WorldWideScience

Sample records for ligand release mechanism

  1. Soluble NKG2D ligands: prevalence, release, and functional impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Helmut Rainer; Holdenrieder, Stefan; Steinle, Alexander

    2008-05-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are capable to recognize and eliminate malignant cells. Anti-tumor responses of NK cells are promoted by the tumor-associated expression of cell stress-inducible ligands of the activating NK receptor NKG2D. Current evidence suggests that established tumors subvert NKG2D-mediated tumor immunosurveillance by releasing NKG2D ligands (NKG2DL). Release of NKG2DL has been observed in a broad variety of human tumor entities and is thought to interfere with NKG2D-mediated tumor immunity in several ways. Further, levels of soluble NKG2DL (sNKG2DL) were also found to be elevated under various non-malignant conditions, although the functional implications remain largely unclear. Here we review and discuss the available data on the prevalence, release, functional impact, and potential clinical value of sNKG2DL.

  2. Regulation mechanisms of the FLT3-ligand after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prat-Lepesant, M.

    2005-06-01

    The hematopoietic compartment is one of the most severely damaged after chemotherapy, radiotherapy or accidental irradiations. Whatever its origin, the resulting damage to the bone marrow remains difficult to evaluate. Thus, it would be of great interest to get a biological indicator of residual hematopoiesis in order to adapt the treatment to each clinical situation. Recent results indicated that the plasma Flt3 ligand concentration was increased in patients suffering from either acquired or induced aplasia, suggesting that Flt3 ligand might be useful as a biological indicator of bone marrow status. We thus followed in a mouse model as well as in several clinical situations the variations in plasma Flt3 ligand concentration, after either homogeneous or heterogeneous irradiations. These variations were correlated to the number of hematopoietic progenitors and to other parameters such as duration and depth of pancytopenia. The results indicated that the concentration of Flt3 ligand in the blood reflects the bone marrow status, and that the follow-up of plasma Flt3 ligand concentration could give predictive information about the bone marrow function and the duration and severity of pancytopenia and thrombocytopenia. Nevertheless, the clinical use of Flt3 ligand as a biological indicator of bone marrow damage require the knowledge of the mechanisms regulating the variations in plasma Flt3 ligand concentration. We thus developed a study in the mouse model. The results indicated that the variations in plasma Flt3 ligand variations were not solely due to a balance between its production by lymphoid cells and its consumption by hematopoietic cells. Moreover, we showed that T lymphocytes are not the main regulator of plasma Flt3 ligand concentration as previously suggested, and that other cell types, possibly including bone marrow stromal cells, might be strongly implicated. These results also suggest that the Flt3 ligand is a main systemic regulator of hematopoiesis

  3. Surface ligand controls silver ion release of nanosilver and its antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Y

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Yan-Min Long,1,2 Li-Gang Hu,1,3 Xue-Ting Yan,1,3 Xing-Chen Zhao,1,3 Qun-Fang Zhou,1,3 Yong Cai,2,4 Gui-Bin Jiang1,3 1State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Beijing, China; 2Institute of Environment and Health, Jianghan University, Wuhan, Hubei, China; 3College of Resources and Environment, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; 4Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Southeast Environmental Research Center, Florida International University, Miami, FL, USA Abstract: Understanding the mechanism of nanosilver-dependent antibacterial activity against microorganisms helps optimize the design and usage of the related nanomaterials. In this study, we prepared four kinds of 10 nm-sized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs with dictated surface chemistry by capping different ligands, including citrate, mercaptopropionic acid, mercaptohexanoic acid, and mercaptopropionic sulfonic acid. Their surface-dependent chemistry and antibacterial activities were investigated. Owing to the weak bond to surface Ag, short carbon chain, and low silver ion attraction, citrate-coated AgNPs caused the highest silver ion release and the strongest antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, when compared to the other tested AgNPs. The study on the underlying antibacterial mechanisms indicated that cellular membrane uptake of Ag, NAD+/NADH ratio increase, and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS generation were significantly induced in both AgNP and silver ion exposure groups. The released silver ions from AgNPs inside cells through a Trojan-horse-type mechanism were suggested to interact with respiratory chain proteins on the membrane, interrupt intracellular O2 reduction, and induce ROS production. The further oxidative damages of lipid peroxidation and membrane breakdown caused the lethal effect on E. coli. Altogether, this study demonstrated that AgNPs exerted

  4. Fission product release mechanisms and groupings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesia, F.C.; Brito, A.C.; Liu, Y.

    1995-01-01

    During CANDU postulated accidents the reactor fuel is estimated to be exposed to a variety of conditions. These conditions are dynamic and, during the course of an accident, the fuel may experience a wide range of temperatures and conditions from highly oxidizing to mildly reducing environments. The exposure of the reactor fuel to these environments and temperatures may affect its stoichiometry and release performance. In this paper a review of the important fission product release mechanisms is presented, the results of three out-of-pile experimental programs are summarized, and fission product release groups, for both oxidizing and reducing conditions are proposed. (author)

  5. Fission product release mechanisms and groupings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesia, F C; Brito, A C; Liu, Y [Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada); and others

    1996-12-31

    During CANDU postulated accidents the reactor fuel is estimated to be exposed to a variety of conditions. These conditions are dynamic and, during the course of an accident, the fuel may experience a wide range of temperatures and conditions from highly oxidizing to mildly reducing environments. The exposure of the reactor fuel to these environments and temperatures may affect its stoichiometry and release performance. In this paper a review of the important fission product release mechanisms is presented, the results of three out-of-pile experimental programs are summarized, and fission product release groups, for both oxidizing and reducing conditions are proposed. (author) 92 refs., 6 tabs.

  6. Ligand-mediated adhesive mechanics of two static, deformed spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, Sarthok; Nguyen, Giang; Kotousov, Andrei; Roberts, Anthony J

    2016-10-01

    A self-consistent model is developed to investigate attachment/detachment kinetics of two static, deformable microspheres with irregular surface and coated with flexible binding ligands. The model highlights how the microscale binding kinetics of these ligands as well as the attractive/repulsive potential of the charged surface affects the macroscale static deformed configuration of the spheres. It is shown that in the limit of smooth, neutrally charged surface (i.e., the dimensionless inverse Debye length, [Formula: see text]), interacting via elastic binders (i.e., the dimensionless stiffness coefficient, [Formula: see text]) the adhesion mechanics approaches the regime of application of the JKR theory, and in this particular limit, the contact radius, R c , scales with the particle radius, R, according to the scaling law, [Formula: see text]. We show that static, deformed, highly charged, ligand-coated surface of micro-spheres exhibit strong adhesion. Normal stress distribution within the contact area adjusts with the binder stiffness coefficient, from a maximum at the center to a maximum at the periphery of the region. Although reported in some in vitro experiments involving particle adhesion, until now a physical interpretation for this variation of the stress distribution for deformable, charged, ligand-coated microspheres is missing. Surface roughness results in a diminished adhesion with a distinct reduction in the pull-off force, larger separation gap, weaker normal stress and limited area of adhesion. These results are in agreement with the published experimental findings.

  7. Development of the Pintle Release Fork Mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.; DALE, R.

    1999-01-01

    An improved method of attachment of the pintle to the piston in the universal sampler is being developed. The mechanism utilizes a forked release disk which captures two balls in a cavity formed by a hole in the piston and a groove in the pintle rod

  8. Regulation mechanisms of the FLT3-ligand after irradiation; Mecanismes de regulation du FLT3-ligand apres irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prat-Lepesant, M

    2005-06-15

    The hematopoietic compartment is one of the most severely damaged after chemotherapy, radiotherapy or accidental irradiations. Whatever its origin, the resulting damage to the bone marrow remains difficult to evaluate. Thus, it would be of great interest to get a biological indicator of residual hematopoiesis in order to adapt the treatment to each clinical situation. Recent results indicated that the plasma Flt3 ligand concentration was increased in patients suffering from either acquired or induced aplasia, suggesting that Flt3 ligand might be useful as a biological indicator of bone marrow status. We thus followed in a mouse model as well as in several clinical situations the variations in plasma Flt3 ligand concentration, after either homogeneous or heterogeneous irradiations. These variations were correlated to the number of hematopoietic progenitors and to other parameters such as duration and depth of pancytopenia. The results indicated that the concentration of Flt3 ligand in the blood reflects the bone marrow status, and that the follow-up of plasma Flt3 ligand concentration could give predictive information about the bone marrow function and the duration and severity of pancytopenia and thrombocytopenia. Nevertheless, the clinical use of Flt3 ligand as a biological indicator of bone marrow damage require the knowledge of the mechanisms regulating the variations in plasma Flt3 ligand concentration. We thus developed a study in the mouse model. The results indicated that the variations in plasma Flt3 ligand variations were not solely due to a balance between its production by lymphoid cells and its consumption by hematopoietic cells. Moreover, we showed that T lymphocytes are not the main regulator of plasma Flt3 ligand concentration as previously suggested, and that other cell types, possibly including bone marrow stromal cells, might be strongly implicated. These results also suggest that the Flt3 ligand is a main systemic regulator of hematopoiesis

  9. Variability in the organic ligands released by Emiliania huxleyi under simulated ocean acidification conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Samperio-Ramos

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The variability in the extracellular release of organic ligands by Emiliania huxleyi under four different pCO2 scenarios (225, 350, 600 and 900 μatm, was determined. Growth in the batch cultures was promoted by enriching them only with major nutrients and low iron concentrations. No chelating agents were added to control metal speciation. During the initial (IP, exponential (EP and steady (SP phases, extracellular release rates, normalized per cell and day, of dissolved organic carbon (DOCER, phenolic compounds (PhCER, dissolved combined carbohydrates (DCCHOER and dissolved uronic acids (DUAER in the exudates were determined. The growth rate decreased in the highest CO2 treatment during the IP (<48 h, but later increased when the exposure was longer (more than 6 days. DOCER did not increase significantly with high pCO2. Although no relationship was observed between DCCHOER and the CO2 conditions, DCCHO was a substantial fraction of the freshly released organic material, accounting for 18% to 37%, in EP, and 14% to 23%, in SP, of the DOC produced. Growth of E. huxleyi induced a strong response in the PhCER and DUAER. While in EP, PhCER were no detected, the DUAER remained almost constant for all CO2 treatments. Increases in the extracellular release of these organic ligands during SP were most pronounced under high pCO2 conditions. Our results imply that, during the final growth stage of E. huxleyi, elevated CO2 conditions will increase its excretion of acid polysaccharides and phenolic compounds, which may affect the biogeochemical behavior of metals in seawater.

  10. Sigma receptor ligand N,N'-di-(ortho-tolyl)guanidine inhibits release of acetylcholine in the guinea pig ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambell, B G; Keana, J F; Weber, E

    1991-11-26

    The inhibition of stimulated contractions of the guinea pig ileum longitudinal muscle/myenteric plexus preparation by sigma receptor ligands has been previously described. In this study, the stimulated release of [3H]acetylcholine from cholinergic nerve terminals in this same preparation was monitored in the presence and absence of sigma receptor ligands. N,N'-Di-(orthotolyl)guanidine (DTG) and other compounds selective for the sigma receptor inhibited stimulated [3H]acetylcholine release. These results suggest that their inhibition of stimulated contractions in this preparation was mediated by inhibition of acetylcholine release.

  11. Half-Sandwich Ru(II and Os(II Bathophenanthroline Complexes Containing a Releasable Dichloroacetato Ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Štarha

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We report on the preparation and thorough characterization of cytotoxic half-sandwich complexes [Ru(η6-pcym(bphen(dca]PF6 (Ru-dca and [Os(η6-pcym(bphen(dca]PF6 (Os-dca containing dichloroacetate(1– (dca as the releasable O-donor ligand bearing its own cytotoxicity; pcym = 1-methyl-4-(propan-2-ylbenzene (p-cymene, bphen = 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (bathophenanthroline. Complexes Ru-dca and Os-dca hydrolyzed in the water-containing media, which led to the dca ligand release (supported by 1H NMR and electrospray ionization mass spectra. Mass spectrometry studies revealed that complexes Ru-dca and Os-dca do not interact covalently with the model proteins cytochrome c and lysozyme. Both complexes exhibited slightly higher in vitro cytotoxicity (IC50 = 3.5 μM for Ru-dca, and 2.6 μM for Os-dca against the A2780 human ovarian carcinoma cells than cisplatin (IC50 = 5.9 μM, while their toxicity on the healthy human hepatocytes was found to be IC50 = 19.1 μM for Ru-dca and IC50 = 19.7 μM for Os-dca. Despite comparable cytotoxicity of complexes Ru-dca and Os-dca, both the complexes modified the cell cycle, mitochondrial membrane potential, and mitochondrial cytochrome c release by a different way, as revealed by flow cytometry experiments. The obtained results point out the different mechanisms of action between the complexes.

  12. Hydraulic running and release tool with mechanical emergency release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, S.F.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a setting tool for connection in a well string to position a tubular member in a well bore. It comprises: a mandrel adapted to be connected to the well string; an outer sleeve surrounding the mandrel and releasably secured thereto; a latch nut releasably connected to the outer sleeve; piston means sealingly engaging the mandrel; shear means releasably securing the piston to the latch nut to maintain the latch nut releasably connected to the tubular member; the mandrel having port means for conducting fluid pressure from the well string to release the piston means from and the latch nut; cooperating engageable surfaces on the piston and latch nut to reengage them together after the piston moves a predetermined longitudinal distance relative to the latch nut; and additional cooperating engageable surfaces on the latch nut and the outer sleeve which are engageable when the piston and engaged latch nut are moved a predetermined additional longitudinal distance by fluid pressure to secure the engaged piston and latch nut with the outer sleeve for retrieval along with the mandrel from the well bore

  13. Drosophila insulin release is triggered by adipose Stunted ligand to brain Methuselah receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delanoue, Renald; Meschi, Eleonora; Agrawal, Neha; Mauri, Alessandra; Tsatskis, Yonit; McNeill, Helen; Léopold, Pierre

    2016-09-30

    Animals adapt their growth rate and body size to available nutrients by a general modulation of insulin-insulin-like growth factor signaling. In Drosophila, dietary amino acids promote the release in the hemolymph of brain insulin-like peptides (Dilps), which in turn activate systemic organ growth. Dilp secretion by insulin-producing cells involves a relay through unknown cytokines produced by fat cells. Here, we identify Methuselah (Mth) as a secretin-incretin receptor subfamily member required in the insulin-producing cells for proper nutrient coupling. We further show, using genetic and ex vivo organ culture experiments, that the Mth ligand Stunted (Sun) is a circulating insulinotropic peptide produced by fat cells. Therefore, Sun and Mth define a new cross-organ circuitry that modulates physiological insulin levels in response to nutrients. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Force spectroscopy studies on protein-ligand interactions: a single protein mechanics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaotang; Li, Hongbin

    2014-10-01

    Protein-ligand interactions are ubiquitous and play important roles in almost every biological process. The direct elucidation of the thermodynamic, structural and functional consequences of protein-ligand interactions is thus of critical importance to decipher the mechanism underlying these biological processes. A toolbox containing a variety of powerful techniques has been developed to quantitatively study protein-ligand interactions in vitro as well as in living systems. The development of atomic force microscopy-based single molecule force spectroscopy techniques has expanded this toolbox and made it possible to directly probe the mechanical consequence of ligand binding on proteins. Many recent experiments have revealed how ligand binding affects the mechanical stability and mechanical unfolding dynamics of proteins, and provided mechanistic understanding on these effects. The enhancement effect of mechanical stability by ligand binding has been used to help tune the mechanical stability of proteins in a rational manner and develop novel functional binding assays for protein-ligand interactions. Single molecule force spectroscopy studies have started to shed new lights on the structural and functional consequence of ligand binding on proteins that bear force under their biological settings. Copyright © 2014 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanisms of renin release from juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skøtt, O; Salomonsson, Max; Sellerup Persson, Anja

    1991-01-01

    In microdissected, nonperfused afferent arterioles changes in intravascular pressure did not affect renin secretion. On the contrary, renin release from isolated afferent arterioles perfused in a free-flow system has been reported to be sensitive to simultaneous changes in luminal pressure and fl....... Hence local blood flow may be involved in the baroreceptor control of renin release. If flow is sensed, the sensor is likely to be located near the endothelial cell layer, where ion channels have been shown to be influenced by variations in shear stress....

  16. Serum Levels of Platelet Released CD40 Ligand Are Increased in Early Onset Occlusive Carotid Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    József Balla

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L has been suggested as a key mediator between inflammation and atherosclerosis, and the CD40-CD40L interaction has a role in atherosclerotic lesion progression. We evaluated if platelet released serum sCD40L and sCD40 levels differ between patients with early onset occlusive carotid artery disease and age-matched controls.

  17. Physics-based scoring of protein-ligand interactions: explicit polarizability, quantum mechanics and free energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, Richard A

    2011-04-01

    The ability to accurately predict the interaction of a ligand with its receptor is a key limitation in computer-aided drug design approaches such as virtual screening and de novo design. In this article, we examine current strategies for a physics-based approach to scoring of protein-ligand affinity, as well as outlining recent developments in force fields and quantum chemical techniques. We also consider advances in the development and application of simulation-based free energy methods to study protein-ligand interactions. Fuelled by recent advances in computational algorithms and hardware, there is the opportunity for increased integration of physics-based scoring approaches at earlier stages in computationally guided drug discovery. Specifically, we envisage increased use of implicit solvent models and simulation-based scoring methods as tools for computing the affinities of large virtual ligand libraries. Approaches based on end point simulations and reference potentials allow the application of more advanced potential energy functions to prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities. Comprehensive evaluation of polarizable force fields and quantum mechanical (QM)/molecular mechanical and QM methods in scoring of protein-ligand interactions is required, particularly in their ability to address challenging targets such as metalloproteins and other proteins that make highly polar interactions. Finally, we anticipate increasingly quantitative free energy perturbation and thermodynamic integration methods that are practical for optimization of hits obtained from screened ligand libraries.

  18. Factors controlling alkalisalt deposition in recovery boiler- release mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeough, P.; Kylloenen, H.; Kurkela, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Process Technology Group

    1996-12-01

    As part of a cooperative effort to develop a model to describe the behaviour of inorganic compounds in kraft recovery boilers, an experimental investigation of the release of sulphur during black liquor pyrolysis has been undertaken. Previous to these studies, the mechanisms of sulphur release and the reasons for the observed effects of process conditions on sulphur release were very poorly understood. On the basis of the experimental results, the main reactions leading to sulphur release have been elucidated with a fair degree of certainty. Logical explanations for the variations of sulphur release with temperature and with liquor solids content have been proposed. The influence of pressure has been investigated in order to gain insights into the effects of mass transfer on the sulphur-release rate. In the near future, the research will be aimed at generating the kinetic data necessary for modelling the release of sulphur in the recovery furnace. (author)

  19. Pressure-sensitive release mechanism for radiosonde applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulhanek, F.C.

    1975-01-01

    As part of the 1975 planetary boundary layer field experimental program, miniature radiosondes attached to pilot balloons were released into the atmosphere for routine sampling of the vertical temperature distribution. A new releasing mechanism used to continue sampling during descent by parachute is described

  20. Comparative study of some mechanical and release properties of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mechanical and release properties of paracetamol tablets formulated with cashew gum (CAG), povidone (PVP) and gelatin (GEL) as binders were studied and compared. The parameters studied were tensile strength (TS), brittle fracture index (BFI), friability (F), disintegration time (DT) and percentage drug released ...

  1. AMMOS2: a web server for protein-ligand-water complexes refinement via molecular mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, Céline M; Pencheva, Tania; Jereva, Dessislava; Desvillechabrol, Dimitri; Becot, Jérôme; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Pajeva, Ilza; Miteva, Maria A

    2017-07-03

    AMMOS2 is an interactive web server for efficient computational refinement of protein-small organic molecule complexes. The AMMOS2 protocol employs atomic-level energy minimization of a large number of experimental or modeled protein-ligand complexes. The web server is based on the previously developed standalone software AMMOS (Automatic Molecular Mechanics Optimization for in silico Screening). AMMOS utilizes the physics-based force field AMMP sp4 and performs optimization of protein-ligand interactions at five levels of flexibility of the protein receptor. The new version 2 of AMMOS implemented in the AMMOS2 web server allows the users to include explicit water molecules and individual metal ions in the protein-ligand complexes during minimization. The web server provides comprehensive analysis of computed energies and interactive visualization of refined protein-ligand complexes. The ligands are ranked by the minimized binding energies allowing the users to perform additional analysis for drug discovery or chemical biology projects. The web server has been extensively tested on 21 diverse protein-ligand complexes. AMMOS2 minimization shows consistent improvement over the initial complex structures in terms of minimized protein-ligand binding energies and water positions optimization. The AMMOS2 web server is freely available without any registration requirement at the URL: http://drugmod.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr/ammosHome.php. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. DMPD: Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insights on cellular andmolecular mechanisms. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17981503 Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insights on cellular andmol...) (.html) (.csml) Show Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insights on cellular andmolecular mech...anisms. PubmedID 17981503 Title Anti-inflammatory actions of PPAR ligands: new insight

  3. Shape memory-based actuators and release mechanisms therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Rajan (Inventor); Snyder, Daniel W. (Inventor); Schoenwald, David K. (Inventor); Lam, Nhin S. (Inventor); Watson, Daniel S. (Inventor); Krishnan, Vinu B. (Inventor); Noebe, Ronald D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    SM-based actuators (110) and release mechanisms (100) therefrom and systems (500) including one or more release mechanisms (100). The actuators (110) comprise a SM member (118) and a deformable member (140) mechanically coupled to the SM member (118) which deforms upon a shape change of the SM member triggered by a phase transition of the SM member. A retaining element (160) is mechanically coupled to the deformable member (140), wherein the retaining element (160) moves upon the shape change. Release mechanism (100) include an actuator, a rotatable mechanism (120) including at least one restraining feature (178) for restraining rotational movement of the retaining element (160) before the shape change, and at least one spring (315) that provides at least one locked spring-loaded position when the retaining element is in the restraining feature and at least one released position that is reached when the retaining element is in a position beyond the restraining feature (178). The rotatable mechanism (120) includes at least one load-bearing protrusion (310). A hitch (400) is for mechanically coupling to the load, wherein the hitch is supported on the load bearing protrusion (310) when the rotatable mechanism is in the locked spring-loaded position.

  4. Mechanisms of iodine release from iodoapatite in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z.; Wang, J.

    2017-12-01

    Immobilization of iodine-129 with waste forms in geological setting is challenging due to its extremely long half-life and high volatility in the environment. To evaluate the long-term performance of waste form, it is imperative to determine the release mechanism of iodine hosted in the waste form materials. This study investigated the iodine released from apatite structured waste form Pb9.85 (VO4)6 I1.7 to understand how diffusion and dissolution control the durability of apatite waste form. A standard semi-dynamic leach test was adopted in this study. Samples were exposed in fresh leachant periodically and the leachant was replaced after each interval. Each experiment was carried out in cap-sealed Teflon vessels under constant temperature (e.g. 90 °C). ICP-MS analysis on the reacted leachates shows that Pb and V were released constantly and congruently with the stoichiometric ratio of Pb/V. However, iodine release is incongruent and time dependent. The iodine release rate starts significantly higher than the corresponding stoichiometric value and gradually decreases, approaching the stoichiometric value. Therefore, a dual-mode mechanism is proposed to account for the iodine release from apatite, which is dominated by short-term diffusion and long-term dissolution processes. Additional tests show that the element release rates depend on a number of test parameters, including sample surface to solution volume ratio (m-1), interval (day), temperature (°C), and solution pH. This study provides a quantitative characterization of iodine release mechanism. The activation energy of iodine leaching 21±1.6 kJ/mol was obtained by varying the test temperature. At the test conditions of to neutral pH and 90 °C, the long-term iodine release rate 3.3 mg/(m2 • day) is projected by normalizing sample surface area to solution volume ratio (S/V) to 1.0 m-1 and interval to 1 day. These findings demonstrate i) the feasibility of our approach to quantify the release mechanism

  5. The mechanism of diclofenac sodium release from non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mechanism of diclofenac sodium release from non-disintegrating bioadhesive tablets was studied. Diclofenac sodium was embedded in Carbopol 941 to produce bioadhesive granules, which were later, incorporated into a structure-forming material, paraffin wax. The tablets were formulated by pour moulding in a ...

  6. Effect of Formulation Methods on the Mechanical and Release ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mechanical properties of the tablets were assessed using the crushing strength (CS), friability(F) and crushing strength-friability ratio (CSFR) of the tablets, while drug release properties were assessed using disintegration time and dissolution profile. The granules possessed better flow properties than the powder ...

  7. Frequency-Dependent Modulation of Dopamine Release by Nicotine and Dopamine D1 Receptor Ligands: An In Vitro Fast Cyclic Voltammetry Study in Rat Striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutier, W; Lowry, J P; McCreary, A C; O'Connor, J J

    2016-05-01

    Nicotine is a highly addictive drug and exerts this effect partially through the modulation of dopamine release and increasing extracellular dopamine in regions such as the brain reward systems. Nicotine acts in these regions on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The effect of nicotine on the frequency dependent modulation of dopamine release is well established and the purpose of this study was to investigate whether dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) ligands have an influence on this. Using fast cyclic voltammetry and rat corticostriatal slices, we show that D1R ligands are able to modulate the effect of nicotine on dopamine release. Nicotine (500 nM) induced a decrease in dopamine efflux at low frequency (single pulse or five pulses at 10 Hz) and an increase at high frequency (100 Hz) electrical field stimulation. The D1R agonist SKF-38393, whilst having no effect on dopamine release on its own or on the effect of nicotine upon multiple pulse evoked dopamine release, did significantly prevent and reverse the effect of nicotine on single pulse dopamine release. Interestingly similar results were obtained with the D1R antagonist SCH-23390. In this study we have demonstrated that the modulation of dopamine release by nicotine can be altered by D1R ligands, but only when evoked by single pulse stimulation, and are likely working via cholinergic interneuron driven dopamine release.

  8. Pathways and mechanisms for product release in the engineered haloalkane dehalogenases explored using classical and random acceleration molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klvana, Martin; Pavlova, Martina; Koudelakova, Tana; Chaloupkova, Radka; Dvorak, Pavel; Prokop, Zbynek; Stsiapanava, Alena; Kuty, Michal; Kuta-Smatanova, Ivana; Dohnalek, Jan; Kulhanek, Petr; Wade, Rebecca C; Damborsky, Jiri

    2009-10-09

    Eight mutants of the DhaA haloalkane dehalogenase carrying mutations at the residues lining two tunnels, previously observed by protein X-ray crystallography, were constructed and biochemically characterized. The mutants showed distinct catalytic efficiencies with the halogenated substrate 1,2,3-trichloropropane. Release pathways for the two dehalogenation products, 2,3-dichloropropane-1-ol and the chloride ion, and exchange pathways for water molecules, were studied using classical and random acceleration molecular dynamics simulations. Five different pathways, denoted p1, p2a, p2b, p2c, and p3, were identified. The individual pathways showed differing selectivity for the products: the chloride ion releases solely through p1, whereas the alcohol releases through all five pathways. Water molecules play a crucial role for release of both products by breakage of their hydrogen-bonding interactions with the active-site residues and shielding the charged chloride ion during its passage through a hydrophobic tunnel. Exchange of the chloride ions, the alcohol product, and the waters between the buried active site and the bulk solvent can be realized by three different mechanisms: (i) passage through a permanent tunnel, (ii) passage through a transient tunnel, and (iii) migration through a protein matrix. We demonstrate that the accessibility of the pathways and the mechanisms of ligand exchange were modified by mutations. Insertion of bulky aromatic residues in the tunnel corresponding to pathway p1 leads to reduced accessibility to the ligands and a change in mechanism of opening from permanent to transient. We propose that engineering the accessibility of tunnels and the mechanisms of ligand exchange is a powerful strategy for modification of the functional properties of enzymes with buried active sites.

  9. Kinetics and mechanism of ligand-exchange reactions of Cd(II) chelates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nivorozhkin, L.E.; Kalabin, G.A.; Nivorozhkin, A.L.; Valeev, R.B.; Minkin, V.I.

    1987-03-01

    Tetrahedral Cd(II) bis(5-thio(or seleno)pyrazole-4-carboxaldiminates) of types II and III have been synthesized for the first time. The kinetics of the degenerate ligand exchange and enantiomerization of the complexes obtained have been studied by dynamic /sup 111/Cd, /sup 77/Se, and /sup 1/H (s = 1/2) NMR. The rate of intramolecular enantiomerization (k = 1/tau) is more than an order of magnitude greater than the corresponding values for processes of degenerate ligand exchange (a second-order reaction) determined from the dynamics of the averaging of the /sup 111/Cd-/sup 77/Se and /sup 111/Cd-N=CH spin-spin coupling constants. The cleavage and formation processes of the Cd-Se and Cd-N bonds are isoenergetic (..delta.. G/sub 298//sup not equal to/ = 14.4 kcal/mole for chelate II with X = Se and R = CH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 5/). The free energies of activation of degenerate ligand exchange determined form the dynamics of the averaging of the /sup 111/Cd N=CH spin-spin coupling constant increase from 12.7 to 17.9 kcal/mole along the following series for R: C/sub 2/H/sub 5/ < Ar < CH/sub 2/C/sub 6/H/sub 5/ < t-C/sub 4/H/sub 9/ < cyclo-C/sub 6/H/sub 11/. Replacement of the sulfur atom in the chelate ring by selenium results in increases in the rates of ligand exchange. A mechanism of degenerate ligand exchange has been proposed.

  10. Controlled release systems containing solid dispersions: strategies and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phuong Ha-Lien; Tran, Thao Truong-Dinh; Park, Jun Bom; Lee, Beom-Jin

    2011-10-01

    In addition to a number of highly soluble drugs, most new chemical entities under development are poorly water-soluble drugs generally characterized by an insufficient dissolution rate and a small absorption window, leading to the low bioavailability. Controlled-release (CR) formulations have several potential advantages over conventional dosage forms, such as providing a uniform and prolonged therapeutic effect to improve patient compliance, reducing the frequency of dosing, minimizing the number of side effects, and reducing the strength of the required dose while increasing the effectiveness of the drug. Solid dispersions (SD) can be used to enhance the dissolution rate of poorly water-soluble drugs and to sustain the drug release by choosing an appropriate carrier. Thus, a CR-SD comprises both functions of SD and CR for poorly water-soluble drugs. Such CR dosage forms containing SD provide an immediately available dose for an immediate action followed by a gradual and continuous release of subsequent doses to maintain the plasma concentration of poorly water-soluble drugs over an extended period of time. This review aims to summarize all currently known aspects of controlled release systems containing solid dispersions, focusing on the preparation methods, mechanisms of action and characterization of physicochemical properties of the system.

  11. Mechanism of Mg2+-Accompanied Product Release in Sugar Nucleotidyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vithani, Neha; Ankush Jagtap, Pravin Kumar; Verma, Sunil Kumar; Tripathi, Ravi; Awasthi, Shalini; Nair, Nisanth N; Prakash, Balaji

    2018-03-06

    The nucleotidyl transfer reaction, catalyzed by sugar nucleotidyltransferases (SNTs), is assisted by two active site Mg 2+ ions. While studying this reaction using X-ray crystallography, we captured snapshots of the pyrophosphate (product) as it exits along a pocket. Surprisingly, one of the active site Mg 2+ ions remains coordinated to the exiting pyrophosphate. This hints at the participation of Mg 2+ in the process of product release, besides its role in catalyzing nucleotidyl transfer. These observations are further supported by enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations. Free energy computations suggest that the product release is likely to be rate limiting in SNTs, and the origin of the high free energy barrier for product release could be traced back to the "slow" conformational change of an Arg residue at the exit end of the pocket. These results establish a dual role for Mg 2+ , and propose a general mechanism of product release during the nucleotidyl transfer by SNTs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Trigger release mechanism for release of mine water to Magela Creek

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQuade, C.V.; McGill, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The Ranger Uranium Mine is surrounded by a World Heritage National Park. The strict environmental controls under which the mine operates are based on scientific and social requirements. Release of non-process storm runoff water to the Magela Creek during flood discharge and under controlled conditions has been identified as best practicable technology for the operation of the water management system. Social and political factors have limited this release to a wet season with an annual exceedance probability of one in ten. The first-generation trigger mechanism was based on a percentile analysis of monthly rainfall. The second-generation trigger is based on cumulative monthly volume increase in the retention ponds and is considered to be more applicable to the operation of the mine water management system. 6 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Molecular mechanism of ligand recognition by NR3 subtype glutamate receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Yongneng; Harrison, Chris B.; Freddolino, Peter L.; Schulten, Klaus; Mayer, Mark L. (UIUC); (NIH)

    2008-10-27

    NR3 subtype glutamate receptors have a unique developmental expression profile, but are the least well-characterized members of the NMDA receptor gene family, which have key roles in synaptic plasticity and brain development. Using ligand binding assays, crystallographic analysis, and all atom MD simulations, we investigate mechanisms underlying the binding by NR3A and NR3B of glycine and D-serine, which are candidate neurotransmitters for NMDA receptors containing NR3 subunits. The ligand binding domains of both NR3 subunits adopt a similar extent of domain closure as found in the corresponding NR1 complexes, but have a unique loop 1 structure distinct from that in all other glutamate receptor ion channels. Within their ligand binding pockets, NR3A and NR3B have strikingly different hydrogen bonding networks and solvent structures from those found in NR1, and fail to undergo a conformational rearrangement observed in NR1 upon binding the partial agonist ACPC. MD simulations revealed numerous interdomain contacts, which stabilize the agonist-bound closed-cleft conformation, and a novel twisting motion for the loop 1 helix that is unique in NR3 subunits.

  14. Kinetic and mechanism formation reaction of complex compound Cu with di-n-buthildithiocarbamate (dbdtc) ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryani, S.; Kurniawan, C.; Kasmui

    2018-04-01

    Synthesis of complex compound is one field of research which intensively studied. Metal-dithiocarbamate complexes find wide-ranging applications in nanomaterial and metal separation science, and have potential use as chemotherapeutic, pesticides, and as additives to lubricants. However, the information about is reaction kinetic and mechanism are very much lacking. The research and analyzes results show that reaction synthesis ligand DBDTC and complex compounds Cu-DBDTC. Optimum reaction condition of formation of complex compounds Cu with DBDTC at pH=3, [DBDTC] = 4.10-3 M, and the time of reaction 5 minutes. Based the analysis varian reaction of complex compounds at pH 3 and 4, diffrence significance at the other pH: 5; 5,5; 6; 6,5 ; 7; and 8. The various of mole with reactants comosition difference sigbificance, those the time reaction for 5 and 6 minutes diffrence by significance with the other time, it is 3,4,8, and 10 minutes. The great product to at condition pH 6, the time optimum at 5 minutes and molar ratio of logam: ligand = 1:2. The reaction kinetic equation of complex compound Cu with chelathing ligand DBDTC is V=0.917106 [Cu2+]0.87921 [DBDTC]2.03021. Based on the kinetic data, and formed complex compounds estimation, the mechanism explaining by 2 stages. In the first stage formation of [Cu(DBDTC)], and then [Cu(DBDTC)2] with the last structure geomethry planar rectangle. The result of this research will be more useful if an effort is being done in reaction mechanism by chemical computation method for obtain intermediate, and for constant “k” in same stage, k1.k2. and compound complex constanta (β).

  15. Ligand-Receptor Interaction-Mediated Transmembrane Transport of Dendrimer-like Soft Nanoparticles: Mechanisms and Complicated Diffusive Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Junshi; Chen, Pengyu; Dong, Bojun; Huang, Zihan; Zhao, Kongyin; Yan, Li-Tang

    2016-05-09

    Nearly all nanomedical applications of dendrimer-like soft nanoparticles rely on the functionality of attached ligands. Understanding how the ligands interact with the receptors in cell membrane and its further effect on the cellular uptake of dendrimer-like soft nanoparticles is thereby a key issue for their better application in nanomedicine. However, the essential mechanism and detailed kinetics for the ligand-receptor interaction-mediated transmembrane transport of such unconventional nanoparticles remain poorly elucidated. Here, using coarse-grained simulations, we present the very first study of molecular mechanism and kinetics behaviors for the transmembrane transport of dendrimer-like soft nanoparticles conjugated with ligands. A phase diagram of interaction states is constructed through examining ligand densities and membrane tensions that allows us to identify novel endocytosis mechanisms featured by the direct wrapping and the penetration-extraction vesiculation. The results provide an in-depth insight into the diffusivity of receptors and dendrimer in the membrane plane and demonstrate how the ligand density influences receptor diffusion and uptake kinetics. It is interesting to find that the ligand-conjugated dendrimers present superdiffusive behaviors on a membrane, which is revealed to be driven by the random fluctuation dynamics of the membrane. The findings facilitate our understanding of some recent experimental observations and could establish fundamental principles for the future development of such important nanomaterials for widespread nanomedical applications.

  16. Different mechanisms are involved in the antibody mediated inhibition of ligand binding to the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, K; Høyer-Hansen, G; Rønne, E

    1999-01-01

    Certain monoclonal antibodies are capable of inhibiting the biological binding reactions of their target proteins. At the molecular level, this type of effect may be brought about by completely different mechanisms, such as competition for common binding determinants, steric hindrance or interfer......Certain monoclonal antibodies are capable of inhibiting the biological binding reactions of their target proteins. At the molecular level, this type of effect may be brought about by completely different mechanisms, such as competition for common binding determinants, steric hindrance......) can be employed as a highly useful tool to characterize the inhibitory mechanism of specific antagonist antibodies. Two inhibitory antibodies against uPAR, mAb R3 and mAb R5, were shown to exhibit competitive and non-competitive inhibition, respectively, of ligand binding to the receptor. The former...

  17. Recent Progress in Treating Protein–Ligand Interactions with Quantum-Mechanical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nusret Duygu Yilmazer

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We review the first successes and failures of a “new wave” of quantum chemistry-based approaches to the treatment of protein/ligand interactions. These approaches share the use of “enhanced”, dispersion (D, and/or hydrogen-bond (H corrected density functional theory (DFT or semi-empirical quantum mechanical (SQM methods, in combination with ensemble weighting techniques of some form to capture entropic effects. Benchmark and model system calculations in comparison to high-level theoretical as well as experimental references have shown that both DFT-D (dispersion-corrected density functional theory and SQM-DH (dispersion and hydrogen bond-corrected semi-empirical quantum mechanical perform much more accurately than older DFT and SQM approaches and also standard docking methods. In addition, DFT-D might soon become and SQM-DH already is fast enough to compute a large number of binding modes of comparably large protein/ligand complexes, thus allowing for a more accurate assessment of entropic effects.

  18. Recent Progress in Treating Protein-Ligand Interactions with Quantum-Mechanical Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmazer, Nusret Duygu; Korth, Martin

    2016-05-16

    We review the first successes and failures of a "new wave" of quantum chemistry-based approaches to the treatment of protein/ligand interactions. These approaches share the use of "enhanced", dispersion (D), and/or hydrogen-bond (H) corrected density functional theory (DFT) or semi-empirical quantum mechanical (SQM) methods, in combination with ensemble weighting techniques of some form to capture entropic effects. Benchmark and model system calculations in comparison to high-level theoretical as well as experimental references have shown that both DFT-D (dispersion-corrected density functional theory) and SQM-DH (dispersion and hydrogen bond-corrected semi-empirical quantum mechanical) perform much more accurately than older DFT and SQM approaches and also standard docking methods. In addition, DFT-D might soon become and SQM-DH already is fast enough to compute a large number of binding modes of comparably large protein/ligand complexes, thus allowing for a more accurate assessment of entropic effects.

  19. Fas ligand exists on intervertebral disc cells: a potential molecular mechanism for immune privilege of the disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Toru; Nishida, Kotaro; Doita, Minoru; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2002-07-15

    Rat and human intervertebral disc specimens were examined immunohistochemically. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was also performed on rat disc tissue to demonstrate the existence of Fas ligand. To clarify the existence of Fas ligand on intact intervertebral disc cells. The nucleus pulposus has been reported to be an immune-privileged site. The immune-privileged characteristic in other tissues such as the retina and testis has been attributed to the local expression of Fas ligand, which acts by inducing apoptosis of invading Fas-positive T-cells. The existence of Fas ligand in normal disc cells has not yet been addressed. Skeletally mature SD male rats were killed, and the coccygeal discs were harvested. Human disc specimens were obtained from idiopathic scoliosis patients during surgical procedures. Immunohistochemical staining for Fas ligand was performed for cross-sections of the discs by standard procedures. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis was also carried out to demonstrate Fas ligand mRNA expression on rat intervertebral discs. Testes of the rats were used for positive controls, and muscles were used for negative controls. The sections were observed by light microscopy. The nucleus pulposus cells exhibited intense positive immune staining for Fas ligand. The outer anulus fibrosus cells and notochordal cells exhibited little immunopositivity. The positive controls exhibited positive immune staining, and the negative control showed no immunopositivity. The result of RT-PCR confirmed the existence of Fas ligand in disc cells. The human nucleus pulposus cells showed a similar predilection to rat disc cells. We demonstrated the existence of Fas ligand on disc cells, which should play a key role in the potential molecular mechanism to maintain immune privilege of the disc. Immune privilege and Fas ligand expression of the intervertebral disc may provide a new insight for basic science research as well as

  20. Homeostatic mechanisms in dopamine synthesis and release: a mathematical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nijhout H Frederik

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dopamine is a catecholamine that is used as a neurotransmitter both in the periphery and in the central nervous system. Dysfunction in various dopaminergic systems is known to be associated with various disorders, including schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and Tourette's syndrome. Furthermore, microdialysis studies have shown that addictive drugs increase extracellular dopamine and brain imaging has shown a correlation between euphoria and psycho-stimulant-induced increases in extracellular dopamine 1. These consequences of dopamine dysfunction indicate the importance of maintaining dopamine functionality through homeostatic mechanisms that have been attributed to the delicate balance between synthesis, storage, release, metabolism, and reuptake. Methods We construct a mathematical model of dopamine synthesis, release, and reuptake and use it to study homeostasis in single dopaminergic neuron terminals. We investigate the substrate inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase by tyrosine, the consequences of the rapid uptake of extracellular dopamine by the dopamine transporters, and the effects of the autoreceoptors on dopaminergic function. The main focus is to understand the regulation and control of synthesis and release and to explicate and interpret experimental findings. Results We show that the substrate inhibition of tyrosine hydroxylase by tyrosine stabilizes cytosolic and vesicular dopamine against changes in tyrosine availability due to meals. We find that the autoreceptors dampen the fluctuations in extracellular dopamine caused by changes in tyrosine hydroxylase expression and changes in the rate of firing. We show that short bursts of action potentials create significant dopamine signals against the background of tonic firing. We explain the observed time courses of extracellular dopamine responses to stimulation in wild type mice and mice that have genetically altered dopamine transporter densities and the observed

  1. Molecular mechanism of ligand recognition by membrane transport protein, Mhp1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Katie J; Jackson, Scott M; Brueckner, Florian; Patching, Simon G; Beckstein, Oliver; Ivanova, Ekaterina; Geng, Tian; Weyand, Simone; Drew, David; Lanigan, Joseph; Sharples, David J; Sansom, Mark SP; Iwata, So; Fishwick, Colin WG; Johnson, A Peter; Cameron, Alexander D; Henderson, Peter JF

    2014-01-01

    The hydantoin transporter Mhp1 is a sodium-coupled secondary active transport protein of the nucleobase-cation-symport family and a member of the widespread 5-helix inverted repeat superfamily of transporters. The structure of Mhp1 was previously solved in three different conformations providing insight into the molecular basis of the alternating access mechanism. Here, we elucidate detailed events of substrate binding, through a combination of crystallography, molecular dynamics, site-directed mutagenesis, biochemical/biophysical assays, and the design and synthesis of novel ligands. We show precisely where 5-substituted hydantoin substrates bind in an extended configuration at the interface of the bundle and hash domains. They are recognised through hydrogen bonds to the hydantoin moiety and the complementarity of the 5-substituent for a hydrophobic pocket in the protein. Furthermore, we describe a novel structure of an intermediate state of the protein with the external thin gate locked open by an inhibitor, 5-(2-naphthylmethyl)-L-hydantoin, which becomes a substrate when leucine 363 is changed to an alanine. We deduce the molecular events that underlie acquisition and transport of a ligand by Mhp1. PMID:24952894

  2. Transfer of the human NKG2D ligands UL16 binding proteins (ULBP) 1-3 is related to lytic granule release and leads to ligand retransfer and killing of ULBP-recipient natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Cobo, Sheila; Romera-Cárdenas, Gema; García-Cuesta, Eva M; Reyburn, Hugh T; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2015-09-01

    After immune interactions, membrane fragments can be transferred between cells. This fast transfer of molecules is transient and shows selectivity for certain proteins; however, the constraints underlying acquisition of a protein are unknown. To characterize the mechanism and functional consequences of this process in natural killer (NK) cells, we have compared the transfer of different NKG2D ligands. We show that human NKG2D ligands can be acquired by NK cells with different efficiencies. The main findings are that NKG2D ligand transfer is related to immune activation and receptor-ligand interaction and that NK cells acquire these proteins during interactions with target cells that lead to degranulation. Our results further demonstrate that NK cells that have acquired NKG2D ligands can stimulate activation of autologous NK cells. Surprisingly, NK cells can also re-transfer the acquired molecule to autologous effector cells during this immune recognition that leads to their death. These data demonstrate that transfer of molecules occurs as a consequence of immune recognition and imply that this process might play a role in homeostatic tuning-down of the immune response or be used as marker of interaction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Bioactive Glass Nanoparticles as a New Delivery System for Sustained 5-Fluorouracil Release: Characterization and Evaluation of Drug Release Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer M. El-Kady

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glass nanoparticles were synthesized and tested for the first time as a new delivery system for sustained 5-fluorouracil (5-FU release. They were characterized by TEM, DTA, TGA, and FT-IR. The porosity % and specific surface area of glass nanoparticles were 85.59% and 378.36 m2/g, respectively. The in vitro bioactivity evaluation confirmed that bioactive glass disks prepared from these nanoparticles could induce hydroxyapatite layer over their surfaces in simulated body fluid. The in vitro drug release experiment indicated that glass nanoparticles could serve as long-term local delivery vehicles for sustained 5-FU release. The release profile of 5-FU showed an initial fast release stage followed by a second stage of slower release. The initial burst release of 5-FU in the first day was about 23% (28.92 mg·L−1 of the total amount of loaded 5-FU, while the final cumulative percentage of the 5-FU released after 32 days was about 45.6% (57.31 mg·L−1 of the total amount of loaded 5-FU. The application of different mathematical models indicated that 5-FU was released by diffusion controlled mechanism and suggested that its release rate was dependent on glass particles dissolution, changes of surface area as well as diameter of glass particles, and concentration of loaded drug.

  4. Insights on Structural Characteristics and Ligand Binding Mechanisms of CDK2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2 is a crucial regulator of the eukaryotic cell cycle. However it is well established that monomeric CDK2 lacks regulatory activity, which needs to be aroused by its positive regulators, cyclins E and A, or be phosphorylated on the catalytic segment. Interestingly, these activation steps bring some dynamic changes on the 3D-structure of the kinase, especially the activation segment. Until now, in the monomeric CDK2 structure, three binding sites have been reported, including the adenosine triphosphate (ATP binding site (Site I and two non-competitive binding sites (Site II and III. In addition, when the kinase is subjected to the cyclin binding process, the resulting structural changes give rise to a variation of the ATP binding site, thus generating an allosteric binding site (Site IV. All the four sites are demonstrated as being targeted by corresponding inhibitors, as is illustrated by the allosteric binding one which is targeted by inhibitor ANS (fluorophore 8-anilino-1-naphthalene sulfonate. In the present work, the binding mechanisms and their fluctuations during the activation process attract our attention. Therefore, we carry out corresponding studies on the structural characterization of CDK2, which are expected to facilitate the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of kinase proteins. Besides, the binding mechanisms of CDK2 with its relevant inhibitors, as well as the changes of binding mechanisms following conformational variations of CDK2, are summarized and compared. The summary of the conformational characteristics and ligand binding mechanisms of CDK2 in the present work will improve our understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating the bioactivities of CDK2.

  5. Impact on the Fe redox cycling of organic ligands released by Synechococcus PCC 7002, under different iron fertilization scenarios. Modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samperio-Ramos, Guillermo; González-Dávila, Melchor; Santana-Casiano, J. Magdalena

    2018-06-01

    The kinetics of Fe redox transformations are of crucial importance in determining the bioavailability of iron, due to inorganic Fe(II) and Fe weakly organic complexes being the most easily assimilated species by phytoplankton. The role played by the natural organic ligands excreted by the cyanobacteria Synecococcus PCC 7002 on the iron redox chemistry was studied at different stages of growth, considering changes in the organic exudation of the cyanobacteria, associated with growth under two different scenarios of iron availability. The oxidation/reduction processes of iron were studied at nanomolar levels and under different physicochemical conditions of pH (7.2- 8.2), temperature (5- 35 °C) and salinity (10- 37). The presence of natural organic exudates of Synechococcus affected the redox behavior of iron. A pH-dependent and photo-induced Fe(III) reduction process was detected in the presence of exudates produced under Fe-Low conditions. Photolytic reactions also modified the reactivity of those exudates with respect to Fe(II), increasing its lifetime in seawater. Without light mediated processes, organic ligands excreted under iron deficient conditions intensified the Fe(II) oxidation at pH redox constants between iron and the major ligands present in solution. Two organic type ligands for the exudates of Synechococcus PCC 7002, with different iron-chelation properties were included in the model. The Fe(II) speciation was radically affected when organic ligands were considered. The individual contributions to the overall Fe(II) oxidation rate demonstrated that these organic ligands played a key role in the oxidation process, although their contributions were dependent on the prescribed iron conditions. The study, therefore, suggests that the variability in the composition and nature of organic exudates released, due to iron availability conditions, might determine the redox behaviour of iron in seawater.

  6. Drug Release Mechanism of Slightly Soluble Drug from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    theophylline (THP) as drug in drug to clay ratios of 1:2, 3:4 and 1:1. The formulations were characterized for drug release and loading. Dependent and independent kinetic models were employed to analyze the drug release data. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was used for the structural characterization of ...

  7. Kinetics and Mechanism of Metal Retention/Release in Geochemical Processes in Soil - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Robert W.

    2000-12-29

    Effective, remediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals requires a better understanding of the mechanisms by which the metals are retained/released in soils over a long period of time. Studies on reaction of Cr(VI) with iron-rich clays indicated that structural iron (II) in these surfaces is capable of reducing chromate to chromium (III). We found that iron (II) either found naturally or produced by treatment of clay with sodium dithionite, effectively reduced Cr (VI) to Cr (III). Thus, in situ remediation of chromium combines reduction of Cr (VI) to Cr (III) and immobilization of chromium on mineral surfaces. During this study, lead sorption on a kaolin surface was found to be a rapid and a pH dependant process in which lead sorption significantly increased with the amount of phosphate on the clay surface. This study verifies that methylmercury cation remains intact when it binds to humic acids, forming a monodentate complex with some sub-population of humic thiol ligands .

  8. Diastereoselective Addition of α-Metalated Sulfoxides to Imines Revisited: Mechanism, Computational Studies, and the Effect of External Chiral Ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Brian; Rein, Tobias; Søtofte, Inger

    2003-01-01

    six-membered "flat chair") was probed by quantum mechanical calculations, which underpinned the idea of using external chiral ligands to enhance the diastereoselectivity of otherwise moderately selective reactions. In this way, the diastereomeric ratio of the product 3a could be raised from (84 : 16...

  9. Quantitative ligand and receptor binding studies reveal the mechanism of interleukin-36 (IL-36) pathway activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Todorovic, Viktor; Kakavas, Steve; Sielaff, Bernhard; Medina, Limary; Wang, Leyu; Sadhukhan, Ramkrishna; Stockmann, Henning; Richardson, Paul L; DiGiammarino, Enrico; Sun, Chaohong; Scott, Victoria

    2018-01-12

    IL-36 cytokines signal through the IL-36 receptor (IL-36R) and a shared subunit, IL-1RAcP (IL-1 receptor accessory protein). The activation mechanism for the IL-36 pathway is proposed to be similar to that of IL-1 in that an IL-36R agonist (IL-36α, IL-36β, or IL-36γ) forms a binary complex with IL-36R, which then recruits IL-1RAcP. Recent studies have shown that IL-36R interacts with IL-1RAcP even in the absence of an agonist. To elucidate the IL-36 activation mechanism, we considered all possible binding events for IL-36 ligands/receptors and examined these events in direct binding assays. Our results indicated that the agonists bind the IL-36R extracellular domain with micromolar affinity but do not detectably bind IL-1RAcP. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we found that IL-1RAcP also does not bind IL-36R when no agonist is present. In the presence of IL-36α, however, IL-1RAcP bound IL-36R strongly. These results suggested that the main pathway to the IL-36R·IL-36α·IL-1RAcP ternary complex is through the IL-36R·IL-36α binary complex, which recruits IL-1RAcP. We could not measure the binding affinity of IL-36R to IL-1RAcP directly, so we engineered a fragment crystallizable-linked construct to induce IL-36R·IL-1RAcP heterodimerization and predicted the binding affinity during a complete thermodynamic cycle to be 74 μm The SPR analysis also indicated that the IL-36R antagonist IL-36Ra binds IL-36R with higher affinity and a much slower off rate than the IL-36R agonists, shedding light on IL-36 pathway inhibition. Our results reveal the landscape of IL-36 ligand and receptor interactions, improving our understanding of IL-36 pathway activation and inhibition. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Mechanical Regulation in Cell Division and in Neurotransmitter Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiyagarajan, Sathish

    During their lifecycle, cells must produce forces which play important roles in several subcellular processes. Force-producing components are organized into macromolecular assemblies of proteins that are often dynamic, and are constructed or disassembled in response to various signals. The forces themselves may directly be involved in subcellular mechanics, or they may influence mechanosensing proteins either within or outside these structures. These proteins play different roles: they may ensure the stability of the force-producing structure, or they may send signals to a coupled process. The generation and sensing of subcellular forces is an active research topic, and this thesis focusses on the roles of these forces in two key areas: cell division and neurotransmitter release. The first part of the thesis deals with the effect of force on cell wall growth regulation during division in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a cigar-shaped, unicellular organism. During cytokinesis, the last stage of cell division in which the cell physically divides into two, a tense cytokinetic ring anchored to the cellular membrane assembles and constricts, accompanied by the inward centripetal growth of new cell wall, called septum, in the wake of the inward-moving membrane. The contour of the septum hole maintains its circularity as it reduces in size--an indication of regulated growth. To characterize the cell wall growth process, we performed image analysis on contours of the leading edge of the septum obtained via fluorescence microscopy in the labs of our collaborators. We quantified the deviations from circularity using the edge roughness. The roughness was spatially correlated, suggestive of regulated growth. We hypothesized that the cell wall growers are mechanosensitive and respond to the force exerted by the ring. A mathematical model based on this hypothesis then showed that this leads to corrections of roughness in a curvature-dependent fashion. Thus, one of

  11. Iron complexes of tetramine ligands catalyse allylic hydroxyamination via a nitroso–ene mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Porter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron(II complexes of the tetradentate amines tris(2-pyridylmethylamine (TPA and N,N′-bis(2-pyridylmethyl-N,N′-dimethylethane-1,2-diamine (BPMEN are established catalysts of C–O bond formation, oxidising hydrocarbon substrates via hydroxylation, epoxidation and dihydroxylation pathways. Herein we report the capacity of these catalysts to promote C–N bond formation, via allylic amination of alkenes. The combination of N-Boc-hydroxylamine with either FeTPA (1 mol % or FeBPMEN (10 mol % converts cyclohexene to the allylic hydroxylamine (tert-butyl cyclohex-2-en-1-yl(hydroxycarbamate in moderate yields. Spectroscopic studies and trapping experiments suggest the reaction proceeds via a nitroso–ene mechanism, with involvement of a free N-Boc-nitroso intermediate. Asymmetric induction is not observed using the chiral tetramine ligand (+-(2R,2′R-1,1′-bis(2-pyridylmethyl-2,2′-bipyrrolidine ((R,R′-PDP.

  12. A Herpesviral induction of RAE-1 NKG2D ligand expression occurs through release of HDAC mediated repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Trever T; Tokuyama, Maria; Knudsen, Giselle M; Kunz, Michele; Lin, James; Greninger, Alexander L; DeFilippis, Victor R; DeRisi, Joseph L; Raulet, David H; Coscoy, Laurent

    2016-11-22

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are essential for control of viral infection and cancer. NK cells express NKG2D, an activating receptor that directly recognizes NKG2D ligands. These are expressed at low level on healthy cells, but are induced by stresses like infection and transformation. The physiological events that drive NKG2D ligand expression during infection are still poorly understood. We observed that the mouse cytomegalovirus encoded protein m18 is necessary and sufficient to drive expression of the RAE-1 family of NKG2D ligands. We demonstrate that RAE-1 is transcriptionally repressed by histone deacetylase inhibitor 3 (HDAC3) in healthy cells, and m18 relieves this repression by directly interacting with Casein Kinase II and preventing it from activating HDAC3. Accordingly, we found that HDAC inhibiting proteins from human herpesviruses induce human NKG2D ligand ULBP-1. Thus our findings indicate that virally mediated HDAC inhibition can act as a signal for the host to activate NK-cell recognition.

  13. Factors controlling alkali salt deposition in recovery boilers. Release mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKeough, P; Kurkela, M; Kylloenen, H; Tapola, E [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Process Technology Group

    1997-10-01

    The research was part of an ongoing cooperative research effort aimed at developing a model to describe the behaviour of inorganic compounds in kraft recovery boilers. During 1996 experimental investigations of sulphur release were continued. Experiments at elevated pressures and employing larger particle sizes were performed in order to gain information about mass transfer effects. The first experiments yielding data on the rates of the sulphur-release reactions were performed. This data will be used as the basis of a drop model for sulphur release being developed in cooperation with another research group. The other part of the work during 1996 explored the possibility of using chemical equilibrium calculations to predict the release of sodium, potassium and chlorine in the recovery furnace. The approach is essentially different from that employed in earlier studies in that the effects of fume formation are taken into account. So far, the predictions of the chemical equilibrium release model have, in no way, conflicted with field measurements. (orig.)

  14. Internalization mechanisms of the epidermal growth factor receptor after activation with different ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Lasse; Grandal, Michael Vibo; Knudsen, Stine Louise Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    after ligand activation focuses on the effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α). For a long time it was believed that clathrin-mediated endocytosis was the major pathway for internalization of the receptor, but recent work suggests that different pathways exist....... Here we show that clathrin ablation completely inhibits internalization of EGF- and TGF-α-stimulated receptor, however the inhibition of receptor internalization in cells treated with heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) or betacellulin (BTC) was only partial. In contrast, clathrin knockdown...... fully inhibits EGFR degradation after all ligands tested. Furthermore, inhibition of dynamin function blocked EGFR internalization after stimulation with all ligands. Knocking out a number of clathrin-independent dynamin-dependent pathways of internalization had no effect on the ligand...

  15. Mechanical energy release in CABRI-2 experiments with Viggen-4 fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, J.

    1993-07-01

    The results of mechanical energy release evaluations in CABRI-2 experiments with Viggen-4 fuel pins (12 atom % burnup) are described. In general the experience gained by the CABRI-1 experiments is confirmed. Those physical phenomena are enhanced which are influenced by the release of fission products. Especially the late blow-out of pressurized fission gases from the lower test pin plenum led to large flow variations. The corresponding mechanical power releases are low

  16. Biophysical and Biochemical Mechanisms in Synaptic Transmitter Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-31

    vesicle is normally released per active zone Sci USA 83. 3032 (1986) pared (15, 19, 20). In fact, in squid, the quantum 8 0 Shimomura 8 Musicki. V Kisni...8217, AND R. LLINAS• *Instituto de Biologia Celular Facultad de Medicina. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Paraguay 2155. Buenos Aires 1121. Argentina: and

  17. Internalization mechanisms of the epidermal growth factor receptor after activation with different ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasse Henriksen

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR regulates normal growth and differentiation, but dysregulation of the receptor or one of the EGFR ligands is involved in the pathogenesis of many cancers. There are eight ligands for EGFR, however most of the research into trafficking of the receptor after ligand activation focuses on the effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF and transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α. For a long time it was believed that clathrin-mediated endocytosis was the major pathway for internalization of the receptor, but recent work suggests that different pathways exist. Here we show that clathrin ablation completely inhibits internalization of EGF- and TGF-α-stimulated receptor, however the inhibition of receptor internalization in cells treated with heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF or betacellulin (BTC was only partial. In contrast, clathrin knockdown fully inhibits EGFR degradation after all ligands tested. Furthermore, inhibition of dynamin function blocked EGFR internalization after stimulation with all ligands. Knocking out a number of clathrin-independent dynamin-dependent pathways of internalization had no effect on the ligand-induced endocytosis of the EGFR. We suggest that EGF and TGF-α lead to EGFR endocytosis mainly via the clathrin-mediated pathway. Furthermore, we suggest that HB-EGF and BTC also lead to EGFR endocytosis via a clathrin-mediated pathway, but can additionally use an unidentified internalization pathway or better recruit the small amount of clathrin remaining after clathrin knockdown.

  18. Internalization Mechanisms of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor after Activation with Different Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Lasse; Grandal, Michael Vibo; Knudsen, Stine Louise Jeppe; van Deurs, Bo; Grøvdal, Lene Melsæther

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) regulates normal growth and differentiation, but dysregulation of the receptor or one of the EGFR ligands is involved in the pathogenesis of many cancers. There are eight ligands for EGFR, however most of the research into trafficking of the receptor after ligand activation focuses on the effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α). For a long time it was believed that clathrin-mediated endocytosis was the major pathway for internalization of the receptor, but recent work suggests that different pathways exist. Here we show that clathrin ablation completely inhibits internalization of EGF- and TGF-α-stimulated receptor, however the inhibition of receptor internalization in cells treated with heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) or betacellulin (BTC) was only partial. In contrast, clathrin knockdown fully inhibits EGFR degradation after all ligands tested. Furthermore, inhibition of dynamin function blocked EGFR internalization after stimulation with all ligands. Knocking out a number of clathrin-independent dynamin-dependent pathways of internalization had no effect on the ligand-induced endocytosis of the EGFR. We suggest that EGF and TGF-α lead to EGFR endocytosis mainly via the clathrin-mediated pathway. Furthermore, we suggest that HB-EGF and BTC also lead to EGFR endocytosis via a clathrin-mediated pathway, but can additionally use an unidentified internalization pathway or better recruit the small amount of clathrin remaining after clathrin knockdown. PMID:23472148

  19. Dynamics of ligand exchange mechanism at Cu(II) in water: An ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics study with extended quantum mechanical region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moin, Syed Tarique; Hofer, Thomas S.; Weiss, Alexander K. H.; Rode, Bernd M.

    2013-01-01

    Ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF-MD) were successfully applied to Cu(II) embedded in water to elucidate structure and to understand dynamics of ligand exchange mechanism. From the simulation studies, it was found that using an extended large quantum mechanical region including two shells of hydration is required for a better description of the dynamics of exchanging water molecules. The structural features characterized by radial distribution function, angular distribution function and other analytical parameters were consistent with experimental data. The major outcome of this study was the dynamics of exchange mechanism and reactions in the first hydration shell that could not be studied so far. The dynamical data such as mean residence time of the first shell water molecules and other relevant data from the simulations are close to the results determined experimentally. Another major characteristic of hydrated Cu(II) is the Jahn-Teller distortion which was also successfully reproduced, leading to the final conclusion that the dominating aqua complex is a 6-coordinated species. The ab initio QMCF-MD formalism proved again its capabilities of unraveling even ambiguous properties of hydrated species that are far difficult to explore by any conventional quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach or experiment

  20. Dynamics of ligand exchange mechanism at Cu(II) in water: an ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics study with extended quantum mechanical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moin, Syed Tarique; Hofer, Thomas S; Weiss, Alexander K H; Rode, Bernd M

    2013-07-07

    Ab initio quantum mechanical charge field molecular dynamics (QMCF-MD) were successfully applied to Cu(II) embedded in water to elucidate structure and to understand dynamics of ligand exchange mechanism. From the simulation studies, it was found that using an extended large quantum mechanical region including two shells of hydration is required for a better description of the dynamics of exchanging water molecules. The structural features characterized by radial distribution function, angular distribution function and other analytical parameters were consistent with experimental data. The major outcome of this study was the dynamics of exchange mechanism and reactions in the first hydration shell that could not be studied so far. The dynamical data such as mean residence time of the first shell water molecules and other relevant data from the simulations are close to the results determined experimentally. Another major characteristic of hydrated Cu(II) is the Jahn-Teller distortion which was also successfully reproduced, leading to the final conclusion that the dominating aqua complex is a 6-coordinated species. The ab initio QMCF-MD formalism proved again its capabilities of unraveling even ambiguous properties of hydrated species that are far difficult to explore by any conventional quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach or experiment.

  1. Human Adenosine A2A Receptor: Molecular Mechanism of Ligand Binding and Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byron Carpenter

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine receptors (ARs comprise the P1 class of purinergic receptors and belong to the largest family of integral membrane proteins in the human genome, the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. ARs are classified into four subtypes, A1, A2A, A2B, and A3, which are all activated by extracellular adenosine, and play central roles in a broad range of physiological processes, including sleep regulation, angiogenesis and modulation of the immune system. ARs are potential therapeutic targets in a variety of pathophysiological conditions, including sleep disorders, cancer, and dementia, which has made them important targets for structural biology. Over a decade of research and innovation has culminated with the publication of more than 30 crystal structures of the human adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR, making it one of the best structurally characterized GPCRs at the atomic level. In this review we analyze the structural data reported for A2AR that described for the first time the binding of mode of antagonists, including newly developed drug candidates, synthetic and endogenous agonists, sodium ions and an engineered G protein. These structures have revealed the key conformational changes induced upon agonist and G protein binding that are central to signal transduction by A2AR, and have highlighted both similarities and differences in the activation mechanism of this receptor compared to other class A GPCRs. Finally, comparison of A2AR with the recently solved structures of A1R has provided the first structural insight into the molecular determinants of ligand binding specificity in different AR subtypes.

  2. Reduction of dinitrogen ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Processes of dinitrogen ligand reduction in complexes of transition metals are considered. The basic character of the dinitrogen ligand is underlined. Data on X-ray photoelectronic spectroscopy and intensities of bands ν (N 2 ) in IR-spectra of nitrogen complexes are given. The mechanism of protonation of an edge dinitrogen ligand is discussed. Model systems and mechanism of nitrogenogenase are compared

  3. Mechanism of selective VEGF-A binding by neuropilin-1 reveals a basis for specific ligand inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W Parker

    Full Text Available Neuropilin (Nrp receptors function as essential cell surface receptors for the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF family of proangiogenic cytokines and the semaphorin 3 (Sema3 family of axon guidance molecules. There are two Nrp homologues, Nrp1 and Nrp2, which bind to both overlapping and distinct members of the VEGF and Sema3 family of molecules. Nrp1 specifically binds the VEGF-A(164/5 isoform, which is essential for developmental angiogenesis. We demonstrate that VEGF-A specific binding is governed by Nrp1 residues in the b1 coagulation factor domain surrounding the invariant Nrp C-terminal arginine binding pocket. Further, we show that Sema3F does not display the Nrp-specific binding to the b1 domain seen with VEGF-A. Engineered soluble Nrp receptor fragments that selectively sequester ligands from the active signaling complex are an attractive modality for selectively blocking the angiogenic and chemorepulsive functions of Nrp ligands. Utilizing the information on Nrp ligand binding specificity, we demonstrate Nrp constructs that specifically sequester Sema3 in the presence of VEGF-A. This establishes that unique mechanisms are used by Nrp receptors to mediate specific ligand binding and that these differences can be exploited to engineer soluble Nrp receptors with specificity for Sema3.

  4. MS-377, a novel selective sigma(1) receptor ligand, reverses phencyclidine-induced release of dopamine and serotonin in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S; Horikomi, K; Kato, T

    2001-09-21

    A novel selective sigma(1) receptor ligand, (R)-(+)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-[4-(2-methoxyethyl)piperazin-1-yl]methyl-2-pyrrolidinone L-tartrate (MS-377), inhibits phencyclidine (1-(1-phenylcyclohexyl)piperidine; PCP)-induced behaviors in animal models. In this study, we measured extracellular dopamine and serotonin levels in the rat brain after treatment with MS-377 alone, using in vivo microdialysis. We also examined the effects of MS-377 on extracellular dopamine and serotonin levels in the rat medial prefrontal cortex after treatment with PCP. MS-377 itself had no significant effects on dopamine release in the striatum (10 mg/kg, p.o.) nor on dopamine or serotonin release in the medial prefrontal cortex (1 and 10 mg/kg, p.o.). PCP (3 mg/kg, i.p.) markedly increased dopamine and serotonin release in the medial prefrontal cortex. MS-377 (1 mg/kg, p.o.), when administered 60 min prior to PCP, significantly attenuated this effect of PCP. These results suggest that the inhibitory effects of MS-377 on PCP-induced behaviors are partly mediated by inhibition of the increase in dopamine and serotonin release in the rat medial prefrontal cortex caused by PCP.

