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Sample records for lidocaine analgesia prior

  1. Bupivacaine versus lidocaine analgesia for neonatal circumcision

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    Stolik-Dollberg Orit C

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analgesia for neonatal circumcision was recently advocated for every male infant, and its use is considered essential by the American Academy of Pediatrics. We compared the post-operative analgesic quality of bupivacaine to that of lidocaine for achieving dorsal penile nerve block (DPNB when performing neonatal circumcision. Methods Data were obtained from 38 neonates following neonatal circumcision. The infants had received DPNB analgesia with either lidocaine or bupivacaine. The outcome variable was the administration by the parents of acetaminophen during the ensuing 24 hours. Results Seventeen infants received lidocaine and 19 received bupivacaine DPNB. Ten infants in the lidocaine group (59% were given acetaminophen following circumcision compared to only 3 (16% in the bupivacaine group (P 2 = 20.6; P = 0.006. Conclusion DPNB with bupivacaine for neonatal circumcision apparently confers better analgesia than lidocaine as judged by the requirement of acetaminophen over the ensuing 24-hour period.

  2. Caudal epidural analgesia using lidocaine alone or in combination with ketamine in dromedary camels (Camelus dromedarius

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    Omid Azari

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to investigate the analgesic effect of lidocaine and a combination of lidocaine and ketamine following epidural administration in dromedary camels. Ten 12–18-month-old camels were randomly divided into two equal groups. In group L, the animals received 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg and in group LK the animals received a mixture of 10% ketamine (1 mg/kg and 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg administered into the first intercoccygeal (Co1–Co2 epidural space while standing. Onset time and duration of caudal analgesia, sedation level and ataxia were recorded after drug administration. Data were analysed by U Mann-Whitney tests and significance was taken as p < 0.05. The results showed that epidural lidocaine and co-administration of lidocaine and ketamine produced complete analgesia in the tail, anus and perineum. Epidural administration of the lidocaine-ketamine mixture resulted in mild to moderate sedation, whilst the animals that received epidural lidocaine alone were alert and nervous during the study. Ataxia was observed in all test subjects and was slightly more severe in camels that received the lidocaine-ketamine mixture. It was concluded that epidural administration of lidocaine plus ketamine resulted in longer caudal analgesia in standing conscious dromedary camels compared with the effect of administering lidocaine alone.

  3. Clinical assessment of epidural analgesia induced by xylazine-lidocaine combination accompanied by xylazine sedation in calves

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    Kamiloglu Alkan

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate whether epidural administration of a xylazine-lidocaine combination accompanied by xylazine sedation would provide satisfactory analgesia for some surgical procedures on 10 calves admitted to the Department of Veterinary Surgery, University of Kafkas with perineal urolithiasis (n:2, rectovaginal fistula (n:1, atresia ani (n:2, omphalophlebitis (n:2, omphaloarteritis (n:1 and umbilical hernia (n:2. Following intramuscular injection of xylazine at a dose of 0.05 mg/kg for sedation, xylazine-lidocaine combination (0.2 mg/kg lidocaine + 0.02 mg/kg xylazine + 5 ml 0.9% NaCl was administrated into the lumbosacral (L6-S1, sacrococcygeal (S5-Co1 or intercoccygeal (Co1-Co2 space. Heart rate, respiratory rate and rectal temperature were recorded prior to and during analgesia at 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 minutes. Furthermore, depth and duration of analgesia were evaluated during surgical intervention. The study revealed that the combination of epidural xylazine-lidocaine with xylazine sedation was highly satisfactory for surgery of the lower urinary tract and the perineal region, but it was less so for surgery of the umbilical area.

  4. Clinical assessment of epidural analgesia induced by xylazine-lidocaine combination accompanied by xylazine sedation in calves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether epidural administration of a xylazine-lidocaine combination accompanied by xylazine sedation would provide satisfactory analgesia for some surgical procedures on 10 calves admitted to the Department of Veterinary Surgery, University of Kafkas with perineal urolithiasis (n:2), rectovaginal fistula (n:1), atresia ani (n:2), omphalophlebitis (n:2), omphaloarteritis (n:1) and umbilical hernia (n:2). Following intramuscular injection of xylazine at a dose of 0.05 mg/kg for sedation, xylazine-lidocaine combination (0.2 mg/kg lidocaine + 0.02 mg/kg xylazine + 5 ml 0.9% NaCl) was administrated into the lumbosacral (L6-S1), sacrococcygeal (S5-Co1) or intercoccygeal (Co1-Co2) space. Heart rate, respiratory rate and rectal temperature were recorded prior to and during analgesia at 5, 10, 15, 30 and 60 minutes. Furthermore, depth and duration of analgesia were evaluated during surgical intervention. The study revealed that the combination of epidural xylazine-lidocaine with xylazine sedation was highly satisfactory for surgery of the lower urinary tract and the perineal region, but it was less so for surgery of the umbilical area. PMID:21851664

  5. Analgesic efficacy of lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal: A randomized trial study

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    Valdecy Ferreira de Oliveira Pinheiro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the analgesic efficacy of subcutaneous lidocaine and multimodal analgesia for chest tube removal following heart surgery. Methods: sixty volunteers were randomly allocated in two groups; 30 participants in the experimental group were given 1% subcutaneous lidocaine, and 30 controls were given a multimodal analgesia regime comprising systemic anti-inflammatory agents and opioids. The intensity and quality of pain and trait and state anxiety were assessed. The association between independent variables and final outcome was assessed by means of the Chi-squared test with Yates' correction and Fisher's exact test. Results: the groups did not exhibit significant difference with respect to the intensity of pain upon chest tube removal (p= 0.47. The most frequent descriptors of pain reported by the participants were pressing, sharp, pricking, burning and unbearable. Conclusion: the present study suggests that the analgesic effect of the subcutaneous administration of 1% lidocaine combined with multimodal analgesia is most efficacious.

  6. Caudal epidural analgesia using lidocaine alone or in combination with ketamine in dromedary camels Camelus dromedarius.

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    Azari, Omid; Molaei, Mohammad M; Ehsani, Amir H

    2014-02-27

    This study was performed to investigate the analgesic effect of lidocaine and a combination of lidocaine and ketamine following epidural administration in dromedary camels. Ten 12-18-month-old camels were randomly divided into two equal groups. In group L, the animals received 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg) and in group LK the animals received a mixture of 10% ketamine (1 mg/kg) and 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg) administered into the first intercoccygeal (Co1-Co2) epidural space while standing. Onset time and duration of caudal analgesia, sedation level and ataxia were recorded after drug administration. Data were analysed by U Mann-Whitney tests and significance was taken as p dromedary camels compared with the effect of administering lidocaine alone.

  7. Impact of intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative analgesia and recovery from surgery: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

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    McCarthy, Grace C; Megalla, Sohair A; Habib, Ashraf S

    2010-06-18

    Postoperative pain continues to be inadequately managed. While opioids remain the mainstay for postoperative analgesia, their use can be associated with adverse effects, including ileus, which can prolong hospital stay. A number of studies have investigated the use of perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion for improving postoperative analgesia and enhancing recovery of bowel function. This systematic review was performed to determine the overall efficacy of intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative analgesia and recovery from surgery in patients undergoing various surgical procedures. We searched the databases of MEDLINE, CINAHL and the Cochrane Library from 1966 to December 2009. We searched for randomized controlled comparisons of lidocaine infusion with placebo in the surgical setting and reporting on postoperative analgesia and other aspects of patient recovery from surgery. The quality of all included studies was assessed using the Modified Oxford Scale. Information on postoperative pain intensity and analgesic requirements was extracted from the trials and compared qualitatively. Other relevant data such as return of bowel function, length of hospital stay, intraoperative anaesthetic requirement and adverse effects were also compared. Sixteen trials were included. A total of 395 patients received intravenous lidocaine with 369 controls. In open and laparoscopic abdominal surgery, as well as in ambulatory surgery patients, intravenous perioperative infusion of lidocaine resulted in significant reductions in postoperative pain intensity and opioid consumption. Pain scores were reduced at rest and with cough or movement for up to 48 hours postoperatively. Opioid consumption was reduced by up to 85% in lidocaine-treated patients when compared with controls. Infusion of lidocaine also resulted in earlier return of bowel function, allowing for earlier rehabilitation and shorter duration of hospital stay. First flatus occurred up to 23 hours earlier

  8. Effects of epidural lidocaine analgesia on labor and delivery: A randomized, prospective, controlled trial

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    Nafisi Shahram

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whether epidural analgesia for labor prolongs the active-first and second labor stages and increases the risk of vacuum-assisted delivery is a controversial topic. Our study was conducted to answer the question: does lumbar epidural analgesia with lidocaine affect the progress of labor in our obstetric population? Method 395 healthy, nulliparous women, at term, presented in spontaneous labor with a singleton vertex presentation. These patients were randomized to receive analgesia either, epidural with bolus doses of 1% lidocaine or intravenous, with meperidine 25 to 50 mg when their cervix was dilated to 4 centimeters. The duration of the active-first and second stages of labor and the neonatal apgar scores were recorded, in each patient. The total number of vacuum-assisted and cesarean deliveries were also measured. Results 197 women were randomized to the epidural group. 198 women were randomized to the single-dose intravenous meperidine group. There was no statistical difference in rates of vacuum-assisted delivery rate. Cesarean deliveries, as a consequence of fetal bradycardia or dystocia, did not differ significantly between the groups. Differences in the duration of the active-first and the second stages of labor were not statistically significant. The number of newborns with 1-min and 5-min Apgar scores less than 7, did not differ significantly between both analgesia groups. Conclusion Epidural analgesia with 1% lidocaine does not prolong the active-first and second stages of labor and does not increase vacuum-assisted or cesarean delivery rate.

  9. Comparative analgesic and sedative effects of tramadol, tramadol-lidocaine and lidocaine for caudal epidural analgesia in donkeys (Equus asinus).

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    Marzok, Mohamed A; El-khodery, Sabry A

    2015-03-01

    To compare anti-nociceptive and sedative effects of tramadol, a combination of tramadol-lidocaine, and lidocaine alone for perineal analgesia in donkeys. Experimental 'blinded' randomized cross-over study. Six healthy adult donkeys. Treatments were tramadol (TR) (1.0 mg kg(-1) ), tramadol-lidocaine (TRLD) (0.5 and 0.2 mg kg(-1) respectively) and lidocaine (LD) (0.4 mg kg(-1) ) given into the epidural space. The volume of all treatments was 0.02 mL kg(-1) . Nociception was tested at the perineal region by pin prick, followed, if no reaction, by pressure from a haemostat clamp. Times to onset, degree and duration of anti-nociception of the perineal region were recorded. Response was tested immediately after drug administration and at: 2, 5, 10, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes post-administration and then at 30 minute intervals thereafter until a response re-occurred. Physiologic data and degree of sedation and ataxia were recorded pre-administration and at intervals for 240 minutes post-administration. Results were analyzed using anova, Kruskal-Wallis tests, and Wilks' Lambda test as relevant. Significance was taken as p < 0.05. Times (minutes, mean ± SD) to onset and duration of anti-nociception, respectively were; TR 13 ± 1.6 and 220 ± 4.6; TRLD 6 ± 0.8 and 180 ± 8.5; LD 4 ± 1.4 and 75 ± 4. Onset and duration times were significantly longer with TR than the other two treatments. TR never produced complete anti-nociception, whereas the TRLD and LD induced complete anti-nociceptive effects. Duration was significantly longer with TRLD than with LD alone. Epidural injections of TR and TRLD induced mild sedation. Epidural combination of TRLD produced an anti-nociceptive effect in the perineum, which was rapid in onset and had a longer duration of action than LD alone. An epidural single dose of TRLD combination would appear to provide an acceptable analgesic effect in the perineal region of donkeys. © 2014 Association of Veterinary

  10. Inhibition of brain cell excitability by lidocaine, QX314, and tetrodotoxin: a mechanism for analgesia from infused local anesthetics?

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    Butterworth, J; Cole, L; Marlow, G

    1993-07-01

    Local anesthetic infusions have been used to provide analgesia in a variety of painful conditions. The mechanism for this drug effect remains unknown. To better define the electrical effects of lidocaine concentrations comparable to those obtained during analgesic infusions, lidocaine (0.05-3 mmol.l-1), QX314 (an obligatorily charged, quaternary lidocaine derivative applied within the cells), and tetrodotoxin (10 mmol.l-1) were applied to rat hippocampal pyramidal cells. The three drugs, which inhibit Na+ currents by varying mechanisms, produced tonic increases in (firing) current threshold, and decreases in the amplitude of action potentials measured using an intracellular microelectrode technique. Lidocaine inhibited action potential spikes and increased current threshold in a concentration-dependent fashion. Lidocaine 50 and 100 mumol.l-1 did not inhibit action potentials, but increased firing threshold by nearly 100%. Lidocaine 1-3 mmol.l-1 significantly inhibited action potential amplitude and increased threshold by as much as 800%. Similarly, QX314 and tetrodotoxin produced greater increases in current threshold than in action potential amplitude. QX314 produced phasic (or frequency-dependent) block during trains of stimuli at 1 Hz, even when almost no tonic block was present. Lidocaine produced less phasic block than QX314, and required both greater tonic block and more frequent stimulation to produce the phenomenon. Tetrodotoxin demonstrated no phasic block. Increases in current threshold occurred in lidocaine concentrations associated with analgesia and toxicity; inhibition of action potentials occurred scarcely at all at these concentrations. Thus, tonic increases in current threshold may underlie analgesia and supplementation of general anesthesia by intravenous lidocaine.

  11. Intraperitoneal Instillation of Lidocaine Improves Postoperative Analgesia at Cesarean Delivery: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial.

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    Patel, Ruchira; Carvalho, Jose C A; Downey, Kristi; Kanczuk, Marcelo; Bernstein, Paul; Siddiqui, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    Cesarean delivery is a commonly performed procedure worldwide. Despite improvements in balanced multimodal analgesia, there remains a proportion of women for whom postoperative pain relief and patient satisfaction are still inadequate. Intraperitoneal instillation of local anesthetic has been shown to be effective in reducing postoperative pain after abdominal surgery. We sought to investigate the effect of intraperitoneal instillation of lidocaine on postcesarean delivery pain as part of a multimodal analgesia regimen. We studied women scheduled for elective cesarean delivery under spinal anesthesia. Spinal anesthesia was performed with 0.75% hyperbaric bupivacaine, fentanyl, and morphine. At the end of the cesarean delivery, immediately before parietal peritoneum or fascia closure, patients were randomized to receive either lidocaine (20 mL 2% lidocaine with epinephrine) or placebo (20 mL normal saline) instilled into the peritoneal cavity. The primary outcome was pain score on movement at 24 hours. Secondary outcomes were pain score at rest and on movement at 2, 24, and 48 hours; maternal satisfaction score; analgesic consumption; incidence of nausea, vomiting, and itching; and return of bowel function. Two hundred four women were recruited. Baseline characteristics were similar between the lidocaine and placebo groups. Pain scores at 24 hours postcesarean delivery on movement (parameter estimate 0.02 [95% confidence interval {CI} -0.14 to 0.18]; P = .823) and at rest (parameter estimate 0.00 [95% CI -0.32 to 0.33]; P = .986) were similar in both groups. Pain scores at 2 hours postcesarean delivery on movement (parameter estimate -0.58 [95% CI -0.90 to -0.26]; P = .001) and at rest (parameter estimate -1.00 [95% CI -1.57 to -0.43]; P = .001) were lower in the lidocaine group. Subgroup analysis of patients with peritoneum closure revealed significantly lower pain scores at 24 hours on movement (parameter estimate -0.33 [95% CI -0.64 to -0.03]; P = .032) in the

  12. Efficacy and safety of intravenous lidocaine for postoperative analgesia and recovery after surgery

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    Weibel, S; Jokinen, J; Pace, N L

    2016-01-01

    % CI -0.47 to 0.03). Subgroup analysis and trial sequential analysis suggested pain reduction for patients undergoing laparoscopic abdominal surgery or open abdominal surgery, but not for patients undergoing other surgeries. There was limited evidence of positive effects of lidocaine on postoperative...... infusion. RESULTS: Forty-five trials (2802 participants) were included. Meta-analysis suggested that lidocaine reduced postoperative pain (visual analogue scale, 0 to 10 cm) at 1-4 h (MD -0.84, 95% CI -1.10 to -0.59) and at 24 h (MD -0.34, 95% CI -0.57 to -0.11) after surgery, but not at 48 h (MD -0.22, 95......) and indirectness (small studies). CONCLUSIONS: There is limited evidence suggesting that i.v. lidocaine may be a useful adjuvant during general anaesthesia because of its beneficial impact on several outcomes after surgery....

  13. Effect of intrathecal Bupivacaine–Lidocaine combination on motor block and analgesia period

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    Sara El-Adawy

    2012-06-01

    Conclusions: Lidocaine 1% (6 mg mixed to spinal 1.5 mL hyperbaric 0.5% Bupivacaine (7.5 mg can shorten the duration of Bupivacaine spinal anesthesia, provide more rapid recovery from the spinal anesthesia compared to the same dose of 0.5% Bupivacaine (7.5 mg alone or the same dose of 0.5% Bupivacaine (7.5 mg mixed with 0.6 mL 2% Lidocaine (12 mg.

  14. Analgesic Efficacy of Intrarectal Instillation of Lidocaine Gel prior to Transrectal Ultrasound Guided Prostate Biopsy: A Prospective Randomized Trial

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    Yun, Tae Jin; Kim, Seung Hyup; Cho, Jeong Yeon [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hak Jong; Lee, Sang Eun; Byun, Seok Soo [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Chang Kyu [Seoul National University Borame Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    To assess the analgesic efficacy of intrarectal lidocaine gel instillation prior to periprostatic nerve block during transrectal, ultrasound-guided prostate biopsies. Between March 2004 and October 2004, 203 consecutive patients for prostate biopsies were randomized into two groups. In 90 patients of group A, 10ml of 2% lidocaine gel was instilled intrarectally 10 minutes prior to periprostatic neurovascular bundle block, while 113 patients of group B received only periprostatic neurovascular bundle block without lidocaine gel instillation. Pain was assessed with the visual analogue pain scale, during periprostatic neurovascular bundle block (VAS 1), during the biopsy procedures (VAS 2) and 20 minutes after the procedure (VAS 3). The difference in VAS scores between patients in the two groups was evaluated with the unpaired t-test, with p < 0.05 considered significant. Patients in group A experienced statistically less pain during transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy (VAS 2, 2.994 versus 3.903, p < 0.01). However, no significant difference in VAS values could be demonstrated during periprostatic neurovascular bundle block (VAS 1, 4.761 versus 5.133, p > 0.05) or at after 20 minutes after the procedure (VAS 3, 0.9778 versus 1.257, p > 0.05). Intrarectal instillation of lidocaine gel leads to significant additional analgesic efficacy during the biopsy procedure. It is a simple, safe and rapid technique that should be considered in all patients undergoing TRUS guided prostate biopsy

  15. Comparison of Iontophoretic Lidocaine to EMLA Cream for Pain Reduction Prior to Intravenous Fannulation in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    1957, used iontophoresis of local anesthetics for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia . Gibson and Cooke, in 1959, used lidocaine and pilocarpine...al. 1994). Other clinical uses of EMLA cream include: lumbar puncture, epidural injections, drug reservoir injections, skin surgery, genitourinary...surgery, ear, nose, throat, oral surgery, lithotripsy, and there are some anecdotal reports of its use for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia

  16. The effects of adding epinephrine or xylazine to lidocaine solution for lumbosacral epidural analgesia in fat-tailed sheep

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    Maryam Rostami

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This blinded, randomised experimental study was designed to compare the analgesic effects of lumbosacral epidural administration of lidocaine-epinephrine or lidocaine-xylazine combinations in fat-tailed sheep. Nine healthy fat-tailed male lambs (mean ± s.d. age, 4.6 ± 0.4 months; weight, 24.6 kg ± 2.5 kg were randomly allocated into four groups of six sheep: lidocaine 2% (LID, lidocaine-epinephrine 5 µg/mL (LIDEP, lidocaine-xylazine 0.05 mg/kg (LIDXY or bupivacaine 0.5% (BUP. The onset and duration of flank, perineum and hindlimb anaesthesia and the onset and duration of hindlimb paralysis were recorded. Epidural administration of LID, LIDEP, LIDXY or BUP produced anaesthesia within 6.6 min, 7.6 min, 3.4 min and 8.4 min, respectively. The mean onset of anaesthesia in the LIDXY group was significantly shorter compared with the BUP group (p = 0.02. The mean duration of anaesthesia was 107.9 min, 190.4 min, 147.6 min and 169.7 min for LID, LIDEP, LIDXY and BUP, respectively. The onset of hindlimb paralysis was faster in the LIDXY group than in the BUP group; however, the duration of hindlimb paralysis was shorter in LIDXY compared with LIDEP. Epidural administration of LIDEP or LIDXY provides a comparable duration of local anaesthesia without any adverse effects in fat-tailed sheep. Epidural LIDXY did not appear to be advantageous over epidural LIDEP.

  17. Quality of analgesia after lower third molar surgery: A randomised, double-blind study of levobupivacaine, bupivacaine and lidocaine with epinephrine

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    Brajković Denis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Surgical extraction of lower third molars is followed by mild or severe postoperative pain which peaks at maximal intensity in the first 12 hours and has a significant impact on a patient’s postoperative quality of life. The use of long-acting local anaesthetics is a promising strategy to improve postoperative analgesia. The aim of the present study was to investigate analgesic parameters and patient satisfaction after using 0.5% levobupivacaine (Lbup, 0.5% bupivacaine (Bup and 2% lidocaine with epinephrine 1:80,000 (Lid + Epi for an inferior alveolar nerve block following lower third molar surgery. Methods. A total of 102 patients (ASA I were divided into three groups, each of which received either 3 mL of Lbup, Bup or Lid + Epi. The intensity of postoperative analgesia was measured using a verbal rating scale (VRS. The total amounts of rescue analgesics were recorded on the first and during seven postoperative days. Patients satisfaction was noted using a modified verbal scales. Results. A significantly higher level of postoperative pain was recorded in Lid + Epi group compared to Bup and Lbup groups. No significant differences were seen between Bup and Lbup, but a significant reduction in the need for rescue analgesics was seen postoperatively in both Lbup and Bup (50% in comparison with Lid + Epi (80% in the first 24 hours. The same significant trend in rescue analgesic consumption was recorded for seven postoperative days. Patients’ overall satisfaction was significantly lower for Lid + Epi (10% than for Lbup (56% and Bup (52%. Conclusion. The use of a new and long-acting local anaesthetic 0.5% levobupivacaine is clinically relevant and effective for an inferior alveolar nerve block and postoperative pain control after third molar surgery. In our study Lbup and Bup controled postoperative pain more efficiently after lower third molar surgery compared to Lid + Epi. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 175021

  18. Comparison of Iontophoretic Lidocaine to EMLA Cream for Pain Reduction Prior to Intravenous Cannulation in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    applied EMLA cream, in producing local anesthesia prior to IV cannulation in adults. An initial convience sample of 15 adult volunteers enrolled in...the study, but the results were not consistent with data analysis. A new convience sample of 14 adult volunteers was enrolled in the study. Each...and Materials Utilized............................................................................. 23 Sampling

  19. Mecanismos envolvidos na analgesia da lidocaína por via venosa Mecanismos involucrados en la analgesia de la lidocaína por vía venosa Mechanisms of analgesia of intravenous lidocaine

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    Gabriela Rocha Lauretti

    2008-06-01

    seguras dosis inferiores 5 mg.kg-1, administradas lentamente (30 minutos, con monitorización.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Intravenous lidocaine has been used for several indications since the decade of 1960. Its multimodal mechanism of action was the objective of this review. CONTENTS: Mechanisms of action that diverge from the classical Na+ channel blockade, the differential action of intravenous lidocaine in central sensitization, and the analgesic and cytoprotective actions, as well as the different doses of intravenous lidocaine were reviewed. CONCLUSIONS: The final analgesic action of intravenous lidocaine is a reflection of its multifactorial action. It has been suggested that its central sensitization is secondary to a peripheral anti-hyperalgic action on somatic pain and central on neuropathic pain, which result on the blockade of central hyperexcitability. The intravenous dose should not exceed the toxic plasma concentration of 5 µg.mL-1; doses smaller than 5 mg.kg-1, administered slowly (30 minutes, under monitoring, are considered safe.

