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Sample records for light induced tellurium

  1. Light-Induced Tellurium Enrichment on CdZnTe Crystal Surfaces Detected by Raman Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, Samantha A.; Villa-Aleman, Eliel; Duff, Martine C.; Hunter, Doug B.; Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael; Buliga, Vladimir; Black, David R.

    2008-01-01

    CdZnTe (CZT) crystals can be grown under controlled conditions to produce high-quality crystals to be used as room-temperature radiation detectors. Even the best crystal growth methods result in defects, such as tellurium secondary phases, that affect the crystal's performance. In this study, CZT crystals were analyzed by micro-Raman spectroscopy. The growth of Te rich areas on the surface was induced by low-power lasers. The growth was observed versus time with low-power Raman scattering and was observed immediately under higher-power conditions. The detector response was also measured after induced Te enrichment.

  2. LIGHT INDUCED TELLURIUM ENRICHMENT ON CDZNTE CRYSTAL SURFACES DETECTED BY RAMAN SPECTROSCOPY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, S; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E; Martine Duff, M; Douglas Hunter, D

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic CdZnTe or 'CZT' crystals can be grown under controlled conditions to produce high quality crystals to be used as room temperature radiation detectors. Even the best crystal growth methods result in defects, such as tellurium secondary phases, that affect the crystal's performance. In this study, CZT crystals were analyzed by micro Raman spectroscopy. The growth of Te rich areas on the surface was induced by low powered lasers. The growth was observed versus time with low power Raman scattering and was observed immediately under higher power conditions. The detector response was also measured after induced Te enrichment

  3. Tellurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Richard J.; Berger, Byron R.; George, Micheal W.; Seal, Robert R.; Schulz, Klaus J.; DeYoung,, John H.; Seal, Robert R.; Bradley, Dwight C.

    2017-12-19

    Tellurium (Te) is a very rare element that averages only 3 parts per billion in Earth’s upper crust. It shows a close association with gold and may be present in orebodies of most gold deposit types at levels of tens to hundreds of parts per million. In large-tonnage mineral deposits, such as porphyry copper and seafloor volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits, sulfide minerals may contain hundreds of parts per million tellurium, although the orebodies likely have overall concentrations of 0.1 to 1.0 parts per million tellurium. Tellurium is presently recovered as a primary ore from only two districts in the world; these are the gold-tellurium epithermal vein deposits located adjacent to one another at Dashuigou and Majiagou (Sichuan Province) in southwestern China, and the epithermal-like mineralization at the Kankberg deposit in the Skellefteå VMS district of Västerbotten County, Sweden. Combined, these two groups of deposits account for about 15 percent (about 70 metric tons) of the annual global production of between 450 and 470 metric tons of tellurium. Most of the world’s tellurium, however, is produced as a byproduct of the mining of porphyry copper deposits. These deposits typically yield concentrations of 1 to 4 percent tellurium in the anode slimes recovered during copper refining. Present production of tellurium from the United States is solely from the anode slimes at ASARCO LLC’s copper refinery in Amarillo, Texas, and may total about 50 metric tons per year. The main uses of tellurium are in photovoltaic solar cells and as an additive to copper, lead, and steel alloys in various types of machinery. The environmental data available regarding the mining of tellurium are limited; most concerns to date have focused on the more-abundant metals present in the large-tonnage deposits from which tellurium is recovered as a byproduct. Global reserves of tellurium are estimated to be 24,000 metric tons, based on the amount of tellurium likely contained in

  4. Influence of ion beam irradiation induced defects on the structural, optical and electrical properties of tellurium nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Narinder [Department of Physics, Chaudhary Devi Lal University, Sirsa, 125055 (India); Department of Physics, Haryana College of Technology & Management, Kaithal, 136027 (India); Kumar, Rajesh [Department of Physics, RN College of Engineering & Technology, Madlauda, 132104 (India); Kumar, Sushil, E-mail: sushil_phys@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Chaudhary Devi Lal University, Sirsa, 125055 (India); Chakarvarti, S.K. [Research and Development, Manav Rachana International University, Faridabad, 121001 (India)

    2016-11-01

    In this study, tellurium nanowires were electrodeposited into the polymer membranes from aqueous acidic bath containing HTeO{sub 2}{sup +} ions. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images confirmed the formation of uniform and straight nanowires. The influence of 110 MeV Ni{sup 8+} ion irradiation induced defects on the structural, optical and electrical properties of as–deposited tellurium nanowires were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–visible absorption spectroscopy and current–voltage (I–V) measurements. The XRD data depicted the hexagonal phase of tellurium nanowires and further revealed a variation in the intensity of diffraction peaks of ion irradiated nanowires. Williamson–Hall (WH) analysis is used for convoluting the size and microstrain contributions to the width of diffraction peaks. Tellurium nanowires exhibited a distinct absorbance band in the visible region at 686 nm, while this was absent in bulk tellurium. Electrical properties of nanowires are explored on the basis of I–V curves, which revealed a significant increase in the electrical conductivity of irradiated nanowires. A possible mechanism for the enhanced electrical conductivity is the increase in carrier concentration due to thermally excited defects. The defects produced by ion irradiation play a vital role in modifying the properties of semiconducting nanowires. - Highlights: • 110 MeV Ni{sup 8+} ion beam induced changes in tellurium nanowires have been examined. • Nanowires were prepared using template electrodeposition method. • Irradiation improved the electrical conductivity of tellurium nanowires. • Mechanism for enhanced electrical conductivity of irradiated nanowires was discussed.

  5. A new tellurium-containing amphiphilic molecule induces apoptosis in HCT116 colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Peng; Saidu, Nathaniel Edward Bennett; Intemann, Johanna; Jacob, Claus; Montenarh, Mathias

    2014-06-01

    Chalcogen-based redox modulators over the years have attracted considerable attention as anti-cancer agents. New selenium- and tellurium-containing compounds with a polar head group and aryl-groups of various lengths have recently been reported as biologically active in several organisms. In the present study, we used the most active of the tellurium compound DP41, and its selenium counterpart DP31 to investigate their effects on the human cancer cell line HCT116. Cells were treated with DP41 or DP31 and the formation of superoxide radicals was determined using dihydroethidium. Cell cycle analysis and apoptosis was determined by cytofluorimetry. Proteins involved in ER signaling and apoptosis were determined by Western blot analysis and fluorescence microscopy. With 50μM of DP41, we observed an increase in O2(-) formation. There was, however, no such increase in O2(-) after treatment with the corresponding selenium compound under the same conditions. In the case of DP41, the production of O2(-) radicals was followed by an up-regulation of Nrf2, HO-1, phospho-eIF2α and ATF4. CHOP was also induced and cells entered apoptosis. Unlike the cancer cells, normal retinal epithelial ARPE-19 cells did not produce elevated levels of O2(-) radicals nor did they induce the ER signaling pathway or apoptosis. The tellurium-containing compound DP41, in contrast to the corresponding selenium compound, induces O2(-) radical formation and oxidative and ER stress responses, including CHOP activation and finally apoptosis. These results indicate that DP41 is a redox modulating agent with promising anti-cancer potentials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Extractive separation of tellurium(4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gawali, S.B.; Shinde, V.M.

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for the extraction of tellurium (4) from hydrobromic acid media using 4-methyl-2-pentanol as an extractant. The method affords the determination of tellurium after its separation from Se, Au, Cu, Pb, Fe, Os, V and Al. (author)

  7. Thermodynamic behaviour of tellurium at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garisto, F.

    1992-09-01

    Thermodynamic calculations are used to determine the chemical speciation of tellurium in the primary heat transport system under postulated reactor accident conditions. The speciation of tellurium is determined for various values of the temperature, oxygen partial pressure, tellurium concentration and Cs/Te ratio. The effects of the Zircaloy cladding and/or cesium on tellurium speciation and volatility are of particular interest in this report. (Author) (37 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.)

  8. Selenium and tellurium nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacenza, Elena; Presentato, Alessandro; Zonaro, Emanuele; Lampis, Silvia; Vallini, Giovanni; Turner, Raymond J.

    2018-04-01

    Over the last 40 years, the rapid and exponential growth of nanotechnology led to the development of various synthesis methodologies to generate nanomaterials different in size, shape and composition to be applied in various fields. In particular, nanostructures composed of Selenium (Se) or Tellurium (Te) have attracted increasing interest, due to their intermediate nature between metallic and non-metallic elements, being defined as metalloids. Indeed, this key shared feature of Se and Te allows us the use of their compounds in a variety of applications fields, such as for manufacturing photocells, photographic exposure meters, piezoelectric devices, and thermoelectric materials, to name a few. Considering also that the chemical-physical properties of elements result to be much more emphasized when they are assembled at the nanoscale range, huge efforts have been made to develop highly effective synthesis methods to generate Se- or Te-nanomaterials. In this context, the present book chapter will explore the most used chemical and/or physical methods exploited to generate different morphologies of metalloid-nanostructures, focusing also the attention on the major advantages, drawbacks as well as the safety related to these synthetic procedures.

  9. Mutations induced by ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeifer, Gerd P.; You, Young-Hyun; Besaratinia, Ahmad

    2005-01-01

    The different ultraviolet (UV) wavelength components, UVA (320-400 nm), UVB (280-320 nm), and UVC (200-280 nm), have distinct mutagenic properties. A hallmark of UVC and UVB mutagenesis is the high frequency of transition mutations at dipyrimidine sequences containing cytosine. In human skin cancers, about 35% of all mutations in the p53 gene are transitions at dipyrimidines within the sequence 5'-TCG and 5'-CCG, and these are localized at several mutational hotspots. Since 5'-CG sequences are methylated along the p53 coding sequence in human cells, these mutations may be derived from sunlight-induced pyrimidine dimers forming at sequences that contain 5-methylcytosine. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) form preferentially at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine when cells are irradiated with UVB or sunlight. In order to define the contribution of 5-methylcytosine to sunlight-induced mutations, the lacI and cII transgenes in mouse fibroblasts were used as mutational targets. After 254 nm UVC irradiation, only 6-9% of the base substitutions were at dipyrimidines containing 5-methylcytosine. However, 24-32% of the solar light-induced mutations were at dipyrimidines that contain 5-methylcytosine and most of these mutations were transitions. Thus, CPDs forming preferentially at dipyrimidines with 5-methylcytosine are responsible for a considerable fraction of the mutations induced by sunlight in mammalian cells. Using mouse cell lines harboring photoproduct-specific photolyases and mutational reporter genes, we showed that CPDs (rather than 6-4 photoproducts or other lesions) are responsible for the great majority of UVB-induced mutations. An important component of UVB mutagenesis is the deamination of cytosine and 5-methylcytosine within CPDs. The mutational specificity of long-wave UVA (340-400 nm) is distinct from that of the shorter wavelength UV and is characterized mainly by G to T transversions presumably arising through mechanisms involving oxidized DNA

  10. Reaction of tellurium with Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, R. de; Cordfunke, E.H.P.

    1994-09-01

    Interaction of tellurium vapour with Zircaloy during the initial stage of an accident will lead to retention of tellurium in the core. For reliable estimation of the release behaviour of tellurium, it is necessary to know which zirconium tellurides are formed during this interaction. In this work the reaction of tellurium with Zircaloy-4 has been studied, using various reaction temperatures and tellurium vapour pressures. The compound ZrTe 2-x is formed on the surface of the Zircaloy in a broad range of reaction temperatures and vapour pressures. It is found that the formation of the more zirconium-rich compound Zr 5 Te 4 is favoured at high reaction temperatures is combination with low tellurium vapour pressures. (orig.)

  11. On the resistivity of metal-tellurium alloys for low concentrations of tellurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorecki, J.

    1982-04-01

    The resistivity and thermoelectric power of metal-tellurium liquid alloys have been discussed for the case of small tellurium concentration. Nearly free electron model of conduction band has been used. The rapid increase of resistivity in transition metal-tellurium alloys has been predicted. (author)

  12. UV Light Induces Dedoping of Polyaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Kaitsuka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available UV (Ultra-Violet light-driven change in optical absorption of polyaniline (PANI is reported. Irradiation of UV light to PANI/camphor sulfonic acid prepared by electrochemical polymerization allows dedoping of the PANI. Especially, UV light irradiation in the presence of a radical trap agent effectively reduces (dedoping the PANI. The result in this study is quite simple; however, this may be a first report for light-induced dedoping (color change of a conductive polymer.

  13. Sulfur, selenium, tellurium and polonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, F.J.

    1987-01-01

    This chapter on the coordination compounds of sulfur, selenium, tellurium and polonium starts with an introduction to the bonding, valence and geometry of the elements. Complexes of the group VIB elements are discussed with particular reference to the halo and pseudohalide complexes, oxo acid complexes, oxygen and nitrogen donor complexes and sulfur and selenium donor complexes. There is a section on the biological properties of the complexes discussed. (UK)

  14. Collinear light scattering using electromagnetically induced transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, S.E.; Sokolov, A.V.; Walker, D.R.; Yavuz, D.D.; Yin, G.Y.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes two types of nonlinear optical processes which are based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These are: (1) Collinear generation of FM-like Raman sidebands and (2) a type of pondermotive light scattering which is inherent to the interaction of slow light with cold atoms. Connections to other areas of EIT-based nonlinear optics are also described

  15. Electrowinning Of Tellurium From Acidic Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalik R.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of electrochemical deposition of tellurium was studied. Preliminary researches embrace the voltammetry and microgravimetric measurements. According to the results the electrolysis of tellurium was conducted under potentiostatic conditions. There was no deposition of tellurium above potential −0.1 vs. Ag/AgCl electrode in 25°C. The process of deposition is observed in the range of potentials −0.1 to −0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The presence of tellurium was confirmed by XRF and XRD. The obtained deposits were homogenous and compact. Below potential −0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl the Faradaic efficiency of the tellurium deposition decreased due to reduction of Te to H2Te and hydrogen evolution.

  16. New radiohalogenated alkenyl tellurium fatty acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, P.C.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Kabalka, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    Radiolabeled long-chain fatty acids have diagnostic value as radiopharmaceutical tools in myocardial imaging. Some applications of these fatty acids are limited due to their natural metabolic degradation in vivo with subsequent washout of the radioactivity from the myocardium. The identification of structural features that will increase the myocardial residence time without decreasing the heart uptake of long-chain fatty acids is of interest. Fatty acids containing the tellurium heteroatom were the first modified fatty acids developed that show unique prolonged myocardial retention and low blood levels. Our detailed studies with radioiodinated vinyliodide substituted tellurium fatty acids demonstrate that heart uptake is a function of the tellurium position. New techniques of tellurium and organoborane chemistry have been developed for the synthesis of a variety of radioiodinated iodoalkenyl tellurium fatty acids. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Tellurium self-diffusion and point defects in lead telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simirskij, Yu.N.; Firsova, L.P.

    1982-01-01

    Method of radioactive indicators was used to determine factors of tellurium self-diffusion in lead telluride with different deviation of the composition from stoichiometric in the range of enrichment by tellurium. It was found that at 973 K factors of tellurium self-diffusion in lead telluride depend slightly on the vapor pressure of tellurium equilibrium with solid phase

  18. Tellurium: providing a bright future for solar energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Tellurium is one of the least common elements on Earth. Most rocks contain an average of about 3 parts per billion tellurium, making it rarer than the rare earth elements and eight times less abundant than gold. Grains of native tellurium appear in rocks as a brittle, silvery-white material, but tellurium more commonly occurs in telluride minerals that include varied quantities of gold, silver, or platinum. Tellurium is a metalloid, meaning it possesses the properties of both metals and nonmetals.

  19. Purification and in vitro antioxidant activities of tellurium-containing phycobiliproteins from tellurium-enriched Spirulina platensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Wong, Ka-Hing; Yang, Yufeng; Li, Xiaoling; Jiang, Jie; Zheng, Wenjie; Wu, Hualian; Chen, Tianfeng

    2014-01-01

    Tellurium-containing phycocyanin (Te-PC) and allophycocyanin (Te-APC), two organic tellurium (Te) species, were purified from tellurium-enriched Spirulina platensis by a fast protein liquid chromatographic method. It was found that the incorporation of Te into the peptides enhanced the antioxidant activities of both phycobiliproteins. With fractionation by ammonium sulfate precipitation and hydroxylapatite chromatography, Te-PC and Te-APC could be effectively separated with high purity, and Te concentrations were 611.1 and 625.3 μg g(-1) protein in Te-PC and Te-APC, respectively. The subunits in the proteins were identified by using MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. Te incorporation enhanced the antioxidant activities of both phycobiliproteins, as examined by 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid assay. Moreover, Te-PC and Te-APC showed dose-dependent protection on erythrocytes against the water-soluble free radical initiator 2,2'-azo(2-asmidinopropane)dihydrochloride-induced hemolysis. In the hepatoprotective model, apoptotic cell death and nuclear condensation induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide in HepG2 cells was significantly attenuated by Te-PC and Te-APC. Taken together, these results suggest that Te-PC and Te-APC are promising Te-containing proteins with application potential for treatment of diseases related to oxidative stress.

  20. Purification and in vitro antioxidant activities of tellurium-containing phycobiliproteins from tellurium-enriched Spirulina platensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang F

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Fang Yang,1 Ka-Hing Wong,2 Yufeng Yang,3 Xiaoling Li,1 Jie Jiang,1 Wenjie Zheng,1 Hualian Wu,1 Tianfeng Chen1 1Department of Chemistry, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, People’s Republic of China; 3Institute of Hydrobiology, College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Tellurium-containing phycocyanin (Te-PC and allophycocyanin (Te-APC, two organic tellurium (Te species, were purified from tellurium-enriched Spirulina platensis by a fast protein liquid chromatographic method. It was found that the incorporation of Te into the peptides enhanced the antioxidant activities of both phycobiliproteins. With fractionation by ammonium sulfate precipitation and hydroxylapatite chromatography, Te-PC and Te-APC could be effectively separated with high purity, and Te concentrations were 611.1 and 625.3 µg g-1 protein in Te-PC and Te-APC, respectively. The subunits in the proteins were identified by using MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry. Te incorporation enhanced the antioxidant activities of both phycobiliproteins, as examined by 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid assay. Moreover, Te-PC and Te-APC showed dose-dependent protection on erythrocytes against the water-soluble free radical initiator 2,2'-azo(2-asmidinopropanedihydrochloride-induced hemolysis. In the hepatoprotective model, apoptotic cell death and nuclear condensation induced by tert-butyl hydroperoxide in HepG2 cells was significantly attenuated by Te-PC and Te-APC. Taken together, these results suggest that Te-PC and Te-APC are promising Te-containing proteins with application potential for treatment of diseases related to oxidative stress. Keywords: tellurium, phycocyanin, allophycocyanin, purification, antioxidant activity

  1. Optimization of scintillator loading with the tellurium-130 isotope for long-term stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhamel, Lauren; Song, Xiaoya; Goutnik, Michael; Kaptanoglu, Tanner; Klein, Joshua; SNO+ Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Tellurium-130 was selected as the isotope for the SNO + neutrinoless double beta decay search, as 130Te decays to 130Xe via double beta decay. Linear alkyl benzene(LAB) is the liquid scintillator for the SNO + experiment. To load tellurium into scintillator, it is combined with 1,2-butanediol to form an organometallic complex, commonly called tellurium butanediol (TeBD). This study focuses on maximizing the percentage of tellurium loaded into scintillator and evaluates the complex's long-term stability. Studies on the effect of nucleation due to imperfections in the detector's surface and external particulates were employed by filtration and induced nucleation. The impact of water on the stability of TeBD complex was evaluated by liquid-nitrogen sparging, variability in pH and induced humidity. Alternative loading methods were evaluated, including the addition of stability-inducing organic compounds. Samples of tellurium-loaded scintillator were synthesized, treated, and consistently monitored in a controlled environment. It was found that the hydronium ions cause precipitation in the loaded scintillator, demonstrating that water has a detrimental effect on long-term stability. Optimization of loaded scintillator stability can contribute to the SNO + double beta decay search.

  2. Tellurium in active volcanic environments: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzo, Silvia; Calabrese, Sergio; D'Alessandro, Walter; Brusca, Lorenzo; Bellomo, Sergio; Parello, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    Tellurium is a toxic metalloid and, according to the Goldschmidt classification, a chalcophile element. In the last years its commercial importance has considerably increased because of its wide use in solar cells, thermoelectric and electronic devices of the last generation. Despite such large use, scientific knowledge about volcanogenic tellurium is very poor. Few previous authors report result of tellurium concentrations in volcanic plume, among with other trace metals. They recognize this element as volatile, concluding that volcanic gases and sulfur deposits are usually enriched with tellurium. Here, we present some results on tellurium concentrations in volcanic emissions (plume, fumaroles, ash leachates) and in environmental matrices (soils and plants) affected by volcanic emissions and/or deposition. Samples were collected at Etna and Vulcano (Italy), Turrialba (Costa Rica), Miyakejima, Aso, Asama (Japan), Mutnovsky (Kamchatka) at the crater rims by using common filtration techniques for aerosols (polytetrafluoroethylene filters). Filters were both eluted with Millipore water and acid microwave digested, and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Volcanic ashes emitted during explosive events on Etna and Copahue (Argentina) were analyzed for tellurium bulk composition and after leaching experiments to evaluate the soluble fraction of tellurium. Soils and leaves of vegetation were also sampled close to active volcanic vents (Etna, Vulcano, Nisyros, Nyiragongo, Turrialba, Gorely and Masaya) and investigated for tellurium contents. Preliminary results showed very high enrichments of tellurium in volcanic emissions comparing with other volatile elements like mercury, arsenic, thallium and bismuth. This suggests a primary transport in the volatile phase, probably in gaseous form (as also suggested by recent studies) and/or as soluble salts (halides and/or sulfates) adsorbed on the surface of particulate particles and ashes. First

  3. Laser induced white lighting of tungsten filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strek, W.; Tomala, R.; Lukaszewicz, M.

    2018-04-01

    The sustained bright white light emission of thin tungsten filament was induced under irradiation with focused beam of CW infrared laser diode. The broadband emission centered at 600 nm has demonstrated the threshold behavior on excitation power. Its intensity increased non-linearly with excitation power. The emission occurred only from the spot of focused beam of excitation laser diode. The white lighting was accompanied by efficient photocurrent flow and photoelectron emission which both increased non-linearly with laser irradiation power.

  4. Metastable light induced defects in pentacene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liguori, R.; Aprano, S.; Rubino, A. [Department of Industrial Engineering (DIIn), University of Salerno, via Giovanni Paolo II, 132, 84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2014-02-21

    In this study we analyzed one of the environmental factors that could affect organic materials. Pentacene thin film samples were fabricated and the degradation of their electrical characteristics was measured when the devices were exposed to ultraviolet light irradiation. The results have been reported in terms of a trap density model, which provides a description of the dynamics of light induced electrically active defects in an organic semiconductor.

  5. Selenium and tellurium reagents in organic synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comasseto, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    A review of the contribution of the University of Sao Paulo (SP, Brazil) to the organic synthesis of selenium and tellurium reagents is made. Major reactions amoung selenium compounds and insaturated substrates, phosphorus, ester enolates as well as the use of phase transference catalysed reactions to produce arylselenolate are described. For tellurium, interactions of its compounds with organic substrates and reactive intermediates (e.g. benzino diazomethane) are reported. (C.L.B.) [pt

  6. Tellurium chemistry, tellurium release and deposition during the TMI-2 accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinjamuri, K.; Sallach, R.A.; Osetek, D.J.; Hobbins, R.R.; Akers, D.W.

    1985-08-01

    This report presents the chemistry and estimated behavior of tellurium during and after the accident at Three Mile Island Unit-2. The discussion of tellurium behavior is based on all available measurement data for /sup 129 m/Te, 132 Te, stable tellurium ( 126 Te, 128 Te, and 130 Te), and best estimate calculations of tellurium release and transport. Results from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) tests, Power Burst Facility (PBF) Severe Fuel Damage Tests at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and SASCHA tests from Karlsruhe, W. Germany are compared with calculated release fractions and samples taken from TMI Unit-2. It is concluded that very little tellurium was released and transported from the TMI-2 core, probably as a result of holdup by zircaloy cladding and other structural materials. 39 refs., 24 figs., 17 tabs

  7. Tellurium chemistry, tellurium release and deposition during the TMI-2 accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinjamuri, K.; Sallach, R.A.; Osetek, D.J.; Hobbins, R.R.; Akers, D.W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents the chemistry and estimated behavior of tellurium during and after the accident at Three Mile Island Unit-2. The discussion of tellurium behavior is based on all available measurement data for /sup 129m/Te, 132 Te, stable tellurium ( 126 Te, 128 Te, and 130 Te), and best estimate calculations of tellurium release and transport. Results from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) tests, Power Burst Facility (PBF) Severe Fuel Damage Tests at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and SASCHA tests from Karlsruhe, W. Germany are compared with calculated release fractions and samples taken from TMI Unit-2. It is concluded that very little tellurium was released and transported from the TMI-2 core, probably as a result of holdup by zircaloy cladding and other structural materials. 37 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs

  8. The defects produced by electron irradiation in tellurium-doped germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuoka, Noboru; Saito, Haruo

    1989-01-01

    The nature of the irradiation induced defects in a germanium single crystal doped with tellurium was studied by DLTS and electrical measurements. The E c -0.21 eV level produced by irradiation with 1.5 MeV electrons was studied using the DLTS technique. It was found that the defect associated with this level is a divacancy. The E-center like defect (group V impurity-vacancy pair) introduces the E c -0.20 eV level in samples doped with a group V impurity. The level introduced by a tellurium (group VI impurity)-vacancy pair is deeper. The E c -0.16 eV level was generated by annealing at 430 K. A tellurium-vacancies complex is proposed as the defect associated with this level. (author)

  9. Electric field fluctuations in liquid tellurium alloys a hint to bond character

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulick, C.A.; Brinkmann, R.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; von Hartrott, M.; Kiehl, M.; Maxim, P.; Quitmann, D.

    1985-01-01

    Atomic scale electric field fluctuations in liquid tellurium alloys are detected as they induce nuclear spin relaxation rate RQ in noble gas impurity atoms, via quadrupolar interaction. Results for Xe in liquid Ag, Ga, In, Tl, Ge, Sn---Te alloys are discussed, assuming that bonding in these alloys

  10. Selenium Se and tellurium Te

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busev, A.I.; Tiptsova, V.G.; Ivanov, V.M.

    1978-01-01

    The basic methods for determining selenium and tellurium in various objects are presented. The bichromatometric determination of Te in cadmium, zinc and mercury tellurides is based on oxidation of Te(4) to (6) in H 2 SO 4 with potassium bichromate. In steels, Te is determined photometrically with the aid of KI. The determination is hindered by Fe(3), Cu(2), Bi(3) and Se(4) ions, which must be separated. The extraction-photometric determination of Te in native sulfur is carried out with the aid of 5-mercapto-3-(naphthyl-2)-1,3,4-thiadiazolthione-2 (pH=4.8-5.0). The dyed complex is readily extracted with chloroform and benzene. The spectrophotometric determination of Te in selenium is performed with the aid of 3,5-diphenylpyrazoline-1-dithiocarbamate of sodium. Te is determined in commercial indium, arsenic and their semiconductor compounds photometrically with the aid of copper diethyldithiocarbamate. The method permits determining 5x10 -5 % Te in a weighed amount of 0.5 g. The chloride complex of Te(4) with diantipyriodolpropylmethane is quantitatively extracted with dichloroethane from hydrochloric acid solutions. Thus, any amounts of Te can be separated from Se and determined photometrically. The extraction-photometric determination of Te in commercial lead and bismuth is carried out with the aid of pyrazolone derivatives, in commercial copper with the aid of diantipyridolpropylmethane, and in ores (more than 0.01% Te) with the aid of bismuthol 2. Also described is the extraction-polarographic determination of Te in sulfide ores

  11. Neuropharmacology of light-induced locomotor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Davide; Pum, Martin E; Groos, Dominik; Lauber, Andrea C; Huston, Joseph P; Carey, Robert J; de Souza Silva, Maria A; Müller, Christian P

    2015-08-01

    Presentation of non-aversive light stimuli for several seconds was found to reliably induce locomotor activation and exploratory-like activity. Light-induced locomotor activity (LIA) can be considered a convenient simple model to study sensory-motor activation. LIA was previously shown to coincide with serotonergic and dopaminergic activation in specific cortical areas in freely moving and anesthetized animals. In the present study we explore the neuropharmacology of LIA using a receptor antagonist/agonist approach in rats. The non-selective 5-HT2-receptor antagonist ritanserin (1.5-6 mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently reduced LIA. Selective antagonism of either the 5-HT2A-receptor by MDL 11,939 (0.1-0.4 mg/kg, i.p.), or the 5-HT2C-receptor by SDZ SER 082 (0.125-0.5 mg/kg, i.p.), alone or in combination, had no significant influence on LIA. Also the selective 5-HT1A-receptor antagonist, WAY 100635 (0.4 mg/kg, i.p.) did not affect LIA. Neither did the preferential dopamine D2-receptor antagonist, haloperidol (0.025-0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) nor the D2/D3-receptor agonist, quinpirole (0.025-0.5 mg/kg, i.p.) affect the expression of LIA. However, blocking the glutamatergic NMDA-receptor with phencyclidine (PCP, 1.5-6 mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently reduced LIA. This effect was also observed with ketamine (10 mg/kg, i.p.). These findings suggest that serotonin and dopamine receptors abundantly expressed in the cortex do not mediate light-stimulus triggered locomotor activity. PCP and ketamine effects, however, suggest an important role of NMDA receptors in LIA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Facile electrochemical synthesis of tellurium nanorods and their photoconductive properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.H. [Center for Photon Manufacturing Science and Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang - 212013 (China); Zhang, P. [Dongguan University of Technology, Dongguan-523808 (China); School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou - 510275 (China); Liang, C.L. [Instrumental Analysis and Research Center, SunYat-sen University, Guangzhou - 510275 (China); Yang, J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang - 212013 (China); Zhou, M. [Center for Photon Manufacturing Science and Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang - 212013 (China); The State Key Laboratory of Tribology, Tsinghua University, Beijing - 10084 (China); Lu, X.H. [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou - 510275 (China); Hope, G.A. [School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan - Qld 4111 (Australia)

    2012-10-15

    Tellurium nanorods have been successfully fabricated by template and surfactant-free electrochemical technique from an aqueous solution at room temperature. The as-prepared tellurium nanorods were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectrometry, UV-vis spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Films based on tellurium nanorods were constructed to study the photoresponse and I-V curves. These photoresponse measurements demonstrate that tellurium nanorods exhibited enhanced conductivity under illumination compared to in the dark measurement. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. The mineralogical characterization of tellurium in copper anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T. T.; Dutrizac, J. E.

    1993-12-01

    A mineralogical study of a «normal» commercial copper anode and six tellurium-rich copper anodes from the CCR Refinery of the Noranda Copper Smelting and Refining Company was carried out to identify the tellurium carriers and their relative abundances. In all the anodes, the major tellurium carrier is the Cu2Se-Cu2Te phase which occurs as a constituent of complex inclusions at the copper grain boundaries. In tellurium-rich anodes, the molar tellurium content of the Cu2Se-Cu2Te phase can exceed that of selenium. Although >85 pct of the tellurium occurs as the Cu2Se-Cu2Te phase, minor amounts are present in Cu-Pb-As-Bi-Sb oxide, Cu-Bi-As oxide, and Cu-Te-As oxide phases which form part of the grain-boundary inclusions. About 1 pct of the tellurium content of silver-rich anodes occurs in various silver alloys, but gold tellurides were never detected. Surprising is the fact that 2 to 8 pct of the total tellurium content of the anodes occurs in solid solution in the copper-metal matrix, and presumably, this form of tellurium dissolves at the anode interface during electrorefining.

  14. Comparison between selenium and tellurium clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benamar, A.; Rayane, D.; Tribollet, B.; Broyer, M.; Melinon, P.

    1991-01-01

    Selenium and tellurium clusters are produced by the inert gas condensation technique. The mass spectra of both species are completely different and reveal different properties. In selenium, a periodicity of 6-7 is observed and may be interpreted by the binding energy between small cyclic molecules. Moreover, it was very difficult to obtained large clusters probably because the binding energy between these molecules is very small. In tellurium, these periodic structures do not exist and large clusters are easily obtained in nucleation conditions where only small selenium clusters are present. These results are discussed and a simple nucleation model is used to illustrate this different behavior. Finally these clusters properties are correlated to the bulk structure of both materials. (orig.)

  15. Neutron activation analysis of high purity tellurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gil'bert, Eh.N.; Verevkin, G.V.; Obrazovskij, E.G.; Shatskaya, S.S.

    1980-01-01

    A scheme of neutron activation analysis of high purity tellurium is developed. Weighed amount of Te (0.5 g) is irradiated for 20-40 hr in the flux of 2x10 13 neutron/(cm 2 xs). After decomposition of the sample impurities of gold and palladium are determined by the extraction with organic sulphides. Tellurium separation from the remaining impurities is carried out by the extraction with monothiobenzoic acid from weakly acidic HCl solutions in the presence of iodide-ions, suppressing silver extraction. Remaining impurity elements in the refined product are determined γ-spectrometrically. The method allows to determine 34 impurities with determination limits 10 -6 -10 -11 g

  16. Interaction of tellurium and tellurium-containing semiconductor compounds with solutions of HI-HNO3-H2O system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomashik, V.N.; Sava, A.A.; Tomashik, Z.F.

    1994-01-01

    As a result of experimental investigations and physical-chemical simulation are established regularities of solution of semiconducting tellurium-containing compounds in HI-HNO 3 -H 2 O systems. In HNO 3 -HI system solutions enriched by HNO 3 are not used for CdTe treatment but HI enriched solution are similar in composition with I 2 -HI solutions. Solution of the given tellurium-containing materials proceeds by a chemical mechanism and is determined by tellurium oxidation with iodine

  17. Copper Tellurium Oxides - A Playground for Magnetism.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norman, M. R.

    2018-04-15

    A variety of copper tellurium oxide minerals are known, and many of them exhibit either unusual forms of magnetism, or potentially novel spin liquid behavior. Here, I review a number of the more interesting materials with a focus on their crystalline symmetry and, if known, the nature of their magnetism. Many of these exist (so far) in mineral form only, and most have yet to have their magnetic properties studied. This means a largely unexplored space of materials awaits our exploration.

  18. Quantum control of light using electromagnetically induced transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andre, A; Eisaman, M D; Walsworth, R L; Zibrov, A S; Lukin, M D

    2005-01-01

    We present an overview of recent theoretical and experimental work on the control of the propagation and quantum properties of light using electromagnetically induced transparency in atomic ensembles. Specifically, we discuss techniques for the generation and storage of few-photon quantum-mechanical states of light as well as novel approaches to manipulate weak pulses of light via enhanced nonlinear optical processes

  19. Strong nonlinear photonic responses from microbiologically synthesized tellurium nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, K.-S.; Wang, Jingyuan; Dias, S.; Dewald, J.; Alley, N.J.; Baesman, S.M.; Oremland, R.S.; Blau, W.J.; Curran, S.A.

    2010-01-01

    A new class of nanomaterials, namely microbiologically-formed nanorods composed of elemental tellurium [Te(0)] that forms unusual nanocomposites when combined with poly(m-phenylenevinylene-co-2,5-dioctoxy-phenylenevinylene) (PmPV) is described. These bio-nanocomposites exhibit excellent broadband optical limiting at 532 and 1064 nm. Nonlinear scattering, originating from the laser induced solvent bubbles and microplasmas, is responsible for this nonlinear behavior. The use of bacterially-formed Te(0) when combined with an organic chemical host (e.g., PmPV) is a new green method of nanoparticle syntheses. This opens the possibilities of using unique, biologically synthesized materials to advance future nanoelectronic and nanophotonic applications. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Modelling the chemical behaviour of tellurium species in the reactor pressure vessel and the reactor cooling system under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, A.; Gonzalez, C.

    1991-07-01

    This state of the art report contains information on the behaviour of tellurium and its compounds in the reactor pressure vessel and the reactor coolant system under light water reactor severe accident conditions. To characterise tellurium behaviour, it is necessary the previous knowledge of the species of tellurium released from the core, and simultaneity of its release with that of other materials which can alter the transport, for instance, control rod and structural materials. Release and transport experiments have been reviewed along with the models implemented in the codes which are used in the international community: TRAPMELT, RAFT, VICTORIA and SOPHIE. From the experiments, it can be concluded that other species different to Te 2 , such as tin telluride and cesium telluride, may be released from the fuel. That is why they must be considered in the transport phenomena. There is also experimental evidence of the strong interaction of Te 2 with Inconel 600 and stainless steel of the pipe walls and structures, however this strong interaction is in competition with the interaction of tellurium with aerosols, which under severe accident conditions may represent an area greater than that of the primary system. It is for the absence of significant tellurium species in the transport models, and also for the interaction of tellurium with aerosols, for which some codes show the greatest deficiencies

  1. The dependence of the texture of tellurium thin films on vacuum deposition angle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cocks, F.H.; Peterson, M.J.; Jones, P.L.

    1980-01-01

    Vacuum-deposited tellurium thin films can show substantially different surface morphologies depending on the angle with which the vapor stream impinges on the substrate surface. These tellurium thin films have a tendency to grow as acicular crystallites but as the deposition angle is increased so that the vapor stream becomes tangential to the substrate surface the spacing between crystallites increases and approaches, at stream angles of approximately 80 0 from the normal, dimensions roughly once or twice the average wavelength of visible light. Such films may have application in solar energy collector systems because of the high absorptivity of sunlight shown by such films. Mechanisms which describe the tendency for crystallite spacing to increase with increasing angle are discussed. (Auth.)

  2. Tellurium release and deposition during the TMI-2 accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinjamuri, K.; Osetek, D.J.; Hobbins, R.R.; Jessup, J.S.

    1984-09-01

    The estimated behavior of tellurium during and after the accident at the Three Mile Island Unit-2 is presented. The behavior is based on all available measurement data for /sup 129m/Te, 132 Te, stable tellurium ( 126 Te, 128 Te and 130 Te), and best estimate calculations of tellurium release and transport. The predicted release was calculated using current techniques that relate release rate to fuel temperature and holdup of tellurium in zircaloy until significant oxidation occurs. The calculated release fraction was low, approx. 7%, but the total measured release for samples analyzed to date is about 5.8%. Of the measured tellurium about 2.4, 1.8, 0.88, 0.42, 0.17 and 0.086% of core inventory were in the containment sump water, upper plenum assembly surfaces, containment solids in the sump water, makeup and purification demineralizer, containment inside surface, and the reactor primary coolant, respectively. A significant fraction (54%) of the tellurium calculated to be retained on the upper plenum surfaces (4.61% of the core inventory) was deposited during the high pressure injection of coolant at about 200 min after the reactor scram. Comparison of tellurium behavior with in-pile and out-of-pile tests strongly suggests that zircaloy holds tellurium until significant cladding oxidation occurs

  3. Tellurium behavior during and after the TMI-2 accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinjamuri, K.; Osetek, D.J.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    The estimated behavior of tellurium during and after the accident at the Three Mile Island Unit-2 is presented. The behavior is based on all available measurement data for /sup 129m/Te, 132 Te and stable tellurium ( 126 Te, 128 Te and 130 Te), and best estimate calculations of tellurium release and transport. The predicted release was calculated using current techniques that relate release rate to fuel temperature and holdup of tellurium in zircaloy until significant oxidation occurs. The calculated release fraction was low, approximately 7%, but the total measured release for samples analyzed to date is about 4.0%. Of the measured tellurium about 2.4, 0.88, 0.42, 0.17 and 0.086% of core inventory were in the containment sump water, containment solids in water, makeup and purification demineralizer, containment inside surface, and the reactor primary coolant, respectively. A significant fraction (54%) of the calculated tellurium retained on the upper plenum surfaces (4.61% of the core inventory) was deposited during the high pressure injection of coolant at about 200 minutes after the reactor scram. Comparison of tellurium behavior with inpile and out-of-pile tests strongly suggests that zircaloy holds tellurium until significant cladding oxidation occurs

  4. Light-induced defect creation in hydrogenated polymorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morigaki, K.; Takeda, K.; Hikita, H.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.

    2005-01-01

    Light-induced defect creation in hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H) is investigated from electron spin resonance measurements and is compared with that in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). Light-induced defect creation occurs at room temperature similarly for both types of films prepared at 250 deg. C. Thermal annealing of light-induced defects is also investigated as a function of temperature. Different behaviours of annealing characteristics for pm-Si:H from those for a-Si:H are observed and discussed. In particular, we observed a decrease of the light-induced defect creation efficiency with repeated light-soaking-annealing cycles and discuss it with respect to the hydrogen bonding in pm-Si:H films

  5. Blue light-induced oxidative stress in live skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Yuya; Ohta, Shigeo; Wolf, Alexander M

    2017-07-01

    Skin damage from exposure to sunlight induces aging-like changes in appearance and is attributed to the ultraviolet (UV) component of light. Photosensitized production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by UVA light is widely accepted to contribute to skin damage and carcinogenesis, but visible light is thought not to do so. Using mice expressing redox-sensitive GFP to detect ROS, blue light could produce oxidative stress in live skin. Blue light induced oxidative stress preferentially in mitochondria, but green, red, far red or infrared light did not. Blue light-induced oxidative stress was also detected in cultured human keratinocytes, but the per photon efficacy was only 25% of UVA in human keratinocyte mitochondria, compared to 68% of UVA in mouse skin. Skin autofluorescence was reduced by blue light, suggesting flavins are the photosensitizer. Exposing human skin to the blue light contained in sunlight depressed flavin autofluorescence, demonstrating that the visible component of sunlight has a physiologically significant effect on human skin. The ROS produced by blue light is probably superoxide, but not singlet oxygen. These results suggest that blue light contributes to skin aging similar to UVA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid radiochemical ion-exchange separation of iodine from tellurium: a novel radioiodine-132 generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrao, A

    1975-01-01

    Tellurium ions form a soluble cationic complex with thiourea in acid medium. The cationic tellurium-thiourea species is strongly absorbed on a cationic ion exchanger. The retention of tellurium on the resin enables many interesting separation schemes for tellurium from various ions. With special interest, the separation of iodine from tellurium was studied. An efficient and convenient iodine-132 generator is described, in which the radio-iodine is eluted with water or 9 g/1 NaCl, when desired.

  7. A rapid radiochemical ion-exchange separation of iodine from tellurium: a novel radioiodine-132 generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrao, A.

    1975-01-01

    Tellurium ions form a soluble cationic complex with thiourea in acid medium. The cationic tellurium-thiourea species is strongly absorbed on a cationic ion exchanger. The retention of tellurium on the resin enables many interesting separation schemes for tellurium from various ions. With special interest, the separation of iodine from tellurium was studied. An efficient and convenient iodine-132 generator is described, in which the radio-iodine is eluted with water or 9 g/1 NaCL, when desired

  8. EDITORIAL Light-induced material organization Light-induced material organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainos, Nikos; Rode, Andrei V.

    2010-12-01

    Light-induced material organization extends over a broad area of research, from photon momentum transfer to atoms, molecules and particles, serving the basis for optical trapping, and expands into the laser-induced changes of material properties through photopolymerization, photodarkening, and materials ablation. Relevant phenomena are observed over many orders of magnitude of light intensity, from a few kW cm-2 for the optical trapping of living cells to 1014 W cm-2 encountered in femtosecond laser micromachining and micro-explosion. Relevant interactions reveal a rich palette of novel phenomena in the solid state, from subtle excitations and material organization to phase transformations, non-equilibrium and transient states. The laser-induced material modifications relate to changes in the crystal structure and the molecular bonding, phase transitions in liquid state, ablation and plasma production associated with extreme pressure and temperature conditions towards entirely new states of matter. The underlying physical mechanisms form the foundations for micro-engineering photonic and other functional devices and lead the way to relevant applications. At the same time, they hold the potential for creating non-equilibrium material states and a range of fundamentally new products not available by other means. The fundamental understanding of both materials nature and functional behaviour will ultimately yield novel devices and improved performance in several fields. The far reaching goals of these studies relate to the development of new methods and technologies for micro- and nano-fabrication, not only offering a significant reduction of cost, but also expanding the fabrication capabilities into unexplored areas of biophotonics and nanotechnology. This special issue of Journal of Optics presents some very recent and exciting advances in the field of materials manipulation by laser beams, aiming to underline its current trends. In optical trapping research we

  9. The characterisation of vapour-phase alkali metal-tellurium-oxygen species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomme, R.A.; Ogden, J.S.; Bowsher, B.R.

    1986-10-01

    Detailed assessments of hypothetical severe accidents in light water reactors require the identification of the chemical forms of the radionuclides in order to determine their transport characteristics. Caesium and tellurium are important volatile fission products in accident scenarios. This report describes detailed studies to characterise the chemical species that vaporise from heated mixtures of various alkali metal-tellurium-oxygen systems. The molecular species were characterised by a combination of quadrupole mass spectrometry and matrix isolation-infrared spectroscopy undertaken in conjunction with experiments involving oxygen-18 substitution. The resulting spectra were interpreted in terms of a vapour-phase molecule with the stoichiometry M 2 TeO 3 (M = K,Rb,Cs) for M/Te molecular ratios of ∼ 2, and polymeric species for ratios < 2. This work has demonstrated the stability of caesium tellurite. The formation of this relatively low-volatility, water-soluble species could significantly modify the transport and release of caesium and tellurium. The data presented in this report should allow more comprehensive thermodynamic calculations to be undertaken that assist in the quantification of fission product behaviour during severe reactor accidents. (author)

  10. Light-induced ion-acoustic instability of rarefied plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnov, I.V.; Sizykh, D.V.

    1987-01-01

    A new method of ion-acoustic instability excitation under the effect of coherent light, resonance to ion quantum transitions on collisionless plasma, is suggested. The light-induced ion-acoustic instability (LIIAI) considered is based on the induced progressive nonequilibrium resonance particles in the field of travelling electromagnetic wave. Principal possibility to use LIIAI in high-resolution spectroscopy and in applied problems of plasma physics, related to its instability, is pointed out

  11. Light-induced vegetative anthocyanin pigmentation in Petunia

    OpenAIRE

    Albert, Nick W.; Lewis, David H.; Zhang, Huaibi; Irving, Louis J.; Jameson, Paula E.; Davies, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    The Lc petunia system, which displays enhanced, light-induced vegetative pigmentation, was used to investigate how high light affects anthocyanin biosynthesis, and to assess the effects of anthocyanin pigmentation upon photosynthesis. Lc petunia plants displayed intense purple anthocyanin pigmentation throughout the leaves and stems when grown under high-light conditions, yet remain acyanic when grown under shade conditions. The coloured phenotypes matched with an accumulation of anthocyanins...

  12. Light-induced reversible expansion of individual gold nanoplates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsheng Lu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Light-induced mechanical response of materials has been extensively investigated and widely utilized to convert light energy into mechanical energy directly. The metallic nanomaterials have excellent photothermal properties and show enormous potential in micromechanical actuators, etc. However, the photo-thermo-mechanical properties of individual metallic nanostructures have yet to be well investigated. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a way to realize light-induced reversible expansion of individual gold nanoplates on optical microfibers. The light-induced thermal expansion coefficient is obtained as 21.4 ± 4.6 ∼ 31.5 ± 4.2 μ·K-1 when the light-induced heating temperature of the gold nanoplates is 240 ∼ 490 °C. The photo-thermo-mechanical response time of the gold nanoplates is about 0.3 ± 0.1 s. This insight into the photo-thermo-mechanical properties of the gold nanoplates could deepen the understanding of the light-induced reversible expansion behavior in nanoscale and pave the way for applications based on this piezoelectric-like response, such as light-driven metallic micromotors.

  13. Analysis of tellurium thin films electrodeposition from acidic citric bath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalik, Remigiusz; Kutyła, Dawid [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Non-Ferrous Metals, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Mech, Krzysztof [AGH University of Science and Technology, Academic Centre for Materials and Nanotechnology, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, Krakow (Poland); Żabiński, Piotr, E-mail: rkowalik@agh.edu.pl [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Non-Ferrous Metals, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    2016-12-01

    This work presents the description of the electrochemical process of formation thin tellurium layers from citrate acidic solution. The suggested methodology consists in the preparation of stable acidic baths with high content of tellurium, and with the addition of citrate acid. In order to analyse the mechanism of the process of tellurium deposition, the electroanalytical tests were conducted. The tests of cyclic voltammetry and hydrodynamic ones were performed with the use of polycrystalline gold disk electrode. The range of potentials in which deposition of tellurium in direct four-electron process is possible was determined as well as the reduction of deposited Te° to Te{sup 2−} and its re-deposition as a result of the comproportionation reaction. On the basis of the obtained results, the deposition of tellurium was conducted by the potentiostatic method. The influence of a deposition potential and a concentration of TeO{sub 2} in the solution on the rate of tellurium coatings deposition was examined. The presence of tellurium was confirmed by X-ray spectrofluorometry and electron probe microanalysis. In order to determine the phase composition and the morphology, the obtained coatings were analysed with the use of x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

  14. Selenium and tellurium as carbon substitutes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    This review has summarized structure-activity studies with 75 Se- and /sup 123m/Te-labeled radiopharmaceuticals in which the selenium or tellurium heteroatom has been inserted between carbon-carbon bonds. The agents that have been investigated in most detail include steroids for adrenal imaging and long-chain fatty acids, and a variety of other unique agents have also been studied. Because of the great versatility of the organic chemistry of selenium and tellurium, there is continuing interest in the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with 75 Se, 73 Se, and /sup 123m/Te. There are two important factors which will determine the extent of future interest in such agents. These include the necessity of a decrease in the cost of highly enriched 122 Te to make the reactor production of /sup 123m/Te cost effective. In addition, the potential preparation of large amounts of 73 Se should stimulate the development of 73 Se-labeled radiopharmaceuticals

  15. Double beta decay of tellurium-130

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, J.F.; Manuel, O.K.; Sinha, B.; Thorpe, R.I.

    1986-01-01

    The isotopic composition of xenon is reported in four, neutron-irradiated tellurium minerals - tellurobismuthite from Boliden, Sweden, native tellurium from the Good Hope Mine of Gunnison County, Colorado, altaite from the Kirkland Lake area, Ontario, and altaite from the Mattagami Lake area, Quebec. From the amount of radiogenic 130 Xe and pile-produced 131 Xe in these samples, it is concluded that the half-life of 130 Te for ββ-decay is 21 y based on measured values of (1.0+-0.3) . 10 21 y and higher. Our results demonstrate that there has been no significant partial leakage of radiogenic 130 Xe from these minerals over geologic time. Larger values of Tsub(1/2), as indicated from some of the analysis reported here and in other studies, are attributed to recrystallization of the soft telluride minerals and complete resetting of the Te-Xe system after mineralization. The value obtained here for the half-life of 130 Te is substantiated by recent measurements on xenon in tellurides from Kalgoorlie, Western Australia. (orig.)

  16. Inclusion free cadmium zinc tellurium and cadmium tellurium crystals and associated growth method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, Aleskey E [South Setauket, NY; James, Ralph B [Ridge, NY

    2010-07-20

    The present disclosure provides systems and methods for crystal growth of cadmium zinc tellurium (CZT) and cadmium tellurium (CdTe) crystals with an inverted growth reactor chamber. The inverted growth reactor chamber enables growth of single, large, high purity CZT and CdTe crystals that can be used, for example, in X-ray and gamma detection, substrates for infrared detectors, or the like. The inverted growth reactor chamber enables reductions in the presence of Te inclusions, which are recognized as an important limiting factor in using CZT or CdTe as radiation detectors. The inverted growth reactor chamber can be utilized with existing crystal growth techniques such as the Bridgman crystal growth mechanism and the like. In an exemplary embodiment, the inverted growth reactor chamber is a U-shaped ampoule.

  17. A light-induced shortcut in the planktonic microbial loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptacnik, Robert; Gomes, Ana; Royer, Sarah-Jeanne; Berger, Stella A.; Calbet, Albert; Nejstgaard, Jens C.; Gasol, Josep M.; Isari, Stamatina; Moorthi, Stefanie D.; Ptacnikova, Radka; Striebel, Maren; Sazhin, Andrey F.; Tsagaraki, Tatiana M.; Zervoudaki, Soultana; Altoja, Kristi; Dimitriou, Panagiotis D.; Laas, Peeter; Gazihan, Ayse; Martínez, Rodrigo A.; Schabhüttl, Stefanie; Santi, Ioulia; Sousoni, Despoina; Pitta, Paraskevi

    2016-07-01

    Mixotrophs combine photosynthesis with phagotrophy to cover their demands in energy and essential nutrients. This gives them a competitive advantage under oligotropihc conditions, where nutrients and bacteria concentrations are low. As the advantage for the mixotroph depends on light, the competition between mixo- and heterotrophic bacterivores should be regulated by light. To test this hypothesis, we incubated natural plankton from the ultra-oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean in a set of mesocosms maintained at 4 light levels spanning a 10-fold light gradient. Picoplankton (heterotrophic bacteria (HB), pico-sized cyanobacteria, and small-sized flagellates) showed the fastest and most marked response to light, with pronounced predator-prey cycles, in the high-light treatments. Albeit cell specific activity of heterotrophic bacteria was constant across the light gradient, bacterial abundances exhibited an inverse relationship with light. This pattern was explained by light-induced top-down control of HB by bacterivorous phototrophic eukaryotes (PE), which was evidenced by a significant inverse relationship between HB net growth rate and PE abundances. Our results show that light mediates the impact of mixotrophic bacterivores. As mixo- and heterotrophs differ in the way they remineralize nutrients, these results have far-reaching implications for how nutrient cycling is affected by light.

  18. A light-induced shortcut in the planktonic microbial loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ptacnik, Robert

    2016-07-11

    Mixotrophs combine photosynthesis with phagotrophy to cover their demands in energy and essential nutrients. This gives them a competitive advantage under oligotropihc conditions, where nutrients and bacteria concentrations are low. As the advantage for the mixotroph depends on light, the competition between mixo- and heterotrophic bacterivores should be regulated by light. To test this hypothesis, we incubated natural plankton from the ultra-oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean in a set of mesocosms maintained at 4 light levels spanning a 10-fold light gradient. Picoplankton (heterotrophic bacteria (HB), pico-sized cyanobacteria, and small-sized flagellates) showed the fastest and most marked response to light, with pronounced predator-prey cycles, in the high-light treatments. Albeit cell specific activity of heterotrophic bacteria was constant across the light gradient, bacterial abundances exhibited an inverse relationship with light. This pattern was explained by light-induced top-down control of HB by bacterivorous phototrophic eukaryotes (PE), which was evidenced by a significant inverse relationship between HB net growth rate and PE abundances. Our results show that light mediates the impact of mixotrophic bacterivores. As mixo- and heterotrophs differ in the way they remineralize nutrients, these results have far-reaching implications for how nutrient cycling is affected by light.

  19. A light-induced shortcut in the planktonic microbial loop

    KAUST Repository

    Ptacnik, Robert; Gomes, Ana; Royer, Sarah-Jeanne; Berger, Stella A.; Calbet, Albert; Nejstgaard, Jens C.; Gasol, Josep M.; Isari, Stamatina; Moorthi, Stefanie D.; Ptacnikova, Radka; Striebel, Maren; Sazhin, Andrey F.; Tsagaraki, Tatiana M.; Zervoudaki, Soultana; Altoja, Kristi; Dimitriou, Panagiotis D.; Laas, Peeter; Gazihan, Ayse; Martí nez, Rodrigo A.; Schabhü ttl, Stefanie; Santi, Ioulia; Sousoni, Despoina; Pitta, Paraskevi

    2016-01-01

    Mixotrophs combine photosynthesis with phagotrophy to cover their demands in energy and essential nutrients. This gives them a competitive advantage under oligotropihc conditions, where nutrients and bacteria concentrations are low. As the advantage for the mixotroph depends on light, the competition between mixo- and heterotrophic bacterivores should be regulated by light. To test this hypothesis, we incubated natural plankton from the ultra-oligotrophic Eastern Mediterranean in a set of mesocosms maintained at 4 light levels spanning a 10-fold light gradient. Picoplankton (heterotrophic bacteria (HB), pico-sized cyanobacteria, and small-sized flagellates) showed the fastest and most marked response to light, with pronounced predator-prey cycles, in the high-light treatments. Albeit cell specific activity of heterotrophic bacteria was constant across the light gradient, bacterial abundances exhibited an inverse relationship with light. This pattern was explained by light-induced top-down control of HB by bacterivorous phototrophic eukaryotes (PE), which was evidenced by a significant inverse relationship between HB net growth rate and PE abundances. Our results show that light mediates the impact of mixotrophic bacterivores. As mixo- and heterotrophs differ in the way they remineralize nutrients, these results have far-reaching implications for how nutrient cycling is affected by light.

  20. Peroxide coordination of tellurium in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhaylov, Alexey A.; Medvedev, Alexander G. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); The Casali Center of Applied Chemistry, The Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel); Churakov, Andrei V.; Grishanov, Dmitry A.; Prikhodchenko, Petr V. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lev, Ovadia [The Casali Center of Applied Chemistry, The Institute of Chemistry, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2016-02-15

    Tellurium-peroxo complexes in aqueous solutions have never been reported. In this work, ammonium peroxotellurates (NH{sub 4}){sub 4}Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O)O{sub 4}(OH){sub 2} (1) and (NH{sub 4}){sub 5}Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O)O{sub 5}(OH).1.28 H{sub 2}O.0.72 H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (2) were isolated from 5 % hydrogen peroxide aqueous solutions of ammonium tellurate and characterized by single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction analysis, by Raman spectroscopy and thermal analysis. The crystal structure of 1 comprises ammonium cations and a symmetric binuclear peroxotellurate anion [Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O)O{sub 4}(OH){sub 2}]{sup 4-}. The structure of 2 consists of an unsymmetrical [Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O)O{sub 5}(OH)]{sup 5-} anion, ammonium cations, hydrogen peroxide, and water. Peroxotellurate anions in both 1 and 2 contain a binuclear Te{sub 2}(μ-OO){sub 2}(μ-O) fragment with one μ-oxo- and two μ-peroxo bridging groups. {sup 125}Te NMR spectroscopic analysis shows that the peroxo bridged bitellurate anions are the dominant species in solution, with 3-40 %wt H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and for pH values above 9. DFT calculations of the peroxotellurate anion confirm its higher thermodynamic stability compared with those of the oxotellurate analogues. This is the first direct evidence for tellurium-peroxide coordination in any aqueous system and the first report of inorganic tellurium-peroxo complexes. General features common to all reported p-block element peroxides could be discerned by the characterization of aqueous and crystalline peroxotellurates. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Structure and activity of tellurium-cerium oxide acrylonitrile catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bart, J.C.J.; Giordano, N.

    1982-01-01

    Ammoxidation of propylene to acrylonitrile (ACN) was investigated over various silica-supported (Te,Ce)O catalysts at 360 and 440 0 C. The binary oxide system used consists of a single nonstoichiometric fluorite-type phase α-(Ce,Te)O 2 up to about 80 mole% TeO 2 and a tellurium-saturated solid solution β-(Ce,Te)O 2 at higher tellurium concentrations. The ACN yield varies almost linearly with the tellurium content of (Ce,Te)O 2 . The β-(Ce,Te)O 2 phase is the most active component of the system (propylene conversion and ACN selectivity at 440 C of 76.7 and 74%, respectively) and is slightly more selective to ACN than α-Te0 2 . Tellurium reduces the overoxidation properties of cerium and selective oxidation occurs through Te(IV)-bonded oxygen

  2. Selenium- or tellurium- containing bile acids and derivatives thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monks, R.; Riley, A.L.M.

    1981-01-01

    This invention relates to the preparation of selenium and tellurium derivatives, particularly γ-emitting radioactive derivatives of bile acids and bile salts. Such compounds are valuable in the examination of body function, especially small bowel function. (author)

  3. Study of distribution coefficients of admixtures in tellurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchar, L.; Drapala, J.; Kuchar, L. jr.

    1986-01-01

    Limit areas of tellurium-admixture binary systems were studied and the values determined of steady-state distribution coefficients of admixtures. A second order polynomial was used to express equations of solidus and liquidus curves for Te-Se, Te-S, Te-Hg systems; the curves are graphically represented. The most effective method for preparing high-purity tellurium is zonal melting with material removal. (M.D.). 4 figs., 4 tabs., 16 refs

  4. Thermal neutron capture cross sections of tellurium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomandl, I.; Honzatko, J.; Egidy, T. von; Wirth, H.-F.; Belgya, T.; Lakatos, M.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Revay, Zs.; Molnar, G.L.; Firestone, R.B.; Bondarenko, V.

    2003-01-01

    New values for thermal neutron capture cross sections of the tellurium isotopes 122 Te, 124 Te, 125 Te, 126 Te, 128 Te, and 130 Te are reported. These values are based on a combination of newly determined partial γ-ray cross sections obtained from experiments on targets contained natural Te and γ intensities per capture of individual Te isotopes. Isomeric ratios for the thermal neutron capture on the even tellurium isotopes are also given

  5. Thermal neutron capture cross sections of tellurium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomandl, I.; Honzatko, J.; Egidy, T. von; Wirth, H.-F.; Belgya, T.; Lakatos, M.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Revay, Zs.; Molnar, G.L.; Firestone, R.B.; Bondarenko, V.

    2004-01-01

    New values for thermal neutron capture cross sections of the tellurium isotopes 122Te, 124Te, 125Te, 126Te, 128Te, and 130Te are reported. These values are based on a combination of newly determined partial g-ray cross sections obtained from experiments on targets contained natural Te and gamma intensities per capture of individual Te isotopes. Isomeric ratios for the thermal neutron capture on the even tellurium isotopes are also given

  6. Thermal neutron capture cross sections of tellurium isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomandl, I.; Honzatko, J.; von Egidy, T.; Wirth, H.-F.; Belgya, T.; Lakatos, M.; Szentmiklosi, L.; Revay, Zs.; Molnar, G.L.; Firestone, R.B.; Bondarenko, V.

    2004-03-01

    New values for thermal neutron capture cross sections of the tellurium isotopes 122Te, 124Te, 125Te, 126Te, 128Te, and 130Te are reported. These values are based on a combination of newly determined partial g-ray cross sections obtained from experiments on targets contained natural Te and gamma intensities per capture of individual Te isotopes. Isomeric ratios for the thermal neutron capture on the even tellurium isotopes are also given.

  7. Tellurium quantum dots: Preparation and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chaoyu; Li, Xueming; Tang, Libin; Lai, Sin Ki; Rogée, Lukas; Teng, Kar Seng; Qian, Fuli; Zhou, Liangliang; Lau, Shu Ping

    2017-08-01

    Herein, we report an effective and simple method for producing Tellurium Quantum dots (TeQDs), zero-dimensional nanomaterials with great prospects for biomedical applications. Their preparation is based on the ultrasonic exfoliation of Te powder dispersed in 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone. Sonication causes the van der Waals forces between the structural hexagons of Te to break so that the relatively coarse powder breaks down into nanoscale particles. The TeQDs have an average size of about 4 nm. UV-Vis absorption spectra of the TeQDs showed an absorption peak at 288 nm. Photoluminescence excitation (PLE) and photoluminescence (PL) are used to study the optical properties of TeQDs. Both the PLE and PL peaks revealed a linear relationship against the emission and excitation energies, respectively. TeQDs have important potential applications in biological imaging and catalysis as well as optoelectronics.

