WorldWideScience

Sample records for ligase alters cell

  1. A wild-type DNA ligase I gene is expressed in Bloom's syndrome cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Petrini, J H; Huwiler, K G; Weaver, D T

    1991-01-01

    Alteration of DNA ligase I activity is a consistent biochemical feature of Bloom's syndrome (BS) cells. DNA ligase I activity in BS cells either is reduced and abnormally thermolabile or is present in an anomalously dimeric form. To assess the role of DNA ligase function in the etiology of BS, we have cloned the DNA ligase I cDNA from normal human cells by a PCR strategy using degenerate oligonucleotide primers based on conserved regions of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces...

  2. DNA Ligase I Is Not Essential for Mammalian Cell Viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Han

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Of the three DNA ligases present in all vertebrates, DNA ligase I (Lig1 has been considered essential for ligating Okazaki fragments during DNA replication and thereby essential for cell viability. Here, we report the striking finding that a Lig1-null murine B cell line is viable. Surprisingly, the Lig1-null cells exhibit normal proliferation and normal immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch recombination and are not hypersensitive to a wide variety of DNA damaging agents. These findings demonstrate that Lig1 is not absolutely required for cellular DNA replication and repair and that either Lig3 or Lig4 can substitute for the role of Lig1 in joining Okazaki fragments. The establishment of a Lig1-null cell line will greatly facilitate the characterization of DNA ligase function in mammalian cells, but the finding alone profoundly reprioritizes the role of ligase I in DNA replication, repair, and recombination.

  3. DNA ligase I is not essential for mammalian cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Li; Masani, Shahnaz; Hsieh, Chih-lin; Yu, Kefei

    2014-04-24

    Of the three DNA ligases present in all vertebrates, DNA ligase I (Lig1) has been considered essential for ligating Okazaki fragments during DNA replication and thereby essential for cell viability. Here, we report the striking finding that a Lig1-null murine B cell line is viable. Surprisingly, the Lig1-null cells exhibit normal proliferation and normal immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch recombination and are not hypersensitive to a wide variety of DNA damaging agents. These findings demonstrate that Lig1 is not absolutely required for cellular DNA replication and repair and that either Lig3 or Lig4 can substitute for the role of Lig1 in joining Okazaki fragments. The establishment of a Lig1-null cell line will greatly facilitate the characterization of DNA ligase function in mammalian cells, but the finding alone profoundly reprioritizes the role of ligase I in DNA replication, repair, and recombination.

  4. Aβ-Induced Synaptic Alterations Require the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Nedd4-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Elizabeth M; Scudder, Samantha L; Goo, Marisa S; Patrick, Gentry N

    2016-02-03

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease in which patients experience progressive cognitive decline. A wealth of evidence suggests that this cognitive impairment results from synaptic dysfunction in affected brain regions caused by cleavage of amyloid precursor protein into the pathogenic peptide amyloid-β (Aβ). Specifically, it has been shown that Aβ decreases surface AMPARs, dendritic spine density, and synaptic strength, and also alters synaptic plasticity. The precise molecular mechanisms by which this occurs remain unclear. Here we demonstrate a role for ubiquitination in Aβ-induced synaptic dysfunction in cultured rat neurons. We find that Aβ promotes the ubiquitination of AMPARs, as well as the redistribution and recruitment of Nedd4-1, a HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase we previously demonstrated to target AMPARs for ubiquitination and degradation. Strikingly, we show that Nedd4-1 is required for Aβ-induced reductions in surface AMPARs, synaptic strength, and dendritic spine density. Our findings, therefore, indicate an important role for Nedd4-1 and ubiquitin in the synaptic alterations induced by Aβ. Synaptic changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) include surface AMPAR loss, which can weaken synapses. In a cell culture model of AD, we found that AMPAR loss correlates with increased AMPAR ubiquitination. In addition, the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-1, known to ubiquitinate AMPARs, is recruited to synapses in response to Aβ. Strikingly, reducing Nedd4-1 levels in this model prevented surface AMPAR loss and synaptic weakening. These findings suggest that, in AD, Nedd4-1 may ubiquitinate AMPARs to promote their internalization and weaken synaptic strength, similar to what occurs in Nedd4-1's established role in homeostatic synaptic scaling. This is the first demonstration of Aβ-mediated control of a ubiquitin ligase to regulate surface AMPAR expression. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/361590-06$15.00/0.

  5. Altered regulation of DNA ligase IV activity by aberrant promoter DNA methylation and gene amplification in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhmann, Christine; Li, Carmen; Kloor, Matthias; Salou, Mariam; Weigel, Christoph; Schmidt, Christopher R; Ng, Linda W C; Tsui, Wendy W Y; Leung, Suet Y; Yuen, Siu T; Becker, Natalia; Weichenhan, Dieter; Plass, Christoph; Schmezer, Peter; Chan, Tsun L; Popanda, Odilia

    2014-04-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) presents as a very heterogeneous disease which cannot sufficiently be characterized with the currently known genetic and epigenetic markers. To identify new markers for CRC we scrutinized the methylation status of 231 DNA repair-related genes by methyl-CpG immunoprecipitation followed by global methylation profiling on a CpG island microarray, as altered expression of these genes could drive genomic and chromosomal instability observed in these tumors. We show for the first time hypermethylation of MMP9, DNMT3A and LIG4 in CRC which was confirmed in two CRC patient groups with different ethnicity. DNA ligase IV (LIG4) showed strong differential promoter methylation (up to 60%) which coincided with downregulation of mRNA in 51% of cases. This functional association of LIG4 methylation and gene expression was supported by LIG4 re-expression in 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-treated colon cancer cell lines, and reduced ligase IV amounts and end-joining activity in extracts of tumors with hypermethylation. Methylation of LIG4 was not associated with other genetic and epigenetic markers of CRC in our study. As LIG4 is located on chromosome 13 which is frequently amplified in CRC, two loci were tested for gene amplification in a subset of 47 cases. Comparison of amplification, methylation and expression data revealed that, in 30% of samples, the LIG4 gene was amplified and methylated, but expression was not changed. In conclusion, hypermethylation of the LIG4 promoter is a new mechanism to control ligase IV expression. It may represent a new epigenetic marker for CRC independent of known markers.

  6. Inhibiting Mitochondrial DNA Ligase IIIα Activates Caspase 1-Dependent Apoptosis in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallmyr, Annahita; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Roginskaya, Vera; Van Houten, Bennett; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2016-09-15

    Elevated levels of DNA ligase IIIα (LigIIIα) have been identified as a biomarker of an alteration in DNA repair in cancer cells that confers hypersensitivity to a LigIIIα inhibitor, L67, in combination with a poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor. Because LigIIIα functions in the nucleus and mitochondria, we examined the effect of L67 on these organelles. Here, we show that, although the DNA ligase inhibitor selectively targets mitochondria, cancer and nonmalignant cells respond differently to disruption of mitochondrial DNA metabolism. Inhibition of mitochondrial LigIIIα in cancer cells resulted in abnormal mitochondrial morphology, reduced levels of mitochondrial DNA, and increased levels of mitochondrially generated reactive oxygen species that caused nuclear DNA damage. In contrast, these effects did not occur in nonmalignant cells. Furthermore, inhibition of mitochondrial LigIIIα activated a caspase 1-dependent apoptotic pathway, which is known to be part of inflammatory responses induced by pathogenic microorganisms in cancer, but not nonmalignant cells. These results demonstrate that the disruption of mitochondrial DNA metabolism elicits different responses in nonmalignant and cancer cells and suggests that the abnormal response in cancer cells may be exploited in the development of novel therapeutic strategies that selectively target cancer cells. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5431-41. ©2016 AACR.

  7. DNA ligase III and DNA ligase IV carry out genetically distinct forms of end joining in human somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sehyun; Harvey, Adam; Zimbric, Jacob; Wang, Yongbao; Nguyen, Thanh; Jackson, Pauline J; Hendrickson, Eric A

    2014-09-01

    Ku-dependent C-NHEJ (classic non-homologous end joining) is the primary DNA EJing (end joining) repair pathway in mammals. Recently, an additional EJing repair pathway (A-NHEJ; alternative-NHEJ) has been described. Currently, the mechanism of A-NHEJ is obscure although a dependency on LIGIII (DNA ligase III) is often implicated. To test the requirement for LIGIII in A-NHEJ we constructed a LIGIII conditionally-null human cell line using gene targeting. Nuclear EJing activity appeared unaffected by a deficiency in LIGIII as, surprisingly, so were random gene targeting integration events. In contrast, LIGIII was required for mitochondrial function and this defined the gene's essential activity. Human Ku:LIGIII and Ku:LIGIV (DNA ligase IV) double knockout cell lines, however, demonstrated that LIGIII is required for the enhanced A-NHEJ activity that is observed in Ku-deficient cells. Most unexpectedly, however, the majority of EJing events remained LIGIV-dependent. In conclusion, although human LIGIII has an essential function in mitochondrial maintenance, it is dispensable for most types of nuclear DSB repair, except for the A-NHEJ events that are normally suppressed by Ku. Moreover, we describe that a robust Ku-independent, LIGIV-dependent repair pathway exists in human somatic cells.

  8. Functional redundancy between DNA ligases I and III in DNA replication in vertebrate cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Bednar, Theresa; Wang, Minli; Paul, Katja; Mladenov, Emil; Bencsik-Theilen, Alena A.; Iliakis, George

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the three families of ATP-dependent DNA ligases are associated with specific functions in DNA metabolism. DNA ligase I (LigI) catalyzes Okazaki-fragment ligation at the replication fork and nucleotide excision repair (NER). DNA ligase IV (LigIV) mediates repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) via the canonical non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. The evolutionary younger DNA ligase III (LigIII) is restricted to higher eukaryotes and has been associated with base excision (BER) and single strand break repair (SSBR). Here, using conditional knockout strategies for LIG3 and concomitant inactivation of the LIG1 and LIG4 genes, we show that in DT40 cells LigIII efficiently supports semi-conservative DNA replication. Our observations demonstrate a high functional versatility for the evolutionary new LigIII in DNA replication and mitochondrial metabolism, and suggest the presence of an alternative pathway for Okazaki fragment ligation. PMID:22127868

  9. Staphylococcal β-Toxin Modulates Human Aortic Endothelial Cell and Platelet Function through Sphingomyelinase and Biofilm Ligase Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Alfa; Kulhankova, Katarina; Sonkar, Vijay K.; Dayal, Sanjana; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus causes many infections, such as skin and soft tissue, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, and infective endocarditis (IE). IE is an endovascular infection of native and prosthetic valves and the lining of the heart; it is characterized by the formation of cauliflower-like “vegetations” composed of fibrin, platelets, other host factors, bacteria, and bacterial products. β-Toxin is an S. aureus virulence factor that contributes to the microorganism’s ability to cause IE. This cytolysin has two enzymatic activities: sphingomyelinase (SMase) and biofilm ligase. Although both activities have functions in a rabbit model of IE, the mechanism(s) by which β-toxin directly affects human cells and is involved in the infectious process has not been elucidated. Here, we compared the in vitro effects of purified recombinant wild-type β-toxin, SMase-deficient β-toxin (H289N), and biofilm ligase-deficient β-toxin (H162A and/or D163A) on human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and platelets. β-Toxin was cytotoxic to HAECs and inhibited the production of interleukin 8 (IL-8) from these cells by both SMase and biofilm ligase activities. β-Toxin altered HAEC surface expression of CD40 and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1). HAECs treated with β-toxin displayed granular membrane morphology not seen in treatment with the SMase-deficient mutant. The altered morphology resulted in two possibly separable activities, cell rounding and redistribution of cell membranes into granules, which were not the result of endosome production from the Golgi apparatus or lysosomes. β-Toxin directly aggregated rabbit platelets via SMase activity. PMID:28325766

  10. A conserved physical and functional interaction between the cell cycle checkpoint clamp loader and DNA ligase I of eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Levin, David S; Varkey, Johnson; Post, Sean; Bermudez, Vladimir P; Hurwitz, Jerard; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2007-08-03

    DNA ligase I joins Okazaki fragments during DNA replication and completes certain excision repair pathways. The participation of DNA ligase I in these transactions is directed by physical and functional interactions with proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a DNA sliding clamp, and, replication factor C (RFC), the clamp loader. Here we show that DNA ligase I also interacts with the hRad17 subunit of the hRad17-RFC cell cycle checkpoint clamp loader, and with each of the subunits of its DNA sliding clamp, the heterotrimeric hRad9-hRad1-hHus1 complex. In contrast to the inhibitory effect of RFC, hRad17-RFC stimulates joining by DNA ligase I. Similar results were obtained with the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins indicating that the interaction between the replicative DNA ligase and checkpoint clamp is conserved in eukaryotes. Notably, we show that hRad17 preferentially interacts with and specifically stimulates dephosphorylated DNA ligase I. Moreover, there is an increased association between DNA ligase I and hRad17 in S phase following DNA damage and replication blockage that occurs concomitantly with DNA damage-induced dephosphorylation of chromatin-associated DNA ligase I. Thus, our results suggest that the in vivo interaction between DNA ligase I and the checkpoint clamp loader is regulated by post-translational modification of DNA ligase I.

  11. Partial complementation of a DNA ligase I deficiency by DNA ligase III and its impact on cell survival and telomere stability in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Chalony, Catherine; Hoffschir, Françoise; Gauthier, Laurent R; Gross, Julia; Biard, Denis S; Boussin, François D; Pennaneach, Vincent

    2012-09-01

    DNA ligase I (LigI) plays a central role in the joining of strand interruptions during replication and repair. In our current study, we provide evidence that DNA ligase III (LigIII) and XRCC1, which form a complex that functions in single-strand break repair, are required for the proliferation of mammalian LigI-depleted cells. We show from our data that in cells with either dysfunctional LigI activity or depleted of this enzyme, both LigIII and XRCC1 are retained on the chromatin and accumulate at replication foci. We also demonstrate that the LigI and LigIII proteins cooperate to inhibit sister chromatid exchanges but that only LigI prevents telomere sister fusions. Taken together, these results suggest that in cells with dysfunctional LigI, LigIII contributes to the ligation of replication intermediates but not to the prevention of telomeric instability.

  12. A Bacterial Inhibitor of Host Programmed Cell Death Defenses is an E3 Ubiquitin Ligase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janjusevic,R.; Abramovitch, R.; Martin, G.; Stebbins, C.

    2005-01-01

    The Pseudomonas syringae protein AvrPtoB is translocated into plant cells, where it inhibits immunity-associated programmed cell death (PCD). The structure of a C-terminal domain of AvrPtoB that is essential for anti-PCD activity reveals an unexpected homology to the U-box and RING-finger components of eukaryotic E3 ubiquitin ligases, and we show that AvrPtoB has ubiquitin ligase activity. Mutation of conserved residues involved in the binding of E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes abolishes this activity in vitro, as well as anti-PCD activity in tomato leaves, which dramatically decreases virulence. These results show that Pseudomonas syringae uses a mimic of host E3 ubiquitin ligases to inactivate plant defenses.

  13. Presequence-Independent Mitochondrial Import of DNA Ligase Facilitates Establishment of Cell Lines with Reduced mtDNA Copy Number.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Spadafora

    Full Text Available Due to the essential role played by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA in cellular physiology and bioenergetics, methods for establishing cell lines with altered mtDNA content are of considerable interest. Here, we report evidence for the existence in mammalian cells of a novel, low- efficiency, presequence-independent pathway for mitochondrial protein import, which facilitates mitochondrial uptake of such proteins as Chlorella virus ligase (ChVlig and Escherichia coli LigA. Mouse cells engineered to depend on this pathway for mitochondrial import of the LigA protein for mtDNA maintenance had severely (up to >90% reduced mtDNA content. These observations were used to establish a method for the generation of mouse cell lines with reduced mtDNA copy number by, first, transducing them with a retrovirus encoding LigA, and then inactivating in these transductants endogenous Lig3 with CRISPR-Cas9. Interestingly, mtDNA depletion to an average level of one copy per cell proceeds faster in cells engineered to maintain mtDNA at low copy number. This makes a low-mtDNA copy number phenotype resulting from dependence on mitochondrial import of DNA ligase through presequence-independent pathway potentially useful for rapidly shifting mtDNA heteroplasmy through partial mtDNA depletion.

  14. Presequence-Independent Mitochondrial Import of DNA Ligase Facilitates Establishment of Cell Lines with Reduced mtDNA Copy Number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadafora, Domenico; Kozhukhar, Natalia; Alexeyev, Mikhail F

    2016-01-01

    Due to the essential role played by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in cellular physiology and bioenergetics, methods for establishing cell lines with altered mtDNA content are of considerable interest. Here, we report evidence for the existence in mammalian cells of a novel, low- efficiency, presequence-independent pathway for mitochondrial protein import, which facilitates mitochondrial uptake of such proteins as Chlorella virus ligase (ChVlig) and Escherichia coli LigA. Mouse cells engineered to depend on this pathway for mitochondrial import of the LigA protein for mtDNA maintenance had severely (up to >90%) reduced mtDNA content. These observations were used to establish a method for the generation of mouse cell lines with reduced mtDNA copy number by, first, transducing them with a retrovirus encoding LigA, and then inactivating in these transductants endogenous Lig3 with CRISPR-Cas9. Interestingly, mtDNA depletion to an average level of one copy per cell proceeds faster in cells engineered to maintain mtDNA at low copy number. This makes a low-mtDNA copy number phenotype resulting from dependence on mitochondrial import of DNA ligase through presequence-independent pathway potentially useful for rapidly shifting mtDNA heteroplasmy through partial mtDNA depletion.

  15. Identification of a specific inhibitor for DNA ligase I in human cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, S W; Becker, F. F.; Chan, J Y

    1992-01-01

    A protein inhibitor for human DNA ligase I has recently been identified. It was copurified with a fraction of the enzymes from HeLa cells through several steps of chromatography. The inhibitor was first identified by the absence of ligation activity of the associated enzyme, while it retained the ability to form the ligase-[32P]AMP adducts. The inhibitor was eluted as a single peak at approximately 0.25-0.30 M NaCl from a Mono S column. It inhibited the ligation of both double-stranded and si...

  16. K48-linked KLF4 ubiquitination by E3 ligase Mule controls T-cell proliferation and cell cycle progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hao, Zhenyue; Sheng, Yi; Duncan, Gordon S.

    2017-01-01

    T-cell proliferation is regulated by ubiquitination but the underlying molecular mechanism remains obscure. Here we report that Lys-48-linked ubiquitination of the transcription factor KLF4 mediated by the E3 ligase Mule promotes T-cell entry into S phase. Mule is elevated in T cells upon TCR...

  17. Chronic Replication Problems Impact Cell Morphology and Adhesion of DNA Ligase I Defective Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Cremaschi

    Full Text Available Moderate DNA damage resulting from metabolic activities or sub-lethal doses of exogenous insults may eventually lead to cancer onset. Human 46BR.1G1 cells bear a mutation in replicative DNA ligase I (LigI which results in low levels of replication-dependent DNA damage. This replication stress elicits a constitutive phosphorylation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM checkpoint kinase that fails to arrest cell cycle progression or to activate apoptosis or cell senescence. Stable transfection of wild type LigI, as in 7A3 cells, prevents DNA damage and ATM activation. Here we show that parental 46BR.1G1 and 7A3 cells differ in important features such as cell morphology, adhesion and migration. Comparison of gene expression profiles in the two cell lines detects Bio-Functional categories consistent with the morphological and migration properties of LigI deficient cells. Interestingly, ATM inhibition makes 46BR.1G1 more similar to 7A3 cells for what concerns morphology, adhesion and expression of cell-cell adhesion receptors. These observations extend the influence of the DNA damage response checkpoint pathways and unveil a role for ATM kinase activity in modulating cell biology parameters relevant to cancer progression.

  18. Chronic Replication Problems Impact Cell Morphology and Adhesion of DNA Ligase I Defective Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremaschi, Paolo; Oliverio, Matteo; Leva, Valentina; Bione, Silvia; Carriero, Roberta; Mazzucco, Giulia; Palamidessi, Andrea; Scita, Giorgio; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Montecucco, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Moderate DNA damage resulting from metabolic activities or sub-lethal doses of exogenous insults may eventually lead to cancer onset. Human 46BR.1G1 cells bear a mutation in replicative DNA ligase I (LigI) which results in low levels of replication-dependent DNA damage. This replication stress elicits a constitutive phosphorylation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) checkpoint kinase that fails to arrest cell cycle progression or to activate apoptosis or cell senescence. Stable transfection of wild type LigI, as in 7A3 cells, prevents DNA damage and ATM activation. Here we show that parental 46BR.1G1 and 7A3 cells differ in important features such as cell morphology, adhesion and migration. Comparison of gene expression profiles in the two cell lines detects Bio-Functional categories consistent with the morphological and migration properties of LigI deficient cells. Interestingly, ATM inhibition makes 46BR.1G1 more similar to 7A3 cells for what concerns morphology, adhesion and expression of cell-cell adhesion receptors. These observations extend the influence of the DNA damage response checkpoint pathways and unveil a role for ATM kinase activity in modulating cell biology parameters relevant to cancer progression.

  19. 4-Coumarate:CoA ligase family members from elicitor-treated Sorbus aucuparia cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaid, Mariam M; Scharnhop, Helge; Ramadan, Hussein; Beuerle, Till; Beerhues, Ludger

    2011-06-15

    Sorbus aucuparia cell cultures accumulate biphenyl and dibenzofuran phytoalexins in response to elicitor treatment. These polyketide derivatives arise from the starter substrate benzoyl-CoA, the biosynthesis of which is largely unresolved. Two CoA ligases involved are cinnamate:CoA ligase and benzoate:CoA ligase, which were assumed to be related in S. aucuparia to the ubiquitous 4-coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL). cDNAs encoding three distinct 4CLs from elicitor-treated S. aucuparia cell cultures were isolated using RT-PCR and RACE techniques and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli as His(6)-tagged proteins (Sa4CL2 and Sa4CL3) or GST-fusion protein (Sa4CL1). All three isoenzymes preferred 4-coumaric acid over cinnamic acid in spectrophotometric assays and failed to utilize benzoic acid in radioisotopic assays. After elicitor treatment of S. aucuparia cell cultures, the transcript levels of all three Sa4CLs increased but were significantly lower than the maximum expression rates of the phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and biphenyl synthase 1 (BIS1) genes. The substrate specificities and the expression profiles indicate that the three 4CL isoenzymes are not involved in benzoyl-CoA biosynthesis in S. aucuparia cell cultures. Sa4CL3 and PAL transcripts also accumulated in response to light treatment. Phylogenetically, Sa4CL1 and Sa4CL2 belong to the class I cluster and Sa4CL3 groups in the class II cluster. Sa4CL3 contains a 49-amino acid N-terminal extension, which includes a chloroplast sorting signal.

  20. The APC/C Ubiquitin Ligase: from Cell Biology to Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara ePenas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS is required for normal cell proliferation, vertebrate development, and cancer cell transformation. The UPS consists of multiple proteins that work in concert to target a protein for degradation via the 26S proteasome. Chains of an 8.5 kDa protein called ubiquitin are attached to substrates, thus allowing recognition by the 26S proteasome. Enzymes called ubiquitin ligases or E3s mediate specific attachment to substrates. Although there are over 600 different ubiquitin ligases, the Skp1-Cullin-F-box proteins (SCF ubiquitin ligases and the Anaphase Promoting Complex/cyclosome (APC/C are the most studied. SCF involvement in cancer has been known for some time while APC/C’s cancer role has recently emerged. In this review we will discuss the importance of APC/C to normal cell proliferation and development, thus underscoring its possible contribution to transformation. We will also put forth the hypothesis that modulating a specific interaction of the APC/C may be therapeutically attractive in specific cancer subtypes. Finally, given that the APC/C pathway is relatively new as a cancer target, therapeutic interventions affecting APC/C activity may be beneficial in cancers that are resistant to classical chemotherapy.

  1. E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Cbl-b Regulates Pten via Nedd4 in T Cells Independently of Its Ubiquitin Ligase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Guo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b plays a crucial role in T cell activation and tolerance induction. However, the molecular mechanism by which Cbl-b inhibits T cell activation remains unclear. Here, we report that Cbl-b does not inhibit PI3K but rather suppresses TCR/CD28-induced inactivation of Pten. The elevated Akt activity in Cbl-b−/− T cells is therefore due to heightened Pten inactivation. Suppression of Pten inactivation in T cells by Cbl-b is achieved by impeding the association of Pten with Nedd4, which targets Pten K13 for K63-linked polyubiquitination. Consistent with this finding, introducing Nedd4 deficiency into Cbl-b−/− mice abrogates hyper-T cell responses caused by the loss of Cbl-b. Hence, our data demonstrate that Cbl-b inhibits T cell activation by suppressing Pten inactivation independently of its ubiquitin ligase activity.

  2. Isolation of ubiquitinated substrates by tandem affinity purification of E3 ligase-polyubiquitin-binding domain fusions (ligase traps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Kevin G; Loveless, Theresa B; Toczyski, David P

    2016-02-01

    Ubiquitination is an essential protein modification that influences eukaryotic processes ranging from substrate degradation to nonproteolytic pathway alterations, including DNA repair and endocytosis. Previous attempts to analyze substrates via physical association with their respective ubiquitin ligases have had some success. However, because of the transient nature of enzyme-substrate interactions and rapid protein degradation, detection of substrates remains a challenge. Ligase trapping is an affinity purification approach in which ubiquitin ligases are fused to a polyubiquitin-binding domain, which allows the isolation of ubiquitinated substrates. Immunoprecipitation is first used to enrich for proteins that are bound to the ligase trap. Subsequently, affinity purification is used under denaturing conditions to capture proteins conjugated with hexahistidine-tagged ubiquitin. By using this protocol, ubiquitinated substrates that are specific for a given ligase can be isolated for mass spectrometry or western blot analysis. After cells have been collected, the described protocol can be completed in 2-3 d.

  3. Tumour suppressor RNF43 is a stem-cell E3 ligase that induces endocytosis of Wnt receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koo, B.K.; Spit, M.; Jordens, I.; Low, T.Y.; Stange, D.E.; van de Wetering, M.; van Es, J.H.; Mohammed, S.; Heck, A.J.R.; Maurice, M.M.; Clevers, H.

    2012-01-01

    LGR5+ stem cells reside at crypt bottoms, intermingled with Paneth cells that provide Wnt, Notch and epidermal growth factor signals. Here we find that the related RNF43 and ZNRF3 transmembrane E3 ubiquitin ligases are uniquely expressed in LGR5+ stem cells. Simultaneous deletion of the two genes en

  4. Inactivation of the putative ubiquitin-E3 ligase PDLIM2 in classical Hodgkin and anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurster, K D; Hummel, F; Richter, J; Giefing, M; Hartmann, S; Hansmann, M-L; Kreher, S; Köchert, K; Krappmann, D; Klapper, W; Hummel, M; Wenzel, S-S; Lenz, G; Janz, M; Dörken, B; Siebert, R; Mathas, S

    2017-01-01

    Apart from its unique histopathological appearance with rare tumor cells embedded in an inflammatory background of bystander cells, classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) is characterized by an unusual activation of a broad range of signaling pathways involved in cellular activation. This includes constitutive high-level activity of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT), activator protein-1 (AP-1) and interferon regulatory factor (IRF) transcription factors (TFs) that are physiologically only transiently activated. Here, we demonstrate that inactivation of the putative ubiquitin E3-ligase PDLIM2 contributes to this TF activation. PDLIM2 expression is lost at the mRNA and protein levels in the majority of cHL cell lines and Hodgkin and Reed–Sternberg (HRS) cells of nearly all cHL primary samples. This loss is associated with PDLIM2 genomic alterations, promoter methylation and altered splicing. Reconstitution of PDLIM2 in HRS cell lines inhibits proliferation, blocks NF-κB transcriptional activity and contributes to cHL-specific gene expression. In non-Hodgkin B-cell lines, small interfering RNA-mediated PDLIM2 knockdown results in superactivation of TFs NF-κB and AP-1 following phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) stimulation. Furthermore, expression of PDLIM2 is lost in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) that shares key biological aspects with cHL. We conclude that inactivation of PDLIM2 is a recurrent finding in cHL and ALCL, promotes activation of inflammatory signaling pathways and thereby contributes to their pathogenesis. PMID:27538486

  5. DLG1 is an anchor for the E3 ligase MARCH2 at sites of cell-cell contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhifang; Huett, Alan; Kuballa, Petric; Giallourakis, Cosmas; Xavier, Ramnik J

    2008-01-01

    PDZ domain containing molecular scaffolds plays a central role in organizing synaptic junctions. Observations in Drosophila and mammalian cells have implicated that ubiquitination and endosomal trafficking, of molecular scaffolds are critical to the development and maintenance of cell-cell junctions and cell polarity. To elucidate if there is a connection between these pathways, we applied an integrative genomic strategy, which combined comparative genomics and proteomics with cell biological assays. Given the importance of ubiquitin in regulating endocytic processes, we first identified the subset of E3 ligases with conserved PDZ binding motifs. Among this subset, the MARCH family ubiquitin ligases account for the largest family and MARCH2 has been previously implicated in endosomal trafficking. Next, we tested in an unbiased fashion, if MARCH2 binds PDZ proteins in vivo using a modified tandem affinity purification strategy followed by mass spectrometry. Of note, DLG1 was co-purified from MARCH2, with subsequent confirmation that MARCH2 interacts with full-length DLG1 in a PDZ domain dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrated that MARCH2 co-localized with DLG1 at sites of cell-cell contact. In addition, loss of the MARCH2 PDZ binding motif led to loss of MARCH2 localization at cell-cell contact sites and MARCH2 appeared to localize away from cell-cell junctions. In in vivo ubiquitination assays we show that MARCH2 promotes DLG1 ubiquitination. Overall, these results suggest that PDZ ligands with E3 ligase activity may link PDZ domain containing tumor suppressors to endocytic pathways and cell polarity determination.

  6. The ubiquitin ligase HUWE1 regulates hematopoietic stem cell maintenance and lymphoid commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Bryan; Boccalatte, Francesco; Moran-Crusio, Kelly; Wolf, Elmar; Wang, Jingjing; Kayembe, Clarisse; Lazaris, Charalampos; Yu, Xiaofeng; Aranda-Orgilles, Beatriz; Lasorella, Anna; Aifantis, Iannis

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are dormant in the bone marrow and can be activated in response to diverse stresses to replenish all blood cell types. Here we identify the ubiquitin ligase Huwe1 as a crucial regulator of HSC functions via its post-translational control of N-myc. We found Huwe1 to be essential for HSC self-renewal, quiescence and lymphoid fate specification. Using a novel fluorescent fusion allele (MycnM), we observed that N-myc expression was restricted to the most immature, multipotent stem and progenitor populations. N-myc was upregulated in response to stress or upon loss of Huwe1, leading to increased proliferation and stem cell exhaustion. Mycn depletion reversed most of these phenotypes in vivo, suggesting that the attenuation of N-myc by Huwe1 is essential to reestablish homeostasis following stress. PMID:27668798

  7. E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Nedd4 Promotes Japanese Encephalitis Virus Replication by Suppressing Autophagy in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qingqiang; Zhu, Naiwei; Chen, Shenglin; Zhao, Ping; Ren, Hao; Zhu, Shiying; Tang, Hailin; Zhu, Yongzhe; Qi, Zhongtian

    2017-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that causes the most prevalent viral encephalitis in Asia. Since JEV is a neurotropic virus, it is important to identify key molecules that mediate JEV infection in neuronal cells and to investigate their underlying mechanisms. In this study, the critical role of Nedd4, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that is highly expressed in the central nervous system, was examined in JEV propagation. In SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells, Nedd4 was up-regulated in response to JEV infection. Moreover, down-regulation of Nedd4 resulted in a significant decrease in JEV replication without alterations in virus attachment and internalization or in JEV pseudotyped virus infection, suggesting that Nedd4 participates in the replication but not in the entry stage of JEV infection. Further functional analysis showed that Nedd4 attenuated JEV-induced autophagy, which negatively regulates virus replication during infection. These results suggest that Nedd4 facilitates the replication of JEV by suppressing virus-induced autophagy. Taken together, our results indicate that Nedd4 plays a crucial role in JEV infection of neuronal cells, which provides a potential target for the development of novel treatment to combat JEV infection. PMID:28349961

  8. Inactivation of SAG E3 ubiquitin ligase blocks embryonic stem cell differentiation and sensitizes leukemia cells to retinoid acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjia Tan

    Full Text Available Sensitive to Apoptosis Gene (SAG, also known as RBX2 (RING box protein-2, is the RING component of SCF (SKP1, Cullin, and F-box protein E3 ubiquitin ligase. Our previous studies have demonstrated that SAG is an anti-apoptotic protein and an attractive anti-cancer target. We also found recently that Sag knockout sensitized mouse embryonic stem cells (mES to radiation and blocked mES cells to undergo endothelial differentiation. Here, we reported that compared to wild-type mES cells, the Sag(-/- mES cells were much more sensitive to all-trans retinoic acid (RA-induced suppression of cell proliferation and survival. While wild-type mES cells underwent differentiation upon exposure to RA, Sag(-/- mES cells were induced to death via apoptosis instead. The cell fate change, reflected by cellular stiffness, can be detected as early as 12 hrs post RA exposure by AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy. We then extended this novel finding to RA differentiation therapy of leukemia, in which the resistance often develops, by testing our hypothesis that SAG inhibition would sensitize leukemia to RA. Indeed, we found a direct correlation between SAG overexpression and RA resistance in multiple leukemia lines. By using MLN4924, a small molecule inhibitor of NEDD8-Activating Enzyme (NAE, that inactivates SAG-SCF E3 ligase by blocking cullin neddylation, we were able to sensitize two otherwise resistant leukemia cell lines, HL-60 and KG-1 to RA. Mechanistically, RA sensitization by MLN4924 was mediated via enhanced apoptosis, likely through accumulation of pro-apoptotic proteins NOXA and c-JUN, two well-known substrates of SAG-SCF E3 ligase. Taken together, our study provides the proof-of-concept evidence for effective treatment of leukemia patients by RA-MLN4924 combination.

  9. Modulation of immune cell functions by the E3 ligase CBL-b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina eLutz-Nicoladoni

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of immunological tolerance is a critical hallmark of the immune system. Several signaling checkpoints necessary to balance activating and inhibitory input to immune cells have been described so far, among which the E3 ligase Cbl-b appears to be a central player. Cbl-b is expressed in all leukocyte subsets and regulates several signaling pathways in T cells, NK cells, B cells and different types of myeloid cells. In most cases Cbl-b negatively regulates activation signals through antigen or pattern recognition receptors and co-stimulatory molecules. In line with this function, cblb-deficient immune cells display lower activation thresholds and cblb knockout mice spontaneously develop autoimmunity and are highly susceptible to experimental autoimmunity. Interestingly, genetic association studies link cblb-polymorphisms with autoimmunity also in humans. Vice versa, the increased activation potential of cblb-deficient cells renders them more potent to fight against malignancies or infections. Accordingly, several reports have shown that cblb knockout mice reject tumors, which mainly depends on cytotoxic T and NK cells. Thus targeting Cbl-b may be an interesting strategy to enhance anti-cancer immunity. In this review we summarize the findings on the molecular function of Cbl-b in different cell types and illustrate the potential of Cbl-b as target for immunomodulatory therapies.

  10. Involvement of DNA ligase III and ribonuclease H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication in cultured human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhanen, Heini; Ushakov, Kathy; Yasukawa, Takehiro

    2011-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis operates in mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, but the factors involved in lagging strand synthesis are largely uncharacterised. We investigated the effect of knockdown of the candidate proteins in cultured human cells under conditions where mtDNA appears to replicate chiefly via coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis to restore the copy number of mtDNA to normal levels after transient mtDNA depletion. DNA ligase III knockdown attenuated the recovery of mtDNA copy number and appeared to cause single strand nicks in replicating mtDNA molecules, suggesting the involvement of DNA ligase III in Okazaki fragment ligation in human mitochondria. Knockdown of ribonuclease (RNase) H1 completely prevented the mtDNA copy number restoration, and replication intermediates with increased single strand nicks were readily observed. On the other hand, knockdown of neither flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) nor DNA2 affected mtDNA replication. These findings imply that RNase H1 is indispensable for the progression of mtDNA synthesis through removing RNA primers from Okazaki fragments. In the nucleus, Okazaki fragments are ligated by DNA ligase I, and the RNase H2 is involved in Okazaki fragment processing. This study thus proposes that the mitochondrial replication system utilises distinct proteins, DNA ligase III and RNase H1, for Okazaki fragment maturation.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA ligase is dispensable for the viability of cultured cells but essential for mtDNA maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokolenko, Inna N; Fayzulin, Rafik Z; Katyal, Sachin; McKinnon, Peter J; Wilson, Glenn L; Alexeyev, Mikhail F

    2013-09-13

    Multiple lines of evidence support the notion that DNA ligase III (LIG3), the only DNA ligase found in mitochondria, is essential for viability in both whole organisms and in cultured cells. Previous attempts to generate cells devoid of mitochondrial DNA ligase failed. Here, we report, for the first time, the derivation of viable LIG3-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These cells lack mtDNA and are auxotrophic for uridine and pyruvate, which may explain the apparent lethality of the Lig3 knock-out observed in cultured cells in previous studies. Cells with severely reduced expression of LIG3 maintain normal mtDNA copy number and respiration but show reduced viability in the face of alkylating and oxidative damage, increased mtDNA degradation in response to oxidative damage, and slow recovery from mtDNA depletion. Our findings clarify the cellular role of LIG3 and establish that the loss of viability in LIG3-deficient cells is conditional and secondary to the ρ(0) phenotype.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA Ligase Is Dispensable for the Viability of Cultured Cells but Essential for mtDNA Maintenance*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokolenko, Inna N.; Fayzulin, Rafik Z.; Katyal, Sachin; McKinnon, Peter J.; Wilson, Glenn L.; Alexeyev, Mikhail F.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple lines of evidence support the notion that DNA ligase III (LIG3), the only DNA ligase found in mitochondria, is essential for viability in both whole organisms and in cultured cells. Previous attempts to generate cells devoid of mitochondrial DNA ligase failed. Here, we report, for the first time, the derivation of viable LIG3-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts. These cells lack mtDNA and are auxotrophic for uridine and pyruvate, which may explain the apparent lethality of the Lig3 knock-out observed in cultured cells in previous studies. Cells with severely reduced expression of LIG3 maintain normal mtDNA copy number and respiration but show reduced viability in the face of alkylating and oxidative damage, increased mtDNA degradation in response to oxidative damage, and slow recovery from mtDNA depletion. Our findings clarify the cellular role of LIG3 and establish that the loss of viability in LIG3-deficient cells is conditional and secondary to the ρ0 phenotype. PMID:23884459

  13. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria protects cells against oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial DNA base excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akbari, Mansour; Keijzers, Guido; Maynard, Scott

    2014-01-01

    slower than the preceding mitochondrial BER steps. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria improved the rate of overall BER, increased cell survival after menadione induced oxidative stress and reduced autophagy following the inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I...... by rotenone. Our results suggest that the amount of DNA ligase III in mitochondria may be critical for cell survival following prolonged oxidative stress, and demonstrate a functional link between mitochondrial DNA damage and repair, cell survival upon oxidative stress, and removal of dysfunctional......Base excision repair (BER) is the most prominent DNA repair pathway in human mitochondria. BER also results in a temporary generation of AP-sites, single-strand breaks and nucleotide gaps. Thus, incomplete BER can result in the generation of DNA repair intermediates that can disrupt mitochondrial...

  14. The role of the e3 ligase cbl-B in murine dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Wallner

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are potent antigen-presenting cells with a promising potential in cancer immunotherapy. Cbl proteins are E3 ubiquitin ligases and have been implicated in regulating the functional activity of various immune cells. As an example, c-Cbl negatively affects DC activation. We here describe that another member of the Cbl-protein family (i.e. Cbl-b is highly expressed in murine bone-marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs. Differentiation of cblb-/- bone marrow mononuclear cells into classical BMDCs is unaltered, except enhanced induction of DEC-205 (CD205 expression. When tested in mixed-lymphocyte reaction (MLR, cblb-/- BMDCs exhibit increased allo-stimulatory capacity in vitro. BMDCs were next in vitro stimulated by various toll like receptor (TLR-agonists (LPS, Poly(I:C, CpG and exposed to FITC-labeled dextran. Upon TLR-stimulation, cblb-/- BMDCs produce higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1α, IL-6 and TNF-α and exhibit a slightly higher level of FITC-dextran uptake. To further characterize the functional significance of cblb-/- BMDCs we tested them in antigen-specific T cell responses against ovalbumin (OVA protein and peptides, activating either CD8(+ OT-I or CD4(+ OT-II transgenic T cells. However, cblb-/- BMDCs are equally effective in inducing antigen-specific T cell responses when compared to wildtype BMDCs both in vitro and in vivo. The migratory capacity into lymph nodes during inflammation was similarly not affected by the absence of Cbl-b. In line with these observations, cblb-/- peptide-pulsed BMDCs are equally effective vaccines against OVA-expressing B16 tumors in vivo when compared to wildtype BMDCs. We conclude that in contrast to c-Cbl, Cbl-b plays only a limited role in the induction of Ag-specific T cell responses by murine BMDCs in vitro and in vivo.

  15. Rlim, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, influences the stability of Stathmin protein in human osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Shen, Jianjun; Li, Xingyu; Wang, Xi; Long, Min; Lin, Fang; Wei, Junxia; Yang, Longfei; Yang, Chinglai; Dong, Ke; Zhang, Huizhong

    2014-07-01

    Stathmin is an oncoprotein and is expressed at high levels in a wide variety of human malignancies, which plays important roles in maintenance of malignant phenotypes. The regulation of Stathmin gene overexpression has been wildly explored, but the exact mechanism still needs to be elucidated. It is believed that regulation of an oncogene protein abundance through post-translational modifications is essential for maintenance of malignant phenotypes. Here we identified the Rlim, a Ring H2 zinc finger protein with intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity, as a Stathmin-interacting protein that could increase Stathmin turnover through binding with this targeted protein and then induce its degradation by proteasome in a ubiquitin-dependent manner. Inhibition of endogenous Rlim expression by siRNA could increase the level of Stathmin protein, which further led to cell proliferation and cell cycle changes in human osteosarcoma cell lines. On the other hand, forced overexpression of Rlim could decrease the level of Stathmin protein. These results demonstrate that Rlim is involved in the negative regulation of Stathmin protein level through physical interaction and ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Hence, Rlim is a novel regulator of Stathmin protein in a ubiquitin-dependent manner, and represents a new pathway for malignant phenotype turnover by modulating the level of Stathmin protein in human osteosarcomas.

  16. Myc protein is stabilized by suppression of a novel E3 ligase complex in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seung H.; Wright, Jason B.; Gerber, Scott A.; Cole, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Rapid Myc protein turnover is critical for maintaining basal levels of Myc activity in normal cells and a prompt response to changing growth signals. We characterize a new Myc-interacting factor, TRPC4AP (transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily C, member 4-associated protein)/TRUSS (tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated ubiquitous scaffolding and signaling protein), which is the receptor for a DDB1 (damage-specific DNA-binding protein 1)–CUL4 (Cullin 4) E3 ligase complex for selective Myc degradation through the proteasome. TRPC4AP/TRUSS binds specifically to the Myc C terminus and promotes its ubiquitination and destruction through the recognition of evolutionarily conserved domains in the Myc N terminus. TRPC4AP/TRUSS suppresses Myc-mediated transactivation and transformation in a dose-dependent manner. Finally, we found that TRPC4AP/TRUSS expression is strongly down-regulated in most cancer cell lines, leading to Myc protein stabilization. These studies identify a novel pathway targeting Myc degradation that is suppressed in cancer cells. PMID:20551172

  17. A HECT ubiquitin-protein ligase as a novel candidate gene for altered quinine and quinidine responses in Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Cecilia P; Liu, Chia-Hao; Mayer, Sybille; Nurhasanah, Astutiati; Cyrklaff, Marek; Mu, Jianbing; Ferdig, Michael T; Stein, Wilfred D; Lanzer, Michael

    2014-05-01

    The emerging resistance to quinine jeopardizes the efficacy of a drug that has been used in the treatment of malaria for several centuries. To identify factors contributing to differential quinine responses in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, we have conducted comparative quantitative trait locus analyses on the susceptibility to quinine and also its stereoisomer quinidine, and on the initial and steady-state intracellular drug accumulation levels in the F1 progeny of a genetic cross. These data, together with genetic screens of field isolates and laboratory strains associated differential quinine and quinidine responses with mutated pfcrt, a segment on chromosome 13, and a novel candidate gene, termed MAL7P1.19 (encoding a HECT ubiquitin ligase). Despite a strong likelihood of association, episomal transfections demonstrated a role for the HECT ubiquitin-protein ligase in quinine and quinidine sensitivity in only a subset of genetic backgrounds, and here the changes in IC50 values were moderate (approximately 2-fold). These data show that quinine responsiveness is a complex genetic trait with multiple alleles playing a role and that more experiments are needed to unravel the role of the contributing factors.

  18. Lnx2 ubiquitin ligase is essential for exocrine cell differentiation in the early zebrafish pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Minho; Ro, Hyunju; Dawid, Igor B

    2015-10-06

    The gene encoding the E3 ubiquitin ligase Ligand of Numb protein-X (Lnx)2a is expressed in the ventral-anterior pancreatic bud of zebrafish embryos in addition to its expression in the brain. Knockdown of Lnx2a by using an exon 2/intron 2 splice morpholino resulted in specific inhibition of the differentiation of ventral bud derived exocrine cell types, with little effect on endocrine cell types. A frame shifting null mutation in lnx2a did not mimic this phenotype, but a mutation that removed the exon 2 splice donor site did. We found that Lnx2b functions in a redundant manner with its paralog Lnx2a. Inhibition of lnx2a exon 2/3 splicing causes exon 2 skipping and leads to the production of an N-truncated protein that acts as an interfering molecule. Thus, the phenotype characterized by inhibition of exocrine cell differentiation requires inactivation of both Lnx2a and Lnx2b. Human LNX1 is known to destabilize Numb, and we show that inhibition of Numb expression rescues the Lnx2a/b-deficient phenotype. Further, Lnx2a/b inhibition leads to a reduction in the number of Notch active cells in the pancreas. We suggest that Lnx2a/b function to fine tune the regulation of Notch through Numb in the differentiation of cell types in the early zebrafish pancreas. Further, the complex relationships among genotype, phenotype, and morpholino effect in this case may be instructive in the ongoing consideration of morpholino use.

  19. Regulation of voltage-gated ion channels in excitable cells by the ubiquitin ligases Nedd4 and Nedd4-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiorno, Daria; Schuetz, Friderike; Poronnik, Philip; Adams, David J

    2011-01-01

    The electrical excitability of neurons is mediated primarily by voltage-gated ion channels, particularly voltage-gated Na(+) (Na(v)), K(+) (K(v)) and Cl(-) (ClC) channels. Cells regulate their electrical excitability by controlling not only the activity, but also the number of individual ion channels in the plasma membrane. There exist several mechanisms for regulating levels of voltage-gated ion channels: transcription and translation, retention and export from the endoplasmic reticulum as well as insertion and retrieval from the plasma membrane. Alterations in voltage-gated ion channel activity, composition and distribution can contribute to the pathophysiology of epilepsy, hypertension, neuropathic and inflammatory pain. One mechanism for retrieval is ubiquitination. Here specific ubiquitin ligases bind to membrane proteins to modulate and regulate their cellular fate. In this review, we focus on Nedd4 and Nedd4-2 ubiquitin ligases and the mechanisms by which they regulate voltage-gated ion channels and describe a novel paradigm on the mechanisms that underpin aberrant ion channel function in neurological disorders.

  20. Cinnamate:CoA ligase initiates the biosynthesis of a benzoate-derived xanthone phytoalexin in Hypericum calycinum cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaid, Mariam M; Sircar, Debabrata; Müller, Andreas; Beuerle, Till; Liu, Benye; Ernst, Ludger; Hänsch, Robert; Beerhues, Ludger

    2012-11-01

    Although a number of plant natural products are derived from benzoic acid, the biosynthesis of this structurally simple precursor is poorly understood. Hypericum calycinum cell cultures accumulate a benzoic acid-derived xanthone phytoalexin, hyperxanthone E, in response to elicitor treatment. Using a subtracted complementary DNA (cDNA) library and sequence information about conserved coenzyme A (CoA) ligase motifs, a cDNA encoding cinnamate:CoA ligase (CNL) was isolated. This enzyme channels metabolic flux from the general phenylpropanoid pathway into benzenoid metabolism. HcCNL preferred cinnamic acid as a substrate but failed to activate benzoic acid. Enzyme activity was strictly dependent on the presence of Mg²⁺ and K⁺ at optimum concentrations of 2.5 and 100 mM, respectively. Coordinated increases in the Phe ammonia-lyase and HcCNL transcript levels preceded the accumulation of hyperxanthone E in cell cultures of H. calycinum after the addition of the elicitor. HcCNL contained a carboxyl-terminal type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal made up by the tripeptide Ser-Arg-Leu, which directed an amino-terminal reporter fusion to the peroxisomes. Masking the targeting signal by carboxyl-terminal reporter fusion led to cytoplasmic localization. A phylogenetic tree consisted of two evolutionarily distinct clusters. One cluster was formed by CoA ligases related to benzenoid metabolism, including HcCNL. The other cluster comprised 4-coumarate:CoA ligases from spermatophytes, ferns, and mosses, indicating divergence of the two clades prior to the divergence of the higher plant lineages.

  1. Ubiquitin ligase UBE3C promotes melanoma progression by increasing epithelial-mesenchymal transition in melanoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    TANG, Li; Yi, Xue-Mei; Chen, Jia; Chen, Fu-Juan; Lou, Wei; Gao, Yun-Lu; Zhou, Jing; Su, Li-Na; Xu, Xin; Lu, Jia-Qing; Ma, Jun; Yu, Ning; Ding, Yang-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive type of skin cancer, exhibiting extensive local invasion and early distant metastasis. Aberrant expression of ubiquitin-protein ligase E3C (UBE3C) plays a key role in tumor development and progression. In the present study, we analyzed UBE3C expression in samples of cancerous and normal skin tissue. Levels of UBE3C expression were much higher in primary and metastatic melanoma tissues than in normal skin, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma or basal cell carcinom...

  2. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase SCF(Cyclin F) Transmits AKT Signaling to the Cell-Cycle Machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Rajarshi; Bonacci, Thomas; Wang, Xianxi; Truong, Andrew; Arceci, Anthony; Zhang, Yanqiong; Mills, Christine A; Kernan, Jennifer L; Liu, Pengda; Emanuele, Michael J

    2017-09-26

    The oncogenic AKT kinase is a key regulator of apoptosis, cell growth, and cell-cycle progression. Despite its important role in proliferation, it remains largely unknown how AKT is mechanistically linked to the cell cycle. We show here that cyclin F, a substrate receptor F-box protein for the SCF (Skp1/Cul1/F-box) family of E3 ubiquitin ligases, is a bona fide AKT substrate. Cyclin F expression oscillates throughout the cell cycle, a rare feature among the 69 human F-box proteins, and all of its known substrates are involved in proliferation. AKT phosphorylation of cyclin F enhances its stability and promotes assembly into productive E3 ligase complexes. Importantly, expression of mutant versions of cyclin F that cannot be phosphorylated by AKT impair cell-cycle entry. Our data suggest that cyclin F transmits mitogen signaling through AKT to the core cell-cycle machinery. This discovery has potential implications for proliferative control in malignancies where AKT is activated. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. E3 ligase CHIP and Hsc70 regulate Kv1.5 protein expression and function in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peili; Kurata, Yasutaka; Maharani, Nani; Mahati, Endang; Higaki, Katsumi; Hasegawa, Akira; Shirayoshi, Yasuaki; Yoshida, Akio; Kondo, Tatehito; Kurozawa, Youichi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Hisatome, Ichiro

    2015-09-01

    Kv1.5 confers ultra-rapid delayed-rectifier potassium channel current (IKur) which contributes to repolarization of the atrial action potential. Kv1.5 proteins, degraded via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, decreased in some atrial fibrillation patients. Carboxyl-terminus heat shock cognate 70-interacting protein (CHIP), an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is known to ubiquitinate short-lived proteins. Here, we investigated the roles of CHIP in Kv1.5 degradation to provide insights into the mechanisms of Kv1.5 decreases and treatments targeting Kv1.5 for atrial fibrillation. Coexpression of CHIP with Kv1.5 in HEK293 cells increased Kv1.5 protein ubiquitination and decreased the protein level. Immunofluorescence revealed decreases of Kv1.5 proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum and on the cell membrane. A siRNA against CHIP suppressed Kv1.5 protein ubiquitination and increased its protein level. CHIP mutants, lacking either the N-terminal tetratricopeptide region domain or the C-terminal U-box domain, failed to exert these effects on Kv1.5 proteins. Immunoprecipitation showed that CHIP formed complexes with Kv1.5 proteins and heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70). Effects of Hsc70 on Kv1.5 were similar to CHIP by altering interaction of CHIP with Kv1.5 protein. Coexpression of CHIP and Hsc70 with Kv1.5 additionally enhanced Kv1.5 ubiquitination. Kv1.5 currents were decreased by overexpression of CHIP or Hsc70 but were increased by knockdown of CHIP or Hsc70 in HEK 293 cells stably expressing Kv1.5. These effects of CHIP and Hsc70 were also observed on endogenous Kv1.5 in HL-1 mouse cardiomyocytes, decreasing IKur and prolonging action potential duration. These results indicate that CHIP decreases the Kv1.5 protein level and functional channel by facilitating its degradation in concert with chaperone Hsc70.

  4. DNA ligase IV and artemis act cooperatively to suppress homologous recombination in human cells: implications for DNA double-strand break repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Aya; Saito, Shinta; So, Sairei; Hashimoto, Mitsumasa; Iwabuchi, Kuniyoshi; Watabe, Haruka; Adachi, Noritaka

    2013-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) are two major pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs); however, their respective roles in human somatic cells remain to be elucidated. Here we show using a series of human gene-knockout cell lines that NHEJ repairs nearly all of the topoisomerase II- and low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage, while it negatively affects survival of cells harbouring replication-associated DSBs. Intriguingly, we find that loss of DNA ligase IV, a critical NHEJ ligase, and Artemis, an NHEJ factor with endonuclease activity, independently contribute to increased resistance to replication-associated DSBs. We also show that loss of Artemis alleviates hypersensitivity of DNA ligase IV-null cells to low-dose radiation- and topoisomerase II-induced DSBs. Finally, we demonstrate that Artemis-null human cells display increased gene-targeting efficiencies, particularly in the absence of DNA ligase IV. Collectively, these data suggest that DNA ligase IV and Artemis act cooperatively to promote NHEJ, thereby suppressing HR. Our results point to the possibility that HR can only operate on accidental DSBs when NHEJ is missing or abortive, and Artemis may be involved in pathway switching from incomplete NHEJ to HR.

  5. DNA ligase IV and artemis act cooperatively to suppress homologous recombination in human cells: implications for DNA double-strand break repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Kurosawa

    Full Text Available Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ and homologous recombination (HR are two major pathways for repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs; however, their respective roles in human somatic cells remain to be elucidated. Here we show using a series of human gene-knockout cell lines that NHEJ repairs nearly all of the topoisomerase II- and low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage, while it negatively affects survival of cells harbouring replication-associated DSBs. Intriguingly, we find that loss of DNA ligase IV, a critical NHEJ ligase, and Artemis, an NHEJ factor with endonuclease activity, independently contribute to increased resistance to replication-associated DSBs. We also show that loss of Artemis alleviates hypersensitivity of DNA ligase IV-null cells to low-dose radiation- and topoisomerase II-induced DSBs. Finally, we demonstrate that Artemis-null human cells display increased gene-targeting efficiencies, particularly in the absence of DNA ligase IV. Collectively, these data suggest that DNA ligase IV and Artemis act cooperatively to promote NHEJ, thereby suppressing HR. Our results point to the possibility that HR can only operate on accidental DSBs when NHEJ is missing or abortive, and Artemis may be involved in pathway switching from incomplete NHEJ to HR.

  6. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria protects cells against oxidative stress and improves mitochondrial DNA base excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Mansour; Keijzers, Guido; Maynard, Scott; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Desler, Claus; Hickson, Ian D; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2014-04-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is the most prominent DNA repair pathway in human mitochondria. BER also results in a temporary generation of AP-sites, single-strand breaks and nucleotide gaps. Thus, incomplete BER can result in the generation of DNA repair intermediates that can disrupt mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription and generate mutations. We carried out BER analysis in highly purified mitochondrial extracts from human cell lines U2OS and HeLa, and mouse brain using a circular DNA substrate containing a lesion at a specific position. We found that DNA ligation is significantly slower than the preceding mitochondrial BER steps. Overexpression of DNA ligase III in mitochondria improved the rate of overall BER, increased cell survival after menadione induced oxidative stress and reduced autophagy following the inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complex I by rotenone. Our results suggest that the amount of DNA ligase III in mitochondria may be critical for cell survival following prolonged oxidative stress, and demonstrate a functional link between mitochondrial DNA damage and repair, cell survival upon oxidative stress, and removal of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagy.

  7. The U-Box/ARM E3 ligase PUB13 regulates cell death, defense, and flowering time in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Ahn, Il-Pyung; Ning, Yuese; Park, Chan-Ho; Zeng, Lirong; Whitehill, Justin G A; Lu, Haibin; Zhao, Qingzhen; Ding, Bo; Xie, Qi; Zhou, Jian-Min; Dai, Liangying; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2012-05-01

    The components in plant signal transduction pathways are intertwined and affect each other to coordinate plant growth, development, and defenses to stresses. The role of ubiquitination in connecting these pathways, particularly plant innate immunity and flowering, is largely unknown. Here, we report the dual roles for the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Plant U-box protein13 (PUB13) in defense and flowering time control. In vitro ubiquitination assays indicated that PUB13 is an active E3 ubiquitin ligase and that the intact U-box domain is required for the E3 ligase activity. Disruption of the PUB13 gene by T-DNA insertion results in spontaneous cell death, the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and salicylic acid (SA), and elevated resistance to biotrophic pathogens but increased susceptibility to necrotrophic pathogens. The cell death, hydrogen peroxide accumulation, and resistance to necrotrophic pathogens in pub13 are enhanced when plants are pretreated with high humidity. Importantly, pub13 also shows early flowering under middle- and long-day conditions, in which the expression of SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 and FLOWERING LOCUS T is induced while FLOWERING LOCUS C expression is suppressed. Finally, we found that two components involved in the SA-mediated signaling pathway, SID2 and PAD4, are required for the defense and flowering-time phenotypes caused by the loss of function of PUB13. Taken together, our data demonstrate that PUB13 acts as an important node connecting SA-dependent defense signaling and flowering time regulation in Arabidopsis.

  8. Two transgenic mouse models for β-subunit components of succinate-CoA ligase yielding pleiotropic metabolic alterations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kacso, Gergely; Ravasz, Dora; Doczi, Judit;

    2016-01-01

    -forming activity. Bioenergetic parameters including substrate-level phosphorylation (SLP) were not different between wild-type and Sucla2 heterozygote mice unless a submaximal pharmacological inhibition of SUCL was concomitantly present. mtDNA contents were moderately decreased, but blood carnitine esters were...... expression, yielding double heterozygote mice with no alterations in GTP-forming activity or SLP, but more pronounced changes in mtDNA content and blood carnitine esters, and an increase in succinate dehydrogenase activity. We conclude that a partial reduction in Sucla2 elicits rebound increases in Suclg2...

  9. Two transgenic mouse models for β-subunit components of succinate-CoA ligase yielding pleiotropic metabolic alterations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kacso, Gergely; Ravasz, Dora; Doczi, Judit

    2016-01-01

    -forming activity. Bioenergetic parameters including substrate-level phosphorylation (SLP) were not different between wild-type and Sucla2 heterozygote mice unless a submaximal pharmacological inhibition of SUCL was concomitantly present. mtDNA contents were moderately decreased, but blood carnitine esters were...... expression, yielding double heterozygote mice with no alterations in GTP-forming activity or SLP, but more pronounced changes in mtDNA content and blood carnitine esters, and an increase in succinate dehydrogenase activity. We conclude that a partial reduction in Sucla2 elicits rebound increases in Suclg2...

  10. The stress phenotype makes cancer cells addicted to CDT2, a substrate receptor of the CRL4 ubiquitin ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivero, Martina; Dettori, Daniela; Arena, Sabrina; Zecchin, Davide; Lantelme, Erica; Di Renzo, Maria Flavia

    2014-08-15

    CDT2/L2DTL/RAMP is one of the substrate receptors of the Cullin Ring Ubiquitin Ligase 4 that targets for ubiquitin mediated degradation a number of substrates, such as CDT1, p21 and CHK1, involved in the regulation of cell cycle and survival. Here we show that CDT2 depletion was alone able to induce the apoptotic death in 12/12 human cancer cell lines from different tissues, regardless of the mutation profile and CDT2 expression level. Cell death was associated to rereplication and to loss of CDT1 degradation. Conversely, CDT2 depletion did not affect non-transformed human cells, such as immortalized kidney, lung and breast cell lines, and primary cultures of endothelial cells and osteoblasts. The ectopic over-expression of an activated oncogene, such as the mutation-activated RAS or the amplified MET in non-transformed immortalized breast cell lines and primary human osteoblasts, respectively, made cells transformed in vitro, tumorigenic in vivo, and susceptible to CDT2 loss. The widespread effect of CDT2 depletion in different cancer cells suggests that CDT2 is not in a synthetic lethal interaction to a single specific pathway. CDT2 likely is a non-oncogene to which transformed cells become addicted because of their enhanced cellular stress, such as replicative stress and DNA damage.

  11. Mdm2 ligase dead mutants did not act in a dominant negative manner to re-activate p53, but promoted tumor cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaroop, Manju; Sun, Yi

    2003-01-01

    Mdm2 (murine double minute 2) is an oncogene, first identified in BALB/c 3T3 cells. Over-expression and gene amplification of Mdm2 were found in a variety of human cancers. Recently, Mdm2 was found to be an E3 ubiquitin ligase that promotes degradation of p53, which contributes significantly to its oncogenic activity. In this study, we test a hypothesis that Mdm2 ligase dead mutants, which retained p53 binding activity but lost degradation activity, would act in a dominant negative manner to re-activate p53, especially upon stressed conditions. Five Mdm2 constructs expressing wild-type and E3 ligase-dead Mdm2 proteins were generated in a Tet-Off system and transfected into MCF-7 breast cancer cells (p53+/+ with Mdm2 overexpression) as well as MCF10A immortalized breast cells (p53+/+ without Mdm2 overexpression) as a normal control. We found that expression of Mdm2 mutants were tightly regulated by doxycycline. Withdrawal of doxycycline in culture medium triggered overexpression of Mdm2 mutants. However, expression of ligase dead mutants in MCF7 and MCF10A cells did not reactivate p53 as shown by a luciferase-reporter transcription assay and Western blot of p53 and its downstream target p21 under either unstressed condition or after exposure to DNA damaging agents. Biologically, over-expression of Mdm2 mutants had no effect on p53-induced apoptosis following DNA damage. Interestingly, over-expression of Mdm2 mutants promoted growth of MCF7 tumor cells probably via a p53-independent mechanism. Over-expression of Mdm2 mutants, however, had no effect on the growth of normal MCF10A cells and did not cause their transformation. Thus, ligase dead mutants of Mdm2 did not act in a dominant negative manner to reactivate p53 and they are not oncogenes in MCF10A cells.

  12. Structure and function of the first full-length murein peptide ligase (Mpl cell wall recycling protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debanu Das

    Full Text Available Bacterial cell walls contain peptidoglycan, an essential polymer made by enzymes in the Mur pathway. These proteins are specific to bacteria, which make them targets for drug discovery. MurC, MurD, MurE and MurF catalyze the synthesis of the peptidoglycan precursor UDP-N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanyl-γ-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelyl-D-alanyl-D-alanine by the sequential addition of amino acids onto UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (UDP-MurNAc. MurC-F enzymes have been extensively studied by biochemistry and X-ray crystallography. In gram-negative bacteria, ∼30-60% of the bacterial cell wall is recycled during each generation. Part of this recycling process involves the murein peptide ligase (Mpl, which attaches the breakdown product, the tripeptide L-alanyl-γ-D-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelate, to UDP-MurNAc. We present the crystal structure at 1.65 Å resolution of a full-length Mpl from the permafrost bacterium Psychrobacter arcticus 273-4 (PaMpl. Although the Mpl structure has similarities to Mur enzymes, it has unique sequence and structure features that are likely related to its role in cell wall recycling, a function that differentiates it from the MurC-F enzymes. We have analyzed the sequence-structure relationships that are unique to Mpl proteins and compared them to MurC-F ligases. We have also characterized the biochemical properties of this enzyme (optimal temperature, pH and magnesium binding profiles and kinetic parameters. Although the structure does not contain any bound substrates, we have identified ∼30 residues that are likely to be important for recognition of the tripeptide and UDP-MurNAc substrates, as well as features that are unique to Psychrobacter Mpl proteins. These results provide the basis for future mutational studies for more extensive function characterization of the Mpl sequence-structure relationships.

  13. PUB13, a U-box/ARM E3 ligase, regulates plant defense, cell death, and flowering time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Dai, Liangying; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2012-08-01

    The ubiquitination pathway is involved in a variety of cellular processes in plant growth, development, and immune responses. However, the function of this pathway in connecting plant development and innate immunity is still largely unknown. Recently, we characterized the U-box/ARM E3 ubiquitin ligase PUB13, which regulates both immune responses and flowering time in Arabidopsis. Here, we show that the rice Spl11 gene can complement the cell death and flowering functions of PUB13 in the pub13 mutant. In addition, HFR1, which functions mainly in photomorphogenesis, was identified as one of the PUB13-interacting proteins through yeast two-hybrid screening and pull-down assays. Because the flowering phenotype of pub13 depends on photoperiod, we propose that PUB13 may regulate HFR1 to fine-tune photomorphogenesis and flowering time in Arabidopsis.

  14. Rice RING protein OSBBI1 with E3 ligase activity confers broad-spectrum resistance against Magnaporthe oryzae by modifying the cell wall defence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Li; Zuhua He; Sihui Zhong; Guojun Li; Qun Li; Bizeng Mao; Yiwen Deng; Huijuan Zhang; Longjun Zeng; Fengming Song

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that E3 ligases play critical roles in diverse biological processes, including innate immune responses in plants. However, the mechanism of the E3 ligase involvement in plant innate immunity is unclear.We report that a rice gene, OsBBI1, encoding a RING finger protein with E3 ligase activity, mediates broad-spectrum disease resistance. The expression of OSBBI1 was induced by rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, as well as chemical inducers, benzothiadiazole and salicylic acid. Biochemical analysis revealed that OsBBI1 protein possesses E3ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro. Genetic analysis revealed that the loss of OsBBI1 function in a Tos17-insertion line increased susceptibility, while the overexpression of OsBBI1 in transgenic plants conferred enhanced resistance to multiple races of M.oryzae. This indicates that OsBBI1 modulates broad-spectrum resistance against the blast fungus. The OsBBII-overexpressing plants showed higher levels of H,O, accumulation in cells and higher levels of phenolic compounds and cross-linking of proteins in cell walls at infection sites by M. Oryzae compared with wild-type(WT)plants. The cell walls were thicker in the OsBB11-overexpressing plants and thinner in the mutant plants than in the WT plants. Our results suggest that OsBBH modulates broad-spectrum resistance to blast fungus by modifying cell wall defence responses. The functional characterization of OsBBI1 provides insight into the E3 ligase-mediated innate immunity, and a practical tool for constructing broad-spectrum resistance against the most destructive disease in rice.

  15. The CUL4-DDB1 ubiquitin ligase complex controls adult and embryonic stem cell differentiation and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Buckley, Shannon M; Cimmino, Luisa; Guillamot, Maria; Strikoudis, Alexandros; Cang, Yong; Goff, Stephen P; Aifantis, Iannis

    2015-11-27

    Little is known on post-transcriptional regulation of adult and embryonic stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Here we characterize the role of Ddb1, a component of the CUL4-DDB1 ubiquitin ligase complex. Ddb1 is highly expressed in multipotent hematopoietic progenitors and its deletion leads to abrogation of both adult and fetal hematopoiesis, targeting specifically transiently amplifying progenitor subsets. However, Ddb1 deletion in non-dividing lymphocytes has no discernible phenotypes. Ddb1 silencing activates Trp53 pathway and leads to significant effects on cell cycle progression and rapid apoptosis. The abrogation of hematopoietic progenitor cells can be partially rescued by simultaneous deletion of Trp53. Conversely, depletion of DDB1 in embryonic stem cell (ESC) leads to differentiation albeit negative effects on cell cycle and apoptosis. Mass spectrometry reveals differing protein interactions between DDB1 and distinct DCAFs, the substrate recognizing components of the E3 complex, between cell types. Our studies identify CUL4-DDB1 complex as a novel post-translational regulator of stem and progenitor maintenance and differentiation.

  16. Overexpressed ubiquitin ligase Cullin7 in breast cancer promotes cell proliferation and invasion via down-regulating p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Hongsheng [Department of Histology and Embryology, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan 523808, Guangdong (China); Wu, Fenping [The 7th People’s Hospital of Chengdu, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China); Wang, Yan [The Second School of Clinical Medicine, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan 523808, Guangdong (China); Yan, Chong [School of Pharmacy, Guangdong Medical College, Dongguan 523808, Guangdong (China); Su, Wenmei, E-mail: wenmeisutg@126.com [Oncology of Affiliated Hospital Guangdong Medical College, Zhanjiang 524000, Guangdong (China)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Cullin7 is overexpressed in human breast cancer samples. • Cullin7 stimulated proliferation and invasion of breast cancer cells. • Inhibition of p53 contributes to Cullin7-induced proliferation and invasion. - Abstract: Ubiquitin ligase Cullin7 has been identified as an oncogene in some malignant diseases such as choriocarcinoma and neuroblastoma. However, the role of Cullin7 in breast cancer carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we compared Cullin7 protein levels in breast cancer tissues with normal breast tissues and identified significantly higher expression of Cullin7 protein in breast cancer specimens. By overexpressing Cullin7 in breast cancer cells HCC1937, we found that Cullin7 could promote cell growth and invasion in vitro. In contrast, the cell growth and invasion was inhibited by silencing Cullin7 in breast cancer cell BT474. Moreover, we demonstrated that Cullin7 promoted breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion via down-regulating p53 expression. Thus, our study provided evidence that Cullin7 functions as a novel oncogene in breast cancer and may be a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer management.

