom-light interaction, the phase acquired by the atom is independent of the incident atomic velocity.

  18. Imaging an atomic beam using fluorescence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming He(何明); Jin Wang(王谨); Mingsheng Zhan(詹明生)

    2003-01-01

    A fluorescence detection scheme is applied to image an atomic beam. Using two laser diodes as the sources of detection light and pumping light respectively, the fluorescence image of the atomic beam is then observed by a commercial CCD-camera, which is corresponding to the atomic state and velocity distribution. The detection scheme has a great utilization in the experiments of cold atoms and atomic optics.

  19. Advanced Light Source (ALS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a world leader in soft x-ray science, generates light in the wavelengths needed for examining the atomic and electronic structure of...

  20. Physics of the atom

    CERN Document Server

    Wehr, Russell M; Adair, Thomas W

    1984-01-01

    The fourth edition of Physics of the Atom is designed to meet the modern need for a better understanding of the atomic age. It is an introduction suitable for students with a background in university physics and mathematical competence at the level of calculus. This book is designed to be an extension of the introductory university physics course into the realm of atomic physics. It should give students a proficiency in this field comparable to their proficiency in mechanics, heat, sound, light, and electricity.

  1. Shaping light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Forbes, A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available mirrors, a gain medium, and a means to excite the gain medium. Quest 6(3) 2010 11 The excited gain medium has what is called a population inversion (it contains more atoms in an excited state than at a lower energy state). Laser light... of what is known as coherence, a measure of how ?in-step? the emitted photons of light are. Coherent light can be made to interfere with itself, in a way that is similar to the way in which ripples on a pond interact. As a result, it is possible...

  2. Atomic lighthouse effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Máximo, C E; Kaiser, R; Courteille, Ph W; Bachelard, R

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease in magnetic field efficiency.

  3. The Atomic Lighthouse Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Máximo, C E; Courteille, Ph W; Bachelard, R

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the deflection of light by a cold atomic cloud when the light-matter interaction is locally tuned via the Zeeman effect using magnetic field gradients. This "lighthouse" effect is strongest in the single-scattering regime, where deviation of the incident field is largest. For optically dense samples, the deviation is reduced by collective effects, as the increase in linewidth leads to a decrease of the magnetic field efficiency.

  4. The isotopic effects in the scattering and the kinetics of the atomic cascade

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, V P

    2016-01-01

    {\\it Ab initio} quantum-mechanical calculations of the differential and integrated cross sections of the elastic scattering, Stark transitions, and Coulomb de-excitation at collisions of excited $\\mu^- p$ and $\\mu^- d$ atoms with hydrogen isotope atoms in the ground state are performed. The scattering processes are treated in a unified manner in the framework of the close-coupling approach. The used basis includes both open and closed channels corresponding to all exotic atom states with principal quantum numbers from $n=1$ up to $n_{\\rm max}=20$. The energy shifts of $ns$ states due to electron vacuum polarization and finite nuclear size are taken into account. The kinetics of atomic cascade of $\\mu^- p$ and $\\mu^- d$ atoms are studied in a wide range of relative target densities ($\\varphi = 10^{-8} -1$) within the improved version of the extended cascade model. The results of the numerical quantum-mechanical calculations of the cross sections for quantum numbers and kinetic energies of muonic atoms, that ar...

  5. Impacts of light illumination on monocrystalline silicon surfaces passivated by atomic layer deposited Al2O3 capped with plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited SiN x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fen; Toh, Mei Gi; Thway, Maung; Li, Xinhang; Nandakumar, Naomi; Gay, Xavier; Dielissen, Bas; Raj, Samuel; Aberle, Armin G.

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we investigate the impact of light illumination on crystalline silicon surfaces passivated with inline atomic layer deposited aluminum oxide capped with plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon nitride. It is found that, for dedicated n-type lifetime samples under illumination, there is no light induced degradation (LID) but enhanced passivation. The lifetime increase happened with a much faster speed compared to the lifetime decay during dark storage, resulting in the overall lifetime enhancement for actual field application scenarios (sunshine during the day and darkness during the night). In addition, it was found that the lifetime enhancement is spectrally dependent and mainly associated with the visible part of the solar spectrum. Hence, it has negligible impact for such interfaces applied on the rear of the solar cells, for example p-type aluminum local back surface field (Al-LBSF) cells.

  6. Atomic energy

    CERN Multimedia

    1996-01-01

    Interviews following the 1991 co-operation Agreement between the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) of the Government of India and the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) concerning the participation in the Large Hadron Collider Project (LHC) . With Chidambaram, R, Chairman, Atomic Energy Commission and Secretary, Department of Atomic Energy, Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) of the Government of India and Professor Llewellyn-Smith, Christopher H, Director-General, CERN.

  7. Atom chips

    CERN Document Server

    Reichel, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a stimulating and multifaceted picture of a rapidly developing field. The first part reviews fundamentals of atom chip research in tutorial style, while subsequent parts focus on the topics of atom-surface interaction, coherence on atom chips, and possible future directions of atom chip research. The articles are written by leading researchers in the field in their characteristic and individual styles.

  8. High-contrast dark resonances with linearly polarized light on the D1 line of alkali atoms with large nuclear spin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Ken-Ichi; Ikegami, Takeshi; Takamizawa, Akifumi; Yanagimachi, Shinya; Ohshima, Shin-Ichi; Knappe, Svenja

    2009-02-20

    High-contrast coherent population trapping signals were observed on the Cs D1 line by use of a bichromatic linear polarized light (lin‖lin field). A maximum absorption contrast of about 10% was obtained. This was nearly twice as high as that measured with the standard configuration of bichromatic circularly polarized light (σ-σ field). The results are compared with density matrix calculations of 4 and 5 level systems.

  9. Atomic motions in poly(vinyl methyl ether): A combined study by quasielastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulations in the light of the mode coupling theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capponi, S; Arbe, A; Alvarez, F; Colmenero, J; Frick, B; Embs, J P

    2009-11-28

    Quasielastic neutron scattering experiments (time-of-flight, neutron spin echo, and backscattering) on protonated poly(vinyl methyl ether) (PVME) have revealed the hydrogen dynamics above the glass-transition temperature. Fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations properly validated with the neutron scattering results have allowed further characterization of the atomic motions accessing the correlation functions directly in real space. Deviations from Gaussian behavior are found in the high-momentum transfer range, which are compatible with the predictions of mode coupling theory (MCT). We have applied the MCT phenomenological version to the self-correlation functions of PVME atoms calculated from our simulation data, obtaining consistent results. The unusually large value found for the lambda-exponent parameter is close to that recently reported for polybutadiene and simple polymer models with intramolecular barriers.

  10. The Abundances of Light Neutron-Capture Elements in Planetary Nebulae III. The Impact of New Atomic Data on Nebular Selenium and Krypton Abundance Determinations

    CERN Document Server

    Sterling, N C; Dinerstein, H L

    2015-01-01

    The detection of neutron(n)-capture elements in several planetary nebulae (PNe) has provided a new means of investigating s-process nucleosynthesis in low-mass stars. However, a lack of atomic data has inhibited accurate trans-iron element abundance determinations in astrophysical nebulae. Recently, photoionization and recombination data were determined for Se and Kr, the two most widely detected n-capture elements in nebular spectra. We have incorporated these new data into the photoionization code Cloudy. To test the atomic data, numerical models were computed for 15 PNe that exhibit emission lines from multiple Kr ions. We found systematic discrepancies between the predicted and observed emission lines that are most likely caused by inaccurate photoionization and recombination data. These discrepancies were removed by adjusting the Kr$^+$--Kr$^{3+}$ photoionization cross sections within their cited uncertainties and the dielectronic recombination rate coefficients by slightly larger amounts. From grids of ...

  11. Application of atomic absorption spectrometry with continuous light source to analyze selected metals important for human health in different parts of oranges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szwerc Wojciech

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The publication describes the application of high-resolution continuum source atomic absorption spectrometry (H-R CS AAS to determine some physiologically essential and toxic elements occurring in citrus fruits of different origins. Before analysis, the samples were mineralized using a mixture of deionized water and 69% nitric acid 3:1 (v/v in high pressure microwave digestion at 188°C during one hour.

  12. Dynamic Behaviors of Coupled Three-Level Atom System Interacting with Light Field in Cavity Filled with Kerr-Like Medium%克尔介质腔中耦合三能级原子与光场相互作用系统的动力学行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李可; 董传华

    2005-01-01

    The Hamiltonian of coupled three-level atoms interacting with light field in the cavity filled with Kerr-like medium is derived.A simplified analytic solution to the Schrodinger equation of the system is obtained. The case of A type atom with degenerate lower levels is discussed in detail. It is shown that the coupling strength between atoms and Kerr coefficient affect the system's dynsmic behaviots, especially the modulation period and oscillation frequency of the squeezing parameters of the field and the collective dipole moment. Dynamic behaviors of the system are sensitive to the initial stateof atoms.

  13. Atomic polarizabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronova, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Mitroy, J. [School of Engineering, Charles Darwin University, Darwin NT 0909 (Australia); Clark, Charles W. [Joint Quantum Institute, National Institute of Standards and Technology and the University of Maryland, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8410 (United States); Kozlov, M. G. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-22

    The atomic dipole polarizability governs the first-order response of an atom to an applied electric field. Atomic polarization phenomena impinge upon a number of areas and processes in physics and have been the subject of considerable interest and heightened importance in recent years. In this paper, we will summarize some of the recent applications of atomic polarizability studies. A summary of results for polarizabilities of noble gases, monovalent, and divalent atoms is given. The development of the CI+all-order method that combines configuration interaction and linearized coupled-cluster approaches is discussed.

  14. Quantum noise property in coherent atomic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jun-xiang; WANG Hai-hong; CAI Jin; GAO Jiang-rui

    2006-01-01

    The coherent superposition of atomic states leads to the characteristic change of interacting lights because of the coupling between the lights and atoms.In this paper,the noise spectrum of the quantified light interacting with the atoms is studied under the condition of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT).It is shown that the noise spectrum displays a double M-shape noise profile resulted from the conversion of phase noise of probe beam.A squeezing of 0.3 dB can be observed at the detuning of probe light at the proper parameters of atoms and coupling beam.

  15. Ultracold atoms on atom chips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Peter; Hofferberth, S.; Haller, E.

    2005-01-01

    Miniaturized potentials near the surface of atom chips can be used as flexible and versatile tools for the manipulation of ultracold atoms on a microscale. The full scope of possibilities is only accessible if atom-surface distances can be reduced to microns. We discuss experiments in this regime...