  8. Quantitative analysis of tellurium in simple substance sulfur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arikawa, Yoshiko

    1976-01-01

    The MIBK extraction-bismuthiol-2 absorptiometric method for the quantitative analysis of tellurium was studied. The method and its limitation were compared with the atomic absorption method. The period of time required to boil the solution in order to decompose excess hydrogen peroxide and to reduce tellurium from 6 valance to 4 valance was examined. As a result of experiment, the decomposition was fast in the alkaline solution. It takes 30 minutes with alkaline solution and 40 minutes with acid solution to indicate constant absorption. A method of analyzing the sample containing tellurium less than 5 ppm was studied. The experiment revealed that the sample containing a very small amount of tellurium can be analyzed when concentration by extraction is carried out for the sample solutions which are divided into one gram each because it is difficult to treat several grams of the sample at one time. This method also is suitable for the quantitative analysis of selenium. This method showed good addition effect and reproducibility within the relative error of 5%. The comparison between the calibration curve of the standard solution of tellurium 4 subjected to the reaction with bismuthiol-2 and the calibration curve obtained from the extraction of tellurium 4 with MIBK indicated that the extraction is perfect. The result by bismuthiol-2 method and that by atom absorption method coincided quite well on the same sample. (Iwakiri, K.)

  9. Light-induced vegetative anthocyanin pigmentation in Petunia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Nick W.; Lewis, David H.; Zhang, Huaibi; Irving, Louis J.; Jameson, Paula E.; Davies, Kevin M.

    2009-01-01

    The Lc petunia system, which displays enhanced, light-induced vegetative pigmentation, was used to investigate how high light affects anthocyanin biosynthesis, and to assess the effects of anthocyanin pigmentation upon photosynthesis. Lc petunia plants displayed intense purple anthocyanin pigmentation throughout the leaves and stems when grown under high-light conditions, yet remain acyanic when grown under shade conditions. The coloured phenotypes matched with an accumulation of anthocyanins and flavonols, as well as the activation of the early and late flavonoid biosynthetic genes required for flavonol and anthocyanin production. Pigmentation in Lc petunia only occurred under conditions which normally induce a modest amount of anthocyanin to accumulate in wild-type Mitchell petunia [Petunia axillaris×(Petunia axillaris×Petunia hybrida cv. ‘Rose of Heaven’)]. Anthocyanin pigmentation in Lc petunia leaves appears to screen underlying photosynthetic tissues, increasing light saturation and light compensation points, without reducing the maximal photosynthetic assimilation rate (Amax). In the Lc petunia system, where the bHLH factor Leaf colour is constitutively expressed, expression of the bHLH (Lc) and WD40 (An11) components of the anthocyanin regulatory system were not limited, suggesting that the high-light-induced anthocyanin pigmentation is regulated by endogenous MYB transcription factors. PMID:19380423

  10. Chromatic assimilation unaffected by perceived depth of inducing light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevell, Steven K; Cao, Dingcai

    2004-01-01

    Chromatic assimilation is a shift toward the color of nearby light. Several studies conclude that a neural process contributes to assimilation but the neural locus remains in question. Some studies posit a peripheral process, such as retinal receptive-field organization, while others claim the neural mechanism follows depth perception, figure/ground segregation, or perceptual grouping. The experiments here tested whether assimilation depends on a neural process that follows stereoscopic depth perception. By introducing binocular disparity, the test field judged in color was made to appear in a different depth plane than the light that induced assimilation. The chromaticity and spatial frequency of the inducing light, and the chromaticity of the test light, were varied. Chromatic assimilation was found with all inducing-light sizes and chromaticities, but the magnitude of assimilation did not depend on the perceived relative depth planes of the test and inducing fields. We found no evidence to support the view that chromatic assimilation depends on a neural process that follows binocular combination of the two eyes' signals.

  11. METHODS OF SYNTHESIS EIGHT-TELLURIUM-CONTAINING HETEROCYCLES WITH MORE HETEROATOMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Abakarov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article systematized and summarized data on the synthesis of neweight-embered tellurium-containing heterocycles and new preparative methods described above produce heterocyclic tellurium.

  12. Retino-hypothalamic regulation of light-induced murine sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanuel eMuindi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The temporal organization of sleep is regulated by an interaction between the circadian clock and homeostatic processes. Light indirectly modulates sleep through its ability to phase shift and entrain the circadian clock. Light can also exert a direct, circadian-independent effect on sleep. For example, acute exposure to light promotes sleep in nocturnal animals and wake in diurnal animals. The mechanisms whereby light directly influences sleep and arousal are not well understood. In this review, we discuss the direct effect of light on sleep at the level of the retina and hypothalamus in rodents. We review murine data from recent publications showing the roles of rod-, cone- and melanopsin-based photoreception on the initiation and maintenance of light-induced sleep. We also present hypotheses about hypothalamic mechanisms that have been advanced to explain the acute control of sleep by light. Specifically, we review recent studies assessing the roles of the ventrolateral preoptic area and the suprachiasmatic nucleus. We also discuss how light might differentially promote sleep and arousal in nocturnal and diurnal animals respectively. Lastly, we suggest new avenues for research on this topic which is still in its early stages.

  13. Light-induced phenomena in polymeric thin films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nešpůrek, Stanislav; Pospíšil, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2005), s. 1157-1168 ISSN 1454-4164 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 700 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : Light-induced phenomena * photodegradation * photochromism Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 1.138, year: 2005

  14. Preventing Ultraviolet Light-Induced Damage: The Benefits of Antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Cheng-Wai

    2007-01-01

    Extracts of fruit peels contain antioxidants that protect the bacterium "Escherichia coli" against damage induced by ultraviolet light. Antioxidants neutralise free radicals, thus preventing oxidative damage to cells and deoxyribonucleic acid. A high survival rate of UV-exposed cells was observed when grapefruit or grape peel extract was…

  15. Light-ion-induced multifragmentation. A fast, evolutionary process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viola, V.E.; Bracken, D.S.; Foxford, E.R.; Ginger, D.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Morley, K.B.; Hsi, W.C.; Wang, G.; Korteling, R.G.; Legrain, R.

    1996-09-01

    GeV light-ion-induced reactions offer a unique tool for preparing hot, dilute nuclear matter. Time evolution of nuclear multifragmentation in 3 He + nat Ag and 3 He + 197 Au reactions are investigated. Fragment-fragment correlations are studied in order to gain information on multifragmentation mechanism. (K.A.)

  16. Investigation of γ-irradiation influence on the DLTS spectra in silicon diluted by tellurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sultanov, N.A.; Tadzhibaev, M.; Mirzabadalov, Zh

    1997-01-01

    The influence of gamma-radiation on deep level transient spectroscopy(DLTS) spectra for silicon crystals doped with tellurium was studied. The DLTS spectra have shown that tellurium in silicon formed two deep levels with fixed ionization energy. It was shown that the presence of tellurium prevents the formation of radiation defects

  17. Fission product tellurium chemistry from fuel to containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarlane, J.

    1996-01-01

    Chemical equilibrium calculations were performed on the speciation of tellurium in-core and inside the primary heat transport system (PHTS) under loss-of-coolant accident conditions. Data from recent Knudsen-cell experiments on the volatilization of Cs 2 Te were incorporated into the calculation. These data were used to recalculate thermodynamic quantities for Cs 2 Te(g), including Δ f G o (298 K)= -118±9 kJ.mol -1 . The description of the condensed high-temperature cesium-tellurium phase was expanded to include Cs 2 Te 3 (c) in addition to Cs 2 Te(c). These modifications were incorporated into the database used in the equilibrium calculations; the net effect was to stabilize the condensed cesium-tellurium phase and reduce the vapour pressure of Cs 2 Te(g) between 1200 and 1600 K. The impact of tellurium speciation in containment, after release from the PHTS, is discussed along with the possible effect of tellurium on iodine chemistry. (author) 10 figs., 5 tabs., 21 refs

  18. Fission product tellurium chemistry from fuel to containment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, J [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1996-12-01

    Chemical equilibrium calculations were performed on the speciation of tellurium in-core and inside the primary heat transport system (PHTS) under loss-of-coolant accident conditions. Data from recent Knudsen-cell experiments on the volatilization of Cs{sub 2}Te were incorporated into the calculation. These data were used to recalculate thermodynamic quantities for Cs{sub 2}Te(g), including {Delta}{sub f}G{sup o}(298 K)= -118{+-}9 kJ.mol{sup -1}. The description of the condensed high-temperature cesium-tellurium phase was expanded to include Cs{sub 2}Te{sub 3}(c) in addition to Cs{sub 2}Te(c). These modifications were incorporated into the database used in the equilibrium calculations; the net effect was to stabilize the condensed cesium-tellurium phase and reduce the vapour pressure of Cs{sub 2}Te(g) between 1200 and 1600 K. The impact of tellurium speciation in containment, after release from the PHTS, is discussed along with the possible effect of tellurium on iodine chemistry. (author) 10 figs., 5 tabs., 21 refs.

  19. A recycling model of the biokinetics of systemic tellurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giussani, Augusto

    2014-11-01

    To develop a compartmental model of the systemic biokinetics of tellurium required for calculating the internal dose and interpreting bioassay measurements after incorporation of radioactive tellurium. The compartmental model for tellurium was developed with the software SAAM II v. 2.0 (©The Epsilon Group, Charlottesville, Virginia, USA). Model parameters were determined on the basis of published retention and excretion data in humans and animals. The model consists of two blood compartments, one compartment each for liver, kidneys, thyroid, four compartments for bone tissues and a generic compartment for the soft tissues. The model predicts a rapid urinary excretion of systemic tellurium: 45% in the first 24 h and 84% after 50 d. Faecal excretion amounts to 0.4% after 3 d and 9% after 50 d. Whole body retention is 55% after one day, and 2.8% after 100 d. These values as well as the retained fractions in the single organs are reasonably consistent with the available human and animal data (studies with swine and guinea pigs). The proposed model gives a realistic description of the available biokinetic data for tellurium and will be adopted by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for applications in internal dosimetry.

  20. Synthesis of ultra-thin tellurium nanoflakes on textiles for high-performance flexible and wearable nanogenerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Wen; Van Ngoc, Huynh; Qian, Yong Teng; Hwang, Jae Seok; Yan, Ya Ping [Department of Physics and Interdisciplinary Course of Physics and Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon 16419, Gyeoggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hongsoo [Department of Robotics Engineering, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), 711-873, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dae Joon, E-mail: djkang@skku.edu [Department of Physics and Interdisciplinary Course of Physics and Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, 2066, Seobu-ro, Jangan-gu, Suwon 16419, Gyeoggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Ultra-thin tellurium (Te) nanoflakes were successfully grown on textile and used as an active piezoelectric material. • Te nanoflake nanogenerator device was systematically studied by bending and compressing test. • The ultra-high output power during compressing test can light up 10 LEDs without any external power source. • The device can offer a breakthrough in applying tellurium nanoflakes into high-performance flexible and wearable piezoelectric nanogenerator. - Abstract: We report that ultra-thin tellurium (Te) nanoflakes were successfully grown on a sample of a gold-coated textile, which then was used as an active piezoelectric material. An output voltage of 4 V and a current of 300 nA were obtained from the bending test under a driving frequency of 10 Hz. To test the practical applications, Te nanoflake nanogenerator (TFNG) device was attached to the subject’s arm, and mechanical energy was converted to electrical energy by means of periodic arm-bending motions. The optimized open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current density of approximately 125 V and 17 μA/cm{sup 2}, respectively, were observed when a TFNG device underwent a compression test with a compressive force of 8 N and driving frequency of 10 Hz. This high-power generation enabled the instantaneous powering of 10 green light-emitting diodes that shone without any assistance from an external power source.

  1. Tracing Tellurium and Its Nanostructures in Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Bijan; Nami, Mohammad; Shahverdi, Ahmad-Reza

    2017-12-01

    Tellurium (Te) is a semimetal rare element in nature. Together with oxygen, sulfur (S), and selenium (Se), Te is considered a member of chalcogen group. Over recent decades, Te applications continued to emerge in different fields including metallurgy, glass industry, electronics, and applied chemical industries. Along these lines, Te has recently attracted research attention in various fields. Though Te exists in biologic organisms such as microbes, yeast, and human body, its importance and role and some of its potential implications have long been ignored. Some promising applications of Te using its inorganic and organic derivatives including novel Te nanostructures are being introduced. Before discovery and straightforward availability of antibiotics, Te had considered and had been used as an antibacterial element. Antilishmaniasis, antiinflammatory, antiatherosclerotic, and immuno-modulating properties of Te have been described for many years, while the innovative applications of Te have started to emerge along with nanotechnological advances over the recent years. Te quantum dots (QDs) and related nanostructures have proposed novel applications in the biological detection systems such as biosensors. In addition, Te nanostructures are used in labeling, imaging, and targeted drug delivery systems and are tested for antibacterial or antifungal properties. In addition, Te nanoparticles show novel lipid-lowering, antioxidant, and free radical scavenging properties. This review presents an overview on the novel forms of Te, their potential applications, as well as related toxicity profiles.

  2. Tellurium Enrichment in Jurassic Coal, Brora, Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam Bullock

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mid-Jurassic pyritic coals exposed at the village of Brora, northern Scotland, UK, contain a marked enrichment of tellurium (Te relative to crustal mean, average world coal compositions and British Isles Carboniferous coals. The Te content of Brora coal pyrite is more than one order of magnitude higher than in sampled pyrite of Carboniferous coals. The Te enrichment coincides with selenium (Se and mercury (Hg enrichment in the rims of pyrite, and Se/Te is much lower than in pyrites of Carboniferous coals. Initial pyrite formation is attributed to early burial (syn-diagenesis, with incorporation of Te, Se, Hg and lead (Pb during later pyrite formation. The source of Te may have been a local hydrothermal system which was responsible for alluvial gold (Au in the region, with some Au in Brora headwaters occurring as tellurides. Anomalous Te is not ubiquitous in coal, but may occur locally, and is detectable by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS.

  3. Disordered resonant media: Self-induced transparency versus light localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novitsky, Denis V.

    2018-01-01

    We propose a concept of disordered resonant media, which are characterized by random variations of their parameters along the light propagation direction. In particular, a simple model of disorder considered in the paper implies random change of the density of active particles (two-level atoms). Within this model, the effect of disorder on self-induced transparency (SIT) is analyzed using numerical simulations of light pulse propagation through the medium. The transition from the SIT to localization regime is revealed as well as its dependence on the disorder level, atom density, medium thickness, and period of random variations.

  4. Light induced modulation instability of surfaces under intense illumination

    KAUST Repository

    Burlakov, V. M.

    2013-12-17

    We show that a flat surface of a polymer in rubber state illuminated with intense electromagnetic radiation is unstable with respect to periodic modulation. Initial periodic perturbation is amplified due to periodic thermal expansion of the material heated by radiation. Periodic heating is due to focusing-defocusing effects caused by the initial surface modulation. The surface modulation has a period longer than the excitation wavelength and does not require coherent light source. Therefore, it is not related to the well-known laser induced periodic structures on polymer surfaces but may contribute to their formation and to other phenomena of light-matter interaction.

  5. Light-Induced Alterations in Basil Ganglia Kynurenic Acid Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroufe, Angela E.; Whittaker, J. A.; Patrickson, J. W.; Orr, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    The metabolic synthesis, release and breakdown of several known CNS neurotransmitters have been shown to follow a circadian pattern entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle. The levels of excitatory amino acid (EAA) transmitters such as glutamate, have been shown to vary with environmental lighting conditions. Kynurenic Acid (KA), an endogenous tryptophan metabolite and glutamate receptor antagonist, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects against EAA-induced excitotoxic cell damage. Changes in KA's activity within the mammalian basal ganglia has been proposed as being contributory to neurotoxicity in Huntington's Disease. It is not known whether CNS KA levels follow a circadian pattern or exhibit light-induced fluctuations. However, because the symptoms of certain degenerative motor disorders seem to fluctuate with daily 24 hour rhythm, we initiated studies to determine if basal ganglia KA were influenced by the daily light/dark cycle and could influence motor function. Therefore in this study, HPLC-EC was utilized to determine if basal ganglia KA levels in tissue extracts from adult male Long-Evans rats (200-250g) entrained to 24 and 48 hours constant light and dark conditions, respectively. Samples were taken one hour before the onset of the subjective day and one hour prior to the onset of the subjective night in order to detect possible phase differences in KA levels and to allow for accumulation of factors expressed in association with the light or dark phase. Data analysis revealed that KA levels in the basal ganglia vary with environmental lighting conditions; being elevated generally during the dark. Circadian phase differences in KA levels were also evident during the subjective night and subjective day, respectively. Results from these studies are discussed with respect to potential cyclic changes in neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxic damage during the daily 24 hour cycle and its possible relevance to future therapeutic approaches in

  6. Electrophilic addition of selenium and tellurium halides to methyldiethynylsilane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amosova, S.V.; Penzik, M.V.; Martynov, A.V.; Zhilitskaya, L.V.; Voronkov, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    Reaction of TeCl 4 with methyldiethynylsilane (MDES) proceeds with the predominant formation of E-isomer 1,1,3,6-tetrachlorine-1-methyl-1-(methyldiethynylsiloxy)-1,4-tellurium(IV) silafulvic due to the interaction of intermediate E-isomer 4-methyl-1,1,3,6-tetrachlorine-1,4-tellurium(IV)silafulvic with MDES. TeCl 4 Reacts with MDES without reduction of Te(IV) in Te(II). Tetracoordination of tellurium atom in heterocycle was established by NMR 125 Te. Mass spectrum of heterocycle shows the presence of fragmentary ions [M-Cl 2 ] + . According elemental analysis Te:Cl=1:4 ratio proves composition of heterocycle

  7. Light-induced aggregation of microbial exopolymeric substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Luni; Xu, Chen; Zhang, Saijin; Lin, Peng; Schwehr, Kathleen A; Quigg, Antonietta; Chiu, Meng-Hsuen; Chin, Wei-Chun; Santschi, Peter H

    2017-08-01

    Sunlight can inhibit or disrupt the aggregation process of marine colloids via cleavage of high molecular weight compounds into smaller, less stable fragments. In contrast, some biomolecules, such as proteins excreted from bacteria can form aggregates via cross-linking due to photo-oxidation. To examine whether light-induced aggregation can occur in the marine environment, we conducted irradiation experiments on a well-characterized protein-containing exopolymeric substance (EPS) from the marine bacterium Sagitulla stellata. Our results show that after 1 h sunlight irradiation, the turbidity level of soluble EPS was 60% higher than in the dark control. Flow cytometry also confirmed that more particles of larger sized were formed by sunlight. In addition, we determined a higher mass of aggregates collected on filter in the irradiated samples. This suggests light can induce aggregation of this bacterial EPS. Reactive oxygen species hydroxyl radical and peroxide played critical roles in the photo-oxidation process, and salts assisted the aggregation process. The observation that Sagitulla stellata EPS with relatively high protein content promoted aggregation, was in contrast to the case where no significant differences were found in the aggregation of a non-protein containing phytoplankton EPS between the dark and light conditions. This, together with the evidence that protein-to-carbohydrate ratio of aggregates formed under light condition is significantly higher than that formed under dark condition suggest that proteins are likely the important component for aggregate formation. Light-induced aggregation provides new insights into polymer assembly, marine snow formation, and the fate/transport of organic carbon and nitrogen in the ocean. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Electric currents induced by twisted light in Quantum Rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteiro, G F; Berakdar, J

    2009-10-26

    We theoretically investigate the generation of electric currents in quantum rings resulting from the optical excitation with twisted light. Our model describes the kinetics of electrons in a two-band model of a semiconductor-based mesoscopic quantum ring coupled to light having orbital angular momentum (twisted light). We find the analytical solution, which exhibits a "circular" photon-drag effect and an induced magnetization, suggesting that this system is the circular analog of that of a bulk semiconductor excited by plane waves. For realistic values of the electric field and material parameters, the computed electric current can be as large as microA; from an applied perspective, this opens new possibilities to the optical control of the magnetization in semiconductors.

  9. Light-induced atomic desorption and related phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchianti, A; Bogi, A; Marinelli, C; Mariotti, E; Moi, L [CNISM and Physics Department, University of Siena, 53100 Siena (Italy)], E-mail: burchianti@unisi.it

    2009-07-15

    We review some recent studies on light-induced atomic desorption (LIAD) from dielectric surfaces. Alkali-metal atoms adsorbed either on organic films or on porous glass are released into the vapor phase under illumination. The measurements were performed in Pyrex resonance cells either coated with siloxane films or containing a porous glass sample. In both cases, the experimental results show that LIAD can be used to produce atomic densities suitable for most atomic physics experiments. Moreover, we find that photoinduced effects, correlated with LIAD, produce reversible formation and evaporation of alkali-metal clusters in porous glass. These processes depend on the light frequency, making the porous glass transmittance controllable by light.

  10. Quantum correlations induced by multiple scattering of quadrature squeezed light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lodahl, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Propagating quadrature squeezed light through a multiple scattering random medium is found to induce pronounced spatial quantum correlations that have no classical analogue. The correlations are revealed in the number of photons transported through the sample that can be measured from the intensity...... fluctuations of the total transmission or reflection. In contrast, no pronounced spatial quantum correlations appear in the quadrature amplitudes where excess noise above the shot noise level is found....

  11. Analysis of tellurium-silicon alloys. Part 1. Determination of tellurium by the reduction from perchloric acid solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teperek, J.

    1977-01-01

    When 100-150 mg of tellurium is dissolved in the solution containing 20 cm 3 72 wt.% of perchloric acid, the reduction of tellurium to elementary form is possible only after adding 60-100 milimoles of HCl. The reduction is performed by adding 1 cm 3 of saturated sodium pyrosulphite solution (Na 2 S 2 O 5 ) and 10 cm 3 of 10 wt.% hydrazine hydrochloride solution (N 2 H 4 .2HCl) to 80-90 cm 3 of cold solution of Te in HClO 4 -HCl mixture. The reduction is completed after 3-5 min. of boiling. When 150-200 mg sample of Te-Si alloy is dissolved in 20 cm 3 of hot 72% per chloric acid, the separation of components is reached. Tellurium can be determinated in filtrate by proposed procedure with high accuracy and precision. (author)

  12. Light-Induced Switching of Tunable Single-Molecule Junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Sendler, Torsten

    2015-04-16

    A major goal of molecular electronics is the development and implementation of devices such as single-molecular switches. Here, measurements are presented that show the controlled in situ switching of diarylethene molecules from their nonconductive to conductive state in contact to gold nanoelectrodes via controlled light irradiation. Both the conductance and the quantum yield for switching of these molecules are within a range making the molecules suitable for actual devices. The conductance of the molecular junctions in the opened and closed states is characterized and the molecular level E 0, which dominates the current transport in the closed state, and its level broadening Γ are identified. The obtained results show a clear light-induced ring forming isomerization of the single-molecule junctions. Electron withdrawing side-groups lead to a reduction of conductance, but do not influence the efficiency of the switching mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations of the light-induced switching processes correlate these observations with the fundamentally different low-lying electronic states of the opened and closed forms and their comparably small modification by electron-withdrawing substituents. This full characterization of a molecular switch operated in a molecular junction is an important step toward the development of real molecular electronics devices.

  13. Light-Induced Switching of Tunable Single-Molecule Junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Sendler, Torsten; Luka-Guth, Katharina; Wieser, Matthias; Lokamani; Wolf, Jannic Sebastian; Helm, Manfred; Gemming, Sibylle; Kerbusch, Jochen; Scheer, Elke; Huhn, Thomas; Erbe, Artur

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of molecular electronics is the development and implementation of devices such as single-molecular switches. Here, measurements are presented that show the controlled in situ switching of diarylethene molecules from their nonconductive to conductive state in contact to gold nanoelectrodes via controlled light irradiation. Both the conductance and the quantum yield for switching of these molecules are within a range making the molecules suitable for actual devices. The conductance of the molecular junctions in the opened and closed states is characterized and the molecular level E 0, which dominates the current transport in the closed state, and its level broadening Γ are identified. The obtained results show a clear light-induced ring forming isomerization of the single-molecule junctions. Electron withdrawing side-groups lead to a reduction of conductance, but do not influence the efficiency of the switching mechanism. Quantum chemical calculations of the light-induced switching processes correlate these observations with the fundamentally different low-lying electronic states of the opened and closed forms and their comparably small modification by electron-withdrawing substituents. This full characterization of a molecular switch operated in a molecular junction is an important step toward the development of real molecular electronics devices.

  14. Light-induced defects in hybrid lead halide perovskite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharia, Onise; Schneider, William

    One of the main challenges facing organohalide perovskites for solar application is stability. Solar cells must last decades to be economically viable alternatives to traditional energy sources. While some causes of instability can be avoided through engineering, light-induced defects can be fundamentally limiting factor for practical application of the material. Light creates large numbers of electron and hole pairs that can contribute to degradation processes. Using ab initio theoretical methods, we systematically explore first steps of light induced defect formation in methyl ammonium lead iodide, MAPbI3. In particular, we study charged and neutral Frenkel pair formation involving Pb and I atoms. We find that most of the defects, except negatively charged Pb Frenkel pairs, are reversible, and thus most do not lead to degradation. Negative Pb defects create a mid-gap state and localize the conduction band electron. A minimum energy path study shows that, once the first defect is created, Pb atoms migrate relatively fast. The defects have two detrimental effects on the material. First, they create charge traps below the conduction band. Second, they can lead to degradation of the material by forming Pb clusters.

  15. METALCOMPLEXES OF TELLURIUM-CONTAINING AMINES AND AZOMETINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Abakarov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article methods of synthesis and reactionary ability of metalcomplexes of tellurium-containing amines, azometines, of a problem of competitive coordination with use of the principle of "soft" and "rigid" acids and the bases (R. Pearson.

  16. Properties of low-alloy steel with tellurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popova, L.V.; Lebedev, D.V.; Litvinenko, D.A.; Nasibov, A.G.

    1983-01-01

    The results of investigations into 09G2 and 09G2F steels alloyed with tellurium after controlled rolling are presented. 0.002-0.011% tellurium additions did not change strength and plastic properties of the steels after controlled rolling. Tellurium additions results in 40-50% increase of the steel impact strength on samples With circular and sharp cuts in brittle-viscous region. 0.002-0.003% of tellurium is considered to be the optimum content from the view point of increa=. sing steel strength. Increase of impact strength takes place at the expense of growth of both work function of crack formation and work function of crack propagation but in different temperature ranges: at the expense of firstone at 80-40 deg C, at the expense of second one at 20-40 deg C. 0.002-0.011% teilurium additions mainly at the expense of sulphide globularization bring about decrease of anisotropy of steet properties by impact strength reducing anisotropy factor from 2 to 1.5

  17. Chemically induced and light-independent cryptochrome photoreceptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeldt, Gesa; Viana, Rafael Muñoz; Mootz, Henning D; von Arnim, Albrecht G; Batschauer, Alfred

    2008-01-01

    The cryptochrome photoreceptors of higher plants are dimeric proteins. Their N-terminal photosensory domain mediates dimerization, and the unique C-terminal extension (CCT) mediates signaling. We made use of the human FK506-binding protein (FKBP) that binds with high affinity to rapamycin or rapamycin analogs (rapalogs). The FKBP-rapamycin complex is recognized by another protein, FRB, thus allowing rapamycin-induced dimerization of two target proteins. Here we demonstrate by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assays the applicability of this regulated dimerization system to plants. Furthermore, we show that fusion proteins consisting of the C-terminal domain of Arabidopsis cryptochrome 2 fused to FKBP and FRB and coexpressed in Arabidopsis cells specifically induce the expression of cryptochrome-controlled reporter and endogenous genes in darkness upon incubation with the rapalog. These results demonstrate that the activation of cryptochrome signal transduction can be chemically induced in a dose-dependent fashion and uncoupled from the light signal, and provide the groundwork for gain-of-function experiments to study specifically the role of photoreceptors in darkness or in signaling cross-talk even under light conditions that activate members of all photoreceptor families.

  18. Light-induced performance increase of silicon heterojunction solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kobayashi, Eiji; De Wolf, Stefaan; Levrat, Jacques; Christmann, Gabriel; Descoeudres, Antoine; Nicolay, Sylvain; Despeisse, Matthieu; Watabe, Yoshimi; Ballif, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Silicon heterojunction solar cells consist of crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers coated with doped/intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) bilayers for passivating-contact formation. Here, we unambiguously demonstrate that carrier injection either due to light soaking or (dark) forward-voltage bias increases the open circuit voltage and fill factor of finished cells, leading to a conversion efficiency gain of up to 0.3% absolute. This phenomenon contrasts markedly with the light-induced degradation known for thin-film a-Si:H solar cells. We associate our performance gain with an increase in surface passivation, which we find is specific to doped a-Si:H/c-Si structures. Our experiments suggest that this improvement originates from a reduced density of recombination-active interface states. To understand the time dependence of the observed phenomena, a kinetic model is presented.

  19. Desolvation Induced Origami of Photocurable Polymers by Digit Light Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zeang; Wu, Jiangtao; Mu, Xiaoming; Chen, Haosen; Qi, H Jerry; Fang, Daining

    2017-07-01

    Self-folding origami is of great interest in current research on functional materials and structures, but there is still a challenge to develop a simple method to create freestanding, reversible, and complex origami structures. This communication provides a feasible solution to this challenge by developing a method based on the digit light processing technique and desolvation-induced self-folding. In this new method, flat polymer sheets can be cured by a light field from a commercial projector with varying intensity, and the self-folding process is triggered by desolvation in water. Folded origami structures can be recovered once immersed in the swelling medium. The self-folding process is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Diverse 3D origami shapes are demonstrated. This method can be used for responsive actuators and the fabrication of 3D electronic devices. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Light-Induced Degradation of Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamelmann, F U; Weicht, J A; Behrens, G

    2016-01-01

    Silicon-wafer based solar cells are still domination the market for photovoltaic energy conversion. However, most of the silicon is used only for mechanical stability, while only a small percentage of the material is needed for the light absorption. Thin film silicon technology reduces the material demand to just some hundred nanometer thickness. But even in a tandem stack (amorphous and microcrystalline silicon) the efficiencies are lower, and light-induced degradation is an important issue. The established standard tests for characterisation are not precise enough to predict the performance of thin film silicon solar cells under real conditions, since many factors do have an influence on the degradation. We will show some results of laboratory and outdoor measurements that we are going to use as a base for advanced modelling and simulation methods. (paper)

  1. Light-induced performance increase of silicon heterojunction solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kobayashi, Eiji

    2016-10-11

    Silicon heterojunction solar cells consist of crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers coated with doped/intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) bilayers for passivating-contact formation. Here, we unambiguously demonstrate that carrier injection either due to light soaking or (dark) forward-voltage bias increases the open circuit voltage and fill factor of finished cells, leading to a conversion efficiency gain of up to 0.3% absolute. This phenomenon contrasts markedly with the light-induced degradation known for thin-film a-Si:H solar cells. We associate our performance gain with an increase in surface passivation, which we find is specific to doped a-Si:H/c-Si structures. Our experiments suggest that this improvement originates from a reduced density of recombination-active interface states. To understand the time dependence of the observed phenomena, a kinetic model is presented.

  2. Tellurium Stable Isotopes as a Paleoredox Proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, N.; Johnson, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    Despite arguments for variably-oxygenated shallow waters and anoxic deep marine waters, which delayed animal development until the Neoproterozoic Oxidation Event, the magnitude of atmospheric oxygen during the Proterozoic is still uncertain [1]. The evidence for low pO2 (<0.1-1% PAL) is based on geochemical and isotopic proxies, which track the mobilization of Fe and Mn on the continents. For example, large chromium isotope shifts occur at the Neoproterozoic Oxidation Event due to the initiation of Cr redox cycling, but this proxy is insensitive to fluctuations in the lower-pO2 conditions at other times during the Proterozoic. Tellurium, a metalloid with a lower threshold to oxidation, may be sensitive to pO2 shifts in a lower range. In the reduced forms, Te(-II) and Te(0), the element is insoluble and immobile. However, in the more oxidized phases, Te(IV) and Te(VI), Te can form soluble oxyanions (though it tends to adsorb to Fe-oxyhydroxides and clays) [2]. Te stable isotopes have been shown to fractionate during abiotic or biologic reduction of Te(VI) or Te(IV) to elemental Te(0) [3, 4]. Utilizing hydride generation MC-ICP-MS, we are able to obtain high precision (2σ 0.04‰) measurements of δ128Te/125Te for natural samples containing < 10 ng of Te. A suite of Phanerozoic and Proterozoic ironstones show significant variation in δ128Te/125Te (<0.5‰), suggesting that the Te redox cycle was active during the Proterozoic. Future directions will include Te isotope measurements of Precambrian paleosols to determine natural isotope variation before the Great Oxidation Event and experiments to determine fractionation during adsorption to Fe-oxyhydroxides. [1] Planavsky et al. (2014) Science 346 (6209), pp. 635-638 [2] Qin et al. (2017) Environmental Science and Technology 51 (11), pp 6027-6035 [3] Baesman et al. (2007) Applied Environmental Microbiology 73 (7), pp 2135-2143 [4] Smithers and Krause (1968) Canadian Journal of Chemistry 46(4): pp 583-591

  3. Light induces petal color change in Quisqualis indica (Combretaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Yan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Petal color change, a common phenomenon in angiosperms, is induced by various environmental and endogenous factors. Interestingly, this phenomenon is important for attracting pollinators and further reproductive success. Quisqualis indica L. (Combretaceae is a tropical Asian climber that undergoes sequential petal color change from white to pink to red. This color changing process is thought to be a good strategy to attract more pollinators. However, the underlying physiological and biochemical mechanisms driving this petal color change phenomenon is still underexplored. In this context, we investigated whether changes in pH, pollination, light, temperature or ethylene mediate petal color change. We found that the detected changes in petal pH were not significant enough to induce color alterations. Additionally, pollination and temperatures of 20–30 °C did not alter the rate of petal color change; however, flowers did not open when exposed to constant temperatures at 15 °C or 35 °C. Moreover, the application of ethylene inhibitor, i.e., silver thiosulphate, did not prevent color change. It is worth mentioning here that in our study we found light as a strong factor influencing the whole process of petal color change, as petals remained white under dark conditions. Altogether, the present study suggests that petal color change in Q. indica is induced by light and not by changes in petal pH, pollination, ethylene, or temperature, while extremely low or high temperatures affect flower anthesis. In summary, our findings represent the probable mechanism underlying the phenomenon of petal color change, which is important for understanding flower color evolution.

  4. Preventing light-induced degradation in multicrystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindroos, J.; Boulfrad, Y.; Yli-Koski, M.; Savin, H.

    2014-04-01

    Multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) is currently dominating the silicon solar cell market due to low ingot costs, but its efficiency is limited by transition metals, extended defects, and light-induced degradation (LID). LID is traditionally associated with a boron-oxygen complex, but the origin of the degradation in the top of the commercial mc-Si brick is revealed to be interstitial copper. We demonstrate that both a large negative corona charge and an aluminum oxide thin film with a built-in negative charge decrease the interstitial copper concentration in the bulk, preventing LID in mc-Si.

  5. Light-induced metastable structural changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsche, H. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Light-induced defects (LID) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and its alloys limit the ultimate efficiency of solar panels made with these materials. This paper reviews a variety of attempts to find the origin of and to eliminate the processes that give rise to LIDs. These attempts include novel deposition processes and the reduction of impurities. Material improvements achieved over the past decade are associated more with the material`s microstructure than with eliminating LIDs. We conclude that metastable LIDs are a natural by-product of structural changes which are generally associated with non-radiative electron-hole recombination in amorphous semiconductors.

  6. Ultraviolet light-induced suppression of antigen presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spellman, C.W.; Tomasi, T.B.

    1983-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation of animals results in the development of specific T suppressor cells that inhibit antitumor immune responses. It is thought that suppression may arise as a consequence of altered antigen presentation by UV-irradiated epidermal cells. This hypothesis is based on evidence demonstrating that specific lymphoid tissues from UV-irradiated hosts exhibit impaired antigen-presenting function and that animals cannot be contact sensitized when antigens are applied to a UV-irradiated skin site. Langerhans cells of the skin are likely candidates as targets of UV-induced defects in antigen presentation as they bear Fc and C3b receptors, express Ia antigens, are of bone marrow origin, and are capable of presenting antigen in vitro. We speculate on the possible clinical usefulness of UV-induced tolerance to specific antigens such as those encountered in monoclonal antibody therapy and tissue transplantation

  7. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolossov, Vladimir L., E-mail: viadimer@illinois.edu [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Beaudoin, Jessica N. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hanafin, William P. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); DiLiberto, Stephen J. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Kenis, Paul J.A. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rex Gaskins, H. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 S. Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition.

  8. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolossov, Vladimir L.; Beaudoin, Jessica N.; Hanafin, William P.; DiLiberto, Stephen J.; Kenis, Paul J.A.; Rex Gaskins, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition

  9. Disruption of cortical integration during midazolam-induced light sedation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Peipeng; Zhang, Han; Xu, Yachao; Jia, Wenbin; Zang, Yufeng; Li, Kuncheng

    2015-11-01

    This work examines the effect of midazolam-induced light sedation on intrinsic functional connectivity of human brain, using a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over, within-subject design. Fourteen healthy young subjects were enrolled and midazolam (0.03 mg/kg of the participant's body mass, to a maximum of 2.5 mg) or saline were administrated with an interval of one week. Resting-state fMRI was conducted before and after administration for each subject. We focus on two types of networks: sensory related lower-level functional networks and higher-order functions related ones. Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to identify these resting-state functional networks. We hypothesize that the sensory (visual, auditory, and sensorimotor) related networks will be intact under midazolam-induced light sedation while the higher-order (default mode, executive control, salience networks, etc.) networks will be functionally disconnected. It was found that the functional integrity of the lower-level networks was maintained, while that of the higher-level networks was significantly disrupted by light sedation. The within-network connectivity of the two types of networks was differently affected in terms of direction and extent. These findings provide direct evidence that higher-order cognitive functions including memory, attention, executive function, and language were impaired prior to lower-level sensory responses during sedation. Our result also lends support to the information integration model of consciousness. © 2015 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Enrichment mechanisms of tellurium in ferromanganese crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Usui, A.; Takahashi, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Marine ferromanganese crusts (FMCs) consist of iron (Fe) hydroxides and manganese (Mn) oxides with various minor and trace elements. Especially for tellurium (Te), which is recognized as one of the rare metals, it has been reported that this element is concentrated about 105 times in FMCs compared with earth's crust, and the host phase might be Fe (oxy)hydroxide (Hein et al., 2003). Actually, in our previous study, the high concentration of Te in very surface layers of FMCs was found from the top to halfway down of a seamount in the Pacific Ocean. However, the concentration of Te in surface layers through the seamount showed good correlation with that of Mn instead of Fe. In this study, we attempted to clarify the enrichment mechanism of Te in FMCs with some methods including X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) technique for synthesised /natural samples. Seventeen FMC samples were collected from the Takuyo-Daigo seamount, from 950 m (summit) to 3000 m in water depth, with hyper-dolphin (remotely operated vehicle) equipped with live video camera and manipulators. The growth rates of all FMC samples were estimated to be about 3 mm/Ma. Very surface layer (less than 1 mm) of all FMC was analyzed with XRD and XAFS to confirm the mineral composition and speciation of Te. Furthermore, to serve as an aid to clarify the adsorption mechanism of Te on FMCs, distribution coefficients (Kd) and oxidation states were determined through the adsorption experiments of Te(IV) and Te(VI) on ferrihydrite and δ-MnO2. In all the experiments, pH and ionic strength were adjusted to pH 7.5 and 0.7 M, respectively. The oxidation state of Te in water phase was determined with HPLC-ICP-MS. As for the analysis of oxidation and adsorption states on the solid phase, XAFS was employed. The major mineral composition of Fe and Mn had no significant variation through the water depth of Takuyo-Daigo seamount. The oxidation state of Te in all samples showed hexavalent, and there was no significant

  11. Collision induced light-scattering from gaseous sulphurhexafluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleich, R.

    1983-10-01

    Modern laser technology permits the measurement of collision induced light-scattering spectra from molecular gases at low densities. Measurements of this type provide a test for the separation dependent pair polarizabilities and pair potentials. For this work the octahedral molecule sulphurhexafluoride (SF 6 , point group symmetry 0sub(h)) has been chosen for which the permanent polarizability anisotropy vanishes. For the experiment an argon ion laser in combination with a double grating monochromator and standard photon counting techniques were used. Both the polarized and depolarized scattering cross sections were obtained. The point dipole-induced-dipole (DID) effect is shown to account for the most of the total scattered intensity. At low frequency shifts the line shape of the SF 6 spectrum is dominated by bound dimers, whereas the intermediate frequency range up to 50 cm -1 is well described by a DID free trajectory binary collision model. The high frequency wings are discussed in terms of the collision induced rotational Raman (CIRR) effect and estimates for the dipole-octopole polarizability E are obtained both from the spectral distribution and from the depolarization ratio. It is demonstrated that the hierarchy of effects constituting the CIRR-model converges slowly for large frequency shifts. (Author)

  12. Atomic absorption determination of ultratrace tellurium in rocks utilizing high sensitivity sampling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaty, R.D.

    1973-01-01

    The sampling boat and the graphite furnace were shown to possess the required sensitivity to detect tellurium at ultratrace levels, in a variety of sample types, by atomic absorption. In the sampling boat approach, tellurium in sample solutions is chemically separated and concentrated by extraction into methyl isobutyl ketone before measurement. For samples exhibiting extraction interferences or excessively high background absorption, a preliminary separation of tellurium by coprecipitation with selenium is described. Using this technique, tellurium can be quantitatively detected down to 5 nanograms and linear response is observed to 100 nanograms. Relative standard deviations of better than 7 percent are achieved for 50 nanograms of tellurium. For samples that have a tellurium content below the detection limits of the sampling boat, the graphite furnace is used for atomization. By this method, as little as 0.07 nanograms of tellurium can be detected, and a precision of 1 percent relative standard deviation is achievable at the 5 nanogram level. A routinely applicable procedure was developed for determining tellurium in rocks, using the graphite furnace, after a hydrofluoric acid decomposition of the sample. Using this procedure, tellurium data were obtained on 20 different rocks, and the significance of this new information is discussed. (Diss. Abstr. Int., B)

  13. Effects of tellurium concentration on the structure of melt-grown ZnSe crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atroshchenko, Lyubov V.; Galkin, Sergey N.; Rybalka, Irina A.; Voronkin, Evgeniy F.; Lalayants, Alexandr I.; Ryzhikov, Vladimir D.; Fedorov, Alexandr G.

    2005-01-01

    It has been shown that isovalent doping by tellurium positively affects the structural perfection of ZnSe crystals related to the completeness of the wurtzite-sphalerite phase transition. The optimum concentration range of tellurium in ZnSe crystals is 0.3-0.6 mass %. X-ray diffraction studies have shown that in ZnSe 1-x Te x crystals at tellurium concentrations below 0.3 mass % twinning and packing defects occur, while tellurium concentrations above 0.6 mass % lead to formation of tetragonal crystal lattice

  14. Determining arsenic in elemental antimony containing selenium and tellurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mogileva, M.G.; Kozlova, E.L.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have developed a method of determining arsenic in metallic antimony containing selenium, tellurium, and mercury, in which they isolated it in elementary form for separation from the antimony and the associated elements (silicon and phosphorus), followed by colorimetric determination of the arsenic from arsenic-molbdenum blue. The reducing agents to reduce the arsenic were sodium hypophosphite and tin(II) chloride, which do not reduce antimony and which do not interfere with the determination. This method of determining arsenic in metallic antimony without preliminary separation of the selenium and tellurium is in no way inferior in accuracy to the method given in All-Union State Standard (GOST) 1367.4-83

  15. RILIS-ionized mercury and tellurium beams at ISOLDE CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day Goodacre, T., E-mail: thomas.day.goodacre@cern.ch [CERN (Switzerland); Billowes, J. [The University of Manchester, School of Physics and Astronomy (United Kingdom); Chrysalidis, K. [CERN (Switzerland); Fedorov, D. V. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Fedosseev, V. N.; Marsh, B. A. [CERN (Switzerland); Molkanov, P. L. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Rossel, R. E.; Rothe, S.; Seiffert, C. [CERN (Switzerland); Wendt, K. D. A. [Johannes Gutenberg Universität, Institut für Physik (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    This paper presents the results of ionization scheme development for application at the ISOLDE Resonance Ionization Laser Ion Source (RILIS). Two new ionization schemes for mercury are presented: a three-step three-resonance ionization scheme, ionizing via an excitation to a Rydberg level and a three-step two-resonance ionization scheme, with a non-resonant final step to the ionization continuum that corresponded to a factor of four higher ionization efficiency. The efficiency of the optimal mercury ionization scheme was measured, together with the efficiency of a new three-step three resonance ionization scheme for tellurium. The efficiencies of the mercury and tellurium ionization schemes were determined to be 6 % and >18 % respectively.

  16. Light-induced bird strikes on vessels in Southwest Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merkel, Flemming Ravn; Johansen, Kasper Lambert

    2011-01-01

    Light-induced bird strikes are known to occur when vessels navigate during darkness in icy waters using powerful searchlight. In Southwest Greenland, which is important internationally for wintering seabirds, we collected reports of incidents of bird strikes over 2–3 winters (2006–2009) from navy...... vessels, cargo vessels and trawlers (total n = 19). Forty-one incidents were reported: mainly close to land (birds were reported killed in a single incident. All occurred between 5 p.m. and 6 a.m. and significantly more birds were involved when...... visibility was poor (snow) rather than moderate or good. Among five seabird species reported, the common eider (Somateria mollissima) accounted for 95% of the bird casualties. Based on spatial analyses of data on vessel traffic intensity and common eider density we are able to predict areas with high risk...

  17. Functional analysis of chloroplast early light inducible proteins (ELIPs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzel, Carolyn M

    2005-02-22

    The objectives of this project were to characterize gene expression patterns of early light inducible protein (ELIP) genes in Arabidopsis thaliana and in Lycopersicon esculentum, to identify knock mutants of the 2 ELIP genes in Arabidopsis, and to characterize the effects of the knockouts. Expression in Arabidopsis was studied in response to thylakoid electron transport chain (PETC) capacity, where it was found that there is a signal for expression associated with reduction of the PETC. Expression in response to salt was also studied, with different responses of the two gene copies. Knockout lines for ELIP1 and ELIP2 have been identified and are being characterized. In tomato, it was found that the single-copy ELIP gene is highly expressed in ripening fruit during the chloroplast-to-chromoplast transition. Studies of expression in tomato ripening mutants are ongoing.

  18. Ultraviolet-light-induced processes in germanium-doped silica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Martin

    2001-01-01

    A model is presented for the interaction of ultraviolet (UV) light with germanium-doped silica glass. It is assumed that germanium sites work as gates for transferring the excitation energy into the silica. In the material the excitation induces forbidden transitions to two different defect states...... which are responsible for the observed refractive index changes. Activation energies [1.85 +/-0.15 eV and 1.91 +/-0.15 eV] and rates [(2.7 +/-1.9) x 10(13) Hz and(7.2 +/-4.5) x 10(13) Hz] are determined for thermal elimination of these states. Good agreement is found with experimental results and new UV...

  19. ELECTROCHEMICAL STUDY OF RHENIUM-TELLURIUM-COPPER SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    E.A.Salakhova*1, D.B.Tagiyev2, P.E.Kalantarova3 and A.M.Askerova4

    2017-01-01

    The formation of the triple alloys Re-Te-Cu on the platinum electrode at volt amperemetric cycling has been studied. The investigation was carried out from chloride acidic solution containing tellurium acid, potassium perrhenate, chloride copper. The kinetics of the processes was controlled using the measurements by the method of cyclic volt-amperometry on the device İVİUMSTAT. For the analysis of composition and structure the methods of XRD (X-ray diffraction analysis) were used, and the inv...

  20. Starting material radiation source for Moessbauer investigations of tellurium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandrov, A.J.; Grushko, J.S.; Makarov, E.F.; Mishin, K.Y.; Baltrunas, D.A.J.

    1977-01-01

    A method is described of preparing a radiation source for Mossbauer investigations of tellurium compounds manufactured on the basis of 5 MgO . Te 124 O 3 . 5 MgO . Te 124 O 3 is irradiated in a reactor by means of thermal neutrons, followed by annealing at a temperature ranging from 600 0 to 1,100 0 C for a period of from 5 to 10 hours

  1. Flotation concentration for tellurium determination in industrial sewage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skripchuk, V.G.; Bormotova, L.V.; Lukoyanova, L.P.; Tret'yakova, M.I.

    1983-01-01

    Combination of the flotation of tellurium (4) precipitate with papaverine toluene and extraction-photometric determination of Te with butylrhodamine C allows one to determine 0.002-0.1 mg Te/l without its preliminary precipitation. Accompanying elements found in non-ferrous metallurgy sewage have no effect upon it. The duration of analysis of 10 samples is 1 to 1.5 h. Relative error is 12%. The method is introduced at the ''Uralelektromed'' plant

  2. Light-induced protein nitration and degradation with HONO emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meusel, Hannah; Elshorbany, Yasin; Kuhn, Uwe; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Reinmuth-Selzle, Kathrin; Kampf, Christopher J.; Li, Guo; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Lelieveld, Jos; Pöschl, Ulrich; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Su, Hang; Ammann, Markus; Cheng, Yafang

    2017-10-01

    Proteins can be nitrated by air pollutants (NO2), enhancing their allergenic potential. This work provides insight into protein nitration and subsequent decomposition in the presence of solar radiation. We also investigated light-induced formation of nitrous acid (HONO) from protein surfaces that were nitrated either online with instantaneous gas-phase exposure to NO2 or offline by an efficient nitration agent (tetranitromethane, TNM). Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and ovalbumin (OVA) were used as model substances for proteins. Nitration degrees of about 1 % were derived applying NO2 concentrations of 100 ppb under VIS/UV illuminated conditions, while simultaneous decomposition of (nitrated) proteins was also found during long-term (20 h) irradiation exposure. Measurements of gas exchange on TNM-nitrated proteins revealed that HONO can be formed and released even without contribution of instantaneous heterogeneous NO2 conversion. NO2 exposure was found to increase HONO emissions substantially. In particular, a strong dependence of HONO emissions on light intensity, relative humidity, NO2 concentrations and the applied coating thickness was found. The 20 h long-term studies revealed sustained HONO formation, even when concentrations of the intact (nitrated) proteins were too low to be detected after the gas exchange measurements. A reaction mechanism for the NO2 conversion based on the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetics is proposed.

  3. Light-induced electronic non-equilibrium in plasmonic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornbluth, Mordechai; Nitzan, Abraham; Seideman, Tamar

    2013-05-07

    We consider the transient non-equilibrium electronic distribution that is created in a metal nanoparticle upon plasmon excitation. Following light absorption, the created plasmons decohere within a few femtoseconds, producing uncorrelated electron-hole pairs. The corresponding non-thermal electronic distribution evolves in response to the photo-exciting pulse and to subsequent relaxation processes. First, on the femtosecond timescale, the electronic subsystem relaxes to a Fermi-Dirac distribution characterized by an electronic temperature. Next, within picoseconds, thermalization with the underlying lattice phonons leads to a hot particle in internal equilibrium that subsequently equilibrates with the environment. Here we focus on the early stage of this multistep relaxation process, and on the properties of the ensuing non-equilibrium electronic distribution. We consider the form of this distribution as derived from the balance between the optical absorption and the subsequent relaxation processes, and discuss its implication for (a) heating of illuminated plasmonic particles, (b) the possibility to optically induce current in junctions, and (c) the prospect for experimental observation of such light-driven transport phenomena.

  4. Effects of day-time exposure to different light intensities on light-induced melatonin suppression at night.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozaki, Tomoaki; Kubokawa, Ayaka; Taketomi, Ryunosuke; Hatae, Keisuke

    2015-07-04

    Bright nocturnal light has been known to suppress melatonin secretion. However, bright light exposure during the day-time might reduce light-induced melatonin suppression (LIMS) at night. The effective proportion of day-time light to night-time light is unclear; however, only a few studies on accurately controlling both day- and night-time conditions have been conducted. This study aims to evaluate the effect of different day-time light intensities on LIMS. Twelve male subjects between the ages of 19 and 23 years (mean ± S.D., 20.8 ± 1.1) gave informed consent to participate in this study. They were exposed to various light conditions (day-time light conditions). They were then exposed to bright light (300 lx) again between 01:00 and 02:30 (night-time light exposure). They provided saliva samples before (00:55) and after night-time light exposure (02:30). A one-tailed paired t test yielded significant decrements of melatonin concentration after night-time light exposure under day-time dim, 100- and 300-lx light conditions. No significant differences exist in melatonin concentration between pre- and post-night-time light exposure under day-time 900- and 2700-lx light conditions. Present findings suggest the amount of light exposure needed to prevent LIMS caused by ordinary nocturnal light in individuals who have a general life rhythm (sleep/wake schedule). These findings may be useful in implementing artificial light environments for humans in, for example, hospitals and underground shopping malls.

  5. Investigation of biomethylation of arsenic and tellurium during composting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Bone, Roland A.; Raabe, Maren; Awissus, Simone; Keuter, Bianca; Menzel, Bernd; Kueppers, Klaus; Widmann, Renatus; Hirner, Alfred V.

    2011-01-01

    Though the process of composting features a high microbiological activity, its potential to methylate metals and metalloids has been little investigated so far in spite of the high impact of this process on metal(loid) toxicity and mobility. Here, we studied the biotransformation of arsenic, tellurium, antimony, tin and germanium during composting. Time resolved investigation revealed a highly dynamic process during self-heated composting with markedly differing time patterns for arsenic and tellurium species. Extraordinary high concentrations of up to 150 mg kg -1 methylated arsenic species as well as conversion rates up to 50% for arsenic and 5% for tellurium were observed. In contrast, little to no conversion was observed for antimony, tin and germanium. In addition to experiments with metal(loid) salts, composting of arsenic hyperaccumulating ferns Pteris vittata and P. cretica grown on As-amended soils was studied. Arsenic accumulated in the fronds was efficiently methylated resulting in up to 8 mg kg -1 methylated arsenic species. Overall, these studies indicate that metal(loid)s can undergo intensive biomethylation during composting. Due to the high mobility of methylated species this process needs to be considered in organic waste treatment of metal(loid) contaminated waste materials.

  6. Rutherford backscatter measurements on tellurium and cadmium implanted gallium arsenide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, E.C.

    1979-10-01

    The primary aim of the work described in this thesis was to examine implanted layers of the dopant impurities cadmium and tellurium in gallium arsenide and to experimentally assess their potential for producing electrically active layers. 1.5 MeV Rutherford backscattering measurements of lattice disorder and atom site location have been used to assess post implantation thermal annealing and elevated temperature implantations to site the dopant impurities on either gallium or arsenic lattice positions in an otherwise undisordered lattice. Pyrolitically deposited silicon dioxide was used as an encapsulant to prevent thermal dissociation of the gallium arsenide during annealing. It has been shown that high doses of cadmium and tellurium can be implanted without forming amorphous lattice disorder by heating the gallium arsenide during implantation to relatively low temperatures. Atom site location measurements have shown that a large fraction of a tellurium dose implanted at 180 0 C is located on or near lattice sites. Channeled backscatter measurements have shown that there is residual disorder or lattice strain in gallium arsenide implanted at elevated temperatures. The extent of this disorder has been shown to depend on the implanted dose and implantation temperature. The channeling effect has been used to measure annealing of the disorder. (author)

  7. Report of the workshop on 'light particle-induced reactions'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The study meeting on light particle (mass number = 3 - 11)-induced reation was held for three days from December 5 to 7, 1991 at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. This book records the report based on the lectures presented at the meeting. In the new facility of the RCNP, the experiment on the nuclear reaction using 400 MeV polarized protons and 200 MeV polarized deuterons is about to begin. When the acceleration of polarized He-3 beam which is being developed at present becomes feasible, by combining it with the high resolution spectrometer GRAND RAIDEN, it is expected that the unique, high accuracy research using the polarized He-3 having intermediate energy (540 MeV) becomes possible. At this time, by focusing attention to what new physics is developed by the nuclear reaction induced by the composite particles having the intermediate energy of mass number 3 - 11, this study meeting was planned and held. As the results, 29 lectures collected in this book were to cover wide fields, and active discussion was carried out. (K.I.)

  8. Revision and extension to the analysis of the third spectrum of tellurium: Te III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauheed, A.; Naz, A.

    2011-01-01

    The spectrum of doubly ionized tellurium atom (Te III) has been investigated in the vacuum ultraviolet wavelength region. The ground configuration of Te III is 5s 2 5p 2 and the excited configurations are of the type 5s 2 5p nl. The core excitation leads to a 5s5p 3 configuration. Cowan's multi-configuration interaction code was utilized to predict the ion structure. The observed spectrum of tellurium was recorded on a 3-m normal incidence vacuum spectrograph of Antigonish Laboratory (Canada) in the wavelength region of 300 - 2000 A by using a triggered spark light source for the excitation of the spectrum. The 5s 2 5p 2 - [ 5s 2 5p (5d + 6d + 7d + 6s + 7s + 8s) + 5s5p 3 ] transition array has been analyzed. Previously reported levels by Joshi et al have been confirmed while the older analysis by Crooker and Joshi has been revised and extended to include the 5s 2 5p (5d, 6d, 7d, 6s,7s, 8s) and 5s5p 3 configurations. Least-squares- fitted parametric calculations were used to interpret the final results. One hundred and fifty spectral lines have been identified to establish 60 energy levels. Our wavelength accuracy for unblended and sharp lines is better than ±0.005 A. The ionization potential of Te III was found to be 224550 ± 300 cm -1 (27.841 ± 0.037eV).

  9. Reprint of “Extracellular production of tellurium nanoparticles by the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghese, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.borghese@unibo.it [Dept. of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy); Brucale, Marco [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials (CNR-ISMN), Rome (Italy); Fortunato, Gianuario [Dept. of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy); Lanzi, Massimiliano [Dept. of Industrial Chemistry “Toso Montanari”, University of Bologna (Italy); Mezzi, Alessio [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials (CNR-ISMN), Rome (Italy); Valle, Francesco; Cavallini, Massimiliano [Institute for the Study of Nanostructured Materials (CNR-ISMN), Bologna (Italy); Zannoni, Davide [Dept. of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, University of Bologna (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Tellurite is reduced by R. capsulatus as cytosolic tellurium nanoprecipitates TeNPs. • Lawsone allows R. capsulatus to produce extracellular TeNPs. • Extracellular TeNPs production depends on the carbon source used for cells growth. • Both lawsone concentration and the incubation time determine the TeNPs size. • Extracellular TeNPs are coated with extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). - Abstract: The toxic oxyanion tellurite (TeO{sub 3}{sup 2−}) is acquired by cells of Rhodobacter capsulatus grown anaerobically in the light, via acetate permease ActP2 and then reduced to Te{sup 0} in the cytoplasm as needle-like black precipitates. Interestingly, photosynthetic cultures of R. capsulatus can also generate Te{sup 0} nanoprecipitates (TeNPs) outside the cells upon addition of the redox mediator lawsone (2-hydroxy-1,4-naphtoquinone). TeNPs generation kinetics were monitored to define the optimal conditions to produce TeNPs as a function of various carbon sources and lawsone concentration. We report that growing cultures over a 10 days period with daily additions of 1 mM tellurite led to the accumulation in the growth medium of TeNPs with dimensions from 200 up to 600–700 nm in length as determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). This result suggests that nucleation of TeNPs takes place over the entire cell growth period although the addition of new tellurium Te{sup 0} to pre-formed TeNPs is the main strategy used by R. capsulatus to generate TeNPs outside the cells. Finally, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis of TeNPs indicate they are coated with an organic material which keeps the particles in solution in aqueous solvents.

  10. Electrodeposition of antimony, tellurium and their alloys from molten acetamide mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, H.P.; Peng, X.; Murugan, G.; Vullers, R.J.M.; Vereecken, P.M.; Fransaer, J.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the electrodeposition of antimony (Sb), tellurium (Te) and their alloys from molten mixtures of acetamide - antimony chloride and tellurium chloride. The binary mixtures of acetamide with SbCl3 and TeCl 4 exhibit eutectic formation with large depressions of freezing points to below room

  11. Biosynthesis and recovery of rod-shaped tellurium nanoparticles and their bactericidal activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zare, Bijan; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham [Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Biotechnology Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 14155-6451 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shakibaie, Mojtaba [Department of Pharmacognosy and Biotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutics Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 76175-493 Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaie, Sassan [Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Advanced Medical Technologies, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza, E-mail: shahverd@sina.tums.ac.ir [Department of Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Biotechnology Research Center, Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, P.O. Box 14155-6451 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ► Biosynthesis of rod shape tellurium nanoparticles with a hexagonal crystal structure. ► Extraction procedure for isolation of tellurium nanoparticles from Bacillus sp. BZ. ► Extracted tellurium nanoparticles have good bactericidal activity against some bacteria. -- Abstract: In this study, a tellurium-transforming Bacillus sp. BZ was isolated from the Caspian Sea in northern Iran. The isolate was identified by various tests and 16S rDNA analysis, and then used to prepare elemental tellurium nanoparticles. The isolate was subsequently used for the intracellular biosynthesis of elemental tellurium nanoparticles. The biogenic nanoparticles were released by liquid nitrogen and purified by an n-octyl alcohol water extraction system. The shape, size, and composition of the extracted nanoparticles were characterized. The transmission electron micrograph showed rod-shaped nanoparticles with dimensions of about 20 nm × 180 nm. The energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction spectra respectively demonstrated that the extracted nanoparticles consisted of only tellurium and have a hexagonal crystal structure. This is the first study to demonstrate a biological method for synthesizing rod-shaped elemental tellurium by a Bacillus sp., its extraction and its antibacterial activity against different clinical isolates.

  12. Biosynthesis and recovery of rod-shaped tellurium nanoparticles and their bactericidal activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zare, Bijan; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham; Shakibaie, Mojtaba; Rezaie, Sassan; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Biosynthesis of rod shape tellurium nanoparticles with a hexagonal crystal structure. ► Extraction procedure for isolation of tellurium nanoparticles from Bacillus sp. BZ. ► Extracted tellurium nanoparticles have good bactericidal activity against some bacteria. -- Abstract: In this study, a tellurium-transforming Bacillus sp. BZ was isolated from the Caspian Sea in northern Iran. The isolate was identified by various tests and 16S rDNA analysis, and then used to prepare elemental tellurium nanoparticles. The isolate was subsequently used for the intracellular biosynthesis of elemental tellurium nanoparticles. The biogenic nanoparticles were released by liquid nitrogen and purified by an n-octyl alcohol water extraction system. The shape, size, and composition of the extracted nanoparticles were characterized. The transmission electron micrograph showed rod-shaped nanoparticles with dimensions of about 20 nm × 180 nm. The energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray diffraction spectra respectively demonstrated that the extracted nanoparticles consisted of only tellurium and have a hexagonal crystal structure. This is the first study to demonstrate a biological method for synthesizing rod-shaped elemental tellurium by a Bacillus sp., its extraction and its antibacterial activity against different clinical isolates.

  13. Polarographic determination of selenium and tellurium in silver-gold alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gornostaeva, T.D.; Shmargun, S.V.

    1986-01-01

    The determination of selenium and tellurium is of importance in monitoring the composition of silver-gold alloys (SGA) since these elements are harmful impurities in the pure metals. Tellurium is determined in silver alloys by atomic absorption and atomic emmission methods; selenium determination is made by atomic absorption methods. This paper examines the polarographic determination of silver and tellurium in SGA containing platinum metals and copper. Copper and the bulk of the platinum and palladium were removed by precipitating selenium and tellurium with potassium hypophosphite in the elementary state from 6 M HC1. The results of an analysis of samples of SGA according to the proposed method were compared with the results obtained by the atomic absorption method. the relative deviation in the determination of 0.02-1.0% by weight selenium and tellurium does not exceed 0.12 (n = 5)

  14. Tunable atom-light beam splitter using electromagnetically induced transparency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xinyu; Wen, Rong; Chen, J. F.

