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Sample records for lifelong athletes frequency

  1. Cervical and lumbar MRI in asymptomatic older male lifelong athletes: Frequency of degenerative findings

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    Healy, J.F.; Healy, B.B.; Wong, W.H.M.; Olson, E.M. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The athletic activity of the adult U.S. population has increased markedly in the last 20 years. To evaluate the possible long-term effects of such activity on the cervical and lumbar spine, we studied a group of asymptomatic currently very active lifelong male athletes over age 40 (41-69 years old, av. age 53). Nineteen active, lifelong male athletes were studied with MRI and the results compared with previous imaging studies of other populations. An athletic history and a spine history were also taken. Evidence of asymptomatic degenerative spine disease was similar to that seen in published series of other populations. Degenerative changes including disk protrusion and herniation, spondylosis, and spinal stenosis were present and increased in incidence with increasing patient age. In this group, all MRI findings proved to be asymptomatic and did not limit athletic activity. The incidence of lumbar degenerative changes in our study population of older male athletes was similar to those seen in other populations. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Relationship Between Lifelong Exercise Volume and Coronary Atherosclerosis in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aengevaeren, Vincent L; Mosterd, Arend; Braber, Thijs L; Prakken, Niek H J; Doevendans, Pieter A; Grobbee, Diederick E; Thompson, Paul D; Eijsvogels, Thijs M H; Velthuis, Birgitta K

    2017-07-11

    Higher levels of physical activity are associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular events. Nevertheless, there is debate on the dose-response relationship of exercise and cardiovascular disease outcomes and whether high volumes of exercise may accelerate coronary atherosclerosis. We aimed to determine the relationship between lifelong exercise volumes and coronary atherosclerosis. Middle-aged men engaged in competitive or recreational leisure sports underwent a noncontrast and contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan to assess coronary artery calcification (CAC) and plaque characteristics. Participants reported lifelong exercise history patterns. Exercise volumes were multiplied by metabolic equivalent of task (MET) scores to calculate MET-minutes per week. Participants' activity was categorized as 2000 MET-min/wk. A total of 284 men (age, 55±7 years) were included. CAC was present in 150 of 284 participants (53%) with a median CAC score of 35.8 (interquartile range, 9.3-145.8). Athletes with a lifelong exercise volume >2000 MET-min/wk (n=75) had a significantly higher CAC score (9.4 [interquartile range, 0-60.9] versus 0 [interquartile range, 0-43.5]; P=0.02) and prevalence of CAC (68%; adjusted odds ratio [ORadjusted]=3.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-6.6) and plaque (77%; ORadjusted=3.3; 95% CI, 1.6-7.1) compared with exercise (≥9 MET) was associated with CAC (ORadjusted=1.47; 95% CI, 1.14-1.91) and plaque (ORadjusted=1.56; 95% CI, 1.17-2.08). Among participants with CAC>0, there was no difference in CAC score (P=0.20), area (P=0.21), density (P=0.25), and regions of interest (P=0.20) across exercise volume groups. Among participants with plaque, the most active group (>2000 MET-min/wk) had a lower prevalence of mixed plaques (48% versus 69%; ORadjusted=0.35; 95% CI, 0.15-0.85) and more often had only calcified plaques (38% versus 16%; ORadjusted=3.57; 95% CI, 1.28-9.97) compared with the least active group (2000 MET-min/wk group had a higher

  3. New records in aerobic power among octogenarian lifelong endurance athletes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scott Trappe; Erik Hayes; Andrew Galpin; Leonard Kaminsky; Bozena Jemiolo; William Fink; Todd Trappe; Anna Jansson; Thomas Gustafsson; Per Tesch

    2013-01-01

    ...). The endurance athletes were cross-country skiers, including a former Olympic champion and several national/regional champions, with a history of aerobic exercise and participation in endurance events...

  4. A comparison of dicarbonyl stress and advanced glycation endproducts in lifelong endurance athletes vs. sedentary controls.

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    Maessen, Martijn F H; Schalkwijk, Casper G; Verheggen, Rebecca J H M; Aengevaeren, Vincent L; Hopman, Maria T E; Eijsvogels, Thijs M H

    2017-10-01

    Dicarbonyl stress and high concentrations of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) relate to an elevated risk for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Exercise training lowers the risk for future CVD. We tested the hypothesis that lifelong endurance athletes have lower dicarbonyl stress and AGEs compared to sedentary controls and that these differences relate to a better cardiovascular health profile. Cross-sectional study. We included 18 lifelong endurance athletes (ATH, 61±7years) and 18 sedentary controls (SED, 58±7years) and measured circulating glyoxal (GO), methylglyoxal (MGO) and 3-deoxyglucosone (3DG) as markers of dicarbonyl stress. Furthermore, we measured serum levels of protein-bound AGEs N(Ɛ)-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML), N(Ɛ)-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL), methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone-1 (MG-H1), and pentosidine. Additionally, we measured cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2peak) and cardiovascular health markers. ATH had lower concentrations of MGO (196 [180-246] vs. 242 [207-292] nmol/mmol lysine, p=0.043) and 3DG (927 [868-972] vs. 1061 [982-1114] nmol/mmol lysine, pcorrelated with cardiovascular health markers, whereas CML and CEL were positively correlated with VO2peak and cardiovascular health markers. Lifelong exercise training relates to lower dicarbonyl stress (MGO and 3DG) and the AGE MG-H1. The underlying mechanism and (clinical) relevance of higher CML and CEL concentrations among lifelong athletes warrants future research, since it conflicts with the idea that higher AGE concentrations relate to poor cardiovascular health outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Achievement Goal Orientation for Athletic Training Education: Preparing for Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Kimberly S.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This review of literature presents the theoretical framework of goal orientation and student achievement from a pedagogical perspective while providing practical applications and implications for integrating goal orientation into athletic training education programs. Data Sources: Selected literature derived from EBSCO, Education…

  6. Athlete presentations and sports injury frequencies by sport branches at a university sports medicine clinic.

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    Tahirbegolli, Bernard; Dinçer, Şensu; Gözübüyük, Ömer B; Değirmenci, Ufuk; Yildiz, Safinaz; Vehid, Suphi

    2017-02-22

    We aimed to investigate the profile of athletes by determining the branch of sports, type, and area of sustained sports injury, and the frequencies through athletes' presentations to the largest university clinic in one of the most crowded and athletepopulated cities of Turkey, Istanbul. THE study population comprised 1302 athletes who presented to the sports medicine clinic between the dates of July 1st, 2014, and June 30th, 2015. This record-based study examined all athlete presentations using the physical examination cards. Eight hundred sixty-five of the athletes were male. The median age of applicants was 21 years (interquartile range 16-30 years), the median body mass index was 22.23 kg/m2 (range, 20.01-24.67 kg/m2), and the median years of sports activity was 5 years (range, 0-10 years). Presentations to the clinic were significantly higher in April (p=0.003). The most commonly injured body part was the knee and soccer was the leading sport among the patients; anterior cruciate ligament injury was the most common pathology among soccer players. Athletes who presented to our clinic most commonly sustained a lower extremity injury. It was notable that ligament injuries were seen as commonly as muscle injuries.

  7. The assessment of frequency of iron deficiency in athletes from the transferrin receptor-ferritin index.

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    Malczewska, J; Szczepańska, B; Stupnicki, R; Sendecki, W

    2001-03-01

    The transferrin receptor-ferritin index (sTfR/logFerr) was determined in 131 male and 121 female athletes in order to assess the frequency of iron deficiency (threshold value of that index taken as 1.8). Blood was drawn for determining morphological indices as well as sTfR, ferritin, iron, total iron binding capacity (TIBC), and haptoglobin. A significantly (p iron deficiency was observed in women (26%) than in men (11%). The iron deficiency was latent, since no subject was found to be anemic. The plasma iron was significantly lower and TIBC higher (p iron-deficient subgroups than in the non-deficient ones. This confirmed the latent character of iron deficiency. Some hematological indices (Hb, MCH, MCHC, MCV) were significantly lower in iron-deficient female athletes than in male athletes, which suggested a more profound iron deficiency in the former. The sTfR/logFerr index might thus be useful in detecting iron deficiency in athletes, especially in those with erythropoiesis disorders, since physical loads may affect the widely used ferritin levels.

  8. Validity of a Semi-Quantitative Food Frequency Questionnaire for Collegiate Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayaka Sunam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Food frequency questionnaires (FFQs have been developed and validated for various populations. To our knowledge, however, no FFQ has been validated for young athletes. Here, we investigated whether an FFQ that was developed and validated to estimate dietary intake in middle-aged persons was also valid for estimating that in young athletes. Methods: We applied an FFQ that had been developed for the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Cohort Study with modification to the duration of recollection. A total of 156 participants (92 males completed the FFQ and a 3-day non-consecutive 24-hour dietary recall (24hDR. Validity of the mean estimates was evaluated by calculating the percentage differences between the 24hDR and FFQ. Ranking estimation was validated using Spearman’s correlation coefficient (CC, and the degree of miscategorization was determined by joint classification. Results: The FFQ underestimated energy intake by approximately 10% for both males and females. For 35 nutrients, the median (range deattenuated CC was 0.30 (0.10 to 0.57 for males and 0.32 (−0.08 to 0.62 for females. For 19 food groups, the median (range deattenuated CC was 0.32 (0.17 to 0.72 for males and 0.34 (−0.11 to 0.58 for females. For both nutrient and food group intakes, cross-classification analysis indicated extreme miscategorization rates of 3% to 5%. Conclusions: An FFQ developed and validated for middle-aged persons had comparable validity among young athletes. This FFQ might be useful for assessing habitual dietary intake in collegiate athletes, especially for calcium, vitamin C, vegetables, fruits, and milk and dairy products.

  9. Comparison of the Frequency of Sudden Cardiovascular Deaths in Young Competitive Athletes Versus Nonathletes: Should We Really Screen Only Athletes?

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    Maron, Barry J; Haas, Tammy S; Duncanson, Emily R; Garberich, Ross F; Baker, Andrew M; Mackey-Bojack, Shannon

    2016-04-15

    The issue of sudden death in young athletes and consideration for the most practical and optimal strategy to identify those genetic and/or congenital heart diseases responsible for these tragic events continues to be debated. However, proponents of broad-based and mandatory national preparticipation screening, including with 12-lead electrocardiograms have confined the focus to a relatively small segment of the youthful population who choose to engage in competitive athletic programs at the high school, college, and elite-professional level. Therefore, lost in this discussion of preparticipation screening of athletes is that the larger population of young people not involved in competitive sports (and, therefore, a priori are excluded from systematic screening) who nevertheless may die suddenly of the same cardiovascular diseases as athletes. To substantiate this hypothesis, we accessed the forensic Hennepin County, Minnesota registry in which cardiovascular sudden deaths were 8-fold more common in nonathletes (n = 24) than athletes (n = 3) and threefold more frequent in terms of incidence. The most common diseases responsible for sudden death were hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 6) and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (n = 4). These data raise ethical considerations inherent in limiting systematic screening for unsuspected genetic and/or congenital heart disease to competitive athletes.

  10. Age related vascular endothelial function following lifelong sedentariness: positive impact of cardiovascular conditioning without further improvement following low frequency high intensity interval training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Fergal M; Herbert, Peter; Ratcliffe, John W; New, Karl J; Baker, Julien S; Sculthorpe, Nicholas F

    2015-01-01

    Aging is associated with diffuse impairments in vascular endothelial function and traditional aerobic exercise is known to ameliorate these changes. High intensity interval training (HIIT) is effective at improving vascular function in aging men with existing disease, but its effectiveness remains to be demonstrated in otherwise healthy sedentary aging. However, the frequency of commonly used HIIT protocols may be poorly tolerated in older cohorts. Therefore, the present study investigated the effectiveness of lower frequency HIIT (LfHIIT) on vascular function in a cohort of lifelong sedentary (SED; n = 22, age 62.7 ± 5.2 years) men compared with a positive control group of lifelong exercisers (LEX; n = 17, age 61.1 ± 5.4 years). The study consisted of three assessment phases; enrolment to the study (Phase A), following 6 weeks of conditioning exercise in SED (Phase B) and following 6 weeks of low frequency HIIT in both SED and LEX (LfHIIT; Phase C). Conditioning exercise improved FMD in SED (3.4 ± 1.5% to 4.9 ± 1.1%; P < 0.01) such that the difference between groups on enrolment (3.4 ± 1.5% vs. 5.3 ± 1.4%; P < 0.01) was abrogated. This was maintained but not further improved following LfHIIT in SED whilst FMD remained unaffected by LfHIIT in LEX. In conclusion, LfHIIT is effective at maintaining improvements in vascular function achieved during conditioning exercise in SED. LfHIIT is a well-tolerated and effective exercise mode for reducing cardiovascular risk and maintaining but does not improve vascular function beyond that achieved by conditioning exercise in aging men, irrespective of fitness level. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  11. Frequency of Maxillofacial Injuries Among Athletes-Members of Various Sports Federations in Iranform 1998-2001

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    H Mahmoud Hasehmi

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, sport injuries constitute a major part of social accidents. The aim of the presentstudy, was to investigate the frequency of maxillofacial injuries among athletes-members of differentsports federations in Iran from 1998-2001. For this reason files which was related to sport injuries of men and women athletes-members of sports federations were studied in Medical Federation of the Islamic Republic of Iran Sports Organization. The information were received through 26 medical organizations,located in different states of the country. The results showed that maxillofacial injuries constitute the major part of the sports injuries. In male athletes, football was the most important cause for maxillofacial injuries. However, mountain climbing and skiing play the least role in this field. Among female athletes,karate was the cause of the highest rate of maxillofacial sport injuries. Diving, mountain climbing and skiing cause the least number of maxillofacial accidents. Nasal fracture was the most common sport injury among Iraninan male and female athletes.

  12. Lifelong Learning

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    Krogh, Lone; Jensen, Annie Aarup

    2010-01-01

    the intended as well as the unintended effects (personal and professional) of the master education. The data have been gathered among graduates from a specific master education, Master in Learning Processes, and the paper will draw on results from a quantitative survey based on a questionnaire answered by 120......Master education for adults has become a strategy for Lifelong Learning among many well-educated people in Denmark. This type of master education is part of the ‘parallel education system' in Denmark. As one of the first Danish universities who offered this type of Master education, Aalborg...... and obtaining a master degree. The research interest was to determine whether the motives and needs would stem from for instance society's increased demands for qualifications, job related expectations of competence development expressed from the work place, or rather the individual wishes for personal...

  13. Frequency of the C34T mutation of the AMPD1 gene in world-class endurance athletes: does this mutation impair performance?

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    Rubio, Juan C; Martín, Miguel A; Rabadán, Manuel; Gómez-Gallego, Félix; San Juan, Alejandro F; Alonso, Juan M; Chicharro, José L; Pérez, Margarita; Arenas, Joaquín; Lucia, Alejandro

    2005-06-01

    The C34T mutation in the gene encoding for the skeletal muscle-specific isoform of AMP deaminase (AMPD1) is a common mutation among Caucasians (i.e., one of five individuals) that can impair exercise capacity. The purpose of this study was twofold. First, we determined the frequency distribution of the C34T mutation in a group of top-level Caucasian (Spanish) male endurance athletes (cyclists and runners, n = 104). This group was compared with randomly selected Caucasian (Spanish) healthy (asymptomatic) nonathletes (n = 100). The second aim of this study was to compare common laboratory indexes of endurance performance (maximal oxygen uptake or ventilatory thresholds) within the group of athletes depending on their C34T AMPD1 genotype. The frequency of the mutant T allele was lower (P 0.05) between athlete carriers or noncarriers of the C34T mutation (e.g., maximal oxygen uptake 72.3 +/- 4.6 vs. 73.5 +/- 5.9 ml.kg(-1).min(-1), respectively). In conclusion, although the frequency distribution of the mutant T allele of the AMPD1 genotype is lower in Caucasian elite endurance athletes than in controls, the C34T mutation does not significantly impair endurance performance once the elite-level status has been reached in sports.

  14. The effect of lifelong exercise dose on cardiovascular function during exercise

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    Carrick-Ranson, Graeme; Hastings, Jeffrey L.; Bhella, Paul S.; Fujimoto, Naoki; Shibata, Shigeki; Palmer, M. Dean; Boyd, Kara; Livingston, Sheryl; Dijk, Erika

    2014-01-01

    An increased “dose” of endurance exercise training is associated with a greater maximal oxygen uptake (V̇o2max), a larger left ventricular (LV) mass, and improved heart rate and blood pressure control. However, the effect of lifelong exercise dose on metabolic and hemodynamic response during exercise has not been previously examined. We performed a cross-sectional study on 101 (69 men) seniors (60 yr and older) focusing on lifelong exercise frequency as an index of exercise dose. These included 27 who had performed ≤2 exercise sessions/wk (sedentary), 25 who performed 2–3 sessions/wk (casual), 24 who performed 4–5 sessions/wk (committed) and 25 who performed ≥6 sessions/wk plus regular competitions (Masters athletes) over at least the last 25 yr. Oxygen uptake and hemodynamics [cardiac output, stroke volume (SV)] were collected at rest, two levels of steady-state submaximal exercise, and maximal exercise. Doppler ultrasound measures of LV diastolic filling were assessed at rest and during LV loading (saline infusion) to simulate increased LV filling. Body composition, total blood volume, and heart rate recovery after maximal exercise were also examined. V̇o2max increased in a dose-dependent manner (P exercise, cardiac output and SV were largest in committed exercisers and Masters athletes (P exercise, effective arterial elastance, an index of ventricular-arterial coupling, was lower in committed exercisers and Masters athletes (P exercise frequency. These data suggest that performing four or more weekly endurance exercise sessions over a lifetime results in significant gains in V̇o2max, SV, and heart rate regulation during exercise; however, improved SV regulation during exercise is not coupled with favorable effects on LV filling, even when the heart is fully loaded. PMID:24458750

  15. Effects of experience on the dimensions of intensity, direction and frequency of the competitive anxiety and self-confidence: A study in athletes of individual and team sports

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    Marcos Gimenes Fernandes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study had the following objectives: i to examine the inter-scale correlations between the three dimensions of responses (intensity, direction and frequency of the CSAI-2R and its relationship with competitive experience, and ii evaluate the effect of competitive experience anxiety (cognitive and somatic and self-confidence in the total sample and for different types of modalities (individual vs. team. The sample consisted of 267 athletes (196 male and 71 female, of different sports, aged between 18 and 40 years (M = 24.30, SD = 5.62. Athletes completed the Brazilian version of the CSAI-2, which included the addition of the dimensions of direction and frequency response. Spearman test and Manova were used for the data analysis. Overall, it was found that the competitive experience has a high multivariate and significant effect on the dimensions of competitive anxiety. Both individual and team athletes with low competitive experience showed a trend to report lower levels of self-confidence intensity, compared to counterparts with high competitive experience. These results were discussed in view of the theoretic framework and practical implications planning Sport Psychology intervention programs in local athletes with different backgrounds.

  16. Adult and lifelong education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella; Holford, John; Mohorčič Špolar, Vida

    2014-01-01

    The contributions published in this special issue of Globalisation, Societies and Education draw from an international conference “Trans-nationalization of Educational Policy Making: Implications for Adult and Lifelong Learning”, held in Nottingham on 10-12 February 2012. The conference...... and lifelong education. Accordingly, the focus was on on-going analysis and reflections on the implications for adult and lifelong education policies of globalization, and the trans-nationalization of decision-making that comes with it. This special issue brings together a first selection of papers presented...... was organised by the Research Network on Policy Studies on Adult Education, established under the auspices of the European Society for the Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA). The aim of the conference was to explore how globalisation affects agency and policy processes in the area of adult and lifelong...

  17. Bone health and the female athlete triad in adolescent athletes.

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    Ackerman, Kathryn E; Misra, Madhusmita

    2011-02-01

    Peak bone mass (PBM) is a negative predictor of osteoporosis and lifelong fracture risk. Because osteoporosis is such a prevalent disease with life-threatening consequences, it is important to try to maximize PBM. Adolescence is a critical period for bone acquisition. This article discusses some of the differences in male and female skeletal development and modifiable factors that enhance bone accrual in this age group, particularly in athletes. Hormonal influences, effects of physical activity, and nutritional contributions are included, with a focus on the adolescent athlete. Emphasis is placed on the importance of appropriate energy availability in this age group. We also review prevention and treatment strategies for the female athlete triad (ie, the inter-relationship of decreased energy availability, menstrual irregularity, and low bone density) in adolescents and athletic women. Recommendations for maximizing bone density in both male and female adolescents are discussed.

  18. Financing lifelong learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterbeek, H.; Patrinos, H.A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes and analyzes different financial schemes to promote lifelong learning. Positive effects of financial incentives to pupils are not restricted to high ability pupils, as low ability students also seem to benefit. The evidence regarding the effects of subsidy forms is limited. The

  19. Vocational Lifelong Learners?

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    Crossouard, Barbara M.; Aynsley, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    The notion of lifelong learning has become a mantra within educational policies. However these have been strongly critiqued for reflecting an understanding of learning that privileges the economic benefits of participation in formal education. In UK contexts, the importance attached to widening participation in higher education is one…

  20. Lifelong learning and participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Jan Jaap; Molpeceres, Mariangeles; Hansen, Helle Krogh

    2014-01-01

    and an assumed desire of generativity. Action learning seems to be an appropriate learning concept in relation to keeping older people engaged in the community. The authors thus point at participating and lifelong learning as part of the answers to the demographic challenges, and they suggest what you might call...

  1. Globalisation and lifelong learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle Damkjær

    2006-01-01

    The paper discusses how concepts and practises of lifelong learning interact with the multiple processes of globalisation that characterise the present. Three types of interaction are discussed: the role of international organisations in educational policies, the development of international...... educational markets and the unintended consequences of globalisation for education and learning....

  2. Adult and lifelong education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella; Holford, John; Mohorčič Špolar, Vida

    2014-01-01

    The contributions published in this special issue of Globalisation, Societies and Education draw from an international conference “Trans-nationalization of Educational Policy Making: Implications for Adult and Lifelong Learning”, held in Nottingham on 10-12 February 2012. The conference...... was organised by the Research Network on Policy Studies on Adult Education, established under the auspices of the European Society for the Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA). The aim of the conference was to explore how globalisation affects agency and policy processes in the area of adult and lifelong...... education, and the conditions or structures under which policy processes occur. The objective was to deepen understanding of how scientific inquiry – as a means of comprehending and interpreting current processes and their implications – can accompany and support contemporary developments in adult...

  3. Age related vascular endothelial function following lifelong sedentariness: positive impact of cardiovascular conditioning without further improvement following low frequency high intensity interval training

    OpenAIRE

    Grace, Fergal M.; Herbert, Peter; Ratcliffe, John W.; New, Karl J; Baker, Julien S; Sculthorpe, Nicholas F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aging is associated with diffuse impairments in vascular endothelial function and traditional aerobic exercise is known to ameliorate these changes. High intensity interval training (HIIT) is effective at improving vascular function in aging men with existing disease, but its effectiveness remains to be demonstrated in otherwise healthy sedentary aging. However, the frequency of commonly used HIIT protocols may be poorly tolerated in older cohorts. Therefore, the present study invest...

  4. Lifelong learning and participation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Jan Jaap; Molpeceres, Mariangeles; Hansen, Helle Krogh

    2014-01-01

    other things because a unilateral focus on the economic aspects may cause dissolution of the social cohesion and decrease in well-being for far too many people. The HEAR ME project aimed at developing strategies for lifelong learning and new roles for older people based on their competences, network...... in involvement of older people in voluntary social work as mentors for young people. The challenge of the ageing societies is quite often discussed as the ‘burden of the elderly’ and discussed as an economic problem. However, the challenge is not only economical. It is also a social and cultural challenge, among...... a pedagogical turn in social work and social policy....

  5. Who Is the Lifelong Learner? Globalization, Lifelong Learning and Hermeneutics

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    Uggla, Bengt Kristensson

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this essay is to elaborate on the inner connection between three such diverse entities as lifelong learning, globalization and hermeneutics. After placing lifelong learning in a societal context framed by globalization, my intention is to reflect on the prerequisites for introducing a hermeneutical contribution to the understanding of…

  6. Archetypal Athletes

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    Eugster, Manuel J A

    2011-01-01

    Discussions on outstanding---positively and/or negatively---athletes are common practice. The rapidly grown amount of collected sports data now allow to support such discussions with state of the art statistical methodology. Given a (multivariate) data set with collected data of athletes within a specific sport, outstanding athletes are values on the data set boundary. In the present paper we propose archetypal analysis to compute these extreme values. The so-called archetypes, i.e., archetypal athletes, approximate the observations as convex combinations. We interpret the archetypal athletes and their characteristics, and, furthermore, the composition of all athletes based on the archetypal athletes. The application of archetypal analysis is demonstrated on basketball statistics and soccer skill ratings.

  7. Globalizing Lifelong Learning - International Organizations' Strategies of Lifelong Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Zapp, Mike

    2012-01-01

    While the 1970s still knew 'permanent education' (Council of Europe), 'recurrent education' (OECD) and 'lifelong education' (UNESCO), over the past 20 years, 'lifelong learning' has become the single buzz word and catch-all term for reform in above all (pre-) primary, higher and adult education in both national and international education policy making. Both highly industrialized and less industrialized countries embrace the term, in many cases motivated by international and supra...

  8. Public libraries and lifelong learning

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    Nielsen, Bo Gerner; Borlund, Pia

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of an empirical study of public librarians’ conception of how public libraries support lifelong learning, as well as the role of information literacy in relation to lifelong learning. Lifelong learning has become essential to all people in today’s information...... citizenship and employability, thereby enabling people to participate in all spheres of social, political and economic life. Therefore, how do the public librarians conceive the learning responsibility and their own role in supporting lifelong learning? Furthermore, how do public librarians become better...... society as a result of easy and free access to information. A basic understanding of the concept is ‘learning throughout life, either continuously or periodically’. This implies that learning is not restricted to educational institutions, but can also take place in for example the public library. Public...

  9. Public libraries and lifelong learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bo Gerner; Borlund, Pia

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of an empirical study of public librarians’ conception of how public libraries support lifelong learning, as well as the role of information literacy in relation to lifelong learning. Lifelong learning has become essential to all people in today’s information...... society as a result of easy and free access to information. A basic understanding of the concept is ‘learning throughout life, either continuously or periodically’. This implies that learning is not restricted to educational institutions, but can also take place in for example the public library. Public...... libraries thus may play an important role in supporting the learning process not the least because lifelong learning is characterised by the inclusion of informal elements of learning, flexible learning opportunities, and a shift towards selfdirected learning. This self-directed learning promotes active...

  10. Mobile Technologies for Lifelong Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Alina Mihaela ION

    2015-01-01

    The article presents an analysis of the impact of using mobile devices on participants at the lifelong learning educational process. Human durable development involves adapting to new hardware and software technologies supported by the progress of information and communication technology. Along with technological evolution the access to mobile devices knew a significant growth and encouraged the extension of educational process towards lifelong learning through mobile devices. Thus m-Learning...

  11. Archetypal Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Eugster, Manuel J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Discussions on outstanding---positively and/or negatively---athletes are common practice. The rapidly grown amount of collected sports data now allow to support such discussions with state of the art statistical methodology. Given a (multivariate) data set with collected data of athletes within a specific sport, outstanding athletes are values on the data set boundary. In the present paper we propose archetypal analysis to compute these extreme values. The so-called arche...

  12. Social media for lifelong learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, Terry; Evans, Yolanda

    2015-04-01

    Learning is ongoing, and can be considered a social activity. In this paper we aim to provide a review of the use of social media for lifelong learning. We start by defining lifelong learning, drawing upon principles of continuous professional development and adult learning theory. We searched Embase and MEDLINE from 2004-2014 for search terms relevant to social media and learning. We describe examples of lifelong learners using social media in medical education and healthcare that have been reported in the peer-reviewed literature. Medical or other health professions students may have qualities consistent with being a lifelong learner, yet once individuals move beyond structured learning environments they will need to recognize their own gaps in knowledge and skills over time and be motivated to fill them, thereby incorporating lifelong learning principles into their day-to-day practice. Engagement with social media can parallel engagement in the learning process over time, to the extent that online social networking fosters feedback and collaboration. The use of social media and online networking platforms are a key way to continuously learn in today's information sharing society. Additional research is needed, particularly rigorous studies that extend beyond learner satisfaction to knowledge, behaviour change, and outcomes.

  13. Changing Notions of Lifelong Education and Lifelong Learning

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    Tuijnman, Albert; Boström, Ann-Kristin

    2002-03-01

    Drawing on material from IRE as well as other sources, this article describes how the notion of lifelong education came into prominence in the educational world in the late 1960s, how it related to the concepts of formal, non-formal and informal education, and how it contrasted with the idea of recurrent eduction, as promoted by the OECD. The author goes on to discuss the emergence of the broader and more holistic concept of lifelong learning and the various ways in which it is understood. The article shows how IRE and its host institute have played an important part in the debate on these issues.

  14. ONLINE EDUCATION FOR LIFELONG LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Bayram

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available This book was edited by, Yukiko Inoue, professor of educational research at the University of Guam, where she teaches online and face-to-face courses. It was published by Information Science Publishing in 2007. The authors of the chapters in this bookare selected from different universities from Guam,Australia, Turkey and Greece. Online education hasprovided considerable opportunities for all peoplein lifelong learning. People who use online learningmaterials has interactive medium for lifelonglearning. The aim of this book is to examine online environment in terms of development, implementation, theories, technology and case studies. It provides theoretical and practical information about online lifelong learning; consequently, it can appeal to researchers, practitioners, online learners and anyone interested in online lifelong learning. This book covers 14 chapters divided into fivesections.

  15. Lifelong inclusive education of people with disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Gluzman Aleksandr Vladimirovich; Boginskaya Yuliya Valerievna

    2015-01-01

    The article analyzes the current state of lifelong inclusive education of people with disabilities. The authors highlight the conditions of developing a lifelong education system for children and youth with disabilities.

  16. Gender, Masculinities and Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowl, Marion, Ed.; Tobias, Robert, Ed.; Leahy, Jennifer, Ed.; Ferguson, Graeme, Ed.; Gage, Jeffrey, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Gender, Masculinities and Lifelong Learning" reflects on current debates and discourses around gender and education, in which some academics, practitioners and policy-makers have referred to a crisis of masculinity. This book explores questions such as: Are men under-represented in education? Are women outstripping men in terms of…

  17. Fiction, Empathy and Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The article aims to demonstrate that the impact of fiction on adult learning could be illuminated by a deeper engagement with research into empathy. It recognises that the lifelong learning literature acknowledges the importance of empathy in adult learning and that discussions of the role of fiction in adult learning often refer to fiction's…

  18. Lifelong Learning, Policy and Desire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Recent lifelong learning policies have been criticized for creating an illusion of freedom whilst simultaneously reducing choice. The concept of desire permits engagement with the conscious and unconscious drives that underpin individual decision-making, which direct the life course. Utilizing the ideas of Hume and Spinoza, the present article…

  19. Language Technologies for Lifelong Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greller, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Greller, W. (2010). Language Technologies for Lifelong Learning. In S. Trausan-Matu & P. Dessus (Eds.), Proceedings of the Natural Language Processing in Support of Learning: Metrics, Feedback and Connectivity. Second Internationl Workshop - NLPSL 2010 (pp. 6-8). September, 14, 2010, Bucharest,

  20. Fiction, Empathy and Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Christine

    2012-01-01

    The article aims to demonstrate that the impact of fiction on adult learning could be illuminated by a deeper engagement with research into empathy. It recognises that the lifelong learning literature acknowledges the importance of empathy in adult learning and that discussions of the role of fiction in adult learning often refer to fiction's…

  1. Language Technologies for Lifelong Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greller, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Greller, W. (2010). Language Technologies for Lifelong Learning. In S. Trausan-Matu & P. Dessus (Eds.), Proceedings of the Natural Language Processing in Support of Learning: Metrics, Feedback and Connectivity. Second Internationl Workshop - NLPSL 2010 (pp. 6-8). September, 14, 2010, Bucharest, Roma

  2. Self directed and lifelong learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Sylvia; Kernohan, George; McCullagh, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Given the many changes that occur in medicine, health care and information technologies we need to prepare all our students to engage in self directed and life long learning. There is considerable opportunity for self-directed and lifelong learning in health informatics bringing together students in exciting global learning environments, where they have much greater freedom and flexibility in their studies and potentially a wider variety of resources available to them. Self-directed learning focuses on the process by which adults take control of their own learning, in particular how they set their own learning goals, locate appropriate resources, decide on which learning methods to use and evaluate their progress. Lifelong learning happens in a variety of formal and informal settings building on both intentional and incidental learning experiences. In a lifelong learning situation the tutor must relinquish the role of expert and assume the role of facilitator, guiding learners to uncover their own knowledge. Against a back drop of rapid advances in technology which can be used to both deliver course materials and provide enhanced learning opportunities, this chapter outlines the pedagogic principles and practices which underpin self-directed and lifelong learning.

  3. Language Technologies for Lifelong Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greller, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Greller, W. (2010). Language Technologies for Lifelong Learning. In S. Trausan-Matu & P. Dessus (Eds.), Proceedings of the Natural Language Processing in Support of Learning: Metrics, Feedback and Connectivity. Second Internationl Workshop - NLPSL 2010 (pp. 6-8). September, 14, 2010, Bucharest, Roma

  4. Assessment of psychological pain management techniques: a comparative study between athletes and non-athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo Daniel Câmara

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Athletes usually deal with injuries and pain. They seem to have similar pain threshold when compared to non-athletes, although they have higher pain tolerance and the exact cause for that is unknown. High levels for pain tolerance and control can improve performance and time for injury recovery. The literature shows that use of coping strategies can increase pain control; possible differences on coping with pain between athletes and non-athletes are poorly described. The purpose of this study was to evaluate frequency of coping strategies used by athletes and non-athletes of both genders and look for possible association between preferred coping style and pain intensity. The sample included 160 subjects with actual pain experience, 80 athletes (52 male, 28 female and 80 non-athletes (50 male and 30 female. All subjects were evaluated for pain intensity, frequency and duration and for coping strategies using a questionnaire (SBS-V. The results show that athletes and non-athletes, despite of gender, use with the same frequency coping strategies. The less common coping strategies for all groups were those poor-adaptative (p < 0.001; the most commonly strategy used was self-statement and regulation of body tension (p < 0.001. Female athletes use more frequently poor-adaptative strategies when pain intensity increases (p < 0.05.

  5. The pathophysiology of lifelong premature ejaculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldinger, Marcel D

    2016-08-01

    For many decades it has been thought that lifelong premature ejaculation (PE) is only characterized by persistent early ejaculations. Despite enormous progress of in vivo animal research, and neurobiological, genetic and pharmacological research in men with lifelong PE, our current understanding of the mechanisms behind early ejaculations is far from complete. The new classification of PE into four PE subtypes has shown that the symptomatology of lifelong PE strongly differs from acquired PE, subjective PE and variable PE. The phenotype of lifelong PE and therefore also the pathophysiology of lifelong PE is much more complex. A substantial number of men with lifelong PE not only have PE, but also premature erection and premature penile detumescence as part of an acute hypertonic or hypererotic state when engaged in an erotic situation or when making love. As both erectio praecox, ejaculatio praecox, detumescentia praecox, and the hypererotic state are part of the phenotype lifelong PE, it is argued that lifelong PE is not only a disturbance of the timing of ejaculation but also a disturbance of the timing of erection, detumescence and arousal. Since 1998, the pathophysiology of lifelong PE was thought to be mainly mediated by the central serotonergic system in line with genetic polymorphisms of specific serotonergic genes. However, by accepting that lifelong PE is characterized by the reversible hypertonic state the hypothesis of mainly serotonergic dysfunction is no longer tenable. Instead, it has been postulated that the pathophysiology of lifelong PE is mediated by a very complex interplay of central and peripheral serotonergic, dopaminergic, oxytocinergic, endocrinological, genetic and probably also epigenetic factors. Progress in research of lifelong PE can only be accomplished when a stopwatch is used to measure the IELT and the cut-off point of 1 minute for the definition of lifelong PE is maintained. Current use of validated questionnaires, neglect of

  6. The pathophysiology of lifelong premature ejaculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    For many decades it has been thought that lifelong premature ejaculation (PE) is only characterized by persistent early ejaculations. Despite enormous progress of in vivo animal research, and neurobiological, genetic and pharmacological research in men with lifelong PE, our current understanding of the mechanisms behind early ejaculations is far from complete. The new classification of PE into four PE subtypes has shown that the symptomatology of lifelong PE strongly differs from acquired PE, subjective PE and variable PE. The phenotype of lifelong PE and therefore also the pathophysiology of lifelong PE is much more complex. A substantial number of men with lifelong PE not only have PE, but also premature erection and premature penile detumescence as part of an acute hypertonic or hypererotic state when engaged in an erotic situation or when making love. As both erectio praecox, ejaculatio praecox, detumescentia praecox, and the hypererotic state are part of the phenotype lifelong PE, it is argued that lifelong PE is not only a disturbance of the timing of ejaculation but also a disturbance of the timing of erection, detumescence and arousal. Since 1998, the pathophysiology of lifelong PE was thought to be mainly mediated by the central serotonergic system in line with genetic polymorphisms of specific serotonergic genes. However, by accepting that lifelong PE is characterized by the reversible hypertonic state the hypothesis of mainly serotonergic dysfunction is no longer tenable. Instead, it has been postulated that the pathophysiology of lifelong PE is mediated by a very complex interplay of central and peripheral serotonergic, dopaminergic, oxytocinergic, endocrinological, genetic and probably also epigenetic factors. Progress in research of lifelong PE can only be accomplished when a stopwatch is used to measure the IELT and the cut-off point of 1 minute for the definition of lifelong PE is maintained. Current use of validated questionnaires, neglect of

  7. Easing access for lifelong learners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Romina; Remdisch, Sabine; Köhler, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Easing access to higher education (HE) for those engaging in lifelong learning has been a common policy objective across the European Union since the late 1990s. To reach this goal, the transition between vocational and academic routes must be simplified, but European countries are at different...... developmental stages. This article maps the development in Denmark, Finland, Germany and England using a case study approach deploying data triangulation from a national and institutional perspective. It explores the extent/commonality of structural factors for easing access for students engaging in lifelong...... learning. The cases are at widely different stages, but the following factors were considered essential in all countries for opening universities: the establishment of transition paths from secondary education and working life into HE and links between HE, businesses and adult education from a national...

  8. Lifelong Learning with Digital Compendia

    OpenAIRE

    Valenzeno, Dennis Paul; Brennan, Thomas; Gasparro, Francis; Lambert, Christopher; Smith, Kendric

    2009-01-01

    The Digital Compendium is a new concept in education, and is described here for the science of photobiology, a Digital Photobiology Compendium (DPC). Medical school is the start of a lifelong learning endeavor. Increasingly computer- and web-based resources will facilitate this process. Yet there are currently few resources that span the range of knowledge from student through practicing professional. To this end we are developing a technologically advanced, scientifically up-to-date learning...

  9. Liability, Athletic Equipment, and the Athletic Trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Richard

    Standards of conduct, roles, and responsibilities expected of athletic trainers should be developed and disseminated. These guidelines could be used in court to show that the athletic trainer was following basic standards if he should be charged with liability. A review of liability cases involving athletic injuries received while athletes were…

  10. Mentoring is a Lifelong Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    One of the greatest personal benefits of mentoring and working with graduate students and postdoctoral fellows is the life-long journey together. Having graduate students who keep up with you, ask advice and sometimes get it when they haven't asked for it, being able to help them find a job, and in some cases, continuing to do research together for over 50 years is a real gift. Seeing the success of your students in their own research programs, or as Professors, or in industry, makes me feel proud like I do in my children, and when we gather at conferences, it does seem like a family.

  11. The Anemias of Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnosing anemia in athletes is complicated because athletes normally have a pseudoanemia that needs no treatment. Athletes, however, can develop anemia from iron deficiency or footstrike hemolysis, which require diagnosis and treatment. (Author/MT)

  12. A Design Model for Lifelong Learning Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koper, Rob; Giesbers, Bas; van Rosmalen, Peter; Sloep, Peter; van Bruggen, Jan; Tattersall, Colin; Vogten, Hubert; Brouns, Francis

    2005-01-01

    The provision of lifelong learning facilities is considered to be a major new direction for higher and distance teaching educational institutes catering for the demands of industry and society. ICT networks will in future support seamless, ubiquitous access to lifelong learning facilities at home, at work, in schools and universities. This implies…

  13. Researching the Rhetoric of Lifelong Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Richard; Nicoll, Katherine

    2001-01-01

    In the analysis of lifelong-learning policies, the gap between rhetoric and reality has been avidly debated. Such critiques are misguided; an "exemplary" rhetorical analysis of lifelong-learning policy is possible. UK government publications suggest that rhetorical analysis helps identify the politics of discourse involved in…

  14. Lifelong Learning Policy in Two National Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2014-01-01

    This article describes and discusses the development of lifelong learning policy in two EU member states, Denmark and Portugal. The purpose is to show how different societal and historical contexts shape the development and implementation of lifelong learning policies, even though these policies have significant common elements. As a basis for the…

  15. The knowledge economy and lifelong learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella

    2014-01-01

    Anmeldelse af bogen: The knowledge economy and lifelong learning. A critical reader, edited by David W. Livingstone and David Guile (Sense Publishers, Rotterdam, 2012.......Anmeldelse af bogen: The knowledge economy and lifelong learning. A critical reader, edited by David W. Livingstone and David Guile (Sense Publishers, Rotterdam, 2012....

  16. Game-Based Life-Long Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelle, Sebastian; Sigurðarson, Steinn; Westera, Wim; Specht, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Kelle, S., Sigurðarson, S., Westera, W., & Specht, M. (2011). Game-Based Life-Long Learning. In G. D. Magoulas (Ed.), E-Infrastructures and Technologies for Lifelong Learning: Next Generation Environments (pp. 337-349). Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

  17. WTO and Lifelong Education Strategies for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-guo; Zheng, Yu

    2006-01-01

    After China's entry into the World Trade Organization (WTO), teachers have been confronted with many opportunities and challenges. Lifelong education strategies are problems we should take into account carefully. This article expounds the objective demands, ideas, content, measures and functions of lifelong education.

  18. The Nordic Model of Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenson, Kjell

    2006-01-01

    This article explores how the so called Nordic welfare state, with its specific institutional make up, handles Lifelong Learning in a time characterised by the challenges of economic globalisation and the hegemonic impact of the neo-liberal agenda. The analysis reveals a high participation in the Nordic countries in Lifelong Learning and, in…

  19. Candlestick and Faces: Aspects of Lifelong Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Cheryl

    1999-01-01

    Government policies view lifelong learning in terms of economic development. A SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) analysis of the environment of British community education councils revealed other views of lifelong learning: it takes time and political expediency and national policy can adversely affect what and how people learn.…

  20. Lifelong learning in an age of measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kauffmann, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    There has been a shift in interest from ‘lifelong education’ to ‘lifelong learning’ in the Western world since the 1990s. This shift is closely related to strategies for securing the competitiveness of national economies. For this purpose one of the tools applied by educational policy makers has...

  1. Game-Based Life-Long Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelle, Sebastian; Sigurðarson, Steinn; Westera, Wim; Specht, Marcus

    2010-01-01

    Kelle, S., Sigurðarson, S., Westera, W., & Specht, M. (2011). Game-Based Life-Long Learning. In G. D. Magoulas (Ed.), E-Infrastructures and Technologies for Lifelong Learning: Next Generation Environments (pp. 337-349). Hershey, PA: IGI Global.