  20. The analgesic efficacy of intravenous lidocaine infusion after laparoscopic fundoplication: a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

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    Dale GJ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gregory J Dale,1 Stephanie Phillips,2 Gregory L Falk3 1Westmead Hospital Clinical School, The University of Sydney, 2Sydney Adventist Hospital Clinical School, The University of Sydney, 3Concord Clinical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia Abstract: This study aimed to determine if intravenous lidocaine infusion reduces postoperative pain intensity following laparoscopic fundoplication surgery and to also validate the safety of intravenous lidocaine at the dose tested. This was an equally randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, single center trial. Adult patients undergoing laparoscopic fundoplication were recruited. The intervention group received 1 mg/kg intravenous lidocaine bolus prior to induction of anesthesia, then an intravenous infusion at 2 mg/kg/h for 24 hours. The primary outcome was pain, measured using a numeric rating scale for 30 hours postoperatively. Secondary outcomes were nausea and vomiting, opioid requirements, adverse events, serum lidocaine concentration, and length of hospital stay. The study was terminated after an interim analysis of 24 patients showed evidence of futility. There was no difference in postoperative pain scores (lidocaine versus control, mean ± standard deviation at rest (2.0 ± 2.7 vs 2.1 ± 2.4, P=0.286 or with movement (2.0 ± 2.6 vs 2.6 ± 2.7, P=0.487. Three adverse events occurred in the lidocaine group (25% of patients. Intravenous lidocaine did not provide clinically significant analgesia to patients undergoing laparoscopic fundoplication. The serum lidocaine concentration of patients who experienced adverse events were within the therapeutic range. This trial cannot confirm the safety of intravenous lidocaine at the dose tested. Keywords: analgesia, local anesthetics, intravenous infusions, pharmacokinetics

  1. Bloqueio peridural sacral: avaliação da duração da analgesia com o uso associado de lidocaína, fentanil e clonidina Bloqueo peridural sacral: evaluación de la duración de la analgesia con el uso asociado de lidocaína, fentanil y clonidina Epidural caudal block: evaluation of length of analgesia with the association of lidocaine, fentanyl and clonidine

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    Carlos Alberto de Souza Martins

    2004-08-01

    fentanil, grupo III (lidocaína, fentanil y clonidina y grupo IV (lidocaína y clonidina. Se compararon las características de los bloqueos sensitivo y motor. RESULTADOS: No hubo diferencia entre la latencia, bien como en el nivel máximo de bloqueo entre los grupos. La ausencia de bloqueo motor fue el resultado más frecuente, encontrado en cerca de 64% de los pacientes. El intervalo de analgesia fue diferente entre los grupos, siendo más significativo en el grupo III. CONCLUSIONES: El uso de la clonidina, asociada o no al fentanil, prolongó el tiempo de analgesia pós-operatoria en la anestesia peridural sacral con lidocaína.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The association of different substances to local anesthetics aims to improve the blockade quality and prolonging analgesia. The aims of this study were to compare the effectiveness of the association of clonidine, clonidine and fentanyl, and fentanyl, to lidocaine for postoperative analgesia. METHODS: Participated in this study 64 patients aged 23 years or above, physical status ASA I or II, undergoing to orificial proctologic surgery under epidural caudal anesthesia. Patients were distributed in 4 groups of 16: group I (lidocaine alone; group II (lidocaine and fentanyl; group III (lidocaine, fentanyl and clonidine; and group IV (lidocaine and clonidine. The quality of sensory and motor blockade were compared. RESULTS: There has been no difference in onset and maximum block level among groups. Absence of motor block was the most frequent result, found in about 64% of patients. Analgesia length was different among groups, being more significant in group III. CONCLUSIONS: Clonidine, associated or not to fentanyl, has prolonged postoperative analgesia after epidural caudal blockade with lidocaine.

  2. Continuous intravenous perioperative lidocaine infusion for postoperative pain and recovery.

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    Kranke, Peter; Jokinen, Johanna; Pace, Nathan Leon; Schnabel, Alexander; Hollmann, Markus W; Hahnenkamp, Klaus; Eberhart, Leopold H J; Poepping, Daniel M; Weibel, Stephanie

    2015-07-16

    The management of postoperative pain and recovery is still unsatisfactory in clinical practice. Opioids used for postoperative analgesia are frequently associated with adverse effects including nausea and constipation. These adverse effects prevent smooth postoperative recovery. On the other hand not all patients may be suited to, and take benefit from, epidural analgesia used to enhance postoperative recovery. The non-opioid lidocaine was investigated in several studies for its use in multi-modal management strategies to reduce postoperative pain and enhance recovery. The aim of this review was to assess the effects (benefits and risks) of perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion compared to placebo/no treatment or compared to epidural analgesia on postoperative pain and recovery in adults undergoing various surgical procedures. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 5 2014), MEDLINE (January 1966 to May 2014), EMBASE (1980 to May 2014), CINAHL (1982 to May 2014), and reference lists of articles. We searched the trial registry database ClinicalTrials.gov, contacted researchers in the field, and handsearched journals and congress proceedings. We did not apply any language restrictions. We included randomized controlled trials comparing the effect of continuous perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion either with placebo, or no treatment, or with epidural analgesia in adults undergoing elective or urgent surgery under general anaesthesia. The intravenous lidocaine infusion must have been started intraoperatively prior to incision and continued at least until the end of surgery. Trial quality was independently assessed by two authors according to the methodological procedures specified by the Cochrane Collaboration. Data were extracted by two independent authors. We collected trial data on postoperative pain, recovery of gastrointestinal function, length of hospital stay, postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV), opioid

  3. Alkalinized lidocaine versus lidocaine gel as local anesthesia prior to intra-vesical botulinum toxin (BoNTA) injections: A prospective, single center, randomized, double-blind, parallel group trial of efficacy and morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Arjun K; Younis, Ayman; Khan, Zainab A; Hildrup, Iona; Emery, Simon J; Lucas, Malcolm G

    2016-04-01

    To assess the efficacy and morbidity of alkalinized lidocaine solution compared to lidocaine gel for intra-vesical anesthesia during botulinum toxin (BoNTA) injections in a statistically powered, prospective, parallel group, double-blind randomized controlled trial. Fifty-four patients of either sex were randomized to receive either alkalinized lidocaine (AL) solution (10 ml 8.4% sodium bicarbonate + 20 ml 2% lidocaine solution + 22 ml sterile Aquagel®) or lidocaine gel (LG) (22 ml standard 2% lidocaine gel Instillagel® + 30 ml 0.9% normal saline solution). Primary outcome was average pain (assessed by 100 mm visual analog score) felt during intra-vesical BoNTA injections performed at least 20 min after instillation. Secondary outcome was the rate of adverse events. Of 60 randomized patients 54 received the allocated intervention and were analyzed. Mean pain score in the AL group was 17.11 mm (95%CI 8.65-25.57 mm) and in the LG group was 19.53 mm (95%CI 13.03-26.03mm) with no significant difference between the groups. Cost of interventional medication in the AL group was almost double that of the LG group. No adverse events were attributable to local anesthetic instillation in either group. Alkalinized lidocaine solution is not superior to lidocaine gel for anesthesia during intra-vesical BoNTA injections, and the higher cost precludes its use over lidocaine gel at our centre. We have used the results of this study to adapt our local protocol for BoNTA injections and continue to use lidocaine gel as the local anesthetic of choice. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:522-527, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Ropivacaine plus lidocaine versus Bupivacaine plus lidocaine for peribulbar double injection regional anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Omar Elsafty MD, Ahmed M.S. Hamed MD, Sherif Wadie MD

    2003-01-01

    Our study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of Ropivacaine 0.75% plus Lidocaine 2% versus Bupivacaine 0.5 % plus lidocaine 2 % to provide peribulbar anaesthesia for cataract surgery .Time to adequate block for surgery, ocular eyelid movement scores at 8 min after block and quality for postoperative analgesia were recorded. Sixty patients are randomly divided into two groups of 30, to receive a peribulbar block with 8 ­ 10 ml of either Ropivacaine ­ Lidocaine or Bupivacaine ­ lidocaine,and...

  5. CLINICAL EVALUATION OF EPIDURAL ADMINISTRATION OF MORPHINE, FENTANYL, METHADONE, LIDOCAINE AND LIDOCAINE WITH EPINEPHRINE IN CATTLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tabatabaei Naeine, A. Rezakhani and J. Fazlinia

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the analgesic efficacy and clinical effects of morphine, fentanyl, methadone, lidocaine, lidocaine with epinephrine and saline (control when injected epidurally into the caudal epidural space in cattle. Epidural analgesia was achieved in five cattle on five successive occasions at weekly intervals. Analgesia was defined as a lack of response to hemostat pressure and pinprick in the skin of the perineal area and ventral aspect of the tail. The results demonstrated that while epidural lidocaine and lidocaine with epinephrine decreased the response to hemostat and pinprick compared to control, there was no reduction in response after the administration of morphine, methadone or fentanyl. Heart rate, pulse and respiratory rates were not significantly altered by any of the drugs. Neither did the drugs produce any change in the electrocardiogram (ECG of the animals.

  6. Identification of the epidural space: loss of resistance with air, lidocaine, or the combination of air and lidocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evron, Samuel; Sessler, Daniel; Sadan, Oscar; Boaz, Mona; Glezerman, Marek; Ezri, Tiberiu

    2004-07-01

    The ideal technique for identifying the epidural space remains unclear. Five-hundred-forty-seven women in labor who requested epidural analgesia were randomly allocated to three groups according to the technique by which the epidural space was identified: 1) loss-of-resistance with air (air; n = 180), 2) loss-of-resistance with lidocaine (lidocaine; n = 185), and 3) loss-of-resistance with both air and lidocaine (air-plus-lidocaine; n = 182). We assessed ease of epidural catheter insertion, characteristics of the blockade, quality of analgesia, and complications. The inability to thread the epidural catheter occurred in 16% of the air, 4% of the lidocaine, and 3% of the air-plus-lidocaine patients (P air group had unblocked segments (6.6% versus 3.2% and 2.2%, respectively; P air group (1.7% versus 0% in the other two groups; P space with air was more difficult and caused more dural punctures than with lidocaine or air plus lidocaine. Additionally, sequential use of air and lidocaine had no advantage over lidocaine alone.

  7. Epidural analgesia during labor vs no analgesia: A comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesam Farid Mousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epidural analgesia is claimed to result in prolonged labor. Previous studies have assessed epidural analgesia vs systemic opioids rather than to parturients receiving no analgesia. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of epidural analgesia on labor duration compared with parturients devoid of analgesia. Methods: One hundred sixty nulliparous women in spontaneous labor at full term with a singleton vertex presentation were assigned to the study. Parturients who request epidural analgesia were allocated in the epidural group, whereas those not enthusiastic to labor analgesia were allocated in the control group. Epidural analgesia was provided with 20 mL bolus 0.5% epidural lidocaine plus fentanyl and maintained at 10 mL for 1 h. Duration of the first and second stages of labor, number of parturients receiving oxytocin, maximal oxytocin dose required for each parturient, numbers of instrumental vaginal, vacuum-assisted, and cesarean deliveries and neonatal Apgar score were recorded. Results: There was no statistical difference in the duration of the active-first and the second stages of labor, instrumental delivery, vacuum-assisted or cesarean delivery rates, the number of newborns with 1-min and 5-min Apgar scores less than 7 between both groups and number of parturients receiving oxytocin, however, the maximal oxytocin dose was significantly higher in the epidural group. Conclusion: Epidural analgesia by lidocaine (0.5% and fentanyl does not prolong labor compared with parturients without analgesia; however, significant oxytocin augmentation is required during the epidural analgesia to keep up the aforementioned average labor duration.

  8. Intraperitoneal lidocaine & tenoxicam for pain relief after gynaecological laparoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ibrahim A Abdelazim; Mohammed Al-Kadi; Maged Mahmoud El Shourbagy; Ahmed Abdelazim Mohamed; Mohannad Lutfi Abu faza

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To detect the effect of intra-peritoneal instillation of local anesthetic with or without NSAIDs on pain relief after gynecological laparoscopy. Methods: Seventy five patients scheduled for laparoscopy were included in the study and randomly divided into three groups. At the end of the laparoscopic procedure, 100 mL normal saline in the first group, or 100 mL normal saline contains 200 mg lidocaine in the second group, or 100 mL normal slaine containing 200 mg lidocaine and 20 mg tenoxicam in the third group were splashed into the pelvis by the surgeon. Post-operative pain were monitored and compared. Results: The incidence and severity of immediate postoperative shoulder pain reduced from 44% of patients scoring 2-5 in saline group to 16% scoring 2-3 in lidocaine group and 8% scoring 2-3 in lidocaine-tenoxicam group. Compared with saline group, abdominal pain scores were significantly lower in lidocaine group and lidocaine-tenoxicam group over 24 hours after surgery. At 12 and 24 hours after surgery, abdominal pain scores were significantly reduced in lidocaine-tenoxicam group compared with lidocaine group. No pain on deep respiration was reported in 84%, and 68% in lidocaine-tenoxicam and lidocaine groups respectively compared to 12% in those in the saline group. The mean time to first request for analgesia was increased from (2.3 ±1.9) hours in saline group to (4.4 ± 2.4) hours in lidocaine group and to (8.3 ± 10.2) hours in lidocaine-tenoxicam group. Conclusion: Intraperitoneal balanced analgesia (local anesthetics ± NSAIDS) is a simple and safe technique for analgesia following gynaecological Laparoscopy.

  9. Analgesic and systemic effects of xylazine, lidocaine and their combination after subarachnoid administration in goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. DeRossi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to determine the analgesic and systemic effects of subarachnoid administration of xylazine hydrochloride (XY, lidocaine hydrochloride (LI and their combination (XYLI in goats. Six healthy goats were used in a prospective randomised study. Three treatments were administered to each goat, with 1-week intervals between each treatment. Treatments consisted of 0.1 mg/kg xylazine, 2.5 mg/kg lidocaine and a combination of xylazine 0.05 (mg/kg and lidocaine (1.25 mg/kg. Analgesia, ataxic, sedative, cardiovascular and respiratory effects, and rectal temperature were evaluated before (baseline and at 5, 10, 15, and 30 min after subarachnoid injection, and then at 30-min intervals until loss of analgesia occurred. Lidocaine induced analgesia in 3.1 + 1min (mean + SD, which lasted for 66 + 31 min. Heart and respiratory rates and blood pressure remained unchanged after lidocaine-induced analgesia. Xylazine induced analgesia in 9.5 + 2.6 min and xylazine-lidocaine in 3.2 + 1.2 min. Xylazine-lidocaine-induced analgesia lasted longer (178.3 + 37 min than that induced by xylazine (88.3 + 15 min. The XYLI treatment induced prolonged motor blocking (115 min, more than the XY (80 min and LI (90 min treatments. Both xylazine and xylazine-lidocaine caused significant decreases in the heart and respiratory rates, but not in blood pressure. The combination of xylazine (0.05 mg/kg and lidocaine (1.25 mg/kg can be administered subarachnoidally (between last lumbar vertebra and 1st sacral vertebra to produce prolonged (>2.5 h analgesia of the tail, perineum, hind limbs, flanks and caudodorsal rib areas in goats. Despite the prolonged analgesia, using this combination is desirable for relieving postoperative pain, but it may be a disadvantage due to a motor block when dealing with goats.

  10. Analgesic and systemic effects of xylazine, lidocaine and their combination after subarachnoid administration in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRossi, R; Junqueira, A L; Beretta, M P

    2005-06-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the analgesic and systemic effects of subarachnoid administration of xylazine hydrochloride (XY), lidocaine hydrochloride (LI) and their combination (XYLI) in goats. Six healthy goats were used in a prospective randomised study. Three treatments were administered to each goat, with 1-week intervals between each treatment. Treatments consisted of 0.1 mg/kg xylazine, 2.5 mg/kg lidocaine and a combination of xylazine 0.05 (mg/kg) and lidocaine (1.25 mg/kg). Analgesia, ataxic, sedative, cardiovascular and respiratory effects, and rectal temperature were evaluated before (baseline) and at 5, 10, 15, and 30 min after subarachnoid injection, and then at 30-min intervals until loss of analgesia occurred. Lidocaine induced analgesia in 3.1 +/- 1 min (mean +/- SD), which lasted for 66 +/- 31 min. Heart and respiratory rates and blood pressure remained unchanged after lidocaine-induced analgesia. Xylazine induced analgesia in 9.5 +/- 2.6 min and xylazine-lidocaine in 3.2 +/- 1.2 min. Xylazine-lidocaine-induced analgesia lasted longer (178.3 +/- 37 min) than that induced by xylazine (88.3 +/- 15 min). The XYLI treatment induced prolonged motor blocking (115 min), more than the XY (80 min) and LI (90 min) treatments. Both xylazine and xylazine-lidocaine caused significant decreases in the heart and respiratory rates, but not in blood pressure. The combination of xylazine (0.05 mg/kg) and lidocaine (1.25 mg/kg) can be administered subarachnoidally (between last lumbar vertebra and 1st sacral vertebra) to produce prolonged (> 2.5 h) analgesia of the tail, perineum, hind limbs, flanks and caudodorsal rib areas in goats. Despite the prolonged analgesia, using this combination is desirable for relieving postoperative pain, but it may be a disadvantage due to a motor block when dealing with goats.

  11. Brachial plexus block using lidocaine/epinephrine or lidocaine/xylazine in fat-tailed sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safoura Ghadirian

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This blinded, randomized experimental study was designed to evaluate the analgesic effects of adding epinephrine or xylazine to lidocaine solution for brachial plexus block (BPB in sheep. Nine healthy, fat-tailed female lambs (26.6 ± 1.5 kg were randomly allocated into three groups: lidocaine 2%, 5 mg kg-1 (LID, n = 6, lidocaine (5 mg kg-1 with epinephrine 5 μg mL-1 (LIDEP, n = 6 or lidocaine (5 mg kg-1 with xylazine 0.05 mg kg-1 (LIDXY, n = 6. Each animal was tested twice. The sheep received a total volume of 0.25 mL kg-1 for BPB. A nerve stimulator was used to locate the nerves of the brachial plexus. Onset and duration of analgesia of the forelimb were evaluated using superficial and deep pin prick and pinching of skin with a hemostat clamp. Heart and respiratory rates, and rectal temperature were recorded before and at predetermined intervals following the completion of the block. Brachial administration of LID, LIDEP or LIDXY produced forelimb analgesia within 11.3, 11.0 and 7.0 minutes, respectively. The mean duration of analgesia was 100.0 min in LID and 133.2 min in LIDEP group. The mean duration of analgesia in LIDXY group (186.8 min was significantly longer compared with LID group. In LIDEP group a significant increase in heart rate occurred 5 min after drug administration. Heart rate decreased from 35 to 80 min in sheep received LIDXY. In conclusion, the addition of xylazine to lidocaine solution for BBP provided a prolonged duration of action without any adverse effects in fat-tailed sheep.

  12. The analgesia efficacy of Compound Lidocaine Cream on subcutaneous injection of Salmon Calcitonin among elderly people%复方利多卡因乳膏减轻鲑降钙素皮下注射疼痛的效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓玉; 王菲菲; 翁敏芳; 刘海艳; 霍丽娟

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察复方利多卡因乳膏在老年人皮下注射鲑降钙素中减轻疼痛的效果。方法采用自体单盲的前后对照的试验方法和数字分级法( NRS法)进行自我疼痛评分。常规皮下注射后左右侧疼痛分值相同的31名患者入选为常规组。对照组和试验组分别在注射前90min前外涂复方利多卡因乳膏和维生素E乳膏。结果对照组与常规组疼痛分值比较P>0.05,尚不能认为两者有统计学意义;试验组与常规组疼痛分值比较P<0.05,差异有统计学意义。结论外用复方利多卡因乳膏能减轻老年人鲑降钙素皮下注射时疼痛感。%Objectives To observe the analgesia efficacy of Compound Lidocaine Cream on subcutaneous injection of Salmon Calcitonin.Methods Single-blind,controlled trial was used with NRS.Routine treatment group just used aseptic operation;Control group and test group used Vitamine E cream and Compound Lidocaine Cream before subcutaneous injection 90 minutes.Results There was no significant difference between routine treatment group and control group (P>0.05);There were significant differences between routine treatment group and test group .Conclusions Compound Lidocaine Cream could reduce pain sense on subcutane-ous injection of Salmon Calcitonin among elderly people .

  13. Intravenous administration of lidocaine directly acts on spinal dorsal horn and produces analgesic effect: An in vivo patch-clamp analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Miyuki Kurabe; Hidemasa Furue; Tatsuro Kohno

    2016-01-01

    Intravenous lidocaine administration produces an analgesic effect in various pain states, such as neuropathic and acute pain, although the underlying mechanisms remains unclear. Here, we hypothesized that intravenous lidocaine acts on spinal cord neurons and induces analgesia in acute pain. We therefore examined the action of intravenous lidocaine in the spinal cord using the in vivo patch-clamp technique. We first investigated the effects of intravenous lidocaine using behavioural measures i...

  14. Prolongation of lidocaine-induced epidural anesthesia by medium molecular weight hyaluronic acid formulations: pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, M M; Hughes, P J; Korszniak, N V; Charman, W N

    1995-04-01

    We evaluated the utility of medium molecular weight hyaluronic acid for prolonging the local anesthetic activity of lidocaine in a rabbit model of epidural analgesia. Equiviscous formulations were prepared as either a physical mixture of lidocaine hydrochloride and sodium hyaluronate (where drug release occurred via diffusion) or as a lidocaine-hyaluronate complex (where drug release occurred via diffusional and electrostatic processes). The novel hyaluronic acid formulations were functionally evaluated, relative to lidocaine solution, in an intact, conscious rabbit model. The hyaluronate formulations were well tolerated. The duration of sensory block and loss of weight-bearing was prolonged twofold by the lidocaine-hyaluronate complex relative to the solution (P lidocaine plasma concentration-time data indicated that the rate of drug absorption from the lidocaine-hyaluronate complex was decreased fourfold relative to the solution (P hyaluronic acid may offer advantages for the prolongation of epidural analgesia.

  15. Tachyphylaxis associated with repeated epidural injections of lidocaine is not related to changes in distribution or the rate of elimination from the epidural space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, T; Simonsen, L; Scott, N B

    1989-01-01

    technetium-99m diethylenetriaminepentaacetate [99mTc-DTPA]) and elimination of lidocaine from the epidural space (as measured by serum concentrations of lidocaine) was investigated in 18 patients undergoing minor surgery during lumbar epidural analgesia. Twelve patients received four injections of 20 mL of 2......% lidocaine at 2-hr intervals. Epidural distribution was assessed by injection of 99mTc-DTPA diluted in saline on the preoperative day and diluted in an equal volume of 2% lidocaine on the morning before surgery and again after the fourth injection of lidocaine 6 hr later. The distribution of 99m......L of 2% lidocaine were injected three times at 2-hr intervals before surgery, with measurements of serum concentrations of lidocaine after the first and last injections. Despite tachyphylaxis (no patient had sensory analgesia 2 hr after the third injection), there was no difference in the rate...

  16. Cardiovascular Complications Resulting from Topical Lidocaine Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Lin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Topical lidocaine is one of the most commonly used anesthetics in the emergency department (ED. The advantages of topical anesthesia include ease of application, minimal discomfort on administration, and rapid onset of anesthesia. Systemic toxic effects after topical lidocaine application are rare. We present a case of a man aged 48 years with no history of heart disease and no evidence of bradycardia in previous electrocardiograms. The patient had sprayed lidocaine solution on the glans of his penis before sex during the 2 weeks prior to admission. Cardiovascular adverse events occurred, including chest tightness and bradycardia. After 2 hours conservative treatment at our ED, his symptoms were alleviated. He was discharged from the ED without any medication. The case suggests that detailed patient histories are necessary for accurate diagnosis and that rapid diagnosis and implementation of treatment is necessary for successful patient outcomes in cases of cardiovascular complications resulting from topical lidocaine application.