    2018-06-01

    With electromagnetically induced transmission (EIT), an optical field can be converted into collective atomic excitation and stored in the atomic medium through switching off the strong-coupling field adiabatically. By varying the power of the coupling pulse, we can control the ratio between the transmitted optical field and the stored atomic mode. We use a cloud of cold 85Rb atoms prepared in magneto-optical trap as the experimental platform. Based on a model of EIT dark-state polariton, we consider the real case where the atomic medium has a finite length. The theoretical calculation gives numerical results that agree well with the experimental data. The results show that the ratio can be changed approximately from 0 to 100%, when the maximum power of the coupling pulse (the pulse length is 100 ns) varies from 0 to 20 mW, in the cold atomic ensemble with an optical depth of 40. This process can be used to achieve an atom-light hybrid beam splitter with tunable splitting ratio and thus find potential application in interferometric measurement and quantum information processing.

  15. The LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) experiment at LNF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agosteo, S.; Anania, M.P.; Caresana, M.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; De Martinis, C.; Delle Side, D.; Fazzi, A.; Gatti, G.; Giove, D.; Giulietti, D.; Gizzi, L.A.; Labate, L.; Londrillo, P.; Maggiore, M.; Nassisi, V.; Sinigardi, S.; Tramontana, A.; Schillaci, F.; Scuderi, V.; Turchetti, G.

    2014-01-01

    Laser-matter interaction at relativistic intensities opens up new research fields in the particle acceleration and related secondary sources, with immediate applications in medical diagnostics, biophysics, material science, inertial confinement fusion, up to laboratory astrophysics. In particular laser-driven ion acceleration is very promising for hadron therapy once the ion energy will attain a few hundred MeV. The limited value of the energy up to now obtained for the accelerated ions is the drawback of such innovative technique to the real applications. LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) is an experiment now running at LNF (Frascati) with the goal of producing a real proton beam able to be driven for significant distances (50–75 cm) away from the interaction point and which will act as a source for further accelerating structure. In this paper the description of the experimental setup, the preliminary results of solid target irradiation and start to end simulation for a post-accelerated beam up to 60 MeV are given

  16. The LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) experiment at LNF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agosteo, S. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Anania, M.P. [INFN LNF Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Caresana, M. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); De Martinis, C. [Physics Department, University of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Delle Side, D. [LEAS, University of Salento and INFN, Lecce (Italy); Fazzi, A. [Energy Department, Polytechnic of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Gatti, G. [INFN LNF Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Giove, D. [Physics Department, University of Milan and INFN, Milan (Italy); Giulietti, D. [Physics Department, University of Pisa and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Gizzi, L.A.; Labate, L. [INO-CNR and INFN, Pisa (Italy); Londrillo, P. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Maggiore, M. [INFN LNL, Legnaro (Italy); Nassisi, V., E-mail: vincenzo.nassisi@le.infn.it [LEAS, University of Salento and INFN, Lecce (Italy); Sinigardi, S. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); Tramontana, A.; Schillaci, F. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); Scuderi, V. [INFN LNS Catania, Catania (Italy); Institute of Physics of the ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Turchetti, G. [Physics Department, University of Bologna and INFN, Bologna (Italy); and others

    2014-07-15

    Laser-matter interaction at relativistic intensities opens up new research fields in the particle acceleration and related secondary sources, with immediate applications in medical diagnostics, biophysics, material science, inertial confinement fusion, up to laboratory astrophysics. In particular laser-driven ion acceleration is very promising for hadron therapy once the ion energy will attain a few hundred MeV. The limited value of the energy up to now obtained for the accelerated ions is the drawback of such innovative technique to the real applications. LILIA (laser induced light ions acceleration) is an experiment now running at LNF (Frascati) with the goal of producing a real proton beam able to be driven for significant distances (50–75 cm) away from the interaction point and which will act as a source for further accelerating structure. In this paper the description of the experimental setup, the preliminary results of solid target irradiation and start to end simulation for a post-accelerated beam up to 60 MeV are given.

  17. What goes down must come up: symmetry in light-induced migration behaviour of Daphnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gool, E.; Ringelberg, J.

    2003-01-01

    During a short period of the year, Daphnia may perform a phenotypically induced diel vertical migration. For this to happen, light-induced swimming reactions must be enhanced both at dawn and at dusk. Enhanced swimming in response to light intensity increase can be elicited by fish-associated

  18. Photoreactivation of ultraviolet light-induced sister chromatid exchanges in potorous cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, K.; Nikaido, O.; Takebe, H.

    1980-01-01

    Exposure to visible light after UV-irradiation showed a remarkable effect on UV-induced sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs). After 6-h exposure to visible light (3 x 10 5 J/m 2 ), two-thirds of the UV-induced SCEs were prevented, confirming Kato's findings. (Nature 249, 552-3, 1974) Exposure to visible light before UV irradiation had no effect. This effect of visible light on UV-induced CSEs was temperature dependent, suggesting the presence of enzymatic photoreactivation. (author)

  19. Synthesis and structure of aromatic and heterocyclic compounds of tellurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadekov, I.D.; Maksimenko, A.A.; Rivkin, B.B.

    1983-01-01

    A new universal method of preparing assymmetric and symmetric diaryl-tellurium chlorides and-dibromides, based on the interaction of diarylditellurides with cations of aryl-diazonium in the presence of copper (2) halogenides is developed. High yields of diaryltellium dihalogenices (60-90 de %), the possibility of the a wide variation of the nature of substituents in both components make this reaction one of the most general methods of preparing assymmetric diaryltellurium dihalogenides. It is advisable to use aryldiazonium boron fluorides instead of halogenides in this reaction

  20. Characterization of tellurium-based films for NO2 detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiulyanu, D.; Tsiulyanu, A.; Liess, H.-D.; Eisele, I.

    2005-01-01

    Sensing characteristics of tellurium-based thin films for NO 2 monitoring was studied systematically. The influence of contact materials, thermal treatment, temperature and thickness of the samples on the electrical conductivity and sensitivity to NO 2 with respect to scanning electron microscopy analyses is given. The possibility is shown to optimize the properties of the films for the development of a simple and stable NO 2 sensor device with rapid response/recovery time and low operating temperature. The sensing mechanism is discussed for the direct interaction of gaseous species with lone-pair electrons of chalcogen atoms

  1. Light induced cooling of a heated solid immersed in liquid helium I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lezak, D.; Brodie, L.C.; Semura, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter investigates the marked enhancement in the transient heat transfer from the heater-thermometer to the liquid helium immediately following the application of a flash of visible light. This ''light effect'' is associated with increased bubble activity, and it is possible that the light induces a rapid nucleation of bubbles in the superheated liquid at or near the heater surface. A summary of the light effect is presented and some potential uses to which this effect could be applied are suggested. Quantification of the light effect and properties of the light effect are discussed. It is determined that the light effect is an additional cooling due to a light induced enhancement of boiling in superheated liquid helium I. The effect could be applied in practical cryogenic engineering and for the acquisition of fundamental knowledge of boiling heat transfer and nucleation in cryogenic liquids

  2. Fluorescent-light-induced lethality and DNA repair in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, M.A.; Williams, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    Cell survival and induction of endonuclease-sensitive sites in DNA were measured in human fibroblast cells exposed to fluorescent light or germicidal ultraviolet light. Cells from a xeroderma pigmentosum patient were hypersensitive to cell killing by fluorescent light, although less so than for germicidal ultraviolet light. Xeroderma pigmentosum cells were deficient in the removal of fluorescent light-induced endonuclease sites that are probably pyrimidine dimers, and both the xeroderma pigmentosum and normal cells removed these sites with kinetics indistinguishable from those for ultraviolet light-induced sites. A comparison of fluorescent with ultraviolet light data demonstrates that there are markedly fewer pyrimidine dimers per lethal event for fluorescent than for ultraviolet light, suggesting a major role for non-dimer damage in fluorescent lethality. (Auth.)

  3. Van der Waals epitaxy and photoresponse of hexagonal tellurium nanoplates on flexible mica sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qisheng; Safdar, Muhammad; Xu, Kai; Mirza, Misbah; Wang, Zhenxing; He, Jun

    2014-07-22

    Van der Waals epitaxy (vdWE) is of great interest due to its extensive applications in the synthesis of ultrathin two-dimensional (2D) layered materials. However, vdWE of nonlayered functional materials is still not very well documented. Here, although tellurium has a strong tendency to grow into one-dimensional nanoarchitecture due to its chain-like structure, we successfully realize 2D hexagonal tellurium nanoplates on flexible mica sheets via vdWE. Chemically inert mica surface is found to be crucial for the lateral growth of hexagonal tellurium nanoplates since it (1) facilitates the migration of tellurium adatoms along mica surface and (2) allows a large lattice mismatch. Furthermore, 2D tellurium hexagonal nanoplates-based photodetectors are in situ fabricated on flexible mica sheets. Efficient photoresponse is obtained even after bending the device for 100 times, indicating 2D tellurium hexagonal nanoplates-based photodetectors on mica sheets have a great application potential in flexible and wearable optoelectronic devices. We believe the fundamental understanding of vdWE effect on the growth of 2D tellurium hexagonal nanoplate can pave the way toward leveraging vdWE as a useful channel to realize the 2D geometry of other nonlayered materials.

  4. Blue light filtered white light induces depression-like responses and temporary spatial learning deficits in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qinghe; Lian, Yuzheng; Jiang, Jianjun; Wang, Wei; Hou, Xiaohong; Pan, Yao; Chu, Hongqian; Shang, Lanqin; Wei, Xuetao; Hao, Weidong

    2018-04-18

    Ambient light has a vital impact on mood and cognitive functions. Blue light has been previously reported to play a salient role in the antidepressant effect via melanopsin. Whether blue light filtered white light (BFW) affects mood and cognitive functions remains unclear. The present study aimed to investigate whether BFW led to depression-like symptoms and cognitive deficits including spatial learning and memory abilities in rats, and whether they were associated with the light-responsive function in retinal explants. Male Sprague-Dawley albino rats were randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 10) and treated with a white light-emitting diode (LED) light source and BFW light source, respectively, under a standard 12 : 12 h L/D condition over 30 days. The sucrose consumption test, forced swim test (FST) and the level of plasma corticosterone (CORT) were employed to evaluate depression-like symptoms in rats. Cognitive functions were assessed by the Morris water maze (MWM) test. A multi-electrode array (MEA) system was utilized to measure electro-retinogram (ERG) responses induced by white or BFW flashes. The effect of BFW over 30 days on depression-like responses in rats was indicated by decreased sucrose consumption in the sucrose consumption test, an increased immobility time in the FST and an elevated level of plasma CORT. BFW led to temporary spatial learning deficits in rats, which was evidenced by prolonged escape latency and swimming distances in the spatial navigation test. However, no changes were observed in the short memory ability of rats treated with BFW. The micro-ERG results showed a delayed implicit time and reduced amplitudes evoked by BFW flashes compared to the white flash group. BFW induces depression-like symptoms and temporary spatial learning deficits in rats, which might be closely related to the impairment of light-evoked output signals in the retina.

  5. Light-dependent expression of flg22-induced defense genes in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi eSano

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chloroplasts have been reported to generate retrograde immune signals that activate defense gene expression in the nucleus. However, the roles of light and photosynthesis in plant immunity remain largely elusive. In this study, we evaluated the effects of light on the expression of defense genes induced by flg22, a peptide derived from bacterial flagellins which acts as a potent elicitor in plants. Whole-transcriptome analysis of flg22-treated Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings under light and dark conditions for 30 min revealed that a number of (30% genes strongly induced by flg22 (>4.0 require light for their rapid expression, whereas flg22-repressed genes include a significant number of genes that are down-regulated by light. Furthermore, light is responsible for the flg22-induced accumulation of salicylic acid, indicating that light is indispensable for basal defense responses in plants. To elucidate the role of photosynthesis in defense, we further examined flg22-induced defense gene expression in the presence of specific inhibitors of photosynthetic electron transport: 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU and 2,5-dibromo-3-methyl-6-isopropyl-benzoquinone (DBMIB. Light-dependent expression of defense genes was largely suppressed by DBMIB, but only partially suppressed by DCMU. These findings suggest that photosynthetic electron flow plays a role in controling the light-dependent expression of flg22-inducible defense genes.

  6. Light-induced protein degradation in human-derived cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wansheng; Zhang, Wenyao; Zhang, Chao; Mao, Miaowei; Zhao, Yuzheng; Chen, Xianjun; Yang, Yi

    2017-05-27

    Controlling protein degradation can be a valuable tool for posttranslational regulation of protein abundance to study complex biological systems. In the present study, we designed a light-switchable degron consisting of a light oxygen voltage (LOV) domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1 (AsLOV2) and a C-terminal degron. Our results showed that the light-switchable degron could be used for rapid and specific induction of protein degradation in HEK293 cells by light in a proteasome-dependent manner. Further studies showed that the light-switchable degron could also be utilized to mediate the degradation of secreted Gaussia princeps luciferase (GLuc), demonstrating the adaptability of the light-switchable degron in different types of protein. We suggest that the light-switchable degron offers a robust tool to control protein levels and may serves as a new and significant method for gene- and cell-based therapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Light-induced modification of plant plasma membrane ion transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marten, I; Deeken, R; Hedrich, R; Roelfsema, M R G

    2010-09-01

    Light is not only the driving force for electron and ion transport in the thylakoid membrane, but also regulates ion transport in various other membranes of plant cells. Light-dependent changes in ion transport at the plasma membrane and associated membrane potential changes have been studied intensively over the last century. These studies, with various species and cell types, revealed that apart from regulation by chloroplasts, plasma membrane transport can be controlled by phytochromes, phototropins or channel rhodopsins. In this review, we compare light-dependent plasma membrane responses of unicellular algae (Eremosphaera and Chlamydomonas), with those of a multicellular alga (Chara), liverworts (Conocephalum), mosses (Physcomitrella) and several angiosperm cell types. Light-dependent plasma membrane responses of Eremosphaera and Chara are characterised by the dominant role of K(+) channels during membrane potential changes. In most other species, the Ca(2+)-dependent activation of plasma membrane anion channels represents a general light-triggered event. Cell type-specific responses are likely to have evolved by modification of this general response or through the development of additional light-dependent signalling pathways. Future research to elucidate these light-activated signalling chains is likely to benefit from the recent identification of S-type anion channel genes and proteins capable of regulating these channels.

  8. GPS tracking for mapping seabird mortality induced by light pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Airam; Rodríguez, Beneharo; Negro, Juan J

    2015-06-02

    Light pollution and its consequences on ecosystems are increasing worldwide. Knowledge on the threshold levels of light pollution at which significant ecological impacts emerge and the size of dark refuges to maintain natural nocturnal processes is crucial to mitigate its negative consequences. Seabird fledglings are attracted by artificial lights when they leave their nest at night, causing high mortality. We used GPS data-loggers to track the flights of Cory's shearwater Calonectris diomedea fledglings from nest-burrows to ground, and to evaluate the light pollution levels of overflown areas on Tenerife, Canary Islands, using nocturnal, high-resolution satellite imagery. Birds were grounded at locations closer than 16 km from colonies in their maiden flights, and 50% were rescued within a 3 km radius from the nest-site. Most birds left the nests in the first three hours after sunset. Rescue locations showed radiance values greater than colonies, and flight distance was positively related to light pollution levels. Breeding habitat alteration by light pollution was more severe for inland colonies. We provide scientific-based information to manage dark refuges facilitating that fledglings from inland colonies reach the sea successfully. We also offer methodological approaches useful for other critically threatened petrel species grounded by light pollution.

  9. Release of tellurium and cesium from UO2 in LWR fuel rods during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malen, K.A.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper the release of tellurium (Te-132) and cesium (Cs-134 and Cs-137) from UO 2 -fuel is analyzed. The basis for the analysis is the experimental results from the S176 series of experiments performed at Studsvik. It seems that the model developed earlier for release of iodine applies also to tellurium and cesium. This model assumes sweeping up of the species in question by moving grain boundaries and subsequent release through grain boundary porosity. An interesting extra feature is deposition of tellurium at temperatures in the range 1500-2000 K believed to be due to condensation. (author)

  10. Review of tellurium release rates from LWR fuel elements under accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, R.A.; Beahm, E.C.; Wichner, R.P.

    1983-01-01

    Although fission product tellurium presents a potentially significant radiohazard, its release and transport in source-term experiments is frequently overlooked because it does not possess a readily measurable, gamma emission; moreover, a recent study emphasized noble gas, iodine and cesium release from LWR fuel elements because of the large data base that exists for these materials. Some new tests show that in some cases tellurium may be held up in core material to a greater degree than previously assumed - an observation that prompts a careful reappraisal of the existing tellurium-release data and its chemical foundation

  11. p38-MK2 signaling axis regulates RNA metabolism after UV-light-induced DNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borisova, Marina E; Voigt, Andrea; Tollenaere, Maxim A X

    2018-01-01

    quantitative phosphoproteomics and protein kinase inhibition to provide a systems view on protein phosphorylation patterns induced by UV light and uncover the dependencies of phosphorylation events on the canonical DNA damage signaling by ATM/ATR and the p38 MAP kinase pathway. We identify RNA-binding proteins......Ultraviolet (UV) light radiation induces the formation of bulky photoproducts in the DNA that globally affect transcription and splicing. However, the signaling pathways and mechanisms that link UV-light-induced DNA damage to changes in RNA metabolism remain poorly understood. Here we employ...

  12. Light induced modulation instability of surfaces under intense illumination

    KAUST Repository

    Burlakov, V. M.; Foulds, Ian G.; Goriely, A.

    2013-01-01

    heated by radiation. Periodic heating is due to focusing-defocusing effects caused by the initial surface modulation. The surface modulation has a period longer than the excitation wavelength and does not require coherent light source. Therefore

  13. Lighting.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  14. Solar light-induced production of reactive oxygen species by single walled carbon nanotubes in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photosensitizing processes of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) which include photo-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) convert light energy into oxidizing chemical energy that mediates transformations of nanomaterials. The oxidative stress associated with ROS may p...

  15. Light meson decays from photon-induced reactions with CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunkel, Michael C. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Collaboration: CLAS-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    Photo-production experiments with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at the Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory produce data sets with unprecedented statistics of light mesons. With these data sets, measurements of transition form factors for η, ω, and η' via conversion decays are performed using a line shape analysis on the invariant mass of the final state dileptons. Tests of fundamental symmetries and information on the light quark mass difference are performed using a Dalitz plot analysis of the meson decay. In addition, the data allows for a search for dark matter, such as the heavy photon via conversion decays of light mesons and physics beyond the Standard Model is searched for via invisible decays of η mesons. An overview of the first results and future prospects is given.

  16. Liquid-liquid extraction of arsenic, antimony, selenium and tellurium by zinc diethyldithiocarbamate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bajo, S.; Wyttenbach, A.

    1978-03-01

    The authors report the solvent extraction, oxidation, reduction, extraction in the presence of iron, and reextraction of arsenic, antimony, selenium and tellurium. These processes were studied using radioactive tracers. (G.T.H.)

  17. A Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy Quantum Computer with Tellurium Donors in Silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Berman, G. P.; Doolen, G. D.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2000-01-01

    We propose a magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM)-based nuclear spin quantum computer using tellurium impurities in silicon. This approach to quantum computing combines the well-developed silicon technology with expected advances in MRFM.

  18. Flame and flameless atomic-absorption determination of tellurium in geological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, T.T.; Sanzolone, R.F.; Hubert, A.E.

    1978-01-01

    The sample is digested with a solution of hydrobromic acid and bromine and the excess of bromine is expelled. After dilution of the solution to approximately 3 M in hydrobromic acid, ascorbic acid is added to reduce iron(III) before extraction of tellurium into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). An oxidizing air-acetylene flame is used to determine tellurium in the 0.1-20 ppm range. For samples containing 4-200 ppb of tellurium, a carbon-rod atomizer is used after the MIBK extract has been washed with 0.5 M hydrobromic acid to remove the residual iron. The flame procedure is useful for rapid preliminary monitoring, and the flameless procedure can determine tellurium at very low concentrations. ?? 1978.

  19. DETECTION OF THE SECOND r-PROCESS PEAK ELEMENT TELLURIUM IN METAL-POOR STARS ,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roederer, Ian U.; Lawler, James E.; Cowan, John J.; Beers, Timothy C.; Frebel, Anna; Ivans, Inese I.; Schatz, Hendrik; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Sneden, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Using near-ultraviolet spectra obtained with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope, we detect neutral tellurium in three metal-poor stars enriched by products of r-process nucleosynthesis, BD +17 3248, HD 108317, and HD 128279. Tellurium (Te, Z = 52) is found at the second r-process peak (A ≈ 130) associated with the N = 82 neutron shell closure, and it has not been detected previously in Galactic halo stars. The derived tellurium abundances match the scaled solar system r-process distribution within the uncertainties, confirming the predicted second peak r-process residuals. These results suggest that tellurium is predominantly produced in the main component of the r-process, along with the rare earth elements.

  20. l-Serine Enhances Light-Induced Circadian Phase Resetting in Mice and Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuo, Shinobu; Iwamoto, Ayaka; Lee, Sang-Il; Ochiai, Shotaro; Hitachi, Rina; Shibata, Satomi; Uotsu, Nobuo; Tarumizu, Chie; Matsuoka, Sayuri; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Higuchi, Shigekazu

    2017-12-01

    Background: The circadian clock is modulated by the timing of ingestion or food composition, but the effects of specific nutrients are poorly understood. Objective: We aimed to identify the amino acids that modulate the circadian clock and reset the light-induced circadian phase in mice and humans. Methods: Male CBA/N mice were orally administered 1 of 20 l-amino acids, and the circadian and light-induced phase shifts of wheel-running activity were analyzed. Antagonists of several neurotransmitter pathways were injected before l-serine administration, and light-induced phase shifts were analyzed. In addition, the effect of l-serine on the light-induced phase advance was investigated in healthy male students (mean ± SD age 22.2 ± 1.8 y) by using dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO) determined by saliva samples as an index of the circadian phase. Results: l-Serine administration enhanced light-induced phase shifts in mice (1.86-fold; P light-dark cycle by 6 h, l-serine administration slightly accelerated re-entrainment to the shifted cycle. In humans, l-serine ingestion before bedtime induced significantly larger phase advances of DLMO after bright-light exposure during the morning (means ± SEMs-l-serine: 25.9 ± 6.6 min; placebo: 12.1 ± 7.0 min; P light-induced phase resetting in mice and humans, and it may be useful for treating circadian disturbances. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  1. Light induced electron transfer reactions of metal complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutin, N.; Creutz, C.

    1980-01-01

    Properties of the excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of chromium(III), iron(II), ruthenium(II), osmium(II), rhodium(III), and iridium(III) are described. The electron transfer reactions of the ground and excited states are discussed and interpreted in terms of the driving force for the reaction and the distortions of the excited states relative to the corresponding ground states. General considerations relevant to the conversion of light into chemical energy are presented and progress in the use of polypyridine complexes to effect the light decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen is reviewed

  2. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  3. Measurable difference in Cherenkov light between gamma and hadron induced EAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabot, H.; Meynadier, Ch. [Universite de Perpignan, Groupe de Physique Fondamentale, Perpignan (France); Sobczynska, D. [Experimental Physics Department, University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland); Szabelska, B. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Lodz (Poland); Szabelski, J. [Universite de Perpignan, Groupe de Physique Fondamentale, Perpignan (France)]|[Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Lodz (Poland); Wibig, T. [Experimental Physics Department, University of Lodz, Lodz (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    We describe the possibly measurable difference in the Cherenkov light component of EAS induced by en electromagnetic particle (i.e. e{sup +}, e{sup -} or {gamma}) and induced by a hadron (i.e. proton or heavier nuclei) in TeV range. The method can be applied in experiments which use wavefront sampling method of EAS Cherenkov light detection (e.g. THEMISTOCLE, ASGAT). (author) 16 refs, 9 figs

  4. Ultraviolet light induced refractive index structures in germanosilica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael

    1997-01-01

    The focus of the research presented in this ph.d. thesis is refractive index structures photoinduced in germanonsilica waveguides with ultra-violet (UV) radiation. The physical mechanisms involved in photosensitivity and applications of a wide range of UV induced refractive index structures in both...... application of a scanning near-field optical microscope to obtain high resolution images of UV induced refractive index structures and by monitoring the dynamics of UV induced index changes and luminescence. During part of my ph.d. project I have worked at the National Institute of Standards and Technolgy...

  5. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Aichi 461-8673 (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center, Aichi 462-8508 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, they conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a {sup 22}Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm{sup 3}) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was possible. The

  6. High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Fujii, Kento; Morishita, Yuki; Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In proton therapy, imaging of the positron distribution produced by fragmentation during or soon after proton irradiation is a useful method to monitor the proton range. Although positron emission tomography (PET) is typically used for this imaging, its spatial resolution is limited. Cerenkov light imaging is a new molecular imaging technology that detects the visible photons that are produced from high-speed electrons using a high sensitivity optical camera. Because its inherent spatial resolution is much higher than PET, the authors can measure more precise information of the proton-induced positron distribution with Cerenkov light imaging technology. For this purpose, they conducted Cerenkov light imaging of induced positron distribution in proton therapy. Methods: First, the authors evaluated the spatial resolution of our Cerenkov light imaging system with a 22 Na point source for the actual imaging setup. Then the transparent acrylic phantoms (100 × 100 × 100 mm 3 ) were irradiated with two different proton energies using a spot scanning proton therapy system. Cerenkov light imaging of each phantom was conducted using a high sensitivity electron multiplied charge coupled device (EM-CCD) camera. Results: The Cerenkov light’s spatial resolution for the setup was 0.76 ± 0.6 mm FWHM. They obtained high resolution Cerenkov light images of the positron distributions in the phantoms for two different proton energies and made fused images of the reference images and the Cerenkov light images. The depths of the positron distribution in the phantoms from the Cerenkov light images were almost identical to the simulation results. The decay curves derived from the region-of-interests (ROIs) set on the Cerenkov light images revealed that Cerenkov light images can be used for estimating the half-life of the radionuclide components of positrons. Conclusions: High resolution Cerenkov light imaging of proton-induced positron distribution was possible. The authors

  7. Visible lights induced polymerization reactions: interactions between rose bengal and iron aren complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burget, D.; Grotzinger, C.; Jacques, P.; Fouassier, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    The present paper is devoted to an investigation of the interactions between Rose Bengal (RB) and an Iron aren (Irg(+)) complex that are usable in visible light induced polymerization reactions. Steady state and flash photolysis experiments were performed in order to elucidate the nature of the intermediates formed after light excitation. A complete scheme of evolution of the excited states is discussed

  8. Simple and effective method for nuclear tellurium isomers separation from antimony cyclotron targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarevskij, S.I.; Eremin, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    Simple and effective method of generation of tellurium nuclear isomers from irradiated on cyclotron metallic antimony is suggested. Basically this method consists in consideration of the big difference in volatilities of metallic forms of antimony, tin and tellurium. Heating of the tin-antimony alloy at 1200 K permits to separate about 90 % of produced quantity of 121m Te and 123m Te (in this case impurity of antimony radionuclides is not more than 1 % on activity) [ru

  9. Nano-Structured Crystalline Te Films by Laser Gas-Phase Pyrolysis of Dimethyl Tellurium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pola, Josef; Pokorná, Veronika; Boháček, Jaroslav; Bastl, Zdeněk; Ouchi, A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 71, č. 2 (2004), s. 739-746 ISSN 0165-2370 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072107; GA MŠk OC 523.60 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4072921; CEZ:AV0Z4032918; CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : dimethyl tellurium * tellurium films * laser Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.352, year: 2004

  10. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of tellurium (IV) by periodate in alkaline medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivas, K.; Vani, P.; Dikshitulu, L.S.A.

    1995-01-01

    Detailed kinetic study of the oxidation of tellurium (IV) by periodate in alkaline medium has been carried out to compare the mechanisms of oxidation in the acid and alkaline media. It is interesting to note that the rate step involves a two-electron transfer from tellurium (IV) to periodate in alkaline medium although the kinetic pattern is somewhat different from that in the acid medium. 7 refs., 1 tab

  11. Methods of selenium and tellurium determination in geological and enviromental materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarenko, I.I.; Kislova, I.V.

    1988-01-01

    Atomic-absorption and atomic-emission methods of tellurium determination in ores and products of their processing are described. Flame variant with extractional concentration permits to determine tellurium with the concentration up to 6x10 -6 %, the use of graphite cuvette after preliminary concentration-up to 1x10 -6 %. Atomic-emissional method permits to determine 3x10 -4 % Te from sample of 0.5 g

  12. Visible light induced photocatalytic degradation of some xanthene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Photocatalytic degradation of eosin and erythrosin-B (xanthene dyes) has been carried out using anthracene semiconductor immobilized on polyethylene films. Effect of various parameters like pH, concentration of dyes, amount of semiconductor and light intensity have been studied on the rate of reaction. Various control ...

  13. Formation of defects in tellurium at various levels of gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parfen'ev, R.V.; Farbshtejn, I.I.; Shul'pina, I.L.; Yakimov, S.V.; Shalimov, V.P.; Turchaninov, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    One investigated into effect of gravitation conditions during tellurium crystallization (ranging from microgravitation up to increased gravitation - 5g 0 ) on concentration of neutral (N D ) and electrically active (N AD ) acceptor structure defects in specimens grown both under complete remelting of parent ingot and under directed recrystallization of ingot with inoculation. N AD and N D concentrations and their distribution along the specimen depth were determined on the basis of analysis of electrical characteristics (conductivity and the Hall effect) measured along ingots within 1.6-300 K temperature range. The results were compared with characteristics of specimens grown following the similar program under normal conditions. At complete remelting under microgravitation one detected attributes of strong supercooling and spontaneous crystallization, as well as, of specimen resistance oscillation by its depth caused by N D modulation [ru

  14. Facile Hydrothermal Synthesis of Tellurium Nanostructures for Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Panahi-Kalamuei

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tellurium (Te nanostructures have been successfully synthesized via a simple hydrothermal methodfrom the reaction of a TeCl4 aqueous solution with thioglycolic acid (TGA as a reductant. TGA can be easily oxidized to the corresponding disulfide [SCH2CO2H]2, which in turn can reduce TeCl4 to Te. The obtained Te was characterized by XRD, SEM, EDS, and DRS. The effect of reducing agent on morphology and size of the products were also studied. Additionally, Te thin film was deposited on the FTO-TiO2 by Dr- blading then employed to solar cell application and measured open circuit voltage (Voc, short circuit current (Isc, and fill factor (FF were determined as well. The studies showed that particle morphology and sizes play crucial role on solar cell efficiencies.

  15. Tellurium adsorption on tungsten and molybdenum field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, R.A.; Kiwanga, C.A.

    1977-01-01

    Studies of the adsorption of tellurium onto tungsten and molybdenum field emitters are described and the results obtained are compared with those obtained in previous work on the adsorption of silicon and selenium. The adsorption of Te onto W was found to be much more uniform than in the case of Se. Although Te is metallic in many of its properties its adsorptive behavior on field emitters is found to be similar to that of selenium and these adsorptive properties are basically common to all semiconductors. The most evident property of these adsorbates is that the work function and emission current decrease simultaneously at coverages of less than half a monolayer and the work function subsequently increases. (B.D.)

  16. Antiparasitic activity of 1,3-dioxolanes containing tellurium in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena-Lopes, Ângela; das Neves, Raquel Nascimento; Bezerra, Francisco Silvestre Brilhante; de Oliveira Silva, Mara Thais; Nobre, Patrick C; Perin, Gelson; Alves, Diego; Savegnago, Lucielli; Begnini, Karine Rech; Seixas, Fabiana Kommling; Collares, Tiago; Borsuk, Sibele

    2017-05-01

    The increased prevalence of metronidazole-resistant infections has resulted in a search for alternative drugs for the treatment of trichomoniasis. In the present study, we report the preparation and in vitro activity of three 1,3-dioxolanes that contain tellurium (PTeDOX 01, PTeDOX 02, and PTeDOX 03) against Trichomonas vaginalis. Six concentrations of these compounds were analyzed for in vitro activity against ATCC 30236 isolate of T. vaginalis. PTeDOX 01 reported a cytotoxic effect against 100% of T. vaginalis trophozoites at a final concentration of 90μM with an IC 50 of 60μM. The kinetic growth curve of trophozoites indicated that PTeDOX 01 reduced the growth by 22% at a concentration of 90μM after an exposure of 12h, and induced complete parasite death at 24h. It induced cytotoxicity of 44% at 90μM concentration but and had no effect in lower concentrations in a culture of CHO-K1 cells. These results confirmed that PTeDOX 01 is an important drug for the treatment of T. vaginalis, and should be evaluated in other infectious agents as well. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  18. Blue and Green Light-Induced Phototropism in Arabidopsis thaliana and Lactuca sativa L. Seedlings 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinitz, Benjamin; Ren, Zhangling; Poff, Kenneth L.

    1985-01-01

    Exposure time-response curves for blue and green light-induced phototropic bending in hypocotyls of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and Lactuca sativa L. seedlings are presented. These seedlings show significant phototropic sensitivity up to 540 to 550 nanometers. Since wave-lengths longer than 560 nanometers do not induce phototropic bending, it is suggested that the response to 510 to 550 nanometers light is mediated by the specific blue light photoreceptor of phototropism. We advise care in the use of green `safelights' for studies of phototropism. PMID:16664021

  19. Weak light emission of soft tissues induced by heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Antonello E.; Durando, Giovanni; Boschi, Federico

    2018-04-01

    The main goal of this work is to show that soft tissue interaction with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) or direct heating leads to a weak light emission detectable using a small animal optical imaging system. Our results show that the luminescence signal is detectable after 30 min of heating, resembling the time scale of delayed luminescence. The imaging of a soft tissue after heating it using an HIFU field shows that the luminescence pattern closely matches the shape of the cone typical of the HIFU beam. We conclude that heating a soft tissue using two different sources leads to the emission of a weak luminescence signal from the heated region with a decay half-life of a few minutes (4 to 6 min). The origin of such light emission needs to be further investigated.

  20. Tunneling-Electron-Induced Light Emission from Single Gold Nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Arthur; Li, Shaowei; Czap, Gregory; Ho, W

    2016-09-14

    The coupling of tunneling electrons with the tip-nanocluster-substrate junction plasmon was investigated by monitoring light emission in a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). Gold atoms were evaporated onto the ∼5 Å thick Al2O3 thin film grown on the NiAl (110) surface where they formed nanoclusters 3-7 nm wide. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) of these nanoclusters revealed quantum-confined electronic states. Spatially resolved photon imaging showed localized emission hot spots. Size dependent study and light emission from nanocluster dimers further support the viewpoint that coupling of tunneling electrons to the junction plasmon is the main radiative mechanism. These results showed the potential of the STM to reveal the electronic and optical properties of nanoscale metallic systems in the confined geometry of the tunnel junction.

  1. Light-induced cell separation in a tailored optical landscape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paterson, L.; Milne, G.; Garcés-Chávez, V.; Tatarkova, S. A.; Sibbett, W.; Dholakia, K.; Papagiakoumou, E.; Gunn-Moore, F. J.; Bryant, P. E.; Riches, A. C.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate passive optical sorting of cell populations in the absence of any externally driven fluid flow. Specifically, we report the movement of erythrocytes and lymphocytes in an optical landscape, consisting of a circularly symmetric light pattern created by a Bessel light beam. These distinct cell populations move, spontaneously and differentially, across the underlying periodic optical landscape. Thus, we were able to separate lymphocytes from a mixed population of cells containing erythrocytes and then collect the lymphocytes in a microcapillary reservoir. We also demonstrate an enhanced form of this separation that exploits the polarizability of silica microspheres by attaching spheres coated with antibodies to cell surface markers to a subpopulation of lymphocytes. These techniques may be applied using standard laboratory apparatus.

  2. Light-induced circular birefringence in cyanoazobenzene side-chain liquid-crystalline polyester films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naydenova, I; Nikolova, L; Ramanujam, P.S.

    1999-01-01

    We report the inducement of large circular birefringence (optical activity) in films of a cyanoazobenzene side-chain liquid-crystalline polyester on illumination with circularly polarized light. The polyester has no chiral groups and is initially isotropic. The induced optical rotation is up to 5...

  3. Light-induced lattice expansion leads to high-efficiency perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsinhan; Asadpour, Reza; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Durand, Olivier; Strzalka, Joseph W.; Chen, Bo; Verduzco, Rafael; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Tretiak, Sergei; Even, Jacky; Alam, Muhammad Ashraf; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.

    2018-04-01

    Light-induced structural dynamics plays a vital role in the physical properties, device performance, and stability of hybrid perovskite–based optoelectronic devices. We report that continuous light illumination leads to a uniform lattice expansion in hybrid perovskite thin films, which is critical for obtaining high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. Correlated, in situ structural and device characterizations reveal that light-induced lattice expansion benefits the performances of a mixed-cation pure-halide planar device, boosting the power conversion efficiency from 18.5 to 20.5%. The lattice expansion leads to the relaxation of local lattice strain, which lowers the energetic barriers at the perovskite-contact interfaces, thus improving the open circuit voltage and fill factor. The light-induced lattice expansion did not compromise the stability of these high-efficiency photovoltaic devices under continuous operation at full-spectrum 1-sun (100 milliwatts per square centimeter) illumination for more than 1500 hours.

  4. Light-induced attractive force between two metal bodies separated by a subwavelength slit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesterov, Vladimir; Frumin, Leonid

    2011-01-01

    A novel light-induced attractive force which acts as a force with negative light pressure has been revealed. The force arises by the interaction of plasmon polaritons which are excited at the surface of metal when a transverse magnetic mode propagates through a subwavelength slit between two metal bodies. The estimation of the repulsive force acting on the metal walls of the slit in the case of subwavelength TE mode propagation along the slit is presented. The explicit analytical expressions of light-induced forces between two macroscopic metal bodies or films separated by a subwavelength slit have been derived. These forces could be used to manipulate metallic macro-, micro- and nano-objects in vacuum or in a dielectric medium. Estimations of these light-induced forces show that the forces are sufficient for measurements and practical applications

  5. Study On Analytical Methods Of Tellurium Content In Natriiodide (Na131I) Radiopharmaceutical Solution Produced In The Dalat Nuclear Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vo Thi Cam Hoa; Duong Van Dong; Nguyen Thi Thu; Chu Van Khoa

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the practical methods for analyzing of Tellurium content in Na 131 I solution produced at the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute. We studied analytical methods to control Tellurium content in final Na 131 I solution product used in medical purposes by three methods such as: spot test, gamma spectrometric and spectrophotometric methods. These investigation results are shown that the spot test method is suitable for controlling Tellurium trace in the final product. This spot test can be determinate Tellurium trace less than 10 ppm and are used to quality control of Na 131 I solution using in medical application. (author)

  6. Properties of light induced EPR signals in enamel and their possible interference with gamma-induced signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sholom, S.V.; Chumak, V.V.; Haskell, E.H.; Hayes, R.B.; Kenner, G.H.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of tooth enamel to natural and artificial UV light results in stable EPR signals with g-factors of 1.9985, 2.0018, 2.0045, 2.0052 and 2.0110. The first three signals correspond to the parallel and perpendicular components of the radiation induced or dosimetric signal and the native signal reported in dosimetry and dating studies. The latter two signals were found to be sensitive to both gamma-ray and sunlight exposure, however, their responses to light differed from that to radiation, giving rise to the possibility of using them as indicators of the dose-equivalent resulting from light exposure

  7. Blue light irradiation-induced oxidative stress in vivo via ROS generation in rat gingival tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Ayaka; Shiotsu-Ogura, Yukako; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Toyama, Toshizo; Yoshino, Fumihiko

    2015-10-01

    It has been reported that oxidative stress with reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is induced by blue light irradiation to a living body. Only limited research has been reported in dental field on the dangers of blue light, mostly focusing on cytotoxicity associated with heat injury of dental pulp. We thus performed an in vivo study on oral tissue exposed to blue light. ROS generated upon blue light irradiation of flavin adenine dinucleotide were measured by electron spin resonance spectroscopy. After blue light irradiation, the palatal gingiva of Wistar rats were isolated. Collected samples were subjected to biochemical analysis of lipid peroxidation and glutathione. Singlet oxygen was generated by blue light irradiation, but was significantly quenched in an N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) concentration-dependent manner. Blue light significantly accelerated oxidative stress and increased the oxidized glutathione levels in gingival tissue. These effects were also inhibited by NAC pre-administration. The results suggest that blue light irradiation at clinical levels of tooth bleaching treatment may enhance lipid peroxidation by the induction of oxidative stress and the consumption of a significant amount of intracellular glutathione. In addition, NAC might be an effective supplement for the protection of oral tissues against blue light irradiation-induced oxidative damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Smoking-Cue Induced Brain Activation In Adolescent Light Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Mark L.; Luks, Tracy L.; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Dryden, Wendy; Rait, Michelle A.; Simpson, Gregory V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Using fMRI, we examined whether or not adolescents with low levels of nicotine exposure (light smokers) display neural activation in areas shown to be involved with addiction in response to smoking-related stimuli. Design/Setting/Participants Twelve adolescent light smokers (aged 13 to17, smoked 1 to 5 cigarettes per day) and 12 non-smokers (ages 13 to 17, never smoked a cigarette) from the San Francisco Bay Area underwent fMRI scanning. During scanning they viewed blocks of photographic smoking and control cues. Smoking cues consisted of pictures of people smoking cigarettes and smoking-related objects such as lighters and ashtrays. Neutral cues consisted of everyday objects and people engaged in everyday activities. Findings For smokers, smoking cues elicited greater activation than neutral cues in the mesolimbic reward circuit (left anterior cingulate (T=7.88, pbrain regions seen in adult and heavy teen smokers suggests that even at low levels of smoking, adolescents exhibit heightened reactivity to smoking cues. This paper adds to the existing literature suggesting that nicotine dependence may begin with exposure to low levels of nicotine, underscoring the need for early intervention among adolescent smokers. PMID:21185518

  9. Light induced electrical and macroscopic changes in hydrogenated polymorphous silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roca i Cabarrocas P.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We report on light-induced electrical and macroscopic changes in hydrogenated polymorphous silicon (pm-Si:H PIN solar cells. To explain the particular light-soaking behavior of such cells – namely an increase of the open circuit voltage (Voc and a rapid drop of the short circuit current density (Jsc – we correlate these effects to changes in hydrogen incorporation and structural properties in the layers of the cells. Numerous techniques such as current-voltage characteristics, infrared spectroscopy, hydrogen exodiffusion, Raman spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry are used to study the light-induced changes from microscopic to macroscopic scales (up to tens of microns. Such comprehensive use of complementary techniques lead us to suggest that light-soaking produces the diffusion of molecular hydrogen, hydrogen accumulation at p-layer/substrate interface and localized delamination of the interface. Based on these results we propose that light-induced degradation of PIN solar cells has to be addressed from not only as a material issue, but also a device point of view. In particular we bring experimental evidence that localized delamination at the interface between the p-layer and SnO2 substrate by light-induced hydrogen motion causes the rapid drop of Jsc.

  10. Light induced tunnel effect in CNT-Si photodiode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aramo, C., E-mail: aramo@na.infn.it [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Ambrosio, M. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Bonavolontà, C. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Dip. di Scienze Fisiche, Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Boscardin, M. [Centro per Materiali e i Microsistemi Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Via Sommarive 18, Povo di Trento, 38123 Trento (Italy); Castrucci, P. [INFN, Sezione di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dip. di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Crivellari, M. [Centro per Materiali e i Microsistemi Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Via Sommarive 18, Povo di Trento, 38123 Trento (Italy); De Crescenzi, M. [INFN, Sezione di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dip. di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); De Lisio, C. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Dip. di Scienze Fisiche, Università degli Studi di Napoli “Federico II”, Via Cintia 2, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Fiandrini, E. [INFN, Sezione di Perugia, Dip. di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Perugia, Piazza Università 1, 06100 Perugia (Italy); and others

    2016-07-11

    Negative differential resistance (NDR), for which the current is a decreasing function of the voltage, has been observed in the current–voltage curves of several types of structures. We measured tunnelling current and NDR by illuminating large area heterojunction obtained by growing Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes on the surface of n-doped Silicon substrate. In the absence of light, the current flow is null until a junction threshold of about 2.4 V is reached, beyond which the dark current flows at room temperature with a very low intensity of few nA. When illuminated, a current of tens nA is observed at a drain voltage of about 1.5 V. At higher voltage the current intensity decreases according to a negative resistance of the order of MΩ. In the following we report details of tunneling photodiode realized and negative resistance characteristics.

  11. Irradiation of skin with visible light induces reactive oxygen species and matrix-degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebel, Frank; Kaur, Simarna; Ruvolo, Eduardo; Kollias, Nikiforos; Southall, Michael D

    2012-07-01

    Daily skin exposure to solar radiation causes cells to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are a primary factor in skin damage. Although the contribution of the UV component to skin damage has been established, few studies have examined the effects of non-UV solar radiation on skin physiology. Solar radiation comprises UV, and thus the purpose of this study was to examine the physiological response of skin to visible light (400-700 nm). Irradiation of human skin equivalents with visible light induced production of ROS, proinflammatory cytokines, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 expression. Commercially available sunscreens were found to have minimal effects on reducing visible light-induced ROS, suggesting that UVA/UVB sunscreens do not protect the skin from visible light-induced responses. Using clinical models to assess the generation of free radicals from oxidative stress, higher levels of free radical activity were found after visible light exposure. Pretreatment with a photostable UVA/UVB sunscreen containing an antioxidant combination significantly reduced the production of ROS, cytokines, and MMP expression in vitro, and decreased oxidative stress in human subjects after visible light irradiation. Taken together, these findings suggest that other portions of the solar spectrum aside from UV, particularly visible light, may also contribute to signs of premature photoaging in skin.

  12. A stable blue-light-derived signal modulates ultraviolet-light-induced activation of the chalcone-synthase gene in cultured parsley cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohl, S.; Hahlbrock, K.; Schäfer, E.

    1989-01-01

    Run-off transcription assays were used to demonstrate that both the ultraviolet (UV)-B and blue-light receptors control transcription rates for chalcone-synthase mRNA in the course of light-induced flavonoid synthesis in parsley (Petroselinum crispum Miller (A.W. Hill)) cell-suspension cultures. Blue and red light alone, presumably acting via a blue-light receptor and active phytochrome (far-red absorbing form) respectively, can induce accumulation of chalcone-synthase mRNA. The extent of the response is however considerably smaller than that obtained when these wavebands are applied in combination with UV light. A preirradiation with blue light strongly increases the response to a subsequent UV pulse and this modulating effect of blue light is stable for at least 20 h. The modulating effect is abolished by a UV induction but can be reestablished by a second irradiation with blue light. (author)

  13. Fragment formation in light-ion induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Yuichi

    2001-01-01

    The intermediate mass fragment (IMF) formation in the 12 GeV proton induced reaction on Au target is analyzed by the quantum molecular dynamics model combined with the JAM hadronic cascade model and the non-equilibrated percolation model. We show that the sideward peaked angular distribution of IMF occur in the multifragmentation at very short time scale around 20 fm/c where non-equilibrated features of the residual nucleus fluctuates the nucleon density and fragments in the repulsive Coulomb force are pushed for the sideward direction. (author)

  14. Quantum Interference and Entanglement Induced by Multiple Scattering of Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Mortensen, Asger; Lodahl, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We report on the effects of quantum interference induced by the transmission of an arbitrary number of optical quantum states through a multiple-scattering medium. We identify the role of quantum interference on the photon correlations and the degree of continuous variable entanglement between two...... output modes. It is shown that quantum interference survives averaging over all ensembles of disorder and manifests itself as increased photon correlations due to photon antibunching. Furthermore, the existence of continuous variable entanglement correlations in a volume speckle pattern is predicted. Our...

  15. Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Absorption of A Monochromatic Light Controlled by a Radio Frequency Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai Xun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency and absorption of a monochromatic light controlled by a radio frequency field in the cold multi-Zeeman-sublevel atoms are theoretically investigated. These Zeeman sublevels are coupled by a radio frequency (RF) field. Both electromagnetically induced transparency and electromagnetically induced absorption can be obtained by tuning the frequency of RF field for both the linear polarization and elliptical polarization monochromatic lights. When the transfer of coherence via spontaneous emission from the excited state to the ground state is considered, electromagnetically induced absorption can be changed into electromagnetically induced transparency with the change of intensity of radio field. The transparency windows controlled by the RF field can have potential applications in the magnetic-field measurement and quantum information processing. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  16. Near threshold electron impact ionization cross section for tellurium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chipev, F.F.; Chernyshova, I.V.; Kontros, J.E.; Shpenik, O.B.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Up today electron-impact ionization is one of the most intensively investigated processes in atomic and molecular physics [1]. These experiments however, are associated with difficulties: high temperatures and densities are required to produce atomic beams and monochromatic intensive electron beams. A crossed electron and atomic beams scattering geometry was employed to measure the ionization efficiency curve for tellurium atoms. Our electron spectrometer comprises two serially mounted hypocycloidal electron energy analyzers [2], the first being the monochromator and the second - the scattered electron analyzer. The whole spectrometer is immersed into the homogenous magnetic field. Great care was taken in selecting the value of the extracting potential at the electrode, mounted normally to the atomic beam direction. By careful choosing this potential as low as possible (∼1.4 V), its influence on the motion of the monochromatized electrons in the collision region was minimized and the full collection of the formed ions was reached. The atom beam was produced using a compact effusion source made of the stainless steel with a microchannel exit to minimise the angular divergency of the beam. The temperature of the microchannel plate was taken about 50 K higher than that of the metal vapour in the heated reservoir. This atomic beam source enabled to produce an atomic beam with the concentration of two orders of magnitude higher than that in the case of a standard effusion source. A typical value of the electron energy spread was 0.15 eV (FWHM) in the 0.1-15 eV energy range. The primary electron beam current was equal to 10 -7 A. Such values of electron energy spread and beam current for the primary electron beam passing through the collision chamber were chosen to provide identical conditions for carrying out all the measurements. The energy scale was calibrated with the accuracy of ± 0.05 eV. The measured ionization cross-section normalized to the results

  17. Active Enhancement of Slow Light Based on Plasmon-Induced Transparency with Gain Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaojian; Yang, Junbo; He, Xin; Han, Yunxin; Zhang, Jingjing; Huang, Jie; Chen, Dingbo; Xu, Siyu

    2018-06-03

    As a plasmonic analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), plasmon-induced transparency (PIT) has drawn more attention due to its potential of realizing on-chip sensing, slow light and nonlinear effect enhancement. However, the performance of a plasmonic system is always limited by the metal ohmic loss. Here, we numerically report a PIT system with gain materials based on plasmonic metal-insulator-metal waveguide. The corresponding phenomenon can be theoretically analyzed by coupled mode theory (CMT). After filling gain material into a disk cavity, the system intrinsic loss can be compensated by external pump beam, and the PIT can be greatly fueled to achieve a dramatic enhancement of slow light performance. Finally, a double-channel enhanced slow light is introduced by adding a second gain disk cavity. This work paves way for a potential new high-performance slow light device, which can have significant applications for high-compact plasmonic circuits and optical communication.

  18. Studies into the transplantation biology of ultraviolet light-induced tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daynes, R.A.; Spellman, C.W.; Woodward, J.G.; Stewart, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    The majority of skin tumors induced in mice by ultraviolet (uv) light are rejected when implanted into normal syngeneic recipients. Subcarcinogenic levels of uv light exposure render the normally resistant mice susceptible to tumor challenge. The immunoregulatory effect of uv light appears to be additive, since the growth rate of a tumor transplant is dependent upon the length of uv exposure administered prior to implantation. This suppressive influence does not appear to be directly mediated by the uv light, because the amputation of uv-irradiated tail skin allows for a retention of tumor resistance in otherwise tumor-susceptible hosts. uv-irradiated mice could also be immunized against uv tumors, which suggests that immune recognition of tumor-specific transplantation antigens has not been inhibited. The ability of uv exposure to alter normal immunological reactivity to uv-induced tumors is possibly an integral factor in the mechanism underlying uv carcinogenesis

  19. Light-induced nonthermal population of optical phonons in nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcão, Bruno P.; Leitão, Joaquim P.; Correia, Maria R.; Soares, Maria R.; Wiggers, Hartmut; Cantarero, Andrés; Pereira, Rui N.

    2017-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is widely used to study bulk and nanomaterials, where information is frequently obtained from spectral line positions and intensities. In this study, we monitored the Raman spectrum of ensembles of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) as a function of optical excitation intensity (optical excitation experiments). We observe that in NCs the red-shift of the Raman peak position with increasing light power density is much steeper than that recorded for the corresponding bulk material. The increase in optical excitation intensity results also in an increasingly higher temperature of the NCs as obtained with Raman thermometry through the commonly used Stokes/anti-Stokes intensity ratio. More significantly, the obtained dependence of the Raman peak position on temperature in optical excitation experiments is markedly different from that observed when the same NCs are excited only thermally (thermal excitation experiments). This difference is not observed for the control bulk material. The inefficient diffusion of photogenerated charges in nanoparticulate systems, due to their inherently low electrical conductivity, results in a higher steady-state density of photoexcited charges and, consequently, also in a stronger excitation of optical phonons that cannot decay quickly enough into acoustic phonons. This results in a nonthermal population of optical phonons and thus the Raman spectrum deviates from that expected for the temperature of the system. Our study has major consequences to the general application of Raman spectroscopy to nanomaterials.

  20. Challenges in Simulating Light-Induced Processes in DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Marquetand

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, we give a perspective on the main challenges in performing theoretical simulations of photoinduced phenomena within DNA and its molecular building blocks. We distinguish the different tasks that should be involved in the simulation of a complete DNA strand subject to UV irradiation: (i stationary quantum chemical computations; (ii the explicit description of the initial excitation of DNA with light; (iii modeling the nonadiabatic excited state dynamics; (iv simulation of the detected experimental observable; and (v the subsequent analysis of the respective results. We succinctly describe the methods that are currently employed in each of these steps. While for each of them, there are different approaches with different degrees of accuracy, no feasible method exists to tackle all problems at once. Depending on the technique or combination of several ones, it can be problematic to describe the stacking of nucleobases, bond breaking and formation, quantum interferences and tunneling or even simply to characterize the involved wavefunctions. It is therefore argued that more method development and/or the combination of different techniques are urgently required. It is essential also to exercise these new developments in further studies on DNA and subsystems thereof, ideally comprising simulations of all of the different components that occur in the corresponding experiments.

  1. Light scattering under conditions of nonstationary electromagnetically induced transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larionov, N V; Sokolov, I M

    2007-01-01

    The propagation of probe radiation pulses in ultracold atomic ensembles is studied theoretically under conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency. The pulse 'stopping' process is considered which takes place upon nonadiabatic switching off and subsequent switching on the control field. We analysed the formation of an inverted recovered probe radiation pulse, i.e. the pulse propagating in the direction opposite to the propagation direction before the pulse stopping. Based on this analysis, a scheme is proposed for lidar probing atomic or molecular clouds in which the probe pulse penetrates into a cloud over the specified depth, while information on the cloud state is obtained from the parameters of the inverted pulse. Calculations are performed for an ensemble of 87 Rb atoms. (fifth seminar in memory of d.n. klyshko)

  2. Nonelastic nuclear reactions induced by light ions with the BRIEFF code

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, H

    2010-01-01

    The intranuclear cascade (INC) code BRIC has been extended to compute nonelastic reactions induced by light ions on target nuclei. In our approach the nucleons of the incident light ion move freely inside the mean potential of the ion in its center-of-mass frame while the center-of-mass of the ion obeys to equations of motion dependant on the mean nuclear+Coulomb potential of the target nucleus. After transformation of the positions and momenta of the nucleons of the ion into the target nucleus frame, the collision term between the nucleons of the target and of the ion is computed taking into account the partial or total breakup of the ion. For reactions induced by low binding energy systems like deuteron, the Coulomb breakup of the ion at the surface of the target nucleus is an important feature. Preliminary results of nucleon production in light ion induced reactions are presented and discussed.

  3. Effects of combined ketamine/xylazine anesthesia on light induced retinal degeneration in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Arango-Gonzalez

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To explore the effect of ketamine-xylazine anesthesia on light-induced retinal degeneration in rats. METHODS: Rats were anesthetized with ketamine and xylazine (100 and 5 mg, respectively for 1 h, followed by a recovery phase of 2 h before exposure to 16,000 lux of environmental illumination for 2 h. Functional assessment by electroretinography (ERG and morphological assessment by in vivo imaging (optical coherence tomography, histology (hematoxylin/eosin staining, TUNEL assay and immunohistochemistry (GFAP and rhodopsin staining were performed at baseline (ERG, 36 h, 7 d and 14 d post-treatment. Non-anesthetized animals treated with light damage served as controls. RESULTS: Ketamine-xylazine pre-treatment preserved retinal function and protected against light-induced retinal degeneration. In vivo retinal imaging demonstrated a significant increase of outer nuclear layer (ONL thickness in the non-anesthetized group at 36 h (p0.05, indicating a stabilizing and/or protective effect with regard to phototoxicity. Histology confirmed light-induced photoreceptor cell death and Müller cells gliosis in non-anesthetized rats, especially in the superior hemiretina, while ketamine-xylazine treated rats showed reduced photoreceptor cell death (TUNEL staining: p<0.001 after 7 d, thicker ONL and longer IS/OS. Fourteen days after light damage, a reduction of standard flash induced a-wave amplitudes and a-wave slopes (p = 0.01 and significant alterations in parameters of the scotopic sensitivity function (e.g. Vmax of the Naka Rushton fit p = 0.03 were observed in non-treated vs. ketamine-xylazine treated animals. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that pre-treatment with ketamine-xylazine anesthesia protects retinas against light damage, reducing photoreceptor cell death. These data support the notion that anesthesia with ketamine-xylazine provides neuroprotective effects in light-induced cell damage.

  4. Glucocorticoid-Induced Leucine Zipper Protects the Retina From Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration by Inducing Bcl-xL in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ruiping; Tang, Wenyi; Lei, Boya; Ding, Xinyi; Jiang, Cheng; Xu, Gezhi

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) in a light-induced retinal degeneration model and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Intravitreal injection of recombinant GILZ-overexpressing lentivirus (OE-GILZ-rLV) and short hairpin RNA targeting GILZ recombinant lentivirus (shRNA-GILZ-rLV) was performed to up- and downregulate retinal GILZ, respectively. Three days after stable transduction, rats were exposed to continuous bright light (5000 lux) for 2 days. Retinal function was assessed by full-field electroretinography (ERG), and the retinal structure was examined for photoreceptor survival and death in rats kept under a 12-hour light:2-hour dark cycle following light exposure. The expression levels of retinal Bcl-xL, caspase-9, and caspase-3 were examined by Western blotting or real-time PCR at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after light exposure. Exposure to bright light downregulated retinal GILZ in parallel with the downregulation of Bcl-xL and the upregulation of active caspase-3. Overexpression of retinal GILZ attenuated the decrease of Bcl-xL and the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3 at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after bright light exposure, respectively. GILZ silencing aggravated the downregulation of Bcl-xL induced by bright light exposure. Bright light exposure reduced the amplitude of ERG, increased the number of apoptotic photoreceptor cells, and decreased retinal thickness; and GILZ overexpression could attenuate all these effects. Overexpression of GILZ by OE-GILZ-rLV transduction protected the retina from light-induced cellular damage by activating antiapoptotic pathways.

  5. Identification of novel light-induced genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piontkivska Helen

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The transmission of information about the photic environment to the circadian clock involves a complex array of neurotransmitters, receptors, and second messenger systems. Exposure of an animal to light during the subjective night initiates rapid transcription of a number of immediate-early genes in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. Some of these genes have known roles in entraining the circadian clock, while others have unknown functions. Using laser capture microscopy, microarray analysis, and quantitative real-time PCR, we performed a comprehensive screen for changes in gene expression immediately following a 30 minute light pulse in suprachiasmatic nucleus of mice. Results The results of the microarray screen successfully identified previously known light-induced genes as well as several novel genes that may be important in the circadian clock. Newly identified light-induced genes include early growth response 2, proviral integration site 3, growth-arrest and DNA-damage-inducible 45 beta, and TCDD-inducible poly(ADP-ribose polymerase. Comparative analysis of promoter sequences revealed the presence of evolutionarily conserved CRE and associated TATA box elements in most of the light-induced genes, while other core clock genes generally lack this combination of promoter elements. Conclusion The photic signalling cascade in the suprachiasmatic nucleus activates an array of immediate-early genes, most of which have unknown functions in the circadian clock. Detected evolutionary conservation of CRE and TATA box elements in promoters of light-induced genes suggest that the functional role of these elements has likely remained the same over evolutionary time across mammalian orders.

  6. Time-resolved spectral investigations of laser light induced microplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nánai, L.; Hevesi, I.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamical and spectral properties of an optical breakdown microplasma created by pulses of different lasers on surfaces of insulators (KCI), metals (Cu) and semiconductors (V 2O 5), have been investigated. Experiments were carried out in air and vacuum using different wavelengths (λ = 0.694μm, type OGM-20,λ = 1.06μm with a home-made laser based on neodymium glass crystal, and λ = 10.6μm, similarly home-made) and pulse durations (Q-switched and free-running regimes). To follow the integral, dynamical and spectral characteristics of the luminous spot of microplasma we have used fast cameras (SFR-2M, IMACON-HADLAND), a high speed spectral camera (AGAT-2) and a spectrograph (STE-1). It has been shown that the microplasma consists of two parts: fast front (peak) with τ≈100 ns and slow front (tail) with τ≈1μs durations. The detonation front speed is of the order of ≈10 5 cm s -1 and follows the temporal dependence of to t0.4. It depends on the composition of the surrounding gas and its pressure and could be connected with quick evaporation of the material investigated (peak) and optical breakdown of the ambient gaseous atmosphere (tail). From the delay in appearance of different characteristic spectral lines of the target material and its gaseous surrounding we have shown that the evolution of the microplasma involves evaporation and ionization of the atoms of the parent material followed by optical breakdown due to the incident and absorbed laser light, together with microplasma expansion.

  7. Light induced kickoff of magnetic domain walls in Ising chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Lapo

    2012-02-01

    Controlling the speed at which systems evolve is a challenge shared by all disciplines, and otherwise unrelated areas use common theoretical frameworks towards this goal. A particularly widespread model is Glauber dynamics, which describes the time evolution of the Ising model and can be applied to any binary system. Here we show, using molecular nanowires under irradiation, that Glauber dynamics can be controlled by a novel domain-wall kickoff mechanism. Contrary to known processes, the kickoff has unambiguous fingerprints, slowing down the spin-flip attempt rate by several orders of magnitude, and following a scaling law. The required irradiation power is very low, a substantial improvement over present methods of magnetooptical switching: in our experimental demonstration we switched molecular nanowires with light, using powers thousands of times lower than in previous optical switching methods. This manipulation of stochastic dynamic processes is extremely clean, leading to fingerprint signatures and scaling laws. These observations can be used, in material science, to better study domain-wall displacements and solitons in discrete lattices. These results provide a new way to control and study stochastic dynamic processes. Being general for Glauber dynamics, they can be extended to different kinds of magnetic nanowires and to a myriad of fields, ranging from social evolution to neural networks and chemical reactivity. For nanoelectronics and molecular spintronics the kickoff affords external control of molecular spin-valves and a magnetic fingerprint in single molecule measurements. It can also be applied to the dynamics of mechanical switches and the related study of phasons and order-disorder transitions.

