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Sample records for light induced tellurium

  1. Tellurium Mobility Through Mine Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsk, M.

    2015-12-01

    Tellurium is a rare metalloid that has received minimal research regarding environmental mobility. Observations of Tellurium mobility are mainly based on observations of related metalloids such as selenium and beryllium; yet little research has been done on specific Tellurium behavior. This laboratory work established the environmental controls that influence Tellurium mobility and chemical speciation in aqueous driven systems. Theoretical simulations show possible mobility of Te as Te(OH)3[+] at highly oxidizing and acidic conditions. Movement as TeO3[2-] under more basic conditions may also be possible in elevated Eh conditions. Mobility in reducing environments is theoretically not as likely. For a practical approach to investigate mobility conditions for Te, a site with known Tellurium content was chosen in Colorado. Composite samples were selected from the top, center and bottom of a tailings pile for elution experiments. These samples were disintegrated using a rock crusher and pulverized with an automated mortar and pestle. The material was then classified to 70 microns. A 10g sample split was digested in concentrated HNO3 and HF and analyzed by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy to determine initial Te concentrations. Additional 10g splits from each location were subjected to elution in 100 mL of each of the following solutions; nitric acid to a pH of 1.0, sulfuric acid to a pH of 2.0, sodium hydroxide to a pH of 12, ammonium hydroxide to a pH of 10, a pine needle/soil tea from material within the vicinity of the collection site to a pH of 3.5 and lastly distilled water to serve as control with a pH of 7. Sulfuric acid was purposefully chosen to simulate acid mine drainage from the decomposition of pyrite within the mine tailings. Sample sub sets were also inundated with 10mL of a 3% hydrogen peroxide solution to induce oxidizing conditions. All collected eluates were then analyzed by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) to measure Tellurium concentrations in

  2. Tellurium-based nanocomposites for plastic electronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomba, M., E-mail: mariano.palomba@cnr.it; Carotenuto, G. [Institute for Polymers, Composites and Biomaterials - National Research Council. Piazzale E. Fermi, 1 - 80055 Portici (Italy); Binetti, S.; Le Donne, A. [Department of Materials Science and Milano-Bicocca Solar Energy Research Center (MIB-SOLAR), University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cozzi 55, 20125 Milano (Italy); Coscia, U. [Department of Physics, University of Naples ’Federico II’, via Cintia - 80126 Napoli (Italy); CNISM, Naples Unit, via Cintia - 80126 Napoli (Italy); Ambrosone, G. [Department of Physics, University of Naples ’Federico II’, via Cintia - 80126 Napoli (Italy); SPIN Institute, National Research Council, via Cintia - 80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2016-05-18

    Owing to the very brittle nature of the tellurium powder, nanoscopic grains with average size of 4.8 nm were produced by dry vibration milling technique using a Mixer mill apparatus. A novel material was obtained by binding the nanosized tellurium grains with poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA). The morphology, elemental composition, and structural properties of Te/PMMA films were investigated. The prepared material was composed of hexagonal tellurium and α-phase of tellurium oxide. The electrical properties of the films were studied in dark condition and under white light illumination varying the optical power density from 10 to 170 mW/cm{sup 2} and turning on and off the light cyclically.

  3. Electrowinning Of Tellurium From Acidic Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalik R.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of electrochemical deposition of tellurium was studied. Preliminary researches embrace the voltammetry and microgravimetric measurements. According to the results the electrolysis of tellurium was conducted under potentiostatic conditions. There was no deposition of tellurium above potential −0.1 vs. Ag/AgCl electrode in 25°C. The process of deposition is observed in the range of potentials −0.1 to −0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The presence of tellurium was confirmed by XRF and XRD. The obtained deposits were homogenous and compact. Below potential −0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl the Faradaic efficiency of the tellurium deposition decreased due to reduction of Te to H2Te and hydrogen evolution.

  4. Tellurium: providing a bright future for solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Tellurium is one of the least common elements on Earth. Most rocks contain an average of about 3 parts per billion tellurium, making it rarer than the rare earth elements and eight times less abundant than gold. Grains of native tellurium appear in rocks as a brittle, silvery-white material, but tellurium more commonly occurs in telluride minerals that include varied quantities of gold, silver, or platinum. Tellurium is a metalloid, meaning it possesses the properties of both metals and nonmetals.

  5. Purification and in vitro antioxidant activities of tellurium-containing phycobiliproteins from tellurium-enriched Spirulina platensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Wong, Ka-Hing; Yang, Yufeng; Li, Xiaoling; Jiang, Jie; Zheng, Wenjie; Wu, Hualian; Chen, Tianfeng

    2014-01-01

    Tellurium-containing phycocyanin (Te-PC) and allophycocyanin (Te-APC), two organic tellurium (Te) species, were purified from tellurium-enriched Spirulina platensis by a fast protein liquid chromatographic method. It was found that the incorporation of Te into the peptides enhanced the antioxidant activities of both phycobiliproteins. With fractionation by ammonium sulfate precipitation and hydroxylapatite chromatography, Te-PC and Te-APC could be effectively separated with high purity, and Te concentrations were 611.1 and 625.3 μg g−1 protein in Te-PC and Te-APC, respectively. The subunits in the proteins were identified by using MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. Te incorporation enhanced the antioxidant activities of both phycobiliproteins, as examined by 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid assay. Moreover, Te-PC and Te-APC showed dose-dependent protection on erythrocytes against the water-soluble free radical initiator 2,2′-azo(2-asmidinopropane)dihydrochloride-induced hemolysis. In the hepatoprotective model, apoptotic cell death and nuclear condensation induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide in HepG2 cells was significantly attenuated by Te-PC and Te-APC. Taken together, these results suggest that Te-PC and Te-APC are promising Te-containing proteins with application potential for treatment of diseases related to oxidative stress. PMID:25336922

  6. Tellurium in active volcanic environments: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Silvia; Calabrese, Sergio; D'Alessandro, Walter; Brusca, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Sergio; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Tellurium is a toxic metalloid and, according to the Goldschmidt classification, a chalcophile element. In the last years its commercial importance has considerably increased because of its wide use in solar cells, thermoelectric and electronic devices of the last generation. Despite such large use, scientific knowledge about volcanogenic tellurium is very poor. Few previous authors report result of tellurium concentrations in volcanic plume, among with other trace metals. They recognize this element as volatile, concluding that volcanic gases and sulfur deposits are usually enriched with tellurium. Here, we present some results on tellurium concentrations in volcanic emissions (plume, fumaroles, ash leachates) and in environmental matrices (soils and plants) affected by volcanic emissions and/or deposition. Samples were collected at Etna and Vulcano (Italy), Turrialba (Costa Rica), Miyakejima, Aso, Asama (Japan), Mutnovsky (Kamchatka) at the crater rims by using common filtration techniques for aerosols (polytetrafluoroethylene filters). Filters were both eluted with Millipore water and acid microwave digested, and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Volcanic ashes emitted during explosive events on Etna and Copahue (Argentina) were analyzed for tellurium bulk composition and after leaching experiments to evaluate the soluble fraction of tellurium. Soils and leaves of vegetation were also sampled close to active volcanic vents (Etna, Vulcano, Nisyros, Nyiragongo, Turrialba, Gorely and Masaya) and investigated for tellurium contents. Preliminary results showed very high enrichments of tellurium in volcanic emissions comparing with other volatile elements like mercury, arsenic, thallium and bismuth. This suggests a primary transport in the volatile phase, probably in gaseous form (as also suggested by recent studies) and/or as soluble salts (halides and/or sulfates) adsorbed on the surface of particulate particles and ashes. First

  7. Tellurium: a maverick among the chalcogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, Tristram; Laitinen, Risto S

    2015-04-07

    The scant attention paid to tellurium in both inorganic and organic chemistry textbooks may reflect, in part, the very low natural abundance of the element. Such treatments commonly imply that the structures and reactivities of tellurium compounds can be extrapolated from the behaviour of their lighter chalcogen analogues (sulfur and selenium). In fact, recent findings and well-established observations clearly illustrate that this assumption is not valid. The emerging importance of the unique properties of tellurium compounds is apparent from the variety of their known and potential applications in both inorganic and organic chemistry, as well as materials science. With reference to selected contemporary examples, this Tutorial Review examines the fundamental concepts that are essential for an understanding of the unique features of tellurium chemistry with an emphasis on hypervalency, three-centre bonding, secondary bonding interactions, σ and π-bond energies (multiply bonded compounds), and Lewis acid behaviour.

  8. Auger recombination via defects in tellurium. [Te

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazur, Yu.I.; Rubo, Yu.G.; Snitko, O.V.; Strikha, M.V. (Inst. of Semiconductors, Academy of Sciences of the Ukrainian SSR, Kiev (Ukrainian SSR))

    1990-12-01

    Auger process including a bound electron and two free holes proved to be the dominant recombination path in tellurium at low temperatures (T < 50 K). The experimental value of the Auger constant is C = 1.6x10{sup -28} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1}. The theoretical model considering the tellurium band structure explains the experimental data qualitatively and gives an order of magnitude value for the lifetimes of excess carriers. (orig.).

  9. Mutations induced by ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifer, Gerd P. [Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States)]. E-mail: gpfeifer@coh.org; You, Young-Hyun [Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States); Besaratinia, Ahmad [Department of Biology, Beckman Research Institute, City of Hope, Duarte, CA 91010 (United States)

    2005-04-01

    The different ultraviolet (UV) wavelength components, UVA (320-400 nm), UVB (280-320 nm), and UVC (200-280 nm), have distinct mutagenic properties. A hallmark of UVC and UVB mutagenesis is the high frequency of transition mutations at dipyrimidine sequences containing cytosine. In human skin cancers, about 35% of all mutations in the p53 gene are transitions at dipyrimidines within the sequence 5'-TCG and 5'-CCG, and these are localized at several mutational hotspots. Since 5'-CG sequences are methylated along the p53 coding sequence in human cells, these mutations may be derived from sunlight-induced pyrimidine dimers forming at sequences that contain 5-methylcytosine. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) form preferentially at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine when cells are irradiated with UVB or sunlight. In order to define the contribution of 5-methylcytosine to sunlight-induced mutations, the lacI and cII transgenes in mouse fibroblasts were used as mutational targets. After 254 nm UVC irradiation, only 6-9% of the base substitutions were at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine. However, 24-32% of the solar light-induced mutations were at dipyrimidines that contain 5-methylcytosine and most of these mutations were transitions. Thus, CPDs forming preferentially at dipyrimidines with 5-methylcytosine are responsible for a considerable fraction of the mutations induced by sunlight in mammalian cells. Using mouse cell lines harboring photoproduct-specific photolyases and mutational reporter genes, we showed that CPDs (rather than 6-4 photoproducts or other lesions) are responsible for the great majority of UVB-induced mutations. An important component of UVB mutagenesis is the deamination of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine within CPDs. The mutational specificity of long-wave UVA (340-400 nm) is distinct from that of the shorter wavelength UV and is characterized mainly by G to T transversions presumably arising through mechanisms

  10. Green light induces shade avoidance symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Maruhnich, Stefanie A; Folta, Kevin M

    2011-11-01

    Light quality and quantity affect plant adaptation to changing light conditions. Certain wavelengths in the visible and near-visible spectrum are known to have discrete effects on plant growth and development, and the effects of red, far-red, blue, and ultraviolet light have been well described. In this report, an effect of green light on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) rosette architecture is demonstrated using a narrow-bandwidth light-emitting diode-based lighting system. When green light was added to a background of constant red and blue light, plants exhibited elongation of petioles and upward leaf reorientation, symptoms consistent with those observed in a shaded light environment. The same green light-induced phenotypes were also observed in phytochrome (phy) and cryptochrome (cry) mutant backgrounds. To explore the molecular mechanism underlying the green light-induced response, the accumulation of shade-induced transcripts was measured in response to enriched green light environments. Transcripts that have been demonstrated to increase in abundance under far-red-induced shade avoidance conditions either decrease or exhibit no change when green light is added. However, normal far-red light-associated transcript accumulation patterns are observed in cryptochrome mutants grown with supplemental green light, indicating that the green-absorbing form of cryptochrome is the photoreceptor active in limiting the green light induction of shade-associated transcripts. These results indicate that shade symptoms can be induced by the addition of green light and that cryptochrome receptors and an unknown light sensor participate in acclimation to the enriched green environment.

  11. UV Light Induces Dedoping of Polyaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Kaitsuka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available UV (Ultra-Violet light-driven change in optical absorption of polyaniline (PANI is reported. Irradiation of UV light to PANI/camphor sulfonic acid prepared by electrochemical polymerization allows dedoping of the PANI. Especially, UV light irradiation in the presence of a radical trap agent effectively reduces (dedoping the PANI. The result in this study is quite simple; however, this may be a first report for light-induced dedoping (color change of a conductive polymer.

  12. Electric field fluctuations in liquid tellurium alloys a hint to bond character

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulick, C.A.; Brinkmann, R.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; von Hartrott, M.; Kiehl, M.; Maxim, P.; Quitmann, D.

    1985-01-01

    Atomic scale electric field fluctuations in liquid tellurium alloys are detected as they induce nuclear spin relaxation rate RQ in noble gas impurity atoms, via quadrupolar interaction. Results for Xe in liquid Ag, Ga, In, Tl, Ge, Sn---Te alloys are discussed, assuming that bonding in these alloys

  13. Light-induced olefin metathesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Vidavsky

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Light activation is a most desirable property for catalysis control. Among the many catalytic processes that may be activated by light, olefin metathesis stands out as both academically motivating and practically useful. Starting from early tungsten heterogeneous photoinitiated metathesis, up to modern ruthenium methods based on complex photoisomerisation or indirect photoactivation, this survey of the relevant literature summarises past and present developments in the use of light to expedite olefin ring-closing, ring-opening polymerisation and cross-metathesis reactions.

  14. Light-induced olefin metathesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidavsky, Yuval

    2010-01-01

    Summary Light activation is a most desirable property for catalysis control. Among the many catalytic processes that may be activated by light, olefin metathesis stands out as both academically motivating and practically useful. Starting from early tungsten heterogeneous photoinitiated metathesis, up to modern ruthenium methods based on complex photoisomerisation or indirect photoactivation, this survey of the relevant literature summarises past and present developments in the use of light to expedite olefin ring-closing, ring-opening polymerisation and cross-metathesis reactions. PMID:21160912

  15. Laser induced white lighting of graphene foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strek, Wieslaw; Tomala, Robert; Lukaszewicz, Mikolaj; Cichy, Bartlomiej; Gerasymchuk, Yuriy; Gluchowski, Pawel; Marciniak, Lukasz; Bednarkiewicz, Artur; Hreniak, Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Laser induced white light emission was observed from porous graphene foam irradiated with a focused continuous wave beam of the infrared laser diode. It was found that the intensity of the emission increases exponentially with increasing laser power density, having a saturation level at ca. 1.5 W and being characterized by stable emission conditions. It was also observed that the white light emission is spatially confined to the focal point dimensions of the illuminating laser light. Several other features of the laser induced white light emission were also discussed. It was observed that the white light emission is highly dependent on the electric field intensity, allowing one to modulate the emission intensity. The electric field intensity ca. 0.5 V/μm was able to decrease the white light intensity by half. Origins of the laser-induced white light emission along with its characteristic features were discussed in terms of avalanche multiphoton ionization, inter-valence charge transfer and possible plasma build-up processes. It is shown that the laser-induced white light emission may be well utilized in new types of white light sources.

  16. Laser induced white lighting of graphene foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strek, Wieslaw; Tomala, Robert; Lukaszewicz, Mikolaj; Cichy, Bartlomiej; Gerasymchuk, Yuriy; Gluchowski, Pawel; Marciniak, Lukasz; Bednarkiewicz, Artur; Hreniak, Dariusz

    2017-01-01

    Laser induced white light emission was observed from porous graphene foam irradiated with a focused continuous wave beam of the infrared laser diode. It was found that the intensity of the emission increases exponentially with increasing laser power density, having a saturation level at ca. 1.5 W and being characterized by stable emission conditions. It was also observed that the white light emission is spatially confined to the focal point dimensions of the illuminating laser light. Several other features of the laser induced white light emission were also discussed. It was observed that the white light emission is highly dependent on the electric field intensity, allowing one to modulate the emission intensity. The electric field intensity ca. 0.5 V/μm was able to decrease the white light intensity by half. Origins of the laser-induced white light emission along with its characteristic features were discussed in terms of avalanche multiphoton ionization, inter-valence charge transfer and possible plasma build-up processes. It is shown that the laser-induced white light emission may be well utilized in new types of white light sources. PMID:28112254

  17. Dimensionality constraints of light induced rotation

    CERN Document Server

    Oroszi, László; Galajda, Péter; Kelemen, Lóránd; Mathesz, Anna; Vicsek, Tamás; Vizsnyiczai, Gaszton; Ormos, Pál

    2015-01-01

    We have studied the conditions of rotation induced by collimated light carrying no angular momentum. Objects of different shapes and optical properties were examined in the nontrivial case where the rotation axis is perpendicular to the direction of light propagation. This geometry offers important advantages for application as it fundamentally broadens the possible practical arrangements to be realised. We found that collimated light cannot drive permanent rotation of 2D or prism-like 3D objects (i.e. fixed cross-sectional profile along the rotation axis) in the case of fully reflective or fully transparent materials. Based on both geometrical optics simulations and theoretical analysis, we derived a general condition for rotation induced by collimated light carrying no angular momentum valid for any arrangement: Permanent rotation is not possible if the scattering interaction is two-dimensional and lossless. In contrast, light induced rotation can be sustained if partial absorption is present or the object ...

  18. Tellurium purification: various techniques and limitations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D S Prasad; Ch Sudheer; N R Munirathnam; T L Prakash

    2002-11-01

    Limitations and techniques to purify tellurium metal especially using non-chemical techniques such as vacuum distillation and zone refining are discussed. It was found that the clean environments, design, handling and cleaning of quartz ware are equally important in achieving the desired purity levels.

  19. Broadband Visible Light Induced NO Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubart, Rachel; Eichler, Maor; Friedmann, Harry; Savion, N.; Breitbart, Haim; Ankri, Rinat

    2009-06-01

    Nitric oxide formation is a potential mechanism for photobiomodulation because it is synthesized in cells by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), which contains both flavin and heme, and thus absorbs visible light. The purpose of this work was to study broadband visible light induced NO formation in various cells. Cardiac, endothelial, sperm cells and RAW 264.7 macrophages were illuminated with broadband visible light, 40-130 mW/cm2, 2.4-39 J/cm2, and nitric oxide production was quantified by using the Griess reagent. The results showed that visible light illumination increased NO concentration both in sperm and endothelial cells, but not in cardiac cells. Activation of RAW 264.7 macrophages was very small. It thus appears that NO is involved in photobiomodulation, though different light parameters and illumination protocols are needed to induce NO in various cells.

  20. First-principles models of equilibrium tellurium isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghnegahdar, M. A.; Schauble, E. A.; Fornadel, A. P.; Spry, P. G.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, equilibrium mass-dependent isotopic fractionation among representative Te-bearing species is estimated with first-principles thermodynamic calculations. Tellurium is a group 16 element (along with O, S, and Se) with eight stable isotopes ranging in mass from 120Te to 130Te, and six commonly-occurring oxidation states: -II, -I, 0, +II, +IV, and +VI. In its reduced form, Te(-II), tellurium has a unique crystal-chemical role as a bond partner for gold and silver in epithermal and orogenic gold deposits, which likely form when oxidized Te species (e.g., H2TeO3, TeO32-) or perhaps polytellurides (e.g., Te22-) interact with precious metals in hydrothermal solution. Te(IV) is the most common oxidation state at the Earth's surface, including surface outcrops of telluride ore deposits, where tellurite and tellurate minerals form by oxidation. In the ocean, dissolved tellurium tends to be scavenged by particulate matter. Te(VI) is more abundant than Te(IV) in the ocean water (1), even though it is thought to be less stable thermodynamically. This variety of valence states in natural systems and range of isotopic masses suggest that tellurium could exhibit geochemically useful isotope abundance variations. Tellurium isotope fractionations were determined for representative molecules and crystals of varying complexity and chemistry. Gas-phase calculations are combined with supermolecular cluster models of aqueous and solid species. These in turn are compared with plane-wave density functional theory calculations with periodic boundary conditions. In general, heavyTe/lightTe is predicted to be higher for more oxidized species, and lower for reduced species, with 130Te/125Te fractionations as large as 4‰ at 100οC between coexisting Te(IV) and Te(-II) or Te(0) compounds. This is a much larger fractionation than has been observed in naturally occurring redox pairs (i.e., Te (0) vs. Te(IV) species) so far, suggesting that disequilibrium processes may control

  1. Thermo EMF and Hall effect behaviour of thin films of antimony-tellurium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhiren Singh, N. (Dept. of Physics, Manipur Univ., Imphal (India)); Sarma, H.N.K. (Dept. of Physics, Manipur Univ., Imphal (India))

    1994-04-16

    This note presents the results of measurements of thermo emf and Hall effect of Sb[sub 40]Te[sub 60] alloy thin films. The alloy was prepared by taking a stoichiometric mixture (2:3) of high purity elements antimony and tellurium each of purity 99.999 (Koch-Light Laboratories Ltd., England) in a vacuum sealed quartz tube and heating in a furnace to a temperature of about 1070 K for 12 h. (orig.)

  2. Behavior of tellurium on silicon (100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, S. A.; Nogami, J.; Quate, C. F.; Pianetta, P.

    1994-12-01

    The adsorption of tellurium on Si(100) was investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and LEED. Tellurium was evaporated onto the clean silicon (100)2 × 1 surface at ≈ 25°C. Coverages ranging from 0.1 to 3.0 ML were investigated. Atom-resolved images reveal that low coverages of Te deposited at room temperature adsorb on top of the silicon 2 × 1 dimer rows with a minimum spacing of 2 a where a = 3.84 Å is the width of a 1 × 1 surface unit cell. There is a slight preference for growth along the silicon dimer rows. This surface saturates at 0.25 ML. When the low coverage sample is subsequently annealed for 10 min at 300°C, trenches perpendicular to the silicon dimer rows appear with tellurium decorating the trench edge. At ⩾ 1 ML Te coverage, the surface consists of rows of Te with a spacing of a with missing rows of atoms at a maximum interval of 5-6 rows.

  3. Magnetic routing of light-induced waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izdebskaya, Yana; Shvedov, Vladlen; Assanto, Gaetano; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2017-01-01

    Among photofunctional materials that can be employed to control the propagation of light by modifying their properties, soft dielectrics such as nematic liquid crystals (NLCs) stand out for their large all-optical response. Through reorientation, the molecular distribution of NLCs can be modified by the electric field of light, permitting functional operations and supporting self-localized light beams or spatial optical solitons. To date, the generation and routing of such solitons have been limited by the boundary conditions employed to tailor the properties of NLCs in planar cells or capillaries. Here we report on spatial solitons in bulk NLCs with no lateral anchoring, where the application of an external magnetic field effectively controls the direction of propagation and the angular steering of the self-trapped wavepackets. Our results entail a completely new approach to the routing of self-localized beams and light-induced waveguides in three dimensions, without the usual limitations imposed by transverse boundary conditions. PMID:28198374

  4. Strong nonlinear photonic responses from microbiologically synthesized tellurium nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, K.-S.; Wang, Jingyuan; Dias, S.; Dewald, J.; Alley, N.J.; Baesman, S.M.; Oremland, R.S.; Blau, W.J.; Curran, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    A new class of nanomaterials, namely microbiologically-formed nanorods composed of elemental tellurium [Te(0)] that forms unusual nanocomposites when combined with poly(m-phenylenevinylene-co-2,5-dioctoxy-phenylenevinylene) (PmPV) is described. These bio-nanocomposites exhibit excellent broadband optical limiting at 532 and 1064 nm. Nonlinear scattering, originating from the laser induced solvent bubbles and microplasmas, is responsible for this nonlinear behavior. The use of bacterially-formed Te(0) when combined with an organic chemical host (e.g., PmPV) is a new green method of nanoparticle syntheses. This opens the possibilities of using unique, biologically synthesized materials to advance future nanoelectronic and nanophotonic applications. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Visible-Light-Induced Click Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Jan O; Schmidt, Friedrich G; Blinco, James P; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2015-08-24

    A rapid and catalyst-free cycloaddition system for visible-light-induced click chemistry is reported. A readily accessible photoreactive 2H-azirine moiety was designed to absorb light at wavelengths above 400 nm. Irradiation with low-energy light sources thus enables efficient small-molecule synthesis with a diverse range of multiple-bond-containing compounds. Moreover, in order to demonstrate the efficiency of the current approach, quantitative ligation of the photoactivatable chromophore with functional polymeric substrates was performed and full conversion with irradiation times of only 1 min at ambient conditions was achieved. The current report thus presents a highly efficient method for applications involving selective cycloaddition to electron-deficient multiple-bond-containing materials.

  6. Light-shift-induced photonic nonlinearities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, F G S L; Hartmann, M J; Plenio, M B [Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Imperial College London, 53 Exhibition Road, SW7 2PE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: fernando@brandao@imperial.ac.uk

    2008-04-15

    We propose a new method to produce self- and cross-Kerr photonic nonlinearities, using light-induced Stark shifts due to the interaction of a cavity mode with atoms. The proposed experimental set-up is simpler than in previous approaches, while the strength of the nonlinearity obtained with a single atom is the same as in the setting based on electromagnetically induced transparency. Furthermore our scheme can be applied to engineer effective photonic nonlinear interactions whose strength increases with the number of atoms coupled to the cavity mode, leading to photon-photon interactions several orders of magnitude larger than previously considered possible.

  7. Isomeric and ground state energy level measurements of natural tellurium isotopes via (γ,n) reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamkas, M.; Akcali, O.; Durusoy, A.

    2015-04-01

    We have planned to measure isomeric and ground state energy levels in 120Te(γ,n)119m,gTe, 122Te(γ,n)121m,gTe, 128Te(γ,n)127m,gTe, 130Te(γ,n)129m,gTe photonuclear reactions of natural tellurium induced by bremsstrahlung photons with end-point energy at 18 MeV. The sample was irradiated in the clinical linear electron accelerator (Philips SLi-25) at Akdeniz University Hospital. The gamma spectrum of the tellurium sample was measured using HP(Ge) semiconductor detector (ORTEC) and multi channel analyzer. We used both MAESTRO (ORTEC) and home made root based gui program (Theia) for data analyzing. The obtained experimental data values are compared with NUDAT energy values.

  8. Extreme Enrichment of Tellurium in Deep-Sea Sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yanhe; WANG Yimin; SONG Hebin; YUE Guoliang

    2005-01-01

    Tellurium is a sort of scattered rare element on the earth.Its concentration is very low in earth's crust,only 1.0 ng/g.However,it has extremely high abundance in Co-rich crusts,marine polymetallic nodules,deep-sea sediments and aerolites.To find out the origin of tellurium enrichment in deep-sea sediments,we analyzed and compared tellurium concentrations and helium isotope compositions in the magnetic parts and those in the bulk parts of deep-sea sediments.The result indicates that the helium content,3He/4He ratio and tellurium concentration are obviously higher in the magnetic parts than those in the bulk parts.The 3He abundance varies synchronously with the tellurium concentration.3He and Te have a distinct positive correlation with each other.It is the first time that the paper brings forward that the extreme enrichment of tellurium in deep-sea sediments,like helium isotope anomalies,probably results from the input of interplanetary dust particles (IDPs).Similarly,the extreme enrichment of tellurium in marine polymetallic nodules and Co-rich crusts is possibly related to IDPs.

  9. Analysis of tellurium thin films electrodeposition from acidic citric bath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalik, Remigiusz; Kutyła, Dawid; Mech, Krzysztof; Żabiński, Piotr

    2016-12-01

    This work presents the description of the electrochemical process of formation thin tellurium layers from citrate acidic solution. The suggested methodology consists in the preparation of stable acidic baths with high content of tellurium, and with the addition of citrate acid. In order to analyse the mechanism of the process of tellurium deposition, the electroanalytical tests were conducted. The tests of cyclic voltammetry and hydrodynamic ones were performed with the use of polycrystalline gold disk electrode. The range of potentials in which deposition of tellurium in direct four-electron process is possible was determined as well as the reduction of deposited Te° to Te2- and its re-deposition as a result of the comproportionation reaction. On the basis of the obtained results, the deposition of tellurium was conducted by the potentiostatic method. The influence of a deposition potential and a concentration of TeO2 in the solution on the rate of tellurium coatings deposition was examined. The presence of tellurium was confirmed by X-ray spectrofluorometry and electron probe microanalysis. In order to determine the phase composition and the morphology, the obtained coatings were analysed with the use of x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

  10. Isorefractive high internal phase emulsion organogels for light induced reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Guo, Qipeng

    2016-03-25

    Isorefractive high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) organogels have been fabricated and investigated for light induced reactions. High transparency facilitates both the UV and visible light induced reactions within HIPE organogels. Transparent HIPE organogels are advantageous for light induced polymerizations, accelerating such polymerizations and enabling the preparation of large polyHIPE monoliths.

  11. Electron Ionization Mass Spectrum of Tellurium Hexafluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Richard A.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Peterson, James M.; Govind, Niranjan; Andersen, Amity; Abrecht, David G.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Ballou, Nathan E.

    2015-05-18

    The first electron ionization mass spectrum of tellurium hexafluoride (TeF6) is reported. The starting material was produced by direct fluorination of Te metal or TeO2 with nitrogen trifluoride. Formation of TeF6 was confirmed through cryogenic capture of the tellurium fluorination product and analysis through Raman spectroscopy. The eight natural abundance isotopes were observed for each of the set of fragment ions: TeF5+, TeF4+ TeF3+, TeF2+, TeF1+, and Te+, Te2+. A trend in increasing abundance was observed for the even fluoride bearing ions: TeF1+ < TeF3+ < TeF5+, and a decreasing abundance was observed for the even fragment series: Te(0)+ > TeF2+ > TeF4+ > TeF6+, with the molecular ion TeF6+ not observed at all. Density functional theory based electronic structure calculations were used to calculate optimized ground state geometries of these gas phase species and their relative stabilities explain the trends in the data and the lack of observed signal for TeF6+.

  12. Electron ionization mass spectrum of tellurium hexafluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Richard A; McNamara, Bruce K; Barinaga, Charles J; Peterson, James M; Govind, Niranjan; Andersen, Amity; Abrecht, David G; Schwantes, Jon M; Ballou, Nathan E

    2015-05-18

    The electron ionization mass spectrum of tellurium hexafluoride (TeF6) is reported for the first time. The starting material was produced by direct fluorination of Te metal or TeO2 with nitrogen trifluoride. Formation of TeF6 was confirmed through cryogenic capture of the tellurium fluorination product and analysis through Raman spectroscopy. The eight natural abundance isotopes were observed for each of the set of fragment ions: TeF5(+), TeF4(+) TeF3(+), TeF2(+), TeF1(+), and Te(+), Te2(+). A trend in increasing abundance was observed for the odd fluoride bearing ions, TeF1(+) TeF2(+) > TeF4(+) > TeF6(+), with the molecular ion TeF6(+) not observed at all. Density functional theory based electronic structure calculations were used to calculate optimized ground state geometries of these gas phase species, and their relative stabilities explain the trends in the data and the lack of observed signal for TeF6(+).

  13. Light propagation in optically induced Fibonacci lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Boguslawski, Martin; Timotijevic, Dejan V; Denz, Cornelia; Savic, Dragana M Jovic

    2015-01-01

    We report on the optical induction of Fibonacci lattices in photorefractive strontium barium niobate by use of Bessel beam waveguide-wise writing techniques. Fibonacci elements A and B are used as lattice periods. We further use the induced structures to execute probing experiments with variously focused Gaussian beams in order to observe light confinement owing to the quasiperiodic character of Fibonacci word sequences. Essentially, we show that Gaussian beam expansion is just slowed down in Fibonacci lattices, as compared with appropriate periodic lattices.

  14. Inclusion free cadmium zinc tellurium and cadmium tellurium crystals and associated growth method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, Aleskey E.; James, Ralph B.

    2010-07-20

    The present disclosure provides systems and methods for crystal growth of cadmium zinc tellurium (CZT) and cadmium tellurium (CdTe) crystals with an inverted growth reactor chamber. The inverted growth reactor chamber enables growth of single, large, high purity CZT and CdTe crystals that can be used, for example, in X-ray and gamma detection, substrates for infrared detectors, or the like. The inverted growth reactor chamber enables reductions in the presence of Te inclusions, which are recognized as an important limiting factor in using CZT or CdTe as radiation detectors. The inverted growth reactor chamber can be utilized with existing crystal growth techniques such as the Bridgman crystal growth mechanism and the like. In an exemplary embodiment, the inverted growth reactor chamber is a U-shaped ampoule.

  15. Peroxide coordination of tellurium in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhaylov, Alexey A.; Medvedev, Alexander G. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); The Casali Center of Applied Chemistry, The Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel); Churakov, Andrei V.; Grishanov, Dmitry A.; Prikhodchenko, Petr V. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lev, Ovadia [The Casali Center of Applied Chemistry, The Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2016-02-15

    Tellurium-peroxo complexes in aqueous solutions have never been reported. In this work, ammonium peroxotellurates (NH{sub 4}){sub 4}Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O)O{sub 4}(OH){sub 2} (1) and (NH{sub 4}){sub 5}Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O)O{sub 5}(OH).1.28 H{sub 2}O.0.72 H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (2) were isolated from 5 % hydrogen peroxide aqueous solutions of ammonium tellurate and characterized by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction analysis, by Raman spectroscopy and thermal analysis. The crystal structure of 1 comprises ammonium cations and a symmetric binuclear peroxotellurate anion [Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O)O{sub 4}(OH){sub 2}]{sup 4-}. The structure of 2 consists of an unsymmetrical [Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O)O{sub 5}(OH)]{sup 5-} anion, ammonium cations, hydrogen peroxide, and water. Peroxotellurate anions in both 1 and 2 contain a binuclear Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O) fragment with one μ-oxo- and two μ-peroxo bridging groups. {sup 125}Te NMR spectroscopic analysis shows that the peroxo bridged bitellurate anions are the dominant species in solution, with 3-40 %wt H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and for pH values above 9. DFT calculations of the peroxotellurate anion confirm its higher thermodynamic stability compared with those of the oxotellurate analogues. This is the first direct evidence for tellurium-peroxide coordination in any aqueous system and the first report of inorganic tellurium-peroxo complexes. General features common to all reported p-block element peroxides could be discerned by the characterization of aqueous and crystalline peroxotellurates. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Chemical state of tellurium in a degraded LWR core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imoto, S.; Tanabe, T.

    1988-06-01

    Changes of the chemical state of tellurium in the heatup stage of a severe fuel damage accident are estimated thermodynamically. According to equilibrium calculations with the SOLGASMIX-PV code, tellurium exists as cesium telluride, as the element or possibly as PdTe during normal operation. In the heatup stage of an accident, elemental tellurium is absorbed in the Zircaloy cladding by formation of ZrTe x ( x = 1-2). Cesium telluride does not react with Zr even under the low oxygen potentials favoring the {Zr}/{UO 2} reaction. Tellurium is also absorbed in oxygen-stabilized alpha-zirconium. The stability of Cs 2Te in the steam/hydrogen atmosphere is discussed.

  17. High purity tellurium production using dry refining processes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N R Munirathnam; D S Prasad; J V Rao; T L Prakash

    2005-07-01

    Tellurium (99.95 at.% purity) is purified using dry processes such as selective vapourization and zone melting in a thoroughly etched and cleaned quartz boat, under continuous flow of hydrogen (H2) gas. The tellurium ingot was quadruple zone refined (QZR) under continuous flow of H2 gas. Thus, the purified tellurium of ultra high purity (UHP) grade is analysed for 60 impurity elements in the periodic table using glow discharge mass spectrometer (GDMS). The sum of all elemental impurities indicate that the purity of tellurium as 7N (99.99999 at.%). The total content of gas and gas forming impurities like O, N and C are found to be within acceptable limits for opto-electronic applications.

  18. Thermal neutron capture cross sections of tellurium isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomandl, I.; Honzátko, J.; von Egidy, T.; Wirth, H.-F.; Belgya, T.; Lakatos, M.; Szentmiklósi, L.; Révay, Zs.; Molnár, G. L.; Firestone, R. B.; Bondarenko, V.

    2003-12-01

    New values for thermal neutron capture cross sections of the tellurium isotopes 122 Te , 124 Te , 125 Te , 126 Te , 128 Te , and 130 Te are reported. These values are based on a combination of newly determined partial γ -ray cross sections obtained from experiments on targets contained natural Te and γ intensities per capture of individual Te isotopes. Isomeric ratios for the thermal neutron capture on the even tellurium isotopes are also given.

  19. Thermal neutron capture cross sections of tellurium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomandl, I.; Honzatko, J.; von Egidy, T.; Wirth, H.-F.; Belgya, T.; Lakatos, M.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Revay, Zs.; Molnar, G.L.; Firestone, R.B.; Bondarenko, V.

    2004-03-01

    New values for thermal neutron capture cross sections of the tellurium isotopes 122Te, 124Te, 125Te, 126Te, 128Te, and 130Te are reported. These values are based on a combination of newly determined partial g-ray cross sections obtained from experiments on targets contained natural Te and gamma intensities per capture of individual Te isotopes. Isomeric ratios for the thermal neutron capture on the even tellurium isotopes are also given.

  20. Tellurium halide IR fibers for remote spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xhang H.; Ma, Hong Li; Blanchetiere, Chantal; Le Foulgoc, Karine; Lucas, Jacques; Heuze, Jean; Colardelle, P.; Froissard, P.; Picque, D.; Corrieu, G.

    1994-07-01

    The new family of IR transmitting glasses, the TeX glasses, based on the association of tellurium and halide (Cl, Br, or I) are characterized by a wide optical window extending from 2 to 18 micrometers and a strong stability towards devitrification. Optical fibers drawn from these glasses exhibit low losses in the 7 - 10 micrometers range (less than 1 dB/m for single index fibers, 1 - 2 dB/m for fibers having a core-clad structure). The TeX glass fibers have been used in a remote analysis set-up which is mainly composed of a FTIR spectrometer coupled with a HgCdTe detector. This prototype system permits qualitative and quantitative analysis in a wide wavelength region lying from 3 to 13 micrometers , covering the fundamental absorption of more organic species. The evolution of a lactic and an alcoholic fermentation has been monitored by means of this set-up.

  1. Isolatable organophosphorus(III)-tellurium heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordheider, Andreas; Chivers, Tristram; Schön, Oliver; Karaghiosoff, Konstantin; Athukorala Arachchige, Kasun S; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; Woollins, J Derek

    2014-01-13

    A new structural arrangement Te3 (RP(III) )3 and the first crystal structures of organophosphorus(III)-tellurium heterocycles are presented. The heterocycles can be stabilized and structurally characterized by the appropriate choice of substituents in Tem (P(III) R)n (m=1: n=2, R=OMes* (Mes*=supermesityl or 2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenyl); n=3, R=adamantyl (Ad); n=4, R=ferrocene (Fc); m=n=3: R=trityl (Trt), Mesor by the installation of a P(V) 2 N2 anchor in RP(III) [TeP(V) (tBuN)(μ-NtBu)]2 (R=Ad, tBu).

  2. Tellurium quantum dots: Preparation and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chaoyu; Li, Xueming; Tang, Libin; Lai, Sin Ki; Rogée, Lukas; Teng, Kar Seng; Qian, Fuli; Zhou, Liangliang; Lau, Shu Ping

    2017-08-01

    Herein, we report an effective and simple method for producing Tellurium Quantum dots (TeQDs), zero-dimensional nanomaterials with great prospects for biomedical applications. Their preparation is based on the ultrasonic exfoliation of Te powder dispersed in 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone. Sonication causes the van der Waals forces between the structural hexagons of Te to break so that the relatively coarse powder breaks down into nanoscale particles. The TeQDs have an average size of about 4 nm. UV-Vis absorption spectra of the TeQDs showed an absorption peak at 288 nm. Photoluminescence excitation (PLE) and photoluminescence (PL) are used to study the optical properties of TeQDs. Both the PLE and PL peaks revealed a linear relationship against the emission and excitation energies, respectively. TeQDs have important potential applications in biological imaging and catalysis as well as optoelectronics.

  3. Light-induced melatonin suppression at night after exposure to different wavelength composition of morning light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaki, Tomoaki; Kubokawa, Ayaka; Taketomi, Ryunosuke; Hatae, Keisuke

    2016-03-11

    Bright nocturnal light has been shown to suppress melatonin secretion. However, bright light exposure during the day might reduce light-induced melatonin suppression at night. The human circadian system is sensitive to short wavelength light. This study evaluated the preventive effect of different wavelengths of daytime light on light-induced melatonin suppression at night. Twelve male subjects were exposed to various light conditions (dim, white, and bluish white light) between the hours of 09:00 and 10:30 (daytime light conditions). They were then exposed to light (300lx) again between 01:00 and 02:30 (night-time light exposure). Subjects provided saliva samples before (00:55) and after night-time light exposure (02:30). A two-tailed paired t-test yielded significant decrements in melatonin concentrations after night-time light exposure under daytime dim and white light conditions. No significant differences were found in melatonin concentrations between pre- and post-night-time light exposure with bluish-white light. Present findings suggest that daytime blue light exposure has an acute preventive impact on light-induced melatonin suppression in individuals with a general life rhythm (sleep/wake schedule). These findings may be useful for implementing artificial light environments for humans in, for example, hospitals and underground shopping malls to reduce health risks.

  4. Light-Induced Dielectrophoretic Manipulation of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeb, Marco; Rädler, Joachim O.; Klein, Stefan; Stutzmann, Martin; Brandt, Martin S.

    2007-01-01

    Light-induced dielectrophoretic movement of polystyrene beads and λ-DNA is studied using thin films of amorphous hydrogenated silicon as local photoaddressable electrodes with a diameter of 4 μm. Positive (high-field seeking) dielectrophoretic movement is observed for both types of objects. The absence of strong negative (low-field seeking) dielectrophoresis of DNA at high frequencies is in agreement with the similarity of the dielectric constants of DNA and water, the real part of the dielectric function. The corresponding imaginary part of the dielectric function governed by the conductivity of DNA can be determined from a comparison of the frequency dependence of the dielectrophoretic drift velocity with the Clausius-Mossotti relation. PMID:17483160

  5. A simple method for the deposition of nanostructured tellurium synthesized in ammonia solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Gutiérrez-Lazos

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this work, we report a highly adherent, and uniform deposition of nanostructured tellurium. The deposition of the nanostructured tellurium was realized by the dripping of a modified solution of NaHTe based on the dissolution of NaBH4 and tellurium powder in an aqueous solution of NH4OH. This method allowed the relatively simple manipulation of tellurium nanostructures under laboratory ambient, without requiring the use of organic stabilizers. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM was realized on a powder sample obtained by the reaction between H2Te and aqueous solution of NH4OH. TEM analysis indicated that tellurium nanorods and Y-type nanostructures are grown from tellurium nanoparticles, such as in a hydrothermal system. Then, the nanoparticles serve as seeds for the growth of more extended tellurium nanostructures. Electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction analysis showed that depositions have the hexagonal structure of tellurium highly oriented on (101 direction.

  6. Tellurium-Containing Conjugated Materials for Solar Cells: From Sulfur to Tellurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park Y. S.; Kale, T.; Wu, Q.; Ocko, B.M.; Black, C.T., Grubbs, R.B.

    2013-04-03

    A series of diketopyrrolopyrrole(DPP)-based small molecules have been synthesized by palladium-catalyzed coupling reactions. Electron-donating moieties (benzothiophene, benzoselenophene, and benzotellurophene) are bridged by an electron-withdrawing DPP unit to generate donor-acceptor-donor (D-A-D) type molecules. We observe red-shifts in absorption spectra of these compounds by varying heteroatoms from sulfur to tellurium. In bulk heterojunction solar cells with [6,6]phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) as acceptor, we obtain power conversion efficiencies of 2.4% (benzothiophene), 4.1% (benzoselenophene), and 3.0% (benzotellurophene), respectively.

  7. Thick tellurium electrodeposition on nickel-coated copper substrate for 124I production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, M; Dastan, M; Ensaf, M R; Tehrani, A Abaspour; Tenreiro, C; Avila, M

    2008-10-01

    Tellurium electrodeposition on a nickel-coated copper substrate was investigated for production of iodine-124. The electrodeposition experiments were carried out by the alkali plating baths. The optimum conditions of the electrodeposition of tellurium were as follows: 6 g l(-1) tellurium, pH=10, DC current density of ca. 8.55 mA cm(-2) and room temperature.

  8. Fission product tellurium chemistry from fuel to containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1996-12-01

    Chemical equilibrium calculations were performed on the speciation of tellurium in-core and inside the primary heat transport system (PHTS) under loss-of-coolant accident conditions. Data from recent Knudsen-cell experiments on the volatilization of Cs{sub 2}Te were incorporated into the calculation. These data were used to recalculate thermodynamic quantities for Cs{sub 2}Te(g), including {Delta}{sub f}G{sup o}(298 K)= -118{+-}9 kJ.mol{sup -1}. The description of the condensed high-temperature cesium-tellurium phase was expanded to include Cs{sub 2}Te{sub 3}(c) in addition to Cs{sub 2}Te(c). These modifications were incorporated into the database used in the equilibrium calculations; the net effect was to stabilize the condensed cesium-tellurium phase and reduce the vapour pressure of Cs{sub 2}Te(g) between 1200 and 1600 K. The impact of tellurium speciation in containment, after release from the PHTS, is discussed along with the possible effect of tellurium on iodine chemistry. (author) 10 figs., 5 tabs., 21 refs.

  9. Adsorption of tellurium ions by nickel oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, W.J.; Bateman, J.M.

    1976-05-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism of the adsorption process, and to provide chemistry data useful for the design of a Failed Fuel Detection and Location system for pressurized water power reactors. Such systems frequently operate by monitoring the level of a selected fission product in the coolant from each rod channel by means of its nuclear radiation. $sup 132$Te is a suitable nuclide for such monitoring and its adsorption on walls of a chamber offers a particularly simple and convenient preconcentration step. The method was to observe the depletion of tellurite ion from a solution of known initial concentration through adsorption by a NiO suspension. The activity of the samples and hence the tellurium concentration were measured with a Ge(Li) spectrometer, which permitted the 230 keV peak of $sup 132$Te to be isolated from the spectrum of the $sup 132$I daughter. The study shows that adsorption process proceeds by a dehydration reaction between -OH groups on the hydroxylated surface and similar groups on the adsorbing species. The equilibrium adsorption ratio is controlled by the solution pH by its effect on the relative distribution of the neutral, monobasic and dibasic tellurite species via the two acid ionization constants.

  10. Light-matter interactions in semiconductor nanowires: Light-effect transistor and light-induced changes in electron-phonon coupling and electrical characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmon, Jason Kendrick

    is particularly important for electronic transport properties at the nanoscale, where controversy and even contradictory experimental and theoretical findings still persist. Zinc telluride (ZnTe) has important uses in optical or laser refrigeration, and the existing studies do not consider extrinsic effects, such as laser-forming tellurium-based species. Nanostructures, with their large surface-to-volume ratios, are more susceptible to extrinsic perturbations that ultimately effect coupling. In this dissertation, ZnTe is studied in bulk, thin film, and nanowire forms with primary focus on the latter. Raman spectroscopy under near resonant excitation is used to extract electron-phonon coupling strengths, which is obtained through the ratio of the first and second order Raman peaks, R = I2LO/I1LO (and is proportional to the Huang-Rhys factor). Laser-formation of tellurium-based species on ZnTe nanowires dynamically altered the ratio R from 6-7 to 2.4 after laser processing, while tuning the (532 nm) laser power from a few microwatts to 150 microwatts (with constant optical exposure time) did not significantly impact the EPC strength. Other explored effects include size dependence, chemical effects (methanol exposure), and interface effects (e.g., at a gold-nanowire junction). The findings suggest that the previously reported size dependence in ZnTe was extrinsic in nature. Tunable coupling strengths also suggest the possibility of novel electronic and optoelectronic devices. The electrical characteristic of CdSe nanowire M-S-M devices are shown to be tunable with laser illumination. As with any semiconductor material, sufficiently low optical powers produce stable and reproducible electrical properties, while higher optical powers and exposure times can induce laser modifications of the material. Drastic modification of electrical characteristics were observed, such as from converting an ohmic response (linear slope change) to rectified characteristics, and

  11. Adsorption and colloidal behaviour of traces of tellurium(IV) and aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Y.; Yamaashi, Y.

    1985-08-01

    Various NaCl solutions containing traces of tellurium(IV) were prepared. The effects of tellurium(IV) concentration and pH on the adsorption of tellurium(IV) on filter paper were studied by filtration method. The effects of NaCl concentration, tellurium(IV) concentration and pH on the formation of a colloid were also studied by ultracentrifugation and ultrafiltration methods. It was found that tellurium(IV) at concentrations below about 10sup(-10)M in neutral NaCl solutions is adsorbed on filter paper and shows colloidal behaviour. (author). 4 refs.; 7 figs.

  12. Synthesis of CdTe Quantum Dots with Tunable Photoluminescence Using Tellurium Dioxide as Tellurium Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘声燕; 王益林; 杨昆; 周立亚

    2012-01-01

    A simple and convenient method has been developed for synthesis of water-soluble CdTe quantum dots (QDs) under ambient atmospheric conditions. In contrast to the traditional aqueous synthesis, green to red emitting CdTe QDs were prepared by using TeO2 to replace Te or AIzTe3 as tellurium source in this method. The influences of ex- perimental variables, including pH value, 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)/Cd and Te/Cd molar ratios, on the emis- sion peak and photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) of the obtained CdTe QDs have been systematically investigated. Experimental results indicate that green to red emitting CdTe QDs with a maximum photolumines- cence quantum yield of 35.4% can be prepared at pH 11.3 and rt(Cd) : n(Te) : n(MPA)= 1 : 0.1 : 1.7.

  13. Surface defect passivation of MoS2 by sulfur, selenium, and tellurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Qi, Long; Shen, Lei; Wu, Yihong

    2016-04-01

    Few-layer MoS2 field-effect transistors often show an n-type conduction behavior due to the presence of high-density sulfur vacancies. Here, we investigated the possibility of surface defect passivation of MoS2 by sulfur treatment in (NH4)2S solution or coating with an ultrathin layer of selenium or tellurium. It was found that all three elements investigated are able to induce a p-doping effect through suppressing the residual electron concentration by an amount exceeding 0.5 × 1012 cm-2 in few-layer MoS2. Among them, the sulfur-treatment exhibits the most superior thermal stability that survives thermal annealing at temperatures ≥120 °C for at least 10 h. Tellurium exhibits the strongest p-doping effect due to electron trapping by physisorption-induced gap states near the valence band edge. On the other hand, selenium is highly volatile on MoS2; it evaporates and desorbs easily due to Joule heating during electrical measurements in vacuum. The results of first-principles calculations support the experimental observations.

  14. EDITORIAL Light-induced material organization Light-induced material organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainos, Nikos; Rode, Andrei V.

    2010-12-01

    Light-induced material organization extends over a broad area of research, from photon momentum transfer to atoms, molecules and particles, serving the basis for optical trapping, and expands into the laser-induced changes of material properties through photopolymerization, photodarkening, and materials ablation. Relevant phenomena are observed over many orders of magnitude of light intensity, from a few kW cm-2 for the optical trapping of living cells to 1014 W cm-2 encountered in femtosecond laser micromachining and micro-explosion. Relevant interactions reveal a rich palette of novel phenomena in the solid state, from subtle excitations and material organization to phase transformations, non-equilibrium and transient states. The laser-induced material modifications relate to changes in the crystal structure and the molecular bonding, phase transitions in liquid state, ablation and plasma production associated with extreme pressure and temperature conditions towards entirely new states of matter. The underlying physical mechanisms form the foundations for micro-engineering photonic and other functional devices and lead the way to relevant applications. At the same time, they hold the potential for creating non-equilibrium material states and a range of fundamentally new products not available by other means. The fundamental understanding of both materials nature and functional behaviour will ultimately yield novel devices and improved performance in several fields. The far reaching goals of these studies relate to the development of new methods and technologies for micro- and nano-fabrication, not only offering a significant reduction of cost, but also expanding the fabrication capabilities into unexplored areas of biophotonics and nanotechnology. This special issue of Journal of Optics presents some very recent and exciting advances in the field of materials manipulation by laser beams, aiming to underline its current trends. In optical trapping research we

  15. Possible room temperature ferromagnetism in silicon doped tellurium semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, P.K., E-mail: pkmishra@barc.gov.in [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Babu, P.D., E-mail: pdbabu@csr.res.in [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Mumbai Centre, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Ravikumar, G. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Mishra, R.; Roy, Mainak; Phapale, S. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sastry, P.U. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-08-05

    Highlights: • In this work we report the observation of ferromagnetism in a silicon doped tellurium sample at room temperature. • Isothermal magnetization hysteresis measurements shows ferromagnetism persists up to room temperature. • We ascribe the origin of ferromagnetism to possible modification of electronic band or generation of local magnetic moment by silicon doping into the parent tellurium lattice. • Potentially this could be a new type of room-temperature magnetic semiconductor that is not based on any oxide or nitride. - Abstract: We have found direct evidence of ferromagnetism in a silicon doped tellurium sample, a new type of magnetic semiconductor that is not based on any oxide or nitride. Room temperature ferromagnetism was very apparent from the magnetization hysteresis. Isothermal magnetization hysteresis loop and differences in ZFC and FC branches of magnetization shows that the ferromagnetic transition temperature is above room temperature. Observation of magnetization hysteresis only at low magnetic fields is indicative of smaller domain size. Average estimated magnetic moment μ per domain is 2.6 μ{sub B}. The origin of ferromagnetism could be ascribed to modification of electronic band or generation of local magnetic moment by silicon doping into the parent tellurium lattice.

  16. METALCOMPLEXES OF TELLURIUM-CONTAINING AMINES AND AZOMETINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Abakarov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article methods of synthesis and reactionary ability of metalcomplexes of tellurium-containing amines, azometines, of a problem of competitive coordination with use of the principle of "soft" and "rigid" acids and the bases (R. Pearson.

  17. Light induced drug delivery into cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamay, Yosi; Adar, Lily; Ashkenasy, Gonen; David, Ayelet

    2011-02-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can be used for intracellular delivery of a broad variety of cargoes, including various nanoparticulate pharmaceutical carriers. However, the cationic nature of all CPP sequences, and thus lack of cell specificity, limits their in vivo use for drug delivery applications. Here, we have devised and tested a strategy for site-specific delivery of dyes and drugs into cancer cells by using polymers bearing a light activated caged CPP (cCPP). The positive charge of Lys residues on the minimum sequence of the CPP penetratin ((52)RRMKWKK(58)) was masked with photo-cleavable groups to minimize non-specific adsorption and cellular uptake. Once illuminated by UV light, these protecting groups were cleaved, the positively charged CPP regained its activity and facilitated rapid intracellular delivery of the polymer-dye or polymer-drug conjugates into cancer cells. We have found that a 10-min light illumination time was sufficient to enhance the penetration of the polymer-CPP conjugates bearing the proapoptotic peptide, (D)(KLAKLAK)(2), into 80% of the target cells, and to promote a 'switch' like cytotoxic activity resulting a shift from 100% to 10% in cell viability after 2 h. This report provides an example for tumor targeting by means of light activation of cell-penetrating peptides for intracellular drug delivery.

  18. Seabird mortality induced by land-based artificial lights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Airam; Holmes, Nick D; Ryan, Peter G; Wilson, Kerry-Jayne; Faulquier, Lucie; Murillo, Yovana; Raine, André F; Penniman, Jay F; Neves, Verónica; Rodríguez, Beneharo; Negro, Juan J; Chiaradia, André; Dann, Peter; Anderson, Tracy; Metzger, Benjamin; Shirai, Masaki; Deppe, Lorna; Wheeler, Jennifer; Hodum, Peter; Gouveia, Catia; Carmo, Vanda; Carreira, Gilberto P; Delgado-Alburqueque, Luis; Guerra-Correa, Carlos; Couzi, François-Xavier; Travers, Marc; Corre, Matthieu Le

    2017-10-01

    Artificial lights at night cause high mortality of seabirds, one of the most endangered groups of birds globally. Fledglings of burrow-nesting seabirds, and to a lesser extent adults, are attracted to and then grounded (i.e., forced to land) by lights when they fly at night. We reviewed the current state of knowledge of seabird attraction to light to identify information gaps and propose measures to address the problem. Although species in families such as Alcidae and Anatidae can be grounded by artificial light, the most affected seabirds are petrels and shearwaters (Procellariiformes). At least 56 species of Procellariiformes, more than one-third of them (24) threatened, are subject to grounding by lights. Seabirds grounded by lights have been found worldwide, mainly on oceanic islands but also at some continental locations. Petrel breeding grounds confined to formerly uninhabited islands are particularly at risk from light pollution due to tourism and urban sprawl. Where it is impractical to ban external lights, rescue programs of grounded birds offer the most immediate and employed mitigation to reduce the rate of light-induced mortality and save thousands of birds every year. These programs also provide useful information for seabird management. However, these data are typically fragmentary, biased, and uncertain and can lead to inaccurate impact estimates and poor understanding of the phenomenon of seabird attraction to lights. We believe the most urgently needed actions to mitigate and understand light-induced mortality of seabirds are estimation of mortality and effects on populations; determination of threshold light levels and safe distances from light sources; documentation of the fate of rescued birds; improvement of rescue campaigns, particularly in terms of increasing recovery rates and level of care; and research on seabird-friendly lights to reduce attraction. © 2017 Society for Conservation Biology.

  19. Light-Induced Surface Patterning of Silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hong Suk; Lee, Seungwoo; Choi, Jaeho; Lee, Hongkyung; Park, Jung-Ki; Kim, Hee-Tak

    2015-10-27

    Manipulating the size and shape of silica precursor patterns using simple far-field light irradiation and transforming such reconfigured structures into inorganic silica patterns by pyrolytic conversion are demonstrated. The key concept of our work is the use of an azobenzene incorporated silica precursor (herein, we refer to this material as azo-silane composite) as ink in a micromolding process. The moving direction of azo-silane composite is parallel to light polarization direction; in addition, the amount of azo-silane composite movement can be precisely determined by controlling light irradiation time. By exploiting this peculiar phenomenon, azo-silane composite patterns produced using the micromolding technique are arbitrarily manipulated to obtain various structural features including high-resolution size or sophisticated shape. The photoreconfigured patterns formed with azo-silane composites are then converted into pure silica patterns through pyrolytic conversion. The pyrolytic converted silica patterns are uniformly formed over a large area, ensuring crack-free formation and providing high structural fidelity. Therefore, this optical manipulation technique, in conjunction with the pyrolytic conversion process, opens a promising route to the design of silica patterns with finely tuned structural features in terms of size and shape. This platform for designing silica structures has significant value in various nanotechnology fields including micro/nanofluidic channel for lab-on-a-chip devices, transparent superhydrophobic surfaces, and optoelectronic devices.

  20. A light-induced shortcut in the planktonic microbial loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ptacnik, Robert

    2016-07-11

    Mixotrophs combine photosynthesis with phagotrophy to cover their demands in energy and essential nutrients. This gives them a competitive advantage under oligotropihc conditions, where nutrients and bacteria concentrations are low. As the advantage for the mixotroph depends on light, the competition between mixo- and heterotrophic bacterivores should be regulated by light. To test this hypothesis, we incubated natural plankton from the ultra-oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean in a set of mesocosms maintained at 4 light levels spanning a 10-fold light gradient. Picoplankton (heterotrophic bacteria (HB), pico-sized cyanobacteria, and small-sized flagellates) showed the fastest and most marked response to light, with pronounced predator-prey cycles, in the high-light treatments. Albeit cell specific activity of heterotrophic bacteria was constant across the light gradient, bacterial abundances exhibited an inverse relationship with light. This pattern was explained by light-induced top-down control of HB by bacterivorous phototrophic eukaryotes (PE), which was evidenced by a significant inverse relationship between HB net growth rate and PE abundances. Our results show that light mediates the impact of mixotrophic bacterivores. As mixo- and heterotrophs differ in the way they remineralize nutrients, these results have far-reaching implications for how nutrient cycling is affected by light.

  1. Phase measurement of fast light pulse in electromagnetically induced absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Lee, Hee Jung; Moon, Han Seb

    2013-09-23

    We report the phase measurement of a fast light pulse in electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) of the 5S₁/₂ (F = 2)-5P₃/₂ (F' = 3) transition of ⁸⁷Rb atoms. Using a beat-note interferometer method, a stable measurement without phase dithering of the phase of the probe pulse before and after it has passed through the EIA medium was achieved. Comparing the phases of the light pulse in air and that of the fast light pulse though the EIA medium, the phase of the fast light pulse at EIA resonance was not shifted and maintained to be the same as that of the free-space light pulse. The classical fidelity of the fast light pulse according to the advancement of the group velocity by adjusting the atomic density was estimated to be more than 97%.

  2. A green-light inducible lytic system for cyanobacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Kotone; Abe, Koichi; Ferri, Stefano; Nakajima, Mitsuharu; Nakamura, Mayumi; Yoshida, Wataru; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Ikebukuro, Kazunori; Sode, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are an attractive candidate for the production of biofuel because of their ability to capture carbon dioxide by photosynthesis and grow on non-arable land. However, because huge quantities of water are required for cultivation, strict water management is one of the greatest issues in algae- and cyanobacteria-based biofuel production. In this study, we aim to construct a lytic cyanobacterium that can be regulated by a physical signal (green-light illumination) for future use in the recovery of biofuel related compounds. We introduced T4 bacteriophage-derived lysis genes encoding holin and endolysin under the control of the green-light regulated cpcG2 promoter in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. When cells harboring the lysis genes were illuminated with both red and green light, we observed a considerable decrease in growth rate, a significant increase in cellular phycocyanin released in the medium, and a considerable fraction of dead cells. These effects were not observed when these cells were illuminated with only red light, or when cells not containing the lysis genes were grown under either red light or red and green light. These results indicate that our constructed green-light inducible lytic system was clearly induced by green-light illumination, resulting in lytic cells that released intracellular phycocyanin into the culture supernatant. This property suggests a future possibility to construct photosynthetic genetically modified organisms that are unable to survive under sunlight exposure. Expression of the self-lysis system with green-light illumination was also found to greatly increase the fragility of the cell membrane, as determined by subjecting the induced cells to detergent, osmotic-shock, and freeze-thaw treatments. A green-light inducible lytic system was constructed in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The engineered lytic cyanobacterial cells should be beneficial for the recovery of biofuels and related compounds from cells with minimal effort

  3. RILIS-ionized mercury and tellurium beams at ISOLDE CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day Goodacre, T., E-mail: thomas.day.goodacre@cern.ch [CERN (Switzerland); Billowes, J. [The University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Chrysalidis, K. [CERN (Switzerland); Fedorov, D. V. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Fedosseev, V. N.; Marsh, B. A. [CERN (Switzerland); Molkanov, P. L. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Seiffert, C. [CERN (Switzerland); Wendt, K. D. A. [Johannes Gutenberg Universität, Institut für Physik (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    This paper presents the results of ionization scheme development for application at the ISOLDE Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS). Two new ionization schemes for mercury are presented: a three-step three-resonance ionization scheme, ionizing via an excitation to a Rydberg level and a three-step two-resonance ionization scheme, with a non-resonant final step to the ionization continuum that corresponded to a factor of four higher ionization efficiency. The efficiency of the optimal mercury ionization scheme was measured, together with the efficiency of a new three-step three resonance ionization scheme for tellurium. The efficiencies of the mercury and tellurium ionization schemes were determined to be 6 % and >18 % respectively.

  4. VUV-light-induced deposited silica films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Christopher K.; Pedraza, Anthony J.; Benson, Roberto S.; Park, Jae-Won

    1998-05-01

    A novel technique to deposit dielectric films at room temperature is described. The deposition of the silica takes place inside a cylindrical glass chamber where a silent discharge is generated between two electrodes connected to a high voltage, high frequency AC source. The chamber contains two parallel glass tubes where the electrodes are located and is filled with argon or xenon at a pressure of 100 mbar. Under these conditions, it has been shown that high intensity VUV light is generated peaking at 126 nm for argon and at 172 nm for xenon. This VUV radiation seems to produce photoablation of the glass tubes that surround the electrodes. Upon operation of the lamp, polyimide, polypropylene and silicon wafer substrates lying at the bottom of the vessel became coated with silica. The films, identified using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), revealed that the silica is oxygen-deficient with a composition of SiO x where x is between 1.7 and 1.8. The deposition rate on silicon wafers was measured by ellipsometry. When Xe gas is used the deposition rate is much lower than when Ar is used. This result is consistent with a photoablation process since the energy of the photons generated in Ar peaks at 10 eV while those generated in Xe peaks at 7 eV. These energy values should be compared with the O-Si bond strength energy that is 8.3 eV. The morphology and structure of the films were examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. Deposition of carbonaceous films occurred when the glass tubes containing the electrodes were coated with carbon.

  5. Thorium Chemistry in Oxo-Tellurium System under Extreme Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bin; Kegler, Philip; Bosbach, Dirk; Alekseev, Evgeny V

    2017-03-06

    Through the use of a high-temperature/high-pressure synthesis method, four thorium oxo-tellurium compounds with different tellurium valence states were isolated. The novel inorganic phases illustrate the intrinsic complexity of the actinide tellurium chemistry under extreme conditions of pressure and temperature. Th2Te3O11 is the first instance of a mixed-valent oxo-tellurium compound, and at the same time, Te exhibits three different coordination environments (Te(IV)O3, Te(IV)O4, and Te(VI)O6) within a single structure. These three types of Te polyhedra are further fused together, resulting in a [Te3O11](8-) fragment. Na4Th2(Te(VI)3O15) and K2Th(Te(VI)O4)3 are the first alkaline thorium tellurates described in the literature. Both compounds are constructed from ThO9 tricapped trigonal prisms and Te(VI)O6 octahedra. Na4Th2(Te(VI)3O15) is a three-dimensional framework based on Th2O15 and Te2O10 dimers, while K2Th(Te(VI)O4)3 contains tungsten oxide bronze like Te layers linked by ThO9 polyhedra. The structure of β-Th(Te(IV)O3)(SO4) is built from infinite thorium chains cross-linked by Te(IV)O3(2-) and SO4(2-) anions. Close structural analysis suggests that β-Th(Te(IV)O3)(SO4) is highly related to the structure of α-Th(SeO4)2. Additionally, the Raman spectra are recorded and the characteristic peaks are assigned based on a comparison of reported tellurites or tellurates.

  6. Red-light-induced positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppel, N J; Hangarter, R P; Kiss, J Z

    2001-02-01

    The interaction between light and gravity is critical in determining the final form of a plant. For example, the competing activities of gravitropism and phototropism can determine the final orientation of a stem or root. The results reported here indicate that, in addition to the previously described blue-light-dependent negative phototropic response in roots, roots of Arahidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. display a previously unknown red-light-dependent positive phototropic response. Both phototropic responses in roots are considerably weaker than the graviresponse, which often masks phototropic curvature. However, through the use of mutant strains with impaired gravitropism, we were able to identify a red-light-dependent positive phototropic response in Arabidopsis roots. The red-induced positive phototropic response is considerably weaker than the blue-light response and is barely detectable in plants with a normal gravitropic response.