  17. Cellular DNA ligase I is recruited to cytoplasmic vaccinia virus factories and masks the role of the vaccinia ligase in viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paran, Nir; De Silva, Frank S; Senkevich, Tatiana G; Moss, Bernard

    2009-12-17

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) encodes DNA polymerase and additional proteins that enable cytoplasmic replication. We confirmed the ability of VACV DNA ligase mutants to replicate and tested the hypothesis that cellular ligases compensate for loss of viral gene expression. RNA silencing of human DNA ligase I expression and a small molecule inhibitor of human DNA ligase I [corrected] severely reduced replication of viral DNA in cells infected with VACV ligase-deficient mutants, indicating that the cellular enzyme plays a complementary role. Replication of ligase-deficient VACV was greatly reduced and delayed in resting primary cells, correlating with initial low levels of ligase I and subsequent viral induction and localization of ligase I in virus factories. These studies indicate that DNA ligation is essential for poxvirus replication and explain the ability of ligase deletion mutants to replicate in dividing cells but exhibit decreased pathogenicity in mice. Encoding its own ligase might allow VACV to "jump-start" DNA synthesis.

  18. Role of SKP1-CUL1-F-Box-Protein (SCF) E3 Ubiquitin Ligases in Skin Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Ming Xie; Wenyi Wei; Yi Sun

    2013-01-01

    Many biological processes such as cell proliferation,differentiation,and cell death depend precisely on the timely synthesis and degradation of key regulatory proteins.While protein synthesis can be regulated at multiple levels,protein degradation is mainly controlled by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS),which consists of two distinct steps:(1) ubiquitylation of targeted protein by E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme,E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and E3 ubiquitin ligase,and (2) subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome.Among all E3 ubiquitin ligases,the SCF (SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein) E3 ligases are the largest family and are responsible for the turnover of many key regulatory proteins.Aberrant regulation of SCF E3 ligases is associated with various human diseases,such as cancers,including skin cancer.In this review,we provide a comprehensive overview of all currently published data to define a promoting role of SCF E3 ligases in the development of skin cancer.The future directions in this area of research are also discussed with an ultimate goal to develop small molecule inhibitors of SCF E3 ligases as a novel approach for the treatment of human skin cancer.Furthermore,altered components or substrates of SCF E3 ligases may also be developed as the biomarkers for early diagnosis or predicting prognosis.

  19. TRIM4; a novel mitochondrial interacting RING E3 ligase, sensitizes the cells to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Dhanendra; Prajapati, Paresh; Lavie, Julie; Singh, Kritarth; Lakshmi, Sripada; Bhatelia, Khyati; Roy, Milton; Singh, Rochika; Bénard, Giovanni; Singh, Rajesh

    2015-12-01

    The emerging evidences suggest that posttranslational modification of target protein by ubiquitin (Ub) not only regulate its turnover through ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) but is a critical regulator of various signaling pathways. During ubiquitination, E3 ligase recognizes the target protein and determines the topology of ubiquitin chains. In current study, we studied the role of TRIM4, a member of the TRIM/RBCC protein family of RING E3 ligase, in regulation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced cell death. TRIM4 is expressed differentially in human tissues and expressed in most of the analyzed human cancer cell lines. The subcellular localization studies showed that TRIM4 forms distinct cytoplasmic speckle like structures which transiently interacts with mitochondria. The expression of TRIM4 induces mitochondrial aggregation and increased level of mitochondrial ROS in the presence of H2O2. It sensitizes the cells to H2O2 induced death whereas knockdown reversed the effect. TRIM4 potentiates the loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and cytochrome c release in the presence of H2O2. The analysis of TRIM4 interacting proteins showed its interaction with peroxiredoxin 1 (PRX1), including other proteins involved in regulation of mitochondrial and redox homeostasis. TRIM4 interaction with PRX1 is critical for the regulation of H2O2 induced cell death. Collectively, the evidences in the current study suggest the role of TRIM4 in regulation of oxidative stress induced cell death.

  20. The Arabidopsis EDR1 Protein Kinase Negatively Regulates the ATL1 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase to Suppress Cell Death[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Irene; Gu, Yangnan; Qi, Dong; Dubiella, Ullrich

    2014-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Arabidopsis thaliana ENHANCED DISEASE RESISTANCE1 (EDR1) gene confer enhanced programmed cell death under a variety of abiotic and biotic stress conditions. All edr1 mutant phenotypes can be suppressed by missense mutations in the KEEP ON GOING gene, which encodes a trans-Golgi network/early endosome (TGN/EE)-localized E3 ubiquitin ligase. Here, we report that EDR1 interacts with a second E3 ubiquitin ligase, ARABIDOPSIS TOXICOS EN LEVADURA1 (ATL1), and negatively regulates its activity. Overexpression of ATL1 in transgenic Arabidopsis induced severe growth inhibition and patches of cell death, while transient overexpression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves induced cell death and tissue collapse. The E3 ligase activity of ATL1 was required for both of these processes. Importantly, we found that ATL1 interacts with EDR1 on TGN/EE vesicles and that EDR1 suppresses ATL1-mediated cell death in N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis. Lastly, knockdown of ATL1 expression suppressed cell death phenotypes associated with the edr1 mutant and made Arabidopsis hypersusceptible to powdery mildew infection. Taken together, our data indicate that ATL1 is a positive regulator of programmed cell death and EDR1 negatively regulates ATL1 activity at the TGN/EE and thus controls stress responses initiated by ATL1-mediated ubiquitination events. PMID:25398498

  1. Characterisation of ATP-dependent Mur ligases involved in the biogenesis of cell wall peptidoglycan in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulika Munshi

    Full Text Available ATP-dependent Mur ligases (Mur synthetases play essential roles in the biosynthesis of cell wall peptidoglycan (PG as they catalyze the ligation of key amino acid residues to the stem peptide at the expense of ATP hydrolysis, thus representing potential targets for antibacterial drug discovery. In this study we characterized the division/cell wall (dcw operon and identified a promoter driving the co-transcription of mur synthetases along with key cell division genes such as ftsQ and ftsW. Furthermore, we have extended our previous investigations of MurE to MurC, MurD and MurF synthetases from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Functional analyses of the pure recombinant enzymes revealed that the presence of divalent cations is an absolute requirement for their activities. We also observed that higher concentrations of ATP and UDP-sugar substrates were inhibitory for the activities of all Mur synthetases suggesting stringent control of the cytoplasmic steps of the peptidoglycan biosynthetic pathway. In line with the previous findings on the regulation of mycobacterial MurD and corynebacterial MurC synthetases via phosphorylation, we found that all of the Mur synthetases interacted with the Ser/Thr protein kinases, PknA and PknB. In addition, we critically analyzed the interaction network of all of the Mur synthetases with proteins involved in cell division and cell wall PG biosynthesis to re-evaluate the importance of these key enzymes as novel therapeutic targets in anti-tubercular drug discovery.

  2. Relationship between genetic polymorphisms of DNA ligase 1 and non-small cell lung cancer susceptibility and radiosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, H; He, X; Yin, L; Guo, W J; Xia, Y Y; Jiang, Z X

    2015-06-26

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between genetic polymorphisms in DNA ligase 1 (LIG1) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) susceptibility and radiosensitivity in a Chinese population. This was a case-control study that included 352 NSCLC patients and 448 healthy controls. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was conducted to detect HaeIII polymorphisms in exon 6 of the LIG1 gene in this popula-tion. This information was used to observe the effects of radiation in pa-tients with different genotypes in order to determine the genotypes as-sociated with radiosensitivity. The CC genotype and C allele frequency were significantly higher in the NSCLC group than in the control group (P = 0.012 and P = 0.023, respectively). The relative risk of experienc-ing NSCLC was 2.55 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12-3.98] for CC homozygous patients and 0.87 (95%CI, 0.46-1.88) for AA homozygous patients. Analysis of LIG1 genetic polymorphisms and radiosensitiv-ity of NSCLC patients showed that AA homozygous patients were sig-nificantly more radiosensitive than the control group (AA vs AC, P = 0.014; AA vs CC, P < 0.001; AC vs CC, P = 0.023). Therefore, the LIG1 CC genotype was associated with susceptibility to NSCLC, and the AA genotype demonstrated increased radiosensitivity compared to the AC and CC genotypes.

  3. Regulation of amino acid transporter trafficking by mTORC1 in primary human trophoblast cells is mediated by the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Fredrick J; Dimasuay, Kris Genelyn; Kanai, Yoshikatsu; Powell, Theresa L; Jansson, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Changes in placental amino acid transfer directly contribute to altered fetal growth, which increases the risk for perinatal complications and predisposes for the development of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease later in life. Placental amino acid transfer is critically dependent on the expression of specific transporters in the plasma membrane of the trophoblast, the transporting epithelium of the human placenta. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating this process are largely unknown. Nedd4-2 is an ubiquitin ligase that catalyses the ubiquitination of proteins, resulting in proteasomal degradation. We hypothesized that inhibition of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) decreases amino acid uptake in primary human trophoblast (PHT) cells by activation of Nedd4-2, which increases transporter ubiquitination resulting in decreased transporter expression in the plasma membrane. mTORC 1 inhibition increased the expression of Nedd4-2, promoted ubiquitination and decreased the plasma membrane expression of SNAT2 (an isoform of the System A amino acid transporter) and LAT1 (a System L amino acid transporter isoform), resulting in decreased cellular amino acid uptake. Nedd4-2 silencing markedly increased the trafficking of SNAT2 and LAT1 to the plasma membrane, which stimulated cellular amino acid uptake. mTORC1 inhibition by silencing of raptor failed to decrease amino acid transport following Nedd4-2 silencing. In conclusion, we have identified a novel link between mTORC1 signalling and ubiquitination, a common posttranslational modification. Because placental mTORC1 is inhibited in fetal growth restriction and activated in fetal overgrowth, we propose that regulation of placental amino acid transporter ubiquitination by mTORC1 and Nedd4-2 constitutes a molecular mechanisms underlying abnormal fetal growth.

  4. Cinnamate:CoA Ligase Initiates the Biosynthesis of a Benzoate-Derived Xanthone Phytoalexin in Hypericum calycinum Cell Cultures1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaid, Mariam M.; Sircar, Debabrata; Müller, Andreas; Beuerle, Till; Liu, Benye; Ernst, Ludger; Hänsch, Robert; Beerhues, Ludger

    2012-01-01

    Although a number of plant natural products are derived from benzoic acid, the biosynthesis of this structurally simple precursor is poorly understood. Hypericum calycinum cell cultures accumulate a benzoic acid-derived xanthone phytoalexin, hyperxanthone E, in response to elicitor treatment. Using a subtracted complementary DNA (cDNA) library and sequence information about conserved coenzyme A (CoA) ligase motifs, a cDNA encoding cinnamate:CoA ligase (CNL) was isolated. This enzyme channels metabolic flux from the general phenylpropanoid pathway into benzenoid metabolism. HcCNL preferred cinnamic acid as a substrate but failed to activate benzoic acid. Enzyme activity was strictly dependent on the presence of Mg2+ and K+ at optimum concentrations of 2.5 and 100 mm, respectively. Coordinated increases in the Phe ammonia-lyase and HcCNL transcript levels preceded the accumulation of hyperxanthone E in cell cultures of H. calycinum after the addition of the elicitor. HcCNL contained a carboxyl-terminal type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal made up by the tripeptide Ser-Arg-Leu, which directed an amino-terminal reporter fusion to the peroxisomes. Masking the targeting signal by carboxyl-terminal reporter fusion led to cytoplasmic localization. A phylogenetic tree consisted of two evolutionarily distinct clusters. One cluster was formed by CoA ligases related to benzenoid metabolism, including HcCNL. The other cluster comprised 4-coumarate:CoA ligases from spermatophytes, ferns, and mosses, indicating divergence of the two clades prior to the divergence of the higher plant lineages. PMID:22992510

  5. Two distinct DNA ligase activities in mitotic extracts of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, W; Tappe, N; Talamantez, J; Friedberg, E C; Tomkinson, A E

    1997-01-01

    Four biochemically distinct DNA ligases have been identified in mammalian cells. One of these enzymes, DNA ligase I, is functionally homologous to the DNA ligase encoded by the Saccharomyces cerevisiae CDC9 gene. Cdc9 DNA ligase has been assumed to be the only species of DNA ligase in this organism. In the present study we have identified a second DNA ligase activity in mitotic extracts of S. cerevisiae with chromatographic properties different from Cdc9 DNA ligase, which is the major DNA joi...

  6. Ubiquitin ligase MARCH 8 cooperates with CD83 to control surface MHC II expression in thymic epithelium and CD4 T cell selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haiyin; Jain, Reema; Guan, Jing; Vuong, Vivian; Ishido, Satoshi; La Gruta, Nicole L; Gray, Daniel H; Villadangos, Jose A; Mintern, Justine D

    2016-08-22

    Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) expression is tightly regulated, being subjected to cell type-specific mechanisms that closely control its levels at the cell surface. Ubiquitination by the E3 ubiquitin ligase MARCH 1 regulates MHC II expression in dendritic cells and B cells. In this study, we demonstrate that the related ligase MARCH 8 is responsible for regulating surface MHC II in thymic epithelial cells (TECs). March8(-/-) mice have elevated MHC II at the surface of cortical TECs and autoimmune regulator (AIRE)(-) medullary TECs (mTECs), but not AIRE(+) mTECs. Despite this, thymic and splenic CD4(+) T cell numbers and repertoires remained unaltered in March8(-/-) mice. Notably, the ubiquitination of MHC II by MARCH 8 is controlled by CD83. Mice expressing a mutated form of CD83 (Cd83(anu/anu) mice) have impaired CD4(+) T cell selection, but deleting March8 in Cd83(anu/anu) mice restored CD4(+) T cell selection to normal levels. Therefore, orchestrated regulation of MHC II surface expression in TECs by MARCH 8 and CD83 plays a major role in CD4(+) T cell selection. Our results also highlight the specialized use of ubiquitinating machinery in distinct antigen-presenting cell types, with important functional consequences and implications for therapeutic manipulation.

  7. Plant cells in vitro under altered gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymchuk, D O

    1998-07-01

    Establishing the role of gravity in plant requires information about how gravity regulates the metabolism of individual cells. Plant cells and tissues in vitro are valuable models for such purpose. Disrupted intercellular relations in such models have allowed to elucidate both the gravity role in non-specialised to gravity plant cells and the correlative relation role of an intact plant organism. The data obtained from non-numerous space and clinostat experiments with plant cells in vitro have demonstrated that their metabolism is sensitive to g-environment. The most experiments have shown a decrease in the biomass production and cell proliferation of spaceflight samples compared with ground controls, although there is study reporting of increased biomass production in an anise suspension culture and D. carota crown gall tissue culture. At the same time, results of experiments with single carrot cells and tomato callus culture demonstrated similarities in differentiation process in microgravity and in ground controls. Noted ultrastructural arrangement in cells, especially mitochondria and plastids, have been related to altered energy load and functions of organelles in microgravity, as well as changes in the lipid peroxidation and the content of malonic dyaldehyde in a haplopappus tissue culture under altered gravity supposed with modification of membrane structural-functional state. This article focuses on growth aspects of the cultured cells in microgravity and under clinostat conditions and considers those aspects that require further analysis.

  8. A new monoclonal antibody against DNA ligase I is a suitable marker of cell proliferation in cultured cell and tissue section samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Vitolo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The extensive characterization of the replicative human DNA ligase I (LigI undertaken in the last decade demonstrated that the level of this protein strongly correlates with the rate of cell proliferation. This may allow to expand the repertoire of clinical biomarkers for the analysis of cell proliferation.We have produced a new monoclonal antibody (5H5 against LigI and exploited it as cell proliferation marker in Western blotting and immunofluorescence as well as in immunohistochemistry on paraffin tissue sections. The Western blot analysis showed that the LigI level detected by 5H5 antibody is high in all proliferating cells. On the contrary the protein is down regulated in resting human fibroblast and peripheral blood lymphocytes. Immunofluorescence analysis on cultured HeLa cells showed that 5H5 antibody labels all proliferating cells and displays the same staining pattern of BrdU in S-phase nuclei. Finally the analysis of serial sections of inflamed tonsils and NHL lymph nodes (either frozen or paraffin embedded demonstrated that 5H5 marks the same population of cells as the Ki-67 antibody. Our results demonstrate that 5H5 antibody is a valuable tool for labeling proliferating cells that can be conveniently used in Western blotting, immunocytochemistry and immunohistochemistry.

  9. Phosphorylated Sp1 is the regulator of DNA-PKcs and DNA ligase IV transcription of daunorubicin-resistant leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Yayoi; Mizutani, Naoki; Inoue, Minami; Omori, Yukari; Tamiya-Koizumi, Keiko; Takagi, Akira; Kojima, Tetsuhito; Suzuki, Motoshi; Nozawa, Yoshinori; Minami, Yosuke; Ohnishi, Kazunori; Naoe, Tomoki; Murate, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a serious problem faced in the treatment of malignant tumors. In this study, we characterized the expression of non-homologous DNA end joining (NHEJ) components, a major DNA double strand break (DSB) repair mechanism in mammals, in K562 cell and its daunorubicin (DNR)-resistant subclone (K562/DNR). K562/DNR overexpressed major enzymes of NHEJ, DNA-PKcs and DNA ligase IV, and K562/DNR repaired DSB more rapidly than K562 after DNA damage by neocarzinostatin (MDR1-independent radiation-mimetic). Overexpressed DNA-PKcs and DNA ligase IV were also observed in DNR-resistant HL60 (HL60/DNR) cells as compared with parental HL60 cells. Expression level of DNA-PKcs mRNA paralleled its protein level, and the promoter activity of DNA-PKcs of K562/DNR was higher than that of K562, and the 5'-region between -49bp and the first exon was important for its activity. Because this region is GC-rich, we tried to suppress Sp1 family transcription factor using mithramycin A (MMA), a specific Sp1 family inhibitor, and siRNAs for Sp1 and Sp3. Both MMA and siRNAs suppressed DNA-PKcs expression. Higher serine-phosphorylated Sp1 but not total Sp1 of both K562/DNR and HL60/DNR was observed compared with their parental K562 and HL60 cells. DNA ligase IV expression of K562/DNR was also suppressed significantly with Sp1 family protein inhibition. EMSA and ChIP assay confirmed higher binding of Sp1 and Sp3 with DNA-PKcs 5'-promoter region of DNA-PKcs of K562/DNR than that of K562. Thus, the Sp1 family transcription factor affects important NHEJ component expressions in anti-cancer drug-resistant malignant cells, leading to the more aggressive MDR phenotype.

  10. DNA ligase I, the replicative DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Timothy R L; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2012-01-01

    Multiple DNA ligation events are required to join the Okazaki fragments generated during lagging strand DNA synthesis. In eukaryotes, this is primarily carried out by members of the DNA ligase I family. The C-terminal catalytic region of these enzymes is composed of three domains: a DNA binding domain, an adenylation domain and an OB-fold domain. In the absence of DNA, these domains adopt an extended structure but transition into a compact ring structure when they engage a DNA nick, with each of the domains contacting the DNA. The non-catalytic N-terminal region of eukaryotic DNA ligase I is responsible for the specific participation of these enzymes in DNA replication. This proline-rich unstructured region contains the nuclear localization signal and a PCNA interaction motif that is critical for localization to replication foci and efficient joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I initially engages the PCNA trimer via this interaction motif which is located at the extreme N-terminus of this flexible region. It is likely that this facilitates an additional interaction between the DNA binding domain and the PCNA ring. The similar size and shape of the rings formed by the PCNA trimer and the DNA ligase I catalytic region when it engages a DNA nick suggest that these proteins interact to form a double-ring structure during the joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I also interacts with replication factor C, the factor that loads the PCNA trimeric ring onto DNA. This interaction, which is regulated by phosphorylation of the non-catalytic N-terminus of DNA ligase I, also appears to be critical for DNA replication.

  11. Fine-tuning of hematopoietic stem cell homeostasis: Novel role for ubiquitin ligase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Yokomizo (Tomomasa); E.A. Dzierzak (Elaine)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractHomeostasis of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) is a tightly regulated process, controlled by intrinsic and extrinsic signals. Although a variety of molecules involved in HSC maintenance and self-renewal are known, it remains unclear how robust HSC homeostasis is achieved. In this issue

  12. The ubiquitin ligase HectH9 regulates transcriptional activation by Myc and is essential for tumor cell proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adhikary, Sovana; Marinoni, Federica; Hock, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    The Myc oncoprotein forms a binary activating complex with its partner protein, Max, and a ternary repressive complex that, in addition to Max, contains the zinc finger protein Miz1. Here we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase HectH9 ubiquitinates Myc in vivo and in vitro, forming a lysine 63-linked...

  13. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  14. Metabolic alterations in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Brunelli, Matteo; Piva, Francesco; Modena, Alessandra; Bimbatti, Davide; Fantinel, Emanuela; Santini, Daniele; Cheng, Liang; Cascinu, Stefano; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-11-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a metabolic disease, being characterized by the dysregulation of metabolic pathways involved in oxygen sensing (VHL/HIF pathway alterations and the subsequent up-regulation of HIF-responsive genes such as VEGF, PDGF, EGF, and glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4, which justify the RCC reliance on aerobic glycolysis), energy sensing (fumarate hydratase-deficient, succinate dehydrogenase-deficient RCC, mutations of HGF/MET pathway resulting in the metabolic Warburg shift marked by RCC increased dependence on aerobic glycolysis and the pentose phosphate shunt, augmented lipogenesis, and reduced AMPK and Krebs cycle activity) and/or nutrient sensing cascade (deregulation of AMPK-TSC1/2-mTOR and PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathways). We analyzed the key metabolic abnormalities underlying RCC carcinogenesis, highlighting those altered pathways that may represent potential targets for the development of more effective therapeutic strategies.

  15. CUL4-DDB1-CDT2 E3 Ligase Regulates the Molecular Clock Activity by Promoting Ubiquitination-Dependent Degradation of the Mammalian CRY1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xin; Zhang, Deqiang; Guha, Anirvan; Arthurs, Blake; Cazares, Victor; Gupta, Neil; Yin, Lei

    2015-01-01

    The CUL4-DDB1 E3 ligase complex serves as a critical regulator in various cellular processes, including cell proliferation, DNA damage repair, and cell cycle progression. However, whether this E3 ligase complex regulates clock protein turnover and the molecular clock activity in mammalian cells is unknown. Here we show that CUL4-DDB1-CDT2 E3 ligase ubiquitinates CRY1 and promotes its degradation both in vitro and in vivo. Depletion of the major components of this E3 ligase complex, including Ddb1, Cdt2, and Cdt2-cofactor Pcna, leads to CRY1 stabilization in cultured cells or in the mouse liver. CUL4A-DDB1-CDT2 E3 ligase targets lysine 585 within the C-terminal region of CRY1 protein, shown by the CRY1 585KA mutant's resistance to ubiquitination and degradation mediated by the CUL4A-DDB1 complex. Surprisingly, both depletion of Ddb1 and over-expression of Cry1-585KA mutant enhance the oscillatory amplitude of the Bmal1 promoter activity without altering its period length, suggesting that CUL4A-DDB1-CDT2 E3 targets CRY1 for degradation and reduces the circadian amplitude. All together, we uncovered a novel biological role for CUL4A-DDB1-CDT2 E3 ligase that regulates molecular circadian behaviors via promoting ubiquitination-dependent degradation of CRY1.

  16. MALT1 cleaves the E3 ubiquitin ligase HOIL-1 in activated T cells, generating a dominant negative inhibitor of LUBAC-induced NF-κB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elton, Lynn; Carpentier, Isabelle; Staal, Jens; Driege, Yasmine; Haegman, Mira; Beyaert, Rudi

    2016-02-01

    Human paracaspase 1 (PCASP1), better known as mucosa associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation 1 (MALT1), plays a key role in immunity and inflammation by regulating gene expression in lymphocytes and other immune cell types. Deregulated MALT1 activity has been implicated in autoimmunity, immunodeficiency and certain types of lymphoma. As a scaffold MALT1 assembles downstream signaling proteins for nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, while its proteolytic activity further enhances NF-κB activation by cleaving NF-κB inhibitory proteins. MALT1 also processes and inactivates a number of mRNA destabilizing proteins, which further fine-tunes gene expression. MALT1 protease inhibitors are currently developed for therapeutic targeting. Here we show that T cell activation, as well as overexpression of the oncogenic fusion protein API2-MALT1, induces the MALT1-mediated cleavage of haem-oxidized IRP2 ubiquitin ligase 1 (HOIL-1). In addition, to acting as a K48-polyubiquitin specific E3 ubiquitin ligase for different substrates, HOIL-1 co-operates in a catalytic-independent manner with the E3 ubiquitin ligase HOIL-1L interacting protein (HOIP) as part of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC). Intriguingly, cleavage of HOIL-1 does not directly abolish its ability to support HOIP-induced NF-κB signaling, which is still mediated by the N-terminal cleavage fragment, but generates a C-terminal fragment with LUBAC inhibitory properties. We propose that MALT1-mediated HOIL-1 cleavage provides a gain-of-function mechanism that is involved in the negative feedback regulation of NF-κB signaling.

  17. BTB-BACK Domain Protein POB1 Suppresses Immune Cell Death by Targeting Ubiquitin E3 ligase PUB17 for Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesmar, Joelle; McLellan, Hazel; Yang, Chengwei; Craig, Adam; Zhang, Cunjin; Moore, Jonathan David; Tian, Zhendong; Birch, Paul R. J.; Sadanandom, Ari

    2017-01-01

    Hypersensitive response programmed cell death (HR-PCD) is a critical feature in plant immunity required for pathogen restriction and prevention of disease development. The precise control of this process is paramount to cell survival and an effective immune response. The discovery of new components that function to suppress HR-PCD will be instrumental in understanding the regulation of this fundamental mechanism. Here we report the identification and characterisation of a BTB domain E3 ligase protein, POB1, that functions to suppress HR-PCD triggered by evolutionarily diverse pathogens. Nicotiana benthamiana and tobacco plants with reduced POB1 activity show accelerated HR-PCD whilst those with increased POB1 levels show attenuated HR-PCD. We demonstrate that POB1 dimerization and nuclear localization are vital for its function in HR-PCD suppression. Using protein-protein interaction assays, we identify the Plant U-Box E3 ligase PUB17, a well established positive regulator of plant innate immunity, as a target for POB1-mediated proteasomal degradation. Using confocal imaging and in planta immunoprecipitation assays we show that POB1 interacts with PUB17 in the nucleus and stimulates its degradation. Mutated versions of POB1 that show reduced interaction with PUB17 fail to suppress HR-PCD, indicating that POB1-mediated degradation of PUB17 U-box E3 ligase is an important step for negative regulation of specific immune pathways in plants. Our data reveals a new mechanism for BTB domain proteins in suppressing HR-PCD in plant innate immune responses. PMID:28056034

  18. Biochemical and structural characterization of DNA ligases from bacteria and archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolizzi, Giulia; Wagner, Gerd K.; Bowater, Richard P.

    2016-01-01

    DNA ligases are enzymes that seal breaks in the backbones of DNA, leading to them being essential for the survival of all organisms. DNA ligases have been studied from many different types of cells and organisms and shown to have diverse sizes and sequences, with well conserved specific sequences that are required for enzymatic activity. A significant number of DNA ligases have been isolated or prepared in recombinant forms and, here, we review their biochemical and structural characterization. All DNA ligases contain an essential lysine that transfers an adenylate group from a co-factor to the 5′-phosphate of the DNA end that will ultimately be joined to the 3′-hydroxyl of the neighbouring DNA strand. The essential DNA ligases in bacteria use β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (β-NAD+) as their co-factor whereas those that are essential in other cells use adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) as their co-factor. This observation suggests that the essential bacterial enzyme could be targeted by novel antibiotics and the complex molecular structure of β-NAD+ affords multiple opportunities for chemical modification. Several recent studies have synthesized novel derivatives and their biological activity against a range of DNA ligases has been evaluated as inhibitors for drug discovery and/or non-natural substrates for biochemical applications. Here, we review the recent advances that herald new opportunities to alter the biochemical activities of these important enzymes. The recent development of modified derivatives of nucleotides highlights that the continued combination of structural, biochemical and biophysical techniques will be useful in targeting these essential cellular enzymes. PMID:27582505

  19. Types of Ubiquitin Ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morreale, Francesca Ester; Walden, Helen

    2016-03-24

    Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification of proteins involved in a variety of cellular processes. Ubiquitination requires the sequential action of three enzymes: E1 (ubiquitin-activating enzymes), E2 (ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes), and E3 (ubiquitin ligases). This SnapShot highlights the main types of E3 ubiquitin ligases, which can be classified in three families depending on the presence of characteristic domains and on the mechanism of ubiquitin transfer to the substrate protein.

  20. Knockdown of glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit by siRNA causes the gold nanoparticles-induced cytotoxicity in lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Liu

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (GNPs have shown promising medical applications in cancer treatment involved in the regulation of intracellular redox balance. Previously, we have reported that GNPs can trigger apoptosis and necrosis in human lung cancer cells (A549 when L-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO was used to decrease the expression of intracellular glutathione (GSH. Herein, we investigated the cytotoxicity of GNPs toward lung cancer cells under the glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC was silenced by siRNA. Our results showed that GNPs cause apoptosis and necrosis in cells transfected with GCLC siRNA by elevating intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS. These findings demonstrated that the regulation of glutathione synthesis by GCLC siRNA in A549 cells can initiate the gold nanoparticles-induced cytotoxicity.

  1. Mammalian DNA ligase III: Molecular cloning, chromosomal localization, and expression in spermatocytes undergoing meiotic recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingwen; Danehower, S.; Besterman, J.M.; Husain, I. [Glaxo Research Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Three biochemically distinct DNA ligase activities have been identified in mammalian cell extracts. We have recently purified DNA ligase II and DNA ligase III to near homogeneity from bovine liver and testis tissue, respectively. Amino acid sequencing studies indicated that these enzymes are encoded by the same gene. In the present study, human and murine cDNA clones encoding DNA ligase III were isolated with probes based on the peptide sequences. The human DNA ligase III cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 862 amino acids, whose sequence is more closely related to those of the DNA ligases encoded by poxviruses than to replicative DNA ligases, such as human DNA ligase I. In vitro transcription and translation of the cDNA produced a catalytically active DNA ligase similar in size and substrate specificity to the purified bovine enzyme. The DNA ligase III gene was localized to human chromosome 17, which eliminated this gene as a candidate for the cancer-prone disease Bloom syndrome that is associated with DNA joining abnormalities. DNA ligase III is ubiquitously expressed at low levels, except in the testes, in which the steady-state levels of DNA ligase III mRNA are at least 10-fold higher than those detected in other tissues and cells. Since DNA ligase I mRNA is also present at high levels in the testes, we examined the expression of the DNA ligase genes during spermatogenesis. DNA ligase I mRNA expression correlated with the contribution of proliferating supermatogonia cells to the testes, in agreement with the previously defined role of this enzyme in DNA replications. In contrast, elevated levels of DNA ligase III mRNA were observed in primary supermatocytes undergoing recombination prior to the first meiotic division. Therefore, we suggest that DNA ligase III seals DNA strand breaks that arise during the process of meiotic recombination in germ cells and as a consequence of DNA damage in somatic cells. 62 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Altered calcium signaling in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Teneale A; Yapa, Kunsala T D S; Monteith, Gregory R

    2015-10-01

    It is the nature of the calcium signal, as determined by the coordinated activity of a suite of calcium channels, pumps, exchangers and binding proteins that ultimately guides a cell's fate. Deregulation of the calcium signal is often deleterious and has been linked to each of the 'cancer hallmarks'. Despite this, we do not yet have a full understanding of the remodeling of the calcium signal associated with cancer. Such an understanding could aid in guiding the development of therapies specifically targeting altered calcium signaling in cancer cells during tumorigenic progression. Findings from some of the studies that have assessed the remodeling of the calcium signal associated with tumorigenesis and/or processes important in invasion and metastasis are presented in this review. The potential of new methodologies is also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  3. The Role of E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Cbl Proteins in β-Elemene Reversing Multi-Drug Resistance of Human Gastric Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Jun Hu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies indicate that β-elemene, a compound isolated from the Chinese herbal medicine Curcuma wenyujin, is capable of reversing tumor MDR, although the mechanism remains elusive. In this study, β-Elemene treatment markedly increased the intracellular accumulation of doxorubicin (DOX and rhodamine 123 in both K562/DNR and SGC7901/ADR cells and significantly inhibited the expression of P-gp. Treatment of SGC7901/ADR cells with β-elemene led to downregulation of Akt phosphorylation and significant upregulation of the E3 ubiquitin ligases, c-Cbl and Cbl-b. Importantly, β-elemene significantly enhanced the anti-tumor activity of DOX in nude mice bearing SGC7901/ADR xenografts. Taken together, our results suggest that β-elemene may target P-gp-overexpressing leukemia and gastric cancer cells to enhance the efficacy of DOX treatment.

  4. Rice ubiquitin ligase EL5 prevents root meristematic cell death under high nitrogen conditions and interacts with a cytosolic GAPDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Yoko; Mochizuki, Susumu; Koiwai, Hanae; Kondo, Katsuhiko; Kishimoto, Kyutaro; Katoh, Etsuko; Minami, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    Root formation in rice transformants overexpressing mutated EL5 (mEL5) was severely inhibited because of meristematic cell death. Cell death was caused by nitrogen sources, particularly nitrate forms, in the culture medium. Nitrite treatment increased the cytokinin contents in roots, but mEL5 contained more cytokinins than non-transformants. Transcriptome profiling showed overlaps between nitrite-responsive genes in non-transformants and genes with altered expression in untreated mEL5. These results indicate that impairment of EL5 function activates nitrogen signaling despite the absence of a nitrogen source. Physical interaction between the EL5 C-terminal region and a cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, OsGapC2, was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Elucidation of the role of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in oxidative cell death in plants is expected in future.

  5. DNA Ligase IV regulates XRCC4 nuclear localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Dailia B; Kozlov, Mikhail; Chavez, Jose; Chu, Jennifer; Malu, Shruti; Hanna, Mary; Cortes, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    DNA Ligase IV, along with its interacting partner XRCC4, are essential for repairing DNA double strand breaks by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Together, they complete the final ligation step resolving the DNA break. Ligase IV is regulated by XRCC4 and XLF. However, the mechanism(s) by which Ligase IV control the NHEJ reaction and other NHEJ factor(s) remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that a C-terminal region of Ligase IV (aa 620-800), which encompasses a NLS, the BRCT I, and the XRCC4 interacting region (XIR), is essential for nuclear localization of its co-factor XRCC4. In Ligase IV deficient cells, XRCC4 showed deregulated localization remaining in the cytosol even after induction of DNA double strand breaks. DNA Ligase IV was also required for efficient localization of XLF into the nucleus. Additionally, human fibroblasts that harbor hypomorphic mutations within the Ligase IV gene displayed decreased levels of XRCC4 protein, implicating that DNA Ligase IV is also regulating XRCC4 stability. Our results provide evidence for a role of DNA Ligase IV in controlling the cellular localization and protein levels of XRCC4.

  6. The archipelago ubiquitin ligase subunit acts in target tissue to restrict tracheal terminal cell branching and hypoxic-induced gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan T Mortimer

    Full Text Available The Drosophila melanogaster gene archipelago (ago encodes the F-box/WD-repeat protein substrate specificity factor for an SCF (Skp/Cullin/F-box-type polyubiquitin ligase that inhibits tumor-like growth by targeting proteins for degradation by the proteasome. The Ago protein is expressed widely in the fly embryo and larva and promotes degradation of pro-proliferative proteins in mitotically active cells. However the requirement for Ago in post-mitotic developmental processes remains largely unexplored. Here we show that Ago is an antagonist of the physiologic response to low oxygen (hypoxia. Reducing Ago activity in larval muscle cells elicits enhanced branching of nearby tracheal terminal cells in normoxia. This tracheogenic phenotype shows a genetic dependence on sima, which encodes the HIF-1α subunit of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor dHIF and its target the FGF ligand branchless (bnl, and is enhanced by depletion of the Drosophila Von Hippel Lindau (dVHL factor, which is a subunit of an oxygen-dependent ubiquitin ligase that degrades Sima/HIF-1α protein in metazoan cells. Genetic reduction of ago results in constitutive expression of some hypoxia-inducible genes in normoxia, increases the sensitivity of others to mild hypoxic stimulus, and enhances the ability of adult flies to recover from hypoxic stupor. As a molecular correlate to these genetic data, we find that Ago physically associates with Sima and restricts Sima levels in vivo. Collectively, these findings identify Ago as a required element of a circuit that suppresses the tracheogenic activity of larval muscle cells by antagonizing the Sima-mediated transcriptional response to hypoxia.

  7. Progressive Purkinje cell degeneration in tambaleante mutant mice is a consequence of a missense mutation in HERC1 E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoji Mashimo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The HERC gene family encodes proteins with two characteristic domains: HECT and RCC1-like. Proteins with HECT domains have been described to function as ubiquitin ligases, and those that contain RCC1-like domains have been reported to function as GTPases regulators. These two activities are essential in a number of important cellular processes such as cell cycle, cell signaling, and membrane trafficking. Mutations affecting these domains have been found associated with retinitis pigmentosa, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and cancer. In humans, six HERC genes have been reported which encode two subgroups of HERC proteins: large (HERC1-2 and small (HERC3-6. The giant HERC1 protein was the first to be identified. It has been involved in membrane trafficking and cell proliferation/growth through its interactions with clathrin, M2-pyruvate kinase, and TSC2 proteins. Mutations affecting other members of the HERC family have been found to be associated with sterility and growth retardation. Here, we report the characterization of a recessive mutation named tambaleante, which causes progressive Purkinje cell degeneration leading to severe ataxia with reduced growth and lifespan in homozygous mice aged over two months. We mapped this mutation in mouse chromosome 9 and then performed positional cloning. We found a GA transition at position 1448, causing a Gly to Glu substitution (Gly483Glu in the highly conserved N-terminal RCC1-like domain of the HERC1 protein. Successful transgenic rescue, with either a mouse BAC containing the normal copy of Herc1 or with the human HERC1 cDNA, validated our findings. Histological and biochemical studies revealed extensive autophagy associated with an increase of the mutant protein level and a decrease of mTOR activity. Our observations concerning this first mutation in the Herc1 gene contribute to the functional annotation of the encoded E3 ubiquitin ligase and underline the crucial and unexpected role of this protein

  8. Cell proliferation alterations in Chlorella cells under stress conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rioboo, Carmen [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, 15008 A Coruna (Spain); O' Connor, Jose Enrique [Laboratorio de Citomica, Unidad Mixta de Investigacion CIPF-UVEG, Centro de Investigacion Principe Felipe, Avda. Autopista del Saler, 16, 46013 Valencia (Spain); Prado, Raquel; Herrero, Concepcion [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, 15008 A Coruna (Spain); Cid, Angeles, E-mail: cid@udc.es [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n, 15008 A Coruna (Spain)

    2009-09-14

    Very little is known about growth and proliferation in relation to the cell cycle regulation of algae. The lack of knowledge is even greater when referring to the potential toxic effects of pollutants on microalgal cell division. To assess the effect of terbutryn, a triazine herbicide, on the proliferation of the freshwater microalga Chlorella vulgaris three flow cytometric approaches were used: (1) in vivo cell division using 5-,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) staining was measured, (2) the growth kinetics were determined by cytometric cell counting and (3) cell viability was evaluated with the membrane-impermeable double-stranded nucleic acid stain propidium iodide (PI). The results obtained in the growth kinetics study using CFSE to identify the microalgal cell progeny were consistent with those determined by cytometric cell counting. In all C. vulgaris cultures, each mother cell had undergone only one round of division through the 96 h of assay and the cell division occurred during the dark period. Cell division of the cultures exposed to the herbicide was asynchronous. Terbutryn altered the normal number of daughter cells (4 autospores) obtained from each mother cell. The number was only two in the cultures treated with 250 nM. The duration of the lag phase after the exposure to terbutryn could be dependent on the existence of a critical cell size to activate cytoplasmic division. Cell size, complexity and fluorescence of chlorophyll a of the microalgal cells presented a marked light/dark (day/night) cycle, except in the non-dividing 500 nM cultures, where terbutryn arrested cell division at the beginning of the cycle. Viability results showed that terbutryn has an algastatic effect in C. vulgaris cells at this concentration. The rapid and precise determination of cell proliferation by CFSE staining has allowed us to develop a model for assessing both the cell cycle of C. vulgaris and the in vivo effects of pollutants on growth and

  9. Ubiquitin ligase RNF123 mediates degradation of heterochromatin protein 1α and β in lamin A/C knock-down cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Chaturvedi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The nuclear lamina is a key determinant of nuclear architecture, integrity and functionality in metazoan nuclei. Mutations in the human lamin A gene lead to highly debilitating genetic diseases termed as laminopathies. Expression of lamin A mutations or reduction in levels of endogenous A-type lamins leads to nuclear defects such as abnormal nuclear morphology and disorganization of heterochromatin. This is accompanied by increased proteasomal degradation of certain nuclear proteins such as emerin, nesprin-1α, retinoblastoma protein and heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1. However, the pathways of proteasomal degradation have not been well characterized. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To investigate the mechanisms underlying the degradation of HP1 proteins upon lamin misexpression, we analyzed the effects of shRNA-mediated knock-down of lamins A and C in HeLa cells. Cells with reduced levels of expression of lamins A and C exhibited proteasomal degradation of HP1α and HP1β but not HP1γ. Since specific ubiquitin ligases are upregulated in lamin A/C knock-down cells, further studies were carried out with one of these ligases, RNF123, which has a putative HP1-binding motif. Ectopic expression of GFP-tagged RNF123 directly resulted in degradation of HP1α and HP1β. Mutational analysis showed that the canonical HP1-binding pentapeptide motif PXVXL in the N-terminus of RNF123 was required for binding to HP1 proteins and targeting them for degradation. The role of endogenous RNF123 in the degradation of HP1 isoforms was confirmed by RNF123 RNAi experiments. Furthermore, FRAP analysis suggested that HP1β was displaced from chromatin in laminopathic cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data support a role for RNF123 ubiquitin ligase in the degradation of HP1α and HP1β upon lamin A/C knock-down. Hence lamin misexpression can cause degradation of mislocalized proteins involved in key nuclear processes by induction of specific components of

  10. RING E3 ligases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Seok Keun; Ryu, Moon Young; Kim, Jong Hum

    2017-01-01

    response pathways of plants through various molecular and genetic studies. In particular, it was recently discovered that ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), a regulatory mechanism for protein turn over, is greatly involved in the stress responsive pathways. In the UPS, many E3 ligases play key roles...... in recognizing and tethering poly-ubiquitins on target proteins for subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. Here we discuss the roles of RING ligases that have been defined in related to abiotic stress responses in plants....

  11. Overexpression of the human ubiquitin E3 ligase CUL4A alleviates hypoxia-reoxygenation injury in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Can [Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Central South University, 172 Tong Zipo Road, Changsha 410013 (China); Zhang, Li-Yang [Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Cancer Invasion of Ministry of Education, Cancer Research Institute, Central South University, 110 Xiang Ya Road, Changsha 410078 (China); Chen, Hong [Department of Developmental Biology, School of Biological Science and Technology, Central South University, 172 Tong Zipo Road, Changsha 410013 (China); Xiao, Ling [Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Central South University, 172 Tong Zipo Road, Changsha 410013 (China); Liu, Xian-Peng, E-mail: xliu@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 1501 Kings Highway, Shreveport, LA 71130-3932 (United States); Zhang, Jian-Xiang, E-mail: jianxiangzhang@yahoo.cn [Department of Histology and Embryology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Central South University, 172 Tong Zipo Road, Changsha 410013 (China); Department of Developmental Biology, School of Biological Science and Technology, Central South University, 172 Tong Zipo Road, Changsha 410013 (China)

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of human CUL4A (hCUL4A) in PC12 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of hCUL4A on hypoxia-reoxygenation injury were investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer hCUL4A suppresses apoptosis and DNA damage and thus promotes cell survival. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer hCUL4A regulates apoptosis-related proteins and cell cycle regulators. -- Abstract: The ubiquitin E3 ligase CUL4A plays important roles in diverse cellular processes including carcinogenesis and proliferation. It has been reported that the expression of CUL4A can be induced by hypoxic-ischemic injury. However, the effect of elevated expression of CUL4A on hypoxia-reoxygenation injury is currently unclear. In this study, human CUL4A (hCUL4A) was expressed in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells using adenoviral vector-mediated gene transfer, and the effects of hCUL4A expression on hypoxia-reoxygenation injury were investigated. In PC12 cells subjected to hypoxia and reoxygenation, we found that hCUL4A suppresses apoptosis and DNA damage by regulating apoptosis-related proteins and cell cycle regulators (Bcl-2, caspase-3, p53 and p27); consequently, hCUL4A promotes cell survival. Taken together, our results reveal the beneficial effects of hCUL4A in PC12 cells upon hypoxia-reoxygenation injury.

  12. Shigella IpaH0722 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Effector Targets TRAF2 to Inhibit PKC–NF-κB Activity in Invaded Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashida, Hiroshi; Nakano, Hiroyasu; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2013-01-01

    NF-κB plays a central role in modulating innate immune responses to bacterial infections. Therefore, many bacterial pathogens deploy multiple mechanisms to counteract NF-κB activation. The invasion of and subsequent replication of Shigella within epithelial cells is recognized by various pathogen recognition receptors as pathogen-associated molecular patterns. These receptors trigger innate defense mechanisms via the activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. Here, we show the inhibition of the NF-κB activation by the delivery of the IpaH E3 ubiquitin ligase family member IpaH0722 using Shigella's type III secretion system. IpaH0722 dampens the acute inflammatory response by preferentially inhibiting the PKC-mediated activation of NF-κB by ubiquitinating TRAF2, a molecule downstream of PKC, and by promoting its proteasome-dependent degradation. PMID:23754945

  13. Phosphorylation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF41 by the kinase Par-1b is required for epithelial cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Katherine T; Piwnica-Worms, Helen

    2014-01-15

    The establishment and maintenance of cell polarity is an essential property governing organismal homeostasis, and loss of polarity is a common feature of cancer cells. The ability of epithelial cells to establish apical-basal polarity depends on intracellular signals generated from polarity proteins, such as the Par-1 family of proteins, as well as extracellular signals generated through cell contacts with the extracellular matrix (ECM). The Par-1 family has a well-established role in regulating cell-cell contacts in the form of tight junctions by phosphorylating Par-3. In addition, Par-1 has been shown to impact on cell-ECM interactions by regulating laminin receptor localization and laminin deposition on the basal surface of epithelial cells. Laminins are major structural and signaling components of basement membrane (BM), a sheet of specialized ECM underlying epithelia. In this study, we identify RNF41, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, as a novel Par-1b (also known as MARK2) effector in the cell-ECM pathway. Par-1b binds to and phosphorylates RNF41 on serine 254. Phosphorylation of RNF41 by Par-1b is required for epithelial cells to localize laminin-111 receptors to their basolateral surfaces and to properly anchor to laminin-111. In addition, phosphorylation of RNF41 is required for epithelial cells to establish apical-basal polarity. Our data suggests that phosphorylation of RNF41 by Par-1b regulates basolateral membrane targeting of laminin-111 receptors, thereby facilitating cell anchorage to laminin-111 and ultimately forming the cell-ECM contacts required for epithelial cells to establish apical-basal cell polarity.

  14. Up-regulation of WRN and DNA ligase IIIalpha in chronic myeloid leukemia: consequences for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallmyr, Annahita; Tomkinson, Alan E; Rassool, Feyruz V

    2008-08-15

    Expression of oncogenic BCR-ABL in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) results in increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) that in turn cause increased DNA damage, including DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). We have previously shown increased error-prone repair of DSBs by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) in CML cells. Recent reports have identified alternative NHEJ pathways that are highly error prone, prompting us to examine the role of the alternative NHEJ pathways in BCR-ABL-positive CML. Importantly, we show that key proteins in the major NHEJ pathway, Artemis and DNA ligase IV, are down-regulated, whereas DNA ligase IIIalpha, and the protein deleted in Werner syndrome, WRN, are up-regulated. DNA ligase IIIalpha and WRN form a complex that is recruited to DSBs in CML cells. Furthermore, "knockdown" of either DNA ligase IIIalpha or WRN leads to increased accumulation of unrepaired DSBs, demonstrating that they contribute to the repair of DSBs. These results indicate that altered DSB repair in CML cells is caused by the increased activity of an alternative NHEJ repair pathway, involving DNA ligase IIIalpha and WRN. We suggest that, although the repair of ROS-induced DSBs by this pathway contributes to the survival of CML cells, the resultant genomic instability drives disease progression.

  15. Human Mre11/human Rad50/Nbs1 and DNA ligase IIIalpha/XRCC1 protein complexes act together in an alternative nonhomologous end joining pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della-Maria, Julie; Zhou, Yi; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Kuhnlein, Jeff; Carney, James P; Paull, Tanya T; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2011-09-30

    Recent studies have implicated a poorly defined alternative pathway of nonhomologous end joining (alt-NHEJ) in the generation of large deletions and chromosomal translocations that are frequently observed in cancer cells. Here, we describe an interaction between two factors, hMre11/hRad50/Nbs1 (MRN) and DNA ligase IIIα/XRCC1, that have been linked with alt-NHEJ. Expression of DNA ligase IIIα and the association between MRN and DNA ligase IIIα/XRCC1 are altered in cell lines defective in the major NHEJ pathway. Most notably, DNA damage induced the association of these factors in DNA ligase IV-deficient cells. MRN interacts with DNA ligase IIIα/XRCC1, stimulating intermolecular ligation, and together these proteins join incompatible DNA ends in a reaction that mimics alt-NHEJ. Thus, our results provide novel mechanistic insights into the alt-NHEJ pathway that not only contributes to genome instability in cancer cells but may also be a therapeutic target.

  16. Expression and biochemical characterization of Plasmodium falciparum DNA ligase I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buguliskis, Jeffrey S; Casta, Louis J; Butz, Charles E; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Taraschi, Theodore F

    2007-10-01

    We report that Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) encodes a 912 amino acid ATP-dependent DNA ligase. Protein sequence analysis of Pf DNA ligase I indicates a strong sequence similarity, particularly in the C-terminal region, to DNA ligase I homologues. The activity of recombinant Pf DNA ligase I (PfLigI) was investigated using protein expressed in HEK293 cells. The PfLigI gene product is approximately 94kDa and catalyzes phosphodiester bond formation on a singly nicked DNA substrate. The enzyme is most active at alkaline pH (8.5) and with Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) and ATP as cofactors. Kinetic studies of PfLigI revealed that the enzyme has similar substrate affinity (K(m) 2.6nM) as compared to human DNA ligase I and k(cat) (2.3x10(-3)s(-1)) and k(cat)/K(m) (8.8x10(5)M(-1)s(-1)) which are similar to other ATP-dependent DNA ligases. PfLigI was able to join RNA-DNA substrates only when the RNA sequence was upstream of the nick, confirming that it is DNA ligase I and has no associated DNA ligase III like activity.

  17. Spaceflight alters immune cell function and distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Mandel, Adrian D.; Konstantinova, Irina V.; Berry, Wallace D.; Taylor, Gerald R.; Lesniak, A. T.; Fuchs, Boris B.; Rakhmilevich, Alexander L.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments are described which were performed onboard Cosmos 2044 to determine spaceflight effects on immunologically important cell function and distribution. Results indicate that bone marrow cells from flown and suspended rats exhibited a decreased response to a granulocyte/monocyte colony-stimulating factor compared with the bone marrow cells from control rats. Bone marrow cells showed an increase in the percentage of cells expressing markers for helper T-cells in the myelogenous population and increased percentages of anti-asialo granulocyte/monocyte-1-bearing interleulin-2 receptor bearing pan T- and helper T-cells in the lymphocytic population.

  18. The E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of Trip12 is essential for mouse embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Kajiro

    Full Text Available Protein ubiquitination is a post-translational protein modification that regulates many biological conditions. Trip12 is a HECT-type E3 ubiquitin ligase that ubiquitinates ARF and APP-BP1. However, the significance of Trip12 in vivo is largely unknown. Here we show that the ubiquitin ligase activity of Trip12 is indispensable for mouse embryogenesis. A homozygous mutation in Trip12 (Trip12(mt/mt that disrupts the ubiquitin ligase activity resulted in embryonic lethality in the middle stage of development. Trip12(mt/mt embryos exhibited growth arrest and increased expression of the negative cell cycle regulator p16. In contrast, Trip12(mt/mt ES cells were viable. They had decreased proliferation, but maintained both the undifferentiated state and the ability to differentiate. Trip12(mt/mt ES cells had increased levels of the BAF57 protein (a component of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex and altered gene expression patterns. These data suggest that Trip12 is involved in global gene expression and plays an important role in mouse development.

  19. RNF38 encodes a nuclear ubiquitin protein ligase that modifies p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheren, Jamie E. [Department of Pathology, The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Kassenbrock, C. Kenneth, E-mail: ken.kassenbrock@ucdenver.edu [Department of Pathology, The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Department of Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1878 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •RNF38 is shown to be a nuclear protein with a bipartite nuclear localization signal. •RNF38 protein is purified and shown to have ubiquitin protein ligase (E3) activity. •We show that RNF38 binds p53 and can ubiquitinate p53 in vitro. •Overexpression of RNF38 increases p53 ubiquitination in HEK293T cells. •Overexpression of RNF38 in HEK293T cells alters p53 localization. -- Abstract: The RNF38 gene encodes a RING finger protein of unknown function. Here we demonstrate that RNF38 is a functional ubiquitin protein ligase (E3). We show that RNF38 isoform 1 is localized to the nucleus by a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS). We confirm that RNF38 is a binding partner of p53 and demonstrate that RNF38 can ubiquitinate p53 in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that overexpression of RNF38 in HEK293T cells results in relocalization of p53 to discrete foci associated with PML nuclear bodies. These results suggest RNF38 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that may play a role in regulating p53.

  20. Alternative Okazaki Fragment Ligation Pathway by DNA Ligase III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Arakawa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Higher eukaryotes have three types of DNA ligases: DNA ligase 1 (Lig1, DNA ligase 3 (Lig3 and DNA ligase 4 (Lig4. While Lig1 and Lig4 are present in all eukaryotes from yeast to human, Lig3 appears sporadically in evolution and is uniformly present only in vertebrates. In the classical, textbook view, Lig1 catalyzes Okazaki-fragment ligation at the DNA replication fork and the ligation steps of long-patch base-excision repair (BER, homologous recombination repair (HRR and nucleotide excision repair (NER. Lig4 is responsible for DNA ligation at DNA double strand breaks (DSBs by the classical, DNA-PKcs-dependent pathway of non-homologous end joining (C-NHEJ. Lig3 is implicated in a short-patch base excision repair (BER pathway, in single strand break repair in the nucleus, and in all ligation requirements of the DNA metabolism in mitochondria. In this scenario, Lig1 and Lig4 feature as the major DNA ligases serving the most essential ligation needs of the cell, while Lig3 serves in the cell nucleus only minor repair roles. Notably, recent systematic studies in the chicken B cell line, DT40, involving constitutive and conditional knockouts of all three DNA ligases individually, as well as of combinations thereof, demonstrate that the current view must be revised. Results demonstrate that Lig1 deficient cells proliferate efficiently. Even Lig1/Lig4 double knockout cells show long-term viability and proliferate actively, demonstrating that, at least in DT40, Lig3 can perform all ligation reactions of the cellular DNA metabolism as sole DNA ligase. Indeed, in the absence of Lig1, Lig3 can efficiently support semi-conservative DNA replication via an alternative Okazaki-fragment ligation pathway. In addition, Lig3 can back up NHEJ in the absence of Lig4, and can support NER and HRR in the absence of Lig1. Supporting observations are available in less elaborate genetic models in mouse cells. Collectively, these observations raise Lig3 from a niche-ligase

  1. Alternative Okazaki Fragment Ligation Pathway by DNA Ligase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Iliakis, George

    2015-06-23

    Higher eukaryotes have three types of DNA ligases: DNA ligase 1 (Lig1), DNA ligase 3 (Lig3) and DNA ligase 4 (Lig4). While Lig1 and Lig4 are present in all eukaryotes from yeast to human, Lig3 appears sporadically in evolution and is uniformly present only in vertebrates. In the classical, textbook view, Lig1 catalyzes Okazaki-fragment ligation at the DNA replication fork and the ligation steps of long-patch base-excision repair (BER), homologous recombination repair (HRR) and nucleotide excision repair (NER). Lig4 is responsible for DNA ligation at DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by the classical, DNA-PKcs-dependent pathway of non-homologous end joining (C-NHEJ). Lig3 is implicated in a short-patch base excision repair (BER) pathway, in single strand break repair in the nucleus, and in all ligation requirements of the DNA metabolism in mitochondria. In this scenario, Lig1 and Lig4 feature as the major DNA ligases serving the most essential ligation needs of the cell, while Lig3 serves in the cell nucleus only minor repair roles. Notably, recent systematic studies in the chicken B cell line, DT40, involving constitutive and conditional knockouts of all three DNA ligases individually, as well as of combinations thereof, demonstrate that the current view must be revised. Results demonstrate that Lig1 deficient cells proliferate efficiently. Even Lig1/Lig4 double knockout cells show long-term viability and proliferate actively, demonstrating that, at least in DT40, Lig3 can perform all ligation reactions of the cellular DNA metabolism as sole DNA ligase. Indeed, in the absence of Lig1, Lig3 can efficiently support semi-conservative DNA replication via an alternative Okazaki-fragment ligation pathway. In addition, Lig3 can back up NHEJ in the absence of Lig4, and can support NER and HRR in the absence of Lig1. Supporting observations are available in less elaborate genetic models in mouse cells. Collectively, these observations raise Lig3 from a niche-ligase to a

  2. Raman spectroscopic study of a genetically altered kidney cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Joel; Garcia, Francisco; Centeno, Silvia P.; Joshi, N. V.

    2008-02-01

    A Raman spectroscopic investigation of a genetically altered Human Embryonic Kidney Cell (HEK293) along with a pathologically normal cell has been carried out by a conventional method. The genetic alteration was carried out with a standard protocol by using a Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP). Raman spectra show that there are dramatic differences between the spectrum obtained from a genetically altered cell and that obtained from a pathologically normal cell. The former shows three broad bands; meanwhile the latter shows several sharp peaks corresponding to the ring vibrational modes of Phen, GFP and DNA. The present analysis provides an indication that the force field near Phen located at 64, 65 and 66 was altered during the genetic transformation. The Raman spectrum could be a direct experimental evidence for substantial modifications triggered due to the expression of specific genes.

  3. Noradrenaline increases intracellular glutathione in human astrocytoma U-251 MG cells by inducing glutamate-cysteine ligase protein via β3-adrenoceptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Yasuhiro; Kadoi, Hisatsugu; Yamamuro, Akiko; Ishimaru, Yuki; Maeda, Sadaaki

    2016-02-05

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a critical role in protecting cells from oxidative damage. Since neurons rely on the supply of GSH from astrocytes to maintain optimal intracellular GSH concentrations, the GSH concentration of astrocytes is important for the survival of neighboring neurons against oxidative stress. The neurotransmitter noradrenaline is known to modulate the functions of astrocytes and has been suggested to have neuroprotective properties in neurodegenerative diseases. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective properties of noradrenaline, in this study, we investigated the effect of noradrenaline on the concentrations of intracellular GSH in human U-251 malignant glioma (MG; astrocytoma) cells. Treatment of the cells with noradrenaline for 24h concentration-dependently increased their intracellular GSH concentration. This increase was inhibited by a non-selective β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol and by a selective β3-adrenoceptor antagonist SR59230A, but not by a non-selective α-adrenoceptor antagonist phenoxybenzamine, or by a selective β1-adrenoceptor antagonist atenolol or by a selective β2-adrenoceptor antagonist butoxamine. In addition, the selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist CL316243 increased the intracellular GSH in U-251 MG cells. Treatment of the cells with noradrenaline (10μM) for 24h increased the protein level of the catalytic subunit of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCLc), the rate-limiting enzyme of GSH synthesis; and this increase was inhibited by SR59230A. These results thus suggest that noradrenaline increased the GSH concentration in astrocytes by inducing GCLc protein in them via β3-adrenoceptor stimulation.

  4. Nylon wool purification alters the activation of T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohler, Jillian E; Barnum, Scott R

    2009-02-01

    Purification of lymphocytes, particularly T cells, is commonly performed using nylon wool. This enrichment method selectively retains B cells and some myeloid cells allowing a significantly more pure T cell population to flow through a nylon wool column. T cells purified in this fashion are assumed to be unaltered and functionally naïve, however some studies have suggested aberrant in vitro T cell responses after nylon wool treatment. We found that nylon wool purification significantly altered T cell proliferation, expression of activation markers and production of cytokines. Our results suggest that nylon wool treatment modifies T cell activation responses and that caution should be used when choosing this purification method.

  5. Differential recruitment of DNA Ligase I and III to DNA repair sites

    OpenAIRE

    Mortusewicz, O; Rothbauer, U.; Cardoso, M C; Leonhardt, H.

    2006-01-01

    DNA ligation is an essential step in DNA replication, repair and recombination. Mammalian cells contain three DNA Ligases that are not interchangeable although they use the same catalytic reaction mechanism. To compare the recruitment of the three eukaryotic DNA Ligases to repair sites in vivo we introduced DNA lesions in human cells by laser microirradiation. Time lapse microscopy of fluorescently tagged proteins showed that DNA Ligase III accumulated at microirradiated sites before DNA Liga...

  6. Alteration of cell cycle progression by Sindbis virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ruirong; Saito, Kengo [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Isegawa, Naohisa [Laboratory Animal Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Shirasawa, Hiroshi, E-mail: sirasawa@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)

    2015-07-10

    We examined the impact of Sindbis virus (SINV) infection on cell cycle progression in a cancer cell line, HeLa, and a non-cancerous cell line, Vero. Cell cycle analyses showed that SINV infection is able to alter the cell cycle progression in both HeLa and Vero cells, but differently, especially during the early stage of infection. SINV infection affected the expression of several cell cycle regulators (CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, p21, cyclin A and cyclin B) in HeLa cells and caused HeLa cells to accumulate in S phase during the early stage of infection. Monitoring SINV replication in HeLa and Vero cells expressing cell cycle indicators revealed that SINV which infected HeLa cells during G{sub 1} phase preferred to proliferate during S/G{sub 2} phase, and the average time interval for viral replication was significantly shorter in both HeLa and Vero cells infected during G{sub 1} phase than in cells infected during S/G{sub 2} phase. - Highlights: • SINV infection was able to alter the cell cycle progression of infected cancer cells. • SINV infection can affect the expression of cell cycle regulators. • SINV infection exhibited a preference for the timing of viral replication among the cell cycle phases.

  7. Alterations in ubiquitin ligase Siah-2 and its corepressor N-CoR after P-MAPA immunotherapy and anti-androgen therapy: new therapeutic opportunities for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Patrick Vianna; Apolinário, Letícia Montanholi; Böckelmann, Petra Karla; da Silva Nunes, Iseu; Duran, Nelson; Fávaro, Wagner José

    2015-01-01

    The present study describes the role of the ubiquitin ligase Siah-2 and corepressor N-CoR in controlling androgen receptor (AR) and estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) signaling in an appropriate animal model (Fischer 344 female rats) of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), especially under conditions of anti-androgen therapy with flutamide. Furthermore, this study describes the mechanisms of a promising therapeutic alternative for NMIBC based on Protein aggregate magnesium-ammonium phospholinoleate-palmitoleate anhydride (P-MAPA) intravesical immunotherapy combined with flutamide, involving the interaction among steroid hormone receptors, their regulators and Toll-like receptors (TLRs). Our results demonstrated that increased Siah-2 and AR protein levels and decreased N-CoR, cytochrome P450 (CYP450) and estrogen receptors levels played a critical role in the urothelial carcinogenesis, probably leading to escape of urothelial cancer cells from immune system attack. P-MAPA immunotherapy led to distinct activation of innate immune system TLRs 2 and 4-mediated, resulting in increase of interferon signaling pathway, which was more effective in recovering the immunosuppressive tumor immune microenvironment and in recovering the bladder histology features than BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin) treatments. The AR blockade therapy was important in the modulating of downstream molecules of TLR2 and TLR4 signaling pathway, decreasing the inflammatory cytokines signaling and enhancing the interferon signaling pathway when associated with P-MAPA. Taken together, the data obtained suggest that interferon signaling pathway activation and targeting AR and Siah-2 signals by P-MAPA intravesical immunotherapy alone and/ or in combination with AR blockade may provide novel therapeutic approaches for NMIBC.

  8. Root exudate-induced alterations in Bacillus cereus cell wall contribute to root colonization and plant growth promotion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarnalee Dutta

    Full Text Available The outcome of an interaction between plant growth promoting rhizobacteria and plants may depend on the chemical composition of root exudates (REs. We report the colonization of tobacco, and not groundnut, roots by a non-rhizospheric Bacillus cereus (MTCC 430. There was a differential alteration in the cell wall components of B. cereus in response to the REs from tobacco and groundnut. Attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy revealed a split in amide I region of B. cereus cells exposed to tobacco-root exudates (TRE, compared to those exposed to groundnut-root exudates (GRE. In addition, changes in exopolysaccharides and lipid-packing were observed in B. cereus grown in TRE-amended minimal media that were not detectable in GRE-amended media. Cell-wall proteome analyses revealed upregulation of oxidative stress-related alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, and DNA-protecting protein chain (Dlp-2, in response to GRE and TRE, respectively. Metabolism-related enzymes like 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate coenzyme A ligase and 2-methylcitrate dehydratase and a 60 kDa chaperonin were up-regulated in response to TRE and GRE. In response to B. cereus, the plant roots altered their exudate-chemodiversity with respect to carbohydrates, organic acids, alkanes, and polyols. TRE-induced changes in surface components of B. cereus may contribute to successful root colonization and subsequent plant growth promotion.

  9. Calcium signaling in plant cells in altered gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, E. L.

    2003-10-01

    Changes in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration in altered gravity (microgravity and clinostating) evidence that Ca 2+ signaling can play a fundamental role in biological effects of microgravity. Calcium as a second messenger is known to play a crucial role in stimulus - response coupling for many plant cellular signaling pathways. Its messenger functions are realized by transient changes in the cytosolic ion concentration induced by a variety of internal and external stimuli such as light, hormones, temperature, anoxia, salinity, and gravity. Although the first data on the changes in the calcium balance in plant cells under the influence of altered gravity have appeared in 80 th, a review highlighting the performed research and the possible significance of such Ca 2+ changes in the structural and metabolic rearrangements of plant cells in altered gravity is still lacking. In this paper, an attempt was made to summarize the available experimental results and to consider some hypotheses in this field of research. It is proposed to distinguish between cell gravisensing and cell graviperception; the former is related to cell structure and metabolism stability in the gravitational field and their changes in microgravity (cells not specialized to gravity perception), the latter is related to active use of a gravitational stimulus by cells presumebly specialized to gravity perception for realization of normal space orientation, growth, and vital activity (gravitropism, gravitaxis) in plants. The main experimental data concerning both redistribution of free Ca 2+ ions in plant cell organelles and the cell wall, and an increase in the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration under the influence of altered gravity are presented. Based on the gravitational decompensation hypothesis, the consequence of events occurring in gravisensing cells not specialized to gravity perception under altered gravity are considered in the following order: changes in the cytoplasmic membrane surface

  10. Control of the B cell-intrinsic tolerance programs by ubiquitin ligases Cbl and Cbl-b.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaura, Yasuyuki; Jang, Ihn Kyung; Wang, Yan; Han, Yoon-Chi; Inazu, Tetsuya; Cadera, Emily J; Schlissel, Mark; Hardy, Richard R; Gu, Hua

    2007-05-01

    B cell receptor (BCR) signaling plays a critical role in B cell tolerance and activation. Here, we show that mice with B cell-specific ablation of both Cbl and Cbl-b (Cbl-/-Cblb-/-) manifested systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like autoimmune disease. The Cbl double deficiency resulted in a substantial increase in marginal zone (MZ) and B1 B cells. The mutant B cells were not hyperresponsive in terms of proliferation and antibody production upon BCR stimulation; however, B cell anergy to protein antigen appeared to be impaired. Concomitantly, BCR-proximal signaling, including tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk tyrosine kinase, Phospholipase C-gamma2 (PLC-gamma2), and Rho-family GTP-GDP exchange factor Vav, and Ca2+ mobilization were enhanced, whereas tyrosine phosphorylation of adaptor protein BLNK was substantially attenuated in the mutant B cells. These results suggested that the loss of coordination between these pathways was responsible for the impaired B cell tolerance induction. Thus, Cbl proteins control B cell-intrinsic checkpoint of immune tolerance, possibly through coordinating multiple BCR-proximal signaling pathways during anergy induction.

  11. Non-canonical NF-κB activation and abnormal B cell accumulation in mice expressing ubiquitin protein ligase-inactive c-IAP2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietrich B Conze

    Full Text Available Chromosomal translocations between loci encoding MALT1 and c-IAP2 are common in MALT lymphomas. The resulting fusion proteins lack the c-IAP2 RING domain, the region responsible for its ubiquitin protein ligase (E3 activity. Ectopic expression of the fusion protein activates the canonical NF-κB signaling cascade, but how it does so is controversial and how it promotes MALT lymphoma is unknown. Considering recent reports implicating c-IAP1 and c-IAP2 E3 activity in repression of non-canonical NF-κB signaling, we asked if the c-IAP2/MALT fusion protein can initiate non-canonical NF-κB activation. Here we show that in addition to canonical activation, the fusion protein stabilizes NIK and activates non-canonical NF-κB. Canonical but not non-canonical activation depended on MALT1 paracaspase activity, and expression of E3-inactive c-IAP2 activated non-canonical NF-κB. Mice in which endogenous c-IAP2 was replaced with an E3-inactive mutant accumulated abnormal B cells with elevated non-canonical NF-κB and had increased numbers of B cells with a marginal zone phenotype, gut-associated lymphoid hyperplasia, and other features of MALT lymphoma. Thus, the c-IAP2/MALT1 fusion protein activates NF-κB by two distinct mechanisms, and loss of c-IAP2 E3 activity in vivo is sufficient to induce abnormalities common to MALT lymphoma.

  12. Screen for abnormal mitochondrial phenotypes in mouse embryonic stem cells identifies a model for succinyl-CoA ligase deficiency and mtDNA depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taraka R. Donti

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in subunits of succinyl-CoA synthetase/ligase (SCS, a component of the citric acid cycle, are associated with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, elevation of methylmalonic acid (MMA, and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA depletion. A FACS-based retroviral-mediated gene trap mutagenesis screen in mouse embryonic stem (ES cells for abnormal mitochondrial phenotypes identified a gene trap allele of Sucla2 (Sucla2SAβgeo, which was used to generate transgenic mice. Sucla2 encodes the ADP-specific β-subunit isoform of SCS. Sucla2SAβgeo homozygotes exhibited recessive lethality, with most mutants dying late in gestation (e18.5. Mutant placenta and embryonic (e17.5 brain, heart and muscle showed varying degrees of mtDNA depletion (20–60%. However, there was no mtDNA depletion in mutant liver, where the gene is not normally expressed. Elevated levels of MMA were observed in embryonic brain. SCS-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs demonstrated a 50% reduction in mtDNA content compared with wild-type MEFs. The mtDNA depletion resulted in reduced steady state levels of mtDNA encoded proteins and multiple respiratory chain deficiencies. mtDNA content could be restored by reintroduction of Sucla2. This mouse model of SCS deficiency and mtDNA depletion promises to provide insights into the pathogenesis of mitochondrial diseases with mtDNA depletion and into the biology of mtDNA maintenance. In addition, this report demonstrates the power of a genetic screen that combines gene trap mutagenesis and FACS analysis in mouse ES cells to identify mitochondrial phenotypes and to develop animal models of mitochondrial dysfunction.