  17. Application of diclofenac sodium suppository anal preemptive analgesia combined with lidocaine hydrochloride in circumcision%双氯芬酸钠栓塞肛超前镇痛联合盐酸利多卡因在包皮环切术中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵春虎; 熊小青; 吴丰学

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate analgesia effect and curative effect of diclofenac sodium suppository anal ahead in circumcision resection.Methods 200 patients with redundant prepuce were randomly divided into control group and the experimental group,patients in control group was given with 1% lidocaine 10mL for penile block anesthesia,patients in experimental group were given diclofenac sodium suppository anal before the surgery,and then given 1% hydrochloric acid lidocaine 10mL for penile block anesthesia.Efficacy of diclofenac sodium suppository anal super analgesia was evaluated.Results Compared with the control group,the pain of the patients in the experimental group was significantly lower than that of the 1 ~3h after anesthesia,and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.05).Conclusions Diclofenac sodium suppository anal can effectively reduce pain of circumcision anesthesia and postoperation.It is recommended that the diclofenac sodium suppository is used in clinical operation for reducing the patient's pain.%目的 采用双氯芬酸钠栓塞肛超前镇痛用于包皮环切术,研究其在包皮环切术中的镇痛效果及疗效.方法 将包皮过长患者200例,随机分为对照组及试验组,对照组给予1%的盐酸利多卡因10mL进行阴茎阻滞麻醉,试验组术前即给予双氯芬酸钠栓塞肛,再给予1%的盐酸利多卡因10mL进行阴茎阻滞麻醉.以阻滞麻醉时、手术时及术后疼痛评分为考核指标,综合评价双氯芬酸钠栓塞肛超前镇痛效果.结果 与对照组比较,试验组患者在麻醉时、手术后1 ~3h的疼痛度均明显降低,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 术前给予双氯芬酸钠栓塞肛可有效减轻包皮环切术麻醉时及术后的疼痛,建议将双氯芬酸钠栓应用于该类手术,以减轻疼痛.

  18. Tumescent Liposuction without Lidocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Joshua J.; Fang, Xin-Hua; Williams, Shelley J.; Baynosa, Richard C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our previous study demonstrated that lidocaine has a negative impact on adipose-derived stem cell (ASC) survival. Currently for large-volume liposuction, patients often undergo general anesthesia; therefore, lidocaine subcutaneous anesthesia is nonessential. We hypothesized that removing lidocaine from tumescent might improve stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and ASC survival from the standard tumescent with lidocaine. Ropivacaine is also a commonly used local anesthetic. The effect of ropivacaine on ASC survival was examined. Methods: Adults who underwent liposuction on bilateral body areas were included (n = 10). Under general anesthesia, liposuction on 1 area was conducted under standard tumescent with lidocaine. On the contralateral side, liposuction was conducted under the modified tumescent without lidocaine. Five milliliters of lipoaspirate were processed for the isolation of SVF. The adherent ASCs were counted after 24 hours of SVF culture. Apoptosis and necrosis of SVF cells were examined by Annexin/propidium iodide staining and analyzed by flow cytometry. Results: Average percentage of live SVF cells was 68.0% ± 4.0% (28.5% ± 3.8% of apoptosis and 3.4% ± 1.0% of necrosis) in lidocaine group compared with 86.7% ± 3.7% (11.5% ± 3.1% of apoptosis and 1.8% ± 0.7% of necrosis) in no-lidocaine group (P = 0.002). Average number of viable ASC was also significantly lower (367,000 ± 107) in lidocaine group compared with that (500,000 ± 152) in no-lidocaine group (P = 0.04). No significant difference was found between lidocaine and ropivacaine on ASC cytotoxicity. Conclusions: Removing lidocaine from tumescent significantly reduced SVF and ASC apoptosis in the lipoaspirate. We recommend tumescent liposuction without lidocaine, particularly if patient’s lipoaspirate will be used for fat grafting. PMID:27622097

  19. Tachyphylaxis associated with repeated epidural injections of lidocaine is not related to changes in distribution or the rate of elimination from the epidural space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, T; Simonsen, L; Scott, N B

    1989-01-01

    technetium-99m diethylenetriaminepentaacetate [99mTc-DTPA]) and elimination of lidocaine from the epidural space (as measured by serum concentrations of lidocaine) was investigated in 18 patients undergoing minor surgery during lumbar epidural analgesia. Twelve patients received four injections of 20 mL of 2......% lidocaine at 2-hr intervals. Epidural distribution was assessed by injection of 99mTc-DTPA diluted in saline on the preoperative day and diluted in an equal volume of 2% lidocaine on the morning before surgery and again after the fourth injection of lidocaine 6 hr later. The distribution of 99mTc-DTPA...

  20. Potentiation of epidural lidocaine by co-administering tramadol by either intramuscular or epidural route in cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermeto, Larissa C.; DeRossi, Rafael; Marques, Beatriz C.; Jardim, Paulo H.A.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the analgesic and systemic effects of intramuscular (IM) versus epidural (EP) administration of tramadol as an adjunct to EP injection of lidocaine in cats. Six healthy, domestic, shorthair female cats underwent general anesthesia. A prospective, randomized, crossover trial was then conducted with each cat receiving the following 3 treatments: EP injection of 2% lidocaine [LEP; 3.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)]; EP injection of a combination of lidocaine and 5% tramadol (LTEP; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively); or EP injection of lidocaine and IM injection of tramadol (LEPTIM; 3.0 and 2.0 mg/kg BW, respectively). Systemic effects, spread and duration of analgesia, behavior, and motor blockade were determined before treatment and at predetermined intervals afterwards. The duration of analgesia was 120 ± 31 min for LTEP, 71 ± 17 min for LEPTIM, and 53 ± 6 min for LEP (P tramadol produces similar side effects in cats after either EP or IM administration. Our findings indicate that EP and IM tramadol (2 mg/kg BW) with EP lidocaine produce satisfactory analgesia in cats. As an adjunct to lidocaine, EP tramadol provides a longer duration of analgesia than IM administration. The adverse effects produced by EP and IM administration of tramadol were not different. Further studies are needed to determine whether EP administration of tramadol could play a role in managing postoperative pain in cats when co-administered with lidocaine after painful surgical procedures. PMID:26130854

  1. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    epidurally. They are opiods and local anesthetics. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of each class are different, and they may act...overall pharmacodynamics of the drug. Epidural Opioids Brown (2000) states that opioids are one class of drug that may be used for epidural analgesia...morphine with lidocaine or bupivacaine with the effects of these medications when administered alone in mice. They used various tests to measure

  2. Tachyphylaxis associated with repeated epidural injections of lidocaine is not related to changes in distribution or the rate of elimination from the epidural space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mogensen, T.; Simonsen, L.; Scott, N.B.; Henriksen, J.H.; Kehlet, H. (Univ. of Copenhagen (Denmark))

    1989-08-01

    The relationship between tachyphylaxis (measured as a decrease in the rate of regression of sensory levels of analgesia) during repeated epidural injections of lidocaine and both the distribution of lidocaine within the epidural space (as measured by spread of simultaneous injection of the tracer technetium-99m diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (99mTc-DTPA)) and elimination of lidocaine from the epidural space (as measured by serum concentrations of lidocaine) was investigated in 18 patients undergoing minor surgery during lumbar epidural analgesia. Twelve patients received four injections of 20 mL of 2% lidocaine at 2-hr intervals. Epidural distribution was assessed by injection of 99mTc-DTPA diluted in saline on the preoperative day and diluted in an equal volume of 2% lidocaine on the morning before surgery and again after the fourth injection of lidocaine 6 hr later. The distribution of 99mTc-DTPA in the epidural space was unchanged during the three measurements despite significant tachyphylaxis in both sensory analgesia and motor blockade (11 of 12 patients had sensory analgesia 2 hr after the first injection in contrast to only 3 of 12 patients during the third injection). In another six patients 20 mL of 2% lidocaine were injected three times at 2-hr intervals before surgery, with measurements of serum concentrations of lidocaine after the first and last injections. Despite tachyphylaxis (no patient had sensory analgesia 2 hr after the third injection), there was no difference in the rate of disappearance of lidocaine from the epidural space as assessed by plasma lidocaine concentration curves during the first and third injection (0.5 +/- 0.1 and 0.3 +/- 0.04 microgram.mL-1.min-1, respectively).

  3. The topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in localized neuropathic pain: a reappraisal of the clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de León-Casasola, Oscar A; Mayoral, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Topical 5% lidocaine medicated plasters represent a well-established first-line option for the treatment of peripheral localized neuropathic pain (LNP). This review provides an updated overview of the clinical evidence (randomized, controlled, and open-label clinical studies, real-life daily clinical practice, and case series). The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster effectively provides pain relief in postherpetic neuralgia, and data from a large open-label controlled study indicate that the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is as effective as systemic pregabalin in postherpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic polyneuropathy but with an improved tolerability profile. Additionally, improved analgesia and fewer side effects were experienced by patients treated synchronously with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, further demonstrating the value of multimodal analgesia in LNP. The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster provides continued benefit after long-term (≤7 years) use and is also effective in various other LNP conditions. Minor application-site reactions are the most common adverse events associated with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster; there is minimal risk of systemic adverse events and drug-drug interactions. Although further well-controlled studies are warranted, the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is efficacious and safe in LNP and may have particular clinical benefit in elderly and/or medically compromised patients because of the low incidence of adverse events.

  4. Epidural fentanyl decreases the minimum local analgesic concentration of epidural lidocaine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jian; ZHENG Yue-ying; FENG Zhi-ying; CHEN Chao-qin; ZHU Sheng-mei

    2012-01-01

    Background Epidural lidocaine can be used when regional anesthesia needs to be established quickly,but the effect of co-administering epidural fentanyl on the minimum local analgesic concentration(MLAC)of lidocaine is not known.We compared the MLAC of epidural lidocaine in combination with different doses of fentanyl for epidural anesthesia in adults.Methods One hundred and twenty patients requiring epidural analgesia were randomly allocated to receive 20 ml of one of four solutions:lidocaine,or lidocaine plus fentanyl 1 μg/ml,2 μg/ml,or 3 μg/ml.The first patient in each group was administered 1% lidocaine weight by volume;subsequent patients received a concentration determined by the response of the previous patient to a higher or lower concentration according to up and down sequential allocation in 0.1% increments.Efficacy was assessed using a visual analog pain scale,and accepted if this was ≤10 mm on a 100 mm scale within 30 minutes.The extent of motor block and of nausea and vomiting were recorded at 30 minutes after administration of the epidural solution and two hours after surgery,respectively.Results The MLAC of lidocaine in those receiving lidocaine alone was 0.785%(95%C/0.738-0.864).A significant dose-dependent reduction was observed with the addition of fentanyl:the MLAC of lidocaine with fentanyl at 2 μg/ml was 0.596%(95%Cl 0.537-0.660)and 0.387% with fentanyl at 3 μg/ml(95%Cl 0.329-0.446,P<0.001).Conclusion Epidural fentanyl significantly reduces the dose of lidocaine required for effective epidural analgesia in adults without causing adverse side effects.

  5. Preventive analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jørgen B; Kehlet, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    findings: The nature of central sensitization during acute and chronic postsurgical pain share common features, and there may be interactions between acute and persistent postoperative pain. The term ‘pre-emptive analgesia’ should be abandoned and replaced by the term ‘preventive analgesia’. Recent studies......This paper will discuss the concepts of pre-emptive and preventive analgesia in acute and persistent postsurgical pain, based on the most recent experimental and clinical literature, with a special focus on injury-induced central sensitization and the development from acute to chronic pain. Recent...... of preventive analgesia for persistent postoperative pain are promising. However, clinicians must be aware of the demands for improved design of their clinical studies in order to get more conclusive answers regarding the different avenues for intervention. Summary: The concept of preventive analgesia is still...

  6. Improvement of Lidocaine Local Anesthetic Action Using Lallemantia royleana Seed Mucilage as an Excipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atabaki, Rabi; Hassanpour-Ezatti, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Lallemantia royleana (Balangu) is a well known Iranian medicinal plant that its seed mucilage has many applications in modern pharmacology. Plant mucilage traditionally was used as a gel supplement, and natural matrix for sustained release of drugs. But it seems that these compounds are not a simple additive and also have many undiscovered pharmacological properties. In this research, the anesthetic action of gel prepared from Balangu mucilage alone and its mixture with lidocaine hydrochloride are compared with the effect of commercial 2% lidocaine gel by rat tail flick test. Mucilage of Balangu seed alone showed analgesic effect. Duration and potency of anesthesia induced by gel containing mucilage alone (0.01 g/mL) were identical to commercial 2% lidocaine gel. But, local anesthetic potency and duration of gel made from 2% lidocaine-mucilage gel mixture was significantly higher than commercial 2% lidocaine gel. The gel prepared from mucilage causes a good analgesia with unknown mechanism. Besides, mixture of Balangu mucilage prepared gel with lidocaine improves lidocaine anesthesia. The increase in potency of lidocaine action results from mucilage dermal penetration enhancing effects; and longer anesthetic duration of this mixture are related to the capability of mucilage based gel for sustained drug release.

  7. [Magistral prepared lidocaine-gel for topical aplication on skin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklenár, Zbynĕk; Horácková, Katerína; Bakhouche, Hana; Slanar, Ondrej

    2012-08-01

    Due to a limited availability of industrially manufactured products containing local anesthetics for skin application and an increased demand for lidocaine-containing gel applicable prior to a product containing capsaicin for neuropathic pain treatment, it is necessary to prepare a topical semi-solid preparation containing the local anesthetic in pharmacies. Our aim was to create a mixed system of a hydrophilic gel with the emulsified drug, using excipients to decrease the lidocaine melting point, thereby creating a eutectic mixture with a high concentration of lidocaine in the oil phase. Based on bibliographic data, thymol creating a binary eutectic system containing lidocaine has been chosen. After addition of other excipients, an emulsion system was prepared and the drug was stabilized in the oil phase by a mixed nonionic emulsifier and carbomera. For the optimal anesthetic effects, the pH value should be adjusted; trometamol has been chosen as a suitable basic reacting excipient. Based on the addition of different amounts of trometamol, pH values of individual emulgels have been measured and the final composition of lidocaine emulgel has been created. A recipe for a 5 % lidocaine emulgel with the pH value of 9.1 has been created, based on the gel-forming substance carbomera with an emulsion of the oil phase containing a eutectic mixture of lidocaine and thymol, with an addition of ethanol and propylenglycol, stabilized by a mixed nonionic emulsifier. The advantage is the absence of other local anesthetics.

  8. [Neurotoxicity of intrathecal lidocaine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavón, A; Anadón Senac, P

    2001-01-01

    Lidocaine is a local anesthetic belonging to the amide group and has been administered intrathecally for over 40 years. Although no serious complications had been attributed to lidocaine before the 1990s, subarachnoid administration is now the subject of controversy following its implication in numerous cases of neurological complication. The clinical pictures described in the literature are cauda equina syndrome, which is mainly associated with continuous subarachnoid anesthesia through microcatheters, and transitory neurological symptoms, also termed radicular irritation syndrome and associated with single injections. The literature reveals a clearly higher incidence of transitory neurological symptoms with lidocaine than with other local anesthetics. Although the underlying mechanism remains unclear, the main hypotheses being the neurotoxicity of lidocaine itself or the malpositioning of the paravertebral musculature due to extreme relaxation. The various factors that can lead to neuropathy have been widely described in the many articles reporting complications. Arthroscopy and lithotomy positions are significantly related to the appearance of symptoms, as are early ambulation or the use of small-gauge needles or pencil-point needles. Further clinical studies should be undertaken. No consensus on subarachnoid administration of lidocaine has emerged, yet no alternative has been demonstrated to be safe and to offer similar pharmacological features (short latency, short duration of action and good muscle relaxation). Prilocaine, mepivacaine, articaine and bupivacaine at low doses have been suggested as alternatives.

  9. Preemptive analgesic effect of lidocaine in a chronic neuropathic pain model Efeito analgésico preemptivo da lidocaína em modelo de dor crônica neuropática

    OpenAIRE

    Batista, Leonardo M; Igor M. Batista; Almeida, João P.; Carlos H. Carvalho; Castro-Costa,Samuel B. de; CASTRO-COSTA,CARLOS M. DE

    2009-01-01

    Preemptive analgesia inhibits the progression of pain caused by surgical lesions. To analyze the effect of lidocaine on postoperative pain relief, we performed compression of the right sciatic nerve in Wistar rats and observed the differences on behavior between the group that received lidocaine and the group that was not treated with the local anesthetics pre-operatively. Group 1 was not operated (control); group 2 underwent the sciatic nerve ligature without lidocaine; group 3, underwent su...

  10. Effect of intraoperative lidocaine on anesthetic consumption, and bowel function, pain intensity, analgesic consumption and hospital stay after breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo Joo; Kim, Myung Hee; Jeong, Hui Yeon; Lee, Jeong Jin

    2012-05-01

    Perioperative lidocaine infusion improves postoperative outcomes, mostly after abdominal and urologic surgeries. Knowledge of the effect of lidocaine on peripheral surgeries is limited. Presently, we investigated whether intraoperative lidocaine infusion reduced anesthetic consumption, duration of ileus, pain intensity, analgesic consumption and hospital stay after breast plastic surgeries. Sixty female patients, aged 20-60 years, enrolled in this prospective study were randomly and equally divided to two groups. One group (n = 30) received a 1.5 mg/kg bolus of lidocaine approximately 30 min before incision followed by continuous infusion of lidocaine (1.5 mg/kg/h) until skin closure (lidocaine group). The other group (n = 30) was untreated (control group). Balanced inhalation (sevoflurane) anesthesia and multimodal postoperative analgesia were standardized. End tidal sevoflurane concentration during surgery, time to the first flatus and defecation, visual analog pain scale (0-10), analgesic consumption and associated side effects at 24, 48, and 72 h after surgery, hospital stay, and patient's general satisfaction were assessed. Compared to the control group, intraoperative lidocaine infusion reduced by 5% the amount of sevoflurane required at similar bispectral index (P = 0.014). However, there were no significant effects of lidocaine regarding the return of bowel function, postoperative pain intensity, analgesic sparing and side effects at all time points, hospital stay, and level of patient's satisfaction for pain control. Low dose intraoperative lidocaine infusion offered no beneficial effects on return of bowel function, opioid sparing, pain intensity and hospital stay after various breast plastic surgeries.

  11. Anaphylactic shock following intraurethral lidocaine administration during transurethral resection of the prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Sinha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaphylactic shock was noted following an apparently uneventful transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP. Lidocaine jelly was used prior to urethral dilatation and before placement of three-way Foley. Lidocaine sensitivity was diagnosed serendipitously when lidocaine jelly was used for application of ECG electrodes. Anaphylaxis may be one of the rare differentials to be considered in a patient with postoperative shock following TURP. This report highlights a potentially fatal complication of an apparently innocuous and ubiquitous urological use of lidocaine.

  12. The topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in localized neuropathic pain: a reappraisal of the clinical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de León-Casasola OA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Oscar A de León-Casasola,1,2 Victor Mayoral3 1Department of Anesthesiology, Division of Pain Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, 2University at Buffalo, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. NY, USA; 3Anesthesiology Department, Pain Management Unit, University Hospital of Bellvitge, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Spain Abstract: Topical 5% lidocaine medicated plasters represent a well-established first-line option for the treatment of peripheral localized neuropathic pain (LNP. This review provides an updated overview of the clinical evidence (randomized, controlled, and open-label clinical studies, real-life daily clinical practice, and case series. The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster effectively provides pain relief in postherpetic neuralgia, and data from a large open-label controlled study indicate that the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is as effective as systemic pregabalin in postherpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic polyneuropathy but with an improved tolerability profile. Additionally, improved analgesia and fewer side effects were experienced by patients treated synchronously with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, further demonstrating the value of multimodal analgesia in LNP. The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster provides continued benefit after long-term (≤7 years use and is also effective in various other LNP conditions. Minor application-site reactions are the most common adverse events associated with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster; there is minimal risk of systemic adverse events and drug–drug interactions. Although further well-controlled studies are warranted, the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is efficacious and safe in LNP and may have particular clinical benefit in elderly and/or medically compromised patients because of the low incidence of adverse events. Keywords: 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, clinical evidence, localized neuropathic pain, postherpetic neuralgia, review

  13. Analgesia for pain control during extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy: Current status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narmada P Gupta

    2008-01-01

    Conclusion: The ideal analgesic, offering optimal pain control, minimal side effects, and cost-effectiveness is still elusive. Opioids administered using various techniques, provide effective analgesia, but require active monitoring of patient for potential adverse effects. Combination therapy (oral NSAID and occlusive dressing of EMLA, DMSO with lidocaine offers an effective alternative mode for achieving analgesia with minimal morbidity. This therapy avoids the need for general anesthesia, injectable analgesics, and opioids along with their side effects.

  14. Research on lidocaine in the application of induced abortion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Tao Tong

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To observe the effect of lidocaine in the application of induced abortion.Methods:A total of 120 pregnant women with 6-10 week gestational age and ASA I-II level who were volunteered to receive induced abortions from January, 2010 to January, 2013 were included in the study, among which 60 cases were given lidocaine during the operation and served as the observation group, while 60 cases were not given lidocaine during the operation and served as the control group. The heart rate, blood pressure, the change of oxygen saturation, pain, and the occurrence of abortion syndrome before and after operation between the two groups were compared.Results:The fineness rates of analgesia and anesthesia evaluation in the observation group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P0.05). The postoperative heart rate and blood pressure in the control group were significantly lower than those before operation and in the observation group with a slow recovery (P0.05). The occurrence rate of abortion syndrome in the observation group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusions:Application of lidocaine in the induced abortion can relieve the pain and reduce the occurrence rate of abortion syndrome with a simple and safe operation; therefore, it deserves to be widely recommended.

  15. Effects of lumbosacral epidural ketamine and lidocaine inxylazine-sedated cats : article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. DeRossi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the analgesic and cardiovascular effects of the combination of epidural ketamine and lidocaine, 6 sedated cats were studied. Six healthy, young cats were used in a prospective randomised study. Each cat underwent 3 treatments, at least 1 week apart, via epidural injection: (1 ketamine (2.5 mg/kg, (2 lidocaine (4.0 mg/kg, and (3 ketamine (2.5 mg/kg plus lidocaine (4.0 mg/kg. Epidural injections were administered through the lumbosacral space. Analgesia, motor block, sedation, heart rate, arterial blood pressure, respiratory rate and arterial oxygen saturation were measured. Rectal temperature was compared before and after sedation as well as after epidural administration of the drugs. Epidural administration of the ketamine/lidocaine combination induced prolonged analgesia extending from the coccygeal to the T13-L1 dermatomes, leading to severe ataxia. Cardiovascular effects were significant in all treatments: heart rate decreased, but there was a minimal reduction in arterial pressure. It was concluded that adding a dose of ketamine to epidural lidocaine in cats is feasible and effective.

  16. Intravenous administration of lidocaine directly acts on spinal dorsal horn and produces analgesic effect: An in vivo patch-clamp analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurabe, Miyuki; Furue, Hidemasa; Kohno, Tatsuro

    2016-05-18

    Intravenous lidocaine administration produces an analgesic effect in various pain states, such as neuropathic and acute pain, although the underlying mechanisms remains unclear. Here, we hypothesized that intravenous lidocaine acts on spinal cord neurons and induces analgesia in acute pain. We therefore examined the action of intravenous lidocaine in the spinal cord using the in vivo patch-clamp technique. We first investigated the effects of intravenous lidocaine using behavioural measures in rats. We then performed in vivo patch-clamp recording from spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons. Intravenous lidocaine had a dose-dependent analgesic effect on the withdrawal response to noxious mechanical stimuli. In the electrophysiological experiments, intravenous lidocaine inhibited the excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) evoked by noxious pinch stimuli. Intravenous lidocaine also decreased the frequency, but did not change the amplitude, of both spontaneous and miniature EPSCs. However, it did not affect inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Furthermore, intravenous lidocaine induced outward currents in SG neurons. Intravenous lidocaine inhibits glutamate release from presynaptic terminals in spinal SG neurons. Concomitantly, it hyperpolarizes postsynaptic neurons by shifting the membrane potential. This decrease in the excitability of spinal dorsal horn neurons may be a possible mechanism for the analgesic action of intravenous lidocaine in acute pain.

  17. Intravenous lidocaine for post-operative pain relief after hand-assisted laparoscopic colon surgery: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Tikuišis, R.; Miliauskas, P.; Samalavičius, N. E.; Žurauskas, A.; Samalavičius, R.; Zabulis, V.

    2013-01-01

    Background Perioperative intravenous (IV) infusion of lidocaine has been shown to decrease post-operative pain, shorten time to return of bowel function, and reduce the length of hospital stay. This randomized, prospective, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial evaluated the impact of IV lidocaine on the quality of post-operative analgesia and other outcomes after hand-assisted laparoscopic colon surgery. Methods Sixty four patients with colon cancer scheduled for elective colon r...