  8. A Transient Exposure to Symbiosis-Competent Bacteria Induces Light Organ Morphogenesis in the Host Squid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doino, J A; McFall-Ngai, M J

    1995-12-01

    Recent studies of the symbiotic association between the Hawaiian sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes and the luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri have shown that colonization of juvenile squid with symbiosis-competent bacteria induces morphogenetic changes of the light organ. These changes occur over a 4-day period and include cell death and tissue regression of the external ciliated epithelium. In the absence of bacterial colonization, morphogenesis does not occur. To determine whether the bacteria must be present throughout the morphogenetic process, we used the antibiotic chloramphenicol to clear the light organ of bacteria at various times during the initial colonization. We provide evidence in this study that a transient, 12-hour exposure to symbiosis-competent bacteria is necessary and sufficient to induce tissue regression in the light organ over the next several days. Further, we show that successful entrance into the light organ is necessary to induce morphogenesis, suggesting that induction results from bacterial interaction with internal crypt cells and not with the external ciliated epithelium. Finally, no difference in development was observed when the light organ was colonized by a mutant strain of V. fischeri that did not produce autoinducer, a potential light organ morphogen.

  9. Chemical Process for Treatment of Tellurium and Chromium Liquid Waste from I-131 Radioisotope Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainus-Salimin; Gunandjar; Dedy-Harsono; Hendro; Sugeng-Purnomo; Mohammad-Faruq; Zulfakhri

    2000-01-01

    The I-131 radioisotope is used in nuclear medicine for diagnosis and therapy. The I-131 radioisotope is produced by wet distillation at Bandung Nuclear Research Center and generated about 4,875 Itr of liquid waste containing 2,532.8 ppm of tellurium and 1,451.8 ppm chromium at pH 1. Considering its negative impact to the environment caused by toxic behaviour of tellurium and chromium, it is necessary to treat chemically that's liquid waste. The research of chemical treatment of tellurium and chromium liquid waste from I-131 radioisotope production has been done. The steps of process are involved of neutralisation with NaOH, coagulation-flocculation process for step I using Ca(OH) 2 coagulant for precipitation of sulphate, sulphite, oxalic, chrome Cr 3+ , and coagulation-flocculation process for step II using BaCI 2 coagulant for precipitation of chrome Cr 6+ and tellurium from the supernatant of coagulation in step I. The best result of experiment was achieved at 0.0161 ppm of chromium concentration on the supernatant from coagulation-flocculation of step I using 3.5 g Ca(OH) 2 for 100 ml of liquid waste, and 0.95 ppm of tellurium concentration on the final supernatant from coagulation-flocculation by of step II using 0.7 g BaCI 2 for supernatant from coagulation of step I. (author)

  10. Light-induced lattice expansion leads to high-efficiency perovskite solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Hsinhan; Asadpour, Reza; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Durand, Olivier; Strzalka, Joseph W.; Chen, Bo; Verduzco, Rafael; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Tretiak, Sergei; Even, Jacky; Alam, Muhammad Ashraf; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Nie, Wanyi; Mohite, Aditya D.

    2018-04-05

    Hybrid-perovskite based high-performance optoelectronic devices and clues from their operation has led to the realization that light-induced structural dynamics play a vital role on their physical properties, device performance and stability. Here, we report that continuous light illumination leads to a uniform lattice expansion in hybrid perovskite thin-films, which is critical for obtaining high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. Correlated, in-situ structural and device characterizations reveal that light-induced lattice expansion significantly benefits the performances of a mixed-cation pure-halide planar device, boosting the power conversion efficiency from 18.5% to 20.5%. This is a direct consequence of the relaxation of local lattice strains during lattice expansion, which results in the reduction of the energetic barriers at the perovskite/contact interfaces in devices, thus improving the open circuit voltage and fill factor. The light-induced lattice expansion stabilizes these high-efficiency photovoltaic devices under continuous operation of full-spectrum 1-Sun illumination for over 1500 hours. One Sentence Summary: Light-induced lattice expansion improves crystallinity, relaxes lattice strain, which enhances photovoltaic performance in hybrid perovskite device.

  11. Dataset of red light induced pupil constriction superimposed on post-illumination pupil response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaobo Lei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We collected and analyzed pupil diameter data from of 7 visually normal participants to compare the maximum pupil constriction (MPC induced by “Red Only” vs. “Blue+Red” visual stimulation conditions.The “Red Only” condition consisted of red light (640±10 nm stimuli of variable intensity and duration presented to dark-adapted eyes with pupils at resting state. This condition stimulates the cone-driven activity of the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC. The “Blue+Red” condition consisted of the same red light stimulus presented during ongoing blue (470±17 nm light-induced post-illumination pupil response (PIPR, representing the cone-driven ipRGC activity superimposed on the melanopsin-driven intrinsic activity of the ipRGCs (“The Absence of Attenuating Effect of Red light Exposure on Pre-existing Melanopsin-Driven Post-illumination Pupil Response” Lei et al. (2016 [1].MPC induced by the “Red Only” condition was compared with the MPC induced by the “Blue+Red” condition by multiple paired sample t-tests with Bonferroni correction. Keywords: Pupil light reflex, Chromatic pupillometry, Melanopsin, Post-illumination pupil response

  12. Thermo-optically induced reorganizations in the main light harvesting antenna of plants. II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jens Kai; Varkonyi, Zsuzsanna; Kovacs, Laszlo

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the circular dichroism spectral transients associated with the light-induced reversible reorganizations in chirally organized macrodomains of pea thylakoid membranes and loosely stacked lamellar aggregates of the main chlorophyll a/b light harvesting complexes (LHCII) isolated...... from the same membranes. These reorganizations have earlier been assigned to originate from a thermo-optic effect. According to the thermo-optic mechanism, fast local thermal transients due to dissipation of the excess excitation energy induce elementary structural changes in the close vicinity...

  13. Visible Light Induces Melanogenesis in Human Skin through a Photoadaptive Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Manpreet; Seo, InSeok; Liebel, Frank; Southall, Michael D.; Kollias, Nikiforos; Ruvolo, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Visible light (400–700 nm) lies outside of the spectral range of what photobiologists define as deleterious radiation and as a result few studies have studied the effects of visible light range of wavelengths on skin. This oversight is important considering that during outdoors activities skin is exposed to the full solar spectrum, including visible light, and to multiple exposures at different times and doses. Although the contribution of the UV component of sunlight to skin damage has been established, few studies have examined the effects of non-UV solar radiation on skin physiology in terms of inflammation, and limited information is available regarding the role of visible light on pigmentation. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of visible light on the pro-pigmentation pathways and melanin formation in skin. Exposure to visible light in ex-vivo and clinical studies demonstrated an induction of pigmentation in skin by visible light. Results showed that a single exposure to visible light induced very little pigmentation whereas multiple exposures with visible light resulted in darker and sustained pigmentation. These findings have potential implications on the management of photo-aggravated pigmentary disorders, the proper use of sunscreens, and the treatment of depigmented lesions. PMID:26121474

  14. Visible Light Induces Melanogenesis in Human Skin through a Photoadaptive Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Manpreet; Seo, InSeok; Liebel, Frank; Southall, Michael D; Kollias, Nikiforos; Ruvolo, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Visible light (400-700 nm) lies outside of the spectral range of what photobiologists define as deleterious radiation and as a result few studies have studied the effects of visible light range of wavelengths on skin. This oversight is important considering that during outdoors activities skin is exposed to the full solar spectrum, including visible light, and to multiple exposures at different times and doses. Although the contribution of the UV component of sunlight to skin damage has been established, few studies have examined the effects of non-UV solar radiation on skin physiology in terms of inflammation, and limited information is available regarding the role of visible light on pigmentation. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of visible light on the pro-pigmentation pathways and melanin formation in skin. Exposure to visible light in ex-vivo and clinical studies demonstrated an induction of pigmentation in skin by visible light. Results showed that a single exposure to visible light induced very little pigmentation whereas multiple exposures with visible light resulted in darker and sustained pigmentation. These findings have potential implications on the management of photo-aggravated pigmentary disorders, the proper use of sunscreens, and the treatment of depigmented lesions.

  15. Visible Light Induces Melanogenesis in Human Skin through a Photoadaptive Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manpreet Randhawa

    Full Text Available Visible light (400-700 nm lies outside of the spectral range of what photobiologists define as deleterious radiation and as a result few studies have studied the effects of visible light range of wavelengths on skin. This oversight is important considering that during outdoors activities skin is exposed to the full solar spectrum, including visible light, and to multiple exposures at different times and doses. Although the contribution of the UV component of sunlight to skin damage has been established, few studies have examined the effects of non-UV solar radiation on skin physiology in terms of inflammation, and limited information is available regarding the role of visible light on pigmentation. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of visible light on the pro-pigmentation pathways and melanin formation in skin. Exposure to visible light in ex-vivo and clinical studies demonstrated an induction of pigmentation in skin by visible light. Results showed that a single exposure to visible light induced very little pigmentation whereas multiple exposures with visible light resulted in darker and sustained pigmentation. These findings have potential implications on the management of photo-aggravated pigmentary disorders, the proper use of sunscreens, and the treatment of depigmented lesions.

  16. Light-induced gauge fields for ultracold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, N.; Juzeliūnas, G.; Öhberg, P.; Spielman, I. B.

    2014-12-01

    Gauge fields are central in our modern understanding of physics at all scales. At the highest energy scales known, the microscopic universe is governed by particles interacting with each other through the exchange of gauge bosons. At the largest length scales, our Universe is ruled by gravity, whose gauge structure suggests the existence of a particle—the graviton—that mediates the gravitational force. At the mesoscopic scale, solid-state systems are subjected to gauge fields of different nature: materials can be immersed in external electromagnetic fields, but they can also feature emerging gauge fields in their low-energy description. In this review, we focus on another kind of gauge field: those engineered in systems of ultracold neutral atoms. In these setups, atoms are suitably coupled to laser fields that generate effective gauge potentials in their description. Neutral atoms ‘feeling’ laser-induced gauge potentials can potentially mimic the behavior of an electron gas subjected to a magnetic field, but also, the interaction of elementary particles with non-Abelian gauge fields. Here, we review different realized and proposed techniques for creating gauge potentials—both Abelian and non-Abelian—in atomic systems and discuss their implication in the context of quantum simulation. While most of these setups concern the realization of background and classical gauge potentials, we conclude with more exotic proposals where these synthetic fields might be made dynamical, in view of simulating interacting gauge theories with cold atoms.

  17. Light-induced gauge fields for ultracold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, N; Juzeliūnas, G; Öhberg, P; Spielman, I B

    2014-01-01

    Gauge fields are central in our modern understanding of physics at all scales. At the highest energy scales known, the microscopic universe is governed by particles interacting with each other through the exchange of gauge bosons. At the largest length scales, our Universe is ruled by gravity, whose gauge structure suggests the existence of a particle—the graviton—that mediates the gravitational force. At the mesoscopic scale, solid-state systems are subjected to gauge fields of different nature: materials can be immersed in external electromagnetic fields, but they can also feature emerging gauge fields in their low-energy description. In this review, we focus on another kind of gauge field: those engineered in systems of ultracold neutral atoms. In these setups, atoms are suitably coupled to laser fields that generate effective gauge potentials in their description. Neutral atoms ‘feeling’ laser-induced gauge potentials can potentially mimic the behavior of an electron gas subjected to a magnetic field, but also, the interaction of elementary particles with non-Abelian gauge fields. Here, we review different realized and proposed techniques for creating gauge potentials—both Abelian and non-Abelian—in atomic systems and discuss their implication in the context of quantum simulation. While most of these setups concern the realization of background and classical gauge potentials, we conclude with more exotic proposals where these synthetic fields might be made dynamical, in view of simulating interacting gauge theories with cold atoms. (review article)

  18. Electronic transitions in quantum dots and rings induced by inhomogeneous off-centered light beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteiro, G F; Lucero, A O; Tamborenea, P I

    2010-12-22

    We theoretically investigate the effect of inhomogeneous light beams with (twisted light) and without (plane-wave light) orbital angular momentum on semiconductor-based nanostructures, when the symmetry axes of the beam and the nanostructure are displaced parallel to each other. Exact analytical results are obtained by expanding the off-centered light field in terms of the appropriate light modes centered around the nanostructure. We demonstrate how electronic transitions involving the transfer of different amounts of orbital angular momentum are switched on and off as a function of the separation between the axes of the beam and the system. In particular, we show that even off-centered plane-wave beams induce transitions such that the angular momenta of the initial and final states are different.

  19. Gamma Radiation Dosimetry Using Tellurium Dioxide Thin Film Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Korostynska

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of Tellurium dioxide (TeO2 were investigated for γ-radiation dosimetry purposes. Samples were fabricated using thin film vapour deposition technique. Thin films of TeO2 were exposed to a 60Co γ-radiation source at a dose rate of 6 Gy/min at room temperature. Absorption spectra for TeO2 films were recorded and the values of the optical band gap and energies of the localized states for as-deposited and γ-irradiated samples were calculated. It was found that the optical band gap values were decreased as the radiation dose was increased. Samples with electrical contacts having a planar structure showed a linear increase in current values with the increase in radiation dose up to a certain dose level. The observed changes in both the optical and the electrical properties suggest that TeO2 thin film may be considered as an effective material for room temperature real time γ-radiation dosimetry.

  20. Light-induced, GTP-binding protein mediated membrane currents of Xenopus oocytes injected with rhodopsin of cephalopods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, H; Seidou, M; Kito, Y

    1991-01-01

    Xenopus oocytes that were injected with rhabdomeric membranes of squid and octopus photoreceptors acquired light sensitivity. The injected oocytes showed a light-induced current having characteristics similar to other G-protein-mediated Cl- currents induced by the activation of other membrane receptors. Pretreatment of the oocytes with pertussis toxin before the injection suppressed the generation of the light-induced current, indicating an ability of cephalopod rhodopsin to cross-react with an endogenous G-protein of Xenopus oocytes.

  1. Theory of disorder-induced coherent scattering and light localization in slow-light photonic crystal waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, M; Hughes, S

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a theoretical formalism to describe disorder-induced extrinsic scattering in slow light photonic crystal waveguides. This work details and extends the optical scattering theory used in a recent issue of Physics Review Letters (Patterson et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 253903) to describe coherent scattering phenomena and successfully explain related experimental measurements. Our presented theory, which combines Green function and coupled mode methods, allows us to self-consistently account for arbitrary multiple scattering for the propagating electric field and recover experimental features such as resonances near the band edge. The technique is fully three-dimensional and can calculate the effects of disorder on the propagating field over thousands of unit cells. As an application of this theory, we explore various sample lengths and disordered instances, and demonstrate the profound effect of multiple scattering in the waveguide transmission. The spectra yield rich features associated with disorder-induced localization and multiple scattering, which are shown to be exacerbated in the slow light propagation regime

  2. Progressive myopia or hyperopia can be induced in chicks and reversed by manipulation of the chromaticity of ambient light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulds, Wallace S; Barathi, Veluchamy A; Luu, Chi D

    2013-12-09

    To determine whether progressive ametropia can be induced in chicks and reversed by manipulation of the chromaticity of ambient light. One-day-old chicks were raised in red light (90% red, 10% yellow-green) or in blue light (85% blue, 15% green) with a 12 hour on/off cycle for 14 to 42 days. Refraction was determined by streak retinoscopy, and by automated infrared photoretinoscopy and ocular biometry by A-scan ultrasonography. Red light induced progressive myopia (mean refraction ± SD at 28 days, -2.83 ± 0.25 diopters [D]). Progressive hyperopia was induced by blue light (mean refraction at 28 days, +4.55 ± 0.21 D). The difference in refraction between the groups was highly significant at P light (-2.21 ± 0.21 D) was reversed to hyperopia (+2.50 ± 0.29 D) by subsequent 21 days of blue light. Hyperopia induced by 21 days of blue light (+4.21 ± 0.19 D) was reversed to myopia (-1.23 ± 0.12 D) by 21 days of red light. Rearing chicks in red light caused progressive myopia, while rearing in blue light caused progressive hyperopia. Light-induced myopia or hyperopia in chicks can be reversed to hyperopia or myopia, respectively, by an alteration in the chromaticity of ambient light. Manipulation of chromaticity may be applicable to the management of human childhood myopia.

  3. Investigation of light-induced conformation changes in spiropyran-modified succinylated poly(L-lysine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, T M; Stone, M O; Natarajan, L V; Crane, R L

    1995-08-01

    To determine the maximum range of coupling between side-chain photochromism and polypeptide conformation change, we modified the carboxylate side chains of succinylated poly(L-lysine) with a spiropyran to form polypeptide I. The extent of modification was determined to be 35.5%. The spacer group length between the polypeptide alpha-carbon and the dye was 12 atoms, providing minimum polypeptide-dye interaction. Conformation changes were monitored by circular dichroism as a function of light adaptation and solvent composition (hexafluoroisopropanol [HFIP] vs trifluoroethanol [TFE]). Under all solvent compositions, the dark-adapted dye was in the merocyanine form. Light adaptation by visible light converted the dye to the spiropyran form. When dissolved in TFE, I adopted a helical conformation insensitive to light adaptation. With increasing percentage HFIP, a solvent-induced helix-to-coil transition was observed around 80% (vol/vol) HFIP. At 100% HFIP, both light- and dark-adapted forms of I were in the coil state. Near the midpoint of the solvent-induced helix-to-coil transition, light adaptation caused conformation changes. Applying helix-to-coil transition theory, we measured a statistically significant difference in coil segment-HFIP binding constant for light- vs dark-adapted solutions (6.38 +/- 0.03 M-1 vs 6.56 +/- 0.03 M-1), but not for the nucleation parameter sigma (1.2 +/- 0.4 10(-3) vs 1.3 +/- 0.3 x 10(-3). The small binding constant difference translated to a light-induced binding energy difference of 17 cal/mol/monomer. Near the midpoint of the helix-to-coil transition, collective interactions between monomer units made possible the translation of a small energy difference (less than RT) into large macromolecular conformation changes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Why is left right and right left in the mirror? Baffled by the basics of reflection and refraction? Wondering just how the eye works? If you have trouble teaching concepts about light that you don t fully grasp yourself, get help from a book that s both scientifically accurate and entertaining with Light. By combining clear explanations, clever drawings, and activities that use easy-to-find materials, this book covers what science teachers and parents need to know to teach about light with confidence. It uses ray, wave, and particle models of light to explain the basics of reflection and refraction, optical instruments, polarization of light, and interference and diffraction. There s also an entire chapter on how the eye works. Each chapter ends with a Summary and Applications section that reinforces concepts with everyday examples. Whether you need a deeper understanding of how light bends or a good explanation of why the sky is blue, you ll find Light more illuminating and accessible than a college textbook...

  5. Enhancement of Au-Ag-Te contents in tellurium-bearing ore minerals via bioleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Nag-Choul; Cho, Kang Hee; Kim, Bong Ju; Lee, Soonjae; Park, Cheon Young

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to enhance the content of valuable metals, such as Au, Ag, and Te, in tellurium-bearing minerals via bioleaching. The ore samples composed of invisible Au and Au paragenesis minerals (such as pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite and galena) in combination with tellurium-bearing minerals (hessite, sylvanite and Tellurobismuthite) were studied. Indigenous microbes from mine drainage were isolated and identified as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, which were used in bioleaching after adaption to copper. The effect of the microbial adaption on the bioleaching performance was then compared with the results produced by the non-adaptive process. The microbial adaption enhanced the Au-Ag-Te contents in biological leaching of tellurium-bearing ore minerals. This suggests that bioleaching with adapted microbes can be used both as a pretreatment and in the main recovery processes of valuable metals.

  6. Status of tellurium--hastelloy N studies in molten fluoride salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keiser, J.R.

    1977-10-01

    Tellurium, which is a fission product in nuclear reactor fuels, can embrittle the surface grain boundaries of nickel-base structural materials. This report summarizes results of an experimental investigation conducted to understand the mechanism and to develop a means of controlling this embrittlement in the alloy Hastelloy N. The addition of a chromium telluride to salt can be used to provide small partial pressures of tellurium simulating a reactor environment where tellurium appears as a fission product. The intergranular embrittlement produced in Hastelloy N when exposed to this chromium telluride-salt mixture can be reduced by adding niobium to the Hastelloy N or by controlling the oxidation potential of the salt in the reducing range

  7. Selective floatation-spectrophotometric determination of tellurium (4) with papaverine and butyl rhodamine B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skripchuk, V.G.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown, that papaverine reacts with a bromide complex of tellurium (4) to form a compound readily floated by toluene. The floatation is carried out from an aqueous solution, 5.2 M in H 2 SO 4 , 0.2 M in KBr and 5.4x10 -3 M in papaverine. The absorbance is a function of tellurium (4) concentration over a range of 5-100 μg Te/5 ml. Such a highly sensitive reagent as butylrhodamine B can be effectively substituted for papaverine. The floatation results in better selectivity. The method makes it possible to determine tellurium in blister, anodic and cathodic copper without matrix preseparation [ru

  8. RECEPTOR POTENTIAL AND LIGHT-INDUCED MITOCHONDRIAL ACTIVATION IN BLOWFLY PHOTORECEPTOR MUTANTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOJET, MH; TINBERGEN, J; STAVENGA, DG

    1991-01-01

    1. Simultaneous measurements of the receptor potential and the light-induced mitochondrial activation were performed in white-eyed blowflies Calliphora vicina, mutant chalky, and Lucilia cuprina, mutants w(F) and w'nss. The intensity dependence and the temporal dynamics were investigated. 2. The

  9. Far-wing light absorption induced by resonant or near-resonant collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalieri, S.; Celli, M.

    1996-01-01

    The authors have studied the absorption of light induced by a resonant or near-resonant collision between two atoms. The calculations have been performed by taking into account also the magnetic sublevels, which makes their theoretical predictions more applicable to realistic cases. Analytical expressions for the far-wing absorption cross-section have been obtained

  10. Light induced drift: a possible mechanism of separation of isotopes by laser excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, D.J.; Nilaya, J.P.; Venkatramani, N.

    2003-02-01

    A comprehensive review of the literature on the effect of light induced drift and its exploitation in the separation of isotopes, both in atomic and molecular forms, is presented. An experimental scheme based on this effect to separate S 33 , with a natural abundance of ∼0.76%, from SF 6 has also been worked out. (author)

  11. Visible light- and radiation-induced alkylation of pyridine ring with alkanoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimori, Akira; Yamada, Tetsuo

    1986-01-01

    Quinoline and 4-methylquinoline are efficiently alkylated with alkanoic acid in the presence of iron(III) sulfate upon visible light-irradiation. Iron(III) sulfate not only accelerates the photoreaction but also increases the yield of alkylation. Gamma-irradiation also brings about the alkylation. In the photo- and radiation-induced alkylation with alkanoic acid, alkyl radicals play important roles. (author)

  12. Classification of quantitative light-induced fluorescence images using convolutional neural network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imangaliyev, S.; van der Veen, M.H.; Volgenant, C.M.C.; Loos, B.G.; Keijser, B.J.F.; Crielaard, W.; Levin, E.; Lintas, A.; Rovetta, S.; Verschure, P.F.M.J.; Villa, A.E.P.

    2017-01-01

    Images are an important data source for diagnosis of oral diseases. The manual classification of images may lead to suboptimal treatment procedures due to subjective errors. In this paper an image classification algorithm based on Deep Learning framework is applied to Quantitative Light-induced

  13. Cyanobacterial high-light-inducible proteins - Protectors of chlorophyll-protein synthesis and assembly

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Komenda, Josef; Sobotka, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1857, č. 3 (2016), s. 288-295 ISSN 0005-2728 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1416; GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/11/0377 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Chlorophyll * Cyanobacteria * High-light-inducible protein Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.932, year: 2016

  14. Light-induced space-charge fields for the structuration of dielectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggert, H.A.

    2006-11-01

    Light-induced space-charge fields in lithium-niobate crystals are used for patterning of dielectric materials. This includes tailored ferroelectric domains in the bulk of the crystal, different sorts of micro and nanoparticles on a crystal surface, as well as poling of electrooptic chromophores. A stochastical model is introduced, which can describe the spatial inhomogeneous domain inversion. (orig.)

  15. Moderate Light-Induced Degeneration of Rod Photoreceptors with Delayed Transducin Translocation in shaker1 Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zallocchi, Marisa; Wang, Wei-Min; Delimont, Duane; Cosgrove, Dominic

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Usher syndrome is characterized by congenital deafness associated with retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Mutations in the myosin VIIa gene (MYO7A) cause a common and severe subtype of Usher syndrome (USH1B). Shaker1 mice have mutant MYO7A. They are deaf and have vestibular dysfunction but do not develop photoreceptor degeneration. The goal of this study was to investigate abnormalities of photoreceptors in shaker1 mice. Methods. Immunocytochemistry and hydroethidine-based detection of intracellular superoxide production were used. Photoreceptor cell densities under various conditions of light/dark exposures were evaluated. Results. In shaker1 mice, the rod transducin translocation is delayed because of a shift of its light activation threshold to a higher level. Even moderate light exposure can induce oxidative damage and significant rod degeneration in shaker1 mice. Shaker1 mice reared under a moderate light/dark cycle develop severe retinal degeneration in less than 6 months. Conclusions. These findings show that, contrary to earlier studies, shaker1 mice possess a robust retinal phenotype that may link to defective rod protein translocation. Importantly, USH1B animal models are likely vulnerable to light-induced photoreceptor damage, even under moderate light. PMID:21447681

  16. Increased Expression of CCN2 in the Red Flashing Light-Induced Myopia in Guinea Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Visual environment plays an important role in the occurrence of myopia. We previously showed that the different flashing lights could result in distinct effects on the ocular growth and development of myopia. CCN2 has been reported to regulate various cellular functions and biological processes. However, whether CCN2 signaling was involved in the red flashing light-induced myopia still remains unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the red flashing lights exposure on the refraction and axial length of the eyes in vivo and then evaluated their effects on the expression of CCN2 and TGF-β in sclera tissues. Our data showed that the eyes exposed to the red flashing light became more myopic with a significant increase of the axial length and decrease of the refraction. Both CCN2 and TGF-β, as well as p38 MAPK and PI3K, were highly expressed in the sclera tissues exposed to the red flashing light. Both CCN2 and TGF-β were found to have the same gene expression profile in vivo. In conclusion, our findings found that CCN2 signaling pathway plays an important role in the red flashing light-induced myopia in vivo. Moreover, our study establishes a useful animal model for experimental myopia research.

  17. Absolute Configuration from Different Multifragmentation Pathways in Light-Induced Coulomb Explosion Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitzer, Martin; Kastirke, Gregor; Kunitski, Maksim; Jahnke, Till; Bauer, Tobias; Goihl, Christoph; Trinter, Florian; Schober, Carl; Henrichs, Kevin; Becht, Jasper; Zeller, Stefan; Gassert, Helena; Waitz, Markus; Kuhlins, Andreas; Sann, Hendrik; Sturm, Felix; Wiegandt, Florian; Wallauer, Robert; Schmidt, Lothar Ph H; Johnson, Allan S; Mazenauer, Manuel; Spenger, Benjamin; Marquardt, Sabrina; Marquardt, Sebastian; Schmidt-Böcking, Horst; Stohner, Jürgen; Dörner, Reinhard; Schöffler, Markus; Berger, Robert

    2016-08-18

    The absolute configuration of individual small molecules in the gas phase can be determined directly by light-induced Coulomb explosion imaging (CEI). Herein, this approach is demonstrated for ionization with a single X-ray photon from a synchrotron light source, leading to enhanced efficiency and faster fragmentation as compared to previous experiments with a femtosecond laser. In addition, it is shown that even incomplete fragmentation pathways of individual molecules from a racemic CHBrClF sample can give access to the absolute configuration in CEI. This leads to a significant increase of the applicability of the method as compared to the previously reported complete break-up into atomic ions and can pave the way for routine stereochemical analysis of larger chiral molecules by light-induced CEI. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Determination of half life of tellurium isotopes: a proposal for the teaching of nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruivo, Julio C.; Zamboni, Cibele B.; Batista, Wagner F.

    2013-01-01

    This work aimed at the development of courseware for teaching nuclear physics, using experimental data of half-life measurement (T1/2) of Tellurium isotopes (A=127 and 131). The choice of Tellurium was established for providing nuclear data, which are fundamental in related investigations of nuclear structure and its use in various areas such as geochemistry, chemical and pharmaceutical industries, astrophysics etc. For evaluation of the proposal performance, the material was made available, bringing a lot of information about nuclear safety, production and storage of radioactive material and concepts of radioactive decay, subatomic particles, emission of gamma radiation, half-life, etc.

  19. Determination of half life of tellurium isotopes: a proposal for the teaching of nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruivo, Julio C.; Zamboni, Cibele B.; Batista, Wagner F., E-mail: julio.ruivo.costa@usp.br, E-mail: czamboni@ipen.br, E-mail: fisicawagner@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This work aimed at the development of courseware for teaching nuclear physics, using experimental data of half-life measurement (T1/2) of Tellurium isotopes (A=127 and 131). The choice of Tellurium was established for providing nuclear data, which are fundamental in related investigations of nuclear structure and its use in various areas such as geochemistry, chemical and pharmaceutical industries, astrophysics etc. For evaluation of the proposal performance, the material was made available, bringing a lot of information about nuclear safety, production and storage of radioactive material and concepts of radioactive decay, subatomic particles, emission of gamma radiation, half-life, etc.

  20. Enhancing the efficacy of AREDS antioxidants in light-induced retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Paul; Markey, M; Rapp, C M; Darrow, R M; Ziesel, A; Organisciak, D T

    2017-01-01

    Light-induced photoreceptor cell degeneration and disease progression in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) involve oxidative stress and visual cell loss, which can be prevented, or slowed, by antioxidants. Our goal was to test the protective efficacy of a traditional Age-related Eye Disease Study antioxidant formulation (AREDS) and AREDS combined with non-traditional antioxidants in a preclinical animal model of photooxidative retinal damage. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were reared in a low-intensity (20 lux) or high-intensity (200 lux) cyclic light environment for 6 weeks. Some animals received a daily dietary supplement consisting of a small cracker infused with an AREDS antioxidant mineral mixture, AREDS antioxidants minus zinc, or zinc oxide alone. Other rats received AREDS combined with a detergent extract of the common herb rosemary, AREDS plus carnosic acid, zinc oxide plus rosemary, or rosemary alone. Antioxidant efficacy was determined by measuring retinal DNA levels 2 weeks after 6 h of intense exposure to white light (9,000 lux). Western blotting was used to determine visual cell opsin and arrestin levels following intense light treatment. Rhodopsin regeneration was determined after 1 h of exposure to light. Gene array analysis was used to determine changes in the expression of retinal genes resulting from light rearing environment or from antioxidant supplementation. Chronic high-intensity cyclic light rearing resulted in lower levels of rod and cone opsins, retinal S-antigen (S-ag), and medium wavelength cone arrestin (mCAR) than found for rats maintained in low cyclic light. However, as determined by retinal DNA, and by residual opsin and arrestin levels, 2 weeks after acute photooxidative damage, visual cell loss was greater in rats reared in low cyclic light. Retinal damage decreased with AREDS plus rosemary, or with zinc oxide plus rosemary whereas AREDS alone and zinc oxide alone (at their daily recommended levels) were both ineffective. One

  1. Fragment formation in GeV-energy proton and light heavy-ion induced reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, T.; Haga, M.; Haseno, M.

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated similarities and differences among the fragment formation processes in GeV-energy light-ion and light heavy-ion induced reactions. We have newly measured inclusive and exclusive energy spectra of intermediate mass fragments (3 ≤ Z ≤ 30; IMFs) for 8-GeV 16 O and 20 Ne and 12-GeV 20 Ne induced target multifragmentations (TMFs) in order to compare them with those previously measured for 8- and 12-GeV proton induced TMFs. We fond noticeable difference in their spectrum shapes and magnitudes but all of them clearly indicate the existence of sideward-peaked components, indicating fragment formations are mainly dictated not by a incident energy per nucleon but by a total energy of the projectile. (author)

  2. Electrochemical and antimicrobial activity of tellurium oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Pramod K. [Department of Applied Sciences and Humanities, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110067 (India); Special Centre for Nanosciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Sharma, Prem Prakash; Sharma, Anshu [Special Centre for Nanosciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Khan, Zishan H., E-mail: zishan_hk@yahoo.co.in [Department of Applied Sciences and Humanities, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110067 (India); Solanki, Pratima R., E-mail: pratimarsolanki@gmail.com [Special Centre for Nanosciences, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • TeO{sub 2} NPs synthesized without using any catalyst by chemical vapour deposition method. • The growth temperature was 410 °C with continuous flow of O{sub 2.} • TeO{sub 2} NPs have anti-bacterial activity against E. coli, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus while enhances the growth of S. pyogenes. • TeO{sub 2} shows maximum redox current at pH 7 for phosphate buffer solution. - Abstract: Thin film of tellurium oxide (TeO{sub 2}) has been synthesized by chemical vapour deposition method onto indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate without using any catalyst. XRD pattern of TeO{sub 2} thin film suggests that the structure of TeO{sub 2} changes from amorphous to crystalline (paratellurite) on dispersing into deionized water. Zeta potential measurement reveals a positive surface potential of 28.8 mV. TEM images shows spherical shaped TeO{sub 2} nanoparticles having average particle size of 65 nm. Electrochemical studies of TeO{sub 2}/ITO electrode exhibit improved electron transfer owing to its inherent electron transfer property at pH 7.0 of phosphate buffer. Antimicrobial activity of TeO{sub 2} has been studied for gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes) and gram negative (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) bacterial and fungal strains (Aspergillus nizer and Candida albicans). These studies suggest that the TeO{sub 2} NPs inhibit the growth of E. coli, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus bacteria, whereas the same particles enhance the growth of S. pyogenes bacteria.

  3. Dietary supplement enriched in antioxidants and omega-3 protects from progressive light-induced retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramchani-Ben Othman, Khaoula; Cercy, Christine; Amri, Mohamed; Doly, Michel; Ranchon-Cole, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we have evaluated one of the dietary supplements enriched with antioxidants and fish oil used in clinical care for patient with age-related macular degeneration. Rats were orally fed by a gastric canula daily with 0.2 ml of water or dietary supplement until they were sacrificed. After one week of treatment, animals were either sacrificed for lipid analysis in plasma and retina, or used for evaluation of rod-response recovery by electroretinography (ERG) followed by their sacrifice to measure rhodopsin content, or used for progressive light-induced retinal degeneration (PLIRD). For PLIRD, animals were transferred to bright cyclic light for one week. Retinal damage was quantified by ERG, histology and detection of apoptotic nuclei. Animals kept in dim-cyclic-light were processed in parallel. PLIRD induced a thinning of the outer nuclear layer and a reduction of the b-wave amplitude of the ERG in the water group. Retinal structure and function were preserved in supplemented animals. Supplement induced a significant increase in omega-3 fatty acids in plasma by 168% for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), 142% for docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and 19% for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and a decrease in the omega-6 fatty acids, DPA by 28%. In the retina, supplement induced significant reduction of linolenic acid by 67% and an increase in EPA and DPA by 80% and 72%, respectively, associated with significant decrease in omega-6 DPA by 42%. Supplement did not affect rhodopsin content or rod-response recovery. The present data indicate that supplement rapidly modified the fatty acid content and induced an accumulation of EPA in the retina without affecting rhodopsin content or recovery. In addition, it protected the retina from oxidative stress induced by light. Therefore, this supplement might be beneficial to slow down progression of certain retinal degeneration.

  4. Dietary supplement enriched in antioxidants and omega-3 protects from progressive light-induced retinal degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaoula Ramchani-Ben Othman

    Full Text Available In the present study, we have evaluated one of the dietary supplements enriched with antioxidants and fish oil used in clinical care for patient with age-related macular degeneration. Rats were orally fed by a gastric canula daily with 0.2 ml of water or dietary supplement until they were sacrificed. After one week of treatment, animals were either sacrificed for lipid analysis in plasma and retina, or used for evaluation of rod-response recovery by electroretinography (ERG followed by their sacrifice to measure rhodopsin content, or used for progressive light-induced retinal degeneration (PLIRD. For PLIRD, animals were transferred to bright cyclic light for one week. Retinal damage was quantified by ERG, histology and detection of apoptotic nuclei. Animals kept in dim-cyclic-light were processed in parallel. PLIRD induced a thinning of the outer nuclear layer and a reduction of the b-wave amplitude of the ERG in the water group. Retinal structure and function were preserved in supplemented animals. Supplement induced a significant increase in omega-3 fatty acids in plasma by 168% for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 142% for docosapentaenoic acid (DPA and 19% for docosahexaenoic acid (DHA and a decrease in the omega-6 fatty acids, DPA by 28%. In the retina, supplement induced significant reduction of linolenic acid by 67% and an increase in EPA and DPA by 80% and 72%, respectively, associated with significant decrease in omega-6 DPA by 42%. Supplement did not affect rhodopsin content or rod-response recovery. The present data indicate that supplement rapidly modified the fatty acid content and induced an accumulation of EPA in the retina without affecting rhodopsin content or recovery. In addition, it protected the retina from oxidative stress induced by light. Therefore, this supplement might be beneficial to slow down progression of certain retinal degeneration.

  5. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Ditchburn, R W

    1963-01-01

    This classic study, available for the first time in paperback, clearly demonstrates how quantum theory is a natural development of wave theory, and how these two theories, once thought to be irreconcilable, together comprise a single valid theory of light. Aimed at students with an intermediate-level knowledge of physics, the book first offers a historical introduction to the subject, then covers topics such as wave theory, interference, diffraction, Huygens' Principle, Fermat's Principle, and the accuracy of optical measurements. Additional topics include the velocity of light, relativistic o

  6. Light-pressure-induced nonlinear dispersion of a laser field interacting with an atomic gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, R.; Mlynek, J.

    1990-01-01

    We report on detailed studies of the effect of resonant light pressure on the optical response of an atomic gas to a single monochromatic laser field. In this very elementary situation of laser spectroscopy, the redistribution of atomic velocities that is induced by spontaneous light pressure leads to a novel contribution to the optical dispersion curve of the medium. This light-pressure-induced dispersion phenomenon displays a pronounced nonlinear dependence on the laser intensity. Moreover, for a given intensity, its strength is closely related to the laser beam diameter. As most important feature, this light-pressure-induced dispersion displays an even symmetry with respect to the optical detuning from line center. As a result, the total Doppler-broadened dispersion curve of the gas can become asymmetric, and a significant shift of the dispersion line center can occur. In addition to a detailed theoretical description of the phenomenon, we report on its experimental investigation on the λ=555.6 nm 1 S 0 - 3 P 1 transition in atomic ytterbium vapor with the use of frequency-modulation spectroscopy. The experimental findings are in good quantitative agreement with theoretical predictions

  7. Slow Light Using Electromagnetically Induced Transparency from Spin Coherence in [110] Strained Quantum Wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Wei; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J.; Wang, Hailin

    2005-03-01

    The electromagnetically induced transparency from spin coherence has been proposed in [001] quantum wells recently. [1] The spin coherence is a potential candidate to demonstrate semiconductor-based slow light at room temperature. However, the spin coherence time is not long enough to demonstrate a significant slowdown factor in [001] quantum wells. Further, the required transition of light-hole excitons lies in the absorption of heavy-hole continuum states. The extra dephasing and absorption from these continuum states are drawbacks for slow light. Here, we propose to use [110] strained quantum wells instead of [001] quantum wells. The long spin relaxation time in [110] quantum wells at room temperature, and thus more robust spin coherence, [2] as well as the strain-induced separation [3, 4] of the light-hole exciton transition from the heavy-hole continuum absorption can help to slow down light in quantum wells. [1] T. Li, H. Wang, N. H. Kwong, and R. Binder, Opt. Express 11, 3298 (2003). [2] Y. Ohno, R. Terauchi, T. Adachi, F. Matsukura, and H. Ohno, Phys. Rev. Lett. 83, 4196 (1999). [3] C. Y. P. Chao and S. L. Chuang, Phys. Rev. B 46, 4110 (1992). [4] C. Jagannath, E. S. Koteles, J. Lee, Y. J. Chen, B. S. Elman, and J. Y. Chi, Phys. Rev. B 34, 7027 (1986).

  8. Effect of Violet-Blue Light on Streptococcus mutans-Induced Enamel Demineralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Gomez Felix Gomez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: This in vitro study determined the effectiveness of violet-blue light (405 nm on inhibiting Streptococcus mutans-induced enamel demineralization. Materials and Methods: S. mutans UA159 biofilm was grown on human enamel specimens for 13 h in 5% CO2 at 37 °C with/without 1% sucrose. Wet biofilm was treated twice daily with violet-blue light for five minutes over five days. A six-hour reincubation was included daily between treatments excluding the final day. Biofilms were harvested and colony forming units (CFU were quantitated. Lesion depth (L and mineral loss (∆Z were quantified using transverse microradiography (TMR. Quantitative light-induced fluorescence Biluminator (QLF-D was used to determine mean fluorescence loss. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA to compare differences in means. Results: The results demonstrated a significant reduction in CFUs between treated and non-treated groups grown with/without 1% sucrose. ∆Z was significantly reduced for specimens exposed to biofilms grown without sucrose with violet-blue light. There was only a trend on reduction of ∆Z with sucrose and with L on both groups. There were no differences in fluorescence-derived parameters between the groups. Conclusions: Within the limitations of the study, the results indicate that violet-blue light can serve as an adjunct prophylactic treatment for reducing S. mutans biofilm formation and enamel mineral loss.

  9. Microscopic theory of light-induced deformation in amorphous side-chain azobenzene polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshchevikov, V; Saphiannikova, M; Heinrich, G

    2009-04-16

    We propose a microscopic theory of light-induced deformation of side-chain azobenzene polymers taking into account the internal structure of polymer chains. Our theory is based on the fact that interaction of chromophores with the polarized light leads to the orientation anisotropy of azobenzene macromolecules which is accompanied by the appearance of mechanical stress. It is the first microscopic theory which provides the value of the light-induced stress larger than the yield stress. This result explains a possibility for the inscription of surface relief gratings in glassy side-chain azobenzene polymers. For some chemical architectures, elongation of a sample demonstrates a nonmonotonic behavior with the light intensity and can change its sign (a stretched sample starts to be uniaxially compressed), in agreement with experiments. Using a viscoplastic approach, we show that the irreversible strain of a sample, which remains after the light is switched off, decreases with increasing temperature and can disappear at certain temperature below the glass transition temperature. This theoretical prediction is also confirmed by recent experiments.

  10. Effects of hydroxyl radical scavengers KCN and CO on ultraviolet light-induced activation of crude soluble guanylate cyclase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, J.O.; Axelsson, K.L.; Andersson, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    The crude soluble guanylate cyclase (GC) from bovine mesenteric artery was stimulated by ultraviolet (UV) light (366 nm). Addition of free radical scavengers, dimethylsulfoxide or superoxide dismutase and/or catalase to the GC assay did not abolish the stimulatory effect of UV light. On the contrary, the UV light-induced activation was enhanced in the presence of these scavengers. KCN (1 mM) did not affect the UV light-induced activation, while 0.1 mM of CO potentiated the activation. These results may indicate that UV light is operating through a direct interaction with the ferrous form of the GC-heme

  11. Temperature rise induced by some light emitting diode and quartz-tungsten-halogen curing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmussen, Erik; Peutzfeldt, Anne

    2005-02-01

    Because of the risk of thermal damage to the pulp, the temperature rise induced by light-curing units should not be too high. LED (light emitting diode) curing units have the main part of their irradiation in the blue range and have been reported to generate less heat than QTH (quartz-tungsten-halogen) curing units. This study had two aims: first, to measure the temperature rise induced by ten LED and three QTH curing units; and, second, to relate the measured temperature rise to the power density of the curing units. The light-induced temperature rise was measured by means of a thermocouple embedded in a small cylinder of resin composite. The power density was measured by using a dental radiometer. For LED units, the temperature rise increased with increasing power density, in a statistically significant manner. Two of the three QTH curing units investigated resulted in a higher temperature rise than LED curing units of the same power density. Previous findings, that LED curing units induce less temperature rise than QTH units, does not hold true in general.

  12. Continuous-wave spatial quantum correlations of light induced by multiple scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolka, Stephan; Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Huck, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    and reflectance. Utilizing frequency-resolved quantum noise measurements, we observe that the strength of the spatial quantum correlation function can be controlled by changing the quantum state of an incident bright squeezed-light source. Our results are found to be in excellent agreement with the developed......We present theoretical and experimental results on spatial quantum correlations induced by multiple scattering of nonclassical light. A continuous-mode quantum theory is derived that enables determining the spatial quantum correlation function from the fluctuations of the total transmittance...... theory and form a basis for future research on, e. g., quantum interference of multiple quantum states in a multiple scattering medium....

  13. Observation of spatial quantum correlations induced by multiple scattering of nonclassical light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolka, Stephan; Huck, Alexander; Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2009-01-01

    and negative spatial quantum correlations are observed when varying the quantum state incident to the multiple scattering medium, and the strength of the correlations is controlled by the number of photons. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with recent theoretical proposals by implementing......We present the experimental realization of spatial quantum correlations of photons that are induced by multiple scattering of squeezed light. The quantum correlation relates photons propagating along two different light paths through the random medium and is infinite in range. Both positive...... the full quantum model of multiple scattering....

  14. Dependence of the saturated light-induced defect density on macroscopic properties of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Park, H. R.; Liu, J. Z.; Roca i Cabarrocas, P.; Maruyama, A.; Isomura, M.; Wagner, S.; Abelson, J. R.; Finger, F.

    2008-01-01

    We report a study of the saturated light-induced defect density Ns,sat in 37 hydrogenated (and in part fluorinated) amorphous silicon [a-Si:H(F)] films grown in six different reactors under widely different conditions. Ns,sat was attained by exposing the films to light from a krypton ion laser (λ=647.1 nm). Ns,sat is determined by the constant photocurrent method and lies between 5×1016 and 2×1017 cm−3. Ns,sat drops with decreasing optical gap Eopt and hydrogen content cH, but is not correlat...

  15. UV light induced photodegradation of organic dye by ZnO nanocatalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumesh, C. K.; Patel, Bhavin; Parekh, Kinnari

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet light induced photocatalytic activity of ZnO nanocatalyst prepared using a wet chemical precipitation route and mineralization of the methyl orange (MO) dye has been carried out in a photocatalytic reactor. The degradation of the MO was monitored spectrophotometrically and showed a decolorization efficiency of 92% after nine hours of irradiation in the MO-ZnO/UV light system. The blue shifting of maximum peak position of the MO and the formation of extra peak at 247 nm during irradiation time advances revealed that MO degrades in the form of intermediates during the photocatalytic process.

  16. Mathematical modelling of light-induced electric reaction of Cucurbita pepo L. leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Stolarek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The bioelectRIc reactions of 14-16 day old plants of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo L. and internodal cells of Nitellopsis obtusa to the action of visible and ultraviolet light (UV-C were studied. The possibility of analyzing the bioelectric reaction of pumpkin plants induced by visible light by means of mathematical modelling using a linear differential equation of the second order was considered. The solution of this equation (positive and negative functions can, in a sufficient way, reflect the participation of H+ and CI- ions in the generation of the photoelectric response in green plant cells.

  17. Flow-induced vibration for light-water reactors. Progress report, April 1978-December 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schardt, J.F.

    1980-03-01

    Flow-Induced vibration for Light Water Reactors (FIV for LWRs) is a four-year program designed to improve the FIV performance of light water reactors through the development of design criteria, analytical models for predicting behavior of components, general scaling laws to improve the accuracy of reduced-scale tests, and the identification of high FIV risk areas. The program commenced December 1, 1976, but was suspended on September 30, 1978, due to a shift in Department of Energy (DOE) priorities away from LWR productivity/availability. It was reinitiated as of August 1, 1979. This progress report summarizes the accomplishments achieved during the period from April 1978 to December 1979

  18. Light-induced cross-linking and post-cross-linking modification of polyglycidol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, F; Bruns, M; Keul, H; Yagci, Y; Möller, M

    2018-02-08

    The photoinduced radical generation process has received renewed interest due to its economic and ecological appeal. Herein the light-induced cross-linking of functional polyglycidol and its post-cross-linking modification are presented. Linear polyglycidol was first functionalized with a tertiary amine in a two-step reaction. Dimethylaminopropyl functional polyglycidol was cross-linked in a UV-light mediated reaction with camphorquinone as a type II photoinitiator. The cross-linked polyglycidol was further functionalized by quaternization with various organoiodine compounds. Aqueous dispersions of the cross-linked polymers were investigated by means of DLS and zeta potential measurements. Polymer films were evaluated by DSC and XPS.

  19. Light-induced switching in pDTE-FICO 1D photonic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Ilka; Scotognella, Francesco

    2018-03-01

    We propose the design of 1D photonic crystals and microcavities in which fluorine-indium codoped cadmium oxide (FICO) nanocrystal based layers and layers of diarylethene-based polyester (pDTE) are alternated or embedded in a microcavity. The irradiation with UV light results in two different behaviours: (i) it dopes the FICO nanocrystals inducing a blue shift of their plasmonic resonances; (ii) it changes the real part of the refractive index of the photochromic pDTE polymer. These two behaviours are combined in the proposed photonic structures and can be useful for switchable filters and cavities for light emission.

  20. Studies of cellular damage induced by X-rays and visible light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, T.; Kinn, G.; Reitan, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    DNA-damage in cells has been studied by use of spectrophotometry and fluorometry. The method is based on the differential fluorescence quantum yield of the fluorochrome Hoechst 33258 when bound to single and double stranded DNA, respectively. DNA-damage by doses of X-rays below 2 Gy was clearly detectable. Blue light from phototherapy lamps induced DNA-damage in human TMG-1 glioblastoma, but no significant effect could be observed after irradiation with green lamps. In the presence of bilirubin the amount of DNA-damage was increased, notably at high bilirubin concentration and by blue light. 9 refs; 12 figs

  1. Microstructure, optical characterization and light induced degradation in a-Si:H deposited at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minani, E.; Sigcau, Z.; Adgebite, O.; Ramukosi, F.L.; Ntsoane, T.P.; Harindintwari, S.; Knoesen, D.; Comrie, C.M.; Britton, D.T.; Haerting, M.

    2006-01-01

    The microstructure and optical properties of a series of hydrogenated amorphous silicon layers deposited on glass substrates at different temperature have been characterized by means of X-ray diffraction techniques and optical spectroscopy. The radial distribution function of the as-deposited samples showed an increase in the bond angle and a decrease in the radial distance indicating a relaxation of the amorphous network with increasing the deposition temperature. Light induced degradation was studied using a simulated daylight spectrum. The changes in hydrogen bonding configuration, associated with the light soaking at different stages of illumination, was monitored via the transmission bands of the vibrational wag and stretch modes of the IR spectrum

  2. The Light-Induced FOS Response in Melanopsin Expressing HEK-293 Cells is Correlated with Melanopsin Quantity and Dependent on Light Duration and Irradiance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georg, Birgitte; Rask, Lene; Hannibal, Jens

    2014-01-01

    We established a cell line (HEK-hMel) expressing melanopsin in a tetracycline dependent manner to elucidate new aspects of melanopsin's light response. Different light stimuli were evaluated using FOS expression as response parameter. Immunoblotting was used to evaluate expression of melanopsin......) s(-1) resulted in equally high FOS expression. The HEK-hMel cells were used to characterize facets of melanopsin's light-induced FOS response not approachable in vivo. Novel information such as dependency of the FOS response on both melanopsin amount and light intensity in addition to a detailed...

  3. Phototropin 2 is involved in blue light-induced anthocyanin accumulation in Fragaria x ananassa fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadomura-Ishikawa, Yasuko; Miyawaki, Katsuyuki; Noji, Sumihare; Takahashi, Akira

    2013-11-01

    Anthocyanins are widespread, essential secondary metabolites in higher plants during color development in certain flowers and fruits. In strawberries, anthocyanins are also key contributors to fruit antioxidant capacity and nutritional value. However, the effects of different light qualities on anthocyanin accumulation in strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa, cv. Sachinoka) fruits remain elusive. In the present study, we showed the most efficient increase in anthocyanin content occurred by blue light irradiation. Light sensing at the molecular level was investigated by isolation of two phototropin (FaPHOT1 and FaPHOT2), two cryptochrome (FaCRY1 and FaCRY2), and two phytochrome (FaPHYA and FaPHYB) homologs. Expression analysis revealed only FaPHOT2 transcripts markedly increased depending on fruit developmental stage, and a corresponding increase in anthocyanin content was detected. FaPHOT2 knockdown resulted in decreased anthocyanin content; however, overexpression increased anthocyanin content. These findings suggested blue light induced anthocyanin accumulation, and FaPHOT2 may play a role in sensing blue light, and mediating anthocyanin biosynthesis in strawberry fruits. This is the first report to find a relationship between visible light sensing, and color development in strawberry fruits.

  4. Magnetic resonance force microscopy quantum computer with tellurium donors in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, G P; Doolen, G D; Hammel, P C; Tsifrinovich, V I

    2001-03-26

    We propose a magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM)-based nuclear spin quantum computer using tellurium impurities in silicon. This approach to quantum computing combines well-developed silicon technology and expected advances in MRFM. Our proposal does not use electrostatic gates to realize quantum logic operations.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Force Microscopy Quantum Computer with Tellurium Donors in Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, G. P.; Doolen, G. D.; Hammel, P. C.; Tsifrinovich, V. I.

    2001-01-01

    We propose a magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM)-based nuclear spin quantum computer using tellurium impurities in silicon. This approach to quantum computing combines well-developed silicon technology and expected advances in MRFM. Our proposal does not use electrostatic gates to realize quantum logic operations

  6. Subnanosecond pulse measurements of 10.6 μm radiation with tellurium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haselhoff, E.H.; Bonnie, R.J.M.; Ernst, G.J.; Witteman, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    Subnanosecond infrared pulses have been measured by noncollinear secondharmonic generation in tellurium. The method is very practical because due to the high refractive index the fine tuning of the phase matching is easily obtained by rotating the crystal around the optic axis.

  7. Dismantling and chemical characterization of spent Peltier thermoelectric devices for antimony, bismuth and tellurium recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balva, Maxime; Legeai, Sophie; Garoux, Laetitia; Leclerc, Nathalie; Meux, Eric

    2017-04-01

    Major uses of thermoelectricity concern refrigeration purposes, using Peltier devices, mainly composed of antimony, bismuth and tellurium. Antimony was identified as a critical raw material by EU and resources of bismuth and tellurium are not inexhaustible, so it is necessary to imagine the recycling of thermoelectric devices. That for, a complete characterization is needed, which is the aim of this work. Peltier devices were manually dismantled in three parts: the thermoelectric legs, the alumina plates on which remain the electrical contacts and the silicone paste used to connect the plates. The characterization was performed using five Peltier devices. It includes mass balances of the components, X-ray diffraction analysis of the thermoelectric legs and elemental analysis of each part of the device. It appears that alumina represents 45% of a Peltier device in weight. The electrical contacts are mainly composed of copper and tin, and the thermoelectric legs of bismuth, tellurium and antimony. Thermoelectric legs appear to be Se-doped Bi 2 Te 3 and (Bi 0,5 Sb 1,5 )Te 3 for n type and p type semiconductors, respectively. This work shows that Peltier devices can be considered as a copper ore and that thermoelectric legs contain high amounts of bismuth, tellurium and antimony compared to their traditional resources.

  8. Thermoelectric properties of electrodeposited tellurium films and the sodium lignosulfonate effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abad, Begoña; Rull-Bravo, Marta; Hodson, Stephen L.; Xu, Xianfan; Martin-Gonzalez, Marisol

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the addition of a surfactant, sodium lignosulfonate (SLS), on the thermoelectric properties of tellurium films prepared by electrochemical deposition is studied. The growth mechanism is found to have an important role in the thermoelectric properties since the grain size of the films is sharply reduced when the surfactant is added to the solution. For this reason, the electrical resistivity of the tellurium films when the surfactant is not added is 229 μΩ·m, which is lower than 798 μΩ·m with SLS. The Seebeck coefficient values are not influenced, with values in the vicinity of 285 μV/K for both solutions. The power factor resulted higher values than previous works, reaching values of 280 μW/m·K 2 (without SLS) and 82 μW/m·K 2 (with SLS) at room temperature. Finally, the thermal conductivity was measured by means of the Photoacoustic technique, which showed values of the order of 1 W/m·K for both solutions, which is a factor of 3 less than the bulk value of tellurium. A notable observation is that the power factor and the thermal conductivity of electrodeposited tellurium films have the same order of magnitude of bismuth telluride films grown by electrodeposition. The figure of merit is estimated to be approximately one order of magnitude higher than the bulk value, 0.09 without SLS and 0.03 with SLS, both at room temperature

  9. Determination of spins and radioactive widths of tellurium nuclear levels with capturre gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchini, F.G.

    1973-01-01

    Spins and levels widths of the tellurium, mainly 128 Te and 130 Te, were determinated by gamma spectroscopy. Measurements of inelastic and elastic scattering, angular distribution and scattering temperature dependence, were still made. Energy levels of this isotopes, were also determinated [pt

  10. Rimonabant, a selective cannabinoid1 receptor antagonist, protects against light-induced retinal degeneration in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Tomoyo; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Yuki; Otsuka, Tomohiro; Ohno, Yuta; Ogami, Shiho; Yamane, Shinsaku; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2017-05-15

    The endocannabinoid system is involved in some neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. An endogenous constellation of proteins related to cannabinoid 1 receptor signaling, including free fatty acids, diacylglycerol lipase, and N-acylethanolamine-hydrolyzing acid amidase, are localized in the murine retina. Moreover, the expression levels of endogenous agonists of cannabinoid receptors are changed in the vitreous fluid. However, the role of the endocannabinoid system in the retina, particularly in the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration, remains unknown. Therefore, we investigated involvement of the cannabinoid 1 receptor in light-induced retinal degeneration using in vitro and in vivo models. To evaluate the effect of cannabinoid 1 receptors in light irradiation-induced cell death, the mouse retinal cone-cell line (661W) was treated with a cannabinoid 1 receptor antagonist, rimonabant. Time-dependent changes of expression and localization of retinal cannabinoid 1 receptors were measured using Western blot and immunostaining. Retinal damage was induced in mice by exposure to light, followed by intravitreal injection of rimonabant. Electroretinograms and histologic analyses were performed. Rimonabant suppressed light-induced photoreceptor cell death. Cannabinoid 1 receptor expression was upregulated by light exposure. Treatment with rimonabant improved both a- and b-wave amplitudes and the thickness of the outer nuclear layer. These results suggest that the cannabinoid 1 receptor is involved in light-induced retinal degeneration and it may represent a therapeutic target in the light-induced photoreceptor degeneration related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Traffic Light Protocol for Induced Seismicity: What is the Best Strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, H.; Mahani, A. B.; Atkinson, G. M.; Eaton, D. W. S.; Maxwell, S.

    2015-12-01

    In response to the occurrence of relatively large (and felt) earthquakes that are potentially induced by man-made activities, there is an increasing trend for the industry and government regulators to include a "traffic light" system in their decision-making process. Despite its tremendous implications to the cost of operations and the protection of public safety, the protocol that defines the different scenarios for different lights ("green", "yellow", or "red") has not been thoroughly validated to truly reflect the associated seismic risk. Most government regulators adopt a traffic light protocol (TLP) that depends on the magnitude of the earthquake of interest and sometimes felt reports from local communities. It is well known that the estimate of an earthquake's magnitude can have some uncertainty. While an uncertainty of +/-0.2 in magnitude is understandable and generally accepted by the seismological community, it can create a serious problem when the value of magnitude is the predominant factor in the TLP for induced seismicity. Recent examples of magnitude 4 and larger earthquakes in northeast BC and western AB that are possibly induced by shale gas hydraulic fracturing have demonstrated vividly the possible deficiency of existing TLP for induced seismicity. From the viewpoint of mitigating seismic risk, we argue that a ground-motion based TLP should be more effective than a magnitude-based approach. A workshop with representatives from government agencies, the industry, and the academia will be held to review the deficiency of the current TLP for induced seismicity and to explore innovative ways of improvement. The ultimate goal of the TLP for induced seismicity is to reach a balance between the protection of public safety and the economic benefit of developing natural resources In this presentation, main conclusions of this workshop will be presented.

  12. Development of a new light collection and detection system optimized for ion beam induced fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanga, Sudheer Kumar; Mi, Zhaohong; Koh, Long Cheng; Tao, Ye; Bettiol, Andrew A.; Watt, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Ion beam induced fluorescence microscopy is a new imaging technique which has the potential to achieve sub-50 nm spatial resolution fluorescence images. Currently the resolution of the technique has been limited to around 150 nm mainly because of inefficient collection and detection of emitted photons from the sample. To overcome this limitation, a new light collection system based on a custom made parabolic mirror is employed to enhance the fluorescence collection. The custom made mirror is designed so as to obtain both structural (scanning transmission ion microscopy) and ion beam induced fluorescence imaging simultaneously. The design and characterization of the parabolic mirror is discussed in detail

  13. On light cluster production in nucleon induced reactions at intermediate energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroix, D.; Blideanu, V.; Durand, D.

    2004-09-01

    A dynamical model dedicated to nucleon induced reaction between 30-150 MeV is presented. It considers different stages of the reaction: the approaching phase, the in-medium nucleon-nucleon collisions, the cluster formation and the secondary de-excitation process. The notions of influence area and phase-space exploration during the reaction are introduced. The importance of the geometry of the reaction and of the conservation laws are underlined. The model is able to globally reproduce the absolute cross sections for the emission of neutron and light charged particles for proton and neutron induced reactions on heavy and intermediate mass targets ( 56 Fe and 208 Pb). (authors)

  14. Mechanism of ultraviolet light induced catabolite repression of L-arabinose isomerase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, D; Bhattacharya, A K [Banaras Hindu Univ. (India). Inst. of Medical Sciences

    1982-12-01

    An attempt has been made to find out how U.V. irradiation of E.coli B/r cells causes catabolite repression to inhibit L-arabinose isomerase synthesis. The results presented show that U.V. irradiation leads to a lowering of the cellular cyclic AMP level and of the cyclic AMP binding activity. Unlike catabolite repression by glucose, no small molecular weight compound is involved in U.V. light induced inhibition of the binding activity. It is therefore concluded that the mechanism of catabolite repression induced by U.V. appears to be different from that of the catabolite repression by glucose.

  15. Blue light potentiates neurogenesis induced by retinoic acid-loaded responsive nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Tiago; Ferreira, Raquel; Quartin, Emanuel; Boto, Carlos; Saraiva, Cláudia; Bragança, José; Peça, João; Rodrigues, Cecília; Ferreira, Lino; Bernardino, Liliana

    2017-09-01

    Neurogenic niches constitute a powerful endogenous source of new neurons that can be used for brain repair strategies. Neuronal differentiation of these cells can be regulated by molecules such as retinoic acid (RA) or by mild levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are also known to upregulate RA receptor alpha (RARα) levels. Data showed that neural stem cells from the subventricular zone (SVZ) exposed to blue light (405nm laser) transiently induced NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS, resulting in β-catenin activation and neuronal differentiation, and increased RARα levels. Additionally, the same blue light stimulation was capable of triggering the release of RA from light-responsive nanoparticles (LR-NP). The synergy between blue light and LR-NP led to amplified neurogenesis both in vitro and in vivo, while offering a temporal and spatial control of RA release. In conclusion, this combinatory treatment offers great advantages to potentiate neuronal differentiation, and provides an innovative and efficient application for brain regenerative therapies. Controlling the differentiation of stem cells would support the development of promising brain regenerative therapies. Blue light transiently increased reactive oxygen species, resulting in neuronal differentiation and increased retinoic acid receptor (RARα) levels. Additionally, the same blue light stimulation was capable of triggering the release of RA from light-responsive nanoparticles (LR-NP). The synergy between blue light and LR-NP led to amplified neurogenesis, while offering a temporal and spatial control of RA release. In this sense, our approach relying on the modulation of endogenous stem cells for the generation of new neurons may support the development of novel clinical therapies. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Protective effect of taurine on the light-induced disruption of isolated frog rod outer segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasantes-Morales, H.; Ademe, R.M.; Quesada, O.

