WorldWideScience

Sample records for light microscopy level

  1. Correlated Light Microscopy and Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sjollema, Klaas A.; Schnell, Ulrike; Kuipers, Jeroen; Kalicharan, Ruby; Giepmans, Ben N. G.; MullerReichert, T; Verkade, P

    2012-01-01

    Understanding where, when, and how biomolecules (inter)act is crucial to uncover fundamental mechanisms in cell biology. Recent developments in fluorescence light microscopy (FLM) allow protein imaging in living cells and at the near molecular level. However, fluorescence microscopy only reveals

  2. Bessel light sheet structured illumination microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noshirvani Allahabadi, Golchehr

    Biomedical study researchers using animals to model disease and treatment need fast, deep, noninvasive, and inexpensive multi-channel imaging methods. Traditional fluorescence microscopy meets those criteria to an extent. Specifically, two-photon and confocal microscopy, the two most commonly used methods, are limited in penetration depth, cost, resolution, and field of view. In addition, two-photon microscopy has limited ability in multi-channel imaging. Light sheet microscopy, a fast developing 3D fluorescence imaging method, offers attractive advantages over traditional two-photon and confocal microscopy. Light sheet microscopy is much more applicable for in vivo 3D time-lapsed imaging, owing to its selective illumination of tissue layer, superior speed, low light exposure, high penetration depth, and low levels of photobleaching. However, standard light sheet microscopy using Gaussian beam excitation has two main disadvantages: 1) the field of view (FOV) of light sheet microscopy is limited by the depth of focus of the Gaussian beam. 2) Light-sheet images can be degraded by scattering, which limits the penetration of the excitation beam and blurs emission images in deep tissue layers. While two-sided sheet illumination, which doubles the field of view by illuminating the sample from opposite sides, offers a potential solution, the technique adds complexity and cost to the imaging system. We investigate a new technique to address these limitations: Bessel light sheet microscopy in combination with incoherent nonlinear Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM). Results demonstrate that, at visible wavelengths, Bessel excitation penetrates up to 250 microns deep in the scattering media with single-side illumination. Bessel light sheet microscope achieves confocal level resolution at a lateral resolution of 0.3 micron and an axial resolution of 1 micron. Incoherent nonlinear SIM further reduces the diffused background in Bessel light sheet images, resulting in

  3. Innovative Strategies for Clinical Microscopy Instruction: Virtual Versus Light Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, M Jane; Russell, Gregory B; Crandall, Sonia J

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare virtual microscopy with light microscopy to determine differences in learning outcomes and learner attitudes in teaching clinical microscopy to physician assistant (PA) students. A prospective, randomized, crossover design study was conducted with a convenience sample of 67 first-year PA students randomized to 2 groups. One group used light microscopes to find microscopic structures, whereas the other group used instructor-directed video streaming of microscopic elements. At the midpoint of the study, the groups switched instructional strategies. Learning outcomes were assessed via posttest after each section of the study, with comparison of final practical examination results to previous cohorts. Attitudes about the 2 educational strategies were assessed through a postcourse questionnaire with a Likert scale. Analysis of the first posttest demonstrated that students in the video-streamed group had significantly better learning outcomes than those in the light microscopy group (P = .004; Cohen's d = 0.74). Analysis of the posttest after crossover showed no differences between the 2 groups (P = .48). Between the 2 posttests, students first assigned to the light microscopy group scored a 6.6 mean point increase (±10.4 SD; p = .0011), whereas students first assigned to the virtual microscopy group scored a 1.3 mean point increase (±7.1 SD; p = .29). The light microscopy group improved more than the virtual microscopy group (P = .019). Analysis of practical examination data revealed higher scores for the study group compared with 5 previous cohorts of first-year students (P virtual microscopy to traditional light microscopy. Virtual microscopy is an effective educational strategy, and students prefer this method when learning to interpret images of clinical specimens.

  4. Coherent light microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, Pietro; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2011-01-01

    This book deals with the latest achievements in the field of optical coherent microscopy. While many other books exist on microscopy and imaging, this book provides a unique resource dedicated solely to this subject. Similarly, many books describe applications of holography, interferometry and speckle to metrology but do not focus on their use for microscopy. The coherent light microscopy reference provided here does not focus on the experimental mechanics of such techniques but instead is meant to provide a users manual to illustrate the strengths and capabilities of developing techniques. Th

  5. Light Microscopy Module (LMM)-Emulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Howard G.; Smith, Trent M.; Richards, Stephanie E.

    2016-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is a microscope facility developed at Glenn Research Center (GRC) that provides researchers with powerful imaging capability onboard the International Space Station (ISS). LMM has the ability to have its hardware recongured on-orbit to accommodate a wide variety of investigations, with the capability of remotely acquiring and downloading digital images across multiple levels of magnication.

  6. Concepts in Light Microscopy of Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Robert; Georgi, Fanny

    2018-01-01

    Viruses threaten humans, livestock, and plants, and are difficult to combat. Imaging of viruses by light microscopy is key to uncover the nature of known and emerging viruses in the quest for finding new ways to treat viral disease and deepening the understanding of virus–host interactions. Here, we provide an overview of recent technology for imaging cells and viruses by light microscopy, in particular fluorescence microscopy in static and live-cell modes. The review lays out guidelines for how novel fluorescent chemical probes and proteins can be used in light microscopy to illuminate cells, and how they can be used to study virus infections. We discuss advantages and opportunities of confocal and multi-photon microscopy, selective plane illumination microscopy, and super-resolution microscopy. We emphasize the prevalent concepts in image processing and data analyses, and provide an outlook into label-free digital holographic microscopy for virus research. PMID:29670029

  7. Correlative Light- and Electron Microscopy Using Quantum Dot Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingsworth, Murray C; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-08-07

    A method is described whereby quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles can be used for correlative immunocytochemical studies of human pathology tissue using widefield fluorescence light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To demonstrate the protocol we have immunolabeled ultrathin epoxy sections of human somatostatinoma tumor using a primary antibody to somatostatin, followed by a biotinylated secondary antibody and visualization with streptavidin conjugated 585 nm cadmium-selenium (CdSe) quantum dots (QDs). The sections are mounted on a TEM specimen grid then placed on a glass slide for observation by widefield fluorescence light microscopy. Light microscopy reveals 585 nm QD labeling as bright orange fluorescence forming a granular pattern within the tumor cell cytoplasm. At low to mid-range magnification by light microscopy the labeling pattern can be easily recognized and the level of non-specific or background labeling assessed. This is a critical step for subsequent interpretation of the immunolabeling pattern by TEM and evaluation of the morphological context. The same section is then blotted dry and viewed by TEM. QD probes are seen to be attached to amorphous material contained in individual secretory granules. Images are acquired from the same region of interest (ROI) seen by light microscopy for correlative analysis. Corresponding images from each modality may then be blended to overlay fluorescence data on TEM ultrastructure of the corresponding region.

  8. Polarized Light Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frandsen, Athela F.

    2016-01-01

    Polarized light microscopy (PLM) is a technique which employs the use of polarizing filters to obtain substantial optical property information about the material which is being observed. This information can be combined with other microscopy techniques to confirm or elucidate the identity of an unknown material, determine whether a particular contaminant is present (as with asbestos analysis), or to provide important information that can be used to refine a manufacturing or chemical process. PLM was the major microscopy technique in use for identification of materials for nearly a century since its introduction in 1834 by William Fox Talbot, as other techniques such as SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy), FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy), XPD (X-ray Powder Diffraction), and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) had not yet been developed. Today, it is still the only technique approved by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for asbestos analysis, and is often the technique first applied for identification of unknown materials. PLM uses different configurations in order to determine different material properties. With each configuration additional clues can be gathered, leading to a conclusion of material identity. With no polarizing filter, the microscope can be used just as a stereo optical microscope, and view qualities such as morphology, size, and number of phases. With a single polarizing filter (single polars), additional properties can be established, such as pleochroism, individual refractive indices, and dispersion staining. With two polarizing filters (crossed polars), even more can be deduced: isotropy vs. anisotropy, extinction angle, birefringence/degree of birefringence, sign of elongation, and anomalous polarization colors, among others. With the use of PLM many of these properties can be determined in a matter of seconds, even for those who are not highly trained. McCrone, a leader in the field of polarized light microscopy, often

  9. Fundamentals of fluorescence microscopy exploring life with light

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, Partha Pratim

    2014-01-01

    This book starts at an introductory level and leads reader to the most advanced developments in fluorescence imaging and super-resolution techniques that have enabled the emergence of new disciplines such as nanobioimaging, multiphoton microscopy, photodynamic therapy, nanometrology and nanosensors. The interdisciplinary subject of fluorescence microscopy and imaging requires complete knowledge of imaging optics and molecular physics. So, this book approaches the subject by introducing optical imaging concepts before going deep into the advanced imaging systems and their applications. Molecular orbital theory forms the basis for understanding fluorescent molecules and thereby facilitates complete explanation of light-matter interaction at the geometrical focus. The two disciplines have some overlap since light controls the states of molecules and conversely, molecular states control the emitted light. These two mechanisms together determine essential fluorescence  factors and phenomena such as, molecular cro...

  10. Quantum Dot Immunocytochemical Localization of Somatostatin in Somatostatinoma by Widefield Epifluorescence, Super-resolution Light, and Immunoelectron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ken; Wu, Xiaojuan; Yong, Jim L. C.; Lee, C. Soon

    2012-01-01

    Quantum dot nanocrystal probes (QDs) have been used for detection of somatostatin hormone in secretory granules of somatostatinoma tumor cells by immunofluorescence light microscopy, super-resolution light microscopy, and immunoelectron microscopy. Immunostaining for all modalities was done using sections taken from an epoxy resin-embedded tissue specimen and a similar labeling protocol. This approach allowed assessment of labeling at light microscopy level before examination at super-resolution and electron microscopy level and was a significant aid in interpretation. Etching of ultrathin sections with saturated sodium metaperiodate was a critical step presumably able to retrieve some tissue antigenicity masked by processing in epoxy resin. Immunofluorescence microscopy of QD-immunolabeled sections showed somatostatin hormone localization in cytoplasmic granules. Some variable staining of tumor gland-like structures appeared related to granule maturity and dispersal of granule contents within the tumor cell cytoplasm. Super-resolution light microscopy demonstrated localization of somatostatin within individual secretory granules to be heterogeneous, and this staining pattern was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. PMID:22899862

  11. Quantum dot immunocytochemical localization of somatostatin in somatostatinoma by Widefield Epifluorescence, super-resolution light, and immunoelectron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingsworth, Murray C; Lai, Ken; Wu, Xiaojuan; Yong, Jim L C; Lee, C Soon

    2012-11-01

    Quantum dot nanocrystal probes (QDs) have been used for detection of somatostatin hormone in secretory granules of somatostatinoma tumor cells by immunofluorescence light microscopy, super-resolution light microscopy, and immunoelectron microscopy. Immunostaining for all modalities was done using sections taken from an epoxy resin-embedded tissue specimen and a similar labeling protocol. This approach allowed assessment of labeling at light microscopy level before examination at super-resolution and electron microscopy level and was a significant aid in interpretation. Etching of ultrathin sections with saturated sodium metaperiodate was a critical step presumably able to retrieve some tissue antigenicity masked by processing in epoxy resin. Immunofluorescence microscopy of QD-immunolabeled sections showed somatostatin hormone localization in cytoplasmic granules. Some variable staining of tumor gland-like structures appeared related to granule maturity and dispersal of granule contents within the tumor cell cytoplasm. Super-resolution light microscopy demonstrated localization of somatostatin within individual secretory granules to be heterogeneous, and this staining pattern was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy.

  12. Validation of Digital Microscopy Compared With Light Microscopy for the Diagnosis of Canine Cutaneous Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Christof A; Gurtner, Corinne; Dettwiler, Martina; Kershaw, Olivia; Dietert, Kristina; Pieper, Laura; Pischon, Hannah; Gruber, Achim D; Klopfleisch, Robert

    2018-07-01

    Integration of new technologies, such as digital microscopy, into a highly standardized laboratory routine requires the validation of its performance in terms of reliability, specificity, and sensitivity. However, a validation study of digital microscopy is currently lacking in veterinary pathology. The aim of the current study was to validate the usability of digital microscopy in terms of diagnostic accuracy, speed, and confidence for diagnosing and differentiating common canine cutaneous tumor types and to compare it to classical light microscopy. Therefore, 80 histologic sections including 17 different skin tumor types were examined twice as glass slides and twice as digital whole-slide images by 6 pathologists with different levels of experience at 4 time points. Comparison of both methods found digital microscopy to be noninferior for differentiating individual tumor types within the category epithelial and mesenchymal tumors, but diagnostic concordance was slightly lower for differentiating individual round cell tumor types by digital microscopy. In addition, digital microscopy was associated with significantly shorter diagnostic time, but diagnostic confidence was lower and technical quality was considered inferior for whole-slide images compared with glass slides. Of note, diagnostic performance for whole-slide images scanned at 200× magnification was noninferior in diagnostic performance for slides scanned at 400×. In conclusion, digital microscopy differs only minimally from light microscopy in few aspects of diagnostic performance and overall appears adequate for the diagnosis of individual canine cutaneous tumors with minor limitations for differentiating individual round cell tumor types and grading of mast cell tumors.

  13. Localization of fluorescently labeled structures in frozen-hydrated samples using integrated light electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, F.G.A.; Bárcena, M.A.; Agronskaia, A.V.; Gerritsen, H.C.; Moscicka, K.B.; Diebolder, C.A.; Driel, L.F.; Limpens, R.W.A.L.; Bos, E.; Ravelli, R.B.G.; Koning, R.I.; Koster, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy is an increasingly popular technique to study complex biological systems at various levels of resolution. Fluorescence microscopy can be employed to scan large areas to localize regions of interest which are then analyzed by electron microscopy to obtain

  14. Restoration of uneven illumination in light sheet microscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Mohammad Shorif; Lee, Hwee Kuan; Preibisch, Stephan; Tomancak, Pavel

    2011-08-01

    Light microscopy images suffer from poor contrast due to light absorption and scattering by the media. The resulting decay in contrast varies exponentially across the image along the incident light path. Classical space invariant deconvolution approaches, while very effective in deblurring, are not designed for the restoration of uneven illumination in microscopy images. In this article, we present a modified radiative transfer theory approach to solve the contrast degradation problem of light sheet microscopy (LSM) images. We confirmed the effectiveness of our approach through simulation as well as real LSM images.

  15. Reproducibility in light microscopy: Maintenance, standards and SOPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deagle, Rebecca C; Wee, Tse-Luen Erika; Brown, Claire M

    2017-08-01

    Light microscopy has grown to be a valuable asset in both the physical and life sciences. It is a highly quantitative method available in individual research laboratories and often centralized in core facilities. However, although quantitative microscopy is becoming a customary tool in research, it is rarely standardized. To achieve accurate quantitative microscopy data and reproducible results, three levels of standardization must be considered: (1) aspects of the microscope, (2) the sample, and (3) the detector. The accuracy of the data is only as reliable as the imaging system itself, thereby imposing the need for routine standard performance testing. Depending on the task some maintenance procedures should be performed once a month, some before each imaging session, while others conducted annually. This text should be implemented as a resource for researchers to integrate with their own standard operating procedures to ensure the highest quality quantitative microscopy data. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Research and application on imaging technology of line structure light based on confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wenfeng; Xiao, Zexin; Wang, Xiaofen

    2009-11-01

    In 2005, the theory of line structure light confocal microscopy was put forward firstly in China by Xingyu Gao and Zexin Xiao in the Institute of Opt-mechatronics of Guilin University of Electronic Technology. Though the lateral resolution of line confocal microscopy can only reach or approach the level of the traditional dot confocal microscopy. But compared with traditional dot confocal microscopy, it has two advantages: first, by substituting line scanning for dot scanning, plane imaging only performs one-dimensional scanning, with imaging velocity greatly improved and scanning mechanism simplified, second, transfer quantity of light is greatly improved by substituting detection hairline for detection pinhole, and low illumination CCD is used directly to collect images instead of photoelectric intensifier. In order to apply the line confocal microscopy to practical system, based on the further research on the theory of the line confocal microscopy, imaging technology of line structure light is put forward on condition of implementation of confocal microscopy. Its validity and reliability are also verified by experiments.

  17. An overview of the legislation and light microscopy for detection of processed animal proteins in feeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xian; Han, Lujia; Veys, Pascal; Baeten, Vincent; Jiang, Xunpeng; Dardenne, Pierre

    2011-08-01

    From the first cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) among cattle in the United Kingdom in 1986, the route of infection of BSE is generally believed by means of feeds containing low level of processed animal proteins (PAPs). Therefore, many feed bans and alternative and complementary techniques were resulted for the BSE safeguards in the world. Now the feed bans are expected to develop into a "species to species" ban, which requires the corresponding species-specific identification methods. Currently, banned PAPs can be detected by various methods as light microscopy, polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, near infrared spectroscopy, and near infrared microscopy. Light microscopy as described in the recent Commission Regulation EC/152/2009 is the only official method for the detection and characterization of PAPs in feed in the European Union. It is able to detect the presence of constituents of animal origin in feed at the level of 1 g/kg with hardly any false negative. Nevertheless, light microscopy has the limitation of lack of species specificity. This article presents a review of legislations on the use of PAPs in feedstuff, the detection details of animal proteins by light microscopy, and also presents and discusses the analysis procedure and expected development of the technique. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Localization of fluorescently labeled structures in frozen-hydrated samples using integrated light electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faas, F G A; Bárcena, M; Agronskaia, A V; Gerritsen, H C; Moscicka, K B; Diebolder, C A; van Driel, L F; Limpens, R W A L; Bos, E; Ravelli, R B G; Koning, R I; Koster, A J

    2013-03-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy is an increasingly popular technique to study complex biological systems at various levels of resolution. Fluorescence microscopy can be employed to scan large areas to localize regions of interest which are then analyzed by electron microscopy to obtain morphological and structural information from a selected field of view at nm-scale resolution. Previously, an integrated approach to room temperature correlative microscopy was described. Combined use of light and electron microscopy within one instrument greatly simplifies sample handling, avoids cumbersome experimental overheads, simplifies navigation between the two modalities, and improves the success rate of image correlation. Here, an integrated approach for correlative microscopy under cryogenic conditions is presented. Its advantages over the room temperature approach include safeguarding the native hydrated state of the biological specimen, preservation of the fluorescence signal without risk of quenching due to heavy atom stains, and reduced photo bleaching. The potential of cryo integrated light and electron microscopy is demonstrated for the detection of viable bacteria, the study of in vitro polymerized microtubules, the localization of mitochondria in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, and for a search into virus-induced intracellular membrane modifications within mammalian cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Enhanced light microscopy visualization of virus particles from Zika virus to filamentous ebolaviruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George G Daaboul

    Full Text Available Light microscopy is a powerful tool in the detection and analysis of parasites, fungi, and prokaryotes, but has been challenging to use for the detection of individual virus particles. Unlabeled virus particles are too small to be visualized using standard visible light microscopy. Characterization of virus particles is typically performed using higher resolution approaches such as electron microscopy or atomic force microscopy. These approaches require purification of virions away from their normal millieu, requiring significant levels of expertise, and can only enumerate small numbers of particles per field of view. Here, we utilize a visible light imaging approach called Single Particle Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (SP-IRIS that allows automated counting and sizing of thousands of individual virions. Virions are captured directly from complex solutions onto a silicon chip and then detected using a reflectance interference imaging modality. We show that the use of different imaging wavelengths allows the visualization of a multitude of virus particles. Using Violet/UV illumination, the SP-IRIS technique is able to detect individual flavivirus particles (~40 nm, while green light illumination is capable of identifying and discriminating between vesicular stomatitis virus and vaccinia virus (~360 nm. Strikingly, the technology allows the clear identification of filamentous infectious ebolavirus particles and virus-like particles. The ability to differentiate and quantify unlabeled virus particles extends the usefulness of traditional light microscopy and can be embodied in a straightforward benchtop approach allowing widespread applications ranging from rapid detection in biological fluids to analysis of virus-like particles for vaccine development and production.

  20. Biobeam—Multiplexed wave-optical simulations of light-sheet microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigert, Martin; Bundschuh, Sebastian T.

    2018-01-01

    Sample-induced image-degradation remains an intricate wave-optical problem in light-sheet microscopy. Here we present biobeam, an open-source software package that enables simulation of operational light-sheet microscopes by combining data from 105–106 multiplexed and GPU-accelerated point-spread-function calculations. The wave-optical nature of these simulations leads to the faithful reproduction of spatially varying aberrations, diffraction artifacts, geometric image distortions, adaptive optics, and emergent wave-optical phenomena, and renders image-formation in light-sheet microscopy computationally tractable. PMID:29652879

  1. Light Microscopy at Maximal Precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierbaum, Matthew; Leahy, Brian D.; Alemi, Alexander A.; Cohen, Itai; Sethna, James P.

    2017-10-01

    Microscopy is the workhorse of the physical and life sciences, producing crisp images of everything from atoms to cells well beyond the capabilities of the human eye. However, the analysis of these images is frequently little more accurate than manual marking. Here, we revolutionize the analysis of microscopy images, extracting all the useful information theoretically contained in a complex microscope image. Using a generic, methodological approach, we extract the information by fitting experimental images with a detailed optical model of the microscope, a method we call parameter extraction from reconstructing images (PERI). As a proof of principle, we demonstrate this approach with a confocal image of colloidal spheres, improving measurements of particle positions and radii by 10-100 times over current methods and attaining the maximum possible accuracy. With this unprecedented accuracy, we measure nanometer-scale colloidal interactions in dense suspensions solely with light microscopy, a previously impossible feat. Our approach is generic and applicable to imaging methods from brightfield to electron microscopy, where we expect accuracies of 1 nm and 0.1 pm, respectively.

  2. Light Microscopy at Maximal Precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Bierbaum

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Microscopy is the workhorse of the physical and life sciences, producing crisp images of everything from atoms to cells well beyond the capabilities of the human eye. However, the analysis of these images is frequently little more accurate than manual marking. Here, we revolutionize the analysis of microscopy images, extracting all the useful information theoretically contained in a complex microscope image. Using a generic, methodological approach, we extract the information by fitting experimental images with a detailed optical model of the microscope, a method we call parameter extraction from reconstructing images (PERI. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate this approach with a confocal image of colloidal spheres, improving measurements of particle positions and radii by 10–100 times over current methods and attaining the maximum possible accuracy. With this unprecedented accuracy, we measure nanometer-scale colloidal interactions in dense suspensions solely with light microscopy, a previously impossible feat. Our approach is generic and applicable to imaging methods from brightfield to electron microscopy, where we expect accuracies of 1 nm and 0.1 pm, respectively.

  3. A Simplified, Low-Cost Method for Polarized Light Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maude, Richard J.; Buapetch, Wanchana; Silamut, Kamolrat

    2009-01-01

    Malaria pigment is an intracellular inclusion body that appears in blood and tissue specimens on microscopic examination and can help in establishing the diagnosis of malaria. In simple light microscopy, it can be difficult to discern from cellular background and artifacts. It has long been known that if polarized light microscopy is used, malaria pigment can be much easier to distinguish. However, this technique is rarely used because of the need for a relatively costly polarization microscope. We describe a simple and economical technique to convert any standard light microscope suitable for examination of malaria films into a polarization microscope. PMID:19861611

  4. Light microscopy - Methods and protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The first part of the book (six chapters is devoted to some selected applications of bright-field microscopy while the second part (eight chapters to some fluorescence microscopy studies. Both animal and plant biology investigations are presented covering multiple fields like immunology, cell signaling, cancer biology and, surprisingly to me, ecology. This chapter is titled: Light microscopy in aquatic ecology: Methods for plankton communities studies and it is due to Maria Carolina S. Soares and colleagues from the Laboratory of Aquatic Ecology, Dept. of Biology, Federal University of Juiz de Fora (Brazil. Here they present methods to quantify the different component of planktonic communities in a step-by-step manner so that virus, bacteria, algae and animals pertaining to different taxa can be recognized and the contribution they made to the plankton composition evaluated. It descends that even how the plankton composition is changing due to environmental variations can be accurately determined....

  5. Noise analysis of a white-light supercontinuum light source for multiple wavelength confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy

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    McConnell, Gail [Centre for Biophotonics, Strathclyde Institute for Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, 27 Taylor Street, Glasgow, G4 0NR (United Kingdom)

    2005-08-07

    Intensity correlations of a Ti : sapphire, Kr/Ar and a white-light supercontinuum were performed to quantify the typical signal amplitude fluctuations and hence ascertain the comparative output stability of the white-light supercontinuum source for confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Intensity correlations across a two-pixel sample (n = 1000) of up to 98%, 95% and 94% were measured for the Ti : sapphire, Kr/Ar and white-light supercontinuum source, respectively. The white-light supercontinuum noise level is therefore acceptable for CLSM, with the added advantage of wider wavelength flexibility over traditional CLSM excitation sources. The relatively low-noise white-light supercontinuum was then used to perform multiple wavelength sequential CLSM of guinea pig detrusor to confirm the reliability of the system and to demonstrate system flexibility.

  6. Low cost light-sheet microscopy for whole brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Nasenbeny, Jordan; Kozorovitskiy, Yevgenia

    2018-02-01

    Light-sheet microscopy has evolved as an indispensable tool in imaging biological samples. It can image 3D samples at fast speed, with high-resolution optical sectioning, and with reduced photobleaching effects. These properties make light-sheet microscopy ideal for imaging fluorophores in a variety of biological samples and organisms, e.g. zebrafish, drosophila, cleared mouse brains, etc. While most commercial turnkey light-sheet systems are expensive, the existing lower cost implementations, e.g. OpenSPIM, are focused on achieving high-resolution imaging of small samples or organisms like zebrafish. In this work, we substantially reduce the cost of light-sheet microscope system while targeting to image much larger samples, i.e. cleared mouse brains, at single-cell resolution. The expensive components of a lightsheet system - excitation laser, water-immersion objectives, and translation stage - are replaced with an incoherent laser diode, dry objectives, and a custom-built Arduino-controlled translation stage. A low-cost CUBIC protocol is used to clear fixed mouse brain samples. The open-source platforms of μManager and Fiji support image acquisition, processing, and visualization. Our system can easily be extended to multi-color light-sheet microscopy.

  7. Gastric Tissue Damage Analysis Generated by Ischemia: Bioimpedance, Confocal Endomicroscopy, and Light Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nohra E. Beltran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastric mucosa ischemic tissular damage plays an important role in critical care patients’ outcome, because it is the first damaged tissue by compensatory mechanism during shock. The aim of the study is to relate bioimpedance changes with tissular damage level generated by ischemia by means of confocal endomicroscopy and light microscopy. Bioimpedance of the gastric mucosa and confocal images were obtained from Wistar male rats during basal and ischemia conditions. They were anesthetized, and stain was applied (fluorescein and/or acriflavine. The impedance spectroscopy catheter was inserted and then confocal endomicroscopy probe. After basal measurements and biopsy, hepatic and gastric arteries clamping induced ischemia. Finally, pyloric antrum tissue was preserved in buffered formaldehyde (10% for histology processing using light microscopy. Confocal images were equalized, binarized, and boundary defined, and infiltrations were quantified. Impedance and infiltrations increased with ischemia showing significant changes between basal and ischemia conditions (. Light microscopy analysis allows detection of general alterations in cellular and tissular integrity, confirming gastric reactance and confocal images quantification increments obtained during ischemia.

  8. Structured light optical microscopy for three-dimensional reconstruction of technical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettel, Johannes; Reinecke, Holger; Müller, Claas

    2016-04-01

    In microsystems technology quality control of micro structured surfaces with different surface properties is playing an ever more important role. The process of quality control incorporates three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of specularand diffusive reflecting technical surfaces. Due to the demand on high measurement accuracy and data acquisition rates, structured light optical microscopy has become a valuable solution to solve this problem providing high vertical and lateral resolution. However, 3D reconstruction of specular reflecting technical surfaces still remains a challenge to optical measurement principles. In this paper we present a measurement principle based on structured light optical microscopy which enables 3D reconstruction of specular- and diffusive reflecting technical surfaces. It is realized using two light paths of a stereo microscope equipped with different magnification levels. The right optical path of the stereo microscope is used to project structured light onto the object surface. The left optical path is used to capture the structured illuminated object surface with a camera. Structured light patterns are generated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP) device in combination with a high power Light Emitting Diode (LED). Structured light patterns are realized as a matrix of discrete light spots to illuminate defined areas on the object surface. The introduced measurement principle is based on multiple and parallel processed point measurements. Analysis of the measured Point Spread Function (PSF) by pattern recognition and model fitting algorithms enables the precise calculation of 3D coordinates. Using exemplary technical surfaces we demonstrate the successful application of our measurement principle.

  9. Contributed review: Review of integrated correlative light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, F J; Otto, C

    2015-01-01

    New developments in the field of microscopy enable to acquire increasing amounts of information from large sample areas and at an increased resolution. Depending on the nature of the technique, the information may reveal morphological, structural, chemical, and still other sample characteristics. In research fields, such as cell biology and materials science, there is an increasing demand to correlate these individual levels of information and in this way to obtain a better understanding of sample preparation and specific sample properties. To address this need, integrated systems were developed that combine nanometer resolution electron microscopes with optical microscopes, which produce chemically or label specific information through spectroscopy. The complementary information from electron microscopy and light microscopy presents an opportunity to investigate a broad range of sample properties in a correlated fashion. An important part of correlating the differences in information lies in bridging the different resolution and image contrast features. The trend to analyse samples using multiple correlated microscopes has resulted in a new research field. Current research is focused, for instance, on (a) the investigation of samples with nanometer scale distribution of inorganic and organic materials, (b) live cell analysis combined with electron microscopy, and (c) in situ spectroscopic and electron microscopy analysis of catalytic materials, but more areas will benefit from integrated correlative microscopy.

  10. Contributed Review: Review of integrated correlative light and electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmermans, F. J.; Otto, C.

    2015-01-01

    New developments in the field of microscopy enable to acquire increasing amounts of information from large sample areas and at an increased resolution. Depending on the nature of the technique, the information may reveal morphological, structural, chemical, and still other sample characteristics. In research fields, such as cell biology and materials science, there is an increasing demand to correlate these individual levels of information and in this way to obtain a better understanding of sample preparation and specific sample properties. To address this need, integrated systems were developed that combine nanometer resolution electron microscopes with optical microscopes, which produce chemically or label specific information through spectroscopy. The complementary information from electron microscopy and light microscopy presents an opportunity to investigate a broad range of sample properties in a correlated fashion. An important part of correlating the differences in information lies in bridging the different resolution and image contrast features. The trend to analyse samples using multiple correlated microscopes has resulted in a new research field. Current research is focused, for instance, on (a) the investigation of samples with nanometer scale distribution of inorganic and organic materials, (b) live cell analysis combined with electron microscopy, and (c) in situ spectroscopic and electron microscopy analysis of catalytic materials, but more areas will benefit from integrated correlative microscopy

  11. Correlative cryo-fluorescence light microscopy and cryo-electron tomography of Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Roman I; Celler, Katherine; Willemse, Joost; Bos, Erik; van Wezel, Gilles P; Koster, Abraham J

    2014-01-01

    Light microscopy and electron microscopy are complementary techniques that in a correlative approach enable identification and targeting of fluorescently labeled structures in situ for three-dimensional imaging at nanometer resolution. Correlative imaging allows electron microscopic images to be positioned in a broader temporal and spatial context. We employed cryo-correlative light and electron microscopy (cryo-CLEM), combining cryo-fluorescence light microscopy and cryo-electron tomography, on vitrified Streptomyces bacteria to study cell division. Streptomycetes are mycelial bacteria that grow as long hyphae and reproduce via sporulation. On solid media, Streptomyces subsequently form distinct aerial mycelia where cell division leads to the formation of unigenomic spores which separate and disperse to form new colonies. In liquid media, only vegetative hyphae are present divided by noncell separating crosswalls. Their multicellular life style makes them exciting model systems for the study of bacterial development and cell division. Complex intracellular structures have been visualized with transmission electron microscopy. Here, we describe the methods for cryo-CLEM that we applied for studying Streptomyces. These methods include cell growth, fluorescent labeling, cryo-fixation by vitrification, cryo-light microscopy using a Linkam cryo-stage, image overlay and relocation, cryo-electron tomography using a Titan Krios, and tomographic reconstruction. Additionally, methods for segmentation, volume rendering, and visualization of the correlative data are described. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Processing scarce biological samples for light and transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Taupin

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Light microscopy (LM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM aim at understanding the relationship structure-function. With advances in biology, isolation and purification of scarce populations of cells or subcellular structures may not lead to enough biological material, for processing for LM and TEM. A protocol for preparation of scarce biological samples is presented. It is based on pre-embedding the biological samples, suspensions or pellets, in bovine serum albumin (BSA and bis-acrylamide (BA, cross-linked and polymerized. This preparation provides a simple and reproducible technique to process biological materials, present in limited quantities that can not be amplified, for light and transmission electron microscopy.

  13. Towards comprehensive cell lineage reconstructions in complex organisms using light-sheet microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amat, Fernando; Keller, Philipp J

    2013-05-01

    Understanding the development of complex multicellular organisms as a function of the underlying cell behavior is one of the most fundamental goals of developmental biology. The ability to quantitatively follow cell dynamics in entire developing embryos is an indispensable step towards such a system-level understanding. In recent years, light-sheet fluorescence microscopy has emerged as a particularly promising strategy for recording the in vivo data required to realize this goal. Using light-sheet fluorescence microscopy, entire complex organisms can be rapidly imaged in three dimensions at sub-cellular resolution, achieving high temporal sampling and excellent signal-to-noise ratio without damaging the living specimen or bleaching fluorescent markers. The resulting datasets allow following individual cells in vertebrate and higher invertebrate embryos over up to several days of development. However, the complexity and size of these multi-terabyte recordings typically preclude comprehensive manual analyses. Thus, new computational approaches are required to automatically segment cell morphologies, accurately track cell identities and systematically analyze cell behavior throughout embryonic development. We review current efforts in light-sheet microscopy and bioimage informatics towards this goal, and argue that comprehensive cell lineage reconstructions are finally within reach for many key model organisms, including fruit fly, zebrafish and mouse. © 2013 The Authors Development, Growth & Differentiation © 2013 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  14. Field-based dynamic light scattering microscopy: theory and numerical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Chulmin; de Boer, Johannes F

    2013-11-01

    We present a theoretical framework for field-based dynamic light scattering microscopy based on a spectral-domain optical coherence phase microscopy (SD-OCPM) platform. SD-OCPM is an interferometric microscope capable of quantitative measurement of amplitude and phase of scattered light with high phase stability. Field-based dynamic light scattering (F-DLS) analysis allows for direct evaluation of complex-valued field autocorrelation function and measurement of localized diffusive and directional dynamic properties of biological and material samples with high spatial resolution. In order to gain insight into the information provided by F-DLS microscopy, theoretical and numerical analyses are performed to evaluate the effect of numerical aperture of the imaging optics. We demonstrate that sharp focusing of fields affects the measured diffusive and transport velocity, which leads to smaller values for the dynamic properties in the sample. An approach for accurately determining the dynamic properties of the samples is discussed.

  15. Comparing phototoxicity during the development of a zebrafish craniofacial bone using confocal and light sheet fluorescence microscopy techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jemielita, Matthew; Taormina, Michael J; Delaurier, April; Kimmel, Charles B; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2013-12-01

    The combination of genetically encoded fluorescent proteins and three-dimensional imaging enables cell-type-specific studies of embryogenesis. Light sheet microscopy, in which fluorescence excitation is provided by a plane of laser light, is an appealing approach to live imaging due to its high speed and efficient use of photons. While the advantages of rapid imaging are apparent from recent work, the importance of low light levels to studies of development is not well established. We examine the zebrafish opercle, a craniofacial bone that exhibits pronounced shape changes at early developmental stages, using both spinning disk confocal and light sheet microscopies of fluorescent osteoblast cells. We find normal and aberrant opercle morphologies for specimens imaged with short time intervals using light sheet and spinning disk confocal microscopies, respectively, under equivalent exposure conditions over developmentally-relevant time scales. Quantification of shapes reveals that the differently imaged specimens travel along distinct trajectories in morphological space. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Visualizing aquatic bacteria by light and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Thiago P; Noyma, Natália P; Duque, Thabata L A; Gamalier, Juliana P; Vidal, Luciana O; Lobão, Lúcia M; Chiarini-Garcia, Hélio; Roland, Fábio; Melo, Rossana C N

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of the functional role of aquatic bacteria in microbial food webs is largely dependent on methods applied to the direct visualization and enumeration of these organisms. While the ultrastructure of aquatic bacteria is still poorly known, routine observation of aquatic bacteria by light microscopy requires staining with fluorochromes, followed by filtration and direct counting on filter surfaces. Here, we used a new strategy to visualize and enumerate aquatic bacteria by light microscopy. By spinning water samples from varied tropical ecosystems in a cytocentrifuge, we found that bacteria firmly adhere to regular slides, can be stained by fluorochoromes with no background formation and fast enumerated. Significant correlations were found between the cytocentrifugation and filter-based methods. Moreover, preparations through cytocentrifugation were more adequate for bacterial viability evaluation than filter-based preparations. Transmission electron microscopic analyses revealed a morphological diversity of bacteria with different internal and external structures, such as large variation in the cell envelope and capsule thickness, and presence or not of thylakoid membranes. Our results demonstrate that aquatic bacteria represent an ultrastructurally diverse population and open avenues for easy handling/quantification and better visualization of bacteria by light microscopy without the need of filter membranes.

  17. Multilayer mounting for long-term light sheet microscopy of zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Michael; Mickoleit, Michaela; Huisken, Jan

    2014-02-27

    Light sheet microscopy is the ideal imaging technique to study zebrafish embryonic development. Due to minimal photo-toxicity and bleaching, it is particularly suited for long-term time-lapse imaging over many hours up to several days. However, an appropriate sample mounting strategy is needed that offers both confinement and normal development of the sample. Multilayer mounting, a new embedding technique using low-concentration agarose in optically clear tubes, now overcomes this limitation and unleashes the full potential of light sheet microscopy for real-time developmental biology.

  18. Hyperspectral microscopy to identify foodborne bacteria with optimum lighting source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperspectral microscopy is an emerging technology for rapid detection of foodborne pathogenic bacteria. Since scattering spectral signatures from hyperspectral microscopic images (HMI) vary with lighting sources, it is important to select optimal lights. The objective of this study is to compare t...

  19. Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy review: shedding new light on old problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashkova, Sviatlana; Leake, Mark C

    2017-08-31

    Fluorescence microscopy is an invaluable tool in the biosciences, a genuine workhorse technique offering exceptional contrast in conjunction with high specificity of labelling with relatively minimal perturbation to biological samples compared with many competing biophysical techniques. Improvements in detector and dye technologies coupled to advances in image analysis methods have fuelled recent development towards single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, which can utilize light microscopy tools to enable the faithful detection and analysis of single fluorescent molecules used as reporter tags in biological samples. For example, the discovery of GFP, initiating the so-called 'green revolution', has pushed experimental tools in the biosciences to a completely new level of functional imaging of living samples, culminating in single fluorescent protein molecule detection. Today, fluorescence microscopy is an indispensable tool in single-molecule investigations, providing a high signal-to-noise ratio for visualization while still retaining the key features in the physiological context of native biological systems. In this review, we discuss some of the recent discoveries in the life sciences which have been enabled using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, paying particular attention to the so-called 'super-resolution' fluorescence microscopy techniques in live cells, which are at the cutting-edge of these methods. In particular, how these tools can reveal new insights into long-standing puzzles in biology: old problems, which have been impossible to tackle using other more traditional tools until the emergence of new single-molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques. © 2017 The Author(s).

  20. Hyperspectral light sheet microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahr, Wiebke; Schmid, Benjamin; Schmied, Christopher; Fahrbach, Florian O.; Huisken, Jan

    2015-09-01

    To study the development and interactions of cells and tissues, multiple fluorescent markers need to be imaged efficiently in a single living organism. Instead of acquiring individual colours sequentially with filters, we created a platform based on line-scanning light sheet microscopy to record the entire spectrum for each pixel in a three-dimensional volume. We evaluated data sets with varying spectral sampling and determined the optimal channel width to be around 5 nm. With the help of these data sets, we show that our setup outperforms filter-based approaches with regard to image quality and discrimination of fluorophores. By spectral unmixing we resolved overlapping fluorophores with up to nanometre resolution and removed autofluorescence in zebrafish and fruit fly embryos.

  1. Near-infrared branding efficiently correlates light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Derron; Nikić, Ivana; Brinkoetter, Mary; Knecht, Sharmon; Potz, Stephanie; Kerschensteiner, Martin; Misgeld, Thomas

    2011-06-05

    The correlation of light and electron microscopy of complex tissues remains a major challenge. Here we report near-infrared branding (NIRB), which facilitates such correlation by using a pulsed, near-infrared laser to create defined fiducial marks in three dimensions in fixed tissue. As these marks are fluorescent and can be photo-oxidized to generate electron contrast, they can guide re-identification of previously imaged structures as small as dendritic spines by electron microscopy.

  2. X-ray microscopy resource center at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer-Ilse, W.; Koike, M.; Beguiristain, R.; Maser, J.; Attwood, D.

    1992-07-01

    An x-ray microscopy resource center for biological x-ray imaging vvill be built at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley. The unique high brightness of the ALS allows short exposure times and high image quality. Two microscopes, an x-ray microscope (XM) and a scanning x-ray microscope (SXM) are planned. These microscopes serve complementary needs. The XM gives images in parallel at comparable short exposure times, and the SXM is optimized for low radiation doses applied to the sample. The microscopes extend visible light microscopy towards significantly higher resolution and permit images of objects in an aqueous medium. High resolution is accomplished by the use of Fresnel zone plates. Design considerations to serve the needs of biological x-ray microscopy are given. Also the preliminary design of the microscopes is presented. Multiple wavelength and multiple view images will provide elemental contrast and some degree of 3D information

  3. Invited Review Article: Advanced light microscopy for biological space research

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Winnok H.; Beghuin, Didier; Schwarz, Christian J.; Jones, David B.; van Loon, Jack J. W. A.; Bereiter-Hahn, Juergen; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.

    2014-10-01

    As commercial space flights have become feasible and long-term extraterrestrial missions are planned, it is imperative that the impact of space travel and the space environment on human physiology be thoroughly characterized. Scrutinizing the effects of potentially detrimental factors such as ionizing radiation and microgravity at the cellular and tissue level demands adequate visualization technology. Advanced light microscopy (ALM) is the leading tool for non-destructive structural and functional investigation of static as well as dynamic biological systems. In recent years, technological developments and advances in photochemistry and genetic engineering have boosted all aspects of resolution, readout and throughput, rendering ALM ideally suited for biological space research. While various microscopy-based studies have addressed cellular response to space-related environmental stressors, biological endpoints have typically been determined only after the mission, leaving an experimental gap that is prone to bias results. An on-board, real-time microscopical monitoring device can bridge this gap. Breadboards and even fully operational microscope setups have been conceived, but they need to be rendered more compact and versatile. Most importantly, they must allow addressing the impact of gravity, or the lack thereof, on physiologically relevant biological systems in space and in ground-based simulations. In order to delineate the essential functionalities for such a system, we have reviewed the pending questions in space science, the relevant biological model systems, and the state-of-the art in ALM. Based on a rigorous trade-off, in which we recognize the relevance of multi-cellular systems and the cellular microenvironment, we propose a compact, but flexible concept for space-related cell biological research that is based on light sheet microscopy.

  4. Invited Review Article: Advanced light microscopy for biological space research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vos, Winnok H.; Beghuin, Didier; Schwarz, Christian J.; Jones, David B.; Loon, Jack J. W. A. van; Bereiter-Hahn, Juergen; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.

    2014-01-01

    As commercial space flights have become feasible and long-term extraterrestrial missions are planned, it is imperative that the impact of space travel and the space environment on human physiology be thoroughly characterized. Scrutinizing the effects of potentially detrimental factors such as ionizing radiation and microgravity at the cellular and tissue level demands adequate visualization technology. Advanced light microscopy (ALM) is the leading tool for non-destructive structural and functional investigation of static as well as dynamic biological systems. In recent years, technological developments and advances in photochemistry and genetic engineering have boosted all aspects of resolution, readout and throughput, rendering ALM ideally suited for biological space research. While various microscopy-based studies have addressed cellular response to space-related environmental stressors, biological endpoints have typically been determined only after the mission, leaving an experimental gap that is prone to bias results. An on-board, real-time microscopical monitoring device can bridge this gap. Breadboards and even fully operational microscope setups have been conceived, but they need to be rendered more compact and versatile. Most importantly, they must allow addressing the impact of gravity, or the lack thereof, on physiologically relevant biological systems in space and in ground-based simulations. In order to delineate the essential functionalities for such a system, we have reviewed the pending questions in space science, the relevant biological model systems, and the state-of-the art in ALM. Based on a rigorous trade-off, in which we recognize the relevance of multi-cellular systems and the cellular microenvironment, we propose a compact, but flexible concept for space-related cell biological research that is based on light sheet microscopy

  5. Invited Review Article: Advanced light microscopy for biological space research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vos, Winnok H., E-mail: winnok.devos@uantwerpen.be [Laboratory of Cell Biology and Histology, Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); Cell Systems and Imaging Research Group, Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Beghuin, Didier [Lambda-X, Nivelles (Belgium); Schwarz, Christian J. [European Space Agency (ESA), ESTEC, TEC-MMG, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Jones, David B. [Institute for Experimental Orthopaedics and Biomechanics, Philipps University, Marburg (Germany); Loon, Jack J. W. A. van [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Oral Pathology, VU University Medical Center and Department of Oral Cell Biology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bereiter-Hahn, Juergen; Stelzer, Ernst H. K. [Physical Biology, BMLS (FB15, IZN), Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    As commercial space flights have become feasible and long-term extraterrestrial missions are planned, it is imperative that the impact of space travel and the space environment on human physiology be thoroughly characterized. Scrutinizing the effects of potentially detrimental factors such as ionizing radiation and microgravity at the cellular and tissue level demands adequate visualization technology. Advanced light microscopy (ALM) is the leading tool for non-destructive structural and functional investigation of static as well as dynamic biological systems. In recent years, technological developments and advances in photochemistry and genetic engineering have boosted all aspects of resolution, readout and throughput, rendering ALM ideally suited for biological space research. While various microscopy-based studies have addressed cellular response to space-related environmental stressors, biological endpoints have typically been determined only after the mission, leaving an experimental gap that is prone to bias results. An on-board, real-time microscopical monitoring device can bridge this gap. Breadboards and even fully operational microscope setups have been conceived, but they need to be rendered more compact and versatile. Most importantly, they must allow addressing the impact of gravity, or the lack thereof, on physiologically relevant biological systems in space and in ground-based simulations. In order to delineate the essential functionalities for such a system, we have reviewed the pending questions in space science, the relevant biological model systems, and the state-of-the art in ALM. Based on a rigorous trade-off, in which we recognize the relevance of multi-cellular systems and the cellular microenvironment, we propose a compact, but flexible concept for space-related cell biological research that is based on light sheet microscopy.

  6. X-ray microscopy as an approach to increasing accuracy and efficiency of serial block-face imaging for correlated light and electron microscopy of biological specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushong, Eric A; Johnson, Donald D; Kim, Keun-Young; Terada, Masako; Hatori, Megumi; Peltier, Steven T; Panda, Satchidananda; Merkle, Arno; Ellisman, Mark H

    2015-02-01

    The recently developed three-dimensional electron microscopic (EM) method of serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM) has rapidly established itself as a powerful imaging approach. Volume EM imaging with this scanning electron microscopy (SEM) method requires intense staining of biological specimens with heavy metals to allow sufficient back-scatter electron signal and also to render specimens sufficiently conductive to control charging artifacts. These more extreme heavy metal staining protocols render specimens light opaque and make it much more difficult to track and identify regions of interest (ROIs) for the SBEM imaging process than for a typical thin section transmission electron microscopy correlative light and electron microscopy study. We present a strategy employing X-ray microscopy (XRM) both for tracking ROIs and for increasing the efficiency of the workflow used for typical projects undertaken with SBEM. XRM was found to reveal an impressive level of detail in tissue heavily stained for SBEM imaging, allowing for the identification of tissue landmarks that can be subsequently used to guide data collection in the SEM. Furthermore, specific labeling of individual cells using diaminobenzidine is detectable in XRM volumes. We demonstrate that tungsten carbide particles or upconverting nanophosphor particles can be used as fiducial markers to further increase the precision and efficiency of SBEM imaging.

  7. Measurement of replication structures at the nanometer scale using super-resolution light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddeley, D; Chagin, V O; Schermelleh, L; Martin, S; Pombo, A; Carlton, P M; Gahl, A; Domaing, P; Birk, U; Leonhardt, H; Cremer, C; Cardoso, M C

    2010-01-01

    DNA replication, similar to other cellular processes, occurs within dynamic macromolecular structures. Any comprehensive understanding ultimately requires quantitative data to establish and test models of genome duplication. We used two different super-resolution light microscopy techniques to directly measure and compare the size and numbers of replication foci in mammalian cells. This analysis showed that replication foci vary in size from 210 nm down to 40 nm. Remarkably, spatially modulated illumination (SMI) and 3D-structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) both showed an average size of 125 nm that was conserved throughout S-phase and independent of the labeling method, suggesting a basic unit of genome duplication. Interestingly, the improved optical 3D resolution identified 3- to 5-fold more distinct replication foci than previously reported. These results show that optical nanoscopy techniques enable accurate measurements of cellular structures at a level previously achieved only by electron microscopy and highlight the possibility of high-throughput, multispectral 3D analyses.

  8. Rapid diagnosis of malaria by fluorescent microscopy with light microscope and interface filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, I.; Tayyib, M.; Farooq, M.; Ahmed, N.

    2008-01-01

    The present study is planned to compare acridine orange (A.O) staining with Giemsa staining by using light microscopy with IF and also with fluorescent microscopy for detection of parasites in peripheral blood of patients suffering from clinically suspected cases of malaria. 200 patients with fever and shivering were included. General investigations like Hb, TLC and platelets were done by sysmex K-1000. Thin and thick blood films were made and stained according to protocol given i.e. by Giemsa and AO stains and slides were examined by different microscopes i.e. light microscope, light microscope with IFS and fluorescent microscope. Out of 200 subjects, 170 (85%) patients showed positive parasitaemia and 30 (15%) subjects were negative for malaria parasites. fib, TLC and platelets were reduced when comparing with MP negative cases. IFS microscope with acridine orange staining showed early detection of malaria parasites by counting fewer fields as compared to light microscopy with Giemsa stains. Time consumed for detection of parasites was also significantly reduced in IFS microscope by using AO stains. (author)

  9. Imaging a seizure model in zebrafish with structured illumination light sheet microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Dale, Savannah; Ball, Rebecca; VanLeuven, Ariel J.; Baraban, Scott; Sornborger, Andrew; Lauderdale, James D.; Kner, Peter

    2018-02-01

    Zebrafish are a promising vertebrate model for elucidating how neural circuits generate behavior under normal and pathological conditions. The Baraban group first demonstrated that zebrafish larvae are valuable for investigating seizure events and can be used as a model for epilepsy in humans. Because of their small size and transparency, zebrafish embryos are ideal for imaging seizure activity using calcium indicators. Light-sheet microscopy is well suited to capturing neural activity in zebrafish because it is capable of optical sectioning, high frame rates, and low excitation intensities. We describe work in our lab to use light-sheet microscopy for high-speed long-time imaging of neural activity in wildtype and mutant zebrafish to better understand the connectivity and activity of inhibitory neural networks when GABAergic signaling is altered in vivo. We show that, with light-sheet microscopy, neural activity can be recorded at 23 frames per second in twocolors for over 10 minutes allowing us to capture rare seizure events in mutants. We have further implemented structured illumination to increase resolution and contrast in the vertical and axial directions during high-speed imaging at an effective frame rate of over 7 frames per second.

  10. Integrated single- and two-photon light sheet microscopy using accelerating beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piksarv, Peeter; Marti, Dominik; Le, Tuan

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the first light sheet microscope using propagation invariant, accelerating Airy beams that operates both in single- and two-photon modes. The use of the Airy beam permits us to develop an ultra compact, high resolution light sheet system without beam scanning. In two-photon mode......, an increase in the field of view over the use of a standard Gaussian beam by a factor of six is demonstrated. This implementation for light sheet microscopy opens up new possibilities across a wide range of biomedical applications, especially for the study of neuronal processes....

  11. Comparative morphology of zebra (Dreissena polymorpha) and quagga (Dreissena bugensis) mussel sperm: Light and electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, G.K.; Black, M.G.; Edwards, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    Adult zebra (Dreissena polymorpha) and quagga (Dreissena bugensis) mussels were induced to release large quantities of live spermatozoa by the administration of 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin). Sperm were photographed alive using phase-contrast microscopy and were fixed subsequently with glutaraldehyde followed by osmium tetroxide for eventual examination by transmission or scanning electron microscopy. The sperm of both genera are of the ect-aquasperm type. Their overall dimensions and shape allow for easy discrimination at the light and scanning electron microscopy level. Transmission electron microscopy of the cells reveals a barrel-shaped nucleus in zebra mussel sperm and an elongated nucleus in quagga mussel sperm. In both species, an acrosome is cradled in a nuclear fossa. The ultrastructure of the acrosome and axial body, however, is distinctive for each species. The structures of the midpiece are shown, including a unique mitochondrial "skirt" that includes densely packed parallel cristae and extends in a narrow sheet from the mitochondria.

  12. Comparing the use of virtual and conventional light microscopy in practical sessions: Virtual reality in Tabuk University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman F.A. Foad, MD

    2017-04-01

    We randomly assigned two groups of second-year medical students from the University of Tabuk in KSA to use either conventional light or virtual microscopy practical sessions. The students' perceptions were assessed by written and practical exams. Students in the virtual microscopy group performed better than those in the light microscopy group in both practical and written exams, as reflected by their more-uniform performance and less-scattered grades. The virtual microscopy group had the advantage of optional online off-campus access to study materials, which they spent an average of 2.5 h reviewing. Virtual microscopy is a valid educational tool that can augment conventional microscopy in pathology practical sessions, and its application is convenient for both students and staff.

  13. Imaging of human differentiated 3D neural aggregates using light sheet fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualda, Emilio J.; Simão, Daniel; Pinto, Catarina; Alves, Paula M.; Brito, Catarina

    2014-01-01

    The development of three dimensional (3D) cell cultures represents a big step for the better understanding of cell behavior and disease in a more natural like environment, providing not only single but multiple cell type interactions in a complex 3D matrix, highly resembling physiological conditions. Light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) is becoming an excellent tool for fast imaging of such 3D biological structures. We demonstrate the potential of this technique for the imaging of human differentiated 3D neural aggregates in fixed and live samples, namely calcium imaging and cell death processes, showing the power of imaging modality compared with traditional microscopy. The combination of light sheet microscopy and 3D neural cultures will open the door to more challenging experiments involving drug testing at large scale as well as a better understanding of relevant biological processes in a more realistic environment. PMID:25161607

  14. Imaging of human differentiated 3D neural aggregates using light sheet fluorescence microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio J Gualda

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of three dimensional cell cultures represents a big step for the better understanding of cell behavior and disease in a more natural like environment, providing not only single but multiple cell type interactions in a complex three dimensional matrix, highly resembling physiological conditions. Light sheet fluorescence microscopy is becoming an excellent tool for fast imaging of such three-dimensional biological structures. We demonstrate the potential of this technique for the imaging of human differentiated 3D neural aggregates in fixed and live samples, namely calcium imaging and cell death processes, showing the power of imaging modality compared with traditional microscopy. The combination of light sheet microscopy and 3D neural cultures will open the door to more challenging experiments involving drug testing at large scale as well as a better understanding of relevant biological processes in a more realistic environment.

  15. 3D Visualization of Developmental Toxicity of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene in Zebrafish Embryogenesis Using Light-Sheet Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juneyong Eum

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Environmental contamination by trinitrotoluene is of global concern due to its widespread use in military ordnance and commercial explosives. Despite known long-term persistence in groundwater and soil, the toxicological profile of trinitrotoluene and other explosive wastes have not been systematically measured using in vivo biological assays. Zebrafish embryos are ideal model vertebrates for high-throughput toxicity screening and live in vivo imaging due to their small size and transparency during embryogenesis. Here, we used Single Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM/light sheet microscopy to assess the developmental toxicity of explosive-contaminated water in zebrafish embryos and report 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene-associated developmental abnormalities, including defects in heart formation and circulation, in 3D. Levels of apoptotic cell death were higher in the actively developing tissues of trinitrotoluene-treated embryos than controls. Live 3D imaging of heart tube development at cellular resolution by light-sheet microscopy revealed trinitrotoluene-associated cardiac toxicity, including hypoplastic heart chamber formation and cardiac looping defects, while the real time PCR (polymerase chain reaction quantitatively measured the molecular changes in the heart and blood development supporting the developmental defects at the molecular level. Identification of cellular toxicity in zebrafish using the state-of-the-art 3D imaging system could form the basis of a sensitive biosensor for environmental contaminants and be further valued by combining it with molecular analysis.

  16. Total internal reflection and dynamic light scattering microscopy of gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, Brian F.

    Two different techniques which apply optical microscopy in novel ways to the study of biological systems and materials were built and applied to several samples. The first is a system for adapting the well-known technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS) to an optical microscope. This can detect and scatter light from very small volumes, as compared to standard DLS which studies light scattering from volumes 1000x larger. The small scattering volume also allows for the observation of nonergodic dynamics in appropriate samples. Porcine gastric mucin (PGM) forms a gel at low pH which lines the epithelial cell layer and acts as a protective barrier against the acidic stomach environment. The dynamics and microscopic viscosity of PGM at different pH levels is studied using polystyrene microspheres as tracer particles. The microscopic viscosity and microrheological properties of the commercial basement membrane Matrigel are also studied with this instrument. Matrigel is frequently used to culture cells and its properties remain poorly determined. Well-characterized and purely synthetic Matrigel substitutes will need to have the correct rheological and morphological characteristics. The second instrument designed and built is a microscope which uses an interferometry technique to achieve an improvement in resolution 2.5x better in one dimension than the Abbe diffraction limit. The technique is based upon the interference of the evanescent field generated on the surface of a prism by a laser in a total internal reflection geometry. The enhanced resolution is demonstrated with fluorescent samples. Additionally. Raman imaging microscopy is demonstrated using the evanescent field in resonant and non-resonant samples, although attempts at applying the enhanced resolution technique to the Raman images were ultimately unsuccessful. Applications of this instrument include high resolution imaging of cell membranes and macroscopic structures in gels and proteins. Finally, a third

  17. Multispectral digital lensless holographic microscopy: from femtosecond laser to white light LED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Sucerquia, J

    2015-01-01

    The use of femtosecond laser radiation and super bright white LED in digital lensless holographic microscopy is presented. For the ultrafast laser radiation two different configurations of operation of the microscope are presented and the dissimilar performance of each one analyzed. The microscope operating with a super bright white light LED in combination with optical filters shows very competitive performance as it is compared with more expensive optical sources. The broadband emission of both radiation sources allows the multispectral imaging of biological samples to obtain spectral responses and/or full color images of the microscopic specimens; sections of the head of a Drosophila melanogaster fly are imaged in this contribution. The simple, solid, compact, lightweight, and reliable architecture of digital lensless holographic microscopy operating with broadband light sources to image biological specimens exhibiting micrometer-sized details is evaluated in the present contribution. (paper)

  18. The light-sheet microscopy revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girkin, J. M.; Carvalho, M. T.

    2018-05-01

    This paper reviews the rapid advances that have been made in one form of optical biological imaging in the last decade, namely that of light sheet microscopy. Although the concept was originally presented over one hundred years ago, at the time it was a methodology that lacked the technology to really make it a viable tool for practical everyday imaging in the biologist’s laboratory. However, since its re-discovery, it has started to transform in vivo and increasingly intact organ imaging in a number of areas of biology. This review looks back at the beginning of the method and then the crucial role that modern optical technology, frequently developed for other fields, has played in advancing the instrumentation. This paper will also look at the OpenSPIM route that was developed whereby, through the purchase of a few optical components, researchers have been able to develop their own bespoke instruments and we consider if this may be a route forward for the rapid development of other technological breakthroughs.

  19. Setting up and running an advanced light microscopy and imaging facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Carlos; Muñoz, Ma Ángeles; Villalba, Maite; Labrador, Verónica; Díez-Guerra, F Javier

    2011-07-01

    During the last twenty years, interest in light microscopy and imaging techniques has grown in various fields, such as molecular and cellular biology, developmental biology, and neurobiology. In addition, the number of scientific articles and journals using these techniques is rapidly increasing. Nowadays, most research institutions require sophisticated microscopy systems to cover their investigation demands. In general, such instruments are too expensive and complex to be purchased and managed by a single laboratory or research group, so they have to be shared with other groups and supervised by specialized personnel. This is the reason why microscopy and imaging facilities are becoming so important at research institutions nowadays. In this unit, we have gathered and presented a number of issues and considerations from our own experience that we hope will be helpful when planning or setting up a new facility.

  20. Phase microscopy using light-field reconstruction method for cell observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Kuang, Cuifang; Xu, Yingke; Liu, Xu

    2015-08-01

    The refractive index (RI) distribution can serve as a natural label for undyed cell imaging. However, the majority of images obtained through quantitative phase microscopy is integrated along the illumination angle and cannot reflect additional information about the refractive map on a certain plane. Herein, a light-field reconstruction method to image the RI map within a depth of 0.2 μm is proposed. It records quantitative phase-delay images using a four-step phase shifting method in different directions and then reconstructs a similar scattered light field for the refractive sample on the focus plane. It can image the RI of samples, transparent cell samples in particular, in a manner similar to the observation of scattering characteristics. The light-field reconstruction method is therefore a powerful tool for use in cytobiology studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A novel fibrous duct structure discovered in the brain meninges by using polarized light microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Min-Ho; Jung, Sharon Jiyoon; Soh, Kwang-Sup; Lim, Jaekwan; Seo, Eunseok; Lim, Jun; Baek, Miok; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-05-01

    We have previously reported the discovery of a novel fibrous structure (NFS) consisting of unidirectionally arranged collagen fibers in the spinal pia mater. Due to its unique structure, it was easily detected using polarized light microscopy. In the current study, we describe the discovery of a similar NFS in the brain meninges of rats by using polarized light microscopy. This NFS is located beneath the superior sagittal sinus. Initially, we systemically analyzed the polarization properties of the NFS. The change in the light intensity of the NFS, with respect to the polarization angle, was eight times greater than that of blood vessels, showing that the collagen fibers are oriented in a particular direction with almost perfect parallelism (0.99). The orientation angle of the polarization ellipse confirmed the orientation of the collagen fibers in the NFS. Histological studies further confirmed that the unidirectionally arranged collagen fibers were responsible for this distinct polarization property. Surprisingly, X-ray microtomography and 3D confocal imaging revealed that the NFS contains within it a duct structure, a putative primo vessel. In conclusion, we report a NFS in the brain meninges, detected by using polarized light microscopy, that provides space for a putative primo vessel, not a blood vessel.

  2. Topography and refractometry of nanostructures using spatial light interference microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Chun, Ik Su; Li, Xiuling; Ong, Zhun-Yong; Pop, Eric; Millet, Larry; Gillette, Martha; Popescu, Gabriel

    2010-01-15

    Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) is a novel method developed in our laboratory that provides quantitative phase images of transparent structures with a 0.3 nm spatial and 0.03 nm temporal accuracy owing to the white light illumination and its common path interferometric geometry. We exploit these features and demonstrate SLIM's ability to perform topography at a single atomic layer in graphene. Further, using a decoupling procedure that we developed for cylindrical structures, we extract the axially averaged refractive index of semiconductor nanotubes and a neurite of a live hippocampal neuron in culture. We believe that this study will set the basis for novel high-throughput topography and refractometry of man-made and biological nanostructures.

  3. Discrimination of Dendrobium officinale and Its Common Adulterants by Combination of Normal Light and Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Chu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The stems of Dendrobium officinale Kimura et Migo, named Tie-pi-shi-hu, is one of the most endangered and precious species in China. Because of its various pharmacodynamic effects, D. officinale is widely recognized as a high-quality health food in China and other countries in south and south-east Asia. With the rising interest of D. officinale, its products have a high price due to a limited supply. This high price has led to the proliferation of adulterants in the market. To ensure the safe use of D. officinale, a fast and convenient method combining normal and fluorescence microscopy was applied in the present study to distinguish D. officinale from three commonly used adulterants including Zi-pi-shi-hu (D. devonianum, Shui-cao-shi-hu (D. aphyllum, Guang-jie-shi-hu (D. gratiosissimum. The result demonstrated that D. officinale could be identified by the characteristic “two hat-shaped” vascular bundle sheath observed under the fluorescence microscopy and the distribution of raphides under normal light microscopy. The other three adulterants could be discriminated by the vascular bundle differences and the distribution of raphides under normal light microscopy. This work indicated that combination of normal light and fluorescence microscopy is a fast and efficient technique to scientifically distinguish D. officinale from the commonly confused species.