  7. Investigation of biomethylation of arsenic and tellurium during composting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Bone, Roland A., E-mail: roland.diaz@uni-due.de [Microbiology I and Instrumental Analytical Chemistry, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 3-5, 45141 Essen (Germany); Raabe, Maren [Municipal Water and Waste Engineering, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 15, 45141 Essen (Germany); Awissus, Simone; Keuter, Bianca; Menzel, Bernd [Institute for Environmental Analytical Chemistry, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 3-5, 45141 Essen (Germany); Kueppers, Klaus [Institute of Applied Botany, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetstrasse 3-5, 45141 Essen (Germany); Widmann, Renatus [Municipal Water and Waste Engineering, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 15, 45141 Essen (Germany); Hirner, Alfred V. [Institute for Environmental Analytical Chemistry, University of Duisburg-Essen, Universitaetsstrasse 3-5, 45141 Essen (Germany)

    2011-05-30

    Though the process of composting features a high microbiological activity, its potential to methylate metals and metalloids has been little investigated so far in spite of the high impact of this process on metal(loid) toxicity and mobility. Here, we studied the biotransformation of arsenic, tellurium, antimony, tin and germanium during composting. Time resolved investigation revealed a highly dynamic process during self-heated composting with markedly differing time patterns for arsenic and tellurium species. Extraordinary high concentrations of up to 150 mg kg{sup -1} methylated arsenic species as well as conversion rates up to 50% for arsenic and 5% for tellurium were observed. In contrast, little to no conversion was observed for antimony, tin and germanium. In addition to experiments with metal(loid) salts, composting of arsenic hyperaccumulating ferns Pteris vittata and P. cretica grown on As-amended soils was studied. Arsenic accumulated in the fronds was efficiently methylated resulting in up to 8 mg kg{sup -1} methylated arsenic species. Overall, these studies indicate that metal(loid)s can undergo intensive biomethylation during composting. Due to the high mobility of methylated species this process needs to be considered in organic waste treatment of metal(loid) contaminated waste materials.

  8. Light-induced scattering of light in NBS:Ce crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronov, V. V.; Dorosh, I. R.; Kuzminov, Iu. S.; Tkachenko, N. V.

    1980-11-01

    An experiment is described in which light-induced scattering of laser light was observed in Ce-doped (Sr/x/Ba/1-x/)/1-y/(Nb2O6)/y/ crystals with x = 0.61 and y = 0.4993. It is shown that the observed effect results from the holographic amplification of light scattered by crystal defects and that the observed asymmetry of the scattering is associated with the diffusion mechanism of hologram recording in crystals. A theoretical model of the scattering process is constructed for the diffusion recording mechanism.

  9. Light Induced Aggregation of Specific Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Gopannagari, Madhusudana; Chaturvedi, Harsh

    2015-01-01

    We report optically induced aggregation and consequent separation of specific diameter of pristine single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) from stable solution. Well dispersed solution of pristine SWNTs, without any surfactant or functionalization, show rapid aggregation by uniform exposure to UV, visible and NIR illumination. Optically induced aggregation linearly increases with consequent increase in the intensity of light. Aggregated SWNTs were separated from the dispersed supernatant and ch...

  10. Light-at-night-induced circadian disruption, cancer and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, Vladimir N; Vinogradova, Irina A; Panchenko, Andrei V; Popovich, Irina G; Zabezhinski, Mark A

    2012-12-01

    Light-at-night has become an increasing and essential part of the modern lifestyle and leads to a number of health problems, including excessive body mass index, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Working Group concluded that "shift-work that involves circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans" (Group 2A) [1]. According to the circadian disruption hypothesis, light-at-night might disrupt the endogenous circadian rhythm and specifically suppress nocturnal production of the pineal hormone melatonin and its secretion into the blood. We evaluated the effect of various light/dark regimens on the survival, life span, and spontaneous and chemical carcinogenesis in rodents. Exposure to constant illumination was followed by accelerated aging and enhanced spontaneous tumorigenesis in female CBA and transgenic HER-2/neu mice. In male and female rats maintained at various light/dark regimens (standard 12:12 light/dark [LD], the natural light [NL] of northwestern Russia, constant light [LL], and constant darkness [DD]) from the age of 25 days until natural death, it was found that exposure to NL and LL regimens accelerated age-related switch-off of the estrous function (in females), induced development of metabolic syndrome and spontaneous tumorigenesis, and shortened life span both in male and females rats compared to the standard LD regimen. Melatonin given in nocturnal drinking water prevented the adverse effect of the constant illumination (LL) and natural light (NL) regimens on the homeostasis, life span, and tumor development both in mice and rats. The exposure to the LL regimen accelerated colon carcinogenesis induced by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) in rats, whereas the treatment with melatonin alleviated the effects of LL. The maintenance of rats at the DD regimen inhibited DMH-induced carcinogenesis. The LL regimen accelerated, whereas the DD regimen inhibited both mammary carcinogenesis

  11. Freeze out temperature on light projectile induced reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, J. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Haga, M.; Haseno, M. [and others

    1997-05-01

    Nuclear temperature was deduced for 12GeV proton induced target multi-fragmentation reactions on Au, Tm, Sm, Ag targets. Using isotope yield ratios, clear target mass dependence was obtained for high-multiplicity events. Deduced temperatures for light targets have higher value than those for heavy targets. (author)

  12. Light-Induced Absorption in Nominally Pure Bismuth Silicon Oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李飞飞; 许京军; 孔勇发; 黄辉; 张光寅; 杨春晖; 徐玉恒

    2001-01-01

    Light-induced absorption in the nominally pure bismuth silicon oxide is investigated experimentally and the result shows that it consists of transient and persistent parts. The experimental evidence is analysed based on the model of three groups of trap (donor) centres.

  13. Quantum correlations induced by multiple scattering of quadrature squeezed light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodahl, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Propagating quadrature squeezed light through a multiple scattering random medium is found to induce pronounced spatial quantum correlations that have no classical analogue. The correlations are revealed in the number of photons transported through the sample that can be measured from the intensity...

  14. Ultraviolet-light-induced processes in germanium-doped silica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Martin

    2001-01-01

    A model is presented for the interaction of ultraviolet (UV) light with germanium-doped silica glass. It is assumed that germanium sites work as gates for transferring the excitation energy into the silica. In the material the excitation induces forbidden transitions to two different defect states...

  15. All-vapor processing of P-type tellurium-containing II-VI semiconductor and ohmic contacts thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCandless, Brian E.

    2000-03-01

    An all dry method for producing solar cells is provided comprising first heat-annealing a II-VI semiconductor; enhancing the conductivity and grain size of the annealed layer; modifying the surface and depositing a tellurium layer onto the enhanced layer; and then depositing copper onto the tellurium layer so as to produce a copper tellurium compound on the layer.

  16. Biosynthesis and recovery of rod-shaped tellurium nanoparticles and their bactericidal activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zare, Bijan; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham [Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Biotechnology Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 14155-6451 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shakibaie, Mojtaba [Department of Pharmacognosy and Biotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutics Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 76175-493 Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaie, Sassan [Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Advanced Medical Technologies, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza, E-mail: shahverd@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Biotechnology Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 14155-6451 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ► Biosynthesis of rod shape tellurium nanoparticles with a hexagonal crystal structure. ► Extraction procedure for isolation of tellurium nanoparticles from Bacillus sp. BZ. ► Extracted tellurium nanoparticles have good bactericidal activity against some bacteria. -- Abstract: In this study, a tellurium-transforming Bacillus sp. BZ was isolated from the Caspian Sea in northern Iran. The isolate was identified by various tests and 16S rDNA analysis, and then used to prepare elemental tellurium nanoparticles. The isolate was subsequently used for the intracellular biosynthesis of elemental tellurium nanoparticles. The biogenic nanoparticles were released by liquid nitrogen and purified by an n-octyl alcohol water extraction system. The shape, size, and composition of the extracted nanoparticles were characterized. The transmission electron micrograph showed rod-shaped nanoparticles with dimensions of about 20 nm × 180 nm. The energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction spectra respectively demonstrated that the extracted nanoparticles consisted of only tellurium and have a hexagonal crystal structure. This is the first study to demonstrate a biological method for synthesizing rod-shaped elemental tellurium by a Bacillus sp., its extraction and its antibacterial activity against different clinical isolates.

  17. Extracellular production of tellurium nanoparticles by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghese, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.borghese@unibo.it [Dept. of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy); Brucale, Marco [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials (CNR-ISMN), Rome (Italy); Fortunato, Gianuario [Dept. of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy); Lanzi, Massimiliano [Dept. of Industrial Chemistry “Toso Montanari”, University of Bologna (Italy); Mezzi, Alessio [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials (CNR-ISMN), Rome (Italy); Valle, Francesco; Cavallini, Massimiliano [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials (CNR-ISMN), Bologna (Italy); Zannoni, Davide [Dept. of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Tellurite is reduced by R. capsulatus as cytosolic tellurium nanoprecipitates TeNPs. • Lawsone allows R. capsulatus to produce extracellular TeNPs. • Extracellular TeNPs production depends on the carbon source used for cells growth. • Both lawsone concentration and the incubation time determine the TeNPs size. • Extracellular TeNPs are coated with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). - Abstract: The toxic oxyanion tellurite (TeO{sub 3}{sup 2−}) is acquired by cells of Rhodobacter capsulatus grown anaerobically in the light, via acetate permease ActP2 and then reduced to Te{sup 0} in the cytoplasm as needle-like black precipitates. Interestingly, photosynthetic cultures of R. capsulatus can also generate Te{sup 0} nanoprecipitates (TeNPs) outside the cells upon addition of the redox mediator lawsone (2-hydroxy-1,4-naphtoquinone). TeNPs generation kinetics were monitored to define the optimal conditions to produce TeNPs as a function of various carbon sources and lawsone concentration. We report that growing cultures over a 10 days period with daily additions of 1 mM tellurite led to the accumulation in the growth medium of TeNPs with dimensions from 200 up to 600–700 nm in length as determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). This result suggests that nucleation of TeNPs takes place over the entire cell growth period although the addition of new tellurium Te{sup 0} to pre-formed TeNPs is the main strategy used by R. capsulatus to generate TeNPs outside the cells. Finally, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis of TeNPs indicate they are coated with an organic material which keeps the particles in solution in aqueous solvents.

  18. Reprint of “Extracellular production of tellurium nanoparticles by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghese, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.borghese@unibo.it [Dept. of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy); Brucale, Marco [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials (CNR-ISMN), Rome (Italy); Fortunato, Gianuario [Dept. of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy); Lanzi, Massimiliano [Dept. of Industrial Chemistry “Toso Montanari”, University of Bologna (Italy); Mezzi, Alessio [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials (CNR-ISMN), Rome (Italy); Valle, Francesco; Cavallini, Massimiliano [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials (CNR-ISMN), Bologna (Italy); Zannoni, Davide [Dept. of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Tellurite is reduced by R. capsulatus as cytosolic tellurium nanoprecipitates TeNPs. • Lawsone allows R. capsulatus to produce extracellular TeNPs. • Extracellular TeNPs production depends on the carbon source used for cells growth. • Both lawsone concentration and the incubation time determine the TeNPs size. • Extracellular TeNPs are coated with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). - Abstract: The toxic oxyanion tellurite (TeO{sub 3}{sup 2−}) is acquired by cells of Rhodobacter capsulatus grown anaerobically in the light, via acetate permease ActP2 and then reduced to Te{sup 0} in the cytoplasm as needle-like black precipitates. Interestingly, photosynthetic cultures of R. capsulatus can also generate Te{sup 0} nanoprecipitates (TeNPs) outside the cells upon addition of the redox mediator lawsone (2-hydroxy-1,4-naphtoquinone). TeNPs generation kinetics were monitored to define the optimal conditions to produce TeNPs as a function of various carbon sources and lawsone concentration. We report that growing cultures over a 10 days period with daily additions of 1 mM tellurite led to the accumulation in the growth medium of TeNPs with dimensions from 200 up to 600–700 nm in length as determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). This result suggests that nucleation of TeNPs takes place over the entire cell growth period although the addition of new tellurium Te{sup 0} to pre-formed TeNPs is the main strategy used by R. capsulatus to generate TeNPs outside the cells. Finally, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis of TeNPs indicate they are coated with an organic material which keeps the particles in solution in aqueous solvents.

  19. A possible mechanism for visible-light-induced skin rejuvenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Leonardo; Lubart, Rachel; Friedman, Harry; Lavie, R.

    2004-09-01

    In recent years there has been intensive research in the field of non-ablative skin rejuvenation. This comes as a response to the desire for a simple method of treating rhytids caused by aging, UV exposure and acne scars. In numerous studies intense visible light pulsed systems (20-30J/cm2) are used. The mechanism of action was supposed to be a selective heat induced denaturalization of dermal collagen that leads to subsequent reactive synthesis. In this study we suggest a different mechanism for photorejuvenation based on light induced Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) formation. We irradiated collagen in-vitro with a broad band of visible light, 400-800 nm, 12-22J/cm2, and used the spin trapping coupled with electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to detect ROS. In vivo, we used dose 30 J in average (35 for acnis scars, 25 for wrinkles and redness). Irradiated collagen results in hydroxyl and methyl radicals formation. We propose, as a new concept, that visible light at the intensity used for skin rejuvenation, 20-30J/cm2, produces high amounts of ROS which destroy old collagen fibers encouraging the formation of new ones. On the other hand at inner depths of the skin, where the light intensity is much weaker, low amounts of ROS are formed which are well known to stimulate fibroblast proliferation.

  20. Photopolymerization-Induced Two-Beam Coupling and Light-Induced Scattering in Polymethyl Methacrylate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wei; GAO Feng; TANG Bai-Quan; Christian Pruner; ZHANG Xin-Zheng; SHI Yan-Li; XU Jing-Jun; QIAO Hai-Jun; WU Qiang; Romano A. Rupp; LOU Ci-Bo; WANG Zhen-Hua

    2008-01-01

    @@ Light amplification due to two-beam coupling is realized in doped polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) glasses. A coupling gain as large as 14 cm-1 is obtained. The dynamic behaviour of absorption and light-induced scattering due to the process of photopolymerization are also studied. The results show that the amplification and its dynamic process enable possible applications of PMMA in optical devices.

  1. Light induced modulation instability of surfaces under intense illumination

    KAUST Repository

    Burlakov, V. M.

    2013-12-17

    We show that a flat surface of a polymer in rubber state illuminated with intense electromagnetic radiation is unstable with respect to periodic modulation. Initial periodic perturbation is amplified due to periodic thermal expansion of the material heated by radiation. Periodic heating is due to focusing-defocusing effects caused by the initial surface modulation. The surface modulation has a period longer than the excitation wavelength and does not require coherent light source. Therefore, it is not related to the well-known laser induced periodic structures on polymer surfaces but may contribute to their formation and to other phenomena of light-matter interaction.

  2. Light-Induced Charge Separation and Transfer in Bacteriorhodopsin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Yu-Hua; LI Qing-Guo; ZHAO You-Yuan; ZHANG Zhong-Bin; OU-YANG Xiao-Ping; GONG Qin-Gan; CHEN Ling-Bing; LI Fu-Ming; LIU Jian; DING Jian-Dong

    2000-01-01

    The photo-voltage signals in bacteriorhodopsin(bR) excited by 1064nm pulse laser are different from those by 532 or 355 nm. It shows that the positive and negative photoelectric signals are produced by the motion of the positive and negative charges, respectively, and more energy is needed for producing the positive charges than the negative. The mechanism of light-induced charge generation and charge transfer in bR was studied and analyzed by measuring the photoelectric signals with different impedance of measuring circuit and different pulse-width of 532 nm laser as pump light.

  3. Light-induced structural changes in a monomeric bacteriophytochrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Takala

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytochromes sense red light in plants and various microorganism. Light absorption causes structural changes within the protein, which alter its biochemical activity. Bacterial phytochromes are dimeric proteins, but the functional relevance of this arrangement remains unclear. Here, we use time-resolved X-ray scattering to reveal the solution structural change of a monomeric variant of the photosensory core module of the phytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans. The data reveal two motions, a bend and a twist of the PHY domain with respect to the chromophore-binding domains. Infrared spectroscopy shows the refolding of the PHY tongue. We conclude that a monomer of the phytochrome photosensory core is sufficient to perform the light-induced structural changes. This implies that allosteric cooperation with the other monomer is not needed for structural activation. The dimeric arrangement may instead be intrinsic to the biochemical output domains of bacterial phytochromes.

  4. Slow light with electromagnetically induced transparency in cylindrical waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Hatta, Agus Muhamad; Al-Hagan, Ola A; Moiseev, Sergey A

    2014-01-01

    Slow light with electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the core of cylindrical waveguide (CW) for an optical fiber system containing three-level atoms is investigated. The CW modes are treated in the weakly guiding approximation which renders the analysis into manageable form. The transparency window and permittivity profile of the waveguide due to the strong pump field in the EIT scheme is calculated. For a specific permittivity profile of the waveguide due to EIT, the propagation constant of the weak signal field and spatial shape of fundamental guided mode are calculated by solving the vector wave equation using the finite difference method. It is found that the transparency window and slow light field can be controlled via the CW parameters. The reduced group velocity of slow light in this configuration is useful for many technological applications such as optical memories, effective control of single photon fields, optical buffer and delay line.

  5. Coherent Light induced in Optical Fiber by a Charged Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artru, Xavier; Ray, Cédric

    2016-07-01

    Coherent light production in an optical fiber by a charged particle (named PIGL, for particle-induced guided, light) is reviewed. From the microscopic point of view, light is emitted by transient electric dipoles induced in the fiber medium by the Coulomb field of the particle. The phenomenon can also considered as the capture of virtual photons of the particle field by the fiber. Two types of captures are distinguished. Type-I takes place in a uniform part of the fiber; then the photon keeps its longitudinal momentum pz . Type-II takes place near an end or in a non-uniform part of the fiber; then pz is not conserved. Type-I PIGL is not affected by background lights external to the fiber. At grazing incidence it becomes nearly monochromatic. Its circular polarization depends on the angular momentum of the particle about the fiber and on the relative velocity between the particle and the guided wave. A general formula for the yield of Type-II radiation, based on the reciprocity theorem, is proposed. This radiation can be assisted by metallic objects stuck to the fiber, via plasmon excitation. A periodic structure leads to a guided Smith-Purcell radiation. Applications of PIGL in beam diagnostics are considered.

  6. Detection of Reactive Oxygen Species Induced by Cadmium Tellurium Quantum Dots%碲化镉量子点诱导氧自由基产生的检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘娜; 赵淑锐; 林彤; 冯爽; 牟颖; 韩四海; 黄沛力; 孙志伟

    2012-01-01

    With the extensive application of quantum dots (QDs) in biomarker and bioimaging, the amount of human exposure to QDs increases, so the exploration of the mechanism of their biological toxicity is of significant concern. The generation of ROS (reactive oxygen species) induced by QDs is accepted to act as a mechanism to produce toxicity. To investigate the relationship between the toxicity of QDs and the production of ROS, cadmhim-telhiride QDs (CdTe QDs and CdTe/ZnS QDs) were selected, and the type and intensity of ROS were detected using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) when adding various concentrations of CdTe QDs or CdTe/ZnS QDs in the cell-free system. The promotive effect of CdTe QDs or CdTe/ZnS QDs on the production of superoxide anion ( · O2- ) and hydroxyl free radicals ( · OH) was studied by EPR, ultraviolet and fluorescence spectrophotometer. Results showed that CdTe QDs could induce the production of · O2-,. The generation of · OH and ·O2- could be obviously promoted by CdTe QDsand CdTe/ZnS QDs. The intensity of ·OH (or ·O2- ) and the dose of QDs showed a clear dose-effect relationship. It was indicated that QDs could induce and promote the production of ROS. The inducing and promoting effect was dependent on the structure of QDs.%随着量子点(quantum dots,QDs)在生物标记和医学影像等领域的应用日益广泛,其环境暴露量逐渐增加,深入探讨QDs的毒性机制具有重要意义.QDs通过产生活性氧(ROS)诱发毒性效应是目前普遍接受的毒作用模式.为了探讨量子点的毒性与所诱发的ROS的种类和数量的关系,选用碲化镉量子点(CdTe QDs和CdTe/ZnS QDs),利用电子顺磁共振技术(EPR)分别测定了CdTe QDs和CdTe/ZnS QDs在无细胞体系中诱导ROS产生的种类和强度;利用EPR法、紫外可见分光光度法和荧光分光光度法分别测定了4、20和l 00 nmol· mL-1的CdTe QDs和CdTe/ZnS QDs对超氧阴离子(·O-2)和羟基自由基(·OH)产生的促进作

  7. Fluorescent light induces neurodegeneration in the rodent nigrostriatal system but near infrared LED light does not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Stefania; Vitale, Flora; Viaggi, Cristina; di Marco, Stefano; Aloisi, Gabriella; Fasciani, Irene; Pardini, Carla; Pietrantoni, Ilaria; Di Paolo, Mattia; Riccitelli, Serena; Maccarone, Rita; Mattei, Claudia; Capannolo, Marta; Rossi, Mario; Capozzo, Annamaria; Corsini, Giovanni U; Scarnati, Eugenio; Lozzi, Luca; Vaglini, Francesca; Maggio, Roberto

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the effects of continuous artificial light exposure on the mouse substantia nigra (SN). A three month exposure of C57Bl/6J mice to white fluorescent light induced a 30% reduction in dopamine (DA) neurons in SN compared to controls, accompanied by a decrease of DA and its metabolites in the striatum. After six months of exposure, neurodegeneration progressed slightly, but the level of DA returned to the basal level, while the metabolites increased with respect to the control. Three month exposure to near infrared LED light (∼710nm) did not alter DA neurons in SN, nor did it decrease DA and its metabolites in the striatum. Furthermore mesencephalic cell viability, as tested by [(3)H]DA uptake, did not change. Finally, we observed that 710nm LED light, locally conveyed in the rat SN, could modulate the firing activity of extracellular-recorded DA neurons. These data suggest that light can be detrimental or beneficial to DA neurons in SN, depending on the source and wavelength. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Manipulating scattering of ultracold atoms with light-induced dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Lemeshko, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    Recently it has been shown that pairs of atoms can form metastable bonds due to non-conservative forces induced by dissipation [Lemeshko&Weimer, Nature Comm. 4, 2230 (2013)]. Here we study the dynamics of interaction-induced coherent population trapping - the process responsible for the formation of dissipatively bound molecules. We derive the effective dissipative potentials induced between ultracold atoms by laser light, and study the time evolution of the scattering states. We demonstrate that binding occurs on short timescales of ~10 microseconds, even if the initial kinetic energy of the atoms significantly exceeds the depth of the dissipative potential. Dissipatively-bound molecules with preordained bond lengths and vibrational wavefunctions can be created and detected in current experiments with ultracold atoms.

  9. Exploring electromagnetic response of tellurium dielectric resonator metamaterial at the infrared wavelengths

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋甲坤; 宋玉志; 李康文; 张祖银; 徐云; 韦欣; 宋国峰

    2015-01-01

    We numerically investigate the electromagnetic properties of tellurium dielectric resonator metamaterial at the infrared wavelengths. The transmission spectra, effective permittivity and permeability of the periodic tellurium metamaterial struc-ture are investigated in detail. The linewidth of the structure in the direction of magnetic field Wx has effects on the position and strength of the electric resonance and magnetic resonance modes. With appropriately optimizing the geometric dimen-sions of the designed structure, the proposed tellurium metamaterial structure can provide electric resonance mode and high order magnetic resonance mode in the same frequency band. This would be helpful to analyze and design low-loss negative refraction index metamaterials at the infrared wavelengths.

  10. Tellurium electrodeposition like a precursor to prepare the p-CdTe semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montiel-Santillan, T.; Solorza-Feria, O. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN (Mexico). Depto. Quimica; Sanchez-Soriano, H. [UAM-Iztapalapa (Mexico). Depto. de Quimica

    2002-04-01

    In this work, some aspects about the electrochemical behavior of tellurium, which is a precursor in the preparation of the p-CdTe semiconductor, are presented. Cadmium telluride has been used in the photoelectrochemical generation of hydrogen and such semiconductor material can be obtained by electrochemistry. By using the rotating disk electrode technique the kinetics of the tellurium deposition process on solid tellurium electrodes was analyzed and the kinetic parameters are presented. Electrochemical techniques in nonstationary diffusional regime were used and, in order to investigate the probable existence of adsorbed electroactive species on the electrode surface, the pulsed current electrolysis technique in a controlled hydrodynamic regime was applied. (author)

  11. Light-Induced Switching of Tunable Single-Molecule Junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Sendler, Torsten

    2015-04-16

    A major goal of molecular electronics is the development and implementation of devices such as single-molecular switches. Here, measurements are presented that show the controlled in situ switching of diarylethene molecules from their nonconductive to conductive state in contact to gold nanoelectrodes via controlled light irradiation. Both the conductance and the quantum yield for switching of these molecules are within a range making the molecules suitable for actual devices. The conductance of the molecular junctions in the opened and closed states is characterized and the molecular level E 0, which dominates the current transport in the closed state, and its level broadening Γ are identified. The obtained results show a clear light-induced ring forming isomerization of the single-molecule junctions. Electron withdrawing side-groups lead to a reduction of conductance, but do not influence the efficiency of the switching mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations of the light-induced switching processes correlate these observations with the fundamentally different low-lying electronic states of the opened and closed forms and their comparably small modification by electron-withdrawing substituents. This full characterization of a molecular switch operated in a molecular junction is an important step toward the development of real molecular electronics devices.

  12. Disruption of cortical integration during midazolam-induced light sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Peipeng; Zhang, Han; Xu, Yachao; Jia, Wenbin; Zang, Yufeng; Li, Kuncheng

    2015-11-01

    This work examines the effect of midazolam-induced light sedation on intrinsic functional connectivity of human brain, using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over, within-subject design. Fourteen healthy young subjects were enrolled and midazolam (0.03 mg/kg of the participant's body mass, to a maximum of 2.5 mg) or saline were administrated with an interval of one week. Resting-state fMRI was conducted before and after administration for each subject. We focus on two types of networks: sensory related lower-level functional networks and higher-order functions related ones. Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to identify these resting-state functional networks. We hypothesize that the sensory (visual, auditory, and sensorimotor) related networks will be intact under midazolam-induced light sedation while the higher-order (default mode, executive control, salience networks, etc.) networks will be functionally disconnected. It was found that the functional integrity of the lower-level networks was maintained, while that of the higher-level networks was significantly disrupted by light sedation. The within-network connectivity of the two types of networks was differently affected in terms of direction and extent. These findings provide direct evidence that higher-order cognitive functions including memory, attention, executive function, and language were impaired prior to lower-level sensory responses during sedation. Our result also lends support to the information integration model of consciousness.

  13. Light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenhammar, Joakim; Wittkowski, Raphael; Marenduzzo, Davide; Cates, Michael E

    2016-04-01

    Self-propelled colloidal objects, such as motile bacteria or synthetic microswimmers, have microscopically irreversible individual dynamics-a feature they share with all living systems. The incoherent behavior of individual swimmers can be harnessed (or "rectified") by microfluidic devices that create systematic motions that are impossible in equilibrium. We present a computational proof-of-concept study showing that such active rectification devices could be created directly from an unstructured "primordial soup" of light-controlled motile particles, solely by using spatially modulated illumination to control their local propulsion speed. Alongside both microscopic irreversibility and speed modulation, our mechanism requires spatial symmetry breaking, such as a chevron light pattern, and strong interactions between particles, such as volume exclusion, which cause a collisional slowdown at high density. Together, we show how these four factors create a novel, many-body rectification mechanism. Our work suggests that standard spatial light modulator technology might allow the programmable, light-induced self-assembly of active rectification devices from an unstructured particle bath.

  14. Light-Induced Infrared Difference Spectroscopy in the Investigation of Light Harvesting Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Mezzetti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Light-induced infrared difference spectroscopy (IR-DS has been used, especially in the last decade, to investigate early photophysics, energy transfer and photoprotection mechanisms in isolated and membrane-bound light harvesting complexes (LHCs. The technique has the definite advantage to give information on how the pigments and the other constituents of the biological system (proteins, membranes, etc. evolve during a given photoreaction. Different static and time-resolved approaches have been used. Compared to the application of IR-DS to photosynthetic Reaction Centers (RCs, however, IR-DS applied to LHCs is still in an almost pioneering age: very often sophisticated techniques (step-scan FTIR, ultrafast IR or data analysis strategies (global analysis, target analysis, multivariate curve resolution are needed. In addition, band assignment is usually more complicated than in RCs. The results obtained on the studied systems (chromatophores and RC-LHC supercomplexes from purple bacteria; Peridinin-Chlorophyll-a-Proteins from dinoflagellates; isolated LHCII from plants; thylakoids; Orange Carotenoid Protein from cyanobacteria are summarized. A description of the different IR-DS techniques used is also provided, and the most stimulating perspectives are also described. Especially if used synergically with other biophysical techniques, light-induced IR-DS represents an important tool in the investigation of photophysical/photochemical reactions in LHCs and LHC-containing systems.

  15. Light-induced vibration in the hearing organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Tianying; He, Wenxuan; Li, Yizeng; Grosh, Karl; Fridberger, Anders

    2014-08-04

    The exceptional sensitivity of mammalian hearing organs is attributed to an active process, where force produced by sensory cells boost sound-induced vibrations, making soft sounds audible. This process is thought to be local, with each section of the hearing organ capable of amplifying sound-evoked movement, and nearly instantaneous, since amplification can work for sounds at frequencies up to 100 kHz in some species. To test these fundamental precepts, we developed a method for focally stimulating the living hearing organ with light. Light pulses caused intense and highly damped mechanical responses followed by traveling waves that developed with considerable delay. The delayed response was identical to movements evoked by click-like sounds. This shows that the active process is neither local nor instantaneous, but requires mechanical waves traveling from the cochlear base toward its apex. A physiologically-based mathematical model shows that such waves engage the active process, enhancing hearing sensitivity.

  16. Light-induced performance increase of silicon heterojunction solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kobayashi, Eiji

    2016-10-11

    Silicon heterojunction solar cells consist of crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers coated with doped/intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) bilayers for passivating-contact formation. Here, we unambiguously demonstrate that carrier injection either due to light soaking or (dark) forward-voltage bias increases the open circuit voltage and fill factor of finished cells, leading to a conversion efficiency gain of up to 0.3% absolute. This phenomenon contrasts markedly with the light-induced degradation known for thin-film a-Si:H solar cells. We associate our performance gain with an increase in surface passivation, which we find is specific to doped a-Si:H/c-Si structures. Our experiments suggest that this improvement originates from a reduced density of recombination-active interface states. To understand the time dependence of the observed phenomena, a kinetic model is presented.

  17. Desolvation Induced Origami of Photocurable Polymers by Digit Light Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zeang; Wu, Jiangtao; Mu, Xiaoming; Chen, Haosen; Qi, H Jerry; Fang, Daining

    2016-12-22

    Self-folding origami is of great interest in current research on functional materials and structures, but there is still a challenge to develop a simple method to create freestanding, reversible, and complex origami structures. This communication provides a feasible solution to this challenge by developing a method based on the digit light processing technique and desolvation-induced self-folding. In this new method, flat polymer sheets can be cured by a light field from a commercial projector with varying intensity, and the self-folding process is triggered by desolvation in water. Folded origami structures can be recovered once immersed in the swelling medium. The self-folding process is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Diverse 3D origami shapes are demonstrated. This method can be used for responsive actuators and the fabrication of 3D electronic devices.

  18. Dissipation-induced optical nonlinearity at low light levels

    CERN Document Server

    Greenberg, Joel A

    2011-01-01

    We observe a dissipation-induced nonlinear optical process in a gas of cold atoms that gives rise to large nonlinear coupling strengths with high transparency. The nonlinearity results from the simultaneous cooling and crystallization of the gas, and can give rise to efficient Bragg scattering in the form of a six-wave-mixing process at low-light-levels with an extremely large effective fifth-order nonlinear susceptibility of \\chi^(5)= 7.6 x 10-15 (m/V)^4. For large optical gains, collective scattering due to the strong light-matter coupling leads to slow group velocities (~c/105) and long atomic coherence times (~100 {\\mu}s).

  19. Light-induced metastable structural changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsche, H. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Light-induced defects (LID) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and its alloys limit the ultimate efficiency of solar panels made with these materials. This paper reviews a variety of attempts to find the origin of and to eliminate the processes that give rise to LIDs. These attempts include novel deposition processes and the reduction of impurities. Material improvements achieved over the past decade are associated more with the material`s microstructure than with eliminating LIDs. We conclude that metastable LIDs are a natural by-product of structural changes which are generally associated with non-radiative electron-hole recombination in amorphous semiconductors.

  20. Light-induced import of the chromoprotein, phytochrome, into mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serlin, B. S.; Roux, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    Mitochondria extracted from plants that were irradiated with actinic light in vivo have associated with them the chromoprotein, phytochrome. This phytochrome retains its native subunit size of 124 kDa after proteolytic treatment of the mitochondria with trypsin and chymotrypsin. This result suggests that phytochrome is not exposed on the outer surface of the outer mitochondrial membrane. Phytochrome, so protected, is not found to be associated with mitochondria derived from unirradiated plants. The possibility that the photoactivation of phytochrome induces a conformational change in its structure which facilitates its transport into the mitochondrion is discussed.

  1. Determination of the absolute chirality of tellurium using resonant diffraction with circularly polarized x-rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y; Collins, S P; Lovesey, S W; Matsumami, M; Moriwaki, T; Shin, S

    2010-03-31

    Many proteins, sugars and pharmaceuticals crystallize into two forms that are mirror images of each other (enantiomers) like our right and left hands. Tellurium is one enantiomer having a space group pair, P3(1)21 (right-handed screw) and P3(2)21 (left-handed screw). X-ray diffraction with dispersion correction terms has been playing an important role in determining the handedness of enantiomers for a long time. However, this approach is not applicable for an elemental crystal such as tellurium or selenium. We have demonstrated that positive and negative circularly polarized x-rays at the resonant energy of tellurium can be used to absolutely distinguish right from left tellurium. This method is applicable to chiral motifs that occur in biomolecules, liquid crystals, ferroelectrics and antiferroelectrics, multiferroics, etc.

  2. Damage of photoreceptor-derived cells in culture induced by light emitting diode-derived blue light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuse, Yoshiki; Ogawa, Kenjiro; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2014-06-09

    Our eyes are increasingly exposed to light from the emitting diode (LED) light of video display terminals (VDT) which contain much blue light. VDTs are equipped with televisions, personal computers, and smart phones. The present study aims to clarify the mechanism underlying blue LED light-induced photoreceptor cell damage. Murine cone photoreceptor-derived cells (661 W) were exposed to blue, white, or green LED light (0.38 mW/cm(2)). In the present study, blue LED light increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, altered the protein expression level, induced the aggregation of short-wavelength opsins (S-opsin), resulting in severe cell damage. While, blue LED light damaged the primary retinal cells and the damage was photoreceptor specific. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant, protected against the cellular damage induced by blue LED light. Overall, the LED light induced cell damage was wavelength-, but not energy-dependent and may cause more severe retinal photoreceptor cell damage than the other LED light.

  3. Protective effect of light emitting diode phototherapy on fluorescent light induced retinal damage in Wistar strain albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed Basha, A; Mathangi, D C; Shyamala, R; Ramesh Rao, K

    2014-09-01

    Artificial light at night alters retinal physiology. Several studies have shown that light emitting diode phototherapy protects the retina from the damaging effects of acute light exposure. The aim of this study has been to elucidate the protective effects of 670 nm LED light on retinal damage induced by chronic fluorescent light in Wistar rats. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into four groups: group 1 were control (CL), group 2, 3 and 4 were exposed to fluorescent light (FL), LED preexposure+fluorescent light exposure (LL) and only LED light exposure (OL) respectively. All animals were maintained in their specific exposure regime for 30 days. Fluorescent light of 1800 lx was exposed between 8 pm to 8 am. Rats were exposed to therapeutic LED light of 670 nm of 9 J/cm2 at 25 mW/cm2 for 6 min duration. Histopathological changes in the retina were studied. Animals of the FL group showed a significant reduction in the outer nuclear layer thickness and cell count in addition to the total thickness of the retina. LL group which were exposed to 670 nm LED prior to exposure to fluorescent light showed a significant decrease in the degree of damage. 670 nm LED light preexposure is protective to retinal cells against fluorescent light-induced damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Light induced DEP for immobilizing and orienting Escherichia coli bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccio, Lisa; Marchesano, Valentina; Mugnano, Martina; Grilli, Simonetta; Ferraro, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Manipulating bacteria and understanding their behavior when interacting with different substrates are of fundamental importance for patterning, detection, and any other topics related to health-care, food-enterprise, etc. Here, we adopt an innovative dielectrophoretic (DEP) approach based on electrode-free DEP for investigating smart but simple strategies for immobilization and orientation of bacteria. Escherichia coli DH5-alpha strain has been selected as subject of the study. The light induced DEP is achieved through ferroelectric iron-doped lithium niobate crystals used as substrates. Due to the photorefractive (PR) property of such material, suitable light patterns allow writing spatial-charges-distribution inside its volume and the resultant electric fields are able to immobilize E. coli on the surface. The experiments showed that, after laser irradiation, about 80% of bacteria is blocked and oriented along a particular direction on the crystals within an area of few square centimeters. The investigation presented here could open the way for detection or patterning applications based on a new driving mechanism. Future perspectives also include the possibility to actively switch by light the DEP forces, through the writing/erasing characteristic of PR fields, to dynamically control biofilm spatial structure and arrangement.

  5. Photodynamic effect of light-emitting diode light on cell growth inhibition induced by methylene blue

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lílian S Peloi; Rafael R S Soares; Carlos E G Biondo; Vagner R Souza; Noboru Hioka; Elza Kimura

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to propose the use of red light-emitting diode (LED) as an alternative light source for methylene blue (MB) photosensitizing effect in photodynamic therapy (PDT). Its effectiveness was tested against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 26923), Escherichia coli (ATCC 26922), Candida albicans (ATCC 90028) and Artemia salina. The maximum absorption of the LED lamps was at a wavelength of 663 nm, at intensities of 2, 4, 6 and 12 J.cm–2 for 10, 20, 30 and 60 min of exposure, respectively. Assays with and without LED exposure were carried out in plates containing MB at concentrations of 7 to 140.8 M for microorganisms and 13.35 to 668.5 M for microorganisms or microcrustaceans. The LED exposure induced more than 93.05%, 93.7% and 93.33% of growth inhibition for concentrations of 42.2 M for S. aureus (D-value=12.05 min) and 35.2 M for E. coli (D-value=11.51 min) and C. albicans (D-value=12.18 min), respectively after 20 min of exposure. LED exposure for 1 h increased the cytotoxic effect of MB against A. salina from 27% to 75%. Red LED is a promising light device for PDT that can effectively inhibit bacteria, yeast and microcrustacean growth.

  6. Microsecond light-induced proton transfer to flavin in the blue light sensor plant cryptochrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenbacher, Thomas; Immeln, Dominik; Dick, Bernhard; Kottke, Tilman

    2009-10-14

    Plant cryptochromes are blue light photoreceptors that regulate key responses in growth and daily rhythm of plants and might be involved in magnetoreception. They show structural homology to the DNA repair enzyme photolyase and bind flavin adenine dinucleotide as chromophore. Blue light absorption initiates the photoreduction from the oxidized dark state of flavin to the flavin neutral radical, which is the signaling state of the sensor. Previous time-resolved studies of the photoreduction process have been limited to observation of the decay of the radical in the millisecond time domain. We monitored faster, light-induced changes in absorption of an algal cryptochrome covering a spectral range of 375-750 nm with a streak camera setup. Electron transfer from tryptophan to flavin is completed before 100 ns under formation of the flavin anion radical. Proton transfer takes place with a time constant of 1.7 micros leading to the flavin neutral radical. Finally, the flavin radical and a tryptophan neutral radical decay with a time constant >200 micros in the millisecond and second time domain. The microsecond proton transfer has not been observed in animal cryptochromes from insects or photolyases. Furthermore, the strict separation in time of electron and proton transfer is novel in the field of flavin-containing photoreceptors. The reaction rate implies that the proton donor is not in hydrogen bonding distance to the flavin N5. Potential candidates for the proton donor and the involvement of the tryptophan triad are discussed.

  7. Ultraviolet light-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in rabbit eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallet, Justin D; Rochette, Patrick J

    2011-01-01

    Sunlight exposure of the eye leads to pathologies including photokeratitis, cortical cataracts, pterygium, actinic conjunctivitis and age-related macular degeneration. It is well established that exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiations leads to DNA damage, mainly cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs). CPD formation is the principal factor involved in skin cancer. However, the exact mechanism by which sunlight induces ocular pathologies is not well understood. To shed light on this issue, we quantified the CPD formation onto DNA of rabbit ocular cells following UVB exposure. We found that CPDs were induced only in the structures of the ocular anterior chamber (cornea, iris and lens) and were more concentrated in the corneal epithelium. Residual UVB that pass through the cornea are completely absorbed by the anterior layers of the iris. CPDs were also detected in the central portion of the lens that is not protected by the iris (pupil). By determining the UV-induced DNA damage formation in eyes, we showed that anterior ocular structures are a reliable physical barrier that protects the subjacent structures from the toxic effects of UV. Although the corneal epithelium is the structure where most of the CPDs were detected, no cancer is related to solar exposure.

  8. Synthesis of ultra-thin tellurium nanoflakes on textiles for high-performance flexible and wearable nanogenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wen; Van Ngoc, Huynh; Qian, Yong Teng; Hwang, Jae Seok; Yan, Ya Ping; Choi, Hongsoo; Kang, Dae Joon

    2017-01-01

    We report that ultra-thin tellurium (Te) nanoflakes were successfully grown on a sample of a gold-coated textile, which then was used as an active piezoelectric material. An output voltage of 4 V and a current of 300 nA were obtained from the bending test under a driving frequency of 10 Hz. To test the practical applications, Te nanoflake nanogenerator (TFNG) device was attached to the subject's arm, and mechanical energy was converted to electrical energy by means of periodic arm-bending motions. The optimized open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current density of approximately 125 V and 17 μA/cm2, respectively, were observed when a TFNG device underwent a compression test with a compressive force of 8 N and driving frequency of 10 Hz. This high-power generation enabled the instantaneous powering of 10 green light-emitting diodes that shone without any assistance from an external power source.

  9. Functional analysis of chloroplast early light inducible proteins (ELIPs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzel, Carolyn M

    2005-02-22

    The objectives of this project were to characterize gene expression patterns of early light inducible protein (ELIP) genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Lycopersicon esculentum, to identify knock mutants of the 2 ELIP genes in Arabidopsis, and to characterize the effects of the knockouts. Expression in Arabidopsis was studied in response to thylakoid electron transport chain (PETC) capacity, where it was found that there is a signal for expression associated with reduction of the PETC. Expression in response to salt was also studied, with different responses of the two gene copies. Knockout lines for ELIP1 and ELIP2 have been identified and are being characterized. In tomato, it was found that the single-copy ELIP gene is highly expressed in ripening fruit during the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition. Studies of expression in tomato ripening mutants are ongoing.

  10. Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Slow Light with Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Safavi-Naeini, Amir H; Chan, Jasper; Eichenfield, Matt; Winger, Martin; Lin, Qiang; Hill, Jeffrey T; Chang, Darrick; Painter, Oskar

    2010-01-01

    Controlling the interaction between localized optical and mechanical excitations has recently become possible following advances in micro- and nano-fabrication techniques. To date, most experimental studies of optomechanics have focused on measurement and control of the mechanical subsystem through its interaction with optics, and have led to the experimental demonstration of dynamical back-action cooling and optical rigidity of the mechanical system. Converseley, the optical response of these systems is also modified in the presence of mechanical interactions, leading to strong nonlinear optical effects such as Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) and parametric normal-mode splitting. In atomic systems, seminal experiments and proposals to slow and stop the propagation of light, and their applicability to modern optical networks, and future quantum networks, have thrust EIT to the forefront of experimental study during the last two decades. In a similar fashion, here we use the optomechanical nonli...

  11. Light-induced crawling of crystals on a glass surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Emi; Azumi, Reiko; Norikane, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    Motion is an essential process for many living organisms and for artificial robots and machines. To date, creating self-propelled motion in nano-to-macroscopic-sized objects has been a challenging issue for scientists. Herein, we report the directional and continuous motion of crystals on a glass surface when irradiated simultaneously with two different wavelengths, using simple azobenzenes as a photoresponsive organic compound. The direction of the motion can be controlled by the position of the light sources, and the crystals can even climb vertical surfaces. The motion is driven by crystallization and melting at the front and rear edges of the crystal, respectively, via photochemical conversion between the crystal and liquid phases induced by the trans-cis isomerization of azobenzenes. This finding could lead to remote-controlled micrometre-sized vehicles and valves on solid substrates.

  12. Light-induced bird strikes on vessels in Southwest Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merkel, Flemming Ravn; Johansen, Kasper Lambert

    2011-01-01

    Light-induced bird strikes are known to occur when vessels navigate during darkness in icy waters using powerful searchlight. In Southwest Greenland, which is important internationally for wintering seabirds, we collected reports of incidents of bird strikes over 2–3 winters (2006–2009) from navy...... vessels, cargo vessels and trawlers (total n = 19). Forty-one incidents were reported: mainly close to land (birds were reported killed in a single incident. All occurred between 5 p.m. and 6 a.m. and significantly more birds were involved when...... visibility was poor (snow) rather than moderate or good. Among five seabird species reported, the common eider (Somateria mollissima) accounted for 95% of the bird casualties. Based on spatial analyses of data on vessel traffic intensity and common eider density we are able to predict areas with high risk...

  13. Granulomatous tattoo reaction induced by intense pulse light treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourlaki, Athanasia; Boneschi, Vinicio; Tosi, Diego; Pigatto, Paolo; Brambilla, Lucia

    2010-10-01

    Cosmetic tattooing involves implantation of pigments into the dermis in order to create a permanent makeup. Here, we report a case of sarcoidal granulomatous reaction to old cosmetic tattoos after an intense pulsed light (IPL) treatment for facial skin rejuvenation. We consider this case as a peculiar example of photo-induced reaction to tattoo. In addition, we hypothesize that an underlying immune dysfunction was present, and acted as a predisposing factor for this unusual response, as the patient had suffered from an episode of acute pulmonary sarcoidosis 15 years before. Overall, our observation suggests that IPL treatment should be used cautiously in patients with tattoos, especially when a history of autoimmune disease is present.

  14. Retinal damage induced by commercial light emitting diodes (LEDs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaadane, Imene; Boulenguez, Pierre; Chahory, Sabine; Carré, Samuel; Savoldelli, Michèle; Jonet, Laurent; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Martinsons, Christophe; Torriglia, Alicia

    2015-07-01

    Spectra of "white LEDs" are characterized by an intense emission in the blue region of the visible spectrum, absent in daylight spectra. This blue component and the high intensity of emission are the main sources of concern about the health risks of LEDs with respect to their toxicity to the eye and the retina. The aim of our study was to elucidate the role of blue light from LEDs in retinal damage. Commercially available white LEDs and four different blue LEDs (507, 473, 467, and 449nm) were used for exposure experiments on Wistar rats. Immunohistochemical stain, transmission electron microscopy, and Western blot were used to exam the retinas. We evaluated LED-induced retinal cell damage by studying oxidative stress, stress response pathways, and the identification of cell death pathways. LED light caused a state of suffering of the retina with oxidative damage and retinal injury. We observed a loss of photoreceptors and the activation of caspase-independent apoptosis, necroptosis, and necrosis. A wavelength dependence of the effects was observed. Phototoxicity of LEDs on the retina is characterized by a strong damage of photoreceptors and by the induction of necrosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Metabolic response to light exercise after exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Stephen P; Clarkson, Priscilla; Patel, Jehangir J

    2002-01-01

    Inherent compromises in substrate metabolism, or impaired perfusion of muscle may contribute to the occurrence of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis. In this study, the lactate response of the elbow flexor muscles to light exercise was examined in eight subjects (five males, three females) who previously demonstrated rhabdomyolysis with extreme swelling (ES; n = 4) or no swelling (NS; n = 4) of the upper arm after eccentric exercise. Subjects performed identical light exercise bouts (45 s of rapid isotonic biceps curls consisting of both concentric and eccentric actions at 25% of maximum voluntary contraction force) using their previously eccentrically exercised arm (E-ARM) and control arm, which was not used previously to perform eccentric exercise (C-ARM). Blood lactate concentration ([La]b) was assessed 1.5, 3, 4.5, 6, and 9 min post-exercise. Peak [La]b and the area under the curve (AUC) were compared between the E-ARM of the ES and NS groups and between the C-ARM and E-ARM of the ES group. The AUC did not differ between the E-ARM of the ES and NS groups (P > 0.05) or between the C-ARM and E-ARM of the ES group (P > 0.05). In the ES group, the increase in [La]b after light exercise with the C-ARM [mean (SD) change, delta: 1.98 (0.7) mmol/l] was not different from the increase after exercising the E-ARM [delta: 2.10 (0.7) mmol/l; P>0.05]. Comparing the response of the E-ARM between groups, the increase in [La]b of the NS group [delta: 1.40 (0.4) mmol/l] was not different than that observed in the ES group [delta: 2.10 (0.7) mmol/l; P>0.05). Thus, subjects who had previously exhibited signs of exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis did not show an abnormal response to low-intensity anaerobic exercise.

  16. Light-induced rotations of chiral birefringent microparticles in optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, M. G.; Mazzulla, A.; Pagliusi, P.; Magazzù, A.; Hernandez, R. J.; Provenzano, C.; Gucciardi, P. G.; Maragò, O. M.; Cipparrone, G.

    2016-01-01

    We study the rotational dynamics of solid chiral and birefringent microparticles induced by elliptically polarized laser light in optical tweezers. We find that both reflection of left circularly polarized light and residual linear retardance affect the particle dynamics. The degree of ellipticity of laser light needed to induce rotations is found. The experimental results are compared with analytical calculations of the transfer of angular moment from elliptically polarized light to chiral birefringent particles. PMID:27601200

  17. Effect of gamma radiation on optical and electrical properties of tellurium dioxide thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T K Maity; S L Sharma

    2008-11-01

    Gamma radiation induced changes in the optical and electrical properties of tellurium dioxide (TeO2) thin films, prepared by thermal evaporation, have been studied in detail. The optical characterization of the as-deposited thin films and that of the thin films exposed to various levels of gamma radiation dose clearly show that the optical bandgap decreases with increase in the gamma radiation dose up to a certain dose. At gamma radiation doses above this value, however, the optical bandgap has been found to increase. On the other hand, the current vs voltage plots for the as-deposited thin films and those for the thin films exposed to various levels of gamma radiation dose show that the current increases with the gamma radiation dose up to a certain dose and that the value of this particular dose depends upon the thickness of the film. The current has, however, been found to decrease with further increase in gamma radiation dose. The observed changes in both the optical and electrical properties indicate that TeO2 thin films can be used as the real time gamma radiation dosimeter up to a certain dose, a quantity that depends upon the thickness of the film.

  18. Self-Induced Light Polarization Rotation in Azobenzene-Containing Polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolova, L.; Nedelchev, L.; Todorov, T.

    2000-01-01

    We report here a light-induced phenomenon--a self-induced rotation of the azimuth of elliptically polarized light passing through photobirefringent azopolymers. The experiments are carried out with films of amorphous and liquid-crystalline polymers. It has been shown that the induced rotation angle...... depends on the ellipticity of the input light. A theoretical analysis of the phenomenon has been done and it has been shown that light induces chiral structure in the polymer films. (C) 2000 American Institute of Physics. [S0003-6951(00)02731-5]....

  19. Green Light Induces Shade Avoidance Symptoms1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Maruhnich, Stefanie A.; Folta, Kevin M.

    2011-01-01

    Light quality and quantity affect plant adaptation to changing light conditions. Certain wavelengths in the visible and near-visible spectrum are known to have discrete effects on plant growth and development, and the effects of red, far-red, blue, and ultraviolet light have been well described. In this report, an effect of green light on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) rosette architecture is demonstrated using a narrow-bandwidth light-emitting diode-based lighting system. When green light was added to a background of constant red and blue light, plants exhibited elongation of petioles and upward leaf reorientation, symptoms consistent with those observed in a shaded light environment. The same green light-induced phenotypes were also observed in phytochrome (phy) and cryptochrome (cry) mutant backgrounds. To explore the molecular mechanism underlying the green light-induced response, the accumulation of shade-induced transcripts was measured in response to enriched green light environments. Transcripts that have been demonstrated to increase in abundance under far-red-induced shade avoidance conditions either decrease or exhibit no change when green light is added. However, normal far-red light-associated transcript accumulation patterns are observed in cryptochrome mutants grown with supplemental green light, indicating that the green-absorbing form of cryptochrome is the photoreceptor active in limiting the green light induction of shade-associated transcripts. These results indicate that shade symptoms can be induced by the addition of green light and that cryptochrome receptors and an unknown light sensor participate in acclimation to the enriched green environment. PMID:21852417

  20. Introducing Dunaliella LIP promoter containing light-inducible motifs improves transgenic expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Kwangryul; Lee, Yew; Nam, Onyou; Park, Seunghye; Sim, Sang Jun; Jin, EonSeon

    2016-03-01

    Promoter of the light-inducible protein gene (LIP) of Dunaliella was recently isolated in our laboratory. The aim of this work is to find the light-inducible motif in the Dunaliella LIP promoter and verify its regulatory motif with a Gaussia luciferase reporter gene transformed in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. 400 bp upstream to the translational start site of the Dunaliella LIP gene was gradually truncated and analyzed for the luciferase expression. Furthermore, this promoter comprising duplicated or triplicated light-responsive motifs was tested for its augmentation of light response. Two putative light-responsive motifs, GT-1 binding motif and sequences over-represented in light-repressed promoters (SORLIP) located in the 200 bp LIP promoter fragment were analyzed for their light responsibility. It is turned out that SORLIP was responsible for the light-inducible activity. With the copy number of SORLIP up to three showed stronger high light response compared with the native LIP promoter fragment. Therefore, we found a light-responsive DNA motif operating in Chlamydomonas and confirm a synthetic promoter including this motif displayed light inducibility in heterologously transformed green algae for the first time. This light-inducible expression system will be applied to various area of algal research including algal biotechnology.

  1. Evidence for a distinct light-induced calcium-dependent potassium current in Hermissenda crassicornis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, K T

    2000-01-01

    A model of phototransduction is developed as a first step toward a model for investigating the critical interaction of light and turbulence stimuli within the type B photoreceptor of Hermissenda crassicronis. The model includes equations describing phototransduction, release of calcium from intracellular stores, and other calcium regulatory mechanisms, as well as equations describing ligand-gating of a rhabdomeric sodium current. The model is used to determine the sources of calcium in the soma, whether calcium or IP3 is a plausible ligand of the light-induced sodium current, and whether the light-induced potassium current is equivalent to the calcium-dependent potassium current activated by light-induced calcium release. Simulations show that the early light-induced calcium elevation is due to influx through voltage-dependent channels, whereas the later calcium elevation is due to release from intracellular stores. Simulations suggest that the ligand of the fast, light-induced sodium current is IP3 but that there is a smaller, prolonged component of the light-induced sodium current that is activated by calcium. In the model, the calcium-dependent potassium current, located in the soma, is activated only slightly by light-induced calcium elevation, leading to the prediction that a calcium-dependent potassium current, active at resting potential, is located in the rhabdomere and is responsible for the light-induced potassium current.

  2. Emerging tellurium nanostructures: controllable synthesis and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhen; Yang, Yuan; Liu, Jian-Wei; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2017-05-22

    Tellurium (Te) is a rare element in trace amounts of about one part per billion, comparable to that of platinum and ranked 75th in the abundance of the elements in the earth crust. Te nanostructures, as narrow bandgap semiconductors, have numerous potential applications in the fabrication of many modern devices. The past decades have witnessed an explosion in new strategies for synthesizing diverse emerging Te nanostructures with controlled compositions, sizes, shapes, and structures. Their structure-determined nature makes functional Te nanomaterials an attractive candidate for modern applications. This review focuses on the synthesis and morphology control of emerging Te nanostructures and summarizes the latest developments in the applications of Te nanostructures, such as their use as chemical transformation templates to access a huge family of nanowires/nanotubes, batteries, photodetectors, ion detection and removal, element doping, piezoelectric energy harvesting, gas sensing, thermoelectric devices and many other device applications. Various Te nanostructures with different shapes and structures will exploit the beneficial properties associated with their assembly process and nanofabrication. Finally, the prospects for future applications of Te nanomaterials are summarized and highlighted.

  3. Diagnosis of dental caries using quantitative light-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaechi, Bennett T.; Higham, Susan M.

    2001-10-01

    Current dental diagnostic methods can detect caries but cannot quantify the mineral status of the lesion. Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence (QLF) measures the percentage fluorescence radiance change of demineralised enamel with respect to surround sound enamel, and related it directly to the amount of mineral lost during demineralisation. Demineralisation of teeth to produce caries-like lesions and the subsequent remineralisation of the lesions were monitored quantitatively and longitudinally with QLF. The influence of factors such as presence of plaque or saliva, lesion staining, lesion magnification, tooth thickness and developmental hypomineralisation, on the reproducibility of QLF imaging and analysis were investigated, Results showed that the integrated fluorescence change (hence the mineral loss) increased linearly with demineralisation time and decreased with increasing remineralisation time. Caries detection was limited by saliva or plaque, but enhanced by staining. QLF could not discriminate between developmental hypomineralisation and caries. Neither the variation in tooth thickness nor lesion magnification within the limit of a sharp image made a significant difference in QLF analysis. It was concluded that QLF could detect and quantitatively monitor the mineral changes in an incipient caries on a longitudinal basis, however detection may be limited by the presence of saliva or plaque or enhanced by staining.

  4. Light-Ion-Induced Multifragmentation: The ISiS Project

    CERN Document Server

    Viola, V E

    2006-01-01

    An extensive study of GeV light-ion-induced multifragmentation and its possible interpretation in terms of a nuclear liquid-gas phase transition has been performed with the Indiana Silicon Sphere (ISiS)4 pi detector array. Measurements were performed with 5-15 GeV/c p, pbar, and pion beams incident on $^{197}$Au and 2-5 GeV $^3$He incident on $^{nat}$Ag and $^{197}$Au targets. Both the reaction dynamics and the subsequent decay of the heavy residues have been explored. The data provide evidence for a dramatic change in the reaction observables near an excitation energy of E*/A = 4-5 MeV per residue nucleon. In this region, fragment multiplicities and energy spectra indicate emission from an expanded/dilute source on a very short time scale (20-50 fm/c). These properties, along with caloric curve and scaling-law behavior, yield a pattern that is consistent with a nuclear liquid-gas phase transition.

  5. Light-ion-induced multifragmentation: The ISiS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, V. E.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Beaulieu, L.; Bracken, D. S.; Breuer, H.; Brzychczyk, J.; de Souza, R. T.; Ginger, D. S.; Hsi, W.-C.; Korteling, R. G.; Lefort, T.; Lynch, W. G.; Morley, K. B.; Legrain, R.; Pienkowski, L.; Pollacco, E. C.; Renshaw, E.; Ruangma, A.; Tsang, M. B.; Volant, C.; Wang, G.; Yennello, S. J.; Yoder, N. R.

    2006-11-01

    An extensive study of GeV light-ion-induced multifragmentation and its possible interpretation in terms of a nuclear liquid-gas phase transition has been performed with the Indiana Silicon Sphere (ISiS) 4π detector array. Measurements were performed with 5-15 GeV/ c p, pbar, and π- beams incident on 197Au and 2-5 GeV 3He incident on natAg and 197Au targets. Both the reaction dynamics and the subsequent decay of the heavy residues have been explored. The data provide evidence for a dramatic change in the reaction observables near an excitation energy of E*/A=4-5 MeV/residue nucleon. In this region, fragment multiplicities and energy spectra indicate emission from an expanded/dilute source on a very short time scale (20-50 fm/ c). These properties, along with caloric curve and scaling-law behavior, yield a pattern that is consistent with a nuclear liquid-gas phase transition.

  6. Light meson emission in (anti)proton induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kuraev, E A; Tomasi-Gustafsson, E

    2015-01-01

    Reactions induced by high energy antiprotons on proton on nuclei are accompanied with large probability by the emission of a few mesons. Interesting phenomena can be observed and QCD tests can be performed, through the detection of one or more mesons. The collinear emission from high energy (anti)proton beams of a hard pion or vector meson, can be calculated similarly to the emission of a hard photon from an electron \\cite{Kuraev:2013izz}. This is a well known process in QED, and it is called the "Quasi-Real Electron method", where the incident particle is an electron and a hard photon is emitted leaving an 'almost on shell' electron impinging on the target \\cite{Baier:1973ms}. Such process is well known as Initial State Emission (ISR) method of scanning over incident energy, and can be used, in the hadron case, to produce different kind of particles in similar kinematical conditions. In case of emission of a charged light meson, $\\pi$ or $\\rho$-meson, in proton-proton(anti-proton) collisions, the meson can b...

  7. The LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) experiment at LNF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agosteo, S. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Anania, M.P. [INFN LNF Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Caresana, M. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); De Martinis, C. [Physics Department, University of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Delle Side, D. [LEAS, University of Salento and INFN, Lecce (Italy); Fazzi, A. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Gatti, G. [INFN LNF Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Giove, D. [Physics Department, University of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Giulietti, D. [Physics Department, University of Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Gizzi, L.A.; Labate, L. [INO-CNR and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Londrillo, P. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Maggiore, M. [INFN LNL, Legnaro (Italy); Nassisi, V., E-mail: vincenzo.nassisi@le.infn.it [LEAS, University of Salento and INFN, Lecce (Italy); Sinigardi, S. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Tramontana, A.; Schillaci, F. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); Scuderi, V. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Turchetti, G. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); and others

    2014-07-15

    Laser-matter interaction at relativistic intensities opens up new research fields in the particle acceleration and related secondary sources, with immediate applications in medical diagnostics, biophysics, material science, inertial confinement fusion, up to laboratory astrophysics. In particular laser-driven ion acceleration is very promising for hadron therapy once the ion energy will attain a few hundred MeV. The limited value of the energy up to now obtained for the accelerated ions is the drawback of such innovative technique to the real applications. LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) is an experiment now running at LNF (Frascati) with the goal of producing a real proton beam able to be driven for significant distances (50–75 cm) away from the interaction point and which will act as a source for further accelerating structure. In this paper the description of the experimental setup, the preliminary results of solid target irradiation and start to end simulation for a post-accelerated beam up to 60 MeV are given.

  8. Light-induced electron localization in a quantum Hall system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikawa, T.; Hyodo, K.; Kadoya, Y.; Tanaka, K.

    2017-07-01

    An insulating bulk state is a prerequisite for the protection of topological edge states. In quantum Hall systems, the thermal excitation of delocalized electrons is the main route to breaking bulk insulation. In equilibrium, the only way to achieve a clear bulk gap is to use a high-quality crystal under high magnetic field at low temperature. However, bulk conduction could also be suppressed in a system driven out of equilibrium such that localized states in the Landau levels are selectively occupied. Here we report a transient suppression of bulk conduction induced by terahertz wave excitation between the Landau levels in a GaAs quantum Hall system. Strikingly, the Hall resistivity almost reaches the quantized value at a temperature where the exact quantization is normally disrupted by thermal fluctuations. The electron localization is realized by the long-range potential fluctuations, which are a unique and inherent feature of quantum Hall systems. Our results demonstrate a new means of effecting dynamical control of topology by manipulating bulk conduction using light.

  9. The LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) experiment at LNF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosteo, S.; Anania, M. P.; Caresana, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; De Martinis, C.; Delle Side, D.; Fazzi, A.; Gatti, G.; Giove, D.; Giulietti, D.; Gizzi, L. A.; Labate, L.; Londrillo, P.; Maggiore, M.; Nassisi, V.; Sinigardi, S.; Tramontana, A.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Turchetti, G.; Varoli, V.; Velardi, L.

    2014-07-01

    Laser-matter interaction at relativistic intensities opens up new research fields in the particle acceleration and related secondary sources, with immediate applications in medical diagnostics, biophysics, material science, inertial confinement fusion, up to laboratory astrophysics. In particular laser-driven ion acceleration is very promising for hadron therapy once the ion energy will attain a few hundred MeV. The limited value of the energy up to now obtained for the accelerated ions is the drawback of such innovative technique to the real applications. LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) is an experiment now running at LNF (Frascati) with the goal of producing a real proton beam able to be driven for significant distances (50-75 cm) away from the interaction point and which will act as a source for further accelerating structure. In this paper the description of the experimental setup, the preliminary results of solid target irradiation and start to end simulation for a post-accelerated beam up to 60 MeV are given.

  10. What goes down must come up: symmetry in light-induced migration behaviour of Daphnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gool, E.; Ringelberg, J.

    2003-01-01

    During a short period of the year, Daphnia may perform a phenotypically induced diel vertical migration. For this to happen, light-induced swimming reactions must be enhanced both at dawn and at dusk. Enhanced swimming in response to light intensity increase can be elicited by fish-associated kairom

  11. Electrochemical and antimicrobial activity of tellurium oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Pramod K. [Department of Applied Sciences and Humanities, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110067 (India); Special Centre for Nanosciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Sharma, Prem Prakash; Sharma, Anshu [Special Centre for Nanosciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Khan, Zishan H., E-mail: zishan_hk@yahoo.co.in [Department of Applied Sciences and Humanities, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110067 (India); Solanki, Pratima R., E-mail: pratimarsolanki@gmail.com [Special Centre for Nanosciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • TeO{sub 2} NPs synthesized without using any catalyst by chemical vapour deposition method. • The growth temperature was 410 °C with continuous flow of O{sub 2.} • TeO{sub 2} NPs have anti-bacterial activity against E. coli, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus while enhances the growth of S. pyogenes. • TeO{sub 2} shows maximum redox current at pH 7 for phosphate buffer solution. - Abstract: Thin film of tellurium oxide (TeO{sub 2}) has been synthesized by chemical vapour deposition method onto indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate without using any catalyst. XRD pattern of TeO{sub 2} thin film suggests that the structure of TeO{sub 2} changes from amorphous to crystalline (paratellurite) on dispersing into deionized water. Zeta potential measurement reveals a positive surface potential of 28.8 mV. TEM images shows spherical shaped TeO{sub 2} nanoparticles having average particle size of 65 nm. Electrochemical studies of TeO{sub 2}/ITO electrode exhibit improved electron transfer owing to its inherent electron transfer property at pH 7.0 of phosphate buffer. Antimicrobial activity of TeO{sub 2} has been studied for gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes) and gram negative (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) bacterial and fungal strains (Aspergillus nizer and Candida albicans). These studies suggest that the TeO{sub 2} NPs inhibit the growth of E. coli, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus bacteria, whereas the same particles enhance the growth of S. pyogenes bacteria.