  18. Comparative Study of Intrathecal Dexamethasone with Epinephrine as Adjuvants to Lidocaine in Cesarean Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Naziri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different additives have been used with local anesthetics to provide prolonged duration of sensory block in spinal anesthesia. The aim of present study was to evaluate the onset and duration of sensory block of intrathecal dexamethasone and epinephrine as adjuvants to lidocaine in patients who were candidate for cesarean section. Materials and Methods: This double-blind clinical trial research was conducted on 90 pregnant women candidate for cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. Patients were randomly allocated to receive intrathecally either 75 mg hyperbaric lidocaine plus 100 μg epinephrine or 75 mg hyperbaric lidocaine plus 4 mg dexamethasone or 75 mg hyperbaric lidocaine. The onset and duration of sensory block as well as postoperative analgesia were assessed. Results: The time to reach the peak sensory block in lidocaine group was shorter than that of other two groups (p<0.001. Duration of sensory block in the control group, dexamethasone group, and epinephrine group were 64.16±7.99 min, 74.79±12.78 min, and 99.30±10.93 min, respectively (p<0.001. Conclusion: The present research shows that intrathecal dexamethasone and intrathecal epinephrine as adjuvant to lidocaine increases sensory block duration in the women candidate for cesarean section.

  19. Intravenous lidocaine for postmastectomy pain treatment: randomized, blind, placebo controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Cursino de Menezes Couceiro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Postoperative pain treatment in mastectomy remains a major challenge despite the multimodal approach. The aim of this study was to investigate the analgesic effect of intravenous lidocaine in patients undergoing mastectomy, as well as the postoperative consumption of opioids. METHODS: After approval by the Human Research Ethics Committee of the Instituto de Medicina Integral Prof. Fernando Figueira in Recife, Pernambuco, a randomized, blind, controlled trial was conducted with intravenous lidocaine at a dose of 3 mg/kg infused over 1 h in 45 women undergoing mastectomy under general anesthesia. One patient from placebo group was. RESULTS: Groups were similar in age, body mass index, type of surgery, and postoperative need for opioids. Two of 22 patients in lidocaine group and three of 22 patients in placebo group requested opioid (p = 0.50. Pain on awakening was identified in 4/22 of lidocaine group and 5/22 of placebo group (p = 0.50; in the post-anesthetic recovery room in 14/22 and 12/22 (p = 0.37 of lidocaine and placebo groups, respectively. Pain evaluation 24 h after surgery showed that 2/22 and 3/22 patients (p = 0.50 of lidocaine and placebo groups, respectively, complained of pain. CONCLUSION: Intravenous lidocaine at a dose of 3 mg/kg administered over a period of an hour during mastectomy did not promote additional analgesia compared to placebo in the first 24 h, and has not decreased opioid consumption. However, a beneficial effect of intravenous lidocaine in selected and/or other therapeutic regimens patients cannot be ruled out.

  20. [High thoracic epidural analgesia in the postoperative period after correction of congenital heart defects in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slin'ko, S K

    1999-01-01

    The effects and side effects of thoracic epidural analgesia on the respiratory response, awakening time, and cooperation with nurses were studied. Forty children received epidural analgesia after open-heart surgery. Lidocaine was injected in a dose of 1.5-2 mg/kg every 1.5-2 h. Controls (16 pts) received intravenous fentanyl + diazepam analgesia. Respiratory response and awakening were significantly earlier (p < 0.001) in the epidural group. Cooperation with nurses was much better in this group, too. No side effects were observed in the epidural group. Therefore, thoracic epidural analgesia is a safe and effective method of postoperative analgesia for children subjected to open-heart surgery.

  1. Comparison of the Effect of Lidocaine Adding Dexketoprofen and Paracetamol in Intravenous Regional Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akdogan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Comparison of dexketoprofen and paracetamol added to the lidocaine in Regional Intravenous Anesthesia in terms of hemodynamic effects, motor and sensorial block onset times, intraoperative VAS values, and analgesia requirements. Method. The files of 73 patients between 18 and 65 years old in the ASA I-II risk group who underwent hand and forearm surgery were analyzed and 60 patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into 3 groups: Group D (n=20, 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine and 50 mg/2 mL dexketoprofen trometamol; Group P (n=20, 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine and 3 mg/kg paracetamol; Group K (n=20, 3 mg/kg 2% lidocaine. Demographic data, motor and sensorial block times, heart rate, mean blood pressure, VAS values, and intraoperative and postoperative analgesia requirements were recorded. Results. Sensorial and motor block onset durations of Group K were significantly longer than other groups. Motor block termination duration was found to be significantly longer in Group D than in Group K. VAS values of Group K were found higher than other groups. There was no significant difference in VAS values between Group D and Group P. Analgesia requirement was found to be significantly more in Group K than in Group P. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of heart rates and mean arterial pressures. Conclusion. We concluded that the addition of 3 mg/kg paracetamol and 50 mg dexketoprofen to lidocaine as adjuvant in Regional Intravenous Anesthesia applied for hand and/or forearm surgery created a significant difference clinically.

  2. INTRATHECAL MIDAZOLAM PROLONGS THE ANALGESIC EFFECTS OF SPINAL BLOCKADE WITH LIDOCAINE FOR PERINEAL OPERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jahangiri R. Jahangiri

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Intrathecal administration of midazolam has been reported to have antinociceptive action, and to be an effective analgesic agent. In this prospective double-blind study we aimed to evaluate the postoperative effects of intrathecal midazolam with lidocaine following perineal operation. Forty patients were randomly allocated to two groups: 20 patients in the control group received 2 ml of 5% heavy lidocaine plus 0.4 ml of 0.9% saline intrathecally; 20 patients in the midazolam group received 2 ml of 5% heavy lidocaine plus 0.4 ml of 0.5% midazolam. Duration of analgesia was significantly greater in the midazolam group (7  1 hours compared to the control group (1.5  0.5 hours.

  3. Recurrent seizures after lidocaine ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Laali, Abolghasem; Nosrati, Nazanin; Jahani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine has a concentration-dependent effect on seizures. Concentrations above 15 μg/mL frequently result in seizures in laboratory animals and human. We report a case of central nervous system (CNS) lidocaine toxicity and recurrent seizure after erroneous ingestion of lidocaine solution. A 4-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department of Imam Hospital of Sari in December 2013 due to tonic-clonic generalized seizures approximately 30 min ago. 3 h before seizure, his mother gave him 2 spoons (amount 20-25 cc) lidocaine hydrochloride 2% solution instead of pediatric gripe by mistake. Seizure with generalized tonic-clonic occurred 3 times in home. Neurological examination was essentially unremarkable except for the depressed level of consciousness. Personal and medical history was unremarkable. There was no evidence of intracranial ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions in computed tomography scan. There were no further seizures, the condition of the patient remained stable, and he was discharged 2 days after admission. The use of viscous lidocaine may result in cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, particularly in children. Conservative management is the best option for treatment of lidocaine induced seizure.

  4. Recurrent seizures after lidocaine ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Aminiahidashti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lidocaine has a concentration-dependent effect on seizures. Concentrations above 15 μg/mL frequently result in seizures in laboratory animals and human. We report a case of central nervous system (CNS lidocaine toxicity and recurrent seizure after erroneous ingestion of lidocaine solution. A 4-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department of Imam Hospital of Sari in December 2013 due to tonic-clonic generalized seizures approximately 30 min ago. 3 h before seizure, his mother gave him 2 spoons (amount 20-25 cc lidocaine hydrochloride 2% solution instead of pediatric gripe by mistake. Seizure with generalized tonic-clonic occurred 3 times in home. Neurological examination was essentially unremarkable except for the depressed level of consciousness. Personal and medical history was unremarkable. There was no evidence of intracranial ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions in computed tomography scan. There were no further seizures, the condition of the patient remained stable, and he was discharged 2 days after admission. The use of viscous lidocaine may result in cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, particularly in children. Conservative management is the best option for treatment of lidocaine induced seizure.

  5. Effect of perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion on postoperative recovery following laparoscopic Cholecystectomy-A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoli; Sun, Yanxia; Zhang, Xiaomei; Li, Tianzuo; Yang, Binbin

    2017-09-01

    Intravenous lidocaine infusion has been shown to facilitate postoperative recovery after major abdominal surgery. The current randomized controlled study was performed to assess the effect of perioperative intravenous lidocaine infusion on pain intensity, bowel function and cytokine response after larparoscopic cholecystectomy. Eighty patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomly allocated to receive intravenous lidocaine (bolus injection of 1.5 mg/kg lidocaine at induction of anesthesia, then a continuous infusion of 2 mg/kg/h until the end of surgery) or an equal volume of saline. Patients, anesthesiologists, and study personnel were blinded, and anesthesia and multimodal perioperative analgesia were standardized. Blood cytokines were measured at scheduled times within 48 h. Pain scores, opioid consumption, time to first flatus and time to first bowel movement were also measured after surgery. Seventy-one of the 80 patients who were recruited completed the study protocol. Patient demographics were similar in the two groups. Lidocaine significantly reduced pain intensity [visual analogue scale (VAS), 0-10 cm] at 2 h (lidocaine 3.01 ± 0.65 cm vs. placebo 4.27 ± 0.58 cm, p = 0.01) and 6 h (lidocaine 3.38 ± 0.42 cm vs. placebo 4.22 ± 0.67 cm, p = 0.01) and total fentanyl consumption 24 h after surgery (lidocaine 98.27 ± 16.33 μg vs. placebo 187.49 ± 19.76 μg, p = 0.005). Time to first flatus passage (lidocaine 20 ± 11 h vs. placebo 29 ± 10 h, p = 0.01) and time to first bowel movement (lidocaine 41 ± 16 h vs. placebo 57 ± 14 h, p = 0.01) were also significantly shorter in patients who received lidocaine. Intravenous lidocaine infusion experienced less cytokine release than the control group. This study indicates that perioperative systemic lidocaine improves postoperative recovery and attenuates the initiation of excessive inflammatory response following laparoscopic cholecystectomy

  6. Epidural analgesia for labour: maternal knowledge, preferences and informed consent.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-02-29

    Epidural analgesia has become increasingly popular as a form of labour analgesia in Ireland. However obtaining true inform consent has always been difficult. Our study recruited 100 parturients who had undergone epidural analgesia for labour, aimed to determine the information they received prior to regional analgesia, and to ascertain their preferences regarding informed consent. Only 65 (65%) of patients planned to have an epidural. Knowledge of potential complications was variable and inaccurate, with less than 30 (30%) of women aware of the most common complications. Most women 79 (79%) believed that discomfort during labour affected their ability to provide informed consent, and believe consent should be taken prior to onset of labour (96, 96%). The results of this study helps define the standards of consent Irish patients expect for epidural analgesia during labour.

  7. Adding magnesium to lidocaine for intravenous regional anesthesia

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    Parviz Kashefi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available

    • BACKGROUND: Magnesium (Mg has been used as an adjuvant medication in postoperative analgesia. We planed this study to assess the effects of Mg, when added to lidocaine in intravenous regional anesthesia (IVRA on the tourniquet pain.
    • METHODS: Forty patients undertaking hand surgery were randomly allocated into 2 groups to be given IVRA. They received 20 ml lidocaine 1% diluted with 20 ml saline to a total of 40 ml in the group L (n = 20 or 7.5 ml magnesium sulfate 20% plus 20 ml lidocaine 1% diluted with 12.5 ml saline to a total of 40 ml in the group M (n = 20. Sensory and motor block onset and recovery times, anesthesia and operation qualities were recorded. Before and after the tourniquet use at 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 40, and 50 minutes, hemodynamic variables, tourniquet pain, and analgesic use were noted. Subsequent to the tourniquet deflation, at 6, 12, and 24 hours, hemodynamic variables, pain, time to first analgesic requirement, analgesic use and side effects were recorded.
    • RESULTS: Shortened sensory and motor block onset times were established in group M (P < 0.05. Visual analog scale (VAS scores were less in group M at 20, 30, 40, and 50 minutes after tourniquet inflation (P < 0.05. Intraoperative, analgesic requirement was less in group M (P < 0.05. Anesthesia excellence, as determined by the anesthesiologist and surgeon, was significantly better in group M (P < 0.05. Time to the first analgesic requirement in group M was 53.75 ± 6.94 minutes and in group L was 40.76 ± 14.55 minutes (P < 0.05. Postoperative VAS scores were higher at 6, 12, and 24 hours in group L (P < 0.05.
    • CONCLUSIONS: Adding Mg to lidocaine for IVRA enhanced the quality of anesthesia and analgesia without causing side effects.
    • KEYWORDS: Magnesium sulfate, intravenous regional anesthesia, postoperative pain.

  8. Intranasal sufentanil/midazolam versus ketamine/midazolam for analgesia/sedation in the pediatric population prior to undergoing multiple dental extractions under general anesthesia: a prospective, double-blind, randomized comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofse, J A; Shipton, E A; de la Harpe, C J; Blignaut, R J

    2004-01-01

    This article details a double-blind, randomized study evaluating the efficacy and safety of intranasal sufentanil and intranasal midazolam (S/M) when compared with intranasal ketamine and intranasal midazolam (K/M) for sedation and analgesia in pediatric patients undergoing dental surgery. Fifty healthy ASA status 1 children aged 5-7 years, weighing 15-20 kg, and having 6 or more teeth extracted, were randomly allocated to 2 groups of 25 patients each (n = 50). In the S/M group, 25 children received intranasal sufentanil 20 microg, and intranasal midazolam 0.3 mg/kg 20 minutes before the induction of anesthesia. In the K/M group, 25 children received intranasal ketamine 5 mg/kg and intranasal midazolam 0.3 mg/kg 20 minutes before the induction of anesthesia. Sevoflurane in nitrous oxide and oxygen was used for induction and maintenance of anesthesia. This study demonstrated the safety and efficacy of both methods with ease of administration, combined with a rapid onset of action. Both groups were equally sedated. A smooth mask induction of anesthesia was experienced in the majority of children. Effective postoperative analgesia for multiple dental extractions was provided. The intranasal administration of drugs for sedation and analgesia has some promising features in preschool children undergoing multiple dental extractions.

  9. Pharmacogenomic considerations in opioid analgesia

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    Vuilleumier PH

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Pascal H Vuilleumier,1 Ulrike M Stamer,1 Ruth Landau21Klinik für Anästhesiologie und Schmerztherapie, Inselspital Universität Bern, Switzerland; 2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA, USAAbstract: Translating pharmacogenetics to clinical practice has been particularly challenging in the context of pain, due to the complexity of this multifaceted phenotype and the overall subjective nature of pain perception and response to analgesia. Overall, numerous genes involved with the pharmacokinetics and dynamics of opioids response are candidate genes in the context of opioid analgesia. The clinical relevance of CYP2D6 genotyping to predict analgesic outcomes is still relatively unknown; the two extremes in CYP2D6 genotype (ultrarapid and poor metabolism seem to predict pain response and/or adverse effects. Overall, the level of evidence linking genetic variability (CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 to oxycodone response and phenotype (altered biotransformation of oxycodone into oxymorphone and overall clearance of oxycodone and oxymorphone is strong; however, there has been no randomized clinical trial on the benefits of genetic testing prior to oxycodone therapy. On the other hand, predicting the analgesic response to morphine based on pharmacogenetic testing is more complex; though there was hope that simple genetic testing would allow tailoring morphine doses to provide optimal analgesia, this is unlikely to occur. A variety of polymorphisms clearly influence pain perception and behavior in response to pain. However, the response to analgesics also differs depending on the pain modality and the potential for repeated noxious stimuli, the opioid prescribed, and even its route of administration.Keywords: pain perception, opioid analgesia, genetic variation, pharmacogenetics

  10. Axillary block duration and related hemodynamic changes: high versus low dose Adrenaline addition to Lidocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shariat Moharari R

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Axillary block is used for inducing anesthesia in outpatient hand and forearm surgeries. Few researches have studied hemodynamic and blockade effects of low doses of Epinephrine. The aim of the present study was to compare the duration of analgesia and hemodynamic changes following the injection of high/low epinephrine doses in such surgeries. "nMethods: The present randomized clinical trial study was conducted on healthy individuals (ASA I-II who were candidates for hand and forearm surgeries. The patients were randomly divided into three groups. The first two groups were allocated to receive lidocaine with low (0.6µg/cc and high (5µg/cc doses of epinephrine whereas lidocaine plus normal saline was injected in the third group. The hemodynamic changes (Mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate and the occurance of any side-effects along with the duration of analgesia and motor block were recorded. "nResults: From among the total of 75 patients, 15 cases were excluded due to incomplete blockade or failure needing general anesthesia. The duration of analgesia and the motor block were longer in the high dose epinephrine group, the difference, however, was not statistically significant. Heart rate changes within the groups was significant in the 4th-7th and 10th minutes. Mean arterial blood pressure changes was only significant in the 4th minute, within the groups. "nConclusions: Administering low doses of epinephrine plus lidocaine as a local anesthetic not only provides acceptable analgesia compared to higher doses of the medication, but also is associated with fewer side effects.

  11. Analgesic effects of adding lidocaine to morphine pumps after orthopedic surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Reza Alebouyeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Opiate is used in patient-controlled intravenous analgesia pumps (PCIA for controlling pain in post-surgical patients. Other drugs are remarkably added to opioid pumps to enhance quality, lengthen analgesia, and reduce side effects. Lidocaine, a local anesthetic which inhibits sodium channels, has anesthetic and analgesic effects when injected locally or intravenously. The objective of this study is to evaluate the analgesic effects of adding lidocaine 1% to different doses of morphine via IV pump to patient-controlled analgesia (PCA after orthopedic surgeries. Materials and Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 60 patients who had undergone orthopedic surgery of lower extremities were divided into three equal groups to control postoperative pain. Intravenous pump with 5 ml/h flow rate was used as the analgesic method. The solution consisted of lidocaine 1% plus 20 mg morphine for the first group, lidocaine 1% plus 10 mg morphine for the second group, and only 20 mg morphine for the third group (control group. Patients were checked every 12 h, and Visual Analog Scale (VAS, extra opioid doses, nausea/vomiting, and sedation scale were examined. Results: Pain score was lower in the first group compared to the other two groups. Mean VAS was 2.15 ± 0.2, 2.75 ± 0.2, and 2 ± 0.25 on the first day and 1.88 ± 0.1, 2.74 ± 0.3, and 2.40 ± 0.3 on the second day, respectively, in the three groups and the difference was statistically significant (P < 0.01 and <0.05, respectively. Also, 10% of patients in the first group needed extra opioid doses, while this figure was 30% in the second group and 25% in the third group (P < 0.01. Nausea/vomiting and sedation scores were not statistically different among the three groups. Conclusion: Compared to lidocaine 1% plus 10 mg morphine or 20 mg morphine alone in PCIA, adding lidocaine 1% to 20 mg morphine decreases the pain score and opioid dose after orthopedic surgeries without having side

  12. Faster onset and more comfortable injection with alkalinized 2% lidocaine with epinephrine 1:100,000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, Stanley F; Tavana, Susan; Falkel, Mic

    2013-02-01

    The pH of lidocaine with epinephrine in dental cartridges ranges between 2.9 and 4.4. In this pH range, less than 0.1% of the anesthetic is in the de-ionized or "active" form. The acidity of the anesthetic may delay onset and contribute to injection pain. The study compared anesthetic latency and injection pain for alkalinized versus non-alkalinized anesthetic in inferior alveolar nerve blocks (IANBs). The study buffered the anesthetic directly in the cartridges using a mixing pen device. The study included 20 participants, each receiving one control and one test IANB injection. The control solution was non-alkalinized 2% lidocaine/epinephrine 1:100,000 at pH 3.85. The test solution was 2% lidocaine/ epinephrine 1:100,000 alkalinized to pH 7.31. Latency was measured using endodontic ice confirmed with an electric pulp tester (EPT), and injection pain was measured using a visual analog scale (VAS). ONSET TIME: With the alkalinized anesthetic, 71% of participants achieved pulpal analgesia in 2 minutes or less. With non-alkalinized anesthetic, 12% achieved pulpal analgesia in 2 minutes or less (P = 0.001). The average time to pulpal analgesia for the non-alkalinized anesthetic was 6:37 (range 0:55 to 13:25). Average time to pulpal analgesia for alkalinized anesthetic was 1:51 (range 0:11 to 6:10) (P = 0.001). INJECTION PAIN RESULTS: 72% of the participants rated the alkalinized injection as more comfortable, 11% rated the non-alkalinized injection as more comfortable, and 17% reported no preference (P = 0.013). Forty-four percent of the patients receiving alkalinized anesthetic rated the injection pain as zero ("no pain") on a 100-mm VAS, compared to 6% of the patients who received non-alkalinized anesthetic (P = 0.056). Alkalinizing lidocaine with epinephrine toward physiologic pH immediately before injection significantly reduces anesthetic onset time and increases the comfort of the injection. Clinicians can begin procedures more quickly and give a more comfortable

  13. The role of hyaluronidase on lidocaine and bupivacaine pharmacokinetics after peribulbar blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, N; Benrhaiem, M; Lotfi, H; Debord, J; Rigaud, G; Lachatre, G; Adenis, J P; Feiss, P

    1996-05-01

    Orbital regional anesthesia is the only circumstance where hyaluronidase is routinely added to local anesthetics to accelerate the onset of the block. The aim of this study was to compare the pharmacokinetics of lidocaine and bupivacaine with or without hyaluronidase for peribulbar blockade. Twenty-one patients scheduled for cataract surgery with lens implantation were included in this prospective randomized study. Peribulbar blocks were achieved with plain bupivacaine 0.5% (5.5 mL), lidocaine 2% (5.5 mL), and hyaluronidase (100 IU = 2 mL) (n = 10) ir sterile water (2 mL) (n = 11). Plasma bupivacaine and lidocaine concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography at regular intervals from the end of the local anesthetic injection until the 360th minute. Maximum plasma concentration (Cmax) and time to reach Cmax (Tmax) were obtained for all the patients except one who needed a supplementary injection and was excluded from the study. The time to onset and duration of the analgesia and akinesia were monitored at the times of sampling. Motor blockade was incomplete in two patients in each group without affecting surgery. The Tmax and absorption half-life (t1/2a) of lidocaine and bupivacaine were not different within each group (P > 0.05). The Tmax of lidocaine was shorter in the presence of hyaluronidase (17.1 +/- 2.6 min vs 32.7 +/- 6.0 min) as well as the Tmax of bupivacaine (16.8 +/- 3.0 min vs 26.5 +/- 4.4 min). The Cmax of lidocaine and bupivacaine were not modified by the addition of hyaluronidase. The clearance, terminal half-life, and volume of distribution were not different between groups. The absorption of lidocaine and bupivacaine from the peribulbar space are hastened by the addition of hyaluronidase. The Tmax of lidocaine is not different from that of bupivacaine within each group suggesting that the absorption of local anesthetics is minimally influenced by the liposolubility of the drugs. Moreover, hyaluronidase influences the

  14. Randomized, controlled, double-blind trial of topical lidocaine gel and intrauterine lidocaine infusion for pain relief during saline contrast sonohysterography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, S S F; Lai, S F; Lam, M T; Lee, V C Y; Li, R H W; Ho, P C; Ng, E H Y

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of topical lidocaine gel and intrauterine lidocaine infusion administered prior to saline contrast sonohysterography (SCSH) in reducing pain level during the procedure. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial. We recruited 120 women scheduled to undergo SCSH and randomized them into one of three groups according to administration of gel and intrauterine infusion immediately prior to the procedure: (1) the 'lidocaine gel' group received 3 mL 2% lidocaine gel applied to the cervix and intrauterine infusion, using an infant feeding tube without balloon, of 5 mL normal saline; (2) the 'lidocaine infusion' group received 3 mL gel lubricant applied to the cervix and intrauterine infusion of 5 mL 2% lidocaine; (3) the placebo group received 3 mL gel lubricant applied to the cervix and intrauterine infusion of 5 mL normal saline. The tube was left in place for the SCSH procedure. The primary outcome measure was the overall pain level (on a scale of 0-100) reported by the women during the SCSH procedure. Women also rated their pain levels at various other time points and an observer assessed visible signs of the women's discomfort during the procedure, producing a distress score. There were no significant differences among the three groups in baseline characteristics, volume of saline solution infused, tenaculum use and duration and difficulty level of the SCSH procedure. The median (range) pain scores during normal saline infusion for the SCSH procedure were 0 (0-65) in the placebo group, 2.5 (0-80) in the lidocaine gel group, and 0 (0-70) in the lidocaine infusion group. The pain scores at other time points, the overall pain score and the distress score were also comparable for the three groups. No significant adverse events were reported. SCSH performed with an infant feeding tube without balloon is associated with very low pain levels. Topical lidocaine gel application and intrauterine lidocaine infusion do not

  15. Comparison of the cytotoxic effects of bupivacaine, lidocaine, and mepivacaine in equine articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinuk; Sutradhar, Bibek C; Hong, Gyeongmi; Choi, Seok H; Kim, Gonhyung

    2011-03-01

    To compare the chondrotoxicity of bupivacaine, lidocaine, and mepivacaine in equine articular chondrocytes in vitro. Prospective, experimental study. Equine articular chondrocytes. Primary cultured equine chondrocytes were exposed to 0.5% bupivacaine, 2% lidocaine, or 2% mepivacaine for 30 or 60 minutes. After treatment, cell viability was evaluated by trypan blue exclusion and the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric assay in a dose dependent manner. Apoptosis and necrosis of chondrocytes were analyzed with the double staining of Hoechst 33258 and propidium iodide using fluorescence microscopy, and the results were confirmed using flow cytometry. After 30-minute exposure, trypan blue exclusion assay revealed that cell viability of 0.5% bupivacaine group was 28.73±8.44%, and those of 2% lidocaine and 2% mepivacaine were 66.85±6.03% and 86.27±2.00%, respectively. The viability of chondrocytes after saline treatment was 95.95±2.75%. The results of MTT assay and fluorescence microscopy had similar tendency with trypan blue assay. Each result showed that bupivacaine was the most toxic of the three local anaesthetics. Mepivacaine was less toxic than lidocaine. The results of the viability test suggest that bupivacaine and lidocaine exhibit a marked chondrotoxicity, and that this is mainly due to necrosis rather than apoptosis. Bupivacaine may induce detrimental chondrotoxicity when administered intra-articularly, especially in patients with joint disease, and we suggest that it should be used cautiously in equine practice. Mepivacaine may be an alternative to both bupivacaine and lidocaine. © 2011 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia © 2011 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists.