    1981-01-01

    Isolated frog rod outer segments (ROS) incubated in a Krebs-bicarbonate medium, and illuminated for 2 h, show a profound alteration in their structure. This is characterized by distention of discs, vesiculation, and a marked swelling. The light-induced ROS disruption requires the presence of bicarbonate and sodium chloride. Replacement of bicarbonate by TRIS or HEPES protects ROS structure. Also, substitution of sodium chloride by sucrose or choline chloride maintains unaltered the ROS structure. Deletion of calcium, magnesium, or phosphate does not modify the effect produced by illumination. An increased accumulation of labeled bicarbonate and tritiated water is observed in illuminated ROS, as compared with controls in the dark. The presence of taurine, GABA, or glycine, at concentrations of 5-25 mM, effectively counteracts the light-induced ROS disruption. Taurine (25 mM) reduces labeled bicarbonate and tritiated water levels to those observed in the dark incubated ROS

  17. Multifragmentation induced by light relativistic projectiles and heavy ions: similarities and differences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnaukhov, V.A.; Avdeev, S.P.; Kuznetsov, V.D.

    1998-01-01

    The experimental data on fragment multiplicities, their energy and charge distributions, the emission times are considered for the nuclear multifragmentation process induced by relativistic light projectiles (protons, helium) and heavy ions. With light projectiles, the multifragmentation is a pure 'thermal' process, well described by the statistical models. Heavy-ion-induced multifragmentation is influenced by dynamic effects related first of all to the compression of the system in the collision. But statistical models can also be applied to rendering the partition of the system if the excitation energy is less than 10 MeV/nucleon and compression is modest. For the central collision of heavy ions the statistical approach fails to describe the data

  18. Eliminating Light-Induced Degradation in Commercial p-Type Czochralski Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Hallam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses developments in the mitigation of light-induced degradation caused by boron-oxygen defects in boron-doped Czochralski grown silicon. Particular attention is paid to the fabrication of industrial silicon solar cells with treatments for sensitive materials using illuminated annealing. It highlights the importance and desirability of using hydrogen-containing dielectric layers and a subsequent firing process to inject hydrogen throughout the bulk of the silicon solar cell and subsequent illuminated annealing processes for the formation of the boron-oxygen defects and simultaneously manipulate the charge states of hydrogen to enable defect passivation. For the photovoltaic industry with a current capacity of approximately 100 GW peak, the mitigation of boron-oxygen related light-induced degradation is a necessity to use cost-effective B-doped silicon while benefitting from the high-efficiency potential of new solar cell concepts.

  19. Large Fizeau's light-dragging effect in a moving electromagnetically induced transparent medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuan, Pei-Chen; Huang, Chang; Chan, Wei Sheng; Kosen, Sandoko; Lan, Shau-Yu

    2016-10-03

    As one of the most influential experiments on the development of modern macroscopic theory from Newtonian mechanics to Einstein's special theory of relativity, the phenomenon of light dragging in a moving medium has been discussed and observed extensively in different types of systems. To have a significant dragging effect, the long duration of light travelling in the medium is preferred. Here we demonstrate a light-dragging experiment in an electromagnetically induced transparent cold atomic ensemble and enhance the dragging effect by at least three orders of magnitude compared with the previous experiments. With a large enhancement of the dragging effect, we realize an atom-based velocimeter that has a sensitivity two orders of magnitude higher than the velocity width of the atomic medium used. Such a demonstration could pave the way for motional sensing using the collective state of atoms in a room temperature vapour cell or solid state material.

  20. Using Light-Induced Thermocleavage in a Roll-to-Roll Process for Polymer Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, Frederik C; Norrman, Kion

    2010-01-01

    We report on the use of intense visible light with a narrow spectral distribution matched to the region where the conjugated polymer material absorbs to selectively heat the active material and induce thermocleavage. We show a full roll-to-roll process, leading to complete large-area polymer solar...... ion mass spectrometry, attenuated total reflectance infrared, and transmission/reflection UV−vis techniques....

  1. Light-Induced Local Heating for Thermophoretic Manipulation of DNA in Polymer Micro- and Nanochannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamdrup, Lasse Højlund; Larsen, Niels Bent; Kristensen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    We present a method for making polymer chips with a narrow-band near-infrared absorber layer that enables light-induced local heating of liquids inside fluidic micro- and nanochannels fabricated by thermal imprint in polymethyl methacrylate. We have characterized the resulting liquid temperature...... profiles in microchannels using the temperature dependent fluorescence of the complex [Ru(bpy)3]2+. We demonstrate thermophoretic manipulation of individual YOYO-1 stained T4 DNA molecules inside micro- and nanochannels....

  2. Cation-Dependent Light-Induced Halide Demixing in Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Perovskites

    OpenAIRE

    Sutter-Fella, CM; Ngo, QP; Cefarin, N; Gardener, K; Tamura, N; Stan, CV; Drisdell, WS; Javey, A; Toma, FM; Sharp, ID

    2018-01-01

    © 2018 American Chemical Society. Mixed cation metal halide perovskites with increased power conversion efficiency, negligible hysteresis, and improved long term stability under illumination, moisture, and thermal stressing have emerged as promising compounds for photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications. Here, we shed light on photo-induced halide demixing using in-situ photoluminescence spectroscopy and in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) to directly compare the evolution of comp...

  3. Symmetry-Induced Light Confinement in a Photonic Quasicrystal-Based Mirrorless Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi Zito

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We numerically investigate the electromagnetic field localization in a two-dimensional photonic quasicrystal generated with a holographic tiling. We demonstrate that light confinement can be induced into an air mirrorless cavity by the inherent symmetry of the spatial distribution of the dielectric scatterers forming the side walls of the open cavity. Furthermore, the propagation direction can be controlled by suitable designs of the structure. This opens up new avenues for designing photonic materials and devices.

  4. Simultaneous determination of selenium and tellurium in native sulfur by atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arikawa, Yoshiko; Hirai, Shoji; Ozawa, Takejiro.

    1979-01-01

    A method for the determination of selenium and tellurium in native sulfur has been investigated by means of atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Native sulfur collected from around fumarole or volcanic crater is ground down into powder, a portion of which weighing 1 g is subjected to analysis. A 2.6% (w/v) sodium hydroxide solution is added by 10 ml to the sample in a teflon beaker, and the mixture is then heated on a hot plate. Sulfur is decomposed and dissolved in the form of disulfide and thiosulfate. A 30% hydrogenperoxide solution is added by 10 ml to oxidize them to sulfate. At the same time selenium and tellurium contained in the sulfur sample are also thought to be oxidized to Se(VI) and Te(VI) states. The solution is neutralized with hydrochloric acid and diluted with distilled water to 100 ml. The sample solution thus prepared is sprayed into the air-acetylene flame of the atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The absorbance is measured at 195.9 nm for selenium and 214.2 nm for tellurium. Calibration curve is prepared by measuring the absorbances of the solutions prepared as follows. One gram portions of pure sulfur (99.9999%) are decomposed as for the samples. After neutralization, standard solutions containing each same amount of selenium and tellurium (0 -- 1000 μg) are added to the sulfur solution and then diluted with water to 100 ml. The standard deviations were estimated to be 50.4 ppm for selenium at 756 ppm and 16.6 ppm for tellurium at 587 ppm. For the check of the reliability of the method, results were compared with those obtained by neutron activation analysis. Results obtained by both methods showed good agreement. (author)

  5. Light field intensification induced by nanoinclusions in optical thin-films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhiwu; Cheng Xiangai; Huang Liangjin; Liu Zejin

    2012-01-01

    Inclusions even in tens of nanometers scale (nanoinclusion) can cause electric field intensifications locally in an optical thin-film when irradiated by laser. It was modeled by using finite element analysis, and the dependences of local light field on complex refractive index, diameter and embedded depth of the nanoinclusion were simulated. In addition, the average light intensity inside the nanodefect was calculated as well as the energy deposition rate. The modeling results show that extinction coefficient of a nanoinclusion has more significant effects on local light field than real part of the refractive index. A light intensification as large as 4× can occur owing to a metallic nanoinclusion and the peaks of electric field distribution locating on the boundary of the particulate. Energy deposition rate, reflecting the behavior of laser induced damage to the thin-film, is found to have the highest value at a certain extinction coefficient, instead of the state that, for a defect, a higher extinction coefficient causes a higher speed of laser absorption. And when this coefficient is relatively small, the energy deposition rate grows linearly with it. Finally, regarding high absorptive nanoinclusions, the larger can induce stronger laser intensification and higher average of energy deposition rate, whereas no significant difference is made by low absorptive nanoinclusions of different sizes.

  6. Evaluation of dental enamel caries assessment using Quantitative Light Induced Fluorescence and Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Ana Marly Araújo; de Freitas, Anderson Zanardi; de L Campello, Sergio; Gomes, Anderson Stevens Leônidas; Karlsson, Lena

    2016-06-01

    An in vitro study of morphological alterations between sound dental structure and artificially induced white spot lesions in human teeth, was performed through the loss of fluorescence by Quantitative Light-Induced Fluorescence (QLF) and the alterations of the light attenuation coefficient by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). To analyze the OCT images using a commercially available system, a special algorithm was applied, whereas the QLF images were analyzed using the software available in the commercial system employed. When analyzing the sound region against white spot lesions region by QLF, a reduction in the fluorescence intensity was observed, whilst an increase of light attenuation by the OCT system occurred. Comparison of the percentage of alteration between optical properties of sound and artificial enamel caries regions showed that OCT processed images through the attenuation of light enhanced the tooth optical alterations more than fluorescence detected by QLF System. QLF versus OCT imaging of enamel caries: a photonics assessment. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Collision-induced light scattering in a thin xenon layer between graphite slabs - MD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawid, A; Górny, K; Wojcieszyk, D; Dendzik, Z; Gburski, Z

    2014-08-14

    The collision-induced light scattering many-body correlation functions and their spectra in thin xenon layer located between two parallel graphite slabs have been investigated by molecular dynamics computer simulations. The results have been obtained at three different distances (densities) between graphite slabs. Our simulations show the increased intensity of the interaction-induced light scattering spectra at low frequencies for xenon atoms in confined space, in comparison to the bulk xenon sample. Moreover, we show substantial dependence of the interaction-induced light scattering correlation functions of xenon on the distances between graphite slabs. The dynamics of xenon atoms in a confined space was also investigated by calculating the mean square displacement functions and related diffusion coefficients. The structural property of confined xenon layer was studied by calculating the density profile, perpendicular to the graphite slabs. Building of a fluid phase of xenon in the innermost part of the slot was observed. The nonlinear dependence of xenon diffusion coefficient on the separation distance between graphite slabs has been found. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Visible light induced changes in the immune response through an eye-brain mechanism (photoneuroimmunology).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J E

    1995-07-01

    The immune system is susceptible to a variety of stresses. Recent work in neuroimmunology has begun to define how mood alteration, stress, the seasons, and daily rhythms can have a profound effect on immune response through hormonal modifications. Central to these factors may be light through an eye-brain hormonal modulation. In adult primates, only visible light (400-700 nm) is received by the retina. This photic energy is then transduced and delivered to the visual cortex and by an alternative pathway to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The SCN is a part of the hypothalamic region in the brain believed to direct circadian rhythm. Visible light exposure also modulates the pituitary and pineal gland which leads to neuroendocrine changes. Melatonin, norepinephrine and acetylcholine decrease with light activation, while cortisol, serotonin, gaba and dopamine levels increase. The synthesis of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in rat SCN has been shown to be modified by light. These induced neuroendocrine changes can lead to alterations in mood and circadian rhythm. All of these neuroendocrine changes can lead to immune modulation. An alternative pathway for immune modulation by light is through the skin. Visible light (400-700 nm) can penetrate epidermal and dermal layers of the skin and may directly interact with circulating lymphocytes to modulate immune function. However, even in the presence of phototoxic agents such as eosin and rose bengal, visible light did not produce suppression of contact hypersensitivity with suppresser cells. In contrast to visible light, in vivo exposure to UV-B (280-320 nm) and UV-A (320-400 nm) radiation can only alter normal human immune function by a skin mediated response. Each UV subgroup (B, A) induces an immunosuppressive response but by differing mechanisms involving the regulation of differing interleukins and growth factors. Some effects observed in humans are

  9. Research Update: A minimal region of squid reflectin for vapor-induced light scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick B. Dennis

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Reflectins are a family of proteins found in the light manipulating cells of cephalopods. These proteins are made up of a series of conserved repeats that contain highly represented amino acids thought to be important for function. Previous studies demonstrated that recombinant reflectins cast into thin films produced structural colors that could be dynamically modulated via changing environmental conditions. In this study, we demonstrate light scattering from reflectin films following exposure to a series of water vapor pulses. Analysis of film surface topography shows that the induction of light scatter is accompanied by self-assembly of reflectins into micro- and nanoscale features. Using a reductionist strategy, we determine which reflectin repeats and sub-repeats are necessary for these events following water vapor pulsing. With this approach, we identify a singly represented, 23-amino acid region in reflectins as being sufficient to recapitulate the light scattering properties observed in thin films of the full-length protein. Finally, the aqueous stability of reflectin films is leveraged to show that pre-exposure to buffers of varying pH can modulate the ability of water vapor pulses to induce light scatter and protein self-assembly.

  10. A gonad-expressed opsin mediates light-induced spawning in the jellyfish Clytia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga Artigas, Gonzalo; Lapébie, Pascal; Leclère, Lucas; Takeda, Noriyo; Deguchi, Ryusaku; Jékely, Gáspár

    2018-01-01

    Across the animal kingdom, environmental light cues are widely involved in regulating gamete release, but the molecular and cellular bases of the photoresponsive mechanisms are poorly understood. In hydrozoan jellyfish, spawning is triggered by dark-light or light-dark transitions acting on the gonad, and is mediated by oocyte maturation-inducing neuropeptide hormones (MIHs) released from the ectoderm. We determined in Clytia hemisphaerica that blue-cyan light triggers spawning in isolated gonads. A candidate opsin (Opsin9) was found co-expressed with MIH within specialised ectodermal cells. Opsin9 knockout jellyfish generated by CRISPR/Cas9 failed to undergo oocyte maturation and spawning, a phenotype reversible by synthetic MIH. Gamete maturation and release in Clytia is thus regulated by gonadal photosensory-neurosecretory cells that secrete MIH in response to light via Opsin9. Similar cells in ancestral eumetazoans may have allowed tissue-level photo-regulation of diverse behaviours, a feature elaborated in cnidarians in parallel with expansion of the opsin gene family. PMID:29303477

  11. Light-induced, dark-reversible colour shifts in petals of Phlox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjön, G.S.; Braune, W.; Bjön, L.O.

    1985-01-01

    Flowers of some Phlox (Phlox x paniculata L.) varieties undergo daily colour shifts, being blue in the early morning, turning red during the day, and returning to blue in the evening. The colour shift, which occurs only in the upper (adaxial) petal surfaces, is due to the daily changes in ambient light. In the laboratory, colour shifts could be induced by 2.5 h of ultraviolet, visible or far-red light and recorded by reflectance spectrophotometry. There are indications that irradiations with different kinds of light cause qualitatively different colour shifts, and that thus more than one photoreceptor pigment and more than one primary light reaction may be involved. The presence of phytochrome was demonstrated in petals of white Phlox flowers by in vivo transmission spectrophotometry. It is therefore possible that colour shifts in coloured Phlox flowers are mediated by phytochrome. Possibly the movement of ions (e.g. hydrogen ions) into or out of the vacuole (where the visible pigments are located) is affected by light absorption in a pigment in the tonoplast

  12. Light-induced fading of the PSL signal from irradiated herbs and spices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberti, A.; Corda, U.; Fuochi, P.; Bortolin, E.; Calicchia, A.; Onori, S.

    2007-01-01

    Reliability of the photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) technique, as screening method for irradiated food identification, has been tested with three kinds of herbs and spices (oregano, red pepper and fennel), prepared in two different ways (granular: i.e. seeds and flakes, or powdered), over a long period of storage with different light exposures. The irradiated samples kept in the dark gave always a positive response (the sample is correctly classified as 'irradiated') for the overall examination period. The samples kept under ambient light conditions, in typical commercial glass containers, exhibited a reduction of the PSL signal, more or less pronounced depending on the type of food and packaging. The different PSL response of the irradiated samples is to be related to the quantity and quality of the mineral debris present in the individual food. It was also found that, for the same type of food, the light-induced fading was much stronger for the flaked and seed samples than for the corresponding powder samples, the penetrating capability of light being much more inhibited in powdered than in whole seeds or flaked form samples. The observed light bleaching of the PSL signal in irradiated herbs and spices is of practical relevance since it may lead to false negative classifications

  13. Reversal or protection by light of the ethidium bromide induced petite mutation in yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hixon, S.C.; Burnham, A.D.; Irons, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    An intermediate in the ethidium bromide (EB) induced petite mutation pathway may be destabilized by daylight light to cause a reversion to the normal grande phenotype. Starved cells preincubated in the dark for up to 6 h with 100μg/ml EB could be reverted to grandes after one hour of light exposure, whereas similarly treated cells maintained in the dark expresse the petite mutation in more than 80 percent of the population. In addition, the production of petite mutants by EB in buffer could be prevented if cell suspensions were exposed to light immediately upon the addition of EB. Photoreversal of the EB-derived petite mutation in growing cells as less efficient presumably because the availability of an energy source caused a continuation of mutation events beyond the light revertible step to a non-reversible fixation of the mutation. Cells treated with EB in growth and reversal of the mutation. This may be due to the cold inhibition of an enzyme which comes into play beyond the light sensitive step in the mutation pathway. (orig.) [de

  14. Visible light-induced OH radicals in Ga2O3: an EPR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzitrinovich, Zeev; Lipovsky, Anat; Gedanken, Aharon; Lubart, Rachel

    2013-08-21

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were found to exist in water suspensions of several metal oxide nanoparticles (NPs), such as CuO, TiO2 and ZnO. Visible light irradiation enhanced the capability of TiO2 and ZnO NPs to generate ROS, thus increasing their antibacterial effects. Because of the possible toxic effects on the host tissue it is desired to find nano-metal oxides which do not produce ROS under room light, but only upon a strong external stimulus. Using the technique of electron-spin resonance (ESR) coupled with spin trapping, we examined the ability of Ga2O3 submicron-particle suspensions in water to produce reactive oxygen species with and without visible light irradiation. We found that in contrast to ZnO and TiO2 NPs, no ROS are produced by Ga2O3 under room light. Nevertheless blue light induced hydroxyl radical formation in Ga2O3. This finding might suggest that NPs of Ga2O3 could be used safely for infected skin sterilization.

  15. Research Update: A minimal region of squid reflectin for vapor-induced light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Patrick B.; Singh, Kristi M.; Vasudev, Milana C.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J.

    2017-12-01

    Reflectins are a family of proteins found in the light manipulating cells of cephalopods. These proteins are made up of a series of conserved repeats that contain highly represented amino acids thought to be important for function. Previous studies demonstrated that recombinant reflectins cast into thin films produced structural colors that could be dynamically modulated via changing environmental conditions. In this study, we demonstrate light scattering from reflectin films following exposure to a series of water vapor pulses. Analysis of film surface topography shows that the induction of light scatter is accompanied by self-assembly of reflectins into micro- and nanoscale features. Using a reductionist strategy, we determine which reflectin repeats and sub-repeats are necessary for these events following water vapor pulsing. With this approach, we identify a singly represented, 23-amino acid region in reflectins as being sufficient to recapitulate the light scattering properties observed in thin films of the full-length protein. Finally, the aqueous stability of reflectin films is leveraged to show that pre-exposure to buffers of varying pH can modulate the ability of water vapor pulses to induce light scatter and protein self-assembly.

  16. Hypoxic preconditioning protects photoreceptors against light damage independently of hypoxia inducible transcription factors in rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Brigitte; Schori, Christian; Grimm, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Hypoxic preconditioning protects photoreceptors against light-induced degeneration preserving retinal morphology and function. Although hypoxia inducible transcription factors 1 and 2 (HIF1, HIF2) are the main regulators of the hypoxic response, photoreceptor protection does not depend on HIF1 in rods. Here we used rod-specific Hif2a single and Hif1a;Hif2a double knockout mice to investigate the potential involvement of HIF2 in rods for protection after hypoxic preconditioning. To identify potential HIF2 target genes in rods we determined the retinal transcriptome of hypoxic control and rod-specific Hif2a knockouts by RNA sequencing. We show that rods do not need HIF2 for hypoxia-induced increased survival after light exposure. The transcriptomic analysis revealed a number of genes that are potentially regulated by HIF2 in rods; among those were Htra1, Timp3 and Hmox1, candidates that are interesting due to their connection to human degenerative diseases of the retina. We conclude that neither HIF1 nor HIF2 are required in photoreceptors for protection by hypoxic preconditioning. We hypothesize that HIF transcription factors may be needed in other cells to produce protective factors acting in a paracrine fashion on photoreceptor cells. Alternatively, hypoxic preconditioning induces a rod-intrinsic response that is independent of HIF transcription factors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Single-strand breaks induced in Bacillus subtilis DNA by ultraviolet light: action spectrum and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peak, M.J.; Peak, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    The induction of single-strand breaks (alkali-labile bonds plus frank breaks) in the DNA of Bacillus subtilis irradiated in vivo by monochromatic UV light at wavelengths from 254 to 434nm was measured. The spectrum consists of a major far-UV (below 320nm) component and a minor near-UV shoulder. A mutant deficient in DNA polymerase I accumulates breaks caused by near-UV (above 320nm) wavelengths faster than the wild-type strain proficient in polymerase I. Measurable breaks in extracted DNA are induced at a higher frequency than those induced in vivo. Anoxia, glycerol, and diazobicyclo (2.2.2.) octane inhibit break formation in extracted DNA. Alkali-labile bonds induced by 365-nm UV radiation are largely (78%) covalent bond chain breaks, the remainder consists of true alkali-labile bonds, probably apurinic and apyrimidinic sites. (author)

  18. Disorder-induced modification of the transmission of light through two-dimensional photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beggs, D M; Kaliteevski, M A; Abram, R A; Cassagne, D; Albert, J P

    2005-01-01

    Disordered two-dimensional photonic crystals with a complete photonic band-gap have been investigated. Transmission and reflection spectra have been modelled for both ballistic and scattered light. The density of states and electromagnetic field profiles of disorder-induced localized states have also been calculated, for various levels of disorder. It is found that there is a threshold-like behaviour in the amount of disorder. Below the threshold, it is seen that there is a vanishing probability of disorder-induced localized states being introduced into the centre of the photonic band-gap, but that edge-states narrow the band-gap. Above the threshold, there is a non-zero probability of disorder-induced localized states throughout the photonic band-gap, and the modification of the transmission and reflection spectra due to disorder rapidly increases with increasing disorder

  19. Inhibition by acrolein of light-induced stomatal opening through inhibition of inward-rectifying potassium channels in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Moshiul; Ye, Wenxiu; Matsushima, Daiki; Khokon, Md Atiqur Rahman; Munemasa, Shintaro; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Acrolein is a reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehyde derived from lipid peroxides, which are produced in plants under a variety of stress. We investigated effects of acrolein on light-induced stomatal opening using Arabidopsis thaliana. Acrolein inhibited light-induced stomatal opening in a dose-dependent manner. Acrolein at 100 μM inhibited plasma membrane inward-rectifying potassium (Kin) channels in guard cells. Acrolein at 100 μM inhibited Kin channel KAT1 expressed in a heterologous system using Xenopus leaves oocytes. These results suggest that acrolein inhibits light-induced stomatal opening through inhibition of Kin channels in guard cells.

  20. A Phenomenology of Meditation-Induced Light Experiences: Traditional Buddhist and Neurobiological Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared R. Lindahl

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The scientific study of Buddhist meditation has proceeded without much attention to Buddhist literature that details the range of psychological and physiological changes thought to occur during meditation. This paper presents reports of various meditation-induced light experiences derived from American Buddhist practitioners. The reports of light experiences are classified into two main types: discrete lightforms and patterned or diffuse lights. Similar phenomena are well documented in traditional Buddhist texts but are virtually undocumented in scientific literature on meditation. Within Buddhist traditions, these phenomena are attributed a range of interpretations. However, because it is insufficient and problematic to rely solely upon the textual sources as a means of investigating the cause or significance of these phenomena, these qualitative reports are also considered in relation to scientific research on light-related experiences in the context of sensory deprivation, perceptual isolation, and clinical disorders of the visual system. The typologies derived from these studies also rely upon reports of experiences and closely match typologies derived from the qualitative study of contemporary practitioners and typologies found in Buddhist literary traditions. Taken together, these studies also provide evidence in support of the hypothesis that certain meditative practices—especially those that deliberately decrease social, kinesthetic, and sensory stimulation and emphasize focused attention—have perceptual and cognitive outcomes similar to sensory deprivation. Given that sensory deprivation increases neuroplasticity, meditation may also have an enhanced neuroplastic potential beyond ordinary experience-dependent changes. By providing and contextualizing these reports of meditation-induced light experiences, scientists, clinicians, and meditators gain a more informed view of the range of experiences that can be elicited by contemplative

  1. Optical feedback-induced light modulation for fiber-based laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-11-01

    Optical fibers have been used as a minimally invasive tool in various medical fields. However, due to excessive heat accumulation, the distal end of a fiber often suffers from severe melting or devitrification, leading to the eventual fiber failure during laser treatment. In order to minimize thermal damage at the fiber tip, an optical feedback sensor was developed and tested ex vivo. Porcine kidney tissue was used to evaluate the feasibility of optical feedback in terms of signal activation, ablation performance, and light transmission. Testing various signal thresholds demonstrated that 3 V was relatively appropriate to trigger the feedback sensor and to prevent the fiber deterioration during kidney tissue ablation. Based upon the development of temporal signal signatures, full contact mode rapidly activated the optical feedback sensor possibly due to heat accumulation. Modulated light delivery induced by optical feedback diminished ablation efficiency by 30% in comparison with no feedback case. However, long-term transmission results validated that laser ablation assisted with optical feedback was able to almost consistently sustain light delivery to the tissue as well as ablation efficiency. Therefore, an optical feedback sensor can be a feasible tool to protect optical fiber tips by minimizing debris contamination and delaying thermal damage process and to ensure more efficient and safer laser-induced tissue ablation.

  2. Visible-light-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based TFTs for transparent electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Jun Ha

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the origin of visible-light-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based thin film transistors (oxide-TFTs for transparent electronics by exploring the shift in threshold voltage (Vth. A large hysteresis window in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO TFTs possessing large optical band-gap (≈3 eV was observed in a visible-light illuminated condition whereas no hysteresis window was shown in a dark measuring condition. We also report the instability caused by photo irradiation and prolonged gate bias stress in oxide-TFTs. Larger Vth shift was observed after photo-induced stress combined with a negative gate bias than the sum of that after only illumination stress and only negative gate bias stress. Such results can be explained by trapped charges at the interface of semiconductor/dielectric and/or in the gate dielectric which play a role in a screen effect on the electric field applied by gate voltage, for which we propose that the localized-states-assisted transitions by visible-light absorption can be responsible.

  3. Visible-light-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based TFTs for transparent electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Tae-Jun [Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    We investigate the origin of visible-light-induced instability in amorphous metal-oxide based thin film transistors (oxide-TFTs) for transparent electronics by exploring the shift in threshold voltage (V{sub th}). A large hysteresis window in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) TFTs possessing large optical band-gap (≈3 eV) was observed in a visible-light illuminated condition whereas no hysteresis window was shown in a dark measuring condition. We also report the instability caused by photo irradiation and prolonged gate bias stress in oxide-TFTs. Larger V{sub th} shift was observed after photo-induced stress combined with a negative gate bias than the sum of that after only illumination stress and only negative gate bias stress. Such results can be explained by trapped charges at the interface of semiconductor/dielectric and/or in the gate dielectric which play a role in a screen effect on the electric field applied by gate voltage, for which we propose that the localized-states-assisted transitions by visible-light absorption can be responsible.

  4. Lead induced changes in phosphorylation of PSII proteins in low light grown pea plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wioleta, Wasilewska; Anna, Drożak; Ilona, Bacławska; Kamila, Kąkol; Elżbieta, Romanowska

    2015-02-01

    Light-intensity and redox-state induced thylakoid proteins phosphorylation involved in structural changes and in regulation of protein turnover. The presence of heavy metal ions triggers a wide range of cellular responses including changes in plant growth and photosynthesis. Plants have evolved a number of mechanisms to protect photosynthetic apparatus. We have characterized the effect of lead on PSII protein phosphorylation in pea (Pisum sativum L.) plants grown in low light conditions. Pb ions affected only slightly photochemical efficiency of PSII and had no effect on organization of thylakoid complexes. Lead activated strongly phosphorylation of PSII core D1 protein and dephosphorylation of this protein did not proceed in far red light. D1 protein was also not degraded in this conditions. However, phosphorylation of LHCII proteins was not affected by lead. These results indicate that Pb(2+) stimulate the phosphorylation of PSII core proteins and by disturbing the disassembly of supercomplexes play a role in PSII repair mechanism. LHCII phosphorylation could control the distribution of energy between the photosystems in low light conditions. This demonstrates that plants may respond to heavy metals by induction different pathways responsible for protein protection under stress conditions.

  5. Light-induced oxidative stress, N-formylkynurenine, and oxygenic photosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina M Dreaden Kasson

    Full Text Available Light stress in plants results in damage to the water oxidizing reaction center, photosystem II (PSII. Redox signaling, through oxidative modification of amino acid side chains, has been proposed to participate in this process, but the oxidative signals have not yet been identified. Previously, we described an oxidative modification, N-formylkynurenine (NFK, of W365 in the CP43 subunit. The yield of this modification increases under light stress conditions, in parallel with the decrease in oxygen evolving activity. In this work, we show that this modification, NFK365-CP43, is present in thylakoid membranes and may be formed by reactive oxygen species produced at the Mn(4CaO(5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex. NFK accumulation correlates with the extent of photoinhibition in PSII and thylakoid membranes. A modest increase in ionic strength inhibits NFK365-CP43 formation, and leads to accumulation of a new, light-induced NFK modification (NFK317 in the D1 polypeptide. Western analysis shows that D1 degradation and oligomerization occur under both sets of conditions. The NFK modifications in CP43 and D1 are found 17 and 14 Angstrom from the Mn(4CaO(5 cluster, respectively. Based on these results, we propose that NFK is an oxidative modification that signals for damage and repair in PSII. The data suggest a two pathway model for light stress responses. These pathways involve differential, specific, oxidative modification of the CP43 or D1 polypeptides.

  6. Large plasma-membrane depolarization precedes rapid blue-light-induced growth inhibition in cucumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, E. P.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1989-01-01

    Blue-light (BL)-induced suppression of elongation of etiolated Cucumis sativus L. hypocotyls began after a 30-s lag time, which was halved by increasing the fluence rate from 10 to 100 micromoles m-2 s-1. Prior to the growth suppression, the plasma-membrane of the irradiated cells depolarized by as much as 100 mV, then returned within 2-3 min to near its initial value. The potential difference measured with surface electrodes changed with an identical time course but opposite polarity. The lag time for the change in surface potential showed an inverse dependence on fluence rate, similar to the lag for the growth inhibition. Green light and red light caused neither the electrical response nor the rapid inhibition of growth. The depolarization by BL did not propagate to nonirradiated regions and exhibited a refractory period of about 10 min following a BL pulse. Fluence-response relationships for the electrical and growth responses provide correlational evidence that the plasma-membrane depolarization reflects an event in the transduction chain of this light-growth response.

  7. Light-Induced Surface Reactions at the Bismuth Vanadate/Potassium Phosphate Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaro, Marco; Abdi, Fatwa F; Lamers, Marlene; Crumlin, Ethan J; Liu, Zhi; van de Krol, Roel; Starr, David E

    2018-01-18

    Bismuth vanadate has recently drawn significant research attention as a light-absorbing photoanode due to its performance for photoelectrochemical water splitting. In this study, we use in situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy with "tender" X-rays (4.0 keV) to investigate a polycrystalline bismuth vanadate (BiVO 4 ) electrode in contact with an aqueous potassium phosphate (KPi) solution at open circuit potential under both dark and light conditions. This is facilitated by the creation of a 25 to 30 nm thick electrolyte layer using the "dip-and-pull" method. We observe that under illumination bismuth phosphate forms on the BiVO 4 surface leading to an increase of the surface negative charge. The bismuth phosphate layer may act to passivate surface states observed in photoelectrochemical measurements. The repulsive interaction between the negatively charged surface under illumination and the phosphate ions in solution causes a shift in the distribution of ions in the thin aqueous electrolyte film, which is observed as an increase in their photoelectron signals. Interestingly, we find that such changes at the BiVO 4 /KPi electrolyte interface are reversible upon returning to dark conditions. By measuring the oxygen 1s photoelectron peak intensities from the phosphate ions and liquid water as a function of time under dark and light conditions, we determine the time scales for the forward and reverse reactions. Our results provide direct evidence for light-induced chemical modification of the BiVO 4 /KPi electrolyte interface.

  8. Retinoic acid modulation of ultraviolet light-induced epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, N.J.; Breeding, J.

    1982-01-01

    Irradiation of skin with ultraviolet light of sunburn range (UVB) leads to a large and rapid induction of the polyamine biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase in the epidermis. Induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase also occurs following application of the tumor promoting agent 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13 acetate and topical retinoic acid is able to block both this ornithine decarboxylase induction and skin tumor promotion. In the studies described below, topical application of retinoic acid to hairless mouse skin leads to a significant inhibition of UVB-induced epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity. The degree of this inhibition was dependent on the dose, timing, and frequency of the application of retinoic acid. To show significant inhibition of UVB-induced ornithine decarboxylase the retinoic acid had to be applied within 5 hr of UVB irradiation. If retinoic acid treatment was delayed beyond 7 hr following UVB, then no inhibition of UVB-induced ornithine decarboxylase was observed. The quantities of retinoic acid used (1.7 nmol and 3.4 nmol) have been shown effective at inhibiting 12-0-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13 acetate induced ornithine decarboxylase. The results show that these concentrations of topical retinoic acid applied either before or immediately following UVB irradiation reduces the UVB induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase. The effect of retinoic acid in these regimens on UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis is currently under study

  9. Effect of tumor promoters on ultraviolet light-induced mutation and mitotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, B.A.; Hannan, M.A.; Haynes, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Recently, it has been suggested that mitotic recombination is involved in tumor promotion. On this basis, one might expect tumor promoters to be recombinagenic. D7 is a diploid strain of yeast in which both mutation and mitotic recombination can be measured. We have used this strain to assay the known tumor promoters, iodacetate, anthralin, and 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, and the cocarcinogen, catechol, for mutagenicity, recombinagenicity, and the ability to enhance ultraviolet light (UV)-induced genetic events. In the absence of preirradiation with UV, iodoacetate was found to be recombinagenic whereas catechol was mutagenic; however, in both cases, the effects were small. Iodoacetate, anthralin, and catechol potentiated UV-induced mitotic crossing-over, aberrant colony formation, and mutation, while catechol also increased UV-induced gene conversion. We were unable to detect any mutagenic or recombinagenic effect of 12-0-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate in either whole cells or spheroplasts. Our results do not indicate any consistent correlation between tumor-promoting activity and the ability of an agent to induce mitotic recombination in yeast. However, the ability to potentiate UV-induced mutation and mitotic recombination may reflect the cocarcinogenic activity of certain promoters

  10. Spontaneous and light-induced photon emission from intact brains of chick embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锦珠; 于文斗; 孙彤

    1997-01-01

    Photon emission (PE) and light-induced photon emission(LPE) of intact brains isolated from chick embryos have been measured by using the single photon counting device. Experimental results showed that the intensi-ty level of photon emission was detected to be higher from intact brain than from the medium in which the brain was immerged during measuring, and the emission intensity was related to the developmental stages, the healthy situation of the measured embryos, and the freshness of isolated brains as well. After white light illumination, a short-life de-layed emission from intact brains was observed, and its relaxation behavior followed a hyperbolic rather than an expo-nential law. According to the hypothesis of biophoton emission originating from a delocalized coherent electromagnetic field and Frohlich’s idea of coherent long-range interactions in biological systems, discussions were made on the signifi-cance of photon emission in studying cell communication, biological regulation, living system’

  11. Ordering of pentacene in organic thin film transistors induced by irradiation of infrared light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C. H.; Chen, S. W.; Hwang, J.

    2009-01-01

    The device performances of pentacene-based organic thin film transistors (OTFTs) were greatly improved by irradiation of infrared light. The field effect mobility and maximum drain current increase from 0.20±0.01 to 0.57±0.02 cm 2 /V s and 1.14x10 -5 to 4.91x10 -5 A, respectively. The (001) peak of the pentacene 'thin film' phase increases in intensity by 4.5 times after infrared irradiation at 50 W for 2 h. Two types of crystal orientations, i.e., 'crystal I' (2θ=5.91 deg.) and 'crystal II' (2θ=5.84 deg.), coexist in the pentacene. The improvement of the characteristics of OTFTs is attributed to crystallization and crystal reorientation induced by infrared light.

  12. A very thin light sheet technique used to investigate meniscus shapes by laser induced fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper a light sheet technique is described to accurately (50 μm) measure meniscus profiles in film formation problems. The use of a slit to create the thin (0.1 mm) laser sheet makes the technique easy to implement, and allows tunable sheet thickness. The low light intensity obtained through the slit is compensated by the induced fluorescence of the tested fluid, which provides good picture contrast. After video recording through a microscope, the actual meniscus is recovered by image processing and proper calibration. The efficiency of the technique is demonstrated on a coating flow experiment. Due to its good accuracy and ease of use, this technique is expected to provide useful quantitative information about meniscus problems, in particular for the validation of computational fluid dynamics CFD solutions of coating flows. (author)

  13. Acousto-optic control of internal acoustic reflection in tellurium dioxide crystal in case of strong elastic energy walkoff [Invited].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshinov, Vitaly; Polikarpova, Nataliya; Ivanova, Polina; Khorkin, Vladimir

    2018-04-01

    Peculiar cases of acoustic wave propagation and reflection may be observed in strongly anisotropic acousto-optical crystals. A tellurium dioxide crystal serves as a prime example of such media, since it possesses record indexes of acoustic anisotropy. We studied one of the unusual scenarios of acoustic incidence and reflection from a free crystal-vacuum boundary in paratellurite. The directions of the acoustic waves in the (001) plane of the crystal were determined, and their basic characteristics were calculated. The carried-out acousto-optic experiment at the wavelength of light 532 nm and the acoustic frequency 73 MHz confirmed the theoretical predictions. The effects examined in the paper include the acoustic wave propagation with the record walkoff angle 74°. We also observed the incidence of the wave on the boundary at the angle exceeding 90°. Finally, we registered the close-to-back reflection of acoustic energy following the incidence. One of the stunning aspects is the distribution of energy between the incident and the back-reflected wave. The unusual features of the acoustic wave reflections pointed out in the paper are valuable for their possible applications in acousto-optic devices.

  14. Chemical Exacerbation of Light-induced Retinal Degeneration in F344/N Rats in National Toxicology Program Rodent Bioassays

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Haruhiro; Hoenerhoff, Mark J.; Peddada, Shyamal D.; Sills, Robert C.; Pandiri, Arun R.

    2016-01-01

    Retinal degeneration due to chronic ambient light exposure is a common spontaneous age-related finding in albino rats, but it can also be related to exposures associated with environmental chemicals and drugs. Typically, light induced retinal degeneration has a central/hemispherical localization where as chemical induced retinal degeneration has a diffuse localization. This study was conducted to identify National Toxicology Program (NTP) rodent bioassays with treatment-related retinal degene...

  15. Fluoride-induced foliar injury in Solanum pseudo-capsicum: its induction in the dark and activation in the light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLean, D.C.; Schneider, R.C.; Weinstein, L.H.

    1982-09-01

    The differential responses of plants exposed to hydrogen fluoride (HF) in continuous light or darkness were investigated in Jerusalem cherry Solanum pseudo-capsicum L. Plants exposed to HF in the dark develop few, if any, foliar symptoms by the end of the exposure period, but severe foliar injury develops rapidly upon transfer to the light after exposure. The results suggest that light is required for the expression of responses induced by exposure to HF in the dark.

  16. Fluoride-induced foliar injury in Solanum pseudo-capsicum: its induction in the dark and activation in the light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLean, D.C.; Schneider, R.E.; Weinstein, L.H.

    1982-01-01

    The differential responses of plants exposed to hydrogen fluoride (HF) in continuous light or darkness were investigated in Jerusalem cherry Solanum pseudo-capsicum L. Plants exposed to HF in the dark develop few, if any, foliar symptoms by the end of the exposure period, but severe folia injury develops rapidly upon transfer to the light after exposure. The results suggest that light is required for the expression of responses induced by exposure to HF in the dark.

  17. Nanoimprinted polymer chips for light induced local heating of liquids in micro- and nanochannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thamdrup, Lasse Højlund; Pedersen, Jonas Nyvold; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    A nanoimprinted polymer chip with a thin near-infrared absorber layer that enables light-induced local heating (LILH) of liquids inside micro- and nanochannels is presented. An infrared laser spot and corresponding hot-spot could be scanned across the device. Large temperature gradients yield...... a 785 nm laser diode was focused from the backside of the chip to a spot diameter down to 5 ..m in the absorber layer, yielding a localized heating (Gaussian profile) and large temperature gradients in the liquid in the nanochannels. A laser power of 38 mW yielded a temperature of 40°C in the center...

  18. Interference effects on quantum light group velocity in cavity induced transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eilam, Asaf; Thanopulos, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the propagation of a quantized probe field in a dense medium composed of three-level Λ-type systems under cavity electromagnetically induced transparency conditions. We treat the medium as composed of collective states of the three-level systems while the light-medium interaction occurs within clusters of such collective states depending on the photon number state of the probe field. We observe slower group velocity for lower photon number input probe field only under conditions of no interference between different clusters of collective states in the system. (paper)

  19. Diffraction of white-light supercontinuum by femtosecond laser-induced transient grating in carbon bisulfide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Huang; Yan-Qiang, Yang; Ying-Hui, Wang; Zhi-Ren, Zheng; Wen-Hui, Su

    2010-01-01

    Experiments on fs laser-induced transient grating (LITG) in carbon bisulfide (CS 2 ) are carried out to explore the chirp characteristics of a white-light supercontinuum (SC) generated by a 800-nm, 160-fs laser pulse in a 4-mm thick Al 2 O 3 crystal. Two orders of diffraction signals of SC by fs LITG in CS 2 are observed, demonstrating that both the third-order process and the fifth-order process are present simultaneously. The experimental results also imply that the formation of an fs transient refractive-index grating in CS 2 is mainly due to the electronic polarization process. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  20. Radioactive isotope and isomer separation with using light induced drift effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hradecny, C.; Slovak, J.; Tethal, T.; Ermolaev, I.M.; Shalagin, A.M.

    1991-01-01

    The isotope separation with using light induced drift (LID) is discussed. The basic theoretical characteristics of the method are deduced: separation simultaneously with an arbitrary high enrichment and without significant losses; separation productivity up to 100 μg/h. These characteristics are sufficient and very convenient for separation of expensive radioactive isotopes and isomers which are applied in medicine and science. The first experimental separation of the radioactive isotopes ( 22,24 Na) by using the LID effect is reported. 13 refs.; 5 figs

  1. Directional sensing of protein adsorption on titanium with a light-induced periodic structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Penttinen, N.; Silvennoinen, M.; Hasoň, Stanislav; Silvennoinen, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 26 (2011), s. 12951-12959 ISSN 1932-7447 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/10/2378; GA AV ČR(CZ) KAN200040651 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : light-induced periodic surface structure * polished titanium * diffractive optical element based sensor Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.805, year: 2011

  2. Large-scale synthesis of Tellurium nanostructures via galvanic displacement of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, Kuan-Ying; Choo, Thye-Foo; Ubaidah Saidin, Nur; Rahman, Che Zuraini Che Ab

    2018-01-01

    Tellurium (Te) is an attractive semiconductor material for a wide range of applications in various functional devices including, radiation dosimeters, optical storage materials, thermoelectric or piezoelectric generators. In this work, large scale synthesis of tellurium (Te) nanostructures have been successfully carried out in different concentrations of aqueous solutions containing TeO2 and NaOH, by galvanic displacements of Zn and Al which served as the sacrificial materials. Galvanic displacement process is cost-effective and it requires no template or surfactant for the synthesis of nanostructures. By varying the concentrations of TeO2 and NaOH, etching temperatures and etching times, Te nanostructures of various forms of nanostructures were successfully obtained, ranging from one-dimensional needles and rod-like structures to more complex hierarchical structures. Microscopy examinations on the nanostructures obtained have shown that both the diameters and lengths of the Te nanostructures increased with increasing etching temperature and etching time.

  3. Equilibrium state of delta-phase with tellurium in the Sb-Bi-Te system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajgukova, V.S.; Dudkin, L.D.; Erofeev, R.S.; Musaelyan, V.V.; Nadzhip, A.Eh.; Sokolov, O.B.

    1978-01-01

    A research has been carried out with a view to establish the equilibrium state of delta-phase of the composition (Sbsub(1-x)Bisub(x)) 2 Te 3 with tellurium, depending on x and temperature. The Hall effect, the thermoelectromotive force, and the electric conductivity of the samples of Sb-Bi-Te alloys have been measured, the samples being annealed at various temperatures (550 to 250 deg C). The measurement results have shown that as the Bi 2 Te 3 content in the solid solutions increases and temperature decreases, the delta-phase-Te boundary monotonously approaches the stoichiometric composition. Using the research carrid out as the basis, the general character of the equilibrium delta-phase with tellurium boundary has been rendered more precise in Sb-Bi-Te system, depending on the temperature and Bi content (up to 25 at.%)

  4. GALVANIC MAGNETIC PROPERTIES OF BISMUTH THIN FILMS DOPED WITH TELLURIUM MADE BY THERMAL VACUUM EVAPORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Komarov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of n-type impurity of tellurium (concentration range from 0.005 atomic % Te to 0.15 atomic % Te on galvanic magnetic properties (resistivity, magnetic resistance and Hall constant of Bi thin films with various thicknesses was studied. The properties were measured in temperature range from 77 to 300 K. It was established that the classical size effect in the films is significant and decreases with higher concentration of Te impurity. The analysis of experimental results was carried out in approximation of the law of Jones-Schoenberg dispersion for Bi films doped with tellurium. Calculation of concentration and mobility of charge carriers in the studied films was made.

  5. Acousto-optic measurements of ultrasound attenuation in tellurium dioxide crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voloshinov, V. B.; Lemyaskina, E. A.

    1996-01-01

    The paper is devoted to experimental investigation of ultrasound propagation in tellurium dioxide monocrystal. In particular, attenuation of slow shear acoustic modes in the crystal was measured. The measurements were performed by acousto-optic methods using probing of acoustic column by a laser beam. The paper describes measurements of acoustic attenuation coefficient for slow shear ultrasonic waves propagating at an angle =4.5 O with respect to the (110) direction in the (110) plane. The investigation was made at acoustic frequency f = 100 MHz with pulsed acoustic waves and with an optical beam of a He-Ne laser. It is found that the attenuation coefficient is α = 0.57 cm -1 ± 15 %. The attenuation at acoustic frequencies f ≥ 100 MHz influences performance characteristics of acousto-optical devices based on tellurium dioxide. As proved, spectral resolution of a quasicollinear acoustooptic filter decreases by a factor of 2 compared to a case of the attenuation absence. (authors)

  6. Near infrared and extreme ultraviolet light pulses induced modifications of ultrathin Co films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Kisielewski

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We report on comparative study of magnetic properties of Pt/Co/Pt trilayers after irradiation with different light sources. Ultrathin Pt/Co/Pt films were deposited by molecular beam epitaxy technique on sapphire (0001 substrates. Pt buffers were grown at room temperature (RT and at 750°C (high temperature, HT. The samples were irradiated with a broad range of light energy densities (up to film ablation using two different single pulse irradiation sources: (i 40 fs laser with 800 nm wavelength and (ii 3 ns laser-plasma source of extreme ultraviolet (EUV with the most intense emission centered at 11 nm. The light pulse-driven irreversible structural and as a consequence, magnetic modifications were investigated using polar magneto-optical Kerr effect-based microscopy and atomic and magnetic force microscopies. The light pulse-induced transitions from the out-of-plane to in-plane magnetization state, and from in-plane to out-of-plane, were observed for both types of samples and irradiation methods. Diagrams of the magnetic states as a function of the Co layer thickness and energy density of the absorbed femtosecond pulses were constructed for the samples with both the RT and HT buffers. The energy density range responsible for the creation of the out-of-plane magnetization was wider for the HT than for RT buffer. This is correlated with the higher (for HT crystalline quality and much smoother Pt/Co surface deduced from the X-ray diffraction studies. Submicrometer magnetic domains were observed in the irradiated region while approaching the out-of-plane magnetization state. Changes of Pt/Co/Pt structures are discussed for both types of light pulses.

  7. Repair of ultraviolet-light-induced DNA damage in Vibrio cholerae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, G.; Sil, K.; Das, J.

    1981-01-01

    Repair of ultraviolet-light-induced DNA damage in a highly pathogenic Gram-negative bacterium, Vibrio cholerae, has been examined. All three strains of V. cholerae belonging to two serotypes, Inaba and Ogawa, are very sensitive to ultraviolet irradiation, having inactivation cross-sections ranging from 0.18 to 0.24 m 2 /J. Although these cells are proficient in repairing the DNA damage by a photoreactivation mechanism, they do not possess efficient dark repair systems. The mild toxinogenic strain 154 of classical Vibrios presumably lacks any excision repair mechanism and studies of irradiated cell DNA indicate that the ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers may not be excised. Ultraviolet-irradiated cells after saturation of dark repair can be further photoreactivated. (Auth.)

  8. Repair of ultraviolet light-induced DNA damage in cholera bacteriophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palit, B.N.; Das, G.; Das, J.

    1983-01-01

    DNA repair-proficient and -deficient strains of Vibrio cholerae were used to examine host cell reactivation, Weigle reactivation and photoreactivation of u.v.-irradiated cholera bacteriophages. U.v. light-induced DNA damage in phages of different morphological and serological groups could be efficiently photoreactivated. Host cell reactivation of irradiated phages of different groups was different on the same indicator host. Phage phi149 was the most sensitive, and phi138 the most resistant to u.v. irradiation. While phi138 showed appreciable host cell reactivation, this was minimal for phi149. Attempts to demonstrate Weigle reactivation of u.v.-irradiated cholera phages were not successful, although u.v.-induced filamentation of host cells was observed. (author)

  9. Coupled plasmon-exciton induced transparency and slow light in plexcitonic metamaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panahpour, Ali; Silani, Yaser; Farrokhian, Marzieh

    2012-01-01

    Classical analogues of the well-known effect of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in quantum optics have been the subject of considerable research in recent years from microwave to optical frequencies, because of their potential applications in slow light devices, studying nonlinear...... effects in low-loss nanostructures, and development of low-loss metamaterials. A large variety of plasmonic structures has been proposed for producing classical EIT-like effects in different spectral ranges. The current approach for producing plasmon-induced transparency is usually based on precise design...... effects in metamaterials composed of such coupled NPs. To reveal more details of the wave-particle and particle-particle interactions, the electric field distribution and field lines of Poynting vector inside and around the NPs are calculated using the finite element method. Finally, using extended...

  10. On light cluster production in nucleon induced reactions at intermediate energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacroix, D.; Blideanu, V.; Durand, D

    2004-09-01

    A dynamical model dedicated to nucleon induced reaction between 30-150 MeV is presented. It considers different stages of the reaction: the approaching phase, the in-medium nucleon-nucleon collisions, the cluster formation and the secondary de-excitation process. The notions of influence area and phase-space exploration during the reaction are introduced. The importance of the geometry of the reaction and of the conservation laws are underlined. The model is able to globally reproduce the absolute cross sections for the emission of neutron and light charged particles for proton and neutron induced reactions on heavy and intermediate mass targets ({sup 56}Fe and {sup 208}Pb). (authors)

  11. Magnetic field generation by circularly polarized laser light and inertial plasma confinement in a miniature 'Magnetic Bottle' induced by circularly polarized laser light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolka, E.

    1993-07-01

    A new concept of hot plasma confinement in a miniature magnetic bottle induced by circularly polarized laser light is suggested in this work. Magnetic fields generated by circularly polarized laser light may be of the order of megagauss. In this configuration the circularly polarized laser light is used to get confinement of a plasma contained in a good conductor vessel. The poloidal magnetic field induced by the circularly polarized laser and the efficiency of laser absorption by the plasma are calculated in this work. The confinement in this scheme is supported by the magnetic forces and the Lawson criterion for a DT plasma might be achieved for number density n=5*10 21 cm -3 and confinement time τ= 20 nsec. The laser and the plasma parameters required to get an energetic gain are calculated. (authors)

  12. Evaluated phase diagrams of binary metal-tellurium systems of the D-block transition elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, G.; Bharadwaj, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    The binary phase diagrams of metal-tellurium systems for twenty seven d-block transition elements have been critically evaluated. Complete phase diagrams are presented for the elements, chromium, manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, copper, molybdenum, palladium, silver, lanthanum, platinum and gold, whereas, for scandium, titanium, vanadium, yttrium, zirconium, niobium, technitium, ruthenium, rhodium, hafnium, tantalum, tungsten , rhenium, osmium and iridium, the phase diagrams are incomplete and tentative. (author). 20 refs., 27 tabs., 27 figs

  13. Exploring molecular and spin interactions of Tellurium adatom in reduced graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alegaonkar, Ashwini [Department of Chemistry, Savitribai Phule Pune University (Formerly University of Pune), Ganeshkhind, Pune, 411 007, MS (India); Alegaonkar, Prashant [Department of Applied Physics, Defence Institute of Advance Technology, Girinagar, Pune, 411 025, MS (India); Pardeshi, Satish, E-mail: skpar@chem.unipune.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Savitribai Phule Pune University (Formerly University of Pune), Ganeshkhind, Pune, 411 007, MS (India)

    2017-07-01

    The transport of spin information fundamentally requires favourable molecular architecture and tunable spin moments to make the medium pertinent for spintronic. We report on achieving coherent molecular-spin parameters for rGO due to Tellurium (Te) adatom. Initially, GO prepared using graphite, was modified into rGO by in situ incorporation of 1 (w/w)% of Te. Both the systems were subjected to ESCA, FTIR, Raman dispersion, ESR spectroscopy, and electron microscopy. Analysis revealed that, Te substantially reacted with epoxides, carbonyl, and carboxylate groups that improved C-to-O ratio by twice. However, the spin splitting character, between Te and C, seems to be quenched. Moreover, Te altered the dynamical force constant between C-C and C=C that generated the mechanical stress within rGO network. The layer conjugation, nature of folding, symmetry, and electronic states of the edges were also affected by precipitation and entrapment of Te. The calculated dynamic molecular Raman and ESR spin parameters indicated that, Te acted as a bridging element for long range spin transport. This is particularly due to, the p-orbital moments of Te contributing, vectorially, to spin relaxation process operative at broken inversion symmetry sites. Our study suggests that, facile addition of Te in rGO is useful to achieve favourable spintronic properties. - Highlights: • Spin interactions and molecular dynamics modification due to Tellurium adatom in rGO. • Molecular level manipulation of Tellurium adatom for favourable spintronic properties. • Bychocov-Rashaba coupling are the operative channels in rGO. • Extrinsic coupling component get added vectorially by Tellurium. • Te-rGO is a viable medium for molecular spintronics.

  14. The effect of hydrostatic pressure on the anomalous sign reversal of the Hall coefficient in tellurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balynas, V.; Dobrovolskis, Z.; Krotkus, A.; Hoerstel, W.

    1981-01-01

    In order to obtain information about the pressure behaviour of the higher lying second conduction band the dependences of the Hall coefficient of single crystalline tellurium on temperature (300 to 500 K) have been measured at atmospheric pressure and hydrostatic pressures of 500 and 800 MPa. The separation between the two conduction bands in Te decreases with increasing pressure. The anomalous sign reversal of the Hall coefficient can be well explained by a double-conduction band model

  15. Dynamic Blue Light-Inducible T7 RNA Polymerases (Opto-T7RNAPs) for Precise Spatiotemporal Gene Expression Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumschlager, Armin; Aoki, Stephanie K; Khammash, Mustafa

    2017-11-17

    Light has emerged as a control input for biological systems due to its precise spatiotemporal resolution. The limited toolset for light control in bacteria motivated us to develop a light-inducible transcription system that is independent from cellular regulation through the use of an orthogonal RNA polymerase. Here, we present our engineered blue light-responsive T7 RNA polymerases (Opto-T7RNAPs) that show properties such as low leakiness of gene expression in the dark state, high expression strength when induced with blue light, and an inducible range of more than 300-fold. Following optimization of the system to reduce expression variability, we created a variant that returns to the inactive dark state within minutes once the blue light is turned off. This allows for precise dynamic control of gene expression, which is a key aspect for most applications using optogenetic regulation. The regulators, which only require blue light from ordinary light-emitting diodes for induction, were developed and tested in the bacterium Escherichia coli, which is a crucial cell factory for biotechnology due to its fast and inexpensive cultivation and well understood physiology and genetics. Opto-T7RNAP, with minor alterations, should be extendable to other bacterial species as well as eukaryotes such as mammalian cells and yeast in which the T7 RNA polymerase and the light-inducible Vivid regulator have been shown to be functional. We anticipate that our approach will expand the applicability of using light as an inducer for gene expression independent from cellular regulation and allow for a more reliable dynamic control of synthetic and natural gene networks.

  16. Electrochemical characterization of the underpotential deposition of tellurium on Au electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, W.; Yang, J.Y.; Zhou, D.X.; Bao, S.Q.; Fan, X.A.; Duan, X.K.

    2007-01-01

    Electrochemical characterization of the underpotential deposition (UPD) of tellurium on Au substrate has been performed in this paper. The mechanism of Te deposition and its voltammetry dependence on the Te ion concentration were studied, and it suggests that variations in the metal ion concentration may affect the UPD process kinetics. The effect of tellurium adsorbates on UPD behavior of Te has also been investigated. The results show that the tellurium adsorbates could be irreversibly adsorbed upon the Au substrate surface under the open-circuit conditions. Subsequent removal of the Te adsorbates was also proved to be very difficult within the Au double-layer region, and a standard electrochemical cleaning procedure is necessary to remove the Te adsorbates completely. When the potential was cycled into the Au oxidation region, a substantial loss of Te adsobates was observed, which occurs simultaneously with the Au oxidation features. Scan rate dependent cyclic voltammetry experiments reveal that the peak current in the Te UPD peak is not a linear function of the scan rate, ν, but of a 2/3 power of the scan rate, ν 2/3 . It is in good consistent with a two-dimension nucleation and growth mechanism

  17. Iodine-129 in thyroids and tellurium isotopes in meteorites by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballad, R.V.

    1978-06-01

    A combination of neutron activation and mass spectrometry has been used to determine the concentration of fissiogenic 129 I and the value of the 129 I/ 127 I ratio in thyroids of man, cow, and deer from Missouri. Deer thyroids show an average value of 129 I/ 127 I = 1.8 x 10 -8 and an average concentration of 3 x 10 -3 pCi 129 I per gram of thyroid (wet weight). Thyroids of cows and humans show successively lower values for the 129 I/ 127 I ratio and the 129 I content because their diets dilute fission-produced 129 I in the natural iodine cycle with mineral iodine. The results of analyses on a few thyroids from other geographic areas are also reported. The isotopic compositions of tellurium, krypton, and xenon were determined in acid-resistant residues of the Allende meteorite. Neutron activation and γ-counting were used to determine the relative abundances of six tellurium isotopes, and mass spectrometry was used to determine the isotopic compositions of krypton and xenon in aliquots of the same residues. Nucleogenetic anomalies were observed in the isotopic compositions of these three elements. The presence of isotopically distinct components of tellurium, krypton, and xenon in these residues provides strong support for the suggestion that our solar system formed directly from the debris of a supernova

  18. Hydrogen-assisted post-growth substitution of tellurium into molybdenum disulfide monolayers with tunable compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Guoli; Zhu, Dancheng; Lv, Danhui; Hashemi, Arsalan; Fei, Zhen; Lin, Fang; Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.; Zhang, Ze; Komsa, Hannu-Pekka; Jin, Chuanhong

    2018-04-01

    Herein we report the successful doping of tellurium (Te) into molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) monolayers to form MoS2x Te2(1-x) alloy with variable compositions via a hydrogen-assisted post-growth chemical vapor deposition process. It is confirmed that H2 plays an indispensable role in the Te substitution into as-grown MoS2 monolayers. Atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy allows us to determine the lattice sites and the concentration of introduced Te atoms. At a relatively low concentration, tellurium is only substituted in the sulfur sublattice to form monolayer MoS2(1-x)Te2x alloy, while with increasing Te concentration (up to ˜27.6% achieved in this study), local regions with enriched tellurium, large structural distortions, and obvious sulfur deficiency are observed. Statistical analysis of the Te distribution indicates the random substitution. Density functional theory calculations are used to investigate the stability of the alloy structures and their electronic properties. Comparison with experimental results indicate that the samples are unstrained and the Te atoms are predominantly substituted in the top S sublattice. Importantly, such ultimately thin Janus structure of MoS2(1-x)Te2x exhibits properties that are distinct from their constituents. We believe our results will inspire further exploration of the versatile properties of asymmetric 2D TMD alloys.

  19. Coupled effects of director orientations and boundary conditions on light induced bending of monodomain nematic liquid crystalline polymer plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Yue; Ding, Shurong; Huo, Yongzhong; Xu, Changwei

    2012-01-01

    A photo-chromic liquid crystal polymers (LCPs) is a smart material for large light-activated variation or bending to transfer luminous energy into mechanical energy. We study the light induced behavior by modeling planar and homeotropic nematic network polymer plates. We effectively illustrate some reported experimental outcomes and theoretically predict some possible bending patterns. This paper constructs an understanding between the bending behaviors and interactions among the alignments, aspect ratios and boundary conditions, etc. Our work provides information on optimizing light induced bending in the process of micro-opto-mechanical system (MOMS) design. (paper)

  20. Light induced intraspecific variability in response to thermal stress in the hard coral Stylophora pistillata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen Tilstra

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent research suggests that prior exposure of several months to elevated irradiance induces enhanced thermal tolerance in scleractinian corals. While this tolerance has been reported at the species level, individual coral colonies may react differently due to individual variability in thermal tolerance. As thermal anomalies are predicted to become common in the upcoming future, intraspecific variation may be key to the survival of coral populations. In order to study light-history based thermal stress responses on individual colonies, we developed a preliminary microcosm experiment where three randomly chosen, aquacultured colonies of the model coral Stylophora pistillata were exposed to two irradiance treatments (200 and 400 μmol photons m−2 s−1 for 31 days, followed by artificially induced heat stress (∼33.4 °C. We found different responses to occur at both the intraspecific and the intracolonial levels, as indicated by either equal, less severe, delayed, and/or even non-necrotic responses of corals previously exposed to the irradiance of 400 compared to 200 μmol photons m−2 s−1. In addition, all individual colonies revealed light-enhanced calcification. Finally, elevated irradiance resulted in a lower chlorophyll a concentration in one colony compared to the control treatment, and the same colony displayed more rapid bleaching compared to the other ones. Taken together, this study highlights the potential importance of intra-individual variability in physiological responses of scleractinian corals and provides recommendations for improving methodological designs for future studies.