  13. Culture adaptation alters transcriptional hierarchies among single human embryonic stem cells reflecting altered patterns of differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Paul J; Au-Young, Janice K; Dadi, SriVidya; Keys, David N; Harrison, Neil J; Jones, Mark; Soneji, Shamit; Enver, Tariq; Sherlock, Jon K; Andrews, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    We have used single cell transcriptome analysis to re-examine the substates of early passage, karyotypically Normal, and late passage, karyotypically Abnormal ('Culture Adapted') human embryonic stem cells characterized by differential expression of the cell surface marker antigen, SSEA3. The results confirmed that culture adaptation is associated with alterations to the dynamics of the SSEA3(+) and SSEA3(-) substates of these cells, with SSEA3(-) Adapted cells remaining within the stem cell compartment whereas the SSEA3(-) Normal cells appear to have differentiated. However, the single cell data reveal that these substates are characterized by further heterogeneity that changes on culture adaptation. Notably the Adapted population includes cells with a transcriptome substate suggestive of a shift to a more naïve-like phenotype in contrast to the cells of the Normal population. Further, a subset of the Normal SSEA3(+) cells expresses genes typical of endoderm differentiation, despite also expressing the undifferentiated stem cell genes, POU5F1 (OCT4) and NANOG, whereas such apparently lineage-primed cells are absent from the Adapted population. These results suggest that the selective growth advantage gained by genetically variant, culture adapted human embryonic stem cells may derive in part from a changed substate structure that influences their propensity for differentiation.

  14. Defects in DNA Ligase I Trigger PCNA Ubiquitination at Lysine 107

    OpenAIRE

    Das-Bradoo, Sapna; Nguyen, Hai Dang; Wood, Jamie L; Ricke, Robin M; Haworth, Justin C.; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin

    2009-01-01

    In all eukaryotes, the ligation of newly synthesized DNA, also known as Okazaki fragments, is catalyzed by DNA ligase I1. An individual with a DNA ligase I deficiency exhibited growth retardation, sunlight sensitivity and severe immunosuppression2, likely due to accumulation of DNA damage. Surprisingly, not much is known about the DNA damage response (DDR) in DNA ligase I-deficient cells. Because DNA replication and DDR pathways are highly conserved in eukaryotes, we utilized Saccharomyces ce...

  15. Altered Proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variants Induced by Exposure to Human Lung Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Rageh Al-Maleki

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei primary diagnostic cultures demonstrate colony morphology variation associated with expression of virulence and adaptation proteins. This study aims to examine the ability of B. pseudomallei colony variants (wild type [WT] and small colony variant [SCV] to survive and replicate intracellularly in A549 cells and to identify the alterations in the protein expression of these variants, post-exposure to the A549 cells. Intracellular survival and cytotoxicity assays were performed followed by proteomics analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. B. pseudomallei SCV survive longer than the WT. During post-exposure, among 259 and 260 protein spots of SCV and WT, respectively, 19 were differentially expressed. Among SCV post-exposure up-regulated proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (CbbA and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were associated with adhesion and virulence. Among the down-regulated proteins, enolase (Eno is implicated in adhesion and virulence. Additionally, post-exposure expression profiles of both variants were compared with pre-exposure. In WT pre- vs post-exposure, 36 proteins were differentially expressed. Of the up-regulated proteins, translocator protein, Eno, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk, ferritin Dps-family DNA binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase B were implicated in invasion and virulence. In SCV pre- vs post-exposure, 27 proteins were differentially expressed. Among the up-regulated proteins, flagellin, Eno, CbbA, Ndk and phenylacetate-coenzyme A ligase have similarly been implicated in adhesion, invasion. Protein profiles differences post-exposure provide insights into association between morphotypic and phenotypic characteristics of colony variants, strengthening the role of B. pseudomallei morphotypes in pathogenesis of melioidosis.

  16. E3 Ubiquitin Ligases Neurobiological Mechanisms: Development to Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Upadhyay

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cells regularly synthesize new proteins to replace old or damaged proteins. Deposition of various aberrant proteins in specific brain regions leads to neurodegeneration and aging. The cellular protein quality control system develop various defense mechanisms against the accumulation of misfolded and aggregated proteins. The mechanisms underlying the selective recognition of specific crucial protein or misfolded proteins are majorly governed by quality control E3 ubiquitin ligases mediated through ubiquitin-proteasome system. Few known E3 ubiquitin ligases have shown prominent neurodevelopmental functions, but their interactions with different developmental proteins play critical roles in neurodevelopmental disorders. Several questions are yet to be understood properly. How E3 ubiquitin ligases determine the specificity and regulate degradation of a particular substrate involved in neuronal proliferation and differentiation is certainly the one, which needs detailed investigations. Another important question is how neurodevelopmental E3 ubiquitin ligases specifically differentiate between their versatile range of substrates and timing of their functional modulations during different phases of development. The premise of this article is to understand how few E3 ubiquitin ligases sense major molecular events, which are crucial for human brain development from its early embryonic stages to throughout adolescence period. A better understanding of these few E3 ubiquitin ligases and their interactions with other potential proteins will provide invaluable insight into disease mechanisms to approach toward therapeutic interventions.

  17. Metabolic alterations in cancer cells and therapeutic implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naima Hammoudi; Kausar Begam Riaz Ahmed; Celia Garcia-Prieto; Peng Huang

    2011-01-01

    Cancer metabolism has emerged as an important area of research in recent years. Elucidation of the metabolic differences between cancer and normal cells and the underlying mechanisms will not only advance our understanding of fundamental cancer cell biology but also provide an important basis for the development of new therapeutic strategies and novel compounds to selectively eliminate cancer cells by targeting their unique metabolism. This article reviews several important metabolic alterations in cancer cells, with an emphasis on increased aerobic glycolysis (the Warburg effect) and glutamine addiction, and discusses the mechanisms that may contribute to such metabolic changes. In addition, metabolic alterations in cancer stem cells, mitochondrial metabolism and its influence on drug sensitivity, and potential therapeutic strategies and agents that target cancer metabolism are also discussed.

  18. A novel conserved isoform of the ubiquitin ligase UFD2a/UBE4B is expressed exclusively in mature striated muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L Mammen

    Full Text Available Yeast Ufd2p was the first identified E4 multiubiquitin chain assembly factor. Its vertebrate homologues later referred to as UFD2a, UBE4B or E4B were also shown to have E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. UFD2a function in the brain has been well established in vivo, and in vitro studies have shown that its activity is essential for proper condensation and segregation of chromosomes during mitosis. Here we show that 2 alternative splice forms of UFD2a, UFD2a-7 and -7/7a, are expressed sequentially during myoblast differentiation of C2C12 cell cultures and during cardiotoxin-induced regeneration of skeletal muscle in mice. UFD2a-7 contains an alternate exon 7, and UFD2a-7/7a, the larger of the 2 isoforms, contains an additional novel exon 7a. Analysis of protein or mRNA expression in mice and zebrafish revealed that a similar pattern of isoform switching occurs during developmental myogenesis of cardiac and skeletal muscle. In vertebrates (humans, rodents, zebrafish, UFD2a-7/7a is expressed only in mature striated muscle. This unique tissue specificity is further validated by the conserved presence of 2 muscle-specific splicing regulatory motifs located in the 3' introns of exons 7 and 7a. UFD2a interacts with VCP/p97, an AAA-type ATPase implicated in processes whose functions appear to be regulated, in part, through their interaction with one or more of 15 previously identified cofactors. UFD2a-7/7a did not interact with VCP/p97 in yeast 2-hybrid experiments, which may allow the ATPase to bind cofactors that facilitate its muscle-specific functions. We conclude that the regulated expression of these UFD2a isoforms most likely imparts divergent functions that are important for myogenisis.

  19. Sealing of chromosomal DNA nicks during nucleotide excision repair requires XRCC1 and DNA ligase III alpha in a cell-cycle-specific manner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moser, Jill; Kool, Hanneke; Giakzidis, Ioannis; Caldecott, Keith; Mullenders, Leon H. F.; Fousteri, Maria I.

    2007-01-01

    Impaired gap filling and sealing of chromosomal DNA in nucleotide excision repair (NER) leads to genome instability. XRCC1-DNA ligase III alpha (XRCC1-Lig3) plays a central role in the repair of DNA single-strand breaks but has never been implicated in NER. Here we show that XRCC1-Lig3 is indispensa

  20. Sealing of chromosomal DNA nicks during nucleotide excision repair requires XRCC1 and DNA ligase III alpha in a cell-cycle-specific manner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moser, Jill; Kool, Hanneke; Giakzidis, Ioannis; Caldecott, Keith; Mullenders, Leon H. F.; Fousteri, Maria I.

    2007-01-01

    Impaired gap filling and sealing of chromosomal DNA in nucleotide excision repair (NER) leads to genome instability. XRCC1-DNA ligase III alpha (XRCC1-Lig3) plays a central role in the repair of DNA single-strand breaks but has never been implicated in NER. Here we show that XRCC1-Lig3 is

  1. DNA ligase IV syndrome; a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Thomas; Gennery, Andrew R

    2016-10-07

    DNA ligase IV deficiency is a rare primary immunodeficiency, LIG4 syndrome, often associated with other systemic features. DNA ligase IV is part of the non-homologous end joining mechanism, required to repair DNA double stranded breaks. Ubiquitously expressed, it is required to prevent mutagenesis and apoptosis, which can result from DNA double strand breakage caused by intracellular events such as DNA replication and meiosis or extracellular events including damage by reactive oxygen species and ionising radiation.Within developing lymphocytes, DNA ligase IV is required to repair programmed DNA double stranded breaks induced during lymphocyte receptor development.Patients with hypomorphic mutations in LIG4 present with a range of phenotypes, from normal to severe combined immunodeficiency. All, however, manifest sensitivity to ionising radiation. Commonly associated features include primordial growth failure with severe microcephaly and a spectrum of learning difficulties, marrow hypoplasia and a predisposition to lymphoid malignancy. Diagnostic investigations include immunophenotyping, and testing for radiosensitivity. Some patients present with microcephaly as a predominant feature, but seemingly normal immunity. Treatment is mainly supportive, although haematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used in a few cases.

  2. Nylon Wool Purification Alters the Activation of T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohler, Jillian E.; Barnum, Scott R.

    2009-01-01

    Purification of lymphocytes, particularly T cells, is commonly performed using nylon wool. This enrichment method selectively retains B cells and some myeloid cells allowing a significantly more pure T cell population to flow through a nylon wool column. T cells purified in this fashion are assumed to be unaltered and functionally naïve, however some studies have suggested aberrant in vitro T cell responses after nylon wool treatment. We found that nylon wool purification significantly altered T cell proliferation, expression of activation markers and production of cytokines. Our results suggest that nylon wool treatment modifies T cell activation responses and that caution should be used when choosing this purification method. PMID:18952296

  3. SUMO ligase PIAS1 functions as a target gene selective androgen receptor coregulator on prostate cancer cell chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropainen, Sari; Malinen, Marjo; Kaikkonen, Sanna; Rytinki, Miia; Jääskeläinen, Tiina; Sahu, Biswajyoti; Jänne, Olli A; Palvimo, Jorma J

    2015-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that plays a central role in the development and growth of prostate carcinoma. PIAS1 is an AR- and SUMO-interacting protein and a putative transcriptional coregulator overexpressed in prostate cancer. To study the importance of PIAS1 for the androgen-regulated transcriptome of VCaP prostate cancer cells, we silenced its expression by RNAi. Transcriptome analyses revealed that a subset of the AR-regulated genes is significantly influenced, either activated or repressed, by PIAS1 depletion. Interestingly, PIAS1 depletion also exposed a new set of genes to androgen regulation, suggesting that PIAS1 can mask distinct genomic loci from AR access. In keeping with gene expression data, silencing of PIAS1 attenuated VCaP cell proliferation. ChIP-seq analyses showed that PIAS1 interacts with AR at chromatin sites harboring also SUMO2/3 and surrounded by H3K4me2; androgen exposure increased the number of PIAS1-occupying sites, resulting in nearly complete overlap with AR chromatin binding events. PIAS1 interacted also with the pioneer factor FOXA1. Of note, PIAS1 depletion affected AR chromatin occupancy at binding sites enriched for HOXD13 and GATA motifs. Taken together, PIAS1 is a genuine chromatin-bound AR coregulator that functions in a target gene selective fashion to regulate prostate cancer cell growth. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. DNA ligase I and Nbs1 proteins associate in a complex and colocalize at replication factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, Riccardo; Leva, Valentina; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Montecucco, Alessandra

    2009-08-15

    DNA ligase I is the main DNA ligase activity involved in eukaryotic DNA replication acting in the joining of Okazaki fragments. This enzyme is also implicated in nucleotide excision repair and in the long-patch base excision repair while its role in the recombinational repair pathways is poorly understood. DNA ligase I is phosphorylated during cell cycle at several serine and threonine residues that regulate its participation in different DNA transactions by modulating the interaction with different protein partners. Here we use an antibody-based array method to identify novel DNA ligase-interacting partners. We show that DNA ligase I participates in several multiprotein complexes with proteins involved in DNA replication and repair, cell cycle control, and protein modification. In particular we demonstrate that DNA ligase I complexes with Nbs1, a core component of the MRN complex critical for detection, processing and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. The analysis of epitope tagged DNA ligase I mutants demonstrates that the association is mediated by the catalytic fragment of the enzyme. DNA ligase I and Nbs1 colocalize at replication factories during unperturbed replication and after treatment with DNA damaging agents. Since MRN complex is involved in the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks by homologous recombination at stalled replication forks our data support the notion that DNA ligase I participates in homology dependent pathways that deal with replication-associated lesions generated when replication fork encounters DNA damage.

  5. Stealing the spotlight: CUL4-DDB1 ubiquitin ligase docks WD40-repeat proteins to destroy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hui

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent investigation of Cullin 4 (CUL4 has ushered this class of multiprotein ubiquitin E3 ligases to center stage as critical regulators of diverse processes including cell cycle regulation, developmental patterning, DNA replication, DNA damage and repair, and epigenetic control of gene expression. CUL4 associates with DNA Damage Binding protein 1 (DDB1 to assemble an ubiquitin E3 ligase that targets protein substrates for ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. CUL4 ligase activity is also regulated by the covalent attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 to CUL4, or neddylation, and the COP9 signalosome complex (CSN that removes this important modification. Recently, multiple WD40-repeat proteins (WDR were found to interact with DDB1 and serve as the substrate-recognition subunits of the CUL4-DDB1 ubiquitin ligase. As more than 150–300 WDR proteins exist in the human genome, these findings impact a wide array of biological processes through CUL4 ligase-mediated proteolysis. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the mechanism of CUL4 ubiquitin E3 ligase and discuss the architecture of CUL4-assembled E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes by comparison to CUL1-based E3s (SCF. Then, we will review several examples to highlight the critical roles of CUL4 ubiquitin ligase in genome stability, cell cycle regulation, and histone lysine methylation. Together, these studies provide insights into the mechanism of this novel ubiquitin ligase in the regulation of important biological processes.

  6. Defining interactions between DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, Hsin-Ling; Yannone, Steven M.; Chen, David J.

    2001-04-10

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), ligase IV, and XRCC4 are all critical components of the NHEJ repair pathway. DNA-PK is composed of a heterodimeric DNA-binding component, Ku, and a large catalytic subunit, DNA-PKcs. Ligase IV and XRCC4 associate to form a multimeric complex that is also essential for NHEJ. DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4 interact at DNA termini which results in stimulated ligase activity. Here we define interactions between the components of these two essential complexes, DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4. We find that ligase IV/XRCC4 associates with DNA-PK in a DNA-independent manner. The specific protein-protein interactions that mediate the interaction between these two complexes are further identified. Direct physical interactions between ligase IV and Ku as well as between XRCC4 and DNA-PKcs are shown. No direct interactions are observed between ligase IV and DNA-PKcs or between XRCC4 and Ku. Our data defines the specific protein pairs involved in the association of DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4, and suggests a molecular mechanism for coordinating the assembly of the DNA repair complex at DNA breaks.

  7. Rational design of human DNA ligase inhibitors that target cellular DNA replication and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Zhong, Shijun; Zhu, Xiao; Dziegielewska, Barbara; Ellenberger, Tom; Wilson, Gerald M; MacKerell, Alexander D; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2008-05-01

    Based on the crystal structure of human DNA ligase I complexed with nicked DNA, computer-aided drug design was used to identify compounds in a database of 1.5 million commercially available low molecular weight chemicals that were predicted to bind to a DNA-binding pocket within the DNA-binding domain of DNA ligase I, thereby inhibiting DNA joining. Ten of 192 candidates specifically inhibited purified human DNA ligase I. Notably, a subset of these compounds was also active against the other human DNA ligases. Three compounds that differed in their specificity for the three human DNA ligases were analyzed further. L82 inhibited DNA ligase I, L67 inhibited DNA ligases I and III, and L189 inhibited DNA ligases I, III, and IV in DNA joining assays with purified proteins and in cell extract assays of DNA replication, base excision repair, and nonhomologous end-joining. L67 and L189 are simple competitive inhibitors with respect to nicked DNA, whereas L82 is an uncompetitive inhibitor that stabilized complex formation between DNA ligase I and nicked DNA. In cell culture assays, L82 was cytostatic whereas L67 and L189 were cytotoxic. Concordant with their ability to inhibit DNA repair in vitro, subtoxic concentrations of L67 and L189 significantly increased the cytotoxicity of DNA-damaging agents. Interestingly, the ligase inhibitors specifically sensitized cancer cells to DNA damage. Thus, these novel human DNA ligase inhibitors will not only provide insights into the cellular function of these enzymes but also serve as lead compounds for the development of anticancer agents.

  8. Understanding and altering cell tropism of vesicular stomatitis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Eric; Cataldi, Marcela; Marriott, Ian; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus. VSV’s broad cell tropism makes it a popular model virus for many basic research applications. In addition, a lack of preexisting human immunity against VSV, inherent oncotropism and other features make VSV a widely used platform for vaccine and oncolytic vectors. However, VSV’s neurotropism that can result in viral encephalitis in experimental animals needs to be addressed for the use of the virus as a safe vector. Therefore, it is very important to understand the determinants of VSV tropism and develop strategies to alter it. VSV glycoprotein (G) and matrix (M) protein play major roles in its cell tropism. VSV G protein is responsible for VSV broad cell tropism and is often used for pseudotyping other viruses. VSV M affects cell tropism via evasion of antiviral responses, and M mutants can be used to limit cell tropism to cell types defective in interferon signaling. In addition, other VSV proteins and host proteins may function as determinants of VSV cell tropism. Various approaches have been successfully used to alter VSV tropism to benefit basic research and clinically relevant applications. PMID:23796410

  9. A human iPSC model of Ligase IV deficiency reveals an important role for NHEJ-mediated-DSB repair in the survival and genomic stability of induced pluripotent stem cells and emerging haematopoietic progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilgner, K; Neganova, I; Moreno-Gimeno, I; Al-Aama, J Y; Burks, D; Yung, S; Singhapol, C; Saretzki, G; Evans, J; Gorbunova, V; Gennery, A; Przyborski, S; Stojkovic, M; Armstrong, L; Jeggo, P; Lako, M

    2013-08-01

    DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are the most common form of DNA damage and are repaired by non-homologous-end-joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). Several protein components function in NHEJ, and of these, DNA Ligase IV is essential for performing the final 'end-joining' step. Mutations in DNA Ligase IV result in LIG4 syndrome, which is characterised by growth defects, microcephaly, reduced number of blood cells, increased predisposition to leukaemia and variable degrees of immunodeficiency. In this manuscript, we report the creation of a human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) model of LIG4 deficiency, which accurately replicates the DSB repair phenotype of LIG4 patients. Our findings demonstrate that impairment of NHEJ-mediated-DSB repair in human iPSC results in accumulation of DSBs and enhanced apoptosis, thus providing new insights into likely mechanisms used by pluripotent stem cells to maintain their genomic integrity. Defects in NHEJ-mediated-DSB repair also led to a significant decrease in reprogramming efficiency of human cells and accumulation of chromosomal abnormalities, suggesting a key role for NHEJ in somatic cell reprogramming and providing insights for future cell based therapies for applications of LIG4-iPSCs. Although haematopoietic specification of LIG4-iPSC is not affected per se, the emerging haematopoietic progenitors show a high accumulation of DSBs and enhanced apoptosis, resulting in reduced numbers of mature haematopoietic cells. Together our findings provide new insights into the role of NHEJ-mediated-DSB repair in the survival and differentiation of progenitor cells, which likely underlies the developmental abnormalities observed in many DNA damage disorders. In addition, our findings are important for understanding how genomic instability arises in pluripotent stem cells and for defining appropriate culture conditions that restrict DNA damage and result in ex vivo expansion of stem cells with intact genomes.

  10. Immunomodulatory agents lenalidomide and pomalidomide co-stimulate T cells by inducing degradation of T cell repressors Ikaros and Aiolos via modulation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex CRL4(CRBN.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Anita K; Kang, Jian; Havens, Courtney G; Conklin, Thomas; Ning, Yuhong; Wu, Lei; Ito, Takumi; Ando, Hideki; Waldman, Michelle F; Thakurta, Anjan; Klippel, Anke; Handa, Hiroshi; Daniel, Thomas O; Schafer, Peter H; Chopra, Rajesh

    2014-03-01

    Cereblon (CRBN), the molecular target of lenalidomide and pomalidomide, is a substrate receptor of the cullin ring E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, CRL4(CRBN) . T cell co-stimulation by lenalidomide or pomalidomide is cereblon dependent: however, the CRL4(CRBN) substrates responsible for T cell co-stimulation have yet to be identified. Here we demonstrate that interaction of the transcription factors Ikaros (IKZF1, encoded by the IKZF1 gene) and Aiolos (IKZF3, encoded by the IKZF3 gene) with CRL4(CRBN) is induced by lenalidomide or pomalidomide. Each agent promotes Aiolos and Ikaros binding to CRL4(CRBN) with enhanced ubiquitination leading to cereblon-dependent proteosomal degradation in T lymphocytes. We confirm that Aiolos and Ikaros are transcriptional repressors of interleukin-2 expression. The findings link lenalidomide- or pomalidomide-induced degradation of these transcriptional suppressors to well documented T cell activation. Importantly, Aiolos could serve as a proximal pharmacodynamic marker for lenalidomide and pomalidomide, as healthy human subjects administered lenalidomide demonstrated Aiolos degradation in their peripheral T cells. In conclusion, we present a molecular model in which drug binding to cereblon results in the interaction of Ikaros and Aiolos to CRL4(CRBN) , leading to their ubiquitination, subsequent proteasomal degradation and T cell activation.

  11. Altered cytoskeletal structures in transformed cells exhibiting obviously metastatic capabilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LINZHONGXIANG; WUBINGQUAN; 等

    1990-01-01

    Cytoskeletal changes in transformed cells (LM-51) eshibiting obviously metastatic capabilities were investigated by utilization of double-fluorescent labelling through combinations of:(1) tubulin indirect immunofluorescence plus Rhodamine-phalloidin staining of F-actins;(2) indirect immunofluorescent staining with α-actinin polyclonal-and vinculin monoclonal antibodies.The LM-51 cells which showed metastatic index of >50% were derived from lung metastasis in nude mice after subcutaneous inoculation of human highly metastatic tumor DNA transfected NIH3T3 cell transformants.The parent NIH3T3 cells exhibited well-organized microtubules,prominent stress fibers and adhesion plaques while their transformants showed remarkable cytoskeletal alterations:(1)reduced microtubules but increased MTOC fluorescence;(2)disrupted stress fibers and fewer adhesion plaques with their protein components redistributed in the cytoplasm;(3)Factin-and α-actinin/vinculin aggregates appeared in the cytoplasm.These aggregates were dot-like,varied in size(0.1-0.4μm) and number,located near the ventral surface of the cells.TPA-induced actin/vinculin bodies were studied too.Indications that actin and α-actinin/vinculin redistribution might be important alterations involved in the expression of metastatic capabilities of LM-51 transformed cells were discussed.

  12. Luciferase does not Alter Metabolism in Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Caroline H.; Fisher, Timothy S.; Hoang, Linh T.; Felding, Brunhilde H.; Siuzdak, Gary; O’Brien, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Luciferase transfected cell lines are used extensively for cancer models, revealing valuable biological information about disease mechanisms. However, these genetically encoded reporters, while useful for monitoring tumor response in cancer models, can impact cell metabolism. Indeed firefly luciferase and fatty acyl-CoA synthetases differ by a single amino acid, raising the possibility that luciferase activity might alter metabolism and introduce experimental artifacts. Therefore knowledge of the metabolic response to luciferase transfection is of significant importance, especially given the thousands of research studies using luciferase as an in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) reporter. Untargeted metabolomics experiments were performed to examine three different types of lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines (Ramos, Raji and SUP T1) commonly used in cancer research, each were analyzed with and without vector transduction. The Raji model was also tested under perturbed starvation conditions to examine potential luciferase-mediated stress responses. The results showed that no significant metabolic differences were observed between parental and luciferase transduced cells for each cell line, and that luciferase overexpression does not alter cell metabolism under basal or perturbed conditions. PMID:24791164

  13. Vaccinia DNA ligase complements Saccharomyces cerevisiae cdc9, localizes in cytoplasmic factories and affects virulence and virus sensitivity to DNA damaging agents.

    OpenAIRE

    Kerr, S M; Johnston, L H; Odell, M; Duncan, S A; Law, K M; Smith, G L

    1991-01-01

    The functional compatibility of vaccinia virus DNA ligase with eukaryotic counterparts was demonstrated by its ability to complement Saccharomyces cerevisiae cdc9. The vaccinia DNA ligase is a 63 kDa protein expressed early during infection that is non-essential for virus DNA replication and recombination in cultured cells. This implies complementation by a mammalian DNA ligase, yet no obvious recruitment of host DNA ligase I from the nucleus to the cytoplasm was observed during infection. An...

  14. SCR7 is neither a selective nor a potent inhibitor of human DNA ligase IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, George E; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Brooks, Rhys C; Lu, Zhengfei; Lieber, Michael R; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2016-07-01

    DNA ligases are attractive therapeutics because of their involvement in completing the repair of almost all types of DNA damage. A series of DNA ligase inhibitors with differing selectivity for the three human DNA ligases were identified using a structure-based approach with one of these inhibitors being used to inhibit abnormal DNA ligase IIIα-dependent repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB)s in breast cancer, neuroblastoma and leukemia cell lines. Raghavan and colleagues reported the characterization of a derivative of one of the previously identified DNA ligase inhibitors, which they called SCR7 (designated SCR7-R in our experiments using SCR7). SCR7 appeared to show increased selectivity for DNA ligase IV, inhibit the repair of DSBs by the DNA ligase IV-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway, reduce tumor growth, and increase the efficacy of DSB-inducing therapeutic modalities in mouse xenografts. In attempting to synthesize SCR7, we encountered problems with the synthesis procedures and discovered discrepancies in its reported structure. We determined the structure of a sample of SCR7 and a related compound, SCR7-G, that is the major product generated by the published synthesis procedure for SCR7. We also found that SCR7-G has the same structure as the compound (SCR7-X) available from a commercial vendor (XcessBio). The various SCR7 preparations had similar activity in DNA ligation assay assays, exhibiting greater activity against DNA ligases I and III than DNA ligase IV. Furthermore, SCR7-R failed to inhibit DNA ligase IV-dependent V(D)J recombination in a cell-based assay. Based on our results, we conclude that SCR7 and the SCR7 derivatives are neither selective nor potent inhibitors of DNA ligase IV.

  15. Cell alterations induced by a biotherapic for influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Nelson Couceiro

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Influenza viruses have been responsible for highly contagious acute respiratory illnesses with high mortality, mainly in the elderly, which encourages the development of new drugs for the treatment of human flu. The biotherapics are medicines prepared from biological products, which are not chemically defined. They are compounded following the homeopathic procedures indicated for infectious diseases with known etiology [1]. Aim: The purpose of the present study is to verify cellular alterations induced by a biotherapic prepared from the infectious influenza A virus. Methodology: This biotherapic was prepared for this study in the homeopathic potency of 30X according to the Brazilian Homeopathic Pharmacopeia [2]. The concentration of 10% was not cytotoxic to cells, as verified by neutral red assay. The cellular alterations observed in MDCK cells were analyzed by optical microscopy for the quantification of mitosis, nucleoli and lipid bodies. The mitochondrial activity was assessed by MTT assay and the phosphosfructokinase-1 (PFK-1 enzyme activity was analyzed on the MDCK cells treated for 5, 10 and 30 days. Macrophages J778.G8 were treated with this biotherapic to evaluate the immunostimulatory cytokine release. Results: The cellular alterations observed in MDCK cells were verified by optical microscopy. The number of lipid bodies present in MDCK cells stimulated for 10 days was significantly lower (p <0.05 when compared to controls. The biotherapic significantly increased (p <0.05 the number of mitosis and the mitochondrial activity of MDCK cells stimulated for 10 and 30 days. These changes were confirmed by a significant reduction (p <0.05 on the PFK-1 activity. These results suggest that the biotherapic was able to activate the Krebs cycle and pentose-phosphate metabolism to the generation of amino acids and nucleotides, situations common to cells whose rate of mitosis is increased. The quantification of immunostimulatory

  16. Alteration of Cell Cycle Mediated by Zinc in Human Bronchial ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc (Zn2+), a ubiquitous ambient air contaminant, presents an oxidant challenge to the human lung and is linked to adverse human health effects. To further elucidate the adaptive and apoptotic cellular responses of human airway cells to Zn2+, we performed pilot studies to examine cell cycle perturbation upon exposure using a normal human bronchial epithelial cell culture (BEAS-2B). BEAS-2B cells were treated with low (0, 1, 2 µM) and apoptotic (3 µM) doses of Zn2+ plus 1 µM pyrithione, a Zn2+-specific ionophore facilitating cellular uptake, for up to 24 h. Fixed cells were then stained with propidium iodine (PI) and cell cycle phase was determined by fluorescent image cytometry. Initial results report the percentage of cells in the S phase after 18 h exposure to 1, 2, and 3 µM Zn2+ were similar (8%, 7%, and 12%, respectively) compared with 7% in controls. Cells exposed to 3 µM Zn2+ increased cell populations in G2/M phase (76% versus 68% in controls). Interestingly, exposure to 1 µM Zn2+ resulted in decreased (59%) cells in G2/M. While preliminary, these pilot studies suggest Zn2+ alters cell cycle in BEAS-2B cells, particularly in the G2/M phase. The G2/M checkpoint maintains DNA integrity by enabling initiation of DNA repair or apoptosis. Our findings suggest that the adaptive and apoptotic responses to Zn2+ exposure may be mediated via perturbation of the cell cycle at the G2/M checkpoint. This work was a collaborative summer student project. The st

  17. Metabolic monosaccharides altered cell responses to anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Liang, Jun F

    2012-06-01

    Metabolic glycoengineering has been used to manipulate the glycochemistry of cell surfaces and thus the cell/cell interaction, cell adhesion, and cell migration. However, potential application of glycoengineering in pharmaceutical sciences has not been studied until recently. Here, we reported that Ac(4)ManNAc, an analog of N-acetyl-D-mannosamine (ManNAc), could affect cell responses to anticancer drugs. Although cells from different tissues and organs responded to Ac(4)ManNAc treatment differently, treated cells with increased sialic acid contents showed dramatically reduced sensitivity (up to 130 times) to anti-cancer drugs as tested on various drugs with distinct chemical structures and acting mechanisms. Neither increased P-glycoprotein activity nor decreased drug uptake was observed during the course of Ac(4)ManNAc treatment. However, greatly altered intracellular drug distributions were observed. Most intracellular daunorubicin was found in the perinuclear region, but not the expected nuclei in the Ac(4)ManNAc treated cells. Since sialoglycoproteins and gangliosides were synthesized in the Golgi, intracellular glycans affected intracellular signal transduction and drug distributions seem to be the main reason for Ac(4)ManNAc affected cell sensitivity to anticancer drugs. It was interesting to find that although Ac(4)ManNAc treated breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) maintained the same sensitivity to 5-Fluorouracil, the IC(50) value of 5-Fluorouracil to the same Ac(4)ManNAc treated normal cells (MCF-10A) was increased by more than 20 times. Thus, this Ac(4)ManNAc treatment enlarged drug response difference between normal and tumor cells provides a unique opportunity to further improve the selectivity and therapeutic efficiency of anticancer drugs.

  18. Genetic alterations in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagai M.A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic alterations observed in head and neck cancer are mainly due to oncogene activation (gain of function mutations and tumor suppressor gene inactivation (loss of function mutations, leading to deregulation of cell proliferation and death. These genetic alterations include gene amplification and overexpression of oncogenes such as myc, erbB-2, EGFR and cyclinD1 and mutations, deletions and hypermethylation leading to p16 and TP53 tumor suppressor gene inactivation. In addition, loss of heterozygosity in several chromosomal regions is frequently observed, suggesting that other tumor suppressor genes not yet identified could be involved in the tumorigenic process of head and neck cancers. The exact temporal sequence of the genetic alterations during head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC development and progression has not yet been defined and their diagnostic or prognostic significance is controversial. Advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of head and neck cancer should help in the identification of new markers that could be used for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of the disease.

  19. CD20(+) B Cell Depletion Alters T Cell Homing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kap, Yolanda S.; van Driel, Nikki; Laman, Jon D.; Tak, Paul P.; 't Hart, Bert A.

    2014-01-01

    Depleting mAbs against the pan B cell marker CD20 are remarkably effective in the treatment of autoimmune-mediated inflammatory disorders, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. The primary objective of this study was to find a mechanistic explanation for the remarkable clinical effect of

  20. Altered B cell receptor signaling in human systemic lupus erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenks, Scott A.; Sanz, Iñaki

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of B cell receptor signaling is essential for the development of specific immunity while retaining tolerance to self. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is characterized by a loss of B cell tolerance and the production of anti-self antibodies. Accompanying this break down in tolerance are alterations in B cell receptor signal transduction including elevated induced calcium responses and increased protein phosphorylation. Specific pathways that negatively regulate B cell signaling have been shown to be impaired in some SLE patients. These patients have reduced levels of the kinase Lyn in lipid raft microdomains and this reduction is inversely correlated with increased CD45 in lipid rafts. Function and expression of the inhibitory immunoglobulin receptor FcγRIIB is also reduced in Lupus IgM- CD27+ memory cells. Because the relative contribution of different memory and transitional B cell subsets can be abnormal in SLE patients, we believe studies targeted to well defined B cell subsets will be necessary to further our understanding of signaling abnormalities in SLE. Intracellular flow cytometric analysis of signaling is a useful approach to accomplish this goal. PMID:18723129

  1. Alterations induced in Escherichia Coli cells by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kappke, J.; Schelin, H.R.; Paschuk, S.A.; Denyak, V.; Silva, E.R. da [Federal University of Technology of Parana (CPGEI/UTFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil)]. E-mails: jaquekap@yahoo.com.br; schelin@cpgei.cefetpr.br; sergei@utfpr.edu.br; Jesus, E.F.O. de; Lopes, R.T. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mails: ricardo@lin.ufrj.br; edgar@lin.ufrj.br; Carlin, N.; Toledo, E.S. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica]. E-mail: nelson.carlin@dfn.if.usp.br

    2007-07-01

    Modifications occurred in Escherichia coli cells exposed to gamma radiation ({sup 60}Co source) were investigated. The irradiations were done at the LIN-COPPE laboratory of the UFRJ and the analysis at the Biology Department of the UTFPR. The E. coli cells were irradiated with 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180, 210, 240, 300, 480, 600 e 750 Gy doses. The samples were analyzed with Gram-stain, biochemical tests in EPM, MIO and Lysine Broth, Simmons Cytrate Medium and Rhamnose Broth, antibiogram and isolation of auxotrophic mutants. It was observed that for the received doses the E. coli did not show morphological alterations in the tests. Some E. Coli cells showed to be able to deaminade the L-tryptophan or they changed their sensibility for amoxillin and cephaloonine after the irradiation. The existence of aauxotrophic mutants after irradiation was also verified. (author)

  2. SUPPRESSION OF LIGASE4 OR XRCC6 ACTIVITIES ENHANCES THE DNA HOMOLOGOUS RECOMBINATION EFFICIENCY IN ZEBRAFISH PRIMORDIAL GERM CELLS%抑制Ligase4或Xrcc6活性增强斑马鱼原始生殖细胞中DNA同源重组的效率

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏志强; 熊凤; 何牡丹; 王厚鹏; 朱作言; 孙永华

    2015-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) give rise to gametes which transmit the genetic information to next generation, therefore PGCs provide us an ideal cell type for genetic manipulation. Homologous recombina-tion (HR) is the most efficient technique to create designed genetic modifications, however, its efficiency is rather low in vertebrates. In this study, by using zebrafish as an in vivo model, we aimed to enhance the effi-ciency of HR in zebrafish PGCs. First, we injected UAS:mRFP-nos1 construct into Tg (kop:KalTA4) embryos to label the transgenic PGCs, and we showed that screening of PGCs-specific mRFP expression led to rela-tively high-efficient germline transmission of transgene. Then we established an in vivo assay to evaluate the HR frequency in PGCs. We further revealed that suppression of the activities of DNA ligase IV (Lig4) and Xrcc6 (previously known as Ku70) could significantly increase the HR efficiency, not only at whole embryo level but also in PGCs. We proposed that the Tg(kop:KalTA4) line could be used as an effective platform for HR-mediated gene targeting.%利用斑马鱼作为体内模型,研究旨在提高斑马鱼原始生殖细胞(Primordial germ cells, PGCs)中同源重组(Homologous recombination, HR)的效率。首先,将 UAS:mRFP-nos1载体显微注射到 Tg (kop:KalTA4)转基因胚胎中标记转基因PGCs,结果表明筛选PGCs特异表达mRFP的胚胎能够相对提高转基因的生殖系传递效率。随后建立了 PGCs 中 HR 效率的评估体系,并且证明抑制 DNA ligase IV(Lig4)和Xrcc6(曾用名Ku70)的活性不但在全胚胎水平,而且在PGCs水平都能够显著提高HR的效率。研究表明Tg (kop:KalTA4)转基因品系是开展HR介导的基因打靶的一个有效平台。

  3. From Structure-Function Analyses to Protein Engineering for Practical Applications of DNA Ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Maiko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Nishida, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    DNA ligases are indispensable in all living cells and ubiquitous in all organs. DNA ligases are broadly utilized in molecular biology research fields, such as genetic engineering and DNA sequencing technologies. Here we review the utilization of DNA ligases in a variety of in vitro gene manipulations, developed over the past several decades. During this period, fewer protein engineering attempts for DNA ligases have been made, as compared to those for DNA polymerases. We summarize the recent progress in the elucidation of the DNA ligation mechanisms obtained from the tertiary structures solved thus far, in each step of the ligation reaction scheme. We also present some examples of engineered DNA ligases, developed from the viewpoint of their three-dimensional structures.

  4. From Structure-Function Analyses to Protein Engineering for Practical Applications of DNA Ligase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko Tanabe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA ligases are indispensable in all living cells and ubiquitous in all organs. DNA ligases are broadly utilized in molecular biology research fields, such as genetic engineering and DNA sequencing technologies. Here we review the utilization of DNA ligases in a variety of in vitro gene manipulations, developed over the past several decades. During this period, fewer protein engineering attempts for DNA ligases have been made, as compared to those for DNA polymerases. We summarize the recent progress in the elucidation of the DNA ligation mechanisms obtained from the tertiary structures solved thus far, in each step of the ligation reaction scheme. We also present some examples of engineered DNA ligases, developed from the viewpoint of their three-dimensional structures.

  5. Overview of the membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) E3 ligase family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Johannes; Bakke, Oddmund; Morth, J Preben

    2016-12-14

    E3 ligases are critical checkpoints for protein ubiquitination, a signal that often results in protein sorting and degradation but has also been linked to regulation of transcription and DNA repair. In line with their key role in cellular trafficking and cell-cycle control, malfunction of E3 ligases is often linked to human disease. Thus, they have emerged as prime drug targets. However, the molecular basis of action of membrane-bound E3 ligases is still unknown. Here, we review the current knowledge on the membrane-embedded MARCH E3 ligases (MARCH-1-6,7,8,11) with a focus on how the transmembrane regions can contribute via GxxxG-motifs to the selection and recognition of other membrane proteins as substrates for ubiquitination. Further understanding of the molecular parameters that govern target protein recognition of MARCH E3 ligases will contribute to development of strategies for therapeutic regulation of MARCH-induced ubiquitination.

  6. Human DNA Ligase I Interacts with and Is Targeted for Degradation by the DCAF7 Specificity Factor of the Cul4-DDB1 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhimin; Liao, Zhongping; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Yang, Austin; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2016-10-14

    The synthesis, processing, and joining of Okazaki fragments during DNA replication is complex, requiring the sequential action of a large number of proteins. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a DNA sliding clamp, interacts with and coordinates the activity of several DNA replication proteins, including the enzymes flap endonuclease 1 (FEN-1) and DNA ligase I that complete the processing and joining of Okazaki fragments, respectively. Although it is evident that maintaining the appropriate relative stoichiometry of FEN-1 and DNA ligase I, which compete for binding to proliferating cell nuclear antigen, is critical to prevent genomic instability, little is known about how the steady state levels of DNA replication proteins are regulated, in particular the proteolytic mechanisms involved in their turnover. Because DNA ligase I has been reported to be ubiquitylated, we used a proteomic approach to map ubiquitylation sites and screen for DNA ligase I-associated E3 ubiquitin ligases. We identified three ubiquitylated lysine residues and showed that DNA ligase I interacts with and is targeted for ubiquitylation by DCAF7, a specificity factor for the Cul4-DDB1 complex. Notably, knockdown of DCAF7 reduced the degradation of DNA ligase I in response to inhibition of proliferation and replacement of ubiquitylated lysine residues reduced the in vitro ubiquitylation of DNA ligase I by Cul4-DDB1 and DCAF7. In contrast, a different E3 ubiquitin ligase regulates FEN-1 turnover. Thus, although the expression of many of the genes encoding DNA replication proteins is coordinately regulated, our studies reveal that different mechanisms are involved in the turnover of these proteins.

  7. Mutations That Alter the Bacterial Cell Envelope Increase Lipid Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmer, Kimberly C; Zhang, Weiping; Langer, Samantha J; Dohnalkova, Alice C; Hu, Dehong; Lemke, Rachelle A; Piotrowski, Jeff S; Orr, Galya; Noguera, Daniel R; Donohue, Timothy J

    2017-05-23

    Lipids from microbes offer a promising source of renewable alternatives to petroleum-derived compounds. In particular, oleaginous microbes are of interest because they accumulate a large fraction of their biomass as lipids. In this study, we analyzed genetic changes that alter lipid accumulation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides By screening an R. sphaeroides Tn5 mutant library for insertions that increased fatty acid content, we identified 10 high-lipid (HL) mutants for further characterization. These HL mutants exhibited increased sensitivity to drugs that target the bacterial cell envelope and changes in shape, and some had the ability to secrete lipids, with two HL mutants accumulating ~60% of their total lipids extracellularly. When one of the highest-lipid-secreting strains was grown in a fed-batch bioreactor, its lipid content was comparable to that of oleaginous microbes, with the majority of the lipids secreted into the medium. Based on the properties of these HL mutants, we conclude that alterations of the cell envelope are a previously unreported approach to increase microbial lipid production. We also propose that this approach may be combined with knowledge about biosynthetic pathways, in this or other microbes, to increase production of lipids and other chemicals.IMPORTANCE This paper reports on experiments to understand how to increase microbial lipid production. Microbial lipids are often cited as one renewable replacement for petroleum-based fuels and chemicals, but strategies to increase the yield of these compounds are needed to achieve this goal. While lipid biosynthesis is often well understood, increasing yields of these compounds to industrially relevant levels is a challenge, especially since genetic, synthetic biology, or engineering approaches are not feasible in many microbes. We show that altering the bacterial cell envelope can be used to increase microbial lipid production. We also find that the utility of some of these alterations can be

  8. Mutations That Alter the Bacterial Cell Envelope Increase Lipid Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemmer, Kimberly C.; Zhang, Weiping; Langer, Samantha J.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Hu, Dehong; Lemke, Rachelle A.; Piotrowski, Jeff S.; Orr, Galya; Noguera, Daniel R.; Donohue, Timothy J.; Ruby, Edward G.

    2017-05-23

    ABSTRACT

    Lipids from microbes offer a promising source of renewable alternatives to petroleum-derived compounds. In particular, oleaginous microbes are of interest because they accumulate a large fraction of their biomass as lipids. In this study, we analyzed genetic changes that alter lipid accumulation inRhodobacter sphaeroides. By screening anR. sphaeroidesTn5mutant library for insertions that increased fatty acid content, we identified 10 high-lipid (HL) mutants for further characterization. These HL mutants exhibited increased sensitivity to drugs that target the bacterial cell envelope and changes in shape, and some had the ability to secrete lipids, with two HL mutants accumulating ~60% of their total lipids extracellularly. When one of the highest-lipid-secreting strains was grown in a fed-batch bioreactor, its lipid content was comparable to that of oleaginous microbes, with the majority of the lipids secreted into the medium. Based on the properties of these HL mutants, we conclude that alterations of the cell envelope are a previously unreported approach to increase microbial lipid production. We also propose that this approach may be combined with knowledge about biosynthetic pathways, in this or other microbes, to increase production of lipids and other chemicals.

    IMPORTANCEThis paper reports on experiments to understand how to increase microbial lipid production. Microbial lipids are often cited as one renewable replacement for petroleum-based fuels and chemicals, but strategies to increase the yield of these compounds are needed to achieve this goal. While lipid biosynthesis is often well understood, increasing yields of these compounds to industrially relevant levels is a challenge, especially since genetic, synthetic biology, or engineering approaches are not feasible in many microbes. We show that altering the bacterial cell envelope can be used to increase

  9. Ligase I and ligase III mediate the DNA double-strand break ligation in alternative end-joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guangqing; Duan, Jinzhi; Shu, Sheng; Wang, Xuxiang; Gao, Linlin; Guo, Jing; Zhang, Yu

    2016-02-02

    In eukaryotes, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), one of the most harmful types of DNA damage, are repaired by homologous repair (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). Surprisingly, in cells deficient for core classic NHEJ factors such as DNA ligase IV (Lig4), substantial end-joining activities have been observed in various situations, suggesting the existence of alternative end-joining (A-EJ) activities. Several putative A-EJ factors have been proposed, although results are mostly controversial. By using a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system, we generated mouse CH12F3 cell lines in which, in addition to Lig4, either Lig1 or nuclear Lig3, representing the cells containing a single DNA ligase (Lig3 or Lig1, respectively) in their nucleus, was completely ablated. Surprisingly, we found that both Lig1- and Lig3-containing complexes could efficiently catalyze A-EJ for class switching recombination (CSR) in the IgH locus and chromosomal deletions between DSBs generated by CRISPR/Cas9 in cis-chromosomes. However, only deletion of nuclear Lig3, but not Lig1, could significantly reduce the interchromosomal translocations in Lig4(-/-) cells, suggesting the unique role of Lig3 in catalyzing chromosome translocation. Additional sequence analysis of chromosome translocation junction microhomology revealed the specificity of different ligase-containing complexes. The data suggested the existence of multiple DNA ligase-containing complexes in A-EJ.

  10. Metabolic flux prediction in cancer cells with altered substrate uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jean-Marc; Barber, Michael; Soons, Zita

    2015-12-01

    Proliferating cells, such as cancer cells, are known to have an unusual metabolism, characterized by an increased rate of glycolysis and amino acid metabolism. Our understanding of this phenomenon is limited but could potentially be used in order to develop new therapies. Computational modelling techniques, such as flux balance analysis (FBA), have been used to predict fluxes in various cell types, but remain of limited use to explain the unusual metabolic shifts and altered substrate uptake in human cancer cells. We implemented a new flux prediction method based on elementary modes (EMs) and structural flux (StruF) analysis and tested them against experimentally measured flux data obtained from (13)C-labelling in a cancer cell line. We assessed the quality of predictions using different objective functions along with different techniques in normalizing a metabolic network with more than one substrate input. Results show a good correlation between predicted and experimental values and indicate that the choice of cellular objective critically affects the quality of predictions. In particular, lactate gives an excellent correlation and correctly predicts the high flux through glycolysis, matching the observed characteristics of cancer cells. In contrast with FBA, which requires a priori definition of all uptake rates, often hard to measure, atomic StruFs (aStruFs) are able to predict uptake rates of multiple substrates.

  11. Genetic alterations in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magić Zvonko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although the patients with diagnosed B-NHL are classified into the same disease stage on the basis of clinical, histopathological, and immunological parameters, they respond significantly different to the applied treatment. This points out the possibility that within the same group of lymphoma there are different diseases at molecular level. For that reason many studies deal with the detection of gene alterations in lymphomas to provide a better framework for diagnosis and treatment of these hematological malignancies. Aim. To define genetic alterations in the B-NHL with highest possibilities for diagnostic purposes and molecular detection of MRD. Methods. Formalin fixed and paraffin embedded lymph node tissues from 45 patients were examined by different PCR techniques for the presence of IgH and TCR γ gene rearrangement; K-ras and H-ras mutations; c-myc amplification and bcl-2 translocation. There were 34 cases of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (B-NHL, 5 cases of T-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (T-NHL and 6 cases of chronic lymphadenitis (CL. The mononuclear cell fraction of the peripheral blood of 12 patients with B-NHL was analyzed for the presence of monoclonality at the time of diagnosis and in 3 to 6 months time intervals after an autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT. Results. The monoclonality of B-lymphocytes, as evidenced by DNA fragment length homogeneity, was detected in 88 % (30/34 of B-NHL, but never in CL, T-NHL, or in normal PBL. Bcl-2 translocation was detected in 7/31 (22.6% B-NHL specimens, c-myc amplification 9/31 (29%, all were more than doubled, K-ras mutations in 1/31 (3.23% and H-ras mutations in 2/31 (6.45% of the examined B-NHL samples. In the case of LC and normal PBL, however, these gene alterations were not detected. All the patients (12 with B-NHL had dominant clone of B-lymphocyte in the peripheral blood at the time of diagnosis while only in 2 of 12 patients MRD was detected 3 or 6 months after

  12. Altered T cell costimulation during chronic hepatitis B infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barboza, Luisa; Salmen, Siham; Peterson, Darrell L; Montes, Henry; Colmenares, Melisa; Hernández, Manuel; Berrueta-Carrillo, Leidith E; Berrueta, Lisbeth

    2009-01-01

    T-cell response to hepatitis B virus (HBV) is vigorous, polyclonal and multi-specific in patients with acute hepatitis who ultimately clear the virus, whereas it is narrow and inefficient in patients with chronic disease, where inappropriate early activation events could account for viral persistence. We investigated the induction of activation receptors and cytokine production in response to HBcAg and crosslinking of CD28 molecules, in CD4+ cells from a group of chronically infected patients (CIP) and naturally immune subjects (NIS). We demonstrated that CD4+ cells from CIP did not increase levels of CD40L and CD69 following stimulation with HBcAg alone or associated to CD28 crosslinking, in contrast to subjects that resolved the infection (p<0.01). Furthermore, CD4+ cells from CIP produced elevated levels of IL-10 in response to HBcAg. These results suggest that a predominant inhibitory environment may be responsible for altered T cell costimulation, representing a pathogenic mechanism for viral persistence.

  13. Ureaplasma parvum infection alters filamin a dynamics in host cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Mary B

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ureaplasmas are among the most common bacteria isolated from the human urogenital tract. Ureaplasmas can produce asymptomatic infections or disease characterized by an exaggerated inflammatory response. Most investigations have focused on elucidating the pathogenic potential of Ureaplasma species, but little attention has been paid to understanding the mechanisms by which these organisms are capable of establishing asymptomatic infection. Methods We employed differential proteome profiling of bladder tissues from rats experimentally infected with U. parvum in order to identify host cell processes perturbed by colonization with the microbe. Tissues were grouped into four categories: sham inoculated controls, animals that spontaneously cleared infection, asymptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI, and complicated UTI. One protein that was perturbed by infection (filamin A was used to further elucidate the mechanism of U. parvum-induced disruption in human benign prostate cells (BPH-1. BPH-1 cells were evaluated by confocal microscopy, immunoblotting and ELISA. Results Bladder tissue from animals actively colonized with U. parvum displayed significant alterations in actin binding proteins (profilin 1, vinculin, α actinin, and filamin A that regulate both actin polymerization and cell cytoskeletal function pertaining to focal adhesion formation and signal transduction (Fisher's exact test, P U. parvum perturbed the regulation of filamin A. Specifically, infected BPH-1 cells exhibited a significant increase in filamin A phosphorylated at serine2152 (P ≤ 0.01, which correlated with impaired proteolysis of the protein and its normal intracellular distribution. Conclusion Filamin A dynamics were perturbed in both models of infection. Phosphorylation of filamin A occurs in response to various cell signaling cascades that regulate cell motility, differentiation, apoptosis and inflammation. Thus, this phenomenon may be a useful

  14. Mutations That Alter the Bacterial Cell Envelope Increase Lipid Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly C. Lemmer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Lipids from microbes offer a promising source of renewable alternatives to petroleum-derived compounds. In particular, oleaginous microbes are of interest because they accumulate a large fraction of their biomass as lipids. In this study, we analyzed genetic changes that alter lipid accumulation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. By screening an R. sphaeroides Tn5 mutant library for insertions that increased fatty acid content, we identified 10 high-lipid (HL mutants for further characterization. These HL mutants exhibited increased sensitivity to drugs that target the bacterial cell envelope and changes in shape, and some had the ability to secrete lipids, with two HL mutants accumulating ~60% of their total lipids extracellularly. When one of the highest-lipid-secreting strains was grown in a fed-batch bioreactor, its lipid content was comparable to that of oleaginous microbes, with the majority of the lipids secreted into the medium. Based on the properties of these HL mutants, we conclude that alterations of the cell envelope are a previously unreported approach to increase microbial lipid production. We also propose that this approach may be combined with knowledge about biosynthetic pathways, in this or other microbes, to increase production of lipids and other chemicals.

  15. Cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment alter the somatostatin status of delta cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Catriona, E-mail: catriona.kelly@qub.ac.uk [SAAD Centre for Pharmacy and Diabetes, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine (United Kingdom); Flatt, Peter R.; McClenaghan, Neville H. [SAAD Centre for Pharmacy and Diabetes, School of Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} TGP52 cells display enhanced functionality in pseudoislet form. {yields} Somatostatin content was reduced, but secretion increased in high glucose conditions. {yields} Cellular interactions and environment alter the somatostatin status of TGP52 cells. -- Abstract: Introduction: Somatostatin, released from pancreatic delta cells, is a potent paracrine inhibitor of insulin and glucagon secretion. Islet cellular interactions and glucose homeostasis are essential to maintain normal patterns of insulin secretion. However, the importance of cell-to-cell communication and cellular environment in the regulation of somatostatin release remains unclear. Methods: This study employed the somatostatin-secreting TGP52 cell line maintained in DMEM:F12 (17.5 mM glucose) or DMEM (25 mM glucose) culture media. The effect of pseudoislet formation and culture medium on somatostatin content and release in response to a variety of stimuli was measured by somatostatin EIA. In addition, the effect of pseudoislet formation on cellular viability (MTT and LDH assays) and proliferation (BrdU ELISA) was determined. Results: TGP52 cells readily formed pseudoislets and showed enhanced functionality in three-dimensional form with increased E-cadherin expression irrespective of the culture environment used. However, culture in DMEM decreased cellular somatostatin content (P < 0.01) and increased somatostatin secretion in response to a variety of stimuli including arginine, calcium and PMA (P < 0.001) when compared with cells grown in DMEM:F12. Configuration of TGP52 cells as pseudoislets reduced the proliferative rate and increased cellular cytotoxicity irrespective of culture medium used. Conclusions: Somatostatin secretion is greatly facilitated by cell-to-cell interactions and E-cadherin expression. Cellular environment and extracellular glucose also significantly influence the function of delta cells.

  16. Alterations of proteins in MDCK cells during acute potassium deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerapen, Paleerath; Ausakunpipat, Nardtaya; Chanchaem, Prangwalai; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-06-01

    Chronic K(+) deficiency can cause hypokalemic nephropathy associated with metabolic alkalosis, polyuria, tubular dilatation, and tubulointerstitial injury. However, effects of acute K(+) deficiency on the kidney remained unclear. This study aimed to explore such effects by evaluating changes in levels of proteins in renal tubular cells during acute K(+) deficiency. MDCK cells were cultivated in normal K(+) (NK) (K(+)=5.3 mM), low K(+) (LK) (K(+)=2.5 mM), or K(+) depleted (KD) (K(+)=0 mM) medium for 24 h and then harvested. Cellular proteins were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and visualized by SYPRO Ruby staining (5 gels per group). Spot matching and quantitative intensity analysis revealed a total 48 protein spots that had significantly differential levels among the three groups. Among these, 46 and 30 protein spots had differential levels in KD group compared to NK and LK groups, respectively. Comparison between LK and NK groups revealed only 10 protein spots that were differentially expressed. All of these differentially expressed proteins were successfully identified by Q-TOF MS and/or MS/MS analyses. The altered levels of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90), ezrin, lamin A/C, tubulin, chaperonin-containing TCP1 (CCT1), and calpain 1 were confirmed by Western blot analysis. Global protein network analysis showed three main functional networks, including 1) cell growth and proliferation, 2) cell morphology, cellular assembly and organization, and 3) protein folding in which the altered proteins were involved. Further investigations on these networks may lead to better understanding of pathogenic mechanisms of low K(+)-induced renal injury.

  17. ATP- and NAD+-dependent DNA ligases share an essential function in the halophilic archaeon Haloferax volcanii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, A.; Gray, F. C; MacNeill, S. A.

    2006-01-01

    DNA ligases join the ends of DNA molecules during replication, repair and recombination. ATP-dependent ligases are found predominantly in the eukarya and archaea whereas NAD+-dependent DNA ligases are found only in the eubacteria and in entomopoxviruses. Using the genetically tractable halophile...... Haloferax volcanii as a model system, we describe the first genetic analysis of archaeal DNA ligase function. We show that the Hfx. volcanii ATP-dependent DNA ligase family member, LigA, is non-essential for cell viability, raising the question of how DNA strands are joined in its absence. We show that Hfx....... volcanii also encodes an NAD+-dependent DNA ligase family member, LigN, the first such enzyme to be identified in the archaea, and present phylogenetic analysis indicating that the gene encoding this protein has been acquired by lateral gene transfer (LGT) from eubacteria. As with LigA, we show that Lig...

  18. E1B 55k-independent dissociation of the DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 complex by E4 34k during adenovirus infection

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    The ligase IV/XRCC4 complex plays a central role in DNA double-strand break repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). During adenovirus infection, NHEJ is inhibited by viral proteins E4 34k and E1B 55k, which redirect the Cul5/Rbx1/Elongin BC ubiquitin E3 ligase to polyubiquitinate and promote degradation of ligase IV. In cells infected with E1B 55k-deficient adenovirus, ligase IV could not be found in XRCC4-containing complexes and was observed in a novel ligase IV/E4 34k/Cul5/Elongin BC ...

  19. Alterations in integrin expression modulates invasion of pancreatic cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Naomi

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Factors mediating the invasion of pancreatic cancer cells through the extracellular matrix (ECM) are not fully understood. METHODS: In this study, sub-populations of the human pancreatic cancer cell line, MiaPaCa-2 were established which displayed differences in invasion, adhesion, anoikis, anchorage-independent growth and integrin expression. RESULTS: Clone #3 displayed higher invasion with less adhesion, while Clone #8 was less invasive with increased adhesion to ECM proteins compared to MiaPaCa-2. Clone #8 was more sensitive to anoikis than Clone #3 and MiaPaCa-2, and displayed low colony-forming efficiency in an anchorage-independent growth assay. Integrins beta 1, alpha 5 and alpha 6 were over-expressed in Clone #8. Using small interfering RNA (siRNA), integrin beta1 knockdown in Clone #8 cells increased invasion through matrigel and fibronectin, increased motility, decreased adhesion and anoikis. Integrin alpha 5 and alpha 6 knockdown also resulted in increased motility, invasion through matrigel and decreased adhesion. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that altered expression of integrins interacting with different extracellular matrixes may play a significant role in suppressing the aggressive invasive phenotype. Analysis of these clonal populations of MiaPaCa-2 provides a model for investigations into the invasive properties of pancreatic carcinoma.

  20. Withaferin a alters intermediate filament organization, cell shape and behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Grin

    Full Text Available Withaferin A (WFA is a steroidal lactone present in Withania somnifera which has been shown in vitro to bind to the intermediate filament protein, vimentin. Based upon its affinity for vimentin, it has been proposed that WFA can be used as an anti-tumor agent to target metastatic cells which up-regulate vimentin expression. We show that WFA treatment of human fibroblasts rapidly reorganizes vimentin intermediate filaments (VIF into a perinuclear aggregate. This reorganization is dose dependent and is accompanied by a change in cell shape, decreased motility and an increase in vimentin phosphorylation at serine-38. Furthermore, vimentin lacking cysteine-328, the proposed WFA binding site, remains sensitive to WFA demonstrating that this site is not required for its cellular effects. Using analytical ultracentrifugation, viscometry, electron microscopy and sedimentation assays we show that WFA has no effect on VIF assembly in vitro. Furthermore, WFA is not specific for vimentin as it disrupts the cellular organization and induces perinuclear aggregates of several other IF networks comprised of peripherin, neurofilament-triplet protein, and keratin. In cells co-expressing keratin IF and VIF, the former are significantly less sensitive to WFA with respect to inducing perinuclear aggregates. The organization of microtubules and actin/microfilaments is also affected by WFA. Microtubules become wavier and sparser and the number of stress fibers appears to increase. Following 24 hrs of exposure to doses of WFA that alter VIF organization and motility, cells undergo apoptosis. Lower doses of the drug do not kill cells but cause them to senesce. In light of our findings that WFA affects multiple IF systems, which are expressed in many tissues of the body, caution is warranted in its use as an anti-cancer agent, since it may have debilitating organism-wide effects.

  1. The Role of Ubiquitin Ligases in Cardiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Monte S.; Bevilacqua, Ariana; Pulinilkunnil, Thomas; Kienesberger, Petra; Tannu, Manasi; Patterson, Cam

    2014-01-01

    Rigorous surveillance of protein quality control is essential for the maintenance of normal cardiac function, while the dysregulation of protein turnover is present in a diverse array of common cardiac diseases. Central to the protein quality control found in all cells is the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). The UPS plays a critical role in protein trafficking, cellular signaling, and most prominently, protein degradation. As ubiquitin ligases (E3s) control the specificity of the UPS, their description in the cardiomyocyte has highlighted how ubiquitin ligases are critical to the turnover and function of the sarcomere complex, responsible for the heart’s required continuous contraction. In this review, we provide an overview of the UPS, highlighting a comprehensive overview of the cardiac ubiquitin ligases identified to date. We then focus on recent studies of new cardiac ubiquitin ligases outlining their novel roles in protein turnover, cellular signaling, and the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and receptor turnover in the pathophysiology of cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac atrophy, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. PMID:24262338

  2. Shielding of the Geomagnetic Field Alters Actin Assembly and Inhibits Cell Motility in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Wei-Chuan Mo; Zi-Jian Zhang; Dong-Liang Wang; Ying Liu; Bartlett, Perry F.; Rong-Qiao He

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that absence of the geomagnetic field (GMF), the so-called hypomagnetic field (HMF) environment, alters the biological functions in seemingly non-magnetosensitive cells and organisms, which indicates that the GMF could be sensed by non-iron-rich and non-photo-sensing cells. The underlying mechanisms of the HMF effects on those cells are closely related to their GMF sensation but remain poorly understood so far. Previously, we found that the HMF represses expres...

  3. Human DNA ligase and DNA polymerase as molecular targets for heavy metals and anticancer drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S.

    1992-01-01

    DNA ligase and DNA polymerase play important roles in DNA replication, repair, and recombination. Frequencies of spontaneous and chemical- and physical-induced mutations are correlated to the fidelity of DNA replication. This dissertation elucidates the mechanisms of the DNA ligation reaction by DNA ligases and demonstrates that human DNA ligase I and DNA polymerase [alpha] are the molecular targets for two metal ions, Zn[sup 2+] and Cd[sup 2+], and an anticancer drug, F-ara-ATP. The formation of the AMP-DNA intermediate and the successive ligation reaction by human DNA ligases were analyzed. Both reactions showed their substrate specificity for ligases I and II, required Mg2+, and were inhibited by ATP. A protein inhibitor from HeLa cells and specific for human DNA ligase I but not ligase II and T4 ligase was discovered. It reversibly inhibited DNA ligation activity but not the AMP-binding activity due to the formation of a reversible ligase I-inhibitor complex. F-ara-ATP inhibited human DNA ligase I activity by competing with ATP for the AMP-binding site of DNA ligase I, forming a ligase I-F-ara-AMP complex, as well as when it was incorporated at 3[prime]-terminus of DNA nick by DNA polymerase [alpha]. All steps of the DNA ligation reaction were inhibited by Zn[sup 2+] and Cd[sup 2+] in a concentration-dependent manner. Both ions did not show the ability to change the fidelity of DNA ligation reaction catalyzed by human DNA ligase I. However, Zn[sup 2+] and Cd[sup 2+] showed their contradictory effects on the fidelity of the reaction by human DNA polymerase [alpha]. Zn[sup 2+] decreased the frequency of misinsertion but less affected that of mispair extension. On the contrary, Cd[sup 2+] increased the frequencies of both misinsertion and mispair extension at very low concentration. The data provided strong evidence in the molecular mechanisms for the mutagenicity of zinc and cadmium, and were comparable with the results previously reported.

  4. Ubiquitin Ligase Cbl-b Is Involved in Icotinib (BPI-2009H-Induced Apoptosis and G1 Phase Arrest of EGFR Mutation-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Mu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is one of the most promising targets for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Icotinib, a highly selective EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI, has shown promising clinical efficacy and safety in patients with NSCLC. The exact molecular mechanism of icotinib remains unclear. In this study, we first investigated the antiproliferative effect of icotinib on NSCLC cells. Icotinib significantly inhibited proliferation of the EGFR-mutated lung cancer HCC827 cells. The IC50 values at 48 and 72 h were 0.67 and 0.07 μM, respectively. Flow cytometric analysis showed that icotinib caused the G1 phase arrest and increased the rate of apoptosis in HCC827 cells. The levels of cyclin D1 and cyclin A2 were decreased. The apoptotic process was associated with activation of caspase-3, -8, and poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. Further study revealed that icotinib inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR, Akt, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase. In addition, icotinib upregulated ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b expression. These observations suggest that icotinib-induced upregulation of Cbl-b is responsible, at least in part, for the antitumor effect of icotinib via the inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in EGFR-mutated NSCLC cells.

  5. The CUL3-KLHL18 ligase regulates mitotic entry and ubiquitylates Aurora-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghe, Saili; Jiang, Fei; Miura, Yoshie; Cerny, Ronald L; Tsai, Ming-Ying; Furukawa, Manabu

    2012-02-15

    The cullin-RING family of ubiquitin ligases regulates diverse cellular functions, such as cell cycle control, via ubiquitylation of specific substrates. CUL3 targets its substrates through BTB proteins. Here we show that depletion of CUL3 and the BTB protein KLHL18 causes a delay in mitotic entry. Centrosomal activation of Aurora-A, a kinase whose activity is required for entry into mitosis, is also delayed in depleted cells. Moreover, we identify Aurora-A as a KLHL18-interacting partner. Overexpression of KLHL18 and CUL3 promotes Aurora-A ubiquitylation in vivo, and the CUL3-KLHL18-ROC1 ligase ubiquitylates Aurora-A in vitro. Our study reveals that the CUL3-KLHL18 ligase is required for timely entry into mitosis, as well as for the activation of Aurora-A at centrosomes. We propose that the CUL3-KLHL18 ligase regulates mitotic entry through an Aurora-A-dependent pathway.

  6. The CUL3-KLHL18 ligase regulates mitotic entry and ubiquitylates Aurora-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saili Moghe

    2012-02-01

    The cullin-RING family of ubiquitin ligases regulates diverse cellular functions, such as cell cycle control, via ubiquitylation of specific substrates. CUL3 targets its substrates through BTB proteins. Here we show that depletion of CUL3 and the BTB protein KLHL18 causes a delay in mitotic entry. Centrosomal activation of Aurora-A, a kinase whose activity is required for entry into mitosis, is also delayed in depleted cells. Moreover, we identify Aurora-A as a KLHL18-interacting partner. Overexpression of KLHL18 and CUL3 promotes Aurora-A ubiquitylation in vivo, and the CUL3-KLHL18-ROC1 ligase ubiquitylates Aurora-A in vitro. Our study reveals that the CUL3-KLHL18 ligase is required for timely entry into mitosis, as well as for the activation of Aurora-A at centrosomes. We propose that the CUL3-KLHL18 ligase regulates mitotic entry through an Aurora-A-dependent pathway.

  7. Defects in DNA ligase I trigger PCNA ubiquitylation at Lys 107.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das-Bradoo, Sapna; Nguyen, Hai Dang; Wood, Jamie L; Ricke, Robin M; Haworth, Justin C; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin

    2010-01-01

    In all eukaryotes, the ligation of newly synthesized DNA, also known as Okazaki fragments, is catalysed by DNA ligase I (ref. 1). An individual with a DNA ligase I deficiency exhibits growth retardation, sunlight sensitivity and severe immunosuppression, probably due to accumulation of DNA damage. Surprisingly, not much is known about the DNA damage response (DDR) in DNA ligase I-deficient cells. As DNA replication and DDR pathways are highly conserved in eukaryotes, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system to address this issue. We uncovered a new pathway, which facilitates ubiquitylation at Lys 107 of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Unlike ubiquitylation at Lys 164 of PCNA in response to UV irradiation, which triggers translesion synthesis, modification of Lys 107 is not dependent on the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme (E2) Rad6 (ref. 4) nor the ubiquitin ligase (E3) Rad18 (ref. 5), but requires the E2 variant Mms2 (ref. 6) in conjunction with Ubc4 (ref. 7) and the E3 Rad5 (Refs 8, 9). Surprisingly, DNA ligase I-deficient S. cerevisiae cdc9-1 cells that carry a PCNAK107R mutation are inviable, because they cannot activate a robust DDR. Furthermore, we show that ubiquitylation of PCNA in response to DNA ligase I deficiency is conserved in humans, yet the lysine residue that is modified remains to be determined. We propose that PCNA ubiquitylation provides a 'DNA damage code' that allows cells to categorize different types of defects that arise during DNA replication.