  12. Tellurium isotope compositions of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehr, M. A.; Rehkämper, M.; Halliday, A. N.; Hattendorf, B.; Günther, D.

    2009-08-01

    A method for the precise and accurate determination of the tellurium (Te) isotope compositions of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) has been developed. The technique utilizes multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) with either Faraday detectors or a dual ion-counting system. The external reproducibility (2σ) for 126Te/125Te was ~15‰ and ~2‰ when 3 pg and 65 pg of Te were analyzed with the electron multipliers. Measurements performed on 200 pg of Te using Faraday detectors and time-resolved software displayed an external reproducibility of ~8‰ for 126Te/124Te, whereas 3 ng Te could be measured to a precision of about 0.6‰. Analyses of five CAIs from the Allende chondrite yielded Te concentrations that range from 12 to 537 ppb and the inclusions are therefore depleted in Te relative to bulk Allende by factors of about 2 to 86. The Sn/Te ratios of the CAIs are also fractionated compared to bulk Allende (which displays 124Sn/128Te ≍ 0.1) with 124Sn/128Te ratios of about 0.1 to 2.5. The Te isotope measurements for these refractory inclusions yielded no 126Te excesses from the decay of the short-lived radionuclide 126Sn (τ½ = 234,500 years) and the most precise analysis provided a ɛ126Te value of 1 ± 6 (ɛ126Te = 126Te/ 124Te normalized to 122Te/124Te = 0.53594 and reported relative to the JMC Te standard). Minor differences in the Te isotope composition of the CAIs relative to the terrestrial standard and bulk Allende hint at the presence of small deficits in r-process Te isotopes or excess of s-process Te, but these nucleosynthetic anomalies are barely resolvable given the analytical uncertainties. Hence, it is also conceivable that these effects reflect small unresolved analytical artifacts.

  13. Technical Research on Recovering Tellurium from Material Containing Tellurium and Copper%从复杂碲铜物料中回收碲的工艺研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邬建辉; 刘刚; 王刚; 张文宏; 苏涛; 魏涛

    2014-01-01

    以某公司复杂碲铜物料为原料,采用双氧水氧化浸出-草酸沉铜-还原碲工艺回收复杂碲铜物料中的碲。研究了浸出温度、H2 SO4浓度、双氧水加入量、液固比、浸出时间对碲浸出效果的影响,草酸钠过量系数和反应温度对沉铜效果的影响以及亚硫酸钠用量对还原效果的影响。实验结果表明,在H2 SO4浓度110 g/L、双氧水加入量为理论量的1.2倍、液固比6∶1、浸出温度80~85℃、浸出时间4 h时,碲、铜浸出率均在99%以上;在草酸钠为理论量的1.2倍、反应温度65~75℃时,沉铜率达99.6%;在亚硫酸钠用量为理论量的1.6倍时,碲的还原率达99.6%。碲以碲粉的形式回收,铜以草酸铜的形式回收,碲、铜回收率分别为98.5%和98%。%With material containing tellurium and copper as raw material, a study on tellurium recovery by adopting a process composed of leaching with hydrogen peroxide oxidation, copper precipitation with oxalic acid and tellurium reduction is reported. Effects of H2 SO4 concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration, liquid-solid ratio, leaching temperature and time on tellurium leaching rate, excess coefficient of sodium oxalate and reaction temperature on copper precipitation,as well as effects of sodium sulfite dosage on tellurium reduction were all investigated. Results showed that, with H2 SO4 concentration at 110 g/L, the dosage of hydrogen peroxide at 1.2 times of theoretical value, liquid-solid ratio of 6∶1, leaching temperature at 80~85 ℃, leaching time of 4 h, the leaching rates of tellurium and copper could be over 99%. With the dosage of sodium oxalate at 1.2 times of theoretical value and reaction temperature at 65~75 ℃, copper precipitation rate reached 99. 6%. With the dosage of sodium sulfite at 1. 6 times of theoretical value, the reduction rate of tellurium could be up to 99.6%. Tellurium was recovered in the form of powder and copper

  14. Motion Induced by Light: Photokinetic Effects in the Rayleigh Limit

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffner, David B; Grier, David G

    2015-01-01

    Structured beams of light can move small objects in surprising ways. Particularly striking examples include observations of polarization-dependent forces acting on optically isotropic objects and tractor beams that can pull objects opposite to the direction of the light's propagation. Here we develop a theoretical framework in which these effects vanish at the leading order of light scattering theory. Exotic optical forces emerge instead from interference between different orders of multipole scattering. These effects create a rich variety of ways to manipulate small objects with light, so-called photokinetic effects. Applying this formalism to the particular case of Bessel beams offers useful insights into the nature of tractor beams and the interplay between spin and orbital angular momentum in vector beams of light, including a manifestation of orbital-to-spin conversion.

  15. Light conditions affect the roll-induced vestibuloocular reflex in Xenopus laevis tadpoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Yamany, Nabil A.

    2008-12-01

    In Xenopus laevis tadpoles, effects of asymmetrical light conditions on the roll-induced vestibuloocular reflex (rVOR) were tested for the developmental period between stage 47 and 49. For comparison, the rVOR was tested in dim- and high-symmetrical light environments. Test parameters were the rVOR gain and rVOR amplitude. Under all light conditions, the rVOR increased from tadpole stage 47 to 49. For all stages, the asymmetrical light field induced the strongest response, the dim light field the weakest one. The response for the left and right eye was identical, even if the tadpoles were tested under asymmetrical light conditions. The experiments can be considered as hints (1) for an age-dependent light sensitivity of vestibular neurons, and (2) for the existence of control systems for coordinated eye movements that has its origin in the proprioceptors of the extraocular eye muscles.

  16. Light-induced protein degradation in human-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wansheng; Zhang, Wenyao; Zhang, Chao; Mao, Miaowei; Zhao, Yuzheng; Chen, Xianjun; Yang, Yi

    2017-05-27

    Controlling protein degradation can be a valuable tool for posttranslational regulation of protein abundance to study complex biological systems. In the present study, we designed a light-switchable degron consisting of a light oxygen voltage (LOV) domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1 (AsLOV2) and a C-terminal degron. Our results showed that the light-switchable degron could be used for rapid and specific induction of protein degradation in HEK293 cells by light in a proteasome-dependent manner. Further studies showed that the light-switchable degron could also be utilized to mediate the degradation of secreted Gaussia princeps luciferase (GLuc), demonstrating the adaptability of the light-switchable degron in different types of protein. We suggest that the light-switchable degron offers a robust tool to control protein levels and may serves as a new and significant method for gene- and cell-based therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Excitation of Light-Induced Acoustic Waves in Doped Lithium Niobate Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The phenomena of acoustic emission in doped lithium niobate crystals were observed in the process of light-induced quasi-breakdown. It is found that the ultrasonic waves introduce into the crystal have been modulated by the low frequency acoustic waves. Its frequency increases with the rise of the intensity of incident light and its jump period of breakdown is the same as that of the photovoltaic current Ic, the change of light-induced refractive index Δn and the diffracted light intensity L. This effect was explained with the interaction of the three waves and resonant state theory. The experimental results and the theoretical analysis are in conformity.

  18. Are There Frame-Distortion Contributions to Collision-Induced Absorption and Collision-Induced Light Scattering?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohm, Uwe

    2007-12-01

    Collision-induced spectroscopy, such as collision-induced absorption (CIA) and collision-induced light scattering (CILS), can give valuable information on permanent electric moments, polarizabilities and intermolecular-interaction potentials. In general the collision-induced spectra of the pure rare-gases and their binary mixtures are understood fairly well. However if at least one of the collision partners is a molecule then in some cases the spectra show features which can hardly be explained by current theories which deal with the case of undistorted molecules. Here we discuss the possibility of collision-induced frame distortion as an additional effect to be considered in collision-induced spectroscopy.

  19. A surface extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of tellurium adsorbed onto Si(100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, S. R.; Cowie, B. C. C.; Wilks, S. P.; Dunstan, P. R.; Dunscombe, C. J.; Williams, R. H.

    1996-09-01

    The adsorption of tellurium on Si(100) has been studied using surface extended X-ray adsorption fine structure (SEXAFS) and X-ray standing wave spectroscopy (XSW). This particular system is of interest due to its potential applicability in the surfactant aided growth of CdHgTeCdTeSi(100) based infra-red detectors. The Te/Si(100) structure was generated by depositing a thick layer (˜ 100 Å) of CdTe onto a clean Si (2 × 1) double domain surface, and annealing the sample to 350°C. This resulted is a ˜ 1 ML Te terminated surface where the (2 × 1) reconstruction was lost in favour of a (1 × 1) symmetry. X-ray absorption of the Te L 3 edge ( E = 4341 eV), with a photon energy range of 4440-4700 eV, was probed using a total yield detection scheme. The SEXAFS results indicated that the Te atoms sat in 2-fold bridge sites directly above a fourth layer Si atom. The corresponding bond length was measured to be 2.52 ± 0.05 Å. The XSW measurements of the (400) reflection gave a coherent position of 1.63 ± 0.03 Å and a coherent fraction of 0.65. This is consistent with the breaking of the SiSi dimers and thus could be an example of the phenomena of adsorbate-induced dereconstruction of the surface. These results are compared with those of Bennet et al. who examined a similar system using soft X-ray photoemission (SXPS) and the STM study of Yoshikawa et al.

  20. Geometric phase and Pancharatnam phase induced by light wave polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Lages, J; Vigoureux, J -M

    2013-01-01

    We use the quantum kinematic approach to revisit geometric phases associated with polarizing processes of a monochromatic light wave. We give the expressions of geometric phases for any, unitary or non-unitary, cyclic or non-cyclic transformations of the light wave state. Contrarily to the usually considered case of absorbing polarizers, we found that a light wave passing through a polarizer may acquire in general a non zero geometric phase. This geometric phase exists despite the fact that initial and final polarization states are in phase according to the Pancharatnam criterion and can not be measured using interferometric superposition. Consequently, there is a difference between the Pancharatnam phase and the complete geometric phase acquired by a light wave passing through a polarizer. We illustrate our work with the particular example of total reflection based polarizers.

  1. Chemical physics: Quantum control of light-induced reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, David W.

    2016-07-01

    An investigation of how ultracold molecules are broken apart by light reveals surprising, previously unobserved quantum effects. The work opens up avenues of research in quantum optics. See Letter p.122

  2. Exciton coupling induces vibronic hyperchromism in light-harvesting complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Schulze, Jan; Kühn, Oliver; Pullerits, Tõnu

    2013-01-01

    The recently suggested possibility that weak vibronic transitions can be excitonically enhanced in light-harvesting complexes is studied in detail. A vibronic exciton dimer model which includes ground state vibrations is investigated using multi-configuration time-dependent Hartree method with a parameter set typical to photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes. Absorption spectra are discussed in dependence on the Coulomb coupling, the detuning of site energies, and the number of vibrational mode. Calculations of the fluorescence spectra show that the spectral densities obtained from the low temperature fluorescence line narrowing measurements of light-harvesting systems need to be corrected for the exciton effects. For the J-aggregate configuration, as in most of the light-harvesting complexes, the true spectral density has larger amplitude than what is obtained from the measurement.

  3. Dismantling and chemical characterization of spent Peltier thermoelectric devices for antimony, bismuth and tellurium recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balva, Maxime; Legeai, Sophie; Garoux, Laetitia; Leclerc, Nathalie; Meux, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Major uses of thermoelectricity concern refrigeration purposes, using Peltier devices, mainly composed of antimony, bismuth and tellurium. Antimony was identified as a critical raw material by EU and resources of bismuth and tellurium are not inexhaustible, so it is necessary to imagine the recycling of thermoelectric devices. That for, a complete characterization is needed, which is the aim of this work. Peltier devices were manually dismantled in three parts: the thermoelectric legs, the alumina plates on which remain the electrical contacts and the silicone paste used to connect the plates. The characterization was performed using five Peltier devices. It includes mass balances of the components, X-ray diffraction analysis of the thermoelectric legs and elemental analysis of each part of the device. It appears that alumina represents 45% of a Peltier device in weight. The electrical contacts are mainly composed of copper and tin, and the thermoelectric legs of bismuth, tellurium and antimony. Thermoelectric legs appear to be Se-doped Bi2Te3 and (Bi0,5Sb1,5)Te3 for n type and p type semiconductors, respectively. This work shows that Peltier devices can be considered as a copper ore and that thermoelectric legs contain high amounts of bismuth, tellurium and antimony compared to their traditional resources.

  4. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  5. Directional migration of cancer cells induced by a blue light intensity gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chien-Chih; Lu, Eugene Youjhen; Pan, Huei-Jyuan; Lee, Chau-Hwang

    2015-07-01

    We used a spatial light modulator to project an optical micropattern of 473 nm light with a quartic intensity gradient on a single lung cancer cell. We observed that the intracellular amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of the cancer cells were proportional to the intensity of the blue light, and the blue light intensity gradients could drive directional cell migration. This optically induced directional cell migration was inhibited by a ROS scavenger in the culture medium in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, the ROS levels in fibroblasts were saturated by the blue light at low intensity and therefore the fibroblasts did not exhibit directional migration in the intensity gradient.

  6. Stable Te isotope fractionation in tellurium-bearing minerals from precious metal hydrothermal ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornadel, Andrew P.; Spry, Paul G.; Haghnegahdar, Mojhgan A.; Schauble, Edwin A.; Jackson, Simon E.; Mills, Stuart J.

    2017-04-01

    The tellurium isotope compositions of naturally-occurring tellurides, native tellurium, and tellurites were measured by multicollector-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS) and compared to theoretical values for equilibrium mass-dependent isotopic fractionation of representative Te-bearing species estimated with first-principles thermodynamic calculations. Calculated fractionation models suggest that 130/125Te fractionations as large as 4‰ occur at 100 °C between coexisting tellurates (Te VI) and tellurides (Te -II) or or native tellurium Te(0), and smaller, typically secondary emmonsite, δ130/125Te compositions were identical. The coincidence of δ130/125Te between all oxidized and reduced species in this study and the apparent lack of isotopic fractionation between native tellurium and emmonsite in one sample suggest that oxidation processes cause little to no fractionation. Because Te is predominantly transported as an oxidized aqueous phase or as a reduced vapor phase under hydrothermal conditions, either a reduction of oxidized Te in hydrothermal liquids or deposition of Te from a reduced vapor to a solid is necessary to form the common tellurides and native tellurium in ore-forming systems. Our data suggest that these sorts of reactions during mineralization may account for a ∼3‰ range of δ130/125Te values. Based on the data ranges for Te minerals from various ore deposits, the underpinning geologic processes responsible for mineralization seem to have primary control on the magnitude of fractionation, with tellurides in epithermal gold deposits showing a narrower range of isotope values than those in orogenic gold and volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits.

  7. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  8. Light-induced nonlinear effects on dispersion relation of ultracold Bose gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡正峰; 杜春光; 李师群

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the optical properties of A-configuration ultracold dense Bose gas interacting with two laser pulses, which usually result in electromagnetically induced transparency. With the nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics and taking into account the atomic dipole-dipole interaction and local field effect, we have derived the Maxwell-Bloch equations of the system. The dispersion relation of an ultracold Bose gas has been obtained and the light-induced nonlinear effects have been analysed. The light-induced nonlinear effects are different from the effects induced by two-body collision of Bose-Einstein condensation atoms which have a frequency shift of transparent window.

  9. Spectral sensitivity of light induced respiratory activity of photoreceptor mitochondria in the intact fly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinbergen, J.; Stavenga, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    Fly Calliphora erythrocephala (white eyed) photoreceptors were investigated in intact, living animals by microspectrofluorometry in vivo. The fluorescence of mitochondrial flavoproteins was used to monitor transient changes in oxidative metabolism, which were induced by a test light following a stim

  10. Solar light-induced production of reactive oxygen species by single walled carbon nanotubes in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photosensitizing processes of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) which include photo-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) convert light energy into oxidizing chemical energy that mediates transformations of nanomaterials. The oxidative stress associated with ROS may p...

  11. Atomic Interaction Effects on Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Slow Light in Ultracold Bose Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡正峰; 杜春光; 李代军; 李师群

    2002-01-01

    We investigate electromagnetically induced transparency and slow group velocity of light in ultracold Bose gas with a two-photon Raman process. The properties of electromagnetically induced transparency and light speed can be changed by controlling the atomic interaction. Atomic interaction can be used as a knob to control the optical properties of atomic media. This can be realized in experiment by using the Feshbach resonance technique.

  12. Reducing disorder-induced losses for slow light photonic crystal waveguides through Bloch mode engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Nishan; Combrié, Sylvian; Colman, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    We present theory and measurements ofdisorder-induced losses for low loss 1.5 mmlong slow light photonic crystal waveguides. A recent class of dispersion engineered waveguides increases the bandwidth of slow light and shows lower propagation losses for the same group index. Our theory and experim...

  13. Observation of spatial quantum correlations induced by multiple scattering of nonclassical light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolka, Stephan; Huck, Alexander; Andersen, Ulrik Lund;

    2009-01-01

    We present the experimental realization of spatial quantum correlations of photons that are induced by multiple scattering of squeezed light. The quantum correlation relates photons propagating along two different light paths through the random medium and is infinite in range. Both positive...

  14. Light-Induced Phosphorylation of Crystallins in the Retinal Pigment Epithelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunju; Chung, Hyewon; Lee, Sung Haeng; Jahng, Wan Jin

    2017-01-01

    Protein phosphorylations have essential regulatory roles in visual signaling. Previously, we found that phosphorylation of several proteins in the retina and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is involved in anti-apoptotic signaling under oxidative stress conditions, including light exposure. In this study, we used a phosphoprotein enrichment strategy to evaluate the light-induced phosphoproteome of primary bovine RPE cells. Phosphoprotein-enriched extracts from bovine RPE cells exposed to light or dark conditions for 1 hour were separated by 2D SDS-PAGE. Serine and tyrosine phosphorylation were visualized by 2D phospho western blotting and specific phosphorylation sites were analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Light induced a marked increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of beta crystallin A3 and A4. The most abundant light-induced up-regulated phosphoproteins were crystallins of 15–25-kDa, including beta crystallin S and zeta crystallin. Phosphorylation of beta crystallin suggests an anti-apoptotic chaperone function in the RPE. Other chaperones, cytoskeletal proteins, and proteins involved in energy balance were expressed at higher levels in the dark. A detailed analysis of RPE phosphoproteins provides a molecular basis for understanding light-induced signal transduction and anti-apoptosis mechanisms. Our data indicates that phosphorylation of crystallins likely represents an important mechanism for RPE shielding from physiological and pathophysiological light-induced oxidative injury. PMID:21094180

  15. Intensity study of LIF spectrum for the B0{sup +}{sub u} and X0{sup +}{sub g} system of a tellurium natural sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polo, A.M.; Poyato, J.M.L.; Camacho, J.J.; Pardo, A. [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049- Madrid (Spain)

    1998-12-01

    The fluorescence spectrum of a tellurium sample in its natural isotopic abundance, induced by the 4764.8 A line of an argon ion laser is studied. The study of natural tellurium samples allows us to bring out and analyze the intensity of three fluorescence series not previously reported. Photographic plates and densitometric techniques were used when recording experimental intensities. The radiative transition probabilities for the observed fluorescence series were calculated by using hybrid Perturbed-Morse-Oscillator (PMO) - Rydberg-Klein-Rees (RKR)- Long Range potential energy curves for the B0{sup +}{sub u} and X0{sup +}{sub g} states and a function for the transition dipole moment in the framework of the r-centroid approximation. Radiative lifetimes of the rovibrational levels for the upper state pumped by the laser line have also been calculated. The transition probabilities and lifetimes are in good agreement with the corresponding observed measurements usually within the experimental uncertainty. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  16. Electric Current Induced Light Emission from C60

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palstra, T.T.M.; Haddon, R.C.; Lyons, K.B.

    1997-01-01

    We report the luminescence of C60 crystals and films due to the passage of an electrical current. The current-voltage behavior is highly non-linear with light-emission beyond a threshold voltage. The emission spectrum is featureless and resembles black-body radiation with an effective temperature on

  17. Fullerene oxidation and clustering in solution induced by light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattani, Rajeev; Gibson, Kirsty F; Few, Sheridan; Borg, Aaron J; DiMaggio, Peter A; Nelson, Jenny; Kazarian, Sergei G; Cabral, João T

    2015-05-15

    We investigate the environmental stability of fullerene solutions by static and dynamic light scattering, FTIR, NMR and mass spectroscopies, and quantum chemical calculations. We find that visible light exposure of fullerene solutions in toluene, a good solvent, under ambient laboratory conditions results in C60 oxidation to form fullerene epoxides, and subsequently causes fullerene clustering in solution. The clusters grow with time, even in absence of further illumination, and can reach dimensions from ≈100 nm to the μm scale over ≈1 day. Static light scattering suggests that resulting aggregates are fractal, with a characteristic power law (d(f)) that increases from approximately 1.3 to 2.0 during light exposure. The clusters are bound by weak Coulombic interactions and are found to be reversible, disintegrating by mechanical agitation and thermal stress, and reforming over time. Our findings are relevant to the solution processing of composites and organic photovoltaics, whose reproducibility and performance requires control of fullerene solution stability under storage conditions.

  18. Light induced structural changes of the photoprotein mnemiopsin: Characterization and contribution in photoinactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashandi, Zaiddodine; Molakarimi, Maryam; Sajedi, Reza H; Taghdir, Majid; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2016-12-01

    Mnemiopsin, an EF-hand Ca(2+) binding photoprotein isolated from luminous ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, emits blue light from its chromophore, coelenterazine, which is non-covalently bond in its central hydrophobic core. Previous studies have revealed unique biochemical properties for ctenophore photoproteins such as inactivation by light, but only few have focused on photoinactivation process. To understand the nature of photoinactivation process we have investigated the impact of light alone and in the presence of Ca(2+) ion on the structure of this photoprotein. We used UV-Vis, circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectroscopy following Ca(2+) binding assay to analyze the light effects on mnemiopsin conformation in comparison with aequorin at both apo and holo form. Our results showed light induced structural changes which resulted into photoinactivation. These changes include significant modification on secondary structure of mnemiopsin in comparison with aequorin. Our data also revealed that light could influence structure of apo protein regardless of presence of coelenterazine. The comparative studies of Ca(2+) ion binding affinity following light exposure, also showed that light induced structural changes could presumably affect coelenterazine binding or its conformation in binding site in such a way that causes photoinactivation. In conclusion, we have proposed that structural rearrangement of helix 5 and C-terminal motif could be responsible for light induced structural changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Red light-induced redox reactions in cells observed with TEMPO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichler, Maor; Lavi, Ronit; Friedmann, Harry; Shainberg, Asher; Lubart, Rachel

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the wavelength dependence of light-induced redox reactions in cells, particularly whether there is any contribution by red wavelengths. An additional aim was to assess the potential of 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl piperidine-N-oxyl (TEMPO) as a tool for measuring these redox reactions. Visible light has been shown to affect cells, and redox reactions, which have been detected previously using spin traps, have been proposed as a mechanism. However, there is little evidence that red light, which is used in most such experiments, is redox active in cells. Redox activity was observed by measuring the decay of the electron paramagnetic resonance signal of TEMPO that occurs in the presence of illuminated cells. Color filters were used to generate blue, green, and red light, and the decay resulting from these wavelengths was compared to the decay caused by white light. Shorter wavelengths have a considerably stronger effect than longer wavelengths, although red light has some effect. Creation of reactive oxygen species by red light was confirmed with the spin trap 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO). Red light can induce redox reactions in illuminated cells. However, shorter wavelengths are more efficient in this regard. In addition, TEMPO was found to be a more sensitive probe than DMPO for detecting light-induced cellular redox reactions.

  20. A plant-specific protein essential for blue-light-induced chloroplast movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBlasio, Stacy L; Luesse, Darron L; Hangarter, Roger P

    2005-09-01

    In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), light-dependent chloroplast movements are induced by blue light. When exposed to low fluence rates of light, chloroplasts accumulate in periclinal layers perpendicular to the direction of light, presumably to optimize light absorption by exposing more chloroplast area to the light. Under high light conditions, chloroplasts become positioned parallel to the incoming light in a response that can reduce exposure to light intensities that may damage the photosynthetic machinery. To identify components of the pathway downstream of the photoreceptors that mediate chloroplast movements (i.e. phototropins), we conducted a mutant screen that has led to the isolation of several Arabidopsis mutants displaying altered chloroplast movements. The plastid movement impaired1 (pmi1) mutant exhibits severely attenuated chloroplast movements under all tested fluence rates of light, suggesting that it is a necessary component for both the low- and high-light-dependant chloroplast movement responses. Analysis of pmi1 leaf cross sections revealed that regardless of the light condition, chloroplasts are more evenly distributed in leaf mesophyll cells than in the wild type. The pmi1-1 mutant was found to contain a single nonsense mutation within the open reading frame of At1g42550. This gene encodes a plant-specific protein of unknown function that appears to be conserved among angiosperms. Sequence analysis of the protein suggests that it may be involved in calcium-mediated signal transduction, possibly through protein-protein interactions.

  1. Nanosecond dynamics of a gallium mirror's light-induced reflectivity change

    CERN Document Server

    Albanis, V; Emelyanov, V I; Fedotov, V A; MacDonald, K F; Petropoulos, P M; Richardson, D J; Zheludev, N I

    2000-01-01

    Transient pump-probe optical reflectivity measurements of the nano/microsecond dynamics of a fully reversible, light-induced, surface-assisted metallization of gallium interfaced with silica are reported. The metallization leads to a considerable increase in the interface's reflectivity when solid a-gallium is on the verge of melting. The reflectivity change was found to be a cumulative effect that grows with light intensity and pulse duration. The reflectivity relaxes back to that of alpha-gallium when the excitation is withdrawn in a time that increases critically at gallium's melting point. The effect is attributed to a non-thermal light-induced structural phase transition.

  2. Blue and Green Light-Induced Phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana and Lactuca sativa L. Seedlings 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinitz, Benjamin; Ren, Zhangling; Poff, Kenneth L.

    1985-01-01

    Exposure time-response curves for blue and green light-induced phototropic bending in hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and Lactuca sativa L. seedlings are presented. These seedlings show significant phototropic sensitivity up to 540 to 550 nanometers. Since wave-lengths longer than 560 nanometers do not induce phototropic bending, it is suggested that the response to 510 to 550 nanometers light is mediated by the specific blue light photoreceptor of phototropism. We advise care in the use of green `safelights' for studies of phototropism. PMID:16664021

  3. Localized linear IgA dermatosis induced by UV light-treatment for herpes zoster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chundi; Xu, Honghui; Xiao, Ting; Geng, Long; Chen, Hong-Duo

    2007-05-01

    We report a case of localized linear IgA dermatosis (LID). The patient suffered from herpes zoster on the right waist and received three localized ultraviolet (UV) light treatments. One month later he presented with bullae on the same site. Direct immunofluorescence showed deposition of linear IgA and weak C3 along the basement membrane zone. Indirect immunofluorescence on the salt-split human skin demonstrated that IgA antibodies were bound to the epidermal side. To our knowledge, this is the first case of localized LID induced by UV light treatment for herpes zoster. It is also the third case of LID induced by UV light.

  4. Light-induced circular birefringence in cyanoazobenzene side-chain liquid-crystalline polyester films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naydenova, I; Nikolova, L; Ramanujam, P.S.;

    1999-01-01

    We report the inducement of large circular birefringence (optical activity) in films of a cyanoazobenzene side-chain liquid-crystalline polyester on illumination with circularly polarized light. The polyester has no chiral groups and is initially isotropic. The induced optical rotation is up to 5...

  5. Light induced degradation of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölscher, T.; Förster, S.; Schneider, T.; Maiberg, M.; Widdra, W.; Scheer, R.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate light-induced degradation of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe) layers by means of time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurements. Illumination in the range of minutes with 1 sun white light equivalent leads to a strong reduction of the carrier lifetime as determined by TRPL. Ambient storage in the dark, however, does not cause degradation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the CIGSe surface reveals a light induced enhancement of Na 1s and O 1s core-level emission. The position of the O 1s peak at 531.6 eV is related to a Na-O-CIGSe bonding complex. The light-induced degradation of the CIGSe layer finally translates into inferior open circuit voltages due to the dominance of interface recombination in completed solar cell devices. This study has implications for laboratory research and may need to be regarded in CIGSe module production.

  6. Light-induced changes in bottled white wine and underlying photochemical mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant-Preece, Paris; Barril, Celia; Schmidtke, Leigh M; Scollary, Geoffrey R; Clark, Andrew C

    2017-03-04

    Bottled white wine may be exposed to UV-visible light for considerable periods of time before it is consumed. Light exposure may induce an off-flavor known as "sunlight" flavor, bleach the color of the wine, and/or increase browning and deplete sulfur dioxide. The changes that occur in bottled white wine exposed to light depend on the wine composition, the irradiation conditions, and the light exposure time. The light-induced changes in the aroma, volatile composition, color, and concentrations of oxygen and sulfur dioxide in bottled white wine are reviewed. In addition, the photochemical reactions thought to have a role in these changes are described. These include the riboflavin-sensitized oxidation of methionine, resulting in the formation of methanethiol and dimethyl disulfide, and the photodegradation of iron(III) tartrate, which gives rise to glyoxylic acid, an aldehyde known to react with flavan-3-ols to form yellow xanthylium cation pigments.

  7. Cyclic AMP-inducible genes respond uniformly to seasonal lighting conditions in the rat pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spessert, R; Gupta, B B P; Rohleder, N; Gerhold, S; Engel, L

    2006-12-01

    The encoding of photoperiodic information ensues in terms of the daily profile in the expression of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-inducible genes such as the arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) gene that encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in melatonin formation. In the present study, we compared the influence of the photoperiodic history on the cAMP-inducible genes AA-NAT, inducible cyclic AMP early repressor (ICER), fos-related antigen-2 (FRA-2), mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), nerve growth factor inducible gene-A (NGFI-A) and nerve growth factor inducible gene-B (NGFI-B) in the pineal gland of rats. For this purpose, we monitored the daily profiles of each gene in the same pineal gland under a long (light/dark 16:8) and a short (light/dark 8:16) photoperiod by measuring the respective mRNA amounts by real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis. We found that, for all genes under investigation, the duration of increased nocturnal expression is lengthened and, in relation to light onset, the nocturnal rise is earlier under the long photoperiod (light/dark 16:8). Furthermore, with the exception of ICER, all other cAMP-inducible genes tend to display higher maximum expression under light/dark 8:16 than under light/dark 16:8. Photoperiod-dependent changes persist for all of the cAMP-inducible genes when the rats are kept for two cycles under constant darkness. Therefore, all cAMP-inducible genes are also influenced by the photoperiod of prior entrained cycles. Our study indicates that, despite differences regarding the expressional control and the temporal phasing of the daily profile, cAMP-inducible genes are uniformly influenced by photoperiodic history in the rat pineal gland.

  8. Light-induced morphological alteration in anthocyanin-accumulating vacuoles of maize cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grotewold Erich

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant pigmentation is affected by a variety of factors. Light, an important plant developmental signal, influences the accumulation of anthocyanins primarily through the activation of the transcription factors that regulate the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. In this study, we utilized maize Black Mexican Sweet (BMS cells expressing the R and C1 regulators of anthocyanin biosynthesis from a light-insensitive promoter as a means to investigate the existence of additional levels of control of pigmentation by light. Results BMS cells expressing the R and C1 regulators from the CaMV 35S constitutive promoter accumulate anthocyanins when grown in complete darkness, suggesting that the transcription factors R and C1 are sufficient for the transcription of the genes corresponding to the structural enzymes of the pathway, with no requirement for additional light-induced regulators. Interestingly, light induces a "darkening" in the color of the purple anthocyanin pigmentation of transgenic BMS cells expressing R and C1. This change in the pigment hue is not associated with a variation in the levels or types of anthocyanins present, or with an alteration of the transcript levels of several flavonoid biosynthetic genes. However, cytological observations show that light drives unexpected changes in the morphology and distribution of the anthocyanins-containing vacuolar compartments. Conclusion By uncoupling the effect of light on anthocyanin accumulation, we have found light to induce the fusion of anthocyanin-containing vacuoles, the coalescence of anthocyanic vacuolar inclusion (AVI-like structures contained, and the spread of anthocyanins from the inclusions into the vacuolar sap. Similar light-induced alterations in vacuolar morphology are also evident in the epidermal cells of maize floral whorls accumulating anthocyanins. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism for the action of light on the vacuolar storage of anthocyanin.

  9. Quantum Interference and Entanglement Induced by Multiple Scattering of Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Mortensen, Asger; Lodahl, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We report on the effects of quantum interference induced by the transmission of an arbitrary number of optical quantum states through a multiple-scattering medium. We identify the role of quantum interference on the photon correlations and the degree of continuous variable entanglement between tw...

  10. Ultraviolet light induced refractive index structures in germanosilica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael

    1997-01-01

    optical fibers and planar wavguides have been explored. This work includes fabrication of fiber Bragg gratings and design of equipment intended for enhancement of photosensitivity by indiffusion of molecular hydrogen. New insight regarding UV induced reactions in germanosilica has been provided through...

  11. Smoking-Cue Induced Brain Activation In Adolescent Light Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Mark L.; Luks, Tracy L.; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Dryden, Wendy; Rait, Michelle A.; Simpson, Gregory V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Using fMRI, we examined whether or not adolescents with low levels of nicotine exposure (light smokers) display neural activation in areas shown to be involved with addiction in response to smoking-related stimuli. Design/Setting/Participants Twelve adolescent light smokers (aged 13 to17, smoked 1 to 5 cigarettes per day) and 12 non-smokers (ages 13 to 17, never smoked a cigarette) from the San Francisco Bay Area underwent fMRI scanning. During scanning they viewed blocks of photographic smoking and control cues. Smoking cues consisted of pictures of people smoking cigarettes and smoking-related objects such as lighters and ashtrays. Neutral cues consisted of everyday objects and people engaged in everyday activities. Findings For smokers, smoking cues elicited greater activation than neutral cues in the mesolimbic reward circuit (left anterior cingulate (T=7.88, pbrain regions seen in adult and heavy teen smokers suggests that even at low levels of smoking, adolescents exhibit heightened reactivity to smoking cues. This paper adds to the existing literature suggesting that nicotine dependence may begin with exposure to low levels of nicotine, underscoring the need for early intervention among adolescent smokers. PMID:21185518

  12. Circadian disruption induced by light-at-night accelerates aging and promotes tumorigenesis in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Irina A.; Anisimov, Vladimir N.; Bukalev, Andrey V.; Semenchenko, Anna V.; Zabezhinski, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the effect of various light/dark regimens on the survival, life span and tumorigenesis in rats. Two hundred eight male and 203 females LIO rats were subdivided into 4 groups and kept at various light/dark regimens: standard 12:12 light/dark (LD); natural lighting of the North-West of Russia (NL); constant light (LL), and constant darkness (DD) since the age of 25 days until natural death. We found that exposure to NL and LL regimens accelerated development of metabolic syndrome and spontaneous tumorigenesis, shortened life span both in male and females rats as compared to the standard LD regimen. We conclude that circadian disruption induced by light-at-night accelerates aging and promotes tumorigenesis in rats. This observation supports the conclusion of the International Agency Research on Cancer that shift-work that involves circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans. PMID:20157558

  13. Effect of tellurium deposition rate on the properties of Cu-In-Te based thin films and solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mise, Takahiro; Nakada, Tokio

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of tellurium (Te) deposition rate on the properties of Cu-In-Te based thin films (Cu/In=0.30-0.31), the films were grown on both bare and Mo-coated soda-lime glass substrates at 200 °C by co-evaporation using a molecular beam epitaxy system. The microstructural properties were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The crystalline quality of the films was improved with increase in the deposition rate of Te, and exhibited a single CuIn 3Te 5 phase with a highly preferred (1 1 2) orientation. Te-deficient film (Te/(Cu+In)=1.07) grown with a low Te deposition rate showed a narrow bandgap of 0.99 eV at room temperature. The solar cell performance was affected by the deposition rate of Te. The best solar cell fabricated using CuIn 3Te 5 thin films grown with the highest deposition rate of Te (2.6 nm/s) yielded a total area (0.50 cm 2) efficiency of 4.4% ( Voc=309 mV, Jsc=28.0 mA/cm 2, and FF=0.509) without light soaking.

  14. Ultraviolet light induced refractive index structures in germanosilica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svalgaard, M.

    1997-03-01

    The focus of the research presented in this ph.d. thesis is refractive index structures photoinduced in germanonsilica waveguides with ultra-violet (UV) radiation. The physical mechanisms involved in photosensitivity and applications of a wide range of UV induced refractive index structures in both optical fibers and planar wavguides have been explored. This work includes fabrication of fiber Bragg gratings and design of equipment intended for enhancement of photosensitivity by indiffusion of molecular hydrogen. New insight regarding UV induced reactions in germanosilica has been provided through application of a scanning near-field optical microscope to obtain high resolution images of UV induced refractive index structures and by monitoring the dynamics of UV induced index changes and luminescence. During part of my ph.d. project I have worked at the National Institute of Standards and Technolgy in Colorado (USA) under supervision of Dr. Sarah L. Gilbert, fabricating and characterizing erbium doped fiber lasers incorporating UV written Bragg gratings. Due to their compact structure, such devices are shown to exhibit a frequency stability several orders of magnitude better than lasers incorporating bulk optics. Finally, I have developed a new method for direct UV writing of planar waveguide devices using a focussed continuous wave UV laser beam which is scanned across a photosensitive thin film deposited on a silicon wafer. Contrary to other waveguide fabrication techniques this method requires no additional wafer processing. By demonstrating a wide variety of integrated devices it is shown that the performance of this method in terms of waveguide loss, flexibility and fabrication yield rivals or surpasses that currently obtainable with other more elaborate techniques.

  15. Longwave UV light induces the aging-associated progerin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hirotaka; Rünger, Thomas M

    2013-07-01

    Premature aging in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is caused by a mutation of the LMNA gene that activates a cryptic splice site. This results in expression of a truncated form of Lamin A, called progerin. Accumulation of progerin in the nuclei of HGPS cells impairs nuclear functions and causes abnormal nuclear morphology. Progerin accumulation has not only been described in HGPS, but also during normal intrinsic aging. We hypothesized that accumulation of progerin with abnormal nuclear shapes may also be accelerated by UV and with that contribute to photoaging of the skin. We exposed neonatal or aged cultured fibroblasts to single or repeated doses of longwave or shortwave UV (UVA or UVB) and found that UVA, but not UVB, induces progerin expression and HGPS-like abnormal nuclear shapes in all cells, but more in aged cells. The induction of progerin is mediated by UVA-induced oxidative damage and subsequent alternative splicing of the LMNA transcript, as progerin induction was suppressed by the singlet oxygen quencher sodium azide, and as mRNA expression of LMNA was not induced by UVA. These data suggest a previously unreported pathway of photoaging and support the concept that photoaging is at least in part a process of damage-accelerated intrinsic aging.

  16. Role of myosin light chain and myosin light chain kinase in advanced glycation end product-induced endothelial hyperpermeability in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fan; Guo, Xiaohua; Xu, Jing; Wang, Weiju; Li, Bingling; Huang, Qiaobing; Su, Lei; Xu, Qiulin

    2016-03-01

    We have previously reported that advanced glycation end products activated Rho-associated protein kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, causing endothelial hyperpermeability. However, the mechanisms involved were not fully clarified. Here, we explored the role of myosin light chain kinase in advanced glycation end product-induced endothelial hyperpermeability. Myosin light chain phosphorylation significantly increased by advanced glycation end products in endothelial cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, indicating that myosin light chain phosphorylation is involved in the advanced glycation end product pathway. Advanced glycation end products also induced myosin phosphatase-targeting subunit 1 phosphorylation, and small interfering RNA knockdown of the receptor for advanced glycation end products, or blocking myosin light chain kinase with its inhibitor, ML-7, or small interfering RNA abated advanced glycation end product-induced myosin light chain phosphorylation. Advanced glycation end product-induced F-actin rearrangement and endothelial hyperpermeability were also diminished by inhibition of receptor for advanced glycation end product or myosin light chain kinase signalling. Moreover, inhibiting myosin light chain kinase with ML-7 or blocking receptor for advanced glycation end product with its neutralizing antibody attenuated advanced glycation end product-induced microvascular hyperpermeability. Our findings suggest a novel role for myosin light chain and myosin light chain kinase in advanced glycation end product-induced endothelial hyperpermeability.

  17. Ligand-Substitution Reactions of the Tellurium Compound AS-101 in Physiological Aqueous and Alcoholic Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Alon; Albeck, Michael; Sredni, Benjamin; Albeck, Amnon

    2016-11-07

    Since its first crystallization, the aqueous structure of the tellurium-containing experimental drug AS-101 has never been studied. We show that, under the aqueous conditions in which it is administered, AS-101 is subjected to an immediate ligand-substitution reaction with water, yielding a stable hydrolyzed oxide anion product that is identified, for the first time, to be TeOCl3(-). Studying the structure of AS-101 in propylene glycol (PG), an alcoholic solvent often used for the topical and oral administration of AS-101, revealed the same phenomenon of ligand-substitution reaction between the alcoholic ligands. Upon exposure to water, the PG-substituted product is also hydrolyzed to the same tellurium(IV) oxide form, TeOCl3(-).

  18. Electronic Structure of Pure Selenium and Tellurium Chains and Selenium Rings and with Impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharjan, N. B.; Cho, Hwa-Suck; Scheicher, R. H.

    2005-03-01

    We have studied the electronic structures of pure chain-structured Selenium and Tellurium and with chalcogen impurities as well as ring-structured Selenium both pure and with Tellurium impurity atoms. The Hartree-Fock Cluster Theory procedure combined with many-body perturbation theory procedure has been used. The accuracy of the calculated electronic wave functions is tested by the investigation of ^77Se and ^125Te nuclear quadrupole interaction parameters. Good agreement is found with experiment for the pure systems. For the impurity systems, the agreement is reasonable but suggests the need for inclusion of more extensive relaxation around the impurity atoms. (*) Current Address: Dept. of Physics, Uppsala University, Sweden (**) Also: Dept. of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida

  19. GALVANIC MAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF BISMUTH THIN FILMS DOPED WITH TELLURIUM MADE BY THERMAL VACUUM EVAPORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Komarov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of n-type impurity of tellurium (concentration range from 0.005 atomic % Te to 0.15 atomic % Te on galvanic magnetic properties (resistivity, magnetic resistance and Hall constant of Bi thin films with various thicknesses was studied. The properties were measured in temperature range from 77 to 300 K. It was established that the classical size effect in the films is significant and decreases with higher concentration of Te impurity. The analysis of experimental results was carried out in approximation of the law of Jones-Schoenberg dispersion for Bi films doped with tellurium. Calculation of concentration and mobility of charge carriers in the studied films was made.

  20. Solidification of Anisotropic Semiconductor Tellurium Samples in Microgravity and Their Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfeniev, R. V.; Farbshtein, I. I.; Yakimov, S. V.; Shalimov, V. P.; Turchaninov, A. M.

    A research program was partly completed to determine the influence of microgravity on the crystallization and electrical properties of tellurium, as a semiconductor with both anisotropic crystal lattice and energy spectrum. Three different tellurium samples were solidified in space by a modified Bridgman method in the Crystallizator ChSK-1 furnace aboard the MIR space station. The variation of the crystal structure, charge carrier concentration and mobility along the sample length was investigated and compared with material solidified on earth. The lowest impurity and defect concentrations were obtained in partially melted single crystals resolidified by the Bridgman method. The distribution of electric active and neutral defects along the samples with a concentration as small as 10 -5 at% were measured by a galvanomagnetic method at low temperatures. Some peculiarities of the remelting process connected with microgravity were observed.

  1. Phototropins mediate blue and red light-induced chloroplast movements in Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Masahiro; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Kiyosue, Tomohiro; Wada, Masamitsu

    2004-07-01

    Phototropin is the blue-light receptor that mediates phototropism, chloroplast movement, and stomatal opening in Arabidopsis. Blue and red light induce chloroplast movement in the moss Physcomitrella patens. To study the photoreceptors for chloroplast movement in P. patens, four phototropin genes (PHOTA1, PHOTA2, PHOTB1, and PHOTB2) were isolated by screening cDNA libraries. These genes were classified into two groups (PHOTA and PHOTB) on the basis of their deduced amino acid sequences. Then phototropin disruptants were generated by homologous recombination and used for analysis of chloroplast movement. Data revealed that blue light-induced chloroplast movement was mediated by phototropins in P. patens. Both photA and photB groups were able to mediate chloroplast avoidance, as has been reported for Arabidopsis phot2, although the photA group contributed more to the response. Red light-induced chloroplast movement was also significantly reduced in photA2photB1photB2 triple disruptants. Because the primary photoreceptor for red light-induced chloroplast movement in P. patens is phytochrome, phototropins may be downstream components of phytochromes in the signaling pathway. To our knowledge, this work is the first to show a function for the phototropin blue-light receptor in a response to wavelengths that it does not absorb.

  2. Light induced electrical and macroscopic changes in hydrogenated polymorphous silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K. H.; Johnson, E. V.; Abramov, A.; Cabarrocas, P. Roca i.

    2012-07-01

    We report on light-induced electrical and macroscopic changes in hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H) PIN solar cells. To explain the particular light-soaking behavior of such cells - namely an increase of the open circuit voltage (Voc) and a rapid drop of the short circuit current density (Jsc) - we correlate these effects to changes in hydrogen incorporation and structural properties in the layers of the cells. Numerous techniques such as current-voltage characteristics, infrared spectroscopy, hydrogen exodiffusion, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry are used to study the light-induced changes from microscopic to macroscopic scales (up to tens of microns). Such comprehensive use of complementary techniques lead us to suggest that light-soaking produces the diffusion of molecular hydrogen, hydrogen accumulation at p-layer/substrate interface and localized delamination of the interface. Based on these results we propose that light-induced degradation of PIN solar cells has to be addressed from not only as a material issue, but also a device point of view. In particular we bring experimental evidence that localized delamination at the interface between the p-layer and SnO2 substrate by light-induced hydrogen motion causes the rapid drop of Jsc.

  3. Light induced electrical and macroscopic changes in hydrogenated polymorphous silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roca i Cabarrocas P.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on light-induced electrical and macroscopic changes in hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H PIN solar cells. To explain the particular light-soaking behavior of such cells – namely an increase of the open circuit voltage (Voc and a rapid drop of the short circuit current density (Jsc – we correlate these effects to changes in hydrogen incorporation and structural properties in the layers of the cells. Numerous techniques such as current-voltage characteristics, infrared spectroscopy, hydrogen exodiffusion, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry are used to study the light-induced changes from microscopic to macroscopic scales (up to tens of microns. Such comprehensive use of complementary techniques lead us to suggest that light-soaking produces the diffusion of molecular hydrogen, hydrogen accumulation at p-layer/substrate interface and localized delamination of the interface. Based on these results we propose that light-induced degradation of PIN solar cells has to be addressed from not only as a material issue, but also a device point of view. In particular we bring experimental evidence that localized delamination at the interface between the p-layer and SnO2 substrate by light-induced hydrogen motion causes the rapid drop of Jsc.

  4. Gibberellins negatively regulate light-induced nitrate reductase activity in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongqiang; Liu, Zhongjuan; Liu, Rongzhi; Wang, Liguang; Bi, Yurong

    2011-12-15

    In the present study, the role of phytohormone gibberellins (GAs) on regulating the nitrate reductase (NR) activity was tested in Arabidopsis seedlings. The NR activity in light-grown Col-0 seedlings was reduced by exogenous GA₃ (an active form of GAs), but enhanced by exogenous paclobutrazol (PAC, a gibberellin biosynthesis inhibitor), suggesting that GAs negatively regulate the NR activity in light-grown seedlings. Light is known to influence the NR activity through both photosynthesis and phytochromes. When etiolated seedlings were transferred to white or red light, both exogenously applied GA₃ and PAC were found to function on the NR activity only in the presence of sucrose, implying that GAs are not involved in light signaling-induced but negatively regulate photoproducts-induced NR activity. NR is regulated by light mainly at two levels: transcript level and post-translational level. Our reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assays showed that GAs did not affect the transcript levels of NIA1 and NIA2, two genes that encode NR proteins. But the divalent cations (especially Mg²⁺) were required for GAs negative regulation of NR activity, in view of the importance of divalent cations during the process of post-translational regulation of NR activity, which indicates that GAs very likely regulate the NR activity at the post-translational level. In the following dark-light shift analyses, GAs were found to accelerate dark-induced decrease, but retard light-induced increase of the NR activity. Furthermore, it was observed that application of G₃ or PAC could impair diurnal variation of the NR activity. These results collectively indicate that GAs play a negative role during light regulation of NR activity in nature.

  5. Light-induced regulation of ligand-gated channel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregestovski, Piotr; Maleeva, Galyna; Gorostiza, Pau

    2017-08-31

    The control of ligand-gated receptors with light using photochromic compounds has evolved from the first handcrafted examples to accurate, engineered receptors, whose development is supported by rational design, high-resolution protein structures, comparative pharmacology and molecular biology manipulations. Photoswitchable regulators have been designed and characterized for a large number of ligand-gated receptors in the mammalian nervous system, including nicotinic acetylcholine, glutamate and GABA receptors. They provide a well-equipped toolbox to investigate synaptic and neuronal circuits in all-optical experiments. This focused review discusses the design and properties of these photoswitches, their applications and shortcomings and future perspectives in the field. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. Light induced tunnel effect in CNT-Si photodiode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aramo, C., E-mail: aramo@na.infn.it [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Ambrosio, M. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Bonavolontà, C. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Dip. di Scienze Fisiche, Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Boscardin, M. [Centro per Materiali e i Microsistemi Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Via Sommarive 18, Povo di Trento, 38123 Trento (Italy); Castrucci, P. [INFN, Sezione di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dip. di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Crivellari, M. [Centro per Materiali e i Microsistemi Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Via Sommarive 18, Povo di Trento, 38123 Trento (Italy); De Crescenzi, M. [INFN, Sezione di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dip. di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); De Lisio, C. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Dip. di Scienze Fisiche, Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Fiandrini, E. [INFN, Sezione di Perugia, Dip. di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Piazza Università 1, 06100 Perugia (Italy); and others

    2016-07-11

    Negative differential resistance (NDR), for which the current is a decreasing function of the voltage, has been observed in the current–voltage curves of several types of structures. We measured tunnelling current and NDR by illuminating large area heterojunction obtained by growing Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes on the surface of n-doped Silicon substrate. In the absence of light, the current flow is null until a junction threshold of about 2.4 V is reached, beyond which the dark current flows at room temperature with a very low intensity of few nA. When illuminated, a current of tens nA is observed at a drain voltage of about 1.5 V. At higher voltage the current intensity decreases according to a negative resistance of the order of MΩ. In the following we report details of tunneling photodiode realized and negative resistance characteristics.

  7. Exploring molecular and spin interactions of Tellurium adatom in reduced graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alegaonkar, Ashwini [Department of Chemistry, Savitribai Phule Pune University (Formerly University of Pune), Ganeshkhind, Pune, 411 007, MS (India); Alegaonkar, Prashant [Department of Applied Physics, Defence Institute of Advance Technology, Girinagar, Pune, 411 025, MS (India); Pardeshi, Satish, E-mail: skpar@chem.unipune.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Savitribai Phule Pune University (Formerly University of Pune), Ganeshkhind, Pune, 411 007, MS (India)

    2017-07-01

    The transport of spin information fundamentally requires favourable molecular architecture and tunable spin moments to make the medium pertinent for spintronic. We report on achieving coherent molecular-spin parameters for rGO due to Tellurium (Te) adatom. Initially, GO prepared using graphite, was modified into rGO by in situ incorporation of 1 (w/w)% of Te. Both the systems were subjected to ESCA, FTIR, Raman dispersion, ESR spectroscopy, and electron microscopy. Analysis revealed that, Te substantially reacted with epoxides, carbonyl, and carboxylate groups that improved C-to-O ratio by twice. However, the spin splitting character, between Te and C, seems to be quenched. Moreover, Te altered the dynamical force constant between C-C and C=C that generated the mechanical stress within rGO network. The layer conjugation, nature of folding, symmetry, and electronic states of the edges were also affected by precipitation and entrapment of Te. The calculated dynamic molecular Raman and ESR spin parameters indicated that, Te acted as a bridging element for long range spin transport. This is particularly due to, the p-orbital moments of Te contributing, vectorially, to spin relaxation process operative at broken inversion symmetry sites. Our study suggests that, facile addition of Te in rGO is useful to achieve favourable spintronic properties. - Highlights: • Spin interactions and molecular dynamics modification due to Tellurium adatom in rGO. • Molecular level manipulation of Tellurium adatom for favourable spintronic properties. • Bychocov-Rashaba coupling are the operative channels in rGO. • Extrinsic coupling component get added vectorially by Tellurium. • Te-rGO is a viable medium for molecular spintronics.

  8. Ultraviolet light induced refractive index structures in germanosilica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael

    1997-01-01

    The focus of the research presented in this ph.d. thesis is refractive index structures photoinduced in germanonsilica waveguides with ultra-violet (UV) radiation. The physical mechanisms involved in photosensitivity and applications of a wide range of UV induced refractive index structures in both...... bulk optics. Finally, I have developed a new method for direct UV writing of planar waveguide devices using a focussed continuous wave UV laser beam which is scanned across a photosensitive thin film deposited on a silicon wafer. Contrary to other waveguide fabrication techniques this method requires...

  9. Exploring electromagnetic response of tellurium dielectric resonator metamaterial at the infrared wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jia-Kun; Song, Yu-Zhi; Li, Kang-Wen; Zhang, Zu-Yin; Xu, Yun; Wei, Xin; Song, Guo-Feng

    2015-10-01

    We numerically investigate the electromagnetic properties of tellurium dielectric resonator metamaterial at the infrared wavelengths. The transmission spectra, effective permittivity and permeability of the periodic tellurium metamaterial structure are investigated in detail. The linewidth of the structure in the direction of magnetic field Wx has effects on the position and strength of the electric resonance and magnetic resonance modes. With appropriately optimizing the geometric dimensions of the designed structure, the proposed tellurium metamaterial structure can provide electric resonance mode and high order magnetic resonance mode in the same frequency band. This would be helpful to analyze and design low-loss negative refraction index metamaterials at the infrared wavelengths. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CBA00608, 2012CB619203, 2015CB351902, and 2015CB932402), the National Key Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011ZX01015-001), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61036010, 61177070, 11374295, and U1431231).

  10. Hartree-Fock-Cluster Investigation of Nuclear Quadrupole Interactions in Solid Chalcogens, Selenium and Tellurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryal, M. M.; Maharjan, N. B.; Paudyal, D. D.; Mishra, D. R.; Byahut, S. R.; Scheicher, R. H.; Badu, S. R.; Jeong, J.; Chow, Lee; Das, T. P.

    2008-03-01

    Using the first-principles Hartree-Fock Cluster Procedure, we have studied the electronic structures of pure chain like Selenium and Tellurium, pure ring structured Selenium, Tellurium impurity in chain and ring-structured Selenium and Selenium impurity in chain-structured Tellurium chain. For our investigations in all the systems we have carried out convergence studies with respect to variational basis set sizes,sizes of clusters and electron correlation effects using many-body perturbation theory. Using our calculated electronic field-gradient parameters q in the pure chain systems and employing the experimental quadrupole coupling constants (e^2qQ), the values Q(^77Se)=(0.50±0.04) 10-28 m^2 and Q(^125Te)=-(0.2±0.02) 10-28m^2. Results will also be presented for the asymmetry parameters η for the pure chain systems and the e^2qQ and η for ^77Se in selenium ring. Our calculated values for e^2qQ and η for the impurity systems will also be presented and compared with available experimental data and earlier theoretical results.

  11. Continuous removal and recovery of tellurium in an upflow anaerobic granular sludge bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mal, Joyabrata; Nancharaiah, Yarlagadda V; Maheshwari, Neeraj; van Hullebusch, Eric D; Lens, Piet N L

    2017-04-05

    Continuous removal of tellurite (TeO3(2-)) from synthetic wastewater and subsequent recovery in the form of elemental tellurium was studied in an upflow anaerobic granular sludge bed (UASB) reactor operated at 30°C. The UASB reactor was inoculated with anaerobic granular sludge and fed with lactate as carbon source and electron donor at an organic loading rate of 0.6g CODL(-1)d(-1). After establishing efficient and stable COD removal, the reactor was fed with 10mg TeO3(2-)L(-1) for 42 d before increasing the influent concentration to 20mg TeO3(2-)L(-1). Tellurite removal (98 and 92%, respectively, from 10 and 20mg TeL(-1)) was primarily mediated through bioreduction and most of the removed Te was retained in the bioreactor. Characterization using XRD, Raman spectroscopy, SEM-EDX and TEM confirmed association of tellurium with the granular sludge, typically in the form of elemental Te(0) deposits. Furthermore, application of an extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extraction method to the tellurite reducing sludge recovered up to 78% of the tellurium retained in the granular sludge. This study demonstrates for the first time the application of a UASB reactor for continuous tellurite removal from tellurite-containing wastewater coupled to elemental Te(0) recovery.

  12. Extraordinary Light-Induced Local Angular Momentum near Metallic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabastri, Alessandro; Yang, Xiao; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Everitt, Henry O; Nordlander, Peter

    2016-04-26

    The intense local field induced near metallic nanostructures provides strong enhancements for surface-enhanced spectroscopies, a major focus of plasmonics research over the past decade. Here we consider that plasmonic nanoparticles can also induce remarkably large electromagnetic field gradients near their surfaces. Sizeable field gradients can excite dipole-forbidden transitions in nearby atoms or molecules and provide unique spectroscopic fingerprinting for chemical and bimolecular sensing. Specifically, we investigate how the local field gradients near metallic nanostructures depend on geometry, polarization, and wavelength. We introduce the concept of the local angular momentum (LAM) vector as a useful figure of merit for the design of nanostructures that provide large field gradients. This quantity, based on integrated fields rather than field gradients, is particularly well-suited for optimization using numerical grid-based full wave electromagnetic simulations. The LAM vector has a more compact structure than the gradient matrix and can be straightforwardly associated with the angular momentum of the electromagnetic field incident on the plasmonic structures.

  13. Evaluation of dental enamel caries assessment using Quantitative Light Induced Fluorescence and Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Ana Marly Araújo; de Freitas, Anderson Zanardi; de L Campello, Sergio; Gomes, Anderson Stevens Leônidas; Karlsson, Lena

    2016-06-01

    An in vitro study of morphological alterations between sound dental structure and artificially induced white spot lesions in human teeth, was performed through the loss of fluorescence by Quantitative Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF) and the alterations of the light attenuation coefficient by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). To analyze the OCT images using a commercially available system, a special algorithm was applied, whereas the QLF images were analyzed using the software available in the commercial system employed. When analyzing the sound region against white spot lesions region by QLF, a reduction in the fluorescence intensity was observed, whilst an increase of light attenuation by the OCT system occurred. Comparison of the percentage of alteration between optical properties of sound and artificial enamel caries regions showed that OCT processed images through the attenuation of light enhanced the tooth optical alterations more than fluorescence detected by QLF System. QLF versus OCT imaging of enamel caries: a photonics assessment.

  14. Light-activated hypericin induces cellular destruction of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C. S.; Leung, A. W. N.

    2010-01-01

    Hypericin from Hypericum perforatum plants shows an important promise in the photodynamic therapy on malignant tumor. The present study investigated that light-activated hypericin induced the cellular destruction of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. The result showed that hypericin resulted in a drug- and light-dose dependent cytotoxicity in the CNE-2 cells, meaning the photocytotoxicity of hypericin depends on both of the drug concentration (0 - 2.5 μM) and light-doses (1 - 8 J/cm2). We further investigated the apoptosis of the CNE-2 cells 8 hours after photosensitization of hypericin using fluorescence microscopy with Hoechst 33258 staining. Flow cytometry with annexin V-FITC and PI staining was used to analyze early and late apoptosis. These data demonstrated that light-activated hypericin could significantly lead to the cellular destruction of the CNE-2 cells and induce early apoptosis as a prominent mode of cell death.

  15. The effects of illumination and focal distance on light-induced fluorescence images in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretty, I A; Ellwood, P G; Davies, R M; Worthington, H W; Ellwood, R P

    2006-01-01

    When using quantitative light-induced fluorescence a number of factors can influence illumination level. The purpose of this study was to investigate, using a high-resolution camera and fibre-optic light source, the impact of illumination level and focal distance on common quantitative light-induced fluorescence outcomes. Twenty-four extracted teeth were examined using 6 illumination levels and 4 focal distances. Analysis was conducted using multiple linear regression models fitted to log DeltaQ, log DeltaF and log area with clustering of teeth and robust standard errors. Separate models were used for the different light and focal levels. The regression coefficients were significant for both DeltaQ and DeltaF but not area. Despite the significant regressions the actual effect was very small, and unlikely to confound clinical trial or practice results.

  16. Light-induced acoustic effect in LiNbO3:Fe:Ce crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Wei; Wu Zhong-Kang; Wang Chang-Qing

    2005-01-01

    The phenomena of acoustic emission in LiNbO3:Fe:Ce crystals have been observed in the process of light-induced quasi-breakdown. It is found that the ultra-high frequency acoustic signal introduced into the crystal is modulated by the low frequency acoustic waves. Its frequency increases with the increase of the intensity of incident light and its jump period of breakdown is the same as that of the photovoltaic current Ic, the change of light-induced refractive index △n and the diffracted light intensity L. This phenomenon has been analysed in this paper, which is caused by the inverse piezoelectric strain effect of the jump of space charge field during the quasi-breakdown.

  17. Light-Induced Charge Transport within a Single Asymmetric Nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIU, CHONG; HWANG, YUN YEONG; JEONG, HOON EIU; YANG, PEIDONG

    2011-01-21

    Artificial photosynthetic systems using semiconductor materials have been explored for more than three decades in order to store solar energy in chemical fuels such as hydrogen. By mimicking biological photosynthesis with two light-absorbing centers that relay excited electrons in a nanoscopic space, a dual-band gap photoelectrochemical (PEC) system is expected to have higher theoretical energy conversion efficiency than a single band gap system. This work demonstrates the vectorial charge transport of photo-generated electrons and holes within a single asymmetric Si/TiO2 nanowire using Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Under UV illumination, higher surface potential was observed on the n-TiO₂ side, relative to the potential of the p-Si side, as a result of majority carriers’ recombination at the Si/TiO₂ interface. These results demonstrate a new approach to investigate charge separation and transport in a PEC system. This asymmetric nanowire heterostructure, with a dual band gap configuration and simultaneously exposed anode and cathode surfaces represents an ideal platform for the development of technologies for the generation of solar fuels, although better photoanode materials remain to be discovered.

  18. Tellurium based glasses for bio-sensing and space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Allison Anne

    2009-12-01

    Te2As3Se5 (TAS) fibers are often used in bio-sensing applications requiring direct contact between the fiber and live cells. However, the toxicity and stability of chalcogenide glasses typically used in such bio-sensing applications are not well known. The stability and toxicity of TAS glass fibers were therefore examined. The surface of TAS fibers stored for up to three years in air were analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). It is shown that an oxide layer develops on the surface of TAS fibers stored in air. This oxide layer is highly soluble in water and therefore easily removed. Additional studies using cyclic voltammetry show that the fresh TAS glass surface is insoluble in water for at least a few days, and attenuation measurements show that oxidation does not affect the transmission properties of the glass fibers. It was also determined that old, oxidized fibers pose a toxic threat to cells, while washed and new fibers show no toxic effect. Therefore, it is concluded that a soluble oxide layer forms on the surface of TAS fibers stored in air and that this layer has a toxic effect on cells in an aqueous environment. However, through etching, the oxide layer and the toxicity can be easily removed. In other applications of telluride glasses, such as the search for possible signs of life on exoplanets, a glass transmitting further into the IR is required in order to detect molecules, such as CO2. A new family of Tellurium based glasses from the Ge-Te-I ternary system has therefore been investigated for use in space and bio-sensing applications. A systematic series of compositions has been synthesized in order to explore the ternary phase diagram in an attempt to optimize the glass composition for the fiber drawing and molding process. The resulting glass transition temperature range lies between 139°C and 174°C, with DeltaT values between 64°C and 124

  19. Nonelastic nuclear reactions induced by light ions with the BRIEFF code

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, H

    2010-01-01

    The intranuclear cascade (INC) code BRIC has been extended to compute nonelastic reactions induced by light ions on target nuclei. In our approach the nucleons of the incident light ion move freely inside the mean potential of the ion in its center-of-mass frame while the center-of-mass of the ion obeys to equations of motion dependant on the mean nuclear+Coulomb potential of the target nucleus. After transformation of the positions and momenta of the nucleons of the ion into the target nucleus frame, the collision term between the nucleons of the target and of the ion is computed taking into account the partial or total breakup of the ion. For reactions induced by low binding energy systems like deuteron, the Coulomb breakup of the ion at the surface of the target nucleus is an important feature. Preliminary results of nucleon production in light ion induced reactions are presented and discussed.

  20. Light-Induced Domain Inversion in Mg-Doped near Stoichiometric Lithium Niobate Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-De; KONG Yong-Fa; HU Qian; WU Ri-Wen; WANG Wen-Jie; LI Xiao-Chun; CHEN Shao-Lin; LIU Shi-Guo; XU Jing-Jun

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the influence of visible light on domain inversion in Mg-doped near stoichiometric lithium niobate crystals and find that the switching electric field decreases about 70% above a threshold light intensity. This effect helps us optically control domain switching and produce bulk domain structures on the micrometre scale. Finally, we introduce a model of photo-induced carriers to explain the origin of the reduction of switching electric field.

  1. Effects of combined ketamine/xylazine anesthesia on light induced retinal degeneration in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Arango-Gonzalez

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To explore the effect of ketamine-xylazine anesthesia on light-induced retinal degeneration in rats. METHODS: Rats were anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine (100 and 5 mg, respectively for 1 h, followed by a recovery phase of 2 h before exposure to 16,000 lux of environmental illumination for 2 h. Functional assessment by electroretinography (ERG and morphological assessment by in vivo imaging (optical coherence tomography, histology (hematoxylin/eosin staining, TUNEL assay and immunohistochemistry (GFAP and rhodopsin staining were performed at baseline (ERG, 36 h, 7 d and 14 d post-treatment. Non-anesthetized animals treated with light damage served as controls. RESULTS: Ketamine-xylazine pre-treatment preserved retinal function and protected against light-induced retinal degeneration. In vivo retinal imaging demonstrated a significant increase of outer nuclear layer (ONL thickness in the non-anesthetized group at 36 h (p0.05, indicating a stabilizing and/or protective effect with regard to phototoxicity. Histology confirmed light-induced photoreceptor cell death and Müller cells gliosis in non-anesthetized rats, especially in the superior hemiretina, while ketamine-xylazine treated rats showed reduced photoreceptor cell death (TUNEL staining: p<0.001 after 7 d, thicker ONL and longer IS/OS. Fourteen days after light damage, a reduction of standard flash induced a-wave amplitudes and a-wave slopes (p = 0.01 and significant alterations in parameters of the scotopic sensitivity function (e.g. Vmax of the Naka Rushton fit p = 0.03 were observed in non-treated vs. ketamine-xylazine treated animals. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that pre-treatment with ketamine-xylazine anesthesia protects retinas against light damage, reducing photoreceptor cell death. These data support the notion that anesthesia with ketamine-xylazine provides neuroprotective effects in light-induced cell damage.