  2. Lifelong learning policy in two national contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2014-01-01

    This article describes and discusses the development of lifelong learning policy in two EU member states, Denmark and Portugal. The purpose is to show how different societal and historical contexts shape the development and implementation of lifelong learning policies, even though these policies...... have significant common elements. As a basis for the discussion an inventory of policy elements is presented. Denmark and Portugal have been chosen as examples of smaller EU member states with different historical, social and cultural characteristics. Developments and policies in the two countries...... of lifelong learning policy. Early development of public primary education and popular adult education has provided a strong foundation for lifelong learning policy in Denmark while in Portugal not only institutional provision but also popular demand for lifelong learning has had to be built up relatively...

  3. INDIVIDUAL ABILITIES AND LIFELONG LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr Yu. Burov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes new and emerging technologies in education, learning environments and methods that have to satisfy lifelong learning, from school age to retirement, on the basis of the psychophysiological model of the cognitive abilities formation. It covers such topics as: evaluation of a human (accounting schoolchildren, youth and adults features abilities and individual propensities, individual trajectory of learning, adaptive learning strategy and design, recommendation on curriculum design, day-to-day support for individual’s learning, assessment of a human learning environment and performance, recommendation regards vocational retraining and/or further carrier etc.. The specific goal is to facilitate a broader understanding of the promise and pitfalls of these technologies and working (learning/teaching environments in global education/development settings, with special regard to the human as subject in the system and to the collaboration of humans and technical, didactic and organizational subsystems.

  4. Lifelong Open and Flexible Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Jørgen

    2006-01-01

    and Flexible (LOF) learning embracing characteristics as: open learning, distance learning, e-learning, online learning, open accessibility, multimedia support, virtual mobility, learning communities, dual mode (earn & learn) approaches, and the like.In my presentation I will focus on the EADTU strategies......EADTU members are universities that are dedicated to off-campus target groups using distance teaching methods as well as associations consisting of universities with mainly mainstream on-campus students but also offering education for off-campus students. Consequently our focus is on Lifelong Open...... for creating a synergy network in e-learning – eventually leading to a European Learning Space that supports virtual mobility of students, staff and courses, adds an e-dimension to the Bologa process and facilitates collaboration between universities and the corporate sector....

  5. National collegiate athletic association division I athletes' use of nonprescription medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Douglas A; Miller, Thomas W; Pescatello, Linda S; Barnes, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Athletes are known to use over-the-counter pain medication. However, the frequency of such use among National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I-A football athletes is unknown. NCAA Division I-A football athletes who use nonprescription analgesics for pain misuse these medications. Cross-sectional study. The football players (N, 144) who met the criteria and agreed to participate were from 8 NCAA Division I-A schools. The participants were administered the Over the Counter Drug Screen for Athletes, which measures attitudes toward the use of a spectrum of substances. Among football athletes surveyed who took nonprescription analgesics for football-related pain, 37% reported taking more than the recommended dose. This was slightly higher than the 28% of players who stated they have not taken nonprescription analgesics for football-related pain. Thirty-four percent of all athletes reported using more than the recommended dose of nonprescription analgesics. Athletes who purchased their own nonprescription analgesics communicated poorly regarding nonprescription analgesics use. Those lacking knowledge about nonprescription analgesics and those using nonprescription analgesics in anticipation of pain or to avoid missing a practice or game were most likely to misuse nonprescription analgesics. NCAA Division I-A football athletes who use nonprescription analgesics for athletic competition do not misuse nonprescription analgesics.

  6. Athletic Apparel Industry Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIE; TAN; NAFISUL; ISLAM; MILAN; MITRASINOVIC

    2015-01-01

    Industry Overview The athletic apparel industry is the fastest growing segment of global clothing industry differentiated by offering high quality athletic apparel made of technically advanced fabrics.The athletic apparel is made for a variety of sports and physical activities for children,men and women and enhances comfort and performance of athletes.The industry consists of companies that design and market

  7. Lifelong learning for creativity and innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta; Mitrev, Sasa; Atanasova-Pacemska, Tatjana; Karov, Ilija

    2014-01-01

    Lifelong learning skills have always been important in any education and work setting. However, recently there is a new focus on these skills in engineering education. The expectation that engineering graduates must have “a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in lifelong learning”. The paper first defines a set of attributes / skills, which are necessary for students to develop as lifelong learners. It is postulated that the “recognition of the need” requires skills in the a...

  8. Long-term Outcomes of the ATHENA (Athletes Targeting Healthy Exercise & Nutrition Alternatives) Program for Female High School Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Elliot, Diane L.; Goldberg, Linn; Moe, Esther L; DeFrancesco, Carol A.; Durham, Melissa B.; McGinnis, Wendy; Lockwood, Chondra

    2008-01-01

    Adolescence and emerging adulthood are critical windows for establishing life-long behaviors. We assessed long-term outcomes of a prospective randomized harm reduction/health promotion program for female high school athletes. The intervention’s immediate beneficial effects on diet pill use and unhealthy eating behaviors have been reported; however, tobacco, alcohol and marijuana use were not immediately altered (Elliot et al, 2004). One to three years following graduation, positive benefits i...

  9. E-portfolios in lifelong learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, Francis; Vogten, Hubert; Janssen, José; Finders, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Brouns, F., Vogten, H., Janssen, J., & Finders, A. (2013, 14-15 November). E-portfolios in lifelong learning. Presentation given at the 2013 Conference on Technological Ecosystems for Enhancing Multiculturality, TEEM2013, Salamanca, Spain.

  10. Facilitating lifelong learning with OpenU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubens, Wilfred; Counotte, Anda

    2012-01-01

    Rubens, W., & Counotte, A. (2012). Facilitating lifelong learning with OpenU. In R. Jacobi, & N. van der Woert (Eds.), Trendreport Open Educational Resources 2012 (pp. 22-26). Utrecht: SURF Foundation - Special Interest Group Open Educational Resources SURF.

  11. Designing Learning Networks for Lifelong Learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koper, Rob

    2005-01-01

    Koper, R. (2005). Designing Learning Networks for Lifelong Learners. In: Koper, R. & Tattersall, C., Learning Design: A Handbook on Modelling and Delivering Networked Education and Training (pp. 239-252). Berlin-Heidelberg: Springer Verlag.

  12. The Language Technologies for Lifelong Learning Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berlanga, Adriana

    2009-01-01

    Berlanga, A. J. (2009). The Language Technologies for Lifelong Learning Project. Poster presented at the 9th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT 2009). July, 15-17, 2009, Riga, Latvia.

  13. The European Network for Lifelong Competence Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgos, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Burgos, D. (2006). The European Network for Lifelong Competence Development. Presentation at the Professional Training Facts 2006 conference. November 15th, Stuttgart, Germany: TENCompetence. Retrieved November 20th, 2006, from http://dspace.learningnetworks.org

  14. Learning Networks for Professional Development & Lifelong Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sloep, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Sloep, P. B. (2009). Learning Networks for Professional Development & Lifelong Learning. Presentation at a NeLLL seminar with Etienne Wenger held at the Open Universiteit Nederland. September, 10, 2009, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  15. The Determinants of Lifelong Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Sinanovic

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to introduce drivers of lifelong learning and to emphasize its importance in modern life. Developed economies throughout the world are driven more by knowledge and globalization than were economies of even the recent past. European economies of the 20th century were largely driven by manufacturing and the need to industrialize. Filling such economies with functional workers required education systems of similar design, that turned out masses of equally-educated workers in large batches. Increased automation, the widespread introduction of computer technologies and communications, and cheaper transportation have combined to encourage firms to be lean, international, and changing. Computer technologies encouraged sharing of documents, speeded workflow from design to production. Cheaper transportation allowed an increase in internationalization of workforces. These major shifts drove change from industrialized to knowledge-based economies. Paper discusses how two simple English words came together, stayed together, and grew into a powerful term driving new political initiatives, and continue to influence political, economic, social, and even cultural currents. Today's developed societies are rapidly aging, live longer and have fewer children. In order to continue to grow vibrant economies, and to fully enjoy the benefits of these vibrant economies, citizens need to continue to renew knowledge and skills during entire lifetime. As the major technological, economic, and social currents change, so must citizens adapt by never ceasing to learn throughout their lifetimes.

  16. Lifelong Learning : A Pacification of 'Know How'

    OpenAIRE

    Nicoll, Katherine; Fejes, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    A tendency of previous studies of lifelong learning to focus on learning and learning subjectivities may have led to an underestimation of potential effects in terms of a system of knowledge constitutive processes that operates powerfully to shape our societies. In this paper we explore lifelong learning and practices in the construction of knowledge at the point where a new relationship is being attempted between university courses and workplaces through programmes for learning. Drawing from...

  17. Parental identity, lifelong learning and school

    OpenAIRE

    Mendel, Maria;

    2016-01-01

    This text presents the thoughts derived from empirical, qualitative research carried out in a small group of parents of school-age children. Although the research terrain was Poland, the problems here considered revolve around the broad issue of parental identity, especially in a context of the concept of Lifelong Learning. Conclusions are built upon an exploratory description of parental identity, which gives support to the assumption that it is the identity of a lifelong learner, shaped mor...

  18. National Athletic Trainers' Association-accredited postprofessional athletic training education: attractors and career intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Dodge, Thomas M

    2012-01-01

    Anecdotally, we know that students select graduate programs based on location, finances, and future career goals. Empirically, however, we lack information on what attracts a student to these programs. To gain an appreciation for the selection process of graduate study. Qualitative study. Postprofessional programs in athletic training (PPATs) accredited by the National Athletic Trainers' Association. A total of 19 first-year PPAT students participated, representing 13 of the 16 accredited PPAT programs. All interviews were conducted via phone and transcribed verbatim. Analysis of the interview data followed the procedures as outlined by a grounded theory approach. Trustworthiness was secured by (1) participant checks, (2) participant verification, and (3) multiple analyst triangulations. Athletic training students select PPAT programs for 4 major reasons: reputation of the program or faculty (or both), career intentions, professional socialization, and mentorship from undergraduate faculty or clinical instructors (or both). Participants discussed long-term professional goals as the driving force behind wanting an advanced degree in athletic training. Faculty and clinical instructor recommendations and the program's prestige helped guide the decisions. Participants also expressed the need to gain more experience, which promoted autonomy, and support while gaining that work experience. Final selection of the PPAT program was based on academic offerings, the assistantship offered (including financial support), advanced knowledge of athletic training concepts and principles, and apprenticeship opportunities. Students who attend PPAT programs are attracted to advancing their entry-level knowledge, are committed to their professional development as athletic trainers, and view the profession of athletic training as a life-long career. The combination of balanced academics, clinical experiences, and additional professional socialization and mentorship from the PPAT program

  19. Lifelong Learning: Concept, Policy, Instruments and Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin TOPRAK

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available European Union has started an education & training initiative under the umbrella of lifelong learning to achieve the 2020 Agenda targets. Th is initiative has nearly half of a century time horizon, and all designed policies and measures have been consolidated under this initiative. Turkish Education authorities have been monitoring this European eff ort closely and made important legal and institutional regulations in recent couple of years. Th is study examines the primary aspects of lifelong learning in detail: conceptual and philosophical background; recognition strategies; the place of formal, non-formal and informal learning in the lifelong learning approach; financing and measurement ways of lifelong learning; and variety of perspectives of international institutions. In addition, education and training strategy of the Europe’s 2020 vision of lifelong learning is also evaluated in detail. Th e human resources vision of the Europe considers education, occupation and economic activities together to allow authorities to plan the future of the European societies. Th e updating mechanisms of this approach are designed both domestically at national and internationally at European levels. It is concluded, in this study, that the lifelong learning policy and implementation of the Europe should be taken as benchmark.

  20. Sport Opportunities for Athletes with Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, 1984

    1984-01-01

    This series outlines sport opportunities for athletes with disabilities. Included are articles discussing sports for athletes with cerebral palsy, deaf athletes, blind athletes, wheelchair bound athletes, amputee athletes, as well as a discussion of the Special Olympics. (JMK)

  1. National Athletic Trainers' Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more by reviewing the NATA Media Kit. NATA Marketing Opportunities Join or Renew Joining NATA offers athletic ... looking for more information about athletic training, youth sports safety or specific health issues, we encourage you ...

  2. Nutrition and athletic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002458.htm Nutrition and athletic performance To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nutrition can help enhance athletic performance. An active lifestyle ...

  3. Athletic Identity, Vocational Identity, and Occupational Engagement in College Student-Athletes and Non-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Lacole L.

    2012-01-01

    Athletic departments in National Collegiate Athletic Association Football Bowl Subdivision universities provide academic support services to their student-athletes. Even though student-athletes receive help including career assistance from academic counselors, some studies have found that student-athletes are behind non-athletes in career…

  4. Coaching the Vegetarian Athlete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandali, Swarna L.

    2011-01-01

    Good nutrition is important for optimal athletic performance. Adolescent athletes often depend on their coaches for nutritional information on weight management, dietary supplements, and dietary practices. Some dietary practices, such as vegetarianism, have the potential to be harmful to the adolescent athlete if not followed with careful…

  5. Coaching the Vegetarian Athlete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandali, Swarna L.

    2011-01-01

    Good nutrition is important for optimal athletic performance. Adolescent athletes often depend on their coaches for nutritional information on weight management, dietary supplements, and dietary practices. Some dietary practices, such as vegetarianism, have the potential to be harmful to the adolescent athlete if not followed with careful…

  6. Preparing for lifelong e-learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Bent B.

    2010-01-01

    -motivated learning strategy foster personal development, social inclusion, and employability. One spinoff is an increased desire to learn more about the use of digital technologies. Another is an increased desire to learn in general. This approach to digital literacy for adults thus stimulates to and prepares......In this paper, the author examines digital inclusion. The use of interactive tools to locate, make meaning of, and produce digital content in workplace contexts and broader social contexts are analysed based on a definition of inclusion related to social practices. The general scope of the paper...... is lifelong learning. Since information and communication technologies offer new opportunities to adult learners, digital inclusion is considered an important prerequisite for lifelong learning. In the paper, the author presents one strategy for removing barriers to lifelong learning caused by lack...

  7. Preparing for lifelong e-learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Bent B.

    2010-01-01

    -motivated learning strategy foster personal development, social inclusion, and employability. One spinoff is an increased desire to learn more about the use of digital technologies. Another is an increased desire to learn in general. This approach to digital literacy for adults thus stimulates to and prepares...... is lifelong learning. Since information and communication technologies offer new opportunities to adult learners, digital inclusion is considered an important prerequisite for lifelong learning. In the paper, the author presents one strategy for removing barriers to lifelong learning caused by lack...... of awareness, confidence, and skills relating to digital technologies. The design and implementation of the strategy was initiated by the Danish Ministry of Education. The author of this paper designed the learning content for adults with little previous experience and working knowledge about interactive tools...

  8. Virtual Reality for Training and Lifelong Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Mellet-d'Huart

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article covers the application of virtual reality (VR to training and lifelong learning. A number of considerations concerning the design of VR applications are included. The introduction is dedicated to the more general aspects of applying VR to training. From multiple perspectives, we will provide an overview of existing applications with their main purposes and go into more depth on certain learning areas. Recent developments of virtual environments for training and lifelong learning are analyzed, followed by an analytical viewpoint on design, advocating more explicit paradigmatic considerations and development of generic design methods. These approaches and proposals are aimed at better exploiting the uniqueness of VR and designing more effective virtual environments. Finally, a number of conclusions will be drawn for future technology-enhanced training and for lifelong learning using VR.

  9. International trends in lifelong learning for pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driesen, Annelies; Verbeke, Koen; Simoens, Steven; Laekeman, Gert

    2007-06-15

    Lifelong learning for community pharmacists is shifting from continuing education (CE) towards continuing professional development (CPD) in some countries. The objectives of this report were to compare lifelong learning frameworks for community pharmacists in different countries, and determine to what extent the concept of CPD has been implemented. A literature search was conducted as well as an Internet search on the web sites of professional pharmacy associations and authorities in 8 countries. The results of this review show that the concept of CPD has been implemented primarily in countries that have a long tradition in lifelong learning, such as Great Britain. However, most countries have opted for the CE approach, eg, France, or for a combination of CE and CPD, eg, New Zealand. This approach combines the controllability by regulatory organizations that CE requires with the advantage of sustained behavior change seen in successful CPD programs.

  10. Overuse injuries in pediatric athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Kathleen A; Gross, Richard H

    2003-07-01

    Children can be seemingly invincible, with inexhaustible energy. Even the elite young athlete, however, may lack the experience to realize when his or her level of activity is increasing the risk of sustaining injuries related to overuse. Coaches, trainers, parents, and physicians need to monitor the activities of young athletes, modify factors that may place them at increased risk of injury, and enforce periods of "relative rest" when necessary. Factors that can increase the risk of overuse injuries can be identified and modified if possible. Environmental factors include the use of sport-specific equipment (ie, running shoes instead of cleats for running activities) and properly sized equipment. Children of the same age will be of different sizes; "one size fits all" is not a good enough policy in this diverse population. Training factors include magnitude, frequency, and intensity. Children should be asked if they are participating in more than one team or sport simultaneously. Also, because the child's interest may exceed his or her skill level, young athletes optimally should be taught sport-specific skills to prevent injuries related to improper biomechanics. Finally, anatomic factors should be assessed, including alignment, laxity, flexibility, and muscle balance. These factors cannot always be changed, but coaches can modify training regimens and suggest strength and flexibility training to counteract specific weaknesses. Young athletes have a long future of activity ahead of them. Even if they never reach the Olympics or compete in the National Basketball Association (NBA), the injuries that occur in young athletes can have significant repercussions long after they leave the competitive arena.

  11. The Chronotype of Elite Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lastella Michele

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were (i to compare the chronotype distribution of elite athletes to a young adult population and (ii to determine if there was a tendency for athletes to select and/or participate in sports which suited their chronotype. A total of 114 elite athletes from five sports (cricket, cycling, hockey, soccer and triathlon participated in this study. The participants’ chronotype, sleepiness, sleep satisfaction and sleep quality were determined using the Horne and Östberg Morningness and Eveningness questionnaire, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and questions concerning their sleep satisfaction and quality. All questionnaires were administered during a typical training phase that was not in the lead up to competition and/or post competition. No differences between chronotype group for sleepiness, sleep satisfaction or sleep quality were found. There was a significantly higher proportion of triathletes that were morning and intermediate types compared to the control group χ2 (2 = 7.5, p = 0.02. A significant relationship between sport and chronotype group (χ2(4=15.9, p = 0.04 was observed, with a higher frequency of morning types involved in sports that required morning training. There was a clear indication that athletes tended to select and pursue sports that suited their chronotype. This was evident by the amount of morning types involved in morning sports. Given that athletes are more likely to pursue and excel in sports which suit their chronotype, it is recommended that coaches consider the athlete’s chronotype during selection processes or if possible design and implement changes to training schedules to either suit the athletes’ chronotype or the timing of an upcoming competition.

  12. Charlie's Words: Supporting Gifted Male Athletes Using Athletes' Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A gifted student-athlete, Charlie Bloomfield is introduced to athlete's journals by his coaches at Burke Mountain Academy (Vermont), an elite American ski school. Used by Olympians and professionals alike, journals provide athletes with ways to organize and reflect on training and competitions. Athlete's journals help gifted male athletes address…

  13. Charlie's Words: Supporting Gifted Male Athletes Using Athletes' Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Richard

    2012-01-01

    A gifted student-athlete, Charlie Bloomfield is introduced to athlete's journals by his coaches at Burke Mountain Academy (Vermont), an elite American ski school. Used by Olympians and professionals alike, journals provide athletes with ways to organize and reflect on training and competitions. Athlete's journals help gifted male athletes address…

  14. Informal science education: lifelong, life-wide, life-deep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Kalie; Falk, John H; Bell, James

    2014-11-01

    Informal Science Education: Lifelong, Life-Wide, Life-Deep Informal science education cultivates diverse opportunities for lifelong learning outside of formal K-16 classroom settings, from museums to online media, often with the help of practicing scientists.

  15. Seamless support for lifelong learning with ubiquitous technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabuenca, Bernardo

    2014-01-01

    This poster presents 3 years research on how to provide support for lifelong learners with mobile technology. The aim of this research is facilitating adapted feedback services to foster self-regulation in adult lifelong learners.

  16. e-Learning for Lifelong Learning in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Andreasen, Lars Birch

    2010-01-01

    The chapter on 'e-Learning for Lifelong Learning in Denmark' is part of an international White Paper, focusing on educational systems, describing status and characteristics and highlighting specific cases of e-learning and of lifelong learning.......The chapter on 'e-Learning for Lifelong Learning in Denmark' is part of an international White Paper, focusing on educational systems, describing status and characteristics and highlighting specific cases of e-learning and of lifelong learning....

  17. Lifelong Learning as Being: The Heideggerian Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ya-hui

    2011-01-01

    This article contends that the development of lifelong learning needs to be grounded within the framework of "being," a concept inspired by Heidegger, rather than within the framework of "having." This article also describes the problems of the adult education literature, which favors the pragmatic sense of being and, thus, may undertheorize the…

  18. The Philosophical Foundations of Lifelong Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michopoulos, Aristotle

    The current lifelong learning movement, the new force toward global education, owes much to the League of Nations and the United Nations that sponsored an expanded multiracial "polis." Its philosophical foundations go back, however, to ancient China, India, and especially Greece, where philosophers and scientists got their creative stimulus from…

  19. Lifelong Learning in SMEs: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Rick; Smith, Vikki; Devins, Dave

    2002-01-01

    Learning centers using information-communications technologies were established in three British industrial estates. A case study of one organization shows the center contributed to lifelong learning and enhanced information technology training and employee confidence. Transfer of training and productivity improvements were not as clear. (Contains…

  20. Elders' Lifelong Connection with the Natural Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Our interaction with nature does not end just because we age. People have a lifelong connection with the outdoor environment in varying degrees. For some, this participation may be subtle by simply watching others interact with the outdoor environment. For others, there is a deeper connection with nature through gardening, birding, exercise,…

  1. Virtual Reality for Training and Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellet-d'Huart, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    This article covers the application of virtual reality (VR) to training and lifelong learning. A number of considerations concerning the design of VR applications are included. The introduction is dedicated to the more general aspects of applying VR to training. From multiple perspectives, we will provide an overview of existing applications with…

  2. Can Lifelong Learning Reshape Life Chances?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Karen; Schoon, Ingrid; Weale, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Despite the expansion of post-school education and incentives to participate in lifelong learning, institutions and labour markets continue to interlock in shaping life chances according to starting social position, family and private resources. The dominant view that the economic and social returns to public investment in adult learning are too…

  3. Musicians as lifelong learners: discovery through biography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smilde, Rineke

    2009-01-01

    Today musicians face major changes in their professional life, confronted with questions of how to function flexibly and exploit opportunities in the rapidly changing cultural context. To this end, the concept of lifelong learning is being investigated within this study. Biographical research into

  4. Students' Plans for Lifelong Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavšic, Marlena; Dikovic, Marina

    2015-01-01

    One of the roles of higher education is to prepare and encourage students for lifelong learning. However, no evidence can be found about students' plans for further learning and teaching related to formal, non-formal and informal context. The purpose of this study was to explore these students' plans in relation to their study group, level of…

  5. Learning Networks for Professional Development & Lifelong Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouns, Francis; Sloep, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Brouns, F., & Sloep, P. B. (2009). Learning Networks for Professional Development & Lifelong Learning. Presentation of the Learning Network Programme for a Korean delegation of Chonnam National University and Dankook University (researchers dr. Jeeheon Ryu and dr. Minjeong Kim and a Group of PhD and

  6. Assessing physicians' orientation toward lifelong learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Veloski, Jon; Nasca, Thomas J; Erdmann, James B; Gonnella, Joseph S

    2006-09-01

    Despite the importance of lifelong learning as an element of professionalism, no psychometrically sound instrument is available for its assessment among physicians. To assess the validity and reliability of an instrument developed to measure physicians' orientation toward lifelong learning. Mail survey. Seven hundred and twenty-one physicians, of whom 444 (62%) responded. The Jefferson Scale of Physician Lifelong Learning (JSPLL), which includes 19 items answered on a 4-point Likert scale, was used with additional questions about respondents' professional activities related to continuous learning. Factor analysis of the JSPLL yielded 4 subscales entitled: "professional learning beliefs and motivation,"scholarly activities,"attention to learning opportunities," and "technical skills in seeking information," which are consistent with widely recognized features of lifelong learning. The validity of the scale and its subscales was supported by significant correlations with a set of criterion measures that presumably require continuous learning. The internal consistency reliability (coefficient alpha) of the JSPLL was 0.89, and the test-retest reliability was 0.91. Empirical evidence supports the validity and reliability of the JSPLL.

  7. Elders' Lifelong Connection with the Natural Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carman, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Our interaction with nature does not end just because we age. People have a lifelong connection with the outdoor environment in varying degrees. For some, this participation may be subtle by simply watching others interact with the outdoor environment. For others, there is a deeper connection with nature through gardening, birding, exercise,…

  8. Musicians as lifelong learners: discovery through biography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rineke Smilde

    2009-01-01

    Today musicians face major changes in their professional life, confronted with questions of how to function flexibly and exploit opportunities in the rapidly changing cultural context. To this end, the concept of lifelong learning is being investigated within this study. Biographical research into

  9. Musicians as lifelong learners: 32 biographies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rineke Smilde

    2009-01-01

    Within the study ‘Musicians as Lifelong Learners: Discovery through Biography’, biographical research was used to examine key developments in the professional lives of musicians, focusing on the relationship between their life, educational and career span ant their learning styles. This resulted in

  10. Lifelong Learning in Colombia and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Henning Salling

    2004-01-01

    The article examines education and learning opportunities in Colombia against the backdrop of Danish modernisation and reform experiences from second half of 20th Century. The article discusses possibilities to learn from Danish experiences in the development of a Colombian lifelong learning policy...

  11. Globalizing and Regionalizing Lifelong Learning - International Organizations' Role in the Diffusion of Lifelong

    OpenAIRE

    Zapp, Mike

    2013-01-01

    While the 1970s still knew 'permanent education' (Council of Europe), 'recurrent education' (OECD) and 'lifelong education' (UNESCO), over the past 20 years, 'lifelong learning (LLL)' has become the single buzz word and catch-all term for reform in above all (pre-) primary, higher and adult education in both national and international education policy making. Both highly industrialized and less industrialized countries embrace the term, in many cases motivated by international and...

  12. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athlet...... be aware of the doping aspects. Systemic ß2-agonist intake is strictly prohibited, whereas inhaled treatment is allowed in therapeutic doses when asthma is documented and dispensation has been granted when needed....

  13. Asthma in elite athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elers, Jimmi; Pedersen, Lars; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Asthma is frequently found among elite athletes performing endurance sports such as swimming, rowing and cross-country skiing. Although these athletes often report symptoms while exercising, they seldom have symptoms at rest. Moreover, compared with nonathletic asthmatic individuals, elite athlet...... be aware of the doping aspects. Systemic β2-agonist intake is strictly prohibited, whereas inhaled treatment is allowed in therapeutic doses when asthma is documented and dispensation has been granted when needed....

  14. Athletic identity foreclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Britton W; Petitpas, Albert J

    2017-08-01

    Athletic identity foreclosure refers to commitment to the athlete role in the absence of exploration of occupational or ideological alternatives. This article traces the theoretical underpinnings of the construct, examines the role of sport participation in identity development, and provides an overview of the course, correlates, and consequences of athletic identity foreclosure. Implications for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The athlete's foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, S S; Lewis, L A; Cohen, B H

    1977-09-01

    In general, painful feet can affect the performance of an athlete in any sport. To prevent skin diseases of the feet, the "Athlete's Foot" should be kept clean and dry with toenails trimmed. Properly fitting athletic shoes should be worn to avoid the formation of blisters. Wearing of sandals in locker and shower rooms, which prevents intimate contact with infecting organisms, can alleviate many of the problems that affect the feet.

  16. Iron and the athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suedekum, Natalie A; Dimeff, Robert J

    2005-08-01

    Iron is an important mineral necessary for many biologic pathways. Different levels of deficiency can occur in the athlete, resulting in symptoms that range from none to severe fatigue. Iron deficiency without anemia may adversely affect athletic performance. Causes of iron deficiency include poor intake, menstrual losses, gastrointestinal and genitourinary losses due to exercise-induced ischemia or organ movement, foot strike hemolysis, thermohemolysis, and sweat losses. A higher incidence of deficiency occurs in female athletes compared with males.

  17. Vegetarian athletes: Special requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Ongan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vegetarian diets have been mentioned on having long and short term beneficial effects while they are important parts of the Western countries. Vegetarians are not homogeneous groups and subjects are motivated to be on a vegetarian diet because of culturel and regional reasons, ethical concerns including animal rights, health parameters and environmental situations. And these reasons differ from vegetarian and omnivour athletes. Athletes, especially endurance ones (sprinters, cyclists, triathlon athletes, …, eat vegetarian diets in order to meet increasing requirements of carbohydrate and manage their weight status. A healthily well planned vegetarian diet positively affect some parameters related with performance of the athlete. However in a diet based on vegetable, herbs and high fiber, inadequate energy intake should be avoided. Although many vegetarian athletes are warned about consuming high amounts of protein, athletes take less protein than omnivour ones. Therefore, vegetarians should increase dietary protein quality by mixing different foods such as legumes and cereals. Vegetarian athletes who avoid eating animal based foods are at risk of having inadequate energy, fat (essential fatty acids, vitamins B12, B2, D and calcium, iron and zinc. In this review, contribution of vegetarian diets on purpose of healthy eating and optimal athletic performance and nutritional strategies for vegetarian athletes were discussed.

  18. Lifelong literacy: Some trends and issues in conceptualising and operationalising literacy from a lifelong learning perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanemann, Ulrike

    2015-06-01

    In a fast-changing and highly inequitable world, lifelong learning is becoming increasingly important, not only as a key organising principle for all forms of education and learning but also as an absolute necessity for everyone. It is particularly important for disadvantaged individuals and groups who have been excluded from or failed to acquire basic competencies through formal schooling. Within a lifelong learning framework, literacy and numeracy are viewed as foundation skills which are the core of basic education and indispensable to full participation in society. This article discusses recent developments in conceptualising literacy as a foundation of lifelong learning. Starting from the evolving notions of adult literacy, the author identifies some current trends, the most important being that literacy is now perceived as a learning continuum of different proficiency levels. Dichotomous states of being either "literate" or "illiterate" no longer apply. She analyses (1) findings extracted from UNESCO Member States' national reports submitted to the UNESCO Institute for Lifelong Learning (UIL) for the 2nd Global Report on Adult Learning and Education; (2) a desk study of national literacy campaigns and programmes as well as (3) some recent developments in formal education. Her suggested three-dimensional analytical framework considers literacy as a lifelong and life-wide learning process and as part of lifelong learning systems. She draws a number of conclusions for policy and practice of literacy as a foundation of lifelong learning. These conclusions are a timely contribution to the ongoing post-2015 education debate, in particular to the challenge of how to mainstream youth and adult literacy into the implementation of the sustainable development agenda for 2015-2030.

  19. Lifelong learning in an age of measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kauffmann, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    be one particular area, however, where evidence based learning research might be thought to have a strong foothold: in the brain sciences. And certainly a rapidly growing interest in ‘educational neuroscience’ has emerged within the last 10 years. But is it possible to bridge the gap between ‘studying...... education on naturalistic grounds without which educational neuroscience is blind and educational theories run the risk of remaining empty.......There has been a shift in interest from ‘lifelong education’ to ‘lifelong learning’ in the Western world since the 1990s. This shift is closely related to strategies for securing the competitiveness of national economies. For this purpose one of the tools applied by educational policy makers has...

  20. E-learning support for lifelong learning

    OpenAIRE

    Doležalová, Klára

    2016-01-01

    The bachelor thesis E-learning support of lifelong learning concerns the topic of e-learning. Its main goal is to create and implement an e-learning course of Czech language for foreigners, more specifically for foreign scientists who come to the Czech Republic for work. This goal is reached in the practical part of the thesis which describes the process of creating the course with learning management system Moodle and its following implementation into practice. The theoretical part focu...

  1. Measurement and correlates of physicians' lifelong learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Veloski, J Jon; Gonnella, Joseph S

    2009-08-01

    To examine the psychometric properties and correlates of an instrument to measure physicians' orientation toward lifelong learning with attention to differences between full-time and academic clinicians. The authors mailed a survey in 2006 to a national sample of 5,349 alumni of Jefferson Medical College who graduated between 1975 and 2000; 3,195 (60%) responded. The respondents were classified as full-time clinicians (n = 1,127) and academic clinicians (n = 1,612). The other 456 respondents were involved in administration or research. The revised Jefferson Scale of Physician Lifelong Learning (JeffSPLL) was included in the survey. Factor analysis, regression analysis, and analysis of variance were used to examine the construct- and criterion-related validities of the scale. Factor analysis of the JeffSPLL items resulted in three factors designated as "learning beliefs and motivation," "attention to learning opportunities," and "skills in seeking information," which supported its construct validity. Alpha reliability coefficients were 0.85 and 0.86, and test-retest reliability coefficients were 0.72 and 0.77 for full-time clinicians and academic clinicians, respectively. For full-time clinicians and academic clinicians, scores on the JeffSPLL were significantly (P satisfaction, and commitment to lifelong learning, which supported the criterion-related validity of the scale. The findings indicate that the JeffSPLL is a psychometrically sound instrument that measures physicians' orientation toward lifelong learning among full-time clinicians and academic clinicians. The instrument can be used to monitor educational programs, assess educational outcomes, and examine group differences.

  2. THE ASSOCIATION OF GENE POLYMORPHISMS WITH ATHLETE STATUS IN UKRAINIANS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosenko, V.E.; Ahmetov, I.I.; Ilyin, V.N.

    2013-01-01

    Athletic performance is a polygenic trait influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. Objective To investigate individually and in combination the association of common gene polymorphisms with athlete status in Ukrainians. Methods A total of 210 elite Ukrainian athletes (100 endurance-oriented and 110 power-orientated athletes) and 326 controls were genotyped for ACE I/D, HIF1A Pro582Ser, NOS3 –786 T/C, PPARA intron 7 G/C, PPARG Pro12Ala and PPARGC1B Ala203Pro gene polymorphisms, most of which were previously reported to be associated with athlete status or related intermediate phenotypes in different populations. Results Power-oriented athletes exhibited an increased frequency of the HIF1A Ser (16.1 vs. 9.4%, P = 0.034) and NOS3 T alleles (78.3 vs. 66.2%, P = 0.0019) in comparison with controls. Additionally, we found that the frequency of the PPARG Ala allele was significantly higher in power-oriented athletes compared with the endurance-oriented athletes (24.7 vs. 13.5%; P = 0.0076). Next, we determined the total genotype score (TGS, from the accumulated combination of the three polymorphisms, with a maximum value of 100 for the theoretically optimal polygenic score) in athletes and controls. The mean TGS was significantly higher in power-oriented athletes (39.1 ± 2.3 vs. 32.6 ± 1.5; P = 0.0142) than in controls. Conclusions We found that the HIF1A Ser, NOS3 T and PPARG Ala alleles were associated with power athlete status in Ukrainians. PMID:24744483

  3. THE ASSOCIATION OF GENE POLYMORPHISMS WITH ATHLETE STATUS IN UKRAINIANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana B. Drozdovska

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Athletic performance is a polygenic trait influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. Objective: to investigate individually and in combination the association of common gene polymorphisms with athlete status in Ukrainians. Methods: A total of 210 elite Ukrainian athletes (100 endurance-oriented and 110 power-orientated athletes and 326 controls were genotyped for ACE I/D, HIF1A Pro582Ser, NOS3 –786 T/C, PPARA intron 7 G/C, PPARG Pro12Ala and PPARGC1B Ala203Pro gene polymorphisms, most of which were previously reported to be associated with athlete status or related intermediate phenotypes in different populations. Results: Power-oriented athletes exhibited an increased frequency of the HIF1A Ser (16.1 vs. 9.420P = 0.034 and NOS3 T alleles (78.3 vs. 66.220P = 0.0019 in comparison with controls. Additionally, we found that the frequency of the PPARG Ala allele was significantly higher in power-oriented athletes compared with the endurance-oriented athletes (24.7 vs. 13.520P = 0.0076. Next, we determined the total genotype score (TGS, from the accumulated combination of the three polymorphisms, with a maximum value of 100 for the theoretically optimal polygenic score in athletes and controls. The mean TGS was significantly higher in power-oriented athletes (39.1 ± 2.3 vs. 32.6 ± 1.5; P = 0.0142 than in controls. Conclusions: We found that the HIF1A Ser, NOS3 T and PPARG Ala alleles were associated with power athlete status in Ukrainians.

  4. Panhellenic athletics at Olympia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Heine

    2014-01-01

    The paper discusses Olympia as a panhellenic venue for athletics and the city-state interaction which took place at the sanctuary......The paper discusses Olympia as a panhellenic venue for athletics and the city-state interaction which took place at the sanctuary...

  5. Finances and College Athletics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Frank; Tanlu, Lloyd

    2009-01-01

    In 2008-2009, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) generated television and marketing revenues of approximately $591 million, college sports apparel sales topped $4 billion, and several schools signed multimedia-rights deals for more than $100 million (Berkowitz, 2009; National Collegiate Athletic Association, 2009). At the Division…

  6. Athletic Director's Survival Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Mike; Giebel, Nancy

    This book examines the duties assigned to athletic directors, offering successful strategies for achieving them and materials to make their jobs easier (e.g., sample memos, letters, forms, and charts for interacting successfully with coaches, students, administrators, and parents). Section 1 discusses the director's work with student athletes and…

  7. Salt, Water, and Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nathan J.

    Good nutrition for athletes demands plenty of water, since water is essential to such vital functions as muscle reactions. Dehydration can result from jet travel as well as from exercise and heat, making it a danger to traveling athletic teams. To avoid dehydration, water needs should be monitored by frequent weighing, and a clean water supply…

  8. Neuroendocrine mechanisms in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Madhusmita

    2014-01-01

    Athletic activity may be associated with alterations in various neuroendocrine axes depending on the state of energy availability. In addition, genetic factors and an underlying predilection for polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) may predispose some athletes to develop functional hypothalamic amenorrhea earlier than other athletes. In conditions of low energy availability associated with athletic activity, changes that occur in various neuroendocrine axes are primarily adaptive, and aim to either conserve energy for the most essential functions, or allow the body to draw on its reserves to meet energy needs. These hormonal changes, however, then lead to changes in body composition and bone metabolism. Impaired bone accrual in younger athletes and low bone density in older athletes constitutes the major pathologic consequence of neuroendocrine changes associated with low energy availability. The female athlete triad of low energy availability, menstrual dysfunction, and low bone density is prevalent in certain kinds of sports and activities, particularly endurance sports, gymnastics, and ballet. It is essential to screen for this condition in athletes at every preparticipation physical and during office visits, and to put in place an effective treatment team to manage the triad early, in order to optimize outcomes.

  9. The Female Athlete Triad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Roberta Trattner; Thompson, Ron A.

    2004-01-01

    The Female Athlete Triad is a syndrome of the interrelated components of disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. Sometimes inadvertently, but more often by willful dietary restriction, many female athletes do not ingest sufficient calories to adequately fuel their physical or sport activities, which can disrupt menstrual functioning,…

  10. Hydration Assessment of Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · Although there is no scientific consensus for 1 ) howbest to assess the hydration status of athletes, 2)what criteria to use as acceptable outcome measurements, or 3) the best time to apply practical assessment methods, there are methods that can be used toprovide athletes with useful feedback about their hydration status

  11. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Fluid Replacement for Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Douglas J.; Armstrong, Lawrence E.; Hillman, Susan K.; Montain, Scott J.; Reiff, Ralph V.; Rich, Brent S. E.; Roberts, William O.; Stone, Jennifer A.

    2000-01-01

    Presents recommendations from the National Athletic Trainers Association for optimizing the fluid replacement practices of athletes, explaining that dehydration can compromise athletic performance and increase the risk of exertional heat injury. Athletes must be educated about the risks of dehydration and overhydration. They must learn fluid…

  12. Female athlete triad update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beals, Katherine A; Meyer, Nanna L

    2007-01-01

    The passage of Title IX legislation in 1972 provided enormous opportunities for women to reap the benefits of sports participation. For most female athletes, sports participation is a positive experience, providing improved physical fitness, enhanced self-esteem, and better physical and mental health. Nonetheless, for a few female athletes, the desire for athletic success combined with the pressure to achieve a prescribed body weight may lead to the development of a triad of medical disorders including disordered eating, menstrual dysfunction, and low bone mineral density (BMD)--known collectively as the female athlete triad. Alone or in combination, the disorders of the triad can have a negative impact on health and impair athletic performance.

  13. Association between eating disorders and body image in athletes and non-athlete students in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Miri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Body image dissatisfaction and eating disorders are of common problems in adolescence and adulthood especially among athletes. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the association of eating disorders and body image in athletes and non-athlete students in Qazvin University of Medical Sciences. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 226 athlete students and 350 non-athlete students of Qazvin University of Medical Sciences during 2013-2014. Students who followed a specific sport field and had participated in at least one sport event were considered as athlete students. All athlete students were entered the study by census method. Non-athlete students were selected among students who had not any exercise activity and by random sampling method. Data were collected through demographic questionnaire, Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26, and Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ. Data were analyzed using T-test and Chi-square test. Results: Mean age was 21.92±3.19 years and mean body mass index (BMI was 22.24±3.18 kg/m2. The frequency of eating disorders was 11.5% among the athlete students and 11.2% among the non-athlete students. Anorexia nervosa was found to be more prevalent than bulimia nervosa in both groups. The students with normal BMI had better body image perception and less eating disorders symptoms than other students. The association of age, educational level, and gender with eating disorders and body image was not statistically significant. The association of eating disorders and body image was not statistically significant. Eating disorders were more prevalent in males than females but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion: With regards to the results, it seems that eating disorders and body image dissatisfaction are relatively prevalent among both athletes and non-athlete students and BMI is predictor of eating disorders.

  14. Overuse injuries, overtraining, and burnout in child and adolescent athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Joel S

    2007-06-01

    Overuse is one of the most common etiologic factors that lead to injuries in the pediatric and adolescent athlete. As more children are becoming involved in organized and recreational athletics, the incidence of overuse injuries is increasing. Many children are participating in sports year-round and sometimes on multiple teams simultaneously. This overtraining can lead to burnout, which may have a detrimental effect on the child participating in sports as a lifelong healthy activity. One contributing factor to overtraining may be parental pressure to compete and succeed. The purpose of this clinical report is to assist pediatricians in identifying and counseling at-risk children and their families. This report supports the American Academy of Pediatrics policy statement on intensive training and sport specialization.

  15. Radiographic Evidence of Femoroacetabular Impingement in Athletes With Athletic Pubalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Economopoulos, Kostas J.; Milewski, Matthew D.; Hanks, John B.; Hart, Joseph M.; Diduch, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Two of the most common causes of groin pain in athletes are femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and athletic pubalgia. An association between the 2 is apparent, but the prevalence of radiographic signs of FAI in patients undergoing athletic pubalgia surgery remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of radiologic signs of FAI in patients with athletic pubalgia. Hypothesis: We hypothesized that patients with athletic pubalgia would have a high prevale...

  16. Sonographic evaluation of athletic pubalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Nicholas; Grant, Thomas; Blount, Kevin; Omar, Imran

    2016-05-01

    Athletic pubalgia, or "sports hernia", represents a constellation of pathologic conditions occurring at and around the pubic symphysis. These injuries are primarily seen in athletes or those involved in athletic activity. In this article, we review the sonographic appearance of the relevant complex anatomy, scanning technique for ultrasound evaluation of athletic pubalgia, and the sonographic appearances of associated pathologic conditions.