  16. Search for displaced muonic lepton jets from light Higgs boson decay in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Andrieux, Marie-Laure; Anduaga, Xabier; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Atkinson, Markus; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Behera, Prafulla; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bittner, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    A search is performed for collimated muon pairs produced in the decay of long-lived neutral particles in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV center of mass energy, with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. In a sample of 1.94 fb-1 of collision events collected during 2011, the observed data are consistent with the Standard Model background expectations. Limits on the product of the production cross section and the branching fraction of a Higgs boson decaying to Hidden Valley neutral long-lived particles are derived as a function of the particles’ mean life time.

  17. Efficient Cu-catalyzed atom transfer radical addition reactions of fluoroalkylsulfonyl chlorides with electron-deficient alkenes induced by visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiao-Jun; Dolbier, William R

    2015-03-27

    Fluoroalkylsulfonyl chlorides, R(f)SO2Cl, in which R(f)=CF3, C4F9, CF2H, CH2F, and CH2CF3, are used as a source of fluorinated radicals to add fluoroalkyl groups to electron-deficient, unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Photochemical conditions, using Cu mediation, are used to produce the respective α-chloro-β-fluoroalkylcarbonyl products in excellent yields through an atom transfer radical addition (ATRA) process. Facile nucleophilic replacement of the α-chloro substituent is shown to lead to further diverse functionalization of the products. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Space-time resolved simulation of femtosecond nonlinear light-matter interactions using a holistic quantum atomic model: application to near-threshold harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesik, M; Wright, E M; Andreasen, J; Brown, J M; Carlson, D R; Jones, R J

    2012-07-02

    We introduce a new computational approach for femtosecond pulse propagation in the transparency region of gases that permits full resolution in three space dimensions plus time while fully incorporating quantum coherent effects such as high-harmonic generation and strong-field ionization in a holistic fashion. This is achieved by utilizing a one-dimensional model atom with a delta-function potential which allows for a closed-form solution for the nonlinear optical response due to ground-state to continuum transitions. It side-steps evaluation of the wave function, and offers more than one hundred-fold reduction in computation time in comparison to direct solution of the atomic Schrödinger equation. To illustrate the capability of our new computational approach, we apply it to the example of near-threshold harmonic generation in Xenon, and we also present a qualitative comparison between our model and results from an in-house experiment on extreme ultraviolet generation in a femtosecond enhancement cavity.

  19. Space-time resolved simulation of femtosecond nonlinear light-matter interactions using a holistic quantum atomic model: Application to near-threshold harmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Kolesik, M; Andreasen, J; Brown, J M; Carlson, D R; Jones, R J; 10.1364/OE.20.016113

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new computational approach for femtosecond pulse propagation in the transparency region of gases that permits full resolution in three space dimensions plus time while fully incorporating quantum coherent effects such as high-harmonic generation and strong-field ionization in a holistic fashion. This is achieved by utilizing a one-dimensional model atom with a delta-function potential which allows for a closed-form solution for the nonlinear optical response due to ground-state to continuum transitions. It side-steps evaluation of the wave function, and offers more than one hundred-fold reduction in computation time in comparison to direct solution of the atomic Schr\\"odinger equation. To illustrate the capability of our new computational approach, we apply it to the example of near-threshold harmonic generation in Xenon, and we also present a qualitative comparison between our model and results from an in-house experiment on extreme ultraviolet generation in a femtosecond enhancement cavity.

  20. Atom chip gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Christian; Abend, Sven; Gebbe, Martina; Gersemann, Matthias; Ahlers, Holger; Müntinga, Hauke; Matthias, Jonas; Sahelgozin, Maral; Herr, Waldemar; Lämmerzahl, Claus; Ertmer, Wolfgang; Rasel, Ernst

    2016-04-01

    Atom interferometry has developed into a tool for measuring rotations [1], accelerations [2], and testing fundamental physics [3]. Gravimeters based on laser cooled atoms demonstrated residual uncertainties of few microgal [2,4] and were simplified for field applications [5]. Atomic gravimeters rely on the interference of matter waves which are coherently manipulated by laser light fields. The latter can be interpreted as rulers to which the position of the atoms is compared. At three points in time separated by a free evolution, the light fields are pulsed onto the atoms. First, a coherent superposition of two momentum states is produced, then the momentum is inverted, and finally the two trajectories are recombined. Depending on the acceleration the atoms experienced, the number of atoms detected in the output ports will change. Consequently, the acceleration can be determined from the output signal. The laser cooled atoms with microkelvin temperatures used in state-of-the-art gravimeters impose limits on the accuracy [4]. Therefore, ultra-cold atoms generated by Bose-Einstein condensation and delta-kick collimation [6,7] are expected to be the key for further improvements. These sources suffered from a low flux implying an incompatible noise floor, but a competitive performance was demonstrated recently with atom chips [8]. In the compact and robust setup constructed for operation in the drop tower [6] we demonstrated all steps necessary for an atom chip gravimeter with Bose-Einstein condensates in a ground based operation. We will discuss the principle of operation, the current performance, and the perspectives to supersede the state of the art. The authors thank the QUANTUS cooperation for contributions to the drop tower project in the earlier stages. This work is supported by the German Space Agency (DLR) with funds provided by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi) due to an enactment of the German Bundestag under grant numbers DLR 50WM

  1. Studies of b-associated production and muonic decays of neutral Higgs bosons at the ATLAS experiment within the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warsinsky, Markus

    2008-09-15

    This thesis presents a Monte Carlo study of neutral Higgs bosons of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) decaying into muons at the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Signal and background processes are simulated using novel Monte Carlo generators that incorporate parts of higher order corrections and are expected to give a more accurate prediction than previous programs. The SHERPA Monte Carlo generator is validated for its use in the analysis and compared to results obtained with other programs. Where possible, the Monte Carlo event samples are normalized to higher order calculations. To increase the available Monte Carlo statistics, this study is based on the ATLAS fast detector simulation ATLFAST. Differences between ATLFAST and the detailed detector simulation of ATLAS are examined, and, where possible, correction procedures are devised. A cut based analysis is performed assuming an integrated luminosity of 30 fb{sup -1}, and optimized with respect to the discovery potential for MSSM Higgs bosons. The systematic uncertainties of the event selection and the Monte Carlo predictions are estimated. A method that can be used to estimate the background from data is presented and evaluated. Last, the discovery potential of the ATLAS experiment in the CP conserving benchmark scenarios of the MSSM is evaluated. One or more of the neutral Higgs bosons of the MSSM can be discovered in the muonic decay mode using 30 fb{sup -1} of data for low masses of the pseudoscalar boson A{sup 0}, if the model parameter tan {beta} is at least 20. For higher masses of the A{sup 0}, tan {beta} would need to be significantly higher to ensure a discovery in the studied decay channel. The sensitivity of ATLAS to MSSM Higgs bosons is multiple times larger than the one of previous and currently running experiments. (orig.)

  2. Relativistic effects in atom gravimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yu-Jie; Shao, Cheng-Gang; Hu, Zhong-Kun

    2017-01-01

    Atom interferometry is currently developing rapidly, which is now reaching sufficient precision to motivate laboratory tests of general relativity. Thus, it is extremely significant to develop a general relativistic model for atom interferometers. In this paper, we mainly present an analytical derivation process and first give a complete vectorial expression for the relativistic interferometric phase shift in an atom interferometer. The dynamics of the interferometer are studied, where both the atoms and the light are treated relativistically. Then, an appropriate coordinate transformation for the light is performed crucially to simplify the calculation. In addition, the Bordé A B C D matrix combined with quantum mechanics and the "perturbation" approach are applied to make a methodical calculation for the total phase shift. Finally, we derive the relativistic phase shift kept up to a sensitivity of the acceleration ˜1 0-14 m/s 2 for a 10 -m -long atom interferometer.

  3. Atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Born, Max

    1989-01-01

    The Nobel Laureate's brilliant exposition of the kinetic theory of gases, elementary particles, the nuclear atom, wave-corpuscles, atomic structure and spectral lines, electron spin and Pauli's principle, quantum statistics, molecular structure and nuclear physics. Over 40 appendices, a bibliography, numerous figures and graphs.

  4. Atomic Calligraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imboden, Matthias; Pardo, Flavio; Bolle, Cristian; Han, Han; Tareen, Ammar; Chang, Jackson; Christopher, Jason; Corman, Benjamin; Bishop, David

    2013-03-01

    Here we present a MEMS based method to fabricate devices with a small number of atoms. In standard semiconductor fabrication, a large amount of material is deposited, after which etching removes what is not wanted. This technique breaks down for structures that approach the single atom limit, as it is inconceivable to etch away all but one atom. What is needed is a bottom up method with single or near single atom precision. We demonstrate a MEMS device that enables nanometer position controlled deposition of gold atoms. A digitally driven plate is swept as a flux of gold atoms passes through an aperture. Appling voltages on four comb capacitors connected to the central plate by tethers enable nanometer lateral precision in the xy plane over 15x15 sq. microns. Typical MEMS structures have manufacturing resolutions on the order of a micron. Using a FIB it is possible to mill apertures as small as 10 nm in diameter. Assuming a low incident atomic flux, as well as an integrated MEMS based shutter with microsecond response time, it becomes possible to deposit single atoms. Due to their small size and low power consumption, such nano-printers can be mounted directly in a cryogenic system at ultrahigh vacuum to deposit clean quench condensed metallic structures.

  5. Atom Interferometry in a Warm Vapor

    CERN Document Server

    Biedermann, G W; Rakholia, A V; Jau, Y -Y; Wheeler, D R; Sterk, J D; Burns, G R

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate matterwave interference in a warm vapor of rubidium atoms. Established approaches to light pulse atom interferometry rely on laser cooling to concentrate a large ensemble of atoms into a velocity class resonant with the atom optical light pulse. In our experiment, we show that clear interference signals may be obtained without laser cooling. This effect relies on the Doppler selectivity of the atom interferometer resonance. This interferometer may be configured to measure accelerations, and we demonstrate that multiple interferometers may be operated simultaneously by addressing multiple velocity classes.