  1. Delayed ultraviolet light-induced cessation of respiration by inadequate aeration of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, J.G.; Swenson, P.A.; Schenley, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    Inadequately aerated Escherichia coli B/r cultures did not shut their respiration off 60 min after ultraviolet light (52 J/m 2 at 254 nm) as they did when well supplied with oxygen. Since cessation of respiration is associated with cell death, the result suggested that oxygen toxicity by superoxide radicals generated by cell metabolism might be responsible for cell death. The specific activity of superoxide dismutase, which scavenges O 2 - radicals, increased twofold after 90 min of adequate aeration, but the specific activity of catalase remained constant. Respiration and viability of irradiated cells were affected not at all by the presence of superoxide dismutase and only slightly by the presence of catalase. Metal ions such as Mn 2+ and Fe 2+ , inducers of superoxide dismutase, had no effect on respiration and viability. When irradiated cells were incubated under N 2 for 90 min, the respiration, growth, and viability time-course responses were the same as for cells not exposed to anaerobiosis. We conclude that superoxide anions generated at the time of irradiation play no part in cessation of respiration and cell death and that inadequate aeration or anaerobiosis delays the ultraviolet light-induced synthesis of proteins responsible for the irreversible cessation of respiration

  2. Light-induced antibacterial activity of electrospun chitosan-based material containing photosensitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severyukhina, A.N., E-mail: severyuhina_alexandra@mail.ru [Institute of Nanostructures and Biosystems, Saratov State University, 410012 Saratov (Russian Federation); Petrova, N.V.; Yashchenok, A.M. [Institute of Nanostructures and Biosystems, Saratov State University, 410012 Saratov (Russian Federation); Bratashov, D.N. [Institute of Nanostructures and Biosystems, Saratov State University, 410012 Saratov (Russian Federation); Department of Nano- and Biomedical Technologies, Saratov State University, 410012 Saratov (Russian Federation); Smuda, K. [Institute of Transfusion Medicine, Charité-Universitätsmedizin, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Mamonova, I.A. [Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics, 410002 Saratov (Russian Federation); Yurasov, N.A. [Institute of Nanostructures and Biosystems, Saratov State University, 410012 Saratov (Russian Federation); Puchinyan, D.M. [Institute of Nanostructures and Biosystems, Saratov State University, 410012 Saratov (Russian Federation); Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics, 410002 Saratov (Russian Federation); Georgieva, R. [Institute of Transfusion Medicine, Charité-Universitätsmedizin, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Department of Medical Physics, Biophysics and Radiology, Medical Faculty, Trakia University, 6000 Stara Zagora (Bulgaria); Bäumler, H. [Institute of Transfusion Medicine, Charité-Universitätsmedizin, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Lapanje, A. [Institute of Nanostructures and Biosystems, Saratov State University, 410012 Saratov (Russian Federation); Josef Stefan Institute, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gorin, D.A. [Institute of Nanostructures and Biosystems, Saratov State University, 410012 Saratov (Russian Federation); Department of Nano- and Biomedical Technologies, Saratov State University, 410012 Saratov (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-01

    Increasing antimicrobial resistance requires the development of novel materials and approaches for treatment of various infections. Utilization of photodynamic therapy represents an advanced alternative to antibiotics and metal-based agents. Here, we report the fabrication of electrospun material that possesses benefits of both topical antimicrobial and photodynamic therapies. This material combines chitosan, as a biocompatible polymer, and a second generation photosensitizer. The incorporation of photosensitizer doesn't affect the material morphology and its nearly uniform distribution in fibers structure was observed by confocal Raman microscopy. Owing to photosensitizer the prepared material exhibits the light-induced and spatially limited antimicrobial activity that was demonstrated against Staphylococcus aureus, an important etiological infectious agent. Such material can be potentially used in antibacterial therapy of chronic wounds, infections of diabetic ulcers, and burns, as well as rapidly spreading and intractable soft-tissue infections caused by resistant bacteria. - Highlights: • Chitosan with a phthalocyanine photosensitizer was electrospun into fibers. • Photosensitizer was uniformly distributed in the electrospun material. • The incorporation of photosensitizer does not affect the fiber morphology. • Chitosan/photosensitizer composites possess light-induced antibacterial activity. • The antibacterial activity of the material is limited to the area of irradiation.

  3. Light-induced magnetoresistance in solution-processed planar hybrid devices measured under ambient conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreetama Banerjee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We report light-induced negative organic magnetoresistance (OMAR measured in ambient atmosphere in solution-processed 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynylpentacene (TIPS-pentacene planar hybrid devices with two different device architectures. Hybrid electronic devices with trench-isolated electrodes (HED-TIE having a channel length of ca. 100 nm fabricated in this work and, for comparison, commercially available pre-structured organic field-effect transistor (OFET substrates with a channel length of 20 µm were used. The magnitude of the photocurrent as well as the magnetoresistance was found to be higher for the HED-TIE devices because of the much smaller channel length of these devices compared to the OFETs. We attribute the observed light-induced negative magnetoresistance in TIPS-pentacene to the presence of electron–hole pairs under illumination as the magnetoresistive effect scales with the photocurrent. The magnetoresistance effect was found to diminish over time under ambient conditions compared to a freshly prepared sample. We propose that the much faster degradation of the magnetoresistance effect as compared to the photocurrent was due to the incorporation of water molecules in the TIPS-pentacene film.

  4. Light-induced magnetoresistance in solution-processed planar hybrid devices measured under ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sreetama; Bülz, Daniel; Reuter, Danny; Hiller, Karla; Zahn, Dietrich R T; Salvan, Georgeta

    2017-01-01

    We report light-induced negative organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) measured in ambient atmosphere in solution-processed 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS-pentacene) planar hybrid devices with two different device architectures. Hybrid electronic devices with trench-isolated electrodes (HED-TIE) having a channel length of ca. 100 nm fabricated in this work and, for comparison, commercially available pre-structured organic field-effect transistor (OFET) substrates with a channel length of 20 µm were used. The magnitude of the photocurrent as well as the magnetoresistance was found to be higher for the HED-TIE devices because of the much smaller channel length of these devices compared to the OFETs. We attribute the observed light-induced negative magnetoresistance in TIPS-pentacene to the presence of electron-hole pairs under illumination as the magnetoresistive effect scales with the photocurrent. The magnetoresistance effect was found to diminish over time under ambient conditions compared to a freshly prepared sample. We propose that the much faster degradation of the magnetoresistance effect as compared to the photocurrent was due to the incorporation of water molecules in the TIPS-pentacene film.

  5. Protective Effect of Proanthocyanidins from Sea Buckthorn (Hippophae Rhamnoides L. Seed against Visible Light-Induced Retinal Degeneration in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Dietary proanthocyanidins (PACs as health-protective agents have become an important area of human nutrition research because of their potent bioactivities. We investigated the retinoprotective effects of PACs from sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L. seed against visible light-induced retinal degeneration in vivo. Pigmented rabbits were orally administered sea buckthorn seed PACs (50 and 100 mg/kg/day for 14 consecutive days of pre-illumination and seven consecutive days of post-illumination. Retinal function was quantified via electroretinography 7 days after light exposure. Retinal damage was evaluated by measuring the thickness of the full-thickness retina and outer nuclear layer 7 days after light exposure. Sea buckthorn seed PACs significantly attenuated the destruction of electroretinograms and maintained the retinal structure. Increased retinal photooxidative damage was expressed by the depletion of glutathione peroxidase and catalase activities, the decrease of total antioxidant capacity level and the increase of malondialdehyde level. Light exposure induced a significant increase of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6 and angiogenesis (VEGF levels in retina. Light exposure upregulated the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and caspase-3 and downregulated the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. However, sea buckthorn seed PACs ameliorated these changes induced by light exposure. Sea buckthorn seed PACs mediated the protective effect against light-induced retinal degeneration via antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic mechanisms.

  6. Prolonged ultraviolet light-induced erythema and the cutaneous carcinoma phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanenbaum, L.; Parrish, J.A.; Haynes, H.A.; Fitzpatrick, T.B.; Pathak, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    A considerable amount of evidence exists in support of the role of ultraviolet radiation as a major etiologic factor in human skin cancer, both melanoma and carcinoma types. On the basis of epidemiologic studies a phenotype has been described which helps to identify the persons who are more susceptible to skin cancer. In an attempt to further define this population, patients with cutaneous carcinoma and a normal control group were exposed to artificial ultraviolet light (UVL) and the erythema and tanning responses of each group were measured over a 21-day period. UVL-induced erythema was prolonged in a significantly higher percentage of patients with skin cancer than in control patients, lasting two to three weeks after single exposures to 6 and 8 times the patient's minimal erythema dose. The presence of prolonged erythema correlated with this history of previous skin cancer but did not correlate with other established risk factors for cutaneous carcinoma, i.e., fair skin, light hair and light eyes, easy sunburning and poor tanning, and Celtic ancestry. Prolonged erythema following UVL radiation may therefore represent an additional risk factor and help to identify the skin cancer-susceptible population

  7. Light-current-induced acceleration of degradation of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yuren; Zhang, Fan; He, Junjie; Lian, Jiarong; Zeng, Pengju; Song, Jun; Qu, Junle

    2018-04-01

    The photo-conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) has been improved considerably in recent years, but the poor stability of PSCs still prevents their commercialization. In this report, we use the rate of the integrated short-circuit current change (Drate) to investigate the performance degradation kinetics and identify the degradation of PSCs that is accelerated by the light current. The value of Drate increases by an order of magnitude from about 0.02 to 0.35 mA cm-2·min-1 after light-IV testing. The accelerated degradation progress is proven to be dominated by the hydration process and the migration of the iodine ions of the light current. The migration of the iodine ions enhances the hydration process through a chain reaction, enabling the formation of fast diffusion channels for both H2O and O2, which induce the rapid decomposition of the perovskite film and increase the density of the trap state. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurement data also indicate that the super oxygen may be formed due to the PCBM damage caused by the migration iodine ions. An understanding of the degradation acceleration mechanism would provide an insight into the effect of ion migration on the stability of PSCs.

  8. Non-doped white organic light-emitting diodes based on aggregation-induced emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Shuming; Kwok, Hoi Sing [Center for Display Research, Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Zhao Zujin; Tang, Ben Zhong, E-mail: eekwok@ust.h [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-03-10

    Non-doped white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) based on newly synthesized bluish-green light-emitting material 1,3,6,8-tetrakis [4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)phenyl]pyrene (TTPEPy) and red light-emitting material 4-(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)phenyl)-7-(5-(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl) phenyl)thiophen-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole (BTPETTD) have been demonstrated. A maximum efficiency of 7.4 cd A{sup -1}, 4 lm W{sup -1} and brightness of 18 000 cd m{sup -2} have been achieved by employing 3 nm thick 4, 4'-bis [N-(1-naphthyl-1-)-N-phenyl-amino]- biphenyl (NPB) as an electron-blocking layer. The WOLEDs exhibit a high colour rendering index of 90 and moderate colour stability with 1931 Commision International de L'Eclairage coordinates changing from (0.41, 0.41) to (0.38, 0.40) over a wide range of driving voltages. Moreover, the non-doped WOLEDs enjoy a reduced efficiency roll-off due to their nature of aggregation-induced emission.

  9. Proteomic analysis of blue light-induced twining response in Cuscuta australis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongxiao; Wang, Liangjiang; Yang, Xiaopo; Zhang, Guoguang; Chen, Liang

    2010-01-01

    The parasitic plant Cuscuta australis (dodder) invades a variety of species by entwining the stem and leaves of a host and developing haustoria. The twining response prior to haustoria formation is regarded as the first sign for dodders to parasitize host plants, and thus has been the focus of studies on the host-parasite interaction. However, the molecular mechanism is still poorly understood. In the present work, we have investigated the different effects of blue and white light on the twining response, and identified a set of proteins that were differentially expressed in dodder seedlings using a proteomic approach. Approximately 1,800 protein spots were detected on each 2-D gel, and 47 spots with increased or decreased protein levels were selected and analyzed with MALDI-TOF-MS. Peptide mass fingerprints (PMFs) obtained for these spots were used for protein identification through cross-species database searches. The results suggest that the blue light-induced twining response in dodder seedlings may be mediated by proteins involved in light signal transduction, cell wall degradation, cell structure, and metabolism.

  10. Non-doped white organic light-emitting diodes based on aggregation-induced emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shuming; Kwok, Hoi Sing; Zhao Zujin; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Non-doped white organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) based on newly synthesized bluish-green light-emitting material 1,3,6,8-tetrakis [4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)phenyl]pyrene (TTPEPy) and red light-emitting material 4-(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl)phenyl)-7-(5-(4-(1,2,2-triphenylvinyl) phenyl)thiophen-2-yl)benzo[c][1,2,5]thiadiazole (BTPETTD) have been demonstrated. A maximum efficiency of 7.4 cd A -1 , 4 lm W -1 and brightness of 18 000 cd m -2 have been achieved by employing 3 nm thick 4, 4'-bis [N-(1-naphthyl-1-)-N-phenyl-amino]- biphenyl (NPB) as an electron-blocking layer. The WOLEDs exhibit a high colour rendering index of 90 and moderate colour stability with 1931 Commision International de L'Eclairage coordinates changing from (0.41, 0.41) to (0.38, 0.40) over a wide range of driving voltages. Moreover, the non-doped WOLEDs enjoy a reduced efficiency roll-off due to their nature of aggregation-induced emission.

  11. Analysis of Light-Induced Transmembrane Ion Gradients and Membrane Potential in Photosystem I Proteoliposomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennisi, Cristian P.; Greenbaum, Elias; Yoshida, Ken

    2010-01-01

    Photosystem I (PSI) complexes can support a light-driven electrochemical gradient for protons, which is the driving force for energy-conserving reactions across biological membranes. In this work, a computational model that enables a quantitative description of the light-induced proton gradients across the membrane of PSI proteoliposomes is presented. Using a set of electrodiffusion equations, a compartmental model of a vesicle suspended in aqueous medium was studied. The light-mediated proton movement was modeled as a single proton pumping step with backpressure of the electric potential. The model fits determinations of pH obtained from PSI proteoliposomes illuminated in the presence of mediators of cyclic electron transport. The model also allows analysis of the proton gradients in relation to the transmembrane ion fluxes and electric potential. Sensitivity analysis enabled a determination of the parameters that have greater influence on steady-state levels and onset/decay rates of transmembrane pH and electric potential. This model could be used as a tool for optimizing PSI proteoliposomes for photo-electrochemical applications.

  12. Dynamically tunable slow light based on plasmon induced transparency in disk resonators coupled MDM waveguide system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Xu; Wang, Tao; Liu, Bo; He, Yu; Tang, Jian; Li, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Ultrafast and low-power dynamically tunable single channel and multichannel slow light based on plasmon induced transparencies (PITs) in disk resonators coupled to a metal-dielectric-metal (MDM) waveguide system with a nonlinear optical Kerr medium is investigated both numerically and analytically. A coupled-mode theory (CMT) is introduced to analyze this dynamically tunable single channel slow light structure. Multichannel slow light is realized in this plasmonic waveguide structure based on a bright–dark mode coupling mechanism. In order to reduce the pump intensity and obtain ultrafast response time, the traditional nonlinear Kerr material is replaced by monolayer graphene. It is found that the magnitude of the single PIT window can be controlled between 0.08 and 0.48, while the corresponding group index is controlled between 14.5 and 2.0 by dynamically decreasing pump intensity from 11.7 to 4.4 MW cm −2 . Moreover, the phase shift multiplication effect is found in this structure. This work paves a new way towards the realization of highly integrated optical circuits and networks, especially for wavelength-selective, all-optical storage and nonlinear devices. (paper)

  13. Light-induced spatial control of pH-jump reaction at smart gel interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techawanitchai, Prapatsorn; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Idota, Naokazu; Aoyagi, Takao

    2012-11-01

    We proposed here a 'smart' control of an interface movement of proton diffusion in temperature- and pH-responsive hydrogels using a light-induced spatial pH-jump reaction. A photoinitiated proton-releasing reaction of o-nitrobenzaldehyde (NBA) was integrated into poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-o-2-carboxyisopropylacrylamide) (P(NIPAAm-co-CIPAAm)) hydrogels. NBA-integrated hydrogels demonstrated quick release of proton upon UV irradiation, allowing the pH inside the gel to decrease below the pK(a) of P(NIPAAm-co-CIPAAm) within a minute. The NBA-integrated gel was shown to shrink rapidly upon UV irradiation without polymer "skin layer" formation due to a uniform decrease of pH inside the gel. Spatial control of gel shrinking was also created by irradiating UV light to a limited region of the gel through a photomask. The interface of proton diffusion ("active interface") gradually moved toward non-illuminated area. The apparent position of "active interface", however, did not change remarkably above the LCST, while protons continuously diffused outward direction. This is because the "active interface" also moved inward direction as gel shrank above the LCST. As a result, slow movement of the apparent interface was observed. The NBA-integrated gel was also successfully employed for the controlled release of an entrapped dextran in a light controlled manner. This system is highly promising as smart platforms for triggered and programmed transportation of drugs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube-TiO2 Nanocomposite for Visible-Light-Induced Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Dai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotube- (MWCNT- TiO2 nanocomposite was synthesized via hydrothermal process and characterized by X-ray diffraction, UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetry analysis, and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. Appropriate pretreatment on MWCNTs could generate oxygen-containing groups, which is beneficial for forming intimate contact between MWCNTs and TiO2 and leads to a higher thermal stability of MWCNT-TiO2 nanocomposite. Modification with MWCNTs can extend the visible-light absorption of TiO2. 5 wt% MWCNT-TiO2 derived from hydrothermal treatment at 140°C exhibiting the highest hydrogen generation rate of 15.1 μmol·h−1 under visible-light irradiation and a wide photoresponse range from 350 to 475 nm with moderate quantum efficiency (4.4% at 420 nm and 3.7% at 475 nm. The above experimental results indicate that the MWCNT-TiO2 nanocomposite is a promising photocatalyst with good stability and visible-light-induced photoactivity.

  15. The effect of sodium ions on the light-induced 86Rb release from the isolated crayfish retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartung, K.; Stieve, H.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of low external Na + concentrations on the light-induced K + release from crayfish photoreceptor cells was tested by labelling intracellular K + with the isotope 86 Rb. The amount of isotope released per light, stimulus is roughly proportional to the external Na + concentration if the osmolarity is kept constant by replacing Na + with Tris, choline or sucrose. When sucrose is used to replace the depleted Na + the light-induced K + release is a linear function of the external Na + concentration and is reduced by approx. 95% at an external Na + concentration of 5 mmol/l. For choline and Tris substitutions the relationships are less clear but at Na + concentrations + release is smaller in a Tris solution and larger in a choline solution. It is suggested that the light-induced K + release is due mainly to an activation of voltage sensitive K + channels. (orig.)

  16. Improvement of Anti-TNF-α Antibody-Induced Palmoplantar Pustular Psoriasis Using a 308-nm Excimer Light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsuko Iga

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α antibody is utilized in the treatment of a variety of chronic inflammatory conditions, including psoriasis. However, it can induce paradoxical development and/or exacerbation of psoriasis in the course of anti-TNF-α antibody treatment, which is sometimes refractory to conventional treatments. Herein, we report a case of refractory palmoplantar pustular psoriasis induced by anti-TNF-α antibody treatment, which was improved by treatment with a 308-nm excimer light. The 308-nm excimer light has less long-term risks than narrow-band UVB. The 308-nm excimer light may be a good therapeutic option for refractory psoriatic skin lesions induced by anti-TNF-α antibody therapy because of localized side effects without systemic problems, short length of treatment and low cumulative dosages of UV light.

  17. Visible light induced photoelectrochemical biosensing based on oxygen-sensitive quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Wenjing; Bao Lei [State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, Department of Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Lei Jianping, E-mail: jpl@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, Department of Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Tu Wenwen [State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, Department of Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Ju Huangxian, E-mail: hxju@nju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, Department of Chemistry, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2012-09-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The near-infrared QDs are synthesized in an aqueous solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer QDs-based biosensor exhibits visible-light induced cathodic photocurrent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The oxygen dependency of the photocurrent is verified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A photoelectrochemical strategy is established by coupling with enzymatic reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photoelectrochemical sensor shows high upper detection limit, acceptable stability and accuracy. - Abstract: A visible light induced photoelectrochemical biosensing platform based on oxygen-sensitive near-infrared quantum dots (NIR QDs) was developed for detection of glucose. The NIR QDs were synthesized in an aqueous solution, and characterized with scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The as-prepared NIR QDs were employed to construct oxygen-sensitive photoelectrochemical biosensor on a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) electrode. The oxygen dependency of the photocurrent was investigated at as-prepared electrode, which demonstrated the signal of photocurrent is suppressed with the decreasing of oxygen. Coupling with the consumption of oxygen during enzymatic reaction, a photoelectrochemical strategy was proposed for the detection of substrate. Using glucose oxidase (GOx) as a model enzyme, that is, GOx was covalently attached to the surface of CdTe QDs, the resulting biosensor showed the sensitive response to glucose. Under the irradiation of visible light of a wavelength at 505 nm, the proposed photoelectrochemical method could detect glucose ranging from 0.1 mM to 11 mM with a detection limit of 0.04 mM. The photoelectrochemical biosensor showed a good performance with high upper detection limit, acceptable stability and accuracy, providing an alternative method for monitoring biomolecules and extending the application of near-infrared QDs.

  18. Red light-induced shift of the fluence-response curve for first positive curvature of maize [Zea mays] coleoptiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, E.; Schäfer, E.

    1987-01-01

    The fluence-response curve for first positive phototropic curvture of dark-grown maize coleoptiles is shifted to ten-fold higher fluences if the coieoptiles are irradiated with red light 2 h prior to the phototropic induction with blue light. Fluence-response curves for this red-induced shift were obtained with unilateral red irradiations 2 h prior to inductive blue pulses of different fluences. They differ significantly depending on whether the red light was given from the same side as or the opposite side to the respective inductive blue pulse, thus demonstrating that the red light effect is a local response of the coleoptile. The fluence-response curves for an inductive blue pulse in the ascending part were compared with those for an inductive blue pulse in the descending part of the fluence-response curve for blue light induced phototropism. They are quite different in threshold of red light sensitivity and shape for irradiations from both the same and the opposite sides. This offers evidence for the hypothesis that at least two different photosystems are involved in phototropism, and that they are modulated differently by a red light preirradiation. All these fluence-response curves indicate that it is possible to increase the response in the coleoptile, if the red light preirradiation is given opposite to the inductive blue pulse. This is supported by blue light fluence-response curves obtained after a weak unilateral red preirradiation. (author)

  19. Typical xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A fibroblasts have detectable ultraviolet light-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petinga, R.A.; Andrews, A.D.; Robbins, J.H.; Tarone, R.E.

    1977-01-01

    Ultraviolet-induced nuclear uptake of tritiated thymidine [ 3 H]dThd demonstrable by autoradiography in non-synthesis phases of the cell cycle is known as unscheduled DNA synthesis and reflects repair replication of ultraviolet-damaged DNA. We have reported that the rate of any such unscheduled DNA synthesis in typical group A xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts, if present, is less than 2% of the normal rate. We have now performed experiments to determine whether these fibroblasts have any unscheduled DNA synthesis. Fibroblast coverslip cultures of four xeroderma pigmentosum group A strains were prepared. Irradiated (254 nm ultraviolet light) and unirradiated cultures from each strain were incubated with [ 3 H]dThd at 37degC, and autoradiograms were prepared using NTB-3 emulsion. A nuclear grain count was made of 100 consecutive nuclei of non-S-phase irradiated and unirradiated cells. A slide background grain count was simultaneously made from an acellular area adjacent to each cell analyzed. When a strain's irradiated and unirradiated autoradiograms having similar slide background grain count averages were compared, the nuclear grain count average of the irradiated cells was always higher than that of the unirradiated cells. This ultraviolet-induced increase in the mean nuclear grain count ranged from 0.4 to 1.3% of that given by normal non-xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts and was not reduced by 10 -2 M hydroxyurea. Planimetric studies showed that the ultraviolet-induced increase in nuclear grain count is not due to an increased nuclear area in irradiated cells. We conclude that these typical group A xeroderma pigmentosum strains perform very low, but detectable, ultraviolet-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis which probably reflects repair replication. We cannot, however, determine if there are significantly different rates of ultraviolet-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis among these ultraviolet strains

  20. Electromagnetically induced transparency and nonlinear pulse propagation in a combined tripod and Λ atom-light coupling scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamedi, H R; Ruseckas, J; Juzeliūnas, G

    2017-01-01

    We consider propagation of a probe pulse in an atomic medium characterized by a combined tripod and Lambda (Λ) atom-light coupling scheme. The scheme involves three atomic ground states coupled to two excited states by five light fields. It is demonstrated that dark states can be formed for such an atom-light coupling. This is essential for formation of the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and slow light. In the limiting cases the scheme reduces to conventional Λ- or N -type atom-light couplings providing the EIT or absorption, respectively. Thus, the atomic system can experience a transition from the EIT to the absorption by changing the amplitudes or phases of control lasers. Subsequently the scheme is employed to analyze the nonlinear pulse propagation using the coupled Maxwell–Bloch equations. It is shown that a generation of stable slow light optical solitons is possible in such a five-level combined tripod and Λ atomic system. (paper)

  1. Role of visible light-activated photocatalyst on the reduction of anthrax spore-induced mortality in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Hwa Kau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Photocatalysis of titanium dioxide (TiO(2 substrates is primarily induced by ultraviolet light irradiation. Anion-doped TiO(2 substrates were shown to exhibit photocatalytic activities under visible-light illumination, relative environmentally-friendly materials. Their anti-spore activity against Bacillus anthracis, however, remains to be investigated. We evaluated these visible-light activated photocatalysts on the reduction of anthrax spore-induced pathogenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Standard plating method was used to determine the inactivation of anthrax spore by visible light-induced photocatalysis. Mouse models were further employed to investigate the suppressive effects of the photocatalysis on anthrax toxin- and spore-mediated mortality. We found that anti-spore activities of visible light illuminated nitrogen- or carbon-doped titania thin films significantly reduced viability of anthrax spores. Even though the spore-killing efficiency is only approximately 25%, our data indicate that spores from photocatalyzed groups but not untreated groups have a less survival rate after macrophage clearance. In addition, the photocatalysis could directly inactivate lethal toxin, the major virulence factor of B. anthracis. In agreement with these results, we found that the photocatalyzed spores have tenfold less potency to induce mortality in mice. These data suggest that the photocatalysis might injury the spores through inactivating spore components. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Photocatalysis induced injuries of the spores might be more important than direct killing of spores to reduce pathogenicity in the host.

  2. Fabrication of Micrometer- and Nanometer-Scale Polymer Structures by Visible Light Induced Dielectrophoresis (DEP Force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen J. Li

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We report in this paper a novel, inexpensive and flexible method for fabricating micrometer- and nanometer-scale three-dimensional (3D polymer structures using visible light sources instead of ultra-violet (UV light sources or lasers. This method also does not require the conventional micro-photolithographic technique (i.e., photolithographic masks for patterning and fabricating polymer structures such as hydrogels. The major materials and methods required for this novel fabrication technology are: (1 any cross-linked network of photoactive polymers (examples of fabricated poly(ethylene glycol (PEG-diacrylate hydrogel structures are shown in this paper; (2 an Optically-induced Dielectrophoresis (ODEP System which includes an “ODEP chip” (i.e., any chip that changes its surface conductivity when exposed to visible light, an optical microscope, a projector, and a computer; and (3 an animator software hosted on a computer that can generate virtual or dynamic patterns which can be projected onto the “ODEP chip” through the use of a projector and a condenser lens. Essentially, by placing a photosensitive polymer solution inside the microfluidic platform formed by the “ODEP chip” bonded to another substrate, and applying an alternating current (a.c. electrical potential across the polymer solution (typically ~20 Vp-p at 10 kHz, solid polymer micro/nano structures can then be formed on the “ODEP chip” surface when visible-light is projected onto the chip. The 2D lateral geometry (x and y dimensions and the thickness (height of the micro/nano structures are dictated by the image geometry of the visible light projected onto the “ODEP chip” and also the time duration of projection. Typically, after an image projection with intensity ranging from ~0.2 to 0.4 mW/cm2 for 10 s, ~200 nm high structures can be formed. In our current system, the thickness of these polymer structures can be controlled to form from ~200 nanometers to ~3

  3. The photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue by green semiconductor films that is induced by irradiation by a light-emitting diode and visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Chi; Doong, Ruey-An; Chen, Ku-Fan; Chen, Giin-Shan; Tsai, Yung-Pin

    2018-01-01

    This study develops a low-energy rotating photocatalytic contactor (LE-RPC) that has Cu-doped TiO 2 films coated on stainless-steel rotating disks, to experimentally evaluate the efficiency of the degradation and decolorization of methylene blue (MB) under irradiation from different light sources (visible 430 nm, light-emitting diode [LED] 460 nm, and LED 525 nm). The production of hydroxyl radicals is also examined. The experimental results show that the photocatalytic activity of TiO 2 that is doped with Cu 2+ is induced by illumination with visible light and an LED. More than 90% of methylene blue at a 10 mg/L concentration is degraded after illumination by visible light (430 nm) for 4 hr at 20 rpm. This study also demonstrates that the quantity of hydroxyl radicals produced is directly proportional to the light energy intensity. The greater the light energy intensity, the greater is the number of hydroxyl radicals produced. The CuO-doped anatase TiO 2 powder was successfully synthesized in this study by a sol-gel method. The catalytic abilities of the stainless-steel film were enhanced in the visible light regions. This study has successfully modified the nano-photocatalytic materials to drop band gap and has also successfully fixed the nano-photocatalytic materials on a substratum to effectively treat dye wastewater in the range of visible light. The results can be useful to the development of a low-energy rotating photocatalytic contactor for decontamination purposes.

  4. Light- induced electron transfer and ATP synthesis in a carotene synthesizing insect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valmalette, Jean Christophe; Dombrovsky, Aviv; Brat, Pierre; Mertz, Christian; Capovilla, Maria; Robichon, Alain

    2012-08-01

    A singular adaptive phenotype of a parthenogenetic insect species (Acyrthosiphon pisum) was selected in cold conditions and is characterized by a remarkable apparition of a greenish colour. The aphid pigments involve carotenoid genes well defined in chloroplasts and cyanobacteria and amazingly present in the aphid genome, likely by lateral transfer during evolution. The abundant carotenoid synthesis in aphids suggests strongly that a major and unknown physiological role is related to these compounds beyond their canonical anti-oxidant properties. We report here that the capture of light energy in living aphids results in the photo induced electron transfer from excited chromophores to acceptor molecules. The redox potentials of molecules involved in this process would be compatible with the reduction of the NAD+ coenzyme. This appears as an archaic photosynthetic system consisting of photo-emitted electrons that are in fine funnelled into the mitochondrial reducing power in order to synthesize ATP molecules.

  5. Nanomechanical inverse electromagnetically induced transparency and confinement of light in normal modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, G S; Huang, Sumei

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the existence of the phenomenon of the inverse electromagnetically induced transparency (IEIT) in an opto mechanical system consisting of a nanomechanical mirror placed in an optical cavity. We show that two weak counter-propagating identical classical probe fields can be completely absorbed by the system in the presence of a strong coupling field so that the output probe fields are zero. The light is completely confined inside the cavity and the energy of the incoming probe fields is shared between the cavity field and creation of a coherent phonon and resides primarily in one of the polariton modes. The energy can be extracted by a perturbation of the external fields or by suddenly changing the Q of the cavity. (paper)

  6. Manipulation and light-induced agglomeration of carbon nanotubes through optical trapping of attached silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Chao; Zhang Yi; Gu, Claire; Seballos, Leo; Zhang, Jin Z

    2008-01-01

    A simple experimental method has been demonstrated for manipulating multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) bundles through the optical trapping of attached silver nanoparticles (SNPs). In our experiments, without the SNPs, the MWCNTs cannot be trapped due to their irregular shapes and large aspect ratio. However, when mixed with SNPs, the MWCNTs can be successfully trapped along with the SNPs using a TEM 00 mode laser at 532 nm. This is attributed to the optical trapping of the SNPs and attractive interaction or binding between the SNPs and MWCNTs due to electrostatic and van der Waals forces. Therefore, optical manipulation of MWCNT bundles is achieved through the manipulation of the attached silver nanoparticles/aggregates. In addition, we have observed the phenomenon of light-induced further agglomeration of SNPs/MWCNTs which could potentially be exploited for fabricating patterned MWCNT films for future nanoscale devices and other applications

  7. Photorefractive Axicon: Study of Light-induced Effect by Bessel Beam in Photorefractive Crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, T A; Gesualdi, M R R; Zamboni-Rached, M; Muramatsu, M

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we present the theoretical and computational study of the original analysis of the light-induced effects by Bessel beams in photorefractive crystals. Modern applications of these beams as: metrological, alignment of optical systems, optical tweezers, non linear optics, optical communication, and others, becoming a very interesting substitute for a Gaussian beam when this is subject to diffraction and dispersion effects to large distance propagation. On the other hand, the photorefractive crystals are very important materials for applications in non-linear optics, holographic storage, interferometry and optical information processing. We perform an analysis of the index refraction modulation generated by Bessel beam in photorefractive medium discussing the possibility this optical material to control and generation of Bessel beam properties.

  8. Improving poor fill factors for solar cells via light-induced plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhao; Jia Rui; Ding Wuchang; Meng Yanlong; Jin Zhi; Liu Xinyu

    2012-01-01

    Silicon solar cells are prepared following the conventional fabrication processes, except for the metallization firing process. The cells are divided into two groups with higher and lower fill factors, respectively. After light-induced plating (LIP), the fill factors of the solar cells in both groups with different initial values reach the same level. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images are taken under the bulk silver electrodes, which prove that the improvement for cells with a poor factor after LIP should benefit from sufficient exploitation of the high density silver crystals formed during the firing process. Moreover, the application of LIP to cells with poor electrode contact performance, such as nanowire cells and radial junction solar cells, is proposed. (semiconductor devices)

  9. The determination of light elements in heavy matrix using proton induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levenets, V.V.; Omel'nik, A.P.; Shchur, A.A.; Chernov, A.E.; Usikov, N.P.; Zats, A.V.

    2007-01-01

    In this report the possibility of determination of light impurities in heavy matrixes is studied using proton induced X-Ray emission. The wide-band X-ray emission filter made from pyrolytic graphite was used in spectrometric scheme of experiment. The results of studying of filter features in energy range of X-ray emission from 4 to 12 keV were presented. The possibilities were examined of application of pyrolytic graphite filter to modify the X-rays spectrum for determination of iron, using characteristic emission of K-series, and hafnium, using L-series, in substances on base of zirconium (glasses, alloys etc.). It was shown, that the using of similar filter allows to reach the significant improving of metrological characteristics of analysis of mentioned impurities: the limits of detection of iron and hafnium were lowered single-order of magnitude. (authors)

  10. Line-shape theory and molecular dynamics in collision-induced light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balucani, U.; Tognetti, V.; Vallauri, R.

    1979-01-01

    Molecular-dynamics studies in argon at 148 amagats are presented for gaining information on the dynamical properties responsible for the depolarized light scattering from simple fluids. The total and pair-correlation functions are computed within the simple dipole--induced-dipole model of polarizability anisotropy. The pair spectral shape is derived. These results are compared with a theoretical analysis based on a continued-fraction approach. The necessary frequency moments are calculated both in the low-density limit and taking into account first-order density corrections, and compared with the molecular-dynamics data. The agreement between the theoretical spectra and molecular-dynamics data shows the validity of the memory-function approach. The comparison with the real experimental results allows one to test the relevant physical contributions to the polarizability anisotropy

  11. Selenium inhibits UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis in hairless mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overvad, Kim; Thorling, E.B.; Bjerring, Peter; Ebbesen, Peter

    1985-01-01

    Female hairless inbred hr/hr mice were exposed to UV-B irradiation from Philips TL 40W/13 fluorescent tubes. Fractionated irradiation, given as single daily doses 5 days a week, was gradually increased from 0.04 to 0.4 J/cm 2 over 2 weeks. Irradiation at 0.4 J/cm 2 was continued for 20 weeks. Selenium supplementation given as sodium selenite in the drinking water at 2, 4 and 8 mg/l began 3 weeks before UV-irradiation and continued thereafter. Development of skin tumors was followed by weekly examinations. Statistical analyses revealed significant dose-dependent selenium-mediated protection against UV-light-induced skin cancer. Leukemia developed in 5 of 150 UV-irradiated mice as opposed to none in a group of 60 unirradiated mice. (author)

  12. Monitoring of transient cavitation induced by ultrasound and intense pulsed light in presence of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazgarnia, Ameneh; Shanei, Ahmad; Shanei, Mohammad Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important challenges in medical treatment is invention of a minimally invasive approach in order to induce lethal damages to cancer cells. Application of high intensity focused ultrasound can be beneficial to achieve this goal via the cavitation process. Existence of the particles and vapor in a liquid decreases the ultrasonic intensity threshold required for cavitation onset. In this study, synergism of intense pulsed light (IPL) and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) has been investigated as a means of providing nucleation sites for acoustic cavitation. Several approaches have been reported with the aim of cavitation monitoring. We conducted the experiments on the basis of sonochemiluminescence (SCL) and chemical dosimetric methods. The acoustic cavitation activity was investigated by determining the integrated SCL signal acquired over polyacrylamide gel phantoms containing luminol in the presence and absence of GNPs in the wavelength range of 400-500 nm using a spectrometer equipped with cooled charged coupled devices (CCD) during irradiation by different intensities of 1 MHz ultrasound and IPL pulses. In order to confirm these results, the terephthalic acid chemical dosimeter was utilized as well. The SCL signal recorded in the gel phantoms containing GNPs at different intensities of ultrasound in the presence of intense pulsed light was higher than the gel phantoms without GNPs. These results have been confirmed by the obtained data from the chemical dosimetry method. Acoustic cavitation in the presence of GNPs and intense pulsed light has been suggested as a new approach designed for decreasing threshold intensity of acoustic cavitation and improving targeted therapeutic effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Pattern of retinal morphological and functional decay in a light-inducible, rhodopsin mutant mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargini, Claudia; Novelli, Elena; Piano, Ilaria; Biagioni, Martina; Strettoi, Enrica

    2017-07-18

    Hallmarks of Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP), a family of genetic diseases, are a typical rod-cone-degeneration with initial night blindness and loss of peripheral vision, followed by decreased daylight sight and progressive visual acuity loss up to legal blindness. Great heterogeneity in nature and function of mutated genes, variety of mutations for each of them, variability in phenotypic appearance and transmission modality contribute to make RP a still incurable disease. Translational research relies on appropriate animal models mimicking the genetic and phenotypic diversity of the human pathology. Here, we provide a systematic, morphological and functional analysis of Rho Tvrm4 /Rho + rhodopsin mutant mice, originally described in 2010 and portraying several features of common forms of autosomal dominant RP caused by gain-of-function mutations. These mice undergo photoreceptor degeneration only when exposed briefly to strong, white light and allow controlled timing of induction of rod and cone death, which therefore can be elicited in adult animals, as observed in human RP. The option to control severity and retinal extent of the phenotype by regulating intensity and duration of the inducing light opens possibilities to exploit this model for multiple experimental purposes. Altogether, the unique features of this mutant make it an excellent resource for retinal degeneration research.

  14. Linear and nonlinear light propagations in a Doppler-broadened medium via electromagnetically induced transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Liang; Huang Guoxiang

    2010-01-01

    We present a systematic theoretical study to deal with linear and nonlinear light propagations in a Doppler-broadened three-level Λ system via electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), with incoherent population exchange between two lower energy levels taken into account. Through a careful analysis of base state and linear excitation, we show that the EIT condition of the system is given by |Ω c | 2 γ 31 >>2γ 21 Δω D 2 , where Ω c is half the Rabi frequency of the control field, Δω D is the Doppler width, and γ jl is the decay rate of the coherence between states |j> and |l>. Under this condition, the effect of incoherent population exchange is insignificant, while dephasing dominates the decoherence of the system. This condition also ensures the validity of the weak nonlinear perturbation theory used in this work for solving the Maxwell-Bloch equations with inhomogeneous broadening. We then investigate the nonlinear propagation of the probe field and show that it is possible to form temporal optical solitons in the Doppler-broadened medium. Such solitons have ultraslow propagating velocity and can be generated in very low light power. The possibility of realizing (1+1)-dimensional and (2+1)-dimensional spatial optical solitons in the adiabatic regime of the system is also discussed.

  15. Quantified light-induced fluorescence, review of a diagnostic tool in prevention of oral disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Josselin de Jong, Elbert; Higham, Susan M.; Smith, Philip W.; van Daelen, Catherina J.; van der Veen, Monique H.

    2009-05-01

    Diagnostic methods for the use in preventive dentistry are being developed continuously. Few of these find their way into general practice. Although the general trend in medicine is to focus on disease prevention and early diagnostics, in dentistry this is still not the case. Nevertheless, in dental research some of these methods seem to be promising for near future use by the general dental professional. In this paper an overview is given of a method called quantitative light-induced fluorescence or (QLF) in which visible and harmless light excites the teeth in the patient's mouth to produce fluorescent images, which can be stored on disk and computer analyzed. White spots (early dental caries) are detected and quantified as well as bacterial metabolites on and in the teeth. An overview of research to validate the technique and modeling to further the understanding of the technique by Monte Carlo simulation is given and it is shown that the fluorescence phenomena can be described by the simulation model in a qualitative way. A model describing the visibility of red fluorescence from within the dental tissue is added, as this was still lacking in current literature. An overview is given of the clinical images made with the system and of the extensive research which has been done. The QLF™ technology has been shown to be of importance when used in clinical trials with respect to the testing of toothpastes and preventive treatments. It is expected that the QLF™ technology will soon find its way into the general dental practice.

  16. Light-induced negative differential resistance in graphene/Si-quantum-dot tunneling diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong Won; Jang, Chan Wook; Shin, Dong Hee; Kim, Jong Min; Kang, Soo Seok; Lee, Dae Hun; Kim, Sung; Choi, Suk-Ho; Hwang, Euyheon

    2016-07-28

    One of the interesing tunneling phenomena is negative differential resistance (NDR), the basic principle of resonant-tunneling diodes. NDR has been utilized in various semiconductor devices such as frequency multipliers, oscillators, relfection amplifiers, logic switches, and memories. The NDR in graphene has been also reported theoretically as well as experimentally, but should be further studied to fully understand its mechanism, useful for practical device applications. Especially, there has been no observation about light-induced NDR (LNDR) in graphene-related structures despite very few reports on the LNDR in GaAs-based heterostructures. Here, we report first observation of LNDR in graphene/Si quantum dots-embedded SiO2 (SQDs:SiO2) multilayers (MLs) tunneling diodes. The LNDR strongly depends on temperature (T) as well as on SQD size, and the T dependence is consistent with photocurrent (PC)-decay behaviors. With increasing light power, the PC-voltage curves are more structured with peak-to-valley ratios over 2 at room temperature. The physical mechanism of the LNDR, governed by resonant tunneling of charge carriers through the minibands formed across the graphene/SQDs:SiO2 MLs and by their nonresonant phonon-assisted tunneling, is discussed based on theoretical considerations.

  17. Flow-induced vibration for light water reactors. Progress report, January-June 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Coster, M.A.

    1981-02-01

    Flow-Induced Vibration for Light Water Reactors (FIV for LWRs) is a four-year program designed to improve the FIV performance of light water reactors through the development of design criteria, analytical models for predicting behavior of components, general scaling laws to improve the accuracy of reduced-scale tests, and the identification of high FIV risk areas. The program is managed by the General Electric Nuclear Power Systems Engineering Department and has three major contributors: General Electric Nuclear Power Systems Engineering Department (NPSED), General Electric Corporate Research and Development (CR and D) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The program commenced December 1, 1976, but was suspended on September 30, 1978, due to a shift in Department of Energy (DOE) priorities away from LWR productivity/availability. It was reinitiated as of August 1, 1979. A second program suspension occurred from March 29, 1980 through May 16, 1980, due to funding limits. This progress report summarizes the accomplishments achieved during the period from Janury 1980 to June 1980

  18. Fractional-topological-charge-induced vortex birth and splitting of light fields on the submicron scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yiqi; Lu, Qinghong; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhang, Wuhong; Chen, Lixiang

    2017-02-01

    The study of vortex dynamics is of fundamental importance in understanding the structured light's propagation behavior in the realm of singular optics. Here, combining with the large-angle holographic lithography in photoresist, a simple experiment to trace and visualize the vortex birth and splitting of light fields induced by various fractional topological charges is reported. For a topological charge M =1.76 , the recorded microstructures reveal that although it finally leads to the formation of a pair of fork gratings, these two vortices evolve asynchronously. More interestingly, it is observed on the submicron scale that high-order topological charges M =3.48 and 3.52, respectively, give rise to three and four characteristic forks embedded in the samples with one-wavelength resolution of about 450 nm. Numerical simulations based on orbital angular momentum eigenmode decomposition support well the experimental observations. Our method could be applied effectively to study other structured matter waves, such as the electron and neutron beams.

  19. Effects of harman and norharman on spontaneous and ultraviolet light-induced mutagenesis in cultured Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.C.; Castellazzi, M.; Glover, T.W.; Trosko, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    Nontoxic concentrations of harman and norharman were tested in cultured Chinese hamster cells for their effects on DNA repair and mutagenesis. The following effects of harman were observed: (a) the survival of ultraviolet light- or x-ray-damaged cells was reduced; (b) the ultraviolet light-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis was slightly inhibited; and (c) the frequency of spontaneous or ultraviolet light-induced ouabain-resistant (ouar) or 6-thioguanine-resistant (6-TGr) mutations was reduced. Furthermore, the effect of harman on survival and mutagenesis was greater than that of norharman and was detected primarily in treatments in which cells were exposed to harman immediately following ultraviolet light irradiation. Our data clearly indicate that harman decreases the capacity to repair DNA damage and fix mutations in Chinese hamster cells, possibly because of the intercalation properties of this compound

  20. First example of a high-level correlated calculation of the indirect spin-spin coupling constants involving tellurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rusakov, Yury Yu; Krivdin, Leonid B.; Østerstrøm, Freja From

    2013-01-01

    This paper documents a very first example of a high-level correlated calculation of spin-spin coupling constants involving tellurium taking into account relativistic effects, vibrational corrections and solvent effects for the medium sized organotellurium molecules. The 125Te-1H spin-spin coupling...... constants of tellurophene and divinyl telluride were calculated at the SOPPA and DFT levels in a good agreement with experiment. A new full-electron basis set av3z-J for tellurium derived from the "relativistic" Dyall's basis set, dyall.av3z, and specifically optimized for the correlated calculations...... of spin-spin coupling constants involving tellurium, was developed. The SOPPA methods show much better performance as compared to 15 those of DFT, if relativistic effects calculated within the ZORA scheme are taken into account. Vibrational and solvent corrections are next to negligible, while...

  1. Site-specific nucleation and controlled growth of a vertical tellurium nanowire array for high performance field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safdar, Muhammad; Zhan Xueying; Mirza, Misbah; Wang Zhenxing; Sun Lianfeng; He Jun; Niu Mutong; Zhang Jinping; Zhao Qing

    2013-01-01

    We report the controlled growth of highly ordered and well aligned one-dimensional tellurium nanostructure arrays via a one-step catalyst-free physical vapor deposition method. The density, size and fine structures of tellurium nanowires are systematically studied and optimized. Field emission measurement was performed to display notable dependence on nanostructure morphologies. The ordered nanowire array based field emitter has a turn-on field as low as 3.27 V μm −1 and a higher field enhancement factor of 3270. Our finding offers the possibility of controlling the growth of tellurium nanowire arrays and opens up new means for their potential applications in electronic devices and displays. (paper)

  2. The artefacts of radiochromic film dosimetry with flatbed scanners and their causation by light scattering from radiation-induced polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A; Poppinga, Daniela; Harder, Dietrich; Doerner, Karl-Joachim; Poppe, Bjoern

    2014-07-07

    Optical experiments and theoretical considerations have been undertaken in order to understand the causes of the 'orientation effect' and the 'parabola effect', the artefacts impairing the desired light absorption measurement on radiochromic EBT3 films with flatbed scanners. EBT3 films exposed to doses up to 20.9 Gy were scanned with an Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner in landscape and portrait orientation. The horizontally and vertically polarized light components of the scanner were determined, and another Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner was disassembled to examine its optical components. The optical properties of exposed and unexposed EBT3 films were studied with incident polarized and unpolarized white light, and the transmitted red light was investigated for its polarization and scattering properties including the distribution of the scattering angles. Neutral density filters were studied for comparison. Guidance was sought from the theory of light scattering from rod-like macromolecular structures. The drastic dose-dependent variation of the transmitted total light current as function of the orientation of front and rear polarizers, interpreted by light scattering theory, shows that the radiation-induced polymerization of the monomers of EBT3 films produces light scattering oscillators preferably polarized at right angles with the coating direction of the film. The directional distribution of the scattered light is partly anisotropic, with a preferred scattering plane at right angles with the coating direction, indicating light scattering from stacks of coherently vibrating oscillators piled up along the monomer crystals. The polyester carrier film also participates in these effects. The 'orientation' and 'parabola' artefacts due to flatbed scanning of radiochromic films can be explained by the interaction of the polarization-dependent and anisotropic light scattering from exposed and unexposed EBT3 films with the quantitative difference

  3. The artefacts of radiochromic film dosimetry with flatbed scanners and their causation by light scattering from radiation-induced polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenfeld, Andreas A; Poppinga, Daniela; Poppe, Bjoern; Harder, Dietrich; Doerner, Karl-Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Optical experiments and theoretical considerations have been undertaken in order to understand the causes of the ‘orientation effect’ and the ‘parabola effect’, the artefacts impairing the desired light absorption measurement on radiochromic EBT3 films with flatbed scanners. EBT3 films exposed to doses up to 20.9 Gy were scanned with an Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner in landscape and portrait orientation. The horizontally and vertically polarized light components of the scanner were determined, and another Epson Expression 10000XL flatbed scanner was disassembled to examine its optical components. The optical properties of exposed and unexposed EBT3 films were studied with incident polarized and unpolarized white light, and the transmitted red light was investigated for its polarization and scattering properties including the distribution of the scattering angles. Neutral density filters were studied for comparison. Guidance was sought from the theory of light scattering from rod-like macromolecular structures. The drastic dose-dependent variation of the transmitted total light current as function of the orientation of front and rear polarizers, interpreted by light scattering theory, shows that the radiation-induced polymerization of the monomers of EBT3 films produces light scattering oscillators preferably polarized at right angles with the coating direction of the film. The directional distribution of the scattered light is partly anisotropic, with a preferred scattering plane at right angles with the coating direction, indicating light scattering from stacks of coherently vibrating oscillators piled up along the monomer crystals. The polyester carrier film also participates in these effects. The ‘orientation’ and ‘parabola’ artefacts due to flatbed scanning of radiochromic films can be explained by the interaction of the polarization-dependent and anisotropic light scattering from exposed and unexposed EBT3 films with the quantitative

  4. The Effects of Brazilian Green Propolis against Excessive Light-Induced Cell Damage in Retina and Fibroblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi Murase

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We investigated the effects of Brazilian green propolis and its constituents against white light- or UVA-induced cell damage in mouse retinal cone-cell line 661W or human skin-derived fibroblast cells (NB1-RGB. Methods. Cell damage was induced by 3,000lx white light for 24 h or 4/10 J/cm2 UVA exposure. Cell viability was assessed by Hoechst33342 and propidium iodide staining or by tetrazolium salt (WST-8 cell viability assay. The radical scavenging activity of propolis induced by UVA irradiation in NB1-RGB cells was measured using a reactive-oxygen-species- (ROS- sensitive probe CM-H2DCFDA. Moreover, the effects of propolis on the UVA-induced activation of p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK were examined by immunoblotting. Results. Treatment with propolis and two dicaffeoylquinic acids significantly inhibited the decrease in cell viability induced by white light in 661W. Propolis and its constituents inhibited the decrease in cell viability induced by UVA in NB1-RGB. Moreover, propolis suppressed the intracellular ROS production by UVA irradiation. Propolis also inhibited the levels of phosphorylated-p38 and ERK by UVA irradiation. Conclusion. Brazilian green propolis may become a major therapeutic candidate for the treatment of AMD and skin damage induced by UV irradiation.

  5. Control of light scattering by nanoparticles with optically-induced magnetic responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wei; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional approaches to control and shape the scattering patterns of light generated by different nanostructures are mostly based on engineering of their electric response due to the fact that most metallic nanostructures support only electric resonances in the optical frequency range. Recently, fuelled by the fast development in the fields of metamaterials and plasmonics, artificial optically-induced magnetic responses have been demonstrated for various nanostructures. This kind of response can be employed to provide an extra degree of freedom for the efficient control and shaping of the scattering patterns of nanoparticles and nanoantennas. Here we review the recent progress in this research direction of nanoparticle scattering shaping and control through the interference of both electric and optically-induced magnetic responses. We discuss the magnetic resonances supported by various structures in different spectral regimes, and then summarize the original results on the scattering shaping involving both electric and magnetic responses, based on the interference of both spectrally separated (with different resonant wavelengths) and overlapped dipoles (with the same resonant wavelength), and also other higher-order modes. Finally, we discuss the scattering control utilizing Fano resonances associated with the magnetic responses. (topical review - plasmonics and metamaterials)

  6. Induced Radioactivity in Lead Shielding at the National Synchrotron Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Vinita J; Schaefer, Charles; Kahnhauser, Henry

    2017-06-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory was shut down in September 2014. Lead bricks used as radiological shadow shielding within the accelerator were exposed to stray radiation fields during normal operations. The FLUKA code, a fully integrated Monte Carlo simulation package for the interaction and transport of particles and nuclei in matter, was used to estimate induced radioactivity in this shielding and stainless steel beam pipe from known beam losses. The FLUKA output was processed using MICROSHIELD® to estimate on-contact exposure rates with individually exposed bricks to help design and optimize the radiological survey process. This entire process can be modeled using FLUKA, but use of MICROSHIELD® as a secondary method was chosen because of the project's resource constraints. Due to the compressed schedule and lack of shielding configuration data, simple FLUKA models were developed. FLUKA activity estimates for stainless steel were compared with sampling data to validate results, which show that simple FLUKA models and irradiation geometries can be used to predict radioactivity inventories accurately in exposed materials. During decommissioning 0.1% of the lead bricks were found to have measurable levels of induced radioactivity. Post-processing with MICROSHIELD® provides an acceptable secondary method of estimating residual exposure rates.

  7. Directing the path of light-induced electron transfer at a molecular fork using vibrational excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delor, Milan; Archer, Stuart A.; Keane, Theo; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; Greetham, Gregory M.; Towrie, Michael; Weinstein, Julia A.

    2017-11-01

    Ultrafast electron transfer in condensed-phase molecular systems is often strongly coupled to intramolecular vibrations that can promote, suppress and direct electronic processes. Recent experiments exploring this phenomenon proved that light-induced electron transfer can be strongly modulated by vibrational excitation, suggesting a new avenue for active control over molecular function. Here, we achieve the first example of such explicit vibrational control through judicious design of a Pt(II)-acetylide charge-transfer donor-bridge-acceptor-bridge-donor 'fork' system: asymmetric 13C isotopic labelling of one of the two -C≡C- bridges makes the two parallel and otherwise identical donor→acceptor electron-transfer pathways structurally distinct, enabling independent vibrational perturbation of either. Applying an ultrafast UVpump(excitation)-IRpump(perturbation)-IRprobe(monitoring) pulse sequence, we show that the pathway that is vibrationally perturbed during UV-induced electron transfer is dramatically slowed down compared to its unperturbed counterpart. One can thus choose the dominant electron transfer pathway. The findings deliver a new opportunity for precise perturbative control of electronic energy propagation in molecular devices.

  8. Biomimetic Water-Collecting Fabric with Light-Induced Superhydrophilic Bumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanfeng; Wang, Xiaowen; Lai, Chuilin; Hu, Huawen; Kong, Yeeyee; Fei, Bin; Xin, John H

    2016-02-10

    To develop an efficient water-collecting surface that integrates both fast water-capturing and easy drainage properties is of high current interest for addressing global water issues. In this work, a superhydrophobic surface was fabricated on cotton fabric via manipulation of both the surface roughness and surface energy. This was followed by a subsequent spray coating of TiO2 nanosol that created light-induced superhydrophilic bumps with a unique raised structure as a result of the interfacial tension of the TiO2 nanosol sprayed on the superhydrophobic fiber surface. These raised TiO2 bumps induce both a wettability gradient and a shape gradient, synergistically accelerating water coalescence and water collection. The in-depth study revealed that the quantity and the distribution of the TiO2 had a significant impact on the final water collection efficiency. This inexpensive and facilely fabricated fabric biomimicks the desert beetle's back and spider silk, which are capable of fog harvesting without additional energy consumption.

  9. Mechanism of blue-light-induced plasma-membrane depolarization in etiolated cucumber hypocotyls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, E. P.; Cosgrove, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    A large, transient depolarization of the plasma membrane precedes the rapid blue-light (BL)-induced growth suppression in etiolated seedlings of Cucumis sativus L. The mechanism of this voltage transient was investigated by applying inhibitors of ion channels and the plasma-membrane H(+)-ATPase, by manipulating extracellular ion concentrations, and by measuring cell input resistance and ATP levels. The depolarizing phase was not affected by Ca(2+)-channel blockers (verapamil, La3+) or by reducing extracellular free Ca2+ by treatment with ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). However, these treatments did reduce the rate of repolarization, indicating an inward movement of Ca2+ is involved. No effects of the K(+)-channel blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA+) were detected. Vanadate and KCN, used to inhibit the H(+)-ATPase, reduced or completely inhibited the BL-induced depolarization. Levels of ATP increased by 11-26% after 1-2 min of BL. Input resistance of trichrome cells, measured with double-barreled microelectrodes, remained constant during the onset of the depolarization but decreased as the membrane voltage became more positive than -90 mV. The results indicate that the depolarization mechanism initially involves inactivation of the H(+)-ATPase with subsequent transient activation of one or more types of ion channels.

  10. Controlling the delocalization-localization transition of light via electromagnetically induced transparency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Jing; Huang Guoxiang

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme to realize a transition from delocalization to localization of light waves via electromagnetically induced transparency. The system we suggested is a resonant cold atomic ensemble having N configuration, with a control field consisting of two pairs of laser beams with different cross angles, which produce an electromagnetically induced quasiperiodic waveguide (EIQPW) for the propagation of a signal field. By appropriately tuning the incommensurate rate or relative modulation strength between the two pairs of control-field components, the signal field can exhibit the delocalization-localization transition as it transports inside the atomic ensemble. The delocalization-localization transition point is determined and the propagation property of the signal field is studied in detail. Our work provides a way of realizing wave localization via atomic coherence, which is quite different from the conventional, off-resonant mechanism-based Aubry-Andre model, and the great controllability of the EIQPW also allows an easy manipulation of the delocalization-localization transition.

  11. The α-induced thick-target γ-ray yield from light elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, R. K. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics

    1994-10-01

    The α-induced thick-target γ-ray yield from light elements has been measured in the energy range 5.6 MeV ≤ Eα ≤ 10 MeV. The γ-ray yield for > 2.1 MeV from thick targets of beryllium, boron nitride, sodium fluoride, magnesium, aluminum and silicon were measured using the α-particle beam from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories 88 in. cyclotron. The elemental yields from this experiment were used to construct the α-induced direct production γ-ray spectrum from materials in the SNO detector, a large volume ultra-low background neutrino detector located in the Creighton mine near Sudbury, Canada. This background source was an order of magnitude lower than predicted by previous calculations. These measurements are in good agreement with theoretical calculations of this spectrum based on a statistical nuclear model of the reaction, with the gross high energy spectrum structure being reproduced to within a factor of two. Detailed comparison of experimental and theoretical excitation population distribution of several residual nuclei indicate the same level of agreement within experimental uncertainties.

  12. Springs-neaps cycles in daily total seabed light: Daylength-induced changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, E. M.; Bowers, D. G.; Davies, A. J.

    2014-04-01

    In shallow, tidal seas, daily total seabed light is determined largely by the interaction of the solar elevation cycle, the tidal cycle in water depth, and any temporal variability in turbidity. Since tidal range, times of low water, and often turbidity vary in regular ways over the springs-neaps cycle, daily total seabed light exhibits cycles of the same periodicity. Corresponding cycles are likely to be induced in the daily total primary production of benthic algae and plants, particularly those light-limited specimens occupying the lower reaches of a sub-tidal population. Consequently, this effect is an important control on the growth patterns, depth distribution and survival of, for example, macroalgal forests and seagrass meadows. Seasonal changes in daylength exert an important additional control on these cycles, as they alter the fraction of the tidal and turbidity cycles occurring within daylight hours. Bowers et al. (1997) modelled this phenomenon numerically and predicted that for a site with low water at about midday and midnight at neaps tides, 6 am and 6 pm at springs, daily total seabed light peaks at neaps in winter, but the ‘sense' of the cycle ‘switches' so that it peaks at springs in summer - the longer daylength permits the morning and evening low water springs to contribute substantially to the daily total. Observations for such a site in North Wales (UK), presented in this paper, show that no such ‘switch' occurs, and neaps tides host the largest daily totals throughout the year. The predicted ‘switch' is not observed because turbidity increases generally at spring tides, and specifically at low water springs, both of which were not accounted for in the model. Observations at a second site in Brittany (France), diametrically opposite in terms of the times of low water at neaps and at springs, indicate a peak at springs throughout the year. Analytical tools are developed to calculate the percentage of daily total sea surface irradiance

  13. Slowing down the speed of light using an electromagnetically-induced-transparency mechanism in a modified reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ronggang; Liu, Tong; Wang, Yingying; Li, Yujie; Gai, Bingzheng

    2017-11-01

    We propose an effective method to achieve extremely slow light by using both the mechanism of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and the localization of a coupled cavity waveguide (CCW). Based on quantum mechanics theory and the dispersion relation of a CCW, we derive a group-velocity formula that reveals both the effects of the EIT and CCW. Results show that ultralow light velocity at the order of several meters per second or even static light, could be obtained feasibly. In comparison with the EIT mechanism in a background of vacuum, this proposed method is more effective and realistic to achieve extremely slow light. And it exhibits potential values in the field of light storage.

  14. UV light-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers are mutagenic in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protic-Sabljic, M.; Tuteja, N.; Munson, P.J.; Hauser, J.; Kraemer, K.H.; Dixon, K.