  4. Optimizing low-light microscopy with back-illuminated electron multiplying charge-coupled device: enhanced sensitivity, speed, and resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Colin G; Denvir, Donal J; McHale, Noel G; Thornbury, Keith D; Hollywood, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    The back-illuminated electron multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) camera is having a profound influence on the field of low-light dynamic cellular microscopy, combining highest possible photon collection efficiency with the ability to virtually eliminate the readout noise detection limit. We report here the use of this camera, in 512 x 512 frame-transfer chip format at 10-MHz pixel readout speed, in optimizing a demanding ultra-low-light intracellular calcium flux microscopy setup. The arrangement employed includes a spinning confocal Nipkow disk, which, while facilitating the need to both generate images at very rapid frame rates and minimize background photons, yields very weak signals. The challenge for the camera lies not just in detecting as many of these scarce photons as possible, but also in operating at a frame rate that meets the temporal resolution requirements of many low-light microscopy approaches, a particular demand of smooth muscle calcium flux microscopy. Results presented illustrate both the significant sensitivity improvement offered by this technology over the previous standard in ultra-low-light CCD detection, the GenIII+intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD), and also portray the advanced temporal and spatial resolution capabilities of the EMCCD. Copyright 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

  5. LED arrays as cost effective and efficient light sources for widefield microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinu F Albeanu

    Full Text Available New developments in fluorophores as well as in detection methods have fueled the rapid growth of optical imaging in the life sciences. Commercial widefield microscopes generally use arc lamps, excitation/emission filters and shutters for fluorescence imaging. These components can be expensive, difficult to maintain and preclude stable illumination. Here, we describe methods to construct inexpensive and easy-to-use light sources for optical microscopy using light-emitting diodes (LEDs. We also provide examples of its applicability to biological fluorescence imaging.

  6. Correlative light and immuno-electron microscopy of retinal tissue cryostat sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoyne, Thomas; Lane, Amelia; Laughlin, William E.; Cheetham, Michael E.

    2018-01-01

    Correlative light-electron microscopy (CLEM) is a powerful technique allowing localisation of specific macromolecules within fluorescence microscopy (FM) images to be mapped onto corresponding high-resolution electron microscopy (EM) images. Existing methods are applicable to limited sample types and are technically challenging. Here we describe novel methods to perform CLEM and immuno-electron microscopy (iEM) on cryostat sections utilising the popular FM embedding solution, optimal cutting temperature (OCT) compound. Utilising these approaches, we have (i) identified the same phagosomes by FM and EM in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of retinal tissue (ii) shown the correct localisation of rhodopsin on photoreceptor outer segment disc like-structures in iPSC derived optic cups and (iii) identified a novel interaction between peroxisomes and melanosomes as well as phagosomes in the RPE. These data show that cryostat sections allow easy characterisation of target macromolecule localisation within tissue samples, thus providing a substantial improvement over many conventional methods that are limited to cultured cells. As OCT embedding is routinely used for FM this provides an easily accessible and robust method for further analysis of existing samples by high resolution EM. PMID:29315318

  7. Studies on silica deposition in sugarcane (Saccharum spp. ) using scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, neutron activation analysis, and light microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufman, P B; Takeoka, Y; Carlson, T J; Bigelow, W C; Jones, J D; Moore, P H; Ghosheh, N S [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor (USA)

    1979-06-01

    Marked differences in silicon content in internodes of two sugarcane cultivars as revealed by neutron activation analysis, were closely correlated with number of silica cells per unit area in the epidermal system of the internodes of the two cultivars, as indicated by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray analysis. Light microscopy of epidermal peels showed that silica cells are capable of transmitting significantly more light through themselves than do other types of adjacent epidermal cells. This could be of great significance to total amount of carbon fixed by photosynthesizing mesophyll cells in leaves and cortical cells in internodes below the epidermis, especially in sugarcane cultivars with high densities of silica cells in their shoot epidermal systems. This has led to propose a window hypothesis, which indicates that silica cells in sugarcane, and in other grasses, act like windows in the epidermal system, allowing more light to be transmitted to photosynthetic tissue below than would occur if silica cells were absent.

  8. Hyaline articular cartilage dissected by papain: light and scanning electron microscopy and micromechanical studies.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, P; Brereton, J D; Gardner, D L

    1984-01-01

    Papain was used to digest the hyaline femoral condylar cartilages of 30 adult Wistar rats. Matrix proteoglycan degradation was assessed by the light microscopy of paraffin sections stained with toluidine blue. The extent of surface structural change was estimated by scanning electron microscopy, and the structural integrity of the hyaline cartilage tested by the controlled impact of a sharp pin. The results demonstrated an early loss of cartilage metachromasia, increasing with time of papain ...

  9. Laser Light-field Fusion for Wide-field Lensfree On-chip Phase Contrast Microscopy of Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemzadeh, Farnoud; Wong, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Wide-field lensfree on-chip microscopy, which leverages holography principles to capture interferometric light-field encodings without lenses, is an emerging imaging modality with widespread interest given the large field-of-view compared to lens-based techniques. In this study, we introduce the idea of laser light-field fusion for lensfree on-chip phase contrast microscopy for detecting nanoparticles, where interferometric laser light-field encodings acquired using a lensfree, on-chip setup with laser pulsations at different wavelengths are fused to produce marker-free phase contrast images of particles at the nanometer scale. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate, for the first time, a wide-field lensfree on-chip instrument successfully detecting 300 nm particles across a large field-of-view of ~30 mm2 without any specialized or intricate sample preparation, or the use of synthetic aperture- or shift-based techniques.

  10. Hierarchical super-structure identified by polarized light microscopy, electron microscopy and nanoindentation: Implications for the limits of biological control over the growth mode of abalone sea shells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Andreas S

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mollusc shells are commonly investigated using high-resolution imaging techniques based on cryo-fixation. Less detailed information is available regarding the light-optical properties. Sea shells of Haliotis pulcherina were embedded for polishing in defined orientations in order to investigate the interface between prismatic calcite and nacreous aragonite by standard materialographic methods. A polished thin section of the interface was prepared with a defined thickness of 60 μm for quantitative birefringence analysis using polarized light and LC-PolScope microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy images were obtained for comparison. In order to study structural-mechanical relationships, nanoindentation experiments were performed. Results Incident light microscopy revealed a super-structure in semi-transparent regions of the polished cross-section under a defined angle. This super-structure is not visible in transmitted birefringence analysis due to the blurred polarization of small nacre platelets and numerous organic interfaces. The relative orientation and homogeneity of calcite prisms was directly identified, some of them with their optical axes exactly normal to the imaging plane. Co-oriented "prism colonies" were identified by polarized light analyses. The nacreous super-structure was also visualized by secondary electron imaging under defined angles. The domains of the super-structure were interpreted to consist of crystallographically aligned platelet stacks. Nanoindentation experiments showed that mechanical properties changed with the same periodicity as the domain size. Conclusions In this study, we have demonstrated that insights into the growth mechanisms of nacre can be obtained by conventional light-optical methods. For example, we observed super-structures formed by co-oriented nacre platelets as previously identified using X-ray Photo-electron Emission Microscopy (X-PEEM [Gilbert et al., Journal of the

  11. Topography and refractometry of nanostructures using spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Chun, Ik Su; Li, Xiuling; Ong, Zhun-Yong; Pop, Eric; Millet, Larry; Gillette, Martha; Popescu, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Spatial Light Interference Microscopy (SLIM) is a novel method developed in our laboratory that provides quantitative phase images of transparent structures with 0.3 nm spatial and 0.03 nm temporal accuracy owing to the white light illumination and its common path interferometric geometry. We exploit these features and demonstrate SLIM's ability to perform topography at a single atomic layer in graphene. Further, using a decoupling procedure that we developed for cylindrical structures, we extract the axially-averaged refractive index of semiconductor nanotubes and a neurite of a live hippocampal neuron in culture. We believe that this study will set the basis for novel high-throughput topography and refractometry of man-made and biological nanostructures. PMID:20081970

  12. Decoupled illumination detection in light sheet microscopy for fast volumetric imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Olarte, Omar; Andilla, Jordi; Artigas García, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Current microscopy demands the visualization of large three-dimensional samples with increased sensitivity, higher resolution, and faster speed. Several imaging techniques based on widefield, point-scanning, and light-sheet strategies have been designed to tackle some of these demands. Although successful, all these require the illuminated volumes to be tightly coupled with the detection optics to accomplish efficient optical sectioning. Here, we break this paradigm and produce optical sectio...

  13. Evaluation of mobile digital light-emitting diode fluorescence microscopy in Hanoi, Viet Nam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisson, L H; Reber, C; Phan, H; Switz, N; Nilsson, L M; Myers, F; Nhung, N V; Luu, L; Pham, T; Vu, C; Nguyen, H; Nguyen, A; Dinh, T; Nahid, P; Fletcher, D A; Cattamanchi, A

    2015-09-01

    Hanoi Lung Hospital, Hanoi, Viet Nam. To compare the accuracy of CellScopeTB, a manually operated mobile digital fluorescence microscope, with conventional microscopy techniques. Patients referred for sputum smear microscopy to the Hanoi Lung Hospital from May to September 2013 were included. Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) smear microscopy, conventional light-emitting diode (LED) fluorescence microscopy (FM), CellScopeTB-based LED FM and Xpert(®) MTB/RIF were performed on sputum samples. The sensitivity and specificity of microscopy techniques were determined in reference to Xpert results, and differences were compared using McNemar's paired test of proportions. Of 326 patients enrolled, 93 (28.5%) were Xpert-positive for TB. The sensitivity of ZN microscopy, conventional LED FM, and CellScopeTB-based LED FM was respectively 37.6% (95%CI 27.8-48.3), 41.9% (95%CI 31.8-52.6), and 35.5% (95%CI 25.8-46.1). The sensitivity of CellScopeTB was similar to that of conventional LED FM (difference -6.5%, 95%CI -18.2 to 5.3, P = 0.33) and ZN microscopy (difference -2.2%, 95%CI -9.2 to 4.9, P = 0.73). The specificity was >99% for all three techniques. CellScopeTB performed similarly to conventional microscopy techniques in the hands of experienced TB microscopists. However, the sensitivity of all sputum microscopy techniques was low. Options enabled by digital microscopy, such as automated imaging with real-time computerized analysis, should be explored to increase sensitivity.

  14. Improving your four-dimensional image: traveling through a decade of light-sheet-based fluorescence microscopy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobl, Frederic; Schmitz, Alexander; Stelzer, Ernst H K

    2017-06-01

    Light-sheet-based fluorescence microscopy features optical sectioning in the excitation process. This reduces phototoxicity and photobleaching by up to four orders of magnitude compared with that caused by confocal fluorescence microscopy, simplifies segmentation and quantification for three-dimensional cell biology, and supports the transition from on-demand to systematic data acquisition in developmental biology applications.

  15. Comparing the use of virtual and conventional light microscopy in practical sessions: Virtual reality in Tabuk University

    OpenAIRE

    Ayman F.A. Foad, MD

    2017-01-01

    Virtual microscopy has an established role in medical practice and education across all medical disciplines. It provides economical and pedagogical advantages, albeit with some shortcomings. We randomly assigned two groups of second-year medical students from the University of Tabuk in KSA to use either conventional light or virtual microscopy practical sessions. The students' perceptions were assessed by written and practical exams. Students in the virtual microscopy group performed bette...

  16. An assessment of the importance ofexposure routes to the uptake and internal localisation of fluorescent nanoparticles in zebrafish (Danio rerio), using light sheet microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjolding, Lars Michael; Ašmonaitė, G; Jølck, Rasmus Irming

    2017-01-01

    A major challenge in nanoecotoxicology is finding suitable methods to determine the uptake and localisation of nanoparticles on a whole-organism level. Some uptake methods have been associated with artefacts induced by sample preparation, including staining for electron microscopy. This study used...... light sheet microscopy (LSM) to define the uptake and localisation of fluorescently labelled nanoparticles in living organisms with minimal sample preparation. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to fluorescent gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and fluorescent polystyrene NPs via aqueous or dietary exposure...

  17. Characterization and quantitative determination of calcium aluminate clinker phases through reflected light microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano Junior, E.; Cunha Munhoz, F.A. da; Splettstoser Junior, J.; Placido, W.F.

    1989-01-01

    The identification and quantitative determination of phases in calcium aluminate clinker is of great importance to the producer, as it enables a better understanding of the cement and concrete properties, specially those concerning setting time and compressive strenght. Polished sections of three electrofused clinkers, one experimental and two industrial, were used to select the most suitable etchings in order to identify by microscopy the main phases (Ca, CA 2 , C 2 AS, C 12 A 7 , α-Al 2 O 3 ). Quantitative phases determinations by reflected light microscopy showed good results when compared to X-ray diffractometry measurements [pt

  18. The 'grey area' between small cell and non-small cell lung carcinomas. Light and electron microscopy versus clinical data in 14 cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooi, W. J.; van Zandwijk, N.; Dingemans, K. P.; Koolen, M. G.; Wagenvoort, C. A.

    1986-01-01

    We studied 14 lung tumours which on light microscopy had posed difficulties on classification as either small cell or non-small cell carcinomas. The light and electron microscopical features were compared with patient follow-up data. Electron microscopy showed neuroendocrine granules in 12 cases,

  19. Inducing fluorescence of uranyl acetate as a dual-purpose contrast agent for correlative light-electron microscopy with nanometre precision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuijtel, Maarten W; Mulder, Aat A; Posthuma, Clara C; van der Hoeven, Barbara; Koster, Abraham J; Bárcena, Montserrat; Faas, Frank G A; Sharp, Thomas H

    2017-09-05

    Correlative light-electron microscopy (CLEM) combines the high spatial resolution of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with the capability of fluorescence light microscopy (FLM) to locate rare or transient cellular events within a large field of view. CLEM is therefore a powerful technique to study cellular processes. Aligning images derived from both imaging modalities is a prerequisite to correlate the two microscopy data sets, and poor alignment can limit interpretability of the data. Here, we describe how uranyl acetate, a commonly-used contrast agent for TEM, can be induced to fluoresce brightly at cryogenic temperatures (-195 °C) and imaged by cryoFLM using standard filter sets. This dual-purpose contrast agent can be used as a general tool for CLEM, whereby the equivalent staining allows direct correlation between fluorescence and TEM images. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by performing multi-colour CLEM of cells containing equine arteritis virus proteins tagged with either green- or red-fluorescent protein, and achieve high-precision localization of virus-induced intracellular membrane modifications. Using uranyl acetate as a dual-purpose contrast agent, we achieve an image alignment precision of ~30 nm, twice as accurate as when using fiducial beads, which will be essential for combining TEM with the evolving field of super-resolution light microscopy.

  20. Uptake and localization of fluorescent labelled gold nanoparticles in living zebrafish (Danio rerio) using Light Sheet Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjolding, Lars Michael; Asmonaite, G.; Jolk, R.

    2015-01-01

    Despite nanoparticles being used in many different products and applications, the effects and fate in the environment are still not well understood. Uptake of nanoparticles into cells has been shown in vitro and in vivo. However, it is challenging to find suitable methods to identify uptake...... and determine localization on a whole organism level. Furthermore, methods used to identify nanoparticle uptake have been associated with artefacts induced by sample preparation including staining methods for electron microscopy.  This study used Fluorescent Light Sheet Microscopy (FLSM) to determine uptake...... to the particles through the diet or the water phase in a series of separate experiments. In the dietary exposure experiments Artemia salina were exposed to 1 mg Au/L for 24h before being fed to D. rerio. For exposure through the water phase 1 mg Au/L was added directly to aquaria holding the fish and non...

  1. Modeling optical behavior of birefringent biological tissues for evaluation of quantitative polarized light microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turnhout, van M.C.; Kranenbarg, S.; Leeuwen, van J.L.

    2009-01-01

    Quantitative polarized light microscopy (qPLM) is a popular tool for the investigation of birefringent architectures in biological tissues. Collagen, the most abundant protein in mammals, is such a birefringent material. Interpretation of results of qPLM in terms of collagen network architecture and

  2. A Comparison of Honey Bee-Collected Pollen From Working Agricultural Lands Using Light Microscopy and ITS Metabarcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, M D; Cornman, R S; Iwanowicz, D D; McDermott-Kubeczko, M; Pettis, J S; Spivak, M S; Otto, C R V

    2017-02-01

    Taxonomic identification of pollen has historically been accomplished via light microscopy but requires specialized knowledge and reference collections, particularly when identification to lower taxonomic levels is necessary. Recently, next-generation sequencing technology has been used as a cost-effective alternative for identifying bee-collected pollen; however, this novel approach has not been tested on a spatially or temporally robust number of pollen samples. Here, we compare pollen identification results derived from light microscopy and DNA sequencing techniques with samples collected from honey bee colonies embedded within a gradient of intensive agricultural landscapes in the Northern Great Plains throughout the 2010-2011 growing seasons. We demonstrate that at all taxonomic levels, DNA sequencing was able to discern a greater number of taxa, and was particularly useful for the identification of infrequently detected species. Importantly, substantial phenological overlap did occur for commonly detected taxa using either technique, suggesting that DNA sequencing is an appropriate, and enhancing, substitutive technique for accurately capturing the breadth of bee-collected species of pollen present across agricultural landscapes. We also show that honey bees located in high and low intensity agricultural settings forage on dissimilar plants, though with overlap of the most abundantly collected pollen taxa. We highlight practical applications of utilizing sequencing technology, including addressing ecological issues surrounding land use, climate change, importance of taxa relative to abundance, and evaluating the impact of conservation program habitat enhancement efforts. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2016. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  3. Light microscopy morphological characteristics of the sperm flagellum may be related to axonemal abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, V; Sigala, J; Ballot, C; Jumeau, F; Barbotin, A L; Duhamel, A; Rives, N; Rigot, J M; Escalier, D; Peers, M C

    2015-03-01

    Although electron microscopy provides a detailed analysis of ultrastructural abnormalities, this technique is not available in all laboratories. We sought to determine whether certain characteristics of the flagellum as assessed by light microscopy were related to axonemal abnormalities. Forty-one patients with an absence of outer dynein arms (type I), a lack of a central complex (type III) and an absence of peripheral doublets (type IV) were studied. Sperm morphology was scored according to David's modified classification. Flagella with an irregular thickness were classified as being of normal length, short or broken. There were correlations between missing outer dynein arms and abnormal, short or coiled flagellum. Type III patients showed the highest flagellar defects (a short (P = 0.0027) or an absent flagellum (P = 0.011)). Just over 68% of the irregular flagella were short in Type III patients, whereas this value was only 34.5% in type I and 26.4% in type IV (P = 0.002). There was a negative correlation between misassembly and spermatozoa of irregular flagella (r = -0.79; P = 0.019). It is concluded that light microscopy analysis of flagellum abnormalities may help provide a correct diagnosis, identify sperm abnormalities with fertility potentials and outcomes in assisted reproduction technologies and assess the genetic risk. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Scanning light-sheet microscopy in the whole mouse brain with HiLo background rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Jerome; Kim, Jinhyun

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that light-sheet illumination can enable optically sectioned wide-field imaging of macroscopic samples. However, the optical sectioning capacity of a light-sheet macroscope is undermined by sample-induced scattering or aberrations that broaden the thickness of the sheet illumination. We present a technique to enhance the optical sectioning capacity of a scanning light-sheet microscope by out-of-focus background rejection. The technique, called HiLo microscopy, makes use of two images sequentially acquired with uniform and structured sheet illumination. An optically sectioned image is then synthesized by fusing high and low spatial frequency information from both images. The benefits of combining light-sheet macroscopy and HiLo background rejection are demonstrated in optically cleared whole mouse brain samples, using both green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fluorescence and dark-field scattered light contrast.

  5. Exploring the brain on multiple scales with correlative two-photon and light sheet microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Ludovico; Allegra Mascaro, Anna Letizia; Costantini, Irene; Sacconi, Leonardo; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2014-02-01

    One of the unique features of the brain is that its activity cannot be framed in a single spatio-temporal scale, but rather spans many orders of magnitude both in space and time. A single imaging technique can reveal only a small part of this complex machinery. To obtain a more comprehensive view of brain functionality, complementary approaches should be combined into a correlative framework. Here, we describe a method to integrate data from in vivo two-photon fluorescence imaging and ex vivo light sheet microscopy, taking advantage of blood vessels as reference chart. We show how the apical dendritic arbor of a single cortical pyramidal neuron imaged in living thy1-GFP-M mice can be found in the large-scale brain reconstruction obtained with light sheet microscopy. Starting from the apical portion, the whole pyramidal neuron can then be segmented. The correlative approach presented here allows contextualizing within a three-dimensional anatomic framework the neurons whose dynamics have been observed with high detail in vivo.

  6. Observation Platform for Dynamic Biomedical and Biotechnology Experiments using the ISS Light Microscopy Module, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed "Observation platform for dynamic biomedical and biotechnology experiments using the ISS Light Microscopy Module" consists of a platen sized to fit the...

  7. 3D single-molecule super-resolution microscopy with a tilted light sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Anna-Karin; Petrov, Petar N; Lee, Maurice Y; Shechtman, Yoav; Moerner, W E

    2018-01-09

    Tilted light sheet microscopy with 3D point spread functions (TILT3D) combines a novel, tilted light sheet illumination strategy with long axial range point spread functions (PSFs) for low-background, 3D super-localization of single molecules as well as 3D super-resolution imaging in thick cells. Because the axial positions of the single emitters are encoded in the shape of each single-molecule image rather than in the position or thickness of the light sheet, the light sheet need not be extremely thin. TILT3D is built upon a standard inverted microscope and has minimal custom parts. The result is simple and flexible 3D super-resolution imaging with tens of nm localization precision throughout thick mammalian cells. We validate TILT3D for 3D super-resolution imaging in mammalian cells by imaging mitochondria and the full nuclear lamina using the double-helix PSF for single-molecule detection and the recently developed tetrapod PSFs for fiducial bead tracking and live axial drift correction.

  8. An introduction to optical super-resolution microscopy for the adventurous biologist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangindertael, J.; Camacho, R.; Sempels, W.; Mizuno, H.; Dedecker, P.; Janssen, K. P. F.

    2018-04-01

    Ever since the inception of light microscopy, the laws of physics have seemingly thwarted every attempt to visualize the processes of life at its most fundamental, sub-cellular, level. The diffraction limit has restricted our view to length scales well above 250 nm and in doing so, severely compromised our ability to gain true insights into many biological systems. Fortunately, continuous advancements in optics, electronics and mathematics have since provided the means to once again make physics work to our advantage. Even though some of the fundamental concepts enabling super-resolution light microscopy have been known for quite some time, practically feasible implementations have long remained elusive. It should therefore not come as a surprise that the 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to the scientists who, each in their own way, contributed to transforming super-resolution microscopy from a technological tour de force to a staple of the biologist’s toolkit. By overcoming the diffraction barrier, light microscopy could once again be established as an indispensable tool in an age where the importance of understanding life at the molecular level cannot be overstated. This review strives to provide the aspiring life science researcher with an introduction to optical microscopy, starting from the fundamental concepts governing compound and fluorescent confocal microscopy to the current state-of-the-art of super-resolution microscopy techniques and their applications.

  9. Correlative Light-Electron Microscopy of Lipid-Encapsulated Fluorescent Nanodiamonds for Nanometric Localization of Cell Surface Antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Feng-Jen; Chen, Yen-Wei; Huang, Yao-Kuan; Lee, Hsien-Ming; Lin, Chun-Hung; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2018-02-06

    Containing an ensemble of nitrogen-vacancy centers in crystal matrices, fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) are a new type of photostable markers that have found wide applications in light microscopy. The nanomaterial also has a dense carbon core, making it visible to electron microscopy. Here, we show that FNDs encapsulated in biotinylated lipids (bLs) are useful for subdiffraction imaging of antigens on cell surface with correlative light-electron microscopy (CLEM). The lipid encapsulation enables not only good dispersion of the particles in biological buffers but also high specific labeling of live cells. By employing the bL-encapsulated FNDs to target CD44 on HeLa cell surface through biotin-mediated immunostaining, we obtained the spatial distribution of these antigens by CLEM with a localization accuracy of ∼50 nm in routine operations. A comparative study with dual-color imaging, in which CD44 was labeled with FND and MICA/MICB was labeled with Alexa Fluor 488, demonstrated the superior performance of FNDs as fluorescent fiducial markers for CLEM of cell surface antigens.

  10. A simple procedure to analyze positions of interest in infectious cell cultures by correlative light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madela, Kazimierz; Banhart, Sebastian; Zimmermann, Anja; Piesker, Janett; Bannert, Norbert; Laue, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Plastic cell culture dishes that contain a thin bottom of highest optical quality including an imprinted finder grid (μ-Dish Grid-500) are optimally suited for routine correlative light and electron microscopy using chemical fixation. Such dishes allow high-resolution fluorescence and bright-field imaging using fixed and living cells and are compatible with standard protocols for scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Ease of use during cell culture and imaging, as well as a tight cover render the dishes particularly suitable for working with infectious organisms up to the highest biosafety level. Detailed protocols are provided and demonstrated by showing two examples: monitoring the production of virus-like particles of the Human Endogenous Retrovirus HERV-K(HML-2) by HeLa cells and investigation of Rab11-positive membrane-compartments of HeLa cells after infection with Chlamydia trachomatis. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Coherent imaging with incoherent light in digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmelik, Radim

    2012-01-01

    Digital holographic microscope (DHM) allows for imaging with a quantitative phase contrast. In this way it becomes an important instrument, a completely non-invasive tool for a contrast intravital observation of living cells and a cell drymass density distribution measurement. A serious drawback of current DHMs is highly coherent illumination which makes the lateral resolution worse and impairs the image quality by a coherence noise and a parasitic interference. An uncompromising solution to this problem can be found in the Leith concept of incoherent holography. An off-axis hologram can be formed with arbitrary degree of light coherence in systems equipped with an achromatic interferometer and thus the resolution and the image quality typical for an incoherent-light wide-field microscopy can be achieved. In addition, advanced imaging modes based on limited coherence can be utilized. The typical example is a coherence-gating effect which provides a finite axial resolution and makes DHM image similar to that of a confocal microscope. These possibilities were described theoretically using the formalism of three-dimensional coherent transfer functions and proved experimentally by the coherence-controlled holographic microscope which is DHM based on the Leith achromatic interferometer. Quantitative-phase-contrast imaging is demonstrated with incoherent light by the living cancer cells observation and their motility evaluation. The coherence-gating effect was proved by imaging of model samples through a scattering layer and living cells inside an opalescent medium.

  12. High-Throughput Light Sheet Microscopy for the Automated Live Imaging of Larval Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ryan; Logan, Savannah; Dudley, Christopher; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    The zebrafish is a model organism with a variety of useful properties; it is small and optically transparent, it reproduces quickly, it is a vertebrate, and there are a large variety of transgenic animals available. Because of these properties, the zebrafish is well suited to study using a variety of optical technologies including light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM), which provides high-resolution three-dimensional imaging over large fields of view. Research progress, however, is often not limited by optical techniques but instead by the number of samples one can examine over the course of an experiment, which in the case of light sheet imaging has so far been severely limited. Here we present an integrated fluidic circuit and microscope which provides rapid, automated imaging of zebrafish using several imaging modes, including LSFM, Hyperspectral Imaging, and Differential Interference Contrast Microscopy. Using this system, we show that we can increase our imaging throughput by a factor of 10 compared to previous techniques. We also show preliminary results visualizing zebrafish immune response, which is sensitive to gut microbiota composition, and which shows a strong variability between individuals that highlights the utility of high throughput imaging. National Science Foundation, Award No. DBI-1427957.

  13. X-ray holographic microscopy experiments at the Brookhaven synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.R.; Iarocci, M.; Kenney, J.; Kirz, J.; Rarback, H.

    1983-01-01

    Soft x-ray holographic microscopy is discussed from an experimental point of view. Three series of measurements have been carried out using the Brookhaven 750 MeV storage ring as an x-ray source. Young slits fringes, Gabor (in line) holograms and various data pertaining to the soft x-ray performance of photographic plates are reported. The measurements are discussed in terms of the technique for recording them and the experimental limitations in effect. Some discussion is also given of the issues involved in reconstruction using visible light

  14. In Depth Analyses of LEDs by a Combination of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) and Light Microscopy (LM) Correlated with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Jörg; Thomas, Christian; Tappe, Frank; Ogbazghi, Tekie

    2016-06-16

    In failure analysis, device characterization and reverse engineering of light emitting diodes (LEDs), and similar electronic components of micro-characterization, plays an important role. Commonly, different techniques like X-ray computed tomography (CT), light microscopy (LM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used separately. Similarly, the results have to be treated for each technique independently. Here a comprehensive study is shown which demonstrates the potentials leveraged by linking CT, LM and SEM. In depth characterization is performed on a white emitting LED, which can be operated throughout all characterization steps. Major advantages are: planned preparation of defined cross sections, correlation of optical properties to structural and compositional information, as well as reliable identification of different functional regions. This results from the breadth of information available from identical regions of interest (ROIs): polarization contrast, bright and dark-field LM images, as well as optical images of the LED cross section in operation. This is supplemented by SEM imaging techniques and micro-analysis using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

  15. Microscopy and Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, George; Difilippantonio, Michael; Ried, Thomas; Bieber, Frederick R

    2017-07-11

    This unit provides an overview of light microscopy, including objectives, light sources, filters, film, and color photography for fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We believe there are excellent opportunities for cytogeneticists, pathologists, and other biomedical readers, to take advantage of specimen optical clearing techniques and expansion microscopy-we briefly point to these new opportunities. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Quantitative localization of (/sup 3/H)TCP binding in rat brain by light microscopy autoradiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sircar, R; Zukin, S R

    1985-09-30

    The anatomical localization of phencyclidine (PCP)/sigma-opiate receptors in rat brain was determined by quantitative light microscopy autoradiography using the new ligand N-(1-(2-thienyl) cyclohexyl(/sup 3/H) piperidine ((/sup 3/H)TCP). TCP is a potent analog of PCP which possesses a higher affinity for PCP/sigma-opiate receptor than does PCP itself. The highest level of (/sup 3/H)TCP binding was detected in the hippocampus. Intermediate levels were found in frontal cortex, striatum, amygdala and cerebellum. Specific (/sup 3/H)TCP binding was undetectable in anterior commissure and corpus callosum. The distribution pattern of (/sup 3/H)TCP binding sites is similar to the pattern obtained with (/sup 3/H)PCP but more sharply defined. On the basis of its greater potency and specificity, (/sup 3/H)TCP may prove superior to (/sup 3/H)PCP as a molecular probe for the study of brain sigma opiate/phencyclidine receptors. 13 refs.; 1 figure; 1 table.

  17. Advanced light microscopy core facilities: Balancing service, science and career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Hella; Reymann, Jürgen; Ansari, Nariman; Utz, Nadine; Fried, Hans‐Ulrich; Kukat, Christian; Peychl, Jan; Liebig, Christian; Terjung, Stefan; Laketa, Vibor; Sporbert, Anje; Weidtkamp‐Peters, Stefanie; Schauss, Astrid; Zuschratter, Werner; Avilov, Sergiy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Core Facilities (CF) for advanced light microscopy (ALM) have become indispensable support units for research in the life sciences. Their organizational structure and technical characteristics are quite diverse, although the tasks they pursue and the services they offer are similar. Therefore, throughout Europe, scientists from ALM‐CFs are forming networks to promote interactions and discuss best practice models. Here, we present recommendations for ALM‐CF operations elaborated by the workgroups of the German network of ALM‐CFs, German Bio‐Imaging (GerBI). We address technical aspects of CF planning and instrument maintainance, give advice on the organization and management of an ALM‐CF, propose a scheme for the training of CF users, and provide an overview of current resources for image processing and analysis. Further, we elaborate on the new challenges and opportunities for professional development and careers created by CFs. While some information specifically refers to the German academic system, most of the content of this article is of general interest for CFs in the life sciences. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:463–479, 2016. © 2016 THE AUTHORS MICROSCOPY RESEARCH AND TECHNIQUE PUBLISHED BY WILEY PERIODICALS, INC. PMID:27040755

  18. Cerebral vessels segmentation for light-sheet microscopy image using convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chaoen; Hui, Hui; Wang, Shuo; Dong, Di; Liu, Xia; Yang, Xin; Tian, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Cerebral vessel segmentation is an important step in image analysis for brain function and brain disease studies. To extract all the cerebrovascular patterns, including arteries and capillaries, some filter-based methods are used to segment vessels. However, the design of accurate and robust vessel segmentation algorithms is still challenging, due to the variety and complexity of images, especially in cerebral blood vessel segmentation. In this work, we addressed a problem of automatic and robust segmentation of cerebral micro-vessels structures in cerebrovascular images acquired by light-sheet microscope for mouse. To segment micro-vessels in large-scale image data, we proposed a convolutional neural networks (CNNs) architecture trained by 1.58 million pixels with manual label. Three convolutional layers and one fully connected layer were used in the CNNs model. We extracted a patch of size 32x32 pixels in each acquired brain vessel image as training data set to feed into CNNs for classification. This network was trained to output the probability that the center pixel of input patch belongs to vessel structures. To build the CNNs architecture, a series of mouse brain vascular images acquired from a commercial light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) system were used for training the model. The experimental results demonstrated that our approach is a promising method for effectively segmenting micro-vessels structures in cerebrovascular images with vessel-dense, nonuniform gray-level and long-scale contrast regions.

  19. Charting Monosynaptic Connectivity Maps by Two-Color Light-Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian J. Niedworok

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Cellular resolution three-dimensional (3D visualization of defined, fluorescently labeled long-range neuronal networks in the uncut adult mouse brain has been elusive. Here, a virus-based strategy is described that allowed fluorescent labeling of centrifugally projecting neuronal populations in the ventral forebrain and their directly, monosynaptically connected bulbar interneurons upon a single stereotaxic injection into select neuronal populations. Implementation of improved tissue clearing combined with light-sheet fluorescence microscopy permitted imaging of the resulting connectivity maps in a single whole-brain scan. Subsequent 3D reconstructions revealed the exact distribution of the diverse neuronal ensembles monosynaptically connected with distinct bulbar interneuron populations. Moreover, rehydratation of brains after light-sheet fluorescence imaging enabled the immunohistochemical identification of synaptically connected neurons. Thus, this study describes a method for identifying monosynaptic connectivity maps from distinct, virally labeled neuronal populations that helps in better understanding of information flow in neural systems.

  20. Summary of 2016 Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Physical Science Experiments on ISS. Update of LMM Science Experiments and Facility Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicker, Ronald J.; Meyer, William V.; Foster, William M.; Fletcher, William A.; Williams, Stuart J.; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will feature a series of short, entertaining, and informative videos that describe the current status and science support for the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) facility on the International Space Station. These interviews will focus on current experiments and provide an overview of future capabilities. The recently completed experiments include nano-particle haloing, 3-D self-assembly with Janus particles and a model system for nano-particle drug delivery. The videos will share perspectives from the scientists, engineers, and managers working with the NASA Light Microscopy program.

  1. Diagnostics of intestinal parasites in light microscopy among the population of children in eastern Afghanistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Korzeniewski

    2016-09-01

    The variety of detected intestinal pathogens in examined children’s population has required the use of combination of multiple diagnostic methods in light microscopy, and finally improved the detection rates of intestinal parasites and helped eliminate infections with nematodes, cestodes, trematodes, and protozoa using appropriate treatment in the study population.

  2. Identification of a Multicomponent Traditional Herbal Medicine by HPLC-MS and Electron and Light Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ju-Han; Cheng, Yung-Yi; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi; Tsai, Tung-Hu

    2017-12-15

    Commercial pharmaceutical herbal products have enabled people to take traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in a convenient and accessible form. However, the quantity and quality should be additionally inspected. To address the issue, a combination of chemical and physical inspection methods were developed to evaluate the amount of an herbal formula, Xiang-Sha-Liu-Jun-Zi-Tang (XSLJZT), in clinical TCM practice. A high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) method with electrospray ionization was developed to measure the herbal biomarkers of guanosine, atractylenolide III, glycyrrhizic acid, dehydrocostus lactone, hesperidin, and oleanolic acid from XSLJZT. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) photographs and light microscopy photographs with Congo red and iodine-KI staining were used to identify the cellulose fibers and starch content. Furthermore, solubility analysis, swelling power test, and crude fiber analysis were contributed to measure the starch additive in pharmaceutical products. The results demonstrated large variations in the chemical components of different pharmaceutical brands. The SEM photographs revealed that the starch was oval, smooth, and granular, and that the raw herbal powder appears stripy, stretched, and filiform. The stained light microscopy photographs of all of the pharmaceutical products showed added starch and raw herbal powder as extenders. The developed chemical and physical methods provide a standard operating procedure for the quantity control of the herbal pharmaceutical products of XSLJZT.

  3. The reinvention of twentieth century microscopy for three-dimensional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Lachlan W; McArthur, Kate; Geoghegan, Niall D; Rogers, Kelly L

    2017-07-01

    In just over a decade, the field of biomedical research has witnessed a radical evolution in technologies for the 3- and 4-dimensional imaging of biological samples. Light sheet fluorescence microscopy is quickly developing into a powerful approach for fast, volumetric imaging of cells, tissues and living organisms. This review touches on the development of 3-dimensional imaging, from its foundations, namely from the invention of confocal microscopy in the twentieth century to more recent examples, notably the IsoView SPIM, the Lattice Light Sheet Microscope and swept confocally aligned planar excitation. These technologies overcome the limitations of conventional optical sectioning techniques and enable unprecedented levels of spatio-temporal resolution with low levels of phototoxicity. Developing in parallel with powerful computational approaches, light sheet based methods promise to completely transform cell biology as we know it today.

  4. Sample Preparation and Mounting of Drosophila Embryos for Multiview Light Sheet Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmied, Christopher; Tomancak, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Light sheet fluorescent microscopy (LSFM), and in particular its most widespread flavor Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (SPIM), promises to provide unprecedented insights into developmental dynamics of entire living systems. By combining minimal photo-damage with high imaging speed and sample mounting tailored toward the needs of the specimen, it enables in toto imaging of embryogenesis with high spatial and temporal resolution. Drosophila embryos are particularly well suited for SPIM imaging because the volume of the embryo does not change from the single cell embryo to the hatching larva. SPIM microscopes can therefore image Drosophila embryos embedded in rigid media, such as agarose, from multiple angles every few minutes from the blastoderm stage until hatching. Here, we describe sample mounting strategies to achieve such a recording. We also provide detailed protocols to realize multiview, long-term, time-lapse recording of Drosophila embryos expressing fluorescent markers on the commercially available Zeiss Lightsheet Z.1 microscope and the OpenSPIM.

  5. Optical spectroscopy and microscopy of radiation-induced light-emitting point defects in lithium fluoride crystals and films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montereali, R. M.; Bonfigli, F.; Menchini, F.; Vincenti, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    Broad-band light-emitting radiation-induced F2 and F3+ electronic point defects, which are stable and laser-active at room temperature in lithium fluoride crystals and films, are used in dosimeters, tuneable color-center lasers, broad-band miniaturized light sources and novel radiation imaging detectors. A brief review of their photoemission properties is presented, and their behavior at liquid nitrogen temperatures is discussed. Some experimental data from optical spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy of these radiation-induced point defects in LiF crystals and thin films are used to obtain information about the coloration curves, the efficiency of point defect formation, the effects of photo-bleaching processes, etc. Control of the local formation, stabilization, and transformation of radiation-induced light-emitting defect centers is crucial for the development of optically active micro-components and nanostructures. Some of the advantages of low temperature measurements for novel confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy techniques, widely used for spatial mapping of these point defects through the optical reading of their visible photoluminescence, are highlighted.

  6. Correlative Stochastic Optical Reconstruction Microscopy and Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Doory; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Sigal, Yaron M.; Babcock, Hazen P.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2015-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence light microscopy and electron microscopy allows the imaging of spatial distributions of specific biomolecules in the context of cellular ultrastructure. Recent development of super-resolution fluorescence microscopy allows the location of molecules to be determined with nanometer-scale spatial resolution. However, correlative super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy (EM) still remains challenging because the optimal specimen preparation and imaging conditions for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy and EM are often not compatible. Here, we have developed several experiment protocols for correlative stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) and EM methods, both for un-embedded samples by applying EM-specific sample preparations after STORM imaging and for embedded and sectioned samples by optimizing the fluorescence under EM fixation, staining and embedding conditions. We demonstrated these methods using a variety of cellular targets. PMID:25874453

  7. A morphological study of the sulfurisation of digenite to covellite using reflected polarised light microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask Møller Frøkiær, Heidi; Warner, Terence E.

    2017-01-01

    A series of copper rods were reacted with sulfur vapour in evacuated glass ampoules at ∼445 °C. Product materials were characterised by powder X-ray diffraction and reflected polarised light microscopy. Copper sulfurised rapidly to digenite, γ-Cu2-xS, under these conditions, whereas the subsequen...... of the covellite structure. Sulfurising a coil of copper wire at ∼445 °C is an effective method for synthesising covellite.......A series of copper rods were reacted with sulfur vapour in evacuated glass ampoules at ∼445 °C. Product materials were characterised by powder X-ray diffraction and reflected polarised light microscopy. Copper sulfurised rapidly to digenite, γ-Cu2-xS, under these conditions, whereas the subsequent...... − besides being a p-type metal − is ionically conducting at 445 °C, although considerably less so than digenite. We infer that the growth of platy covellite crystals and their radial alignment in the primary CuS layer are a consequence of copper ion mobility being restricted to the basal plane...

  8. Morphology of Ichthyophonus hoferi assessed by light and scanning electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanggaard, Bettina; Huss, Hans Henrik; Bresciani, J.

    1995-01-01

    The morphology of Ichthyophonus hoferi in vitro at pH 3.5 and 7.0 is described using light and scanning electron microscopy. Only vegetative growth was observed. At pH 3.5, hyphal growth was seen. The hyphae of I. hoferi are characterized by evacuated hyphal walls with the cytoplasm migrating......-walled multinucleate spores in the fish stomach as a response to the low pH. The hyphae then penetrate the digestive tract and rupture when they reach a blood vessel (neutral pH), whereby uni- and binucleate bodies and/or amoeboid bodies are released. The small cells are transported in the blood vessels and spread...

  9. Light Microscopy Module: International Space Station Premier Automated Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicker, Ronald J.; Foster, William M.; Motil, Brian J.; Meyer, William V.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Abbott-Hearn, Amber; Atherton, Arthur; Beltram, Alexander; Bodzioney, Christopher; Brinkman, John; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) was launched to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2009 and began hardware operations in 2010. It continues to support Physical and Biological scientific research on ISS. During 2016, if all goes as planned, three experiments will be completed: [1] Advanced Colloids Experiments with Heated base-2 (ACE-H2) and [2] Advanced Colloids Experiments with Temperature control (ACE-T1). Preliminary results, along with an overview of present and future LMM capabilities will be presented; this includes details on the planned data imaging processing and storage system, along with the confocal upgrade to the core microscope. [1] a consortium of universities from the State of Kentucky working through the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR): Stuart Williams, Gerold Willing, Hemali Rathnayake, et al. and [2] from Chungnam National University, Daejeon, S. Korea: Chang-Soo Lee, et al.

  10. [Polarized light microscopy for evaluation of oocytes as a prognostic factor in the evolution of a cycle in assisted reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ortega, C; Cancino-Villarreal, P; Alonzo-Torres, V E; Martínez-Robles, I; Pérez-Peña, E; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, A M

    2016-04-01

    Identification of the best embryos to transfer is a key element for success in assisted reproduction. In the last decade, several morphological criteria of oocytes and embryos were evaluated with regard to their potential for predicting embryo viability. The introduction of polarization light microscopy systems has allowed the visualization of the meiotic spindle and the different layers of the zona pellucida in human oocytes on the basis of birefringence in a non-destructive way. Conflicting results have been reported regarding the predictive value in ICSI cycles. To assess the predictive ability of meiotic spindle and zona pellucida of human oocytes to implant by polarized microscopy in ICSI cycles. Prospective and observational clinical study. 903 oocytes from 94 ICSI cycles were analyzed with polarized microscopy. Meiotic spindle visualization and zona pellucida birefringence values by polarized microscopy were correlated with ICSI cycles results. Meiotic spindle visualization and birefringence values of zona pellucida decreased in a direct basis with increasing age. In patients aged over the 35 years, the percentage of a visible spindle and mean zona pellucida birefringence was lower than in younger patients. Fertilization rate were higher in oocytes with visible meiotic spindle (81.3% vs. 64%; p vs. 39%; p=0.01). Fertilization rate was higher in oocytes with positive values of birefringence (77.5 % vs. 68.5% p=0.005) with similar embryo quality. Conception cycles showed oocytes with higher mean value of zona birefringence and visible spindle vs. no-conception cycles (pPolarized light microscopy improves oocyte selection, which significantly impacts in the development of embryos with greater implantation potential. The use of polarized light microscopy with sperm selection methods, blastocyst culture and deferred embryo transfers will contribute to transfer fewer embryos without diminishing rates of live birth and single embryo transfer will be more feasible.

  11. Shedding new light on lipid functions with CARS and SRS microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yong; Ramachandran, Prasanna V.; Wang, Meng C.

    2014-01-01

    Modern optical microscopy has granted biomedical scientists unprecedented access to the inner workings of a cell, and revolutionized our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying physiological and disease states. In spite of these advances, however, visualization of certain classes of molecules (e.g. lipids) at the sub-cellular level has remained elusive. Recently developed chemical imaging modalities – Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy and Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy – have helped bridge this gap. By selectively imaging the vibration of a specific chemical group, these non-invasive techniques allow high-resolution imaging of individual molecules in vivo, and circumvent the need for potentially perturbative extrinsic labels. These tools have already been applied to the study of fat metabolism, helping uncover novel regulators of lipid storage. Here we review the underlying principle of CARS and SRS microscopy, and discuss the advantages and caveats of each technique. We also review recent applications of these tools in the study of lipids as well as other biomolecules, and conclude with a brief guide for interested researchers to build and use CARS/SRS systems for their own research. PMID:24576891

  12. Lipid vesicle shape analysis from populations using light video microscopy and computer vision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Zupanc

    Full Text Available We present a method for giant lipid vesicle shape analysis that combines manually guided large-scale video microscopy and computer vision algorithms to enable analyzing vesicle populations. The method retains the benefits of light microscopy and enables non-destructive analysis of vesicles from suspensions containing up to several thousands of lipid vesicles (1-50 µm in diameter. For each sample, image analysis was employed to extract data on vesicle quantity and size distributions of their projected diameters and isoperimetric quotients (measure of contour roundness. This process enables a comparison of samples from the same population over time, or the comparison of a treated population to a control. Although vesicles in suspensions are heterogeneous in sizes and shapes and have distinctively non-homogeneous distribution throughout the suspension, this method allows for the capture and analysis of repeatable vesicle samples that are representative of the population inspected.

  13. Preservation of protein fluorescence in embedded human dendritic cells for targeted 3D light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhn, K; Fuchs, J; Fröber, A; Kirmse, R; Glass, B; Anders-Össwein, M; Walther, P; Kräusslich, H-G; Dietrich, C

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we present a correlative microscopy workflow to combine detailed 3D fluorescence light microscopy data with ultrastructural information gained by 3D focused ion beam assisted scanning electron microscopy. The workflow is based on an optimized high pressure freezing/freeze substitution protocol that preserves good ultrastructural detail along with retaining the fluorescence signal in the resin embedded specimens. Consequently, cellular structures of interest can readily be identified and imaged by state of the art 3D confocal fluorescence microscopy and are precisely referenced with respect to an imprinted coordinate system on the surface of the resin block. This allows precise guidance of the focused ion beam assisted scanning electron microscopy and limits the volume to be imaged to the structure of interest. This, in turn, minimizes the total acquisition time necessary to conduct the time consuming ultrastructural scanning electron microscope imaging while eliminating the risk to miss parts of the target structure. We illustrate the value of this workflow for targeting virus compartments, which are formed in HIV-pulsed mature human dendritic cells. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  14. New approach for the quantification of processed animal proteins in feed using light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veys, P; Baeten, V

    2010-07-01

    A revision of European Union's total feed ban on animal proteins in feed will need robust quantification methods, especially for control analyses, if tolerance levels are to be introduced, as for fishmeal in ruminant feed. In 2006, a study conducted by the Community Reference Laboratory for Animal Proteins in feedstuffs (CRL-AP) demonstrated the deficiency of the official quantification method based on light microscopy. The study concluded that the method had to be revised. This paper puts forward an improved quantification method based on three elements: (1) the preparation of permanent slides with an optical adhesive preserving all morphological markers of bones necessary for accurate identification and precision counting; (2) the use of a counting grid eyepiece reticle; and (3) new definitions for correction factors for the estimated portions of animal particles in the sediment. This revised quantification method was tested on feeds adulterated at different levels with bovine meat and bone meal (MBM) and fishmeal, and it proved to be effortless to apply. The results obtained were very close to the expected values of contamination levels for both types of adulteration (MBM or fishmeal). Calculated values were not only replicable, but also reproducible. The advantages of the new approach, including the benefits of the optical adhesive used for permanent slide mounting and the experimental conditions that need to be met to implement the new method correctly, are discussed.

  15. Direct imaging of phase objects enables conventional deconvolution in bright field light microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Noemí Hernández Candia

    Full Text Available In transmitted optical microscopy, absorption structure and phase structure of the specimen determine the three-dimensional intensity distribution of the image. The elementary impulse responses of the bright field microscope therefore consist of separate absorptive and phase components, precluding general application of linear, conventional deconvolution processing methods to improve image contrast and resolution. However, conventional deconvolution can be applied in the case of pure phase (or pure absorptive objects if the corresponding phase (or absorptive impulse responses of the microscope are known. In this work, we present direct measurements of the phase point- and line-spread functions of a high-aperture microscope operating in transmitted bright field. Polystyrene nanoparticles and microtubules (biological polymer filaments serve as the pure phase point and line objects, respectively, that are imaged with high contrast and low noise using standard microscopy plus digital image processing. Our experimental results agree with a proposed model for the response functions, and confirm previous theoretical predictions. Finally, we use the measured phase point-spread function to apply conventional deconvolution on the bright field images of living, unstained bacteria, resulting in improved definition of cell boundaries and sub-cellular features. These developments demonstrate practical application of standard restoration methods to improve imaging of phase objects such as cells in transmitted light microscopy.

  16. Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS): A light and electron microscopy study in human liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreuls, C P H; Driessen, A; Olde Damink, S W M; Koek, G H; Duimel, H; van den Broek, M A J; Dejong, C H C; Braet, F; Wisse, E

    2016-05-01

    Oxaliplatin is an important chemotherapeutic agent, used in the treatment of hepatic colorectal metastases, and known to induce the sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS). Pathophysiological knowledge concerning SOS is based on a rat model. Therefore, the aim was to perform a comprehensive study of the features of human SOS, using both light microscopy (LM) and electron microscopy (EM). Included were all patients of whom wedge liver biopsies were collected during a partial hepatectomy for colorectal liver metastases, in a 4-year period. The wedge biopsy were perfusion fixated and processed for LM and EM. The SOS lesions were selected by LM and details were studied using EM. Material was available of 30 patients, of whom 28 patients received neo-adjuvant oxaliplatin. Eighteen (64%) of the 28 patients showed SOS lesions, based on microscopy. The lesions consisted of sinusoidal endothelial cell detachment from the space of Disse on EM. In the enlarged space of Disse a variable amount of erythrocytes were located. Sinusoidal endothelial cell detachment was present in human SOS, accompanied by enlargement of the space of Disse and erythrocytes in this area. These findings, originally described in a rat model, were now for the first time confirmed in human livers under clinically relevant settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of a new light collection and detection system optimized for ion beam induced fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanga, Sudheer Kumar; Mi, Zhaohong; Koh, Long Cheng; Tao, Ye; Bettiol, Andrew A.; Watt, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Ion beam induced fluorescence microscopy is a new imaging technique which has the potential to achieve sub-50 nm spatial resolution fluorescence images. Currently the resolution of the technique has been limited to around 150 nm mainly because of inefficient collection and detection of emitted photons from the sample. To overcome this limitation, a new light collection system based on a custom made parabolic mirror is employed to enhance the fluorescence collection. The custom made mirror is designed so as to obtain both structural (scanning transmission ion microscopy) and ion beam induced fluorescence imaging simultaneously. The design and characterization of the parabolic mirror is discussed in detail

  18. Fluorescence photooxidation with eosin: a method for high resolution immunolocalization and in situ hybridization detection for light and electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    A simple method is described for high-resolution light and electron microscopic immunolocalization of proteins in cells and tissues by immunofluorescence and subsequent photooxidation of diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride into an insoluble osmiophilic polymer. By using eosin as the fluorescent marker, a substantial improvement in sensitivity is achieved in the photooxidation process over other conventional fluorescent compounds. The technique allows for precise correlative immunolocalization studies on the same sample using fluorescence, transmitted light and electron microscopy. Furthermore, because eosin is smaller in size than other conventional markers, this method results in improved penetration of labeling reagents compared to gold or enzyme based procedures. The improved penetration allows for three-dimensional immunolocalization using high voltage electron microscopy. Fluorescence photooxidation can also be used for high resolution light and electron microscopic localization of specific nucleic acid sequences by in situ hybridization utilizing biotinylated probes followed by an eosin-streptavidin conjugate. PMID:7519623

  19. Identification of crystals in Hanford nuclear waste using polarized light microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herting, D.L.

    1984-09-01

    The use of polarized light microscopy for identifying crystals encountered in Rockwell Hanford Operations chemical studies is described. Identifying characteristics and full-color photographs are presented for crystals commonly found in Hanford Site nuclear waste, including sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, sodium aluminate, sodium phosphate, sodium fluoride, ammonium heptafluorozirconate, sodium sulfate, sodium carbonate, and ammonium nitrate. These characteristics are described in terms of birefringence, extinction position, interference figure, sign of elongation, optic sign, and crystal morphology. Background information on crystal optics is presented so that these traits can be understood by the nonmicroscopist. Detailed operational instructions are given so that the novice microscope user can make the proper adjustments of the instrument to search for and observe the identifying features of the crystals

  20. Visible light optical coherence microscopy imaging of the mouse cortex with femtoliter volume resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkle, Conrad W.; Chong, Shau Poh; Kho, Aaron M.; Zhu, Jun; Kholiqov, Oybek; Dubra, Alfredo; Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    2018-02-01

    Most flying-spot Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) systems use a symmetric confocal geometry, where the detection path retraces the illumination path starting from and ending with the spatial mode of a single mode optical fiber. Here, we describe a visible light OCM instrument that breaks this symmetry to improve transverse resolution without sacrificing collection efficiency in scattering tissue. This was achieved by overfilling a 0.3 numerical aperture (NA) water immersion objective on the illumination path, while maintaining a conventional Gaussian mode detection path (1/e2 intensity diameter 0.82 Airy disks), enabling 1.1 μm full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) transverse resolution. At the same time, a 0.9 μm FWHM axial resolution in tissue, achieved by a broadband visible light source, enabled femtoliter volume resolution. We characterized this instrument according to paraxial coherent microscopy theory, and then used it to image the meningeal layers, intravascular red blood cell-free layer, and myelinated axons in the mouse neocortex in vivo through the thinned skull. Finally, by introducing a 0.8 NA water immersion objective, we improved the lateral resolution to 0.44 μm FWHM, which provided a volumetric resolution of 0.2 fL, revealing cell bodies in cortical layer I of the mouse brain with OCM for the first time.

  1. Structured illumination microscopy and its new developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianling Chen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Optical microscopy allows us to observe the biological structures and processes within living cells. However, the spatial resolution of the optical microscopy is limited to about half of the wavelength by the light diffraction. Structured illumination microscopy (SIM, a type of new emerging super-resolution microscopy, doubles the spatial resolution by illuminating the specimen with a patterned light, and the sample and light source requirements of SIM are not as strict as the other super-resolution microscopy. In addition, SIM is easier to combine with the other imaging techniques to improve their imaging resolution, leading to the developments of diverse types of SIM. SIM has great potential to meet the various requirements of living cells imaging. Here, we review the recent developments of SIM and its combination with other imaging techniques.

  2. Correlative Super-Resolution Microscopy: New Dimensions and New Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Meghan; Wojcik, Michal; Kim, Doory; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Li, Wan; Xu, Ke

    2017-06-14

    Correlative microscopy, the integration of two or more microscopy techniques performed on the same sample, produces results that emphasize the strengths of each technique while offsetting their individual weaknesses. Light microscopy has historically been a central method in correlative microscopy due to its widespread availability, compatibility with hydrated and live biological samples, and excellent molecular specificity through fluorescence labeling. However, conventional light microscopy can only achieve a resolution of ∼300 nm, undercutting its advantages in correlations with higher-resolution methods. The rise of super-resolution microscopy (SRM) over the past decade has drastically improved the resolution of light microscopy to ∼10 nm, thus creating exciting new opportunities and challenges for correlative microscopy. Here we review how these challenges are addressed to effectively correlate SRM with other microscopy techniques, including light microscopy, electron microscopy, cryomicroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and various forms of spectroscopy. Though we emphasize biological studies, we also discuss the application of correlative SRM to materials characterization and single-molecule reactions. Finally, we point out current limitations and discuss possible future improvements and advances. We thus demonstrate how a correlative approach adds new dimensions of information and provides new opportunities in the fast-growing field of SRM.

  3. Light-free magnetic resonance force microscopy for studies of electron spin polarized systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelekhov, Denis V.; Selcu, Camelia; Banerjee, Palash; Chung Fong, Kin; Chris Hammel, P.; Bhaskaran, Harish; Schwab, Keith

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance force microscopy is a scanned probe technique capable of three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging. Its excellent sensitivity opens the possibility for magnetic resonance studies of spin accumulation resulting from the injection of spin polarized currents into a para-magnetic collector. The method is based on mechanical detection of magnetic resonance which requires low noise detection of cantilever displacement; so far, this has been accomplished using optical interferometry. This is undesirable for experiments on doped silicon, where the presence of light is known to enhance spin relaxation rates. We report a non-optical displacement detection scheme based on sensitive microwave capacitive readout

  4. Light depolarization induced by metallic tips in apertureless near-field optical microscopy and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gucciardi, P G [CNR-Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, sezione Messina, Salita Sperone, Contrada Papardo, I-98158 Faro Superiore, Messina (Italy); Lopes, M; Deturche, R; Julien, C; Barchiesi, D; Chapelle, M Lamy de la [Institut Charles Delaunay-CNRS FRE 2848, Laboratoire de Nanotechnologie et d' Instrumentation Optique, Universite de Technologie de Troyes, 12 rue Marie Curie, BP2060, 10010 Troyes (France)

    2008-05-28

    We have investigated the depolarization effects of light scattered by sharp tips used for apertureless near-field optical microscopy. Dielectric and metal coated tips have been investigated and depolarization factors between 5 and 30% have been measured, changing as a function of the incident light polarization and of the tip shape. The experimental results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations performed by the finite element method, giving a near-field depolarization factor close to 10%. The effect of depolarization has been investigated in polarized tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) experiments; the depolarization gives rise to forbidden Raman modes in Si crystals.

  5. Two dimensional crystals of LH2 light-harvesting complexes from Ectothiorhodospira sp. and Rhodobacter capsulatus investigated by electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oling, Frank; Boekema, EJ; deZarate, IO; Visschers, R; vanGrondelle, R; Keegstra, W; Brisson, A; Picorel, R

    1996-01-01

    Two-dimensional crystals of LH2 (B800-850) light-harvesting complexes from Ectothiorhodospira sp, and Rhodobacter capsulatus were obtained by reconstitution of purified protein into phospholipid vesicles and characterized by electron microscopy. The size of the crystals was up to several

  6. Two-dimensional crystals of LH2 light-harvesting complexes from Ectothiorhodospira sp. and Rhodobacter capsulatus investigated by electron microscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oling, F.; Boekema, E.J.; Ortiz de Zarate, I.; Visschers, R.W.; van Grondelle, R.; Keegstra, W.; Brisson, A.; Picorel, R.

    1996-01-01

    Two-dimensional crystals of LH2 (B800-850) light-harvesting complexes from Ectothiorhodospira sp. and Rhodobacter capsulatus were obtained by reconstitution of purified protein into phospholipid vesicles and characterized by electron microscopy. The size of the crystals was up to several

  7. Grinding and polishing instead of sectioning for the tissue samples with a graft: Implications for light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhamadiyarov, Rinat A; Sevostyanova, Victoria V; Shishkova, Daria K; Nokhrin, Andrey V; Sidorova, Olga D; Kutikhin, Anton G

    2016-06-01

    A broad use of the graft replacement requires a detailed investigation of the host-graft interaction, including both histological examination and electron microscopy. A high quality sectioning of the host tissue with a graft seems to be complicated; in addition, it is difficult to examine the same tissue area by both of the mentioned microscopy techniques. To solve these problems, we developed a new technique of epoxy resin embedding with the further grinding, polishing, and staining. Graft-containing tissues prepared by grinding and polishing preserved their structure; however, sectioning frequently required the explantation of the graft and led to tissue disintegration. Moreover, stained samples prepared by grinding and polishing may then be assessed by both light microscopy and backscattered scanning electron microscopy. Therefore, grinding and polishing outperform sectioning when applied to the tissues with a graft. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantitative analysis with advanced compensated polarized light microscopy on wavelength dependence of linear birefringence of single crystals causing arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takanabe, Akifumi; Tanaka, Masahito; Taniguchi, Atsuo; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Asahi, Toru

    2014-07-01

    To improve our ability to identify single crystals causing arthritis, we have developed a practical measurement system of polarized light microscopy called advanced compensated polarized light microscopy (A-CPLM). The A-CPLM system is constructed by employing a conventional phase retardation plate, an optical fibre and a charge-coupled device spectrometer in a polarized light microscope. We applied the A-CPLM system to measure linear birefringence (LB) in the visible region, which is an optical anisotropic property, for tiny single crystals causing arthritis, i.e. monosodium urate monohydrate (MSUM) and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD). The A-CPLM system performance was evaluated by comparing the obtained experimental data using the A-CPLM system with (i) literature data for a standard sample, MgF2, and (ii) experimental data obtained using an established optical method, high-accuracy universal polarimeter, for the MSUM. The A-CPLM system was found to be applicable for measuring the LB spectra of the single crystals of MSUM and CPPD, which cause arthritis, in the visible regions. We quantitatively reveal the large difference in LB between MSUM and CPPD crystals. These results demonstrate the usefulness of the A-CPLM system for distinguishing the crystals causing arthritis.

  9. Applications of microscopy in Salmonella research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malt, Layla M; Perrett, Charlotte A; Humphrey, Suzanne; Jepson, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a Gram-negative enteropathogen that can cause localized infections, typically resulting in gastroenteritis, or systemic infection, e.g., typhoid fever, in humans and many other animals. Understanding the mechanisms by which Salmonella induces disease has been the focus of intensive research. This has revealed that Salmonella invasion requires dynamic cross-talk between the microbe and host cells, in which bacterial adherence rapidly leads to a complex sequence of cellular responses initiated by proteins translocated into the host cell by a type 3 secretion system. Once these Salmonella-induced responses have resulted in bacterial invasion, proteins translocated by a second type 3 secretion system initiate further modulation of cellular activities to enable survival and replication of the invading pathogen. Elucidation of the complex and highly dynamic pathogen-host interactions ultimately requires analysis at the level of single cells and single infection events. To achieve this goal, researchers have applied a diverse range of microscopy techniques to analyze Salmonella infection in models ranging from whole animal to isolated cells and simple eukaryotic organisms. For example, electron microscopy and high-resolution light microscopy techniques such as confocal microscopy can reveal the precise location of Salmonella and its relationship to cellular components. Widefield light microscopy is a simpler approach with which to study the interaction of bacteria with host cells and often has advantages for live cell imaging, enabling detailed analysis of the dynamics of infection and cellular responses. Here we review the use of imaging techniques in Salmonella research and compare the capabilities of different classes of microscope to address specific types of research question. We also provide protocols and notes on some microscopy techniques used routinely in our own research.

  10. Application of micro-PIXE, MRI and light microscopy for research in wood science and dendroecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merela, M.; Pelicon, P.; Vavpetic, P.; Regvar, M.; Vogel-Mikus, K.; Sersa, I.; Policnik, H.; Pokorny, B.; Levanic, T.; Oven, P.

    2009-01-01

    Beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) branches were topped and after five months the wound response was analyzed by PIXE, 3D-MRI and light microscopy. From freshly cut and deeply frozen sample 30 μm thick longitudinal-radial tissue sections were prepared for anatomical investigations and micro-PIXE analysis. Light microscopy revealed the structural response to wounding, i.e. occurrence of the reaction zone between the exposed and dehydrated dead tissue and healthy sound wood. The reaction zone was characterized by tylosis in vessels and accumulation of colored deposits in parenchyma cells, fibres and vessels. 3D MRI of a parallel sample showed that the moisture content in the reaction zone was three times higher than in normal healthy wood. Micro-PIXE mapping at margins of compromised wood in beech revealed an increased concentration of potassium in the reaction zone. The increase in the calcium concentration was associated with the dehydrated tissue adjacent to reaction zones. In addition, micro-PIXE was used to determine the elemental distribution in annual tree rings. This may be relevant for retrospective assessment of environmental pollution in wood by measuring yearly increments as a biomonitoring tool. The analysis of European larch (Larix decidua Mill.) wood revealed a high similarity between optical characteristics (i.e. late versus earlywood) and elemental (e.g. Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Zn) distribution.