  6. Optimization of the light-induced-fluorescence signals of single atoms and efficient loading of single atoms into a magneto-optical trap%磁光阱中单原子荧光信号的优化及单原子的高效装载

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王杰英; 刘贝; 刁文婷; 靳刚; 何军; 王军民

    2014-01-01

    In our experiment, firstly, we carry out the loading of single atoms in the magneto-optical trap (MOT) by increasing the quadrupole magnetic field gradient, improving the background vacuum, and reducing the diameters of the cooling and trapping laser beams. Secondly, we get the single atomic fluorescence signal of a high signal-to-background ratio in the MOT by means of reducing the detuning of cooling light and increasing its intensity appropriately, and using the polarization spectroscopy locking technique to suppress the fluctuations of cooling laser. In addition, with the real-time feedback on quadrupole magnetic field gradient, we demonstrate a probability of loading single atoms in the MOT as high as 98%. We also measure the statistical properties of the single atomic fluorescence which is excited by continuous light in the MOT;the measured second-order correlation is g(2)(τ =0)=0.09.%实验中首先通过增大四极磁场梯度、提高背景真空度、缩小冷却俘获激光光束直径的方法获得了磁光阱中单原子的装载.其次,通过减小冷却光失谐量、适当增加其光强、同时使用偏振光谱锁频技术抑制冷却光噪声的方法得到了磁光阱中高信号背景比的单原子荧光信号.此外,通过实时反馈控制磁光阱四极磁场梯度的方法,在实验中实现了单原子98%的装载概率.使用Hamburg Brown-Twiss 方案测量了磁光阱中的单原子在连续光激发下所辐射荧光的光子统计特性,得到二阶关联度g(2)(τ=0)=0.09.

  7. Resonant Formation of $d\\mu t$ Molecules in Deuterium An Atomic Beam Measurement of Muon Catalyzed dt Fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, M C; Bailey, J M; Beer, G A; Beveridge, J L; Faifman, M P; Huber, T M; Kammel, P; Kim, S K; Knowles, P E; Kunselman, A R; Maier, M; Markushin, V E; Marshall, G M; Martoff, C J; Mason, G R; Mulhauser, F; Olin, A; Petitjean, C; Porcelli, T A; Wozniak, J; Zmeskal, J

    2000-01-01

    Resonant formation of $d\\mu t$ molecules in collisions of muonic tritium ($\\mu t$) on D$_2$ was investigated using a beam of $\\mu t$ atoms, demonstrating a new direct approach in muon catalyzed fusion studies. Strong epithermal resonances in $d\\mu t$ formation were directly revealed for the first time. From the time-of-flight analysis of $2036\\pm 116$ $dt$ fusion events, a formation rate consistent with $0.73\\pm (0.16)_{meas} \\pm (0.09)_{model}$ times the theoretical prediction was obtained. For the largest peak at a resonance energy of $0.423 \\pm 0.037$ eV, this corresponds to a rate of $(7.1 \\pm 1.8) \\times 10^9$ s$^{-1}$, more than an order of magnitude larger than those at low energies.

  8. Sampling the Hydrogen Atom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graves N.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A model is proposed for the hydrogen atom in which the electron is an objectively real particle orbiting at very near to light speed. The model is based on the postulate that certain velocity terms associated with orbiting bodies can be considered as being af- fected by relativity. This leads to a model for the atom in which the stable electron orbits are associated with orbital velocities where Gamma is n /α , leading to the idea that it is Gamma that is quantized and not angular momentum as in the Bohr and other models. The model provides a mechanism which leads to quantization of energy levels within the atom and also provides a simple mechanical explanation for the Fine Struc- ture Constant. The mechanism is closely associated with the Sampling theorem and the related phenomenon of aliasing developed in the mid-20th century by engineers at Bell labs.

  9. Storage of Quantum Variables in Atomic Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cviklinski, J.; Ortalo, J.; Josse, V.

    2007-01-01

    Storage and read-out of non classical states of light is a critical element for quantum information networks. Simultaneous storage of two non-commuting variables carried by light and subsequent read-out is shown to be possible in atomic ensembles. Interaction of light fields with three-level syst......Storage and read-out of non classical states of light is a critical element for quantum information networks. Simultaneous storage of two non-commuting variables carried by light and subsequent read-out is shown to be possible in atomic ensembles. Interaction of light fields with three...

  10. International Conference on Neutrino Mass, Dark Matter and Gravitational Waves, Condensation of Atoms and Monopoles, Light-cone Quantization : Orbis Scientiae '96

    CERN Document Server

    Mintz, Stephan; Perlmutter, Arnold; Neutrino Mass, Dark Matter and Gravitational Waves, Condensation of Atoms and Monopoles, Light-cone Quantization : Orbis Scientiae '96

    1996-01-01

    The International Conference, Orbis Scientiae 1996, focused on the topics: The Neutrino Mass, Light Cone Quantization, Monopole Condensation, Dark Matter, and Gravitational Waves which we have adopted as the title of these proceedings. Was there any exciting news at the conference? Maybe, it depends on who answers the question. There was an almost unanimous agreement on the overall success of the conference as was evidenced by the fact that in the after-dinner remarks by one of us (BNK) the suggestion of organizing the conference on a biannual basis was presented but not accepted: the participants wanted the continuation of the tradition to convene annually. We shall, of course, comply. The expected observation of gravitational waves will constitute the most exciting vindication of Einstein's general relativity. This subject is attracting the attention of the experimentalists and theorists alike. We hope that by the first decade of the third millennium or earlier, gravitational waves will be detected,...

  11. Thallium magnesium chloride: A high light yield, large effective atomic number, intrinsically activated crystalline scintillator for X-ray and gamma-ray detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Yutaka; Koshimizu, Masanori; Yanagida, Takayuki; Okada, Go; Saeki, Keiichiro; Asai, Keisuke

    2016-09-01

    We report the luminescence and the scintillation properties of a newly developed thallium magnesium chloride (TlMgCl3) crystal. The crystal sample can be easily fabricated from the melt using the Bridgman method. The photoluminescence band appeared near the wavelength of 405 nm under excitation at 230 nm. An X-ray-induced scintillation spectrum showed an intense emission band near the wavelength of 405 nm. The decay time constant was estimated to be approximately 60 ns (∼25%) and 350 ns (∼75%) using a bi-exponential fitting. The scintillation light yield reached 46,000 photons/MeV with an energy resolution of 5% at 662 keV.

  12. Influence of selective atomic measurement on the entanglement properties of a two-atom outside cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Dao-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Considering three two-level atoms initially in the W or Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) state, one of the three atoms is put into an initially coherent light cavity and made to resonantly interact with the cavity. The two-atom entanglement evolution outside the cavity is investigated. The influences of state-selective measurement of the atom inside the cavity and strength of the light field on the two-atom entanglement evolution outside the cavity are discussed. The results obtained from the numerical method show that the two-atom entanglement outside the cavity is strengthened through state-selective measurement of the atom inside the cavity. In addition, the strength of the light field also influences the two-atom entanglement properties.

  13. Kinetic Atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David B.

    1981-01-01

    Surveys the research of scientists like Joule, Kelvin, Maxwell, Clausius, and Boltzmann as it comments on the basic conceptual issues involved in the development of a more precise kinetic theory and the idea of a kinetic atom. (Author/SK)

  14. Elastic recoil atomic spectroscopy of light elements with sub-nanometer depth resolution; Elastische Rueckstossatomspektrometrie leichter Elemente mit Subnanometer-Tiefenaufloesung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosmata, Marcel

    2011-06-30

    In this thesis the QQDS magnetic spectrometer that is used for high resolution ion beam analysis (IBA) of light elements at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf is presented for the first time. In addition all parameters are investigated that influence the analysis. Methods and models are presented with which the effects can be minimised or calculated. There are five focal points of this thesis. The first point is the construction and commissioning of the QQDS magnetic spectrometer, the corresponding scattering chamber with all the peripherals and the detector, which is specially developed for high resolution elastic recoil detection. Both the reconstructed spectrometer and the detector were adapted to the specific experimental conditions needed for high-resolution Ion beam analysis of light elements and tested for routine practice. The detector consists of two components. At the back end of the detector a Bragg ionization chamber is mounted, which is used for the particle identification. At the front end, directly behind the entrance window a proportional counter is mounted. This proportional counter includes a highresistance anode. Thus, the position of the particles is determined in the detector. The following two points concern fundamental studies of ion-solid interaction. By using a magnetic spectrometer the charge state distribution of the particles scattered from the sample after a binary collision is both possible and necessary for the analysis. For this reason the charge states are measured and compared with existing models. In addition, a model is developed that takes into account the charge state dependent energy loss. It is shown that without the application of this model the depth profiles do not correspond with the quantitative measurements by conventional IBA methods and with the thickness obtained by transmission electron microscopy. The second fundamental ion-solid interaction is the damage and the modification of the sample that occurs during

  15. 《原子弹的初光:原子时代初期美国人的思想与文化》书评%Review on"First light of atomic bomb:the thought and culture of American in early atomic age"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙博

    2012-01-01

      The writing of Bowyer"First light of atomic bomb". As the name implies, is a new cultural history and the history of ideas of the works. The book uses the extremely rich data to build the Americans’ perception, psychology and thinking on the atomic bomb from 1945 to 1950, and use of comprehensive information, rigorous attitude, makes the book read like watching America's"Qingmingshanghetu"in fifty's of the last century,.%  鲍耶的著作《原子弹的初光》。顾名思义,是一部新文化史和思想史的著作。全书采用了极其丰富的资料重新构建了1945年至1950年美国人对原子弹的看法、心理与思考,且使用资料之全面,编选之精细,态度之严谨,使得本书让人读起来犹如观看一幅上世纪五十年代末美国的“清明上河图”。

  16. A study of a zone approach to IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) safeguards: The low-enriched-uranium zone of a light-water-reactor fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishbone, L.G.; Higinbotham, W.A.

    1986-06-01

    At present the IAEA designs its safeguards approach with regard to each type of nuclear facility so that the safeguards activities and effort are essentially the same for a given type and size of nuclear facility wherever it may be located. Conclusions regarding a state are derived by combining the conclusions regarding the effectiveness of safeguards for the individual facilities within a state. In this study it was convenient to define three zones in a state with a closed light-water-reactor nuclear fuel cycle. Each zone contains those facilities or parts thereof which use or process nuclear materials of the same safeguards significance: low-enriched uranium, radioactive spent fuel, or recovered plutonium. The possibility that each zone might be treated as an extended material balance area for safeguards purposes is under investigation. The approach includes defining the relevant features of the facilities in the three zones and listing the safeguards activities which are now practiced. This study has focussed on the fresh-fuel zone, the several facilities of which use or process low-enriched uranium. At one extreme, flows and inventories would be verified at each material balance area. At the other extreme, the flows into and out of the zone and the inventory of the whole zone would be verified. There are a number of possible safeguards approaches which fall between the two extremes. The intention is to develop a rational approach which will make it possible to compare the technical effectiveness and the inspection effort for the facility-oriented approach, for the approach involving the zone as a material balance area, and for some reasonable intermediate safeguards approaches.