  16. Effect of local anaesthesia and/or analgesia on pain responses induced by piglet castration

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    Nyman Görel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgical castration in male piglets is painful and methods that reduce this pain are requested. This study evaluated the effect of local anaesthesia and analgesia on vocal, physiological and behavioural responses during and after castration. A second purpose was to evaluate if herdsmen can effectively administer anaesthesia. Methods Four male piglets in each of 141 litters in five herds were randomly assigned to one of four treatments: castration without local anaesthesia or analgesia (C, controls, analgesia (M, meloxicam, local anaesthesia (L, lidocaine, or both local anaesthesia and analgesia (LM. Lidocaine (L, LM was injected at least three minutes before castration and meloxicam (M, LM was injected after castration. During castration, vocalisation was measured and resistance movements judged. Behaviour observations were carried out on the castration day and the following day. The day after castration, castration wounds were ranked, ear and skin temperature was measured, and blood samples were collected for analysis of acute phase protein Serum Amyloid A concentration (SAA. Piglets were weighed on the castration day and at three weeks of age. Sickness treatments and mortality were recorded until three weeks of age. Results Piglets castrated with lidocaine produced calls with lower intensity (p p p = 0.06, n.s. and the following day (p = 0.02. Controls had less swollen wounds compared to piglets assigned to treatments M, L and LM (p p = 0.005; p = 0.05 for C + L compared to M + LM. Ear temperature was higher (p Conclusions The study concludes that lidocaine reduced pain during castration and that meloxicam reduced pain after castration. The study also concludes that the herdsmen were able to administer local anaesthesia effectively.

  17. Lidocaine suppository for transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate: a prospective, double-blind, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goluza, Eleonora; Hudolin, Tvrtko; Kastelan, Zeljko; Peric, Mladen; Murselovic, Tamara; Sosic, Hrvoje

    2011-01-01

    To investigate analgesia using lidocaine suppositories for prostate biopsy. From 2007 to 2009, 160 patients underwent transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy at the Department of Urology, KBC Zagreb. 80 patients received a 60-mg lidocaine suppository intrarectally at different time points from 15 to 120 min before biopsy and 80 patients received a glycerin suppository as placebo. The pain level was evaluated using a visual analogue scale (VAS). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups, i.e. they were similar regarding patients' age, prostate-specific antigen levels, prostate volume and the incidence of diagnosis of malignancy on biopsy. The mean pain score in the lidocaine group (3 ± 1) was significantly lower than the mean pain score in the glycerin group (4.1 ± 1.3) (p suppository till the biopsy and the optimal time for performing biopsy starting approximately 1 h after placing the suppository. Lidocaine suppositories are an easy-to-use, self-applicable (by the patient) and cheap method of local analgesia, with acceptable results. Possible complications related to this procedure are insignificant. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. NaHCO3-Buffered Lidocaine Gel for Outpatient Rigid Cystoscopy in Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Cheng, Yanxin; Li, Jun; Chen, Yongxue; Yuan, Jinge; Yang, Shuhong; Shi, Huiqiao; Li, Wenpin; Yang, Shijie; Wang, Wei; Xu, Guanjie; Zhao, Senming

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of NaHCO3-buffered lidocaine gel as a topical anesthetic agent for pain relief for rigid cystoscopy. Prospective randomized controlled trial. ASA I-II male patients undergoing rigid cystoscopy randomly received 10 mL 2% Carbocaine lidocaine gel with 1 mL 0.9% saline (group 1) or 1 mL 5% NaHCO3 solution (group 2). After 3 minutes exposure, the cystoscope was inserted into the urethra. On receiving the gel, cystoscope insertion, and intravesical observation, pain score was recorded using the visual analog scale. The gel pH with or without NaHCO3 was 7.20 and 6.41, respectively. The concentration of soluble lidocaine in the gel was stable for 24 hours or more. The visual analog scale score in group 2 was significantly lower (1.3 ± 0.9) than in group 1 (5.28 ± 1.99). No adverse effects were recorded. Alkalized lidocaine gel resulted in successful analgesia for rigid cystoscopy in men without adverse effects. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Mouse anesthesia and analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sean; Pacharinsak, Cholawat

    2015-03-02

    Providing anesthesia and analgesia for mouse subjects is a common and critical practice in the laboratory setting. These practices are necessary for performing invasive procedures, achieving prolonged immobility for sensitive imaging modalities (magnetic resonance imaging for instance), and providing intra- and post-procedural pain relief. In addition to facilitating the procedures performed by the investigator, the provision of anesthesia and analgesia is crucial for the preservation of animal welfare and for humane treatment of animals used in research. Furthermore, anesthesia and analgesia are important components of animal use protocols reviewed by Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees, requiring careful consideration and planning for the particular animal model. In this article, we provide technical outlines for the investigator covering the provision of anesthesia by two routes (injectable and inhalant), guidelines for monitoring anesthesia, current techniques for recognition of pain, and considerations for administering preventative analgesia. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. ANALGESIA IN SMALL CHILDREN

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Opioids provide effective analgesia, but also have known side ... significance of the study lies in the improvement in post-operative pain management in children after day-case .... have required intervention or delay in discharge from hospital.

  1. OUR EXPERIENCE WITH EPIDURAL LABOUR ANALGESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uršula Reš Muravec

    2003-12-01

    , headache, a drop in blood pressure were not increased in none of the regional analgesia technique group.Conclusions. Since regional analgesic techniques offer excellent labour pain relief with minimal adverse effects on labour outcome, it is reasonable to proceed using them in the future, as well as to thoroughly inform the parturient about this effective method of pain relief prior to labour.

  2. Efficacy of caudal epidural injection of lidocaine, xylazine and xylazine plus hyaluronidase in reducing discomfort produced by electroejaculation in bulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliosa, Ronaldo C; Derossi, Rafael; Costa, Deiler S; Faria, Fabio J C

    2015-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that epidural administration of lidocaine, xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase provides reduced pain and stress during electroejaculation in bulls, eight 30-month-old Nellore bulls received saline solution (control), 2% lidocaine, 2% xylazine or 2% xylazine plus hyaluronidase injected into the first intercoccygeal (Co1-Co2) epidural space in randomized order. Heart rate, respiratory rate, mean arterial pressure, analgesia, animal behavior and motor blockade were evaluated before treatment and at predetermined intervals during and after treatment. Pain and stress were scored subjectively, and semen quality was evaluated. The onset of anesthetic action was significantly faster with lidocaine (3.0 ± 1.2 min) than with xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase (8.9 ± 1.5 and 5.5 ± 2.6 min, P=0.021 and P=0.012, respectively), and the onset of anesthesia with xylazine plus hyaluronidase was significantly faster than that with xylazine alone (P=0.032). Treatment with xylazine or xylazine plus hyaluronidase resulted in less discomfort than treatment with lidocaine, as indicated by animal behavior. Changes in heart rate, respiratory rate and arterial pressure were within acceptable limits. Penile protrusion and semen emission occurred in all animals during all four treatments. Our results suggest that xylazine plus hyaluronidase reduced discomfort during electroejaculation more effectively than xylazine or lidocaine alone. Further experiments are necessary to determine whether electroejaculation with xylazine plus hyaluronidase is feasible for obtaining semen from Nellore bulls unaccustomed to being handled or restrained.

  3. Proinflammatory cytokines oppose opioid induced acute and chronic analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    Hutchinson, Mark R.; Coats, Benjamen D; Lewis, Susannah S.; Zhang, Yingning; Sprunger, David B.; Rezvani, Niloofar; Baker, Eric M.; Jekich, Brian M.; Wieseler, Julie L.; Somogyi, Andrew A; Martin, David; Poole, Stephen; Judd, Charles M.; Steven F. Maier; Watkins, Linda R.

    2008-01-01

    Spinal proinflammatory cytokines are powerful pain-enhancing signals that contribute to pain following peripheral nerve injury (neuropathic pain). Recently, one proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1, was also implicated in the loss of analgesia upon repeated morphine exposure (tolerance). In contrast to prior literature, we demonstrate that the action of several spinal proinflammatory cytokines oppose systemic and intrathecal opioid analgesia, causing reduced pain suppression. In vitro morp...

  4. Peribulbar anaesthesia using a combination of lidocaine, bupivocaine and clonidine in vitreoretinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calenda Emile

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The efficacy and safety of peribulbar anaesthesia was assessed using a combination of lidocaine, bupivacaine and clonidine during eye surgery. Methods: We prospectively studied 100 vitreo-retinal surgical procedures performed by several surgeons. The exclusion criteria included age below 30 years and, axial length of the orbit above 28 mm. Peribulbar was performed using Hamilton′s technique. A mixed anaesthetic solution of equal quantity of lidocaine 2% and bupivacaine 0.5% with clonidine (1mg/kg was injected. Patients received a mean volume of 14.5 ml ± 3.5 of the mixture. Akinesia and analgesia were assessed 15 minutes later by the surgeon. Whenever required, supplemental lidocaine 2% (3 ml by sub- Tenon infiltration was added by the surgeon. Supplemental injections were given only to patients who failed to develop analgesia. Results: The mean age of patients (male 52%, female 48% was 66 years ± 10 (mean ± SD, range 44-90. The 100 surgical procedures were made up of vitrectomy ± gas ± silicone oil (22/100, vitrectomy and lensectomy (6/100, vitrectomy and epiretinal membrane ± laser coagulation ± gas ± silicone oil (35/100, scleral buckling or encircling ± gas (36/100, and cryosurgery ± gas (1/100. Analgesia was adequate throughout surgery without any supplementation in 85% of cases and with a sub-Tenon infiltration in 99%. Akinesia was complete in 84%, mild in 12% and absent in 4% of cases. The sub-Tenon injection was performed in 15% of cases. Three patients (3% were agitated during surgery. No neurologic or cardiac complication was seen. In one patient, the systolic blood pressure decreased from 170 to 110 mmHg, 30 minutes after the institution of the peribulbar block. Conclusion: Our results show that peribulbar anaesthesia in the proposed mixture offers excellent analgesia in 85% of patients, and in 99% of the patients when supplemented by a subtenon injection. The current mixture of lidocaine, bupivacaine and

  5. Prophylactic lidocaine for myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí-Carvajal, Arturo J; Simancas-Racines, Daniel; Anand, Vidhu; Bangdiwala, Shrikant

    2015-08-21

    Coronary artery disease is a major public health problem affecting both developed and developing countries. Acute coronary syndromes include unstable angina and myocardial infarction with or without ST-segment elevation (electrocardiogram sector is higher than baseline). Ventricular arrhythmia after myocardial infarction is associated with high risk of mortality. The evidence is out of date, and considerable uncertainty remains about the effects of prophylactic use of lidocaine on all-cause mortality, in particular, in patients with suspected myocardial infarction. To determine the clinical effectiveness and safety of prophylactic lidocaine in preventing death among people with myocardial infarction. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2015, Issue 3), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 13 April 2015), EMBASE (1947 to 13 April 2015) and Latin American Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS) (1986 to 13 April 2015). We also searched Web of Science (1970 to 13 April 2013) and handsearched the reference lists of included papers. We applied no language restriction in the search. We included randomised controlled trials assessing the effects of prophylactic lidocaine for myocardial infarction. We considered all-cause mortality, cardiac mortality and overall survival at 30 days after myocardial infarction as primary outcomes. We performed study selection, risk of bias assessment and data extraction in duplicate. We estimated risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous outcomes and measured statistical heterogeneity using I(2). We used a random-effects model and conducted trial sequential analysis. We identified 37 randomised controlled trials involving 11,948 participants. These trials compared lidocaine versus placebo or no intervention, disopyramide, mexiletine, tocainide, propafenone, amiodarone, dimethylammonium chloride, aprindine and pirmenol. Overall, trials were underpowered and had high risk of bias. Ninety-seven per cent of trials (36

  6. Efficacy and safety of 5% lidocaine (lignocaine) medicated plaster in comparison with pregabalin in patients with postherpetic neuralgia and diabetic polyneuropathy: interim analysis from an open-label, two-stage adaptive, randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Ralf; Mayoral, Victor; Leijon, Göran; Binder, Andreas; Steigerwald, Ilona; Serpell, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia (PHN) and diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) are two common causes of peripheral neuropathic pain. Typical localized symptoms can include burning sensations or intermittent shooting or stabbing pains with or without allodynia. Evidence-based treatment guidelines recommend the 5% lidocaine (lignocaine) medicated plaster or pregabalin as first-line therapy for relief of peripheral neuropathic pain. This study aimed to compare 5% lidocaine medicated plaster treatment with pregabalin in patients with PHN and patients with DPN. The study was a two-stage, adaptive, randomized, controlled, open-label, multicentre trial that incorporated a drug wash-out phase of up to 2 weeks prior to the start of the comparative phase. At the end of the enrollment phase, patients who fulfilled the eligibility criteria were randomized to either 5% lidocaine medicated plaster or pregabalin treatment and entered the 4-week comparative phase. The interim analysis represents the first stage of the two-stage adaptive trial design and was planned to include data from the comparative phase for the first 150 randomized patients of the 300 total planned for the trial. Patients aged > or = 18 years with PHN or DPN were recruited from 53 investigational centres in 14 European countries. For this interim analysis, 55 patients with PHN and 91 with DPN (full-analysis set [FAS]), randomly assigned to the treatment groups, were available for analysis. Topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster treatment was administered by patients to the area of most painful skin. A maximum of three or four plasters were applied for up to 12 hours within each 24-hour period in patients with PHN or DPN, respectively. Pregabalin capsules were administered orally, twice daily. The dose was titrated to effect: all patients received 150 mg/day in the first week and 300 mg/day in the second week of treatment. After 1 week at 300 mg/day, the dose of pregabalin was further increased to 600 mg/day in patients with

  7. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  8. Comparison of the Analgesic Efficacy of Lidocaine/Prilocaine (EMLA Cream and Needle-Free Delivery of Lidocaine During Fine-Needle Aspiration Biopsy of Thyroid Nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alptekin Gürsoy

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Efficacy of eutectic mixture of local anesthetic (EMLA cream and the needle-free injection of local anesthesia for reducing pain associated with fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB of thyroid nodules has been previously reported. However, there has not been a direct comparison of the analgesic efficacy of these methods. The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of EMLA cream and needle-free injection of lidocaine for FNAB-associated pain. Materials and Methods: A total of 138 patients having their first ultrasonography-guided thyroid nodule biopsy were randomly assigned to receive either EMLA cream (n=68 or needle-free injection of lidocaine (n=70 before FNAB of thyroid nodules. Four needle passes for biopsy of each nodule were performed. Patients rated pain associated with the procedure according to a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS, an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS, and 4-category verbal rating scale (VRS. Results: There were no significant differences between groups in age, sex, thyroid volume, nodule size, or nodule site. Significant differences between groups were noted in ratings of all three pain scales. When the effectiveness of EMLA was compared with that of needle-free injection of lidocaine, the mean VAS score was 23.4±20.5 mm versus 12.7±15.5 mm (p=0.001, and the mean NRS score was 2.8±2.1 points versus 1.6±1.7 points (p<0.001. There was also a significant difference between groups in VRS score (p=0.001. Conclusions: Needle-free injection of lidocaine provides more effective and faster analgesia than EMLA cream application during the FNAB. Turk Jem 2009; 13: 5-7

  9. Differential effects of lidocaine on nerve growth factor (NGF)-evoked heat- and mechanical hyperalgesia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinkauf, B; Obreja, O; Schmelz, M; Rukwied, R

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the effects of a non-specific sodium channel blocker (lidocaine) on heat pain thresholds and mechanical impact pain at day 7 and 21 after intradermal injection of 1 μg NGF. Measurements were performed in 12 healthy male subjects prior to and 5 min after intradermal injection of 150 μl lidocaine administered at concentrations of 0.01% (∼0.4 mM) and 0.1% (∼4 mM) to both NGF and control skin sites. NGF caused a maximum reduction of heat pain thresholds at day 7 (NGF 42.6 ± 0.6 vs. 49.4 ± 0.3 °C in control skin). Lidocaine sensitized normal skin for heat pain, but reduced heat hyperalgesia after NGF at day 7 (44.3 ± 0.8 °C, lidocaine 0.1%; p Lidocaine dose-dependently attenuated mechanically-induced pain at both control and NGF-treated sites. Maximum lidocaine effects on mechanical hyperalgesia were recorded at day 21 in NGF skin (pain reduction to VAS 37 ± 4, p lidocaine 0.1%. Lidocaine differentially affects NGF-induced mechanical hyperalgesia (analgesic effect) and heat sensitivity of nociceptors (sensitizing effect). These opposing responses may be attributed to block of sodium channels vs. sensitization of TRPV1. NGF-evoked extreme mechanical impact pain indicates high action potential discharge frequencies, which might be more susceptible to lidocaine block.

  10. Efficacy of 2% Lidocaine Injection as a Topical Agent in Cataract Surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenyong Huang; Bin Liu; Jiewei Liu; Jinxing Xu; Zhende Lin

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether 2% Lidocaine injection is an effective topical anesthetic agent for non-phaco small incision cataract surgery.Setting: Charity eye clinic supported by Hellen Keller International.Methods:One hundred and twenty-five consecutive cataract surgery patients received topical anesthesia with 2% Lidocaine injection solution just 1 and 0.5 minutes prior to non-phaco small incision cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. Each patient was asked about pain or piessure sensation during the operation.Results: The surgeon felt ease in the operations. Many patients (93/125) were comfort during the whole surgery. Only 9 patients′ score was above level 3,mostly complained during the nucleus extraction; Among those whose score was level 1~2, 82.6%(19/23)claimed discomfort at middle of the operation (nucleus extraction) or the beginning (creating the conjunctival flap).Conclusion: Lidocaine injection solution(2%) was an effective topical anesthesia agent in cataract surgery.

  11. Epidural analgesia in cattle, buffalo, and camels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuhair Bani Ismail

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Epidural analgesia is commonly used in large animals. It is an easy, cheap, and effective technique used to prevent or control pain during surgeries involving the tail, anus, vulva, perineum, caudal udder, scrotum, and upper hind limbs. The objectives of this article were to comprehensively review and summarize all scientific data available in the literature on new techniques and drugs or drug combinations used for epidural anesthesia in cattle, camel, and buffalo. Only articles published between 2006 and 2016 were included in the review. The most common sites for epidural administration in cattle, camels, and buffalos were the sacrococcygeal intervertebral space (S5-Co1 and first intercoccygeal intervertebral space (Co1-Co2. The most frequently used drugs and dosages were lidocaine (0.22-0.5 mg/kg, bupivacaine (0.125 mg/kg, ropivacaine (0.11 mg/kg, xylazine (0.05 mg/kg, medetomidine (15 μg/kg, romifidine (30-50 μg/kg, ketamine (0.3-2.5 mg/kg, tramadol (1 mg/kg, and neostigmine (10 μg/kg, and the clinical applications, clinical effects, recommendations, and side effects were discussed.

  12. Epidural analgesia in cattle, buffalo, and camels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Zuhair Bani

    2016-12-01

    Epidural analgesia is commonly used in large animals. It is an easy, cheap, and effective technique used to prevent or control pain during surgeries involving the tail, anus, vulva, perineum, caudal udder, scrotum, and upper hind limbs. The objectives of this article were to comprehensively review and summarize all scientific data available in the literature on new techniques and drugs or drug combinations used for epidural anesthesia in cattle, camel, and buffalo. Only articles published between 2006 and 2016 were included in the review. The most common sites for epidural administration in cattle, camels, and buffalos were the sacrococcygeal intervertebral space (S5-Co1) and first intercoccygeal intervertebral space (Co1-Co2). The most frequently used drugs and dosages were lidocaine (0.22-0.5 mg/kg), bupivacaine (0.125 mg/kg), ropivacaine (0.11 mg/kg), xylazine (0.05 mg/kg), medetomidine (15 µg/kg), romifidine (30-50 µg/kg), ketamine (0.3-2.5 mg/kg), tramadol (1 mg/kg), and neostigmine (10 µg/kg), and the clinical applications, clinical effects, recommendations, and side effects were discussed.

  13. Epidural analgesia in cattle, buffalo, and camels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Zuhair Bani

    2016-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is commonly used in large animals. It is an easy, cheap, and effective technique used to prevent or control pain during surgeries involving the tail, anus, vulva, perineum, caudal udder, scrotum, and upper hind limbs. The objectives of this article were to comprehensively review and summarize all scientific data available in the literature on new techniques and drugs or drug combinations used for epidural anesthesia in cattle, camel, and buffalo. Only articles published between 2006 and 2016 were included in the review. The most common sites for epidural administration in cattle, camels, and buffalos were the sacrococcygeal intervertebral space (S5-Co1) and first intercoccygeal intervertebral space (Co1-Co2). The most frequently used drugs and dosages were lidocaine (0.22-0.5 mg/kg), bupivacaine (0.125 mg/kg), ropivacaine (0.11 mg/kg), xylazine (0.05 mg/kg), medetomidine (15 µg/kg), romifidine (30-50 µg/kg), ketamine (0.3-2.5 mg/kg), tramadol (1 mg/kg), and neostigmine (10 µg/kg), and the clinical applications, clinical effects, recommendations, and side effects were discussed. PMID:28096620

  14. Comparing the painlessness effects of spinal (sufentanil and epidural(bupivacaine plus lidocaine analgesic methods in labour and delivery

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    A. Shafiee

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: This study was designed in order to compare the effects of spinal and epidural analgesia on labour and also several maternal and fetal factors in vaginal delivery.Materials and Methods: The study was a randomized clinical trail and participatnts were 120 gravid 1 and gravid 2 women in the active phase of delivery, admitted to the labour room of Fatemieh Hospital in Hamedan in 1381-1382.Sixty patients were randomly divided into two groups of 30, analgesia was induced by single spinal sufentanil injection in one group and, bupivacaine plus lidocaine injection in the other group.Maternal vital signs and pain score were recorded (VAS at 1, 5, 15 and 30 minutes after administration of analgesia and every 30 minutes thereafter. Fetal heart rate every 15 minutes, vaginal examination every hour, urinary output every 4 hours after delivery and the incidence of headache and back pain, one week after delivery were the variables under study.Results: Both groups were matched regarding demographic, gravida and Parity factors. There was no significant difference between groups regarding pain score, (based on VAS,duration of the first and second delivery phase, the incidence of fetal distress, meconium excretion, apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes after delivery, abnormal laboar, operative or assisted delivery. Average analgesic duration was longer in spinal analgesia than single epidural injection analgesia.Conclusion: Considering the difficulty of the technique, the need for anaestheticianHs supervision and injection repeatition in epidural analgesia, it seems that spinal analgesia is a suitable replacement which is more practical, less expensive, easy to perform and induces a desirable analgesia.