  5. Mechanical efficiency of the energy release during a steam explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krieg, R.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanical processes during the expansion phase of a steam explosion with intimately fragmented liquid particles is investigated based on elementary principles and analytical solutions. During a short load pulse, the different densities of the water and the melted particles lead to different velocities. After the load pulse, viscosity effects lead to a slow down of the higher velocities and to a corresponding reconversion of the kinetic energy of the mixture into thermal energy. It is shown that both effects are proportional to each other. The ratio between the residual and the applied mechanical energy is defined as the mechanical efficiency of the steam explosion. Using data typical for a steam explosion in a pressurized water reactor, mechanical efficiencies of <50% are estimated. Considering that the thermodynamic efficiencies are quite limited, the very low conversion rates from thermal energy into mechanical energy observed during steam explosion experiments can be more easily understood

  6. Converging ligand-binding free energies obtained with free-energy perturbations at the quantum mechanical level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Martin A; Söderhjelm, Pär; Ryde, Ulf

    2016-06-30

    In this article, the convergence of quantum mechanical (QM) free-energy simulations based on molecular dynamics simulations at the molecular mechanics (MM) level has been investigated. We have estimated relative free energies for the binding of nine cyclic carboxylate ligands to the octa-acid deep-cavity host, including the host, the ligand, and all water molecules within 4.5 Å of the ligand in the QM calculations (158-224 atoms). We use single-step exponential averaging (ssEA) and the non-Boltzmann Bennett acceptance ratio (NBB) methods to estimate QM/MM free energy with the semi-empirical PM6-DH2X method, both based on interaction energies. We show that ssEA with cumulant expansion gives a better convergence and uses half as many QM calculations as NBB, although the two methods give consistent results. With 720,000 QM calculations per transformation, QM/MM free-energy estimates with a precision of 1 kJ/mol can be obtained for all eight relative energies with ssEA, showing that this approach can be used to calculate converged QM/MM binding free energies for realistic systems and large QM partitions. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Soluble ligands for the NKG2D receptor are released during endometriosis and correlate with disease severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iñaki González-Foruria

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is a benign gynaecological disease. Abundant bulk of evidence suggests that patients with endometriosis have an immunity dysfunction that enables ectopic endometrial cells to implant and proliferate. Previous studies show that natural killer cells have a pivotal role in the immune control of endometriosis.This is a prospective laboratory study conducted in a tertiary-care university hospital between January 2011 and April 2013. We investigated non-pregnant, younger than 42-year-old patients (n= 202 during surgery for benign gynaecological conditions. After complete surgical exploration of the abdominopelvic cavity, 121 women with histologically proven endometriosis and 81 endometriosis-free controls women were enrolled. Patients with endometriosis were classified according to a surgical classification in three different types of endometriosis: superficial peritoneal endometriosis (SUP, ovarian endometrioma (OMA and deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE. Peritoneal fluid samples were obtained from all study participants during the surgery in order to detect soluble NKG2D ligands (MICA, MICB and ULBP-2. When samples with undetectable peritoneal fluid levels of MICA, MICB and ULBP-2 were excluded, MICA ratio levels were significantly higher in endometriosis patients than in controls (median, 1.1 pg/mg; range, 0.1-143.5 versus median, 0.6 pg/mg; range, 0.1-3.5; p=0.003. In a similar manner peritoneal fluid MICB levels were also increased in endometriosis-affected patients compared with disease-free women (median, 4.6 pg/mg; range, 1.2-4702 versus median, 3.4 pg/mg; range, 0.7-20.1; p=0.001. According to the surgical classification, peritoneal fluid soluble MICA, MICB and ULBP-2 ratio levels were significantly increased in DIE as compared to controls (p=0.015, p=0.003 and p=0.045 respectively. MICA ratio levels also correlated with dysmenorrhea (r=0.232; p=0.029, total rAFS score (r=0.221; p=0.031 and adhesions rAFS score (r=0.221; p=0

  8. The mechanism of nuclear energy release in nucleus-nucleus collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.; Strugalska-Gola, E.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanism of intranuclear energy release in reactions induced by nucleus-nucleus collisions at energies higher than ∼ 0.5 GeV/nucl. is presented - as prompted experimentally. The intranuclear energy release goes through local damages of the colliding nuclei

  9. Modeling comodulation masking release using an equalization cancellation mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piechowiak, Tobias; Ewert, Stephan; Dau, Torsten

    of the study investigates the relation between CMR and envelope-based binaural masking level differences (BMLD), using narrowband noise maskers and classical across-channel configurations (like N0Spi, N0Sm). In the second part, a model is presented that explicitly simulates CMR whereby the EC mechanism...

  10. Overview on phenomena of mechanical energy release in the CABRI-experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, J.

    1989-01-01

    Mechanical energy release phenomena observed in the CABRI-experiments are overviewed and discussed. Intensifying and mitigating effects are identified. They are caused by fission gases, inertia effects, pressure dissipation and fissile power

  11. [Preparation of hydrophilic matrix sustained release tablets of total lactones from Andrographis paniculata and study on its in vitro release mechanism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fang-Fang; Shi, Wei; Zhang, Hui; Guo, Qing-Ming; Wang Zhen-Zhong; Bi, Yu-An; Wang, Zhi-Min; Xiao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, hydrophilic matrix sustained release tablets of total lactones from Andrographis paniculata were prepared and the in vitro release behavior were also evaluated. The optimal prescription was achieved by studying the main factor of the type and amount of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) using single factor test and evaluating through cumulative release of three lactones. No burst drug release from the obtained matrix tablets was observed. Drug release sustained to 14 h. The release mechanism of three lactones from A. paniculata was accessed by zero-order, first-order, Higuchi and Peppas equation. The release behavior of total lactones from A. paniculata was better agreed with Higuchi model and the drug release from the tablets was controlled by degradation of the matrix. The preparation of hydrophilic matrix sustained release tablets of total lactones from A. paniculata with good performance of drug release was simple.

  12. Examination of Mechanisms Responsible for Organic Dust-related Diseases: Mediator Release induced by Microorgansims. A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norn, Svend; Clementsen, Paul; Kristensen, K.S.

    1994-01-01

    Farmakologi, org. dust-related diseases, bacteria, pathogenic mechanisms, mediator release, entoxins - fungal spores......Farmakologi, org. dust-related diseases, bacteria, pathogenic mechanisms, mediator release, entoxins - fungal spores...

  13. Binding mechanisms for histamine and agmatine ligands in plasmid deoxyribonucleic acid purifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ângela; Pereira, Patrícia; Sousa, Fani; Queiroz, João A

    2014-10-31

    Histamine and agmatine amino acid derivatives were immobilized into monolithic disks, in order to combine the specificity and selectivity of the ligand with the high mass transfer and binding capacity offered by monolithic supports, to purify potential plasmid DNA biopharmaceuticals. Different elution strategies were explored by changing the type and salt concentration, as well as the pH, in order to understand the retention pattern of different plasmids isoforms The pVAX1-LacZ supercoiled isoform was isolated from a mixture of pDNA isoforms by using NaCl increasing stepwise gradient and also by ammonium sulfate decreasing stepwise gradient, in both histamine and agmatine monoliths. Acidic pH in the binding buffer mainly strengthened ionic interactions with both ligands in the presence of sodium chloride. Otherwise, for histamine ligand, pH values higher than 7 intensified hydrophobic interactions in the presence of ammonium sulfate. In addition, circular dichroism spectroscopy studies revealed that the binding and elution chromatographic conditions, such as the combination of high ionic strength with extreme pH values can reversibly influence the structural stability of the target nucleic acid. Therefore, ascending sodium chloride gradients with pH manipulation can be preferable chromatographic conditions to be explored in the purification of plasmid DNA biopharmaceuticals, in order to avoid the environmental impact of ammonium sulfate. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Release mechanisms of acetaminophen from polyethylene oxide/polyethylene glycol matrix tablets utilizing magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Tomokazu; Morita, Shigeaki; Sakamoto, Ryosaku; Suzuki, Masazumi; Yamanashi, Shigeyuki; Ozaki, Yukihiro; Kitamura, Satoshi

    2010-08-16

    Release mechanism of acetaminophen (AAP) from extended-release tablets of hydrogel polymer matrices containing polyethylene oxide (PEO) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) were achieved using flow-through cell with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The hydrogel forming abilities are observed characteristically and the layer thickness which is corresponding to the diffusion length of AAP has a good correlation with the drug release profiles. In addition, polymeric erosion contribution to AAP releasing from hydrogel matrix tablets was directly quantified using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC). The matrix erosion profile indicates that the PEG erosion kinetic depends primarily on the composition ratio of PEG to PEO. The present study has confirmed that the combination of in situ MRI and SEC should be well suited to investigate the drug release mechanisms of hydrogel matrix such as PEO/PEG. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Ca2+ Entry is Required for Mechanical Stimulation-induced ATP Release from Astrocyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaekwang; Chun, Ye-Eun; Han, Kyung-Seok; Lee, Jungmoo; Woo, Dong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes and neurons are inseparable partners in the brain. Neurotransmitters released from neurons activate corresponding G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) expressed in astrocytes, resulting in release of gliotransmitters such as glutamate, D-serine, and ATP. These gliotransmitters in turn influence neuronal excitability and synaptic activities. Among these gliotransmitters, ATP regulates the level of network excitability and is critically involved in sleep homeostasis and astrocytic Ca2+ oscillations. ATP is known to be released from astrocytes by Ca2+-dependent manner. However, the precise source of Ca2+, whether it is Ca2+ entry from outside of cell or from the intracellular store, is still not clear yet. Here, we performed sniffer patch to detect ATP release from astrocyte by using various stimulation. We found that ATP was not released from astrocyte when Ca2+ was released from intracellular stores by activation of Gαq-coupled GPCR including PAR1, P2YR, and B2R. More importantly, mechanical stimulation (MS)-induced ATP release from astrocyte was eliminated when external Ca2+ was omitted. Our results suggest that Ca2+ entry, but not release from intracellular Ca2+ store, is critical for MS-induced ATP release from astrocyte. PMID:25792866

  16. Mechanisms for closing bores and releasably securing articles within the bores under longitudinal load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klahn, F.C.; Nolan, J.H.; Wills, C.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to mechanisms for closing bores of tubular passages and for releasably securing articles within the bores under longitudinal load. The system includes an axially movable latch, an actuator and locking devices. Embodiments of the invention can be used as closure mechanisms for tubular irradiation surveillance specimen assembly holders used in nuclear reactors. (UK)

  17. Mechanisms for closing bores and releasably securing articles within the bores under longitudinal load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalen, D.D.; Mitchem, J.W.

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to mechanisms for closing bores of tubular passages and for releasably securing articles within the bores under longitudinal load. The system includes an axially movable actuator and a latch which engages the tubular opening. Embodiments of the invention can be used as closure mechanisms for tubular irradiation surveillance specimen assembly holders used in nuclear reactors. (UK)

  18. Kinetics, Ca2+ dependence, and biophysical properties of integrin-mediated mechanical modulation of transmitter release from frog motor nerve terminals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B. M.; Grinnell, A. D.

    1997-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release from frog motor nerve terminals is strongly modulated by change in muscle length. Over the physiological range, there is an approximately 10% increase in spontaneous and evoked release per 1% muscle stretch. Because many muscle fibers do not receive suprathreshold synaptic inputs at rest length, this stretch-induced enhancement of release constitutes a strong peripheral amplifier of the spinal stretch reflex. The stretch modulation of release is inhibited by peptides that block integrin binding of natural ligands. The modulation varies linearly with length, with a delay of no more than approximately 1-2 msec and is maintained constant at the new length. Moreover, the stretch modulation persists in a zero Ca2+ Ringer and, hence, is not dependent on Ca2+ influx through stretch activated channels. Eliminating transmembrane Ca2+ gradients and buffering intraterminal Ca2+ to approximately normal resting levels does not eliminate the modulation, suggesting that it is not the result of release of Ca2+ from internal stores. Finally, changes in temperature have no detectable effect on the kinetics of stretch-induced changes in endplate potential (EPP) amplitude or miniature EPP (mEPP) frequency. We conclude, therefore, that stretch does not act via second messenger pathways or a chemical modification of molecules involved in the release pathway. Instead, there is direct mechanical modulation of release. We postulate that tension on integrins in the presynaptic membrane is transduced mechanically into changes in the position or conformation of one or more molecules involved in neurotransmitter release, altering sensitivity to Ca2+ or the equilibrium for a critical reaction leading to vesicle fusion.

  19. The stress response to surgery: release mechanisms and the modifying effect of pain relief

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H

    1989-01-01

    This short review updates information on the release mechanisms of the systemic response to surgical injury and the modifying effect of pain relief. Initiation of the response is primarily due to afferent nerve impulses combined with release of humoral substances (such as prostaglandins, kinins...... in releasing the classical endocrine catabolic response, while humoral factors are important for the hyperthermic response, changes in coagulation and fibrinolysis immunofunction, and capillary permeability. The modifying effect of pain relief on the surgical stress response is dependent upon the technique...... on the stress response. In summary, pain alleviation itself may not necessarily lead to an important modification of the stress response, and a combined approach with inhibition of the neural and humoral release mechanisms is necessary for a pronounced inhibition or prevention of the response to surgical injury....

  20. Mechanical stretch induces MMP-2 release and activation in lung endothelium: role of EMMPRIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseneen, Nadia A; Vaday, Gayle G; Zucker, Stanley; Foda, Hussein D

    2003-03-01

    High-volume mechanical ventilation leads to ventilator-induced lung injury. This type of lung injury is accompanied by an increased release and activation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). To investigate the mechanism leading to the increased MMP release, we systematically studied the effect of mechanical stretch on human microvascular endothelial cells isolated from the lung. We exposed cells grown on collagen 1 BioFlex plates to sinusoidal cyclic stretch at 0.5 Hz using the Flexercell system with 17-18% elongation of cells. After 4 days of cell stretching, conditioned media and cell lysate were collected and analyzed by gelatin, casein, and reverse zymograms as well as Western blotting. RT-PCR of mRNA extracted from stretched cells was performed. Our results show that 1) cyclic stretch led to increased release and activation of MMP-2 and MMP-1; 2) the activation of MMP-2 was accompanied by an increase in membrane type-1 MMP (MT1-MMP) and inhibited by a hydroxamic acid-derived inhibitor of MMPs (Prinomastat, AG3340); and 3) the MMP-2 release and activation were preceded by an increase in production of extracellular MMP inducer (EMMPRIN). These results suggest that cyclic mechanical stretch leads to MMP-2 activation through an MT1-MMP mechanism. EMMPRIN may play an important role in the release and activation of MMPs during lung injury.

  1. The design and testing of a memory metal actuated boom release mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powley, D. G.; Brook, G. B.

    1979-01-01

    A boom latch and release mechanism was designed, manufactured and tested, based on a specification for the ISEE-B satellite mechanism. From experimental results obtained, it is possible to calculate the energy available and the operating torques which can be achieved from a torsional shape memory element in terms of the reversible strain induced by prior working. Some guidelines to be followed when designing mechanisms actuated by shape memory elements are included.

  2. Oxygen Atom Exchange between H2O and Non-Heme Oxoiron(IV) Complexes: Ligand Dependence and Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, Mayank; Company, Anna; Sabenya, Gerard; Costas, Miquel; Que, Lawrence

    2016-06-20

    Detailed studies of oxygen atom exchange (OAE) between H2(18)O and synthetic non-heme oxoiron(IV) complexes supported by tetradentate and pentadentate ligands provide evidence that they proceed by a common mechanism but within two different kinetic regimes, with OAE rates that span 2 orders of magnitude. The first kinetic regime involves initial reversible water association to the Fe(IV) complex, which is evidenced by OAE rates that are linearly dependent on [H2(18)O] and H2O/D2O KIEs of 1.6, while the second kinetic regime involves a subsequent rate determining proton-transfer step between the bound aqua and oxo ligands that is associated with saturation behavior with [H2(18)O] and much larger H2O/D2O KIEs of 5-6. [Fe(IV)(O)(TMC)(MeCN)](2+) (1) and [Fe(IV)(O)(MePy2TACN)](2+) (9) are examples of complexes that exhibit kinetic behavior in the first regime, while [Fe(IV)(O)(N4Py)](2+) (3), [Fe(IV)(O)(BnTPEN)](2+) (4), [Fe(IV)(O)(1Py-BnTPEN)](2+) (5), [Fe(IV)(O)(3Py-BnTPEN)](2+) (6), and [Fe(IV)(O)(Me2Py2TACN)](2+) (8) represent complexes that fall in the second kinetic regime. Interestingly, [Fe(IV)(O)(PyTACN)(MeCN)](2+) (7) exhibits a linear [H2(18)O] dependence below 0.6 M and saturation above 0.6 M. Analysis of the temperature dependence of the OAE rates shows that most of these complexes exhibit large and negative activation entropies, consistent with the proposed mechanism. One exception is complex 9, which has a near-zero activation entropy and is proposed to undergo ligand-arm dissociation during the RDS to accommodate H2(18)O binding. These results show that the observed OAE kinetic behavior is highly dependent on the nature of the supporting ligand and are of relevance to studies of non-heme oxoiron(IV) complexes in water or acetonitrile/water mixtures for applications in photocatalysis and water oxidation chemistry.

  3. The link between bond forfeiture and pretrial release mechanism: The case of Dallas County, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clipper, Stephen J; Morris, Robert G; Russell-Kaplan, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of four pretrial jail release mechanisms (i.e., bond types) commonly used during the pretrial phase of the criminal justice process in terms of their ability to discriminate between defendants failing to appear in court (i.e., bond forfeiture). These include attorney bonds, cash bonds, commercial bail bonds, and release via a pretrial services agency. A multi-treatment propensity score matching protocol was employed to assess between-release-mechanism differences in the conditional probability of failure to appear/bond forfeiture. Data were culled from archival state justice records comprising all defendants booked into the Dallas County, Texas jail during 2008 (n = 29,416). The results suggest that defendants released via commercial bail bonds were less likely to experience failure to appear leading to the bond forfeiture process compared to equivalent defendants released via cash, attorney, and pretrial services bonds. This finding held across different offense categories. The study frames these differences within a discussion encompassing procedural variation within and between each release mechanism, thereby setting the stage for further research and dialog regarding potential justice reform.

  4. The link between bond forfeiture and pretrial release mechanism: The case of Dallas County, Texas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J Clipper

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of four pretrial jail release mechanisms (i.e., bond types commonly used during the pretrial phase of the criminal justice process in terms of their ability to discriminate between defendants failing to appear in court (i.e., bond forfeiture. These include attorney bonds, cash bonds, commercial bail bonds, and release via a pretrial services agency.A multi-treatment propensity score matching protocol was employed to assess between-release-mechanism differences in the conditional probability of failure to appear/bond forfeiture. Data were culled from archival state justice records comprising all defendants booked into the Dallas County, Texas jail during 2008 (n = 29,416.The results suggest that defendants released via commercial bail bonds were less likely to experience failure to appear leading to the bond forfeiture process compared to equivalent defendants released via cash, attorney, and pretrial services bonds. This finding held across different offense categories. The study frames these differences within a discussion encompassing procedural variation within and between each release mechanism, thereby setting the stage for further research and dialog regarding potential justice reform.

  5. Barium ionization mechanisms in the CRRES G-1 and G-11b releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunton, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    The G-11b chemical release experiment form the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) was conducted in darkness below the solar UV terminator to test the Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) hypothesis. The Quadrupole Ion Mass Spectrometer (QIMS) aboard CRRES measured fluxes of barium ions from this darkness release that were only a factor of ten smaller than the G-1 release measurements in full sunlight. Possible mechanisms for this significant barium ionization in darkness include CIV, charge exchange with O + , collisional ionization and associative ionization. The authors have evaluated the relative contributions of the collisional mechanisms by constructing a simple model of barium ions from the darkness release seem to be consistent with recent measurements of the charge transfer cross section. A collective plasma ionization mechanism such as CIV does not seem to necessary in order to explain the large barium ion fluxes observed. However, QIMS could only detect barium ions formed several seconds after the initial detonation of the release canister. A CIV process could still have occurred very early in the expansion of the barium neutral cloud and the mass spectrometer would not have detected these ions

  6. Emerging role of chemokine CC motif ligand 4 related mechanisms in diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease: friends or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ting-Ting; Chen, Jaw-Wen

    2016-08-24

    Chemokines are critical components in pathology. The roles of chemokine CC motif ligand 4 (CCL4) and its receptor are associated with diabetes mellitus (DM) and atherosclerosis cardiovascular diseases. However, due to the complexity of these diseases, the specific effects of CCL4 remain unclear, although recent reports have suggested that multiple pathways are related to CCL4. In this review, we provide an overview of the role and potential mechanisms of CCL4 and one of its major receptors, fifth CC chemokine receptor (CCR5), in DM and cardiovascular diseases. CCL4-related mechanisms, including CCL4 and CCR5, might provide potential therapeutic targets in DM and/or atherosclerosis cardiovascular diseases.

  7. Direct Pore Binding as a Mechanism for Isoflurane Inhibition of the Pentameric Ligand-gated Ion Channel ELIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Kinde, Monica N; Arjunan, Palaniappa; Wells, Marta M; Cohen, Aina E; Xu, Yan; Tang, Pei

    2015-09-08

    Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) are targets of general anesthetics, but molecular mechanisms underlying anesthetic action remain debatable. We found that ELIC, a pLGIC from Erwinia chrysanthemi, can be functionally inhibited by isoflurane and other anesthetics. Structures of ELIC co-crystallized with isoflurane in the absence or presence of an agonist revealed double isoflurane occupancies inside the pore near T237(6') and A244(13'). A pore-radius contraction near the extracellular entrance was observed upon isoflurane binding. Electrophysiology measurements with a single-point mutation at position 6' or 13' support the notion that binding at these sites renders isoflurane inhibition. Molecular dynamics simulations suggested that isoflurane binding was more stable in the resting than in a desensitized pore conformation. This study presents compelling evidence for a direct pore-binding mechanism of isoflurane inhibition, which has a general implication for inhibitory action of general anesthetics on pLGICs.

  8. Semiconductor Quantum Dots with Photoresponsive Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansalone, Lorenzo; Tang, Sicheng; Zhang, Yang; Thapaliya, Ek Raj; Raymo, Françisco M; Garcia-Amorós, Jaume

    2016-10-01

    Photochromic or photocaged ligands can be anchored to the outer shell of semiconductor quantum dots in order to control the photophysical properties of these inorganic nanocrystals with optical stimulations. One of the two interconvertible states of the photoresponsive ligands can be designed to accept either an electron or energy from the excited quantum dots and quench their luminescence. Under these conditions, the reversible transformations of photochromic ligands or the irreversible cleavage of photocaged counterparts translates into the possibility to switch luminescence with external control. As an alternative to regulating the photophysics of a quantum dot via the photochemistry of its ligands, the photochemistry of the latter can be controlled by relying on the photophysics of the former. The transfer of excitation energy from a quantum dot to a photocaged ligand populates the excited state of the species adsorbed on the nanocrystal to induce a photochemical reaction. This mechanism, in conjunction with the large two-photon absorption cross section of quantum dots, can be exploited to release nitric oxide or to generate singlet oxygen under near-infrared irradiation. Thus, the combination of semiconductor quantum dots and photoresponsive ligands offers the opportunity to assemble nanostructured constructs with specific functions on the basis of electron or energy transfer processes. The photoswitchable luminescence and ability to photoinduce the release of reactive chemicals, associated with the resulting systems, can be particularly valuable in biomedical research and can, ultimately, lead to the realization of imaging probes for diagnostic applications as well as to therapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer.

  9. Release mechanisms from shallow engineered trenches used as repositories for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locke, J.; Wood, E.

    1987-05-01

    This report has been written for the Department of the Environment as part of their radioactive waste management research programme. The aim has been to identify release mechanisms of radioactivity from fully engineered trenches of the LAND 2 type and, to identify the data needed for their assessment. No direct experimental work has been involved. The report starts with a brief background to UK strategy and outlines a basic disposal system. It gives reviews of existing experience of low level radioactive waste disposal from LAND 1 trenches and of UK experience of toxic waste disposal to provide a practical basis for the next section which covers the implications of identified release mechanisms on the design requirements for an engineered trench. From these design requirements and their interaction with potential site conditions (both saturated and unsaturated zone sites are considered) an assessment of radionuclide release mechanism is made. (author)

  10. Mechanisms of constitutive and ATP-evoked ATP release in neonatal mouse olfactory epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayoz Sébastien

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATP is an extracellular signaling molecule with many ascribed functions in sensory systems, including the olfactory epithelium. The mechanism(s by which ATP is released in the olfactory epithelium has not been investigated. Quantitative luciferin-luciferase assays were used to monitor ATP release, and confocal imaging of the fluorescent ATP marker quinacrine was used to monitor ATP release via exocytosis in Swiss Webster mouse neonatal olfactory epithelial slices. Results Under control conditions, constitutive release of ATP occurs via exocytosis, hemichannels and ABC transporters and is inhibited by vesicular fusion inhibitor Clostridium difficile toxin A and hemichannel and ABC transporter inhibitor probenecid. Constitutive ATP release is negatively regulated by the ATP breakdown product ADP through activation of P2Y receptors, likely via the cAMP/PKA pathway. In vivo studies indicate that constitutive ATP may play a role in neuronal homeostasis as inhibition of exocytosis inhibited normal proliferation in the OE. ATP-evoked ATP release is also present in mouse neonatal OE, triggered by several ionotropic P2X purinergic receptor agonists (ATP, αβMeATP and Bz-ATP and a G protein-coupled P2Y receptor agonist (UTP. Calcium imaging of P2X2-transfected HEK293 “biosensor” cells confirmed the presence of evoked ATP release. Following purinergic receptor stimulation, ATP is released via calcium-dependent exocytosis, activated P2X1,7 receptors, activated P2X7 receptors that form a complex with pannexin channels, or ABC transporters. The ATP-evoked ATP release is inhibited by the purinergic receptor inhibitor PPADS, Clostridium difficile toxin A and two inhibitors of pannexin channels: probenecid and carbenoxolone. Conclusions The constitutive release of ATP might be involved in normal cell turn-over or modulation of odorant sensitivity in physiological conditions. Given the growth-promoting effects of ATP, ATP-evoked ATP

  11. Compressional, mechanical and release properties of a novel gum in paracetamol tablet formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adedokun Musiliu O.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The binding properties of Eucalyptus gum obtained from the incised trunk of Eucalyptus tereticornis, were evaluated in paracetamol tablet formulations, in comparison with that of Gelatin B.P. In so doing, the compression properties were analyzed using density measurements and the compression equations of Heckel, Kawakita and Gurham. In our work, the mechanical properties of the tablets were assessed using the crushing strength and friability of the tablets, while the drug release properties of the tablets were assessed using disintegration and dissolution times. The results of the study reveal that tablet formulations incorporating Eucalyptus gum as binder, exhibited faster onset and higher amount of plastic deformation during compression than those containing gelatin. What is more, the Gurnham equation could be used as a substitute for the Kawakita equation in describing the compression properties of pharmaceutical tablets. Furthermore, the crushing strength, disintegration and dissolution times of the tablets increased with binder concentration, while friability values decreased. We noted that no significant differences in properties exist between formulations derived from the two binders (p > 0.05 exist. While tablets incorporating gelatin exhibited higher values for mechanical properties, Eucalyptus gum tablets had better balance between mechanical and release properties - as seen from the CSFR/Dt values. Tablets of good mechanical and release properties were prepared using Eucalyptus gum as a binder, and, therefore, it could serve as an alternative binder in producing tablets with good mechanical strength and fast drug release.

  12. Rates and mechanisms of radioactive release and retention inside a waste disposal canister - in Can Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oversby, V.M. (ed.) [and others

    2003-10-01

    the system that will not be present under long term disposal conditions. A simulation of long-term conditions can be done using uranium dioxide that contains a short-lived isotope of uranium, but this will not include the effects of fission product and higher actinide elements on the behaviour of the spent fuel. We designed a project that had as its objective to improve the scientific understanding of the processes that control release of radioactive species from spent fuel inside a disposal canister and the chemical changes in those species that might limit release of radioactivity from the canister. If the mechanisms that control dissolution of the fuel matrix, including self-irradiation effects, can be clarified, a more realistic assessment of the long-term behaviour of spent fuel under disposal conditions can be made. By removing uncertainties concerning waste form performance, a better assessment of the individual and collective role of the engineered barriers can be made. To achieve the overall objective of the project, the following scientific and technical objectives were set. 1. Measure the actual rate of matrix dissolution of uranium dioxide under oxidising and reducing conditions. 2. Measure the effect of alpha radiolysis on the dissolution rate of uranium dioxide under oxidising and reducing conditions. 3. Measure the dissolution rate of the matrix material of spent fuel and thereby determine the additional effects of beta and gamma radiation on uranium dioxide dissolution rate under oxidising and reducing conditions. 4. Measure the ability of actively corroding iron to reduce oxidised U(VI) to U(IV) when U is present as the complex ion uranyl carbonate. 5. Measure the rate of reduction of Np(V) species in the presence of actively corroding iron. 6. Calculate the expected equilibrium and steady state concentrations of U under the conditions of the experiments used for meeting objectives 1 through 3 and compare the calculated results with those measured in

  13. Porcine malignant hyperthermia susceptibility: hypersensitive calcium-release mechanism of skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, P J

    1986-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that calcium-release from sarcoplasmic reticulum isolated from malignant hyperthermia swine had abnormal concentration-dependency on release modulators. Halothane stimulated half-maximal calcium-release at similar concentrations for malignant hyperthermia and control sarcoplasmic reticulum (0.10 +/- 0.04 mM). However, concentrations causing half-maximal calcium-release were lower for malignant hyperthermia sarcoplasmic reticulum (P less than 0.001) by an order of magnitude for Ca2+ (28.1 +/- 8.3 versus 1.23 +/- 0.45 nM), adenosine triphosphate (0.33 +/- 0.09 versus 0.023 +/- 0.014 mM) and caffeine (7.79 +/- 1.56 versus 0.80 +/- 0.44 mM). Half-maximal inhibition by Mg2+ occurred at threefold higher concentrations for malignant hyperthermia sarcoplasmic reticulum (0.23 +/- 0.02 versus 0.78 +/- 0.17 mM). The Ca2+-sensitivity curves for calcium-release by sarcoplasmic reticulum isolated from heterozygotes for the malignant hyperthermia-defect were indistinguishable from the averages of the curves for controls and malignant hyperthermia-homozygotes. Results of this study suggest that malignant hyperthermia is initiated due to a hypersensitive calcium-release mechanism which is inherited in an autosomal, codominant pattern and may be diagnosed using calcium-release sensitivity-tests on isolated sarcoplasmic reticulum. Images Fig. 1. PMID:3742367

  14. Mechanized azobenzene-functionalized zirconium metal-organic framework for on-command cargo release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangshi; Gui, Bo; Yuan, Daqiang; Zeller, Matthias; Wang, Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Stimuli-responsive metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have gained increasing attention recently for their potential applications in many areas. We report the design and synthesis of a water-stable zirconium MOF (Zr-MOF) that bears photoresponsive azobenzene groups. This particular MOF can be used as a reservoir for storage of cargo in water, and the cargo-loaded MOF can be further capped to construct a mechanized MOF through the binding of β-cyclodextrin with the azobenzene stalks on the MOF surface. The resulting mechanized MOF has shown on-command cargo release triggered by ultraviolet irradiation or addition of competitive agents without premature release. This study represents a simple approach to the construction of stimuli-responsive mechanized MOFs, and considering mechanized UiO-68-azo made from biocompatible components, this smart system may provide a unique MOF platform for on-command drug delivery in the future.

  15. Unit mechanisms of fission gas release: Current understanding and future needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonks, Michael; Andersson, David; Devanathan, Ram; Dubourg, Roland; El-Azab, Anter; Freyss, Michel; Iglesias, Fernando; Kulacsy, Katalin; Pastore, Giovanni; Phillpot, Simon R.; Welland, Michael

    2018-06-01

    Gaseous fission product transport and release has a large impact on fuel performance, degrading fuel and gap properties. While gaseous fission product behavior has been investigated with bulk reactor experiments and simplified analytical models, recent improvements in experimental and modeling approaches at the atomistic and mesoscales are beginning to reveal new understanding of the unit mechanisms that define fission product behavior. Here, existing research on the basic mechanisms of fission gas release during normal reactor operation are summarized and critical areas where work is needed are identified. This basic understanding of the fission gas behavior mechanisms has the potential to revolutionize our ability to predict fission product behavior and to design fuels with improved performance. In addition, this work can serve as a model on how a coupled experimental and modeling approach can be applied to understand the unit mechanisms behind other critical behaviors in reactor materials.

  16. Combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations for protein-ligand complexes: free energies of binding of water molecules in influenza neuraminidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Christopher J; Shaw, Katherine E; Mulholland, Adrian J

    2015-01-22

    The applicability of combined quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods for the calculation of absolute binding free energies of conserved water molecules in protein/ligand complexes is demonstrated. Here, we apply QM/MM Monte Carlo simulations to investigate binding of water molecules to influenza neuraminidase. We investigate five different complexes, including those with the drugs oseltamivir and peramivir. We investigate water molecules in two different environments, one more hydrophobic and one hydrophilic. We calculate the free-energy change for perturbation of a QM to MM representation of the bound water molecule. The calculations are performed at the BLYP/aVDZ (QM) and TIP4P (MM) levels of theory, which we have previously demonstrated to be consistent with one another for QM/MM modeling. The results show that the QM to MM perturbation is significant in both environments (greater than 1 kcal mol(-1)) and larger in the more hydrophilic site. Comparison with the same perturbation in bulk water shows that this makes a contribution to binding. The results quantify how electronic polarization differences in different environments affect binding affinity and also demonstrate that extensive, converged QM/MM free-energy simulations, with good levels of QM theory, are now practical for protein/ligand complexes.

  17. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulation of the ligand vibrations of the water-oxidizing Mn4CaO5 cluster in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shin; Noguchi, Takumi

    2016-10-11

    During photosynthesis, the light-driven oxidation of water performed by photosystem II (PSII) provides electrons necessary to fix CO 2 , in turn supporting life on Earth by liberating molecular oxygen. Recent high-resolution X-ray images of PSII show that the water-oxidizing center (WOC) is composed of an Mn 4 CaO 5 cluster with six carboxylate, one imidazole, and four water ligands. FTIR difference spectroscopy has shown significant structural changes of the WOC during the S-state cycle of water oxidation, especially within carboxylate groups. However, the roles that these carboxylate groups play in water oxidation as well as how they should be properly assigned in spectra are unresolved. In this study, we performed a normal mode analysis of the WOC using the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method to simulate FTIR difference spectra on the S 1 to S 2 transition in the carboxylate stretching region. By evaluating WOC models with different oxidation and protonation states, we determined that models of high-oxidation states, Mn(III) 2 Mn(IV) 2 , satisfactorily reproduced experimental spectra from intact and Ca-depleted PSII compared with low-oxidation models. It is further suggested that the carboxylate groups bridging Ca and Mn ions within this center tune the reactivity of water ligands bound to Ca by shifting charge via their π conjugation.

  18. Mechanism of energy release from nucleus-target in hadron-nucleus collision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strugalski, Z.; Strugalska-Gola, E.

    2000-01-01

    The collisions of hadrons (protons, mesons) with 131 Xe nucleus and arising light nuclear fragments as nuclear refraction products have been observed in bubble chamber. Mechanism of energy release during these collisions has been discussed. The quantitative calculations has proved that this phenomena can be treated as potential energy source with use of many different target materials

  19. Nickel release from orthodontic retention wires: the action of mechanical loading and pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milheiro, A.; Kleverlaan, C.; Muris, J.; Feilzer, A.; Pallav, P.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel (Ni) is a potent sensitizer and may induce innate and adaptive immune responses. Ni is an important component of orthodontic appliances (8-50 wt%). Due to chemical and mechanical factors in the oral environment, Ni is released from these appliances. Retention wires are in situ for a long

  20. A Discussion of SY-101 Crust Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, D.P.; Mahoney, L.A.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Caley, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    The flammable gas hazard in Hanford waste tanks was made an issue by the behavior of double-shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 (SY-101). Shortly after SY-101 was filled in 1980, the waste level began rising periodically, due to the generation and retention of gases within the slurry, and then suddenly dropping as the gases were released. An intensive study of the tank's behavior revealed that these episodic releases posed a safety hazard because the released gas was flammable, and, in some cases, the volume of gas released was sufficient to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL) in the tank headspace (Alleinann et al. 1993). A mixer pump was installed in SY-101 in late 1993 to prevent gases from building up in the settled solids layer, and the large episodic gas releases have since ceased (Allemann et al. 1994; Stewart et al. 1994; Brewster et al. 1995). However, the surface level of SY-101 has been increasing since at least 1995, and in recent months the level growth has shown significant and unexpected acceleration. Based on a number of observations and measurements, including data from the void fraction instrument (VFI), we have concluded that the level growth is caused largely by increased gas retention in the floating crust. In September 1998, the crust contained between about 21 and 43% void based on VFI measurements (Stewart et al. 1998). Accordingly, it is important to understand the dominant mechanisms of gas retention, why the gas retention is increasing, and whether the accelerating level increase will continue, diminish or even reverse. It is expected that the retained gas in the crust is flammable, with hydrogen as a major constituent. This gas inventory would pose a flammable gas hazard if it were to release suddenly. In May 1997, the mechanisms of bubble retention and release from crust material were the subject of a workshop. The evaluation of the crust and potential hazards assumed a more typical void of roughly 15% gas. It could be similar to

  1. A Discussion of SY-101 Crust Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SD Rassat; PA Gauglitz; SM Caley; LA Mahoney; DP Mendoza

    1999-02-23

    The flammable gas hazard in Hanford waste tanks was made an issue by the behavior of double-shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 (SY-101). Shortly after SY-101 was filled in 1980, the waste level began rising periodically, due to the generation and retention of gases within the slurry, and then suddenly dropping as the gases were released. An intensive study of the tank's behavior revealed that these episodic releases posed a safety hazard because the released gas was flammable, and, in some cases, the volume of gas released was sufficient to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL) in the tank headspace (Allemann et al. 1993). A mixer pump was installed in SY-101 in late 1993 to prevent gases from building up in the settled solids layer, and the large episodic gas releases have since ceased (Allemann et al. 1994; Stewart et al. 1994; Brewster et al. 1995). However, the surface level of SY-101 has been increasing since at least 1995, and in recent months the level growth has shown significant and unexpected acceleration. Based on a number of observations and measurements, including data from the void fraction instrument (VFI), we have concluded that the level growth is caused largely by increased gas retention in the floating crust. In September 1998, the crust contained between about 21 and 43% void based on VFI measurements (Stewart et al. 1998). Accordingly, it is important to understand the dominant mechanisms of gas retention, why the gas retention is increasing, and whether the accelerating level increase will continue, diminish or even reverse. It is expected that the retained gas in the crust is flammable, with hydrogen as a major constituent. This gas inventory would pose a flammable gas hazard if it were to release suddenly. In May 1997, the mechanisms of bubble retention and release from crust material were the subject of a workshop. The evaluation of the crust and potential hazards assumed a more typical void of roughly 15% gas. It could be similar to

  2. Nanoparticle Photoresists: Ligand Exchange as a New, Sensitive EUV Patterning Mechanism

    KAUST Repository

    Kryask, Marie; Trikeriotis, Markos; Ouyang, Christine; Chakrabarty, Sovik; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Ober, Christopher K.

    2013-01-01

    compared to other standard photoresists. The current study aims at investigating and establishing the underlying mechanism for dual tone patterning of these nanoparticle photoresist systems. Infrared spectroscopy and UV absorbance studies supported by mass

  3. In-reactor measurements of thermo mechanical behaviour and fission gas release of water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolstad, E.; Vitanza, C.

    1983-01-01

    the fuel performance during and after a power ramp can be investigated by direct in-pile measurements related to the thermal, mechanical and fission gas release behaviour. The thermal response is examined by thermocouples placed at the centre of the fuel. Such measurements allow the determination of thermal feedback effects induced by the simultaneous liberation of fission gases. The thermal feedback effect is also being separately studied out-of-pile in a specially designed rod where the fission gas release is simulated by injecting xenon in known quantities at different axial positions within the rod. Investigations on the mechanical behaviour are based on axial and diametral cladding deformation measurements. This enables the determination of the amount of local cladding strain and ridging during ramping, the extent of relaxation during the holding time and the amount of residual (plastic) deformation. Gap width measurements are also performed in operating fuel rods using a cladding deflection technique. Fission gas release data are obtained, besides from post-irradiation puncturing, by continuous measurements of the rod internal pressure. This type of measurement leads to the description of the kinetics of the fission gas release process at different powers. The data tend to indicate that the time-dependent release can be reasonably well described by simple diffusion. The paper describes measuring techniques developed and currently in use in Halden, and presents and discusses selected experimental results obtained during various power ramps and transients. (author)

  4. Genipin crosslinker releasing sutures for improving the mechanical/repair strength of damaged connective tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararaj, Sharath; Slusarewicz, Paul; Brown, Matt; Hedman, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    The most common mode of surgical repair of ruptured tendons and ligaments involves the use of sutures for reattachment. However, there is a high incidence of rerupture and repair failure due to pulling out of the suture material from the damaged connective tissue. The main goal of this research was to achieve a localized delivery of crosslinking agent genipin (GP) from rapid-release biodegradable coatings on sutures, for strengthening the repair of ruptured connective tissue. Our hypothesis is that GP released from the suture coating will lead to exogenous crosslinking of native connective tissue resulting in beneficial effects on clinically relevant mechanical parameters such as tear resistance, tissue strength, and energy required to rupture the tissue (toughness). Sutures were successfully coated with a biodegradable polymer layer loaded with the crosslinking agent genipin, without compromising the mechanical properties of the suture. The rapid-release of genipin was achieved under both in vitro and ex vivo conditions. Exogenous crosslinking using these genipin releasing sutures was demonstrated using equine tendons. The tendons treated with genipin releasing sutures showed significant improvement in failure load, energy required for pull-out failure, and stiffness. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2199-2205, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Mechanism of acute depletion of plasma fibronectin following thermal injury in rats. Appearance of a gelatinlike ligand in plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deno, D.C.; McCafferty, M.H.; Saba, T.M.; Blumenstock, F.A.

    1984-01-01

    Plasma fibronectin was depleted within 15 min following sublethal burn, followed by partial recovery at 8 h and complete restoration by 24 h in anesthetized rats. Radiolabeled 75 Se-plasma fibronectin, injected intravenously before burn, was rapidly sequestered in burn skin as well as the liver. Fibronectin levels at 2 h postburn as detected by immunoassay vs. 75 Se-plasma fibronectin indicated that more fibronectin was in the plasma than detected by electroimmunoassay. Crossed immunoelectrophoretic analysis of fibronectin in early postburn plasma demonstrated a reduced electrophoretic mobility of the fibronectin antigen. Addition of heparin or fibrin, both of which have affinity for fibronectin, to normal plasma was unable to reproduce this altered fibronectin electrophoretic pattern. In contrast, addition of gelatin or native collagen to normal plasma reproduced the abnormal electrophoretic pattern of fibronectin seen in burn plasma. Extracts of burned skin, but not extracts of normal skin, when added to normal plasma, elicited a similar altered electrophoretic pattern for fibronectin. By gel filtration, fibronectin in burn plasma had an apparent molecular weight approximately 40% greater than that observed in normal plasma. These data suggest the release into the blood of a gelatinlike ligand from burned skin, which complexes with plasma fibronectin. Thus, fibronectin deficiency acutely postburn appears mediated by (a) its accumulation at the site of burn injury; (b) its removal from the circulation by the liver; and (c) its presence in the plasma in a form that is less detectable by immunoassay

  6. Binding Characteristics of Sphingosine-1-Phosphate to ApoM hints to Assisted Release Mechanism via the ApoM Calyx-Opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hansi; Pluhackova, Kristyna; Jiang, Zhenyan; Böckmann, Rainer A.

    2016-08-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a lysophospholipid mediator carried by the HDL-associated apoM protein in blood, regulating many physiological processes by activating the G protein-coupled S1P receptor in mammals. Despite the solved crystal structure of the apoM-S1P complex, the mechanism of S1P release from apoM as a part of the S1P pathway is unknown. Here, the dynamics of the wild type apoM-S1P complex as well as of mutants were investigated by means of atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The potential of mean force for S1P unbinding from apoM reflected a large binding strength of more than 60 kJ/mol. This high unbinding free energy for S1P underlines the observed specificity of the physiological effects of S1P as it suggests that the spontaneous release of S1P from apoM is unlikely. Instead, S1P release and thus the control of this bioactive lipid probably requires the tight interaction with other molecules, e.g. with the S1P receptor. Mutations of specific S1P anchoring residues of apoM decreased the energetic barrier by up to 20 kJ/mol. Moreover, the ligand-free apoM protein is shown to adopt a more open upper hydrophilic binding pocket and to result in complete closure of the lower hydrophobic cavity, suggesting a mechanism for adjusting the gate for ligand access.

  7. The mechanism of gastrin release in cysteamine-induced duodenal ulcer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Steen Seier

    1982-01-01

    a rise in serum gastrin from 29 +/- 5 pg/ml to a maximum of 203 +/- 62 pg/ml after 3 h in unoperated rats, whereas no rise was seen in vagotomized or antrectomized rats. The beta-adrenergic blocking agent propranolol strongly inhibited cysteamine-induced gastrin release, whereas atropine dependent......Duodenal ulcer can be induced in rats by a single dose of cysteamine. The ulcer formation is accompanied by acid hypersecretion and elevated serum gastrin levels. This study was performed to elucidate the mechanisms of gastrin release after an ulcerogenic dose of cysteamine. Cysteamine induced...

  8. Ca2+ influx and ATP release mediated by mechanical stretch in human lung fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Naohiko; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Takahara, Norihiro; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Uniaxial stretching activates Ca 2+ signaling in human lung fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced intracellular Ca 2+ elevation is mainly via Ca 2+ influx. • Mechanical strain enhances ATP release from fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced Ca 2+ influx is not mediated by released ATP or actin cytoskeleton. - Abstract: One cause of progressive pulmonary fibrosis is dysregulated wound healing after lung inflammation or damage in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mechanical forces are considered to regulate pulmonary fibrosis via activation of lung fibroblasts. In this study, the effects of mechanical stretch on the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ) and ATP release were investigated in primary human lung fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretch (10–30% in strain) was applied to fibroblasts cultured in a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Following stretching and subsequent unloading, [Ca 2+ ] i transiently increased in a strain-dependent manner. Hypotonic stress, which causes plasma membrane stretching, also transiently increased the [Ca 2+ ] i . The stretch-induced [Ca 2+ ] i elevation was attenuated in Ca 2+ -free solution. In contrast, the increase of [Ca 2+ ] i by a 20% stretch was not inhibited by the inhibitor of stretch-activated channels GsMTx-4, Gd 3+ , ruthenium red, or cytochalasin D. Cyclic stretching induced significant ATP releases from fibroblasts. However, the stretch-induced [Ca 2+ ] i elevation was not inhibited by ATP diphosphohydrolase apyrase or a purinergic receptor antagonist suramin. Taken together, mechanical stretch induces Ca 2+ influx independently of conventional stretch-sensitive ion channels, the actin cytoskeleton, and released ATP

  9. Ca{sup 2+} influx and ATP release mediated by mechanical stretch in human lung fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Naohiko [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Ito, Satoru, E-mail: itori@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Furuya, Kishio [Mechanobiology Laboratory, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Takahara, Norihiro [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Naruse, Keiji [Department of Cardiovascular Physiology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Sokabe, Masahiro [Mechanobiology Laboratory, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hasegawa, Yoshinori [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan)

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Uniaxial stretching activates Ca{sup 2+} signaling in human lung fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation is mainly via Ca{sup 2+} influx. • Mechanical strain enhances ATP release from fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx is not mediated by released ATP or actin cytoskeleton. - Abstract: One cause of progressive pulmonary fibrosis is dysregulated wound healing after lung inflammation or damage in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mechanical forces are considered to regulate pulmonary fibrosis via activation of lung fibroblasts. In this study, the effects of mechanical stretch on the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) and ATP release were investigated in primary human lung fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretch (10–30% in strain) was applied to fibroblasts cultured in a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Following stretching and subsequent unloading, [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} transiently increased in a strain-dependent manner. Hypotonic stress, which causes plasma membrane stretching, also transiently increased the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. The stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was attenuated in Ca{sup 2+}-free solution. In contrast, the increase of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} by a 20% stretch was not inhibited by the inhibitor of stretch-activated channels GsMTx-4, Gd{sup 3+}, ruthenium red, or cytochalasin D. Cyclic stretching induced significant ATP releases from fibroblasts. However, the stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was not inhibited by ATP diphosphohydrolase apyrase or a purinergic receptor antagonist suramin. Taken together, mechanical stretch induces Ca{sup 2+} influx independently of conventional stretch-sensitive ion channels, the actin cytoskeleton, and released ATP.

  10. Nanoparticle Photoresists: Ligand Exchange as a New, Sensitive EUV Patterning Mechanism

    KAUST Repository

    Kryask, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid nanoparticle photoresists and their patterning using DUV, EUV, 193 nm lithography and e-beam lithography has been investigated and reported earlier. The nanoparticles have demonstrated very high EUV sensitivity and significant etch resistance compared to other standard photoresists. The current study aims at investigating and establishing the underlying mechanism for dual tone patterning of these nanoparticle photoresist systems. Infrared spectroscopy and UV absorbance studies supported by mass loss and dissolution studies support the current model. © 2013SPST.

  11. Unit mechanisms of fission gas release: Current understanding and future needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonks, Michael; Andersson, David; Devanathan, Ram; Dubourg, Roland; El-Azab, Anter; Freyss, Michel; Iglesias, Fernando; Kulacsy, Katalin; Pastore, Giovanni; Phillpot, Simon R.; Welland, Michael

    2018-06-01

    Gaseous fission product transport and release has a large impact on fuel performance, degrading fuel properties and, once the gas is released into the gap between the fuel and cladding, lowering gap thermal conductivity and increasing gap pressure. While gaseous fission product behavior has been investigated with bulk reactor experiments and simplified analytical models, recent improvements in experimental and modeling approaches at the atomistic and mesoscales are being applied to provide unprecedented understanding of the unit mechanisms that define the fission product behavior. In this article, existing research on the basic mechanisms behind the various stages of fission gas release during normal reactor operation are summarized and critical areas where experimental and simulation work is needed are identified. This basic understanding of the fission gas behavior mechanisms has the potential to revolutionize our ability to predict fission product behavior during reactor operation and to design fuels that have improved fission product retention. In addition, this work can serve as a model on how a coupled experimental and modeling approach can be applied to understand the unit mechanisms behind other critical behaviors in reactor materials.

  12. Chiral ligand exchange high-speed countercurrent chromatography: mechanism, application and comparison with conventional liquid chromatography in enantioseparation of aromatic α-hydroxyl acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Shengqiang; Shen, Mangmang; Cheng, Dongping; Ito, Yoichiro; Yan, Jizhong

    2014-01-01

    This work concentrates on the separation mechanism and application of chiral ligand exchange high-speed countercurrent chromatography (HSCCC) in enantioseparations, and comparison with traditional chiral ligand exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The enantioseparation of ten aromatic α-hydroxyl acids were performed by these two chromatographic methods. Results showed that five of the racemates were successfully enantioseparated by HSCCC while only three of the racemates could be enantioseparated by HPLC using a suitable chiral ligand mobile phase additive. For HSCCC, the two-phase solvent system was composed of butanol-water (1:1, v/v), to which N-n-dodecyl-L-proline was added in the organic phase as chiral ligand and cupric acetate was added in the aqueous phase as a transition metal ion. Various operation parameters in HSCCC were optimized by enantioselective liquid-liquid extraction. Based on the results of the present studies the separation mechanism for HSCCC was proposed. For HPLC, the optimized mobile phase composed of aqueous solution containing 6 mmol L−1 L-phenylalanine and 3 mmol L−1 cupric sulfate and methanol was used for enantioseparation. Among three ligands tested on a conventional reverse stationary phase column, only one was found to be effective. In the present studies HSCCC presented unique advantages due to its high versatility of two-phase solvent systems and it could be used as an alternative method for enantioseparations. PMID:25087742

  13. Silver nanoparticles embedded in zeolite membranes: release of silver ions and mechanism of antibacterial action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Amber; Harrison, Alistair; Sabbani, Supriya; Munson, Robert S; Dutta, Prabir K; Waldman, W James

    2011-01-01

    Background The focus of this study is on the antibacterial properties of silver nanoparticles embedded within a zeolite membrane (AgNP-ZM). Methods and Results These membranes were effective in killing Escherichia coli and were bacteriostatic against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. E. coli suspended in Luria Bertani (LB) broth and isolated from physical contact with the membrane were also killed. Elemental analysis indicated slow release of Ag+ from the AgNP-ZM into the LB broth. The E. coli killing efficiency of AgNP-ZM was found to decrease with repeated use, and this was correlated with decreased release of silver ions with each use of the support. Gene expression microarrays revealed upregulation of several antioxidant genes as well as genes coding for metal transport, metal reduction, and ATPase pumps in response to silver ions released from AgNP-ZM. Gene expression of iron transporters was reduced, and increased expression of ferrochelatase was observed. In addition, upregulation of multiple antibiotic resistance genes was demonstrated. The expression levels of multicopper oxidase, glutaredoxin, and thioredoxin decreased with each support use, reflecting the lower amounts of Ag+ released from the membrane. The antibacterial mechanism of AgNP-ZM is proposed to be related to the exhaustion of antioxidant capacity. Conclusion These results indicate that AgNP-ZM provide a novel matrix for gradual release of Ag+. PMID:21931480

  14. Nuclear, thermo-mechanical and tritium release analysis of ITER breeding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosaku, Yasuo; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Enoeda, Mikio; Hatano, Toshihisa; Sato, Satoshi; Miki, Nobuharu; Akiba, Masato

    2003-06-01

    The design of the breeding blanket in ITER applies pebble bed breeder in tube (BIT) surrounded by multiplier pebble bed. It is assumed to use the same module support mechanism and coolant manifolds and coolant system as the shielding blankets. This work focuses on the verification of the design of the breeding blanket, from the viewpoints which is especially unique to the pebble bed type breeding blanket, such as, tritium breeding performance, tritium inventory and release behavior and thermo-mechanical performance of the ITER breeding blanket. With respect to the neutronics analysis, the detailed analyses of the distribution of the nuclear heating rate and TBR have been performed in 2D model using MCNP to clarify the input data for the tritium inventory and release rate analyses and thermo-mechanical analyses. With respect to the tritium inventory and release behavior analysis, the parametric analyses for selection of purge gas flow rate were carried out from the view point of pressure drop and the tritium inventory/release performance for Li 2 TiO 3 breeder. The analysis result concluded that purge gas flow rate can be set to conventional flow rate setting (88 l/min per module) to 1/10 of that to save the purge gas flow and minimize the size of purge gas pipe. However, it is necessary to note that more tritium is transformed to HTO (chemical form of water) in case of Li 2 TiO 3 compared to other breeder materials. With respect to the thermo-mechanical analyses of the pebble bed blanket structure, the analyses have been performed by ABAQUS with 2D model derived from one of eight facets of a blanket module, based on the reference design. Analyses were performed to identify the temperature distribution incorporating the pebble bed mechanical simulation and influence of mechanical behavior to the thermal behavior. The result showed that the maximum temperature in the breeding material was 617degC in the first row of breeding rods and the minimum temperature was 328

  15. X-ray structures of progesterone receptor ligand binding domain in its agonist state reveal differing mechanisms for mixed profiles of 11beta-substituted steroids.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lusher, S.J.; Raaijmakers, H.C.A.; Vu-Pham, D.; Kazemier, B.; Bosch, R.; McGuire, R.; Azevedo, R.; Hamersma, H.; Dechering, K.; Oubrie, A.; Duin, M. van; Vlieg, J. de

    2012-01-01

    We present here the x-ray structures of the progesterone receptor (PR) in complex with two mixed profile PR modulators whose functional activity results from two differing molecular mechanisms. The structure of Asoprisnil bound to the agonist state of PR demonstrates the contribution of the ligand

  16. IFPE/IFA-432, Fission Gas Release, Mechanical Interaction BWR Fuel Rods, Halden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Description: It contains data from experiments that have been performed at the IFE/OECD Halden Reactor Project, available for use in fuel performance studies. It covers experiments on thermal performance, fission product release, clad properties and pellet clad mechanical interaction. It includes also experimental data relevant to high burn-up behaviour. IFA-432: Measurements of fuel temperature response, fission gas release and mechanical interaction on BWR-type fuel rods up to high burn-ups. The assembly featured several variations in rod design parameters, including fuel type, fuel/cladding gap size, fill gas composition (He and Xe) and fuel stability. It contained 6 BWR-type fuel rods with fuel centre thermocouples at two horizontal planes, rods were also equipped with pressure transducers and cladding extensometers. Only data from 6 rods are compiled here

  17. Ion Selectivity Mechanism in a Bacterial Pentameric Ligand-Gated Ion Channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hailong; Cheng, Xiaolin

    2011-01-01

    The proton-gated ion channel from Gloeobacter violaceus (GLIC) is a prokaryotic homolog of the eukaryotic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) that responds to the binding of neurotransmitter acetylcholine and mediates fast signal transmission. Recent emergence of a high resolution crystal structure of GLIC captured in a potentially open state allowed detailed, atomic-level insight into ion conduction and selectivity mechanisms in these channels. Herein, we have examined the barriers to ion conduction and origins of ion selectivity in the GLIC channel by the construction of potential of mean force (PMF) profiles for sodium and chloride ions inside the transmembrane region. Our calculations reveal that the GLIC channel is open for a sodium ion to transport, but presents a ∼10 kcal/mol free energy barrier for a chloride ion, which arises primarily from the unfavorable interactions with a ring of negatively charged glutamate residues (E-2) at the intracellular end and a ring of hydrophobic residues (I9) in the middle of the transmembrane domain. Our collective findings further suggest that the charge selection mechanism can, to a large extent, be attributed to the narrow intracellular end and a ring of glutamate residues in this position their strong negative electrostatics and ability to bind cations. By contrast, E19 at the extracellular entrance only plays a minor role in ion selectivity of GLIC. In addition to electrostatics, both ion hydration and protein dynamics are found to be crucial for ion conduction as well, which explains why a chloride ion experiences a much greater barrier than a sodium ion in the hydrophobic region of the pore.

  18. Structural mechanism of ligand activation in human calcium-sensing receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Yong; Mosyak, Lidia; Kurinov, Igor; Zuo, Hao; Sturchler, Emmanuel; Cheng, Tat Cheung; Subramanyam, Prakash; Brown, Alice P.; Brennan, Sarah C.; Mun, Hee-chang; Bush, Martin; Chen, Yan; Nguyen, Trang X.; Cao, Baohua; Chang, Donald D.; Quick, Matthias; Conigrave, Arthur D.; Colecraft, Henry M.; McDonald, Patricia; Fan, Qing R.

    2016-07-19

    Human calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that maintains extracellular Ca2+homeostasis through the regulation of parathyroid hormone secretion. It functions as a disulfide-tethered homodimer composed of three main domains, the Venus Flytrap module, cysteine-rich domain, and seven-helix transmembrane region. Here, we present the crystal structures of the entire extracellular domain of CaSR in the resting and active conformations. We provide direct evidence that L-amino acids are agonists of the receptor. In the active structure, L-Trp occupies the orthosteric agonist-binding site at the interdomain cleft and is primarily responsible for inducing extracellular domain closure to initiate receptor activation. Our structures reveal multiple binding sites for Ca2+and PO43-ions. Both ions are crucial for structural integrity of the receptor. While Ca2+ions stabilize the active state, PO43-ions reinforce the inactive conformation. The activation mechanism of CaSR involves the formation of a novel dimer interface between subunits.

  19. Ligand-controlled reactivity, selectivity, and mechanism of cationic ruthenium-catalyzed hydrosilylations of alkynes, ketones, and nitriles: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun-Fang; Chung, Lung Wa; Zhang, Xinhao; Houk, K N; Wu, Yun-Dong

    2014-09-19

    Density functional theory calculations with the M06 functional have been performed on the reactivity, selectivity, and mechanism of hydrosilylations of alkynes, ketones, and nitriles catalyzed by cationic ruthenium complexes [CpRu(L)(MeCN)2](+), with L = P(i)Pr3 or MeCN. The hydrosilylation of alkynes with L = P(i)Pr3 involves an initial silyl migration mechanism to generate the anti-Markovnikov product, in contrast to the Markovnikov product obtained with L = MeCN. The bulky phosphine ligand directs the silyl group to migrate to Cβ of the alkyne. This explains the anti-Markovnikov selectivity of the catalyst with L = P(i)Pr3. By contrast, the silane additions to either ketone or nitrile proceed through an ionic SN2-Si outer-sphere mechanism, in which the substrate attacks the Si center. The P(i)Pr3 ligand facilitates the activation of the Si-H bond to furnish a η(2)-silane complex, whereas a η(1)-silane complex is formed for the MeCN ligand. This property of the phosphine ligand enables the catalytic hydrosilylation of ketones and nitriles in addition to that of alkynes.

  20. Molecular Mechanisms That Underlie the Dynamic Adaptation of Innate Monocyte Memory to Varying Stimulant Strength of TLR Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ruoxi; Geng, Shuo; Li, Liwu

    2016-01-01

    In adaptation to rising stimulant strength, innate monocytes can be dynamically programed to preferentially express either pro- or anti-inflammatory mediators. Such dynamic innate adaptation or programing may bear profound relevance in host health and disease. However, molecular mechanisms that govern innate adaptation to varying strength of stimulants are not well understood. Using lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the model stimulant of toll-like-receptor 4 (TLR4), we reported that the expressions of pro-inflammatory mediators are preferentially sustained in monocytes adapted by lower doses of LPS, and suppressed/tolerized in monocytes adapted by higher doses of LPS. Mechanistically, monocytes adapted by super-low dose LPS exhibited higher levels of transcription factor, interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), and reduced levels of transcriptional modulator B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein-1 (Blimp-1). Intriguingly, the inflammatory monocyte adaptation by super-low dose LPS is dependent upon TRAM/TRIF but not MyD88. Similar to LPS, we also observed biphasic inflammatory adaptation and tolerance in monocytes challenged with varying dosages of TLR7 agonist. In sharp contrast, rising doses of TLR3 agonist preferentially caused inflammatory adaptation without inducing tolerance. At the molecular level, the differential regulation of IRF5 and Blimp-1 coincides with unique monocyte adaptation dynamics by TLR4/7 and TLR3 agonists. Our study provides novel clue toward the understanding of monocyte adaptation and memory toward distinct TLR ligands.

  1. Molecular mechanisms that underlie the dynamic adaptation of innate monocyte memory to varying stimulant strength of TLR ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruoxi Yuan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In adaptation to rising stimulant strength, innate monocytes can be dynamically programmed to preferentially express either pro- or anti-inflammatory mediators. Such dynamic innate adaptation or programming may bear profound relevance in host health and disease. However, molecular mechanisms that govern innate adaptation to varying strength of stimulants are not well understood. Using lipopolysaccharide (LPS, the model stimulant of Toll-Like-Receptor 4 (TLR4, we reported that the expressions of pro-inflammatory mediators are preferentially sustained in monocytes adapted by lower doses of LPS, and suppressed/tolerized in monocytes adapted by higher doses of LPS. Mechanistically, monocytes adapted by super-low dose LPS exhibited higher levels of transcription factor IRF5 and reduced levels of transcriptional modulator BLIMP-1. Intriguingly, the inflammatory monocyte adaptation by super-low dose LPS is dependent upon TRAM/TRIF but not MyD88. Similar to LPS, we also observed biphasic inflammatory adaptation and tolerance in monocytes challenged with varying dosages of TLR7 agonist. In sharp contrast, rising doses of TLR3 agonist preferentially caused inflammatory adaptation without inducing tolerance. At the molecular level, the differential regulation of IRF5 and Blimp-1 coincides with unique monocyte adaptation dynamics by TLR4/7 and TLR3 agonists. Our study provides novel clue toward the understanding of monocyte adaptation and memory toward distinct TLR ligands.

  2. Mechanism and degradation kinetics of zinc complex containing isophthalato and 2,2‧-dipyridylamine ligands under different atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdravković, J. D.; Radovanović, L.; Poleti, D.; Rogan, J. R.; Vulić, P. J.; Radovanović, Ž.; Minić, D. M.

    2018-06-01

    The design of mixed-ligand complexes are of increasing interest from fundamental as well as technological and curative aspects. Having that in mind, we studied zinc complex containing 2,2‧-dipyridylamine (dipya) and dianion of isophthalic acid (ipht), [Zn(dipya)(ipht)]n, as promising precursor for synthesis of nanostructured metal oxide. In that sense, the mechanism and degradation kinetics of [Zn(dipya)(ipht)]n was analyzed under non-isothermal conditions in nitrogen and in air atmospheres. Peak deconvolution of the [Zn(dipya)(ipht)]n decomposition profile, in the form of a derivative thermogram (DTG), in nitrogen atmosphere, revealed the presence of three decomposition steps, while in air five single steps were isolated. In both cases ZnO is formed as residue at 530 °C: pure (in air) or in amorphous matrix (nitrogen). In air we obtained well crystalized ZnO nanospheres (∼25 nm), by thermal treatment in temperature range 370-530 °C showing that this complex could be considered as good precursor for production of nanosized ZnO.

  3. Mechanisms of the induction of apoptosis mediated by radiation-induced cytokine release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babini, G.; Bellinzona, V.E.; Baiocco, G.; Ottolenghi, A.; Morini, J.; Mariotti, L.; Unger, K.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the mechanisms of radiation-induced bystander signalling leading to apoptosis in non-irradiated co-cultured cells. Cultured non-transformed cells were irradiated, and the effect on the apoptosis rate on co-cultured non-irradiated malignant cells was determined. For this, two different levels of the investigation are presented, i.e. release of signalling proteins and transcriptomic profiling of the irradiated and non-irradiated co-cultured cells. Concerning the signalling proteins, in this study, the attention was focussed on the release of the active and latent forms of the transforming growth factor-β1 protein. Moreover, global gene expression profiles of non-transformed and transformed cells in untreated co-cultures were compared with those of 0.5-Gy-irradiated non-transformed cells co-cultured with the transformed cells. The results show an effect of radiation on the release of signalling proteins in the medium, although no significant differences in release rates were detectable when varying the doses in the range from 0.25 to 1 Gy. Moreover, gene expression results suggest an effect of radiation on both cell populations, pointing out specific signalling pathways that might be involved in the enhanced induction of apoptosis. (authors)

  4. Pre-clinical evaluation of eight DOTA coupled gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R) ligands for in vivo targeting of receptor-expressing tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardo, Antonella; Galli, Filippo; Mansi, Rosalba; Del Pozzo, Luigi; Aurilio, Michela; Morisco, Anna; Ringhieri, Paola; Signore, Alberto; Morelli, Giancarlo; Aloj, Luigi

    2016-12-01

    Overexpression of the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRP-R) has been documented in several human neoplasms such as breast, prostate, and ovarian cancer. There is growing interest in developing radiolabeled peptide-based ligands toward these receptors for the purpose of in vivo imaging and radionuclide therapy of GRP-R-overexpressing tumors. A number of different peptide sequences, isotopes, and labeling methods have been proposed for this purpose. The aim of this work is to perform a direct side-by-side comparison of different GRP-R binding peptides utilizing a single labeling strategy to identify the most suitable peptide sequence. Solid-phase synthesis of eight derivatives (BN1-8) designed based on literature analysis was carried out. Peptides were coupled to the DOTA chelator through a PEG4 spacer at the N-terminus. Derivatives were characterized for serum stability, binding affinity on PC-3 human prostate cancer cells, biodistribution in tumor-bearing mice, and gamma camera imaging at 1, 6, and 24 h after injection. Serum stability was quite variable among the different compounds with half-lives ranging from 16 to 400 min at 37 °C. All compounds tested showed K d values in the nanomolar range with the exception of BN3 that showed no binding. Biodistribution and imaging studies carried out for compounds BN1, BN4, BN7, and BN8 showed targeting of the GRP-R-positive tumors and the pancreas. The BN8 compound (DOTA-PEG-DPhe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-NMeGly-His-Sta-Leu-NH2) showed high affinity, the longest serum stability, and the highest target-to-background ratios in biodistribution and imaging experiments among the compounds tested. Our results indicate that the NMeGly for Gly substitution and the Sta-Leu substitution at the C-terminus confer high serum stability while maintaining high receptor affinity, resulting in biodistribution properties that outperform those of the other peptides.

  5. Dynamic microvesicle release and clearance within the cardiovascular system: triggers and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Lisa; Nieuwland, Rienk; Kohler, Malcolm; Kraenkel, Nicolle; Ferry, Berne; Leeson, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Interest in cell-derived microvesicles (or microparticles) within cardiovascular diagnostics and therapeutics is rapidly growing. Microvesicles are often measured in the circulation at a single time point. However, it is becoming clear that microvesicle levels both increase and decrease rapidly in response to certain stimuli such as hypoxia, acute cardiac stress, shear stress, hypertriglyceridaemia and inflammation. Consequently, the levels of circulating microvesicles will reflect the balance between dynamic mechanisms for release and clearance. The present review describes the range of triggers currently known to lead to microvesicle release from different cellular origins into the circulation. Specifically, the published data are used to summarize the dynamic impact of these triggers on the degree and rate of microvesicle release. Secondly, a summary of the current understanding of microvesicle clearance via different cellular systems, including the endothelial cell and macrophage, is presented, based on reported studies of clearance in experimental models and clinical scenarios, such as transfusion or cardiac stress. Together, this information can be used to provide insights into potential underlying biological mechanisms that might explain the increases or decreases in circulating microvesicle levels that have been reported and help to design future clinical studies. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  6. Presynaptic mechanisms of lead neurotoxicity: effects on vesicular release, vesicle clustering and mitochondria number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Lei; Guariglia, Sara R; McGlothan, Jennifer L; Stansfield, Kirstie H; Stanton, Patric K; Guilarte, Tomás R

    2015-01-01

    Childhood lead (Pb2+) intoxication is a global public health problem and accounts for 0.6% of the global burden of disease associated with intellectual disabilities. Despite the recognition that childhood Pb2+ intoxication contributes significantly to intellectual disabilities, there is a fundamental lack of knowledge on presynaptic mechanisms by which Pb2+ disrupts synaptic function. In this study, using a well-characterized rodent model of developmental Pb2+ neurotoxicity, we show that Pb2+ exposure markedly inhibits presynaptic vesicular release in hippocampal Schaffer collateral-CA1 synapses in young adult rats. This effect was associated with ultrastructural changes which revealed a reduction in vesicle number in the readily releasable/docked vesicle pool, disperse vesicle clusters in the resting pool, and a reduced number of presynaptic terminals with multiple mitochondria with no change in presynaptic calcium influx. These studies provide fundamental knowledge on mechanisms by which Pb2+ produces profound inhibition of presynaptic vesicular release that contribute to deficits in synaptic plasticity and intellectual development.