  8. Erioflorin stabilizes the tumor suppressor Pdcd4 by inhibiting its interaction with the E3-ligase β-TrCP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blees, Johanna S; Bokesch, Heidi R; Rübsamen, Daniela; Schulz, Kathrin; Milke, Larissa; Bajer, Magdalena M; Gustafson, Kirk R; Henrich, Curtis J; McMahon, James B; Colburn, Nancy H; Schmid, Tobias; Brüne, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Loss of the tumor suppressor Pdcd4 was reported for various tumor entities and proposed as a prognostic marker in tumorigenesis. We previously characterized decreased Pdcd4 protein stability in response to mitogenic stimuli, which resulted from p70(S6K1)-dependent protein phosphorylation, β-TrCP1-mediated ubiquitination, and proteasomal destruction. Following high-throughput screening of natural product extract libraries using a luciferase-based reporter assay to monitor phosphorylation-dependent proteasomal degradation of the tumor suppressor Pdcd4, we succeeded in showing that a crude extract from Eriophyllum lanatum stabilized Pdcd4 from TPA-induced degradation. Erioflorin was identified as the active component and inhibited not only degradation of the Pdcd4-luciferase-based reporter but also of endogenous Pdcd4 at low micromolar concentrations. Mechanistically, erioflorin interfered with the interaction between the E3-ubiquitin ligase β-TrCP1 and Pdcd4 in cell culture and in in vitro binding assays, consequently decreasing ubiquitination and degradation of Pdcd4. Interestingly, while erioflorin stabilized additional β-TrCP-targets (such as IκBα and β-catenin), it did not prevent the degradation of targets of other E3-ubiquitin ligases such as p21 (a Skp2-target) and HIF-1α (a pVHL-target), implying selectivity for β-TrCP. Moreover, erioflorin inhibited the tumor-associated activity of known Pdcd4- and IκBα-regulated αtranscription factors, that is, AP-1 and NF-κB, altered cell cycle progression and suppressed proliferation of various cancer cell lines. Our studies succeeded in identifying erioflorin as a novel Pdcd4 stabilizer that inhibits the interaction of Pdcd4 with the E3-ubiquitin ligase β-TrCP1. Inhibition of E3-ligase/target-protein interactions may offer the possibility to target degradation of specific proteins only as compared to general proteasome inhibition.

  9. Erioflorin stabilizes the tumor suppressor Pdcd4 by inhibiting its interaction with the E3-ligase β-TrCP1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna S Blees

    Full Text Available Loss of the tumor suppressor Pdcd4 was reported for various tumor entities and proposed as a prognostic marker in tumorigenesis. We previously characterized decreased Pdcd4 protein stability in response to mitogenic stimuli, which resulted from p70(S6K1-dependent protein phosphorylation, β-TrCP1-mediated ubiquitination, and proteasomal destruction. Following high-throughput screening of natural product extract libraries using a luciferase-based reporter assay to monitor phosphorylation-dependent proteasomal degradation of the tumor suppressor Pdcd4, we succeeded in showing that a crude extract from Eriophyllum lanatum stabilized Pdcd4 from TPA-induced degradation. Erioflorin was identified as the active component and inhibited not only degradation of the Pdcd4-luciferase-based reporter but also of endogenous Pdcd4 at low micromolar concentrations. Mechanistically, erioflorin interfered with the interaction between the E3-ubiquitin ligase β-TrCP1 and Pdcd4 in cell culture and in in vitro binding assays, consequently decreasing ubiquitination and degradation of Pdcd4. Interestingly, while erioflorin stabilized additional β-TrCP-targets (such as IκBα and β-catenin, it did not prevent the degradation of targets of other E3-ubiquitin ligases such as p21 (a Skp2-target and HIF-1α (a pVHL-target, implying selectivity for β-TrCP. Moreover, erioflorin inhibited the tumor-associated activity of known Pdcd4- and IκBα-regulated αtranscription factors, that is, AP-1 and NF-κB, altered cell cycle progression and suppressed proliferation of various cancer cell lines. Our studies succeeded in identifying erioflorin as a novel Pdcd4 stabilizer that inhibits the interaction of Pdcd4 with the E3-ubiquitin ligase β-TrCP1. Inhibition of E3-ligase/target-protein interactions may offer the possibility to target degradation of specific proteins only as compared to general proteasome inhibition.

  10. Analysis of cell surface alterations in Legionella pneumophila cells treated with human apolipoprotein E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palusinska-Szysz, Marta; Zdybicka-Barabas, Agnieszka; Cytryńska, Małgorzata; Wdowiak-Wróbel, Sylwia; Chmiel, Elżbieta; Gruszecki, Wiesław I

    2015-03-01

    Binding of human apolipoprotein E (apoE) to Legionella pneumophila lipopolysaccharide was analysed at the molecular level by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, thereby providing biophysical evidence for apoE-L. pneumophila lipopolysaccharide interaction. Atomic force microscopy imaging of apoE-exposed L. pneumophila cells revealed alterations in the bacterial cell surface topography and nanomechanical properties in comparison with control bacteria. The changes induced by apoE binding to lipopolysaccharide on the surface of L. pneumophila cells may participate in: (1) impeding the penetration of host cells by the bacteria; (2) suppression of pathogen intracellular growth and eventually; and (3) inhibition of the development of infection.

  11. Stretching Fibroblasts Remodels Fibronectin and Alters Cancer Cell Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Mingfang; Brewer, Bryson M.; Yang, Lijie; Franco Coronel, Omar E.; Hayward, Simon W.; Webb, Donna J.; Li, Deyu

    2015-02-01

    Most investigations of cancer-stroma interactions have focused on biochemical signaling effects, with much less attention being paid to biophysical factors. In this study, we investigated the role of mechanical stimuli on human prostatic fibroblasts using a microfluidic platform that was adapted for our experiments and further developed for both repeatable performance among multiple assays and for compatibility with high-resolution confocal microscopy. Results show that mechanical stretching of normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs) alters the structure of secreted fibronectin. Specifically, unstretched NAFs deposit and assemble fibronectin in a random, mesh-like arrangement, while stretched NAFs produce matrix with a more organized, linearly aligned structure. Moreover, the stretched NAFs exhibited an enhanced capability for directing co-cultured cancer cell migration in a persistent manner. Furthermore, we show that stretching NAFs triggers complex biochemical signaling events through the observation of increased expression of platelet derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα). A comparison of these behaviors with those of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) indicates that the observed phenotypes of stretched NAFs are similar to those associated with CAFs, suggesting that mechanical stress is a critical factor in NAF activation and CAF genesis.

  12. Membrane alterations in irreversibly sickled cells: hemoglobin--membrane interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessin, L S; Kurantsin-Mills, J; Wallas, C; Weems, H

    1978-01-01

    Irreversibly sickled cells (ISCs) are sickle erythrocytes which retain bipolar elongated shapes despite reoxygenation and owe their biophysical abnormalities to acquired membrane alterations. Freeze-etched membranes both of ISCs produced in vitro and ISCs isolated in vivo reveal microbodies fixed to the internal (PS) surface which obscure spectrin filaments. Intramembranous particles (IMPs) on the intramembrane (PF) surface aggregate over regions of subsurface microbodies. Electron microscopy of diaminobenzidine-treated of ISC ghosts show the microbodies to contain hemoglobin and/or hemoglobin derivatives. Scanning electron microscopy and freeze-etching demonstrate that membrane--hemoglobin S interaction in ISCs enhances the membrane loss by microspherulation. Membrane-bound hemoglobin is five times greater in in vivo ISCs than non-ISCs, and increases during ISC production, parallelling depletion of adenosine triphosphate. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of ISC membranes shows the presence of high-molecular-weight heteropolymers in the pre--band 1 region, a decrease in band 4.1 and an increase in bands 7, 8, and globin. The role of cross-linked membrane protein polymers in the generation of ISCs is discussed and is synthesized in terms of a unified concept for the determinants of the genesis of ISCs.

  13. Lenalidomide Stabilizes the Erythropoietin Receptor by Inhibiting the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase RNF41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiorka, Ashley A; McGraw, Kathy L; De Ceuninck, Leentje; Griner, Lori N; Zhang, Ling; Clark, Justine A; Caceres, Gisela; Sokol, Lubomir; Komrokji, Rami S; Reuther, Gary W; Wei, Sheng; Tavernier, Jan; List, Alan F

    2016-06-15

    In a subset of patients with non-del(5q) myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), lenalidomide promotes erythroid lineage competence and effective erythropoiesis. To determine the mechanism by which lenalidomide promotes erythropoiesis, we investigated its action on erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) cellular dynamics. Lenalidomide upregulated expression and stability of JAK2-associated EpoR in UT7 erythroid cells and primary CD71+ erythroid progenitors. The effects of lenalidomide on receptor turnover were Type I cytokine receptor specific, as evidenced by coregulation of the IL3-Rα receptor but not c-Kit. To elucidate this mechanism, we investigated the effects of lenalidomide on the E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF41. Lenalidomide promoted EpoR/RNF41 association and inhibited RNF41 auto-ubiquitination, accompanied by a reduction in EpoR ubiquitination. To confirm that RNF41 is the principal target responsible for EpoR stabilization, HEK293T cells were transfected with EpoR and/or RNF41 gene expression vectors. Steady-state EpoR expression was reduced in EpoR/RNF41 cells, whereas EpoR upregulation by lenalidomide was abrogated, indicating that cellular RNF41 is a critical determinant of drug-induced receptor modulation. Notably, shRNA suppression of CRBN gene expression failed to alter EpoR upregulation, indicating that drug-induced receptor modulation is independent of cereblon. Immunohistochemical staining showed that RNF41 expression decreased in primary erythroid cells of lenalidomide-responding patients, suggesting that cellular RNF41 expression merits investigation as a biomarker for lenalidomide response. Our findings indicate that lenalidomide has E3 ubiquitin ligase inhibitory effects that extend to RNF41 and that inhibition of RNF41 auto-ubiquitination promotes membrane accumulation of signaling competent JAK2/EpoR complexes that augment Epo responsiveness. Cancer Res; 76(12); 3531-40. ©2016 AACR.

  14. Knockdown of DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 by RNA interference inhibits herpes simplex virus type I DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muylaert, Isabella; Elias, Per

    2007-04-13

    Herpes simplex virus has a linear double-stranded DNA genome with directly repeated terminal sequences needed for cleavage and packaging of replicated DNA. In infected cells, linear genomes rapidly become endless. It is currently a matter of discussion whether the endless genomes are circles supporting rolling circle replication or arise by recombination of linear genomes forming concatemers. Here, we have examined the role of mammalian DNA ligases in the herpes simplex virus, type I (HSV-1) life cycle by employing RNA interference (RNAi) in human 1BR.3.N fibroblasts. We find that RNAi-mediated knockdown of DNA ligase IV and its co-factor XRCC4 causes a hundred-fold reduction of virus yield, a small plaque phenotype, and reduced DNA synthesis. The effect is specific because RNAi against DNA ligase I or DNA ligase III fail to reduce HSV-1 replication. Furthermore, RNAi against DNA ligase IV and XRCC4 does not affect replication of adenovirus. In addition, high multiplicity infections of HSV-1 in human DNA ligase IV-deficient cells reveal a pronounced delay of production of infectious virus. Finally, we demonstrate that formation of endless genomes is inhibited by RNAi-mediated depletion of DNA ligase IV and XRCC4. Our results suggests that DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 serves an important role in the replication cycle of herpes viruses and is likely to be required for the formation of the endless genomes early during productive infection.

  15. Mechanism of replication machinery assembly as revealed by the DNA ligase-PCNA-DNA complex architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayanagi, Kouta; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Saito, Mihoko; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2009-03-24

    The 3D structure of the ternary complex, consisting of DNA ligase, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) clamp, and DNA, was investigated by single-particle analysis. This report presents the structural view, where the crescent-shaped DNA ligase with 3 distinct domains surrounds the central DNA duplex, encircled by the closed PCNA ring, thus forming a double-layer structure with dual contacts between the 2 proteins. The relative orientations of the DNA ligase domains, which remarkably differ from those of the known crystal structures, suggest that a large domain rearrangement occurs upon ternary complex formation. A second contact was found between the PCNA ring and the middle adenylation domain of the DNA ligase. Notably, the map revealed a substantial DNA tilt from the PCNA ring axis. This structure allows us to propose a switching mechanism for the replication factors operating on the PCNA ring.

  16. Crystal structure of lipoate-bound lipoate ligase 1, LipL1, from Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Alfredo J; Afanador, Gustavo A; Prigge, Sean T

    2017-09-01

    Plasmodium falciparum lipoate protein ligase 1 (PfLipL1) is an ATP-dependent ligase that belongs to the biotin/lipoate A/B protein ligase family (PFAM PF03099). PfLipL1 is the only known canonical lipoate ligase in Pf and functions as a redox switch between two lipoylation routes in the parasite mitochondrion. Here, we report the crystal structure of a deletion construct of PfLipL1 (PfLipL1Δ243-279 ) bound to lipoate, and validate the lipoylation activity of this construct in both an in vitro lipoylation assay and a cell-based lipoylation assay. This characterization represents the first step in understanding the redox dependence of the lipoylation mechanism in malaria parasites. Proteins 2017; 85:1777-1783. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Bioinformatics analysis identifies several intrinsically disordered human E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Wouter Krogh; Nielsen, Sofie Vincents; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system targets misfolded proteins for degradation. Since the accumulation of such proteins is potentially harmful for the cell, their prompt removal is important. E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases mediate substrate ubiquitination by bringing together the substrate with an E2...... ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, which transfers ubiquitin to the substrate. For misfolded proteins, substrate recognition is generally delegated to molecular chaperones that subsequently interact with specific E3 ligases. An important exception is San1, a yeast E3 ligase. San1 harbors extensive regions...... of intrinsic disorder, which provide both conformational flexibility and sites for direct recognition of misfolded targets of vastly different conformations. So far, no mammalian ortholog of San1 is known, nor is it clear whether other E3 ligases utilize disordered regions for substrate recognition. Here, we...

  18. E1B 55k-independent dissociation of the DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 complex by E4 34k during adenovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaram, Sumithra; Gilson, Timra; Ehrlich, Elana S; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Ketner, Gary; Hanakahi, Les

    2008-12-20

    The ligase IV/XRCC4 complex plays a central role in DNA double-strand break repair by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). During adenovirus infection, NHEJ is inhibited by viral proteins E4 34k and E1B 55k, which redirect the Cul5/Rbx1/Elongin BC ubiquitin E3 ligase to polyubiquitinate and promote degradation of ligase IV. In cells infected with E1B 55k-deficient adenovirus, ligase IV could not be found in XRCC4-containing complexes and was observed in a novel ligase IV/E4 34k/Cul5/Elongin BC complex. These observations suggest that dissociation of the ligase IV/XRCC4 complex occurs at an early stage in E4 34k-mediated degradation of ligase IV and indicate a role for E4 34k in dissociation of the ligase IV/XRCCC4 complex. Expression of E4 34k alone was not sufficient to dissociate the ligase IV/XRCC4 complex, which indicates a requirement for an additional, as yet unidentified, factor in E1B 55k-independent dissociation of the ligase IV/XRCC4 complex.

  19. Iduna is a poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR)-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates DNA damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ho Chul; Lee, Yun-Il; Shin, Joo-Ho; Andrabi, Shaida A.; Chi, Zhikai; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Lee, Yunjong; Ko, Han Seok; Lee, Byoung Dae; Poirier, Guy G.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitin mediated protein degradation is crucial for regulation of cell signaling and protein quality control. Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is a cell-signaling molecule that mediates changes in protein function through binding at PAR binding sites. Here we characterize the PAR binding protein, Iduna, and show that it is a PAR-dependent ubiquitin E3 ligase. Iduna’s E3 ligase activity requires PAR binding because point mutations at Y156A and R157A eliminate Iduna’s PAR binding and Iduna’s E3 ligase activity. Iduna’s E3 ligase activity also requires an intact really interesting new gene (RING) domain because Iduna possessing point mutations at either H54A or C60A is devoid of ubiquitination activity. Tandem affinity purification reveals that Iduna binds to a number of proteins that are either PARsylated or bind PAR including PAR polymerase-1, 2 (PARP1, 2), nucleolin, DNA ligase III, KU70, KU86, XRCC1, and histones. PAR binding to Iduna activates its E3 ligase function, and PAR binding is required for Iduna ubiquitination of PARP1, XRCC1, DNA ligase III, and KU70. Iduna’s PAR-dependent ubiquitination of PARP1 targets it for proteasomal degradation. Via PAR binding and ubiquitin E3 ligase activity, Iduna protects against cell death induced by the DNA damaging agent N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and rescues cells from G1 arrest and promotes cell survival after γ-irradiation. Moreover, Iduna facilitates DNA repair by reducing apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites after MNNG exposure and facilitates DNA repair following γ-irradiation as assessed by the comet assay. These results define Iduna as a PAR-dependent E3 ligase that regulates cell survival and DNA repair. PMID:21825151

  20. Shielding of the Geomagnetic Field Alters Actin Assembly and Inhibits Cell Motility in Human Neuroblastoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Wei-Chuan; Zhang, Zi-Jian; Wang, Dong-Liang; Liu, Ying; Bartlett, Perry F; He, Rong-Qiao

    2016-03-31

    Accumulating evidence has shown that absence of the geomagnetic field (GMF), the so-called hypomagnetic field (HMF) environment, alters the biological functions in seemingly non-magnetosensitive cells and organisms, which indicates that the GMF could be sensed by non-iron-rich and non-photo-sensing cells. The underlying mechanisms of the HMF effects on those cells are closely related to their GMF sensation but remain poorly understood so far. Previously, we found that the HMF represses expressions of genes associated with cell migration and cytoskeleton assembly in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y cell line). Here, we measured the HMF-induced changes on cell morphology, adhesion, motility and actin cytoskeleton in SH-SY5Y cells. The HMF inhibited cell adhesion and migration accompanied with a reduction in cellular F-actin amount. Moreover, following exposure to the HMF, the number of cell processes was reduced and cells were smaller in size and more round in shape. Furthermore, disordered kinetics of actin assembly in vitro were observed during exposure to the HMF, as evidenced by the presence of granule and meshed products. These results indicate that elimination of the GMF affects assembly of the motility-related actin cytoskeleton, and suggest that F-actin is a target of HMF exposure and probably a mediator of GMF sensation.

  1. Altered epigenetic regulation of homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M.; Gudas, Lorraine J., E-mail: ljgudas@med.cornell.edu

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into oral squamous cell carcinogenesis, we performed deep sequencing (RNAseq) of non-tumorigenic human OKF6-TERT1R and tumorigenic SCC-9 cells. Numerous homeobox genes are differentially expressed between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells. Data from Oncomine, a cancer microarray database, also show that homeobox (HOX) genes are dysregulated in oral SCC patients. The activity of Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC), which causes epigenetic modifications, and retinoic acid (RA) signaling can control HOX gene transcription. HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcripts are higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells; using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) we detected PRC2 protein SUZ12 and the epigenetic H3K27me3 mark on histone H3 at these genes in OKF6-TERT1R, but not in SCC-9 cells. In contrast, IRX1, IRX4, SIX2 and TSHZ3 transcripts are lower in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells. We detected SUZ12 and the H3K27me3 mark at these genes in SCC-9, but not in OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 depletion increased HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcript levels and decreased the proliferation of OKF6-TERT1R cells. Transcriptional responses to RA are attenuated in SCC-9 versus OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 and H3K27me3 levels were not altered by RA at these HOX genes in SCC-9 and OKF6-TERT1R cells. We conclude that altered activity of PRC2 is associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human SCC cells, and that this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of oral keratinocytes. - Highlights: • RNAseq elucidates differences between non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic oral keratinocytes. • Changes in HOX mRNA in SCC-9 vs. OKF6-TERT1R cells are a result of altered epigenetic regulation. • RNAseq shows that retinoic acid (RA) influences gene expression in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells.

  2. ADAM17 deletion in thymic epithelial cells alters aire expression without affecting T cell developmental progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Gravano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular interactions between thymocytes and thymic stromal cells are critical for normal T cell development. Thymic epithelial cells (TECs are important stromal niche cells that provide essential growth factors, cytokines, and present self-antigens to developing thymocytes. The identification of genes that mediate cellular crosstalk in the thymus is ongoing. One candidate gene, Adam17, encodes a metalloprotease that functions by cleaving the ectodomain of several transmembrane proteins and regulates various developmental processes. In conventional Adam17 knockout mice, a non-cell autonomous role for ADAM17 in adult T cell development was reported, which strongly suggested that expression of ADAM17 in TECs was required for normal T cell development. However, knockdown of Adam17 results in multisystem developmental defects and perinatal lethality, which has made study of the role of Adam17 in specific cell types difficult. Here, we examined T cell and thymic epithelial cell development using a conditional knockout approach. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated an Adam17 conditional knockout mouse in which floxed Adam17 is deleted specifically in TECs by Cre recombinase under the control of the Foxn1 promoter. Normal T cell lineage choice and development through the canonical αβ T cell stages was observed. Interestingly, Adam17 deficiency in TECs resulted in reduced expression of the transcription factor Aire. However, no alterations in the patterns of TEC phenotypic marker expression and thymus morphology were noted. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In contrast to expectation, our data clearly shows that absence of Adam17 in TECs is dispensable for normal T cell development. Differentiation of TECs is also unaffected by loss of Adam17 based on phenotypic markers. Surprisingly, we have uncovered a novel genetic link between Adam17and Aire expression in vivo. The cell type in which ADAM17 mediates its non-cell autonomous impact and

  3. Trypsin-induced proteome alteration during cell subculture in mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Cheng-Wen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is essential to subculture the cells once cultured cells reach confluence. For this, trypsin is frequently applied to dissociate adhesive cells from the substratum. However, due to the proteolytic activity of trypsin, cell surface proteins are often cleaved, which leads to dysregulation of the cell functions. Methods In this study, a triplicate 2D-DIGE strategy has been performed to monitor trypsin-induced proteome alterations. The differentially expressed spots were identified by MALDI-TOF MS and validated by immunoblotting. Results 36 proteins are found to be differentially expressed in cells treated with trypsin, and proteins that are known to regulate cell metabolism, growth regulation, mitochondrial electron transportation and cell adhesion are down-regulated and proteins that regulate cell apoptosis are up-regulated after trypsin treatment. Further study shows that bcl-2 is down-regulated, p53 and p21 are both up-regulated after trypsinization. Conclusions In summary, this is the first report that uses the proteomic approach to thoroughly study trypsin-induced cell physiological changes and provides researchers in carrying out their experimental design.

  4. Retinal Targets ALDH Positive Cancer Stem Cell and Alters the Phenotype of Highly Metastatic Osteosarcoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Mu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH is a cancer stem cell marker. Retinoic acid has antitumor properties, including the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation. Retinal, the precursor of retinoic acid, can be oxidized to retinoic acid by dehydrogenases, including ALDH. We hypothesized that retinal could potentially be transformed to retinoic acid with higher efficiency by cancer stem cells, due to the higher ALDH activity. We previously observed that ALDH activity is greater in highly metastatic K7M2 osteosarcoma (OS cells than in nonmetastatic K12 OS cells. We also demonstrated that ALDH activity correlates with clinical metastases in bone sarcoma patients, suggesting that ALDH may be a therapeutic target specific to cells with high metastatic potential. Our current results demonstrated that retinal preferentially affected the phenotypes of ALDH-high K7M2 cells in contrast to ALDH-low K12 cells, which could be mediated by the more efficient transformation of retinal to retinoic acid by ALDH in K7M2 cells. Retinal treatment of highly metastatic K7M2 cells decreased their proliferation, invasion capacity, and resistance to oxidative stress. Retinal altered the expression of metastasis-related genes. These observations indicate that retinal may be used to specifically target metastatic cancer stem cells in OS.

  5. Recombinant expression and purification of an ATP-dependent DNA ligase from Aliivibrio salmonicida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Adele; Pedersen, Hege

    2014-05-01

    The genome of the psychrophilic fish-pathogen Aliivibrio salmonicida encodes a putative ATP-dependent DNA ligase in addition to a housekeeping NAD-dependent enzyme. In order to study the structure and activity of the ATP dependent ligase in vitro we have undertaken its recombinant production and purification from an Escherichia coli based expression system. Expression and purification of this protein presented two significant challenges. First, the gene product was moderately toxic to E. coli cells, second it was necessary to remove the large amounts of E. coli DNA present in bacterial lysates without contamination of the protein preparation by nucleases which might interfere with future assaying. The toxicity problem was overcome by fusion of the putative ligase to large solubility tags such as maltose-binding protein (MBP) or Glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and DNA was removed by treatment with a nuclease which could be inhibited by reducing agents. As the A. salmonicida ATP-dependent DNA ligase gene encodes a predicted leader peptide, both the full-length and mature forms of the protein were produced. Both possessed ATP-dependent DNA ligase activity, but the truncated form was significantly more active. Here we detail the first reported production, purification and preliminary characterization of active A. salmonicida ATP-dependent DNA ligase.

  6. A novel interaction between DNA ligase III and DNA polymerase gamma plays an essential role in mitochondrial DNA stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Ananya; Campbell, Colin

    2007-02-15

    The data in the present study show that DNA polymerase gamma and DNA ligase III interact in mitochondrial protein extracts from cultured HT1080 cells. An interaction was also observed between the two recombinant proteins in vitro. Expression of catalytically inert versions of DNA ligase III that bind DNA polymerase gamma was associated with reduced mitochondrial DNA copy number and integrity. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type DNA ligase III had no effect on mitochondrial DNA copy number or integrity. Experiments revealed that wild-type DNA ligase III facilitates the interaction of DNA polymerase gamma with a nicked DNA substrate in vitro, and that the zinc finger domain of DNA ligase III is required for this activity. Mitochondrial protein extracts prepared from cells overexpressing a DNA ligase III protein that lacked the zinc finger domain had reduced base excision repair activity compared with extracts from cells overexpressing the wild-type protein. These data support the interpretation that the interaction of DNA ligase III and DNA polymerase gamma is required for proper maintenance of the mammalian mitochondrial genome.

  7. Cadmium delays non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair via inhibition of DNA-PKcs phosphorylation and downregulation of XRCC4 and Ligase IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Weiwei; Gu, Xueyan; Zhang, Xiaoning; Kong, Jinxin [Gansu Key Laboratory of Biomonitoring and Bioremediation for Environmental Pollution, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Ding, Nan [Gansu Key laboratory of Space Radiobiology, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Qi, Yongmei; Zhang, Yingmei [Gansu Key Laboratory of Biomonitoring and Bioremediation for Environmental Pollution, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Jufang [Gansu Key laboratory of Space Radiobiology, Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Huang, Dejun, E-mail: huangdj@lzu.edu.cn [Gansu Key Laboratory of Biomonitoring and Bioremediation for Environmental Pollution, School of Life Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Cadmium (Cd) exposure delayed the repair of DNA damage induced by X-ray. • Cd exposure altered the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs on Thr-2609 and Ser-2056 sites. • Cd impaired the formation of XRCC4 and Ligase IV foci, and down-regulated their protein expression. • Zinc mitigated the effects of Cd on DDR by regulating pDNA-PKcs (Thr-2609), XRCC4 and Ligase IV. - Abstract: Although studies have shown that cadmium (Cd) interfered with DNA damage repair (DDR), whether Cd could affect non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair remains elusive. To further understand the effect of Cd on DDR, we used X-ray irradiation of Hela cells as an in vitro model system, along with γH2AX and 53BP1 as markers for DNA damage. Results showed that X-ray significantly increased γH2AX and 53BP1 foci in Hela cells (p < 0.01), all of which are characteristic of accrued DNA damage. The number of foci declined rapidly over time (1–8 h postirradiation), indicating an initiation of NHEJ process. However, the disappearance of γH2AX and 53BP1 foci was remarkably slowed by Cd pretreatment (p < 0.01), suggesting that Cd reduced the efficiency of NHEJ. To further elucidate the mechanisms of Cd toxicity, several markers of NHEJ pathway including Ku70, DNA-PKcs, XRCC4 and Ligase IV were examined. Our data showed that Cd altered the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs, and reduced the expression of both XRCC4 and Ligase IV in irradiated cells. These observations are indicative of the impairment of NHEJ-dependent DNA repair pathways. In addition, zinc (Zn) mitigated the effects of Cd on NHEJ, suggesting that the Cd-induced NHEJ alteration may partly result from the displacement of Zn or from an interference with the normal function of Zn-containing proteins by Cd. Our findings provide a new insight into the toxicity of Cd on NHEJ repair and its underlying mechanisms in human cells.

  8. Genetic alteration in notch pathway is associated with better prognosis in renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chenchen; Xiong, Zuquan; Jiang, Haowen; Ding, Qiang; Fang, Zujun; Hui, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling was associated with a variety of cancers but was not comprehensively studied in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). We have in this study studied the genetic alteration (mutation and copy number variance) of Notch gene set in the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Kidney Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma (KIRC) database. We found that Notch pathway was frequently altered in ccRCC. The Notch gene set was genetically altered in 182 (44%) of the 415 ccRCC patients. CNV was the predominant type of alteration in most genes. Alterations in KAT2B and MAML1 occurred in 13% and 19% of patients, respectively, both of which were functionally active in ccRCC. Deletion of VHL was exclusively found in cases with Notch alteration. Overall survival was longer in ccRCC patients with altered-Notch pathway. The median survival was 90.41 months in Notch-altered cases and 69.15 in Notch-unaltered cases (P = 0.0404). The median disease free time was 89.82 months in Notch-altered cases and 77.27 months in in Notch-unaltered cases (P = 0.935). Conclusively, Notch signaling was altered in almost half of the ccRCC patients and copy number variances in MAML1 and KAT2B were predominant changes. These findings broadened our understanding of the role of Notch in ccRCC.

  9. Alterations in the growth and adhesion pattern of Vero cells induced by nutritional stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genari, S C; Gomes, L; Wada, M L

    1998-01-01

    The pattern of growth, adhesion and protein synthesis in Vero cells submitted to nutritional stress conditions was investigated. The control cells presented a characteristic pattern, with monolayer growth, while the stressed cells presented multilayered growth, with aggregate or spheroid formation which detached on the flask surface and continued their growth in another region. In the soft agar assay, with reduced amount of nutrients, only the stressed cells presented growth, indicating physical and nutritional independence. A 44-kDa protein was observed in stressed cells and was absent in non-stressed cells. The adhesion index and fibronectin synthesis and distribution were altered in stressed cells. After confluence, control cells presented fibronectin accumulation in lateral cell-cell contact regions, while this fibronectin accumulation pattern was not observed in stressed cells. These alterations may be responsible for the multilayered growth and decreased adhesion index observed in stressed cells which were transformed by nutritional stress conditions.

  10. Virus Innexins induce alterations in insect cell and tissue function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polydnaviruses are dsDNA viruses that induce immune and developmental alterations in their caterpillar hosts. Characterization of polydnavirus gene families and family members is necessary to understand mechanisms of pathology and evolution of these viruses, and may aid to elucidate the role of host...

  11. Altered status of glutathione and its metabolites in cystinotic cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levtchenko, E.N.; Graaf-Hess, A.C. de; Wilmer, M.J.G.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Monnens, L.A.H.; Blom, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disorder, caused by mutations of the lysosomal cystine carrier cystinosin, encoded by the CTNS gene (17p13). The concomitant intralysosomal cystine accumulation leads to multi-organ damage, with kidneys being the first affected. Altered mitochondrial

  12. Alterations in Cell Signaling Pathways in Breast Cancer Cells after Environmental Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulp, K; McCutcheon-Maloney, S M; Bennett, L M

    2003-02-01

    Recent human epidemiological studies suggest that up to 75% of human cancers can be attributed to environmental exposures. Understanding the biologic impact of being exposed to a lifetime of complex environmental mixtures that may not be fully characterized is currently a major challenge. Functional endpoints may be used to assess the gross health consequences of complex mixture exposures from groundwater contamination, superfund sites, biologic releases, or nutritional sources. Such endpoints include the stimulation of cell growth or the induction of a response in an animal model. An environmental exposure that upsets normal cell growth regulation may have important ramifications for cancer development. Stimulating cell growth may alter an individual's cancer risk by changing the expression of genes and proteins that have a role in growth regulatory pathways within cells. Modulating the regulation of these genes and their products may contribute to the initiation, promotion or progression of disease in response to environmental exposure. We are investigating diet-related compounds that induce cell proliferation in breast cancer cell lines. These compounds, PhIP, Flor-Essence{reg_sign} and Essiac{reg_sign}, may be part of an everyday diet. PhIP is a naturally occurring mutagen that is formed in well-cooked muscle meats. PhIP consistently causes dose-dependent breast tumor formation in rats and consumption of well-done meat has been linked to increased risk of breast cancer in women. Flor-Essence{reg_sign} and Essiac{reg_sign} herbal tonics are complementary and alternative medicines used by women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer as an alternative therapy for disease treatment and prevention. The long-term goal of this work is to identify those cellular pathways that are altered by a chemical or biologic environmental exposure and understand how those changes correlate with and or predict changes in human health risk. This project addressed this goal

  13. Altering β-cell number through stable alteration of miR-21 and miR-34a expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backe, Marie Balslev; Novotny, Guy Wayne; Christensen, Dan Ploug;

    2014-01-01

    RNAs, miR-21 and miR-34a, may be involved in mediating cytokine-induced β-cell dysfunction. Therefore, manipulation of miR-21 and miR-34a levels may potentially be beneficial to β cells. To study the effect of long-term alterations of miR-21 or miR-34a levels upon net β-cell number, we stably overexpressed...... miR-21 and knocked down miR-34a, and investigated essential cellular processes. Materials and Methods: miRNA expression was manipulated using Lentiviral transduction of the β-cell line INS-1. Stable cell lines were generated, and cell death, NO synthesis, proliferation, and total cell number were...... monitored in the absence or presence of cytokines. Results: Overexpression of miR-21 decreased net β-cell number in the absence of cytokines, and increased apoptosis and NO synthesis in the absence and presence of cytokines. Proliferation was increased upon miR-21 overexpression. Knockdown of miR-34a...

  14. TRAIP is a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase that protects genome stability after replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Saskia; Smedegaard, Stine; Nakamura, Kyosuke

    2016-01-01

    , allowing cells to mitigate the threats to genome stability posed by replication stress. We identify the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRAIP as a new factor at active and stressed replication forks that directly interacts with PCNA via a conserved PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) box motif. We show that TRAIP promotes...... ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling in human cells by facilitating the generation of RPA-bound single-stranded DNA regions upon replication stress in a manner that critically requires its E3 ligase activity and is potentiated by the PIP box. Consequently, loss of TRAIP function leads to enhanced...... chromosomal instability and decreased cell survival after replication stress. These findings establish TRAIP as a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase with an important role in protecting genome integrity after obstacles to DNA replication....

  15. Alemtuzumab treatment alters circulating innate immune cells in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmetspahic, Diana; Ruck, Tobias; Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Andreas; Schwarte, Kathrin; Jörgens, Silke; Scheu, Stefanie; Windhagen, Susanne; Graefe, Bettina; Melzer, Nico; Klotz, Luisa; Arolt, Volker; Wiendl, Heinz; Meuth, Sven G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To characterize changes in myeloid and lymphoid innate immune cells in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) during a 6-month follow-up after alemtuzumab treatment. Methods: Circulating innate immune cells including myeloid cells and innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) were analyzed before and 6 and 12 months after onset of alemtuzumab treatment. Furthermore, a potential effect on granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin (IL)–23 production by myeloid cells and natural killer (NK) cell cytolytic activity was determined. Results: In comparison to CD4+ T lymphocytes, myeloid and lymphoid innate cell subsets of patients with MS expressed significantly lower amounts of CD52 on their cell surface. Six months after CD52 depletion, numbers of circulating plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) and conventional DCs were reduced compared to baseline. GM-CSF and IL-23 production in DCs remained unchanged. Within the ILC compartment, the subset of CD56bright NK cells specifically expanded under alemtuzumab treatment, but their cytolytic activity did not change. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that 6 months after alemtuzumab treatment, specific DC subsets are reduced, while CD56bright NK cells expanded in patients with MS. Thus, alemtuzumab specifically restricts the DC compartment and expands the CD56bright NK cell subset with potential immunoregulatory properties in MS. We suggest that remodeling of the innate immune compartment may promote long-term efficacy of alemtuzumab and preserve immunocompetence in patients with MS. PMID:27766281

  16. Altered effector function of peripheral cytotoxic cells in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corne Jonathan M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is mounting evidence that perforin and granzymes are important mediators in the lung destruction seen in COPD. We investigated the characteristics of the three main perforin and granzyme containing peripheral cells, namely CD8+ T lymphocytes, natural killer (NK; CD56+CD3- cells and NKT-like (CD56+CD3+ cells. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were isolated and cell numbers and intracellular granzyme B and perforin were analysed by flow cytometry. Immunomagnetically selected CD8+ T lymphocytes, NK (CD56+CD3- and NKT-like (CD56+CD3+ cells were used in an LDH release assay to determine cytotoxicity and cytotoxic mechanisms were investigated by blocking perforin and granzyme B with relevant antibodies. Results The proportion of peripheral blood NKT-like (CD56+CD3+ cells in smokers with COPD (COPD subjects was significantly lower (0.6% than in healthy smokers (smokers (2.8%, p +CD3- cells from COPD subjects were significantly less cytotoxic than in smokers (16.8% vs 51.9% specific lysis, p +CD3+ cells (16.7% vs 52.4% specific lysis, p +CD3- and NKT-like (CD56+CD3+ cells from smokers and HNS. Conclusion In this study, we show that the relative numbers of peripheral blood NK (CD56+CD3- and NKT-like (CD56+CD3+ cells in COPD subjects are reduced and that their cytotoxic effector function is defective.

  17. The auto-ubiquitylation of E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase Chfr at G2 phase is required for accumulation of polo-like kinase 1 and mitotic entry in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jo-Sun; Park, Yong-Yea; Park, Sun-Yi; Cho, Hyeseon; Kang, Dongmin; Cho, Hyeseong

    2011-09-01

    The E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase Chfr is a mitotic stress checkpoint protein that delays mitotic entry in response to microtubule damage; however, the molecular mechanism by which Chfr accomplishes this remains elusive. Here, we show that Chfr levels are elevated in response to microtubule-damaging stress. Moreover, G(2)/M transition is associated with cell cycle-dependent turnover of Chfr accompanied by high autoubiquitylation activity, suggesting that regulation of Chfr levels and auto-ubiquitylation activity are functionally significant. To test this, we generated Chfr mutants Chfr-K2A and Chfr-K5A in which putative lysine target sites of auto-ubiquitylation were replaced with alanine. Chfr-K2A did not undergo cell cycle-dependent degradation, and its levels remained high during G(2)/M phase. The elevated levels of Chfr-K2A caused a significant reduction in phosphohistone H3 levels and cyclinB1/Cdk1 kinase activities, leading to mitotic entry delay. Notably, polo-like kinase 1 levels at G(2) phase, but not at S phase, were ∼2-3-fold lower in cells expressing Chfr-K2A than in wild-type Chfr-expressing cells. Consistent with this, ubiquitylation of Plk1 at G(2) phase was accelerated in Chfr-K2A-expressing cells. In contrast, Aurora A levels remained constant, indicating that Plk1 is a major target of Chfr in controlling the timing of mitotic entry. Indeed, overexpression of Plk1 in Chfr-K2A-expressing cells restored cyclin B1/Cdk1 kinase activity and promoted mitotic entry. Collectively, these data indicate that Chfr auto-ubiquitylation is required to allow Plk1 to accumulate to levels necessary for activation of cyclin B1/Cdk1 kinase and mitotic entry. Our results provide the first evidence that Chfr auto-ubiquitylation and degradation are important for the G(2)/M transition.

  18. A sporadic Parkinson disease model via silencing of the ubiquitin-proteasome/E3 ligase component SKP1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman-Jacob, Tali; Reznichenko, Lydia; Youdim, Moussa B H; Mandel, Silvia A

    2009-11-20

    The aim of this study was to develop a new model of sporadic Parkinson disease (PD) based on silencing of the SKP1A gene, a component of the ubiquitin-proteasome/E3 ligase complex, Skp1, Cullin 1, F-box protein, which was found to be highly decreased in the substantia nigra of sporadic PD patients. Initially, an embryonic mouse substantia nigra-derived cell line (SN4741 cells) was infected with short hairpin RNA lentiviruses encoding the murine transcript of the SKP1A gene or with scrambled vector. SKP1A silencing resulted in increased susceptibility to neuronal damages induced by the parkinsonism-inducing neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion and serum starvation, in parallel with a decline in the expression of the dopaminergic markers, dopamine transporter and vesicular monoamine transporter-2. SKP1A-deficient cells presented a delay in completion of the cell cycle and the inability to arrest at the G(0)/G(1) phase when induced to differentiate. Instead, the cells progressed through S phase, developing rounded aggregates with characteristics of aggresomes including immunoreactivity for gamma-tubulin, alpha-synuclein, ubiquitin, tyrosine hydroxylase, Hsc-70 (70-kDa heat shock cognate protein), and proteasome subunit, and culminating in a lethal phenotype. Conversely, stably enforced expression of wild type SKP1A duplicated the survival index of naïve SN4741 cells under proteasomal inhibition injury, suggesting a new structural role of SKP1 in dopaminergic neuronal function, besides its E3 ligase activity. These results link, for the first time, SKP1 to dopamine neuronal function and survival, suggesting an essential role in sporadic PD. In summary, this new model has reproduced to a significant extent the molecular alterations described in sporadic PD at the cellular level, implicating Skp1 as a potential modifier in sporadic PD neurodegeneration.

  19. A Sporadic Parkinson Disease Model via Silencing of the Ubiquitin-Proteasome/E3 Ligase Component SKP1A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman-Jacob, Tali; Reznichenko, Lydia; Youdim, Moussa B. H.; Mandel, Silvia A.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a new model of sporadic Parkinson disease (PD) based on silencing of the SKP1A gene, a component of the ubiquitin-proteasome/E3 ligase complex, Skp1, Cullin 1, F-box protein, which was found to be highly decreased in the substantia nigra of sporadic PD patients. Initially, an embryonic mouse substantia nigra-derived cell line (SN4741 cells) was infected with short hairpin RNA lentiviruses encoding the murine transcript of the SKP1A gene or with scrambled vector. SKP1A silencing resulted in increased susceptibility to neuronal damages induced by the parkinsonism-inducing neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion and serum starvation, in parallel with a decline in the expression of the dopaminergic markers, dopamine transporter and vesicular monoamine transporter-2. SKP1A-deficient cells presented a delay in completion of the cell cycle and the inability to arrest at the G0/G1 phase when induced to differentiate. Instead, the cells progressed through S phase, developing rounded aggregates with characteristics of aggresomes including immunoreactivity for γ-tubulin, α-synuclein, ubiquitin, tyrosine hydroxylase, Hsc-70 (70-kDa heat shock cognate protein), and proteasome subunit, and culminating in a lethal phenotype. Conversely, stably enforced expression of wild type SKP1A duplicated the survival index of naïve SN4741 cells under proteasomal inhibition injury, suggesting a new structural role of SKP1 in dopaminergic neuronal function, besides its E3 ligase activity. These results link, for the first time, SKP1 to dopamine neuronal function and survival, suggesting an essential role in sporadic PD. In summary, this new model has reproduced to a significant extent the molecular alterations described in sporadic PD at the cellular level, implicating Skp1 as a potential modifier in sporadic PD neurodegeneration. PMID:19748892

  20. Radiation-induced motility alterations in medulloblastoma cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rieken, Stefan; Rieber, Juliane; Brons, Stephan; Habermehl, Daniel; Rief, Harald; Orschiedt, Lena; Lindel, Katja; Weber, Klaus J; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2015-01-01

    .... Expression of integrins was determined by quantitative FACS analysis. Matrix metalloproteinase concentrations within cell culture supernatants were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA...

  1. Diabetes Alters Osmotic Swelling Characteristics and Membrane Conductance of Glial Cells in Rat Retina

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thomas Pannicke; Ianors Iandiev; Antje Wurm; Ortrud Uckermann; Franziska vom Hagen; Andreas Reichenbach; Peter Wiedemann; Hans-Peter Hammes; Andreas Bringmann

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes Alters Osmotic Swelling Characteristics and Membrane Conductance of Glial Cells in Rat Retina Thomas Pannicke 1 , Ianors Iandiev 2 , Antje Wurm 2 , Ortrud Uckermann 3 , Franziska vom Hagen 4...

  2. Centrosomal and mitotic abnormalities in cell lines derived from papillary thyroid cancer harboring specific gene alterations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maric, Irena; Viaggi, Silvia; Caria, Paola; Frau, Daniela V; Degan, Paolo; Vanni, Roberta

    2011-01-01

    .... We investigated the centrosome status and mitotic abnormalities in three thyroid carcinoma-derived cell lines, each maintaining the specific, biologically relevant gene alteration harbored by the parental tumors...

  3. Carbofuran alters centrosome and spindle organization, and delays cell division in oocytes and mitotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Ozgur; Semiz, Olcay; Can, Alp

    2015-04-01

    Although many countries banned of its usage, carbofuran (CF) is still one of the most commonly used carbamate derivative insecticides against insects and nematodes in agriculture and household, threatening the human and animal health by contaminating air, water, and food. Our goal was to evaluate the potential toxic effects of CF on mammalian oocytes besides mitotic cells. Caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway was assessed by immunofluorescence and western blot techniques. Alterations in the meiotic spindle formation after CF exposure throughout the in vitro maturation of mice oocyte-cumulus complexes (COCs) were analyzed by using a 3D confocal laser microscope. Maturation efficiency and kinetics were assessed by direct observation of the COCs. Results indicated that the number of TUNEL-positive cells increased in CF-exposed groups, particularly higher doses (>250 µM) in a dose-dependent fashion. The ratio of anticleaved caspase-3 labeled cells in those groups positively correlated with TUNEL-positivity. Western blot analysis confirmed a significant increase in active caspase-3 activity. CF caused a dose-dependent accumulation of oocytes at prometaphase-I (PM-I) of meiosis. Partial loss of spindle microtubules (MTs) was noted, which consequently gave rise to a diamond shape spindle. Aberrant pericentrin foci were noted particularly in PM-I and metaphase-I (M-I) stages. Conclusively, CF (1) induces programmed cell death in a dose-dependent manner, and (2) alters spindle morphology most likely through a mechanism that interacts with MT assembly and/or disorientation of pericentriolar proteins. Overall, data suggest that CF could give rise to aneuploidy or cell death in higher doses, therefore reduce fertilization and implantation rates. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Temporal proteomics of NGF-TrkA signaling identifies an inhibitory role for the E3 ligase Cbl-b in neuroblastoma cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emdal, Kristina B; Pedersen, Anna-Kathrine; Bekker-Jensen, Dorte B

    2015-01-01

    SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells respond to nerve growth factor (NGF)-mediated activation of the tropomyosin-related kinase A (TrkA) with neurite outgrowth, thereby providing a model to study neuronal differentiation. We performed a time-resolved analysis of NGF-TrkA signaling in neuroblastoma cells...... then becomes phosphorylated and ubiquitylated and decreases in abundance. We also found that recruitment of Cbl-b promotes TrkA ubiquitylation and degradation. Furthermore, the amount of phosphorylation of the kinase ERK and neurite outgrowth increased upon Cbl-b depletion in several neuroblastoma cell lines...

  5. Cell surface glycan alterations in epithelial mesenchymal transition process of Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Due to recurrence and metastasis, the mortality of Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is high. It is well known that the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT and glycan of cell surface glycoproteins play pivotal roles in tumor metastasis. The goal of this study was to identify HCC metastasis related differential glycan pattern and their enzymatic basis using a HGF induced EMT model. METHODOLOGY: HGF was used to induce HCC EMT model. Lectin microarray was used to detect the expression of cell surface glycan and the difference was validated by lectin blot and fluorescence cell lectin-immunochemistry. The mRNA expression levels of glycotransferases were determined by qRT-PCR. RESULTS: After HGF treatment, the Huh7 cell lost epithelial characteristics and obtained mesenchymal markers. These changes demonstrated that HGF could induce a typical cell model of EMT. Lectin microarray analysis identified a decreased affinity in seven lectins ACL, BPL, JAC, MPL, PHA-E, SNA, and SBA to the glycan of cell surface glycoproteins. This implied that glycan containing T/Tn-antigen, NA2 and bisecting GlcNAc, Siaα2-6Gal/GalNAc, terminal α or βGalNAc structures were reduced. The binding ability of thirteen lectins, AAL, LCA, LTL, ConA, NML, NPL, DBA, HAL, PTL II, WFL, ECL, GSL II and PHA-L to glycan were elevated, and a definite indication that glycan containing terminal αFuc and ± Sia-Le, core fucose, α-man, gal-β(α GalNAc, β1,6 GlcNAc branching and tetraantennary complex oligosaccharides structures were increased. These results were further validated by lectin blot and fluorescence cell lectin-immunochemistry. Furthermore, the mRNA expression level of Mgat3 decreased while that of Mgat5, FucT8 and β3GalT5 increased. Therefore, cell surface glycan alterations in the EMT process may coincide with the expression of glycosyltransferase. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study systematically clarify the alterations of cell surface

  6. Bactericidal Antibiotics Increase Hydroxyphenyl Fluorescein Signal by Altering Cell Morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulander, Wilhelm; Wang, Ying; Folkesson, Sven Anders

    2014-01-01

    to support this hypothesis. Here we show that increased HPF signals in antibiotics-exposed bacterial cells are explained by fluorescence associated with increased cell size, and do not reflect reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration. Independently of antibiotics, increased fluorescence was seen...

  7. Asbestos exposure correlates with alterations in circulating T cell subsets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, L.G.; Sparrow, D.; Ginns, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes were analysed from 40 subjects with occupational asbestos exposure and 40 controls matched for age and smoking habits. Patients were classified by duration of exposure as short or long, and by chest radiograph as normal, pleural plaques or interstitial changes. As a group, subjects with asbestos exposure had decreased percentages of OKT3+ and OKT8+ cells and increased OKT4+/OKT8+ ratio compared to controls. Correcting for age and smoking, those with short exposure were similar to controls, while those with long exposure had decreased percentages OKT3+ and OKT8+ cells and an increased OKT4+/OKT8+ ratio. Among radiographic subgroups, those with normal radiographs were similar to controls, but those with plaques had increased circulating OKT4+ cells, and those with interstitial changes had decreased percentages OKT3+ and OKT8+ cells and OKT8+ cells/mm3, with an increased OKT4+/OKT8+ ratio. There were no differences between subjects and controls in OKT10+ cells and OKIa+ cells. There appears to be a progressive decrease in percentage OKT8+ cells and increase in OKT4+/OKT8+ ratio with increasing exposure to asbestos, as determined by length of exposure and by radiographic abnormalities.

  8. Structural and functional interaction between the human DNA repair proteins DNA ligase IV and XRCC4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Peï-Yu; Frit, Philippe; Meesala, SriLakshmi; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Modesti, Mauro; Andres, Sara N; Huang, Ying; Sekiguchi, JoAnn; Calsou, Patrick; Salles, Bernard; Junop, Murray S

    2009-06-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining represents the major pathway used by human cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks. It relies on the XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to reseal DNA strands. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of human XRCC4 bound to the carboxy-terminal tandem BRCT repeat of DNA ligase IV. The structure differs from the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae complex and reveals an extensive DNA ligase IV binding interface formed by a helix-loop-helix structure within the inter-BRCT linker region, as well as significant interactions involving the second BRCT domain, which induces a kink in the tail region of XRCC4. We further demonstrate that interaction with the second BRCT domain of DNA ligase IV is necessary for stable binding to XRCC4 in cells, as well as to achieve efficient dominant-negative effects resulting in radiosensitization after ectopic overexpression of DNA ligase IV fragments in human fibroblasts. Together our findings provide unanticipated insight for understanding the physical and functional architecture of the nonhomologous end-joining ligation complex.

  9. Structural and Functional Interaction Between the Human DNA Repair Proteins DNA ligase IV and XRCC4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, P.; Meesala, S; Dauvillier, S; Modesti, M; Andres, S; Huang, Y; Sekiguchi, J; Calsou, P; Salles, B; Junop, M

    2009-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining represents the major pathway used by human cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks. It relies on the XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to reseal DNA strands. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of human XRCC4 bound to the carboxy-terminal tandem BRCT repeat of DNA ligase IV. The structure differs from the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae complex and reveals an extensive DNA ligase IV binding interface formed by a helix-loop-helix structure within the inter-BRCT linker region, as well as significant interactions involving the second BRCT domain, which induces a kink in the tail region of XRCC4. We further demonstrate that interaction with the second BRCT domain of DNA ligase IV is necessary for stable binding to XRCC4 in cells, as well as to achieve efficient dominant-negative effects resulting in radiosensitization after ectopic overexpression of DNA ligase IV fragments in human fibroblasts. Together our findings provide unanticipated insight for understanding the physical and functional architecture of the nonhomologous end-joining ligation complex.

  10. A palmitoylated RING finger ubiquitin ligase and its homologue in the brain membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Kazuaki; Kawamura, Meiko; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Matsuda, Noriyuki; Kanbe, Daiji; Ishii, Kyoko; Ichikawa, Tomio; Kumanishi, Toshiro; Chiba, Tomoki; Tanaka, Keiji; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2003-08-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) ligation is implicated in active protein metabolism and subcellular trafficking and its impairment is involved in various neurologic diseases. In rat brain, we identified two novel Ub ligases, Momo and Sakura, carrying double zinc finger motif and RING finger domain. Momo expression is enriched in the brain gray matter and testis, and Sakura expression is more widely detected in the brain white matter as well as in many peripheral organs. Both proteins associate with the cell membranes of neuronal and/or glial cells. We examined their Ub ligase activity in vivo and in vitro using viral expression vectors carrying myc-tagged Momo and Sakura. Overexpression of either Momo or Sakura in mixed cortical cultures increased total polyubiquitination levels. In vitro ubiquitination assay revealed that the combination of Momo and UbcH4 and H5c, or of Sakura and UbcH4, H5c and H6 is required for the reaction. Deletion mutagenesis suggested that the E3 Ub ligase activity of Momo and Sakura depended on their C-terminal domains containing RING finger structure, while their N-terminal domains influenced their membrane association. In agreement, Sakura associating with the membrane was specifically palmitoylated. Although the molecular targets of their Ub ligation remain to be identified, these findings imply a novel function of the palmitoylated E3 Ub ligase(s).

  11. Effects of altered gravity on the cell cycle, actin cytoskeleton and proteome in Physarum polycephalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoxian; Gao, Yong; Li, Shuijie; Sun, Yeqing

    Some researchers suggest that the changes of cell cycle under the effect of microgravity may be associated with many serious adverse physiological changes. In the search for underlying mechanisms and possible new countermeasures, we used the slime mold Physarum polycephalum in which all the nuclei traverse the cell cycle in natural synchrony to study the effects of altered gravity on the cell cycle, actin cytoskeleton and proteome. In parallel, the cell cycle was analyzed in Physarum incubated (1) in altered gravity for 20 h, (2) in altered gravity for 40 h, (3) in altered gravity for 80 h, and (4) in ground controls. The cell cycle, the actin cytoskeleton, and proteome in the altered gravity and ground controls were examined. The results indicated that the duration of the G2 phase was lengthened 20 min in high aspect ratio vessel (HARV) for 20 h, and prolonged 2 h in altered gravity either for 40 h or for 80 h, whereas the duration of other phases in the cell cycle was unchanged with respect to the control. The microfilaments in G2 phase had a reduced number of fibers and a unique abnormal morphology in altered gravity for 40 h, whereas the microfilaments in other phases of cell cycle were unchanged when compared to controls. Employing classical two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), we examined the effect of the altered gravity on P. polycephalum proteins. The increase in the duration of G2 phase in altered gravity for 40 h was accompanied by changes in the 2-DE protein profiles, over controls. Out of a total of 200 protein spots investigated in G2 phase, which were reproducible in repeated experiments, 72 protein spots were visually identified as specially expressed, and 11 proteins were up-regulated by 2-fold and 28 proteins were down-regulated by 2-fold over controls. Out of a total of three low-expressed proteins in G2 phase in altered gravity for 40 h, two proteins were unknown proteins, and one protein was spherulin 3b by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS

  12. Computational models of dentate gyrus with epilepsy-induced morphological alterations in granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, Julian; Roque, Antonio C

    2014-09-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy provokes a number of different morphological alterations in granule cells of the hippocampus dentate gyrus. These alterations may be associated with the hyperactivity and hypersynchrony found in the epileptic dentate gyrus, and their study requires the use of different kinds of approaches including computational modeling. Conductance-based models of both normal and epilepsy-induced morphologically altered granule cells have been used in the construction of network models of dentate gyrus to study the effects of these alterations on epilepsy. Here, we review these models and discuss their contributions to the understanding of the association between alterations in neuronal morphology and epilepsy in the dentate gyrus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Alterations in cell surface area and deformability of individual human red blood cells in stored blood

    CERN Document Server

    Park, HyunJoo; Lee, SangYun; Kim, Kyoohyun; Sohn, Yong-Hak; Jang, Seongsoo; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    The functionality and viability of stored human red blood cells (RBCs) is an important clinical issue in transfusion. To systematically investigate changes in stored whole blood, the hematological properties of individual RBCs were quantified in blood samples stored for various periods with and without a preservation solution called CPDA-1. With 3-D quantitative phase imaging techniques, the optical measurements of the 3-D refractive index (RI) distributions and membrane fluctuations were done at the individual cell level. From the optical measurements, the morphological (volume, surface area and sphericity), biochemical (hemoglobin content and concentration), and mechanical parameters (dynamic membrane fluctuation) were simultaneously quantified to investigate the functionalities and their progressive alterations in stored RBCs. Our results show that the stored RBCs without CPDA-1 had a dramatic morphological transformation from discocytes to spherocytes within 2 weeks which was accompanied with significant ...

  14. Defining the interactions and role of DCAF1/VPRBP in the DDB1-cullin4A E3 ubiquitin ligase complex engaged by HIV-1 Vpr to induce a G2 cell cycle arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francine C A Gérard

    Full Text Available HIV viral protein R (Vpr induces a cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase by activating the ATR DNA damage/replication stress signalling pathway through engagement of the DDB1-CUL4A-DCAF1 E3 ubiquitin ligase via a direct binding to the substrate specificity receptor DCAF1. Since no high resolution structures of the DDB1-DCAF1-Vpr substrate recognition module currently exist, we used a mutagenesis approach to better define motifs in DCAF1 that are crucial for Vpr and DDB1 binding. Herein, we show that the minimal domain of DCAF1 that retained the ability to bind Vpr and DDB1 was mapped to residues 1041 to 1393 (DCAF1 WD. Mutagenic analyses identified an α-helical H-box motif and F/YxxF/Y motifs located in the N-terminal domain of DCAF1 WD that are involved in exclusive binding to DDB1. While we could not identify elements specifically involved in Vpr binding, overall, the mutagenesis data suggest that the predicted β-propeller conformation of DCAF1 is likely to be critical for Vpr association. Importantly, we provide evidence that binding of Vpr to DCAF1 appears to modulate the formation of a DDB1/DCAF1 complex. Lastly, we show that expression of DCAF1 WD in the absence of endogenous DCAF1 was not sufficient to enable Vpr-mediated G2 arrest activity. Overall, our results reveal that Vpr and DDB1 binding on DCAF1 can be genetically separated and further suggest that DCAF1 contains determinants in addition to the Vpr and DDB1 minimal binding domain, which are required for Vpr to enable the induction of a G2 arrest.

  15. Disconnecting XRCC1 and DNA ligase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Sachin; McKinnon, Peter J

    2011-07-15

    DNA strand break repair is essential for the prevention of multiple human diseases, particularly those which feature neuropathology. To further understand the pathogenesis of these syndromes, we recently developed animal models in which the DNA single-strand break repair (SSBR) components, XRCC1 and DNA Ligase III (LIG3), were inactivated in the developing nervous system. Although biochemical evidence suggests that inactivation of XRCC1 and LIG3 should share common biological defects, we found profound phenotypic differences between these two models, implying distinct biological roles for XRCC1 and LIG3 during DNA repair. Rather than a key role in nuclear DNA repair, we found LIG3 function was central to mitochondrial DNA maintenance. Instead, our data indicate that DNA Ligase 1 is the main DNA ligase for XRCC1-mediated DNA repair. These studies refine our understanding of DNA SSBR and the etiology of neurological disease.

  16. Disconnecting XRCC1 and DNA ligase III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Sachin

    2011-01-01

    DNA strand break repair is essential for the prevention of multiple human diseases, particularly those which feature neuropathology. To further understand the pathogenesis of these syndromes, we recently developed animal models in which the DNA single-strand break repair (SSBR) components, XRCC1 and DNA Ligase III (LIG3), were inactivated in the developing nervous system. Although biochemical evidence suggests that inactivation of XRCC1 and LIG3 should share common biological defects, we found profound phenotypic differences between these two models, implying distinct biological roles for XRCC1 and LIG3 during DNA repair. Rather than a key role in nuclear DNA repair, we found LIG3 function was central to mitochondrial DNA maintenance. Instead, our data indicate that DNA Ligase 1 is the main DNA ligase for XRCC1-mediated DNA repair. These studies refine our understanding of DNA SSBR and the etiology of neurological disease. PMID:21636980

  17. Membrane-Associated Ubiquitin Ligase SAUL1 Suppresses Temperature- and Humidity-Dependent Autoimmunity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disch, Eva-Maria; Tong, Meixuezi; Kotur, Tanja; Koch, Gerald; Wolf, Carl-Asmus; Li, Xin; Hoth, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Plants have evolved elaborate mechanisms to regulate pathogen defense. Imbalances in this regulation may result in autoimmune responses that are affecting plant growth and development. In Arabidopsis, SAUL1 encodes a plant U-box ubiquitin ligase and regulates senescence and cell death. Here, we show that saul1-1 plants exhibit characteristics of an autoimmune mutant. A decrease in relative humidity or temperature resulted in reduced growth and systemic lesioning of saul1-1 rosettes. These physiological changes are associated with increased expression of salicylic acid-dependent and pathogenesis-related (PR) genes. Consistently, resistance of saul1-1 plants against Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola ES4326, P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000, or Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis Noco2 was enhanced. Transmission electron microscopy revealed alterations in saul1-1 chloroplast ultrastructure and cell-wall depositions. Confocal analysis on aniline blue-stained leaf sections and cellular universal micro spectrophotometry further showed that these cell-wall depositions contain callose and lignin. To analyze signaling downstream of SAUL1, we performed epistasis analyses between saul1-1 and mutants in the EDS1/PAD4/SAG101 hub. All phenotypes observed in saul1-1 plants at low temperature were dependent on EDS1 and PAD4 but not SAG101. Taken together, SAUL1 negatively regulates immunity upstream of EDS1/PAD4, likely through the degradation of an unknown activator of the pathway.

  18. DNA ligase 1 deficient plants display severe growth defects and delayed repair of both DNA single and double strand breaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bray Clifford M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA ligase enzymes catalyse the joining of adjacent polynucleotides and as such play important roles in DNA replication and repair pathways. Eukaryotes possess multiple DNA ligases with distinct roles in DNA metabolism, with clear differences in the functions of DNA ligase orthologues between animals, yeast and plants. DNA ligase 1, present in all eukaryotes, plays critical roles in both DNA repair and replication and is indispensable for cell viability. Results Knockout mutants of atlig1 are lethal. Therefore, RNAi lines with reduced levels of AtLIG1 were generated to allow the roles and importance of Arabidopsis DNA ligase 1 in DNA metabolism to be elucidated. Viable plants were fertile but displayed a severely stunted and stressed growth phenotype. Cell size was reduced in the silenced lines, whilst flow cytometry analysis revealed an increase of cells in S-phase in atlig1-RNAi lines relative to wild type plants. Comet assay analysis of isolated nuclei showed atlig1-RNAi lines displayed slower repair of single strand breaks (SSBs and also double strand breaks (DSBs, implicating AtLIG1 in repair of both these lesions. Conclusion Reduced levels of Arabidopsis DNA ligase 1 in the silenced lines are sufficient to support plant development but result in retarded growth and reduced cell size, which may reflect roles for AtLIG1 in both replication and repair. The finding that DNA ligase 1 plays an important role in DSB repair in addition to its known function in SSB repair, demonstrates the existence of a previously uncharacterised novel pathway, independent of the conserved NHEJ. These results indicate that DNA ligase 1 functions in both DNA replication and in repair of both ss and dsDNA strand breaks in higher plants.

  19. Lipid body accumulation alters calcium signaling dynamics in immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greineisen, William E; Speck, Mark; Shimoda, Lori M N; Sung, Carl; Phan, Nolwenn; Maaetoft-Udsen, Kristina; Stokes, Alexander J; Turner, Helen

    2014-09-01

    There is well-established variability in the numbers of lipid bodies (LB) in macrophages, eosinophils, and neutrophils. Similarly to the steatosis observed in adipocytes and hepatocytes during hyperinsulinemia and nutrient overload, immune cell LB hyper-accumulate in response to bacterial and parasitic infection and inflammatory presentations. Recently we described that hyperinsulinemia, both in vitro and in vivo, drives steatosis and phenotypic changes in primary and transformed mast cells and basophils. LB reach high numbers in these steatotic cytosols, and here we propose that they could dramatically impact the transcytoplasmic signaling pathways. We compared calcium release and influx responses at the population and single cell level in normal and steatotic model mast cells. At the population level, all aspects of FcɛRI-dependent calcium mobilization, as well as activation of calcium-dependent downstream signaling targets such as NFATC1 phosphorylation are suppressed. At the single cell level, we demonstrate that LB are both sources and sinks of calcium following FcɛRI cross-linking. Unbiased analysis of the impact of the presence of LB on the rate of trans-cytoplasmic calcium signals suggest that LB enrichment accelerates calcium propagation, which may reflect a Bernoulli effect. LB abundance thus impacts this fundamental signaling pathway and its downstream targets.

  20. Distinct mesenchymal alterations in N-cadherin and E-cadherin positive primary renal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christof Keller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Renal tubular epithelial cells of proximal and distal origin differ markedly in their physiological functions. Therefore, we hypothesized that they also differ in their capacity to undergo epithelial to mesenchymal alterations. RESULTS: We used cultures of freshly isolated primary human tubular cells. To distinguish cells of different tubular origin we took advantage of the fact that human proximal epithelial cells uniquely express N-cadherin instead of E-cadherin as major cell-cell adhesion molecule. To provoke mesenchymal alteration we treated these cocultures with TGF-β for up to 6 days. Within this time period, the morphology of distal tubular cells was barely altered. In contrast to tubular cell lines, E-cadherin was not down-regulated by TGF-β, even though TGF-β signal transduction was initiated as demonstrated by nuclear localization of Smad2/3. Analysis of transcription factors and miRNAs possibly involved in E-cadherin regulation revealed high levels of miRNAs of the miR200-family, which may contribute to the stability of E-cadherin expression in human distal tubular epithelial cells. By contrast, proximal tubular epithelial cells altered their phenotype when treated with TGF-β. They became elongated and formed three-dimensional structures. Rho-kinases were identified as modulators of TGF-β-induced morphological alterations. Non-specific inhibition of Rho-kinases resulted in stabilization of the epithelial phenotype, while partial effects were observed upon downregulation of Rho-kinase isoforms ROCK1 and ROCK2. The distinct reactivity of proximal and distal cells was retained when the cells were cultured as polarized cells. CONCLUSIONS: Interference with Rho-kinase signaling provides a target to counteract TGF-β-mediated mesenchymal alterations of epithelial cells, particularly in proximal tubular epithelial cells. Furthermore, primary distal tubular cells differed from cell lines by their high phenotypic stability

  1. Bactericidal Antibiotics Increase Hydroxyphenyl Fluorescein Signal by Altering Cell Morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulander, Wilhelm; Wang, Ying; Folkesson, Sven Anders;

    2014-01-01

    It was recently proposed that for bactericidal antibiotics a common killing mechanism contributes to lethality involving indirect stimulation of hydroxyl radical (OH center dot) formation. Flow cytometric detection of OH center dot by hydroxyphenyl fluorescein (HPF) probe oxidation was used...... to support this hypothesis. Here we show that increased HPF signals in antibiotics-exposed bacterial cells are explained by fluorescence associated with increased cell size, and do not reflect reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration. Independently of antibiotics, increased fluorescence was seen...... for elongated cells expressing the oxidative insensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP). Although our data question the role of ROS in lethality of antibiotics other research approaches point to important interplays between basic bacterial metabolism and antibiotic susceptibility. To underpin...

  2. Bactericidal Antibiotics Increase Hydroxyphenyl Fluorescein Signal by Altering Cell Morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulander, Wilhelm; Wang, Ying; Folkesson, Sven Anders

    2014-01-01

    It was recently proposed that for bactericidal antibiotics a common killing mechanism contributes to lethality involving indirect stimulation of hydroxyl radical (OH center dot) formation. Flow cytometric detection of OH center dot by hydroxyphenyl fluorescein (HPF) probe oxidation was used...... to support this hypothesis. Here we show that increased HPF signals in antibiotics-exposed bacterial cells are explained by fluorescence associated with increased cell size, and do not reflect reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration. Independently of antibiotics, increased fluorescence was seen...... for elongated cells expressing the oxidative insensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP). Although our data question the role of ROS in lethality of antibiotics other research approaches point to important interplays between basic bacterial metabolism and antibiotic susceptibility. To underpin...

  3. Bactericidal antibiotics increase hydroxyphenyl fluorescein signal by altering cell morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilhelm Paulander

    Full Text Available It was recently proposed that for bactericidal antibiotics a common killing mechanism contributes to lethality involving indirect stimulation of hydroxyl radical (OH• formation. Flow cytometric detection of OH• by hydroxyphenyl fluorescein (HPF probe oxidation was used to support this hypothesis. Here we show that increased HPF signals in antibiotics-exposed bacterial cells are explained by fluorescence associated with increased cell size, and do not reflect reactive oxygen species (ROS concentration. Independently of antibiotics, increased fluorescence was seen for elongated cells expressing the oxidative insensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP. Although our data question the role of ROS in lethality of antibiotics other research approaches point to important interplays between basic bacterial metabolism and antibiotic susceptibility. To underpin such relationships, methods for detecting bacterial metabolites at a cellular level are needed.

  4. Directed evolution of the substrate specificity of biotin ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei-Cheng; Levy, Matthew; Kincaid, Rodney; Ellington, Andrew D

    2014-06-01

    We have developed selection scheme for directing the evolution of Escherichia coli biotin protein ligase (BPL) via in vitro compartmentalization, and have used this scheme to alter the substrate specificity of the ligase towards the utilization of the biotin analogue desthiobiotin. In this scheme, a peptide substrate (BAP) was conjugated to a DNA library encoding BirA, emulsified such that there was a single template per compartment, and protein variants were transcribed and translated in vitro. Those variants that could efficiently desthiobiotinylate their corresponding peptide:DNA conjugate were subsequently captured and amplified. Following just six rounds of selection and amplification several variants that demonstrated higher activity with desthiobiotin were identified. The best variants from Round 6, BirA6-40 and BirA6-47 , showed 17-fold and 10-fold higher activity, respectively, their abilities to use desthiobiotin as a substrate. While selected enzymes contained a number of substitutions, a single mutation, M157T, proved sufficient to provide much greater activity with desthiobiotin. Further characterization of BirA6-40 and the single substitution variant BirAM157T revealed that they had twoto threefold higher kcat values for desthiobiotin. These variants had also lost much of their ability to utilize biotin, resulting in orthogonal enzymes that in conjunction with streptavidin variants that can utilize desthiobiotin may prove to be of great use in developing additional, robust conjugation handles for a variety of biological and biotechnological applications.