  2. Effects of Combined Ketamine/Xylazine Anesthesia on Light Induced Retinal Degeneration in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolz, Sylvia; Eslava-Schmalbach, Javier; Willmann, Gabriel; Zhour, Ahmad; Zrenner, Eberhart; Fischer, M. Dominik; Gekeler, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To explore the effect of ketamine-xylazine anesthesia on light-induced retinal degeneration in rats. Methods Rats were anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine (100 and 5 mg, respectively) for 1 h, followed by a recovery phase of 2 h before exposure to 16,000 lux of environmental illumination for 2 h. Functional assessment by electroretinography (ERG) and morphological assessment by in vivo imaging (optical coherence tomography), histology (hematoxylin/eosin staining, TUNEL assay) and immunohistochemistry (GFAP and rhodopsin staining) were performed at baseline (ERG), 36 h, 7 d and 14 d post-treatment. Non-anesthetized animals treated with light damage served as controls. Results Ketamine-xylazine pre-treatment preserved retinal function and protected against light-induced retinal degeneration. In vivo retinal imaging demonstrated a significant increase of outer nuclear layer (ONL) thickness in the non-anesthetized group at 36 h (p0.05), indicating a stabilizing and/or protective effect with regard to phototoxicity. Histology confirmed light-induced photoreceptor cell death and Müller cells gliosis in non-anesthetized rats, especially in the superior hemiretina, while ketamine-xylazine treated rats showed reduced photoreceptor cell death (TUNEL staining: p<0.001 after 7 d), thicker ONL and longer IS/OS. Fourteen days after light damage, a reduction of standard flash induced a-wave amplitudes and a-wave slopes (p = 0.01) and significant alterations in parameters of the scotopic sensitivity function (e.g. Vmax of the Naka Rushton fit p = 0.03) were observed in non-treated vs. ketamine-xylazine treated animals. Conclusions Our results suggest that pre-treatment with ketamine-xylazine anesthesia protects retinas against light damage, reducing photoreceptor cell death. These data support the notion that anesthesia with ketamine-xylazine provides neuroprotective effects in light-induced cell damage. PMID:22558200

  3. Identification of novel light-induced genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piontkivska Helen

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transmission of information about the photic environment to the circadian clock involves a complex array of neurotransmitters, receptors, and second messenger systems. Exposure of an animal to light during the subjective night initiates rapid transcription of a number of immediate-early genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Some of these genes have known roles in entraining the circadian clock, while others have unknown functions. Using laser capture microscopy, microarray analysis, and quantitative real-time PCR, we performed a comprehensive screen for changes in gene expression immediately following a 30 minute light pulse in suprachiasmatic nucleus of mice. Results The results of the microarray screen successfully identified previously known light-induced genes as well as several novel genes that may be important in the circadian clock. Newly identified light-induced genes include early growth response 2, proviral integration site 3, growth-arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 45 beta, and TCDD-inducible poly(ADP-ribose polymerase. Comparative analysis of promoter sequences revealed the presence of evolutionarily conserved CRE and associated TATA box elements in most of the light-induced genes, while other core clock genes generally lack this combination of promoter elements. Conclusion The photic signalling cascade in the suprachiasmatic nucleus activates an array of immediate-early genes, most of which have unknown functions in the circadian clock. Detected evolutionary conservation of CRE and TATA box elements in promoters of light-induced genes suggest that the functional role of these elements has likely remained the same over evolutionary time across mammalian orders.

  4. Visible Light Induced Organic Transformations Using Metal-Organic-Frameworks (MOFs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaoyu; Li, Zhaohui; García, Hermenegildo

    2017-08-22

    With the aim of developing renewable energy based processes, researchers are paying increasing interest to light induced organic transformations. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a class of micro-/mesoporous hybrid materials, are recently emerging as a new type of photoactive materials for organic syntheses due to their unique structural characteristics. In this Review, we summarized the recent applications of MOFs as photocatalysts for light induced organic transformations, including (1) oxidation of alcohols, amines, alkene, alkanes and sulfides; (2) hydroxylation of aromatic compounds like benzene; (3) activation of the C-H bonds to construct new C-C or C-X bonds; (4) atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). This Review starts with general background information of using MOFs in photocatalysis, followed by a description of light induced organic transformations promoted by photoactive inorganic nodes and photocatalytic active ligands in MOFs, respectively. Thereafter, the use of MOFs as multifunctional catalysts for light induced organic transformations via an efficient merge of the metal/ligand/guest based catalysis where the photocatalytic activity of MOFs plays a key role are discussed. Finally, the limitations, challenges and the future perspective of the application of MOFs for light induced organic transformations were addressed. The objective of this Review is to serve as a starting point for other researchers to get into this largely unexplored field. It is also our goal to stimulate intensive research in this field for rational designing of MOF materials to overcome their current limitations in photocatalysis, which can lead to more creative visible-light-induced organic transformations. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Time-resolved spectral investigations of laser light induced microplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nánai, L.; Hevesi, I.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical and spectral properties of an optical breakdown microplasma created by pulses of different lasers on surfaces of insulators (KCI), metals (Cu) and semiconductors (V 2O 5), have been investigated. Experiments were carried out in air and vacuum using different wavelengths (λ = 0.694μm, type OGM-20,λ = 1.06μm with a home-made laser based on neodymium glass crystal, and λ = 10.6μm, similarly home-made) and pulse durations (Q-switched and free-running regimes). To follow the integral, dynamical and spectral characteristics of the luminous spot of microplasma we have used fast cameras (SFR-2M, IMACON-HADLAND), a high speed spectral camera (AGAT-2) and a spectrograph (STE-1). It has been shown that the microplasma consists of two parts: fast front (peak) with τ≈100 ns and slow front (tail) with τ≈1μs durations. The detonation front speed is of the order of ≈10 5 cm s -1 and follows the temporal dependence of to t0.4. It depends on the composition of the surrounding gas and its pressure and could be connected with quick evaporation of the material investigated (peak) and optical breakdown of the ambient gaseous atmosphere (tail). From the delay in appearance of different characteristic spectral lines of the target material and its gaseous surrounding we have shown that the evolution of the microplasma involves evaporation and ionization of the atoms of the parent material followed by optical breakdown due to the incident and absorbed laser light, together with microplasma expansion.

  6. Visible Light Induces Melanogenesis in Human Skin through a Photoadaptive Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Manpreet; Seo, InSeok; Liebel, Frank; Southall, Michael D.; Kollias, Nikiforos; Ruvolo, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Visible light (400–700 nm) lies outside of the spectral range of what photobiologists define as deleterious radiation and as a result few studies have studied the effects of visible light range of wavelengths on skin. This oversight is important considering that during outdoors activities skin is exposed to the full solar spectrum, including visible light, and to multiple exposures at different times and doses. Although the contribution of the UV component of sunlight to skin damage has been established, few studies have examined the effects of non-UV solar radiation on skin physiology in terms of inflammation, and limited information is available regarding the role of visible light on pigmentation. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of visible light on the pro-pigmentation pathways and melanin formation in skin. Exposure to visible light in ex-vivo and clinical studies demonstrated an induction of pigmentation in skin by visible light. Results showed that a single exposure to visible light induced very little pigmentation whereas multiple exposures with visible light resulted in darker and sustained pigmentation. These findings have potential implications on the management of photo-aggravated pigmentary disorders, the proper use of sunscreens, and the treatment of depigmented lesions. PMID:26121474

  7. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Why is left right and right left in the mirror? Baffled by the basics of reflection and refraction? Wondering just how the eye works? If you have trouble teaching concepts about light that you don t fully grasp yourself, get help from a book that s both scientifically accurate and entertaining with Light. By combining clear explanations, clever drawings, and activities that use easy-to-find materials, this book covers what science teachers and parents need to know to teach about light with confidence. It uses ray, wave, and particle models of light to explain the basics of reflection and refraction, optical instruments, polarization of light, and interference and diffraction. There s also an entire chapter on how the eye works. Each chapter ends with a Summary and Applications section that reinforces concepts with everyday examples. Whether you need a deeper understanding of how light bends or a good explanation of why the sky is blue, you ll find Light more illuminating and accessible than a college textbook...

  8. Crystal structures and molecular mechanism of light-induced signaling switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Ilme

    2005-03-01

    Since light is an important environmental variable, many organisms have evolved signalling pathways that transmit and thereby translate this stimulus into various biochemical activities. Recently, new classes of blue light photoreceptors have been identified that use flavin based photosensors. The photosensor domains are coupled to an array of other domains, including kinases and transcription factors. Recent progress in understanding the mechanism of blue-light signaling will be presented based on crystal structures of dark states and light-induced photopoducts. The structures are interpreted in the light of the spectroscopic data and used as a basis for quantum chemical calculations to obtain insight in the reaction mechanism. It will be presented and compared to previously suggested mechanisms.

  9. Quenching the radiation induced luminescence in quartz fibers under light monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Demenkov, P V; Stepanov, V A; Stepanov, P A

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of the luminescence intensity in the optical fiber with the quartz glass core by the reactor pulsed irradiation in the visible range are carried out. Decrease in the intensity of the radiation-induced luminescence with growth of the sounding light intensity is determined by sounding the light guide by the laser radiation (the wave length of 532 and 632 nm). The decrease in the luminescence intensity takes place by the wave lengths greater, smaller or equal to the sounding light wave length

  10. Robust Measurement of Thin-Film Photovoltaic Modules Exhibiting Light-Induced Transients: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deceglie, Michael, G.; Silverman, Timothy J.; Marion, Bill; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2015-09-09

    Light-induced changes to the current-voltage characteristic of thin-film photovoltaic modules (i.e. light-soaking effects) frustrate the repeatable measurement of their operating power. We describe best practices for mitigating, or stabilizing, light-soaking effects for both CdTe and CIGS modules to enable robust, repeatable, and relevant power measurements. We motivate the practices by detailing how modules react to changes in different stabilization methods. We also describe and demonstrate a method for validating alternative stabilization procedures, such as those relying on forward bias in the dark. Reliable measurements of module power are critical for qualification testing, reliability testing, and power rating.

  11. Robust measurement of thin-film photovoltaic modules exhibiting light-induced transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deceglie, Michael G.; Silverman, Timothy J.; Marion, Bill; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    2015-09-01

    Light-induced changes to the current-voltage characteristic of thin-film photovoltaic modules (i.e. light-soaking effects) frustrate the repeatable measurement of their operating power. We describe best practices for mitigating, or stabilizing, light-soaking effects for both CdTe and CIGS modules to enable robust, repeatable, and relevant power measurements. We motivate the practices by detailing how modules react to changes in different stabilization methods. We also describe and demonstrate a method for validating alternative stabilization procedures, such as those relying on forward bias in the dark. Reliable measurements of module power are critical for qualification testing, reliability testing, and power rating.

  12. Further study on mechanism of production of light complex particles in nucleon-induced reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Dexian; Mao, Lihua; Wang, Ning; Liu, Min; Ou, Li, E-mail: only.ouli@gmail.com

    2015-01-15

    The Improved Quantum Molecular Dynamics model incorporated with the statistical decay model is used to investigate the intermediate energy nucleon-induced reactions. In our last work, by introducing a phenomenological mechanism called surface coalescence and emission into ImQMD model, the description on the light complex particle emission has been great improved. In this work, taking account of different specific binding energies and separation energies for various light complex particles, the phase space parameters in surface coalescence model are readjusted. By using the new phase space parameters set with better physical fundament, the double differential cross sections of light complex particles are found to be in better agreement with experimental data.

  13. New insights into the chemistry of imidodiphosphinates from investigations of tellurium-centered systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivers, Tristram; Ritch, Jamie S; Robertson, Stuart D; Konu, Jari; Tuononen, Heikki M

    2010-08-17

    Dichalcogenido-imidodiphosphinates, [N(PR(2)E)(2)](-) (R = alkyl, aryl), are chelating ligands that readily form cyclic complexes with main group metals, transition metals, lanthanides, and actinides. Since their discovery in the early 1960s, researchers have studied the structural chemistry of the resulting metal complexes (where E = O, S, Se) extensively and identified a variety of potential applications, including as NMR shift reagents, luminescent complexes in photonic devices, or single-source precursors for metal sulfides or selenides. In 2002, a suitable synthesis of the tellurium analogs [N(PR(2)Te)(2)](-) was developed. In this Account, we describe comprehensive investigations of the chemistry of these tellurium-centered anions, and related mixed chalcogen systems, which have revealed unanticipated features of their fundamental structure and reactivity. An exhaustive examination of previously unrecognized redox behavior has uncovered a variety of novel dimeric arrangements of these ligands, as well as an extensive series of cyclic cations. In combination with calculations using density functional theory, these new structural frameworks have provided new insights into the nature of chalcogen-chalcogen bonding. Studies of metal complexes of the ditellurido ligands [N(PR(2)Te)(2)](-) have revealed unprecedented structural and reaction chemistry. The large tellurium donor sites confer greater flexibility, which can lead to unique structures in which the tellurium-centered ligand bridges two metal centers. The relatively weak P-Te bonds facilitate metal-insertion reactions (intramolecular oxidative-addition) to give new metal-tellurium ring systems for some group 11 and 13 metals. Metal tellurides have potential applications as low band gap semiconductor materials in solar cells, thermoelectric devices, and in telecommunications. Practically, some of these telluride ligands could be applied in these industries. For example, certain metal complexes of the

  14. Light and Heat Induced Denaturation of Photosystem Ⅱ Core Antenna Complex CP47

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Light and heat induced denaturation of CP47, the core antenna complex of photosystem Ⅱ purified from spinach, were investigated using absorption and circular dichroism spectra.Light caused the destruction of chlorophyll a and excitonic interaction of chlorophyll a in CP47, while the protein secondary structure was not apparently changed.Heat induced the destruction of protein secondary structure and excitonic interaction of chlorophyll a, but the chlorophyll a molecule was not damaged.The results suggest that both the chlorophyll a molecular structure and the protein native conformation are necessary for excitonic interaction of chlorophyll a and the energy transfer function of the chlorophyll a binding protein.

  15. Rototranslational collision-induced absorption and collision-induced light scattering spectra of molecular hydrogen using isotropic intermolecular potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kader, M. S. A.; Maroulis, G.; Bich, E.

    2012-07-01

    Quantum mechanical lineshapes of collision-induced absorption (CIA) at different temperatures and of collision-induced light scattering (CILS) at room temperature are computed for gaseous molecular hydrogen using theoretical values for induced dipole moments and pair-polarizability trace and anisotropy as input. Comparison with measured spectra of absorption, isotropic and anisotropic light scattering shows satisfactory agreement, for which the uncertainty in measurement of its spectral moments is seen to be large. Empirical models of the dipole moment and pair-polarizability trace and anisotropy which reproduce the experimental spectra and the first three spectral moments more closely than the fundamental theory are also given. Good agreement between computed and experimental lineshapes of both absorption and scattering is obtained when potential models which are constructed from the thermophysical, transport, total scattering cross-section and spectroscopic properties are used. Also, the use of the new potential in lattice dynamic calculations yields good results for several properties of solid hydrogen.

  16. Light-induced gauge fields for ultracold atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, N; Juzeliūnas, G; Öhberg, P; Spielman, I B

    2014-12-01

    Gauge fields are central in our modern understanding of physics at all scales. At the highest energy scales known, the microscopic universe is governed by particles interacting with each other through the exchange of gauge bosons. At the largest length scales, our Universe is ruled by gravity, whose gauge structure suggests the existence of a particle-the graviton-that mediates the gravitational force. At the mesoscopic scale, solid-state systems are subjected to gauge fields of different nature: materials can be immersed in external electromagnetic fields, but they can also feature emerging gauge fields in their low-energy description. In this review, we focus on another kind of gauge field: those engineered in systems of ultracold neutral atoms. In these setups, atoms are suitably coupled to laser fields that generate effective gauge potentials in their description. Neutral atoms 'feeling' laser-induced gauge potentials can potentially mimic the behavior of an electron gas subjected to a magnetic field, but also, the interaction of elementary particles with non-Abelian gauge fields. Here, we review different realized and proposed techniques for creating gauge potentials-both Abelian and non-Abelian-in atomic systems and discuss their implication in the context of quantum simulation. While most of these setups concern the realization of background and classical gauge potentials, we conclude with more exotic proposals where these synthetic fields might be made dynamical, in view of simulating interacting gauge theories with cold atoms.

  17. Light-induced gauge fields for ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, N.; Juzeliūnas, G.; Öhberg, P.; Spielman, I. B.

    2014-12-01

    Gauge fields are central in our modern understanding of physics at all scales. At the highest energy scales known, the microscopic universe is governed by particles interacting with each other through the exchange of gauge bosons. At the largest length scales, our Universe is ruled by gravity, whose gauge structure suggests the existence of a particle—the graviton—that mediates the gravitational force. At the mesoscopic scale, solid-state systems are subjected to gauge fields of different nature: materials can be immersed in external electromagnetic fields, but they can also feature emerging gauge fields in their low-energy description. In this review, we focus on another kind of gauge field: those engineered in systems of ultracold neutral atoms. In these setups, atoms are suitably coupled to laser fields that generate effective gauge potentials in their description. Neutral atoms ‘feeling’ laser-induced gauge potentials can potentially mimic the behavior of an electron gas subjected to a magnetic field, but also, the interaction of elementary particles with non-Abelian gauge fields. Here, we review different realized and proposed techniques for creating gauge potentials—both Abelian and non-Abelian—in atomic systems and discuss their implication in the context of quantum simulation. While most of these setups concern the realization of background and classical gauge potentials, we conclude with more exotic proposals where these synthetic fields might be made dynamical, in view of simulating interacting gauge theories with cold atoms.

  18. Increased sensitivity to light-induced damage in a mouse model of autosomal dominant retinal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, D Alan; Fritz, Jason J; Hauswirth, William W; Kaushal, Shalesh; Lewin, Alfred S

    2007-05-01

    To describe a sensitivity to light-induced damage associated with expression of a T17M mutant human rhodopsin (hT17M) transgene in mice, with the goal of minimizing retinal injury during the subretinal delivery of rAAV-mediated gene therapy. Mice were bred to express the hT17M rhodopsin transgene in a line that was hemizygous null for wild-type mouse rhodopsin (mrho(+/-)), and the eyes of transgenic mice and nontransgenic littermates were exposed for 2.5 minutes to unilateral illumination with fiber-optic light ranging from 5,000 to 10,000 lux. Funduscopic images were made with a handheld camera (Genesis; Kowa Company, Ltd., Tokyo, Japan). Full-field scotopic electroretinographic analysis (ERG) was performed to measure loss of retinal function. Morphometry in the light microscope was used to measure loss of rod photoreceptors. TUNEL staining and a nucleosome release assay were used to measure levels of apoptosis in retinal specimens. mrho(+/-);hT17M mice exhibited a sensitivity to light-induced damage that caused severe loss of a- and b-wave ERG responses. hT17M transgenic mice on the mrho(+/+) background were equally sensitive to light-induced damage. Histologic analysis showed a concomitant loss of photoreceptors and TUNEL labeling of fragmented DNA in rod photoreceptor cells, demonstrating that the damage occurred via an apoptotic pathway. Nontransgenic littermate mice were not affected by this exposure to light. Mice expressing an hP23H mutant human rhodopsin transgene were minimally sensitive to light-induced damage at these intensities, in comparison to hT17M mice. Treating the hT17M mice with an equivalent regimen of exposure to red light was less damaging to the retina, as measured by ERG and histology. Expression of a human hT17M mutant rhodopsin transgene in mice is associated with photoreceptor apoptosis in response to moderate exposure to light. This phenotype was not observed in nontransgenic littermates or in mice expressing an hP23H mutant human

  19. Phytochromes A and B mediate red-light-induced positive phototropism in roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, John Z; Mullen, Jack L; Correll, Melanie J; Hangarter, Roger P

    2003-03-01

    The interaction of tropisms is important in determining the final growth form of the plant body. In roots, gravitropism is the predominant tropistic response, but phototropism also plays a role in the oriented growth of roots in flowering plants. In blue or white light, roots exhibit negative phototropism that is mediated by the phototropin family of photoreceptors. In contrast, red light induces a positive phototropism in Arabidopsis roots. Because this red-light-induced response is weak relative to both gravitropism and negative phototropism, we used a novel device to study phototropism without the complications of a counteracting gravitational stimulus. This device is based on a computer-controlled system using real-time image analysis of root growth and a feedback-regulated rotatable stage. Our data show that this system is useful to study root phototropism in response to red light, because in wild-type roots, the maximal curvature detected with this apparatus is 30 degrees to 40 degrees, compared with 5 degrees to 10 degrees without the feedback system. In positive root phototropism, sensing of red light occurs in the root itself and is not dependent on shoot-derived signals resulting from light perception. Phytochrome (Phy)A and phyB were severely impaired in red-light-induced phototropism, whereas the phyD and phyE mutants were normal in this response. Thus, PHYA and PHYB play a key role in mediating red-light-dependent positive phototropism in roots. Although phytochrome has been shown to mediate phototropism in some lower plant groups, this is one of the few reports indicating a phytochrome-dependent phototropism in flowering plants.

  20. Polychromatic light-induced osteogenic activity in 2D and 3D cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ülker, Nazife; Çakmak, Anıl S; Kiremitçi, Arlin S; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe

    2016-11-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) has been applied to manipulate cellular responses by using monochromatic light in different wavelengths from ultraviolet (UV) to infrared (IR) region. Until now, an effective wavelength has not been revealed to induce proliferation and/or differentiation of cells. Therefore, in the presented study, we decided to use a specially designed plasma arc light source providing wavelengths between 590 and 1500 nm in order to investigate its biomodulatory effects on chitosan scaffold-supported three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures. For comparison, two-dimensional (2D) cell cultures were also carried out in tissue-culture polystyrene dishes (TCPS). The results showed that light-induced temperature rise did not affect cells when the distance between the light source and the cells was 10 cm and the frequency of administration was daily. Moreover, light was applied for 5 and 10 min to the cells in TCPS and in chitosan scaffold groups, respectively. Cell culture studies under static conditions indicated that polychromatic light significantly stimulated bone nodule formation via the prolonged cell survival and stimulated differentiation of MC3T3-E1 preosteoblastic cells in both TCPS and chitosan scaffold groups. In conclusion, specially designed plasma arc light source used in this study induces formation of bone tissue and so, this light source is proposed as an appropriate system for in vitro bone tissue engineering applications. Statistical analyses were performed with one-way ANOVA by using GraphPad Instat software and standard deviations were calculated by using data of three parallel samples for each group.

  1. Prevention of scattered light-induced asthenopia and fatigue by a polarized filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramoto, Keiichi; Yamate, Yurika; Orita, Kumi; Jikumaru, Mika; Kasahara, Emiko; Sato, Eisuke F; Tamura, Shinzo; Inoue, Masayasu

    2010-04-01

    It has been well documented that a long-time irradiation of the eye by a strong light elicits eyestrain and fatigue. To elucidate the mechanism for the induction of light-induced fatigue and asthenopia, changes in the mouse were analyzed after white light-irradiation to the eye. C57BL/6j male mice were irradiated with white light in a specially designed room equipped with four mirrors covering all areas of its four walls to elicit diffused reflected light, and changes in their plasma levels of cortisol, INF-gamma, interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) were analyzed. Irradiation of mice with scattered white light significantly decreased the motional activity of animals, suggesting the occurrence of fatigue. Biochemical analysis and enzyme-immunoassay revealed that the irradiation of mice significantly elevated the plasma levels of cortisol, IFN-gamma, IL-10 and TGF-beta. All these changes were not observed with mice irradiated with the light in a similar room not equipped with mirrors. These changes were successfully inhibited by a polarized glass filter but not by a non-polarized filter with a similar absorbance. These observations suggest that irradiation of the eye by scattered reflected light stimulated a stress response via hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis to enhance the secretion of cortisol from the adrenal grand and increase the plasma levels of cytokines.

  2. Synthesis of crystalline gels on a light-induced polymerization 3D printer (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jin; Mao, Yuchen; Miyazaki, Takuya; Zhu, Meifang

    2017-04-01

    3D printing, also knows as Additive Manufacturing (AM), was first commercialized in 1986, and has been growing at breakneck speed since 2009 when Stratasys' key patent expired. Currently the 3D printing machines coming on the market can be broadly classified into three categories from the material state point of view: plastic filament printers, powder (or pellet) printers, film printers and liquid photopolymer printers. Much of the work in our laboratory revolves around the crystalline gels. We have succeeded in developing them with high toughness, high flexibility, particularly with many functions as shape memory, energy storage, freshness-retaining, water-absorbing, etc. These crystalline gels are synthesized by light-induced radical polymerization that involves light-reactive monomer having the property of curing with light of a sufficient energy to drive the reaction from liquid to solid. Note that the light-induced polymerized 3D printing uses the same principle. To open up the possibilities for broader application of our crystalline functional gels, we are interested in making them available for 3D printing. In this paper, we share the results of our latest research on the 3D printing of crystalline gels on light-induced 3D printers.

  3. Impaired Mitochondrial Energy Production Causes Light-Induced Photoreceptor Degeneration Independent of Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Jaiswal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Two insults often underlie a variety of eye diseases including glaucoma, optic atrophy, and retinal degeneration--defects in mitochondrial function and aberrant Rhodopsin trafficking. Although mitochondrial defects are often associated with oxidative stress, they have not been linked to Rhodopsin trafficking. In an unbiased forward genetic screen designed to isolate mutations that cause photoreceptor degeneration, we identified mutations in a nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene, ppr, a homolog of human LRPPRC. We found that ppr is required for protection against light-induced degeneration. Its function is essential to maintain membrane depolarization of the photoreceptors upon repetitive light exposure, and an impaired phototransduction cascade in ppr mutants results in excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis. Moreover, loss of ppr results in a reduction in mitochondrial RNAs, reduced electron transport chain activity, and reduced ATP levels. Oxidative stress, however, is not induced. We propose that the reduced ATP level in ppr mutants underlies the phototransduction defect, leading to increased Rhodopsin1 endocytosis during light exposure, causing photoreceptor degeneration independent of oxidative stress. This hypothesis is bolstered by characterization of two other genes isolated in the screen, pyruvate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase. Their loss also causes a light-induced degeneration, excessive Rhodopsin1 endocytosis and reduced ATP without concurrent oxidative stress, unlike many other mutations in mitochondrial genes that are associated with elevated oxidative stress and light-independent photoreceptor demise.

  4. A visible light-induced photocatalytic silver enhancement reaction for gravimetric biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Wooree; Yim, Changyong; Jung, Namchul; Joo, Jinmyoung; Jeon, Sangmin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Hyejung; Lee, Soo Suk; Park, Jae Chan, E-mail: jeons@postech.ac.kr [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT), Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-07

    We have developed a novel microgravimetric immunosensor using a WO{sub 3} nanoparticle-modified immunoassay and a silver enhancement reaction. When the nanoparticles in silver ion solution (i.e. AgNO{sub 3}) are exposed to visible light, the silver ions are photocatalytically reduced and form a metallic silver coating on the nanoparticles. This silver coating consequently induces changes in the mass and light absorption spectrum. Although photocatalytic reduction reactions can be achieved using ultraviolet (UV) light and TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles as described in our previous publication (Seo et al 2010 Nanotechnology 21 505502), the use of UV light in biosensing applications has drawbacks in that UV light can damage proteins. In addition, conventional quartz crystal substrates must be passivated to prevent undesirable silver ion reduction on their gold-coated sensing surfaces. We addressed these problems by adopting a visible light-induced photocatalytic silver enhancement method using WO{sub 3} nanoparticles and lateral field excited (LFE) quartz crystals. As a proof-of-concept demonstration of the technique, streptavidin was adsorbed onto an LFE quartz crystal, and its mass was enhanced with biotinylated WO{sub 3} nanoparticles, this being followed by a photocatalytic silver enhancement reaction. The mass change due to the enhancement was found to be > 30 times greater than the mass change obtained with the streptavidin alone.

  5. A visible light-induced photocatalytic silver enhancement reaction for gravimetric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Wooree; Yim, Changyong; Jung, Namchul; Joo, Jinmyoung; Jeon, Sangmin; Seo, Hyejung; Lee, Soo Suk; Park, Jae Chan

    2011-10-07

    We have developed a novel microgravimetric immunosensor using a WO(3) nanoparticle-modified immunoassay and a silver enhancement reaction. When the nanoparticles in silver ion solution (i.e.  AgNO(3)) are exposed to visible light, the silver ions are photocatalytically reduced and form a metallic silver coating on the nanoparticles. This silver coating consequently induces changes in the mass and light absorption spectrum. Although photocatalytic reduction reactions can be achieved using ultraviolet (UV) light and TiO(2) nanoparticles as described in our previous publication (Seo et al 2010 Nanotechnology 21 505502), the use of UV light in biosensing applications has drawbacks in that UV light can damage proteins. In addition, conventional quartz crystal substrates must be passivated to prevent undesirable silver ion reduction on their gold-coated sensing surfaces. We addressed these problems by adopting a visible light-induced photocatalytic silver enhancement method using WO(3) nanoparticles and lateral field excited (LFE) quartz crystals. As a proof-of-concept demonstration of the technique, streptavidin was adsorbed onto an LFE quartz crystal, and its mass was enhanced with biotinylated WO(3) nanoparticles, this being followed by a photocatalytic silver enhancement reaction. The mass change due to the enhancement was found to be > 30 times greater than the mass change obtained with the streptavidin alone.

  6. Increased Expression of CCN2 in the Red Flashing Light-Induced Myopia in Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Visual environment plays an important role in the occurrence of myopia. We previously showed that the different flashing lights could result in distinct effects on the ocular growth and development of myopia. CCN2 has been reported to regulate various cellular functions and biological processes. However, whether CCN2 signaling was involved in the red flashing light-induced myopia still remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the red flashing lights exposure on the refraction and axial length of the eyes in vivo and then evaluated their effects on the expression of CCN2 and TGF-β in sclera tissues. Our data showed that the eyes exposed to the red flashing light became more myopic with a significant increase of the axial length and decrease of the refraction. Both CCN2 and TGF-β, as well as p38 MAPK and PI3K, were highly expressed in the sclera tissues exposed to the red flashing light. Both CCN2 and TGF-β were found to have the same gene expression profile in vivo. In conclusion, our findings found that CCN2 signaling pathway plays an important role in the red flashing light-induced myopia in vivo. Moreover, our study establishes a useful animal model for experimental myopia research.

  7. Intense pulsed light therapy (IPL) induced iritis following treatment for a medial canthal capillary malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabb, Matthew; Chan, Weng Onn; Taranath, Deepa; Huilgol, Shyamala C

    2014-11-01

    The popularity of intense pulsed light (IPL) therapy continues to increase due to its relative safety, high skin coverage rate and ability to treat both vascular and pigmented lesions. An often-overlooked risk is the potential for IPL-induced ocular damage. The damage sustained can cause significant, persistent morbidity and can occur even with very limited IPL exposure to the eye.

  8. Early-time photodynamics of ruthenium-based photocatalysts for light-induced hydrogen generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Qing

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aims to provide a fundamental understanding of the early-time photodynamics of a series of Ru/M (M = Pd or Pt) bimetallic photocatalysts for light-induced hydrogen generation. This class of complexes adopts a general structure involving a Ru(II) center coordinated to two peripheral ligan

  9. Light-Induced Local Heating for Thermophoretic Manipulation of DNA in Polymer Micro- and Nanochannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamdrup, Lasse Højlund; Larsen, Niels Bent; Kristensen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for making polymer chips with a narrow-band near-infrared absorber layer that enables light-induced local heating of liquids inside fluidic micro- and nanochannels fabricated by thermal imprint in polymethyl methacrylate. We have characterized the resulting liquid temperature...

  10. The formation of light-induced gratings in the rigid eosine K solution in gelatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorob'ev, A. A.; Kolchanova, S. A.; Sizykh, A. G.; Sul'Kis, I. G.

    1992-03-01

    The mechanism of the formation of light-induced amplitude gratings in the rigid eosine K solution in gelatin is investigated. It is shown that spatial modulation of the absorptance of the recording medium is caused by the transformation of the dye into a colorless form in the process of photosensitized proton transfer from gelatin to the eosine.

  11. Laser-frequency locking using light-pressure-induced spectroscopy in a calcium beam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mollema, A. K.; Wansbeek, L. W.; Willmann, L.; Jungmann, K.; Timmermans, R. G. E.; Hoekstra, R.

    We demonstrate a spectroscopy method that can be applied in an atomic beam, light-pressure-induced spectroscopy (LiPS). A simple pump and probe experiment yields a dispersivelike spectroscopy signal that can be utilized for laser frequency stabilization. The underlying principles are discussed and

  12. Formation of liquid inclusion induced light scatter in KDP (DKDP) crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙洵; 孙大亮; 许心光; 王正平; 付有君; 王圣来; 曾红; 李毅平; 于锡玲; 高樟寿

    2001-01-01

    We describe in this paper the formation of liquid inclusion induced light scatter in potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystal and deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP) crystals. The measurement has been done with an atomic force microscope (AFM). The mechanism of formation of liquid inclusion scatter has been proposed and the effect of super-saturation discussed.

  13. An Efficient Light-Inducible P53 Expression System for Inhibiting Proliferation of Bladder Cancer Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fan; Dong, Liang; Wang, Weiming; Liu, Yuchen; Huang, Weiren; Cai, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetic gene expression systems enable spatial-temporal modulation of gene transcription and cell behavior. Although applications in biomedicine are emerging, the utility of optogenetic gene switches remains elusive in cancer research due to the relative low gene activation efficiency. Here, we present an optimized CRISPR-Cas9-based light-inducible gene expression device that controls gene transcription in a dose-dependent manner. To prove the potential utility of this device, P53 was tested as a functional target in the bladder cancer cell models. It was illustrated that the light-induced P53 inhibited proliferation of 5637 and UMUC-3 cell effectively. The “light-on” gene expression system may demonstrate a novel therapeutic strategy for bladder cancer intervention. PMID:27766041

  14. Light-induced Notch activity controls neurogenic and gliogenic potential of neural progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Tai; Song, Mi-Ryoung

    2016-10-28

    Oscillations in Notch signaling are essential for reserving neural progenitors for cellular diversity in developing brains. Thus, steady and prolonged overactivation of Notch signaling is not suitable for generating neurons. To acquire greater temporal control of Notch activity and mimic endogenous oscillating signals, here we adopted a light-inducible transgene system to induce active form of Notch NICD in neural progenitors. Alternating Notch activity saved more progenitors that are prone to produce neurons creating larger number of mixed clones with neurons and progenitors in vitro, compared to groups with no light or continuous light stimulus. Furthermore, more upper layer neurons and astrocytes arose upon intermittent Notch activity, indicating that dynamic Notch activity maintains neural progeny and fine-tune neuron-glia diversity.

  15. Determination of trace selenium in high purity tellurium by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry after solid phase extraction of a diaminobenzidine-selenium chelate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wang; Ying, Zeng; Jinyong, Xu

    2016-09-01

    Macroporous adsorption resin was used as the sorbent for solid phase extraction and determination of the trace Se content in high purity tellurium prior to hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry analysis. Selenium was converted into an organic Se chelate using 3,3‧-diaminobenzidine and was separated from the tellurium matrix by solid phase extraction. The resin was packed as a column for solid phase extraction. Under optimum conditions, trace Se can be quantitatively extracted and the tellurium matrix can be removed. The Se in the eluate was determined by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The limit of detection (3σ) of this method was 0.22 ng g- 1 and the relative standard deviation (RSD, n = 5) ranged from 2.0 to 2.5% for the three investigated tellurium samples. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of the trace Se content in high purity tellurium samples.

  16. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Ditchburn, R W

    2011-01-01

    This classic study, available for the first time in paperback, clearly demonstrates how quantum theory is a natural development of wave theory, and how these two theories, once thought to be irreconcilable, together comprise a single valid theory of light. Aimed at students with an intermediate-level knowledge of physics, the book first offers a historical introduction to the subject, then covers topics such as wave theory, interference, diffraction, Huygens' Principle, Fermat's Principle, and the accuracy of optical measurements. Additional topics include the velocity of light, relativistic o

  17. Measurement-Induced Strong Kerr Nonlinearity for Weak Quantum States of Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, Luca S.; Coelho, Antonio S.; Biagi, Nicola; Fiurášek, Jaromír; Bellini, Marco; Zavatta, Alessandro

    2017-07-01

    Strong nonlinearity at the single photon level represents a crucial enabling tool for optical quantum technologies. Here we report on experimental implementation of a strong Kerr nonlinearity by measurement-induced quantum operations on weak quantum states of light. Our scheme coherently combines two sequences of single photon addition and subtraction to induce a nonlinear phase shift at the single photon level. We probe the induced nonlinearity with weak coherent states and characterize the output non-Gaussian states with quantum state tomography. The strong nonlinearity is clearly witnessed as a change of sign of specific off-diagonal density matrix elements in the Fock basis.

  18. Salt-induced redox-independent phosphorylation of light harvesting chlorophyll a/b proteins in Dunaliella salina thylakoid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xian-De; Shen, Yun-Gang

    2005-02-17

    This study investigated the regulation of the major light harvesting chlorophyll a/b protein (LHCII) phosphorylation in Dunaliella salina thylakoid membranes. We found that both light and NaCl could induce LHCII phosphorylation in D. salina thylakoid membranes. Treatments with oxidants (ferredoxin and NADP) or photosynthetic electron flow inhibitors (DCMU, DBMIB, and stigmatellin) inhibited LHCII phosphorylation induced by light but not that induced by NaCl. Furthermore, neither addition of CuCl(2), an inhibitor of cytochrome b(6)f complex reduction, nor oxidizing treatment with ferricyanide inhibited light- or NaCl-induced LHCII phosphorylation, and both salts even induced LHCII phosphorylation in dark-adapted D. salina thylakoid membranes as other salts did. Together, these results indicate that the redox state of the cytochrome b(6)f complex is likely involved in light- but not salt-induced LHCII phosphorylation in D. salina thylakoid membranes.

  19. Controlled-motion of floating macro-objects induced by light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucchetta, Daniele E., E-mail: d.e.lucchetta@univpm.it; Simoni, Francesco [Dipartimento SIMAU, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Via Brecce Bianche, 60131 Ancona (Italy); Nucara, Luca [The BioRobotics Institute, Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna, Viale Reginaldo Piaggio 34, 56025 Pontedera (Italy); Center for Micro-BioRobotics @SSSA, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Viale Reginaldo Piaggio 34, 56025 Pontedera (Italy); Castagna, Riccardo, E-mail: riccardo.castagna@sns.it [NEST, Istituto Nanoscienze – CNR, Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-07-15

    Photons energy can be conventionally converted to mechanical work through a series of energy-expensive steps such as for example delivery and storage. However, these steps can be bypassed obtaining a straightforward conversion of photons energy to mechanical work. As an example, in literature, high power near infrared light is used to move small objects floating on fluid surfaces, exploiting the Marangoni effect. In this work we use a low power non-collimated visible laser-light to induce thermal surface tension gradients, resulting in the movement of objects floating on fluid surfaces. By real time tracking of the object trajectories, we evaluate the average applied driving force caused by the light irradiation. In addition we show how transparent objects can be moved by light when the supporting fluids are properly doped.

  20. Photolytic decomposition of adsorbed tellurium and cadmium alkyl species at 295 K upon 193 nm photon irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinespring, C. D.; Freedman, A.

    1988-06-01

    The photolytic decomposition of adspecies formed by the adsorption of tellurium and cadmium alkyls at 295 K under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions has been studied using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Dimethyl tellurium adsorbed at submonolayer coverages on a polycrystalline gold substrate has been observed to undergo nearly quantitative photolytic decomposition at 193 nm to form metallic tellurium. The hydrocarbon photofragments produced in the decomposition lead to negligible carbon contamination on the gold surface. Dimethyl cadmium adsorbed on amorphous SiO2 both desorbs and decomposes to form the metal adspecies. In this case, most of the carbon remains as hydrocarbon and carbidic contaminants. Monomethyl adspecies of both metals formed on Si(100) and GaAs(100) surfaces are inactive with respect to decomposition at the low fluences (0.25 mJ cm-2) used in these experiments; however, substantial desorption is observed.

  1. Synthesis of novel E-2-chlorovinyltellurium compounds based on the stereospecific anti-addition of tellurium tetrachloride to acetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musalova, Maria V; Potapov, Vladimir A; Amosova, Svetlana V

    2012-05-15

    The reaction of tellurium tetrachloride with acetylene proceeds in a stereospecific anti-addition manner to afford the novel products E-2-chlorovinyltellurium trichloride and E,E-bis(2-chlorovinyl)tellurium dichloride. Reaction conditions for the selective preparation of each of these products were found. The latter was obtained in 90% yield in CHCl(3) under a pressure of acetylene of 10-15 atm, whereas the former product was formed in up to 72% yield in CCl(4) under a pressure of acetylene of 1-3 atm. Synthesis of the previously unknown E,E-bis(2-chlorovinyl) telluride, E,E-bis(2-chlorovinyl) ditelluride, E-2-chlorovinyl 1,2,2-trichloroethyl telluride and E,E-bis(2-chlorovinyl)-tellurium dibromide is described.

  2. Influence of parameters on light propagation dynamics in optically induced planar waveguide arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The diffraction and refraction of light beam in optical periodic structures can be determined by the photonic band-gap structures of spatial frequency.In this paper,by employing the equation governing the nonlinear light propagations in photorefractive crystals,we study the photonic band-gap structures, Bloch modes,and light transmission properties of optically induced planar waveguide arrays.The relationship between the photonic band-gap structures and the light diffraction characteristics is discussed in detail.Then the influence of the parameters of planar waveguide arrays on the band-gaps structures,Bloch modes,and linear light transmissions is analyzed.It is revealed that the linear light transmission properties of waveguide arrays are tightly related to the diffraction relationships determined by band-gap structures.And the Bloch modes corresponding to different transmission bands can be excited by different excitation schemes.Both the increases of the intensity and the period of the array writing beam will lead to the broadening of the forbidden gaps and the concentration of the energy of the Bloch modes to the high-index regions.Furthermore,the broadening of the forbidden gaps will lead to separation and transition between the Bloch modes of neighboring bands around the Bragg angle.Additionally,with the increase of the intensity of the array writing beams,the influences from light intensity will tend to be steady due to the saturation of the photorefractive effect.

  3. Photon drag enhancement by a slow-light moving medium via electromagnetically-induced transparency amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Azmat; Khan, Naveed; Bacha, Bakht Amin; Rahman, Amin Ur; Ahmad, Afaq

    2017-09-01

    Recently, a considerable enhancement has been observed in the celebrated Fresnel-Fizeau light drag by innovative experimental and theoretical approaches because of its fundamental and practical interest in the emerging technology of quantum optics and photonics. We present a semiclassical density matrix approach on the demonstration of light drag in a slow-light moving medium comprising five-level single tripod atomic configuration. To accomplish this, we introduce Kerr-type nonlinearity that leads to electromagnetically-induced transparency amplification under resonance conditions. By switching ON Kerr-type nonlinearity effect, we observe a prominent transparency window in probe field's absorption spectrum whose width and amplitude can be controlled further by the intensity of Kerr field and control field. The incorporation of Kerr field also switches light propagation from superluminal to subluminal domain. We predict a significant enhancement both in the lateral and the rotary photon drag owing to drag of light linear polarization state subjected to translation and rotation of the host medium, respectively. Consistent with earlier results, light drag considerably depends on both transverse and angular velocity of the host medium. In regime of subluminal propagation, light polarization state drags along the medium motion while in the superluminal propagation region it drags opposite to the medium motion.

  4. Influence of parameters on light propagation dynamics in optically induced planar waveguide arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Sheng; ZHANG Peng; XIAO FaJun; YANG DeXing; ZHAO JianLin

    2009-01-01

    The diffraction and refraction of light beam in optical periodic structures can be determined by the photonic band-gap structures of spatial frequency. In this paper, by employing the equation governing the nonlinear light propagations in photorefractive crystals, we study the photonic band-gap structures,Bloch modes, and light transmission properties of optically induced planar waveguide arrays. The relationship between the photonic band-gap structures and the light diffraction characteristics is discussed in detail. Then the influence of the parameters of planar waveguide arrays on the band-gaps structures, Bloch modes, and linear light transmissions is analyzed. It is revealed that the linear light transmission properties of waveguide arrays are tightly related to the diffraction relationships determined by band-gap structures. And the Bloch modes corresponding to different transmission bands can be excited by different excitation schemes. Both the increases of the intensity and the period of the array writing beam will lead to the broadening of the forbidden gaps and the concentration of the energy of the Bloch modes to the high-index regions. Furthermore, the broadening of the forbidden gaps will lead to separation and transition between the Bloch modes of neighboring bands around the Bragg angle. Additionally, with the increase of the intensity of the array writing beams, the influences from light intensity will tend to be steady due to the saturation of the photorefractive effect.

  5. Dietary supplement enriched in antioxidants and omega-3 protects from progressive light-induced retinal degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaoula Ramchani-Ben Othman

    Full Text Available In the present study, we have evaluated one of the dietary supplements enriched with antioxidants and fish oil used in clinical care for patient with age-related macular degeneration. Rats were orally fed by a gastric canula daily with 0.2 ml of water or dietary supplement until they were sacrificed. After one week of treatment, animals were either sacrificed for lipid analysis in plasma and retina, or used for evaluation of rod-response recovery by electroretinography (ERG followed by their sacrifice to measure rhodopsin content, or used for progressive light-induced retinal degeneration (PLIRD. For PLIRD, animals were transferred to bright cyclic light for one week. Retinal damage was quantified by ERG, histology and detection of apoptotic nuclei. Animals kept in dim-cyclic-light were processed in parallel. PLIRD induced a thinning of the outer nuclear layer and a reduction of the b-wave amplitude of the ERG in the water group. Retinal structure and function were preserved in supplemented animals. Supplement induced a significant increase in omega-3 fatty acids in plasma by 168% for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 142% for docosapentaenoic acid (DPA and 19% for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and a decrease in the omega-6 fatty acids, DPA by 28%. In the retina, supplement induced significant reduction of linolenic acid by 67% and an increase in EPA and DPA by 80% and 72%, respectively, associated with significant decrease in omega-6 DPA by 42%. Supplement did not affect rhodopsin content or rod-response recovery. The present data indicate that supplement rapidly modified the fatty acid content and induced an accumulation of EPA in the retina without affecting rhodopsin content or recovery. In addition, it protected the retina from oxidative stress induced by light. Therefore, this supplement might be beneficial to slow down progression of certain retinal degeneration.

  6. Dietary Supplement Enriched in Antioxidants and Omega-3 Protects from Progressive Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchani-Ben Othman, Khaoula; Cercy, Christine; Amri, Mohamed; Doly, Michel; Ranchon-Cole, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we have evaluated one of the dietary supplements enriched with antioxidants and fish oil used in clinical care for patient with age-related macular degeneration. Rats were orally fed by a gastric canula daily with 0.2 ml of water or dietary supplement until they were sacrificed. After one week of treatment, animals were either sacrificed for lipid analysis in plasma and retina, or used for evaluation of rod-response recovery by electroretinography (ERG) followed by their sacrifice to measure rhodopsin content, or used for progressive light-induced retinal degeneration (PLIRD). For PLIRD, animals were transferred to bright cyclic light for one week. Retinal damage was quantified by ERG, histology and detection of apoptotic nuclei. Animals kept in dim-cyclic-light were processed in parallel. PLIRD induced a thinning of the outer nuclear layer and a reduction of the b-wave amplitude of the ERG in the water group. Retinal structure and function were preserved in supplemented animals. Supplement induced a significant increase in omega-3 fatty acids in plasma by 168% for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), 142% for docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and 19% for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and a decrease in the omega-6 fatty acids, DPA by 28%. In the retina, supplement induced significant reduction of linolenic acid by 67% and an increase in EPA and DPA by 80% and 72%, respectively, associated with significant decrease in omega-6 DPA by 42%. Supplement did not affect rhodopsin content or rod-response recovery. The present data indicate that supplement rapidly modified the fatty acid content and induced an accumulation of EPA in the retina without affecting rhodopsin content or recovery. In addition, it protected the retina from oxidative stress induced by light. Therefore, this supplement might be beneficial to slow down progression of certain retinal degeneration. PMID:26042773

  7. Reversible Fano resonance by transition from fast light to slow light in a coupled-resonator-induced transparency structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yundong; Zhang, Xuenan; Wang, Ying; Zhu, Ruidong; Gai, Yulong; Liu, Xiaoqi; Yuan, Ping

    2013-04-08

    We theoretically propose and experimentally perform a novel dispersion tuning scheme to realize a tunable Fano resonance in a coupled-resonator-induced transparency (CRIT) structure coupled Mach-Zehnder interferometer. We reveal that the profile of the Fano resonance in the resonator coupled Mach-Zehnder interferometers (RCMZI) is determined not only by the phase shift difference between the two arms of the RCMZI but also by the dispersion (group delay) of the CRIT structure. Furthermore, it is theoretically predicted and experimentally demonstrated that the slope and the asymmetry parameter (q) describing the Fano resonance spectral line shape of the RCMZI experience a sign reversal when the dispersion of the CRIT structure is tuned from abnormal dispersion (fast light) to normal dispersion (slow light). These theoretical and experimental results indicate that the reversible Fano resonance which holds significant implications for some attractive device applications such as highly sensitive biochemical sensors, ultrafast optical switches and routers can be realized by the dispersion tuning scheme in the RCMZI.

  8. Light-emitting-diode induced retinal damage and its wavelength dependency in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Yu-Man; Wang, Gen-Shuh; Sliney, David H; Yang, Chang-Hao; Lee, Li-Ling

    2017-01-01

    To examine light-emitting-diode (LED)-induced retinal neuronal cell damage and its wavelength-driven pathogenic mechanisms. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to blue LEDs (460 nm), green LEDs (530 nm), and red LEDs (620 nm). Electroretinography (ERG), Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining, Western blotting (WB) and the detection of superoxide anion (O2(-)·), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), total iron, and ferric (Fe(3+)) levels were applied. ERG results showed the blue LED group induced more functional damage than that of green or red LED groups. H&E staining, TUNEL, IHC, and TEM revealed apoptosis and necrosis of photoreceptors and RPE, which indicated blue LED also induced more photochemical injury. Free radical production and iron-related molecular marker expressions demonstrated that oxidative stress and iron-overload were associated with retinal injury. WB assays correspondingly showed that defense gene expression was up-regulated after the LED light exposure with a wavelength dependency. The study results indicate that LED blue-light exposure poses a great risk of retinal injury in awake, task-oriented rod-dominant animals. The wavelength-dependent effect should be considered carefully when switching to LED lighting applications.

  9. First example of a high-level correlated calculation of the indirect spin-spin coupling constants involving tellurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rusakov, Yury Yu; Krivdin, Leonid B.; Østerstrøm, Freja From;

    2013-01-01

    This paper documents a very first example of a high-level correlated calculation of spin-spin coupling constants involving tellurium taking into account relativistic effects, vibrational corrections and solvent effects for the medium sized organotellurium molecules. The 125Te-1H spin-spin coupling...... of spin-spin coupling constants involving tellurium, was developed. The SOPPA methods show much better performance as compared to 15 those of DFT, if relativistic effects calculated within the ZORA scheme are taken into account. Vibrational and solvent corrections are next to negligible, while...

  10. The Synthesis of Ternary Acetylides with Tellurium: Li2TeC2 and Na2TeC2

    OpenAIRE

    Nemeth, Karoly; Unni, Aditya K.; Kalnmals, Christopher; Segre, Carlo U.; Kaduk, James

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of ternary acetylides Li2TeC2 and Na2TeC2 is presented as the first example of ternary acetylides with metalloid elements instead of transition metals. The synthesis was carried out by the direct reaction of the corresponding bialkali acetylides with tellurium powder in liquid ammonia. Alternatively, the synthesis of Na2TeC2 was also carried out by the direct reaction of tellurium powder and two equivalents of NaC2H in liquid ammonia leading to Na2TeC2 and acetylene gas through ...

  11. Microscopic theory of light-induced deformation in amorphous side-chain azobenzene polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshchevikov, V; Saphiannikova, M; Heinrich, G

    2009-04-16

    We propose a microscopic theory of light-induced deformation of side-chain azobenzene polymers taking into account the internal structure of polymer chains. Our theory is based on the fact that interaction of chromophores with the polarized light leads to the orientation anisotropy of azobenzene macromolecules which is accompanied by the appearance of mechanical stress. It is the first microscopic theory which provides the value of the light-induced stress larger than the yield stress. This result explains a possibility for the inscription of surface relief gratings in glassy side-chain azobenzene polymers. For some chemical architectures, elongation of a sample demonstrates a nonmonotonic behavior with the light intensity and can change its sign (a stretched sample starts to be uniaxially compressed), in agreement with experiments. Using a viscoplastic approach, we show that the irreversible strain of a sample, which remains after the light is switched off, decreases with increasing temperature and can disappear at certain temperature below the glass transition temperature. This theoretical prediction is also confirmed by recent experiments.

  12. Dental resin curing blue light induced oxidative stress with reactive oxygen species production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Ayaka; Okada, Eizo; Okada, Yasue; Maehata, Yojiro; Miyamoto, Chihiro; Kishimoto, Sachi; Otsuka, Takero; Nishimura, Tomoko; Lee, Masaichi Chang-il

    2012-09-01

    Dental resin curing blue light has been used in the treatment of tooth bleaching and to restore teeth with resin-based composite fillings. However, there has been little consideration of its effect on oral tissues such as dental pulp and oral mucosa. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dental resin curing blue light irradiation affects the dental pulp, especially the blood vessels that are known as the first target of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which play an important role in vascular reactivity. We found that blue light irradiation increased the level of lipid peroxidation in isolated rat aorta blood vessels by measuring malondialdehyde. Furthermore, cell proliferative activity was decreased in a time-dependent manner and apoptosis of human aorta vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was induced. These results indicated that (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals were generated in VSMCs by irradiation with blue light, and they induced cytotoxicity associated with oxidative stress, which increased lipid peroxidation and apoptosis. In addition, N-acetyl-l-cysteine, which is a typical intracellular antioxidant, protected VSMCs against cytotoxicity associated with oxidative stress. These findings suggested that antioxidants may be used to prevent oxidative stress in dental pulp by repeated and/or multiple treatments with blue light irradiation in future dental treatments.

  13. Light-emitting diodes at 940nm attenuate colitis-induced inflammatory process in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belém, Mônica O; de Andrade, Giovana M M; Carlos, Thalita M; Guazelli, Carla F S; Fattori, Victor; Toginho Filho, Dari O; Dias, Ivan F L; Verri, Waldiceu A; Araújo, Eduardo J A

    2016-09-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) presents intense inflammatory infiltrate, crypt abscesses, ulceration and even loss of function. Despite the clinical relevance of IBD, its current therapy remains poorly effective. Infrared wavelength phototherapy shows therapeutic potential on inflammation. Our goal was to evaluate whether light-emitting diodes (LED) at 940nm are capable of mitigating the colitis-induced inflammatory process in mice. Forty male Swiss mice were assigned into five groups: control; control treated with LED therapy; colitis without treatment; colitis treated with LED therapy; colitis treated with Prednisolone. Experimental colitis was induced by acetic acid 7.5% (pH2.5) rectal administration. LED therapy was performed with light characterized by wavelength of 940nm, 45nm bandwidth, intensity of 4.05J/cm(2), total power of 270mW and total dose of 64.8J for 4min in a single application. Colitis-induced intestinal transit delay was inhibited by LED therapy. Colitis caused an increase of colon dimensions (length, diameter, total area) and colon weight (edema), which were inhibited by LED therapy. LED therapy also decreased colitis-induced tissue gross lesion, myeloperoxidase activity, microscopic tissue damage score and the presence of inflammatory infiltrate in all intestinal layers. Furthermore, LED therapy inhibited colitis-induced IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 production. We conclude LED therapy at 940nm inhibited experimental colitis-induced colon inflammation in mice, therefore, rendering it a promising therapeutic approach that deserves further investigation.

  14. Growth and atomic structure of tellurium thin films grown on Bi2Te3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Yuma; Sugiyama, Yuya; Ideta, Shin-ichiro; Tanaka, Kiyohisa; Hirahara, Toru

    2017-03-01

    We have grown tellurium (Te) thin films on Bi2Te3 and investigated the atomic structure. From low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) measurements, we found that the Te films are [10 1 bar0]-oriented with six domains. A detailed analysis of the reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) pattern revealed that the films are strained with the in-plane lattice constant compressed by ∼1.5% compared to the bulk value due to the epitaxy between Te and Bi2Te3. These films will be interesting systems to investigate the predicted topological phases that occur in strained Te.

  15. Continuous-wave spatial quantum correlations of light induced by multiple scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolka, Stephan; Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Huck, Alexander;

    2012-01-01

    and reflectance. Utilizing frequency-resolved quantum noise measurements, we observe that the strength of the spatial quantum correlation function can be controlled by changing the quantum state of an incident bright squeezed-light source. Our results are found to be in excellent agreement with the developed......We present theoretical and experimental results on spatial quantum correlations induced by multiple scattering of nonclassical light. A continuous-mode quantum theory is derived that enables determining the spatial quantum correlation function from the fluctuations of the total transmittance...

  16. Mathematical modelling of light-induced electric reaction of Cucurbita pepo L. leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Stolarek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The bioelectRIc reactions of 14-16 day old plants of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L. and internodal cells of Nitellopsis obtusa to the action of visible and ultraviolet light (UV-C were studied. The possibility of analyzing the bioelectric reaction of pumpkin plants induced by visible light by means of mathematical modelling using a linear differential equation of the second order was considered. The solution of this equation (positive and negative functions can, in a sufficient way, reflect the participation of H+ and CI- ions in the generation of the photoelectric response in green plant cells.

  17. UV light induced photodegradation of organic dye by ZnO nanocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumesh, C. K.; Patel, Bhavin; Parekh, Kinnari

    2013-06-01

    Ultraviolet light induced photocatalytic activity of ZnO nanocatalyst prepared using a wet chemical precipitation route and mineralization of the methyl orange (MO) dye has been carried out in a photocatalytic reactor. The degradation of the MO was monitored spectrophotometrically and showed a decolorization efficiency of 92% after nine hours of irradiation in the MO-ZnO/UV light system. The blue shifting of maximum peak position of the MO and the formation of extra peak at 247 nm during irradiation time advances revealed that MO degrades in the form of intermediates during the photocatalytic process.

  18. Observation of spatial quantum correlations induced by multiple scattering of nonclassical light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolka, S; Huck, A; Andersen, U L; Lagendijk, A; Lodahl, P

    2009-05-15

    We present the experimental realization of spatial quantum correlations of photons that are induced by multiple scattering of squeezed light. The quantum correlation relates photons propagating along two different light paths through the random medium and is infinite in range. Both positive and negative spatial quantum correlations are observed when varying the quantum state incident to the multiple scattering medium, and the strength of the correlations is controlled by the number of photons. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with recent theoretical proposals by implementing the full quantum model of multiple scattering.

  19. Nrf2 protects photoreceptor cells from photo-oxidative stress induced by blue light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wan-Ju; Wu, Caiying; Xu, Zhenhua; Kuse, Yoshiki; Hara, Hideaki; Duh, Elia J

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in age-related macular degeneration and hereditary retinal degenerations. Light damage in rodents has been used extensively to model oxidative stress-induced photoreceptor degeneration, and photo-oxidative injury from blue light is particularly damaging to photoreceptors. The endogenous factors protecting photoreceptors from oxidative stress, including photo-oxidative stress, are continuing to be elucidated. In this study, we evaluated the effect of blue light exposure on photoreceptors and its relationship to Nrf2 using cultured murine photoreceptor (661W) cells. 661W cells were exposed to blue light at 2500 lux. Exposure to blue light for 6-24 h resulted in a significant increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and death of 661W cells in a time-dependent fashion. Blue light exposure resulted in activation of Nrf2, as indicated by an increase in nuclear translocation of Nrf2. This was associated with a significant induction of expression of Nrf2 as well as an array of Nrf2 target genes, including antioxidant genes, as indicated by quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR). In order to determine the functional role of Nrf2, siRNA-mediated knockdown studies were performed. Nrf2-knockdown in 661W cells resulted in significant exacerbation of blue light-induced reactive oxygen species levels as well as cell death. Taken together, these findings indicate that Nrf2 is an important endogenous protective factor against oxidative stress in photoreceptor cells. This suggests that drugs targeting Nrf2 could be considered as a neuroprotective strategy for photoreceptors in AMD and other retinal conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Blue-light-induced rapid chloroplast de-anchoring in Vallisneria epidermal cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuuki Sakai; Shin-Ichiro Inoue; Akiko Harada; Ken-Ichiro Shimazaki; Shingo Takagi

    2015-01-01

    In the outer periclinal cytoplasm of leaf epidermal cells of an aquatic angiosperm Vallisneria, blue light induces “chloroplast de‐anchoring”, a rapid decline in the resistance of chloroplasts against centrifugal force. Chloroplast deanchoring is known induced within 1 min of irradiation with high‐fluence‐rate blue light specifically, preceding the commencement of chloroplasts migration toward the anticlinal cytoplasm. However, its regulatory mechanism has remained elusive, although pharmacological analysis suggested that a calcium release from intracellular calcium stores is necessary for the response. In search of the responsible photoreceptors, immunoblotting analysis using antibodies against phototropins demonstrated that cross‐reactive polypeptides of 120‐kDa exist in the plasma‐membrane fraction prepared from the leaves. In vitro phosphorylation analysis revealed that 120‐kDa polypeptides were phosphorylated by exposure to blue light in a fluence‐dependent manner. The blue‐light‐induced phosphorylation activity was sensitive to a Ser/Thr kinase inhibitor, staurosporine, and unusually was retained at a high level for a long time in darkness. Furthermore, phototropin gene homologs (Vallisneria PHOTOTROPIN1 and PHOTOTROPIN2) expressed in leaves were isolated. We propose that calciumregulated chloroplast de‐anchoring, possibly mediated by phototropins, is an initial process of the blue‐light‐induced avoidance response of chloroplasts in Vallisneria.

  1. Rototranslational collision-induced absorption and collision-induced light scattering spectra of molecular hydrogen using isotropic intermolecular potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Kader, M.S.A., E-mail: Mohamedsay68@hotmail.com [Department of Engineering Mathematics and Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Cairo University, Giza 12211 (Egypt); Maroulis, G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Patras, GR-26500 Patras (Greece); Bich, E. [Institut fuer Chemie, Universitaet Rostock Albert-Einstein-Strasse 3a, D-18059 Rostock (Germany)

    2012-07-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have determined an isotropic intermolecular potential for the interaction of hydrogen. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The thermophysical and transport properties are calculated for this system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The rovibrational energy levels and scattering cross-sections are determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have adopted a model for the induced dipole moment {mu}(r) with adjustable parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The quantum lineshapes of absorption and scattering are calculated. -- Abstract: Quantum mechanical lineshapes of collision-induced absorption (CIA) at different temperatures and of collision-induced light scattering (CILS) at room temperature are computed for gaseous molecular hydrogen using theoretical values for induced dipole moments and pair-polarizability trace and anisotropy as input. Comparison with measured spectra of absorption, isotropic and anisotropic light scattering shows satisfactory agreement, for which the uncertainty in measurement of its spectral moments is seen to be large. Empirical models of the dipole moment and pair-polarizability trace and anisotropy which reproduce the experimental spectra and the first three spectral moments more closely than the fundamental theory are also given. Good agreement between computed and experimental lineshapes of both absorption and scattering is obtained when potential models which are constructed from the thermophysical, transport, total scattering cross-section and spectroscopic properties are used. Also, the use of the new potential in lattice dynamic calculations yields good results for several properties of solid hydrogen.

  2. Purely Visible-Light-Induced Photochromism in Ag-TiO2 Nanoheterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobaldi, D M; Hortigüela Gallo, M J; Otero-Irurueta, G; Singh, M K; Pullar, R C; Seabra, M P; Labrincha, J A

    2017-05-23

    We report titania nanoheterostructures decorated with silver, exhibiting tuneable photochromic properties for the first time when stimulated only by visible white light (domestic indoor lamp), with no UV wavelengths. Photochromic materials show reversible color changes under light exposure. However, all inorganic photochromic nanoparticles (NPs) require UV light to operate. Conventionally, multicolor photochromism in Ag-TiO2 films involves a change in color to brownish-gray during UV-light irradiation (i.e., reduction of Ag(+) to Ag(0)) and a (re)bleaching (i.e., (re)oxidation of Ag(0) to colorless Ag(+)) upon visible-light exposure. In this work, on the contrary, we demonstrate visible-light-induced photochromism (ranging from yellow to violet) of 1-10 mol % Ag-modified titania NPs using both spectroscopic and colorimetric CIEL*a*b* analyses. This is not a bleaching of the UV-induced color but a change in color itself under exposure to visible light, and it is shown to be a completely different mechanism-driven by the interfacial charge transfer of an electron from the valence band of TiO2 to that of the AgxO clusters that surround the titania-to the usual UV-triggered photochromism reported in titania-based materials. The quantity of Ag or irradiation time dictated the magnitude and degree of tuneability of the color change, from pale yellow to dark blue, with a rapid change visible only after a few seconds, and the intensity and red shift of surface plasmon resonance induced under visible light also increased. This effect was reversible after annealing in the dark at 100 °C/15 min. Photocatalytic activity under visible light was also assessed against the abatement of nitrogen oxide pollutants, for interior use, therefore showing the coexistence of photochromism and photocatalysis-both triggered by the same wavelength-in the same material, making it a multifunctional material. Moreover, we also demonstrate and explain why X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is an

  3. Formation of tellurium nanocrystals during anaerobic growth of bacteria that use Te oxyanions as respiratory electron acceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baesman, S.M.; Bullen, T.D.; Dewald, J.; Zhang, Dongxiao; Curran, S.; Islam, F.S.; Beveridge, T.J.; Oremland, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    Certain toxic elements support the metabolism of diverse prokaryotes by serving as respiratory electron acceptors for growth. Here, we demonstrate that two anaerobes previously shown to be capable of respiring oxyanions of selenium also achieve growth by reduction of either tellurate [Te(VI)] or tellurite [Te(IV)] to elemental tellurium [Te(0)]. This reduction achieves a sizeable stable-Te-isotopic fractionation (isotopic enrichment factor [??] = -0.4 to -1.0 per ml per atomic mass unit) and results in the formation of unique crystalline Te(0) nanoarchitectures as end products. The Te(0) crystals occur internally within but mainly externally from the cells, and each microorganism forms a distinctly different structure. Those formed by Bacillus selenitireducens initially are nanorods (???10-nm diameter by 200-nm length), which cluster together, forming larger (???1,000-nm) rosettes composed of numerous individual shards (???100-nm width by 1,000-nm length). In contrast, Sulfurospirillium barnesii forms extremely small, irregularly shaped nanospheres (diameter < 50 nm) that coalesce into larger composite aggregates. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction indicate that both biominerals are composed entirely of Te and are crystalline, while Raman spectroscopy confirms that they are in the elemental state. These Te biominerals have specific spectral signatures (UV-visible light, Raman) that also provide clues to their internal structures. The use of microorganisms to generate Te nanomaterials may be an alternative for bench-scale syntheses. Additionally, they may also generate products with unique properties unattainable by conventional physical/chemical methods. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Chloroplasts do not have a polarity for light-induced accumulation movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Hidenori; Yamashita, Hiroko; Wada, Masamitsu

    2009-01-01

    Chloroplast photorelocation movement in green plants is generally mediated by blue light. However, in cryptogam plants, including ferns, mosses, and algae, both red light and blue light are effective. Although the photoreceptors required for this phenomenon have been identified, the mechanisms underlying this movement response are not yet known. In order to analyze this response in more detail, chloroplast movement was induced in dark-adapted Adiantum capillus-veneris gametophyte cells by partial cell irradiation with a microbeam of red and/or blue light. In each case, chloroplasts were found to move toward the microbeam-irradiated area. A second microbeam was also applied to the cell at a separate location before the chloroplasts had reached the destination of the first microbeam. Under these conditions, chloroplasts were found to change their direction of movement without turning and move toward the second microbeam-irradiated area after a lag time of a few minutes. These findings indicate that chloroplasts can move in any direction and do not exhibit a polarity for chloroplast accumulation movement. This phenomenon was analyzed in detail in Adiantum and subsequently confirmed in Arabidopsis thaliana palisade cells. Interestingly, the lag time for direction change toward the second microbeam in Adiantum was longer in the red light than in the blue light. However, the reason for this discrepancy is not yet understood.