  7. LysoPC and PAF Trigger Arachidonic Acid Release by Divergent Signaling Mechanisms in Monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janne Oestvang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidized low-density lipoproteins (LDLs play an important role during the development of atherosclerosis characterized by intimal inflammation and macrophage accumulation. A key component of LDL is lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC. LysoPC is a strong proinflammatory mediator, and its mechanism is uncertain, but it has been suggested to be mediated via the platelet activating factor (PAF receptor. Here, we report that PAF triggers a pertussis toxin- (PTX- sensitive intracellular signaling pathway leading to sequential activation of sPLA2, PLD, cPLA2, and AA release in human-derived monocytes. In contrast, lysoPC initiates two signaling pathways, one sequentially activating PLD and cPLA2, and a second parallel PTX-sensitive pathway activating cPLA2 with concomitant activation of sPLA2, all leading to AA release. In conclusion, lysoPC and PAF stimulate AA release by divergent pathways suggesting involvement of independent receptors. Elucidation of monocyte lysoPC-specific signaling mechanisms will aid in the development of novel strategies for atherosclerosis prevention, diagnosis, and therapy.

  8. Slide release mechanism. [for space shuttle orbiter/external tank connection device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, J. W.; Ritchie, R. S. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A releasable support device is described which is comprised of a hollow body with a sleeve extending transversely there-through for receiving the end of a support shank. A slider-latch, optionally lubricated, extends through side recesses in the sleeve to straddle the shank, respectively, in latched and released positions. The slider-latch is slid from its latched to its unlatched position by a pressure squib whereupon a spring or other pressure means pushes the shank out of the sleeve. At the same time, a follower element is lodged in and closed the hole in the body wall from which the shank was discharged. The mechanism was designed for the shuttle orbiter/external tank connection device.

  9. Evaluation of fuel release rate and mechanism tests under RBCB conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamson, M.G.

    1981-09-01

    This task includes theoretical evaluation of fuel/fission product release behavior from failed LMFBR fuel elements as well as an on-going experimental investigation of the mechanism of oxide fuel dispersal into flowing liquid sodium. The primary objectives of this work are to develop a fuel source term that can be used in predictive models for primary heat transfer system contamination and to understand the separate influences of important system variables (such as flow rate, oxygen impurity level) on this source term. The present report is written in two parts: the first, in condensed form, is an updated evaluation of fuel (U,Pu) and fission product release data, and the second describes the current status of supporting experimental work at General Electric's Vallecitos Laboratory

  10. Setting accelerated dissolution test for PLGA microspheres containing peptide, investigation of critical parameters affecting drug release rate and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomic, I; Vidis-Millward, A; Mueller-Zsigmondy, M; Cardot, J-M

    2016-05-30

    The objective of this study was development of accelerated in vitro release method for peptide loaded PLGA microspheres using flow-through apparatus and assessment of the effect of dissolution parameters (pH, temperature, medium composition) on drug release rate and mechanism. Accelerated release conditions were set as pH 2 and 45°C, in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) 0.02M. When the pH was changed from 2 to 4, diffusion controlled phases (burst and lag) were not affected, while release rate during erosion phase decreased two-fold due to slower ester bonds hydrolyses. Decreasing temperature from 45°C to 40°C, release rate showed three-fold deceleration without significant change in release mechanism. Effect of medium composition on drug release was tested in PBS 0.01M (200 mOsm/kg) and PBS 0.01M with glucose (380 mOsm/kg). Buffer concentration significantly affected drug release rate and mechanism due to the change in osmotic pressure, while ionic strength did not have any effect on peptide release. Furthermore, dialysis sac and sample-and-separate techniques were used, in order to evaluate significance of dissolution technique choice on the release process. After fitting obtained data to different mathematical models, flow-through method was confirmed as the most appropriate for accelerated in vitro dissolution testing for a given formulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Crystal structure of LGR4-Rspo1 complex: insights into the divergent mechanisms of ligand recognition by leucine-rich repeat G-protein-coupled receptors (LGRs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jin-Gen; Huang, Chunfeng; Yang, Zhengfeng; Jin, Mengmeng; Fu, Panhan; Zhang, Ni; Luo, Jian; Li, Dali; Liu, Mingyao; Zhou, Yan; Zhu, Yongqun

    2015-01-23

    Leucine-rich repeat G-protein-coupled receptors (LGRs) are a unique class of G-protein-coupled receptors characterized by a large extracellular domain to recognize ligands and regulate many important developmental processes. Among the three groups of LGRs, group B members (LGR4-6) recognize R-spondin family proteins (Rspo1-4) to stimulate Wnt signaling. In this study, we successfully utilized the "hybrid leucine-rich repeat technique," which fused LGR4 with the hagfish VLR protein, to obtain two recombinant human LGR4 proteins, LGR415 and LGR49. We determined the crystal structures of ligand-free LGR415 and the LGR49-Rspo1 complex. LGR4 exhibits a twisted horseshoe-like structure. Rspo1 adopts a flat and β-fold architecture and is bound in the concave surface of LGR4 in the complex through electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. All the Rspo1-binding residues are conserved in LGR4-6, suggesting that LGR4-6 bind R-spondins through an identical surface. Structural analysis of our LGR4-Rspo1 complex with the previously determined LGR4 and LGR5 structures revealed that the concave surface of LGR4 is the sole binding site for R-spondins, suggesting a one-site binding model of LGR4-6 in ligand recognition. The molecular mechanism of LGR4-6 is distinct from the two-step mechanism of group A receptors LGR1-3 and the multiple-interface binding model of group C receptors LGR7-8, suggesting LGRs utilize the divergent mechanisms for ligand recognition. Our structures, together with previous reports, provide a comprehensive understanding of the ligand recognition by LGRs. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. An autocrine ATP release mechanism regulates basal ciliary activity in airway epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droguett, Karla; Rios, Mariana; Carreño, Daniela V; Navarrete, Camilo; Fuentes, Christian; Villalón, Manuel; Barrera, Nelson P

    2017-07-15

    Extracellular ATP, in association with [Ca 2+ ] i regulation, is required to maintain basal ciliary beat frequency. Increasing extracellular ATP levels increases ciliary beating in airway epithelial cells, maintaining a sustained response by inducing the release of additional ATP. Extracellular ATP levels in the millimolar range, previously associated with pathophysiological conditions of the airway epithelium, produce a transient arrest of ciliary activity. The regulation of ciliary beat frequency is dependent on ATP release by hemichannels (connexin/pannexin) and P2X receptor activation, the blockage of which may even stop ciliary movement. The force exerted by cilia, measured by atomic force microscopy, is reduced following extracellular ATP hydrolysis. This result complements the current understanding of the ciliary beating regulatory mechanism, with special relevance to inflammatory diseases of the airway epithelium that affect mucociliary clearance. Extracellular nucleotides, including ATP, are locally released by the airway epithelium and stimulate ciliary activity in a [Ca 2+ ] i -dependent manner after mechanical stimulation of ciliated cells. However, it is unclear whether the ATP released is involved in regulating basal ciliary activity and mediating changes in ciliary activity in response to chemical stimulation. In the present study, we evaluated ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and ciliary beating forces in primary cultures from mouse tracheal epithelium, using videomicroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. Extracellular ATP levels and [Ca 2+ ] i were measured by luminometric and fluorimetric assays, respectively. Uptake of ethidium bromide was measured to evaluate hemichannel functionality. We show that hydrolysis of constitutive extracellular ATP levels with apyrase (50 U ml -1 ) reduced basal CBF by 45% and ciliary force by 67%. The apyrase effect on CBF was potentiated by carbenoxolone, a hemichannel inhibitor, and oxidized ATP, an

  13. Two Mechanisms for Methane Release at the Paleocene/Eocene Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, M. E.; Cramer, B. S.; Mountain, G. S.; Mountain, G. S.; Katz, S.; Miller, K. G.; Miller, K. G.

    2001-12-01

    The rapid global warming of the Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) has been attributed to a massive methane release from marine gas hydrate reservoirs. Two mechanisms have been proposed for this methane release. The first relies on a deepwater circulation change and water temperature increase that was sufficiently large and rapid to trigger massive thermal dissociation of gas hydrate frozen beneath the seafloor (Dickens et al., 1995). The second relies on slope failure (via erosion or seismic activity) of the oversteepened continental margins of the western North Atlantic to allow methane to escape from gas reservoirs trapped between the hydrate-bearing sediments and the underlying reef front (Katz et al., in press). We evaluate thermal dissociation by modeling heat flow through the sediments to show the effect of the temperature change on the gas hydrate stability zone through time. We use Paleocene bottom water temperatures (constrained by isotope records) and assume an instantaneous water temperature increase (i.e., no time allotted for ocean circulation change and water mass mixing). This yields an end-member minimum estimate of >2350 years necessary to melt all gas hydrate at locations shallower than 1570m; gas hydrates at greater depths remain frozen. We also use this model to predict the amount of C12-enriched methane that could have contributed to the carbon isotope excursion (CIE). Using reasonable methane distributions within sediments, we conclude that thermal dissociation alone cannot account for the full magnitude of the CIE. We propose that thermal dissociation did not initiate the CIE; rather, a different mechanism injected a large amount of carbon into the atmosphere, causing global greenhouse warming that could have led to subsequent thermal dissociation. Methane remains a plausible source for this initial carbon injection; however, initial release would have resulted from mechanical disruption of sediments rather than thermal dissociation

  14. An investigation into the mechanisms of drug release from taste-masking fatty acid microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Sheng; Deutsch, David; Craig, Duncan Q M

    2008-09-01

    Fatty acid microspheres based on stearic and palmitic acids are known to form effective taste masking systems, although the mechanisms by which the drug is preferentially released in the lower gastrointestinal tract are not known. The objective of the present study was to identify the mechanisms involved, with a particular view to clarify the role of acid soap formation in the dissolution process. Microspheres were prepared by a spray chilling process. Using benzoic acid as a model drug and an alkaline dissolution medium, a faster drug release was observed in the mixed fatty acid formulation (50:50 stearic:palmitic acid (w/w)) compared to the single fatty acid component systems. Thermal and powder X-ray diffraction studies indicated a greater degree of acid soap formation for the mixed formulation in alkaline media compared to the single fatty acid systems. Particle size and porosity studies indicated a modest reduction in size for the mixed systems and an increase in porosity on immersion in the dissolution medium. It is proposed that the mixed fatty acid system form a mixed crystal system which in turn facilitates interaction with the dissolution medium, thereby leading to a greater propensity for acid soap formation which in turn forms a permeable liquid crystalline phase through which the drug may diffuse. The role of dissolution of palmitic acid into the dissolution medium is also discussed as a secondary mechanism.

  15. Analysis and prospectives of the mechanism of release of energy efficiency titles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastore, P.

    2009-01-01

    Starting from the Third annual report on the mechanism of release of energetic efficiency titles and considering the Decree Ministerial 21/12/2007, there is an analysis of the better aspects of the mechanism of release of energetic efficiency titles introduced from the norms regarding the previous annual relations. Particularly important is the role carried out from the Authority of the Electric Power and the Gas in the action of control and monitoring of the market. In this direction they have been formulated various deliberations. Analyzing the results obtained from the market of energetic efficiency titles in the course of 2007, it has been caught up 98% of the established objectives. In the course of the same year they have been cancelled many titles, as a result of verification activity. The obtained results refer to the geographic distribution, to the exchanged volumes and to the costs of the titles. At last some criticalities are placed in evidence that remain in the mechanism and that they can be resolved in order to improve the market. [it

  16. Mechanisms of within- and across- channel processing in comodulation masking release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piechowiak, Tobias

    2007-01-01

    The audibility of a target sound embedded in another masking sound can be improved by adding sound energy that is remote in frequency from both the masker and the target. This effect is known as comodulation masking release (CMR) and is observed when the remote sound and the masker share coherent...... role in our ability to deal with natural complex acoustic environments. While a large body of data has been presented, the mechanisms underlying CMR are not clear. This study proposes an auditory processing model that accounts for various aspects of CMR. The model includes an equalization...

  17. Method of forming through substrate vias (TSVs) and singulating and releasing die having the TSVs from a mechanical support substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-12-09

    Accessing a workpiece object in semiconductor processing is disclosed. The workpiece object includes a mechanical support substrate, a release layer over the mechanical support substrate, and an integrated circuit substrate coupled over the release layer. The integrated circuit substrate includes a device layer having semiconductor devices. The method also includes etching through-substrate via (TSV) openings through the integrated circuit substrate that have buried ends at or within the release layer including using the release layer as an etch stop. TSVs are formed by introducing one or more conductive materials into the TSV openings. A die singulation trench is etched at least substantially through the integrated circuit substrate around a perimeter of an integrated circuit die. The integrated circuit die is at least substantially released from the mechanical support substrate.

  18. Expression of Fas ligand by human gastric adenocarcinomas: a potential mechanism of immune escape in stomach cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, M W; O'connell, J; O'sullivan, G C; Roche, D; Brady, C; Kelly, J; Collins, J K; Shanahan, F

    1999-02-01

    Despite being immunogenic, gastric cancers overcome antitumour immune responses by mechanisms that have yet to be fully elucidated. Fas ligand (FasL) is a molecule that induces Fas receptor mediated apoptosis of activated immunocytes, thereby mediating normal immune downregulatory roles including immune response termination, tolerance acquisition, and immune privilege. Colon cancer cell lines have previously been shown to express FasL and kill lymphoid cells by Fas mediated apoptosis in vitro. Many diverse tumours have since been found to express FasL suggesting that a "Fas counterattack" against antitumour immune effector cells may contribute to tumour immune escape. To ascertain if human gastric tumours express FasL in vivo, as a potential mediator of immune escape in stomach cancer. Thirty paraffin wax embedded human gastric adenocarcinomas. FasL protein was detected in gastric tumours using immunohistochemistry; FasL mRNA was detected in the tumours using in situ hybridisation. Cell death was detected in situ in tumour infiltrating lymphocytes using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). Prevalent expression of FasL was detected in all 30 resected gastric adenocarcinomas examined. In the tumours, FasL protein and mRNA were co-localised to neoplastic gastric epithelial cells, confirming expression by the tumour cells. FasL expression was independent of tumour stage, suggesting that it may be expressed throughout gastric cancer progression. TUNEL staining disclosed a high level of cell death among lymphocytes infiltrating FasL positive areas of tumour. Human gastric adenocarcinomas express the immune downregulatory molecule, FasL. The results suggest that FasL is a prevalent mediator of immune privilege in stomach cancer.

  19. Expression of Fas ligand by human gastric adenocarcinomas: a potential mechanism of immune escape in stomach cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bennett, M W

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Despite being immunogenic, gastric cancers overcome antitumour immune responses by mechanisms that have yet to be fully elucidated. Fas ligand (FasL) is a molecule that induces Fas receptor mediated apoptosis of activated immunocytes, thereby mediating normal immune downregulatory roles including immune response termination, tolerance acquisition, and immune privilege. Colon cancer cell lines have previously been shown to express FasL and kill lymphoid cells by Fas mediated apoptosis in vitro. Many diverse tumours have since been found to express FasL suggesting that a "Fas counterattack" against antitumour immune effector cells may contribute to tumour immune escape. AIM: To ascertain if human gastric tumours express FasL in vivo, as a potential mediator of immune escape in stomach cancer. SPECIMENS: Thirty paraffin wax embedded human gastric adenocarcinomas. METHODS: FasL protein was detected in gastric tumours using immunohistochemistry; FasL mRNA was detected in the tumours using in situ hybridisation. Cell death was detected in situ in tumour infiltrating lymphocytes using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL). RESULTS: Prevalent expression of FasL was detected in all 30 resected gastric adenocarcinomas examined. In the tumours, FasL protein and mRNA were co-localised to neoplastic gastric epithelial cells, confirming expression by the tumour cells. FasL expression was independent of tumour stage, suggesting that it may be expressed throughout gastric cancer progression. TUNEL staining disclosed a high level of cell death among lymphocytes infiltrating FasL positive areas of tumour. CONCLUSIONS: Human gastric adenocarcinomas express the immune downregulatory molecule, FasL. The results suggest that FasL is a prevalent mediator of immune privilege in stomach cancer.

  20. On the intracellular release mechanism of hydrophobic cargo and its relation to the biodegradation behavior of mesoporous silica nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Haartman, Eva; Lindberg, Desiré; Prabhakar, Neeraj; Rosenholm, Jessica M

    2016-12-01

    The intracellular release mechanism of hydrophobic molecules from surface-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles was studied in relation to the biodegradation behavior of the nanocarrier, with the purpose of determining the dominant release mechanism for the studied drug delivery system. To be able to follow the real-time intracellular release, a hydrophobic fluorescent dye was used as model drug molecule. The in vitro release of the dye was investigated under varying conditions in terms of pH, polarity, protein and lipid content, presence of hydrophobic structures and ultimately, in live cancer cells. Results of investigating the drug delivery system show that the degradation and drug release mechanisms display a clear interdependency in simple aqueous solvents. In pure aqueous media, the cargo release was primarily dependent on the degradation of the nanocarrier, while in complex media, mimicking intracellular conditions, the physicochemical properties of the cargo molecule itself and its interaction with the carrier and/or surrounding media were found to be the main release-governing factors. Since the material degradation was retarded upon loading with hydrophobic guest molecules, the cargo could be efficiently delivered into live cancer cells and released intracellularly without pronounced premature release under extracellular conditions. From a rational design point of view, pinpointing the interdependency between these two processes can be of paramount importance considering future applications and fundamental understanding of the drug delivery system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. CB1 receptor antagonism increases hippocampal acetylcholine release: site and mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degroot, Aldemar; Köfalvi, Attila; Wade, Mark R; Davis, Richard J; Rodrigues, Ricardo J; Rebola, Nelson; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Nomikos, George G

    2006-10-01

    Evidence indicates that blockade of cannabinoid receptors increases acetylcholine (ACh) release in brain cortical regions. Although it is assumed that this type of effect is mediated through CB1 receptor (CB1R) antagonism, several in vitro functional studies recently have suggested non-CB1R involvement. In addition, neither the precise neuroanatomical site nor the exact mechanisms underlying this effect are known. We thoroughly examined these issues using a combination of systemic and local administration of CB1R antagonists, different methods of in vivo microdialysis, CB1R knockout (KO) mice, tissue measurements of ACh, and immunochemistry. First, we showed that systemic injections of the CB1R antagonists N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboximide hydrochloride (SR-141716A) and N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2, 4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251) dose-dependently increased hippocampal ACh efflux. Likewise, local hippocampal, but not septal, infusions of SR141716A or AM251 increased hippocampal ACh release. It is noteworthy that the stimulatory effects of systemically administered CB1R antagonists on hippocampal ACh release were completely abolished in CB1R KO mice. CB1R KO mice had similar basal but higher stress-enhanced hippocampal ACh levels compared with wild-type controls. It is interesting that dopamine D1 receptor antagonism counteracted the stimulatory effect of CB1R blockade on hippocampal ACh levels. Finally, immunohistochemical methods revealed that a high proportion of CB1R-positive nerve terminals were found in hippocampus and confirmed the colocalization of CB1 receptors with cholinergic and dopaminergic nerve terminals. In conclusion, hippocampal ACh release may specifically be controlled through CB1Rs located on both cholinergic and dopaminergic neuronal projections, and CB1R antagonism increases hippocampal ACh release, probably through both a direct

  2. Controlled-release, pegylation, liposomal formulations: new mechanisms in the delivery of injectable drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K R

    2000-01-01

    To review recent developments in novel injectable drug delivery mechanisms and outline the advantages and disadvantages of each. A MEDLINE (1995-January 2000) search using the terms polyethylene glycol, liposomes, polymers, polylactic acid, and controlled release was conducted. Additional references were identified by scanning bibliographies. All articles were considered for inclusion. Abstracts were included only if they were judged to add critical information not otherwise available in the medical literature. A number of systems that alter the delivery of injectable drugs have been developed in attempts to improve pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties of therapeutic agents. New drug delivery systems can be produced either through a change in formulation (e.g., continuous-release products, liposomes) or an addition to the drug molecule (e.g., pegylation). Potential advantages of new delivery mechanisms include an increased or prolonged duration of pharmacologic activity, a decrease in adverse effects, and increased patient compliance and quality of life. Injectable continuous-release systems deliver drugs in a controlled, predetermined fashion and are particularly appropriate when it is important to avoid large fluctuations in plasma drug concentrations. Encapsulating a drug within a liposome can produce a prolonged half-life and a shift of distribution toward tissues with increased capillary permeability (e.g., tumors, infected tissue). Pegylation provides a method for modification of therapeutic proteins to minimize many of the limitations (e.g., poor stability, short half-life, immunogenicity) associated with these agents. Pegylation of therapeutic proteins is an established process with new applications. However, not all pegylated proteins are alike, and each requires optimization on a protein-by-protein basis to derive maximum clinical benefit. The language required to describe each pegylated therapeutic protein must be more precise to accurately

  3. The mechanisms of drug release from solid dispersions in water-soluble polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Duncan Q M

    2002-01-14

    Solid dispersions in water-soluble carriers have attracted considerable interest as a means of improving the dissolution rate, and hence possibly bioavailability, of a range of hydrophobic drugs. However, despite the publication of numerous original papers and reviews on the subject, the mechanisms underpinning the observed improvements in dissolution rate are not yet understood. In this review the current consensus with regard to the solid-state structure and dissolution properties of solid dispersions is critically assessed. In particular the theories of carrier- and drug-controlled dissolution are highlighted. A model is proposed whereby the release behaviour from the dispersions may be understood in terms of the dissolution or otherwise of the drug into the concentrated aqueous polymer layer adjacent to the solid surface, including a derivation of an expression to describe the release of intact particles from the dispersions. The implications of a deeper understanding of the dissolution mechanisms are discussed, with particular emphasis on optimising the choice of carrier and manufacturing method and the prediction of stability problems.

  4. Ab Initio Ligand Field Molecular Mechanics and the Nature of Metal-Ligand π-Bonding in Fe(II) 2,6-di(pyrazol-1-yl)pyridine Spin Crossover Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeth, Robert J; Halcrow, Malcolm A; Kershaw Cook, Laurence J; Raithby, Paul R

    2018-04-06

    A ligand field molecular mechanics (LFMM) force field has been constructed for the spin states of [Fe(bpp) 2 ] 2+ (bpp=2,6-di(pyrazol-1-yl)pyridine) and related complexes. A new charge scheme is employed which interpolates between partial charges for neutral bpp and protonated [H 3 bpp] 3+ to achieve a target metal charge. The LFMM angular overlap model (AOM) parameters are fitted to fully ab initio d orbital energies. However, several AOM parameter sets are possible. The ambiguity is resolved by calculating the Jahn-Teller distortion mode for high spin, which indicates that in [Fe(bpp) 2 ] 2+ pyridine is a π-acceptor and pyrazole a weak π-donor. The alternative fit, assumed previously, where both ligands act as π-donors leads to an inconsistent distortion. LFMM optimisations in the presence of [BF 4 ] - or [PF 6 ] - anions are in good agreement with experiment and the model also correctly predicts the spin state energetics for 3-pyrazolyl substituents where the interactions are mainly steric. However, for 4-pyridyl or 4-pyrazolyl substituents, LFMM only treats the electrostatic contribution which, for the pyridyl substituents, generates a fair correlation with the spin crossover transition temperatures, T 1/2 , but in the reverse sense to the dominant electronic effect. Thus, LFMM generates its smallest spin state energy difference for the substituent with the highest T 1/2 . One parameter set for all substituted bpp ligands is insufficient and further LFMM development will be required. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Epinephrine impairs insulin release by a mechanism distal to calcium mobilization. Similarity to lipoxygenase inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms that enable epinephrine (EPI) and lipoxygenase inhibitors to impede insulin secretion are unknown. We examined the possibility that EPI inhibits Ca 2+ fluxes as its major mechanism by studying 45 Ca efflux from prelabeled, intact rat islets. EPI (2.5 x 10(-7) to 1 x 10(-5) M) inhibited insulin release induced by the influx of extracellular Ca 2+ (46 mM K+) or the mobilization of intracellular Ca 2+ stores (2 mM Ba 2+ ), but it did not reduce the 45 Ca efflux stimulated by either agonist. EPI also nullified insulin release induced by isobutylmethylxanthine or dibutyryl cAMP, with minimal or no effects on 45 Ca efflux, and blocked the insulinotropic effects of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (a direct activator of protein kinase C), which is believed primarily to sensitize the exocytotic apparatus to Ca 2+ without mobilizing additional Ca 2+ . Previously we reported that similar effects were induced by inhibitors of pancreatic islet lipoxygenase. In this study, however, pretreatment with either the alpha 2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine or pertussis toxin did not block the effects of lipoxygenase inhibitors, although either agent did block the effects of EPI. Thus, EPI, via an alpha 2-receptor mechanism, is able to reduce exocytosis largely distal to, or independent of, changes in Ca 2+ flux, cAMP formation or its Ca 2+ -mobilizing action, or generation of protein kinase C activators. Therefore, EPI may reduce the sensitivity of the exocytotic apparatus to Ca 2+ . Inhibition of islet lipoxygenase may have a similar effect; however, in this case, the effect would have to be unrelated, or distal, to stimulation of alpha 2-receptors

  6. Mechanism of redox reactions induced by light and electron pulse in solutions of mixed ligand iron(II) complex cyanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, A.; Szoeke, J.; Wojnarovits, L.

    1991-01-01

    Redox reactions induced by light and electron pulse have been studied in aqueous solutions of mixed ligand iron(II) complex cyanides. The short lived intermediates have been identified by time resolved specroscopy, the results of detailed kinetic analysis have been discussed. (author) 6 refs.; 3 figs.; 2 tabs

  7. Origin of the Substitution Mechanism for the Binding of Organic Ligands on the Surface of CsPbBr3 Perovskite Nanocubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Vikash Kumar; Santra, Pralay K; Joshi, Niharika; Chugh, Jeetender; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Rensmo, Håkan; Ghosh, Prasenjit; Nag, Angshuman

    2017-10-19

    Optoelectronic properties of CsPbBr 3 perovskite nanocubes (NCs) depend strongly on the interaction of the organic passivating molecules with the inorganic crystal. To understand this interaction, we employed a combination of synchrotron-based X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and first-principles density functional theory (DFT)-based calculations. Variable energy XPS elucidated the internal structure of the inorganic part in a layer-by-layer fashion, whereas NMR characterized the organic ligands. Our experimental results confirm that oleylammonium ions act as capping ligands by substituting Cs + ions from the surface of CsPbBr 3 NCs. DFT calculations shows that the substitution mechanism does not require much energy for surface reconstruction and, in contrast, stabilizes the nanocrystal by the formation of three hydrogen bonds between the -NH 3 + moiety of oleylammonium and surrounding Br - on the surface of NCs. This substitution mechanism and its origin are in stark contrast to the usual adsorption of organic ligands on the surface of typical NCs.

  8. Halogenation processes of secondary organic aerosol and implications on halogen release mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ofner

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Reactive halogen species (RHS, such as X·, X2 and HOX containing X = chlorine and/or bromine, are released by various sources like photo-activated sea-salt aerosol or from salt pans, and salt lakes. Despite many studies of RHS reactions, the potential of RHS reacting with secondary organic aerosol (SOA and organic aerosol derived from biomass-burning (BBOA has been neglected. Such reactions can constitute sources of gaseous organohalogen compounds or halogenated organic matter in the tropospheric boundary layer and can influence physicochemical properties of atmospheric aerosols.

    Model SOA from α-pinene, catechol, and guaiacol was used to study heterogeneous interactions with RHS. Particles were exposed to molecular chlorine and bromine in an aerosol smog-chamber in the presence of UV/VIS irradiation and to RHS, released from simulated natural halogen sources like salt pans. Subsequently, the aerosol was characterized in detail using a variety of physicochemical and spectroscopic methods. Fundamental features were correlated with heterogeneous halogenation, which results in new functional groups (FTIR spectroscopy, changes UV/VIS absorption, chemical composition (ultrahigh resolution mass spectroscopy (ICR-FT/MS, or aerosol size distribution. However, the halogen release mechanisms were also found to be affected by the presence of organic aerosol. Those interaction processes, changing chemical and physical properties of the aerosol are likely to influence e.g. the ability of the aerosol to act as cloud condensation nuclei, its potential to adsorb other gases with low-volatility, or its contribution to radiative forcing and ultimately the Earth's radiation balance.

  9. Comparison of airway pressure release ventilation to conventional mechanical ventilation in the early management of smoke inhalation injury in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchinsky, Andriy I; Burkett, Samuel E; Zanders, Thomas B; Chung, Kevin K; Regn, Dara D; Jordan, Bryan S; Necsoiu, Corina; Nguyen, Ruth; Hanson, Margaret A; Morris, Michael J; Cancio, Leopoldo C

    2011-10-01

    The role of airway pressure release ventilation in the management of early smoke inhalation injury has not been studied. We compared the effects of airway pressure release ventilation and conventional mechanical ventilation on oxygenation in a porcine model of acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by wood smoke inhalation. Prospective animal study. Government laboratory animal intensive care unit. Thirty-three Yorkshire pigs. Smoke inhalation injury. Anesthetized female Yorkshire pigs (n = 33) inhaled room-temperature pine-bark smoke. Before injury, the pigs were randomized to receive conventional mechanical ventilation (n = 15) or airway pressure release ventilation (n = 12) for 48 hrs after smoke inhalation. As acute respiratory distress syndrome developed (PaO2/Fio2 ratio conventional mechanical ventilation for 48 hrs and served as time controls. Changes in PaO2/Fio2 ratio, tidal volume, respiratory rate, mean airway pressure, plateau pressure, and hemodynamic variables were recorded. Survival was assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. PaO2/Fio2 ratio was lower in airway pressure release ventilation vs. conventional mechanical ventilation pigs at 12, 18, and 24 hrs (p conventional mechanical ventilation animals between 30 and 48 hrs post injury (p animals between 6 and 48 hrs (p conventional mechanical ventilation and airway pressure release ventilation pigs. In this model of acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by severe smoke inhalation in swine, airway pressure release ventilation-treated animals developed acute respiratory distress syndrome faster than conventional mechanical ventilation-treated animals, showing a lower PaO2/Fio2 ratio at 12, 18, and 24 hrs after injury. At other time points, PaO2/Fio2 ratio was not different between conventional mechanical ventilation and airway pressure release ventilation.

  10. Extracellular DNA Release Acts as an Antifungal Resistance Mechanism in Mature Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Ranjith; Williams, Craig; Lappin, David F.; Millington, Owain; Martins, Margarida

    2013-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus has been shown to form biofilms that are associated with adaptive antifungal resistance mechanisms. These include multidrug efflux pumps, heat shock proteins, and extracellular matrix (ECM). ECM is a key structural and protective component of microbial biofilms and in bacteria has been shown to contain extracellular DNA (eDNA). We therefore hypothesized that A. fumigatus biofilms also possess eDNA as part of the ECM, conferring a functional role. Fluorescence microscopy and quantitative PCR analyses demonstrated the presence of eDNA, which was released phase dependently (8 autolysis, were significantly upregulated as the biofilm matured and that inhibition of chitinases affected biofilm growth and stability, indicating mechanistically that autolysis was possibly involved. Finally, using checkerboard assays, it was shown that combinational treatment of biofilms with DNase plus amphotericin B and caspofungin significantly improved antifungal susceptibility. Collectively, these data show that eDNA is an important structural component of A. fumigatus ECM that is released through autolysis, which is important for protection from environmental stresses, including antifungal therapy. PMID:23314962

  11. CORONAL SOURCES, ELEMENTAL FRACTIONATION, AND RELEASE MECHANISMS OF HEAVY ION DROPOUTS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weberg, Micah J. [PhD Candidate in Space Science, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, 2134A Space Research Building, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143, USA. (United States); Lepri, Susan T. [Associate Professor, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, 2429 Space Research Building, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143, USA. (United States); Zurbuchen, Thomas H., E-mail: mjweberg@umich.edu, E-mail: slepri@umich.edu, E-mail: thomasz@umich.edu [Professor, Space Science and Aerospace Engineering, Associate Dean for Entrepreneurship Senior Counselor of Entrepreneurship Education, Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, 2431 Space Research Building, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143, USA. (United States)

    2015-03-10

    The elemental abundances of heavy ions (masses larger than He) in the solar wind provide information about physical processes occurring in the corona. Additionally, the charge state distributions of these heavy ions are sensitive to the temperature profiles of their respective source regions in the corona. Heavy ion dropouts are a relatively new class of solar wind events identified by both elemental and ionic charge state distributions. We have shown that their origins lie in large, closed coronal loops where processes such as gravitational settling dominate and can cause a mass-dependent fractionation pattern. In this study we consider and attempt to answer three fundamental questions concerning heavy ion dropouts: (1) 'where are the source loops located in the large-scale corona?'; (2) 'how does the interplay between coronal processes influence the end elemental abundances?'; and (3) 'what are the most probable release mechanisms'? We begin by analyzing the temporal and spatial variability of heavy ion dropouts and their correlation with heliospheric plasma and magnetic structures. Next we investigate the ordering of the elements inside dropouts with respect to mass, ionic charge state, and first ionization potential. Finally, we discuss these results in the context of the prevailing solar wind theories and the processes they posit that may be responsible for the release of coronal plasma into interplanetary space.

  12. Novel Alleviation Mechanisms of Aluminum Phytotoxicity via Released Biosilicon from Rice Straw-Derived Biochars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Linbo; Chen, Baoliang; Chen, Mengfang

    2016-07-01

    Replacing biosilicon and biocarbon in soil via biochar amendment is a novel approach for soil amelioration and pollution remediation. The unique roles of silicon (Si)-rich biochar in aluminum (Al) phytotoxicity alleviation have not been discovered. In this study, the alleviation of Al phytotoxicity to wheat plants (root tips cell death) by biochars fabricated from rice straw pyrolyzed at 400 and 700 °C (RS400 and RS700) and the feedstock (RS100) were studied using a slurry system containing typical acidic soils for a 15-day exposure experiment. The distributions of Al and Si in the slurry solution, soil and plant root tissue were monitored by staining methods, chemical extractions and SEM-EDS observations. We found that the biological sourced silicon in biochars served dual roles in Al phytotoxicity alleviation in acidic soil slurry. On one hand, the Si particles reduced the amount of soil exchangeable Al and prevented the migration of Al to the plant. More importantly, the Si released from biochars synchronously absorbed by the plants and coordinated with Al to form Al-Si compounds in the epidermis of wheat roots, which is a new mechanism for Al phytotoxicity alleviation in acidic soil slurry by biochar amendment. In addition, the steady release of Si from the rice straw-derived biochars was a sustainable Si source for aluminosilicate reconstruction in acidic soil.

  13. CORONAL SOURCES, ELEMENTAL FRACTIONATION, AND RELEASE MECHANISMS OF HEAVY ION DROPOUTS IN THE SOLAR WIND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weberg, Micah J.; Lepri, Susan T.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2015-01-01

    The elemental abundances of heavy ions (masses larger than He) in the solar wind provide information about physical processes occurring in the corona. Additionally, the charge state distributions of these heavy ions are sensitive to the temperature profiles of their respective source regions in the corona. Heavy ion dropouts are a relatively new class of solar wind events identified by both elemental and ionic charge state distributions. We have shown that their origins lie in large, closed coronal loops where processes such as gravitational settling dominate and can cause a mass-dependent fractionation pattern. In this study we consider and attempt to answer three fundamental questions concerning heavy ion dropouts: (1) 'where are the source loops located in the large-scale corona?'; (2) 'how does the interplay between coronal processes influence the end elemental abundances?'; and (3) 'what are the most probable release mechanisms'? We begin by analyzing the temporal and spatial variability of heavy ion dropouts and their correlation with heliospheric plasma and magnetic structures. Next we investigate the ordering of the elements inside dropouts with respect to mass, ionic charge state, and first ionization potential. Finally, we discuss these results in the context of the prevailing solar wind theories and the processes they posit that may be responsible for the release of coronal plasma into interplanetary space

  14. Sustained release of doxorubicin from zeolite-magnetite nanocomposites prepared by mechanical activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arruebo, Manuel; Fernandez-Pacheco, Rodrigo; Irusta, Silvia; Arbiol, Jordi; Ibarra, M Ricardo; SantamarIa, Jesus

    2006-01-01

    Nanocomposites consisting of magnetite and FAU zeolite with a high surface area and adsorption capacity have been prepared by mechanical activation using high-energy milling at room temperature. FTIR results, as well as HRTEM, EFTEM, and XPS measurements, show that the resulting magnetic nanoparticles are covered by a thin aluminosilicate coating. A saturation magnetization as high as 16 emu g -1 and 94.2 Oe of coercivity were observed for the obtained composites. The main advantages of this synthesis procedure are (i) simplicity of the preparation procedure (ii) prevention of agglomeration of the magnetite nanoparticles to a large extent, and (iii) absence of free magnetite outside the zeolitic matrix. In addition, in vitro experiments revealed that the nanoparticles prepared were able to store and release substantial amounts of doxorubicin. In view of these advantages, these magnetic nanoparticles can be considered as potential candidates for drug-delivery applications

  15. The analgesic agent tapentadol inhibits calcitonin gene-related peptide release from isolated rat brainstem via a serotonergic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Maria Cristina; Navarra, Pierluigi; Tringali, Giuseppe

    2016-01-15

    In this study we tested the hypothesis that tapentadol inhibits GGRP release from the rat brainstem through a mechanism mediated by the inhibition of NA reuptake; as a second alternative hypothesis, we investigated whether tapentadol inhibits GGRP release via the inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Rat brainstems were explanted and incubated in short-term experiments. CGRP released in the incubation medium was taken as a marker of CGRP release from the central terminals of trigeminal neurons within the brainstem. CGRP levels were measured by radioimmunoassay under basal conditions or in the presence of tapentadol; NA, 5-HT, clonidine, yohimbine and ondansetron were used as pharmacological tools to investigate the action mechanism of tapentadol. The α2-antagonist yohimbine failed to counteract the effects of tapentadol. Moreover, neither NA nor the α2-agonist clonidine per se inhibited K(+)-stimulated CGRP release, thereby indicating that the effects of tapentadol are nor mediated through the block of NA reuptake. Further experiments showed that 5-HT and tramadol, which inhibits both NA and 5-HT reuptake, significantly reduced K(+)-stimulated CGRP release. Moreover, the 5-HT3 antagonist ondansetron was able to counteract the effects of tapentadol in this system. This study provided pharmacological evidence that tapentadol inhibits stimulated CGRP release from the rat brainstem in vitro through a mechanism involving an increase in 5-HT levels in the system and the subsequent activation of 5-HT3 receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanical characterization and ion release of bioactive dental composites containing calcium phosphate particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natale, Livia C; Rodrigues, Marcela C; Alania, Yvette; Chiari, Marina D S; Boaro, Leticia C C; Cotrim, Marycel; Vega, Oscar; Braga, Roberto R

    2018-08-01

    to verify the effect of the addition of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) particles functionalized with di- or triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (DEGDMA or TEGDMA) on the degree of conversion (DC), post-gel shrinkage (PS), mechanical properties, and ion release of experimental composites. Four composites were prepared containing a BisGMA/TEGDMA matrix and 60 vol% of fillers. The positive control contained only barium glass fillers, while in the other composites 15 vol% of the barium was replaced by DCPD. Besides the functionalized particles, non-functionalized DCPD was also tested. DC after 24 h (n = 3) was determined by FTIR spectroscopy. The strain gage method was used to obtain PS 5 min after photoactivation (n = 5). Flexural strength and modulus (n = 10) were calculated based on the biaxial flexural test results, after specimen storage for 24 h or 60 days in water. The same storage times were used for fracture toughness testing (FT, n = 10). Calcium and phosphate release up to 60 days was quantified by ICP-OES (n = 3). Data were analyzed by ANOVA/Tukey test (alpha: 5%). Composites containing functionalized DCPD presented higher DC than the control (p composites (p composite with DEGDMA-functionalized DCPD presented fracture strength similar to the control, while for flexural modulus only the composite with TEGDMA-functionalized particles was lower than the control (p composites containing DCPD was higher than the control after 60 days (p composite with non-functionalized DCPD at 15 days and no significant reductions were observed for composites with functionalized DCPD during the observation period (p composites, phosphate release was higher at 15 days than in the subsequent periods, and no difference among them was recorded at 45 and 60 days (p composite with DEGDMA-functionalized particles was the only material with strength similar to the control after 60 days in water; however, it also presented the highest

  17. Rosetta Ligand docking with flexible XML protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmon, Gordon; Meiler, Jens

    2012-01-01

    RosettaLigand is premiere software for predicting how a protein and a small molecule interact. Benchmark studies demonstrate that 70% of the top scoring RosettaLigand predicted interfaces are within 2Å RMSD from the crystal structure [1]. The latest release of Rosetta ligand software includes many new features, such as (1) docking of multiple ligands simultaneously, (2) representing ligands as fragments for greater flexibility, (3) redesign of the interface during docking, and (4) an XML script based interface that gives the user full control of the ligand docking protocol.

  18. Antibiotic-loaded acrylic bone cements: An in vitro study on the release mechanism and its efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miola, Marta, E-mail: marta.miola@polito.it [Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino (Italy); Bistolfi, Alessandro [Department of Orthopaedics, Traumatology and HM, University of Turin (Italy); AO CTO, M Adelaide Hospital, Turin (Italy); Valsania, Maria Carmen; Bianco, Carlotta [Department of Orthopaedics, Traumatology and HM, University of Turin (Italy); Fucale, Giacomo [Chemical, Clinical and Microbiological Analyses Dept., CTO, Turin (Italy); Verné, Enrica [Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    An in vitro study was carried out in order to investigate the antibiotic release mechanism and the antibacterial properties of commercially (Palacos® R + G and Palacos® LV + G) and manually (Palacos® R + GM and Palacos® LV + GM) blended gentamicin-loaded bone cements. Samples were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compression strength was evaluated. The antibiotic release was investigated by dipping sample in simulated body fluid (SBF) and periodically analyzing the solution by means of high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Different antibacterial tests were performed to investigate the possible influence of blending technique on antibacterial properties. Only some differences were observed between gentamicin manually added and commercial ones, in the release curves, while the antibacterial effect and the mechanical properties seem to not feel the blending technique. Highlights: • The efficacy of commercially and manually mixed antibiotic-loaded cements is studied. • Exhaustive mechanical, drug release and antibacterial studies are carried out. • The blending technique does not affect the antibacterial and mechanical properties. • The blending process influences only the release curve, not the released drug amount.

  19. Antibiotic-loaded acrylic bone cements: An in vitro study on the release mechanism and its efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miola, Marta; Bistolfi, Alessandro; Valsania, Maria Carmen; Bianco, Carlotta; Fucale, Giacomo; Verné, Enrica

    2013-01-01

    An in vitro study was carried out in order to investigate the antibiotic release mechanism and the antibacterial properties of commercially (Palacos® R + G and Palacos® LV + G) and manually (Palacos® R + GM and Palacos® LV + GM) blended gentamicin-loaded bone cements. Samples were characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compression strength was evaluated. The antibiotic release was investigated by dipping sample in simulated body fluid (SBF) and periodically analyzing the solution by means of high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Different antibacterial tests were performed to investigate the possible influence of blending technique on antibacterial properties. Only some differences were observed between gentamicin manually added and commercial ones, in the release curves, while the antibacterial effect and the mechanical properties seem to not feel the blending technique. Highlights: • The efficacy of commercially and manually mixed antibiotic-loaded cements is studied. • Exhaustive mechanical, drug release and antibacterial studies are carried out. • The blending technique does not affect the antibacterial and mechanical properties. • The blending process influences only the release curve, not the released drug amount

  20. Mechanism of charge transport in ligand-capped crystalline CdTe nanoparticles according to surface photovoltaic and photoacoustic results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Kuiying, E-mail: kuiyingli@ysu.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Metastable Materials Manufacture Technology and Science, Yanshan University, Hebei Str. 438, Qinhuangdao, Hebei Province 066004 (China); Zhang Hao [Key Laboratory for Supramolecular Structure and Materials, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Yang Weiyong; Wei Sailing [National Laboratory of Metastable Materials Manufacture Technology and Science, Yanshan University, Hebei Str. 438, Qinhuangdao, Hebei Province 066004 (China); Wang Dayang, E-mail: dayang@mpikg-golm.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam 14424 (Germany)

    2010-09-01

    By combining surface photovoltaic and photoacoustic techniques, we probed the photogenerated charge transport channels of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA)- and 2-mercaptoethylamine (MA)-capped crystalline CdTe nanoparticles on illumination with UV-near IR light. The results experimentally confirmed the presence of a CdS shell outside the CdTe core that formed through the self-assembly and decomposition of mercapto ligands during CdTe preparation. The data revealed that the CdS layer was partly responsible for the deexcitation behavior of the photogenerated carriers, which is related to the quantum tunnel effect. Experiments demonstrated that two quantum wells were located at wavelengths of 440 and 500 nm in buried interfacial space-charge regions, whereas the formation of a ligand layer obstructed charge transfer transitions of the core CdTe nanoparticles to a certain extent.

  1. An investigation of effects of modification processes on physical properties and mechanism of drug release for sustaining drug release from modified rice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo, Vuong Duy; Luu, Thinh Duc; Van Vo, Toi [Pharmaceutical Engineering Laboratory, Biomedical Engineering Department, International University, Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Tran, Van-Thanh [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Duan, Wei [School of Medicine, Deakin University, Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, Victoria (Australia); Tran, Phuong Ha-Lien, E-mail: phuong.tran1@deakin.edu.au [School of Medicine, Deakin University, Pigdons Road, Waurn Ponds, Victoria (Australia); Tran, Thao Truong-Dinh, E-mail: ttdthao@hcmiu.edu.vn [Pharmaceutical Engineering Laboratory, Biomedical Engineering Department, International University, Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of modification processes on physical properties and explain the mechanism of sustained drug release from modified rice (MR). Various types of Vietnamese rice were introduced in the study as the matrices of sustained release dosage form. Rice was thermally modified in water for a determined temperature at different times with a simple process. Then tablets containing MR and isradipine, the model drug, were prepared to investigate the capability of sustained drug release. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to determine different morphologies between MR formulations. Flow property of MR was analyzed by Hausner ratio and Carr's indices. The dissolution rate and swelling/erosion behaviors of tablets were evaluated at pH 1.2 and pH 6.8 at 37 ± 0.5 °C. The matrix tablet containing MR showed a sustained release as compared to the control. The SEM analyses and swelling/erosion studies indicated that the morphology as well as swelling/erosion rate of MR were modulated by modification time, drying method and incubation. It was found that the modification process was crucial because it could highly affect the granule morphologies and hence, leading to the change of flowability and swelling/erosion capacity for sustained release of drug. - Highlights: • Modification process affected granule morphologies and flowability of modified rice. • Modification process affected swelling/erosion capacity for drug sustained release. • Freeze-drying could decrease the erosion as well as increase the swelling rate.

  2. An investigation of effects of modification processes on physical properties and mechanism of drug release for sustaining drug release from modified rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, Vuong Duy; Luu, Thinh Duc; Van Vo, Toi; Tran, Van-Thanh; Duan, Wei; Tran, Phuong Ha-Lien; Tran, Thao Truong-Dinh

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of modification processes on physical properties and explain the mechanism of sustained drug release from modified rice (MR). Various types of Vietnamese rice were introduced in the study as the matrices of sustained release dosage form. Rice was thermally modified in water for a determined temperature at different times with a simple process. Then tablets containing MR and isradipine, the model drug, were prepared to investigate the capability of sustained drug release. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to determine different morphologies between MR formulations. Flow property of MR was analyzed by Hausner ratio and Carr's indices. The dissolution rate and swelling/erosion behaviors of tablets were evaluated at pH 1.2 and pH 6.8 at 37 ± 0.5 °C. The matrix tablet containing MR showed a sustained release as compared to the control. The SEM analyses and swelling/erosion studies indicated that the morphology as well as swelling/erosion rate of MR were modulated by modification time, drying method and incubation. It was found that the modification process was crucial because it could highly affect the granule morphologies and hence, leading to the change of flowability and swelling/erosion capacity for sustained release of drug. - Highlights: • Modification process affected granule morphologies and flowability of modified rice. • Modification process affected swelling/erosion capacity for drug sustained release. • Freeze-drying could decrease the erosion as well as increase the swelling rate.

  3. Release mechanism of doxazosin from carrageenan matrix tablets: Effect of ionic strength and addition of sodium dodecyl sulphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Petra; Pavli, Matej; Baumgartner, Saša; Kogej, Ksenija

    2017-08-30

    The polyelectrolyte matrix tablets loaded with an oppositely charged drug exhibit complex drug-release mechanisms. In this study, the release mechanism of a cationic drug doxazosin mesylate (DM) from matrix tablets based on an anionic polyelectrolyte λ-carrageenan (λ-CARR) is investigated. The drug release rates from λ-CARR matrices are correlated with binding results based on potentiometric measurements using the DM ion-sensitive membrane electrode and with molecular characteristics of the DM-λ-CARR-complex particles through hydrodynamic size measurements. Experiments are performed in solutions with different ionic strength and with the addition of an anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). It is demonstrated that in addition to swelling and erosion of tablets, the release rates depend strongly on cooperative interactions between DM and λ-CARR. Addition of SDS at concentrations below its critical micelle concentration (CMC) slows down the DM release through hydrophobic binding of SDS to the DM-λ-CARR complex. On the contrary, at concentrations above the CMC SDS pulls DM from the complex by forming mixed micelles with it and thus accelerates the release. Results involving SDS show that the concentration of surfactants that are naturally present in gastrointestinal environment may have a great impact on the drug release process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Insights into the swelling process and drug release mechanisms from cross-linked pectin/high amylose starch matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda M. Carbinatto

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cross-linked pectin/high amylose mixtures were evaluated as a new excipient for matrix tablets formulations, since the mixing of polymers and cross-linking reaction represent rational tools to reach materials with modulated and specific properties that meet specific therapeutic needs. Objective: In this work the influence of polymer ratio and cross-linking process on the swelling and the mechanism driving the drug release from swellable matrix tablets prepared with this excipient was investigated. Methods: Cross-linked samples were characterized by their micromeritic properties (size and shape, density, angle of repose and flow rate and liquid uptake ability. Matrix tablets were evaluated according their physical properties and the drug release rates and mechanisms were also investigated. Results: Cross-linked samples demonstrated size homogeneity and irregular shape, with liquid uptake ability insensible to pH. Cross-linking process of samples allowed the control of drug release rates and the drug release mechanism was influenced by both polymer ratio and cross-linking process. The drug release of samples with minor proportion of pectin was driven by an anomalous transport and the increase of the pectin proportion contributed to the erosion of the matrix. Conclusion: The cross-linked mixtures of high amylose and pectin showed a suitable excipient for slowing the drug release rates.

  5. Optogenetic release of norepinephrine from cardiac sympathetic neurons alters mechanical and electrical function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengrowski, Anastasia M; Wang, Xin; Tapa, Srinivas; Posnack, Nikki Gillum; Mendelowitz, David; Kay, Matthew W

    2015-02-01

    Release of norepinephrine (NE) from sympathetic neurons enhances heart rate (HR) and developed force through activation of β-adrenergic receptors, and this sympathoexcitation is a key risk for the generation of cardiac arrhythmias. Studies of β-adrenergic modulation of cardiac function typically involve the administration of exogenous β-adrenergic receptor agonists to directly elicit global β-adrenergic receptor activation by bypassing the involvement of sympathetic nerve terminals. In this work, we use a novel method to activate sympathetic fibres within the myocardium of Langendorff-perfused hearts while measuring changes in electrical and mechanical function. The light-activated optogenetic protein channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was expressed in murine catecholaminergic sympathetic neurons. Sympathetic fibres were then photoactivated to examine changes in contractile force, HR, and cardiac electrical activity. Incidence of arrhythmia was measured with and without exposure to photoactivation of sympathetic fibres, and hearts were optically mapped to detect changes in action potential durations and conduction velocities. Results demonstrate facilitation of both developed force and HR after photostimulated release of NE, with increases in contractile force and HR of 34.5 ± 5.5 and 25.0 ± 9.3%, respectively. Photostimulation of sympathetic fibres also made hearts more susceptible to arrhythmia, with greater incidence and severity. In addition, optically mapped action potentials displayed a small but significant shortening of the plateau phase (-5.5 ± 1.0 ms) after photostimulation. This study characterizes a powerful and clinically relevant new model for studies of cardiac arrhythmias generated by increasing the activity of sympathetic nerve terminals and the resulting activation of myocyte β-adrenergic receptors. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Isolation of TRPV1 independent mechanisms of spontaneous and asynchronous glutamate release at primary afferent to NTS synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel J. Fenwick

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cranial visceral afferents contained within the solitary tract (ST contact second-order neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS and release the excitatory amino acid glutamate via three distinct exocytosis pathways; synchronous, asynchronous, and spontaneous release. The presence of TRPV1 in the central terminals of a majority of ST afferents conveys activity-dependent asynchronous glutamate release and provides a temperature sensitive calcium conductance which largely determines the rate of spontaneous vesicle fusion. TRPV1 is present in unmyelinated C-fiber afferents and these facilitated forms of glutamate release may underlie the relative strength of C-fibers in activating autonomic reflex pathways. However, pharmacological blockade of TRPV1 signaling eliminates only ~50% of the asynchronous profile and attenuates the temperature sensitivity of spontaneous release indicating additional thermosensitive calcium influx pathways may exist which mediate these forms of vesicle release. In the present study we isolate the contribution of TRPV1 independent forms of glutamate release at ST-NTS synapses. We found ST afferent innervation at NTS neurons and synchronous vesicle release from TRPV1 KO mice was not different to control animals; however, only half of TRPV1 KO ST afferents completely lacked asynchronous glutamate release. Further, temperature driven spontaneous rates of vesicle release were not different from 33˚ - 37˚C between control and TRPV1 KO afferents. These findings suggest additional temperature dependent mechanisms controlling asynchronous and thermosensitive spontaneous release at physiological temperatures, possibly mediated by additional thermosensitive TRP channels in primary afferent terminals.

  7. Effect of Organic Fe-Ligands, Released by Emiliania huxleyi, on Fe(II Oxidation Rate in Seawater Under Simulated Ocean Acidification Conditions: A Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Samperio-Ramos

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential effect of ocean acidification on the exudation of organic matter by phytoplankton and, consequently, on the iron redox chemistry is largely unknown. In this study, the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi was exposed to different pCO2 conditions (225–900 μatm, in order to determine the role of natural organic ligands on the Fe(II oxidation rate. Oxidation kinetics of Fe(II were studied as a function of pH (7.75–8.25 and dissolved organic carbon levels produced (0–141.11 μmol C L−1 during the different growth stages. The Fe(II oxidation rate always decreased in the presence of exudates as compared to that in the exudates-free seawater. The organic ligands present in the coccolithophorid exudates were responsible for this decrease. The oxidation of Fe(II in artificial seawater was also investigated at nanomolar levels over a range of pH (7.75–8.25 at 25°C in the presence of different glucuronic acid concentrations. Dissolved uronic acids (DUA slightly increased the experimental rate compared to control artificial seawater (ASW which can be ascribed to the stabilization of the oxidized form by chelation. This behavior was a function of the Fe(II:DUA ratio and was a pH dependent process. A kinetic model in ASW, with a single organic ligand, was applied for computing the equilibrium constant (log KFeCHO+ = 3.68 ± 0.81 M−1 and the oxidation rate (log kFeCHO+ = 3.28 ± 0.41 M−1 min−1 for the Fe(II-DUA complex (FeCHO+, providing an excellent description of data obtained over a wide range of DUA concentrations and pH conditions. Considering the Marcus theory the Fe(III complexing constant with DUA was limited to between 1013 and 1016. For the seawater enriched with exudates of E. huxleyi a second kinetic modeling approach was carried out for fitting the Fe(II speciation, and the contribution of each Fe(II species to the overall oxidation rate as a function of the pH/pCO2 conditions. The influence of organic ligands in the

  8. HTR fuel modelling with the ATLAS code. Thermal mechanical behaviour and fission product release assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillermier, Pierre; Daniel, Lucile; Gauthier, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    To support AREVA NP in its design on HTR reactor and its HTR fuel R and D program, the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique developed the ATLAS code (Advanced Thermal mechanicaL Analysis Software) with the objectives: - to quantify, with a statistical approach, the failed particle fraction and fission product release of a HTR fuel core under normal and accidental conditions (compact or pebble design). - to simulate irradiation tests or benchmark in order to compare measurements or others code results with ATLAS evaluation. These two objectives aim at qualifying the code in order to predict fuel behaviour and to design fuel according to core performance and safety requirements. A statistical calculation uses numerous deterministic calculations. The finite element method is used for these deterministic calculations, in order to be able to choose among three types of meshes, depending on what must be simulated: - One-dimensional calculation of one single particle, for intact particles or particles with fully debonded layers. - Two-dimensional calculations of one single particle, in the case of particles which are cracked, partially debonded or shaped in various ways. - Three-dimensional calculations of a whole compact slice, in order to simulate the interactions between the particles, the thermal gradient and the transport of fission products up to the coolant. - Some calculations of a whole pebble, using homogenization methods are being studied. The temperatures, displacements, stresses, strains and fission product concentrations are calculated on each mesh of the model. Statistical calculations are done using these results, taking into account ceramic failure mode, but also fabrication tolerances and material property uncertainties, variations of the loads (fluence, temperature, burn-up) and core data parameters. The statistical method used in ATLAS is the importance sampling. The model of migration of long-lived fission products in the coated particle and more

  9. Ligand Depot: a data warehouse for ligands bound to macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zukang; Chen, Li; Maddula, Himabindu; Akcan, Ozgur; Oughtred, Rose; Berman, Helen M; Westbrook, John

    2004-09-01

    Ligand Depot is an integrated data resource for finding information about small molecules bound to proteins and nucleic acids. The initial release (version 1.0, November, 2003) focuses on providing chemical and structural information for small molecules found as part of the structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. Ligand Depot accepts keyword-based queries and also provides a graphical interface for performing chemical substructure searches. A wide variety of web resources that contain information on small molecules may also be accessed through Ligand Depot. Ligand Depot is available at http://ligand-depot.rutgers.edu/. Version 1.0 supports multiple operating systems including Windows, Unix, Linux and the Macintosh operating system. The current drawing tool works in Internet Explorer, Netscape and Mozilla on Windows, Unix and Linux.

  10. Fabrication of drug eluting implants: study of drug release mechanism from titanium dioxide nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamlekhan, Azhang; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Sinha-Ray, Suman; Yarin, Alexander L; Takoudis, Christos; Mathew, Mathew T; Sukotjo, Cortino

    2015-01-01

    Formation of titanium dioxide nanotubes (TNTs) on a titanium surface holds great potential for promoting desirable cellular response. However, prolongation of drug release from these nano-reservoirs remains to be a challenge. In our previous work TNTs were successfully loaded with a drug. In this study the effect of TNTs dimensions on prolongation of drug release is quantified aiming at the introduction of a simple novel technique which overcomes complications of previously introduced methods. Different groups of TNTs with different lengths and diameters are fabricated. Samples are loaded with a model drug and rate of drug release over time is monitored. The relation of the drug release rate to the TNT dimensions (diameter, length, aspect ratio and volume) is established. The results show that an increase in any of these parameters increases the duration of the release process. However, the strongest parameter affecting the drug release is the aspect ratio. In fact, TNTs with higher aspect ratios release drug slower. It is revealed that drug release from TNT is a diffusion-limited process. Assuming that diffusion of drug in (Phosphate-Buffered Saline) PBS follows one-dimensional Fick’s law, the theoretical predictions for drug release profile is compatible with our experimental data for release from a single TNT. (paper)

  11. Mechanisms and interaction phenomena influencing releases in low- and medium-level waste disposal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodersen, K.; Nilsson, K.

    1990-11-01

    The report covers work done 1986-1990 at Risoe National Laboratory as part of the third EC Research Programme on Radioactive Waste Management. Waste product characterization: Leaching and volume stability of cemented ion-exchange resins. Wet/dry cycling was found to be an important degradation mechanism. Hygroscopic properties of cemented and bituminized radioactive waste. Water uptake from the air can be an important release mechanism when waste containing soluble salts are disposed of by shallow land burial. Water uptake and swelling of bituminized waste including studies on water migration in bitumen membranes and measurements of swelling pressures. Ageing of bituminized products was demonstrated to result in increasing stiffness of the materials. Nickel ferrocyanide in precipitation sludge was found to be unstable in contact with concrete. Barrier material properties: The influence of the pore structure in concrete on the hydraulic or diffusive transport of water and ions through concrete barriers was investigated. The main parameter is the water/cement ratio. A theoretical interpretation is given. Healing of cracks in concrete barriers by precipitation of calcium carbonate was demonstrated experimentally and described by a simplified model. Transport of components between two thin plates of cement paste with different composition stored together in water was found to take place at a low rate. The structure of degraded cement paste was studied using SANS (small angle neutron scattering). Interaction phenomena: - Integral experiments with migration of radioisotopes from cemented waste through barriers made from kaolin, chalk or concrete were made under different external conditions. The results can be used for model validation and some preliminary work was done. (author) 16 tabs., 51 ills., 25 refs

  12. Distinct uptake mechanisms but similar intracellular processing of two different toll-like receptor ligand-peptide conjugates in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Selina; Bijker, Martijn S; Weterings, Jimmy J; Tanke, Hans J; Adema, Gosse J; van Hall, Thorbald; Drijfhout, Jan W; Melief, Cornelis J M; Overkleeft, Hermen S; van der Marel, Gijsbert A; Filippov, Dmitri V; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Ossendorp, Ferry

    2007-07-20

    Covalent conjugation of Toll-like receptor ligands (TLR-L) to synthetic antigenic peptides strongly improves antigen presentation in vitro and T lymphocyte priming in vivo. These molecularly well defined TLR-L-peptide conjugates, constitute an attractive vaccination modality, sharing the peptide antigen and a defined adjuvant in one single molecule. We have analyzed the intracellular trafficking and processing of two TLR-L conjugates in dendritic cells (DCs). Long synthetic peptides containing an ovalbumin cytotoxic T-cell epitope were chemically conjugated to two different TLR-Ls the TLR2 ligand, Pam(3)CysSK(4) (Pam) or the TLR9 ligand CpG. Rapid and enhanced uptake of both types of TLR-L-conjugated peptide occurred in DCs. Moreover, TLR-L conjugation greatly enhanced antigen presentation, a process that was dependent on endosomal acidification, proteasomal cleavage, and TAP translocation. The uptake of the CpG approximately conjugate was independent of endosomally-expressed TLR9 as reported previously. Unexpectedly, we found that Pam approximately conjugated peptides were likewise internalized independently of the expression of cell surface-expressed TLR2. Further characterization of the uptake mechanisms revealed that TLR2-L employed a different uptake route than TLR9-L. Inhibition of clathrin- or caveolin-dependent endocytosis greatly reduced uptake and antigen presentation of the Pam-conjugate. In contrast, internalization and antigen presentation of CpG approximately conjugates was independent of clathrin-coated pits but partly dependent on caveolae formation. Importantly, in contrast to the TLR-independent uptake of the conjugates, TLR expression and downstream TLR signaling was required for dendritic cell maturation and for priming of naïve CD8(+) T-cells. Together, our data show that targeting to two distinct TLRs requires distinct uptake mechanism but follows similar trafficking and intracellular processing pathways leading to optimal antigen

  13. A rainfall-based mechanism to regulate the release of water from Ranger uranium mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    The far north of Australia (the Top End) has a monsoon-like climate. This wet-dry climate presents problems in water management for mining operations. These problems are exacerbated for the Ranger uranium mine at Jabiru due to the need to protect the environment of the surrounding Kakadu National Park, particularly the major wetland system downstream of the Ranger mine. An analysis of rainfall records for the wet-dry tropics of the far north of Australia is presented. A probability curve of the ratio between rainfall at a given date and rainfall at the year end, has been produced from actual data and can be used with a normalized curve to set levels of confidence of predicted rainfall being exceeded. The results of this analysis are used to develop a regulatory mechanism to limit release of waste water from a uranium mine to particularly wet years in accordance with the Australian Government's environmental protection policy. 19 refs., 11 tabs., 17 figs

  14. Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford waste tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rassat, S.D.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Bredt, P.R.; Mahoney, L.A.; Forbes, S.V.; Tingey, S.M.

    1997-09-01

    The 177 storage tanks at Hanford contain a vast array of radioactive waste forms resulting, primarily, from nuclear materials processing. Through radiolytic, thermal, and other decomposition reactions of waste components, gaseous species including hydrogen, ammonia, and the oxidizer nitrous oxide are generated within the waste tanks. Many of these tanks are known to retain and periodically release quantities of these flammable gas mixtures. The primary focus of the Flammable Gas Project is the safe storage of Hanford tank wastes. To this end, we strive to develop an understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford tanks through laboratory investigations on actual tank wastes. These results support the closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) on the safe storage of waste tanks known to retain flammable gases and support resolution of the broader Flammable Gas Safety Issue. The overall purpose of this ongoing study is to develop a comprehensive and thorough understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release. The first objective of the current study was to classify bubble retention and release mechanisms in two previously untested waste materials from Tanks 241-AN-103 (AN-103) and 241-AW-101 (AW-101). Results were obtained for retention mechanisms, release characteristics, and the maximum gas retention. In addition, unique behavior was also documented and compared with previously studied waste samples. The second objective was to lengthen the duration of the experiments to evaluate the role of slowing bubble growth on the retention and release behavior. Results were obtained for experiments lasting from a few hours to a few days.

  15. Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford waste tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassat, S.D.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Bredt, P.R.; Mahoney, L.A.; Forbes, S.V.; Tingey, S.M.

    1997-09-01

    The 177 storage tanks at Hanford contain a vast array of radioactive waste forms resulting, primarily, from nuclear materials processing. Through radiolytic, thermal, and other decomposition reactions of waste components, gaseous species including hydrogen, ammonia, and the oxidizer nitrous oxide are generated within the waste tanks. Many of these tanks are known to retain and periodically release quantities of these flammable gas mixtures. The primary focus of the Flammable Gas Project is the safe storage of Hanford tank wastes. To this end, we strive to develop an understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford tanks through laboratory investigations on actual tank wastes. These results support the closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) on the safe storage of waste tanks known to retain flammable gases and support resolution of the broader Flammable Gas Safety Issue. The overall purpose of this ongoing study is to develop a comprehensive and thorough understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release. The first objective of the current study was to classify bubble retention and release mechanisms in two previously untested waste materials from Tanks 241-AN-103 (AN-103) and 241-AW-101 (AW-101). Results were obtained for retention mechanisms, release characteristics, and the maximum gas retention. In addition, unique behavior was also documented and compared with previously studied waste samples. The second objective was to lengthen the duration of the experiments to evaluate the role of slowing bubble growth on the retention and release behavior. Results were obtained for experiments lasting from a few hours to a few days

  16. The effect of powder blend and tablet structure on drug release mechanisms of hydrophobic starch acetate matrix tablets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Veen, B.; Pajander, J.; Zuurman, K.; Lappalainen, R.; Poso, A.; Frijlink, H.W.; Ketolainen, J.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigates the release mechanism of a hydrophilic drug (caffeine) from hydrophobic matrix tablets composed of starch acetate. Different particle size fractions of starch acetate were mixed with caffeine (22% V/V) to obtain various mixture organisations in the powder, as 14 well as in

  17. Saturation mechanism of the heat release response of a premixed swirl flame using LES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krediet, H.J.; Beck, C. H.; Krebs, W.; Kok, J. B.W.