  11. Active Appearance Segmentation for Intensity Inhomogeneity in Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bo; Lyksborg, Mark; Hecksher-Sørensen, J.

    2016-01-01

    inhomogeneities which are often seen in Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy (LSFM) images. This robustness is achieved by modelling the appearance of an image as a regularized Normalized Gradient Field (rNGF). We perform two experiments to challenge the model. First it is tested using a repeated leave......Active Appearance Models (AAM) are used for annotating or segmenting shapes in biomedical images. Performance relies heavily on the image data used to train the AAM. In this paper we improve the generalization properties of the model by making it robust to slowly varying spatial intensity......-one-out approach on images with minimal imperfections where the left out images are corrupted by a simulated bias field and segmented using the AAM. Secondly we test the model on LSFM images with common acquisition problems. In both experiments the proposed approach outperforms the often used AAM implementation...

  12. X-ray microscopy in Aarhus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uggerhoej, Erik; Abraham-Peskir, Joanna V.

    2000-01-01

    The Aarhus imaging soft X-ray microscope is now a busy multi-user facility. The optical set-up will be described and project highlights discussed. a) Metal-induced structural changes in whole cells in solution. The effects of aluminum, copper, nickel and zinc on protozoa investigated by using a combination of light microscopy, confocal scanning laser microscopy and X-ray microscopy. b) Botanical studies by X-ray microscopy used to compliment electron microscopy studies. c) Sludge morphology and iron precipitation in Danish freshwater plants by combining X-ray, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy

  13. Automated Diatom Analysis Applied to Traditional Light Microscopy: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Z. H. L.; Bishop, I.; Spaulding, S. A.; Nelson, H.; Mahoney, C.

    2017-12-01

    Diatom identification and enumeration by high resolution light microscopy is required for many areas of research and water quality assessment. Such analyses, however, are both expertise and labor-intensive. These challenges motivate the need for an automated process to efficiently and accurately identify and enumerate diatoms. Improvements in particle analysis software have increased the likelihood that diatom enumeration can be automated. VisualSpreadsheet software provides a possible solution for automated particle analysis of high-resolution light microscope diatom images. We applied the software, independent of its complementary FlowCam hardware, to automated analysis of light microscope images containing diatoms. Through numerous trials, we arrived at threshold settings to correctly segment 67% of the total possible diatom valves and fragments from broad fields of view. (183 light microscope images were examined containing 255 diatom particles. Of the 255 diatom particles present, 216 diatoms valves and fragments of valves were processed, with 170 properly analyzed and focused upon by the software). Manual analysis of the images yielded 255 particles in 400 seconds, whereas the software yielded a total of 216 particles in 68 seconds, thus highlighting that the software has an approximate five-fold efficiency advantage in particle analysis time. As in past efforts, incomplete or incorrect recognition was found for images with multiple valves in contact or valves with little contrast. The software has potential to be an effective tool in assisting taxonomists with diatom enumeration by completing a large portion of analyses. Benefits and limitations of the approach are presented to allow for development of future work in image analysis and automated enumeration of traditional light microscope images containing diatoms.

  14. A New Method for Automated Identification and Morphometry of Myelinated Fibers Through Light Microscopy Image Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Novas, Romulo Bourget; Fazan, Valeria Paula Sassoli; Felipe, Joaquim Cezar

    2015-01-01

    Nerve morphometry is known to produce relevant information for the evaluation of several phenomena, such as nerve repair, regeneration, implant, transplant, aging, and different human neuropathies. Manual morphometry is laborious, tedious, time consuming, and subject to many sources of error. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a new method for the automated morphometry of myelinated fibers in cross-section light microscopy images. Images from the recurrent laryngeal nerve of adult rats and ...

  15. Topography and refractometry of sperm cells using spatial light interference microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lina; Kandel, Mikhail E; Rubessa, Marcello; Schreiber, Sierra; Wheeler, Mathew B; Popescu, Gabriel

    2018-02-01

    Characterization of spermatozoon viability is a common test in treating infertility. Recently, it has been shown that label-free, phase-sensitive imaging can provide a valuable alternative for this type of assay. We employ spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) to perform high-accuracy single-cell phase imaging and decouple the average thickness and refractive index information for the population. This procedure was enabled by quantitative-phase imaging cells on media of two different refractive indices and using a numerical tool to remove the curvature from the cell tails. This way, we achieved ensemble averaging of topography and refractometry of 100 cells in each of the two groups. The results show that the thickness profile of the cell tail goes down to 150 nm and the refractive index can reach values of 1.6 close to the head. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  16. Visual Understanding of Light Absorption and Waveguiding in Standing Nanowires with 3D Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederiksen, Rune; Tutuncuoglu, Gozde; Matteini, Federico; Martinez, Karen L; Fontcuberta I Morral, Anna; Alarcon-Llado, Esther

    2017-09-20

    Semiconductor nanowires are promising building blocks for next-generation photonics. Indirect proofs of large absorption cross sections have been reported in nanostructures with subwavelength diameters, an effect that is even more prominent in vertically standing nanowires. In this work we provide a three-dimensional map of the light around vertical GaAs nanowires standing on a substrate by using fluorescence confocal microscopy, where the strong long-range disruption of the light path along the nanowire is illustrated. We find that the actual long-distance perturbation is much larger in size than calculated extinction cross sections. While the size of the perturbation remains similar, the intensity of the interaction changes dramatically over the visible spectrum. Numerical simulations allow us to distinguish the effects of scattering and absorption in the nanowire leading to these phenomena. This work provides a visual understanding of light absorption in semiconductor nanowire structures, which is of high interest for solar energy conversion applications.

  17. Dictionary of Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Julian

    2005-10-01

    The past decade has seen huge advances in the application of microscopy in all areas of science. This welcome development in microscopy has been paralleled by an expansion of the vocabulary of technical terms used in microscopy: terms have been coined for new instruments and techniques and, as microscopes reach even higher resolution, the use of terms that relate to the optical and physical principles underpinning microscopy is now commonplace. The Dictionary of Microscopy was compiled to meet this challenge and provides concise definitions of over 2,500 terms used in the fields of light microscopy, electron microscopy, scanning probe microscopy, x-ray microscopy and related techniques. Written by Dr Julian P. Heath, Editor of Microscopy and Analysis, the dictionary is intended to provide easy navigation through the microscopy terminology and to be a first point of reference for definitions of new and established terms. The Dictionary of Microscopy is an essential, accessible resource for: students who are new to the field and are learning about microscopes equipment purchasers who want an explanation of the terms used in manufacturers' literature scientists who are considering using a new microscopical technique experienced microscopists as an aide mémoire or quick source of reference librarians, the press and marketing personnel who require definitions for technical reports.

  18. Glycogen in the Nervous System. I; Methods for Light and Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estable, Rosita F. De; Estable-Puig, J. F.; Miquel, J.

    1964-01-01

    'l'he relative value of different methods for combined light and electron microscopical studies of glycogen in the nervous tissue was investigated. Picroalcoholic fixatives preserve glycogen in a considerable amount but give an inadequate morphological image of glycogen distribution and are unsuitable for ultrastructural studies. Fixation by perfusion, with Dalton's chromeosmic fluid seems adequate for ultrastructural cytochemistry of glycogen. Furthermore it permits routine paraffin embedding of brain slices adjacent to those used for electron microscopy. Dimedone blocking is a necessary step for a selective staining of glycogen with PAS after osmic fixation. Enzymatic removal of glycogen in osmic fixed nervous tissue can be done In paraffin-embedded tissue. It can also be performed in glycolmethacrylate-embedded tissue without removal of the embedding medium. Paraphenylenediamine stains glycogen following periodic acid oxidation.

  19. Super-Resolution Microscopy: Shedding Light on the Cellular Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Matthew B; Shelby, Sarah A; Veatch, Sarah L

    2017-06-14

    Lipids and the membranes they form are fundamental building blocks of cellular life, and their geometry and chemical properties distinguish membranes from other cellular environments. Collective processes occurring within membranes strongly impact cellular behavior and biochemistry, and understanding these processes presents unique challenges due to the often complex and myriad interactions between membrane components. Super-resolution microscopy offers a significant gain in resolution over traditional optical microscopy, enabling the localization of individual molecules even in densely labeled samples and in cellular and tissue environments. These microscopy techniques have been used to examine the organization and dynamics of plasma membrane components, providing insight into the fundamental interactions that determine membrane functions. Here, we broadly introduce the structure and organization of the mammalian plasma membrane and review recent applications of super-resolution microscopy to the study of membranes. We then highlight some inherent challenges faced when using super-resolution microscopy to study membranes, and we discuss recent technical advancements that promise further improvements to super-resolution microscopy and its application to the plasma membrane.

  20. Revealing t-tubules in striated muscle with new optical super-resolution microscopy techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isuru D. Jayasinghe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The t-tubular system plays a central role in the synchronisation of calcium signalling and excitation-contraction coupling in most striated muscle cells. Light microscopy has been used for imaging t-tubules for well over 100 years and together with electron microscopy (EM, has revealed the three-dimensional complexities of the t-system topology within cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle fibres from a range of species. The emerging super-resolution single molecule localisation microscopy (SMLM techniques are offering a near 10-fold improvement over the resolution of conventional fluorescence light microscopy methods, with the ability to spectrally resolve nanometre scale distributions of multiple molecular targets. In conjunction with the next generation of electron microscopy, SMLM has allowed the visualisation and quantification of intricate t-tubule morphologies within large areas of muscle cells at an unprecedented level of detail. In this paper, we review recent advancements in the t-tubule structural biology with the utility of various microscopy techniques. We outline the technical considerations in adapting SMLM to study t-tubules and its potential to further our understanding of the molecular processes that underlie the sub-micron scale structural alterations observed in a range of muscle pathologies.

  1. Light-Induced Alterations in Basil Ganglia Kynurenic Acid Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroufe, Angela E.; Whittaker, J. A.; Patrickson, J. W.; Orr, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    The metabolic synthesis, release and breakdown of several known CNS neurotransmitters have been shown to follow a circadian pattern entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle. The levels of excitatory amino acid (EAA) transmitters such as glutamate, have been shown to vary with environmental lighting conditions. Kynurenic Acid (KA), an endogenous tryptophan metabolite and glutamate receptor antagonist, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects against EAA-induced excitotoxic cell damage. Changes in KA's activity within the mammalian basal ganglia has been proposed as being contributory to neurotoxicity in Huntington's Disease. It is not known whether CNS KA levels follow a circadian pattern or exhibit light-induced fluctuations. However, because the symptoms of certain degenerative motor disorders seem to fluctuate with daily 24 hour rhythm, we initiated studies to determine if basal ganglia KA were influenced by the daily light/dark cycle and could influence motor function. Therefore in this study, HPLC-EC was utilized to determine if basal ganglia KA levels in tissue extracts from adult male Long-Evans rats (200-250g) entrained to 24 and 48 hours constant light and dark conditions, respectively. Samples were taken one hour before the onset of the subjective day and one hour prior to the onset of the subjective night in order to detect possible phase differences in KA levels and to allow for accumulation of factors expressed in association with the light or dark phase. Data analysis revealed that KA levels in the basal ganglia vary with environmental lighting conditions; being elevated generally during the dark. Circadian phase differences in KA levels were also evident during the subjective night and subjective day, respectively. Results from these studies are discussed with respect to potential cyclic changes in neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxic damage during the daily 24 hour cycle and its possible relevance to future therapeutic approaches in

  2. The Fate of Inhaled Nanoparticles: Detection and Measurement by Enhanced Dark-field Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Robert R; Scabilloni, James F; Wang, Liying; Battelli, Lori A; Antonini, James M; Roberts, Jenny R; Qian, Yong; Sisler, Jennifer D; Castranova, Vincent; Porter, Dale W; Hubbs, Ann F

    2018-01-01

    Assessing the potential health risks for newly developed nanoparticles poses a significant challenge. Nanometer-sized particles are not generally detectable with the light microscope. Electron microscopy typically requires high-level doses, above the physiologic range, for particle examination in tissues. Enhanced dark-field microscopy (EDM) is an adaption of the light microscope that images scattered light. Nanoparticles scatter light with high efficiency while normal tissues do not. EDM has the potential to identify the critical target sites for nanoparticle deposition and injury in the lungs and other organs. This study describes the methods for EDM imaging of nanoparticles and applications. Examples of EDM application include measurement of deposition and clearance patterns. Imaging of a wide variety of nanoparticles demonstrated frequent situations where nanoparticles detected by EDM were not visible by light microscopy. EDM examination of colloidal gold nanospheres (10-100 nm diameter) demonstrated a detection size limit of approximately 15 nm in tissue sections. EDM determined nanoparticle volume density was directly proportional to total lung burden of exposed animals. The results confirm that EDM can determine nanoparticle distribution, clearance, transport to lymph nodes, and accumulation in extrapulmonary organs. Thus, EDM substantially improves the qualitative and quantitative microscopic evaluation of inhaled nanoparticles.

  3. Shedding light on endocytosis with optimized super-resolution microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leyton Puig, D.M.

    2017-01-01

    Super-resolution microscopy is a relatively new microscopy technique that is still under optimization. In this thesis we focus on the improvement of the quality of super-resolution images, to apply them to the study of the processes of cell signaling and endocytosis. First, we show that the use of a

  4. Multi-modality photoacoustic tomography, ultrasound, and light sheet microscopy for volumetric tumor margin detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, Gurneet S.; Hu, Bihe; Bolus, Daniel; Wang, Mei; Skidmore, Shelby J.; Sholl, Andrew B.; Brown, J. Quincy; Goergen, Craig J.

    2018-02-01

    Current methods for breast tumor margin detection are invasive, time consuming, and typically result in a reoperative rate of over 25%. This marks a clear clinical need to develop improved tools to intraoperatively differentiate negative versus positive tumor margins. Here, we utilize photoacoustic tomography (PAT), ultrasound (US), and inverted Selective Plane Illumination Microscopy (iSPIM) to assess breast tumor margins in eight human breast biopsies. Our PAT/US system consists of a tunable Nd:YAG laser (NT 300, EKSPLA) coupled with a 40MHz central frequency US probe (Vevo2100, FUJIFILM Visual Sonics). This system allows for the delivery of 10Hz, 5ns pulses with fluence of 40mJ/cm2 to the tissue with PAT and US axial resolutions of 125μm and 40μm, respectively. For this study, we used a linear stepper motor to acquire volumetric PAT/US images of the breast biopsies using 1100nm light to identify bloodrich "tumor" regions and 1210nm light to identify lipid-rich "healthy" regions. iSPIM (Applied Scientific Instrumentation) is an advanced microscopy technique with lateral resolution of 1.5μm and axial resolution of 7μm. We used 488nm laser excitation and acridine orange as a general comprehensive histology stain. Our results show that PAT/US can be used to identify lipid-rich regions, dense areas of arterioles and arteries, and other internal structures such as ducts. iSPIM images correlate well with histopathology slides and can verify nuclear features, cell type and density, stromal features, and microcalcifications. Together, this multimodality approach has the potential to improve tumor margin detection with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity.

  5. Soft X-Ray Microscopy and Spectroscopy at the Molecular Environmental Science Beamline at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluhm, Hendrik; Andersson, Klas J.; Araki, Tohru; Benzerara, Karim; Brown, Gordon E.; Dynes, Jay J.; Ghosal, Sutapa; Gilles, Mary K.; Hansen, Hans C.; Hemminger, J. C.; Hitchcock, Adam P.; Ketteler, Guido; Kilcoyne, Arthur L.; Kneedler, Eric M.; Lawrence, John R.; Leppard, Gary G.; Majzlam, Juraj; Mun, B. S.; Myneni, Satish C.; Nilsson, Anders R.; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Ogletree, D. F.; Pecher, Klaus H.; Salmeron, Miquel B.; Shuh, David K.; Tonner, Brian; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Warwick, Tony; Yoon, T. H.

    2006-02-01

    We present examples of the application of synchrotron-based spectroscopies and microscopies to environmentally-relevant samples. The experiments were performed at the Molecular Environmental Science beamline (11.0.2) at the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Examples range from the study of water monolayers on Pt(111) single crystal surfaces using X-ray emission spectroscopy and the examination of alkali halide solution/water vapor interfaces using ambient pressure photoemission spectroscopy, to the investigation of actinides, river-water biofilms, Al-containing colloids and mineral-bacteria suspensions using scanning transmission X-ray spectromicroscopy. The results of our experiments show that spectroscopy and microscopy in the soft X-ray energy range are excellent tools for the investigation of environmentally relevant samples under realistic conditions, i.e. with water or water vapor present at ambient temperature.

  6. Comparative morphology of the snake spectacle using light and transmission electron microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da Silva, Mari-Ann O; Bertelsen, Mads F; Wang, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the interspecific variation in the morphology of the snake spectacle. ANIMALS STUDIED: About 43 snakes of 14 different species, belonging to three different families: Boidae, Colubridae, and Pythonidae. PROCEDURE: The spectacles were examined by light and transmission...... electron microscopy. The thickness of the stromal layer was measured and the location of the blood vessels was noted. The shape of the transition zone located at the rim of the spectacle and the presence of pigment herein were also recorded. RESULTS: The spectacles of all species examined consisted...... of three layers. The outer epithelium was made of basal cells with overlaying keratin layers, the stroma comprised layers of organized collagen fibrils, and the inner epithelium was a layer of squamous cells with microvilli. Blood vessels were found in the stroma of all spectacles: in boas and pythons...

  7. Platinum replica electron microscopy: Imaging the cytoskeleton globally and locally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitkina, Tatyana M

    2017-05-01

    Structural studies reveal how smaller components of a system work together as a whole. However, combining high resolution of details with full coverage of the whole is challenging. In cell biology, light microscopy can image many cells in their entirety, but at a lower resolution, whereas electron microscopy affords very high resolution, but usually at the expense of the sample size and coverage. Structural analyses of the cytoskeleton are especially demanding, because cytoskeletal networks are unresolvable by light microscopy due to their density and intricacy, whereas their proper preservation is a challenge for electron microscopy. Platinum replica electron microscopy can uniquely bridge the gap between the "comfort zones" of light and electron microscopy by allowing high resolution imaging of the cytoskeleton throughout the entire cell and in many cells in the population. This review describes the principles and applications of platinum replica electron microscopy for studies of the cytoskeleton. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Full optical model of micro-endoscope with optical coherence microscopy, multiphoton microscopy and visible capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, David; Kiekens, Kelli C.; Syson, Nikolas C.; Romano, Gabriella; Baker, Tressa; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2018-02-01

    While Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM), Multiphoton Microscopy (MPM), and narrowband imaging are powerful imaging techniques that can be used to detect cancer, each imaging technique has limitations when used by itself. Combining them into an endoscope to work in synergy can help achieve high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis at the point of care. Such complex endoscopes have an elevated risk of failure, and performing proper modelling ensures functionality and minimizes risk. We present full 2D and 3D models of a multimodality optical micro-endoscope to provide real-time detection of carcinomas, called a salpingoscope. The models evaluate the endoscope illumination and light collection capabilities of various modalities. The design features two optical paths with different numerical apertures (NA) through a single lens system with a scanning optical fiber. The dual path is achieved using dichroic coatings embedded in a triplet. A high NA optical path is designed to perform OCM and MPM while a low NA optical path is designed for the visible spectrum to navigate the endoscope to areas of interest and narrowband imaging. Different tests such as the reflectance profile of homogeneous epithelial tissue were performed to adjust the models properly. Light collection models for the different modalities were created and tested for efficiency. While it is challenging to evaluate the efficiency of multimodality endoscopes, the models ensure that the system is design for the expected light collection levels to provide detectable signal to work for the intended imaging.

  9. Teager-Kaiser Energy and Higher-Order Operators in White-Light Interference Microscopy for Surface Shape Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Ouahab Boudraa

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In white-light interference microscopy, measurement of surface shape generally requires peak extraction of the fringe function envelope. In this paper the Teager-Kaiser energy and higher-order energy operators are proposed for efficient extraction of the fringe envelope. These energy operators are compared in terms of precision, robustness to noise, and subsampling. Flexible energy operators, depending on order and lag parameters, can be obtained. Results show that smoothing and interpolation of envelope approximation using spline model performs better than Gaussian-based approach.

  10. High-throughput isotropic mapping of whole mouse brain using multi-view light-sheet microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jun; Li, Yusha; Zhao, Fang; Ping, Junyu; Liu, Sa; Yu, Tingting; Zhu, Dan; Fei, Peng

    2018-02-01

    Light-sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) uses an additional laser-sheet to illuminate selective planes of the sample, thereby enabling three-dimensional imaging at high spatial-temporal resolution. These advantages make LSFM a promising tool for high-quality brain visualization. However, even by the use of LSFM, the spatial resolution remains insufficient to resolve the neural structures across a mesoscale whole mouse brain in three dimensions. At the same time, the thick-tissue scattering prevents a clear observation from the deep of brain. Here we use multi-view LSFM strategy to solve this challenge, surpassing the resolution limit of standard light-sheet microscope under a large field-of-view (FOV). As demonstrated by the imaging of optically-cleared mouse brain labelled with thy1-GFP, we achieve a brain-wide, isotropic cellular resolution of 3μm. Besides the resolution enhancement, multi-view braining imaging can also recover complete signals from deep tissue scattering and attenuation. The identification of long distance neural projections across encephalic regions can be identified and annotated as a result.

  11. Application of super-resolution optical microscopy in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xiuhai; Du Jiancong; Huang Qing; Fan Chunhai; Deng Suhui

    2013-01-01

    Background: A noninvasive, real-time far-field optical microscopy is needed to study the dynamic function inside cells and proteins. However, the resolution limit of traditional optical microscope is about 200 nm due to the diffraction limit of light. So, it's hard to directly observe the subcellular structures. Over the past several years of microscopy development, the diffraction limit of fluorescence microscopy has been overcome and its resolution limit is about tens of nanometers. Methods: To overcome the diffraction limit of light, many super-resolution fluoresce microscopes, including stimulated emission of depletion microscopy (STED), photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), have been developed. Conclusions: These methods have been applied in cell biology, microbiology and neurobiology, and the technology of super-resolution provides a new insight into the life science. (authors)

  12. Super-resolved linear fluorescence localization microscopy using photostable fluorophores: A virtual microscopy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, Udo; Szczurek, Aleksander; Cremer, Christoph

    2017-12-01

    Current approaches to overcome the conventional limit of the resolution potential of light microscopy (of about 200 nm for visible light), often suffer from non-linear effects, which render the quantification of the image intensities in the reconstructions difficult, and also affect the quantification of the biological structure under investigation. As an attempt to face these difficulties, we discuss a particular method of localization microscopy which is based on photostable fluorescent dyes. The proposed method can potentially be implemented as a fast alternative for quantitative localization microscopy, circumventing the need for the acquisition of thousands of image frames and complex, highly dye-specific imaging buffers. Although the need for calibration remains in order to extract quantitative data (such as the number of emitters), multispectral approaches are largely facilitated due to the much less stringent requirements on imaging buffers. Furthermore, multispectral acquisitions can be readily obtained using commercial instrumentation such as e.g. the conventional confocal laser scanning microscope.

  13. Separation of ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons in confocal Light-Sheet Microscopy of Arabidopsis roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinert, Tobias; Tietz, Olaf; Palme, Klaus J.; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Image quality in light-sheet fluorescence microscopy is strongly affected by the shape of the illuminating laser beam inside embryos, plants or tissue. While the phase of Gaussian or Bessel beams propagating through thousands of cells can be partly controlled holographically, the propagation of fluorescence light to the detector is difficult to control. With each scatter process a fluorescence photon loses information necessary for the image generation. Using Arabidopsis root tips we demonstrate that ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons can be separated by analyzing the image spectra in each plane without a priori knowledge. We introduce a theoretical model allowing to extract typical scattering parameters of the biological material. This allows to attenuate image contributions from diffusive photons and to amplify the relevant image contributions from ballistic photons through a depth dependent deconvolution. In consequence, image contrast and resolution are significantly increased and scattering artefacts are minimized especially for Bessel beams with confocal line detection. PMID:27553506

  14. Separation of ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons in confocal Light-Sheet Microscopy of Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinert, Tobias; Tietz, Olaf; Palme, Klaus J; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2016-08-24

    Image quality in light-sheet fluorescence microscopy is strongly affected by the shape of the illuminating laser beam inside embryos, plants or tissue. While the phase of Gaussian or Bessel beams propagating through thousands of cells can be partly controlled holographically, the propagation of fluorescence light to the detector is difficult to control. With each scatter process a fluorescence photon loses information necessary for the image generation. Using Arabidopsis root tips we demonstrate that ballistic and diffusive fluorescence photons can be separated by analyzing the image spectra in each plane without a priori knowledge. We introduce a theoretical model allowing to extract typical scattering parameters of the biological material. This allows to attenuate image contributions from diffusive photons and to amplify the relevant image contributions from ballistic photons through a depth dependent deconvolution. In consequence, image contrast and resolution are significantly increased and scattering artefacts are minimized especially for Bessel beams with confocal line detection.

  15. Electronic Blending in Virtual Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybury, Terrence S.; Farah, Camile S.

    2010-01-01

    Virtual microscopy (VM) is a relatively new technology that transforms the computer into a microscope. In essence, VM allows for the scanning and transfer of glass slides from light microscopy technology to the digital environment of the computer. This transition is also a function of the change from print knowledge to electronic knowledge, or as…

  16. Correlative Light and Electron Microscopy (CLEM) and its applications in infectious disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-20

    has been shown to handle OsO4 fixation by withstanding standard EM processing concentrations of 1% [29]. A great utility of FPs is the endogenous...Development of imaging techniques to study the pathogenesis of biosafety level 2/3 infectious agents. Pathog Dis, 2014. 72(3): p. 167-73. 3. Sridhar...3): p. 397-406. 32. Johnson, E., et al., Correlative in-resin super-resolution and electron microscopy using standard fluorescent proteins. Sci Rep

  17. Light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) reduces phototoxic effects and provides new means for the modern life sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampaloni, Francesco; Ansari, Nari; Girard, Philippe; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.

    2011-07-01

    Most optical technologies are applied to flat, basically two-dimensional cellular systems. However, physiological meaningful information relies on the morphology, the mechanical properties and the biochemistry of a cell's context. A cell requires the complex three-dimensional relationship to other cells. However, the observation of multi-cellular biological specimens remains a challenge. Specimens scatter and absorb light, thus, the delivery of the probing light and the collection of the signal light become inefficient; many endogenous biochemical compounds also absorb light and suffer degradation of some sort (photo-toxicity), which induces malfunction of a specimen. In conventional and confocal fluorescence microscopy, whenever a single plane, the entire specimen is illuminated. Recording stacks of images along the optical Z-axis thus illuminates the entire specimen once for each plane. Hence, cells are illuminated 10-20 and fish 100-300 times more often than they are observed. This can be avoided by changing the optical arrangement. The basic idea is to use light sheets, which are fed into the specimen from the side and overlap with the focal plane of a wide-field fluorescence microscope. In contrast to an epi-fluorescence arrangement, such an azimuthal fluorescence arrangement uses two independently operated lenses for illumination and detection. Optical sectioning and no photo-toxic damage or photo-bleaching outside a small volume close to the focal plane are intrinsic properties. Light sheet-based fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) takes advantage of modern camera technologies. LSFM can be operated with laser cutters and for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. During the last few years, LSFM was used to record zebrafish development from the early 32-cell stage until late neurulation with sub-cellular resolution and short sampling periods (60-90 sec/stack). The recording speed was five 4-Megapixel large frames/sec with a dynamic range of 12-14 bit. We followed

  18. Phase contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging of light and heavy atoms at the limit of contrast and resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yücelen, Emrah; Lazić, Ivan; Bosch, Eric G T

    2018-02-08

    Using state of the art scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) it is nowadays possible to directly image single atomic columns at sub-Å resolution. In standard (high angle) annular dark field STEM ((HA)ADF-STEM), however, light elements are usually invisible when imaged together with heavier elements in one image. Here we demonstrate the capability of the recently introduced Integrated Differential Phase Contrast STEM (iDPC-STEM) technique to image both light and heavy atoms in a thin sample at sub-Å resolution. We use the technique to resolve both the Gallium and Nitrogen dumbbells in a GaN crystal in [[Formula: see text

  19. Scanning Capacitance Microscopy | Materials Science | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    obtained using scanning capacitance microscopy. Top Right: Image of p-type and n-type material, obtained 'fingers' of light-colored n-type material on a yellow and blue background representing p-type material material, obtained using scanning capacitance microscopy, in a sample semiconductor device; the image shows

  20. Correlative and integrated light and electron microscopy of in-resin GFP fluorescence, used to localise diacylglycerol in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peddie, Christopher J.; Blight, Ken; Wilson, Emma [Electron Microscopy Unit, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Melia, Charlotte [Electron Microscopy Unit, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Cell Biophysics Laboratory, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Leiden University Medical Centre, 2300 RC Leiden (Netherlands); Marrison, Jo [Department of Biology, The University of York, Heslington, York (United Kingdom); Carzaniga, Raffaella [Electron Microscopy Unit, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Domart, Marie-Charlotte [Electron Microscopy Unit, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Cell Biophysics Laboratory, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); O' Toole, Peter [Department of Biology, The University of York, Heslington, York (United Kingdom); Larijani, Banafshe [Cell Biophysics Laboratory, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom); Cell Biophysics Laboratory, Unidad de Biofísica (CSIC-UPV/EHU),Sarriena s/n, 48940 Leioa (Spain); IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao (Spain); Collinson, Lucy M. [Electron Microscopy Unit, London Research Institute, Cancer Research UK, London WC2A 3LY (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of GFP-tagged proteins is a fundamental tool in cell biology, but without seeing the structure of the surrounding cellular space, functional information can be lost. Here we present a protocol that preserves GFP and mCherry fluorescence in mammalian cells embedded in resin with electron contrast to reveal cellular ultrastructure. Ultrathin in-resin fluorescence (IRF) sections were imaged simultaneously for fluorescence and electron signals in an integrated light and scanning electron microscope. We show, for the first time, that GFP is stable and active in resin sections in vacuo. We applied our protocol to study the subcellular localisation of diacylglycerol (DAG), a modulator of membrane morphology and membrane dynamics in nuclear envelope assembly. We show that DAG is localised to the nuclear envelope, nucleoplasmic reticulum and curved tips of the Golgi apparatus. With these developments, we demonstrate that integrated imaging is maturing into a powerful tool for accurate molecular localisation to structure. - Highlights: • GFP and mCherry fluorescence are preserved in heavy-metal stained mammalian cells embedded in resin • Fluorophores are stable and intensity is sufficient for detection in ultrathin sections • Overlay of separate LM and EM images from the same ultrathin section improves CLEM protein localisation precision • GFP is stable and active in the vacuum of an integrated light and scanning EM • Integrated light and electron microscopy shows new subcellular locations of the lipid diacylglycerol.

  1. Masked rhodamine dyes of five principal colors revealed by photolysis of a 2-diazo-1-indanone caging group: synthesis, photophysics, and light microscopy applications.

    OpenAIRE

    Belov, V.; Mitronova, G.; Bossi, M.; Boyarski, V.; Hebisch, E.; Geisler, C.; Kolmakov, K.; Wurm, C.; Willig, K.; Hell, S.

    2014-01-01

    Caged rhodamine dyes (Rhodamines NN) of five basic colors were synthesized and used as “hidden” markers in subdiffractional and conventional light microscopy. These masked fluorophores with a 2-diazo-1-indanone group can be irreversibly photoactivated, either by irradiation with UV- or violet light (one-photon process), or by exposure to intense red light (λ∼750 nm; two-photon mode). All dyes possess a very small 2-diazoketone caging group incorporated into the 2-diazo-1-indanone residue with...

  2. Comprehensive optical and data management infrastructure for high-throughput light-sheet microscopy of whole mouse brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllenbroich, M Caroline; Silvestri, Ludovico; Onofri, Leonardo; Costantini, Irene; Hoff, Marcel Van't; Sacconi, Leonardo; Iannello, Giulio; Pavone, Francesco S

    2015-10-01

    Comprehensive mapping and quantification of neuronal projections in the central nervous system requires high-throughput imaging of large volumes with microscopic resolution. To this end, we have developed a confocal light-sheet microscope that has been optimized for three-dimensional (3-D) imaging of structurally intact clarified whole-mount mouse brains. We describe the optical and electromechanical arrangement of the microscope and give details on the organization of the microscope management software. The software orchestrates all components of the microscope, coordinates critical timing and synchronization, and has been written in a versatile and modular structure using the LabVIEW language. It can easily be adapted and integrated to other microscope systems and has been made freely available to the light-sheet community. The tremendous amount of data routinely generated by light-sheet microscopy further requires novel strategies for data handling and storage. To complete the full imaging pipeline of our high-throughput microscope, we further elaborate on big data management from streaming of raw images up to stitching of 3-D datasets. The mesoscale neuroanatomy imaged at micron-scale resolution in those datasets allows characterization and quantification of neuronal projections in unsectioned mouse brains.

  3. Correlating Intravital Multi-Photon Microscopy to 3D Electron Microscopy of Invading Tumor Cells Using Anatomical Reference Points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karreman, Matthia A.; Mercier, Luc; Schieber, Nicole L.; Shibue, Tsukasa; Schwab, Yannick; Goetz, Jacky G.

    2014-01-01

    Correlative microscopy combines the advantages of both light and electron microscopy to enable imaging of rare and transient events at high resolution. Performing correlative microscopy in complex and bulky samples such as an entire living organism is a time-consuming and error-prone task. Here, we investigate correlative methods that rely on the use of artificial and endogenous structural features of the sample as reference points for correlating intravital fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. To investigate tumor cell behavior in vivo with ultrastructural accuracy, a reliable approach is needed to retrieve single tumor cells imaged deep within the tissue. For this purpose, fluorescently labeled tumor cells were subcutaneously injected into a mouse ear and imaged using two-photon-excitation microscopy. Using near-infrared branding, the position of the imaged area within the sample was labeled at the skin level, allowing for its precise recollection. Following sample preparation for electron microscopy, concerted usage of the artificial branding and anatomical landmarks enables targeting and approaching the cells of interest while serial sectioning through the specimen. We describe here three procedures showing how three-dimensional (3D) mapping of structural features in the tissue can be exploited to accurately correlate between the two imaging modalities, without having to rely on the use of artificially introduced markers of the region of interest. The methods employed here facilitate the link between intravital and nanoscale imaging of invasive tumor cells, enabling correlating function to structure in the study of tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:25479106

  4. A Comparative Study of Sample Preparation for Staining and Immunodetection of Plant Cell Walls by Light Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhertbruggen, Yves; Walker, Jesse L.; Guillon, Fabienne; Scheller, Henrik V.

    2017-01-01

    Staining and immunodetection by light microscopy are methods widely used to investigate plant cell walls. The two techniques have been crucial to study the cell wall architecture in planta, its deconstruction by chemicals or cell wall-degrading enzymes. They have been instrumental in detecting the presence of cell types, in deciphering plant cell wall evolution and in characterizing plant mutants and transformants. The success of immunolabeling relies on how plant materials are embedded and sectioned. Agarose coating, wax and resin embedding are, respectively, associated with vibratome, microtome and ultramicrotome sectioning. Here, we have systematically carried out a comparative analysis of these three methods of sample preparation when they are applied for cell wall staining and cell wall immunomicroscopy. In order to help the plant community in understanding and selecting adequate methods of embedding and sectioning for cell wall immunodetection, we review in this article the advantages and limitations of these three methods. Moreover, we offer detailed protocols of embedding for studying plant materials through microscopy. PMID:28900439

  5. Nanocrystals of [Cu3(btc)2] (HKUST-1): a combined time-resolved light scattering and scanning electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacher, Denise; Liu, Jianing; Huber, Klaus; Fischer, Roland A

    2009-03-07

    The formation of [Cu(3)(btc)(2)] (HKUST-1; btc = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate) nanocrystals from a super-saturated mother solution at room temperature was monitored by time-resolved light scattering (TLS); the system is characterized by a rapid growth up to a size limit of 200 nm within a few minutes, and the size and shape of the crystallites were also determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  6. Confocal Raman Microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Dieing, Thomas; Toporski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Confocal Raman Microscopy is a relatively new technique that allows chemical imaging without specific sample preparation. By integrating a sensitive Raman spectrometer within a state-of-the-art microscope, Raman microscopy with a spatial resolution down to 200nm laterally and 500nm vertically can be achieved using visible light excitation. Recent developments in detector and computer technology as well as optimized instrument design have reduced integration times of Raman spectra by orders of magnitude, so that complete images consisting of tens of thousands of Raman spectra can be acquired in seconds or minutes rather than hours, which used to be standard just one decade ago. The purpose of this book is to provide the reader a comprehensive overview of the rapidly developing field of Confocal Raman Microscopy and its applications.

  7. Wound healing stimulation in mice by low-level light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidova, Tatiana N.; Herman, Ira M.; Salomatina, Elena V.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2006-02-01

    It has been known for many years that low levels of laser or non-coherent light (LLLT) accelerate some phases of wound healing. LLLT can stimulate fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation and migration. It is thought to work via light absorption by mitochondrial chromophores leading to an increase in ATP, reactive oxygen species and consequent gene transcription. However, despite many reports about the positive effects of LLLT on wound healing, its use remains controversial. Our laboratory has developed a model of a full thickness excisional wound in mice that allows quantitative and reproducible light dose healing response curves to be generated. We have found a biphasic dose response curve with a maximum positive effect at 2 J/cm2 of 635-nm light and successively lower beneficial effects from 3-25 J/cm2, the effect is diminished at doses below 2J/cm2 and gradually reaches control healing levels. At light doses above 25 J/cm2 healing is actually worse than controls. The two most effective wavelengths of light were found to be 635 and 820-nm. We found no difference between filtered 635+/-15-nm light from a lamp and 633-nm light from a HeNe laser. The strain and age of the mouse affected the magnitude of the effect. Light treated wounds start to contract after illumination while control wounds initially expand for the first 24 hours. Our hypothesis is that a single brief light exposure soon after wounding affects fibroblast cells in the margins of the wound. Cells may be induced to proliferate, migrate and assume a myofibroblast phenotype. Our future work will be focused on understanding the mechanisms underlying effects of light on wound healing processes.

  8. Color and illuminance level of lighting can modulate willingness to eat bell peppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenbeck, Aimee; Cho, Sungeun; Meullenet, Jean-François; Tokar, Tonya; Yang, Famous; Huddleston, Elizabeth A; Seo, Han-Seok

    2014-08-01

    Food products are often encountered under colored lighting, particularly in restaurants and retail stores. However, relatively little attention has been paid to whether the color of ambient lighting can affect consumers' motivation for consumption. This study aimed to determine whether color (Experiment 1) and illuminance level (Experiment 2) of lighting can influence consumers' liking of appearance and their willingness to eat bell peppers. For red, green, and yellow bell peppers, yellow and blue lighting conditions consistently increased participants' liking of appearance the most and the least, respectively. Participants' willingness to consume bell peppers increased the most under yellow lighting and the least under blue lighting. In addition, a dark condition (i.e. low level of lighting illuminance) decreased liking of appearance and willingness to eat the bell peppers compared to a bright condition (i.e. high level of lighting illuminance). Our findings demonstrate that lighting color and illuminance level can influence consumers' hedonic impression and likelihood to consume bell peppers. Furthermore, the influences of color and illuminance level of lighting appear to be dependent on the surface color of bell peppers. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. An optical investigation of dentinal discoloration due to commonly endodontic sealers, using the transmitted light polarizing microscopy and spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suciu, Ioana; Ionescu, Ecaterina; Dimitriu, Bogdan Alexandru; Bartok, Ruxandra Ioana; Moldoveanu, Georgiana Florentina; Gheorghiu, Irina Maria; Suciu, Ileana; Ciocîrdel, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the degree of tooth crown staining by commonly used endodontic sealers. Crown discolorations by tooth canal sealers [AH Plus (Dentsply DeTrey Gmbh, Konstanz, Germany); Endofill (Produits Dentaires SA, Vevey, Switzerland); Apexit (Dentsply DeTrey Gmbh, Konstanz, Germany); and MTA Fillapex (Angelus, Londrina, Brazil)] were tested on extracted human premolars. The samples were divided into five groups of five samples each, after root canal sealing. Five teeth were used as control groups. The spectrophotometric method was performed in order to quantify in terms of color change of the coronal part (it was also recorded a track on how the color changes over time). For the microscopic study of the extracted dental specimens subjected to this study, polarized transmitted light microscopy was used. This method involves the development of special microscopic preparations, called "thin sections". In our case, the thin section was performed on 20 prepared and obturated recently extracted teeth. The degree of discoloration was determined after one week and three months using spectrophotometry and polarized light microscopy. All sealers usually cause some degree of discoloration on the cervical aspect of the crowns that increases in time. AH Plus and Endofill caused the greatest discoloration, followed by Apexit and MTA Fillapex.

  10. Super-resolution optical microscopy for studying membrane structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Erdinc

    2017-07-12

    Investigation of cell membrane structure and dynamics requires high spatial and temporal resolution. The spatial resolution of conventional light microscopy is limited due to the diffraction of light. However, recent developments in microscopy enabled us to access the nano-scale regime spatially, thus to elucidate the nanoscopic structures in the cellular membranes. In this review, we will explain the resolution limit, address the working principles of the most commonly used super-resolution microscopy techniques and summarise their recent applications in the biomembrane field.

  11. Virtual Microscopy in Histopathology Training: Changing Student Attitudes in 3 Successive Academic Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Christof A; Firsching, Theresa; Klopfleisch, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Several veterinary faculties have integrated virtual microscopy into their curricula in recent years to improve and refine their teaching techniques. The many advantages of this recent technology are described in the literature, including remote access and an equal and constant slide quality for all students. However, no study has analyzed the change of perception toward virtual microscopy at different time points of students' academic educations. In the present study, veterinary students in 3 academic years were asked for their perspectives and attitudes toward virtual microscopy and conventional light microscopy. Third-, fourth-, and fifth-year veterinary students filled out a questionnaire with 12 questions. The answers revealed that virtual microscopy was overall well accepted by students of all academic years. Most students even suggested that virtual microscopy be implemented more extensively as the modality for final histopathology examinations. Nevertheless, training in the use of light microscopy and associated skills was surprisingly well appreciated. Regardless of their academic year, most students considered these skills important and necessary, and they felt that light microscopy should not be completely replaced. The reasons for this view differed depending on academic year, as the perceived main disadvantage of virtual microscopy varied. Third-year students feared that they would not acquire sufficient light microscopy skills. Fifth-year students considered technical difficulties (i.e., insufficient transmission speed) to be the main disadvantage of this newer teaching modality.

  12. Ultra-compact silicon nitride grating coupler for microscopy systems

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Yunpeng; Wang, Jie; Xie, Weiqiang; Tian, Bin; Li, Yanlu; Brainis, Edouard; Jiao, Yuqing; Van Thourhout, Dries

    2017-01-01

    Grating couplers have been widely used for coupling light between photonic chips and optical fibers. For various quantum-optics and bio-optics experiments, on the other hand, there is a need to achieve good light coupling between photonic chips and microscopy systems. Here, we propose an ultra-compact silicon nitride (SiN) grating coupler optimized for coupling light from a waveguide to a microscopy system. The grating coupler is about 4 by 2 mu m(2) in size and a 116 nm 1 dB bandwidth can be...

  13. Simultaneous differential spinning disk fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miranda, Adelaide; De Beule, Pieter A. A.; Martins, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Combined microscopy techniques offer the life science research community a powerful tool to investigate complex biological systems and their interactions. Here, we present a new combined microscopy platform based on fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy through aperture correlation microscopy with a Differential Spinning Disk (DSD) and nanomechanical mapping with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The illumination scheme of the DSD microscope unit, contrary to standard single or multi-point confocal microscopes, provides a time-independent illumination of the AFM cantilever. This enables a distortion-free simultaneous operation of fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and atomic force microscopy with standard probes. In this context, we discuss sample heating due to AFM cantilever illumination with fluorescence excitation light. Integration of a DSD fluorescence optical sectioning unit with an AFM platform requires mitigation of mechanical noise transfer of the spinning disk. We identify and present two solutions to almost annul this noise in the AFM measurement process. The new combined microscopy platform is applied to the characterization of a DOPC/DOPS (4:1) lipid structures labelled with a lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye deposited on a mica substrate

  14. Simultaneous differential spinning disk fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and nanomechanical mapping atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Adelaide; De Beule, Pieter A. A., E-mail: pieter.de-beule@inl.int [Applied Nano-Optics Laboratory, International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Avenida Mestre José Veiga, s/n, 4715-330 Braga (Portugal); Martins, Marco [Nano-ICs Group, International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory, Avenida Mestre José Veiga, s/n, 4715-330 Braga (Portugal)

    2015-09-15

    Combined microscopy techniques offer the life science research community a powerful tool to investigate complex biological systems and their interactions. Here, we present a new combined microscopy platform based on fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy through aperture correlation microscopy with a Differential Spinning Disk (DSD) and nanomechanical mapping with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). The illumination scheme of the DSD microscope unit, contrary to standard single or multi-point confocal microscopes, provides a time-independent illumination of the AFM cantilever. This enables a distortion-free simultaneous operation of fluorescence optical sectioning microscopy and atomic force microscopy with standard probes. In this context, we discuss sample heating due to AFM cantilever illumination with fluorescence excitation light. Integration of a DSD fluorescence optical sectioning unit with an AFM platform requires mitigation of mechanical noise transfer of the spinning disk. We identify and present two solutions to almost annul this noise in the AFM measurement process. The new combined microscopy platform is applied to the characterization of a DOPC/DOPS (4:1) lipid structures labelled with a lipophilic cationic indocarbocyanine dye deposited on a mica substrate.

  15. Examining Thermally Sprayed Coats By Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W., Jr.; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1994-01-01

    True flaws distinquished from those induced by preparation of specimens. Fluorescence microscopy reveals debonding, porosity, cracks, and other flaws in specimens of thermally sprayed coating materials. Specimen illuminated, and dye it contains fluoresces, emitting light at different wavelength. Filters emphasize contrast between excitation light and emission light. Specimen viewed directly or photographed on color film.

  16. In situ atomic force microscopy studies of reversible light-induced switching of surface roughness and adhesion in azobenzene-containing PMMA films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, M.; Gonzalez-Garcia, Y.; Pakula, C.; Zaporojtchenko, V.; Strunskus, T.; Faupel, F.; Herges, R.; Zargarani, D.; Magnussen, O.M.

    2011-01-01

    Thin films in the range 40-80 nm of a blend of PMMA with an azobenzene derivative have been studied directly during UV and blue light irradiation by atomic force microscopy (AFM), revealing highly reversible changes in the surface roughness and the film adhesion. UV light induces an ∼80% increase in surface roughness, whereas illumination by blue light completely reverses these changes. Based on the observed surface topography and transition kinetics a reversible mass flow mechanisms is suggested, where the polarity changes upon switching trigger a wetting-dewetting transition in a surface segregation layer of the chromophore. Similar AFM measurements of the pull-off force indicate a decrease upon UV and an increase after blue light illumination with a complex kinetic behavior: a rapid initial change, attributed to the change in the cis isomer fraction of the azobenzene derivative, and a more gradual change, indicative of slow structural reorganization.

  17. Identification of light elements in silicon nitride by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idrobo, Juan C., E-mail: idrobojc@ornl.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Walkosz, Weronika [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States); Klie, Robert F.; Oeguet, Serdar [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60607 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    In silicon nitride structural ceramics, the overall mechanical and thermal properties are controlled by the atomic and electronic structures at the interface between the ceramic grains and the amorphous intergranular films (IGFs) formed by various sintering additives. In the last ten years the atomic arrangements of heavy elements (rare-earths) at the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/IGF interfaces have been resolved. However, the atomic position of light elements, without which it is not possible to obtain a complete description of the interfaces, has been lacking. This review article details the authors' efforts to identify the atomic arrangement of light elements such as nitrogen and oxygen at the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} interface and in bulk Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Revealing the atomic structure of the {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification and lattice location of oxygen impurities in bulk {alpha}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Short range ordering of nitrogen and oxygen at the {beta}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}/SiO{sub 2} interface.

  18. EVEREST: Pixel Level Decorrelation of K2 Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luger, Rodrigo; Agol, Eric; Kruse, Ethan; Barnes, Rory; Becker, Andrew; Foreman-Mackey, Daniel; Deming, Drake

    2016-10-01

    We present EPIC Variability Extraction and Removal for Exoplanet Science Targets (EVEREST), an open-source pipeline for removing instrumental noise from K2 light curves. EVEREST employs a variant of pixel level decorrelation to remove systematics introduced by the spacecraft’s pointing error and a Gaussian process to capture astrophysical variability. We apply EVEREST to all K2 targets in campaigns 0-7, yielding light curves with precision comparable to that of the original Kepler mission for stars brighter than {K}p≈ 13, and within a factor of two of the Kepler precision for fainter targets. We perform cross-validation and transit injection and recovery tests to validate the pipeline, and compare our light curves to the other de-trended light curves available for download at the MAST High Level Science Products archive. We find that EVEREST achieves the highest average precision of any of these pipelines for unsaturated K2 stars. The improved precision of these light curves will aid in exoplanet detection and characterization, investigations of stellar variability, asteroseismology, and other photometric studies. The EVEREST pipeline can also easily be applied to future surveys, such as the TESS mission, to correct for instrumental systematics and enable the detection of low signal-to-noise transiting exoplanets. The EVEREST light curves and the source code used to generate them are freely available online.

  19. Ultrahigh Voltage Electron Microscopy Links Neuroanatomy and Neuroscience/Neuroendocrinology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Sakamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional (3D analysis of anatomical ultrastructures is extremely important in most fields of biological research. Although it is very difficult to perform 3D image analysis on exact serial sets of ultrathin sections, 3D reconstruction from serial ultrathin sections can generally be used to obtain 3D information. However, this technique can only be applied to small areas of a specimen because of technical and physical difficulties. We used ultrahigh voltage electron microscopy (UHVEM to overcome these difficulties and to study the chemical neuroanatomy of 3D ultrastructures. This methodology, which links UHVEM and light microscopy, is a useful and powerful tool for studying molecular and/or chemical neuroanatomy at the ultrastructural level.

  20. The 2015 super-resolution microscopy roadmap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hell, Stefan W; Sahl, Steffen J; Bates, Mark; Jakobs, Stefan; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Heintzmann, Rainer; Booth, Martin J; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Shtengel, Gleb; Hess, Harald; Tinnefeld, Philip; Honigmann, Alf; Testa, Ilaria; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim; Ewers, Helge; Davis, Simon J; Eggeling, Christian; Klenerman, David; Willig, Katrin I

    2015-01-01

    Far-field optical microscopy using focused light is an important tool in a number of scientific disciplines including chemical, (bio)physical and biomedical research, particularly with respect to the study of living cells and organisms. Unfortunately, the applicability of the optical microscope is limited, since the diffraction of light imposes limitations on the spatial resolution of the image. Consequently the details of, for example, cellular protein distributions, can be visualized only to a certain extent. Fortunately, recent years have witnessed the development of ‘super-resolution’ far-field optical microscopy (nanoscopy) techniques such as stimulated emission depletion (STED), ground state depletion (GSD), reversible saturated optical (fluorescence) transitions (RESOLFT), photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM), stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM), structured illumination microscopy (SIM) or saturated structured illumination microscopy (SSIM), all in one way or another addressing the problem of the limited spatial resolution of far-field optical microscopy. While SIM achieves a two-fold improvement in spatial resolution compared to conventional optical microscopy, STED, RESOLFT, PALM/STORM, or SSIM have all gone beyond, pushing the limits of optical image resolution to the nanometer scale. Consequently, all super-resolution techniques open new avenues of biomedical research. Because the field is so young, the potential capabilities of different super-resolution microscopy approaches have yet to be fully explored, and uncertainties remain when considering the best choice of methodology. Thus, even for experts, the road to the future is sometimes shrouded in mist. The super-resolution optical microscopy roadmap of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics addresses this need for clarity. It provides guidance to the outstanding questions through a collection of short review articles from experts in the field, giving a thorough

  1. Timing growth and development of Campanula by daily light integral and supplemental light level in a cost-efficient light control system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Katrine Heinsvig; Ottosen, Carl-Otto; Jørgensen, Bo Nørregaard

    2012-01-01

    light control system (DynaLight desktop) automatically defines the most cost-efficient use of supplemental light based on predefined setpoints for daily photosynthesis integral (DPI), forecasted solar irradiance and the market price on electricity. It saves energy in high-cost periods of electricity......Two campanula species Campanula portenschlagiana (‘Blue Get Mee’) and Campanula cochlearifolia (‘Blue Wonder’) were grown in a cost-efficient light control system and the effect of supplemental light level and daily light integral (DLI) on growth and development was quantified. The alternative...... the number of flowers and buds and CLI in ‘Blue Get Mee’. The results demonstrate that DLI was the main limiting factor for prediction of growth and development when two campanula species were grown in a cost-efficient light control system where the number of daily light hours was often below the critical...

  2. Quantitative Assessment of Fat Levels in Caenorhabditis elegans Using Dark Field Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony D. Fouad

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans is widely used as a model for studying conserved pathways for fat storage, aging, and metabolism. The most broadly used methods for imaging fat in C. elegans require fixing and staining the animal. Here, we show that dark field images acquired through an ordinary light microscope can be used to estimate fat levels in worms. We define a metric based on the amount of light scattered per area, and show that this light scattering metric is strongly correlated with worm fat levels as measured by Oil Red O (ORO staining across a wide variety of genetic backgrounds and feeding conditions. Dark field imaging requires no exogenous agents or chemical fixation, making it compatible with live worm imaging. Using our method, we track fat storage with high temporal resolution in developing larvae, and show that fat storage in the intestine increases in at least one burst during development.

  3. Low-Level Detection of Poly(amidoamine) PAMAM Dendrimers Using Immunoimaging Scanning Probe Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Cason, Chevelle A.; Fabré, Thomas A.; Buhrlage, Andrew; Haik, Kristi L.; Bullen, Heather A.

    2012-01-01

    Immunoimaging scanning probe microscopy was utilized for the low-level detection and quantification of biotinylated G4 poly(amidoamine) PAMAM dendrimers. Results were compared to those of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and found to provide a vastly improved analytical method for the low-level detection of dendrimers, improving the limit of detection by a factor of 1000 (LOD = 2.5 × 10−13 moles). The biorecognition method is reproducible and shows high specificity and good accur...

  4. Light sheet microscopy reveals more gradual light attenuation in light green versus dark green soybean leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light wavelengths preferentially absorbed by chlorophyll (chl) often display steep absorption gradients. This oversaturates photosynthesis in upper chloroplasts and deprives lower chloroplasts of blue and red light, causing a steep gradient in carbon fixation. Reducing chl content could create a mor...

  5. Selective sensitivity in Kerr microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, I V; Schäfer, R

    2017-07-01

    A new technique for contrast separation in wide-field magneto-optical Kerr microscopy is introduced. Utilizing the light from eight light emitting diodes, guided to the microscope by glass fibers and being switched synchronously with the camera exposure, domain images with orthogonal in-plane sensitivity can be displayed simultaneously at real-time, and images with pure in-plane or polar contrast can be obtained. The benefit of this new method of contrast separation is demonstrated for Permalloy films, a NdFeB sinter magnet, and a cobalt crystal. Moreover, the new technique is shown to strongly enhance the sensitivity of Kerr microscopy by eliminating parasitic contrast contributions occurring in conventional setups. A doubling of the in-plane domain contrast and a sensitivity to Kerr rotations as low as 0.6 mdeg is demonstrated.

  6. Selective sensitivity in Kerr microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, I. V.; Schäfer, R.

    2017-07-01

    A new technique for contrast separation in wide-field magneto-optical Kerr microscopy is introduced. Utilizing the light from eight light emitting diodes, guided to the microscope by glass fibers and being switched synchronously with the camera exposure, domain images with orthogonal in-plane sensitivity can be displayed simultaneously at real-time, and images with pure in-plane or polar contrast can be obtained. The benefit of this new method of contrast separation is demonstrated for Permalloy films, a NdFeB sinter magnet, and a cobalt crystal. Moreover, the new technique is shown to strongly enhance the sensitivity of Kerr microscopy by eliminating parasitic contrast contributions occurring in conventional setups. A doubling of the in-plane domain contrast and a sensitivity to Kerr rotations as low as 0.6 mdeg is demonstrated.

  7. A comparison of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) methods to characterize nanoparticle size distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoo, Christopher M.; Starostin, Natasha; West, Paul; Mecartney, Martha L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper compares the accuracy of conventional dynamic light scattering (DLS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) for characterizing size distributions of polystyrene nanoparticles in the size range of 20-100 nm. Average DLS values for monosize dispersed particles are slightly higher than the nominal values whereas AFM values were slightly lower than nominal values. Bimodal distributions were easily identified with AFM, but DLS results were skewed toward larger particles. AFM characterization of nanoparticles using automated analysis software provides an accurate and rapid analysis for nanoparticle characterization and has advantages over DLS for non-monodispersed solutions.

  8. Circumventing photodamage in live-cell microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magidson, Valentin; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool in cell biology. This technique allows researchers to visualize the dynamics of tissue, cells, individual organelles and macromolecular assemblies inside the cell. Unfortunately, fluorescence microscopy is not completely ‘non-invasive’ as the high-intensity excitation light required for excitation of fluorophores is inherently toxic for live cells. Physiological changes induced by excessive illumination can lead to artifacts and abnormal responses. In this chapter we review major factors that contribute to phototoxicity and discuss practical solutions for circumventing photodamage. These solutions include the proper choice of image acquisition parameters, optimization of filter sets, hardware synchronization, and the use of intelligent illumination to avoid unnecessary light exposure. PMID:23931522

  9. UmUTracker: A versatile MATLAB program for automated particle tracking of 2D light microscopy or 3D digital holography data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanqing; Stangner, Tim; Wiklund, Krister; Rodriguez, Alvaro; Andersson, Magnus

    2017-10-01

    We present a versatile and fast MATLAB program (UmUTracker) that automatically detects and tracks particles by analyzing video sequences acquired by either light microscopy or digital in-line holographic microscopy. Our program detects the 2D lateral positions of particles with an algorithm based on the isosceles triangle transform, and reconstructs their 3D axial positions by a fast implementation of the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld model using a radial intensity profile. To validate the accuracy and performance of our program, we first track the 2D position of polystyrene particles using bright field and digital holographic microscopy. Second, we determine the 3D particle position by analyzing synthetic and experimentally acquired holograms. Finally, to highlight the full program features, we profile the microfluidic flow in a 100 μm high flow chamber. This result agrees with computational fluid dynamic simulations. On a regular desktop computer UmUTracker can detect, analyze, and track multiple particles at 5 frames per second for a template size of 201 ×201 in a 1024 × 1024 image. To enhance usability and to make it easy to implement new functions we used object-oriented programming. UmUTracker is suitable for studies related to: particle dynamics, cell localization, colloids and microfluidic flow measurement. Program Files doi : http://dx.doi.org/10.17632/fkprs4s6xp.1 Licensing provisions : Creative Commons by 4.0 (CC by 4.0) Programming language : MATLAB Nature of problem: 3D multi-particle tracking is a common technique in physics, chemistry and biology. However, in terms of accuracy, reliable particle tracking is a challenging task since results depend on sample illumination, particle overlap, motion blur and noise from recording sensors. Additionally, the computational performance is also an issue if, for example, a computationally expensive process is executed, such as axial particle position reconstruction from digital holographic microscopy data. Versatile

  10. 3D structure tensor analysis of light microscopy data for validating diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ahmad Raza; Cornea, Anda; Leigland, Lindsey A; Kohama, Steven G; Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj; Kroenke, Christopher D

    2015-05-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (d-MRI) is a powerful non-invasive and non-destructive technique for characterizing brain tissue on the microscopic scale. However, the lack of validation of d-MRI by independent experimental means poses an obstacle to accurate interpretation of data acquired using this method. Recently, structure tensor analysis has been applied to light microscopy images, and this technique holds promise to be a powerful validation strategy for d-MRI. Advantages of this approach include its similarity to d-MRI in terms of averaging the effects of a large number of cellular structures, and its simplicity, which enables it to be implemented in a high-throughput manner. However, a drawback of previous implementations of this technique arises from it being restricted to 2D. As a result, structure tensor analyses have been limited to tissue sectioned in a direction orthogonal to the direction of interest. Here we describe the analytical framework for extending structure tensor analysis to 3D, and utilize the results to analyze serial image "stacks" acquired with confocal microscopy of rhesus macaque hippocampal tissue. Implementation of 3D structure tensor procedures requires removal of sources of anisotropy introduced in tissue preparation and confocal imaging. This is accomplished with image processing steps to mitigate the effects of anisotropic tissue shrinkage, and the effects of anisotropy in the point spread function (PSF). In order to address the latter confound, we describe procedures for measuring the dependence of PSF anisotropy on distance from the microscope objective within tissue. Prior to microscopy, ex vivo d-MRI measurements performed on the hippocampal tissue revealed three regions of tissue with mutually orthogonal directions of least restricted diffusion that correspond to CA1, alveus and inferior longitudinal fasciculus. We demonstrate the ability of 3D structure tensor analysis to identify structure tensor orientations that

  11. Multispectral simulation environment for modeling low-light-level sensor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ientilucci, Emmett J.; Brown, Scott D.; Schott, John R.; Raqueno, Rolando V.

    1998-11-01

    Image intensifying cameras have been found to be extremely useful in low-light-level (LLL) scenarios including military night vision and civilian rescue operations. These sensors utilize the available visible region photons and an amplification process to produce high contrast imagery. It has been demonstrated that processing techniques can further enhance the quality of this imagery. For example, fusion with matching thermal IR imagery can improve image content when very little visible region contrast is available. To aid in the improvement of current algorithms and the development of new ones, a high fidelity simulation environment capable of producing radiometrically correct multi-band imagery for low- light-level conditions is desired. This paper describes a modeling environment attempting to meet these criteria by addressing the task as two individual components: (1) prediction of a low-light-level radiance field from an arbitrary scene, and (2) simulation of the output from a low- light-level sensor for a given radiance field. The radiance prediction engine utilized in this environment is the Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model which is a first principles based multi-spectral synthetic image generation model capable of producing an arbitrary number of bands in the 0.28 to 20 micrometer region. The DIRSIG model is utilized to produce high spatial and spectral resolution radiance field images. These images are then processed by a user configurable multi-stage low-light-level sensor model that applies the appropriate noise and modulation transfer function (MTF) at each stage in the image processing chain. This includes the ability to reproduce common intensifying sensor artifacts such as saturation and 'blooming.' Additionally, co-registered imagery in other spectral bands may be simultaneously generated for testing fusion and exploitation algorithms. This paper discusses specific aspects of the DIRSIG radiance prediction for low

  12. Mechanisms of fine extinction band development in vein quartz: new insights from correlative light and electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derez, Tine; Van Der Donck, Tom; Plümper, Oliver; Muchez, Philippe; Pennock, Gill; Drury, Martyn R.; Sintubin, Manuel

    2017-07-01

    Fine extinction bands (FEBs) (also known as deformation lamellae) visible with polarized light microscopy in quartz consist of a range of nanostructures, inferring different formation processes. Previous transmission electron microscopy studies have shown that most FEB nanostructures in naturally deformed quartz are elongated subgrains formed by recovery of dislocation slip bands. Here we show that three types of FEB nanostructure occur in naturally deformed vein quartz from the low-grade metamorphic High-Ardenne slate belt (Belgium). Prismatic oriented FEBs are defined by bands of dislocation walls. Dauphiné twin boundaries present along the FEB boundaries probably formed after FEB formation. In an example of two sub-rhombohedral oriented FEBs, developed as two sets in one grain, the finer FEB set consists of elongated subgrains, similar to FEBs described in previous transmission electron microscopy studies. The second wider FEB set consists of bands with different dislocation density and fluid-inclusion content. The wider FEB set is interpreted as bands with different plastic strain associated with the primary growth banding of the vein quartz grain. The nanometre-scale fluid inclusions are interpreted to have formed from structurally bounded hydroxyl groups that moreover facilitated formation of the elongate subgrains. Larger fluid inclusions aligned along FEBs are explained by fluid-inclusion redistribution along dislocation cores. The prismatic FEB nanostructure and the relation between FEBs and growth bands have not been recognized before, although related structures have been reported in experimentally deformed quartz.