  5. Phototropin 2 is involved in blue light-induced anthocyanin accumulation in Fragaria x ananassa fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadomura-Ishikawa, Yasuko; Miyawaki, Katsuyuki; Noji, Sumihare; Takahashi, Akira

    2013-11-01

    Anthocyanins are widespread, essential secondary metabolites in higher plants during color development in certain flowers and fruits. In strawberries, anthocyanins are also key contributors to fruit antioxidant capacity and nutritional value. However, the effects of different light qualities on anthocyanin accumulation in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa, cv. Sachinoka) fruits remain elusive. In the present study, we showed the most efficient increase in anthocyanin content occurred by blue light irradiation. Light sensing at the molecular level was investigated by isolation of two phototropin (FaPHOT1 and FaPHOT2), two cryptochrome (FaCRY1 and FaCRY2), and two phytochrome (FaPHYA and FaPHYB) homologs. Expression analysis revealed only FaPHOT2 transcripts markedly increased depending on fruit developmental stage, and a corresponding increase in anthocyanin content was detected. FaPHOT2 knockdown resulted in decreased anthocyanin content; however, overexpression increased anthocyanin content. These findings suggested blue light induced anthocyanin accumulation, and FaPHOT2 may play a role in sensing blue light, and mediating anthocyanin biosynthesis in strawberry fruits. This is the first report to find a relationship between visible light sensing, and color development in strawberry fruits.

  6. Effect of a complex lutein formula in an animal model for light-induced retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yin-Pin; Ke, Chia-Ying; Kuo, Chih-Chieh; Lee, Yih-Jing

    2016-08-31

    Several retinal degenerative diseases cause vision loss and retinal cell death. Currently, people face prolonged exposure to digital screens, rendering vision protection from light exposure a critical topic. In this study, we designed a complex lutein formula (CLF) by combining several natural compounds: Calendula officinalis, Lycium barbarum, Vaccinium myrtillus, Cassia obtusifolia, and Rhodiola rosea. In addition, we evaluated the protective effects of the formula on retinal functions in an animal model for light-induced retinal degeneration. We employed electroretinography to analyse retinal function, and conducted a histological examination of the morphological changes in the retina treated under various conditions. We revealed that the retinal function in animals exposed to light for 7 days decreased significantly; however, the retinal function of animals that had received the CLF exhibited superior performance, despite light exposure. In addition, a greater portion of the outer nuclear layer (ONL) (i.e. the nuclei of photoreceptors) in these animals was preserved compared with the animals that had not received the formula after 7 days of light exposure. These results revealed that our dietary CLF supplement attenuated retinal function loss resulting from long-term light exposure.

  7. Direct Measurement of Light Speed Reduction in a Rubidium Vapour Medium Coherently Prepared by Electromagnetically Induced Transparency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂鲜花; 王谨; 江开军; 何明; 李可; 仲嘉琪; 詹明生

    2003-01-01

    We have experimentally observed the reduction of light speed in a rubidium vapour medium coherently prepared by electromagnetically induced transparency.The light speed reduction was deduced by directly measuring the time delay of a probe light when it passed through the medium.The time delay varies with the intensity of the coupling laser,and the typical time delay we recorded was 1.8 μs,corresponding to a light speed of 56000m/s.

  8. Traffic Light Protocol for Induced Seismicity: What is the Best Strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, H.; Mahani, A. B.; Atkinson, G. M.; Eaton, D. W. S.; Maxwell, S.

    2015-12-01

    In response to the occurrence of relatively large (and felt) earthquakes that are potentially induced by man-made activities, there is an increasing trend for the industry and government regulators to include a "traffic light" system in their decision-making process. Despite its tremendous implications to the cost of operations and the protection of public safety, the protocol that defines the different scenarios for different lights ("green", "yellow", or "red") has not been thoroughly validated to truly reflect the associated seismic risk. Most government regulators adopt a traffic light protocol (TLP) that depends on the magnitude of the earthquake of interest and sometimes felt reports from local communities. It is well known that the estimate of an earthquake's magnitude can have some uncertainty. While an uncertainty of +/-0.2 in magnitude is understandable and generally accepted by the seismological community, it can create a serious problem when the value of magnitude is the predominant factor in the TLP for induced seismicity. Recent examples of magnitude 4 and larger earthquakes in northeast BC and western AB that are possibly induced by shale gas hydraulic fracturing have demonstrated vividly the possible deficiency of existing TLP for induced seismicity. From the viewpoint of mitigating seismic risk, we argue that a ground-motion based TLP should be more effective than a magnitude-based approach. A workshop with representatives from government agencies, the industry, and the academia will be held to review the deficiency of the current TLP for induced seismicity and to explore innovative ways of improvement. The ultimate goal of the TLP for induced seismicity is to reach a balance between the protection of public safety and the economic benefit of developing natural resources In this presentation, main conclusions of this workshop will be presented.

  9. Large Fizeau's light-dragging effect in a moving electromagnetically induced transparent medium

    CERN Document Server

    Kuan, Pei-Chen; Chan, Wei Sheng; Kosen, Sandoko; Lan, Shau-Yu

    2016-01-01

    As one of the most influential experiments on the development of modern macroscopic theory from Newtonian mechanics to Einstein's special theory of relativity, the phenomenon of light dragging in a moving medium has been discussed and observed extensively in different types of systems. To have a significant dragging effect, the long duration of light travelling in the medium is preferred. Here we demonstrate a light-dragging experiment in an electromagnetically induced transparent cold atomic ensemble and enhance the dragging effect by at least three orders of magnitude compared with the previous experiments. With a large enhancement of the dragging effect, we realize an atom-based velocimeter that has a sensitivity two orders of magnitude higher than the velocity width of the atomic medium used. Such a demonstration could pave the way for motional sensing using the collective state of atoms in a room temperature vapour cell or solid state material.

  10. Light-Induced Reversible Self-Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles Surface-Immobilized with Coumarin Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Huibin; Feng, Miao; Chen, Qidi; Zhang, Xinqi; Zhan, Hongbing

    2016-01-18

    A novel light-induced reversible self-assembly (LIRSA) system is based on the reversible photodimerization and photocleavage of coumarin groups on the surface of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in THF solution. Facilitated by coumarin groups, light irradiation at 365 nm triggers the stable assembly of monodisperse AuNPs; the resulting self-assembly system can be disassembled back to the disassembled state by a relatively short exposure to benign UV light. The reversible self-assembly cycle can be repeated 4 times. A specific concentration range of coumarin ligand and the THF solvent were identified to be the two predominant factors that contribute to the LIRSA of AuNPs. This is the first successful application of reversible photodimerization based on a coumarin derivative in the field of AuNP LIRSA. This LIRSA system may provide unique opportunities for the photoregulated synthesis of many adjustable nanostructures and devices.

  11. Lidar remote sensing of laser-induced incandescence on light absorbing particles in the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miffre, Alain; Anselmo, Christophe; Geffroy, Sylvain; Fréjafon, Emeric; Rairoux, Patrick

    2015-02-09

    Carbon aerosol is now recognized as a major uncertainty on climate change and public health, and specific instruments are required to address the time and space evolution of this aerosol, which efficiently absorbs light. In this paper, we report an experiment, based on coupling lidar remote sensing with Laser-Induced-Incandescence (LII), which allows, in agreement with Planck's law, to retrieve the vertical profile of very low thermal radiation emitted by light-absorbing particles in an urban atmosphere over several hundred meters altitude. Accordingly, we set the LII-lidar formalism and equation and addressed the main features of LII-lidar in the atmosphere by numerically simulating the LII-lidar signal. We believe atmospheric LII-lidar to be a promising tool for radiative transfer, especially when combined with elastic backscattering lidar, as it may then allow a remote partitioning between strong/less light absorbing carbon aerosols.

  12. Versatile Micropatterning of Plasmonic Nanostructures by Visible Light Induced Electroless Silver Plating on Gold Nanoseeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Hironou, Asami; Shen, ZhengJun; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2016-09-14

    A versatile fabrication technique for plasmonic silver (Ag) nanostructures that uses visible light exposure for micropatterning and plasmon resonance tuning is presented. The surface of a glass substrate modified with gold (Au) nanoseeds by a thermal dewetting process was used as a Ag plating platform. When a solution containing silver nitrate and sodium citrate was dropped on the Au nanoseeds under visible light exposure, the plasmon-mediated reduction of Ag ions was induced on the Au nanoseeds to form Ag nanostructures. The plasmon resonance spectra of Ag nanostructures were examined by an absorption spectral measurement and a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. Some examples of Ag nanostructure patterning were demonstrated by means of light exposure through a photomask, direct writing with a focused laser beam, and the interference between two laser beams. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) was conducted with fabricated Ag nanostructures.

  13. Magnetic-field-induced rotation of light with orbital angular momentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Shuai; Ding, Dong-Sheng, E-mail: dds@ustc.edu.cn; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Shi, Bao-Sen, E-mail: drshi@ustc.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Quantum Information, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information & Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2015-06-29

    Light carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) has attractive applications in the fields of precise optical measurements and high capacity optical communications. We study the rotation of a light beam propagating in warm {sup 87}Rb atomic vapor using a method based on magnetic-field-induced circular birefringence. The dependence of the rotation angle on the magnetic field makes it appropriate for weak magnetic field measurements. We quote a detailed theoretical description that agrees well with the experimental observations. The experiment shown here provides a method to measure the magnetic field intensity precisely and expands the application of OAM-carrying light. This technique has advantage in measurement of magnetic field weaker than 0.5 G, and the precision we achieved is 0.8 mG.

  14. Large Fizeau's light-dragging effect in a moving electromagnetically induced transparent medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Pei-Chen; Huang, Chang; Chan, Wei Sheng; Kosen, Sandoko; Lan, Shau-Yu

    2016-10-01

    As one of the most influential experiments on the development of modern macroscopic theory from Newtonian mechanics to Einstein's special theory of relativity, the phenomenon of light dragging in a moving medium has been discussed and observed extensively in different types of systems. To have a significant dragging effect, the long duration of light travelling in the medium is preferred. Here we demonstrate a light-dragging experiment in an electromagnetically induced transparent cold atomic ensemble and enhance the dragging effect by at least three orders of magnitude compared with the previous experiments. With a large enhancement of the dragging effect, we realize an atom-based velocimeter that has a sensitivity two orders of magnitude higher than the velocity width of the atomic medium used. Such a demonstration could pave the way for motional sensing using the collective state of atoms in a room temperature vapour cell or solid state material.

  15. Further study on mechanism of production of light complex particles in nucleon-induced reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Dexian; Wang, Ning; Liu, Min; Ou, Li

    2015-01-01

    The Improved Quantum Molecular Dynamics (ImQMD) model incorporated with the statistical decay model is used to investigate the intermediate energy nucleon-induced reactions. In our last work, the description on light complex particle emission has been great improved with a phenomenological mechanism called surface coalescence and emission introduced into ImQMD model. In this work, taking account of different specific binding energies and separation energies for various light complex particles, the phase space parameters in surface coalescence model are readjusted. By using the new phase space parameters set with better physical fundament, the double differential cross sections of emitted light complex particles are found to be in better agreement with experimental data.

  16. Large Fizeau's light-dragging effect in a moving electromagnetically induced transparent medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Pei-Chen; Huang, Chang; Chan, Wei Sheng; Kosen, Sandoko; Lan, Shau-Yu

    2016-10-03

    As one of the most influential experiments on the development of modern macroscopic theory from Newtonian mechanics to Einstein's special theory of relativity, the phenomenon of light dragging in a moving medium has been discussed and observed extensively in different types of systems. To have a significant dragging effect, the long duration of light travelling in the medium is preferred. Here we demonstrate a light-dragging experiment in an electromagnetically induced transparent cold atomic ensemble and enhance the dragging effect by at least three orders of magnitude compared with the previous experiments. With a large enhancement of the dragging effect, we realize an atom-based velocimeter that has a sensitivity two orders of magnitude higher than the velocity width of the atomic medium used. Such a demonstration could pave the way for motional sensing using the collective state of atoms in a room temperature vapour cell or solid state material.

  17. Effect Of Free Radical Quenchers On Dye-Mediated Laser Light Induced Photosensitization Of Leukemic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliya, Kirpal S.; Matthews, James L.; Fay, Joseph W.; Dowben, Robert M.

    1988-02-01

    The effect of free radical quenchers (ascorbate, catalase, and mannitol) on merocyanine 540 (MC540) mediated, laser light induced photolysis of human acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line (HL-60) was investigated. Results show that in the presence of human albumin (0.25%), dye-mediated (2014/m1), laser light induced photolysis of leukemic cells resulted in a 99.9999% cell kill. Seventy percent of the normal bone marrow cells survived the treatment. The addition of free radical quenchers prior to laser irradiation procedure increases the HL-60 cell survival. Increases of 5.5% and 4.4%, respectively, were observed in the presence of catalase and ascorbate or mannitol. In the presence of a mixture of catalase and mannitol or catalase and ascorbate, this increase in viability was not observed. However, the viability of normal bone marrow cells under these conditions also decreased from 70% to 63%. These findings may be useful in ex-vivo bone marrow purging.

  18. Using Light-Induced Thermocleavage in a Roll-to-Roll Process for Polymer Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, Frederik C; Norrman, Kion

    2010-01-01

    We report on the use of intense visible light with a narrow spectral distribution matched to the region where the conjugated polymer material absorbs to selectively heat the active material and induce thermocleavage. We show a full roll-to-roll process, leading to complete large-area polymer sola...... ion mass spectrometry, attenuated total reflectance infrared, and transmission/reflection UV−vis techniques....... cell modules using light-induced thermocleavage. The process employs full solution processing in air for all five layers in the device and does not employ indium−tin oxide or vacuum processing. The process steps were carefully analyzed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary...

  19. Extension of the Li\\`ege Intranuclear-Cascade model to reactions induced by light nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Mancusi, Davide; Cugnon, Joseph; David, Jean-Christophe; Kaitaniemi, Pekka; Leray, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is twofold. First, we present the extension of the Li\\`ege Intranuclear Cascade model to reactions induced by light ions. Second, we describe the C++ version of the code, which it is physics-wise equivalent to the legacy version, is available in Geant4 and will serve as the basis for all future development of the model. We describe the ideas upon which we built our treatment of nucleus-nucleus reactions and we compare the model predictions against a vast set of heterogeneous experimental data. In spite of the discussed limitations of the intranuclear-cascade scheme, we find that our model yields valid predictions for a number of observables and positions itself as one of the most attractive alternatives available to Geant4 users for the simulation of light-ion-induced reactions.

  20. Protective effect of taurine on the light-induced disruption of isolated frog rod outer segments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasantes-Morales, H.; Ademe, R.M.; Quesada, O.

    1981-01-01

    Isolated frog rod outer segments (ROS) incubated in a Krebs-bicarbonate medium, and illuminated for 2 h, show a profound alteration in their structure. This is characterized by distention of discs, vesiculation, and a marked swelling. The light-induced ROS disruption requires the presence of bicarbonate and sodium chloride. Replacement of bicarbonate by TRIS or HEPES protects ROS structure. Also, substitution of sodium chloride by sucrose or choline chloride maintains unaltered the ROS structure. Deletion of calcium, magnesium, or phosphate does not modify the effect produced by illumination. An increased accumulation of labeled bicarbonate and tritiated water is observed in illuminated ROS, as compared with controls in the dark. The presence of taurine, GABA, or glycine, at concentrations of 5-25 mM, effectively counteracts the light-induced ROS disruption. Taurine (25 mM) reduces labeled bicarbonate and tritiated water levels to those observed in the dark incubated ROS.

  1. Visible light induced ocular delayed bioluminescence as a possible origin of negative afterimage

    CERN Document Server

    Bokkon, I; Wang, C; Dai, J; Salari, V; Grass, F; Antal, I

    2011-01-01

    The delayed luminescence of biological tissues is an ultraweak reemission of absorbed photons after exposure to external monochromatic or white light illumination. Recently, Wang, B\\'okkon, Dai and Antal (Brain Res. 2011) presented the first experimental proof of the existence of spontaneous ultraweak biophoton emission and visible light induced delayed ultraweak photon emission from in vitro freshly isolated rat's whole eye, lens, vitreous humor and retina. Here, we suggest that the photobiophysical source of negative afterimage can also occur within the eye by delayed bioluminescent photons. In other words, when we stare at a colored (or white) image for few seconds, external photons can induce excited electronic states within different parts of the eye that is followed by a delayed reemission of absorbed photons for several seconds. Finally, these reemitted photons can be absorbed by nonbleached photoreceptors that produce a negative afterimage. Although this suggests the photobiophysical source of negativ...

  2. Radiation-damage-induced phasing: a case study using UV irradiation with light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sanctis, Daniele; Zubieta, Chloe; Felisaz, Franck; Caserotto, Hugo; Nanao, Max H

    2016-03-01

    Exposure to X-rays, high-intensity visible light or ultraviolet radiation results in alterations to protein structure such as the breakage of disulfide bonds, the loss of electron density at electron-rich centres and the movement of side chains. These specific changes can be exploited in order to obtain phase information. Here, a case study using insulin to illustrate each step of the radiation-damage-induced phasing (RIP) method is presented. Unlike a traditional X-ray-induced damage step, specific damage is introduced via ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs). In contrast to UV lasers, UV-LEDs have the advantages of small size, low cost and relative ease of use.

  3. In situ transmission electron microscopy of light-induced photocatalytic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalca, F; Laursen, A B; Kardynal, B E; Dunin-Borkowski, R E; Dahl, S; Wagner, J B; Hansen, T W

    2012-02-24

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) makes it possible to obtain insight into the structure, composition and reactivity of photocatalysts, which are of fundamental interest for sustainable energy research. Such insight can be used for further material optimization. Here, we combine conventional TEM analysis of photocatalysts with environmental TEM (ETEM) and photoactivation using light. Two novel types of TEM specimen holder that enable in situ illumination are developed to study light-induced phenomena in photoactive materials, systems and photocatalysts at the nanoscale under working conditions. The technological development of the holders is described and two representative photo-induced phenomena are studied: the photodegradation of Cu₂O and the photodeposition of Pt onto a GaN:ZnO photocatalyst.

  4. Light-induced evaporative cooling in a magneto-optical trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Hong-Yu; Cheng Hua-Dong; Wang Yu-Zhu; Liu Liang

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental demonstration of light-induced evaporative cooling in a magneto-optical trap.An additional laser is used to interact with atoms at the edge of the atomic cloud in the trap.These atoms get an additional force and evaporated away from the trap by both the magnetic field and laser fields.The remaining atoms have lower kinetic energy and thus are cooled.It reports the measurements on the temperature and atomic number after the evaporative cooling with different parameters including the distance between the laser and the centre of the atomic cloud,the detuning,the intensity.The results show that the light-induced evaporative cooling is a way to generate an ultra-cold atom source.

  5. Spatial Symmetry Breaking in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky Reaction with Light-Induced Remote Communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrand, M.; Skodt, H.; Showalter, K.

    2001-08-20

    Domains containing spiral waves form on a stationary background in a photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction with light-induced alternating nonlocal feedback. Complex behavior of colliding and splitting wave fragments is found with feedback radii comparable to the spiral wavelength. A linear stability analysis of the uniform stationary states in an Oregonator model reveals a spatial symmetry breaking instability. Numerical simulations show behavior in agreement with that found experimentally and also predict a variety of other new patterns.

  6. Light-induced degradation of storage starch in turions of Spirodela polyrhiza depends on nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appenroth, Klaus-J; Ziegler, Paul

    2008-10-01

    Light induces both the germination of turions of the duckweed Spirodela polyrhiza and the degradation of the reserve starch stored in the turions. The germination photoresponse requires nitrate, and we show here that nitrate is also needed for the light-induced degradation of the turion starch. Ammonium cannot substitute for nitrate in this regard, and nitrate thus acts specifically as signal to promote starch degradation in the turions. Irradiation with continuous red light leads to starch degradation via auto-phosphorylation of starch-associated glucan, water dikinase (GWD), phosphorylation of the turion starch and enhanced binding of alpha-amylase to starch granules. The present study shows that all of these processes require the presence of nitrate, and that nitrate exerts its effect on starch degradation at a point between the absorption of light by phytochrome and the auto-phosphorylation of the GWD. Nitrate acts to coordinate carbon and nitrogen metabolism in germinating turions: starch will only be broken down when sufficient nitrogen is present to ensure appropriate utilization of the released carbohydrate. These data constitute the first report of control over the initiation of reserve starch degradation by nitrate.

  7. Mechanisms for light induced degradation in MAPbI3 perovskite thin films and solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmageed, Ghada; Jewell, Leila; Hellier, Kaitlin; Seymour, Lydia; Luo, Binbin; Bridges, Frank; Zhang, Jin Z.; Carter, Sue

    2016-12-01

    Organometal halide perovskites are highly promising materials for photovoltaic applications, yet their rapid degradation remains a significant challenge. Here, the light-induced structural degradation mechanism of methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) perovskite films and devices is studied in low humidity environment using X-Ray Diffraction, Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectroscopy, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, and device measurements. Under dry conditions, the perovskite film degrades only in the presence of both light and oxygen, which together induce the formation of halide anions through donation of electrons to the surrounding oxygen. The halide anions generate free radicals that deprotonate the methylammonium cation and form the highly volatile CH3NH2 molecules that escape and leave pure PbI2 behind. The device findings show that changes in the local structure at the TiO2 mesoporous layer occur with light, even in the absence of oxygen, and yet such changes can be prevented by the application of UV blocking layer on the cells. Our results indicate that the stability of mp-TiO2-MAPbI3 photovoltaics can be dramatically improved with effective encapsulation that protects the device from UV light, oxygen, and moisture.

  8. Exposure of Metarhizium acridum mycelium to light induces tolerance to UV-B radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancini, Guilherme T P; Rangel, Drauzio E N; Braga, Gilberto Ú L

    2016-03-01

    Metarhizium acridum is an entomopathogenic fungus commonly used as a bioinsecticide. The conidium is the fungal stage normally employed as field inoculum in biological control programs and must survive under field conditions such as high ultraviolet-B (UV-B) exposure. Light, which is an important stimulus for many fungi, has been shown to induce the production of M. robertsii conidia with increased stress tolerance. Here we show that a two-hour exposure to white or blue/UV-A light of fast-growing mycelium induces tolerance to subsequent UV-B irradiation. Red light, however, does not have the same effect. In addition, we established that this induction can take place with as little as 1 min of white-light exposure. This brief illumination scheme could be relevant in future studies of M. acridum photobiology and for the production of UV-B resistant mycelium used in mycelium-based formulations for biological control. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Improved detection of induced seismicity using beamforming techniques: application to traffic light systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Stephen; Verdon, James; Kendal, J.-Michael; Hill, Phil

    2016-04-01

    Unconventional methods of hydrocarbon extraction, such as hydraulic fracturing, have the potential to reactivate existing faults, causing induced seismicity. Traffic Light Schemes have been implemented in some regions; these systems ensure that drilling activities are paused or shut-down if seismic events larger than a given magnitude are induced. In particular, the United Kingdom has imposed a traffic light scheme based on magnitude thresholds of Ml = 0.0 and Ml = 0.5 for the amber and red limits, respectively. Therefore, an effective traffic light scheme in the UK requires monitoring arrays capable of detecting events with Ml stack. We test our method using a dataset from a surface array of Güralp 3T broadband seismometers that recorded hydraulic fracturing activities in the central United States. Our beamforming and stacking approach identified a total of 20 events, compared to only 4 events detected by traditional picking methods. We therefore suggest that our approach is suitable for use with low magnitude traffic light schemes, especially in noisy environments.

  10. Collision-induced light scattering in a thin xenon layer between graphite slabs - MD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawid, A; Górny, K; Wojcieszyk, D; Dendzik, Z; Gburski, Z

    2014-08-14

    The collision-induced light scattering many-body correlation functions and their spectra in thin xenon layer located between two parallel graphite slabs have been investigated by molecular dynamics computer simulations. The results have been obtained at three different distances (densities) between graphite slabs. Our simulations show the increased intensity of the interaction-induced light scattering spectra at low frequencies for xenon atoms in confined space, in comparison to the bulk xenon sample. Moreover, we show substantial dependence of the interaction-induced light scattering correlation functions of xenon on the distances between graphite slabs. The dynamics of xenon atoms in a confined space was also investigated by calculating the mean square displacement functions and related diffusion coefficients. The structural property of confined xenon layer was studied by calculating the density profile, perpendicular to the graphite slabs. Building of a fluid phase of xenon in the innermost part of the slot was observed. The nonlinear dependence of xenon diffusion coefficient on the separation distance between graphite slabs has been found.

  11. Phytochrome and retrograde signalling pathways converge to antagonistically regulate a light-induced transcriptional network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Guiomar; Leivar, Pablo; Ludevid, Dolores; Tepperman, James M; Quail, Peter H; Monte, Elena

    2016-05-06

    Plastid-to-nucleus retrograde signals emitted by dysfunctional chloroplasts impact photomorphogenic development, but the molecular link between retrograde- and photosensory-receptor signalling has remained unclear. Here, we show that the phytochrome and retrograde signalling (RS) pathways converge antagonistically to regulate the expression of the nuclear-encoded transcription factor GLK1, a key regulator of a light-induced transcriptional network central to photomorphogenesis. GLK1 gene transcription is directly repressed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR (PIF)-class bHLH transcription factors in darkness, but light-activated phytochrome reverses this activity, thereby inducing expression. Conversely, we show that retrograde signals repress this induction by a mechanism independent of PIF mediation. Collectively, our data indicate that light at moderate levels acts through the plant's nuclear-localized sensory-photoreceptor system to induce appropriate photomorphogenic development, but at excessive levels, sensed through the separate plastid-localized RS system, acts to suppress such development, thus providing a mechanism for protection against photo-oxidative damage by minimizing the tissue exposure to deleterious radiation.

  12. Theory for ^77Se and ^125Te Nuclear Quadrupole Interactions in Selenium and Tellurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suck-Cho, Hwa; Oh, Young-Kee; Park, Jin-Ho; Das, T. P.

    1998-03-01

    The electric field gradient(efg) tensors at ^77Se and ^125Te nuclei have been studied for the four systems involving each of these nuclei in both Selenium and Tellurium crystals utilizing the first principles Hartee-Fock Cluster procedure. Using the calculated efg for the pure systems and the experimental quadrupole coupling constants (e^2qQ), the quadrupole moments are determined to be Q(^77Se)=0.74±0,07(b) and Q(^125Te)=0.35±0.04(b). Comparison will be made with earlier values for the Q of the two nuclei. Using our values of Q and the calculated efg for ^77Se in tellurium and ^125Te in selenium, our values of e^2qQ agree within 15 per cent with that of experiment. The asymmetry parametrs η also agree reasonably well with experiment, but not as closely as the e^2qQ. Experimental results for η for ^125Te in selenium are needed to compare with theory.

  13. Tellurium as a valuable tool for studying the prokaryotic origins of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontieri, Paola; De Stefano, Mario; Massardo, Domenica Rita; Gunge, Norio; Miyakawa, Isamu; Sando, Nobundo; Pignone, Domenico; Pizzolante, Graziano; Romano, Roberta; Alifano, Pietro; Del Giudice, Luigi

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondria are eukaryotic organelles which contain the own genetic material and evolved from free-living Eubacteria, namely hydrogen-producing Alphaproteobacteria. Since 1965, biologists provided, by research at molecular level, evidence for the prokaryotic origins of mitochondria. However, determining the precise origins of mitochondria is challenging due to inherent difficulties in phylogenetically reconstructing ancient evolutionary events. The use of new tools to evidence the prokaryotic origin of mitochondria could be useful to gain an insight into the bacterial endosymbiotic event that resulted in the permanent acquisition of bacteria, from the ancestral cell, that through time were transformed into mitochondria. Electron microscopy has shown that both proteobacterial and yeast cells during their growth in the presence of increasing amount of tellurite resulted in dose-dependent blackening of the culture due to elemental tellurium (Te(0)) that formed large deposits either along the proteobacterial membrane or along the yeast cell wall and mitochondria. Since the mitochondrial inner membrane composition is similar to that of proteobacterial membrane, in the present work we evidenced the black tellurium deposits on both, cell wall and mitochondria of ρ(+) and respiratory deficient ρ(-) mutants of yeast. A possible role of tellurite in studying the evolutionary origins of mitochondria will be discussed.

  14. Determination of tellurium by hydride generation with in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matusiewicz, H.; Krawczyk, M. [Politechn Poznanska, Poznan (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    The analytical performance of coupled hydride generation - integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system was evaluated for determination of Te in reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment), coal fly ash and garlic. Tellurium, using formation of H{sub 2}Te vapors, is atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangernents (a water-cooled single silica tube, double-slotted quartz tube or an 'integrated trap') was investigated. An improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with using either of the above atom trapping techniques separately. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3{sigma}), was 0.9 ng mL{sup -1} for Te. For a 2 min in situ preconcentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 222 fold, using the hydride generation atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed as RSD, was 7.0% (n = 6) for Te. The accuracy of the method was verified using a certified reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment) by aqueous standard calibration curves. The measured Te contents of the reference material was in agreement with the information value. The method was successfully applied to the determination of tellurium in coal fly ash and garlic.

  15. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of Tellurium Vanadate (Te2V2O9)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhu, Sai Pavan Prashanth; Shet, Tukaram; Abhijit, B. K.; Pradhan, Akash; Molli, Muralikrishna; Sai Muthukumar, V.; Varma, K. B. R.

    2017-07-01

    We report here the structure property correlation of Tellurium Vanadate (Te2V2O9) through various optical and vibrational spectroscopic investigations. Pure phase polycrystalline powder of Te2V2O9 was prepared by solid state reaction technique. Phase purity of the sample was confirmed by Powder X-Ray diffraction and the microstructural investigation was analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy. Raman microscopy was employed to validate the molecular structure. Diffused Reflectance and Photoluminescence spectroscopy were employed to study the optical properties. Because of non-centrosymmetry, we also observed second harmonic generation in tellurium vanadate. Subsequently, third order nonlinear optical response of Te2V2O9 was probed using open-aperture Z-scan technique estimating the nonlinear absorption coefficient to be 1e-10 mW-1. The mechanism of nonlinear absorption was deduced to be a two-photon absorption process. This was ascertained through existence of excited states predicted from electronic structure of Te2V2O9 using Density Functional Theory. It is also noteworthy to highlight that Te2V2O9 possess higher nonlinear optical coefficient than other vanadate compounds reported in literature.

  16. Microbial-assisted synthesis and evaluation the cytotoxic effect of tellurium nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forootanfar, Hamid [Herbal and Traditional Medicines Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amirpour-Rostami, Sahar; Jafari, Mandana [Pharmaceutics Research Center, Institute of Neuropharmacology, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Forootanfar, Amir [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yousefizadeh, Zahra [The Student Research Committee, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shakibaie, Mojtaba, E-mail: shakiba@kmu.ac.ir [Pharmaceutics Research Center, Institute of Neuropharmacology, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    The present study was designed to isolate bacterial strain capable of tellurium nanorods' (Te NRs) production followed by purification and evaluation of the cytotoxic effect of Te NRs. Among 25 environmental samples collected for screening of Te NR-producer bacterial strains one bacterial colony (isolated from hot spring and identified as Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes strain Te) was selected and applied for biosynthesis of Te NRs. Thereafter, an organic–aqueous partitioning system was applied for the purification of the biogenic Te NRs and the purified Te NRs were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), UV–visible spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. The cytotoxic effect of biologically synthesized Te NRs and potassium tellurite on four cell lines of MCF-7, HT1080, HepG2 and A549 was then determined using the MTT assay method. The obtained results revealed lower toxicity for the rod-shaped biogenic tellurium nanostructures (~ 22 nm diameter by 185 nm length) compared to K{sub 2}TeO{sub 3}. - Highlights: • Te NR producing bacterial strain were isolated from hot springs. • Organic–aqueous partitioning system was applied for purification of Te nanorods. • The rod-shaped biogenic Te NPs showed lower cytotoxicity compared to K{sub 2}TeO{sub 3}.

  17. Light-induced fading of the PSL signal from irradiated herbs and spices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, A.; Corda, U.; Fuochi, P.; Bortolin, E.; Calicchia, A.; Onori, S.

    2007-08-01

    Reliability of the photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) technique, as screening method for irradiated food identification, has been tested with three kinds of herbs and spices (oregano, red pepper and fennel), prepared in two different ways (granular: i.e. seeds and flakes, or powdered), over a long period of storage with different light exposures. The irradiated samples kept in the dark gave always a positive response (the sample is correctly classified as "irradiated") for the overall examination period. The samples kept under ambient light conditions, in typical commercial glass containers, exhibited a reduction of the PSL signal, more or less pronounced depending on the type of food and packaging. The different PSL response of the irradiated samples is to be related to the quantity and quality of the mineral debris present in the individual food. It was also found that, for the same type of food, the light-induced fading was much stronger for the flaked and seed samples than for the corresponding powder samples, the penetrating capability of light being much more inhibited in powdered than in whole seeds or flaked form samples. The observed light bleaching of the PSL signal in irradiated herbs and spices is of practical relevance since it may lead to false negative classifications.

  18. Manifestation of Hyperandrogenism in the Continuous Light Exposure-Induced PCOS Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhi Kang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a complex endocrine and metabolic disorder, and its pathogenesis has yet to be completely clarified. A fully convincing animal model has not been established for PCOS. In earlier studies, researchers have shown that the exposure of rats to continuous light can induce PCOS; nevertheless, hyperandrogenism, a key characteristic observed in human PCOS, has not been reported previously. In the present study, we found that (1 body weights decreased in female rats in a continuous light environment with both ovarian and uterine augmentation; (2 the estrous cycle in rats under continuous light environment was disordered, and polycystic ovary-like changes occurred, accompanied with fur loss and lethargy; and (3 serum testosterone levels in rats in a continuous light environment significantly increased. Our data suggest that continuous light can lead to the occurrence of PCOS in female rats without the need for drugs; this is a reasonable PCOS animal model that is more consistent with the natural disease state in humans; and poor sleep habits or negligence of sleep hygiene may be an important lifestyle factor in pathogenesis of PCOS.

  19. A remotely driven and controlled micro-gripper fabricated from light-induced deformation smart material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chaolei; Lv, Jiu-an; Tian, Xiaojun; Wang, Yuechao; Liu, Jie; Yu, Yanlei

    2016-09-01

    Micro-gripper is an important tool to manipulate and assemble micro-scale objects. Generally, as micro-gripper is too small to be directly driven by general motors, it always needs special driving devices and suitable structure design. In this paper, two-finger micro-grippers are designed and fabricated, which utilize light-induced deformation smart material to make one of the two fingers. As the smart material is directly driven and controlled by remote lights instead of lines and motors, this light-driven mode simplifies the design of the two-finger micro-gripper and avoids special drivers and complex mechanical structure. In addition, a micro-manipulation experiment system is set up which is based on the light-driven micro-gripper. Experimental results show that this remotely light-driven micro-gripper has ability to manipulate and assemble micro-scale objects both in air and water. Furthermore, two micro-grippers can also work together for cooperation which can further enhance the assembly ability. On the other hand, this kind of remotely controllable micro-gripper that does not require on-board energy storage, can be used in mobile micro-robot as a manipulation hand.

  20. Proliferation of chicken fibroblasts induced by light-emitting diodes: a comparative trial for different wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinck, Elke; Cagnie, B.; Declercq, H.; Cornelissen, R.; Cambier, D.

    2003-12-01

    The effectiveness and applicability of a variety of light sources, in the treatment of wounds has thoroughly been investigated, in vitro as well as in vivo. The current commercial availability of Light Emitting Diode (LED) sources therefore also invites research to explore the effect of low power infrared, red and green light on wound healing, e.g. by means of fibroblast proliferation. Therefore a controlled and randomized study on cultured embryonic chicken fibroblasts was conducted. The fibroblasts were irradiated during three consecutive days, at several wavelengths (950 nm, 660 nm and 570 nm) and a respective power output of 160 mW, 80 mW or 10 mW. Treatment duration varied from 1 minute to 3 minutes to obtain a surface energy density of 0.9 J/cm2 (infrared and red light) or 0.2 J/cm2 (green light). Statistical analysis revealed that LED irradiation for all three wavelengths induced a higher rate of proliferation in comparison of the control group. This difference was statistically significant (p cells, than the red (p < .001) an the infrared probe (p < .001). Furthermore, the red probe provided a higher increase (p < .001) than the IR probe. LED irradiation results in an increased fibroblast proliferation in vitro. This outcome postulates beneficial stimulatory effects of LED at the applied wavelength, energy density and power output on wound healing in vivo. Further investigation is necessary to examine this hypothesis.

  1. Light-induced reactions of Escherichia coli DNA photolyase monitored by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Erik; Hessling, Benedikt; Illarionova, Viktoria; Bacher, Adelbert; Weber, Stefan; Richter, Gerald; Gerwert, Klaus

    2005-04-01

    Cyclobutane-type pyrimidine dimers generated by ultraviolet irradiation of DNA can be cleaved by DNA photolyase. The enzyme-catalysed reaction is believed to be initiated by the light-induced transfer of an electron from the anionic FADH- chromophore of the enzyme to the pyrimidine dimer. In this contribution, first infrared experiments using a novel E109A mutant of Escherichia coli DNA photolyase, which is catalytically active but unable to bind the second cofactor methenyltetrahydrofolate, are described. A stable blue-coloured form of the enzyme carrying a neutral FADH radical cofactor can be interpreted as an intermediate analogue of the light-driven DNA repair reaction and can be reduced to the enzymatically active FADH- form by red-light irradiation. Difference Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to monitor vibronic bands of the blue radical form and of the fully reduced FADH- form of the enzyme. Preliminary band assignments are based on experiments with 15N-labelled enzyme and on experiments with D2O as solvent. Difference FT-IR measurements were also used to observe the formation of thymidine dimers by ultraviolet irradiation and their repair by light-driven photolyase catalysis. This study provides the basis for future time-resolved FT-IR studies which are aimed at an elucidation of a detailed molecular picture of the light-driven DNA repair process.

  2. Influence of tellurium sulfides` morphology and workability of constructional steel; Wplyw telluru na morfologie siarczkow i skrawalnosc stali konstrukcyjnej

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pytel, S.M.; Kadluczka, A.M. [Instytut Materialoznawstwa i Technologii Metali, Politechnika Krakowska, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    The interactions of the tellurium additions on quantitative changes in sulfur geometry as well as the influence of such changes on workability improvement of low-alloyed construction steel have been investigated and discussed. (author). 7 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs.

  3. On the dissolution of non-metallic solid elements (sulfur, selenium, tellurium and phosphorus) in ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boros, Eva; Earle, Martyn J; Gîlea, Manuela A; Metlen, Andreas; Mudring, Anja-Verena; Rieger, Franziska; Robertson, Allan J; Seddon, Kenneth R; Tomaszowska, Alina A; Trusov, Lev; Vyle, Joseph S

    2010-02-07

    Ionic liquids are shown to be good solvents for elemental sulfur, selenium, phosphorus and tellurium, and can be designed to maximise the solubility of these elements. The presence of the [S(3)](*-) radical anion in diluted solutions of sulfur in some ionic liquids has been confirmed, and is the origin of their intense blue colour (cf. lapis lazuli).

  4. Photoprotection of PSI by Far-Red Light Against the Fluctuating Light-Induced Photoinhibition in Arabidopsis thaliana and Field-Grown Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Masaru; Yamori, Wataru; Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Terashima, Ichiro

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported that PSI photoinhibition is induced even in wild-type plants of Arabidopsis thaliana, rice and other species by exposure of leaves to fluctuating light (FL) for a few hours. Because plants are exposed to FL in nature, they must possess protective mechanisms against the FL-induced photodamage. Here, using A. thaliana grown at various irradiances, we examined PSI photoprotection by far-red (FR) light at intensities comparable with those observed in nature. Dark-treated leaves were illuminated by red FL alternating high/low light at 1,200/30 µmol m-2 s-1 for 800 ms/10 s. By this FL treatment without FR light for 120 min, the level of photo-oxidizable P700 was decreased by 30% even in the plants grown at high irradiances. The addition of continuous FR light during the FL suppressed this damage almost completely. With FR light, P700 was kept in a more oxidized state in both low- and high-light phases. The protective effect of FR light was diminished more in mutants of the NADH dehydrogenase-like complex (NDH)-mediated cyclic electron flow around PSI (CEF-PSI) than in the PGR5 (proton gradient regulation 5)-mediated CEF-PSI, indicating that the NDH-mediated CEF-PSI would be a major contributor to PSI photoprotection in the presence of FR light. We also confirmed that PSI photoinhibition decreased with the increase in growth irradiance in A. thaliana and field-grown plants, and that this PSI photodamage was largely suppressed by addition of FR light. These results clearly indicate that the most effective PSI protection is realized in the presence of FR light. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Inhibition by acrolein of light-induced stomatal opening through inhibition of inward-rectifying potassium channels in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Moshiul; Ye, Wenxiu; Matsushima, Daiki; Khokon, Md Atiqur Rahman; Munemasa, Shintaro; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Acrolein is a reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehyde derived from lipid peroxides, which are produced in plants under a variety of stress. We investigated effects of acrolein on light-induced stomatal opening using Arabidopsis thaliana. Acrolein inhibited light-induced stomatal opening in a dose-dependent manner. Acrolein at 100 μM inhibited plasma membrane inward-rectifying potassium (Kin) channels in guard cells. Acrolein at 100 μM inhibited Kin channel KAT1 expressed in a heterologous system using Xenopus leaves oocytes. These results suggest that acrolein inhibits light-induced stomatal opening through inhibition of Kin channels in guard cells.

  6. A Phenomenology of Meditation-Induced Light Experiences: Traditional Buddhist and Neurobiological Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared R. Lindahl

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The scientific study of Buddhist meditation has proceeded without much attention to Buddhist literature that details the range of psychological and physiological changes thought to occur during meditation. This paper presents reports of various meditation-induced light experiences derived from American Buddhist practitioners. The reports of light experiences are classified into two main types: discrete lightforms and patterned or diffuse lights. Similar phenomena are well documented in traditional Buddhist texts but are virtually undocumented in scientific literature on meditation. Within Buddhist traditions, these phenomena are attributed a range of interpretations. However, because it is insufficient and problematic to rely solely upon the textual sources as a means of investigating the cause or significance of these phenomena, these qualitative reports are also considered in relation to scientific research on light-related experiences in the context of sensory deprivation, perceptual isolation, and clinical disorders of the visual system. The typologies derived from these studies also rely upon reports of experiences and closely match typologies derived from the qualitative study of contemporary practitioners and typologies found in Buddhist literary traditions. Taken together, these studies also provide evidence in support of the hypothesis that certain meditative practices—especially those that deliberately decrease social, kinesthetic, and sensory stimulation and emphasize focused attention—have perceptual and cognitive outcomes similar to sensory deprivation. Given that sensory deprivation increases neuroplasticity, meditation may also have an enhanced neuroplastic potential beyond ordinary experience-dependent changes. By providing and contextualizing these reports of meditation-induced light experiences, scientists, clinicians, and meditators gain a more informed view of the range of experiences that can be elicited by contemplative

  7. Crystal structure of the nucleosome containing ultraviolet light-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi, Naoki; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kagawa, Wataru; Osakabe, Akihisa; Matsumoto, Syota; Iwai, Shigenori; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2016-02-26

    The cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) is induced in genomic DNA by ultraviolet (UV) light. In mammals, this photolesion is primarily induced within nucleosomal DNA, and repaired exclusively by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. However, the mechanism by which the CPD is accommodated within the nucleosome has remained unknown. We now report the crystal structure of a nucleosome containing CPDs. In the nucleosome, the CPD induces only limited local backbone distortion, and the affected bases are accommodated within the duplex. Interestingly, one of the affected thymine bases is located within 3.0 Å from the undamaged complementary adenine base, suggesting the formation of complementary hydrogen bonds in the nucleosome. We also found that UV-DDB, which binds the CPD at the initial stage of the NER pathway, also efficiently binds to the nucleosomal CPD. These results provide important structural and biochemical information for understanding how the CPD is accommodated and recognized in chromatin.

  8. Control of 1,3-cyclohexadiene photoisomerization using light-induced conical intersections

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jaehee; White, James L; Petrovic, Vladimir S; Martinez, Todd J; Bucksbaum, Philip H

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the photo-induced isomerization from 1,3-cyclohexadiene to 1,3,5-hexatriene in the presence of an intense ultrafast laser pulse. We find that the laser field can suppress isomerization if it is both polarized parallel to the excitation dipole and present 50 fs after the initial photoabsorption, at the time when the system is expected to be in the vicinity of a conical intersection that mediates this structural transition. A modified ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) method shows that the laser induces a resonant coupling between the excited state and the ground state, which is a light-induced conical intersection. The theory accounts for the timing and direction of the effect.

  9. Effect of the thickness of light absorption layer on the light-induced transverse thermoelectric effect in Bi2Sr2Co2Oy films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guoying Yan; Liqing Sun; Shufang Wang; Guangsheng Fu

    2015-01-01

    Light-induced transverse thermoelectric effect is investigated in incline-oriented Bi2 Sr2Co2Oy thin films covered with a graphite light absorption layer.Upon the illumination of a 980 nm cw laser,an enhanced voltage signal is detected and the improvement degree is found to be dependent on the thickness of the graphite layer.A twodimensional (2D) heat transport model using the finite-difference method provides a reasonable explanation to the experimental data.Present results give some valuable instructions for the design of light absorption layers in this type of detector.

  10. The 4-Dimensional Plant: Effects of Wind-Induced Canopy Movement on Light Fluctuations and Photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Alexandra J; Retkute, Renata; Preston, Simon P; Jensen, Oliver E; Pound, Michael P; Pridmore, Tony P; Murchie, Erik H

    2016-01-01

    Physical perturbation of a plant canopy brought about by wind is a ubiquitous phenomenon and yet its biological importance has often been overlooked. This is partly due to the complexity of the issue at hand: wind-induced movement (or mechanical excitation) is a stochastic process which is difficult to measure and quantify; plant motion is dependent upon canopy architectural features which, until recently, were difficult to accurately represent and model in 3-dimensions; light patterning throughout a canopy is difficult to compute at high-resolutions, especially when confounded by other environmental variables. Recent studies have reinforced the expectation that canopy architecture is a strong determinant of productivity and yield; however, links between the architectural properties of the plant and its mechanical properties, particularly its response to wind, are relatively unknown. As a result, biologically relevant data relating canopy architecture, light- dynamics, and short-scale photosynthetic responses in the canopy setting are scarce. Here, we hypothesize that wind-induced movement will have large consequences for the photosynthetic productivity of our crops due to its influence on light patterning. To address this issue, in this study we combined high resolution 3D reconstructions of a plant canopy with a simple representation of canopy perturbation as a result of wind using solid body rotation in order to explore the potential effects on light patterning, interception, and photosynthetic productivity. We looked at two different scenarios: firstly a constant distortion where a rice canopy was subject to a permanent distortion throughout the whole day; and secondly, a dynamic distortion, where the canopy was distorted in incremental steps between two extremes at set time points in the day. We find that mechanical canopy excitation substantially alters light dynamics; light distribution and modeled canopy carbon gain. We then discuss methods required for

  11. The 4-dimensional plant: effects of wind- induced canopy movement on light fluctuations and photosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Jacquelyn Burgess

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Physical perturbation of a plant canopy brought about by wind is a ubiquitous phenomenon and yet its biological importance has often been overlooked. This is partly due to the complexity of the issue at hand: wind-induced movement (or mechanical excitation is a stochastic process which is difficult to measure and quantify; plant motion is dependent upon canopy architectural features which, until recently, were difficult to accurately represent and model in 3-dimensions; light patterning throughout a canopy is difficult to compute at high-resolutions, especially when confounded by other environmental variables. Recent studies have reinforced the expectation that canopy architecture is a strong determinant of productivity and yield; however, links between the architectural properties of the plant and its mechanical properties, particularly its response to wind, are relatively unknown. As a result, biologically relevant data relating canopy architecture, light dynamics and short-scale photosynthetic responses in the canopy setting are scarce. Here, we hypothesise that wind-induced movement will have large consequences for the photosynthetic productivity of our crops due to its influence on light patterning. To address this issue, in this study we combined high resolution 3D reconstructions of a plant canopy with a simple representation of canopy perturbation as a result of wind using solid body rotation in order to explore the potential effects on light patterning, interception and photosynthetic productivity. We looked at two different scenarios: firstly a constant distortion where a rice canopy was subject to a permanent distortion throughout the whole day; and secondly, a dynamic distortion, where the canopy was distorted in incremental steps between two extremes at set time points in the day. We find that mechanical canopy excitation substantially alters light dynamics; light distribution and modelled canopy carbon gain. We then discuss methods

  12. Inhibition of photosynthesis and energy dissipation induced by water and high light stresses in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanhong; Lam, Hon Ming; Zhang, Jianhua

    2007-01-01

    Photoprotection mechanisms of rice plants were studied when its seedlings were subjected to the combined stress of water and high light. The imposition of water stress, induced by PEG 6000 which was applied to roots, resulted in substantial inhibition of stomatal conductance and net photosynthesis under all irradiance treatments. Under high light stress, the rapid decline of photosynthesis with the development of water stress was accompanied by decreases in the maximum velocity of RuBP carboxylation by Rubisco (V(cmax)), the capacity for ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate regeneration (J(max)), Rubisco and stromal FBPase activities, and the quantum efficiency of photosystem II, in the absence of any stomatal limitation of CO(2) supply. Water stress significantly reduced the energy flux via linear electron transport (J(PSII)), but increased light-dependent and DeltapH- and xanthophyll-mediated thermal dissipation (J(NPQ)). It is concluded that the drought-induced inhibition of photosynthesis under different irradiances in the rice was due to both diffusive and metabolic limitations. Metabolic limitation of photosynthesis may be related to the adverse effects of some metabolic processes and the oxidative damage to the chloroplast. Meanwhile, an enhanced thermal dissipation is an important process to minimize the adverse effects of drought and high irradiance when CO(2) assimilation is suppressed.

  13. Optical feedback-induced light modulation for fiber-based laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-11-01

    Optical fibers have been used as a minimally invasive tool in various medical fields. However, due to excessive heat accumulation, the distal end of a fiber often suffers from severe melting or devitrification, leading to the eventual fiber failure during laser treatment. In order to minimize thermal damage at the fiber tip, an optical feedback sensor was developed and tested ex vivo. Porcine kidney tissue was used to evaluate the feasibility of optical feedback in terms of signal activation, ablation performance, and light transmission. Testing various signal thresholds demonstrated that 3 V was relatively appropriate to trigger the feedback sensor and to prevent the fiber deterioration during kidney tissue ablation. Based upon the development of temporal signal signatures, full contact mode rapidly activated the optical feedback sensor possibly due to heat accumulation. Modulated light delivery induced by optical feedback diminished ablation efficiency by 30% in comparison with no feedback case. However, long-term transmission results validated that laser ablation assisted with optical feedback was able to almost consistently sustain light delivery to the tissue as well as ablation efficiency. Therefore, an optical feedback sensor can be a feasible tool to protect optical fiber tips by minimizing debris contamination and delaying thermal damage process and to ensure more efficient and safer laser-induced tissue ablation.

  14. Theory of light-induced resonances with collective Higgs and Leggett modes in multiband superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murotani, Yuta; Tsuji, Naoto; Aoki, Hideo

    2017-03-01

    We theoretically investigate coherent optical excitations of collective modes in two-band BCS superconductors, which accommodate two Higgs modes and one Leggett mode corresponding, respectively, to the amplitude and relative-phase oscillations of the superconducting order parameters associated with the two bands. We find, based on a mean-field analysis, that each collective mode can be resonantly excited through a nonlinear light-matter coupling when the doubled frequency of the driving field coincides with the frequency of the corresponding mode. Among the two Higgs modes, the higher-energy one exhibits a sharp resonance with light, while the lower-energy mode has a broadened resonance width. The Leggett mode is found to be resonantly induced by a homogeneous ac electric field because the leading nonlinear effect generates a potential offset between the two bands that couples to the relative phase of the order parameters. The resonance for the Leggett mode becomes sharper with increasing temperature. All of these light-induced collective modes along with density fluctuations contribute to the third-harmonic generation. We also predict an experimental possibility of optical detection of the Leggett mode.

  15. Protective effects of bilberry and lingonberry extracts against blue light-emitting diode light-induced retinal photoreceptor cell damage in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Kenjirou; Kuse, Yoshiki; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Kobayashi, Saori; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2014-04-02

    Blue light is a high-energy or short-wavelength visible light, which induces retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) and lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) contain high amounts of polyphenols (anthocyanins, resveratrol, and proanthocyanidins) and thus confer health benefits. This study aimed to determine the protective effects and mechanism of action of bilberry extract (B-ext) and lingonberry extract (L-ext) and their active components against blue light-emitting diode (LED) light-induced retinal photoreceptor cell damage. Cultured murine photoreceptor (661 W) cells were exposed to blue LED light following treatment with B-ext, L-ext, or their constituents (cyanidin, delphinidin, malvidin, trans-resveratrol, and procyanidin B2). 661 W cell viability was assessed using a tetrazolium salt (WST-8) assay and Hoechst 33342 nuclear staining, and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was determined using CM-H2DCFDA after blue LED light exposure. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), and LC3, an ubiquitin-like protein that is necessary for the formation of autophagosomes, were analyzed using Western blotting. Caspase-3/7 activation caused by blue LED light exposure in 661 W cells was determined using a caspase-3/7 assay kit. B-ext, L-ext, NAC, and their active components improved the viability of 661 W cells and inhibited the generation of intracellular ROS induced by blue LED light irradiation. Furthermore, B-ext and L-ext inhibited the activation of p38 MAPK and NF-κB induced by blue LED light exposure. Finally, B-ext, L-ext, and NAC inhibited caspase-3/7 activation and autophagy. These findings suggest that B-ext and L-ext containing high amounts of polyphenols exert protective effects against blue LED light-induced retinal photoreceptor cell damage mainly through inhibition of ROS production and activation of

  16. Slow-light Airy wave packets and their active control via electromagnetically induced transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Hang, Chao

    2014-01-01

    We propose a scheme to generate (3+1)-dimensional slow-light Airy wave packets in a resonant $\\Lambda$-type three-level atomic gas via electromagnetically induced transparency. We show that in the absence of dispersion the Airy wave packets formed by a probe field consist of two Airy wave packets accelerated in transverse directions and a longitudinal Gaussian pulse with a constant propagating velocity lowered to $10^{-5}\\,c$ ($c$ is the light speed in vacuum). We also show that in the presence of dispersion it is possible to generate another type of slow-light Airy wave packets consisting of two Airy beams in transverse directions and an Airy wave packet in the longitudinal direction. In this case, the longitudinal velocity of the Airy wave packet can be further reduced during propagation. Additionally, we further show that the transverse accelerations (or bending) of the both types of slow-light Airy wave packets can be completely eliminated and the motional trajectories of them can be actively manipulated ...

  17. Large plasma-membrane depolarization precedes rapid blue-light-induced growth inhibition in cucumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, E. P.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Blue-light (BL)-induced suppression of elongation of etiolated Cucumis sativus L. hypocotyls began after a 30-s lag time, which was halved by increasing the fluence rate from 10 to 100 micromoles m-2 s-1. Prior to the growth suppression, the plasma-membrane of the irradiated cells depolarized by as much as 100 mV, then returned within 2-3 min to near its initial value. The potential difference measured with surface electrodes changed with an identical time course but opposite polarity. The lag time for the change in surface potential showed an inverse dependence on fluence rate, similar to the lag for the growth inhibition. Green light and red light caused neither the electrical response nor the rapid inhibition of growth. The depolarization by BL did not propagate to nonirradiated regions and exhibited a refractory period of about 10 min following a BL pulse. Fluence-response relationships for the electrical and growth responses provide correlational evidence that the plasma-membrane depolarization reflects an event in the transduction chain of this light-growth response.

  18. Low-level light therapy for zymosan-induced arthritis in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano, Ana P.; Dai, Tianhong; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Salomatina, Elena V.; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.; Yaroslavsky, Ilya; Cohen, Richard; Apruzzese, William A.; Smotrich, Michael H.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2007-02-01

    It has been known for many years that low level laser (or light) therapy (LLLT) can ameliorate the pain, swelling and inflammation associated with various forms of arthritis. Light is absorbed by mitochondrial chromophores leading to an increase in ATP, reactive oxygen species and/or cyclic AMP production and consequent gene transcription via activation of transcription factors. However, despite many reports about the positive effects of LLLT in medicine, its use remains controversial. Our laboratory has developed animal models designed to objectively quantify response to LLLT and compare different light delivery regimens. In the arthritis model we inject zymosan into rat knee joints to induce inflammatory arthritis. We have compared illumination regimens consisting of a high and low fluence (3 J/cm2 and 30 J/cm2), delivered at a high and low irradiance (5 mW/cm2 and 50 mW/cm2) using 810-nm laser light daily for 5 days, with the effect of conventional corticosteroid (dexamethasone) therapy. Results indicated that illumination with 810-nm laser is highly effective (almost as good as dexamethasone) at reducing swelling and that longer illumination time was more important in determining effectiveness than either total fluence delivered or irradiance. Experiments carried out using 810-nm LLLT on excisional wound healing in mice also confirmed the importance of longer illumination times. These data will be of value in designing clinical trials of LLLT.

  19. Light-Induced Surface Reactions at the Bismuth Vanadate/Potassium Phosphate Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaro, Marco; Abdi, Fatwa F; Lamers, Marlene; Crumlin, Ethan J; Liu, Zhi; van de Krol, Roel; Starr, David E

    2017-09-18

    Bismuth vanadate has recently drawn significant research attention as a light-absorbing photoanode due to its performance for photoelectrochemical water splitting. In this study, we use in situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with "tender" X-rays (4.0 keV) to investigate a polycrystalline bismuth vanadate (BiVO4) electrode in contact with an aqueous potassium phosphate (KPi) solution at open circuit potential under both dark and light conditions. This is facilitated by the creation of a 25 to 30 nm thick electrolyte layer using the "dip-and-pull" method. We observe that under illumination bismuth phosphate forms on the BiVO4 surface leading to an increase of the surface negative charge. The bismuth phosphate layer may act to passivate surface states observed in photoelectrochemical measurements. The repulsive interaction between the negatively charged surface under illumination and the phosphate ions in solution causes a shift in the distribution of ions in the thin aqueous electrolyte film, which is observed as an increase in their photoelectron signals. Interestingly, we find that such changes at the BiVO4/KPi electrolyte interface are reversible upon returning to dark conditions. By measuring the oxygen 1s photoelectron peak intensities from the phosphate ions and liquid water as a function of time under dark and light conditions, we determine the time scales for the forward and reverse reactions. Our results provide direct evidence for light-induced chemical modification of the BiVO4/KPi electrolyte interface.

  20. Light-induced oxidative stress, N-formylkynurenine, and oxygenic photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreaden Kasson, Tina M; Rexroth, Sascha; Barry, Bridgette A

    2012-01-01

    Light stress in plants results in damage to the water oxidizing reaction center, photosystem II (PSII). Redox signaling, through oxidative modification of amino acid side chains, has been proposed to participate in this process, but the oxidative signals have not yet been identified. Previously, we described an oxidative modification, N-formylkynurenine (NFK), of W365 in the CP43 subunit. The yield of this modification increases under light stress conditions, in parallel with the decrease in oxygen evolving activity. In this work, we show that this modification, NFK365-CP43, is present in thylakoid membranes and may be formed by reactive oxygen species produced at the Mn(4)CaO(5) cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex. NFK accumulation correlates with the extent of photoinhibition in PSII and thylakoid membranes. A modest increase in ionic strength inhibits NFK365-CP43 formation, and leads to accumulation of a new, light-induced NFK modification (NFK317) in the D1 polypeptide. Western analysis shows that D1 degradation and oligomerization occur under both sets of conditions. The NFK modifications in CP43 and D1 are found 17 and 14 Angstrom from the Mn(4)CaO(5) cluster, respectively. Based on these results, we propose that NFK is an oxidative modification that signals for damage and repair in PSII. The data suggest a two pathway model for light stress responses. These pathways involve differential, specific, oxidative modification of the CP43 or D1 polypeptides.

  1. Light-induced oxidative stress, N-formylkynurenine, and oxygenic photosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina M Dreaden Kasson

    Full Text Available Light stress in plants results in damage to the water oxidizing reaction center, photosystem II (PSII. Redox signaling, through oxidative modification of amino acid side chains, has been proposed to participate in this process, but the oxidative signals have not yet been identified. Previously, we described an oxidative modification, N-formylkynurenine (NFK, of W365 in the CP43 subunit. The yield of this modification increases under light stress conditions, in parallel with the decrease in oxygen evolving activity. In this work, we show that this modification, NFK365-CP43, is present in thylakoid membranes and may be formed by reactive oxygen species produced at the Mn(4CaO(5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex. NFK accumulation correlates with the extent of photoinhibition in PSII and thylakoid membranes. A modest increase in ionic strength inhibits NFK365-CP43 formation, and leads to accumulation of a new, light-induced NFK modification (NFK317 in the D1 polypeptide. Western analysis shows that D1 degradation and oligomerization occur under both sets of conditions. The NFK modifications in CP43 and D1 are found 17 and 14 Angstrom from the Mn(4CaO(5 cluster, respectively. Based on these results, we propose that NFK is an oxidative modification that signals for damage and repair in PSII. The data suggest a two pathway model for light stress responses. These pathways involve differential, specific, oxidative modification of the CP43 or D1 polypeptides.

  2. Gold-silver-tellurium mineral assemblages in different ore styles of the Southern Urals VHMS deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslennikov, V. V.; Zaykov, V. V.; Maslennikova, S. P.; Tesalina, S. G.; Herrington, R. J.; Buschmann, B.; Becker, K.; Petersen, S.; Orgeval, J. J.; Leistel, M.

    2003-04-01

    VMS deposits of the South Urals generally show a continuum in degradation and reworking ranging from pristine steep-sided hydrothermal sulphide mounds to deposits dominated by layered strata of clastic sulphides. Four different deposits with varying degrees of degradation in order of increased reworking: (Yaman-Kasy longrightarrow Molodezhnoe longrightarrow Alexandrinskoe longrightarrow Balta-Tau) have been ranged. The influence of sulphide mound destruction and of sea-floor alteration on mineral assemblages was investigated In the pristine Yaman-Kasy sulphide mound gold and silver occur as altaite+tellurium+hessite-stuetzite+sylvanite and later galena+native gold+pyrite assemblages in chalcopyrite+isocubanite-rich linings of former chimney conduits. Chalcopyrite-dominated conduit fragments in clastic ore facies contain native tellurium+gold intergrowths. In the weakly reworked Molodezhnoe deposit gold-silver assemblages only occur in sea-floor altered clastic sulphides on the slope of massive sulphide mounds in bornite- and tennantite-rich ores in association with Cu-Ag sulfides such as jalpaite, mckinstryite, and stromeyerite and rare Au-Ag-tellurides (petzite). The Alexandrinskoe deposit is dominated by clastic ores and here native gold and rare hessite occur together with galena in tennantite-sphalerite-dominated veins of the footwall as well as in drusy sphalerite forming conduits of vent chimneys. An assemblage of electrum+galena+tennantite was observed in secondary chalcopyrite in the outer walls of chimneys. Native gold+stromeyerite are common in bornite-rich clastic sulphides while an assemblage of Ag-sulphosalts+electrum is common in barite-rich ores. In the reworked Balta-Tau deposit Ag-sulphosalts+electrum-kustelite occur often together with tennantite+galena+barite banded ores. Gold-silver-telluride mineralisation in these VMS deposits changes with degree of reworking from Au-tellurides, and native gold+galena+pyrite in pristine sulphide mounds to

  3. Stress-induced piezoelectric field in GaN-based 450-nm light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawfik, Wael Z. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, Yongbong 300 Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62511 (Egypt); Hyeon, Gil Yong; Lee, June Key, E-mail: junekey@chonnam.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chonnam National University, Yongbong 300 Gwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-28

    We investigated the influence of the built-in piezoelectric field induced by compressive stress on the characteristics of GaN-based 450-nm light-emitting diodes (LEDs) prepared on sapphire substrates of different thicknesses. As the sapphire substrate thickness was reduced, the compressive stress in the GaN layer was released, resulting in wafer bowing. The wafer bowing-induced mechanical stress altered the piezoelectric field, which in turn reduced the quantum confined Stark effect in the InGaN/GaN active region of the LED. The flat-band voltage was estimated by measuring the applied bias voltage that induced a 180° phase shift in the electro-reflectance (ER) spectrum. The piezoelectric field estimated by the ER spectra changed by ∼110 kV/cm. The electroluminescence spectral peak wavelength was blue-shifted, and the internal quantum efficiency was improved by about 22% at a high injection current of 100 mA. The LED on the 60-μm-thick sapphire substrate exhibited the highest light output power of ∼59 mW at an injection current of 100 mA, with the operating voltage unchanged.