  17. New Developments in Atom Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-01

    interferometers can be applied to a number of experiments in fundamental physics: tests of quantum mechanics such as the Aharonov - Casher effect (6), measurement of...qualitatively new types of experiments involving inertial effects , studies of atomic and molecular properties, tests of basic quantum physics, and may ultimately...laser light as the beam splitters. Atom interferometers will make possible qualitatively new types of experiments involving inertial effects , studies of

  18. Atomic theories

    CERN Document Server

    Loring, FH

    2014-01-01

    Summarising the most novel facts and theories which were coming into prominence at the time, particularly those which had not yet been incorporated into standard textbooks, this important work was first published in 1921. The subjects treated cover a wide range of research that was being conducted into the atom, and include Quantum Theory, the Bohr Theory, the Sommerfield extension of Bohr's work, the Octet Theory and Isotopes, as well as Ionisation Potentials and Solar Phenomena. Because much of the material of Atomic Theories lies on the boundary between experimentally verified fact and spec

  19. Light in complex dielectrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuurmans, F.J.P.

    1999-01-01

    In this thesis the properties of light in complex dielectrics are described, with the two general topics of "modification of spontaneous emission" and "Anderson localization of light". The first part focuses on the spontaneous emission rate of an excited atom in a dielectric host with variable refra

  20. Quantum Dynamical Theory for Squeezed Atom Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Hui; HAN Yi-Ang; CHEN Jing-Ling; MIAO Yuan-Xiu

    2000-01-01

    A model for the squeezed output coupler of the trapped Bose-Einstein condensed atoms is established with a simple many-boson system of two states with linear coupling, by preparing an initially squeezed light field. In the Bogoliubov approximation, its solutions show that the quadrature squeezing effect mutually oscillates between the coupling light field and the output atomic field. This manifests that the initially squeezed light will transform into a coherent state after some period of coupling interaction while the output atomic field is in a squeezed state.

  1. [The Chinese nuclear test and 'atoms for peace' as a measure for preventing nuclear armament of Japan: the nuclear non-proliferation policy of the United States and the introduction of light water reactors into Japan, 1964-1968].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Masakatsu

    2014-07-01

    Japan and the United States signed in 1968 a new atomic energy agreement through which US light-water nuclear reactors, including those of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of Tokyo Electric Power Company, were to be introduced into Japan. This paper studies the history of negotiations for the 1968 agreement using documents declassified in the 1990s in the US and Japan. After the success of the Chinese nuclear test in October 1964, the United States became seriously concerned about nuclear armament of other countries in Asia including Japan. Expecting that Japan would not have its own nuclear weapons, the US offered to help the country to demonstrate its superiority in some fields of science including peaceful nuclear energy to counter the psychological effect of the Chinese nuclear armament. Driven by his own political agenda, the newly appointed Prime Minister Eisaku Sato responded to the US expectation favorably. When he met in January 1965 with President Johnson, Sato made it clear that Japan would not pursue nuclear weapons. Although the US continued its support after this visit, it nevertheless gave priority to the control of nuclear technology in Japan through the bilateral peaceful nuclear agreement. This paper argues that the 1968 agreement implicitly meant a strategic measure to prevent Japan from going nuclear and also a tactic to persuade Japan to join the Nuclear Non -Proliferation Treaty.

  2. The new approach to the investigation of the roughness changes of the non-uniform materials irradiated with UV light and imaged by means of atomic force microscopy supported with precise repetitive scanning area positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Andrzej

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, a new approach to the observation of the roughness changes due to the UV light exposition is presented. The advantages of the shown method is based on the utilization of repeatable precise positioning of the sample in order to perform the imaging using atomic force microscopy, which enables continuous observation of the surface’s deterioration at specific areas during every inspection step. As the degradation of the material due to a radiation is a process, the measurements are performed repeatedly after a specific dose of the energy is applied to the surface. In the presented research, three samples: two polyethylene and one polycarbonate, revealing various levels of the homogeneity were used. For each sample seven spots have been chosen and then at each ageing step they are imaged in order to provide reliable information about the roughness changes. It is shown that using this novel approach one can obtain superior degradation detection sensitivity. Additionally, it is possible to verify the impact of the morphological and material non-homogeneities on the investigation results, due to the dispersion of the roughness determination at various areas of a certain sample.

  3. Atomic layer deposition of photoactive CoO/SrTiO3 and CoO/TiO2 on Si(001) for visible light driven photoelectrochemical water oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Thong Q.; Posadas, Agham; Seo, Hosung; Hoang, Son; McDaniel, Martin D.; Utess, Dirk; Triyoso, Dina H.; Buddie Mullins, C.; Demkov, Alexander A.; Ekerdt, John G.

    2013-08-01

    Cobalt oxide (CoO) films are grown epitaxially on Si(001) by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using a thin (1.6 nm) buffer layer of strontium titanate (STO) grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The ALD growth of CoO films is done at low temperature (170-180 °C), using cobalt bis(diisopropylacetamidinate) and water as co-reactants. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy are performed to characterize the crystalline structure of the films. The CoO films are found to be crystalline as-deposited even at the low growth temperature with no evidence of Co diffusion into Si. The STO-buffered Si (001) is used as a template for ALD growth of relatively thicker epitaxial STO and TiO2 films. Epitaxial and polycrystalline CoO films are then grown by ALD on the STO and TiO2 layers, respectively, creating thin-film heterostructures for photoelectrochemical testing. Both types of heterostructures, CoO/STO/Si and CoO/TiO2/STO/Si, demonstrate water photooxidation activity under visible light illumination. In-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is used to measure the band alignment of the two heterojunctions, CoO/STO and CoO/TiO2. The experimental band alignment is compared to electronic structure calculations using density functional theory.

  4. Optical tweezer manipulation for atom tetris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyosub; Lee, Woojun; Ahn, Jaewook

    2017-04-01

    Atoms can be individually captured and guided by light through optical dipole-trapping. However, applying this to many atoms simultaneously has been difficult due to the low inertia of atoms. Recently dynamically-controlled laser beams achieved such demonstrations, enabling a bottom-up approach to form arbitrary atom lattices, deterministic atom loading, atom-sorting, and even single-atom-level machinery. Here we report the latest improvements of the single-atom-level dynamic holographic optical tweezers. With the hardware and software upgrades to be explained in the text, the overall performance has improved to form arbitrary 2D lattices of a size about N=20, with success probability exceeding 50%.

  5. Atomic rivals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1990-01-01

    This book is a memoir of rivalries among the Allies over the bomb, by a participant and observer. Nuclear proliferation began in the uneasy wartime collaboration of the United States, England, Canada, and Free France to produce the atom bomb. Through the changes of history, a young French chemist had a role in almost every act of this international drama. This memoir is based on Goldschmidt's own recollections, interviews with other leading figures, and 3,000 pages of newly declassified documents in Allied archives. From his own start as Marie Curie's lab assistant, Goldschmidt's career was closely intertwined with Frances complicated rise to membership in the nuclear club. As a refugee from the Nazis, he became part of the wartime nuclear energy project in Canada and found himself the only French scientist to work (although briefly) on the American atom bomb project.

  6. Atomic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingston, A.E.; Kukla, K.; Cheng, S. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    In a collaboration with the Atomic Physics group at Argonne and the University of Toledo, the Atomic Physics group at the University of Notre Dame is measuring the fine structure transition energies in highly-charged lithium-like and helium-like ions using beam-foil spectroscopy. Precise measurements of 2s-2p transition energies in simple (few-electron) atomic systems provide stringent tests of several classes of current atomic- structure calculations. Analyses of measurements in helium-like Ar{sup 16+} have been completed, and the results submitted for publication. A current goal is to measure the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} - 1s2p{sup 3}P{sub 0} transition wavelength in helium-like Ni{sup 26+}. Measurements of the 1s2s{sup 2}S{sub 1/2} - 1s2p{sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2} transition wavelengths in lithium-like Kr{sup 33+} is planned. Wavelength and lifetime measurements in copper-like U{sup 63+} are also expected to be initiated. The group is also participating in measurements of forbidden transitions in helium-like ions. A measurement of the lifetime of the 1s2s{sup 3}S{sub 1} state in Kr{sup 34+} was published recently. In a collaboration including P. Mokler of GSI, Darmstadt, measurements have been made of the spectral distribution of the 2E1 decay continuum in helium-like Kr{sup 34+}. Initial results have been reported and further measurements are planned.

  7. The Inhomogeneous Light Shift in Alkali Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-24

    could be easily confused with this effect. It is our contention that this was exactly the case with the asymmetries observed by Arditi and Picque for the...Goodwin, ed., Advances in Quantum Electronics, (Academic Press, New York, 1975). 21. M. Arditi and J. L. Picqug, J. Phys. B. 8 (14), L331 (1975). 38 0

  8. The Properties of Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haglund, Richard F.

    The mystery of light has formed the core of creation stories in every culture, and attracted the earnest attentions of philosophers since at least the fifth century BCE. Their questions have ranged from how and what we see, to the interaction of light with material bodies, and finally to the nature of light itself. This chapter begins with a brief intellectual history of light from ancient Greece to the end of the 19th century. After introducing the physical parameterization of light in terms of standard units, three concepts of light are introduced: light as a wave, light as a quantum particle, and light as a quantum field. After highlighting the distinctive characteristics of light beams from various sources - thermal radiation, luminescence from atoms and molecules, and synchrotron light sources - the distinctive physical characteristics of light beams are examined in some detail. The chapter concludes with a survey of the statistical and quantum-mechanical properties of light beams. In the appropriate limits, this treatment not only recovers the classical description of light waves and the semiclassical view of light as a stream of quanta, but also forms a consistent description of quantum phenomena - such as interference phenomena generated by single photons - that have no classical analogs.

  9. The Atomic orbitals of the topological atom

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Salvador Sedano, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The effective atomic orbitals have been realized in the framework of Bader's atoms in molecules theory for a general wavefunction. This formalism can be used to retrieve from any type of calculation a proper set of orthonormalized numerical atomic orbitals, with occupation numbers that sum up to the respective Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) atomic populations. Experience shows that only a limited number of effective atomic orbitals exhibit significant occupation numbers. These c...

  10. The magneto-optical effect of cold atoms in an integrating sphere for atomic clock and optical magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, Jinyin; Meng, Yanling; Xiao, Ling; Liu, Peng; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Yaning; Liu, Liang

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the magneto-optical effect of cold atoms in an integrating sphere both experimentally and theoretically. The dependence of magneto-optical rotation angle on the biased magnetic field, the probe light intensity, and the probe light detuning are investigated. The probe light background is blocked and the shot noise is strongly suppressed. This detection scheme may provide a new approach for high contrast cold atom clock and cold atom optical magnetometer.