  13. Navigational efficiency of nocturnal Myrmecia ants suffers at low light levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Narendra

    Full Text Available Insects face the challenge of navigating to specific goals in both bright sun-lit and dim-lit environments. Both diurnal and nocturnal insects use quite similar navigation strategies. This is despite the signal-to-noise ratio of the navigational cues being poor at low light conditions. To better understand the evolution of nocturnal life, we investigated the navigational efficiency of a nocturnal ant, Myrmecia pyriformis, at different light levels. Workers of M. pyriformis leave the nest individually in a narrow light-window in the evening twilight to forage on nest-specific Eucalyptus trees. The majority of foragers return to the nest in the morning twilight, while few attempt to return to the nest throughout the night. We found that as light levels dropped, ants paused for longer, walked more slowly, the success in finding the nest reduced and their paths became less straight. We found that in both bright and dark conditions ants relied predominantly on visual landmark information for navigation and that landmark guidance became less reliable at low light conditions. It is perhaps due to the poor navigational efficiency at low light levels that the majority of foragers restrict navigational tasks to the twilight periods, where sufficient navigational information is still available.

  14. You can't measure what you can't see - detectors for microscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denes, Peter

    For centuries, the human eye has been the imaging detector of choice thanks to its high sensitivity, wide dynamic range, and direct connection to a built-in data recording and analysis system. The eye, however, is limited to visible light, which excludes microscopies with electrons and X-rays, and the built-in recording system stores archival information at very low rates. The former limitation has been overcome by ``indirect'' detectors, which convert probe particles to visible light, and the latter by a variety of recording techniques, from photographic film to semiconductor-based imagers. Semiconductor imagers have been used for decades as ``direct'' detectors in particle physics, and almost as long for hard X-rays. For soft X-ray microscopy, the challenge has been the small signal levels - plus getting the X-rays into the detector itself, given how quickly they are absorbed in inert layers. For electron microscopy, the challenge has been reconciling detector spatial resolution and pixel count with the large multiple scattering of electrons with energies used for microscopy. Further, a high recording rate (``movies'' rather than ``snapshots'') enables time-resolved studies, time-dependent corrections, shot-by-shot experiments and scanning techniques - at the expense of creating large data volumes. This talk will discuss solutions to these challenges, as well as an outlook towards future developments.

  15. Determination of the synthesis site of the infections flacherie virus-RNA by light microscopy-autoradiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, I.M.G. de; Silva, D.M.

    1981-01-01

    The site of the RNA synthesis of the infectious flacherie virus in the midgut epithelial cells of the silkworm, Bombyx mori L., 1758 (Lep., Bombycidae), has been investigated using both autoradiography and light microscopy techniques. The density or ratio between silver grain and the respective cell structure (silver grain/μm 2 ) has been used as criteria to identify the site of the viral RNA synthesis. Actinomycin D selectively blocked about 60% of the cell RNA synthesis without affecting the virus RNA synthesis. The obtained data indicated that the viral RNA synthesis occurs in the nucleus of the midgut epithelial cells of the silkworm larvae. Some evidence about the viral RNA translocation from nucleus to cytoplasm and inhibition of the synthesis of normal RNA by the virus were observed. (Author) [pt

  16. Effects of light-emitting diode light v. fluorescent light on growing performance, activity levels and well-being of non-beak-trimmed W-36 pullets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K; Xin, H; Settar, P

    2018-01-01

    More energy-efficient, readily dimmable, long-lasting and more affordable light-emitting diode (LED) lights are increasingly finding applications in poultry production facilities. Despite anecdotal evidence about the benefits of such lighting on bird performance and behavior, concrete research data were lacking. In this study, a commercial poultry-specific LED light (dim-to-blue, controllable correlated color temperature (CCT) from 4500 to 5300 K) and a typical compact fluorescent light (CFL) (soft white, CCT=2700 K) were compared with regards to their effects on growing performance, activity levels, and feather and comb conditions of non-beak-trimmed W-36 pullets during a 14-week rearing period. A total of 1280-day-old pullets in two successive batches, 640 birds each, were used in the study. For each batch, pullets were randomly assigned to four identical litter-floor rooms equipped with perches, two rooms per light regimen, 160 birds per room. Body weight, BW uniformity (BWU), BW gain (BWG) and cumulative mortality rate (CMR) of the pullets were determined every 2 weeks from day-old to 14 weeks of age (WOA). Activity levels of the pullets at 5 to 14 WOA were delineated by movement index. Results revealed that pullets under the LED and CFL lights had comparable BW (1140±5 g v. 1135±5 g, P=0.41), BWU (90.8±1.0% v. 91.9±1.0%, P=0.48) and CMR (1.3±0.6% v. 2.7±0.6%, P=0.18) at 14 WOA despite some varying BWG during the rearing. Circadian activity levels of the pullets were higher under the LED light than under the CFL light, possibly resulting from differences in spectrum and/or perceived light intensity between the two lights. No feather damage or comb wound was apparent in either light regimen at the end of the rearing period. The results contribute to understanding the impact of emerging LED lights on pullets rearing which is a critical component of egg production.

  17. Probing neural tissue with airy light-sheet microscopy: investigation of imaging performance at depth within turbid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylk, Jonathan; McCluskey, Kaley; Aggarwal, Sanya; Tello, Javier A.; Dholakia, Kishan

    2017-02-01

    Light-sheet microscopy (LSM) has received great interest for fluorescent imaging applications in biomedicine as it facilitates three-dimensional visualisation of large sample volumes with high spatiotemporal resolution whilst minimising irradiation of, and photo-damage to the specimen. Despite these advantages, LSM can only visualize superficial layers of turbid tissues, such as mammalian neural tissue. Propagation-invariant light modes have played a key role in the development of high-resolution LSM techniques as they overcome the natural divergence of a Gaussian beam, enabling uniform and thin light-sheets over large distances. Most notably, Bessel and Airy beam-based light-sheet imaging modalities have been demonstrated. In the single-photon excitation regime and in lightly scattering specimens, Airy-LSM has given competitive performance with advanced Bessel-LSM techniques. Airy and Bessel beams share the property of self-healing, the ability of the beam to regenerate its transverse beam profile after propagation around an obstacle. Bessel-LSM techniques have been shown to increase the penetration-depth of the illumination into turbid specimens but this effect has been understudied in biologically relevant tissues, particularly for Airy beams. It is expected that Airy-LSM will give a similar enhancement over Gaussian-LSM. In this paper, we report on the comparison of Airy-LSM and Gaussian-LSM imaging modalities within cleared and non-cleared mouse brain tissue. In particular, we examine image quality versus tissue depth by quantitative spatial Fourier analysis of neural structures in virally transduced fluorescent tissue sections, showing a three-fold enhancement at 50 μm depth into non-cleared tissue with Airy-LSM. Complimentary analysis is performed by resolution measurements in bead-injected tissue sections.

  18. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saibil, Helen R.; Grünewald, Kay; Stuart, David I.

    2015-01-01

    This review provides a brief update on the use of cryo-electron microscopy for integrated structural biology, along with an overview of the plans for the UK national facility for electron microscopy being built at the Diamond synchrotron. Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback

  19. Noninvasive assessment of articular cartilage surface damage using reflected polarized light microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Ruby N.; Nehmetallah, George; Raub, Christopher B.

    2017-06-01

    Articular surface damage occurs to cartilage during normal aging, osteoarthritis, and in trauma. A noninvasive assessment of cartilage microstructural alterations is useful for studies involving cartilage explants. This study evaluates polarized reflectance microscopy as a tool to assess surface damage to cartilage explants caused by mechanical scraping and enzymatic degradation. Adult bovine articular cartilage explants were scraped, incubated in collagenase, or underwent scrape and collagenase treatments. In an additional experiment, cartilage explants were subject to scrapes at graduated levels of severity. Polarized reflectance parameters were compared with India ink surface staining, features of histological sections, changes in explant wet weight and thickness, and chondrocyte viability. The polarized reflectance signal was sensitive to surface scrape damage and revealed individual scrape features consistent with India ink marks. Following surface treatments, the reflectance contrast parameter was elevated and correlated with image area fraction of India ink. After extensive scraping, polarized reflectance contrast and chondrocyte viability were lower than that from untreated explants. As part of this work, a mathematical model was developed and confirmed the trend in the reflectance signal due to changes in surface scattering and subsurface birefringence. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of polarized reflectance microscopy to sensitively assess surface microstructural alterations in articular cartilage explants.

  20. Transmission-type angle deviation microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, M.-H.; Lai, C.-W.; Tan, C.-T.; Lai, C.-F.

    2008-01-01

    We present a new microscopy technique that we call transmission angle deviation microscopy (TADM). It is based on common-path heterodyne interferometry and geometrical optics. An ultrahigh sensitivity surface plasmon resonance (SPR) angular sensor is used to expand dynamic measurement ranges and to improve the axial resolution in three-dimensional optical microscopy. When transmitted light is incident upon a specimen, the beam converges or diverges because of refractive and/or surface height variations. Advantages include high axial resolution (∼32 nm), nondestructive and noncontact measurement, and larger measurement ranges (± 80 μm) for a numerical aperture of 0.21in a transparent measurement medium. The technique can be used without conductivity and pretreatment

  1. ultraLM and miniLM: Locator tools for smart tracking of fluorescent cells in correlative light and electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brama, Elisabeth; Peddie, Christopher J; Wilkes, Gary; Gu, Yan; Collinson, Lucy M; Jones, Martin L

    2016-12-13

    In-resin fluorescence (IRF) protocols preserve fluorescent proteins in resin-embedded cells and tissues for correlative light and electron microscopy, aiding interpretation of macromolecular function within the complex cellular landscape. Dual-contrast IRF samples can be imaged in separate fluorescence and electron microscopes, or in dual-modality integrated microscopes for high resolution correlation of fluorophore to organelle. IRF samples also offer a unique opportunity to automate correlative imaging workflows. Here we present two new locator tools for finding and following fluorescent cells in IRF blocks, enabling future automation of correlative imaging. The ultraLM is a fluorescence microscope that integrates with an ultramicrotome, which enables 'smart collection' of ultrathin sections containing fluorescent cells or tissues for subsequent transmission electron microscopy or array tomography. The miniLM is a fluorescence microscope that integrates with serial block face scanning electron microscopes, which enables 'smart tracking' of fluorescent structures during automated serial electron image acquisition from large cell and tissue volumes.

  2. High-resolution light microscopy using luminescent nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y; Roy, Indrajit; Yong, Ken-Tye; Pudavar, Haridas E; Prasad, Paras N

    2010-01-01

    This review presents recent progress in the development of the luminescent nanoparticles for confocal and multiphoton microscopy. Four classes of nanomaterials are discussed: (1) silica-based nanoparticles doped with fluorescent molecules, (2) gold nanoparticles, (3) semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum dots/rods), and (4) nanophosphors. Special considerations are given to recently developed imaging nanoprobes, such as (1) organically modified silica (ORMOSIL) nanoparticles doped with two-photon absorbing fluorophores, which exhibit aggregation-enhanced fluorescence (AEF), and (2) nanophosphors (ceramic nanoparticles containing luminescent lanthanoid ions). Advantages and disadvantages of every class of nanomaterials and their specific applications are briefly discussed.

  3. Deleterious phases precipitation on superduplex stainless steel UNS S32750: characterization by light optical and scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Pardal

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Deleterious phases precipitation in superduplex stainless steels is the main concern in fabrication by welding and hot forming of this class of material. Sigma, chi and secondary austenite phases are considered deleterious phases because they produce negative effects on corrosion resistance. Besides, sigma and chi phases also promote strong decrease of toughness. In the present work, the precipitations of sigma, chi and secondary austenite under aging in the 800-950 °C interval were studied in two UNS S32750 steels with different grain sizes. The deleterious phases could be quantified by light optical microscopy, with no distinction between them. Scanning electron microscopy was used to distinguish the individual phases in various aging conditions. The results elucidate the influence of the aging temperature and grain size on the kinetics precipitation and morphology of deleterious phases. The kinetics of deleterious phases is higher in the fine grained material in the initial stage of aging, but the maximum amount of deleterious phases is higher in the coarse grained steel.

  4. Functional characterization of neotropical snakes peripheral blood leukocytes subsets: Linking flow cytometry cell features, microscopy images and serum corticosterone levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Marcelo Pires Nogueira; Queiroz-Hazarbassanov, Nicolle Gilda Teixeira; de Oliveira Massoco, Cristina; Sant'Anna, Sávio Stefanini; Lourenço, Mariana Mathias; Levin, Gabriel; Sogayar, Mari Cleide; Grego, Kathleen Fernandes; Catão-Dias, José Luiz

    2017-09-01

    Reptiles are the unique ectothermic amniotes, providing the key link between ectothermic anamniotes fish and amphibians, and endothermic birds and mammals; becoming an important group to study with the aim of providing significant knowledge into the evolutionary history of vertebrate immunity. Classification systems for reptiles' leukocytes have been described by their appearance rather than function, being still inconsistent. With the advent of modern techniques and the establishment of analytical protocols for snakes' blood by flow cytometry, we bring a qualitative and quantitative assessment of innate activities presented by snakes' peripheral blood leukocytes, thereby linking flow cytometric features with fluorescent and light microscopy images. Moreover, since corticosterone is an important immunomodulator in reptiles, hormone levels of all blood samples were measured. We provide novel and additional information which should contribute to better understanding of the development of the immune system of reptiles and vertebrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Accuracy of Mobile Phone and Handheld Light Microscopy for the Diagnosis of Schistosomiasis and Intestinal Protozoa Infections in Côte d'Ivoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean T Coulibaly

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Handheld light microscopy using compact optics and mobile phones may improve the quality of health care in resource-constrained settings by enabling access to prompt and accurate diagnosis.Laboratory technicians were trained to operate two handheld diagnostic devices (Newton Nm1 microscope and a clip-on version of the mobile phone-based CellScope. The accuracy of these devices was compared to conventional light microscopy for the diagnosis of Schistosoma haematobium, S. mansoni, and intestinal protozoa infection in a community-based survey in rural Côte d'Ivoire. One slide of 10 ml filtered urine and a single Kato-Katz thick smear from 226 individuals were subjected to the Newton Nm1 microscope and CellScope for detection of Schistosoma eggs and compared to conventional microscopy. Additionally, 121 sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin (SAF-fixed stool samples were examined by the Newton Nm1 microscope and compared to conventional microscopy for the diagnosis of intestinal protozoa.The prevalence of S. haematobium, S. mansoni, Giardia intestinalis, and Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar, as determined by conventional microscopy, was 39.8%, 5.3%, 20.7%, and 4.9%, respectively. The Newton Nm1 microscope had diagnostic sensitivities for S. mansoni and S. haematobium infection of 91.7% (95% confidence interval (CI 59.8-99.6% and 81.1% (95% CI 71.2-88.3%, respectively, and specificities of 99.5% (95% CI 97.0-100% and 97.1% (95% CI 92.2-99.1%, respectively. The CellScope demonstrated sensitivities for S. mansoni and S. haematobium of 50.0% (95% CI 25.4-74.6% and 35.6% (95% CI 25.9-46.4%, respectively, and specificities of 99.5% (95% CI 97.0-100% and 100% (95% CI 86.7-100%, respectively. For G. intestinalis and E. histolytica/E. dispar, the Newton Nm1 microscope had sensitivity of 84.0% (95% CI 63.1-94.7% and 83.3% (95% CI 36.5-99.1%, respectively, and 100% specificity.Handheld diagnostic devices can be employed in community-based surveys in resource

  6. Accuracy of Mobile Phone and Handheld Light Microscopy for the Diagnosis of Schistosomiasis and Intestinal Protozoa Infections in Côte d'Ivoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulibaly, Jean T; Ouattara, Mamadou; D'Ambrosio, Michael V; Fletcher, Daniel A; Keiser, Jennifer; Utzinger, Jürg; N'Goran, Eliézer K; Andrews, Jason R; Bogoch, Isaac I

    2016-06-01

    Handheld light microscopy using compact optics and mobile phones may improve the quality of health care in resource-constrained settings by enabling access to prompt and accurate diagnosis. Laboratory technicians were trained to operate two handheld diagnostic devices (Newton Nm1 microscope and a clip-on version of the mobile phone-based CellScope). The accuracy of these devices was compared to conventional light microscopy for the diagnosis of Schistosoma haematobium, S. mansoni, and intestinal protozoa infection in a community-based survey in rural Côte d'Ivoire. One slide of 10 ml filtered urine and a single Kato-Katz thick smear from 226 individuals were subjected to the Newton Nm1 microscope and CellScope for detection of Schistosoma eggs and compared to conventional microscopy. Additionally, 121 sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin (SAF)-fixed stool samples were examined by the Newton Nm1 microscope and compared to conventional microscopy for the diagnosis of intestinal protozoa. The prevalence of S. haematobium, S. mansoni, Giardia intestinalis, and Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar, as determined by conventional microscopy, was 39.8%, 5.3%, 20.7%, and 4.9%, respectively. The Newton Nm1 microscope had diagnostic sensitivities for S. mansoni and S. haematobium infection of 91.7% (95% confidence interval (CI) 59.8-99.6%) and 81.1% (95% CI 71.2-88.3%), respectively, and specificities of 99.5% (95% CI 97.0-100%) and 97.1% (95% CI 92.2-99.1%), respectively. The CellScope demonstrated sensitivities for S. mansoni and S. haematobium of 50.0% (95% CI 25.4-74.6%) and 35.6% (95% CI 25.9-46.4%), respectively, and specificities of 99.5% (95% CI 97.0-100%) and 100% (95% CI 86.7-100%), respectively. For G. intestinalis and E. histolytica/E. dispar, the Newton Nm1 microscope had sensitivity of 84.0% (95% CI 63.1-94.7%) and 83.3% (95% CI 36.5-99.1%), respectively, and 100% specificity. Handheld diagnostic devices can be employed in community-based surveys in resource

  7. Application of multiphoton microscopy in dermatological studies: A mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Yew

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the historical and more recent developments of multiphoton microscopy, as applied to dermatology. Multiphoton microscopy offers several advantages over competing microscopy techniques: there is an inherent axial sectioning, penetration depths that compete well with confocal microscopy on account of the use of near-infrared light, and many two-photon contrast mechanisms, such as second-harmonic generation, have no analogue in one-photon microscopy. While the penetration depths of photons into tissue are typically limited on the order of hundreds of microns, this is of less concern in dermatology, as the skin is thin and readily accessible. As a result, multiphoton microscopy in dermatology has generated a great deal of interest, much of which is summarized here. The review covers the interaction of light and tissue, as well as the various considerations that must be made when designing an instrument. The state of multiphoton microscopy in imaging skin cancer and various other diseases is also discussed, along with the investigation of aging and regeneration phenomena, and finally, the use of multiphoton microscopy to analyze the transdermal transport of drugs, cosmetics and other agents is summarized. The review concludes with a look at potential future research directions, especially those that are necessary to push these techniques into widespread clinical acceptance.

  8. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Much of the modern understanding of orientational order in liquid crystals (LCs) is based on polarizing microscopy (PM). A PM image bears only two-dimensional (2D) information, integrating the 3D pattern of optical birefringence over the path of light. Recently, we proposed a technique to image 3D director patterns by ...

  9. Mutations in specific structural regions of immunoglobulin light chains are associated with free light chain levels in patients with AL amyloidosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya L Poshusta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The amyloidoses are protein misfolding diseases characterized by the deposition of amyloid that leads to cell death and tissue degeneration. In immunoglobulin light chain amyloidosis (AL, each patient has a unique monoclonal immunoglobulin light chain (LC that forms amyloid deposits. Somatic mutations in AL LCs make these proteins less thermodynamically stable than their non-amyloidogenic counterparts, leading to misfolding and ultimately the formation of amyloid fibrils. We hypothesize that location rather than number of non-conservative mutations determines the amyloidogenicity of light chains. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed sequence alignments on the variable domain of 50 kappa and 91 lambda AL light chains and calculated the number of non-conservative mutations over total number of patients for each secondary structure element in order to identify regions that accumulate non-conservative mutations. Among patients with AL, the levels of circulating immunoglobulin free light chain varies greatly, but even patients with very low levels can have very advanced amyloid deposition. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that in specific secondary structure elements, there are significant differences in the number of non-conservative mutations between normal and AL sequences. AL sequences from patients with different levels of secreted light chain have distinct differences in the location of non-conservative mutations, suggesting that for patients with very low levels of light chains and advanced amyloid deposition, the location of non-conservative mutations rather than the amount of free light chain in circulation may determine the amyloidogenic propensity of light chains.

  10. A correlative optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy approach to locating nanoparticles in brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempen, Paul J; Kircher, Moritz F; de la Zerda, Adam; Zavaleta, Cristina L; Jokerst, Jesse V; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications, including cancer diagnosis and treatment, demands the capability to exactly locate them within complex biological systems. In this work a correlative optical and scanning electron microscopy technique was developed to locate and observe multi-modal gold core nanoparticle accumulation in brain tumor models. Entire brain sections from mice containing orthotopic brain tumors injected intravenously with nanoparticles were imaged using both optical microscopy to identify the brain tumor, and scanning electron microscopy to identify the individual nanoparticles. Gold-based nanoparticles were readily identified in the scanning electron microscope using backscattered electron imaging as bright spots against a darker background. This information was then correlated to determine the exact location of the nanoparticles within the brain tissue. The nanoparticles were located only in areas that contained tumor cells, and not in the surrounding healthy brain tissue. This correlative technique provides a powerful method to relate the macro- and micro-scale features visible in light microscopy with the nanoscale features resolvable in scanning electron microscopy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Target detection and driving behaviour measurements in a driving simulator at mesopic light levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alferdinck, J.W.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    During night-time driving hazardous objects often appear at mesopic light levels, which are typically measured using light meters with a spectral sensitivity that is only valid for photopic light levels. In order to develop suitable mesopic models a target detection experiment was performed in a

  12. 3D imaging of cleared human skin biopsies using light-sheet microscopy: A new way to visualize in-depth skin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadie, S; Jardet, C; Colombelli, J; Chaput, B; David, A; Grolleau, J-L; Bedos, P; Lobjois, V; Descargues, P; Rouquette, J

    2018-05-01

    Human skin is composed of the superimposition of tissue layers of various thicknesses and components. Histological staining of skin sections is the benchmark approach to analyse the organization and integrity of human skin biopsies; however, this approach does not allow 3D tissue visualization. Alternatively, confocal or two-photon microscopy is an effective approach to perform fluorescent-based 3D imaging. However, owing to light scattering, these methods display limited light penetration in depth. The objectives of this study were therefore to combine optical clearing and light-sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) to perform in-depth optical sectioning of 5 mm-thick human skin biopsies and generate 3D images of entire human skin biopsies. A benzyl alcohol and benzyl benzoate solution was used to successfully optically clear entire formalin fixed human skin biopsies, making them transparent. In-depth optical sectioning was performed with LSFM on the basis of tissue-autofluorescence observations. 3D image analysis of optical sections generated with LSFM was performed by using the Amira ® software. This new approach allowed us to observe in situ the different layers and compartments of human skin, such as the stratum corneum, the dermis and epidermal appendages. With this approach, we easily performed 3D reconstruction to visualise an entire human skin biopsy. Finally, we demonstrated that this method is useful to visualise and quantify histological anomalies, such as epidermal hyperplasia. The combination of optical clearing and LSFM has new applications in dermatology and dermatological research by allowing 3D visualization and analysis of whole human skin biopsies. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Dual light-emitting diode-based multichannel microscopy for whole-slide multiplane, multispectral and phase imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jun; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Zibang; Bian, Zichao; Guo, Kaikai; Nambiar, Aparna; Jiang, Yutong; Jiang, Shaowei; Zhong, Jingang; Choma, Michael; Zheng, Guoan

    2018-02-01

    We report the development of a multichannel microscopy for whole-slide multiplane, multispectral and phase imaging. We use trinocular heads to split the beam path into 6 independent channels and employ a camera array for parallel data acquisition, achieving a maximum data throughput of approximately 1 gigapixel per second. To perform single-frame rapid autofocusing, we place 2 near-infrared light-emitting diodes (LEDs) at the back focal plane of the condenser lens to illuminate the sample from 2 different incident angles. A hot mirror is used to direct the near-infrared light to an autofocusing camera. For multiplane whole-slide imaging (WSI), we acquire 6 different focal planes of a thick specimen simultaneously. For multispectral WSI, we relay the 6 independent image planes to the same focal position and simultaneously acquire information at 6 spectral bands. For whole-slide phase imaging, we acquire images at 3 focal positions simultaneously and use the transport-of-intensity equation to recover the phase information. We also provide an open-source design to further increase the number of channels from 6 to 15. The reported platform provides a simple solution for multiplexed fluorescence imaging and multimodal WSI. Acquiring an instant focal stack without z-scanning may also enable fast 3-dimensional dynamic tracking of various biological samples. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Correlation of ''twins'' observed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy in YBa2Cu3O7/sub -//sub x/ superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, H.A.; Singh, A.K.; Pande, C.S.

    1988-01-01

    By using transmission electron microscopy and optical microscopy on the same specimens, the patterns of light- and dark-contrast lines seen in reflected polarized light were shown to be an interference pattern due to the variable spacing of suboptical microtwins. These microtwins are mostly [110] reflection twins. The [110] twinning was observed to be cyclic and occasionally pseudotetragonal because of the progressive cycling of contact twin domains. Within a domain, and occasionally in a whole grain, the [110] reflection twins occurred as polysynthetic lamellae. The morphology of the domain structure can be explained from the theory of martensitic transformation

  15. Tilted Light Sheet Microscopy with 3D Point Spread Functions for Single-Molecule Super-Resolution Imaging in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Anna-Karin; Petrov, Petar N; Lee, Maurice Y; Shechtman, Yoav; Moerner, W E

    2018-02-01

    To obtain a complete picture of subcellular nanostructures, cells must be imaged with high resolution in all three dimensions (3D). Here, we present tilted light sheet microscopy with 3D point spread functions (TILT3D), an imaging platform that combines a novel, tilted light sheet illumination strategy with engineered long axial range point spread functions (PSFs) for low-background, 3D super localization of single molecules as well as 3D super-resolution imaging in thick cells. TILT3D is built upon a standard inverted microscope and has minimal custom parts. The axial positions of the single molecules are encoded in the shape of the PSF rather than in the position or thickness of the light sheet, and the light sheet can therefore be formed using simple optics. The result is flexible and user-friendly 3D super-resolution imaging with tens of nm localization precision throughout thick mammalian cells. We validated TILT3D for 3D super-resolution imaging in mammalian cells by imaging mitochondria and the full nuclear lamina using the double-helix PSF for single-molecule detection and the recently developed Tetrapod PSF for fiducial bead tracking and live axial drift correction. We envision TILT3D to become an important tool not only for 3D super-resolution imaging, but also for live whole-cell single-particle and single-molecule tracking.

  16. Tilted light sheet microscopy with 3D point spread functions for single-molecule super-resolution imaging in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Anna-Karin; Petrov, Petar N.; Lee, Maurice Y.; Shechtman, Yoav; Moerner, W. E.

    2018-02-01

    To obtain a complete picture of subcellular nanostructures, cells must be imaged with high resolution in all three dimensions (3D). Here, we present tilted light sheet microscopy with 3D point spread functions (TILT3D), an imaging platform that combines a novel, tilted light sheet illumination strategy with engineered long axial range point spread functions (PSFs) for low-background, 3D super localization of single molecules as well as 3D super-resolution imaging in thick cells. TILT3D is built upon a standard inverted microscope and has minimal custom parts. The axial positions of the single molecules are encoded in the shape of the PSF rather than in the position or thickness of the light sheet, and the light sheet can therefore be formed using simple optics. The result is flexible and user-friendly 3D super-resolution imaging with tens of nm localization precision throughout thick mammalian cells. We validated TILT3D for 3D superresolution imaging in mammalian cells by imaging mitochondria and the full nuclear lamina using the double-helix PSF for single-molecule detection and the recently developed Tetrapod PSF for fiducial bead tracking and live axial drift correction. We envision TILT3D to become an important tool not only for 3D super-resolution imaging, but also for live whole-cell single-particle and single-molecule tracking.

  17. Hybrid of two-photon microscopy and optical multimodality imaging for multi-scale imaging of small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianmeng; Hui, Hui; Ma, He; Yang, Xin; Tian, Jie

    2018-02-01

    Non-invasive imaging technologies, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and optical multimodality imaging methods, are commonly used for diagnosing and supervising the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). These in vivo imaging methods can provide morphology changes information of IBD in macro-scale. However, it is difficult to investigate the intestinal wall in molecular and cellular level. State-of-art light-sheet and two-photon microscopy have the ability to acquire the changes for IBD in micro-scale. The aim of this work is to evaluate the size of the enterocoel and the thickness of colon wall using both MRI for in vivo imaging, and light-sheet and two-photon microscope for in vitro imaging. C57BL/6 mice were received 3.5% Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) in the drinking water for 5 days to build IBD model. Mice were imaged with MRI on days 0, 6 to observe colitis progression. After MRI imaging, the mice were sacrificed to take colons for tissue clearing. Then, light-sheet and two-photon microscopies are used for in vitro imaging of the cleared samples. The experimental group showed symptoms of bloody stools, sluggishness and weight loss. It showed that the colon wall was thicker while the enterocoel was narrower compare to control group. The more details are observed using light-sheet and two-photon microscope. It is demonstrated that hybrid of MRI in macro-scale and light-sheet and two-photon microscopy in micro-scale imaging is feasible for colon inflammation diagnosing and supervising.

  18. Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) improves the resolution of confocal microscopy and increases the sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Luca, Giulia; Breedijk, Ronald; Hoebe, Ron; Stallinga, Sjoerd; Manders, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) is a new super-resolution technique based on a standard confocal microscope extended with a re-scan unit in the detection path that projects the emitted light onto a sensitive camera. In this paper the fundamental properties of RCM, lateral resolution, axial

  19. Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) improves the resolution of confocal microscopy and increases the sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Luca, G.; Breedijk, R.; Hoebe, R.; Stallinga, S.; Manders, E.

    Re-scan confocal microscopy (RCM) is a new super-resolution technique based on a standard confocal microscope extended with a re-scan unit in the detection path that projects the emitted light onto a sensitive camera. In this paper the fundamental properties of RCM, lateral resolution, axial

  20. Different Levels of DNA Methylation Detected in Human Sperms after Morphological Selection Using High Magnification Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nino Guy Cassuto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze DNA methylation levels between two groups of spermatozoa taken from the same sample, following morphological selection by high magnification (HM at 6100x microscopy. A prospective study was conducted and studied 876 spermatozoa from 10 randomly selected men. Sperm morphology was characterized at HM according to criteria previously established. High-scoring Score 6 and low-scoring Score 0 sperm were selected. Sperm DNA methylation level was assessed using an immunoassay method targeting 5-methylcytosine residues by fluorescence microscopy with imaging analysis system to detect DNA methylation in single spermatozoon. Results. In total, 448 S6 spermatozoa and 428 S0 spermatozoa were analyzed. A strong relationship was found between sperm DNA methylation levels and sperm morphology observed at HM. Sperm DNA methylation level in the S6 group was significantly lower compared with that in the S0 group (p<10-6, OR = 2.4; and p<0.001, as determined using the Wilcoxon test. Conclusion. Differences in DNA methylation levels are associated with sperm morphology variations as observed at HM, which allows spermatozoa with abnormal levels to be discarded and ultimately decrease birth defects, malformations, and epigenetic diseases that may be transmitted from sperm to offspring in ICSI.

  1. A national facility for biological cryo-electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saibil, Helen R; Grünewald, Kay; Stuart, David I

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional electron microscopy is an enormously powerful tool for structural biologists. It is now able to provide an understanding of the molecular machinery of cells, disease processes and the actions of pathogenic organisms from atomic detail through to the cellular context. However, cutting-edge research in this field requires very substantial resources for equipment, infrastructure and expertise. Here, a brief overview is provided of the plans for a UK national three-dimensional electron-microscopy facility for integrated structural biology to enable internationally leading research on the machinery of life. State-of-the-art equipment operated with expert support will be provided, optimized for both atomic-level single-particle analysis of purified macromolecules and complexes and for tomography of cell sections. The access to and organization of the facility will be modelled on the highly successful macromolecular crystallography (MX) synchrotron beamlines, and will be embedded at the Diamond Light Source, facilitating the development of user-friendly workflows providing near-real-time experimental feedback.

  2. Development of an ultralow-light-level luminescence image analysis system for dynamic measurements of transcriptional activity in living and migrating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maire, E; Lelièvre, E; Brau, D; Lyons, A; Woodward, M; Fafeur, V; Vandenbunder, B

    2000-04-10

    We have developed an approach to study in single living epithelial cells both cell migration and transcriptional activation, which was evidenced by the detection of luminescence emission from cells transfected with luciferase reporter vectors. The image acquisition chain consists of an epifluorescence inverted microscope, connected to an ultralow-light-level photon-counting camera and an image-acquisition card associated to specialized image analysis software running on a PC computer. Using a simple method based on a thin calibrated light source, the image acquisition chain has been optimized following comparisons of the performance of microscopy objectives and photon-counting cameras designed to observe luminescence. This setup allows us to measure by image analysis the luminescent light emitted by individual cells stably expressing a luciferase reporter vector. The sensitivity of the camera was adjusted to a high value, which required the use of a segmentation algorithm to eliminate the background noise. Following mathematical morphology treatments, kinetic changes of luminescent sources were analyzed and then correlated with the distance and speed of migration. Our results highlight the usefulness of our image acquisition chain and mathematical morphology software to quantify the kinetics of luminescence changes in migrating cells.

  3. Digital Fourier microscopy for soft matter dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giavazzi, Fabio; Cerbino, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Soft matter is studied with a large portfolio of methods. Light scattering and video microscopy are the most employed at optical wavelengths. Light scattering provides ensemble-averaged information on soft matter in the reciprocal space. The wave-vectors probed correspond to length scales ranging from a few nanometers to fractions of millimetre. Microscopy probes the sample directly in the real space, by offering a unique access to the local properties. However, optical resolution issues limit the access to length scales smaller than approximately 200 nm. We describe recent work that bridges the gap between scattering and microscopy. Several apparently unrelated techniques are found to share a simple basic idea: the correlation properties of the sample can be characterized in the reciprocal space via spatial Fourier analysis of images collected in the real space. We describe the main features of such digital Fourier microscopy (DFM), by providing examples of several possible experimental implementations of it, some of which not yet realized in practice. We also provide an overview of experimental results obtained with DFM for the study of the dynamics of soft materials. Finally, we outline possible future developments of DFM that would ease its adoption as a standard laboratory method. (topical review)

  4. Three-dimensional fluorescent microscopy via simultaneous illumination and detection at multiple planes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qian; Khademhosseinieh, Bahar; Huang, Eric; Qian, Haoliang; Bakowski, Malina A; Troemel, Emily R; Liu, Zhaowei

    2016-08-16

    The conventional optical microscope is an inherently two-dimensional (2D) imaging tool. The objective lens, eyepiece and image sensor are all designed to capture light emitted from a 2D 'object plane'. Existing technologies, such as confocal or light sheet fluorescence microscopy have to utilize mechanical scanning, a time-multiplexing process, to capture a 3D image. In this paper, we present a 3D optical microscopy method based upon simultaneously illuminating and detecting multiple focal planes. This is implemented by adding two diffractive optical elements to modify the illumination and detection optics. We demonstrate that the image quality of this technique is comparable to conventional light sheet fluorescent microscopy with the advantage of the simultaneous imaging of multiple axial planes and reduced number of scans required to image the whole sample volume.

  5. Light and electron microscope assessment of the lytic activity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Microcystis cells were exposed to copper, B. mycoides B16 and Triton X-100, in order to ascertain the level of cell membrane damage. The membrane cell damage ... The electron microscopy observations appeared to reveal at least two mechanisms of Microcystis lysis (contact and parasitism). The light and electron ...

  6. Collaborative study on the effect of grinding on the detection of bones from processed animal proteins in feed by light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veys, Pascal; Planchon, Viviane; Colbert, Ruairi; Cruz, Clara; Frick, Geneviève; Ioannou, Ioannis; Marchis, Daniela; Nordkvist, Erik; Paradies-Severin, Inge; Pohto, Arja; Weiss, Roland; Baeten, Vincent; Berben, Gilbert

    2017-08-01

    Bone fragments are essential structures for the detection of processed animal proteins (PAPs) in feed by light microscopy for official controls according to Annex VI of European Union Regulation EC/152/2009. The preparation of samples submitted for analysis requires a grinding step to make them suitable for microscopic slide preparation and observation. However, there are no technical guidelines set down for this step despite the fact that it can lead to an increase in bone numbers due to fragmentation. This was demonstrated by an in-house study carried out by the Irish National Reference Laboratory (NRL) for animal protein detection. The present collaborative study investigated the possible effects of three different grinding conditions on the final result for a feed adulterated with 0.05 and 0.01% (w/w) of PAP. The microscopic analysis either combined or not with an Alizarin Red staining was carried out by 10 different laboratories. The results demonstrated that although a large variation in the numbers of bone fragments was noted, five of the six different grinding/staining combinations applied at two levels of PAP adulteration did not significantly (at p = 0.05) differ from one another. The only exception occurred when grinding the feed containing 0.05% of PAP with a rotor mill equipped with a 0.5-mm sieve and combined with a staining which resulted in a greater number of bone fragments by forced fragmentation. Overall, the impact of the grinding/staining combinations on the final results was shown to be negligible when considering the regulatory limit of detection (LOD) requirement for the method and the current rules of implementation of the light microscopic method. From a total of 180 analyses carried out on the feed matrix containing 0.05% of PAP no false-negative result was observed, and at a level of 0.01% PAP only 10 false-negative results occurred.

  7. Flow velocity and light level drive non-linear response of seagrass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villazán, B.; Brun, F.G.; Moreno-Marín, F; Bouma, T.J.; Vergara, J.J.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the interactive effects of light (low and high light doses) and flowvelocity (low, medium and high levels) under NH4+ enriched conditions on dynamic and morphologicalvariables of Zostera noltei plants in a 5 wk flume experiment. Our results showed a nonlinearresponse of Z. noltei in

  8. A new light on Alkaptonuria: A Fourier-transform infrared microscopy (FTIRM) and low energy X-ray fluorescence (LEXRF) microscopy correlative study on a rare disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, Elisa; Millucci, Lia; Merolle, Lucia; Bernardini, Giulia; Vaccari, Lisa; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Santucci, Annalisa

    2017-05-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an ultra-rare disease associated to the lack of an enzyme involved in tyrosine catabolism. This deficiency results in the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA) in the form of ochronotic pigment in joint cartilage, leading to a severe arthropathy. Secondary amyloidosis has been also unequivocally assessed as a comorbidity of AKU arthropathy. Composition of ochronotic pigment and how it is structurally related to amyloid is still unknown. We exploited Synchrotron Radiation Infrared and X-Ray Fluorescence microscopies in combination with conventional bio-assays and analytical tools to characterize chemical composition and morphology of AKU cartilage. We evinced that AKU cartilage is characterized by proteoglycans depletion, increased Sodium levels, accumulation of lipids in the peri-lacunar regions and amyloid formation. We also highlighted an increase of aromatic compounds and oxygen-containing species, depletion in overall Magnesium content (although localized in the peri-lacunar region) and the presence of calcium carbonate fragments in proximity of cartilage lacunae. We highlighted common features between AKU and arthropathy, but also specific signatures of the disease, like presence of amyloids and peculiar calcifications. Our analyses provide a unified picture of AKU cartilage, shedding a new light on the disease and opening new perspectives. Ochronotic pigment is a hallmark of AKU and responsible of tissue degeneration. Conventional bio-assays have not yet clarified its composition and its structural relationship with amyloids. The present work proposes new strategies for filling the aforementioned gap that encompass the integration of new analytical approaches with standardized analyses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Electron microscopy of primary cell cultures in solution and correlative optical microscopy using ASEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Kazumi; Kinoshita, Takaaki; Uemura, Takeshi; Motohashi, Hozumi; Watanabe, Yohei; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Sato, Mari; Suga, Mitsuo; Maruyama, Yuusuke; Tsuji, Noriko M.; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Nishihara, Shoko; Sato, Chikara

    2014-01-01

    Correlative light-electron microscopy of cells in a natural environment of aqueous liquid facilitates high-throughput observation of protein complex formation. ASEM allows the inverted SEM to observe the wet sample from below, while an optical microscope observes it from above quasi-simultaneously. The disposable ASEM dish with a silicon nitride (SiN) film window can be coated variously to realize the primary-culture of substrate-sensitive cells in a few milliliters of culture medium in a stable incubator environment. Neuron differentiation, neural networking, proplatelet-formation and phagocytosis were captured by optical or fluorescence microscopy, and imaged at high resolution by gold-labeled immuno-ASEM with/without metal staining. Fas expression on the cell surface was visualized, correlated to the spatial distribution of F-actin. Axonal partitioning was studied using primary-culture neurons, and presynaptic induction by GluRδ2-N-terminus-linked fluorescent magnetic beads was correlated to the presynaptic-marker Bassoon. Further, megakaryocytes secreting proplatelets were captured, and P-selectins with adherence activity were localized to some of the granules present by immuno-ASEM. The phagocytosis of lactic acid bacteria by dendritic cells was also imaged. Based on these studies, ASEM correlative microscopy promises to allow the study of various mesoscopic-scale dynamics in the near future. - Highlights: • In situ correlative light electron microscopy of samples in open solution by ASEM. • Primary cultures for in-solution CLEM by developing SiN-film coating methods • First visualization of fluorescent magnetic beads in aqueous solution by CLEM. • Presynaptic induction of neurons by GluRδ2-N-terminus-coated beads studied by CLEM. • Axonal partitioning, bacterial phagocytosis, platelet formation imaged by CLEM

  10. Electron microscopy of primary cell cultures in solution and correlative optical microscopy using ASEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirano, Kazumi; Kinoshita, Takaaki [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Department of Bioinformatics, Faculty of Engineering, Soka University, 1-236 Tangi-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-8577 (Japan); Uemura, Takeshi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology and Pharmacology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, 3-1-1 Asahi, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Motohashi, Hozumi [Department of Gene Expression Regulation, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, 4-1 Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Watanabe, Yohei; Ebihara, Tatsuhiko [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Nishiyama, Hidetoshi [JEOL Ltd., 1-2 Musashino 3-chome, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Sato, Mari [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Suga, Mitsuo [JEOL Ltd., 1-2 Musashino 3-chome, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Maruyama, Yuusuke; Tsuji, Noriko M. [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan); Yamamoto, Masayuki [Department of Medical Biochemistry, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryo-cho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575 (Japan); Nishihara, Shoko, E-mail: shoko@soka.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Biology, Department of Bioinformatics, Faculty of Engineering, Soka University, 1-236 Tangi-machi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-8577 (Japan); Sato, Chikara, E-mail: ti-sato@aist.go.jp [Biomedical Research Institute, National Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8566 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    Correlative light-electron microscopy of cells in a natural environment of aqueous liquid facilitates high-throughput observation of protein complex formation. ASEM allows the inverted SEM to observe the wet sample from below, while an optical microscope observes it from above quasi-simultaneously. The disposable ASEM dish with a silicon nitride (SiN) film window can be coated variously to realize the primary-culture of substrate-sensitive cells in a few milliliters of culture medium in a stable incubator environment. Neuron differentiation, neural networking, proplatelet-formation and phagocytosis were captured by optical or fluorescence microscopy, and imaged at high resolution by gold-labeled immuno-ASEM with/without metal staining. Fas expression on the cell surface was visualized, correlated to the spatial distribution of F-actin. Axonal partitioning was studied using primary-culture neurons, and presynaptic induction by GluRδ2-N-terminus-linked fluorescent magnetic beads was correlated to the presynaptic-marker Bassoon. Further, megakaryocytes secreting proplatelets were captured, and P-selectins with adherence activity were localized to some of the granules present by immuno-ASEM. The phagocytosis of lactic acid bacteria by dendritic cells was also imaged. Based on these studies, ASEM correlative microscopy promises to allow the study of various mesoscopic-scale dynamics in the near future. - Highlights: • In situ correlative light electron microscopy of samples in open solution by ASEM. • Primary cultures for in-solution CLEM by developing SiN-film coating methods • First visualization of fluorescent magnetic beads in aqueous solution by CLEM. • Presynaptic induction of neurons by GluRδ2-N-terminus-coated beads studied by CLEM. • Axonal partitioning, bacterial phagocytosis, platelet formation imaged by CLEM.

  11. Molecular Processes Studied at a Single-Molecule Level Using DNA Origami Nanostructures and Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilko Bald

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA origami nanostructures allow for the arrangement of different functionalities such as proteins, specific DNA structures, nanoparticles, and various chemical modifications with unprecedented precision. The arranged functional entities can be visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM which enables the study of molecular processes at a single-molecular level. Examples comprise the investigation of chemical reactions, electron-induced bond breaking, enzymatic binding and cleavage events, and conformational transitions in DNA. In this paper, we provide an overview of the advances achieved in the field of single-molecule investigations by applying atomic force microscopy to functionalized DNA origami substrates.

  12. Imaging bacterial spores by soft-x-ray microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stead, A.D.; Ford, T.W.; Judge, J.

    1997-01-01

    Bacterial spores are able to survive dehydration, but neither the physiological nor structural basis of this have been fully elucidated. Furthermore, once hydrated, spores often require activation before they will germinate. Several treatments can be used to activate spores, but in the case of Bacillus subtlis the most effective is heat treatment. The physiological mechanism associated with activation is also not understood, but some workers suggest that the loss of calcium from the spores may be critical. However, just prior to germination, the spores change from being phase bright to phase dark when viewed by light microscopy. Imaging spores by soft x-ray microscopy is possible without fixation. Thus, in contrast to electron microscopy, it is possible to compare the structure of dehydrated and hydrated spores in a manner not possible previously. A further advantage is that it is possible to monitor individual spores by phase contrast light microscopy immediately prior to imaging with soft x-rays; whereas, with both electron microscopy and biochemical studies, it is a population of spores being studied without knowledge of the phase characteristics of individual spores. This study has therefore tried to compare dehydrated and hydrated spores and to determine if there is a mass loss from individual spores as they pass the transition from being phase bright to phase dark

  13. Imaging bacterial spores by soft-x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stead, A.D.; Ford, T.W. [Univ. of London, Surrey (United Kingdom); Judge, J. [Unilever plc, Sharnbrook (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Bacterial spores are able to survive dehydration, but neither the physiological nor structural basis of this have been fully elucidated. Furthermore, once hydrated, spores often require activation before they will germinate. Several treatments can be used to activate spores, but in the case of Bacillus subtlis the most effective is heat treatment. The physiological mechanism associated with activation is also not understood, but some workers suggest that the loss of calcium from the spores may be critical. However, just prior to germination, the spores change from being phase bright to phase dark when viewed by light microscopy. Imaging spores by soft x-ray microscopy is possible without fixation. Thus, in contrast to electron microscopy, it is possible to compare the structure of dehydrated and hydrated spores in a manner not possible previously. A further advantage is that it is possible to monitor individual spores by phase contrast light microscopy immediately prior to imaging with soft x-rays; whereas, with both electron microscopy and biochemical studies, it is a population of spores being studied without knowledge of the phase characteristics of individual spores. This study has therefore tried to compare dehydrated and hydrated spores and to determine if there is a mass loss from individual spores as they pass the transition from being phase bright to phase dark.

  14. LED-FISH: Fluorescence microscopy based on light emitting diodes for the molecular analysis of Her-2/neu oncogene amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vollmer Ekkehard

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Light emitting diodes (LED, which are available as small monochromatic light sources with characteristic features such as maximum illumination power combined with minimum energy consumption and extremely long lifespan have already proved as a highly potential low-cost alternative for specific diagnostic applications in clinical medicine such as tuberculosis fluorescence microscopy. Likewise, the most reliable evaluation of Her-2/neu (c-erbB2 gene amplification, which has been established in the last few years for routine diagnosis in clinical pathology as determinant towards Herceptin-based treatment of patients with breast cancer, is based on fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and corresponding high priced fluorescence equipment. In order to test the possibility to utilize the advantages of low-cost LED technology on FISH analysis of c-erbB2 gene expression for routine diagnostic purposes, the applicability of a standard bright field Carl Zeiss Axiostar Plus microscope equipped with a Fraen AFTER* LED Fluorescence Microscope Kit for the detection of Her-2/neu gene signals was compared to an advanced Nikon Eclipse 80i fluorescence microscope in combination with a conventional 100W mercury vapor lamp. Both microscopes were fitted with the same Quicam FAST CCD digital camera to unequivocally compare the quality of the captured images. C-erbB2 gene expression was analyzed in 30 different human tissue samples of primary invasive breast cancer, following formalin fixation and subsequent paraffin-embedding. The Her2/neu gene signals (green were identifiable in the tumor cells in all cases and images of equal quality were captured under almost identical conditions by 480 nm (blue LED module equipped standard Axiostar microscope as compared to conventional fluorescence microscopy. In this first attempt, these monochromatic LED elements proved in principle to be suitable for the detection of Her-2/neu gene expression by FISH. Thus, our own

  15. Fluorescence microscopy for the characterization of structural integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Kenneth W.; Leonhardt, Todd A.

    1991-01-01

    The absorption characteristics of light and the optical technique of fluorescence microscopy for enhancing metallographic interpretation are presented. Characterization of thermally sprayed coatings by optical microscopy suffers because of the tendency for misidentification of the microstructure produced by metallographic preparation. Gray scale, in bright field microscopy, is frequently the only means of differentiating the actual structural details of porosity, cracking, and debonding of coatings. Fluorescence microscopy is a technique that helps to distinguish the artifacts of metallographic preparation (pullout, cracking, debonding) from the microstructure of the specimen by color contrasting structural differences. Alternative instrumentation and the use of other dye systems are also discussed. The combination of epoxy vacuum infiltration with fluorescence microscopy to verify microstructural defects is an effective means to characterize advanced materials and to assess structural integrity.

  16. Correlation of Cell Surface Biomarker Expression Levels with Adhesion Contact Angle Measured by Lateral Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, Jenna A; Mace, Charles R

    2018-06-05

    Immunophenotyping is typically achieved using flow cytometry, but any influence a biomarker may have on adhesion or surface recognition cannot be determined concurrently. In this manuscript, we demonstrate the utility of lateral microscopy for correlating cell surface biomarker expression levels with quantitative descriptions of cell morphology. With our imaging system, we observed single cells from two T cell lines and two B cell lines adhere to antibody-coated substrates and quantified this adhesion using contact angle measurements. We found that SUP-T1 and CEM CD4+ cells, both of which express similar levels of CD4, experienced average changes in contact angle that were not statistically different from one another on surfaces coated in anti-CD4. However, MAVER-1 and BJAB K20 cells, both of which express different levels of CD20, underwent average changes in contact angle that were significantly different from one another on surfaces coated in anti-CD20. Our results indicate that changes in cell contact angles on antibody-coated substrates reflect the expression levels of corresponding antigens on the surfaces of cells as determined by flow cytometry. Our lateral microscopy approach offers a more reproducible and quantitative alternative to evaluate adhesion compared to commonly used wash assays and can be extended to many additional immunophenotyping applications to identify cells of interest within heterogeneous populations.

  17. Comparison of two methods of preparation of tissue to study the internal anatomy of the delphacid Togosodes orizicolus with microscopy of electronic light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macaya-Lizano, A.V.; Pereira, R.; Espinoza, A.M.

    1997-01-01

    Two methods of embedding, sectioning and staining were developed to study the internal anatomy of delphacid plant hopper Tagosodes orizicolus, one of the most important plagues of rice in Latin America and the only vector of the white leaf tenuivirus (RHBV), using both light and electron microscopy. The paraffines-hematoxyline-eosin Y method allows color identification of tissues, for example purple for fat tissue, pink for muscles, yellow-brown for exocutile, while the resin-toluidine-blue method preserves better the ultrastructure but do not permit color identification. The information obtained by these procedures is complementary and the material can also be used for in situ studies by immuno microscopy, to assess the changes in cell ultrastructure and the localization and replication of the RHBV during its infection cycle in the insect vector. (author) [es

  18. Virtual Hematoxylin and Eosin Transillumination Microscopy Using Epi-Fluorescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomelli, Michael G; Husvogt, Lennart; Vardeh, Hilde; Faulkner-Jones, Beverly E; Hornegger, Joachim; Connolly, James L; Fujimoto, James G

    2016-01-01

    We derive a physically realistic model for the generation of virtual transillumination, white light microscopy images using epi-fluorescence measurements from thick, unsectioned tissue. We demonstrate this technique by generating virtual transillumination H&E images of unsectioned human breast tissue from epi-fluorescence multiphoton microscopy data. The virtual transillumination algorithm is shown to enable improved contrast and color accuracy compared with previous color mapping methods. Finally, we present an open source implementation of the algorithm in OpenGL, enabling real-time GPU-based generation of virtual transillumination microscopy images using conventional fluorescence microscopy systems.

  19. Integration of a high-NA light microscope in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonnevylle, A C; Van Tol, R F C; Liv, N; Narvaez, A C; Effting, A P J; Kruit, P; Hoogenboom, J P

    2013-10-01

    We present an integrated light-electron microscope in which an inverted high-NA objective lens is positioned inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). The SEM objective lens and the light objective lens have a common axis and focal plane, allowing high-resolution optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy on the same area of a sample simultaneously. Components for light illumination and detection can be mounted outside the vacuum, enabling flexibility in the construction of the light microscope. The light objective lens can be positioned underneath the SEM objective lens during operation for sub-10 μm alignment of the fields of view of the light and electron microscopes. We demonstrate in situ epifluorescence microscopy in the SEM with a numerical aperture of 1.4 using vacuum-compatible immersion oil. For a 40-nm-diameter fluorescent polymer nanoparticle, an intensity profile with a FWHM of 380 nm is measured whereas the SEM performance is uncompromised. The integrated instrument may offer new possibilities for correlative light and electron microscopy in the life sciences as well as in physics and chemistry. © 2013 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2013 Royal Microscopical Society.

  20. Contributed Review: Review of integrated correlative light and electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, Frank Jan; Otto, Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    New developments in the field of microscopy enable to acquire increasing amounts of information from large sample areas and at an increased resolution. Depending on the nature of the technique, the information may reveal morphological, structural, chemical, and still other sample characteristics. In

  1. Use of astronomy filters in fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    Monochrome astronomy filters are well suited for use as excitation or suppression filters in fluorescence microscopy. Because of their particular optical design, such filters can be combined with standard halogen light sources for excitation in many fluorescent probes. In this "low energy excitation," photobleaching (fading) or other irritations of native specimens are avoided. Photomicrographs can be taken from living motile fluorescent specimens also with a flash so that fluorescence images can be created free from indistinctness caused by movement. Special filter cubes or dichroic mirrors are not needed for our method. By use of suitable astronomy filters, fluorescence microscopy can be carried out with standard laboratory microscopes equipped with condensers for bright-field (BF) and dark-field (DF) illumination in transmitted light. In BF excitation, the background brightness can be modulated in tiny steps up to dark or black. Moreover, standard industry microscopes fitted with a vertical illuminator for examinations of opaque probes in DF or BF illumination based on incident light (wafer inspections, for instance) can also be used for excitation in epi-illumination when adequate astronomy filters are inserted as excitatory and suppression filters in the illuminating and imaging light path. In all variants, transmission bands can be modulated by transmission shift.

  2. Super-resolution and super-localization microscopy: A novel tool for imaging chemical and biological processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Bin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Optical microscopy imaging of single molecules and single particles is an essential method for studying fundamental biological and chemical processes at the molecular and nanometer scale. The best spatial resolution (~ λ/2) achievable in traditional optical microscopy is governed by the diffraction of light. However, single molecule-based super-localization and super-resolution microscopy imaging techniques have emerged in the past decade. Individual molecules can be localized with nanometer scale accuracy and precision for studying of biological and chemical processes.This work uncovered the heterogeneous properties of the pore structures. In this dissertation, the coupling of molecular transport and catalytic reaction at the single molecule and single particle level in multilayer mesoporous nanocatalysts was elucidated. Most previous studies dealt with these two important phenomena separately. A fluorogenic oxidation reaction of non-fluorescent amplex red to highly fluorescent resorufin was tested. The diffusion behavior of single resorufin molecules in aligned nanopores was studied using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM).

  3. Quantitative neuroanatomy of all Purkinje cells with light sheet microscopy and high-throughput image analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovico eSilvestri

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Characterizing the cytoarchitecture of mammalian central nervous system on a brain-wide scale is becoming a compelling need in neuroscience. For example, realistic modeling of brain activity requires the definition of quantitative features of large neuronal populations in the whole brain. Quantitative anatomical maps will also be crucial to classify the cytoarchtitectonic abnormalities associated with neuronal pathologies in a high reproducible and reliable manner. In this paper, we apply recent advances in optical microscopy and image analysis to characterize the spatial distribution of Purkinje cells across the whole cerebellum. Light sheet microscopy was used to image with micron-scale resolution a fixed and cleared cerebellum of an L7-GFP transgenic mouse, in which all Purkinje cells are fluorescently labeled. A fast and scalable algorithm for fully automated cell identification was applied on the image to extract the position of all the fluorescent Purkinje cells. This vectorized representation of the cell population allows a thorough characterization of the complex three-dimensional distribution of the neurons, highlighting the presence of gaps inside the lamellar organization of Purkinje cells, whose density is believed to play a significant role in autism spectrum disorders. Furthermore, clustering analysis of the localized somata permits dividing the whole cerebellum in groups of Purkinje cells with high spatial correlation, suggesting new possibilities of anatomical partition. The quantitative approach presented here can be extended to study the distribution of different types of cell in many brain regions and across the whole encephalon, providing a robust base for building realistic computational models of the brain, and for unbiased morphological tissue screening in presence of pathologies and/or drug treatments.

  4. High spatial resolution soft-x-ray microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer-Ilse, W.; Medecki, H.; Brown, J.T. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    A new soft x-ray microscope (XM-1) with high spatial resolution has been constructed by the Center for X-ray Optics. It uses bending magnet radiation from beamline 6.1 at the Advanced Light Source, and is used in a variety of projects and applications in the life and physical sciences. Most of these projects are ongoing. The instrument uses zone plate lenses and achieves a resolution of 43 nm, measured over 10% to 90% intensity with a knife edge test sample. X-ray microscopy permits the imaging of relatively thick samples, up to 10 {mu}m thick, in water. XM-1 has an easy to use interface, that utilizes visible light microscopy to precisely position and focus the specimen. The authors describe applications of this device in the biological sciences, as well as in studying industrial applications including structured polymer samples.

  5. Feeling Safe in the Dark : Examining the Effect of Entrapment, Lighting Levels, and Gender on Feelings of Safety and Lighting Policy Acceptability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boomsma, Christine; Steg, LInda

    This research examined to what extent physical factors, notably lighting and entrapment (blocked escape), and individual factors, notably gender, affect feelings of safety and the acceptability of reduced lighting levels. The authors reasoned that acceptability of reduced street lighting depends on

  6. Proximal design for a multimodality endoscope with multiphoton microscopy, optical coherence microscopy and visual modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiekens, Kelli C.; Talarico, Olivia; Barton, Jennifer K.

    2018-02-01

    A multimodality endoscope system has been designed for early detection of ovarian cancer. Multiple illumination and detection systems must be integrated in a compact, stable, transportable configuration to meet the requirements of a clinical setting. The proximal configuration presented here supports visible light navigation with a large field of view and low resolution, high resolution multiphoton microscopy (MPM), and high resolution optical coherence microscopy (OCM). All modalities are integrated into a single optical system in the endoscope. The system requires two light sources: a green laser for visible light navigation and a compact fiber based femtosecond laser for MPM and OCM. Using an inline wavelength division multiplexer, the two sources are combined into a single mode fiber. To accomplish OCM, a fiber coupler is used to separate the femtosecond laser into a reference arm and signal arm. The reflected reference arm and the signal from the sample are interfered and wavelength separated by a reflection grating and detected using a linear array. The MPM signal is collimated and goes through a series of filters to separate the 2nd and 3rd harmonics as well as twophoton excitation florescence (2PEF) and 3PEF. Each signal is independently detected on a photo multiplier tube and amplified. The visible light is collected by multiple high numerical aperture fibers at the endoscope tip which are bundled into one SMA adapter at the proximal end and connected to a photodetector. This integrated system design is compact, efficient and meets both optical and mechanical requirements for clinical applications.

  7. Reduction of parasitic interferences in digital holographic microscopy by numerically decreased coherence length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmeier, S.; Langehanenberg, P.; von Bally, G.; Kemper, B.

    2012-01-01

    Due to the large coherence length of laser light, optical path length (OPL) resolution in laser based digital holographic microscopy suffers from parasitic interferences caused by multiple reflections within the experimental setup. Use of partially coherent light reduces this drawback but requires precise and stable matching of object and reference arm's OPLs and limits the spatial frequency of the interference pattern in off-axis holography. Here, we investigate if the noise properties of spectrally broadened light sources can be generated numerically. Therefore, holograms are coherently captured at different laser wavelengths and the corresponding reconstructed wave fields are numerically superimposed utilizing variable weightings. Gaussian and rectangular spectral shapes of the so synthesized field are analyzed with respect to the resulting noise level, which is quantified in OPL distributions of a reflective test target. Utilizing a Gaussian weighting, the noise level is found to be similar to the one obtained with the partially coherent light of a superluminescent diode. With a rectangular shaped synthesized spectrum, noise is reduced more efficient than with a Gaussian one. The applicability of the method in label-free cell analysis is demonstrated by quantitative phase contrast images obtained from living cancer cells.

  8. A review of cellphone microscopy for disease detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendere, R; Myburg, N; Douglas, T S

    2015-12-01

    The expansion in global cellphone network coverage coupled with advances in cellphone imaging capabilities present an opportunity for the advancement of cellphone microscopy as a low-cost alternative to conventional microscopy for disease detection in resource-limited regions. The development of cellphone microscopy has also benefitted from the availability of low-cost miniature microscope components such as low-power light-emitting diodes and ball lenses. As a result, researchers are developing hardware and software techniques that would enable such microscopes to produce high-resolution, diagnostic-quality images. This approach may lead to more widespread delivery of diagnostic services in resource-limited areas where there is a shortage of the skilled labour required for conventional microscopy and where prevalence of infectious and other diseases is still high. In this paper, we review current techniques, clinical applications and challenges faced in the field of cellphone microscopy. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  9. Confocal Cornea Microscopy Detects Involvement of Corneal Nerve Fibers in a Patient with Light-Chain Amyloid Neuropathy Caused by Multiple Myeloma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietrich Sturm

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the subbasal corneal plexus detected by confocal cornea microscopy (CCM have been described for various types of neuropathy. An involvement of these nerves within light-chain (AL amyloid neuropathy (a rare cause of polyneuropathy has never been shown. Here, we report on a case of a patient suffering from neuropathy caused by AL amyloidosis and underlying multiple myeloma. Small-fiber damage was detected by CCM.

  10. Virtual Hematoxylin and Eosin Transillumination Microscopy Using Epi-Fluorescence Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Giacomelli

    Full Text Available We derive a physically realistic model for the generation of virtual transillumination, white light microscopy images using epi-fluorescence measurements from thick, unsectioned tissue. We demonstrate this technique by generating virtual transillumination H&E images of unsectioned human breast tissue from epi-fluorescence multiphoton microscopy data. The virtual transillumination algorithm is shown to enable improved contrast and color accuracy compared with previous color mapping methods. Finally, we present an open source implementation of the algorithm in OpenGL, enabling real-time GPU-based generation of virtual transillumination microscopy images using conventional fluorescence microscopy systems.

  11. Polarized light microscopy for 3-dimensional mapping of collagen fiber architecture in ocular tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Jan, Ning-Jiun; Brazile, Bryn; Voorhees, Andrew; Lathrop, Kira L; Sigal, Ian A

    2018-04-06

    Collagen fibers play a central role in normal eye mechanics and pathology. In ocular tissues, collagen fibers exhibit a complex 3-dimensional (3D) fiber orientation, with both in-plane (IP) and out-of-plane (OP) orientations. Imaging techniques traditionally applied to the study of ocular tissues only quantify IP fiber orientation, providing little information on OP fiber orientation. Accurate description of the complex 3D fiber microstructures of the eye requires quantifying full 3D fiber orientation. Herein, we present 3dPLM, a technique based on polarized light microscopy developed to quantify both IP and OP collagen fiber orientations of ocular tissues. The performance of 3dPLM was examined by simulation and experimental verification and validation. The experiments demonstrated an excellent agreement between extracted and true 3D fiber orientation. Both IP and OP fiber orientations can be extracted from the sclera and the cornea, providing previously unavailable quantitative 3D measures and insight into the tissue microarchitecture. Together, the results demonstrate that 3dPLM is a powerful imaging technique for the analysis of ocular tissues. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Pattern of glomerular diseases in oman: A study based on light microscopy and immunofluorescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasar Yousuf Alwahaibi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Light microscopy and immunofluorescence play an important part in the final diagnosis of renal biopsy. The aim of this study was to analyze the pattern of various glomerular diseases in Oman. A total of 424 renal biopsies were retrospectively analyzed at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital between 1999 and 2010. Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS, minimal change disease (MCD, membranous glomerulopathy (MGN and IgA nephropathy were the most common primary glomerular diseases encountered, accounting for 21.2%, 17%, 12.3% and 8.3%, respectively, of all cases. Lupus nephritis was the most common secondary glomerular disease and was the most prevalent among all biopsies, accounting for 30.4% of all biopsies. Amyloidosis was seen in only two cases. The presence of fluorescein isothiocyanatefibrin in all renal cases was low when compared with IgG, IgA, IgM, C3 and C1q markers. In conclusion, based on the findings of this study, lupus nephritis was the most common of all glomerular diseases and FSGS was the most common primary glomerular disease. The importance of fluorescein isothiocyanate-fibrin in the diagnosis of renal biopsy needs to be further investigated.