    2013-01-01

    The nonlinear heat release response of a premixed swirl flame to velocity perturbations is investigated using Large Eddy Simulation. The nonlinear heat release response is required for the prediction of thermoacoustic limit cycle pressure amplitudes and is represented here by the Flame Describing

  18. Mechanisms of proton relay and product release by Class A β-lactamase at ultrahigh resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Eric M; Lethbridge, Kathryn G; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Skiba, Joanna; Kowalski, Konrad; Chen, Yu

    2018-01-01

    The β-lactam antibiotics inhibit penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) by forming a stable, covalent, acyl-enzyme complex. During the evolution from PBPs to Class A β-lactamases, the β-lactamases acquired Glu166 to activate a catalytic water and cleave the acyl-enzyme bond. Here we present three product complex crystal structures of CTX-M-14 Class A β-lactamase with a ruthenocene-conjugated penicillin-a 0.85 Å resolution structure of E166A mutant complexed with the penilloate product, a 1.30 Å resolution complex structure of the same mutant with the penicilloate product, and a 1.18 Å resolution complex structure of S70G mutant with a penicilloate product epimer-shedding light on the catalytic mechanisms and product inhibition of PBPs and Class A β-lactamases. The E166A-penilloate complex captured the hydrogen bonding network following the protonation of the leaving group and, for the first time, unambiguously show that the ring nitrogen donates a proton to Ser130, which in turn donates a proton to Lys73. These observations indicate that in the absence of Glu166, the equivalent lysine would be neutral in PBPs and therefore capable of serving as the general base to activate the catalytic serine. Together with previous results, this structure suggests a common proton relay network shared by Class A β-lactamases and PBPs, from the catalytic serine to the lysine, and ultimately to the ring nitrogen. Additionally, the E166A-penicilloate complex reveals previously unseen conformational changes of key catalytic residues during the release of the product, and is the first structure to capture the hydrolyzed product in the presence of an unmutated catalytic serine. Structural data are available in the PDB database under the accession numbers 5TOP, 5TOY, and 5VLE. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  19. Mechanical properties and total hydroxycinnamic derivative release of starch/glycerol/Melissa officinalis extract films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Mello Rechia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanical properties of starch/glycerol/Melissa officinalis, a topical drug delivery system for labial herpes treatment. Four films were prepared with different concentrations of starch, glycerol, and Melissa officinalis extract. The results revealed that increasing the glycerol concentration in the film reduced elasticity modulus and tensile strength, exhibiting a plasticizing effect. The increase in free volume resulted in increased release of hydroxycinnamic derivatives expressed as rosmarinic acid.O objetivo deste trabalho foi estudar as propriedades mecânicas e o mecanismo de liberação de um sistema tópico de liberação prolongada para o tratamento do Herpes labial a partir de filmes de amido/glicerol/extrato de Melissa officinalis, planta com comprovada atividade antiviral. Foram obtidos quatro filmes poliméricos com diferentes concentrações de amido, glicerol e extrato de Melissa officinalis os quais foram caracterizados mecanicamente e determinado o perfil de liberação de derivados hidroxicinâmicos. Os resultados demonstraram que o aumento da concentração de glicerol no filme produz uma redução no módulo de elasticidade e na tensão de deformação como conseqüência do efeito plastificante. O aumento no volume livre do polímero resultou em aumento da liberação dos derivados hidroxicinâmicos expressos como ácido rosmarínico.

  20. Mechanisms of proton relay and product release by Class A β-lactamase at ultrahigh resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewandowski, Eric M. [Department of Molecular Medicine, University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa FL USA; Lethbridge, Kathryn G. [Department of Molecular Medicine, University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa FL USA; Sanishvili, Ruslan [GMCA@APS, X-ray Science Division, Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, IL USA; Skiba, Joanna [Department of Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Lodz, Poland; Kowalski, Konrad [Department of Organic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Lodz, Poland; Chen, Yu [Department of Molecular Medicine, University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa FL USA

    2017-11-20

    The beta-lactam antibiotics inhibit penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) by forming a stable, covalent, acyl-enzyme complex. During the evolution from PBPs to Class A beta-lactamases, the beta-lactamases acquired Glu166 to activate a catalytic water and cleave the acyl-enzyme bond. Here we present three product complex crystal structures of CTX-M-14 Class A beta-lactamase with a ruthenocene-conjugated penicillin-a 0.85 angstrom resolution structure of E166A mutant complexed with the penilloate product, a 1.30 angstrom resolution complex structure of the same mutant with the penicilloate product, and a 1.18 angstrom resolution complex structure of S70G mutant with a penicilloate product epimer-shedding light on the catalytic mechanisms and product inhibition of PBPs and Class A beta-lactamases. The E166A-penilloate complex captured the hydrogen bonding network following the protonation of the leaving group and, for the first time, unambiguously show that the ring nitrogen donates a proton to Ser130, which in turn donates a proton to Lys73. These observations indicate that in the absence of Glu166, the equivalent lysine would be neutral in PBPs and therefore capable of serving as the general base to activate the catalytic serine. Together with previous results, this structure suggests a common proton relay network shared by Class A beta-lactamases and PBPs, from the catalytic serine to the lysine, and ultimately to the ring nitrogen. Additionally, the E166A-penicilloate complex reveals previously unseen conformational changes of key catalytic residues during the release of the product, and is the first structure to capture the hydrolyzed product in the presence of an unmutated catalytic serine.

  1. ATP Release Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyuki Taruno

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine triphosphate (ATP has been well established as an important extracellular ligand of autocrine signaling, intercellular communication, and neurotransmission with numerous physiological and pathophysiological roles. In addition to the classical exocytosis, non-vesicular mechanisms of cellular ATP release have been demonstrated in many cell types. Although large and negatively charged ATP molecules cannot diffuse across the lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane, conductive ATP release from the cytosol into the extracellular space is possible through ATP-permeable channels. Such channels must possess two minimum qualifications for ATP permeation: anion permeability and a large ion-conducting pore. Currently, five groups of channels are acknowledged as ATP-release channels: connexin hemichannels, pannexin 1, calcium homeostasis modulator 1 (CALHM1, volume-regulated anion channels (VRACs, also known as volume-sensitive outwardly rectifying (VSOR anion channels, and maxi-anion channels (MACs. Recently, major breakthroughs have been made in the field by molecular identification of CALHM1 as the action potential-dependent ATP-release channel in taste bud cells, LRRC8s as components of VRACs, and SLCO2A1 as a core subunit of MACs. Here, the function and physiological roles of these five groups of ATP-release channels are summarized, along with a discussion on the future implications of understanding these channels.

  2. Design of a long-term antipsychotic in situ forming implant and its release control method and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lexi; Wang, Aiping; Zhao, Xiaolei; Liu, Ximing; Wang, Dan; Sun, Fengying; Li, Youxin

    2012-05-10

    Two kinds of in situ forming implants (ISFIs) of atypical antipsychotics, risperidone and its 9-hydroxy active metabolite, paliperidone, using poly(lactide-co-glycolide)(PLGA) as carrier, were investigated. Significant difference was observed in the solution-gel transition mechanism of the two systems: homogeneous system of N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) ISFI, in which drug was dissolved, and heterogeneous system of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) ISFI, in which drug was dispersed. Fast solvent extractions were found in both systems, but in comparison with the high drug release rate from homogeneous system of drug/polymer/NMP, a fast solvent extraction from the heterogeneous system of drug/polymer/DMSO was not accompanied by a high drug release rate but a rapid solidification of the implant, which resulted in a high drug retention, well-controlled initial burst and slow release of the drug. In vivo study on beagle dogs showed a more than 3-week sustained release with limited initial burst. Pharmacologic evaluation on optimized paliperidone ISFIs presented a sustained-suppressing effect from 1 day to 38 day on the MK-801 induced schizophrenic behavior mice model. A long sustained-release antipsychotic ISFI of 50% drug loading and controlled burst release was achieved, which indicated a good potential in clinic application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Mechanism for release of arachidonic acid during guinea pig platelet aggregation: a role for the diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor RHC 80267

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin, D.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism of the release of arachidonic acid from phospholipids after the stimulation of guinea pig platelets with collagen, thrombin and platelet activating factor (PAF) was studied. RHC 80267, a diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor, and indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, were used. Various in vitro assays for enzymes involved in arachidonic acid release and metabolism were conducted. Platelet aggregation and simultaneous release of ADP from platelets were monitored using a Chrono-log Lumiaggregometer. Platelets were labeled with ( 14 C)arachidonic acid to facilitate sensitive determination of small changes in platelet phospholipids during platelet aggregation. In the present investigation it is shown that collagen, thrombin and PAF increased phospholipase C activity. It was also discovered that cyclooxygenase products were responsible for further stimulation (a positive feed-back) of phospholipase C activity, while diacylglycerol provided a negative feed-back control over receptor-stimulated phospholipase C activity and inhibited ADP release. The guinea pig platelet is an ideal model to study phospholipase C-diacylglycerol lipase pathway for the release of arachidonic acid from platelet phospholipids because it does not have any phospholipase A 2 activity. It was observed that cyclooxygenase products were responsible for collagen-induced guinea pig platelet aggregation. Indomethacin completely inhibited collagen-induced platelet aggregation, was less effective against thrombin, and had no effect on PAF-induced platelet aggregation. On the other hand, RHC 80267 was a powerful inhibitor of aggregation and ADP release induced by all three of these potent aggregating agents

  4. Mechanical properties and ion release from bioactive restorative composites containing glass fillers and calcium phosphate nano-structured particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiari, Marina D S; Rodrigues, Marcela C; Xavier, Tathy A; de Souza, Eugen M N; Arana-Chavez, Victor E; Braga, Roberto R

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the effect of the replacement of barium glass by dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) particles on the mechanical properties and degree of conversion (DC) of composites. Additionally, calcium and hydrogen phosphate (HPO4(2-)) release were followed for 28 days. Nine composites containing equal parts (in mols) of BisGMA and TEGDMA and 40, 50 or 60 vol% of total filler were manipulated. Filler phase was constituted by silanated barium glass and 0%, 10% or 20% of DCPD particles. DC was determined by near-FTIR. Biaxial flexural strength (BFS) and modulus (E) were tested using the "piston on three balls" method, while fracture toughness (KIc) used the "single edge notched beam" method. Specimens were tested after 24h and 28 days in water. Ion release was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Data were analyzed by ANOVA/Tukey (DC and ion release) or Kruskal-Wallis/Mann-Whitney (mechanical properties; alpha: 5%). DC was not affected by DCPD. The presence of DCPD reduced BFS for both storage times, while differences in E became evident after 28 days. After 24h, KIc increased with the addition of DCPD; after 28 days, however, KIc decreased only for DCPD-containing composites. Calcium release was similar for both DCPD contents and remained fairly constant during the 28-day period. Overall, HPO4(2-) release was higher at 7 days and did not decrease after 14 days. The composite with the highest filler level and 10% DCPD represented the best compromise between mechanical properties after aging in water and ion release. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Nanocarriers for DNA Vaccines: Co-Delivery of TLR-9 and NLR-2 Ligands Leads to Synergistic Enhancement of Proinflammatory Cytokine Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Poecheim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Adjuvants enhance immunogenicity of vaccines through either targeted antigen delivery or stimulation of immune receptors. Three cationic nanoparticle formulations were evaluated for their potential as carriers for a DNA vaccine, and muramyl dipeptide (MDP as immunostimulatory agent, to induce and increase immunogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen encoding plasmid DNA (pDNA. The formulations included (1 trimethyl chitosan (TMC nanoparticles, (2 a squalene-in-water nanoemulsion, and (3 a mineral oil-in-water nanoemulsion. The adjuvant effect of the pDNA-nanocomplexes was evaluated by serum antibody analysis in immunized mice. All three carriers display a strong adjuvant effect, however, only TMC nanoparticles were capable to bias immune responses towards Th1. pDNA naturally contains immunostimulatory unmethylated CpG motifs that are recognized by Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR-9. In mechanistic in vitro studies, activation of TLR-9 and the ability to enhance immunogenicity by simultaneously targeting TLR-9 and NOD-like receptor 2 (NLR-2 was determined by proinflammatory cytokine release in RAW264.7 macrophages. pDNA in combination with MDP was shown to significantly increase proinflammatory cytokine release in a synergistic manner, dependent on NLR-2 activation. In summary, novel pDNA-Ag85A loaded nanoparticle formulations, which induce antigen specific immune responses in mice were developed, taking advantage of the synergistic combinations of TLR and NLR agonists to increase the adjuvanticity of the carriers used.

  6. Mechanism of aminopyridine-induced release of [3H]dopamine from rat brain synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, H W; Lavoie, P A

    1991-01-01

    1. Aminopyridines (APs) induced the release of [3H]dopamine (3H-DA) from rat synaptosomal preparations. 2. 4-AP and 3,4-DAP were of equal efficacy in inducing release of 3H-DA; 3-AP, 2-AP and 2,6-AP were less active; pyridine and pyridine-4-carboxylamide were inactive. 3. Cd2+ was more effective in inhibiting 4-AP-induced release of 3H-DA (IC50 approximately 4 microM) than Co2+ and Ni2+ (IC50s approximately 500 microM). 4. While 4-AP increased the 45Ca2+ content of whole synaptosomal preparations, no effect of 4-AP on 45Ca2+ content was observed in lysed synaptosomal preparations. 5. 4-AP-induced 45Ca2+ uptake was inhibited by Cd2+, Ni2+ and Co2+ in concentration ranges similar to those inhibiting 3H-DA release.

  7. Mechanism of palytoxin-induced [3H]norepinephrine release from a rat pheochromocytoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsumi, M.; Takahashi, M.; Ohizumi, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Palytoxin, isolated from the zoanthid Palytoha species, is one of the most potent marine toxins. Palytoxin caused a release of [ 3 H]norepinephrine from clonal rat pheochromocytoma cells in a concentration-dependent manner. This releasing action of palytoxin was markedly inhibited or abolished by Co 2+ or Ca 2+ -free medium, but was not modified by tetrodotoxin. The release of [ 3 H]norepinephrine induced by a low concentration of palytoxin was abolished in sodium-free medium and increased as the external Na+ concentrations were increased, but the release induced by a high concentration was unaffected by varying the concentration of external Na + . The release of [ 3 H]norepinephrine induced by both concentrations of palytoxin increased with increasing Ca 2+ concentrations. Palytoxin caused a concentration-dependent increase in 22 Na and 45 Ca influxes into pheochromocytoma cells. The palytoxin-induced 45 Ca influx was markedly inhibited by Co 2+ , whereas the palytoxin-induced 22 Na influx was not affected by tetrodotoxin. These results suggest that in pheochromocytoma cells the [ 3 H]norepinephrine release induced by lower concentrations of palytoxin is primarily brought about by increasing tetrodotoxin-insensitive Na + permeability across the cell membrane, whereas that induced by higher concentrations is mainly caused by a direct increase in Ca 2+ influx into them

  8. Evidence for ligand and/or receptor-specific mechanisms of internalization and processing in cultured H35 hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, R.I.; Smith, R.M.; Jarett, L.

    1987-01-01

    Total cell associated (TC) and intracellularly accumulated (IC) 125 I-labeled insulin (INS) or α-2-macroglobulin (α2M) were assessed in cultured H35 hepatoma cells which were preincubated with various agents. Cytochalasin D or sodium azide, which affect microfilament- or energy-dependent receptor internalization, had no significant effects on INS TC or IC but each decreased α2M TC and IC to 50-75% of control. Monensin and chloroquine, acidotrophic agents, each increased INS TC and IC to 150-300% of control yet decreased TC and IC of α2M to 20-50% of control. Only leupeptin, a lysosomal protease inhibitor, caused an increase in both INS and α2M TC and IC. These data suggest significant differences exist in the biochemical regulation or structural routes of INS and α2M receptors and/or receptor-ligand complexes in their (1) internalization, (2) processing in acidic organelles, (3) recycling to the cell surface or in combinations of the above. Biochemical and ultrastructural studies are being performed on the H35 hepatoma cell which will characterize the processing of INS and α2M receptors and provide an explanation for the differences observed

  9. Ionic and Polyampholyte N-Isopropylacrylamide-Based Hydrogels Prepared in the Presence of Imprinting Ligands: Stimuli-Responsiveness and Adsorption/Release Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Alvarez-Lorenzo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The conformation of the imprinted pockets in stimulus-responsive networks can be notably altered when the stimulus causes a volume phase transition. Such a tunable affinity for the template molecule finds interesting applications in the biomedical and drug delivery fields. Nevertheless, the effect that the binding of the template causes on the stimuli-responsiveness of the network has barely been evaluated. In this work, the effect of two ionic drugs used as templates, namely propranolol hydrochloride and ibuprofen sodium, on the responsiveness of N-isopropylacrylamide-based hydrogels copolymerized with acrylic acid (AAc and N-(3-aminopropyl methacrylamide (APMA and on their ability to rebind and to control the release of the template was evaluated. The degree of swelling and, in some cases, energetics (HS-DSC of the transitions were monitored as a function of temperature, pH, and concentration of drug. Marked decrease in the transition temperature of the hydrogels, accompanied by notable changes in the transition width, was observed in physiological NaCl solutions and after the binding of the drug molecules, which reveals relevant changes in the domain structure of the hydrogels as the charged groups are shielded. The ability of the hydrogels to rebind propranolol or ibuprofen was quantified at both 4 and 37 °C and at two different drug concentrations, in the range of those that cause major changes in the network structure. Noticeable differences between hydrogels bearing AAc or APMA and between imprinted and non-imprinted networks were also observed during the release tests in NaCl solutions of various concentrations. Overall, the results obtained evidence the remarkable effect of the template molecules on the responsiveness of intelligent imprinted hydrogels.

  10. Microstructure, mechanical property and metal release of As-SLM CoCrW alloy under different solution treatment conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yanjin; Wu, Songquan; Gan, Yiliang; Zhang, Shuyuan; Guo, Sai; Lin, Junjie; Lin, Jinxin

    2015-03-01

    In the study, the microstructure, mechanical property and metal release behavior of selective laser melted CoCrW alloys under different solution treatment conditions were systemically investigated to assess their potential use in orthopedic implants. The effects of the solution treatment on the microstructure, mechanical properties and metal release were systematically studied by OM, SEM, XRD, tensile test, and ICP-AES, respectively. The XRD indicated that during the solution treatment the alloy underwent the transformation of γ-fcc to ε-hcp phase; the ε-hcp phase nearly dominated in the alloy when treated at 1200°C following the water quenching; the results from OM, SEM showed that the microstructural change was occurred under different solution treatments; solution at 1150°C with furnace cooling contributed to the formation of larger precipitates at the grain boundary regions, while the size and number of the precipitates was decreased as heated above 1100°C with the water quenching; moreover, the diamond-like structure was invisible at higher solution temperature over 1150°C following water quenching; compared with the furnace cooling, the alloy quenched by water showed excellent mechanical properties and low amount of metal release; as the alloy heated at 1200°C, the mechanical properties of the alloy reached their optimum combination at UTS=1113.6MPa, 0.2%YS=639.5MPa, and E%=20.1%, whilst showed the lower total quantity of metal release. It is suggested that a proper solution treatment is an efficient strategy for improving the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of As-SLM CoCrW alloy that show acceptable tensile ductility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Mechanical properties and modeling of drug release from chlorhexidine-containing etch-and-rinse adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislawczuk, Rodrigo; Reis, Alessandra; Malaquias, Pamela; Pereira, Fabiane; Farago, Paulo Vitor; Meier, Marcia Margarete; Loguercio, Alessandro D

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of chlorhexidine (CHX) addition in different concentrations into simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives on the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), water sorption (WS), solubility (SO) and the rate of CHX release over time. We added CHX diacetate to Ambar [AM] (FGM) and XP Bond [XP] (Dentsply) in concentrations of 0, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1 and 0.2 wt%. For UTS (n=10 for each group), adhesive specimens were constructed in an hourglass shape metallic matrix with cross-sectional area of 0.8 mm(2). Half of specimens were tested after 24 h and the other half after 28 days of water storage in tension of 0.5 mm/min. For WS and SO (n=10 for each group), adhesive discs (5.8 mm×1.0 mm) were prepared into a mold. After desiccation, we weighed and stored the cured adhesive specimens in distilled water for evaluation of the WS, SO and the cumulative release of CHX over a 28-day period. For CHX release (n=10 for each group), spectrophotometric measurements of storage solution were performed to examine the release kinetics of CHX. We subjected data from each test to ANOVA and Tukey' test (α=0.05). XP Bond adhesive showed significantly more WS and SO and lower UTS than Ambar. In general, the addition of CHX did not alter WS, SO and UTS of the adhesives. XP showed a higher CHX release than AM (p<0.05) in all concentrations and the final amount of CHX release was directly proportional to the initial CHX concentration added to the adhesives. After 28 days of water storage, approximately 20% of CHX was released from XP and 8.0-12.0% from AM. Addition of CHX to commercial adhesive is a feasible method to provide a controlled release of CHX over time without jeopardizing WS, SO and UTS of the adhesives. Manufacturers should consider adding CHX to commercial adhesives to provide a controlled release of CHX over time. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of the capping ligands, linkers and oxide surface on the electron injection mechanism of copper sulfide quantum dot-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, Javier Amaya; Plata, Jose J; Márquez, Antonio M; Sanz, Javier Fdez

    2017-06-07

    Quantum dot-sensitized solar cells, QDSCs, are a clean and effective alternative to fossil fuels to reduce CO 2 emissions. However, the different components that constitute the QDSCs and the difficulty of isolating experimentally their effects on the performance of the whole system slow down the development of more efficient devices. In this work, DFT calculations are combined with a bottom-up approach to differentiate the effect of each component on the electronic structure and absorption spectra. First, Cu 2 S QDs were built including a U parameter to effectively describe the localization of electrons. The effect of capping agents is addressed using ligands with different electron-donating/withdrawing groups. The role of linkers and their adsorption on the oxide surface are also examined. Finally, we propose a main indirect electron injection mechanism based on the position of the peaks of the spectra.

  13. Distinct Dasatinib-Induced Mechanisms of Apoptotic Response and Exosome Release in Imatinib-Resistant Human Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Liu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although dasatinib is effective in most imatinib mesylate (IMT-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients, the underlying mechanism of its effectiveness in eliminating imatinib-resistant cells is only partially understood. This study investigated the effects of dasatinib on signaling mechanisms driving-resistance in imatinib-resistant CML cell line K562 (K562RIMT. Compared with K562 control cells, exsomal release, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt/ mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling and autophagic activity were increased significantly in K562RIMT cells and mTOR-independent beclin-1/Vps34 signaling was shown to be involved in exosomal release in these cells. We found that Notch1 activation-mediated reduction of phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN was responsible for the increased Akt/mTOR activities in K562RIMT cells and treatment with Notch1 γ-secretase inhibitor prevented activation of Akt/mTOR. In addition, suppression of mTOR activity by rapamycin decreased the level of activity of p70S6K, induced upregulation of p53 and caspase 3, and led to increase of apoptosis in K562RIMT cells. Inhibition of autophagy by spautin-1 or beclin-1 knockdown decreased exosomal release, but did not affect apoptosis in K562RIMT cells. In summary, in K562RIMT cells dasatinib promoted apoptosis through downregulation of Akt/mTOR activities, while preventing exosomal release and inhibiting autophagy by downregulating expression of beclin-1 and Vps34. Our findings reveal distinct dasatinib-induced mechanisms of apoptotic response and exosomal release in imatinib-resistant CML cells.

  14. MECHANISMS CONTROLLING Ca ION RELEASE FROM SOL-GEL DERIVED IN SITU APATITE-SILICA NANOCOMPOSITE POWDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohsen Latifi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Ca ion release from bioactive biomaterials could play an important role in their bioactivity and osteoconductivity properties. In order to improve hydroxyapatite (HA dissolution rate, in situ apatite-silica nanocomposite powders with various silica contents were synthesized via sol-gel method and mechanisms controlling the Ca ion release from them were investigated. Obtained powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD and transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM techniques, acid dissolution test, and spectroscopy by atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS. Results indicated the possible incorporation of (SiO44- into the HA structure and tendency of amorphous silica to cover the surface of HA particles. However, 20 wt. % silica was the lowest amount that fully covered HA particles. All of the nanocomposite powders showed more Ca ion release compared with pure HA, and HA - 10 wt. % silica had the highest Ca ion release. The crystallinity, the crystallite size, and the content of HA, along with the integrity, thickness, and ion diffusion possibility through the amorphous silica layer on the surface of HA, were factors that varied due to changes in the silica content and were affected the Ca ion release from nanocomposite powders.

  15. A lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived soluble protein, p40, stimulates ligand release from intestinal epithelial cells to transactivate epidermal growth factor receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-derived soluble protein, ameliorates intestinal injury and colitis, reduces apoptosis and preserves barrier function by activation of EGF receptor (EGFR) in intestinal epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanisms by which p40...

  16. Mechanism of S100b release from rat cortical slices determined under basal and stimulated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsoy, Murat; Büyükuysal, R Levent

    2010-03-01

    Incubation of rat cortical slices in a medium that was not containing oxygen and glucose (oxygen-glucose deprivation, OGD) caused a 200% increase in the release of S100B. However, when slices were transferred to a medium containing oxygen and glucose (reoxygenation conditions, or REO), S100B release reached 500% of its control value. Neither inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthase by L-NAME nor addition of the NO donors sodium nitroprussid (SNP) or hydroxylamine (HA) to the medium altered basal S100B release. Similarly, the presence of SNP, HA or NO precursor L: -arginine in the medium, or inhibition of NO synthase by L-NAME also failed to alter OGD- and REO-induced S100B outputs. Moreover, individual inhibition of PKC, PLA(2) or PLC all failed to attenuate the S100B release determined under control condition or enhanced by either OGD or REO. Blockade of calcium channels with verapamil, chelating the Ca(+2) ions with BAPTA or blockade of sodium channels with tetrodotoxin (TTX) did not alter OGD- and REO-induced S100B release. In contrast to the pharmacologic manipulations mentioned above, glutamate and alpha-ketoglutarate added at high concentrations to the medium prevented both OGD- and REO-induced S100B outputs. These results indicate that neither NO nor the activation of PKC, PLA(2) or PLC seem to be involved in basal or OGD- and REO-induced S100B outputs. Additionally, calcium and sodium currents that are sensitive to verapamil and TTX, respectively, are unlikely to contribute to the enhanced S100B release observed under these conditions.

  17. Physical mechanisms contributing to the episodic gas release from Hanford tank 241-SY-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allemann, R.T.

    1992-04-01

    Volume growth of contents in a waste storage tank at Hanford is accompanied by episodic releases of gas and a rise in the level of tank contents. A theory is presented to describe how the gas is retained in the waste and how it is released. The theory postulates that somewhat cohesive gobs of sludge rise from the lower regions of the tank and buoyancy overcomes the cohesive strength of the slurry; this quantitatively explains several of the measured phenomena and qualitatively explains other observations

  18. Updated questions and research on mechanisms which control release in nuclear power plants. Solubility or other effects?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinard, L.; Noel, D.; Kerrec, O.

    1997-01-01

    There are many computer codes, based on mass transfer in the liquid phase, which have been developed to help in predicting emission and transport of corrosion products. Their limit for the release is discussed and, through two new studies, it is investigated how new mechanisms can be taken into account. Models based on the transfer of electronic or ionic charges in the solid phase should be developed. (K.A.)

  19. Updated questions and research on mechanisms which control release in nuclear power plants. Solubility or other effects?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guinard, L.; Noel, D.; Kerrec, O.

    1997-01-01

    There are many computer codes, based on mass transfer in the liquid phase, which have been developed to help in predicting emission and transport of corrosion products. Their limit for the release is discussed and, through two new studies, it is investigated how new mechanisms can be taken into account. Models based on the transfer of electronic or ionic charges in the solid phase should be developed. (K.A.). 29 refs.

  20. Mechanisms of inhibition of vasopressin release during moderate antiorthostatic posture change in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pump, B.; Gabrielsen, A.; Christensen, N.J.

    1999-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that the carotid baroreceptor stimulation caused by a posture change from upright seated with legs horizontal (Seat) to supine (Sup) participates in the suppression of arginine vasopressin (AVP) release. Ten healthy males underwent this posture change for 30 min without...... decreased from 0.9 +/- 0.2 to 0.5 +/- 0.1 pg/ml (P posture...

  1. Therapeutic ion-releasing bioactive glass ionomer cements with improved mechanical strength and radiopacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian eFuchs

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioactive glasses (BG are used to regenerate bone, as they degrade and release therapeutic ions. Glass ionomer cements (GIC are used in dentistry, can be delivered by injection and set in situ by a reaction between an acid-degradable glass and a polymeric acid. Our aim was to combine the advantages of BG and GIC, and we investigated the use of alkali-free BG (SiO2-CaO-CaF2-MgO with 0 to 50% of calcium replaced by strontium, as the beneficial effects of strontium on bone formation are well documented. When mixing BG and poly(vinyl phosphonic-co-acrylic acid, ions were released fast (up to 90% within 15 minutes at pH 1, which resulted in GIC setting, as followed by infrared spectroscopy. GIC mixed well and set to hard cements (compressive strength up to 35 MPa, staying hard when in contact with aqueous solution. This is in contrast to GIC prepared with poly(acrylic acid, which were shown previously to become soft in contact with water. Strontium release from GIC increased linearly with strontium for calcium substitution, allowing for tailoring of strontium release depending on clinical requirements. Furthermore, strontium substitution increased GIC radiopacity. GIC passed ISO10993 cytotoxicity test, making them promising candidates for use as injectable bone cements.

  2. Vitamin D receptor: key roles in bone mineral pathophysiology, molecular mechanism of action, and novel nutritional ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurutka, Peter W; Bartik, Leonid; Whitfield, G Kerr; Mathern, Douglas R; Barthel, Thomas K; Gurevich, Miriam; Hsieh, Jui-Cheng; Kaczmarska, Magdalena; Haussler, Carol A; Haussler, Mark R

    2007-12-01

    The vitamin D hormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1,25(OH)(2)D(3)], binds with high affinity to the nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR), which recruits its retinoid X receptor (RXR) heterodimeric partner to recognize vitamin D responsive elements (VDREs) in target genes. 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) is known primarily as a regulator of calcium, but it also controls phosphate (re)absorption at the intestine and kidney. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a phosphaturic hormone produced in osteoblasts that, like PTH, lowers serum phosphate by inhibiting renal reabsorption through Npt2a/Npt2c. Real-time PCR and reporter gene transfection assays were used to probe VDR-mediated transcriptional control by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3). Reporter gene and mammalian two-hybrid transfections, plus competitive receptor binding assays, were used to discover novel VDR ligands. 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) induces FGF23 78-fold in osteoblasts, and because FGF23 in turn represses 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) synthesis, a reciprocal relationship is established, with FGF23 indirectly curtailing 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)-mediated intestinal absorption and counterbalancing renal reabsorption of phosphate, thereby reversing hyperphosphatemia and preventing ectopic calcification. Therefore, a 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)-FGF23 axis regulating phosphate is comparable in importance to the 1,25(OH)(2)D(3)-PTH axis that regulates calcium. 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) also elicits regulation of LRP5, Runx2, PHEX, TRPV6, and Npt2c, all anabolic toward bone, and RANKL, which is catabolic. Regulation of mouse RANKL by 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) supports a cloverleaf model, whereby VDR-RXR heterodimers bound to multiple VDREs are juxtapositioned through chromatin looping to form a supercomplex, potentially allowing simultaneous interactions with multiple co-modulators and chromatin remodeling enzymes. VDR also selectively binds certain omega3/omega6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) with low affinity, leading to transcriptionally active VDR-RXR complexes. Moreover, the turmeric

  3. Review: Regulatory mechanisms of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH synthesis and release in photoperiodic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyoshi eTsutsui

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH is a novel hypothalamic neuropeptide that was discovered in quail as an inhibitory factor for gonadotropin release. GnIH inhibits gonadotropin synthesis and release in birds through actions on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons and gonadotropes, mediated via the GnIH receptor (GnIH-R, GPR147. Subsequently, GnIH was identified in mammals and other vertebrates. As in birds, mammalian GnIH inhibits gonadotropin secretion, indicating a conserved role for this neuropeptide in the control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis across species. Identification of the regulatory mechanisms governing GnIH expression and release is important in understanding the physiological role of the GnIH system. A nocturnal hormone, melatonin, appears to act directly on GnIH neurons through its receptor to induce expression and release of GnIH in quail, a photoperiodic bird. Recently, a similar, but opposite, action of melatonin on the inhibition of expression of mammalian GnIH was shown in hamsters and sheep, photoperiodic mammals. These results in photoperiodic animals demonstrate that GnIH expression is photoperiodically modulated via a melatonin-dependent process. Recent findings indicate that GnIH may be a mediator of stress-induced reproductive disruption in birds and mammals, pointing to a broad role for this neuropeptide in assessing physiological state and modifying reproductive effort accordingly. This paper summarizes the advances made in our knowledge regarding the regulation of GnIH synthesis and release in photoperiodic birds and mammals. This paper also discusses the neuroendocrine integration of environmental signals, such as photoperiods and stress, and internal signals, such as GnIH, melatonin and glucocorticoids, to control avian and mammalian reproduction.

  4. Early application of airway pressure release ventilation may reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongfang; Jin, Xiaodong; Lv, Yinxia; Wang, Peng; Yang, Yunqing; Liang, Guopeng; Wang, Bo; Kang, Yan

    2017-11-01

    Experimental animal models of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have shown that the updated airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) methodologies may significantly improve oxygenation, maximize lung recruitment, and attenuate lung injury, without circulatory depression. This led us to hypothesize that early application of APRV in patients with ARDS would allow pulmonary function to recover faster and would reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation as compared with low tidal volume lung protective ventilation (LTV). A total of 138 patients with ARDS who received mechanical ventilation for mechanical ventilation from enrollment to day 28. The secondary endpoints included oxygenation, P plat , respiratory system compliance, and patient outcomes. Compared with the LTV group, patients in the APRV group had a higher median number of ventilator-free days {19 [interquartile range (IQR) 8-22] vs. 2 (IQR 0-15); P mechanical ventilation and ICU stay.

  5. Free energies of binding from large-scale first-principles quantum mechanical calculations: application to ligand hydration energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Stephen J; Pittock, Chris; Tautermann, Christofer S; Fox, Thomas; Christ, Clara; Malcolm, N O J; Essex, Jonathan W; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2013-08-15

    Schemes of increasing sophistication for obtaining free energies of binding have been developed over the years, where configurational sampling is used to include the all-important entropic contributions to the free energies. However, the quality of the results will also depend on the accuracy with which the intermolecular interactions are computed at each molecular configuration. In this context, the energy change associated with the rearrangement of electrons (electronic polarization and charge transfer) upon binding is a very important effect. Classical molecular mechanics force fields do not take this effect into account explicitly, and polarizable force fields and semiempirical quantum or hybrid quantum-classical (QM/MM) calculations are increasingly employed (at higher computational cost) to compute intermolecular interactions in free-energy schemes. In this work, we investigate the use of large-scale quantum mechanical calculations from first-principles as a way of fully taking into account electronic effects in free-energy calculations. We employ a one-step free-energy perturbation (FEP) scheme from a molecular mechanical (MM) potential to a quantum mechanical (QM) potential as a correction to thermodynamic integration calculations within the MM potential. We use this approach to calculate relative free energies of hydration of small aromatic molecules. Our quantum calculations are performed on multiple configurations from classical molecular dynamics simulations. The quantum energy of each configuration is obtained from density functional theory calculations with a near-complete psinc basis set on over 600 atoms using the ONETEP program.

  6. Synthetic Polymer Affinity Ligand for Bacillus thuringiensis ( Bt) Cry1Ab/Ac Protein: The Use of Biomimicry Based on the Bt Protein-Insect Receptor Binding Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingming; Huang, Rong; Weisman, Adam; Yu, Xiaoyang; Lee, Shih-Hui; Chen, Yalu; Huang, Chao; Hu, Senhua; Chen, Xiuhua; Tan, Wenfeng; Liu, Fan; Chen, Hao; Shea, Kenneth J

    2018-05-24

    We report a novel strategy for creating abiotic Bacillus thuringiensis ( Bt) protein affinity ligands by biomimicry of the recognition process that takes place between Bt Cry1Ab/Ac proteins and insect receptor cadherin-like Bt-R 1 proteins. Guided by this strategy, a library of synthetic polymer nanoparticles (NPs) was prepared and screened for binding to three epitopes 280 FRGSAQGIEGS 290 , 368 RRPFNIGINNQQ 379 and 436 FRSGFSNSSVSIIR 449 located in loop α8, loop 2 and loop 3 of domain II of Bt Cry1Ab/Ac proteins. A negatively charged and hydrophilic nanoparticle (NP12) was found to have high affinity to one of the epitopes, 368 RRPFNIGINNQQ 379 . This same NP also had specific binding ability to both Bt Cry1Ab and Bt Cry1Ac, proteins that share the same epitope, but very low affinity to Bt Cry2A, Bt Cry1C and Bt Cry1F closely related proteins that lack epitope homology. To locate possible NP- Bt Cry1Ab/Ac interaction sites, NP12 was used as a competitive inhibitor to block the binding of 865 NITIHITDTNNK 876 , a specific recognition site in insect receptor Bt-R 1 , to 368 RRPFNIGINNQQ 379 . The inhibition by NP12 reached as high as 84%, indicating that NP12 binds to Bt Cry1Ab/Ac proteins mainly via 368 RRPFNIGINNQQ 379 . This epitope region was then utilized as a "target" or "bait" for the separation and concentration of Bt Cry1Ac protein from the extract of transgenic Bt cotton leaves by NP12. This strategy, based on the antigen-receptor recognition mechanism, can be extended to other biotoxins and pathogen proteins when designing biomimic alternatives to natural protein affinity ligands.

  7. STUDIES ON TUBERCULIN FEVER. 3. MECHANISMS INVOLVED IN THE RELEASE OF ENDOGENOUS PYROGEN IN VITRO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATKINS, E; HEIJN, C

    1965-08-01

    In a search for the source of the circulating endogenous pyrogen (EP) that mediates tuberculin-induced fever, tuberculin was incubated in vitro with various tissues of rabbits sensitized by intravenous infection with BCG. Evidence was obtained that tuberculin specifically stimulates cells in the blood of sensitized rabbits to generate pyrogen in vitro, whereas both lymph node and spleen cells from the same donors were inactive. Since normal blood cells, incubated in plasma of sensitized donors, were similarly activated, it is postulated that circulating antibodies play a role in sensitizing cells (presumably granulocytes) to release pyrogen on contact with tuberculin) both in vitro and in vivo. Release of endogenous pyrogen in vitro may be a sensitive means of detecting immunologic reactions between antigen and specifically sensitized blood cells-in other allergic states accompanied by fever.

  8. Strontium and cesium release mechanisms during unsaturated flow through waste-weathered Hanford sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hyun-Shik; Um, Wooyong; Rod, Kenton A.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Thompson, Aaron; Perdrial, Nicolas; Steefel, Carl I.; Chorover, Jon

    2011-01-01

    Leaching behavior of Sr and Cs in the vadose zone of Hanford site (WA, USA) was studied with laboratory-weathered sediments mimicking realistic conditions beneath the leaking radioactive waste storage tanks. Unsaturated column leaching experiments were conducted using background Hanford pore water focused on first 200 pore volumes. The weathered sediments were prepared by 6 months reaction with a synthetic Hanford tank waste leachate containing Sr and Cs (10-5 and 10-3 molal representative of LO- and HI-sediment, respectively) as surrogates for 90Sr and 137Cs. The mineral composition of the weathered sediments showed that zeolite (chabazite-type) and feldspathoid (sodalite-type) were the major byproducts but different contents depending on the weathering conditions. Reactive transport modeling indicated that Cs leaching was controlled by ion-exchange, while Sr release was affected primarily by dissolution of the secondary minerals. The later release of K, Al, and Si from the HI-column indicated the additional dissolution of a more crystalline mineral (cancrinite-type). A two-site ion-exchange model successfully simulated the Cs release from the LO-column. However, a three-site ion-exchange model was needed for the HI-column. The study implied that the weathering conditions greatly impact the speciation of the secondary minerals and leaching behavior of sequestrated Sr and Cs.

  9. Benzodiazepine receptor ligand influences on learning: an endogenous modulatory mechanism mediated by benzodiazepines possibly of alimentary origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Izquierdo

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available In rats pre-but not post-training ip administration of either flumazenil, a central benzodiazepine (BSD receptor antagonist, or of n-butyl-B-carboline-carboxylate (BCCB, an inverse agonist, enhanced retention of inhibitory avoidance learning. Flumazenil vlocked the enhancing effect of BCCB, and the inhibitory effect of the BZD agonists clonazepam and diazepam also given pre-training. Post-training administration of these drugs had no effects. The peripheral BZD receptor agonist/chloride channel blocker Ro5-4864 had no effect on the inhibitory avoidance task when given ip prior to training, buth it caused enhancement when given immediately post-training either ip or icv. This effect was blocked by PK11195, a competitive antagonist of Ro5-4864. These results suggest that ther is an endogenous mechanism mediated by BZD agonists, which is sensitive to inverse agonists and that normally down-regulates the formation of memories through a mechanism involving GABA-A receptors and the corresponding chloride channels. The most likely agonists for the endogenous mechanism suggested are the diazepam-like BZDs found in brain whose origin is possibly alimentary. Levels of these BZDs in the cortex were found to sharply decrease after inhibitory acoidance training or mere exposure to the training apparatus.

  10. Obesity-stimulated aldosterone release is not related to an S1P-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, Stephan; Müller-Fielitz, Helge; Raasch, Walter

    2017-12-01

    Aldosterone has been identified as an important factor in obesity-associated hypertension. Here, we investigated whether sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), which has previously been linked to obesity, increases aldosterone release. S1P-induced aldosterone release was determined in NCI H295R cells in the presence of S1P receptor (S1PR) antagonists. In vivo release of S1P (100-300 µg/kg bw ) was investigated in pithed, lean Sprague Dawley (SD) rats, diet-obese spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs), as well as in lean or obese Zucker rats. Aldosterone secretion was increased in NCI H295R cells by S1P, the selective S1PR1 agonist SEW2871 and the selective S1PR2 antagonist JTE013. Treatment with the S1PR1 antagonist W146 or fingolimod and the S1PR1/3 antagonist VPbib2319 decreased baseline and/or S1P-stimulated aldosterone release. Compared to saline-treated SD rats, plasma aldosterone increased by ~50 pg/mL after infusing S1P. Baseline levels of S1P and aldosterone were higher in obese than in lean SHRs. Adrenal S1PR expression did not differ between chow- or CD-fed rats that had the highest S1PR1 and lowest S1PR4 levels. S1P induced a short-lasting increase in plasma aldosterone in obese, but not in lean SHRs. However, 2-ANOVA did not demonstrate any difference between lean and obese rats. S1P-induced aldosterone release was also similar between obese and lean Zucker rats. We conclude that S1P is a local regulator of aldosterone production. S1PR1 agonism induces an increase in aldosterone secretion, while stimulating adrenal S1PR2 receptor suppresses aldosterone production. A significant role of S1P in influencing aldosterone secretion in states of obesity seems unlikely. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  11. [Effects of mechanical transplanting of rice with controlled release bulk blending fertilizer on rice yield and soil fertility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuan; Ding, Jun-Shan; Liu, Yan-Ling; Gu, Yan; Han, Ke-Feng; Wu, Liang-Huan

    2014-03-01

    Abstract: A 2-year field experiment with a yellow-clay paddy soil in Zhejiang Province was conducted to study the effects of different planting measures combined with different fertilization practices on rice yield, soil nutrients, microbial biomass C and N and activities of urease, phosphatase, sucrase and hydrogen peroxidase at the maturity stage. Results showed that mechanical transplanting of rice with controlled release bulk blending (BB) fertilizer (BBMT) could achieve a significantly higher mean yield than traditional manual transplanting with traditional fertilizer (TFTM) and direct seeding with controlled release BB fertilizer (BBDS) by 16.3% and 27.0%, respectively. The yield by BBMT was similar to that by traditional manual transplanting with controlled release BB fertilizer (BBTM). Compared with TFTM, BBMT increased the contents of soil total-N, available N, available P and microbial biomass C, and the activities of urease, sucrase and hydrogen peroxidase by 21.5%, 13.6%, 41.2%, 27.1%, 50.0%, 22.5% and 46.2%, respectively. Therefore, BBMT, a simple high-efficiency rice cultivation method with use of a light-weighted mechanical transplanter, should be widely promoted and adopted.

  12. Release of Bacterial Spores from the Inner Walls of a Stainless Steel Cup Subjected to Thermal Stresses and Mechanical Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolochow, H.; Chatigny, M.; Hebert, J.

    1973-01-01

    The release and fallout of particulates from surfaces afforded thermal or impact stress is of concern for control of contamination of Mars from planetary landing vehicles. A metal vessel contaminated by aerosols of spores was used as a model system and the fallout of spores as affected by various mechanisms was examined. Thermal stresses simulating those expected on the Mars lander dislodged approximately .01% of the aerosol deposited surface burden as did a landing shock of 8 to 10G deceleration. Spores imprinted by finger or swab contact yielded similar results. In all cases where repeated cycling of temperature, motion, or shock were employed the majority of fallout occurred in the first cycle. Particles released from the surface were predominantly in the size range 1 to 5 microns.

  13. Effect of Fluoride-Releasing Adhesive Systems on the Mechanical Properties of Eroded Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedes, Ana Paula Albuquerque; Moda, Mariana Dias; Suzuki, Thaís Yumi Umeda; Godas, André Gustavo de Lima; Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Santos, Paulo Henrique dos

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of erosive pH cycling with solutions that simulate dental erosion on Martens hardness (HMV) and elastic modulus (Eit) of dentin restored with fluoride-releasing adhesive systems. Twenty-seven bovine dentin slabs were restored with three adhesive systems: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch adhesive system, One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect fluoride-containing self-etching adhesive systems. The restorations were made with Filtek Z250. The HMV and Eit values at distances of 10, 30, 50 and 70 µm from the interface were evaluated using a dynamic ultra microhardness tester before and after immersion in deionized water, citric acid and hydrochloric acid (n=9). Data were submitted to repeated-measures ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD tests (=0.05). After erosive cycling, HMV values of dentin decreased in all groups. For dentin restored with Adper Single Bond 2, the lowest values were found closer to the hybrid layer, while for One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect, the values remained unaltered at all distances. For dentin restored with fluoride-releasing adhesive systems, a decrease in Eit was found, but after 30 µm this difference was not significant. The acid substances were able to alter HMV and Eit of the underlying dentin. For fluoride-releasing adhesives, the greater the distance from bonded interface, the lower the Eit values. The fluoride in One Up Bond F and Clearfil SE Protect was able to protect the underlying dentin closer to the materials. In this way, the fluoride from adhesive systems could have some positive effect in the early stages of erosive lesions.

  14. Tumor cell-released TLR4 ligands stimulate Gr-1+CD11b+F4/80+ cells to induce apoptosis of activated T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Yan; Sun, Ling-Cong; Wei, Jing-Jing; Li, Dong; Yuan, Ye; Yan, Bin; Liang, Zhi-Hui; Zhu, Hui-Fen; Xu, Yong; Li, Bo; Song, Chuan-Wang; Liao, Sheng-Jun; Lei, Zhang; Zhang, Gui-Mei; Feng, Zuo-Hua

    2010-09-01

    Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells play important roles in tumor development and have a negative effect on tumor immunotherapy. So far, the mechanisms underlying the regulation of their immunosuppressive phenotype by classical and alternative macrophage activation stimuli are not well elucidated. In this study, we found that molecules from necrotic tumor cells (NTC-Ms) stimulated Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells to induce apoptosis of activated T cells but not nonstimulated T cells. The apoptosis-inducing capacity was determined by higher expression levels of arginase I and IL-10 relative to those of NO synthase 2 and IL-12 in Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells, which were induced by NTC-Ms through TLR4 signaling. The apoptosis-inducing capacity of NTC-Ms-stimulated Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells could be enhanced by IL-10. IFN-gamma may reduce the apoptosis-inducing capacity of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells only if their response to IFN-gamma was not attenuated. However, the potential of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells to express IL-12 in response to IFN-gamma could be attenuated by tumor, partially due to the existence of active STAT3 in Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells and NTC-Ms from tumor. In this situation, IFN-gamma could not effectively reduce the apoptosis-inducing capacity of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells. Tumor immunotherapy with 4-1BBL/soluble programmed death-1 may significantly reduce, but not abolish the apoptosis-inducing capacity of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells in local microenvironment. Blockade of TLR4 signaling could further reduce the apoptosis-inducing capacity of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells and enhance the suppressive effect of 4-1BBL/soluble form of programmed death-1 on tumor growth. These findings indicate the relationship of distinct signaling pathways with apoptosis-inducing capacity of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells and emphasize the importance of blocking TLR4 signaling to prevent the induction of T cell apoptosis by Gr-1(+)CD11b(+)F4/80(+) cells.

  15. Insights into the mechanism of ligand binding to octopine dehydrogenase from Pecten maximus by NMR and crystallography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander H J Smits

    Full Text Available Octopine dehydrogenase (OcDH from the adductor muscle of the great scallop, Pecten maximus, catalyzes the NADH dependent, reductive condensation of L-arginine and pyruvate to octopine, NAD(+, and water during escape swimming and/or subsequent recovery. The structure of OcDH was recently solved and a reaction mechanism was proposed which implied an ordered binding of NADH, L-arginine and finally pyruvate. Here, the order of substrate binding as well as the underlying conformational changes were investigated by NMR confirming the model derived from the crystal structures. Furthermore, the crystal structure of the OcDH/NADH/agmatine complex was determined which suggests a key role of the side chain of L-arginine in protein cataylsis. Thus, the order of substrate binding to OcDH as well as the molecular signals involved in octopine formation can now be described in molecular detail.

  16. Haw-glass dissolution and radionuclide release: mechanism - modelling - source term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grambow, B [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fur Nukleare, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    Important release controlling processes are: 1) kinetics of glass matrix dissolution (leaching), 2) formation of secondary alteration products (controlling thermodynamic solubility), 3) sorption on surfaces in the engineered barrier system and 4) formation of mobile species. Quantification of these processes requires assessment of the energetics and dynamics of the various reversible and irreversible processes within an overall open non-equilibrium system. Corrosion/dissolution of the waste matrices is not necessarily associated with a proportional release of radionuclides. The formation of new secondary phases, such as silicates, molybdates, uranates, carbonates... establishes a new geochemical barrier for re-immobilization of radionuclides dissolved from the waste matrices. The presence of iron (corroding canisters during glass alteration) reduces the solution concentration of redox sensitive radionuclides. Consequently, the container, after being corroded, constitutes an important geochemical barrier for radionuclide re-immobilization. Geochemical modelling of the long-term behaviour of glasses must be performed in an integrated way, considering simultaneous reactions of the glass, of container corrosion, of repository rock and of backfill material. Until now, only few attempts were made for integral systems modelling. (A.C.)

  17. Mechanical properties and antibiotic release characteristics of poly(methyl methacrylate)-based bone cement formulated with mesoporous silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letchmanan, Kumaran; Shen, Shou-Cang; Ng, Wai Kiong; Kingshuk, Poddar; Shi, Zhilong; Wang, Wilson; Tan, Reginald B H

    2017-08-01

    The influence of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) loaded with antibiotics on the mechanical properties of functional poly(methyl methacrylate)-(PMMA) based bone cements is investigated. The incorporation of MSNs to the bone cements (8.15wt%) shows no detrimental effects on the biomechanical properties of the freshly solidified bone cements. Importantly, there are no significant changes in the compression strength and bending modulus up to 6 months of aging in PBS buffer solution. The preserved mechanical properties of MSN-functionalized bone cements is attributed to the unchanged microstructures of the cements, as more than 96% of MSNs remains in the bone cement matrix to support the cement structures after 6 months of aging. In addition, the MSN-functionalized bone cements are able to increase the drug release of gentamicin (GTMC) significantly as compared with commercially available antibiotic-loaded bone cements. It can be attributed to the loaded nano-sized MSNs with uniform pore channels which build up an effective nano-network path enable the diffusion and extended release of GTMC. The combination of excellent mechanical properties and sustainable drug delivery efficiency demonstrates the potential applicability of MSN-functionalized PMMA bone cements for orthopedic surgery to prevent post-surgery infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Sorption/Desorption Behavior and Mechanism of NH4(+) by Biochar as a Nitrogen Fertilizer Sustained-Release Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yanxue; Qi, Hejinyan; Liu, Yujia; He, Xiaowei

    2016-06-22

    Biochar, the pyrolysis product of biomass material with limited oxygen, has the potential to increase crop production and sustained-release fertilizer, but the understanding of the reason for improving soil fertility is insufficient, especially the behavior and mechanism of ammonium sulfate. In this study, the sorption/desorption effect of NH4(+) by biochar deriving from common agricultural wastes under different preparation temperatures from 200 to 500 °C was studied and its mechanism was discussed. The results showed that biochar displayed excellent retention ability in holding NH4(+) above 90% after 21 days under 200 °C preparation temperature, and it can be deduced that the oxygen functional groups, such as carboxyl and keto group, played the primary role in adsorbing NH4(+) due to hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interaction. The sorption/desorption effect and mechanism were studied for providing an optional way to dispose of agricultural residues into biochar as a nitrogen fertilizer sustained-release material under suitable preparation temperature.

  19. Kinetics and mechanisms of metal retention/release in geochemical processes in soil. 1997 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    'Remediation of soils polluted with heavy metals is a major challenge facing the nation. This is especially so at many DOE facilities and other superfund sites. In many cases, speciation of the metals is inaccurate and difficult and the mechanisms by which the metals are retained/released in soils over long times are poorly understood. Consequently, the long-term fate of metals in soils cannot be precisely predicted and often, the remediation recommendations and techniques that are employed to clean up soils may be ineffective or unnecessary. Accordingly, the authors are proposing work to generate basic knowledge on the kinetics and mechanism(s) of heavy metal retention/release by soil mineral colloids as affected by inorganic anion. The nature of the interaction of Cd(II), Co(II), Cr(VI), Cu(II), Ni(II) and Pb(II) with pure soil minerals and extracted soil clays will be investigated. The colloids will be characterized in terms of surface area, surface charge and surface site density. They will be used to study the effect(s) of pH, phosphate rate, and temperature on metals retention/release. The experiments will involve using various kinetic and isothermic sorption equations as models to describe the data thus acquired. The spectroscopic methods will involve using extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). The data generated from the proposed study will assist in designing better remediation strategies to effectively clean up toxic heavy metal contaminated soils at DOE facilities and other superfund sites.'

  20. Probing the mechanisms of drug release from amorphous solid dispersions in medium-soluble and medium-insoluble carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dajun D; Lee, Ping I

    2015-08-10

    The objective of the current study is to mechanistically differentiate the dissolution and supersaturation behaviors of amorphous drugs from amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) based on medium-soluble versus medium-insoluble carriers under nonsink dissolution conditions through a direct head-to-head comparison. ASDs of indomethacin (IND) were prepared in several polymers which exhibit different solubility behaviors in acidic (pH1.2) and basic (pH7.4) dissolution media. The selected polymers range from water-soluble (e.g., PVP and Soluplus) and water-insoluble (e.g., ethylcellulose and Eudragit RL PO) to those only soluble in an acidic or basic dissolution medium (e.g., Eudragit E100, Eudragit L100, and HPMCAS). At 20wt.% drug loading, DSC and powder XRD analysis confirmed that the majority of incorporated IND was present in an amorphous state. Our nonsink dissolution results confirm that whether the carrier matrix is medium soluble determines the release mechanism of amorphous drugs from ASD systems which has a direct impact on the rate of supersaturation generation, thus in turn affecting the evolution of supersaturation in amorphous systems. For example, under nonsink dissolution conditions, the release of amorphous IND from medium-soluble carriers is governed by a dissolution-controlled mechanism leading to an initial surge of supersaturation followed by a sharp decline in drug concentration due to rapid nucleation and crystallization. In contrast, the dissolution of IND ASD from medium-insoluble carriers is more gradual as drug release is regulated by a diffusion-controlled mechanism by which drug supersaturation is built up gradually and sustained over an extended period of time without any apparent decline. Since several tested carrier polymers can be switched from soluble to insoluble by simply changing the pH of the dissolution medium, the results obtained here provide unequivocal evidence of the proposed transition of kinetic solubility profiles from the

  1. Releasing method of connection of control rod and its drive mechanism in a reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Kazuo; Futatsugi, Masao.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To disengage a control rod from a control rod drive device in a boiling water reactor with a minimal failure of the device, when connection there between cannot be released in a normal manner. Structure: First, a part of a piston tube in the control rod drive device is withdrawn externally of a control rod housing and cut. Next, a discharge tool, which is designed to be connected with the cut piston tube, is connected to the remainder of the piston tube within the housing and the aforesaid piston tube is pushed into the index tube. The index tube is then cut by the discharge tool. Thus, the control rod drive device and the control rod may be separated. Thereafter, the control rod may be removed from the top of the reactor container whereas the control rod drive device removed from the bottom thereof. (Ikeda, J.)

  2. Mechanism for optimization of signal-to-noise ratio of dopamine release based on short-term bidirectional plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Cunha, Claudio; McKimm, Eric; Da Cunha, Rafael M; Boschen, Suelen L; Redgrave, Peter; Blaha, Charles D

    2017-07-15

    Repeated electrical stimulation of dopamine (dopamine) fibers can cause variable effects on further dopamine release; sometimes there are short-term decreases while in other cases short-term increases have been reported. Previous studies have failed to discover what factors determine in which way dopamine neurons will respond to repeated stimulation. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate what determines the direction and magnitude of this particular form of short-term plasticity. Fixed potential amperometry was used to measure dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens in response to two trains of electrical pulses administered to the ventral tegmental area of anesthetized mice. When the pulse trains were of equal magnitude we found that low magnitude stimulation was associated with short-term suppression and high magnitude stimulation with short-term facilitation of dopamine release. Secondly, we found that the magnitude of the second pulse train was critical for determining the sign of the plasticity (suppression or facilitation), while the magnitude of the first pulse train determined the extent to which the response to the second train was suppressed or facilitated. This form of bidirectional plasticity might provide a mechanism to enhance signal-to-noise ratio of dopamine neurotransmission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Suppressed histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells by ultraviolet B irradiation: decreased diacylglycerol formation as a possible mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danno, K.; Fujii, K.; Tachibana, T.; Toda, K.; Horio, T.

    1988-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation on mast cell functions. Purified mast cells obtained from rat peritoneal cavity were irradiated with UVB and subsequently exposed to a degranulator, compound 48/80, or the calcium ionophore A-23187. The amount of histamine released from mast cells measured by the enzyme isotopic assay was significantly decreased by UVB irradiation (100-400 mJ/cm2). Within this dose range, UVB alone was not cytotoxic to the cells because it did not induce histamine release. The suppression was observed when mast cells were subjected to degranulation without intervals after UVB irradiation, and even after 5 h postirradiation. The wavelength of 300 nm from a monochromatic light source showed the maximum effect. When mast cells prelabeled with [ 3 H]arachidonate were irradiated and challenged by compound 48/80, label accumulation in diacylglycerol produced by the phosphatidylinositol cycle was considerably decreased by UVB irradiation. From these results, we hypothesize that, within an adequate irradiation dose, UVB irradiation suppresses histamine release from mast cells, probably by causing noncytotoxic damage to the membrane phospholipid metabolism, which is tied to the degranulation mechanisms

  4. Nine Different Chemical Species and Action Mechanisms of Pancreatic Lipase Ligands Screened Out from Forsythia suspensa Leaves All at One Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tinggui; Li, Yayun; Zhang, Liwei

    2017-05-12

    It is difficult to screen out as many active components as possible from natural plants all at one time. In this study, subfractions of Forsythia suspensa leaves were firstly prepared; then, their inhibitive abilities on pancreatic lipase were tested; finally, the highest inhibiting subfraction was screened by self-made immobilized pancreatic lipase. Results showed that nine ligands, including eight inhibitors and one promotor, were screened out all at one time. They were three flavonoids (rutin, IC 50 : 149 ± 6.0 μmol/L; hesperidin, 52.4 μmol/L; kaempferol-3- O -rutinoside, isolated from F. suspensa leaves for the first time, IC 50 notably reached 2.9 ± 0.5 μmol/L), two polyphenols (chlorogenic acid, 3150 ± 120 μmol/L; caffeic acid, 1394 ± 52 μmol/L), two lignans (phillyrin, promoter; arctigenin, 2129 ± 10.5 μmol/L), and two phenethyl alcohol (forsythiaside A, 2155 ± 8.5 μmol/L; its isomer). Their action mechanisms included competitive inhibition, competitive promotion, noncompetitive inhibition, and uncompetitive inhibition. In sum, using the appropriate methods, more active ingredients can be simply and quickly screened out all at one time from a complex natural product system. In addition, F. suspensa leaves contain numerous inhibitors of pancreatic lipase.

  5. Investigation on Releasing of a Stuck Drill String by Means of a Mechanical Jar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisyshyn V.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In this article the most important part is dedicated to the research of elimination of accident that is caused by drill string sticking during the process. That is why it is necessary to develop a mathematical model of the mechanic system: travelling system + drill string + mechanical jar + rock, to develop a computer model for numerical calculation of dynamic characteristics of firing gear. The aim is to use the results of the research and to work out recommendations for expediency of jar application. Methods. For description of the drill string we are using synthesis of the wave theory and theory of the local distortions. For mathematical modeling of firing device we are offering the use of the combined method that combines static solutions of the theory of elasticity for contact zone of drill string and method of a plain wave of Saint-Venant. We solved systems of differential equations using the methods of mathematical physics. An algorithm of the numerical decision which mounted in the computing environment were used at simulation of the longitudinal impact to the stuck drill pipe. In this article we designed a wave chart of the equation system of the drill pipe and conducted step-by-step calculation of a collision momentum. We also designed a computer program for numerical modeling of the drill pipe mechanism with firing gear. We also designed a method of calculation of main dynamic characteristics of firing device that will help analyze and prove the performance of the mechanical jar. A wave diagram was built that shows the impact forces and speeds on the boundary surfaces of the sections of the drill string. There were calculated main dynamic characteristic of mechanical the jar. Originality. Authors also developed a dynamic mathematical model that combined elastic vibrations of continual system of loose part drill pipe, impact mechanisms and discrete movements of a given drill pipe. The process of a mechanical jar

  6. Estradiol induces dendritic spines by enhancing glutamate release independent of transcription: A mechanism for organizational sex differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Jaclyn M.; Liang, Shu-Ling; Thompson, Scott M.; McCarthy, Margaret M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The naturally occurring sex difference in dendritic spine number on hypothalamic neurons offers a unique opportunity to investigate mechanisms establishing synaptic patterning during perinatal sensitive periods. A major advantage of the model is the ability to treat neonatal females with estradiol to permanently induce the male phenotype. During the development of other systems, exuberant innervation is followed by activity-dependent pruning necessary for elimination of spurious synapses. In contrast, we demonstrate that estradiol-induced organization in the hypothalamus involves the induction of new synapses on dendritic spines. Activation of estrogen receptors by estradiol triggers a non-genomic activation of PI3 kinase that results in enhanced glutamate release from presynaptic neurons. Subsequent activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors activates MAP kinases inducing dendritic spine formation. These results reveal a trans-neuronal mechanism by which estradiol acts during a sensitive period to establish a profound and lasting sex difference in hypothalamic synaptic patterning. PMID:18498739

  7. Understanding the drug release mechanism from a montmorillonite matrix and its binary mixture with a hydrophilic polymer using a compartmental modelling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choiri, S.; Ainurofiq, A.

    2018-03-01

    Drug release from a montmorillonite (MMT) matrix is a complex mechanism controlled by swelling mechanism of MMT and an interaction of drug and MMT. The aim of this research was to explain a suitable model of the drug release mechanism from MMT and its binary mixture with a hydrophilic polymer in the controlled release formulation based on a compartmental modelling approach. Theophylline was used as a drug model and incorporated into MMT and a binary mixture with hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) as a hydrophilic polymer, by a kneading method. The dissolution test was performed and the modelling of drug release was assisted by a WinSAAM software. A 2 model was purposed based on the swelling capability and basal spacing of MMT compartments. The model evaluation was carried out to goodness of fit and statistical parameters and models were validated by a cross-validation technique. The drug release from MMT matrix regulated by a burst release mechanism of unloaded drug, swelling ability, basal spacing of MMT compartment, and equilibrium between basal spacing and swelling compartments. Furthermore, the addition of HPMC in MMT system altered the presence of swelling compartment and equilibrium between swelling and basal spacing compartment systems. In addition, a hydrophilic polymer reduced the burst release mechanism of unloaded drug.

  8. Effect of thermal and chemical modifications on the mechanical and release properties of paracetamol tablet formulations containing corn, cassava and sweet potato starches as filler-binders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariam Vbamiunomhene Lawal

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Modification of the experimental starches improved the mechanical and release properties of directly compressed paracetamol tablet formulations. Thus, they can be developed for use as pharmaceutical excipients in specific formulations.

  9. Creep rupture behavior of polypropylene suture material and its applications as a time-release mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusy, R.P.; Whitley, J.Q.

    1983-01-01

    The controlled failure of polypropylene (PP) sutures is studied via creep rupture tests. From plots of log time (tB) vs. stress (sigma), linear relationships are generated over the failure times of 1-1000 h. Results show that as a function of stress, the time dependence varies with irradiation dose (15, 20, 25, and 50 Mrad), irradiation atmosphere (air and vacuum), suture diameter (7-0, 6-0, 5-0, and 4-0), and test temperature (26 and 37 degrees C). For a given stress, the time to failure is least for the greatest dose in the presence of air and at the highest temperature. When suture loops are wrapped around a small wire sheave, however, failure occurs in the largest suture as much as two decades sooner than the smallest suture studied. Within the limitations stated herein, they are independent of test method, loop diameter, aging, and humidity. Consequently, after irradiation in vacuum and postirradiation heat treatment, the processed material may be stored at room temperature for at least 1 month. Such materials are advocated when the time release of a dental or medical device is required, for example, in the self-activating cleft palate appliance

  10. Mechanical breath profile of airway pressure release ventilation: the effect on alveolar recruitment and microstrain in acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollisch-Singule, Michaela; Emr, Bryanna; Smith, Bradford; Roy, Shreyas; Jain, Sumeet; Satalin, Joshua; Snyder, Kathy; Andrews, Penny; Habashi, Nader; Bates, Jason; Marx, William; Nieman, Gary; Gatto, Louis A

    2014-11-01

    Improper mechanical ventilation settings can exacerbate acute lung injury by causing a secondary ventilator-induced lung injury. It is therefore important to establish the mechanism by which the ventilator induces lung injury to develop protective ventilation strategies. It has been postulated that the mechanism of ventilator-induced lung injury is the result of heterogeneous, elevated strain on the pulmonary parenchyma. Acute lung injury has been associated with increases in whole-lung macrostrain, which is correlated with increased pathology. However, the effect of mechanical ventilation on alveolar microstrain remains unknown. To examine whether the mechanical breath profile of airway pressure release ventilation (APRV), consisting of a prolonged pressure-time profile and brief expiratory release phase, reduces microstrain. In a randomized, nonblinded laboratory animal study, rats were randomized into a controlled mandatory ventilation group (n = 3) and an APRV group (n = 3). Lung injury was induced by polysorbate lavage. A thoracotomy was performed and an in vivo microscope was placed on the lungs to measure alveolar mechanics. In the controlled mandatory ventilation group, multiple levels of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP; 5, 10, 16, 20, and 24 cm H2O) were tested. In the APRV group, decreasing durations of expiratory release (time at low pressure [T(low)]) were tested. The T(low) was set to achieve ratios of termination of peak expiratory flow rate (T-PEFR) to peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) of 10%, 25%, 50%, and 75% (the smaller this ratio is [ie, 10%], the more time the lung is exposed to low pressure during the release phase, which decreases end-expiratory lung volume and potentiates derecruitment). Alveolar perimeters were measured at peak inspiration and end expiration using digital image analysis, and strain was calculated by normalizing the change in alveolar perimeter length to the original length. Macrostrain was measured by volume

  11. Towards elucidation of the drug release mechanism from compressed hydrophilic matrices made of cellulose ethers. III. Critical use of thermodynamic parameters of activation for modeling the water penetration and drug release processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Carmen; Massuelle, Danielle; Jeannerat, Damien; Doelker, Eric

    2013-09-10

    The two main purposes of this work were: (i) to critically consider the use of thermodynamic parameters of activation for elucidating the drug release mechanism from hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) matrices, and (ii) to examine the effect of neutral (pH 6) and acidic (pH 2) media on the release mechanism. For this, caffeine was chosen as model drug and various processes were investigated for the effect of temperature and pH: caffeine diffusion in solution and HPMC gels, and drug release from and water penetration into the HPMC tablets. Generally, the kinetics of the processes was not significantly affected by pH. As for the temperature dependence, the activation energy (E(a)) values calculated from caffeine diffusivities were in the range of Fickian transport (20-40 kJ mol⁻¹). Regarding caffeine release from HPMC matrices, fitting the profiles using the Korsmeyer-Peppas model would indicate anomalous transport. However, the low apparent E(a) values obtained were not compatible with a swelling-controlled mechanism and can be assigned to the dimensional change of the system during drug release. Unexpectedly, negative apparent E(a) values were calculated for the water uptake process, which can be ascribed to the exothermic dissolution of water into the initially dry HPMC, the expansion of the matrix and the polymer dissolution. Taking these contributions into account, the true E(a) would fall into the range valid for Fickian diffusion. Consequently, a relaxation-controlled release mechanism can be dismissed. The apparent anomalous drug release from HPMC matrices results from a coupled Fickian diffusion-erosion mechanism, both at pH 6 and 2. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Autocrine signal transmission with extracellular ligand degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratov, C B; Posta, F; Shvartsman, S Y

    2009-03-01

    Traveling waves of cell signaling in epithelial layers orchestrate a number of important processes in developing and adult tissues. These waves can be mediated by positive feedback autocrine loops, a mode of cell signaling where binding of a diffusible extracellular ligand to a cell surface receptor can lead to further ligand release. We formulate and analyze a biophysical model that accounts for ligand-induced ligand release, extracellular ligand diffusion and ligand-receptor interaction. We focus on the case when the main mode for ligand degradation is extracellular and analyze the problem with the sharp threshold positive feedback nonlinearity. We derive expressions that link the speed of propagation and other characteristics of traveling waves to the parameters of the biophysical processes, such as diffusion rates, receptor expression level, etc. Analyzing the derived expressions we found that traveling waves in such systems can exhibit a number of unusual properties, e.g. non-monotonic dependence of the speed of propagation on ligand diffusivity. Our results for the fully developed traveling fronts can be used to analyze wave initiation from localized perturbations, a scenario that frequently arises in the in vitro models of epithelial wound healing, and guide future modeling studies of cell communication in epithelial layers.