  11. Quantum information with Rydberg atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saffman, Mark; Walker, T.G.; Mølmer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    qubits. The availability of a strong long-range interaction that can be coherently turned on and off is an enabling resource for a wide range of quantum information tasks stretching far beyond the original gate proposal. Rydberg enabled capabilities include long-range two-qubit gates, collective encoding...... of multiqubit registers, implementation of robust light-atom quantum interfaces, and the potential for simulating quantum many-body physics. The advances of the last decade are reviewed, covering both theoretical and experimental aspects of Rydberg-mediated quantum information processing.......Rydberg atoms with principal quantum number n»1 have exaggerated atomic properties including dipole-dipole interactions that scale as n4 and radiative lifetimes that scale as n3. It was proposed a decade ago to take advantage of these properties to implement quantum gates between neutral atom...

  12. Coexistence of photonic and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates in ideal atomic gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Boichenko

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We have studied conditions of photon Bose-Einstein condensate formation that is in thermodynamic equilibrium with ideal gas of two-level Bose atoms below the degeneracy temperature. Equations describing thermodynamic equilibrium in the system were formulated; critical temperatures and densities of photonic and atomic gas subsystems were obtained analytically. Coexistence conditions of these photonic and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates were found. There was predicted the possibility of an abrupt type of photon condensation in the presence of Bose condensate of ground-state atoms: it was shown that the slightest decrease of the temperature could cause a significant gathering of photons in the condensate. This case could be treated as a simple model of the situation known as "stopped light" in cold atomic gas. We also showed how population inversion of atomic levels can be created by lowering the temperature. The latter situation looks promising for light accumulation in atomic vapor at very low temperatures.

  13. Spatial distribution of optically induced atomic excitation in a dense and cold atomic ensemble

    CERN Document Server

    Fofanov, Ya A; Sokolov, I M; Havey, M D

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of our general theoretical results developed previously in JETP 112, 246 (2011), we calculate the spatial distribution of atoms excited in a dense and cold atomic cloud by weak monochromatic light. We also study the atomic distribution over different Zeeman sublevels of the excited state in different parts of the cloud. The dependence of this distribution of atomic excitation on the density of the atomic ensemble and the frequency of external emission is investigated. We show that in the boundary regions of the cloud the orientation and alignment of atomic angular momentum takes place. Analysis of the spatial distribution of atomic excitation shows no noticeable signs of light localization effects even in those parameter regimes where the Ioffe-Regel criterium of strong localization is satisfied. However, comparative calculations performed in the framework of the scalar approximation to the dipole-dipole interaction reveals explicit manifestation of strong localization under some conditions.

  14. Improved performance of organic light-emitting diodes fabricated on Al-doped ZnO anodes incorporating a homogeneous Al-doped ZnO buffer layer grown by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong-June; Gong, Su Cheol; Park, Chang-Sun; Lee, Hong-Sub; Jang, Ji Geun; Chang, Ho Jung; Yeom, Geun Young; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2013-05-01

    In this work, we investigated the use of a homogeneous Al-doped zinc oxide (AZO) buffer layer to improve the performance of an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) device fabricated on an AZO anode. For this, 10-nm-thick AZO buffer layers with Al doping concentrations of 3.1, 4.1, and 5.1 at % were grown on 140-nm-thick AZO anode films containing 2.1 at % Al by atomic layer deposition. The electrical resistivity of the AZO anode with a homogeneous AZO buffer layer decreased with an increase in Al doping concentration up to 4.1 at %; however, the resistivity increased at higher doping concentrations in the AZO buffer layer. On the other hand, the work functions of the AZO anode with the AZO buffer layer containing various Al doping concentrations gradually increased with an increase in Al doping concentration from 3.1 to 5.1 at %. Therefore, the best film properties were obtained for an AZO anode with an AZO buffer layer containing 4.1 at % Al, and the work function value for this film was 4.64 eV. The highest luminance and current efficiency values were optimized to be 20290 cd/m(2) and 13.4 cd/A, respectively, with the OLED device composed of a DNTPD/TAPC/Bebq2:10% doped RP-411/Bphen/LiF/Al structure on an AZO anode with an AZO buffer layer containing 4.1 at % Al.

  15. Fast spatial atomic layer deposition of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at low temperature (<100 °C) as a gas permeation barrier for flexible organic light-emitting diode displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hagyoung; Shin, Seokyoon; Jeon, Hyeongtag, E-mail: hjeon@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yeongtae; Kim, Junghun; Kim, Sanghun; Chung, Seog Chul; Oh, Kiyoung [LIG INVENIA Co., Ltd., Seongnam, Gyeonggi 462-807 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The authors developed a high throughput (70 Å/min) and scalable space-divided atomic layer deposition (ALD) system for thin film encapsulation (TFE) of flexible organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays at low temperatures (<100 °C). In this paper, the authors report the excellent moisture barrier properties of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films deposited on 2G glass substrates of an industrially relevant size (370 × 470 mm{sup 2}) using the newly developed ALD system. This new ALD system reduced the ALD cycle time to less than 1 s. A growth rate of 0.9 Å/cycle was achieved using trimethylaluminum as an Al source and O{sub 3} as an O reactant. The morphological features and step coverage of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were investigated using field emission scanning electron microscopy. The chemical composition was analyzed using Auger electron spectroscopy. These deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} films demonstrated a good optical transmittance higher than 95% in the visible region based on the ultraviolet visible spectrometer measurements. Water vapor transmission rate lower than the detection limit of the MOCON test (less than 3.0 × 10{sup −3} g/m{sup 2} day) were obtained for the flexible substrates. Based on these results, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposited using our new high-throughput and scalable spatial ALD is considered a good candidate for preparation of TFE films of flexible OLEDs.

  16. Slow light beam splitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yanhong; Klein, Mason; Hohensee, Michael; Jiang, Liang; Phillips, David F; Lukin, Mikhail D; Walsworth, Ronald L

    2008-07-25

    We demonstrate a slow light beam splitter using rapid coherence transport in a wall-coated atomic vapor cell. We show that particles undergoing random and undirected classical motion can mediate coherent interactions between two or more optical modes. Coherence, written into atoms via electromagnetically induced transparency using an input optical signal at one transverse position, spreads out via ballistic atomic motion, is preserved by an antirelaxation wall coating, and is then retrieved in outgoing slow light signals in both the input channel and a spatially-separated second channel. The splitting ratio between the two output channels can be tuned by adjusting the laser power. The slow light beam splitter may improve quantum repeater performance and be useful as an all-optical dynamically reconfigurable router.

  17. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  18. Zitterbewegung in Cold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteado, Poliana; Egues, J. Carlos

    2013-03-01

    In condensed matter systems, the coupling between spatial and spin degrees of freedom through the spin-orbit (SO) interaction offers the possibility of manipulating the electron spin via its orbital motion. The proposal by Datta and Das of a `spin transistor' for example, highlights the use of the SO interaction to control the electron spin via electrical means. Recently, arrangements of crossed lasers and magnetic fields have been used to trap and cool atoms in optical lattices and also to create light-induced gauge potentials, which mimic the SO interactions in real solids. In this work, we investigate the Zitterbewegung in cold atoms by starting from the effective SO Hamiltonian derived in Ref.. Cross-dressed atoms as effective spins can provide a proper setting in which to observe this effect, as the relevant parameter range of SO strengths may be more easily attainable in this context. We find a variety of peculiar Zitterbewegung orbits in real and pseudo-spin spaces, e.g., cycloids and ellipses - all of which obtained with realistic parameters. This work is supported by FAPESP, CAPES and CNPq.

  19. High Atom Number in Microsized Atom Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-14

    Final Performance Report on ONR Grant N00014-12-1-0608 High atom number in microsized atom traps for the period 15 May 2012 through 14 September...TYPE Final Technical Report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 05/15/2012-09/14/2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High atom number in microsized atom traps...forces for implementing a small-footprint, large-number atom -chip instrument. Bichromatic forces rely on absorption and stimulated emission to produce

  20. Detecting Neutral Atoms on an Atom Chip

    OpenAIRE

    Wilzbach, M.; Haase, A.; Schwarz, M; Heine, D.; Wicker, K.; Liu, X; Brenner, K. -H.; Groth, S.; Fernholz, Th.; Hessmo, B.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2006-01-01

    Detecting single atoms (qubits) is a key requirement for implementing quantum information processing on an atom chip. The detector should ideally be integrated on the chip. Here we present and compare different methods capable of detecting neutral atoms on an atom chip. After a short introduction to fluorescence and absorption detection we discuss cavity enhanced detection of single atoms. In particular we concentrate on optical fiber based detectors such as fiber cavities and tapered fiber d...

  1. Sub-atom shot noise Faraday imaging of ultracold atom clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kristensen, Mick A; Pedersen, Poul L; Klempt, Carsten; Sherson, Jacob F; Arlt, Jan J; Hilliard, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that a dispersive imaging technique based on the Faraday effect can measure the atom number in a large, ultracold atom cloud with a precision below the atom shot noise level. The minimally destructive character of the technique allows us to take multiple images of the same cloud, which enables sub-atom shot noise measurement precision of the atom number and allows for an in situ determination of the measurement precision. We have developed a noise model that quantitatively describes the noise contributions due to photon shot noise in the detected light and the noise associated with single atom loss. This model contains no free parameters and is calculated through an analysis of the fluctuations in the acquired images. For clouds containing $N \\sim 5 \\times 10^6$ atoms, we achieve a precision more than a factor of two below the atom shot noise level.

  2. Sub-atom shot noise Faraday imaging of ultracold atom clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, M. A.; Gajdacz, M.; Pedersen, P. L.; Klempt, C.; Sherson, J. F.; Arlt, J. J.; Hilliard, A. J.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate that a dispersive imaging technique based on the Faraday effect can measure the atom number in a large, ultracold atom cloud with a precision below the atom shot noise level. The minimally destructive character of the technique allows us to take multiple images of the same cloud, which enables sub-atom shot noise measurement precision of the atom number and allows for an in situ determination of the measurement precision. We have developed a noise model that quantitatively describes the noise contributions due to photon shot noise in the detected light and the noise associated with single atom loss. This model contains no free parameters and is calculated through an analysis of the fluctuations in the acquired images. For clouds containing N∼ 5× {10}6 atoms, we achieve a precision more than a factor of two below the atom shot noise level.