  13. Acute radiation nephritis. Light and electron microscopic observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapur, S.; Chandra, R.; Antonovych, T.

    1977-01-01

    Light and electron microscopy were used to observe acute radiation nephritis. By light microscopy the changes were of fibrinoid necrosis of the arteries and arterioles with segmental necrosis of the glomerular tufts. By electron microscopy the endocapillary cells reacted by hypertrophy and hyperplasia with increase in cytoplasmic organelles. In addition, disruption of endothelial and epithelial cells from the basement membranes were seen. It is concluded that the electron microscopic changes were unique and may be helpful in differentiating the necrotizing glomerulitis seen in other conditions, especially malignant hypertension

  14. Subdiffraction Multicolor Imaging of the Nuclear Periphery with 3D Structured Illumination Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermelleh, Lothar; Carlton, Peter M.; Haase, Sebastian; Shao, Lin; Winoto, Lukman; Kner, Peter; Burke, Brian; Cardoso, M. Cristina; Agard, David A.; Gustafsson, Mats G. L.; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Sedat, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence light microscopy allows multicolor visualization of cellular components with high specificity, but its utility has until recently been constrained by the intrinsic limit of spatial resolution. We applied three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) to circumvent this limit and to study the mammalian nucleus. By simultaneously imaging chromatin, nuclear lamina, and the nuclear pore complex (NPC), we observed several features that escape detection by conventional microscopy. We could resolve single NPCs that colocalized with channels in the lamin network and peripheral heterochromatin. We could differentially localize distinct NPC components and detect double-layered invaginations of the nuclear envelope in prophase as previously seen only by electron microscopy. Multicolor 3D-SIM opens new and facile possibilities to analyze subcellular structures beyond the diffraction limit of the emitted light. PMID:18535242

  15. The ring structure and organization of light harvesting 2 complexes in a reconstituted lipid bilayer, resolved by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamouli, Amalia; Kafi, Sidig; Klein, Dionne C G; Oosterkamp, Tjerk H; Frenken, Joost W M; Cogdell, Richard J; Aartsma, Thijs J

    2003-04-01

    The main function of the transmembrane light-harvesting complexes in photosynthetic organisms is the absorption of a light quantum and its subsequent rapid transfer to a reaction center where a charge separation occurs. A combination of freeze-thaw and dialysis methods were used to reconstitute the detergent-solubilized Light Harvesting 2 complex (LH2) of the purple bacterium Rhodopseudomonas acidophila strain 10050 into preformed egg phosphatidylcholine liposomes, without the need for extra chemical agents. The LH2-containing liposomes opened up to a flat bilayer, which were imaged with tapping and contact mode atomic force microscopy under ambient and physiological conditions, respectively. The LH2 complexes were packed in quasicrystalline domains. The endoplasmic and periplasmic sides of the LH2 complexes could be distinguished by the difference in height of the protrusions from the lipid bilayer. The results indicate that the complexes entered in intact liposomes. In addition, it was observed that the most hydrophilic side, the periplasmic, enters first in the membrane. In contact mode the molecular structure of the periplasmic side of the transmembrane pigment-protein complex was observed. Using Föster's theory for describing the distance dependent energy transfer, we estimate the dipole strength for energy transfer between two neighboring LH2s, based on the architecture of the imaged unit cell.

  16. Cathodoluminescence Microscopy of Nanostructures on Transparent Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narváez, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL), the excitation of light by an electron beam, has gained attention as an analysis tool for investigating the optical response of a structure, at a resolution that approaches that in electron microscopy, in the nanometer range. However, the application possibilities are

  17. Effects of gamma radiation on hard dental tissues of albino rats: investigation by light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Faramawy, Nabil; Ameen, Reham; El-Haddad, Khaled; El-Zainy, Medhat

    2013-08-01

    The present work aims at studying the effect of gamma radiation on the hard dental tissues. Eighty adult male albino rats with weights of about 250 g were used. The rats were irradiated at 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 and 6.0 Gy whole-body gamma doses. The effects on hard dental tissue samples were investigated after 48 h in histological and ground sections using light microscopy. Areas of acid phosphatase activity were detected using tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) stains. Observation of histological sections revealed disturbance in predentin thickness and odontoblastic layer as the irradiation dose increased. In cementum, widened cementocytes lacunae were occasionally detected even with low irradiated doses. On the other hand, relatively homogenous enamel was detected with darkened areas in enamel surface at doses over than 0.5 Gy. TRAP-positive cells were detected on the surface of the dentin of irradiated groups as well as cementum surface. Minimal detectable changes were observed in ground sections.

  18. Microscopy as a diagnostic tool in pulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Singhal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis continues to cast a huge impact on humanity with its high incidence and mortality, especially in developing countries. For tuberculosis case detection, microscopy continues to be indispensible, given its low cost, rapidity, simplicity of procedure and high specificity. Modifications have attempted to improve the sensitivity of microscopy which include: concentration methods such as centrifugation, N-acetyl cysteine–sodium hydroxide, bleach, ammonium sulfate or chitin. Furthermore, classical Ziehl–Neelsen (ZN staining has been subjected to varying carbol fuchsin concentrations or replaced by Kinyoun staining, fluorescent microscopy or immune-fluorescence. Currently, light emitting diode fluorescence is recognizably the most plausible method as an alternative to ZN staining.

  19. Resonant Scanning with Large Field of View Reduces Photobleaching and Enhances Fluorescence Yield in STED Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong; Wu, Xundong; Lu, Rong; Zhang, Jin; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico

    2015-10-01

    Photobleaching is a major limitation of superresolution Stimulated Depletion Emission (STED) microscopy. Fast scanning has long been considered an effective means to reduce photobleaching in fluorescence microscopy, but a careful quantitative study of this issue is missing. In this paper, we show that the photobleaching rate in STED microscopy can be slowed down and the fluorescence yield be enhanced by scanning with high speed, enabled by using large field of view in a custom-built resonant-scanning STED microscope. The effect of scanning speed on photobleaching and fluorescence yield is more remarkable at higher levels of depletion laser irradiance, and virtually disappears in conventional confocal microscopy. With ≥6 GW∙cm(-2) depletion irradiance, we were able to extend the fluorophore survival time of Atto 647N and Abberior STAR 635P by ~80% with 8-fold wider field of view. We confirm that STED Photobleaching is primarily caused by the depletion light acting upon the excited fluorophores. Experimental data agree with a theoretical model. Our results encourage further increasing the linear scanning speed for photobleaching reduction in STED microscopy.

  20. Analyzing Lysosome-Related Organelles by Electron Microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Hurbain, Ilse

    2017-04-29

    Intracellular organelles have a particular morphological signature that can only be appreciated by ultrastructural analysis at the electron microscopy level. Optical imaging and associated methodologies allow to explore organelle localization and their dynamics at the cellular level. Deciphering the biogenesis and functions of lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles (LROs) and their dysfunctions requires their visualization and detailed characterization at high resolution by electron microscopy. Here, we provide detailed protocols for studying LROs by transmission electron microscopy. While conventional electron microscopy and its recent improvements is the method of choice to investigate organelle morphology, immunoelectron microscopy allows to localize organelle components and description of their molecular make up qualitatively and quantitatively.

  1. The role of vitamin E in the prevention of zoledronic acid-induced nephrotoxicity in rats: a light and electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sert, İbrahim Unal; Kilic, Ozcan; Akand, Murat; Saglik, Lutfi; Avunduk, Mustafa Cihat; Erdemli, Esra

    2018-03-01

    Bisphosphonates are widely used in metastatic cancer such as prostate and breast cancer, and their nephrotoxic effects have been established previously. In this study we aimed to evaluate both the nephrotoxic effects of zoledronic acid (ZA) and the protective effects of vitamin E (Vit-E) on this process under light and electron microscopy. A total of 30 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups. The first group constituted the control group. The second group was given i.v. ZA of 3 mg/kg once every 3 weeks for 12 weeks from the tail vein. The third group received the same dosage of ZA with an additional i.m . injection of 15 mg Vit-E every week for 12 weeks. Tissues were taken 4 days after the last dose of ZA for histopathological and ultrastructural evaluation. Paller score, tubular epithelial thickness and basal membrane thickness were calculated for each group. For group 2, the p -values are all < 0.001 for Paller score, epitelial thickness, and basal membrane thickness. For group 3 (ZA + Vit. E), the p -values are < 0.001 for Paller score, 0.996 for epitelial thickness, and < 0.001 basal membrane thickness. Significant differences were also observed in ultrastructural changes for group 2. However, adding Vit-E to ZA administration reversed all the histopathological changes to some degree, with statistical significance. Administration of ZA had nephrotoxic effects on rat kidney observed under both light and electron microscopy. Concomitant administration of Vit-E significantly reduces toxic histopathological effects of ZA.

  2. Low-temperature fabrication and characterization of a symmetric hybrid organic–inorganic slab waveguide for evanescent light microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnarsson, Björn; Mapar, Mokhtar; Sjöberg, Mattias; Alizadehheidari, Mohammadreza; Höök, Fredrik

    2018-06-01

    Organic and inorganic solid materials form the building blocks for most of today’s high-technological instruments and devices. However, challenges related to dissimilar material properties have hampered the synthesis of thin-film devices comprised of both organic and inorganic films. We here give a detailed description of a carefully optimized processing protocol used for the construction of a three-layered hybrid organic–inorganic waveguide-chip intended for combined scattering and fluorescence evanescent-wave microscopy in aqueous environments using conventional upright microscopes. An inorganic core layer (SiO2 or Si3N4), embedded symmetrically in an organic cladding layer (CYTOP), aids simple, yet efficient in-coupling of light, and since the organic cladding layer is refractive index matched to water, low stray-light (background) scattering of the propagating light is ensured. Another major advantage is that the inorganic core layer makes the chip compatible with multiple well-established surface functionalization schemes that allows for a broad range of applications, including detection of single lipid vesicles, metallic nanoparticles or cells in complex environments, either label-free—by direct detection of scattered light—or by use of fluorescence excitation and emission. Herein, focus is put on a detailed description of the fabrication of the waveguide-chip, together with a fundamental characterization of its optical properties and performance, particularly in comparison with conventional epi illumination. Quantitative analysis of images obtained from both fluorescence and scattering intensities from surface-immobilized polystyrene nanoparticles in suspensions of different concentrations, revealed enhanced signal-to-noise and signal-to-background ratios for the waveguide illumination compared to the epi-illumination.

  3. On the study of level density parameters for some deformed light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonmezoglu, S.

    2005-01-01

    The nuclear level density, which is the number of energy levels/MeV at an excitation energy Ex , is a characteristic property of every nucleus. Total level densities are among the key quantities in statistical calculations in many fields, such as nuclear physics, astrophysics, spallation s neutrons measurements, and studies of intermediate-energy heavy-ion collisions. The nuclear level density is an important physical quantity both from the fundamental point of view as well as in understanding the particle and gamma ray emission in various reactions. In light and heavy deformed nucleus, the gamma-ray energies drop with decreasing spin in a very regular fashion. The nuclear level density parameters have been usually used in investigation of the nuclear level density. This parameter itself changes with excitation energy depending on both shell effect in the single particle model and different excitation modes in the collective models. In this study, the energy level density parameters of some deformed light nucleus (40 C a, 47 T i, 59 N i, 79 S e, 80 B r) are determined by using energy spectrum of the interest nucleus for different band. In calculation of energy-level density parameters dependent upon excitation energy of nuclei studied, a model was considered which relies on the fact that energy levels of deformed light nuclei, just like those of deformed heavy nuclei, are equidistant and which relies on collective motions of their nucleons. The present calculation results have been compared with the corresponding experimental and theoretical results. The obtained results are in good agreement with the experimental results

  4. Lensfree microscopy on a cellphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Derek; Mudanyali, Onur; Oztoprak, Cetin; Isikman, Serhan O.; Sencan, Ikbal; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate lensfree digital microscopy on a cellphone. This compact and light-weight holographic microscope installed on a cellphone does not utilize any lenses, lasers or other bulky optical components and it may offer a cost-effective tool for telemedicine applications to address various global health challenges. Weighing ~38 grams (cellphone where the samples are loaded from the side, and are vertically illuminated by a simple light-emitting diode (LED). This incoherent LED light is then scattered from each micro-object to coherently interfere with the background light, creating the lensfree hologram of each object on the detector array of the cellphone. These holographic signatures captured by the cellphone permit reconstruction of microscopic images of the objects through rapid digital processing. We report the performance of this lensfree cellphone microscope by imaging various sized micro-particles, as well as red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and a waterborne parasite (Giardia lamblia). PMID:20445943

  5. Ultrafast Science Opportunities with Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DURR, HERMANN; Wang, X.J., ed.

    2016-04-28

    X-rays and electrons are two of the most fundamental probes of matter. When the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world’s first x-ray free electron laser, began operation in 2009, it transformed ultrafast science with the ability to generate laser-like x-ray pulses from the manipulation of relativistic electron beams. This document describes a similar future transformation. In Transmission Electron Microscopy, ultrafast relativistic (MeV energy) electron pulses can achieve unsurpassed spatial and temporal resolution. Ultrafast temporal resolution will be the next frontier in electron microscopy and can ideally complement ultrafast x-ray science done with free electron lasers. This document describes the Grand Challenge science opportunities in chemistry, material science, physics and biology that arise from an MeV ultrafast electron diffraction & microscopy facility, especially when coupled with linac-based intense THz and X-ray pump capabilities.

  6. Hybrid fluorescence and electron cryo-microscopy for simultaneous electron and photon imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Hirofumi; Fukuda, Yoshiyuki; Arai, Yoshihiro; Terakawa, Susumu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Nagayama, Kuniaki

    2014-01-01

    Integration of fluorescence light and transmission electron microscopy into the same device would represent an important advance in correlative microscopy, which traditionally involves two separate microscopes for imaging. To achieve such integration, the primary technical challenge that must be solved regards how to arrange two objective lenses used for light and electron microscopy in such a manner that they can properly focus on a single specimen. To address this issue, both lateral displacement of the specimen between two lenses and specimen rotation have been proposed. Such movement of the specimen allows sequential collection of two kinds of microscopic images of a single target, but prevents simultaneous imaging. This shortcoming has been made up by using a simple optical device, a reflection mirror. Here, we present an approach toward the versatile integration of fluorescence and electron microscopy for simultaneous imaging. The potential of simultaneous hybrid microscopy was demonstrated by fluorescence and electron sequential imaging of a fluorescent protein expressed in cells and cathodoluminescence imaging of fluorescent beads. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The hematology of captive Bobtail lizards (Tiliqua rugosa): blood counts, light microscopy, cytochemistry, and ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, Cheryl A; Gaál, Tibor; Mills, Jennifer N

    2016-12-01

    Bobtail lizards (Tiliqua rugosa) are native to Australia. The only previous study on the hematology of this species documented just 6 animals. The aims of this study were to characterize the light microscopy, ultrastructure and cytochemistry of blood cells, and evaluate CBCs of captive Bobtail lizards. Over 2 consecutive summers, heparinized venous blood was collected from the ventral coccygeal vein of 46 clinically healthy, captive indoor- or outdoor-housed adult Bobtails. Complete blood cell counts and smear evaluations were performed, and cytochemical stains and transmission electron microscopy were used to further characterize blood cells. The eosinophils of this species were uniformly vacuolated: a unique feature not previously reported in reptiles. Heterophils were the predominant leukocyte, with fewer lymphocytes, azurophilic and nonazurophilic monocytes, occasional eosinophils, and basophils. Thrombocytes were frequently clumped. Slight polychromasia (0-15% of erythrocytes) was typically present. Hemogregarine parasites were seen on some smears. The range of CBC results was often wide. The PCV ranged from 11% to 38%. Total plasma proteins by refractometry were between 3.5 and 7.8 g/dL. Hemoglobin ranged between 2.6 and 12.6 g/dL by the modified hemoglobin-hydroxylamine method. Manual RBC count was 0.35-1.27 × 10 6 /μL, and WBC count was 2.86-22.66 × 10 3 /μL. Bobtail lizards housed outdoors had lower PCVs than indoor-housed animals. Bobtails with hemogregarine infections had lower PCVs than noninfected lizards. Ranges for CBC data were often very wide, influenced by preanalytic and analytic factors. Hemogregarine infection is associated with a decreased PCV, suggesting that some hemogregarine species are pathogenic in this population. © 2016 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  8. Perspectives in Super-resolved Fluorescence Microscopy: What comes next?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Christoph; Birk, Udo

    2016-04-01

    The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 has been awarded to three scientists involved in the development of STED and PALM super-resolution fluorescence microscopy (SRM) methods. They have proven that it is possible to overcome the hundred year old theoretical limit for the resolution potential of light microscopy (of about 200 nm for visible light), which for decades has precluded a direct glimpse of the molecular machinery of life. None of the present-day super-resolution techniques have invalidated the Abbe limit for light optical detection; however, they have found clever ways around it. In this report, we discuss some of the challenges still to be resolved before arising SRM approaches will be fit to bring about the revolution in Biology and Medicine envisaged. Some of the challenges discussed are the applicability to image live and/or large samples, the further enhancement of resolution, future developments of labels, and multi-spectral approaches.

  9. Perspectives in Super-resolved Fluorescence Microscopy: What comes next?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph eCremer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 has been awarded to three scientists involved in the development of STED and PALM super-resolution fluorescence microscopy (SRM methods. They have proven that it is possible to overcome the hundred year old theoretical limit for the resolution potential of light microscopy (of about 200 nm for visible light, which for decades has precluded a direct glimpse of the molecular machinery of life. None of the present-day super-resolution techniques have invalidated the Abbe limit for light optical detection; however, they have found clever ways around it. In this report, we discuss some of the challenges still to be resolved before arising SRM approaches will be fit to bring about the revolution in Biology and Medicine envisaged. Some of the challenges discussed are the applicability to image live and/or large samples, the further enhancement of resolution, future developments of labels, and multi-spectral approaches.

  10. Performance of LED-based fluorescence microscopy to diagnose tuberculosis in a peripheral health centre in Nairobi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryline Bonnet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sputum microscopy is the only tuberculosis (TB diagnostic available at peripheral levels of care in resource limited countries. Its sensitivity is low, particularly in high HIV prevalence settings. Fluorescence microscopy (FM can improve performance of microscopy and with the new light emitting diode (LED technologies could be appropriate for peripheral settings. The study aimed to compare the performance of LED-FM versus Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN microscopy and to assess feasibility of LED-FM at a low level of care in a high HIV prevalence country. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted in an urban health clinic in Nairobi, Kenya. Three sputum specimens were collected over 2 days from suspected TB patients. Each sample was processed with Auramine O and ZN methods and a 4(th specimen was collected for TB culture reference standard. Auramine smears were read using the same microscope, equipped with the FluoLED™ fluorescence illuminator. Inter-reader agreement, reading time and technicians' acceptability assessed feasibility. RESULTS: 497 patients were included and 1394 specimens were collected. The detection yields of LED-FM and ZN microscopy were 20.3% and 20.6% (p = 0.64, respectively. Sensitivity was 73.2% for LED-FM and 72% for ZN microscopy, p = 0.32. It was 96.7% and 95.9% for specificity, p = 0.53. Inter-reader agreement was high (kappa = 0.9. Mean reading time was three times faster than ZN microscopy with very good acceptance by technicians. CONCLUSIONS: Although it did not increase sensitivity, the faster reading time combined with very good acceptance and ease of use supports the introduction of LED-FM at the peripheral laboratory level of high TB and HIV burden countries.

  11. Electron microscopy at reduced levels of irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, I.A.M.

    1975-05-01

    Specimen damage by electron radiation is one of the factors that limits high resolution electron microscopy of biological specimens. A method was developed to record images of periodic objects at a reduced electron exposure in order to preserve high resolution structural detail. The resulting image would tend to be a statistically noisy one, as the electron exposure is reduced to lower and lower values. Reconstruction of a statistically defined image from such data is possible by spatial averaging of the electron signals from a large number of identical unit cells. (U.S.)

  12. 3D light robotics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin; Villangca, Mark Jayson

    2016-01-01

    As celebrated by the Nobel Prize 2014 in Chemistry light-based technologies can now overcome the diffraction barrier for imaging with nanoscopic resolution by so-called super-resolution microscopy1. However, interactive investigations coupled with advanced imaging modalities at these small scale ...... research discipline that could potentially be able to offer the full packet needed for true "active nanoscopy" by use of so-called light-driven micro-robotics or Light Robotics in short....

  13. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy and image deconvolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swedlow, Jason R

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative imaging and image deconvolution have become standard techniques for the modern cell biologist because they can form the basis of an increasing number of assays for molecular function in a cellular context. There are two major types of deconvolution approaches--deblurring and restoration algorithms. Deblurring algorithms remove blur but treat a series of optical sections as individual two-dimensional entities and therefore sometimes mishandle blurred light. Restoration algorithms determine an object that, when convolved with the point-spread function of the microscope, could produce the image data. The advantages and disadvantages of these methods are discussed in this chapter. Image deconvolution in fluorescence microscopy has usually been applied to high-resolution imaging to improve contrast and thus detect small, dim objects that might otherwise be obscured. Their proper use demands some consideration of the imaging hardware, the acquisition process, fundamental aspects of photon detection, and image processing. This can prove daunting for some cell biologists, but the power of these techniques has been proven many times in the works cited in the chapter and elsewhere. Their usage is now well defined, so they can be incorporated into the capabilities of most laboratories. A major application of fluorescence microscopy is the quantitative measurement of the localization, dynamics, and interactions of cellular factors. The introduction of green fluorescent protein and its spectral variants has led to a significant increase in the use of fluorescence microscopy as a quantitative assay system. For quantitative imaging assays, it is critical to consider the nature of the image-acquisition system and to validate its response to known standards. Any image-processing algorithms used before quantitative analysis should preserve the relative signal levels in different parts of the image. A very common image-processing algorithm, image deconvolution, is used

  14. Flight performance in night-flying sweat bees suffers at low light levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, Jamie Carroll; Coates, Melissa M; Wcislo, William T; Warrant, Eric J

    2007-11-01

    The sweat bee Megalopta (Hymenoptera: Halictidae), unlike most bees, flies in extremely dim light. And although nocturnal insects are often equipped with superposition eyes, which greatly enhance light capture, Megalopta performs visually guided flight with apposition eyes. We examined how light limits Megalopta's flight behavior by measuring flight times and corresponding light levels and comparing them with flight trajectories upon return to the nest. We found the average time to land increased in dim light, an effect due not to slow approaches, but to circuitous approaches. Some landings, however, were quite fast even in the dark. To explain this, we examined the flight trajectories and found that in dim light, landings became increasingly error prone and erratic, consistent with repeated landing attempts. These data agree well with the premise that Megalopta uses visual summation, sacrificing acuity in order to see and fly at the very dimmest light intensities that its visual system allows.

  15. Analysis of peripheral thermal damage after laser irradiation of dentin using polarized light microscopy and synchrotron radiation infrared spectromicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dela Rosa, Alfredo; Sarma, Anupama V.; Le, Charles Q.; Jones, Robert S.; Fried, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    It is necessary to minimize peripheral thermal damage during laser irradiation, since thermal damage to collagen and mineral compromises the bond strength to restorative materials in dentin and inhibits healing and osteointegration in bone. The overall objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that lasers resonant to the specific absorption of water, collagen, and hydroxyapatite with pulse durations less than the thermal relaxation times at each respective laser wavelength will efficiently remove dentin with minimal peripheral thermal damage. Precise incisions were produced in 3 x 3 mm2 blocks of human dentin using CO2 (9.6 μm), Er:YSGG (2.79 μm), and Nd:YAG (355 nm) lasers with and without a computer controlled water spray. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography was used to obtain optical cross-sections of each incision to determine the rate and efficiency of ablation. The peripheral thermal damage zone around each incision was analyzed using polarized light microscopy (PLM) and Synchrotron-Radiation Fourier Transform Infrared Spectro-microscopy (SR-FTIR). Thermally induced chemical changes to both mineral and the collagen matrix was observed with SR-FTIR with a 10-μm spatial resolution and those changes were correlated with optical changes observed with PLM. Minimal (alveolar bone.

  16. Fluorescence confocal polarizing microscopy: Three-dimensional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Much of the modern understanding of orientational order in liquid crystals (LCs) is based on polarizing microscopy (PM). A PM image bears only two-dimensional (2D) information, integrating the 3D pattern of optical birefringence over the path of light. Recently, we proposed a technique to image 3D director patterns by ...

  17. Effect of Magnesium on Gas Exchange and Photosynthetic Efficiency of Coffee Plants Grown under Different Light Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaio Gonçalves de Lima Dias

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of magnesium on the gas exchange and photosynthetic efficiency of Coffee seedlings grown in nutrient solution under different light levels. The experiment was conducted under controlled conditions in growth chambers and nutrient solution at the Department of Plant Pathology of the Federal University of Lavras. The treatments consisted of five different Mg concentrations (0, 48, 96, 192 and 384 mg·L−1 and four light levels (80, 160, 240 and 320 µmol photon m−2·s−1. Both the Mg concentration and light levels affected gas exchange in the coffee plants. Photosynthesis increased linearly with the increasing light, indicating that the light levels tested were low for this crop. The highest CO2 assimilation rate, lowest transpiration, and highest water use efficiency were observed with 250 mg·Mg·L−1, indicating that this concentration was the optimal Mg supply for the tested light levels.

  18. New developments in transmission electron microscopy for nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.L.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is one of the most powerful tools used for characterizing nanomaterials, and it is indispensable for nanotechnology. This paper reviews some of the most recent developments in electron microscopy techniques for characterizing nanomaterials. The review covers the following areas: in-situ microscopy for studying dynamic shape transformation of nanocrystals; in-situ nanoscale property measurements on the mechanical, electrical and field emission properties of nanotubes/nanowires; environmental microscopy for direct observation of surface reactions; aberration-free angstrom-resolution imaging of light elements (such as oxygen and lithium); high-angle annular-dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM); imaging of atom clusters with atomic resolution chemical information; electron holography of magnetic materials; and high-spatial resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) for nanoscale electronic and chemical analysis. It is demonstrated that the picometer-scale science provided by HRTEM is the foundation of nanometer-scale technology. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Head-facial hemangiomas studied with scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallotti, Carlo; Cavallotti, Chiara; Giovannetti, Filippo; Iannetti, Giorgio

    2009-11-01

    Hemangiomas of the head or face are a frequent vascular pathology, consisting in an embryonic dysplasia that involves the cranial-facial vascular network. Hemangiomas show clinical, morphological, developmental, and structural changes during their course. Morphological, structural, ultrastructural, and clinical characteristics of head-facial hemangiomas were studied in 28 patients admitted in our hospital. Nineteen of these patients underwent surgery for the removal of the hemangiomas, whereas 9 patients were not operated on. All the removed tissues were transferred in our laboratories for the morphological staining. Light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used for the observation of all microanatomical details. All patients were studied for a clinical diagnosis, and many were subjected to surgical therapy. The morphological results revealed numerous microanatomical characteristics of the hemangiomatous vessels. The observation by light microscopy shows the afferent and the efferent vessels for every microhemangioma. All the layers of the arterial wall are uneven. The lumen of the arteriole is entirely used by a blood clot. The observation by transmission electron microscopy shows that it was impossible to see the limits of the different layers (endothelium, medial layer, and adventitia) in the whole wall of the vessels. Moreover, both the muscular and elastic components are disarranged and replaced with connective tissue. The observation by scanning electron microscopy shows that the corrosion cast of the hemangioma offers 3 periods of filling: initially with partial filling of the arteriolar and of the whole cast, intermediate with the entire filling of the whole cast (including arteriole and venule), and a last period with a partial emptying of the arteriolar and whole cast while the venule remains totally injected with resin. Our morphological results can be useful to clinicians for a precise

  20. The investigation of the light radiation caused polyethylene based materials deterioration by means of atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikora, A; Moroń, L; Wałecki, M; Kryla, P; Grabarek, A

    2016-01-01

    The impact of the environmental conditions on the materials used in various devices and constructions, in particular in electrotechnical applications, has an critical impact in terms of their reliability and utilization range in specific climatic conditions. Due to increasing utilitarian requirements, technological processes complexity and introducing new materials (for instance nanomaterials), advanced diagnostic techniques are desired. One of such techniques is atomic force microscopy (AFM), which allows to study the changes of the roughness and mechanical properties of the surface at the submicrometer scale, enabling the investigation of the degradation processes. In this work the deterioration of selected group of polyethylene based materials have been measured by means of AFM, as the samples were exposed to the simulated solar light and UV-C radiation. Such an analysis of the environmental conditions impact on the deterioration process using AFM methods for various versions of specific material was not presented before. (paper)

  1. Synchronizing atomic force microscopy force mode and fluorescence microscopy in real time for immune cell stimulation and activation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazaux, Séverine; Sadoun, Anaïs; Biarnes-Pelicot, Martine; Martinez, Manuel; Obeid, Sameh [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); Bongrand, Pierre [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); APHM, Hôpital de la Conception, Laboratoire d’Immunologie, Marseille F-13385 (France); Limozin, Laurent [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France); Puech, Pierre-Henri, E-mail: pierre-henri.puech@inserm.fr [Aix Marseille Université, LAI UM 61, Marseille F-13288 (France); Inserm, UMR-S 1067, Marseille F-13288 (France); CNRS, UMR 7333, Marseille F-13288 (France)

    2016-01-15

    A method is presented for combining atomic force microscopy (AFM) force mode and fluorescence microscopy in order to (a) mechanically stimulate immune cells while recording the subsequent activation under the form of calcium pulses, and (b) observe the mechanical response of a cell upon photoactivation of a small G protein, namely Rac. Using commercial set-ups and a robust signal coupling the fluorescence excitation light and the cantilever bending, the applied force and activation signals were very easily synchronized. This approach allows to control the entire mechanical history of a single cell up to its activation and response down to a few hundreds of milliseconds, and can be extended with very minimal adaptations to other cellular systems where mechanotransduction is studied, using either purely mechanical stimuli or via a surface bound specific ligand. - Highlights: • A signal coupling AFM and fluorescence microscopy was characterized for soft cantilevers. • It can be used as an intrinsic timer to synchronize images and forces. • Mechanical stimulation of single immune cells while recording calcium fluxes was detailed. • Light-induced mechanical modifications of lymphocytes using a PA-Rac protein were demonstrated. • The precautions and limitations of use of this effect were presented.

  2. French Society of Microscopies, 11. Colloquium. SFM Paris 2009. Compilation of summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-06-01

    The 11. conference of the SFM (French Society of Microscopies), held in Paris in 2009, was divided into 14 symposiums, 4 GN-MEBA symposiums, and 10 workshops. The titles of the symposiums are: homage to Nicolas Boisset, advanced microscopies, alternative microscopies, new optical and plasmonic imaging microscopies, dynamic and quantitative microscopy of the living matter, photonic and correlative electronic microscopy, near field microscopy, molecular and cellular electronic cryo-microscopy, cellular compartmentation and dynamics (CFPU), microscopy and materials, dynamical microscopy in materials science, minerals/bio-minerals and environment, structure and properties of nano-materials, sub-eV and sub-nm chemical bonds imaging. The titles of the GN-MEBA symposiums are: microscopy and metals, microscopy and minerals, microscopy and living beings, microscopy and new materials. The titles of the workshops are: Correlative Light and Electron Microscopy (CLEM), Cryo and electronic tomography in cellular biology, Cryo electronic microscopy of vitreous sections (CEMOVIS), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), ULTRASTEM, Digital Micrograph programming, Cryo-Microscopy and molecular tomography, Cryo-ultra-microtomy and immuno-marking, FIB, ASTAR(EBSD-MET) - rapid mapping of crystalline orientations and phases

  3. Nanoscale surface characterization using laser interference microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatyev, Pavel S.; Skrynnik, Andrey A.; Melnik, Yury A.

    2018-03-01

    Nanoscale surface characterization is one of the most significant parts of modern materials development and application. The modern microscopes are expensive and complicated tools, and its use for industrial tasks is limited due to laborious sample preparation, measurement procedures, and low operation speed. The laser modulation interference microscopy method (MIM) for real-time quantitative and qualitative analysis of glass, metals, ceramics, and various coatings has a spatial resolution of 0.1 nm for vertical and up to 100 nm for lateral. It is proposed as an alternative to traditional scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods. It is demonstrated that in the cases of roughness metrology for super smooth (Ra >1 nm) surfaces the application of a laser interference microscopy techniques is more optimal than conventional SEM and AFM. The comparison of semiconductor test structure for lateral dimensions measurements obtained with SEM and AFM and white light interferometer also demonstrates the advantages of MIM technique.

  4. Higher Serum Levels of Free ĸ plus λ Immunoglobulin Light Chains Ameliorate Survival of Hemodialysis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thilo, Florian; Caspari, Christina; Scholze, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims: Impaired immune function is common in patients with chronic renal failure. Now, we determined whether serum levels of free immunoglobulin light chains predict mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease stage 5 on hemodialysis. Methods: We performed a prospective cohort study...... of 160 hemodialysis patients with a median follow-up of 15 months (interquartile range, 3-44 months). Serum levels of free κ and λ immunoglobulin light chains were measured at the start of the study. The primary end point was mortality from any cause. Results: In survivors, median serum levels of free κ...... plus λ immunoglobulin light chains were significantly higher compared with nonsurvivors (p light chains above the median compared with patients with serum levels below the median of 210 mg...

  5. Three-dimensional live microscopy beyond the diffraction limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiolka, Reto

    2013-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy it has become possible to fundamentally overcome the diffraction limited resolution in all three spatial dimensions. However, to have the most impact in biological sciences, new optical microscopy techniques need to be compatible with live cell imaging: image acquisition has to be fast enough to capture cellular dynamics at the new resolution limit while light exposure needs to be minimized to prevent photo-toxic effects. With increasing spatial resolution, these requirements become more difficult to meet, even more so when volumetric imaging is performed. In this review, techniques that have been successfully applied to three-dimensional, super-resolution live microscopy are presented and their relative strengths and weaknesses are discussed. (special issue article)

  6. Ultrastructure and Light Microscope Analysis of Intact Skin after a Varying Number of Low Level Laser Irradiations in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamie Mizusaki Iyomasa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low level laser therapy (LLLT has been used to relieve pain, inflammation, and wound healing processes. Thus, the skin is overexposed to laser and this effect is not completely understood. This study analyzed the effects of the number of laser applications (three, six, and 10 on the intact skin of the masseteric region in mice of strain HRS/J. The animals (n=30 were equally divided into control (0 J/cm2 and irradiated (20 J/cm2, and each of these groups was further equally divided according to the number of laser applications (three, six, and 10 and underwent LLLT on alternate days. Samples were analyzed by light microscopy and transmission electron microscope (TEM. The animals receiving applications exhibited open channels more dilated between the keratinocytes and photobiomodulation effect on endothelial cells and fibroblasts by TEM. Under the light microscope after 10 laser applications, the type I collagen decreased (P<0.05 compared to the three and six applications. Under these experimental conditions, all numbers of applications provided photobiomodulatory effect on the epidermis and dermis, without damage. More studies are needed to standardize the energy density and number of applications recommended for laser therapy to have a better cost-benefit ratio associated with treatment.

  7. Potential profile and photovoltaic effect in nanoscale lateral pn junction observed by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowak, Roland; Moraru, Daniel; Mizuno, Takeshi; Jablonski, Ryszard; Tabe, Michiharu

    2014-01-01

    Nanoscale pn junctions have been investigated by Kelvin probe force microscopy and several particular features were found. Within the depletion region, a localized noise area is observed, induced by temporal fluctuations of dopant states. Electronic potential landscape is significantly affected by dopants with ground-state energies deeper than in bulk. Finally, the effects of light illumination were studied and it was found that the depletion region shifts its position as a function of light intensity. This is ascribed to charge redistribution within the pn junction as a result of photovoltaic effect and due to the impact of deepened-level dopants. - Highlights: • In pn nano-junctions, temporal potential fluctuations are found in depletion layer. • Fluctuations are due to frequent capture and emission of free carriers by dopants. • Depletion layer position shifts as a function of the intensity of irradiated light. • The depletion layer shifts are due to changes of deep-level dopants' charge states

  8. Measurement of the airway surface liquid volume with simple light refraction microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Peter R; Tarran, Robert; Garoff, Stephen; Myerburg, Mike M

    2011-09-01

    In the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung, the airway surface liquid (ASL) volume is depleted, impairing mucus clearance from the lung and leading to chronic airway infection and obstruction. Several therapeutics have been developed that aim to restore normal airway surface hydration to the CF airway, yet preclinical evaluation of these agents is hindered by the paucity of methods available to directly measure the ASL. Therefore, we sought to develop a straightforward approach to measure the ASL volume that would serve as the basis for a standardized method to assess mucosal hydration using readily available resources. Primary human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells cultured at an air-liquid interface develop a liquid meniscus at the edge of the culture. We hypothesized that the size of the fluid meniscus is determined by the ASL volume, and could be measured as an index of the epithelial surface hydration status. A simple method was developed to measure the volume of fluid present in meniscus by imaging the refraction of light at the ASL interface with the culture wall using low-magnification microscopy. Using this method, we found that primary CF HBE cells had a reduced ASL volume compared with non-CF HBE cells, and that known modulators of ASL volume caused the predicted responses. Thus, we have demonstrated that this method can detect physiologically relevant changes in the ASL volume, and propose that this novel approach may be used to rapidly assess the effects of airway hydration therapies in high-throughput screening assays.

  9. Inclusion bodies induced by bean rugose mosaic virus seen under light microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Rivera

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Two types of inclusion bodies were consistently observed under light microscopy in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris leaf tissue infected with bean rugose mosaic virus (BRMV, a species of the genus Comovirus, family Comoviridae. One type consisted of vacuolated inclusions found mainly in the cytoplasm of epidermal cells. The other type consisted of abundant crystalloid inclusions of different sizes and shapes found consistently in glandular hairs, guard cells, phloem tissue, xylem elements and occasionally in epidermal and mesophyll tissues. The two types of inclusion bodies stained with Azure A and Luxol Brilliant Green Bl-Calcomine Orange 2RS (O-G, and were similar to those seen to be caused by other species of comoviruses.Se observaron dos tipos de inclusiones virales, mediante microscopia de luz, en hojas de plantas de frijol (Phaseolus vulgaris previamente infectadas con el virus del mosaico rugoso del frijol ("bean rugose mosaic comovirus", BRMV, especie del género Comovirus, familia Comoviridae. Se hallaron inclusiones vesiculadas, principalmente en el citoplasma de células de la epidermis, y abundantes inclusiones cristalinas de diferentes formas y tamaños siempre en células guarda, tricomas glandulares, floema, elementos del xilema y ocasionalmente en células epidérmicas y del mesófilo. Ambos tipos de inclusiones tiñeron con Azure A y con la tinción, verde naranja (Luxol Brilliant Green BL-Calcomine Orange 2 RS conocida como OG, y son similares a las inclusiones inducidas por otras especies del género Comovirus.

  10. Quantitative tracking of tumor cells in phase-contrast microscopy exploiting halo artifact pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Song, Soo-Min; Lee, Hana; Kim, Myoung-Hee

    2012-03-01

    Tumor cell morphology is closely related to its invasiveness characteristics and migratory behaviors. An invasive tumor cell has a highly irregular shape, whereas a spherical cell is non-metastatic. Thus, quantitative analysis of cell features is crucial to determine tumor malignancy or to test the efficacy of anticancer treatment. We use phase-contrast microscopy to analyze single cell morphology and to monitor its change because it enables observation of long-term activity of living cells without photobleaching and phototoxicity, which is common in other fluorescence-labeled microscopy. Despite this advantage, there are image-level drawbacks to phase-contrast microscopy, such as local light effect and contrast interference ring, among others. Thus, we first applied a local filter to compensate for non-uniform illumination. Then, we used intensity distribution information to detect the cell boundary. In phase-contrast microscopy images, the cell normally appears as a dark region surrounded by a bright halo. As the halo artifact around the cell body is minimal and has an asymmetric diffusion pattern, we calculated the cross-sectional plane that intersected the center of each cell and was orthogonal to the first principal axis. Then, we extracted the dark cell region by level set. However, a dense population of cultured cells still rendered single-cell analysis difficult. Finally, we measured roundness and size to classify tumor cells into malignant and benign groups. We validated segmentation accuracy by comparing our findings with manually obtained results.

  11. Masked rhodamine dyes of five principal colors revealed by photolysis of a 2-diazo-1-indanone caging group: synthesis, photophysics, and light microscopy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belov, Vladimir N; Mitronova, Gyuzel Yu; Bossi, Mariano L; Boyarskiy, Vadim P; Hebisch, Elke; Geisler, Claudia; Kolmakov, Kirill; Wurm, Christian A; Willig, Katrin I; Hell, Stefan W

    2014-10-06

    Caged rhodamine dyes (Rhodamines NN) of five basic colors were synthesized and used as "hidden" markers in subdiffractional and conventional light microscopy. These masked fluorophores with a 2-diazo-1-indanone group can be irreversibly photoactivated, either by irradiation with UV- or violet light (one-photon process), or by exposure to intense red light (λ∼750 nm; two-photon mode). All dyes possess a very small 2-diazoketone caging group incorporated into the 2-diazo-1-indanone residue with a quaternary carbon atom (C-3) and a spiro-9H-xanthene fragment. Initially they are non-colored (pale yellow), non-fluorescent, and absorb at λ=330-350 nm (molar extinction coefficient (ε)≈10(4)  M(-1)  cm(-1)) with a band edge that extends to about λ=440 nm. The absorption and emission bands of the uncaged derivatives are tunable over a wide range (λ=511-633 and 525-653 nm, respectively). The unmasked dyes are highly colored and fluorescent (ε=3-8×10(4)  M(-1)  cm(-1) and fluorescence quantum yields (ϕ)=40-85% in the unbound state and in methanol). By stepwise and orthogonal protection of carboxylic and sulfonic acid groups a highly water-soluble caged red-emitting dye with two sulfonic acid residues was prepared. Rhodamines NN were decorated with amino-reactive N-hydroxysuccinimidyl ester groups, applied in aqueous buffers, easily conjugated with proteins, and readily photoactivated (uncaged) with λ=375-420 nm light or intense red light (λ=775 nm). Protein conjugates with optimal degrees of labeling (3-6) were prepared and uncaged with λ=405 nm light in aqueous buffer solutions (ϕ=20-38%). The photochemical cleavage of the masking group generates only molecular nitrogen. Some 10-40% of the non-fluorescent (dark) byproducts are also formed. However, they have low absorbance and do not quench the fluorescence of the uncaged dyes. Photoactivation of the individual molecules of Rhodamines NN (e.g., due to reversible or irreversible

  12. X-ray microscopy of human malaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magowan, C.; Brown, J.T.; Mohandas, N.; Meyer-Ilse, W.

    1997-01-01

    Associations between intracellular organisms and host cells are complex and particularly difficult to examine. X-ray microscopy provides transmission images of subcellular structures in intact cells at resolutions superior to available methodologies. The spatial resolution is 50-60nm with a 1 micron depth of focus, superior to anything achievable with light microscopy. Image contrast is generated by differences in photoelectric absorption by the atoms in different areas (i.e. subcellular structures) throughout the full thickness of the sample. Absorption due to carbon dominates among all the elements in the sample at 2.4 nm x-ray wavelength. Thus images show features or structures, in a way not usually seen by other types of microscopy. The authors used soft x-ray microscopy to investigate structural development of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in normal and genetically abnormal erythrocytes, and in infected erythrocytes treated with compounds that have anti-malarial effects. X-ray microscopy showed newly elaborated structures in the cytosol of unstained, intact erythrocytes, redistribution of mass (carbon) in infected erythrocytes, and aberrant parasite morphology. Better understanding of the process of intracellular parasite maturation and the interactions between the parasite and its host erythrocyte can help define new approaches to the control of this deadly disease

  13. X-ray microscopy of human malaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magowan, C.; Brown, J.T.; Mohandas, N.; Meyer-Ilse, W. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Associations between intracellular organisms and host cells are complex and particularly difficult to examine. X-ray microscopy provides transmission images of subcellular structures in intact cells at resolutions superior to available methodologies. The spatial resolution is 50-60nm with a 1 micron depth of focus, superior to anything achievable with light microscopy. Image contrast is generated by differences in photoelectric absorption by the atoms in different areas (i.e. subcellular structures) throughout the full thickness of the sample. Absorption due to carbon dominates among all the elements in the sample at 2.4 nm x-ray wavelength. Thus images show features or structures, in a way not usually seen by other types of microscopy. The authors used soft x-ray microscopy to investigate structural development of Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in normal and genetically abnormal erythrocytes, and in infected erythrocytes treated with compounds that have anti-malarial effects. X-ray microscopy showed newly elaborated structures in the cytosol of unstained, intact erythrocytes, redistribution of mass (carbon) in infected erythrocytes, and aberrant parasite morphology. Better understanding of the process of intracellular parasite maturation and the interactions between the parasite and its host erythrocyte can help define new approaches to the control of this deadly disease.

  14. Fluorescence Microscopy Gets Faster and Clearer: Roles of Photochemistry and Selective Illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolenski, Joseph S.; Julich, Doerthe

    2014-01-01

    Significant advances in fluorescence microscopy tend be a balance between two competing qualities wherein improvements in resolution and low light detection are typically accompanied by losses in acquisition rate and signal-to-noise, respectively. These trade-offs are becoming less of a barrier to biomedical research as recent advances in optoelectronic microscopy and developments in fluorophore chemistry have enabled scientists to see beyond the diffraction barrier, image deeper into live specimens, and acquire images at unprecedented speed. Selective plane illumination microscopy has provided significant gains in the spatial and temporal acquisition of fluorescence specimens several mm in thickness. With commercial systems now available, this method promises to expand on recent advances in 2-photon deep-tissue imaging with improved speed and reduced photobleaching compared to laser scanning confocal microscopy. Superresolution microscopes are also available in several modalities and can be coupled with selective plane illumination techniques. The combination of methods to increase resolution, acquisition speed, and depth of collection are now being married to common microscope systems, enabling scientists to make significant advances in live cell and in situ imaging in real time. We show that light sheet microscopy provides significant advantages for imaging live zebrafish embryos compared to laser scanning confocal microscopy. PMID:24600334

  15. Optically sectioned imaging by oblique plane microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Lin, Ziduo; Lyon, Alex R.; MacLeod, Ken T.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-03-01

    Oblique Plane Microscopy (OPM) is a light sheet microscopy technique that combines oblique illumination with correction optics that tilt the focal plane of the collection system. OPM can be used to image conventionally mounted specimens on coverslips or tissue culture dishes and has low out-of-plane photobleaching and phototoxicity. No moving parts are required to achieve an optically sectioned image and so high speed optically sectioned imaging is possible. The first OPM results obtained using a high NA water immersion lens on a commercially available inverted microscope frame are presented, together with a measurement of the achievable optical resolution.

  16. Natural enamel caries in polarized light microscopy: differences in histopathological features derived from a qualitative versus a quantitative approach to interpret enamel birefringence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Medeiros, R C G; Soares, J D; De Sousa, F B

    2012-05-01

    Lesion area measurement of enamel caries using polarized light microscopy (PLM) is currently performed in a large number of studies, but measurements are based mainly on a mislead qualitative interpretation of enamel birefringence in a single immersion medium. Here, five natural enamel caries lesions are analysed by microradiography and in PLM, and the differences in their histopathological features derived from a qualitative versus a quantitative interpretation of enamel birefringence are described. Enamel birefringence in different immersion media (air, water and quinoline) is interpreted by both qualitative and quantitative approaches, the former leading to an underestimation of the depth of enamel caries mainly when the criterion of validating sound enamel as a negatively birefringent area in immersion in water is used (a current common practice in dental research). Procedures to avoid the shortcomings of a qualitative interpretation of enamel birefringence are presented and discussed. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  17. Revealing the dark side of Portlandite Clusters in cement paste by circular polarization microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Copuroglu, O.

    2016-01-01

    Plane and crossed polarization are the two standard light modes in polarized light microscopy that are widely used to characterize crystalline and amorphous phases in cement-based materials. However, the use of the crossed polarized light mode has been found to be restrictive for studying

  18. Second harmonic generation microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brüggemann, Dagmar Adeline; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Risbo, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Myofibers and collagen show non-linear optical properties enabling imaging using second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. The technique is evaluated for use as a tool for real-time studies of thermally induced changes in thin samples of unfixed and unstained pork. The forward and the backward...... scattered SHG light reveal complementary features of the structures of myofibers and collagen fibers. Upon heating the myofibers show no structural changes before reaching a temperature of 53 °C. At this temperature the SHG signal becomes extinct. The extinction of the SHG at 53 °C coincides with a low......-temperature endotherm peak observable in the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) thermograms. DSC analysis of epimysium, the connective tissue layer that enfold skeletal muscles, produces one large endotherm starting at 57 °C and peaking at 59.5 °C. SHG microscopy of collagen fibers reveals a variability of thermal...

  19. The X-ray microscopy project at saga SLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasumoto, M.; Ishiguro, E.; Takemoto, K.; Kihara, H.; Kamijo, N.; Tomimasu, T.; Tsurushima, T.; Takahara, A.; Hara, K.; Chikaura, Y.

    2002-01-01

    A new high resolution X-ray microscopy project has been proposed at Saga synchrotron light source, which is a third generation synchrotron light facility in Japan. Two microscopy beamlines are planned for this project. One is a scanning microscope in the water window region, and the other is a full-field imaging microscope in the multi-keV X-ray energy region. To demonstrate the feasibility of the project, the optical layout of the scanning microscope was designed. The beamline mainly consists of a 3.5 cm periodical undulator, a varied line-spacing plane grating monochromator (600 lines/mm) and an end-station including a zone plate. Thus, the calculated X-ray properties focused on the sample position are as follows: the spot size is ∼ 70 nm, the monochromaticity is ∼2000, and the photon flux is 10 9 ∼ 10 10 photons/sec. (authors)

  20. Scanning electron microscopy of coal macerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.R.; White, A.; Deegan, M.D.

    1986-02-01

    Individual macerals separated from some United Kingdom coals of Carboniferous age and bituminous rank were examined by scanning electron microscopy. In each case a specific morphology characteristic of the macerals studied could be recognized. Collinite (a member of the vitrinite maceral group) was recognizable in all samples by its angular shape and characteristic fracture patterns, the particles (30-200 ..mu..m) frequently showing striated or laminated surface. Sporinite particles had no well defined shape and were associated with more detrital material than were the other macerals studied. This detritus was shown by conventional light microscopy to be the maceral micrinite. Fusinite was remarkable in having a chunky needle form, with lengths of up to 200 ..mu..m. 8 references.

  1. ON THE IDENTITY OF KARLODINIUM VENEFICUM AND DESCRIPTION OF KARLODINIUM ARMIGER SP. NOV. (DINOPHYCEAE), BASED ON LIGHT AND ELECTRON MICROSCOPY, NUCLEAR-ENCODED LSU RDNA, AND PIGMENT COMPOSITION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergholtz, Trine; Daugbjerg, Niels; Moestrup, Øjvind

    2006-01-01

    An undescribed species of the dinoflagellate genus Karlodinium J. Larsen (viz. K. armiger sp. nov.) is described from Alfacs Bay (Spain), using light and electron microscopy, pigment composition, and partial large subunit (LSU) rDNA sequence. The new species differs from the type species of Karlo......An undescribed species of the dinoflagellate genus Karlodinium J. Larsen (viz. K. armiger sp. nov.) is described from Alfacs Bay (Spain), using light and electron microscopy, pigment composition, and partial large subunit (LSU) rDNA sequence. The new species differs from the type species...... of Karlodinium (K. micrum (Leadbeater et Dodge) J. Larsen) by lacking rows of amphiesmal plugs, a feature presently considered to be a characteristic of Karlodinium. In K. armiger, an outer membrane is underlain by a complex system of cisternae and vacuoles. The pigment profile of K. armiger revealed...... sequence, differed in only 0.3% of 1438 bp. We consider the two taxa to belong to the same species. This necessitates a change of name for the most widely found species, K. micrum, to K. veneficum. The three genera Karlodinium, Takayama, and Karenia constitute a separate evolutionary lineage, for which...

  2. Cellular chromophores and signaling in low level light therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.

    2007-02-01

    The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light (LLLT) for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing tissue damage by reducing cellular apoptosis has been known for almost forty years since the invention of lasers. Originally thought to be a peculiar property of laser light (soft or cold lasers), the subject has now broadened to include photobiomodulation and photobiostimulation using non-coherent light. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial. This likely is due to two main reasons; firstly the biochemical mechanisms underlying the positive effects are incompletely understood, and secondly the complexity of rationally choosing amongst a large number of illumination parameters such as wavelength, fluence, power density, pulse structure and treatment timing has led to the publication of a number of negative studies as well as many positive ones. In recent years major advances have been made in understanding the mechanisms that operate at the cellular and tissue levels during LLLT. Mitochondria are thought to be the main site for the initial effects of light and specifically cytochrome c oxidase that has absorption peaks in the red and near infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum matches the action spectra of LLLT effects. The discovery that cells employ nitric oxide (NO) synthesized in the mitochondria by neuronal nitric oxide synthase, to regulate respiration by competitive binding to the oxygen binding of cytochrome c oxidase, now suggests how LLLT can affect cell metabolism. If LLLT photodissociates inhibitory NO from cytochrome c oxidase, this would explain increased ATP production, modulation of reactive oxygen species, reduction and prevention of apoptosis, stimulation of angiogenesis, increase of blood flow and induction of transcription factors. In

  3. Line-scanning confocal microscopy for high-resolution imaging of upconverting rare-earth-based contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Laura M.; Zevon, Margot; Ganapathy, Vidya; Sheng, Yang; Tan, Mei Chee; Riman, Richard E.; Roth, Charles M.; Moghe, Prabhas V.; Pierce, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Rare-earth (RE) doped nanocomposites emit visible luminescence when illuminated with continuous wave near-infrared light, making them appealing candidates for use as contrast agents in biomedical imaging. However, the emission lifetime of these materials is much longer than the pixel dwell times used in scanning intravital microscopy. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a line-scanning confocal microscope for high-resolution, optically sectioned imaging of samples labeled with RE-based nanomaterials. Instrument performance is quantified using calibrated test objects. NaYF4:Er,Yb nanocomposites are imaged in vitro, and in ex vivo tissue specimens, with direct comparison to point-scanning confocal microscopy. We demonstrate that the extended pixel dwell time of line-scanning confocal microscopy enables subcellular-level imaging of these nanomaterials while maintaining optical sectioning. The line-scanning approach thus enables microscopic imaging of this emerging class of contrast agents for preclinical studies, with the potential to be adapted for real-time in vivo imaging in the clinic. PMID:26603495

  4. Optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Baoshan; Lei, Cheng; Wu, Yi; Kobayashi, Hirofumi; Ito, Takuro; Yalikun, Yaxiaer; Lee, Sangwook; Isozaki, Akihiro; Li, Ming; Jiang, Yiyue; Yasumoto, Atsushi; Di Carlo, Dino; Tanaka, Yo; Yatomi, Yutaka; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Goda, Keisuke

    2018-03-01

    Innovations in optical microscopy have opened new windows onto scientific research, industrial quality control, and medical practice over the last few decades. One of such innovations is optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy - an emerging method for high-throughput quantitative phase imaging that builds on the interference between temporally stretched signal and reference pulses by using dispersive properties of light in both spatial and temporal domains in an interferometric configuration on a microfluidic platform. It achieves the continuous acquisition of both intensity and phase images with a high throughput of more than 10,000 particles or cells per second by overcoming speed limitations that exist in conventional quantitative phase imaging methods. Applications enabled by such capabilities are versatile and include characterization of cancer cells and microalgal cultures. In this paper, we review the principles and applications of optofluidic time-stretch quantitative phase microscopy and discuss its future perspective. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison between optical techniques and confocal microscopy for defect detection on thin wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegmann, Philip; Sanchez-Brea, Luis Miguel; Martinez-Anton, Juan Carlos; Bernabeu, Eusebio

    2004-01-01

    Conventional microscopy techniques, such as atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and confocal microscopy (CM) are not suitable for on-line surface inspection of fine metallic wires. In the recent years, some optical techniques have been developed to be used for those tasks. However, they need a rigorous validation. In this work, we have used confocal microscopy to obtain the topography z(x,y) of wires with longitudinal defects, such as dielines. The topography has been used to predict the light scattered by the wire. These simulations have been compared with experimental results, showing a good agreement

  6. Mapping the subcellular distribution of biomolecules at the ultrastructural level by ion microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galle, P; Escaig, F; Dantin, F; Zhang, L

    1996-05-01

    Analytical ion microscopy, a method proposed and developed in 1960 by Casting and Slodzian at the Orsay University (France), makes it possible to obtain easily and rapidly analytical images representing the distribution in a tissue section of elements or isotopes (beginning from the three isotopes of hydrogen until to transuranic elements), even when these elements or isotopes are at a trace concentration of 1 ppm or less. This method has been applied to study the subcellular distribution of different varieties of biomolecules. The subcellular location of these molecules can be easily determined when the molecules contain in their structures a specific atom such as fluorine, iodine, bromine or platinum, what is the case of many pharmaceutical drugs. In this situation, the distribution of these specific atoms can be considered as representative of the distribution of the corresponding molecule. In other cases, the molecules must be labelled with an isotope which may be either radioactive or stable. Recent developments in ion microscopy allow the obtention of their chemical images at ultra structural level. In this paper we present the results obtained with the prototype of a new Scanning Ion Microscope used for the study of the intracellular distribution of different varieties of molecules: glucocorticoids, estrogens, pharmaceutical drugs and pyrimidine analogues.

  7. Modulation of the pupil function of microscope objective lens for multifocal multi-photon microscopy using a spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Naoya; Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Takamoto, Hisayoshi; Inoue, Takashi; Terakawa, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    We propose a method for high precision modulation of the pupil function of a microscope objective lens to improve the performance of multifocal multi-photon microscopy (MMM). To modulate the pupil function, we adopt a spatial light modulator (SLM) and place it at the conjugate position of the objective lens. The SLM can generate an arbitrary number of spots to excite the multiple fluorescence spots (MFS) at the desired positions and intensities by applying an appropriate computer-generated hologram (CGH). This flexibility allows us to control the MFS according to the photobleaching level of a fluorescent protein and phototoxicity of a specimen. However, when a large number of excitation spots are generated, the intensity distribution of the MFS is significantly different from the one originally designed due to misalignment of the optical setup and characteristics of the SLM. As a result, the image of a specimen obtained using laser scanning for the MFS has block noise segments because the SLM could not generate a uniform MFS. To improve the intensity distribution of the MFS, we adaptively redesigned the CGH based on the observed MFS. We experimentally demonstrate an improvement in the uniformity of a 10 × 10 MFS grid using a dye solution. The simplicity of the proposed method will allow it to be applied for calibration of MMM before observing living tissue. After the MMM calibration, we performed laser scanning with two-photon excitation to observe a real specimen without detecting block noise segments.

  8. The importance of macro- versus microstructure in modulating light levels inside coral colonies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaniewska, Paulina; Magnusson, Sveinn H.; Anthony, Ken R. N.

    2011-01-01

    Adjusting the light exposure and capture of their symbiotic photosynthetic dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium Freud.) is central to the success of reef-building corals (order Scleractinia) across high spatio-temporal variation in the light environment of coral reefs. We tested the hypothesis...... irradiances at the level of coral photosymbionts. Key index words: irradiance; morphology; photoacclimation; scale; scleractinian coral; Symbiodinium Abbreviations: a chl a, specific absorption coefficient of chl a; Ddn, diadinoxanthin; Dtn, diatoxanthin; GBR, Great Barrier Reef; GFP, green fluorescent...... that optical properties of tissues in some coral species can provide light management at the tissue scale comparable to light modulation by colony architecture in other species. We compared within-tissue scalar irradiance in two coral species from the same light habitat but with contrasting colony growth forms...

  9. Localization of proteins and nucleic acids using soft x-ray microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larabell, Carolyn A.; Yager, Deborah; Meyer-Ilse, Werner

    2000-01-01

    The high-resolution soft x-ray microscope (XM-1) at the Advanced Light Source was used to examine whole, hydrated mammalian cells, both chemically fixed and rapidly frozen and viewed in a cryostage. Using x-ray microscopy, high contrast information about the organization of the cytoplasm and nucleus of these cells was revealed at unsurpassed resolution. It is important to note that cryo-fixed cells have been examined in a state that most closely resembles their natural environment in that the cells were not exposed to chemical fixatives or chemical contrast enhancement reagents. We also used the power of soft x-ray microscopy to examine the localization of proteins and nucleic acids in whole, hydrated cells using silver-enhanced, immunogold labeling techniques. With this approach, we have obtained information about the distribution of such molecules with respect to cellular ultrastructure at five times better resolution than light microscopy. The power of soft x-ray microscopy to provide superb resolution information about the subcellular localization of proteins and nucleic acids places it in a commanding position to contribute to our understanding of the numerous molecules being identified through modern molecular biology techniques

  10. X-ray Tomographic Microscopy at TOMCAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marone, F; Hintermueller, C; McDonald, S; Abela, R; Mikuljan, G; Isenegger, A; Stampanoni, M, E-mail: federica.marone@psi.c [Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2009-09-01

    Synchrotron-based X-ray Tomographic Microscopy is a powerful technique for fast non-destructive, high resolution quantitative volumetric investigations on diverse samples. At the TOMCAT (TOmographic Microscopy and Coherent rAdiology experimenTs) beamline at the Swiss Light Source, synchrotron light is delivered by a 2.9 T superbend. The main optical component, a Double Crystal Multilayer Monochromator, covers an energy range between 8 and 45 keV. The standard TOMCAT detector offers field of views ranging from 0.75x0.75 mm{sup 2} up to 12.1x12.1 mm{sup 2} with a pixel size of 0.37 {mu}m and 5.92 {mu}m, respectively. In addition to routine measurements, which exploit the absorption contrast, the high coherence of the source also enables phase contrast tomography, implemented with two complementary techniques (Modified Transport of Intensity approach and Grating Interferometry). Typical acquisition times for a tomogram are in the order of few minutes, ensuring high throughput and allowing for semi-dynamical investigations. Raw data are automatically post-processed online and full reconstructed volumes are available shortly after a scan with minimal user intervention.

  11. Light and electron microscopy of the European beaver (Castor fiber) stomach reveal unique morphological features with possible general biological significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziółkowska, Natalia; Lewczuk, Bogdan; Petryński, Wojciech; Palkowska, Katarzyna; Prusik, Magdalena; Targońska, Krystyna; Giżejewski, Zygmunt; Przybylska-Gornowicz, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Anatomical, histological, and ultrastructural studies of the European beaver stomach revealed several unique morphological features. The prominent attribute of its gross morphology was the cardiogastric gland (CGG), located near the oesophageal entrance. Light microscopy showed that the CGG was formed by invaginations of the mucosa into the submucosa, which contained densely packed proper gastric glands comprised primarily of parietal and chief cells. Mucous neck cells represented beaver stomach was the presence of specific mucus with a thickness up to 950 µm (in frozen, unfixed sections) that coated the mucosa. Our observations suggest that the formation of this mucus is complex and includes the secretory granule accumulation in the cytoplasm of pit cells, the granule aggregation inside cells, and the incorporation of degenerating cells into the mucus.

  12. Oxygen radical microscopy in living plant tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kim Anker; Møller, Ian Max; Schulz, Alexander

    the ROS production stems from the mitochondria and peroxisomes as is seen in animal cells. At the Bioimaging Center at KVL we employ different techniques to induce, detect and monitor ROS production, distribution and in and among living plant cells. Both confocal laser scanning microscopy and 2-photon......Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a crucial role in a wide variety of processes. Initiation of many different cellular pathways, crosstalk between cells, developmental signalling in planta, programmed cell death and hypersensitive response in connection with plant-pathogen interactions are among...... the different roles ROS play. On the other hand ROS also cause damage to cellular components at sub-lethal to lethal levels. In photosynthesizing plants the major production of ROS origin from the chloroplast. ROS is a by product from the Photosystem I/II handling of light energy. In nonphotosynthesizing plants...