  13. Leaching of boron, arsenic and selenium from sedimentary rocks: II. pH dependence, speciation and mechanisms of release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabelin, Carlito Baltazar, E-mail: carlito@trans-er.eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Soil Environment Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Hashimoto, Ayaka, E-mail: a.hashimoto@diaconsult.co.jp [DIA Consultants Co. Ltd., Sapporo (Japan); Igarashi, Toshifumi, E-mail: tosifumi@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Groundwater and Mass Transport, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Yoneda, Tetsuro, E-mail: yonet@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Laboratory of Soil Environment Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2014-03-01

    Sedimentary rocks excavated in Japan from road- and railway-tunnel projects contain relatively low concentrations of hazardous trace elements like boron (B), arsenic (As) and selenium (Se). However, these seemingly harmless waste rocks often produced leachates with concentrations of hazardous trace elements that exceeded the environmental standards. In this study, the leaching behaviors and release mechanisms of B, As and Se were evaluated using batch leaching experiments, sequential extraction and geochemical modeling calculations. The results showed that B was mostly partitioned with the residual/crystalline phase that is relatively stable under normal environmental conditions. In contrast, the majority of As and Se were associated with the exchangeable and organics/sulfides phases that are unstable under oxidizing conditions. Dissolution of water-soluble phases controlled the leaching of B, As and Se from these rocks in the short term, but pyrite oxidation, calcite dissolution and adsorption/desorption reactions became more important in the long term. The mobilities of these trace elements were also strongly influenced by the pH of the rock-water system. Although the leaching of Se only increased in the acidic region, those of B and As were enhanced under both acidic and alkaline conditions. Under strongly acidic conditions, the primarily release mechanism of B, As and Se was the dissolution of mineral phases that incorporated and/or adsorbed these elements. Lower concentrations of these trace elements in the circumneutral pH range could be attributed to their strong adsorption onto minerals like Al-/Fe-oxyhydroxides and clays, which are inherently present and/or precipitated in the rock-water system. The leaching of As and B increased under strongly alkaline conditions because of enhanced desorption and pyrite oxidation while that of Se remained minimal due to its adsorption onto Fe-oxyhydroxides and co-precipitation with calcite. - Highlights: • The bulk of

  14. Loss of covalently linked lipid as the mechanism for radiation-induced release of membrane-bound polysaccharide and exonuclease from Micrococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.

    1981-01-01

    The mechanism of γ-radiation-induced release of polysaccharide and exonuclease from the midwall membrane of Micrococcus radiodurans has been examined. These two components appear to be released independently, but by very similar processes. Direct analysis of radiation-released polysaccharide indicated the absence of an alkali-labile neutral lipid normally present in the native material. Radiation-induced release therefore probably results from the radiolytic cleavage of a covalently linked lipid which normally serves to anchor these substances to the membrane. The absence of a natural membrane-bound carotenoid had no effect on the rate of release of these components. Likewise, the absence of exonuclease in an exonuclease minus mutant did not influence the release of polysaccharide. It is suggested that the major pathway of radical transfer from the initiating .OH and culminating in the cleavage of the neutral lipid anchor may not be via the membrane

  15. Mechanical stress and stress release channels in 10–350 nm palladium hydrogen thin films with different micro-structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, Stefan; Kramer, Thilo; Uchida, Helmut; Dobron, Patrik; Cizek, Jakub; Pundt, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    For thin metal films adhered to rigid substrates hydrogen uptake results in compressive stresses in the GPa range. Stresses affect the thermodynamics as well as the durability of thin films, but many films can release stress above critical stress values. Depending on the films' thickness, microstructure and adhesion to the substrate, which determine the energy available in the nano-sized system, stress release is conducted via different release mechanisms. To evaluate the different mechanisms, Palladium thin films ranging from 10 nm to 350 nm and with three different types of microstructures (nanocrystalline, multi-oriented epitaxy and three-fold epitaxy) are studied with special focus on the mechanical stress. In-situ substrate curvature measurements, XRD stress analyses and acoustic emission (AE) measurements are conducted to determine intrinsic stresses, hydrogen-induced stress changes and stress release signals. By this complementary experimental approach, different stress release mechanisms (named channels) are identified. Discrete stress relaxation (DSR) events are found already within the overall linear elastic stress-strain regime. Energies to stimulate DSRs lay well below the formation energy of dislocations, and may allow the movement of defects pre-existing in the films. For higher strain energies, all studied films can release stress by the formation of new dislocations and plastic deformation. When the adhesion to the substrate is small, an alternative release channel of film buckling opens for thick films.

  16. Glutamate-induced glutamate release: A proposed mechanism for calcium bursting in astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larter, Raima; Craig, Melissa Glendening

    2005-12-01

    Here we present a new model for the generation of complex calcium-bursting patterns in astrocytes, a type of brain cell recently implicated in a variety of neural functions including memory formation. The model involves two positive feedback processes, in which the key feedback species are calcium ion and glutamate. The latter is the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and has been shown to be involved in bidirectional communication between astrocytes and nearby neurons. The glutamate feedback process considered here is shown to be critical for the generation of complex bursting oscillations in the astrocytes and to, perhaps, code for information which may be passed from neuron to neuron via the astrocyte. These processes may be involved in memory storage and formation as well as in mechanisms which lead to dynamical diseases such as epilepsy.

  17. Carbon monoxide releasing molecule induces endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation through a calcium and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Po-Min; Huang, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Yu-Qi; Hsieh, Chia-Wen; Wung, Being-Sun

    2016-12-01

    The production of nitric oxide (NO) by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) plays a major role in maintaining vascular homeostasis. This study elucidated the potential role of carbon monoxide (CO)-releasing molecules (CORMs) in NO production and explored the underlying mechanisms in endothelial cells. We observed that 25μM CORM-2 could increase NO production and stimulate an increase in the intracellular Ca 2+ level. Furthermore, ethylene glycol-bis(β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid caused CORM-2-induced NO production, which was abolished by 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetraacetoxy-methyl ester (BAPTA-AM), indicating that intracellular Ca 2+ release plays a major role in eNOS activation. The inhibition of the IP3 receptor diminished the CORM-2-induced intracellular Ca 2+ increase and NO production. Furthermore, CORM-2 induced eNOS Ser 1179 phosphorylation and eNOS dimerization, but it did not alter eNOS expression. CORM-2 (25μM) also prolonged Akt phosphorylation, lasting for at least 12h. Pretreatment with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors (wortmannin or LY294002) inhibited the increases in NO production and phosphorylation but did not affect eNOS dimerization. CORM-2-induced eNOS Ser 1179 phosphorylation was intracellularly calcium-dependent, because pretreatment with an intracellular Ca 2+ chelator (BAPTA-AM) inhibited this process. Although CORM-2 increases intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), pretreatment with antioxidant enzyme catalase and N-acetyl-cysteine did not abolish the CORM-2-induced eNOS activity or phosphorylation, signifying that ROS is not involved in this activity. Hence, CORM-2 enhances eNOS activation through intracellular calcium release, Akt phosphorylation, and eNOS dimerization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Non-domestic phosphorus release in rivers during low-flow: Mechanisms and implications for sources identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupas, Rémi; Tittel, Jörg; Jordan, Phil; Musolff, Andreas; Rode, Michael

    2018-05-01

    A common assumption in phosphorus (P) load apportionment studies is that P loads in rivers consist of flow independent point source emissions (mainly from domestic and industrial origins) and flow dependent diffuse source emissions (mainly from agricultural origin). Hence, rivers dominated by point sources will exhibit highest P concentration during low-flow, when flow dilution capacity is minimal, whereas rivers dominated by diffuse sources will exhibit highest P concentration during high-flow, when land-to-river hydrological connectivity is maximal. Here, we show that Soluble Reactive P (SRP) concentrations in three forested catchments free of point sources exhibited seasonal maxima during the summer low-flow period, i.e. a pattern expected in point source dominated areas. A load apportionment model (LAM) is used to show how point sources contribution may have been overestimated in previous studies, because of a biogeochemical process mimicking a point source signal. Almost twenty-two years (March 1995-September 2016) of monthly monitoring data of SRP, dissolved iron (Fe) and nitrate-N (NO3) were used to investigate the underlying mechanisms: SRP and Fe exhibited similar seasonal patterns and opposite to that of NO3. We hypothesise that Fe oxyhydroxide reductive dissolution might be the cause of SRP release during the summer period, and that NO3 might act as a redox buffer, controlling the seasonality of SRP release. We conclude that LAMs may overestimate the contribution of P point sources, especially during the summer low-flow period, when eutrophication risk is maximal.

  19. The behaviour of ceramic breeder materials with respect to tritium release and pellet/pebble mechanical integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwast, H.; Conrad, R.; May, R.; Casadio, S.; Roux, N.; Werle, H.

    1994-09-01

    In situ tritium release experiments from several candidate fusion blanket ceramic breeder materials have been performed in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten over the last few years. The sixth experiment, EXOTIC-6, contained pellets of LiAlO 2, Li 2XrO 3, Li 6Xr 2O 7 and Li 8ZrO 6 and pebbles of Li 4SiO 4 and Li 2ZrO 3 which were irradiated up to a lithium burnup of 3%. A large number of temperature transients and purge gas composition changes were performed. From the temperature transients tritium residence times have been determined. Some preliminary results were presented at the 17th Symposium on Fusion Technology (SOFT) held in Rome in 1992. In the present paper results of a further analysis of the residence times are presented together with some postirradiation examination results. The LiAlO 2 pellets showed a better mechanical stability than the Li-zirconates pellets. The pebbels remained intact. The tritium residence times determined from the tritium inventories were in good agreement with those previously determined from temperature transients. The tritium release characteristics of the materials investigated remain substantially unchanged up to the maximum lithium burnup achieved in this experiment.

  20. Mechanical constraint and release generates long, ordered horizontal pores in anodic alumina templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolger, Ciara T; Petkov, Nikolay; Holmes, Justin D; Fois, Giovanni; Cross, Graham L W; Sassiat, Nicolas; Burke, Micheál; Quinn, Aidan J

    2012-01-01

    We describe the formation of long, highly ordered arrays of planar oriented anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) pores during plane parallel anodization of thin aluminum ‘finger’ microstructures fabricated on thermally oxidized silicon substrates and capped with a silicon oxide layer. The pore morphology was found to be strongly influenced by mechanical constraint imposed by the oxide layers surrounding the Al fingers. Tractions induced by the SiO 2 substrate and capping layer led to frustrated volume expansion and restricted oxide flow along the interface, with extrusion of oxide into the primary pore volume, leading to the formation of dendritic pore structures and meandering pore growth. However, partial relief of the constraint by a delaminating interfacial fracture, with its tip closely following the anodization front, led to pore growth that was highly ordered with regular, hexagonally packed arrays of straight horizontal pores up to 3 µm long. Detailed characterization of both straight and dendritic planar pores over a range of formation conditions using advanced microscopy techniques is reported, including volume reconstruction, enabling high quality 3D visualization of pore formation. (paper)

  1. The effect of motivation and positive affect on ego depletion: Replenishment versus release mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ze; Li, Jian; Zhang, Bo; Li, Ye; Zhang, Houcan

    2017-12-01

    In this study, 2 experiments were conducted to investigate whether motivation and positive affect can alleviate ego depletion and to elucidate their possible mechanisms. In Experiment 1, a crossing-out-letter task was adapted to reach an ego depletion state for Chinese participants. Participants were then randomly assigned to the extrinsic motivation group, the positive affect group or the depletion control group. After the experimental treatment, a dumbbell task was used to measure participants' remaining self-regulatory resources. The results showed that participants in the motivation and positive affect groups performed better on the dumbbell task than participants in the depletion control group. Experiment 2 was similar to Experiment 1 except that participants were asked to perform an additional unexpected dumbbell task after a neutral video following the above procedure. The results of Experiment 1 were replicated; however, participants' performance on the additional dumbbell task differed. The positive affect group performed better than the depletion control group, indicating an increase in self-regulatory resources and thus supporting the replenishment effect of positive affect. No significant difference was found between the motivation group and the depletion control group. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  2. In-situ investigation of the hydrogen release mechanism in bulk Mg2NiH4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Xuan Quy; McDonald, Stuart D.; Gu, Qinfen; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Shigematsu, Koji; Aso, Kohei; Tanaka, Eishi; Matsumura, Syo; Nogita, Kazuhiro

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen storage is an important aspect to enable the so-called hydrogen economy. Mg-Ni alloys are among the most promising candidates for solid-state hydrogen storage systems yet many questions remain unanswered regarding the hydriding/dehydriding mechanism of the alloys. Mg2NiH4 particularly has received much attention both for its potential as a hydrogen storage medium and also exhibits interesting properties relating to its different polymorphs. Here, the dehydriding mechanism in bulk Mg2NiH4 is investigated using in-situ ultra-high voltage transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). We find that the hydrogen release is based on a mechanism of nucleation and growth of Mg2NiHx (x∼0-0.3) solid solution grains and is greatly enhanced in the presence of crystal defects occurring as a result of the polymorphic phase transformation. Also importantly, with atomic resolution TEM imaging a high density of stacking faults is identified in the dehydrided Mg2NiHx (x∼0-0.3) lattices.

  3. Caffeine alleviates the deterioration of Ca2+ release mechanisms and fragmentation of in vitro aged mouse eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Wakai, Takuya; Fissore, Rafael. A.

    2011-01-01

    The developmental competence of mammalian eggs is compromised by postovulatory aging. We and others found that in these eggs the intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) responses required for egg activation and initiation of development are altered. Nevertheless, the mechanism(s) underlying this defective Ca2+ release is not well known. Here, we investigated if the function of IP3R1, the major Ca2+ release channel at fertilization, was undermined in in vitro aged mouse eggs. We found that in aged eggs IP3R1 displayed reduced function, as many of the changes acquired during maturation that enhance IP3R1 Ca2+ conductivity such as phosphorylation, receptor reorganization and increased Ca2+ store content ([Ca2+]ER) were lost with increasing postovulatory time. IP3R1 fragmentation, possibly associated with the activation of caspase-3, was also observed in these eggs. Many of these changes were prevented when the postovulatory aging of eggs was carried out in the presence of caffeine, which minimized the decline in IP3R1 function and maintained [Ca2+]ER content. Caffeine also maintained mitochondrial membrane potential as measured by JC-1 fluorescence. We therefore conclude that [Ca2+]i responses in aged eggs are undermined by reduced IP3R1 sensitivity, decreased [Ca2+]ER and compromised mitochondrial function, and that addition of caffeine ameliorates most of these aging-associated changes. Understanding the molecular basis of the protective effects of caffeine will be useful in elucidating, and possibly reversing, the signaling pathway(s) compromised by in vitro culture of eggs. PMID:22095868

  4. Towards an interpretation of the mechanism of the actinides(III)/lanthanides(III) separation by synergistic solvent extraction with nitrogen-containing polydendate ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, N.

    2000-01-01

    In the field of the separation of long-lived radionuclides from the wastes produced by nuclear fuel reprocessing, aromatic nitrogen-containing polydendate ligands are potential candidates for the selective extraction, alone or in synergistic mixture with acidic extractants, of trivalent actinides from trivalent lanthanides. The first part of this work deals with the complexation of trivalent f cations with various nitrogen-containing ligands (poly-pyridine analogues). Time-resolved laser-induced fluorimetry (TRLIF) and UV-visible spectrophotometry were used to determine the nature and evaluate the stability of each complex. Among the ligands studied, the least basic Me-Btp proved to be highly selective towards americium(III) in acidic solution. In the second part, two synergistic systems (nitrogen-containing polydendate ligand and lipophilic carboxylic acid) are studied and compared in regard to the extraction and separation of lanthanides(III) and actinides(III). TRLIF and gamma spectrometry allowed the nature of the extracted complexes and the optimal conditions of efficiency of both systems to be determined. Comparison between these different studies showed that the selectivity of complexation of trivalent f cations by a given nitrogen-containing polydendate ligand could not always be linked to the Am(III)Eu(III) selectivity reached in synergistic extraction. The latter depends on the 'balance' between the acid-basic properties on the one hand, and on the hard-soft characteristics on the other hand, of both components of synergistic system. (author)

  5. Mechanical properties and drug release of venlafaxine HCl solid mini matrices prepared by hot-melt extrusion and hot or ambient compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avgerinos, Theodoros; Kantiranis, Nikolaos; Panagopoulou, Athanasia; Malamataris, Stavros; Kachrimanis, Kyriakos; Nikolakakis, Ioannis

    2018-02-01

    Objective/significance: To elucidate the role of plasticizers in different mini matrices and correlate mechanical properties with drug release. Cylindrical pellets were prepared by hot-melt extrusion (HME) and mini tablets by hot (HC) and ambient compression (AC). Venlafaxine HCl was the model drug, Eudragit ® RSPO the matrix former and citric acid or Lutrol ® F127 the plasticizers. The matrices were characterized for morphology, crystallinity, and mechanical properties. The influence of plasticizer's type and content on the extrusion pressure (P e ) during HME and ejection during tableting was examined and the mechanical properties were correlated with drug release parameters. Resistance to extrusion and tablet ejection force were reduced by Lutrol ® F127 which also produced softer and weaker pellets with faster release, but harder and stronger HC tablets with slower release. HME pellets showed greater tensile strength (T) and 100 times slower release than tablets. P e correlated with T and resistance to deformation of the corresponding pellets (r 2  = 0.963 and 0.945). For both HME and HC matrices the decrease of drug release with T followed a single straight line (r 2  = 0.990) and for HME the diffusion coefficient (D e ) and retreat rate constant (k b ) decreased linearly with T (r 2  = 0.934 and 0.972). Lutrol ® F127 and citric acid are efficient plasticizers and Lutrol ® F127 is a thermal binder/lubricant in HC compression. The different bonding mechanisms of the matrices were reflected in the mechanical strength and drug release. Relationships established between T and drug release parameters for HME and HC matrices may be useful during formulation work.

  6. Autocrine signal transmission with extracellular ligand degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muratov, C B; Posta, F; Shvartsman, S Y

    2009-01-01

    Traveling waves of cell signaling in epithelial layers orchestrate a number of important processes in developing and adult tissues. These waves can be mediated by positive feedback autocrine loops, a mode of cell signaling where binding of a diffusible extracellular ligand to a cell surface receptor can lead to further ligand release. We formulate and analyze a biophysical model that accounts for ligand-induced ligand release, extracellular ligand diffusion and ligand–receptor interaction. We focus on the case when the main mode for ligand degradation is extracellular and analyze the problem with the sharp threshold positive feedback nonlinearity. We derive expressions that link the speed of propagation and other characteristics of traveling waves to the parameters of the biophysical processes, such as diffusion rates, receptor expression level, etc. Analyzing the derived expressions we found that traveling waves in such systems can exhibit a number of unusual properties, e.g. non-monotonic dependence of the speed of propagation on ligand diffusivity. Our results for the fully developed traveling fronts can be used to analyze wave initiation from localized perturbations, a scenario that frequently arises in the in vitro models of epithelial wound healing, and guide future modeling studies of cell communication in epithelial layers

  7. Dual-Ligand Modified Polymer-Lipid Hybrid Nanoparticles for Docetaxel Targeting Delivery to Her2/neu Overexpressed Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhe; Tang, Wenxin; Luo, Xingen; Zhang, Xiaofang; Zhang, Chao; Li, Hao; Gao, Di; Luo, Huiyan; Jiang, Qing; Liu, Jie

    2015-08-01

    In this study, a dual-ligand polymer-lipid hybrid nanoparticle drug delivery vehicle comprised of an anti-HER2/neu peptide (AHNP) mimic with a modified HIV-1 Tat (mTAT) was established for the targeted treatment of Her2/neu-overexpressing cells. The resultant dual-ligand hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) consisted of a poly(lactide-co-glycolide) core, a near 90% surface coverage of the lipid monolayer, and a 5.7 nm hydrated polyethylene glycol shell. Ligand density optimization study revealed that cellular uptake efficiency of the hybrid NPs could be manipulated by controlling the surface-ligand densities. Furthermore, the cell uptake kinetics and mechanism studies showed that the dual-ligand modifications of hybrid NPs altered the cellular uptake pathway from caveolae-mediated endocytosis (CvME) to the multiple endocytic pathways, which would significantly enhance the NP internalization. Upon the systemic investigation of the cellular uptake behavior of dual-ligand hybrid NPs, docetaxel (DTX), a hydrophobic anticancer drug, was successfully encapsulated into dual-ligand hybrid NPs with high drug loading for Her2/neu-overexpressing SK-BR-3 breast cancer cell treatment. The DTX-loaded dual-ligand hybrid NPs showed a decreased burst release and a more gradual sustained drug release property. Because of the synergistic effect of dual-ligand modification, DTX-loaded dual-ligand hybrid NPs exerted substantially better therapeutic potency against SK-BR-3 cancer cells than other NP formulations and free DTX drugs. These results demonstrate that the dual-ligand hybrid NPs could be a promising vehicle for targeted drug delivery to treat breast cancer.

  8. The corticotropin-releasing hormone network and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis: molecular and cellular mechanisms involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfiglio, Juan José; Inda, Carolina; Refojo, Damián; Holsboer, Florian; Arzt, Eduardo; Silberstein, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays a key role in adjusting the basal and stress-activated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA). CRH is also widely distributed in extrahypothalamic circuits, where it acts as a neuroregulator to integrate the complex neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral adaptive response to stress. Hyperactive and/or dysregulated CRH circuits are involved in neuroendocrinological disturbances and stress-related mood disorders such as anxiety and depression. This review describes the main physiological features of the CRH network and summarizes recent relevant information concerning the molecular mechanism of CRH action obtained from signal transduction studies using cells and wild-type and transgenic mice lines. Special focus is placed on the MAPK signaling pathways triggered by CRH through the CRH receptor 1 that plays an essential role in CRH action in pituitary corticotrophs and in specific brain structures. Recent findings underpin the concept of specific CRH-signaling pathways restricted to specific anatomical areas. Understanding CRH action at molecular levels will not only provide insight into the precise CRH mechanism of action, but will also be instrumental in identifying novel targets for pharmacological intervention in neuroendocrine tissues and specific brain areas involved in CRH-related disorders. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. WOOD HEMICELLULOSE/CHITOSAN-BASED SEMI-INTERPENETRATING NETWORK HYDROGELS: MECHANICAL, SWELLING AND CONTROLLED DRUG RELEASE PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer Ahmet Karaaslan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The cell wall of most plant biomass from forest and agricultural resources consists of three major polymers, cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. Of these, hemicelluloses have gained increasing attention as sustainable raw materials. In this study, novel pH-sensitive semi-IPN hydrogels based on hemicelluloses and chitosan were prepared using glutaraldehyde as the crosslinking agent. The hemicellulose isolated from aspen was analyzed for sugar content by HPLC, and its molecular weight distribution was determined by high performance size exclusion chromatography. Results revealed that hemicellulose had a broad molecular weight distribution with a fair amount of polymeric units, together with xylose, arabinose, and glucose. The effects of hemicellulose content on mechanical properties and swelling behavior of hydrogels were investigated. The semi-IPNs hydrogel structure was confirmed by FT-IR, X-ray study, and the ninhydrin assay method. X-ray analysis showed that higher hemicellulose contents yielded higher crystallinity. Mechanical properties were mainly dependent on the crosslink density and average molecular weight between crosslinks. Swelling ratios increased with increasing hemicellulose content and were high at low pH values due to repulsion between similarly charged groups. In vitro release study of a model drug showed that these semi-IPN hydrogels could be used for controlled drug delivery into gastric fluid.

  10. Depolarization by K+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in GABAergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of GABA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Schousboe, A

    1993-01-01

    differences in the mode of action of the two depolarizing stimuli were reflected in the properties of the increase in [Ca++]i elicited by 55 mM K+ and 100 microM glutamate, respectively. The K(+)-induced increase in [Ca++]i was reduced by both verapamil and Ca(++)-free media whereas the corresponding...... neurotransmitter glutamate (100 microM). Both depolarizing stimuli exerted prompt increases in the release of preloaded [3H]GABA as well as in [Ca++]i. However, the basic properties of transmitter release and the increase in [Ca++]i under a variety of conditions were different during stimulation with K...... was also reduced by organic (verapamil) and inorganic (Co++) Ca++ channel blockers but was insensitive to the GABA transport inhibitor SKF 89976A. In contrast, the second phase was less sensitive to nocodazole and Ca++ channel antagonists but could be inhibited by SKF 89976A. The glutamate-induced [3H...

  11. A Proposed Mechanism for Development of CTE Following Concussive Events: Head Impact, Water Hammer Injury, Neurofilament Release, and Autoimmune Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornguth, Steven; Rutledge, Neal; Perlaza, Gabe; Bray, James; Hardin, Allen

    2017-12-19

    During the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in early diagnosis and treatment of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) that lead to chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The subjects involved range from soldiers exposed to concussive injuries from improvised explosive devices (IEDs) to a significant number of athletes involved in repetitive high force impacts. Although the forces from IEDs are much greater by a magnitude than those from contact sports, the higher frequency associated with contact sports allows for more controlled assessment of the mechanism of action. In our study, we report findings in university-level women soccer athletes followed over a period of four and a half years from accession to graduation. Parameters investigated included T1-, T2-, and susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance images (SWI), IMPACT (Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing), and C3 Logix behavioral and physiological assessment measures. The MRI Studies show several significant findings: first, a marked increase in the width of sulci in the frontal to occipital cortices; second, an appearance of subtle hemorrhagic changes at the base of the sulci; third was a sustained reduction in total brain volume in several soccer players at a developmental time when brain growth is generally seen. Although all of the athletes successfully completed their college degree and none exhibited long term clinical deficits at the time of graduation, the changes documented by MRI represent a clue to the pathological mechanism following an injury paradigm. The authors propose that our findings and those of prior publications support a mechanism of injury in CTE caused by an autoimmune process associated with the release of neural proteins from nerve cells at the base of the sulcus from a water hammer injury effect. As evidence accumulates to support this hypothesis, there are pharmacological treatment strategies that may be able to mitigate the development of

  12. A Proposed Mechanism for Development of CTE Following Concussive Events: Head Impact, Water Hammer Injury, Neurofilament Release, and Autoimmune Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Kornguth

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade, there has been an increasing interest in early diagnosis and treatment of traumatic brain injuries (TBI that lead to chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE. The subjects involved range from soldiers exposed to concussive injuries from improvised explosive devices (IEDs to a significant number of athletes involved in repetitive high force impacts. Although the forces from IEDs are much greater by a magnitude than those from contact sports, the higher frequency associated with contact sports allows for more controlled assessment of the mechanism of action. In our study, we report findings in university-level women soccer athletes followed over a period of four and a half years from accession to graduation. Parameters investigated included T1-, T2-, and susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance images (SWI, IMPACT (Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing, and C3 Logix behavioral and physiological assessment measures. The MRI Studies show several significant findings: first, a marked increase in the width of sulci in the frontal to occipital cortices; second, an appearance of subtle hemorrhagic changes at the base of the sulci; third was a sustained reduction in total brain volume in several soccer players at a developmental time when brain growth is generally seen. Although all of the athletes successfully completed their college degree and none exhibited long term clinical deficits at the time of graduation, the changes documented by MRI represent a clue to the pathological mechanism following an injury paradigm. The authors propose that our findings and those of prior publications support a mechanism of injury in CTE caused by an autoimmune process associated with the release of neural proteins from nerve cells at the base of the sulcus from a water hammer injury effect. As evidence accumulates to support this hypothesis, there are pharmacological treatment strategies that may be able to mitigate the

  13. Research on the Characteristics and Mechanism of the Cumulative Release of Antimony from an Antimony Smelting Slag Stacking Area under Rainfall Leaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yingying; Deng, Renjian

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to study the characteristics and the mechanism of the cumulative release of antimony at an antimony smelting slag stacking area in southern China. A series of dynamic and static leaching experiments to simulate the effects of rainfall were carried out. The results showed that the release of antimony from smelting slag increased with a decrease in the solid-liquid ratio, and the maximum accumulated release was found to be 42.13 mg Sb/kg waste and 34.26 mg Sb/kg waste with a solid/liquid ratio of 1 : 20; the maximum amount of antimony was released within 149–420 μm size fraction with 7.09 mg/L of the cumulative leaching. Also, the antimony release was the greatest and most rapid at pH 7.0 with the minimum release found at pH 4.0. With an increase in rainfall duration, the antimony release increased. The influence of variation in rainfall intensity on the release of antimony from smelting slag was small. PMID:28804669

  14. The release of nickel from orthodontic NiTi wires is increased by dynamic mechanical loading but not constrained by surface nitridation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitsch, T; Klocke, A; Kahl-Nieke, B; Prymak, O; Epple, M

    2007-09-01

    The influence of dynamic mechanical loading and of surface nitridation on the nickel release from superelastic nickel-titanium orthodontic wires was investigated under ultrapure conditions. Commercially available superelastic NiTi arch wires (size 0.018 x 0.025'') without surface modification (Neo Sentalloy) and with nitrogen ion implantation surface treatment (Neo Sentalloy Ionguard) were analyzed. Mechanical loading of wire segments with a force similar to the physiological situation was performed with a frequency of 5 Hz in ultrapure water and saline solution, respectively. The release of nickel was monitored by atomic absorption spectroscopy for up to 36 days. The mechanically loaded wires released significantly more nickel ( approximately 45 ng cm(-2) d(-1)) than did nonloaded wires (<1 ng cm(-2) d(-1)). There was no statistically significant effect of the testing solution (water or NaCl) or of the surface nitridation. The total amount of released nickel was small in all cases, but may nevertheless account for the occasional clinical observations of adverse reactions during application of NiTi-based orthodontic appliances. The surface nitridation did not constrain the release of nickel from NiTi under continuous mechanical stress.

  15. Effect of ligand self-assembly on nanostructure and carrier transport behaviour in CdSe quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Kuiying, E-mail: kuiyingli@ysu.edu.cn; Xue, Zhenjie

    2014-11-14

    Adjustment of the nanostructure and carrier behaviour of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) by varying the ligands used during QD synthesis enables the design of specific quantum devices via a self-assembly process of the QD core–shell structure without additional technologies. Surface photovoltaic (SPV) technology supplemented by X-ray diffractometry and infrared absorption spectroscopy were used to probe the characteristics of these QDs. Our study reveals that while CdSe QDs synthesized in the presence of and capped by thioglycolic acid, 3-mercaptopropionic acid, mercaptoethanol or α-thioglycerol ligands display zinc blende nanocrystalline structures, CdSe QDs modified by L-cysteine possess wurtzite nanocrystalline structures, because different end groups in these ligands induce distinctive nucleation and growth mechanisms. Carboxyl end groups in the ligand served to increase the SPV response of the QDs, when illuminated by hν ≥ E{sub g,nano-CdSe}. Increased length of the alkyl chains and side-chain radicals in the ligands partially inhibit photo-generated free charge carrier (FCC) transfer transitions of CdSe QDs illuminated by photon energy of 4.13 to 2.14 eV. The terminal hydroxyl group might better accommodate energy released in the non-radiative de-excitation process of photo-generated FCCs in the ligand's lowest unoccupied molecular orbital in the 300–580 nm wavelength region, when compared with other ligand end groups. - Highlights: • CdSe QDs modified by L-cysteine possess wurtzite nanocrystalline structures. • Carboxyl end groups in the ligand serve to increase the SPV response of CdSe QDs. • Terminal hydroxyl group in the ligand might accommodate non-radiative de-excitation process in CdSe QDs. • Increased length of the alkyl chains and side-chain radicals in the ligands partially inhibit carriers transport of CdSe QDs.

  16. Kinetics and mechanisms of metal retention/release in geochemical processes in soil. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, R.W.

    1998-01-01

    'The long-term fate of toxic metals in soils cannot be precisely predicted, and often remediation recommendations and techniques may be ineffective or unnecessary. This work will generate basic knowledge on the kinetics and mechanism(s) of heavy metal retention/release by soil mineral colloids. The information should assist in improving remediation strategies for toxic heavy metal contaminated soils. The objectives are: (1) To determine the effects of residence time on the mechanisms of Cr(VI), Cu(II), Co(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), and Ni(II) sorption/release on Fe and Al oxide and clay mineral surfaces using kinetic studies coupled to extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. (2) To study the effect of temperature, pH, and phosphate on metal sorption by oxides, and derive thermodynamic parameters to describe the sorption process. As of June, 16, 1997 several clay minerals were tested for their efficiency of removing Cr from aqueous systems. The materials tested--smectite, vermiculites, illites, and kaolinite--represent the natural clay minerals that are abundant in soils and sediments. The clays were used in either their original or reduced (reduced with sodium dithionite) forms. The experimental result indicate that the reduced clays acted as an efficient remover of Cr(VI) from an aqueous system. The XANES spectra of Cr-treated clays provided evidence that the clays reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III) and immobilized Cr in the clays at the same time. Sodium dithionite applied directly into aqueous systems reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III), but could not immobilize Cr even in the presence of the clays. The Cr(VI) removal capacity varied with the clay mineral type and the structural Fe content. For the clays used in this study, the removal capacity follows the orders of smectites > vermiculites and illites > kaolinite. Within the same type of clay minerals, reduction of Cr(VI) is highly related to the ferrous iron

  17. The human immunodeficiency virus-1 protein Tat and its discrete fragments evoke selective release of acetylcholine from human and rat cerebrocortical terminals through species-specific mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feligioni, Marco; Raiteri, Luca; Pattarini, Roberto; Grilli, Massimo; Bruzzone, Santina; Cavazzani, Paolo; Raiteri, Maurizio; Pittaluga, Anna

    2003-07-30

    The effect of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 protein Tat was investigated on neurotransmitter release from human and rat cortical nerve endings. Tat failed to affect the release of several neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, GABA, norepinephrine, and others, but it evoked the release of [3H]ACh via increase of cytosolic [Ca2+]. In human nerve terminals, the Tat effect partly depends on Ca2+ entry through voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels, because Cd2+ halved the Tat-evoked release. Activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) and mobilization of Ca2+ from IP3-sensitive intraterminal stores are also involved, because the Tat effect was prevented by mGluR antagonists 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride and 7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxylate ethyl ester and by the IP3 receptor antagonists heparin and xestospongin C. Furthermore, the group I selective mGlu agonist (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine enhanced [3H]ACh release. In rat nerve terminals, the Tat-evoked release neither depends on external Ca2+ ions entry nor on IP3-mediated mechanisms. Tat seems to cause mobilization of Ca2+ from ryanodine-sensitive internal stores because its effect was prevented by both 8-bromo-cyclic adenosine diphosphate-ribose and dantrolene. The Tat-evoked release from human synaptosomes was mimicked by the peptide sequences Tat 32-62, Tat 49-86, and Tat 41-60. In contrast, the Tat 49-86 and Tat 61-80 fragments, but not the Tat 32-62 fragment, were active in rat synaptosomes. In conclusion, Tat elicits Ca2+-dependent [3H]ACh release by species-specific intraterminal mechanisms by binding via discrete amino acid sequences to different receptive sites on human and rat cholinergic terminals.

  18. The Physico-Mechanical Properties and Release Kinetics of Eugenol in Chitosan-Alginate Polyelectrolyte Complex Films as Active Food Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baiq Amelia Riyandari

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A study of eugenol release and its kinetics model from chitosan-alginate polyelectrolyte complex (PEC films has been conducted. Some factors that affected the eugenol release were also studied, including the composition of chitosan-alginate PEC and the concentration of eugenol. The chitosan-alginate-eugenol PEC films were synthesized at pH ± 4.0, then the PEC films were characterized using a Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR spectrophotometer. An investigation of the films’ properties was also conducted, including morphology analysis using a scanning electron microscope (SEM, differential thermal analysis (DTA / thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, mechanical strength, transparency testing, water absorption, and water vapor permeability. The release of eugenol was investigated through in vitro assay in ethanol 96% (v/v for four days, and the concentration of eugenol was measured using an ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The characterization of the films using FTIR showed that the formation of PEC occurred through ionic interaction between the amine groups (–NH3+of the chitosan and the carboxylate groups (–COO– of the alginate. The result showed that the composition of chitosan-alginate PEC and the concentration of eugenol can affect the release of eugenol from PEC films. A higher concentration of alginate and eugenol could increase the concentration of eugenol that was released from the films. The mechanism for the release of eugenol from chitosan-alginate PEC films followed the Korsmeyer-Peppas model with an n value of < 0.5, which means the release mechanism for eugenol was controlled by a Fickian diffusion process. The antioxidant activity assay of the films using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH method resulted in a high radical scavenging activity (RSA value of 55.99% in four days.

  19. Melatonin: functions and ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mahaveer; Jadhav, Hemant R

    2014-09-01

    Melatonin is a chronobiotic substance that acts as synchronizer by stabilizing bodily rhythms. Its synthesis occurs in various locations throughout the body, including the pineal gland, skin, lymphocytes and gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Its synthesis and secretion is controlled by light and dark conditions, whereby light decreases and darkness increases its production. Thus, melatonin is also known as the 'hormone of darkness'. Melatonin and analogs that bind to the melatonin receptors are important because of their role in the management of depression, insomnia, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease (AD), diabetes, obesity, alopecia, migraine, cancer, and immune and cardiac disorders. In this review, we discuss the mechanism of action of melatonin in these disorders, which could aid in the design of novel melatonin receptor ligands. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ligands in PSI structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Abhinav; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Morse, Andrew; Elsliger, Marc-André; Wilson, Ian A.; Deacon, Ashley

    2010-01-01

    A survey of the types and frequency of ligands that are bound to PSI structures is analyzed as well as their utility in functional annotation of previously uncharacterized proteins. Approximately 65% of PSI structures report some type of ligand(s) that is bound in the crystal structure. Here, a description is given of how such ligands are handled and analyzed at the JCSG and a survey of the types, variety and frequency of ligands that are observed in the PSI structures is also compiled and analyzed, including illustrations of how these bound ligands have provided functional clues for annotation of proteins with little or no previous experimental characterization. Furthermore, a web server was developed as a tool to mine and analyze the PSI structures for bound ligands and other identifying features

  1. Design of sustained release fine particles using two-step mechanical powder processing: particle shape modification of drug crystals and dry particle coating with polymer nanoparticle agglomerate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Keita; Ito, Natsuki; Niwa, Toshiyuki; Danjo, Kazumi

    2013-09-10

    We attempted to prepare sustained release fine particles using a two-step mechanical powder processing method; particle-shape modification and dry particle coating. First, particle shape of bulk drug was modified by mechanical treatment to yield drug crystals suitable for the coating process. Drug crystals became more rounded with increasing rotation speed, which demonstrates that powerful mechanical stress yields spherical drug crystals with narrow size distribution. This process is the result of destruction, granulation and refinement of drug crystals. Second, the modified drug particles and polymer coating powder were mechanically treated to prepare composite particles. Polymer nanoparticle agglomerate obtained by drying poly(meth)acrylate aqueous dispersion was used as a coating powder. The porous nanoparticle agglomerate has superior coating performance, because it is completely deagglomerated under mechanical stress to form fine fragments that act as guest particles. As a result, spherical drug crystals treated with porous agglomerate were effectively coated by poly(meth)acrylate powder, showing sustained release after curing. From these findings, particle-shape modification of drug crystals and dry particle coating with nanoparticle agglomerate using a mechanical powder processor is expected as an innovative technique for preparing controlled-release coated particles having high drug content and size smaller than 100 μm. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanism of norepinephrine release elicited by renal nerve stimulation, veratridine and potassium chloride in the isolated rat kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    el-Din, M.M.; Malik, K.U.

    1987-01-01

    We have investigated the mechanism by which renal nerve stimulation (RNS), veratridine (Vt) and KCl promote release of norepinephrine in the isolated rat kidney perfused with Tyrode's solution and prelabeled with [ 3 H]norepinephrine by examining the overflow of tritium elicited by these stimuli during 1) extracellular Ca++ depletion, 2) alterations in extracellular Na+ concentration and 3) administration of tetrodotoxin, amiloride, LiCl and calcium channel blockers. RNS (1-4 Hz), Vt (15-90 nmol) and KCl (150-500 mumol) produced renal vasoconstriction and enhanced the tritium overflow in a frequency- and concentration-dependent manner, respectively. Omission of Ca++ (1.8 mM) from the perfusion fluid abolished the renal vasoconstriction and the increase in tritium overflow elicited by RNA and KCl and substantially reduced that caused by Vt. Lowering the Na+ concentration in the perfusion medium (from 150 to 25 mM) reduced the overflow of tritium and the renal vasoconstriction caused by RNS (2 Hz) or Vt (45 nmol); the increase in tritium overflow in response to these stimuli was positively correlated with extracellular Na+ (25-150 mM). In contrast, KCl-induced tritium overflow was negatively correlated with extracellular Na+ concentration. Tetrodotoxin (0.3 microM) abolished the effect of RNS and Vt, but not that of KCl, to increase overflow of tritium and to produce renal vasoconstriction. Administration of amiloride (180 microM) enhanced the overflow of tritium but attenuated the associated renal vasoconstriction produced by RNS, Vt and KCl. Replacement of NaCl (75 mM) with equimolar concentration of LiCl enhanced the overflow of tritium elicited by RNS, Vt and KCl; the associated renal vasoconstriction remained unaltered

  3. Mechanical and microbiological properties and drug release modeling of an etch-and-rinse adhesive containing copper nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, M F; Malaquias, P; Matos, T P; Szesz, A; Souza, S; Bermudez, J; Reis, A; Loguercio, A D; Farago, P V

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of addition of copper nanoparticles (CN) at different concentrations into a two-step etch-and-rinse (2-ER) adhesive on antimicrobial activity (AMA), copper release (CR), ultimate tensile strength (UTS), degree of conversion (DC), water sorption (WS), solubility (SO), as well as the immediate (IM) and 1-year resin-dentin bond strength (μTBS) and nanoleakage (NL). Seven adhesives were formulated according to the addition of CN (0, 0.0075, 0.015, 0.06, 0.1, 0.5 and 1wt%) in adhesive. The AMA was evaluated against Streptococcus mutans using agar diffusion assay. For CR, WS and SO, specimens were constructed and tested for 28 days. For UTS, specimens were tested after 24h and 28 days. For DC, specimens were constructed and tested after 24h by FTIR. After enamel removal, the ER was applied to dentin. After composite resin build-ups, specimens were sectioned to obtain resin-dentin sticks. For μTBS and NL, specimens were tested after 24h and 1-year periods. All data were submitted to statistical analysis (α=0.05). The addition of CN provided AMA to the adhesives at all concentrations. Higher CR was observed in adhesives with higher concentration of CN. UTS, DC, WS and SO were not influenced. For μTBS an increase was observed in 0.1 and 0.5% copper group. For NL, a significant decrease was observed in all groups in comparison with control group. After 1-year, no significant reductions of μTBS and no significant increases of NL were observed for copper containing adhesives compared to the control group. The addition of CN in concentrations up to 1wt% in the 2-ER adhesive may be an alternative to provide AMA and preserve the bonding to dentin, without reducing adhesives' mechanical properties evaluated. Copyright © 2016 The Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of the effects and mechanisms of action of glufosinate, an organophosphate insecticide, on striatal dopamine release by using in vivo microdialysis in freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira Nunes, Brenda V; Durán, Rafael; Alfonso, Miguel; de Oliveira, Iris Machado; Ferreira Faro, Lilian R

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of the present work was to assess the effects of glufosinate ammonium (GLA), an aminoacid structurally related to glutamate, on in vivo dopamine (DA) release from rat striatum, using brain microdialysis coupled to HPLC-EC. Intrastriatal administration of GLA produced significant concentration-dependent increases in DA levels. At least two mechanisms can be proposed to explain these increases: GLA could be inducing DA release from synaptic vesicles or producing an inhibition of DA transporter (DAT). Thus, we investigated the effects of GLA under Ca(++)-free condition, and after pretreatment with reserpine and TTX. It was observed that the pretreatment with Ca(++)-free Ringer, reserpine or TTX significantly reduced the DA release induced by GLA. Coinfusion of GLA and nomifensine shows that the GLA-induced DA release did not involve the DAT. These results show that GLA-induced striatal DA release is probably mediated by an exocytotic-, Ca(++)-, action potential-dependent mechanism, being independent of DAT.

  5. Understanding the Selectivity Mechanism of the Human Asialoglycoprotein Receptor (ASGP-R toward Gal- and Man- type Ligands for Predicting Interactions with Exogenous Sugars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emo Chiellini

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A practical approach for addressing the computer simulation of protein-carbohydrate interactions is described here. An articulated computational protocol was setup and validated by checking its ability to predict experimental data, available in theliterature, and concerning the selectivity shown by the Carbohydrate Recognition Domain(CRD of the human asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R toward Gal-type ligands. Somerequired features responsible for the interactions were identified. Subsequently the sameprotocol was applied to monomer sugar molecules that constitute the building blocks foralginates and ulvans. Such sugar polymers may supply a low-cost source of rare sugars witha potential impact on several industrial applications, from pharmaceutical to fine chemicalindustry. An example of their applicative exploitation could be given by their use indeveloping biomaterial with adhesion properties toward hepatocytes, through interactionwith the ASGP-R. Such a receptor has been already proposed as a target for exogenousmolecules, specifically in the case of hepatocytes, for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.The DOCK5.2 program was used to search optimal locations of the above ligands of interestinto CRD binding site and to roughly estimate interaction energies. Finally, the binding ∆G oftheoretical protein-ligand complexes was estimated by using the DelPhi program in which thesolvation free energy is accounted for with a continuum solvent model, by solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. The structure analysis of the obtained complexes and their ∆G values suggest that one of the sugar monomers of interest shows the desired characteristics.

  6. Mechanisms of gas bubble retention and release: results for Hanford Waste Tanks 241-S-102 and 241-SY-103 and single-shell tank simulants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Konynenbelt, J.H.; Tingey, S.M.; Mendoza, D.P.

    1996-09-01

    Research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has probed the physical mechanisms and waste properties that contribute to the retention and release of flammable gases from radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford. This study was conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNNL Flammable Gas Project. The wastes contained in the tanks are mixes of radioactive and chemical products, and some of these wastes are known to generate mixtures of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Because these gases are flammable, their retention and episodic release pose a number of safety concerns

  7. Mechanisms of gas bubble retention and release: results for Hanford Waste Tanks 241-S-102 and 241-SY-103 and single-shell tank simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Konynenbelt, J.H.; Tingey, S.M.; Mendoza, D.P.

    1996-09-01

    Research at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has probed the physical mechanisms and waste properties that contribute to the retention and release of flammable gases from radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at Hanford. This study was conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNNL Flammable Gas Project. The wastes contained in the tanks are mixes of radioactive and chemical products, and some of these wastes are known to generate mixtures of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Because these gases are flammable, their retention and episodic release pose a number of safety concerns.

  8. Sleep-wake sensitive mechanisms of adenosine release in the basal forebrain of rodents: an in vitro study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Edward Sims

    Full Text Available Adenosine acting in the basal forebrain is a key mediator of sleep homeostasis. Extracellular adenosine concentrations increase during wakefulness, especially during prolonged wakefulness and lead to increased sleep pressure and subsequent rebound sleep. The release of endogenous adenosine during the sleep-wake cycle has mainly been studied in vivo with microdialysis techniques. The biochemical changes that accompany sleep-wake status may be preserved in vitro. We have therefore used adenosine-sensitive biosensors in slices of the basal forebrain (BFB to study both depolarization-evoked adenosine release and the steady state adenosine tone in rats, mice and hamsters. Adenosine release was evoked by high K(+, AMPA, NMDA and mGlu receptor agonists, but not by other transmitters associated with wakefulness such as orexin, histamine or neurotensin. Evoked and basal adenosine release in the BFB in vitro exhibited three key features: the magnitude of each varied systematically with the diurnal time at which the animal was sacrificed; sleep deprivation prior to sacrifice greatly increased both evoked adenosine release and the basal tone; and the enhancement of evoked adenosine release and basal tone resulting from sleep deprivation was reversed by the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS inhibitor, 1400 W. These data indicate that characteristics of adenosine release recorded in the BFB in vitro reflect those that have been linked in vivo to the homeostatic control of sleep. Our results provide methodologically independent support for a key role for induction of iNOS as a trigger for enhanced adenosine release following sleep deprivation and suggest that this induction may constitute a biochemical memory of this state.

  9. Antiphospholipid Antibodies Promote the Release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps: A New Mechanism of Thrombosis in the Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Gould, Travis J.; Rao, Ashish N.; Mazza, Levi F.; Morris, Alexandra E.; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos; Hernández-Ramírez, Diego; Bockenstedt, Paula L.; Liaw, Patricia C.; Cabral, Antonio R.; Knight, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), especially those targeting beta-2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI), are well known to activate endothelial cells, monocytes, and platelets, with prothrombotic implications. In contrast, the interaction of aPL with neutrophils has not been extensively studied. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have recently been recognized as an important activator of the coagulation cascade, as well as an integral component of arterial and venous thrombi. Here, we hypothesized that aPL might activate neutrophils to release NETs, thereby predisposing to the arterial and venous thrombosis inherent to the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Methods Neutrophils, sera, and plasma were prepared and characterized from patients with primary APS (n=52), or from healthy volunteers. No patient carried a concomitant diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Results Sera and plasma from patients with primary APS have elevated levels of both cell-free DNA and NETs, as compared to healthy volunteers. Freshly-isolated APS neutrophils are predisposed to high levels of spontaneous NET release. Further, APS-patient sera, as well as IgG purified from APS patients, stimulate NET release from control neutrophils. Human aPL monoclonals, especially those targeting β2GPI, also enhance NET release. The induction of APS NETs can be abrogated with inhibitors of reactive oxygen species formation and toll-like receptor 4 signaling. Highlighting the potential clinical relevance of these findings, APS NETs promote thrombin generation. Conclusion Neutrophil NET release warrants further investigation as a novel therapeutic target in APS. PMID:26097119

  10. Mechanisms of stress-induced cellular HSP72 release: implications for exercise-induced increases in extracellular HSP72.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Graeme I; Febbraio, Mark A

    2005-01-01

    The heat shock proteins are a family of highly conserved proteins with critical roles in maintaining cellular homeostasis and in protecting the cell from stressful conditions. While the critical intracellular roles of heat shock proteins are undisputed, evidence suggests that the cell possess the necessary machinery to actively secrete specific heat shock proteins in response to cellular stress. In this review, we firstly discuss the evidence that physical exercise induces the release of heat shock protein 72 from specific tissues in humans. Importantly, it appears as though this release is the result of an active secretory process, as opposed to non-specific processes such as cell lysis. Next we discuss recent in vitro evidence that has identified a mechanistic basis for the observation that cellular stress induces the release of a specific subset of heat shock proteins. Importantly, while the classical protein secretory pathway does not seem to be involved in the stress-induced release of HSP72, we discuss the evidence that lipid-rafts and exosomes are important mediators of the stress-induced release of HSP72.

  11. Antidepressant-like effects of the cannabinoid receptor ligands in the forced swimming test in mice: mechanism of action and possible interactions with cholinergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk-Slomka, Marta; Michalak, Agnieszka; Biala, Grazyna

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the experiments was to explore the role of the endocannabinoid system, through cannabinoid (CB) receptor ligands, nicotine and scopolamine, in the depression-related responses using the forced swimming test (FST) in mice. Our results revealed that acute injection of oleamide (10 and 20 mg/kg), a CB1 receptor agonist, caused antidepressant-like effect in the FST, while AM 251 (0.25-3 mg/kg), a CB1 receptor antagonist, did not provoke any effect in this test. Moreover, acute administration of both CB2 receptor agonist, JWH 133 (0.5 and 1 mg/kg) and CB2 receptor antagonist, AM 630 (0.5 mg/kg), exhibited antidepressant action. Antidepressant effects of oleamide and JWH 133 were attenuated by acute injection of both non-effective dose of AM 251, as well as AM 630. Among the all CB compounds used, only the combination of non-effective dose of oleamide (2.5 mg/kg) with non-effective dose of nicotine (0.5 mg/kg) caused an antidepressant effect. However, none of the CB receptor ligands, had influence on the antidepressant effects provoked by nicotine (0.2 mg/kg) injection. In turn, the combination of non-effective dose of oleamide (2.5 mg/kg); JWH (2 mg/kg) or AM 630 (2 mg/kg), but not of AM 251 (0.25 mg/kg), with non-effective dose of scopolamine (0.1 mg/kg), exhibited antidepressant properties. Indeed, all of the CB compounds used, intensified the antidepressant-like effects induced by an acute injection of scopolamine (0.3 mg/kg). Our results provide clear evidence that the endocannabinoid system participates in the depression-related behavior and through interactions with cholinergic system modulate these kind of responses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The contribution of the endogenous TRPV1 ligands 9-HODE and 13-HODE to nociceptive processing and their role in peripheral inflammatory pain mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsalem, Mohammad; Wong, Amy; Millns, Paul; Arya, Pallavi Huma; Chan, Michael Siang Liang; Bennett, Andrew; Barrett, David A; Chapman, Victoria; Kendall, David A

    2013-04-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) plays a fundamental role in the detection of heat and inflammatory pain responses. Here we investigated the contribution of two potential endogenous ligands [9- and 13- hydroxyoctadecadienoic acid (HODE)] to TRPV1-mediated noxious responses and inflammatory pain responses. 9- and 13-HODE, and their precursor, linoleic acid, were measured in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and in the hindpaws of control and carrageenan-inflamed rats by liquid chromatography/tandem electrospray mass spectrometry. Calcium imaging studies of DRG neurons were employed to determine the role of TRPV1 in mediating linoleic acid, 9-HODE- and 13-HODE-evoked responses, and the contribution of 15-lipoxygenase to the generation of the HODEs. Behavioural studies investigated the contribution of 9- and 13-HODE and 15-lipoxygenase to inflammatory pain behaviour. 9-HODE (35 ± 7 pmol g(-1)) and 13-HODE (32 ± 6 pmol g(-1)) were detected in hindpaw tissue, but were below the limits of detection in DRGs. Following exposure to linoleic acid, 9- and 13-HODE were detected in DRGs and TRPV1 antagonist-sensitive calcium responses evoked, which were blocked by the 15-lipoxygenase inhibitor PD146176 and an anti-13-HODE antibody. Levels of linoleic acid were significantly increased in the carrageenan-inflamed hindpaw (P PD146176 significantly (P < 0.01) attenuated carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia. This study demonstrates that, although 9- and 13-HODE can activate TRPV1 in DRG cell bodies, the evidence for a role of these lipids as endogenous peripheral TRPV1 ligands in a model of inflammatory pain is at best equivocal. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Radiation induced ligand loss from cobalt complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funston, A. M.; McFadyen, W.D.; Tregloan, P.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Due to the rapid nature of ligand dissociation from cobalt(II) complexes the study of the rate of ligand dissociation necessitates the use of a technique such as pulse radiolysis. This allows the rapid reduction of the corresponding cobalt(III) complex by a reducing radical, such as the aquated electron, to form the cobalt(II) complex. However, to date, no systematic study of either the mechanism of reduction or the influence of the electronic structure on the rate of ligand dissociation has been carried out. In order to understand these processes more fully the mechanism of reduction of a range of related cobalt(III) complexes by the aquated electron and the subsequent rate of ligand dissociation from the resulting cobalt(II) complexes is being investigated. It has been found that a number of processes are observed following the initial rapid reaction of the cobalt(III) complex with the aquated electron. Ultimately ligand loss is observed. Depending upon the complex, the initial processes observed may include the formation of coordinated radicals and electron transfer within the complex. For complexes containing aromatic ligands such as 2,2'-bipyridine, 1,10-phenanthroline and dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine the formation of a coordinated radical is observed as the initial reduction step. The kinetics of ligand dissociation of these complexes has been determined. The loss of monodentate ligands is fast and has been indistinguishable from the reduction processes when aromatic ligands are also present in the complex. However, for diamine chelates and diimine chelates spectra of the transient species can be resolved

  14. Schiff base ligand

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Low-temperature stoichiometric Schiff base reaction in air in 3 : 1 mole ratio between benz- aldehyde and triethylenetetramine (trien) in methanol yields a novel tetraaza µ-bis(bidentate) acyclic ligand L. It was .... electrochemical work was performed as reported in ..... change in ligand shape through change in oxidation.

  15. Pathways and mechanisms for product release in the engineered haloalkane dehalogenases explored using classical and random acceleration molecular dynamics simulations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klvana, M.; Pavlová, M.; Koudeláková, T.; Chaloupková, R.; Dvořák, P.; Prokop, Z.; Stsiapanava, A.; Kutý, Michal; Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana; Dohnálek, Jan; Kulhánek, P.; Damborský, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 392, č. 5 (2009), s. 1339-1356 ISSN 0022-2836 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06010 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505; CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : haloalkane dehalogenase * product release * random acceleration molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 3.871, year: 2009

  16. A GTPase chimera illustrates an uncoupled nucleotide affinity and release rate, Providing insight into the activation mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guilfoyle, Amy P.; Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Font Sadurni, Josep

    2014-01-01

    , biophysical studies on both the eukaryotic Gα proteins and the GTPase domain (NFeoB) of prokaryotic FeoB proteins have revealed conformational changes in the G5 loop that accompany nucleotide binding and release. However, it is unclear whether this conformational change in the G5 loop is a prerequisite...

  17. Contraction-stimulated glucose transport in muscle is controlled by AMPK and mechanical stress but not sarcoplasmatic reticulum Ca2+ release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Sylow, Lykke; Rose, Adam John

    2014-01-01

    signals through proteins such as AMPK. Here, we demonstrate in incubated mouse muscle that Ca(2+) release is neither sufficient nor strictly necessary to increase glucose transport. Rather, the glucose transport response is associated with metabolic feedback signals through AMPK, and mechanical stress......-activated signals. Furthermore, artificial stimulation of AMPK combined with passive stretch of muscle is additive and sufficient to elicit the full contraction glucose transport response. These results suggest that ATP-turnover and mechanical stress feedback are sufficient to fully increase glucose transport...

  18. Survival, differentiation, and neuroprotective mechanisms of human stem cells complexed with neurotrophin-3-releasing pharmacologically active microcarriers in an ex vivo model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daviaud, Nicolas; Garbayo, Elisa; Sindji, Laurence; Martínez-Serrano, Alberto; Schiller, Paul C; Montero-Menei, Claudia N

    2015-06-01

    Stem cell-based regenerative therapies hold great potential for the treatment of degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). We recently reported the repair and functional recovery after treatment with human marrow-isolated adult multilineage inducible (MIAMI) cells adhered to neurotrophin-3 (NT3) releasing pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs) in hemiparkinsonian rats. In order to comprehend this effect, the goal of the present work was to elucidate the survival, differentiation, and neuroprotective mechanisms of MIAMI cells and human neural stem cells (NSCs), both adhering to NT3-releasing PAMs in an ex vivo organotypic model of nigrostriatal degeneration made from brain sagittal slices. It was shown that PAMs led to a marked increase in MIAMI cell survival and neuronal differentiation when releasing NT3. A significant neuroprotective effect of MIAMI cells adhering to PAMs was also demonstrated. NSCs barely had a neuroprotective effect and differentiated mostly into dopaminergic neuronal cells when adhering to PAM-NT3. Moreover, those cells were able to release dopamine in a sufficient amount to induce a return to baseline levels. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analyses identified vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and stanniocalcin-1 as potential mediators of the neuroprotective effect of MIAMI cells and NSCs, respectively. It was also shown that VEGF locally stimulated tissue vascularization, which might improve graft survival, without excluding a direct neuroprotective effect of VEGF on dopaminergic neurons. These results indicate a prospective interest of human NSC/PAM and MIAMI cell/PAM complexes in tissue engineering for PD. Stem cell-based regenerative therapies hold great potential for the treatment of degenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). The present work elucidates and compares the survival, differentiation, and neuroprotective mechanisms

  19. Quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations of complexation of alkaline-earth and lanthanide cations by poly-amino-carboxylate ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durand, S.

    1999-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on lanthanide(III) and alkaline-earth(II) complexes with poly-amino-carboxylates (ethylene-diamino-tetra-acetate EDTA 4- , ethylene-diamino-tri-acetate-acetic acid EDTA(H) 3- , tetra-aza-cyclo-dodecane-tetra-acetate DOTA 4- , methylene-imidine-acetate MIDA 2- ) are reported. First, a consistent set of Lennard-Jones parameters for La 3+ , Eu 3+ and Lu 3+ cations has been derived from free energy calculations in aqueous solution. Observed differences in hydration free energies, coordination distances and hydration numbers are reproduced. Then, the solution structures of 1:1 complexes of alkaline-earth and/or lanthanide cations with EDTA 4- , EDTA(H) 3- , DOTA 4- and 1:2 complexes of lanthanide cations with MIDA 2- were studied by MD in water. In addition, free energy calculations were performed to study, for each ligand, the relative thermodynamic stabilities of complexes with Ca 2+ vs Sr 2+ and vs Ba 2+ on the one hand, and with La 3+ vs Eu 3+ and vs Lu 3+ on the other hand. Model does not take into account explicitly polarization and charge transfer. However, the results qualitatively agree with experimental complexation data (structure and selectivities). (author)

  20. Ligand modeling and design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, B.P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop and implement a molecular design basis for selecting organic ligands that would be used in the cost-effective removal of specific radionuclides from nuclear waste streams. Organic ligands with metal ion specificity are critical components in the development of solvent extraction and ion exchange processes that are highly selective for targeted radionuclides. The traditional approach to the development of such ligands involves lengthy programs of organic synthesis and testing, which in the absence of reliable methods for screening compounds before synthesis, results in wasted research effort. The author`s approach breaks down and simplifies this costly process with the aid of computer-based molecular modeling techniques. Commercial software for organic molecular modeling is being configured to examine the interactions between organic ligands and metal ions, yielding an inexpensive, commercially or readily available computational tool that can be used to predict the structures and energies of ligand-metal complexes. Users will be able to correlate the large body of existing experimental data on structure, solution binding affinity, and metal ion selectivity to develop structural design criteria. These criteria will provide a basis for selecting ligands that can be implemented in separations technologies through collaboration with other DOE national laboratories and private industry. The initial focus will be to select ether-based ligands that can be applied to the recovery and concentration of the alkali and alkaline earth metal ions including cesium, strontium, and radium.

  1. Suitability of Nickel Chromium Wire Cutters as Deployable Release Mechanisms on CubeSats in Low Earth Orbit

    OpenAIRE

    Gardiner, James

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the suitability of a nickel chromium wire cutter (NCWC) for use on the GASPACS (Get Away Special Passive Attitude Control Satellite) Mission. It is intended that when activated the NCWC will cut through a restraining wire and thereby release the stored energy of the deployable AeroBoom. Flight worthiness is based on favorable performance during functional testing to address known issues with the NCWC, such as wire burn through and cutting issues. In-depth testing discu...

  2. A novel experimental design method to optimize hydrophilic matrix formulations with drug release profiles and mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Du Hyung; Lim, Jun Yeul; Shin, Sangmun; Choi, Won Jun; Jeong, Seong Hoon; Lee, Sangkil

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the effects of hydrophilic polymers on the matrix system, an experimental design method was developed to integrate response surface methodology and the time series modeling. Moreover, the relationships among polymers on the matrix system were studied with the evaluation of physical properties including water uptake, mass loss, diffusion, and gelling index. A mixture simplex lattice design was proposed while considering eight input control factors: Polyethylene glycol 6000 (x1 ), polyethylene oxide (PEO) N-10 (x2 ), PEO 301 (x3 ), PEO coagulant (x4 ), PEO 303 (x5 ), hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) 100SR (x6 ), HPMC 4000SR (x7 ), and HPMC 10(5) SR (x8 ). With the modeling, optimal formulations were obtained depending on the four types of targets. The optimal formulations showed the four significant factors (x1 , x2 , x3 , and x8 ) and other four input factors (x4 , x5 , x6 , and x7 ) were not significant based on drug release profiles. Moreover, the optimization results were analyzed with estimated values, targets values, absolute biases, and relative biases based on observed times for the drug release rates with four different targets. The result showed that optimal solutions and target values had consistent patterns with small biases. On the basis of the physical properties of the optimal solutions, the type and ratio of the hydrophilic polymer and the relationships between polymers significantly influenced the physical properties of the system and drug release. This experimental design method is very useful in formulating a matrix system with optimal drug release. Moreover, it can distinctly confirm the relationships between excipients and the effects on the system with extensive and intensive evaluations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  3. Cholinesterases: structure of the active site and mechanism of the effect of cholinergic receptor blockers on the rate of interaction with ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antokhin, A M; Gainullina, E T; Taranchenko, V F; Ryzhikov, S B; Yavaeva, D K

    2010-01-01

    Modern views on the structure of cholinesterase active sites and the mechanism of their interaction with organophosphorus inhibitors are considered. The attention is focused on the mechanism of the effect of cholinergic receptor blockers, acetylcholine antagonists, on the rate of interaction of acetylcholine esterase with organophosphorus inhibitors.

  4. Cholinesterases: structure of the active site and mechanism of the effect of cholinergic receptor blockers on the rate of interaction with ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antokhin, A M; Gainullina, E T; Taranchenko, V F [Federal State Agency ' 27 Scientific Centre of Ministry of Defence of the Russian Federation' (Russian Federation); Ryzhikov, S B; Yavaeva, D K [Department of Physics, M.V.Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2010-10-19

    Modern views on the structure of cholinesterase active sites and the mechanism of their interaction with organophosphorus inhibitors are considered. The attention is focused on the mechanism of the effect of cholinergic receptor blockers, acetylcholine antagonists, on the rate of interaction of acetylcholine esterase with organophosphorus inhibitors.

  5. Forensic mental health clinician's experiences with and assessment of alliance regarding the patient's readiness to be released from mechanical restraint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lea Deichmann; Gildberg, Frederik Alkier; Bech, Per

    2018-01-01

    One of the main reasons for prolonged duration of mechanical restraint is patient behaviour in relation to the clinician-patient alliance. This article reports on the forensic mental health clinicians experiences of the clinician-patient alliance during mechanical restraint, and their assessment...

  6. Release of infectious cells from epidermal ulcers in Ichthyophonus sp.-infected Pacific herring (Clupea pallasii): evidence for multiple mechanisms of transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocan, Richard M; Gregg, Jacob L; Hershberger, Paul K

    2010-04-01

    A common clinical sign of ichthyophoniasis in herring and trout is "sandpaper" skin, a roughening of the epidermis characterized by the appearance of small papules, followed by ulceration and sloughing of the epithelium; early investigators hypothesized that these ulcers might be a means of transmitting the parasite, Ichthyophonus sp., without the necessity of ingesting an infected host. We examined the cells associated with the epidermal lesions and confirmed that they were viable Ichthyophonus sp. cells that were readily released from the skin into the mucous layer and ultimately into the aquatic environment. The released cells were infectious when injected into the body cavity of specific-pathogen-free herring. Our hypothesis is that different mechanisms of transmission occur in carnivorous and planktivorous hosts: Planktonic feeders become infected by ingestion of ulcer-derived cells, while carnivores become infected by ingestion of whole infected fish.

  7. Release of infectious cells from epidermal ulcers in Ichthyophonus sp.–infected Pacific Herring (Clupea pallasii): Evidence for multiple mechanisms of transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, Paul K.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Kocan, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    A common clinical sign of ichthyophoniasis in herring and trout is “sandpaper” skin, a roughening of the epidermis characterized by the appearance of small papules, followed by ulceration and sloughing of the epithelium; early investigators hypothesized that these ulcers might be a means of transmitting the parasite, Ichthyophonus sp., without the necessity of ingesting an infected host. We examined the cells associated with the epidermal lesions and confirmed that they were viable Ichthyophonus sp. cells that were readily released from the skin into the mucous layer and ultimately into the aquatic environment. The released cells were infectious when injected into the body cavity of specific-pathogen-free herring. Our hypothesis is that different mechanisms of transmission occur in carnivorous and planktivorous hosts: Planktonic feeders become infected by ingestion of ulcer-derived cells, while carnivores become infected by ingestion of whole infected fish.

  8. Biophysical elucidation of the mechanism of enhanced drug release and topical delivery from polymeric film-forming systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvie-Cook, Hazel; Frederiksen, Kit; Petersson, Karsten; Guy, Richard H; Gordeev, Sergey N

    2015-08-28

    The effect of incorporating the lipidic medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) into polymeric film-forming systems (FFS) for topical drug delivery has been evaluated. First, the in vitro release of betamethasone-17-valerate (BMV), a representative dermatological drug, was determined from FFS comprising either hydrophobic polyacrylate co-polymers, or hydrophilic hydroxypropyl cellulose, with and without MCT. Release was enhanced from both polymers in the presence of MCT. Atomic force microscopy imaging and nanoindentation of FFS with MCT revealed two-phase structured films with softer inclusions (0.5 to 4μm in diameter) surrounded by a more rigid structure. Chemical mapping with Raman micro-spectroscopy showed that MCT was primarily confined to the inclusions within the polymer, which predominated in the surrounding film. BMV was distributed throughout the film but was more concentrated outside the inclusions. Furthermore, while BMV dissolved better into the hydrophobic films, it was more soluble in the MCT inclusions in hydrophilic films, suggesting its increased availability for diffusion from these softer regions of the polymer and explaining the release enhancement observed. Second, ex vivo skin penetration studies clearly revealed that uptake of BMV was higher from hydrophobic FFS than that from the more hydrophilic polymer due, at least in part, to the superior anti-nucleation efficiency of the former. Drug was quickly taken up into the SC from which it then diffused continuously over a sustained period into the lower, viable skin layers. In the presence of MCT, the overall uptake of BMV was increased and provides the basis for further optimisation of FFS as simple, convenient and sustained formulations for topical therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Optimization of biodegradable sponges as controlled release drug matrices. I. Effect of moisture level on chitosan sponge mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Nagwa H; El-laithy, Hanan M; Tadros, Mina I

    2004-04-01

    Cross-linked chitosan sponges as controlled release drug carrier systems were developed. Tramadol hydrochloride, a centrally acting analgesic, was used as a model drug. The sponges were prepared by freeze-drying 1.25% and 2.5% (w/w) high and low M.wt. chitosan solutions, respectively, using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linking agent. The hardness of the prepared sponges was a function of glutaraldehyde concentration and volume where the optimum concentration that offered accepted sponge consistency was 5%. Below or above 5%, very soft or very hard and brittle sponges were obtained, respectively. The determined drug content in the prepared sponges was uniform and did not deviate markedly from the calculated amount. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the internal structures of the sponges. The SEM photos revealed that cross-linked high M.wt. chitosan sponges have larger size surface pores that form connections (channels) with the interior of the sponge than cross-linked low M.wt. ones. Moreover, crystals of the incorporated Tramadol hydrochloride were detected on the lamellae and within pores in both chitosan sponges. Differences in pore size and dissolution medium uptake capacity were crucial factors for the more delayed drug release from cross-linked low M.wt. chitosan sponges over high M.wt. ones at pH 7.4. Kinetic analysis of the release data using linear regression followed the Higuchi diffusion model over 12 hours. Setting storage conditions at room temperature under 80-92% relative humidity resulted in soft, elastic, and compressible sponges.