  3. Development of an atomic gravimeter based on atom interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Taeg Yong; Lee, Sang-Bum; Park, Sang Eon; Heo, Myoung-Sun; Hong, Hyun-Gue; Park, Chang Yong; Lee, Won-Kyu; Yu, Dai-Hyuk

    2015-05-01

    We present an atomic gravimeter under development at KRISS in Korea for precise measurement of absolute gravity. It is based on atomic interference of laser cooled 87Rb atoms in free fall. The temperature of the atoms is cooled to about 5 μK in a magneto-optic trap. Three Raman light pulses are applied for splitting, reflecting and recombining the atoms clouds while the atoms are in free fall. The pulse width and spacing time of Raman pulses is 40 μs and about 50 ms, respectively. During the interferometry, the frequency difference between the two counter-propagating Raman beams is chirped to compensate for Doppler shift induced by gravitational acceleration. The interference signals are measured at different spacing times to find the chirping rate at which the phase of interference fringe is independent of the spacing time. The chirping rate (~ 25.1 MHz/s) corresponds to g .keff/2 π, where keff = k1 +k2 (k1 and k2 are wave numbers for two Raman beams). At present, we are going to introduce an anti-vibration platform and a magnetic shield for accuracy evaluation of the gravimeter. In the presentation, the preliminary results of the KRISS gravimeter will be discussed.

  4. Coherence of a squeezed sodium atom laser generated from Raman output coupling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiyong He; Chunjia Huang

    2009-01-01

    The coherence of a squeezed sodium atom laser generated from a Raman output coupler,in which the sodium atoms in Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) intcract with two light beams consisting of a weaker squeezed coherent probe light and a stronger classical coupling light,is investigated.The results show that in the case of a large mean number of BEC atoms and a weaker probe light field,the atom laser is antibunching,and this atom laser is second-order coherent if the number of BEC atoms in traps is large enough.

  5. Advances in atomic, molecular, and optical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, Paul R; Arimondo, Ennio

    2006-01-01

    Volume 54 of the Advances Series contains ten contributions, covering a diversity of subject areas in atomic, molecular and optical physics. The article by Regal and Jin reviews the properties of a Fermi degenerate gas of cold potassium atoms in the crossover regime between the Bose-Einstein condensation of molecules and the condensation of fermionic atom pairs. The transition between the two regions can be probed by varying an external magnetic field. Sherson, Julsgaard and Polzik explore the manner in which light and atoms can be entangled, with applications to quantum information processing

  6. Spectroscopic detection of atom-surface interactions in an atomic vapour layer with nanoscale thickness

    CERN Document Server

    Whittaker, K A; Hughes, I G; Sargsyan, A; Sarkisyan, D; Adams, C S

    2015-01-01

    We measure the resonance line shape of atomic vapor layers with nanoscale thickness confined between two sapphire windows. The measurement is performed by scanning a probe laser through resonance and collecting the scattered light. The line shape is dominated by the effects of Dicke narrowing, self-broadening, and atom-surface interactions. By fitting the measured line shape to a simple model we discuss the possibility to extract information about the atom-surface interaction.

  7. "Bohr's Atomic Model."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willden, Jeff

    2001-01-01

    "Bohr's Atomic Model" is a small interactive multimedia program that introduces the viewer to a simplified model of the atom. This interactive simulation lets students build an atom using an atomic construction set. The underlying design methodology for "Bohr's Atomic Model" is model-centered instruction, which means the central model of the…

  8. The atomic orbitals of the topological atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Salvador, Pedro; Mayer, István

    2013-06-07

    The effective atomic orbitals have been realized in the framework of Bader's atoms in molecules theory for a general wavefunction. This formalism can be used to retrieve from any type of calculation a proper set of orthonormalized numerical atomic orbitals, with occupation numbers that sum up to the respective Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) atomic populations. Experience shows that only a limited number of effective atomic orbitals exhibit significant occupation numbers. These correspond to atomic hybrids that closely resemble the core and valence shells of the atom. The occupation numbers of the remaining effective orbitals are almost negligible, except for atoms with hypervalent character. In addition, the molecular orbitals of a calculation can be exactly expressed as a linear combination of this orthonormalized set of numerical atomic orbitals, and the Mulliken population analysis carried out on this basis set exactly reproduces the original QTAIM atomic populations of the atoms. Approximate expansion of the molecular orbitals over a much reduced set of orthogonal atomic basis functions can also be accomplished to a very good accuracy with a singular value decomposition procedure.

  9. Entanglement between two atoms in the system of Schr(o)dinger cat state interacting with two entangled atoms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Tang-Kun

    2007-01-01

    By the negative eigenvalues of partial transposition of density matrix, this paper investigates the time evolution of entanglement of the two entangled atoms in the system of two atoms interacting with Schr(o)dinger cat state. The result shows that the two atoms are always in the entanglement state, and the degree of entanglement between the two atoms exhibits ordinary collapses and revivals at 0.2 degree of entanglement, when the light field is large enough. On the other hand, the reinforcement of three different light fields on the degree of entanglement between two atoms is not evident.

  10. Low Energy Atomic Photodesorption from Organic Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Lucchesini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Organic coatings have been widely used in atomic physics during the last 50 years because of their mechanical properties, allowing preservation of atomic spins after collisions. Nevertheless, this did not produce detailed insight into the characteristics of the coatings and their dynamical interaction with atomic vapors. This has changed since the 1990s, when their adsorption and desorption properties triggered a renewed interest in organic coatings. In particular, a novel class of phenomena produced by non-destructive light-induced desorption of atoms embedded in the coating surface was observed and later applied in different fields. Nowadays, low energy non-resonant atomic photodesorption from organic coatings can be considered an almost standard technique whenever large densities of atomic vapors or fast modulation of their concentration are required. In this paper, we review the steps that led to this widespread diffusion, from the preliminary observations to some of the most recent applications in fundamental and applied physics.

  11. Atomic-position Localization Via Dual Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Nha, H; Chang, J S; An, K; Nha, Hyunchul; Lee, Jai-Hyung; Chang, Joon-Sung; An, Kyungwon

    2002-01-01

    We study localization of atomic position when a three-level atom interacts with a quantized standing-wave field in the Ramsey interferometer setup. Both the field quadrature amplitude and the atomic internal state are measured to obtain the atomic position information. It is found that this dual measurement scheme produces an interference pattern superimposed on a diffraction-like pattern in the atomic position distribution, where the former pattern originates from the state-selective measurement and the latter from the field measurement. The present scheme results in a better resolution in the position localization than the field-alone measurement schemes. We also discuss the measurement-correlated mechanical action of the standing-wave field on the atom in the light of Popper's test.

  12. Trapping cold ground state argon atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, P D; Barker, P F

    2014-10-31

    We trap cold, ground state argon atoms in a deep optical dipole trap produced by a buildup cavity. The atoms, which are a general source for the sympathetic cooling of molecules, are loaded in the trap by quenching them from a cloud of laser-cooled metastable argon atoms. Although the ground state atoms cannot be directly probed, we detect them by observing the collisional loss of cotrapped metastable argon atoms and determine an elastic cross section. Using a type of parametric loss spectroscopy we also determine the polarizability of the metastable 4s[3/2](2) state to be (7.3±1.1)×10(-39)  C m(2)/V. Finally, Penning and associative losses of metastable atoms in the absence of light assisted collisions, are determined to be (3.3±0.8)×10(-10)  cm(3) s(-1).

  13. Atomic-level imaging, processing and characterization of semiconductor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmerski, L.L.

    1995-08-22

    A method for selecting and removing single specific atoms from a solid material surface uses photon biasing to break down bonds that hold the selected atom in the lattice and to reduce barrier effects that hold the atom from transferring to a probe. The photon bias is preferably light or other electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength and frequency that approximately matches the wave function of the target atom species to be removed to induce high energy, selective thermionic-like vibration. An electric field potential is then applied between the probe and the surface of the solid material to pull the atom out of the lattice and to transfer the atom to the probe. Different extrinsic atoms can be installed in the lattice sites that are vacated by the removed atoms by using a photon bias that resonates the extrinsic atom species, reversing polarity of the electric field, and blowing gas comprising the extrinsic atoms through a hollow catheter probe. 8 figs.

  14. Atomic-level imaging, processing and characterization of semiconductor surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L. (Lakewood, CO)

    1995-01-01

    A method for selecting and removing single specific atoms from a solid material surface uses photon biasing to break down bonds that hold the selected atom in the lattice and to reduce barrier effects that hold the atom from transferring to a probe. The photon bias is preferably light or other electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength and frequency that approximately matches the wave function of the target atom species to be removed to induce high energy, selective thermionic-like vibration. An electric field potential is then applied between the probe and the surface of the solid material to pull the atom out of the lattice and to transfer the atom to the probe. Different extrinsic atoms can be installed in the lattice sites that are vacated by the removed atoms by using a photon bias that resonates the extrinsic atom species, reversing polarity of the electric field, and blowing gas comprising the extrinsic atoms through a hollow catheter probe.

  15. Isolating and moving single atoms using silicon nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Malcolm S.

    2010-09-07

    A method is disclosed for isolating single atoms of an atomic species of interest by locating the atoms within silicon nanocrystals. This can be done by implanting, on the average, a single atom of the atomic species of interest into each nanocrystal, and then measuring an electrical charge distribution on the nanocrystals with scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM) or electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) to identify and select those nanocrystals having exactly one atom of the atomic species of interest therein. The nanocrystals with the single atom of the atomic species of interest therein can be sorted and moved using an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. The method is useful for forming nanoscale electronic and optical devices including quantum computers and single-photon light sources.

  16. Light Sources and Lighting Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hisashi; Suwa, Takumi; Yasuda, Takeo; Ohtani, Yoshihiko; Maehara, Akiyoshi; Okada, Atsunori; Komatsu, Naoki; Mannami, Tomoaki

    means of using filler gas with a higher atomic weight. Regarding fluorescent lamps, studies and developments for longer operating life and improvement in the lumen maintenance factor for the straight-type and circular-type fluorescent lamps were actively pursued. Regarding self-ballasted fluorescent lamps, the main stream of development was aimed at reducing lamp size and increasing energy conservation, and the development of new products that took advantage of these features proceeded. In regard to LED light sources, basic research and product development, including new application development, were vigorously implemented. In basic research, studies were reported, not only on efficacy improvements through optimization of the LED chips, phosphor layers, and packaging technology, but also on photometry, colorimetry, and visual psychology. In the field of application, applications were studied for general lighting sources and also for a wide range of fields, such as automotive headlights and visible light communication. Also, many academic conferences and exhibitions were held domestically and overseas, and the high level of interest suggests high expectations for this next-generation light source. Regarding HID lamps, there was much activity in research and development and in the commercialization of the ceramic metal halide lamp product, and products were commercialized with features such as higher efficiency (130 lm/W) and higher color rendering properties (R9 ≥ 90). In the high-pressure sodium lamps, there were many study reports concerning plant growth and insect pest control using its low insect-attracting characteristics. With high-pressure mercury lamps, there were many reports on reducing lamp size and increasing intensity for use as a light source for projectors.