  5. Transfected parvalbumin alters calcium homeostasis in teratocarcinoma PCC7 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, B K; Kabos, P; Belhage, B

    1996-01-01

    Indirect evidence supports a protective role of some EF-hand calcium-binding proteins against calcium-induced neurotoxicity. Little is known about how these proteins influence cytosolic calcium levels. After cloning the parvalbumin cDNA into an expression vector, teratocarcinoma cells (PCC7) were...

  6. Transfected parvalbumin alters calcium homeostasis in teratocarcinoma PCC7 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, B K; Kabos, P; Belhage, B;

    1996-01-01

    Indirect evidence supports a protective role of some EF-hand calcium-binding proteins against calcium-induced neurotoxicity. Little is known about how these proteins influence cytosolic calcium levels. After cloning the parvalbumin cDNA into an expression vector, teratocarcinoma cells (PCC7) were...

  7. Spatial distributions of red blood cells significantly alter local haemodynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M Sherwood

    Full Text Available Although bulk changes in red blood cell concentration between vessels have been well characterised, local distributions are generally overlooked. Red blood cells aggregate, deform and migrate within vessels, forming heterogeneous distributions which have considerable effect on local haemodynamics. The present study reports data on the local distribution of human red blood cells in a sequentially bifurcating microchannel, representing the branching geometry of the microvasculature. Imaging methodologies with simple extrapolations are used to infer three dimensional, time-averaged velocity and haematocrit distributions under a range of flow conditions. Strong correlation between the bluntness of the velocity and haematocrit profiles in the parent branch of the geometry is observed and red blood cell aggregation has a notable effect on the observed trends. The two branches of the first bifurcation show similar characteristics in terms of the shapes of the profiles and the extent of plasma skimming, despite the difference in geometric configuration. In the second bifurcation, considerable asymmetry between the branches in the plasma skimming relationship is observed, and elucidated by considering individual haematocrit profiles. The results of the study highlight the importance of considering local haematocrit distributions in the analysis of blood flow and could lead to more accurate computational models of blood flow in microvascular networks. The experimental approaches developed in this work provide a foundation for further examining the characteristics of microhaemodynamics.

  8. Lowering extracellular chloride concentration alters outer hair cell shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecola, R P; Bobbin, R P

    1992-08-01

    In general, increasing external K+ concentration, as well as exposure to hypotonic medium, induces a shortening of outer hair cells (OHCs) accompanied by an increase in width and volume. One possible mechanism suggested for these changes is a movement of Cl- and/or water across the cell membrane. We therefore examined the role of Cl- in OHC volume maintenance by testing the effect of decreasing extracellular Cl- concentration on OHC length and shape. In addition, the effect of hypotonic medium was examined. OHCs were isolated from guinea pig cochleae, mechanically dissociated and dispersed, and placed in a modified Hanks balanced salt solution (HBS). Exposing the cells to a Cl(-)-free HBS produced an initial shortening, which was rapidly followed by an increase in length. After about 9 min of exposure to Cl(-)-free HBS, the cells appeared to lose all water and collapsed. Upon return to normal HBS, the OHCs returned to their normal shape. We speculate that the collapse of the OHCs may be due to the loss of intracellular Cl-, which, in turn, resulted in the loss of intracellular K+ and water. The results indicate that Cl- contributes greatly to the maintenance of OHC volume. In addition, we confirmed that isolated OHCs swell in hypotonic medium and maintain their swollen state until returned to normal medium. The mechanism for maintenance of the swollen state is unknown.

  9. Alterations of red blood cell metabolome in overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darghouth, D.; Koehl, B.; Heilier, J.F.; Madalinski, G.; Bovee, P.H.; Bosman, G.J.C.G.M.; Delaunay, J.; Junot, C.; Romeo, P.H.

    2011-01-01

    Overhydrated hereditary stomatocytosis, clinically characterized by hemolytic anemia, is a rare disorder of the erythrocyte membrane permeability to monovalent cations, associated with mutations in the Rh-associated glycoprotein gene. We assessed the red blood cell metabolome of 4 patients with this

  10. Inhibition of human DNA ligase I activity by zinc and cadmium and the fidelity of ligation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shu Wei; Becker, F.F. [Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Chan, J.Y.H. [Chinese Univ. of Hong Kong, New Territories (Hong Kong)

    1996-12-31

    Heavy metals, including zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd), are potentially important genotoxic agents in our environment. Here we report that human DNA ligase I, the major form of the enzyme in replicative cells, is a target for Zn and Cd ions. ZnCl{sub 2} at 0.8 mM caused complete inhibition of DNA ligase I activity, whereas only 0.04 mM CdCl{sub 2} was required to achieve a similar effect. Both metals affected all three steps of the reaction, namely, the formation of ligase-AMP intermediate, the transfer of the AMP to DNA and the ligation reaction that succeeds the formation of the AMP-DNA complex. Unlike F-ara-ATP and the natural protein inhibitor of DNA ligase-I, these metals may affect different domains of the enzyme. Moreover, these metal ions did not increase that rate of misligation of F-ara-A-modified DNA or mismatched DNA substrates, but considerable misligation was observed for the T:C mispairing. These data support the notion of high fidelity of the human DNA ligases and that the major action of these metal ions on the enzyme is their inhibitory function. 31 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Inhibition of human DNA ligase I activity by zinc and cadmium and the fidelity of ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S W; Becker, F F; Chan, J Y

    1996-01-01

    Heavy metals, including zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd), are potentially important genotoxic agents in our environment. Here we report that human DNA ligase I, the major form of the enzyme in replicative cells, is a target for Zn and Cd ions. ZnCl2 at 0.8 mM caused complete inhibition of DNA ligase I activity, whereas only 0.04 mM CdCl2 was required to achieve a similar effect. Both metals affected all three steps of the reaction, namely, the formation of ligase-AMP intermediate, the transfer of the AMP to DNA and the ligation reaction that succeeds the formation of the AMP-DNA complex. Unlike F-ara-ATP and the natural protein inhibitor of DNA ligase-I, these metals may affect different domains of the enzyme. Moreover, these metal ions did not increase the rate of misligation of F-ara-A-modified DNA or mismatched DNA substrates, but considerable misligation was observed for the T:C mispairing. These data support the notion of high fidelity of the human DNA ligases and that the major action of these metal ions on the enzyme is their inhibitory function.

  12. Exposure to Music Alters Cell Viability and Cell Motility of Human Nonauditory Cells in Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalia R. Lestard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although music is part of virtually all cultures in the world, little is known about how it affects us. Since the beginning of this century several studies suggested that the response to music, and to sound in general, is complex and might not be exclusively due to emotion, given that cell types other than auditory hair cells can also directly react to audible sound. The present study was designed to better understand the direct effects of acoustic vibrations, in the form of music, in human cells in culture. Our results suggest that the mechanisms of cell growth arrest and/or cell death induced by acoustic vibrations are similar for auditory and nonauditory cells.

  13. Nuclear targeting of an endosomal E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocock, Jeffrey P; Carmicle, Stephanie; Madamba, Egbert; Erickson, Ann H

    2010-06-01

    Ring finger protein 13 (RNF13) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase embedded in endosome membranes. The protein undergoes constitutive post-translational proteolysis, making its detection difficult unless cells are incubated with a proteasome inhibitor to allow biosynthetic forms to accumulate. When cells were treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), RNF13 avoided proteolysis. A similar stabilization was seen on ionomycin treatment of cells. Drug treatment stabilized both the full-length protein and a membrane-embedded C-terminal fragment generated following ectodomain shedding. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that PMA treatment caused the protein to accumulate in recycling endosomes, where it colocalized with transferrin receptor, and on the inner nuclear membrane, where it colocalized with lamin B. Expression of dominant-negative Rab11 inhibited nuclear localization, suggesting RNF13 was targeted to the inner nuclear membrane through recycling endosomes. New protein synthesis was necessary for this targeting. Nuclear localization was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy and by purification of the inner nuclear membrane. Stress-induced transport of an endosomal protein to the inner nuclear membrane is a novel mechanism for introduction of regulatory proteins to the DNA environment. RNF13, with its ubiquitin ligase-active RING domain, has the potential to turn over key nuclear proteins in response to signals received at the plasma membrane.

  14. GM-CSF alters dendritic cells in autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-Zhu; Ye, Qian-Ling; Xu, Wang-Dong; Li, Jie-Hua; Ye, Dong-Qing; Xu, Yuekang

    2013-11-01

    Autoimmune diseases arise from an inappropriate immune response against self components, including macromolecules, cells, tissues, organs etc. They are often triggered or accompanied by inflammation, during which the levels of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are elevated. GM-CSF is an inflammatory cytokine that has profound impact on the differentiation of immune system cells of myeloid lineage, especially dendritic cells (DCs) that play critical roles in immune initiation and tolerance, and is involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Although GM-CSF was discovered decades ago, recent studies with some new findings have shed an interesting light on the old hematopoietic growth factor. In the inflammatory autoimmune diseases, GM-CSF redirects the normal developmental pathway of DCs, conditions their antigen presentation capacities and endows them with unique cytokine signatures to affect autoimmune responses. Here we review the latest advances in the field, with the aim of demonstrating the effects of GM-CSF on DCs and their influences on autoimmune diseases. The summarized knowledge will help to design DC-based strategies for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  15. Alterations in Helicobacter pylori triggered by contact with gastric epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M. Johnson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori lives within the mucus layer of the human stomach, in close proximity to gastric epithelial cells. While a great deal is known about the effects of H. pylori on human cells and the specific bacterial products that mediate these effects, relatively little work has been done to investigate alterations in H. pylori that may be triggered by bacterial contact with human cells. In this review, we discuss the spectrum of changes in bacterial physiology and morphology that occur when H. pylori is in contact with gastric epithelial cells. Several studies have reported that cell contact causes alterations in H. pylori gene transcription. In addition, H. pylori contact with gastric epithelial cells promotes the formation of pilus-like structures at the bacteria-host cell interface. The formation of these structures requires multiple genes in the cag pathogenicity island, and these structures are proposed to have an important role in the type IV secretion system-dependent process through which CagA enters host cells. Finally, H. pylori contact with epithelial cells can promote bacterial replication and the formation of microcolonies, phenomena that are facilitated by the acquisition of iron and other nutrients from infected cells. In summary, the gastric epithelial cell surface represents an important niche for H. pylori, and upon entry into this niche, the bacteria alter their behavior in a manner that optimizes bacterial proliferation and persistent colonization of the host.

  16. Butachlor, a suspected carcinogen, alters growth and transformation characteristics of mouse liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Y H; Chung, P C; Chang, Y C; Ngo, F Q; Hsu, K Y; Chen, F D

    2000-12-01

    Butachlor is a widely used herbicide in Asia and South America. Previous investigations have indicated that it is a suspected carcinogen. To understand more about the biological effects of butachlor on cultured cells and the mechanism(s) of its carcinogenicity, we studied the alteration of the growth characteristics that was induced by butachlor in normal mouse liver cells (BNL CL2). This study demonstrates that butachlor decreases the population-doubling time of BNL CL2 cells, suggesting that it stimulates cell proliferation. To support this finding, a thymidine incorporation assay was conducted and a similar result that butachlor stimulates cell proliferation was elucidated. In addition, we show that butachlor increases the saturation density of the BNL CL2 cells. When combined with the tumor initiator N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), butachlor transforms cells efficiently, as demonstrated by loss of contact inhibition. These findings indicate that butachlor alters the growth characteristics of BNL CL2 cells and suggest that butachlor may induce malignant transformation through stimulation of cell proliferation, alteration of cell cycle regulation, and suppression of cell density-dependent inhibition of proliferation.

  17. Use of Genetically Altered Stem Cells for the Treatment of Huntington’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T. Crane

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of stem cells for the treatment of Huntington’s disease (HD garnered much attention prior to the turn of the century. Several studies using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have indicated that these cells have enormous therapeutic potential in HD and other disorders. Advantages of using MSCs for cell therapies include their ease of isolation, rapid propagation in culture, and favorable immunomodulatory profiles. However, the lack of consistent neuronal differentiation of transplanted MSCs has limited their therapeutic efficacy to slowing the progression of HD-like symptoms in animal models of HD. The use of MSCs which have been genetically altered to overexpress brain derived neurotrophic factor to enhance support of surviving cells in a rodent model of HD provides proof-of-principle that these cells may provide such prophylactic benefits. New techniques that may prove useful for cell replacement therapies in HD include the use of genetically altering fate-restricted cells to produce induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs. These iPSCs appear to have certain advantages over the use of embryonic stem cells, including being readily available, easy to obtain, less evidence of tumor formation, and a reduced immune response following their transplantation. Recently, transplants of iPSCs have shown to differentiate into region-specific neurons in an animal model of HD. The overall successes of using genetically altered stem cells for reducing neuropathological and behavioral deficits in rodent models of HD suggest that these approaches have considerable potential for clinical use. However, the choice of what type of genetically altered stem cell to use for transplantation is dependent on the stage of HD and whether the end-goal is preserving endogenous neurons in early-stage HD, or replacing the lost neurons in late-stage HD. This review will discuss the current state of stem cell technology for treating the different stages of HD and

  18. Transactivation of Schizosaccharomyces pombe cdt2+ stimulates a Pcu4-Ddb1-CSN ubiquitin ligase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, C.; Poitelea, M.; Watson, A.

    2005-01-01

    Cullin-4 forms a scaffold for multiple ubiquitin ligases. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the Cullin-4 homologue (Pcu4) physically associates with Ddb1 and the COP9 signalosome (CSN). One target of this complex is Spd1. Spd1 regulates ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) activity. Spd1 degradation during S...... phase, or following DNA damage of G2 cells, results in the nuclear export of the small RNR subunit. We demonstrate that Cdt2, an unstable WD40 protein, is a regulatory subunit of Pcu4-Ddb1-CSN ubiquitin ligase. cdt2 deletion stabilises Spd1 and prevents relocalisation of the small RNR subunit from...... degradation. We propose that Cdt2 incorporation into the Pcu4-Ddb1-CSN complex prompts Spd1 targeting and subsequent degradation and that Cdt2 is a WD40 repeat adaptor protein for Cullin-4-based ubiquitin ligase....

  19. Structure and function of Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase reveals aspects of RING and HECT ligases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Riley, B E; Lougheed, J C; Callaway, K; Velasquez, M; Brecht, E; Nguyen, L; Shaler, T; Walker, D; Yang, Y; Regnstrom, K; Diep, L; Zhang, Z; Chiou, S; Bova, M; Artis, D R; Yao, N; Baker, J; Yednock, T; Johnston, J A

    2013-01-01

    Parkin is a RING-between-RING E3 ligase that functions in the covalent attachment of ubiquitin to specific substrates, and mutations in Parkin are linked to Parkinson's disease, cancer and mycobacterial infection...

  20. Cigarette Smoke Alters the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Siggins

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Effects of tobacco smoke on hematologic derangements have received little attention. This study employed a mouse model of cigarette smoke exposure to explore the effects on bone marrow niche function. While lung cancer is the most widely studied consequence of tobacco smoke exposure, other malignancies, including leukemia, are associated with tobacco smoke exposure. Animals received cigarette smoke exposure for 6 h/day, 5 days/week for 9 months. Results reveal that the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC pool size is reduced by cigarette smoke exposure. We next examined the effect of cigarette smoke exposure on one supporting cell type of the niche, the mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. Smoke exposure decreased the number of MSCs. Transplantation of naïve HSPCs into irradiated mice with cigarette smoke exposure yielded fewer numbers of engrafted HSPCs. This result suggests that smoke-exposed mice possess dysfunctional niches, resulting in abnormal hematopoiesis. Co-culture experiments using MSCs isolated from control or cigarette smoke-exposed mice with naïve HSPCs in vitro showed that MSCs from cigarette smoke-exposed mice generated marked expansion of naïve HSPCs. These data show that cigarette smoke exposure decreases in vivo MSC and HSC number and also increases pro-proliferative gene expression by cigarette smoke-exposed MSCs, which may stimulate HSPC expansion. These results of this investigation are clinically relevant to both bone marrow donors with a history of smoking and bone marrow transplant (BMT recipients with a history of smoking.

  1. Prenatal cadmium exposure alters postnatal immune cell development and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Miranda L.; Holásková, Ida; Elliott, Meenal; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B., E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu

    2012-06-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is generally found in low concentrations in the environment due to its widespread and continual use, however, its concentration in some foods and cigarette smoke is high. Although evidence demonstrates that adult exposure to Cd causes changes in the immune system, there are limited reports of immunomodulatory effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. This study was designed to investigate the effects of prenatal exposure to Cd on the immune system of the offspring. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose of CdCl{sub 2} (10 ppm) and the effects on the immune system of the offspring were assessed at two time points following birth (2 and 7 weeks of age). Thymocyte and splenocyte phenotypes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Prenatal Cd exposure did not affect thymocyte populations at 2 and 7 weeks of age. In the spleen, the only significant effect on phenotype was a decrease in the number of macrophages in male offspring at both time points. Analysis of cytokine production by stimulated splenocytes demonstrated that prenatal Cd exposure decreased IL-2 and IL-4 production by cells from female offspring at 2 weeks of age. At 7 weeks of age, splenocyte IL-2 production was decreased in Cd-exposed males while IFN-γ production was decreased from both male and female Cd-exposed offspring. The ability of the Cd-exposed offspring to respond to immunization with a S. pneumoniae vaccine expressing T-dependent and T-independent streptococcal antigens showed marked increases in the levels of both T-dependent and T-independent serum antibody levels compared to control animals. CD4{sup +}FoxP3{sup +}CD25{sup +} (nTreg) cell percentages were increased in the spleen and thymus in all Cd-exposed offspring except in the female spleen where a decrease was seen. CD8{sup +}CD223{sup +} T cells were markedly decreased in the spleens in all offspring at 7 weeks of age. These findings suggest that even very low levels of Cd exposure during gestation can

  2. Mineralocorticoid receptor degradation is promoted by Hsp90 inhibition and the ubiquitin-protein ligase CHIP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faresse, Nourdine; Ruffieux-Daidie, Dorothée; Salamin, Mélanie; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Staub, Olivier

    2010-12-01

    The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) plays a crucial role in the regulation of Na(+) balance and blood pressure, as evidenced by gain of function mutations in the MR of hypertensive families. In the kidney, aldosterone binds to the MR, induces its nuclear translocation, and promotes a transcriptional program leading to increased transepithelial Na(+) transport via the epithelial Na(+) channel. In the unliganded state, MR is localized in the cytosol and part of a multiprotein complex, including heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), which keeps it ligand-binding competent. 17-Allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG) is a benzoquinone ansamycin antibiotic that binds to Hsp90 and alters its function. We investigated whether 17-AAG affects the stability and transcriptional activity of MR and consequently Na(+) reabsorption by renal cells. 17-AAG treatment lead to reduction of MR protein level in epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo, thereby interfering with aldosterone-dependent transcription. Moreover, 17-AAG inhibited aldosterone-induced Na(+) transport, possibly by interfering with MR availability for the ligand. Finally, we identified the ubiquitin-protein ligase, COOH terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein, as a novel partner of the cytosolic MR, which is responsible for its polyubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation in presence of 17-AAG. In conclusion, 17-AAG may represent a novel pharmacological tool to interfere with Na(+) reabsorption and hypertension.

  3. Viroid RNA redirects host DNA ligase 1 to act as an RNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohales, María-Ángeles; Flores, Ricardo; Daròs, José-Antonio

    2012-08-21

    Viroids are a unique class of noncoding RNAs: composed of only a circular, single-stranded molecule of 246-401 nt, they manage to replicate, move, circumvent host defenses, and frequently induce disease in higher plants. Viroids replicate through an RNA-to-RNA rolling-circle mechanism consisting of transcription of oligomeric viroid RNA intermediates, cleavage to unit-length strands, and circularization. Though the host RNA polymerase II (redirected to accept RNA templates) mediates RNA synthesis and a type-III RNase presumably cleavage of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) and closely related members of the family Pospiviroidae, the host enzyme catalyzing the final circularization step, has remained elusive. In this study we propose that PSTVd subverts host DNA ligase 1, converting it to an RNA ligase, for the final step. To support this hypothesis, we show that the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) DNA ligase 1 specifically and efficiently catalyzes circularization of the genuine PSTVd monomeric linear replication intermediate opened at position G95-G96 and containing 5'-phosphomonoester and 3'-hydroxyl terminal groups. Moreover, we also show a decreased PSTVd accumulation and a reduced ratio of monomeric circular to total monomeric PSTVd forms in Nicotiana benthamiana Domin plants in which the endogenous DNA ligase 1 was silenced. Thus, in a remarkable example of parasitic strategy, viroids reprogram for their replication the template and substrate specificity of a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase and a DNA ligase to act as RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and RNA ligase, respectively.

  4. FGFR gene alterations in lung squamous cell carcinoma are potential targets for the multikinase inhibitor nintedanib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibi, Masaaki; Kaneda, Hiroyasu; Tanizaki, Junko; Sakai, Kazuko; Togashi, Yosuke; Terashima, Masato; De Velasco, Marco Antonio; Fujita, Yoshihiko; Banno, Eri; Nakamura, Yu; Takeda, Masayuki; Ito, Akihiko; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Okamoto, Isamu; Nishio, Kazuto

    2016-11-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) gene alterations are relatively frequent in lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) and are a potential targets for therapy with FGFR inhibitors. However, little is known regarding the clinicopathologic features associated with FGFR alterations. The angiokinase inhibitor nintedanib has shown promising activity in clinical trials for non-small cell lung cancer. We have now applied next-generation sequencing (NGS) to characterize FGFR alterations in LSCC patients as well as examined the antitumor activity of nintedanib in LSCC cell lines positive for FGFR1 copy number gain (CNG). The effects of nintedanib on the proliferation of and FGFR signaling in LSCC cell lines were examined in vitro, and its effects on tumor formation were examined in vivo. A total of 75 clinical LSCC specimens were screened for FGFR alterations by NGS. Nintedanib inhibited the proliferation of FGFR1 CNG-positive LSCC cell lines in association with attenuation of the FGFR1-ERK signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. FGFR1 CNG (10.7%), FGFR1 mutation (2.7%), FGFR2 mutation (2.7%), FGFR4 mutation (5.3%), and FGFR3 fusion (1.3%) were detected in LSCC specimens by NGS. Clinicopathologic features did not differ between LSCC patients positive or negative for FGFR alterations. However, among the 36 patients with disease recurrence after surgery, prognosis was significantly worse for those harboring FGFR alterations. Screening for FGFR alterations by NGS warrants further study as a means to identify patients with LSCC recurrence after surgery who might benefit from nintedanib therapy.

  5. Alterations of FHIT Gene and P16 Gene in Nickel Transformed Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI-DONG JI; JIA-KUN CHEN; JIA-CHUN LU; ZHONG-LIANG WU; FEI YI; SU-MEI FENG

    2006-01-01

    To study the alterations of FHIT gene and P16 gene in malignant transformed human bronchial epithelial cells induced by crystalline nickel sulfide using an immoral human bronchial epithelial cell line, and to explore the molecular mechanism of nickel carcinogenesis. Methods 16HBE cells were treated 6 times with different concentrations of NiS in vitro, and the degree of malignant transformation was determined by assaying the anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenicity. Malignant transformed cells and tumorigenic cells were examined for alterations of FHIT gene and P16 gene using RT-PCR, DNA sequencing, silver staining PCR-SSCP and Western blotting. Results NiS-treated cells exhibited overlapping growth. Compared with that of negative control cells, soft agar colony formation efficiency of NiS-treated cells showed significant increases (P<0.01) and dose-dependent effects. NiS-treated cells could form tumors in nude mice, and a squamous cell carcinoma was confirmed by histopathological examination. No mutation of exon 2 and exons 2-3, no abnormal expression in p16 gene and mutation of FHIT exons 5-8 and exons 1-4 or exons 5-9 were observed in transformed cells and tumorigenic cells. However, aberrant transcripts or loss of expression of the FHIT gene and Fhit protein was observed in transformed cells and tumorigenic cells. One of the aberrant transcripts in the FHIT gene was confirmed to have a deletion of exon 6, exon 7, exon 8, and an insertion of a 36 bp sequence replacing exon 6-8. Conclusions The FHIT gene rather than the P16 gene, plays a definite role in nickel carcinogenesis. Alterations of the FHIT gene induced by crystalline NiS may be a molecular event associated with carcinogen, chromosome fragile site instability and cell malignant transformation. FHIT may be an important target gene activated by nickel and other exotic carcinogens.

  6. Altered Cell Mechanics from the Inside: Dispersed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Integrate with and Restructure Actin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad F. Islam

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available With a range of desirable mechanical and optical properties, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs are a promising material for nanobiotechnologies. SWCNTs also have potential as biomaterials for modulation of cellular structures. Previously, we showed that highly purified, dispersed SWCNTs grossly alter F-actin inside cells. F-actin plays critical roles in the maintenance of cell structure, force transduction, transport and cytokinesis. Thus, quantification of SWCNT-actin interactions ranging from molecular, sub-cellular and cellular levels with both structure and function is critical for developing SWCNT-based biotechnologies. Further, this interaction can be exploited, using SWCNTs as a unique actin-altering material. Here, we utilized molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interactions of SWCNTs with actin filaments. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that SWCNTs were located within ~5 nm of F-actin in cells but did not interact with G-actin. SWCNTs did not alter myosin II sub-cellular localization, and SWCNT treatment in cells led to significantly shorter actin filaments. Functionally, cells with internalized SWCNTs had greatly reduced cell traction force. Combined, these results demonstrate direct, specific SWCNT alteration of F-actin structures which can be exploited for SWCNT-based biotechnologies and utilized as a new method to probe fundamental actin-related cellular processes and biophysics.

  7. Partial purification and characterization of an escherichia coli toxic factor that induces morphological cell alterations.

    OpenAIRE

    Caprioli, A; Falbo, V.; Roda, L G; Ruggeri, F. M.; Zona, C

    1983-01-01

    A factor produced by several strains of Escherichia coli isolated from enteritis-affected children has been shown to produce both a necrotizing effect on rabbit skin and striking morphological alterations on CHO, Vero, and HeLa cells. The same strains were found to have hemolytic activity on sheep erythrocytes. The toxic, cell-altering factor was demonstrated to be different from both heat-labile and heat-stable enterotoxins and from Vero toxin. The main effect induced by the isolated factor ...

  8. Astrocytes from the brain microenvironment alter migration and morphology of metastatic breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumakovich, Marina A; Mencio, Caitlin P; Siglin, Jonathan S; Moriarty, Rebecca A; Geller, Herbert M; Stroka, Kimberly M

    2017-08-09

    Tumor cell metastasis to the brain involves cell migration through biochemically and physically complex microenvironments at the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The current understanding of tumor cell migration across the BBB is limited. We hypothesize that an interplay between biochemical cues and physical cues at the BBB affects the mechanisms of brain metastasis. We found that astrocyte conditioned medium (ACM) applied directly to tumor cells increased tumor cell velocity, induced elongation, and promoted actin stress fiber organization. Notably, treatment of the extracellular matrix with ACM led to even more significant increases in tumor cell velocity in comparison with ACM treatment of cells directly. Furthermore, inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases in ACM reversed ACM's effect on tumor cells. The effects of ACM on tumor cell morphology and migration also depended on astrocytes' activation state. Finally, using a microfluidic device, we found that the effects of ACM were abrogated in confinement. Overall, our work demonstrates that astrocyte-secreted factors alter migration and morphology of metastatic breast tumor cells, and this effect depends on the cells' mechanical microenvironment.-Shumakovich, M. A., Mencio, C. P., Siglin, J. S., Moriarty, R. A., Geller, H. M., Stroka, K. M. Astrocytes from the brain microenvironment alter migration and morphology of metastatic breast cancer cells. © FASEB.

  9. The ubiquitin ligase Ubr2, a recognition E3 component of the N-end rule pathway, stabilizes Tex19.1 during spermatogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Yang

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin E3 ligases target their substrates for ubiquitination, leading to proteasome-mediated degradation or altered biochemical properties. The ubiquitin ligase Ubr2, a recognition E3 component of the N-end rule proteolytic pathway, recognizes proteins with N-terminal destabilizing residues and plays an important role in spermatogenesis. Tex19.1 (also known as Tex19 has been previously identified as a germ cell-specific protein in mouse testis. Here we report that Tex19.1 forms a stable protein complex with Ubr2 in mouse testes. The binding of Tex19.1 to Ubr2 is independent of the second position cysteine of Tex19.1, a putative target for arginylation by the N-end rule pathway R-transferase. The Tex19.1-null mouse mutant phenocopies the Ubr2-deficient mutant in three aspects: heterogeneity of spermatogenic defects, meiotic chromosomal asynapsis, and embryonic lethality preferentially affecting females. In Ubr2-deficient germ cells, Tex19.1 is transcribed, but Tex19.1 protein is absent. Our results suggest that the binding of Ubr2 to Tex19.1 metabolically stabilizes Tex19.1 during spermatogenesis, revealing a new function for Ubr2 outside the conventional N-end rule pathway.

  10. Electron microscopy visualization of DNA-protein complexes formed by Ku and DNA ligase IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Patricia; Zhang, Teri T; Hannah, Ryan; Yang, Hui; Hefferin, Melissa L; Tomkinson, Alan E; Nogales, Eva

    2012-01-02

    The repair of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) is essential for cell viability and genome stability. Aberrant repair of DSBs has been linked with cancer predisposition and aging. During the repair of DSBs by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), DNA ends are brought together, processed and then joined. In eukaryotes, this repair pathway is initiated by the binding of the ring-shaped Ku heterodimer and completed by DNA ligase IV. The DNA ligase IV complex, DNA ligase IV/XRRC4 in humans and Dnl4/Lif1 in yeast, is recruited to DNA ends in vitro and in vivo by an interaction with Ku and, in yeast, Dnl4/Lif1 stabilizes the binding of yKu to in vivo DSBs. Here we have analyzed the interactions of these functionally conserved eukaryotic NHEJ factors with DNA by electron microscopy. As expected, the ring-shaped Ku complex bound stably and specifically to DNA ends at physiological salt concentrations. At a ratio of 1 Ku molecule per DNA end, the majority of DNA ends were occupied by a single Ku complex with no significant formation of linear DNA multimers or circular loops. Both Dnl4/Lif1 and DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 formed complexes with Ku-bound DNA ends, resulting in intra- and intermolecular DNA end bridging, even with non-ligatable DNA ends. Together, these studies, which provide the first visualization of the conserved complex formed by Ku and DNA ligase IV at juxtaposed DNA ends by electron microscopy, suggest that the DNA ligase IV complex mediates end-bridging by engaging two Ku-bound DNA ends.

  11. Altered expression of glycosaminoglycans in metastatic 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steck, P.A.; Cheong, P.H.; Nakajima, M.; Yung, W.K.A.; Moser, R.P.; Nicolson, G.L.

    1987-02-24

    A difference in the expression and metabolism of (/sup 35/S)sulfated glycosaminoglycans between rat mammary tumor cells derived from a primary tumor and those from its metastatic lesions has been observed. Cells from the primary tumor possessed about equal quantities of chondroitin sulfate and heparan sulfate on their cell surfaces but released fourfold more chondroitin sulfate than heparan sulfate into their medium. In contrast, cells from distal metastatic lesions expressed approximately 5 times more heparan sulfate than chondroitin sulfate in both medium and cell surface fractions. This was observed to be the result of differential synthesis of the glycosaminoglycans and not of major structural alterations of the individual glycosaminoglycans. The degree of sulfation and size of heparan sulfate were similar for all cells examined. However, chondroitin sulfate, observed to be only chondroitin 4-sulfate, from the metastases-derived cells had a smaller average molecular weight on gel filtration chromatography and showed a decreased quantity of sulfated disaccharides upon degradation with chondroitin ABC lyase compared to the primary tumor derived cells. Major qualitative or quantitative alterations were not observed for hyaluronic acid among the various 13762NF cells. The metabolism of newly synthesized sulfated glycosaminoglycans was also different between cells from primary tumor and metastases. A pulse-chase kinetics study demonstrated that both heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate were degraded by the metastases-derived cells, whereas the primary tumor derived cells degraded only heparan sulfate and degraded it at a slower rate. These results suggested that altered glycosaminoglycan expression and metabolism may be associated with the metastatic process in 13762NF rat mammary tumor cells.

  12. Efficient in situ detection of mRNAs using the Chlorella virus DNA ligase for padlock probe ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Nils; Meier, Matthias

    2017-02-01

    Padlock probes are single-stranded DNA molecules that are circularized upon hybridization to their target sequence by a DNA ligase. In the following, the circulated padlock probes are amplified and detected with fluorescently labeled probes complementary to the amplification product. The hallmark of padlock probe assays is a high detection specificity gained by the ligation reaction. Concomitantly, the ligation reaction is the largest drawback for a quantitative in situ detection of mRNAs due to the low affinities of common DNA or RNA ligases to RNA-DNA duplex strands. Therefore, current protocols require that mRNAs be reverse transcribed to DNA before detection with padlock probes. Recently, it was found that the DNA ligase from Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1) is able to efficiently ligate RNA-splinted DNA. Hence, we designed a padlock probe assay for direct in situ detection of mRNAs using the PBCV-1 DNA ligase. Experimental single-cell data were used to optimize and characterize the efficiency of mRNA detection with padlock probes. Our results demonstrate that the PBCV-1 DNA ligase overcomes the efficiency limitation of current protocols for direct in situ mRNA detection, making the PBCV-1 DNA ligase an attractive tool to simplify in situ ligation sequencing applications.

  13. Effects of bile acids on proliferation and ultrastructural alteration of pancreatic cancer cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Wu; Yi Lüi; Bo Wang; Chang Liu; Zuo-Ren Wang,

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Pancreatic cancer in the head is frequently accompanied by jaundice and high bile acid level in serum. This study focused on the direct effects of bile acids on proliferation and ultrastructural alteration of pancreatic cancer.METHODS: Pancreatic cancer cell lines PANC-1, MIA PaCa2 and PGHAM-1 were explored in this study. The cell lines were cultured in media supplemented with certain bile acids,CA, DCA, LCA, TCDC, TDCA and GCA. Their influence on cell growth was measured with MTT assay after 72 h of incubation. Cell cycles of PANC-1 cells in 40 μM of bile acids media were analyzed by flow cytometry. Ultrastructural alteration of PANC-1 cells induced by DCA was observed using scanning and transmission electron microscope (SEM and TEM).RESULTS: At various concentrations of bile acids and incubation time, no enhanced effects of bile acids on cell proliferation were observed. Significant inhibitory effects were obtained in almost all media with bile acids. DCA and CA increased the percentage of G0+G1 phase cells, while GCA and TDCA elevated the S phase cell number. After 48 h of incubation in DCA medium, PANC-1 cells showed some structural damages such as loss of their microvilli and vacuolization of organelles in cytoplasm.CONCLUSION: Bile acids can reduce proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells due to their direct cytotoxicity. This result implies that elevation of bile acids in jaundiced serum may inhibit pancreatic cancer progression.

  14. Gadd45a inhibits cell migration and invasion by altering the global RNA expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Zhanhai; Li, Guiyuan; Zhan, Qimin; Li, Dan

    2012-09-01

    Gadd45a, the first well-defined p53 downstream gene, can be induced by multiple DNA-damaging agents, which plays important roles in the control of cell cycle checkpoint, DNA repair process and signaling transduction. Our previous findings suggested that Gadd45a maintains cell-cell adhesion and cell contact inhibition. However, little is known about how Gadd45a participates in the suppression of malignancy in human cancer cells. To examine the functions of Gadd45a in cell invasion and metastasis, we performed the adhesion, wound-healing and transwell assays in Gadd45a (+/+) and Gadd45a (-/-) MEF cell lines. We found the adhesion, migration and invasive abilities were much higher in Gadd45a deficient cells. We furthermore applied high-throughput cDNA microarray analysis and bioinformatics analysis to analyze the mechanisms of Gadd45a gene in invasion and metastasis. Compared with the Gadd45a wild type cells, the Gadd45a deficient cells showed a wide range of transcripts alterations. The altered gene pathways were predicted by the MAS software, which indicated focal adhesion,cell communication,ECM-receptor interaction as the three main pathways. Real-time PCR was employed to validate the differentially expressed genes. Interestingly, we figured out that the deregulations of these genes are caused neither by genomic aberrations nor methylation status. These findings provided a novel insight that Gadd45a may involve in tumor progression by regulating related genes expressions.

  15. Molecular alterations in tumorigenic human bronchial and breast epithelial cells induced by high let radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, T. K.; Zhao, Y. L.; Roy, D.; Piao, C. Q.; Calaf, G.; Hall, E. J.

    Carcinogenesis is a multi-stage process with sequence of genetic events governing the phenotypic expression of a series of transformation steps leading to the development of metastatic cancer. In the present study, immortalized human bronchial (BEP2D) and breast (MCF-10F) cells were irradiated with graded doses of either 150 keV/μm alpha particles or 1 GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions. Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming tumorigenic in nude mice. Cell fusion studies indicated that radiation-induced tumorigenic phenotype in BEP2D cells could be completely suppressed by fusion with non-tumorigenic BEP2D cells. The differential expressions of known genes between tumorigenic bronchial and breast cells induced by alpha particles and their respective control cultures were compared using cDNA expression array. Among the 11 genes identified to be differentially expressed in BEP2D cells, three ( DCC, DNA-PK and p21 CIPI) were shown to be consistently down-regulated by 2 to 4 fold in all the 5 tumor cell lines examined. In contrast, their expressions in the fusion cell lines were comparable to control BEP2D cells. Similarly, expression levels of a series of genes were found to be altered in a step-wise manner among tumorigenic MCF-10F cells. The results are highly suggestive that functional alterations of these genes may be causally related to the carcinogenic process.

  16. Effects of Chemotherapy-Induced Alterations in Cell Mechanical Properties on Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathivadhi, Sruti; Ekpenyong, Andrew; Nichols, Michael; Taylor, Carolyn; Ning, Jianhao

    Biological cells can modulate their mechanical properties to suit their functions and in response to changes in their environment. Thus, mechanical phenotyping of cells has been employed for tracking stem cell differentiation, bacterial infection, cell death, etc. Malignant transformation of cells also involves changes in mechanical properties. However, the extent to which mechanical properties of cancer cells contribute to metastasis is not well understood. Yet, more than 90% of all cancer deaths are directly related to metastasis. Transit of cells through the microcirculation is one of the key features of metastasis. We hypothesize that cancer treatment regimens do inadvertently alter cell mechanical properties in ways that might promote cancer metastasis. We use a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic (MMM) platform which mimics the capillary constrictions of the pulmonary and peripheral microcirculation to determine if in-vivo-like mechanical stimuli can evoke different responses from cells subjected to various cancer drugs. In particular, we show that cancer cells treated with chemotherapeutic drugs such as daunorubicin, become more deformable at short timescales (0.1 s) and transit faster through the device. Our results are first steps in evaluating the pro- or anti-metastatic effects of chemotherapeutic drugs based on their induced alterations in cell mechanical properties.

  17. Altered cell wall properties are responsible for ammonium-reduced aluminium accumulation in rice roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhao, Xue Qiang; Chen, Rong Fu; Dong, Xiao Ying; Lan, Ping; Ma, Jian Feng; Shen, Ren Fang

    2015-07-01

    The phytotoxicity of aluminium (Al) ions can be alleviated by ammonium (NH4(+)) in rice and this effect has been attributed to the decreased Al accumulation in the roots. Here, the effects of different nitrogen forms on cell wall properties were compared in two rice cultivars differing in Al tolerance. An in vitro Al-binding assay revealed that neither NH4(+) nor NO3(-) altered the Al-binding capacity of cell walls, which were extracted from plants not previously exposed to N sources. However, cell walls extracted from NH4(+)-supplied roots displayed lower Al-binding capacity than those from NO3(-)-supplied roots when grown in non-buffered solutions. Fourier-transform infrared microspectroscopy analysis revealed that, compared with NO3(-)-supplied roots, NH4(+)-supplied roots possessed fewer Al-binding groups (-OH and COO-) and lower contents of pectin and hemicellulose. However, when grown in pH-buffered solutions, these differences in the cell wall properties were not observed. Further analysis showed that the Al-binding capacity and properties of cell walls were also altered by pHs alone. Taken together, our results indicate that the NH4(+)-reduced Al accumulation was attributed to the altered cell wall properties triggered by pH decrease due to NH4(+) uptake rather than direct competition for the cell wall binding sites between Al(3+) and NH4(+).

  18. Altered MARCH1 ubiquination-regulated dendritic cell immune functions during the early stage of zymosan-induced multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Lu, Jiang-yang; Liu, Qian; Wang, Hong-wei; Guo, Huiqin

    2013-02-01

    Using a zymosan-induced mouse model of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS), we previously found profound increases in spleen immune cells' expressions of ubiquitin and MHC-II molecules and increased CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs) within 24h of zymosan injection. We postulated that the early stage of MODS altered DCs function via an ubiquitination-associated mechanism. We intraperitoneally injected zymosan into 100 male C57BL/6 mice (0.8mg/g) and randomly divided them into 5 groups based on the days after injection (20mice/group): 1d, 3d, 5d, 7d, and 10d. Mice were examined for spleen CD11c+ DC functions at the indicated days. Untreated mice were used for normal spleen tissue and T cell samples. By qPCR, IL-12 and TNF-α mRNA expressions in spleen CD11c+ DCs were significantly increased in MODS 1d mice; on subsequent days post-injection, these mRNA levels gradually returned to control levels. The same patterns were found for MODS mice DCs induction of untreated mouse T cells proliferation and IL-2 and IFN-γ mRNA expressions. When T cell functions were examined using MODS 1d DCs with and without MG132 treatment, an inhibitor of ubiquitinated protein degradation, T cell functional activities were enhanced by DCs treated with MG132. MODS 1d DCs also had significantly reduced MARCH1 mRNA expression, a key ubiquitin ligase that regulates DCs MHC-II expression. Silencing DCs MARCH1 expression with siRNA resulted in enhancing their induction of T cell functional activities. Using co-immunoprecipitation, Western blot, and flow cytometry assays, we deduced that MARCH1 ubiquitinated DC surface MHC-II molecules to regulate DC's immune functions in MODS mice. Our results suggest that aberrant degradation of spleen DCs MARCH1-mediated ubiquitinated proteins is involved during the earliest stage of MODS development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Tumor-altered dendritic cell function: implications for anti-tumor immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Michael Hargadon

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are key regulators of both innate and adaptive immunity, and the array of immunoregulatory functions exhibited by these cells is dictated by their differentiation, maturation, and activation status. Although a major role for these cells in the induction of immunity to pathogens has long been appreciated, data accumulated over the last several years has demonstrated that DC are also critical regulators of anti-tumor immune responses. However, despite the potential for stimulation of robust anti-tumor immunity by DC, tumor-altered DC function has been observed in many cancer patients and tumor-bearing animals and is often associated with tumor immune escape. Such dysfunction has significant implications for both the induction of natural anti-tumor immune responses as well as the efficacy of immunotherapeutic strategies that target endogenous DC in situ or that employ exogenous DC as part of anti-cancer immunization maneuvers. In this review, the major types of tumor-altered DC function will be described, with emphasis on recent insights into the mechanistic bases for the inhibition of DC differentiation from hematopoietic precursors, the altered programming of DC precursors to differentiate into myeloid-derived suppressor cells or tumor-associated macrophages, the suppression of DC maturation and activation, and the induction of immunoregulatory DC by tumors, tumor-derived factors, and tumor-associated cells within the milieu of the tumor microenvironment. The impact of these tumor-altered cells on the quality of the overall anti-tumor immune response will also be discussed. Finally, this review will also highlight questions concerning tumor-altered DC function that remain unanswered, and it will address factors that have limited advances in the study of this phenomenon in order to focus future research efforts in the field on identifying strategies for interfering with tumor-associated DC dysfunction and improving DC-mediated anti

  20. Altered T cell surface glycosylation in HIV-1 infection results in increased susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantéri, Marion; Giordanengo, Valérie; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Fuzibet, Jean-Gabriel; Auberger, Patrick; Fukuda, Minoru; Baum, Linda G; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude

    2003-12-01

    The massive T cell death that occurs in HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infection contributes profoundly to the pathophysiology associated with AIDS. The mechanisms controlling cell death of both infected and uninfected T cells ("bystander" death) are not completely understood. We have shown that HIV-1 infection of T cells results in altered glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins; specifically, it decreased sialylation and increased expression of core 2 O-glycans. Galectin-1 is an endogenous human lectin that recognizes these types of glycosylation changes and induces cell death of activated lymphocytes. Therefore we studied the possible contribution of galectin-1 in the pathophysiology of AIDS. O-glycan modifications were investigated on peripheral lymphocytes from AIDS patients. Oligosaccharides from CD43 and CD45 of CEM cells latently infected with HIV-1 were chemically analyzed. Consistent with our previous results, we show that HIV-1 infection results in accumulation of exposed lactosamine residues, oligosaccharides recognized by galectin-1 on cell surface glycoproteins. Both latently HIV-1-infected T cell lines and peripheral CD4 and CD8 T cells from AIDS patients exhibited exposed lactosamine residues and demonstrated marked susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death, in contrast to control cultures or cells from uninfected donors. The fraction of cells that died in response to galectin-1 exceeded the fraction of infected cells, indicating that death of uninfected cells occurred. Altered cell surface glycosylation of T cells during HIV-1 infection increases the susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death, and this death pathway can contribute to loss of both infected and uninfected T cells in AIDS.

  1. Modifications of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cell envelope in the cystic fibrosis airway alters interactions with immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Preston J; Scordo, Julia M; Arcos, Jesús; Kirkby, Stephen E; Wewers, Mark D; Wozniak, Daniel J; Torrelles, Jordi B

    2017-07-06

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous environmental organism and an opportunistic pathogen that causes chronic lung infections in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients as well as other immune-compromised individuals. During infection, P. aeruginosa enters the terminal bronchioles and alveoli and comes into contact with alveolar lining fluid (ALF), which contains homeostatic and antimicrobial hydrolytic activities, termed hydrolases. These hydrolases comprise an array of lipases, glycosidases, and proteases and thus, they have the potential to modify lipids, carbohydrates and proteins on the surface of invading microbes. Here we show that hydrolase levels between human ALF from healthy and CF patients differ. CF-ALF influences the P. aeruginosa cell wall by reducing the content of one of its major polysaccharides, Psl. This CF-ALF induced Psl reduction does not alter initial bacterial attachment to surfaces but reduces biofilm formation. Importantly, exposure of P. aeruginosa to CF-ALF drives the activation of neutrophils and triggers their oxidative response; thus, defining human CF-ALF as a new innate defense mechanism to control P. aeruginosa infection, but at the same time potentially adding to the chronic inflammatory state of the lung in CF patients.

  2. Lipooligosaccharide-independent alteration of cellular homeostasis in Neisseria meningitidis-infected epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnah, Robert A; Hoelter, Jenny; Steeghs, Liana; Enns, Caroline A; So, Magdalene; Muckenthaler, Martina U

    2005-06-01

    Neisseria meningitidis (MC) is an important cause of meningitis and septic shock. Primary loose attachment of MC to host epithelial cells is mediated by type IV pili. Lipooligosaccharide (LOS), opacity (Opa) proteins and glycolipid adhesins facilitate subsequent tight attachment. MC infection causes numerous changes in host epithelial cell homeostasis. These include cortical plaque formation, increased expression of proinflammatory cytokines and alterations in host iron homeostasis. Using both biochemical and genetic approaches, we examined the role of LOS in mediating these events. We first examined specific cellular iron homeostasis changes that occur following addition of purified MC LOS to epithelial cells. Using an MC mutant that completely lacks LOS (MC lps tbp), we examined pili-mediated attachment and cortical plaque formation in human endocervical epithelial cells (A431). We also tested whether the lack of LOS alters cellular homeostasis, including changes in the levels of host stress response factors and proinflammatory cytokines. MC lps tbp elicited the formation of cortical plaques in A431 cells. However, the plaques were less pronounced than those formed by the MC parent. Surprisingly, the proinflammatory cytokine TNF(alpha) was upregulated during infection in MC lps tbp-infected cells. Furthermore, alterations in iron homeostasis, including lower transferrin receptor 1 (TfR-1) levels, altered TfR-1 trafficking, an 'iron-starvation' gene expression profile and low iron regulatory protein (IRP) binding activity are independent of LOS. Our results demonstrate that LOS is partially involved in both the attachment to host cells and formation of cortical plaques. However, TNFalpha induction and changes in iron homeostasis observed in MC-infected epithelial cells are independent of LOS.

  3. Sucrose synthase affects carbon partitioning to increase cellulose production and altered cell wall ultrastructure

    OpenAIRE

    Coleman, Heather D.; Yan, Jimmy; Mansfield, Shawn D.

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of the Gossypium hirsutum sucrose synthase (SuSy) gene under the control of 2 promoters was examined in hybrid poplar (Populus alba × grandidentata). Analysis of RNA transcript abundance, enzyme activity, cell wall composition, and soluble carbohydrates revealed significant changes in the transgenic lines. All lines showed significantly increased SuSy enzyme activity in developing xylem. This activity manifested in altered secondary cell wall cellulose content per dry weight in...

  4. Early alterations of red blood cell rheology in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggiori, Giulia; Occhipinti, Giovanna; De Gasperi, Andrea; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Piagnerelli, Michael

    2009-12-01

    To investigate red blood cell rheology in a large intensive care unit population on admission, and to assess the possible influence of comorbidities on the rheology. : Prospective study. Medico-surgical intensive care unit with 31 beds. All intensive care unit admissions during a 5-month period and 20 healthy volunteers. Blood sampling. A total of 196 intensive care patients (160 without and 36 with sepsis) and 20 healthy volunteers were studied. Red blood cell rheology (deformability and aggregation) was assessed ex vivo using the laser-assisted optical rotational cell analyzer (LORCA; Mechatronics Instruments BV, AN Zwaag, Netherlands) within the first 24 hrs after intensive care unit admission. Red blood cell deformability was determined by the elongation index in relation to the shear stress (0.3 to 50 Pa) applied on the red blood cell membrane surface. Aggregation was assessed by the aggregation index. Septic patients were more likely to have anemia, coagulation abnormalities, and comorbidities than were nonseptic patients. Red blood cell deformability was significantly altered in septic compared to nonseptic patients and volunteers for the majority of shear stress rates studied. The aggregation index was greater in septic patients than in volunteers (67.9% [54.7-73.5] vs. 61.8% [58.2-68.4]; p < .05). Only sepsis and hematologic disease influenced the elongation index (both p < .01). Other comorbidities, like cancer, diabetes mellitus, cirrhosis, and terminal renal failure, had no effect on the elongation index. Aggregation index was related to the degree of organ failure (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score), the red blood cell count, and fibrinogen concentrations. Early alterations of red blood cell rheology are common in intensive care unit patients, especially in those with sepsis. Comorbidities (other than hematologic diseases) do not significantly influence these abnormalities. These alterations could contribute to the microcirculatory alterations

  5. Disodium Cromoglycate, A Mast-Cell Stabilizer, Alters Postradiation Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    ranD RISEARCH INSTITUTI SCIENTIFIC REPORTTC SR86-14 ELECTE JUL0186_ _ ~D DISODIUM CROMOGLYCATE , A MAST-CELL STABILIZER, ALTERS POSTRADIATION...were given the mast-cell stabilizers disodium cromoglycate (DSCC) or BRL 22321 (Beecham Phar- maceuticals, Research Division) before exposure to 100 Gy...flow could be mitigated by the pre- radiation administration of either disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) (Fisons Corporation, ledford, Mass.) or BRL 22321

  6. CHK2 stability is regulated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase SIAH2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Limones, C; Lara-Chica, M; Jiménez-Jiménez, C; Pérez, M; Moreno, P; Muñoz, E; Calzado, M A

    2016-08-18

    The serine threonine checkpoint kinase 2 (CHK2) is a critical protein involved in the DNA damage-response pathway, which is activated by phosphorylation inducing cellular response such as DNA repair, cell-cycle regulation or apoptosis. Although CHK2 activation mechanisms have been amply described, very little is known about degradation control processes. In the present study, we identify the ubiquitin E3 ligase SIAH2 as an interaction partner of CHK2, which mediates its ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. CHK2 degradation is independent of both its activation and its kinase activity, but also of the phosphorylation in S456. We show that SIAH2-deficient cells present CHK2 accumulation together with lower ubiquitination levels. Accordingly, SIAH2 depletion by siRNA increases CHK2 levels. In response to DNA damage induced by etoposide, interaction between both proteins is disrupted, thus avoiding CHK2 degradation and promoting its stabilization. We also found that CHK2 phosphorylates SIAH2 at three residues (Thr26, Ser28 and Thr119), modifying its ability to regulate certain substrates. Cellular arrest in the G2/M phase induced by DNA damage is reverted by SIAH2 expression through the control of CHK2 levels. We observed that hypoxia decreases CHK2 levels in parallel to SIAH2 induction. Similarly, we provide evidence suggesting that resistance to apoptosis induced by genotoxic agents in cells subjected to hypoxia could be partly explained by the mutual regulation between both proteins. These results indicate that SIAH2 regulates CHK2 basal turnover, with important consequences on cell-cycle control and on the ability of hypoxia to alter the DNA damage-response pathway in cancer cells.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Streptococcus mutans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yong-Zhi; Sheng, Yu [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); Li, Lan-Fen [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Tang, De-Wei [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); Liu, Xiang-Yu [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhao, Xiaojun, E-mail: zhaoxj@scu.edu.cn [Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China); Liang, Yu-He, E-mail: zhaoxj@scu.edu.cn; Su, Xiao-Dong [National Laboratory of Protein Engineering and Plant Genetic Engineering, College of Life Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute for Nanobiomedical Technology and Membrane Biology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065, Sichuan (China)

    2007-09-01

    A potential target for antibiotic drug design, d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from S. mutans, was expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. d-Alanine-d-alanine ligase is encoded by the gene ddl (SMU-599) in Streptococcus mutans. This ligase plays a very important role in cell-wall biosynthesis and may be a potential target for drug design. To study the structure and function of this ligase, the gene ddl was amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET28a. The protein was expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Homogeneous protein was obtained using a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified protein was crystallized and the cube-shaped crystal diffracted to 2.4 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.50, c = 108.97 Å. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  8. Akt is negatively regulated by the MULAN E3 ligase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seunghee Bae; Jongdoo Kim; Hong-Duck Um; In-Chul Park; Su-Jae Lee; Seon Young Nam; Young-Woo Jin; Jae Ho Lee; Sungkwan An; Sun-Yong Kim; Jin Hyuk Jung; Yeongmin Yoon; Hwa Jun Cha; Hyunjin Lee; Karam Kim; Jongran Kim; In-Sook An

    2012-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase Akt functions in multiple cellular processes,including cell survival and tumor development.Studies of the mechanisms that negatively regulate Akt have focused on dephosphorylation-mediated inactivation.In this study,we identified a negative regulator of Akt,MULAN,which possesses both a RING finger domain and E3 ubiquitin ligase activity.Akt was found to directly interact with MULAN and to be ubiquitinated by MULAN in vitro and in vivo.Other molecular assays demonstrated that phosphorylated Akt is a substantive target for both interaction with MULAN and ubiquitination by MULAN.The results of the functional studies suggest that the degradation of Akt by MULAN suppresses cell proliferation and viability.These data provide insight into the Akt ubiquitination signaling network.

  9. Dyslipidemia-associated alterations in B cell subpopulation frequency and phenotype during experimental atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón-Arévalo, Héctor; Castaño, Diana; Villa-Pulgarín, Janny; Rojas, Mauricio; Vásquez, Gloria; Correa, Luis A; Ramírez-Pineda, José R; Yassin, Lina M

    2016-04-01

    Lymphocytes, the cellular effectors of adaptive immunity, are involved in the chronic inflammatory process known as atherosclerosis. Proatherogenic and atheroprotective properties have been ascribed to B cells. However, information regarding the role of B cells during atherosclerosis is scarce. Both the frequency and the phenotype of B cell subpopulations were studied by flow cytometry in wild type and apolipoprotein-E-deficient (apoE(-/-)) mice fed a high-fat (HFD) or control diet. Whereas the proportion of follicular cells was decreased, transitional 1-like cells were increased in mice with advanced atherosclerotic lesions (apoE(-/-) HFD). B cells in atherosclerotic mice were more activated, indicated by their higher surface expression of CD80, CD86, CD40 and CD95 and increased serum IgG1 levels. In the aorta, a decreased frequency of B cells was observed in mice with advanced atherosclerosis. Low expression of CD19 was observed on B cells from the spleen, aorta and lymph nodes of apoE(-/-) HFD mice. This alteration correlated with serum levels of IgG1 and cholesterol. A reduction in CD19 expression was induced in splenic cells from young apoE(-/-) mice cultured with lipemic serum. These results show that mice with advanced atherosclerosis display a variety of alterations in the frequency and phenotype of B lymphocytes, most of which are associated with dyslipidemia.

  10. Embedding Arabidopsis Plant Cell Suspensions in Low-Melting Agarose Facilitates Altered Gravity Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Khaled Y.; van Loon, Jack J. W. A.; Medina, F. Javier; Herranz, Raúl

    2017-02-01

    Gravity plays a role in modulating plant growth and development and its alteration induces changes in these processes. Microgravity research has recently been extended to the use of in vitro plant cell cultures which are considered as an ideal model system to study cell proliferation and growth. In general, among the ground-based facilities available for microgravity simulation, the 2D pipette clinostat had been previously considered a suitable facility to be used for unicellular biological models although studies using single plant cell cultures raised some concerns. The incompatibility comes from the standard requirement of shaking a suspension culture for assuring its viability and active proliferation status in the control samples. Moreover, a related issue applies to the use of the random positioning machine (RPM) for cell suspension experiments. Here, we demonstrate an alternative culture method based on the immobilization of the culture before the altered gravity treatment occurs, such that it behaves as a solid object. Our immobilization procedure preserved plant cell culture viability without compromising basic cell properties as viability, morphology, cell cycle phases distribution, or chromatin organization, when compared with a standard cell suspension under shaking as a control. This approach should allow the space biology community to improve the quantity and quality of plant cell results in future simulated microgravity experiments or spaceflight opportunities.

  11. Altered expression of epithelial cell surface glycoconjugates and intermediate filaments at the margins of mucosal wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik; Grøn, B; Mandel, U

    1998-01-01

    Alterations in cell to cell adhesion are necessary to enable the type of cell movements that are associated with epithelial wound healing and malignant invasion. Several studies of transformed cells have related epithelial cell movement to changes in the cell surface expression of the carbohydrate......-T antigen. The changes induced by wounding in the expression of collagen IV, laminin gamma2-chain (laminin-5), and laminin alpha5-chain were similar to those found in skin wounds and served to define the region of epithelial movement. This region was found to show a marked increase in staining for both...... epithelium, a pattern of expression similar to K16, which was also strongly upregulated in both the outgrowth and the adjacent nonwounded epithelium. These findings provide further support for an influence of such carbohydrate structures on the migratory behavior of epithelial cells....

  12. A Cytoplasmic RNA Virus Alters the Function of the Cell Splicing Protein SRSF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Serrano, Efraín E; Fritch, Ethan J; Scholl, Elizabeth H; Sherry, Barbara

    2017-04-01

    To replicate efficiently, viruses must create favorable cell conditions and overcome cell antiviral responses. We previously reported that the reovirus protein μ2 from strain T1L, but not strain T3D, represses one antiviral response: alpha/beta interferon signaling. We report here that T1L, but not T3D, μ2 localizes to nuclear speckles, where it forms a complex with the mRNA splicing factor SRSF2 and alters its subnuclear localization. Reovirus replicates in cytoplasmic viral factories, and there is no evidence that reovirus genomic or messenger RNAs are spliced, suggesting that T1L μ2 might target splicing of cell RNAs. Indeed, RNA sequencing revealed that reovirus T1L, but not T3D, infection alters the splicing of transcripts for host genes involved in mRNA posttranscriptional modifications. Moreover, depletion of SRSF2 enhanced reovirus replication and cytopathic effect, suggesting that T1L μ2 modulation of splicing benefits the virus. This provides the first report of viral antagonism of the splicing factor SRSF2 and identifies the viral protein that determines strain-specific differences in cell RNA splicing.IMPORTANCE Efficient viral replication requires that the virus create favorable cell conditions. Many viruses accomplish this by repressing specific antiviral responses. We demonstrate here that some mammalian reoviruses, RNA viruses that replicate strictly in the cytoplasm, express a protein variant that localizes to nuclear speckles, where it targets a cell mRNA splicing factor. Infection with a reovirus strain that targets this splicing factor alters splicing of cell mRNAs involved in the maturation of many other cell mRNAs. Depletion of this cell splicing factor enhances reovirus replication and cytopathic effect. Our results provide the first evidence of viral antagonism of this splicing factor and suggest that downstream consequences to the cell are global and benefit the virus. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Kinetics of plasma membrane and mitochondrial alterations in cells undergoing apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizard, G.; Fournel, S.; Genestier, L.; Dhedin, N. [Hospital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Programmed cell death or apoptosis is characterized by typical morphological alterations. By transmission electron microscopy, apoptotic cells are identified by condensation of the chromatin in tight apposition to the nuclear envelope, alteration of the nuclear envelope and fragmentation of the nucleus, whereas integrity of the plasma membrane and organelles is preserved. Conversely cells undergoing necrosis display and early desintegration of cytoplasmic membrane and swelling of mitochondria. In this study we assessed by flow cytometry the sequential alterations of forward angle light scatter, 90{degrees} light scatter, and fluorescence associated with fluorescein diacetate, rhodamine 123, and propidium iodide in two human B cell lines undergoing apoptosis induced by the topoisomerase II inhibitor VP-16. The kinetics of these modifications were compared to those of cells undergoing necrosis induced by the topoisomerase II inhibitor VP-16. The kinetics of these modifications were compared to those of cells undergoing necrosis induced by sodium azide. At the same time intervals, cells were examined by transmission electron microscopy and by UV microscopy after staining with Hoechst 33342. We report that sequential changes in light scatters and fluorescein diacetate are similar in cells undergoing apoptosis or necrosis, whereas apoptosis is characterized by a slightly delayed decrease of mitochondrial activity as assessed by rhodamine 123 staining. Surprisingly, a part of cells undergoing apoptosis displayed an early uptake of propidium iodide followed by a condensation and then a fragmentation of their nuclei. It is concluded that uptake of propidium iodide is a very early marker of cell death which does not discriminate between necrosis and apoptosis. Along with biochemical criteria, nuclear morphology revealed by staining with Hoechst 33342 would seem to be of the most simple and most discriminative assay of apoptosis. 33 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Alteration of cadherin isoform expression and inhibition of gap junctions in stomach carcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To explore cell malignant phenotype correlated changes of cell surface adhesion molecules and cell-cell communication in carcinogenesis, human stomach transformed and cancer cell lines were investigated. Expressions of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, ?-catenin, ?-catenin as well as gap junction (GJ) protein Cx32 were studied by utilization of immunoblotting, immunocytochemical and fluorescent dye transfer methods. Mammalian normal stomach mucosal cells expressed E-cadherin but not N-cadherin. E-cadherin immunofluorescence was detected at cell membranous adherens junctions (AJ) where colocalization with immunofluorescent staining of inner surface adhesion plaque proteins ?- and ?-catenins was observed. The existence of E-cadherin/ catenin (?-, ?-) protein complexes as AJ was suggested. In transformed and stomach cancer cells E-cadherin was inhibited, instead, N-cadherin was expressed and localized at membranous AJ where co-staining with ?- and ?-catenin fluorescence was observed. Formation of N-cadherin/catenin (?-, ?-) protein complex at AJs of transformed and cancer cells was suggested. The above observations were further supported by immunoblotting results. Normal stomach muscosal and transformed cells expressed Cx32 at membranous GJ and were competent of gap junction communication (GJIC). In stomach cancer cells, Cx32 was inhibited and GJIC was defective. The results suggested that changes of signal pathways mediated by both cell adhesion and cell communication systems are associated intracellular events of stomach carcinogenesis. The alteration of cadherin isoform from E- to N-cadherin in transformed and stomach cancer cells is the first report.

  15. Previously unknown role for the ubiquitin ligase Ubr1 in endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Alexandra; Besser, Stefanie; Hottmann, Heike; Wolf, Dieter H

    2013-09-17

    Quality control and degradation of misfolded proteins are essential processes of all cells. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the entry site of proteins into the secretory pathway in which protein folding occurs and terminally misfolded proteins are recognized and retrotranslocated across the ER membrane into the cytosol. Here, proteins undergo polyubiquitination by one of the membrane-embedded ubiquitin ligases, in yeast Hrd1/Der3 (HMG-CoA reductase degradation/degradation of the ER) and Doa10 (degradation of alpha), and are degraded by the proteasome. In this study, we identify cytosolic Ubr1 (E3 ubiquitin ligase, N-recognin) as an additional ubiquitin ligase that can participate in ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) in yeast. We show that two polytopic ERAD substrates, mutated transporter of the mating type a pheromone, Ste6* (sterile), and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, undergo Ubr1-dependent degradation in the presence and absence of the canonical ER ubiquitin ligases. Whereas in the case of Ste6* Ubr1 is specifically required under stress conditions such as heat or ethanol or in the absence of the canonical ER ligases, efficient degradation of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator requires function of Ubr1 already in wild-type cells under standard growth conditions. Together with the Hsp70 (heat shock protein) chaperone Ssa1 (stress-seventy subfamily A) and the AAA-type ATPase Cdc48 (cell division cycle), Ubr1 directs the substrate to proteasomal degradation. These data unravel another layer of complexity in ERAD.

  16. Interaction of the Ku heterodimer with the DNA ligase IV/Xrcc4 complex and its regulation by DNA-PK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Silvia; Woodbine, Lisa; Andreoli, Lucia; Jeggo, Penny A; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2007-06-01

    DNA non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) is a major mechanism for repairing DNA double-stranded (ds) breaks in mammalian cells. Here, we characterize the interaction between two key components of the NHEJ machinery, the Ku heterodimer and the DNA ligase IV/Xrcc4 complex. Our results demonstrate that Ku interacts with DNA ligase IV via its tandem BRCT domain and that this interaction is enhanced in the presence of Xrcc4 and dsDNA. Moreover, residues 644-748 of DNA ligase IV encompassing the first BRCT motif are necessary for binding. We show that Ku needs to be in its heterodimeric form to bind DNA ligase IV and that the C-terminal tail of Ku80, which mediates binding to DNA-PKcs, is dispensable for DNA ligase IV recognition. Although the interaction between Ku and DNA ligase IV/Xrcc4 occurs in the absence of DNA-PKcs, the presence of the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK kinase enhances complex formation. Previous studies have shown that DNA-PK kinase activity causes disassembly of DNA-PKcs from Ku at the DNA end. Here, we show that DNA-PK kinase activity also results in disassembly of the Ku/DNA ligase IV/Xrcc4 complex. Collectively, our findings provide novel information on the protein-protein interactions that regulate NHEJ in cells.

  17. Altered Natural Killer Cell Function in HIV-Exposed Uninfected Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiana Smith

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesHIV-exposed uninfected (HEU infants have higher rates of severe and fatal infections compared with HIV-unexposed (HUU infants, likely due to immune perturbations. We hypothesized that alterations in natural killer (NK cell activity might occur in HEU infants and predispose them to severe infections.DesignCase–control study using cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs at birth and 6 months from HEU infants enrolled from 2002 to 2009 and HUU infants enrolled from 2011 to 2013.MethodsNK cell phenotype and function were assessed by flow cytometry after 20-h incubation with and without K562 cells.ResultsThe proportion of NK cells among PBMCs was lower at birth in 12 HEU vs. 22 HUU (1.68 vs. 10.30%, p < 0.0001 and at 6 months in 52 HEU vs. 72 HUU (3.09 vs. 4.65%, p = 0.0005. At birth, HEU NK cells demonstrated increased killing of K562 target cells (p < 0.0001 and increased expression of CD107a (21.65 vs. 12.70%, p = 0.047, but these differences resolved by 6 months. Stimulated HEU NK cells produced less interferon (IFNγ at birth (0.77 vs. 2.64%, p = 0.008 and at 6 months (4.12 vs. 8.39%, p = 0.001, and showed reduced perforin staining at 6 months (66.95 vs. 77.30%, p = 0.0008. Analysis of cell culture supernatants indicated that lower NK cell activity in HEU was associated with reduced interleukin (IL-12, IL-15, and IL-18. Addition of recombinant human IL-12 to stimulated HEU PBMCs restored IFNγ production to that seen in stimulated HUU cultures.ConclusionNK cell proportion, phenotype, and function are altered in HEU infants. NK cell cytotoxicity and degranulation are increased in HEU at birth, but HEU NK cells have reduced IFNγ and perforin production, suggesting an adequate initial response, but decreased functional reserve. NK cell function improved with addition of exogenous IL-12, implicating impaired production of IL-12 by accessory cells. Alterations in NK cell and accessory

  18. Transforming growth factor-β2 induces morphological alteration of human corneal endothelial cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing; Wang; Ting-Jun; Fan; Xiu-Xia; Yang; Shi-Min; Chang

    2014-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the morphological altering effect of transforming growth factor-β2(TGF-β2) on untransfected human corneal endothelial cells(HCECs)in vitro.METHODS:After untransfected HCECs were treated with TGF-β2 at different concentrations, the morphology,cytoskeleton distribution, and type IV collagen expression of the cells were examined with inverted contrast light microscopy, fluorescence microscopy,immunofluorescence or Western Blot.RESULTS:TGF-β2 at the concentration of 3-15 μg/L had obviously alterative effects on HCECs morphology in dose and time-dependent manner, and 9 μg/L was the peak concentration. TGF-β2(9 μg/L) altered HCE cell morphology after treatment for 36 h, increased the mean optical density(P <0.01) and the length of F-actin,reduced the mean optical density(P <0.01) of the collagen type IV in extracellular matrix(ECM) and induced the rearrangement of F-actin, microtubule in cytoplasm and collagen type IV in ECM after treatment for 72 h.·CONCLUTION: TGF-β2 has obviously alterative effect on the morphology of HCECs from polygonal phenotype to enlarged spindle-shaped phenotype, in dose and time-dependence manner by inducing more, elongation and alignment of F-actin, rearrangement of microtubule and larger spread area of collagen type IV.

  19. Beryllium alters lipopolysaccharide-mediated intracellular phosphorylation and cytokine release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Shannon; Ganguly, Kumkum; Fresquez, Theresa M; Gupta, Goutam; McCleskey, T Mark; Chaudhary, Anu

    2009-12-01

    Beryllium exposure in susceptible individuals leads to the development of chronic beryllium disease, a lung disorder marked by release of inflammatory cytokine and granuloma formation. We have previously reported that beryllium induces an immune response even in blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals. In this study, we investigate the effects of beryllium on lipopolysaccharide-mediated cytokine release in blood mononuclear and dendritic cells from healthy individuals. We found that in vitro treatment of beryllium sulfate inhibits the secretion of lipopolysaccharide-mediated interleukin 10, while the release of interleukin 1beta is enhanced. In addition, not all lipopolysaccharide-mediated responses are altered, as interleukin 6 release in unaffected upon beryllium treatment. Beryllium sulfate-treated cells show altered phosphotyrosine levels upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Significantly, beryllium inhibits the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transducer 3, induced by lipopolysaccharide. Finally, inhibitors of phosphoinositide-3 kinase mimic the effects of beryllium in inhibition of interleukin 10 release, while they have no effect on interleukin 1beta secretion. This study strongly suggests that prior exposures to beryllium could alter host immune responses to bacterial infections in healthy individuals, by altering intracellular signaling.