  10. Interaction between seed dormancy-release mechanism, environment and seed bank strategy for a widely distributed perennial legume, Parkinsonia aculeata (Caesalpinaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Klinken, Rieks D; Lukitsch, Bert; Cook, Carly

    2008-08-01

    Parkinsonia aculeata (Caesalpinaceae) is a perennial legume with seeds that have hard-seeded (physical) dormancy and are potentially very long-lived. Seed dormancy is a characteristic that can both help maximize the probability of seedling establishment and spread the risk of recruitment failure across years (bet-hedging). In this study, dormancy-release patterns are described across the diverse environments in which this species occurs in order to test whether wet heat (incubation under wet, warm-to-hot, conditions) alone can explain those patterns, and in order to determine the likely ecological role of physical dormancy across this species distribution. A seed burial trial was conducted across the full environmental distribution of P. aculeata in Australia (arid to wet-dry tropics, uplands to wetlands, soil surface to 10 cm deep). Wet heat explained the pattern of dormancy release across all environments. Most seeds stored in the laboratory remained dormant throughout the trial (at least 84 %). Dormancy release was quickest for seeds buried during the wet season at relatively high rainfall, upland sites (only 3 % of seeds remained dormant after 35 d). The longest-lived seeds were in wetlands (9 % remained dormant after almost 4 years) and on the soil surface (57 % after 2 years). There was no consistent correlation between increased aridity and rate of dormancy release. The results suggest that physical dormancy in P. aculeata is a mechanism for maximizing seedling establishment rather than a bet-hedging strategy. However, seed persistence can occur in environmental refuges where dormancy-release cues are weak and conditions for germination and establishment are poor (e.g. under dense vegetation or in more arid micro-environments) or unsuitable (e.g. when seeds are inundated or on the soil surface). Risks of recruitment failure in suboptimal environments could therefore be reduced by inter-year fluctuations in microclimate or seed movement.

  11. Release kinetics and mechanisms of trace heavy metals from cement based material; Cinetiques et mecanismes de relargage des metaux lourds presents en traces dans les matrices cimentaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moudilou, E.

    2002-12-15

    Chemical species contained in a solid matrix may be transferred to the environment through water leaching. Previous studies of trace metals released from building materials (particularly cement-based ones) highlight an important analytical difficulty. The aim of this study is to determine the kinetics and the mechanisms involved in the release of trace heavy metals (Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, V and Zn) from industrial cement pastes (usually ranging from 20 to 300 ppm). The development of a dynamic leaching system, named CTG-LEACHCRETE, (used at pH=5, 20 C) which permits the evaluation of the kinetics of trace heavy metals is presented in the first part. Also, innovative solid analysis techniques (ICP-MS-Laser Ablation, local and Grazing Incidence X-rays Diffraction (GIXD) technique) were used to characterise the cement-degraded layers formed during leaching experiments. These techniques enable to monitor the mineralogical evolution and the distribution of trace metals in these areas. The confrontation of these two approaches, kinetic and solid analysis, coupled with a thorough investigation of previously developed models, lead to proposals concerning the mechanisms of release of the trace heavy metals studied. In all the cement pastes studied (CPA-CEM I, CPJ-CEM II/A and CLC-CEM V/A), chromium is trapped in ettringite by substitution SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}(U)CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and its release is then controlled by the dissolution of this hydrate. The behaviour of copper, nickel and zinc in degraded areas and in leachates, are correlated to the silicon of the hydrated calcium silicate (CSH), which imply that they are localised there. Lead, was never detected in the leachates. But it is also correlated to the silicon in the degraded layers. (author)

  12. Ligand-selective activation of heterologously-expressed mammalian olfactory receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukhanov, K; Bobkov, Y; Corey, E A; Ache, B W

    2014-10-01

    Mammalian olfactory receptors (ORs) appear to have the capacity to couple to multiple G protein-coupled signaling pathways in a ligand-dependent selective manner. To better understand the mechanisms and molecular range of such ligand selectivity, we expressed the mouse eugenol OR (mOR-EG) in HEK293T cells together with Gα15 to monitor activation of the phospholipase-C (PLC) signaling pathway and/or Gαolf to monitor activation of the adenylate cyclase (AC) signaling pathway, resulting in intracellular Ca(2+) release and/or Ca(2+) influx through a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, respectively. PLC-dependent responses differed dynamically from AC-dependent responses, allowing them to be distinguished when Gα15 and Gαolf were co-expressed. The dynamic difference in readout was independent of the receptor, the heterologous expression system, and the ligand concentration. Of 17 reported mOR-EG ligands tested, including eugenol, its analogs, and structurally dissimilar compounds (mousse cristal, nootkatone, orivone), some equally activated both signaling pathways, some differentially activated both signaling pathways, and some had no noticeable effect even at 1-5mM. Our findings argue that mOR-EG, when heterologously expressed, can couple to two different signaling pathways in a ligand selective manner. The challenge now is to determine the potential of mOR-EG, and perhaps other ORs, to activate multiple signaling pathways in a ligand selective manner in native ORNs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Presynaptic nicotinic α7 and non-α7 receptors stimulate endogenous GABA release from rat hippocampal synaptosomes through two mechanisms of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Zappettini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although converging evidence has suggested that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR play a role in the modulation of GABA release in rat hippocampus, the specific involvement of different nAChR subtypes at presynaptic level is still a matter of debate. In the present work we investigated, using selective α7 and α4β2 nAChR agonists, the presence of different nAChR subtypes on hippocampal GABA nerve endings to assess to what extent and through which mechanisms they stimulate endogenous GABA release. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: All agonists elicited GABA overflow. Choline (Ch-evoked GABA overflow was dependent to external Ca(2+, but unaltered in the presence of Cd(2+, tetrodotoxin (TTX, dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE and 1-(4,4-Diphenyl-3-butenyl-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid hydrochloride SKF 89976A. The effect of Ch was blocked by methyllycaconitine (MLA, α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX, dantrolene, thapsigargin and xestospongin C, suggesting that GABA release might be triggered by Ca(2+ entry into synaptosomes through the α7 nAChR channel with the involvement of calcium from intracellular stores. Additionally, 5-Iodo-A-85380 dihydrochloride (5IA85380 elicited GABA overflow, which was Ca(2+ dependent, blocked by Cd(2+, and significantly inhibited by TTX and DHβE, but unaffected by MLA, SKF 89976A, thapsigargin and xestospongin C and dantrolene. These findings confirm the involvement of α4β2 nAChR in 5IA85380-induced GABA release that seems to occur following membrane depolarization and opening calcium channels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Rat hippocampal synaptosomes possess both α7 and α4β2 nAChR subtypes, which can modulate GABA release via two distinct mechanisms of action. The finding that GABA release evoked by the mixture of sub-maximal concentration of 5IA85380 plus sub-threshold concentrations of Ch was significantly larger than that elicited by the sum of the effects of the two agonists is compatible with the possibility that

  14. Mechanical properties, biological activity and protein controlled release by poly(vinyl alcohol)–bioglass/chitosan–collagen composite scaffolds: A bone tissue engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pon-On, Weeraphat, E-mail: fsciwpp@ku.ac.th [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand); Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol; Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Thongbunchoo, Jirawan; Krishnamra, Nateetip [Center of Calcium and Bone Research (COCAB), Faculty of Science, Mahidol University (Thailand); Department of Physiology, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University (Thailand); Tang, I-Ming [ThEP Center, Commission of Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Rd. (Thailand); Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Kasetsart University, Bangkok 10900 (Thailand)

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, composite scaffolds made with different weight ratios (0.5:1, 1:1 and 2:1) of bioactive glass (15Ca:80Si:5P) (BG)/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) (PVABG) and chitosan (Chi)/collagen (Col) (ChiCol) were prepared by three mechanical freeze–thaw followed by freeze-drying to obtain the porous scaffolds. The mechanical properties and the in vitro biocompatibility of the composite scaffolds to simulated body fluid (SBF) and to rat osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells were investigated. The results from the studies indicated that the porosity and compressive strength were controlled by the weight ratio of PVABG:ChiCol. The highest compressive modulus of the composites made was 214.64 MPa which was for the 1:1 weight ratio PVABG:ChiCol. Mineralization study in SBF showed the formation of apatite crystals on the PVABG:ChiCol surface after 7 days of incubation. In vitro cell availability and proliferation tests confirmed the osteoblast attachment and growth on the PVABG:ChiCol surface. MTT and ALP tests on the 1:1 weight ratio PVABG:ChiCol composite indicated that the UMR-106 cells were viable. Alkaline phosphatase activity was found to increase with increasing culturing time. In addition, we showed the potential of PVABG:ChiCol drug delivery through PBS solution studies. 81.14% of BSA loading had been achieved and controlled release for over four weeks was observed. Our results indicated that the PVABG:ChiCol composites, especially the 1:1 weight ratio composite exhibited significantly improved mechanical, mineral deposition, biological properties and controlled release. This made them potential candidates for bone tissue engineering applications. - Graphical abstract: Mechanical properties, biological activity and protein controlled release by poly(vinyl alcohol)–bioglass/chitosan–collagen composite scaffolds: A bone tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • Preparation of PVABG:ChiCol hybrid composites and their bioactivities • Mechanical

  15. Mechanical properties, biological activity and protein controlled release by poly(vinyl alcohol)–bioglass/chitosan–collagen composite scaffolds: A bone tissue engineering applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pon-On, Weeraphat; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol; Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Thongbunchoo, Jirawan; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Tang, I-Ming

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, composite scaffolds made with different weight ratios (0.5:1, 1:1 and 2:1) of bioactive glass (15Ca:80Si:5P) (BG)/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) (PVABG) and chitosan (Chi)/collagen (Col) (ChiCol) were prepared by three mechanical freeze–thaw followed by freeze-drying to obtain the porous scaffolds. The mechanical properties and the in vitro biocompatibility of the composite scaffolds to simulated body fluid (SBF) and to rat osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells were investigated. The results from the studies indicated that the porosity and compressive strength were controlled by the weight ratio of PVABG:ChiCol. The highest compressive modulus of the composites made was 214.64 MPa which was for the 1:1 weight ratio PVABG:ChiCol. Mineralization study in SBF showed the formation of apatite crystals on the PVABG:ChiCol surface after 7 days of incubation. In vitro cell availability and proliferation tests confirmed the osteoblast attachment and growth on the PVABG:ChiCol surface. MTT and ALP tests on the 1:1 weight ratio PVABG:ChiCol composite indicated that the UMR-106 cells were viable. Alkaline phosphatase activity was found to increase with increasing culturing time. In addition, we showed the potential of PVABG:ChiCol drug delivery through PBS solution studies. 81.14% of BSA loading had been achieved and controlled release for over four weeks was observed. Our results indicated that the PVABG:ChiCol composites, especially the 1:1 weight ratio composite exhibited significantly improved mechanical, mineral deposition, biological properties and controlled release. This made them potential candidates for bone tissue engineering applications. - Graphical abstract: Mechanical properties, biological activity and protein controlled release by poly(vinyl alcohol)–bioglass/chitosan–collagen composite scaffolds: A bone tissue engineering applications. - Highlights: • Preparation of PVABG:ChiCol hybrid composites and their bioactivities • Mechanical

  16. Loading and release mechanisms of a biocide in polystyrene-block-poly(acrylic acid) block copolymer micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyhnalkova, Renata; Eisenberg, Adi; van de Ven, Theo G M

    2008-07-24

    The kinetics of loading of polystyrene197-block-poly(acrylic acid)47 (PS197-b-PAA47) micelles, suspended in water, with thiocyanomethylthiobenzothiazole biocide and its subsequent release were investigated. Loading of the micelles was found to be a two-step process. First, the surface of the PS core of the micelles is saturated with biocide, with a rate determined by the transfer of solid biocide to micelles during transient micelle-biocide contacts. Next, the biocide penetrates as a front into the micelles, lowering the Tg in the process (non-Fickian case II diffusion). The slow rate of release is governed by the height of the energy barrier that a biocide molecule must overcome to pass from PS into water, resulting in a uniform biocide concentration within the micelle, until Tg is increased to the point that diffusion inside the micelles becomes very slow. Maximum loading of biocide into micelles is approximately 30% (w/w) and is achieved in 1 h. From partition experiments, it can be concluded that the biocide has a similar preference for polystyrene as for ethylbenzene over water, implying that the maximum loading is governed by thermodynamics.

  17. Groundwater hydrochemistry,Variation of Arsenic and Monsoonal influence : An explanation regarding release mechanism assisted by isotopic signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Debashis

    2017-04-01

    The investigation examines the groundwater and surface water geochemistry of two different geomorphics in West Bengal. During investigation, several key factors are taken into account e.g. potential influences of groundwater abstraction on the hydrochemical evolution of the aquifer, the effect of different water inputs (monsoon rain, irrigation and downward percolation from surface water impoundments) to the groundwater system and accompanying As release. A natural levee and low-land flood plain have been chosen for said investigation. The results reveal that the stable isotopic signatures of oxygen (d18O) and hydrogen (d2H) are governed by local precipitation, the isotopic composition falls sub-parallel to the Global Meteoric Water Line (GMWL). The Cl/Br molar ratio indicates vertical recharge into the wells within the flood plain area, notably during the post-monsoon season, while influences of both evaporation and vertical mixing are visible within the natural levee wells. The important finding is the increasing mean DOC concentrations (from 1.33 to 6.29 mg/L), from pre- to post-monsoon season, which is indicative of possible inflow of organic carbon to the aquifer during the monsoonal recharge. This suggests the subsequent increase in AsT, Fe(II) and HCO3 highlighting a possible initial episode of reductive dissolution of As-rich Fe-oxyhydroxides. The abrupt increase in the mean As(III) proportions (by 223%), notably in the flood plain samples during the post-monsoon season. This is attended by a slight increase in mean AsT (7%). This may refer to anaerobic microbial degradation of DOC coupled with the reduction of As(V) to As(III) without resulting in additional As release from the aquifer sediments.

  18. Characteristic molecular vibrations of adenosine receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Hyun Keun; Yang, Jin-San; Joung, Je-Gun; Zhang, Byoung-Tak; Oh, S June

    2015-02-13

    Although the regulation of membrane receptor activation is known to be crucial for molecular signal transduction, the molecular mechanism underlying receptor activation is not fully elucidated. Here we study the physicochemical nature of membrane receptor behavior by investigating the characteristic molecular vibrations of receptor ligands using computational chemistry and informatics methods. By using information gain, t-tests, and support vector machines, we have identified highly informative features of adenosine receptor (AdoR) ligand and corresponding functional amino acid residues such as Asn (6.55) of AdoR that has informative significance and is indispensable for ligand recognition of AdoRs. These findings may provide new perspectives and insights into the fundamental mechanism of class A G protein-coupled receptor activation. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Temperature and magnetism bi-responsive molecularly imprinted polymers: Preparation, adsorption mechanism and properties as drug delivery system for sustained release of 5-fluorouracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Longfei; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Huan; Yang, Yongzhen; Liu, Xuguang; Chen, Yongkang

    2016-04-01

    Temperature and magnetism bi-responsive molecularly imprinted polymers (TMMIPs) based on Fe3O4-encapsulating carbon nanospheres were prepared by free radical polymerization, and applied to selective adsorption and controlled release of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) from an aqueous solution. Characterization results show that the as-synthesized TMMIPs have an average diameter of about 150 nm with a typical core-shell structure, and the thickness of the coating layer is approximately 50 nm. TMMIPs also displayed obvious magnetic properties and thermo-sensitivity. The adsorption results show that the prepared TMMIPs exhibit good adsorption capacity (up to 96.53 mg/g at 25 °C) and recognition towards 5-FU. The studies on 5-FU loading and release in vitro suggest that the release rate increases with increasing temperature. Meanwhile, adsorption mechanisms were explored by using a computational analysis to simulate the imprinted site towards 5-FU. The interaction energy between the imprinted site and 5-FU is -112.24 kJ/mol, originating from a hydrogen bond, Van der Waals forces and a hydrophobic interaction between functional groups located on 5-FU and a NIPAM monomer. The electrostatic potential charges and population analysis results suggest that the imprinted site of 5-FU can be introduced on the surface of TMMIPs, confirming their selective adsorption behavior for 5-FU. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Characterization of Selectin Ligands on Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Hanan

    2013-05-18

    Successful bone marrow (BM) transplantation requires the homing of the transplanted hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) to their bone marrow niche, where they undergo differentiation to form mature cells that are eventually released into the peripheral blood. However, the survival rate of patients receiving BM transplants is poor since many of the transplanted HSPCs do not make it to their BM niches in the recipient’s body. Since the availability of HSPCs from traditional sources is limited, transplanting more number of HSPCs is not a solution to this problem. This study aims to characterize the adhesion molecules mediating cell migration in order to better understand the adhesion mechanisms of HSCs with the bone marrow endothelium. This will aid in developing future tools to improve the clinical transplantation of HSPCs. This study also aims to understand the factors that influence HSPC proliferation in the bone marrow niche. E-selectin plays an important role in the process of homing; however, its ligands on HSPCs are not well characterized. We used western blotting and immunoprecipitation to show that endomucin is expressed on HSPCs and plays a role in the binding of HSPCs to E-selectin. We also studied the effect of recombinant E-selectin on the expression of a newly characterized E-selectin ligand in our lab, CD34, in HSPCs. This will provide us insight into novel roles for endomucin and E-selectin and help us to understand the factors influencing HSPC migration to BM endothelium.

  1. Mechanisms of strand break formation in DNA due to the direct effect of ionizing radiation: the dependency of free base release on the length of alternating CG oligodeoxynucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kiran K; Razskazovskiy, Yuriy; Purkayastha, Shubhadeep; Bernhard, William A

    2009-06-11

    The question of how NA base sequence influences the yield of DNA strand breaks produced by the direct effect of ionizing radiation was investigated in a series of oligodeoxynucleotides of the form (d(CG)(n))(2) and (d(GC)(n))(2). The yields of free base release from X-irradiated DNA films containing 2.5 waters/nucleotide were measured by HPLC as a function of oligomer length. For (d(CG)(n))(2), the ratio of the Gua yield to Cyt yield, R, was relatively constant at 2.4-2.5 for n = 2-4 and it decreased to 1.2 as n increased from 5 to 10. When Gua was moved to the 5' end, for example going from d(CG)(5) to d(GC)(5), R dropped from 1.9 +/- 0.1 to 1.1 +/- 0.1. These effects are poorly described if the chemistry at the oligomer ends is assumed to be independent of the remainder of the oligomer. A mathematical model incorporating charge transfer through the base stack was derived to explain these effects. In addition, EPR was used to measure the yield of trapped-deoxyribose radicals at 4 K following X-irradiation at 4 K. The yield of free base release was substantially greater, by 50-100 nmol/J, than the yield of trapped-deoxyribose radicals. Therefore, a large fraction of free base release stems from a nonradical intermediate. For this intermediate, a deoxyribose carbocation formed by two one-electron oxidations is proposed. This reaction pathway requires that the hole (electron loss site) transfers through the base stack and, upon encountering a deoxyribose hole, oxidizes that site to form a deoxyribose carbocation. This reaction mechanism provides a consistent way of explaining both the absence of trapped radical intermediates and the unusual dependence of free base release on oligomer length.

  2. Contraction-stimulated glucose transport in muscle is controlled by AMPK and mechanical stress but not sarcoplasmatic reticulum Ca2+ release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E. Jensen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how muscle contraction orchestrates insulin-independent muscle glucose transport may enable development of hyperglycemia-treating drugs. The prevailing concept implicates Ca2+ as a key feed forward regulator of glucose transport with secondary fine-tuning by metabolic feedback signals through proteins such as AMPK. Here, we demonstrate in incubated mouse muscle that Ca2+ release is neither sufficient nor strictly necessary to increase glucose transport. Rather, the glucose transport response is associated with metabolic feedback signals through AMPK, and mechanical stress-activated signals. Furthermore, artificial stimulation of AMPK combined with passive stretch of muscle is additive and sufficient to elicit the full contraction glucose transport response. These results suggest that ATP-turnover and mechanical stress feedback are sufficient to fully increase glucose transport during muscle contraction, and call for a major reconsideration of the established Ca2+ centric paradigm.

  3. Emergence and fate of cyclic volatile polydimethylsiloxanes (D4, D5) in municipal waste streams: release mechanisms, partitioning and persistence in air, water, soil and sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surita, Sharon C; Tansel, Berrin

    2014-01-15

    Siloxane use in consumer products (i.e., fabrics, paper, concrete, wood, adhesive surfaces) has significantly increased in recent years due to their excellent water repelling and antimicrobial characteristics. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the release mechanisms of two siloxane compounds, octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5), which have been detected both at landfills and wastewater treatment plants, estimate persistence times in different media, and project release quantities over time in relation to their increasing use. Analyses were conducted based on fate and transport mechanisms after siloxanes enter waste streams. Due to their high volatility, the majority of D4 and D5 end up in the biogas during decomposition. D5 is about ten times more likely to partition into the solid phase (i.e., soil, biosolids). D5 concentrations in the wastewater influent and biogas are about 16 times and 18 times higher respectively, in comparison to the detected levels of D4. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. In vivo evaluation of the potential neurotoxicity of aerosols released from mechanical stress of nano-TiO2 additived paints in mice chronically exposed by inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manixay, S.; Delaby, S.; Gaie-Levrel, F.; Wiart, M.; Motzkus, C.; Bencsik, A.

    2017-06-01

    Engineered Nanomaterials (ENM) provide technical and specific benefits due to their physical-chemical properties at the nanometer scale. For instance, many ENM are used to improve products in the building industry. Nanoscaled titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most used ENM in this industry. Incorporated in different matrix, cement, glass, paints… TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) provide the final product with anti-UV, air purification and self-cleaning properties, thanks to their photocatalytic activity. However, ageing processes of such products, as photocatalytic paints, during a mechanical stress have been shown to release TiO2 NPs from this matrix associated with sanding dust. Thus, workers who sand painted walls could be exposed to TiO2 NPs through inhalation. As inhalation may lead to a translocation of particulate matter to the brain via olfactory or trigeminal nerves, there is an urgent need for evaluating a potential neurotoxicity. In order to provide new knowledge on this topic, we developed a dedicated experimental set-up using a rodent model exposed via inhalation. The aerosol released from a mechanical stress of photocatalytic paints containing TiO2 NPs was characterized and coupled to an exposition chamber containing group of mice free to move and chronically exposed (2 hours per day for 5 days a week during 8 weeks).

  5. In vivo evaluation of the potential neurotoxicity of aerosols released from mechanical stress of nano-TiO2 additived paints in mice chronically exposed by inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manixay, S; Bencsik, A; Delaby, S; Gaie-Levrel, F; Wiart, M; Motzkus, C

    2017-01-01

    Engineered Nanomaterials (ENM) provide technical and specific benefits due to their physical-chemical properties at the nanometer scale. For instance, many ENM are used to improve products in the building industry. Nanoscaled titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) is one of the most used ENM in this industry. Incorporated in different matrix, cement, glass, paints… TiO 2 nanoparticles (NPs) provide the final product with anti-UV, air purification and self-cleaning properties, thanks to their photocatalytic activity. However, ageing processes of such products, as photocatalytic paints, during a mechanical stress have been shown to release TiO 2 NPs from this matrix associated with sanding dust. Thus, workers who sand painted walls could be exposed to TiO 2 NPs through inhalation. As inhalation may lead to a translocation of particulate matter to the brain via olfactory or trigeminal nerves, there is an urgent need for evaluating a potential neurotoxicity. In order to provide new knowledge on this topic, we developed a dedicated experimental set-up using a rodent model exposed via inhalation. The aerosol released from a mechanical stress of photocatalytic paints containing TiO 2 NPs was characterized and coupled to an exposition chamber containing group of mice free to move and chronically exposed (2 hours per day for 5 days a week during 8 weeks). (paper)

  6. Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford single-shell waste tanks 241-A-101, 241-S-106, and 241-U-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassat, S.D.; Caley, S.M.; Bredt, P.R.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Rinehart, D.E.; Forbes, S.V.

    1998-09-01

    The 177 underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site contain millions of gallons of radioactive waste resulting from the purification of nuclear materials and related processes. Through various mechanisms, flammable gas mixtures of hydrogen, ammonia, methane, and nitrous oxide are generated and retained in significant quantities within the waste in many (∼25) of these tanks. The potential for large releases of retained gas from these wastes creates a flammability hazard. It is a critical component of the effort to understand the flammability hazard and a primary goal of this laboratory investigation to establish an understanding of the mechanisms of gas retention and release in these wastes. The results of bubble retention experimental studies using waste samples from several waste tanks and a variety of waste types support resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue. Gas bubble retention information gained in the pursuit of safe storage will, in turn, benefit future waste operations including salt-well pumping, waste transfers, and sluicing/retrieval

  7. Mechanical injury induces brain endothelial-derived microvesicle release: Implications for cerebral vascular injury during traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison M. Andrews

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that the endothelium responds to mechanical forces induced by changes in shear stress and mechanotransduction. However, our understanding of vascular remodeling following traumatic brain injury (TBI remains incomplete. Recently published studies have revealed that lung and umbilical endothelial cells produce extracellular microvesicles (eMVs, such as microparticles, in response to changes in mechanical forces (blood flow and mechanical injury. Yet, to date, no studies have shown whether brain endothelial cells produce eMVs following TBI. The brain endothelium is highly specialized and forms the blood-brain barrier (BBB, which regulates diffusion and transport of solutes into the brain. This specialization is largely due to the presence of tight junction proteins (TJPs between neighboring endothelial cells. Following TBI, a breakdown in tight junction complexes at the BBB leads to increased permeability, which greatly contributes to the secondary phase of injury. We have therefore tested the hypothesis that brain endothelium responds to mechanical injury, by producing eMVs that contain brain endothelial proteins, specifically TJPs. In our study, primary human adult brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC were subjected to rapid mechanical injury to simulate the abrupt endothelial disruption that can occur in the primary injury phase of TBI. eMVs were isolated from the media following injury at 2, 6, 24 and 48 hrs. Western blot analysis of eMVs demonstrated a time-dependent increase in TJP occludin, PECAM-1 and ICAM-1 following mechanical injury. In addition, activation of ARF6, a small GTPase linked to extracellular vesicle production, was increased after injury. To confirm these results in vivo, mice were subjected to sham surgery or TBI and blood plasma was collected 24 hrs post-injury. Isolation and analysis of eMVs from blood plasma using cryo-EM and flow cytometry revealed elevated levels of vesicles containing

  8. Mechanical Injury Induces Brain Endothelial-Derived Microvesicle Release: Implications for Cerebral Vascular Injury during Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Allison M; Lutton, Evan M; Merkel, Steven F; Razmpour, Roshanak; Ramirez, Servio H

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that the endothelium responds to mechanical forces induced by changes in shear stress and strain. However, our understanding of vascular remodeling following traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains incomplete. Recently published studies have revealed that lung and umbilical endothelial cells produce extracellular microvesicles (eMVs), such as microparticles, in response to changes in mechanical forces (blood flow and mechanical injury). Yet, to date, no studies have shown whether brain endothelial cells produce eMVs following TBI. The brain endothelium is highly specialized and forms the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which regulates diffusion and transport of solutes into the brain. This specialization is largely due to the presence of tight junction proteins (TJPs) between neighboring endothelial cells. Following TBI, a breakdown in tight junction complexes at the BBB leads to increased permeability, which greatly contributes to the secondary phase of injury. We have therefore tested the hypothesis that brain endothelium responds to mechanical injury, by producing eMVs that contain brain endothelial proteins, specifically TJPs. In our study, primary human adult brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) were subjected to rapid mechanical injury to simulate the abrupt endothelial disruption that can occur in the primary injury phase of TBI. eMVs were isolated from the media following injury at 2, 6, 24, and 48 h. Western blot analysis of eMVs demonstrated a time-dependent increase in TJP occludin, PECAM-1 and ICAM-1 following mechanical injury. In addition, activation of ARF6, a small GTPase linked to extracellular vesicle production, was increased after injury. To confirm these results in vivo, mice were subjected to sham surgery or TBI and blood plasma was collected 24 h post-injury. Isolation and analysis of eMVs from blood plasma using cryo-EM and flow cytometry revealed elevated levels of vesicles containing occludin following brain trauma

  9. Structure of eEF3 and the mechanism of transfer RNA release from the E-site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Brix Folsted; Becker, T.; Blau, M.

    2006-01-01

    Elongation factor eEF3 is an ATPase, which, in addition to the two canonical factors eEF1A and eEF2, serves an essential function in the translation cycle of fungi. eEF3 is required for the binding of the aatRNA-eEF1A-GTP ternary complex to the ribosomal A-site and has been suggested to facilitate...... the clearance of deacyl-tRNA from the E-site. Here, we present the crystal structure of eEF3 showing that it consists of an N-terminal HEAT repeat domain, followed by a four-helix bundle and two ABC-type ATPase domains with a chromo-domain inserted in ABC2. Moreover, we present the cryo-EM structure of the ATP......-bound form of eEF3 in complex with the post-translocational state 80S ribosome from yeast. eEF3 uses an entirely new factor binding site near the ribosomal E-site, with the chromodomain stabilizing the ribosomal L1 stalk in an open conformation, thus, allowing tRNA release....

  10. THERMODYNAMICS OF PROTEIN-LIGAND INTERACTIONS AND THEIR ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rummi Devi Saini

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Physiological processes are controlled mainly by intermolecular recognition mechanisms which involve protein–protein and protein–ligand interactions with a high specificity and affinity to form a specific complex. Proteins being an important class of macromolecules in biological systems, it is important to understand their actions through binding to other molecules of proteins or ligands. In fact, the binding of low molecular weight ligands to proteins plays a significant role in regulating biological processes such as cellular metabolism and signal transmission. Therefore knowledge of the protein–ligand interactions and the knowledge of the mechanisms involved in the protein-ligand recognition and binding are key in understanding biology at molecular level which will facilitate the discovery, design, and development of drugs. In this review, the mechanisms involved in protein–ligand binding, the binding kinetics, thermodynamic concepts and binding driving forces are discussed. Thermodynamic mechanisms involved in a few important protein-ligand binding are described. Various spectroscopic, non-spectroscopic and computational method for analysis of protein–ligand binding are also discussed.

  11. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Odom, Susan A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry; Sottos, Nancy R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; White, Scott R. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Aerospace Engineering; Moore, Jeffrey S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Beckman Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology and Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  12. Mechanism of pyridine-ligand exchanges at the different labile sites of 3d heterometallic and mixed valence mu3-oxo trinuclear clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novitchi, Ghenadie; Riblet, Fabrice; Scopelliti, Rosario; Helm, Lothar; Gulea, Aurelian; Merbach, André E

    2008-11-17

    The syntheses and single crystal X-ray structural analysis of five novel hetero- and homometallic mu 3-oxo trinuclear cluster with the formula [Fe (III) 2M (II)(mu 3-O)(mu-O 2CCH 3) 6(4-Rpy) 3]. x(4-Rpy). y(CH 3CN) where R = Ph for 1(Fe 2Mn), 2(Fe 2Fe), 3(Fe 2Co), 4(Fe 2Ni) and R = CF 3 for 5(Fe 2Co), are reported. The persistence of the structure for compounds 2- 5 in dichloromethane solution in the temperature range 190-320 K is demonstrated by (1)H and (19)F NMR spectroscopy. Even at the lowest temperature, the electron exchange in the homometallic mixed-valence compound 2(Fe 2Fe) is in the fast regime at the NMR time scale. Variable temperature and pressure NMR line broadening allowed quantifying the fast coordinated/free 4-Rpy exchanges at the two labile metal centers in these clusters: 2: Fe (III)( k (298)/10 (3) s (-1) = 16.6; Delta H (++) = 60.32 kJ mol (-1); Delta S (++) = + 34.8 J K (-1) mol (-1); Delta V (++) = + 12.5 cm (3) mol (-1)); 3: Fe (11.9; 58.92; +30.7; +10.6) and Co (2.8; 68.24; +49.8; +13.9); 4: Fe(12.2; 67.91; +61.0; -) and Ni (0.37; 78.62; +67.8; +12.3); 5: Fe (46; 58.21; +39.3; +14.2) and Co (4.7; 55.37; +11.2; +10.9). A limiting D mechanism is assigned to these exchange reactions. This assignment is based on a first-order rate law, the detection of intermediates, the positive and large entropies and volumes of activation. The order of reactivity k (Co) > k (Ni) is expected for a D mechanism at these metal centers: their low exchange rates are due to their strong binding with the 4-Rpy donor. Surrounded by oxygen donors the d (5) iron(III) usually reacts associatively; however, here due to low affinity of this ion for nitrogen the mechanism is D and the rate of exchange is very fast, even faster than on the divalent ions. There is no significant effect of the divalent ion in cluster 2, 3, and 5 on the exchange rates of 4-Phpy at the iron center, which seems to indicate that the specific electronic interactions between the three ions making

  13. Metastatic melanoma cells escape from immunosurveillance through the novel mechanism of releasing nitric oxide to induce dysfunction of immunocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X M; Xu, Q

    2001-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is known to facilitate tumour metastasis through the promotion of angiogenesis, vascular dilation, platelet aggregation, etc. In the present study we explored its novel role in producing dysfunction of the host immune system in the metastasis of murine metastatic melanoma B16-BL6 cells. A significant reduction in the mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) was observed in the spleen cells from B16-BL6-bearing mice, but not in those from mice bearing the parent cell B16. When B16-BL6 cells were added in vitro to the MLR, a significant decrease was also found, even when they were co-cultured with the lymphocytes in two compartments of a Transwell chamber separated by an 8.0 microm filter. The supernatant from cultured B16-BL6 but not B16 cells, which had a greatly increased NO activity, significantly inhibited concanavalin A- and lipopolysaccharide-induced lymphocyte proliferation. A remarkably higher expression of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) was detected in B16-BL6 cells than in B16 cells. Nomega-Nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA), a NO synthase inhibitor and superoxide dismutase, significantly antagonized the above inhibition by B16-BL6 cells, while l-arginine, a NO precursor, and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-d,l-penicillamine, a NO donor, strengthened the inhibition. Furthermore, l-NNA significantly inhibited lung metastasis of B16-BL6 cells, while l-arginine tended to enhance the metastasis. The cytotoxicity of B16-BL6-specific T-cells was significantly decreased by pre-culture with B16-BL6 cells in a Transwell chamber or the culture supernatants of B16-BL6 cells, whereas l-iminoethyl-lysine, a selective inhibitor of iNOS, showed a significant recovery from the disease. These results suggest that NO released by metastatic tumour cells may impair the immune system, which facilitates the escape from immunosurveillance and metastasis of tumour cells.

  14. Mechanical energy release and fuel fragmentation in high energy deposition into fuel under a reactivity initiated accident condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruta, Takaharu; Saito, Shinzo; Ochiai, Masaaki

    1985-01-01

    The fuel fragmentation is one of important subjects to be studied, since it is one of basic processes of molten fuel-coolant interaction (MFCI) and it has not yet been made clear enough. Accordingly, UO 2 fuel fragmentation was studied in the NSRR experiments simulating a reactivity initiated accident (RIA). As results of the experiments, the distribution of the size of fuel fragments was obtained and the mechanism of fuel fragmentation was discussed as described below. It was revealed that the distribution was well displayed in the form of logarithmic Rosin-Rammler's distribution law. It was shown that the conversion ratio from thermal energy to mechanical in the experiment was in inverse propotion to the volume-surface mean diameter defined as a ratio of the total volume of fragments to the total surface. Consequently, it was confirmed that the mean diameter was proper as an index for the degree of the fuel fragmentation. It was also pointed out that the Weber-type hydraulic instability model for fragmentation was consistent with the experimental results. The mechanism of the fuel fragmentation is understood as follows. Cladding tube is ruptured due to the increase in rod pressure when fuel is molten, and then molten fuel spouts through the openings in the form of jet. As a result of molten fuel spouting, fuel is fragmented by the Weber-type of hydraulic instability. The model well explains the effects of experimental parameters as heat deposition, subcooling of cooling water and capsule diameter, on the fuel fragmentation. According to the model, fuel fragments have to be spherical. There were many spherical particles which had hollow and burst crack. This may be due to internal burst during solidification process. The items which should be studied further are also described in the end of this report. (author)

  15. The role and molecular mechanism of D-aspartic acid in the release and synthesis of LH and testosterone in humans and rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronsini Salvatore

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background D-aspartic acid is an amino acid present in neuroendocrine tissues of invertebrates and vertebrates, including rats and humans. Here we investigated the effect of this amino acid on the release of LH and testosterone in the serum of humans and rats. Furthermore, we investigated the role of D-aspartate in the synthesis of LH and testosterone in the pituitary and testes of rats, and the molecular mechanisms by which this amino acid triggers its action. Methods For humans: A group of 23 men were given a daily dose of D-aspartate (DADAVIT® for 12 days, whereas another group of 20 men were given a placebo. For rats: A group of 10 rats drank a solution of either 20 mM D-aspartate or a placebo for 12 days. Then LH and testosterone accumulation was determined in the serum and D-aspartate accumulation in tissues. The effects of D-aspartate on the synthesis of LH and testosterone were gauged on isolated rat pituitary and Leydig cells. Tissues were incubated with D-aspartate, and then the concentration (synthesis of LH and cGMP in the pituitary and of testosterone and cAMP in the Leydig cells was determined. Results In humans and rats, sodium D-aspartate induces an enhancement of LH and testosterone release. In the rat pituitary, sodium D-aspartate increases the release and synthesis of LH through the involvement of cGMP as a second messenger, whereas in rat testis Leydig cells, it increases the synthesis and release of testosterone and cAMP is implicated as second messenger. In the pituitary and in testes D-Asp is synthesized by a D-aspartate racemase which convert L-Asp into D-Asp. The pituitary and testes possesses a high capacity to trapping circulating D-Asp from hexogen or endogen sources. Conclusion D-aspartic acid is a physiological amino acid occurring principally in the pituitary gland and testes and has a role in the regulation of the release and synthesis of LH and testosterone in humans and rats.

  16. Mechanical properties, biological activity and protein controlled release by poly(vinyl alcohol)-bioglass/chitosan-collagen composite scaffolds: a bone tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pon-On, Weeraphat; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol; Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Thongbunchoo, Jirawan; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Tang, I-Ming

    2014-05-01

    In the present study, composite scaffolds made with different weight ratios (0.5:1, 1:1 and 2:1) of bioactive glass (15Ca:80Si:5P) (BG)/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) (PVABG) and chitosan (Chi)/collagen (Col) (ChiCol) were prepared by three mechanical freeze-thaw followed by freeze-drying to obtain the porous scaffolds. The mechanical properties and the in vitro biocompatibility of the composite scaffolds to simulated body fluid (SBF) and to rat osteoblast-like UMR-106 cells were investigated. The results from the studies indicated that the porosity and compressive strength were controlled by the weight ratio of PVABG:ChiCol. The highest compressive modulus of the composites made was 214.64 MPa which was for the 1:1 weight ratio PVABG:ChiCol. Mineralization study in SBF showed the formation of apatite crystals on the PVABG:ChiCol surface after 7 days of incubation. In vitro cell availability and proliferation tests confirmed the osteoblast attachment and growth on the PVABG:ChiCol surface. MTT and ALP tests on the 1:1 weight ratio PVABG:ChiCol composite indicated that the UMR-106 cells were viable. Alkaline phosphatase activity was found to increase with increasing culturing time. In addition, we showed the potential of PVABG:ChiCol drug delivery through PBS solution studies. 81.14% of BSA loading had been achieved and controlled release for over four weeks was observed. Our results indicated that the PVABG:ChiCol composites, especially the 1:1 weight ratio composite exhibited significantly improved mechanical, mineral deposition, biological properties and controlled release. This made them potential candidates for bone tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Glutamate receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandt, Mette; Johansen, Tommy N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Homologation and substitution on the carbon backbone of (S)-glutamic acid [(S)-Glu, 1], as well as absolute stereochemistry, are structural parameters of key importance for the pharmacological profile of (S)-Glu receptor ligands. We describe a series of methyl-substituted 2-aminoadipic acid (AA...

  18. Ligand Exchange Kinetics of Environmentally Relevant Metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panasci, Adele Frances [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2014-07-15

    The interactions of ground water with minerals and contaminants are of broad interest for geochemists but are not well understood. Experiments on the molecular scale can determine reaction parameters (i.e. rates of ligand exchange, activation entropy, activation entropy, and activation volume) that can be used in computations to gain insight into reactions that occur in natural groundwaters. Experiments to determine the rate of isotopic ligand exchange for three environmentally relevant metals, rhodium (Rh), iron (Fe), and neptunium (Np), are described. Many environmental transformations of metals (e.g. reduction) in soil occur at trivalent centers, Fe(III) in particular. Contaminant ions absorb to mineral surfaces via ligand exchange, and the reversal of this reaction can be dangerous, releasing contaminants into the environment. Ferric iron is difficult to study spectroscopically because most of its complexes are paramagnetic and are generally reactive toward ligand exchange; therefore, Rh(III), which is diamagnetic and less reactive, was used to study substitution reactions that are analogous to those that occur on mineral oxide surfaces. Studies on both Np(V) and Np(VI) are important in their own right, as 237Np is a radioactive transuranic element with a half-life of 2 million years.

  19. DNA-histone complexes as ligands amplify cell penetration and nuclear targeting of anti-DNA antibodies via energy-independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannikou, Markella; Bellou, Sofia; Eliades, Petros; Hatzioannou, Aikaterini; Mantzaris, Michael D; Carayanniotis, George; Avrameas, Stratis; Lymberi, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    We have generated three monoclonal cell-penetrating antibodies (CPAbs) from a non-immunized lupus-prone (NZB × NZW)F1 mouse that exhibited high anti-DNA serum titres. These CPAbs are polyreactive because they bind to DNA and other cellular components, and localize mainly in the nucleus of HeLa cells, albeit with a distinct nuclear labelling profile. Herein, we have examined whether DNA-histone complexes (DHC) binding to CPAbs, before cell entry, could modify the cell penetration of CPAbs or their nuclear staining properties. By applying confocal microscopy and image analysis, we found that extracellular binding of purified CPAbs to DHC significantly enhanced their subsequent cell-entry, both in terms of percentages of positively labelled cells and fluorescence intensity (internalized CPAb amount), whereas there was a variable effect on their nuclear staining profile. Internalization of CPAbs, either alone or bound to DHC, remained unaltered after the addition of endocytosis-specific inhibitors at 37° or assay performance at 4°, suggesting the involvement of energy-independent mechanisms in the internalization process. These findings assign to CPAbs a more complex pathogenetic role in systemic lupus erythematosus where both CPAbs and nuclear components are abundant. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Serotonin receptor B may lock the gate of PTTH release/synthesis in the Chinese silk moth, Antheraea pernyi; a diapause initiation/maintenance mechanism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiushi Wang

    Full Text Available The release of prothoracicotropic hormone, PTTH, or its blockade is the major endocrine switch regulating the developmental channel either to metamorphosis or to pupal diapause in the Chinese silk moth, Antheraea pernyi. We have cloned cDNAs encoding two types of serotonin receptors (5HTRA and B. 5HTRA-, and 5HTRB-like immunohistochemical reactivities (-ir were colocalized with PTTH-ir in two pairs of neurosecretory cells at the dorsolateral region of the protocerebrum (DL. Therefore, the causal involvement of these receptors was suspected in PTTH release/synthesis. The level of mRNA(5HTRB responded to 10 cycles of long-day activation, falling to 40% of the original level before activation, while that of 5HTRA was not affected by long-day activation. Under LD 16:8 and 12:12, the injection of dsRNA(5HTRB resulted in early diapause termination, whereas that of dsRNA(5HTRA did not affect the rate of diapause termination. The injection of dsRNA(5HTRB induced PTTH accumulation, indicating that 5HTRB binding suppresses PTTH synthesis also. This conclusion was supported pharmacologically; the injection of luzindole, a melatonin receptor antagonist, plus 5th inhibited photoperiodic activation under LD 16:8, while that of 5,7-DHT, induced emergence in a dose dependent fashion under LD 12:12. The results suggest that 5HTRB may lock the PTTH release/synthesis, maintaining diapause. This could also work as diapause induction mechanism.

  1. Studies on the mechanism of endogenous pyrogen production. II. Role of cell products in the regulation of pyrogen release from blood leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodel, P

    1974-09-01

    Some characteristics of the process by which endogenous pyrogen (EP), the mediator of fever, is released from cells were examined by using human blood leukocytes incubated in vitro. Studies were designed to examine a possible role for leukocyte products, including EP, in the induction, augmentation, or suppression of pyrogen release by blood leukocytes. Products of stimulated leukocytes, including a partially purified preparation of EP, did not induce significant activation of nonstimulated cells. Also, no evidence was obtained that stimulated cell products either augment or inhibit pyrogen production by other stimulated cells. A feedback control of EP production was thus not observed. A crude preparation of EP, containing other products of activated cells, maintained its pyrogenicity when incubated at pH 7.4 but not at pH 5.0. These studies thus provide no support for hypothesized control mechanisms regulating production of EP by blood leukocytes. By contrast, local inactivation of EP at inflammatory sites may modify the amount of EP entering the blood, and hence fever.

  2. Studies on the pathogenesis of fever. IX. Characteristics of endogenous serum pyrogen and mechanisms governing its release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    PETERSDORF, R G; KEENE, W R; BENNETT, I L

    1957-12-01

    The "endogenous serum pyrogen" that appears in the circulating blood after a single intravenous injection of endotoxin does not produce leukopenia in normal animals, fails to provoke the local Shwartzman reaction, and elicits no "tolerance" when injected daily. Suppression of the febrile response to endotoxin by prednisone does not prevent the appearance of pyrogen in the blood. Animals given large amounts of endotoxin daily continue to respond with high fevers despite failure of endogenous serum pyrogen to appear in detectable amounts after the first two or three injections. Analysis of the response to daily injections shows clearly that the fever during the first 2 hours after administration of endotoxin is unrelated to levels of endogenous serum pyrogen; in contrast, the magnitude of the fever after the 2nd hour correlates well with endogenous pyrogen in some instances. The leukopenic response to endotoxin could not be correlated with the appearance of endogenous serum pyrogen. The differences between endotoxin and endogenous pyrogen and the similarities between leukocyte extracts (sterile exudates) and endogenous pyrogen are summarized and discussed. Dissociation of the febrile response to bacterial endotoxin and levels of endogenous serum pyrogen are discussed and it is concluded that a mechanism involving both direct and indirect action of endotoxins offers the best explanation for the pyrogenic action of these bacterial products.

  3. Systematic study of ligand structures of metal oxide EUV nanoparticle photoresists

    KAUST Repository

    Jiang, Jing

    2015-03-19

    Ligand stabilized metal oxide nanoparticle resists are promising candidates for EUV lithography due to their high sensitivity for high-resolution patterning and high etching resistance. As ligand exchange is responsible for the patterning mechanism, we systematically studied the influence of ligand structures of metal oxide EUV nanoparticles on their sensitivity and dissolution behavior. ZrO2 nanoparticles were protected with various aromatic ligands with electron withdrawing and electron donating groups. These nanoparticles have lower sensitivity compared to those with aliphatic ligands suggesting the structures of these ligands is more important than their pka on resist sensitivity. The influence of ligand structure was further studied by comparing the nanoparticles’ solubility for a single type ligand to mixtures of ligands. The mixture of nanoparticles showed improved pattern quality. © (2015) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  4. Honey/PVA hybrid wound dressings with controlled release of antibiotics: Structural, physico-mechanical and in-vitro biomedical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Javad; Tang, Youhong

    2017-08-01

    Hydrogel/honey hybrids manifest an attractive design with an exclusive therapeutic property that promotes wound healing process. The greater the concentration of honey within the formulation, the better the biomedical properties that will be achieved. However, an increase in the percentage of honey can negatively affect the physico-chemical and mechanical properties of hybrid hydrogels. The need exists, therefore, to prepare wound dressings that contain high honey density with optimal biomedical, mechanical and physicochemical properties. In this study, a simple method for the preparation of a highly concentrated honey/PVA hybrid hydrogel with borax as the crosslinking agent is reported. Comprehensive evaluations of the morphology, swelling kinetics, permeability, bio-adhesion, mechanical characteristics, cytotoxicity, antibacterial property, cell proliferation ability and their controlling release properties were conducted as a function of crosslinking density. All the borax-induced hydrogels showed acceptable biocompatibility, and the incorporation of 1% borax in the hydrogel formulation produced optimal behaviours for wound addressing applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Interaction mechanisms of radioactive, chemical and thermal releases from the nuclear industry: Methodology for considering co-operative effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streffer, C.

    1975-01-01

    A number of chemicals are known which can modify radiation effects on cell killing, carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. In this paper data are reported for radiosensitizing agents. In order to discuss the interaction mechanisms of these synergistic effects, the action of radiation on DNA, on its biological functions and on its metabolism are explained briefly. Also it is indicated that part of the radiation effects in the DNA can be 'repaired' and that living cells can recover from radiation damage. One group of radiosensitizers interacts with cellular DNA or with the DNP-complex. These reactions change the configurational structure or metabolism of DNA and DNP. In this connection the action of antibiotics such as actinomycin D, and the action of SH-blocking agents such as iodoacetamide and NEM, as well as the action of alkylating agents, are discussed. A second group of radiosensitizers, especially with hypoxic cells, are the electron affinic chemicals like nitro-compounds, ketones and others. Data are also given on the modification of radiation effects by changes in temperature. Further, the problem of whether synergistic effects are to be expected arising from the chemicals and radiation originating in the nuclear industry is considered. Data show that repair and recovery processes especially are modified by radiosensitizers. The implications of this fact on sensitization at low radiation doses and at low dose rates, as well as the effect of high LET radiation, are considered. It is of interest that the dose modifying factor of some sensitizers can reach a magnitude of a factor of two to three. (author)

  6. A poly(glycerol sebacate)-coated mesoporous bioactive glass scaffold with adjustable mechanical strength, degradation rate, controlled-release and cell behavior for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Dan; Yang, Kai; Tang, Wei; Liu, Yutong; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Changsheng

    2015-07-01

    Various requirements in the field of tissue engineering have motivated the development of three-dimensional scaffold with adjustable physicochemical properties and biological functions. A series of multiparameter-adjustable mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) scaffolds with uncrosslinked poly(glycerol sebacate) (PGS) coating was prepared in this article. MBG scaffold was prepared by a modified F127/PU co-templating process and then PGS was coated by a simple adsorption and lyophilization process. Through controlling macropore parameters and PGS coating amount, the mechanical strength, degradation rate, controlled-release and cell behavior of the composite scaffold could be modulated in a wide range. PGS coating successfully endowed MBG scaffold with improved toughness and adjustable mechanical strength covering the bearing range of trabecular bone (2-12MPa). Multilevel degradation rate of the scaffold and controlled-release rate of protein from mesopore could be achieved, with little impact on the protein activity owing to an "ultralow-solvent" coating and "nano-cavity entrapment" immobilization method. In vitro studies indicated that PGS coating promoted cell attachment and proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, without affecting the osteogenic induction capacity of MBG substrate. These results first provide strong evidence that uncrosslinked PGS might also yield extraordinary achievements in traditional MBG scaffold. With the multiparameter adjustability, the composite MBG/PGS scaffolds would have a hopeful prospect in bone tissue engineering. The design considerations and coating method of this study can also be extended to other ceramic-based artificial scaffolds and are expected to provide new thoughts on development of future tissue engineering materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Bone marrow stromal cells spontaneously produce Flt3-ligand: influence of ionizing radiations and cytokine stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertho, Jean Marc; Demarquay, Christelle; Mouiseddine, Moubarak; Douenat, Noémie; Stefani, Johanna; Prat, Marie; Paquet, François

    2008-08-01

    To define the ability of human bone marrow (BM) stromal cells to produce fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3)-ligand (FL), and the effect of irradiation, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) or tumour growth factor beta (TGFbeta) on FL production. Primary BM stromal cell cultures were irradiated at 2-10 Gy or were stimulated with TNFalpha or TGFbeta1. The presence of FL was tested in culture supernatants and in cell lysate. The presence of a membrane-bound form of FL and the level of gene expression were also tested. Primary BM stromal cells spontaneously released FL. This production was increased by TNFalpha but not by TGFbeta1 or by irradiation. Chemical induction of osteoblastic differentiation from BM stromal cells also induced an increase in FL release. Our results suggest that the observed increase in FL concentration after in vivo irradiation is an indirect effect. The possible implication of BM stromal cells in these mechanisms is discussed.

  8. Role of ligands in permanganate oxidation of organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jin; Pang, Su-Yan; Ma, Jun

    2010-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that several ligands such as phosphate, pyrophosphate, EDTA, and humic acid could significantly enhance permanganate oxidation of triclosan (one phenolic biocide), which was explained by the contribution of ligand-stabilized reactive manganese intermediates in situ formed upon permanganate reduction. To further understand the underlying mechanism, we comparatively investigated the influence of ligands on permanganate oxidation of bisphenol A (BPA, one phenolic endocrine-disrupting chemical), carbamazepine (CBZ, a pharmaceutical containing the olefinic group), and methyl p-tolyl sulfoxide (TMSO, a typical oxygen-atom acceptor). Selected ligands exerted oxidation enhancement for BPA but had negligible influence for CBZ and TMSO. This was mainly attributed to the effects of identified Mn(III) complexes, which would otherwise disproportionate spontaneously in the absence of ligands. The one-electron oxidant Mn(III) species exhibited no reactivity toward CBZ and TMSO for which the two-electron oxygen donation may be the primary oxidation mechanism but readily oxidized BPA. The latter case was a function of pH, the complexing ligand, and the molar [Mn(III)]:[ligand] ratio, generally consistent with the patterns of ligand-affected permanganate oxidation. Moreover, the combination of the one-electron reduction of Mn(III) (Mn(III) + e(-) -->Mn(II)) and the Mn(VII)/Mn(II) reaction in excess ligands (Mn(VII) + 4Mn(II) ----> (ligands) 5Mn(III)) suggested a catalytic role of the Mn(III)/Mn(II) pair in permanganate oxidation of some phenolics in the presence of ligands.

  9. AMPA receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Mellor, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player in the f......Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player...... in the formation of memory. Hence, ligands affecting AMPARs are highly important for the study of the structure and function of this receptor, and in this regard polyamine-based ligands, particularly polyamine toxins, are unique as they selectively block Ca2+ -permeable AMPARs. Indeed, endogenous intracellular...

  10. Determination by a CFD code of the heat release rate in a confined and mechanically-ventilated compartment fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasr, Ayoub

    2011-01-01

    For several years, many experimental/numerical research programs have been carried out at IRSN in order to provide sufficient data on the burning process and understand the behavior of a pool fire in a confined and mechanically ventilated compartment. Several experimental tests have shown that in some cases, the oxygen concentration in the local decreases then stabilizes until fire extinction. The fuel mass loss rate is instantaneously adjusted according to the ventilation in the local, which may leads to a lower fuel consumption rate as compared to that in free atmosphere. The fire duration is then 2 to 3 times greater than that obtained in free atmosphere, which may damages some specific safety equipment used to reduce the spread of fire between compartments such as fire doors. The objective of this work is to propose a theoretical approach that allows the determination of the burning rate of fuels for pool fires in a closed compartment. Fuel response to vitiated air as well as burning enhancement due to hot gases and confinement should be taken into account. Thus, a theoretical formulation, based on an energy balance equation at the pool fire surface, was developed and compared with the empirical correlation of Peatross and Beyler before being implemented in a CFD code 'ISIS', developed at IRSN and validated against PRISME fire test results. The main advantage of this global approach is that no assumptions were made on the relative importance of each mode of heat transfer from the flame. In fact, the convective and the radiant components of the heat flux from the flame to the fuel surface were determined taking into account the air vitiation effect. In addition to this theoretical approach, an experimental work was conducted at the Institut PPRIME to study heptane pool fires in a reduced-scale fire compartment, in the aim to investigate the effects of vitiated air on fire parameters. These results were used to validate the theoretical formulation developed

  11. Radiobiology with DNA ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinreich, R.; Argentini, M.; Guenther, I.; Koziorowski, J.; Larsson, B.; Nievergelt-Egido, M.C.; Salt, C.; Wyer, L.; Dos Santos, D.F.; Hansen, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    The paper deals with the following topics: labelling of DNA ligands and other tumour-affinic compounds with 4.15-d 124 I, radiotoxicity of Hoechst 33258 and 33342 and of iodinated Hoechst 33258 in cell cultures, preparation of 76 Br-, 123 I-, and 221 At-labelled 5-halo-2'-deoxyuridine, chemical syntheses of boron derivatives of Hoechst 33258.III., Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

  12. Towards an interpretation of the mechanism of the actinides(III)/lanthanides(III) separation by synergistic solvent extraction with nitrogen-containing polydendate ligands; Vers une interpretation des mecanismes de la separation actinides(III)/lanthanides(III) par extraction liquide-liquide synergique impliquant des ligands polyazotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francois, N [CEA/VALRHO - site de Marcoule, Dept. de Recherche en Retraitement et en Vitrification, (DRRV), 30 - Marcoule (France); Universite Henri Poincare, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2000-07-01

    In the field of the separation of long-lived radionuclides from the wastes produced by nuclear fuel reprocessing, aromatic nitrogen-containing polydendate ligands are potential candidates for the selective extraction, alone or in synergistic mixture with acidic extractants, of trivalent actinides from trivalent lanthanides. The first part of this work deals with the complexation of trivalent f cations with various nitrogen-containing ligands (poly-pyridine analogues). Time-resolved laser-induced fluorimetry (TRLIF) and UV-visible spectrophotometry were used to determine the nature and evaluate the stability of each complex. Among the ligands studied, the least basic Me-Btp proved to be highly selective towards americium(III) in acidic solution. In the second part, two synergistic systems (nitrogen-containing polydendate ligand and lipophilic carboxylic acid) are studied and compared in regard to the extraction and separation of lanthanides(III) and actinides(III). TRLIF and gamma spectrometry allowed the nature of the extracted complexes and the optimal conditions of efficiency of both systems to be determined. Comparison between these different studies showed that the selectivity of complexation of trivalent f cations by a given nitrogen-containing polydendate ligand could not always be linked to the Am(III)Eu(III) selectivity reached in synergistic extraction. The latter depends on the 'balance' between the acid-basic properties on the one hand, and on the hard-soft characteristics on the other hand, of both components of synergistic system. (author)

  13. Towards an interpretation of the mechanism of the actinides(III)/lanthanides(III) separation by synergistic solvent extraction with nitrogen-containing polydendate ligands; Vers une interpretation des mecanismes de la separation actinides(III)/lanthanides(III) par extraction liquide-liquide synergique impliquant des ligands polyazotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francois, N. [CEA/VALRHO - site de Marcoule, Dept. de Recherche en Retraitement et en Vitrification, (DRRV), 30 - Marcoule (France); Universite Henri Poincare, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2000-07-01

    In the field of the separation of long-lived radionuclides from the wastes produced by nuclear fuel reprocessing, aromatic nitrogen-containing polydendate ligands are potential candidates for the selective extraction, alone or in synergistic mixture with acidic extractants, of trivalent actinides from trivalent lanthanides. The first part of this work deals with the complexation of trivalent f cations with various nitrogen-containing ligands (poly-pyridine analogues). Time-resolved laser-induced fluorimetry (TRLIF) and UV-visible spectrophotometry were used to determine the nature and evaluate the stability of each complex. Among the ligands studied, the least basic Me-Btp proved to be highly selective towards americium(III) in acidic solution. In the second part, two synergistic systems (nitrogen-containing polydendate ligand and lipophilic carboxylic acid) are studied and compared in regard to the extraction and separation of lanthanides(III) and actinides(III). TRLIF and gamma spectrometry allowed the nature of the extracted complexes and the optimal conditions of efficiency of both systems to be determined. Comparison between these different studies showed that the selectivity of complexation of trivalent f cations by a given nitrogen-containing polydendate ligand could not always be linked to the Am(III)Eu(III) selectivity reached in synergistic extraction. The latter depends on the 'balance' between the acid-basic properties on the one hand, and on the hard-soft characteristics on the other hand, of both components of synergistic system. (author)

  14. Organic iron (III) complexing ligands during an iron enrichment experiment in the western subarctic North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yoshiko; Takeda, Shigenobu; Nishioka, Jun; Obata, Hajime; Furuya, Ken; Johnson, William Keith; Wong, C. S.

    2008-06-01

    Complexation of iron (III) with natural organic ligands was investigated during a mesoscale iron enrichment experiment in the western subarctic North Pacific (SEEDS II). After the iron infusions, ligand concentrations increased rapidly with subsequent decreases. While the increases of ligands might have been partly influenced by amorphous iron colloids formation (12-29%), most in-situ increases were attributable to the Dilution of the fertilized patch may have contributed to the rapid decreases of the ligands. During the bloom decline, ligand concentration increased again, and the high concentrations persisted for 10 days. The conditional stability constant was not different between inside and outside of the fertilized patch. These results suggest that the chemical speciation of the released iron was strongly affected by formation of the ligands; the production of ligands observed during the bloom decline will strongly impact the iron cycle and bioavailability in the surface water.

  15. Growth hormone-releasing peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghigo, E; Arvat, E; Muccioli, G; Camanni, F

    1997-05-01

    Growth hormone-releasing peptides (GHRPs) are synthetic, non-natural peptides endowed with potent stimulatory effects on somatotrope secretion in animals and humans. They have no structural homology with GHRH and act via specific receptors present either at the pituitary or the hypothalamic level both in animals and in humans. The GHRP receptor has recently been cloned and, interestingly, it does not show sequence homology with other G-protein-coupled receptors known so far. This evidence strongly suggests the existence of a natural GHRP-like ligand which, however, has not yet been found. The mechanisms underlying the GHRP effect are still unclear. At present, several data favor the hypothesis that GHRPs could act by counteracting somatostatinergic activity both at the pituitary and the hypothalamic level and/or, at least partially, via a GHRH-mediated mechanism. However, the possibility that GHRPs act via an unknown hypothalamic factor (U factor) is still open. GHRP-6 was the first hexapeptide to be extensively studied in humans. More recently, a heptapeptide, GHRP-1, and two other hexapeptides, GHRP-2 and Hexarelin, have been synthesized and are now available for human studies. Moreover, non-peptidyl GHRP mimetics have been developed which act via GHRP receptors and their effects have been clearly demonstrated in animals and in humans in vivo. Among non-peptidyl GHRPs, MK-0677 seems the most interesting molecule. The GH-releasing activity of GHRPs is marked and dose-related after intravenous, subcutaneous, intranasal and even oral administration. The effect of GHRPs is reproducible and undergoes partial desensitization, more during continuous infusion, less during intermittent administration: in fact, prolonged administration of GHRPs increases IGF-1 levels both in animals and in humans. The GH-releasing effect of GHRPs does not depend on sex but undergoes age-related variations. It increases from birth to puberty, persists at a similar level in adulthood and

  16. Influence of Citric Acid on the Metal Release of Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazinanian, N.; Wallinder, I. Odnevall; Hedberg, Y. S. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    Knowledge of how metal releases from the stainless steels used in food processing applications and cooking utensils is essential within the framework of human health risk assessment. A new European standard test protocol for testing metal release in food contact materials made from metals and alloys has recently been published by the Council of Europe. The major difference from earlier test protocols is the use of citric acid as the worst-case food simulant. The objectives of this study were to assess the effect of citric acid at acidic, neutral, and alkaline solution pH on the extent of metal release for stainless steel grades AISI 304 and 316, commonly used as food contact materials. Both grades released lower amounts of metals than the specific release limits when they were tested according to test guidelines. The released amounts of metals were assessed by means of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy, and changes in the outermost surface composition were determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that both the pH and the complexation capacity of the solutions affected the extent of metal release from stainless steel and are discussed from a mechanistic perspective. The outermost surface oxide was significantly enriched in chromium upon exposure to citric acid, indicating rapid passivation by the acid. This study elucidates the effect of several possible mechanisms, including complex ion- and ligand-induced metal release, that govern the process of metal release from stainless steel under passive conditions in solutions that contain citric acid.

  17. Dimeric ligands for GPCRs involved in human reproduction : synthesis and biological evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonger, Kimberly Michelle

    2008-01-01

    Dimeric ligands for G-protein coupled receptors that are involved in human reproduction, namely the gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor, the luteinizing hormone receptor and the follicle-stimulating hormone receptor, were synthesized and biologically evaluated.

  18. Symptom clusters in cancer patients and their relation to EGFR ligand modulation of the circadian axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Tyvin A

    2007-04-01

    Recent studies in chronobiology and the neurosciences have led to rapid growth in our understanding of the molecular biology of the human timekeeping apparatus and the neuroanatomic sites involved in signaling between the "master clock" in the hypothalamus and other parts of the brain. The circadian axis comprises a central clock mechanism and a downstream network of hypothalamic relay stations that modulate arousal, feeding, and sleeping behavior. Communication between the clock and these hypothalamic signaling centers is mediated, in part, by diffusible substances that include ligands of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Preclinical studies reveal that EGFR ligands such as transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha) inhibit hypothalamic signaling of rhythmic behavior; clinical observations show that elevated levels of TGF-alpha are associated with fatigue, flattened circadian rhythms, and loss of appetite in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. These data support the hypothesis that a symptom cluster of fatigue, appetite loss, and sleep disruption commonly seen in cancer patients may be related to EGFR ligands, released either by the cancer itself or by the host in response to the stress of cancer, and suggest that further examination of their role in the production of symptom clustering is warranted.

  19. Plasmid DNA is released from nanosized acicular material surface by low molecular weight oligonucleotides: exogenous plasmid acquisition mechanism for penetration intermediates based on the Yoshida effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, N; Ide, K

    2008-10-01

    When a colloidal solution consisting of nanosized acicular material and bacterial cells is stimulated with sliding friction at the interface between the hydrogel and interface-forming material where the frictional coefficient increases rapidly, the nanosized acicular material accompanying the bacterial cells forms a penetration intermediate. This effect is known as the Yoshida effect in honor of its discoverer. Through the Yoshida effect, a novel property in which penetration intermediates incorporate exogenous plasmid DNA has been identified. This report proposes a possible mechanism for exogenous plasmid acquisition by penetration intermediates in the Yoshida effect. Escherichia coli cells, pUC18, and chrysotile were used as recipient cells, plasmid DNA, and nanosized acicular material, respectively. Even when repeatedly washing the mixture consisting of pUC18 and chrysotile, transformation efficiency by pUC18 was stable. Accordingly, pUC18 adsorbed onto chrysotile was introduced into recipient E. coli cells. At saturation, the amount of pUC18 adsorbed onto chrysotile was 0.8-1.2 microg/mg. To investigate whether pUC18 adsorbed on chrysotile is replicated by polymerase, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out with the chrysotile. Amplification of the beta-lactamase gene coded in pUC18, which was adsorbed onto chrysotile, was strongly inhibited. This suggests that DNA adsorbed onto chrysotile is not replicated in vivo. When we searched for substances to release pUC18 adsorbed onto chrysotile, we found that a 300-bp single- or double-stranded segment of DNA releases pUC18 from chrysotile. Competitive adsorption onto chrysotile between double-stranded DNA and pUC18 was then examined through the Yoshida effect. The 310- and 603-bp double-stranded nucleotides caused 50% competitive inhibition at the same molar ratio with pUC18. Hence, the adsorbed region of pUC18 is about 300 bp in length. As the culture period for recipient cells increases, transformation

  20. Upregulation of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor alph4+beta2 through a Ligand-Independent PI3Kbeta Mechanism That Is Enhanced by TNFalpha and the Jak2/p38Mapk Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Scott W; Gahring, Lorise C

    2015-01-01

    High affinity nicotine-binding sites in the mammalian brain are neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) assembled from at least alpha4 and beta2 subunits into pentameric ion channels. When exposed to ligands such as nicotine, these receptors respond by undergoing upregulation, a correlate of nicotine addiction. Upregulation can be measured using HEK293 (293) cells that stably express alpha4 and beta2 subunits using quantification of [3H]epibatidine ([3H]Eb) binding to measure mature receptors. Treatment of these cells with choline also produces upregulation through a hemicholinium3 (HC3)-sensitive (choline kinase) and an HC3-insensitive pathway which are both independent of the mechanism used by nicotine for upregulation. In both cases, upregulation is significantly enhanced by the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) which signals through its receptor Tnfr1 to activate p38Mapk. Here we report that the inhibition of class1 phosphoinositide 3-kinases isoform PI3Kbeta using the selective antagonist PI828 is alone sufficient to produce upregulation and enhance both nicotine and choline HC3-sensitive mediated upregulation. Further, these processes are impacted upon by an AG-490 sensitive Jak2-associated pathway. Both PI3Kbeta (negative) and Jak2 (positive) modulation of upregulation converge through p38Mapk and both overlap with TNFalpha enhancement of this process. Upregulation through the PI3Kbeta pathway did not require Akt. Collectively these findings support upregulation of endogenous alpha4beta2 as a balance among cellular signaling networks that are highly responsive to multiple environmental, inflammatory and metabolic agents. The findings also suggest how illness and metabolic stress could alter the expression of this important nicotinic receptor and novel avenues to intercede in modifying its expression.