  17. Intercollegiate Athlete as Student Leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Anthony; Simet, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The chapter explores student-athlete campus engagement and challenges faced by athletes that may impede leadership development. The roles of athletic academic advisors, team coaches, and teammates in leadership development are outlined. Current campus initiatives directly related to intercollegiate athlete leadership development are also shared.

  18. Left ventricular atrioventricular plane displacement is preserved with lifelong endurance training and is the main determinant of maximal cardiac output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steding-Ehrenborg, Katarina; Boushel, Robert C; Calbet, José A; Åkeson, Per; Mortensen, Stefan P

    2015-12-01

    Age-related decline in cardiac function can be prevented or postponed by lifelong endurance training. However, effects of normal ageing as well as of lifelong endurance exercise on longitudinal and radial contribution to stroke volume are unknown. The aim of this study was to determine resting longitudinal and radial pumping in elderly athletes, sedentary elderly and young sedentary subjects. Furthermore, we aimed to investigate determinants of maximal cardiac output in elderly. Eight elderly athletes (63 ± 4 years), seven elderly sedentary (66 ± 4 years) and ten young sedentary subjects (29 ± 4 years) underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. All subjects underwent maximal exercise testing and for elderly subjects maximal cardiac output during cycling was determined using a dye dilution technique. Longitudinal and radial contribution to stroke volume did not differ between groups (longitudinal left ventricle (LV) 52-65%, P = 0.12, right ventricle (RV) 77-87%, P = 0.16, radial 7.9-8.6%, P = 1.0). Left ventricular atrioventricular plane displacement (LVAVPD) was higher in elderly athletes and young sedentary compared with elderly sedentary subjects (14 ± 3, 15 ± 2 and 11 ± 1 mm, respectively, P cardiac output (R(2) = 0.61, P Longitudinal and radial contributions to stroke volume did not differ between groups. However, how longitudinal pumping was achieved differed; elderly athletes and young sedentary subjects showed similar AVPD whereas this was significantly lower in elderly sedentary subjects. Elderly sedentary subjects achieved longitudinal pumping through increased short-axis area of the ventricle. Large AVPD was a determinant of maximal cardiac output and exercise capacity.

  19. Cultivating Lifelong Learning Skills During Graduate Medical Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Rajiv; Badyal, Dinesh Kumar; Gupta, Piyush; Singh, Tejinder

    2016-09-08

    Lifelong learning is referred to as learning practiced by the individual for the whole life, is flexible, and is accessible at all times. Medical Council of India has included lifelong learning as a competency in its new regulations for graduate medical training. Acquisition of metacognitive skills, self-directed learning, self-monitoring, and reflective attitude are the main attributes of lifelong learning; and all of these can be inculcated in the students by using appropriate instructional methodologies. It is time to deliberate upon the instructional designs to foster the lifelong learning skills and behaviors in medical graduates. In this communication, we aim to debrief the concept of lifelong learning, particularly in context with medical training and detailing the process that can be explicitly used to cultivate the attitude of lifelong learning in medical graduates.

  20. Measuring medical students' orientation toward lifelong learning: a psychometric evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Angela P; Mazmanian, Paul E; Hojat, Mohammadreza; Kreutzer, Kathleen O; Carrico, Robert J; Carr, Caroline; Veloski, Jon; Rafiq, Azhar

    2010-10-01

    The principle of lifelong learning is pervasive in regulations governing medical education and medical practice; yet, tools to measure lifelong learning are lagging in development. This study evaluates the Jefferson Scale of Physician Lifelong Learning (JeffSPLL) adapted for administration to medical students. The Jefferson Scale of Physician Lifelong Learning-Medical Students (JeffSPLL-MS) was administered to 732 medical students in four classes. Factor analysis and t tests were performed to investigate its construct validity. Maximum likelihood factor analysis identified a three-factor solution explaining 46% of total variance. Mean scores of clinical and preclinical students were compared; clinical students scored significantly higher in orientation toward lifelong learning (P < .001). The JeffSPLL-MS presents findings consistent with key concepts of lifelong learning. Results from use of the JeffSPLL-MS may reliably inform curriculum design and education policy decisions that shape the careers of physicians.

  1. THE SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF LIFELONG LEARNING (experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana BATOG

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article we will analyze the signiicance and impact of lifelong learning and some obtained results in an experimental research conducted within IŞE, on a sample that included various professionals (technicians, teachers, civil servants, health workers, lawyers, arts specialists, concerning the deinition of lifelong learning, the signiicance of this process for society, capacities that can be developed in this context and the impact of lifelong learning.

  2. Learning technologies and the lifelong learner: armament or disarmament?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Seale

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available In a general context, lifelong learning appears to be about increasing access to education and supporting individual development. In the specific context of the United Kingdom, lifelong learning is about converting people to a culture of learning in order that the nation can produce creative, enterprising scholars (Blunkett, 1998. In both contexts, it is considered that learning needs to be a lifelong commitment, in order that individuals can fulfil their potential and improve themselves.

  3. Energy availability in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Anne B; Kiens, Bente; Wright, Hattie H

    2011-01-01

    This review updates and complements the review of energy balance and body composition in the Proceedings of the 2003 IOC Consensus Conference on Sports Nutrition. It argues that the concept of energy availability is more useful than the concept of energy balance for managing the diets of athletes. It then summarizes recent reports of the existence, aetiologies, and clinical consequences of low energy availability in athletes. This is followed by a review of recent research on the failure of appetite to increase ad libitum energy intake in compensation for exercise energy expenditure. The review closes by summarizing the implications of this research for managing the diets of athletes.

  4. The deaf athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Trish; Weber, Kathleen M

    2006-12-01

    Deaf and hard of hearing athletes have few documented related medical problems. Hearing loss has multiple causes. A portion of those with a hearing loss consider themselves part of the Deaf community, a community with a unique language and culture. Athletes may have assistive devices to enhance their ability to perceive auditory cues, whereas in deaf sport competitions, common auditory cues may be made visible. There are athletic organizations whose missions are to provide a sport and social venue specific to the deaf population. Having a better understanding and appreciation of the Deaf community will help sports medicine physicians to work more effectively with this population.

  5. Athletic pubalgia (sports hernia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Demetrius E M; Sneider, Erica B; McEnaney, Patrick M; Busconi, Brian D

    2011-04-01

    Athletic pubalgia or sports hernia is a syndrome of chronic lower abdomen and groin pain that may occur in athletes and nonathletes. Because the differential diagnosis of chronic lower abdomen and groin pain is so broad, only a small number of patients with chronic lower abdomen and groin pain fulfill the diagnostic criteria of athletic pubalgia (sports hernia). The literature published to date regarding the cause, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of sports hernias is confusing. This article summarizes the current information and our present approach to this chronic lower abdomen and groin pain syndrome.

  6. Photobiomodulation in athletic training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Timon Cheng-Yi; Liu, Jiang; Wang, Shuang-Xi; Cui, Li-Ping; Xu, Xiao-Yang; Lu, Jian; Deng, Xiao-Yuan; Liu, Song-Hao

    2006-09-01

    Photobiomodulation (PBM) has been mainly used in athlete trauma care. In this paper, the possible applications of PBM in athlete medical care to maintain pro-oxidant-antioxidant homeostasis and in athlete trauma care to treat osteoarthritis and delayed onset of muscular soreness (DOMS) have been discussed. In order to maintain pro-oxidant-antioxidant homeostasis, PBM might be used in an intravascular way, in an endonasal way or in a directly irradiated way. DOMS was supposed to have three phases, z-line disruption, proteolysis of damaged proteins and protein synthesis for myofibril remodeling, each of which might have its own optimum dose of PBM.

  7. Providing Formative Feedback: Language Technologies for Lifelong Learning CONSPECT tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berlanga, Adriana

    2011-01-01

    Berlanga, A. J. (2011). Providing Formative Feedback: Language Technologies for Lifelong Learning CONSPECT tool. Presentation given at the Onderwijslunch, University of Maastricht. January, 18, 2011, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

  8. Providing Formative Feedback; Language Technologies for Lifelong Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berlanga, Adriana; Stoyanov, Slavi

    2010-01-01

    Berlanga, A. J., & Stoyanov, S. (2010, 24 November). Providing Formative Feedback; Language Technologies for Lifelong Learning. Presentation at a LTfLL workshop validation session, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  9. Supporting lifelong competence development and employability using TENCompetence services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manderveld, Jocelyn; Griffiths, Dai; Kew, Chris; Krekels, Bas

    2009-01-01

    Manderveld, J., Griffiths, D., Kew, C., & Krekels, B. (2008). Supporting lifelong competence development and employability using TENCompetence services. Presentation at Online Educa Berlin, December, 3, 2008, Berlin, Germany.

  10. Confucian Educational Philosophy and Its Implication for Lifelong Learning and Lifelong Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qi

    2008-01-01

    This paper, from historical and philosophical perspectives, presents Confucian education philosophy, a philosophy that is argued is a philosophy of lifelong learning. Examined and illustrated are the Confucian concepts of "Sage", a Confucian ideal human model, and "Jun Zi", a Confucian realistic educational result. Through "Sage", Confucius…

  11. Insight on pathogenesis of lifelong premature ejaculation: inverse relationship between lifelong premature ejaculation and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökçe, A; Ekmekcioglu, O

    2010-01-01

    Although both biological and psychological factors are important in the etiology, the exact pathogenesis of lifelong premature ejaculation (PE) remains to be clarified. Obesity is a worldwide epidemic that contributes to many chronic diseases. Obesity is associated with erectile dysfunction, but the relationship between obesity and PE has not yet been specifically investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships of these two conditions. Between January 2008 and December 2009, we evaluated consecutive patients with lifelong PE in the urology outpatient clinic. Control cases without lifelong PE were selected randomly among cases attending the department of internal medicine for a checkup procedure. The age and sex of control group were matched with that of the study group. Body mass index (BMI) of each case was calculated using the World Health Organization criteria by the measurements of the physician instead of relying on verbal expressions. The mean (+/-s.d.) age of the premature ejaculators was 31.7+/-5.7 (range 21-51) years and in the control cases it was 32.3+/-6.7 (range 22-54) years. The comparison of the mean (+/-s.d.) weight between the study (74.1+/-11.2 kg) and control groups (81.9+/-6.4 kg) revealed a significant difference (Pobese cases in the control group (n=26, 24.1%) was three times greater than the obese premature ejaculators (Pobesity, and we found that patients with lifelong PE were leaner than the healthy control cases.

  12. Disordered eating behaviors and body image in male athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Reistenbach Goltz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify disordered eating behaviors and body image dissatisfaction, as well as their relationship to body fat (BF, among male athletes in high risk sports for eating disorders. Methods: One hundred and fifty-six male athletes were divided into the following categories: weight-class sports, sports where leanness improves performance, and sports with aesthetic ideals. BF was assessed and three questionnaires were used: the Eating Attitudes Test; the Bulimic Investigatory Test, Edinburgh; the Body Shape Questionnaire. Results: Disordered eating behaviors and body image dissatisfaction were found in 43 (27.6% and 23 athletes (14.7%, respectively, and an association was detected between the two variables (p < 0.001. Athletes with and without disordered eating behaviors did not differ in %BF (11.0±5.2% and 9.8±4.0%, respectively; p = 0.106. However, athletes with body image dissatisfaction had higher %BF than those who were satisfied (12.6±5.9% and 9.7±3.9%, respectively; p = 0.034. There were no differences in BF, frequency of disordered eating behaviors, and body image dissatisfaction between sports categories. Conclusion: Nearly one-quarter of athletes showed disordered eating behaviors, which was associated with body image dissatisfaction. Athletes with higher %BF were more likely to be dissatisfied with body image. There was no difference in eating behavior and body image between athletes from different sports categories.

  13. Female Athlete Triad

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... term, female athlete triad may lead to reduced physical performance, stress fractures, and other injuries. Over the long term, it can cause bone weakness, long-term effects on the reproductive system, and heart problems. A ...

  14. Female athletes and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malara Marzena

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well documented that regular physical activity has a beneficial effect on human health by affecting the metabolic processes that are of fundamental importance in the body’s functions, such as insulin sensitivity and glucose disposal, as well as lipid and lipoprotein turnover. On the other hand, there is a wealth of studies which indicate that strenuous, regular physical activity, such as that performed by high performance athletes, may be detrimental for the athletes’ health especially in women. This review focuses on the factors that contribute to health problems in female athletes, named the female athlete triad, which includes excessive dieting, menstrual dysfunctions (anovulatory menstrual cycles, oligomenorrhea, amenorrhea and a low bone mineral density (BMD. As a result of these factors, women who participate in sports, especially those focused on leanness, need special attention and education from health professionals, coaches and the athletes themselves to prevent the detrimental effects of an inadequate energy supply against high energy demands.

  15. Biomechanically Engineered Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Tekla S.

    1991-01-01

    The real-world meeting of electronics, computer monitoring, control systems, and mathematics, introduced in the context of sports, is described. Recent advances in the field of biomechanics and its use in improving athletic performance are discussed. (KR)

  16. NUTRIONAL NEEDS OF ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Pandey

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim – is to provide a comprehensive information regarding the nutritional needs of athletes, followed by female athletes who have a higher necessity for Iron. Sports and nutrition are directly related to each other. Taking into consideration the fact that sports person need more energy to carry out their sporting activity effectively, it becomes of prime importance to take care for sports performance. Athletes must supposedly eat the perfect ratio of Protein, carbohydrate and fat at each meal and snack to control the hormonal systems and thus reach their maximum performance and ideal weight .The carbohydrate/protein/fat ratio of the 40-30-30 diet allegedly maintains the proper balance between the hormones insulin and glucagon. The present review focuses on the intake for a wholesome nutrient and well balanced diet for better performance among male as well as female athletes.

  17. Vegetarian athletes: Special requirements

    OpenAIRE

    Dilek Ongan; Gülgün Ersoy

    2012-01-01

    Vegetarian diets have been mentioned on having long and short term beneficial effects while they are important parts of the Western countries. Vegetarians are not homogeneous groups and subjects are motivated to be on a vegetarian diet because of culturel and regional reasons, ethical concerns including animal rights, health parameters and environmental situations. And these reasons differ from vegetarian and omnivour athletes. Athletes, especially endurance ones (sprinters, cyclists, triathl...

  18. Review: Placenta, evolution and lifelong health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, R M; Cleal, J K; Hanson, M A

    2012-02-01

    The intrauterine environment has an important influence on lifelong health, and babies who grew poorly in the womb are more likely to develop chronic diseases in later life. Placental function is a major determinant of fetal growth and is therefore also a key influence on lifelong health. The capacity of the placenta to transport nutrients to the fetus and regulate fetal growth is determined by both maternal and fetal signals. The way in which the placenta responds to these signals will have been subject to evolutionary selective pressures. The responses selected are those which increase Darwinian fitness, i.e. reproductive success. This review asks whether in addition to responding to short-term signals, such as a rise in maternal nutrient levels, the placenta also responds to longer-term signals representing the mother's phenotype as a measure of environmental influences across her life course. Understanding how the placenta responds to maternal signals is therefore not only important for promoting optimal fetal growth but can also give insights into how human evolution affected developmental history with long-term effects on health and disease.

  19. Professionals calling in lifelong learning centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Manuel Monteiro Seco

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aims to understand how the way people see their work and the authentizotic character of their organizational climate contribute to the building of a Great Place to Work. Design/methodology/approach: This paper presents the results of a quantitative investigation that correlate the perceptions of organizational climate and the work orientations of professionals with different occupations on Portuguese lifelong education centers. Findings: The study indicates that all the core elements of an authentizotic organization contribute to explain what people potentially expect from their companies:  adequate  material  conditions  plus  a  meaningful contribution. Practical implications: The study has implications in the future for National Qualification Agency directors, education politicians and human resource managers who are responsible for providing good expectations within a healthy context of talent retention. Originality/value: The novel contribution of this paper is the finding that employee’s work orientations and authentizotic climate are related to each other in a Lifelong learning Center in the public education sector.

  20. Are the prevalence and treatment of asthma similar in elite athletes and the aged-matched non-athlete population?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, S; Marks, G

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of asthma and use of asthma medications in elite athletes compared with an age-matched non-athlete population. Data were collected from the respiratory component of annual medical screening of 424 elite athletes from the Queensland Academy of Sport. Measures included the prevalence of current asthma and ever doctor-diagnosed asthma, and the prevalence of use of treatment for asthma including beta-agonists and inhaled corticosteroid medication. The prevalence of current asthma in athletes aged 18-29 years was 14% (95% CI, 9-19%), which did not differ significantly from the prevalence in the non-athlete control population (11%; 95% CI, 9-12%, P=0.3). Of athletes with current asthma, 27% were not taking any medications for asthma, and 25% were treated with short-acting beta-agonist medications alone and were not taking inhaled corticosteroids. These data indicate that the overall cumulative and period prevalence of asthma in Queensland athletes is similar to that in the general age-matched population. Athletes use beta-agonists with a frequency similar to the general population.

  1. female collegiate athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JL Ayers

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Olympic weightlifting movements and their variations are believed to be among the most effective ways to improve power, strength, and speed in athletes. This study investigated the effects of two Olympic weightlifting variations (hang cleans and hang snatches, on power (vertical jump height, strength (1RM back squat, and speed (40-yard sprint in female collegiate athletes. 23 NCAA Division I female athletes were randomly assigned to either a hang clean group or hang snatch group. Athletes participated in two workout sessions a week for six weeks, performing either hang cleans or hang snatches for five sets of three repetitions with a load of 80-85% 1RM, concurrent with their existing, season-specific, resistance training program. Vertical jump height, 1RM back squat, and 40-yard sprint all had a significant, positive improvement from pre-training to post-training in both groups (p≤0.01. However, when comparing the gain scores between groups, there was no significant difference between the hang clean and hang snatch groups for any of the three dependent variables (i.e., vertical jump height, p=0.46; 1RM back squat, p=0.20; and 40-yard sprint, p=0.46. Short-term training emphasizing hang cleans or hang snatches produced similar improvements in power, strength, and speed in female collegiate athletes. This provides strength and conditioning professionals with two viable programmatic options in athletic-based exercises to improve power, strength, and speed.

  2. Testosterone, social and sexual behavior of perinatally and lifelong calorie restricted offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govic, Antonina; Kent, Stephen; Levay, Elizabeth A; Hazi, Agnes; Penman, Jim; Paolini, Antonio G

    2008-06-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) during sensitive perinatal periods has consistently been demonstrated to alter the development of a variety of physiological systems, which consequently affect behavior. This study compared the social behavior and sexual behavior of the adult male offspring of mothers administered a 25% CR at one of four times in the perinatal period: a brief period preconception, during gestation, during lactation, or a lifelong restriction (beginning at conception and continuing throughout life). Levels of serum testosterone were also determined in these animals. Social interaction increased in the gestation and lifelong CR groups. The lifelong group also exhibited more dominant type behaviors. CR during preconception and lactation resulted in offspring that displayed an enhanced and more efficient copulatory pattern compared to all other conditions. This was demonstrated by a reduced frequency of intromissions, shorter latency to ejaculation, and a greater frequency of ejaculations by the preconception and lactation group compared to some, if not all of the other CR groups and controls. Serum testosterone was significantly higher in the preconception group compared to controls. These findings indicate that CR during specific periods of development can differentially alter the social behavioral phenotype and hormone levels in adulthood.

  3. The Development of a Lifelong Guidance System in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, A. G.; Borbely-Pecze, Bors Tibor

    2011-01-01

    The development of a lifelong guidance system in Hungary Systematic work is currently being undertaken in Hungary to develop a lifelong guidance system, in line with principles outlined by leading international organisations. The origins of career guidance in Hungary, and the nature of the current career guidance system, are outlined. The main…

  4. Thinking More Strategically about Funding Lifelong Learning Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walshok, Mary Lindenstein

    2001-01-01

    Recognizing that lifelong learning is broader than continuing education, providers must move to organizational and community models of learning and seek private and philanthropic funding sources for lifelong learning programs. Continuing education professionals should adopt a new orientation to their professional role. (SK)

  5. Landscapes of Learning: Lifelong Learning in Rural Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Fred, Ed.

    This document contains 12 papers about lifelong learning in rural communities in Great Britain. The papers, which are intended for lecturers, tutors, and guidance professionals but may also prove useful to organizations providing lifelong learning and policymakers, include conceptual tools as well as empirical case studies documenting lifelong…

  6. Challenges in Evaluating the EU's Lifelong Learning Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clain, Alexandru

    2016-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, lifelong learning has become a major policy concern for the European Union, being seen as a means for enabling individuals to be more competitive in social and economic contexts that are continually changing. After a series of white papers and strategies in the field of lifelong learning, the EU launched the Lifelong…

  7. Some Critical Reflections on Lifelong Learning Policy in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayilan, Fevziye

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the Lifelong Learning Strategy document which was on the agenda during the European Union harmonization process of Turkey. The public policies in the document, regarding non-formal and adult education, will be analyzed. Lifelong Learning strategy became a current issue in the last stage of neoliberal transformation of…

  8. Career Education as Humanization: A Freirean Approach to Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyslop-Margison, Emery J.; Naseem, M. Ayaz

    2007-01-01

    This article contrasts the view of lifelong learning posed by the human capital discourse with Freire's understanding of education as a lifelong journey toward personal growth and social transformation. Rather than reducing learners to objects of economic globalization, Freire's pedagogy considers students as political participants who actively…

  9. Lifelong Learning and its support with new technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview about the use of new technologies for lifelong learning. While in the past learning technologies were mostly provided by educational institutions to support a specific lifetime or shorter learning episodes nowadays more personal technologies are used for lifelong

  10. Lifelong Education (Learning) in China: Present Situation and Development Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhupeng

    2009-01-01

    Based on the historic background and development of lifelong education (learning) in China, this paper introduces major developments of lifelong education (learning) that have been achieved through adopting a series of measures under policies issued by the Chinese government since the 1990s. Throughout the decades, efforts have been made to…

  11. The Application of Buddhist Principles to Lifelong Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ian

    2002-01-01

    Defining lifelong learning as conscious learning taking place throughout life, Buddhist meditation, contemplation, and mindfulnes are practices suitable to developing awareness of life experience. This broadens the concept of lifelong learning beyond the narrow vocationalism and economic determinism of much current discourse. (Contains 36…

  12. Lifelong Learning in a Developed and a Developing Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaupre, Charles

    Comparing the evolution of lifelong learning in Chinese Taipei and Vietnam, this paper describes cultural, political, and economic factors influencing approaches and attitudes towards the lifelong learning movement and makes projections for the future. Following a description of sources used, including informal interviews with 50 adult learners in…

  13. Lifelong Learning and its support with new technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview about the use of new technologies for lifelong learning. While in the past learning technologies were mostly provided by educational institutions to support a specific lifetime or shorter learning episodes nowadays more personal technologies are used for lifelong le

  14. The Development of a Lifelong Guidance System in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, A. G.; Borbely-Pecze, Bors Tibor

    2011-01-01

    The development of a lifelong guidance system in Hungary Systematic work is currently being undertaken in Hungary to develop a lifelong guidance system, in line with principles outlined by leading international organisations. The origins of career guidance in Hungary, and the nature of the current career guidance system, are outlined. The main…

  15. TBI-ROC Part Six: Lifelong Living after TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeing, Marianne; Barton, Barbara; Zinsmeister, Paula; Brouwers, Lynn; Trudel, Tina M.; Elias, Eileen; Weider, Katie

    2010-01-01

    This article is the sixth of a multi-part series on traumatic brain injury (TBI) and discusses lifelong living after TBI. Following TBI, lifelong outcomes vary depending on the individual affected, treatment provided and severity of injury. Fortunately, many individuals who experience mild concussions common to childhood have no lasting symptoms.…

  16. Researching Lifelong Learning Participation through an Interdisciplinary Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeren, Ellen

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the interdisciplinary nature of studies in the field of lifelong learning participation. Until recently, participation studies have been presented in a rather fragmented way, often drawing on insights from separate disciplines such as sociology or psychology. The complex nature of lifelong learning participation, however, urges…

  17. Longitudinal Study Evaluating Postural Balance of Young Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Nili; Nemet, Dan; Pantanowitz, Michal; Zeev, Aviva; Hallumi, Monder; Sindiani, Mahmood; Meckel, Yoav; Eliakim, Alon

    2016-02-01

    Repeated anaerobic conditions during athletic performance may cause general and local fatigue that result in postural balance deficit. Evidence suggests that improved postural balance during athletic training may decrease the risk for fallings and traumatic injuries among athletes. Twenty athletes (12 girls, 8 boys) and 20 controls (12 girls, 8 boys) ages 10-15 years participated in the current study. All athletes were active in an 8-month physical activity program, 3 times per week for 90 min., specific to basketball, soccer, or athletic training. The control children participated in physical education at school only, with no involvement in organized extracurricular sports. All participants were evaluated for postural balance in three assessments over one year (at 4-mo intervals); the Interactive Balance System machine (Tetrax device) was used to assess balance at three test times (pre-, post-, and 10 min) after a session of a repeated sprint anaerobic test, consisting of 12 × 20 m run starting every 20 sec. The athletes had better postural balance than controls. There were different group patterns of change over the sessions; a significant interaction of session and group indicated that postural balance of the groups differed. The contribution of low sway frequencies (F1) and high sway frequencies (F6) differed between the controls and the athletes group. Results suggested that although athletes had better postural balance, improvement should be encouraged during training over the sessions and seasons, with special awareness of the balance deficit that occurs immediately after anaerobic stress and at the end of the season, to decrease the risk of injuries.

  18. [Epidemiology of maxillofacial injuries in athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Marcin; Mazur-Psonka, Lidia; Drugacz, Jan; Krajewski-Siuda, Krzysztof

    2006-01-01

    The general enthusiasm connected with sports activities causes that we often forget about threat connected with careless sports activities. The aim of this paper was the evaluation of causes and frequencies of maxillofacial injuries in hospitalized athletes in the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery in Katowice. Period between 1992-2002 was analyzed. Material consisted of 59 patients in whom injury required hospitalization. In studied material the frequency and causes of maxillofacial injuries in athletes in eleven-year period was examined. Male and female patients were divided in two groups: I--team sports and II--individual sports. In analyzed material injuries of upper part of facial skull were not affirmed. Injuries of upper facial massif overweighed its bottom massif injuries.

  19. Collapse in the Endurance Athlete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert Sallis

    2005-01-01

    @@ KEY POINTS · Most cases of collapse are benign in nature and occur after an athlete crosses the finish line or stops exercising. Athletes who collapse before finishing are more likely to have a serious condition.

  20. Coaching preferences of athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, P C; Howe, B L

    1984-12-01

    The study examined the coaching preferences of 80 male and 80 female athletes, as measured by the Leadership Scale for Sports (Chelladurai and Saleh, 1978, 1980). In addition, it attempted to assess the applicability to sport of the Life-cycle and Path-goal theories of leadership. Comparisons between groups were made on the basis of sex, age, and type of sport. A MANOVA indicated that athletes in independent sports preferred more democratic behaviour (p less than .001) and less autocratic behaviour (p = .028) than athletes in interdependent sports. No differences in coaching preferences were found which could be attributed to the age or sex of the athlete, or the variability of the sports task. These results partially supported the Path-goal theory, but did not support the Life-cycle theory. Athletes of all groups tended to favour coaches who displayed training behaviour and rewarding behaviour "often", democratic behaviour and social support behaviour "occasionally", and autocratic behaviour "seldom". This consistency may be a useful finding for those organizations and institutions interested in preparing coaches.

  1. Asthma in adolescent athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Hem, Erlend; Stensrud, Trine

    2011-12-01

    Athletes active in endurance sports are at an increased risk of acquiring asthma through their sports activities, especially so for cross-country skiers, biathlon skiers, swimmers and athletes of other endurance sports. Asthma may be present from early childhood or develop while in active sports. This article focuses on the physical activity and sports activities in children and adolescents. Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is found in 8-10% of a normal child population of school age and in about 35% of children with current asthma. EIA is caused by the markedly increased ventilation during exercise, with increased heat and water loss through respiration, leading to bronchial constriction. The risk of developing asthma in the young athlete is related to the repeated daily training activity with increased epithelial damage of the airways, delayed repair due to the daily repetition of the training and increased airway mucosal inflammation. The increased environmental exposure through the sports activity to environmental agents, such as cold, dry air in skiers and chlorine compounds in swimmers, increases symptoms and signs of asthma and bronchial hyper-responsiveness, either worsening an existing asthma or leading to a novel disease in a previously healthy athlete. Several specific aspects of daily training life, environmental exposure, diagnostic procedures and aspects of treatment related to the regulations of medication use in sports need particular attention when addressing the adolescent athlete with respiratory symptoms.

  2. Drug abuse in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reardon CL

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Claudia L Reardon, Shane Creado Department of Psychiatry, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA Abstract: Drug abuse occurs in all sports and at most levels of competition. Athletic life may lead to drug abuse for a number of reasons, including for performance enhancement, to self-treat otherwise untreated mental illness, and to deal with stressors, such as pressure to perform, injuries, physical pain, and retirement from sport. This review examines the history of doping in athletes, the effects of different classes of substances used for doping, side effects of doping, the role of anti-doping organizations, and treatment of affected athletes. Doping goes back to ancient times, prior to the development of organized sports. Performance-enhancing drugs have continued to evolve, with “advances” in doping strategies driven by improved drug testing detection methods and advances in scientific research that can lead to the discovery and use of substances that may later be banned. Many sports organizations have come to ban the use of performance-enhancing drugs and have very strict consequences for people caught using them. There is variable evidence for the performance-enhancing effects and side effects of the various substances that are used for doping. Drug abuse in athletes should be addressed with preventive measures, education, motivational interviewing, and, when indicated, pharmacologic interventions. Keywords: doping, athletes, steroids, drug abuse, mental illness

  3. Same Story; Different Day: Greatest Challenges of Women Working in Intercollegiate Athletic Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenna G. Bower

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Women continue to be under-represented in administrative positions in intercollegiate athletics. Women in this study offered unique insights into challenges they face in the field. This study explored career profiles and challenges facing women working in intercollegiate athletic administration. The subjects were women working in intercollegiate athletic administration across National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA divisions I, II, III; National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA; National Christian College Athletic Association (NCCAA; Junior Colleges; and Canadian Colleges. The study, which utilized the Female Sport Manager Career Survey, posed two research questions: (a what are the profiles of females working in athletic administration?, and (b what are the gender specific greatest challenges that women working in intercollegiate athletic administration face? This study included all 1834 women working in intercollegiate athletic administration listed by the National Directory of College Athletics in 2012, of which 28.0% (N=514 provided usable responses. Frequencies were calculated for the demographics using SPSS 20.0 and the qualitative data were analyzed using HyperResearch 2.8. Several practical implications for women wanting to work in intercollegiate athletic administration originated from this study including developing networks, being prepared to balance work and family, being aware of stereotyping, and gaining as much experience as possible.

  4. Sports Nutrition for Young Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotugna, Nancy; Vickery, Connie E.; McBee, Sheldon

    2005-01-01

    Nutritional needs for peak athletic performance include sufficient calorie intake, adequate hydration, and attention to timing of meals. Student athletes and their advisors often are misinformed or have misconceptions about sports nutrition. This paper identifies nutritional needs of young athletes, reviews common misconceptions, and examines the…

  5. Sports Nutrition for Young Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotugna, Nancy; Vickery, Connie E.; McBee, Sheldon

    2005-01-01

    Nutritional needs for peak athletic performance include sufficient calorie intake, adequate hydration, and attention to timing of meals. Student athletes and their advisors often are misinformed or have misconceptions about sports nutrition. This paper identifies nutritional needs of young athletes, reviews common misconceptions, and examines the…

  6. Diet Quality of Collegiate Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Kelly; Stoess, Amanda Ireland; Forsythe, Hazel; Kurzynske, Janet; Vaught, Joy Ann; Adams, Bailey

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Collegiate athletes generally appear healthy according to weight for height and body fat standards. Despite the fact that there are well known connections between athletic performance and nutrition, little is known about the diets of collegiate athletes. The objective of this study was to determine the diet quality of 138…

  7. The relationship between coaching behaviours and sport anxiety in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, J; Côté, J; Hawes, R

    2000-06-01

    Previous research has identified the relationship between athlete sport anxiety and various sport outcomes (e.g., performance and dropout). For the majority of athletes involved in sport, the coach is an influential element of the competitive experience. Two hundred and twenty-eight athletes from 15 sports, completed the Sport Anxiety Scale (SAS) and the Coaching Behavior Scale for Sport (CBS-S). The predictive ability of athletes' perceived frequency of seven coaching behaviours (physical training, mental preparation, goal setting, technical skills, competition strategies, personal rapport and negative personal rapport) on four forms of sport anxiety (total anxiety, somatic anxiety, concentration disruption and worry) was examined. Results indicate that negative personal rapport was a significant predictor of all measured forms of sport anxiety while competition strategies was a significant predictor for total anxiety, concentration disruption, and worry. Other behaviours were not significant. The findings suggest that negative rapport between coach and athlete is an important contributor to athlete anxiety. In addition, behaviours that the coach demonstrates relative to competition can be influential in reducing athlete anxiety.

  8. Energy availability in athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loucks, Anne B; Kiens, Bente; Wright, Hattie H

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This review updates and complements the review of energy balance and body composition in the Proceedings of the 2003 IOC Consensus Conference on Sports Nutrition. It argues that the concept of energy availability is more useful than the concept of energy balance for managing the diets...... of athletes. It then summarizes recent reports of the existence, aetiologies, and clinical consequences of low energy availability in athletes. This is followed by a review of recent research on the failure of appetite to increase ad libitum energy intake in compensation for exercise energy expenditure...

  9. Fueling the vegetarian (vegan) athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrman, Joel; Ferreri, Deana M

    2010-01-01

    Vegetarian diets are associated with several health benefits, but whether a vegetarian or vegan diet is beneficial for athletic performance has not yet been defined. Based on the evidence in the literature that diets high in unrefined plant foods are associated with beneficial effects on overall health, lifespan, immune function, and cardiovascular health, such diets likely would promote improved athletic performance as well. In this article, we review the state of the literature on vegetarian diets and athletic performance, discuss prevention of potential micronutrient deficiencies that may occur in the vegan athlete, and provide strategies on meeting the enhanced caloric and protein needs of an athlete with a plant-based diet.

  10. Lifelong vegetarianism and breast cancer risk: a large multicentre case control study in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathani, Toral; Barnes, Isobel; Ali, Raghib; Arumugham, Rajkumar; Chacko, Raju; Digumarti, Raghunadharao; Jivarajani, Parimal; Kannan, Ravi; Loknatha, Dasappa; Malhotra, Hemant; Mathew, Beela S

    2017-01-18

    The lower incidence of breast cancer in Asian populations where the intake of animal products is lower than that of Western populations has led some to suggest that a vegetarian diet might reduce breast cancer risk. Between 2011 and 2014 we conducted a multicentre hospital based case-control study in eight cancer centres in India. Eligible cases were women aged 30-70 years, with newly diagnosed invasive breast cancer (ICD10 C50). Controls were frequency matched to the cases by age and region of residence and chosen from the accompanying attendants of the patients with cancer or those patients in the general hospital without cancer. Information about dietary, lifestyle, reproductive and socio-demographic factors were collected using an interviewer administered structured questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals for the risk of breast cancer in relation to lifelong vegetarianism, adjusting for known risk factors for the disease. The study included 2101 cases and 2255 controls. The mean age at recruitment was similar in cases (49.7 years (SE 9.7)) and controls (49.8 years (SE 9.1)). About a quarter of the population were lifelong vegetarians and the rates varied significantly by region. On multivariate analysis, with adjustment for known risk factors for the disease, the risk of breast cancer was not decreased in lifelong vegetarians (OR 1.09 (95% CI 0.93-1.29)). Lifelong exposure to a vegetarian diet appears to have little, if any effect on the risk of breast cancer.

  11. Athlete burnout: review and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Henrik; DeFreese, J D; Madigan, Daniel J

    2017-08-01

    Over the last two decades, growing concerns regarding the negative implications of athlete burnout have spurred empirical research on the topic. In their citation network analysis of the burnout literature, Gustafsson et al. (2014), cited well over 100 publications on the syndrome. Despite considerable investigation into athlete burnout, there remain a number of unresolved questions and issues. Four main aims guide the current review. First, we highlight various models of athlete burnout. Second, we discuss the measurement of athlete burnout. Third, we describe the symptoms, antecedents, and consequences of athlete burnout with a focus on social perceptions and perfectionism. Finally, we provide suggestions for the prevention and treatment of athlete burnout via an illustration of links between theory and practice. It is our hope that this review can stimulate future research in order to help athletes avoid burnout and other severe forms of training maladaptation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Cardiac MRI in Athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijkx, T.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) is often used in athletes to image cardiac anatomy and function and is increasingly requested in the context of screening for pathology that can cause sudden cardiac death (SCD). In this thesis, patterns of cardiac adaptation to sports are investigated with C

  13. MUSCLE INJURIES IN ATHLETES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Guilherme Campos; Thiele, Edilson Schwansee

    2011-01-01

    This article had the aim of demonstrating the physiology, diagnosis and treatment of muscle injuries, focusing on athletes and their demands and expectations. Muscle injuries are among the most common complaints in orthopedic practice, occurring both among athletes and among non-athletes. These injuries present a challenge for specialists, due to the slow recovery, during which time athletes are unable to take part in training and competitions, and due to frequent sequelae and recurrences of the injuries. Most muscle injuries (between 10% and 55% of all injuries) occur during sports activities. The muscles most commonly affected are the ischiotibial, quadriceps and gastrocnemius. These muscles go across two joints and are more subject to acceleration and deceleration forces. The treatment for muscle injuries varies from conservative treatment to surgery. New procedures are being used, like the hyperbaric chamber and the use of growth factors. However, there is still a high rate of injury recurrence. Muscle injury continues to be a topic of much controversy. New treatments are being researched and developed, but prevention through muscle strengthening, stretching exercises and muscle balance continues to be the best "treatment".

  14. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the scope and importance of gastrointestinal bleeding in runners and other athletes, discussing causes, sites, and implications of exercise-related bleeding. Practical tips to mitigate the problem, potentially more troublesome in women because of lower iron stores, are presented (e.g., gradual conditioning and avoidance of prerace…

  15. Case Study: Effect of Handrim Diameter on Performance in a Paralympic Wheelchair Athlete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Gabriel Brizuela; Rubio, Miguel Polo; Belloch, Salvador Llana; Soriano, Pedro Perez

    2009-01-01

    This study, with a top T-52 class athlete, determines the relationship between stroke frequency (SF) and push time (PT) and wheelchair velocity (Wv) using different handrim diameters (HD) and the effect of different HDs on the athlete's heart rate (HR) and blood lactate (LACT) at competition speeds. Wv shows a linear-direct relationship with SF…

  16. Lifelong and Continuing Education. What Is a Learning Society? Monitoring Change in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Paul, Ed.

    The 14 chapters in this book explore the concept of lifelong learning and illustrate its application to specific situations. Titles and authors are as follows: "The Concept of Lifelong Learning" (Paul Oliver); "Degrees of Adult Participation: Lifelong Learning in European Universities" (Barbara Merrill); "Lifelong (L)earning and a 'New Age' at…

  17. Lifelong Education in Jewish Sources: Principles and Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodesh, Shlomo

    1997-01-01

    Jewish cultural tradition shows strong support for lifelong learning and study for its own sake. Basic principles of Jewish education include functionalism (life change resulting from education) and accessibility (all are entitled to education). (SK)

  18. Lifelong learning in aviation and medicine; Comments and suggestions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshuizen, Els

    2011-01-01

    Boshuizen, H. P. A. (2010, 25-27 August). Lifelong learning in aviation and medicine; Comments and suggestions. Discussion at the 5th EARLI-SIG14 Learning and Professional Development, Munich, Germany.

  19. Karl Popper at ninety: Highlights of a lifelong intellectual quest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selleri, Franco; van der Merwe, Alwyn

    1991-12-01

    On the occasion of his ninetieth birthday, Karl Popper's lifelong pursuit of answers in several areas of scientific and philosophical thinking is briefly traced, mainly with reference to excerpts from his own writings.

  20. Lifelong Learning as Social Need and as Policy Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2009-01-01

    Lifelong learning is a key concept in EU policy documents not only on education, but also on economic competitiveness and social cohesion. The discourse on lifelong learning has been strongly criticised by educational researchers, who document that it often reflects narrow notions of learning...... and neoliberal ideology. However, the concept of lifelong learning is basically sound and promising, because people in the contemporary world increasingly have and express needs to learn in order to handle the social transformations, opportunities and risks they experience. Drawing on Habermas' conceptualisation...... of systemic and communicative processes in modern society this chapter discusses the social need for learning and its policy implications. The development of lifelong learning provision under the conditions of globalisation and Europeanisation is traced and serious limitations in the policies of EU and other...

  1. Low skilled, mature workers and lifelong learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Leif Emil

    There is some evidence that mature industrial workers have specific profiles, views and values, when it comes to learning and participation in educational processes and programs. It seems as if the kind of education they are motivated for should be: mimetic, minimalistic and instrumental. This is......There is some evidence that mature industrial workers have specific profiles, views and values, when it comes to learning and participation in educational processes and programs. It seems as if the kind of education they are motivated for should be: mimetic, minimalistic and instrumental...... with this in lifelong learning? It is probably necessary to establish different forms of workplace learning (or: establish workplaces as learning arenas and environments). This means that the group in question should be offered personal and vocational development in a practical and ‘secure’ context and set up...... decision processes). Finally, stakeholders should realise a balance between the complexity of the challenge and the resources needed. This goes for adult educators, employers, politicians, community organizations, families etc. lear output and result, i.e. for instance a (better) job (situation) •They...

  2. The motivation of lifelong mathematics learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim Ali, Siti Aishah

    2013-04-01

    As adults, we have always learned throughout our life, but this learning is informal. Now, more career-switchers and career-upgraders who are joining universities for further training are becoming the major group of adult learners. This current situation requires formal education in courses with controlled output. Hence, lifelong learning is seen as a necessity and an opportunity for these adult learners. One characteristic of adult education is that the learners tend to bring with them life experience from their past, especially when learning mathematics. Most of them associate mathematics with the school subjects and unable to recognize the mathematics in their daily practice as mathematics. They normally place a high value on learning mathematics because of its prominent role in their prospective careers, but their learning often requires overcoming personal experience and motivating themselves to learn mathematics again. This paper reports on the study conducted on a group of adult learners currently pursuing their study. The aim of this study is to explore (i) the motivation of the adult learners continuing their study; and (ii) the perception and motivation of these learners in learning mathematics. This paper will take this into account when we discuss learners' perception and motivation to learning mathematics, as interrelated phenomena. Finding from this study will provide helpful insights in understanding the learning process and adaption of adult learners to formal education.

  3. IS GNB3 C825T POLYMORPHISM ASSOCIATED WITH ELITE STATUS OF POLISH ATHLETES?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sawczuk

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The GNB3 gene encodes the beta 3 subunit of heterotrimeric G-proteins that are key components of intracellular signal transduction between G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR and intracellular effectors and might be considered as a potential candidate gene for physical performance. Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare frequency distribution of the common C to T polymorphism at position 825 (C825T of the GNB3 gene between athletes and nonathletic controls of the Polish population as well as to compare the genotype distribution and allele frequency of C825T variants within a group of athletes, i.e. between athletes of sports of different metabolic demands and competitive levels. Methods: The study was performed in a group of 223 Polish athletes of the highest nationally competitive standard (123 endurance-oriented athletes and 100 strength/power athletes. Control samples were prepared from 354 unrelated, sedentary volunteers. Results: The χ2 test revealed no statistical differences between the endurance-oriented athletes and the control group or between sprint/strength athletes and the control group across the GNB3 825C/T genotypes. There were no male-female genotype or allele frequency differences in controls or in either strength/power or endurance-oriented athletes. No statistically significant differences in either allele frequencies or genotype distribution were noted between the top-elite, elite or sub-elite of endurance-oriented and strength/power athletes and the control group. Conclusions: No association between elite status of Polish athletes and the GNB3 C825T polymorphic site has been found.