  20. Epigenetic alteration of imprinted genes during neural differentiation of germline-derived pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Jeong; Choi, Na Young; Lee, Seung-Won; Ko, Kisung; Hwang, Tae Sook; Han, Dong Wook; Lim, Jisun; Schöler, Hans R; Ko, Kinarm

    2016-03-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), which are unipotent stem cells in the testes that give rise to sperm, can be converted into germline-derived pluripotent stem (gPS) by self-induction. The androgenetic imprinting pattern of SSCs is maintained even after their reprogramming into gPS cells. In this study, we used an in vitro neural differentiation model to investigate whether the imprinting patterns are maintained or altered during differentiation. The androgenetic patterns of H19, Snrpn, and Mest were maintained even after differentiation of gPS cells into NSCs (gPS-NSCs), whereas the fully unmethylated status of Ndn in SSCs was altered to somatic patterns in gPS cells and gPS-NSCs. Thus, our study demonstrates epigenetic alteration of genomic imprinting during the induction of pluripotency in SSCs and neural differentiation, suggesting that gPS-NSCs can be a useful model to study the roles of imprinted genes in brain development and human neurodevelopmental disorders.

  1. Legumain Regulates Differentiation Fate of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells and Is Altered in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Abbas; Qanie, Diyako; Andersen, Thomas L; Zhang, Yuxi; Chen, Li; Postert, Benno; Parsons, Stuart; Ditzel, Nicholas; Khosla, Sundeep; Johansen, Harald Thidemann; Kjærsgaard-Andersen, Per; Delaisse, Jean-Marie; Abdallah, Basem M; Hesselson, Daniel; Solberg, Rigmor; Kassem, Moustapha

    2017-02-14

    Secreted factors are a key component of stem cell niche and their dysregulation compromises stem cell function. Legumain is a secreted cysteine protease involved in diverse biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that legumain regulates lineage commitment of human bone marrow stromal cells and that its expression level and cellular localization are altered in postmenopausal osteoporotic patients. As shown by genetic and pharmacological manipulation, legumain inhibited osteoblast (OB) differentiation and in vivo bone formation through degradation of the bone matrix protein fibronectin. In addition, genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of legumain activity led to precocious OB differentiation and increased vertebral mineralization in zebrafish. Finally, we show that localized increased expression of legumain in bone marrow adipocytes was inversely correlated with adjacent trabecular bone mass in a cohort of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Our data suggest that altered proteolytic activity of legumain in the bone microenvironment contributes to decreased bone mass in postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  2. Altered goblet cell differentiation and surface mucus properties in Hirschsprung disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay R Thiagarajah

    Full Text Available Hirschsprung disease-associated enterocolitis (HAEC leads to significant mortality and morbidity, but its pathogenesis remains unknown. Changes in the colonic epithelium related to goblet cells and the luminal mucus layer have been postulated to play a key role. Here we show that the colonic epithelium of both aganglionic and ganglionic segments are altered in patients and in mice with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR. Structurally, goblet cells were altered with increased goblet cell number and reduced intracellular mucins in the distal colon of biopsies from patients with HSCR. Endothelin receptor B (Ednrb mutant mice showed increased goblet cell number and size and increased cell proliferation compared to wild-type mice in aganglionic segments, and reduced goblet cell size and number in ganglionic segments. Functionally, compared to littermates, Ednrb-/- mice showed increased transepithelial resistance, reduced stool water content and similar chloride secretion in the distal colon. Transcript levels of goblet cell differentiation factors SPDEF and Math1 were increased in the distal colon of Ednrb-/- mice. Both distal colon from Ednrb mice and biopsies from HSCR patients showed reduced Muc4 expression as compared to controls, but similar expression of Muc2. Particle tracking studies showed that mucus from Ednrb-/- mice provided a more significant barrier to diffusion of 200 nm nanoparticles as compared to wild-type mice. These results suggest that aganglionosis is associated with increased goblet cell proliferation and differentiation and subsequent altered surface mucus properties, prior to the development of inflammation in the distal colon epithelium. Restoration of normal goblet cell function and mucus layer properties in the colonic epithelium may represent a therapeutic strategy for prevention of HAEC.

  3. PIAS1 is a GATA4 SUMO ligase that regulates GATA4-dependent intestinal promoters independent of SUMO ligase activity and GATA4 sumoylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narasimhaswamy S Belaguli

    Full Text Available GATA4 confers cell type-specific gene expression on genes expressed in cardiovascular, gastro-intestinal, endocrine and neuronal tissues by interacting with various ubiquitous and cell-type-restricted transcriptional regulators. By using yeast two-hybrid screening approach, we have identified PIAS1 as an intestine-expressed GATA4 interacting protein. The physical interaction between GATA4 and PIAS1 was confirmed in mammalian cells by coimmunoprecipitation and two-hybrid analysis. The interacting domains were mapped to the second zinc finger and the adjacent C-terminal basic region of GATA4 and the RING finger and the adjoining C-terminal 60 amino acids of PIAS1. PIAS1 and GATA4 synergistically activated IFABP and SI promoters but not LPH promoters suggesting that PIAS1 differentially activates GATA4 targeted promoters. In primary murine enterocytes PIAS1 was recruited to the GATA4-regulated IFABP promoter. PIAS1 promoted SUMO-1 modification of GATA4 on lysine 366. However, sumoylation was not required for the nuclear localization and stability of GATA4. Further, neither GATA4 sumoylation nor the SUMO ligase activity of PIAS1 was required for coactivation of IFABP promoter by GATA4 and PIAS1. Together, our results demonstrate that PIAS1 is a SUMO ligase for GATA4 that differentially regulates GATA4 transcriptional activity independent of SUMO ligase activity and GATA4 sumoylation.

  4. Altered Pattern of Naive and Memory B cells and B1 Cells in Patients with Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohsenzadegan, Monireh; Fattahi, Fahimeh; Fattahi, Fatemeh; Mirshafiey, Abbas; Fazlollahi, Mohammad Reza; Beni, Fariba Naderi; Movahedi, Masoud; Pourpak, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a rare primary immunodeficiency disorder characterized by a greatly increased susceptibility to severe fungal and bacterial infections caused by defects in NADPH oxidase of phagocytic cells. We aimed to investigate immunophenotype alterations of naive and memor

  5. Phenobarbital induces alterations in the proteome of hepatocytes and mesenchymal cells of rat livers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Klepeisz

    Full Text Available Preceding studies on the mode of action of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens (NGCs have concentrated on alterations induced in hepatocytes (HCs. A potential role of non-parenchymal liver cells (NPCs in NGC-driven hepatocarcinogenesis has been largely neglected so far. The aim of this study is to characterize NGC-induced alterations in the proteome profiles of HCs as well as NPCs. We chose the prototypic NGC phenobarbital (PB which was applied to male rats for a period of 14 days. The livers of PB-treated rats were perfused by collagenase and the cell suspensions obtained were subjected to density gradient centrifugation to separate HCs from NPCs. In addition, HCs and NPC isolated from untreated animals were treated with PB in vitro. Proteome profiling was done by CHIP-HPLC and ion trap mass spectrometry. Proteome analyses of the in vivo experiments showed many of the PB effects previously described in HCs by other methods, e.g. induction of phase I and phase II drug metabolising enzymes. In NPCs proteins related to inflammation and immune regulation such as PAI-1 and S100-A10, ADP-ribosyl cyclase 1 and to cell migration such as kinesin-1 heavy chain, myosin regulatory light chain RLC-A and dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 1 were found to be induced, indicating major PB effects on these cells. Remarkably, in vitro treatment of HCs and NPCs with PB hardly reproduced the proteome alterations observed in vivo, indicating differences of NGC induced responses of cells at culture conditions compared to the intact organism. To conclude, the present study clearly demonstrated that PB induces proteome alterations not only in HCs but also in NPCs. Thus, any profound molecular understanding on the mode of action of NGCs has to consider effects on cells of the hepatic mesenchyme.

  6. Phenobarbital Induces Alterations in the Proteome of Hepatocytes and Mesenchymal Cells of Rat Livers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klepeisz, Philip; Sagmeister, Sandra; Haudek-Prinz, Verena; Pichlbauer, Melanie; Grasl-Kraupp, Bettina; Gerner, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Preceding studies on the mode of action of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens (NGCs) have concentrated on alterations induced in hepatocytes (HCs). A potential role of non-parenchymal liver cells (NPCs) in NGC-driven hepatocarcinogenesis has been largely neglected so far. The aim of this study is to characterize NGC-induced alterations in the proteome profiles of HCs as well as NPCs. We chose the prototypic NGC phenobarbital (PB) which was applied to male rats for a period of 14 days. The livers of PB-treated rats were perfused by collagenase and the cell suspensions obtained were subjected to density gradient centrifugation to separate HCs from NPCs. In addition, HCs and NPC isolated from untreated animals were treated with PB in vitro. Proteome profiling was done by CHIP-HPLC and ion trap mass spectrometry. Proteome analyses of the in vivo experiments showed many of the PB effects previously described in HCs by other methods, e.g. induction of phase I and phase II drug metabolising enzymes. In NPCs proteins related to inflammation and immune regulation such as PAI-1 and S100-A10, ADP-ribosyl cyclase 1 and to cell migration such as kinesin-1 heavy chain, myosin regulatory light chain RLC-A and dihydropyrimidinase-related protein 1 were found to be induced, indicating major PB effects on these cells. Remarkably, in vitro treatment of HCs and NPCs with PB hardly reproduced the proteome alterations observed in vivo, indicating differences of NGC induced responses of cells at culture conditions compared to the intact organism. To conclude, the present study clearly demonstrated that PB induces proteome alterations not only in HCs but also in NPCs. Thus, any profound molecular understanding on the mode of action of NGCs has to consider effects on cells of the hepatic mesenchyme. PMID:24204595

  7. Altered development of NKT cells, γδ T cells, CD8 T cells and NK cells in a PLZF deficient patient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie Eidson

    Full Text Available In mice, the transcription factor, PLZF, controls the development of effector functions in invariant NKT cells and a subset of NKT cell-like, γδ T cells. Here, we show that in human lymphocytes, in addition to invariant NKT cells, PLZF was also expressed in a large percentage of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, PLZF was also found to be expressed in all γδ T cells and in all NK cells. Importantly, we show that in a donor lacking functional PLZF, all of these various lymphocyte populations were altered. Therefore, in contrast to mice, PLZF appears to control the development and/or function of a wide variety of human lymphocytes that represent more than 10% of the total PBMCs. Interestingly, the PLZF-expressing CD8+ T cell population was found to be expanded in the peripheral blood of patients with metastatic melanoma but was greatly diminished in patients with autoimmune disease.

  8. V(D)J recombination in mature B cells: a mechanism for altering antibody responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papavasiliou, F; Casellas, R; Suh, H; Qin, X F; Besmer, E; Pelanda, R; Nemazee, D; Rajewsky, K; Nussenzweig, M C

    1997-10-10

    The clonal selection theory states that B lymphocytes producing high-affinity immunoglobulins are selected from a pool of cells undergoing antibody gene mutation. Somatic hypermutation is a well-documented mechanism for achieving diversification of immune responses in mature B cells. Antibody genes were also found to be modified in such cells in germinal centers by recombination of the variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) segments. The ability to alter immunoglobulin expression by V(D)J recombination in the selective environment of the germinal center may be an additional mechanism for inactivation or diversification of immune responses.

  9. Stromal-epithelial interactions in aging and cancer: Senescent fibroblasts alter epithelial cell differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrinello, Simona; Coppe, Jean-Philippe; Krtolica, Ana; Campisi, Judith

    2004-07-14

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by arresting cells at risk for malignant tumorigenesis. However, senescent cells also secrete molecules that can stimulate premalignant cells to proliferate and form tumors, suggesting the senescence response is antagonistically pleiotropic. We show that premalignant mammary epithelial cells exposed to senescent human fibroblasts in mice irreversibly lose differentiated properties, become invasive and undergo full malignant transformation. Moreover, using cultured mouse or human fibroblasts and non-malignant breast epithelial cells, we show that senescent fibroblasts disrupt epithelial alveolar morphogenesis, functional differentiation, and branching morphogenesis. Further, we identify MMP-3 as the major factor responsible for the effects of senescent fibroblasts on branching morphogenesis. Our findings support the idea that senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology, including cancer, and describe a new property of senescent fibroblasts--the ability to alter epithelial differentiation--that might also explain the loss of tissue function and organization that is a hallmark of aging.

  10. Archaeal Nucleic Acid Ligases and Their Potential in Biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia R. Chambers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With their ability to catalyse the formation of phosphodiester linkages, DNA ligases and RNA ligases are essential tools for many protocols in molecular biology and biotechnology. Currently, the nucleic acid ligases from bacteriophage T4 are used extensively in these protocols. In this review, we argue that the nucleic acid ligases from Archaea represent a largely untapped pool of enzymes with diverse and potentially favourable properties for new and emerging biotechnological applications. We summarise the current state of knowledge on archaeal DNA and RNA ligases, which makes apparent the relative scarcity of information on in vitro activities that are of most relevance to biotechnologists (such as the ability to join blunt- or cohesive-ended, double-stranded DNA fragments. We highlight the existing biotechnological applications of archaeal DNA ligases and RNA ligases. Finally, we draw attention to recent experiments in which protein engineering was used to modify the activities of the DNA ligase from Pyrococcus furiosus and the RNA ligase from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, thus demonstrating the potential for further work in this area.

  11. The E3 ubiquitin ligase CTRIP controls CLOCK levels and PERIOD oscillations in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamaze, Angélique; Lamouroux, Annie; Vias, Carine; Hung, Hsiu-Cheng; Weber, Frank; Rouyer, François

    2011-06-01

    In the Drosophila circadian clock, the CLOCK/CYCLE complex activates the period and timeless genes that negatively feedback on CLOCK/CYCLE activity. The 24-h pace of this cycle depends on the stability of the clock proteins. RING-domain E3 ubiquitin ligases have been shown to destabilize PERIOD or TIMELESS. Here we identify a clock function for the circadian trip (ctrip) gene, which encodes a HECT-domain E3 ubiquitin ligase. ctrip expression in the brain is mostly restricted to clock neurons and its downregulation leads to long-period activity rhythms in constant darkness. This altered behaviour is associated with high CLOCK levels and persistence of phosphorylated PERIOD during the subjective day. The control of CLOCK protein levels does not require PERIOD. Thus, CTRIP seems to regulate the pace of the oscillator by controlling the stability of both the activator and the repressor of the feedback loop.

  12. An alternative splicing event which occurs in mouse pachytene spermatocytes generates a form of DNA ligase III with distinct biochemical properties that may function in meiotic recombination.

    OpenAIRE

    Mackey, Z B; Ramos, W; Levin, D. S.; Walter, C. A.; McCarrey, J R; Tomkinson, A E

    1997-01-01

    Three mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases have been identified. However, the role of each of these enzymes in mammalian DNA metabolism has not been established. In this study, we show that two forms of mammalian DNA ligase III, alpha and beta, are produced by a conserved tissue-specific alternative splicing mechanism involving exons encoding the C termini of the polypeptides. DNA ligase III-alpha cDNA, which encodes a 103-kDa polypeptide, is expressed in all tissues and cells, whereas DNA li...

  13. Prolonged Mitosis of Neural Progenitors Alters Cell Fate in the Developing Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilaz, Louis-Jan; McMahon, John J; Miller, Emily E; Lennox, Ashley L; Suzuki, Aussie; Salmon, Edward; Silver, Debra L

    2016-01-06

    Embryonic neocortical development depends on balanced production of progenitors and neurons. Genetic mutations disrupting progenitor mitosis frequently impair neurogenesis; however, the link between altered mitosis and cell fate remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that prolonged mitosis of radial glial progenitors directly alters neuronal fate specification and progeny viability. Live imaging of progenitors from a neurogenesis mutant, Magoh(+/-), reveals that mitotic delay significantly correlates with preferential production of neurons instead of progenitors, as well as apoptotic progeny. Independently, two pharmacological approaches reveal a causal relationship between mitotic delay and progeny fate. As mitotic duration increases, progenitors produce substantially more apoptotic progeny or neurons. We show that apoptosis, but not differentiation, is p53 dependent, demonstrating that these are distinct outcomes of mitotic delay. Together our findings reveal that prolonged mitosis is sufficient to alter fates of radial glia progeny and define a new paradigm to understand how mitosis perturbations underlie brain size disorders such as microcephaly.

  14. Altering adsorbed proteins or cellular gene expression in bone-metastatic cancer cells affects PTHrP and Gli2 without altering cell growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M. Page

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The contents of this data in brief are related to the article titled “Matrix Rigidity Regulates the Transition of Tumor Cells to a Bone-Destructive Phenotype through Integrin β3 and TGF-β Receptor Type II”. In this DIB we will present our supplemental data investigating Integrin expression, attachment of cells to various adhesion molecules, and changes in gene expression in multiple cancer cell lines. Since the interactions of Integrins with adsorbed matrix proteins are thought to affect the ability of cancer cells to interact with their underlying substrates, we examined the expression of Integrin β1, β3, and β5 in response to matrix rigidity. We found that only Iβ3 increased with increasing substrate modulus. While it was shown that fibronectin greatly affects the expression of tumor-produced factors associated with bone destruction (parathyroid hormone-related protein, PTHrP, and Gli2, poly-l-lysine, vitronectin and type I collagen were also analyzed as potential matrix proteins. Each of the proteins was independently adsorbed on both rigid and compliant polyurethane films which were subsequently used to culture cancer cells. Poly-l-lysine, vitronectin and type I collagen all had negligible effects on PTHrP or Gli2 expression, but fibronectin was shown to have a dose dependent effect. Finally, altering the expression of Iβ3 demonstrated that it is required for tumor cells to respond to the rigidity of the matrix, but does not affect other cell growth or viability. Together these data support the data presented in our manuscript to show that the rigidity of bone drives Integrinβ3/TGF-β crosstalk, leading to increased expression of Gli2 and PTHrP.

  15. The prolific ATL family of RING-H2 ubiquitin ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, Plinio

    2012-08-01

    An abundant class of E3 ubiquitin ligases encodes the RING-finger domain. The RING finger binds to the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and brings together both the E2 and substrate. It is predicted that 477 RING finger E3 ligases exist in Arabidopsis thaliana. A particular family among them, named Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL), consists of 91 members that contain the RING-H2 variation and a hydrophobic domain located at the N-terminal end. Transmembrane E3 ligases are important in several biological processes. For instance, some transmembrane RING finger E3 ligases are main participants in the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway that targets misfolded proteins. Functional analysis of a number of ATLs has shown that some of them regulate distinct pathways in plants. Several ATLs have been shown to participate in defense responses, while others play a role in the regulation of the carbon/nitrogen response during post-germinative seedling growth transition, in the regulation of cell death during root development, in endosperm development, or in the transition to flowering under short day conditions. The ATL family has also been instrumental in evolution studies for showing how gene families are expanded in plant genomes.

  16. Altered cell wall disassembly during ripening of Cnr tomato fruit: implications for cell adhesion and fruit softening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orfila, C.; Huisman, M.M.H.; Willats, William George Tycho

    2002-01-01

    polysaccharides to the non-softening and altered cell adhesion phenotype. Cell wall material (CWM) and solubilised fractions of mature green and red ripe fruit were analysed by chemical, enzymatic and immunochemical techniques. No major differences in CWM sugar composition were detected although differences were...... that was chelator-soluble was 50% less in Cnr cell walls at both the mature green and red ripe stages. Chelator-soluble material from ripe-stage Cnr was more susceptible to endo-polygalacturonase degradation than the corresponding material from wild-type fruit. In addition, cell walls from Cnr fruit contained......The Cnr (Colourless non-ripening) tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) mutant has an aberrant fruit-ripening phenotype in which fruit do not soften and have reduced cell adhesion between pericarp cells. Cell walls from Cnr fruit were analysed in order to assess the possible contribution of pectic...

  17. Histological alterations of intestinal villi and epithelial cells after feeding dietary sugar cane extract in piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikazu Kawai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Effects of sugar cane extract (SCE on the piglet intestinal histology were observed. Twelve castrated male piglets weaned at the age of 26 days were allotted to three groups fed diets containing 0, 0.05 or 0.10% SCE. At the end of feeding experiment, each intestinal segment was taken for light or scanning electron microscopy. Feed intake, body weight gain and feed efficiency did not show a difference among groups. Most of the values for villus height, villus area, cell area and cell mitosis numbers were not different among groups, except for that the villus area of the 0.10% SCE group and the cell area of both SCE groups increased significantly at the jejunum compared to the control (P<0.05. For cell mitosis numbers, the 0.10% SCE group was higher than the 0.05% SCE group at the jejunum. Compared with the majority of flat cells of each intestinal segment in the control, the SCE groups had protuberated cells. In the 0.05% SCE group, deeper cells at the sites of recently exfoliated cells in the duodenum, cell clusters aggregated by protuberated cells in the jejunum and much more protuberant cells in the ileum were observed. These histological intestinal alterations suggest that SCE could raise the functions of intestinal villi and epithelial cells, especially at the 0.05%.

  18. Secretion of interferon gamma from human immune cells is altered by exposure to tributyltin and dibutyltin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Shanieek; Reid, Jacqueline; Whalen, Margaret

    2015-05-01

    Tributyltin (TBT) and dibutyltin (DBT) are widespread environmental contaminants found in food, beverages, and human blood samples. Both of these butyltins (BTs) interfere with the ability of human natural killer (NK) cells to lyse target cells and alter secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) from human immune cells in vitro. The capacity of BTs to interfere with secretion of other pro-inflammatory cytokines has not been examined. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) is a modulator of adaptive and innate immune responses, playing an important role in overall immune competence. This study shows that both TBT and DBT alter secretion of IFNγ from human immune cells. Peripheral blood cell preparations that were increasingly reconstituted were used to determine if exposures to either TBT or DBT affected IFNγ secretion and how the makeup of the cell preparation influenced that effect. IFNγ secretion was examined after 24 h, 48 h, and 6 day exposures to TBT (200 - 2.5 nM) and DBT (5 - 0.05 µM) in highly enriched human NK cells, a monocyte-depleted preparation of PBMCs, and monocyte-containing PBMCs. Both BTs altered IFNγ secretion from immune cells at most of the conditions tested (either increasing or decreasing secretion). However, there was significant variability among donors as to the concentrations and time points that showed changes as well as the baseline secretion of IFNγ. The majority of donors showed an increase in IFNγ secretion in response to at least one concentration of TBT or DBT at a minimum of one length of exposure.

  19. Mechanistic Framework for Establishment, Maintenance, and Alteration of Cell Polarity in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Dhonukshe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell polarity establishment, maintenance, and alteration are central to the developmental and response programs of nearly all organisms and are often implicated in abnormalities ranging from patterning defects to cancer. By residing at the distinct plasma membrane domains polar cargoes mark the identities of those domains, and execute localized functions. Polar cargoes are recruited to the specialized membrane domains by directional secretion and/or directional endocytic recycling. In plants, auxin efflux carrier PIN proteins display polar localizations in various cell types and play major roles in directional cell-to-cell transport of signaling molecule auxin that is vital for plant patterning and response programs. Recent advanced microscopy studies applied to single cells in intact plants reveal subcellular PIN dynamics. They uncover the PIN polarity generation mechanism and identified important roles of AGC kinases for polar PIN localization. AGC kinase family members PINOID, WAG1, and WAG2, belonging to the AGC-3 subclass predominantly influence the polar localization of PINs. The emerging mechanism for AGC-3 kinases action suggests that kinases phosphorylate PINs mainly at the plasma membrane after initial symmetric PIN secretion for eventual PIN internalization and PIN sorting into distinct ARF-GEF-regulated polar recycling pathways. Thus phosphorylation status directs PIN translocation to different cell sides. Based on these findings a mechanistic framework evolves that suggests existence of cell side-specific recycling pathways in plants and implicates AGC3 kinases for differential PIN recruitment among them for eventual PIN polarity establishment, maintenance, and alteration.

  20. Senescence-Induced Alterations of Laminin Chain Expression Modulate Tumorigenicity of Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia C.T. Sprenger

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer is an age-associated epithelial cancer, and as such, it contributes significantly to the mortality of the elderly. Senescence is one possible mechanism by which the body defends itself against various epithelial cancers. Senescent cells alter the microenvironment, in part, through changes to the extracellular matrix. Laminins (LMs are extracellular proteins important to both the structure and function of the microenvironment. Overexpression of the senescence-associated gene mac25 in human prostate cancer cells resulted in increased mRNA levels of the LM α4 and β2 chains compared to empty vector control cells. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of these senescence-induced LM chains on tumorigenicity of prostate cancer cells. We created stable M12 human prostate cancer lines overexpressing either the LM α4 or β2 chain or both chains. Increased expression of either the LM α4 or β2 chain resulted in increased in vitro migration and in vivo tumorigenicity of those cells, whereas high expression of both chains led to decreased in vitro proliferation and in vivo tumorigenicity compared to M12 control cells. This study demonstrates that senescent prostate epithelial cells can alter the microenvironment and that these changes modulate progression of prostate cancer.

  1. Hydrochloric acid alters the effect of L-glutamic acid on cell viability in human neuroblastoma cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croce, Nicoletta; Bernardini, Sergio; Di Cecca, Stefano; Caltagirone, Carlo; Angelucci, Francesco

    2013-07-15

    l-Glutamic acid (l-glutamate) is used to induce excitotoxicity and test neuroprotective compounds in cell cultures. However, because l-glutamate powder is nearly insoluble in water, many manufacturers recommend reconstituting l-glutamate in hydrochloric acid (HCl) prior to successive dilutions. Nevertheless, HCl, even at low concentrations, may alter the pH of the cell culture medium and interfere with cell activity. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate whether the reconstitution of l-glutamate powder in HCl alters its capacity to induce neurotoxicity in different human neuroblastoma cell lines. SH-SY5Y, IMR-32 and SK-N-BE(2) cells were exposed to various concentrations of l-glutamate, which was either reconstituted in HCl (1M) or post re-equilibrated to the pH of the culture medium (7.5). After 24 and 48h of incubation, changes in the cell viability of treated versus untreated cells were evaluated. The effect of an identical amount of HCl present in the l-glutamate dilutions on neuroblastoma cell survival was also investigated. Our data showed that the neurotoxicity of glutamate reconstituted in HCl was comparable to that of HCl alone. Moreover, the pH variations induced by glutamate or HCl in the culture medium were similar. When the pH of the glutamate stock solution was re-equilibrated, l-glutamate induced variation in cell viability to a lower extent and after a longer incubation time. This study demonstrated that HCl used to reconstitute l-glutamate powder might alter the effect of glutamate itself in neuroblastoma cell cultures. Thus, this information might be useful to scientists who use l-glutamate to induce excitotoxicity or to test neuroprotective agents.

  2. Impaired APP activity and altered Tau splicing in embryonic stem cell-derived astrocytes obtained from an APPsw transgenic minipig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Vanessa Jane; Lindblad, Maiken Marie; Jakobsen, Jannik E.;

    2015-01-01

    onset mechanisms related to cell renewal and function in familial AD astrocytes. These outcomes also highlight that radial glia could be a potentially useful population of cells for drug discovery, and that altered APP expression and altered tau phosphorylation can be detected in an in vitro model...

  3. Sucrose synthase affects carbon partitioning to increase cellulose production and altered cell wall ultrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Heather D; Yan, Jimmy; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2009-08-04

    Overexpression of the Gossypium hirsutum sucrose synthase (SuSy) gene under the control of 2 promoters was examined in hybrid poplar (Populus alba x grandidentata). Analysis of RNA transcript abundance, enzyme activity, cell wall composition, and soluble carbohydrates revealed significant changes in the transgenic lines. All lines showed significantly increased SuSy enzyme activity in developing xylem. This activity manifested in altered secondary cell wall cellulose content per dry weight in all lines, with increases of 2% to 6% over control levels, without influencing plant growth. The elevated concentration of cellulose was associated with an increase in cell wall crystallinity but did not alter secondary wall microfibril angle. This finding suggests that the observed increase in crystallinity is a function of altered carbon partitioning to cellulose biosynthesis rather than the result of tension wood formation. Furthermore, the augmented deposition of cellulose in the transgenic lines resulted in thicker xylem secondary cell wall and consequently improved wood density. These findings clearly implicate SuSy as a key regulator of sink strength in poplar trees and demonstrate the tight association of SuSy with cellulose synthesis and secondary wall formation.

  4. Dibutyltin-induced alterations of interleukin 1beta secretion from human immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shyretha; Tehrani, Shahin; Whalen, Margaret M

    2017-02-01

    Dibutyltin (DBT) is used to stabilize polyvinyl chloride plastics (including pipes that distribute drinking water) and as a de-worming agent in poultry. DBT is found in human blood, and DBT exposures alter the secretion of tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma from lymphocytes. Interleukin (IL)-1β is a proinflammatory cytokine that regulates cellular growth, tissue restoration and immune response regulation. IL-1β plays a role in increasing invasiveness of certain tumors. This study reveals that exposures to DBT (24 h, 48 h and 6 days) modify the secretion of IL-1β from increasingly reconstituted preparations of human immune cells (highly enriched human natural killer cells, monocyte-depleted [MD] peripheral blood mononuclear cells [PBMCs], PBMCs, granulocytes and a preparation combining both PBMCs and granulocytes). DBT altered IL-1β secretion from all cell preparations. Higher concentrations of DBT (5 and 2.5 μm) decreased the secretion of IL-1β, while lower concentrations of DBT (0.1 and 0.05 μm) increased the secretion of IL-1β. Selected signaling pathways were examined in MD-PBMCs to determine if they play a role in DBT-induced elevations of IL-1β secretion. Pathways examined were IL-1β converting enzyme (caspase 1), mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor kappa B. Caspase 1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways appear to be utilized by DBT in increasing IL-1β secretion. These results indicate that DBT alters IL-1β secretion from human immune cells in an ex. vivo system utilizing several IL-1β regulating signaling pathways. Thus, DBT may have the potential to alter IL-1β secretion in an in vivo system. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. WNT5A inhibits metastasis and alters splicing of Cd44 in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Jiang

    Full Text Available Wnt5a is a non-canonical signaling Wnt. Low expression of WNT5A is correlated with poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. The highly invasive breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and 4T1, express very low levels of WNT5A. To determine if enhanced expression of WNT5A would affect metastatic behavior, we generated WNT5A expressing cells from the 4T1 and MDA-MB-231 parental cell lines. WNT5A expressing cells demonstrated cobblestone morphology and reduced in vitro migration relative to controls. Cell growth was not altered. Metastasis to the lung via tail vein injection was reduced in the 4T1-WNT5A expressing cells relative to 4T1-vector controls. To determine the mechanism of WNT5A action on metastasis, we performed microarray and whole-transcriptome sequence analysis (RNA-seq to compare gene expression in 4T1-WNT5A and 4T1-vector cells. Analysis indicated highly significant alterations in expression of genes associated with cellular movement. Down-regulation of a subset of these genes, Mmp13, Nos2, Il1a, Cxcl2, and Lamb3, in WNT5A expressing cells was verified by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Significant differences in transcript splicing were also detected in cell movement associated genes including Cd44. Cd44 is an adhesion molecule with a complex genome structure. Variable exon usage is associated with metastatic phenotype. Alternative spicing of Cd44 in WNT5A expressing cells was confirmed using RT-PCR. We conclude that WNT5A inhibits metastasis through down-regulation of multiple cell movement pathways by regulating transcript levels and splicing of key genes like Cd44.

  6. Altered differentiation and paracrine stimulation of mammary epithelial cell proliferation by conditionally activated Smoothened.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visbal, Adriana P; LaMarca, Heather L; Villanueva, Hugo; Toneff, Michael J; Li, Yi; Rosen, Jeffrey M; Lewis, Michael T

    2011-04-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling network is critical for patterning and organogenesis in mammals, and has been implicated in a variety of cancers. Smoothened (Smo), the gene encoding the principal signal transducer, is overexpressed frequently in breast cancer, and constitutive activation in MMTV-SmoM2 transgenic mice caused alterations in mammary gland morphology, increased proliferation, and changes in stem/progenitor cell number. Both in transgenic mice and in clinical specimens, proliferative cells did not usually express detectable Smo, suggesting the hypothesis that Smo functioned in a non-cell autonomous manner to stimulate proliferation. Here, we employed a genetically tagged mouse model carrying a Cre-recombinase-dependent conditional allele of constitutively active Smo (SmoM2) to test this hypothesis. MMTV-Cre- or adenoviral-Cre-mediated SmoM2 expression in the luminal epithelium, but not in the myoepithelium, was required for the hyper-proliferative phenotypes. High levels of proliferation were observed in cells adjacent or in close-proximity to Smo expressing cells demonstrating that SmoM2 expressing cells were stimulating proliferation via a paracrine or juxtacrine mechanism. In contrast, Smo expression altered luminal cell differentiation in a cell-autonomous manner. SmoM2 expressing cells, purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) via the genetic fluorescent tag, expressed high levels of Ptch2, Gli1, Gli2, Jag2 and Dll-1, and lower levels of Notch4 and Hes6, in comparison to wildtype cells. These studies provide insight into the mechanism of Smo activation in the mammary gland and its possible roles in breast tumorigenesis. In addition, these results also have potential implications for the interpretation of proliferative phenotypes commonly observed in other organs as a consequence of hedgehog signaling activation.

  7. Multipronged functional proteomics approaches for global identification of altered cell signalling pathways in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Paula; Lorenzo, Seila; Dégano, Rosa M; Ibarrola, Nieves; González-González, María; Nieto, Wendy; Almeida, Julia; González, Marcos; Orfao, Alberto; Fuentes, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a malignant B cell disorder characterized by its high heterogeneity. Although genomic alterations have been broadly reported, protein studies are still in their early stages. Herein, a 224-antibody microarray has been employed to study the intracellular signalling pathways in a cohort of 14 newly diagnosed B-CLL patients as a preliminary study for further investigations. Several protein profiles were differentially identified across the cytogenetic and molecular alterations presented in the samples (deletion 13q14 and 17p13.1, trisomy 12, and NOTCH1 mutations) by a combination of affinity and MS/MS proteomics approaches. Among others altered cell signalling pathways, PKC family members were identified as down-regulated in nearly 75% of the samples tested with the antibody arrays. This might explain the rapid progression of the disease when showing p53, Rb1, or NOTCH1 mutations due to PKC-proteins family plays a critical role favouring the slowly progressive indolent behaviour of CLL. Additionally, the antibody microarray results were validated by a LC-MS/MS quantification strategy and compared to a transcriptomic CLL database. In summary, this research displays the usefulness of proteomic strategies to globally evaluate the protein alterations in CLL cells and select the possible biomarkers to be further studied with larger sample sizes.

  8. DNA ligase III promotes alternative nonhomologous end-joining during chromosomal translocation formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Deniz; Brunet, Erika; Wong, Sunnie Yan-Wai; Katyal, Sachin; Gao, Yankun; McKinnon, Peter J; Lou, Jacqueline; Zhang, Lei; Li, James; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Jasin, Maria

    2011-06-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the primary DNA repair pathway thought to underlie chromosomal translocations and other genomic rearrangements in somatic cells. The canonical NHEJ pathway, including DNA ligase IV (Lig4), suppresses genomic instability and chromosomal translocations, leading to the notion that a poorly defined, alternative NHEJ (alt-NHEJ) pathway generates these rearrangements. Here, we investigate the DNA ligase requirement of chromosomal translocation formation in mouse cells. Mammals have two other DNA ligases, Lig1 and Lig3, in addition to Lig4. As deletion of Lig3 results in cellular lethality due to its requirement in mitochondria, we used recently developed cell lines deficient in nuclear Lig3 but rescued for mitochondrial DNA ligase activity. Further, zinc finger endonucleases were used to generate DNA breaks at endogenous loci to induce translocations. Unlike with Lig4 deficiency, which causes an increase in translocation frequency, translocations are reduced in frequency in the absence of Lig3. Residual translocations in Lig3-deficient cells do not show a bias toward use of pre-existing microhomology at the breakpoint junctions, unlike either wild-type or Lig4-deficient cells, consistent with the notion that alt-NHEJ is impaired with Lig3 loss. By contrast, Lig1 depletion in otherwise wild-type cells does not reduce translocations or affect microhomology use. However, translocations are further reduced in Lig3-deficient cells upon Lig1 knockdown, suggesting the existence of two alt-NHEJ pathways, one that is biased toward microhomology use and requires Lig3 and a back-up pathway which does not depend on microhomology and utilizes Lig1.

  9. DNA ligase III promotes alternative nonhomologous end-joining during chromosomal translocation formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Simsek

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ is the primary DNA repair pathway thought to underlie chromosomal translocations and other genomic rearrangements in somatic cells. The canonical NHEJ pathway, including DNA ligase IV (Lig4, suppresses genomic instability and chromosomal translocations, leading to the notion that a poorly defined, alternative NHEJ (alt-NHEJ pathway generates these rearrangements. Here, we investigate the DNA ligase requirement of chromosomal translocation formation in mouse cells. Mammals have two other DNA ligases, Lig1 and Lig3, in addition to Lig4. As deletion of Lig3 results in cellular lethality due to its requirement in mitochondria, we used recently developed cell lines deficient in nuclear Lig3 but rescued for mitochondrial DNA ligase activity. Further, zinc finger endonucleases were used to generate DNA breaks at endogenous loci to induce translocations. Unlike with Lig4 deficiency, which causes an increase in translocation frequency, translocations are reduced in frequency in the absence of Lig3. Residual translocations in Lig3-deficient cells do not show a bias toward use of pre-existing microhomology at the breakpoint junctions, unlike either wild-type or Lig4-deficient cells, consistent with the notion that alt-NHEJ is impaired with Lig3 loss. By contrast, Lig1 depletion in otherwise wild-type cells does not reduce translocations or affect microhomology use. However, translocations are further reduced in Lig3-deficient cells upon Lig1 knockdown, suggesting the existence of two alt-NHEJ pathways, one that is biased toward microhomology use and requires Lig3 and a back-up pathway which does not depend on microhomology and utilizes Lig1.

  10. DNA ligase III promotes alternative nonhomologous end-joining during chromosomal translocation formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deniz Simsek

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ is the primary DNA repair pathway thought to underlie chromosomal translocations and other genomic rearrangements in somatic cells. The canonical NHEJ pathway, including DNA ligase IV (Lig4, suppresses genomic instability and chromosomal translocations, leading to the notion that a poorly defined, alternative NHEJ (alt-NHEJ pathway generates these rearrangements. Here, we investigate the DNA ligase requirement of chromosomal translocation formation in mouse cells. Mammals have two other DNA ligases, Lig1 and Lig3, in addition to Lig4. As deletion of Lig3 results in cellular lethality due to its requirement in mitochondria, we used recently developed cell lines deficient in nuclear Lig3 but rescued for mitochondrial DNA ligase activity. Further, zinc finger endonucleases were used to generate DNA breaks at endogenous loci to induce translocations. Unlike with Lig4 deficiency, which causes an increase in translocation frequency, translocations are reduced in frequency in the absence of Lig3. Residual translocations in Lig3-deficient cells do not show a bias toward use of pre-existing microhomology at the breakpoint junctions, unlike either wild-type or Lig4-deficient cells, consistent with the notion that alt-NHEJ is impaired with Lig3 loss. By contrast, Lig1 depletion in otherwise wild-type cells does not reduce translocations or affect microhomology use. However, translocations are further reduced in Lig3-deficient cells upon Lig1 knockdown, suggesting the existence of two alt-NHEJ pathways, one that is biased toward microhomology use and requires Lig3 and a back-up pathway which does not depend on microhomology and utilizes Lig1.

  11. Nicotine Alters the Proteome of Two Human Pancreatic Duct Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, Joao A

    2015-01-01

    Context Cigarette smoking is a known risk factor of pancreatic disease. Nicotine - a major cigarette tobacco component - can traffic through the circulatory system and may induce fibrosis and metastasis, hallmarks of chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic adenocarcinoma, respectively. However, at the biomolecular level, particularly in pancreatic research, the effects of nicotine remain unresolved. Methods The effects of nicotine on the proteomes of two pancreatic duct cell lines–an immortalized normal cell line (HPNE) and a cancer cell line (PanC1)- were investigated using mass spectrometry-based proteomics. For each cell line, the global proteomesof cells exposed to nicotine for 24 hrswere compared with untreated cells in triplicate using 6-plex tandem mass tag-based isobaric labeling techniques. Results Over 5,000 proteins were detectedper cell line. Of these, over 900 proteins were differentially abundant with statistical significance (corrected p-value <0.01) upon nicotine treatment, 57 of which were so in both cell lines. Amyloid precursor protein, previously observed to increase expression in pancreatic stellate cells when exposed to nicotine, was also up-regulated in both cell lines.In general, the two cell lines varied in the classes of proteins altered by nicotine treatment, supporting published evidence that nicotine may play different roles in the initiation and progression of pancreatic disease. Conclusions Understanding the underlying mechanisms associating nicotine with pancreatic function is paramount to intervention aiming to retard, arrest, or ameliorate pancreatic disease. PMID:25262714

  12. Structure and function of the DNA ligases encoded by the mammalian LIG3 gene

    OpenAIRE

    Tomkinson, Alan E.; Sallmyr, Annahita

    2013-01-01

    Among the mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases (LIG), the LIG3 gene is unique in that it encodes multiple DNA ligase polypeptides with different cellular functions. Notably, this nuclear gene encodes the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and so is essential for this organelle. In the nucleus, there is significant functional redundancy between DNA ligase IIIα and DNA ligase I in excision repair. In addition, DNA ligase IIIα is essential for DNA replication in the absence of the replicative DNA lig...

  13. A Family of Salmonella Virulence Factors Functions as a Distinct Class of Autoregulated E3 Ubiquitin Ligases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quezada, C.; Hicks, S; Galan, J; Stebbins, C

    2009-01-01

    Processes as diverse as receptor binding and signaling, cytoskeletal dynamics, and programmed cell death are manipulated by mimics of host proteins encoded by pathogenic bacteria. We show here that the Salmonella virulence factor SspH2 belongs to a growing class of bacterial effector proteins that harness and subvert the eukaryotic ubiquitination pathway. This virulence protein possesses ubiquitination activity that depends on a conserved cysteine residue. A crystal structure of SspH2 reveals a canonical leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain that interacts with a unique E{sub 3} ligase [which we have termed NEL for Novel E{sub 3} Ligase] C-terminal fold unrelated to previously observed HECT or RING-finger E{sub 3} ligases. Moreover, the LRR domain sequesters the catalytic cysteine residue contained in the NEL domain, and we suggest a mechanism for activation of the ligase requiring a substantial conformational change to release the catalytic domain for function. We also show that the N-terminal domain targets SspH2 to the apical plasma membrane of polarized epithelial cells and propose a model whereby binding of the LRR to proteins at the target site releases the ligase domain for site-specific function.

  14. A family of Salmonella virulence factors functions as a distinct class of autoregulated E3 ubiquitin ligases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada, Cindy M.; Hicks, Stuart W.; Galán, Jorge E.; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2009-01-01

    Processes as diverse as receptor binding and signaling, cytoskeletal dynamics, and programmed cell death are manipulated by mimics of host proteins encoded by pathogenic bacteria. We show here that the Salmonella virulence factor SspH2 belongs to a growing class of bacterial effector proteins that harness and subvert the eukaryotic ubiquitination pathway. This virulence protein possesses ubiquitination activity that depends on a conserved cysteine residue. A crystal structure of SspH2 reveals a canonical leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain that interacts with a unique E3 ligase [which we have termed NEL for Novel E3 Ligase] C-terminal fold unrelated to previously observed HECT or RING-finger E3 ligases. Moreover, the LRR domain sequesters the catalytic cysteine residue contained in the NEL domain, and we suggest a mechanism for activation of the ligase requiring a substantial conformational change to release the catalytic domain for function. We also show that the N-terminal domain targets SspH2 to the apical plasma membrane of polarized epithelial cells and propose a model whereby binding of the LRR to proteins at the target site releases the ligase domain for site-specific function. PMID:19273841

  15. TRAIP is a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase that protects genome stability after replication stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Saskia; Smedegaard, Stine; Nakamura, Kyosuke;

    2016-01-01

    , allowing cells to mitigate the threats to genome stability posed by replication stress. We identify the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRAIP as a new factor at active and stressed replication forks that directly interacts with PCNA via a conserved PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) box motif. We show that TRAIP promotes......Cellular genomes are highly vulnerable to perturbations to chromosomal DNA replication. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), the processivity factor for DNA replication, plays a central role as a platform for recruitment of genome surveillance and DNA repair factors to replication forks...... ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling in human cells by facilitating the generation of RPA-bound single-stranded DNA regions upon replication stress in a manner that critically requires its E3 ligase activity and is potentiated by the PIP box. Consequently, loss of TRAIP function leads to enhanced...

  16. MicroRNA and DNA methylation alterations mediating retinoic acid induced neuroblastoma cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Raymond L; Foley, Niamh H; Bray, Isabella M; Das, Sudipto; Buckley, Patrick G

    2011-10-01

    Many neuroblastoma cell lines can be induced to differentiate into a mature neuronal cell type with retinoic acid and other compounds, providing an important model system for elucidating signalling pathways involved in this highly complex process. Recently, it has become apparent that miRNAs, which act as regulators of gene expression at a post-transcriptional level, are differentially expressed in differentiating cells and play important roles governing many aspects of this process. This includes the down-regulation of DNA methyltransferases that cause the de-methylation and transcriptional activation of numerous protein coding gene sequences. The purpose of this article is to review involvement of miRNAs and DNA methylation alterations in the process of neuroblastoma cell differentiation. A thorough understanding of miRNA and genetic pathways regulating neuroblastoma cell differentiation potentially could lead to targeted therapies for this disease.

  17. Chlorpyrifos is estrogenic and alters embryonic hatching, cell proliferation and apoptosis in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kaimin; Li, Guochao; Feng, Weimin; Liu, Lili; Zhang, Jiayu; Wu, Wei; Xu, Lei; Yan, Yanchun

    2015-09-05

    The potential interference of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) on aquatic animals and humans has drawn wide attention in recent years. Reports have shown that some organophosphorus pesticides were a kind of EDCs, but their effects on fish species are still under research. In present study, flow cytometry data of HEC-1B cell line showed that chlorpyrifos (CPF) could increase cell proliferation index like 17β-estradiol (E2), but the effect of CPF was weaker than of E2 in the same concentration. Moreover, CPF altered the expression pattern of estrogen-responsive gene VTG and ERα in zebrafish embryos. When exposed to CPF at various concentrations (0, 0.10, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00mg/L) for 48h during the embryo stage, compared with controls, the hatching rate of treated groups significantly increased at the same time and the hatching rate of embryos was proportional to CPF concentration. The mRNA expression levels of c-myc, cyclin D1, Bax and Bcl-2, which are closely related to cell proliferation and cell apoptosis, were disturbed by CPF in zebrafish embryos after exposure treated for 48h. In addition, acridine orange (AO) staining of zebrafish embryos showed that cell apoptosis was appeared in the 0.75, 1.00mg/L CPF treated groups. Taken together, the results obtained in the present study indicated that chlorpyrifos is estrogenic and alters embryonic hatching, cell proliferation and apoptosis in zebrafish.

  18. Selective alterations of transcription factors in MPP+-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z; Cawthon, D; McCastlain, K A; Duhart, H M; Newport, G D; Fang, H; Patterson, T A; Slikker, W; Ali, S F

    2005-08-01

    MPP(+) (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium; the active metabolite of the neurotoxin MPTP (1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridine)) depletes dopamine (DA) content and elicits cell death in PC12 cells. However, the mechanism of MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity is still unclear. In this study, the dose response and time-course of MPP(+)-induced DA depletion and decreased cell viability were determined in nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells. The alteration of transcription factors (TFs) induced by MPP(+) from a selected dose level and time point was then evaluated using protein/DNA-binding arrays. K-means clustering analysis identified four patterns of protein/DNA-binding changes. Three of the 28 TFs identified in PC12 cells increased by 100% (p53, PRE, Smad SBE) and 2 decreased by 50% (HSE, RXR(DR1)) of control with MPP(+) treatment. In addition, three TFs decreased within the range of 33-50% (TFIID, E2F1, CREB) and two TFs increased within the range of 50-100% (PAX-5, Stat4). An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) was used to confirm the changes of p53 and HSE. The observed changes in TFs correlated with the alterations of DA and cell viability. The data indicates that selective transcription factors are involved in MPP(+)-induced neurotoxicity and it provides mechanistic information that may be applicable to animal studies with MPTP and clinical studies of Parkinson's disease.

  19. Valproate, thalidomide and ethyl alcohol alter the migration of HTR-8/SVneo cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rout Ujjwal K

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Valproate, thalidomide and alcohol (ethanol exposure during the first trimester of pregnancy is known to cause several developmental disorders. All these teratogens are known to pass the placental barrier and interfere directly with the normal development of the fetus. However, these teratogens also alter the formation and function of the placenta itself which may in turn affect the proper nourishment and development of the fetus. Optimum development of the placenta requires adequate invasion of trophoblast into the maternal uterine tissues. Changes in the migratory behavior of trophoblast by maternal exposure to these teratogens during placentogenesis may therefore alter the structure and function of the placenta. Methods In the present study, the effects of sodium valproate, thalidomide and alcohol on the migration of human first trimester trophoblast cell line (HTR-8/SVneo were examined in vitro. Cells were cultured in the wells of 48-well culture plates as mono or multilayers. Circular patches of cells were removed from the center of the wells by suction, and the migration of cells into the wound was studied using microscopy. Effects of low and high concentrations of valproate, thalidomide and alcohol were examined on the healing of wounds and on the migration rate of cells by determining the wound areas at 0, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h. Effects of drugs and alcohol on the proliferation and the expression levels of integrin subunits beta1 and alpha5 in cells were examined. Results The migration rates of trophoblast differed between wounds created in mono and multilayers of cells. Exposure to teratogens altered the migration of trophoblast into mono and multilayer wounds. The effects of valproate, thalidomide and alcohol on the proliferation of cells during the rapid migratory phase were mild. Drug exposure caused significant changes in the expression levels of beta1 and alpha5 integrin subunits. Conclusion Results suggest that

  20. Targeted alteration of real and imaginary refractive index of biological cells by histological staining

    OpenAIRE

    Cherkezyan, Lusik; Subramanian, Hariharan; Stoyneva, Valentina; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Yang, Seungmoo; Damania, Dhwanil; Taflove, Allen; Backman, Vadim

    2012-01-01

    Various staining techniques are commonly used in biomedical research to investigate cellular morphology. By inducing absorption of light, staining dyes change the intracellular refractive index due to the Kramers-Kronig relationship. We present a method for creating 2-D maps of real and imaginary refractive indices of stained biological cells using their thickness and absorptance. We validate our technique on dyed polystyrene microspheres and quantify the alteration in refractive index of sta...

  1. Alterations in the nuclear proteome of HIV-1 infected T-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeBoer, Jason [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Jagadish, Teena; Haverland, Nicole A. [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Neuroscience, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); Madson, Christian J. [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Ciborowski, Pawel [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Neuroscience, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); The Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln 68583 (United States); Belshan, Michael, E-mail: michaelbelshan@creighton.edu [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); The Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln 68583 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Virus infection of a cell involves the appropriation of host factors and the innate defensive response of the cell. The identification of proteins critical for virus replication may lead to the development of novel, cell-based inhibitors. In this study we mapped the changes in T-cell nuclei during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) at 20 hpi. Using a stringent data threshold, a total of 13 and 38 unique proteins were identified in infected and uninfected cells, respectively, across all biological replicates. An additional 15 proteins were found to be differentially regulated between infected and control nuclei. STRING analysis identified four clusters of protein–protein interactions in the data set related to nuclear architecture, RNA regulation, cell division, and cell homeostasis. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the differential expression of several proteins in both C8166-45 and Jurkat E6-1 T-cells. These data provide a map of the response in host cell nuclei upon HIV-1 infection. - Highlights: • We identify changes in the expression of nuclear proteins during HIV-1 infection. • 163 nuclear proteins were found differentially regulated during HIV-1 infection. • Bioinformatic analysis identified several nuclear pathways altered by HIV infection. • Candidate factors were validated in two independent cell lines.

  2. An altered endometrial CD8 tissue resident memory T cell population in recurrent miscarriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southcombe, J H; Mounce, G; McGee, K; Elghajiji, A; Brosens, J; Quenby, S; Child, T; Granne, I

    2017-01-23

    When trying to conceive 1% of couples have recurrent miscarriages, defined as three or more consecutive pregnancy losses. This is not accounted for by the known incidence of chromosomal aneuploidy in miscarriage, and it has been suggested that there is an immunological aetiology. The endometrial mucosa is populated by a variety of immune cells which in addition to providing host pathogen immunity must facilitate pregnancy. Here we characterise the endometrial CD8-T cell population during the embryonic window of implantation and find that the majority of cells are tissue resident memory T cells with high levels of CD69 and CD103 expression, proteins that prevent cells egress. We demonstrate that unexplained recurrent miscarriage is associated with significantly decreased expression of the T-cell co-receptor CD8 and tissue residency marker CD69. These cells differ from those found in control women, with less expression of CD127 indicating a lack of homeostatic cell control through IL-7 signalling. Nevertheless this population is resident in the endometrium of women who have RM, more than three months after the last miscarriage, indicating that the memory CD8-T cell population is altered in RM patients. This is the first evidence of a differing pre-pregnancy phenotype in endometrial immune cells in RM.

  3. Alterations of expression and regulation of transforming growth factor beta in human cancer prostate cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchère, M; Saunier, E; Mestayer, C; Broshuis, M; Mowszowicz, I

    2002-11-01

    TGF beta can promote and/or suppress prostate tumor growth through multiple and opposing actions. Alterations of its expression, secretion, regulation or of the sensitivity of target cells can lead to a favorable environment for tumor development. To gain a better insight in TGF beta function during cancer progression, we have used different cultured human prostate cells: preneoplastic PNT2 cells, the androgen-dependent LNCaP and the androgen-independent PC3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines. We have studied by specific ELISA assays in conditioned media (CM), the secretion of TGF beta 1 and TGF beta 2 in basal conditions and after hormonal treatment (DHT or E2) and the expression of TGF beta 1 mRNA by Northern blot. We have also compared the effect of fibroblast CM on TGF beta secretion by the different cell types. Compared to PNT2 cells, cancer cell lines secrete lower levels of active TGF beta which are not increased in the presence of fibroblast CM. LNCaP cells respond to androgen or estrogen treatment by a 10-fold increase of active TGF beta secretion while PC3 and DU145 are unresponsive. In conclusion, prostate cancer cell lines have lost part of their ability to secrete and activate TGF beta, and to regulate this secretion through stromal-epithelial interactions. Androgen-sensitive cancer cells may compensate this loss by hormonal regulation.

  4. The microenvironment of visceral adipose tissue and liver alter natural killer cell viability and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Melissa J; Fitzgerald, Vivienne; Doyle, Suzanne L; Channon, Shauna; Useckaite, Zivile; Gilmartin, Niamh; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Ravi, Narayanasamy; Reynolds, John V; Lysaght, Joanne

    2016-12-01

    The role of NK cells in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and liver inflammation in obesity is not fully understood. This study investigated the frequency, cytokine expression, chemokine receptor, and cytotoxicity receptor profile of NK cells in the blood, omentum, and liver of patients with the obesity-associated cancer, oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC). The effect of chronically inflamed tissue microenvironments on NK cell viability and function was also examined. We identified significantly lower NK cell frequencies in the liver of OAC patients compared with healthy controls and within the omentum and liver of OAC patients compared with blood, whereas IL-10-producing populations were significantly higher. Interestingly, our data suggest that reduced frequencies of NK cells in omentum and liver of OAC patients are not a result of impaired NK cell chemotaxis to these tissues. In fact, our functional data revealed that secreted factors from omentum and liver of OAC patients induce significant levels of NK cell death and lead to reduced percentages of TNF-α(+) and NKP46(+) NK cells and higher frequencies of IL-10-producing NK cells. Together, these data suggest that the omental and hepatic microenvironments of OAC patients alter the NK cell phenotype to a more anti-inflammatory homeostatic role. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  5. Extracellular vesicles released by CD40/IL-4-stimulated CLL cells confer altered functional properties to CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Dawn T; Apollonio, Benedetta; Willimott, Shaun; Lezina, Larissa; Alharthi, Afaf; Ambrose, Ashley R; De Rossi, Giulia; Ramsay, Alan G; Wagner, Simon D

    2016-07-28

    The complex interplay between cancer cells, stromal cells, and immune cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME) regulates tumorigenesis and provides emerging targets for immunotherapies. Crosstalk between CD4(+) T cells and proliferating chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) tumor B cells occurs within lymphoid tissue pseudofollicles, and investigating these interactions is essential to understand both disease pathogenesis and the effects of immunotherapy. Tumor-derived extracellular vesicle (EV) shedding is emerging as an important mode of intercellular communication in the TME. In order to characterize tumor EVs released in response to T-cell-derived TME signals, we performed microRNA (miRNA [miR]) profiling of EVs released from CLL cells stimulated with CD40 and interleukin-4 (IL-4). Our results reveal an enrichment of specific cellular miRNAs including miR-363 within EVs derived from CD40/IL-4-stimulated CLL cells compared with parental cell miRNA content and control EVs from unstimulated CLL cells. We demonstrate that autologous patient CD4(+) T cells internalize CLL-EVs containing miR-363 that targets the immunomodulatory molecule CD69. We further reveal that autologous CD4(+) T cells that are exposed to EVs from CD40/IL-4-stimulated CLL cells exhibit enhanced migration, immunological synapse signaling, and interactions with tumor cells. Knockdown of miR-363 in CLL cells prior to CD40/IL-4 stimulation prevented the ability of CLL-EVs to induce increased synapse signaling and confer altered functional properties to CD4(+) T cells. Taken together, these data reveal a novel role for CLL-EVs in modifying T-cell function that highlights unanticipated complexity of intercellular communication that may have implications for bidirectional CD4(+) T-cell:tumor interactions within the TME. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  6. Menstrual cycle distribution of uterine natural killer cells is altered in heavy menstrual bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas Shivhare, Sourima; Bulmer, Judith N; Innes, Barbara A; Hapangama, Dharani K; Lash, Gendie E

    2015-11-01

    Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) affects 30% of women of reproductive age and significantly interferes with quality of life. Altered endometrial vascular maturation has been reported in HMB and recurrent miscarriage, the latter associated with increased uterine natural killer (uNK) cell numbers. This study compared endometrial leukocyte populations in controls and women with HMB. Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded endometrial biopsies from controls (without endometrial pathology) and HMB were immunostained for CD14 (macrophages), CD56 (uNK cells), CD83 (dendritic cells), FOXP3 (regulatory T cells/Tregs), CD3 and CD8 (T cells). Leukocyte numbers were analysed as a percentage of total stromal cells in five randomly selected fields of view in the stratum functionalis of each sample. In control women across the menstrual cycle, 2-8% of total stromal cells were CD3(+) cells, 2-4% were CD8(+) T cells and 6-8% were CD14(+) macrophages. Compared with controls, CD3(+) cells were reduced during the mid-secretory phase (4%, P<0.01) and increased in the late secretory phase (12%, P=0.01) in HMB. CD83(+) dendritic cells and FOXP3(+) Tregs were scarce throughout the menstrual cycle in both groups. In controls, 2% of stromal cells in proliferative endometrium were CD56(+) uNK cells, increasing to 17% during the late secretory phase. In HMB, CD56(+) uNK cells were increased in the proliferative (5%, P<0.01) and early secretory (4%, P<0.02) phases, but reduced (10%, P<0.01) in the late secretory phase. This study demonstrates dysregulation of uNK cells in HMB, the functional consequence of which may have an impact on endometrial vascular development and/or endometrial preparation for menstruation.

  7. Origin and diversification of TRIM ubiquitin ligases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Marín

    Full Text Available Most proteins of the TRIM family (also known as RBCC family are ubiquitin ligases that share a peculiar protein structure, characterized by including an N-terminal RING finger domain closely followed by one or two B-boxes. Additional protein domains found at their C termini have been used to classify TRIM proteins into classes. TRIMs are involved in multiple cellular processes and many of them are essential components of the innate immunity system of animal species. In humans, it has been shown that mutations in several TRIM-encoding genes lead to diverse genetic diseases and contribute to several types of cancer. They had been hitherto detected only in animals. In this work, by comprehensively analyzing the available diversity of TRIM and TRIM-like protein sequences and evaluating their evolutionary patterns, an improved classification of the TRIM family is obtained. Members of one of the TRIM subfamilies defined, called Subfamily A, turn to be present not only in animals, but also in many other eukaryotes, such as fungi, apusozoans, alveolates, excavates and plants. The rest of subfamilies are animal-specific and several of them originated only recently. Subfamily A proteins are characterized by containing a MATH domain, suggesting a potential evolutionary connection between TRIM proteins and a different type of ubiquitin ligases, known as TRAFs, which contain quite similar MATH domains. These results indicate that the TRIM family emerged much earlier than so far thought and contribute to our understanding of its origin and diversification. The structural and evolutionary links with the TRAF family of ubiquitin ligases can be experimentally explored to determine whether functional connections also exist.

  8. E3 ubiquitin ligases Pellinos as regulators of pattern recognition receptor signaling and immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedev, Andrei E; Murphy, Michael; Zhou, Hao; Li, Xiaoxia

    2015-07-01

    Pellinos are a family of E3 ubiquitin ligases discovered for their role in catalyzing K63-linked polyubiquitination of Pelle, an interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor-associated kinase homolog in the Drosophila Toll pathway. Subsequent studies have revealed the central and non-redundant roles of mammalian Pellino-1, Pellino-2, and Pelino-3 in signaling pathways emanating from IL-1 receptors, Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors, T- and B-cell receptors. While Pellinos ability to interact with many signaling intermediates suggested their scaffolding roles, recent findings in mice expressing ligase-inactive Pellinos demonstrated the importance of Pellino ubiquitin ligase activity. Cell-specific functions of Pellinos have emerged, e.g. Pellino-1 being a negative regulator in T lymphocytes and a positive regulator in myeloid cells, and details of molecular regulation of receptor signaling by various members of the Pellino family have been revealed. In this review, we summarize current information about Pellino-mediated regulation of signaling by pattern recognition receptors, T-cell and B-cell receptors and tumor necrosis factor receptors, and discuss Pellinos roles in sepsis and infectious diseases, as well as in autoimmune, inflammatory, and allergic disorders. We also provide our perspective on the potential of targeting Pellinos with peptide- or small molecule-based drug compounds as a new therapeutic approach for septic shock and autoimmune pathologies.

  9. Novel E3 ubiquitin ligases that regulate histone protein levels in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Singh

    Full Text Available Core histone proteins are essential for packaging the genomic DNA into chromatin in all eukaryotes. Since multiple genes encode these histone proteins, there is potential for generating more histones than what is required for chromatin assembly. The positively charged histones have a very high affinity for negatively charged molecules such as DNA, and any excess of histone proteins results in deleterious effects on genomic stability and cell viability. Hence, histone levels are known to be tightly regulated via transcriptional, posttranscriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. We have previously elucidated the posttranslational regulation of histone protein levels by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway involving the E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzymes Ubc4/5 and the HECT (Homologous to E6-AP C-Terminus domain containing E3 ligase Tom1 in the budding yeast. Here we report the identification of four additional E3 ligases containing the RING (Really Interesting New Gene finger domains that are involved in the ubiquitylation and subsequent degradation of excess histones in yeast. These E3 ligases are Pep5, Snt2 as well as two previously uncharacterized Open Reading Frames (ORFs YKR017C and YDR266C that we have named Hel1 and Hel2 (for Histone E3 Ligases respectively. Mutants lacking these E3 ligases are sensitive to histone overexpression as they fail to degrade excess histones and accumulate high levels of endogenous histones on histone chaperones. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that these E3 ligases interact with the major E2 enzyme Ubc4 that is involved in the degradation related ubiquitylation of histones. Using mutagenesis we further demonstrate that the RING domains of Hel1, Hel2 and Snt2 are required for histone regulation. Lastly, mutants corresponding to Hel1, Hel2 and Pep5 are sensitive to replication inhibitors. Overall, our results highlight the importance of posttranslational histone regulatory mechanisms that employ multiple E3

  10. Loss of caveolin-1 causes blood-retinal barrier breakdown, venous enlargement, and mural cell alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaowu; Fliesler, Steven J; Zhao, You-Yang; Stallcup, William B; Cohen, Alex W; Elliott, Michael H

    2014-02-01

    Blood-retinal barrier (BRB) breakdown and related vascular changes are implicated in several ocular diseases. The molecules and mechanisms regulating BRB integrity and pathophysiology are not fully elucidated. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) ablation results in loss of caveolae and microvascular pathologies, but the role of Cav-1 in the retina is largely unknown. We examined BRB integrity and vasculature in Cav-1 knockout mice and found a significant increase in BRB permeability, compared with wild-type controls, with branch veins being frequent sites of breakdown. Vascular hyperpermeability occurred without apparent alteration in junctional proteins. Such hyperpermeability was not rescued by inhibiting eNOS activity. Veins of Cav-1 knockout retinas exhibited additional pathological features, including i) eNOS-independent enlargement, ii) altered expression of mural cell markers (eg, down-regulation of NG2 and up-regulation of αSMA), and iii) dramatic alterations in mural cell phenotype near the optic nerve head. We observed a significant NO-dependent increase in retinal artery diameter in Cav-1 knockout mice, suggesting that Cav-1 plays a role in autoregulation of resistance vessels in the retina. These findings implicate Cav-1 in maintaining BRB integrity in retinal vasculature and suggest a previously undefined role in the retinal venous system and associated mural cells. Our results are relevant to clinically significant retinal disorders with vascular pathologies, including diabetic retinopathy, uveoretinitis, and primary open-angle glaucoma.

  11. Characteristics of nobiletin-mediated alteration of gene expression in cultured cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Kiyomitsu, E-mail: nemoto@u-shizuoka-ken.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Ikeda, Ayaka; Yoshida, Chiaki; Kimura, Junko; Mori, Junki [Department of Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Fujiwara, Hironori [Department of Anti-Dementia Functional Food Development, Research Center of Supercritical Fluid Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-7 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Yokosuka, Akihito; Mimaki, Yoshihiro [Department of Medicinal Pharmacognosy, School of Pharmacy, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Sciences, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji 192-0392 (Japan); Ohizumi, Yasushi [Department of Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan); Department of Anti-Dementia Functional Food Development, Research Center of Supercritical Fluid Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-7 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Laboratory of Kampo Medicines, Yokohama College of Pharmacy, 601 Matano-cho, Totsuka-ku, Yokohama 245-0066 (Japan); Degawa, Masakuni [Department of Molecular Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Shizuoka, 52-1 Yada, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8526 (Japan)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Nobiletin-mediated alterations of gene expression were examined with DNA microarrays. ► Three organ-derived cell lines were treated with 100 μM nobiletin for 24 h. ► In all cell lines, 3 endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes were up-regulated. ► Some cell cycle-regulating and oxidative stress-promoting genes were down-regulated. ► These alterations may contribute to nobiletin-mediated biological effects. -- Abstract: Nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavonoid that is highly contained in the peels of citrus fruits, exerts a wide variety of beneficial effects, including anti-proliferative effects in cancer cells, repressive effects in hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia, and ameliorative effects in dementia at in vitro and in vivo levels. In the present study, to further understand the mechanisms of these actions of nobiletin, the nobiletin-mediated alterations of gene expression in three organ-derived cell lines – 3Y1 rat fibroblasts, HuH-7 human hepatocarcinoma cells, and SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells – were first examined with DNA microarrays. In all three cell lines, treatments with nobiletin (100 μM) for 24 h resulted in more than 200% increases in the expression levels of five genes, including the endoplasmic reticulum stress-responsive genes Ddit3, Trib3, and Asns, and in less than 50% decreases in the expression levels of seven genes, including the cell cycle-regulating genes Ccna2, Ccne2, and E2f8 and the oxidative stress-promoting gene Txnip. It was also confirmed that in each nobiletin-treated cell line, the levels of the DDIT3 (DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3, also known as CHOP and GADD153) and ASNS (asparagine synthetase) proteins were increased, while the level of the TXNIP (thioredoxin-interacting protein, also known as VDUP1 and TBP-2) protein was decreased. All these findings suggest that nobiletin exerts a wide variety of biological effects, at least partly, through induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress and

  12. Molecular and immunological characterization of DNA ligase IV deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinqiu; Tang, Wenjing; An, Yunfei; Tang, Maozhi; Wu, Junfeng; Qin, Tao; Zhao, Xiaodong

    2016-02-01

    DNA ligase IV (LIG4) deficiency is an extremely rare autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disease caused by the LIG4 mutation. To date, fewer than 30 cases of patients have been reported worldwide. No reversion mutations have been previously identified in LIG4. This study enrolled seven Chinese patients with LIG4 deficiency who presented with combined immunodeficiency, microcephaly, and growth retardation. One patient (P1) acquired non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Four patients had impaired T cell proliferation function and skewed T cell receptor diversity. Five novel mutations in LIG4 and a potential hotspot mutation (c.833G>T; p.R278L) in the Chinese population were identified. TA cloning analysis of T cells, NK cells, granulocytes, and oral mucosa cells in P6 revealed wild-type clones and clones that contained both maternally and paternally inherited mutations, indicating possible somatic reversion which need further investigation since no functional or protein assays were possible for all the patients died and no cell lines were available.

  13. Oestradiol and progesterone differentially alter cytoskeletal protein expression and flame cell morphology in Taenia crassiceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Javier R; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Palacios-Arreola, M Isabel; Ruíz-Rosado, Azucena; Sánchez-Orellana, Pedro L; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Nava-Castro, Karen E; Martínez-Velázquez, Nancy; Escobedo, Galileo; Ibarra-Coronado, Elizabeth G; Valverde-Islas, Laura; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2014-09-01

    We examined the effects of oestradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) on cytoskeletal protein expression in the helminth Taenia crassiceps - specifically actin, tubulin and myosin. These proteins assemble into flame cells, which constitute the parasite excretory system. Total protein extracts were obtained from E2- and P4-treated T. crassiceps cysticerci and untreated controls, and analysed by one- and two-dimensional protein electrophoresis, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and videomicroscopy. Exposure of T. crassiceps cysticerci to E2 and P4 induced differential protein expression patterns compared with untreated controls. Changes in actin, tubulin and myosin expression were confirmed by flow cytometry of parasite cells and immunofluorescence. In addition, parasite morphology was altered in response to E2 and P4 versus controls. Flame cells were primarily affected at the level of the ciliary tuft, in association with the changes in actin, tubulin and myosin. We conclude that oestradiol and progesterone act directly on T. crassiceps cysticerci, altering actin, tubulin and myosin expression and thus affecting the assembly and function of flame cells. Our results increase our understanding of several aspects of the molecular crosstalk between host and parasite, which might be useful in designing anthelmintic drugs that exclusively impair parasitic proteins which mediate cell signaling and pathogenic reproduction and establishment.