  1. Bexarotene ligand pharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, R E

    2000-12-01

    Bexarotene (LGD-1069), from Ligand, was the first retinoid X receptor (RXR)-selective, antitumor retinoid to enter clinical trials. The company launched the drug for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), as Targretin capsules, in the US in January 2000 [359023]. The company filed an NDA for Targretin capsules in June 1999, and for topical gel in December 1999 [329011], [349982] specifically for once-daily oral administration for the treatment of patients with early-stage CTCL who have not tolerated other therapies, patients with refractory or persistent early stage CTCL and patients with refractory advanced stage CTCL. The FDA approved Targretin capsules at the end of December 1999 for once-daily oral treatment of all stages of CTCL in patients refractory to at least one prior systemic therapy, at an initial dose of 300 mg/m2/day. After an NDA was submitted in December 1999 for Targretin gel, the drug received Priority Review status for use as a treatment of cutaneous lesions in patients with stage IA, IB or IIA CTCL [354836]. The FDA issued an approvable letter in June 2000, and granted marketing clearance for CTCL in the same month [370687], [372768], [372769], [373279]. Ligand had received Orphan Drug designation for this indication [329011]. At the request of the FDA, Ligand agreed to carry out certain post-approval phase IV and pharmacokinetic studies [351604]. The company filed an MAA with the EMEA for Targretin Capsules to treat lymphoma in November 1999 [348944]. The NDA for Targretin gel is based on a multicenter phase III trial that was conducted in the US, Canada, Europe and Australia involving 50 patients and a multicenter phase I/II clinical program involving 67 patients. Targretin gel was evaluated for the treatment of patients with early stage CTCL (IA-IIA) who were refractory to, intolerant to, or reached a response plateau for at least 6 months on at least two prior therapies. Efficacy results exceeded the protocol-defined response

  2. Probing Ligand Exchange in the P450 Enzyme CYP121 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Dynamic Equilibrium of the Distal Heme Ligand as a Function of pH and Temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Andrew J; Dornevil, Kednerlin; Ma, Li; Davis, Ian; Liu, Aimin

    2017-12-06

    CYP121 is a cytochrome P450 enzyme from Mycobacterium tuberculosis that catalyzes the formation of a C-C bond between the aromatic groups of its cyclodityrosine substrate (cYY). The crystal structure of CYP121 in complex with cYY reveals that the solvent-derived ligand remains bound to the ferric ion in the enzyme-substrate complex. Whereas in the generally accepted P450 mechanism, binding of the primary substrate in the active-site triggers the release of the solvent-derived ligand, priming the metal center for reduction and subsequent O 2 binding. Here we employed sodium cyanide to probe the metal-ligand exchange of the enzyme and the enzyme-substrate complex. The cyano adducts were characterized by UV-vis, EPR, and ENDOR spectroscopies and X-ray crystallography. A 100-fold increase in the affinity of cyanide binding to the enzyme-substrate complex over the ligand-free enzyme was observed. The crystal structure of the [CYP121(cYY)CN] ternary complex showed a rearrangement of the substrate in the active-site, when compared to the structure of the binary [CYP121(cYY)] complex. Transient kinetic studies showed that cYY binding resulted in a lower second-order rate constant (k on (CN) ) but a much more stable cyanide adduct with 3 orders of magnitude slower k off (CN) rate. A dynamic equilibrium between multiple high- and low-spin species for both the enzyme and enzyme-substrate complex was also observed, which is sensitive to changes in both pH and temperature. Our data reveal the chemical and physical properties of the solvent-derived ligand of the enzyme, which will help to understand the initial steps of the catalytic mechanism.

  3. Steric effects in release of amides from linkers in solid-phase synthesis. Molecular mechanics modeling of key step in peptide and combinatorial chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrby, Per-Ola; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    Acidolytic release of an amide from a solid support by C-N bond cleavage is all ubiquitous and crucial step in many solid-phase syntheses. We have used molecular modeling of a pseudo-equilibrium to explore substituent and steric effects in the release of peptides. The high acid-lability of the ba......Acidolytic release of an amide from a solid support by C-N bond cleavage is all ubiquitous and crucial step in many solid-phase syntheses. We have used molecular modeling of a pseudo-equilibrium to explore substituent and steric effects in the release of peptides. The high acid......-lability of the backbone amide linkage (BAL), which releases sec. amides, compared to C-terminal amide anchoring, which releases primary amides, was rationalized by steric relief upon cleavage. Thus, the relative stability of the carbenium ion formed from the linker in the acidolytic release is an insufficient measure...

  4. New polyvinyl chloride (PVC) nanocomposite consisting of aromatic polyamide and chitosan modified ZnO nanoparticles with enhanced thermal stability, low heat release rate and improved mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajibeygi, Mohsen; Maleki, Mahdiye; Shabanian, Meisam; Ducos, Franck; Vahabi, Henri

    2018-05-01

    New ternary nanocomposite systems containing polylvinyl chloride (PVC), chitosan modified ZnO (CMZN) nanoparticles and new synthesized polyamide (PA) were designed and prepared by solution casting method. As a potential reinforcement, CMZN was used in PVC system combined with and without PA. Morphology, mechanical, thermal and combustion properties of the all PVC systems were studied. In the presence of the CMZN, PA showed a synergistic effect on improvement of the all investigated properties of PVC. The 5 mass% loss temperature (T5) was increased from 195 °C to 243 °C in PVC/CMZN-PA nanocomposite containing 1 mass% of each PA and CMZN (PZP 2). The peak of heat release rate was decreased from 131 W/g for PVC to 104 W/g for PVC/CMZN-PA nanocomposite containing 3 mass% of each PA and CMZN (PZP 6). According to the tensile tests, compared to the neat PVC, the tensile strength was increased from 35.4 to 53.4 MPa for PZP 6.

  5. Monitoring β-arrestin recruitment via β-lactamase enzyme fragment complementation: purification of peptide E as a low-affinity ligand for mammalian bombesin receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Ikeda

    Full Text Available Identification of cognate ligands for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs provides a starting point for understanding novel regulatory mechanisms. Although GPCR ligands have typically been evaluated through the activation of heterotrimeric G proteins, recent studies have shown that GPCRs signal not only through G proteins but also through β-arrestins. As such, monitoring β-arrestin signaling instead of G protein signaling will increase the likelihood of identifying currently unknown ligands, including β-arrestin-biased agonists. Here, we developed a cell-based assay for monitoring ligand-dependent GPCR-β-arrestin interaction via β-lactamase enzyme fragment complementation. Inter alia, β-lactamase is a superior reporter enzyme because of its cell-permeable fluorescent substrate. This substrate makes the assay non-destructive and compatible with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. In a reporter cell, complementary fragments of β-lactamase (α and ω were fused to β-arrestin 2 and GPCR, respectively. Ligand stimulation initiated the interaction of these chimeric proteins (β-arrestin-α and GPCR-ω, and this inducible interaction was measured through reconstituted β-lactamase activity. Utilizing this system, we screened various mammalian tissue extracts for agonistic activities on human bombesin receptor subtype 3 (hBRS3. We purified peptide E as a low-affinity ligand for hBRS3, which was also found to be an agonist for the other two mammalian bombesin receptors such as gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR and neuromedin B receptor (NMBR. Successful purification of peptide E has validated the robustness of this assay. We conclude that our newly developed system will facilitate the discovery of GPCR ligands.

  6. Characterization of chicken thrombocyte responses to Toll-like receptor ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael St Paul

    Full Text Available Thrombocytes are the avian equivalent to mammalian platelets. In addition to their hemostatic effects, mammalian platelets rely in part on pattern recognition receptors, such as the Toll-like receptors (TLR, to detect the presence of pathogens and signal the release of certain cytokines. Ligands for TLRs include lipopolysaccharide (LPS, which is bound by TLR4, as well as unmethylated CpG DNA motifs, which are bound by TLR9 in mammals and TLR21 in chickens. Similar to mammalian platelets, avian thrombocytes have been shown to express TLR4 and secrete some pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to LPS treatment. However, the full extent of the contributions made by thrombocytes to host immunity has yet to be elucidated. Importantly, the mechanisms by which TLR stimulation may modulate thrombocyte effector functions have not been well characterized. As such, the objective of the present study was to gain further insight into the immunological role of thrombocytes by analyzing their responses to treatment with ligands for TLR4 and TLR21. To this end, we quantified the relative expression of several immune system genes at 1, 3, 8 and 18 hours post-treatment using real-time RT-PCR. Furthermore, production of nitric oxide and phagocytic activity of thrombocytes was measured after their activation with TLR ligands. We found that thrombocytes constitutively express transcripts for both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, in addition to those associated with anti-viral responses and antigen presentation. Moreover, we found that both LPS and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN induced robust pro-inflammatory responses in thrombocytes, as characterized by more than 100 fold increase in interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 transcripts, while only LPS enhanced nitric oxide production and phagocytic capabilities. Future studies may be aimed at examining the responses of thrombocytes to other TLR ligands.

  7. Metal-ligand interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ervin, Kent M.

    Experimental studies of the interactions of small transition-metal cluster anions with carbonyl ligands are reviewed and compared with neutral and cationic clusters. Under thermal conditions, the reaction rates of transition-metal clusters with carbon monoxide are measured as a function of cluster size. Saturation limits for carbon monoxide addition can be related to the geometric structures of the clusters. Both energy-resolved threshold collision-induced dissociation experiments and time-resolved photodissociation experiments are used to measure metal-carbonyl binding energies. For platinum and palladium trimer anions, the carbonyl binding energies are assigned to different geometric binding sites. Platinum and palladium cluster anions catalyse the oxidation of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide in a full catalytic cycle at thermal energies.

  8. Database of ligand-induced domain movements in enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayward Steven

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conformational change induced by the binding of a substrate or coenzyme is a poorly understood stage in the process of enzyme catalysed reactions. For enzymes that exhibit a domain movement, the conformational change can be clearly characterized and therefore the opportunity exists to gain an understanding of the mechanisms involved. The development of the non-redundant database of protein domain movements contains examples of ligand-induced domain movements in enzymes, but this valuable data has remained unexploited. Description The domain movements in the non-redundant database of protein domain movements are those found by applying the DynDom program to pairs of crystallographic structures contained in Protein Data Bank files. For each pair of structures cross-checking ligands in their Protein Data Bank files with the KEGG-LIGAND database and using methods that search for ligands that contact the enzyme in one conformation but not the other, the non-redundant database of protein domain movements was refined down to a set of 203 enzymes where a domain movement is apparently triggered by the binding of a functional ligand. For these cases, ligand binding information, including hydrogen bonds and salt-bridges between the ligand and specific residues on the enzyme is presented in the context of dynamical information such as the regions that form the dynamic domains, the hinge bending residues, and the hinge axes. Conclusion The presentation at a single website of data on interactions between a ligand and specific residues on the enzyme alongside data on the movement that these interactions induce, should lead to new insights into the mechanisms of these enzymes in particular, and help in trying to understand the general process of ligand-induced domain closure in enzymes. The website can be found at: http://www.cmp.uea.ac.uk/dyndom/enzymeList.do

  9. Macrocyclic G-quadruplex ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M C; Ulven, Trond

    2010-01-01

    are macrocyclic structures which have been modeled after the natural product telomestatin or from porphyrin-based ligands discovered in the late 1990s. These two structural classes of G-quadruplex ligands are reviewed here with special attention to selectivity and structure-activity relationships, and with focus...

  10. pH-controlled quaternary ammonium herbicides capture/release by carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin functionalized magnetic adsorbents: Mechanisms and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Peng [Department of Applied Chemistry, China Agricultural University, No. 2 West Yuanmingyuan Road, Beijing 100193 (China); Shen, Zhigang [Zhong Nong Fa Seed Industry Group Co. Ltd, Beijing 600313 (China); Liu, Xueke; Zhou, Zhiqiang [Department of Applied Chemistry, China Agricultural University, No. 2 West Yuanmingyuan Road, Beijing 100193 (China); Liu, Donghui, E-mail: liudh@cau.edu.cn [Department of Applied Chemistry, China Agricultural University, No. 2 West Yuanmingyuan Road, Beijing 100193 (China)

    2015-12-11

    In our work, the pH-controlled magnetic solid phase extraction for the determination of paraquat and diquat was introduced firstly. Furthermore, to clarify the mechanism of carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin functionalized magnetic adsorbents, we studied the pH-responsive supramolecular interaction between carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin (CM-β-CD) and paraquat/diquat by ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment, and the energy-minimized structures were also obtained. Then, the functional group CM-β-CD was modified on the surface of magnetic materials to synthesize the adsorbent. The Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FT-IR) results proved the successful modification of CM-β-CD. Thus, this absorbent was applied for the determination of paraquat and diquat in water. Under the optimal condition, limits of detection (LODs) of paraquat and diquat were 0.8 μg L{sup −1} and 0.9 μg L{sup −1}, relative standard deviations (RSD) and recoveries varied 0.7–4.6% and 86.5–106.6%, respectively. Good recoveries (70.2–100.0%) and low RSD (1.7–9.6%) were achieved in analyzing spiked water samples. Furthermore, with the capillary electrophoresis (CE) as the analyser, the whole analytical process did not need the attendance of organic solvents. - Highlights: • The carboxymethyl-β-cyclodextrin functionalized magnetic adsorbents were synthesized. • The adsorbents could capture or release quaternary ammonium herbicides by changing pH. • The adsorbents were applied in the analysis of real water samples. • There is no attendance of organic solvents in the whole analysis process.

  11. Effects of electrostatic interactions on ligand dissociation kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbaş, Aykut; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera; Marko, John F.

    2018-02-01

    We study unbinding of multivalent cationic ligands from oppositely charged polymeric binding sites sparsely grafted on a flat neutral substrate. Our molecular dynamics simulations are suggested by single-molecule studies of protein-DNA interactions. We consider univalent salt concentrations spanning roughly a 1000-fold range, together with various concentrations of excess ligands in solution. To reveal the ionic effects on unbinding kinetics of spontaneous and facilitated dissociation mechanisms, we treat electrostatic interactions both at a Debye-Hückel (DH) (or implicit ions, i.e., use of an electrostatic potential with a prescribed decay length) level and by the more precise approach of considering all ionic species explicitly in the simulations. We find that the DH approach systematically overestimates unbinding rates, relative to the calculations where all ion pairs are present explicitly in solution, although many aspects of the two types of calculation are qualitatively similar. For facilitated dissociation (FD) (acceleration of unbinding by free ligands in solution) explicit-ion simulations lead to unbinding at lower free-ligand concentrations. Our simulations predict a variety of FD regimes as a function of free-ligand and ion concentrations; a particularly interesting regime is at intermediate concentrations of ligands where nonelectrostatic binding strength controls FD. We conclude that explicit-ion electrostatic modeling is an essential component to quantitatively tackle problems in molecular ligand dissociation, including nucleic-acid-binding proteins.

  12. Essential role of conformational selection in ligand binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Austin D; Pozzi, Nicola; Chen, Zhiwei; Di Cera, Enrico

    2014-02-01

    Two competing and mutually exclusive mechanisms of ligand recognition - conformational selection and induced fit - have dominated our interpretation of ligand binding in biological macromolecules for almost six decades. Conformational selection posits the pre-existence of multiple conformations of the macromolecule from which the ligand selects the optimal one. Induced fit, on the other hand, postulates the existence of conformational rearrangements of the original conformation into an optimal one that are induced by binding of the ligand. In the former case, conformational transitions precede the binding event; in the latter, conformational changes follow the binding step. Kineticists have used a facile criterion to distinguish between the two mechanisms based on the dependence of the rate of relaxation to equilibrium, kobs, on the ligand concentration, [L]. A value of kobs decreasing hyperbolically with [L] has been seen as diagnostic of conformational selection, while a value of kobs increasing hyperbolically with [L] has been considered diagnostic of induced fit. However, this simple conclusion is only valid under the rather unrealistic assumption of conformational transitions being much slower than binding and dissociation events. In general, induced fit only produces values of kobs that increase with [L] but conformational selection is more versatile and is associated with values of kobs that increase with, decrease with or are independent of [L]. The richer repertoire of kinetic properties of conformational selection applies to kinetic mechanisms with single or multiple saturable relaxations and explains the behavior of nearly all experimental systems reported in the literature thus far. Conformational selection is always sufficient and often necessary to account for the relaxation kinetics of ligand binding to a biological macromolecule and is therefore an essential component of any binding mechanism. On the other hand, induced fit is never necessary and

  13. Modulation of the release of ( sup 3 H)norepinephrine from the base and body of the rat urinary bladder by endogenous adrenergic and cholinergic mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somogyi, G.T.; de Groat, W.C. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Modulation of (3H)NE release was studied in rat urinary bladder strips prelabeled with (3H)NE. (3H)NE uptake occurred in strips from the bladder base and body, but was very prominent in the base where the noradrenergic innervation is most dense. Electrical field stimulation markedly increased (3H)NE outflow from the superfused tissue. The quantity of (3H)NE release was approximately equal during three consecutive periods of stimulation. Activation of presynaptic muscarinic receptors by 1.0 microM oxotremorine reduced (3H)NE release to 46% of the control. Atropine (1 microM) blocked the effect of oxotremorine and increased the release to 147% of predrug control levels. Activation of presynaptic alpha-2 adrenoceptors by 1 microM clonidine reduced (3H)NE release to 55% of control. Yohimbine blocked the action of clonidine and increased the release to 148% of control. The release of (3H)NE from the bladder base and body was increased by both 1 microM atropine (to 167% and 174% of control, respectively) and 1 microM yohimbine (to 286% and 425% of control, respectively). Atropine and yohimbine administered in combination had similar facilitatory effects as when administered alone. We conclude that the release of (3H)NE from adrenergic nerve endings in electrically stimulated bladder strips is modulated via endogenous transmitters acting on both muscarinic and alpha-2 adrenergic presynaptic receptors and that the latter provide the most prominent control.

  14. Two novel mixed-ligand complexes containing organosulfonate ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingtian; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Xuan; Fang, Hua; Ding, Liyun

    2008-07-01

    The structures reported herein, viz. bis(4-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonato-kappaO)bis(4,5-diazafluoren-9-one-kappa(2)N,N')copper(II), [Cu(C(10)H(8)NO(3)S)(2)(C(11)H(6)N(2)O)(2)], (I), and poly[[[diaquacadmium(II)]-bis(mu-4-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonato)-kappa(2)O:N;kappa(2)N:O] dihydrate], {[Cd(C(10)H(8)NO(3)S)(2)(H(2)O)(2)].2H(2)O}(n), (II), are rare examples of sulfonate-containing complexes where the anion does not fulfill a passive charge-balancing role, but takes an active part in coordination as a monodentate and/or bridging ligand. Monomeric complex (I) possesses a crystallographic inversion center at the Cu(II) atom, and the asymmetric unit contains one-half of a Cu atom, one complete 4-aminonaphthalene-1-sulfonate (ans) ligand and one 4,5-diazafluoren-9-one (DAFO) ligand. The Cu(II) atom has an elongated distorted octahedral coordination geometry formed by two O atoms from two monodentate ans ligands and by four N atoms from two DAFO molecules. Complex (II) is polymeric and its crystal structure is built up by one-dimensional chains and solvent water molecules. Here also the cation (a Cd(II) atom) lies on a crystallographic inversion center and adopts a slightly distorted octahedral geometry. Each ans anion serves as a bridging ligand linking two Cd(II) atoms into one-dimensional infinite chains along the [010] direction, with each Cd(II) center coordinated by four ans ligands via O and N atoms and by two aqua ligands. In both structures, there are significant pi-pi stacking interactions between adjacent ligands and hydrogen bonds contribute to the formation of two- and three-dimensional networks.

  15. Ligand cluster-based protein network and ePlatton, a multi-target ligand finder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yu; Shi, Tieliu

    2016-01-01

    with normalized mutual information at 0.9. The study of target and ligand cluster promiscuity underlying the LCBN showed that light ligand clusters were more promiscuous than the heavy one and that highly connected nodes tended to be protein kinases and involved in phosphorylation. ePlatton considerably reduced the redundancy of the ligand set of targets and made it easy to deduce the possible relationship between compounds and targets, pathways and side effects. ePlatton behaved reliably in validation experiments and also fast in virtual screening and information retrieval.Graphical abstractCluster exemplars and ePlatton's mechanism.

  16. Cutting an NKG2D Ligand Short: Cellular Processing of the Peculiar Human NKG2D Ligand ULBP4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Zöller

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Stress-induced cell surface expression of MHC class I-related glycoproteins of the MIC and ULBP families allows for immune recognition of dangerous “self cells” by human cytotoxic lymphocytes via the NKG2D receptor. With two MIC molecules (MICA and MICB and six ULBP molecules (ULBP1–6, there are a total of eight human NKG2D ligands (NKG2DL. Since the discovery of the NKG2D–NKG2DL system, the cause for both redundancy and diversity of NKG2DL has been a major and ongoing matter of debate. NKG2DL diversity has been attributed, among others, to the selective pressure by viral immunoevasins, to diverse regulation of expression, to differential tissue expression as well as to variations in receptor interactions. Here, we critically review the current state of knowledge on the poorly studied human NKG2DL ULBP4. Summarizing available facts and previous studies, we picture ULBP4 as a peculiar ULBP family member distinct from other ULBP family members by various aspects. In addition, we provide novel experimental evidence suggesting that cellular processing gives rise to mature ULBP4 glycoproteins different to previous reports. Finally, we report on the proteolytic release of soluble ULBP4 and discuss these results in the light of known mechanisms for generation of soluble NKG2DL.

  17. Correcting ligands, metabolites, and pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ott, M.A.; Vriend, G.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A wide range of research areas in bioinformatics, molecular biology and medicinal chemistry require precise chemical structure information about molecules and reactions, e.g. drug design, ligand docking, metabolic network reconstruction, and systems biology. Most available databases,

  18. Targeting Selectins and Their Ligands in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eNatoni

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant glycosylation is a hallmark of cancer cells with increased evidence pointing to a role in tumor progression. In particular, aberrant sialylation of glycoproteins and glycolipids have been linked to increased immune cell evasion, drug evasion, drug resistance, tumor invasiveness, and vascular dissemination leading to metastases. Hypersialylation of cancer cells is largely the result of overexpression of sialyltransferases. Humans differentially express twenty different sialyltransferases in a tissue-specific manner, each of which catalyze the attachment of sialic acids via different glycosidic linkages (2-3; 2-6 or 2-8 to the underlying glycan chain. One important mechanism whereby overexpression of sialyltransferases contributes to an enhanced metastatic phenotype is via the generation of selectin ligands. Selectin ligand function requires the expression of sialyl-Lewis X and its structural-isomer sialyl-Lewis A, which are synthesized by the combined action of alpha 1-3-fucosyltransferases, 2-3-sialyltransferases, 1-4-galactosyltranferases, and N-acetyl--glucosaminyltransferases. The α2-3-sialyltransferases ST3Gal4 and ST3Gal6 are critical to the generation of functional E- and P-selectin ligands and overexpression of these sialyltransferases have been linked to increased risk of metastatic disease in solid tumors and poor outcome in multiple myeloma. Thus, targeting selectins and their ligands as well as the enzymes involved in their generation, in particular sialyltransferases, could be beneficial to many cancer patients. Potential strategies include sialyltransferase inhibition and the use of selectin antagonists, such as glycomimetic drugs and antibodies. Here, we review ongoing efforts to optimize the potency and selectivity of sialyltransferase inhibitors, including the potential for targeted delivery approaches, as well as evaluate the potential utility of selectin inhibitors, which are now in early clinical

  19. Ligand Binding Induces Conformational Changes in Human Cellular Retinol-binding Protein 1 (CRBP1) Revealed by Atomic Resolution Crystal Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvaroli, Josie A; Arne, Jason M; Chelstowska, Sylwia; Kiser, Philip D; Banerjee, Surajit; Golczak, Marcin

    2016-04-15

    Important in regulating the uptake, storage, and metabolism of retinoids, cellular retinol-binding protein 1 (CRBP1) is essential for trafficking vitamin A through the cytoplasm. However, the molecular details of ligand uptake and targeted release by CRBP1 remain unclear. Here we report the first structure of CRBP1 in a ligand-free form as well as ultra-high resolution structures of this protein bound to either all-trans-retinol or retinylamine, the latter a therapeutic retinoid that prevents light-induced retinal degeneration. Superpositioning of human apo- and holo-CRBP1 revealed major differences within segments surrounding the entrance to the retinoid-binding site. These included α-helix II and hairpin turns between β-strands βC-βD and βE-βF as well as several side chains, such as Phe-57, Tyr-60, and Ile-77, that change their orientations to accommodate the ligand. Additionally, we mapped hydrogen bond networks inside the retinoid-binding cavity and demonstrated their significance for the ligand affinity. Analyses of the crystallographic B-factors indicated several regions with higher backbone mobility in the apoprotein that became more rigid upon retinoid binding. This conformational flexibility of human apo-CRBP1 facilitates interaction with the ligands, whereas the more rigid holoprotein structure protects the labile retinoid moiety during vitamin A transport. These findings suggest a mechanism of induced fit upon ligand binding by mammalian cellular retinol-binding proteins. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Hartog, J P Den

    1961-01-01

    First published over 40 years ago, this work has achieved the status of a classic among introductory texts on mechanics. Den Hartog is known for his lively, discursive and often witty presentations of all the fundamental material of both statics and dynamics (and considerable more advanced material) in new, original ways that provide students with insights into mechanical relationships that other books do not always succeed in conveying. On the other hand, the work is so replete with engineering applications and actual design problems that it is as valuable as a reference to the practicing e

  1. Histamine release from rodent and human mast cells induced by protoporphyrin and ultraviolet light: studies of the mechanism of mast-cell activation in erythropoietic protoporphyria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, R.A.; Bailey, C.S.; Barrett, K.E.; Wasserman, S.I.; Gigli, I.

    1990-01-01

    We report that protoporphyrin (PP) and ultraviolet light (UVA) induces histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells, mouse bone marrow mast cells and human cutaneous mast cells in a dose- and temperature-dependent manner. The mast-cell activation was associated with loss of membrane integrity and inhibited by the hydrogen peroxide scavenger, catalase. Histamine release was independent of extracellular calcium in the rodent mast cells, but was markedly reduced in the absence of calcium in human cells. These findings indicate that PP and UVA induce mast-cell-mediator release by a process that may involve hydrogen peroxide formation. There appear to be differences in response to PP and UVA between rodent and human mast cells. (author)

  2. Histamine release from rodent and human mast cells induced by protoporphyrin and ultraviolet light: studies of the mechanism of mast-cell activation in erythropoietic protoporphyria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, R.A.; Bailey, C.S.; Barrett, K.E.; Wasserman, S.I.; Gigli, I. (California Univ., San Diego, CA (USA). Dept. of Medicine)

    1990-04-01

    We report that protoporphyrin (PP) and ultraviolet light (UVA) induces histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells, mouse bone marrow mast cells and human cutaneous mast cells in a dose- and temperature-dependent manner. The mast-cell activation was associated with loss of membrane integrity and inhibited by the hydrogen peroxide scavenger, catalase. Histamine release was independent of extracellular calcium in the rodent mast cells, but was markedly reduced in the absence of calcium in human cells. These findings indicate that PP and UVA induce mast-cell-mediator release by a process that may involve hydrogen peroxide formation. There appear to be differences in response to PP and UVA between rodent and human mast cells. (author).

  3. New Ru(II) Complexes for Dual Photoreactivity: Ligand Exchange and 1O2 Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Knoll, Jessica D.; Albani, Bryan A.; Turro, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Uncovering the factors that govern the electronic structure of Ru(II)–polypyridyl complexes is critical in designing new compounds for desired photochemical reactions, and strategies to tune excited states for ligand dissociation and 1O2 production are discussed herein. The generally accepted mechanism for photoinduced ligand dissociation proposes that population of the dissociative triplet ligand field (3LF) state proceeds through thermal population from the vibrationally cooled triplet meta...

  4. Comparison of molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) and molecular mechanics-three-dimensional reference interaction site model (MM-3D-RISM) method to calculate the binding free energy of protein-ligand complexes: Effect of metal ion and advance statistical test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Preeti; Srivastava, Rakesh; Bandyopadhyay, Pradipta

    2018-03-01

    The relative performance of MM-PBSA and MM-3D-RISM methods to estimate the binding free energy of protein-ligand complexes is investigated by applying these to three proteins (Dihydrofolate Reductase, Catechol-O-methyltransferase, and Stromelysin-1) differing in the number of metal ions they contain. None of the computational methods could distinguish all the ligands based on their calculated binding free energies (as compared to experimental values). The difference between the two comes from both polar and non-polar part of solvation. For charged ligand case, MM-PBSA and MM-3D-RISM give a qualitatively different result for the polar part of solvation.

  5. The heparin-binding domain of HB-EGF mediates localization to sites of cell-cell contact and prevents HB-EGF proteolytic release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prince, Robin N.; Schreiter, Eric R.; Zou, Peng; Wiley, H. S.; Ting, Alice Y.; Lee, Richard T.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2010-07-01

    Heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) is a ligand for EGF receptor (EGFR) and possesses the ability to signal in juxtacrine, autocrine and/or paracrine mode, with these alternatives being governed by the degree of proteolytic release of the ligand. Although the spatial range of diffusion of released HB-EGF is restricted by binding heparan-sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) in the extracellular matrix and/or cellular glycocalyx, ascertaining mechanisms governing non-released HB-EGF localization is also important for understanding its effects. We have employed a new method for independently tracking the localization of the extracellular EGFlike domain of HB-EGF and the cytoplasmic C-terminus. A striking observation was the absence of the HB-EGF transmembrane proform from the leading edge of COS-7 cells in a wound-closure assay; instead, this protein localized in regions of cell-cell contact. A battery of detailed experiments found that this localization derives from a trans interaction between extracellular HSPGs and the HBEGF heparin-binding domain, and that disruption of this interaction leads to increased release of soluble ligand and a switch in cell phenotype from juxtacrine-induced growth inhibition to autocrine-induced proliferation. Our results indicate that extracellular HSPGs serve to sequester the transmembrane pro-form of HB-EGF at the point of cell-cell contact, and that this plays a role in governing the balance between juxtacrine versus autocrine and paracrine signaling.

  6. Prediction of ligand effects in platinum-amyloid-β coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Matthew; Deeth, Robert J; Platts, James A

    2017-08-01

    Ligand field molecular mechanics (LFMM) and semi-empirical Parametric Model 7 (PM7) methods are applied to a series of six Pt II -Ligand systems binding to the N-terminal domain of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide. Molecular dynamics using a combined LFMM/Assisted Model Building with Energy Refinement (AMBER) approach is used to explore the conformational freedom of the peptide fragment, and identifies favourable platinum binding modes and peptide conformations for each ligand investigated. Platinum coordination is found to depend on the nature of the ligand, providing evidence that binding mode may be controlled by suitable ligand design. Boltzmann populations at 310K indicate that each Pt-Aβ complex has a small number of thermodynamically accessible states. Ramachandran maps are constructed for the sampled Pt-Aβ conformations and secondary structural analysis of the obtained complex structures is performed and contrasted with the free peptide; coordination of these platinum complexes disrupts existing secondary structure in the Aβ peptide and promotes formation of ligand-specific turn-type secondary structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ligand recognition by RAR and RXR receptors: binding and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Fredy; de Lera, Angel R

    2005-10-06

    Fundamental biological functions, most notably embriogenesis, cell growth, cell differentiation, and cell apoptosis, are in part regulated by a complex genomic network that starts with the binding (and activation) of retinoids to their cognate receptors, members of the superfamily of nuclear receptors. We have studied ligand recognition of retinoic receptors (RXRalpha and RARgamma) using a molecular-mechanics-based docking method. The protocol used in this work is able to rank the affinity of pairs of ligands for a single retinoid receptor, the highest values corresponding to those that adapt better to the shape of the binding site and generate the optimal set of electrostatic and apolar interactions with the receptor. Moreover, our studies shed light onto some of the energetic contributions to retinoid receptor ligand selectivity. In this regard we show that there is a difference in polarity between the binding site regions that anchor the carboxylate in RAR and RXR, which translates itself into large differences in the energy of interaction of both receptors with the same ligand. We observe that the latter energy change is canceled off by the solvation energy penalty upon binding. This energy compensation is borne out as well by experiments that address the effect of site-directed mutagenesis on ligand binding to RARgamma. The hypothesis that the difference in binding site polarity might be exploited to build RXR-selective ligands is tested with some compounds having a thiazolidinedione anchoring group.

  8. A steady-state mechanism can account for the properties of inositol 2,4,5-trisphosphate-stimulated Ca2+ release from permeabilized L1210 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis-Husselbee, J W; Dawson, A P

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of sub-maximal Ins(2,4,5)P3 concentrations on the Ca2+ permeability of the residual undischarged Ca2+ stores in electroporated or digitonin-permeabilized L1210 cells by measuring Ca(2+)-efflux rate after addition of the ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin. Low concentrations of Ins(2,4,5)P3, causing rapid discharge of a small proportion of the releasable Ca2+, result in a substantial stimulation of Ca2+ efflux after thapsigargin addition. This indicates firstly that in the absence of thapsigargin there must have been a substantial, counterbalancing, increase in rate of Ca2+ pumping, and secondly that the increased Ca2+ permeability is more consistent with a steady state than with a quantal model of Ca2+ release. Similar increases in passive Ca2+ permeability are produced by addition of concentrations of ionomycin which produce equivalent changes in Ca2+ loading to those produced by Ins(2,4,5)P3, although the time course and initial rate of Ca2+ release are very much slower. In the presence of a Ca(2+)-buffering system, the time course of Ca2+ release by Ins(2,4,5)P3 becomes superimposable on that of ionomycin, indicating that the initial rapid phase of Ins(2,4,5)P3-stimulated Ca2+ is at least partially due to positive feedback from extravesicular Ca2+. PMID:8382056

  9. Organic ligand-induced dissolution kinetics of antimony trioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xingyun Hu; Mengchang He

    2017-01-01

    The influence of low-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (LMWDOM) on the dissolution rate of Sb2O3 was investigated.Some representative LMWDOMs with carboxyl,hydroxyl,hydrosulfuryl and amidogen groups occurring naturally in the solution were chosen,namely oxalic acid,citric acid,tartaric acid,EDTA,salicylic acid,phthalandione,glycine,thiolactic acid,xylitol,glucose and catechol.These LMWDOMs were dissolved in inert buffers at pH =3.7,6.6 and 8.6 and added to powdered Sb2O3 in a stirred,thermostatted reactor (25℃).The addition of EDTA,tartaric acid,thiolactic acid,citric acid and oxalic acid solutions at pH 3.7 and catechol at pH 8.6 increased the rate of release of antimony.In the 10 mmol/L thiolactic acid solution,up to 97% by mass of the antimony was released after 120 min reaction.There was no effect on the dissolution of Sb2O3 for the other ligands.A weak correlation between dissolution rate with the dissociation constant of ligands and the stability of the dissolved complex was also found.All the results showed that the extent of the promoting effect of ligands on the dissolution of Sb2O3 was not determined by the stability of the dissolved complex,but by the dissociation constant of ligands and detachment rate of surface chelates from the mineral surface.This study can not only help in further understanding the effect of individual low-molecular-weight organic ligands,but also provides a reference to deduce the effect of natural organic matters with oxygen-bearing functional groups on the dissolution of antimony oxide minerals.

  10. Organic ligand-induced dissolution kinetics of antimony trioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xingyun; He, Mengchang

    2017-06-01

    The influence of low-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter (LMWDOM) on the dissolution rate of Sb 2 O 3 was investigated. Some representative LMWDOMs with carboxyl, hydroxyl, hydrosulfuryl and amidogen groups occurring naturally in the solution were chosen, namely oxalic acid, citric acid, tartaric acid, EDTA, salicylic acid, phthalandione, glycine, thiolactic acid, xylitol, glucose and catechol. These LMWDOMs were dissolved in inert buffers at pH=3.7, 6.6 and 8.6 and added to powdered Sb 2 O 3 in a stirred, thermostatted reactor (25°C). The addition of EDTA, tartaric acid, thiolactic acid, citric acid and oxalic acid solutions at pH3.7 and catechol at pH8.6 increased the rate of release of antimony. In the 10mmol/L thiolactic acid solution, up to 97% by mass of the antimony was released after 120min reaction. There was no effect on the dissolution of Sb 2 O 3 for the other ligands. A weak correlation between dissolution rate with the dissociation constant of ligands and the stability of the dissolved complex was also found. All the results showed that the extent of the promoting effect of ligands on the dissolution of Sb 2 O 3 was not determined by the stability of the dissolved complex, but by the dissociation constant of ligands and detachment rate of surface chelates from the mineral surface. This study can not only help in further understanding the effect of individual low-molecular-weight organic ligands, but also provides a reference to deduce the effect of natural organic matters with oxygen-bearing functional groups on the dissolution of antimony oxide minerals. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Human interleukin 1. beta. stimulates islet insulin release by a mechanism not dependent on changes in phospholipase C and protein kinase C activities or Ca sup 2+ handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welsh, N.; Nilsson, T.; Hallberg, A.; Arkhammar, P.; Berggren, P.-O.; Sandler, S.

    1989-01-01

    Isolated islets from adult rats or obese hyperglycemic (ob/ob) mice were incubated with human recombinant interleukin 1{beta} in order to study whether the acute effects of the cytokine on islet insulin release are associated with changes in islet phospholipase C activity, Ca{sup 2+} handling or protein phosphorylation. The cytokine stimulated insulin release both at low and high glucose concentrations during one hour incubations. In shortterm incubations (<1 min) interleukin 1{beta} did not affect the production of inositoltrisphosphate. Addition of interleukin 1{beta} affected neither the cytoplasmic free Ca{sup 2+} concentration at rest nor that observed subsequent to stimulation with a high concentration of glucose. Furthermore, the endogenous protein kinase C activity, as visualized by immunoprecipitation of a {sup 32}P-labelled substrate for this enzyme, was not altered by interleukin 1{beta}. Separation of {sup 32}P-labelled proteins by means of 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis failed to reveal any specific effects of the cytokine on the total protein phosphorylation activity. These results suggest that the stimulatory effects on insulin release exerted by interleukin 1{beta} are not caused by acute activation of phospholipase C and protein kinase C or by an alternation of islet Ca{sup 2+} handling of the B-cells. (author).

  12. Human interleukin 1β stimulates islet insulin release by a mechanism not dependent on changes in phospholipase C and protein kinase C activities or Ca2+ handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, N.; Nilsson, T.; Hallberg, A.; Arkhammar, P.; Berggren, P.-O.; Sandler, S.

    1989-01-01

    Isolated islets from adult rats or obese hyperglycemic (ob/ob) mice were incubated with human recombinant interleukin 1β in order to study whether the acute effects of the cytokine on islet insulin release are associated with changes in islet phospholipase C activity, Ca 2+ handling or protein phosphorylation. The cytokine stimulated insulin release both at low and high glucose concentrations during one hour incubations. In shortterm incubations ( 2+ concentration at rest nor that observed subsequent to stimulation with a high concentration of glucose. Furthermore, the endogenous protein kinase C activity, as visualized by immunoprecipitation of a 32 P-labelled substrate for this enzyme, was not altered by interleukin 1β. Separation of 32 P-labelled proteins by means of 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis failed to reveal any specific effects of the cytokine on the total protein phosphorylation activity. These results suggest that the stimulatory effects on insulin release exerted by interleukin 1β are not caused by acute activation of phospholipase C and protein kinase C or by an alternation of islet Ca 2+ handling of the B-cells. (author)

  13. Highly efficient bioinspired molecular Ru water oxidation catalysts with negatively charged backbone ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lele; Wang, Lei; Li, Fusheng; Li, Fei; Sun, Licheng

    2015-07-21

    The oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of the natural photosynthesis system II (PSII) oxidizes water to produce oxygen and reducing equivalents (protons and electrons). The oxygen released from PSII provides the oxygen source of our atmosphere; the reducing equivalents are used to reduce carbon dioxide to organic products, which support almost all organisms on the Earth planet. The first photosynthetic organisms able to split water were proposed to be cyanobacteria-like ones appearing ca. 2.5 billion years ago. Since then, nature has chosen a sustainable way by using solar energy to develop itself. Inspired by nature, human beings started to mimic the functions of the natural photosynthesis system and proposed the concept of artificial photosynthesis (AP) with the view to creating energy-sustainable societies and reducing the impact on the Earth environments. Water oxidation is a highly energy demanding reaction and essential to produce reducing equivalents for fuel production, and thereby effective water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) are required to catalyze water oxidation and reduce the energy loss. X-ray crystallographic studies on PSII have revealed that the OEC consists of a Mn4CaO5 cluster surrounded by oxygen rich ligands, such as oxyl, oxo, and carboxylate ligands. These negatively charged, oxygen rich ligands strongly stabilize the high valent states of the Mn cluster and play vital roles in effective water oxidation catalysis with low overpotential. This Account describes our endeavors to design effective Ru WOCs with low overpotential, large turnover number, and high turnover frequency by introducing negatively charged ligands, such as carboxylate. Negatively charged ligands stabilized the high valent states of Ru catalysts, as evidenced by the low oxidation potentials. Meanwhile, the oxygen production rates of our Ru catalysts were improved dramatically as well. Thanks to the strong electron donation ability of carboxylate containing ligands, a seven

  14. LigandRFs: random forest ensemble to identify ligand-binding residues from sequence information alone

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Peng; Huang, Jianhua Z; Gao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Protein-ligand binding is important for some proteins to perform their functions. Protein-ligand binding sites are the residues of proteins that physically bind to ligands. Despite of the recent advances in computational prediction

  15. Surfactant Ligand Removal and Rational Fabrication of Inorganically Connected Quantum Dots

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Haitao; Hu, Bo; Sun, Liangfeng; Hovden, Robert; Wise, Frank W.; Muller, David A.; Robinson, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    in that no new surfactant ligands are introduced and the post-treated NC surfaces are nearly bare. The detailed mechanism study shows that the high reactivity between (NH 4) 2S and metal-surfactant ligand complexes enables the complete removal of surfactant

  16. Integrated nanotechnology platform for tumor-targeted multimodal imaging and therapeutic cargo release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoya, Hitomi; Dobroff, Andrey S; Driessen, Wouter H P; Cristini, Vittorio; Brinker, Lina M; Staquicini, Fernanda I; Cardó-Vila, Marina; D'Angelo, Sara; Ferrara, Fortunato; Proneth, Bettina; Lin, Yu-Shen; Dunphy, Darren R; Dogra, Prashant; Melancon, Marites P; Stafford, R Jason; Miyazono, Kohei; Gelovani, Juri G; Kataoka, Kazunori; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Sidman, Richard L; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2016-02-16

    A major challenge of targeted molecular imaging and drug delivery in cancer is establishing a functional combination of ligand-directed cargo with a triggered release system. Here we develop a hydrogel-based nanotechnology platform that integrates tumor targeting, photon-to-heat conversion, and triggered drug delivery within a single nanostructure to enable multimodal imaging and controlled release of therapeutic cargo. In proof-of-concept experiments, we show a broad range of ligand peptide-based applications with phage particles, heat-sensitive liposomes, or mesoporous silica nanoparticles that self-assemble into a hydrogel for tumor-targeted drug delivery. Because nanoparticles pack densely within the nanocarrier, their surface plasmon resonance shifts to near-infrared, thereby enabling a laser-mediated photothermal mechanism of cargo release. We demonstrate both noninvasive imaging and targeted drug delivery in preclinical mouse models of breast and prostate cancer. Finally, we applied mathematical modeling to predict and confirm tumor targeting and drug delivery. These results are meaningful steps toward the design and initial translation of an enabling nanotechnology platform with potential for broad clinical applications.

  17. Methane release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Swiss Gas Industry has carried out a systematic, technical estimate of methane release from the complete supply chain from production to consumption for the years 1992/1993. The result of this survey provided a conservative value, amounting to 0.9% of the Swiss domestic output. A continuation of the study taking into account new findings with regard to emission factors and the effect of the climate is now available, which provides a value of 0.8% for the target year of 1996. These results show that the renovation of the network has brought about lower losses in the local gas supplies, particularly for the grey cast iron pipelines. (author)

  18. Molecular characterization of the haptoglobin.hemoglobin receptor CD163. Ligand binding properties of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mette; Møller, Holger J; Nielsen, Marianne Jensby

    2004-01-01

    binding to SRCR domain 3 exhibited effective inhibition of ligand binding. Furthermore, analysis of purified native CD163 revealed that proteolytic cleavage in SRCR domain 3 inactivates ligand binding. Calcium protects against cleavage in this domain. Analysis of the calcium sensitivity of ligand binding...... to CD163 demonstrated that optimal ligand binding requires physiological plasma calcium concentrations, and an immediate ligand release occurs at the low calcium concentrations measured in acidifying endosomes. In conclusion, SRCR domain 3 of CD163 is an exposed domain and a critical determinant...... for the calcium-sensitive coupling of haptoglobin.hemoglobin complexes....

  19. Quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations of complexation of alkaline-earth and lanthanide cations by poly-amino-carboxylate ligands; Simulations par mecanique quantique et dynamique moleculaire de la complexation de cations alcalino-terreux et lanthanides par des ligands polyaminocarboxylates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durand, S

    1999-07-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on lanthanide(III) and alkaline-earth(II) complexes with poly-amino-carboxylates (ethylene-diamino-tetra-acetate EDTA{sup 4-}, ethylene-diamino-tri-acetate-acetic acid EDTA(H){sup 3-}, tetra-aza-cyclo-dodecane-tetra-acetate DOTA{sup 4-}, methylene-imidine-acetate MIDA{sup 2-}) are reported. First, a consistent set of Lennard-Jones parameters for La{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} and Lu{sup 3+} cations has been derived from free energy calculations in aqueous solution. Observed differences in hydration free energies, coordination distances and hydration numbers are reproduced. Then, the solution structures of 1:1 complexes of alkaline-earth and/or lanthanide cations with EDTA{sup 4-}, EDTA(H){sup 3-}, DOTA{sup 4-} and 1:2 complexes of lanthanide cations with MIDA{sup 2-} were studied by MD in water. In addition, free energy calculations were performed to study, for each ligand, the relative thermodynamic stabilities of complexes with Ca{sup 2+} vs Sr{sup 2+} and vs Ba{sup 2+} on the one hand, and with La{sup 3+} vs Eu{sup 3+} and vs Lu{sup 3+} on the other hand. Model does not take into account explicitly polarization and charge transfer. However, the results qualitatively agree with experimental complexation data (structure and selectivities). (author)

  20. Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Chester, W

    1979-01-01

    When I began to write this book, I originally had in mind the needs of university students in their first year. May aim was to keep the mathematics simple. No advanced techniques are used and there are no complicated applications. The emphasis is on an understanding of the basic ideas and problems which require expertise but do not contribute to this understanding are not discussed. How­ ever, the presentation is more sophisticated than might be considered appropri­ ate for someone with no previous knowledge of the subject so that, although it is developed from the beginning, some previous acquaintance with the elements of the subject would be an advantage. In addition, some familiarity with element­ ary calculus is assumed but not with the elementary theory of differential equations, although knowledge of the latter would again be an advantage. It is my opinion that mechanics is best introduced through the motion of a particle, with rigid body problems left until the subject is more fully developed. Howev...

  1. Soluble CD40 Ligand and Oxidative Response Are Reciprocally Stimulated during Shiga Toxin-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J. Abrey Recalde

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin (Stx, produced by Escherichia coli, is the main pathogenic factor of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS, which is characterized by the obstruction of renal microvasculature by platelet-fibrin thrombi. It is well known that the oxidative imbalance generated by Stx induces platelet activation, contributing to thrombus formation. Moreover, activated platelets release soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L, which in turn contributes to oxidative imbalance, triggering the release of reactive oxidative species (ROS on various cellular types. The aim of this work was to determine if the interaction between the oxidative response and platelet-derived sCD40L, as consequence of Stx-induced endothelium damage, participates in the pathogenic mechanism during HUS. Activated human glomerular endothelial cells (HGEC by Stx2 induced platelets to adhere to them. Although platelet adhesion did not contribute to endothelial damage, high levels of sCD40L were released to the medium. The release of sCD40L by activated platelets was inhibited by antioxidant treatment. Furthermore, we found increased levels of sCD40L in plasma from HUS patients, which were also able to trigger the respiratory burst in monocytes in a sCD40L-dependent manner. Thus, we concluded that platelet-derived sCD40L and the oxidative response are reciprocally stimulated during Stx2-associated HUS. This process may contribute to the evolution of glomerular occlusion and the microangiopathic lesions.

  2. Soluble CD40 Ligand and Oxidative Response Are Reciprocally Stimulated during Shiga Toxin-Associated Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrey Recalde, Maria J.; Alvarez, Romina S.; Alberto, Fabiana; Mejias, Maria P.; Ramos, Maria V.; Fernandez Brando, Romina J.; Bruballa, Andrea C.; Exeni, Ramon A.; Alconcher, Laura; Ibarra, Cristina A.; Amaral, María M.; Palermo, Marina S.

    2017-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx), produced by Escherichia coli, is the main pathogenic factor of diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), which is characterized by the obstruction of renal microvasculature by platelet-fibrin thrombi. It is well known that the oxidative imbalance generated by Stx induces platelet activation, contributing to thrombus formation. Moreover, activated platelets release soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), which in turn contributes to oxidative imbalance, triggering the release of reactive oxidative species (ROS) on various cellular types. The aim of this work was to determine if the interaction between the oxidative response and platelet-derived sCD40L, as consequence of Stx-induced endothelium damage, participates in the pathogenic mechanism during HUS. Activated human glomerular endothelial cells (HGEC) by Stx2 induced platelets to adhere to them. Although platelet adhesion did not contribute to endothelial damage, high levels of sCD40L were released to the medium. The release of sCD40L by activated platelets was inhibited by antioxidant treatment. Furthermore, we found increased levels of sCD40L in plasma from HUS patients, which were also able to trigger the respiratory burst in monocytes in a sCD40L-dependent manner. Thus, we concluded that platelet-derived sCD40L and the oxidative response are reciprocally stimulated during Stx2-associated HUS. This process may contribute to the evolution of glomerular occlusion and the microangiopathic lesions. PMID:29068360

  3. Nicotine facilitates nicotinic acetylcholine receptor targeting to mitochondria but makes them less susceptible to selective ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uspenska, Kateryna; Lykhmus, Olena; Gergalova, Galyna; Chernyshov, Volodymyr; Arias, Hugo R; Komisarenko, Sergiy; Skok, Maryna

    2017-08-24

    Several nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes are expressed in mitochondria to regulate the internal pathway of apoptosis in ion channel-independent manner. However, the mechanisms of nAChR activation in mitochondria and targeting to mitochondria are still unknown. Nicotine has been shown to favor nAChR pentamer assembly, folding, and maturation on the way of biosynthesis. The idea of the present work was to determine whether nicotine affects the content, glycosylation, and function of mitochondrial nAChRs. Experiments were performed in isolated liver mitochondria from mice, that either consumed or not nicotine with the drinking water (200μL/L) for 7days. Mitochondria detergent lysates were studied by sandwich or lectin ELISA for the presence and carbohydrate composition of different nAChR subunits. Intact mitochondria were examined by flow cytometry for the binding of fluorescently labeled α-cobratoxin and were tested in functional assay of cytochrome c release under the effect of either Ca 2+ or wortmannin in the presence or absence of nAChR-selective ligands, including PNU-282987 (1nM), dihydro-β-erythroidine (DhβE, 1μM), PNU-120596 (0.3, 3, or 10μM) and desformylflustrabromine hydrochloride (dFBr, 0.001, 0.3, or 1μM). It was found that nicotine consumption increased the ratio of mitochondrial vs non-mitochondrial nAChRs in the liver, enhanced fucosylation of mitochondrial nAChRs, but prevented the binding of α-cobratoxin and the cytochrome c release-attenuating effects of nAChR-specific agonists, antagonists, or positive allosteric modulators. It is concluded that nicotine consumption in vivo favors nAChR glycosylation and trafficking to mitochondria but makes them less susceptible to the effects of specific ligands. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of carbon on the microstructure, mechanical properties and metal ion release of Ni-free Co-Cr-Mo alloys containing nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Manami; Yamanaka, Kenta; Kuramoto, Koji; Ohmura, Kazuyo; Ashino, Tetsuya; Chiba, Akihiko

    2015-10-01

    This paper investigated the effect of carbon addition on the microstructure and tensile properties of Ni-free biomedical Co-29Cr-6Mo (mass%) alloys containing 0.2 mass% nitrogen. The release of metal ions by the alloys was preliminarily evaluated in an aqueous solution of 0.6% sodium chloride (NaCl) and 1% lactic acid, after which samples with different carbon contents were subjected to hot rolling. All specimens were found to primarily consist of a γ-phase matrix due to nitrogen doping, with only the volume fraction of M23C6 increasing with carbon concentration. Owing to the very fine size of these carbide particles (less than 1 μm), which results from fragmentation during hot rolling, the increased formation of M23C6 increased the 0.2% proof stress, but reduced the elongation-to-failure. Carbon addition also increased the amount of Co and Cr released during static immersion; Co and Cr concentrations at the surfaces, which increased with increasing the bulk carbon concentrations, possibly enhanced the metal ion release. However, only a very small change in the Mo concentration was noticed in the solution. Therefore, it is not necessarily considered a suitable means of improving the strength of biomedical Co-Cr-Mo alloys, even though it has only to date been used in this alloy system. The results of this study revealed the limitations of the carbon strengthening and can aid in the design of biomedical Co-Cr-Mo-based alloys that exhibit the high durability needed for their practical application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantitative analysis of protein-ligand interactions by NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Ayako; Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Yanaka, Saeko; Sugase, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Protein-ligand interactions have been commonly studied through static structures of the protein-ligand complex. Recently, however, there has been increasing interest in investigating the dynamics of protein-ligand interactions both for fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanisms and for drug development. NMR is a versatile and powerful tool, especially because it provides site-specific quantitative information. NMR has widely been used to determine the dissociation constant (KD), in particular, for relatively weak interactions. The simplest NMR method is a chemical-shift titration experiment, in which the chemical-shift changes of a protein in response to ligand titration are measured. There are other quantitative NMR methods, but they mostly apply only to interactions in the fast-exchange regime. These methods derive the dissociation constant from population-averaged NMR quantities of the free and bound states of a protein or ligand. In contrast, the recent advent of new relaxation-based experiments, including R2 relaxation dispersion and ZZ-exchange, has enabled us to obtain kinetic information on protein-ligand interactions in the intermediate- and slow-exchange regimes. Based on R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange, methods that can determine the association rate, kon, dissociation rate, koff, and KD have been developed. In these approaches, R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange curves are measured for multiple samples with different protein and/or ligand concentration ratios, and the relaxation data are fitted to theoretical kinetic models. It is critical to choose an appropriate kinetic model, such as the two- or three-state exchange model, to derive the correct kinetic information. The R2 dispersion and ZZ-exchange methods are suitable for the analysis of protein-ligand interactions with a micromolar or sub-micromolar dissociation constant but not for very weak interactions, which are typical in very fast exchange. This contrasts with the NMR methods that are used

  6. Removal of Cr(VI) and Ni(II) from aqueous solution by fused yeast: Study of cations release and biosorption mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Hua; He Baoyan; Peng Hui; Ye Jinshao; Yang Feng; Zhang Na

    2008-01-01

    Biosorption of Cr(VI) and Ni(II) by a fused yeast from Candida tropicalis and Candida lipolytica under varying range of pH, initial metal concentration and reaction time was investigated. Net cation release and Cr removal reached 2.000 mmol/l and 81.37% when treating 20 mg/l Cr(VI) at pH 2 with 25 mg/l biomass for 30 min, while for Ni were 0.351 mmol/l and 64.60%, respectively. Trace metal elements such as Co, Cu, Mn, Mo, Se and Zn played active role in biosorption as important ingredients of functional enzymes. Cr(VI) was reduced to less toxic Cr(III) and chelated with extracellular secretions, and further accumulated inside the cells. For Ni biosorption, however, largely a passive uptake process influenced by ion gradient led to lower adsorption capacity and cations release. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrum analysis indicated that amide and pyridine on cells were involved in binding with Cr, but for Ni, bound-OH and nitro-compounds were the main related functional groups. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis confirmed that considerable amounts of metals precipitated on cell surface when dealing with high concentration metals

  7. The effect of Nb addition on mechanical properties, corrosion behavior, and metal-ion release of ZrAlCuNi bulk metallic glasses in artificial body fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, C L; Liu, L; Sun, M; Zhang, S M

    2005-12-15

    Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) of Zr(65 - x)Nb(x)- Cu(17.5)Ni(10)Al(7.5) with Nb = 0, 2, and 5 at % were prepared by copper mold casting. Compression tests reveal that the two BMGs containing Nb exhibited superior strength and plasticity to the base alloy. The corrosion behavior of the alloys obtained was investigated in artificial body fluid by electrochemical measurements. It was found that the addition of Nb significantly enhanced the corrosion resistance of the Zr-based BMG, as indicated by a remarkable increase in corrosion potential and pitting potential. XPS analysis revealed that the passive film formed after anodic polarization was enriched in aluminum oxide and depleted in phosphate ions for the BMGs containing Nb, which accounts for the improvement of corrosion resistance. On the other hand, metal-ion release of different BMGs were determined in PPb (ng/mL) level with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after being immersed in artificial body fluid at 37 degrees C for 20 days. It was found that the addition of Nb considerably reduced the ion release of all kinds of metals of the base system. This is probably attributed to the promoting effect of Nb on a rapid formation of highly protective film.

  8. Cytotoxic macrophage-released tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as a killing mechanism for cancer cell death after cold plasma activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Kaushik, Neha; Min, Booki; Choi, Ki Hong; Hong, Young June; Miller, Vandana; Fridman, Alexander; Choi, Eun Ha

    2016-03-01

    The present study aims at studying the anticancer role of cold plasma-activated immune cells. The direct anti-cancer activity of plasma-activated immune cells against human solid cancers has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed the effect of plasma-treated RAW264.7 macrophages on cancer cell growth after co-culture. In particular, flow cytometer analysis revealed that plasma did not induce any cell death in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed that TNF-α released from plasma-activated macrophages acts as a tumour cell death inducer. In support of these findings, activated macrophages down-regulated the cell growth in solid cancer cell lines and induced cell death in vitro. Together our findings suggest plasma-induced reactive species recruit cytotoxic macrophages to release TNF-α, which blocks cancer cell growth and can have the potential to contribute to reducing tumour growth in vivo in the near future.

  9. Cytotoxic macrophage-released tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as a killing mechanism for cancer cell death after cold plasma activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Kaushik, Neha; Min, Booki; Choi, Ki Hong; Hong, Young June; Choi, Eun Ha; Miller, Vandana; Fridman, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims at studying the anticancer role of cold plasma-activated immune cells. The direct anti-cancer activity of plasma-activated immune cells against human solid cancers has not been described so far. Hence, we assessed the effect of plasma-treated RAW264.7 macrophages on cancer cell growth after co-culture. In particular, flow cytometer analysis revealed that plasma did not induce any cell death in RAW264.7 macrophages. Interestingly, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis confirmed that TNF-α released from plasma-activated macrophages acts as a tumour cell death inducer. In support of these findings, activated macrophages down-regulated the cell growth in solid cancer cell lines and induced cell death in vitro. Together our findings suggest plasma-induced reactive species recruit cytotoxic macrophages to release TNF-α, which blocks cancer cell growth and can have the potential to contribute to reducing tumour growth in vivo in the near future. (paper)

  10. Mechanical particle coating using polymethacrylate nanoparticle agglomerates for the preparation of controlled release fine particles: The relationship between coating performance and the characteristics of various polymethacrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Keita; Kato, Shinsuke; Niwa, Toshiyuki

    2017-10-30

    We aimed to understand the factors controlling mechanical particle coating using polymethacrylate. The relationship between coating performance and the characteristics of polymethacrylate powders was investigated. First, theophylline crystals were treated using a mechanical powder processor to obtain theophylline spheres (grindability of the agglomerates were attributed to differences in particle structure, resulting from consolidation between colloidal particles. High-grindability agglomerates exhibited higher pulverization as their glass transition temperature (T g ) increased and the further pulverization promoted coating. We therefore conclude that the minimization of polymethacrylate powder by pulverization is an important factor in mechanical particle coating using polymethacrylate with low deformability. Meanwhile, when product temperature during coating approaches T g of polymer, polymethacrylate was soften to show high coating performance by plastic deformation. The effective coating by this mechanism may be accomplished by adjusting the temperature in the processor to the T g . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Crystallization of protein–ligand complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassell, Anne M.; An, Gang; Bledsoe, Randy K.; Bynum, Jane M.; Carter, H. Luke III; Deng, Su-Jun J.; Gampe, Robert T.; Grisard, Tamara E.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Nolte, Robert T.; Rocque, Warren J.; Wang, Liping; Weaver, Kurt L.; Williams, Shawn P.; Wisely, G. Bruce; Xu, Robert; Shewchuk, Lisa M.

    2007-01-01

    Methods presented for growing protein–ligand complexes fall into the categories of co-expression of the protein with the ligands of interest, use of the ligands during protein purification, cocrystallization and soaking the ligands into existing crystals. Obtaining diffraction-quality crystals has long been a bottleneck in solving the three-dimensional structures of proteins. Often proteins may be stabilized when they are complexed with a substrate, nucleic acid, cofactor or small molecule. These ligands, on the other hand, have the potential to induce significant conformational changes to the protein and ab initio screening may be required to find a new crystal form. This paper presents an overview of strategies in the following areas for obtaining crystals of protein–ligand complexes: (i) co-expression of the protein with the ligands of interest, (ii) use of the ligands during protein purification, (iii) cocrystallization and (iv) soaks

  12. A grand unified model for liganded gold clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wen Wu; Zhu, Beien; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Gao, Yi

    2016-12-01

    A grand unified model (GUM) is developed to achieve fundamental understanding of rich structures of all 71 liganded gold clusters reported to date. Inspired by the quark model by which composite particles (for example, protons and neutrons) are formed by combining three quarks (or flavours), here gold atoms are assigned three `flavours' (namely, bottom, middle and top) to represent three possible valence states. The `composite particles' in GUM are categorized into two groups: variants of triangular elementary block Au3(2e) and tetrahedral elementary block Au4(2e), all satisfying the duet rule (2e) of the valence shell, akin to the octet rule in general chemistry. The elementary blocks, when packed together, form the cores of liganded gold clusters. With the GUM, structures of 71 liganded gold clusters and their growth mechanism can be deciphered altogether. Although GUM is a predictive heuristic and may not be necessarily reflective of the actual electronic structure, several highly stable liganded gold clusters are predicted, thereby offering GUM-guided synthesis of liganded gold clusters by design.

  13. Spectrochemical study on different ligand neodymium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomenko, V.S.; Lozinskij, M.O.; Fialkov, Yu.A.; Krasovskaya, L.I.; Rasshinina, T.A.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Organicheskoj Khimii)

    1986-01-01

    A series of new adducts of neodymium complexes with 1, 1, 1, 5, 5, 5-hexafluoropentadione - 2, 4 and 2-heptafluoropropoxy-1, 1, 1, 2-tetrafluoro-5-phenylpentadione-3, 5: Nd(HFPTFPhPD) 3 x2H 2 O, Nd(HFPTFPhPD) 3 xDipy, Nd(HFPTFPhPD) 3 xPhen, Nd(HFPTFPhPD) 3 xDphen, Nd(HFA) 3 x2H 2 O, Nd(HFA) 3 xDipy, Nd(HFA) 3 xPhen, Nd(HFA) 3 xDphen, have been synthesized. Ways of their fragmentation under electron impact are established. Bond strength of additional ligands with central atom in the complexes studied is evaluated. Data on decomposition mechanisms of bicharged ions have been obtained for the first time. Addition of bis-heterocycles to neodymium three-ligand complexes changes the properties of the complexes - their thermal stability and photochemical stability increase, in certain cases their volatility increases

  14. Comment on “Emergence and fate of cyclic volatile polydimethylsiloxanes (D4, D5) in municipal waste streams: Release mechanisms, partitioning and persistence in air, water, soil and sediments”

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buser, Andreas M., E-mail: andreas.buser@alumni.ethz.ch; Bogdal, Christian; Scheringer, Martin

    2015-02-01

    The review article “Emergence and fate of cyclic volatile polydimethylsiloxanes (D4, D5) in municipal waste streams: Release mechanisms, partitioning and persistence in air, water, soil and sediments” by Surita and Tansel covers a relevant topic, but there are several serious issues with this paper. The inappropriate handling of data gathered from various sources has resulted in a flawed dataset. In addition, the authors performed several erroneous or meaningless calculations with the data. Their dataset leads to incorrect and misleading interpretations and should not be used.

  15. -Pincer Ligand Family through Ligand Post-Modification

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Mei-Hui; Hu, Jinsong; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2017-01-01

    A series of air-stable nickel complexes containing triazine-based PN3P-pincer ligands were synthesized and fully characterized. Complex 3 contains a de-aromatized central triazine ring from the deprotonation of one of the N–H arms. With a post-modification strategy, the Me-PN3P*NiCl complex (3) could be converted into a new class of diimine–traizine PN3P-pincer nickel complexes.

  16. -Pincer Ligand Family through Ligand Post-Modification

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Mei-Hui

    2017-10-02

    A series of air-stable nickel complexes containing triazine-based PN3P-pincer ligands were synthesized and fully characterized. Complex 3 contains a de-aromatized central triazine ring from the deprotonation of one of the N–H arms. With a post-modification strategy, the Me-PN3P*NiCl complex (3) could be converted into a new class of diimine–traizine PN3P-pincer nickel complexes.

  17. Mechanism of the beneficial effects of ATP-MgCl2 following trauma-hemorrhage and resuscitation: downregulation of inflammatory cytokine (TNF, IL-6) release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P; Ba, Z F; Morrison, M H; Ayala, A; Dean, R E; Chaudry, I H

    1992-04-01

    Although ATP-MgCl2 improves hepatocellular function in a nonheparinized model of trauma-hemorrhage and crystalloid resuscitation, it remains unknown whether the beneficial effects of this agent are due to downregulation of the release of the inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) under those conditions. To study this, rats underwent a 5-cm laparotomy (i.e., trauma induced) and were bled to and maintained at a mean arterial pressure of 40 mm Hg until 40% of maximum bleedout volume was returned in the form of Ringer's lactate (RL). The animals were then resuscitated with four times the volume of shed blood with RL over 60 min. ATP-MgCl2 (50 mumoles/kg body weight each) or an equivalent volume of normal saline was infused intravenously for 95 min. This infusion was started during the last 15 min of RL resuscitation. Plasma levels of TNF and IL-6 were measured at 1.5 hr after the completion of resuscitation by cytokine-dependent cellular assays. Hepatic blood flow was determined by in vivo indocyanine green clearance (corrected by hepatic extraction ratio for indocyanine green), radioactive microspheres, and [3H]-galactose clearance techniques. The results indicate that the levels of circulating TNF and IL-6 increased significantly in the hemorrhaged-resuscitated animals. ATP-MgCl2 treatment, however, markedly decreased the synthesis and/or release of these cytokines to levels similar to the sham group. The markedly decreased hepatic blood flow (as determined by three different methods) and hepatic extraction ratio for indocyanine green were also restored by ATP-MgCl2 treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Reactivity of halide and pseudohalide ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukushkin, Yu.N.

    1987-01-01

    Reactivity of halide and pseudohalide (cyanide, azide, thiocyanate, cyanate) ligands tending to form bridge bonds in transition metal (Re, Mo, W) complexes is considered. Complexes where transition metal salts are ligands of other, complex-forming ion, are described. Transformation of innerspheric pseudohalide ligands is an important way of directed synthesis of these metal coordination compounds

  19. The cholinergic ligand binding material of axonal membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mautner, H.G.; Coronado, R.; Jumblatt, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    Choline acetyltransferase and acetylcholinesterase, the enzymes responsible for the synthesis and hydrolysis of ACh, are present in nerve fibers. In crustacean peripheral nerves, release of ACh from cut nerve fibers has been demonstrated. Previously closed membrane vesicles have been prepared from lobster walking leg nerve plasma membrane and saturable binding of cholinergic agonsist and antagonists to such membranes have been demonstrated. This paper studies this axonal cholinergic binding material, and elucidates its functions. The binding of tritium-nicotine to lobster nerve plasma membranes was antagonized by a series of cholinergic ligands as well as by a series of local anesthetics. This preparation was capable of binding I 125-alpha-bungarotoxin, a ligand widely believed to be a specific label for nicotinic ACh receptor. The labelling of 50 K petide band with tritium-MBTA following disulfide reduction is illustrated

  20. Techniques for Reaeration of Hydropower Releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    release improvement. However, selected reservoir aeration studies not conducted primarily for improving hydroturbine releases but which have application...for hydroturbine release reaeration were also reviewed. Because oxygen transfer mechanisms are vitally important to the development of more efficient...the key words turbine aeration, turbine vent, turbine I’ aspiration, hydroturbine aeration, tailrace aeration, draft tube vent, and vacuum breaker. A

  1. ATP Release and Effects in Pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Ivana; Amstrup, Jan; Henriksen, Katrine Lütken

    2003-01-01

    ATP and other nucleotides are released from various cells, but the pathway and physiological stimulus for ATP release are often unclear. The focus of our studies is the understanding of ATP release and signaling in rat exocrine pancreas. In acinar suspension mechanical stimulation, hypotonic shock...