  4. From lifelong education to lifelong learning Discussion of some effects of today's neoliberal policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Barros

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available When we think about current adult education in the context of the uneven and contradictory social and economic mpact of globalization, it necessarily implies thinking about the transfer from the paradigm of lifelong education to the paradigm of lifelong learning. We shall examine the essential quality involved in the social significance and the political dimension of each of these paradigms, because, since the post-war period, both became innovative educational policy strategies capable of mobilizing and transforming society. We would like to stress the importance of rethinking the role of adult education today in the light of the responsibilities shifting from the state to individuals, arising from the implications of this transition of paradigms: we do this by framing it in the context of the socio-productive restructuring movement, which speeded up the move from the so-called model of qualification, associated to social emancipation, to what is known as the model of competence (later competences, which is associated with individual empowerment. Therefore in this article we intend to question this new policy direction, which is associated with a conceptual and methodological shift in adult education practices, by using the prism of a critical sociology of education.

  5. Treatment strategies for the female athlete triad in the adolescent athlete: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thein-Nissenbaum J

    2017-04-01

    estrogen deficiency or infertility. Lastly, adequate intake of calcium and vitamin D is critical for lifelong bone health. For this review, a comprehensive search of relevant databases from the earliest dates to July 2016 was performed. Keywords, including female athlete triad, adolescent female athlete, disordered eating, eating disorder, low energy availability, relative energy deficit, anorexia, bulimia, menstrual dysfunction, amenorrhea, oligoamenorrhea, bone mineral density, osteopenia, osteoporosis, stress fracture, and stress reaction, were utilized to search for relevant articles. Articles that directly addressed assessment and management of any 1 or all of the Triad components were included in this comprehensive review. The purpose of this narrative review is to provide the reader with the latest terms used to define the components of the female athlete triad, to discuss examination and diagnosis of the Triad, and lastly, to provide the reader with the latest evidence to successfully implement a multidisciplinary treatment approach when providing care for the adolescent female athlete who may be suffering from Triad-related components. Keywords: energy availability, menstrual dysfunction, bone mineral density, treatment 

  6. Estimation of the Aerobic-anaerobic Transition by Heart Rate Variability in Athletes and Non-athletes Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio López-Fuenzalida

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The estimate of aerobic-anaerobic threshold is commonly used for exercise prescription in athletes and non-athletes subjects; however, the methods currently used are expensive, and some of them use invasive techniques. The analysis of changes in heart rate variability during exercise may contribute to the introduction of a novel methodology to estimate the aerobic-anaerobic metabolic transition. Objective: The purpose of this study was to estimate the heart rate variability threshold (HRVT through the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT and compare the exercise intensities at which this happens to the moment when the aerobic-anaerobic metabolic transition occurs, estimated by the ventilatory threshold 2 (VT2 in athletes and non-athletes. Methods: 24 male subjects were enrolled (12 athletes; 12 non-athletes. Ventilatory parameters and R-R intervals were recorded breath by breath in a maximal incremental intensity exercise. HRVT was estimated through DWT and the VT2 was determined by 5 indicators: respiratory quotient ≥1.0, non-linear increase of the VE and VCO2, decrease of the PETCO2 and increase of the PETO2. Reserve heart rate frequency percentages (%RHRF are determined, compared and correlated to VT2 (%RHRF-VT2 and HRVT (%RHRF-HRVT. We used a significance level of p<0.05 for all our analysis. Results: The results showed that there is no significant difference between the %RHRF-VT and %RHRF-HRVT in the assessed subject groups (total, athletes, non-athletes. There is a correlation between %RHRF-VT and %RHRF-HRVT in the whole group (r=0.91; p<0.001, athletes (r=0.84; p<0,001 and non-athletes (r=0.88; p<0,001. Conclusion: We conclude that the aerobic-anaerobic metabolic transition (i.e. VT2 during an incremental maximal exercise can be estimated through the HRVT measured by the DWT in athletes and non-athletes. Keywords: non-linear analysis, anaerobic threshold, exercise test

  7. NUTRIENT INTAKES OF MEN AND WOMEN COLLEGIATE ATHLETES WITH DISORDERED EATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela S. Hinton

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the macro- and micronutrient intakes of men and women collegiate athletes with disordered eating behaviors and to compare the nutrient intakes of athletes with restrictive- versus binge-eating behaviors. National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA Division I University athletes (n = 232 were administered an anonymous, written questionnaire to compare nutrient intakes, desired weight change, and weight control behaviors in athletes with restrictive- (R and binge- (B eating behaviors to those in asymptomatic (A athletes. T-tests, χ2 statistic, and ANOVA were used to test for differences among disordered eating groups within genders (p < 0.05. Data are means ± standard error of the mean. Among men athletes, those with disordered eating consumed a smaller percentage of energy from carbohydrate compared to controls (R = 49.7 ± 1.5; B = 48.7 ± 2.3; A = 53.4 ± 0.7%. Among female athletes, those with disordered eating wanted to lose a greater percentage of their current body weight than did asymptomatic athletes (B = -6.1 ± 1.4; R = -6.7 ± 1.1; A = -3.7 ± 0.4%. Women who were classified with binge eating consumed significantly more alcohol than did controls (B = 6.8 ± 1.3; A = 3.9 ± 0.4 g alcohol per day. Athletes with disordered eating were more likely to report restricting their intake of carbohydrate and fat and using supplements to control their weight than asymptomatic athletes. Disordered eating was not associated with greater frequencies of inadequate micronutrient intake in either gender. Athletes with disordered eating may be at significantly greater risk for nutritional inadequacies than athletes who are asymptomatic due to macronutrient restriction and greater alcohol consumption

  8. Nutrition for the pediatric athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnithan, Viswanath B; Goulopoulou, Styliani

    2004-08-01

    A paucity of literature exists with regard to research on nutrition for the pediatric athlete. This lack of research makes the development of specific nutritional recommendations for young athletes problematic. This issue is made difficult by the macro- and micronutrient intake required for growth and development in conjunction with that required for sports. Exogenous carbohydrate drinks could be considered for the young athlete engaged in both endurance exercise and high-intensity exercise. Monitoring of the energy intake during resistance training in the pediatric athlete needs to be considered, as there is evidence to suggest that energy deficits may occur. If decrements in exercise performance are noted, then serum ferritin and hemoglobin concentrations should be monitored, as nonanemic iron deficiency is prevalent in the pediatric athlete. The pediatric athlete exercising in the heat is susceptible to voluntary dehydration and evidence exists to suggest that a carbohydrate-electrolyte drink will abolish this phenomenon.

  9. Antibiotic Precautions in Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Fayock, Kristopher; Voltz, Matthew; Sandella, Bradley; Close, Jeremy; Lunser, Matthew; Okon, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    Context: Antibiotics are the mainstay of treatment for bacterial infections in patients of all ages. Athletes who maximally train are at risk for illness and various infections. Routinely used antibiotics have been linked to tendon injuries, cardiac arrhythmias, diarrhea, photosensitivity, cartilage issues, and decreased performance. Evidence Acquisition: Relevant articles published from 1989 to 2012 obtained through searching MEDLINE and OVID. Also, the Food and Drug Administration website w...

  10. [Athletic pubalgia and hip impingement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthaudin, A; Schindler, M; Ziltener, J-L; Menetrey, J

    2014-07-16

    Athletic pubalgia is a painful and complex syndrom encountered by athletes involved in pivoting and cutting sports such as hockey and soccer. To date, there is no real consensus on the criteria for a reliable diagnostic, the different investigations, and the appropriate therapy. Current literature underlines intrinsic and extrinsic factors contributing to athletic pubalgia. This review article reports upon two novelties related to the issue: the importance and efficience of prevention program and the association of femoro-acetabular impingement with the pubalgia.

  11. YOUNG ATHLETES' MOTIVATIONAL PROFILES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Moreno Murcia

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between motivational characteristics and dispositional flow. In order to accomplish this goal, motivational profiles emerging from key constructs within Achievement Goal Theory and Self-Determination Theory were related to the dispositional flow measures. A sample of 413 young athletes (Age range 12 to 16 years completed the PMCSQ-2, POSQ, SMS and DFS measures. Cluster analysis results revealed three profiles: a "self-determined profile" characterised by higher scores on the task-involving climate perception and on the task orientation; a "non-self-determined profile", characterised by higher scores on ego-involving climate perception and ego orientation; and a "low self-determined and low non-self-determined profile" which had the lowest dispositional flow. No meaningful differences were found between the "self-determined profile" and the "non-self-determined profile" in dispositional flow. The "self-determined profile" was more commonly associated with females, athletes practising individual sports and those training more than three days a week. The "non-self-determined profile" was more customary of males and athletes practising team sports as well as those training just two or three days a week

  12. The young female athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurvitz, Michal; Weiss, Ram

    2009-12-01

    Participation of adolescents and young women in strenuous sports activity may lead to various metabolic and psychological derangements of clinical relevance to the endocrinologist. The most common manifestations encountered in practice are primary and secondary amenorrhea, reduced bone mineral density and eating disorders. The occurrence of all three together has been named "the athletic triad". The underlying hormonal drivers that lead to some of these manifestations are the reduced leptin level as well as the persistent low grade stress response commonly observed in such females. "Exercise-related female reproductive dysfunction" (ERFRD), can possibly include short-term (infertility) and long-term (osteoporosis) consequences. Functional hypothalamic amenorrhea, a manifestation of ERFRD in adolescence, is an integrated response to the combination of excessive physical and emotional stress, exercise, and/or reduced food intake characterized by decreased endogenous GNRH secretion. The primary aim of treating these athletes should be the prevention of the development of any component of the triad as well as the whole complex by educating athletes, trainers, parents and health care professionals about proper nutrition and safe training. The long term prognosis is good. However, significant long term morbidity may affect these young women later in life.

  13. [ERGOGENIC SPORT SUPPLEMENTS FOR ATHLETES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arieli, Rakefet; Lahav, Yair

    2016-06-01

    Use of performance-enhancing supplements occurs at all levels of sports, from recreational athletes to professional athletes. Although some supplements do enhance athletic performance, many have no proven benefits and have adverse effects. Nutritional supplements are categorized into the following categories: I. Apparently Effective. II. Possibly Effective. III. Too Early To Tell. IV. Apparently Ineffective. This article will review 4 ergogenic supplements which are categorized in the first category--"Apparently Effective"--1) Buffer agents 2) Creatine 3) Caffeine and 4 Nitric Oxide. Given the widespread use of performance enhancing supplements, physicians, and dietitians should be prepared to counsel athletes about their effectiveness, safety and legality.

  14. Elite athletes and pubertal delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapczuk, Karina

    2017-10-01

    Intensive physical training and participation in competitive sports during childhood and early adolescence may affect athletes' pubertal development. On the other hand, pubertal timing, early or late, may impact on an athlete selection for a particular sport. Genetic predisposition, training load, nutritional status and psychological stress determine athletes' pubertal timing. Athletes that practice esthetic sports, especially gymnasts, are predisposed to a delay in pubertal development. The growing evidence indicates that energy deficiency, not a systemic training per se, plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of functional hypothalamic hypogonadism in female athletes. Metabolic and psychologic stress activate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and suppress hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Female athletes who do not begin secondary sexual development by the age of 14 or menstruation by the age of 16 warrant a comprehensive evaluation and a targeted treatment. Somatic growth and sexual maturation of elite female athletes are largely sport-specific since each sport favors a particular somatotype and requires a specific training. Chronic negative energy balance resulting from a systemic physical training and inadequate energy intake may delay pubertal development in elite athletes. Youth athletes, especially those engaged in competitive sports that emphasize prepubertal or lean appearance, are at risk of developing relative energy deficiency in sport associated with disordered eating or eating disorders. Management strategies should address the complex conditions underlying functional hypothalamic hypogonadism.

  15. Nutritional supplements use in high-performance athletes is related with lower nutritional inadequacy from food

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mónica Sousa Maria J.Fernandes Pedro Carvalho José Soares Pedro Moreira Vitor Hugo Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    ...) between NS users and non-users.Methods: Portuguese athletes from 13 sports completed an NS usage questionnaire and a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire assessing information over the previous 12 months...

  16. Hazard of deceptive advertising of athletic footwear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, S; Waked, E

    1997-12-01

    Athletic footwear are associated with frequent injury that are thought to result from repetitive impact. No scientific data suggest they protect well. Expensive athletic shoes are deceptively advertised to safeguard well through "cushioning impact", yet account for 123% greater injury frequency than the cheapest ones. This study tested the hypothesis that deceptive advertising creates a false sense of security with users of expensive athletic shoes, inducing attenuation of impact moderating behaviour, increased impact, and injury. Fifteen young healthy male volunteers confronted four surfaces: a bare force moment platform, and three with this platform covered by identical shoe sole material made to appear different and advertised divergently. Advertising messages suggested superior impact absorption and protection (deceptive message), poor impact absorption and high injury risk (warning message), and unknown impact absorption and safety (neutral message). Ground reaction forces were recorded for 10 barefoot footfalls, according to a protocol requiring stepping forward from perch to a surface 4.5 cm below. Impact varied as a function of advertising message (p Deceptive message equalled neutral message in eliciting higher impact than the warning message and the bare platform. Differences grew with repetitions (p deceptive advertising of protective devices may represent a public health hazard and may have to be eliminated presumably through regulation; (2) a tendency in humans to be less cautious when using new devices of unknown benefit because of overly positive attitudes associated with new technology and novel devices.

  17. Parallels with the Female Athlete Triad in Male Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenforde, Adam S; Barrack, Michelle T; Nattiv, Aurelia; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Participation in sports offers many health benefits to athletes of both sexes. However, subsets of both female and male athletes are at increased risk of impaired bone health and bone stress injuries. The Female Athlete Triad (Triad) is defined as the interrelationship of low energy availability (with or without disordered eating), menstrual dysfunction, and low bone mineral density. The Triad may result in health consequences, including bone stress injuries. Our review presents evidence that an analogous process may occur in male athletes. Our review of the available literature indicates that a subset of male athletes may experience adverse health issues that parallel those associated with the Triad, including low energy availability (with or without disordered eating), hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and low bone mineral density. Consequently, male athletes may be predisposed to developing bone stress injuries, and these injuries can be the first presenting feature of associated Triad conditions. We discuss the evidence for impaired nutrition, hormonal dysfunction, and low bone mineral density in a subset of male athletes, and how these health issues may parallel those of the Triad. With further research into the mechanisms and outcomes of these health concerns in active and athletic men, evidence-based guidelines can be developed that result in best practice.

  18. Vascular adaptation in athletes: is there an 'athlete's artery'?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, D.J.; Spence, A.; Rowley, N.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Naylor, L.H.

    2012-01-01

    Whilst the existence of a specific phenotype characterized as 'athlete's heart' is generally acknowledged, the question of whether athletes exhibit characteristic vascular adaptations has not been specifically addressed. To do so in this symposium, studies which have assessed the size, wall thicknes

  19. Spatial Ability Differences in Athletes and Non-Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Cynthia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cognitive processes, specifically spatial abilities, are responsible for integration of daily activities. Many factors contribute to the plasticity of the brain which, furthermore, alter the spatial ability. Physical activity, which can be further grouped into sport and exercise, is a modifiable factor that enhances the cognitive processes through a divergent mechanism. This study aimed to gain further understanding on whether sport differs from exercise in altering spatial ability in athletes and non-athletes. Methods: This observational study compared the spatial ability score of athletes of Indonesia National Sport Comitte (Komite Olahraga Nasional Indonesia, KONI in West Java (n= 21 and non-athletes (n= 21. Sampling were performed using stratified random technique and data were collected between August and October 2015 which included spatial scores and demographic of subjects. Results: The difference in spatial scores between athletes and non-athletes were not significant (p=0.432. Conclusions: This study suggests an insignificant difference in spatial ability in athletes performing sport and non-athletes performing exercise. Hence, the cognitive component skills in sport experience do not alter the spatial ability.

  20. Disorders of the female athlete triad among collegiate athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beals, Katherine A; Manore, Melinda M

    2002-09-01

    This study examined the prevalence of and relationship between the disorders of the female athlete triad in collegiate athletes participating in aesthetic, endurance, or team/anaerobic sports. Participants were 425 female collegiate athletes from 7 universities across the United States. Disordered eating, menstrual dysfunction, and musculoskeletal injuries were assessed by a health/medical, dieting and menstrual history questionnaire, the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26), and the Eating Disorder Inventory Body Dissatisfaction Subscale (EDI-BD). The percentage of athletes reporting a clinical diagnosis of anorexia and bulimia nervosa was 3.3% and 2.3%, respectively; mean ( SD) EAT and EDI-BD scores were 10.6 9.6 and 9.8 7.6, respectively. The percentage of athletes with scores indicating "at-risk" behavior for an eating disorder were 15.2% using the EAT-26 and 32.4% using the EDI-BD. A similar percentage of athletes in aesthetic, endurance, and team/anaerobic sports reported a clinical diagnosis of anorexia or bulimia. However, athletes in aesthetic sports scored higher on the EAT-26 (13.5 10.9) than athletes in endurance (10.0 9.3) or team/anaerobic sports (9.9 9.0, p athletes in aesthetic versus endurance or team/anaerobic sports scored above the EAT-26 cut-off score of 20 (p athletes not using oral contraceptives, and there were no group differences in the prevalence of self-reported menstrual irregularity. Muscle and bone injuries sustained during the collegiate career were reported by 65.9% and 34.3% of athletes, respectively, and more athletes in aesthetic versus endurance and team/anaerobic sports reported muscle (p =.005) and/or bone injuries (p Athletes "at risk" for eating disorders more frequently reported menstrual irregularity (p =.004) and sustained more bone injuries (p =.003) during their collegiate career. These data indicate that while the prevalence of clinical eating disorders is low in female collegiate athletes, many are "at risk" for an eating

  1. Psychosocial aspects of athletic injuries as perceived by athletic trainers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, Damien; Granquist, Megan D; Arvinen-Barrow, Monna M

    2013-01-01

    Despite the Psychosocial Strategies and Referral content area, athletic trainers (ATs) generally lack confidence in their ability to use this information. The current study's primary purpose was to determine (a) perceived psychological responses and coping behaviors athletes may present to ATs, (b) psychosocial strategies ATs currently use with their athletes, (c) psychosocial strategies ATs deem important to learn more about, and (d) ATs' current practices in referring athletes to counseling or sport psychology services. Mixed-methods study. Online survey containing both quantitative and qualitative items. A total of 215 ATs (86 male, 129 female), representing a response rate of 22.50%. The Athletic Training and Sport Psychology Questionnaire. Stress/anxiety (4.24 ± 0.82), anger (3.70 ± 0.96), and treatment adherence problems (3.62 ± 0.94) were rated as the primary psychological responses athletes may present upon injury. Adherence and having a positive attitude were identified as key determinants in defining athletes' successful coping with their injuries. The top 3 selected psychosocial strategies were keeping the athlete involved with the team (4.57 ± 0.73), using short-term goals (4.45 ± 0.67), and creating variety in rehabilitation exercises (4.32 ± 0.75). The top 3 rated psychosocial strategies ATs deem important to learn more about were understanding motivation (4.29 ± 0.89), using effective communication (4.24 ± 0.91), and setting realistic goals (4.22 ± 0.97). Of the sample, only 59 (27.44%) ATs reported referring an athlete for counseling services, and 37 (84.09%) of those who had access to a sport psychologist (n = 44) reported referring for sport psychology services. These results not only highlight ATs' current use of psychosocial strategies but also their desires to increase their current knowledge and understanding of these strategies while caring for injured athletes.

  2. A survey of energy drinks consumption practices among student -athletes in Ghana: lessons for developing health education intervention programmes

    OpenAIRE

    Buxton Christiana; Hagan John E

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Globally, young adults and college athletes are primary targets of the marketing campaigns of energy drink companies. Consequently, it is reported that young adults and college athletes consume energy drinks frequently. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of energy drink consumption among student-athletes selected from seven public universities in Ghana. The study assessed the energy drink consumption patterns, types usually consumed, frequency of con...

  3. Improving Lifelong Learning in China by Policy-making

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Lifelong learning underlines a paradigm shift away from an emphasis on the education and training scopes rendered by institutions and system towards an appetite of actual acquisition of learning in many different settings reflecting changing needs over the lifetime of individual. The policies on lifelong learning of many Asian countries has tightly related to national development and largely focused on two main aspects namely improving the academic and vocational skills of the growing number of new entrants through the formal education system and upgrading general skills through the non-formal system. As the representative of developing country in Asia,this essay will display the development and obstacles on lifelong learning in China.

  4. Lifelong learning for active ageing in nordic museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Tine; Grut, Sara

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we develop a framework that demonstrates how older adults need to develop diverse capabilities in relation to their educational life course through engagements in Nordic museums, archives and street art activities. We discuss how European museums have taken up UNESCO’s approach...... to lifelong learning as a way to conceptualise activities for older adults’ in museums, as we emphasise an approach to adult education for active ageing articulated as ‘lifelong learning for active ageing’. To illustrate this framing, we outline a number of activities taken from publications, cultural sites...... and conferences in which we have been involved over the last decade in the context of the Nordic Centre of Heritage Learning and Creativity in Östersund, Sweden. We argue that lifelong learning for active ageing in cultural heritage institutions can contribute to the development of older adults’ civic...

  5. Injuries to the Young Athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandusky, Jane C.

    A review of literature on the incidence and nature of injuries to young athletes is presented on the topics of: (1) physiological characteristics of preadolescents, adolescents, and young adults; (2) musculo-skeletal changes in the growing athlete; (3) epiphyseal injuries and their potential for resulting in temporary or permanent impairment; (4)…

  6. Avoid Overtraining in Young Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rearick, Matt; Creasy, John; Buriak, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Each year many young athletes suffer injuries from overtraining. According to the existing literature, strategies do exist to help control this growing problem. This article explores the basic nature of training and overtraining, with a particular emphasis on endurance athletes. Several psychological factors are highlighted as the first clear…

  7. SUPPLEMENT USE BY YOUNG ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Anne McDowall

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews studies of supplement use among child and adolescent athletes, focusing on prevalence and type of supplement use, as well as gender comparisons. Supplement use among adult athletes has been well documented however there are a limited number of studies investigating supplement use by child and adolescent athletes. A trend in the current literature revealed that the most frequently used supplements are in the form of vitamin and minerals. While health and illness prevention are the main reasons for taking supplements, enhanced athletic performance was also reported as a strong motivating factor. Generally, females are found to use supplements more frequently and are associated with reasons of health, recovery, and replacing an inadequate diet. Males are more likely to report taking supplements for enhanced performance. Both genders equally rated increased energy as another reason for engaging in supplement use. Many dietary supplements are highly accessible to young athletes and they are particularly vulnerable to pressures from the media and the prospect of playing sport at increasingly elite levels. Future research should provide more direct evidence regarding any physiological side effects of taking supplements, as well as the exact vitamin and mineral requirements for child and adolescent athletes. Increased education for young athletes regarding supplement use, parents and coaches should to be targeted to help the athletes make the appropriate choices

  8. Iron and the endurance athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Pamela S

    2014-09-01

    Iron is a trace mineral that is highly significant to endurance athletes. Iron is critical to optimal athletic performance because of its role in energy metabolism, oxygen transport, and acid-base balance. Endurance athletes are at increased risk for suboptimal iron status, with potential negative consequences on performance, because of the combination of increased iron needs and inadequate dietary intake. This review paper summarizes the role of iron in maximal and submaximal exercise and describes the effects of iron deficiency on exercise performance. Mechanisms that explain the increased risk of iron deficiency in endurance athletes, including exercise-associated inflammation and hepcidin release on iron sequestration, are described. Information on screening athletes for iron deficiency is presented, and suggestions to increase iron intake through diet modification or supplemental iron are provided.

  9. The power athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, J C; Stebbins, C L

    1997-08-01

    A number of normal daily and athletic activities require isometric or static exercise. Sports such as weight lifting and other high-resistance activities are used by power athletes to gain strength and skeletal muscle bulk. Static exercise, the predominant activity used in power training, significantly increases blood pressure, heart rate, myocardial contractility, and cardiac output. These changes occur in response to central neural irradiation, called central command, as well as a reflex originating from statically contracting muscle. Studies have demonstrated that blood pressure appears to be the regulated variable, presumably because the increased pressure provides blood flow into muscles whose arterial inflow is reduced as a result of increases in intramuscular pressure created by contraction. Thus, static exercise is characterized by a pressure load on the heart and can be differentiated from the hemodynamic response to dynamic (isotonic) exercise, which involves a volume load to the heart. Physical training with static exercise (i.e., power training) leads to concentric cardiac (particularly left ventricular) hypertrophy, whereas training with dynamic exercise leads to eccentric hypertrophy. The magnitude of cardiac hypertrophy is much less in athletes training with static than dynamic exercise. Neither systolic nor diastolic function is altered by the hypertrophic process associated with static exercise training. Many of the energy requirements for static exercise, particularly during more severe levels of exercise, are met by anaerobic glycolysis because the contracting muscle becomes comes deprived of blood flow. Power athletes, training with repetitive static exercise, derive little benefit from an increase in oxygen transport capacity, so that maximal oxygen consumption is increased only minimally or not at all. Peripheral cardiovascular adaptations also can occur in response to training with static exercise. Although the studies are controversial

  10. Athlete endorsements in food marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Marie A; Yanamadala, Swati; Roberto, Christina A; Harris, Jennifer L; Brownell, Kelly D

    2013-11-01

    This study quantified professional athletes' endorsement of food and beverages, evaluated the nutritional quality of endorsed products, and determined the number of television commercial exposures of athlete-endorsement commercials for children, adolescents, and adults. One hundred professional athletes were selected on the basis of Bloomberg Businessweek's 2010 Power 100 rankings, which ranks athletes according to their endorsement value and prominence in their sport. Endorsement information was gathered from the Power 100 list and the advertisement database AdScope. Endorsements were sorted into 11 endorsement categories (eg, food/beverages, sports apparel). The nutritional quality of the foods featured in athlete-endorsement advertisements was assessed by using a Nutrient Profiling Index, whereas beverages were evaluated on the basis of the percentage of calories from added sugar. Marketing data were collected from AdScope and Nielsen. Of 512 brands endorsed by 100 different athletes, sporting goods/apparel represented the largest category (28.3%), followed by food/beverages (23.8%) and consumer goods (10.9%). Professional athletes in this sample were associated with 44 different food or beverage brands during 2010. Seventy-nine percent of the 62 food products in athlete-endorsed advertisements were energy-dense and nutrient-poor, and 93.4% of the 46 advertised beverages had 100% of calories from added sugar. Peyton Manning (professional American football player) and LeBron James (professional basketball player) had the most endorsements for energy-dense, nutrient-poor products. Adolescents saw the most television commercials that featured athlete endorsements of food. Youth are exposed to professional athlete endorsements of food products that are energy-dense and nutrient-poor.

  11. Athletic Participation and Wellness: Implications for Counseling College Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Joshua C.; Kissinger, Daniel B.

    2007-01-01

    This study used a holistic wellness paradigm to explore the adjustment of student-athletes and non-athletes at a Division I institution. Results were that non-athletes reported higher levels of wellness than did student-athletes. The authors discuss the ways in which wellness may affect student-athletes' physical and mental health at different…

  12. Distal Fibula Fractures in National Football League Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Brian C; Mack, Christina; Franke, Kristina; Barnes, Ronnie P; Warren, Russell F; Rodeo, Scott A

    2017-09-01

    Despite the frequency of distal fibula fractures in elite athletes and the significant potential impact on the athletes' season and future careers, little data exist characterizing the epidemiology of these injuries or, more importantly, return to competition. To (1) evaluate the incidence of acute distal fibula fractures in National Football League (NFL) athletes, including isolated distal fibula and combined ankle fracture patterns; (2) analyze distal fibula fracture rates in NFL athletes by position, type of play, and contact type; (3) determine the rates of distal fibula fracture surgery in NFL athletes; and (4) report the days missed due to distal fibula fractures in NFL athletes. Descriptive epidemiology study. A retrospective review of distal fibula fractures reported to the NFL from 2000 to 2014 was performed using the NFL Injury Surveillance System. All distal fibula fractures were included, along with isolated and combined fracture patterns. Stress fractures and proximal fibula fractures were excluded. Epidemiological data and rates of surgery were determined. Return to sport was calculated and stratified by injury pattern and management. Overall, 237 distal fibula fractures in NFL athletes from 2000 to 2014 were included; 197 (83%) were isolated distal fibula fractures. A mean of 16 distal fibula fractures occurred each year (median, 16 per year). Fractures occurred most frequently on running (38%) and passing (24%) plays, but the frequency was next highest on kickoffs (16%), despite the relative infrequency of kickoffs during the average game compared with other play types. Surgery was reported for more than half of all distal fibula fractures (n = 128, 54%). Overall, patients who underwent surgery missed significantly more days (mean, 123.8 days) than players who did not undergo surgery (mean, 75.3 days) (P NFL athletes and result in significant time missed from competition. Further research is required to determine the optimal management of fibula

  13. Personality Preferences of College Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Michael D.; Liput, Taylor; Nirmal, Rashmeen

    2007-01-01

    College student-athletes face many unique role strains during their academic and athletic career, which may impact the way in which they understand themselves. This study was designed to explore whether college student-athletes have a different perceived personality preference than their non-athlete counterpart. Ninety-one college students took…

  14. Hypermobility in Adolescent Athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Heidi; Pedersen, Trine Lykke; Junge, Tina

    2017-01-01

    athletes, and to study the association of GJH with pain, function, HRQoL, and musculoskeletal injuries. Methods A total of 132 elite-level adolescent athletes (36 adolescent boys, 96 adolescent girls; mean ± SD age, 14.0 ± 0.9 years), including ballet dancers (n = 22), TeamGym gymnasts (n = 57), and team......-reported questionnaires, and part of physical performance was assessed by 4 postural-sway tests and 2 single-legged hop-for-distance tests. Results Overall prevalence rates for GJH4, GJH5, and GJH6 were 27.3%, 15.9%, and 6.8%, respectively, with a higher prevalence of GJH4 in ballet dancers (68.2%) and TeamGym gymnasts...... significantly larger center-of-pressure path length across sway tests. Conclusion For ballet dancers and TeamGym gymnasts, the prevalence of GJH4 was higher than that of team handball players. For ballet dancers, the prevalence of GJH5 and GJH6 was higher than that of team handball players and the general...

  15. Social Support System in Learning Network for lifelong learners: A Conceptual framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nadeem, Danish; Stoyanov, Slavi; Koper, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Nadeem, D., Stoyanov, S., & Koper, R. (2009). Social support system in learning network for lifelong learners: A Conceptual framework [Special issue]. International Journal of Continuing Engineering Education and Life-Long Learning, 19(4/5/6), 337-351.

  16. The Harvard Management for Lifelong Education Program: Creative Approaches to Designing a Professional Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baden, Clifford

    1999-01-01

    The Harvard Institute for the Management of Lifelong Education is a professional-development program for leaders in postsecondary lifelong education. It exemplifies creative design and delivery as ideas come from multiple sources and the program is continuously reinvented. (SK)

  17. Integration of Heterogeneous Information Sources into a Knowledge Resource Management System for Lifelong Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demidova, Elena; Ternier, Stefaan; Olmedilla, Daniel; Duval, Erik; Dicerto, Michele; Stefanov, Krassen; Sacristán, Naiara

    2007-01-01

    Demidova, E., Ternier, S., Olmedilla, D., Duval, E., Dicerto, M., Stefanov, K., et al. (2007). Integration of Heterogeneous Information Sources into a Knowledge Resource Management System for Lifelong. TENCompetence Workshop on Service Oriented Approaches and Lifelong Competence Development Infrastr

  18. Probiotics supplementation for athletes - clinical and physiological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, David B; West, Nicholas P; Cox, Amanda J; Cripps, Allan W

    2015-01-01

    Probiotic supplementation has traditionally focused on gut health. However, in recent years, the clinical applications of probiotics have broadened to allergic, metabolic, inflammatory, gastrointestinal and respiratory conditions. Gastrointestinal health is important for regulating adaptation to exercise and physical activity. Symptoms such as nausea, bloating, cramping, pain, diarrhoea and bleeding occur in some athletes, particularly during prolonged exhaustive events. Several studies conducted since 2006 examining probiotic supplementation in athletes or highly active individuals indicate modest clinical benefits in terms of reduced frequency, severity and/or duration of respiratory and gastrointestinal illness. The likely mechanisms of action for probiotics include direct interaction with the gut microbiota, interaction with the mucosal immune system and immune signalling to a variety of organs and systems. Practical issues to consider include medical and dietary screening of athletes, sourcing of recommended probiotics and formulations, dose-response requirements for different probiotic strains, storage, handling and transport of supplements and timing of supplementation in relation to travel and competition.

  19. Competence Based Educational Metadata for Supporting Lifelong Competence Development Programmes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sampson, Demetrios; Fytros, Demetrios

    2008-01-01

    Sampson, D., & Fytros, D. (2008). Competence Based Educational Metadata for Supporting Lifelong Competence Development Programmes. In P. Diaz, Kinshuk, I. Aedo & E. Mora (Eds.), Proceedings of the 8th IEEE International Conference on Advanced Learning Technologies (ICALT 2008), pp. 288-292. July, 1-

  20. A Placement Web-Service for Lifelong Learners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Kalz, M. (2009). A Placement Web-Service for Lifelong Learners. Presentation held at the 9th International Conference on Knowledge Management and Knowledge Technologies. September, 2-4, 2009, Graz, Austria. You can embed this presentation from here http://slideshare.net/mkalz

  1. Lifelong Learning Policies in Mexico: Context, Challenges and Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Mendiola, German

    2006-01-01

    For Mexico, a country characterised by a high degree of inequality both with regard to income and education, concepts such as the "knowledge-based economy" and Lifelong Learning are even more elusive than in other countries. Given its poor school system and the large part of the adult population who are without any basic educational…

  2. Piano Performance: Group Classes for the Lifelong Learner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddon, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative research presents data relating to eight amateur pianists who completed a 10-week Piano Performance course for lifelong learners at the University of York, UK. This article discusses the development of learning through the impact of group participation, challenges faced by learners and pedagogical strategies used by the leader to…

  3. Digital Repository for Life-long Competence Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigorov, Alexander; Georgiev, Atanas; Petrov, Milen; Stefanov, Krassen

    2009-01-01

    Grigorov, A., Georgiev, A., Petrov, M., & Stefanov, K. (2009). Digital Repository for Life-long Competence Development. Paper presented at the 'Open workshop of TENCompetence - Rethinking Learning and Employment at a Time of Economic Uncertainty-event'. November, 19-20, 2009, Manchester, UK: TENComp

  4. Lifelong Learning Hub: A Seamless Tracking Tool for Mobile Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabuenca, Bernardo; Kalz, Marco; Specht, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Lifelong learners’ learning activities are scattered along the day in different locations and they make use of multiple devices. Most of the times adults have to merge learning, work and everyday life making it difficult to have an account on how much time is devoted to learning activities and learn

  5. Lifelong Learning and the Sultans of Spin: Policy as Persuasion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Katherine; Edwards, Richard

    2004-01-01

    This paper seeks to extend work previously published that points to the importance of rhetorical analysis to policy studies. It argues against the notion that policy can be dismissed as 'spin' and explores further the work of rhetoric within the UK government's policy texts of lifelong learning. For the authors, rhetorical analysis helps to point…

  6. Obsolescence or Lifelong Education: A Choice for the Professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubin, Samuel S.

    Life-long education, in which the learning process is continuous and unbroken, for the professional is discussed from the standpoint of obsolescence, its symptoms and causes, and present efforts to cope with it. The concept of half-life is used to describe a professional's competence, and it is stated that the two factors that are most prominent…

  7. Adult Education and Lifelong Learning: New Developments in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajda, Joseph

    1999-01-01

    Examines effects of social and economic change on adult education and lifelong learning in postcommunist Russia. Discusses the history of Russian adult education, educational policy changes in the 1990s, establishment of the first Open University and a network of adult-education centers, and the conflict between market-oriented objectives and…

  8. The Lifelong Learning as a Modern Educational Paradigm [In Bulgarian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Katansky

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Lifelong learning, life-wide learning, continuing education, vocational education, professional education of adults, formal education, informal education, permanent education, etc. – the author of the present article seeks the relationships between these widely used terms and traces through the history of their introduction in the modern educational theory and practice.

  9. Knowledge, Sentience and Receptivity: A Paradigm of Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eneroth, Bo

    2008-01-01

    This article aims to develop a paradigm of lifelong learning situations. The starting point is the EU-Commission policy document where three kinds of learning situations are identified: formal, non-formal and informal. The article tries to deepen this categorisation by searching for the underlying ontological and epistemological dimensions. The…

  10. Lifelong Learning in Artistic Context Mediated by Advanced Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Mirella

    2016-01-01

    This research starts by analysing the current state of artistic heritage in Italy and studying some examples in Europe: we try to investigate the scope of non-formal learning in artistic context, mediated by advanced technology. The framework within which we have placed our investigation is that of lifelong learning and lifedeep learning. The…

  11. The Lifelong Learning Ecosystem in Korea: Evolution of Learning Capitalism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Soonghee

    2008-01-01

    Korean lifelong learning in practice is gradually adapted by neo-liberals and the discourses of the economic market. Considering that the public foundation of Korean education is fragile to cope with the market challenge, the whole picture of Korean learning ecology is rapidly distorted towards the establishment of the learning market and the…

  12. Dutch Lifelong learning : A Policy Perspective bringing together parallel Worlds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dellen, Teije; Klercq, Jumbo; Buiskool, Bert-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Lifelong learning has never been an integral part of the Dutch educational culture. Nevertheless, nowadays yearly many adults (about 17.8% in 2015) are after either or not finishing initial education in some respect emergently participating in (continuing) second, third or more learning paths throug

  13. Demographic and Behavioral Characteristics of Osher Lifelong Learning Institute Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Robert Jack; Brady, E. Michael; Thaxton, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    The number of lifelong learning institutes (LLIs) is growing across the United States and it is important for educational planners and administrators to know about current demographic and behavioral characteristics of program participants. A 14-question survey was administered via SurveyMonkey to members who use computers in eight Osher Lifelong…

  14. Lifelong Professional Education in the Russian Federation: Personal Aspect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibatova, Aygul Z.; Ippolitova, Natalia V.; Mukhametgaliyeva, Safia Kh.; Rodionova, Anna E.; Yagafarova, Khafiza N.; Ikonnikova, Ludmila N.

    2016-01-01

    The article analyzes the problem of realization of the postulate of "lifelong education" in the field of professional education in Russia, and reveals its importance for the development of personality of a future specialist. A brief overview and the results of the implementation of this principle in the process of professional training…

  15. An Empirical Framework for Implementing Lifelong Learning Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Song Seng; Low, Sock Hwee

    Based on a literature review of factors that affect the provision of learning opportunities for adults and the experiences of Singapore's Institute of Technical Education (ITE), this paper proposes an empirical framework for developing and implementing lifelong learning systems. Following an introduction, the theoretical foundation for the…

  16. Digital Repository for Life-long Competence Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigorov, Alexander; Georgiev, Atanas; Petrov, Milen; Stefanov, Krassen

    2009-01-01

    Grigorov, A., Georgiev, A., Petrov, M., & Stefanov, K. (2009). Digital Repository for Life-long Competence Development. Paper presented at the 'Open workshop of TENCompetence - Rethinking Learning and Employment at a Time of Economic Uncertainty-event'. November, 19-20, 2009, Manchester, UK: TENComp

  17. Building a Knowledge Repository for Life-long Competence Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigorov, Alexander; Georgiev, Atanas; Petrov, Milen; Varbanov, Sergey; Stefanov, Krassen

    2008-01-01

    Grigorov, A., Georgiev, A., Petrov, M., Varbanov, S., & Stefanov, K. (2008). Building a Knowledge Repository for Life-long Competence Development. In R. Koper, K. Stefanov & D. Dicheva (Eds.), Proceedings of the 5th International TENCompetence Open Workshop "Stimulating Personal Development and Know

  18. Promoting Lifelong Learning in Multilingual Context: A Case from Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Kapil Dev

    2011-01-01

    Nepal is a multilingual country with low adult literacy rate (about 57% in 2008). Through different policy documents and motivation from some of the transnational organizations such as UNESCO, Nepal is on the process of adopting lifelong learning perspective as a major educational policy. In this context the article raises two issues: how to…

  19. "Lost Ladies": Lifelong Learning and Community Participation for Older Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This article will explore lifelong learning and community participation for older women. In doing so, it will draw on empirical work undertaken with the National Federation of Women's Institutes in England and Wales in the UK; and the Sydney Older Women's Network in Australia. The article will briefly outline something of the policies and…

  20. Self-directed lifelong learning in hybrid learning configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cremers, P.H.M.; Wals, A.E.J.; Wesselink, R.; Nieveen, N.; Mulder, M.

    2014-01-01

    Present-day students are expected to be lifelong learners throughout their working life. Higher education must therefore prepare students to self-direct their learning beyond formal education, in real-life working settings. This can be achieved in so-called hybrid learning configurations in which

  1. Foundations of Life-Long Sexual Health Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Allyson Stella; Patrick, Julie Hicks

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Sexual education in adolescence may represent the only formal sexual information individuals ever receive. It is unclear whether this early educational experience is sufficient to promote lifelong sexual health literacy. The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of the timing and source of sexual knowledge on current safe sex…

  2. Participation in Lifelong Learning in Portugal and the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingham, Hilary; Ingham, Mike; Afonso, José Adelino

    2017-01-01

    Lifelong learning is a long-standing European Union priority, with an emphasis on the need for it to be pursued by all, but particularly those at the risk of exclusion. This study explores participation in Portugal and the UK, countries at opposite ends of the European adult learning spectrum with markedly different contexts. Analysis reveals that…

  3. Perceptions of Workplace Mentoring Behaviors for Lifelong Career Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key, Lynne A.