  15. THE EFFECT OF CLONIDINE ON LIDOCAINE INDUCED SUPRACLAVICULAR BRACHIAL PLEXUS BLOCK

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    Shrinivas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brachial plexus nerve blocks (BPB are the most common nerve blocks used for upper limb surgeries. Techniques using only Local Anaesthetics (LA have limited duration of post-operative analgesia. Clonidine has been used to prolong the duration of LA s for neuraxial blocks. Hence the effect of clonidine on Lidocaine induced BPB was studied. METHODS: 60 patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA class I and II were randomly divided into 2 groups. Group L given 30 ml of Lidocaine with adrenaline 1.5% with 0.6 ml of normal saline and the Group C given 30 ml of same LA with 0.6 ml of 90mcg of Clonidine. All the patients’ supraclavicular BPB was given using Winnies’ peri-vascular approach. The primary outcome was onset, duration of sensory and motor blockade. The secondary outcomes were motor block duration, opioid supplementation, and BPB complication. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference in the onset of sensory and motor block, motor blockade quality and overall quality of block. Duration of sensory and motor blockade was prolonged in groups with Clonidine. No adverse events / hemodynamic instability noted in either group. Sedation scores were higher in Clonidine group. No patients required any intervention. CONCLUSIONS: 90µg Clonidine added to Lidocaine 1.5% with adrenaline produces prolongation of both the duration of sensory and motor blockade with minimal adverse effects.

  16. The effect of lidocaine on neutrophil respiratory burst during induction of general anaesthesia and tracheal intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Swanton, B J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Respiratory burst is an essential component of the neutrophil\\'s biocidal function. In vitro, sodium thiopental, isoflurane and lidocaine each inhibit neutrophil respiratory burst. The objectives of this study were (a) to determine the effect of a standard clinical induction\\/tracheal intubation sequence on neutrophil respiratory burst and (b) to determine the effect of intravenous lidocaine administration during induction of anaesthesia on neutrophil respiratory burst. METHODS: Twenty ASA I and II patients, aged 18-60 years, undergoing elective surgery were studied. After induction of anaesthesia [fentanyl (2 microg kg-1), thiopental (4-6 mg kg-1), isoflurane (end-tidal concentration 0.5-1.5%) in nitrous oxide (66%) and oxygen], patients randomly received either lidocaine 1.5 mg kg-1 (group L) or 0.9% saline (group S) prior to tracheal intubation. Neutrophil respiratory burst was measured immediately prior to induction of anaesthesia, immediately before and 1 and 5 min after lidocaine\\/saline. RESULTS: Neutrophil respiratory burst decreased significantly after induction of anaesthesia in both groups [87.4 +\\/- 8.2% (group L) and 88.5 +\\/- 13.4% (group S) of preinduction level (P < 0.01 both groups)]. After intravenous lidocaine (but not saline) administration, neutrophil respiratory burst returned towards preinduction levels, both before (97.1 +\\/- 23.6%) and after (94.4 +\\/- 16.6%) tracheal intubation. CONCLUSION: Induction of anaesthesia and tracheal intubation using thiopentone and isoflurane, inhibit neutrophil respiratory burst. This effect may be diminished by the administration of lidocaine.

  17. Intrathecal lidocaine pretreatment attenuates immediate neuropathic pain by modulating Nav1.3 expression and decreasing spinal microglial activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Intrathecal lidocaine reverses tactile allodynia after nerve injury, but whether neuropathic pain is attenuated by intrathecal lidocaine pretreatment is uncertain. Methods Sixty six adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three treatment groups: (1) sham (Group S), which underwent removal of the L6 transverse process; (2) ligated (Group L), which underwent left L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL); and (3) pretreated (Group P), which underwent L5 SNL and was pretreated with intrathecal 2% lidocaine (50 μl). Neuropathic pain was assessed based on behavioral responses to thermal and mechanical stimuli. Expression of sodium channels (Nav1.3 and Nav1.8) in injured dorsal root ganglia and microglial proliferation/activation in the spinal cord were measured on post-operative days 3 (POD3) and 7 (POD7). Results Group L presented abnormal behavioral responses indicative of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, exhibited up-regulation of Nav1.3 and down-regulation of Nav1.8, and showed increased microglial activation. Compared with ligation only, pretreatment with intrathecal lidocaine before nerve injury (Group P), as measured on POD3, palliated both mechanical allodynia (p lidocaine prior to SNL blunts the response to noxious stimuli by attenuating Nav1.3 up-regulation and suppressing activation of spinal microglia. Although its effects are limited to 3 days, intrathecal lidocaine pretreatment can alleviate acute SNL-induced neuropathic pain. PMID:21676267

  18. Lidocaine block of cardiac sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, B P; Cohen, C J; Tsien, R W

    1983-05-01

    Lidocaine block of cardiac sodium channels was studied in voltage-clamped rabbit purkinje fibers at drug concentrations ranging from 1 mM down to effective antiarrhythmic doses (5-20 muM). Dose-response curves indicated that lidocaine blocks the channel by binding one-to-one, with a voltage-dependent K(d). The half-blocking concentration varied from more than 300 muM, at a negative holding potential where inactivation was completely removed, to approximately 10 muM, at a depolarized holding potential where inactivation was nearly complete. Lidocaine block showed prominent use dependence with trains of depolarizing pulses from a negative holding potential. During the interval between pulses, repriming of I (Na) displayed two exponential components, a normally recovering component (tauless than 0.2 s), and a lidocaine-induced, slowly recovering fraction (tau approximately 1-2 s at pH 7.0). Raising the lidocaine concentration magnified the slowly recovering fraction without changing its time course; after a long depolarization, this fraction was one-half at approximately 10 muM lidocaine, just as expected if it corresponded to drug-bound, inactivated channels. At less than or equal to 20 muM lidocaine, the slowly recovering fraction grew exponentially to a steady level as the preceding depolarization was prolonged; the time course was the same for strong or weak depolarizations, that is, with or without significant activation of I(Na). This argues that use dependence at therapeutic levels reflects block of inactivated channels, rather than block of open channels. Overall, these results provide direct evidence for the "modulated-receptor hypothesis" of Hille (1977) and Hondeghem and Katzung (1977). Unlike tetrodotoxin, lidocaine shows similar interactions with Na channels of heart, nerve, and skeletal muscle.

  19. Effect of epidural analgesia with 0.075% ropivacaine versus 0.1%ropivacaine on the maternal temperature during labor:a randomized controlled study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Hong-li; SHAO Liu-jiazi; LI Jin; WANG Ya-nan; WANG Lei; HAN Ru-quan

    2013-01-01

    Background A wealth of evidence has indicated that labor epidural analgesia is associated with an increased risk of hyperthermia and overt clinical fever.Recently,evidence is emerging that the epidural analgesia-induced fever is associated with the types of the epidural analgesia and the variations in the epidural analgesia will affect the incidence of fever.The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of epidural analgesia with 0.075% or 0.1%ropivacaine on the maternal temperature during labor.Methods Two hundred healthy term nulliparas were randomly assigned to receive epidural analgesia with either 0.1% ropivacaine or 0.075% ropivacaine.Epidural analgesia was initiated with 10 ml increment of the randomized solution and 0.5 μg/ml sufentanyl after a negative test dose of 5 ml of 1.5% lidocaine,and maintained with 7 ml bolus doses of the abovementioned mixed analgesics every 30 minutes by the patient-controlled epidural analgesia.The measurements included the maternal oral temperature,visual analog scale pain scores,labor events and neonatal outcomes.Results Epidural analgesia with 0.075% ropivacaine could significantly lower the mean maternal temperature at 4 hours after the initiation of analgesia and the oxytocin administration during labor compared with the one with 0.1%ropivacaine.Moreover,0.075% ropivacaine treatment could provide satisfactory pain relief during labor and had no significant adverse effects on the labor events and neonatal outcomes.Conclusion Epidural analgesia with 0.075% ropivacaine may be a good choice for the epidural analgesia during labor.

  20. Long-term treatment of neuropathic pain with a 5% lidocaine medicated plaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Ilca Ricarda; Tzabazis, Alexander; Likar, Rudolf; Sittl, Reinhard; Griessinger, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is a topical treatment for peripheral neuropathic pain symptoms (e.g. burning, shooting and stabbing pain) and is registered for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia. This study examined the efficacy and tolerability of long-term treatment with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in patients with localized neuropathic pain conditions. Twenty patients with localized neuropathic pain [postoperative neuropathic pain (n = 14); complex regional pain syndrome (n = 2); and postherpetic neuralgia (n = 4)], who had been successfully treated with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster, were followed up by telephone interview after 3 and 5 years. Questions were related to the efficacy, development of tolerance, tolerability, wear time and comfort of the plaster. At 3 years, 10 out of 20 (50%) initial responders were still using the plasters with no decline in analgesic efficacy. After 5 years, eight of the original 20 responders (40%) maintained treatment and continued to experience effective pain relief. The 12 responders who discontinued treatment did so because they no longer required analgesic therapy (n = 4); their health insurer refused to fund treatment (n = 2); they were lost to follow-up (n = 1); or had died from an illness unrelated to plaster treatment (n = 5). No patient discontinued because of inadequate analgesia or intolerable side effects. Reversible erythema occurred in two patients wearing the plaster for more than 16 h. There were no systemic side effects. The 5% lidocaine medicated plaster provides sustained pain relief over long-term treatment in patients with neuropathic pain of various causes and is well tolerated.

  1. Relapse of Neuromyelitis Optica Spectrum Disorder Associated with Intravenous Lidocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyuki Uzawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lidocaine unmasks silent symptoms and eases neuropathic pain in multiple sclerosis patients; however, the effects of lidocaine in neuromyelitis optica have never been reported. We describe the case of a 59-year-old Japanese woman with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder who developed optic neuritis 1 day after intravenous lidocaine injection for treating allodynia. Her symptom seemed to result from a relapse of neuromyelitis optica induced by lidocaine administration, and not because of the transient effects of intravenous lidocaine administration. The possibility that lidocaine administration results in relapse of neuromyelitis optica due to its immunomodulating effects cannot be ruled out.

  2. Analgesic efficacy of equimolar 50% nitrous oxide/oxygen gas premix (Kalinox®) as compared with a 5% eutectic mixture of lidocaine/prilocaine (EMLA®) in chronic leg ulcer debridement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traber, Juerg; Held, Ulrike; Signer, Maria; Huebner, Tobias; Arndt, Stefan; Neff, Thomas A

    2017-08-01

    Chronic foot and leg ulcers are a common health problem worldwide. A mainstay of chronic ulcer therapy is sharp mechanical wound debridement requiring potent analgesia. In this prospective, controlled, single-centre, crossover design study, patients were assigned to either the administration of topical analgesia with 5% lidocaine/prilocaine cream or the inhalation of an analgesic 50% N2 O/O2 gas premix. Primary outcome parameter was level of pain at maximum wound depth during debridement as measured by a visual analogue scale. Secondary outcomes included level of pain after debridement, overall duration of treatment session, duration and completeness of debridement, and the patient's subjective perception of analgesic quality during debridement. Pain level increased from 0·60/0·94 (first/second debridement; baseline) to 1·76/2·50 (debridement) with 5% lidocaine/prilocaine and from 1·00/1·35 (baseline) to 3·95/3·29 (debridement) with 50% N2 O/O2 gas premix. Patient satisfaction was 90·48%/94·44% (first/second debridement) with topical 5% lidocaine/prilocaine analgesia and 90·48%/76·47% with the inhalation of 50% N2 O/O2 gas premix. Debridement was completed in a significantly higher percentage of 85·71%/88·89% (first/second debridement) with 5% lidocaine/prilocaine than with 50% N2 O/O2 gas premix (42·86%/58·82%) (odds ratio 6·7; P = 0·001). This study provides sound evidence that analgesia with topically administered 5% lidocaine/prilocaine cream is superior to the use of inhaled 50% N2 O/O2 gas premix in chronic leg ulcer debridement. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. [Delayed convulsion after lidocaine instillation for bronchoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaïes, E; Jebabli, N; Lakhal, M; Klouz, A; Salouage, I; Trabelsi, S

    2016-05-01

    Lidocaine toxicity usually appears rapidly and is directly correlated with plasma concentrations of the drug. We report a case of a late neurologic toxicity occurring after instillation of lidocaine during fibre-optic bronchoscopy. A patient with bronchiolitis obliterans underwent a diagnostic bronchoscopy. She received multiples instillations of Xylocaine(®) 2% (lidocaine). Three and a half hours later, she had a tonic-clonic seizure. Seven hours later, this recurred. Lidocaine plasma levels were in the toxic range at the time of the first seizure (18.32μg/mL) with a significant decrease in the concentration noted 24hours later. The slow absorption of lidocaine into the blood from the bronchial tree explains the delayed neurologic toxicity. Our observation is a reminder that complications can occur due to high doses of lidocaïne administrated by instillation. Thus, if the recommended dose of lidocaine is exceeded, it is essential to monitor patients closely for a prolonged period, especially those with fibrosing lung disease in order to avoid possible late toxicity. Copyright © 2015 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. New lidocaine lozenge as topical anesthesia compared to lidocaine viscous oral solution before upper gastrointestinal endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Stine; Treldal, Charlotte; Feldager, Erik

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect and acceptance of a new lidocaine lozenge compared with a lidocaine viscous oral solution as a pharyngeal anesthetic before upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE), a diagnostic procedure commonly performed worldwide during which many patients experience severe discomfort mo...

  5. Topical lidocaine patch 5% for acute postoperative pain control.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gilhooly, D

    2011-02-01

    A 39-year-old para 3 woman presented for elective caesarean section (lower segment caesarean section (LSCS)) for breech presentation. The patient had a strong history of atopy and anaphylaxis to paracetamol, codeine, penicillin and latex. The patient was asthmatic, triggered by aspirin. Epidural anaesthesia was unsuccessful and LSCS was carried out under spinal anaesthesia. Postoperatively the patient was unwilling to take analgesic medication due to fear of an allergic reaction. Three 5% lidocaine patches were applied to the wound for postoperative analgesia. This reduced the patient\\'s visual analogue scale pain score from 10\\/10 to 5\\/10 at rest and 10\\/10 to 7\\/10 with movement. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation was added and this improved associated back pain, reducing the pain further to 2\\/10. This is the first description of lignocaine patch 5% for postoperative LSCS pain. It is suggested that this method of delivery of local anaesthetic, which is easy to apply and has minimal side effects, should be considered not as a sole agent but as part of a multimodal technique to address postoperative LSCS pain.

  6. CENTRAL MECHANISMS OF ACUPUNCTURE ANALGESIA

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    Eman S. Mansour

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acupuncture is an component of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM that has been used for three thousand years to treat diseases and relieve pain. Pain is found to be the most common reason for people to use acupuncture. Due to recent scientific findings, acupuncture treatment has been accepted worldwide. Numerous trials have been conducted especially in analgesia. The mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia has been widely investigated, however, the underlying mechanism still not clear. This article summarizes the central mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia and reviews recent studies on the topic. Method: We have focused on examining the recent literature on acupuncture analgesia. The central mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia and reviews recent studies on the topic. We focused on the studies related to central mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia from these aspects: (neurophysiology, neurochemistry and neuroanatomy. Result: The result revealed that acupuncture act on various parts of the central nervous system, including the spinal cord, brain stem, cerebral ganglia and cerebral cortex to alleviate pain. The central mechanisms underlying the effects of acupuncture include neurohumors and neurotransmitters, which are involved in analgesia. At spinal level, Spinal opioids, glutamate, norepinephrine and serotonin are the key elements acupuncture-induced analgesia. At brain level, Endogenous opioid peptides, limbic system play essential roles in mediating the analgesia. Conclusion: Acupuncture is an effective approach to pain management. There is good evidence in both experimental and clinical research that supports acupuncture efficacy in management of chronic pain through central nervous system. Acupuncture should be strongly used as a part of pain management plans. This work helps in improving our understanding of the scientific basis underlying acupuncture analgesia.

  7. Effects of topical and systemic administration of Eugenia caryophyllata buds essential oil on corneal anesthesia and analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Khalilzadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical studies suggest that essential oil of Eugenia caryophyllata (Clove buds (EOEC is efficacious in the treatment of dental pain. In the present study, we investigated the analgesic and local anesthetic effects of EOEC and its possible mechanisms of action in acute corneal pain in rats. EOEC was extracted by hydro-distillation in a Clevenger type apparatus from clove buds. The acute corneal pain was induced by applying a drop (40 µl of 5 M NaCl solution on the corneal surface, and the numbers of eye wipes were counted during the first 30 s. The mechanical sensation of the cornea was evaluated by calibrated Von Frey filaments. Systemic administration of EOEC (100 and 200 mg/kg, SC and morphine (2.5 and 5 mg/kg, IP produced a significant antinociceptive effect in acute corneal pain. Pretreatment with naloxone or atropine prevented the EOEC-induced analgesia. However, L-arginine and methylene blue did not change the suppressive effect of EOEC on corneal pain response. Topical application of EOEC, eugenol and lidocaine significantly decreased corneal sensitivity. Combination treatments of eugenol (25 µg with lidocaine (0.5% and EOEC (50 µg with lidocaine (0.5% also significantly suppressed corneal sensitivity. Systemic administration of EOEC produced analgesia in the acute corneal pain through mechanisms that involved both opioidergic and cholinergic systems. In addition, topical instillation of EOEC, eugenol, and lidocaine produced local anesthesia in the rat cornea. Sub-anesthetic doses of EOEC or eugenol produced a significant local anesthetic effect when concurrently used with the sub-anesthetic dose of lidocaine.

  8. Effects of topical and systemic administration of Eugenia caryophyllata buds essential oil on corneal anesthesia and analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilzadeh, Emad; Hazrati, Reza; Saiah, Gholamreza Vafaei

    2016-07-01

    Clinical studies suggest that essential oil of Eugenia caryophyllata (Clove) buds (EOEC) is efficacious in the treatment of dental pain. In the present study, we investigated the analgesic and local anesthetic effects of EOEC and its possible mechanisms of action in acute corneal pain in rats. EOEC was extracted by hydro-distillation in a Clevenger type apparatus from clove buds. The acute corneal pain was induced by applying a drop (40 µl) of 5 M NaCl solution on the corneal surface, and the numbers of eye wipes were counted during the first 30 s. The mechanical sensation of the cornea was evaluated by calibrated Von Frey filaments. Systemic administration of EOEC (100 and 200 mg/kg, SC) and morphine (2.5 and 5 mg/kg, IP) produced a significant antinociceptive effect in acute corneal pain. Pretreatment with naloxone or atropine prevented the EOEC-induced analgesia. However, L-arginine and methylene blue did not change the suppressive effect of EOEC on corneal pain response. Topical application of EOEC, eugenol and lidocaine significantly decreased corneal sensitivity. Combination treatments of eugenol (25 µg) with lidocaine (0.5%) and EOEC (50 µg) with lidocaine (0.5%) also significantly suppressed corneal sensitivity. Systemic administration of EOEC produced analgesia in the acute corneal pain through mechanisms that involved both opioidergic and cholinergic systems. In addition, topical instillation of EOEC, eugenol, and lidocaine produced local anesthesia in the rat cornea. Sub-anesthetic doses of EOEC or eugenol produced a significant local anesthetic effect when concurrently used with the sub-anesthetic dose of lidocaine.

  9. Effects of topical and systemic administration of Eugenia caryophyllata buds essential oil on corneal anesthesia and analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilzadeh, Emad; Hazrati, Reza; Saiah, Gholamreza Vafaei

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies suggest that essential oil of Eugenia caryophyllata (Clove) buds (EOEC) is efficacious in the treatment of dental pain. In the present study, we investigated the analgesic and local anesthetic effects of EOEC and its possible mechanisms of action in acute corneal pain in rats. EOEC was extracted by hydro-distillation in a Clevenger type apparatus from clove buds. The acute corneal pain was induced by applying a drop (40 µl) of 5 M NaCl solution on the corneal surface, and the numbers of eye wipes were counted during the first 30 s. The mechanical sensation of the cornea was evaluated by calibrated Von Frey filaments. Systemic administration of EOEC (100 and 200 mg/kg, SC) and morphine (2.5 and 5 mg/kg, IP) produced a significant antinociceptive effect in acute corneal pain. Pretreatment with naloxone or atropine prevented the EOEC-induced analgesia. However, L-arginine and methylene blue did not change the suppressive effect of EOEC on corneal pain response. Topical application of EOEC, eugenol and lidocaine significantly decreased corneal sensitivity. Combination treatments of eugenol (25 µg) with lidocaine (0.5%) and EOEC (50 µg) with lidocaine (0.5%) also significantly suppressed corneal sensitivity. Systemic administration of EOEC produced analgesia in the acute corneal pain through mechanisms that involved both opioidergic and cholinergic systems. In addition, topical instillation of EOEC, eugenol, and lidocaine produced local anesthesia in the rat cornea. Sub-anesthetic doses of EOEC or eugenol produced a significant local anesthetic effect when concurrently used with the sub-anesthetic dose of lidocaine. PMID:27651809

  10. Pharmacokinetic based adjustment of lidocaine antiarrhythmic schedule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voicu, V; Mircioiu, C; Jinga, M; Ionescu, M; Burcea, X; Ionescu, D D; Lupescu, G

    1994-01-01

    Administration of lidocaine, 200 mg/day i.m. or 275 mg orally, decreased sudden death after myocardial infarct (from 20.7% to 10.3%) although such schedules are not considered adequate to guarantee efficient plasma levels. Inclusion of lidocaine in a polyethylene matrix assured a slow release and complete disappearance of known side effects. Lidocaine was administered 200 mg intramuscularly to hospitalized patients every 6 h or 275 mg oral tablets to healthy volunteers every 8 h and plasma levels evaluated. Plasma levels after oral administration to healthy volunteers showed a great variability, so that it was not possible to draw a statistically significant conclusion about the accumulation of lidocaine in a period of 1 week. In coronary artery disease patients, plasma levels slowly increased with time, but clinical signs indicated, in some cases, a much more rapid accumulation. The therapeutic efficiency at low repeated doses was explained as a consequence of a slow accumulation on the one hand and of the addition of the action of MEGX, the major metabolite of lidocaine, on the other hand.

  11. Investigation of Efficacy of Lidocaine Spray for Sedated Esophagogastroduodenoscopy in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basturk, Ahmet; Artan, Reha; Yılmaz, Aygen

    2017-06-01

    Our aim in this study is to investigate efficacy of topical lidocaine spray for sedated esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in children. The endoscopy of children aged between 3-18 years who underwent EGD in our endoscopy unit. Intravenous (IV) midazolam and ketamine were used for sedation. Prior to sedation, endoscopy nurse applied topical lidocaine 10% with pump spray at 1 mg/kg dose in group 1, and distilled water via identically scaled pump spray in group 2, in a double blinded fashion. Sedation was not applied in 24.1% of the cases in topical lidocaine spray group (LS group) and in 5.7% of the cases in distilled water spray group (DS group). Gag reflex was observed in 6.5% of cases in LS group and 33.3% of cases in DS group (p=0.024), increased oral secretion was observed in 9.3% of cases in LS group and 51.7% of cases in DS group (p=0.038), sore throat was observed in 3.7% of cases in LS group and 35.6% of cases in DS group (p=0.019) and the difference was statistically significant. The study showed that topical pharyngeal lidocaine reduces both requirement and amount of IV sedation before EGD in children and sore throat, gag reflex and decreased oral secretion increase.