  13. Quantifying the blue shift in the light absorption of small gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsekov, Roumen; Georgiev, Peter; Simeonova, Silviya; Balashev, Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    The dependence of the surface plasmons resonance (SPR) frequency on the size of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) is experimentally studied. The measured data for the SPR frequency by UV-Vis spectroscopy and GNPs diameter by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) are collected in the course of classical citrate GNPs synthesis. The relationship between the GNPs size and the blue shift of the light absorption is presented. They are fitted by an equation with a single free parameter, the dielectric permittivity of the surrounding media. Thus, the refractive index of the surrounding media is determined, which characterizes the GNPs surface shell. Key words: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs), Surface plasmon resonance (SPR), Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM)

  14. A Study of Light Level Effect on the Accuracy of Image Processing-based Tomato Grading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prijatna, D.; Muhaemin, M.; Wulandari, R. P.; Herwanto, T.; Saukat, M.; Sugandi, W. K.

    2018-05-01

    Image processing method has been used in non-destructive tests of agricultural products. Compared to manual method, image processing method may produce more objective and consistent results. Image capturing box installed in currently used tomato grading machine (TEP-4) is equipped with four fluorescence lamps to illuminate the processed tomatoes. Since the performance of any lamp will decrease if its service time has exceeded its lifetime, it is predicted that this will affect tomato classification. The objective of this study was to determine the minimum light levels which affect classification accuracy. This study was conducted by varying light level from minimum and maximum on tomatoes in image capturing boxes and then investigates its effects on image characteristics. Research results showed that light intensity affects two variables which are important for classification, for example, area and color of captured image. Image processing program was able to determine correctly the weight and classification of tomatoes when light level was 30 lx to 140 lx.

  15. Super-resolution microscopy in studying neuroendocrine cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneka eBost

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The last two decades have seen a tremendous development in high resolution microscopy techniques giving rise to acronyms such as TIRFM, SIM, PALM, STORM, and STED. The goal of all these techniques is to overcome the physical resolution barrier of light microscopy in order to resolve precise protein localization and possibly their interaction in cells. Neuroendocrine cell function is to secrete hormones and peptides on demand. This fine-tuned multi-step process is mediated by a large array of proteins. Here, we review the new microscopy techniques used to obtain high resolution and how they have been applied to increase our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in neuroendocrine cell secretion. Further the limitations of these methods are discussed and insights in possible new applications are provided.

  16. Spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetard, L; Passian, A; Farahi, R H; Kalluri, U C; Davison, B H; Thundat, T

    2010-05-01

    Scanning probe microscopy has emerged as a powerful approach to a broader understanding of the molecular architecture of cell walls, which may shed light on the challenge of efficient cellulosic ethanol production. We have obtained preliminary images of both Populus and switchgrass samples using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results show distinctive features that are shared by switchgrass and Populus. These features may be attributable to the lignocellulosic cell wall composition, as the collected images exhibit the characteristic macromolecular globule structures attributable to the lignocellulosic systems. Using both AFM and a single case of mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy (MSAFM) to characterize Populus, we obtained images that clearly show the cell wall structure. The results are of importance in providing a better understanding of the characteristic features of both mature cells as well as developing plant cells. In addition, we present spectroscopic investigation of the same samples.

  17. Laser induced florescence: application to spectroscopy and new microscopy imaging methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galaup, L. P.

    2012-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is one of the light using techniques which allows the highest sensitivity for atoms and molecules detection, up to the single atom or single molecule level. This field is much too large for an extensive review; therefor we have chosen to focus on two main points: 1- the observation of laser stimulated fluorescence in phthalocyanine and porphyrin like molecules in rare gas and nitrogen matrices at low temperatures. 2- the presentation of laser induced fluorescence techniques suitable for achieving ultra-high spatial resolution imaging, below the diffraction limit of conventional microscopy, thanks to highly fluorescent molecules to be used as biological markers. (Author)

  18. Analysis of Using Acoustic Microscopy to Evaluate Defects in Spot Welding Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korzeniowski M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the possibilities of using acoustic microscopy to evaluate defects in resistance spot welding joints. For this purpose, the welded joints were made from two grades of aluminium plates EN AW5754 H24 and EN AW6005 T606, which were then subjected to non-destructive testing using acoustic microscopy and conventional destructive testing using traditional light microscopy techniques. Additionally, the study examined the influence of the typical contaminants found in industrial conditions on the quality of the joint.

  19. Does vitamin E prevent tubal damage caused by smoking? A light microscopy and animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Muzeyyen; Ustunyurt, Emin; Kosus, Aydin; Kosus, Nermin; Turhan, Nilgun; Hızlı, Deniz; Sarac, Gulce Naz; Erdogan, Deniz

    2014-04-01

    To assess the histomorphological effects of smoking on the cilia of fallopian tubes in mice and the effect of vitamin E on the negative effects of smoke. Eighteen 12-14 week-old Swiss albino type female mice were randomly divided into three groups, each consisting of six mice: Group A: control group; Group B: mice exposed to cigarette smoke; Group C: mice exposed to cigarette smoke together with vitamin E. Groups B and C were exposed to cigarette smoke for 10 weeks. After 10 weeks, tubal excision was performed in all animals. Histopathologic examination of excised tubal tissue was conducted under light microscopy. The number of cilia was significantly lower in Group B. Although not statistically significant, the median number of cilia in Group C was measured to be higher than in Group B but lower than in Group A. Based on the results, it can be concluded that smoking decreases tubal cilia numbers. Supplementation by vitamin E may treat or at least help to slow down the decrease in number of cilia caused by smoking; therefore it could be used therapeutically in the treatment of smoking-related tubal damage. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Visible light alters yeast metabolic rhythms by inhibiting respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, James Brian; Davis, Chris R; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2013-12-24

    Exposure of cells to visible light in nature or in fluorescence microscopy often is considered to be relatively innocuous. However, using the yeast respiratory oscillation (YRO) as a sensitive measurement of metabolism, we find that non-UV visible light has a significant impact on yeast metabolism. Blue/green wavelengths of visible light shorten the period and dampen the amplitude of the YRO, which is an ultradian rhythm of cell metabolism and transcription. The wavelengths of light that have the greatest effect coincide with the peak absorption regions of cytochromes. Moreover, treating yeast with the electron transport inhibitor sodium azide has similar effects on the YRO as visible light. Because impairment of respiration by light would change several state variables believed to play vital roles in the YRO (e.g., oxygen tension and ATP levels), we tested oxygen's role in YRO stability and found that externally induced oxygen depletion can reset the phase of the oscillation, demonstrating that respiratory capacity plays a role in the oscillation's period and phase. Light-induced damage to the cytochromes also produces reactive oxygen species that up-regulate the oxidative stress response gene TRX2 that is involved in pathways that enable sustained growth in bright visible light. Therefore, visible light can modulate cellular rhythmicity and metabolism through unexpectedly photosensitive pathways.

  1. Modeling of Fibrin Gels Based on Confocal Microscopy and Light-Scattering Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magatti, Davide; Molteni, Matteo; Cardinali, Barbara; Rocco, Mattia; Ferri, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Fibrin gels are biological networks that play a fundamental role in blood coagulation and other patho/physiological processes, such as thrombosis and cancer. Electron and confocal microscopies show a collection of fibers that are relatively monodisperse in diameter, not uniformly distributed, and connected at nodal points with a branching order of ∼3–4. Although in the confocal images the hydrated fibers appear to be quite straight (mass fractal dimension Dm = 1), for the overall system 1light-scattering measurements. We then derived an analytical form factor for accurately fitting the scattering data, which allowed us to directly recover the gels’ structural parameters. PMID:23473498

  2. Resins for combined light and electron microscopy: a half century of development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, G R; Hobot, J A

    1999-08-01

    The last fifty years have seen enormous improvements in the way biological specimens are prepared for microscopy. The Fifties produced the essential groundwork upon which many of our current methodologies are based. Acrylic resin embedding was introduced in 1949, with subsequent publications seeking improvements to resin formulations, embedding protocols, and modes of polymerisation. Procedures for progressive lowering of temperature processing, cryosubstitution, freeze-drying and polymerisation by ultra-violet light at low temperatures, all had their genesis in this decade of great innovation. The Sixties marked the period when the acrylics were eclipsed by the more stable and reliable epoxy resins, and much of our present-day understanding of ultrastructure was elucidated. The Seventies carried on this work with advances in technical developments concerned mainly with freezing methodologies. The beginning of the Eighties saw a resurrection of the acrylic resins, with new formulations of these resins giving reliable and stable embeddings. The low temperature and freezing methodologies pioneered in the Fifties, backed up by recent improvements to low temperature technologies, were used to further our understanding of ultrastructure and breathe new life into the science of immunocytochemistry. The remainder of the Eighties and Nineties has seen the ever increasing application of these various microscopical techniques to a wide range of biological studies. The flexibility offered by the acrylic resins in choosing between different processing, embedding and polymerisation methods has provided the impetus for detailed studies to bring to the attention of microscopists the underlying trends governing specimen preparation. Therefore, looking forward to the new Millennium, this has allowed for a more reasoned choice in organising a strategy to deal with a variety of microscopical requirements and for planning an appropriate protocol.

  3. Particle Shape Characterization of Lunar Regolith using Reflected Light Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, C. B.; Garcia, G. C.; Rickman, D.

    2014-12-01

    Automated identification of particles in lunar thin sections is necessary for practical measurement of particle shape, void characterization, and quantitative characterization of sediment fabric. This may be done using image analysis, but several aspects of the lunar regolith make such automations difficult. For example, many of the particles are shattered; others are aggregates of smaller particles. Sieve sizes of the particles span 5 orders of magnitude. The physical thickness of a thin section, at a nominal 30 microns, is large compared to the size of many of the particles. Image acquisition modes, such as SEM and reflected light, while superior to transmitted light, still have significant ambiguity as to the volume being sampled. It is also desirable to have a technique that is inexpensive, not resource intensive, and analytically robust. To this end, we have developed an image acquisition and processing protocol that identifies and delineates resolvable particles on the front surface of a lunar thin section using a petrographic microscope in reflected light. For a polished thin section, a grid is defined covering the entire thin section. The grid defines discrete images taken with 20% overlap, minimizing the number of particles that intersect image boundaries. In reflected light mode, two images are acquired at each grid location, with a closed aperture diaphragm. One image, A, is focused precisely on the front surface of the thin section. The second image, B, is made after the stage is brought toward the objective lens just slightly. A bright fringe line, analogous to a Becke line, appears inside all transparent particles at the front surface of the section in the second image. The added light in the bright line corresponds to a deficit around the particles. Particle identification is done using ImageJ and uses multiple steps. A hybrid 5x5 median filter is used to make images Af and Bf. This primarily removes very small particles just below the front surface

  4. Time-lapse 3-D measurements of a glucose biosensor in multicellular spheroids by light sheet fluorescence microscopy in commercial 96-well plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maioli, Vincent; Chennell, George; Sparks, Hugh; Lana, Tobia; Kumar, Sunil; Carling, David; Sardini, Alessandro; Dunsby, Chris

    2016-11-25

    Light sheet fluorescence microscopy has previously been demonstrated on a commercially available inverted fluorescence microscope frame using the method of oblique plane microscopy (OPM). In this paper, OPM is adapted to allow time-lapse 3-D imaging of 3-D biological cultures in commercially available glass-bottomed 96-well plates using a stage-scanning OPM approach (ssOPM). Time-lapse 3-D imaging of multicellular spheroids expressing a glucose Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor is demonstrated in 16 fields of view with image acquisition at 10 minute intervals. As a proof-of-principle, the ssOPM system is also used to acquire a dose response curve with the concentration of glucose in the culture medium being varied across 42 wells of a 96-well plate with the whole acquisition taking 9 min. The 3-D image data enable the FRET ratio to be measured as a function of distance from the surface of the spheroid. Overall, the results demonstrate the capability of the OPM system to measure spatio-temporal changes in FRET ratio in 3-D in multicellular spheroids over time in a multi-well plate format.

  5. Recent achievements in multi-keV x-ray microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susini, J.; Barrett, R.; Salome, M.; Kaulich, B.

    2002-01-01

    X-ray microscopy (XRM) techniques are emerging as powerful and complementary tools for sub-micron investigations. Soft XRM traditionally offers the possibility to form direct images of thick hydrated biological material in near-native environments, at a spatial resolution well beyond that achievable with visible light microscopy. Natural contrast is available in the soft X-ray region, in the so-called 'water-window', due to the presence of absorption edges of the major constituents (C,N,O). Recent advances in manufacturing techniques have enlarged the accessible energy range of micro-focusing optics and offer new applications in a broad range of disciplines. XRM in the 1-20 keV energy range is better suited to map trace elements in fluorescence yield, 3-D tomographic imaging and in micro-diffraction. After a brief introduction to the principles and methods, the main attributes of X-ray microscopy will be presented. This presentation will be biased towards sub-micron microscopy developed at the ESRF in the 2-10 keV energy. Strengths and weaknesses of X-ray microscopy and spectro-microscopy techniques will be discussed and illustrated by examples in biology, materials sciences and geology. (authors)

  6. Brillouin microscopy: assessing ocular tissue biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Seok Hyun; Chernyak, Dimitri

    2018-07-01

    Assessment of corneal biomechanics has been an unmet clinical need in ophthalmology for many years. Many researchers and clinicians have identified corneal biomechanics as source of variability in refractive procedures and one of the main factors in keratoconus. However, it has been difficult to accurately characterize corneal biomechanics in patients. The recent development of Brillouin light scattering microscopy heightens the promise of bringing biomechanics into the clinic. The aim of this review is to overview the progress and discuss prospective applications of this new technology. Brillouin microscopy uses a low-power near-infrared laser beam to determine longitudinal modulus or mechanical compressibility of tissue by analyzing the return signal spectrum. Human clinical studies have demonstrated significant difference in the elastic properties of normal corneas versus corneas diagnosed with mild and severe keratoconus. Clinical data have also shown biomechanical changes after corneal cross-linking treatment of keratoconus patients. Brillouin measurements of the crystalline lens and sclera have also been demonstrated. Brillouin microscopy is a promising technology under commercial development at present. The technique enables physicians to characterize the biomechanical properties of ocular tissues.

  7. A 256×256 low-light-level CMOS imaging sensor with digital CDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Mei; Chen, Nan; Zhong, Shengyou; Li, Zhengfen; Zhang, Jicun; Yao, Li-bin

    2016-10-01

    In order to achieve high sensitivity for low-light-level CMOS image sensors (CIS), a capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) pixel circuit with a small integration capacitor is used. As the pixel and the column area are highly constrained, it is difficult to achieve analog correlated double sampling (CDS) to remove the noise for low-light-level CIS. So a digital CDS is adopted, which realizes the subtraction algorithm between the reset signal and pixel signal off-chip. The pixel reset noise and part of the column fixed-pattern noise (FPN) can be greatly reduced. A 256×256 CIS with CTIA array and digital CDS is implemented in the 0.35μm CMOS technology. The chip size is 7.7mm×6.75mm, and the pixel size is 15μm×15μm with a fill factor of 20.6%. The measured pixel noise is 24LSB with digital CDS in RMS value at dark condition, which shows 7.8× reduction compared to the image sensor without digital CDS. Running at 7fps, this low-light-level CIS can capture recognizable images with the illumination down to 0.1lux.

  8. Light-sheet microscopy for quantitative ovarian folliculometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiao-Chun Amy; Dutta, Rahul; Mandal, Subhamoy; Kind, Alexander; Schnieke, Angelika; Razansky, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Determination of ovarian status and follicle monitoring are common methods of diagnosing female infertility. We evaluated the suitability of selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) for the study of ovarian follicles. Owing to the large field of view and fast acquisition speed of our newly developed SPIM system, volumetric image stacks from entire intact samples of pig ovaries have been rendered demonstrating clearly discernible follicular features like follicle diameters (70 μm - 2.5 mm), size of developing Cumulus oophorus complexes (COC ) (40 μm - 110 μm), and follicular wall thicknesses (90 μm-120 μm). The observation of clearly distinguishable COCs protruding into the follicular antrum was also shown possible, and correlation with the developmental stage of the follicles was determined. Follicles of all developmental stages were identified, and even the small primordial follicle clusters forming the egg nest could be observed. The ability of the system to non-destructively generate sub-cellular resolution 3D images of developing follicles, with excellent image contrast and high throughput capacity compared to conventional histology, suggests that it can be used to monitor follicular development and identify structural abnormalities indicative of ovarian ailments. Accurate folliculometric measurements provided by SPIM images can immensely help the understanding of ovarian physiology and provide important information for the proper management of ovarian diseases.

  9. Simultaneous correlative scanning electron and high-NA fluorescence microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalan Liv

    Full Text Available Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM is a unique method for investigating biological structure-function relations. With CLEM protein distributions visualized in fluorescence can be mapped onto the cellular ultrastructure measured with electron microscopy. Widespread application of correlative microscopy is hampered by elaborate experimental procedures related foremost to retrieving regions of interest in both modalities and/or compromises in integrated approaches. We present a novel approach to correlative microscopy, in which a high numerical aperture epi-fluorescence microscope and a scanning electron microscope illuminate the same area of a sample at the same time. This removes the need for retrieval of regions of interest leading to a drastic reduction of inspection times and the possibility for quantitative investigations of large areas and datasets with correlative microscopy. We demonstrate Simultaneous CLEM (SCLEM analyzing cell-cell connections and membrane protrusions in whole uncoated colon adenocarcinoma cell line cells stained for actin and cortactin with AlexaFluor488. SCLEM imaging of coverglass-mounted tissue sections with both electron-dense and fluorescence staining is also shown.

  10. Efficiency of light energy used by leaves situated in different levels of a sweet pepper canopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dueck, T.A.; Grashoff, C.; Broekhuijsen, A.G.M.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2006-01-01

    In order to make the most use of the available light in glasshouse crops, measurements of light penetration, leaf photosynthesis, respiration and transpiration were performed at five levels in a sweet paper canopy at two commercial farms, from July to November 2004. Light response curves of leaf

  11. Lighting.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  12. Light microscopy with differential staining techniques for the characterisation and discrimination of insects versus marine arthropods processed animal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottoboni, Matteo; Tretola, Marco; Cheli, Federica; Marchis, Daniela; Veys, Pascal; Baeten, Vincent; Pinotti, Luciano

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of light microscopy with differential staining techniques for the discrimination of insect material from marine arthropods - classified as fishmeal. Specifically, three samples of single-species insect material, Hermetia illucens (HI), Bombyx mori (BM) and Tenebrio molitor (TM), and two samples of marine arthropods, shrimp material and krill, were analysed and compared after staining by two reagents to enhance fragment identification. Alizarin Red (AR) and Chlorazol Black (CB), which react respectively with calcium salts and chitin, were tested for their potential efficacy in distinguishing between insect and marine materials. Results indicated that AR failed to stain HI, BM and TM materials. By contrast, the three insect species materials tested were stained by CB. When shrimp fragments and krill were considered, AR and CB stained marine materials reddish-pink and light blue to black, respectively. By combining these results, it can be suggested that CB staining may efficiently be used to mark insect materials; AR does stain shrimp fragments but does not stain the tested insect material, indicating a possible approach for discriminating between insects and marine arthropods. However, since the present study was performed on pure materials and a small set of samples, possible implementation of this technique still needs to be confirmed in complex matrices such as compound feed.

  13. Comparison of tissue damage caused by various laser systems with tissue tolerable plasma by light and laser scan microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandersee, Staffan; Lademann, Jürgen; Richter, Heike; Patzelt, Alexa; Lange-Asschenfeldt, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Tissue tolerable plasma (TTP) represents a novel therapeutic method with promising capabilities in the field of dermatological interventions, in particular disinfection but also wound antisepsis and regeneration. The energy transfer by plasma into living tissue is not easily educible, as a variety of features such as the medium’s actual molecule-stream, the ions, electrons and free radicals involved, as well as the emission of ultraviolet, visible and infrared light contribute to its increasingly well characterized effects. Thus, relating possible adversary effects, especially of prolonged exposure to a single component of the plasma’s mode of action, is difficult. Until now, severe adverse events connected to plasma exposure have not been reported when conducted according to existing therapeutic protocols. In this study, we have compared the tissue damage-potential of CO 2 and dye lasers with TTP in a porcine model. After exposure of pig ear skin to the three treatment modalities, all specimens were examined histologically and by means of laser scan microscopy (LSM). Light microscopical tissue damage could only be shown in the case of the CO 2 laser, whereas dye laser and plasma treatment resulted in no detectable impairment of the specimens. In the case of TTP, LSM examination revealed only an impairment of the uppermost corneal layers of the skin, thus stressing its safety when used in vivo. (letter)

  14. Atomic force microscopy study of nano-physiological response of ladybird beetles to photostimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V Guz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insects are of interest not only as the most numerous and diverse group of animals but also as highly efficient bio-machines varying greatly in size. They are the main human competitors for crop, can transmit various diseases, etc. However, little study of insects with modern nanotechnology tools has been done. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we applied an atomic force microscopy (AFM method to study stimulation of ladybird beetles with light. This method allows for measuring of the internal physiological responses of insects by recording surface oscillations in different parts of the insect at sub-nanometer amplitude level and sub-millisecond time. Specifically, we studied the sensitivity of ladybird beetles to light of different wavelengths. We demonstrated previously unknown blindness of ladybird beetles to emerald color (∼500nm light, while being able to see UV-blue and green light. Furthermore, we showed how one could study the speed of the beetle adaptation to repetitive flashing light and its relaxation back to the initial stage. CONCLUSIONS: The results show the potential of the method in studying insects. We see this research as a part of what might be a new emerging area of "nanophysiology" of insects.

  15. Visible light induced electron transfer process over nitrogen doped TiO2 nanocrystals prepared by oxidation of titanium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhongbiao; Dong Fan; Zhao Weirong; Guo Sen

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen doped TiO 2 nanocrystals with anatase and rutile mixed phases were prepared by incomplete oxidation of titanium nitride at different temperatures. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), core level X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (CL XPS), valence band X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (VB XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-vis DRS), and visible light excited photoluminescence (PL). The photocatalytic activity was evaluated for photocatalytic degradation of toluene in gas phase under visible light irradiation. The visible light absorption and photoactivities of these nitrogen doped TiO 2 nanocrystals can be clearly attributed to the change of the additional electronic (N - ) states above the valence band of TiO 2 modified by N dopant as revealed by the VB XPS and visible light induced PL. A band gap structure model was established to explain the electron transfer process over nitrogen doped TiO 2 nanocrystals under visible light irradiation, which was consistent with the previous theoretical and experimental results. This model can also be applied to understand visible light induced photocatalysis over other nonmetal doped TiO 2

  16. Elastomeric photo-actuators and their investigation by confocal laser scanning microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czaniková, Klaudia; Ilčíková, Markéta; Mičušík, Matej; Kasák, Peter; Mosnáček, Jaroslav; Omastová, Mária; Krupa, Igor; Pavlova, Ewa; Chorvát Jr, Dušan

    2013-01-01

    The photo-actuation behavior of nanocomposites based on ethylene–vinylacetate copolymer (EVA) and styrene–isoprene–styrene (SIS) block copolymer filled with well-dispersed and modified multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is discussed in this paper. The nanocomposites were prepared by casting from solution. To improve the dispersion of the MWCNTs in EVA, the MWCNT surface was modified with a non-covalent surfactant, cholesteryl 1-pyrenecarboxylate (PyChol). To prepare SIS nanocomposites, the MWCNT surface was covalently modified with polystyrene chains. The good dispersion of the filler was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Special, custom-made punch/die molds were used to create a Braille element (BE)-like shape, which under shear forces induces a uniaxial orientation of the MWCNTs within the matrix. The uniaxial orientation of MWCNTs is an essential precondition to ensure the photo-actuating behavior of MWCNTs in polymeric matrices. The orientation of the MWCNTs within the matrices was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Nanocomposite BEs were illuminated from the bottom by a red light-emitting diode (LED), and the photo-actuation was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). When the BEs were exposed to light, a temporary increase in the height of the element was detected. This process was observed to be reversible: after switching off the light, the BEs returned to their original shape and height. (paper)

  17. Microsphere imaging with confocal microscopy and two photon microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Hyung Su; An, Kyung Won; Lee, Jai Hyung

    2002-01-01

    We have acquired images of polystyrene and fused-silica microsphere by using conventional optical microscopy, confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy, and performed comparative analysis of these images. Different from conventional optical microscopy, confocal and two-photon microscopy had good optical sectioning capability. In addition, confocal microscopy and two-photon microscopy had better lateral resolution than conventional optical microscopy. These results are attributed to confocality and nonlinearity of confocal microscopy and two photon microscopy, respectively.

  18. The coming paradigm shift: A transition from manual to automated microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahani, Navid; Monteith, Corey E

    2016-01-01

    The field of pathology has used light microscopy (LM) extensively since the mid-19(th) century for examination of histological tissue preparations. This technology has remained the foremost tool in use by pathologists even as other fields have undergone a great change in recent years through new technologies. However, as new microscopy techniques are perfected and made available, this reliance on the standard LM will likely begin to change. Advanced imaging involving both diffraction-limited and subdiffraction techniques are bringing nondestructive, high-resolution, molecular-level imaging to pathology. Some of these technologies can produce three-dimensional (3D) datasets from sampled tissues. In addition, block-face/tissue-sectioning techniques are already providing automated, large-scale 3D datasets of whole specimens. These datasets allow pathologists to see an entire sample with all of its spatial information intact, and furthermore allow image analysis such as detection, segmentation, and classification, which are impossible in standard LM. It is likely that these technologies herald a major paradigm shift in the field of pathology.

  19. The coming paradigm shift: A transition from manual to automated microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Farahani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of pathology has used light microscopy (LM extensively since the mid-19 th century for examination of histological tissue preparations. This technology has remained the foremost tool in use by pathologists even as other fields have undergone a great change in recent years through new technologies. However, as new microscopy techniques are perfected and made available, this reliance on the standard LM will likely begin to change. Advanced imaging involving both diffraction-limited and subdiffraction techniques are bringing nondestructive, high-resolution, molecular-level imaging to pathology. Some of these technologies can produce three-dimensional (3D datasets from sampled tissues. In addition, block-face/tissue-sectioning techniques are already providing automated, large-scale 3D datasets of whole specimens. These datasets allow pathologists to see an entire sample with all of its spatial information intact, and furthermore allow image analysis such as detection, segmentation, and classification, which are impossible in standard LM. It is likely that these technologies herald a major paradigm shift in the field of pathology.

  20. Real-time Near-infrared Virtual Intraoperative Surgical Photoacoustic Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changho Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We developed a near infrared (NIR virtual intraoperative surgical photoacoustic microscopy (NIR-VISPAM system that combines a conventional surgical microscope and an NIR light photoacoustic microscopy (PAM system. NIR-VISPAM can simultaneously visualize PA B-scan images at a maximum display rate of 45 Hz and display enlarged microscopic images on a surgeon's view plane through the ocular lenses of the surgical microscope as augmented reality. The use of the invisible NIR light eliminated the disturbance to the surgeon's vision caused by the visible PAM excitation laser in a previous report. Further, the maximum permissible laser pulse energy at this wavelength is approximately 5 times more than that at the visible spectral range. The use of a needle-type ultrasound transducer without any water bath for acoustic coupling can enhance convenience in an intraoperative environment. We successfully guided needle and injected carbon particles in biological tissues ex vivo and in melanoma-bearing mice in vivo.

  1. Perspective: Differential dynamic microscopy extracts multi-scale activity in complex fluids and biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbino, Roberto; Cicuta, Pietro

    2017-09-01

    Differential dynamic microscopy (DDM) is a technique that exploits optical microscopy to obtain local, multi-scale quantitative information about dynamic samples, in most cases without user intervention. It is proving extremely useful in understanding dynamics in liquid suspensions, soft materials, cells, and tissues. In DDM, image sequences are analyzed via a combination of image differences and spatial Fourier transforms to obtain information equivalent to that obtained by means of light scattering techniques. Compared to light scattering, DDM offers obvious advantages, principally (a) simplicity of the setup; (b) possibility of removing static contributions along the optical path; (c) power of simultaneous different microscopy contrast mechanisms; and (d) flexibility of choosing an analysis region, analogous to a scattering volume. For many questions, DDM has also advantages compared to segmentation/tracking approaches and to correlation techniques like particle image velocimetry. The very straightforward DDM approach, originally demonstrated with bright field microscopy of aqueous colloids, has lately been used to probe a variety of other complex fluids and biological systems with many different imaging methods, including dark-field, differential interference contrast, wide-field, light-sheet, and confocal microscopy. The number of adopting groups is rapidly increasing and so are the applications. Here, we briefly recall the working principles of DDM, we highlight its advantages and limitations, we outline recent experimental breakthroughs, and we provide a perspective on future challenges and directions. DDM can become a standard primary tool in every laboratory equipped with a microscope, at the very least as a first bias-free automated evaluation of the dynamics in a system.

  2. Neuroanatomy from Mesoscopic to Nanoscopic Scales: An Improved Method for the Observation of Semithin Sections by High-Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, José-Rodrigo; Turégano-López, Marta; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel

    2018-01-01

    Semithin sections are commonly used to examine large areas of tissue with an optical microscope, in order to locate and trim the regions that will later be studied with the electron microscope. Ideally, the observation of semithin sections would be from mesoscopic to nanoscopic scales directly, instead of using light microscopy and then electron microscopy (EM). Here we propose a method that makes it possible to obtain high-resolution scanning EM images of large areas of the brain in the millimeter to nanometer range. Since our method is compatible with light microscopy, it is also feasible to generate hybrid light and electron microscopic maps. Additionally, the same tissue blocks that have been used to obtain semithin sections can later be used, if necessary, for transmission EM, or for focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM).

  3. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  4. [Influence of different lighting levels at workstations with video display terminals on operators' work efficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janosik, Elzbieta; Grzesik, Jan

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of different lighting levels at workstations with video display terminals (VDTs) on the course of the operators' visual work, and to determine the optimal levels of lighting at VDT workstations. For two kinds of job (entry of figures from a typescript and edition of the text displayed on the screen), the work capacity, the degree of the visual strain and the operators' subjective symptoms were determined for four lighting levels (200, 300, 500 and 750 lx). It was found that the work at VDT workstations may overload the visual system and cause eyes complaints as well as the reduction of accommodation or convergence strength. It was also noted that the edition of the text displayed on the screen is more burdening for operators than the entry of figures from a typescript. Moreover, the examination results showed that the lighting at VDT workstations should be higher than 200 lx and that 300 lx makes the work conditions most comfortable during the entry of figures from a typescript, and 500 lx during the edition of the text displayed on the screen.

  5. Classification of video sequences into chosen generalized use classes of target size and lighting level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczuk, Mikołaj; Dudek, Łukasz; Witkowski, Marcin

    The VQiPS (Video Quality in Public Safety) Working Group, supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, has been developing a user guide for public safety video applications. According to VQiPS, five parameters have particular importance influencing the ability to achieve a recognition task. They are: usage time-frame, discrimination level, target size, lighting level, and level of motion. These parameters form what are referred to as Generalized Use Classes (GUCs). The aim of our research was to develop algorithms that would automatically assist classification of input sequences into one of the GUCs. Target size and lighting level parameters were approached. The experiment described reveals the experts' ambiguity and hesitation during the manual target size determination process. However, the automatic methods developed for target size classification make it possible to determine GUC parameters with 70 % compliance to the end-users' opinion. Lighting levels of the entire sequence can be classified with an efficiency reaching 93 %. To make the algorithms available for use, a test application has been developed. It is able to process video files and display classification results, the user interface being very simple and requiring only minimal user interaction.

  6. Efficient globally optimal segmentation of cells in fluorescence microscopy images using level sets and convex energy functionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeest, Jan-Philip; Rohr, Karl

    2012-10-01

    In high-throughput applications, accurate and efficient segmentation of cells in fluorescence microscopy images is of central importance for the quantification of protein expression and the understanding of cell function. We propose an approach for segmenting cell nuclei which is based on active contours using level sets and convex energy functionals. Compared to previous work, our approach determines the global solution. Thus, the approach does not suffer from local minima and the segmentation result does not depend on the initialization. We consider three different well-known energy functionals for active contour-based segmentation and introduce convex formulations of these functionals. We also suggest a numeric approach for efficiently computing the solution. The performance of our approach has been evaluated using fluorescence microscopy images from different experiments comprising different cell types. We have also performed a quantitative comparison with previous segmentation approaches. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Lights Will Guide You : Sample Preparation and Applications for Integrated Laser and Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karreman, M. A.

    2013-03-01

    Correlative microscopy is the combined use of two different forms of microscopy in the study of a specimen, allowing for the exploitation of the advantages of both imaging tools. The integrated Laser and Electron Microscope (iLEM), developed at Utrecht University, combines a fluorescence microscope (FM) and a transmission electron microscope (TEM) in a single set-up. The region of interest in the specimen is labeled or tagged with a fluorescent probe and can easily be identified within a large field of view with the FM. Next, this same area is retraced in the TEM and can be studied at high resolution. The iLEM demands samples that can be imaged with both FM and TEM. Biological specimen, typically composed of light elements, generate low image contrast in the TEM. Therefore, these samples are often ‘contrasted’ with heavy metal stains. FM, on the other hand, images fluorescent samples. Sample preparation for correlative microscopy, and iLEM in particular, is complicated by the fact that the heavy metals stains employed for TEM quench the fluorescent signal of the probe that is imaged with FM. The first part of this thesis outlines preparation procedures for biological material yielding specimen that can be imaged with the iLEM. Here, approaches for the contrasting of thin sections of cells and tissue are introduced that do not affect the fluorescence signal of the probe that marks the region of interest. Furthermore, two novel procedures, VIS2FIXH and VIS2FIX­FS are described that allow for the chemical fixation of thin sections of cryo-immobilized material. These procedures greatly expedite the sample preparation process, and open up novel possibilities for the immuno-labeling of difficult antigens, eg. proteins and lipids that are challenging to preserve. The second part of this thesis describes applications of iLEM in research in the field of life and material science. The iLEM was employed in the study of UVC induced apoptosis (programmed cell death) of

  8. Super-resolution binding activated localization microscopy through reversible change of DNA conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurek, Aleksander; Birk, Udo; Knecht, Hans; Dobrucki, Jurek; Mai, Sabine; Cremer, Christoph

    2018-01-01

    Methods of super-resolving light microscopy (SRM) have found an exponentially growing range of applications in cell biology, including nuclear structure analyses. Recent developments have proven that Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM), a type of SRM, is particularly useful for enhanced spatial analysis of the cell nucleus due to its highest resolving capability combined with very specific fluorescent labeling. In this commentary we offer a brief review of the latest methodological development in the field of SMLM of chromatin designated DNA Structure Fluctuation Assisted Binding Activated Localization Microscopy (abbreviated as fBALM) as well as its potential future applications in biology and medicine.

  9. Fluorescence (FISH) and chromogenic (CISH) in situ hybridisation in prostate carcinoma cell lines: comparison and use of virtual microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, K; Hamilton, P W; Maxwell, P

    2008-01-01

    Chromogenic in situ hybridisation (CISH) has become an attractive alternative to fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) due to its permanent stain which is more familiar to pathologists and because it can be viewed using light microscopy. The aim of the present study is to examine reproducibility in the assessment of abnormal chromosome number by CISH in comparison to FISH. Using three prostate cell lines--PNT1A (derived from normal epithelium), LNCAP and DU145 (derived from prostatic carcinoma), chromosomes 7 and 8 were counted in 40 nuclei in FISH preparations (x100 oil immersion) and 100 nuclei in CISH preparations (x40) by two independent observers. The CISH slides were examined using standard light microscopy and virtual microscopy. Reproducibility was examined using paired Student's t-test (PCISH. No significant differences in chromosome count were seen between the techniques. Chromosomes 7 and 8 showed disomic status for each cell line except LNCAP, which proved to be heterogeneous (disomic/aneusomic), particularly for chromosome 8. Virtual microscopy proved to be easy to use and gave no significant differences from standard light microscopy. These results support the hypothesis that there is no significant difference between FISH and CISH techniques.

  10. Qualitative histologic evaluation of the tissue reaction to the polyurethane resin (ricinus communis - based biopolymer implantation assessed by light and scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Campos Belmonte

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The tissue reaction of bone tissue accessed by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM images after polyurethane resin implantation is presented in this study. Twenty four male rabbits were used, divided into two groups of 12 animals each (experimental group and control group in which full-thickness cranial defect was surgically created. At 30 and 90 days post operation 6 animals of each group were euthanized and bone samples were removed for analysis. The microscopic results indicated no inflammatory foreign body reaction, a perfect union between the polymer and surgical bone bed surface, lack of bone resorption and presence of a thin layer of osteogenic material covering the polymer surface in contact with the surgical bone bed. The SEM images demonstrate the porosity of the resin, with diameters from 120 to 500 µm. This important feature of this polymer is associated with its osteoconductivity, allowing the bone growth inside it, improving the integration between the material and bone tissue. These results confirm that polyurethane resin derived from Ricinuscommunis is an excellent bone substitute for use in repair surgery for great bone losses.

  11. Structured Illumination-Based Super-Resolution Optical Microscopy for Hemato- and Cyto-Pathology Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tieqiao Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Structured illumination fluorescence microscopy utilizes interfering light and the moiré effect to enhance spatial resolution to about a half of that of conventional light microscopy, i.e. approximately 90 nm. In addition to the enhancement in the x and y directions, it also allows enhancement of resolution in the z- direction by the same factor of two (to approximately 220 nm, making it a powerful tool for 3-D morphology studies of fluorescently labeled cells or thin tissue sections. In this report, we applied this technique to several types of blood cells that are commonly seen in hematopathology. Compared with standard brightfield and ordinary fluorescence microscopy images, the 3-D morphology results clearly reveal the morphological features of different types of normal blood cells. We have also used this technique to evaluate morphologies of abnormal erythrocytes and compare them with those recorded on normal cells. The results give a very intuitive presentation of morphological structures of erythrocytes with great details. This research illustrates the potential of this technique to be used in hematology and cyto-pathology studies aimed at identifying nanometer-sized features that cannot be distinguished otherwise with conventional optical microscopy.

  12. Low level light in combination with metabolic modulators for effective therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Tingting; Zhang, Qi; Hamblin, Michael R.; Wu, Mei X.

    2015-03-01

    Vascular damage occurs frequently at the injured brain causing hypoxia and is associated with poor outcomes in the clinics. We found high levels of glycolysis, reduced ATP generation, and increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis in neurons under hypoxia. Strikingly, these adverse events were reversed significantly by noninvasive exposure of injured brain to low-level light (LLL). LLL illumination sustained the mitochondrial membrane potential, constrained cytochrome C leakage in hypoxic cells, and protected them from apoptosis, underscoring a unique property of LLL. The effect of LLL was further bolstered by combination with metabolic substrates such as pyruvate or lactate both in vivo and in vitro. The combinational treatment retained memory and learning activities of injured mice to a normal level, whereas those treated with LLL or pyruvate alone, or sham light displayed partial or severe deficiency in these cognitive functions. In accordance with well-protected learning and memory function, the hippocampal region primarily responsible for learning and memory was completely protected by a combination of LLL and pyruvate, in marked contrast to the severe loss of hippocampal tissue due to secondary damage in control mice. These data clearly suggest that energy metabolic modulators can additively or synergistically enhance the therapeutic effect of LLL in energy-producing insufficient tissues like injured brain. Keywords:

  13. A rapid method of reprocessing for electronic microscopy of cut histological in paraffin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez Chavarri, F.; Vargas Montero, M.; Rivera, P.; Carranza, A.

    2000-01-01

    A simple and rapid method is described for re-processing of light microscopy paraffin sections to observe they under transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) The paraffin-embedded tissue is sectioned and deparaffinized in toluene; then exposed to osmium vapor under microwave irradiation using a domestic microwave oven. The tissues were embedded in epoxy resin, polymerized and ultrathin sectioned. The method requires a relatively short time (about 30 minutes for TEM and 15 for SEM), and produces a reasonable quality of the ultrastructure for diagnostic purposes. (Author) [es

  14. Brain Slice Staining and Preparation for Three-Dimensional Super-Resolution Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Christopher L.; Gudheti, Manasa V.; Fleckenstein, Annette E.; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2018-01-01

    Localization microscopy techniques – such as photoactivation localization microscopy (PALM), fluorescent PALM (FPALM), ground state depletion (GSD), and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) – provide the highest precision for single molecule localization currently available. However, localization microscopy has been largely limited to cell cultures due to the difficulties that arise in imaging thicker tissue sections. Sample fixation and antibody staining, background fluorescence, fluorophore photoinstability, light scattering in thick sections, and sample movement create significant challenges for imaging intact tissue. We have developed a sample preparation and image acquisition protocol to address these challenges in rat brain slices. The sample preparation combined multiple fixation steps, saponin permeabilization, and tissue clarification. Together, these preserve intracellular structures, promote antibody penetration, reduce background fluorescence and light scattering, and allow acquisition of images deep in a 30 μm thick slice. Image acquisition challenges were resolved by overlaying samples with a permeable agarose pad and custom-built stainless steel imaging adapter, and sealing the imaging chamber. This approach kept slices flat, immobile, bathed in imaging buffer, and prevented buffer oxidation during imaging. Using this protocol, we consistently obtained single molecule localizations of synaptic vesicle and active zone proteins in three-dimensions within individual synaptic terminals of the striatum in rat brain slices. These techniques may be easily adapted to the preparation and imaging of other tissues, substantially broadening the application of super-resolution imaging. PMID:28924666

  15. Neural plasticity explored by correlative two-photon and electron/SPIM microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegra Mascaro, A. L.; Silvestri, L.; Costantini, I.; Sacconi, L.; Maco, B.; Knott, G. W.; Pavone, F. S.

    2013-06-01

    Plasticity of the central nervous system is a complex process which involves the remodeling of neuronal processes and synaptic contacts. However, a single imaging technique can reveal only a small part of this complex machinery. To obtain a more complete view, complementary approaches should be combined. Two-photon fluorescence microscopy, combined with multi-photon laser nanosurgery, allow following the real-time dynamics of single neuronal processes in the cerebral cortex of living mice. The structural rearrangement elicited by this highly confined paradigm of injury can be imaged in vivo first, and then the same neuron could be retrieved ex-vivo and characterized in terms of ultrastructural features of the damaged neuronal branch by means of electron microscopy. Afterwards, we describe a method to integrate data from in vivo two-photon fluorescence imaging and ex vivo light sheet microscopy, based on the use of major blood vessels as reference chart. We show how the apical dendritic arbor of a single cortical pyramidal neuron imaged in living mice can be found in the large-scale brain reconstruction obtained with light sheet microscopy. Starting from its apical portion, the whole pyramidal neuron can then be segmented and located in the correct cortical layer. With the correlative approach presented here, researchers will be able to place in a three-dimensional anatomic context the neurons whose dynamics have been observed with high detail in vivo.

  16. Mapping whole-brain activity with cellular resolution by light-sheet microscopy and high-throughput image analysis (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Ludovico; Rudinskiy, Nikita; Paciscopi, Marco; Müllenbroich, Marie Caroline; Costantini, Irene; Sacconi, Leonardo; Frasconi, Paolo; Hyman, Bradley T.; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2016-03-01

    Mapping neuronal activity patterns across the whole brain with cellular resolution is a challenging task for state-of-the-art imaging methods. Indeed, despite a number of technological efforts, quantitative cellular-resolution activation maps of the whole brain have not yet been obtained. Many techniques are limited by coarse resolution or by a narrow field of view. High-throughput imaging methods, such as light sheet microscopy, can be used to image large specimens with high resolution and in reasonable times. However, the bottleneck is then moved from image acquisition to image analysis, since many TeraBytes of data have to be processed to extract meaningful information. Here, we present a full experimental pipeline to quantify neuronal activity in the entire mouse brain with cellular resolution, based on a combination of genetics, optics and computer science. We used a transgenic mouse strain (Arc-dVenus mouse) in which neurons which have been active in the last hours before brain fixation are fluorescently labelled. Samples were cleared with CLARITY and imaged with a custom-made confocal light sheet microscope. To perform an automatic localization of fluorescent cells on the large images produced, we used a novel computational approach called semantic deconvolution. The combined approach presented here allows quantifying the amount of Arc-expressing neurons throughout the whole mouse brain. When applied to cohorts of mice subject to different stimuli and/or environmental conditions, this method helps finding correlations in activity between different neuronal populations, opening the possibility to infer a sort of brain-wide 'functional connectivity' with cellular resolution.

  17. A color fusion method of infrared and low-light-level images based on visual perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing; Yan, Minmin; Zhang, Yi; Bai, Lianfa

    2014-11-01

    The color fusion images can be obtained through the fusion of infrared and low-light-level images, which will contain both the information of the two. The fusion images can help observers to understand the multichannel images comprehensively. However, simple fusion may lose the target information due to inconspicuous targets in long-distance infrared and low-light-level images; and if targets extraction is adopted blindly, the perception of the scene information will be affected seriously. To solve this problem, a new fusion method based on visual perception is proposed in this paper. The extraction of the visual targets ("what" information) and parallel processing mechanism are applied in traditional color fusion methods. The infrared and low-light-level color fusion images are achieved based on efficient typical targets learning. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method. The fusion images achieved by our algorithm can not only improve the detection rate of targets, but also get rich natural information of the scenes.

  18. Superresolution size determination in fluorescence microscopy: A comparison between spatially modulated illumination and confocal laser scanning microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spoeri, Udo; Failla, Antonio Virgilio; Cremer, Christoph

    2004-01-01

    Recently developed far field light optical methods are a powerful tool to analyze biological nanostructures and their dynamics, in particular including the interior of three-dimensionally conserved cells. In this article, the recently described method of spatially modulated illumination (SMI) microscopy has been further extended to the online determination of the extension of small, subwavelength sized, fluorescent objects (nanosizing). Using fluorescence excitation with 488 nm, the determination of fluorescent labeled object diameters down to 40 nm corresponding to about 1/12th of the wavelength used for one-photon excitation could be shown. The results of the SMI nanosizing procedure for a detailed, systematic variation of the object diameter are presented together with a fast algorithm for online size evaluation. In addition, we show a direct comparison of the diameter of 'colocalization volumes' between SMI nanosizing and conventional confocal laser scanning microscopy

  19. A methodology for the extraction of quantitative information from electron microscopy images at the atomic level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galindo, P L; Pizarro, J; Guerrero, E; Guerrero-Lebrero, M P; Scavello, G; Yáñez, A; Sales, D L; Herrera, M; Molina, S I; Núñez-Moraleda, B M; Maestre, J M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe a methodology developed at the University of Cadiz (Spain) in the past few years for the extraction of quantitative information from electron microscopy images at the atomic level. This work is based on a coordinated and synergic activity of several research groups that have been working together over the last decade in two different and complementary fields: Materials Science and Computer Science. The aim of our joint research has been to develop innovative high-performance computing techniques and simulation methods in order to address computationally challenging problems in the analysis, modelling and simulation of materials at the atomic scale, providing significant advances with respect to existing techniques. The methodology involves several fundamental areas of research including the analysis of high resolution electron microscopy images, materials modelling, image simulation and 3D reconstruction using quantitative information from experimental images. These techniques for the analysis, modelling and simulation allow optimizing the control and functionality of devices developed using materials under study, and have been tested using data obtained from experimental samples

  20. Ex Vivo (Fluorescence) Confocal Microscopy in Surgical Pathology: State of the Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragazzi, Moira; Longo, Caterina; Piana, Simonetta

    2016-05-01

    First developed in 1957, confocal microscopy is a powerful imaging tool that can be used to obtain near real-time reflected light images of untreated human tissue with nearly histologic resolution. Besides its research applications, in the last decades, confocal microscopy technology has been proposed as a useful device to improve clinical diagnosis, especially in ophthalmology, dermatology, and endomicroscopy settings, thanks to advances in instrument development. Compared with the wider use of the in vivo tissue assessment, ex vivo applications of confocal microscopy are not fully explored. A comprehensive review of the current literature was performed here, focusing on the reliable applications of ex vivo confocal microscopy in surgical pathology and on some potential evolutions of this new technique from pathologists' viewpoint.

  1. Effects of long-term light, darkness and oral administration of melatonin on serum levels of melatonin

    OpenAIRE

    Naser Farhadi; Majid Gharghani; Zahra Farhadi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Continuous light or darkness has various effects on different systems. In the present research work, the effects of constant light and darkness exposure of male rats and oral administration of exogenous melatonin on the serum levels of melatonin have been studied. Methods: Thirty adult male Wistar rats were divided into six groups of: (1) Control, (2) melatonin, (3) light, (4) light and melatonin, (5) darkness, and (6) darkness and melatonin. All groups were placed according to...

  2. A New Method for Automated Identification and Morphometry of Myelinated Fibers Through Light Microscopy Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novas, Romulo Bourget; Fazan, Valeria Paula Sassoli; Felipe, Joaquim Cezar

    2016-02-01

    Nerve morphometry is known to produce relevant information for the evaluation of several phenomena, such as nerve repair, regeneration, implant, transplant, aging, and different human neuropathies. Manual morphometry is laborious, tedious, time consuming, and subject to many sources of error. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a new method for the automated morphometry of myelinated fibers in cross-section light microscopy images. Images from the recurrent laryngeal nerve of adult rats and the vestibulocochlear nerve of adult guinea pigs were used herein. The proposed pipeline for fiber segmentation is based on the techniques of competitive clustering and concavity analysis. The evaluation of the proposed method for segmentation of images was done by comparing the automatic segmentation with the manual segmentation. To further evaluate the proposed method considering morphometric features extracted from the segmented images, the distributions of these features were tested for statistical significant difference. The method achieved a high overall sensitivity and very low false-positive rates per image. We detect no statistical difference between the distribution of the features extracted from the manual and the pipeline segmentations. The method presented a good overall performance, showing widespread potential in experimental and clinical settings allowing large-scale image analysis and, thus, leading to more reliable results.

  3. Atomic force microscopy and light scattering study of onion-type micelles formed by polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine) and poly(2-vinylpyridine)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) copolymers in aqueous solutions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, P.; Štěpánek, M.; Uchman, M.; Procházka, K.; Špírková, Milena

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 5 (2006), s. 723-738 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/04/0490; GA AV ČR IAA400500505 Grant - others:Marie Curie Research and Training Network(XE) 505 027 POLYAMPHI Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : atomic force microscopy * light scattering * polymer micelles Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.881, year: 2006

  4. Nanodiamonds as multi-purpose labels for microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemelaar, S R; de Boer, P; Chipaux, M; Zuidema, W; Hamoh, T; Martinez, F Perona; Nagl, A; Hoogenboom, J P; Giepmans, B N G; Schirhagl, R

    2017-04-07

    Nanodiamonds containing fluorescent nitrogen-vacancy centers are increasingly attracting interest for use as a probe in biological microscopy. This interest stems from (i) strong resistance to photobleaching allowing prolonged fluorescence observation times; (ii) the possibility to excite fluorescence using a focused electron beam (cathodoluminescence; CL) for high-resolution localization; and (iii) the potential use for nanoscale sensing. For all these schemes, the development of versatile molecular labeling using relatively small diamonds is essential. Here, we show the direct targeting of a biological molecule with nanodiamonds as small as 70 nm using a streptavidin conjugation and standard antibody labelling approach. We also show internalization of 40 nm sized nanodiamonds. The fluorescence from the nanodiamonds survives osmium-fixation and plastic embedding making them suited for correlative light and electron microscopy. We show that CL can be observed from epon-embedded nanodiamonds, while surface-exposed nanoparticles also stand out in secondary electron (SE) signal due to the exceptionally high diamond SE yield. Finally, we demonstrate the magnetic read-out using fluorescence from diamonds prior to embedding. Thus, our results firmly establish nanodiamonds containing nitrogen-vacancy centers as unique, versatile probes for combining and correlating different types of microscopy, from fluorescence imaging and magnetometry to ultrastructural investigation using electron microscopy.

  5. Light and electron microscopy of contacts between primary afferent fibres and neurones with axons ascending the dorsal columns of the feline spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, D J; Koerber, H R; Bannatyne, B A

    1985-10-01

    In addition to primary afferent fibres, the dorsal columns of the cat spinal cord contain ascending second-order axons which project to the dorsal column nuclei. The aim of the present study was to obtain morphological evidence that certain primary afferent axons form monosynaptic contacts with cells of origin of this postsynaptic dorsal column pathway. In ten adult cats, neurones with axons ascending the dorsal columns were retrogradely labelled with horseradish peroxidase using a pellet implantation method in the thoracic dorsal columns. In the lumbosacral regions of the same animals, primary afferent fibres were labelled intra-axonally with ionophoretic application of horseradish peroxidase. Tissue containing labelled axons was prepared for light and combined light and electron microscopy. Ultrastructural examination demonstrated that slowly adapting (Type I), hair follicle, Pacinian corpuscle and group Ia muscle spindle afferents formed monosynaptic contacts with labelled cells and light microscopical analysis suggested that they also received monosynaptic input from rapidly adapting (Krause) afferents. This evidence suggests that sensory information from large-diameter cutaneous and muscle spindle afferent fibres is conveyed disynaptically via the postsynaptic dorsal column pathway to the dorsal column nuclei. Some of the input to this pathway is probably modified in the spinal cord as the majority of primary afferent boutons forming monosynaptic contacts were postsynaptic to other axon terminals. The postsynaptic dorsal column system appears to constitute a major somatosensory pathway in the cat.

  6. Studies of energy levels and lifetimes in neutral and ionized light atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huldt, S.

    1980-05-01

    The spectrum of singly ionized Titanium has been analysed by photographic spectral recordings of the light from a hollow- cathod. 1240 classified lines in the region 1200 A - 11000 A and 202 term values are reported. Lifetimes of the 3p 5 5p levels in neutral Argon have been measured by the High-frequency-Deflection technique considering the trapping of radiation from the excited 3p 5 4s level. Energy levels and lifetimes of excited states have been studied with the beam-foil method for selected ions in the atomic number range 7 - 30. Influence of transition probabilities caused by hyper-fine interaction for low members of the Helium iso-electronic sequence i verified. The oscillator strength for the inter-combination transition ls 2 1S 0 -1s3p 3 p 1 is measured in Beryllium-like Nitrogen, Oxygen and Fluorine. Accurate determinations of lifetimes for some of the lowest excited levels in Si I - Si IV and Zn II are reported. A large fraction of circularly polarized light is seen in the 0 VI n=6-7 hydrogenic transition when a 4 MeV beam of oxygen was passed through a tilted carbon foil. (author)

  7. Low-level rf system for the AGS Light Ion Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovarik, V.; Ahrens, L.; Barton, D.S.; Frankel, R.; Otis, A.; Pope, D.; Pritsker, M.; Raka, E.; Warkentien, R.

    1987-01-01

    The new low level rf system for the light ion acceleration program features direct digital control of a phase continuous rf synthesizer clocked by finite changes in the B field. The system, its operation and testing are described. The system covers the complete rf frequency range and switches over from single cavity acceleration to multiple cavity acceleration with no beam loss. It also switches from the programmed drive to the normal bootstrap system

  8. Axial tomography in 3D live cell microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Verena; Bruns, Sarah; Bruns, Thomas; Piper, Mathis; Weber, Petra; Wagner, Michael; Cremer, Christoph; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    2017-07-01

    A miniaturized setup for sample rotation on a microscope stage has been developed, combined with light sheet, confocal or structured illumination microscopy and applied to living cells as well as to small organisms. This setup permits axial tomography with improved visualization of single cells or small cell clusters as well as an enhanced effective 3D resolution upon sample rotation.

  9. Effects of monochromatic light sources on sex hormone levels in serum and on semen quality of ganders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shen-Chang; Zhuang, Zi-Xuan; Lin, Min-Jung; Cheng, Chuen-Yu; Lin, Tsung-Yi; Jea, Yu-Shine; Huang, San-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Light is an essential external factor influencing various physiological processes, including reproductive performance, in birds. Although several attempts have been made to understand the effect of light on poultry production, the effect of light of a particular wavelength (color) on the reproductive function in geese remains unclear. This study evaluated the effect of various monochromatic light sources on the levels of sex hormone and on semen quality of ganders. Of 30 male White Roman geese in their third reproductive season (average age=3 years), 27 were divided into three groups receiving monochromatic white or red or blue lights. The birds were kept in an environmentally controlled house with a lighting photoperiod of 7L:17D for six weeks as the adaptation period. The photoperiod was subsequently changed to 9L:15D and maintained for 24 weeks. Three ganders at the beginning of the study and three from each group at the end of the adjusting period and the 20th and 30th week of the study period were sacrificed, and their testes and blood samples were collected for determining the sex hormone levels. Semen samples were collected for determining semen quality parameters, including the semen collection index, sperm concentration, semen volume, sperm motility, sperm viability, sperm morphology, and semen quality factor. The results showed that the testosterone and estradiol levels remained unchanged in all three groups at all time points. The ratio of testosterone to estradiol of ganders exposed to white light was significantly higher than that of ganders exposed to red light at the 30th week (PSemen collection index and sperm viability of ganders exposed to blue light were significantly the lowest (Psemen quality than that with red or blue lights in ganders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Erosion Potential of Tooth Whitening Regimens as Evaluated with Polarized Light Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambert, Patrick; Qian, Fang; Kwon, So Ran

    2015-11-01

    Tooth whitening is a widely utilized esthetic treatment in dentistry. With increased access to over-the-counter (OTC) systems concerns have been raised as to potential adverse effects associated with overuse of whitening materials. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate enamel erosion due to different whitening regimens when used in excess of recommended guidelines. Extracted human teeth (n = 66) were randomly divided into 11 groups (n = 6/group). Specimens were exposed to OTC products: Crest Whitestrips and 5-minute natural white and a do-it-yourself (DIY) strawberry whitening recipe. Within each regimen, groups were further divided per exposure time: specimens receiving the recommended product dosage; 5 times the recommended dosage; and 10 times the recommended dosage. Negative and positive controls were treated with grade 3 water and 1.0% citric acid, respectively. Specimens were nail-varnished to limit application to a 1 × 4 mm window. Following treatment, specimens were sectioned and erosion (drop in μm) measured using polarized light microscopy. Two-sample t-test was used to detect difference in amount of enamel erosion between negative and positive groups, while one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by post hoc Dunnett's test was used to detect difference between set of treatment groups and negative control groups or among all experimental groups. There was significant difference in mean amount of enamel erosion (p enamel erosion for positive control group was significantly greater than that for negative control group (23.50 vs 2.65 μm). There was significant effect for type of treatments on enamel erosion [F(9,50) = 25.19; p 0.05 for all instances), except for Natural White_10 times treatment group (p enamel erosion. Enamel erosion due to the overuse of whitening products varies for different modalities and products. Therefore, caution is advised when using certain over-the-counter products beyond recommended guidelines, as there is potential

  11. X-ray Microscopy as an Approach to Increasing Accuracy and Efficiency of Serial Block-face Imaging for Correlated Light and Electron Microscopy of Biological Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Bushong, Eric A.; Johnson, Donald D.; Kim, Keun-Young; Terada, Masako; Hatori, Megumi; Peltier, Steven T.; Panda, Satchidananda; Merkle, Arno; Ellisman, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    The recently developed three-dimensional electron microscopic (EM) method of serial block-face scanning electron microscopy (SBEM) has rapidly established itself as a powerful imaging approach. Volume EM imaging with this scanning electron microscopy (SEM) method requires intense staining of biological specimens with heavy metals to allow sufficient back-scatter electron signal and also to render specimens sufficiently conductive to control charging artifacts. These more extreme heavy metal s...

  12. DMD-based LED-illumination super-resolution and optical sectioning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Dan; Lei, Ming; Yao, Baoli; Wang, Wen; Winterhalder, Martin; Zumbusch, Andreas; Qi, Yujiao; Xia, Liang; Yan, Shaohui; Yang, Yanlong; Gao, Peng; Ye, Tong; Zhao, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Super-resolution three-dimensional (3D) optical microscopy has incomparable advantages over other high-resolution microscopic technologies, such as electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy, in the study of biological molecules, pathways and events in live cells and tissues. We present a novel approach of structured illumination microscopy (SIM) by using a digital micromirror device (DMD) for fringe projection and a low-coherence LED light for illumination. The lateral resolution of 90 nm and the optical sectioning depth of 120 μm were achieved. The maximum acquisition speed for 3D imaging in the optical sectioning mode was 1.6×10(7) pixels/second, which was mainly limited by the sensitivity and speed of the CCD camera. In contrast to other SIM techniques, the DMD-based LED-illumination SIM is cost-effective, ease of multi-wavelength switchable and speckle-noise-free. The 2D super-resolution and 3D optical sectioning modalities can be easily switched and applied to either fluorescent or non-fluorescent specimens.

  13. Correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy with high spatial precision and improved sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schorb, Martin; Briggs, John A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Performing fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy on the same sample allows fluorescent signals to be used to identify and locate features of interest for subsequent imaging by electron microscopy. To carry out such correlative microscopy on vitrified samples appropriate for structural cryo-electron microscopy it is necessary to perform fluorescence microscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperatures. Here we describe an adaptation of a cryo-light microscopy stage to permit use of high-numerical aperture objectives. This allows high-sensitivity and high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of vitrified samples. We describe and apply a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy workflow together with a fiducial bead-based image correlation procedure. This procedure allows us to locate fluorescent bacteriophages in cryo-electron microscopy images with an accuracy on the order of 50 nm, based on their fluorescent signal. It will allow the user to precisely and unambiguously identify and locate objects and events for subsequent high-resolution structural study, based on fluorescent signals. - Highlights: • Workflow for correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy. • Cryo-fluorescence microscopy setup incorporating a high numerical aperture objective. • Fluorescent signals located in cryo-electron micrographs with 50 nm spatial precision

  14. Correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy with high spatial precision and improved sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schorb, Martin [Structural and Computational Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Briggs, John A.G., E-mail: john.briggs@embl.de [Structural and Computational Biology Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Cell Biology and Biophysics Unit, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-08-01

    Performing fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy on the same sample allows fluorescent signals to be used to identify and locate features of interest for subsequent imaging by electron microscopy. To carry out such correlative microscopy on vitrified samples appropriate for structural cryo-electron microscopy it is necessary to perform fluorescence microscopy at liquid-nitrogen temperatures. Here we describe an adaptation of a cryo-light microscopy stage to permit use of high-numerical aperture objectives. This allows high-sensitivity and high-resolution fluorescence microscopy of vitrified samples. We describe and apply a correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy workflow together with a fiducial bead-based image correlation procedure. This procedure allows us to locate fluorescent bacteriophages in cryo-electron microscopy images with an accuracy on the order of 50 nm, based on their fluorescent signal. It will allow the user to precisely and unambiguously identify and locate objects and events for subsequent high-resolution structural study, based on fluorescent signals. - Highlights: • Workflow for correlated cryo-fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy. • Cryo-fluorescence microscopy setup incorporating a high numerical aperture objective. • Fluorescent signals located in cryo-electron micrographs with 50 nm spatial precision.

  15. Two-Photon Fluorescence Microscopy Developed for Microgravity Fluid Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, David G.; Zimmerli, Gregory A.; Asipauskas, Marius

    2004-01-01

    Recent research efforts within the Microgravity Fluid Physics Branch of the NASA Glenn Research Center have necessitated the development of a microscope capable of high-resolution, three-dimensional imaging of intracellular structure and tissue morphology. Standard optical microscopy works well for thin samples, but it does not allow the imaging of thick samples because of severe degradation caused by out-of-focus object structure. Confocal microscopy, which is a laser-based scanning microscopy, provides improved three-dimensional imaging and true optical sectioning by excluding the out-of-focus light. However, in confocal microscopy, out-of-focus object structure is still illuminated by the incoming beam, which can lead to substantial photo-bleaching. In addition, confocal microscopy is plagued by limited penetration depth, signal loss due to the presence of a confocal pinhole, and the possibility of live-cell damage. Two-photon microscopy is a novel form of laser-based scanning microscopy that allows three-dimensional imaging without many of the problems inherent in confocal microscopy. Unlike one-photon microscopy, it utilizes the nonlinear absorption of two near-infrared photons. However, the efficiency of two-photon absorption is much lower than that of one-photon absorption because of the nonlinear (i.e., quadratic) electric field dependence, so an ultrafast pulsed laser source must typically be employed. On the other hand, this stringent energy density requirement effectively localizes fluorophore excitation to the focal volume. Consequently, two-photon microscopy provides optical sectioning and confocal performance without the need for a signal-limiting pinhole. In addition, there is a reduction in photo-damage because of the longer excitation wavelength, a reduction in background fluorescence, and a 4 increase in penetration depth over confocal methods because of the reduction in Rayleigh scattering.