    2013-01-01

    This study's purpose was to investigate the importance of mentoring functions and behaviors for lifelong career development as perceived by protégés. The population included individuals in middle to late adulthood (age 40 years and older) who reported they had been a protege in at least one mentoring association perceived as beneficial to their…

  4. The Shifting Demographics and Lifelong Learning. Conference Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmel, Tom

    2011-01-01

    This paper was presented at the International Symposium on Lifelong Learning for Poverty Alleviation and Sustainable Development: Developing a Research Agenda for the Asia-Pacific in Hong Kong, 12-13 January 2011. Tom Karmel suggests that there are four implications of an ageing population: the need to improve labour force participation and…

  5. Alternative Approaches to Financing Lifelong Learning. Country Report: Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurzburg, Gregory

    One of the main strategies for achieving lifelong learning objectives in Denmark has been to steadily shore up and improve the efficiency of the institutional arrangements for adult learning and to progressively strengthen the arrangements for financing it. Because there has been no attempt to create totally new structures or programs, the trends…

  6. Cartographical Imaginations: Spatiality, Adult Education and Lifelong Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Richard; Cervero, Ron; Clarke, Julia; Morgan-Klein, Brenda; Usher, Robin; Wilson, Arthur

    Recent empirical and theoretical literature in cultural geography, feminist and postcolonial philosophy, cultural studies, and political economy, was explored in an examination of the significance of spatiality to the changes taking place in the policy, practice, and study of adult education and lifelong learning. The following were among the key…

  7. Lifelong Education in Greece: Recent Developments and Current Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karalis, Thanassis; Vergidis, Dimitris

    2004-01-01

    This article concerns recent developments and current trends in lifelong education in Greece, specifically those related with funding from European Social Fund (ESF). The analysis undertaken focuses mainly on (a) the expansion of continuing training activities in Greece during the past ten years and the development of new training organizations as…

  8. Legislation and Lifelong Learning in Canada: Inconsistencies in Implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollings-Magnusson, Sandra

    2001-01-01

    This review of Canadian government policy as expressed in legislation revealed inconsistencies between rhetorical and actual support for a lifelong learning agenda; the absence of the protection and sense of permanence that legislation provides to policy implementation means that any actions taken or programs created may be easily changed,…

  9. The Idea of Lifelong Learning in the Chautauqua Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubblefield, Harold W.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the theories of the Chautauqua movement concerning lifelong learning. Presents its religious basis, the theory of self-culture, access to knowledge, why adulthood is a unique time for learning, and how Chautauqua influenced contemporary thought and social movements. (CT)

  10. The Community Perspective for Research on Lifelong Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Roger

    Examining the meaning of lifelong learning within the context of "community" (defined in terms of interests and locality), the author explores many learning resources and opportunities and identifies related research questions. The content of this study is presented in three sections. The first section on the community as a setting for…

  11. Aging Memory Is "Not" a Limiting Factor for Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalovic, Dejan; Gvozdenovic, Vasilije

    2015-01-01

    Efficient memory is one of the necessary cognitive potentials required for virtually every form of lifelong learning. In this contribution we first briefly review and summarize state of the art of knowledge on memory and related cognitive functions in normal aging. Then we critically discuss a relatively short inventory of clinical, psychometric,…

  12. Self-Directed Lifelong Learning in Hybrid Learning Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremers, Petra H. M.; Wals, Arjen E. J.; Wesselink, Renate; Nieveen, Nienke; Mulder, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Present-day students are expected to be lifelong learners throughout their working life. Higher education must therefore prepare students to self-direct their learning beyond formal education, in real-life working settings. This can be achieved in so-called hybrid learning configurations in which working and learning are integrated. In such a…

  13. Lifelong Learning in Architectural Design Studio: The Learning Contract Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanpour, B.; Che-Ani, A. I.; Usman, I. M. S.; Johar, S.; Tawil, N. M.

    2015-01-01

    Avant-garde educational systems are striving to find lifelong learning methods. Different fields and majors have tested a variety of proposed models and found varying difficulties and strengths. Architecture is one of the most critical areas of education because of its special characteristics, such as learning by doing and complicated evaluation…

  14. Conceptions of Lifelong Learning in Confucian Culture: Their Impact on Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiyuan

    2008-01-01

    The philosophy and practice of lifelong learning has a long history in China, being traceable to Confucius's idea (circa 500 BC) of "education for all". However, very little research has been done on the development of the Confucian idea of lifelong learning in ancient China, or on its influence on current practices of lifelong learning within the…

  15. How Social and Human Capital Predict Participation in Lifelong Learning: A Longitudinal Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipprath, Heidi; De Rick, Katleen

    2015-01-01

    Policy makers and researchers are increasingly showing interest in lifelong learning due to a rising unemployment rate in recent years. Much attention has been paid to determinants and benefits of lifelong learning but not to the impact of social capital on lifelong learning so far. In this article, we study how social and human capital can…

  16. An Operational Measure of Physician Lifelong Learning: Its Development, Components and Preliminary Psychometric Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Nasca, Thomas J.; Erdmann, James B.; Frisby, Anthony J.; Veloski, J. Jon; Gonnella, Joseph S.

    2003-01-01

    Develops a tool for measuring physician lifelong learning. Identifies 19 items that were included in the Jefferson Scale of Physician Lifelong Learning. Factor analysis showed five meaningful factors of lifelong learning: (1) need recognition; (2) research endeavor; (3) self-initiation; (4) technical skills; and (5) personal motivation. Concludes…

  17. Lifelong Learning at the International Agenda - and its Implementation in a Danish Context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larson, Anne

    2005-01-01

    The first part of the article gives an overview of the history of lifelong learning. It then looks at how lifelong learning is implemented in Denmark, and the impact on different groups in society, leading to the conclusion that lifelong learning in Denmark is mainly for the already well educated....

  18. Meta-Analyses from a Collaborative Project in Mobile Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigo, Marco; Kukulska-Hulme, Agnes; Arnedillo-Sanchez, Inmaculada; Kismihok, Gabor

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of mobile technologies in relation to the aims of the European Union's Lifelong Learning programme. First, we explain the background to the notion of mobile lifelong learning. We then present a methodological framework to analyse and identify good practices in mobile lifelong learning, based on the outcomes of the…

  19. The EU "Memorandum on Lifelong Learning". Old Wine in New Bottles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg, Carmel; Mayo, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a critical analysis of the EU's "Memorandum on lifelong learning" in light of the evolution of the concepts of lifelong education and lifelong learning from the late sixties onward. It also analyses this document in light of the forces of globalisation that impinge on educational policy-making in Europe as well as the…

  20. How Social and Human Capital Predict Participation in Lifelong Learning: A Longitudinal Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipprath, Heidi; De Rick, Katleen

    2015-01-01

    Policy makers and researchers are increasingly showing interest in lifelong learning due to a rising unemployment rate in recent years. Much attention has been paid to determinants and benefits of lifelong learning but not to the impact of social capital on lifelong learning so far. In this article, we study how social and human capital can…

  1. Understanding Athletic Pubalgia: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Brian; Kleinhenz, Dominic; Schiller, Jonathan; Tabaddor, Ramin

    2016-10-04

    Athletic Pubalgia, more commonly known as sports hernia, is defined as chronic lower abdominal and groin pain without the presence of a true hernia. It is increasingly recognized in athletes as a source of groin pain and is often associated with other pathology. A comprehensive approach to the physical exam and a strong understanding of hip and pelvic anatomy are critical in making the appropriate diagnosis. Various management options are available. We review the basic anatomy, patholophysiology, diagnostic approach and treatment of athletic pubalgia as well as discuss associated conditions such as femoroacetabular impingement. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-10.asp].

  2. Expanding the frontiers of national qualifications frameworks through lifelong learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Agyeman, Yaw

    2017-09-01

    The adoption of a national qualifications framework (NQF) by some governments in all world regions has shown some success in the area of formal learning. However, while NQFs continue to enhance formal learning in many countries, the same cannot be said for the recognition, validation and accreditation (RVA) of non-formal and informal learning. Focusing on competency-based technical and vocational education and training (TVET) within its NQF, Ghana introduced the National Technical and Vocational Education and Training Qualifications Framework (NTVETQF) as a sub-framework in 2012. In the wake of the NTVETQF's limited success, the author of this article reasons that a lifelong learning approach could enhance its effectiveness considerably. Comparing national and international policies, he argues that the NTVETQF should be able to properly address the issues of progression from informal and non-formal to formal modes of lifelong learning within the country's broad context of education. In addition, the study conceptualises the integration of lifelong learning within a broad NQF in four key domains: (1) individual; (2) institutional; (3) industry; and (4) state. The author concludes that, for the NTVETQF to achieve its goal of facilitating access to further education and training while also promoting lifelong learning for all (including workers in the informal economy), effective integration of all modes of lifelong learning is required. Although this entails some challenges, such as recognition of prior learning and validation of all modes of learning, it will help to widen access to education as well as providing individuals with a pathway for achieving their educational aspirations.

  3. The isometric athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, J C; Stebbins, C L

    1992-05-01

    A number of normal daily and athletic activities require isometric or static exercise. Such sports as weight lifting and other high-resistance activities are used by athletes to gain strength and skeletal muscle bulk. However, static exercise also causes significant increases in blood pressure, heart rate, myocardial contractility, and cardiac output. These changes occur in response to central neural irradiation, called central command, as well as a reflex originating from statically contracting muscle. Studies have demonstrated that blood pressure appears to be the regulated variable, presumably because the increased pressure provides blood flow into muscles that have compressed their arterial inflow as a result of increases in intramuscular pressure created by contraction. Thus, static exercise is characterized by a pressure load to the heart and can be differentiated from dynamic (isotonic) exercise, which involves a volume load to the heart. Physical training with static exercise leads to concentric cardiac, particularly left ventricular, hypertrophy, whereas training with dynamic exercise leads to eccentric hypertrophy. Furthermore, the magnitude of cardiac hypertrophy is much less in athletes training with static than dynamic exercise. Neither systolic nor diastolic function is altered by the hypertrophic process associated with static exercise training. Many of the energy requirements for static exercise, particularly during more severe levels of exercise, are met by anaerobic glycolysis because the contracting muscle becomes deprived of blood flow. Training with repetitive static exercise therefore causes little increase in oxygen transport capacity, so that maximal oxygen consumption is either not or only minimally increased. Peripheral cardiovascular adaptations also can occur in response to static exercise training. Although controversial, these adaptations include modest decreases in resting blood pressure, smaller increases in blood pressure during a

  4. Female athlete triad syndrome in the high school athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thein-Nissenbaum, Jill M; Carr, Kathleen E

    2011-08-01

    Female sports participation at the high school level has significantly increased since the 1970s. Physical activity in females has numerous positive benefits, including improved body image and overall health. Unfortunately, a select population of exercising females may experience symptoms related to the "female athlete triad," which refers to the interrelationships among energy availability, menstrual function, and bone mineral density. Clinically, these conditions can manifest as disordered eating behaviors, menstrual irregularity, and stress fractures. Athletes with conditions related to the triad are distributed along a spectrum between optimal health and disease and may not experience all conditions simultaneously. Previous research related to the triad has primarily focused on collegiate and elite athletes. However, mounting evidence demonstrates that the triad is present in the high school population. High school athletes should be assessed for triad components at preparticipation physicals. In addition, parents, coaches, and health care professionals should be educated and informed about the female athlete triad syndrome. In the presence of triad symptoms, further evaluation and treatment by a multidisciplinary team is strongly recommended for the athlete.

  5. [Female athlete triad].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portmann, Luc; Giusti, Vittorio

    2009-08-05

    The practitioner, as well as specialist such as gynecologist and endocrinologist, may face in their office women with eating disorders, abnormalities of menstrual cycles and low bone mass, which may be the first hints of the female athlete triad. In these situations, the practitioner may search other findings of these triad by looking at some particular physical findings and by using appropriate questionnaire. In some advanced forms of this triad specific abnormalities of eating disorders (anorexia and boulimia) may be present as well as amenorrhea and osteoporosis, which may disturb the well-being and cause health damages of women practising sport either as amateur or in a elite setting. An appropriate handling of such disorders has to be proposed to these women.

  6. Magnesium and the Athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, Stella Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral and the second most abundant intracellular divalent cation in the body. It is a required mineral that is involved in more than 300 metabolic reactions in the body. Magnesium helps maintain normal nerve and muscle function, heart rhythm (cardiac excitability), vasomotor tone, blood pressure, immune system, bone integrity, and blood glucose levels and promotes calcium absorption. Because of magnesium's role in energy production and storage, normal muscle function, and maintenance of blood glucose levels, it has been studied as an ergogenic aid for athletes. This article will cover the general roles of magnesium, magnesium requirements, and assessment of magnesium status as well as the dietary intake of magnesium and its effects on exercise performance. The research articles cited were limited from those published in 2003 through 2014.

  7. Need for and Interest in a Sports Nutrition Mobile Device Application Among Division I Collegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga, Krystle E; Downey, Darcy L; McCluskey, Ryan; Rivers, Carley A

    2016-08-24

    The majority of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) programs do not have a sports nutritionist, leaving athletes to gather information from resources that vary in reputability. The objective of this study was to identify a need for the development of accessible and reputable resources of nutrition information by assessing the current use of nutrition information resources, dietary habits, and sports nutrition knowledge among Division I collegiate athletes. Seventy-two athletes across eight sports completed questionnaires concerning nutrition resources used, dietary habits, and sports nutrition knowledge. Additionally, interest levels in a mobile device application for delivery of nutrition information and tools were assessed. Primary sources for nutrition information included parents and family, athletic trainers (AT), and the internet/media, and athletes felt most comfortable discussing nutrition with parents and family, ATs, and strength and conditioning specialists. Performance on a sports nutrition knowledge questionnaire indicated a general lack of nutrition knowledge, and the high frequency of "unsure" responses suggested a lack of confidence in nutrition knowledge. Athletes conveyed a high likelihood that they would utilize a mobile device application as a nutrition resource, but were more interested in access to nutrition topics than tools such as a food log. We found that college athletes possess minimal sports nutrition knowledge, obtain nutrition information from non-professional resources, and were interested in utilizing a mobile device application as a resource. Further research is needed to explore the feasibility and effectiveness of alternative resources, such as a mobile device application, to deliver nutrition information and improve nutrition knowledge.

  8. Prevalence of asthma-like symptoms, asthma and its treatment in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, T; Pedersen, L; Larsson, B; Backer, V

    2009-04-01

    The objective was to determine the prevalence of asthma-like symptoms and asthma and the use of asthma medication in Danish elite athletes. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey of Danish elite athletes was conducted in 2006. All elite athletes (N=418) financially supported by the national organization of elite athletes comprised the study group; 329 (79%) completed the questionnaire concerning their sport, asthma-like symptoms, asthma and use of asthma medication. Asthma-like symptoms at rest were reported by 41% of respondents; 55% reported asthma-like symptoms at rest or at exercise. Physician-diagnosed asthma was present in 16% and 14% had current asthma. Asthma medication was taken by 7% of the athletes, of whom 79% used inhaled corticosteroids and 21% used inhaled beta(2)-agonists only. Athletes participating in endurance sports had higher prevalences of current asthma (24%) and use of asthma medication (15%) than all other athletes (Pendurance sports have a higher prevalence of asthma and use of asthma medication. The frequency of asthma medication is lower than the prevalence of current asthma indicating that there is no overuse of asthma medication among Danish elite athletes.

  9. Role ambiguity and athlete satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eys, Mark A; Carron, Albert V; Bray, Steven R; Beauchamp, Mark R

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between athletes' perceptions of role ambiguity and satisfaction. The relationship between these multidimensional constructs was investigated at the beginning and at the end of the season, as well as from early season to end of season. Consistent with the a prioi hypothesis, concurrent analyses revealed lower perceived role ambiguity was associated with higher athlete satisfaction. Specifically, role ambiguity, as represented by the dimension Scope of Responsibilities on offence, was significantly related to the leadership facets of athlete satisfaction (i.e. ability utilization, strategy, and training/instruction) both at the beginning and at the end of the season. However, contrary to expectations, role ambiguity at the beginning of the season was not predictive of athlete satisfaction at the end of the season. The implications of the results are discussed and future research is suggested.

  10. Special Medical Problems of Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Joan M.

    1987-01-01

    This article addresses the situations in which athletes with special needs and considerations participate in sports. The health problems discussed are diabetes mellitus, exercise-induced asthma, exercise-induced anaphylaxis, and epilepsy. (MT)

  11. Nutritional Supplements for Endurance Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Christopher J.

    Athletes engaged in heavy endurance training often seek additional nutritional strategies to help maximize performance. Specific nutritional supplements exist to combat certain factors that limit performance beginning with a sound everyday diet. Research has further demonstrated that safe, effective, legal supplements are in fact available for today's endurance athletes. Several of these supplements are marketed not only to aid performance but also to combat the immunosuppressive effects of intense endurance training. It is imperative for each athlete to research the legality of certain supplements for their specific sport or event. Once the legality has been established, it is often up to each individual athlete to decipher the ethics involved with ingesting nutritional supplements with the sole intent of improving performance.

  12. Sports Hernia/Athletic Pubalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Larson, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Sports hernia/athletic pubalgia has received increasing attention as a source of disability and time lost from athletics. Studies are limited, however, lacking consistent objective criteria for making the diagnosis and assessing outcomes. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed database through January 2013 and hand searches of the reference lists of pertinent articles. Study Design: Review article. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Nonsurgical outcomes have not been well reported. Various s...

  13. Depression in athletes: prevalence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolanin, Andrew; Gross, Michael; Hong, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Depression affects an estimated 6.7% of today's adult population in a 12-month period. The prevalence rates for certain age groups, such as young adults and older adults, are higher. There are approximately 400,000 National Collegiate Athletic Association student athletes competing each year and 5 to 7 million high school student athletes involved in competitive interscholastic sports. Given such a high prevalence rate in certain age groups and a large denominator pool of athletes, past notions that athletes are devoid of mental health issues have come under scrutiny by sports medicine providers. Initial data suggest that athletes are far from immune to depression. The purpose of this article was to review the current research on athletes and depression; particularly this article will provide an overview of studies, which have investigated the rate of depression among athletes, and discuss relevant risk factors, which may contribute to depression among athletes.

  14. Distal Fibula Fractures in National Football League Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Brian C.; Mack, Christina; Franke, Kristina; Barnes, Ronnie P.; Warren, Russell F.; Rodeo, Scott A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Despite the frequency of distal fibula fractures in elite athletes and the significant potential impact on the athletes’ season and future careers, little data exist characterizing the epidemiology of these injuries or, more importantly, return to competition. Purpose: To (1) evaluate the incidence of acute distal fibula fractures in National Football League (NFL) athletes, including isolated distal fibula and combined ankle fracture patterns; (2) analyze distal fibula fracture rates in NFL athletes by position, type of play, and contact type; (3) determine the rates of distal fibula fracture surgery in NFL athletes; and (4) report the days missed due to distal fibula fractures in NFL athletes. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: A retrospective review of distal fibula fractures reported to the NFL from 2000 to 2014 was performed using the NFL Injury Surveillance System. All distal fibula fractures were included, along with isolated and combined fracture patterns. Stress fractures and proximal fibula fractures were excluded. Epidemiological data and rates of surgery were determined. Return to sport was calculated and stratified by injury pattern and management. Results: Overall, 237 distal fibula fractures in NFL athletes from 2000 to 2014 were included; 197 (83%) were isolated distal fibula fractures. A mean of 16 distal fibula fractures occurred each year (median, 16 per year). Fractures occurred most frequently on running (38%) and passing (24%) plays, but the frequency was next highest on kickoffs (16%), despite the relative infrequency of kickoffs during the average game compared with other play types. Surgery was reported for more than half of all distal fibula fractures (n = 128, 54%). Overall, patients who underwent surgery missed significantly more days (mean, 123.8 days) than players who did not undergo surgery (mean, 75.3 days) (P NFL athletes and result in significant time missed from competition. Further research is

  15. Fear of Reinjury in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chao-Jung; Meierbachtol, Adam; George, Steven Z; Chmielewski, Terese L

    A sports injury has both physical and psychological consequences for the athlete. A common postinjury psychological response is elevated fear of reinjury. To provide an overview of the implications of fear of reinjury on the rehabilitation of athletes, including clinical methods to measure fear of reinjury; the impact of fear of reinjury on rehabilitation outcomes, including physical impairments, function, and return to sports rate; and potential interventions to address fear of reinjury during rehabilitation. PubMed was searched for articles published in the past 16 years (1990-2016) relating to fear of reinjury in athletes. The reference lists of the retrieved articles were searched for additionally relevant articles. Clinical review. Level 3. Fear of reinjury after a sports injury can negatively affect the recovery of physical impairments, reduce self-report function, and prevent a successful return to sport. Athletes with high fear of reinjury might benefit from a psychologically informed practice approach to improve rehabilitation outcomes. The application of psychologically informed practice would be to measure fear of reinjury in the injured athletes and provide interventions to reduce fear of reinjury to optimize rehabilitation outcomes. Fear of reinjury after a sports injury can lead to poor rehabilitation outcomes. Incorporating principles of psychologically informed practice into sports injury rehabilitation could improve rehabilitation outcomes for athletes with high fear of reinjury.

  16. Sports Hernia/Athletic Pubalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Sports hernia/athletic pubalgia has received increasing attention as a source of disability and time lost from athletics. Studies are limited, however, lacking consistent objective criteria for making the diagnosis and assessing outcomes. Evidence Acquisition: PubMed database through January 2013 and hand searches of the reference lists of pertinent articles. Study Design: Review article. Level of Evidence: Level 5. Results: Nonsurgical outcomes have not been well reported. Various surgical approaches have return-to–athletic activity rates of >80% regardless of the approach. The variety of procedures and lack of outcomes measures in these studies make it difficult to compare one surgical approach to another. There is increasing evidence that there is an association between range of motion–limiting hip disorders (femoroacetabular impingement) and sports hernia/athletic pubalgia in a subset of athletes. This has added increased complexity to the decision-making process regarding treatment. Conclusion: An association between femoroacetabular impingement and athletic pubalgia has been recognized, with better outcomes reported when both are managed concurrently or in a staged manner. PMID:24587864

  17. Under Different Frequency Bikes Athletes Muscle Electric Index and Output Power of the Comparative Study%不同频率下场地自行车运动员肌电指标与输出功率的对比研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王敏; 钱竞光; 王斌; 李家旺; 王孝如; 陈龙

    2012-01-01

    为研究专业运动员在不同蹬踏频率下的下肢肌电信号与输出功率之间的特征关系,选取9名专业场地自行车运动员在8%的自身体重负荷下分别以100rpm、120rpm、130rpm、140rpm骑行,同时测试下肢9块肌肉的EMG信号和输出功率的变化值。结果表明:(1)TA、RF、VM、GAS(M)、GAS(L)、BF、STG、GM的AVG和RMS值随着蹬踏频率的增高而变大,而MNF值先降低再增加最后又下降;其中TA、VM、GAS(M)、GAS(L)、STG、GM的AVG和RMS值呈显著性增加,且相关性较明显;(2)峰值(最大输出功率)随蹬踏频率的增高而变大,且相关性十分显著,而相对峰值、最小功率、相对最小功率、平均功率、相对平均功率值随着蹬踏频率的增高而变大,但除蹬踏频率在140RPM外,其他蹬踏频率之间的各个指标不具有相关性;(3)从单因素的Anova分析指标、共线性诊断指标、残差统计量指标出发,结合回归指标建立相关的多元线性模型。%As the research professional athletes in different pedaling frequency of lower limb muscle electrical signals and output power between the feature relation,the selection of nine professional athletes bikes in 8% of their body weight load respectively under 100 RPM,120 RPM,130 RPM,140 RPM riding,at the same time to test the changes in value of the lower extremity 9 muscle EMG signal and output power.The results show that:(1)TA、RF、VM、GAS(M)、GAS(L)、BF、STG、GM's AVG and RMS value with cadence of frequency and change,and to reduce the MNF value add then down;The TA、VM、GAS(M)、GAS(L)、STG、GM's AVG and RMS value was significantly increased,and the correlation is obvious;(2)Peak(maximum output power) along with the cadence of frequency and change,and correlation is very remarkable,and relatively peak,minimum power,relative minimum power,average power,relative average power value with cadence of frequency and change,but the addition to the

  18. Tap it again, Sam: Harmonizing Personal Environments towards Lifelong Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Tabuenca

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing number of mobile vendors releasing NFC-enabled devices to the market and their prominent adoption has moved this technology from a niche product to a product with a large market-share. NFC facilitates natural interactions between digital world and physical learning environments. The scaffolding of learning ecologies is a key aspect for lifelong learners in their challenge to integrate learning activities into busy daily life. The contribution of this manuscript is twofold: first, a review of scientific literature in which NFC has been used with a direct or indirect purpose to learn is presented, and potential uses for learners are classified according to their type of interaction; based on these findings the NFC MediaPlayer is presented as an instantiation of an ecology of resources (EoR in a lifelong learning context. Finally, shortcomings and best practices are highlighted in the conclusions, and future work is discussed.

  19. DEVELOPING INFORMATION LITERACY SKILLS FOR LIFELONG LEARNING IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raziye Demiralay

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid changes in information and communication technologieshave high impact on societies to transform into the information societies. Nowadays,owning a dynamic economy which based on information is the main objective of thesocieties. It is the fact that the individuals need to have lifelong learning and informationliteracy skills in order to come into being in the information society. The educationalinstitutions are responsible to cause individuals to gain these skills. Especially it isimportant to be acquired these skills in elementary education. In this study; lifelonglearning and information literacy concepts are examined, the models which will be usedto provide students to gain information literacy skills in a systematic way are presented,and an example course plan in elementary education based on Big6 Model which haswidely used and project based learning are presented. Finally, information society,lifelong learning and information literacy are discussed in the perspectives of teacher,student and teacher candidates and various suggestions are offered

  20. Learning/work: Turning work and lifelong learning inside out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Shirley; Cooper, Linda

    2011-08-01

    CONFINTEA VI took place against the background of an uneven and contradictory social and economic impact of globalisation. This impact registered globally and locally, in both the political North and South, drawing new lines of inequality between "core" and "periphery", between insiders and outsiders of contemporary society. Financial turmoil in the world has exacerbated levels of poverty and insecurity. The question is how work-related education and conceptions of learning might promote greater inclusion and security for those whose livelihoods are most severely affected by globalisation. The Belém Framework for Action implicitly recognises that lifelong learning and work cannot be discussed outside broader socio-economic and political contexts. The authors of this article draw substantially on research from around the world and argue for the re-insertion of "politics and power" into both the theory and practice of "lifelong learning" and "work".

  1. Life-Long Radar Tracking of Bumblebees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ka S.; Reynolds, Andrew M.; Chittka, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Insect pollinators such as bumblebees play a vital role in many ecosystems, so it is important to understand their foraging movements on a landscape scale. We used harmonic radar to record the natural foraging behaviour of Bombus terrestris audax workers over their entire foraging career. Every flight ever made outside the nest by four foragers was recorded. Our data reveal where the bees flew and how their behaviour changed with experience, at an unprecedented level of detail. We identified how each bee’s flights fit into two categories—which we named exploration and exploitation flights—examining the differences between the two types of flight and how their occurrence changed over the course of the bees’ foraging careers. Exploitation of learned resources takes place during efficient, straight trips, usually to a single foraging location, and is seldom combined with exploration of other areas. Exploration of the landscape typically occurs in the first few flights made by each bee, but our data show that further exploration flights can be made throughout the bee’s foraging career. Bees showed striking levels of variation in how they explored their environment, their fidelity to particular patches, ratio of exploration to exploitation, duration and frequency of their foraging bouts. One bee developed a straight route to a forage patch within four flights and followed this route exclusively for six days before abandoning it entirely for a closer location; this second location had not been visited since her first exploratory flight nine days prior. Another bee made only rare exploitation flights and continued to explore widely throughout its life; two other bees showed more frequent switches between exploration and exploitation. Our data shed light on the way bumblebees balance exploration of the environment with exploitation of resources and reveal extreme levels of variation between individuals. PMID:27490662

  2. Lifelong learning in public libraries principles, programs, and people

    CERN Document Server

    Gilton, Donna L

    2012-01-01

    Lifelong Learning in Public Libraries demonstrates that public librarians can promote learning by combining the elements of Information Literacy Instruction (ILI) with traditional practices of public libraries. This approach contributes to the information enfranchisement of patrons and enhances the fulfillment of the traditional goals and purposes of libraries. Donna L. Gilton provides background on ILI and current developments in public library instruction and also examines educational the

  3. Leveraging teamwork by Google+ in a lifelong learning perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Sabrina Leone; Giovanni Biancofiore

    2015-01-01

    The current affordances of ubiquitous global connections, of a large number of open resources, and of social and professional networks may boost innovation in open-minded organisations through their personnel’s empowerment. Lifelong and ubiquitous learning, cloud computing and smart working frameworks are the pillars of the change that is replacing the traditional work model and transforming the way crowds of people communicate, collaborate, teamwork, produce value and growth for the entities...

  4. Participation in lifelong learning in Portugal and the UK

    OpenAIRE

    Ingham, Hilary; Ingham, Mike; Adelino Afonso, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Lifelong learning (LLL) has now been on the agenda of the European Union and other major international organizations for some considerable time, with the European institutions stressing the need that such learning should be available to all, especially hard to reach groups. This paper seeks to explore LLL participation in Portugal and the UK, two countries at opposite ends of the adult learning spectrum and having very different labour market and educational contexts. Using Labour Force Surve...

  5. Youth and Adult Education within Lifelong Learning: Claims and challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Chris Duke; Heribert Hinzen

    2010-01-01

    The national and international development agenda looks at education as an important tool for transformation and change. Within education most attention is given to schooling and the wider formal sector of colleges and universities. Much less attention and still less resources go to youth and adult learning, and the non-formal education sector. Lifelong learning systems have yet to be implemented. Chris Duke and Heribert Hinzen describe the major processes, programmes and organizations such a...

  6. Knowing when to assist: developmental issues in lifelong assistive robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiris, Yiannis

    2009-01-01

    Children and adults with sensorimotor disabilities can significantly increase their autonomy through the use of assistive robots. As the field progresses from short-term, task-specific solutions to long-term, adaptive ones, new challenges are emerging. In this paper a lifelong methodological approach is presented, that attempts to balance the immediate context-specific needs of the user, with the long-term effects that the robot's assistance can potentially have on the user's developmental trajectory.

  7. Knowing when to assist: Developmental issues in lifelong assistive robotics

    OpenAIRE

    Demiris1, Y.

    2009-01-01

    20.03.15 KB. Ok to add accepted version to spiral Children and adults with sensorimotor disabilities can significantly increase their autonomy through the use of assistive robots. As the field progresses from short-term, task-specific solutions to long-term, adaptive ones, new challenges are emerging. In this paper a lifelong methodological approach is presented, that attempts to balance the immediate context-specific needs of the user, with the long-term effects that the robots assistance...

  8. Nutritional status and dietary pattern of male athletes in Ibadan, South Western Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oladunni, M O; Sanusi, R A

    2013-12-20

    Several factors, including nutritional status and dietary pattern are paramount to optimum performance among athletes. Notwithstanding, risky behaviours that limit or impair athletic performance are widely prevalent among athletes; these include excessive weight reduction and inappropriate dietary practices. This study was conducted to provide information on the nutritional status and dietary pattern of athletes in Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria. This was a cross sectional descriptive study, involving 207 athletes aged 17 to 40 years in Ibadan. Nutritional status was assessed by anthropometric indices: Body Mass Index (BMI) and percentage body fat (%BF). BMI was calculated from weight and height measurements and %BF was estimated from the sum of skin-fold thickness at 4 sites (triceps, biceps, sub-scapular and supra-iliac skin-folds). Dietary pattern was assessed by food habits and food frequency questionnaire. Descriptive and inferential statistics were conducted to describe and examine relationships between variables. Mean (SD) for variables were: age; 26.09(±4.77) years, weight; 72.13(±0.45) kg, height; 1.74(±0.06)m, and BMI; 23.89(±3.34)kg/m2. Only 4(1.93%) of the participants were underweight, 39(18.84%) were overweight and 8(3.86%) obese. Mean (SD) of %BF among overweight athletes was 14.25(±3.12) and maximum %BF among overweight athletes was 21.2. A strong and positive correlation was observed between BMI and %BF and %BF increased with age among overweight athletes. About 72% of the athletes skipped meals, 77% drank water or sports drinks during sporting activities, about 11% spent less than #40.00 for each meal. About 49% ate before sports. Foods most frequently consumed by athletes in this study were meat, fish, roots/tubers, cereals, vegetables and fruits. Milk and legumes were less frequently consumed by these athletes. Most of these athletes had nutritional status adequate for their sport activity. With regards to food habits, most of these athletes

  9. Athletic Engagement and Athletic Identity in Top Croatian Sprint Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, Vesna; Sarac, Jelena; Missoni, Sasa; Sindik, Josko

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the research was to determine construct validity and reliability for two questionnaires (Athlete Engagement Questionnaire-AEQ and Athletic Identity Measurement Scale-AIMS), applied on elite Croatian athletes-sprinters, as well as the correlations among the dimensions in these measuring instruments. Then, we have determined the differences in the dimensions of sport engagement and sport identity, according to gender, education level and winning medals on international competitions. A total of 71 elite athletes-sprinters (former and still active) are examined, from which 27 (38%) females and 44 (62%) males. The results of factor analyses revealed the existence of dimensions very similar as in the original instruments, which showed moderate to-high reliabilities. A small number of statistically significant correlations have been found between the dimensions of sport engagement and sport identity, mainly in male sprinter runners. Small number of statistically significant differences in the dimensions of sport engagement and sport identity have been found according to the gender, education level and winning medals on the international competitions. The most reasonable explanation of these differences could be given in terms of very similar characteristics of elite athletes on the same level of sport excellence.

  10. Many non-elite multisport endurance athletes do not meet sports nutrition recommendations for carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Geneviève; Lamarche, Benoît

    2016-07-01

    Little is known regarding the dietary intake of non-elite athletes involved in multisport endurance events. The primary objective of this observational study was to characterize the dietary intake of non-elite athletes participating in winter triathlon (snowshoeing, skating, and cross-country skiing), winter pentathlon (winter triathlon sports + cycling and running), Ironman (IM: swimming, cycling, running), and half-distance Ironman (IM 70.3) in relation with current sports nutrition recommendations. A total of 116 non-elite athletes (32 women and 84 men) who had participated in one of those events in 2014 were included in the analyses. Usual dietary intake was assessed using a validated online food frequency questionnaire. Participants (22-66 years old) trained 14.8 ± 5.3 h/week, on average (±SD). Only 45.7% [95% confidence interval, 36.4%-55.2%] of all athletes reported consuming the recommended intake for carbohydrates, with the highest proportion (66.7%) seen in IM athletes. On the other hand, 87.1% [79.6%-92.6%] of all athletes reported consuming at least 1.2 g protein·kg(-1)·day(-1), while 66.4% [57.0%-74.9%] reported consuming more than 1.6 g protein·kg(-1)·day(-1). The proportion of athletes consuming the recommended amount of protein was highest (84.6%) among IM athletes. There was no difference in the proportion of athletes achieving the recommended carbohydrate and protein intakes between men and women. These findings suggest that many non-elite multisport endurance athletes do not meet the current recommendations for carbohydrates, emphasizing the need for targeted nutritional education. Further research is needed to examine how underreporting of food intake may have affected these estimates.

  11. Upper gastrointestinal issues in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Jason J; Kapur, Rahul

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) complaints are common among athletes with rates in the range of 30% to 70%. Both the intensity of sport and the type of sporting activity have been shown to be contributing factors in the development of GI symptoms. Three important factors have been postulated as contributing to the pathophysiology of GI complaints in athletes: mechanical forces, altered GI blood flow, and neuroendocrine changes. As a result of those factors, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), nausea, vomiting, gastritis, peptic ulcers, GI bleeding, or exercise-related transient abdominal pain (ETAP) may develop. GERD may be treated with changes in eating habits, lifestyle modifications, and training modifications. Nausea and vomiting may respond to simple training modifications, including no solid food 3 hours prior to an athletic event. Mechanical trauma, decreased splanchnic blood flow during exercise, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) contribute to gastritis, GI bleeding, and ulcer formation in athletes. Acid suppression with proton-pump inhibitors may be useful in athletes with persistence of any of the above symptoms. ETAP is a common, poorly-understood, self-limited acute abdominal pain which is difficult to treat. ETAP incidence increases in athletes beginning a new exercise program or increasing the intensity of their current exercise program. ETAP may respond to changes in breathing patterns or may resolve simply with continued training. Evaluation of the athlete with upper GI symptoms requires a thorough history, a detailed training log, a focused physical examination aimed at ruling out potentially serious causes of symptoms, and follow-up laboratory testing based on concerning physical examination findings.

  12. Lifelong caloric restriction increases working memory in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Kuhla

    Full Text Available Caloric restriction (CR is argued to positively affect general health, longevity and the normally occurring age-related reduction of cognition. This issue is well examined, but most studies investigated the effect of short-term periods of CR. Herein, 4 weeks old female mice were fed caloric restricted for 4, 20 and especially for 74 weeks. CR mice received 60% of food eaten by their ad libitum (AL fed littermates, and all age-matched groups were behaviorally analyzed. The motor coordination, which was tested by rotarod/accelerod, decreased age-related, but was not influenced by the different periods of CR. In contrast, the age-related impairment of spontaneous locomotor activity and anxiety, both being evaluated by open field and by elevated plus maze test, was found aggravated by a lifelong CR. Measurement of cognitive performance with morris water maze showed that the working memory decreased age-related in AL mice, while a lifelong CR caused a better cognitive performance and resulted in a significantly better spatial memory upon 74 weeks CR feeding. However, a late-onset CR feeding in 66 weeks old mice did not ameliorate the working memory. Therefore, a lifelong CR seems to be necessary to improve working memory.

  13. Lifelong caloric restriction increases working memory in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhla, Angela; Lange, Sophie; Holzmann, Carsten; Maass, Fabian; Petersen, Jana; Vollmar, Brigitte; Wree, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) is argued to positively affect general health, longevity and the normally occurring age-related reduction of cognition. This issue is well examined, but most studies investigated the effect of short-term periods of CR. Herein, 4 weeks old female mice were fed caloric restricted for 4, 20 and especially for 74 weeks. CR mice received 60% of food eaten by their ad libitum (AL) fed littermates, and all age-matched groups were behaviorally analyzed. The motor coordination, which was tested by rotarod/accelerod, decreased age-related, but was not influenced by the different periods of CR. In contrast, the age-related impairment of spontaneous locomotor activity and anxiety, both being evaluated by open field and by elevated plus maze test, was found aggravated by a lifelong CR. Measurement of cognitive performance with morris water maze showed that the working memory decreased age-related in AL mice, while a lifelong CR caused a better cognitive performance and resulted in a significantly better spatial memory upon 74 weeks CR feeding. However, a late-onset CR feeding in 66 weeks old mice did not ameliorate the working memory. Therefore, a lifelong CR seems to be necessary to improve working memory.

  14. Lifelong Learning Competencies Development Program for Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Martinez-Mediano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Lifelong learning (LLL is an intentional learning that people engage in throughout their lives for personal and professional fulfillment and to improve the quality of their lives. Develop the capability for lifelong learning in Higher Education is important to facilitate the incorporation of new graduates to work. To this end, we have designed a program on "Lifelong learning competencies for Higher Education students', which we have applied to students at University of San Diego, California, USA and to the University of Distance Education, Spain. Methodology. We have presented the program by means a workshop where the debate and the reflection played one important strategy. To check the program’s achievements we used mixed methodologies, according to the evaluative research. We applied one questionnaire, and together to a practice and the students' personal portfolio, they enabled us to assess the program effectiveness, satisfaction and impact. Results. The comparison of the answers in the questionnaire, before and after of the workshops sing that students improved in their knowledge and awareness about the importance of LLL and key competencies for their profession development plan. Discussion. The program contributes to improve key competencies and commitment to learning throughout the people’s lives.

  15. Eating patterns and composition of meals and snacks in elite Canadian athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdman, Kelly Anne; Tunnicliffe, Jasmine; Lun, Victor M; Reimer, Raylene A

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the meal- and snack-eating frequency and the nutritional composition of each eating occasion of Canadian high-performance athletes during training. Athletes from 8 Canadian Sport Centres prospectively completed 3-d dietary records including all food, fluid, and supplements consumed. The time of consumption and whether the consumption was a meal or snack were also identified. The dietary records were analyzed for energy (kcal) and macronutrient intake (carbohydrate, protein, and fat) and compared based on gender, age, meal vs. snack, and training vs. rest days. Three hundred twenty-four athletic subjects (64% female and 36% male) completed the study. On average, the athletes ate 4.8 ± 0.8 times daily. Nearly all athletes consumed 3 daily meals of breakfast (98.9%), lunch (97.9%), and dinner (98.7%), with few having snacks: 57%, 71.6%, and 58.1% of athletes consumed an a.m., p.m., and evening snack, respectively. Training-day meal frequency did not differ from that during rest days; however, fewer snacks were consumed on rest days. A.m. and p.m. snacks were consumed significantly more often on training days than rest days. Overall, snacks contributed 24.3% of total daily energy intake. Few dietary variations were discovered between genders, while the youngest athletes (athletes. In conclusion, Canadian high-performance athletes self-adjusted their energy intakes on training vs. rest days primarily by snacking less and reducing their carbohydrate and protein intakes on rest days, yet they consistently ate regular meals.

  16. Assessment of electrocardiography, echocardiography, and heart rate variability in dynamic and static type athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ataei A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mehrnoush Toufan,1 Babak Kazemi,1 Fariborz Akbarzadeh,1 Amin Ataei,1 Majid Khalili21Cardiovascular Research Center, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; 2Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku, AzerbaijanBackground: Over the last two decades, morphological cardiac changes induced by athletic conditioning have been of great interest. Therefore, several studies have been orchestrated to delineate electrocardiography (ECG, echocardiography, and heart rate variability (HRV findings in athletes.Purpose: To assess the ECG, echocardiography, and HRV in a group of dynamic and static type athletes.Methods: Fifty professional athletes (20 static and 30 dynamic exercise athletes and 50 healthy nonathletes (control group were recruited. Standard 12-lead ECG and transthoracic echocardiography was performed on all athletes and the control group. Through echocardiography, variables including left ventricular (LV end-diastolic/systolic diameter, LV mass, and left atrial volume index were measured. In addition, both the athletes and the control group underwent ECG Holter monitoring for 15 minutes and several parameters related to HRV (time and frequency domain were recorded.Results: The most common ECG abnormalities among the athletes were sinus bradycardia and incomplete right bundle branch block. LV end-diastolic diameter and left atrial volume index were significantly greater in the dynamic athletes (P < 0.001. LV end-systolic diameter was significantly lower in the static group (P < 0.001. LV mass of the dynamic and static athletes was significantly greater than that of the controls (P < 0.001. Among the ECG Holter monitoring findings, the dynamic athletes had lower systolic blood pressure than the controls (P = 0.01. Heart rate was lowest in the control group (P < 0.001.Conclusion: The most common ECG abnormalities among adolescent Iranian athletes were sinus bradycardia and incomplete right bundle branch block. Static exercise seemed

  17. Patellofemoral pain in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersen W

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Wolf Petersen,1 Ingo Rembitzki,2 Christian Liebau3 1Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Martin Luther Hospital, Grunewald, Berlin; 2German Sport University Cologne, 3Asklepios Clinic, Bad Harzburg, Germany Abstract: Patellofemoral pain (PFP is a frequent cause of anterior knee pain in athletes, which affects patients with and without structural patellofemoral joint (PFJ damage. Most younger patients do not have any structural changes to the PFJ, such as an increased Q angle and a cartilage damage. This clinical entity is known as patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS. Older patients usually present with signs of patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA. A key factor in PFPS development is dynamic valgus of the lower extremity, which leads to lateral patellar maltracking. Causes of dynamic valgus include weak hip muscles and rearfoot eversion with pes pronatus valgus. These factors can also be observed in patients with PFOA. The available evidence suggests that patients with PFP are best managed with a tailored, multimodal, nonoperative treatment program that includes short-term pain relief with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs, passive correction of patellar maltracking with medially directed tape or braces, correction of the dynamic valgus with exercise programs that target the muscles of the lower extremity, hip, and trunk, and the use of foot orthoses in patients with additional foot abnormalities. Keywords: anterior knee pain, dynamic valgus, hip strength, rearfoot eversion, single leg squat, hip strength 

  18. Differences in Socialization between Visually Impaired Student-Athletes and Non-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahedi, Ahmadreza; Mojtahedi, Hossein; Farazyani, Fateh

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine whether there was a significant difference in measure of socialization between visually impaired student-athletes and non-athletes. We compared the social skills of Iranian visually impaired student-athletes (n = 51) and visually impaired student non-athletes (n = 56) with ages ranging from 13 to…

  19. How Stereotypes Affect Current Collegiate Female Athletes' Athletic Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Stereotype discrimination affects female athletes' athletic experiences. Studies have been conducted of former collegiate female athletes' perceptions of the lesbian stereotype found that they were discriminated against because of their sport participation. These limit the recalling of thoughts and experience from the female athletes' playing…

  20. Effective nutrition support programs for college athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinci, D M

    1998-09-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Husky Sport Nutrition Program at the University of Washington. This program is a component of the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics Total Student-Athlete Program, an NCAA-sponsored CHAMPS/Life Skills Program that provides life skills assistance to student-athletes. Successful integration of a sport nutrition program requires an understanding of the athletic culture, physiological milestones, and life stressors faced by college athletes. The sport nutritionist functions as an educator, counselor, and administrator. Team presentations and individual nutrition counseling provide athletes with accurate information on healthy eating behaviors for optimal performance. For women's sports, a multidisciplinary team including the sport nutritionist, team physician, clinical psychologist, and athletic trainer work to prevent and treat eating disorders. Case studies are presented illustrating the breadth of nutrition-related issues faced by a sport nutritionist working with college athletes.