  12. A Prospective, Comparative Study of the Pain of Local Anesthesia Using 2% Lidocaine, 2% Lidocaine With Epinephrine, and 2% Lidocaine With Epinephrine-Bupivicaine Mixture for Eyelid Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jung-Woo; Nah, Seung Kwan; Lee, Sang Yeul; Kim, Chang Yeom; Yoon, Jin Sook; Jang, Sun Young

    A mixture of 2% lidocaine with epinephrine and bupivacaine was developed to achieve the fast-onset anesthetic effect of lidocaine and the long-lasting effect of bupivacaine. The authors compared pain scores between 2% lidocaine, 2% lidocaine with epinephrine, and 2% lidocaine with epinephrine-bupivicaine mixture during local anesthesia for eyelid surgeries. This was a double-blind, randomized, prospective, comparative study. In total, 120 consecutive patients (43 males, 77 females, mean age = 47.2 ± 21.2) who underwent bilateral eyelid surgery under subcutaneous anesthesia were asked to report pain scores for each eye during the first injection of anesthesia. Each patient was randomly assigned to receive 1 of the 3 anesthetic agents in 1 eyelid, and 1 of the remaining 2 agents in the other. The pH values of the 2% lidocaine, 2% lidocaine with epinephrine, and 2% lidocaine with epinephrine-bupivicaine mixture were 6.23 ± 0.21, 4.21 ± 0.37, and 3.87 ± 0.19, respectively. The pain scores of each were 4.3 ± 1.8, 5.1 ± 1.8, and 5.7 ± 1.9, respectively. The 2% lidocaine with epinephrine produced a statistically significantly higher pain score than 2% lidocaine (p = 0.044, generalized estimating equation method). The mixture also showed a significantly higher pain score than 2% lidocaine (p = 0.003, generalized estimating equation method). Epinephrine seemed to increase subjective pain scores. Compared with 2% lidocaine with epinephrine, 2% lidocaine with epinephrine-bupivicaine mixture was not significantly different in terms of subjective symptoms or pH.

  13. Preemptive analgesia I: physiological pathways and pharmacological modalities.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, D J

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: This two-part review summarizes the current knowledge of physiological mechanisms, pharmacological modalities and controversial issues surrounding preemptive analgesia. SOURCE: Articles from 1966 to present were obtained from the MEDLINE databases. Search terms included: analgesia, preemptive; neurotransmitters; pain, postoperative; hyperalgesia; sensitization, central nervous system; pathways, nociception; anesthetic techniques; analgesics, agents. Principal findings: The physiological basis of preemptive analgesia is complex and involves modification of the pain pathways. The pharmacological modalities available may modify the physiological responses at various levels. Effective preemptive analgesic techniques require multi-modal interception of nociceptive input, increasing threshold for nociception, and blocking or decreasing nociceptor receptor activation. Although the literature is controversial regarding the effectiveness of preemptive analgesia, some general recommendations can be helpful in guiding clinical care. Regional anesthesia induced prior to surgical trauma and continued well into the postoperative period is effective in attenuating peripheral and central sensitization. Pharmacologic agents such as NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) opioids, and NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) - and alpha-2-receptor antagonists, especially when used in combination, act synergistically to decrease postoperative pain. CONCLUSION: The variable patient characteristics and timing of preemptive analgesia in relation to surgical noxious input requires individualization of the technique(s) chosen. Multi-modal analgesic techniques appear most effective.

  14. Influence of anatomic location of lidocaine patch 5% on effectiveness and tolerability for postherpetic neuralgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalamachu S

    2013-06-01

    effective and generally well tolerated for each anatomic area evaluated, although application to the head was tolerated less well compared with the trunk and extremities.Keywords: acute herpes zoster, analgesia, efficacy, lidocaine, postherpetic neuralgia, topical therapies

  15. Lidocaine block of cardiac sodium channels

    OpenAIRE

    Bean, BP; Cohen, CJ; Tsien, RW

    1983-01-01

    Lidocaine block of cardiac sodium channels was studied in voltage-clamped rabbit purkinje fibers at drug concentrations ranging from 1 mM down to effective antiarrhythmic doses (5-20 μM). Dose-response curves indicated that lidocaine blocks the channel by binding one-to-one, with a voltage-dependent K(d). The half-blocking concentration varied from more than 300 μM, at a negative holding potential where inactivation was completely removed, to approximately 10 μM, at a depolarized holding pote...

  16. Articaine and lidocaine for maxillary infiltration anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vähätalo, K.; Antila, H.; Lehtinen, R.

    1993-01-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the anesthetic properties of articaine hydrochloride with 1:200,000 epinephrine (Ultracain DS) and lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine (Xylocain-Adrenalin) for maxillary infiltration anesthesia. Twenty healthy dental student volunteers were included in this double-blind study. Each subject received 0.6 mL of each test solution at different times. Infiltration anesthesia was performed on the upper lateral incisor. The onset and duration of anesthesia were monitored using an electric pulp tester. No statistically significant differences were seen in the onset and duration of anesthesia between the articaine and lidocaine solutions. PMID:7943919

  17. Popularizing labor analgesia in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zi Tian; Gao, Xue Lian; Yang, Hui Xia

    2007-09-01

    In China many women in labor are young primigravidas whose fear of labor pain leads them to request cesarean deliveries. While the rate of cesarean deliveries has reached 50% in many hospitals, less than 1% of women in labor are given neuraxial analgesia. The necessary equipment is seldom available in China and many physicians have misconceptions about the risks associated with neuraxial analgesia, which are low with the ultra-low-dosages used today. However, attitudes have begun to change. Meetings held in China have brought together Chinese physicians and world experts on the various epidural and combined spinal-epidural techniques. Thanks to the information and support provided at these meetings clinical trials were carried out, more than 5000 women benefited from labor analgesia, and publications appeared in Chinese journals. An effective, safe, and cost-effective way to provide analgesia to women in labor may slow the increase in cesarean delivery rates across China and improve women's health in general.

  18. [Intravenous remifentanyl for labor analgesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, D; Serrano, M L; Corral, E M; García del Valle, S

    2009-04-01

    Intravenous remifentanil may be the preferred analgesic when regional techniques are contraindicated. To perform a systematic review on the use of remifentanil for analgesia in labor. We searched MEDLINE (January 1995-August 2007) for studies on obstetric analgesia with remifentanil. We found 32 references representing the use of remifentanil in 257 women in labor. In most cases, patients reported relief of pain and a high level of satisfaction, with no severe side effects in mothers or neonates. When compared with meperidine and nitrous oxide in clinical trials, remifentanil provided better analgesia with fewer adverse effects. Analgesia with intravenous remifentanil is more effective and safer than other alternatives to regional analgesic techniques in obstetrics. Nevertheless, the optimum system for infusing the drug must b e established and further studies of maternal and fetal safety should be carried out.

  19. Electroencephalographic Changes Associated with Antinociceptive Actions of Lidocaine, Ketamine, Meloxicam, and Morphine Administration in Minimally Anaesthetized Dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubedullah Kaka

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of ketamine and lidocaine on electroencephalographic (EEG changes were evaluated in minimally anaesthetized dogs, subjected to electric stimulus. Six dogs were subjected to six treatments in a crossover design with a washout period of one week. Dogs were subjected to intravenous boluses of lidocaine 2 mg/kg, ketamine 3 mg/kg, meloxicam 0.2 mg/kg, morphine 0.2 mg/kg and loading doses of lidocaine 2 mg/kg followed by continuous rate infusion (CRI of 50 and 100 mcg/kg/min, and ketamine 3 mg/kg followed by CRI of 10 and 50 mcg/kg/min. Electroencephalogram was recorded during electrical stimulation prior to any drug treatment (before treatment and during electrical stimulation following treatment with the drugs (after treatment under anaesthesia. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with halothane at a stable concentration between 0.85 and 0.95%. Pretreatment median frequency was evidently increased (P<0.05 for all treatment groups. Lidocaine, ketamine, and morphine depressed the median frequency resulting from the posttreatment stimulation. The depression of median frequency suggested evident antinociceptive effects of these treatments in dogs. It is therefore concluded that lidocaine and ketamine can be used in the analgesic protocol for the postoperative pain management in dogs.

  20. COMPARISON OF PATIENT CONTROLLED EPIDURAL ANALGESIA WITH CONTINUOUS EPIDURAL INFUSION FOR LABOUR ANALGESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumaiah Tahseen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a study to compare the efficacy and safety of Patient Controlled Epidural Analgesia (PCEA with that of Continuous Infusion of Epidural Analgesia (CIEA for maintenance of labour analgesia and evaluated the quality of analgesia and obstetric and safety outcomes. METHODS The study was a hospital-based prospective, randomised control trial on 80 parturients who had a normal antenatal period. Each parturient received 500-1000 mL lactated ringer solution Intravenously (IV prior to initiating epidural blockade. Epidural catheter placement was performed in a standard manner and all patients received an initial dose of 8-10 mL bupivacaine 0.25%. Parturients self-administered 0.125% bupivacaine with fentanyl 2.5 µg/mL using PCA pumps programmed as follows: 4 mL bolus with a 20 mins Lockout Interval (LI. Group B received CIEA of 8 mL 0.125% bupivacaine with fentanyl 2.5/mL. Hourly assessments included: VAS scores for pain and satisfaction, sensory and motor block, analgesic supplements, bupivacaine and fentanyl consumption. RESULTS Data from 80 patients showed no differences among groups in pain relief. Maternal satisfaction was greater in PCEA group. Anaesthetic interventions by way of supplemental doses of Bupivacaine and Fentanyl in the PCEA group were minimal (4 and 2 vs 25 and 12 P <0.001 compared to CEI group. PCEA group received less local anaesthetic (5.2 vs 9.4 p <0.001 and few patients in PCEA group had motor weakness compared to CEI group (6 vs 17 p <0.05. Both methods were safe for mother and newborn. CONCLUSION Patients who received PCEA required less anaesthetic interventions, required lower doses of local anaesthetic, fentanyl and have less motor weakness than those who received CEI.

  1. Similar Motor Block Effects and Disposition Kinetics between Lidocaine and (±Mepivacaine in Patients Undergoing Axillary Brachial Plexus Block during Day Case Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. M. Simon

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation was to compare the clinical effects and pharmacokinetics of lidocaine (one metabolite and mepivacaine (two metabolites in 2 groups of 15 patients undergoing axillary brachial plexus anaesthesia. The study had a randomised design. The 30 patients were divided into 2 groups. The patients received either lidocaine (600 mg = 2.561 mMol + 5 μg ml-1 adrenaline or mepivacaine (600 mg = 2.436 mMol + 5 μg ml-1 adrenaline, injected via the axilla near the brachial plexus over a period of 30 s. Onset of surgical analgesia was defined as the period from the end of the local anaesthetic injection to the loss of pinprick sensation in the distribution of the ulnar, radial, and median nerve. Motor block was measured. Onset of motor block was similar for both drugs. Lidocaine is eliminated biexponentially with a t1/2α of 9.95 ± 14.3 min and a t1/2β of 2.86 α 1.55 h. Lidocaine is metabolised into MEGX (tmax 2.31 α 0.84 h; Cmax 0.32 α 0.13 mg l-1; t1/2β 2.36 α 2.35 h; total body clearance was 67.9 α 28.9 l h-1.

  2. Lidocaine toxicity in primary afferent neurons from the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, M S; Reichling, D B; Hampl, K F; Drasner, K; Levine, J D

    1998-05-01

    Evidence from both clinical studies and animal models suggests that the local anesthetic, lidocaine, is neurotoxic. However, the mechanism of lidocaine-induced toxicity is unknown. To test the hypothesis that toxicity results from a direct action of lidocaine on sensory neurons we performed in vitro histological, electrophysiological and fluorometrical experiments on isolated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from the adult rat. We observed lidocaine-induced neuronal death after a 4-min exposure of DRG neurons to lidocaine concentrations as low as 30 mM. Consistent with an excitotoxic mechanism of neurotoxicity, lidocaine depolarized DRG neurons at concentrations that induced cell death (EC50 = 14 mM). This depolarization occurred even though voltage-gated sodium currents and action potentials were blocked effectively at much lower concentrations. (EC50 values for lidocaine-induced block of tetrodotoxin-sensitive and -resistant voltage-gated sodium currents were 41 and 101 microM, respectively.) At concentrations similar to those that induced neurotoxicity and depolarization, lidocaine also induced an increase in the concentration of intracellular Ca++ ions ([Ca++]i; EC50 = 21 mM) via Ca++ influx through the plasma membrane as well as release of Ca++ from intracellular stores. Finally, lidocaine-induced neurotoxicity was attenuated significantly when lidocaine was applied in the presence of nominally Ca(++)-free bath solution to DRG neurons preloaded with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA). Our results indicate: 1) that lidocaine is neurotoxic to sensory neurons; 2) that toxicity results from a direct action on sensory neurons; and 3) that a lidocaine-induced increase in intracellular Ca++ is a mechanism of lidocaine-induced neuronal toxicity.

  3. Effect on postoperative sore throat of spraying the endotracheal tube cuff with benzydamine hydrochloride, 10% lidocaine, and 2% lidocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Nan-Kai; Wu, Ching-Tang; Chan, Shun-Ming; Lu, Chueng-He; Huang, Yuan-Shiou; Yeh, Chun-Chang; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Cherng, Chen-Hwan

    2010-10-01

    Postoperative sore throat (POST) is a common complication after endotracheal intubation. We compared the effectiveness on POST of spraying the endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff with benzydamine hydrochloride, 10% lidocaine, and 2% lidocaine. Three hundred seventy-two patients were randomly allocated into 4 groups. The ETT cuffs in each group were sprayed with benzydamine hydrochloride, 10% lidocaine hydrochloride, 2% lidocaine hydrochloride, or normal saline before endotracheal intubation. After insertion, the cuffs were inflated to an airway leak pressure of 20 cm H(2)O. Anesthesia was maintained with propofol. The patients were examined for sore throat (none, mild, moderate, or severe) at 1, 6, 12, and 24 hours after extubation. The highest incidence of POST occurred at 6 hours after extubation in all groups. There was a significantly lower incidence of POST in the benzydamine group than 10% lidocaine, 2% lidocaine, and normal saline groups (P benzydamine group (17.0%) compared with 10% lidocaine (53.7%), 2% lidocaine (37.0%), and normal saline (40.8%) groups (P benzydamine group had significantly decreased severity of POST compared with the 10% lidocaine, 2% lidocaine, and normal saline groups (P benzydamine hydrochloride on the ETT cuff is a simple and effective method to reduce the incidence and severity of POST.

  4. Effect of a single dose of lidocaine and ketamine on intraoperative opioids requirements in patients undergoing elective gynecological laparotomies under general anesthesia. A randomized, placebo controlled pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jusset Teresa García-Navia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and goal of study: there is evidence that perioperative intravenous ketamine and lidocaine reduce postoperative pain, postoperative opioids consumption, shortens hospital stay and accelerates intestinal function recovery. However, it has not been studied the beneficial effects in the intraoperative period. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a single dose of lidocaine and ketamine on intraoperative opioids requirements in patients undergoing elective gynecological laparotomies under general anesthesia. Materials and methods: we performed a single-centre, prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. We included 33 patients (11 in the ketamine group, 11 in the lidocaine group and 11 in the placebo group. Postoperative analgesia was accomplished by patient-controlled morphine. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either a 1.5 mg/kg of 2% lidocaine, 0.5 mg/kg of 5% ketamine or 0.9% saline bolus. The primary outcome was the opioids consumption during surgery. The secondary outcomes included: emergence time, pain scores, opioids consumption within 24 h after surgery and side effects. Results: decreased intraoperative opioids requirements were noted in the experimental groups (ketamine: 402.3 } 106.3 and lidocaine: 397.7 } 107.5, compared with saline: 561.4 } 97.1; p = 0.001. We found a positive correlation between intraoperative opioids consumption and emergence time (r = 0.864, p < 0.001. There was no significant difference between the groups in VAS pain scores at rest within the first 24 postoperative hours. Total morphine consumption within 24 h after surgery did not differ significantly among the groups (placebo: 27.54 } 11.75; ketamine: 30.95 } 7.88; lidocaine 34.77 } 10.25; p = 0.26. Postoperative nausea and vomiting were more common in placebo group (it was observed in 3 subjects in ketamine group, in 5 subjects in lidocaine group and in 9 subjects in placebo group; p = 0

  5. Treatment of localized neuropathic pain of different etiologies with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster - a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likar, Rudolf; Demschar, Susanne; Kager, Ingo; Neuwersch, Stefan; Pipam, Wolfgang; Sittl, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of the topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in the treatment of localized neuropathic pain. This was a case series at an Austrian pain clinic, using retrospective analysis. Data of 27 patients treated for localized neuropathic pain with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster were retrospectively analyzed. Assessment included changes in overall pain intensity, in intensity of different pain qualities, and of hyperalgesia and allodynia, and changes in sleep quality. Patients (17 female, ten male; mean age 53.4±11.4 years) presented mainly with dorsalgia (16 patients) or postoperative/posttraumatic pain (seven patients); one patient suffered from both. The mean overall pain intensity prior to treatment with lidocaine medicated plaster was 8.4±1.2 on the 11-point Likert scale. In the majority of cases, the lidocaine plaster was applied concomitantly with preexisting pain medication (81.5% of the patients). During the 6-month observation period, overall mean pain intensity was reduced by almost 5 points (4.98) to 3.5±2.6. Substantial reductions were also observed for neuralgiform pain (5 points from 7.9±2.6 at baseline) and burning pain (3 points from 5.2±4.1). Sleep quality improved from 4.6±2.6 at baseline to 5.5±1.8. Stratification by pain diagnosis showed marked improvements in overall pain intensity for patients with dorsalgia or postoperative/posttraumatic pain. The lidocaine plaster was well tolerated. Overall, topical treatment with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster was associated with effective pain relief and was well tolerated.

  6. Treatment of localized neuropathic pain of different etiologies with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster – a case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likar, Rudolf; Demschar, Susanne; Kager, Ingo; Neuwersch, Stefan; Pipam, Wolfgang; Sittl, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the efficacy and safety of the topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in the treatment of localized neuropathic pain. Study design This was a case series at an Austrian pain clinic, using retrospective analysis. Patients and methods Data of 27 patients treated for localized neuropathic pain with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster were retrospectively analyzed. Assessment included changes in overall pain intensity, in intensity of different pain qualities, and of hyperalgesia and allodynia, and changes in sleep quality. Results Patients (17 female, ten male; mean age 53.4±11.4 years) presented mainly with dorsalgia (16 patients) or postoperative/posttraumatic pain (seven patients); one patient suffered from both. The mean overall pain intensity prior to treatment with lidocaine medicated plaster was 8.4±1.2 on the 11-point Likert scale. In the majority of cases, the lidocaine plaster was applied concomitantly with preexisting pain medication (81.5% of the patients). During the 6-month observation period, overall mean pain intensity was reduced by almost 5 points (4.98) to 3.5±2.6. Substantial reductions were also observed for neuralgiform pain (5 points from 7.9±2.6 at baseline) and burning pain (3 points from 5.2±4.1). Sleep quality improved from 4.6±2.6 at baseline to 5.5±1.8. Stratification by pain diagnosis showed marked improvements in overall pain intensity for patients with dorsalgia or postoperative/posttraumatic pain. The lidocaine plaster was well tolerated. Conclusion Overall, topical treatment with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster was associated with effective pain relief and was well tolerated. PMID:25565882

  7. Intrathecal lidocaine pretreatment attenuates immediate neuropathic pain by modulating Nav1.3 expression and decreasing spinal microglial activation

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    Wang Hung-Chen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intrathecal lidocaine reverses tactile allodynia after nerve injury, but whether neuropathic pain is attenuated by intrathecal lidocaine pretreatment is uncertain. Methods Sixty six adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three treatment groups: (1 sham (Group S, which underwent removal of the L6 transverse process; (2 ligated (Group L, which underwent left L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL; and (3 pretreated (Group P, which underwent L5 SNL and was pretreated with intrathecal 2% lidocaine (50 μl. Neuropathic pain was assessed based on behavioral responses to thermal and mechanical stimuli. Expression of sodium channels (Nav1.3 and Nav1.8 in injured dorsal root ganglia and microglial proliferation/activation in the spinal cord were measured on post-operative days 3 (POD3 and 7 (POD7. Results Group L presented abnormal behavioral responses indicative of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, exhibited up-regulation of Nav1.3 and down-regulation of Nav1.8, and showed increased microglial activation. Compared with ligation only, pretreatment with intrathecal lidocaine before nerve injury (Group P, as measured on POD3, palliated both mechanical allodynia (p p 1.3 up-regulation (p = 0.003, and mitigated spinal microglial activation (p = 0.026 by inhibiting phosphorylation (activation of p38 MAP kinase (p = 0.034. p38 activation was also suppressed on POD7 (p = 0.002. Conclusions Intrathecal lidocaine prior to SNL blunts the response to noxious stimuli by attenuating Nav1.3 up-regulation and suppressing activation of spinal microglia. Although its effects are limited to 3 days, intrathecal lidocaine pretreatment can alleviate acute SNL-induced neuropathic pain.

  8. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of 2% lidocaine HCl with different epinephrine concentration for local anesthesia in participants undergoing surgical extraction of impacted mandibular third molars: A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, crossover, phase IV trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karm, Myong-Hwan; Park, Fiona Daye; Kang, Moonkyu; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Kang, Jeong Wan; Kim, Seungoh; Kim, Yong-Deok; Kim, Cheul-Hong; Seo, Kwang-Suk; Kwon, Kyung-Hwan; Kim, Chul-Hwan; Lee, Jung-Woo; Hong, Sung-Woon; Lim, Mi Hyoung; Nam, Seung Kwan; Cho, Jae Min

    2017-05-01

    The most commonly impacted tooth is the third molar. An impacted third molar can ultimately cause acute pain, infection, tumors, cysts, caries, periodontal disease, and loss of adjacent teeth. Local anesthesia is employed for removing the third molar. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 or 1:200,000 epinephrine for surgical extraction of bilateral impacted mandibular third molars. Sixty-five healthy participants underwent surgical extraction of bilateral impacted mandibular third molars in 2 separate visits while under local anesthesia with 2% lidocaine with different epinephrine concentration (1:80,000 or 1:200,000) in a double-blind, randomized, crossover trial. Visual analog scale pain scores obtained immediately after surgical extraction were primarily evaluated for the 2 groups receiving different epinephrine concentrations. Visual analog scale pain scores were obtained 2, 4, and 6 hours after administering an anesthetic. Onset and duration of analgesia, onset of pain, intraoperative bleeding, operator's and participant's overall satisfaction, drug dosage, and hemodynamic parameters were evaluated for the 2 groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the 2 groups in any measurements except hemodynamic factors (P >.05). Changes in systolic blood pressure and heart rate following anesthetic administration were significantly greater in the group receiving 1:80,000 epinephrine than in that receiving 1:200,000 epinephrine (P ≤.01). The difference in epinephrine concentration between 1:80,000 and 1:200,000 in 2% lidocaine liquid does not affect the medical efficacy of the anesthetic. Furthermore, 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine has better safety with regard to hemodynamic parameters than 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine. Therefore, we suggest using 2% lidocaine with 1:200,000 epinephrine rather than 2% lidocaine with 1:80,000 epinephrine for surgical extraction of impacted

  9. Lidocaine for preventing postoperative sore throat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuu; Nakayama, Takeo; Nishimori, Mina; Tsujimura, Yuka; Kawaguchi, Masahiko; Sato, Yuki

    2015-07-14

    Sore throat is a common side-effect of general anaesthesia and is reported by between 30% and 70% of patients after tracheal intubation. The likelihood of a sore throat varies with the type, diameter, and cuff pressure of the endotracheal tube used. If intubation is essential, it may be helpful to give drugs prophylactically to alleviate postoperative sore throat. Local anaesthetics and steroids have been used for this purpose. This review was originally published in 2009 and was updated in 2015. The objective of this review was to evaluate the efficacy and any harm caused by topical and systemic lidocaine used prophylactically to prevent postoperative sore throat in adults undergoing general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation. We searched CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 9), MEDLINE (January 1966 to October 2013), and EMBASE (1980 to October 2013). We also contacted manufacturers and researchers in the field. The original search was undertaken in June 2007. We reran the search in February 2015 and found four studies of interest. We will deal with those studies when we next update the review. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of topical and systemic prophylactic lidocaine therapy versus control (using air or saline) that reported on the risk and severity of postoperative sore throat as an outcome. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information, such as the risk of any adverse effects. We included 19 studies involving 1940 participants in this updated review. Of those 1940 participants, 952 received topical or systemic lidocaine therapy and 795 were allocated to the control groups. Topical and systemic lidocaine therapy appeared to reduce the risk of postoperative sore throat (16 studies, 1774 participants, risk ratio (RR) was 0.64 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48 to 0.85), the quality of the evidence was low), although when only high-quality trials were

  10. Nanoethosomes for Dermal Delivery of Lidocaine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaie, Soraya; Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Davaran, Soodabeh; Kouhsoltani, Maryam; Hamishehkar, Hamed

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: It is necessary for local anesthetics to pass through the stratum corneum to provide rapid pain relief. Many techniques have been reported to enhance intradermal penetration of local anesthetics such as vesicular lipid carriers. Ethosomes are lipid vesicles containing phospholipids, ethanol at relatively high concentration. We hypothesized that synergistic effects of phospholipids and high concentration of ethanol in formulation could accelerate penetration of nanoethosomes in deep layers of skin. Methods: Lidocaine-loaded nanoethosomes were prepared and characterized by size and zeta analyzer, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Furthermore, encapsulation efficiency (EE), loading capacity (LC), and skin penetration capability were evaluated by in vitro and in vivo experiments. Results: results showed that the particle size, zeta potential, EE and LC of optimum formulation were 105.4 ± 7.9 nm, -33.6 ± 2.4 mV, 40.14 ± 2.5 %, and 8.02 ± 0.71 respectively. SEM results confirmed the non-aggregated nano-scale size of prepared nanoethosomes. Particle size of ethosomes and EE of Lidocaine were depended on the phospholipid and ethanol concentrations. XRD results demonstrated the drug encapsulation in amorphous status interpreting the achieved high drug EE and LC values. In vitro and in vivo assays confirmed the appropriate skin penetration of Lidocaine with the aid of nanoethosomes and existence of deposition of nanoethosomes in deep skin layers, respectively. Conclusion: The developed nanoethosomes are proposed as a suitable carrier for topical delivery of anesthetics such as Lidocaine. PMID:26819928

  11. Evaluation of Analgesic Effect of Caudal Epidural Tramadol, Tramadol-Lidocaine, and Lidocaine in Water Buffalo Calves (Bubalus bubalis)

    OpenAIRE

    Ayman Atiba; Alaa Ghazy; Naglaa Gomaa; Tarek Kamal; Mustafa Shukry

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to compare the analgesic effect of tramadol and a combination of tramadol-lidocaine with that produced by lidocaine administration in the epidural space in buffalo calves. In a prospective randomized crossover study, ten male buffalo calves were used to compare the epidural analgesic effect of tramadol (1 mg/kg) and tramadol-lidocaine combination (0.5 mg/kg and 0.11 mg/kg, resp.) with that produced by 2% lidocaine (0.22 mg/kg). Loss of sensation was examined by pin-prick...