  4. A new photoacoustic method based on the modulation of the light induced absorption coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, S.; Wenisch, C.; Müller, F. A.; Gräf, S.

    2016-04-01

    The present study reports on a new photoacoustic (PA) measurement method that is suitable for the investigation of light induced absorption effects including e.g. excited state absorption. Contrary to the modulation of the radiation intensity used in conventional PA-methods, the key principle of this novel setup is based on the modulation of the induced absorption coefficient by light. For this purpose, a pump-probe setup with a pulsed pump laser beam and a continuous probe laser beam is utilized. In this regime, the potential influence of heat on the PA-signal is much smaller when compared to arrangements with pulsed probe beam and continuous pump beam. Beyond that, the negative effect of thermal lenses can be neglected. Thus, the measurement technique is well-suited for materials exhibiting a strong absorption at the pump wavelength. The quantitative analysis of the induced absorption coefficient was achieved by the calibration of the additional PA-signal caused by the continuous probe laser to the PA-signal resulting from the pulsed pump laser using thallium bromoiodide (KRS-5) as sample material.

  5. Collision-induced light scattering spectra of krypton layer confined between graphite slabs - MD simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawid, A.; Wojcieszyk, D.; Gburski, Z.

    2016-12-01

    We have used the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation method to obtain the collision-induced light scattering spectra of the thin krypton layer confined between two parallel graphite slabs. The simulations have been made under constant density, pressure and temperature condition. We have investigated four thin krypton layers of the thickness ranging from 13 to 24 Å. The 2-, 3- and 4-body correlation functions of collision-induced polarizability anisotropy were calculated. The spectra of colliding krypton atoms were simulated as cosine Fourier transform of the total polarizability anisotropy correlation function. The calculated correlation functions and their spectra show substantial dependence on the distance between graphite slabs. The collision-induced light scattering spectrum of krypton bulk sample was also simulated and compared with the krypton layer between graphite walls. The striking differences between these two systems are observed. We have further extended our analysis of krypton movement between graphite slabs by calculating the mean square displacement functions and diffusion coefficients. The decrease of the diffusion of krypton atoms with the increasing distance between graphite walls has been found. The structure of krypton layer has been also investigated by calculating the density profile and pressure tension across the rift. The distance between graphite slabs, for which the highest mobility of krypton's atoms occurred, has been found.

  6. Photoswitchable Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast by Improved Light-Driven Coordination-Induced Spin State Switch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommaschk, Marcel; Peters, Morten; Gutzeit, Florian; Schütt, Christian; Näther, Christian; Sönnichsen, Frank D; Tiwari, Sanjay; Riedel, Christian; Boretius, Susann; Herges, Rainer

    2015-06-24

    We present a fully reversible and highly efficient on-off photoswitching of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast with green (500 nm) and violet-blue (435 nm) light. The contrast change is based on intramolecular light-driven coordination-induced spin state switch (LD-CISSS), performed with azopyridine-substituted Ni-porphyrins. The relaxation time of the solvent protons in 3 mM solutions of the azoporphyrins in DMSO was switched between 3.5 and 1.7 s. The relaxivity of the contrast agent changes by a factor of 6.7. No fatigue or side reaction was observed, even after >100,000 switching cycles in air at room temperature. Electron-donating substituents at the pyridine improve the LD-CISSS in two ways: better photostationary states are achieved, and intramolecular binding is enhanced.

  7. Flow-induced vibration for light water reactors. Final progress report, July 1981-September 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, M.R.

    1981-11-01

    Flow-Induced Vibration for Light Water Reactors (FIV for LWRs) is a program designed to improve the FIV performance of light water reactors through the development of design criteria, analytical models for predicting behavior of components, and general scaling laws to improve the accuracy of reduced-scale tests, and through the identification of high FIV risk areas. The program is managed by the General Electric Nuclear Power Systems Engineering Department and has three major contributors: General Electric Nuclear Power Systems Engineering Department (NPSED), General Electric Corporate Research and Development (CR and D) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The program commenced December 1, 1976. This progress report summarizes the accomplishments achieved during the final period from July 1981 to September 1981. This is the last quarterly progress report to be issued for this program.

  8. Light-Induced Agglomeration and Diffusion of Different Particles with Optical Tweezers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xue-Cong; SUN Xiu-Dong; LIU Hong-Peng; ZHANG Jian-Long

    2010-01-01

    @@ The dynamic process of light-induced agglomeration of carbon nanotubes(CNTs),C60 and Escherichia coli(E.coli)in aqueous solutions is demonstrated using an optical tweezers system.Based on the results,the diameter of the agglomerated region and the agglomeration rate increase with the increasing laser power.After the saturation-stable period,CNTs diffuse completely,C60 dusters only diffuse partially,and E.coli never diffuses in the agglomeration region.Theoretical analyses show that the molecular polarization and thermal diffusion of particles play crucial roles in the diffusion process.The results indicate the possibility of using light to aggregate and sort nanoparticles.

  9. Batch and Flow Synthesis of Disulfides by Visible-Light-Induced TiO2 Photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottecchia, Cecilia; Erdmann, Nico; Tijssen, Patricia M A; Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Brunsveld, Luc; Hessel, Volker; Noël, Timothy

    2016-07-21

    A mild and practical method for the preparation of disulfides through visible-light-induced photocatalytic aerobic oxidation of thiols has been developed. The method involves the use of TiO2 as a heterogeneous photocatalyst. The catalyst's high stability and recyclability makes this method highly practical. The reaction can be substantially accelerated in a continuous-flow packed-bed reactor, which enables a safe and reliable scale-up of the reaction conditions. The batch and flow protocol described herein can be applied to a diverse set of thiol substrates for the preparation of homo- and hetero-dimerized disulfides. Furthermore, biocompatible reaction conditions (i.e., room temperature, visible light, neutral buffer solution, and no additional base) have been developed, which permits the rapid and chemoselective modification of densely functionalized peptide substrates without recourse to complex purification steps.

  10. Spontaneous and light-induced photon emission from intact brains of chick embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锦珠; 于文斗; 孙彤

    1997-01-01

    Photon emission (PE) and light-induced photon emission(LPE) of intact brains isolated from chick embryos have been measured by using the single photon counting device. Experimental results showed that the intensi-ty level of photon emission was detected to be higher from intact brain than from the medium in which the brain was immerged during measuring, and the emission intensity was related to the developmental stages, the healthy situation of the measured embryos, and the freshness of isolated brains as well. After white light illumination, a short-life de-layed emission from intact brains was observed, and its relaxation behavior followed a hyperbolic rather than an expo-nential law. According to the hypothesis of biophoton emission originating from a delocalized coherent electromagnetic field and Frohlich’s idea of coherent long-range interactions in biological systems, discussions were made on the signifi-cance of photon emission in studying cell communication, biological regulation, living system’

  11. Reduction of Light-induced Degradation of Boron-doped Solar-grade Czochralski Silicon by Corona Charging

    OpenAIRE

    Boulfrad, Yacine; Lindroos, Jeanette; Inglese, Alessandro; Yli-Koski, Marko; Savin, Hele

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study aims at the reduction of light-induced degradation of boron-doped solar-grade Czochralski silicon wafers by corona charging. The method consists of deposition of negative charges on both surface sides of wafer and keeping the wafer in dark for 24 hours to allow the diffusion of positively-charged interstitial copper towards the surfaces. This method proves to be useful to reduce or eliminate light-induced degradation caused by copper. The degradation was significantly redu...

  12. Light-induced disorder in liquid-crystalline elastomers for actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ferrer, Antoni

    2011-10-01

    Liquid-Crystalline Elastomers (LCEs) are materials which combine the entropic properties of a crosslinked polymer melt with the enthalpic properties of a liquid-crystalline state of order. LCEs show unique characteristics: visco-elasticity and order at the same time in one system. The elastic and the viscous properties come from the crosslinking and friction of the polymer chains, respectively, while the orientation comes from the mesophase which keeps the polymer backbone aligned. LCEs behave as normal polymer networks or rubbers when no energy-storing mesophase is present. This state of disorder can be induced by means of temperature or light. Thermally, the change in shape of LCEs can easily reach 300% when all the enthalpy stored by the mesophase is released and the crosslinked polymer chains are free to move and adopt a random coil conformation. The light-induced local disorder can be achieved when shape-changing molecules are incorporated in the LCE matrix. These compounds are able to absorb light, rearrange themselves in a new shape and subsequently disturbing the mesophase. This results in the molecules that are keeping the order no longer being able to sustain the retractive force of the polymer backbone, and the material contracts, exerting an actuating force. But how does a light sensitive side-chain LCE elastomer behave? And a main-chain LCE? What about nematics or smectics? Is a different kind of actuation, besides the common retractive force, possible? To answer these questions, new chemistry needs to be developed, together with new physics to understand the systems, and new applications need to be created.

  13. A large deflection light-induced bending model for liquid crystal elastomers under uniform or non-uniform illumination

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jin, Lihua; Lin, Yin; Huo, Yongzhong

    2011-01-01

    .... If some photochromic liquid crystal molecules, such as azobenzenes, are added into the LCE, not only thermo but also light can induce a large contraction up to 20% ( Finkelmann et al., 2001 ). UV light photoisomerizes the azobenzenes from the straight trans isomers to the bent cis ones, which changes the alignment and order degree of the molecules, ...

  14. Light-induced phenomena in one-component gas: The transport phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chermyaninov, I. V.; Chernyak, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the theory of transport processes in a one-component gas located in the capillary under the action of resonant laser radiation and the temperature and pressure gradients. The expressions for the kinetic coefficients determining heat and mass transport in the gas are obtained on the basis of the modified Boltzmann equations for the excited and unexcited particles. The Onsager reciprocal relations for cross kinetic coefficients are proven for all Knudsen numbers and for any law interaction of gas particles with each other and boundary surface. Light-induced phenomena associated with the possible non-equilibrium stationary states of system are analyzed.

  15. Nucleon and cluster knockout reactions induced in light nuclei by intermediate-energy protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vdovin, A.I.; Golovin, A.V.; Loshchakov, I.I.

    1987-11-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies of nucleon and cluster knockout reactions induced in light nuclei by intermediate-energy (30--150 MeV) protons are reviewed. The methods of theoretical analysis of knockout reactions are considered. The main attention is devoted to the t-matrix approximation with distorted waves. It is shown for the example of cluster knockout reactions how quasielastic and two-step processes can be coherently included in the matrix element when the t-matrix approximation is used.

  16. Slow-light plasmonic metamaterial based on dressed-state analog of electromagnetically-induced transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Raza, Søren

    2015-01-01

    We consider a simple configuration for realizing one-dimensional slow-light metamaterials with large bandwidth-delay products using stub-shaped Fabry-Perot resonators as building blocks. Each metaatom gives rise to large group indices due to a classical analog of the dressed-state picture of electromagnetically-induced transparency. By connecting up to eight metaatoms, we find bandwidth-delay products over unity and group indices approaching 100. Our approach is quite general and can be applied to any type of Fabry-Perot resonators and tuned to different operating wavelengths.

  17. Light-induced nonhomogeneity and gradient bending in photochromic liquid crystal elastomers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN; Lihua; JIANG; Xin; HUO; Yongzhong

    2006-01-01

    The recently reported opto-mechanical effect of some photochromic liquid crystal elastomers (LCEs) is studied. It is found that in such LCEs, material parameters such as the Young's modulus and the stress-free strains will become nonhomogeneous Analytical expressions for the dependence of the material parameters on the space variable and possibly on the time variable are obtained. Exponential dependence can be derived under certain approximations. As an example, the light-induced bending of a beam is studied. Two neutral planes are found in the beam. Thus, along the thickness of the beam,there are extensions in the upper and lower parts and contractions in the middle.

  18. Segregation of isotopes of heavy metals due to light-induced drift: results and problems

    CERN Document Server

    Sapar, A; Poolamäe, R; Sapar, L

    2007-01-01

    Atutov and Shalagin (1988) proposed light-induced drift (LID) as a physically well understandable mechanism to explain the formation of isotopic anomalies observed in CP stars. We generalized the theory of LID and applied it to diffusion of heavy elements and their isotopes in quiescent atmospheres of CP stars. Diffusional segregation of isotopes of chemical elements is described by the equations of continuity and diffusion velocity. Computations of the evolutionary sequences for abundances of mercury isotopes in several model atmospheres have been made using the Fortran 90 program SMART, composed by the authors. Results confirm predominant role of LID in separation of isotopes.

  19. Amplified light storage with high fidelity based on electromagnetically induced transparency in rubidium atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Wang, Gang; Tang, Guoyu; Xue, Yan

    2016-06-01

    By using slow and stored light based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), we theoretically realize the storage of optical pulses with enhanced efficiency and high fidelity in ensembles of warm atoms in 85Rb vapor cells. The enhancement of storage efficiency is achieved by introducing a pump field beyond three-level configuration to form a N-type scheme, which simultaneously inhibits the undesirable four-wave mixing effect while preserves its fidelity. It is shown that the typical storage efficiency can be improved from 29% to 53% with the application of pump field. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this efficiency decreases with storage time and increases over unity with optical depth.

  20. Visualizations of Light-induced Refractive Index Changes in Photorefractive Crystals Employing Digital Holography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵建林; 张鹏; 周俭波; 杨德兴; 杨东升; 李恩普

    2003-01-01

    We propose a novel approach to visualize the light-induced refractive index changes in photorefractive crystals employing digital holography. The holograms formed in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer are recorded by a twodimensional CCD camera. From these holograms, the phase differences, which contain the information of the index changes in photorefractive crystals, are determined by utilizing digital holographic interferometry. Then the two-dimensional visualizations of index changes in the crystals can be obtained. This method is successfully demonstrated in LiNbO3:Fe, KNSBN:Ce and SBN:Cr crystals.

  1. Cold-atom physics using ultrathin optical fibers: light-induced dipole forces and surface interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagué, G; Vetsch, E; Alt, W; Meschede, D; Rauschenbeutel, A

    2007-10-19

    The strong evanescent field around ultrathin unclad optical fibers bears a high potential for detecting, trapping, and manipulating cold atoms. Introducing such a fiber into a cold-atom cloud, we investigate the interaction of a small number of cold cesium atoms with the guided fiber mode and with the fiber surface. Using high resolution spectroscopy, we observe and analyze light-induced dipole forces, van der Waals interaction, and a significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate of the atoms. The latter can be assigned to the modification of the vacuum modes by the fiber.

  2. Near infrared and extreme ultraviolet light pulses induced modifications of ultrathin Co films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kisielewski

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We report on comparative study of magnetic properties of Pt/Co/Pt trilayers after irradiation with different light sources. Ultrathin Pt/Co/Pt films were deposited by molecular beam epitaxy technique on sapphire (0001 substrates. Pt buffers were grown at room temperature (RT and at 750°C (high temperature, HT. The samples were irradiated with a broad range of light energy densities (up to film ablation using two different single pulse irradiation sources: (i 40 fs laser with 800 nm wavelength and (ii 3 ns laser-plasma source of extreme ultraviolet (EUV with the most intense emission centered at 11 nm. The light pulse-driven irreversible structural and as a consequence, magnetic modifications were investigated using polar magneto-optical Kerr effect-based microscopy and atomic and magnetic force microscopies. The light pulse-induced transitions from the out-of-plane to in-plane magnetization state, and from in-plane to out-of-plane, were observed for both types of samples and irradiation methods. Diagrams of the magnetic states as a function of the Co layer thickness and energy density of the absorbed femtosecond pulses were constructed for the samples with both the RT and HT buffers. The energy density range responsible for the creation of the out-of-plane magnetization was wider for the HT than for RT buffer. This is correlated with the higher (for HT crystalline quality and much smoother Pt/Co surface deduced from the X-ray diffraction studies. Submicrometer magnetic domains were observed in the irradiated region while approaching the out-of-plane magnetization state. Changes of Pt/Co/Pt structures are discussed for both types of light pulses.

  3. Resource recovery from urban stock, the example of cadmium and tellurium from thin film module recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, F-G; Holm, O; Berger, W

    2013-04-01

    Raw material supply is essential for all industrial activities. The use of secondary raw material gains more importance since ore grade in primary production is decreasing. Meanwhile urban stock contains considerable amounts of various elements. Photovoltaic (PV) generating systems are part of the urban stock and recycling technologies for PV thin film modules with CdTe as semiconductor are needed because cadmium could cause hazardous environmental impact and tellurium is a scarce element where future supply might be constrained. The paper describes a sequence of mechanical processing techniques for end-of-life PV thin film modules consisting of sandblasting and flotation. Separation of the semiconductor material from the glass surface was possible, however, enrichment and yield of valuables in the flotation step were non-satisfying. Nevertheless, recovery of valuable metals from urban stock is a viable method for the extension of the availability of limited natural resources.

  4. Theory of Electronic Structures of Selenium and Tellurium with and without Impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hwa-Suck; Scheicher, R. H.; Jeong, Junho; Das, T. P.; Paudyal, D. D.; Maharjan, N. B.; Mishra, D. R.; Byahut, S. P.

    2003-03-01

    As part of our program to understand at an electronic level the mechanism for influence of impurity ions on glass transition temperatures in chalcogen glasses we are carrying out electronic structure investigations of pure Se and Te and with Te and Se impurities respectively, to examine how well one can explain available nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) tensors for ^77Se and ^125Te nuclei in the latter four systems(See for instance, P. Boolchand et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 30, 1292 (1973); Solid State Commun. 13, 1619 (1973).) and thus obtain an assessment of the accuracy of the electronic structures of these systems. Our results on the chains of selenium and tellurium show good agreement with NQI data for the pure and impurity systems. Investigations are in progress on Se and Te rings that occur in amorphous systems.

  5. Ab initio Study of Nuclear Quadrupole Interactions in Selenium and Tellurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharjan, N. B.; Paudyal, D. D.; Mishra, D. R.; Byahut, S. P.; Cho, Hwa-Suck; Scheicher, R. H.; Jeong, Junho; Das, T. P.

    2004-03-01

    We are systematically studying the influence of impurities in calcogenide glasses on the glass transition temperature using the first-principles Hartree-Fock cluster method. Results of our calculations on the electronic structures of pure selenium and tellurium chain systems, and with Te and Se impurities respectively, will be reported. By comparing the theoretically obtained nuclear quadrupole interaction (NQI) tensors for ^77Se and ^125Te with available experimental NQI tensors, we were able to test the accuracy of the calculated electronic structures. Good agreement for both the pure and the impurity systems has been found. We have also studied ^125Te NQI tensors in Te-Thiourea and compared our result with experimental data to check on the choice of the ^125Te quadrupole moment used.

  6. Bonding properties of tellurium under high pressure from 125Te Mössbauer studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulliet, P.; Sanchez, J. P.

    1998-07-01

    High-pressure 125Te Mössbauer experiments on elemental tellurium have been carried out at 77 K over a wide range of pressure up to 38 GPa. While the isomer shift barely increases with pressure, the quadrupolar splitting (QS) exhibits a strong pressure dependence. The decrease of QS with increasing pressure was attributed to the growing importance of interchain (interlayer) interactions in the hexagonal (monoclinic/orthorhombic) phase. Our measurements suggest that the phase boundary between the metallic high-pressure β-Po and bcc phases is shifted from 27 GPa at room temperature to about 35 GPa at 77 K. Our data confirm the first-order character of that structural transition.

  7. Improved Thermoelectric Performance in Flexible Tellurium Nanowires/Reduced Graphene Oxide Sandwich Structure Hybrid Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Liu, Chengyan; Miao, Lei; Wang, Xiaoyang; Peng, Ying; Chen, Yu

    2016-11-01

    With a high flexibility and an adjustable electronic structure, reduced graphene oxide (RGO) is a potential candidate for flexible thermoelectric materials. Here, we report that flexible RGO/tellurium nanowires (Te NWs)/RGO sandwich structure hybrid films are prepared on glass fabrics through the drop-cast method. The addition of 20 wt.% Te NWs into a RGO matrix remarkably improves the Seebeck coefficient from 15.2 μV/K to 89.7 μV/K while maintaining relatively high electrical conductivity, thus resulting in a one order of magnitude higher power factor value compared with the Te NWs. According to the values of carrier mobility and concentration of hybrid films, the improved thermoelectric properties are presented because of the energy filtering effect on the interfaces in hybrid films. This article suggests that RGO/Te NWs/RGO hybrid films would be promising for fabricating flexible energy sources.

  8. Structural and optical properties of tellurium films obtained by chemical vapor deposition(CVD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yu-tian; GONG Zhu-Qing; XU Wei-Hong; HUANG Jian

    2006-01-01

    Tellurium thin films were prepared by the chemical vapor deposition method. The structure, surface morphology and optical properties of the Te thin films were analyzed by powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, FTIR transmission,UV/VIS/NIR transmission and reflectance. The results show that the films structural and optical properties are influenced by many factors such as film thickness, crystallite size and substrate temperature. The films as thick as 111-133 nm have high IR transmission across the full 8-13 μm band and highly blocking in the solar spectral region elsewhere, which indicates that Te films thickness in this region can be used as good solar radiation shields in radiative cooling devices.

  9. Improved Thermoelectric Performance in Flexible Tellurium Nanowires/Reduced Graphene Oxide Sandwich Structure Hybrid Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Liu, Chengyan; Miao, Lei; Wang, Xiaoyang; Peng, Ying; Chen, Yu

    2017-05-01

    With a high flexibility and an adjustable electronic structure, reduced graphene oxide (RGO) is a potential candidate for flexible thermoelectric materials. Here, we report that flexible RGO/tellurium nanowires (Te NWs)/RGO sandwich structure hybrid films are prepared on glass fabrics through the drop-cast method. The addition of 20 wt.% Te NWs into a RGO matrix remarkably improves the Seebeck coefficient from 15.2 μV/K to 89.7 μV/K while maintaining relatively high electrical conductivity, thus resulting in a one order of magnitude higher power factor value compared with the Te NWs. According to the values of carrier mobility and concentration of hybrid films, the improved thermoelectric properties are presented because of the energy filtering effect on the interfaces in hybrid films. This article suggests that RGO/Te NWs/RGO hybrid films would be promising for fabricating flexible energy sources.

  10. Gold-platinum bimetallic nanotubes templated from tellurium nanowires as efficient electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chenchen; Kong, Wei; Zhang, Huying; Song, Bo; Wang, Zhenghua

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, gold-platinum (Au-Pt) bimetallic nanotubes with different Au/Pt ratio are successfully synthesized through a simple wet-chemical reduction route in which tellurium (Te) nanowires serve as both sacrificial template and reducing agent. The hollow nanostructure of Au-Pt nanotubes is formed due to Kirkendall effect. The as-prepared Au-Pt nanotubes can be applied as catalyst for methanol oxidation reaction, and the results indicate that the Au-Pt nanotubes with an Au/Pt ratio of 1:1 show the best electrochemical catalytic performances. Furthermore, the catalytic activity of the Au-Pt nanotubes is also better than Pt nanotubes and commercial Pt/C catalyst.

  11. Repair of ultraviolet light-induced DNA damage in cholera bacteriophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palit, B.N.; Das, G.; Das, J. (Indian Inst. of Chemical Biology, Calcutta. Dept. of Biophysics)

    1983-08-01

    DNA repair-proficient and -deficient strains of Vibrio cholerae were used to examine host cell reactivation, Weigle reactivation and photoreactivation of u.v.-irradiated cholera bacteriophages. U.v. light-induced DNA damage in phages of different morphological and serological groups could be efficiently photoreactivated. Host cell reactivation of irradiated phages of different groups was different on the same indicator host. Phage phi149 was the most sensitive, and phi138 the most resistant to u.v. irradiation. While phi138 showed appreciable host cell reactivation, this was minimal for phi149. Attempts to demonstrate Weigle reactivation of u.v.-irradiated cholera phages were not successful, although u.v.-induced filamentation of host cells was observed.

  12. Coupled plasmon-exciton induced transparency and slow light in plexcitonic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panahpour, Ali; Silani, Yaser; Farrokhian, Marzieh

    2012-01-01

    effects in low-loss nanostructures, and development of low-loss metamaterials. A large variety of plasmonic structures has been proposed for producing classical EIT-like effects in different spectral ranges. The current approach for producing plasmon-induced transparency is usually based on precise design...... effects in metamaterials composed of such coupled NPs. To reveal more details of the wave-particle and particle-particle interactions, the electric field distribution and field lines of Poynting vector inside and around the NPs are calculated using the finite element method. Finally, using extended...... Maxwell Garnett theory, we study the coupled-NP-induced transparency and slow light effects in a metamaterial comprising random mixture of silver and copper chloride (CuCl) NPs, and more effectively in a metamaterial consisting of random distribution of coated NPs with CuCl cores and aluminum shells...

  13. Control of light scattering by nanoparticles with optically-induced magnetic responses

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Wei; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2013-01-01

    Conventional approaches to control and shape the scattering patterns of light generated by different nanostructures are mostly based on engineering of their electric response due to the fact that most metallic nanostructures support electric resonances in the optical frequency range. Recently, fuelled by the fast development in the fields of metamaterials and plasmonics, artificial optically-induced magnetic responses have been demonstrated for various nanostructures. This kind of response can be employed to provide an extra degree of freedom for the efficient control and shaping of the scattering patterns of nanoparticles and nanoantennas. Here we review the recent progress in this research direction of nanoparticle scattering shaping and control through the interference of both electric and optically-induced magnetic responses. We discuss the magnetic resonances supported by various structures in different spectral regimes, and then summarize the original results on the scattering shaping involving both ele...

  14. Self-induced white-light seeding laser in a femtosecond laser filament

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Wei; Xie, Hongqiang; Ni, Jielei; Yao, Jinping; Zeng, Bin; Zhang, Haisu; Jing, Chenrui; Xu, Huailiang; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-01-01

    We report, for what we believe to be the first time, on the generation of remote self-seeding laser amplification by using only one 800 nm Ti:Sapphire femtosecond laser pulse. The laser pulse (~ 40 fs) is first used to generate a filament either in pure nitrogen or in ambient air in which population inversion between ground and excited states of nitrogen molecular ions is realized. Self-induced white light inside the filament is then serving as the seed to be amplified. The self-induced narrow-band laser at 428 nm has a pulse duration of ~2.6 ps with perfect linear polarization property. This finding opens new possibilities for remote detection in the atmosphere.

  15. Theory of light-induced effective magnetic field in Rashba ferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaiumzadeh, Alireza; Titov, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on all-optical magnetization reversal in conductive ferromagnetic thin films we use nonequilibrium formalism to calculate the effective magnetic field induced in a Rashba ferromagnet by a short laser pulse. The main contribution to the effect originates in the direct optical transitions between spin-split subbands. The resulting effective magnetic field is inversely proportional to the impurity scattering rate and can reach the amplitude of a few Tesla in the systems like Co/Pt bilayers. We show that the total light-induced effective magnetic field in ferromagnetic systems is the sum of two contributions: a helicity dependent term, which is an even function of magnetization, and a helicity independent term, which is an odd function of magnetization. The primary role of the spin-orbit interaction is to widen the frequency range for direct optical transitions.

  16. Potential for improved extraction of tellurium as a byproduct of current copper mining processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, S. M.; Spaleta, K. J.; Skidmore, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    Tellurium (Te) is classified as a critical element due to its increasing use in high technology applications, low average crustal abundance (3 μg kg-1), and primary source as a byproduct of copper extraction. Although Te can be readily recovered from copper processing, previous studies have estimated a 4 percent extraction efficiency, and few studies have addressed Te behavior during the entire copper extraction process. The goals of the present study are to perform a mass balance examining Te behavior during copper extraction and to connect these observations with mineralogy of Te-bearing phases which are essential first steps in devising ways to optimize Te recovery. Our preliminary mass balance results indicate that less than 3 percent of Te present in copper ore is recovered, with particularly high losses during initial concentration of copper ore minerals by flotation. Tellurium is present in the ore in telluride minerals (e.g., Bi-Te-S phases, altaite, and Ag-S-Se-Te phases identified using electron microprobe) with limited substitution into sulfide minerals (possibly 10 mg kg-1 Te in bulk pyrite and chalcopyrite). This work has also identified Te accumulation in solid-phase intermediate extraction products that could be further processed to recover Te, including smelter dusts (158 mg kg-1) and pressed anode slimes (2.7 percent by mass). In both the smelter dusts and anode slimes, X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicates that about two thirds of the Te is present as reduced tellurides. In anode slimes, electron microscopy shows that the remaining Te is present in an oxidized form in a complex Te-bearing oxidate phase also containing Pb, Cu, Ag, As, Sb, and S. These results clearly indicate that more efficient, increased recovery of Te may be possible, likely at minimal expense from operating copper processing operations, thereby providing more Te for manufacturing of products such as inexpensive high-efficiency solar panels.

  17. Novel Evidence for a Reversible Dissociation of Light-harvesting Complex Ⅱ from Photosystem Ⅱ Reaction Center Complex Induced by Saturating Light Illumination in Soybean Leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Liao; Da-Quan Xu

    2007-01-01

    After saturating light illumination for 3 h the potential photochemical efficiency of photosystem Ⅱ (PSⅡ) (Fv/Fm, the ratio of variable to maximal fluorescence) decreased markedly and recovered basically to the level before saturating light illumination after dark recovery for 3 h in both soybean and wheat leaves, indicating that the decline in Fv/Fm is a reversible down-regulation. Also, the saturating light illumination led to significant decreases in the low temperature (77 K) chlorophyll fluorescence parameters F685 (chlorophyll a fluorescence peaked at 685 nm ) and F685/F735 (F735, chlorophyll a fluorescence peaked at 735 nm) in soybean leaves but not in wheat leaves. Moreover,trypsin (a protease) treatment resulted in a remarkable decrease in the amounts of PsbS protein (a nuclear gene psbS-encoded 22 kDa protein) in the thylakoids from saturating light-illuminated (SI), but not in those from darkadapted (DT) and dark-recovered (DRT) soybean leaves. However, the treatment did not cause such a decrease in amounts of the PsbS protein in the thylakoids from saturating light-illuminated wheat leaves. These results support the conclusion that saturating light illumination induces a reversible dissociation of some light-harvesting complex Ⅱ (LHCⅡ) from PSⅡ reaction center complex in soybean leaf but not in wheat leaf.

  18. Protective Effect of Proanthocyanidins from Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae Rhamnoides L.) Seed against Visible Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Zhao, Liang; Huo, Yazhen; Zhou, Feng; Wu, Wei; Lu, Feng; Yang, Xue; Guo, Xiaoxuan; Chen, Peng; Deng, Qianchun; Ji, Baoping

    2016-05-02

    Dietary proanthocyanidins (PACs) as health-protective agents have become an important area of human nutrition research because of their potent bioactivities. We investigated the retinoprotective effects of PACs from sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) seed against visible light-induced retinal degeneration in vivo. Pigmented rabbits were orally administered sea buckthorn seed PACs (50 and 100 mg/kg/day) for 14 consecutive days of pre-illumination and seven consecutive days of post-illumination. Retinal function was quantified via electroretinography 7 days after light exposure. Retinal damage was evaluated by measuring the thickness of the full-thickness retina and outer nuclear layer 7 days after light exposure. Sea buckthorn seed PACs significantly attenuated the destruction of electroretinograms and maintained the retinal structure. Increased retinal photooxidative damage was expressed by the depletion of glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities, the decrease of total antioxidant capacity level and the increase of malondialdehyde level. Light exposure induced a significant increase of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6) and angiogenesis (VEGF) levels in retina. Light exposure upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and caspase-3 and downregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. However, sea buckthorn seed PACs ameliorated these changes induced by light exposure. Sea buckthorn seed PACs mediated the protective effect against light-induced retinal degeneration via antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic mechanisms.

  19. Protective Effect of Proanthocyanidins from Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae Rhamnoides L. Seed against Visible Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Dietary proanthocyanidins (PACs as health-protective agents have become an important area of human nutrition research because of their potent bioactivities. We investigated the retinoprotective effects of PACs from sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L. seed against visible light-induced retinal degeneration in vivo. Pigmented rabbits were orally administered sea buckthorn seed PACs (50 and 100 mg/kg/day for 14 consecutive days of pre-illumination and seven consecutive days of post-illumination. Retinal function was quantified via electroretinography 7 days after light exposure. Retinal damage was evaluated by measuring the thickness of the full-thickness retina and outer nuclear layer 7 days after light exposure. Sea buckthorn seed PACs significantly attenuated the destruction of electroretinograms and maintained the retinal structure. Increased retinal photooxidative damage was expressed by the depletion of glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities, the decrease of total antioxidant capacity level and the increase of malondialdehyde level. Light exposure induced a significant increase of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 and angiogenesis (VEGF levels in retina. Light exposure upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and caspase-3 and downregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. However, sea buckthorn seed PACs ameliorated these changes induced by light exposure. Sea buckthorn seed PACs mediated the protective effect against light-induced retinal degeneration via antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic mechanisms.

  20. Electromagnetically induced transparency for guided light in an atomic array outside an optical nanofiber

    CERN Document Server

    Kien, Fam Le

    2015-01-01

    We study the propagation of guided light along an array of three-level atoms in the vicinity of an optical nanofiber under the condition of electromagnetically induced transparency. We examine two schemes of atomic levels and field polarizations where the guided probe field is quasilinearly polarized along the major or minor principal axis, which is parallel or perpendicular, respectively, to the radial direction of the atomic position. Our numerical calculations indicate that 200 cesium atoms in a linear array with a length of 100 $\\mu$m at a distance of 200 nm from the surface of a nanofiber with a radius of 250 nm can slow down the speed of guided probe light by a factor of about $3.5\\times 10^6$ (the corresponding group delay is about 1.17 $\\mu$s). In the neighborhood of the Bragg resonance, a significant fraction of the guided probe light can be reflected back with a negative group delay. The reflectivity and the group delay of the reflected field do not depend on the propagation direction of the probe f...

  1. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube-TiO2 Nanocomposite for Visible-Light-Induced Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Dai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotube- (MWCNT- TiO2 nanocomposite was synthesized via hydrothermal process and characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetry analysis, and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. Appropriate pretreatment on MWCNTs could generate oxygen-containing groups, which is beneficial for forming intimate contact between MWCNTs and TiO2 and leads to a higher thermal stability of MWCNT-TiO2 nanocomposite. Modification with MWCNTs can extend the visible-light absorption of TiO2. 5 wt% MWCNT-TiO2 derived from hydrothermal treatment at 140°C exhibiting the highest hydrogen generation rate of 15.1 μmol·h−1 under visible-light irradiation and a wide photoresponse range from 350 to 475 nm with moderate quantum efficiency (4.4% at 420 nm and 3.7% at 475 nm. The above experimental results indicate that the MWCNT-TiO2 nanocomposite is a promising photocatalyst with good stability and visible-light-induced photoactivity.

  2. Analysis of light-induced transmembrane ion gradients and membrane potential in Photosystem I proteoliposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, Cristian Pablo; Greenbaum, Elias; Yoshida, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) complexes can support a light-driven electrochemical gradient for protons, which is the driving force for energy-conserving reactions across biological membranes. In this work, a computational model that enables a quantitative description of the light-induced proton gradients across the membrane of PSI proteoliposomes is presented. Using a set of electrodiffusion equations, a compartmental model of a vesicle suspended in aqueous medium was studied. The light-mediated proton movement was modeled as a single proton pumping step with backpressure of the electric potential. The model fits determinations of pH obtained from PSI proteoliposomes illuminated in the presence of mediators of cyclic electron transport. The model also allows analysis of the proton gradients in relation to the transmembrane ion fluxes and electric potential. Sensitivity analysis enabled a determination of the parameters that have greater influence on steady-state levels and onset/decay rates of transmembrane pH and electric potential. This model could be used as a tool for optimizing PSI proteoliposomes for photo-electrochemical applications.

  3. Analysis of Light-Induced Transmembrane Ion Gradients and Membrane Potential in Photosystem I Proteoliposomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennisi, Cristian P. [Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark; Greenbaum, Elias [ORNL; Yoshida, Ken [Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark

    2010-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) complexes can support a light-driven electrochemical gradient for protons, which is the driving force for energy-conserving reactions across biological membranes. In this work, a computational model that enables a quantitative description of the light-induced proton gradients across the membrane of PSI proteoliposomes is presented. Using a set of electrodiffusion equations, a compartmental model of a vesicle suspended in aqueous medium was studied. The light-mediated proton movement was modeled as a single proton pumping step with backpressure of the electric potential. The model fits determinations of pH obtained from PSI proteoliposomes illuminated in the presence of mediators of cyclic electron transport. The model also allows analysis of the proton gradients in relation to the transmembrane ion fluxes and electric potential. Sensitivity analysis enabled a determination of the parameters that have greater influence on steady-state levels and onset/decay rates of transmembrane pH and electric potential. This model could be used as a tool for optimizing PSI proteoliposomes for photo-electrochemical applications.

  4. LSD1 and HY5 Antagonistically Regulate Red Light induced-Programmed Cell Death in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting eChai

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Programmed cell death (PCD in plant is triggered by abiotic and biotic stress. Light-dependent PCD is unique to plants. Light-induced PCD also requires reactive oxygen species (ROS and salicylic acid (SA. In this study, lesion simulating disease1 (LSD1 and elongated hypocotyl 5 (HY5 perform opposite roles to regulate excess red light (RL-triggered PCD associated with ROS and SA production. Under RL, the lsd1 mutant released more ROS and SA and displayed a stronger cell death rate than the hy5 mutant. It was shown that active LSD1 converted into inactive form by changing the redox status of the plastoquinone pool, and HY5 interacted with phytochrome B (phyB to promote PCD in response to RL. LSD1 inhibited the enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1 expression by upregulating SR1, whereas HY5 enhanced the enhanced EDS1 expression by binding to the G-box of the EDS1 promoter. This study suggested that LSD1 and HY5 antagonistically modulated EDS1-dependent ROS and SA signaling; thus, PCD was mediated in response to RL.

  5. LSD1 and HY5 antagonistically regulate red light induced-programmed cell death in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Tingting; Zhou, Jun; Liu, Jian; Xing, Da

    2015-01-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in plant is triggered by abiotic and biotic stress. Light-dependent PCD is unique to plants. Light-induced PCD also requires reactive oxygen species (ROS) and salicylic acid (SA). In this study, lesion simulating disease1 (LSD1) and elongated hypocotyl 5 (HY5) perform opposite roles to regulate excess red light (RL)-triggered PCD associated with ROS and SA production. Under RL, the lsd1 mutant released more ROS and SA and displayed a stronger cell death rate than the hy5 mutant. It was shown that active LSD1 converted into inactive form by changing the redox status of the plastoquinone pool, and HY5 interacted with phytochrome B (phyB) to promote PCD in response to RL. LSD1 inhibited the enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1) expression by upregulating SR1, whereas HY5 enhanced the enhanced EDS1 expression by binding to the G-box of the EDS1 promoter. This study suggested that LSD1 and HY5 antagonistically modulated EDS1-dependent ROS and SA signaling; thus, PCD was mediated in response to RL.

  6. Pigmented spots in the wool-bearing skin on white merino sheep induced by ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, J W; Fleet, M R

    1986-01-01

    Black-grey pigmented skin spots, some of which contained pigmented wool fibres, were observed in a flock of 8.5-year-old white Merino ewes. The spots were concentrated along the backline and increased in number following shearing, suggesting exposure to sunlight to be of importance in the development of these non-congenital pigmented skin spots in genetically white Merino sheep. To test the effect of ultraviolet light, white Merino sheep, ranging in age from 3 to 8 years, had a closely clipped midside area of wool-bearing skin irradiated on each of 28 consecutive days. Pigmented skin spots developed in 6 of the 16 white Merino sheep irradiated. Spots first appeared after 10 days of irradiation, the number subsequently increasing with time, and two skin spots were found to contain sparse numbers of black-grey pigmented wool fibres. Histological examination showed both the naturally occurring and irradiation-induced pigmented skin spots resulted from an increase in both number and activity of melanocytes localized along the epidermal-dermal border of the epidermis. With time, the melanocytes were observed to have entered, to varying depths, the outer-root sheath of follicles still producing white wool fibres. These ultraviolet-light-induced changes to epidermal melanocytes in white Merino sheep presumably occur due to alterations within the local tissue environment in which the melanocytes lie.

  7. Trapped-ion probing of light-induced charging effects on dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlander, M; Brownnutt, M; Haensel, W; Blatt, R, E-mail: max.harlander@uibk.ac.a [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-09-15

    We use a string of confined {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions to measure perturbations to a trapping potential which are caused by the light-induced charging of an antireflection-coated window and of insulating patches on the ion-trap electrodes. The electric fields induced at the ions' position are characterized as a function of distance to the dielectric and as a function of the incident optical power and wavelength. The measurement of the ion-string position is sensitive to as few as 40 elementary charges per {radical}(Hz) on the dielectric at distances of the order of millimetres, and perturbations are observed for illuminations with light of wavelengths as large as 729 nm. This has important implications for the future of miniaturized ion-trap experiments, notably with regard to the choice of electrode material and the optics that must be integrated in the vicinity of the ion. The method presented here can be readily applied to the investigation of charging effects beyond the context of ion-trap experiments.

  8. Transcriptomic changes arising during light-induced sporulation in Physarum polycephalum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrantes, Israel; Glockner, Gernot; Meyer, Sonja; Marwan, Wolfgang

    2010-02-17

    Physarum polycephalum is a free-living amoebozoan protist displaying a complex life cycle, including alternation between single- and multinucleate stages through sporulation, a simple form of cell differentiation. Sporulation in Physarum can be experimentally induced by several external factors, and Physarum displays many biochemical features typical for metazoan cells, including metazoan-type signaling pathways, which makes this organism a model to study cell cycle, cell differentiation and cellular reprogramming. In order to identify the genes associated to the light-induced sporulation in Physarum, especially those related to signal transduction, we isolated RNA before and after photoinduction from sporulation- competent cells, and used these RNAs to synthesize cDNAs, which were then analyzed using the 454 sequencing technology. We obtained 16,669 cDNAs that were annotated at every computational level. 13,169 transcripts included hit count data, from which 2,772 displayed significant differential expression (upregulated: 1,623; downregulated: 1,149). Transcripts with valid annotations and significant differential expression were later integrated into putative networks using interaction information from orthologs. Gene ontology analysis suggested that most significantly downregulated genes are linked to DNA repair, cell division, inhibition of cell migration, and calcium release, while highly upregulated genes were involved in cell death, cell polarization, maintenance of integrity, and differentiation. In addition, cell death- associated transcripts were overrepresented between the upregulated transcripts. These changes are associated to a network of actin-binding proteins encoded by genes that are differentially regulated before and after light induction.

  9. Characterization of Phototransduction Gene Knockouts Revealed Important Signaling Networks in the Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayalakshmi Krishnan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the molecular pathways mediating neuronal function in retinas can be greatly facilitated by the identification of genes regulated in the retinas of different mutants under various light conditions. We attempted to conduct a gene chip analysis study on the genes regulated during rhodopsin kinase (Rhok-/- and arrestin (Sag-/- knockout and double knockouts in mice retina. Hence, mice were exposed to constant illumination of 450 lux or 6,000 lux on dilated pupils for indicated periods. The retinas were removed after the exposure and processed for microarray analysis. Double knockout was associated with immense changes in gene expression regulating a number of apoptosis inducing transcription factors. Subsequently, network analysis revealed that during early exposure the transcription factors, p53, c-MYC, c-FOS, JUN, and, in late phase, NF-B, appeared to be essential for the initiation of light-induced retinal rod loss, and some other classical pro- and antipoptotic genes appeared to be significantly important as well.

  10. Regulatory light chain phosphorylation increases eccentric contraction-induced injury in skinned fast-twitch fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childers, Martin K; McDonald, Kerry S

    2004-02-01

    During contraction, activation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) results in phosphorylation of myosin's regulatory light chain (RLC), which potentiates force and increases speed of force development over a wide range of [Ca(2+)]. We tested the hypothesis that RLC phosphorylation by MLCK mediates the extent of eccentric contraction-induced injury as measured by force deficit in skinned fast-twitch skeletal muscle fibers. Results indicated that RLC phosphorylation in single skinned rat psoas fibers significantly increased Ca(2+) sensitivity of isometric force; isometric force from 50 +/- 16 to 59 +/- 18 kN/m(2) during maximal Ca(2+) activation; peak absolute power output from 38 +/- 15 to 48 +/- 14 nW during maximal Ca(2+) activation; and the magnitude of contraction-induced force deficit during maximal (pCa 4.5) activation from 26 +/- 9.8 to 35 +/- 9.6%. We conclude that RLC phosphorylation increases force deficits following eccentric contractions, perhaps by increasing the number of force-generating cross-bridges.

  11. Infrared light-induced protein crystallization. Structuring of protein interfacial water and periodic self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowacz, Magdalena; Marchel, Mateusz; Juknaité, Lina; Esperança, José M. S. S.; Romão, Maria João; Carvalho, Ana Luísa; Rebelo, Luís Paulo N.

    2017-01-01

    We show that a physical trigger, a non-ionizing infrared (IR) radiation at wavelengths strongly absorbed by liquid water, can be used to induce and kinetically control protein (periodic) self-assembly in solution. This phenomenon is explained by considering the effect of IR light on the structuring of protein interfacial water. Our results indicate that the IR radiation can promote enhanced mutual correlations of water molecules in the protein hydration shell. We report on the radiation-induced increase in both the strength and cooperativeness of H-bonds. The presence of a structured dipolar hydration layer can lead to attractive interactions between like-charged biomacromolecules in solution (and crystal nucleation events). Furthermore, our study suggests that enveloping the protein within a layer of structured solvent (an effect enhanced by IR light) can prevent the protein non-specific aggregation favoring periodic self-assembly. Recognizing the ability to affect protein-water interactions by means of IR radiation may have important implications for biological and bio-inspired systems.

  12. Laser light induced modulations in metabolic activities in human brain cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tata, Darrell B.; Waynant, Ronald W.

    2008-03-01

    The role of low visible or near infra-red laser intensity in suppressing metabolic activity of malignant human brain cancer (glioblastoma) cells was investigated through the application of either a continuous wave 633nm HeNe or a pulsed picosecond 1,552nm wavelength laser. Human glioblastomas were exposed in their growth culture medium with serum for several energy doses. For both types of laser exposures the glioblastomas exhibited a maximal decline in the metabolic activity relative to their respective sham control counterparts at 10 J/cm2. The cellular metabolic activities for various treatment doses were measured through the colorimetric MTS metabolic assay after the laser exposure. Interestingly, addition of (the enzyme) catalase in the growth medium prior to the laser exposure was found to diminish the laser induced metabolic suppression for all fluence treatment conditions, thus suggesting a functional role of H IIO II in the metabolic suppression. Taken together, our findings reveal that visible or near infra-red low level light exposures could potentially be a viable tool in reducing the metabolic activity of cancers; evidence at hand implicates a role of light induced H IIO II in bringing about in part, suppression in the metabolic activity. Due to the cellular "biphasic" response to the laser exposure, further research needs to be undertaken to determine exposure parameters which would optimize metabolic and cellular growth suppression in-vivo.

  13. Shining new light on dark percepts: visual sensations induced by TMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Ramisha; Mazzi, Chiara; Savazzi, Silvia

    2015-11-01

    Phosphenes induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are sensations of light, whereas a missing region in the visual field induced by TMS is generally referred to as a scotoma. It is believed that phosphenes are caused by neural excitation, while scotomas are due to neural inhibition. In light of the recent literature it might, however, be surmised that both phenomena are the result of neural noise injected into the cortex by TMS and that the likelihood of perceiving the two kinds of percepts depends on the state of the cortex at the time of stimulation. In the present study, TMS was applied over the left occipital cortex under different background conditions (Experiments 1-2) and using different TMS intensities (Experiment 3). Behavioral responses indicate the visual system processes luminance in a standardized manner, as lighter percepts were reacted to faster than darker percepts; this effect, however, did not extend to percept size. Our results suggest that phenomenological characteristics of artificial visual percepts are in line with the proposed effects of TMS as the induction of random neural noise interfering with the neural dynamics (the state of the cortex) at the time of stimulation.

  14. Improvement of Anti-TNF-α Antibody-Induced Palmoplantar Pustular Psoriasis Using a 308-nm Excimer Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuko Iga

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α antibody is utilized in the treatment of a variety of chronic inflammatory conditions, including psoriasis. However, it can induce paradoxical development and/or exacerbation of psoriasis in the course of anti-TNF-α antibody treatment, which is sometimes refractory to conventional treatments. Herein, we report a case of refractory palmoplantar pustular psoriasis induced by anti-TNF-α antibody treatment, which was improved by treatment with a 308-nm excimer light. The 308-nm excimer light has less long-term risks than narrow-band UVB. The 308-nm excimer light may be a good therapeutic option for refractory psoriatic skin lesions induced by anti-TNF-α antibody therapy because of localized side effects without systemic problems, short length of treatment and low cumulative dosages of UV light.

  15. Light-Intensity-Induced Characterization of Elastic Constants and d33 Piezoelectric Coefficient of PLZT Single Fiber Based Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiri Erhart

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced functionality of electro-optic devices by implementing piezoelectric micro fibers into their construction is proposed. Lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate (PLZT ceramics are known to exhibit high light transparency, desirable electro-optic properties and fast response. In this study PLZT fibers with a diameter of around 300 microns were produced by a thermoplastic processing method and their light-induced impedance and piezoelectric coefficient were investigated at relatively low light intensity (below 50 mW/cm2. The authors experimentally proved higher performance of light controlled microfiber transducers in comparison to their bulk form. The advantage of the high surface area to volume ratio is shown to be an excellent technique to design high quality light sensors by using fibrous materials. The UV absorption induced change in elastic constants of 3% and 4% for the piezoelectric coefficient d33.

  16. Light-intensity-induced characterization of elastic constants and d33 piezoelectric coefficient of PLZT single fiber based transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozielski, Lucjan; Erhart, Jiri; Clemens, Frank Jörg

    2013-02-12

    Enhanced functionality of electro-optic devices by implementing piezoelectric micro fibers into their construction is proposed. Lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramics are known to exhibit high light transparency, desirable electro-optic properties and fast response. In this study PLZT fibers with a diameter of around 300 microns were produced by a thermoplastic processing method and their light-induced impedance and piezoelectric coefficient were investigated at relatively low light intensity (below 50 mW/cm2). The authors experimentally proved higher performance of light controlled microfiber transducers in comparison to their bulk form. The advantage of the high surface area to volume ratio is shown to be an excellent technique to design high quality light sensors by using fibrous materials. The UV absorption induced change in elastic constants of 3% and 4% for the piezoelectric coefficient d(33).

  17. Spectral lineshapes of collision-induced absorption (CIA) and collision-induced light scattering (CILS) for molecular nitrogen using isotropic intermolecular potential. New insights and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kader, M. S. A.; Mostafa, S. I.; Bancewicz, T.; Maroulis, G.

    2014-08-01

    The rototranslational collision-induced absorption (CIA) at different temperatures and collision-induced light scattering (CILS) at room temperature of nitrogen gas are analyzed in terms of new isotropic intermolecular potential, multipole-induced dipole functions and interaction-induced pair polarizability models, using quantum spectral lineshape computations. The irreducible spherical form for the induced operator of light scattering mechanisms was determined. The high frequency wings are discussed in terms of the collision-induced rotational Rayleigh effect and estimates for the dipole-octopole polarizability E4, is obtained and checked with the ab initio theoretical value. The quality of the present potential has been checked by comparing between calculated and experimental thermo-physical and transport properties over a wide temperature range, which are found to be in good agreement.

  18. Numerical study of light-induced phase behavior of smectic solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hayoung; Park, Jaesung; Cho, Maenghyo

    2016-10-01

    By the chemical cross-linking of rigid molecules, liquid crystal polymer (LCP) has been envisaged as a novel heterogeneous material due to the fact that various optical and geometric states of the liquid crystalline (LC) phases are projected onto the polymeric constituents. The phase behavior, which refers to the macroscopic shape change of LCP under thermotropic phase change, is a compelling example of such optical-mechanical coupling. In this study, the photomechanical behavior, which broadly refers to the thermal- or light-induced actuation of smectic solids, is investigated using three-dimensional nonlinear finite element analysis (FEA). First, the various phases of LC are considered as well as their relation to polymeric conformation defined by the strain energy of the smectic polymer; a comprehensive constitutive equation that bridges the strong, optomechanical coupling is then derived. Such photomechanical coupling is incorporated in the FEA considering geometric nonlinearity, which is vital to understanding the large-scale light-induced bending behavior of the smectic solid.To demonstrate the simulation capability of the present model, numerous examples of photomechanical deformations are investigated parametrically, either by changing the operating conditions such as stimuli (postsynthesis) or the intrinsic properties (presynthesis). When compared to nematic solids, distinguished behaviors due to smectic substances are found herein and discussed through experiments. The quasisoftness that bidirectionally couples microscopic variables to mechanical behavior is also explained, while considering the effect of nonlinearity. In addition to providing a comprehensive measure that could deepen the knowledge of photomechanical coupling, the use of the proposed finite element framework offers an insight into the design of light-responsive actuating systems made of smectic solids.

  19. Origin of Light-Induced Spin-Correlated Radical Pairs in Cryptochrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Stefan; Biskup, Till; Okafuji, Asako; Marino, Anthony R.; Berthold, Thomas; Link, Gerhard; Hitomi, Kenichi; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.; Schleicher, Erik; Norris, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Blue-light excitation of cryptochromes and homologs uniformly triggers electron transfer (ET) from the protein surface to the flavin-adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor. A cascade of three conserved tryptophan residues has been considered to be critically involved in this photoreaction. If the FAD is initially in its fully oxidized (diamagnetic) redox state, light-induced ET via the tryptophan triad generates a series of short-lived spin-correlated radical pairs comprising an FAD radical and a tryptophan radical. Coupled doublet-pair species of this type have been proposed as the basis, e.g., of a biological magnetic compass in migratory birds, and were found critical for some cryptochrome functions in vivo. In this contribution, a cryptochrome-like protein (CRYD) derived from Xenopus laevis has been examined as a representative system. The terminal radical-pair state FAD•⋯W324• of X. laevis CRYD has been characterized in detail by time-resolved electron-paramagnetic resonance (TREPR) at X-band microwave frequency (9.68 GHz) and magnetic fields around 345 mT, and at Q-band (34.08 GHz) at around 1215 mT. Different precursor states – singlet versus triplet – of radical-pair formation have been considered in spectral simulations of the experimental electron-spin polarized TREPR signals. Conclusively, we present evidence for a singlet-state precursor of FAD•⋯W324• radical-pair generation because at both magnetic fields, where radical pairs were studied by TREPR, net-zero electron-spin polarization has been detected. Neither a spin-polarized triplet precursor nor a triplet at thermal equilibrium can explain such an electron-spin polarization. It turns out that a two-microwave-frequency TREPR approach is essential to draw conclusions on the nature of the precursor electronic states in light-induced spin-correlated radical pair formations. PMID:20684534

  20. Hydrogen peroxide generated by NADPH oxidase is involved in high blue-light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Feng; Xing, Da; Zhang, Lingrui

    2009-08-01

    One of the most important functions of blue light is to induce chloroplast movements by reducing the damage to photosynthetic machinery under excess light. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), generated by various environmental stimuli, can act as a signaling molecule that regulates a number of developmental processes and environmental responses. To investigate whether H2O2 is involved in high blue light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements, we use luminescence spectrometer to observe H2O2 generation with the assistance of the fluorescence probe dichlorofluorescin diacetate (H2DCF-DA). After treatment with high blue light, a large quantity of H2O2 indicated by the fluorescence intensity of DCF is produced in a dose-dependent manner in leaf strip of Arabidopsis. Enzymatic assay shows that the activity of NADPH oxidase, which is a major site for H2O2 generation, also rapidly increases in treated strips. Exogenously applied H2O2 can promote the high blue light-induced chloroplast movements. Moreover, high blue light-induced H2O2 generation can be abolished completely by addition of exogenous catalase (CAT), and partly by diphenylene iodonium (DPI) and dichlorophenyl dimethylurea (DCMU), which are an NADPH oxidase inhibitor and a blocker of electron transport chain. And subsequent chloroplast movements can be abolished by CAT and DPI, but not by DCMU. These results presented here suggested that high blue light can induce oxidative burst, and NADPH oxidase as a major producer for H2O2 is involved in blue light-induced chloroplast avoidance movements.

  1. Dynamics of slow light and light storage in a Doppler-broadened electromagnetically-induced-transparency medium: A numerical approach

    CERN Document Server

    Su, Shih-Wei; Gou, Shih-Chuan; Horng, Tzyy-Leng; Yu, Ite A

    2011-01-01

    We present a numerical scheme to study the dynamics of slow light and light storage in an electromagneticallyinduced- transparency (EIT) medium at finite temperatures. Allowing for the motional coupling, we derive a set of coupled Schr\\"{o}dinger equations describing a boosted closed three-level EIT system according to the principle of Galilean relativity. The dynamics of a uniformly moving EIT medium can thus be determined by numerically integrating the coupled Schr\\"odinger equations for atoms plus one ancillary Maxwell-Schr\\"odinger equation for the probe pulse. The central idea of this work rests on the assumption that the loss of ground-state coherence at finite temperatures can be ascribed to the incoherent superposition of density matrices representing the EIT systems with various velocities. Close agreements are demonstrated in comparing the numerical results with the experimental data for both slow light and light storage. In particular, the distinct characters featuring the decay of ground-state coh...

  2. Investigation of evaporation characteristics of polonium and its lighter homologues selenium and tellurium from liquid Pb-Bi-eutecticum

    CERN Document Server

    Neuhausen, J; Eichler, B

    2004-01-01

    The evaporation behaviour of polonium and its lighter homologues selenium and tellurium dissolved in liquid Pb-Bi-eutecticum (LBE) has been studied at various temperatures in the range from 482 K up to 1330 K under Ar/H2 and Ar/H2O-atmospheres using γ-ray spectroscopy. Polonium release in the temperature range of interest for technical applications is slow. Within short term (1h) experiments measurable amounts of polonium are evaporated only at temperatures above 973 K. Long term experiments reveal that a slow evaporation of polonium occurs at temperatures around 873 K resulting in a fractional polonium loss of the melt around 1% per day. Evaporation rates of selenium and tellurium are smaller than those of polonium. The presence of H2O does not enhance the evaporation within the error limits of our experiments. The thermodynamics and possible reaction pathways involved in polonium release from LBE are discussed.

  3. Differential control of xanthophylls and light-induced stress proteins, as opposed to light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b proteins, during photosynthetic acclimation of barley leaves to light irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montane; Tardy; Kloppstech; Havaux

    1998-09-01

    Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) plants were grown at different photon flux densities ranging from 100 to 1800 &mgr;mol m-2 s-1 in air and/or in atmospheres with reduced levels of O2 and CO2. Low O2 and CO2 partial pressures allowed plants to grow under high photosystem II (PSII) excitation pressure, estimated in vivo by chlorophyll fluorescence measurements, at moderate photon flux densities. The xanthophyll-cycle pigments, the early light-inducible proteins, and their mRNA accumulated with increasing PSII excitation pressure irrespective of the way high excitation pressure was obtained (high-light irradiance or decreased CO2 and O2 availability). These findings indicate that the reduction state of electron transport chain components could be involved in light sensing for the regulation of nuclear-encoded chloroplast gene expression. In contrast, no correlation was found between the reduction state of PSII and various indicators of the PSII light-harvesting system, such as the chlorophyll a-to-b ratio, the abundance of the major pigment-protein complex of PSII (LHCII), the mRNA level of LHCII, the light-saturation curve of O2 evolution, and the induced chlorophyll-fluorescence rise. We conclude that the chlorophyll antenna size of PSII is not governed by the redox state of PSII in higher plants and, consequently, regulation of early light-inducible protein synthesis is different from that of LHCII.

  4. Saturating Light Induces Sustained Accumulation of Oil in Plastidal Lipid Droplets in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goold, Hugh Douglas; Cuiné, Stéphan; Légeret, Bertrand; Liang, Yuanxue; Brugière, Sabine; Auroy, Pascaline; Javot, Hélène; Tardif, Marianne; Jones, Brian; Beisson, Fred; Peltier, Gilles; Li-Beisson, Yonghua

    2016-08-01

    Enriching algal biomass in energy density is an important goal in algal biotechnology. Nitrogen (N) starvation is considered the most potent trigger of oil accumulation in microalgae and has been thoroughly investigated. However, N starvation causes the slow down and eventually the arrest of biomass growth. In this study, we show that exposing a Chlamydomonas reinhardtii culture to saturating light (SL) under a nonlimiting CO2 concentration in turbidostatic photobioreactors induces a sustained accumulation of lipid droplets (LDs) without compromising growth, which results in much higher oil productivity than N starvation. We also show that the polar membrane lipid fraction of SL-induced LDs is rich in plastidial lipids (approximately 70%), in contrast to N starvation-induced LDs, which contain approximately 60% lipids of endoplasmic reticulum origin. Proteomic analysis of LDs isolated from SL-exposed cells identified more than 200 proteins, including known proteins of lipid metabolism, as well as 74 proteins uniquely present in SL-induced LDs. LDs induced by SL and N depletion thus differ in protein and lipid contents. Taken together, lipidomic and proteomic data thus show that a large part of the sustained oil accumulation occurring under SL is likely due to the formation of plastidial LDs. We discuss our data in relation to the different metabolic routes used by microalgae to accumulate oil reserves depending on cultivation conditions. Finally, we propose a model in which oil accumulation is governed by an imbalance between photosynthesis and growth, which can be achieved by impairing growth or by boosting photosynthetic carbon fixation, with the latter resulting in higher oil productivity.

  5. Electromagnetically induced transparency and nonlinear pulse propagation in a combined tripod and Λ atom-light coupling scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamedi, H. R.; Ruseckas, J.; Juzeliūnas, G.

    2017-09-01

    We consider propagation of a probe pulse in an atomic medium characterized by a combined tripod and Lambda (Λ) atom-light coupling scheme. The scheme involves three atomic ground states coupled to two excited states by five light fields. It is demonstrated that dark states can be formed for such an atom-light coupling. This is essential for formation of the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and slow light. In the limiting cases the scheme reduces to conventional Λ- or N-type atom-light couplings providing the EIT or absorption, respectively. Thus, the atomic system can experience a transition from the EIT to the absorption by changing the amplitudes or phases of control lasers. Subsequently the scheme is employed to analyze the nonlinear pulse propagation using the coupled Maxwell-Bloch equations. It is shown that a generation of stable slow light optical solitons is possible in such a five-level combined tripod and Λ atomic system.

  6. Intergranular tellurium cracking of nickel-based alloys in molten Li, Be, Th, U/F salt mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatiev, Victor, E-mail: ignatiev@vver.kiae.ru; Surenkov, Alexander; Gnidoy, Ivan; Kulakov, Alexander; Uglov, Vadim; Vasiliev, Alexander; Presniakov, Mikhail

    2013-09-15

    In Russia, R and D on Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) are concentrated now on fast/intermediate spectrum concepts which were recognized as long term alternative to solid fueled fast reactors due to their attractive features: strong negative feedback coefficients, easy in-service inspection, and simplified fuel cycle. For high-temperature MSR corrosion of the metallic container alloy in primary circuit is the primary concern. Key problem receiving current attention include surface fissures in Ni-based alloys probably arising from fission product tellurium attack. This paper summarizes results of corrosion tests conducted recently to study effect of oxidation state in selected fuel salt on tellurium attack and to develop means of controlling tellurium cracking in the special Ni-based alloys recently developed for molten salt actinide recycler and tranforming (MOSART) system. Tellurium corrosion of Ni-based alloys was tested at temperatures up to 750 °C in stressed and unloaded conditions in molten LiF–BeF{sub 2} salt mixture fueled by about 20 mol% of ThF{sub 4} and 2 mol% of UF{sub 4} at different [U(IV)]/[U(III)] ratios: 0.7, 4, 20, 100 and 500. Following Ni-based alloys (in mass%): HN80M-VI (Mo—12, Cr—7.6, Nb—1.5), HN80MTY (Mo—13, Cr—6.8, Al—1.1, Ti—0.9), HN80MTW (Mo—9.4, Cr—7.0, Ti—1.7, W—5.5) and EM-721 (W—25.2, Cr—5.7, Ti—0.17) were used for the study in the corrosion facility.

  7. The phytotoxin coronatine induces light-dependent reactive oxygen species in tomato seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Uppalapati, Srinivasa Rao; Ishiga, Takako; Elavarthi, Sathya; Martin, Bjorn; Bender, Carol L

    2009-01-01

    The phytotoxin coronatine (COR), which is produced by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (DC3000), has multiple roles in virulence that lead to chlorosis and a reduction in chlorophyll content. However, the physiological significance of COR-induced chlorosis in disease development is still largely unknown. Global expression analysis demonstrated that DC3000 and COR, but not the COR-defective mutant DB29, caused reduced expression of photosynthesis-related genes and result in a 1.5- to 2-fold reduction in maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II (F(V)/F(M)). Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) seedlings inoculated with DC3000 and incubated in a long daily photoperiod showed more necrosis than inoculated seedlings incubated in either dark or a short daily photoperiod. The accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected in cotyledons inoculated with either purified COR or DC3000 but not in tissues inoculated with DB29. Interestingly, COR-induced ROS accumulated only in light and was inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea and diphenylene iodonium, which function to inhibit electron transport from PSII. Furthermore, COR and DC3000 suppressed expression of the gene encoding the thylakoid Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase but not the cytosolic form of the same enzyme. In conclusion, these results demonstrate a role for COR-induced effects on photosynthetic machinery and ROS in modulating necrotic cell death during bacterial speck disease of tomato.

  8. Interactions between dislocations and irradiation-induced defects in light water reactor pressure vessel steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumel, Stéphanie; Van Duysen, Jean-Claude; Ruste, Jacky; Domain, Christophe

    2005-11-01

    The REVE project (REactor for Virtual Experiments) is an international effort aimed at developing tools to simulate irradiation effects in light water reactors materials. In the framework of this project, a European team developed a first tool, called RPV-1 designed for reactor pressure vessel steels. This article is the third of a series dedicated to the presentation of the codes and models used to build RPV-1. It describes the simplified approach adopted to simulate the irradiation-induced hardening. This approach relies on a characterization of the interactions between a screw dislocation and irradiation-induced defects from molecular dynamics simulations. The pinning forces exerted by the defects on the dislocation were estimated from the obtained results and some hypotheses. In RPV-1, these forces are used as input parameters of a Foreman and Makin-type code, called DUPAIR, to simulate the irradiation-induced hardening at 20 °C. The relevance of the proposed approach was validated by the comparison with experimental results. However, this work has to be considered as an initial step to facilitate the development of a first tool to simulate irradiation effects. It can be improved by many ways (e.g. by use of dislocation dynamics code).