  1. Secondary Amenorrhea among Female Athletes. Current Understandings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasiene, Gwen Hagenbuch

    1983-01-01

    Research pertaining to female athletes' problems with secondary amenorrhea is reviewed. Studies point to stress, weight loss, anorexia nervosa, obesity, arduous athletic training, and age of onset of training as factors which may contribute to this disorder. (PP)

  2. Infectious Mononucleosis: Recognition and Management in Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1987-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis strikes many young athletes. Considered here are its epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, natural course, complications, and management. The focus is on concerns of athletes with a perspective on personality, convalescence, and chronic fatigue. (Author/MT)

  3. Performance-Enhancing Drugs and Teen Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Tween and teen health Performance-enhancing drugs can be tempting for teen athletes. Understand the warning signs and what you can do to keep your teen from using shortcuts to improve athletic performance. By Mayo ...

  4. Does Cupping = Success for Olympic Athletes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_160301.html Does 'Cupping' = Success for Olympic Athletes? Telltale red circles of ancient Chinese practice ... Eyebrows raised in Rio over the weekend when Olympic athletes like swimmer Michael Phelps started showing up ...

  5. Helping Athletes Avoid Hazardous Weight Control Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janz, Kathleen

    1988-01-01

    This article addresses dangerous dieting techniques used by athletes and provides coaches and teachers specific strategies to aid in preventing eating-related disorders among athletes. Symptoms of anorexia and of bulimia are described. (JL)

  6. Nutrition, Diet, and Weight Control for Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Kathy

    1980-01-01

    Athletes can achieve their full potential and develop good eating habits for the future through proper diet and weight control. The basics of nutrition are as important as the basic skills of the sports in which athletes participate. (CJ)

  7. SOCIAL SECURITY OF TURKISH ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barış ÖZTUNA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Law No. 5510 realized within the social security reform aims providing a structure which presents equal scope and quality of social security service other all citizens. According to Labor Law No 4857, unionization of sportsmen in Turkish legal environment is possible, sport clubs and sportsmen are continuing to live without so many rights and obligations but they didn’t. Aim of this study; to prove sportsmen of location of the labour law and to mark off. The purpose of the study is explained according to Law No. 4857 and Law No. 5510 Turkish athletes. Profesional athletes deemed to be insurance holders for the purposes of implementing short and long term insurance branches of No 5510 Law. But amateur athletes don't seem to be insurance holders for the purposes of implementing short and long term insurance branches of No 5510 Law. According to the law 5774 regarding to be called as an g overnment athlete, within the adults category of the sports that are accepted as olympic, paralympic and deaflympic; pension is paid to the amateur athletes who became first, second or third at Olymic games, World or European Champions as an individual or team sports and to the national team coaches and assistant coaches of the athletes’ who became Olympic or World Champion as a team.

  8. Injuries and training variables in Filipino judo athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciejewski Reylin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: The aim of this study was twofold: first, to compare the incidence of injuries between male and female athletes in the junior and youth divisions during competition, as well as to identify body parts commonly injured and the types of injury frequently incurred; second, to assess overall incidence of injuries in relation to the frequency and duration of training as well as supplemental training.

  9. Sudden cardiac death in the elite athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Rio-santiago, Valentín; Santiago Trinidad, Ricardo; Vicenty Rivera, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a long -recognized disease that occurs rarely in trained athletes. Most affected athletes have no symptoms before death. Many attempts have been made to detect those at risk for SCD before athletic participation. However, its overall clinical advantages remain questionable in medical literature. This article will review cardiogenic and non-cardiogenic causes of SCD as well as discuss how this entity affects those athletes older than 35 years.

  10. Steroids in Athletics: One University's Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Mike

    1990-01-01

    Presents an account of one university's experience in conducting an investigation into possible steroid use by student athletes and the development of a program to deal with the problem. Discusses why athletes use steroids and how steroids are taken. Concludes it is likely many steroid-related deaths of athletes go undetected. (Author/ABL)

  11. NCAA Takes Heat over Commercialization of Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Libby

    2008-01-01

    The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) is no stranger to criticism. This article reports that during a meeting of the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics, some higher-education officials questioned the NCAA's handling of a CBS fantasy football league, announced over the summer, that would use college athletes' names. Many…

  12. Chem I Supplement: Nutrition (Diet) and Athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineback, David R.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses various aspects related to nutrition and athletics. Examines nutritional requirements, energy use, carbohydrate loading, and myths and fallacies regarding food and athletic performance. Indicates that scientific evidence does not validate the use of any special diet by an athlete. (JN)

  13. Personality and motivation of top athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Kajtna

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The research investigated the differences in personality structure and the motivational structure of top athletes and athletes and male and female athletes, and we also looked for the interactive effect of sport success and gender. We also investigated anxiety in the mentioned groups. We gathered the results from 385 athletes, divided into two groups according to their success. World class athletes and international class athletes, as categorized according to the Slovenian Olympic committee, were assigned to "top athletes" group, whereas those with the perspective, national and youth class were assigned to the group of "athletes". We found no effect of sport success in the personality structure and anxiety, while we found that successful athletes are more competitive, have stronger win orientation, stronger need for power and stronger need for success and are more self – motivated. Differences between male and female athletes have demonstrated themselves to be significant in all three investigated areas – female athletes are more failure avoidant in the motivational scope of our investigation, express a higher level of state and trait anxiety than male athletes, and are less emotionally stable and are more agreeable as far as personality is concerned. We found no interactive effect of sport success and sex in any of the investigated areas.

  14. Transportation Practices in Community College Athletics

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVetter, David; Kim, Hyun Duck

    2010-01-01

    Over 45,000 U.S. community college athletes were transported to events during 2005-2006. Transporting college athletes has been an overlooked risk management issue facing administrators. Team travel accidents have caused death, injury, liability claims, property loss, and grief. National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) member…

  15. Intercollegiate Athletics Subsidies: A Regressive Tax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denhart, Matthew; Vedder, Richard

    2010-01-01

    For most colleges and universities in the United States, intercollegiate athletics is a losing financial proposition. The vast majority ICA departments do not break even and require subsidization from the institution as a whole. When schools are forced to heavily subsidize athletics, ICA serves to impose an "athletics tax" on other dimensions of…

  16. Smokeless Tobacco Education for College Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burak, Lydia J.

    2001-01-01

    Chewing tobacco and taking snuff are common practices among college athletes. This article describes one college's smokeless tobacco education program for students athletes in the health, physical education, and recreation department. Research on the multiple-strategy intervention indicated decreases in student athletes' smokeless tobacco use and…

  17. A Proposed Athletic Training Curriculum Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Sue

    An athletic training curriculum for the training of high school coaches and physical education teachers in Virginia includes courses on: (1) athletic injuries--a basic study of human physiology and anatomy relevant to different athletic injuries; (2) the art and science of sports medicine--prevention, evaluation, treatment, and rehabilitation of…

  18. Female College Athlete Leadership and Team Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galicinao, Brianne M.

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory study contributes to the research on athlete leadership and team effectiveness in college sports. Athletic departments and sports coaches could benefit from a study about athlete leadership and team effectiveness in order to assist their student-leaders with leadership development and explore additional means to help improve team…

  19. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, Eugene Brent; Adams, Brian B

    2008-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections have become an increasingly common condition among athletes. Physical contact, shared facilities and equipment, and hygienic practices of athletes all contribute to methicillin-resistant S. aureus transmission among sports participants. This review elucidates the risk factors predisposing to methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection in athletes and provides guidance for treatment and prevention.

  20. Policies on screening female athletes for iron deficiency in NCAA division I-A institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowell, Brandy S; Rosenbloom, Christine A; Skinner, Robert; Summers, Stephanie H

    2003-09-01

    Iron deficiency is the most prevalent nutritional deficiency in the United States. This condition has been reported to affect 60% of female athletes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention emphasize screening for anemia in women of childbearing age. The purpose of this study was to determine the number of National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I-A schools that implement screening for iron deficiency in female athletes as well as the screening policies for those who do. A link to an online survey was sent to 94 NCAA Division I-A schools to determine current practices concerning screening and treating female athletes for iron deficiency. There was a 58% response rate. Frequencies for each response were computed. Forty-three percent of responding institutions report screening female athletes for iron deficiency. This study suggests that screening for iron deficiency in female athletes at NCAA Division I-A schools is not a routine procedure and, for those who do screen, variability exists in the criteria for diagnosis, as well as in treatment protocols. Standard protocols for assessment and treatment of iron deficiency in female athletes need to be developed and implemented.

  1. Nutritional considerations for vegetarian athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Susan I; Rideout, Candice A

    2004-01-01

    With the growing interest in the potential health benefits of plant-based diets, it is relevant to consider whether vegetarian dietary practices could influence athletic performance. Accordingly, this review examines whether nutrients that may differ between vegetarian and omnivorous diets could affect physical performance. We also describe recent studies that attempt to assess the effects of a vegetarian diet on performance and comment on other nutritional aspects of vegetarianism of relevance to athletes. Although well-controlled long-term studies assessing the effects of vegetarian diets on athletes have not been conducted, the following observations can be made: 1) well-planned, appropriately supplemented vegetarian diets appear to effectively support athletic performance; 2) provided protein intakes are adequate to meet needs for total nitrogen and the essential amino acids, plant and animal protein sources appear to provide equivalent support to athletic training and performance; 3) vegetarians (particularly women) are at increased risk for non-anemic iron deficiency, which may limit endurance performance; and 4) as a group, vegetarians have lower mean muscle creatine concentrations than do omnivores, and this may affect supramaximal exercise performance. Because their initial muscle creatine concentrations are lower, vegetarians are likely to experience greater performance increments after creatine loading in activities that rely on the adenosine triphosphate/phosphocreatine system. 5) Coaches and trainers should be aware that some athletes may adopt a vegetarian diet as a strategy for weight control. Accordingly, the possibility of a disordered eating pattern should be investigated if a vegetarian diet is accompanied by unwarranted weight loss.

  2. COMPOSITION OF THE ATHLETES DIET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastislav Salaj

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available  Sports nutrition is a constantly evolving field with many of research papers published annually. However, designing the most suitable sports diet is very difficult. It must be given to the type of training, its duration and intensity, the age and sex of the athlete and also for overall health. The aim of this article is to summarize knowledges about sports nutrition, especially intake of carbohydrates, proteins, fats and dietary supplements and their influence on the performance and recovery of the athlete.doi:10.5219/126 

  3. Sacroiliac joint dysfunction in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brolinson, P Gunnar; Kozar, Albert J; Cibor, Greg

    2003-02-01

    The sacroiliac (SI) joint is a common source of low back pain in the general population. Because it is the link between the lower extremities and the spine, it sustains even higher loads during athletic activity, predisposing athletes to a greater probability of joint dysfunction and pain. The diagnosis and treatment of SI joint dysfunction remains controversial, due to complex anatomy and biomechanics, and a lack of universally accepted nomenclature and terminology, consistently reliable clinical tests and imaging studies, and consistently effective treatments. This article clarifies these issues by presenting a model of SI joint anatomy and function, a systematic approach to the diagnosis of dysfunction, and a comprehensive treatment plan.

  4. Polymorphisms in the control region of mitochondrial DNA associated with elite Japanese athlete status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, E; Fuku, N; Takahashi, H; Ohiwa, N; Pitsiladis, Y P; Higuchi, M; Kawahara, T; Tanaka, M

    2013-10-01

    The control region of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) contains the main regulatory elements for mtDNA replication and transcription. Certain polymorphisms in this region would, therefore, contribute to elite athletic performance, because mitochondrial function is one of determinants of physical performance. The present study was undertaken to examine the effect of polymorphisms in this region on elite athlete status by sequencing the mtDNA control region. Subjects comprised 185 elite Japanese athletes who had represented Japan at international competitions (i.e., 100 endurance/middle-power athletes: EMA; 85 sprint/power athletes: SPA), and 672 Japanese controls (CON). The mtDNA control region was analyzed by direct sequencing. Frequency differences of polymorphisms (minor allele frequency ≥ 0.05) in the mtDNA control region between EMA, SPA, and CON were examined. EMA displayed excess of three polymorphisms [m.152T>C, m.514(CA)n repeat (n ≥ 5), and poly-C stretch at m.568-573 (C ≥ 7)] compared with CON. On the other hand, SPA showed greater frequency of the m.204T>C polymorphism compared with CON. In addition, none of the SPA had m.16278C>T polymorphism, whereas the frequencies of this polymorphism in CON and EMA were 8.3% and 10.0%, respectively. These findings imply that several polymorphisms detected in the control region of mtDNA may influence physical performance probably in a functional manner.

  5. Body composition and endocrine profile of male Olympic athletes striving for leanness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagmar, Magnus; Berglund, Bo; Brismar, Kerstin; Hirschberg, Angelica Lindén

    2013-05-01

    To investigate the endocrine profile, body composition, and state of mood in male Olympic athletes participating in sports that do or do not emphasize leanness. Cross-sectional study. Research unit at a university hospital. Forty-four Swedish male Olympic athletes participating in 26 different sport disciplines. Body composition was determined by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and blood levels of steroid hormones and biomarkers of nutritional status were analyzed. In addition, states of mood were assessed employing the profile of mood states (POMS) test. The athletes were divided into 2 groups on the basis of whether their sporting discipline emphasized leanness or not. In all subjects, body composition, hormone levels, and POMS scores were within normal ranges. However, the leanness athletes (n = 18) displayed significantly lower proportion of body fat (P anger, and a higher global POMS score (P < 0.05), the latter being positively correlated to the frequency of illness (r = 0.42, P < 0.01) before the Olympic Games. Although there were no indications of energy deficiency or endocrine disturbance in the leanness athletes, their higher POMS scores and frequency of illness may indicate the potential harmfulness of their pursuit of outstanding athletic performance.

  6. The female athlete triad and endothelial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanser, Erica M; Zach, Karie N; Hoch, Anne Z

    2011-05-01

    A tremendous increase in the number of female athletes of all ages and abilities has occurred in the past 35 years. In general, sports and athletic competition produce healthier and happier women. However, explosion in participation has revealed clear gender-specific injuries and medical conditions unique to the female athlete. This article focuses on the latest advances in our knowledge of the female athlete triad and the relationship between athletic-associated amenorrhea and endothelial dysfunction. Treatment of vascular dysfunction with folic acid is also discussed.

  7. The special olympics healthy athletes experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Special Olympics is the largest sports organization in the world serving athletes with intellectual disabilities. Because of their unique needs, Special Olympics has designed a multitude of programs specifically for athletes with intellectual disabilities, including the world's largest public health screening program for people with intellectual disabilities, known as the Special Olympics Healthy Athletes Program. This article describes the Healthy Athletes program and some of the results of the program within the context of impacting health care professional education with respect to athletes with intellectual disabilities.

  8. [Endurance and Fatigue Caused by Local Muscular Performance in Skilled Athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, T V; Koryukalov, Y I; Kourova, O G

    2015-01-01

    It was the objective of this research to study the functional parameters of endurance and performance and the brain electrobiological activity during local antebrachial muscle work performance among skilled athletes and unfit people aged 18-23. We examined performance and the brain bioelectrical activity changes at local muscle work by means of an ergograph until fatigue. Our results suggested that local performance increased the spectral power of slow alpha- and theta waves as the fatigue set in, but these changes developed slower and were manifested later in the athletes than in the unfit people. Besides, tired athletes' EEGs showed alpha waves synchronization and only demonstrated a decrease in low- and high frequency beta waves indexes. Athletes show higher performance and lower fatigability if compared to unfit people during local performance, also proved by the EEG bioelectrical changes.

  9. Popular universities: An alternative vision for lifelong learning in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromquist, Nelly P.; da Costa, Romina B.

    2017-08-01

    At its inception in 1993, the European Union (EU) did not consider education one of the pillars of its regional cohesiveness and identity. As time went by, recognition of the potential role of education at individual and social levels increased. This concern for education, however, is much more centred on the acquisition of knowledge and skills towards developing a competitive labour force than towards facilitating the integration of all citizens in the European community - a bias which is reflected in EU policies and recommendations. At local levels, communities need to offer educational opportunities to all members of society, irrespective of their social, cultural and linguistic background and their level of education. In many EU member countries, this kind of learning is offered by popular universities (PUs), which are not state-funded and run in close collaboration with their respective local communities. The authors of this paper carried out a qualitative survey, collecting data on PUs in Spain and France. Their purpose was to examine how European PU offerings align with community needs, and to what extent they address emerging issues such as immigration, the refugee crisis, an aging population and youth unemployment. In the evaluation of their comparative survey, the authors link the grassroots approaches of PUs in Spain and France to the broader European Union (EU) discourse on lifelong learning (LLL) as seen in policy documents such as the European Commission's Memorandum on Lifelong Learning. Finally, they examine the ways in which PUs' approach to LLL works to contest the dominant consensus on the meaning and scope of lifelong learning, offering an alternative way forward.

  10. Europe: Strategies and agendas for lifelong learning at time of crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella

    2014-01-01

    A complete overview of lifelong learning strategies in Europe, at both international and national levels, calls for understanding the processes through which these strategies take shape. Accordingly, in this contribution, lifelong learning strategies are analyzed through a critical lens...... and the OECD, with important consequences for lifelong learning policy. Evidence is found, for instance, in the formation of a reductionist skills agenda, joint between the EU and the OECD; an agenda capable of influencing future governmental thinking about lifelong learning and adult education in Europe....

  11. Empowering Learners for Lifelong Competence Development: Pedagogical, Organizational and Technological Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sligte, Henk; Koper, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Sligte, H., & Koper, R. (Eds.) (2008). Empowering Learners for Lifelong Competence Development: Pedagogical, Organizational and Technological Issues. International Journal Emerging Technologies in Learning, 3, 4-6.

  12. ACTN3 R577X Gene Variant Is Associated With Muscle-Related Phenotypes in Elite Chinese Sprint/Power Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruoyu; Shen, Xunzhang; Wang, Yubin; Voisin, Sarah; Cai, Guang; Fu, Yongnan; Xu, Wangyu; Eynon, Nir; Bishop, David J; Yan, Xu

    2017-04-01

    Yang, R, Shen, X, Wang, Y, Voisin, S, Cai, G, Fu, Y, Xu, W, Eynon, N, Bishop, DJ, and Yan, X. ACTN3 R577X gene variant is associated with muscle-related phenotypes in elite Chinese sprint/power athletes. J Strength Cond Res 31(4): 1107-1115, 2017-The ACTN3 R577X polymorphism (rs1815739) has been shown to influence athletic performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of this polymorphism in elite Chinese track and field athletes, and to explore its effects on athletes' level of competition and lower-extremity power. We compared the ACTN3 R577X genotypes and allele frequencies in 59 elite sprint/power athletes, 44 elite endurance athletes, and 50 healthy controls from Chinese Han origin. We then subcategorized the athletes into international level and national level and investigated the effects of ACTN3 genotype on lower-extremity power. Genotype distribution of the sprint/power athletes was significantly different from endurance athletes (p = 0.001) and controls (p power athletes (p = 0.004), with no international-level sprint/power athletes with XX genotype. The best standing long jump and standing vertical jump results of sprint/power athletes were better in the RR than those in the RX + XX genotypes (p = 0.004 and p = 0.001, respectively). In conclusion, the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism influences the level of competition and lower-extremity power of elite Chinese sprint/power athletes. Including relevant phenotypes such as muscle performance in future studies is important to further understand the effects of gene variants on elite athletic performance.

  13. Morbidity and mortality following poliomyelitis - a lifelong follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kay, L; Nielsen, N M; Wanscher, B

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In the world today 10-20 million people are still living with late effects of poliomyelitis (PM), but the long-term consequences of the disease are not well known. The aim of this study was to describe lifelong morbidity and mortality among Danes who survived PM. METHODS...... no major differences in morbidities between paralytic and non-paralytic PM cases. CONCLUSIONS: Poliomyelitis has significant long-term consequences on morbidity and mortality of both paralytic and non-paralytic cases....

  14. Lifelong Learning Within Higher Education in South Africa: Emancipatory Potential?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Shirley

    1999-11-01

    In South Africa under apartheid higher education was inaccessible to the majority. This article argues that in the new South Africa there is an opportunity to redress this situation and promote equity though lifelong learning. This would involve greatly widening access and providing programmes to develop broadly applicable abilities such as computer literacy and problem-solving skills, which would increase the economic competitiveness and personal empowerment of learners. At the same time, the author argues, new educational approaches are needed to promote active citizenship.

  15. The Incidence and Intensity of Formal Lifelong Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Marianne; Skipper, Lars

    We exploit a rich high quality register-based employer-employee panel data set to investigate the incidence and intensity of government co-sponsored training for the Danish adult population. We focus specifically on training over the working life cycle and find that the levels of participation vary...... across genders. We consider both the incidence (take-up in a given year) and intensity (hours conditional on enrolment) of training. We find evidence of considerable lifelong learning with regards to enrolment in basic and vocational training regardless of gender, whereas post-secondary training...

  16. Internet platforms for lifelong learning: a continuum of opportunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedory Holzer, Susan E; Kokemueller, Phillip

    2007-12-01

    Access to knowledge through the Internet has spawned a world of online learning, stimulating a new passion for lifelong learning in academia, professional environments, the workplace, and at home. This article takes a fresh look at the wide spectrum of opportunities for online medical education for physicians. We first explore a continuum of "e-learning" models and then look at the range of platforms used to support these systems. We will also look forward to the options likely to change e-learning in the near future and improve physician performance and patient outcomes.

  17. CARBOHYDRATE INTAKE CONSIDERATIONS FOR YOUNG ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Montfort-Steiger

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Good nutritional practices are important for exercise performance and health during all ages. Athletes and especially growing children engaged in heavy training have higher energy and nutrient requirements compared to their non-active counterparts. Scientific understanding of sports nutrition for the young athlete is lacking behind the growing number of young athletes engaged in sports. Most of the sports nutrition recommendations given to athletic children and adolescents are based on adult findings due to the deficiency in age specific information in young athletes. Therefore, this review reflects on child specific sports nutrition, particularly on carbohydrate intake and metabolism that distinguishes the child athlete from the adult athlete. Children are characterised to be in an insulin resistance stage during certain periods of maturation, have different glycolytic/metabolic responses during exercise, have a tendency for higher fat oxidation during exercise and show different heat dissipation mechanisms compared to adults. These features point out that young athletes may need different nutritional advice on carbohydrate for exercise to those from adult athletes. Sport drinks for example may need to be adapted to children specific needs. However, more research in this area is warranted to clarify sports nutrition needs of the young athlete to provide better and healthy nutritional guidance to young athletes

  18. Evaluation of factors associated with severe and frequent back pain in high school athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Matias; Silveira, Erika Aparecida; de Avelar, Ivan Silveira

    2017-01-01

    Several studies have shown that half of all young athletes experience back pain (BP). However, high intensity and frequency of BP may be harmful, and the factors associated with BP severity have not been investigated in detail. Here, we investigated the factors associated with a high intensity and high frequency of BP in high school athletes. We included 251 athletes (173 boys and 78 girls [14–20 years old]) in this cross-sectional study. The dependent variables were a high frequency and high intensity of BP, and the independent variables were demographic, socioeconomic, psychosocial, hereditary, anthropometric, behavioural, and postural factors and the level of exercise. The effect measure is presented as prevalence ratio (PR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). Of 251 athletes, 104 reported BP; thus, only these athletes were included in the present analysis. Results of multivariable analysis showed an association between high BP intensity and time spent using a computer (PR: 1.15, CI: 1.01–1.33), posture while writing (PR: 1.41, CI: 1.27–1.58), and posture while using a computer (PR: 1.39, CI: 1.26–1.54). Multivariable analysis also revealed an association of high BP frequency with studying in bed (PR: 1.19, CI: 1.01–1.40) and the method of carrying a backpack (PR: 1.19, CI: 1.01–1.40). In conclusion, we found that behavioural and postural factors are associated with a high intensity and frequency of BP. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to compare different intensities and frequencies of BP, and our results may help physicians and coaches to better understand BP in high school athletes. PMID:28222141

  19. Female Athlete Triad: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzkin, Elizabeth; Curry, Emily J; Whitlock, Kaitlyn

    2015-07-01

    After the passage of Title IX in 1972, female sports participation skyrocketed. In 1992, the female athlete triad was first defined; diagnosis required the presence of an eating disorder, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis. However, many athletes remained undiagnosed because they did not meet all three of these criteria. In 2007, the definition was modified to a spectrum disorder involving low energy availability (with or without disordered eating), menstrual dysfunction, and low bone mineral density. With the new definition, all three components need not be present for a diagnosis of female athlete triad. Studies using the 1992 definition of the disorder demonstrated a prevalence of 1% to 4% in athletes. However, in certain sports, many female athletes may meet at least one of these criteria. The actual prevalence of athletes who fall under the "umbrella" diagnosis of the female athlete triad remains unknown.

  20. Paralympic Athletes and "Knowing Disability"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Hayley

    2012-01-01

    This article explores non-disabled young people's understandings of Paralympic athletes and the disability sports they play. The article examines how society has come to know disability by discussing medical and social model views of disability. The conceptual tools offered by Pierre Bourdieu are utilised as a means of understanding the nature and…

  1. Athletic Excellence and National Glory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    The Athens Olympic Games marked a watershed in Chinesesporting history. China's remarkable achievements, second only tothose of America, placed indelibly it on the list of powerful sportingnations. More important, China's most celebrated athlete, 110-meterhurdle gold medallist Liu Xiang, banished forever the myth that Asianathletes do not measure up to those of Europe or the USA.

  2. Common problems in endurance athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosca, David D; Navazio, Franco

    2007-07-15

    Endurance athletes alternate periods of intensive physical training with periods of rest and recovery to improve performance. An imbalance caused by overly intensive training and inadequate recovery leads to a breakdown in tissue reparative mechanisms and eventually to overuse injuries. Tendon overuse injury is degenerative rather than inflammatory. Tendinopathy is often slow to resolve and responds inconsistently to anti-inflammatory agents. Common overuse injuries in runners and other endurance athletes include patellofemoral pain syndrome, iliotibial band friction syndrome, medial tibial stress syndrome, Achilles tendinopathy, plantar fasciitis, and lower extremity stress fractures. These injuries are treated with relative rest, usually accompanied by a rehabilitative exercise program. Cyclists may benefit from evaluation on their bicycles and subsequent adjustment of seat height, cycling position, or pedal system. Endurance athletes also are susceptible to exercise-associated medical conditions, including exercise-induced asthma, exercise-associated collapse, and overtraining syndrome. These conditions are treatable or preventable with appropriate medical intervention. Dilutional hyponatremia is increasingly encountered in athletes participating in marathons and triathlons. This condition is related to overhydration with hypotonic fluids and may be preventable with guidance on appropriate fluid intake during competition.

  3. Self Hypnosis for Elite Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Colin P.

    A summary of the use of hypnosis in sport (Morgan 1980) has suggested that the evidence in this area is equivocal, particularly in strength, endurance, and psychomotor tasks. However, some experiments have demonstrated the potential use of hypnosis. This paper presents examples of two elite Australian athletes who achieve success using hypnosis or…

  4. Nutrient Needs of Young Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenberg, Barbara; Hemmelgarn, Melinda

    1991-01-01

    Explains the nutritional requirements of children and adolescents, and the physiological roles of the major nutrients. Details the nutrient needs of young athletes, including pre- and postgame meals and fluid replacement. Discusses eating disorders and obesity. Advocates a diet rich in complex carbohydrates. (BC)

  5. A Corporate Pitch for Athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Steve

    1998-01-01

    The challenge of funding new athletic programs with no additional tax revenue forced a Colorado Springs school district to supplement existing funding arrangements (participation fees, gate admissions, and team fundraising) with a new income source--a lucrative Coca-Cola contract. This article explains how to negotiate (and justify) favorable…

  6. Paralympic Athletes and "Knowing Disability"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Hayley

    2012-01-01

    This article explores non-disabled young people's understandings of Paralympic athletes and the disability sports they play. The article examines how society has come to know disability by discussing medical and social model views of disability. The conceptual tools offered by Pierre Bourdieu are utilised as a means of understanding the nature and…

  7. Nutrition recommendations for masters athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, Christine A; Dunaway, Ann

    2007-01-01

    "More than 3000 masters athletes from 62 countries compete in Linz, Austria, in March of 2006." In 2005, 9000 "silver-haired Americans go for the gold." The National Senior Games Association announced a "major change in the NSGA rules affecting the game of basketball; a new age division of 80+ has been added for 2007."

  8. Self Hypnosis for Elite Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Colin P.

    A summary of the use of hypnosis in sport (Morgan 1980) has suggested that the evidence in this area is equivocal, particularly in strength, endurance, and psychomotor tasks. However, some experiments have demonstrated the potential use of hypnosis. This paper presents examples of two elite Australian athletes who achieve success using hypnosis or…

  9. The TOPGAME-study : effectiveness of extracorporeal shockwave therapy in jumping athletes with patellar tendinopathy. Design of a randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerver, Johannes; Verhagen, Evert; Hartgens, Fred; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ron L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Patellar tendinopathy is a major problem for many athletes, especially those involved in jumping activities. Despite its frequency and negative impact on athletic careers, no evidence-based guidelines for management of this overuse injury exist. Since functional outcomes of conservative

  10. Use of dietary supplements in Olympic athletes is decreasing: a follow-up study between 2002 and 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helenius Ilkka

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of use of dietary supplements (DS among large sample of elite Finnish athletes and to describe possible changes in dietary supplement use between the years 2002 and 2009. Methods A prospective follow-up study was conducted on Olympic athletes. The first survey was conducted on Olympic athletes in 2002 (N = 446 and the follow-up study was conducted between May 2008 and June 2009 (N = 372. Results In 2002, a total of 81% of the athletes used dietary supplements (a mean of 3.37 ± 3.06 DS per user and in 2009, a total of 73% of the athletes (a mean of 2.60 ± 2.69 per DS user used them. After adjusting for age-, sex- and sport type, the OR (95% confidence interval, CI for use of any dietary supplement was significantly less in 2009 as compared with 2002 results (OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.43-0.90. Decrease in DS use was observed in all supplement subgroups (vitamins, minerals, nutritional supplements. Athletes in speed and power events and endurance events reported use of any dietary supplement significantly more often than team sport athletes both in 2002 and 2009. In year 2009, the frequency of all dietary supplement use increased when athlete's age increased and the increase was significant in older age groups: of the athletes under 21 years 63%, 21-24 years 83% and over 24 years 90% consumed nutritional supplements. Conclusions Based in our study, there seems to be a lowering trend of dietary supplement use among elite Finnish athletes although differences between sport subgroups and age groups are considerable.

  11. Lifelong Bilingualism Maintains White Matter Integrity in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Gigi; Bialystok, Ellen; Craik, Fergus I. M.; Grady, Cheryl L.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has shown that bilingual speakers have higher levels of cognitive control than comparable monolinguals, especially at older ages. The present study investigates a possible neural correlate of this behavioral effect. Given that white matter (WM) integrity decreases with age in adulthood, we tested the hypothesis that bilingualism is associated with maintenance of WM in older people. Using diffusion tensor imaging, we found higher WM integrity in older people who were lifelong bilinguals than in monolinguals. This maintained integrity was measured by fractional anisotropy (FA) and was found in the corpus callosum extending to the superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi. We also hypothesized that stronger WM connections would be associated with more widely distributed patterns of functional connectivity in bilinguals. We tested this by assessing the resting-state functional connectivity of frontal lobe regions adjacent to WM areas with group differences in FA. Bilinguals showed stronger anterior to posterior functional connectivity compared to monolinguals. These results are the first evidence that maintained WM integrity is related to lifelong naturally occurring experience; the resulting enhanced structural and functional connectivity may provide a neural basis for “brain reserve.” PMID:22090506

  12. Teaching new media composition studies in a lifelong learning context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Jameson

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The government 'spin' on lifelong learning, as expressed in the Green Paper, The Learning Age (DfEE, 1998, and taken forward in the White Paper, Learning to Succeed (DfEE, 1999, emphasizes knowledge acquisition, skills development and student-centred flexible education and training. The aim of the government, as expressed in the summary document, Education and Training Development Agenda 2000-2001, is to 'help develop a "learning society" in which everyone, in whatever circumstances, routinely expects to learn and upgrade skills throughout life' (DfEE, 1998. Central to this idealistic notion is the view that continuous updating in ICT skills will play a vital part in the self-empowerment of individual learners. In support of this vision the government is funding ventures such as the Information and Communication Technologies (ICT Learning Centres initiative - 'a new programme designed to help bridge the gap between those in society who have access to ICT and those who do not' (DfEE, 1999. Community Access to Lifelong Learning is a parallel New Opportunities Fund programme which is designed to encourage adult learning. It focuses on improving access to learning opportunities through the use of ICT.

  13. LIFELONG LEARNING THROUGH SECOND LIFE: CURRENT TRENDS, POTENTIALS AND LIMITATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nil GOKSEL-CANBEK

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Lifelong Learning (LLL has been a remarkable response to people-centered educational demand of 21st century. In order to provide effective formal, non-formal, and informal learning, immersive educational activities undertaken throughout life should be aimed to create a learning society in which people can experience individual and collective learning with no constrains of time or location. The concept of lifelong learning within the context of distance immersive education encompasses diverse 3D activities. The three dimensional, Web-based structured activities supported by distance learning technologies can be viewed as interactive tools which foster LLL. In this perspective, Second Life (SL can be regarded as one of the learning simulation milieus that allow learners to participate in various educational LLL activities in individual or group forms. The following paper examines how SL, taking advantage of its simulative nature and the possibility for creative interaction among participants, which are also common in games, allows the learners to participate in immersive constructivist learning activities. The article will also touch on the current uses of SL as a tool for LLL, as well as its potentials for further development according to the current trends in adult education. Further, the authors will discuss its limitations and will make suggestions towards a more complete pedagogical use.

  14. Lifelong education in china: New policies and activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo-Dong, Xie

    1994-05-01

    In this article, the author presents a descriptive survey of China's policies in the field of lifelong education in the 1980s and early 1990s, undertaken as part of the country's overall drive towards modernization. With the second largest illiterate population in the world, one of China's highest priorities is the promotion of literacy, and a variety of initiatives with this aim have been launched at national and local level. In China, the concept of lifelong education is taken literally to encompass all ages from infancy onwards. Recognizing the importance of the family, and especially of the mother, in educating the young, China has created a programme for strengthening family education through workshops, lectures, advisory services and the mass media. The author goes on to survey recent policies in primary and secondary education, vocational education, workers' in-service training, continuing education for specialists, and the development of a radio and television university, the expansion of evening classes and correspondence courses, education for the aged, and examinations for independent learners.

  15. Lifelong bilingualism maintains neural efficiency for cognitive control in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Brian T; Kim, Chobok; Johnson, Nathan F; Kryscio, Richard J; Smith, Charles D

    2013-01-09

    Recent behavioral data have shown that lifelong bilingualism can maintain youthful cognitive control abilities in aging. Here, we provide the first direct evidence of a neural basis for the bilingual cognitive control boost in aging. Two experiments were conducted, using a perceptual task-switching paradigm, including a total of 110 participants. In Experiment 1, older adult bilinguals showed better perceptual switching performance than their monolingual peers. In Experiment 2, younger and older adult monolinguals and bilinguals completed the same perceptual task-switching experiment while functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed. Typical age-related performance reductions and fMRI activation increases were observed. However, like younger adults, bilingual older adults outperformed their monolingual peers while displaying decreased activation in left lateral frontal cortex and cingulate cortex. Critically, this attenuation of age-related over-recruitment associated with bilingualism was directly correlated with better task-switching performance. In addition, the lower blood oxygenation level-dependent response in frontal regions accounted for 82% of the variance in the bilingual task-switching reaction time advantage. These results suggest that lifelong bilingualism offsets age-related declines in the neural efficiency for cognitive control processes.

  16. Lifelong bilingualism maintains white matter integrity in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Gigi; Bialystok, Ellen; Craik, Fergus I M; Grady, Cheryl L

    2011-11-16

    Previous research has shown that bilingual speakers have higher levels of cognitive control than comparable monolinguals, especially at older ages. The present study investigates a possible neural correlate of this behavioral effect. Given that white matter (WM) integrity decreases with age in adulthood, we tested the hypothesis that bilingualism is associated with maintenance of WM in older people. Using diffusion tensor imaging, we found higher WM integrity in older people who were lifelong bilinguals than in monolinguals. This maintained integrity was measured by fractional anisotropy (FA) and was found in the corpus callosum extending to the superior and inferior longitudinal fasciculi. We also hypothesized that stronger WM connections would be associated with more widely distributed patterns of functional connectivity in bilinguals. We tested this by assessing the resting-state functional connectivity of frontal lobe regions adjacent to WM areas with group differences in FA. Bilinguals showed stronger anterior to posterior functional connectivity compared to monolinguals. These results are the first evidence that maintained WM integrity is related to lifelong naturally occurring experience; the resulting enhanced structural and functional connectivity may provide a neural basis for "brain reserve."

  17. HOW HEALTHY IS THE BEHAVIOR OF YOUNG ATHLETES? A SYSTEMATIC LITERATURE REVIEW AND META-ANALYSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Diehl

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Participation in sports during adolescence is considered a healthy behavior. The extent to which adolescent athletes engage in other healthful (or risky behaviors is less clear, however. We conducted a systematic literature review following the PRISMA Statement to assess the frequency of risky behaviors among athletes in this age group. We searched the PubMed, PsycINFO and SCA Sociological Abstracts databases for observational studies published in English over the last twenty years on the frequency of selected risk behaviors (alcohol consumption, smoking behavior, use of illicit drugs, unhealthy nutrition, and doping in adolescent athletes. Two independent reviewers selected articles following the PRISMA Statement. Behavior frequency was assessed as was comparability of study design and methods. When possible, meta- analyses were performed using data from subgroups of studies in which operational indicators were comparable. Seventy-eight articles met eligibility criteria. Although report of risky behaviors varied across studies, we observed overall, that studies tend to report higher alcohol use, less smoking, less recreational drug use, and more smokeless tobacco use in (high-involved athletes. Considerable heterogeneity was noted in study design, definition of target groups and use of operational indicators (I² ranged from 93.2% to 100%. Especially the higher prevalence of using alcohol and smokeless tobacco needs more attention in interventions targeted to this group. Overall, greater consensus on methods used to assess risky behaviors in adolescent athletes

  18. Perceptions of Sport Retirement by Current Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Brandy Sue

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the problem of college student-athletes retiring from their sports unprepared for life outside of sanctioned athletics. The purpose was to identify if a current student-athlete believes he/she is prepared for a career life after competitive college athletics and who the student-athlete feels should provide guidance into the…

  19. The experiences of female athletic trainers in the role of the head athletic trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Burton, Laura; Cotrufo, Raymond J

    2015-01-01

    Very few women have leadership positions in athletic training (ie, head athletic training positions) in intercollegiate athletics. Research exists on the barriers to attaining the role; however, our understanding about the experiences of those currently engaged in the role is limited. To examine the experiences of female head athletic trainers as they worked toward and attained the position of head athletic trainer. Qualitative study. National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I setting. Eight female athletic trainers serving in the role of head athletic trainer participated in our study. The mean age of the participants was 45 ± 12 years, with 5 ± 1.5 years of experience in the role of head athletic trainer and 21 ± 10 years of experience as athletic trainers. We conducted phone interviews with the 8 participants following a semistructured format. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed following a general inductive approach as described by Thomas. To establish credibility, we used a peer reviewer, member checks, and multiple-analyst triangulation. Six major themes emerged from our analysis regarding the experiences of female head athletic trainers. Opportunities to become a head athletic trainer, leadership qualities, and unique personal characteristics were discussed as factors leading to the assumption of the role of the head athletic trainer. Where women hold back, family challenges, and organizational barriers speak to the potential obstacles to assuming the role of head athletic trainer. Female head athletic trainers did not seek the role, but through persistence and encouragement, they find themselves assuming the role. Leadership skills were discussed as important for success in the role of head athletic trainer. Life balancing and parenting were identified as barriers to women seeking the role of head athletic trainer.

  20. of iron deficiency in adolescent female athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Malczewska-Lenczowska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyse the effectiveness of new haematology parameters related to reticulocytes and mature red blood cells to differentiate pre latent and latent iron deficiency. The study included 219 female athletes (aged 15-20 years representing volleyball, handball, cycling, canoeing, cross-country skiing, swimming and judo. To assess iron status the concentration of ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR, iron and total iron binding capacity (TIBC were determined in serum. In addition to blood morphology, the mean cellular haemoglobin content in erythrocytes (CH and reticulocytes (CHr, mean cellular haemoglobin concentration in reticulocytes (CHCMr, the percentage of erythrocytes (HYPOm and reticulocytes (HYPOr with decreased cellular haemoglobin concentration, the percentage of erythrocytes (LowCHm and reticulocytes (LowCHr with decreased cellular haemoglobin content, and percentage of erythrocytes with decreased volume (MICROm were determined. Subjects with ferritin <30 ng/ml were classified as having stage I (pre-latent iron deficiency (ID. The second stage (latent ID was diagnosed when low ferritin was accompanied by elevated sTfR and/or elevated TIBC values. The frequency of ID (without anaemia symptoms was high, amounting to 60% (stage I in 45%, stage II in 15% of subjects. In subjects with stage I ID significant changes in haematological variables concerned mainly reticulocytes: CHCMr (p<.001, CHr (p<.05, LowCHr (p<.05, HYPOr (p<.001 in comparison to normal iron stores. In athletes with latent ID, there were also significant changes (p<.001 in many indices of mature red blood cells, i.e. haemoglobin concentration (Hb, mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC, CH, %LowCHm, as well as %MICROm (p<.01 in relation to the group without iron deficiency. The main finding of this study was that the diminished or exhausted iron stores had already caused changes in reticulocytes

  1. Attention and Reaction Time in Shotokan Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António VencesBrito

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to analyze the attention capacity and the reaction time in Portuguese karate Shotokan athletes. Participated 96 Shotokan athletes from the Portuguese Karate Association. We physically characterized the sample (weight, height, body mass index, and body fat mass percentage and evaluated Simple Reaction Time (TRS, Choice Reaction Time (TRE, Decision Time (TD and the Distributed Attention (AD. Data was analyzed according to athletes’ group age (15 to 19 yr, 20 to 35 yr and more than 35 yr, level of graduation (9th to 4th kyu, 3rd to 1st kyu, DAN and by gender (male and female. Male athletes present significant differences from female athletes in height, weight, years of practice and body fat mass. In relation to TRS all groups tend to a value near to 300 ms without significant differences among them, but the TRE and the TD are significantly higher in the Dan athletes and in the +35 yrs athletes than in the other groups. On the other hand the Dan and +35 yrs athletes tend to do less mistakes. Gender does not influence significantly the reaction time in the Shotokan karate athletes, but it seems that women tend to have smaller reaction times than men. Athletes with more years of practice and more graduation need more time to reply to the stimulus than the other athletes, but they tend to do fewer mistakes on their choices than other subjects. As for distributed attention, no significant differences were found in function of the athlete graduation, nor in function of gender. However, for distributed attention, we found statistical significant differences in function of the age, with the oldest athletes presenting lower levels of distributed attention. Our results seem to show that is necessary to do some modifications in the training process of Portuguese Shotokan karate athletes.