    1986-01-01

    We used a simian virus 40-based shuttle vector plasmid, pZ189, to determine the role of pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers in UV light-induced mutagenesis in monkey cells. The vector DNA was UV irradiated and then introduced into monkey cells by transfection. After replication, vector DNA was recovered from the cells and tested for mutations in its supF suppressor tRNA marker gene by transformation of Escherichia coli carrying a nonsense mutation in the beta-galactosidase gene. When the irradiated vector was treated with E. coli photolyase prior to transfection, pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers were removed selectively. Removal of approximately 90% of the pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers increased the biological activity of the vector by 75% and reduced its mutation frequency by 80%. Sequence analysis of 72 mutants recovered indicated that there were significantly fewer tandem double-base changes and G X C----A X T transitions (particularly at CC sites) after photoreactivation of the DNA. UV-induced photoproducts remained (although at greatly reduced levels) at all pyr-pyr sites after photoreactivation, but there was a relative increase in photoproducts at CC and TC sites and a relative decrease at TT and CT sites, presumably due to a persistence of (6-4) photoproducts at some CC and TC sites. These observations are consistent with the fact that mutations were found after photoreactivation at many sites at which only cyclobutane dimers would be expected to occur. From these results we conclude that UV-induced pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers are mutagenic in DNA replicated in monkey cells

  15. Light-induced second-order nonlinear optical properties of molecular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, Celine

    1995-01-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of all-optical orientation. The work focusses more particularly on the realization of poled polymers for quadratic nonlinear optics. It is shown that the coherent superposition of two beams at fundamental and second harmonic frequencies results in the breaking of the former centro-symmetry of the material. The source is a Neodymium-YAG laser delivering 25 ps pulses at 1064 nm. The incident second-harmonic beam is obtained by frequency doubling in a KDP crystal. Using a phase conjugation configuration based on six-wave mixing interactions, we have Investigated in detail the mechanism of photo-induced second-harmonic generation in initially centrosymmetric materials. It is shown that the light-induced non-centro-symmetry is due to an orientational hole burning of the molecules. The process involves interference effects between one and two photon absorptions. Experiments are performed in various solutions of an azo-dye molecule (Disperse Red One). The possibility of inducing quasi-permanent second-order susceptibility in a PMMA polymer matrix doped with the azo-dye molecule of Disperse Red One is also demonstrated. The method of all-optical poling consists in a seeding type process with alternate writing and probing phases. Permanent orientation of the molecules can be described in terms of photo-isomerization processes. It leads to a poling of the molecules with a spatial modulation which is phase-matched for frequency doubling. Relevant parameters leading to an efficient polarisation of the sample are identified. A theoretical modelling of the different phenomena observed is proposed. Last part of the study is devoted to an enlarged study of the potentialities offered by this dual-frequency holography technique: orientation of octupolar molecules, polarisation of highly transparent materials. We also show that the new techniques developed during this work can also reveal to be complementary methods for nonlinear

  16. Amelioration of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in C57BL/6 mice by photobiomodulation induced by 670 nm light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaldeen A Muili

    Full Text Available The approved immunomodulatory agents for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS are only partially effective. It is thought that the combination of immunomodulatory and neuroprotective strategies is necessary to prevent or reverse disease progression. Irradiation with far red/near infrared light, termed photobiomodulation, is a therapeutic approach for inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases. Data suggests that near-infrared light functions through neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. We sought to investigate the clinical effect of photobiomodulation in the Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE model of multiple sclerosis.The clinical effect of photobiomodulation induced by 670 nm light was investigated in the C57BL/6 mouse model of EAE. Disease was induced with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG according to standard laboratory protocol. Mice received 670 nm light or no light treatment (sham administered as suppression and treatment protocols. 670 nm light reduced disease severity with both protocols compared to sham treated mice. Disease amelioration was associated with down-regulation of proinflammatory cytokines (interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α and up-regulation of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-10 in vitro and in vivo.These studies document the therapeutic potential of photobiomodulation with 670 nm light in the EAE model, in part through modulation of the immune response.

  17. Intergranular tellurium cracking of nickel-based alloys in molten Li, Be, Th, U/F salt mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatiev, Victor; Surenkov, Alexander; Gnidoy, Ivan; Kulakov, Alexander; Uglov, Vadim; Vasiliev, Alexander; Presniakov, Mikhail

    2013-09-01

    In Russia, R&D on Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) are concentrated now on fast/intermediate spectrum concepts which were recognized as long term alternative to solid fueled fast reactors due to their attractive features: strong negative feedback coefficients, easy in-service inspection, and simplified fuel cycle. For high-temperature MSR corrosion of the metallic container alloy in primary circuit is the primary concern. Key problem receiving current attention include surface fissures in Ni-based alloys probably arising from fission product tellurium attack. This paper summarizes results of corrosion tests conducted recently to study effect of oxidation state in selected fuel salt on tellurium attack and to develop means of controlling tellurium cracking in the special Ni-based alloys recently developed for molten salt actinide recycler and tranforming (MOSART) system. Tellurium corrosion of Ni-based alloys was tested at temperatures up to 750 °C in stressed and unloaded conditions in molten LiF-BeF2 salt mixture fueled by about 20 mol% of ThF4 and 2 mol% of UF4 at different [U(IV)]/[U(III)] ratios: 0.7, 4, 20, 100 and 500. Following Ni-based alloys (in mass%): HN80М-VI (Mo—12, Cr—7.6, Nb—1.5), HN80МТY (Mo—13, Cr—6.8, Al—1.1, Ti—0.9), HN80МТW (Mo—9.4, Cr—7.0, Ti—1.7, W—5.5) and ЕМ-721 (W—25.2, Cr—5.7, Ti—0.17) were used for the study in the corrosion facility. If the redox state the fuel salt is characterized by uranium ratio [U(IV)]/[U(III)] uranium intermetallic compounds and alloys with nickel and molybdenum. This leads to spontaneous behavior of alloy formation processes on the specimens' surface and further diffusion of uranium deep into the metallic phase. As consequence of this films of intermetallic compounds and alloys of nickel, molybdenum, tungsten with uranium are formed on the alloys specimens' surface, and intergranular corrosion does not take place. In the fuel salt with [U(IV)]/[U(III)] = 4-20 the potentials of uranium

  18. Continuous removal and recovery of tellurium in an upflow anaerobic granular sludge bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mal, Joyabrata, E-mail: joyabrata2006@gmail.com [UNESCO-IHE, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands); Nancharaiah, Yarlagadda V. [Biofouling and Biofilm Processes Section, Water and Steam Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Kalpakkam, 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Anushakti Nagar Complex, Mumbai 400094 (India); Maheshwari, Neeraj [CNRS UMR 7338, BMBI University de Technologie Compiegne, 60200 Compiegne (France); Hullebusch, Eric D. van [UNESCO-IHE, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands); Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Géomatériaux et Environnement (LGE), EA 4508, UPEM, 77454, Marne-la-Vallée (France); Lens, Piet N.L. [UNESCO-IHE, Westvest 7, 2611 AX Delft (Netherlands); Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, P.O-Box 541, Tampere (Finland)

    2017-04-05

    Highlights: • Tellurite bioreduction coupled to recovery of biogenic Te(0) nanocrystals. • First report on continuous tellurite removal in a UASB reactor. • Biogenic Te(0) was mainly associated with loosely-bound EPS of granular sludge. • Repeated exposure to tellurite caused compositional changes in the EPS matrix. - Abstract: Continuous removal of tellurite (TeO{sub 3}{sup 2−}) from synthetic wastewater and subsequent recovery in the form of elemental tellurium was studied in an upflow anaerobic granular sludge bed (UASB) reactor operated at 30 °C. The UASB reactor was inoculated with anaerobic granular sludge and fed with lactate as carbon source and electron donor at an organic loading rate of 0.6 g COD L{sup −1} d{sup −1}. After establishing efficient and stable COD removal, the reactor was fed with 10 mg TeO{sub 3}{sup 2−} L{sup −1} for 42 d before increasing the influent concentration to 20 mg TeO{sub 3}{sup 2−} L{sup −1}. Tellurite removal (98 and 92%, respectively, from 10 and 20 mg Te L{sup −1}) was primarily mediated through bioreduction and most of the removed Te was retained in the bioreactor. Characterization using XRD, Raman spectroscopy, SEM-EDX and TEM confirmed association of tellurium with the granular sludge, typically in the form of elemental Te(0) deposits. Furthermore, application of an extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extraction method to the tellurite reducing sludge recovered up to 78% of the tellurium retained in the granular sludge. This study demonstrates for the first time the application of a UASB reactor for continuous tellurite removal from tellurite-containing wastewater coupled to elemental Te(0) recovery.

  19. Continuous reduction of tellurite to recoverable tellurium nanoparticles using an upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Ruiz, Adriana; Sesma-Martin, Juan; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Field, Jim A

    2017-01-01

    According to the U.S. Department of Energy and the European Union, tellurium is a critical element needed for energy and defense technology. Thus methods are needed to recover tellurium from waste streams. The objectives of this study was to determine the feasibility of utilizing upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors to convert toxic tellurite (Te IV ) oxyanions to non-toxic insoluble elemental tellurium (Te 0 ) nanoparticles (NP) that are amendable to separation from aqueous effluents. The reactors were supplied with ethanol as the electron donating substrate to promote the biological reduction of Te IV . One reactor was additionally amended with the redox mediating flavonoid compound, riboflavin (RF), with the goal of enhancing the bioreduction of Te IV . Its performance was compared to a control reactor lacking RF. The continuous formation of Te 0 NPs using the UASB reactors was found to be feasible and remarkably improved by the addition of RF. The presence of this flavonoid was previously shown to enhance the conversion rate of Te IV by approximately 11-fold. In this study, we demonstrated that this was associated with the added benefit of reducing the toxic impact of Te IV towards the methanogenic consortium in the UASB and thus enabled a 4.7-fold higher conversion rate of the chemical oxygen demand. Taken as a whole, this work demonstrates the potential of a methanogenic granular sludge to be applied as a bioreactor technology producing recoverable Te 0 NPs in a continuous fashion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Continuous removal and recovery of tellurium in an upflow anaerobic granular sludge bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mal, Joyabrata; Nancharaiah, Yarlagadda V.; Maheshwari, Neeraj; Hullebusch, Eric D. van; Lens, Piet N.L.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Tellurite bioreduction coupled to recovery of biogenic Te(0) nanocrystals. • First report on continuous tellurite removal in a UASB reactor. • Biogenic Te(0) was mainly associated with loosely-bound EPS of granular sludge. • Repeated exposure to tellurite caused compositional changes in the EPS matrix. - Abstract: Continuous removal of tellurite (TeO 3 2− ) from synthetic wastewater and subsequent recovery in the form of elemental tellurium was studied in an upflow anaerobic granular sludge bed (UASB) reactor operated at 30 °C. The UASB reactor was inoculated with anaerobic granular sludge and fed with lactate as carbon source and electron donor at an organic loading rate of 0.6 g COD L −1 d −1 . After establishing efficient and stable COD removal, the reactor was fed with 10 mg TeO 3 2− L −1 for 42 d before increasing the influent concentration to 20 mg TeO 3 2− L −1 . Tellurite removal (98 and 92%, respectively, from 10 and 20 mg Te L −1 ) was primarily mediated through bioreduction and most of the removed Te was retained in the bioreactor. Characterization using XRD, Raman spectroscopy, SEM-EDX and TEM confirmed association of tellurium with the granular sludge, typically in the form of elemental Te(0) deposits. Furthermore, application of an extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) extraction method to the tellurite reducing sludge recovered up to 78% of the tellurium retained in the granular sludge. This study demonstrates for the first time the application of a UASB reactor for continuous tellurite removal from tellurite-containing wastewater coupled to elemental Te(0) recovery.

  1. Formation of tellurium nanocrystals during anaerobic growth of bacteria that use Te oxyanions as respiratory electron acceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baesman, S.M.; Bullen, T.D.; Dewald, J.; Zhang, Dongxiao; Curran, S.; Islam, F.S.; Beveridge, T.J.; Oremland, R.S.

    2007-01-01

    Certain toxic elements support the metabolism of diverse prokaryotes by serving as respiratory electron acceptors for growth. Here, we demonstrate that two anaerobes previously shown to be capable of respiring oxyanions of selenium also achieve growth by reduction of either tellurate [Te(VI)] or tellurite [Te(IV)] to elemental tellurium [Te(0)]. This reduction achieves a sizeable stable-Te-isotopic fractionation (isotopic enrichment factor [??] = -0.4 to -1.0 per ml per atomic mass unit) and results in the formation of unique crystalline Te(0) nanoarchitectures as end products. The Te(0) crystals occur internally within but mainly externally from the cells, and each microorganism forms a distinctly different structure. Those formed by Bacillus selenitireducens initially are nanorods (???10-nm diameter by 200-nm length), which cluster together, forming larger (???1,000-nm) rosettes composed of numerous individual shards (???100-nm width by 1,000-nm length). In contrast, Sulfurospirillium barnesii forms extremely small, irregularly shaped nanospheres (diameter < 50 nm) that coalesce into larger composite aggregates. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and selected area electron diffraction indicate that both biominerals are composed entirely of Te and are crystalline, while Raman spectroscopy confirms that they are in the elemental state. These Te biominerals have specific spectral signatures (UV-visible light, Raman) that also provide clues to their internal structures. The use of microorganisms to generate Te nanomaterials may be an alternative for bench-scale syntheses. Additionally, they may also generate products with unique properties unattainable by conventional physical/chemical methods. Copyright ?? 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Simultaneous analysis of arsenic, antimony, selenium and tellurium in environmental samples using hydride generation ICPMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowski, L.M.; Breidenbach, R.; Bakker, I.J.I.; Epema, O.J.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: A quantitative method for simultaneous analysis of arsenic, antimony, selenium and tellurium in environmental samples is being developed using hydride generation ICPMS. These elements must be first transformed into hydride-forming oxidation states. This is particularly challenging for selenium and antimony because selenium is susceptible to reduction to the non-hydride-forming elemental state and antimony requires strong reducing conditions. The effectiveness of three reducing agents (KI, thiourea, cysteine) is studied. A comparison is made between addition of reducing agent to the sample and addition of KI to the NaBH 4 solution. Best results were obtained with the latter approach. (author)

  3. Effect of tellurium on viscosity and liquid structure of GaSb melts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji Leilei [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Jinan 250022 (China); Geng Haoran [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Jinan 250022 (China)], E-mail: mse_genghr@ujn.edu.cn; Sun Chunjing [Key Laboratory of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan 250061 (China); Teng Xinying; Liu Yamei [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jinan University, Jinan 250022 (China)

    2008-04-03

    The behavior of GaSb melt with tellurium addition was investigated using viscometer and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Normally, the viscosity of all melts measured decreased with the increasing temperature. However, anomalous transition points were observed in the temperature dependence of viscosity for Ga-Sb-Te system. Corresponded with the abnormal points on the viscosity-temperature curves, there were thermal effect peaks on the DSC curves. Furthermore, viscous activation energy and flow units of these melts and their structural features were discussed in this paper.

  4. Vaporization studies on elemental tellurium and selenium by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, R., E-mail: rvis1953@gmail.com; Balasubramanian, R., E-mail: rbs@igcar.gov.in; Darwin Albert Raj, D., E-mail: darwinalbertraj1953@gmail.com; Sai Baba, M., E-mail: msb@igcar.gov.in; Lakshmi Narasimhan, T.S., E-mail: tslak@igcar.gov.in

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • A detailed KEMS study of vaporization of elemental tellurium and selenium systems. • Clusters Te{sub i}(g) (i = 2 to 7) and Se{sub i}(g) (i = 2 to 9) identified over Te(s) and Se(s). • p–T relations for Te{sub i}(g) (590 to 690 K) and Se{sub i}(g) (380 to 480 K). • Vapor phase of Te dominated by Te{sub 2}(g) (∼95%) while that of Se by Se{sub 6}(g) (∼50%) and Se{sub 5}(g) (∼25%). • Sublimation and atomization enthalpies deduced for Te{sub i}(g) and Se{sub i}(g). - Abstract: Vaporization studies on elemental tellurium and selenium were conducted by Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry in the temperature range of 590–690 K and 380–480 K, respectively. The ionic species Te{sub i}{sup +} (i = 1–7) and Se{sub i}{sup +}(g) (i = 1–9) were detected in the mass spectra over these two condensed phases. Measurement of ion intensities were performed as a function of electron impact energy and as a function of temperature (at different electron impact energies) for identifying the gaseous precursor species as well as for determining the partial pressure–temperature relations and sublimation enthalpies for these species. While the major species over elemental tellurium was confirmed to be Te{sub 2}(g) (with all other gaseous species Te{sub 3}–Te{sub 7} put together constituting less than 5%), the major species over elemental selenium was found to be Se{sub 6}(g), closely followed by Se{sub 5}(g) (with other gaseous species Se{sub 2}–Se{sub 4} and Se{sub 7}–Se{sub 9} put together also moderately constituting ∼25%). From the partial pressures, the thermodynamic data for the sublimation reactions i Te(s) = Te{sub i}(g) and i Se(s) = Se{sub i}(g) were deduced by second- and third-law methods. The atomization enthalpies of tellurium and selenium clusters were also deduced by using the recommended enthalpies of formation of monomeric species. Comparison of the findings obtained in the present study with those in previous studies revealed

  5. Characterization of tellurium-based films for NO{sub 2} detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsiulyanu, D. [Technical University, Department of Physics, bul. Dacia 41, MD-2060 Kishinau (Moldova, Republic of)]. E-mail: tsiu@cni.md; Tsiulyanu, A. [Technical University, Department of Physics, bul. Dacia 41, MD-2060 Kishinau (Moldova, Republic of); Liess, H.-D. [University of the Bundeswehr Munich, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Institute of Physics, D-85577 Neubiberg (Germany); Eisele, I. [University of the Bundeswehr Munich, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Institute of Physics, D-85577 Neubiberg (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    Sensing characteristics of tellurium-based thin films for NO{sub 2} monitoring was studied systematically. The influence of contact materials, thermal treatment, temperature and thickness of the samples on the electrical conductivity and sensitivity to NO{sub 2} with respect to scanning electron microscopy analyses is given. The possibility is shown to optimize the properties of the films for the development of a simple and stable NO{sub 2} sensor device with rapid response/recovery time and low operating temperature. The sensing mechanism is discussed for the direct interaction of gaseous species with lone-pair electrons of chalcogen atoms.

  6. Influence of the hydrolysis conditions on the properties of tellurium coatings obtained from hydrochloric acid baths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigelis, V.M.; Kim, G.N.; Navalikhin, L.V.; Kalanov, M.; Abrarov, O.A.

    1982-01-01

    The structure of tellurium coatings has been studied using the methods of activational analysis on fast neutrons, roentgenography using DRON-2. The study is carried out in electrolyte 1N TeO 2 +6NHCl+2NH 2 SO 4 at the temperatures 25 and 95 deg C in the range of current densities 10-150 mA/cm 2 with and without mixing. Atomic content of chlorine and oxygen in deposite depending on the electrolyte work is determined. Nicrohardness, density, specific resistance of the coatings investigated are determined

  7. Test of irradiation of tellurium oxide for obtaining iodine-131 by dry distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanis M, J.

    2003-07-01

    With the purpose of optimizing to the maximum independently the work of the reactor of those mathematical calculations of irradiation that are already optimized, now it corresponds to carry out irradiation tests in the different positions with their respective neutron fluxes that it counts the reactor for samples irradiation. Then, it is necessary to carry out the irradiation of the tellurium dioxide through cycles, with the purpose of observing the activity that it goes accumulating in each cycle and this way to obtain an activity of the Iodine-131 obtained when finishing the last cycle. (Author)

  8. The anti-inflammatory effects of the tellurium redox modulating compound, AS101, are associated with regulation of NFκB signaling pathway and nitric oxide induction in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sredni Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background LPS-activated macrophages produce mediators which are involved in inflammation and tissue injury, and especially those associated with endotoxic shock. The non toxic tellurium compound ammonium tri-chloro(dioxoethylene-O,O'-tellurate, AS101, has been recently shown to exert profound anti-inflammatory properties in animal models, associated with its Te(IV redox chemistry. This study explores the anti-inflammatory properties of AS101 with respect to modulation of inflammatory cytokines production and regulation of iNOS transcription and expression in activated macrophages via targeting the NFkB complex. Results AS101 decreased production of IL-6 and in parallel down-regulated LPS-induced iNOS expression and NO secretion by macrophages. AS101 reduced IkB phosphorylation and degradation, and reduced NFkB nuclear translocalization, albeit these effects were exerted at different kinetics. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that AS101 treatment attenuated p50-subunit ability to bind DNA at the NFkB consensus site in the iNOS promotor following LPS induction. Conclusions Besides AS101, the investigation of therapeutic activities of other tellurium(IV compounds is scarce in the literature, although tellurium is the fourth most abundant trace element in the human body. Since IKK and NFkB may be regulated by thiol modifications, we may thus envisage, inview of our integrated results, that Te(IV compounds, may have important roles in thiol redox biological activity in the human body and represent a new class of anti-inflammatory compounds.

  9. Epidermal Rac1 regulates the DNA damage response and protects from UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis and skin carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Haase, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common type of cancer. Increased expression and activity of Rac1, a small Rho GTPase, has been shown previously in NMSC and other human cancers; suggesting that Rac1 may function as an oncogene in skin. DMBA/TPA skin carcinogenesis studies in mice have shown that Rac1 is required for chemically induced skin papilloma formation. However, UVB radiation by the sun, which causes DNA damage, is the most relevant cause for NMSC. A potential role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far. To investigate this, we irradiated mice with epidermal Rac1 deficiency (Rac1-EKO) and their controls using a well-established protocol for long-term UV-irradiation. Most of the Rac1-EKO mice developed severe skin erosions upon long-term UV-irradiation, unlike their controls. These skin erosions in Rac1-EKO mice healed subsequently. Surprisingly, we observed development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) within the UV-irradiation fields. This shows that the presence of Rac1 in the epidermis protects from UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis. Short-term UV-irradiation experiments revealed increased UV-light-induced apoptosis of Rac1-deficient epidermal keratinocytes in vitro as well as in vivo. Further investigations using cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase transgenic mice revealed that the observed increase in UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis in Rac1-EKO mice is DNA damage dependent and correlates with caspase-8 activation. Furthermore, Rac1-deficient keratinocytes showed reduced levels of p53, γ-H2AX and p-Chk1 suggesting an attenuated DNA damage response upon UV-irradiation. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for a protective role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis and keratinocyte apoptosis probably through regulating mechanisms of the DNA damage response and repair pathways. PMID:28277539

  10. Epidermal Rac1 regulates the DNA damage response and protects from UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis and skin carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Haase, Ingo

    2017-03-09

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common type of cancer. Increased expression and activity of Rac1, a small Rho GTPase, has been shown previously in NMSC and other human cancers; suggesting that Rac1 may function as an oncogene in skin. DMBA/TPA skin carcinogenesis studies in mice have shown that Rac1 is required for chemically induced skin papilloma formation. However, UVB radiation by the sun, which causes DNA damage, is the most relevant cause for NMSC. A potential role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far. To investigate this, we irradiated mice with epidermal Rac1 deficiency (Rac1-EKO) and their controls using a well-established protocol for long-term UV-irradiation. Most of the Rac1-EKO mice developed severe skin erosions upon long-term UV-irradiation, unlike their controls. These skin erosions in Rac1-EKO mice healed subsequently. Surprisingly, we observed development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) within the UV-irradiation fields. This shows that the presence of Rac1 in the epidermis protects from UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis. Short-term UV-irradiation experiments revealed increased UV-light-induced apoptosis of Rac1-deficient epidermal keratinocytes in vitro as well as in vivo. Further investigations using cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase transgenic mice revealed that the observed increase in UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis in Rac1-EKO mice is DNA damage dependent and correlates with caspase-8 activation. Furthermore, Rac1-deficient keratinocytes showed reduced levels of p53, γ-H2AX and p-Chk1 suggesting an attenuated DNA damage response upon UV-irradiation. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for a protective role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis and keratinocyte apoptosis probably through regulating mechanisms of the DNA damage response and repair pathways.

  11. Detection and Analysis of Enamel Cracks by Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Mi-Kyoung; Ku, Hye-Min; Kim, Euiseong; Kim, Hee-Eun; Kwon, Ho-Keun; Kim, Baek-Il

    2016-03-01

    The ability to accurately detect tooth cracks and quantify their depth would allow the prediction of crack progression and treatment success. The aim of this in vitro study was to determine the capabilities of quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) technology in the detection of enamel cracks. Ninety-six extracted human teeth were selected for examining naturally existing or suspected cracked teeth surfaces using a photocuring unit. QLF performed with a digital camera (QLF-D) images were used to assess the ability to detect enamel cracks based on the maximum fluorescence loss value (ΔFmax, %), which was then analyzed using the QLF-D software. A histologic evaluation was then performed in which the samples were sectioned and observed with the aid of a polarized light microscope. The relationship between ΔFmax and the histology findings was assessed based on the Spearman rank correlation. The sensitivity and specificity were calculated to evaluate the validity of using QLF-D to analyze enamel inner-half cracks and cracks extending to the dentin-enamel junction. There was a strong correlation between the results of histologic evaluations of enamel cracks and the ΔFmax value, with a correlation coefficient of 0.84. The diagnostic accuracy of QLF-D had a sensitivity of 0.87 and a specificity of 0.98 for enamel inner-half cracks and a sensitivity of 0.90 and a specificity of 1.0 for cracks extending to the dentin-enamel junction. These results indicate that QLF technology would be a useful clinical tool for diagnosing enamel cracks, especially given that this is a nondestructive method. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Photobiomodulation induced by 670 nm light ameliorates MOG35-55 induced EAE in female C57BL/6 mice: a role for remediation of nitrosative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamaldeen A Muili

    Full Text Available Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is the most commonly studied animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS, a chronic autoimmune demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system. Immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive therapies currently approved for the treatment of MS slow disease progression, but do not prevent it. A growing body of evidence suggests additional mechanisms contribute to disease progression. We previously demonstrated the amelioration of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG-induced EAE in C57BL/6 mice by 670 nm light-induced photobiomodulation, mediated in part by immune modulation. Numerous other studies demonstrate that near-infrared/far red light is therapeutically active through modulation of nitrosoxidative stress. As nitric oxide has been reported to play diverse roles in EAE/MS, and recent studies suggest that axonal loss and progression of disability in MS is mediated by nitrosoxidative stress, we investigated the effect of 670 nm light treatment on nitrosative stress in MOG-induced EAE.Cell culture experiments demonstrated that 670 nm light-mediated photobiomodulation attenuated antigen-specific nitric oxide production by heterogenous lymphocyte populations isolated from MOG immunized mice. Experiments in the EAE model demonstrated down-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS gene expression in the spinal cords of mice with EAE over the course of disease, compared to sham treated animals. Animals receiving 670 nm light treatment also exhibited up-regulation of the Bcl-2 anti-apoptosis gene, an increased Bcl-2:Bax ratio, and reduced apoptosis within the spinal cord of animals over the course of disease. 670 nm light therapy failed to ameliorate MOG-induced EAE in mice deficient in iNOS, confirming a role for remediation of nitrosative stress in the amelioration of MOG-induced EAE by 670 nm mediated photobiomodulation.These data indicate that 670 nm light therapy protects against nitrosative

  13. [Blue-light induced expression of S-adenosy-L-homocysteine hydrolase-like gene in Mucor amphibiorum RCS1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ya; Wang, Shu; Fu, Mingjia; Zhong, Guolin

    2013-09-04

    To determine blue-light induced expression of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase-like (sahhl) gene in fungus Mucor amphibiorum RCS1. In the random process of PCR, a sequence of 555 bp was obtained from M. amphibiorum RCS1. The 555 bp sequence was labeled with digoxin to prepare the probe for northern hybridization. By northern hybridization, the transcription of sahhl gene was analyzed in M. amphibiorum RCS1 mycelia culture process from darkness to blue light to darkness. Simultaneously real-time PCR method was used to the sahhl gene expression analysis. Compared with the sequence of sahh gene from Homo sapiens, Mus musculus and some fungi species, a high homology of the 555 bp sequence was confirmed. Therefore, the preliminary confirmation has supported that the 555 bp sequence should be sahhl gene from M. amphibiorum RCS1. Under the dark pre-culture in 24 h, a large amounts of transcript of sahhl gene in the mycelia can be detected by northern hybridization and real-time PCR in the condition of 24 h blue light. But a large amounts of transcript of sahhl gene were not found in other detection for the dark pre-culture of 48 h, even though M. amphibiorum RCS1 mycelia were induced by blue light. Blue light can induce the expression of sahhl gene in the vigorous growth of M. amphibiorum RCS1 mycelia.

  14. Light induced expression of β-glucosidase in Escherichia coli with autolysis of cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Fei; Zhang, Xianbing; Pan, Yu; Lu, Youxue; Fang, Wei; Fang, Zemin; Xiao, Yazhong

    2017-11-07

    β-Glucosidase has attracted substantial attention in the scientific community because of its pivotal role in cellulose degradation, glycoside transformation and many other industrial processes. However, the tedious and costly expression and purification procedures have severely thwarted the industrial applications of β-glucosidase. Thus development of new strategies to express β-glucosidases with cost-effective and simple procedure to meet the increasing demands on enzymes for biocatalysis is of paramount importance. Light activated cassette YF1/FixJ and the SRRz lysis system were successfully constructed to produce Bgl1A(A24S/F297Y), a mutant β-glucosidase tolerant to both glucose and ethanol. By optimizing the parameters for light induction, Bgl1A(A24S/F297Y) activity reached 33.22 ± 2.0 U/mL and 249.92 ± 12.25 U/mL in 250-mL flask and 3-L fermentation tank, respectively, comparable to the controls of 34.02 ± 1.96 U/mL and 322.21 ± 10.16 U/mL under similar culture conditions with IPTG induction. To further simplify the production of our target protein, the SRRz lysis gene cassette from bacteriophage Lambda was introduced to trigger cell autolysis. As high as 84.53 ± 6.79% and 77.21 ± 4.79% of the total β-glucosidase were released into the lysate after cell autolysis in 250 mL flasks and 3-L scale fermentation with lactose as inducer of SRRz. In order to reduce the cost of protein purification, a cellulose-binding module (CBM) from Clostridium thermocellum was fused into the C-terminal of Bgl1A(A24S/F297Y) and cellulose was used as an economic material to adsorb the fusion enzyme from the lysate. The yield of the fusion protein could reach 92.20 ± 2.27% after one-hour adsorption at 25 °C. We have developed an efficient and inexpensive way to produce β-glucosidase for potential industrial applications by using the combination of light induction, cell autolysis, and CBM purification strategy.

  15. Mechanism of redox reactions induced by light and electron pulse in solutions of mixed ligand iron(II) complex cyanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, A.; Szoeke, J.; Wojnarovits, L.

    1991-01-01

    Redox reactions induced by light and electron pulse have been studied in aqueous solutions of mixed ligand iron(II) complex cyanides. The short lived intermediates have been identified by time resolved specroscopy, the results of detailed kinetic analysis have been discussed. (author) 6 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  16. Light-induced space-charge fields for the structuration of dielectric materials; Lichtinduzierte Raumladungsfelder zur Strukturierung dielektrischer Materialien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggert, H A

    2006-11-15

    Light-induced space-charge fields in lithium-niobate crystals are used for patterning of dielectric materials. This includes tailored ferroelectric domains in the bulk of the crystal, different sorts of micro and nanoparticles on a crystal surface, as well as poling of electrooptic chromophores. A stochastical model is introduced, which can describe the spatial inhomogeneous domain inversion. (orig.)

  17. A role for HVEM, but not lymphotoxin-beta receptor, in LIGHT-induced tumor cell death and chemokine production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasero, Christine; Barbarat, Bernadette; Just-Landi, Sylvaine; Bernard, Alain; Aurran-Schleinitz, Thérèse; Rey, Jérome; Eldering, Eric; Truneh, Alemsedeg; Costello, Régis T.; Olive, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The TNF member LIGHT also known as TL4 or TNFSF14) can play a major role in cancer control via its two receptors; it induces tumor cell death through lymphotoxin-P receptor (LT-beta R) and ligation to the herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) amplifies the immune response. By studying the effect of

  18. Interaction-induced light scattering in a fullerene surrounded by an ultrathin argon 'atmosphere': Molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawid, A.; Gburski, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Using the molecular dynamics method, we have calculated the interaction-induced polarizability correlation functions and spectra of the depolarized light scattering in a C 60 fullerene molecule surrounded by an argon atmosphere. The liquid phase of (C 60 )Ar n (n=36, 40, 44) system has been studied

  19. Direct characterization of ultraviolet-light-induced refractive index structures by scanning near-field optical microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael; Madsen, S.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1998-01-01

    We have applied a reflection scanning near-field optical microscope to directly probe ultraviolet (UV)-light-induced refractive index structures in planar glass samples. This technique permits direct comparison between topography and refractive index changes (10(-5)-10(-3)) with submicrometer...

  20. Do daily and seasonal trends in leaf solar induced fluorescence reflect changes in photosynthesis, growth or light exposure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wyber, R.; Malenovský, Zbyněk; Ashcroft, M. B.; Osmond, C. B.; Robinson, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 6 (2017), č. článku 604. ISSN 2072-4292 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Light induced fluorescence transient * Photosynthetic active radiation * Photosynthetic yield * Pulse amplitude modulation * Remote sensing of vegetation Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) Impact factor: 3.244, year: 2016

  1. Light-induced changes of cubic and uniaxial magnetic aniosotropy in a magnet doped by strongly anisotropic ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zaytseva, I.; Stupakiewicz, A.; Maziewski, A.; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.

    254-255, - (2003), s. 118-120 ISSN 0304-8853. [Soft Magnetic Material Conference ( SMM 15). Bilbao, 05.09.2001-07.09.2001] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : photomagnetic effects * light-induced anisotropy * garnets Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.910, year: 2003

  2. Antioxidant properties of green tea extract protect reduced fat soft cheese against oxidation induced by light exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huvaere, Kevin André Jurgen; Nielsen, Jacob Holm; Bakman, Mette

    2011-01-01

    The effect of two different antioxidants, EDTA and green tea extract (GTE), used individually or in combination, on the light-induced oxidation of reduced fat soft cheeses (0.2 and 6% fat) was investigated. In samples with 0.2% fat, lipid hydroperoxides as primary lipid oxidation products were...

  3. Light-induced retinal injury enhanced neurotrophins secretion and neurotrophic effect of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate neurotrophins expression and neurotrophic effect change in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs under different types of stimulation. METHODS: Rats were exposed in 10,000 lux white light to develop light-induced retinal injury. Supernatants of homogenized retina (SHR, either from normal or light-injured retina, were used to stimulate MSCs. Quantitative real time for polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA were conducted for analysis the expression change in basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF in MSCs after stimulation. Conditioned medium from SHR-stimulated MSCs and control MSCs were collected for evaluation their effect on retinal explants. RESULTS: Supernatants of homogenized retina from light-injured rats significantly promoted neurotrophins secretion from MSCs (p<0.01. Conditioned medium from mesenchymal stem cells stimulated by light-injured SHR significantly reduced DNA fragmentation (p<0.01, up-regulated bcl-2 (p<0.01 and down-regulated bax (p<0.01 in retinal explants, displaying enhanced protective effect. CONCLUSIONS: Light-induced retinal injury is able to enhance neurotrophins secretion from mesenchymal stem cells and promote the neurotrophic effect of mesenchymal stem cells.

  4. Visible light induced electron transfer process over nitrogen doped TiO2 nanocrystals prepared by oxidation of titanium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhongbiao; Dong Fan; Zhao Weirong; Guo Sen

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen doped TiO 2 nanocrystals with anatase and rutile mixed phases were prepared by incomplete oxidation of titanium nitride at different temperatures. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), core level X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (CL XPS), valence band X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (VB XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-vis DRS), and visible light excited photoluminescence (PL). The photocatalytic activity was evaluated for photocatalytic degradation of toluene in gas phase under visible light irradiation. The visible light absorption and photoactivities of these nitrogen doped TiO 2 nanocrystals can be clearly attributed to the change of the additional electronic (N - ) states above the valence band of TiO 2 modified by N dopant as revealed by the VB XPS and visible light induced PL. A band gap structure model was established to explain the electron transfer process over nitrogen doped TiO 2 nanocrystals under visible light irradiation, which was consistent with the previous theoretical and experimental results. This model can also be applied to understand visible light induced photocatalysis over other nonmetal doped TiO 2

  5. Speciation analysis of tellurium by solid-phase extraction in the presence of ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Chunhai; Cai, Qiantao; Guo, Zhong-Xian; Yang, Zhaoguang [Centre for Advanced Water Technology, Innovation Centre (NTU), Singapore (Singapore); Khoo, Soo Beng [Department of Chemistry, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2003-05-01

    Under acidic conditions tellurium(IV) formed a complex with ammonium pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (APDC). The tellurium(IV) complex was completely retained on a non-polar Isolute silica-based octadecyl (C{sub 18}) sorbent-containing solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridge, while the uncomplexed Te(VI) passed through the cartridge and remained as a free species in the solution. Only partial Te(IV) was retained on the SPE cartridge for samples without addition of APDC. On the basis of different retention behaviours of the complexed Te(IV) and uncomplexed Te(VI), a simple and highly sensitive method is proposed for the determination of total tellurium and Te(VI) by SPE separation and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection. The Te(IV) concentration was calculated as the difference between total tellurium and Te(VI) concentrations. The detection limit (3{sigma}) is 3 ng L{sup -1} tellurium. Factors affecting the separation and detection of tellurium species were investigated. Coexisting ions did not show significant interferences with the Te(IV)-APDC complex retention and the subsequent ICP-MS detection of Te. The method has been successfully applied to the tellurium speciation analysis in waters with spiked recoveries for Te(IV) and Te(VI) of 86.0-108% and 87.1-97.4%, respectively. (orig.)

  6. Heat-stress and light-stress induce different cellular pathologies in the symbiotic dinoflagellate during coral bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, C A; McDougall, Kathleen E; Woodley, Cheryl M; Fauth, John E; Richmond, Robert H; Kushmaro, Ariel; Gibb, Stuart W; Loya, Yossi; Ostrander, Gary K; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti

    2013-01-01

    Coral bleaching is a significant contributor to the worldwide degradation of coral reefs and is indicative of the termination of symbiosis between the coral host and its symbiotic algae (dinoflagellate; Symbiodinium sp. complex), usually by expulsion or xenophagy (symbiophagy) of its dinoflagellates. Herein, we provide evidence that during the earliest stages of environmentally induced bleaching, heat stress and light stress generate distinctly different pathomorphological changes in the chloroplasts, while a combined heat- and light-stress exposure induces both pathomorphologies; suggesting that these stressors act on the dinoflagellate by different mechanisms. Within the first 48 hours of a heat stress (32°C) under low-light conditions, heat stress induced decomposition of thylakoid structures before observation of extensive oxidative damage; thus it is the disorganization of the thylakoids that creates the conditions allowing photo-oxidative-stress. Conversely, during the first 48 hours of a light stress (2007 µmoles m(-2) s(-1) PAR) at 25°C, condensation or fusion of multiple thylakoid lamellae occurred coincidently with levels of oxidative damage products, implying that photo-oxidative stress causes the structural membrane damage within the chloroplasts. Exposure to combined heat- and light-stresses induced both pathomorphologies, confirming that these stressors acted on the dinoflagellate via different mechanisms. Within 72 hours of exposure to heat and/or light stresses, homeostatic processes (e.g., heat-shock protein and anti-oxidant enzyme response) were evident in the remaining intact dinoflagellates, regardless of the initiating stressor. Understanding the sequence of events during bleaching when triggered by different environmental stressors is important for predicting both severity and consequences of coral bleaching.

  7. Progranulin, a major secreted protein of mouse adipose-derived stem cells, inhibits light-induced retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Yamauchi, Mika; Sugitani, Sou; Otsuka, Tomohiro; Ohno, Yuta; Nagahara, Yuki; Ikegame, Yuka; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Yoshimura, Shinichi; Iwama, Toru; Hara, Hideaki

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue stromal vascular fraction contains mesenchymal stem cells, which show protective effects when administered to damaged tissues, mainly through secreted trophic factors. We examined the protective effects of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and ASC-conditioned medium (ASC-CM) against retinal damage and identified the neuroprotective factors in ASC-CM. ASCs and mature adipocytes were isolated from mouse subcutaneous tissue. ASCs were injected intravitreally in a mouse model of light-induced retinal damage, and ASC injection recovered retinal function as measured by electroretinogram and inhibited outer nuclear layer, thinning, without engraftment of ASCs. ASC-CM and mature adipocyte-conditioned medium were collected after 72 hours of culture. In vitro, H2O2- and light-induced cell death was reduced in a photoreceptor cell line with ASC-CM but not with mature adipocyte-conditioned medium. In vivo, light-induced photoreceptor damage was evaluated by measurement of outer nuclear layer thickness at 5 days after light exposure and by electroretinogram recording. ASC-CM significantly inhibited photoreceptor degeneration and retinal dysfunction after light exposure. Progranulin was identified as a major secreted protein of ASCs that showed protective effects against retinal damage in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, progranulin phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase, cAMP response element binding protein, and hepatocyte growth factor receptor, and protein kinase C signaling pathways were involved in the protective effects of progranulin. These findings suggest that ASC-CM and progranulin have neuroprotective effects in the light-induced retinal-damage model. Progranulin may be a potential target for the treatment of the degenerative diseases of the retina.

  8. Heat-stress and light-stress induce different cellular pathologies in the symbiotic dinoflagellate during coral bleaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C A Downs

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching is a significant contributor to the worldwide degradation of coral reefs and is indicative of the termination of symbiosis between the coral host and its symbiotic algae (dinoflagellate; Symbiodinium sp. complex, usually by expulsion or xenophagy (symbiophagy of its dinoflagellates. Herein, we provide evidence that during the earliest stages of environmentally induced bleaching, heat stress and light stress generate distinctly different pathomorphological changes in the chloroplasts, while a combined heat- and light-stress exposure induces both pathomorphologies; suggesting that these stressors act on the dinoflagellate by different mechanisms. Within the first 48 hours of a heat stress (32°C under low-light conditions, heat stress induced decomposition of thylakoid structures before observation of extensive oxidative damage; thus it is the disorganization of the thylakoids that creates the conditions allowing photo-oxidative-stress. Conversely, during the first 48 hours of a light stress (2007 µmoles m(-2 s(-1 PAR at 25°C, condensation or fusion of multiple thylakoid lamellae occurred coincidently with levels of oxidative damage products, implying that photo-oxidative stress causes the structural membrane damage within the chloroplasts. Exposure to combined heat- and light-stresses induced both pathomorphologies, confirming that these stressors acted on the dinoflagellate via different mechanisms. Within 72 hours of exposure to heat and/or light stresses, homeostatic processes (e.g., heat-shock protein and anti-oxidant enzyme response were evident in the remaining intact dinoflagellates, regardless of the initiating stressor. Understanding the sequence of events during bleaching when triggered by different environmental stressors is important for predicting both severity and consequences of coral bleaching.

  9. Characterization and role of p53 family members in the symbiont-induced morphogenesis of the Euprymna scolopes light organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Michael S; Crookes-Goodson, Wendy J; Kimbell, Jennifer R; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J

    2006-08-01

    Within hours of hatching, the squid Euprymna scolopes forms a specific light organ symbiosis with the marine luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Interactions with the symbiont result in the loss of a complex ciliated epithelium dedicated to promoting colonization of host tissue, and some or all of this loss is due to widespread, symbiont-induced apoptosis. Members of the p53 family, including p53, p63, and p73, are conserved across broad phyletic lines and p63 is thought to be the ancestral gene. These proteins have been shown to induce apoptosis and developmental morphogenesis. In this study, we characterized p63-like transcripts from mRNA isolated from the symbiotic tissues of E. scolopes and described their role in symbiont-induced morphogenesis. Using degenerate RT-PCR and RACE PCR, we identified two p63-like transcripts encoding proteins of 431 and 567 amino acids. These transcripts shared identical nucleotides where they overlapped, suggesting that they are splice variants of the same gene. Immunocytochemistry and Western blots using an antibody specific for E. scolopes suggested that the p53 family members are activated in cells of the symbiont-harvesting structures of the symbiotic light organ. We propose that once the symbiosis is initiated, a symbiont-induced signal activates p53 family members, inducing apoptosis and developmental morphogenesis of the light organ.

  10. Resource recovery from urban stock, the example of cadmium and tellurium from thin film module recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, F.-G., E-mail: franz-georg.simon@bam.de [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division 4.3 Contaminant Transfer and Environmental Technologies, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Holm, O.; Berger, W. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division 4.3 Contaminant Transfer and Environmental Technologies, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► The semiconductor layer on thin-film photovoltaic modules can be removed from the glass-plate by vacuum blast cleaning. ► The separation of blasting agent and semiconductor can be performed using flotation with a valuable yield of 55%. ► PV modules are a promising source for the recovery of tellurium in the future. - Abstract: Raw material supply is essential for all industrial activities. The use of secondary raw material gains more importance since ore grade in primary production is decreasing. Meanwhile urban stock contains considerable amounts of various elements. Photovoltaic (PV) generating systems are part of the urban stock and recycling technologies for PV thin film modules with CdTe as semiconductor are needed because cadmium could cause hazardous environmental impact and tellurium is a scarce element where future supply might be constrained. The paper describes a sequence of mechanical processing techniques for end-of-life PV thin film modules consisting of sandblasting and flotation. Separation of the semiconductor material from the glass surface was possible, however, enrichment and yield of valuables in the flotation step were non-satisfying. Nevertheless, recovery of valuable metals from urban stock is a viable method for the extension of the availability of limited natural resources.

  11. Ecological aspects of selenium and tellurium in human and animal health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, D V; Ingvoldstad, D

    1975-01-01

    Animal and human studies indicate that selenium inadequacy, in part, underlies various chronic diseases. Epidemiologic evidence suggests that cancer and heart disease are most common where ambient Se availability is low. Plant Se uptake and Se blood levels are inverse to human cancer mortality. As the active group in glutathione peroxidase, Se/sup -2/ inhibits aberrant oxidations which lead to chronic diseases. It binds heavy metals, and with tocopherol maintains tissue integrity. Sulfur dioxide fallout from the atmosphere, resulting from fossil fuel burning, may diminish the nutritional availability of selenium by diminishing plant uptake. Intensive ruminant grazing returns unavailable Se/sup 0/ to soils. Trimethyl selenium ion, as excreted by animals, also appears to be unavailable to plants. Modern fertilization practices and the effect of buildup of sulfates in the soil, due to acid rains, both appear to lessen the availability of Se to plants. SeO/sub 2/ added to the atmosphere from combustion and volcanic activity react with SO/sub 2/ to yield Se/sup 0/. This is presumed to fall out as particles from the air. How traces of Se are otherwise carried in air, explaining its enrichment in some areas, is unknown. The New Zealand experience with Se inadequacy in animals and man may be repeated in other parts of the world. Se inadequacy is far more of a human health problem than Se toxicity. There are no known adverse health effects from tellurium, other than tellurium breath. 164 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Catalytic activity of oxide cerium-molybdenum-tellurium catalysts in oxidation ammonolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhordano, N.; Bart, D.; Madzhori, R.

    1984-01-01

    A commercial catalyst containing a mixture of Ce-, Mo-, Te oxides deposited on SiO 2 is shown to manifest a high efficiency in oxidative ammonolysis of propylene (C 3 - ) to acrylonitrile (AN). The dependence of the catalytic properties on the catalyst composition and reaction conditions is studied. It is established that three-component mixtures are more active and selective than the systems with a lesser number of components. Using the catalyst with the optimum ratio of constituent oxides in a microreactor at 440 deg enabled one to achieve initial selectivity in terms of AN equal to 82.5% at 97% conversion of C 3 - . Acrolein, acetonitrile, HCN and nitrogen oxides are the reaction by-products. A supposition is made that the reaction proceeds via the formation of π-compleXes on the centres of Te(4). Setective oxidation occurs on oxygen atoms bonded with the Mo(6) ions. Tellurium enhances the molybdenum reducibleness due to delocalization of electrons, whereas the cerium addition to the mixture of tellurium- and molybdenum oxides increases the rate of molybdenum reoxidation and thus enhances the catalytic system stability

  13. Determination of tellurium by hydride generation with in situ trapping flame atomic absorption spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matusiewicz, H.; Krawczyk, M. [Politechn Poznanska, Poznan (Poland)

    2007-03-15

    The analytical performance of coupled hydride generation - integrated atom trap (HG-IAT) atomizer flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) system was evaluated for determination of Te in reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment), coal fly ash and garlic. Tellurium, using formation of H{sub 2}Te vapors, is atomized in air-acetylene flame-heated IAT. A new design HG-IAT-FAAS hyphenated technique that would exceed the operational capabilities of existing arrangernents (a water-cooled single silica tube, double-slotted quartz tube or an 'integrated trap') was investigated. An improvement in detection limit was achieved compared with using either of the above atom trapping techniques separately. The concentration detection limit, defined as 3 times the blank standard deviation (3{sigma}), was 0.9 ng mL{sup -1} for Te. For a 2 min in situ preconcentration time (sample volume of 2 mL), sensitivity enhancement compared to flame AAS, was 222 fold, using the hydride generation atom trapping technique. The sensitivity can be further improved by increasing the collection time. The precision, expressed as RSD, was 7.0% (n = 6) for Te. The accuracy of the method was verified using a certified reference material (GBW 07302 Stream Sediment) by aqueous standard calibration curves. The measured Te contents of the reference material was in agreement with the information value. The method was successfully applied to the determination of tellurium in coal fly ash and garlic.

  14. High performance supercapacitor and non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor based on tellurium nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Manikandan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Tellurium nanoparticles (Te Nps were synthesized by wet chemical method and characterized by XRD, Raman, FESEM, TEM, XPS, UV–Vis and FL. The Nps were coated on graphite foil and Glassy carbon electrode to prepare the electrodes for supercapacitor and biosensor applications. The supercapacitor performance is evaluated in 2 M KOH electrolyte by both Cyclic Voltammetry (CV and galvanostatic charge-discharge method. From charge-discharge method, Te Nps show a specific capacitance of 586 F/g at 2 mA/cm2 and 100 F/g at 30 mA/cm2 as well as an excellent cycle life (100% after 1000 cycles. In addition, the H2O2 sensor performance of Te Nps modified glassy carbon electrode is checked by CV and Chronoamperometry (CA in phosphate buffer solution (PBS. In the linear range of 0.67 to 8.04 μM of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, Te NPs show a high sensitivity of 0.83 mA mM−1 cm−2 with a correlation coefficient of 0.995. The detection limit is 0.3 μM with a response time less than 5 s. Keywords: Tellurium nanoparticles, Supercapacitor, Biosensor, Hydrogen peroxide

  15. Equilibrium evaporation test of lead-bismuth eutectic and of tellurium in lead-bismuth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Shuji; Nishimura, Masahiro; Hamada, Hirotsugu; Miyahara, Shinya; Sasa, Toshinobu; Kurata, Yuji

    2005-01-01

    A series of equilibrium evaporation experiment was performed to acquire the essential and the fundamental knowledge about the transfer behavior of lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and impurity tellurium in LBE from liquid to gas phase. The experiments were conducted using the transpiration method in which saturated vapor in an isothermal evaporation pot was transported by inert carrier gas and collected outside of the pot. The size of the used evaporation pot is 8 cm inner diameter and 15 cm length. The weight of the LBE pool in the pot is about 500 g. The investigated temperature range was 450degC to 750degC. From this experiment and discussion using the data in literature, we have obtained several instructive and useful data on the LBE evaporation behavior such as saturated vapor pressure of LBE, vapor concentration of Pb, Bi and Bi 2 in LBE saturated gas phase, and activity coefficient of Pb in the LBE. The LBE vapor pressure equation is represented as the sum of Pb, Bi and Bi 2 vapor in the temperature range between 550degC and 750degC as logP[Pa]=10.2-10100/T[k]. The gas-liquid equilibrium partition coefficient of tellurium in LBE is in the range of 10 to 100, with no remarkable temperature dependency between 450degC and 750degC. This research was founded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT). (author)

  16. Improvement of physical properties of ZnO thin films by tellurium doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sönmezoğlu, Savaş, E-mail: svssonmezoglu@kmu.edu.tr; Akman, Erdi

    2014-11-01

    Highlights: • We report the synthesis of tellurium-doped zinc oxide (Te–ZnO) thin films using sol–gel method. • Highly c-axis oriented Te-doped ZnO thin films were grown on FTO glasses as substrate. • 1.5% Te-doping ratio could improve the physical properties of ZnO thin films. - Abstract: This investigation addressed the structural, optical and morphological properties of tellurium incorporated zinc oxide (Te–ZnO) thin films. The obtained results indicated that Te-doped ZnO thin films exhibit an enhancement of band gap energy and crystallinity compared with non-doped films. The optical transmission spectra revealed a shift in the absorption edge toward lower wavelengths. X-ray diffraction measurement demonstrated that the film was crystallized in the hexagonal (wurtzite) phase and presented a preferential orientation along the c-axis. The XRD obtained patterns indicate that the crystallite size of the thin films, ranging from 23.9 to 49.1 nm, changed with the Te doping level. The scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy results demonstrated that the grain size and surface roughness of the thin films increased as the Te concentration increased. Most significantly, we demonstrate that it is possible to control the structural, optical and morphological properties of ZnO thin films with the isoelectronic Te-incorporation level.

  17. Tellurium labeled analogues of the fatty acid hexadecenoic acid for imaging of myocardial tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, S.L.

    1980-01-01

    Non-invasive nuclear diagnostic procedures for the evaluation of acute myocardial infarction and ischemia are currently limited by problems associated with the availablity of radiopharmaceuticals, development of imaging equipment, and inherent characteristics of radionuclides. Myocardial tissue requires high levels of substrates which provide energy for the continuous functioning of this vital organ. Of the major sources of energy, the most utilized source is fatty acids. Tellurium-123m, with excellent gamma imaging characteristics was chosen as the radionuclide. A 16 carbon fatty acid, hexadecenoic acid, was chosen as the carrier molecule. The tellurium-123m fatty acid radiopharmaceuticals were formulated either in a solution of 20 percent ethanol, two percent polysorbate 80, and brought to volume with normal saline or in 12.5 percent human serum ablumin and brought to volume with normal saline. Biodistribution was performed in three animal species: Sprague-Dawley rats (three rats per time frame), Australian white rabbits (three rabbits per time frame), and mongrel dogs (one dog per time frame). Dosimetry calculations were performed to assess the radiation dose

  18. Microbial-assisted synthesis and evaluation the cytotoxic effect of tellurium nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forootanfar, Hamid [Herbal and Traditional Medicines Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amirpour-Rostami, Sahar; Jafari, Mandana [Pharmaceutics Research Center, Institute of Neuropharmacology, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Forootanfar, Amir [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Yousefizadeh, Zahra [The Student Research Committee, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shakibaie, Mojtaba, E-mail: shakiba@kmu.ac.ir [Pharmaceutics Research Center, Institute of Neuropharmacology, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    The present study was designed to isolate bacterial strain capable of tellurium nanorods' (Te NRs) production followed by purification and evaluation of the cytotoxic effect of Te NRs. Among 25 environmental samples collected for screening of Te NR-producer bacterial strains one bacterial colony (isolated from hot spring and identified as Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes strain Te) was selected and applied for biosynthesis of Te NRs. Thereafter, an organic–aqueous partitioning system was applied for the purification of the biogenic Te NRs and the purified Te NRs were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), UV–visible spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. The cytotoxic effect of biologically synthesized Te NRs and potassium tellurite on four cell lines of MCF-7, HT1080, HepG2 and A549 was then determined using the MTT assay method. The obtained results revealed lower toxicity for the rod-shaped biogenic tellurium nanostructures (~ 22 nm diameter by 185 nm length) compared to K{sub 2}TeO{sub 3}. - Highlights: • Te NR producing bacterial strain were isolated from hot springs. • Organic–aqueous partitioning system was applied for purification of Te nanorods. • The rod-shaped biogenic Te NPs showed lower cytotoxicity compared to K{sub 2}TeO{sub 3}.

  19. Microbial-assisted synthesis and evaluation the cytotoxic effect of tellurium nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forootanfar, Hamid; Amirpour-Rostami, Sahar; Jafari, Mandana; Forootanfar, Amir; Yousefizadeh, Zahra; Shakibaie, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to isolate bacterial strain capable of tellurium nanorods' (Te NRs) production followed by purification and evaluation of the cytotoxic effect of Te NRs. Among 25 environmental samples collected for screening of Te NR-producer bacterial strains one bacterial colony (isolated from hot spring and identified as Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes strain Te) was selected and applied for biosynthesis of Te NRs. Thereafter, an organic–aqueous partitioning system was applied for the purification of the biogenic Te NRs and the purified Te NRs were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), UV–visible spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. The cytotoxic effect of biologically synthesized Te NRs and potassium tellurite on four cell lines of MCF-7, HT1080, HepG2 and A549 was then determined using the MTT assay method. The obtained results revealed lower toxicity for the rod-shaped biogenic tellurium nanostructures (~ 22 nm diameter by 185 nm length) compared to K 2 TeO 3 . - Highlights: • Te NR producing bacterial strain were isolated from hot springs. • Organic–aqueous partitioning system was applied for purification of Te nanorods. • The rod-shaped biogenic Te NPs showed lower cytotoxicity compared to K 2 TeO 3

  20. Resource recovery from urban stock, the example of cadmium and tellurium from thin film module recycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, F.-G.; Holm, O.; Berger, W.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The semiconductor layer on thin-film photovoltaic modules can be removed from the glass-plate by vacuum blast cleaning. ► The separation of blasting agent and semiconductor can be performed using flotation with a valuable yield of 55%. ► PV modules are a promising source for the recovery of tellurium in the future. - Abstract: Raw material supply is essential for all industrial activities. The use of secondary raw material gains more importance since ore grade in primary production is decreasing. Meanwhile urban stock contains considerable amounts of various elements. Photovoltaic (PV) generating systems are part of the urban stock and recycling technologies for PV thin film modules with CdTe as semiconductor are needed because cadmium could cause hazardous environmental impact and tellurium is a scarce element where future supply might be constrained. The paper describes a sequence of mechanical processing techniques for end-of-life PV thin film modules consisting of sandblasting and flotation. Separation of the semiconductor material from the glass surface was possible, however, enrichment and yield of valuables in the flotation step were non-satisfying. Nevertheless, recovery of valuable metals from urban stock is a viable method for the extension of the availability of limited natural resources

  1. Light-induced ultrafast phase transitions in VO2 thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lysenko, S.; Rua, A.J.; Vikhnin, V.; Jimenez, J.; Fernandez, F.; Liu, H.

    2006-01-01

    Vanadium dioxide shows a passive and reversible change from a monoclinic insulator phase to a metallic tetragonal rutile structure when the sample temperature is close to and over 68 deg. C. As a kind of functional material, VO 2 thin films deposited on fused quartz substrates were successfully prepared by the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. With laser illumination at 400 nm on the obtained films, the phase transition (PT) occurred. The observed light-induced PT was as fast as the laser pulse duration of 100 fs. Using a femtosecond laser system, the relaxation processes in VO 2 were studied by optical pump-probe spectroscopy. Upon a laser excitation an instantaneous response in the transient reflectivity and transmission was observed followed by a relatively longer relaxation process. The alteration is dependent on pump power. The change in reflectance reached a maximum value at a pump pulse energy between 7 and 14 mJ/cm 2 . The observed PT is associated with the optical interband transition in VO 2 thin film. It suggests that with a pump laser illuminating on the film, excitation from the d θ,ε - state of valence band to the unoccupied excited mixed d θ,ε -π* - state of the conduction band in the insulator phase occurs, followed by a resonant transition to an unoccupied excited mixed d θ,ε -π* - state of the metallic phase band

  2. Theoretical approach to study the light particles induced production routes of 22Na

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eslami, M.; Kakavand, T.; Mirzaii, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Excitation function of 22 Na via thirty-three various reactions. • Various theoretical frameworks along with adjustments are employed in the calculations. • The results are given at energy range from the threshold up to 100 MeV. • The results are compared with each other and corresponding experimental data. - Abstract: To create a roadmap for the industrial-scale production of sodium-22, various production routes of this radioisotope involving light charged-particle-induced reactions at the bombarding energy range of threshold to a maximum of 100 MeV have been calculated. The excitation functions are calculated by using various nuclear models. Reaction pre-equilibrium process calculations have been made in the framework of the hybrid and geometry dependent hybrid models using ALICE/ASH code, and in the framework of the exciton model using TALYS-1.4 code. To calculate the compound nucleus evaporation process, both Weisskopf–Ewing and Hauser–Feshbach theories have been employed. The cross sections have also separately been estimated with five different level density models at the whole projectile energies. A comparison with calculations based on the codes, on one hand, and experimental data, on the other hand, is arranged and discussed

  3. Use of quantitative light-induced fluorescence to monitor tooth whitening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaechi, Bennett T.; Higham, Susan M.

    2001-04-01

    The changing of tooth shade by whitening agents occurs gradually. Apart from being subjective and affected by the conditions of the surroundings, visual observation cannot detect a very slight change in tooth color. An electronic method, which can communicate the color change quantitatively, would be more reliable. Quantitative Light- induced Fluorescence (QLF) was developed to detect and assess dental caries based on the phenomenon of change of autofluorescence of a tooth by demineralization. However, stains on the tooth surface exhibit the same phenomenon, and therefore QLF can be used to measure the percentage fluorescence change of stained enamel with respect to surrounding unstained enamel. The present study described a technique of assessing the effect of a tooth-whitening agent using QLF. This was demonstrated in two experiments in which either wholly or partially stained teeth were whitened by intermittent immersion in sodium hypochlorite. Following each immersion, the integrated fluorescence change due to the stain was quantified using QLF. In either situation, the value of (Delta) Q decreased linearly as the tooth regained its natural shade. It was concluded that gradual changing of the shade of discolored teeth by a whitening agent could be quantified using QLF.

  4. Quantification of high-power ultrasound induced damage on potato starch granules using light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yue Yue J; Hébraud, Pascal; Hemar, Yacine; Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2012-05-01

    A simple light microscopic technique was developed in order to quantify the damage inflicted by high-power low-frequency ultrasound (0-160 W, 20 kHz) treatment on potato starch granules in aqueous dispersions. The surface properties of the starch granules were modified using ethanol and SDS washing methods, which are known to displace proteins and lipids from the surface of the starch granules. The study showed that in the case of normal and ethanol-washed potato starch dispersions, two linear regions were observed. The number of defects first increased linearly with an increase in ultrasound power up to a threshold level. This was then followed by another linear dependence of the number of defects on the ultrasound power. The power threshold where the change-over occurred was higher for the ethanol-washed potato dispersions compared to non-washed potato dispersions. In the case of SDS-washed potato starch, although the increase in defects was linear with the ultrasound power, the power threshold for a second linear region was not observed. These results are discussed in terms of the different possible mechanisms of cavitation induced-damage (hydrodynamic shear stresses and micro-jetting) and by taking into account the hydrophobicity of the starch granule surface. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Light induced heterogeneous ozone processing on the pesticides adsorbed on silica particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socorro, J.; Désert, M.; Quivet, E.; Gligorovski, S.; Wortham, H.