  16. Prospects for hybrid pixel detectors in electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faruqi, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    The current status of CCD-based detectors for cryo-electron microscopy of membrane and other proteins is described briefly, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of the technique. Over the past few years CCD detectors have been used extensively in electron crystallography of membrane proteins, and in particular, in the study of the molecular transitions which take place during the photo-cycle of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin. Direct-detection methods, which avoid the intermediate stages of converting the electron energy into light, offer the possibility of improved spatial resolution compared to CCD detectors; in addition, photon counting and noise-free readout should improve the signal-to-noise ratio

  17. Lighting up medicine with lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durrani, M.

    2004-01-01

    If you have ever shone a torch onto the back of your hand, you will know that your palm glows red. Haemoglobin in the blood absorbs almost all visible radiation at wavelengths below about 600nm, letting only red light pass through. Disappointingly, however, bones and other anatomical structures are impossible to see. Light is scattered so strongly by soft tissue that even a parallel beam becomes diffuse after travelling just a millimetre into the skin. Despite this superficial drawback, light is widely used in modern medicine. It can be reflected, refracted, absorbed, emitted and amplified. Light can be used to detect tumours, to take pictures of your stomach, or - in laser form - to remove cancerous tissue. Light in the 700-1300 nm range, known as the sup t herapeutic window sup , yields molecular information about fat, water and lipids, as well as the oxygenation of haemoglobin. For some, the holy grail in biomedical optics is a portable Star Trek style device that latter-day Dr McCoys can shine over patients to provide a diagnosis and therapy all in one. Optical scientists and engineers have developed a vast range of sophisticated light-based techniques for medical applications. But one of the most common biomedical research tools remains the optical microscope, which is almost the only way of studying biological processes in living tissue at the sub-micron cellular level. Although it might seem rather old-fashioned, microscopy has recently returned to the front line of biological research. In the August issue of Physics World Matin Durrani describes the latest developments in the field of biomedical optics. (U.K.)

  18. Integrated Photoacoustic and Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yu; Maslov, Konstantin; Kim, Chulhong; Hu, Song; Wang, Lihong V.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a dual-modality imaging system by integrating optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy and fluorescence confocal microscopy to provide optical absorption and fluorescence contrasts simultaneously. By sharing the same laser source and objective lens, intrinsically registered photoacoustic and fluorescence images are acquired in a single scan. The micrometer resolution allows imaging of both blood and lymphatic vessels down to the capillary level. Simultaneous photoacoustic...

  19. Light-Triggered Soft Artificial Muscles: Molecular-Level Amplification of Actuation Control Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicker, Michael P M; Baker, Anna B; Iredale, Robert J; Naficy, Sina; Bond, Ian P; Faul, Charl F J; Rossiter, Jonathan M; Spinks, Geoffrey M; Weaver, Paul M

    2017-08-23

    The principle of control signal amplification is found in all actuation systems, from engineered devices through to the operation of biological muscles. However, current engineering approaches require the use of hard and bulky external switches or valves, incompatible with both the properties of emerging soft artificial muscle technology and those of the bioinspired robotic systems they enable. To address this deficiency a biomimetic molecular-level approach is developed that employs light, with its excellent spatial and temporal control properties, to actuate soft, pH-responsive hydrogel artificial muscles. Although this actuation is triggered by light, it is largely powered by the resulting excitation and runaway chemical reaction of a light-sensitive acid autocatalytic solution in which the actuator is immersed. This process produces actuation strains of up to 45% and a three-fold chemical amplification of the controlling light-trigger, realising a new strategy for the creation of highly functional soft actuating systems.

  20. Confocal scanning microscopy with multiple optical probes for high speed measurements and better imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Wanhee; Lee, SeungWoo; Gweon, Dae-Gab

    2008-02-01

    Confocal scanning microscopy (CSM) needs a scanning mechanism because only one point information of specimen can be obtained. Therefore the speed of the confocal scanning microscopy is limited by the speed of the scanning tool. To overcome this limitation from scanning tool we propose another scanning mechanism. We make three optical probes in the specimen under confocal condition of each point. Three optical probes are moved by beam scanning mechanism with shared resonant scanning mirror (RM) and galvanometer driven mirror (GM). As each optical probe scan allocated region of the specimen, information from three points is obtained simultaneously and image acquisition time is reduced. Therefore confocal scanning microscopy with multiple optical probes is expected to have three times faster speed of the image acquisition than conventional one. And as another use, multiple optical probes to which different light wavelength is applied can scan whole same region respectively. It helps to obtain better contrast image in case of specimens having different optical characteristics for specific light wavelength. In conclusion confocal scanning microscopy with multiple optical probes is useful technique for views of image acquisition speed and image quality.

  1. Level densities and γ strength functions in light Sc and Ti isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, A.; Larsen, A.C.; Syed, N.U.H.; Guttormsen, M.; Nyhus, H.; Siem, S.; Harissopulos, S.; Konstantinopoulos, T.; Lagoyannis, A.; Perdidakis, G.; Spyrou, A.; Kmiecik, M.; Mazurek, K.; Krticka, M.; Loennroth, T.; Norby, M.; Voinov, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present preliminary results from a measurement of nuclear level densities and the γ-ray strength of light Sc (Sc 43 , Sc 45 ) and Ti (Ti 44 , Ti 45 and Ti 46 ) isotopes using the Oslo Method. The article begins with a presentation of the experimental setup. (authors)

  2. Tracking Lithium Ions via Widefield Fluorescence Microscopy for Battery Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Nicolas A; Rea, Morgan T; Foy, Michael; Upadhyay, Sunil P; Desrochers, Kyle A; Derus, Tyler; Knapper, Kassandra A; Hunter, Nathanael H; Wood, Sharla; Hinton, Daniel A; Cavell, Andrew C; Masias, Alvaro G; Goldsmith, Randall H

    2017-07-28

    Direct tracking of lithium ions with time and spatial resolution can provide an important diagnostic tool for understanding mechanisms in lithium ion batteries. A fluorescent indicator of lithium ions, 2-(2-hydroxyphenyl)naphthoxazole, was synthesized and used for real-time tracking of lithium ions via widefield fluorescence microscopy. The fluorophore can be excited with visible light and was shown to enable quantitative determination of the lithium ion diffusion constant in a microfluidic model system for a plasticized polymer electrolyte lithium battery. The use of widefield fluorescence microscopy for in situ tracking of lithium ions in batteries is discussed.

  3. Scanning microscopy of magnetic domains using the Fe 3p core level transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, J.; Rozhko, I.; Voss, J.; Hillebrecht, F. U.; Kisker, E.; Wedemeier, V.

    1999-04-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of the vacuum ultraviolet analog to visible-light magneto-optical imaging of magnetic structures using the resonantly enhanced transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect at core level thresholds with incident p-polarized radiation. The advantages are element specificity and a variable information depth. We used the scanning x-ray microscope at HASYLAB capable of obtaining about 1 μm resolution by means of its focusing ellipsoidal ring mirror. The p-polarized component of the reflected light was selected using multilayer reflection at an additional plane mirror downstream to the sample. Micrographs of the optical reflectivity were taken in the vicinity of the Fe 3p core level threshold at 53.7 and 56.5 eV photon energy where the magneto-optical effect is of opposite sign. Magnetic domains are visible in the difference of both recorded images.

  4. Development of X-ray excitable luminescent probes for scanning X-ray microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moronne, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    Transmission soft X-ray microscopy is now capable of achieving resolutions that are typically 5 times better than the best-visible light microscopes. With expected improvements in zone plate optics, an additional factor of two may be realized within the next few years. Despite the high resolution now available with X-ray microscopes and the high X-ray contrast provided by biological molecules in the soft X-ray region (λ=2-5 nm), molecular probes for localizing specific biological targets have been lacking. To circumvent this problem, X-ray excitable molecular probes are needed that can target unique biological features. In this paper we report our initial results on the development of lanthanide-based fluorescent probes for biological labeling. Using scanning luminescence X-ray microscopy (SLXM, Jacobsen et al., J. Microscopy 172 (1993) 121-129), we show that lanthanide organo-polychelate complexes are sufficiently bright and radiation resistant to be the basis of a new class of X-ray excitable molecular probes capable of providing at least a fivefold improvement in resolution over visible light microscopy. Lanthanide probes, able to bind 80-100 metal ions per molecule, were found to give strong luminescent signals with X-ray doses exceeding 10 8 Gy, and were used to label actin stress fibers and in vitro preparations of polymerized tubulin. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  5. Low-level light therapy of the eye and brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas JC

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Julio C Rojas1,2, F Gonzalez-Lima1 1Departments of Psychology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX; 2Department of Neurology and Neurotherapeutics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA Abstract: Low-level light therapy (LLLT using red to near-infrared light energy has gained attention in recent years as a new scientific approach with therapeutic applications in ophthalmology, neurology, and psychiatry. The ongoing therapeutic revolution spearheaded by LLLT is largely propelled by progress in the basic science fields of photobiology and bioenergetics. This paper describes the mechanisms of action of LLLT at the molecular, cellular, and nervous tissue levels. Photoneuromodulation of cytochrome oxidase activity is the most important primary mechanism of action of LLLT. Cytochrome oxidase is the primary photoacceptor of light in the red to near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. It is also a key mitochondrial enzyme for cellular bioenergetics, especially for nerve cells in the retina and the brain. Evidence shows that LLLT can secondarily enhance neural metabolism by regulating mitochondrial function, intraneuronal signaling systems, and redox states. Current knowledge about LLLT dosimetry relevant for its hormetic effects on nervous tissue, including noninvasive in vivo retinal and transcranial effects, is also presented. Recent research is reviewed that supports LLLT potential benefits in retinal disease, stroke, neurotrauma, neurodegeneration, and memory and mood disorders. Since mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in neurodegeneration, LLLT has potential significant applications against retinal and brain damage by counteracting the consequences of mitochondrial failure. Upon transcranial delivery in vivo, LLLT induces brain metabolic and antioxidant beneficial effects, as measured by increases in cytochrome oxidase and superoxide dismutase activities. Increases

  6. New fluorinated rhodamines for optical microscopy and nanoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitronova, Gyuzel Yu; Belov, Vladimir N; Bossi, Mariano L; Wurm, Christian A; Meyer, Lars; Medda, Rebecca; Moneron, Gael; Bretschneider, Stefan; Eggeling, Christian; Jakobs, Stefan; Hell, Stefan W

    2010-04-19

    New photostable rhodamine dyes represented by the compounds 1 a-r and 3-5 are proposed as efficient fluorescent markers with unique combination of structural features. Unlike rhodamines with monoalkylated nitrogen atoms, N',N-bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) derivatives 1 e, 1 i, 1 j, 3-H and 5 were found to undergo sulfonation of the xanthene fragment at the positions 4' and 5'. Two fluorine atoms were introduced into the positions 2' and 7' of the 3',6'-diaminoxanthene fragment in compounds 1 a-d, 1 i-l and 1 m-r. The new rhodamine dyes may be excited with λ=488 or 514 nm light; most of them emit light at λ=512-554 nm (compounds 1 q and 1r at λ=576 and 589 nm in methanol, respectively) and have high fluorescence quantum yields in solution (up to 98 %), relatively long excited-state lifetimes (>3 ns) and are resistant against photobleaching, especially at high laser intensities, as is usually applied in confocal microscopy. Sulfonation of the xanthene fragment with 30 % SO3 in H2SO4 is compatible with the secondary amide bond (rhodamine-CON(Me)CH2CH2COOH) formed with MeNHCH2CH2COOCH3 to providing the sterically unhindered carboxylic group required for further (bio)conjugation reactions. After creating the amino reactive sites, the modified derivatives may be used as fluorescent markers and labels for (bio)molecules in optical microscopy and nanoscopy with very-high light intensities. Further, the new rhodamine dyes are able to pass the plasma membrane of living cells, introducing them as potential labels for recent live-cell-tag approaches. We exemplify the excellent performance of the fluorinated rhodamines in optical microscopy by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy experiments. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. An assessment of the importance ofexposure routes to the uptake and internal localisation of fluorescent nanoparticles in zebrafish (Danio rerio), using light sheet microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjolding, Lars Michael; Ašmonaitė, G; Jølck, Rasmus Irming

    2017-01-01

    A major challenge in nanoecotoxicology is finding suitable methods to determine the uptake and localisation of nanoparticles on a whole-organism level. Some uptake methods have been associated with artefacts induced by sample preparation, including staining for electron microscopy. This study use...

  8. Single-Molecule Light-Sheet Imaging of Suspended T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponjavic, Aleks; McColl, James; Carr, Alexander R; Santos, Ana Mafalda; Kulenkampff, Klara; Lippert, Anna; Davis, Simon J; Klenerman, David; Lee, Steven F

    2018-05-08

    Adaptive immune responses are initiated by triggering of the T cell receptor. Single-molecule imaging based on total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy at coverslip/basal cell interfaces is commonly used to study this process. These experiments have suggested, unexpectedly, that the diffusional behavior and organization of signaling proteins and receptors may be constrained before activation. However, it is unclear to what extent the molecular behavior and cell state is affected by the imaging conditions, i.e., by the presence of a supporting surface. In this study, we implemented single-molecule light-sheet microscopy, which enables single receptors to be directly visualized at any plane in a cell to study protein dynamics and organization in live, resting T cells. The light sheet enabled the acquisition of high-quality single-molecule fluorescence images that were comparable to those of total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. By comparing the apical and basal surfaces of surface-contacting T cells using single-molecule light-sheet microscopy, we found that most coated-glass surfaces and supported lipid bilayers profoundly affected the diffusion of membrane proteins (T cell receptor and CD45) and that all the surfaces induced calcium influx to various degrees. Our results suggest that, when studying resting T cells, surfaces are best avoided, which we achieve here by suspending cells in agarose. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Electron Microscopy of Ebola Virus-Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) replicates in host cells, where both viral and cellular components show morphological changes during the process of viral replication from entry to budding. These steps in the replication cycle can be studied using electron microscopy (EM), including transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which is one of the most useful methods for visualizing EBOV particles and EBOV-infected cells at the ultrastructural level. This chapter describes conventional methods for EM sample preparation of cultured cells infected with EBOV.

  10. Application of oblique plane microscopy to high speed live cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sunil; Wilding, Dean; Sikkel, Markus B.; Lyon, Alexander R.; MacLeod, Ken T.; Dunsby, Chris

    2011-07-01

    Oblique Plane Microscopy (OPM) is a light sheet microscopy technique that combines oblique illumination with correction optics that tilt the focal plane of the collection system. OPM can be used to image conventionally mounted specimens on coverslips or tissue culture dishes and has low out-of-plane photobleaching and phototoxicity. No moving parts are required to achieve an optically sectioned image and so high speed optically sectioned imaging is possible. We present high speed 2D and 3D optically sectioned OPM imaging of live cells using a high NA water immersion lens.

  11. Output blue light evaluation for phosphor based smart white LED wafer level packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolahdouz, Zahra; Rostamian, Ali; Kolahdouz, Mohammadreza; Ma, Teng; van Zeijl, Henk; Zhang, Kouchi

    2016-02-22

    This study presents a blue light detector for evaluating the output light of phosphor based white LED package. It is composed of a silicon stripe-shaped photodiode designed and implemented in a 2 μm BiCMOS process which can be used for wafer level integration of different passive and active devices all in just 5 lithography steps. The final device shows a high selectivity to blue light. The maximum responsivity at 480 nm is matched with the target blue LED illumination. The designed structure have better responsivity compared to simple photodiode structure due to reducing the effect of dead layer formation close to the surface because of implantation. It has also a two-fold increase in the responsivity and quantum efficiency compared to previously similar published sensors.

  12. Waveguide evanescent field fluorescence microscopy & its application in cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Abdollah

    There are many powerful microscopy technologies available for the investigation of bulk materials as well as for thin film samples. Nevertheless, for imaging an interface, especially live cells on a substrate and ultra thin-films, only Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is available. This TIRF microscopy allows imaging without interference of the bulk. Various approaches are employed in fluorescence microscopy applications to restrict the excitation and detection of fluorophores to a thin region of the specimen. Elimination of background fluorescence from outside the focal plane can dramatically improve the signal-to-noise ratio, and consequently, the spatial resolution of the features or events of interest. TIRF microscopy is an evanescent field based microscopy. In this method, fluorescent dyes are only excited within an evanescent field: roughly within 100 nm above a glass coverslip. This will allow imaging surface and interfacial issues of the glass coverslip and an adjacent material. Waveguide evanescent field fluorescence (WEFF) microscopy is a new development for imaging cell-substrate interactions in real time and in vitro. It is an alternative to TIRF microscopy. In this method the light is coupled into a waveguide via an optical grating. The coupled light propagates as a waveguide mode and exhibits an evanescent field on top of the waveguide. This can be used as a surface-bound illumination source to excite fluorophores. This evanescent field serves as an extremely powerful tool for quality control of thin films, to study cell-substrate contacts, and investigating the effect of external agents and drugs on the cell-substrate interaction in real time and in vitro. This new method has been established and optimized to minimize non-uniformity, scattering and photo bleaching issues. Visualizing and quantifying of the cell-substrates and solid thin films have been carried out by WEFF microscopy. The images of the cell-substrate interface

  13. Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering Microscopy: A Step toward Nanoscale Control of Intrinsic Molecular Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Taka-aki; Hara, Masahiko

    2018-06-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman scattering microscopy, a family of scanning probe microscopy techniques, has been recognized as a powerful surface analytical technique with both single-molecule sensitivity and angstrom-scale spatial resolution. This review covers the current status of tip-enhanced Raman scattering microscopy in surface and material nanosciences, including a brief history, the basic principles, and applications for the nanoscale characterization of a variety of nanomaterials. The focus is on the recent trend of combining tip-enhanced Raman scattering microscopy with various external stimuli such as pressure, voltage, light, and temperature, which enables the local control of the molecular properties and functions and also enables chemical reactions to be induced on a nanometer scale.

  14. A compact two photon light sheet microscope for applications in neuroscience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piksarv, Peeter; Marti, Dominik; Le, Tuan

    2016-01-01

    We present a compact setup for two photon light sheet microscopy. By using pulsed Airy beam illumination we demonstrate eight-fold increase of the FOV compared to Gaussian light sheet with the same axial resolution....

  15. Fluorescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Michael J; Smith, Ian; Parker, Ian; Bootman, Martin D

    2014-10-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is a major tool with which to monitor cell physiology. Although the concepts of fluorescence and its optical separation using filters remain similar, microscope design varies with the aim of increasing image contrast and spatial resolution. The basics of wide-field microscopy are outlined to emphasize the selection, advantages, and correct use of laser scanning confocal microscopy, two-photon microscopy, scanning disk confocal microscopy, total internal reflection, and super-resolution microscopy. In addition, the principles of how these microscopes form images are reviewed to appreciate their capabilities, limitations, and constraints for operation. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Fasciola hepatica: effect of the natural light level on cercarial emergence from temperature-challenged Galba truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vignoles Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As abrupt changes in water temperature (thermal shock triggered a significantly greater cercarial emergence of Fasciola hepatica from experimentally infected Galba truncatula, laboratory investigations were carried out to study the influence of light on cercarial emergence in snails subjected to a thermal shock every week (a mean of 12 °C for 3 h during the patent period. Thermal shock for these temperature-challenged (TC snails was carried out outdoors under artificial or natural light, or indoors under constant artificial light. Compared with the infected control snails always reared indoors at 20 °C, the number of cercariae in TC snails subjected to a thermal shock and natural light outdoors was significantly greater. The repetition of this experiment by subjecting TC snails to the same thermal shock indoors under an artificial light level ranging from 600 to 3000 lux did not show any significant difference among the numbers of cercariae in the different subgroups. A detailed analysis of the results noted in the TC snails subjected to natural light during the thermal shock demonstrated that the number of cercariae-releasing snails was significantly higher between 601 and 1200 lux and for the highest nebulosity values (7–8 octas, which corresponds to a sufficiently or completely overcast sky. Contrary to the intensity of artificial light, which did not influence cercarial emergence, the natural light level had a significant effect on this process when F. hepatica-infected snails were subjected to a regular thermal shock during the patent period.

  17. Type 1 diabetes mellitus effects on dental enamel formation revealed by microscopy and microanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Bruna Larissa Lago; Medeiros, Danila Lima; Soares, Ana Prates; Line, Sérgio Roberto Peres; Pinto, Maria das Graças Farias; Soares, Telma de Jesus; do Espírito Santo, Alexandre Ribeiro

    2018-03-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) largely affects children, occurring therefore at the same period of deciduous and permanent teeth development. The aim of this work was to investigate birefringence and morphology of the secretory stage enamel organic extracellular matrix (EOECM), and structural and mechanical features of mature enamel from T1DM rats. Adult Wistar rats were maintained alive for a period of 56 days after the induction of experimental T1DM with a single dose of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg). After proper euthanasia of the animals, fixed upper incisors were accurately processed, and secretory stage EOECM and mature enamel were analyzed by transmitted polarizing and bright field light microscopies (TPLM and BFLM), energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and microhardness testing. Bright field light microscopies and transmitted polarizing light microscopies showed slight morphological changes in the secretory stage EOECM from diabetic rats, which also did not exhibit statistically significant alterations in birefringence brightness when compared to control animals (P > .05). EDX analysis showed that T1DM induced statistically significant little increases in the amount of calcium and phosphorus in outer mature enamel (P  .05). T1DM also caused important ultrastructural alterations in mature enamel as revealed by SEM and induced a statistically significant reduction of about 13.67% in its microhardness at 80 μm from dentin-enamel junction (P enamel development, leading to alterations in mature enamel ultrastructure and in its mechanical features. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Sculpting light for new biophotonics applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin; Villangca, Mark Jayson

    illumination, optical phase encryption, and recently in contemporary biophotonics applications such as for real-time parallel twophoton optogenetics and neurophotonics [3]. Our most recent GPC light sculpting developments will be presented. These include both static and dynamic GPC Light Shapers where lasers......Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) is a power efficient approach for generating speckle-free contiguous optical distributions using spatial phaseonly light modulation. GPC has been demonstrated in a variety of applications such as optical micro-manipulation [1], active microscopy [2], structured...... have to be actively shaped into particular light patterns [4]. We show the potential of GPC for biomedical and multispectral applications where we demonstrate phase-only light shaping of a supercontinuum laser over most of its visible wavelength range [5]....

  19. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchuk, Kyle

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called "non-blinking" quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  20. The development of optical microscopy techniques for the advancement of single-particle studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchuk, Kyle [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Single particle orientation and rotational tracking (SPORT) has recently become a powerful optical microscopy tool that can expose many molecular motions. Unfortunately, there is not yet a single microscopy technique that can decipher all particle motions in all environmental conditions, thus there are limitations to current technologies. Within, the two powerful microscopy tools of total internal reflection and interferometry are advanced to determine the position, orientation, and optical properties of metallic nanoparticles in a variety of environments. Total internal reflection is an optical phenomenon that has been applied to microscopy to produce either fluorescent or scattered light. The non-invasive far-field imaging technique is coupled with a near-field illumination scheme that allows for better axial resolution than confocal microscopy and epi-fluorescence microscopy. By controlling the incident illumination angle using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy, a new type of imaging probe called “non-blinking” quantum dots (NBQDs) were super-localized in the axial direction to sub-10-nm precision. These particles were also used to study the rotational motion of microtubules being propelled by the motor protein kinesin across the substrate surface. The same instrument was modified to function under total internal reflection scattering (TIRS) microscopy to study metallic anisotropic nanoparticles and their dynamic interactions with synthetic lipid bilayers. Utilizing two illumination lasers with opposite polarization directions at wavelengths corresponding to the short and long axis surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the nanoparticles, both the in-plane and out-of-plane movements of many particles could be tracked simultaneously. When combined with Gaussian point spread function (PSF) fitting for particle super-localization, the binding status and rotational movement could be resolved without degeneracy. TIRS microscopy was also used to

  1. Damage threshold in adult rabbit eyes after scleral cross-linking by riboflavin/blue light application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseli, Hans Peter; Körber, Nicole; Karl, Anett; Koch, Christian; Schuldt, Carsten; Penk, Anja; Liu, Qing; Huster, Daniel; Käs, Josef; Reichenbach, Andreas; Wiedemann, Peter; Francke, Mike

    2015-10-01

    Several scleral cross-linking (SXL) methods were suggested to increase the biomechanical stiffness of scleral tissue and therefore, to inhibit axial eye elongation in progressive myopia. In addition to scleral cross-linking and biomechanical effects caused by riboflavin and light irradiation such a treatment might induce tissue damage, dependent on the light intensity used. Therefore, we characterized the damage threshold and mechanical stiffening effect in rabbit eyes after application of riboflavin combined with various blue light intensities. Adult pigmented and albino rabbits were treated with riboflavin (0.5 %) and varying blue light (450 ± 50 nm) dosages from 18 to 780 J/cm(2) (15 to 650 mW/cm(2) for 20 min). Scleral, choroidal and retinal tissue alterations were detected by means of light microscopy, electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Biomechanical changes were measured by shear rheology. Blue light dosages of 480 J/cm(2) (400 mW/cm(2)) and beyond induced pathological changes in ocular tissues; the damage threshold was defined by the light intensities which induced cellular degeneration and/or massive collagen structure changes. At such high dosages, we observed alterations of the collagen structure in scleral tissue, as well as pigment aggregation, internal hemorrhages, and collapsed blood vessels. Additionally, photoreceptor degenerations associated with microglia activation and macroglia cell reactivity in the retina were detected. These pathological alterations were locally restricted to the treated areas. Pigmentation of rabbit eyes did not change the damage threshold after a treatment with riboflavin and blue light but seems to influence the vulnerability for blue light irradiations. Increased biomechanical stiffness of scleral tissue could be achieved with blue light intensities below the characterized damage threshold. We conclude that riboflavin and blue light application increased the biomechanical stiffness of scleral tissue at

  2. Dislocation-related trap levels in nitride-based light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturi, Giulia; Castaldini, Antonio; Cavallini, Anna [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, Bologna 40127 (Italy); Meneghini, Matteo; Zanoni, Enrico [Department of Information Engineering, University of Padova, via Gradenigo 6/B, Padova 35131 (Italy); Zhu, Dandan; Humphreys, Colin [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-26

    Deep level transient spectroscopy was performed on InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well light emitting diodes (LEDs) in order to determine the effect of the dislocation density on the deep intragap electronic levels. The LEDs were grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on GaN templates with a high dislocation density of 8 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2} and a low dislocation density of 3 × 10{sup 8} cm{sup −2}. Three trapping levels for electrons were revealed, named A, A1, and B, with energies E{sub A} ≈ 0.04 eV, E{sub A1} ≈ 0.13 eV, and E{sub B} ≈ 0.54 eV, respectively. The trapping level A has a much higher concentration in the LEDs grown on the template with a high density of dislocations. The logarithmic dependence of the peak amplitude on the bias pulse width for traps A and A1 identifies the defects responsible for these traps as associated with linearly arranged defects. We conclude that traps A and A1 are dislocation-related intragap energy levels.

  3. Dislocation-related trap levels in nitride-based light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturi, Giulia; Castaldini, Antonio; Cavallini, Anna; Meneghini, Matteo; Zanoni, Enrico; Zhu, Dandan; Humphreys, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy was performed on InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well light emitting diodes (LEDs) in order to determine the effect of the dislocation density on the deep intragap electronic levels. The LEDs were grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on GaN templates with a high dislocation density of 8 × 10 9 cm −2 and a low dislocation density of 3 × 10 8 cm −2 . Three trapping levels for electrons were revealed, named A, A1, and B, with energies E A  ≈ 0.04 eV, E A1  ≈ 0.13 eV, and E B  ≈ 0.54 eV, respectively. The trapping level A has a much higher concentration in the LEDs grown on the template with a high density of dislocations. The logarithmic dependence of the peak amplitude on the bias pulse width for traps A and A1 identifies the defects responsible for these traps as associated with linearly arranged defects. We conclude that traps A and A1 are dislocation-related intragap energy levels.

  4. Stimulated Emission Pumping Enablling Sub-Diffraction-Limited Spatial Resolution in CARS Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleff, C.; Gross, P.; Fallnich, C.; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Kruse, K.; Beeker, W.P; Beeker, W.P.; Lee, Christopher James; Boller, Klaus J.; Dobner, S.

    2012-01-01

    Suppression of CARS signal generation is demonstrated by equalization of the ground and Raman states via a control state in a theoretical investigation. Using donut-shaped control light fields for population transfer results in sub-diffraction-limited spatial resolution CARS microscopy.

  5. Whole-organ atlas imaged by label-free high-resolution photoacoustic microscopy assisted by a microtome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Terence T. W.; Zhang, Ruiying; Hsu, Hsun-Chia; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Shi, Junhui; Chen, Ruimin; Shung, K. Kirk; Zhou, Qifa; Wang, Lihong V.

    2018-02-01

    In biomedical imaging, all optical techniques face a fundamental trade-off between spatial resolution and tissue penetration. Therefore, obtaining an organelle-level resolution image of a whole organ has remained a challenging and yet appealing scientific pursuit. Over the past decade, optical microscopy assisted by mechanical sectioning or chemical clearing of tissue has been demonstrated as a powerful technique to overcome this dilemma, one of particular use in imaging the neural network. However, this type of techniques needs lengthy special preparation of the tissue specimen, which hinders broad application in life sciences. Here, we propose a new label-free three-dimensional imaging technique, named microtomy-assisted photoacoustic microscopy (mPAM), for potentially imaging all biomolecules with 100% endogenous natural staining in whole organs with high fidelity. We demonstrate the first label-free mPAM, using UV light for label-free histology-like imaging, in whole organs (e.g., mouse brains), most of them formalin-fixed and paraffin- or agarose-embedded for minimal morphological deformation. Furthermore, mPAM with dual wavelength illuminations is also employed to image a mouse brain slice, demonstrating the potential for imaging of multiple biomolecules without staining. With visible light illumination, mPAM also shows its deep tissue imaging capability, which enables less slicing and hence reduces sectioning artifacts. mPAM could potentially provide a new insight for understanding complex biological organs.

  6. Vibrational Imaging with High Sensitivity via Epidetected Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkmer, Andreas; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Sunney Xie, X.

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally a novel epidetection scheme for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy that significantly improves the detection sensitivity. Calculations show that epidetected CARS (E-CARS) signals are present for scatterers smaller than the wavelength of light, whereas the large background signals from the surrounding bulk solvent are suppressed by destructive interference. E-CARS microscopy is capable of revealing small intracellular features that are otherwise buried by the strong water CARS signal

  7. ultraLM and miniLM: Locator tools for smart tracking of fluorescent cells in correlative light and electron microscopy [version 1; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Brama

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In-resin fluorescence (IRF protocols preserve fluorescent proteins in resin-embedded cells and tissues for correlative light and electron microscopy, aiding interpretation of macromolecular function within the complex cellular landscape. Dual-contrast IRF samples can be imaged in separate fluorescence and electron microscopes, or in dual-modality integrated microscopes for high resolution correlation of fluorophore to organelle. IRF samples also offer a unique opportunity to automate correlative imaging workflows. Here we present two new locator tools for finding and following fluorescent cells in IRF blocks, enabling future automation of correlative imaging. The ultraLM is a fluorescence microscope that integrates with an ultramicrotome, which enables ‘smart collection’ of ultrathin sections containing fluorescent cells or tissues for subsequent transmission electron microscopy or array tomography. The miniLM is a fluorescence microscope that integrates with serial block face scanning electron microscopes, which enables ‘smart tracking’ of fluorescent structures during automated serial electron image acquisition from large cell and tissue volumes.

  8. Efficient light emission from inorganic and organic semiconductor hybrid structures by energy-level tuning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, R; Bianchi, F; Blumstengel, S; Christodoulou, C; Ovsyannikov, R; Kobin, B; Moudgil, K; Barlow, S; Hecht, S; Marder, S R; Henneberger, F; Koch, N

    2015-04-15

    The fundamental limits of inorganic semiconductors for light emitting applications, such as holographic displays, biomedical imaging and ultrafast data processing and communication, might be overcome by hybridization with their organic counterparts, which feature enhanced frequency response and colour range. Innovative hybrid inorganic/organic structures exploit efficient electrical injection and high excitation density of inorganic semiconductors and subsequent energy transfer to the organic semiconductor, provided that the radiative emission yield is high. An inherent obstacle to that end is the unfavourable energy level offset at hybrid inorganic/organic structures, which rather facilitates charge transfer that quenches light emission. Here, we introduce a technologically relevant method to optimize the hybrid structure's energy levels, here comprising ZnO and a tailored ladder-type oligophenylene. The ZnO work function is substantially lowered with an organometallic donor monolayer, aligning the frontier levels of the inorganic and organic semiconductors. This increases the hybrid structure's radiative emission yield sevenfold, validating the relevance of our approach.

  9. Efficient light emission from inorganic and organic semiconductor hybrid structures by energy-level tuning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, R.; Bianchi, F.; Blumstengel, S.; Christodoulou, C.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Kobin, B.; Moudgil, K.; Barlow, S.; Hecht, S.; Marder, S.R.; Henneberger, F.; Koch, N.

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental limits of inorganic semiconductors for light emitting applications, such as holographic displays, biomedical imaging and ultrafast data processing and communication, might be overcome by hybridization with their organic counterparts, which feature enhanced frequency response and colour range. Innovative hybrid inorganic/organic structures exploit efficient electrical injection and high excitation density of inorganic semiconductors and subsequent energy transfer to the organic semiconductor, provided that the radiative emission yield is high. An inherent obstacle to that end is the unfavourable energy level offset at hybrid inorganic/organic structures, which rather facilitates charge transfer that quenches light emission. Here, we introduce a technologically relevant method to optimize the hybrid structure's energy levels, here comprising ZnO and a tailored ladder-type oligophenylene. The ZnO work function is substantially lowered with an organometallic donor monolayer, aligning the frontier levels of the inorganic and organic semiconductors. This increases the hybrid structure's radiative emission yield sevenfold, validating the relevance of our approach. PMID:25872919

  10. Comparison of LED and Conventional Fluorescence Microscopy for Detection of Acid Fast Bacilli in a Low-Incidence Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minion, Jessica; Pai, Madhukar; Ramsay, Andrew; Menzies, Dick; Greenaway, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Light emitting diode fluorescence microscopes have many practical advantages over conventional mercury vapour fluorescence microscopes, which would make them the preferred choice for laboratories in both low- and high-resource settings, provided performance is equivalent. Methods In a nested case-control study, we compared diagnostic accuracy and time required to read slides with the Zeiss PrimoStar iLED, LW Scientific Lumin, and a conventional fluorescence microscope (Leica DMLS). Mycobacterial culture was used as the reference standard, and subgroup analysis by specimen source and organism isolated were performed. Results There was no difference in sensitivity or specificity between the three microscopes, and agreement was high for all comparisons and subgroups. The Lumin and the conventional fluorescence microscope were equivalent with respect to time required to read smears, but the Zeiss iLED was significantly time saving compared to both. Conclusions Light emitting diode microscopy should be considered by all tuberculosis diagnostic laboratories, including those in high income countries, as a replacement for conventional fluorescence microscopes. Our findings provide support to the recent World Health Organization policy recommending that conventional fluorescence microscopy be replaced by light emitting diode microscopy using auramine staining in all settings where fluorescence microscopy is currently used. PMID:21811622

  11. Comparison of LED and conventional fluorescence microscopy for detection of acid fast bacilli in a low-incidence setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Minion

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Light emitting diode fluorescence microscopes have many practical advantages over conventional mercury vapour fluorescence microscopes, which would make them the preferred choice for laboratories in both low- and high-resource settings, provided performance is equivalent. METHODS: In a nested case-control study, we compared diagnostic accuracy and time required to read slides with the Zeiss PrimoStar iLED, LW Scientific Lumin, and a conventional fluorescence microscope (Leica DMLS. Mycobacterial culture was used as the reference standard, and subgroup analysis by specimen source and organism isolated were performed. RESULTS: There was no difference in sensitivity or specificity between the three microscopes, and agreement was high for all comparisons and subgroups. The Lumin and the conventional fluorescence microscope were equivalent with respect to time required to read smears, but the Zeiss iLED was significantly time saving compared to both. CONCLUSIONS: Light emitting diode microscopy should be considered by all tuberculosis diagnostic laboratories, including those in high income countries, as a replacement for conventional fluorescence microscopes. Our findings provide support to the recent World Health Organization policy recommending that conventional fluorescence microscopy be replaced by light emitting diode microscopy using auramine staining in all settings where fluorescence microscopy is currently used.

  12. Relationship between Lighting and Noise Levels and Productivity of the Occupants in Automotive Assembly Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Akbari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Work environment affects human productivity and his performance. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of lighting and noise levels on human productivity in the automotive assembly industry. Method. Subjects were 181 workers from different parts of an automobile assembly industry. Illuminance (Lx at the height of 30 inches from the surface of work station and noise (dBA were locally measured. Also human productivity by the Goldsmith and Hersey scale (1980 was measured. Data were analyzed by using SPSS v20 Pearson correlation coefficient. Results. The results showed that the relationship between noise level and human productivity is negative and significant (, , but there was no significant relationship between lighting and human productivity (. Conclusion. Based on the results, in assembly tasks, noise has a negative impact on human productivity, and lighting does not affect this. So, in order to increase employee productivity, noise control and reduction to less than the standard values (less than 85 dB is necessary.

  13. Fine surface structure of unfixed and hydrated macrophages observed by laser-plasma x-ray contact microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yoshimasa; Friedman, Herman; Yoshimura, Hideyuki; Kinjo, Yasuhito; Shioda, Seiji; Debari, Kazuhiro; Shinohara, Kunio; Rajyaguru, Jayshree; Richardson, Martin

    2000-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution, laser-plasma, x-ray contact microscope using a table-top Nd:glass laser system has been developed and utilized for the analysis of the surface structure of live macrophages. Fine fluffy surface structures of murine peritoneal macrophages, which were live, hydrolyzed and not sliced and stained, were observed by the x-ray microscope followed by analysis using an atomic force microscopy. In order to compare with other techniques, a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the surface structure of the macrophages. The SEM offered a fine whole cell image of the same macrophages, which were fixed and dehydrated, but the surfaces were ruffled and different from that of x-ray images. A standard light microscope was also utilized to observe the shape of live whole macrophages. Light microscopy showed some fluffy surface structures of the macrophages, but the resolution was too low to observe the fine structures. Thus, the findings of fine fluffy surface structures of macrophages by x-ray microscopy provide valuable information for studies of phagocytosis, cell spreading and adherence, which are dependent on the surface structure of macrophages. Furthermore, the present study also demonstrates the usefulness of x-ray microscopy for analysis of structures of living cells

  14. In situ Transmission Electron Microscopy of catalyst sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeLaRiva, Andrew T.; Hansen, Thomas Willum; Challa, Sivakumar R.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advancements in the field of electron microscopy, such as aberration correctors, have now been integrated into Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopes (TEMs), making it possible to study the behavior of supported metal catalysts under operating conditions at atomic resolution. Here......, we focus on in situ electron microscopy studies of catalysts that shed light on the mechanistic aspects of catalyst sintering. Catalyst sintering is an important mechanism for activity loss, especially for catalysts that operate at elevated temperatures. Literature from the past decade is reviewed...... along with our recent in situ TEM studies on the sintering of Ni/MgAl2O4 catalysts. These results suggest that the rapid loss of catalyst activity in the earliest stages of catalyst sintering could result from Ostwald ripening rather than through particle migration and coalescence. The smallest...

  15. Wave front engineering by means of diffractive optical elements for applications in microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojoc, Dan; Ferrari, Enrico; Garbin, Valeria; Cabrini, Stefano; Carpentiero, Alessandro; Prasciolu, Mauro; Businaro, Luca; Kaulich, Burchard; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2006-05-01

    We present a unified view regarding the use of diffractive optical elements (DOEs) for microscopy applications a wide range of electromagnetic spectrum. The unified treatment is realized through the design and fabrication of DOE through which wave front beam shaping is obtained. In particular we show applications ranging from micromanipulation using optical tweezers to X-ray differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. We report some details on the design and physical implementation of diffractive elements that beside focusing perform also other optical functions: beam splitting, beam intensity and phase redistribution or mode conversion. Laser beam splitting is used for multiple trapping and independent manipulation of spherical micro beads and for direct trapping and manipulation of biological cells with non-spherical shapes. Another application is the Gauss to Laguerre-Gaussian mode conversion, which allows to trap and transfer orbital angular momentum of light to micro particles with high refractive index and to trap and manipulate low index particles. These experiments are performed in an inverted optical microscope coupled with an infrared laser beam and a spatial light modulator for DOEs implementation. High resolution optics, fabricated by means of e-beam lithography, are demonstrated to control the intensity and the phase of the sheared beams in X-ray DIC microscopy. DIC experiments with phase objects reveal a dramatic increase in image contrast compared to bright-field X-ray microscopy.

  16. Spectral confocal reflection microscopy using a white light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, M.; Juškaitis, R.; Wilson, T.

    2008-08-01

    We present a reflection confocal microscope incorporating a white light supercontinuum source and spectral detection. The microscope provides images resolved spatially in three-dimensions, in addition to spectral resolution covering the wavelength range 450-650nm. Images and reflection spectra of artificial and natural specimens are presented, showing features that are not normally revealed in conventional microscopes or confocal microscopes using discrete line lasers. The specimens include thin film structures on semiconductor chips, iridescent structures in Papilio blumei butterfly scales, nacre from abalone shells and opal gemstones. Quantitative size and refractive index measurements of transparent beads are derived from spectral interference bands.

  17. Characterizing string-of-pearls colloidal silica by multidetector hydrodynamic chromatography and comparison to multidetector size-exclusion chromatography, off-line multiangle static light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Amandaa K; Striegel, André M

    2011-04-15

    The string-of-pearls-type morphology is ubiquitous, manifesting itself variously in proteins, vesicles, bacteria, synthetic polymers, and biopolymers. Characterizing the size and shape of analytes with such morphology, however, presents a challenge, due chiefly to the ease with which the "strings" can be broken during chromatographic analysis or to the paucity of information obtained from the benchmark microscopy and off-line light scattering methods. Here, we address this challenge with multidetector hydrodynamic chromatography (HDC), which has the ability to determine, simultaneously, the size, shape, and compactness and their distributions of string-of-pearls samples. We present the quadruple-detector HDC analysis of colloidal string-of-pearls silica, employing static multiangle and quasielastic light scattering, differential viscometry, and differential refractometry as detection methods. The multidetector approach shows a sample that is broadly polydisperse in both molar mass and size, with strings ranging from two to five particles, but which also contains a high concentration of single, unattached "pearls". Synergistic combination of the various size parameters obtained from the multiplicity of detectors employed shows that the strings with higher degrees of polymerization have a shape similar to the theory-predicted shape of a Gaussian random coil chain of nonoverlapping beads, while the strings with lower degrees of polymerization have a prolate ellipsoidal shape. The HDC technique is contrasted experimentally with multidetector size-exclusion chromatography, where, even under extremely gentle conditions, the strings still degraded during analysis. Such degradation is shown to be absent in HDC, as evidenced by the fact that the molar mass and radius of gyration obtained by HDC with multiangle static light scattering detection (HDC/MALS) compare quite favorably to those determined by off-line MALS analysis under otherwise identical conditions. The

  18. The Suitability of Different Nighttime Light Data for GDP Estimation at Different Spatial Scales and Regional Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoxin Dai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Nighttime light data offer a unique view of the Earth’s surface and can be used to estimate the spatial distribution of gross domestic product (GDP. Historically, using a simple regression function, the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program’s Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS has been used to correlate regional and global GDP values. In early 2013, the first global Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP visible infrared imaging radiometer suite (VIIRS nighttime light data were released. Compared with DMSP/OLS, they have a higher spatial resolution and a wider radiometric detection range. This paper aims to study the suitability of the two nighttime light data sources for estimating the GDP relationship between the provincial and city levels in Mainland China, as well as of different regression functions. First, NPP/VIIRS nighttime light data for 2014 are corrected with DMSP/OLS data for 2013 to reduce the background noise in the original data. Subsequently, three regression functions are used to estimate the relationship between nighttime light data and GDP statistical data at the provincial and city levels in Mainland China. Then, through the comparison of the relative residual error (RE and the relative root mean square error (RRMSE parameters, a systematical assessment of the suitability of the GDP estimation is provided. The results show that the NPP/VIIRS nighttime light data are better than the DMSP/OLS data for GDP estimation, whether at the provincial or city level, and that the power function and polynomial models are better for GDP estimation than the linear regression model. This study reveals that the accuracy of GDP estimation based on nighttime light data is affected by the resolution of the data and the spatial scale of the study area, as well as by the land cover types and industrial structures of the study area.

  19. Scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging and analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Pennycook, Stephen J

    2011-01-01

    Provides the first comprehensive treatment of the physics and applications of this mainstream technique for imaging and analysis at the atomic level Presents applications of STEM in condensed matter physics, materials science, catalysis, and nanoscience Suitable for graduate students learning microscopy, researchers wishing to utilize STEM, as well as for specialists in other areas of microscopy Edited and written by leading researchers and practitioners

  20. Performance of rapid diagnostic test, blood-film microscopy and PCR for the diagnosis of malaria infection among febrile children from Korogwe District, Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahende, Coline; Ngasala, Billy; Lusingu, John

    2016-01-01

    with fever and/or history of fever in the previous 48 h attending outpatient clinics. Blood samples were collected for identification of Plasmodium falciparum infection using histidine-rich-protein-2 (HRP-2)-based malaria RDT, light microscopy and conventional PCR. Results: A total of 867 febrile patients......Background: Rapid diagnostic tests (RDT) and light microscopy are still recommended for diagnosis to guide the clinical management of malaria despite difficult challenges in rural settings. The performance of these tests may be affected by several factors, including malaria prevalence and intensity...... of transmission. The study evaluated the diagnostic performance of malaria RDT, light microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in detecting malaria infections among febrile children at outpatient clinic in Korogwe District, northeastern Tanzania. Methods: The study enrolled children aged 2-59 months...

  1. Cortical Actin Flow in T Cells Quantified by Spatio-temporal Image Correlation Spectroscopy of Structured Illumination Microscopy Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashdown, George; Pandžić, Elvis; Cope, Andrew; Wiseman, Paul; Owen, Dylan

    2015-12-17

    Filamentous-actin plays a crucial role in a majority of cell processes including motility and, in immune cells, the formation of a key cell-cell interaction known as the immunological synapse. F-actin is also speculated to play a role in regulating molecular distributions at the membrane of cells including sub-membranous vesicle dynamics and protein clustering. While standard light microscope techniques allow generalized and diffraction-limited observations to be made, many cellular and molecular events including clustering and molecular flow occur in populations at length-scales far below the resolving power of standard light microscopy. By combining total internal reflection fluorescence with the super resolution imaging method structured illumination microscopy, the two-dimensional molecular flow of F-actin at the immune synapse of T cells was recorded. Spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) was then applied, which generates quantifiable results in the form of velocity histograms and vector maps representing flow directionality and magnitude. This protocol describes the combination of super-resolution imaging and STICS techniques to generate flow vectors at sub-diffraction levels of detail. This technique was used to confirm an actin flow that is symmetrically retrograde and centripetal throughout the periphery of T cells upon synapse formation.

  2. Immunophenotype of leukemic blasts with small peroxidase-positive granules detected by electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainchenker, W; Villeval, J L; Tabilio, A; Matamis, H; Karianakis, G; Guichard, J; Henri, A; Vernant, J P; Rochant, H; Breton-Gorius, J

    1988-05-01

    Forty-three cases of undifferentiated leukemias by light microscopy examination were diagnosed as acute myeloblastic leukemias by ultrastructural revelation of peroxidase and were subsequently studied by immunological markers. In 41 of these cases, blasts were labeled by at least one of the antimyeloid MoAbs (My 7, My 9, and 80H5). An antimyeloperoxidase polyclonal antibody was used in 23 cases and was clearly positive in 11 of them, while cytochemistry by light microscopy was negative. These myeloblasts were frequently mixed with a minority of blasts from other lineages especially promegakaryoblasts. It is noteworthy that in 6 cases myeloid and lymphoid markers (E rosette receptor, common acute lymphoblastic leukemia antigen (cALLA), CD 9, CD 19 antigens (anti-B4 MoAb] were detected on a fraction of blast cells, suggesting a bilineage leukemia. However, in double labeling experiments, blasts with myeloperoxidase coexpressed lymphoid and myeloid markers including cALLA and CD 19 antigen. In one case, blasts had a typical non-B, non-T acute lymphoblastic leukemia phenotype (HLA-DR, CD 9, CD 19, cALLA positive) without staining by any of the antimyeloid MoAbs. However, 70% of the blasts were labeled by the antimyeloperoxidase antibody and expressed peroxidase-positive granules at ultrastructural level. In conclusion, most of the AML undiagnosed by optical cytochemistry are identified by antimyeloid antibodies. Some of these cases are also stained by some antilymphoid MoAbs. Use of antibodies against myeloperoxidase may improve the diagnosis of difficult cases of acute myeloblastic leukemia.

  3. Dynamic contrast enhancement in widefield microscopy using projector-generated illumination patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samson, Edward Carlo; Blanca, Carlo Mar

    2007-01-01

    We present a simple and cost-effective optical protocol to realize contrast-enhancement imaging (such as dark-field, optical-staining and oblique illumination microscopy) of transparent samples on a conventional widefield microscope using commercial multimedia projectors. The projector functions as both light source and mask generator implemented by creating slideshows of the filters projected along the illumination planes of the microscope. The projected optical masks spatially modulate the distribution of the incident light to selectively enhance structures within the sample according to spatial frequency thereby increasing the image contrast of translucent biological specimens. Any amplitude filter can be customized and dynamically controlled so that switching from one imaging modality to another involves a simple slide transition and can be executed at a keystroke with no physical filters and no moving optical parts. The method yields an image contrast of 89-96% comparable with standard enhancement techniques. The polarization properties of the projector are then utilized to discriminate birefringent and non-birefringent sites on the sample using single-shot, simultaneous polarization and optical-staining microscopy. In addition to dynamic pattern generation and polarization, the projector also provides high illumination power and spectral excitation selectivity through its red-green-blue (RGB) channels. We exploit this last property to explore the feasibility of using video projectors to selectively excite stained samples and perform fluorescence imaging in tandem with reflectance and polarization reflectance microscopy

  4. Circularly polarized light emission in scanning tunneling microscopy of magnetic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apell, S.P.; Penn, D.R.; Johansson, P.

    2000-01-01

    Light is produced when a scanning tunneling microscope is used to probe a metal surface. Recent experiments on cobalt utilizing a tungsten tip found that the light is circularly polarized; the sense of circular polarization depends on the direction of the sample magnetization, and the degree of polarization is of order 10%. This raises the possibility of constructing a magnetic microscope with very good spatial resolution. We present a theory of this effect for iron and cobalt and find a degree of polarization of order 0.1%. This is in disagreement with the experiments on cobalt as well as previous theoretical work which found order of magnitude agreement with the experimental results. However, a recent experiment on iron showed 0.0±2%. We predict that the use of a silver tip would increase the degree of circular polarization for a range of photon energies

  5. Light bodies in human pituitary adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, S; Wewer, U M; Albrechtsen, R

    1987-01-01

    Light bodies are large cytoplasmic granules originally described in the gonadotrophic cells of the rat pituitary gland. In order to determine whether similar bodies occur in the human anterior pituitary gland, 89 pituitary adenomas and periadenomatous tissue from 20 cases were examined...... cells in periadenomatous tissue from 20 cases. These results show that some human pituitary adenomas may contain light bodies identical to those seen in gonadotrophs of rat pituitary....... by transmission electron microscopy. Double membrane bound bodies with filamentous internal structure identical to rodent light bodies were identified in 10 hormone-producing adenomas: 5 PRL, 1 PRL-GH, 2 GH, and 2 ACTH-producing tumours. No light bodies were found in the remaining 79 tumours nor in the pituitary...

  6. Imaging Live Drosophila Brain with Two-Photon Fluorescence Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Syeed Ehsan

    Two-photon fluorescence microscopy is an imaging technique which delivers distinct benefits for in vivo cellular and molecular imaging. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a second messenger molecule, is responsible for triggering many physiological changes in neural system. However, the mechanism by which this molecule regulates responses in neuron cells is not yet clearly understood. When cAMP binds to a target protein, it changes the structure of that protein. Therefore, studying this molecular structure change with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging can shed light on the cAMP functioning mechanism. FRET is a non-radiative dipole-dipole coupling which is sensitive to small distance change in nanometer scale. In this study we have investigated the effect of dopamine in cAMP dynamics in vivo. In our study two-photon fluorescence microscope was used for imaging mushroom bodies inside live Drosophila melanogaster brain and we developed a method for studying the change in cyclic AMP level.

  7. Scanning Tunneling Optical Resonance Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila; Wilt, Dave; Raffaelle, Ryne; Gennett, Tom; Tin, Padetha; Lau, Janice; Castro, Stephanie; Jenkins, Philip; Scheiman, Dave

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling optical resonance microscopy (STORM) is a method, now undergoing development, for measuring optoelectronic properties of materials and devices on the nanoscale by means of a combination of (1) traditional scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) with (2) tunable laser spectroscopy. In STORM, an STM tip probing a semiconductor is illuminated with modulated light at a wavelength in the visible-to-near-infrared range and the resulting photoenhancement of the tunneling current is measured as a function of the illuminating wavelength. The photoenhancement of tunneling current occurs when the laser photon energy is sufficient to excite charge carriers into the conduction band of the semiconductor. Figure 1 schematically depicts a proposed STORM apparatus. The light for illuminating the semiconductor specimen at the STM would be generated by a ring laser that would be tunable across the wavelength range of interest. The laser beam would be chopped by an achromatic liquid-crystal modulator. A polarization-maintaining optical fiber would couple the light to the tip/sample junction of a commercial STM. An STM can be operated in one of two modes: constant height or constant current. A STORM apparatus would be operated in the constant-current mode, in which the height of the tip relative to the specimen would be varied in order to keep the tunneling current constant. In this mode, a feedback control circuit adjusts the voltage applied to a piezoelectric actuator in the STM that adjusts the height of the STM tip to keep the tunneling current constant. The exponential relationship between the tunneling current and tip-to-sample distance makes it relatively easy to implement this mode of operation. The choice of method by which the photoenhanced portion of the tunneling current would be measured depends on choice of the frequency at which the input illumination would be modulated (chopped). If the frequency of modulation were low enough (typically tunneling current

  8. Using the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) on the International Space Station (ISS), The Advanced Colloids Experiment (ACE) and MacroMolecular Biophysics (MMB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William; Foster, William M.; Motil, Brian J.; Sicker, Ronald; Abbott-Hearn, Amber; Chao, David; Chiaramonte, Fran; Atherton, Arthur; Beltram, Alexander; Bodzioney, Christopher M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) was launched to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2009 and began science operations in 2010. It continues to support Physical and Biological scientific research on ISS. During 2016, if all goes as planned, three experiments will be completed: [1] Advanced Colloids Experiments with Heated base-2 (ACE-H2) and [2] Advanced Colloids Experiments with Temperature control (ACE-T1). Preliminary results, along with an overview of present and future LMM capabilities will be presented; this includes details on the planned data imaging processing and storage system, along with the confocal upgrade to the core microscope. [1] a consortium of universities from the State of Kentucky working through the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR): Stuart Williams, Gerold Willing, Hemali Rathnayake, et al. and [2] from Chungnam National University, Daejeon, S. Korea: Chang-Soo Lee, et al.

  9. Acute unclassified leukemia: A clinicopathologic study with diagnostic implications of electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youness, E; Trujillo, J M; Ahearn, M J; McCredie, K B; Cork, A

    1980-01-01

    By rigid cytological and cytochemical criteria, the diagnosis of acute and undifferentiated leukemia was established in 22 patients. According to defined criteria, the leukemic cells could not be classified by conventional light microscopic techniques employed in the study of hematopoietic tissue. Cytochemical studies including peroxidase, periodic acid schiff (PAS) and nonspecific esterase (alpha napthyl butyrate-reacting esterase) stains were done on fresh bone marrow samples, and the percentage of positive leukemia cells for each of these stains was determined on 200 cells. In this series of leukemias, cytochemistry at the light microscope level did not contribute to further classification. Subsequent electron microscopic examination of bone marrow samples from these patients confirmed the immaturity and nuclear/cytoplasmic asynchrony of the leukemic cells. Several in vivo neoplastic markers, such as nuclear blebs, increased nuclear bodies, and cytoplasmic fibrillar bundles could be demonstrated in these cells. Fourteen cases from this series exhibited peroxidase-positive developmental granule formation at the ultrastructural level and were reclassified as acute granulocyte leukemia (AGL). One case was reclassified as lymphoma (poor differentiated type), one case was diagnosed as acute monocytic leukemia (AmonoL), and six cases remained in the undifferentiated category (AUL). Clinical and laboratory features, response to treatment, and survival data were evaluated for these patients. This study demonstrated that electron microscopy is useful in the cytological diagnosis of human leukemia.

  10. Radial super-resolution in digital holographic microscopy using structured illumination with circular symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yujian; Su, Ping; Ma, Jianshe

    2018-01-01

    A method to improve the radial resolution using special structured light is proposed in the field of digital holographic microscopy (DHM). A specimen is illuminated with circular symmetrical structured light that makes the spectrum have radial movement, so that high frequency components of the specimen are moved into the passband of the receiver to overcome the diffraction limit. In the DHM imaging system, Computer Generated Hologram (CGH) technology is used to generate the required structured light grating. Then the grating is loaded into a spatial light modulator (SLM) to obtain specific structured illumination. After recording the hologram, digital reconstruction, for the microstructure of a binary optical element that needs to observe radial distribution, the radial resolution of the specimen is improved experimentally compare it with the result of one-dimensional sinusoidal structured light imaging. And a method of designing structured light is presented.

  11. Super-nonlinear fluorescence microscopy for high-contrast deep tissue imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lu; Zhu, Xinxin; Chen, Zhixing; Min, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy (TPFM) offers the highest penetration depth with subcellular resolution in light microscopy, due to its unique advantage of nonlinear excitation. However, a fundamental imaging-depth limit, accompanied by a vanishing signal-to-background contrast, still exists for TPFM when imaging deep into scattering samples. Formally, the focusing depth, at which the in-focus signal and the out-of-focus background are equal to each other, is defined as the fundamental imaging-depth limit. To go beyond this imaging-depth limit of TPFM, we report a new class of super-nonlinear fluorescence microscopy for high-contrast deep tissue imaging, including multiphoton activation and imaging (MPAI) harnessing novel photo-activatable fluorophores, stimulated emission reduced fluorescence (SERF) microscopy by adding a weak laser beam for stimulated emission, and two-photon induced focal saturation imaging with preferential depletion of ground-state fluorophores at focus. The resulting image contrasts all exhibit a higher-order (third- or fourth- order) nonlinear signal dependence on laser intensity than that in the standard TPFM. Both the physical principles and the imaging demonstrations will be provided for each super-nonlinear microscopy. In all these techniques, the created super-nonlinearity significantly enhances the imaging contrast and concurrently extends the imaging depth-limit of TPFM. Conceptually different from conventional multiphoton processes mediated by virtual states, our strategy constitutes a new class of fluorescence microscopy where high-order nonlinearity is mediated by real population transfer.

  12. Resolution enhancement techniques in microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Christoph; Masters, Barry R.

    2013-05-01

    We survey the history of resolution enhancement techniques in microscopy and their impact on current research in biomedicine. Often these techniques are labeled superresolution, or enhanced resolution microscopy, or light-optical nanoscopy. First, we introduce the development of diffraction theory in its relation to enhanced resolution; then we explore the foundations of resolution as expounded by the astronomers and the physicists and describe the conditions for which they apply. Then we elucidate Ernst Abbe's theory of optical formation in the microscope, and its experimental verification and dissemination to the world wide microscope communities. Second, we describe and compare the early techniques that can enhance the resolution of the microscope. Third, we present the historical development of various techniques that substantially enhance the optical resolution of the light microscope. These enhanced resolution techniques in their modern form constitute an active area of research with seminal applications in biology and medicine. Our historical survey of the field of resolution enhancement uncovers many examples of reinvention, rediscovery, and independent invention and development of similar proposals, concepts, techniques, and instruments. Attribution of credit is therefore confounded by the fact that for understandable reasons authors stress the achievements from their own research groups and sometimes obfuscate their contributions and the prior art of others. In some cases, attribution of credit is also made more complex by the fact that long term developments are difficult to allocate to a specific individual because of the many mutual connections often existing between sometimes fiercely competing, sometimes strongly collaborating groups. Since applications in biology and medicine have been a major driving force in the development of resolution enhancing approaches, we focus on the contribution of enhanced resolution to these fields.

  13. Diffractive elements performance in chromatic confocal microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garzon, J; Duque, D; Alean, A; Toledo, M; Meneses, J; Gharbi, T

    2011-01-01

    The Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM) has been widely used in the semiconductor industry and biomedicine because of its depth discrimination capability. Subsequent to this technique has been developed in recent years Chromatic Confocal Microscopy. This method retains the same principle of confocal and offers the added advantage of removing the axial movement of the moving system. This advantage is usually accomplished with an optical element that generates a longitudinal chromatic aberration and a coding system that relates the axial position of each point of the sample with the wavelength that is focused on each. The present paper shows the performance of compact chromatic confocal microscope when some different diffractive elements are used for generation of longitudinal chromatic aberration. Diffractive elements, according to the process and manufacturing parameters, may have different diffraction efficiency and focus a specific wavelength in a specific focal position. The performance assessment is carried out with various light sources which exhibit an incoherent behaviour and a broad spectral width.

  14. Heavy-ion microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraft, G.; Yang, T.C.H.; Richards, T.; Tobias, C.A.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter briefly describes the techniques of optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, soft x-ray microscopy and compares these latter techniques with heavy-ion microscopy. The resolution obtained with these various types of microscopy are compared and the influence of the etching procedure on total resolution is discussed. Several micrographs of mammalian cells are included

  15. Imaging cellular structures in super-resolution with SIM, STED and Localisation Microscopy: A practical comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegel, Eva; Göhler, Antonia; Lagerholm, B Christoffer; Wainman, Alan; Uphoff, Stephan; Kaufmann, Rainer; Dobbie, Ian M

    2016-06-06

    Many biological questions require fluorescence microscopy with a resolution beyond the diffraction limit of light. Super-resolution methods such as Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM), STimulated Emission Depletion (STED) microscopy and Single Molecule Localisation Microscopy (SMLM) enable an increase in image resolution beyond the classical diffraction-limit. Here, we compare the individual strengths and weaknesses of each technique by imaging a variety of different subcellular structures in fixed cells. We chose examples ranging from well separated vesicles to densely packed three dimensional filaments. We used quantitative and correlative analyses to assess the performance of SIM, STED and SMLM with the aim of establishing a rough guideline regarding the suitability for typical applications and to highlight pitfalls associated with the different techniques.

  16. An electronically tunable ultrafast laser source applied to fluorescence imaging and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunsby, C; Lanigan, P M P; McGinty, J; Elson, D S; Requejo-Isidro, J; Munro, I; Galletly, N; McCann, F; Treanor, B; Oenfelt, B; Davis, D M; Neil, M A A; French, P M W

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is used widely in microscopy and macroscopic imaging applications for fields ranging from biomedicine to materials science. A critical component for any fluorescence imaging system is the excitation source. Traditionally, wide-field systems use filtered thermal or arc-generated white light sources, while point scanning confocal microscope systems require spatially coherent (point-like) laser sources. Unfortunately, the limited range of visible wavelengths available from conventional laser sources constrains the design and usefulness of fluorescent probes in confocal microscopy. A 'hands-off' laser-like source, electronically tunable across the visible spectrum, would be invaluable for fluorescence imaging and provide new opportunities, e.g. automated excitation fingerprinting and in situ measurement of excitation cross-sections. Yet more information can be obtained using fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), which requires that the light source be pulsed or rapidly modulated. We show how a white light continuum, generated by injecting femtosecond optical radiation into a micro-structured optical fibre, coupled with a simple prism-based tunable filter arrangement, can fulfil all these roles as a continuously electronically tunable (435-1150 nm) visible ultrafast light source in confocal, wide-field and FLIM systems

  17. Low level light therapy and tattoos: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingenito, Teresa

    2016-10-01

    Physical therapists (PTs) frequently provide neuromusculoskeletal treatment for patients who incidentally may have one or more tattoos. Low level light therapy (LLLT) is one of the modalities commonly used by physical therapists to decrease pain and facilitate healing. This case report describes a 22 year old man who was given LLLT to address his complaints of musculoskeletal pain. Blistering of the skin was documented over the LLLT application site, a black tattoo. The blisters, which formed after the LLLT treatment were most likely caused by the inadvertent and unexpected heating of the iron oxides and/or the metal salts in the tattoo's black pigment. PTs should exercise caution when applying LLLT in the presence of dark tattoos. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Light Chain Amyloid Fibrils Cause Metabolic Dysfunction in Human Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen P McWilliams-Koeppen

    Full Text Available Light chain (AL amyloidosis is the most common form of systemic amyloid disease, and cardiomyopathy is a dire consequence, resulting in an extremely poor prognosis. AL is characterized by the production of monoclonal free light chains that deposit as amyloid fibrils principally in the heart, liver, and kidneys causing organ dysfunction. We have studied the effects of amyloid fibrils, produced from recombinant λ6 light chain variable domains, on metabolic activity of human cardiomyocytes. The data indicate that fibrils at 0.1 μM, but not monomer, significantly decrease the enzymatic activity of cellular NAD(PH-dependent oxidoreductase, without causing significant cell death. The presence of amyloid fibrils did not affect ATP levels; however, oxygen consumption was increased and reactive oxygen species were detected. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that fibrils bound to and remained at the cell surface with little fibril internalization. These data indicate that AL amyloid fibrils severely impair cardiomyocyte metabolism in a dose dependent manner. These data suggest that effective therapeutic intervention for these patients should include methods for removing potentially toxic amyloid fibrils.