  2. Student retention in athletic training education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, Thomas M; Mitchell, Murray F; Mensch, James M

    2009-01-01

    The success of any academic program, including athletic training, depends upon attracting and keeping quality students. The nature of persistent students versus students who prematurely leave the athletic training major is not known. Understanding the profiles of athletic training students who persist or leave is important. To (1) explore the relationships among the following variables: anticipatory factors, academic integration, clinical integration, social integration, and motivation; (2) determine which of the aforementioned variables discriminate between senior athletic training students and major changers; and (3) identify which variable is the strongest predictor of persistence in athletic training education programs. Descriptive study using a qualitative and quantitative mixed-methods approach. Thirteen athletic training education programs located in District 3 of the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Ninety-four senior-level athletic training students and 31 college students who changed majors from athletic training to another degree option. Data were collected with the Athletic Training Education Program Student Retention Questionnaire (ATEPSRQ). Data from the ATEPSRQ were analyzed via Pearson correlations, multivariate analysis of variance, univariate analysis of variance, and a stepwise discriminant analysis. Open-ended questions were transcribed and analyzed using open, axial, and selective coding procedures. Member checks and peer debriefing techniques ensured trustworthiness of the study. Pearson correlations identified moderate relationships among motivation and clinical integration (r = 0.515, P students. Understanding student retention in athletic training is important for our profession. Results from this study suggest 3 key factors associated with student persistence in athletic training education programs: (1) student motivation, (2) clinical and academic integration, and (3) the presence of a peer-support system. Educators and program

  3. Common cutaneous disorders in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, R J

    1990-02-01

    Athletic activity may cause or aggravate skin disorders, which in turn may diminish athletic performance. Since many sporting activities necessitate prolonged exposure to the sun, athletes must avoid painful sunburn which will adversely affect their performance. Drugs and chemicals also may cause photoallergic and/or phototoxic reactions, including polymorphous light eruption and athletes should thus avoid photosensitising drugs and chemicals. The effects of chronic ultraviolet exposure include ageing, pigmentation and skin cancers. The most effective protection against excessive exposure to sunlight is the use of sunscreens, although inadequate application and poor protection in the UVA spectrum may diminish their effectiveness and contact allergies may create other problems. Viral, bacterial and fungal infections are common in athletes due to heat, friction and contact with others. Herpes simplex may be treated with any drying agents (e.g. alcohol) as they are as effective as more expensive topical agents such as acyclovir. Molluscum contagiosum may be spread by close contact or water contact and is treated by superficial incision, cryotherapy or standard wart varnishes. Plantar wart infection is transmitted by swimming pool decks, changing rooms and hand-to-hand from weights in gymnasiums. Plantar warts presenting with pain may be aggressively treated, by blunt dissection, but painless ones are best treated conservatively. Impetigo and folliculitis often develop after trauma. Antibiotics are effective against mild infections while abrasions and lacerations should be cleansed and dressed with occlusive dressings. Diphtheroid bacteria in moist footwear may produce pitted keratolysis and erythrasma. Tinea pedis is common in athletes and probably originates in swimming pools, gymnasium floors and locker rooms. Interdigital, dry-moccasin and pustular-midsole forms can be distinguished. The latter two forms respond to topical antifungal agents, while the interdigital

  4. The ACTN3 R577X nonsense allele is under-represented in elite-level strength athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Stephen M; Walsh, Sean; Liu, Dongmei; Metter, E Jeffrey; Ferrucci, Luigi; Hurley, Ben F

    2008-03-01

    Previous reports have shown a lower proportion of the ACTN3 X/X genotype (R577X nonsense polymorphism) in sprint-related athletes compared to the general population, possibly attributed to impairment of muscle function related to alpha-actinin-3 deficiency. In the present study, we examined the frequency of the X/X genotype in both Black and White elite-level bodybuilders and strength athletes in comparison to the general population. A reference population of 668 Whites (363 men and 305 women) and 208 Blacks (98 men and 110 women) was genotyped for the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism. Strength athletes (52 white and 23 black; 4 women) consisting predominantly of world class and locally competitive bodybuilders, and elite powerlifters were recruited and similarly genotyped. Significantly lower X/X genotype frequencies were observed in the athletes (6.7%) vs controls (16.3%; P=0.005). The X/X genotype was significantly lower in White athletes (9.7%) vs controls (19.9%; P=0.018). No black athletes (0%) were observed with the X/X genotype, though this finding only approached statistical significance vs controls (4.8%; P=0.10). The results indicate that the ACTN3 R577X nonsense allele (X) is under-represented in elite strength athletes, consistent with previous reports indicating that alpha-actinin-3 deficiency appears to impair muscle performance.

  5. Association between the Pro12Ala Polymorphism of the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma Gene and Strength Athlete Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewska-Karlowska, Agnieszka; Sawczuk, Marek; Cieszczyk, Pawel; Zarebska, Aleksandra; Sawczyn, Stanislaw

    2013-01-01

    Background The 12Ala allele of the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma gene (PPARG) Pro12Ala polymorphism produces a decreased binding affinity of the PPARγ2 protein, resulting in low activation of the target genes. The 12Ala allele carriers display a significantly improved insulin sensitivity that may result in better glucose utilisation in working skeletal muscles. We hypothesise that the PPARG 12Ala allele could be associated with strength athlete status in Polish athletes. Methodology The genotype distribution of PPARG Pro12Ala was examined in 660 Polish athletes. The athletes were stratified into four subgroups: endurance, strength-endurance, sprint-strength and strength. Control samples were prepared from 684 unrelated sedentary volunteers. A χ2 test was used to compare the PPARG Pro12Ala allele and genotype frequencies between the different groups of athletes and control subjects. Bonferroni’s correction for multiple testing was applied. Results A statistically significant higher frequency of PPARG 12Ala alleles was observed in the subgroup of strength athletes performing short-term and very intense exertion characterised by predominant anaerobic energy production (13.2% vs. 7.5% in controls; P = 0.0007). Conclusion The PPARG 12Ala allele may be a relevant genetic factor favouring strength abilities in professional athletes, especially in terms of insulin-dependent metabolism, a shift of the energy balance towards glucose utilisation and the development of a favourable weight-to-strength ratio. PMID:23799144

  6. Association between the Pro12Ala polymorphism of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma gene and strength athlete status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewska-Karlowska, Agnieszka; Sawczuk, Marek; Cieszczyk, Pawel; Zarebska, Aleksandra; Sawczyn, Stanislaw

    2013-01-01

    The 12Ala allele of the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma gene (PPARG) Pro12Ala polymorphism produces a decreased binding affinity of the PPARγ2 protein, resulting in low activation of the target genes. The 12Ala allele carriers display a significantly improved insulin sensitivity that may result in better glucose utilisation in working skeletal muscles. We hypothesise that the PPARG 12Ala allele could be associated with strength athlete status in Polish athletes. The genotype distribution of PPARG Pro12Ala was examined in 660 Polish athletes. The athletes were stratified into four subgroups: endurance, strength-endurance, sprint-strength and strength. Control samples were prepared from 684 unrelated sedentary volunteers. A χ(2) test was used to compare the PPARG Pro12Ala allele and genotype frequencies between the different groups of athletes and control subjects. Bonferroni's correction for multiple testing was applied. A statistically significant higher frequency of PPARG 12Ala alleles was observed in the subgroup of strength athletes performing short-term and very intense exertion characterised by predominant anaerobic energy production (13.2% vs. 7.5% in controls; P = 0.0007). The PPARG 12Ala allele may be a relevant genetic factor favouring strength abilities in professional athletes, especially in terms of insulin-dependent metabolism, a shift of the energy balance towards glucose utilisation and the development of a favourable weight-to-strength ratio.

  7. Association between the Pro12Ala polymorphism of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma gene and strength athlete status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Maciejewska-Karlowska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The 12Ala allele of the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma gene (PPARG Pro12Ala polymorphism produces a decreased binding affinity of the PPARγ2 protein, resulting in low activation of the target genes. The 12Ala allele carriers display a significantly improved insulin sensitivity that may result in better glucose utilisation in working skeletal muscles. We hypothesise that the PPARG 12Ala allele could be associated with strength athlete status in Polish athletes. METHODOLOGY: The genotype distribution of PPARG Pro12Ala was examined in 660 Polish athletes. The athletes were stratified into four subgroups: endurance, strength-endurance, sprint-strength and strength. Control samples were prepared from 684 unrelated sedentary volunteers. A χ(2 test was used to compare the PPARG Pro12Ala allele and genotype frequencies between the different groups of athletes and control subjects. Bonferroni's correction for multiple testing was applied. RESULTS: A statistically significant higher frequency of PPARG 12Ala alleles was observed in the subgroup of strength athletes performing short-term and very intense exertion characterised by predominant anaerobic energy production (13.2% vs. 7.5% in controls; P = 0.0007. CONCLUSION: The PPARG 12Ala allele may be a relevant genetic factor favouring strength abilities in professional athletes, especially in terms of insulin-dependent metabolism, a shift of the energy balance towards glucose utilisation and the development of a favourable weight-to-strength ratio.

  8. Lifelong guidance: How guidance and counselling support lifelong learning in the contrasting contexts of China and Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhixin

    2016-10-01

    Due to the effects of globalisation and rapid technological development, traditional linear life course patterns of the past are gradually disappearing, and this affects education and learning systems as well as labour markets. Individuals are forced to develop lifestyles and survival strategies to manage job insecurity and make their skills and interests meet labour market needs. In modern attempts to develop and implement institutional provision for lifelong learning, guidance and counselling play an important role. The current Danish guidance system is well-organised, highly structured and professionalised. By contrast, Chinese guidance is still fragmented and "sectorisational". This paper explores whether elements of the highly structured and professionalised Danish guidance system and practice might be applicable to the Chinese context. The author begins by outlining international and national factors which are affecting citizens' life and career planning. She then presents and discusses the evolution of guidance and the different elements of provision in each of the two countries. Next, She compares the concepts and goals of "lifelong guidance" in Denmark and China, pointing out their similarities and differences and their respective strengths and weaknesses. The paper concludes with some suggestions for the further development of guidance in China.

  9. Lifelong guidance: How guidance and counselling support lifelong learning in the contrasting contexts of China and Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhixin

    2016-09-01

    Due to the effects of globalisation and rapid technological development, traditional linear life course patterns of the past are gradually disappearing, and this affects education and learning systems as well as labour markets. Individuals are forced to develop lifestyles and survival strategies to manage job insecurity and make their skills and interests meet labour market needs. In modern attempts to develop and implement institutional provision for lifelong learning, guidance and counselling play an important role. The current Danish guidance system is well-organised, highly structured and professionalised. By contrast, Chinese guidance is still fragmented and "sectorisational". This paper explores whether elements of the highly structured and professionalised Danish guidance system and practice might be applicable to the Chinese context. The author begins by outlining international and national factors which are affecting citizens' life and career planning. She then presents and discusses the evolution of guidance and the different elements of provision in each of the two countries. Next, She compares the concepts and goals of "lifelong guidance" in Denmark and China, pointing out their similarities and differences and their respective strengths and weaknesses. The paper concludes with some suggestions for the further development of guidance in China.

  10. Issues of Identity and Knowledge in the Schooling of VET: A Case Study of Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennant, Mark; Yates, Lyn

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses two school-based case studies of vocational education and training in the areas of information technology and hospitality from the perspective of the agendas of "lifelong learning". Lifelong learning can be seen as both a policy goal leading to institutional and programme reforms and as a process which fosters in learners…

  11. Lifelong learning arrangements in chinese organizations in the context of an emerging knowedge economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dilin Meiyi, Yao

    2008-01-01

    There is a proverb in China: huo dao lao, xue dao lao, which means keep on learning as long as you live. Though this is an ancient thought for Lifelong Learning, the meaning of the current research in Lifelong Learning is still up to date. Kessels (2001) stated that our society is gradually moving t

  12. A Study of a Two-Year College and How It Fosters Lifelong Learning and Empowerment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen-Simmermon, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    The study of lifelong learning is a study that has deep roots in higher education. The reasons a student seeks further education is important to the overall study of lifelong learning. When a student completes an associate degree and subsequently pursues a higher education degree, it is important to understand the motivation that drives them to…

  13. Effect of lifelong football training on the expression of muscle molecular markers involved in healthy longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mancini, A; Vitucci, D; Labruna, G

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: We investigated whether lifelong football training affects the expression of healthy longevity-related muscle molecular markers. METHODS: Biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis muscle of 10 lifelong football-trained men (68.2 ± 3.0 years) and of 10 active untrained healthy men...

  14. The Inclusion and Construction of the Worthy Citizen through Lifelong Learning: A Focus on the OECD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Judith

    2009-01-01

    This paper argues that underlying the OECD's promotion of inclusion in, for and through lifelong learning is the notion of an "active citizen" who establishes their worth through learning and, ultimately, competence. Through the critical examination of recent OECD policy documents on adult and lifelong learning, the paper also calls for…

  15. Where is my time? Identifying productive time of lifelong learners for effective feedback services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabuenca, Bernardo

    2014-01-01

    Lifelong learners are confronted with a broad range of activities they have to manage every day. In most cases they have to combine learning, working, family life and leisure activities throughout the day. Hence, learning activities from lifelong learners are disrupted. The difficulty to find a suit

  16. Europe: Strategies and agendas for lifelong learning at time of crisis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella

    2014-01-01

    and the OECD, with important consequences for lifelong learning policy. Evidence is found, for instance, in the formation of a reductionist skills agenda, joint between the EU and the OECD; an agenda capable of influencing future governmental thinking about lifelong learning and adult education in Europe....

  17. Networking for Learning The role of Networking in a Lifelong Learner's Professional Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajagopal, Kamakshi

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation discusses the role the social activity of networking plays in lifelong learners’ professional and personal continuous development. The main hypothesis of this thesis is that networking is a learning strategy for lifelong learners, in which conversations are key activities through w

  18. Effect of lifelong resveratrol supplementation and exercise training on skeletal muscle oxidative capacity in aging mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringholm, Stine; Olesen, Jesper; Pedersen, Jesper Thorhauge;

    2013-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that lifelong resveratrol (RSV) supplementation counteracts an age-associated decrease in skeletal muscle oxidative capacity through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator (PGC)-1α and that RSV combined with lifelong exercise training (ET...

  19. Financing Lifelong Learning for All: An International Perspective. Working Paper No. 46

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Gerald

    2002-01-01

    Improvements in lifelong learning are necessary for a range of overlapping reasons, including changing needs of the labour force in a globalised economy, the aging of the population in high-income countries and inequalities in education, work and income. Increased lifelong learning, for all, is important for productivity, but also to support…

  20. Education and Lifelong Learning in Romania--Perspectives of the Year 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Veronica Adriana; Popescu, Gheorghe N.; Popescu, Cristina Raluca

    2012-01-01

    Our research study focuses on the problems of education and lifelong learning in the Romanian society of the year 2020. Starting from the idea that lifelong learning represents the continuous building of skills and knowledge through the life of an individual, we believe that the process of continuous education is the key element that each and…

  1. Toward Recognitive Justice: Emerging Trends and Challenges in Transnational Migration and Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shibao

    2010-01-01

    As a result of globalization and transnational migration, many countries are becoming increasingly ethno-culturally diverse. Unfortunately, lifelong learning has failed to integrate cultural difference and diversity into educational environments. Rather than facilitating immigrants' adaptation, lifelong learning has become a vehicle for…

  2. Lifelong Learning: Ideas and Achievements at the Threshold of the Twenty-first Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bown, Lalage

    2000-01-01

    Explores the concept of lifelong learning and other related ideas, highlighting applications such as human rights, literacy, and gender. Reports on new areas for lifelong learning and suggests lessons in learning for the high development countries, such as development-related learning and popular participation. (CMK)

  3. Lifelong Learning Policy for the Elderly People: A Comparative Experience between Japan and Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhirathiti, Nopraenue

    2014-01-01

    This study examined and compared the legal inputs, structural settings and implementation process of lifelong learning policy in Thailand and Japan focusing on street-level agents. The findings demonstrated that while both countries had legal frameworks that provided a legislative platform to promote lifelong learning among the elderly based on a…

  4. Work-related lifelong learning for entrepreneurs in the agri-food sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lans, T.; Wesselink, R.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Mulder, M.

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a study on work-related lifelong learning for entrepreneurs in the agri-food sector. Accordingly, learning needs, learning preferences, learning motivation and conditions in the context of lifelong learning were identified. The results indicate that technology, IT and entrepren

  5. Lifelong Education, Quality of Life and Self-Efficacy of Chinese Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Dion S. Y.; Liu, Ben C. P.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the relationships between lifelong learning, quality of life, and self-efficacy of older adults. One thousand and three participants of a lifelong educational program participated; the mean age was 50.6 (SD = 7.8, range: 18-78). Findings revealed that the patterns of study established a positive association with…

  6. Choosing Learning in Later Life: Constructions of Age and Identity among Lifelong Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Summer

    2013-01-01

    Lifelong learning programs for older adults are expanding in university communities, given the growing emphasis on successful aging in our society. This dissertation consists of two articles that examine data from ethnographic research in a southeastern lifelong learning institute associated with a state university. Data include observations over…

  7. Lifelong learning arrangements in chinese organizations in the context of an emerging knowedge economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dilin Meiyi, Yao

    2008-01-01

    There is a proverb in China: huo dao lao, xue dao lao, which means keep on learning as long as you live. Though this is an ancient thought for Lifelong Learning, the meaning of the current research in Lifelong Learning is still up to date. Kessels (2001) stated that our society is gradually moving

  8. The EU as a Norm Entrepreneur: The Case of Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleibrink, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The EU has become one of the most prominent promoters of lifelong learning policies. Inside the European single market, EU member states have strong incentives to adopt similar approaches to lifelong learning and recognition of educational attainments in order to foster labour mobility. More surprisingly, countries neighbouring the EU also develop…

  9. WBL to Promote Lifelong Learning among Farmers from Developing Countries: Key Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Pradeep Kumar

    2010-01-01

    In times of liberalization, privatization and globalization (LPG), countries are looking to establish effective systems of lifelong learning to prepare farmers for changing agricultural sector. But offering lifelong learning to farmers in developing countries) is a vital challenge as majority of them are residing in remote and rural areas and have…

  10. Relationship between Lifelong Learning Levels and Information Literacy Skills in Teacher Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solmaz, Dilek Yaliz

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to examine the relationship between lifelong learning levels and information literacy skills in teacher candidates. The research group consists of 127 physical education and sports teacher candidates. Data were collected by means of "Lifelong Learning Scale (LLL)" and "Information Literacy Scale". In the data…

  11. Lifelong Learning and Teacher Development. Estonian Studies in Education. Volume 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikk, Jaan, Ed.; Veisson, Marika, Ed.; Luik, Piret, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The papers in this collection contribute to the understanding of several aspects of lifelong learning. Two papers highlight the characteristics of reflection among teachers including self-evaluation and blogging. Two other papers study cooperation in lifelong learning--one, the impact of communities on professional learning among university…

  12. Work-Related Lifelong Learning for Entrepreneurs in the Agri-Food Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lans, Thomas; Wesselink, Renate; Biemans, Harm J. A.; Mulder, Martin

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a study on work-related lifelong learning for entrepreneurs in the agri-food sector. Accordingly, learning needs, learning preferences, learning motivation and conditions in the context of lifelong learning were identified. The results indicate that technology, IT and entrepreneurial competencies will become of increasing…

  13. Lifelong Learning in a Market Economy: Education, Training and the Citizen-Consumer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axford, Beverley; Seddon, Terry

    2006-01-01

    Australian public policy adopted the concept of lifelong learning in the 1980s and harnessed it to human capital theory to articulate a new policy emphasis on "up-skilling" the Australian labour force. This paper addresses the question of how this conception of lifelong learning has fared in practice as Australian Commonwealth government…

  14. Ensuring the Continuum of Learning: The Role of Assessment for Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yahui

    2015-01-01

    This article explores how assessment plays a role in helping learners to learn on a continuous, sustainable basis. It begins by exploring the paradigm of lifelong learning, which implies a shift in the way we think about learning and knowledge. Based on knowledge formation rooted in a flux of learning, lifelong learning assessment is not so much…

  15. Lifelong Learning for Equity and Social Cohesion: A New Challenge for Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halimi, Suzy; Hristoskova, Stefanka

    2001-01-01

    The Council of Europe's lifelong learning project affirmed the role of higher education in promoting social cohesion and equal access to lifelong learning opportunities. The need to change formal structures to accommodate nontraditional methods was recognized. The impact of information/communications technologies on educational processes and…

  16. Rethinking Lifelong Learning through Online Distance Learning in Chinese Educational Policies, Practices and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min

    2008-01-01

    This paper offers a critique of the Chinese philosophy of online distance learning as a means of building a lifelong learning society. Literature about lifelong learning and its implications for online distance learning is reviewed. Documents, reports and research papers are examined to explore the characteristics of the Chinese philosophy of…

  17. International Perspectives on Lifelong Learning: From Recurrent Education to the Knowledge Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istance, David, Ed.; Schuetze, Hans G., Ed.; Schuller, Tom, Ed.

    This book, consisting of 17 chapters written by different authors, traces the progress that has been made in developing lifelong learning policies over the past 30 years and examines current challenges to lifelong learning policymakers. Focusing on a global agenda, the book is organized in six parts with thematic chapters following an introductory…

  18. Lifelong Learning in Public Libraries in 12 European Union Countries: Issues in Monitoring and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanziola, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Public libraries in Europe have supported lifelong learning for the past 500 years. Since the Lisbon Strategy emphasized the role of lifelong learning in economic policy, public libraries have been repositioning their services to respond to this new context. In some cases, these roles are undertaken with limited legislative or strategic changes…

  19. Serious but Fun, Self-Directed yet Social: Blogging as a Form of Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harju, Vilhelmiina; Pehkonen, Leila; Niemi, Hannele

    2016-01-01

    The article explores the role of digital media in supporting lifelong learning. In particular, it focuses on bloggers who write their blogs voluntarily in their own free time. The aim is to examine how lifelong learning--viewed as self-directed, nonformal learning and active participation that evolves from a desire for self-actualization--occurs…

  20. Lifelong Learning in Public Libraries in 12 European Union Countries: Issues in Monitoring and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanziola, Javier

    2011-01-01

    Public libraries in Europe have supported lifelong learning for the past 500 years. Since the Lisbon Strategy emphasized the role of lifelong learning in economic policy, public libraries have been repositioning their services to respond to this new context. In some cases, these roles are undertaken with limited legislative or strategic changes…

  1. Serious but Fun, Self-Directed yet Social: Blogging as a Form of Lifelong Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harju, Vilhelmiina; Pehkonen, Leila; Niemi, Hannele

    2016-01-01

    The article explores the role of digital media in supporting lifelong learning. In particular, it focuses on bloggers who write their blogs voluntarily in their own free time. The aim is to examine how lifelong learning--viewed as self-directed, nonformal learning and active participation that evolves from a desire for self-actualization--occurs…

  2. Physical Education and Physically Active Lives: A Lifelong Approach to Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Dawn; Jess, Mike

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses upon the relationship between physical education and interests in enabling more people to establish and maintain "active and healthy lives" from a curriculum development perspective. Twin and inter-linked concepts of "lifelong learning" and "lifelong physical activity" are presented as a conceptual basis for curriculum…

  3. In search of transformative moments: Blending community building pursuits into lifelong learning experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulas Pstross

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a reflective exploration on the relationship between community building and lifelong learning. Using a reflective style, the authors propose that the fusion of community building principles with lifelong learning practice can positively transform educational practice. Seven positive pursuits are highlighted regarding their potential to assist the implementation of community building into a lifelong learning programs: (1 asset- based thinking; (2 critical reflection; (3 systems thinking; (4 cognitive vibrancy, (5 inclusiveness; (6 creative expression; and, (7 purpose in life. These pursuits draw upon the power of the community development field to bring about more positive transformative moments for individuals and communities participating in lifelong learning programs. The metaphor of bread making is used to illustrate how such transformative moments occur and why they are meaningful to individuals pursuing lifelong learning.

  4. Lifelong Learning in a Learning Society: Are Community Learning Centres the Vehicle?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzoor Ahmed

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This chapter provides a historical perspective on the evolving concepts of lifelong learning and the learning society and makes the case for the community learning centre as a potential institutional vehicle for the promotion of adult and lifelong learning. It highlights the pertinence of lifelong learning/learning society in the post-2015 Development Agenda discourse. Arguments in favour of the community learning centre as a vehicle for lifelong learning/learning society are illustrated using the example of Bangladesh and drawing on parallels and contrasts with China and India. Finally, lessons derived from a recent review of the Asia-Pacific region are evaluated with respect to the development of strategic actions intended to offer adult and lifelong learning within and through community learning centres.

  5. Review of S. Jackson (2011): Lifelong Learning and Social Justice: Communities, Work and Identities in a Globalises World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birger Steen

    2012-01-01

    A discussion of lifelong learning, sustainability and equity. Critique of limitations in a Foucauldian conceptualization......A discussion of lifelong learning, sustainability and equity. Critique of limitations in a Foucauldian conceptualization...

  6. Lifelong Education of Teachers: The Gap between Reality and Awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đula Borozan

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available By providing the acquisition of knowledge and skills matching the demands of the modern times, education has a major impact on the development of economy and society in general. However, in order to have such significance, education has to constantly and consistently improve its quality. Teachers have a key role in this process and accordingly have to look after their professional development. The basic aim of this paper was to research the attitudes of teachers in the Brčko District in Bosnia and Herzegovina about lifelong education, their willingness and involvement in different types of lifelong education, and the satisfaction with their profession. The field research was conducted by surveying 101 elementary school teachers in the Brčko District in 2009. In some ways, the results of this piece of research were consistent with the results of the research conducted in developed countries, and in other ways, they were not. The results are consistent when it comes to the levels of satisfaction with working in their profession. However, there are some differences when it comes to the question of evaluating the level of one’s knowledge and educational skills, as well as the knowledge and educational skills of fellow teachers, and also when it comes to the question of participating in different types of professional development. Unlike most of the teachers surveyed in developed countries, the majority of teachers in the Brčko District are very satisfied with their knowledge and skills, with how they are equipped with the literature for both personal and professional development, and they do not identify the way the schools are equipped with literature as a problem. Even though most of the teachers are aware of the importance of lifelong education in their own professional development and the development of society in general, they rarely take part in different types of organized professional advancement opportunities and many of them do not

  7. Rationale and implementation of anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention warm-up programs in female athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bien, Daniel P

    2011-01-01

    The sex disparity in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury risk and the subsequent adverse effects on knee joint health, psychosocial well-being, and financial costs incurred have produced a surge in research on risk factors and interventions designed to decrease this disparity and overall incidence. Biomechanical and neuromuscular differences have been identified throughout the trunk and lower extremity that may increase noncontact ACL injury risk in female athletes. Evidence demonstrates that many risk factors are modifiable with intervention programs and that athletic performance measures can be enhanced. No universally accepted ACL injury prevention program currently exists, and injury prevention programs are diverse. Anterior cruciate ligament injury prevention programs introduced in a warm-up format offer multiple benefits, primarily, improved compliance based on improved practicality of implementation. However, drawbacks of warm-up style formats also exist, most notably that a lack of equipment and resources may preclude measurable improvements in athletic performance that foster improved compliance among participants. The purpose of this review is to analyze the current literature researching possible biomechanical and neuromuscular risk factors in noncontact ACL injury in female athletes and the most effective means of implementing critical elements of a program to decrease ACL injury risk in female athletes while improving athletic performance. Hip and hamstring training, core stabilization, plyometrics, balance, agility, neuromuscular training with video and verbal feedback to modify technique, and stretching appear to be essential components of these programs. Further research is critical to determine ideal training program volume, intensity, duration, and frequency.

  8. Eating attitudes, body esteem, perfectionism and anxiety of judo athletes and nonathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouveix, M; Bouget, M; Pannafieux, C; Champely, S; Filaire, E

    2007-04-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the prevalence and relationships between disordered eating, menstrual irregularity, musculoskeletal injuries and psychological characteristics in 24 judo athletes (12 females and 12 males) and 31 controls (14 females and 17 males). All these parameters were assessed by a health/medical, dieting and menstrual history questionnaire, the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26), the Multidimensional perfectionism scale, the Rosenberg Self-esteem, the Body esteem scale, and the Profile of Mood States. Body mass index (BMI) was also computed. Twenty-five percent of female athletes would be "at risk" of EDs (EAT-26 > 20) and 0 % in the other sample groups. Bone injuries sustained over the judo athlete career were reported by 25 % of females and 33.3 % of males, while 35.7 % of the female controls reported bone injuries. The total frequency of menstrual dysfunction among judo athletes was 58.3 %, while 7.1 % of female controls reported oligoamenorrhea. Regression analyses showed that BE-Weight Satisfaction and BMI contributed to 54.6 % and 17 % of the variance, respectively, in the prediction of log-transformed Global EAT scores among female judo athletes. These data indicate that while the prevalence of clinical eating disorders is low in judo athletes, many are "at risk" for an eating disorder, which places them at an increased risk for menstrual irregularity and bone injuries. This study also highlights the relevance of body esteem to eating disorder symptoms.

  9. Medical considerations for the master athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlis-Mayor, Stephanie

    2012-09-01

    As the American population ages, older adults are likely to continue their active lifestyles including participation in high-level competitive sports. Physicians caring for the older athlete will need to guide activity and return-to-play to optimize the athlete's performance, as well as safely support their physical and mental health. Many medical concerns of the older athlete have the same etiology and treatment as those of their younger counterpart However, there are medical considerations of the mature athlete that are unique to this population. It is the purpose of this paper to review some of the medical considerations that may arise in the care of the older athlete. For the purpose of this review, the mature athlete is de!ned as an individual over the age of 40, who participates in sport at a competitive level.

  10. Sudden cardiac death in athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Camilo Pellegrino dos Santos

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The most accepted definition of sudden cardiac death nowadays is an unexplained death occurred suddenly within one hour of symptom onset. If it was not witnessed, individuals need to had been observed for at least 24 hours before the event and should be discarded the possibility of non cardiac causes of sudden death, pulmonary embolism or extensive malignancy. The term athlete refers to individuals of any age who participate in collective or individual regular physical activity, as well as physical training program for regular competitions. The sudden death of a young athlete, whether amateur or professional, especially during competitions, is always dramatic, with strong negative social impact and in the media. The fact that sports are recommended as a formula for longevity and quality of life makes these events a cause for concern in sports and society in general.

  11. Drugs and the adolescent athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, P G

    1984-08-01

    The pediatrician performing a preparticipation physical examination on an adolescent athlete should discuss the use of ergogenic aids. This could be with all of the athletes present in the case of the mass screening examination, or in private during the preferred office-based physical examination, whether preparticipation or health maintenance. Knowing which sport the youth is active in can lead to the drugs most likely being misused being emphasized by the physician; ie, androgens in the case of weightlifting and football, and amphetamines in competitive events like swimming, football, and track. Not only should the risks be discussed (an unsuccessful way to influence adolescents' behavior), but the drugs' degree of ineffectiveness should be stressed. Finally, and possibly at least as importantly, the moral question of a competitor attempting to gain an "illegal edge" should be addressed.

  12. Eating disorders among university student-athletes | Van Zyl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eating disorders among university student-athletes. ... the student-athletes felt that they did not receive any pressure from their coaches to lose weight. Healthy relationships between student-athletes and coaches, family, friends and teammates ...

  13. Recognition and Management of Athletic Pubalgia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul R. Geisler; Ed.D; ATC

    2011-01-01

    Whether termed “sports hernias”,“hockey groin”,or “athletic pubalgia”,insidious onset and vague groin and hip maladies seem to be on the rise in the last few years,creating much confusion as to the best way to diagnosis and treat the multifaceted and complex conditions.Because of the vague nature of their clinical presentation,sports hernias and athletic pubalgia are complicated and multifaceted problems for clinicians and athletes to manage.

  14. Electrophysiological characteristics of the athlete's heart

    OpenAIRE

    Popović Dejana; Brkić Predrag; Nešić Dejan; Stojiljković Stanimir; Šćepanović Ljiljana; Ostojić Miodrag Č.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction. The athletic heart syndrome is characterized by morphological, functional and electrophysiological alterations as an adaptive response to vigorous physical activity. Athletes heart is predominantly associated with a programmed, intensive training. But as there are different kinds of physical activities, the degree of these changes is highly variable. Electrophysiological characteristics of the athlete's heart. The response of the body to vigorous physical activity is a multiorga...

  15. ATHLETES ENGAGEMENT MODEL: A GENDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Martins

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigation from a diversity of theoretical perspectives displays that one of the best predictors of children’s continuing involvement in sports is the development of positive feelings for sport involvement (e.g. Martins, Rosado, Ferreira & Biscaia, 2014. In sport, the concept of engagement reflects the energy in action, the connection between the person and the activity, and it is considered as a form of active involvement between the individual and the task (Russell, Ainley, & Frydenberg, 2005. In sport, the concept of athletes’ engagement reflects a relatively stable and long lasting experience that is generically characterized through positive emotions and cognitions when engaged in the act of practicing the given activity (Lonsdale, Hodge, & Raedeke, 2007. Therefore, the analysis of experiences related to engagement is important in order to understand sport participation, and how its different levels can condition the social involvement. In addition, these studies failed to examine potentially important gender differences in engagement among athletes. Therefore, the study of athletes by evaluating their engagement levels comparing genders, can contribute towards shedding light on decisive aspects pertaining to its social involvement within ethical dimensions as well as personal and social responsibility, on which research is still lacking. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of gender on engagement in a sport scenario among youth athletes.

  16. Management of allergic Olympic athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, K D

    1984-05-01

    Twenty percent of the recent Australian Olympic athletes have had an allergic disorder. Because of the ban on all sympathomimetic drugs except some beta 2-agonists. Olympic team physicians have a major responsibility to ensure that no competitor is disqualified for infringing on the antidoping rules of the Medical Commission of the International Olympic Committee. Inadvertent contravention of these regulations may occur because numerous banned sympathomimetics are available to athletes and their coaches without medical prescription and are frequently contained in combination preparations. The unbroken 24 yr in which asthmatics have won Olympic medals have been both before and after the introduction of drug tests. Currently a comprehensive range of preventive and therapeutic medications are available for asthmatics to compete with minimal respiratory disadvantage. It was, however, during a period of unnecessary restriction that an American swimmer forfeited his gold medal because of prerace ingestion of a banned sympathomimetic agent. Should adverse air quality be encountered during the Los Angeles Olympics, allergic competitors will be among the most inconvenienced . Athletes with allergic rhinitis and sinusitis will be the most disadvantaged because sympathomimetic vasoconstrictors remain banned. It is strongly recommended that the Medical Commission of the International Olympic Committee meet with an appropriate body of experts (i.e., the American Academy of Allergy and Immunology) to review this ban on vasoconstrictor agents.

  17. Misperceptions of the Prevalence of Marijuana Use Among College Students: Athletes and Non-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Randy M.; Roland, Michelle

    2004-01-01

    The prevalence of marijuana use and perceptions of the prevalence of marijuana use was assessed in a sample of intercollegiate athletes and a separate sample of primarily first-year non-athlete students at a northwestern public university. Marijuana use prevalence in the non-athlete sample was higher than the prevalence found in nationwide surveys…

  18. Academic and Athletic Motivation as Predictors of Academic Performance of Division I College Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Christina Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Division I intercollegiate student-athletes represent a unique population of college students on college campuses today because they face competing demands between the student and athlete roles. Without the proper environment and motivation for academic performance, some Division I student-athletes are unable to obtain a college degree and leave…

  19. The Effects of Athletic Competition on Character Development in College Student Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Sharon Kay

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that there are inherent problems in athletic competition relating to character development in college student athletes. A review of the research supports the claim that athletic competitions do not build character. The author proposes ways to address this problem and provides personal observations and published research to…

  20. An Interpersonal Psychotherapy Approach to Counseling Student Athletes: Clinical Implications of Athletic Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heird, Emily Benton; Steinfeldt, Jesse A.

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that disruptive circumstances in an athlete's career (temporary injury, permanent injury, retirement) can pose significant difficulties, especially if the athlete has developed a salient athletic identity at the expense of a multidimensional self-concept. The authors present an interpersonal psychotherapy approach to case…

  1. Exploring relations of wellness and athletic coping skills of collegiate athletes: implications for sport performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Guenthner, Shannon; Hammermeister, Jon

    2007-12-01

    In exploring the relationship between wellness and athletic performance, this study assessed the link between wellness, as defined by a high score on five wellness dimensions of emotional, social, spiritual, intellectual, and physical well-being, with psychological variables thought to be related to athletic performance as measured by athletes' self-report of specific athletic coping skills. 142 collegiate athletes completed a survey composed of the Optimal Living Profile to measure wellness dimensions and the Athletic Coping Skills Inventory to measure specific psychological variables. Analysis indicated that athletes scoring higher on the dimensions of wellness also scored significantly higher on athletic coping skills. Specifically, male athletes who scored higher on wellness also reported higher scores on coachability, concentration, goal setting/mental preparation, and peaking under pressure, and female athletes who scored higher on wellness also reported higher scores in coping with adversity, coachability, concentration, goal setting/mental preparation, and freedom from worry. Various dimensions of wellness seem related to better performance by involving the athletic coping skills of intercollegiate athletes. Implications for coaches and sport psychologists are also discussed.

  2. EVALUATION OF UNEXPLAINED DYSPNEA IN A YOUNG ATHLETIC MALE WITH PECTUS EXCAVATUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory B. Tardie

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Pectus excavatum (PE is a relatively common congenital deformity of the anterior chest wall associated with reduced exercise capacity. Uncertainty exists over the nature of physiologic impairment in PE. Evidence suggests that myocardial compression exerted by the displaced sternum on the right heart chambers, disables the ability of the heart to augment stroke volume during exercise. This case study describes the evaluation of an athletic 20 year old Caucasian male, lifelong non-smoker, with severe pectus deformity and previous fixation procedure to repair a sternal fracture. The patient performed an incremental cycle ergometer exercise test to determine the etiology of his dyspnea with exertion. The patient demonstrated normal work output and normal aerobic capacity but displayed dynamic hyperinflation. Mechanical restriction of tidal volume expansion appeared to be the major contributors to exercise limitation. These results are compared and contrasted with similar cases reported in the literature

  3. Trailing the unpredictable pathways of European Union lifelong learning policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cort, Pia

    2014-01-01

    actors from different sites to make a ‘European Area of Lifelong Learning a Reality’ (EU Commission, 2001). The changes challenge policy research and its traditional analytical units of the nation-state and the EU as a supranational organization. As stated in the introduction of the book, decision......Since 2000 the concept of Europeanization has gained importance as a way of conceptualizing the changes in education and training policy in the European Union. Not least the introduction of the Open Method of Coordination in education and training has launched important policy processes through...... which the usual distinctions between policy-making, policy decision and policy implementation are changing. Policy pathways have become unpredictable as ‘transnational flows and networks of people, ideas and practices across European borders’ (Lawn & Grek, 2012, p. 8) have intensified and drawn together...

  4. Induction and Mentoring - Counselling to lifelong professional career as teacher

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paaske, Karen Annette; Krøjgaard, Frede; Frederiksen, Lisbeth Angela Lunde

    2016-01-01

    . This research has further shown the importance of establishing a mentoring-service to support the new teachers (Kemmis, Heikkinen, Fransson, & G. Aspfors, 2014). Research questions What actions does the Danish schools take to support the new teachers at the start of their career? What supportive measures...... to induct new teachers into their teaching profession effect the number of teachers quitting the teaching profession in Denmark. Additionally we wish to formulate recommendations that ensures that induction can be viewed and structured as the first phase in a lifelong career. Theoretical frameworkThe term...... on constructivistic and systemic theory to analyse collaborative learning, development though collegial counselling as well as supervision.We wish to investigate the challenges faced by new teachers in their first job. We wish to do this from three different levels: a Society level, an organizational or school...

  5. Exercise training improves free testosterone in lifelong sedentary aging men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Lawrence D; Herbert, Peter; Sculthorpe, Nicholas F; Grace, Fergal M

    2017-07-01

    As the impact of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on systemic hormones in aging men is unstudied to date, we investigated whether total testosterone (TT), sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), free testosterone (free-T) and cortisol (all in serum) were altered following HIIT in a cohort of 22 lifelong sedentary (62 ± 2 years) older men. As HIIT requires preconditioning exercise in sedentary cohorts, participants were tested at three phases, each separated by six-week training; baseline (phase A), following conditioning exercise (phase B) and post-HIIT (phase C). Each measurement phase used identical methods. TT was significantly increased following HIIT (~17%; P sedentary older males, with the HIIT stimulus accounting for a small but statistically significant increase in free-T. Further study is required to determine the biological importance of small improvements in free-T in aging men. © 2017 The authors.

  6. Life-long learning: lessons from a Journal Study Club.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausner, Christine P

    2007-01-01

    Evaluation of scientific literature, promoting the delivery of evidence-based care, became the focus of a group of dental hygiene colleagues. The "Journal Study Club" (JSC) was established from this concept. JSC members discuss and evaluate professional issues utilizing research-based literature. Topics include patient care, public health/access to care, technology, modalities of treatment, and professional issues. For each topic, one member serves as a program facilitator researching the scientific literature on an agreed upon topic, chooses appropriate articles, and disseminates the articles to the members to read prior to meeting. Discussion at the study club event follows the format of examining literature content, relevance, significance, evidence accuracy, and application to clinical practice. This process supports dental Hygienists' commitment to life-long learning and the practice of evidence-based care, while providing a valuable venue for continuing dental hygiene competence and professional development.

  7. The Incidence and Intensity of Formal Lifelong Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Marianne; Skipper, Lars

    across genders. We consider both the incidence (take-up in a given year) and intensity (hours conditional on enrolment) of training. We find evidence of considerable lifelong learning with regards to enrolment in basic and vocational training regardless of gender, whereas post-secondary training......We exploit a rich high quality register-based employer-employee panel data set to investigate the incidence and intensity of government co-sponsored training for the Danish adult population. We focus specifically on training over the working life cycle and find that the levels of participation vary...... enrolment usually takes place early in life with a smooth decline over the working life cycle. Once the enrolment decision is made, however, and once a comprehensive conditioning set is included there are no striking differences in hours in training with regards to gender. Neither hours in vocational nor...

  8. Portfolio at Tertiary Level – Lifelong Learning Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Kavaliauskienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of electronic language portfolios has been preferable to the use of common paper portfolios for ease of application – there is no need for accumulating a number of files of written papers, which solves the problem of storing space and, to some extent, helps reduce students’ and teachers’ workload.The study investigated learners’ perceptions of employing electronic language portfolios for conducting various assignments in English for Specific Purposes. The research involved university students of different specializations. Learners’ experience of employing portfolios and opinions on their benefits for improving language skills have been analyzed and statistically treated using SPSS software. The results show that students are positive about application of electronic portfolios in ESP classes. The use of online portfolios for various assignments helps teachers foster students’ learning, encourages critical thinking, develops creativity, motivates learners to use digital technology, encourages collaboration of learners, and in the long run, leads to lifelong learning.