    2013-12-01

    In France, in 2010, the sales of pesticides reached 1.8 billion euros for 61 900 tons of active ingredients, positioning France as a first European consumer of pesticides, as reported by the European Crop Protection Association. About 19 million hectares of crops are sprayed annually with pesticides, i.e., 35% of the total surface area of France. This corresponds to an average pesticide dose of 3.2 kg ha-1. The consumption of herbicide and fungicide is favoured in comparison to the use of insecticides in France and the other European countries, as well. The partitioning of pesticides between the gas and particulate phases influences the atmospheric fate of these compounds such as their photo-chemical degradation. There is much uncertainty concerning the behavior of the pesticides in the atmosphere. Especially, there is a gap of knowledge concerning the degradation of the pesticides induced by heterogeneous reactions in absence and especially in presence of solar light. Considering that most of the pesticides currently used are semi-volatile, it is of crucial importance to investigate the heterogeneous reactivity of particulate pesticides with light and with atmospheric oxidants such as ozone and OH radical. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the light induced heterogeneous ozonation of suspended pesticide particles. 8 pesticides (cyprodinil, deltamethrin, difenoconazole, fipronil, oxadiazon, pendimethalin, permethrin and tetraconazole) were chosen for their physico-chemical properties and their concentration levels in the PACA (Région Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur) region, France. Silica particles with well-known properties were chosen as model particles of atmospheric relevance. Kinetic rate constants were determined to allow estimate the atmospheric lifetimes relating to ozone. The rate constants were determined as follows: k = (6.6 × 0.2) 10-19, (7.2 × 0.3) 10-19, (5.1 × 0.5) 10-19, (3.9 × 0.3) 10-19 [cm3 molecules-1 s-1] for Cyprodinil

  6. Effect of AC magnetic fields on ultraviolet light-induced mutation and mitotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ager, D.D.; Radul, J.A.

    1994-01-01

    The ability of 60-Hz magnetic fields to induce genetic damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied. The frequencies of induced mutation, gene conversion, and reciprocal mitotic crossing over were measured for exposures to 1-millitesla magnetic fields alone or in combination with various preliminary exposures to 254-nm ultraviolet light at intensities of 2-50 J/m 2 . These experiments were performed using a repair-proficient strain as well as a strain incapable of excising ultraviolet-induced thymine dimers. Magnetic field exposures did not induce mutation, gene conversion, or reciprocal mitotic crossing over in either of these strains, nor did the fields influence the frequencies of ultraviolet-induced genetic events. 32 refs., 4 tabs

  7. The influence of composition of fluoride electrolytes and conditions of the electrodeposition on some properties of tellurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugelis, V.M.; Kum, G.N.; Abrarov, O.A.; Madumarov, A.; Navalikhin, L.V.; Ajnakulov, Eh.B.

    1981-01-01

    Effect of electrolytic bath content, cathode current density, illumination and temperature on specific resistance, photosensitivity, structure and chemical purity of plated tellurium coatings is studied. Deposition is realized from moderately acid fluoride electrolytes at the constant temperature with a platinum working electrode. X-ray studies of precipitates obtained are carried out

  8. Exploratory studies of element substitutions in synthetic tetrahedrite. Part II. Selenium and tellurium as anions in Zn-Fe tetrahedrites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karup-Møller, Sven; Makovicky, E.

    1999-01-01

    -free) compositons do not materialize. The substituted Se tetrahedrite coexists with Cu3SbSe3, (iron-bearing) Cu2-xSe, Cu3SbSe4 plus/minus low Zn-sulfide melt. Selenium does not adopt the role of cation and tellurium that of anion in the tetrahedrite structure. The explanation of the severely restricted composition...

  9. The enhancing of Au-Ag-Te content in tellurium-bearing ore mineral by bio-oxidation-leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, PyeongMan; Kim, HyunSoo; Myung, EunJi; Kim, YoonJung; Lee, YongBum; Park*, CheonYoung

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to enhance the content of valuable metals such as Au-Ag-Te in tellurium-bearing minerals by bio-oxidation-leaching. It was confirmed that pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite and galena were produced together with tellurium-bearing minerals including hessite, sylvanite and tellurobismuthite from ore minerals and concentrates through microscopic observation and SEM/EDS analysis. In a bio-oxidation-leaching experiment, with regard to Au, Ag, Te, Cu and Fe, the changes in the amount of leaching and the content of leaching residues were compared and analyzed with each other depending on the adaptation of an indigenous microbe identified as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. As a result of the experiment, the Au-Ag-Te content in tellurium-bearing ore mineral was enhanced in the order of physical oxidation leaching, physical/non-adaptive bio-oxidation-leaching and physical/adaptive biological leaching. It suggests that the bio-oxidation-leaching using microbes adapted in tellurium-bearing ore mineral can be used as a pre-treatment and a main process in a recovery process of valuable metals. "This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education(NRF-2013R1A1A2004898)"

  10. Phenylethynyl-butyltellurium inhibits the sulfhydryl enzyme Na+, K+ -ATPase: an effect dependent on the tellurium atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quines, Caroline B; Rosa, Suzan G; Neto, José S S; Zeni, Gilson; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2013-11-01

    Organotellurium compounds are known for their toxicological effects. These effects may be associated with the chemical structure of these compounds and the oxidation state of the tellurium atom. In this context, 2-phenylethynyl-butyltellurium (PEBT) inhibits the activity of the sulfhydryl enzyme, δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase. The present study investigated on the importance of the tellurium atom in the PEBT ability to oxidize mono- and dithiols of low molecular weight and sulfhydryl enzymes in vitro. PEBT, at high micromolar concentrations, oxidized dithiothreitol (DTT) and inhibited cerebral Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity, but did not alter the lactate dehydrogenase activity. The inhibition of cerebral Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity was completely restored by DTT. By contrast, 2-phenylethynyl-butyl, a molecule without the tellurium atom, neither oxidized DTT nor altered the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity. In conclusion, the tellurium atom of PEBT is crucial for the catalytic oxidation of sulfhydryl groups from thiols of low molecular weight and from Na(+), K(+)-ATPase.

  11. Extraction-spectrophotometric method for silicon determination in high-purity substances. 1. Silicon determination in tellurium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaburova, V P; Yudelevich, I G [AN SSSR, Novosibirsk (USSR). Inst. Neorganicheskoj Khimii

    1989-01-01

    The extraction-spectrophotometric method for silicon determination in tellurium based on extraction isolation of the base by tributyl phosphate from hydrochloride solutions and with addition of HNO/sub 3/ and spectrophotometric silicon determination using malachite green is developed. The method permits to determine 2x10/sup -1/-3x10/sup -4/ % Si.

  12. Effects of RGD immobilization on light-induced cell sheet detachment from TiO{sub 2} nanodots films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Kui; Wang, Tiantian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Yu, Mengliu [The Affiliated Stomatologic Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310003 (China); Wan, Hongping [School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Lin, Jun [The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310003 (China); Weng, Wenjian, E-mail: wengwj@zju.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Cyrus Tang Center for Sensor Materials and Applications, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); The Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Wang, Huiming, E-mail: hmwang1960@hotmail.com [The Affiliated Stomatologic Hospital, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310003 (China); The First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310003 (China)

    2016-06-01

    Light-induced cell detachment is reported to be a safe and effective cell sheet harvest method. In the present study, the effects of arginine–glycine–aspartic acid (RGD) immobilization on cell growth, cell sheet construction and cell harvest through light illumination are investigated. RGD was first immobilized on TiO{sub 2} nanodots films through simple physical adsorption, and then mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were seeded on the films. It was found that RGD immobilization promoted cell adhesion and proliferation. It was also observed that cells cultured on RGD immobilized films showed relatively high level of pan-cadherin. Cells harvested with ultraviolet illumination (365 nm) showed good viability on both RGD immobilized and unmodified TiO{sub 2} nanodot films. Single cell detachment assay showed that cells detached more quickly on RGD immobilized TiO{sub 2} nanodot films. That could be ascribed to the RGD release after UV365 illumination. The current study demonstrated that RGD immobilization could effectively improve both the cellular responses and light-induced cell harvest. - Highlights: • RGD immobilization on TiO{sub 2} nanodots film favors light-induced cell sheet detachment. • Physically adsorbed RGD detaches from the film through ultraviolet illumination. • RGD detachment promotes cells and cell sheets detachment.

  13. Effect of Locomotor Respiratory Coupling Induced by Cortical Oxygenated Hemoglobin Levels During Cycle Ergometer Exercise of Light Intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyanagi, Keiichi; Tsubaki, Atsuhiro; Yasufuku, Yuichi; Takai, Haruna; Kera, Takeshi; Tamaki, Akira; Iwata, Kentaro; Onishi, Hideaki

    This study aimed to clarify the effects of locomotor-respiratory coupling (LRC) induced by light load cycle ergometer exercise on oxygenated hemoglobin (O2Hb) in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), supplementary motor area (SMA), and sensorimotor cortex (SMC). The participants were 15 young healthy adults (9 men and 6 women, mean age: 23.1 ± 1.8 (SEM) years). We conducted a task in both LRC-inducing and LRC-non-inducing conditions for all participants. O2Hb was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy. The LRC frequency ratio during induction was 2:1; pedaling rate, 50 rpm; and intensity of load, 30 % peak volume of oxygen uptake. The test protocol included a 3-min rest prior to exercise, steady loading motion for 10 min, and 10-min rest post exercise (a total of 23 min). In the measurement of O2Hb, we focused on the DLPFC, SMA, and SMC. The LRC frequency was significantly higher in the LRC-inducing condition (p < 0.05). O2Hb during exercise was significantly lower in the DLPFC and SMA, under the LRC-inducing condition (p < 0.05). The study revealed that even light load could induce LRC and that O2Hb in the DLPFC and SMA decreases during exercise via LRC induction.

  14. Delay of constant light-induced persistent vaginal estrus by 24-hour time cues in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, A L; Adler, N T

    1979-04-20

    The normal ovarian cycle of female rats is typically replaced by persistent estrus when these animals are housed under constant light. Evidence presented here shows that the maintenance of periodicity in the environment can at least delay (if not prevent) the photic induction of persistent vaginal estrus. Female rats in constant light were exposed to vaginal smearing at random times or at the same time every day. In another experiment, female rats were exposed to either constant bright light, constant dim light, or a 24-hour photic cycle of bright and dim light. The onset of persistent vaginal estrus was delayed in rats exposed to 24-hour time cues even though the light intensities were the same as or greater than those for the aperiodic control groups. The results suggest that the absence of 24-hour time cues in constant light contributes to the induction of persistent estrus.

  15. Residual Stress Induced Mechanical Property Enhancement in Steel Encapsulated Light Metal Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fudger, Sean James

    Macro hybridized systems consisting of steel encapsulated light metal matrix composites (MMCs) were produced with the goal of creating a low cost/light weight composite system with enhanced mechanical properties. MMCs are frequently incorporated into advanced material systems due to their tailorable material properties. However, they often have insufficient ductility for many structural applications. The macro hybridized systems take advantage of the high strength, modulus, and damage tolerance of steels and high specific stiffness and low density of MMCs while mitigating the high density of steels and the poor ductility of MMCs. Furthermore, a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch induced residual compressive stress method is utilized as a means of improving the ductility of the MMCs and overall efficiency of the macro hybridized systems. Systems consisting of an A36, 304 stainless steel, or NitronicRTM 50 stainless steel shell filled with an Al-SiC, Al-Al2O3, or Mg-B4C MMC are evaluated in this work. Upon cooling from processing temperatures, residual strains are generated due to a CTE mismatch between each of the phases. The resulting systems offer higher specific properties and a more structurally efficient system can be attained. Mechanical testing was performed and improvements in yield stress, ultimate tensile stress, and ductility were observed. However, the combination of these dissimilar materials often results in the formation of intermetallic compounds. In certain loading situations, these typically brittle intermetallic layers can result in degraded performance. X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS), and Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) are utilized to characterize the intermetallic layer formation at the interface between the steel and MMC. As the residual stress condition in each phase has a large impact on the mechanical property improvement, accurate quantification of these strains/stresses is

  16. Multi-property isotropic intermolecular potentials and predicted spectral lineshapes of collision-induced absorption (CIA), collision-induced light scattering (CILS) and collision-induced hyper-Rayleigh scattering (CIHR) for H2sbnd Ne, -Kr and -Xe

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kader, M. S. A.; Godet, J.-L.; Gustafsson, M.; Maroulis, G.

    2018-04-01

    Quantum mechanical lineshapes of collision-induced absorption (CIA), collision-induced light scattering (CILS) and collision-induced hyper-Rayleigh scattering (CIHR) at room temperature (295 K) are computed for gaseous mixtures of molecular hydrogen with neon, krypton and xenon. The induced spectra are detected using theoretical values for induced dipole moment, pair-polarizability trace and anisotropy, hyper-polarizability and updated intermolecular potentials. Good agreement is observed for all spectra when the literature and the present potentials which are constructed from the transport and thermo-physical properties are used.

  17. Effect of melatonin on monochromatic light-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation in the thymus of chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fuju; Reheman, Aikebaier; Cao, Jing; Wang, Zixu; Dong, Yulan; Zhang, Yuxian; Chen, Yaoxing

    2016-08-01

    A total of 360 post-hatching day 0 (P0) Arbor Acre male broilers, including intact, sham operation and pinealectomy groups, were exposed to white light (WL), red light (RL), green light (GL) and blue light (BL) from a light-emitting diode (LED) system until for P14. We studied the effects of melatonin and its receptors on monochromatic light-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation in the thymus of broilers. The density of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) cells and the proliferation of T-lymphocytes in response to Concanavalin A (ConA) in GL significantly increased both in vivo and in vitro (from 9.57% to 32.03% and from 34.30% to 50.53%, respectively) compared with other lights (p<0.005) and was strongly correlated with melatonin levels in plasma (p<0.005). Pinealectomy reduced the levels of circulatory melatonin and the proliferation of T-lymphocytes and eliminated the differences between GL and other lights (p<0.005). However, exogenous melatonin (10(-9)M) significantly increased the proliferative activity of T-lymphocyte by 9.64% (p=0.002). In addition, GL significantly increased mRNA expression levels of Mel1a, Mel1b and Mel1c receptors from 21.09% to 32.57%, and protein expression levels from 24.43% to 42.92% compared with RL (p<0.05). However, these effects were blocked after pinealectomy. Furthermore, 4P-PDOT (a selective Mel1b antagonist) and prazosin (a selective Mel1c antagonist) attenuated GL-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation in response to ConA (p=0.000). Luzindole (a nonselective Mel1a/Mel1b antagonist), however, did not induce these effects (p=0.334). These results suggest that melatonin may mediate GL-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation via the Mel1b and Mel1c receptors but not via the Mel1a receptor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Loss of Melanopsin Photoreception and Antagonism of the Histamine H3 Receptor by Ciproxifan Inhibit Light-Induced Sleep in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanuel Muindi

    Full Text Available Light has direct effects on sleep and wakefulness causing arousal in diurnal animals and sleep in nocturnal animals. In the present study, we assessed the modulation of light-induced sleep by melanopsin and the histaminergic system by exposing mice to millisecond light flashes and continuous light respectively. First, we show that the induction of sleep by millisecond light flashes is dose dependent as a function of light flash number. We found that exposure to 60 flashes of light occurring once every 60 seconds for 1-h (120-ms of total light over an hour induced a similar amount of sleep as a continuous bright light pulse. Secondly, the induction of sleep by millisecond light flashes was attenuated in the absence of melanopsin when animals were presented with flashes occurring every 60 seconds over a 3-h period beginning at ZT13. Lastly, the acute administration of a histamine H3 autoreceptor antagonist, ciproxifan, blocked the induction of sleep by a 1-h continuous light pulse during the dark period. Ciproxifan caused a decrease in NREMS delta power and an increase in theta activity during both sleep and wake periods respectively. The data suggest that some form of temporal integration occurs in response to millisecond light flashes, and that this process requires melanopsin photoreception. Furthermore, the pharmacological data suggest that the increase of histaminergic neurotransmission is sufficient to attenuate the light-induced sleep response during the dark period.

  19. Laser light scattering in a laser-induced argon plasma: Investigations of the shock wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokrzywka, B. [Obserwatorium Astronomiczne na Suhorze, Uniwersytet Pedagogiczny, ulica Podchorazych 2, 30-084 Krakow (Poland); Mendys, A., E-mail: agata.mendys@uj.edu.pl [Instytut Fizyki im. M. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Dzierzega, K.; Grabiec, M. [Instytut Fizyki im. M. Smoluchowskiego, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ulica Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Pellerin, S. [GREMI, site de Bourges, Universite d' Orleans, CNRS, rue Gaston Berger BP 4043, 18028 Bourges (France)

    2012-08-15

    Shock wave produced by a laser induced spark in argon at atmospheric pressure was examined using Rayleigh and Thomson scattering. The spark was generated by focusing a laser pulse from the second harmonic ({lambda} = 532 nm) of a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser using an 80 mm focal length lens, with a fluence of 2 kJ{center_dot}cm{sup -2}. Images of the spark emission were recorded for times between 30 ns and 100 {mu}s after the laser pulse in order to characterize its spatial evolution. The position of the shock wave at several instants of its evolution and for several plasma regions was determined from the Rayleigh-scattered light of another nanosecond Nd:YAG laser (532 nm, 40 J{center_dot}cm{sup -2} fluence). Simultaneously, Thomson scattering technique was applied to determine the electron density and temperature in the hot plasma core. Attempts were made to describe the temporal evolution of the shock wave within a self-similar model, both by the simple Sedov-Taylor formula as well as its extension deduced by de Izarra. The temporal radial evolution of the shock position is similar to that obtained within theory taking into account the counter pressure of the ambient gas. Density profiles just behind the shock front are in qualitative agreement with those obtained by numerically solving the Euler equations for instantaneous explosion at a point with counter pressure. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated shock wave evolution by Rayleigh scattering method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2D map of shockwave position for several times after plasma generation is presented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Shock wave evolution is not satisfactorily described within self-similar models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evolution of shock position similar to theory taking into account counter pressure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Density profile behind the shock similar to numerical solution of Euler equations.

  20. An ancestral haplotype of the human PERIOD2 gene associates with reduced sensitivity to light-induced melatonin suppression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tokiho Akiyama

    Full Text Available Humans show various responses to the environmental stimulus in individual levels as "physiological variations." However, it has been unclear if these are caused by genetic variations. In this study, we examined the association between the physiological variation of response to light-stimulus and genetic polymorphisms. We collected physiological data from 43 subjects, including light-induced melatonin suppression, and performed haplotype analyses on the clock genes, PER2 and PER3, exhibiting geographical differentiation of allele frequencies. Among the haplotypes of PER3, no significant difference in light sensitivity was found. However, three common haplotypes of PER2 accounted for more than 96% of the chromosomes in subjects, and 1 of those 3 had a significantly low-sensitive response to light-stimulus (P < 0.05. The homozygote of the low-sensitive PER2 haplotype showed significantly lower percentages of melatonin suppression (P < 0.05, and the heterozygotes of the haplotypes varied their ratios, indicating that the physiological variation for light-sensitivity is evidently related to the PER2 polymorphism. Compared with global haplotype frequencies, the haplotype with a low-sensitive response was more frequent in Africans than in non-Africans, and came to the root in the phylogenetic tree, suggesting that the low light-sensitive haplotype is the ancestral type, whereas the other haplotypes with high sensitivity to light are the derived types. Hence, we speculate that the high light-sensitive haplotypes have spread throughout the world after the Out-of-Africa migration of modern humans.

  1. Infrared rotational light curves on Jupiter induced by wave activities and cloud patterns andimplications on brown dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Huazhi; Zhang, Xi; Fletcher, Leigh; Orton, Glenn S.; Sinclair, James Andrew; Fernandes,, Joshua; Momary, Thomas W.; Warren, Ari; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Sato, Takao M.; Fujiyoshi, Takuya

    2017-10-01

    Many brown dwarfs exhibit infrared rotational light curves with amplitude varying from a fewpercent to twenty percent (Artigau et al. 2009, ApJ, 701, 1534; Radigan et al. 2012, ApJ, 750,105). Recently, it was claimed that weather patterns, especially planetary-scale waves in thebelts and cloud spots, are responsible for the light curves and their evolutions on brown dwarfs(Apai et al. 2017, Science, 357, 683). Here we present a clear relationship between the direct IRemission maps and light curves of Jupiter at multiple wavelengths, which might be similar withthat on cold brown dwarfs. Based on infrared disk maps from Subaru/COMICS and VLT/VISIR,we constructed full maps of Jupiter and rotational light curves at different wavelengths in thethermal infrared. We discovered a strong relationship between the light curves and weatherpatterns on Jupiter. The light curves also exhibit strong multi-bands phase shifts and temporalvariations, similar to that detected on brown dwarfs. Together with the spectra fromTEXES/IRTF, our observations further provide detailed information of the spatial variations oftemperature, ammonia clouds and aerosols in the troposphere of Jupiter (Fletcher et al. 2016,Icarus, 2016 128) and their influences on the shapes of the light curves. We conclude that waveactivities in Jupiter’s belts (Fletcher et al. 2017, GRL, 44, 7140), cloud holes, and long-livedvortices such as the Great Red Spot and ovals control the shapes of IR light curves and multi-wavelength phase shifts on Jupiter. Our finding supports the hypothesis that observed lightcurves on brown dwarfs are induced by planetary-scale waves and cloud spots.

  2. Graphene based silicon–air grating structure to realize electromagnetically-induced-transparency and slow light effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Buzheng; Liu, Huaiqing [Key Lab of All Optical Network & Advanced Telecommunication Network of EMC, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Institute of Lightwave Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Ren, Guobin, E-mail: gbren@bjtu.edu.cn [Key Lab of All Optical Network & Advanced Telecommunication Network of EMC, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Institute of Lightwave Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Yang, Yuguang; Ye, Shen; Pei, Li; Jian, Shuisheng [Key Lab of All Optical Network & Advanced Telecommunication Network of EMC, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Institute of Lightwave Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2017-01-23

    Highlights: • The EIT and slow light effect are achieved by our novel graphene based structure. • Excellent tunability of wide wavelength range can be obtained only by a small change in Fermi energy level. • The group velocity of incident light is reduced to more than 1/600 of that in vacuum. • Position control is realized by designing a graded period grating. - Abstract: A broad band tunable graphene based silicon–air grating structure is proposed. Electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) window can be successfully tuned by virtually setting the desired Fermi energy levels on graphene sheets. Carrier mobility plays an important role in modulating the resonant depth. Furthermore, by changing the grating periods, light can be trapped at corresponding resonant positions where slow down factor is relatively larger than in the previous works. This structure can be used as a highly tunable optoelectronic device such as optical filter, broad-band modulator, plasmonic switches and buffers.

  3. Synthesis of surface oxygen-deficient BiPO{sub 4} nanocubes with enhanced visible light induced photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Bingtao; Yin, Haoyong; Li, Tao; Gong, Jianying; Lv, Shumei; Nie, Qiulin, E-mail: yhy@hdu.edu.cn [College of Materials & Environmental Engineering, Hangzhou Dianzi University, Hangzhou (China)

    2017-05-15

    The visible light driven BiPO{sub 4} nanocubes with sufficient surface oxygen deficiency were fabricated by a hydrothermal process and subsequently ultrasonic assistant Fe reduction process. The products were characterized by XRD, DRS, XPS, SEM and TEM which showed that the BiPO{sub 4} had cuboid-like shape with a smooth surface and clear edges and the oxygen vacancies were successfully introduced on the surface of the BiPO{sub 4} nanocubes. The as prepared oxygen-deficient BiPO{sub 4} nanocubes showed greatly enhanced visible light induced photocatalytic activity in degradation of Rhodamine B. The enhanced photocatalytic performance and expanded visible light response of BiPO{sub 4} may be due to the introduction of surface oxygen vacancies which can generate the oxygen vacancies mid-gap states lower to the conduction band of BiPO{sub 4}. (author)

  4. Variable-temperature Microwave Impedance Microscope with Light Stimulation for Research on Photo-induced Phase Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-24

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The DURIP program "Variable-temperature Microwave Impedance Microscope with Light Stimulation for Research on Photo... Stimulation for Research on Photo- induced Phase Transitions The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should...reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions

  5. Stress-induced light scattering method for the detection of latent flaws on fine polished glass substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Y; Sakai, K; Nonaka, K

    2014-08-01

    Fine polishing techniques, such as the chemical mechanical polishing treatment, are one of the most important technique to glass substrate manufacturing. Mechanical interaction in the form of friction occurs between the abrasive and the substrate surface during polishing, which may cause formation of latent flaws on the glass substrate surface. Fine polishing-induced latent flaws may become obvious during a subsequent cleaning process if glass surfaces are corroded away by chemical interaction with the cleaning liquid. Latent flaws thus reduce product yield. In general, non-destructive inspection techniques, such as the light-scattering methods, used to detect foreign matters on the glass substrate surface. However, it is difficult to detect latent flaws by these methods because the flaws remain closed. Authors propose a novel inspection technique for fine polishing-induced latent flaws by combining the light scattering method with stress effects, referred to as the stress-induced light scattering method (SILSM). SILSM is able to distinguish between latent flaws and particles on the surface. In this method, samples are deformed by an actuator and stress effects are induced around the tips of latent flaws. Due to the photoelastic effect, the refractive index of the material around the tip of a latent flaw is changed. This changed refractive index is in turn detected by a cooled charge-coupled device camera as variations in light scattering intensity. In this report, surface latent flaws are detected non-destructively by applying SILSM to glass substrates, and the utility of SILSM evaluated as a novel inspection technique.

  6. Light charged particle production induced by fast neutrons (En=25-65 MeV) on 209Bi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raeymackers, Erwin; Slypen, Isabelle; Benck, Sylvie; Meulders, Jean-Pierre; Nica, Ninel; Corcalciuc, Valentin

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the experimental set-up and data reduction procedures regarding the measurement of double-differential cross sections for light charged particle production in fast neutron induced reactions (n, px), (n, dx), (n, tx) and (n, αx) on bismuth in the incident neutron energy range 25-65 MeV and at laboratory angles from 20deg to 160deg. preliminary double-differential and energy-differential cross sections for hydrogen isotopes are presented. (author)

  7. Determination of tellurium in coal samples by means of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry after coprecipitation with iron(III) hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, S.; Arikawa, Y. [Japan Womens University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2005-11-01

    A simple and accurate method for the determination of tellurium in coal samples was investigated by the combustion of samples under a high pressure of oxygen and coprecipitation with Fe(OH){sub 3}, followed by a measurement by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS). About 0.5 g of an accurately weighed ground coal sample and 0.5 g of starch were combusted in an oxygen combustion bomb filled with oxygen to 3 MPa and added with 3 ml of water as an absorbing solution. The formed tellurium trioxide TeOs dissolved in water as TeO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, which was in turn reduced to TeO{sub 3}{sup 2-} by heating. After diluting the above-mentioned solution up to about 50 ml with water, Fe(OH){sub 3} is formed upon adding Fe(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and sodium hydroxide solutions at pH 8-9 and left standing overnight. After dissolving the precipitate by HCl, the solution was diluted to 10 ml with water and the concentration of tellurium was measured by GF-AAS at a wavelength of 214.3 nm. The standard addition method was employed for the determination of tellurium in real coal samples, because those processes for the formation of tellurium(VI) oxide and coprecipitation with Fe(OH)3 were interfered by matrices. For NIST SRM 1632c, the standard coal sample tellurium content of 0.057 {+-} 0.004 mg kg{sup -1} was in good agreement with the information value of 0.05 mg kg{sup -1} with 7% of RSD in five replicate analyses. The tellurium contents in 20 real coal samples given by Center for Coal Utilization, Japan were also determined. The tellurium contents in these samples were scattered over the narrow range between 0.032 and 0.100 mg kg{sup -1}.

  8. Preventive and therapeutic effects of SkQ1-containing Visomitin eye drops against light-induced retinal degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, Yu P; Gancharova, O S; Eichler, O V; Philippov, P P; Grigoryan, E N

    2014-10-01

    The human retina is constantly affected by light of varying intensity, this being especially true for photoreceptor cells and retinal pigment epithelium. Traditionally, photoinduced damages of the retina are induced by visible light of high intensity in albino rats using the LIRD (light-induced retinal degeneration) model. This model allows study of pathological processes in the retina and the search for retinoprotectors preventing retinal photodamage. In addition, the etiology and mechanisms of retina damage in the LIRD model have much in common with the mechanisms of the development of age-related retinal disorders, in particular, with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We have studied preventive and therapeutic effects of Visomitin eye drops (based on the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant SkQ1) on albino rat retinas damaged by bright light. In the first series of experiments, rats receiving Visomitin for two weeks prior to illumination demonstrated significantly less expressed atrophic and degenerative changes in the retina compared to animals receiving similar drops with no SkQ1. In the second series, the illuminated rats were treated for two weeks with Visomitin or similar drops without SkQ1. The damaged retinas of the experimental animals were repaired much more effectively than those of the control animals. Therefore, we conclude that Visomitin SkQ1-containing eye drops have pronounced preventive and therapeutic effects on the photodamaged retina and might be recommended as a photoprotector and a pharmaceutical preparation for the treatment of AMD in combination with conventional medicines.

  9. Vascular targeting of LIGHT normalizes blood vessels in primary brain cancer and induces intratumoural high endothelial venules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bo; Jabouille, Arnaud; Steri, Veronica; Johansson-Percival, Anna; Michael, Iacovos P; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Junckerstorff, Reimar; Nowak, Anna K; Hamzah, Juliana; Lee, Gabriel; Bergers, Gabriele; Ganss, Ruth

    2018-06-01

    High-grade brain cancer such as glioblastoma (GBM) remains an incurable disease. A common feature of GBM is the angiogenic vasculature, which can be targeted with selected peptides for payload delivery. We assessed the ability of micelle-tagged, vascular homing peptides RGR, CGKRK and NGR to specifically bind to blood vessels in syngeneic orthotopic GBM models. By using the peptide CGKRK to deliver the tumour necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily member LIGHT (also known as TNF superfamily member 14; TNFSF14) to angiogenic tumour vessels, we have generated a reagent that normalizes the brain cancer vasculature by inducing pericyte contractility and re-establishing endothelial barrier integrity. LIGHT-mediated vascular remodelling also activates endothelia and induces intratumoural high endothelial venules (HEVs), which are specialized blood vessels for lymphocyte infiltration. Combining CGKRK-LIGHT with anti-vascular endothelial growth factor and checkpoint blockade amplified HEV frequency and T-cell accumulation in GBM, which is often sparsely infiltrated by immune effector cells, and reduced tumour burden. Furthermore, CGKRK and RGR peptides strongly bound to blood vessels in freshly resected human GBM, demonstrating shared peptide-binding activities in mouse and human primary brain tumour vessels. Thus, peptide-mediated LIGHT targeting is a highly translatable approach in primary brain cancer to reduce vascular leakiness and enhance immunotherapy. Copyright © 2018 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2018 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Effects of photoprotection and reversible inactivation of the yeast Candida guilliermondii, induced by 313 nm light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frajkin, G.Ya.; Pospelov, M.E.; Rubin, L.B.

    1976-01-01

    The results of studies on the effect of near uv light on the yeast Candida guilliermondii are presented. It was shown that certain doses of 313 nm light inactivated the yeast. The detailed affect is shown in the loss of the ability of the cells to form microcolonies and outwardly does not differ from inactivation caused by 254 nm uv. It was concluded that the cell destruction caused by the 313 nm light was not due to damage to DNA. Experiments in which yeast cells were inactivated by 313 nm light before plating on agar and held for some time in a non-nutrient medium permitted observation of recovery of their viability. A difference was shown in the level of repair of yeasts irradiated by 313 nm light (up to 100% recovery) and 254 nm light (60% recovery). The nature of the dependence of the photoprotection on the 313 nm light dose was determined. A decrease in photoprotection was noted, starting with 7x10 -7 einstein/cm 2 , with its complete disappearance upon further dose increase. It is suggested that, in this recovery of the yeast, some other, thus far unknown, mechanism participates. Data were obtained on the survival of yeast irradiated with lethal uv doses. Of special importance, in the authors' opinion, is the fact that, for the photoprotection effect to appear, some time is needed between actions of the 313 and 254 nm lights, which suggests a photoinduced formation in the yeast cells of compounds that protect them from lethal injury

  11. Optical spectroscopy and microscopy of radiation-induced light-emitting point defects in lithium fluoride crystals and films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montereali, R. M.; Bonfigli, F.; Menchini, F.; Vincenti, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    Broad-band light-emitting radiation-induced F2 and F3+ electronic point defects, which are stable and laser-active at room temperature in lithium fluoride crystals and films, are used in dosimeters, tuneable color-center lasers, broad-band miniaturized light sources and novel radiation imaging detectors. A brief review of their photoemission properties is presented, and their behavior at liquid nitrogen temperatures is discussed. Some experimental data from optical spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy of these radiation-induced point defects in LiF crystals and thin films are used to obtain information about the coloration curves, the efficiency of point defect formation, the effects of photo-bleaching processes, etc. Control of the local formation, stabilization, and transformation of radiation-induced light-emitting defect centers is crucial for the development of optically active micro-components and nanostructures. Some of the advantages of low temperature measurements for novel confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy techniques, widely used for spatial mapping of these point defects through the optical reading of their visible photoluminescence, are highlighted.

  12. Light and Electrically Induced Phase Segregation and Its Impact on the Stability of Quadruple Cation High Bandgap Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, The; Mulmudi, Hemant Kumar; Wu, YiLiang; Fu, Xiao; Shen, Heping; Peng, Jun; Wu, Nandi; Nguyen, Hieu T; Macdonald, Daniel; Lockrey, Mark; White, Thomas P; Weber, Klaus; Catchpole, Kylie

    2017-08-16

    Perovskite material with a bandgap of 1.7-1.8 eV is highly desirable for the top cell in a tandem configuration with a lower bandgap bottom cell, such as a silicon cell. This can be achieved by alloying iodide and bromide anions, but light-induced phase-segregation phenomena are often observed in perovskite films of this kind, with implications for solar cell efficiency. Here, we investigate light-induced phase segregation inside quadruple-cation perovskite material in a complete cell structure and find that the magnitude of this phenomenon is dependent on the operating condition of the solar cell. Under short-circuit and even maximum power point conditions, phase segregation is found to be negligible compared to the magnitude of segregation under open-circuit conditions. In accordance with the finding, perovskite cells based on quadruple-cation perovskite with 1.73 eV bandgap retain 94% of the original efficiency after 12 h operation at the maximum power point, while the cell only retains 82% of the original efficiency after 12 h operation at the open-circuit condition. This result highlights the need to have standard methods including light/dark and bias condition for testing the stability of perovskite solar cells. Additionally, phase segregation is observed when the cell was forward biased at 1.2 V in the dark, which indicates that photoexcitation is not required to induce phase segregation.

  13. Using induced pluripotent stem cell-derived conditional medium to attenuate the light-induced photodamaged retina of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Ming Chang

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: The conditional medium of iPSCs contains plenty of cytoprotective, immune-modulative and rescue chemicals, contributing to the maintenance of neuronal function and retinal layers in light-damaged retina compared with apoptotic iPSC-CM and PBS. The antiapoptotic effect of iPSC-CM also shows promise in restoring damaged neurons. This result demonstrates that iPSC-CM may serve as an alternative to cell therapy alone to treat retinal light damage and maintain functional and structural integrity of the retina.

  14. Light-Induced Acid Generation on a Gatekeeper for Smart Nitric Oxide Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyung Woo; Kim, Jihoon; Kim, Jinhwan; Kim, Yonghwi; Song, Hyun Beom; Kim, Jeong Hun; Kim, Kimoon; Kim, Won Jong

    2016-04-26

    We report herein the design of a light-responsive gatekeeper for smart nitric oxide (NO) delivery. The gatekeeper is composed of a pH-jump reagent as an intermediary of stimulus and a calcium phosphate (CaP) coating as a shielding layer for NO release. The light irradiation and subsequent acid generation are used as triggers for uncapping the gatekeeper and releasing NO. The acids generated from a light-activated pH-jump agent loaded in the mesoporous nanoparticles accelerated the degradation of the CaP-coating layers on the nanoparticles, facilitating the light-responsive NO release from diazeniumdiolate by exposing a NO donor to physiological conditions. Using the combination of the pH-jump reagent and CaP coating, we successfully developed a light-responsive gatekeeper system for spatiotemporal-controlled NO delivery.

  15. Intrinsic two-dimensional states on the pristine surface of tellurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengke; Appelbaum, Ian

    2018-05-01

    Atomic chains configured in a helical geometry have fascinating properties, including phases hosting localized bound states in their electronic structure. We show how the zero-dimensional state—bound to the edge of a single one-dimensional helical chain of tellurium atoms—evolves into two-dimensional bands on the c -axis surface of the three-dimensional trigonal bulk. We give an effective Hamiltonian description of its dispersion in k space by exploiting confinement to a virtual bilayer, and elaborate on the diminished role of spin-orbit coupling. These intrinsic gap-penetrating surface bands were neglected in the interpretation of seminal experiments, where two-dimensional transport was otherwise attributed to extrinsic accumulation layers.

  16. Calculations of energy levels and electromagnetic properties for tellurium pair isotopes, by unified method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, R.R.P.

    1988-01-01

    Calculations with the Unified Model (vibrator coupled to two particles), of the energy levels and the eletromagnetic properties have been performed and compared with the twelve pair isotopes from tellurium with A between 112 and 134. The results were analysed using as particles interaction: pairing and SDI (Surface Delta Interaction). The SDI and 3 fonons collective states were used in the fittings, and a syntematic comparison between the theoretical and experimental results was made. The dependence of the results with the model parameters was determined, through large variation sof them. Calculations using 4 fonons have been made, and the importance of the introduced variations in the results was discussed. Calculations have been made in the VAX Computer of the Pelletron at IFUSP. (author) [pt

  17. Studies on nickel (II and palladium (II complexes with some tetraazamacrocycles containing tellurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathee Nitu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of 10-membered and 12-membered tellurium containing tetraazamacrocyclic complexes of divalent nickel and palladium by template condensation of diaryltellurium dichlorides, (aryl = p-hydroxyphenyl, 3-methyl-4-hydroxyphenyl, p-methoxyphenyl with 1,2-diaminoethane and 1,3-diaminopropane in the presence of metal dichloride is reported. The resulting complexes have been subjected to elemental analyses, magnetic measurements, electronic absorption, infra-red, and proton magnetic resonance spectral studies. The formation of proposed macrocyclic skeletons and their donor sites have been identified on the basis of spectral studies. Distorted octahedral structure for the nickel complexes in the solid state and squareplanar structure for the palladium complexes have been suggested.

  18. Effect of aging and temperature on alternating current conductivity of tellurium thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsiulyanu, D. [Technical University, Department of Physics, bul. Dacia 41, MD-2060, Chisinau (Moldova, Republic of)], E-mail: tsiu@cni.md; Marian, T.; Tiuleanu, A. [Technical University, Department of Physics, bul. Dacia 41, MD-2060, Chisinau (Moldova, Republic of); Liess, H.-D.; Eisele, I. [University of the Bundeswehr Munich, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Institute of Physics, D-85577 Neubiberg (Germany)

    2009-02-27

    The impedance spectra of tellurium films with interdigital platinum electrodes were investigated in air at temperatures between 10 and 50 deg. C . Cole-Cole analysis made it possible to assess time constants, resistance, and capacitance of the film at characteristic frequencies and the dependence of these parameters on aging and temperature. Aging under normal conditions over 12 months led to a relative increase of only {approx} 5% in film impedance at the characteristic frequency. However, aging noticeably influences the electrical resistance of the film at high (> 500 kHz) frequencies, and capacitance diminished after 12 months by more than 50% throughout the spectrum. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the effect of aging is due to structural changes in the film. Temperature does not influence the capacitance of the film but uncommonly influences its resistance, which reaches a maximum at around 20 deg. C . This is ascribed to desorption of oxygen previously adsorbed from the environment.

  19. Effect of aging and temperature on alternating current conductivity of tellurium thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsiulyanu, D.; Marian, T.; Tiuleanu, A.; Liess, H.-D.; Eisele, I.

    2009-01-01

    The impedance spectra of tellurium films with interdigital platinum electrodes were investigated in air at temperatures between 10 and 50 deg. C . Cole-Cole analysis made it possible to assess time constants, resistance, and capacitance of the film at characteristic frequencies and the dependence of these parameters on aging and temperature. Aging under normal conditions over 12 months led to a relative increase of only ∼ 5% in film impedance at the characteristic frequency. However, aging noticeably influences the electrical resistance of the film at high (> 500 kHz) frequencies, and capacitance diminished after 12 months by more than 50% throughout the spectrum. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the effect of aging is due to structural changes in the film. Temperature does not influence the capacitance of the film but uncommonly influences its resistance, which reaches a maximum at around 20 deg. C . This is ascribed to desorption of oxygen previously adsorbed from the environment

  20. Thermodynamic assessment of the palladium-tellurium (Pd-Te) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gosse, S.; Gueneau, C.

    2011-01-01

    Among the fission products formed in nuclear fuels, the platinum-group metal palladium and the chalcogen element tellurium exhibit strong interaction. It is therefore of interest to be able to predict the chemical equilibria involving the Pd and Te fission products. A thermodynamic assessment is carried out using the Calphad (Calculation of Phase Diagram) method to investigate the behaviour of Pd-Te alloy system in nuclear fuels under irradiation and under waste disposal conditions. The Pd-Te binary description was optimized using experimental data found in literature including thermodynamic properties and phase diagram data. To validate the calculated phase diagram and thermodynamic properties, the results are compared with data from the literature. Both calculated and experimental phase diagrams and thermodynamic properties are in good agreement in the whole Pd-Te composition range. (authors)

  1. Melt-gas phase equilibria and state diagrams of the selenium-tellurium system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volodin, V. N.; Trebukhov, S. A.; Burabaeva, N. M.; Nitsenko, A. V.

    2017-05-01

    The partial pressures of saturated vapor of the components in the Se-Te system are determined and presented in the form of temperature-concentration dependences from which the boundaries of the melt-gas phase transition are calculated at atmospheric pressure and vacuums of 2000 and 100 Pa. The existence of azeotropic mixtures is revealed. It is found that the points of inseparably boiling melts correspond to 7.5 at % of Se and 995°C at 101325 Pa, 10.9 at % at 673°C and 19.5 at % at 522°C in vacuums of 2000 and 100 Pa, respectively. A complete state diagram is constructed, including the fields of gas-liquid equilibria at atmospheric and low pressures, the boundaries of which allow us to assess the behavior of selenium and tellurium upon distillation fractionation.

  2. In vitro and in vivo activity of an organic tellurium compound on Leishmania (Leishmania chagasi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Aparecida Salerno Pimentel

    Full Text Available Tellurium compounds have shown several biological properties and recently the leishmanicidal effect of one organotellurane was demonstrated. These findings led us to test the effect of the organotellurium compound RF07 on Leishmania (Leishmania chagasi, the agent of visceral leishmaniasis in Latin America. In vitro assays were performed in L. (L. chagasi-infected bone marrow derived macrophages treated with different concentrations of RF07. In in vivo experiments Golden hamsters were infected with L. (L. chagasi and injected intraperitoneally with RF07 whereas control animals received either Glucantime or PBS. The effect of RF07 on cathepsin B activity of L. (L. chagasi amastigotes was assayed spectrofluorometrically using fluorogenic substrates. The main findings were: 1 RF07 showed significant leishmanicidal activity against intracellular parasites at submicromolar concentrations (IC50 of 529.7±26.5 nM, and the drug displayed 10-fold less toxicity to macrophages (CC50 of 5,426±272.8 nM; 2 kinetics assays showed an increasing leishmanicidal action of RF07 at longer periods of treatment; 3 one month after intraperitoneal injection of RF07 L. (L. chagasi-infected hamsters showed a reduction of 99.6% of parasite burden when compared to controls that received PBS; 4 RF07 inhibited the cathepsin B activity of L. (L. chagasi amastigotes. The present results demonstrated that the tellurium compound RF07 is able to destroy L. (L. chagasi in vitro and in vivo at concentrations that are non toxic to the host. We believe these findings support further study of the potential of RF07 as a possible alternative for the chemotherapy of visceral leishmaniasis.

  3. Potential for improved extraction of tellurium as a byproduct of current copper mining processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, S. M.; Spaleta, K. J.; Skidmore, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    Tellurium (Te) is classified as a critical element due to its increasing use in high technology applications, low average crustal abundance (3 μg kg-1), and primary source as a byproduct of copper extraction. Although Te can be readily recovered from copper processing, previous studies have estimated a 4 percent extraction efficiency, and few studies have addressed Te behavior during the entire copper extraction process. The goals of the present study are to perform a mass balance examining Te behavior during copper extraction and to connect these observations with mineralogy of Te-bearing phases which are essential first steps in devising ways to optimize Te recovery. Our preliminary mass balance results indicate that less than 3 percent of Te present in copper ore is recovered, with particularly high losses during initial concentration of copper ore minerals by flotation. Tellurium is present in the ore in telluride minerals (e.g., Bi-Te-S phases, altaite, and Ag-S-Se-Te phases identified using electron microprobe) with limited substitution into sulfide minerals (possibly 10 mg kg-1 Te in bulk pyrite and chalcopyrite). This work has also identified Te accumulation in solid-phase intermediate extraction products that could be further processed to recover Te, including smelter dusts (158 mg kg-1) and pressed anode slimes (2.7 percent by mass). In both the smelter dusts and anode slimes, X-ray absorption spectroscopy indicates that about two thirds of the Te is present as reduced tellurides. In anode slimes, electron microscopy shows that the remaining Te is present in an oxidized form in a complex Te-bearing oxidate phase also containing Pb, Cu, Ag, As, Sb, and S. These results clearly indicate that more efficient, increased recovery of Te may be possible, likely at minimal expense from operating copper processing operations, thereby providing more Te for manufacturing of products such as inexpensive high-efficiency solar panels.

  4. Estimating Collisionally-Induced Escape Rates of Light Neutrals from Early Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacesa, M.; Zahnle, K. J.

    2016-12-01

    Collisions of atmospheric gases with hot oxygen atoms constitute an important non-thermal mechanism of escape of light atomic and molecular species at Mars. In this study, we present revised theoretical estimates of non-thermal escape rates of neutral O, H, He, and H2 based on recent atmospheric density profiles obtained from the NASA Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission and related theoretical models. As primary sources of hot oxygen, we consider dissociative recombination of O2+ and CO2+ molecular ions. We also consider hot oxygen atoms energized in primary and secondary collisions with energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) produced in charge-exchange of solar wind H+ and He+ ions with atmospheric gases1,2. Scattering of hot oxygen and atmospheric species of interest is modeled using fully-quantum reactive scattering formalism3. This approach allows us to construct distributions of vibrationally and rotationally excited states and predict the products' emission spectra. In addition, we estimate formation rates of excited, translationally hot hydroxyl molecules in the upper atmosphere of Mars. The escape rates are calculated from the kinetic energy distributions of the reaction products using an enhanced 1D model of the atmosphere for a range of orbital and solar parameters. Finally, by considering different scenarios, we estimate the influence of these escape mechanisms on the evolution of Mars's atmosphere throughout previous epochs and their impact on the atmospheric D/H ratio. M.G.'s research was supported by an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program at the NASA Ames Research Center, administered by Universities Space Research Association under contract with NASA. 1N. Lewkow and V. Kharchenko, "Precipitation of Energetic Neutral Atoms and Escape Fluxes induced from the Mars Atmosphere", Astroph. J., 790, 98 (2014) 2M. Gacesa, N. Lewkow, and V. Kharchenko, "Non-thermal production and escape of OH from the upper atmosphere of Mars", arXiv:1607

  5. UV light-induced survival response in a highly radiation-resistant isolate of the Moraxella-acinetobacter group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, L.C.; Thompson, T.L.; Maxcy, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    A highly radiation-resistant member of the Moraxella-Acinetobacter group, isolate 4, obtained from meat, was studied to determine the effect of preexposure to UV radiation on subsequent UV light resistance. Cultures that were preexposed to UV light and incubated for a short time in plate count broth exhibited increased survival of a UV light challenge dose. This response was inhibited in the presence of chloramphenicol. Frequencies of mutation to streptomycin, trimethoprim, and sulfanilamide resistance remained the same after the induction of this survival response and were not altered by treatment with mutagens, with the exception of mutation to streptomycin resistance after γ-irradiation or nitrosoguanidine or methyl methane sulfonate treatment. The results indicated that isolate 4 has a UV light-inducible UV light resistance mechanism which is not associated with increased mutagenesis. The characteristics of the radiation resistance response in this organism are similar to those of certain other common food contaminants. Therefore, considered as part of the total microflora of meat, isolate 4 and the other radiation-resistant Moraxella-Acinetobacter isolates should not pose unique problems in a proposed radappertizaton process

  6. NMR spectroscopy of organic compounds of selenium and tellurium. Communication 8. Constants of spin-spin interaction of /sup 125/Te-/sup 1/o/sup 3/C in nmr spectra of unsaturated organtellurides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalabin, G.A.; Kushnarev, D.F.; Valeev, R.B. (Irkutskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR))

    1981-06-01

    On the basis of /sup 13/C NMR spectra of a series of unsaturated and aromatic tellurium compounds the constants of spin-spin interaction (SSIC) (sup(1.2)J(Te, C)) are measured. A reliable linear relation between /sup 1/J(Te, C) and s-character of a carbon orbitale forming bond with tellurium is found. Correlation of straight SSIC of carbon with selenium and tellurium in isological compounds is established.

  7. Reversible Low-Light Induced Photoswitching of Crowned Spiropyran-DO3A Complexed with Gadolinium(III Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Knoesen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Photoswitchable spiropyran has been conjugated to the crowned ring system DO3A, which improves its solubility in dipolar and polar media and stabilizes the merocyanine isomer. Adding the lanthanide ion gadolinium(III to the macrocyclic ring system leads to a photoresponsive magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent that displays an increased spin-lattice relaxation time (T1 upon visible light stimulation. In this work, the photoresponse of this photochromic molecule to weak light illumination using blue and green light emitting diodes was investigated, simulating the emission spectra from bioluminescent enzymes. Photon emission rate of the light emitting diodes was changed, from 1.75 × 1016 photons·s−1 to 2.37 × 1012 photons·s−1. We observed a consistent visible light-induced isomerization of the merocyanine to the spiropyran form with photon fluxes as low as 2.37 × 1012 photons·s−1 resulting in a relaxivity change of the compound. This demonstrates the potential for use of the described imaging probes in low light level applications such as sensing bioluminescence enzyme activity. The isomerization behavior of gadolinium(III-ion complexed and non-complexed spiropyran-DO3A was analyzed in water and ethanol solution in response to low light illumination and compared to the emitted photon emission rate from over-expressed Gaussia princeps luciferase.

  8. Preparation and controlled drug delivery applications of mesoporous silica polymer nanocomposites through the visible light induced surface-initiated ATRP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Long; Liu, Meiying; Mao, Liucheng; Xu, Dazhuang; Wan, Qing; Zeng, Guangjian; Shi, Yingge [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wen, Yuanqing, E-mail: m18600788382@163.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Zhang, Xiaoyong, E-mail: xiaoyongzhang1980@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, 999 Xuefu Avenue, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wei, Yen, E-mail: weiyen@tsinghua.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and The Tsinghua Center for Frontier Polymer Research, Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Graphical abstract: A novel strategy for surface PEGylation of mesoporous silica nanoparticles was developed based on the light induced surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. - Highlights: • Surface modification of silica nanoparticles through light induced surface-initiated ATRP. • MSNs-NH{sub 2}-poly(IA-co-PEGMA) nanocomposites show high water dispersity. • MSNs-NH{sub 2}-poly(IA-co-PEGMA) nanocomposites are promising for biomedical applications. • The light induced ATRP possesses many advantages as compared with traditional ATRP. - Abstract: The mesoporous materials with large pore size, high specific surface area and high thermal stability have been widely utilized in a variety of fields ranging from environmental remediation to separation and biomedicine. However, surface modification of these silica nanomaterials is required to endow novel properties and achieve better performance for most of these applications. In this work, a new method has been established for surface modification of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) that relied on the visible light induced atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). In the procedure, the copolymers composited with itaconic acid (IA) and poly(ethylene glycol)methyl acrylate (PEGMA) were grafted from MSNs using IA and PEGMA as the monomers and 10-Phenylphenothiazine(PTH) as the organic catalyst. The successful preparation of final polymer nanocomposites (named as MSNs-NH{sub 2}-poly(IA-co-PEGMA)) were evidenced by a series of characterization techniques. More importantly, the anticancer agent cisplatin can be effectively loaded on MSNs-NH{sub 2}-poly(IA-co-PEGMA) and controlled release it from the drug-loading composites with pH responsive behavior. As compared with conventional ATRP, the light induced surface-initiated ATRP could also be utilized for preparation of various silica polymer nanocomposites under rather benign conditions (e.g. absent of transition metal ions, low polymerization

  9. Fiber fuse light-induced continuous breakdown of silica glass optical fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Todoroki, Shin-ichi

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the fiber fuse phenomenon that causes a serious problem for the present optical communication systems. High-power light often brings about catastrophic damage to optical devices. Silica glass optical fibers with ultralow transmission loss are not the exception. A fiber fuse appears in a heated region of the fiber cable delivering a few watts of light and runs toward the light source destroying its core region. Understanding this phenomenon is a necessary first step in the development of future optical communication systems. This book provides supplementary videos and photog

  10. Stress-Induced Sleep After Exposure to Ultraviolet Light Is Promoted by p53 in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBardeleben, Hilary K; Lopes, Lindsey E; Nessel, Mark P; Raizen, David M

    2017-10-01

    Stress-induced sleep (SIS) in Caenorhabditis elegans is important for restoration of cellular homeostasis and is a useful model to study the function and regulation of sleep. SIS is triggered when epidermal growth factor (EGF) activates the ALA neuron, which then releases neuropeptides to promote sleep. To further understand this behavior, we established a new model of SIS using irradiation by ultraviolet C (UVC) light. While UVC irradiation requires ALA signaling and leads to a sleep state similar to that induced by heat and other stressors, it does not induce the proteostatic stress seen with heat exposure. Based on the known genotoxic effects of UVC irradiation, we tested two genes, atl-1 and cep-1 , which encode proteins that act in the DNA damage response pathway. Loss-of-function mutants of atl-1 had no defect in UVC-induced SIS but a partial loss-of-function mutant of cep-1 , gk138 , had decreased movement quiescence following UVC irradiation. Germline ablation experiments and tissue-specific RNA interference experiments showed that cep-1 is required somatically in neurons for its effect on SIS. The cep-1 ( gk138 ) mutant suppressed body movement quiescence controlled by EGF, indicating that CEP-1 acts downstream or in parallel to ALA activation to promote quiescence in response to ultraviolet light. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  11. Reply to "Comment on `Dynamics of slow light and light storage in a Doppler-broadened electromagnetically-induced-transparency medium: A numerical approach' "

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Shih-Chuan; Su, Shih-Wei; Yu, Ite A.

    2017-10-01

    A damping term in the theoretical model of our paper [Phys. Rev. A 83, 013827 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.83.013827] was questioned by the author of the Comment. The author argued this damping term cannot exactly describe the spontaneous decay or quantum jump process and, thus, concluded that our results are prone to be incorrect. However, the physics of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is mainly determined by the ground-state coherence and the optical coherence of the probe transition. We show here that the damping term in our paper described the relaxation process of optical coherence in the EIT system, but not the spontaneous decay process of the population. The case of spontaneous decay used in the argument of the Comment is not an issue in typical EIT studies, in which the probe field is weak and treated as the perturbation. Furthermore, the experimental data in the paper were taken under the condition of a weak probe field. Our theoretical model in the weak-probe condition actually deals with the two coherences of EIT physics, and is suitable for analysis of the data. We believe the results of the study, focusing on the dynamics of slow light and light storage in Doppler-broadened EIT media, are correct.

  12. Dichotomy in response to indomethacin in uv-C and uv-B induced ultraviolet light inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eaglstein, W.H.; Marsico, A.R.

    1975-01-01

    In subjects irradiated with both UV-C and UV-B ultraviolet light (UVL), 10 μg of intradermal indomethacin decreased the redness in all 13 of the UV-B irradiated areas but in only 2 of 13 of the UV-C irradiated areas. Higher doses of intradermal indomethacin (50 μg and 100 μg) decreased the redness produced by UV-C irradiation in 6 subjects. It is suggested that the failure of 10 μg of indomethacin to decrease the redness of the UV-C induced inflammation, while decreasing the redness in the UV-B induced inflammation, is consistent with the possibility that prostaglandins participate in UV-B but not UV-C induced inflammation

  13. Photocrystallography at TriCS/SINQ: light-induced structural changes in Na2[Fe(CN)5NO]2H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schefer, J.; Schaniel, D.; Woike, Th.; Imlau, M.

    2004-01-01

    Light-induced metastable electronic states as observed e.g. in sodium nitroprusside are of fundamental interest for data storage and optical computing. Structural functionality and therefore the light-induced structure itself is of basic interest in such systems. As neutrons are sensitive to the position of the nucleus and non-destructive with respect to the metastable electronic states, neutron photocrystallography provides a useful method to determine light-induced structural changes. A photocrystallographic experimental setup has been built-up at SINQ and has been successfully used at the single-crystal instrument TriCS and the test facility TOPSI (now called MORPHEUS)

  14. Study of ultraviolet light-induced DNA damage and repair: the role of the (6-4) photoproduct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, W.A.

    1985-01-01

    Ultraviolet light induces lethal, mutagenic, and carcinogenic effects to cells. These effects are a result of the induction of photoproducts in the cellular DNA. One class of photoproducts was found as alkaline labile lesions in DNA, and it was proposed that such lesions were precursor products to the 6,4'-[pyrimidin-2'-one]-pyrimidine class of photoproducts that have been previously shown to occur in UV light-irradiated DNA. Using a series of dinucleotide compounds, the precursor compounds were isolated, and were demonstrated to be alkaline labile. These products were named the UV light-induced pyrimidine-pyrimidone (6-4) photoproducts, and their chemistry of formation in dinucleotides and DNA was studied. The formation of these photoproducts under conditions of chemical photosensitization was also measured. The most abundant of the (6-4) photoproducts is the thymine-cytosine (6-4) product, and the molecular structure of this compounds was determined by the use of infrared spectroscopy, proton NMR, and mass spectroscopy. The (6-4) products have been recently shown to be the major UV light-induced premutagenic lesions in E. coli. In E. coli, the repair of the (6-4) products is under the control of the uvrABC excision pathway. The rate of removal of (6-4) products was measured in a series of human cells lines. The rate of removal of (6-4) products from the DNA of a xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A cell line was nearly that of the normal cells, yet these cells are unable to excise cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. These results suggest that the removal of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and (6-4) products may be controlled by separate enzymatic pathways

  15. STM-induced light emission from vacuum-evaporated gold film

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    ... investigations of individual surface nanostructures,10–12 light to be detected is fundamentally weak owing to the low efficiency of excitation by tunnel- ... signal level can be improved by measuring STM-LE in a prism-coupled configuration.

  16. Intraocular 6-hydroxydopamine prevents the persistent estrus induced by continuous light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, K; Hokano, M

    1985-01-15

    Following the intraocular injection of 6-hydroxydopamine, which can destroy the retinal dopaminergic neurons, female rats showed a normal estrous cycle in LD 12:12 but not a persistent estrus in continuous light.

  17. Visible light irradiation-induced conductivity change for CVD-grown graphene on different substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiangdi; Zhang, Peng; Liu, Xianming; Cao, Xueying; Lei, Xiaohua; Chen, Weimin

    2017-08-01

    This research examines the influence of lighting on the electrical properties of graphene on different substrates, including PET, glass and SiO2, which are the most widely used substrate materials representing the flexible and rigid applications. The graphene sheets were prepared by CVD and subsequently transferred to three substrates. The resistances of graphene under periodic visible light irradiation were measured inside a vacuum chamber. Results show that the resistances for graphene samples on all substrates increased slowly under lighting, while decreased slowly as well after the light was switched off. The change degree and speed were different for graphene on different substrates, which were influenced as well by the illumination time, environment atmosphere and irradiation power. Graphene on flexible PET substrate is more stable than that on other substrates.

  18. Light-induced dynamic structural color by intracellular 3D photonic crystals in brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Garcia, Martin; Masters, Nathan; O'Brien, Heath E; Lennon, Joseph; Atkinson, George; Cryan, Martin J; Oulton, Ruth; Whitney, Heather M

    2018-04-01

    Natural photonic crystals are responsible for strong reflectance at selective wavelengths in different natural systems. We demonstrate that intracellular opal-like photonic crystals formed from lipids within photosynthetic cells produce vivid structural color in the alga Cystoseira tamariscifolia . The reflectance of the opaline vesicles is dynamically responsive to environmental illumination. The structural color is present in low light-adapted samples, whereas higher light levels produce a slow disappearance of the structural color such that it eventually vanishes completely. Once returned to low-light conditions, the color re-emerges. Our results suggest that these complex intracellular natural photonic crystals are responsive to environmental conditions, changing their packing structure reversibly, and have the potential to manipulate light for roles beyond visual signaling.

  19. Correlation of light transmittance with asthma attack: fine water particles as a possible inducing factor of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Kazuo; Okamoto, Koji; Shimbo, Shinichiro; Ikeda, Masayuki

    2011-01-01

    It has been postulated that air-borne fine water particles (or mist) can induce asthma attacks in asthmatic children. To date, no attempt has been made to quantify the density of air-borne fine water particles with the aim of relating particle density to the etiology of asthma among children. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation of asthma attack frequency and the particle density evaluated in terms of light transmittance. The density of fine water particles was quantified by measuring reductions in light transmittance at 250, 365 and 580 nm at an outdoor location when the surroundings were in darkness. The measurements were made at distances varying from 1 to 3 m from the light sources and performed every morning and evening for 1 year. Each day was separated into two half-day units [i.e., morning (from midnight to noon) and afternoon (from noon to midnight)]. The number of asthma attacks among 121 enrolled asthmatic children was counted for each unit. A possible correlation between the transmittance reduction and frequency of asthma attacks was assessed. A significant difference was observed in the extent of reduction in light transmittance at 365 nm between the units with asthma attacks and those without attacks. Furthermore, the reduction in the transmittance was more evident when more asthma attacks were recorded among the patients. No difference was detected in the reduction in light transmittance at 250 or 580 nm. These results support the hypothesis that air-borne fine water particles are among the etiological factors that induce asthma attacks in asthmatic children.

  20. Transcriptome analysis of the exocarp of apple fruit identifies light-induced genes involved in red color pigmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vimolmangkang, Sornkanok; Zheng, Danman; Han, Yuepeng; Khan, M Awais; Soria-Guerra, Ruth Elena; Korban, Schuyler S

    2014-01-15

    Although the mechanism of light regulation of color pigmentation of apple fruit is not fully understood, it has been shown that light can regulate expression of genes in the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway by inducing transcription factors (TFs). Moreover, expression of genes encoding enzymes involved in this pathway may be coordinately regulated by multiple TFs. In this study, fruits on trees of apple cv. Red Delicious were covered with paper bags during early stages of fruit development and then removed prior to maturation to analyze the transcriptome in the exocarp of apple fruit. Comparisons of gene expression profiles of fruit covered with paper bags (dark-grown treatment) and those subjected to 14 h light treatment, following removal of paper bags, were investigated using an apple microarray of 40,000 sequences. Expression profiles were investigated over three time points, at one week intervals, during fruit development. Overall, 736 genes with expression values greater than two-fold were found to be modulated by light treatment. Light-induced products were classified into 19 categories with highest scores in primary metabolism (17%) and transcription (12%). Based on the Arabidopsis gene ontology annotation, 18 genes were identified as TFs. To further confirm expression patterns of flavonoid-related genes, these were subjected to quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) using fruit of red-skinned apple cv. Red Delicious and yellow-skinned apple cv. Golden Delicious. Of these, two genes showed higher levels of expression in 'Red Delicious' than in 'Golden Delicious', and were likely involved in the regulation of fruit red color pigmentation. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.