  19. Ultrafast photon counting applied to resonant scanning STED microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xundong; Toro, Ligia; Stefani, Enrico; Wu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    To take full advantage of fast resonant scanning in super-resolution stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy, we have developed an ultrafast photon counting system based on a multigiga sample per second analogue-to-digital conversion chip that delivers an unprecedented 450 MHz pixel clock (2.2 ns pixel dwell time in each scan). The system achieves a large field of view (∼50 × 50 μm) with fast scanning that reduces photobleaching, and advances the time-gated continuous wave STED technology to the usage of resonant scanning with hardware-based time-gating. The assembled system provides superb signal-to-noise ratio and highly linear quantification of light that result in superior image quality. Also, the system design allows great flexibility in processing photon signals to further improve the dynamic range. In conclusion, we have constructed a frontier photon counting image acquisition system with ultrafast readout rate, excellent counting linearity, and with the capacity of realizing resonant-scanning continuous wave STED microscopy with online time-gated detection. © 2014 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2014 Royal Microscopical Society.

  20. Selective Deflection of Polarized Light Via Coherently Driven Four-Level Atoms in a Double-Λ Configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Yu

    2010-01-01

    We study the interaction of a weak probe field, having two circular polarized components, i.e., σ - and σ + polarization, with an optically dense medium of four-level atoms in a double-Λ configuration, which is mediated by the electromagnetically induced transparency with a polarized control light with spatially inhomogeneous profile. We analyse the deflection of the polarized probe light and we find that we can selectively determine which circular component will be deflected after the polarized probe light enters the atom medium via adjusting the polarization and detuning of the control field. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  1. Aligned energy-level design for decreasing operation voltage of tandem white organic light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Wu, Zih-Jyun; Liang, Yi-Hu; Chang, Yu-Shuo; Chiu, Chuan-Hao; Tai, Cheng-Wei; Chang, Hsin-Hua

    2013-01-01

    In general, organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) need to operate at higher current density levels to ensure an ample light flux. However, stressed operation will result in poor performance and limited device lifetime. Recently, a tandem structure has been proposed as a pivotal technique to meet the stringent lighting requirements for OLED commercialization, with a research focus on decreasing the concomitant higher operation voltage. Driving two connected emission units (EMUs) in a tandem structure often requires more than twice the driving voltage for a single EMU. This study investigates bipolar host materials and their effective employment in fabricating tandem white phosphorescent OLEDs (PhOLEDs). In addition, the design of a mechanism to align the energy level between the hole transport layer/emitting layer is shown to effectively mitigate operational voltages. In sharp contrast to devices using a unipolar host material, we demonstrate that the turn-on voltage of blue PhOLEDs could be decreased from 3.8 V to 2.7 V through utilizing a bipolar host. Furthermore, applying the proposed techniques to tandem white PhOLEDs produces a luminance of 10 3 cd/m 2 by a 10.1 V driving voltage. - Highlights: • The matched energy level between the hole transport/emitting layer lowers voltages. • Multiple conduction dopants were used to investigate charge generation layer. • Two-color emitters were used to quantify the charge generation strength

  2. Nanometric locking of the tight focus for optical microscopy and tip-enhanced microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayazawa, N; Furusawa, K; Kawata, S

    2012-01-01

    We have successfully stabilized the tight focus onto the sample surface of an optical microscope within ±1.0 nm for a virtually unlimited time duration. The time-dependent thermal drift of the tight focus and the mechanical tilt of the sample surface were simultaneously sensed by a non-optical means based on a capacitive sensor and were compensated for in real-time. This non-optical scheme is promising for the suppression of background light sources for optical microscopy. The focus stabilization is crucial for microscopic measurement at an interface, particularly when scanning a large surface area, because there is always a certain amount of mechanical tilt of the sample substrate, which degrades the contrast of the image. When imaging nanoscopic materials such as carbon nanotubes or silicon nanowires, more stringent nanometric stabilization of the focus position relative to such samples is required, otherwise it is often difficult to interpret the results from the observations. Moreover, the smaller the sample volume is, the smaller the signal becomes, resulting in a long exposure time at each position. In this sense, long-term stability of the tight focus is essential for both microscopic large area scanning and nanosized sample scanning (high-resolution/large-area imaging). In addition, the recently developed tip-enhanced microscopy requires long-term stability of the relative position of the tip, sample and focus position. We were able to successfully demonstrate a stability improvement for tip-enhanced microscopy in the same manner. The stabilization of the tight focus enables us to perform long-term and robust measurements without any degradation of optical signal, resulting in the capability of true nanometric optical imaging with good reproducibility and high precision. The technique presented is a simple add-on for any kind of optical microscope. (paper)

  3. Preparation of fluorescein-functionalized electrospun fibers coated with TiO{sub 2} and gold nanoparticles for visible-light-induced photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Won Suk [Department of Chemistry, Hannam University, Daejeon 306-791 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Insung S. [Department of Chemistry, KAIST, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jungkyu K., E-mail: jkl@knu.ac.kr [Molecular-Level Interface Research Center, Department of Chemistry and Green-Nano Research Center, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Kuk Ro, E-mail: kryoon@hannam.ac.kr [Department of Chemistry, Hannam University, Daejeon 306-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrated a new type of visible light-induced photocatalyst, comprising fluorescein molecules, TiO{sub 2}, and gold nanoparticles anchored onto polymer fibers. The synthesized fiber composite was fully characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, contact angle measurement, and fluorescence microscopy. Under sunlight and visible light irradiation, the photocatalytic activity of the tricomponent system showed 2–3 times greater photodegradation efficiency for methylene blue than a representative photocatalyst, Degussa P25. - Graphical abstract: PSS/PAH-FITC/TiO{sub 2}/AuNP composite demonstrated 2–3 times greater visible light photodegradation efficiency for methylene blue than a representative photocatalyst, Degussa P25. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Synthesis of a novel composite, polymer fiber/organic dye/TiO{sub 2}/gold nanoparticles. • The composite was characterized by TGA, SEM, TEM, and fluorescence microscopy. • Improved visible light photocatalytic activity of the sythesized novel composite.

  4. Calcium hydroxylapatite treatment of human skin: evidence of collagen turnover through picrosirius red staining and circularly polarized microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zerbinati N

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicola Zerbinati,1 Alberto Calligaro2 1Department of Surgical and Morphological Sciences, University of Insubria (Varese and Polyspecialist Medical Center, Pavia, 2Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, Unit of Histology and Embryology, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy Background: Calcium hydroxylapatite (CaHA, Radiesse® is a biocompatible, injectable filler for facial soft-tissue augmentation that provides volume to tissues, followed by a process of neocollagenesis for improved skin quality. Objective: To examine the effects of CaHA treatment on the molecular organization of collagen using a combination of picrosirius red staining and circularly polarized light microscopy.Methods: Five subjects received subdermal injection of 0.3 mL of CaHA in tissues scheduled for removal during abdominoplasty 2 months later. Tissue specimens from the CaHA injection site and a control untreated area were obtained from excised skin at the time of surgery. Processed tissue sections were stained with picrosirius red solution 0.1% and visualized under circularly polarized light microscopy for identification of thick mature (type I and thin newly formed (type III collagen fibers. Pixel signals from both the control and CaHA-treated areas were extracted from the images, and morphometric computerized hue analysis was performed to provide a quantitative evaluation of mature and newly formed collagen fibers.Results: Under picrosirius red staining and circularly polarized light microscopy, green/yellow areas (thin newly formed collagen type III were visible among the collagen fibers in tissue sections from the area of CaHA injection. In contrast, the majority of the collagen fibers appeared red (thick mature collagen type I in control tissues. Morphometric analysis confirmed that, following CaHA treatment, the proportion of fibers represented by thin newly formed collagen type III increased significantly (p<0.01 in comparison with the

  5. Improved localization of cellular membrane receptors using combined fluorescence microscopy and simultaneous topography and recognition imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duman, M; Pfleger, M; Chtcheglova, L A; Neundlinger, I; Bozna, B L; Ebner, A; Schuetz, G J; Hinterdorfer, P; Zhu, R; Mayer, B; Rankl, C; Moertelmaier, M; Kada, G; Kienberger, F; Salio, M; Shepherd, D; Polzella, P; Cerundolo, V; Dieudonne, M

    2010-01-01

    The combination of fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy has a great potential in single-molecule-detection applications, overcoming many of the limitations coming from each individual technique. Here we present a new platform of combined fluorescence and simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) for improved localization of cellular receptors. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled human sodium-glucose cotransporter (hSGLT1) expressed Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and endothelial cells (MyEnd) from mouse myocardium stained with phalloidin-rhodamine were used as cell systems to study AFM topography and fluorescence microscopy on the same surface area. Topographical AFM images revealed membrane features such as lamellipodia, cytoskeleton fibers, F-actin filaments and small globular structures with heights ranging from 20 to 30 nm. Combined fluorescence and TREC imaging was applied to detect density, distribution and localization of YFP-labeled CD1d molecules on α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer)-loaded THP1 cells. While the expression level, distribution and localization of CD1d molecules on THP1 cells were detected with fluorescence microscopy, the nanoscale distribution of binding sites was investigated with molecular recognition imaging by using a chemically modified AFM tip. Using TREC on the inverted light microscope, the recognition sites of cell receptors were detected in recognition images with domain sizes ranging from ∼ 25 to ∼ 160 nm, with the smaller domains corresponding to a single CD1d molecule.

  6. Improved localization of cellular membrane receptors using combined fluorescence microscopy and simultaneous topography and recognition imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duman, M; Pfleger, M; Chtcheglova, L A; Neundlinger, I; Bozna, B L; Ebner, A; Schuetz, G J; Hinterdorfer, P [Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Zhu, R; Mayer, B [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Nanoscopic Methods in Biophysics, Institute for Biophysics, University of Linz, Altenbergerstrasse 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Rankl, C; Moertelmaier, M; Kada, G; Kienberger, F [Agilent Technologies Austria GmbH, Aubrunnerweg 11, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Salio, M; Shepherd, D; Polzella, P; Cerundolo, V [Cancer Research UK Tumor Immunology Group, Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine, Nuffield Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 9DS (United Kingdom); Dieudonne, M, E-mail: ferry_kienberger@agilent.com [Agilent Technologies Belgium, Wingepark 51, Rotselaar, AN B-3110 (Belgium)

    2010-03-19

    The combination of fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy has a great potential in single-molecule-detection applications, overcoming many of the limitations coming from each individual technique. Here we present a new platform of combined fluorescence and simultaneous topography and recognition imaging (TREC) for improved localization of cellular receptors. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled human sodium-glucose cotransporter (hSGLT1) expressed Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and endothelial cells (MyEnd) from mouse myocardium stained with phalloidin-rhodamine were used as cell systems to study AFM topography and fluorescence microscopy on the same surface area. Topographical AFM images revealed membrane features such as lamellipodia, cytoskeleton fibers, F-actin filaments and small globular structures with heights ranging from 20 to 30 nm. Combined fluorescence and TREC imaging was applied to detect density, distribution and localization of YFP-labeled CD1d molecules on {alpha}-galactosylceramide ({alpha}GalCer)-loaded THP1 cells. While the expression level, distribution and localization of CD1d molecules on THP1 cells were detected with fluorescence microscopy, the nanoscale distribution of binding sites was investigated with molecular recognition imaging by using a chemically modified AFM tip. Using TREC on the inverted light microscope, the recognition sites of cell receptors were detected in recognition images with domain sizes ranging from {approx} 25 to {approx} 160 nm, with the smaller domains corresponding to a single CD1d molecule.

  7. Developmental light level affects growth, morphology, and leaf physiology of young carambola trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marler, T.E.; Schaffer, B.; Crane, J.H.

    1994-01-01

    Growth and leaf physiology responses of container-grown 'Arkin' carambola (Averrhoa carambola L.) trees to long-term exposure of approximately 25%, approximately 50%, or 100% sunlight were studied in four experiments in Guam and Florida. Shading increased rachis length and leaflet area, and decreased leaflet thickness. Shaded trees also had a more horizontal branch orientation. Shading reduced dark respiration (Rd) and light compensation and saturation points but increased chlorophyll concentration and N-use efficiency. Light-saturated net CO2 assimilation (A) was not affected by developmental light level. Trees in full sun had smaller total leaf area, canopy diameter, and shoot:root ratio and exhibited leaflet movement to avoid direct solar radiation. Also, trees grown in 100% sunlight had a more vertical branch orientation and greater stomatal density than shaded trees. The ratio of variable to maximum fluorescence (Fv/Fm) declined during midday in 100% sunlight trees. This pattern was accompanied by a midday suppression of A in 100% sunlight-grown trees in Guam. 'Arkin' carambola trees exposed to approximately 25%, approximately 50%, or 100% sunlight for up to 39 weeks exhibited physiological and morphological adaptations that resulted in similar growth. These results indicate that carambola efficiently adapts to different developmental light intensities

  8. Erbium environments in erbium-silicon/silica light emitting nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashtiban, R J; Bangert, U; Crowe, I F; Halsall, M P

    2011-01-01

    Co-doping of SiO 2 with Si and Er to achieve silica fibre amplifiers has resulted in encouraging levels of light emission, much above those of Er-only doped SiO 2 . However, different fabrication methods, i.e., co-implantion and sequential implantation of Er and Si, has led to several factors difference in light levels. This paper looks into the reasons for these differences by establishing structure and local stoichiometry of the created entities via analytical transmission electron microscopy. In both cases Si-nanocrystals (NCs) have formed in the SiO 2 matrix. In the former case Er-ions are co-located with /integrated within the NCs, in the latter case NCs and Er are separate. By assessing the NCs' internal and interfacial structure with the surrounding material, we attempt to identify chemical/structural Er-phases/defects and their effect on the sensitising efficiency in the Er:Si-NCs system; high resolution phase contrast- and high angle dark field imaging as well as nano-scale spatially resolved electron energy core loss- and plasmon-spectroscopy carried out in an aberration corrected dedicated STEM lend valuable support to these studies.

  9. Mobile phone based clinical microscopy for global health applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David N Breslauer

    Full Text Available Light microscopy provides a simple, cost-effective, and vital method for the diagnosis and screening of hematologic and infectious diseases. In many regions of the world, however, the required equipment is either unavailable or insufficiently portable, and operators may not possess adequate training to make full use of the images obtained. Counterintuitively, these same regions are often well served by mobile phone networks, suggesting the possibility of leveraging portable, camera-enabled mobile phones for diagnostic imaging and telemedicine. Toward this end we have built a mobile phone-mounted light microscope and demonstrated its potential for clinical use by imaging P. falciparum-infected and sickle red blood cells in brightfield and M. tuberculosis-infected sputum samples in fluorescence with LED excitation. In all cases resolution exceeded that necessary to detect blood cell and microorganism morphology, and with the tuberculosis samples we took further advantage of the digitized images to demonstrate automated bacillus counting via image analysis software. We expect such a telemedicine system for global healthcare via mobile phone -- offering inexpensive brightfield and fluorescence microscopy integrated with automated image analysis -- to provide an important tool for disease diagnosis and screening, particularly in the developing world and rural areas where laboratory facilities are scarce but mobile phone infrastructure is extensive.

  10. High-resolution intravital microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Andresen

    Full Text Available Cellular communication constitutes a fundamental mechanism of life, for instance by permitting transfer of information through synapses in the nervous system and by leading to activation of cells during the course of immune responses. Monitoring cell-cell interactions within living adult organisms is crucial in order to draw conclusions on their behavior with respect to the fate of cells, tissues and organs. Until now, there is no technology available that enables dynamic imaging deep within the tissue of living adult organisms at sub-cellular resolution, i.e. detection at the level of few protein molecules. Here we present a novel approach called multi-beam striped-illumination which applies for the first time the principle and advantages of structured-illumination, spatial modulation of the excitation pattern, to laser-scanning-microscopy. We use this approach in two-photon-microscopy--the most adequate optical deep-tissue imaging-technique. As compared to standard two-photon-microscopy, it achieves significant contrast enhancement and up to 3-fold improved axial resolution (optical sectioning while photobleaching, photodamage and acquisition speed are similar. Its imaging depth is comparable to multifocal two-photon-microscopy and only slightly less than in standard single-beam two-photon-microscopy. Precisely, our studies within mouse lymph nodes demonstrated 216% improved axial and 23% improved lateral resolutions at a depth of 80 µm below the surface. Thus, we are for the first time able to visualize the dynamic interactions between B cells and immune complex deposits on follicular dendritic cells within germinal centers (GCs of live mice. These interactions play a decisive role in the process of clonal selection, leading to affinity maturation of the humoral immune response. This novel high-resolution intravital microscopy method has a huge potential for numerous applications in neurosciences, immunology, cancer research and

  11. High-Resolution Intravital Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andresen, Volker; Pollok, Karolin; Rinnenthal, Jan-Leo; Oehme, Laura; Günther, Robert; Spiecker, Heinrich; Radbruch, Helena; Gerhard, Jenny; Sporbert, Anje; Cseresnyes, Zoltan; Hauser, Anja E.; Niesner, Raluca

    2012-01-01

    Cellular communication constitutes a fundamental mechanism of life, for instance by permitting transfer of information through synapses in the nervous system and by leading to activation of cells during the course of immune responses. Monitoring cell-cell interactions within living adult organisms is crucial in order to draw conclusions on their behavior with respect to the fate of cells, tissues and organs. Until now, there is no technology available that enables dynamic imaging deep within the tissue of living adult organisms at sub-cellular resolution, i.e. detection at the level of few protein molecules. Here we present a novel approach called multi-beam striped-illumination which applies for the first time the principle and advantages of structured-illumination, spatial modulation of the excitation pattern, to laser-scanning-microscopy. We use this approach in two-photon-microscopy - the most adequate optical deep-tissue imaging-technique. As compared to standard two-photon-microscopy, it achieves significant contrast enhancement and up to 3-fold improved axial resolution (optical sectioning) while photobleaching, photodamage and acquisition speed are similar. Its imaging depth is comparable to multifocal two-photon-microscopy and only slightly less than in standard single-beam two-photon-microscopy. Precisely, our studies within mouse lymph nodes demonstrated 216% improved axial and 23% improved lateral resolutions at a depth of 80 µm below the surface. Thus, we are for the first time able to visualize the dynamic interactions between B cells and immune complex deposits on follicular dendritic cells within germinal centers (GCs) of live mice. These interactions play a decisive role in the process of clonal selection, leading to affinity maturation of the humoral immune response. This novel high-resolution intravital microscopy method has a huge potential for numerous applications in neurosciences, immunology, cancer research and developmental biology

  12. Long-Range Energy Propagation in Nanometer Arrays of Light Harvesting Antenna Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escalantet, Maryana; Escalante Marun, M.; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; Zhao, Yiping; Tas, Niels Roelof; Huskens, Jurriaan; Hunter, C. Neil; Subramaniam, Vinod; Otto, Cornelis

    2010-01-01

    Here we report the first observation of long-range transport of excitation energy within a biomimetic molecular nanoarray constructed from LH2 antenna complexes from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Fluorescence microscopy of the emission of light after local excitation with a diffraction-limited light beam

  13. Two-photon Microscopy and Polarimetry for Assessment of Myocardial Tissue Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault-Wallenburg, Marika

    Optical methods can provide useful tissue characterization tools. For this project, two-photon microscopy and polarized light examinations (polarimetry) were used to assess the organizational state of myocardium in healthy, infarcted, and stem-cell regenerated states. Two-photon microscopy visualizes collagen through second-harmonic generation and myocytes through two-photon excitation autofluorescence, providing information on the composition and structure/organization of the tissue. Polarimetry measurements yield a value of linear retardance that can serve as an indicator of tissue anisotropy, and with a dual-projection method, information about the anisotropy axis orientation can also be extracted. Two-photon microscopy results reveal that stem-cell treated tissue retains more myocytes and structure than infarcted myocardium, while polarimetry findings suggest that the injury caused by temporary ligation of a coronary artery is less severe and more diffuse that than caused by a permanent ligation. Both these methods show potential for tissue characterization.

  14. Optimization of s-Polarization Sensitivity in Apertureless Near-Field Optical Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuika Saito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is a general belief in apertureless near-field microscopy that the so-called p-polarization configuration, where the incident light is polarized parallel to the axis of the probe, is advantageous to its counterpart, the s-polarization configuration, where the incident light is polarized perpendicular to the probe axis. While this is true for most samples under common near-field experimental conditions, there are samples which respond better to the s-polarization configuration due to their orientations. Indeed, there have been several reports that have discussed such samples. This leads us to an important requirement that the near-field experimental setup should be equipped with proper sensitivity for measurements with s-polarization configuration. This requires not only creation of effective s-polarized illumination at the near-field probe, but also proper enhancement of s-polarized light by the probe. In this paper, we have examined the s-polarization enhancement sensitivity of near-field probes by measuring and evaluating the near-field Rayleigh scattering images constructed by a variety of probes. We found that the s-polarization enhancement sensitivity strongly depends on the sharpness of the apex of near-field probes. We have discussed the efficient value of probe sharpness by considering a balance between the enhancement and the spatial resolution, both of which are essential requirements of apertureless near-field microscopy.

  15. P1-16: The Effect of Visual Stimuli of LED Lighting by Color Temperature and Illuminance Control on Attention and Meditation Level of Mind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Su Lee

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently LED (Lighting Emitting Diode lighting sources are applied not only for displays like LED BLU (back light unit TV but also for general lighting like LED lamps for home and office. The color temperature, or chromaticity, and brightness of LED lighting can be easily controlled. Preferred combinations between illuminance and color temperature of lighting depend on daily living activities (Oi et al., 2007 Symposium on Design of Artificial Environments 214–215. Changes in intensity can be more easily detected than color changes (Almeida et al., 2009 Perception 38 1109–1117. We investigated whether the illumination stimuli of LED lighting can enhance attention and relaxation level by controlling color temperature and illuminance according to activities. EEG signals are used to estimate attention and relaxation levels of human subjects under different lighting conditions. Nine participants with normal eye sight and color vision participated in the experiments with four different activities under different illumination conditions. LED lighting with color temperature 3600 K in 240 lux is used for relaxation activities, and LED lighting with 6600 K in 794 lux is used for the task which requires attention. These lighting conditions are compared with conventional lighting condition with 4600 K in 530 lux. Preliminary experiment results show that low color temperature with low illumination intensity of LED lighting enhances relaxation level and high color temperature with high illuminance improves attention level compared with conventional lighting environment without illuminance and color temperature changes.

  16. Handheld Fluorescence Microscopy based Flow Analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Manish; Jayakumar, Nitin; Gorthi, Sai Siva

    2016-03-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has the intrinsic advantages of favourable contrast characteristics and high degree of specificity. Consequently, it has been a mainstay in modern biological inquiry and clinical diagnostics. Despite its reliable nature, fluorescence based clinical microscopy and diagnostics is a manual, labour intensive and time consuming procedure. The article outlines a cost-effective, high throughput alternative to conventional fluorescence imaging techniques. With system level integration of custom-designed microfluidics and optics, we demonstrate fluorescence microscopy based imaging flow analyzer. Using this system we have imaged more than 2900 FITC labeled fluorescent beads per minute. This demonstrates high-throughput characteristics of our flow analyzer in comparison to conventional fluorescence microscopy. The issue of motion blur at high flow rates limits the achievable throughput in image based flow analyzers. Here we address the issue by computationally deblurring the images and show that this restores the morphological features otherwise affected by motion blur. By further optimizing concentration of the sample solution and flow speeds, along with imaging multiple channels simultaneously, the system is capable of providing throughput of about 480 beads per second.

  17. Investigation into scanning tunnelling luminescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson-Smith, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    This work reports on the development of a scanning tunnelling luminescence (STL) microscope and its application to the study of Ill-nitride semiconductor materials used in the production of light emitting devices. STL microscopy is a technique which uses the high resolution topographic imaging capabilities of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) to generate high resolution luminescence images. The STM tunnelling current acts as a highly localised source of electrons (or holes) which generates luminescence in certain materials. Light generated at the STM tunnelling junction is collected concurrently with the height variation of the tunnelling probe as it is scanned across a sample surface, producing simultaneous topographic and luminescence images. Due to the very localised excitation source, high resolution luminescence images can be obtained. Spectroscopic resolution can be obtained by using filters. Additionally, the variation of luminescence intensity with tunnel current and with bias voltage can provide information on recombination processes and material properties. The design and construction of a scanning tunnelling luminescence microscope is described in detail. Operating under ambient conditions, the microscope has several novel features, including a new type of miniature inertial slider-based approach motor, large solid-angle light collection optical arrangement and a tip-height regulation system which requires the minimum of operator input. (author)

  18. Diffraction and microscopy with attosecond electron pulse trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Yuya; Baum, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Attosecond spectroscopy1-7 can resolve electronic processes directly in time, but a movie-like space-time recording is impeded by the too long wavelength ( 100 times larger than atomic distances) or the source-sample entanglement in re-collision techniques8-11. Here we advance attosecond metrology to picometre wavelength and sub-atomic resolution by using free-space electrons instead of higher-harmonic photons1-7 or re-colliding wavepackets8-11. A beam of 70-keV electrons at 4.5-pm de Broglie wavelength is modulated by the electric field of laser cycles into a sequence of electron pulses with sub-optical-cycle duration. Time-resolved diffraction from crystalline silicon reveals a propagates in space and time. This unification of attosecond science with electron microscopy and diffraction enables space-time imaging of light-driven processes in the entire range of sample morphologies that electron microscopy can access.

  19. The morphology of Ichthyophonus sp. in their mugilid hosts (Pisces: Teleostei) and following cultivation in vitro. A light and electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Sierra, A; Alvarez-Pellitero, P

    1999-07-01

    The morphology of Ichthyophonus sp., a parasite of Mugil capito and Liza saliens, was investigated by light and transmission electron microscopy. The most frequent stage found in the fish hosts was the multinucleate spore, though germinating stages, hyphae, and endospores were also found. Different development patterns were observed in the media assayed for in vitro culture. Optimal growth and development were obtained in Eagle's minimum essential medium (MEM) supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum at pH 7. Ultrastructural features of multinucleate spores, both in the fish host and in culture, were a fibrillar thick wall and an electron-lucent matrix, with large glycogen granules, some electron-dense bodies, large vacuoles, lipid inclusions, and endoplasmic reticulum mainly appearing among the nuclei. Mitochondria with scarce tubulovesicular cristae were observed in the different stages, mainly near the wall and the germinating sites. Condensed heterochromatin was rarely seen. A nucleus-associated organelle (NAO) was frequently observed, and dictyosome cisternae and vesicles appeared in its vicinity.

  20. Effect of Annealing Time of YAG:Ce3+ Phosphor on White Light Chromaticity Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd, Husnen R.; Hassan, Z.; Ahmed, Naser M.; Almessiere, Munirah Abdullah; Omar, A. F.; Alsultany, Forat H.; Sabah, Fayroz A.; Osman, Ummu Shuhada

    2018-02-01

    Yttrium and aluminium nitrate phosphors doped with cerium nitrate and mixed with urea (fuel) are prepared by using microwave-induced combustion synthesis according to the formula Y(3-0.06)Al5O12:0.06Ce3+ (YAG:Ce3+) to produce white light emitting diodes by conversion from blue indium gallium nitride-light emitting diode chips. The sintering time with fixed temperature (1050°C) for phosphor powder was optimized and found to be 5 h. The crystallinity, structure, chemical composition, luminescent properties with varying currents densities and chromaticity were characterized by x-ray diffraction, field emission-scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, photoluminescence emission, electroluminescence and standard CIE 1931 chromaticity diagram, respectively. The energy levels of Ce3+ in YAG were discussed based on its absorption and excitation spectra. The results show that the obtained YAG:Ce3+ phosphor sintered for 5 h has good crystallinity with pure phase, low agglomerate with spherical shaped particles and strong yellow emission, offering cool-white LED with tuneable correlated color temperature and a good color rendering index compared to those prepared by sintering for 2 h and as-prepared phosphor powders.

  1. Image processing and data reduction of Apollo low light level photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvord, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The removal of the lens induced vignetting from a selected sample of the Apollo low light level photographs is discussed. The methods used were developed earlier. A study of the effect of noise on vignetting removal and the comparability of the Apollo 35mm Nikon lens vignetting was also undertaken. The vignetting removal was successful to about 10% photometry, and noise has a severe effect on the useful photometric output data. Separate vignetting functions must be used for different flights since the vignetting function varies from camera to camera in size and shape.

  2. Coherent scattering of three-level atoms in the field of a bichromatic standing light wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pazgalev, A.S.; Rozhdestvenskii, Yu.V.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the coherent scattering of three-level atoms in the field of two standing light waves for two values of the spatial shift. In the case of a zero spatial shift and equal frequency detunings of the standing waves, the problem of scattering of a three-level atoms is reduced to scattering of an effectively two-level atom. For the case of an exact resonance between the waves and transitions we give expressions for the population probability of the states of the three-level atom obtained in the short-interaction-time approximation. Depending on the initial population distribution over the states, different scattering modes are realized. In particular, we show that there can be initial conditions for which the three-level system does not interact with the field of the standing waves, with the result that there is no coherent scattering of atoms. In the case of standing waves shifted by π/2, there are two types of solution, depending on the values of the frequency detuning. For instance, when the light waves are detuned equally we give the exact solution for arbitrary relationships between the detuning and the standing wave intensities valid for any atom-field interaction times. The case of 'mirror' detunings and shifted standing waves is studied only numerically

  3. Effects of different levels of intraocular stray light on kinetic perimetry findings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazunori Hirasawa

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effect of different levels of intraocular stray light on kinetic perimetry findings.Twenty-five eyes of 25 healthy young participants were examined by automated kinetic perimetry (Octopus 900 using Goldmann stimuli III4e, I4e, I3e, I2e, and I1e. Each stimulus was presented with a velocity of 3°/s at 24 meridians with 15° intervals. Four levels of intraocular stray light were induced using non-white opacity filter (WOF filters and WOFs applied to the clear plastic eye covers of the participants. The visual acuity, pupil diameter, isopter area, and kinetic sensitivity of each meridian were analyzed for each WOF density.Visual acuity deteriorated with increasing WOF densities (p < 0.01. With a visual acuity of 0.1 LogMAR units, the isopter areas for III4e, I4e, I3e, I2e, and I1e decreased by -32.7 degree2 (-0.2%, -255.7 degree2 (-2.6%, -381.2 degree2 (-6.2%, -314.8 degree2 (-12.8%, and -59.2 degree2 (-15.2%, respectively; kinetic sensitivity for those stimuli decreased by -0.1 degree (-0.1%, -0.8 degree (-1.4%, -1.6 degree (-3.7%, -2.7 degree (-9.7%, and -1.7 degree (-16.2%, respectively. The pupil diameter with each WOF density was not significantly different.Kinetic perimetry measurements with a high-intensity stimulus (i.e., III4e were unaffected by intraocular stray light. In contrast, measurements with the I4e, I3e, I2e, and I1e stimuli, especially I2e and I1e, were affected. Changes in the shape of the isopter resulting from opacity must be monitored, especially in cases of smaller and lower-intensity stimuli.

  4. Microscopy imaging system and method employing stimulated raman spectroscopy as a contrast mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney [Lexington, MA; Freudiger, Christian [Boston, MA; Min, Wei [Cambridge, MA

    2011-09-27

    A microscopy imaging system includes a first light source for providing a first train of pulses at a first center optical frequency .omega..sub.1, a second light source for providing a second train of pulses at a second center optical frequency .omega..sub.2, a modulator system, an optical detector, and a processor. The modulator system is for modulating a beam property of the second train of pulses at a modulation frequency f of at least 100 kHz. The optical detector is for detecting an integrated intensity of substantially all optical frequency components of the first train of pulses from the common focal volume by blocking the second train of pulses being modulated. The processor is for detecting, a modulation at the modulation frequency f, of the integrated intensity of the optical frequency components of the first train of pulses to provide a pixel of an image for the microscopy imaging system.

  5. Effects of the murine skull in optoacoustic brain microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Moritz; Turner, Jake; Estrada, Héctor; Rebling, Johannes; Shoham, Shy; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Despite the great promise behind the recent introduction of optoacoustic technology into the arsenal of small-animal neuroimaging methods, a variety of acoustic and light-related effects introduced by adult murine skull severely compromise the performance of optoacoustics in transcranial imaging. As a result, high-resolution noninvasive optoacoustic microscopy studies are still limited to a thin layer of pial microvasculature, which can be effectively resolved by tight focusing of the excitation light. We examined a range of distortions introduced by an adult murine skull in transcranial optoacoustic imaging under both acoustically- and optically-determined resolution scenarios. It is shown that strong low-pass filtering characteristics of the skull may significantly deteriorate the achievable spatial resolution in deep brain imaging where no light focusing is possible. While only brain vasculature with a diameter larger than 60 µm was effectively resolved via transcranial measurements with acoustic resolution, significant improvements are seen through cranial windows and thinned skull experiments. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Characterization and simulation of the response of Multi-Pixel Photon Counters to low light levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vacheret, A. [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Barker, G.J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Dziewiecki, M. [Institute of Radioelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, 15/19 Nowowiejska St., 00-665 Warsaw (Poland); Guzowski, P. [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Haigh, M.D. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Gibbet Hill Road, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Hartfiel, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Izmaylov, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, 60 October Revolution Pr. 7A, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Johnston, W. [Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kudenko, Yu. [Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, 60 October Revolution Pr. 7A, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kurjata, R. [Institute of Radioelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, 15/19 Nowowiejska St., 00-665 Warsaw (Poland); Kutter, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Lindner, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, Canada, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Masliah, P. [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Marzec, J. [Institute of Radioelectronics, Warsaw University of Technology, 15/19 Nowowiejska St., 00-665 Warsaw (Poland); Mineev, O.; Musienko, Yu. [Institute for Nuclear Research RAS, 60 October Revolution Pr. 7A, 117312 Moscow (Russian Federation); and others

    2011-11-11

    The calorimeter, range detector and active target elements of the T2K near detectors rely on the Hamamatsu Photonics Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs) to detect scintillation light produced by charged particles. Detailed measurements of the MPPC gain, afterpulsing, crosstalk, dark noise, and photon detection efficiency for low light levels are reported. In order to account for the impact of the MPPC behavior on T2K physics observables, a simulation program has been developed based on these measurements. The simulation is used to predict the energy resolution of the detector.

  7. Characterization and simulation of the response of Multi-Pixel Photon Counters to low light levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacheret, A.; Barker, G.J.; Dziewiecki, M.; Guzowski, P.; Haigh, M.D.; Hartfiel, B.; Izmaylov, A.; Johnston, W.; Khabibullin, M.; Khotjantsev, A.; Kudenko, Yu.; Kurjata, R.; Kutter, T.; Lindner, T.; Masliah, P.; Marzec, J.; Mineev, O.; Musienko, Yu.

    2011-01-01

    The calorimeter, range detector and active target elements of the T2K near detectors rely on the Hamamatsu Photonics Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs) to detect scintillation light produced by charged particles. Detailed measurements of the MPPC gain, afterpulsing, crosstalk, dark noise, and photon detection efficiency for low light levels are reported. In order to account for the impact of the MPPC behavior on T2K physics observables, a simulation program has been developed based on these measurements. The simulation is used to predict the energy resolution of the detector.

  8. Goos-Hänchen shifts of partially coherent light beams from a cavity with a four-level Raman gain medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziauddin; Lee, Ray-Kuang; Qamar, Sajid

    2016-09-01

    We theoretically investigate spatial and angular Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts (both negative and positive) in the reflected light for a partial coherent light incident on a cavity. A four-level Raman gain atomic medium is considered in a cavity. The effects of spatial coherence, beam width, and mode index of partial coherent light fields on spatial and angular GH shifts are studied. Our results reveal that a large magnitude of negative and positive GH shifts in the reflected light is achievable with the introduction of partial coherent light fields. Furthermore, the amplitude of spatial (negative and positive) GH shifts are sharply affected by the partial coherent light beam as compared to angular (negative and positive) GH shifts in the reflected light.

  9. A line scanned light-sheet microscope with phase shaped self-reconstructing beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrbach, Florian O; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2010-11-08

    We recently demonstrated that Microscopy with Self-Reconstructing Beams (MISERB) increases both image quality and penetration depth of illumination beams in strongly scattering media. Based on the concept of line scanned light-sheet microscopy, we present an add-on module to a standard inverted microscope using a scanned beam that is shaped in phase and amplitude by a spatial light modulator. We explain technical details of the setup as well as of the holograms for the creation, positioning and scaling of static light-sheets, Gaussian beams and Bessel beams. The comparison of images from identical sample areas illuminated by different beams allows a precise assessment of the interconnection between beam shape and image quality. The superior propagation ability of Bessel beams through inhomogeneous media is demonstrated by measurements on various scattering media.

  10. Aligned energy-level design for decreasing operation voltage of tandem white organic light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chih-Hao, E-mail: chc@saturn.yzu.edu.tw [Department of Photonics Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li 32003, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wu, Zih-Jyun; Liang, Yi-Hu; Chang, Yu-Shuo; Chiu, Chuan-Hao; Tai, Cheng-Wei [Department of Photonics Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li 32003, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chang, Hsin-Hua, E-mail: hhua3@mail.vnu.edu.tw [Department of Electro-Optical Engineering, Vanung University, Chung-Li 32061, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-12-02

    In general, organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) need to operate at higher current density levels to ensure an ample light flux. However, stressed operation will result in poor performance and limited device lifetime. Recently, a tandem structure has been proposed as a pivotal technique to meet the stringent lighting requirements for OLED commercialization, with a research focus on decreasing the concomitant higher operation voltage. Driving two connected emission units (EMUs) in a tandem structure often requires more than twice the driving voltage for a single EMU. This study investigates bipolar host materials and their effective employment in fabricating tandem white phosphorescent OLEDs (PhOLEDs). In addition, the design of a mechanism to align the energy level between the hole transport layer/emitting layer is shown to effectively mitigate operational voltages. In sharp contrast to devices using a unipolar host material, we demonstrate that the turn-on voltage of blue PhOLEDs could be decreased from 3.8 V to 2.7 V through utilizing a bipolar host. Furthermore, applying the proposed techniques to tandem white PhOLEDs produces a luminance of 10{sup 3} cd/m{sup 2} by a 10.1 V driving voltage. - Highlights: • The matched energy level between the hole transport/emitting layer lowers voltages. • Multiple conduction dopants were used to investigate charge generation layer. • Two-color emitters were used to quantify the charge generation strength.

  11. Photoassisted Kelvin probe force microscopy at GaN surfaces: The role of polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, J. D.; Li, S. F.; Atamuratov, A.; Wehmann, H.-H.; Waag, A.

    2010-10-01

    The behavior of GaN surfaces during photoassisted Kelvin probe force microscopy is demonstrated to be strongly dependant on surface polarity. The surface photovoltage of GaN surfaces illuminated with above-band gap light is analyzed as a function of time and light intensity. Distinct differences between Ga-polar and N-polar surfaces could be identified, attributed to photoinduced chemisorption of oxygen during illumination. These differences can be used for a contactless, nondestructive, and easy-performable analysis of the polarity of GaN surfaces.

  12. 3D visualization of mold filling stages in thermal nanoimprint by white light interferometry and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schift, Helmut; Gobrecht, Jens; Kim, Geehong; Lee, Jaejong

    2009-01-01

    A method for continuous 3D visualization of the mold filling at a microscopic level during a thermoplastic nanoimprint process was developed. It is based on superposition of micrographs of a series of different stages of imprint. It was applied to two common 3D microscopies with different resolution limitations. Due to advanced image processing, the animated movie sequence, available as supplementary multimedia information in the online version of this journal, gives an unprecedented insight into the complex polymer flow and shows how voids are forming and vanishing during the imprint process around micropillars. The method has advantages over current real-time methods and can be used as an analytical tool for optimization of processes and improvement of stamp design down to the sub-10 nm nanometer range.

  13. Distribution of trace levels of therapeutic gallium in bone as mapped by synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bockman, R.S.; Repo, M.A.; Warrell, R.P. Jr.; Pounds, J.G.; Schidlovsky, G.; Gordon, B.M.; Jones, K.W.

    1990-01-01

    Gallium nitrate, a drug that inhibits calcium release from bone, has been proven a safe and effective treatment for the accelerated bone resorption associated with cancer. Though bone is a target organ for gallium, the kinetics, sites, and effects of gallium accumulation in bone are not known. The authors have used synchrotron X-ray microscopy to map the distribution of trace levels of gallium in bone. After short-term in vivo administration of gallium nitrate to rats, trace (nanogram) amounts of gallium preferentially localized to the metabolically active regions in the metaphysis as well as the endosteal and periosteal surfaces of diaphyseal bone, regions where new bone formation and modeling were occurring. The amounts measured were well below the levels known to be cytotoxic. Iron and zinc, trace elements normally found in bone, were decreased in amount after in vivo administration of gallium. These studies represent a first step toward understanding the mechanism(s) of action of gallium in bone by suggesting the possible cellular, structural, and elemental targets of gallium

  14. Energy utilization of light and heavy weaned piglets subjected to different dietary energy levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Machado Leal Ribeiro

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary metabolisable energy (ME: 3.25, 3.40, 3.55, or 3.70 Mcal kg−1 and weaning weight (WW: light 4.0±0.7 kg, and heavy: 6.3±0.6 kg on productive response and energy utilization of weaned piglets. Sixty-four male piglets were housed in 32 metabolic cages (two animals per cage during the first 14 d postweaning. At day 15, only one animal per cage was kept until day 28. Body composition, energy, and nutrient deposition rates and energy utilization efficiency were measured through a comparative slaughter procedure. Piglets with light WW had a poorer feed conversion ratio and lower weight gain and feed intake when expressed per live weight. Increased ME led to greater daily fat deposition in the empty bodies (defined as weighted mean of the carcass + organs + blood, no intestinal content, while light WW piglets had a reduced protein deposition. Light WW piglets increased heat production with increased ME, but no effect was seen for the heavy WW piglets. By contrast, heavy WW piglets increased empty body gross energy as ME increased, while no influence was observed on light WW piglets. Increasing dietary energy levels did not contribute to the subsequent growth performance of piglets that were lighter at weaning. The lack of interaction between weaning weight and dietary ME content on growth performance does not support the hypothesis that light piglets at weaning do not exhibit compensatory growth because of limitations in energy intake.

  15. Abrasion of 6 dentifrices measured by vertical scanning interference microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascaretti-Grizon, Florence; Mabilleau, Guillaume; Chappard, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The abrasion of dentifrices is well recognized to eliminate the dental plaque. The aims of this study were to characterize the abrasive powders of 6 dentifrices (3 toothpastes and 3 toothpowders) and to measure the abrasion on a test surface by Vertical Scanning Interference microscopy (VSI). Bright field and polarization microscopy were used to identify the abrasive particles on the crude dentifrices and after prolonged washes. Scanning electron microscopy and microanalysis characterized the shape and nature of the particles. Standardized and polished blocks of poly(methylmethacrylate) were brushed with a commercial electric toothbrush with the dentifrices. VSI quantified the mean roughness (Ra) and illustrated in 3D the abraded areas. Toothpastes induced a limited abrasion. Toothpowders induced a significantly higher roughness linked to the size of the abrasive particles. One powder (Gencix® produced a high abrasion when used with a standard testing weight. However, the powder is based on pumice particles covered by a plant homogenate that readily dissolves in water. When used in the same volume, or after dispersion in water, Ra was markedly reduced. Light and electron microscopy characterize the abrasive particles and VSI is a new tool allowing the analysis of large surface of abraded materials.

  16. New light on ion channel imaging by total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Hisao; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2015-05-01

    Ion channels play pivotal roles in a wide variety of cellular functions; therefore, their physiological characteristics, pharmacological responses, and molecular structures have been extensively investigated. However, the mobility of an ion channel itself in the cell membrane has not been examined in as much detail. A total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscope allows fluorophores to be imaged in a restricted region within an evanescent field of less than 200 nm from the interface of the coverslip and plasma membrane in living cells. Thus the TIRF microscope is useful for selectively visualizing the plasmalemmal surface and subplasmalemmal zone. In this review, we focused on a single-molecule analysis of the dynamic movement of ion channels in the plasma membrane using TIRF microscopy. We also described two single-molecule imaging techniques under TIRF microscopy: fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for the identification of molecules that interact with ion channels, and subunit counting for the determination of subunit stoichiometry in a functional channel. TIRF imaging can also be used to analyze spatiotemporal Ca(2+) events in the subplasmalemma. Single-molecule analyses of ion channels and localized Ca(2+) signals based on TIRF imaging provide beneficial pharmacological and physiological information concerning the functions of ion channels. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Nonlinear multicontrast microscopy of hematoxylin-and-eosin-stained histological sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuer, Adam; Tokarz, Danielle; Prent, Nicole; Cisek, Richard; Alami, Jennifer; Dumont, Daniel J.; Bakueva, Ludmila; Rowlands, John; Barzda, Virginijus

    2010-03-01

    Imaging hematoxylin-and-eosin-stained cancerous histological sections with multicontrast nonlinear excitation fluorescence, second- and third-harmonic generation (THG) microscopy reveals cellular structures with extremely high image contrast. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy together with second hyperpolarizability measurements of the dyes shows that strong THG appears due to neutral hemalum aggregation and is subsequently enhanced by interaction with eosin. Additionally, fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy reveals eosin fluorescence quenching by hemalums, showing better suitability of only eosin staining for fluorescence microscopy. Multicontrast nonlinear microscopy has the potential to differentiate between cancerous and healthy tissue at a single cell level.

  18. Wide-field fluorescent microscopy and fluorescent imaging flow cytometry on a cell-phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongying; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2013-04-11

    Fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry are widely used tools in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. However these devices are in general relatively bulky and costly, making them less effective in the resource limited settings. To potentially address these limitations, we have recently demonstrated the integration of wide-field fluorescent microscopy and imaging flow cytometry tools on cell-phones using compact, light-weight, and cost-effective opto-fluidic attachments. In our flow cytometry design, fluorescently labeled cells are flushed through a microfluidic channel that is positioned above the existing cell-phone camera unit. Battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are butt-coupled to the side of this microfluidic chip, which effectively acts as a multi-mode slab waveguide, where the excitation light is guided to uniformly excite the fluorescent targets. The cell-phone camera records a time lapse movie of the fluorescent cells flowing through the microfluidic channel, where the digital frames of this movie are processed to count the number of the labeled cells within the target solution of interest. Using a similar opto-fluidic design, we can also image these fluorescently labeled cells in static mode by e.g. sandwiching the fluorescent particles between two glass slides and capturing their fluorescent images using the cell-phone camera, which can achieve a spatial resolution of e.g. - 10 μm over a very large field-of-view of - 81 mm(2). This cell-phone based fluorescent imaging flow cytometry and microscopy platform might be useful especially in resource limited settings, for e.g. counting of CD4+ T cells toward monitoring of HIV+ patients or for detection of water-borne parasites in drinking water.

  19. Double-doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles as an efficient visible-light-active photocatalyst and antibacterial agent under solar simulated light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashkarran, Ali Akbar, E-mail: ashkarran@umz.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hamidinezhad, Habib [Nano and Biotechnology Research Group, Faculty of Basic Sciences, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haddadi, Hedayat [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Shahrekord University, P.O. Box 115, Shahrekord (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahmoudi, Morteza [Department of Nanotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nanotechnology Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: Double doping introduces two different electronic states in the band gap of TiO{sub 2}, which increase the lifetime of the charge carriers and leads to narrower band gap and enhancement of the visible-light absorption. - Highlights: • Preparation of single and double doped TiO{sub 2} NPs using a simple sol–gel route. • Extension of light absorption spectrum toward the visible region. • Enhanced visible-light photo-induced activity and antibacterial property in double doped TiO{sub 2} NPs. - Abstract: Silver and nitrogen doped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized via sol–gel method. The physicochemical properties of the achieved NPs were characterized by various methods including X-Ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and ultra violet–visible absorption spectroscopy (UV–vis). Both visible-light photocatalytic activity and antimicrobial properties were successfully demonstrated for the degradation of Rhodamine B (Rh. B.), as a model dye, and inactivation of Escherichia coli (E. coli), as a representative of microorganisms. The concentration of the employed dopant was optimized and the results revealed that the silver and nitrogen doped TiO{sub 2} NPs extended the light absorption spectrum toward the visible region and significantly enhanced the photodegradation of model dye and inactivation of bacteria under visible-light irradiation while double-doped TiO{sub 2} NPs exhibited highest photocatalytic and antibacterial activity compared with single doping. The significant enhancement in the photocatalytic activity and antibacterial properties of the double doped TiO{sub 2} NPs, under visible-light irradiation, can be attributed to the generation of two different electronic states acting as electron traps in TiO{sub 2} and responsible for narrowing the band gap of TiO{sub 2} and shifting its optical response from UV to the

  20. LudusScope: Accessible Interactive Smartphone Microscopy for Life-Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Honesty; Gerber, Lukas Cyrill; Chiu, Daniel; Lee, Seung Ah; Cira, Nate J; Xia, Sherwin Yuyang; Riedel-Kruse, Ingmar H

    2016-01-01

    For centuries, observational microscopy has greatly facilitated biology education, but we still cannot easily and playfully interact with the microscopic world we see. We therefore developed the LudusScope, an accessible, interactive do-it-yourself smartphone microscopy platform that promotes exploratory stimulation and observation of microscopic organisms, in a design that combines the educational modalities of build, play, and inquire. The LudusScope's touchscreen and joystick allow the selection and stimulation of phototactic microorganisms such as Euglena gracilis with light. Organismal behavior is tracked and displayed in real time, enabling open and structured game play as well as scientific inquiry via quantitative experimentation. Furthermore, we used the Scratch programming language to incorporate biophysical modeling. This platform is designed as an accessible, low-cost educational kit for easy construction and expansion. User testing with both teachers and students demonstrates the educational potential of the LudusScope, and we anticipate additional synergy with the maker movement. Transforming observational microscopy into an interactive experience will make microbiology more tangible to society, and effectively support the interdisciplinary learning required by the Next Generation Science Standards.

  1. Corneal confocal microscopy alterations in Sjögren's syndrome dry eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Michele; Iaccarino, Stefania; Varricchi, Gilda; D'Errico, Tito; Gironi Carnevale, Ugo Antonello; Bifani, Mario

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate light backscattering (LB) in corneal layers in patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome dry eye (SSDE) utilizing in vivo corneal confocal microscopy (IVCM) and to determine the eventual association with the lacrimal functional test values. A complete ophthalmic evaluation, Schirmer test with and without stimulation, break-up time (BUT) and IVCM were performed on 55 patients affected by SSDE and in an age- and sex-matched cohort of healthy participants (HP). Light backscattering, measures as light reflectivity unit (LRU), detected by IVCM at Bowman's membrane (BM) at 50 μm, at 100 μm and at 200 μm deeper than BM was compared in the two groups. The correlations between LB values and lacrimal function results were evaluated. In patients affected by SSDE, LB was significantly higher (p lacrimal function. Light backscattering (LB) could be very useful for clinical diagnosis and management of SSDE. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Confocal laser scanning microscopy in study of bone calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Tetsunari; Kokubu, Mayu; Kato, Hirohito; Imai, Koichi; Tanaka, Akio

    2012-12-01

    Bone regeneration in mandible and maxillae after extraction of teeth or tumor resection and the use of rough surface implants in bone induction must be investigated to elucidate the mechanism of calcification. The calcified tissues are subjected to chemical decalcification or physical grinding to observe their microscopic features with light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy where the microscopic tissue morphology is significantly altered. We investigated the usefulness of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) for this purpose. After staggering the time of administration of calcein and alizarin red to experimental rats and dogs, rat alveolar bone and dog femur grafted with coral as scaffold or dental implants were observed with CLSM. In rat alveolar bone, the calcification of newly-formed bone and net-like canaliculi was observed at the mesial bone from the roots progressed at the rate of 15 μm/day. In dog femur grafted with coral, newly-formed bones along the space of coral were observed in an orderly manner. In dog femur with dental implants, after 8 weeks, newly-formed bone proceeded along the rough surface of the implants. CLSM produced high-magnification images of newly-formed bone and thin sections were not needed.

  3. Progress in the Correlative Atomic Force Microscopy and Optical Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulu Zhou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Atomic force microscopy (AFM has evolved from the originally morphological imaging technique to a powerful and multifunctional technique for manipulating and detecting the interactions between molecules at nanometer resolution. However, AFM cannot provide the precise information of synchronized molecular groups and has many shortcomings in the aspects of determining the mechanism of the interactions and the elaborate structure due to the limitations of the technology, itself, such as non-specificity and low imaging speed. To overcome the technical limitations, it is necessary to combine AFM with other complementary techniques, such as fluorescence microscopy. The combination of several complementary techniques in one instrument has increasingly become a vital approach to investigate the details of the interactions among molecules and molecular dynamics. In this review, we reported the principles of AFM and optical microscopy, such as confocal microscopy and single-molecule localization microscopy, and focused on the development and use of correlative AFM and optical microscopy.

  4. X-ray microscopy and spectromicroscopy - tools for environmental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thieme, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: X-ray microscopy achieves a much higher resolution than light microscopy. This is due to the much shorter wavelength of X-rays compared to visible light. The smallest structures that can be seen in an X-ray microscope at present are about 20 nm in size. X-ray microscopy is also capable of imaging specimens directly in aqueous media. By choosing the wavelength of the X-radiation appropriately, it is possible to perform spectromicroscopy studies. Comprising, it is a tool very well suited to study colloidal structures in the environment. X-ray microscopy can be performed with two types of instruments. An X-ray microscope quickly takes high-resolution images of objects to be studied, whereas a scanning X-ray microscope is an analytical instrument for spectromicroscopy. Here, an object can be imaged using energies above and below the absorption edge of an element. Dividing both images gives rise to a map of the distribution of this element in the sample. Using near-edge resonances it is possible to conduct NEXAFS studies. As the X-ray energy is raised to match the absorption edge resonances are found, that reflect the chemical bonding state of the element. Therefore, it is possible with X-ray microscopy to combine high spatial resolution with high spectral resolution for studies of colloidal structures. The Institute of X-ray physics builds up an X-ray microscopy beamline at the electron storage ring BESSY II with both, an X-ray microscope and a scanning X-ray microscope. The status of this beamline will be presented in this talk. Colloidal structures play an important role in the environment. Due to their surface activity they are involved in various processes. Substances can be bound and immobilized or transported, colloids can attach to microorganisms building up microhabitats, and organic substances as humics can flocculate due the interaction with metals. A great variety of colloidal structures from the environment have been studied using X

  5. Macrophages and mast cells in dystrophic masseter muscle: a light and electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S; Mikkelsen, H

    1988-01-01

    Macrophages and mast cells in masseter muscle from normal and dystrophic mice were studied by light and electron microscopy. Acid phosphatase activity and FITC-dextran were used to identify and describe macrophages. Toluidine blue was used as a marker for mast cells. In dystrophic muscle, the num......Macrophages and mast cells in masseter muscle from normal and dystrophic mice were studied by light and electron microscopy. Acid phosphatase activity and FITC-dextran were used to identify and describe macrophages. Toluidine blue was used as a marker for mast cells. In dystrophic muscle...

  6. Short communication: Artificial ultraviolet B light exposure increases vitamin D levels in cow plasma and milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jette; Jensen, Søren Krogh; Hymøller, Lone

    2015-01-01

    tested the ability of a specially designed UVB lamp to enhance the vitamin D-3 content in milk from dairy cows housed indoors. This study included 16 cows divided into 4 groups. Each group was exposed daily to artificial UVB light simulating 1, 2, 3, or 4 h of summer sun at 56 degrees N for 24 d...... exposure to artificial UVB light to 73 d did not lead to an increase of vitamin D-3 or 25OHD(3) level in the milk. In conclusion, the change in production facilities for dairy cows providing cows with no access to pasture and sunlight causes a decrease of vitamin D levels in dairy products. This decrease......The number of dairy cows without access to pasture or sunlight is increasing; therefore, the content of vitamin D in dairy products is decreasing. Ultimately, declining vitamin D levels in dairy products will mean that dairy products are a negligible source of natural vitamin D for humans. We...

  7. Micellar aggregates of saponins from Chenopodium quinoa: characterization by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verza, S G; de Resende, P E; Kaiser, S; Quirici, L; Teixeira, H F; Gosmann, G; Ferreira, F; Ortega, G G

    2012-04-01

    Entire seeds of Chenopodium quinoa Willd are a rich protein source and are also well-known for their high saponin content. Due to their amphiphily quinoa saponins are able to form intricate micellar aggregates in aqueous media. In this paper we study the aggregates formed by self-association of these compounds from two quinoa saponin fractions (FQ70 and FQ90) as well as several distinctive nanostructures obtained after their complexation with different ratios of cholesterol (CHOL) and phosphatidylcholine (PC). The FQ70 and FQ90 fractions were obtained by reversed-phase preparative chromatography. The structural features of their resulting aggregates were determined by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Novel nanosized spherical vesicles formed by self-association with mean diameter about 100-200 nm were observed in FQ70 aqueous solutions whereas worm-like micelles an approximate width of 20 nm were detected in FQ90 aqueous solutions. Under experimental conditions similar to those reported for the preparation of Quillaja saponaria ISCOM matrices, tubular and ring-like micelles arose from FQ70:CHOL:PC and FQ90:CHOL:PC formulations, respectively. However, under these conditions no cage-like ISCOM matrices were observed. The saponin composition of FQ70 and FQ90 seems to determine the nanosized structures viewed by TEM. Phytolaccagenic acid, predominant in FQ70 and FQ90 fractions, is accountable for the formation of the nanosized vesicles and tubular structures observed by TEM in the aqueous solutions of both samples. Conversely, ring-like micelles observed in FQ90:CHOL:PC complexes can be attributed to the presence of less polar saponins present in FQ90, in particular those derived from oleanolic acid.

  8. Image-Guided Cryoablation of the Spine in a Swine Model: Clinical, Radiological, and Pathological Findings with Light and Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Ricardo Miguel Costa de, E-mail: ricardomcfreitas@gmail.com; Andrade, Celi Santos, E-mail: celis.andrade@hotmail.com; Caldas, José Guilherme Mendes Pereira, E-mail: jgmpcaldas@uol.com.br [Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology Unit of the Instituto de Radiologia (Brazil); Tsunemi, Miriam Harumi, E-mail: miharumi@gmail.com [Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho, Department of Biostatistics, Biosciences Institute (Brazil); Ferreira, Lorraine Braga, E-mail: lorraine.braga@gmail.com; Arana-Chavez, Victor Elias, E-mail: vearana@usp.br [Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de São Paulo, Department of Oral Pathology (Brazil); Cury, Patrícia Maluf, E-mail: pmcury@hotmail.com [Faculdade de Medicina de São José do Rio Preto, Department of Pathology and Forensic Medicine (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to present the feasibility of an in vivo image-guided percutaneous cryoablation of the porcine vertebral body.MethodsThe institutional animal care committee approved this study. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided vertebral cryoablations (n = 22) were performed in eight pigs with short, 2-min, single or double-freezing protocols. Protective measures to nerves included dioxide carbon (CO{sub 2}) epidural injections and spinal canal temperature monitoring. Clinical, radiological, and pathological data with light (n = 20) or transmission electron (n = 2) microscopic analyses were evaluated after 6 days of clinical follow-up and euthanasia.ResultsCBCT/fluoroscopic-guided transpedicular vertebral body cryoprobe positioning and CO{sub 2} epidural injection were successful in all procedures. No major complications were observed in seven animals (87.5 %, n = 8). A minor complication was observed in one pig (12.5 %, n = 1). Logistic regression model analysis showed the cryoprobe-spinal canal (Cp-Sc) distance as the most efficient parameter to categorize spinal canal temperatures lower than 19 °C (p < 0.004), with a significant Pearson’s correlation test (p < 0.041) between the Cp-Sc distance and the lowest spinal canal temperatures. Ablation zones encompassed pedicles and the posterior wall of the vertebral bodies with an inflammatory rim, although no inflammatory infiltrate was depicted in the surrounding neural structures at light microscopy. Ultrastructural analyses evidenced myelin sheath disruption in some large nerve fibers, although neurological deficits were not observed.ConclusionsCBCT-guided vertebral cryoablation of the porcine spine is feasible under a combination of a short freezing protocol and protective measures to the surrounding nerves. Ultrastructural analyses may be helpful assess the early modifications of the nerve fibers.

  9. Image-Guided Cryoablation of the Spine in a Swine Model: Clinical, Radiological, and Pathological Findings with Light and Electron Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, Ricardo Miguel Costa de; Andrade, Celi Santos; Caldas, José Guilherme Mendes Pereira; Tsunemi, Miriam Harumi; Ferreira, Lorraine Braga; Arana-Chavez, Victor Elias; Cury, Patrícia Maluf

    2015-01-01

    PurposeThis study was designed to present the feasibility of an in vivo image-guided percutaneous cryoablation of the porcine vertebral body.MethodsThe institutional animal care committee approved this study. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided vertebral cryoablations (n = 22) were performed in eight pigs with short, 2-min, single or double-freezing protocols. Protective measures to nerves included dioxide carbon (CO 2 ) epidural injections and spinal canal temperature monitoring. Clinical, radiological, and pathological data with light (n = 20) or transmission electron (n = 2) microscopic analyses were evaluated after 6 days of clinical follow-up and euthanasia.ResultsCBCT/fluoroscopic-guided transpedicular vertebral body cryoprobe positioning and CO 2 epidural injection were successful in all procedures. No major complications were observed in seven animals (87.5 %, n = 8). A minor complication was observed in one pig (12.5 %, n = 1). Logistic regression model analysis showed the cryoprobe-spinal canal (Cp-Sc) distance as the most efficient parameter to categorize spinal canal temperatures lower than 19 °C (p < 0.004), with a significant Pearson’s correlation test (p < 0.041) between the Cp-Sc distance and the lowest spinal canal temperatures. Ablation zones encompassed pedicles and the posterior wall of the vertebral bodies with an inflammatory rim, although no inflammatory infiltrate was depicted in the surrounding neural structures at light microscopy. Ultrastructural analyses evidenced myelin sheath disruption in some large nerve fibers, although neurological deficits were not observed.ConclusionsCBCT-guided vertebral cryoablation of the porcine spine is feasible under a combination of a short freezing protocol and protective measures to the surrounding nerves. Ultrastructural analyses may be helpful assess the early modifications of the nerve fibers

  10. Low-level laser/light therapy for androgenetic alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aditya K; Lyons, Danika C A; Abramovits, William

    2014-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a persistent and pervasive condition that affects men worldwide. Some common treatment options for AGA include hair prosthetics, oral and topical medications, and surgical hair restoration (SHR). Pharmaceutical and SHR treatments are associated with limitations including adverse side effects and significant financial burden. Low-level laser or light (LLL) devices offer alternative treatment options that are not typically associated with adverse side effects or significant costs. There are clinic- and home-based LLL devices. One home-based laser comb device has set a standard for others; however, this device requires time devoted to carefully moving the comb through the hair to allow laser penetration to the scalp. A novel helmet-like LLL device for hair growth has proven effective in preliminary trials and allows for hands-free use. Regardless, there are few clinical trials that have been conducted regarding LLL devices for AGA and results are mixed. Further research is required to establish the true efficacy of these devices for hair growth in comparison to existing alternative therapies.

  11. Amplification without inversion, fast light and optical bistability in a duplicated two-level system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebrahimi Zohravi, Lida; Vafafard, Azar; Mahmoudi, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    The optical properties of a weak probe field in a duplicated two-level system are investigated in multi-photon resonance (MPR) condition and beyond it. It is shown that by changing the relative phase of applied fields, the absorption switches to the amplification without inversion in MPR condition. By applying the Floquet decomposition to the equations of motion beyond MPR condition, it is shown that the phase-dependent behavior is valid only in MPR condition. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the group velocity of light pulse can be controlled by the intensity of the applied fields and the gain-assisted superluminal light propagation (fast light) is obtained in this system. In addition, the optical bistability (OB) behavior of the system is studied beyond MPR condition. We apply an indirect incoherent pumping field to the system and it is found that the group velocity and OB behavior of the system can be controlled by the incoherent pumping rate. - Highlights: • We studied the optical properties of DTL system under MPR condition and beyond it. • By changing the relative phase, the absorption switches to the amplification without inversion in MPR condition. • The gain-assisted superluminal light propagation (fast light) is obtained in this system. • The optical bistability (OB) behavior of the system is studied beyond MPR condition. • The incoherent pumping rate has a major role in controlling the group velocity and OB behavior of the system

  12. Low level light promotes the proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jin-Chul; Rhee, Yun-Hee; Choi, Sun-Hyang; Kim, Dae Yu; Chung, Phil-Sang

    2015-03-01

    Low-level light irradiation (LLLI) reported to stimulate the proliferation or differentiati