  9. Nutrition for Women Athletes. Commonly Asked Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, N. Peggy

    1987-01-01

    Information on the nutritional needs of female athletes is presented. Among the topics discussed are proper eating habits, carbohydrate loading, amenorrhea, osteoporosis, anemia, vitamins, and minerals. (MT)

  10. Organic food consumption by athletes in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranauskas, Marius; Stukas, Rimantas; Tubelis, Linas; Žagminas, Kęstutis; Šurkienė, Genė; Dobrovolskij, Valerij; Jakubauskienė, Marija; Giedraitis, Vincentas Rolandas

    2015-01-01

    With environmental pollution increasing, interest in organic farming and organic foodstuffs has been growing all over the world. Data on organic food consumption by Lithuanian athletes is not yet available. This lack of data determined the aim of this study: to identify the particulars of organic foodstuff consumption among athletes. In September-November 2012, we polled 158 of the best-performing athletes of the Olympic sports team through direct interviews. An approved questionnaire was used to identify the specifics of organic foodstuff consumption among athletes. The survey results showed that 97% of athletes consume organic foodstuffs, and 80% of athletes highlighted the positive impact of organic food on health. Nevertheless, a slim majority of athletes (51.7%) consume organic foodstuffs seldomly, 2-3 times per week. The range of organic foodstuffs consumed depends on the gender of athletes, and the consumption of some products depends on monthly incomes. Survey results confirm the need for the production and expansion of the variety of organic foodstuffs. In the course of the development of the organic food market, it should be beneficial for manufacturers to target high-performance athletes and physically active people.

  11. Psychological profile of high risk sports athlets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Kajtna

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The research attempted to compose a psycjhological profile of high risk sports athletes, based on personality, values and sensation seeking. 38 high risk sports athletes participated in the research (alpinists, sky divers, parachute gliders, white water kayakers, downhill mountain bikers, motocross riders, downhill skiers and Nordic jumpers, the non risk sports athletes consisted of 38 swimmers, track athletes, sailers, still water kayakers, rowers, Nordic skiers, sports climbers and karate players, whereas non athletes were equalled with both groups in age and education and included 76 non athletes. We used the self descriptive scale Big five observer, Musek's Value scale and Zuckerman' Sensation seeking scale IV. The dimensions, obtained from the discrimination analysis, were named personality maturity and sensation seeking in a social environment. Our results show that high risk sports athletes are more mature personalities than non risk sports athletes and non athletes and that they do not attempt to find stimulation in social environments. We also suggest some possibilities for further research.

  12. European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network Representatives' Conceptions of the Role of Information and Communication Technologies Related to National Guidance Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettunen, Jaana; Vuorinen, Raimo; Ruusuvirta, Outi

    2016-01-01

    This article reports findings from a phenomenographic investigation into European Lifelong Guidance Policy Network representatives' conceptions of the role of information and communication technologies (ICT) related to national lifelong guidance policies. The role of ICT in relation to national lifelong guidance policies was conceived as (1)…

  13. Análise da fadiga muscular localizada em atletas e sedentários através de parâmetros de freqüência do sinal eletromiográfico Analysis of localized muscular fatigue in athletes and sedentary subjects through frequency parameters of electromyographic signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cláudio Amaral Santos

    2008-12-01

    to verify the viability of the EMG signal application, through its frequency domain analysis, as a parameter for determination and differentiation of the behavior of localized muscle fatigue. Two groups of subjects, one characterized as athletes (n = 12 and the other as sedentary (n = 12, were submitted to analysis based on procedures from three different experimental situations, all involving isometric exercise modality: i maximum test for determination of the Maximum Voluntary Isometric Contraction (MVIC; ii fatigue test, 35 sec. sustained load of 80% of MVIC; iii recovery test, 10 sec. sustained load of 80% of MVIC. In the latter, the MF behavior in the three first (Fmedi and three last (Fmedf seconds of the EMG signal of tibialis anterior muscle during the fatigue test have been monitored. During the 10 seconds of the recovery test, MF was calculated regarding the whole period (Fmedr; this parameter was used to calculate the Muscular Recovery Index (MRI. The results showed that Fmedf presented lower value in relation to Fmedi in both groups (p 0.05. Therefore, the results presented in this study allow inferring the viability in the application of the frequency domain parameters of the EMG signal for the determination and differentiation of localized muscle fatigue behavior.

  14. A systematic review of studies comparing body image concerns among female college athletes and non-athletes, 1997-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnes, Julia R; Stellefson, Michael L; Janelle, Christopher M; Dorman, Steven M; Dodd, Virginia; Miller, M David

    2013-09-01

    Research prior to 2001 indicated that athletes experienced better body image than non-athletes, with no differences among sport types. Since then, female athletes have become increasingly sexually objectified in the media, and the sociocultural beauty ideal has shifted to emphasize appearing both athletic and thin. Part I of this paper explores the literature describing these changes. Part II presents a systematic and comprehensive literature review of 10 recent studies comparing body image concerns (BIC) among collegiate female athletes and non-athletes to identify the current status of BIC in female athletes. Findings indicate that involvement in collegiate athletics provides some protection from BIC; however, this protection appears attenuated for athletes in more feminine sports (e.g., gymnastics), and higher level athletes (Division I). Researchers should examine how sociocultural pressures unrelated to competition predict female athletes' BIC using measures that focus on objectification, positive body image, body functionality, and thin- and athletic-ideal internalization.

  15. Merits and demerits of engaging in athletic, academic and part-time job roles among university student-athletes in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Motoki; Ebara, Takeshi; Hirosawa, Masataka

    2011-12-01

    Although role conflict management is necessary for the prevention of dropout from participation in sports, little has been known about it, especially regarding Japanese university student-athletes. Hence, this study examined the aspects of merit and demerit involved in their performances of academic, athletic, part-time job, family and human relationship roles. The merits and demerits were evaluated using the theoretical concepts of negative spillover (NSP), positive spillover (PSP), compensation and segmentation. In the research, a total of 108 participants (63 males, 45 females) described information about their multiple roles in the Multiple Roles Map (MRM) form. NSP with high frequency rates (3rd quartile) showed demerit that negative condition in athletic and part-time job roles tended to disturb performance of other roles (male ≥ 17.5%, female ≥ 15.6%). The results of PSP showed merit that positive condition in the athletic, part-time job and academic roles contributes to accomplishment of good performance in other roles (male ≥ 19.0%, female ≥ 17.8%). Compensation indicated that negative conditions in the roles were compensated by satisfaction in the human relationships and family roles and private time (male ≥ 9.5%, female ≥ 11.1%). The family role was segmented from other roles (male ≥ 71.4%, female ≥ 68.9%). Sharing these findings will be effective in helping to solve role conflict problems of university student-athletes in Japan.

  16. Age, sex, and setting factors and labor force in athletic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahanov, Leamor; Eberman, Lindsey E

    2011-01-01

    Occupation or occupational setting shifts might be occurring in the athletic training profession, and differences between sexes might exist; however, little evidence exists to confirm this supposition. To evaluate trends in male and female athletic training employment patterns in terms of age and occupational setting. Cross-sectional study. We requested demographic data from the National Athletic Trainers' Association (October 27, 2009) and obtained frequency totals of members by sex across the occupational life span by occupational setting. Our sample included 18 571 athletic trainers employed in the 3 largest classifications of occupational settings within the profession: college or university, clinical, and secondary school. We calculated frequencies and percentages to determine demographic and descriptive data. We analyzed the data using an analysis of variance to identify the differences between sexes across age and setting. We observed trends in occupational setting and sex across ages 22 to 67 years. We identified differences between sexes across the ages 22 to 67 years (F(1,18569) = 110818.080, P job duties might influence the exodus or shift in athletic training.

  17. Sport-Related Achievement Motivation and Alcohol Outcomes: An Athlete-Specific Risk Factor among Intercollegiate Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Weaver, Cameron C.; Martens, Matthew P.; Cadigan, Jennifer M.; Takamatsu, Stephanie K.; Treloar, Hayley R.; Pedersen, Eric R.

    2013-01-01

    Intercollegiate athletes report greater alcohol consumption and more alcohol-related problems than their non-athlete peers. Although college athletes share many of the same problems faced by non-athletes, there are some consequences that are unique to athletes. Studies have demonstrated that alcohol negatively affects athletic performance including increased dehydration, impeded muscle recovery, and increased risk for injury. Beyond risk factors for alcohol misuse that may affect college stud...

  18. [Energy balance, body composition and the female athlete triad syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Yitzhak; Weinstein, Ayelet

    2012-02-01

    With the rising participation of women in sports events, the prevalence of eating disorders and the female athlete triad (FTS), a syndrome of disordered eating, amenorrhea, and osteoporosis, have also increased in recent years. FTS is often seen in sports that emphasize thinness (e.g. gymnastics, figure skating and dancing) and also in endurance events. Elements of the FTS are pathophysiologically linked, leading to several disease risks and even to mortality. In spite of the considerable knowledge about sports nutrition, there is no consensus as to the correct nutrition regime for the female athlete. There is consensus that minimizing fluctuations in 'target-body-weight' is an indication of a long-term energy balance. Female athletes (e.g. in endurance events and gymnastics) are less likely to achieve the recommended carbohydrates (CHO) and fat consumption due to chronic or episodic constraints of total energy intake while struggling to achieve or maintain low levels of body fat. It is recommended that dietary CHO and fat content be increased to preserve fat-free mass thus enhancing health and performance. Energy balance should also be maintained during recesses. Furthermore, within-day episodes of energy deficits/surplus (measured by the frequency and/or magnitude of the episodes) should be monitored and treated closest to the time of the incidents.

  19. Use of prescription drugs in athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaranta, Antti; Alaranta, Hannu; Helenius, Ilkka

    2008-01-01

    Although athletes are young and generally healthy, they use a variety of non-doping classified medicines to treat injuries, cure illnesses and obtain a competitive edge. Athletes and sports medicine physicians try to optimize the treatment of symptoms related to extreme training during an elite athlete's active career. According to several studies, the use of antiasthmatic medication is more frequent among elite athletes than in the general population. The type of training and the kind of sport influence the prevalence of asthma. Asthma is most common among those competing in endurance events, such as cycling, swimming, cross-country skiing and long-distance running. Recent studies show that athletes use also NSAIDs and oral antibacterials more commonly than age-matched controls, especially athletes competing in speed and power sports. Inappropriately high doses and concomitant use of several different NSAIDs has been observed. All medicines have adverse effects that may have deleterious effects on elite athletes' performance. Thus, any unnecessary medication use should be minimized in elite athletes. Inhaled beta(2)-agonists may cause tachycardia and muscle tremor, which are especially harmful in events requiring accuracy and a steady hand. In experimental animal models of acute injury, especially selective cyclo-oxygenase-2 inhibitors have been shown to be detrimental to tissue-level repair. They have been shown to impair mechanical strength return following acute injury to bone, ligament and tendon. This may have clinical implications for future injury susceptibility. However, it should be noted that the current animal studies have limited translation to the clinical setting. Adverse effects related to the CNS and gastrointestinal adverse reactions are commonly reported in connection with NSAID use also in elite athletes. In addition to the potential for adverse effects, recent studies have shown that NSAID use may negatively regulate muscle growth by inhibiting

  20. Motor unit number estimates and neuromuscular transmission in the tibialis anterior of master athletes: evidence that athletic older people are not spared from age-related motor unit remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, Mathew; Ireland, Alex; Coulson, Jessica; Stashuk, Dan W; Hamilton-Wright, Andrew; Swiecicka, Agnieszka; Rutter, Martin K; McPhee, Jamie S; Jones, David A

    2016-10-01

    Muscle motor unit numbers decrease markedly in old age, while remaining motor units are enlarged and can have reduced neuromuscular junction transmission stability. However, it is possible that regular intense physical activity throughout life can attenuate this remodeling. The aim of this study was to compare the number, size, and neuromuscular junction transmission stability of tibialis anterior (TA) motor units in healthy young and older men with those of exceptionally active master runners. The distribution of motor unit potential (MUP) size was determined from intramuscular electromyographic signals recorded in healthy male Young (mean ± SD, 26 ± 5 years), Old (71 ± 4 years) and Master Athletes (69 ± 3 years). Relative differences between groups in numbers of motor units was assessed using two methods, one comparing MUP size and muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) determined with MRI, the other comparing surface recorded MUPs with maximal compound muscle action potentials and commonly known as a "motor unit number estimate (MUNE)". Near fiber (NF) jiggle was measured to assess neuromuscular junction transmission stability. TA CSA did not differ between groups. MUNE values for the Old and Master Athletes were 45% and 40%, respectively, of the Young. Intramuscular MUPs of Old and Master Athletes were 43% and 56% larger than Young. NF jiggle was slightly higher in the Master Athletes, with no difference between Young and Old. These results show substantial and similar motor unit loss and remodeling in Master Athletes and Old individuals compared with Young, which suggests that lifelong training does not attenuate the age-related loss of motor units.

  1. LIFELONG VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING IN KOREA: THE VISION AND TASKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Sun Chung

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The ideal TVET from the HRD perspectives should assist the acquisition of knowledge and qualities in individuals for their career pursuits, which are the most commonly, recognized objectives of lifelong learning. Korean government during economic development era has failed to provide detailed information about the change in future labour demand has caused difficulties for education and training providers to adjust themselves. In its transformation to an advanced, knowledge-based economy, Korea must analyze its education system – not only from the supply side, but also from the demand side. A knowledge-based society is marked by an increase in the economic value of knowledge, a shortened life cycle of knowledge, an explosive increase in knowledge, and the increasing relative importance of knowledge workers. In order to cope with these changes, HRD should be facilitated throughout the course of one's life by means of the systematization of lifelong learning, equalization of opportunities in lifelong learning, localization of lifelong learning, creation  of a data base for lifelong learning, and networking among lifelong learning systems as facilitated through the Lifelong Education Law. It is clear that Korea’s VET has greatly contributed to economic and social developments in the past, but with the advent of the knowledge based economy and unprecedented global competition, Korea is facing really profound changes and is in need of a paradigmatic shift in vocational education and training.

  2. Ensuring the continuum of learning: The role of assessment for lifelong learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yahui

    2015-02-01

    This article explores how assessment plays a role in helping learners to learn on a continuous, sustainable basis. It begins by exploring the paradigm of lifelong learning, which implies a shift in the way we think about learning and knowledge. Based on knowledge formation rooted in a flux of learning, lifelong learning assessment is not so much the assessment of how much fixed knowledge learners possess but rather the assessment of learners' abilities to reconstruct knowledge and engage with change. This article argues that three concerns - the primacy of self-assessment, the assessment of learners' engagement, and the importance of qualitative assessment - are crucial to an assessment which contributes to the development of lifelong learners who have the continuing ability to grow and to find deep and meaningful connections during times of change. The importance of self-assessment as the central aspect of lifelong learning is presented, and the way in which self-assessment relates to formative assessment and summative assessment to ensure a valid development of lifelong learning is considered. Judging whether lifelong learning is relevant or desirable requires learners' engagement in considering how they are holistically related to the world. To assess learners' overall engagement, this article suggests a multi-faceted, holistic approach which emphasises qualitative methods to track each individual's learning situation, although quantitative methods are not rejected. It is hoped that the article's discussion of this lifelong learning assessment will contribute to an understanding of the assessment's appropriate nature and development.

  3. Isokinetic dynamometry of knee flexors and extensors: comparative study among non-athletes, jumper athletes and runner athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siqueira Cássio Marinho

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Participation in intensive sports activities leads to muscular specializations that may generate alterations in involved articular forces and cause static (posture and dynamic changes (alterations of articular stability, coordination, etc.. Prevention of injury requires specific functional muscular evaluation in all athletes and for any kind of sport. OBJECTIVE: To dynamically evaluate, through isokinetic tests, the peak torque, total work, and average power of the knee flexor and extensor muscles of jumper and runner athletes and compare them to those of a non-athletic population, evaluating dominance and balance between agonistic and antagonistic muscle groups. RESULTS: In the non-athlete group, we noted a higher asymmetry between the dominant and nondominant members. The jumpers had the highest values of the evaluated parameters of all groups, whereas parameters for the runners were intermediate between non-athletes and jumpers.

  4. The Comparison of Multiple Intelligence Levels of 13 - 1 6 Years Old Athlete and Non - Athlete Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer BOZKUŞ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to compare the multiple intelligence levels of athlete children and new registered children to summer sport course s. Screening model was used in the study. The research included 156 voluntary children attending to 2013 summer term sport courses ( x age = 15.27 ± 0.90 . Children's personal information form to obtain demographic information and data on multiple intelligences data were collected for evaluation. Data analysis software SPSS was used for data analysis. Frequency, mean, standard deviation values were obtained, as well as inferential statistical techniques, considering the normal distrib ution of the data from the independent samples t - test was used. Significance level of p <0.05 was considered. Considering the findings of the study, verbal / linguistic intelligence, physical /kinesthetic intelligence, and social / interpersonal communica tion in favor of athlete s in the areas of intelligence differences were detected (p <0.05. As a result, important information gathered from this study pointing out that there is significant differences between multiple intelligence development of ath lete and non - athlete children. The children at development ages should be supported to attend regular sport activities.

  5. The continuum of care for individuals with lifelong disabilities: role of the physical therapist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlin, Margo N; Cicirello, Nancy A; O'Donnell, Anne E; Doty, Antonette K

    2014-07-01

    Many individuals with lifelong disabilities (LLDs) of childhood onset are living longer, participating in adult roles, and seeking comprehensive health care services, including physical therapy, with greater frequency than in the past. Individuals with LLDs have the same goals of health and wellness as those without disabilities. Aging with a chronic LLD is not yet well understood; however, impairments such as pain, fatigue, and osteoporosis often present earlier than in adults who are aging typically. People with LLDs, especially those living with developmental disabilities such as cerebral palsy, myelomeningocele, Down syndrome, and intellectual disabilities, frequently have complex and multiple body system impairments and functional limitations that can: (1) be the cause of numerous and varied secondary conditions, (2) limit overall earning power, (3) diminish insurance coverage, and (4) create unique challenges for accessing health care. Collaboration between adult and pediatric practitioners is encouraged to facilitate smooth transitions to health practitioners, including physical therapists. A collaborative client-centered emphasis to support the transition to adult-oriented facilities and promote strategies to increase accessibility should become standard parts of examination, goal setting, and intervention. This perspective article identifies barriers individuals with selected LLDs experience in accessing health care, including physical therapy. Strategies are suggested, including establishment of niche practices, physical accessibility improvement, and inclusion of more specific curriculum content in professional (entry-level) doctorate physical therapy schools.

  6. Anaerobic work capacity in elite wheelchair athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woude, L H; Bakker, W H; Elkhuizen, J W; Veeger, DirkJan (H. E. J.); Gwinn, T

    1997-01-01

    To study the anaerobic work capacity in wheelchair athletes, 67 elite wheelchair athletes (50 male) were studied in a 30-second sprint test on a computer-controlled wheelchair ergometer during the World Championships and Games for the Disabled in Assen (1990). The experimental set-up (ergometer,

  7. Retention among Community College Student-Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Pilar; Horton, David, Jr.; Mendez, Jesse P.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the impact of financial-aid on student-athletes' academic progression from freshmen to sophomore year in associates' degree programs in Oklahoma. Differences were found according to socioeconomic status (SES), gender, and race/ethnicity and between athlete and nonathlete students. (Contains 6 tables and 2 figures.)

  8. Faculty Perceptions of Division I Male Student-Athletes: The Relationship between Student-Athlete Contact, Athletic Department Involvement, and Perceptions of Intercollegiate Athletics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that student-athletes, especially in the sports of men's basketball and football, endure stereotyping (Bowen & Levin, 2003; Simons, Bosworth, Fujita, & Jensen, 2007, Baucom & Lantz, 2001). Although stereotypes about male basketball and football student-athletes academic behaviors are expressed by many sectors of the…

  9. Faculty Perceptions of Division I Male Student-Athletes: The Relationship between Student-Athlete Contact, Athletic Department Involvement, and Perceptions of Intercollegiate Athletics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that student-athletes, especially in the sports of men's basketball and football, endure stereotyping (Bowen & Levin, 2003; Simons, Bosworth, Fujita, & Jensen, 2007, Baucom & Lantz, 2001). Although stereotypes about male basketball and football student-athletes academic behaviors are expressed by many sectors of the…

  10. Athletes at Risk for Sudden Cardiac Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasic, Kim

    2010-01-01

    High school athletes represent the largest group of individuals affected by sudden cardiac death, with an estimated incidence of once or twice per week. Structural cardiovascular abnormalities are the most frequent cause of sudden cardiac death. Athletes participating in basketball, football, track, soccer, baseball, and swimming were found to…

  11. The Stereotype and Recognition of Female Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Cyd; And Others

    The stereotype of women athletes in college is predominantly positive rather than negative. In one study, female athletes were seen to be strong, strong-willed, leaders, brave and healthy. In the second study, women were judged to be significantly more attractive when the interviewer was male, and males gave significantly higher ratings than…

  12. Anaerobic work capacity in elite wheelchair athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Woude, L H; Bakker, W H; Elkhuizen, J W; Veeger, DirkJan (H. E. J.); Gwinn, T

    1997-01-01

    To study the anaerobic work capacity in wheelchair athletes, 67 elite wheelchair athletes (50 male) were studied in a 30-second sprint test on a computer-controlled wheelchair ergometer during the World Championships and Games for the Disabled in Assen (1990). The experimental set-up (ergometer, pro

  13. Dance Dynamics. Athletes & Dancers Training & Moving Together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, Diane Milhan, Ed.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    This series of articles explores the various ways in which training procedures in both dance and athletics are compatible. Topics include: traditional and adapted dance class structures and materials; the inclusion of dance in the physical education curriculum; and the physical fitness of dancers as compared to athletes. (JN)

  14. "The Student Athlete": Too Little, Too Late.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyquist, Ewald B.

    1982-01-01

    There are vast differences in life experiences and advantages for all college students, not just student athletes; to shunt off the super athlete lacking minimum skills into a second-rate educational training is inexcusable. Institutions that have "turned professional" have become football franchises dabbling in education. (MLW)

  15. Sex Discrimination in High School Athletics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Timothy K.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses Yellow Springs Exempted Village School District Board of Education vs Ohio High School Athletic Association where U.S. District Court in Ohio held unconstitutional a state athletic association rule prohibiting girls from participating on the same team as boys in contact sports. Available from City School of Law, 5100 Rockhill Road, K.C.,…

  16. Injuries in the competitive paediatric motocross athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, C B; Holbert, J A; Hennrikus, W L

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to report the spectrum of injuries sustained by competitive paediatric motocross athletes at a level I trauma centre. A retrospective study of paediatric competitive motocross injuries treated at a level I trauma centre between 2004 and 2014 was performed. Athletes were included if aged less than 18 years and injured while practising or competing on a competitive motocross track. Medical records were reviewed for age, gender, race, location of accident, use of safety equipment, mechanism of injury, injury type and severity, Glasgow Coma Score at hospital presentation and Injury Severity Score (ISS). In total, 35 athletes were studied. The average age was 14 years. One athlete died. Thirty athletes were injured during competition; five were injured during practice. Twenty-four athletes (69%) suffered an orthopaedic injury with a total of 32 fractures and two dislocations. Two fractures were open (6.3%). Lower extremity fractures were twice as common as upper extremity fractures. Surgery was more common for lower extremity fractures-83% versus 30%. The most common fractures were femoral shaft (18.8%), fibula (12.5%), clavicle (12.5%), tibial shaft (9.4%) and forearm (9.4%). Competitive paediatric motocross athletes suffer serious, potentially life-threatening injuries despite the required use of protective safety equipment. Femoral shaft, fibula and clavicle were found to be the most commonly fractured bones. Further prospective research into track regulations, protective equipment and course design may reduce the trauma burden in this athlete population.

  17. Creatine and the Male Adolescent Athlete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumaker, Shauna; Eyers, Christina; Cappaert, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    As the level of competition in youth sports increases, so does athletes' vulnerability to experimenting with performance-enhancing aids (PEAs) at alarmingly young ages. One of the more commonly used PEAs is a supplement called creatine, which has the ability to generate muscular energy, allowing athletes to train at higher intensities for longer…

  18. Triathlon Team excels in athletics and philanthropy

    OpenAIRE

    Kropff, Catherine L.

    2008-01-01

    The Virginia Tech Triathlon Team has experienced many firsts this semester, as they created their own mentoring program, and six of its members competed in their first Ironman Triathlon-- one of the most grueling and challenging athletic events in which an athlete can compete.

  19. Stress in College Athletics: Causes, Consequences, Coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, James H.; Yow, Deborah A.; Bowden, William W.

    This book addresses the causes and consequences of stress in college sports and offers effective coping mechanisms to help individuals understand and control stressors and emotions in their environment. The chapters are: (1) "Understanding Stress"; (2) "Perceptions of Stress in College Athletics"; (3) "Stress among College Athletes"; (4) "Stress…

  20. Iron deficiency in the young athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, T W

    1990-10-01

    Although overt anemia is uncommon, depletion of body iron stores is common among adolescent female athletes. Poor dietary iron intake, menstruation, and increased iron losses associated with physical training all appear to be important factors. Whether nonanemic iron deficiency can impair exercise performance is uncertain. Nonetheless, athletes with low ferritin levels are at risk for impaired erythropoiesis and should receive therapeutic iron supplementation.

  1. Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome in Iranian Female Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Baradaran

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS is the most common overuse syndrome in athletes. It is one of the causes of anterior knee pain in athletic population who come to the sports medicine clinic. Patellofemoral pain is more common among female athletes especially adolescents and young adults. Symptoms include: persistent pain behind the patella or peripatella. Pain increases on ascending and descending stairs and squatting and prolonged sitting. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PFPS in Iranian female athletes. 418 female athletes aged 15-35 years were examined in five sports: Soccer (190, volleyball (103, running (42, fencing (45 and rock climbing (38. The athletes who had non- traumatic onset anterior knee pain of at least 3 months that increased in descending and ascending stairs and squatting, had no other causes of anterior knee pain such as ligament instability, bursitis, meniscal injury, tendonitis and arthritis and no history of knee surgery during the one past year were diagnosed as PFPS. 26/190 (13.68 % soccer players, 21/103(20.38 % volleyball players, 7/42 (16.66 % runners, 6/45(13.33 % fencers and 10/38 (26.31% rock climbers had patellofemoral pain. Among the 418 female athletes who were evaluated 70 had PFPS. Rock climbers were the most common athletes with PFPS followed by volleyball players and runners.

  2. A survey of energy drinks consumption practices among student -athletes in Ghana: lessons for developing health education intervention programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buxton Christiana

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, young adults and college athletes are primary targets of the marketing campaigns of energy drink companies. Consequently, it is reported that young adults and college athletes consume energy drinks frequently. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of energy drink consumption among student-athletes selected from seven public universities in Ghana. The study assessed the energy drink consumption patterns, types usually consumed, frequency of consumption and reasons why athletes consumed energy drinks. Methods A total number of 180 student-athletes gave their consent to participate in the study and completed a questionnaire which was administered during an inter-university sports competition. Results Most of the participants (62.2% reported consuming at least one can of energy drink in a week. A high proportion (53.6% of the respondents who drink energy drinks indicated that they did so to replenish lost energy after training or a competition. Other reasons given as to why energy drinks were consumed by the study participants included to provide energy and fluids to the body (25.9%, to improve performance (9.8% and to reduce fatigue (5.4%. Conclusion These results suggest the need to plan health education programmes to particularly correct some wrong perceptions that athletes have regarding the benefits of energy drinks and also create awareness among student-athletes about the side effects of excessive intake of energy drinks.

  3. A survey of energy drinks consumption practices among student -athletes in Ghana: lessons for developing health education intervention programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxton, Christiana; Hagan, John E

    2012-03-24

    Globally, young adults and college athletes are primary targets of the marketing campaigns of energy drink companies. Consequently, it is reported that young adults and college athletes consume energy drinks frequently. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of energy drink consumption among student-athletes selected from seven public universities in Ghana. The study assessed the energy drink consumption patterns, types usually consumed, frequency of consumption and reasons why athletes consumed energy drinks. A total number of 180 student-athletes gave their consent to participate in the study and completed a questionnaire which was administered during an inter-university sports competition. Most of the participants (62.2%) reported consuming at least one can of energy drink in a week. A high proportion (53.6%) of the respondents who drink energy drinks indicated that they did so to replenish lost energy after training or a competition. Other reasons given as to why energy drinks were consumed by the study participants included to provide energy and fluids to the body (25.9%), to improve performance (9.8%) and to reduce fatigue (5.4%). These results suggest the need to plan health education programmes to particularly correct some wrong perceptions that athletes have regarding the benefits of energy drinks and also create awareness among student-athletes about the side effects of excessive intake of energy drinks.

  4. A survey of energy drinks consumption practices among student -athletes in Ghana: lessons for developing health education intervention programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Globally, young adults and college athletes are primary targets of the marketing campaigns of energy drink companies. Consequently, it is reported that young adults and college athletes consume energy drinks frequently. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of energy drink consumption among student-athletes selected from seven public universities in Ghana. The study assessed the energy drink consumption patterns, types usually consumed, frequency of consumption and reasons why athletes consumed energy drinks. Methods A total number of 180 student-athletes gave their consent to participate in the study and completed a questionnaire which was administered during an inter-university sports competition. Results Most of the participants (62.2%) reported consuming at least one can of energy drink in a week. A high proportion (53.6%) of the respondents who drink energy drinks indicated that they did so to replenish lost energy after training or a competition. Other reasons given as to why energy drinks were consumed by the study participants included to provide energy and fluids to the body (25.9%), to improve performance (9.8%) and to reduce fatigue (5.4%). Conclusion These results suggest the need to plan health education programmes to particularly correct some wrong perceptions that athletes have regarding the benefits of energy drinks and also create awareness among student-athletes about the side effects of excessive intake of energy drinks. PMID:22444601

  5. Dual career pathways of transnational athletes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryba, Tatiana; Stambulova, Natalia; Ronkainen, Noora

    2015-01-01

    . The developmental transition from secondary to higher education was chosen as a key transition to classify the DC pathways. Additional insights into DC mobilization across international borders were gleaned by employing the typologies of sport migrants developed in the sport labor migration research. Results Three......Objectives Transnationalism, as part of the globalization processes, has transformed the lifestyle and the course of athletes' careers. This presents previously unexplored challenges encountered by student-athletes in combining athletic and academic pursuits. In this article, we propose...... a conceptual framework for the taxonomy of transnational dual careers (DC). Design and method Narrative inquiry from the life story perspective was used to elicit and analyze career narratives of six transnational athletes (3 male and 3 female), generating about five interview hours per athlete...

  6. Weight cycling in adolescent Taekwondo athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Mohsen; Rahman, Alima; De Ciantis, Marco

    2011-12-01

    Weight reduction cycles are used by weight classed athletes in Taekwondo to make a weight category. Tension, dizziness, headaches, and confusion have been associated with rapid weight loss (RWL). There is a lack of research in weight cycling and its benefits among Taekwondo athletes. To investigate the rate of weight cycling in Junior Taekwondo athletes and its effect on performance. Athletes were weighed prior to competition, then again before their first match. Body mass difference in relation to winning was compared. A significant increase from weigh-in to pre-match measurements was consistently found in both genders with no significant difference between them. Winners had a mean body mass gain (1.02 kg) which was non-significantly less than the non-winners (1.09 kg). RWL practices do not define which athlete will perform better. Negative effects of weight cycling coupled with RWL has unclear performance benefits which indicates a need for further research.

  7. Preparing for events for physically challenged athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Lauren M; Ward, David C

    2014-01-01

    The participation in sports for physically challenged athletes continues to expand in multiple domains from recreational, novice, and competitive to elite competitions such as the Paralympics. Physically challenged athletes have various disabilities such as visual impairments, spinal cord injuries, amputations, cerebral palsy, or other neuromuscular impairments and have different levels of functional ability within these broad categories. The spectrum of medical illnesses and musculoskeletal injuries seen with sports is similar to that of able-bodied athletes; however medical teams caring for athletes with disabilities need to be familiar with medical risks such as skin breakdown, thermoregulation problems, dehydration, autonomic dysreflexia, infections, orthotic and prosthetic issues, and psychiatric comorbidities that may be encountered. The medical team preparation for events involving physically challenged athletes should include obtaining appropriate medical supplies, ensuring disability-compatible access to medical areas, and preparing for emergency extraction from adaptive equipment.

  8. ECHOCARDIOGRAPHIC PARAMETERS IN ATHLETES OF DIFFERENT SPORTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Venckunas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Competitive athletics is often associated with moderate left ventricular (LV hypertrophy, and it has been hypothesized that training mode and type of exercise modulates long-term cardiac adaptation. The purpose of the study was to compare cardiac structure and function among athletes of various sports and sedentary controls. Standard transthoracic two-dimensional M-mode and Doppler echocardiography was performed at rest in Caucasian male canoe/kayak paddlers (n = 9, long distance runners (LDR, n = 18, middle distance runners (MDR, n = 17, basketball players (BP, n = 31, road cyclists (n = 8, swimmers (n = 10, strength/power athletes (n = 9 of similar age (range, 15 to 31 yrs, training experience (4 to 9 years, and age-matched healthy male sedentary controls (n = 15. Absolute interventricular septum (IVS thickness and LV wall thickness, but not LV diameter, were greater in athletes than sedentary controls. Left ventricular mass of all athletes but relative wall thickness of only BP, swimmers, cyclists, and strength/power athletes were higher as compared with controls (p < 0.05. Among athletes, smaller IVS thickness was observed in MDR than BP, cyclists, swimmers or strength/power athletes, while LDR had higher body size-adjusted LV diameter as compared to BP, cyclists and strength/power athletes. In conclusion, relative LV diameter was increased in long distance runners as compared with basketball players, cyclists, and strength/power athletes. Basketball, road cycling, strength/power, and swimming training were associated with increased LV concentricity as compared with paddling or distance running

  9. On the Field and Outside the Lines: Relationships between Student-Athletes' Perceptions of Their Intercollegiate Coaches' Leadership Practices and Student-Athletes' Self Reported Satisfaction, Athletic and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dispo, Elaine J.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the relationships between intercollegiate student-athletes' perceptions of their coaches' exemplary leadership practices and those student-athletes' self-reported athlete satisfaction, athletic and academic performances, while controlling for the demographics of coach and student-athlete gender, student-athlete playing…

  10. Comparison of Mental Health Components among Athlete and Non-athlete Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Ghiami

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adolescence is a period of rapid biological and behavioral changes that may expand the risk of mental health issues. Objective: This study aimed to compare the mental health of male and female athletes and non-athletes among a high school student groups. Methodology: On this base 100 students (50 athletes and 50 non-athletes, Mage = 16 (SD = ±1 were selected through multi stage random sampling and divided equally into four groups (female athlete / non-athlete, male athlete / non-athlete. General Health Questionnaire designed by Goldberg and Hiller (1979 was used for data collections. Results: The analysis of one-way ANOVA displayed significant differences between the mean scores in mental health among the groups in terms of mental health, F (3, 96 =39, P = .01 with less prevalence of these symptoms among athletes comparing to non-athletes. Conclusion: Increasing opportunities for students to take part in sport competitions can protect them against poor psychological well-being.Keywords: Mental Health; Depression; Anxiety; Social dysfunction; Somatic

  11. Acyl coenzyme A synthetase long-chain 1 (ACSL1 gene polymorphism (rs6552828 and elite endurance athletic status: a replication study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Yvert

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the association between the rs6552828 polymorphism in acyl coenzyme A synthetase (ACSL1 and elite endurance athletic status. We studied 82 Caucasian (Spanish World/Olympic-class endurance male athletes, and a group of sex and ethnically matched healthy young adults (controls, n=197. The analyses were replicated in a cohort of a different ethnic origin (Chinese of the Han ethnic group, composed of elite endurance athletes (runners [cases, n=241 (128 male] and healthy sedentary adults [controls, n=504 (267 male]. In the Spanish cohort, genotype (P=0.591 and minor allele (A frequencies were similar in cases and controls (P=0.978. In the Chinese cohort, genotype (P=0.973 and minor allele (G frequencies were comparable in female endurance athletes and sedentary controls (P=0.881, whereas in males the frequency of the G allele was higher in endurance athletes (0.40 compared with their controls (0.32, P=0.040. The odds ratio (95%CI for an elite endurance Chinese athlete to carry the G allele compared with ethnically matched controls was 1.381 (1.015-1.880 (P-value=0.04. Our findings suggest that the ACSL1 gene polymorphism rs6552828 is not associated with elite endurance athletic status in Caucasians, yet a marginal association seems to exist for the Chinese (Han male population.

  12. Is there an interaction between BDKRB2 -9/+9 and GNB3 C825T polymorphisms and elite athletic performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eynon, N; Meckel, Y; Alves, A J; Nemet, D; Eliakim, A

    2011-12-01

    The -9 deletion allele in the BDKRB2 -9/+9 polymorphism was associated previously with improved endurance performance. We compared the frequency distribution of the BDKRB2 -9/+9 (rs5810761) polymorphism between athletes (n=155) of sports with different demands (endurance runners; n=74 vs sprinters; n=81) as well as between athletes of different competitive levels (elite level; n=46 vs national level; n=109). These results were compared with those of 240 non-athletic healthy individuals. We also tested the influence of the interaction between the BDKRB2 -9/+9 and the GNB3 C825T (rs5443) genotypes in relation to endurance performance. Genotype distribution and allele frequencies were found to be similar in the endurance athlete, sprinter, and control groups (P=0.83 for genotype distribution and P=0.9 for allele frequencies). Similarly, no statistical differences were found between the subgroups of elite-level endurance athletes and national-level endurance athletes, or between elite-level and national-level sprinters (P>0.09 for all comparisons). There was no interaction between BDKRB2 -9/+9 and GNB3 C825T polymorphisms in relation to endurance performance (P=0.16 for interaction effect). In conclusion, the BDKRB2 +9/-9 polymorphism is not associated with endurance performance, at least among Israeli athletes, and the GNB3TT+BDKRB2 -9/-9 "optimal genotype" is not associated with endurance performance.

  13. Use of heart rate variability in monitoring stress and recovery in judo athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, José; Alamo, Juan M; García-Massó, Xavier; Buscà, Bernat; López, Jose L; Serra-Añó, Pilar; González, Luís-Millán

    2014-07-01

    The main objective of this study was to examine the effect of different judo training loads on heart rate variability (HRV) measurements, to determine if they can be used as valid indicators in monitoring stress and recovery in judo athletes. Fourteen male national-standard judo athletes were randomly divided into 2 groups, and each group followed a different type of training, namely, a high training load (HTL) and a moderate training load program (MTL). Data collection included HRV measurements, a Recovery Stress Questionnaire for athletes (RESTQ-SPORT), and strength measurements, 4 weeks before and after the training program. The HTL group had lower square root of the mean squared difference of successive RR intervals, very low frequency, high frequency, short-term variability, short-range scaling exponents, general recovery, sport-specific recovery, general stress, maximum strength, maximum power, and higher low/high frequency ratio at posttest compared with pretest (p ≤ 0.05). The HTL group showed lower short-range and long-range scaling exponents, general recovery, sport-specific recovery, and higher general stress than the MTL group in posttest measurements (p ≤ 0.05). In conclusion, judo athletes enrolled in an HTL program showed an imbalance of the autonomic nervous system with decreased vagal modulation, together with a decrease in strength parameters, higher markers for stress, and a lower perception of recovery.

  14. Biomechanical head impact characteristics during sparring practice sessions in high school taekwondo athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, David M; Fife, Gabriel P

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to monitor head impact magnitude and characteristics, such as impact location and frequency, at high school taekwondo sparring sessions. METHODS Eight male high school taekwondo athletes participated in this study. The head impact characteristics were recorded by X-Patch, a wireless accelerometer and gyroscope, during 6 taekwondo sparring sessions. The outcome measures were the peak linear acceleration ( g = 9.81 msec(2)), peak rotational acceleration, rotational velocity, and Head Injury Criterion. RESULTS A total of 689 impacts occurred over 6 sessions involving the 8 athletes. There was an average of 24 impacts per 100 minutes, and there were significant differences in the frequency of impacts among both the sessions and individual athletes. In order of frequency, the most commonly hit locations were the side (38.2%), back (35.7%), and front (23.8%) of the head. CONCLUSIONS The data indicate that there is a relatively high number of head impacts experienced by taekwondo athletes during sparring practice. According to the rotational acceleration predicting impact severity published in previous research, 17.1% of the impacts were deemed to be a moderate and 15.5% were deemed to be severe.

  15. THE UNIVERSITY FOR SENIOR, ELDERLY PERSON. -THE STATE OF FUTURE LIFELONG LEARNING-

    OpenAIRE

    白井, 真理子; SHIRAI, Mariko

    2014-01-01

    In the society which an aging society progresses, and elderly people increase in number, elderly people's knowledge of life is property for society. The university of senior is a lifelong learning institution which can return elderly people's knowledge to society.

  16. Research and Development of a Positioning Service for Learning Networks for Lifelong Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco

    2006-01-01

    Kalz, M. (2006). Research and Development of a Positioning Service for Learning Networks for Lifelong Learning. Presentation given at the Doctoral Consortium of the First European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning. October, 1-4, 2006, Crete.

  17. Deschooling Society? A Lifelong Learning Network for Sustainable Communities, Urban Regeneration and Environmental Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Blewitt

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The complexity and multifaceted nature of sustainable lifelong learning can be effectively addressed by a broad network of providers working co-operatively and collaboratively. Such a network involving the third, public and private sector bodies must realise the full potential of accredited flexible and blended formal learning, contextual opportunities offered by enablers of informal and non formal learning and the affordances derived from the various loose and open spaces that can make social learning effective. Such a conception informs the new Lifelong Learning Network Consortium on Sustainable Communities, Urban Regeneration and Environmental Technologies established and led by the Lifelong Learning Centre at Aston University. This paper offers a radical, reflective and political evaluation of its first year in development arguing that networked learning of this type could prefigure a new model for lifelong learning and sustainable education that renders the city itself a creative medium for transformative learning and sustainability.

  18. Investigation of The Relationships Between Lifelong Learning And Social Emotional Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Akcalan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current research aims to investigate the relationship between lifelong learning and social emotional learning. Study group consists of 590 university students (390 females, 200 males studying in different undergraduate programs in University of Sakarya, Faculty of Education in the Fall Term of 2015.In this research, relationships between the variables of lifelong learning and social emotional learning were investigated. Pearson Product Moment Correlation, Partial Correlation methods were utilized so as to investigate these relationships. As consequence of the research, lifelong learning and social emotional learning scores were correlating significantly. According to these results, it can be discussed that social emotional learning which can be explained as the behavioral reflection of social and emotional skills in a systematical and consistent way, has a positive relationship with lifelong learning which can be defined as all kinds of learning including formal or informal through one's life. Results are discussed within the context of the associated literature.

  19. Lifelong mobile learning: Increasing accessibility and flexibility with tablet computers and ebooks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Kalz, M. (2011, 1 September). Lifelong mobile learning: Increasing accessibility and flexibility with tablet computers and ebooks. Presentation provided during the opening ceremony of the iPad pilot for schakelzone rechten, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

  20. Support Services for e-Learning; Using Language Technologies for Lifelong Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berlanga, Adriana; Stoyanov, Slavi

    2010-01-01

    Berlanga, A. J., & Stoyanov, S. (2010, 14 December). Support Services for e-Learning; Using Language Technologies for Lifelong Learning. Presentation at a LTfLL workshop validation session, Heerlen, The Netherlands.