  17. Lighting: Green Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniccia, Dorine

    2003-01-01

    Explains that by using sustainable (green) building practices, schools and universities can make their lighting systems more efficient, noting that embracing green design principles can help schools attract students. Discusses lighting-control technologies (occupancy sensing technology, daylighting technology, and scheduling based technologies),…

  18. Gold volatile species atomization and preconcentration in quartz devices for atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslan, Yasin [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Mehmet Akif Ersoy University, Faculty of Arts & Sciences, Chemistry Department, 15030 Burdur (Turkey); Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš; Kratzer, Jan [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Dědina, Jiří, E-mail: dedina@biomed.cas.cz [Institute of Analytical Chemistry of the ASCR, v. v. i., Veveří 97, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-01

    The on-line atomization of gold volatile species was studied and the results were compared with thermodynamic calculations in several quartz atomizers, namely: diffusion flame, flame-in-gas-shield, flame-in-plain-tube, externally heated T-tube and externally heated flame-in-T-tube. Atomization mechanism in the explored devices is proposed, where volatile species are converted to thermodynamically stable AuH at elevated temperature over 500 °C and then atomized by an interaction with a cloud of hydrogen radicals. Because of its inherent simplicity and robustness, diffusion flame was employed as a reference atomizer. It yielded atomization efficiency of 70 to 100% and a very good long time reproducibility of peak area sensitivity: 1.6 to 1.8 s μg{sup −1}. Six and eleven times higher sensitivity, respectively, was provided by atomizers with longer light paths in the observation volume, i.e. externally heated T-tube and externally heated flame-in-T-tube. The latter one, offering limit of detection below 0.01 μg ml{sup −1}, appeared as the most prospective for on-line atomization. Insight into the mechanism of atomization of gold volatile species, into the fate of free atoms and into subsequent analyte transfer allowed to assess possibilities of in-atomizer preconcentration of gold volatile species: it is unfeasible with quartz atomizers but a sapphire tube atomizer could be useful in this respect. - Highlights: • On-line atomization of gold volatile species for AAS in quartz devices was studied. • Atomization mechanism was proposed and atomization efficiency was estimated. • Possibilities of in-atomizer preconcentration of gold volatile species were assessed.

  19. Stochastic electrodynamics simulations for collective atom response in optical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mark D.; Jenkins, Stewart D.; Bronstein, Yael; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2017-08-01

    We study the collective optical response of an atomic ensemble confined within a single-mode optical cavity by stochastic electrodynamics simulations that include the effects of atomic position correlations, internal level structure, and spatial variations in cavity coupling strength and atom density. In the limit of low light intensity, the simulations exactly reproduce the full quantum field-theoretical description for cold stationary atoms and at higher light intensities we introduce semiclassical approximations to atomic saturation that we compare with the exact solution in the case of two atoms. We find that collective subradiant modes of the atoms, with very narrow linewidths, can be coupled to the cavity field by spatial variation of the atomic transition frequency and resolved at low intensities, and show that they can be specifically driven by tailored transverse pumping beams. We show that the cavity optical response, in particular both the subradiant mode profile and the resonance shift of the cavity mode, can be used as a diagnostic tool for the position correlations of the atoms and hence the atomic quantum many-body phase. The quantum effects are found to be most prominent close to the narrow subradiant mode resonances at high light intensities. Although an optical cavity can generally strongly enhance quantum fluctuations via light confinement, we show that the semiclassical approximation to the stochastic electrodynamics model provides at least a qualitative agreement with the exact optical response outside the subradiant mode resonances even in the presence of significant saturation of the atoms.

  20. Atomic phase diagram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shichun

    2004-01-01

    Based on the Thomas-Fermi-Dirac-Cheng model, atomic phase diagram or electron density versus atomic radius diagram describing the interaction properties of atoms of different kinds in equilibrium state is developed. Atomic phase diagram is established based on the two-atoms model. Besides atomic radius, electron density and continuity condition for electron density on interfaces between atoms, the lever law of atomic phase diagram involving other physical parameters is taken into account, such as the binding energy, for the sake of simplicity.

  1. Spin-sensitive atom mirror via spin-orbit interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lu; Zheng, Ren-Fei; Zhang, Weiping

    2016-11-01

    Based on the spin-orbit coupling recently implemented in a neutral cold-atom gas, we propose a scheme to realize spin-dependent scattering of cold atoms. In particular we consider a matter wave packet of cold-atom gas impinging upon a step potential created by the optical light field, inside of which the atoms are subject to spin-orbit interaction. We show that the proposed system can act as a spin polarizer or spin-selective atom mirror for the incident atomic beam. The principle and the operating parameter regime of the system are carefully discussed.

  2. Coupled dynamics of atoms and radiation pressure driven interferometers

    OpenAIRE

    Meiser, D.; Meystre, P.

    2005-01-01

    We consider the motion of the end mirror of a cavity in whose standing wave mode pattern atoms are trapped. The atoms and the light field strongly couple to each other because the atoms form a distributed Bragg mirror with a reflectivity that can be fairly high. We analyze how the dipole potential in which the atoms move is modified due to this backaction of the atoms. We show that the position of the atoms can become bistable. These results are of a more general nature and can be applied to ...

  3. Dynamical observations of self-stabilizing stationary light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, J. L.; Campbell, G. T.; Cho, Y.-W.; Vernaz-Gris, P.; Higginbottom, D. B.; Pinel, O.; Robins, N. P.; Lam, P. K.; Buchler, B. C.

    2017-01-01

    The precise control of atom-light interactions is vital to many quantum technologies. For instance, atomic systems can be used to slow and store light, acting as a quantum memory. Optical storage can be achieved via stopped light, where no optical energy continues to exist in the atomic system, or as stationary light, where some optical energy remains present during storage. Here, we demonstrate a form of self-stabilizing stationary light. From any initial state, our atom-light system evolves to a stable configuration that may contain bright optical excitations trapped within the atomic ensemble. This phenomenon is verified experimentally in a cloud of cold Rb87 atoms. The spinwave in our atomic cloud is imaged from the side, allowing direct comparison with theoretical predictions.

  4. Laser spectroscopy of atomic radium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groot, Alexander; Jungmann, Klaus; Santra, Bodhaditya; Willmann, Lorenz; Wilschut, Hans W. [KVI, University of Groningen (Netherlands)

    2009-07-01

    The heavy alkaline earth elements radium (Ra) offers a unique sensitivity to a parity and time reversal violating permanent electric dipole moments (EDM). In particular, Ra exhibits the largest known atomic enhancements factors for EDMs. The intrinsic sensitivity arises from the specific atomic and nuclear structure of Ra. All Ra isotopes with nuclear spin I are radioactive. The lifetimes are shorter than 15 d. Several Ra isotopes are available at the TRI{mu}P facility at KVI. For the exploitation of the sensitivity Ra atoms have to be collected in a neutral atom trap. The main laser cooling is done on the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 1}P{sub 1} transition at 482.7 nm, similar to the laser cooling and trapping of the chemical homologue barium. Laser spectroscopy of the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 1}P{sub 1} transitions is presented. The light at this wavelength is provided by frequency doubling of a Ti:sapphire laser in a KNbO{sub 3} crystal. Of particular interest is the decay branching of the excited state to the metastable D-states. Such measurements are indispensable input for current atomic structure calculations, which are necessary for the analysis of a EDM measurement using Ra.

  5. Cold Matter Assembled Atom-by-Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Endres, Manuel; Keesling, Alexander; Levine, Harry; Anschuetz, Eric R; Krajenbrink, Alexandre; Senko, Crystal; Vuletic, Vladan; Greiner, Markus; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2016-01-01

    The realization of large-scale fully controllable quantum systems is an exciting frontier in modern physical science. We use atom-by-atom assembly to implement a novel platform for the deterministic preparation of regular arrays of individually controlled cold atoms. In our approach, a measurement and feedback procedure eliminates the entropy associated with probabilistic trap occupation and results in defect-free arrays of over 50 atoms in less than 400 ms. The technique is based on fast, real-time control of 100 optical tweezers, which we use to arrange atoms in desired geometric patterns and to maintain these configurations by replacing lost atoms with surplus atoms from a reservoir. This bottom-up approach enables controlled engineering of scalable many-body systems for quantum information processing, quantum simulations, and precision measurements.

  6. Atomic vapor spectroscopy in integrated photonic structures

    CERN Document Server

    Ritter, Ralf; Pernice, Wolfram; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert

    2015-01-01

    We investigate an integrated optical chip immersed in atomic vapor providing several waveguide geometries for spectroscopy applications. The narrow-band transmission through a silicon nitride waveguide and interferometer is altered when the guided light is coupled to a vapor of rubidium atoms via the evanescent tail of the waveguide mode. We use grating couplers to couple between the waveguide mode and the radiating wave, which allow for addressing arbitrary coupling positions on the chip surface. The evanescent atom-light interaction can be numerically simulated and shows excellent agreement with our experimental data. This work demonstrates a next step towards miniaturization and integration of alkali atom spectroscopy and provides a platform for further fundamental studies of complex waveguide structures.

  7. High data-rate atom interferometers through high recapture efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Grant; Rakholia, Akash Vrijal; McGuinness, Hayden

    2015-01-27

    An inertial sensing system includes a magneto-optical trap (MOT) that traps atoms within a specified trapping region. The system also includes a cooling laser that cools the trapped atoms so that the atoms remain within the specified region for a specified amount of time. The system further includes a light-pulse atom interferometer (LPAI) that performs an interferometric interrogation of the atoms to determine phase changes in the atoms. The system includes a controller that controls the timing of MOT and cooling laser operations, and controls the timing of interferometric operations to substantially recapture the atoms in the specified trapping region. The system includes a processor that determines the amount inertial movement of the inertial sensing system based on the determined phase changes in the atoms. Also, a method of inertial sensing using this inertial sensing system includes recapture of atoms within the MOT following interferometric interrogation by the LPAI.

  8. Photon-Atom Coupling with Parabolic Mirrors

    CERN Document Server

    Sondermann, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Efficient coupling of light to single atomic systems has gained considerable attention over the past decades. This development is driven by the continuous growth of quantum technologies. The efficient coupling of light and matter is an enabling technology for quantum information processing and quantum communication. And indeed, in recent years much progress has been made in this direction. But applications aside, the interaction of photons and atoms is a fundamental physics problem. There are various possibilities for making this interaction more efficient, among them the apparently 'natural' attempt of mode-matching the light field to the free-space emission pattern of the atomic system of interest. Here we will describe the necessary steps of implementing this mode-matching with the ultimate aim of reaching unit coupling efficiency. We describe the use of deep parabolic mirrors as the central optical element of a free-space coupling scheme, covering the preparation of suitable modes of the field incident on...