  14. Positional and expressive alteration of prohibitin during the induced differentiation of human hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Hui Xu; Jian Tang; Qi-Fu Li; Song-Lin Shi; Xiang-Feng Chen; Ying Liang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To explore the existence and distribution of prohibitin (PHB) in nuclear matrix and its co-localization with products of some related genes during the differentiation of human hepatocarcinoma SMMC-7721cells.METHODS: The nuclear matrix of the SHHC-7721 cells cultured with or without 5 x 10-3 mmol/L hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA) was selectively extracted.Western blot was used to analyze the expression of PHB in nuclear matrix; imrnunofluorescence microscope observation was used to analyze the distribution of PHB in cell. LCSM was used to observe the co-localization of PHB with products of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.RESULTS: Western blot analysis showed that PHB existed in the composition of nuclear matrix proteins and was down-regulated by HMBA treatment.Immunofluorescence observation revealed that PHB existed in the nuclear matrix, and its distribution regions and expression levels were altered after HMBA treatment. Laser scanning confocal microscopy revealed the co-localization between PHB and the products of oncogenes or tumor repression genes including c-fos, c-myc, p53 and Rb and its alteration of distributive area in the cells treated by HMBA.CONCLUSION: These data confirm that PHB is a nuclear matrix protein, which is located in the nuclear matrix, and the distribution and expression of PHB and its relation with associated genes may play significant roles during the differentiation of SMHC-7721 cells.

  15. Low oxygen alters mitochondrial function and response to oxidative stress in human neural progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury M. Lages

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen concentration should be carefully regulated in all living tissues, beginning at the early embryonic stages. Unbalances in oxygen regulation can lead to cell death and disease. However, to date, few studies have investigated the consequences of variations in oxygen levels for fetal-like cells. Therefore, in the present work, human neural progenitor cells (NPCs derived from pluripotent stem cells grown in 3% oxygen (v/v were compared with NPCs cultured in 21% (v/v oxygen. Low oxygen concentrations altered the mitochondrial content and oxidative functions of the cells, which led to improved ATP production, while reducing generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. NPCs cultured in both conditions showed no differences in proliferation and glucose metabolism. Furthermore, antioxidant enzymatic activity was not altered in NPCs cultured in 3% oxygen under normal conditions, however, when exposed to external agents known to induce oxidative stress, greater susceptibility to DNA damage was observed. Our findings indicate that the management of oxygen levels should be considered for in vitro models of neuronal development and drug screening.

  16. Adhesion defective BHK cell mutant has cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan of altered properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Austria, R; Woods, A;

    1988-01-01

    In the light of accumulating data that implicate cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) with a role in cell interactions with extracellular matrix molecules such as fibronectin, we have compared the properties of these molecules in wild-type BHK cells and an adhesion-defective ricin......-resistant mutant (RicR14). Our results showed that the mutant, unlike BHK cells, cannot form focal adhesions when adherent to planar substrates in the presence of serum. Furthermore, while both cell lines possess similar amounts of cell surface HSPG with hydrophobic properties, that of RicR14 cells had decreased...

  17. Phenotypic alterations in breast cancer cells overexpressing the nuclear receptor co-activator AIB1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azorsa David O

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen signaling plays a critical role in a number of normal physiological processes and has important implications in the treatment of breast cancer. The p160 nuclear receptor coactivator, AIB1 (amplified in breast cancer 1, is frequently amplified and overexpressed in human breast cancer and has been shown to enhance estrogen-dependent transactivation. Methods To better understand the molecular and physiological consequences of AIB1 overexpression in breast cancer cells, an AIB1 cDNA was transfected into the low AIB1 expressing, estrogen-receptor (ER negative breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-436. The features of a derivative cell line, designated 436.1, which expresses high levels of AIB1, are described and compared with the parental cell line. Results A significant increase in the levels of CREB binding protein (CBP was observed in 436.1 cells and immunofluorescent staining revealed altered AIB1 and CBP staining patterns compared to the parental cells. Further, transient transfection assays demonstrated that the overall estrogen-dependent transactivation in 436.1 cells is approximately 20-fold higher than the parental cells and the estrogen dose-response curve is repositioned to the right. Finally, cDNA microarray analysis of approximately 7,100 cDNAs identified a number of differentially expressed genes in the 436.1 cells. Conclusion These observations lend insight into downstream signaling pathways that are influenced by AIB1.

  18. Altered global gene expression profiles in human gastrointestinal epithelial Caco2 cells exposed to nanosilver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saura C. Sahu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive consumer exposure to food- and cosmetics-related consumer products containing nanosilver is of public safety concern. Therefore, there is a need for suitable in vitro models and sensitive predictive rapid screening methods to assess their toxicity. Toxicogenomic profile showing subtle changes in gene expressions following nanosilver exposure is a sensitive toxicological endpoint for this purpose. We evaluated the Caco2 cells and global gene expression profiles as tools for predictive rapid toxicity screening of nanosilver. We evaluated and compared the gene expression profiles of Caco-2 cells exposed to 20 nm and 50 nm nanosilver at a concentration 2.5 μg/ml. The global gene expression analysis of Caco2 cells exposed to 20 nm nanosilver showed that a total of 93 genes were altered at 4 h exposure, out of which 90 genes were up-regulated and 3 genes were down-regulated. The 24 h exposure of 20 nm silver altered 15 genes in Caco2 cells, out of which 14 were up-regulated and one was down-regulated. The most pronounced changes in gene expression were detected at 4 h. The greater size (50 nm nanosilver at 4 h exposure altered more genes by more different pathways than the smaller (20 nm one. Metallothioneins and heat shock proteins were highly up-regulated as a result of exposure to both the nanosilvers. The cellular pathways affected by the nanosilver exposure is likely to lead to increased toxicity. The results of our study presented here suggest that the toxicogenomic characterization of Caco2 cells is a valuable in vitro tool for assessing toxicity of nanomaterials such as nanosilver.

  19. Restricted maternal nutrition alters myogenic regulatory factor expression in satellite cells of ovine offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, J S; Hoffman, M L; Govoni, K E; Zinn, S A; Reed, S A

    2016-07-01

    Poor maternal nutrition inhibits muscle development and postnatal muscle growth. Satellite cells are myogenic precursor cells that contribute to postnatal muscle growth, and their activity can be evaluated by the expression of several transcription factors. Paired-box (Pax)7 is expressed in quiescent and active satellite cells. MyoD is expressed in activated and proliferating satellite cells and myogenin is expressed in terminally differentiating cells. Disruption in the expression pattern or timing of expression of myogenic regulatory factors negatively affects muscle development and growth. We hypothesized that poor maternal nutrition during gestation would alter the in vitro temporal expression of MyoD and myogenin in satellite cells from offspring at birth and 3 months of age. Ewes were fed 100% or 60% of NRC requirements from day 31±1.3 of gestation. Lambs from control-fed (CON) or restricted-fed (RES) ewes were euthanized within 24 h of birth (birth; n=5) or were fed a control diet until 3 months of age (n=5). Satellite cells isolated from the semitendinosus muscle were used for gene expression analysis or cultured for 24, 48 or 72 h and immunostained for Pax7, MyoD or myogenin. Fusion index was calculated from a subset of cells allowed to differentiate. Compared with CON, temporal expression of MyoD and myogenin was altered in cultured satellite cells isolated from RES lambs at birth. The percent of cells expressing MyoD was greater in RES than CON (P=0.03) after 24 h in culture. After 48 h of culture, there was a greater percent of cells expressing myogenin in RES compared with CON (P0.05). In satellite cells from RES lambs at 3 months of age, the percent of cells expressing MyoD and myogenin were greater than CON after 72 h in culture (Psatellite cells of the offspring, which may reduce the pool of myoblasts, decrease myoblast fusion and contribute to the poor postnatal muscle growth previously observed in these animals.

  20. Systemic Sclerosis Patients Present Alterations in the Expression of Molecules Involved in B-Cell Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Lilian; Ferrier, Ashley; Aravena, Octavio; Fonseca, Elianet; Berendsen, Jorge; Biere, Andrea; Bueno, Daniel; Ramos, Verónica; Aguillón, Juan Carlos; Catalán, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The activation threshold of B cells is tightly regulated by an array of inhibitory and activator receptors in such a way that disturbances in their expression can lead to the appearance of autoimmunity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of activating and inhibitory molecules involved in the modulation of B cell functions in transitional, naive, and memory B-cell subpopulations from systemic sclerosis patients. To achieve this, blood samples were drawn from 31 systemic sclerosis patients and 53 healthy individuals. Surface expression of CD86, MHC II, CD19, CD21, CD40, CD22, Siglec 10, CD35, and FcγRIIB was determined by flow cytometry. IL-10 production was evaluated by intracellular flow cytometry from isolated B cells. Soluble IL-6 and IL-10 levels were measured by ELISA from supernatants of stimulated B cells. Systemic sclerosis patients exhibit an increased frequency of transitional and naive B cells related to memory B cells compared with healthy controls. Transitional and naive B cells from patients express higher levels of CD86 and FcγRIIB than healthy donors. Also, B cells from patients show high expression of CD19 and CD40, whereas memory cells from systemic sclerosis patients show reduced expression of CD35. CD19 and CD35 expression levels associate with different autoantibody profiles. IL-10(+) B cells and secreted levels of IL-10 were markedly reduced in patients. In conclusion, systemic sclerosis patients show alterations in the expression of molecules involved in B-cell regulation. These abnormalities may be determinant in the B-cell hyperactivation observed in systemic sclerosis.

  1. Systemic sclerosis patients present alterations in the expression of molecules involved in B cell regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian eSoto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The activation threshold of B cells is tightly regulated by an array of inhibitory and activator receptors, in such a way that disturbances in their expression can lead to the appearance of autoimmunity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of activating and inhibitory molecules involved in the modulation of B cell functions in transitional, naïve and memory B cell sub-populations from systemic sclerosis patients. To achieve this, blood samples were drawn from thirty one systemic sclerosis patients and fifty three healthy individuals. Surface expression of CD86, MHC II, CD19, CD21, CD40, CD22, Siglec 10, CD35, and FcgammaRIIB was determined by flow cytometry. IL-10 production was evaluated by intracellular flow cytometry from isolated B cells. Soluble IL-6 and IL-10 levels were measured by ELISA from supernatants of stimulated B cells. Systemic sclerosis patients exhibit an increased frequency of transitional and naïve B cells related to memory B cells, compared to healthy controls. Transitional and naïve B cells from patients express higher levels of CD86 and FcgammaRIIB than healthy donors. Also, B cells from patients show high expression of CD19 and CD40, while memory cells from systemic sclerosis patients show reduced expression of CD35. CD19 and CD35 expression levels associate to different autoantibody profiles. IL-10+ B cells and secreted levels of IL-10 were markedly reduced in patients. In conclusion, systemic sclerosis patients show alterations in the expression of molecules involved in B cell regulation. These abnormalities may be determinant in the B cell hyperactivation observed in systemic sclerosis.

  2. Microgravity-induced alterations in signal transduction in cells of the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulsen, Katrin; Thiel, Cora; Timm, Johanna; Schmidt, Peter M.; Huber, Kathrin; Tauber, Svantje; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Seibt, Dieter; Kroll, Hartmut; Grote, Karl-Heinrich; Zipp, Frauke; Schneider-Stock, Regine; Cogoli, Augusto; Hilliger, Andre; Engelmann, Frank; Ullrich, Oliver

    2010-11-01

    Since decades it is known that the activity of cells of the immune system is severely dysregulated in microgravity, however, the underlying molecular aspects have not been elucidated yet. The identification of gravity-sensitive molecular mechanisms in cells of the immune system is an important and indispensable prerequisite for the development of counteractive measures to prevent or treat disturbed immune cell function of astronauts during long-term space missions. Moreover, their sensitivity to altered gravity renders immune cells an ideal model system to understand if and how gravity on Earth is required for normal mammalian cell function and signal transduction. We investigated the effect of simulated weightlessness (2D clinostat) and of real microgravity (parabolic flights) on key signal pathways in a human monocytic and a T lymphocyte cell line. We found that cellular responses to microgravity strongly depend on the cell-type and the conditions in which the cells are subjected to microgravity. In Jurkat T cells, enhanced phosphorylation of the MAP kinases ERK-1/2, MEK and p38 and inhibition of nuclear translocation of NF-kB were the predominant responses to simulated weightlessness, in either stimulated or non-stimulated cells. In contrast, non-stimulated monocytic U937 cells responded to simulated weightlessness with enhanced overall tyrosine-phosphorylation and activation of c-jun, whereas PMA-stimulated U937 cells responded the opposite way with reduced tyrosine-phosphorylation and reduced activation of c-jun, compared with PMA-stimulated 1 g controls. P53 protein was phosphorylated rapidly in microgravity. The identification of gravi-sensitive mechanisms in cells of the immune system will not only enable us to understand and prevent the negative effects of long time exposure to microgravity on Astronauts, but could also lead to novel therapeutic targets in general.

  3. Purification of histidine-tagged T4 RNA ligase from E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing S; Unrau, Peter J

    2002-12-01

    Here we report the construction of a histidine-tagged T4 RNA ligase expression plasmid (pRHT4). The construct, when overexpressed in BL21 (DE3) cells, allows the preparation of large quantities of T4 RNA ligase in high purity using only a single purification column. The histidine affinity tag does not inhibit enzyme function, and we were able to purify 1-3 mg pure protein/g cell pellet. A simple purification procedure ensures that the enzyme is de-adenylated to levels comparable to those found for many commercial preparations. The purified protein has very low levels of RNase contamination and functioned normally in a variety of activity assays.

  4. Overexpression of a soybean ariadne-like ubiquitin ligase gene GmARI1 enhances aluminum tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolian Zhang

    Full Text Available Ariadne (ARI subfamily of RBR (Ring Between Ring fingers proteins have been found as a group of putative E3 ubiquitin ligases containing RING (Really Interesting New Gene finger domains in fruitfly, mouse, human and Arabidopsis. Recent studies showed several RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligases play important roles in plant response to abiotic stresses, but the function of ARI in plants is largely unknown. In this study, an ariadne-like E3 ubiquitin ligase gene was isolated from soybean, Glycine max (L. Merr., and designated as GmARI1. It encodes a predicted protein of 586 amino acids with a RBR supra-domain. Subcellular localization studies using Arabidopsis protoplast cells indicated GmARI protein was located in nucleus. The expression of GmARI1 in soybean roots was induced as early as 2-4 h after simulated stress treatments such as aluminum, which coincided with the fact of aluminum toxicity firstly and mainly acting on plant roots. In vitro ubiquitination assay showed GmARI1 protein has E3 ligase activity. Overexpression of GmARI1 significantly enhanced the aluminum tolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis. These findings suggest that GmARI1 encodes a RBR type E3 ligase, which may play important roles in plant tolerance to aluminum stress.

  5. Overexpression of a soybean ariadne-like ubiquitin ligase gene GmARI1 enhances aluminum tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaolian; Wang, Ning; Chen, Pei; Gao, Mengmeng; Liu, Juge; Wang, Yufeng; Zhao, Tuanjie; Li, Yan; Gai, Junyi

    2014-01-01

    Ariadne (ARI) subfamily of RBR (Ring Between Ring fingers) proteins have been found as a group of putative E3 ubiquitin ligases containing RING (Really Interesting New Gene) finger domains in fruitfly, mouse, human and Arabidopsis. Recent studies showed several RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligases play important roles in plant response to abiotic stresses, but the function of ARI in plants is largely unknown. In this study, an ariadne-like E3 ubiquitin ligase gene was isolated from soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., and designated as GmARI1. It encodes a predicted protein of 586 amino acids with a RBR supra-domain. Subcellular localization studies using Arabidopsis protoplast cells indicated GmARI protein was located in nucleus. The expression of GmARI1 in soybean roots was induced as early as 2-4 h after simulated stress treatments such as aluminum, which coincided with the fact of aluminum toxicity firstly and mainly acting on plant roots. In vitro ubiquitination assay showed GmARI1 protein has E3 ligase activity. Overexpression of GmARI1 significantly enhanced the aluminum tolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis. These findings suggest that GmARI1 encodes a RBR type E3 ligase, which may play important roles in plant tolerance to aluminum stress.

  6. F-cell levels are altered with erythrocyte density in sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sumanta; Dash, Bisnu Prasad; Patel, Dilip Kumar; Chakravarty, Sudipa; Chakravarty, Amit; Banerjee, Debashis; Chakrabarti, Abhijit

    2011-08-15

    Lighter cells from density fractionated erythrocytes of sickle cell disease (SCD) patients carry higher amount of externalized phosphatidylserine (PS) and cell surface glycophorins compared to the denser counterparts. Further analysis also revealed that the denser cells contained higher levels of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) compared to the lighter cells, supported by the presence of larger number of F-cells in these populations. In this report, we have found direct evidence on the higher survival of the HbF rich erythrocytes in SCD.

  7. Tyrosine phosphorylation of NEDD4 activates its ubiquitin ligase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persaud, Avinash; Alberts, Philipp; Mari, Sara; Tong, Jiefei; Murchie, Ryan; Maspero, Elena; Safi, Frozan; Moran, Michael F; Polo, Simona; Rotin, Daniela

    2014-10-07

    Ligand binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor 1 (FGFR1) causes dimerization and activation by transphosphorylation of tyrosine residues in the kinase domain. FGFR1 is ubiquitylated by the E3 ligase NEDD4 (also known as NEDD4-1), which promotes FGFR1 internalization and degradation. Although phosphorylation of FGFR1 is required for NEDD4-dependent endocytosis, NEDD4 directly binds to a nonphosphorylated region of FGFR1. We found that activation of FGFR1 led to activation of c-Src kinase-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of NEDD4, enhancing the ubiquitin ligase activity of NEDD4. Using mass spectrometry, we identified several FGF-dependent phosphorylated tyrosines in NEDD4, including Tyr(43) in the C2 domain and Tyr(585) in the HECT domain. Mutating these tyrosines to phenylalanine to prevent phosphorylation inhibited FGF-dependent NEDD4 activity and FGFR1 endocytosis and enhanced cell proliferation. Mutating the tyrosines to glutamic acid to mimic phosphorylation enhanced NEDD4 activity. Moreover, the NEDD4 C2 domain bound the HECT domain, and the presence of phosphomimetic mutations inhibited this interaction, suggesting that phosphorylation of NEDD4 relieves an inhibitory intra- or intermolecular interaction. Accordingly, activation of FGFR1 was not required for activation of NEDD4 that lacked its C2 domain. Activation of c-Src by epidermal growth factor (EGF) also promoted tyrosine phosphorylation and enhanced the activity of NEDD4. Thus, we identified a feedback mechanism by which receptor tyrosine kinases promote catalytic activation of NEDD4 and that may represent a mechanism of receptor crosstalk.

  8. KF-1 ubiquitin ligase: an anxiety suppressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamotsu Hashimoto-Gotoh

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety is an instinct that may have developed to promote adaptive survival by evading unnecessary danger. However, excessive anxiety is disruptive and can be a basic disorder of other psychiatric diseases such as depression. The KF-1, a ubiquitin ligase located to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, may prevent excessive anxiety; kf-1−/− mice exhibit selectively elevated anxiety-like behavior against light or heights. Thus, KF-1 may degrade some target proteins, responsible for promoting anxiety, through the ER-associated degradation pathway, similar to Parkin in Parkinson's disease (PD. Parkin, another ER-ubiquitin ligase, prevents the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons by degrading the target proteins responsible for PD. Molecular phylogenetic studies have revealed that the prototype of kf-1 appeared in the very early phase of animal evolution but was lost, unlike parkin, in the lineage leading up to Drosophila. Therefore, kf-1−/− mice, be a powerful tool for elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in emotional regulation, and for screening novel anxiolytic/antidepressant compounds.

  9. DNA ligase C1 mediates the LigD-independent nonhomologous end-joining pathway of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Hitesh; Gupta, Richa; Glickman, Michael S

    2014-10-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a recently described bacterial DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway that has been best characterized for mycobacteria. NHEJ can religate transformed linear plasmids, repair ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSBs in nonreplicating cells, and seal I-SceI-induced chromosomal DSBs. The core components of the mycobacterial NHEJ machinery are the DNA end binding protein Ku and the polyfunctional DNA ligase LigD. LigD has three autonomous enzymatic modules: ATP-dependent DNA ligase (LIG), DNA/RNA polymerase (POL), and 3' phosphoesterase (PE). Although genetic ablation of ku or ligD abolishes NHEJ and sensitizes nonreplicating cells to ionizing radiation, selective ablation of the ligase activity of LigD in vivo only mildly impairs NHEJ of linearized plasmids, indicating that an additional DNA ligase can support NHEJ. Additionally, the in vivo role of the POL and PE domains in NHEJ is unclear. Here we define a LigD ligase-independent NHEJ pathway in Mycobacterium smegmatis that requires the ATP-dependent DNA ligase LigC1 and the POL domain of LigD. Mycobacterium tuberculosis LigC can also support this backup NHEJ pathway. We also demonstrate that, although dispensable for efficient plasmid NHEJ, the activities of the POL and PE domains are required for repair of IR-induced DSBs in nonreplicating cells. These findings define the genetic requirements for a LigD-independent NHEJ pathway in mycobacteria and demonstrate that all enzymatic functions of the LigD protein participate in NHEJ in vivo.

  10. Induction of Cell Death through Alteration of Oxidants and Antioxidants in Epithelial Cells Exposed to High Energy Protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Govindarajan; Wu, Honglu

    2012-01-01

    Radiation affects several cellular and molecular processes including double strand breakage, modifications of sugar moieties and bases. In outer space, protons are the primary radiation source which poses a range of potential health risks to astronauts. On the other hand, the use of proton radiation for tumor radiation therapy is increasing as it largely spares healthy tissues while killing tumor tissues. Although radiation related research has been conducted extensively, the molecular toxicology and cellular mechanisms affected by proton radiation remain poorly understood. Therefore, in the present study, we irradiated rat epithelial cells (LE) with different doses of protons and investigated their effects on cell proliferation and cell death. Our data showed an inhibition of cell proliferation in proton irradiated cells with a significant dose dependent activation and repression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants, glutathione and superoxide dismutase respectively as compared to control cells. In addition, apoptotic related genes such as caspase-3 and -8 activities were induced in a dose dependent manner with corresponding increased levels of DNA fragmentation in proton irradiated cells than control cells. Together, our results show that proton radiation alters oxidant and antioxidant levels in the cells to activate apoptotic pathway for cell death.

  11. Ectopic KNOX Expression Affects Plant Development by Altering Tissue Cell Polarity and Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Annis Elizabeth; Rebocho, Alexandra B; Coen, Enrico S

    2016-08-23

    Plant development involves two polarity types: tissue cell (asymmetries within cells are coordinated across tissues) and regional (identities vary spatially across tissues) polarity. Both appear altered in the barley (Hordeum vulgare) Hooded mutant, in which ectopic expression of the KNOTTED1-like Homeobox (KNOX) gene, BKn3, causes inverted polarity of differentiated hairs and ectopic flowers, in addition to wing-shaped outgrowths. These lemma-specific effects allow the spatiotemporal analysis of events following ectopic BKn3 expression, determining the relationship between KNOXs, polarity, and shape. We show that tissue cell polarity, based on localization of the auxin transporter SISTER OF PINFORMED1 (SoPIN1), dynamically reorients as ectopic BKn3 expression increases. Concurrently, ectopic expression of the auxin importer LIKE AUX1 and boundary gene NO APICAL MERISTEM is activated. The polarity of hairs reflects SoPIN1 patterns, suggesting that tissue cell polarity underpins oriented cell differentiation. Wing cell files reveal an anisotropic growth pattern, and computational modeling shows how polarity guiding growth can account for this pattern and wing emergence. The inverted ectopic flower orientation does not correlate with SoPIN1, suggesting that this form of regional polarity is not controlled by tissue cell polarity. Overall, the results suggest that KNOXs trigger different morphogenetic effects through interplay between tissue cell polarity, identity, and growth.

  12. Ectopic KNOX Expression Affects Plant Development by Altering Tissue Cell Polarity and Identity[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebocho, Alexandra B.

    2016-01-01

    Plant development involves two polarity types: tissue cell (asymmetries within cells are coordinated across tissues) and regional (identities vary spatially across tissues) polarity. Both appear altered in the barley (Hordeum vulgare) Hooded mutant, in which ectopic expression of the KNOTTED1-like Homeobox (KNOX) gene, BKn3, causes inverted polarity of differentiated hairs and ectopic flowers, in addition to wing-shaped outgrowths. These lemma-specific effects allow the spatiotemporal analysis of events following ectopic BKn3 expression, determining the relationship between KNOXs, polarity, and shape. We show that tissue cell polarity, based on localization of the auxin transporter SISTER OF PINFORMED1 (SoPIN1), dynamically reorients as ectopic BKn3 expression increases. Concurrently, ectopic expression of the auxin importer LIKE AUX1 and boundary gene NO APICAL MERISTEM is activated. The polarity of hairs reflects SoPIN1 patterns, suggesting that tissue cell polarity underpins oriented cell differentiation. Wing cell files reveal an anisotropic growth pattern, and computational modeling shows how polarity guiding growth can account for this pattern and wing emergence. The inverted ectopic flower orientation does not correlate with SoPIN1, suggesting that this form of regional polarity is not controlled by tissue cell polarity. Overall, the results suggest that KNOXs trigger different morphogenetic effects through interplay between tissue cell polarity, identity, and growth. PMID:27553356

  13. Nicotine alters MicroRNA expression and hinders human adult stem cell regenerative potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tsz Kin; Carballosa, Carlos M; Pelaez, Daniel; Wong, Hoi Kin; Choy, Kwong Wai; Pang, Chi Pui; Cheung, Herman S

    2013-03-01

    Adult stem cells are critical for the healing process in regenerative medicine. However, cigarette smoking inhibits stem cell recruitment to tissues and delays the wound-healing process. This study investigated the effect of nicotine, a major constituent in the cigarette smoke, on the regenerative potentials of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and periodontal ligament-derived stem cells (PDLSC). The cell proliferation of 1.0 μM nicotine-treated MSC and PDLSC was significantly reduced when compared to the untreated control. Moreover, nicotine also retarded the locomotion of these adult stem cells. Furthermore, their osteogenic differentiation capabilities were reduced in the presence of nicotine as evidenced by gene expression (RUNX2, ALPL, BGLAP, COL1A1, and COL1A2), calcium deposition, and alkaline phosphatase activity analyses. In addition, the microRNA (miRNA) profile of nicotine-treated PDLSC was altered; suggesting miRNAs might play an important role in the nicotine effects on stem cells. This study provided the possible mechanistic explanations on stem cell-associated healing delay in cigarette smoking.

  14. Proteome alteration induced by hTERT transfection of human fibroblast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riou Jean-François

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telomerase confers cellular immortality by elongating telomeres, thereby circumventing the Hayflick limit. Extended-life-span cells have been generated by transfection with the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene. hTERT transfected cell lines may be of outstanding interest to monitor the effect of drugs targeting the telomerase activity. The incidence of hTERT gene transfection at the proteome level is a prerequisite to that purpose. The effect of the transfection has been studied on the proteome of human fibroblast (WI38. Cytosolic and nuclear fractions of WI38 cells, empty vector transfected WI38 (WI38-HPV and hTERT WI38 cells were submitted to a 2D-DIGE (Two-Dimensional Differential In-Gel Electrophoresis analysis. Only spots that had a similar abundance in WI38 and WI38-HPV, but were differentially expressed in WI38 hTERT were selected for MS identification. This method directly points to the proteins linked with the hTERT expression. Number of false positive differentially expressed proteins has been excluded by using control WI38-HPV cells. The proteome alteration induced by hTERT WI38 transfection should be taken into account in subsequent use of the cell line for anti-telomerase drugs evaluation. Results 2D-DIGE experiment shows that 57 spots out of 2246 are significantly differentially expressed in the cytosolic fraction due to hTERT transfection, and 38 were confidently identified. In the nuclear fraction, 44 spots out of 2172 were selected in the differential proteome analysis, and 14 were identified. The results show that, in addition to elongating telomeres, hTERT gene transfection has other physiological roles, among which an enhanced ER capacity and a potent cell protection against apoptosis. Conclusion We show that the methodology reduces the complexity of the proteome analysis and highlights proteins implicated in other processes than telomere elongation. hTERT induced proteome changes suggest

  15. Alterations in expression, proteolysis and intracellular localizations of clusterin in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Zhi He; Xiao-Hang Zhao; Zhen-Mei Song; Kun Wang; Liang-Hong Teng; Fang Liu; You-Sheng Mao; Ning Lu; Shang-Zhong Zhang; Min Wu

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate biogenesis and intracellular localizations of clusterin to elucidate the potential molecular mechanisms implicated in tumorigenesis of esophageal mucosa.METHODS: Semi-quantitative RT-PCR for multi-region alteration analysis, Western blot for different transcriptional forms and immunohistochemical staining for intracellular localizations of clusterin were carried out in both tissues and cell lines of ESCC.RESULTS: The N-terminal deletions of the clusterin gene and the appearance of a 50-53 ku nuclear clusterin, an uncleaved, nonglycosylated, and disulfide-linked isoform,were the major alterations in cancer cells of esophagus.Naturally the 40 ku clusterin was located in the connective tissue of the lamina propria of epithelial mucosa and right under the basal membrane of epithelia, but it was disappeared in stromal mucosa of esophagus and the pre-matured clusterin was found positive in cancerous epithelia.CONCLUSION: The N-terminal deletion of clusterin may be essential for its alterations of biogenesis in ESCC.

  16. The RING finger domain E3 ubiquitin ligases BRCA1 and the RNF20/RNF40 complex in global loss of the chromatin mark histone H2B monoubiquitination (H2Bub1) in cell line models and primary high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Kristie-Ann; Cole, Alexander J; Gill, Anthony J; Clarkson, Adele; Gard, Gregory B; Chou, Angela; Kennedy, Catherine J; Henderson, Beric R; Fereday, Sian; Traficante, Nadia; Alsop, Kathryn; Bowtell, David D; deFazio, Anna; Clifton-Bligh, Roderick; Marsh, Deborah J

    2016-12-15

    Enzymatic factors driving cancer-associated chromatin remodelling are of increasing interest as the role of the cancer epigenome in gene expression and DNA repair processes becomes elucidated. Monoubiquitination of histone H2B at lysine 120 (H2Bub1) is a central histone modification that functions in histone cross-talk, transcriptional elongation, DNA repair, maintaining centromeric chromatin and replication-dependent histone mRNA 3'-end processing, as well as being required for the differentiation of stem cells. The loss of global H2Bub1 is seen in a number of aggressive malignancies and has been linked to tumour progression and/or a poorer prognosis in some cancers. Here, we analyse a large cohort of high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOC) and show loss of global H2Bub1 in 77% (313 of 407) of tumours. Loss of H2Bub1 was seen at all stages (I-IV) of HGSOC, indicating it is a relatively early epigenomic event in this aggressive malignancy. Manipulation of key H2Bub1 E3 ubiquitin ligases, RNF20, RNF40 and BRCA1, in ovarian cancer cell line models modulated H2Bub1 levels, indicative of the role of these RING finger ligases in monoubiquitination of H2Bub1 in vitro. However, in primary HGSOC, loss of RNF20 protein expression was identified in just 6% of tumours (26 of 424) and did not correlate with global H2Bub1 loss. Similarly, germline mutation of BRCA1 did not show a correlation with the global H2Bub1 loss. We conclude that the regulation of tumour-associated H2Bub1 levels is complex. Aberrant expression of alternative histone-associated 'writer' or 'eraser' enzymes are likely responsible for the global loss of H2Bub1 seen in HGSOC. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. HACE1 is a putative tumor suppressor gene in B-cell lymphomagenesis and is down-regulated by both deletion and epigenetic alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzelfen, Abdelilah; Alcantara, Marion; Kora, Hafid; Picquenot, Jean-Michel; Bertrand, Philippe; Cornic, Marie; Mareschal, Sylvain; Bohers, Elodie; Maingonnat, Catherine; Ruminy, Philippe; Adriouch, Sahil; Boyer, Olivier; Dubois, Sydney; Bastard, Christian; Tilly, Hervé; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Jardin, Fabrice

    2016-06-01

    HECT domain and ankyrin repeat containing E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1, HACE1, located on chromosome 6q, encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase and is downregulated in many human tumors. Here, we report HACE1 as a candidate tumor suppressor gene down-regulated by a combination of deletion and epigenetic mechanisms. HACE1 deletions were observed in 40% of B-cell lymphoma tumors. Hypermethylation of the HACE1 promoter CpG177 island was found in 60% (68/111) of cases and in all tested B-cell lymphoma lines. Using HDAC inhibitors, we observed predominantly inactive chromatin conformation (methylated H3 histones H3K9me2) in HACE1 gene promoter region. We demonstrated in Ramos and Raji cells that down-regulation of HACE1 expression was associated with a significant decrease in apoptosis and an accumulation of cells in the S and G2/M phases. Our experiments indicate that HACE1 can act as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene in most B-cell lymphomas and can be downregulated by deacetylation of its promoter region chromatin, which makes HACE1 a potential target for HDAC inhibitors.

  18. Bone cell expression on titanium surfaces is altered by sterilization treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, C M; Keller, J C; Solursh, M

    1994-05-01

    Phenotypic responses of rat calvarial osteoblast-like cells (RCOB) were evaluated on commercially pure titanium (cpTi) surfaces when cultured at high density (5100 cells/mm2). These surfaces were prepared to three different clinically relevant surface preparations (1-micron, 600-grit, and 50-microns-grit sand-blast), followed by sterilization with either ultraviolet light, ethylene oxide, argon plasma-cleaning, or routine clinical autoclaving. Osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase, but not collagen expression, were significantly affected by surface roughness when these surfaces were altered by argon plasma-cleaning. In general, plasma-cleaned cpTi surfaces demonstrated an inverse relationship between surface roughness and phenotypic markers for a bone-like response. On a per-cell basis, levels of the bone-specific protein, osteocalcin, and the enzymatic activity of alkaline phosphatase were highest on the smooth 1-micron polished surface and lowest on the roughest surfaces for the plasma-cleaned cpTi. Detectable bone cell expression can be altered by clinically relevant surfaces prepared by standard dental implant preparation techniques.

  19. Canine Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transcriptome Composition Alterations: A Step towards Standardizing Therapeutic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Krešić

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Although canine adipose derived stem cells (cASCs morphology characteristics and differentiation ability are well documented, transcriptome alterations of undifferentiated cASCs during ex vivo cultivation remain unknown. Here we demonstrate, for the first time, the transcriptome composition of isolated cASCs in undifferentiated state originating from six donors. Transcriptome changes were monitored during ex vivo cultivation between passage 3 (P3 and P5, which are mostly used in therapy. Influence of donors’ age in given passage number on transcriptome composition was also investigated. Cultivation from P3 to P5 resulted in 16 differentially expressed genes with cooverexpression of pluripotency and self-renewal transcription factors genes SOX2 and POU5F1 dominant in old donors’ cells. Furthermore, cASCs demonstrated upregulation of IL-6 in young and old donors’ cells. In addition, ex vivo cultivation of cASCs revealed well-known morphological alterations accompanied with decrease in expression of CD90 and CD44 markers in P4 and higher monitored by flow cytometry and successful osteo- and chondrodifferentiation but inefficient adipodifferentiation in P3. Our results revealed the impact of ex vivo cultivation on nature of cells. Correlation of transcriptome changes with secretome composition is needed and its further impact on therapeutic potential of cASCs remains to be evaluated in clinical trials.

  20. Hyperlipidemia Alters Regulatory T Cell Function and Promotes Resistance to Tolerance Induction Through Costimulatory Molecule Blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, J; Yuan, J; Chandrakar, A; Iacomini, J

    2015-09-01

    Recent work from our laboratory has shown that hyperlipidemia promotes accelerated rejection of vascularized cardiac allografts in mice by inducing anti-donor Th17 reactivity and production of IL-17. Here, we show that hyperlipidemia also affects FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). Hyperlipidemia promotes the development of Tregs that express low levels of CD25. Hyperlipidemia also promotes a decrease in central Tregs and an increase in effector Tregs that appears to account for the increase in the frequency of CD25(low) Tregs. Alterations in Treg subsets also appear to lead to alterations in Treg function. The ability of FoxP3(+) , CD25(high) , CD4(+) Tregs from hyperlipidemic mice to inhibit proliferation of effector T cells stimulated with anti-CD3 and CD28 was reduced when compared with Tregs from control mice. Regulatory T cells isolated from hyperlipidemic recipients exhibit increased activation of Akt, and a reduction in Bim levels that permits the expansion of FoxP3(+) CD25(low) CD4(+) T cells. Hyperlipidemic mice were also resistant to tolerance induction using costimulatory molecule blockade consisting of anti-CD154 and CTLA4Ig, a strategy that requires Tregs. Together, our data suggest that hyperlipidemia profoundly affects Treg subsets and function as well as the ability to induce tolerance.

  1. Chronic ketamine produces altered distribution of parvalbumin-positive cells in the hippocampus of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Murtishaw, Andrew S; Bolton, Monica M; Heaney, Chelcie F; Langhardt, Michael; Kinney, Jefferson W

    2013-08-29

    The underlying mechanisms of schizophrenia pathogenesis are not well understood. Increasing evidence supports the glutamatergic hypothesis that posits a hypofunction of the N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor on specific gamma amino-butyric acid (GABA)-ergic neurons may be responsible for the disorder. Alterations in the GABAergic system have been observed in schizophrenia, most notably a change in the expression of parvalbumin (PV) in the cortex and hippocampus. Several reports also suggest abnormal neuronal migration may play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia. The current study examined the positioning and distribution of PV-positive cells in the hippocampus following chronic treatment with the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine. A robust increase was found in the number of PV-positive interneurons located outside the stratum oriens (SO), the layer where most of these cells are normally localized, as well as an overall numerical increase in CA3 PV cells. These results suggest ketamine leads to an abnormal distribution of PV-positive cells, which may be indicative of aberrant migratory activity and possibly related to the Morris water maze deficits observed. These findings may also be relevant to alterations observed in schizophrenia populations.

  2. Human cytomegalovirus alters localization of MHC class II and dendrite morphology in mature Langerhans cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrew W; Hertel, Laura; Louie, Ryan K; Burster, Timo; Lacaille, Vashti; Pashine, Achal; Abate, Davide A; Mocarski, Edward S; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2006-09-15

    Hemopoietic stem cell-derived mature Langerhans-type dendritic cells (LC) are susceptible to productive infection by human CMV (HCMV). To investigate the impact of infection on this cell type, we examined HLA-DR biosynthesis and trafficking in mature LC cultures exposed to HCMV. We found decreased surface HLA-DR levels in viral Ag-positive as well as in Ag-negative mature LC. Inhibition of HLA-DR was independent of expression of unique short US2-US11 region gene products by HCMV. Indeed, exposure to UV-inactivated virus, but not to conditioned medium from infected cells, was sufficient to reduce HLA-DR on mature LC, implicating particle binding/penetration in this effect. Reduced surface levels reflected an altered distribution of HLA-DR because total cellular HLA-DR was not diminished. Accumulation of HLA-DR was not explained by altered cathepsin S activity. Mature, peptide-loaded HLA-DR molecules were retained within cells, as assessed by the proportion of SDS-stable HLA-DR dimers. A block in egress was implicated, as endocytosis of surface HLA-DR was not increased. Immunofluorescence microscopy corroborated the intracellular retention of HLA-DR and revealed markedly fewer HLA-DR-positive dendritic projections in infected mature LC. Unexpectedly, light microscopic analyses showed a dramatic loss of the dendrites themselves and immunofluorescence revealed that cytoskeletal elements crucial for the formation and maintenance of dendrites are disrupted in viral Ag-positive cells. Consistent with these dendrite effects, HCMV-infected mature LC exhibit markedly reduced chemotaxis in response to lymphoid chemokines. Thus, HCMV impedes MHC class II molecule trafficking, dendritic projections, and migration of mature LC. These changes likely contribute to the reduced activation of CD4+ T cells by HCMV-infected mature LC.

  3. Tubulin tyrosine ligase and stathmin compete for tubulin binding in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Szyk, Agnieszka; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Roll-Mecak, Antonina

    2013-01-01

    Tubulin partition between soluble and polymeric forms is tightly regulated in cells. Stathmin and tubulin tyrosine ligase (TTL)a each form stable complexes with tubulin and inhibit tubulin polymerization. Here we explore the mutual relationship between these proteins in vitro and demonstrate that full-length stathmin and TTL compete for binding to tubulin and fail to make a stable tubulin:stathmin:TTL triple complex in solution. Moreover, stathmin depresses TTL tubulin tyrosination activity i...

  4. A novel effect of thalidomide and its analogs: suppression of cereblon ubiquitination enhances ubiquitin ligase function

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yaobin; Huang, Xiangao; He, Xian; Zhou, Yanqing; Jiang, Xiaogang; Chen-Kiang, Selina; Jaffrey, Samie R.; Xu, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    The immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) thalidomide and its structural analogs lenalidomide and pomalidomide are highly effective in treating clinical indications. Thalidomide binds to cereblon (CRBN), a substrate receptor of the cullin-4 really interesting new gene (RING) E3 ligase complex. Here, we examine the effect of thalidomide and its analogs on CRBN ubiquitination and its functions in human cell lines. We find that the ubiquitin modification of CRBN includes K48-linked polyubiquitin chains a...

  5. Liver cell adenoma showing sequential alteration of radiological findings suggestive of well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takayuki Kogure; Yoshiyuki Ueno; Satoshi Sekiguchi; Kazuyuki Ishida; Takehiko Igarashi; Yuta Wakui; Takao Iwasaki; Tooru Shimosegawa

    2009-01-01

    A liver tumor 35 mm in diameter was found incidentally in a 40-year-old woman who had no history of liver diseases or the use of oral contraceptives. Radiological diagnostics showed the typical findings of liver cell adenoma (LCA). Dynamic computed tomography revealed that the tumor showed a homogenous enhancement in the arterial phase and almost the same enhancement as the surrounding liver parenchyma in the delayed phase. The tumor was found to contain fat on magnetic resonance imaging. A benign fat containing liver tumor was suggested. However, radiological findings altered, which caused us to suspect that a welldifferentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) containing fat was becoming dedifferentiated. Partial hepatectomy was performed and the pathological findings showed the typical findings of LCA. This case was an extremely rare LCA, which had no background of risk for LCA and developed the sequential alteration of the radiological findings to suspect well-differentiated HCC.

  6. Structural basis for c-KIT inhibition by the suppressor of cytokine signaling 6 (SOCS6) ubiquitin ligase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zadjali, Fahad; Pike, Ashley C W; Vesterlund, Mattias

    2011-01-01

    of cytokine signaling 6 (SOCS6) is a member of the SOCS family of E3 ubiquitin ligases that can interact with c-KIT and suppress c-KIT-dependent pathways. Here, we analyzed the molecular mechanisms that determine SOCS6 substrate recognition. Our results show that the SH2 domain of SOCS6 is essential for its...... to substrate residue position pY+6 and envelopes the c-KIT phosphopeptide with a large BG loop insertion that contributes significantly to substrate interaction. We demonstrate that SOCS6 has ubiquitin ligase activity toward c-KIT and regulates c-KIT protein turnover in cells. Our data support a role of SOCS6...... as a feedback inhibitor of SCF-dependent signaling and provides molecular data to account for target specificity within the SOCS family of ubiquitin ligases....

  7. Imatinib alters cell viability but not growth factors levels in TM4 Sertoli cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemnia, Seyyed Mohammad Reza; Atari-Hajipirloo, Somayeh; Roshan-Milani, Shiva; Valizadeh, Nasim; Mahabadi, Sonya; Kheradmand, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: The anticancer agent imatinib (IM) is a small molecular analog of ATP that inhibits tyrosine kinase activity of platelet derived growth factors (PDGFs) and stem cell factor (SCF) receptor in cancer cells. However these factors have a key role in regulating growth and development of normal Sertoli, Leydig and germ cells. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine cell viability, PDGF and SCF levels in mouse normal Sertoli cells exposed to IM. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, the mouse TM4 Sertoli cells were treated with 0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 20 μM IM for 2, 4 or 6 days. The cell viability and growth factors levels were assessed by MTT and ELISA methods, respectively. For statistical analysis, One-Way ANOVA was performed. Results: IM showed significant decrease in Sertoli cell viability compared to control group (p=0.001). However, IM increased PDGF and SCF level insignificantly (p>0.05). Conclusion: Results suggested that IM treatment induced a dose dependent reduction of cell viability in Sertoli cells. It seems that treatment with this anticancer drug is involved in the fertility process. Further studies are needed to evaluate the role of PDGF and SCF in this cell. PMID:27738659

  8. Down-regulation of ubiquitin ligase Cbl induced by twist haploinsufficiency in Saethre-Chotzen syndrome results in increased PI3K/Akt signaling and osteoblast proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenou, Hind; Kaabeche, Karim; Dufour, Cécilie; Miraoui, Hichem; Marie, Pierre J

    2006-10-01

    Genetic mutations of Twist, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, induce premature fusion of cranial sutures in Saethre-Chotzen syndrome (SCS). We report here a previously undescribed mechanism involved in the altered osteoblastogenesis in SCS. Cranial osteoblasts from an SCS patient with a Twist mutation causing basic helix-loop-helix deletion exhibited decreased expression of E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl compared with wild-type osteoblasts. This was associated with decreased ubiquitin-mediated degradation of phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase (PI3K) and increased PI3K expression and PI3K/Akt signaling. Increased PI3K immunoreactivity was also found in osteoblasts in histological sections of affected cranial sutures from SCS patients. Transfection with Twist or Cbl abolished the increased PI3K/Akt signaling in Twist mutant osteoblasts. Forced overexpression of Cbl did not correct the altered expression of osteoblast differentiation markers in Twist mutant cells. In contrast, pharmacological inhibition of PI3K/Akt, but not ERK signaling, corrected the increased cell growth in Twist mutant osteoblasts. The results show that Twist haploinsufficiency results in decreased Cbl-mediated PI3K degradation in osteoblasts, causing PI3K accumulation and activation of PI3K/Akt-dependent osteoblast growth. This provides genetic and biochemical evidence for a role for Cbl-mediated PI3K signaling in the altered osteoblast phenotype induced by Twist haploinsufficiency in SCS.

  9. HIV-Infected Spleens Present Altered Follicular Helper T Cell (Tfh Subsets and Skewed B Cell Maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Colineau

    Full Text Available Follicular helper T (Tfh cells within secondary lymphoid organs control multiple steps of B cell maturation and antibody (Ab production. HIV-1 infection is associated with an altered B cell differentiation and Tfh isolated from lymph nodes of HIV-infected (HIV+ individuals provide inadequate B cell help in vitro. However, the mechanisms underlying this impairment of Tfh function are not fully defined. Using a unique collection of splenocytes, we compared the frequency, phenotype and transcriptome of Tfh subsets in spleens from HIV negative (HIV- and HIV+ subjects. We observed an increase of CXCR5+PD-1highCD57-Tfh and germinal center (GC CD57+ Tfh in HIV+ spleens. Both subsets showed a reduced mRNA expression of the transcription factor STAT-3, co-stimulatory, regulatory and signal transduction molecules as compared to HIV- spleens. Similarly, Foxp3 expressing follicular regulatory T (Tfr cells were increased, suggesting sustained GC reactions in chronically HIV+ spleens. As a consequence, GC B cell populations were expanded, however, complete maturation into memory B cells was reduced in HIV+ spleens where we evidenced a compromised production of B cell-activating cytokines such as IL-4 and IL-10. Collectively our data indicate that, although Tfh proliferation and GC reactions seem to be ongoing in HIV-infected spleens, Tfh "differentiation" and expression of costimulatory molecules is skewed with a profound effect on B cell maturation.

  10. Activation of secretion and surface alteration of cytolytic T-lymphocytes interacting with target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykovskaya, S N; Shevelev, A A; Kupriyanova, T A

    1988-01-01

    Cells obtained in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) and memory cells adsorbed on the surface of target cells (TC) were examined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy depending on the time of interaction with TC. Three types of lymphocytes were revealed: type I - cells of spherical shape with a smooth surface or an insignificant amount of microvilli; predominantly small and medium-sized lymphocytes contacting TC with non significant involvement of their surface or by several microvilli; type II - oval or round-shaped lymphocytes evenly covered with microvilli with considerably enlarged region of contact; type III cells - predominantly large lymphocytes and lymphoblasts flattened (spread) on TC, with multiple microvilli, ridge-like projections, and ruffles on their surface. TEM revealed activation of the secretory apparatus in the cytoplasm of such lymphocytes. With increased time of interaction, type III cells increase in number (from 8.6% after 10 min to 90.2% after 60 min of incubation). Memory cells show no morphologic signs of secretion in correlation with the absence of lysis of TC on which they are adsorbed. The surface of the lymphocytes adsorbed on the substrate with poly-L-lysin is not noticeably altered. It is suggested that 3 morphological types of lymphocytes correspond to 3 stages of secretion activation. Lymphocyte contact with TC surface is evidently a specific stimulus for activating secretory apparatus of CTL. SEM can be used for quantitation of activated lymphocytes.

  11. Calcium signaling and cell volume regulation are altered in Sjögren's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enger, Tone Berge; Aure, Marit Høyberg; Jensen, Janicke Liaaen; Galtung, Hilde Kanli

    2014-10-01

    Sjögren's Syndrome (SS) is a chronic autoimmune disease, leading to deficient secretion from salivary and lacrimal glands. Saliva production is normally increased by cholinergic innervation, giving rise to intracellular calcium signaling and water transport through water channels (aquaporins, AQPs). The aim of this study was to investigate possible pathophysiological changes in cell volume regulation, AQP expression and localization, and intracellular calcium signaling in glandular cells from SS patients compared to controls. A total of 35 SS patients and 41 non-SS controls were included. Real time qPCR was combined with immunohistochemistry to analyze the mRNA expression and cellular distribution of AQP1, 3 and 5. Cell volume regulation and intracellular calcium signaling were examined in fresh acinar cells. We show for the first time a reduced mRNA expression of AQP1 and 5 in SS compared to controls, accompanied by a decrease in staining intensity of AQP1, 3 and 5 in areas adjacent to local lymphocytic infiltration. Furthermore, we observed that the SS cells' capacity for volume regulation was abnormal. Similarly, the calcium response after parasympathetic agonist (carbachol) stimulation was markedly decreased in SS cells. It is concluded that mRNA expression of AQP1 and 5, protein distribution of AQP1, 3 and 5, glandular cell volume regulation and intracellular calcium signaling are all altered in SS, pointing to possible pathophysiological mechanisms in SS.

  12. Altered thymocyte and T cell development in neonatal mice with hyperoxia-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angusamy, Sowmya; Mansour, Tamer; Abdulmageed, Mohammed; Han, Rachel; Schutte, Brian C; LaPres, John; Harkema, Jack R; Omar, Said A

    2017-08-19

    The adaptive immune system of neonates is relatively underdeveloped. The thymus is an essential organ for adaptive T cell development and might be affected during the natural course of oxygen induced lung injury. The effect of prolonged hyperoxia on the thymus, thymocyte and T cell development, and its proliferation has not been studied extensively. Neonatal mice were exposed to 85% oxygen (hyperoxia) or room air (normoxia) up to 28 days. Flow cytometry using surface markers were used to assay for thymocyte development and proliferation. Mice exposed to prolonged hyperoxia had evidence of lung injury associated alveolar simplification, a significantly lower mean weight, smaller thymic size, lower mean thymocyte count and higher percentage of apoptotic thymocytes. T cells subpopulation in the thymus showed a significant reduction in the count and proliferation of double positive and double negative T cells. There was a significant reduction in the count and proliferation of single positive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Prolonged hyperoxia in neonatal mice adversely affected thymic size, thymocyte count and altered the distribution of T cells sub-populations. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that prolonged hyperoxia causes defective development of T cells in the thymus.

  13. A deficiency of uPAR alters endothelial angiogenic function and cell morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balsara Rashna D

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The angiogenic potential of a cell requires dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeletal architecture that involves the interaction of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR with the extracellular matrix. This study focuses on the effect of uPAR deficiency (uPAR-/- on angiogenic function and associated cytoskeletal organization. Utilizing murine endothelial cells, it was observed that adhesion, migration, proliferation, and capillary tube formation were altered in uPAR-/- cells compared to wild-type (WT cells. On a vitronectin (Vn matrix, uPAR-/- cells acquired a "fried egg" morphology characterized by circular actin organization and lack of lamellipodia formation. The up-regulation of β1 integrin, FAK(P-Tyr925, and paxillin (P-Tyr118, and decreased Rac1 activation, suggested increased focal adhesions, but delayed focal adhesion turnover in uPAR-/- cells. This accounted for the enhanced adhesion, but attenuated migration, on Vn. VEGF-enriched Matrigel implants from uPAR-/- mice demonstrated a lack of mature vessel formation compared to WT mice. Collectively, these results indicate that a uPAR deficiency leads to decreased angiogenic functions of endothelial cells.

  14. Knockdown of a Laccase in Populus deltoides Confers Altered Cell Wall Chemistry and Increased Sugar Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Anthony C.; Jawdy, Sara; Gunter, Lee; Gjersing, Erica; Sykes, Robert; Hinchee, Maud A. W.; Winkeler, Kimberly A.; Collins, Cassandra M.; Engle, Nancy; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Yang, Xiaohan; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Muchero, Wellington; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2016-10-01

    Plant laccases are thought to function in the oxidation of monolignols which leads to higher order lignin formation. Only a hand-full of laccases in plants have been functionally evaluated and as such little is known about the breadth of their impact on cell wall chemistry or structure. Here we describe a previously uncharacterized laccase from Populus, encoded by locus Potri.008G064000, whose reduced expression resulted in transgenic Populus trees with changes in syringyl/guaiacyl (S/G) ratios as well as altered sugar release phenotypes. These phenotypes are consistent with plant biomass exhibiting reduced recalcitrance. Interestingly, the transgene effect on recalcitrance is dependent on a mild pretreatment prior to chemical extraction of sugars. Metabolite profiling suggests the transgene modulates phenolics that are associated with the cell wall structure. We propose that this particular laccase has a range of functions related to oxidation of phenolics and conjugation of flavonoids that interact with lignin in the cell wall.

  15. Knockdown of a laccase in Populus deltoides confers altered cell wall chemistry and increased sugar release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Anthony C; Jawdy, Sara; Gunter, Lee; Gjersing, Erica; Sykes, Robert; Hinchee, Maud A W; Winkeler, Kimberly A; Collins, Cassandra M; Engle, Nancy; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Yang, Xiaohan; Tuskan, Gerald A; Muchero, Wellington; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2016-10-01

    Plant laccases are thought to function in the oxidation of monolignols which leads to higher order lignin formation. Only a hand-full of laccases in plants have been functionally evaluated, and as such little is known about the breadth of their impact on cell wall chemistry or structure. Here, we describe a previously uncharacterized laccase from Populus, encoded by locus Potri.008G064000, whose reduced expression resulted in transgenic Populus trees with changes in syringyl/guaiacyl ratios as well as altered sugar release phenotypes. These phenotypes are consistent with plant biomass exhibiting reduced recalcitrance. Interestingly, the transgene effect on recalcitrance is dependent on a mild pretreatment prior to chemical extraction of sugars. Metabolite profiling suggests the transgene modulates phenolics that are associated with the cell wall structure. We propose that this particular laccase has a range of functions related to oxidation of phenolics and conjugation of flavonoids that interact with lignin in the cell wall.

  16. Herbicide effects on freshwater benthic diatoms: Induction of nucleus alterations and silica cell wall abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debenest, T. [Ecolab UMR 5245 (INP ENSAT, CNRS, UPS), Equipe ECOGEN, Avenue de l' Agrobiopole - BP 32607 Auzeville Tolosane, 31326 Castanet Tolosan Cedex (France); Cemagref, 50 avenue de Verdun, 33612 Cestas Cedex (France); Silvestre, J. [Ecolab UMR 5245 (INP ENSAT, CNRS, UPS), Equipe ECOGEN, Avenue de l' Agrobiopole - BP 32607 Auzeville Tolosane, 31326 Castanet Tolosan Cedex (France); Coste, M.; Delmas, F. [Cemagref, 50 avenue de Verdun, 33612 Cestas Cedex (France); Pinelli, E. [Ecolab UMR 5245 (INP ENSAT, CNRS, UPS), Equipe ECOGEN, Avenue de l' Agrobiopole - BP 32607 Auzeville Tolosane, 31326 Castanet Tolosan Cedex (France)], E-mail: pinelli@ensat.fr

    2008-06-02

    Benthic diatoms are well known bio-indicators of river pollution by nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus). Biological indexes, based on diatom sensitivity for non-toxic pollution, have been developed to assess the water quality. Nevertheless, they are not reliable tools to detect pollution by pesticides. Many authors have suggested that toxic agents, like pesticides, induce abnormalities of the diatom cell wall (frustule). High abnormal frustule abundances have been reported in natural diatom communities sampled in streams contaminated by pesticides. However, no direct link was found between the abundances of abnormal frustules in these communities and the pesticide concentrations in stream water. In the present study, a freshwater benthic diatom community, isolated from natural biofilm and cultured under controlled conditions, was treated with a known genotoxic herbicide, maleic hydrazide (MH). Cells were exposed to three concentrations of MH (5 x 10{sup -6}, 10{sup -6}, 10{sup -7} M) for 6 h followed by a 24 h-recovery time. After MH treatments, nucleus alterations were observed: abnormal nucleus location, micronucleus, multinuclear cell or disruption of the nuclear membrane. A dose-dependent increase of nuclear alterations was observed. The difference between the control (9.65 nuclear alterations per 1000 cells observed (9.65 per mille), S.D. = 4.23) and the highest concentrations (29.40 per mille, S.D. = 8.49 for 10{sup -6} M and 35.96 per mille , S.D. = 3.71 for 5 x 10{sup -6} M) was statistically significant (Tukey test, P < 0.05). Diatoms also exhibited frustules with deformed morphology and abnormal ornamentation. Significantly increased abundances of abnormal frustules were observed for the highest concentrations (10{sup -6} and 5 x 10{sup -6} M; Tukey test, P < 0.05). These two parameters tended to increase together (Pearson correlation = 0.702, P < 0.05). The results suggest that the induction of abnormal frustules could be associated with the genotoxic

  17. Herbicide effects on freshwater benthic diatoms: induction of nucleus alterations and silica cell wall abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debenest, T; Silvestre, J; Coste, M; Delmas, F; Pinelli, E

    2008-06-02

    Benthic diatoms are well known bio-indicators of river pollution by nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus). Biological indexes, based on diatom sensitivity for non-toxic pollution, have been developed to assess the water quality. Nevertheless, they are not reliable tools to detect pollution by pesticides. Many authors have suggested that toxic agents, like pesticides, induce abnormalities of the diatom cell wall (frustule). High abnormal frustule abundances have been reported in natural diatom communities sampled in streams contaminated by pesticides. However, no direct link was found between the abundances of abnormal frustules in these communities and the pesticide concentrations in stream water. In the present study, a freshwater benthic diatom community, isolated from natural biofilm and cultured under controlled conditions, was treated with a known genotoxic herbicide, maleic hydrazide (MH). Cells were exposed to three concentrations of MH (5x10(-6), 10(-6), 10(-7)M) for 6h followed by a 24h-recovery time. After MH treatments, nucleus alterations were observed: abnormal nucleus location, micronucleus, multinuclear cell or disruption of the nuclear membrane. A dose-dependent increase of nuclear alterations was observed. The difference between the control (9.65 nuclear alterations per 1000 cells observed (9.65 per thousand), S.D.=4.23) and the highest concentrations (29.40 per thousand, S.D.=8.49 for 10(-6)M and 35.96 per thousand, S.D.=3.71 for 5x10(-6)M) was statistically significant (Tukey test, P<0.05). Diatoms also exhibited frustules with deformed morphology and abnormal ornamentation. Significantly increased abundances of abnormal frustules were observed for the highest concentrations (10(-6) and 5x10(-6)M; Tukey test, P<0.05). These two parameters tended to increase together (Pearson correlation=0.702, P<0.05). The results suggest that the induction of abnormal frustules could be associated with the genotoxic effects of MH. The alterations observed could be

  18. Apoptosis and morphological alterations after UVA irradiation in red blood cells of p53 deficient Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed, Alla El-Din Hamid; Watanabe-Asaka, Tomomi; Oda, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2016-08-01

    Morphological alterations in red blood cells were described as hematological bioindicators of UVA exposure to investigate the sensitivity to UVA in wild type Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) and a p53 deficient mutant. The fewer abnormal red blood cells were observed in the p53 mutant fish under the control conditions. After exposure to different doses of UVA radiation (15min, 30min and 60min/day for 3days), cellular and nuclear alterations in red blood cells were analyzed in the UVA exposed fish compared with non-exposed controls and those alterations included acanthocytes, cell membrane lysis, swollen cells, teardrop-like cell, hemolyzed cells and sickle cells. Those alterations were increased after the UVA exposure both in wild type and the p53 deficient fish. Moreover, apoptosis analyzed by acridine orange assay showed increased number of apoptosis in red blood cells at the higher UVA exposure dose. No micronuclei but nuclear abnormalities as eccentric nucleus, nuclear budding, deformed nucleus, and bilobed nucleus were observed in each group. These results suggested that UVA exposure induced both p53 dependent and independent apoptosis and morphological alterations in red blood cells but less sensitive to UVA than Wild type in medaka fish.

  19. Calprotectin induces cell death in human prostate cancer cell (LNCaP) through survivin protein alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattari, Mina; Pazhang, Yaghub; Imani, Mehdi

    2014-11-01

    Calprotectin (CP), an abundant heterodimeric cytosolic protein of neutrophils, conveys a variety of functions such as tumor cell growth arrest and antimicrobial activity. We investigated CP activity and its possible apoptosis-inducing mechanism of action against an antiandrogen therapy-resistance prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. Cell viability and Annexin V FITC assays were performed in order to investigate its cell death activity and apoptosis, respectively. In order to address cell death inducing mechanism(s), immunocytochemistry and immunobloting analysis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) measurements were performed. The effective concentration of CP against LNCaP promoting LNCaP cell death was 200 µg/mL. ROS and NO levels of cells remarkably were enhanced following treatment with 50 and 100 µg/mL of CP, respectively. Protein expression of anti-apoptotic protein survivin was significantly decreased after administration of tumor cells with CP. Our data indicate that CP regulates the LNCaP cells viability via survivin-mediated pathway and ROS and NO enhancement. Thus, inhibition of survivin expression, enhancement of ROS and NO level by CP or other similar pharmaceutical agents might be effective in lowering the malignant proliferation of human prostate cancer cells.

  20. Comparative and Experimental Studies on the Genes Altered by Chronic Hypoxia in Human Brain Microendothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Mata-Greenwood

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background : Hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1A is a master regulator of acute hypoxia; however, with chronic hypoxia, HIF1A levels return to the normoxic levels. Importantly, the genes that are involved in the cell survival and viability under chronic hypoxia are not known. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that chronic hypoxia leads to the upregulation of a core group of genes with associated changes in the promoter DNA methylation that mediates the cell survival under hypoxia.Results : We examined the effect of chronic hypoxia (3 days; 0.5% oxygen on human brain micro endothelial cells (HBMEC viability and apoptosis. Hypoxia caused a significant reduction in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis. Next, we examined chronic hypoxia associated changes in transcriptome and genome-wide promoter methylation. The data obtained was compared with 16 other microarray studies on chronic hypoxia. Nine genes were altered in response to chronic hypoxia in all 17 studies. Interestingly, HIF1A was not altered with chronic hypoxia in any of the studies. Furthermore, we compared our data to three other studies that identified HIF-responsive genes by various approaches. Only two genes were found to be HIF dependent. We silenced each of these 9 genes using CRISPR/Cas9 system. Downregulation of EGLN3 significantly increased the cell death under chronic hypoxia, whereas downregulation of ERO1L, ENO2, adrenomedullin, and spag4 reduced the cell death under hypoxia.Conclusions : We provide a core group of genes that regulates cellular acclimatization under chronic hypoxic stress, and most of them are HIF independent.

  1. Multiplexed quantitative high content screening reveals that cigarette smoke condensate induces changes in cell structure and function through alterations in cell signaling pathways in human bronchial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Charleata A; Hamm, Jonathan T

    2009-07-10

    Human bronchial cells are one of the first cell types exposed to environmental toxins. Toxins often activate nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) and protein kinase C (PKC). We evaluated the hypothesis that cigarette smoke condensate (CSC), the particulate fraction of cigarette smoke, activates PKC-alpha and NF-kappaB, and concomitantly disrupts the F-actin cytoskeleton, induces apoptosis and alters cell function in BEAS-2B human bronchial epithelial cells. Compared to controls, exposure of BEAS-2B cells to doses of 30mug/ml CSC significantly activated PKC-alpha, while CSC doses above 20mug/ml CSC significantly activated NF-kappaB. As NF-kappaB was activated, cell number decreased. CSC treatment of BEAS-2B cells induced a decrease in cell size and an increase in cell surface extensions including filopodia and lamellipodia. CSC treatment of BEAS-2B cells induced F-actin rearrangement such that stress fibers were no longer prominent at the cell periphery and throughout the cells, but relocalized to perinuclear regions. Concurrently, CSC induced an increase in the focal adhesion protein vinculin at the cell periphery. CSC doses above 30mug/ml induced a significant increase in apoptosis in BEAS-2B cells evidenced by an increase in activated caspase 3, an increase in mitochondrial mass and a decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. As caspase 3 increased, cell number decreased. CSC doses above 30mug/ml also induced significant concurrent changes in cell function including decreased cell spreading and motility. CSC initiates a signaling cascade in human bronchial epithelial cells involving PKC-alpha, NF-kappaB and caspase 3, and consequently decreases cell spreading and motility. These CSC-induced alterations in cell structure likely prevent cells from performing their normal function thereby contributing to smoke-induced diseases.

  2. The Brain Proteome of the Ubiquitin Ligase Peli1 Knock-Out Mouse during Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lereim, Ragnhild Reehorst; Oveland, Eystein; Xiao, Yichuan; Torkildsen, Øivind; Wergeland, Stig; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Sun, Shao-Cong; Berven, Frode S

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin ligase Peli1 has previously been suggested as a potential treatment target in multiple sclerosis. In the multiple sclerosis disease model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, Peli1 knock-out led to less activated microglia and less inflammation in the central nervous system. Despite being important in microglia, Peli1 expression has also been detected in glial and neuronal cells. In the present study the overall brain proteomes of Peli1 knock-out mice and wild-type mice were compared prior to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induction, at onset of the disease and at disease peak. Brain samples from the frontal hemisphere, peripheral from the extensive inflammatory foci, were analyzed using TMT-labeling of sample pools, and the discovered proteins were verified in individual mice using label-free proteomics. The greatest proteomic differences between Peli1 knock-out and wild-type mice were observed at the disease peak. In Peli1 knock-out a higher degree of antigen presentation, increased activity of adaptive and innate immune cells and alterations to proteins involved in iron metabolism were observed during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. These results unravel global effects to the brain proteome when abrogating Peli1 expression, underlining the importance of Peli1 as a regulator of the immune response also peripheral to inflammatory foci during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. The proteomics data is available in PRIDE with accession PXD003710.

  3. Genome wide transcriptome analysis of dendritic cells identifies genes with altered expression in psoriasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kata Filkor

    Full Text Available Activation of dendritic cells by different pathogens induces the secretion of proinflammatory mediators resulting in local inflammation. Importantly, innate immunity must be properly controlled, as its continuous activation leads to the development of chronic inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS or peptidoglycan (PGN induced tolerance, a phenomenon of transient unresponsiveness of cells to repeated or prolonged stimulation, proved valuable model for the study of chronic inflammation. Thus, the aim of this study was the identification of the transcriptional diversity of primary human immature dendritic cells (iDCs upon PGN induced tolerance. Using SAGE-Seq approach, a tag-based transcriptome sequencing method, we investigated gene expression changes of primary human iDCs upon stimulation or restimulation with Staphylococcus aureus derived PGN, a widely used TLR2 ligand. Based on the expression pattern of the altered genes, we identified non-tolerizeable and tolerizeable genes. Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (Kegg analysis showed marked enrichment of immune-, cell cycle- and apoptosis related genes. In parallel to the marked induction of proinflammatory mediators, negative feedback regulators of innate immunity, such as TNFAIP3, TNFAIP8, Tyro3 and Mer are markedly downregulated in tolerant cells. We also demonstrate, that the expression pattern of TNFAIP3 and TNFAIP8 is altered in both lesional, and non-lesional skin of psoriatic patients. Finally, we show that pretreatment of immature dendritic cells with anti-TNF-α inhibits the expression of IL-6 and CCL1 in tolerant iDCs and partially releases the suppression of TNFAIP8. Our findings suggest that after PGN stimulation/restimulation the host cell utilizes different mechanisms in order to maintain critical balance between inflammation and tolerance. Importantly, the transcriptome sequencing of stimulated/restimulated iDCs identified

  4. Haploinsufficiency of the E3 ubiquitin ligase C-terminus of heat shock cognate 70 interacting protein (CHIP) produces specific behavioral impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Bethann; Buendia, Matthew A; Saborido, Tommy P; Palubinsky, Amy M; Stankowski, Jeannette N; Stanwood, Gregg D

    2012-01-01

    The multifunctional E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP is an essential interacting partner of HSP70, which together promote the proteasomal degradation of client proteins. Acute CHIP overexpression provides neuroprotection against neurotoxic mitochondrial stress, glucocorticoids, and accumulation of toxic amyloid fragments, as well as genetic mutations in other E3 ligases, which have been shown to result in familial Parkinson's disease. These studies have created a great deal of interest in understanding CHIP activity, expression and modulation. While CHIP knockout mice have the potential to provide essential insights into the molecular control of cell fate and survival, the animals have been difficult to characterize in vivo due to severe phenotypic and behavioral dysfunction, which have thus far been poorly characterized. Therefore, in the present study we conducted a battery of neurobehavioral and physiological assays of adult CHIP heterozygotic (HET) mutant mice to provide a better understanding of the functional consequence of CHIP deficiency. We found that CHIP HET mice had normal body and brain weight, body temperature, muscle tone and breathing patterns, but do have a significant elevation in baseline heart rate. Meanwhile basic behavioral screens of sensory, motor, emotional and cognitive functions were normative. We observed no alterations in performance in the elevated plus maze, light-dark preference and tail suspension assays, or two simple cognitive tasks: novel object recognition and spontaneous alternation in a Y maze. Significant deficits were found, however, when CHIP HET mice performed wire hang, inverted screen, wire maneuver, and open field tasks. Taken together, our data indicate a clear subset of behaviors that are altered at baseline in CHIP deficient animals, which will further guide whole animal studies of the effects of CHIP dysregulation on cardiac function, brain circuitry and function, and responsiveness to environmental and cellular stress.