  2. Dynamical Binding Modes Determine Agonistic and Antagonistic Ligand Effects in the Prostate-Specific G-Protein Coupled Receptor (PSGR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Steffen; Jovancevic, Nikolina; Gelis, Lian; Pietsch, Sebastian; Hatt, Hanns; Gerwert, Klaus

    2017-11-22

    We analysed the ligand-based activation mechanism of the prostate-specific G-protein coupled receptor (PSGR), which is an olfactory receptor that mediates cellular growth in prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, it is an olfactory receptor with a known chemically near identic antagonist/agonist pair, α- and β-ionone. Using a combined theoretical and experimental approach, we propose that this receptor is activated by a ligand-induced rearrangement of a protein-internal hydrogen bond network. Surprisingly, this rearrangement is not induced by interaction of the ligand with the network, but by dynamic van der Waals contacts of the ligand with the involved amino acid side chains, altering their conformations and intraprotein connectivity. Ligand recognition in this GPCR is therefore highly stereo selective, but seemingly lacks any ligand recognition via polar contacts. A putative olfactory receptor-based drug design scheme will have to take this unique mode of protein/ligand action into account.

  3. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.O. Bader

    1999-10-18

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  4. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S.O. Bader

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  5. Ligand-regulated peptide aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Russell A

    2009-01-01

    The peptide aptamer approach employs high-throughput selection to identify members of a randomized peptide library displayed from a scaffold protein by virtue of their interaction with a target molecule. Extending this approach, we have developed a peptide aptamer scaffold protein that can impart small-molecule control over the aptamer-target interaction. This ligand-regulated peptide (LiRP) scaffold, consisting of the protein domains FKBP12, FRB, and GST, binds to the cell-permeable small-molecule rapamycin and the binding of this molecule can prevent the interaction of the randomizable linker region connecting FKBP12 with FRB. Here we present a detailed protocol for the creation of a peptide aptamer plasmid library, selection of peptide aptamers using the LiRP scaffold in a yeast two-hybrid system, and the screening of those peptide aptamers for a ligand-regulated interaction.

  6. Ligand binding by PDZ domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Celestine N.; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    , for example, are particularly rich in these domains. The general function of PDZ domains is to bring proteins together within the appropriate cellular compartment, thereby facilitating scaffolding, signaling, and trafficking events. The many functions of PDZ domains under normal physiological as well...... as pathological conditions have been reviewed recently. In this review, we focus on the molecular details of how PDZ domains bind their protein ligands and their potential as drug targets in this context....

  7. JS-K, a nitric oxide-releasing prodrug, modulates ß-catenin/TCF signaling in leukemic Jurkat cells: evidence of an S-nitrosylated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Niharika; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Pospishil, Liliya; Cieciura, Lucyna Z; Goswami, Satindra; Kodela, Ravinder; Saavedra, Joseph E; Keefer, Larry K; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2010-12-01

    β-Catenin is a central player of the Wnt signaling pathway that regulates cell-cell adhesion and may promote leukemia cell proliferation. We examined whether JS-K, an NO-donating prodrug, modulates the Wnt/β-catenin/TCF-4 signaling pathway in Jurkat T-Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia cells. JS-K inhibited Jurkat T cell growth in a concentration and time-dependent manner. The IC(50)s for cell growth inhibition were 14±0.7 and 9±1.2μM at 24 and 48h, respectively. Treatment of the cells with JS-K for 24h, caused a dose-dependent increase in apoptosis from 16±3.3% at 10μM to 74.8±2% at 100μM and a decrease in proliferation. This growth inhibition was also due, in part, to alterations in the different phases of the cell cycle. JS-K exhibited a dose-dependent cytotoxicity as measured by LDH release at 24h. However, between 2 and 8h, LDH release was less than 20% for any indicated JS-K concentration. The β-catenin/TCF-4 transcriptional inhibitory activity was reduced by 32±8, 63±5, and 93±2% at 2, 10, and 25μM JS-K, respectively, based on luciferase reporter assays. JS-K reduced nuclear β-catenin and cyclin D1 protein levels, but cytosolic β-catenin expression did not change. Based on a time-course assay of S-nitrosylation of proteins by a biotin switch assay, S-nitrsolyation of nuclear β-catenin was determined to precede its degradation. A comparison of the S-nitrosylated nuclear β-catenin to the total nuclear β-catenin showed that β-catenin protein levels were degraded at 24h, while S-nitrosylation of β-catenin occurred earlier at 0-6h. The NO scavenger PTIO abrogated the JS-K mediated degradation of β-catenin demonstrating the need for NO. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Mechanisms of glycine release, which build up synaptic and extrasynaptic glycine levels: the role of synaptic and non-synaptic glycine transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsing, Laszlo G; Matyus, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Glycine is an amino acid neurotransmitter that is involved in both inhibitory and excitatory neurochemical transmission in the central nervous system. The role of glycine in excitatory neurotransmission is related to its coagonist action at glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. The glycine levels in the synaptic cleft rise many times higher during synaptic activation assuring that glycine spills over into the extrasynaptic space. Another possible origin of extrasynaptic glycine is the efflux of glycine occurring from astrocytes associated with glutamatergic synapses. The release of glycine from neuronal or glial origins exhibits several differences compared to that of biogenic amines or other amino acid neurotransmitters. These differences appear in an external Ca(2+)- and temperature-dependent manner, conferring unique characteristics on glycine as a neurotransmitter. Glycine transporter type-1 at synapses may exhibit neural and glial forms and plays a role in controlling synaptic glycine levels and the spill over rate of glycine from the synaptic cleft into the extrasynaptic biophase. Non-synaptic glycine transporter type-1 regulates extrasynaptic glycine concentrations, either increasing or decreasing them depending on the reverse or normal mode operation of the carrier molecule. While we can, at best, only estimate synaptic glycine levels at rest and during synaptic activation, glycine concentrations are readily measurable via brain microdialysis technique applied in the extrasynaptic space. The non-synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor may obtain glycine for activation following its spill over from highly active synapses or from its release mediated by the reverse operation of non-synaptic glycine transporter-1. The sensitivity of non-synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors to glutamate and glycine is many times higher than that of synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors making the former type of receptor the primary target for drug action. Synaptic

  9. Bitopic Ligands and Metastable Binding Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fronik, Philipp; Gaiser, Birgit I; Sejer Pedersen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    of orthosteric binding sites. Bitopic ligands have been employed to address the selectivity problem by combining (linking) an orthosteric ligand with an allosteric modulator, theoretically leading to high-affinity subtype selective ligands. However, it remains a challenge to identify suitable allosteric binding...... that have been reported to date, this type of bitopic ligands would be composed of two identical pharmacophores. Herein, we outline the concept of bitopic ligands, review metastable binding sites, and discuss their potential as a new source of allosteric binding sites....

  10. Radioiodinated ligands for dopamine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, H.F.

    1994-01-01

    The dopamine receptor system is important for normal brain function; it is also the apparent action site for various neuroleptic drugs for the treatment of schizophrenia and other metal disorders. In the past few years radioiodinated ligands for single photon emission tomography (SPECT) have been successfully developed and tested in humans: [ 123 I]TISCH for D1 dopamine receptors; [ 123 I]IBZM, epidepride, IBF and FIDA2, four iodobenzamide derivatives, for D2/D3 dopamine receptors. In addition, [ 123 I]β-CIT (RTI-55) and IPT, cocaine derivatives, for the dopamine reuptake site are potentially useful for diagnosis of loss of dopamine neurons. The first iodinated ligand, (R)trans-7-OH-PIPAT, for D3 dopamine receptors, was synthesized and characterized with cloned cell lines (Spodoptera frugiperda, Sf9) expressing the D2 and D3 dopamine receptors and with rat basal forebrain membrane preparations. Most of the known iodobenzamides displayed similar potency in binding to both D2 and D3 dopamine receptors expressed in the cell lines. Initial studies appear to suggest that by fine tuning the structures it may be possible to develop agents specific for D2 and D3 dopamine receptors. It is important to investigate D2/D3 selectivity for this series of potent ligands

  11. Border cell release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mravec, Jozef

    2017-01-01

    Plant border cells are specialised cells derived from the root cap with roles in the biomechanics of root growth and in forming a barrier against pathogens. The mechanism of highly localised cell separation which is essential for their release to the environment is little understood. Here I present...... in situ analysis of Brachypodium distachyon, a model organism for grasses which possess type II primary cell walls poor in pectin content. Results suggest similarity in spatial dynamics of pectic homogalacturonan during dicot and monocot border cell release. Integration of observations from different...... species leads to the hypothesis that this process most likely does not involve degradation of cell wall material but rather employs unique cell wall structural and compositional means enabling both the rigidity of the root cap as well as detachability of given cells on its surface....

  12. The role of tumor necrosis factor-α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) in mediating autophagy in myositis skeletal muscle: A potential non-immune mechanism of muscle damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alger, Heather M.; Raben, Nina; Pistilli, Emidio; Francia, Dwight; Rawat, Rashmi; Getnet, Derese; Ghimbovschi, Svetlana; Chen, Yi-Wen; Lundberg, Ingrid E.; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2011-01-01

    Objective Multinucleated cells are relatively resistant to classical apoptosis, and the factors initiating cell-death and damage in myositis are not well defined. We hypothesized that non-immune autophagic cell death may play a role in muscle fiber damage. Recent literature indicates that tumor necrosis factor-alpha-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) may induce both NFκB (nuclear factor kappa-light chain enhancer of activated B cells) activation and autophagic cell death in other systems. Here, we have investigated its role in cell death and pathogenesis in vitro and in vivo using myositis (human and mouse) muscle tissues. Methods Gene expression profiling indicated that expression of TRAIL and several autophagy markers was specifically upregulated in myositis muscle tissue; these results were confirmed by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. We also analyzed TRAIL-induced cell death (apoptosis and autophagy) and NFκB activation in vitro in cultured cells. Results TRAIL was expressed predominantly in muscle fibers of myositis, but not in biopsies from normal or other dystrophic-diseased muscle. Autophagy markers were upregulated in human and mouse models of myositis. TRAIL expression was restricted to regenerating/atrophic areas of muscle fascicles, blood vessels, and infiltrating lymphocytes. TRAIL induced NFκB activation and IκB degradation in cultured cells that are resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis but undergo autophagic cell death. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that TRAIL is expressed in myositis muscle and may mediate both activation of NFκB and autophagic cell death in myositis. Thus, this non-immune pathway may be an attractive target for therapeutic intervention in myositis. PMID:21769834

  13. Strong binding of apolar hydrophobic organic contaminants by dissolved black carbon released from biochar: A mechanism of pseudomicelle partition and environmental implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Heyun; Wei, Chenhui; Qu, Xiaolei; Li, Hui; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2018-01-01

    Dissolved black carbon (DBC), the soluble fraction of black carbon (BC), is an important constituent of dissolved organic matter pool. However, little is known about the binding interactions between hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) and DBC and their significance in the fate process. This study determined the binding ability of DBC released from rice-derived BC for a series of apolar HOCs, including four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and four chlorinated benzenes, using batch sorption and solubility enhancement techniques. Bulk BC and a dissolved soil humic acid (DSHA) were included as benchmark sorbents. The organic carbon-normalized sorption coefficient of phenanthrene to DBC was slightly lower than bulk BC, but was over ten folds higher than DSHA. Consistently, DBC was more effective than DSHA in enhancing the apparent water solubility of the tested HOCs, and the enhancement positively correlated with solute n-octanol-water partition coefficient, indicating the predominance of hydrophobic partition. The much higher binding ability of DBC relative to DSHA was mainly attributed to its higher tendency to form pseudomicellar structures as supported by the fluorescence quenching and the pH-edge data. Our findings suggest that DBC might play a significant role in the environmental fate and transport of HOCs as both sorbent and carrier. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Acetylcholine receptors and cholinergic ligands: biochemical and genetic aspects in Torpedo californica and Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, L.S.

    1987-01-01

    This study evaluates the biochemical and genetic aspects of the acetylcholine receptor proteins and cholinergic ligands in Drosophila melanogaster and Torpedo californica. Included are (1) a comparative study of nicotinic ligand-induced cation release from acetylcholine receptors isolated from Torpedo californica and from Drosophila melanogaster, (2) solution studies of the cholinergic ligands, nikethamide and ethamivan, aimed at measuring internal molecular rotational barriers in solvents of different polarity; and (3) the isolation and characterization of the gene(s) for the acetylcholine receptor in Drosophila melasogaster. Acetylcholine receptor proteins isolated from Drosphila melanogaster heads were found to behave kinetically similar (with regards to cholinergic ligand-induced 155 Eu: 3+ displacement from prelabeled proteins) to receptor proteins isolated from Torpedo californica electric tissue, providing additional biochemical evidence for the existence of a Drosophila acetylcholine receptor

  15. Solution characterization of the extracellular region of CD147 and its interaction with its enzyme ligand cyclophilin-A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlegel, Jennifer; Redzic, Jasmina S.; Porter, Christopher; Yurchenko, Vyacheslav; Bukrinsky, Michael; Labeikovsky, Wladimir; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Zhang, Fengli; Isern, Nancy G.; Degregori, James; Hodges, Robert; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.

    2009-08-21

    The CD147 receptor plays an integral role in numerous diseases by stimulating the expression of several protein families and serving as the receptor for extracellular cyclophilins, however, neither CD147 nor its interactions with its cyclophilin ligands have been well characterized in solution. CD147 is a unique protein in that it can function both at the cell membrane and after being released from cells where it continues to retain activity. Thus, the CD147 receptor functions through at least two mechanisms that include both cyclophilin-independent and cyclophilin-dependent modes of action. In regard to CD147 cyclophilin-independent activity, CD147 homophilic interactions are thought to underlie its activity. In regard to CD147 cyclophilin-dependent activity, cyclophilin/CD147 interactions may represent a novel means of signaling since cyclophilins are also peptidyl-prolyl isomerases.

  16. Identification of small heat shock protein B8 (HSP22) as a novel TLR4 ligand and potential involvement in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, M.F.; Boelens, W.C.; Joosten, L.A.B.; Abdollahi-Roodsaz, S.; Geurts, J.; Wunderink, L.U.; Schreurs, B.W.; Berg, W.B. van den; Radstake, T.R.D.J.

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized APCs that can be activated upon pathogen recognition as well as recognition of endogenous ligands, which are released during inflammation and cell stress. The recognition of exogenous and endogenous ligands depends on TLRs, which are abundantly expressed in

  17. Designer ligands. Part 14. Novel Mn(lI), Ni(II) and Zn(II) complexes of benzamide- and biphenyl-derived ligands

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wellington, Kevin W

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available . Results and Discussion The ligands 1a-c (Scheme 1) were prepared by treating benzoic acid with carbonyl diimidazole (CDI)13 in dimethylformamide (DMF), followed by the respective primary amines, histamine, 2- (2-aminoethyl)benzimidazole and 2...-(2-aminoethyl)pyridine. [Histamine had to be released from its dihydrochloride salt by treatment with sodium methoxide, while 2-(2- aminoethyl)benzimidazole was prepared from 1,2-diaminobenzene and β-alanine.16] The synthesis of the biphenyl-derived ligand 2...

  18. Long-Acting Diclofenac Ester Prodrugs for Joint Injection: Kinetics, Mechanism of Degradation, and In Vitro Release From Prodrug Suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Nina; Larsen, Susan Weng; Kristensen, Jesper; Østergaard, Jesper; Larsen, Claus

    2016-10-01

    A prodrug approach for local and sustained diclofenac action after injection into joints based on ester prodrugs having a pH-dependent solubility is presented. Inherent ester prodrug properties influencing the duration of action include their pH-dependent solubility and charge state, as well as susceptibility to undergo esterase facilitated hydrolysis. In this study, physicochemical properties and pH rate profiles of 3 diclofenac ester prodrugs differing with respect to the spacer carbon chain length between the drug and the imidazole-based promoiety were determined and a rate equation for prodrug degradation in aqueous solution in the pH range 1-10 was derived. In the pH range 6-10, the prodrugs were subject to parallel degradation to yield diclofenac and an indolinone derivative. The prodrug degradation was found to be about 6-fold faster in 80% (vol/vol) human plasma as compared to 80% (vol/vol) human synovial fluid with 2-(1-methyl-1H-imidazol-2-yl)ethyl 2-(2-(2,6 dichlorophenyl)amino)phenylacetate being the poorest substrate toward enzymatic cleavage. The conversion and release of parent diclofenac from prodrug suspensions in vitro were studied using the rotating dialysis model. The results suggest that it is possible to alter and control dissolution and reconversion behavior of the diclofenac prodrugs, thus making the prodrug approach feasible for local and sustained diclofenac action after joint injection. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. An intracellular adrenomedullin system reduces IL-6 release via a NF-kB-mediated, cAMP-independent transcriptional mechanism in rat thymic epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Giulia; Paliuri, Giovanna; Orso, Genny; Paccagnella, Nicola; D'Amore, Claudio; Facci, Laura; Cima, Francesca; Caicci, Federico; Palatini, Pietro; Bova, Sergio; De Martin, Sara

    2016-12-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) play a key role in the regulation of central immune tolerance by expressing autoantigens and eliminating self-reactive T cells. In a previous paper we reported that adrenomedullin (ADM) and its co-receptor protein RAMP2 are located intracellularly in newborn human thymic epithelial cells (TECs). This work has two main aims: (1) to examine the cellular localization of ADM and its receptor in TECs of adult Wistar rats to validate this animal model for the study of the ADM system and its function(s) in thymus; (2) to investigate the potential modulating effect of ADM on the NF-kB pathway, which is involved through the production of cytokines such as IL-6, in the maturation of T-lymphocytes and immunological tolerance. Our results show that, similarly to human newborn TECs, ADM is localized to the cytoplasm of adult rat TECs, and RAMP2 is expressed in the nucleus but not in the plasma membrane. Pretreatment of TECs for 4h with ADM significantly reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced release of IL-6 (PkB, while doubled the expression of IkBα (PkB nuclear translocation. These effects were not mediated by activation of the cAMP pathway, a signalling cascade that is rapidly activated by ADM in cells that express plasma membrane RAMP2, but were the consequence of a reduction in the transcription of p65 (PkB genes transcription through an interaction with a receptor localized to the nucleus. This may partly explain the protective effects of ADM in autoimmune diseases and points to the ADM system of TECs as a novel potential target for immunomodulating drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thiol ligand-induced transformation of Au38(SC2H4Ph)24 to Au36(SPh-t-Bu)24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chenjie; Liu, Chunyan; Pei, Yong; Jin, Rongchao

    2013-07-23

    We report a disproportionation mechanism identified in the transformation of rod-like biicosahedral Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24 to tetrahedral Au36(TBBT)24 nanoclusters. Time-dependent mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy analyses unambiguously map out the detailed size-conversion pathway. The ligand exchange of Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24 with bulkier 4-tert-butylbenzenethiol (TBBT) until a certain extent starts to trigger structural distortion of the initial biicosahedral Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24 structure, leading to the release of two Au atoms and eventually the Au36(TBBT)24 nanocluster with a tetrahedral structure, in which process the number of ligands is interestingly preserved. The other product of the disproportionation process, i.e., Au40(TBBT)m+2(SCH2CH2Ph)24-m, was concurrently observed as an intermediate, which was the result of addition of two Au atoms and two TBBT ligands to Au38(TBBT)m(SCH2CH2Ph)24-m. The reaction kinetics on the Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24 to Au36(TBBT)24 conversion process was also performed, and the activation energies of the structural distortion and disproportionation steps were estimated to be 76 and 94 kJ/mol, respectively. The optical absorption features of Au36(TBBT)24 are interpreted on the basis of density functional theory simulations.

  1. Surfactant Ligand Removal and Rational Fabrication of Inorganically Connected Quantum Dots

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Haitao

    2011-12-14

    A novel method is reported to create inorganically connected nanocrystal (NC) assemblies for both II-VI and IV-VI semiconductors by removing surfactant ligands using (NH 4) 2S. This surface modification process differs from ligand exchange methods in that no new surfactant ligands are introduced and the post-treated NC surfaces are nearly bare. The detailed mechanism study shows that the high reactivity between (NH 4) 2S and metal-surfactant ligand complexes enables the complete removal of surfactant ligands in seconds and converts the NC metal-rich shells into metal sulfides. The post-treated NCs are connected through metal-sulfide bonding and form a larger NCs film assembly, while still maintaining quantum confinement. Such "connected but confined" NC assemblies are promising new materials for electronic and optoelectronic devices. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  2. Potential ligand-binding residues in rat olfactory receptors identified by correlated mutation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, M. S.; Oliveira, L.; Vriend, G.; Shepherd, G. M.

    1995-01-01

    A family of G-protein-coupled receptors is believed to mediate the recognition of odor molecules. In order to identify potential ligand-binding residues, we have applied correlated mutation analysis to receptor sequences from the rat. This method identifies pairs of sequence positions where residues remain conserved or mutate in tandem, thereby suggesting structural or functional importance. The analysis supported molecular modeling studies in suggesting several residues in positions that were consistent with ligand-binding function. Two of these positions, dominated by histidine residues, may play important roles in ligand binding and could confer broad specificity to mammalian odor receptors. The presence of positive (overdominant) selection at some of the identified positions provides additional evidence for roles in ligand binding. Higher-order groups of correlated residues were also observed. Each group may interact with an individual ligand determinant, and combinations of these groups may provide a multi-dimensional mechanism for receptor diversity.

  3. Inhibition of rat pituitary growth hormone (GH) release by subclinical levels of lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camoratto, A.M.; White, L.M.; Lau, Y.S.; Moriarty, C.M.

    1990-01-01

    Lead toxicity has been associated with short stature in children. Since growth hormone is a major regulator of growth, the effects of chronic exposure to subclinical lead levels on pituitary function were assessed. Timed pregnant rats were given 125 ppm lead (as lead nitrate) in their drinking water beginning on day 5 of gestation. After weaning, pups were continued on lead until sacrifice at 7 weeks of age. The average blood lead level at this time was 18.9 ug/dl (range 13.7-27.8). On the day of sacrifice the pituitary was removed, hemisected and incubated with vehicle or 40 nM hGRH (human growth hormone releasing hormone). Pituitaries from chronically lead-treated pups were 64% less responsive to GRH than controls. In contrast, no difference in responsiveness was observed in pituitaries from the dams. The specific binding of GRH was also examined. Control animals showed a dose-dependent displacement of 125I-GRH by unlabeled ligand (10-1000 nM). In the pituitaries of lead-treated pups binding of labeled ligand was markedly reduced by unlabeled GRH (less than 100 nM). Chronic exposure to lead had no effect on serum GH or prolactin levels or on pituitary content of GH. These data suggest that one mechanism by which lead can affect growth is by inhibition of GH release

  4. Contrasting roles for TLR ligands in HIV-1 pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beda Brichacek

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The first line of a host's response to various pathogens is triggered by their engagement of cellular pattern recognition receptors (PRRs. Binding of microbial ligands to these receptors leads to the induction of a variety of cellular factors that alter intracellular and extracellular environment and interfere directly or indirectly with the life cycle of the triggering pathogen. Such changes may also affect any coinfecting microbe. Using ligands to Toll-like receptors (TLRs 5 and 9, we examined their effect on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 replication in lymphoid tissue ex vivo. We found marked differences in the outcomes of such treatment. While flagellin (TLR5 agonist treatment enhanced replication of CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR 5-tropic and CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4-tropic HIV-1, treatment with oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN M362 (TLR9 agonist suppressed both viral variants. The differential effects of these TLR ligands on HIV-1 replication correlated with changes in production of CC chemokines CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, and of CXC chemokines CXCL10, and CXCL12 in the ligand-treated HIV-1-infected tissues. The nature and/or magnitude of these changes were dependent on the ligand as well as on the HIV-1 viral strain. Moreover, the tested ligands differed in their ability to induce cellular activation as evaluated by the expression of the cluster of differentiation markers (CD 25, CD38, CD39, CD69, CD154, and human leukocyte antigen D related (HLA-DR as well as of a cell proliferation marker, Ki67, and of CCR5. No significant effect of the ligand treatment was observed on apoptosis and cell death/loss in the treated lymphoid tissue ex vivo. Our results suggest that binding of microbial ligands to TLRs is one of the mechanisms that mediate interactions between coinfected microbes and HIV-1 in human tissues. Thus, the engagement of appropriate TLRs by microbial molecules or their mimetic might become a new strategy for HIV therapy or prevention.

  5. Water oxidation catalyzed by mononuclear ruthenium complexes with a 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylate (bda) ligand: how ligand environment influences the catalytic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staehle, Robert; Tong, Lianpeng; Wang, Lei; Duan, Lele; Fischer, Andreas; Ahlquist, Mårten S G; Sun, Licheng; Rau, Sven

    2014-02-03

    A new water oxidation catalyst [Ru(III)(bda)(mmi)(OH2)](CF3SO3) (2, H2bda = 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid; mmi = 1,3-dimethylimidazolium-2-ylidene) containing an axial N-heterocyclic carbene ligand and one aqua ligand was synthesized and fully characterized. The kinetics of catalytic water oxidation by 2 were measured using stopped-flow technique, and key intermediates in the catalytic cycle were probed by density functional theory calculations. While analogous Ru-bda water oxidation catalysts [Ru(bda)L2] (L = pyridyl ligands) are supposed to catalyze water oxidation through a bimolecular coupling pathway, our study points out that 2, surprisingly, undergoes a single-site water nucleophilic attack (acid-base) pathway. The diversion of catalytic mechanisms is mainly ascribed to the different ligand environments, from nonaqua ligands to an aqua ligand. Findings in this work provide some critical proof for our previous hypothesis about how alternation of ancillary ligands of water oxidation catalysts influences their catalytic efficiency.

  6. Mechanisms of Silver Nanoparticle Release, Transformation and Toxicity: A Critical Review of Current Knowledge and Recommendations for Future Studies and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iseult Lynch

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanosilver, due to its small particle size and enormous specific surface area, facilitates more rapid dissolution of ions than the equivalent bulk material; potentially leading to increased toxicity of nanosilver. This, coupled with their capacity to adsorb biomolecules and interact with biological receptors can mean that nanoparticles can reach sub-cellular locations leading to potentially higher localized concentrations of ions once those particles start to dissolve or degrade in situ. Further complicating the story is the capacity for nanoparticles to generate reactive oxygen species, and to interact with, and potentially disturb the functioning of biomolecules such as proteins, enzymes and DNA. The fact that the nanoparticle size, shape, surface coating and a host of other factors contribute to these interactions, and that the particles themselves are evolving or ageing leads to further complications in terms of elucidating mechanisms of interaction and modes of action for silver nanoparticles, in contrast to dissolved silver species. This review aims to provide a critical assessment of the current understanding of silver nanoparticle toxicity, as well as to provide a set of pointers and guidelines for experimental design of future studies to assess the environmental and biological impacts of silver nanoparticles. In particular; in future we require a detailed description of the nanoparticles; their synthesis route and stabilisation mechanisms; their coating; and evolution and ageing under the exposure conditions of the assay. This would allow for comparison of data from different particles; different environmental or biological systems; and structure-activity or structure-property relationships to emerge as the basis for predictive toxicology. On the basis of currently available data; such comparisons or predictions are difficult; as the characterisation and time-resolved data is not available; and a full understanding of silver

  7. Fluorescent ligands for studying neuropeptide receptors by confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Beaudet

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the use of confocal microscopy as it pertains to the identification of G-protein coupled receptors and the study of their dynamic properties in cell cultures and in mammalian brain following their tagging with specific fluorescent ligands. Principles that should guide the choice of suitable ligands and fluorophores are discussed. Examples are provided from the work carried out in the authors' laboratory using custom synthetized fluoresceinylated or BODIPY-tagged bioactive peptides. The results show that confocal microscopic detection of specifically bound fluorescent ligands permits high resolution appraisal of neuropeptide receptor distribution both in cell culture and in brain sections. Within the framework of time course experiments, it also allows for a dynamic assessment of the internalization and subsequent intracellular trafficking of bound fluorescent molecules. Thus, it was found that neurotensin, somatostatin and mu- and delta-selective opioid peptides are internalized in a receptor-dependent fashion and according to receptor-specific patterns into their target cells. In the case of neurotensin, this internalization process was found to be clathrin-mediated, to proceed through classical endosomal pathways and, in neurons, to result in a mobilization of newly formed endosomes from neural processes to nerve cell bodies and from the periphery of cell bodies towards the perinuclear zone. These mechanisms are likely to play an important role for ligand inactivation, receptor regulation and perhaps also transmembrane signaling.

  8. Insights into an original pocket-ligand pair classification: a promising tool for ligand profile prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Pérot

    Full Text Available Pockets are today at the cornerstones of modern drug discovery projects and at the crossroad of several research fields, from structural biology to mathematical modeling. Being able to predict if a small molecule could bind to one or more protein targets or if a protein could bind to some given ligands is very useful for drug discovery endeavors, anticipation of binding to off- and anti-targets. To date, several studies explore such questions from chemogenomic approach to reverse docking methods. Most of these studies have been performed either from the viewpoint of ligands or targets. However it seems valuable to use information from both ligands and target binding pockets. Hence, we present a multivariate approach relating ligand properties with protein pocket properties from the analysis of known ligand-protein interactions. We explored and optimized the pocket-ligand pair space by combining pocket and ligand descriptors using Principal Component Analysis and developed a classification engine on this paired space, revealing five main clusters of pocket-ligand pairs sharing specific and similar structural or physico-chemical properties. These pocket-ligand pair clusters highlight correspondences between pocket and ligand topological and physico-chemical properties and capture relevant information with respect to protein-ligand interactions. Based on these pocket-ligand correspondences, a protocol of prediction of clusters sharing similarity in terms of recognition characteristics is developed for a given pocket-ligand complex and gives high performances. It is then extended to cluster prediction for a given pocket in order to acquire knowledge about its expected ligand profile or to cluster prediction for a given ligand in order to acquire knowledge about its expected pocket profile. This prediction approach shows promising results and could contribute to predict some ligand properties critical for binding to a given pocket, and conversely

  9. Insights into an original pocket-ligand pair classification: a promising tool for ligand profile prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérot, Stéphanie; Regad, Leslie; Reynès, Christelle; Spérandio, Olivier; Miteva, Maria A; Villoutreix, Bruno O; Camproux, Anne-Claude

    2013-01-01

    Pockets are today at the cornerstones of modern drug discovery projects and at the crossroad of several research fields, from structural biology to mathematical modeling. Being able to predict if a small molecule could bind to one or more protein targets or if a protein could bind to some given ligands is very useful for drug discovery endeavors, anticipation of binding to off- and anti-targets. To date, several studies explore such questions from chemogenomic approach to reverse docking methods. Most of these studies have been performed either from the viewpoint of ligands or targets. However it seems valuable to use information from both ligands and target binding pockets. Hence, we present a multivariate approach relating ligand properties with protein pocket properties from the analysis of known ligand-protein interactions. We explored and optimized the pocket-ligand pair space by combining pocket and ligand descriptors using Principal Component Analysis and developed a classification engine on this paired space, revealing five main clusters of pocket-ligand pairs sharing specific and similar structural or physico-chemical properties. These pocket-ligand pair clusters highlight correspondences between pocket and ligand topological and physico-chemical properties and capture relevant information with respect to protein-ligand interactions. Based on these pocket-ligand correspondences, a protocol of prediction of clusters sharing similarity in terms of recognition characteristics is developed for a given pocket-ligand complex and gives high performances. It is then extended to cluster prediction for a given pocket in order to acquire knowledge about its expected ligand profile or to cluster prediction for a given ligand in order to acquire knowledge about its expected pocket profile. This prediction approach shows promising results and could contribute to predict some ligand properties critical for binding to a given pocket, and conversely, some key pocket

  10. Ligand photo-isomerization triggers conformational changes in iGluR2 ligand binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tino Wolter

    Full Text Available Neurological glutamate receptors bind a variety of artificial ligands, both agonistic and antagonistic, in addition to glutamate. Studying their small molecule binding properties increases our understanding of the central nervous system and a variety of associated pathologies. The large, oligomeric multidomain membrane protein contains a large and flexible ligand binding domains which undergoes large conformational changes upon binding different ligands. A recent application of glutamate receptors is their activation or inhibition via photo-switchable ligands, making them key systems in the emerging field of optochemical genetics. In this work, we present a theoretical study on the binding mode and complex stability of a novel photo-switchable ligand, ATA-3, which reversibly binds to glutamate receptors ligand binding domains (LBDs. We propose two possible binding modes for this ligand based on flexible ligand docking calculations and show one of them to be analogues to the binding mode of a similar ligand, 2-BnTetAMPA. In long MD simulations, it was observed that transitions between both binding poses involve breaking and reforming the T686-E402 protein hydrogen bond. Simulating the ligand photo-isomerization process shows that the two possible configurations of the ligand azo-group have markedly different complex stabilities and equilibrium binding modes. A strong but slow protein response is observed after ligand configuration changes. This provides a microscopic foundation for the observed difference in ligand activity upon light-switching.

  11. Disruption of contact inhibition in rat liver epithelial cells by various types of AhR ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondracek, J.; Chramostova, K.; Kozubik, A. [Institute of Biophysics, Brno (Czech Republic); Krcmar, P.; Machala, M. [Veterinary Research Institute, Brno (Czech Republic)

    2004-09-15

    The maintenance of a balance between cell gain and cell loss is essential for proper liver function. The exact role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis of liver cells remains unclear, since ligand-dependent activation of AhR has been shown to induce cell cycle arrest, proliferation, differentiation or apoptosis, depending on the cellular model used. AhR can directly interact with retinoblastoma protein in hepatic cells, forming protein complexes that can efficiently block cell cycle progression by inducing G1 arrest, or to induce the expression of inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases, such as p271. On the other hand, it has been suggested that AhR could play a stimulatory role in cell proliferation, either directly or by mediating a release from contact inhibition. It is now generally accepted that progenitor cells exist in the liver, are activated in various liver diseases and can form a potential target cell population for both tumor initiating and tumor promoting chemicals4. 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-pdioxin (TCDD) has been found to release rat liver epithelial cells from contact inhibition by upregulating cyclin A expression and cyclin A/cdk2 activity. Our previous studies have shown that a number of AhR ligands5,6 can stimulate proliferation of confluent of rat liver epithelial ''stem-like'' WB-F344 cells. Such mechanism could play a role in liver tumor promotion. In the present study, we used flavonoid compounds that have been reported to act either as pure agonists, such as beta-naphthoflavone (BNF), or as partial/complete antagonists of AhR - alpha-naphthoflavone (ANF) and 3'-methoxy-4'-nitroflavone (3'M4'NF), in order to investigate effects of AhR agonists/antagonists on confluent rat liver epithelial cells. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of model flavonoids on the release of rat liver epithelial cells from contact inhibition, and on inducibility of

  12. Attenuated Tonic and Enhanced Phasic Release of Dopamine in Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra D Badgaiyan

    Full Text Available It is unclear whether attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD is a hypodopaminergic or hyperdopaminergic condition. Different sets of data suggest either hyperactive or hypoactive dopamine system. Since indirect methods used in earlier studies have arrived at contradictory conclusions, we directly measured the tonic and phasic release of dopamine in ADHD volunteers. The tonic release in ADHD and healthy control volunteers was measured and compared using dynamic molecular imaging technique. The phasic release during performance of Eriksen's flanker task was measured in the two groups using single scan dynamic molecular imaging technique. In these experiments volunteers were positioned in a positron emission tomography (PET camera and administered a dopamine receptor ligand (11C-raclopride intravenously. After the injection PET data were acquired dynamically while volunteers either stayed still (tonic release experiments or performed the flanker task (phasic release experiments. PET data were analyzed to measure dynamic changes in ligand binding potential (BP and other receptor kinetic parameters. The analysis revealed that at rest the ligand BP was significantly higher in the right caudate of ADHD volunteers suggesting reduced tonic release. During task performance significantly lower ligand BP was observed in the same area, indicating increased phasic release. In ADHD tonic release of dopamine is attenuated and the phasic release is enhanced in the right caudate. By characterizing the nature of dysregulated dopamine neurotransmission in ADHD, the results explain earlier findings of reduced or increased dopaminergic activity.

  13. Development of immobilized ligands for actinide separations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paine, R.T.

    1994-01-01

    Primary goals during this grant period were to (1) synthesize new bifunctional chelating ligands, (2) characterize the structural features of the Ln and An coordination complexes formed by these ligands, (3) use structural data to iteratively design new classes of multifunctional ligands, and (4) explore additional routes for attachment of key ligands to solid supports that could be useful for chromatographic separations. Some highlights of recently published work as well as a summary of submitted, unpublished and/or still in progress research are outlined

  14. News/Press Releases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — A press release, news release, media release, press statement is written communication directed at members of the news media for the purpose of announcing programs...

  15. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  16. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M andO 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  17. Social Laughter Triggers Endogenous Opioid Release in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Sandra; Tuominen, Lauri; Dunbar, Robin I; Karjalainen, Tomi; Hirvonen, Jussi; Arponen, Eveliina; Hari, Riitta; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Sams, Mikko; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2017-06-21

    The size of human social networks significantly exceeds the network that can be maintained by social grooming or touching in other primates. It has been proposed that endogenous opioid release after social laughter would provide a neurochemical pathway supporting long-term relationships in humans (Dunbar, 2012), yet this hypothesis currently lacks direct neurophysiological support. We used PET and the μ-opioid-receptor (MOR)-specific ligand [ 11 C]carfentanil to quantify laughter-induced endogenous opioid release in 12 healthy males. Before the social laughter scan, the subjects watched laughter-inducing comedy clips with their close friends for 30 min. Before the baseline scan, subjects spent 30 min alone in the testing room. Social laughter increased pleasurable sensations and triggered endogenous opioid release in thalamus, caudate nucleus, and anterior insula. In addition, baseline MOR availability in the cingulate and orbitofrontal cortices was associated with the rate of social laughter. In a behavioral control experiment, pain threshold-a proxy of endogenous opioidergic activation-was elevated significantly more in both male and female volunteers after watching laughter-inducing comedy versus non-laughter-inducing drama in groups. Modulation of the opioidergic activity by social laughter may be an important neurochemical pathway that supports the formation, reinforcement, and maintenance of human social bonds. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Social contacts are vital to humans. The size of human social networks significantly exceeds the network that can be maintained by social grooming in other primates. Here, we used PET to show that endogenous opioid release after social laughter may provide a neurochemical mechanism supporting long-term relationships in humans. Participants were scanned twice: after a 30 min social laughter session and after spending 30 min alone in the testing room (baseline). Endogenous opioid release was stronger after laughter versus the

  18. Attenuation of eph receptor kinase activation in cancer cells by coexpressed ephrin ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Falivelli

    Full Text Available The Eph receptor tyrosine kinases mediate juxtacrine signals by interacting "in trans" with ligands anchored to the surface of neighboring cells via a GPI-anchor (ephrin-As or a transmembrane segment (ephrin-Bs, which leads to receptor clustering and increased kinase activity. Additionally, soluble forms of the ephrin-A ligands released from the cell surface by matrix metalloproteases can also activate EphA receptor signaling. Besides these trans interactions, recent studies have revealed that Eph receptors and ephrins coexpressed in neurons can also engage in lateral "cis" associations that attenuate receptor activation by ephrins in trans with critical functional consequences. Despite the importance of the Eph/ephrin system in tumorigenesis, Eph receptor-ephrin cis interactions have not been previously investigated in cancer cells. Here we show that in cancer cells, coexpressed ephrin-A3 can inhibit the ability of EphA2 and EphA3 to bind ephrins in trans and become activated, while ephrin-B2 can inhibit not only EphB4 but also EphA3. The cis inhibition of EphA3 by ephrin-B2 implies that in some cases ephrins that cannot activate a particular Eph receptor in trans can nevertheless inhibit its signaling ability through cis association. We also found that an EphA3 mutation identified in lung cancer enhances cis interaction with ephrin-A3. These results suggest a novel mechanism that may contribute to cancer pathogenesis by attenuating the tumor suppressing effects of Eph receptor signaling pathways activated by ephrins in trans.

  19. Ligand design for riboswitches, an emerging target class for novel antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekand, Illimar Hugo; Brenk, Ruth

    2017-09-01

    Riboswitches are cis-acting gene regulatory elements and constitute potential targets for new antibiotics. Recent studies in this field have started to explore these targets for drug discovery. New ligands found by fragment screening, design of analogs of the natural ligands or serendipitously by phenotypic screening have shown antibacterial effects in cell assays against a range of bacteria strains and in animal models. In this review, we highlight the most advanced drug design work of riboswitch ligands and discuss the challenges in the field with respect to the development of antibiotics with a new mechanism of action.

  20. Solving the cardiac hypertrophy riddle: The angiotensin II-mechanical stress connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zablocki, Daniela; Sadoshima, Junichi

    2013-11-08

    A series of studies conducted 20 years ago, documenting the cardiac hypertrophy phenotype and its underlying signaling mechanism induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) and mechanical stress, showed a remarkable similarity between the effect of the Gαq agonist and that of mechanical forces on cardiac hypertrophy. Subsequent studies confirmed the involvement of autocrine/paracrine mechanisms, including stretch-induced release of Ang II in load-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Recent studies showed that the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor is also directly activated by mechanical forces, suggesting that AT1 receptors play an important role in mediating load-induced cardiac hypertrophy through both ligand- and mechanical stress-dependent mechanisms.

  1. Ligand and membrane-binding behavior of the phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins PITPα and PITPβ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptist, Matilda; Panagabko, Candace; Cockcroft, Shamshad; Atkinson, Jeffrey

    2016-12-01

    Phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITPs) are believed to be lipid transfer proteins because of their ability to transfer either phosphatidylinositol (PI) or phosphatidylcholine (PC) between membrane compartments, in vitro. However, the detailed mechanism of this transfer process is not fully established. To further understand the transfer mechanism of PITPs we examined the interaction of PITPs with membranes using dual polarization interferometry (DPI), which measures protein binding affinity on a flat immobilized lipid surface. In addition, a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based assay was also employed to monitor how quickly PITPs transfer their ligands to lipid vesicles. DPI analysis revealed that PITPβ had a higher affinity to membranes compared with PITPα. Furthermore, the FRET-based transfer assay revealed that PITPβ has a higher ligand transfer rate compared with PITPα. However, both PITPα and PITPβ demonstrated a preference for highly curved membrane surfaces during ligand transfer. In other words, ligand transfer rate was higher when the accepting vesicles were highly curved.

  2. Surface Ligand Promotion of Carbon Dioxide Reduction through Stabilizing Chemisorbed Reactive Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijiang; Wu, Lina; Sun, Kun; Chen, Ting; Jiang, Zhaohua; Cheng, Tao; Goddard, William A

    2018-05-23

    We have explored functionalizing metal catalysts with surface ligands as an approach to facilitate electrochemical carbon dioxide reduction reaction (CO 2 RR). To provide a molecular level understanding of the mechanism by which this enhancement occurs, we combine in situ spectroscopy analysis with an interpretation based on quantum mechanics (QM) calculations. We find that a surface ligand can play a critical role in stabilizing the chemisorbed CO 2 , which facilitates CO 2 activation and leads to a 0.3 V decrease in the overpotential for carbon monoxide (CO) formation. Moreover, the presence of the surface ligand leads to nearly exclusive CO production. At -0.6 V (versus reversible hydrogen electrode, RHE), CO is the only significant product with a faradic efficiency of 93% and a current density of 1.9 mA cm -2 . This improvement corresponds to 53-fold enhancement in turnover frequency compared with the Ag nanoparticles (NPs) without surface ligands.

  3. Calculation of protein-ligand binding affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilson, Michael K; Zhou, Huan-Xiang

    2007-01-01

    Accurate methods of computing the affinity of a small molecule with a protein are needed to speed the discovery of new medications and biological probes. This paper reviews physics-based models of binding, beginning with a summary of the changes in potential energy, solvation energy, and configurational entropy that influence affinity, and a theoretical overview to frame the discussion of specific computational approaches. Important advances are reported in modeling protein-ligand energetics, such as the incorporation of electronic polarization and the use of quantum mechanical methods. Recent calculations suggest that changes in configurational entropy strongly oppose binding and must be included if accurate affinities are to be obtained. The linear interaction energy (LIE) and molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) methods are analyzed, as are free energy pathway methods, which show promise and may be ready for more extensive testing. Ultimately, major improvements in modeling accuracy will likely require advances on multiple fronts, as well as continued validation against experiment.

  4. Thermodynamic fingerprints of ligand binding to human telomeric G-quadruplexes

    OpenAIRE

    Bon?ina, Matja?; Podlipnik, ?rtomir; Piantanida, Ivo; Eilmes, Julita; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Vesnaver, Gorazd; Lah, Jurij

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic studies of ligand binding to human telomere (ht) DNA quadruplexes, as a rule, neglect the involvement of various ht-DNA conformations in the binding process. Therefore, the thermodynamic driving forces and the mechanisms of ht-DNA G-quadruplex-ligand recognition remain poorly understood. In this work we characterize thermodynamically and structurally binding of netropsin (Net), dibenzotetraaza[14]annulene derivatives (DP77, DP78), cationic porphyrin (TMPyP4) and two bisquinolini...

  5. Arrested α-hydride migration activates a phosphido ligand for C–H insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickey, Anne K. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Muñoz, Salvador B. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Lutz, Sean A. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Pink, Maren [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Chen, Chun-Hsing [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States); Smith, Jeremy M. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2016-12-05

    Bulky tris(carbene)borate ligands provide access to high spin iron(II) phosphido complexes. The complex PhB(MesIm)3FeP(H)Ph is thermally unstable, and we observed [PPh] group insertion into a C–H bond of the supporting ligand. An arrested α-hydride migration mechanism suggests increased nucleophilicity of the phosphorus atom facilitates [PPh] group transfer reactivity.

  6. Explicit all-atom modeling of realistically sized ligand-capped nanocrystals

    KAUST Repository

    Kaushik, Ananth P.

    2012-01-01

    We present a study of an explicit all-atom representation of nanocrystals of experimentally relevant sizes (up to 6 nm), capped with alkyl chain ligands, in vacuum. We employ all-atom molecular dynamics simulation methods in concert with a well-tested intermolecular potential model, MM3 (molecular mechanics 3), for the studies presented here. These studies include determining the preferred conformation of an isolated single nanocrystal (NC), pairs of isolated NCs, and (presaging studies of superlattice arrays) unit cells of NC superlattices. We observe that very small NCs (3 nm) behave differently in a superlattice as compared to larger NCs (6 nm and above) due to the conformations adopted by the capping ligands on the NC surface. Short ligands adopt a uniform distribution of orientational preferences, including some that lie against the face of the nanocrystal. In contrast, longer ligands prefer to interdigitate. We also study the effect of changing ligand length and ligand coverage on the NCs on the preferred ligand configurations. Since explicit all-atom modeling constrains the maximum system size that can be studied, we discuss issues related to coarse-graining the representation of the ligands, including a comparison of two commonly used coarse-grained models. We find that care has to be exercised in the choice of coarse-grained model. The data provided by these realistically sized ligand-capped NCs, determined using explicit all-atom models, should serve as a reference standard for future models of coarse-graining ligands using united atom models, especially for self-assembly processes. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  7. Macrocyclic ligands for uranium complexation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potts, K.T.

    1991-04-01

    A highly preorganized 24-macrocycle containing biuret, thiobiuret and pyridine subunits has been prepared by high dilution ring-closure procedures. Intermediate products to this macrocycle have been utilized to extend this synthetic route to include further representatives where solubility and stability will be influenced by substituent variation. A 1:1 complex has been formed from uranyl acetate and a quinquepyridine derivative, this representing a new type of ligand for the uranyl ion. A very convenient synthetic procedure that will allow the incorporation of these macrocycles into polymeric systems has been developed for the introduction of a vinyl substituent into the 4-position of the pyridine ring. Using triflate, vinyltributyltin and Pd 0 chemistry, this procedure should make a variety of substituted 4-vinylpyridines available for the first time. 3 refs

  8. PPARγ ligand production is tightly linked to clonal expansion during initiation of adipocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallenborg, Philip; Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Feddersen, Søren

    2014-01-01

    of differentiation. Concomitant with agonist production, murine fibroblasts undergo two rounds of mitosis referred to as mitotic clonal expansion. Here we show that mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in either of two cell cycle inhibitors, the transcription factor p53 or its target gene encoding the cyclin...... cycle inhibitory compounds decreased PPAR ligand production in differentiating 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Furthermore, these inhibitors abolished the release of arachidonic acid induced by the hormonal cocktail initiating adipogenesis. Collectively, our results suggest that murine fibroblasts require clonal...... expansion for PPAR ligand production at the onset of adipocyte differentiation....

  9. Preparation of temperature responsive fragrance release membranes by UV curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Hiroshi; Kaetsu, Isao; Uchida, Kumao; Okuda, Jyunya; Kitami, Toshiaki; Matsubara, Yoshio

    2003-01-01

    The authors have studied the preparation and the function of intelligent drug release membranes by UV curing. Temperature responsive fragrance release membranes were prepared by UV curing process and the release functions were investigated as the function of thickness and composition of membrane. Microscopic observations were used to prove the postulated release mechanism

  10. CXCR4 Ligands : The Next Big Hit?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walenkamp, Annemiek M. E.; Lapa, Constantin; Herrmann, Ken; Wester, Hans-Juergen

    2017-01-01

    The G protein-coupled protein receptor C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) is an attractive target for cancer diagnosis and treatment, as it is overexpressed in many solid and hematologic cancers. Binding of its ligand, C-X-C chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12), results in receptor internalization and

  11. Ligand-receptor Interactions by NMR Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novak. P.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Today NMR spectroscopy is a method of choice for elucidation of interactions between biomolecules and the potential ligands. Knowledge on these interactions is an essential prerequisite for the rational drug design. The most important contribution of NMR to drug design a few years ago was the 3D structure determination of proteins. Besides delivering the 3D structures of the free proteins as a raw material for the modeling studies on ligand binding, NMR can directly yield valuable experimental data on the biologically important protein-ligand complexes. In addition to X-ray diffraction, NMR spectroscopy can provide information on the internal protein dynamics ordynamics of intermolecular interactions. Changes in NMR parameters allow us to detect ("SAR by NMR" and quantitatively determine binding affinities (titration, diffusion NMR experiments, etc. of potential ligands. Also, it is possible to determine the binding site and conformations of ligands, receptors and receptor-ligand complexes with the help of NMR methods such as tr-NOESY. Epitopes or functional groups responsible for binding of ligands to the receptor can be identified by employing STD or WaterLOGSY experiments. In this review are described some of the most frequent NMR methods for the characterization of the interactions between biomolecules and ligands, together with their advantages and disadvantages.

  12. Organotellurium ligands – designing and complexation reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    membered rings it is negative and ~30 ppm only. Keywords. Organotellurium ligands; hybrid telluroether; platinum metal complexes; tellurium-125 NMR. 1. Introduction. Tellurium is the noblest metalloid which may act as a Lewis acid as well as Lewis base. The ligand chemistry of tellurium, which acts as a 'soft' donor, was ...

  13. Femtosecond Mid-Infrared Study of the Aqueous Solution Photochemistry of a CO-Releasing Molecule (CORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schatzschneider U.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet irradiation of CO-releasing molecules (CORMs in water eventually leads to the loss of several carbon monoxide ligands.We show for an exemplary manganese tricarbonyl CORM that only one ligand is photolyzed off on an ultrafast timescale and that some molecules may undergo geminate recombination.

  14. Feeding Releases Endogenous Opioids in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuulari, Jetro J; Tuominen, Lauri; de Boer, Femke E; Hirvonen, Jussi; Helin, Semi; Nuutila, Pirjo; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2017-08-23

    The endogenous opioid system supports a multitude of functions related to appetitive behavior in humans and animals, and it has been proposed to govern hedonic aspects of feeding thus contributing to the development of obesity. Here we used positron emission tomography to investigate whether feeding results in hedonia-dependent endogenous opioid release in humans. Ten healthy males were recruited for the study. They were scanned with the μ-opioid-specific ligand [ 11 C]carfentanil three times, as follows: after a palatable meal, a nonpalatable meal, and after an overnight fast. Subjective mood, satiety, and circulating hormone levels were measured. Feeding induced significant endogenous opioid release throughout the brain. This response was more pronounced following a nonpalatable meal versus a palatable meal, and independent of the subjective hedonic responses to feeding. We conclude that feeding consistently triggers cerebral opioid release even in the absence of subjective pleasure associated with feeding, suggesting that metabolic and homeostatic rather than exclusively hedonic responses play a role in the feeding-triggered cerebral opioid release. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The endogenous opioid system supports both hedonic and homeostatic functions. It has been proposed that overeating and concomitant opioid release could downregulate opioid receptors and promote the development of obesity. However, it remains unresolved whether feeding leads to endogenous opioid release in humans. We used in vivo positron emission tomography to test whether feeding triggers cerebral opioid release and whether this response is associated with pleasurable sensations. We scanned volunteers using the μ-opioid receptor-specific radioligand [ 11 C]carfentanil three times, as follows: after an overnight fast, after consuming a palatable meal, and after consuming a nonpalatable meal. Feeding led to significant endogenous opioid release, and this occurred also in the absence of feeding

  15. Sampling protein motion and solvent effect during ligand binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limongelli, Vittorio; Marinelli, Luciana; Cosconati, Sandro; La Motta, Concettina; Sartini, Stefania; Mugnaini, Laura; Da Settimo, Federico; Novellino, Ettore; Parrinello, Michele

    2012-01-01

    An exhaustive description of the molecular recognition mechanism between a ligand and its biological target is of great value because it provides the opportunity for an exogenous control of the related process. Very often this aim can be pursued using high resolution structures of the complex in combination with inexpensive computational protocols such as docking algorithms. Unfortunately, in many other cases a number of factors, like protein flexibility or solvent effects, increase the degree of complexity of ligand/protein interaction and these standard techniques are no longer sufficient to describe the binding event. We have experienced and tested these limits in the present study in which we have developed and revealed the mechanism of binding of a new series of potent inhibitors of Adenosine Deaminase. We have first performed a large number of docking calculations, which unfortunately failed to yield reliable results due to the dynamical character of the enzyme and the complex role of the solvent. Thus, we have stepped up the computational strategy using a protocol based on metadynamics. Our approach has allowed dealing with protein motion and solvation during ligand binding and finally identifying the lowest energy binding modes of the most potent compound of the series, 4-decyl-pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-7-one. PMID:22238423

  16. Sustained Release Drug Delivery Applications of Polyurethanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B. Lowinger

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Since their introduction over 50 years ago, polyurethanes have been applied to nearly every industry. This review describes applications of polyurethanes to the development of modified release drug delivery. Although drug delivery research leveraging polyurethanes has been ongoing for decades, there has been renewed and substantial interest in the field in recent years. The chemistry of polyurethanes and the mechanisms of drug release from sustained release dosage forms are briefly reviewed. Studies to assess the impact of intrinsic drug properties on release from polyurethane-based formulations are considered. The impact of hydrophilic water swelling polyurethanes on drug diffusivity and release rate is discussed. The role of pore formers in modulating drug release rate is examined. Finally, the value of assessing mechanical properties of the dosage form and approaches taken in the literature are described.

  17. Programmed death-1 & its ligands: promising targets for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrimali, Rajeev K; Janik, John E; Abu-Eid, Rasha; Mkrtichyan, Mikayel; Khleif, Samir N

    2015-01-01

    Novel strategies for cancer treatment involving blockade of immune inhibitors have shown significant progress toward understanding the molecular mechanism of tumor immune evasion. The preclinical findings and clinical responses associated with programmed death-1 (PD-1) and PD-ligand pathway blockade seem promising, making these targets highly sought for cancer immunotherapy. In fact, the anti-PD-1 antibodies, pembrolizumab and nivolumab, were recently approved by the US FDA for the treatment of unresectable and metastatic melanoma resistant to anticytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 antibody (ipilimumab) and BRAF inhibitor. Here, we discuss strategies of combining PD-1/PD-ligand interaction inhibitors with other immune checkpoint modulators and standard-of-care therapy to break immune tolerance and induce a potent antitumor activity, which is currently a research area of key scientific pursuit.

  18. Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptors Modulate Oxytocin Release in the Dorsolateral Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis (BNST in Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Martinon

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT plays an important role in the regulation of social and anxiety-like behavior. Our previous studies have shown that OT neurons send projections from the hypothalamus to the dorsolateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNSTdl, a forebrain region critically involved in the modulation of anxiety-like behavior. Importantly, these OT terminals in the BNSTdl express presynaptic corticotropin releasing factor (CRF receptor type 2 (CRFR2. This suggests that CRFR2 might be involved in the modulation of OT release. To test this hypothesis, we measured OT content in microdialysates collected from the BNSTdl of freely-moving male Sprague-Dawley rats following the administration of a selective CRFR2 agonist (Urocortin 3 or antagonist (Astressin 2B, As2B. To determine if type 1 CRF receptors (CRFR1 are also involved, we used selective CRFR1 antagonist (NBI35965 as well as CRF, a putative ligand of both CRFR1 and CRFR2. All compounds were delivered directly into the BNSTdl via reverse dialysis. OT content in the microdialysates was measured with highly sensitive and selective radioimmunoassay. Blocking CRFR2 with As2B caused an increase in OT content in BNSTdl microdialysates, whereas CRFR2 activation by Urocortin 3 did not have an effect. The As2B-induced increase in OT release was blocked by application of the CRFR1 antagonist demonstrating that the effect was dependent on CRFR1 transmission. Interestingly, CRF alone caused a delayed increase in OT content in BNSTdl microdialysates, which was dependent on CRF2 but not CRF1 receptors. Our results suggest that members of the CRF peptide family modulate OT release in the BNSTdl via a fine-tuned mechanism that involves both CRFR1 and CRFR2. Further exploration of mechanisms by which endogenous OT system is modulated by CRF peptide family is needed to better understand the role of these neuropeptides in the regulation of anxiety and the stress response.

  19. physiological mechanisms for potato dormancy release

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    of deep dormancy, during which potato seeds do not germinate after ... dormancy period and sprouting behaviour are major criteria ... develop once sprouting begins; such as changes ...... an example of plant information processing. Plant Cell ...

  20. Compression, Mechanical and Release Properties of Chloroquine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Tablet formulations containing trifoliate yam starch exhibited faster onset and higher amount of plastic deformation during compression than those containing corn starch. The crushing strength, disintegration and dissolution times of the tablets increased with binder concentration while friability values decreased.

  1. Protein tyrosine phosphatases: regulatory mechanisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Hertog, J.; Ostman, A.; Bohmer, F.D.

    2008-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine phosphatases are tightly controlled by various mechanisms, ranging from differential expression in specific cell types to restricted subcellular localization, limited proteolysis, post-translational modifications affecting intrinsic catalytic activity, ligand binding and

  2. Correcting ligands, metabolites, and pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vriend Gert

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A wide range of research areas in bioinformatics, molecular biology and medicinal chemistry require precise chemical structure information about molecules and reactions, e.g. drug design, ligand docking, metabolic network reconstruction, and systems biology. Most available databases, however, treat chemical structures more as illustrations than as a datafield in its own right. Lack of chemical accuracy impedes progress in the areas mentioned above. We present a database of metabolites called BioMeta that augments the existing pathway databases by explicitly assessing the validity, correctness, and completeness of chemical structure and reaction information. Description The main bulk of the data in BioMeta were obtained from the KEGG Ligand database. We developed a tool for chemical structure validation which assesses the chemical validity and stereochemical completeness of a molecule description. The validation tool was used to examine the compounds in BioMeta, showing that a relatively small number of compounds had an incorrect constitution (connectivity only, not considering stereochemistry and that a considerable number (about one third had incomplete or even incorrect stereochemistry. We made a large effort to correct the errors and to complete the structural descriptions. A total of 1468 structures were corrected and/or completed. We also established the reaction balance of the reactions in BioMeta and corrected 55% of the unbalanced (stoichiometrically incorrect reactions in an automatic procedure. The BioMeta database was implemented in PostgreSQL and provided with a web-based interface. Conclusion We demonstrate that the validation of metabolite structures and reactions is a feasible and worthwhile undertaking, and that the validation results can be used to trigger corrections and improvements to BioMeta, our metabolite database. BioMeta provides some tools for rational drug design, reaction searches, and

  3. Sol-gel encapsulation for controlled drug release and biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jonathan

    The main focus of this dissertation is to investigate the use of sol-gel encapsulation of biomolecules for controlled drug release and biosensing. Controlled drug release has advantages over conventional therapies in that it maintains a constant, therapeutic drug level in the body for prolonged periods of time. The anti-hypertensive drug Captopril was encapsulated in sol-gel materials of various forms, such as silica xerogels and nanoparticles. The primary objective was to show that sol-gel silica materials are promising drug carriers for controlled release by releasing Captopril at a release rate that is within a therapeutic range. We were able to demonstrate desired release for over a week from Captopril-doped silica xerogels and overall release from Captopril-doped silica nanoparticles. As an aside, the antibiotic Vancomycin was also encapsulated in these porous silica nanoparticles and desired release was obtained for several days in-vitro. The second part of the dissertation focuses on immobilizing antibodies and proteins in sol-gel to detect various analytes, such as hormones and amino acids. Sol-gel competitive immunoassays on antibody-doped silica xerogels were used for hormone detection. Calibration for insulin and C-peptide in standard solutions was obtained in the nM range. In addition, NASA-Ames is also interested in developing a reagentless biosensor using bacterial periplasmic binding proteins (bPBPs) to detect specific biomarkers, such as amino acids and phosphate. These bPBPs were doubly labeled with two different fluorophores and encapsulated in silica xerogels. Ligand-binding experiments were performed on the bPBPs in solution and in sol-gel. Ligand-binding was monitored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the two fluorophores on the bPBP. Titration data show that one bPBP has retained its ligand-binding properties in sol-gel.

  4. Exogenous or endogenous Toll-like receptor ligands: which is the MVP in tumorigenesis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li; Wang, Liantang; Chen, Shangwu

    2012-03-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a class of pattern recognition receptors sensing microbial components and triggering an immune response against pathogens. In addition to their role in anti-infection immunity, increasing evidence indicates that engagement of TLRs can promote cancer cell survival and proliferation, induce tumor immune evasion, and enhance tumor metastasis and chemoresistance. Recent studies have demonstrated that endogenous molecules or damage-associated molecular patterns released from damaged/necrotic tissues are capable of activating TLRs and that the endogenous ligands-mediated TLR signaling is implicated in the tumor development and affects the therapeutic efficacy of tumors. Since both exogenous and endogenous TLR ligands can initiate TLR signaling, which is the most valuable player in tumor development becomes an interesting question. Here, we summarize the effect of TLR signaling on the development and progression of tumors, and discuss the role of exogenous and endogenous TLR ligands in the tumorigenesis.

  5. Reversible Guest Exchange Mechanisms in Supramolecular Host-GuestAssemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2006-09-01

    Synthetic chemists have provided a wide array of supramolecular assemblies able to encapsulate guest molecules. The scope of this tutorial review focuses on supramolecular host molecules capable of reversibly encapsulating polyatomic guests. Much work has been done to determine the mechanism of guest encapsulation and guest release. This review covers common methods of monitoring and characterizing guest exchange such as NMR, UV-VIS, mass spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and calorimetry and also presents representative examples of guest exchange mechanisms. The guest exchange mechanisms of hemicarcerands, cucurbiturils, hydrogen-bonded assemblies, and metal-ligand assemblies are discussed. Special attention is given to systems which exhibit constrictive binding, a motif common in supramolecular guest exchange systems.

  6. Labeled receptor ligands for spect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, H.F.

    1989-01-01

    Receptor specific imaging agents for single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can potentially be useful in the understanding of basic biochemistry and pharmacology of receptors. SPECT images may also provide tools for evaluation of density and binding kinetics of a specific receptor, information important for diagnosis and patient management. Basic requirements for receptor imaging agents are: (a) they are labeled with short-lived isotopes, (b) they show high selectivity and specific uptake, (c) they exhibit high target/background ratio, and (d) they can be modeled to obtain quantitative information. Several good examples of CNS receptor specific ligands labeled with I-123 have been developed, including iodoQNB, iodoestrogen iodobenzadiazepine, iodobenazepine, iodobenzamides for muscarinic, estrogen benzadiazepine, D-1 and D-2 dopamine receptors. With the advent of newer and faster SPECT imaging devices, it may be feasible to quantitate the receptor density by in vivo imaging techniques. These new brain imaging agents can provide unique diagnostic information, which may not be available through other imaging modalities, such as CT and MRI

  7. Preparation and characterizations of new U(IV) and U(VI) complexes with carboxylate ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sbrignadello, G; Tomat, G; Battiston, G; Vigato, P A [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Padua (Italy). Lab. di Chimica e Tecnologia dei Radioelementi

    1978-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of some uranyl(VI) complexes containing glycolate (gly = CH/sub 2/OHCOO/sup -/) and methoxyacetate (MeOAc = CH/sub 3/OCH/sub 2/COO/sup -/) ligands with metal:ligand ratios of 1:1 and 1:2 are reported. In addition, new stable uranium(IV) complexes containing the same ligands, or the oxydiacetate (oda = /sup -/OOCCH/sub 2/OCH/sub 2/COO/sup -/) anion, have been prepared by photolysing aqueous solutions of uranyl(VI) nitrate in the presence of an excess of ligand. The possible structures of these complexes are discussed on the basis of IR results. The photoproduction mechanism of U(IV) complexes is proposed from electronic and spectrofluorimetric spectra and quantum yield data.

  8. Revealing a steroid receptor ligand as a unique PPAR[gamma] agonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Shengchen; Han, Ying; Shi, Yuzhe; Rong, Hui; Zheng, Songyang; Jin, Shikan; Lin, Shu-Yong; Lin, Sheng-Cai; Li, Yong (Pitt); (Xiamen)

    2012-06-28

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) regulates metabolic homeostasis and is a molecular target for anti-diabetic drugs. We report here the identification of a steroid receptor ligand, RU-486, as an unexpected PPAR{gamma} agonist, thereby uncovering a novel signaling route for this steroid drug. Similar to rosiglitazone, RU-486 modulates the expression of key PPAR{gamma} target genes and promotes adipocyte differentiation, but with a lower adipogenic activity. Structural and functional studies of receptor-ligand interactions reveal the molecular basis for a unique binding mode for RU-486 in the PPAR{gamma} ligand-binding pocket with distinctive properties and epitopes, providing the molecular mechanisms for the discrimination of RU-486 from thiazolidinediones (TZDs) drugs. Our findings together indicate that steroid compounds may represent an alternative approach for designing non-TZD PPAR{gamma} ligands in the treatment of insulin resistance.

  9. Thermo-Kinetic Investigation of Comparative Ligand Effect on Cysteine Iron Redox Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masood Ahmad Rizvi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal ions in their free state bring unwanted biological oxidations generating oxidative stress. The ligand modulated redox potential can be indispensable in prevention of such oxidative stress by blocking the redundant bio-redox reactions. In this study we investigated the comparative ligand effect on the thermo-kinetic aspects of biologically important cysteine iron (III redox reaction using spectrophotometric and potentiometric methods. The results were corroborated with the complexation effect on redox potential of iron(III-iron(II redox couple. The selected ligands were found to increase the rate of cysteine iron (III redox reaction in proportion to their stability of iron (II complex (EDTA < terpy < bipy < phen. A kinetic profile and the catalytic role of copper (II ions by means of redox shuttle mechanism for the cysteine iron (III redox reaction in presence of 1,10-phenanthroline (phen ligand is also reported.

  10. Identification of ligands for DAF-12 that govern dauer formation and reproduction in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motola, Daniel L; Cummins, Carolyn L; Rottiers, Veerle; Sharma, Kamalesh K; Li, Tingting; Li, Yong; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, H Eric; Auchus, Richard J; Antebi, Adam; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2006-03-24

    In response to environmental and dietary cues, the C. elegans orphan nuclear receptor, DAF-12, regulates dauer diapause, reproductive development, fat metabolism, and life span. Despite strong evidence for hormonal control, the identification of the DAF-12 ligand has remained elusive. In this work, we identified two distinct 3-keto-cholestenoic acid metabolites of DAF-9, a cytochrome P450 involved in hormone production, that function as ligands for DAF-12. At nanomolar concentrations, these steroidal ligands (called dafachronic acids) bind and transactivate DAF-12 and rescue the hormone deficiency of daf-9 mutants. Interestingly, DAF-9 has a biochemical activity similar to mammalian CYP27A1 catalyzing addition of a terminal acid to the side chain of sterol metabolites. Together, these results define the first steroid hormones in nematodes as ligands for an invertebrate orphan nuclear receptor and demonstrate that steroidal regulation of reproduction, from biology to molecular mechanism, is conserved from worms to humans.

  11. In-vitro Release Study of Carvedilol Phosphate Matrix Tablets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    decreased while Starch 1500 and lactose monohydrate increased drug release. Drug release mechanism ... case of antihypertensive agents to maintain constant blood levels ... systems because of their low toxicity, pH- independent swelling ...

  12. A Versatile Dinucleating Ligand Containing Sulfonamide Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundberg, Jonas; Witt, Hannes; Cameron, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    ligand can be prepared in aqueous solutions using only divalent metal ions. Two of the copper(II) complexes, [Cu2(psmp)(OH)] and [Cu2(psmp)(OAc)2]-, demonstrate the anticipated 1:2 ligand/metal stoichiometry and show that the dimetallic binding site created for exogenous ligands possesses high inherent...... of antiferromagnetic coupling. This is corroborated computationally by broken-symmetry density functional theory, which for isotropic modeling of the coupling predicts an antiferromagnetic coupling strength of J = 70.5 cm-1....

  13. Controlled Release from Recombinant Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Ghandehari, Hamidreza</