  9. Search for light custodians in a clean decay channel at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    de Sandes, H

    2008-01-01

    Models of warped extra dimensions with custodial symmetry usually predict the existence of a light Kaluza-Klein fermion arising as a partner of the right-handed top quark, sometimes called light custodians which we will denote $\\tilde{b}_R$. The production of these particles at the LHC can give rise to multi-W events which could be observed in same-sign dilepton channels, but its mass reconstruction is challenging. In this letter we study the possibility of finding a signal for the pair production of this new particle at the LHC focusing on a rarer, but cleaner decay mode of a light custodian into a $Z$ boson and a $b$-quark. In this mode it would be possible to reconstruct the light custodian mass. In addition to the dominant standard model QCD production processes, we include the contribution of a Kaluza-Klein gluon first mode. We find that the $\\tilde{b}_R$ stands out from the background as a peak in the $b Z$ invariant mass. However, when taking into account only the electronic and muonic decay modes of t...

  10. Generation and storage of quantum states using cold atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantan, Aurelien Romain; Josse, Vincent; Cviklinski, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Cold cesium or rubidium atomic samples have a good potential both for generation and storage of nonclassical states of light. Generation of nonclassical states of light is possible through the high non-linearity of cold atomic samples excited close to a resonance line. Quadrature squeezing, polar......, polarization squeezing and entanglement have been demonstrated. Quantum state storage is made possible by the presence of long-lived angular momentum in the ground state. Cold atoms are thus a promising resource in quantum information.......Cold cesium or rubidium atomic samples have a good potential both for generation and storage of nonclassical states of light. Generation of nonclassical states of light is possible through the high non-linearity of cold atomic samples excited close to a resonance line. Quadrature squeezing...

  11. Kinetics of the reaction of the heaviest hydrogen atom with H2, the 4Heμ + H2 → 4HeμH + H reaction: experiments, accurate quantal calculations, and variational transition state theory, including kinetic isotope effects for a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Donald G; Arseneau, Donald J; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Brewer, Jess H; Mielke, Steven L; Truhlar, Donald G; Schatz, George C; Garrett, Bruce C; Peterson, Kirk A

    2011-11-14

    The neutral muonic helium atom (4)Heμ, in which one of the electrons of He is replaced by a negative muon, may be effectively regarded as the heaviest isotope of the hydrogen atom, with a mass of 4.115 amu. We report details of the first muon spin rotation (μSR) measurements of the chemical reaction rate constant of (4)Heμ with molecular hydrogen, (4)Heμ + H(2) → (4)HeμH + H, at temperatures of 295.5, 405, and 500 K, as well as a μSR measurement of the hyperfine coupling constant of muonic He at high pressures. The experimental rate constants, k(Heμ), are compared with the predictions of accurate quantum mechanical (QM) dynamics calculations carried out on a well converged Born-Huang (BH) potential energy surface, based on complete configuration interaction calculations and including a Born-Oppenheimer diagonal correction. At the two highest measured temperatures the agreement between the quantum theory and experiment is good to excellent, well within experimental uncertainties that include an estimate of possible systematic error, but at 295.5 K the quantum calculations for k(Heμ) are below the experimental value by 2.1 times the experimental uncertainty estimates. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed. Variational transition state theory calculations with multidimensional tunneling have also been carried out for k(Heμ) on the BH surface, and they agree with the accurate QM rate constants to within 30% over a wider temperature range of 200-1000 K. Comparisons between theory and experiment are also presented for the rate constants for both the D + H(2) and Mu + H(2) reactions in a novel study of kinetic isotope effects for the H + H(2) reactions over a factor of 36.1 in isotopic mass of the atomic reactant. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  12. Two-Photon Collective Atomic Recoil Lasing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. McKelvie

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a theoretical study of the interaction between light and a cold gasof three-level, ladder configuration atoms close to two-photon resonance. In particular, weinvestigate the existence of collective atomic recoil lasing (CARL instabilities in differentregimes of internal atomic excitation and compare to previous studies of the CARL instabilityinvolving two-level atoms. In the case of two-level atoms, the CARL instability is quenchedat high pump rates with significant atomic excitation by saturation of the (one-photoncoherence, which produces the optical forces responsible for the instability and rapid heatingdue to high spontaneous emission rates. We show that in the two-photon CARL schemestudied here involving three-level atoms, CARL instabilities can survive at high pump rateswhen the atoms have significant excitation, due to the contributions to the optical forces frommultiple coherences and the reduction of spontaneous emission due to transitions betweenthe populated states being dipole forbidden. This two-photon CARL scheme may form thebasis of methods to increase the effective nonlinear optical response of cold atomic gases.

  13. Hydrogen atom kinetics in capacitively coupled plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunomura, Shota; Katayama, Hirotaka; Yoshida, Isao

    2017-05-01

    Hydrogen (H) atom kinetics has been investigated in capacitively coupled very high frequency (VHF) discharges at powers of 16-780 mW cm-2 and H2 gas pressures of 0.1-2 Torr. The H atom density has been measured using vacuum ultra violet absorption spectroscopy (VUVAS) with a micro-discharge hollow cathode lamp as a VUV light source. The measurements have been performed in two different electrode configurations of discharges: conventional parallel-plate diode and triode with an intermediate mesh electrode. We find that in the triode configuration, the H atom density is strongly reduced across the mesh electrode. The H atom density varies from ˜1012 cm-3 to ˜1010 cm-3 by crossing the mesh with 0.2 mm in thickness and 36% in aperture ratio. The fluid model simulations for VHF discharge plasmas have been performed to study the H atom generation, diffusion and recombination kinetics. The simulations suggest that H atoms are generated in the bulk plasma, by the electron impact dissociation (e + H2 \\to e + 2H) and the ion-molecule reaction (H2 + + H2 \\to {{{H}}}3+ + H). The diffusion of H atoms is strongly limited by a mesh electrode, and thus the mesh geometry influences the spatial distribution of the H atoms. The loss of H atoms is dominated by the surface recombination.

  14. Neutral atom traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  15. A new approach to entangling neutral atoms.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jongmin [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Michael J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Deutsch, Ivan H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Biedermann, Grant W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Our team has developed a new approach to entangling neutral atoms with a Rydberg-dressed interaction. Entangling neutral atoms is an essential key of quantum technologies such as quantum computation, many-body quantum simulation, and high-precision atomic sensors . The demonstrated Rydberg-dressed protocol involves adiabatically imposing a light shift on the ground state by coupling an excited Rydberg state with a tuned laser field. Using this technique, we have demonstrated a strong and tunable dipole - dipole interaction between two individually trapped atoms with energy shifts of order 1 MHz, which has been challenging to achieve in other protocols . During this program, we experimentally demonstrated Bell-state entanglement and the isomorphism to the Jaynes - Cumming model of a Rydberg-dressed two-atom system. Our theoretical calculations of a CPHASE quantum logic gate and arbitrary Dicke state quantum control in this system encourage further work.

  16. High data rate atom interferometric device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Grant; McGuinness, Hayden James Evans; Rakholia, Akash

    2015-07-21

    A light-pulse atomic interferometry (LPAI) apparatus is provided. The LPAI apparatus comprises a vessel, two sets of magnetic coils configured to magnetically confine an atomic vapor in two respective magneto-optical traps (MOTs) within the vessel when activated, and an optical system configured to irradiate the atomic vapor within the vessel with laser radiation that, when suitably tuned, can launch atoms previously confined in each of the MOTs toward the other MOT. In embodiments, the magnetic coils are configured to produce a magnetic field that is non-zero at the midpoint between the traps. In embodiments, the time-of-flight of the launched atoms from one MOT to the other is 12 ms or less. In embodiments, the MOTs are situated approximately 36 mm apart. In embodiments, the apparatus is configured to activate the magnetic coils according to a particular temporal magnetic field gradient profile.

  17. Absorption imaging of a single atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streed, Erik W.; Jechow, Andreas; Norton, Benjamin G.; Kielpinski, David

    2012-07-01

    Absorption imaging has played a key role in the advancement of science from van Leeuwenhoek's discovery of red blood cells to modern observations of dust clouds in stellar nebulas and Bose-Einstein condensates. Here we show the first absorption imaging of a single atom isolated in a vacuum. The optical properties of atoms are thoroughly understood, so a single atom is an ideal system for testing the limits of absorption imaging. A single atomic ion was confined in an RF Paul trap and the absorption imaged at near wavelength resolution with a phase Fresnel lens. The observed image contrast of 3.1 (3)% is the maximum theoretically allowed for the imaging resolution of our set-up. The absorption of photons by single atoms is of immediate interest for quantum information processing. Our results also point out new opportunities in imaging of light-sensitive samples both in the optical and X-ray regimes.

  18. Efficient cooling and trapping of strontium atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtillot, I; Quessada, A; Kovacich, R P; Zondy, J J; Landragin, A; Clairon, A; Lemonde, P

    2003-03-15

    We report the capture of cold strontium atoms in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) at a rate of 4 x 10(10) atoms/s. The MOT is loaded from an atomic beam decelerated by a Zeeman slower operating with a focused laser beam. The 461-nm laser, used for both cooling and trapping, was generated by sum-frequency mixing in a KTP crystal with diode lasers at 813 nm and a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm. As much as 115 mW of blue light was obtained.

  19. Relativistic collisions of structured atomic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voitkiv, A.; Ullrich, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The book reviews the progress achieved over the last decade in the study of collisions between an ion and an atom in which both the atomic particles carry electrons and can undergo transitions between their internal states - including continua. It presents the detailed considerations of different theoretical approaches, that can be used to describe collisions of structured atomic particles for the very broad interval of impact energies ranging from 0.5-1 MeV/u till extreme relativistic energies where the collision velocity very closely approaches the speed of light. (orig.)

  20. Simple integrated single-atom detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilzbach, Marco; Heine, Dennis; Groth, Sönke; Liu, Xiyuan; Raub, Thomas; Hessmo, Björn; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2009-02-01

    We present a reliable and robust integrated fluorescence detector capable of detecting single atoms. The detector consists of a tapered lensed single-mode fiber for precise delivery of excitation light and a multimode fiber to collect the fluorescence. Both are mounted in lithographically defined SU-8 holding structures on an atom chip. 87Rb atoms propagating freely in a magnetic guide are detected with an efficiency of up to 66%, and a signal-to-noise ratio in excess of 100 is obtained for short integration times.