  9. Droplet Trajectory Control Using Light-Induced Thermocapillary Effects in a Microchannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, June; Kang, Seungmin; Song, Simon

    2015-11-01

    Controlling droplets is one of the important functions on a microfluidic chip. Marangoni effects induced by interfacial tension gradient has been paid attention due to its strong driving force on a droplet by means of droplet control. Solutalcapillary effects occurs when the interfacial tension gradient is induced due to the transport of surfactant molecules. We aim to investigate light-induced solutalcapillary effects on a droplet trajectory. Unlike few previous studies, we illuminate a continuous phase with a laser beam, in order to minimize possible damage or property change to target molecules contained in droplets. A mixture solution of black metallic ink and oleic acid is used for the continuous phase fluid. DI-water is the disperse phase. As a result, we found that the trajectory shifting increases with increasing the laser power and the droplet diameter and decreasing the droplet velocity. The magnitude of Marangoni force was estimated to be about 100 nN by assuming quasi-equilibrium between drag force and Marangoni force. As an application of this technique, we successfully routed droplets toward one of three outlets at higher than 95% success rate on demand.

  10. 17β-estradiol ameliorates light-induced retinal damage in Sprague-Dawley rats by reducing oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaolan; Wang, Baoying; Feng, Yan; Mo, Mingshu; Du, Fangying; Li, Hongbo; Yu, Xiaorui

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered as a major cause of light-induced retinal neurodegeneration. The protective role of 17β-estradiol (βE2) in neurodegenerative disorders is well known, but its underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we utilized a light-induced retinal damage model to explore the mechanism by which βE2 exerts its neuroprotective effect. Adult male and female ovariectomized (OVX) rats were exposed to 8,000 lx white light for 12 h to induce retinal light damage. Electroretinogram (ERG) assays and hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining revealed that exposure to light for 12 h resulted in functional damage to the rat retina, histological changes, and retinal neuron loss. However, intravitreal injection (IVI) of βE2 significantly rescued this impaired retinal function in both female and male rats. Based on the level of malondialdehyde (MDA) production (a biomarker of oxidative stress), an increase in retinal oxidative stress followed light exposure, and βE2 administration reduced this light-induced oxidative stress. Quantitative reverse-transcriptase (qRT)-PCR indicated that the messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (Gpx) were downregulated in female OVX rats but were upregulated in male rats after light exposure, suggesting a gender difference in the regulation of these antioxidant enzyme genes in response to light. However, βE2 administration restored or enhanced the SOD and Gpx expression levels following light exposure. Although the catalase (CAT) expression level was insensitive to light stimulation, βE2 also increased the CAT gene expression level in both female OVX and male rats. Further examination indicated that the antioxidant proteins thioredoxin (Trx) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) are also involved in βE2-mediated antioxidation and that the cytoprotective protein heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) plays a key role in the endogenous defense mechanism

  11. Synergetic effect of functional cadmium–tellurium quantum dots conjugated with gambogic acid for HepG2 cell-labeling and proliferation inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu P

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Peipei Xu,1 Jingyuan Li,2 Lixin Shi,3 Matthias Selke,3 Baoan Chen,4 Xuemei Wang5 1Department of Hematology, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 2Laboratory Animal Center, Institute of Comparative Medicine, Nantong University, Nantong, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University – Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 4Department of Hematology, Zhongda Hospital, Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China; 5State Key Lab of Bioelectronics (Chien-Shiung Wu Laboratory, Southeast University, Nanjing, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: We prepared and studied novel fluorescent nanocomposites based on gambogic acid (GA and cadmium–tellurium (CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs modified with cysteamine for purpose of cancer cell labeling and combined treatment. The nanocomposites were denoted as GA-CdTe. Characterization results indicated that the CdTe QDs can readily bind onto cell plasma membranes and then be internalized into cancer cells for real-time labeling and tracing of human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2 cells. GA-CdTe significantly enhanced drug accumulation in HepG2 cells and inhibited cancer cell proliferation. GA-CdTe nanocomposites also improved the drug action of GA molecules in HepG2 cells and induced the G2/M phase arrest of the cancer cell cycle, promoting cell apoptosis. Given the sensitive, pH-triggered release of GA-CdTe, the side effects of GA anticancer agents on normal cells/tissues in the blood circulation markedly decreased. Efficient drug release and accumulation in target tumor cells were also facilitated. Thus, the fluorescent GA-CdTe offered a new strategy for potential multimode cancer therapy and provided new channels for research into naturally-active compounds extracted from traditional Chinese medicinal plants.Keywords: cadmium-tellurium quantum dots

  12. The influence of stoichiometry on the growth of tellurium-doped indium antimonide for magnetic field sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partin, D. L.; Pelczynski, M.; Cooke, P.; Green, L.; Heremans, J.; Thrush, C. M.

    1998-12-01

    Indium antimonide magnetoresistors are used as magnetic position sensors in very demanding automotive environments such as crankshaft and camshaft sensors for engine control. The use of tellurium as an n-type dopant was studied using Hall effect measurements up to 200°C, Hall depth profiling, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The films were grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition using trimethyl indium, trisdimethylamino antimony, and diethyl telluride. It was found that the incorporation of tellurium strongly depends upon the V/III ratio during growth, implying that it is influenced by the availability of antimony vacancies. Thus, our results show that the reproducibility of tellurium doping is not limited by memory effects in a well-designed reactor, but by the control of stoichiometry. It is now possible to grow films with optimum doping profile and with good uniformity and reproducibility over hundreds of growth runs. These films can be used to make magnetoresistors that have good sensitivity to a magnetic field and good stability over a wide temperature range.

  13. Solvent Extraction of Tellurium from Chloride Solutions Using Tri-n-butyl Phosphate: Conditions and Thermodynamic Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongchan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The extractive separation of tellurium (IV from hydrochloric acid media with tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP in kerosene was investigated. The dependence on the extraction of tellurium species, concentrations of tellurium and TBP, extraction time and stage, organic/aqueous ratio, and interferences from coexist metallic ions were examined and are discussed. Besides, the stripping agent and stripping time were also studied. It was found that the extraction reaction corresponds to the neutral complex formation mechanism and the extracted species is TeCl4·3TBP and that the extraction process is exothermic. The thermodynamic parameters of enthalpy ΔH, entropy ΔS, and free energy ΔG of the extraction process were evaluated at −26.2 kJ·mol−1, −65.6 J·mol−1·K−1, and −7.0 kJ·mol−1, respectively at 293 K.

  14. Effect of sample preparation methods on photometric determination of the tellurium and cobalt content in the samples of copper concentrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoriya Butenko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Methods of determination of cobalt and nickel in copper concentrates currently used in factory laboratories are very labor intensive and time consuming. The limiting stage of the analysis is preliminary chemical sample preparation. Carrying out the decomposition process of industrial samples with concentrated mineral acids in open systems does not allow to improve the metrological characteristics of the methods, for this reason improvement the methods of sample preparation is quite relevant and has a practical interest. The work was dedicated to the determination of the optimal conditions of preliminary chemical preparation of copper concentrate samples for the subsequent determination of cobalt and tellurium in the obtained solution using tellurium-spectrophotometric method. Decomposition of the samples was carried out by acid dissolving in individual mineral acids and their mixtures by heating in an open system as well as by using ultrasonification and microwave radiation in a closed system. In order to select the optimal conditions for the decomposition of the samples in a closed system the phase contact time and ultrasonic generator’s power were varied. Intensification of the processes of decomposition of copper concentrates with nitric acid (1:1, ultrasound and microwave radiation allowed to transfer quantitatively cobalt and tellurium into solution spending 20 and 30 min respectively. This reduced the amount of reactants used and improved the accuracy of determination by running the process in strictly identical conditions.

  15. Role of visible light-activated photocatalyst on the reduction of anthrax spore-induced mortality in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Hwa Kau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Photocatalysis of titanium dioxide (TiO(2 substrates is primarily induced by ultraviolet light irradiation. Anion-doped TiO(2 substrates were shown to exhibit photocatalytic activities under visible-light illumination, relative environmentally-friendly materials. Their anti-spore activity against Bacillus anthracis, however, remains to be investigated. We evaluated these visible-light activated photocatalysts on the reduction of anthrax spore-induced pathogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Standard plating method was used to determine the inactivation of anthrax spore by visible light-induced photocatalysis. Mouse models were further employed to investigate the suppressive effects of the photocatalysis on anthrax toxin- and spore-mediated mortality. We found that anti-spore activities of visible light illuminated nitrogen- or carbon-doped titania thin films significantly reduced viability of anthrax spores. Even though the spore-killing efficiency is only approximately 25%, our data indicate that spores from photocatalyzed groups but not untreated groups have a less survival rate after macrophage clearance. In addition, the photocatalysis could directly inactivate lethal toxin, the major virulence factor of B. anthracis. In agreement with these results, we found that the photocatalyzed spores have tenfold less potency to induce mortality in mice. These data suggest that the photocatalysis might injury the spores through inactivating spore components. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Photocatalysis induced injuries of the spores might be more important than direct killing of spores to reduce pathogenicity in the host.

  16. Plastid movement impaired 2, a new gene involved in normal blue-light-induced chloroplast movements in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luesse, Darron R; DeBlasio, Stacy L; Hangarter, Roger P

    2006-08-01

    Chloroplasts move in a light-dependent manner that can modulate the photosynthetic potential of plant cells. Identification of genes required for light-induced chloroplast movement is beginning to define the molecular machinery that controls these movements. In this work, we describe plastid movement impaired 2 (pmi2), a mutant in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that displays attenuated chloroplast movements under intermediate and high light intensities while maintaining a normal movement response under low light intensities. In wild-type plants, fluence rates below 20 micromol m(-2) s(-1) of blue light lead to chloroplast accumulation on the periclinal cell walls, whereas light intensities over 20 micromol m(-2) s(-1) caused chloroplasts to move toward the anticlinal cell walls (avoidance response). However, at light intensities below 75 micromol m(-2) s(-1), chloroplasts in pmi2 leaves move to the periclinal walls; 100 micromol m(-2) s(-1) of blue light is required for chloroplasts in pmi2 to move to the anticlinal cell walls, indicating a shift in the light threshold for the avoidance response in the mutant. The pmi2 mutation has been mapped to a gene that encodes a protein of unknown function with a large coiled-coil domain in the N terminus and a putative P loop. PMI2 shares sequence and structural similarity with PMI15, another unknown protein in Arabidopsis that, when mutated, causes a defect in chloroplast avoidance under high-light intensities.

  17. Fabrication of Micrometer- and Nanometer-Scale Polymer Structures by Visible Light Induced Dielectrophoresis (DEP Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen J. Li

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We report in this paper a novel, inexpensive and flexible method for fabricating micrometer- and nanometer-scale three-dimensional (3D polymer structures using visible light sources instead of ultra-violet (UV light sources or lasers. This method also does not require the conventional micro-photolithographic technique (i.e., photolithographic masks for patterning and fabricating polymer structures such as hydrogels. The major materials and methods required for this novel fabrication technology are: (1 any cross-linked network of photoactive polymers (examples of fabricated poly(ethylene glycol (PEG-diacrylate hydrogel structures are shown in this paper; (2 an Optically-induced Dielectrophoresis (ODEP System which includes an “ODEP chip” (i.e., any chip that changes its surface conductivity when exposed to visible light, an optical microscope, a projector, and a computer; and (3 an animator software hosted on a computer that can generate virtual or dynamic patterns which can be projected onto the “ODEP chip” through the use of a projector and a condenser lens. Essentially, by placing a photosensitive polymer solution inside the microfluidic platform formed by the “ODEP chip” bonded to another substrate, and applying an alternating current (a.c. electrical potential across the polymer solution (typically ~20 Vp-p at 10 kHz, solid polymer micro/nano structures can then be formed on the “ODEP chip” surface when visible-light is projected onto the chip. The 2D lateral geometry (x and y dimensions and the thickness (height of the micro/nano structures are dictated by the image geometry of the visible light projected onto the “ODEP chip” and also the time duration of projection. Typically, after an image projection with intensity ranging from ~0.2 to 0.4 mW/cm2 for 10 s, ~200 nm high structures can be formed. In our current system, the thickness of these polymer structures can be controlled to form from ~200 nanometers to ~3

  18. Effect of LED photobiomodulation on fluorescent light induced changes in cellular ATPases and Cytochrome c oxidase activity in Wistar rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Ahamed Basha; C, Mathangi D; R, Shyamala

    2016-12-01

    Fluorescent light exposure at night alters cellular enzyme activities resulting in health defects. Studies have demonstrated that light emitting diode photobiomodulation enhances cellular enzyme activities. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the effects of fluorescent light induced changes in cellular enzymes and to assess the protective role of pre exposure to 670 nm LED in rat model. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into 10 groups of 6 animals each based on duration of exposure (1, 15, and 30 days) and exposure regimen (cage control, exposure to fluorescent light [1800 lx], LED preexposure followed by fluorescent light exposure and only LED exposure). Na(+)-K(+) ATPase, Ca(2+) ATPase, and cytochrome c oxidase of the brain, heart, kidney, liver, and skeletal muscle were assayed. Animals of the fluorescent light exposure group showed a significant reduction in Na(+)-K(+) ATPase and Ca(2+) ATPase activities in 1 and 15 days and their increase in animals of 30-day group in most of the regions studied. Cytochrome c oxidase showed increase in their level at all the time points assessed in most of the tissues. LED light preexposure showed a significant enhancement in the degree of increase in the enzyme activities in almost all the tissues and at all the time points assessed. This study demonstrates the protective effect of 670 nm LED pre exposure on cellular enzymes against fluorescent light induced change.

  19. Multiple electromagnetically induced transparency, slow and fast light in hybrid optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Akram, M Javed; Saif, Farhan

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) of a weak probe field in hybrid optomechanics with a single three-level ($\\Lambda$-type) atomic system. We report that, in the presence of optomechanical coupling and two transition coupling parameters of three-level atom (TLA), there occurs three distinct multiple EIT windows in the probe absorption spectrum. Moreover, the switching of multiple windows into double and single EIT windows can be obtained by suitably tuning the system parameters. Furthermore, the probe transmission spectrum have been studied. Based on our analytical and numerical work, we explain the occurrence of slow and fast light (superluminal) regimes, and enhancement of superluminal behaviour in the probe field transmission. This work demonstrates great potential in multi-channel waveguide, fiber optics and classical communication networks, multi-channel quantum information processing, real quality imaging, cloaking devices and delay lines & ...

  20. Diffusion voltage in polymer light emitting diodes measured with electric field induced second harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, P. K.; Rafaelsen, J.; Pedersen, T. G.; Pedersen, K.

    2005-12-01

    We apply electric field induced second harmonic (EFISH) to polymer light emitting diodes (PLEDs) and demonstrate the ability to determine the diffusion voltage in PLED devices. The EFISH signal is proportional to the square of the effective field, which is the sum of the diffusion voltage and the applied voltage. By minimizing the EFISH-signal as a function of the applied voltage, the diffusion voltage is determined by measuring the applied voltage that cancels out the diffusion voltage. The PLEDs are fabricated with indium tin oxide (ITO) as the hole injecting contact and two different electron injecting contacts, namely aluminum and calcium. The diffusion voltage originates from the rearranged charges caused by the difference in Fermi levels in the materials in the PLEDs. Different contacts will thus cause different diffusion voltages. We demonstrate here that the EFISH signal is proportional to the square of the effective field in both reverse and forward bias, and discuss the dependence on contact materials.

  1. Light flux density threshold at which protein denaturation is induced by synchrotron radiation circular dichroism beamlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, A J; Janes, Robert W; Brown, A; Clarke, D T; Sutherland, J C; Tao, Y; Wallace, B A; Hoffmann, S V

    2008-07-01

    New high-flux synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) beamlines are providing important information for structural biology, but can potentially cause denaturation of the protein samples under investigation. This effect has been studied at the new CD1 dedicated SRCD beamline at ISA in Denmark, where radiation-induced thermal damage effects were observed, depending not only on the radiation flux but also on the focal spot size of the light. Comparisons with similar studies at other SRCD facilities worldwide has lead to the estimation of a flux density threshold under which SRCD beamlines should be operated when samples are to be exposed to low-wavelength vacuum ultraviolet radiation for extended periods of time.

  2. White light scattering spectroscopy and electron microscopy of laser induced melting in single gold nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlstra, Peter; Chon, James W M; Gu, Min

    2009-07-28

    We present the first measurements of laser induced melting and reshaping of single gold nanorods. Using a combination of white light scattering spectroscopy and electron microscopy we find a melting energy of 260 fJ for nanorods with an average size of 92 x 30 nm. Contrary to previous reports on ensembles of nanorods, this melting energy corresponds well to the theoretical prediction of 225 fJ. We observe a gradual shape change from a long and thin rod to a shorter and wider rod, which eventually collapses into a sphere when enough laser energy is deposited. We also observe that higher aspect ratio particles are thermodynamically less stable, leading to a greater reduction of the aspect ratio at lower laser pulse energy densities.

  3. Combination of light-induced effect and gate bias stress in organic phototransistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, R.; Sheets, W. C.; Bezzeccheri, E.; Facchetti, A.; Rubino, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the photoresponse of pentacene-based thin film transistors fabricated with a photocurable polymer insulator was investigated under visible and ultraviolet illumination. A simple model was developed to distinguish a photoconductive and a photovoltaic effect, that is, a direct photocurrent and a current enhancement caused by a threshold voltage shift. The direction of the light-induced threshold translation is affected by measurement conditions (e.g. integration time and voltage range) and is related to the nature of the trap states, specifically those located in the pentacene film near the interface with the polymer. In particular, it was shown that, thanks to this phenomenon, the photosensitivity of the fabricated phototransistors could be modulated by the gate bias applied during illumination.

  4. Light-induced antibacterial activity of electrospun chitosan-based material containing photosensitizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severyukhina, A N; Petrova, N V; Yashchenok, A M; Bratashov, D N; Smuda, K; Mamonova, I A; Yurasov, N A; Puchinyan, D M; Georgieva, R; Bäumler, H; Lapanje, A; Gorin, D A

    2017-01-01

    Increasing antimicrobial resistance requires the development of novel materials and approaches for treatment of various infections. Utilization of photodynamic therapy represents an advanced alternative to antibiotics and metal-based agents. Here, we report the fabrication of electrospun material that possesses benefits of both topical antimicrobial and photodynamic therapies. This material combines chitosan, as a biocompatible polymer, and a second generation photosensitizer. The incorporation of photosensitizer doesn't affect the material morphology and its nearly uniform distribution in fibers structure was observed by confocal Raman microscopy. Owing to photosensitizer the prepared material exhibits the light-induced and spatially limited antimicrobial activity that was demonstrated against Staphylococcus aureus, an important etiological infectious agent. Such material can be potentially used in antibacterial therapy of chronic wounds, infections of diabetic ulcers, and burns, as well as rapidly spreading and intractable soft-tissue infections caused by resistant bacteria. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Modeling of coherent ultrafast magneto-optical experiments: Light-induced molecular mean-field model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinschberger, Y. [Instituto de Física dos Materiais da Universidade do Porto, Departamento de Física et Astronomia, Rua do campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Hervieux, P.-A. [Institut de Physique et Chimie des Matériaux de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS UMR 7504 BP 43 - F-67034 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-12-28

    We present calculations which aim to describe coherent ultrafast magneto-optical effects observed in time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Our approach is based on a nonlinear semi-classical Drude-Voigt model and is used to interpret experiments performed on nickel ferromagnetic thin film. Within this framework, a phenomenological light-induced coherent molecular mean-field depending on the polarizations of the pump and probe pulses is proposed whose microscopic origin is related to a spin-orbit coupling involving the electron spins of the material sample and the electric field of the laser pulses. Theoretical predictions are compared to available experimental data. The model successfully reproduces the observed experimental trends and gives meaningful insight into the understanding of magneto-optical rotation behavior in the ultrafast regime. Theoretical predictions for further experimental studies are also proposed.

  6. Light- induced electron transfer and ATP synthesis in a carotene synthesizing insect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmalette, Jean Christophe; Dombrovsky, Aviv; Brat, Pierre; Mertz, Christian; Capovilla, Maria; Robichon, Alain

    2012-08-01

    A singular adaptive phenotype of a parthenogenetic insect species (Acyrthosiphon pisum) was selected in cold conditions and is characterized by a remarkable apparition of a greenish colour. The aphid pigments involve carotenoid genes well defined in chloroplasts and cyanobacteria and amazingly present in the aphid genome, likely by lateral transfer during evolution. The abundant carotenoid synthesis in aphids suggests strongly that a major and unknown physiological role is related to these compounds beyond their canonical anti-oxidant properties. We report here that the capture of light energy in living aphids results in the photo induced electron transfer from excited chromophores to acceptor molecules. The redox potentials of molecules involved in this process would be compatible with the reduction of the NAD+ coenzyme. This appears as an archaic photosynthetic system consisting of photo-emitted electrons that are in fine funnelled into the mitochondrial reducing power in order to synthesize ATP molecules.

  7. Improving poor fill factors for solar cells via light-induced plating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing Zhao; Jia Rui; Ding Wuchang; Meng Yanlong; Jin Zhi; Liu Xinyu

    2012-01-01

    Silicon solar cells are prepared following the conventional fabrication processes,except for the metallization firing process.The cells are divided into two groups with higher and lower fill factors,respectively.After light-induced plating (LIP),the fill factors of the solar cells in both groups with different initial values reach the same level.Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images are taken under the bulk silver electrodes,which prove that the improvement for cells with a poor factor after LIP should benefit from sufficient exploitation of the high density silver crystals formed during the firing process.Moreover,the application of LIP to cells with poor electrode contact performance,such as nanowire cells and radial junction solar cells,is proposed.

  8. Laser-induced photo emission detection: data acquisition based on light intensity counting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulianto, N.; Yudasari, N.; Putri, K. Y.

    2017-04-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Detection (LIBD) is one of the quantification techniques for colloids. There are two ways of detection in LIBD: optical detection and acoustic detection. LIBD is based on the detection of plasma emission due to the interaction between particle and laser beam. In this research, the changing of light intensity during plasma formations was detected by a photodiode sensor. A photo emission data acquisition system was built to collect and transform them into digital counts. The real-time system used data acquisition device National Instrument DAQ 6009 and LABVIEW software. The system has been tested on distilled water and tap water samples. The result showed 99.8% accuracy by using counting technique in comparison to the acoustic detection with sample rate of 10 Hz, thus the acquisition system can be applied as an alternative method to the existing LIBD acquisition system.

  9. Visible light induced oxidation of water by rare earth manganites, cobaltites and related oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, B. S.; Gupta, Uttam; Maitra, Urmimala; Rao, C. N. R.

    2014-01-01

    A study of the visible light induced oxidation of water by perovskite oxides of the formula LaMO3 (M = transition metal) has revealed the best activity with LaCoO3 which contains Co3+ in the intermediate-spin (IS) with one eg electron. Among the rare earth manganites, only orthorhombic manganites with octahedral Mn3+ ions exhibit good catalytic activity, but hexagonal manganites are poor catalysts. Interestingly, not only the perovskite rare earth cobaltites but also solid solutions of Co3+ in cubic rare earth sesquioxides exhibit catalytic activity comparable to LaCoO3, the Co3+ ion in all these oxides also being in the IS t2g5eg1 state.

  10. White-light-induced disruption of nanoscale conducting filament in hafnia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Y.; Yew, K. S.; Ang, D. S., E-mail: edsang@ntu.edu.sg; Bera, M. K.; Zhang, H. Z. [Nanyang Technological University, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Kawashima, T. [Nanyang Technological University, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Toshiba Corporation, 33 Shin-Isogo-Cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-0017 (Japan); Bersuker, G. [The Aerospace Corporation, P.O. Box 92957, M2-244, Los Angeles, California 90009-2957 (United States)

    2015-08-17

    Nanoscale conducting filament, which forms the basis of the HfO{sub 2} resistive memory, is shown to exhibit a “negative photoconductivity” behavior, in that, electrical conduction through it can be disrupted upon white-light illumination. This behavior should be contrasted against the positive photoconductivity behavior commonly exhibited by oxides or perovskites having narrower bandgaps. The negative photoconductivity effect may be explained in terms of a photon-induced excitation of surrounding oxygen ions, which leads to migration and subsequent recombination with vacancies in the conducting filament. The finding suggests possible electrical-cum-optical applications for HfO{sub 2}-based devices, whose functionality is limited to-date by electrical stimulation.

  11. Monitoring of transient cavitation induced by ultrasound and intense pulsed light in presence of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazgarnia, Ameneh; Shanei, Ahmad; Shanei, Mohammad Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important challenges in medical treatment is invention of a minimally invasive approach in order to induce lethal damages to cancer cells. Application of high intensity focused ultrasound can be beneficial to achieve this goal via the cavitation process. Existence of the particles and vapor in a liquid decreases the ultrasonic intensity threshold required for cavitation onset. In this study, synergism of intense pulsed light (IPL) and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) has been investigated as a means of providing nucleation sites for acoustic cavitation. Several approaches have been reported with the aim of cavitation monitoring. We conducted the experiments on the basis of sonochemiluminescence (SCL) and chemical dosimetric methods. The acoustic cavitation activity was investigated by determining the integrated SCL signal acquired over polyacrylamide gel phantoms containing luminol in the presence and absence of GNPs in the wavelength range of 400-500 nm using a spectrometer equipped with cooled charged coupled devices (CCD) during irradiation by different intensities of 1 MHz ultrasound and IPL pulses. In order to confirm these results, the terephthalic acid chemical dosimeter was utilized as well. The SCL signal recorded in the gel phantoms containing GNPs at different intensities of ultrasound in the presence of intense pulsed light was higher than the gel phantoms without GNPs. These results have been confirmed by the obtained data from the chemical dosimetry method. Acoustic cavitation in the presence of GNPs and intense pulsed light has been suggested as a new approach designed for decreasing threshold intensity of acoustic cavitation and improving targeted therapeutic effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Light-induced changes in an alkali metal atomic vapor cell coating studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hibberd, A. M.; Bernasek, S. L. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Seltzer, S. J. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Materials Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Balabas, M. V. [Department of Physics, Saint-Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg 198504 (Russian Federation); Morse, M. [Department of Materials Science Engineering, Boise State University, Boise, Idaho 83725 (United States); Budker, D. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-7300 (United States); Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2013-09-07

    The light-induced desorption of Rb atoms from a paraffin coating is studied with depth-profiling X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) using tunable synchrotron radiation. Following Rb exposure, shifts of the C1s signal to higher binding energies, as well as the appearance of lower binding energy components in the O1s region, were observed. These effects were diminished after irradiation with desorbing light. Additionally, following desorbing-light irradiation, changes in the depth-dependent concentration of carbon were observed. These observations offer an insight into the microscopic changes that occur during light-induced atomic desorption and demonstrate the utility of XPS in understanding atom-coating interactions.

  13. Blue and red light-induced germination of resting spores in the red-tide diatom Leptocylindrus danicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikata, Tomoyuki; Iseki, Mineo; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Higashi, Sho-ichi; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Masakatsu

    2011-01-01

    Photophysiological and pharmacological approaches were used to examine light-induced germination of resting spores in the red-tide diatom Leptocylindrus danicus. The equal-quantum action spectrum for photogermination had peaks at about 440 nm (blue light) and 680 nm (red light), which matched the absorption spectrum of the resting spore chloroplast, as well as photosynthetic action spectra reported for other diatoms. DCMU, an inhibitor of photosynthetic electron flow near photosystem II, completely blocked photogermination. These results suggest that the photosynthetic system is involved in the photoreception process of light-induced germination. Results of pharmacological studies of the downstream signal transduction pathway suggested that Ca(2+) influx is the closest downstream neighbor, followed by steps involving calmodulin, nitric oxide synthase, guanylyl cyclase, protein-tyrosine-phosphatase, protein kinase C and actin polymerization and translation.

  14. Myosin Light Chain Kinase (MLCK) Gene Influences Exercise Induced Muscle Damage during a Competitive Marathon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Coso, Juan; Valero, Marjorie; Lara, Beatriz; Salinero, Juan José; Gallo-Salazar, César; Areces, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates the regulatory light chain (RLC) of myosin producing increases in force development during skeletal muscle contraction. It has been suggested that MLCK gene polymorphisms might alter RLC phosphorylation thereby decreasing the ability to produce force and to resist strain during voluntary muscle contractions. Thus, the genetic variations in the MLCK gene might predispose some individuals to higher values of muscle damage during exercise, especially during endurance competitions. The aim of this investigation was to determine the influence of MLCK genetic variants on exercise-induced muscle damage produced during a marathon. Sixty-seven experienced runners competed in a marathon race. The MLCK genotype (C37885A) of these marathoners was determined. Before and after the race, a sample of venous blood was obtained to assess changes in serum myoglobin concentrations and leg muscle power changes were measured during a countermovement jump. Self-reported leg muscle pain and fatigue were determined by questionnaires. A total of 59 marathoners (88.1%) were CC homozygotes and 8 marathoners (11.9%) were CA heterozygotes. The two groups of participants completed the race with a similar time (228 ± 33 vs 234 ± 39 min; P = 0.30) and similar self-reported values for fatigue (15 ± 2 vs 16 ± 2 A.U.; P = 0.21) and lower-limb muscle pain (6.2 ± 1.7 vs 6.6 ± 1.8 cm; P = 0.29). However, CC marathoners presented higher serum myoglobin concentrations (739 ± 792 vs 348 ± 144 μg·mL-1; P = 0.03) and greater pre-to-post- race leg muscle power reduction (-32.7 ± 15.7 vs -21.2 ± 21.6%; P = 0.05) than CA marathoners. CA heterozygotes for MLCK C37885A might present higher exercise-induced muscle damage after a marathon competition than CC counterparts.

  15. Transcriptomic changes arising during light-induced sporulation in Physarum polycephalum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glockner Gernot

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physarum polycephalum is a free-living amoebozoan protist displaying a complex life cycle, including alternation between single- and multinucleate stages through sporulation, a simple form of cell differentiation. Sporulation in Physarum can be experimentally induced by several external factors, and Physarum displays many biochemical features typical for metazoan cells, including metazoan-type signaling pathways, which makes this organism a model to study cell cycle, cell differentiation and cellular reprogramming. Results In order to identify the genes associated to the light-induced sporulation in Physarum, especially those related to signal transduction, we isolated RNA before and after photoinduction from sporulation- competent cells, and used these RNAs to synthesize cDNAs, which were then analyzed using the 454 sequencing technology. We obtained 16,669 cDNAs that were annotated at every computational level. 13,169 transcripts included hit count data, from which 2,772 displayed significant differential expression (upregulated: 1,623; downregulated: 1,149. Transcripts with valid annotations and significant differential expression were later integrated into putative networks using interaction information from orthologs. Conclusions Gene ontology analysis suggested that most significantly downregulated genes are linked to DNA repair, cell division, inhibition of cell migration, and calcium release, while highly upregulated genes were involved in cell death, cell polarization, maintenance of integrity, and differentiation. In addition, cell death- associated transcripts were overrepresented between the upregulated transcripts. These changes are associated to a network of actin-binding proteins encoded by genes that are differentially regulated before and after light induction.

  16. Light-induced activation of class II cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafuji, Asako; Biskup, Till; Hitomi, Kenichi; Getzoff, Elizabeth D; Kaiser, Gebhard; Batschauer, Alfred; Bacher, Adelbert; Hidema, Jun; Teranishi, Mika; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Schleicher, Erik; Weber, Stefan

    2010-05-04

    Light-induced activation of class II cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyases of Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa has been examined by UV/Vis and pulsed Davies-type electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) spectroscopy, and the results compared with structure-known class I enzymes, CPD photolyase and (6-4) photolyase. By ENDOR spectroscopy, the local environment of the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor is probed by virtue of proton hyperfine couplings that report on the electron-spin density at the positions of magnetic nuclei. Despite the amino-acid sequence dissimilarity as compared to class I enzymes, the results indicate similar binding motifs for FAD in the class II photolyases. Furthermore, the photoreduction kinetics starting from the FAD cofactor in the fully oxidized redox state, FAD(ox), have been probed by UV/Vis spectroscopy. In Escherichia coli (class I) CPD photolyase, light-induced generation of FADH from FAD(ox), and subsequently FADH(-) from FADH, proceeds in a step-wise fashion via a chain of tryptophan residues. These tryptophans are well conserved among the sequences and within all known structures of class I photolyases, but completely lacking from the equivalent positions of class II photolyase sequences. Nevertheless, class II photolyases show photoreduction kinetics similar to those of the class I enzymes. We propose that a different, but also effective, electron-transfer cascade is conserved among the class II photolyases. The existence of such electron transfer pathways is supported by the observation that the catalytically active fully reduced flavin state obtained by photoreduction is maintained even under oxidative conditions in all three classes of enzymes studied in this contribution.

  17. Light-induced protein nitration and degradation with HONO emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Meusel

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Proteins can be nitrated by air pollutants (NO2, enhancing their allergenic potential. This work provides insight into protein nitration and subsequent decomposition in the presence of solar radiation. We also investigated light-induced formation of nitrous acid (HONO from protein surfaces that were nitrated either online with instantaneous gas-phase exposure to NO2 or offline by an efficient nitration agent (tetranitromethane, TNM. Bovine serum albumin (BSA and ovalbumin (OVA were used as model substances for proteins. Nitration degrees of about 1 % were derived applying NO2 concentrations of 100 ppb under VIS∕UV illuminated conditions, while simultaneous decomposition of (nitrated proteins was also found during long-term (20 h irradiation exposure. Measurements of gas exchange on TNM-nitrated proteins revealed that HONO can be formed and released even without contribution of instantaneous heterogeneous NO2 conversion. NO2 exposure was found to increase HONO emissions substantially. In particular, a strong dependence of HONO emissions on light intensity, relative humidity, NO2 concentrations and the applied coating thickness was found. The 20 h long-term studies revealed sustained HONO formation, even when concentrations of the intact (nitrated proteins were too low to be detected after the gas exchange measurements. A reaction mechanism for the NO2 conversion based on the Langmuir–Hinshelwood kinetics is proposed.

  18. Low temperature solution process-based defect-induced orange-red light emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Pranab; Baek, Sung-Doo; Hoon Lee, Sang; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Jeong Lee, Su; Il Lee, Tae; Myoung, Jae-Min

    2015-01-01

    We report low-temperature solution-processed p-CuO nanorods (NRs)/n-ZnO NRs heterojunction light emitting diode (LED), exploiting the native point defects of ZnO NRs. ZnO NRs were synthesized at 90 °C by using hydrothermal method while CuO NRs were synthesized at 100 °C by using microwave reaction system. The electrical properties of newly synthesized CuO NRs revealed a promising p-type nature with a hole concentration of 9.64 × 1018 cm−3. The current-voltage characteristic of the heterojunction showed a significantly high rectification ratio of 105 at 4 V with a stable current flow. A broad orange-red emission was obtained from the forward biased LED with a major peak at 610 nm which was attributed to the electron transition from interstitial zinc to interstitial oxygen point defects in ZnO. A minor shoulder peak was also observed at 710 nm, corresponding to red emission which was ascribed to the transition from conduction band of ZnO to oxygen vacancies in ZnO lattice. This study demonstrates a significant progress toward oxide materials based, defect-induced light emitting device with low-cost, low-temperature methods. PMID:26648420

  19. In vitro quantitative light-induced fluorescence to measure changes in enamel mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmür, Rudolf; Giertsen, Elin; van der Veen, Monique H; de Josselin de Jong, Elbert; ten Cate, Jacob M; Guggenheim, Bernhard

    2006-09-01

    A sensitive, quantitative method for investigating changes in enamel mineralization of specimens subjected to in vitro or in situ experimentation is presented. The fluorescence-detecting instrument integrates a Xenon arc light source and an object positioning stage, which makes it particularly suitable for the nondestructive assessment of demineralized or remineralized enamel. We demonstrate the ability of in vitro quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) to quantify changes in mineralization of bovine enamel discs that had been exposed in vitro to a demineralizing gel (n=36) or biofilm-mediated demineralization challenges (n=10), or were carried in situ by three volunteers during a 10-day experiment (n=12). Further experiments show the technique's value for monitoring the extent of remineralization in 36 specimens exposed in vitro to oral multispecies biofilms and document the repeatability of in vitro QLF measurements (n=10) under standardized assay conditions. The validity of the method is illustrated by comparison with transversal microradiography (TMR), the invasive current gold standard for assessing experimental changes in enamel mineralization. Ten discs with 22 measurement areas for comparison demonstrated a positive correlation between TMR and QLF (r=0.82). Filling a technological gap, this QLF system is a promising tool to assay in vitro nondestructively localized changes in mineralization of enamel specimens.

  20. Light-induced negative differential resistance in graphene/Si-quantum-dot tunneling diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong Won; Jang, Chan Wook; Shin, Dong Hee; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Soo Seok; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Sung; Choi, Suk-Ho; Hwang, Euyheon

    2016-01-01

    One of the interesing tunneling phenomena is negative differential resistance (NDR), the basic principle of resonant-tunneling diodes. NDR has been utilized in various semiconductor devices such as frequency multipliers, oscillators, relfection amplifiers, logic switches, and memories. The NDR in graphene has been also reported theoretically as well as experimentally, but should be further studied to fully understand its mechanism, useful for practical device applications. Especially, there has been no observation about light-induced NDR (LNDR) in graphene-related structures despite very few reports on the LNDR in GaAs-based heterostructures. Here, we report first observation of LNDR in graphene/Si quantum dots-embedded SiO2 (SQDs:SiO2) multilayers (MLs) tunneling diodes. The LNDR strongly depends on temperature (T) as well as on SQD size, and the T dependence is consistent with photocurrent (PC)-decay behaviors. With increasing light power, the PC-voltage curves are more structured with peak-to-valley ratios over 2 at room temperature. The physical mechanism of the LNDR, governed by resonant tunneling of charge carriers through the minibands formed across the graphene/SQDs:SiO2 MLs and by their nonresonant phonon-assisted tunneling, is discussed based on theoretical considerations.

  1. Iterative experiment design guides the characterization of a light-inducible gene expression circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruess, Jakob; Parise, Francesca; Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Khammash, Mustafa; Lygeros, John

    2015-06-30

    Systems biology rests on the idea that biological complexity can be better unraveled through the interplay of modeling and experimentation. However, the success of this approach depends critically on the informativeness of the chosen experiments, which is usually unknown a priori. Here, we propose a systematic scheme based on iterations of optimal experiment design, flow cytometry experiments, and Bayesian parameter inference to guide the discovery process in the case of stochastic biochemical reaction networks. To illustrate the benefit of our methodology, we apply it to the characterization of an engineered light-inducible gene expression circuit in yeast and compare the performance of the resulting model with models identified from nonoptimal experiments. In particular, we compare the parameter posterior distributions and the precision to which the outcome of future experiments can be predicted. Moreover, we illustrate how the identified stochastic model can be used to determine light induction patterns that make either the average amount of protein or the variability in a population of cells follow a desired profile. Our results show that optimal experiment design allows one to derive models that are accurate enough to precisely predict and regulate the protein expression in heterogeneous cell populations over extended periods of time.

  2. Light-induced negative differential resistance in graphene/Si-quantum-dot tunneling diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong Won; Jang, Chan Wook; Shin, Dong Hee; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Soo Seok; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Sung; Choi, Suk-Ho; Hwang, Euyheon

    2016-07-01

    One of the interesing tunneling phenomena is negative differential resistance (NDR), the basic principle of resonant-tunneling diodes. NDR has been utilized in various semiconductor devices such as frequency multipliers, oscillators, relfection amplifiers, logic switches, and memories. The NDR in graphene has been also reported theoretically as well as experimentally, but should be further studied to fully understand its mechanism, useful for practical device applications. Especially, there has been no observation about light-induced NDR (LNDR) in graphene-related structures despite very few reports on the LNDR in GaAs-based heterostructures. Here, we report first observation of LNDR in graphene/Si quantum dots-embedded SiO2 (SQDs:SiO2) multilayers (MLs) tunneling diodes. The LNDR strongly depends on temperature (T) as well as on SQD size, and the T dependence is consistent with photocurrent (PC)-decay behaviors. With increasing light power, the PC-voltage curves are more structured with peak-to-valley ratios over 2 at room temperature. The physical mechanism of the LNDR, governed by resonant tunneling of charge carriers through the minibands formed across the graphene/SQDs:SiO2 MLs and by their nonresonant phonon-assisted tunneling, is discussed based on theoretical considerations.

  3. White-Light Electroluminescence with Tetraphenylethylene as Emitting Layer of Aggregation-Induced Emissions Enhancement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗建芳; 王晓宏; 王筱梅; 苏文明; 陶绪堂; 陈志刚

    2012-01-01

    Tetraphenylethylene (TPE) based molecules with easy synthesis, good thermal stability, and especially their aggregation-induced emissions enhancement (AIEE) effect recently become attractive organic emitting materials due to their potentially practical application in OLEDs. Herein, the AIEE behaviors of tetraphenylethylene dyes (TMTPE and TBTPE) were investigated. Fabricated luminesent device using TMTPE dye as emitting layer displays two strong emitting bands: the blue emission coming from the first-step aggregation and the yellow emission attrib- uted to the second-step aggregation. Thus, it can be utilized to fabricate the white-light OLEDs (WOLEDs) of the single-emitting-component. A three-layer device with the brightness of 1200 cd·m^-2 and current efficiency of 0.78 cd·A^-1 emits the close to white light with the CIE coordinates of x=0.333 and y=0.358, when applied voltage from 8-13 V, verifying that the TPE-based dyes of AIEE effect can be effectively applied in single-emitting- component WOLEDs fabrication.

  4. Fractional-topological-charge-induced vortex birth and splitting of light fields on the submicron scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yiqi; Lu, Qinghong; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Wuhong; Chen, Lixiang

    2017-02-01

    The study of vortex dynamics is of fundamental importance in understanding the structured light's propagation behavior in the realm of singular optics. Here, combining with the large-angle holographic lithography in photoresist, a simple experiment to trace and visualize the vortex birth and splitting of light fields induced by various fractional topological charges is reported. For a topological charge M =1.76 , the recorded microstructures reveal that although it finally leads to the formation of a pair of fork gratings, these two vortices evolve asynchronously. More interestingly, it is observed on the submicron scale that high-order topological charges M =3.48 and 3.52, respectively, give rise to three and four characteristic forks embedded in the samples with one-wavelength resolution of about 450 nm. Numerical simulations based on orbital angular momentum eigenmode decomposition support well the experimental observations. Our method could be applied effectively to study other structured matter waves, such as the electron and neutron beams.

  5. Electromagnetically induced transparency of a plasmonic metamaterial light absorber based on multilayered metallic nanoparticle sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Koichi; Tanaka, Daisuke; Degawa, Ryo; Li, Xinheng; Wang, Pangpang; Ryuzaki, Sou; Tamada, Kaoru

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we observed the peak splitting of absorption spectra for two-dimensional sheets of silver nanoparticles due to the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) effect. This unique optical phenomenon was observed for the multilayered nanosheets up to 20 layers on a metal substrate, while this phenomenon was not observed on a transparent substrate. The wavelength and intensities of the split peaks depend on the number of layers, and the experimental results were well reproduced by the calculation of the Transfer-Matrix method by employing the effective medium approximation. The Ag nanosheets used in this study can act as a plasmonic metamaterial light absorber, which has a such large oscillator strength. This phenomenon is a fundamental optical property of a thin film on a metal substrate but has never been observed because native materials do not have a large oscillator strength. This new type of EIT effect using a plasmonic metamaterial light absorber presents the potential for the development of future optic and photonic technologies.

  6. Light-Intensity-Induced Characterization of Elastic Constants and d33 Piezoelectric Coefficient of PLZT Single Fiber Based Transducers

    OpenAIRE

    Jiri Erhart; Frank Jörg Clemens; Lucjan Kozielski

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced functionality of electro-optic devices by implementing piezoelectric micro fibers into their construction is proposed. Lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramics are known to exhibit high light transparency, desirable electro-optic properties and fast response. In this study PLZT fibers with a diameter of around 300 microns were produced by a thermoplastic processing method and their light-induced impedance and piezoelectric coefficient were investigated at relatively...

  7. Comparative analyses of light-induced anthocyanin accumulation and gene expression between the ray florets and leaves in chrysanthemum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yan; Yang, Li-Wen; Li, Meng-Ling; Dai, Si-Lan

    2016-06-01

    Light is one of the key environmental factors that affect anthocyanin biosynthesis. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear, and many problems regarding phenotypic change and corresponding gene regulation have not been solved. In the present study, comparative analyses of light-induced anthocyanin accumulation and gene expression between the ray florets and leaves were performed in Chrysanthemum × morifolium 'Purple Reagan'. After contrasting the variations in the flower color phenotype and relative pigment content, as well as expression patterns of structural and regulator genes responsible for anthocyanin biosynthesis and photoreceptor between different plant organs under light and dark conditions, we concluded that (1) both the capitulum and foliage are key organs responding to light for chrysanthemum coloration; (2) compared with flavones, shading makes a greater decrease on the anthocyanins accumulation; (3) most of the structural and regulatory genes in the light-induced anthocyanin pathway specifically express in the ray florets; and (4) CmCHS, CmF3H, CmF3'H, CmANS, CmDFR, Cm3GT, CmMYB5-1, CmMYB6, CmMYB7-1, CmbHLH24, CmCOP1 and CmHY5 are key genes for light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis in chrysanthemum ray florets, while on the transcriptional level, the expressions of CmPHYA, CmPHYB, CmCRY1a, CmCRY1b and CmCRY2 are insignificantly changed. Moreover, the inferred comprehensive effect of multiple signals on the accumulation of anthocyanins and transmission channel of light signal that exist between the leaves and ray florets were further discussed. These results further our understanding of the relationship between the gene expression and light-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis, and lay foundations for the promotion of the molecular breeding of novel flower colors in chrysanthemums.

  8. Validation of a new design of tellurium dioide-irradiated target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fllaoui, Aziz; Ghamad, Younes; Zoubir, Brahim; Ayaz, Zinel Abidine; El Morabiti, Aissam; Amayoud, Hafid [Centre National de l' Energie des Sciences et des Techniques Nucleaires, Rabat (Morocco); Chakir, El Mahjoub [Nuclear Physics Department, University Ibn Toufail, Kenitra (Morocco)

    2016-10-15

    Production of iodine-131 by neutron activation of tellurium in tellurium dioxide (TeO{sub 2}) material requires a target that meets the safety requirements. In a radiopharmaceutical production unit, a new lid for a can was designed, which permits tight sealing of the target by using tungsten inert gas welding. The leakage rate of all prepared targets was assessed using a helium mass spectrometer. The accepted leakage rate is ≤ 10 - 4 mbr.L/s, according to the approved safety report related to iodine-131 production in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor (TRIGA: Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics). To confirm the resistance of the new design to the irradiation conditions in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor's central thimble, a study of heat effect on the sealed targets for 7 hours in an oven was conducted and the leakage rates were evaluated. The results show that the tightness of the targets is ensured up to 600 .deg. C with the appearance of deformations on lids beyond 450 .deg. C. The study of heat transfer through the target was conducted by adopting a one-dimensional approximation, under consideration of the three transfer modes-convection, conduction, and radiation. The quantities of heat generated by gamma and neutron heating were calculated by a validated computational model for the neutronic simulation of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor using the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code. Using the heat transfer equations according to the three modes of heat transfer, the thermal study of I-131 production by irradiation of the target in the central thimble showed that the temperatures of materials do not exceed the corresponding melting points. To validate this new design, several targets have been irradiated in the central thimble according to a preplanned irradiation program, going from 4 hours of irradiation at a power level of 0.5 MW up to 35 hours (7 h/d for 5 days a week) at 1.5 MW. The results show that the irradiated targets are

  9. Validation of a New Design of Tellurium Dioxide-Irradiated Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Fllaoui

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Production of iodine-131 by neutron activation of tellurium in tellurium dioxide (TeO2 material requires a target that meets the safety requirements. In a radiopharmaceutical production unit, a new lid for a can was designed, which permits tight sealing of the target by using tungsten inert gas welding. The leakage rate of all prepared targets was assessed using a helium mass spectrometer. The accepted leakage rate is ≤ 10−4 mbr.L/s, according to the approved safety report related to iodine-131 production in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor (TRIGA: Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics. To confirm the resistance of the new design to the irradiation conditions in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor's central thimble, a study of heat effect on the sealed targets for 7 hours in an oven was conducted and the leakage rates were evaluated. The results show that the tightness of the targets is ensured up to 600°C with the appearance of deformations on lids beyond 450°C. The study of heat transfer through the target was conducted by adopting a one-dimensional approximation, under consideration of the three transfer modes—convection, conduction, and radiation. The quantities of heat generated by gamma and neutron heating were calculated by a validated computational model for the neutronic simulation of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor using the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code. Using the heat transfer equations according to the three modes of heat transfer, the thermal study of I-131 production by irradiation of the target in the central thimble showed that the temperatures of materials do not exceed the corresponding melting points. To validate this new design, several targets have been irradiated in the central thimble according to a preplanned irradiation program, going from 4 hours of irradiation at a power level of 0.5 MW up to 35 hours (7 h/d for 5 days a week at 1.5 MW. The results show that the irradiated targets are

  10. Light induced heterogeneous ozone processing on the pesticides adsorbed on silica particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socorro, J.; Désert, M.; Quivet, E.; Gligorovski, S.; Wortham, H.

    2013-12-01

    In France, in 2010, the sales of pesticides reached 1.8 billion euros for 61 900 tons of active ingredients, positioning France as a first European consumer of pesticides, as reported by the European Crop Protection Association. About 19 million hectares of crops are sprayed annually with pesticides, i.e., 35% of the total surface area of France. This corresponds to an average pesticide dose of 3.2 kg ha-1. The consumption of herbicide and fungicide is favoured in comparison to the use of insecticides in France and the other European countries, as well. The partitioning of pesticides between the gas and particulate phases influences the atmospheric fate of these compounds such as their photo-chemical degradation. There is much uncertainty concerning the behavior of the pesticides in the atmosphere. Especially, there is a gap of knowledge concerning the degradation of the pesticides induced by heterogeneous reactions in absence and especially in presence of solar light. Considering that most of the pesticides currently used are semi-volatile, it is of crucial importance to investigate the heterogeneous reactivity of particulate pesticides with light and with atmospheric oxidants such as ozone and OH radical. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the light induced heterogeneous ozonation of suspended pesticide particles. 8 pesticides (cyprodinil, deltamethrin, difenoconazole, fipronil, oxadiazon, pendimethalin, permethrin and tetraconazole) were chosen for their physico-chemical properties and their concentration levels in the PACA (Région Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur) region, France. Silica particles with well-known properties were chosen as model particles of atmospheric relevance. Kinetic rate constants were determined to allow estimate the atmospheric lifetimes relating to ozone. The rate constants were determined as follows: k = (6.6 × 0.2) 10-19, (7.2 × 0.3) 10-19, (5.1 × 0.5) 10-19, (3.9 × 0.3) 10-19 [cm3 molecules-1 s-1] for Cyprodinil

  11. The photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue by green semiconductor films that is induced by irradiation by a light emitting diode and visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Chi; Doong, Ruey-An; Chen, Ku-Fan; Chen, Giin-Shan; Tsai, Yung-Pin

    2017-07-24

    This study develops a low-energy rotating photocatalytic contactor (LE-RPC) that has Cu-doped TiO2 films coated on stainless steel rotating disks, to experimentally evaluate the efficiency of the degradation and decolourization of methylene blue (MB) under irradiation from different light sources (visible 430 nm, LED 460 nm and LED 525 nm). The production of hydroxyl radicals is also examined. The experimental results show that the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 that is doped with Cu(2+)is induced by illumination with visible light and a LED. More than 90% of methylene blue at a 10 mg/L concentration is degraded after illumination by visible light (430nm) for 4 hours at 20 rpm. This study also demonstrates that the quantity of hydroxyl radicals that are produced is directly proportional to the light energy intensity. The greater the light energy intensity, the greater is the number of hydroxyl radicals that are produced. The CuO doped anatase TiO2 powder was successfully synthesized in this study by the sol-gel method. The catalytic abilities of the stainless steel film were enhanced in the visible light regions. This study has successfully modified the nano-photocatalytic materials to drop band gap and has also successfully fixed the nano-photocatalytic materials on a substratum to effectively treat dye wastewater in the range of visible light. The results can be useful to the development of a Low-Energy Rotating Photocatalytic Contactor for decontamination purposes.

  12. Local bonding structure of tellurium and antimony in the phase change chalcogenides germanium-antimony-tellurium: A nuclear magnetic resonance study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobela, David C.

    Recent technological applications of some chalcogenide materials, compounds containing a group VI atom, have prompted studies of the local atomic structure of the amorphous phase. In the case of Ge2Sb2Te 5, metastability in the local bonding structure is responsible for its usefulness as a phase-change memory material. There is no consensus on the exact phase-change mechanism, which is partly due to the inadequacy of standard scattering techniques to probe the structure of the amorphous phase. Nuclear magnetic resonance methods, on the other hand, are well suited to study local structural order even in the absence of a periodic lattice. In this technique, structural information is encoded as an oscillating voltage caused by the nuclear spin. For the tellurium isotope, 125Te (spin = 1/2 in the ground state), the dominant interaction comes from the core and valence electrons that carry angular momentum. This interaction is helpful in identifying Te sites of different local coordination since the number of neighboring atoms should markedly change the local electronic structure. The antimony isotope 125Sb has a spin = 5/2 in the ground state and possesses an asymmetric nuclear charge. This quadrupole moment will interact with an electric field gradient at the nuclear site, which is provided by an asymmetric electron cloud surrounding the nucleus. The frequency-space spectra will reflect the strength of the interaction as well as the symmetry of the local electronic environment. This work investigates the nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of 125Te and 125Sb in the crystalline and amorphous forms of several GexSbyTe 1-x-y compounds where 0 arranged such that the constituent elements have enough bonds, on average, to satisfy their valence requirement. The implications of the NMR data on theoretical modeling data are immediate. Theoretical models of these systems must possess some aspect of the "8-n" mentality. With this idea as a foundation for physically realistic

  13. The Effects of Brazilian Green Propolis against Excessive Light-Induced Cell Damage in Retina and Fibroblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Murase

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We investigated the effects of Brazilian green propolis and its constituents against white light- or UVA-induced cell damage in mouse retinal cone-cell line 661W or human skin-derived fibroblast cells (NB1-RGB. Methods. Cell damage was induced by 3,000lx white light for 24 h or 4/10 J/cm2 UVA exposure. Cell viability was assessed by Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide staining or by tetrazolium salt (WST-8 cell viability assay. The radical scavenging activity of propolis induced by UVA irradiation in NB1-RGB cells was measured using a reactive-oxygen-species- (ROS- sensitive probe CM-H2DCFDA. Moreover, the effects of propolis on the UVA-induced activation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK were examined by immunoblotting. Results. Treatment with propolis and two dicaffeoylquinic acids significantly inhibited the decrease in cell viability induced by white light in 661W. Propolis and its constituents inhibited the decrease in cell viability induced by UVA in NB1-RGB. Moreover, propolis suppressed the intracellular ROS production by UVA irradiation. Propolis also inhibited the levels of phosphorylated-p38 and ERK by UVA irradiation. Conclusion. Brazilian green propolis may become a major therapeutic candidate for the treatment of AMD and skin damage induced by UV irradiation.

  14. Submillimetre Network Formation by Light-induced Hybridization of Zeptomole-level DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Takuya; Nishimura, Yushi; Tamura, Mamoru; Nishida, Keisuke; Ito, Syoji; Tokonami, Shiho

    2016-12-01

    Macroscopic unique self-assembled structures are produced via double-stranded DNA formation (hybridization) as a specific binding essential in biological systems. However, a large amount of complementary DNA molecules are usually required to form an optically observable structure via natural hybridization, and the detection of small amounts of DNA less than femtomole requires complex and time-consuming procedures. Here, we demonstrate the laser-induced acceleration of hybridization between zeptomole-level DNA and DNA-modified nanoparticles (NPs), resulting in the assembly of a submillimetre network-like structure at the desired position with a dramatic spectral modulation within several minutes. The gradual enhancement of light-induced force and convection facilitated the two-dimensional network growth near the air-liquid interface with optical and fluidic symmetry breakdown. The simultaneous microscope observation and local spectroscopy revealed that the assembling process and spectral change are sensitive to the DNA sequence. Our findings establish innovative guiding principles for facile bottom-up production via various biomolecular recognition events.

  15. Mechanism of blue-light-induced plasma-membrane depolarization in etiolated cucumber hypocotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, E. P.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    A large, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane precedes the rapid blue-light (BL)-induced growth suppression in etiolated seedlings of Cucumis sativus L. The mechanism of this voltage transient was investigated by applying inhibitors of ion channels and the plasma-membrane H(+)-ATPase, by manipulating extracellular ion concentrations, and by measuring cell input resistance and ATP levels. The depolarizing phase was not affected by Ca(2+)-channel blockers (verapamil, La3+) or by reducing extracellular free Ca2+ by treatment with ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). However, these treatments did reduce the rate of repolarization, indicating an inward movement of Ca2+ is involved. No effects of the K(+)-channel blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA+) were detected. Vanadate and KCN, used to inhibit the H(+)-ATPase, reduced or completely inhibited the BL-induced depolarization. Levels of ATP increased by 11-26% after 1-2 min of BL. Input resistance of trichrome cells, measured with double-barreled microelectrodes, remained constant during the onset of the depolarization but decreased as the membrane voltage became more positive than -90 mV. The results indicate that the depolarization mechanism initially involves inactivation of the H(+)-ATPase with subsequent transient activation of one or more types of ion channels.

  16. Light-induced autofluorescence of animal skin used in tissue optical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, E.; Bliznakova, I.; Troyanova, P.; Avramov, L.

    2007-07-01

    Light-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy provides many possibilities for medical diagnostics needs for differentiation of tissue pathologies including cancer. For the needs of clinical practice scientists collect spectral data from patients in vivo or they study different tumor models to obtain objective information for fluorescent properties of every kind of normal and diseased tissue. Therefore it is very important to find the most appropriate and close to the human skin samples from the point of view of laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy, which will give the possibility for easier transfer of data obtained in animal models to spectroscopic medical diagnostics in humans. In this study are presented some results for in vitro detection of the autofluorescence signals of the animal skin (pig and chicken) with using of LEDs as excitation sources (maximum emission at 365, 375, 385 and 400 nm). The autofluorescence signals from in vivo human skin were also detected for comparison with the models' results. Specific features of the spectra measured are discussed and there are proposed some of the origins of the fluorescence signals obtained. Fluorescence maxima detected are addressed to the typical fluorophores existing in the cutaneous tissues. Influence of main skin absorbers, namely melanin and hemoglobin, is also discussed.

  17. The α-induced thick-target γ-ray yield from light elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, R. K. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics

    1994-10-01

    The α-induced thick-target γ-ray yield from light elements has been measured in the energy range 5.6 MeV ≤ Eα ≤ 10 MeV. The γ-ray yield for > 2.1 MeV from thick targets of beryllium, boron nitride, sodium fluoride, magnesium, aluminum and silicon were measured using the α-particle beam from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories 88 in. cyclotron. The elemental yields from this experiment were used to construct the α-induced direct production γ-ray spectrum from materials in the SNO detector, a large volume ultra-low background neutrino detector located in the Creighton mine near Sudbury, Canada. This background source was an order of magnitude lower than predicted by previous calculations. These measurements are in good agreement with theoretical calculations of this spectrum based on a statistical nuclear model of the reaction, with the gross high energy spectrum structure being reproduced to within a factor of two. Detailed comparison of experimental and theoretical excitation population distribution of several residual nuclei indicate the same level of agreement within experimental uncertainties.

  18. Light-induced cytotoxicity after aminolevulinic acid treatment is mediated by heme and not by iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breusing, Nicolle; Grimm, Stefanie; Mvondo, Dagmar; Flaccus, Andrea; Biesalski, Hans Konrad; Grune, Tilman

    2010-04-02

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising antitumor treatment strategy. However, effectiveness of PDT is limited due to an initiation of rescue responses in tumor cells, including the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Furthermore, the main sources of free radical production in PDT-induced oxidative stress are not clear. Here, human melanoma cells were loaded with the photosensitizer 5-aminolevulinic acid and exposed to non-thermal light of 420-800 nm at different doses. It was shown that inhibition of HO-1 activity by zinc protoporphyrin IX increased PDT-induced cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the cytotoxic effects were not diminished by the simultaneous application of the iron chelator desferrioxamine. Importantly, PDT together with non-toxic doses of hemin increased the number of dead cells. From these results can be concluded that heme but not iron act as the main source of free radicals in PDT treatment. This is supported by the fact that during PDT ferritin is readily up-regulated, able to bind excess iron formed by the HO-1 action. The combined treatment of photosensitizers with HO-1 inhibitors might increase the effectiveness of PDT in tumor treatment.

  19. The {alpha}-induced thick-target {gamma}-ray yield from light elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, R.K. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-10-01

    The {alpha}-induced thick-target {gamma}-ray yield from light elements has been measured in the energy range 5.6 MeV {le} E{sub {alpha}} {le} 10 MeV. The {gamma}-ray yield for > 2.1 MeV from thick targets of beryllium, boron nitride, sodium fluoride, magnesium, aluminum and silicon were measured using the {alpha}-particle beam from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories 88 in. cyclotron. The elemental yields from this experiment were used to construct the {alpha}-induced direct production {gamma}-ray spectrum from materials in the SNO detector, a large volume ultra-low background neutrino detector located in the Creighton mine near Sudbury, Canada. This background source was an order of magnitude lower than predicted by previous calculations. These measurements are in good agreement with theoretical calculations of this spectrum based on a statistical nuclear model of the reaction, with the gross high energy spectrum structure being reproduced to within a factor of two. Detailed comparison of experimental and theoretical excitation population distribution of several residual nuclei indicate the same level of agreement within experimental uncertainties.

  20. Determination of RNA degradation by capillary electrophoresis with cyan light-emitted diode-induced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tzu-Hsueh; Chang, Po-Ling

    2012-05-25

    RNA integrity plays an important role in RNA studies because poor RNA quality may have a great impact on downstream methodologies. This study proposes a cost-effective, rapid, and sensitive method for determining RNA integrity based on capillary electrophoresis that utilizes a cyan light-emitted diode-induced fluorescence as a separation tool. The capillary was initially coated with 0.1% Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (M(ave) 1,300,000 Da) to reduce electroosmotic flow and avoid RNA adsorption. When the capillary was filled with 0.4% poly(ethylene) oxide (M(ave) 4,000,000) and a nucleic acid-specific fluorescent dye, SYTO 9, the baseline separation of the 18S and 28S ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in total RNA was accomplished within 15 min. The lowest detectable concentration for the 18S and 28S rRNAs was estimated to be 50 pg/μL. Some peaks longer than the 28S rRNA that migrated slowly were observed as long as the initial total RNA concentration was optimized. The temperature-induced degradation of the large RNA fragments (longer than the 28S rRNA) was faster than that of 18S rRNA and 28S rRNA. These large RNA fragments may serve as a promising marker for testing RNA integrity compared to the traditional method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Understanding the Solvent Molecules Induced Spontaneous Growth of Uncapped Tellurium Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Liang, Changhao; Zhu, Xiaoguang; Lin, Yue; Zhang, Hao; Wu, Shouliang

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the thermodynamic behavior and growth kinetics of colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) is essential to synthesize materials with desirable structures and properties. In this paper, we present specific uncapped Te colloidal NPs obtained through laser ablation of Te in various protic or aprotic solvents. At ambient temperature and pressure, the uncapped Te NPs spontaneously exhibited analogous evolution and growth of “nanoparticle-nanochain-agglomerate-microsphere” in different solvents. The distinctive growth kinetics of the formation of nanochains strongly depended on the polarity and dielectric constant of solvent molecules. The growth rate of agglomerates and microspheres was closely related to the zeta potential of the colloidal solution of Te nanochains and the average size of Te agglomerates. Furthermore, the resulting uncapped Te NPs and Te nanochains displayed a prominent size-dependent and structure-inherited chemical reductive ability. These findings provide insights into the growth of active uncapped nanoparticles in various dispersion media. This study also provides an alternative route in designing novel nanostructures of alloys, telluride, and functional composites using Te as a unique reactive precursor. PMID:27599448

  2. Springs-neaps cycles in daily total seabed light: Daylength-induced changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, E. M.; Bowers, D. G.; Davies, A. J.

    2014-04-01

    In shallow, tidal seas, daily total seabed light is determined largely by the interaction of the solar elevation cycle, the tidal cycle in water depth, and any temporal variability in turbidity. Since tidal range, times of low water, and often turbidity vary in regular ways over the springs-neaps cycle, daily total seabed light exhibits cycles of the same periodicity. Corresponding cycles are likely to be induced in the daily total primary production of benthic algae and plants, particularly those light-limited specimens occupying the lower reaches of a sub-tidal population. Consequently, this effect is an important control on the growth patterns, depth distribution and survival of, for example, macroalgal forests and seagrass meadows. Seasonal changes in daylength exert an important additional control on these cycles, as they alter the fraction of the tidal and turbidity cycles occurring within daylight hours. Bowers et al. (1997) modelled this phenomenon numerically and predicted that for a site with low water at about midday and midnight at neaps tides, 6 am and 6 pm at springs, daily total seabed light peaks at neaps in winter, but the ‘sense' of the cycle ‘switches' so that it peaks at springs in summer - the longer daylength permits the morning and evening low water springs to contribute substantially to the daily total. Observations for such a site in North Wales (UK), presented in this paper, show that no such ‘switch' occurs, and neaps tides host the largest daily totals throughout the year. The predicted ‘switch' is not observed because turbidity increases generally at spring tides, and specifically at low water springs, both of which were not accounted for in the model. Observations at a second site in Brittany (France), diametrically opposite in terms of the times of low water at neaps and at springs, indicate a peak at springs throughout the year. Analytical tools are developed to calculate the percentage of daily total sea surface irradiance

  3. Comparison of light-induced and laser-induced fluorescence methods for the detection and quantification of enamel demineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Masatoshi; Analoui, Mostafa; Schemehorn, Bruce R.; Stookey, George K.

    1999-05-01

    The Quantitative Laser-Induced Fluorescence (QLF) technique has been sued for diagnosis of early caries in permanent teeth (PT). The objective of this study was to determine the caries quantification ability of QLF in deciduous teeth (DT). Sixty sound teeth, thirty DT and thirty PT, were used. All teeth were cleaned to remove debris and equally divided into three groups. Lesions were created in small windows (0.8x2.0 mm2) on buccal or labial surface for 48, 72, and 96 hr. Lesion images were made with a 488 nm argon laser (QLF I) and then with a 370 +/- 80 nm violet-blue light (QLF II). Both images were analyzed to determine the mean percent change in fluorescence radiance (ΔF). A center section from the lesions was taken for analysis with microradiography. The lesion depth and loss of mineral content were determined. The correlations between ΔF and lesion depth as well as ΔZ in DT were 0.76 and 0.84 with QLF I, 0.81 and 0.88 with QLF II, respectively. It can be concluded the ability of QLF to quantify white-spots in DT is better than in PT.