  5. Haploinsufficiency of the E3 ubiquitin ligase C-terminus of heat shock cognate 70 interacting protein (CHIP produces specific behavioral impairments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethann McLaughlin

    Full Text Available The multifunctional E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP is an essential interacting partner of HSP70, which together promote the proteasomal degradation of client proteins. Acute CHIP overexpression provides neuroprotection against neurotoxic mitochondrial stress, glucocorticoids, and accumulation of toxic amyloid fragments, as well as genetic mutations in other E3 ligases, which have been shown to result in familial Parkinson's disease. These studies have created a great deal of interest in understanding CHIP activity, expression and modulation. While CHIP knockout mice have the potential to provide essential insights into the molecular control of cell fate and survival, the animals have been difficult to characterize in vivo due to severe phenotypic and behavioral dysfunction, which have thus far been poorly characterized. Therefore, in the present study we conducted a battery of neurobehavioral and physiological assays of adult CHIP heterozygotic (HET mutant mice to provide a better understanding of the functional consequence of CHIP deficiency. We found that CHIP HET mice had normal body and brain weight, body temperature, muscle tone and breathing patterns, but do have a significant elevation in baseline heart rate. Meanwhile basic behavioral screens of sensory, motor, emotional and cognitive functions were normative. We observed no alterations in performance in the elevated plus maze, light-dark preference and tail suspension assays, or two simple cognitive tasks: novel object recognition and spontaneous alternation in a Y maze. Significant deficits were found, however, when CHIP HET mice performed wire hang, inverted screen, wire maneuver, and open field tasks. Taken together, our data indicate a clear subset of behaviors that are altered at baseline in CHIP deficient animals, which will further guide whole animal studies of the effects of CHIP dysregulation on cardiac function, brain circuitry and function, and responsiveness to environmental and

  6. Iron alters cell survival in a mitochondria-dependent pathway in ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauckman, Kyle; Haller, Edward; Taran, Nicholas; Rockfield, Stephanie; Ruiz-Rivera, Abigail; Nanjundan, Meera

    2015-03-01

    The role of iron in the development of cancer remains unclear. We previously reported that iron reduces cell survival in a Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent manner in ovarian cells; however, the underlying downstream pathway leading to reduced survival was unclear. Although levels of intracellular iron, ferritin/CD71 protein and reactive oxygen species did not correlate with iron-induced cell survival changes, we identified mitochondrial damage (via TEM) and reduced expression of outer mitochondrial membrane proteins (translocase of outer membrane: TOM20 and TOM70) in cell lines sensitive to iron. Interestingly, Ru360 (an inhibitor of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter) reversed mitochondrial changes and restored cell survival in HEY ovarian carcinoma cells treated with iron. Further, cells treated with Ru360 and iron also had reduced autophagic punctae with increased lysosomal numbers, implying cross-talk between these compartments. Mitochondrial changes were dependent on activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway since treatment with a MAPK inhibitor restored expression of TOM20/TOM70 proteins. Although glutathione antioxidant levels were reduced in HEY treated with iron, extracellular glutamate levels were unaltered. Strikingly, oxalomalate (inhibitor of aconitase, involved in glutamate production) reversed iron-induced responses in a similar manner to Ru360. Collectively, our results implicate iron in modulating cell survival in a mitochondria-dependent manner in ovarian cancer cells.

  7. Altered distribution of peripheral blood memory B cells in humans chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Esteban R; Olivera, Gabriela C; Quebrada Palacio, Luz P; González, Mariela N; Hernandez-Vasquez, Yolanda; Sirena, Natalia María; Morán, María L; Ledesma Patiño, Oscar S; Postan, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans.

  8. Altered distribution of peripheral blood memory B cells in humans chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban R Fernández

    Full Text Available Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans.

  9. Genetic deletion of Mst1 alters T cell function and protects against autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin V Salojin

    Full Text Available Mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1 (Mst1 is a MAPK kinase kinase kinase which is involved in a wide range of cellular responses, including apoptosis, lymphocyte adhesion and trafficking. The contribution of Mst1 to Ag-specific immune responses and autoimmunity has not been well defined. In this study, we provide evidence for the essential role of Mst1 in T cell differentiation and autoimmunity, using both genetic and pharmacologic approaches. Absence of Mst1 in mice reduced T cell proliferation and IL-2 production in vitro, blocked cell cycle progression, and elevated activation-induced cell death in Th1 cells. Mst1 deficiency led to a CD4+ T cell development path that was biased toward Th2 and immunoregulatory cytokine production with suppressed Th1 responses. In addition, Mst1-/- B cells showed decreased stimulation to B cell mitogens in vitro and deficient Ag-specific Ig production in vivo. Consistent with altered lymphocyte function, deletion of Mst1 reduced the severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE and protected against collagen-induced arthritis development. Mst1-/- CD4+ T cells displayed an intrinsic defect in their ability to respond to encephalitogenic antigens and deletion of Mst1 in the CD4+ T cell compartment was sufficient to alleviate CNS inflammation during EAE. These findings have prompted the discovery of novel compounds that are potent inhibitors of Mst1 and exhibit desirable pharmacokinetic properties. In conclusion, this report implicates Mst1 as a critical regulator of adaptive immune responses, Th1/Th2-dependent cytokine production, and as a potential therapeutic target for immune disorders.

  10. Acute high-intensity sound exposure alters responses of place cells in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, T J; Møller, A R; Thompson, L T

    2009-07-01

    Overstimulation is known to activate neural plasticity in the auditory nervous system causing changes in function and re-organization. It has been shown earlier that overstimulation using high-intensity noise or tones can induce signs of tinnitus. Here we show in studies in rats that overstimulation causes changes in the way place cells of the hippocampus respond as rats search for rewards in a spatial maze. In familiar environments, a subset of hippocampal pyramidal neurons, known as place cells, respond when the animal moves through specific locations but are relatively silent in others. This place-field activity (i.e. location-specific firing) is stable in a fixed environment. The present study shows that activation of neural plasticity through overstimulation by sound can alter the response of these place cells. Rats implanted with chronic drivable dorsal hippocampal tetrodes (four microelectrodes) were assessed for stable single-unit place-field responses that were extracted from multiunit responses using NeuroExplorer computer spike-sorting software. Rats then underwent either 30 min exposure to a 4 kHz tone at 104 dB SPL or a control period in the same sound chamber. The place-field activity was significantly altered after sound exposure showing that plastic changes induced by overstimulation are not limited to the auditory nervous system but extend to other parts of the CNS, in this case to the hippocampus, a brain region often studied in the context of plasticity.

  11. Injury to the Spinal Cord Niche Alters the Engraftment Dynamics of Human Neural Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Sontag

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The microenvironment is a critical mediator of stem cell survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. The majority of preclinical studies involving transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs into the CNS have focused on injured or degenerating microenvironments, leaving a dearth of information as to how NSCs differentially respond to intact versus damaged CNS. Furthermore, single, terminal histological endpoints predominate, providing limited insight into the spatiotemporal dynamics of NSC engraftment and migration. We investigated the early and long-term engraftment dynamics of human CNS stem cells propagated as neurospheres (hCNS-SCns following transplantation into uninjured versus subacutely injured spinal cords of immunodeficient NOD-scid mice. We stereologically quantified engraftment, survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation at 1, 7, 14, 28, and 98 days posttransplantation, and identified injury-dependent alterations. Notably, the injured microenvironment decreased hCNS-SCns survival, delayed and altered the location of proliferation, influenced both total and fate-specific migration, and promoted oligodendrocyte maturation.

  12. In vitro organotin administration alters guinea pig cochlear outer hair cell shape and viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerici, W J; Chertoff, M E; Brownell, W E; Fechter, L D

    1993-06-01

    Trimethyltin (TMT) and triethyltin (TET) disrupt auditory function at doses far below those shown to be neurotoxic. In vivo studies suggest that the initial effect of TMT on hearing occurs at the inner hair cell/spiral ganglion cell synapse, while later, the outer hair cell (OHC) undergoes structural and functional damage. TET produces acute effects upon afferent neurotransmission similar to those observed following TMT, but TET's effects on OHC structure and function have not been examined. OHCs are motile elements within the cochlea, believed to modulate the sensitivity and tuning within the inner ear. Changes in OHC length may alter hearing function, and length changes have been reported following exposure to various ototoxic agents in vitro. In the present study, 77 OHCs from 45 pigmented male guinea pigs were isolated in primary culture and exposed for 90 min to concentrations between 30 microM and 1.0 mM of TMT or TET and then to bathing medium for 30 min to remove the toxicant. Significant shortening of the OHC cell body occurred at all doses to both organotins, with a mean reduction in length of 15.1 and 20.2% for 1.0 mM TMT and TET, respectively, at the end of testing; control cells were only 3.4% shorter at the end of 90 min of perfusion with bathing medium. The effect of organotin exposure on OHC volume was not consistently related to either TMT or TET concentration or altered cell length. In addition, disruption of the plasma membrane characterized by bleb formation, the forceful ejection of cytoplasm, or bursting was seen in 80% of cells exposed to 1.0 mM TET, although not TMT; lower concentrations of both organotins disrupted the cell membrane in 10-30% of cells. Membrane rupture was not reliably associated with either increased cell volume or decreased length, implicating a weakening of the plasma membrane or cortical lattice as the basis for this effect. Consistent with the irreversible structural weakening of the lateral wall, resorption of

  13. Expression, purification and biochemical characterization of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, You; Xie, Juan-Juan; Han, Zhong; Liu, Jian-Hua; Liu, Xi-Peng

    2013-02-01

    We describe the biochemical characterization of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (M. jannaschii) DNA ligase and its potential application in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. The recombinant M. jannaschii DNA ligase is an ATP-dependent ligase. The ligase activity was dependent on metal ions of Mg(2+) and Mn(2+). The optimal concentrations of ATP cofactor and Mg(2+) ion were 0.01-2 and 10 mM, respectively. The optimal pH value for DNA ligation was 8.5. High concentrations of NaCl inhibited DNA ligation. The effects of mismatches on joining short oligonucleotides by M. jannaschii DNA ligase were fully characterized. The mismatches at the first position 5' to the nick inhibited ligation more than those at the first position 3' to the nick. The mismatches at other positions 5' to the nick (3rd to 7th sites) exhibited less inhibition on ligation. However, the introduction of a C/C mismatch at the third position 5' to the nick could completely inhibit the ligation of the terminal-mismatched nick of an oligonucleotide duplex by M. jannaschii DNA ligase. Therefore, introducing an additional mismatch at the third position 5' to the SNP site is a more effective approach in genotyping by M. jannaschii DNA ligase.

  14. Differential gene regulation under altered gravity conditions in follicular thyroid cancer cells: relationship between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulbrich, C.; Pietsch, J.; Grosse, J.; Wehland, M.; Schulz, H.; Saar, K.; Hübner, N.; Hauslage, J.; Hemmersbach, R.; Braun, M.; van Loon, J.; Vagt, N.; Egli, M.; Richter, P.; Einspanier, R.; Sharbati, S.; Baltz, T.; Infanger, M.; Ma, X.; Grimm, D.

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins, adhesion molecules, and cytoskeletal proteins form a dynamic network interacting with signalling molecules as an adaptive response to altered gravity. An important issue is the exact differentiation between real microgravity responses of the cells or cellular reactions

  15. Evaluation of cell culture flasks designed for experiment under altered gravity-vector conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyotoku, Jun-Ichiro; Nagase, Mutsumu; Ando, Noboru; Tanigaki, Fumiaki; Takaoki, Muneo

    2003-10-01

    Cell culture flasks applicable for altered gravity conditions, such as centrifugation, clino-rotation or microgravity in space, were manufactured for trial. The flask has flat polystyrene surface for monolayer culture and gas-permeable film window on the opposite face. The space in-between consists the culture chamber to be filled with liquid medium. To reduce the water loss and bubble formation in the culture fluid, another gas permeable window was placed on top to form a space where distilled water may be filled. The double-decker culture flask can be used for both space and ground-based experiments in common.

  16. Re-directing an alkylating agent to mitochondria alters drug target and cell death mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rida Mourtada

    Full Text Available We have successfully delivered a reactive alkylating agent, chlorambucil (Cbl, to the mitochondria of mammalian cells. Here, we characterize the mechanism of cell death for mitochondria-targeted chlorambucil (mt-Cbl in vitro and assess its efficacy in a xenograft mouse model of leukemia. Using a ρ° cell model, we show that mt-Cbl toxicity is not dependent on mitochondrial DNA damage. We also illustrate that re-targeting Cbl to mitochondria results in a shift in the cell death mechanism from apoptosis to necrosis, and that this behavior is a general feature of mitochondria-targeted Cbl. Despite the change in cell death mechanisms, we show that mt-Cbl is still effective in vivo and has an improved pharmacokinetic profile compared to the parent drug. These findings illustrate that mitochondrial rerouting changes the site of action of Cbl and also alters the cell death mechanism drastically without compromising in vivo efficacy. Thus, mitochondrial delivery allows the exploitation of Cbl as a promiscuous mitochondrial protein inhibitor with promising therapeutic potential.

  17. Ginsenoside Rg1-induced alterations in gene expression in TNF-α stimulated endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕俊萍; 马增春; 杨静; 黄坚; 王树人; 王升启

    2004-01-01

    Background In China the ginseng root began to be used in medicine over 2000 years ago. Ginsenosides are the most important component isolated from ginseng. The authors investigated the effect of ginsenoside Rg1 on the spectrum of gene expression in the endothelial cells stimulated by TNF-α and further explored the potential molecular mechanism of endothelial protection by ginsenoside Rg1.Methods Nitric oxide (NO) production in the cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells(HUVECs) was measured by using an NO assay kit. A home-made oligonucleotide microarray containing approximately 400 cardiovascular disease-related genes was constructed. The alteration of the spectrum of gene expression induced by ginsenoside Rg1 in HUVECs which were activated by TNF-α were detected by oligonucleotide microarray analysis.Results NO production in HUVECs was decreased significantly after TNF-α treatment, while pretreatment with ginsenoside Rg1 enhanced NO production in TNF-αstimulated HUVECs. Ginsenoside Rg1 affected the expression levels of genes involved in vascular constriction, cell adherence, coagulation, cell growth and signal transduction in TNF-αstimulated HUVECs.Conclusions Ginsenoside Rg1 could enhance NO production and the expression of eNOS mRNA in TNF-α stimulated HUVECs. Ginsenoside Rg1 regulated sets of genes in endothelial cells and protected endothelial cells from TNF-αactivation. Microarray analysis provided us with valuable insights into the atheroprotective mechanism by gingsenoside Rg1.

  18. Propionibacterium acnes inhibits FOXM1 and induces cell cycle alterations in human primary prostate cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sayanjali, Behnam; Christensen, Gitte J M; Al-Zeer, Munir A;

    2016-01-01

    Propionibacterium acnes has been detected in diseased human prostate tissue, and cell culture experiments suggest that the bacterium can establish a low-grade inflammation. Here, we investigated its impact on human primary prostate epithelial cells. Microarray analysis confirmed the inflammation......-inducing capability of P. acnes but also showed deregulation of genes involved in the cell cycle. qPCR experiments showed that viable P. acnes downregulates a master regulator of cell cycle progression, FOXM1. Flow cytometry experiments revealed that P. acnes increases the number of cells in S-phase. We tested...... the hypothesis that a P. acnes-produced berninamycin-like thiopeptide is responsible for this effect, since it is related to the FOXM1 inhibitor siomycin. The thiopeptide biosynthesis gene cluster was strongly expressed; it is present in subtype IB of P. acnes, but absent from type IA, which is most abundant...

  19. Correlation of genomic and expression alterations of AS3 with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Zhang; Xiaoping Huang; Jun Qi; Cai Yan; Xin Xu; Yaling Han; Mingrong Wang

    2008-01-01

    Androgen-induced proliferation shutoff gene AS3, also known as APRIN, is a growth inhibitory gene that is in itially implicated inprostate cancer. This gene is required for androgen-dependent growth arrest and is a primary target for 1,25(OH)2D3 and androgens. Alle-lic loss at AS3 locus has been linked to a variety of cancers. However, the correlation of genomic and expression alterations of AS3 with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is not well established. In this study, the genomic and expression alterations of AS3 in ESCC and their clinical significance are evaluated. Loss of beterozygosity (LOH) analysis using an AS3 intragenic mierosatellite marker D13S171 revealed 72% allelic loss at AS3 locus in ESCC, which is significantly correlated with higher pathological grade (P=0.042).RT-PCR examination showed that AS3 mRNA obviously decreased in 44% tumors and its down-regulation was correlated with the sex of patients (P=0.03). Furthermore, the correlation between genomic and expression alterations of AS3 gene was analyzed in 18 ESCC specimens, which indicated that the consistency between allelic loss and decreased mRNA expression of AS3 was relatively poor. The results of this study indicate that the aberrant expression of AS3 may be involved in the tumorigenesis of esophagus and is responsible for the male predominance of ESCC.

  20. Distinct patterns of somatic genome alterations in lung adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Joshua D; Alexandrov, Anton; Kim, Jaegil; Wala, Jeremiah; Berger, Alice H; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Shukla, Sachet A; Guo, Guangwu; Brooks, Angela N; Murray, Bradley A; Imielinski, Marcin; Hu, Xin; Ling, Shiyun; Akbani, Rehan; Rosenberg, Mara; Cibulskis, Carrie; Ramachandran, Aruna; Collisson, Eric A; Kwiatkowski, David J; Lawrence, Michael S; Weinstein, John N; Verhaak, Roel G W; Wu, Catherine J; Hammerman, Peter S; Cherniack, Andrew D; Getz, Gad; Artyomov, Maxim N; Schreiber, Robert; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Meyerson, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    To compare lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) and to identify new drivers of lung carcinogenesis, we examined the exome sequences and copy number profiles of 660 lung ADC and 484 lung SqCC tumor-normal pairs. Recurrent alterations in lung SqCCs were more similar to those of other squamous carcinomas than to alterations in lung ADCs. New significantly mutated genes included PPP3CA, DOT1L, and FTSJD1 in lung ADC, RASA1 in lung SqCC, and KLF5, EP300, and CREBBP in both tumor types. New amplification peaks encompassed MIR21 in lung ADC, MIR205 in lung SqCC, and MAPK1 in both. Lung ADCs lacking receptor tyrosine kinase-Ras-Raf pathway alterations had mutations in SOS1, VAV1, RASA1, and ARHGAP35. Regarding neoantigens, 47% of the lung ADC and 53% of the lung SqCC tumors had at least five predicted neoepitopes. Although targeted therapies for lung ADC and SqCC are largely distinct, immunotherapies may aid in treatment for both subtypes.

  1. Propionibacterium acnes inhibits FOXM1 and induces cell cycle alterations in human primary prostate cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayanjali, Behnam; Christensen, Gitte J M; Al-Zeer, Munir A; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Meyer, Thomas F; Brüggemann, Holger

    2016-11-01

    Propionibacterium acnes has been detected in diseased human prostate tissue, and cell culture experiments suggest that the bacterium can establish a low-grade inflammation. Here, we investigated its impact on human primary prostate epithelial cells. Microarray analysis confirmed the inflammation-inducing capability of P. acnes but also showed deregulation of genes involved in the cell cycle. qPCR experiments showed that viable P. acnes downregulates a master regulator of cell cycle progression, FOXM1. Flow cytometry experiments revealed that P. acnes increases the number of cells in S-phase. We tested the hypothesis that a P. acnes-produced berninamycin-like thiopeptide is responsible for this effect, since it is related to the FOXM1 inhibitor siomycin. The thiopeptide biosynthesis gene cluster was strongly expressed; it is present in subtype IB of P. acnes, but absent from type IA, which is most abundant on human skin. A knock-out mutant lacking the gene encoding the berninamycin-like peptide precursor was unable to downregulate FOXM1 and to halt the cell cycle. Our study reveals a novel host cell-interacting activity of P. acnes.

  2. Melanoma cell-derived exosomes alter macrophage and dendritic cell functions in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Annamaria; Vizler, Csaba; Kusz, Erzsebet; Temesfoi, Viktoria; Szathmary, Zsuzsa; Nagy, Krisztina; Szegletes, Zsolt; Varo, Gyorgy; Siklos, Laszlo; Katona, Robert L; Tubak, Vilmos; Howard, O M Zack; Duda, Erno; Minarovits, Janos; Nagy, Katalin; Buzas, Krisztina

    2012-01-01

    To clarify controversies in the literature of the field, we have purified and characterized B16F1 melanoma cell derived exosomes (mcd-exosomes) then we attempted to dissect their immunological activities. We tested how mcd-exosomes influence CD4+ T cell proliferation induced by bone marrow derived dendritic cells; we quantified NF-κB activation in mature macrophages stimulated with mcd-exosomes, and we compared the cytokine profile of LPS-stimulated, IL-4 induced, and mcd-exosome treated macrophages. We observed that mcd-exosomes helped the maturation of dendritic cells, enhancing T cell proliferation induced by the treated dendritic cells. The exosomes also activated macrophages, as measured by NF-κB activation. The cytokine and chemokine profile of macrophages treated with tumor cell derived exosomes showed marked differences from those induced by either LPS or IL-4, and it suggested that exosomes may play a role in the tumor progression and metastasis formation through supporting tumor immune escape mechanisms.

  3. Aluminum oxide nanoparticles alter cell cycle progression through CCND1 and EGR1 gene expression in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periasamy, Vaiyapuri Subbarayan; Athinarayanan, Jegan; Alshatwi, Ali A

    2016-05-01

    Aluminum oxide nanoparticles (Al2 O3 -NPs) are important ceramic materials that have been used in a variety of commercial and industrial applications. However, the impact of acute and chronic exposure to Al2 O3 -NPs on the environment and on human health has not been well studied. In this investigation, we evaluated the cytotoxic effects of Al2 O3 -NPs on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) by using a cell viability assay and observing cellular morphological changes, analyzing cell cycle progression, and monitoring the expression of cell cycle response genes (PCNA, EGR1, E2F1, CCND1, CCNC, CCNG1, and CYCD3). The Al2 O3 -NPs reduced hMSC viability in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Nuclear condensation and fragmentation, chromosomal DNA fragmentation, and cytoplasmic vacuolization were observed in Al2 O3 -NP-exposed cells. The nuclear morphological changes indicated that Al2 O3 -NPs alter cell cycle progression and gene expression. The cell cycle distribution revealed that Al2 O3 -NPs cause cell cycle arrest in the sub-G0-G1 phase, and this is associated with a reduction in the cell population in the G2/M and G0/G1 phases. Moreover, Al2 O3 -NPs induced the upregulation of cell cycle response genes, including EGR1, E2F1, and CCND1. Our results suggested that exposure to Al2 O3 -NPs could cause acute cytotoxic effects in hMSCs through cell cycle regulatory genes.

  4. Inhibition of Lon protease by triterpenoids alters mitochondria and is associated to cell death in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibellini, Lara; Pinti, Marcello; Bartolomeo, Regina; De Biasi, Sara; Cormio, Antonella; Musicco, Clara; Carnevale, Gianluca; Pecorini, Simone; Nasi, Milena; De Pol, Anto; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2015-09-22

    Mitochondrial Lon protease (Lon) regulates several mitochondrial functions, and is inhibited by the anticancer molecule triterpenoid 2-cyano-3, 12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO), or by its C-28 methyl ester derivative (CDDO-Me). To analyze the mechanism of action of triterpenoids, we investigated intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial mass, mitochondrial dynamics and morphology, and Lon proteolytic activity in RKO human colon cancer cells, in HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells and in MCF7 breast carcinoma cells. We found that CDDO and CDDO-Me are potent stressors for mitochondria in cancer cells, rather than normal non-transformed cells. In particular, they: i) cause depolarization; ii) increase mitochondrial ROS, iii) alter mitochondrial morphology and proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics; iv) affect the levels of Lon and those of aconitase and human transcription factor A, which are targets of Lon activity; v) increase level of protein carbonyls in mitochondria; vi) lead to intrinsic apoptosis. The overexpression of Lon can rescue cells from cell death, providing an additional evidence on the role of Lon in conditions of excessive stress load.

  5. Antiproliferative Effects of Drugs on Endothelial and Osteoblastic Cells and Altered Release of Angioregulatory Mediators by Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilde Kvestad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The combined use of the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (VPA, the retinoic acid receptor-α agonist all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA, and the deoxyribonucleic acid polymerase-α inhibitor cytarabine (Ara-C is now considered for disease-stabilizing treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Leukemogenesis and leukemia cell chemoresistance seem to be supported by neighbouring stromal cells in the bone marrow, and we have therefore investigated the effects of these drugs on primary human endothelial cells and the osteoblastic Cal72 cell line. The results show that VPA and Ara-C have antiproliferative effects, and the antiproliferative/cytotoxic effect of Ara-C was seen at low concentrations corresponding to serum levels found during low-dose in vivo treatment. Furthermore, in functional assays of endothelial migration and tube formation VPA elicited an antiangiogenic effect, whereas ATRA elicited a proangiogenic effect. Finally, VPA and ATRA altered the endothelial cell release of angiogenic mediators; ATRA increased levels of CXCL8, PDGF-AA, and VEGF-D, while VPA decreased VEGF-D and PDGF-AA/BB levels and both drugs reduced MMP-2 levels. Several of these mediators can enhance AML cell proliferation and/or are involved in AML-induced bone marrow angiogenesis, and direct pharmacological effects on stromal cells may thus indirectly contribute to the overall antileukemic activity of this triple drug combination.

  6. Rat hepatic stellate cells alter the gene expression profile and promote the growth, migration and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Ming; Zhou, Le-Yuan; Liu, Bin-Bin; Jia, Qin-An; Dong, Yin-Ying; Xia, Yun-Hong; Ye, Sheng-Long

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) and their paracrine secretions, on hepatocellular cancer cell growth and gene expression in vitro and in vivo. Differentially expressed genes in McA-RH7777 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells following non-contact co-culture with activated stellate cells, were identified by a cDNA microarray. The effect of the co-injection of HCC cells and activated HSCs on tumor size in rats was also investigated. Non-contact co-culture altered the expression of 573 HCC genes by >2-fold of the control levels. Among the six selected genes, ELISA revealed increased protein levels of hepatic growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and -9 (MMP-9). Incubation of HCC cells with medium conditioned by activated HSCs significantly increased the proliferation rate (Pprofile of HCC cells and affected their growth, migration and invasiveness. The results from the present study indicate that the interaction between the activated HSCs and HCC has an important role in the development of HCC.

  7. Phenotypic and Functional Alterations in Circulating Memory CD8 T Cells with Time after Primary Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Matthew D.; Kim, Marie T.; Shan, Qiang; Sompallae, Ramakrishna; Xue, Hai-Hui; Harty, John T.; Badovinac, Vladimir P.

    2015-01-01

    Memory CD8 T cells confer increased protection to immune hosts upon secondary viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections. The level of protection provided depends on the numbers, quality (functional ability), and location of memory CD8 T cells present at the time of infection. While primary memory CD8 T cells can be maintained for the life of the host, the full extent of phenotypic and functional changes that occur over time after initial antigen encounter remains poorly characterized. Here we show that critical properties of circulating primary memory CD8 T cells, including location, phenotype, cytokine production, maintenance, secondary proliferation, secondary memory generation potential, and mitochondrial function change with time after infection. Interestingly, phenotypic and functional alterations in the memory population are not due solely to shifts in the ratio of effector (CD62Llo) and central memory (CD62Lhi) cells, but also occur within defined CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cell subsets. CD62Lhi memory cells retain the ability to efficiently produce cytokines with time after infection. However, while it is was not formally tested whether changes in CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cells over time occur in a cell intrinsic manner or are due to selective death and/or survival, the gene expression profiles of CD62Lhi memory CD8 T cells change, phenotypic heterogeneity decreases, and mitochondrial function and proliferative capacity in either a lymphopenic environment or in response to antigen re-encounter increase with time. Importantly, and in accordance with their enhanced proliferative and metabolic capabilities, protection provided against chronic LCMV clone-13 infection increases over time for both circulating memory CD8 T cell populations and for CD62Lhi memory cells. Taken together, the data in this study reveal that memory CD8 T cells continue to change with time after infection and suggest that the outcome of vaccination strategies designed to elicit protective memory

  8. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L; Tomkinson, Alan E; Tainer, John A; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-08-18

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation.

  9. MDM2 is a novel E3 ligase for HIV-1 Vif

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomonaga Mitsunori

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 Vif plays a crucial role in the viral life cycle by antagonizing a host restriction factor APOBEC3G (A3G. Vif interacts with A3G and induces its polyubiquitination and subsequent degradation via the formation of active ubiquitin ligase (E3 complex with Cullin5-ElonginB/C. Although Vif itself is also ubiquitinated and degraded rapidly in infected cells, precise roles and mechanisms of Vif ubiquitination are largely unknown. Here we report that MDM2, known as an E3 ligase for p53, is a novel E3 ligase for Vif and induces polyubiquitination and degradation of Vif. We also show the mechanisms by which MDM2 only targets Vif, but not A3G that binds to Vif. MDM2 reduces cellular Vif levels and reversely increases A3G levels, because the interaction between MDM2 and Vif precludes A3G from binding to Vif. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MDM2 negatively regulates HIV-1 replication in non-permissive target cells through Vif degradation. These data suggest that MDM2 is a regulator of HIV-1 replication and might be a novel therapeutic target for anti-HIV-1 drug.

  10. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Tainer, John A.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation. PMID:26130724

  11. T-cell intracellular antigen (TIA-proteins deficiency in murine embryonic fibroblasts alters cell cycle progression and induces autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sánchez-Jiménez

    Full Text Available Mice lacking either T-cell intracellular antigen 1 (TIA1 or TIA1 related/like protein (TIAR/TIAL1 show high rates of embryonic lethality, suggesting a relevant role for these proteins during embryonic development. However, intrinsic molecular and cellular consequences of either TIA1 or TIAR deficiency remain poorly defined. By using genome-wide expression profiling approach, we demonstrate that either TIA1 or TIAR inactivation broadly alter normal development-associated signalling pathways in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF. Indeed, these analyses highlighted alterations of cytokine-cytokine and ECM-receptor interactions and Wnt, MAPK, TGF-beta dependent signalling pathways. Consistent with these results, TIA1 and TIAR knockout (KO MEF show reduced rates of cell proliferation, cell cycle progression delay and increased cell size. Furthermore, TIA-proteins deficiency also caused metabolic deficiencies, increased ROS levels and DNA damage, promoting a gentle rise of cell death. Concomitantly, high rates of autophagy were detected in both TIA1 and TIAR KO MEF with induction of the formation of autophagosomes, as evidenced by the up-regulation of the LC3B protein, and autolysosomes, measured by colocalization of LC3B and LAMP1, as a survival mechanism attempt. Taken together, these observations support that TIA proteins orchestrate a transcriptome programme to activate specific developmental decisions. This program is likely to contribute to mouse physiology starting at early stages of the embryonic development. TIA1/TIAR might function as cell sensors to maintain homeostasis and promote adaptation/survival responses to developmental stress.

  12. Expression of activated Ras during Dictyostelium development alters cell localization and changes cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, Z M; Khosla, M; Spiegelman, G B; Weeks, G

    2001-03-01

    There is now a body of evidence to indicate that Ras proteins play important roles in development. Dictyostelium expresses several ras genes and each appears to perform a distinct function. Previous data had indicated that the overexpression of an activated form of the major developmentally regulated gene, rasD, caused a major aberration in morphogenesis and cell type determination. We now show that the developmental expression of an activated rasG gene under the control of the rasD promoter causes a similar defect. Our results indicate that the expression of activated rasG in prespore cells results in their transdifferentiation into prestalk cells, whereas activated rasG expression in prestalk causes gross mislocalization of the prestalk cell populations.

  13. NF-Y activates genes of metabolic pathways altered in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, Paolo; Chiaramonte, Maria Luisa; Lorenzo, Mariangela; Hartley, John A; Hochhauser, Daniel; Gnesutta, Nerina; Mantovani, Roberto; Imbriano, Carol; Dolfini, Diletta

    2016-01-12

    The trimeric transcription factor NF-Y binds to the CCAAT box, an element enriched in promoters of genes overexpressed in tumors. Previous studies on the NF-Y regulome identified the general term metabolism as significantly enriched. We dissect here in detail the targeting of metabolic genes by integrating analysis of NF-Y genomic binding and profilings after inactivation of NF-Y subunits in different cell types. NF-Y controls de novo biosynthetic pathways of lipids, teaming up with the master SREBPs regulators. It activates glycolytic genes, but, surprisingly, is neutral or represses mitochondrial respiratory genes. NF-Y targets the SOCG (Serine, One Carbon, Glycine) and Glutamine pathways, as well as genes involved in the biosynthesis of polyamines and purines. Specific cancer-driving nodes are generally under NF-Y control. Altogether, these data delineate a coherent strategy to promote expression of metabolic genes fuelling anaerobic energy production and other anabolic pathways commonly altered in cancer cells.

  14. Uncivil engineers: Chlamydia, Salmonella and Shigella alter cytoskeleton architecture to invade epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Joe Dan; Valdivia, Raphael H

    2010-08-01

    The obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis is a major cause of blindness and sexually transmitted diseases. Like the enteric pathogens Salmonella and Shigella, Chlamydia injects effector proteins into epithelial cells to initiate extensive remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton at the bacterial attachment site, which culminates in the engulfment of the bacterium by plasma membrane extensions. Numerous Salmonella and Shigella effectors promote this remodeling by activating Rho GTPases and tyrosine kinase signaling cascades and by directly manipulating actin dynamics. Recent studies indicate that similar host-cell alterations occur during Chlamydia invasion, but few effectors are known. The identification of additional Chlamydia effectors and the elucidation of their modes of function are critical steps towards an understanding of how this clinically important pathogen breaches epithelial surfaces and causes infection.

  15. Alteration of T cell function in healthy persons with a history of thymic x irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieger, C.H.L.; Kraft, S.C.; Rothberg, R.M.

    1975-10-01

    The possible late effects of x irradiation to the infantile thymus were investigated by studying immune functions in 12 healthy persons with a history of thymic x irradiation and healthy control subjects. No differences were found in serum immunoglobulin values, humoral antibody levels, lymphocyte counts, and lymphocyte reactivity to phytohemagglutinin, vaccinia virus, purified protein derivative (PPD), and allogeneic cells. The irradiation group exhibited cellular hyperresponsiveness to streptokinase-streptodornase (SK-SD). In contrast, mean skin and in vitro lymphocyte responses to Candida albicans were depressed in the patients with thymic irradiation. A dissociation of these two Candida responses was found in only 1 of 14 healthy control subjects but in 7 of 12 irradiated individuals. While thymic irradiation did not result in impaired immunologic defenses leading to clinical disease, it caused alterations in T cell responses similar to those reported in patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis.

  16. Chemokine Receptor Ccr6 Deficiency Alters Hepatic Inflammatory Cell Recruitment and Promotes Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Affò

    Full Text Available Chronic liver diseases are characterized by a sustained inflammatory response in which chemokines and chemokine-receptors orchestrate inflammatory cell recruitment. In this study we investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR6 in acute and chronic liver injury. In the absence of liver injury Ccr6-/- mice presented a higher number of hepatic macrophages and increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and M1 markers Tnf-α, Il6 and Mcp1. Inflammation and cell recruitment were increased after carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in Ccr6-/- mice. Moreover, chronic liver injury by carbon tetrachloride in Ccr6-/- mice was associated with enhanced inflammation and fibrosis, altered macrophage recruitment, enhanced CD4+ cells and a reduction in Th17 (CD4+IL17+ and mature dendritic (MHCII+CD11c+ cells recruitment. Clodronate depletion of macrophages in Ccr6-/- mice resulted in a reduction of hepatic pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic markers in the absence and after liver injury. Finally, increased CCR6 hepatic expression in patients with alcoholic hepatitis was found to correlate with liver expression of CCL20 and severity of liver disease. In conclusion, CCR6 deficiency affects hepatic inflammatory cell recruitment resulting in the promotion of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis.

  17. Chemokine Receptor Ccr6 Deficiency Alters Hepatic Inflammatory Cell Recruitment and Promotes Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affò, Silvia; Rodrigo-Torres, Daniel; Blaya, Delia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Coll, Mar; Millán, Cristina; Altamirano, José; Arroyo, Vicente; Caballería, Joan; Bataller, Ramón; Ginès, Pere; Sancho-Bru, Pau

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases are characterized by a sustained inflammatory response in which chemokines and chemokine-receptors orchestrate inflammatory cell recruitment. In this study we investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR6 in acute and chronic liver injury. In the absence of liver injury Ccr6-/- mice presented a higher number of hepatic macrophages and increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and M1 markers Tnf-α, Il6 and Mcp1. Inflammation and cell recruitment were increased after carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in Ccr6-/- mice. Moreover, chronic liver injury by carbon tetrachloride in Ccr6-/- mice was associated with enhanced inflammation and fibrosis, altered macrophage recruitment, enhanced CD4+ cells and a reduction in Th17 (CD4+IL17+) and mature dendritic (MHCII+CD11c+) cells recruitment. Clodronate depletion of macrophages in Ccr6-/- mice resulted in a reduction of hepatic pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic markers in the absence and after liver injury. Finally, increased CCR6 hepatic expression in patients with alcoholic hepatitis was found to correlate with liver expression of CCL20 and severity of liver disease. In conclusion, CCR6 deficiency affects hepatic inflammatory cell recruitment resulting in the promotion of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis.

  18. Fingolimod alters the transcriptome profile of circulating CD4+ cells in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friess, Jörg; Hecker, Michael; Roch, Luisa; Koczan, Dirk; Fitzner, Brit; Angerer, Ines Charlotte; Schröder, Ina; Flechtner, Kristin; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen; Winkelmann, Alexander; Zettl, Uwe Klaus

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a demyelinating disease affecting the central nervous system. T cells are known to contribute to this immune-mediated condition. Fingolimod modulates sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors, thereby preventing the egress of lymphocytes, especially CCR7-expressing CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, from lymphoid tissues. Using Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Arrays (HTA 2.0), we performed a transcriptome profiling analysis of CD4+ cells obtained from the peripheral blood of patients with highly active relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. The samples were drawn before the first administration of fingolimod as well as 24 hours and 3 months after the start of therapy. Three months after treatment initiation, 890 genes were found to be differentially expressed with fold-change >2.0 and t-test p-value CCR7 as expected, while 618 genes showed an increase in expression, e.g., CCR2, CX3CR1, CD39, CD58 as well as LYN, PAK1 and TLR2. To conclude, we studied the gene expression of CD4+ cells to evaluate the effects of fingolimod treatment, and we identified 890 genes to be altered in expression after continuous drug administration. T helper cells circulating in the blood during fingolimod therapy present a distinct gene expression signature. PMID:28155899

  19. Genetic alteration of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 in human germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiokawa, Motoko; Masutani, Mitsuko; Fujihara, Hisako; Ueki, Keisuke; Nishikawa, Ryo; Sugimura, Takashi; Kubo, Harumi; Nakagama, Hitoshi

    2005-02-01

    Accumulated evidence suggests that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is involved in DNA repair, cell-death induction, differentiation and tumorigenesis. Parp-1 deficiency also induces trophoblast differentiation from mouse embryonic stem cells during teratocarcinoma-like tumor formation. To understand the relationship of PARP-1 dysfunction and development of germ cell tumors, we conducted a genetic analysis of the PARP-1 gene in human germ cell tumors. Sixteen surgical specimens of germ cell tumors that developed in the brain and testes were used. Two known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (Val762Ala and Lys940Arg), which are listed in the SNP database of the NCBI (National Center for Biotechnology Information), were detected. In both cases, cSNPs encoded amino acids located within peptide stretches in the catalytic domain, which are highly conserved among various animal species. Furthermore, another novel sequence alteration, a base change of ATG to ACG, was identified in a tumor specimen, which would result in the amino acid substitution, Met129Thr. This base change was observed in one allele of both tumor and normal tissues, suggesting that it is either a rare SNP or a germline mutation of the PARP-1 gene. Notably, the amino acid Met129 is located within the second zinc finger domain, which is essential for DNA binding and is conserved among animal species. One SNP in intron 2 and one in the upstream 5'-UTR (untranslated region) were also detected.

  20. Diet-induced obesity alters dendritic cell function in the presence and absence of tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Britnie R; Tomanek-Chalkley, Ann; Askeland, Eric J; Kucaba, Tamara; Griffith, Thomas S; Norian, Lyse A

    2012-08-01

    Obesity is a mounting health concern in the United States and is associated with an increased risk for developing several cancers, including renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Despite this, little is known regarding the impact of obesity on antitumor immunity. Because dendritic cells (DC) are critical regulators of antitumor immunity, we examined the combined effects of obesity and tumor outgrowth on DC function. Using a diet-induced obesity (DIO) model, DC function was evaluated in mice bearing orthotopic RCC and in tumor-free controls. Tumor-free DIO mice had profoundly altered serum cytokine and chemokine profiles, with upregulation of 15 proteins, including IL-1α, IL-17, and LIF. Tumor-free DIO mice had elevated percentages of conventional splenic DC that were impaired in their ability to stimulate naive T cell expansion, although they were phenotypically similar to normal weight (NW) controls. In DIO mice, intrarenal RCC tumor challenge in the absence of therapy led to increased local infiltration by T cell-suppressive DC and accelerated early tumor outgrowth. Following administration of a DC-dependent immunotherapy, established RCC tumors regressed in normal weight mice. The same immunotherapy was ineffective in DIO mice and was characterized by an accumulation of regulatory DC in tumor-bearing kidneys, decreased local infiltration by IFN-γ-producing CD8 T cells, and progressive tumor outgrowth. Our results suggest that the presence of obesity as a comorbidity can impair the efficacy of DC-dependent antitumor immunotherapies.

  1. Systems and synthetic biology approaches to alter plant cell walls and reduce biomass recalcitrance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Udaya C; Yin, Hengfu; Yang, Xiaohan; Davison, Brian H

    2014-12-01

    Fine-tuning plant cell wall properties to render plant biomass more amenable to biofuel conversion is a colossal challenge. A deep knowledge of the biosynthesis and regulation of plant cell wall and a high-precision genome engineering toolset are the two essential pillars of efforts to alter plant cell walls and reduce biomass recalcitrance. The past decade has seen a meteoric rise in use of transcriptomics and high-resolution imaging methods resulting in fresh insights into composition, structure, formation and deconstruction of plant cell walls. Subsequent gene manipulation approaches, however, commonly include ubiquitous mis-expression of a single candidate gene in a host that carries an intact copy of the native gene. The challenges posed by pleiotropic and unintended changes resulting from such an approach are moving the field towards synthetic biology approaches. Synthetic biology builds on a systems biology knowledge base and leverages high-precision tools for high-throughput assembly of multigene constructs and pathways, precision genome editing and site-specific gene stacking, silencing and/or removal. Here, we summarize the recent breakthroughs in biosynthesis and remodelling of major secondary cell wall components, assess the impediments in obtaining a systems-level understanding and explore the potential opportunities in leveraging synthetic biology approaches to reduce biomass recalcitrance. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Altered expression of nuclear matrix proteins in etoposide induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The events of cell death and the expression of nuclear matrix protein(NMP)have been investigated in a promyelocytic leukemic cell line HL-60 induced with etoposide.By means of TUNEL assay,the nuclei displayed a characteristic morphology change,and the amount of apoptotic cells increased early and reached maximun about 39% after treatment with etoposide for 2 h.Nucleosomal DNA fragmentation was observed after treatment for 4 h.The morphological change of HL-60 cells,thus,occurred earlier than the appearance of DNA ladder.Total nuclear matrix proteins were analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis.Differential expression of 59 nuclear matrix proteins was found in 4 h etoposide treated cells.Western blotting was then performed on three nuclear matrix acssociated proteins,PML,HSC70 and NuMA.The expression of the suppressor PML protein and heat shock protein HSC70 were significantly upregulated after etoposide treatment,while NuMA,a nuclear mitotic apparatus protein,was down regulated.These results demonstrate that significant biochemical alterations in nuclear matrix proteins take place during the apoptotic process.

  3. Alteration of osteoblast arrangement via direct attack by cancer cells: New insights into bone metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yumi; Matsugaki, Aira; Sekita, Aiko; Nakano, Takayoshi

    2017-01-01

    Intact bone tissue exhibits a characteristic anisotropic microstructure derived from collagen fiber alignment and the related c-axis orientation of apatite crystals, which govern the mechanical properties of bone tissue. In contrast, tumor-invaded bone exhibits a disorganized, less-aligned microstructure that results in severely disrupted mechanical function. Despite its importance both in basic principle and in therapeutic applications, the classical understanding of bone metastasis is limited to alterations in bone mass regulated by metastatic cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrate a novel mechanism underlying the disruption of bone tissue anisotropy in metastasized bone. We observed that direct attack by cancer cells on osteoblasts induces the less-organized osteoblast arrangement. Importantly, the crystallographic anisotropy of bone tissue is quantitatively determined by the level of osteoblast arrangement. Osteoblast arrangement was significantly disrupted by physical contact with cancer cells such as osteolytic melanoma B16F10, breast cancer MDA-MB-231, and osteoblastic prostate cancer MDA-PCa-2b cells. The present findings demonstrate that the abnormal arrangement of osteoblasts induced by physical contact with cancer cells facilitates the disorganized microstructure of metastasized bone. PMID:28303941

  4. Matrine alters microRNA expression profiles in SGC-7901 human gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hailong; Xie, Shoupin; Liu, Xiaojun; Wu, Hongyan; Lin, Xingyao; Gu, Jing; Wang, Huping; Duan, Yongqiang

    2014-11-01

    Matrine, a major alkaloid extracted from Sophora flavescens, has been reported to possess antitumor properties in several types of cancers, including gastric cancer. However, its mechanisms of action on gastric cancer remain poorly understood. Dysregulation of microRNAs, a class of small, non-coding, regulatory RNA molecules involved in gene expression, is strongly correlated with cancer. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate that matrine treatment altered miRNA expression in SGC7901 cells. Using miRCURY™ microarray analysis, we identified 128 miRNAs substantially exhibiting >2-fold expression changes in matrine-treated cells relative to their expression levels in untreated cells. RT-qPCR was used to show that the levels of 8 miRNAs whose target genes were clustered in the cell cycle pathway increased, while levels of 14 miRNAs whose target genes were clustered in the MAPK signaling pathway decreased. These results were consistent with those from the miRNA microarray experiment. Bioinformatical analysis revealed that the majority of 57 identified enrichment pathways were highly involved in tumorigenesis. In conclusion, the results demonstrated that matrine induces considerable changes in the miRNA expression profiles of SGC7901 cells, suggesting miRNA microarray combined with RT-qPCR validation and bioinformatical analysis provide a novel and promising approach to identify anticancer targets and the mechanisms of matrine involved.

  5. Chemokine Receptor Ccr6 Deficiency Alters Hepatic Inflammatory Cell Recruitment and Promotes Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaya, Delia; Morales-Ibanez, Oriol; Coll, Mar; Millán, Cristina; Altamirano, José; Arroyo, Vicente; Caballería, Joan; Bataller, Ramón; Ginès, Pere; Sancho-Bru, Pau

    2015-01-01

    Chronic liver diseases are characterized by a sustained inflammatory response in which chemokines and chemokine-receptors orchestrate inflammatory cell recruitment. In this study we investigated the role of the chemokine receptor CCR6 in acute and chronic liver injury. In the absence of liver injury Ccr6-/- mice presented a higher number of hepatic macrophages and increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and M1 markers Tnf-α, Il6 and Mcp1. Inflammation and cell recruitment were increased after carbon tetrachloride-induced acute liver injury in Ccr6-/- mice. Moreover, chronic liver injury by carbon tetrachloride in Ccr6-/- mice was associated with enhanced inflammation and fibrosis, altered macrophage recruitment, enhanced CD4+ cells and a reduction in Th17 (CD4+IL17+) and mature dendritic (MHCII+CD11c+) cells recruitment. Clodronate depletion of macrophages in Ccr6-/- mice resulted in a reduction of hepatic pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic markers in the absence and after liver injury. Finally, increased CCR6 hepatic expression in patients with alcoholic hepatitis was found to correlate with liver expression of CCL20 and severity of liver disease. In conclusion, CCR6 deficiency affects hepatic inflammatory cell recruitment resulting in the promotion of hepatic inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:26691857

  6. Alterations in Circulating Immune Cells in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Judith; Chen, Mei; Hogg, Ruth E; Toth, Levente; Silvestri, Giuliana; Chakravarthy, Usha; Xu, Heping

    2015-11-17

    Neovascular age-related macular degeneration (nAMD) is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in developed countries. Recent advances have highlighted the essential role of inflammation in the development of the disease. In addition to local retinal chronic inflammatory response, systemic immune alterations have also been observed in AMD patients. In this study we investigated the association between the frequency of circulating leukocyte populations and the prevalence as well as clinical presentations of nAMD. Leukocyte subsets of 103 nAMD patients (most of them were receiving anti-VEGF therapy prior to enrolment) and 26 controls were analysed by flow cytometry by relative cell size, granularity and surface markers. Circulating CD11b(+) cells and CD16(hi)HLA-DR(-) neutrophils were significantly increased (P = 0.015 and 0.009 respectively) in nAMD when compared to controls. The percentage of circulating CD4(+) T-cells was reduced in nAMD patients without subretinal fibrosis (P = 0.026) compared to patients with subretinal fibrosis. There was no correlation between the percentage of circulating leukocytes and the responsiveness to anti-VEGF therapy in nAMD patients. Our results suggest that higher levels of circulating CD11b(+) cells and neutrophils are associated with nAMD and that reduced levels of CD4(+) T-cells are associated with the absence of subretinal fibrosis in nAMD.

  7. Selenium Protects Retinal Cells from Cisplatin-Induced Alterations in Carbohydrate Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akşit, Dilek; Yazıcı, Alper; Akşit, Hasan; Sarı, Esin S.; Yay, Arzu; Yıldız, Onur; Kılıç, Adil; Ermiş, Sıtkı S.; Seyrek, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Background: Investigate alterations in the expression and localization of carbohydrate units in rat retinal cells exposed to cisplatin toxicity. Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate putative protective effects of selenium on retinal cells subjected to cisplatin. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: Eighteen healthy Wistar rats were divided into three equal groups: 1. Control, 2. Cisplatin and 3. Cisplatin+selenium groups. After anesthesia, the right eye of each rat was enucleated. Results: Histochemically, retinal cells of control groups reacted with α-2,3-bound sialic acid-specific Maackia amurensis lectin (MAA) strongly, while cisplatin reduced the staining intensity for MAA. However, selenium administration alleviated the reducing effect of cisplatin on the binding sites for MAA in retinal cells. The staining intensity for N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc residues) specific Griffonia simplicifolia-1 (GSL–1) was relatively slight in control animals and cisplatin reduced this slight staining for GSL-1 further. Selenium administration mitigated the reducing effect of cisplatin on the binding sites for GSL-1. A diffuse staining for N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) specific wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) was observed throughout the retina of the control animals. In particular, cells localized in the inner plexiform and photoreceptor layers are reacted strongly with WGA. Compared to the control animals, binding sites for WGA in the retina of rats given cisplatin were remarkably decreased. However, the retinal cells of rats given selenium reacted strongly with WGA. Conclusion: Cisplatin reduces α-2,3-bound sialic acid, GlcNAc and GalNAc residues in certain retinal cells. However, selenium alleviates the reducing effect of cisplatin on carbohydrate residues in retinal cells. PMID:27606141

  8. Alteration of CD44 expression in HIV type 1-infected T cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordanengo, V; Limouse, M; Doglio, A; Lesimple, J; Lefebvre, J C

    1996-11-20

    CD44 is known to interfere in HIV replication and to participate in many physiological processes such as lymphocyte binding to high endothelial venules of lymphoid tissue, lymph nodes, and mucosal endothelium. The T cell lines MOLT-4 and CEM, and CEM subclones were infected with the HIV-1 LAI strain and monitored for the expression of CD44 during the course of chronic virus production until the infected cells were at the stage of latent infection. The levels of CD44 protein expression were quantified using cell surface immunostaining and biotinylation. The maturation of CD44 molecules was evaluated by metabolic sulforadiolabeling and CD44 mRNA was visualized by Northern blot analysis. We show a downmodulation of CD44 expression in infected T cell lines and subclones. This phenomenon was most evident at the stage of latent infection. Then, CD44 molecules were undetectable at both the protein and mRNA levels in latently infected CEM cells and CEM subclones. In addition, the 97-kDa standard CD44 isoform showed a shift upward, while detectable during the stage of chronic virus production. In latently infected MOLT-4 cells, the CD44 protein levels were dramatically decreased; CD44 mRNA was detected, but the sizes differed from the mRNA in uninfected cells. Since CD44 is known to regulate in part lymphocyte homing and HIV replication, the alterations that were observed in the expression of this molecule could interfere with the particular homing of HIV-infected cells and/or viral latency.

  9. Rapid alterations of cell cycle control proteins in human T lymphocytes in microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiel Cora S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In our study we aimed to identify rapidly reacting gravity-responsive mechanisms in mammalian cells in order to understand if and how altered gravity is translated into a cellular response. In a combination of experiments using "functional weightlessness" provided by 2D-clinostats and real microgravity provided by several parabolic flight campaigns and compared to in-flight-1g-controls, we identified rapid gravity-responsive reactions inside the cell cycle regulatory machinery of human T lymphocytes. In response to 2D clinorotation, we detected an enhanced expression of p21 Waf1/Cip1 protein within minutes, less cdc25C protein expression and enhanced Ser147-phosphorylation of cyclinB1 after CD3/CD28 stimulation. Additionally, during 2D clinorotation, Tyr-15-phosphorylation occurred later and was shorter than in the 1 g controls. In CD3/CD28-stimulated primary human T cells, mRNA expression of the cell cycle arrest protein p21 increased 4.1-fold after 20s real microgravity in primary CD4+ T cells and 2.9-fold in Jurkat T cells, compared to 1 g in-flight controls after CD3/CD28 stimulation. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT inhibitor curcumin was able to abrogate microgravity-induced p21 mRNA expression, whereas expression was enhanced by a histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor. Therefore, we suppose that cell cycle progression in human T lymphocytes requires Earth gravity and that the disturbed expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins could contribute to the breakdown of the human immune system in space.

  10. Shear Stress-Induced Alteration of Epithelial Organization in Human Renal Tubular Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Maggiorani

    Full Text Available Tubular epithelial cells in the kidney are continuously exposed to urinary fluid shear stress (FSS generated by urine movement and recent in vitro studies suggest that changes of FSS could contribute to kidney injury. However it is unclear whether FSS alters the epithelial characteristics of the renal tubule. Here, we evaluated in vitro and in vivo the influence of FSS on epithelial characteristics of renal proximal tubular cells taking the organization of junctional complexes and the presence of the primary cilium as markers of epithelial phenotype. Human tubular cells (HK-2 were subjected to FSS (0.5 Pa for 48 h. Control cells were maintained under static conditions. Markers of tight junctions (Claudin-2, ZO-1, Par polarity complex (Pard6, adherens junctions (E-Cadherin, β-Catenin and the primary cilium (α-acetylated Tubulin were analysed by quantitative PCR, Western blot or immunocytochemistry. In response to FSS, Claudin-2 disappeared and ZO-1 displayed punctuated and discontinuous staining in the plasma membrane. Expression of Pard6 was also decreased. Moreover, E-Cadherin abundance was decreased, while its major repressors Snail1 and Snail2 were overexpressed, and β-Catenin staining was disrupted along the cell periphery. Finally, FSS subjected-cells exhibited disappeared primary cilium. Results were confirmed in vivo in a uninephrectomy (8 months mouse model where increased FSS induced by adaptive hyperfiltration in remnant kidney was accompanied by both decreased epithelial gene expression including ZO-1, E-cadherin and β-Catenin and disappearance of tubular cilia. In conclusion, these results show that proximal tubular cells lose an important number of their epithelial characteristics after long term exposure to FSS both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, the changes in urinary FSS associated with nephropathies should be considered as potential insults for tubular cells leading to disorganization of the tubular epithelium.

  11. Hepatitis C virus and ethanol alter antigen presentation in liver cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natalia A Osna

    2009-01-01

    Alcoholic patients have a high incidence of hepatitis Cvirus (HCV) infection. Alcohol consumption enhances the severity of the HCV disease course and worsens the outcome of chronic hepatitis C. The accumulation of virally infected cells in the liver is related to the HCVinduced inability of the immune system to recognizeinfected cells and to develop the immune responses. This review covers the effects of HCV proteins and ethanol on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) classⅠ- and class Ⅱ-restricted antigen presentation. Here, we discuss the liver which functions as an immune privilege organ; factors, which affect cleavage and loading of antigenic peptides onto MHC classⅠand class Ⅱ in hepatocytes and dendritic cells, and the modulating effects of ethanol and HCV on antigen presentation by liver cells. Altered antigen presentation in the liver limits the ability of the immune system to clear HCV and infected cells and contributes to disease progression. HCV by itself affects dendritic cell function, switching their cytokine profile to the suppressive phenotype of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) predominance,preventing cell maturation and allostimulation capacity.The synergistic action of ethanol with HCV results in the suppression of MHC class Ⅱ-restricted antigen presentation. In addition, ethanol metabolism and HCV proteins reduce proteasome function and interferon signaling, thereby suppressing the generation of peptides for MHC classⅠ-restricted antigen presentation.Collectively, ethanol exposure further impairs antigen presentation in HCV-infected liver cells, which may provide a partial explanation for exacerbations and the poor outcome of HCV infection in alcoholics.

  12. Altered cellular metabolism of HepG2 cells caused by microcystin-LR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junguo; Feng, Yiyi; Jiang, Siyu; Li, Xiaoyu

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possible effects of microcystin-LR (MC-LR) exposure on the metabolism and drug resistance of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. For this purpose, we first conducted an experiment to make sure that MC-LR could penetrate the HepG2 cell membrane effectively. The transcriptional levels of phase I (such as CYP2E1, CYP3A4, and CYP26B1) and phase II (such as EPHX1, SULTs, and GSTM) enzymes and export pump genes (such as MRP1 and MDR1) were altered by MC-LR-exposure for 24 h, indicating that MC-LR treatment may destabilize the metabolism of HepG2 cells. Further research showed that the CYP inducers omeprazole, ethanol, and rifampicin inhibited cell viability, in particular, ethanol, a CYP2E1 inducer, induced ROS generation, lipid peroxidation, and apoptosis in HepG2 cells treated with MC-LR. The CYP2E1 inhibitor chlormethiazole inhibited ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane potential loss, caspase-3 activity, and cytotoxicity caused by MC-LR. Meanwhile, the results also showed that co-incubation with the ROS scavenger l-ascorbic acid and MC-LR decreased ROS levels and effectively prevented apoptosis. These findings provide an interesting mechanistic explanation of cellular metabolism associated with MC-LR, i.e., MC-LR-exposure exerted toxicity on HepG2 cells and induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells via promoting CYP2E1 expression and inducing excessive ROS in HepG2 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Genistein inhibits invasive potential of human hepatocellular carcinoma by altering cell cycle, apoptosis, and angiogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Gu; Chen-Fang Zhu; Hitoshi Iwamoto; Ji-Sheng Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study the in vitro and in vivo inhibitory effects of genistein on invasive potential of Bel 7402 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and to explore the underlying mechanism.METHODS: Bel 7402 HCC cells were exposed to genistein. The invasive activity of tumor cells was assayed in transwell cell culture chamber. p125FAK expression and cell cycle were evaluated by a functional assay. Cell apoptosis analysis was performed with TUNEL method. In addition, bilateral subrenal capsule xenograft transplantation of HCC was performed in 10 nude mice.Genistein was injected and the invasion of HCC into the renal parenchyma was observed. Microvessels with immunohistochemical staining were detected.RESULTS: Genistein significantly inhibited the growth of Bel 7402 cells, the inhibitory rate of tumor cells was 26 -42%. The invasive potential of Bel 7402 cells in vitro was significantly inhibited, the inhibitory rate was 11-28%. Genistein caused G2/M cell cycle arrest, S phase decreased significantly. The occurrence of apoptosis in genistein group increased significantly. The expression of p125FAK in 5 μg/mL genistein group (15.26±0.16%)and 10 μg/mL genistein group (12.89±0.36%) was significantly lower than that in the control group (19.75± 1.12%,P<0.05). Tumor growth in genistein-treated nude mice was significantly retarded in comparison to control mice, the inhibitory rate of tumor growth was about 20%. Genistein also significantly inhibited the invasion of Bel 7402 cells into the renal parenchyma of nude mice with xenograft transplant. The positive unit value of microvessels in genistein-treated group (10.422±0.807)was significantly lower than that in control group (22.330 ± 5.696, P< 0.01).CONCLUSION: Genistein can effectively inhibit the invasive potential of Bel 7402 HCC cells by altering cell cycle, apoptosis and angiogenesis, inhibition of focal adhesion kinase may play a significant role in this process.

  14. The bacterial effector Cif interferes with SCF ubiquitin ligase function by inhibiting deneddylation of Cullin1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Hanako; Kim, Minsoo; Mimuro, Hitomi; Punginelli, Claire; Koyama, Tomohiro; Nagai, Shinya; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2010-10-15

    Cycle inhibiting factor (Cif) is one of the effectors delivered into epithelial cells by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) via the type III secretion system (TTSS). Cif family proteins, which inhibit host cell-cycle progression via mechanisms not yet precisely understood, are highly conserved among EPEC, EHEC, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Photorhabdus luminescens and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Levels of several proteins relevant to cell-cycle progression are modulated by Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs), which in turn are activated by conjugation and deconjugation of NEDD8 to Cullins. Here we show that Cif interacts with NEDD8 and interferes with SCF (Skp1-Cullin1-F-box protein) complex ubiquitin ligase function. We found that neddylated Cullin family proteins accumulated and ubiquitination of p27 decreased in cells infected with EPEC. Consequently, Cif stabilized SCF substrates such as CyclinD1, Cdt1, and p27, and caused G1 cell-cycle arrest. Using time-lapse-imaging of fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator (Fucci)-expressing cells, we were able to monitor cell-cycle progression during EPEC infection and confirmed the arrest of infected cells at G1. Our in vitro and in vivo data show that Cif-NEDD8 interaction inhibits deneddylation of Cullins, suppresses CRL activity and induces G1 arrest. We thus conclude that the bacterial effector Cif interferes with neddylation-mediated cell-cycle control.

  15. Proteome Alterations of Hippocampal Cells Caused by Clostridium botulinum C3 Exoenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Anke; Rohrbeck, Astrid; Just, Ingo; Pich, Andreas

    2015-11-06

    C3bot from Clostridium botulinum is a bacterial mono-ADP-ribosylating enzyme, which transfers an ADP-ribose moiety onto the small GTPases Rho A/B/C. C3bot and the catalytic inactive mutant (C3E174Q) cause axonal and dendritic growth as well as branching in primary hippocampal neurons. In cultured murine hippocampal HT22 cells, protein abundances were analyzed in response to C3bot or C3E174Q treatment using a shotgun proteomics approach. Proteome analyses were performed at four time points over 6 days. More than 4000 protein groups were identified at each time point and quantified in triplicate analyses. On day one, 46 proteins showed an altered abundance, and after 6 days, more than 700 proteins responded to C3bot with an up- or down-regulation. In contrast, C3E174Q had no provable impact on protein abundance. Protein quantification was verified for several proteins by multiple reaction monitoring. Data analysis of altered proteins revealed different cellular processes that were affected by C3bot. They are particularly involved in mitochondrial and lysosomal processes, adhesion, carbohydrate and glucose metabolism, signal transduction, and nuclear proteins of translation and ribosome biogenesis. The results of this study gain novel insights into the function of C3bot in hippocampal cells.

  16. Danazol alters mitochondria metabolism of fibrocystic breast Mcf10A cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irgebay, Zhazira; Yeszhan, Banu; Sen, Bhaswati; Tuleukhanov, Sultan; Brooks, Ari D; Sensenig, Richard; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya

    2017-10-01

    Fibrocystic Breast Disease (FBD) or Fibrocystic change (FC) affects about 60% of women at some time during their life. Although usually benign, it is often associated with pain and tenderness (mastalgia). The synthetic steroid danazol has been shown to be effective in reducing the pain associated with FBD, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms for its action have not been elucidated. We investigated the hypothesis that danazol acts by affecting energy metabolism. Effects of danazol on Mcf10A cells homeostasis, including mechanisms of oxidative phosphorylation, cytosolic calcium signaling and oxidative stress, were assessed by high-resolution respirometry and flow cytometry. In addition to fast physiological responses the associated genomic modulations were evaluated by Affimetrix microarray analysis. The alterations of mitochondria membrane potential and respiratory activity, downregulation of energy metabolism transcripts result in suppression of energy homeostasis and arrest of Mcf10A cells growth. The data obtained in this study impacts the recognition of direct control of mitochondria by cellular mechanisms associated with altered energy metabolism genes governing the breast tissue susceptibility and response to medication by danazol. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic and Biochemical Alterations in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackie L. Johnson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite significant advances in the detection and treatment of lung cancer, it causes the highest number of cancer-related mortality. Recent advances in the detection of genetic alterations in patient samples along with physiologically relevant animal models has yielded a new understanding of the molecular etiology of lung cancer. This has facilitated the development of potent and specific targeted therapies, based on the genetic and biochemical alterations present in the tumor, especially non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. It is now clear that heterogeneous cell signaling pathways are disrupted to promote NSCLC, including mutations in critical growth regulatory proteins (K-Ras, EGFR, B-RAF, MEK-1, HER2, MET, EML-4-ALK, KIF5B-RET, and NKX2.1 and inactivation of growth inhibitory pathways (TP53, PTEN, p16, and LKB-1. How these pathways differ between smokers and non-smokers is also important for clinical treatment strategies and development of targeted therapies. This paper describes these molecular targets in NSCLC, and describes the biological significance of each mutation and their potential to act as a therapeutic target.

  18. Alterations in regulatory T cells induced by specific oligosaccharides improve vaccine responsiveness in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel A Schijf

    Full Text Available Prophylactic vaccinations are generally performed to protect naïve individuals with or without suppressed immune responsiveness. In a mouse model for Influenza vaccinations the specific alterations of CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ regulatory T-cells (Tregs in the immune modulation induced by orally supplied oligosaccharides containing scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS was assessed. This dietary intervention increased vaccine specific DTH responses. In addition, a significant increased percentage of T-bet(+ (Th1 activated CD69(+CD4(+ T cells (p<0.001 and reduced percentage of Gata-3(+ (Th2 activated CD69(+CD4(+T cells (p<0.001 was detected in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN of mice receiving scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS compared to control mice. Although no difference in the number or percentage of Tregs (CD4(+Foxp3(+ could be determined after scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS intervention, the percentage of CXCR3 (+ /T-bet(+ (Th1-Tregs was significantly reduced (p<0.05 in mice receiving scGOS/lcFOS/pAOS as compared to mice receiving placebo diets. Moreover, although no absolute difference in suppressive capacity could be detected, an alteration in cytokine profile suggests a regulatory T cell shift towards a reducing Th1 suppression profile, supporting an improved vaccination response.These data are indicative for improved vaccine responsiveness due to reduced Th1 suppressive capacity in the Treg population of mice fed the oligosaccharide specific diet, showing compartmentalization within the Treg population. The modulation of Tregs to control immune responses provides an additional arm of intervention using alternative strategies possibly leading to the development of improved vaccines.

  19. Alcohol abuse and smoking alter inflammatory mediator production by pulmonary and systemic immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaydos, Jeanette; McNally, Alicia; Guo, Ruixin; Vandivier, R William; Simonian, Philip L; Burnham, Ellen L

    2016-03-15

    Alcohol use disorders (AUDs) and tobacco smoking are associated with an increased predisposition for community-acquired pneumonia and the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Mechanisms are incompletely established but may include alterations in response to pathogens by immune cells, including alveolar macrophages (AMs) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We sought to determine the relationship of AUDs and smoking to expression of IFNγ, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα by AMs and PBMCs from human subjects after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or lipoteichoic acid (LTA). AMs and PBMCs from healthy subjects with AUDs and controls, matched on smoking, were cultured with LPS (1 μg/ml) or LTA (5 μg/ml) in the presence and absence of the antioxidant precursor N-acetylcysteine (10 mM). Cytokines were measured in cell culture supernatants. Expression of IFNγ, IL-1β, IL-6, and TNFα in AMs and PBMCs was significantly increased in response to stimulation with LPS and LTA. AUDs were associated with augmented production of proinflammatory cytokines, particularly IFNγ and IL-1β, by AMs and PBMCs in response to LPS. Smoking diminished the impact of AUDs on AM cytokine expression. Expression of basal AM and PBMC Toll-like receptors-2 and -4 was not clearly related to differences in cytokine expression; however, addition of N-acetylcysteine with LPS or LTA led to diminished AM and PBMC cytokine secretion, especially among current smokers. Our findings suggest that AM and PBMC immune cell responses to LPS and LTA are influenced by AUDs and smoking through mechanisms that may include alterations in cellular oxidative stress.

  20. Light-induced morphological alteration in anthocyanin-accumulating vacuoles of maize cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grotewold Erich

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant pigmentation is affected by a variety of factors. Light, an important plant developmental signal, influences the accumulation of anthocyanins primarily through the activation of the transcription factors that regulate the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. In this study, we utilized maize Black Mexican Sweet (BMS cells expressing the R and C1 regulators of anthocyanin biosynthesis from a light-insensitive promoter as a means to investigate the existence of additional levels of control of pigmentation by light. Results BMS cells expressing the R and C1 regulators from the CaMV 35S constitutive promoter accumulate anthocyanins when grown in complete darkness, suggesting that the transcription factors R and C1 are sufficient for the transcription of the genes corresponding to the structural enzymes of the pathway, with no requirement for additional light-induced regulators. Interestingly, light induces a "darkening" in the color of the purple anthocyanin pigmentation of transgenic BMS cells expressing R and C1. This change in the pigment hue is not associated with a variation in the levels or types of anthocyanins present, or with an alteration of the transcript levels of several flavonoid biosynthetic genes. However, cytological observations show that light drives unexpected changes in the morphology and distribution of the anthocyanins-containing vacuolar compartments. Conclusion By uncoupling the effect of light on anthocyanin accumulation, we have found light to induce the fusion of anthocyanin-containing vacuoles, the coalescence of anthocyanic vacuolar inclusion (AVI-like structures contained, and the spread of anthocyanins from the inclusions into the vacuolar sap. Similar light-induced alterations in vacuolar morphology are also evident in the epidermal cells of maize floral whorls accumulating anthocyanins. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism for the action of light on the vacuolar storage of anthocyanin.

  1. Mutations That Alter Use of Hepatitis C Virus Cell Entry Factors Mediate Escape From Neutralizing Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    FAUVELLE, CATHERINE; ZAHID, MUHAMMAD NAUMAN; TUREK, MARINE; HEYDMANN, LAURA; CURY, KARINE; HAYER, JULIETTE; COMBET, CHRISTOPHE; COSSET, FRANÇOIS–LOÏC; PIETSCHMANN, THOMAS; HIET, MARIE–SOPHIE; BARTENSCHLAGER, RALF; HABERSETZER, FRANÇOIS; DOFFOËL