  4. Amelioration of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice by photobiomodulation induced by 670 nm light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaldeen A Muili

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The approved immunomodulatory agents for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS are only partially effective. It is thought that the combination of immunomodulatory and neuroprotective strategies is necessary to prevent or reverse disease progression. Irradiation with far red/near infrared light, termed photobiomodulation, is a therapeutic approach for inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Data suggests that near-infrared light functions through neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. We sought to investigate the clinical effect of photobiomodulation in the Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE model of multiple sclerosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The clinical effect of photobiomodulation induced by 670 nm light was investigated in the C57BL/6 mouse model of EAE. Disease was induced with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG according to standard laboratory protocol. Mice received 670 nm light or no light treatment (sham administered as suppression and treatment protocols. 670 nm light reduced disease severity with both protocols compared to sham treated mice. Disease amelioration was associated with down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines (interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α and up-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-10 in vitro and in vivo. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies document the therapeutic potential of photobiomodulation with 670 nm light in the EAE model, in part through modulation of the immune response.

  5. Soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. sprouts germinated under red light irradiation induce disease resistance against bacterial rotting disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhika Dhakal

    Full Text Available Specific wavelengths of light can exert various physiological changes in plants, including effects on responses to disease incidence. To determine whether specific light wavelength had effects on rotting disease caused by Pseudomonas putida 229, soybean sprouts were germinated under a narrow range of wavelengths from light emitting diodes (LEDs, including red (650-660, far red (720-730 and blue (440-450 nm or broad range of wavelength from daylight fluorescence bulbs. The controls were composed of soybean sprouts germinated in darkness. After germination under different conditions for 5 days, the soybean sprouts were inoculated with P. putida 229 and the disease incidence was observed for 5 days. The sprouts exposed to red light showed increased resistance against P. putida 229 relative to those grown under other conditions. Soybean sprouts germinated under red light accumulated high levels of salicylic acid (SA accompanied with up-regulation of the biosynthetic gene ICS and the pathogenesis- related (PR gene PR-1, indicating that the resistance was induced by the action of SA via de novo synthesis of SA in the soybean sprouts by red light irradiation. Taken together, these data suggest that only the narrow range of red light can induce disease resistance in soybean sprouts, regulated by the SA-dependent pathway via the de novo synthesis of SA and up-regulation of PR genes.

  6. Soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) sprouts germinated under red light irradiation induce disease resistance against bacterial rotting disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakal, Radhika; Park, Euiho; Lee, Se-Weon; Baek, Kwang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Specific wavelengths of light can exert various physiological changes in plants, including effects on responses to disease incidence. To determine whether specific light wavelength had effects on rotting disease caused by Pseudomonas putida 229, soybean sprouts were germinated under a narrow range of wavelengths from light emitting diodes (LEDs), including red (650-660), far red (720-730) and blue (440-450 nm) or broad range of wavelength from daylight fluorescence bulbs. The controls were composed of soybean sprouts germinated in darkness. After germination under different conditions for 5 days, the soybean sprouts were inoculated with P. putida 229 and the disease incidence was observed for 5 days. The sprouts exposed to red light showed increased resistance against P. putida 229 relative to those grown under other conditions. Soybean sprouts germinated under red light accumulated high levels of salicylic acid (SA) accompanied with up-regulation of the biosynthetic gene ICS and the pathogenesis- related (PR) gene PR-1, indicating that the resistance was induced by the action of SA via de novo synthesis of SA in the soybean sprouts by red light irradiation. Taken together, these data suggest that only the narrow range of red light can induce disease resistance in soybean sprouts, regulated by the SA-dependent pathway via the de novo synthesis of SA and up-regulation of PR genes.

  7. Studies in hydride generation atomic fluorescence determination of selenium and tellurium. Part 1 — self interference effect in hydrogen telluride generation and the effect of KI

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ulivo, A.; Marcucci, K.; Bramanti, E.; Lampugnani, L.; Zamboni, R.

    2000-08-01

    The effects of tetrahydroborate (0.02-1%) and iodide (0-3 M) were investigated in determination of tellurium and selenium by hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry. The effect of tetrahydroborate and iodide concentration were tested on the shape of calibration curves in concentration range of 1-1000 ng ml -1 analyte. Reductant deficiency resulted in a moderate sensitivity depression for tellurium but dramatically reduced the useful dynamic range down to 50 ng ml -1. On the contrary, selenium calibration curves retained a linear character even under conditions generating strong sensitivity depression. Curvature and rollover of tellurium calibration curves has been addressed to a self-interference effect caused by the formation of finely dispersed elemental tellurium. Iodide ions were found to have beneficial or no negative effects in the hydrogen telluride generation. Addition of iodide on-line to the sample has been proved effective in the control of the self-interference effect and allows to work in mild reaction conditions. Moreover, it allows a good control of Cu(II) interference and eliminates Ni(II) and Co(II) interferences. The method has been successfully applied to determination of tellurium in copper and lead ores certified reference materials.

  8. Effect of melatonin on monochromatic light-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation in the thymus of chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fuju; Reheman, Aikebaier; Cao, Jing; Wang, Zixu; Dong, Yulan; Zhang, Yuxian; Chen, Yaoxing

    2016-08-01

    A total of 360 post-hatching day 0 (P0) Arbor Acre male broilers, including intact, sham operation and pinealectomy groups, were exposed to white light (WL), red light (RL), green light (GL) and blue light (BL) from a light-emitting diode (LED) system until for P14. We studied the effects of melatonin and its receptors on monochromatic light-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation in the thymus of broilers. The density of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) cells and the proliferation of T-lymphocytes in response to Concanavalin A (ConA) in GL significantly increased both in vivo and in vitro (from 9.57% to 32.03% and from 34.30% to 50.53%, respectively) compared with other lights (plights (p<0.005). However, exogenous melatonin (10(-9)M) significantly increased the proliferative activity of T-lymphocyte by 9.64% (p=0.002). In addition, GL significantly increased mRNA expression levels of Mel1a, Mel1b and Mel1c receptors from 21.09% to 32.57%, and protein expression levels from 24.43% to 42.92% compared with RL (p<0.05). However, these effects were blocked after pinealectomy. Furthermore, 4P-PDOT (a selective Mel1b antagonist) and prazosin (a selective Mel1c antagonist) attenuated GL-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation in response to ConA (p=0.000). Luzindole (a nonselective Mel1a/Mel1b antagonist), however, did not induce these effects (p=0.334). These results suggest that melatonin may mediate GL-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation via the Mel1b and Mel1c receptors but not via the Mel1a receptor.

  9. High performance supercapacitor and non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor based on tellurium nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Manikandan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tellurium nanoparticles (Te Nps were synthesized by wet chemical method and characterized by XRD, Raman, FESEM, TEM, XPS, UV–Vis and FL. The Nps were coated on graphite foil and Glassy carbon electrode to prepare the electrodes for supercapacitor and biosensor applications. The supercapacitor performance is evaluated in 2 M KOH electrolyte by both Cyclic Voltammetry (CV and galvanostatic charge-discharge method. From charge-discharge method, Te Nps show a specific capacitance of 586 F/g at 2 mA/cm2 and 100 F/g at 30 mA/cm2 as well as an excellent cycle life (100% after 1000 cycles. In addition, the H2O2 sensor performance of Te Nps modified glassy carbon electrode is checked by CV and Chronoamperometry (CA in phosphate buffer solution (PBS. In the linear range of 0.67 to 8.04 μM of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, Te NPs show a high sensitivity of 0.83 mA mM−1 cm−2 with a correlation coefficient of 0.995. The detection limit is 0.3 μM with a response time less than 5 s.

  10. Tellurium-speciation in seawater and accumulation by marine phytoplankton and crustaceans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolan, C.; Whitehead, N.; Teyssie, J.-L. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco-Ville (Monaco). Lab. of Marine Radioactivity)

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the speciation of tellurium (using {sup 129m}Te as a radiotracer) in seawater and the extent of its accumulation by cultures of marine phytoplankton and crustaceans. Tellurite Te(IV) added to distilled water and to sterile filtered seawater was gradually transformed to the tellurate Te(VI) form, whereas Te(IV) tracer added to phytoplankton cultures was almost instantaneously transformed to a neutral form. Accumulation of radiotracer by phytoplankton (Dunaliella tertiolecta and Thallassiosira pseudonana) was moderate and for Dunaliella was greater in static cultures than in those which were actively dividing. Equilibrium concentration factors of 20 and 8 were established respectively after up to seven days' exposure of the herbivorous brine shrimp (Artemia salina) to labelled seawater with and without added phytoplankton. The loss of radionuclide upon transfer to uncontaminated running seawater was extensive and complete after one day, indicating that no true assimilation occurred. Transfer of radioactivity from Artemia salina to a predator, the Monaco shrimp (Lysmata seticaudata), was not observed. (author).

  11. From Selenium- to Tellurium-Based Glass Optical Fibers for Infrared Spectroscopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Lucas

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chalcogenide glasses are based on sulfur, selenium and tellurium elements, and have been studied for several decades regarding different applications. Among them, selenide glasses exhibit excellent infrared transmission in the 1 to 15 µm region. Due to their good thermo-mechanical properties, these glasses could be easily shaped into optical devices such as lenses and optical fibers. During the past decade of research, selenide glass fibers have been proved to be suitable for infrared sensing in an original spectroscopic method named Fiber Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy (FEWS. FEWS has provided very nice and promising results, for example for medical diagnosis. Then, some sophisticated fibers, also based on selenide glasses, were developed: rare-earth doped fibers and microstructured fibers. In parallel, the study of telluride glasses, which can have transmission up to 28 µm due to its atom heaviness, has been intensified thanks to the DARWIN mission led by the European Space Agency (ESA. The development of telluride glass fiber enables a successful observation of CO2 absorption band located around 15 µm. In this paper we review recent results obtained in the Glass and Ceramics Laboratory at Rennes on the development of selenide to telluride glass optical fibers, and their use for spectroscopy from the mid to the far infrared ranges.

  12. Dibromidochlorido{2-[(dimethylaminomethyl]phenyl-κ2N,C1}tellurium(IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakul Rakesh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C9H13Br2ClNTe, was synthesized by reacting [2-(dimethylaminomethylphenyl]tellurium(II chloride with Br2. As a consequence, the Cl and Br atoms are not well ordered but distributed over the three possible positions such that the overall stiochiometry is two Br atoms and one Cl atom. The scrambling of the Br and Cl atoms indicates a small energy barrier for the exchange process between the apical and equatorial positions. Overall, the Te atom geometry is slightly distorted square pyramidal (τ = 0.052 for the major component. However, there is a weak secondary interaction between the Te atoms and the disordered Br/Cl atoms of a nearby molecule. The Te—Br and Te—Cl distances in both disorder components fall into two groups; a longer distance for the Br/Cl involved in this secondary interaction [2.6945 (17 Å for Br and 2.601 (9Å for Cl] and shorter bond distances to the remaining halogen atoms, indicating that this interaction has slightly weakened the Te—X bond, as is the case in the previously reported tribromido structure [Singh et al. (1990. J. Chem. Soc. Dalton Trans. pp. 907–913]. Otherwise, the metrical parameters in the two structures are not significantly different. An intermolecular C—H...Br interaction occurs.

  13. Effect of tellurium addition on the physical properties of germanium selenide glassy semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Katyal, S. C.

    2008-10-01

    Effect of tellurium (Te) addition on the physical properties, density ( ρ), molar volume ( Vm), compactness ( δ), cohesive energy (CE), coordination number ( m), lone pair electrons ( L) and glass transition temperature ( Tg) of Ge 10Se 90-xTe x ( x=0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50) bulk glassy alloy has been investigated. The density of the glassy alloys has been found to increase with the increasing Te content. The molar volume and compactness of the structure of the glass, determined from measured density of the glass, have been found to increase with the increase of Te content. The CE of the investigated samples has been calculated using the chemical bond approach (CBA) and is correlated with decrease in optical band gap with the increase of Te content. The glass transition temperature has been estimated using Tichy-Ticha approach and found to increase with the increase of Te content. This has been observed that the estimated glass transition temperature using Tichy-Ticha approach is not consistent with experimental results.

  14. Effect of tellurium addition on the physical properties of germanium selenide glassy semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Pankaj [Department of Physics, Jaypee University of Information Technology, Waknaghat, Solan, H.P. 173215 (India)], E-mail: pankaj.sharma@juit.ac.in; Katyal, S.C. [Department of Physics, Jaypee University of Information Technology, Waknaghat, Solan, H.P. 173215 (India)

    2008-10-01

    Effect of tellurium (Te) addition on the physical properties, density ({rho}), molar volume (V{sub m}), compactness ({delta}), cohesive energy (CE), coordination number (m), lone pair electrons (L) and glass transition temperature (T{sub g}) of Ge{sub 10}Se{sub 90-x}Te{sub x} (x=0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50) bulk glassy alloy has been investigated. The density of the glassy alloys has been found to increase with the increasing Te content. The molar volume and compactness of the structure of the glass, determined from measured density of the glass, have been found to increase with the increase of Te content. The CE of the investigated samples has been calculated using the chemical bond approach (CBA) and is correlated with decrease in optical band gap with the increase of Te content. The glass transition temperature has been estimated using Tichy-Ticha approach and found to increase with the increase of Te content. This has been observed that the estimated glass transition temperature using Tichy-Ticha approach is not consistent with experimental results.

  15. Large-amplitude chirped coherent phonons in tellurium mediated by ultrafast photoexcited carrier diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaraju, N.; Kumar, Sunil; Anija, M.; Sood, A. K.

    2010-11-01

    We report femtosecond time-resolved reflectivity measurements of coherent phonons in tellurium performed over a wide range of temperatures (3-296 K) and pump-laser intensities. A totally symmetric A1 coherent phonon at 3.6 THz responsible for the oscillations in the reflectivity data is observed to be strongly positively chirped (i.e., phonon time period decreases at longer pump-probe delay times) with increasing photoexcited carrier density, more so at lower temperatures. We show that the temperature dependence of the coherent phonon frequency is anomalous (i.e, increasing with increasing temperature) at high photoexcited carrier density due to electron-phonon interaction. At the highest photoexcited carrier density of ˜1.4×1021cm-3 and the sample temperature of 3 K, the lattice displacement of the coherent phonon mode is estimated to be as high as ˜0.24Å . Numerical simulations based on coupled effects of optical absorption and carrier diffusion reveal that the diffusion of carriers dominates the nonoscillatory electronic part of the time-resolved reflectivity. Finally, using the pump-probe experiments at low carrier density of 6×1018cm-3 , we separate the phonon anharmonicity to obtain the electron-phonon coupling contribution to the phonon frequency and linewidth.

  16. Quantum Molecular Dynamical Calculations of PEDOT 12-Oligomer and its Selenium and Tellurium Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsakiyeva, Amina; Hugosson, Håkan W.; Crispin, Xavier; Delin, Anna

    2016-12-01

    We present simulation results, computed with the Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics method, at zero and ambient temperature (300 K) for poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) [PEDOT] and its selenium and tellurium derivatives PEDOS and PEDOTe, represented as 12-oligomer chains. In particular, we focus on structural parameters such as the dihedral rotation angle distribution, as well as how the charge distribution is affected by temperature. We find that for PEDOT, the dihedral angle distribution shows two distinct local maxima whereas for PEDOS and PEDOTe, the distributions only have one clear maximum. The twisting stiffness at ambient temperature appears to be larger the lighter the heteroatom (S, Se, Te) is, in contrast to the case at 0 K. As regards point charge distributions, they suggest that aromaticity increases with temperature, and also that aromaticity becomes more pronounced the lighter the heteroatom is, both at 0 K and ambient temperature. Our results agree well with previous results, where available. The bond lengths are consistent with substantial aromatic character both at 0 K and at ambient temperature. Our calculations also reproduce the expected trend of diminishing gap between the highest occupied molecular orbital and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital with increasing atomic number of the heteroatom.

  17. From selenium- to tellurium-based glass optical fibers for infrared spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shuo; Chahal, Radwan; Boussard-Plédel, Catherine; Nazabal, Virginie; Doualan, Jean-Louis; Troles, Johann; Lucas, Jacques; Bureau, Bruno

    2013-05-10

    Chalcogenide glasses are based on sulfur, selenium and tellurium elements, and have been studied for several decades regarding different applications. Among them, selenide glasses exhibit excellent infrared transmission in the 1 to 15 µm region. Due to their good thermo-mechanical properties, these glasses could be easily shaped into optical devices such as lenses and optical fibers. During the past decade of research, selenide glass fibers have been proved to be suitable for infrared sensing in an original spectroscopic method named Fiber Evanescent Wave Spectroscopy (FEWS). FEWS has provided very nice and promising results, for example for medical diagnosis. Then, some sophisticated fibers, also based on selenide glasses, were developed: rare-earth doped fibers and microstructured fibers. In parallel, the study of telluride glasses, which can have transmission up to 28 µm due to its atom heaviness, has been intensified thanks to the DARWIN mission led by the European Space Agency (ESA). The development of telluride glass fiber enables a successful observation of CO₂ absorption band located around 15 µm. In this paper we review recent results obtained in the Glass and Ceramics Laboratory at Rennes on the development of selenide to telluride glass optical fibers, and their use for spectroscopy from the mid to the far infrared ranges.

  18. LEACHING OF CADMIUM, TELLURIUM AND COPPER FROM CADMIUM TELLURIDE PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FTHENAKIS,V.

    2004-02-03

    Separating the metals from the glass is the first step in recycling end-of-life cadmium telluride photovoltaic modules and manufacturing scrap. We accomplished this by leaching the metals in solutions of various concentrations of acids and hydrogen peroxide. A relatively dilute solution of sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide was found to be most effective for leaching cadmium and tellurium from broken pieces of CdTe PV modules. A solution comprising 5 mL of hydrogen peroxide per kg of PV scrap in 1 M sulfuric acid, gave better results than the 12 mL H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/kg, 3.2 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution currently used in the industry. Our study also showed that this dilute solution is more effective than hydrochloric-acid solutions and it can be reused after adding a small amount of hydrogen peroxide. These findings, when implemented in large-scale operation, would result in significant savings due to reductions in volume of the concentrated leaching agents (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and of the alkaline reagents required to neutralize the residuals of leaching.

  19. Determination of selenium and tellurium in the gas phase using specific columns and atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muangnoicharoen, S.; Chiou, K.Y.; Manuel, O.K.

    1986-11-01

    Total selenium and tellurium in the gas phase were analyzed after adsorption on gold-coated beads and charcoal. The thermally eluting gas was trapped on columns filled with quartz beads that were cooled in an ice bath. The beads were boiled in dilute HCl, and the resulting solution was analyzed for Se and Te by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Their results demonstrate that gold-coated beads efficiently trap gaseous Se and Te at a low gas flow rate, but at higher flow rates charcoal traps are more expedient. With charcoal traps, it was found that local air samples contain Se in the range of 0.92-3.05 ng m/sup -3/ and Te in the range of 0.10-0.34 ng m/sup -3/. Detection limits down to about 0.1 ng m/sup -3/ allow the ready detection of Se and Te in rural air with a precision of about +/- 6% at the nanogram level of Te and about +/- 4% at the nanogram level of Se.

  20. Effect of aluminum and tellurium tetrachloride addition on the loss of arsenic selenide optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vinh Q.; Drake, Gryphon; Villalobos, Guillermo; Gibson, Daniel; Bayya, Shyam; Kim, Woohong; Baker, Colin; Chin, Geoff; Kung, Frederic H.; Kotov, Mikhail I.; Busse, Lynda; Sanghera, Jasbinder S.

    2017-02-01

    Arsenic selenide glass optical fibers typically possess extrinsic absorption bands in the infrared wavelength regions associated with residual hydrogen and oxygen related impurities, despite using 6N purified elemental precursors. Consequently, special additives and refined processing steps are utilized in an attempt to reduce these and other impurities. We investigate the formation of particulate impurities during a purification process based on the addition of 0.1 wt% elemental aluminum (Al) and 0.2 wt% tellurium tetrachloride (TeCl4) during glass synthesis. It was found that during purification and melting steps, Al reacts with TeCl4 to form AlCl3, which in turn reacts with oxygen and hydrogen impurities and the fused quartz (SiO2) ampoule to produce HCl and stable submicron Al2SiO5 compounds in the As-Se glass and fibers. The intensity of the H-Se absorption band centered at 4.57 μm has been significantly reduced from 18 dB/m to 0.8 dB/m. Using thermodynamic data, we have identified stable Al2SiO5 submicron inclusions in the glass and fibers. A two-step gettering process is proposed as a solution to eliminating these inclusions.

  1. Multi-level modeling of light-induced stomatal opening offers new insights into its regulation by drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhongyao; Jin, Xiaofen; Albert, Réka; Assmann, Sarah M

    2014-11-01

    Plant guard cells gate CO2 uptake and transpirational water loss through stomatal pores. As a result of decades of experimental investigation, there is an abundance of information on the involvement of specific proteins and secondary messengers in the regulation of stomatal movements and on the pairwise relationships between guard cell components. We constructed a multi-level dynamic model of guard cell signal transduction during light-induced stomatal opening and of the effect of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) on this process. The model integrates into a coherent network the direct and indirect biological evidence regarding the regulation of seventy components implicated in stomatal opening. Analysis of this signal transduction network identified robust cross-talk between blue light and ABA, in which [Ca2+]c plays a key role, and indicated an absence of cross-talk between red light and ABA. The dynamic model captured more than 10(31) distinct states for the system and yielded outcomes that were in qualitative agreement with a wide variety of previous experimental results. We obtained novel model predictions by simulating single component knockout phenotypes. We found that under white light or blue light, over 60%, and under red light, over 90% of all simulated knockouts had similar opening responses as wild type, showing that the system is robust against single node loss. The model revealed an open question concerning the effect of ABA on red light-induced stomatal opening. We experimentally showed that ABA is able to inhibit red light-induced stomatal opening, and our model offers possible hypotheses for the underlying mechanism, which point to potential future experiments. Our modelling methodology combines simplicity and flexibility with dynamic richness, making it well suited for a wide class of biological regulatory systems.

  2. Spectral lineshapes of collision-induced absorption (CIA) and collision-induced light scattering (CILS) for molecular nitrogen using isotropic intermolecular potential. New insights and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Kader, M.S.A., E-mail: mohamedsay68@hotmail.com [Department of Engineering Mathematics and Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Giza 12211 (Egypt); Mostafa, S.I. [Department of Engineering Mathematics and Physics, Faculty of Engineering, Giza 12211 (Egypt); Bancewicz, T. [Faculty of Physics, Department of Nonlinear Optics, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Maroulis, G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Patras, GR-26500 Patras (Greece)

    2014-08-31

    Highlights: • We have determined an isotropic intermolecular potential for the interaction of nitrogen. • The thermophysical and transport properties are calculated for this gas. • We have adopted a model for the induced dipole moment μ(r) with adjustable parameters. • The induced trace polarizability model are constructed for scattering. • The quantum lineshapes of absorption and scattering are calculated. - Abstract: The rototranslational collision-induced absorption (CIA) at different temperatures and collision-induced light scattering (CILS) at room temperature of nitrogen gas are analyzed in terms of new isotropic intermolecular potential, multipole-induced dipole functions and interaction-induced pair polarizability models, using quantum spectral lineshape computations. The irreducible spherical form for the induced operator of light scattering mechanisms was determined. The high frequency wings are discussed in terms of the collision-induced rotational Rayleigh effect and estimates for the dipole–octopole polarizability E{sub 4}, is obtained and checked with the ab initio theoretical value. The quality of the present potential has been checked by comparing between calculated and experimental thermo-physical and transport properties over a wide temperature range, which are found to be in good agreement.

  3. Integration of Phot1, Phot2, and PhyB signalling in light-induced chloroplast movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luesse, Darron R; DeBlasio, Stacy L; Hangarter, Roger P

    2010-10-01

    In Arabidopsis thaliana, chloroplasts move towards the periclinal cell walls upon exposure to low blue light intensities and to anticlinal walls under high light. The regulation of these chloroplast movements involves members of both the phototropin and phytochrome families of photoreceptors. Examination of fluence-rate response dependencies in phot1 and phot2 mutants revealed that although both photoreceptors are capable of inducing chloroplast accumulation under low-light conditions, the signals from these photoreceptors appear to be antagonistic. Chloroplast movements in wild-type plants were intermediate between those of the single phot mutants, consistent with each operating through separate signalling cascades. Mutants in phot2 showed transient chloroplast avoidance responses upon exposure to intense blue light, and slow but sustained chloroplast avoidance under intense white light, indicating that in the absence of phot2, phot1 is capable of generating both a low and a high-light response signal. Mutations in phytochrome B (phyB) caused an enhanced avoidance response at intermediate and high light intensities. Examination of phyB, phot1phyB, and phot2phyB mutants indicated that this enhancement is caused by PhyB inhibition of the high-light avoidance response in wild-type plants. In addition, our results suggest that the inhibition by PhyB is not exclusive to either of the phot1 or phot2 signalling pathways.

  4. Roles of iron in light-induced transformations of dissolved organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzberger, B.; Durisch-Kaiser, E.

    2009-04-01

    Light-induced transformations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) play an important role with regard to DOM optical properties and bioavailability and thus carbon cycling. There exist several pathways of DOM phototransformations, depending on DOM chemical composition and on environmental factors such as the presence of iron. In iron-abundant aquatic systems, light-induced transformations of DOM may proceed via photolysis of Fe(III)-DOM complexes and/or via attack by hydroxyl radicals (OH) that are formed in the Fenton reaction (oxidation of Fe(II) by hydrogen peroxide), in addition to direct phototransformation of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), which is part of DOM. This paper will present results from laboratory studies with model systems and natural water samples, combined with mathematical kinetic modeling, that demonstrate the importance of photolysis of Fe(III)-DOM complexes, both in solution and at the surface of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, in overall DOM phototransformations in the presence of iron. Photochemical studies with high-molecular-weight (HMW) and low-molecular-weight (LMW) DOM fractions from both freshwater and marine systems further indicate that LMW compounds are more reactive towards light-induced Fe(II) formation than HMW compounds. This higher reactivity of LMW materials in photochemical reduction of Fe(III) may be rationalized by more efficient photolysis of Fe(III) complexes with LMW ligands, as compared to HMW ligands, possibly due to a higher content of carboxyl functional groups contained in aquatic LMW DOM. Results from a bioavailability study with various DOM fractions from the River Tagliamento, a semi-natural, iron-abundant river in Italy, revealed that photochemical transformations drastically decreased the bioavailability of initially bioreactive LMW compounds, while that of HMW compounds did not change. These findings may be due to the higher photoreactivity of LMW compounds in the presence of iron, as indicated by a higher net

  5. Is light deflected by light ? A proposal to observe a vacuum refractive index gradient induced by intense laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Couchot, F; Guilbaud, O; Kazamias, S; Pittman, M; Sarazin, X; Urban, M

    2016-01-01

    In very intense electromagnetic fields, the vacuum refractive index is expected to be modified due to non linear QED properties. Up to now, these predictions are tested by searching phase shifts in the propagation of polarized light through uniform magnetic fields. We propose a new approach which consists in producing a vacuum index gradient and send a light beam trough it in order to detect its angular deviation. The vacuum index gradient, similar to a "prismatic vacuum", is created by the interaction of two very intense and ultra short laser pulses, used as pump pulses. At the maximum of the index gradient, the deflection angle of the probe pulse is estimated to be $2 \\ 10^{-13} \\times (\\frac{w_0}{10 \\mu\\mathrm{m}})^{-3} \\times \\frac{I}{1 \\mathrm{J}}$ radians, where $I$ is the total energy of the two pump pulses and $w_0$ is the minimum waist (fwhm) at the interaction area of the two pump pulses. Assuming the most intense laser pulses attainable by the LASERIX facility ($I = 25$ J, 30 fs fwhm duration, 800 ...

  6. Mixed polarity in polarization-induced p-n junction nanowire light-emitting diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Santino D; Kent, Thomas F; Phillips, Patrick J; Sarwar, A T M G; Selcu, Camelia; Klie, Robert F; Myers, Roberto C

    2013-07-10

    Polarization-induced nanowire light emitting diodes (PINLEDs) are fabricated by grading the Al composition along the c-direction of AlGaN nanowires grown on Si substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE). Polarization-induced charge develops with a sign that depends on the direction of the Al composition gradient with respect to the [0001] direction. By grading from GaN to AlN then back to GaN, a polarization-induced p-n junction is formed. The orientation of the p-type and n-type sections depends on the material polarity of the nanowire (i.e., Ga-face or N-face). Ga-face material results in an n-type base and a p-type top, while N-face results in the opposite. The present work examines the polarity of catalyst-free nanowires using multiple methods: scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), selective etching, conductive atomic force microscopy (C-AFM), and electroluminescence (EL) spectroscopy. Selective etching and STEM measurements taken in annular bright field (ABF) mode demonstrate that the preferred orientation for catalyst-free nanowires grown by PAMBE is N-face, with roughly 10% showing Ga-face orientation. C-AFM and EL spectroscopy allow electrical and optical differentiation of the material polarity in PINLEDs since the forward bias direction depends on the p-n junction orientation and therefore on nanowire polarity. Specifically, C-AFM reveals that the direction of forward bias for individual nanowire LEDs changes with the polarity, as expected, due to reversal of the sign of the polarization-induced charge. Electroluminescence measurements of mixed polarity PINLEDs wired in parallel show ambipolar emission due to the mixture of p-n and n-p oriented PINLEDs. These results show that, if catalyst-free III-nitride nanowires are to be used to form polarization-doped heterostructures, then it is imperative to understand their mixed polarity and to design devices using these nanowires accordingly.

  7. Photobiomodulation induced by 670 nm light ameliorates MOG35-55 induced EAE in female C57BL/6 mice: a role for remediation of nitrosative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaldeen A Muili

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is the most commonly studied animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS, a chronic autoimmune demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system. Immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive therapies currently approved for the treatment of MS slow disease progression, but do not prevent it. A growing body of evidence suggests additional mechanisms contribute to disease progression. We previously demonstrated the amelioration of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-induced EAE in C57BL/6 mice by 670 nm light-induced photobiomodulation, mediated in part by immune modulation. Numerous other studies demonstrate that near-infrared/far red light is therapeutically active through modulation of nitrosoxidative stress. As nitric oxide has been reported to play diverse roles in EAE/MS, and recent studies suggest that axonal loss and progression of disability in MS is mediated by nitrosoxidative stress, we investigated the effect of 670 nm light treatment on nitrosative stress in MOG-induced EAE. METHODOLOGY: Cell culture experiments demonstrated that 670 nm light-mediated photobiomodulation attenuated antigen-specific nitric oxide production by heterogenous lymphocyte populations isolated from MOG immunized mice. Experiments in the EAE model demonstrated down-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS gene expression in the spinal cords of mice with EAE over the course of disease, compared to sham treated animals. Animals receiving 670 nm light treatment also exhibited up-regulation of the Bcl-2 anti-apoptosis gene, an increased Bcl-2:Bax ratio, and reduced apoptosis within the spinal cord of animals over the course of disease. 670 nm light therapy failed to ameliorate MOG-induced EAE in mice deficient in iNOS, confirming a role for remediation of nitrosative stress in the amelioration of MOG-induced EAE by 670 nm mediated photobiomodulation. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that 670 nm

  8. Laser-induced forward transfer of polymer light-emitting diode pixels with increased charge injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw-Stewart, James; Lippert, Thomas; Nagel, Matthias; Nüesch, Frank; Wokaun, Alexander

    2011-02-01

    Laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) has been used to print 0.6 mm × 0.5 mm polymer light-emitting diode (PLED) pixels with poly[2-methoxy, 5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene] (MEH-PPV) as the light-emitting polymer. The donor substrate used in the LIFT process is covered by a sacrificial triazene polymer (TP) release layer on top of which the aluminium cathode and functional MEH-PPV layers are deposited. To enhance electron injection into the MEH-PPV layer, a thin poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) layer on the Al cathode or a blend of MEH-PPV and PEO was used. These donor substrates have been transferred onto both plain indium tin oxide (ITO) and bilayer ITO/PEDOT:PSS (poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) blend) receiver substrates to create the PLED pixels. For comparison, devices were fabricated in a conventional manner on ITO substrates coated with a PEDOT:PSS hole-transporting layer. Compared to multilayer devices without PEO, devices with ITO/PEDOT:PSS/MEH-PPV:PEO blend/Al architecture show a 100 fold increase of luminous efficiency (LE) reaching a maximum of 0.45 cd/A for the blend at a brightness of 400 cd/m(2). A similar increase is obtained for the polymer light-emitting diode (PLED) pixels deposited by the LIFT process, although the maximum luminous efficiency only reaches 0.05 cd/A for MEH-PPV:PEO blend, which we have attributed to the fact that LIFT transfer was carried out in an ambient atmosphere. For all devices, we confirm a strong increase in device performance and stability when using a PEDOT:PSS film on the ITO anode. For PLEDs produced by LIFT, we show that a 25 nm thick PEDOT:PSS layer on the ITO receiver substrate considerably reduces the laser fluence required for pixel transfer from 250 mJ/cm(2) without the layer to only 80 mJ/cm(2) with the layer.

  9. Visible light induced electron transfer process over nitrogen doped TiO(2) nanocrystals prepared by oxidation of titanium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhongbiao; Dong, Fan; Zhao, Weirong; Guo, Sen

    2008-08-30

    Nitrogen doped TiO(2) nanocrystals with anatase and rutile mixed phases were prepared by incomplete oxidation of titanium nitride at different temperatures. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), core level X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (CL XPS), valence band X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (VB XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-vis DRS), and visible light excited photoluminescence (PL). The photocatalytic activity was evaluated for photocatalytic degradation of toluene in gas phase under visible light irradiation. The visible light absorption and photoactivities of these nitrogen doped TiO(2) nanocrystals can be clearly attributed to the change of the additional electronic (N(-)) states above the valence band of TiO(2) modified by N dopant as revealed by the VB XPS and visible light induced PL. A band gap structure model was established to explain the electron transfer process over nitrogen doped TiO(2) nanocrystals under visible light irradiation, which was consistent with the previous theoretical and experimental results. This model can also be applied to understand visible light induced photocatalysis over other nonmetal doped TiO(2).

  10. Light-induced retinal injury enhanced neurotrophins secretion and neurotrophic effect of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate neurotrophins expression and neurotrophic effect change in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs under different types of stimulation. METHODS: Rats were exposed in 10,000 lux white light to develop light-induced retinal injury. Supernatants of homogenized retina (SHR, either from normal or light-injured retina, were used to stimulate MSCs. Quantitative real time for polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA were conducted for analysis the expression change in basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF in MSCs after stimulation. Conditioned medium from SHR-stimulated MSCs and control MSCs were collected for evaluation their effect on retinal explants. RESULTS: Supernatants of homogenized retina from light-injured rats significantly promoted neurotrophins secretion from MSCs (p<0.01. Conditioned medium from mesenchymal stem cells stimulated by light-injured SHR significantly reduced DNA fragmentation (p<0.01, up-regulated bcl-2 (p<0.01 and down-regulated bax (p<0.01 in retinal explants, displaying enhanced protective effect. CONCLUSIONS: Light-induced retinal injury is able to enhance neurotrophins secretion from mesenchymal stem cells and promote the neurotrophic effect of mesenchymal stem cells.

  11. Antioxidant properties of green tea extract protect reduced fat soft cheese against oxidation induced by light exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huvaere, Kevin; Nielsen, Jacob Holm; Bakman, Mette

    2011-01-01

    The effect of two different antioxidants, EDTA and green tea extract (GTE), used individually or in combination, on the light-induced oxidation of reduced fat soft cheeses (0.2 and 6% fat) was investigated. In samples with 0.2% fat, lipid hydroperoxides as primary lipid oxidation products were...

  12. Photoinduced charge carriers in conjugated polymer-fullerene composites studied with light-induced electron-spin resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyakonov, V.; Zoriniants, G.; Scharber, M.C.; Brabec, C.J.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Hummelen, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Detailed studies on photoinduced spins in conjugated polymer/fullerene composites using (cw) light-induced electron-spin-resonance (LESR) technique are reported. Two overlapping LESR lines are observed, from positive polarons on the polymer chains and negative charges on the fullerene moieties.

  13. Difunctionalization of Alkenes via the Visible-Light-Induced Trifluoromethylarylation/1,4-Aryl Shift/Desulfonylation Cascade Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lewei; Yang, Chao; Xu, ZhaoZhong; Gao, Fei; Xia, Wujiong

    2015-06-05

    A novel visible-light-induced trifluoromethylarylation/1,4-aryl shift/desulfonylation cascade reaction using CF3SO2Cl as CF3 source was described. The protocol provides an efficient approach for the synthesis of α-aryl-β-trifluoromethyl amides and/or CF3-containing oxindoles as well as the isoquinolinediones under benign conditions.

  14. Light-induced space-charge fields for the structuration of dielectric materials; Lichtinduzierte Raumladungsfelder zur Strukturierung dielektrischer Materialien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggert, H.A.

    2006-11-15

    Light-induced space-charge fields in lithium-niobate crystals are used for patterning of dielectric materials. This includes tailored ferroelectric domains in the bulk of the crystal, different sorts of micro and nanoparticles on a crystal surface, as well as poling of electrooptic chromophores. A stochastical model is introduced, which can describe the spatial inhomogeneous domain inversion. (orig.)

  15. Photoinduced charge carriers in conjugated polymer-fullerene composites studied with light-induced electron-spin resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyakonov, V.; Zoriniants, G.; Scharber, M.C.; Brabec, C.J.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Hummelen, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    Detailed studies on photoinduced spins in conjugated polymer/fullerene composites using (cw) light-induced electron-spin-resonance (LESR) technique are reported. Two overlapping LESR lines are observed, from positive polarons on the polymer chains and negative charges on the fullerene moieties. Micr

  16. Photoinduced charge carriers in conjugated polymer–fullerene composites studied with light-induced electron-spin resonance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyakonov, V.; Zoriniants, G.; Scharber, M.; Brabec, C.J.; Janssen, R.A.J.; Hummelen, J.C.; Sariciftci, N.S.

    1999-01-01

    Detailed studies on photoinduced spins in conjugated polymer/fullerene composites using (cw) light-induced electron-spin-resonance (LESR) technique are reported. Two overlapping LESR lines are observed, from positive polarons on the polymer chains and negative charges on the fullerene moieties. Micr

  17. SIMULATION OF THE LIGHT-INDUCED OSCILLATIONS OF THE MEMBRANE-POTENTIAL IN POTAMOGETON LEAF-CELLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MIEDEMA, H; PRINS, HBA

    1993-01-01

    An attempt has been made to simulate the light-induced oscillations of the membrane potential of Potamogeton lucens leaf cells in relation to the apoplastic pH changes. Previously it was demonstrated that the membrane potential of these cells can be described in terms of proton movements only. It is

  18. Correlating in Vitro and in Vivo Activities of Light-Inducible Dimers: A Cellular Optogenetics Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Ryan A; Zimmerman, Seth P; Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Bear, James E; Kuhlman, Brian

    2016-01-15

    Light-inducible dimers are powerful tools for cellular optogenetics, as they can be used to control the localization and activity of proteins with high spatial and temporal resolution. Despite the generality of the approach, application of light-inducible dimers is not always straightforward, as it is frequently necessary to test alternative dimer systems and fusion strategies before the desired biological activity is achieved. This process is further hindered by an incomplete understanding of the biophysical/biochemical mechanisms by which available dimers behave and how this correlates to in vivo function. To better inform the engineering process, we examined the biophysical and biochemical properties of three blue-light-inducible dimer variants (cryptochrome2 (CRY2)/CIB1, iLID/SspB, and LOVpep/ePDZb) and correlated these characteristics to in vivo colocalization and functional assays. We find that the switches vary dramatically in their dark and lit state binding affinities and that these affinities correlate with activity changes in a variety of in vivo assays, including transcription control, intracellular localization studies, and control of GTPase signaling. Additionally, for CRY2, we observe that light-induced changes in homo-oligomerization can have significant effects on activity that are sensitive to alternative fusion strategies.

  19. Direct characterization of ultraviolet-light-induced refractive index structures by scanning near-field optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael; Madsen, S.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher;

    1998-01-01

    We have applied a reflection scanning near-field optical microscope to directly probe ultraviolet (UV)-light-induced refractive index structures in planar glass samples. This technique permits direct comparison between topography and refractive index changes (10(-5)-10(-3)) with submicrometer...

  20. Tumour cell death induced by the bulk photovoltaic effect of LiNbO3:Fe under visible light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez-Castro, Alfonso; Stockert, Juan C; López-Arias, Begoña; Juarranz, Angeles; Agulló-López, Fernando; García-Cabañes, Angel; Carrascosa, Mercedes

    2011-06-01

    This work reports a pioneer application of the bulk photovoltaic effect in the biomedical field. Massive necrotic cell death was induced in human tumour cell cultures grown on a bulk photovoltaic material (iron-doped lithium niobate, LiNbO(3):Fe) after irradiation with visible light. Lethal doses (≈100% cell death) were obtained with low-intensity visible light sources (10-100 mW cm(-2) irradiances) and short exposure times of the order of minutes. The wavelength dependence to induce the lethal effect observed is consistent with that corresponding to the bulk photovoltaic effect generation in LiNbO(3):Fe. Necrosis also occurred when cultured tumour cells were exposed to LiNbO(3):Fe microparticles and visible light.

  1. Sensing nanometric displacement of a micro-/nano-fiber induced by optical forces by use of white light interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Weiqia; Huang, Hankai; Yu, Jianhui; Dong, Huazhuo; Chen, Zhe; Lu, Huihui

    2015-07-01

    Sensing the nanometric displacement of a micro-/nano-fiber induced by optical forces is a key technology to study optical forces and optical momentum. When the gap between a micro-/nano-fiber and glass substrate becomes down to micrometer scale or less, a white light interference was observed. The gap changes when optical force arising from the propagating pump light along the micro-/nano-fiber causes a transversal nanometric displacement of a micro-/nanofiber, resulting in movement of the interferometric fringes. Therefore this movement of the interferometric fringes can be used to sense the nanometric displacement of the micro-/nano-fiber induced by optical forces. Experimental results show that the resolutions of this method can reach 7.27nm/pixel for tilted angle 0.8o between the micro-/nano-fiber and substrate. It is concluded that the white light interferometry method is suitable for measuring the weak optical force.

  2. Light-induced conformational changes of the chromophore and the protein in phytochromes: bacterial phytochromes as model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheerer, Patrick; Michael, Norbert; Park, Jung Hee; Nagano, Soshichiro; Choe, Hui-Woog; Inomata, Katsuhiko; Borucki, Berthold; Krauss, Norbert; Lamparter, Tilman

    2010-04-26

    Recombinant phytochromes Agp1 and Agp2 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens are used as model phytochromes for biochemical and biophysical studies. In biliverdin binding phytochromes the site for covalent attachment of the chromophore lies in the N-terminal region of the protein, different from plant phytochromes. The issue which stereochemistry the chromophore adopts in the so-called Pr and Pfr forms is addressed by using a series of locked chromophores which form spectrally characteristic adducts with Agp1 and Agp2. Studies on light-induced conformational changes of Agp1 give an insight into how the intrinsic histidine kinase is modulated by light. Comparison of the crystal structure of an Agp1 fragment with other phytochrome crystal structures supports the idea that a light induced rearrangement of subunits within the homodimer modulates the activity of the kinase.

  3. Light induced oxidative water splitting in photosynthesis: energetics, kinetics and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renger, Gernot

    2011-01-01

    The essential steps of photosynthetic water splitting take place in Photosystem II (PSII) and comprise three different reaction sequences: (i) light induced formation of the radical pair P680(+)Q(A)(-), (ii) P680(+) driven oxidative water splitting into O(2) and four protons, and (iii) two step plastoquinone reduction to plastoquinol by Q(A)(-). This mini-review briefly summarizes our state of knowledge on energetics, kinetics and mechanism of oxidative water splitting. Essential features of the two types of reactions involved are described: (a) P680(+) reduction by the redox active tyrosine Y(z) and (b) sequence of oxidation steps induced by Y(z)(ox) in the water-oxidizing complex (WOC). The rate of the former reaction is limited by the non-adiabatic electron transfer (NET) step and the multi-phase kinetics shown to originate from a sequence of relaxation processes. In marked contrast, the rate of the stepwise oxidation by Y(z)(ox) of the WOC up to the redox level S(3) is not limited by NET but by trigger reactions which probably comprise proton shifts and/or conformational changes. The overall rate of the final reaction sequence leading to formation and release of O(2) is assumed to be limited by the electron transfer step from the S(3) state of WOC to Y(z)(ox) due to involvement of an endergonic redox equilibrium. Currently discussed controversial ideas on possible pathways are briefly outlined. Several crucial points of the mechanism of oxidative water splitting, like O-O bond formation, role of local proton shift(s), details of hydrogen bonding, are still not clarified and remain a challenging topic of future research.

  4. Heat-Stress and Light-Stress Induce Different Cellular Pathologies in the Symbiotic Dinoflagellate during Coral Bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, C. A.; McDougall, Kathleen E.; Woodley, Cheryl M.; Fauth, John E.; Richmond, Robert H.; Kushmaro, Ariel; Gibb, Stuart W.; Loya, Yossi; Ostrander, Gary K.; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching is a significant contributor to the worldwide degradation of coral reefs and is indicative of the termination of symbiosis between the coral host and its symbiotic algae (dinoflagellate; Symbiodinium sp. complex), usually by expulsion or xenophagy (symbiophagy) of its dinoflagellates. Herein, we provide evidence that during the earliest stages of environmentally induced bleaching, heat stress and light stress generate distinctly different pathomorphological changes in the chloroplasts, while a combined heat- and light-stress exposure induces both pathomorphologies; suggesting that these stressors act on the dinoflagellate by different mechanisms. Within the first 48 hours of a heat stress (32°C) under low-light conditions, heat stress induced decomposition of thylakoid structures before observation of extensive oxidative damage; thus it is the disorganization of the thylakoids that creates the conditions allowing photo-oxidative-stress. Conversely, during the first 48 hours of a light stress (2007 µmoles m−2 s−1 PAR) at 25°C, condensation or fusion of multiple thylakoid lamellae occurred coincidently with levels of oxidative damage products, implying that photo-oxidative stress causes the structural membrane damage within the chloroplasts. Exposure to combined heat- and light-stresses induced both pathomorphologies, confirming that these stressors acted on the dinoflagellate via different mechanisms. Within 72 hours of exposure to heat and/or light stresses, homeostatic processes (e.g., heat-shock protein and anti-oxidant enzyme response) were evident in the remaining intact dinoflagellates, regardless of the initiating stressor. Understanding the sequence of events during bleaching when triggered by different environmental stressors is important for predicting both severity and consequences of coral bleaching. PMID:24324575

  5. Heat-stress and light-stress induce different cellular pathologies in the symbiotic dinoflagellate during coral bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, C A; McDougall, Kathleen E; Woodley, Cheryl M; Fauth, John E; Richmond, Robert H; Kushmaro, Ariel; Gibb, Stuart W; Loya, Yossi; Ostrander, Gary K; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching is a significant contributor to the worldwide degradation of coral reefs and is indicative of the termination of symbiosis between the coral host and its symbiotic algae (dinoflagellate; Symbiodinium sp. complex), usually by expulsion or xenophagy (symbiophagy) of its dinoflagellates. Herein, we provide evidence that during the earliest stages of environmentally induced bleaching, heat stress and light stress generate distinctly different pathomorphological changes in the chloroplasts, while a combined heat- and light-stress exposure induces both pathomorphologies; suggesting that these stressors act on the dinoflagellate by different mechanisms. Within the first 48 hours of a heat stress (32°C) under low-light conditions, heat stress induced decomposition of thylakoid structures before observation of extensive oxidative damage; thus it is the disorganization of the thylakoids that creates the conditions allowing photo-oxidative-stress. Conversely, during the first 48 hours of a light stress (2007 µmoles m(-2) s(-1) PAR) at 25°C, condensation or fusion of multiple thylakoid lamellae occurred coincidently with levels of oxidative damage products, implying that photo-oxidative stress causes the structural membrane damage within the chloroplasts. Exposure to combined heat- and light-stresses induced both pathomorphologies, confirming that these stressors acted on the dinoflagellate via different mechanisms. Within 72 hours of exposure to heat and/or light stresses, homeostatic processes (e.g., heat-shock protein and anti-oxidant enzyme response) were evident in the remaining intact dinoflagellates, regardless of the initiating stressor. Understanding the sequence of events during bleaching when triggered by different environmental stressors is important for predicting both severity and consequences of coral bleaching.

  6. CHUP1 mediates actin-based light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usami, Hiroka; Maeda, Takuma; Fujii, Yusuke; Oikawa, Kazusato; Takahashi, Fumio; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu; Kasahara, Masahiro

    2012-12-01

    Chloroplasts change their intracellular distribution in response to light intensity. CHUP1 (CHLOROPLAST UNUSUAL POSITIONING1) is indispensable for this response in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, involvement of CHUP1 in light-induced chloroplast movement is unknown in other plants. In this study, CHUP1 orthologues were isolated from a moss, Physcomitrella patens, and a fern, Adiantum capillus-veneris, by cDNA library screening and PCR cloning based on the P. patens genome sequence. Functional motifs found in CHUP1 of A. thaliana were conserved among the CHUP1 orthologues. In addition to the putative functional regions, the C-terminal regions (approximately 250 amino acids), which are unique in CHUP1s, were highly conserved. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions of P. patens CHUP1s (PpCHUP1A, PpCHUP1B and PpCHUP1C) were transiently expressed in protoplast cells. All GFP fusions were localized on the chloroplasts. Light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement of chup1 disruptants of P. patens was examined in the presence of cytoskeletal inhibitors because of the utilization of both microtubules and actin filaments for the movement in P. patens. When actin filaments were disrupted by cytochalasin B, the wild type (WT) and all chup1 disruptants showed chloroplast avoidance movement. However, when microtubules were disrupted by Oryzalin, chloroplasts in ∆chup1A and ∆chup1A/B rarely moved and stayed in the strong light-irradiated area. On the other hand, WT, ∆chup1B and ∆chup1C showed chloroplast avoidance movement. These results suggest that PpCHUP1A predominantly mediates the actin-based light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement. This study reveals that CHUP1 functions on the chloroplasts and is involved in the actin-based light-induced chloroplast avoidance movement in P. patens.

  7. Heat-stress and light-stress induce different cellular pathologies in the symbiotic dinoflagellate during coral bleaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C A Downs

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching is a significant contributor to the worldwide degradation of coral reefs and is indicative of the termination of symbiosis between the coral host and its symbiotic algae (dinoflagellate; Symbiodinium sp. complex, usually by expulsion or xenophagy (symbiophagy of its dinoflagellates. Herein, we provide evidence that during the earliest stages of environmentally induced bleaching, heat stress and light stress generate distinctly different pathomorphological changes in the chloroplasts, while a combined heat- and light-stress exposure induces both pathomorphologies; suggesting that these stressors act on the dinoflagellate by different mechanisms. Within the first 48 hours of a heat stress (32°C under low-light conditions, heat stress induced decomposition of thylakoid structures before observation of extensive oxidative damage; thus it is the disorganization of the thylakoids that creates the conditions allowing photo-oxidative-stress. Conversely, during the first 48 hours of a light stress (2007 µmoles m(-2 s(-1 PAR at 25°C, condensation or fusion of multiple thylakoid lamellae occurred coincidently with levels of oxidative damage products, implying that photo-oxidative stress causes the structural membrane damage within the chloroplasts. Exposure to combined heat- and light-stresses induced both pathomorphologies, confirming that these stressors acted on the dinoflagellate via different mechanisms. Within 72 hours of exposure to heat and/or light stresses, homeostatic processes (e.g., heat-shock protein and anti-oxidant enzyme response were evident in the remaining intact dinoflagellates, regardless of the initiating stressor. Understanding the sequence of events during bleaching when triggered by different environmental stressors is important for predicting both severity and consequences of coral bleaching.

  8. Efficient light harvesting of a luminescent solar concentrator using excitation energy transfer from an aggregation-induced emitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banal, James L; Ghiggino, Kenneth P; Wong, Wallace W H

    2014-12-14

    The compromise between light absorption and reabsorption losses limits the potential light conversion efficiency of luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). Current approaches do not fully address both issues. By using the excitation energy transfer (EET) strategy with a donor chromophore that exhibits aggregation-induced emission (AIE) behaviour, it is shown that both transmission and reabsorption losses can be minimized in a LSC device achieving high light collection and concentration efficiencies. The light harvesting performance of the LSC developed has been characterized using fluorescence quantum yield measurements and Monte Carlo ray tracing simulations. Comparative incident photon conversion efficiency and short-circuit current data based on the LSC coupled to a silicon solar cell provide additional evidence for improved performance.

  9. The effects of taurine on vigabatrin, high light intensity and mydriasis induced retinal toxicity in the pigmented rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Allan D; Truchot, Nathalie; Pickersgill, Nigel; Thale, Zia Irene; Rosolen, Serge G; Botteron, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    The overall purpose of this study was to establish a model that may be used for examining the effect of Vigabatrin-induced retinal toxicity in pigmented rats, and subsequently examine the possible effects of taurine on the retinal toxicity. In the first part of the study, pigmented Long Evans rats were subjected to combinations of induced mydriasis, low/high light intensities (40/2000 lx) and oral administration of near-MTD (Maximum Tolerated Dose) doses (200 mg/kg/day) of Vigabatrin for up to 6 weeks. The combination of mydriasis and high light intensity applied to Long Evans rats resulted in retinal damage that was increased by the administration of Vigabatrin. In the second part of the study Long Evans rats were subjected to combinations of induced mydriasis and high/low light intensity (40/2000 lx) while being orally administered low (30 mg/kg/day) or high (200 mg/kg/day) doses of Vigabatrin for up to 6 weeks. In addition, selected groups of animals were administered taurine via the drinking water (20 mg/ml), resulting in systemic taurine concentrations of approximately threefold the endogenous concentration. The combined results of the studies demonstrate that retinal damage can be induced in pigmented animals when combining mydriasis and high light intensity. Retinal damage was functionally evaluated by electroretinography (ERG), then confirmed by histopathology. While depending on mydriasis and high light intensity, administration of Vigabatrin increased the retinal toxicity and resulted in the formation of rosette-like structures in the retina in a dose-related manner. Administration of taurine did not alleviate the Vigabatrin-induced retinal toxicity, as demonstrated either functionally by ERG or morphologically, although systemic concentrations of 3-fold the endogenous levels were reached, and it was thus not possible to demonstrate a protective effect of taurine in these pigmented animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Neonates with sickle cell disease are vulnerable to blue light phototherapy-induced oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine elevations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Hemakshi; Goyal, Sameer; Patil, Chandragouda

    2016-11-01

    Sickle cell disease is a frequent genetic anomaly characterized by altered molecular structure of hemoglobin resulting into crescent-like deformation of the red blood corpuscles. Neonatal jaundice is a frequent co-morbidity in sickle cell disease. Phototherapy induces isomerization of bilirubin rendering it extractable through urine and hence it is used as a routine treatment of neonatal jaundice. An exposure to light phototherapy as a treatment of neonatal jaundice induces oxidative stress. It is hypothesized that such exposure of neonates with sickle cell disease to the blue light phototherapy as a treatment of neonatal jaundice induces severe oxidative stress and increases the levels of proinflammatory cytokines. This hypothesis is supported with two case studies of sickle cell disease suffering neonates who were exposed to blue light phototherapy to treat jaundice. In both these cases, exposure to phototherapy induced oxidative stress (increased lipid peroxidation and superoxide dismutase, slight change in activity of catalase and GSH) and elevated the levels of proinflammatory cytokine (TNFα, IL-1, and IL-6) in the sickle cell disease suffering neonates. These observations warrant further investigations to determine the consequences and clinical significance of the blue phototherapy-induced oxidative and proinflammatory stress in Sickle cell disease suffering neonates exposed to phototherapy as a treatment of jaundice.

  11. Diffusion voltage in polymer light emitting diodes measured with electric field induced second harmonic generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristensen, P.K.; Rafaelsen, J.; Pedersen, T.G.; Pedersen, K. [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Aalborg University, Pontoppidanstraede 103, 9220 Aalborg East (Denmark)

    2005-12-01

    We apply electric field induced second harmonic (EFISH) to polymer light emitting diodes (PLEDs) and demonstrate the ability to determine the diffusion voltage in PLED devices. The EFISH signal is proportional to the square of the effective field, which is the sum of the diffusion voltage and the applied voltage. By minimizing the EFISH-signal as a function of the applied voltage, the diffusion voltage is determined by measuring the applied voltage that cancels out the diffusion voltage. The PLEDs are fabricated with indium tin oxide (ITO) as the hole injecting contact and two different electron injecting contacts, namely aluminum and calcium. The diffusion voltage originates from the rearranged charges caused by the difference in Fermi levels in the materials in the PLEDs. Different contacts will thus cause different diffusion voltages. We demonstrate here that the EFISH signal is proportional to the square of the effective field in both reverse and forward bias, and discuss the dependence on contact materials. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Understanding Light-Induced Degradation of c-Si Solar Cells: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopori, B.; Basnyat, P.; Devayajanam, S.; Shet, S.; Mehta, V.; Binns, J.; Appel, J.

    2012-06-01

    We discuss results of our investigations toward understanding bulk and surface components of light-induced degradation (LID) in low-Fe c-Si solar cells. The bulk effects, arising from boron-oxygen defects, are determined by comparing degradation of cell parameters and their thermal recovery, with that of the minority-carrier lifetime (964;) in sister wafers. We found that the recovery of 964; in wafers takes a much longer annealing time compared to that of the cell. We also show that cells having SiN:H coating experience a surface degradation (ascribed to surface recombination). The surface LID is seen as an increase in the q/2kT component of the dark saturation current (J02). The surface LID does not recover fully upon annealing and is attributed to degradation of the SiN:H-Si interface. This behavior is also exhibited by mc-Si cells that have very low oxygen content and do not show any bulk degradation.

  13. Light-induced vibration characteristics of free-standing carbon nanotube films fabricated by vacuum filtration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Junying; Zhu, Yong, E-mail: yongzhu@cqu.edu.cn; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Jie [The Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and System, Education Ministry of China, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400044 (China); Wang, Xin [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, 610054 (China)

    2014-07-14

    In this paper, we fabricated carbon nanotube (CNT) films with different thickness by vacuum filtration method, and the films were separated from Mixed Cellulose Ester membranes with burn-off process. The thickness of CNT films with different concentrations of CNTs 50 mg, 100 mg, 150 mg, and 200 mg are 10.36 μm, 20.90 μm, 30.19 μm, and 39.98 μm respectively. The CNT bundles are homogeneously distributed and entangled with each other, and still maintain 2D continuous network structures after burn-off process. The optical absorptivity of the films is between 84% and 99% at wavelengths ranging from 400 nm to 2500 nm. Vibration characteristics were measured with the Fabry-Perot (F-P) interferometer vibration measurement system. CNT films vibrate only under the xenon light irradiating perpendicularly to the surface. Vibration recorded by Fabry-Perot interferometer is considered to be caused by the time-dependent thermal moment, which is due to the temperature differences of two sides of CNT films. The vibration frequency spectrums between 0.1 ∼ 0.5 Hz were obtained by the Fast Fourier Transform spectra from time domain to frequency domain, and showed a linear relationship with films thickness, which is in accordance with theoretical model of thermal induced vibration.

  14. Light-induced hetero-Diels-Alder cycloaddition: a facile and selective photoclick reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Selvanathan; Popik, Vladimir V

    2011-04-13

    2-Napthoquinone-3-methides (oNQMs) generated by efficient photodehydration (Φ=0.2) of 3-(hydroxymethyl)-2-naphthol undergo facile hetero-Diels-Alder addition (k(D-A)∼ 4×10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) to electron-rich polarized olefins in an aqueous solution. The resulting photostable benzo[g]chromans are produced in high to quantitative yield. The unreacted oNQM is rapidly hydrated (k(H2O) ∼145 s(-1)) to regenerate the starting diol. This competition between hydration and cycloaddition makes oNQMs highly selective, since only vinyl ethers and enamines are reactive enough to form the Diels-Alder adduct in an aqueous solution; no cycloaddition was observed with other types of alkenes. To achieve photolabeling or photoligation of two substrates, one is derivatized with a vinyl ether moiety, while 3-(hydroxymethyl)-2-naphthol is attached to the other via an appropriate linker. The light-induced Diels-Alder "click" strategy permits the formation of either a permanent or hydrolytically labile linkage. Rapid kinetics of this photoclick reaction (k=4×10(4) M(-1) s(-1)) is useful for time-resolved applications. The short lifetime (τ ∼7 ms in H(2)O) of the active form of the photoclick reagent prevents its migration from the site of irradiation, thus, allowing for spatial control of the ligation or labeling.

  15. Quantification of high-power ultrasound induced damage on potato starch granules using light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yue Yue J; Hébraud, Pascal; Hemar, Yacine; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2012-05-01

    A simple light microscopic technique was developed in order to quantify the damage inflicted by high-power low-frequency ultrasound (0-160 W, 20 kHz) treatment on potato starch granules in aqueous dispersions. The surface properties of the starch granules were modified using ethanol and SDS washing methods, which are known to displace proteins and lipids from the surface of the starch granules. The study showed that in the case of normal and ethanol-washed potato starch dispersions, two linear regions were observed. The number of defects first increased linearly with an increase in ultrasound power up to a threshold level. This was then followed by another linear dependence of the number of defects on the ultrasound power. The power threshold where the change-over occurred was higher for the ethanol-washed potato dispersions compared to non-washed potato dispersions. In the case of SDS-washed potato starch, although the increase in defects was linear with the ultrasound power, the power threshold for a second linear region was not observed. These results are discussed in terms of the different possible mechanisms of cavitation induced-damage (hydrodynamic shear stresses and micro-jetting) and by taking into account the hydrophobicity of the starch granule surface.

  16. Thermally induced light-driven microfluidics using a MOEMS-based laser scanner for particle manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Matthias P.; Tortschanoff, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    One key challenge in the field of microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip experiments for biological or chemical applications is the remote manipulation of fluids, droplets and particles. These can be volume elements of reactants, particles coated with markers, cells or many others. Light-driven microfluidics is one way of accomplishing this challenge. In our work, we manipulated micrometre sized polystyrene beads in a microfluidic environment by inducing thermal flows. Therefore, the beads were held statically in an unstructured microfluidic chamber, containing a dyed watery solution. Inside this chamber, the beads were moved along arbitrary trajectories on a micrometre scale. The experiments were performed, using a MOEMS (micro-opto-electro-mechanical-systems)-based laser scanner with a variable focal length. This scanner system is integrated in a compact device, which is flexibly applicable to various microscope setups. The device utilizes a novel approach for varying the focal length, using an electrically tunable lens. A quasi statically driven MOEMS mirror is used for beam steering. The combination of a tunable lens and a dual axis micromirror makes the device very compact and robust and is capable of positioning the laser focus at any arbitrary location within a three dimensional working space. Hence, the developed device constitutes a valuable extension to manually executed microfluidic lab-on-chip experiments.

  17. Towards controlling the dissociation probability by light-induced conical intersections

    CERN Document Server

    Csehi, András; Cederbaum, Lorenz S; Vibók, Ágnes

    2016-01-01

    Light-induced conical intersections (LICIs) can be formed both by standing or by running laser waves. The position of a LICI is determined by the laser frequency while the laser intensity controls the strength of the nonadiabatic coupling. Recently, it was shown within the LICI framework that linearly chirped laser pulses have an impact on the dissociation dynamics of the $D_{2}^{+}$ molecule (J. Chem. Phys. 143, 014305, (2015); ibid 144, 074309, (2016)). In this work we exploit this finding and perform calculations using chirped laser pulses in which the time dependence of the laser frequency is designed so as to force the LICI to move together with the field-free vibrational wave packet as much as possible. Since nonadiabaticity is strongest in the vicinity of the conical intersection, this is the first step towards controlling the dissociation process via the LICI. Our showcase example is again the $D_{2}^{+}$ molecular ion. To demonstrate the impact of the LICIs on the dynamical properties of diatomics, t...

  18. Effect of magnesium doping on the light-induced hydrophilicity of ZnO thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Kai; Lü Jianguo; Zhang Li; Tang Zhen; Yu Jiangying; Li Ping; Liu Feng

    2012-01-01

    Undoped and Mg-doped ZnO thin films were deposited on Si (111) and quartz substrates by using the sol-gel method.Microstructure,surface topography and water contact angle of the thin films have been measured by X-ray diffraction (XRD),an atomic force microscope (AFM) and water contact angle apparatus,respectively.The XRD results show that all the thin films are polycrystalline with a hexagonal structure and have a preferred orientation along the c-axis perpendicular to the substrate.With the increase of Mg concentration,the RMS roughness increases from 2.14 to 9.56 nm and the contact angle of the un-irradiated thin films decreases from 89° to 82°.The wetting behavior of the resulting films can be reversibly switched from hydrophobic to hydrophilic,through alternation of UV illumination and dark storage.The light-induced efficiency of the thin films increases with the increase of Mg concentration.

  19. Light-induced atom desorption from glass surfaces characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Ryo; Hatakeyama, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    We analyzed the surfaces of vitreous silica (quartz) and borosilicate glass (Pyrex) substrates exposed to rubidium (Rb) vapor by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to understand the surface conditions of alkali metal vapor cells. XPS spectra indicated that Rb atoms adopted different bonding states in quartz and Pyrex. Furthermore, Rb atoms in quartz remained in the near-surface region, while they diffused into the bulk in Pyrex. For these characterized surfaces, we measured light-induced atom desorption (LIAD) of Rb atoms. Clear differences in time evolution, photon energy dependence, and substrate temperature dependence were found; the decay of LIAD by continuous ultraviolet irradiation for quartz was faster than that for Pyrex, a monotonic increase in LIAD with increasing photon energy from 1.8 to 4.3 eV was more prominent for quartz, and LIAD from quartz was more efficient at higher temperatures in the range from 300 to 580 K, while that from Pyrex was almost independent of temperature.

  20. Dressed-state electromagnetically induced transparency for light storage in uniform-phase spin waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šibalić, N.; Kondo, J. M.; Adams, C. S.; Weatherill, K. J.

    2016-09-01

    We present, experimentally and theoretically, a scheme for dressed-state electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in a three-step cascade system in which a four-level system is mapped into an effective three-level system. Theoretical analysis reveals that the scheme provides coherent-state control via adiabatic following and a generalized protocol for light storage in uniform phase spin-waves that are insensitive to motional dephasing. The three-step driving enables a number of other features, including spatial selectivity of the excitation region within the atomic medium, and kick-free and Doppler-free excitation that produces narrow resonances in thermal vapor. As a proof of concept, we present an experimental demonstration of the generalized EIT scheme using the 6 S1 /2→6 P3 /2→7 S1 /2→8 P1 /2 excitation path in thermal cesium vapor. This technique could be applied to cold and thermal ensembles to enable longer storage times for Rydberg polaritons.