  12. Procainamide and lidocaine produce dissimilar changes in ventricular repolarization and arrhythmogenicity in guinea-pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchii, Oleg E

    2014-08-01

    Procainamide is class Ia Na(+) channel blocker that may prolong ventricular repolarization secondary to inhibition of IK r , the rapid component of the delayed rectifier K(+) current. In contrast to selective IN a blockers such as lidocaine, procainamide was shown to produce arrhythmogenic effects in the clinical setting. This study examined whether pro-arrhythmic responses to procainamide may be accounted for by drug-induced repolarization abnormalities including impaired electrical restitution kinetics, spatial gradients in action potential duration (APD), and activation-to-repolarization coupling. In perfused guinea-pig hearts, procainamide was found to prolong the QT interval on ECG and left ventricular (LV) epicardial monophasic APD, increased the maximum slope of electrical restitution, enhanced transepicardial APD variability, and eliminated the inverse correlation between the local APD and activation time values determined at distinct epicardial recording sites prior to drug infusion. In contrast, lidocaine had no effect on electrical restitution, the degree of transepicardial repolarization heterogeneities, and activation-to-repolarization coupling. Spontaneous episodes of monomorphic ventricular tachycardia were observed in 57% of procainamide-treated heart preparations. No arrhythmia was induced by lidocaine. In summary, this study suggests that abnormal changes in repolarization may contribute to pro-arrhythmic effects of procainamide.

  13. [Use of intrarectal lidocaine gel in ultrasound-guided transrectal biopsies of the prostate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Mediero, J M; Martínez-Piñeiro Lorenzo, L; Núñez Mora, C; de Fata Chillón, F Ramón; Cruz Jimeno, J L; Alonso y Gregorio, S; de la Peña Barthel, J J

    2003-01-01

    To know in a quantitative manner the degree of discomfort and pain of the biopsies of the prostate and to evaluate the effectiveness of the transrectal lidocaine. We performed 140 transrectal biopsies of the prostate, Patients were included on a random basis into two arms: one of them received intrarectal lidocaine, 20 mg (group 1, n = 71) and the other group received placebo (group 2, n = 28) both of them ten minutes prior the proceeding. The global pain mean was 3.7 (0 no pain, 10 highest pain) and the global discomfort mean was 3.5. The group 1 patients showed a trend to feel less pain and discomfort although it did not reach the necessary statistic significance (p = 0.7 y p = 0.5 respectively). We do not achieve the good results obtained by other groups in order to decrease the degree of pain and discomfort with the use of intrarectal lidocaine. We did not find relationship between the PSA level, previous biopsies, intrarectal lidocaina and degree of information received and the degree of pain and discomfort.

  14. 21 CFR 522.810 - Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution. 522.810 Section 522.810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.810 Embutramide, chloroquine, and lidocaine solution. (a) Specifications....

  15. Preparation and characterization of lidocaine rice gel for oral application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okonogi, Siriporn; Kaewpinta, Adchareeya; Yotsawimonwat, Songwut; Khongkhunthian, Sakornrat

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the present study was to prepare buccal anesthetic gels using rice as gelling agent. Rice grains of four rice varieties, Jasmine (JM), Saohai (SH), Homnil (HN), and Doisket (DS) were chemically modified. Buccal rice gels, containing lidocaine hydrochloride as local anesthetic drug were formulated using the respective modified rice varieties. The gels were evaluated for outer appearance, pH, color, gel strength, foaming property, adhesion, in vitro drug release and in vivo efficacy. It was found that the developed rice gels possessed good texture. Rice varieties showed influence on gel strength, color, turbidity, adhesive property, release property, and anesthetic efficacy. JM gel showed the lowest turbidity with light transmission of 86.76 ± 1.18% whereas SH gel showed the highest gel strength of 208.78 ± 10.42 g/cm(2). Lidocaine hydrochloride can cause a decrease in pH and adhesive property but an increase in turbidity of the gels. In vitro drug release profile within 60 min of lidocaine SH gel and lidocaine HN gel showed that lidocaine could be better released from SH gel. Evaluation of in vivo anesthetic efficacy in 100 normal volunteers indicates that both lidocaine rice gels have high efficacy but different levels. Lidocaine SH gel possesses faster onset of duration and longer duration of action than lidocaine HN gel.

  16. Lidocaine Metabolism and Toxicity: A Laboratory Experiment for Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusek, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    A laboratory exercise for dental students is presented using a toxic dose of lidocaine in place of an anesthetic dose of pentobarbital. The use of lidocaine demonstrates its toxic and lethal actions and increases the relevance of the experience for dental students. (Author/MLW)

  17. 21 CFR 862.3555 - Lidocaine test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... lidocaine, an antiarrythmic and anticonvulsant drug, in serum and plasma. Measurements obtained by this... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lidocaine test system. 862.3555 Section 862.3555 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED...

  18. The Use of Topical Lidocaine Gel During Intermaxillary Fixation Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yeon Jin; Kim, Ho Jun; Kwon, Ho; Shim, Hyung-Sup; Seo, Bommie Florence; Jung, Sung-No

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to validate the usefulness of lidocaine gel during intermaxillary fixation using arch bars in patients with mandible fracture by comparing 2 patient groups: one group using lidocaine gel in intermaxillary fixation and the other group undergoing traditional local infiltration.Subjects were patients with mandible fracture undergoing intermaxillary fixation using arch bars from March 2003 to February 2007. Twenty-three patients were anesthetized in the upper and lower gingiva by 2% local lidocaine solution injection; another 23 underwent topical anesthesia with 2% lidocaine hydrochloride gel applied to the upper and lower gingiva. The convenience of fixation was measured in terms of operation time and degree of pain according to the visual analog scale; arch bar loosening rate was assessed postoperatively.The mean operation times were 63 and 47 minutes in the groups undergoing local infiltration and using topical lidocaine gel, respectively. For pain degree according to the visual analog scale, the mean scores were 6.4 and 3.2 in the groups using local infiltration and topical lidocaine gel, respectively. When the arch bar loosening rate was measured postoperatively, the 2 groups differed significantly, with a rate of 26% in the group using local infiltration and 13% in the group using topical lidocaine gel.Application of topical lidocaine gel during intermaxillary fixation using arch bars in patients with mandible fracture relieves pain and offers convenience in performing the procedure. It can be a useful alternative method for patients who are sensitive to pain or have needle phobia.

  19. Methemoglobin levels in generally anesthetized pediatric dental patients receiving prilocaine versus lidocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutenberg, Lauren L; Chen, Jung-Wei; Trapp, Larry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure and compare peak methemoglobin levels and times to peak methemoglobin levels following the use of prilocaine and lidocaine in precooperative children undergoing comprehensive dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia. Ninety children, 3-6 years of age, undergoing dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia were enrolled and randomly assigned into 3 equal groups: group 1, 4% prilocaine plain, 5 mg/kg; group 2, 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine, 2.5 mg/kg; and group 3, no local anesthetic. Subjects in groups 1 and 2 were administered local anesthetic prior to restorative dental treatment. Methemoglobin levels (SpMET) were measured and recorded throughout the procedure using a Masimo Radical-7 Pulse Co-Oximeter (Masimo Corporation, Irvine, Calif, RDS-1 with SET software with methemoglobin interface). Data were analyzed using chi-square, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and Pearson correlation (significance of P < .05). Group 1 had a significantly higher mean peak SpMET level at 3.55% than groups 2 and 3 at 1.63 and 1.60%, respectively. The mean time to peak SpMET was significantly shorter for group 3 at 29.50 minutes than that of group 1 at 62.73 and group 2 at 57.50 minutes. Prilocaine, at 5 mg/kg in pediatric dental patients, resulted in significantly higher peak SpMET levels than lidocaine and no local anesthetic. In comparison to no local anesthetic, the administration of prilocaine and lidocaine caused peak SpMET levels to occur significantly later in the procedure.

  20. Can treatment success with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster be predicted in cancer pain with neuropathic components or trigeminal neuropathic pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Kai-Uwe; Nalamachu, Srinivas; Brasseur, Louis; Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2013-01-01

    An expert group of 40 pain specialists from 16 countries performed a first assessment of the value of predictors for treatment success with 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster in the management of cancer pain with neuropathic components and trigeminal neuropathic pain. Results were based on the retrospective analysis of 68 case reports (sent in by participants in the 4 weeks prior to the conference) and the practical experience of the experts. Lidocaine plaster treatment was mostly successful for surgery or chemotherapy-related cancer pain with neuropathic components. A dose reduction of systemic pain treatment was observed in at least 50% of all cancer pain patients using the plaster as adjunct treatment; the presence of allodynia, hyperalgesia or pain quality provided a potential but not definitively clear indication of treatment success. In trigeminal neuropathic pain, continuous pain, severe allodynia, hyperalgesia, or postherpetic neuralgia or trauma as the cause of orofacial neuropathic pain were perceived as potential predictors of treatment success with lidocaine plaster. In conclusion, these findings provide a first assessment of the likelihood of treatment benefits with 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster in the management of cancer pain with neuropathic components and trigeminal neuropathic pain and support conducting large, well-designed multicenter studies.

  1. Can treatment success with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster be predicted in cancer pain with neuropathic components or trigeminal neuropathic pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Kai-Uwe; Nalamachu, Srinivas; Brasseur, Louis; Zakrzewska, Joanna M

    2013-01-01

    An expert group of 40 pain specialists from 16 countries performed a first assessment of the value of predictors for treatment success with 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster in the management of cancer pain with neuropathic components and trigeminal neuropathic pain. Results were based on the retrospective analysis of 68 case reports (sent in by participants in the 4 weeks prior to the conference) and the practical experience of the experts. Lidocaine plaster treatment was mostly successful for surgery or chemotherapy-related cancer pain with neuropathic components. A dose reduction of systemic pain treatment was observed in at least 50% of all cancer pain patients using the plaster as adjunct treatment; the presence of allodynia, hyperalgesia or pain quality provided a potential but not definitively clear indication of treatment success. In trigeminal neuropathic pain, continuous pain, severe allodynia, hyperalgesia, or postherpetic neuralgia or trauma as the cause of orofacial neuropathic pain were perceived as potential predictors of treatment success with lidocaine plaster. In conclusion, these findings provide a first assessment of the likelihood of treatment benefits with 5% lidocaine-medicated plaster in the management of cancer pain with neuropathic components and trigeminal neuropathic pain and support conducting large, well-designed multicenter studies. PMID:23630431

  2. Monitoring Lidocaine Single-Crystal Dissolution by Ultraviolet Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, Jesper; Ye, Fengbin; Rantanen, Jukka

    2011-01-01

    Dissolution critically affects the bioavailability of Biopharmaceutics Classification System class 2 compounds. When unexpected dissolution behaviour occurs, detailed studies using high information content technologies are warranted. In the present study, an evaluation of real‐time ultraviolet (UV......) imaging for conducting single‐crystal dissolution studies was performed. Using lidocaine as a model compound, the aim was to develop a setup capable of monitoring and quantifying the dissolution of lidocaine into a phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, under stagnant conditions. A single crystal of lidocaine...... was placed in the quartz dissolution cell and UV imaging was performed at 254 nm. Spatially and temporally resolved mapping of lidocaine concentration during the dissolution process was achieved from the recorded images. UV imaging facilitated the monitoring of lidocaine concentrations in the dissolution...

  3. Effect of labor analgesia on labor outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Stephen H; Abdallah, Faraj W

    2010-06-01

    Labor is among the most painful experiences that humans encounter. Neuraxial analgesia is the most effective means of treating this pain. In this review, we discussed the effect of neuraxial analgesia on the progress of labor when compared with parenteral opioids. We then compared initiation of analgesia with a combined spinal-epidural technique (CSE) to conventional epidural analgesia. Finally we discussed the impact of neuraxial analgesia, given early in labor, compared with later administration. Compared with parenteral opioids, neuraxial analgesia does not increase the incidence of cesarean section, although it is associated with a longer (approximately 16 min) second stage of labor. The incidence of operative vaginal delivery is higher in the epidural group but this may be due to indirect reasons such as changes in physician behavior. There was no difference in labor outcome when CSE was compared with low-concentration epidural analgesia, but higher concentrations may prolong labor. Early administration of neuraxial analgesia does not increase the incidence of operative delivery or prolong labor. Neuraxial analgesia does not interfere with the progress or outcome of labor. There is no need to withhold neuraxial analgesia until the active stage of labor.

  4. The influence of Lidocaine temperature on pain during subcutaneous injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundbom, Janne S; Tangen, Lena F; Wågø, Kathrine J; Skarsvåg, Trine I; Ballo, Solveig; Hjelseng, Tonje; Foss, Olav A; Finsen, Vilhjalmur

    2017-04-01

    Injection of local anaesthetics is an uncomfortable procedure. The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of lidocaine temperature on pain during subcutaneous injection. A randomised, double blind trial with 36 healthy volunteers was performed. Each subject received three injections of 4.5 ml 1% lidocaine subcutaneously on the abdomen; refrigerated (8 °C), at room temperature (21 °C), and warmed to body temperature (37 °C). By giving every subject injections of all three temperatures they served as their own controls. The participants were asked to evaluate the pain felt during the injection by placing a pencil mark on a 100 mm Visual Analogue Scale without intermediate markings immediately after every injection. They were told that the scale ranged from no pain to worst imaginable pain (0 = best; 100 = worst). Retrospectively the participants did a verbal assessment of the most and least painful injection. The median VAS score for the heated lidocaine was 16 (range =11-28), lidocaine at room temperature 25 (13-40) and for the cold 24 (11-35). The VAS scores for the heated lidocaine was significantly lower than for lidocaine at room temperature (p = 0.004). Also, the verbal assessment of heated lidocaine being less painful than the injection at room temperature was statistically significant (p = 0.015). Injection with lidocaine heated to around body temperature was less painful than injection with lidocaine at room temperature. There was no statistically significant difference in verbal assessment or VAS scores between the cold lidocaine and that at room temperature.

  5. Isobolographic analysis of caramiphen and lidocaine on spinal anesthesia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Chu, Chin-Chen; Chen, Yu-Chung; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Hung, Ching-Hsia

    2010-01-18

    The aims of the study were to evaluate the spinal anesthetic effect of caramiphen and also assess spinal anesthetic interactions of caramiphen with lidocaine. Lidocaine, a common local anesthetic, was used as control. Dose-dependent responses of intrathecal caramiphen on spinal anesthesia were compared with lidocaine in rats. The interactions of caramiphen with lidocaine were evaluated via an isobolographic analysis. Caramiphen and lidocaine produced a dose-dependent local anesthetic effect as spinal anesthesia. On a 50% effective dose (ED(50)) basis, the spinal anesthetic effect of caramiphen was more potent than lidocaine (P<0.01 for each comparison). Co-administration of caramiphen with lidocaine produced an additive effect. Caramiphen and lidocaine are known to have local anesthetic effects as spinal anesthesia in rats. The spinal anesthetic effects of adding caramiphen to lidocaine are similar to the combinations of other anesthetics with lidocaine.

  6. Placebo analgesia: understanding the mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medoff, Zev M; Colloca, Luana

    2015-01-01

    Expectations of pain relief drive placebo analgesia. Understanding how expectations of improvement trigger distinct biological systems to shape therapeutic analgesic outcomes has been the focus of recent pharmacologic and neuroimaging studies in the field of pain. Recent findings indicate that placebo effects can imitate the actions of real painkillers and promote the endogenous release of opioids and nonopioids in humans. Social support and observational learning also contribute to placebo analgesic effects. Distinct psychological traits can modulate expectations of analgesia, which facilitate brain pain control mechanisms involved in pain reduction. Many studies have highlighted the importance and clinical relevance of these responses. Gaining deeper understanding of these pain modulatory mechanisms has important implications for personalizing patient pain management.

  7. Patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil versus epidural analgesia in labour : randomised multicentre equivalence trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freeman, Liv M; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W; Franssen, Maureen T; Papatsonis, Dimitri N; Hajenius, Petra J; Hollmann, Markus W; Woiski, Mallory D; Porath, Martina; van den Berg, Hans J; van Beek, Erik; Borchert, Odette W H M; Schuitemaker, Nico; Sikkema, J Marko; Kuipers, A H M; Logtenberg, Sabine L M; van der Salm, Paulien C M; Oude Rengerink, Katrien; Lopriore, Enrico; van den Akker-van Marle, M Elske; le Cessie, Saskia; van Lith, Jan M; Struys, Michel M; Mol, Ben Willem J; Dahan, Albert; Middeldorp, Johanna M; Oude Rengerink, K

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine women's satisfaction with pain relief using patient controlled analgesia with remifentanil compared with epidural analgesia during labour. DESIGN: Multicentre randomised controlled equivalence trial. SETTING: 15 hospitals in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Women with an interm

  8. Labour pain with remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia versus epidural analgesia : a randomised equivalence trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logtenberg, Slm; Oude Rengerink, K; Verhoeven, C J; Freeman, L M; van den Akker, Esa; Godfried, M B; van Beek, E; Borchert, Owhm; Schuitemaker, N; van Woerkens, Ecsm; Hostijn, I; Middeldorp, J M; van der Post, J A; Mol, B W

    OBJECTIVE: To distinguish satisfaction with pain relief using remifentanil patient-controlled analgesia (RPCA) compared with epidural analgesia (EA) in low-risk labouring women. DESIGN: Randomised controlled equivalence trial. SETTING: Eighteen midwifery practices and six hospitals in the

  9. Placebo analgesia: understanding the mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Medoff, Zev M; Colloca, Luana

    2015-01-01

    Expectations of pain relief drive placebo analgesia. Understanding how expectations of improvement trigger distinct biological systems to shape therapeutic analgesic outcomes has been the focus of recent pharmacologic and neuroimaging studies in the field of pain. Recent findings indicate that placebo effects can imitate the actions of real painkillers and promote the endogenous release of opioids and nonopioids in humans. Social support and observational learning also contribute to placebo a...

  10. Single dose oral clonidine premedication does not enhance postoperative, single low dose epidural morphine analgesia in hysterectomy patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oofuvong, Maliwan; Chanvej, Laksamee; Thongsuksai, Paramee

    2005-03-01

    In this randomized, double blind placebo controlled study, the authors evaluated the effects of oral clonidine premedication on very low dose epidural morphine analgesia in 50 hysterectomy patients. Patients were randomized to receive a single oral clonidine 300 microg (n = 25) or a placebo (n = 25) 90 minutes before insertion of the epidural catheter. 3 ml of 2% lidocaine with adrenaline (5 microg ml(-1) mixed with 2 mg morphine were injected via epidural, followed by an additional volume of 2% lidocaine with adrenaline (5 microg ml(-1)) titrated to T6 block height before commencing general anesthesia. The postoperative analgesia regimen was 2 mg of intravenous morphine every 10 minutes for the first 48 hr and 1 gm of oral acetaminophen every 4-6 hr after initiation of oral diet at 24-48 hr as required. Morphine consumption, acetaminophen, pain scores, and side effects were recorded thoughout 48 hr after surgery. The results show patients in the clonidine and placebo groups were not different in terms of local anesthetics dose (p = 0.27), total morphine and acetaminophen requirement (p = 0.34, p = 0.1) respectively. Pain scores at rest and movement were also not different in both groups (p = 0.83, p = 0.64) respectively. No serious adverse effects were noted. The authors concluded that oral clonidine approximately 6 microg kg(-1) does not enhance the analgesic effect of epidural morphine 2 mg after hysterectomy.

  11. The experience of labour with epidural analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Ingrid; Keller, Kurt Dauer

    2014-01-01

    of the epidural analgesia as high, in general, their satisfaction with labour is unchanged or even lower when epidural analgesia is used. Question: How do women experience being in labour with epidural analgesia, and what kind of midwifery care do they, consequently, need? Methods: A field study and semi......-structured interviews were conducted on a phenomenological basis. Nine nulliparous women were observed from initiation of epidural analgesia until birth of their baby. They were interviewed the day after the birth and again 2 months later. The involved midwives were interviewed 2–3 h after the birth. Findings......: Initiation of epidural analgesia can have considerable implications for women’s experience of labour. Two different types of emotional reactions towards epidural analgesia are distinguished, one of which is particularly marked by a subtle sense of worry and ambivalence. Another important finding refers...

  12. A COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF LORNOXICAM AND CLONIDINE AS POTENTIAL ADJUNCTS TO LIDOCAINE IN INTRAVENOUS REGIONAL ANAESTHESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of lornoxicam and clonidine on sensory and motor block onset time, tourniquet pa in , sensory and motor block recovery time and postoperative analgesia, when added to lidoca in e in in travenous regional anaesthesia (IVRA. METHODS : Ninety patients undergo in g surgeries on hand and forearm were randomly and bl in dly divided in to three groups as to receive either i.v. sal in e and IVRA with lidoca in e 0.5% (Group I , n =30, i.v. sal in e and IVRA lidoca in e 0.5% with lornoxicam 8mg (Group II , n =30 and i.v. sal in e and IVRA lidoca in e 0.5% with clonidine 1μg/kg (Group III , n =30. Sensory and motor block onset time, time of onset of tourniquet pa in was measured after tourniquet application, intraoperative analgesia, sensory and motor block recovery times were recorded. After the tourniquet deflation the time to first analgesic requirement, total analgesic consumption in first 24h, and side effects were noted. 3 RESULTS : Sensory and motor block onset times were shorter and the recovery time prolonged in the lornoxicam group compared with the control group and clonidine group ( P < 0.001. The time to first analgesic requirement was prolonged more in clonidine group compared to lornoxicam group which in turn was prolonged compared to lidocaine group [416(21.73 minutes vs 229(84 m inutes vs 21.43(20 m inutes , respectively P < 0.001]. However the mean time to onset of tourniquet pain was increased in clonidine group compared with control group 21.13(2.84 minutes vs 18.93(3.43 minutes p< 0.001 and lornoxicam group 18.6(2.22 minutes, p<0.001. CONCLUSION : The addition of lornoxicam to l idoca in e for in travenous regional anaesthesia shortens the onset of sensory and motor block , prolongs sensory and motor block recovery times and improves postoperative analgesia without caus in g any side effect. The addition of clonidine to lidoca in e for in travenous regional anaesthesia

  13. Single dose spinal analgesia: Is it a good alternative to epidural analgesia in controlling labour pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek AbdElBarr

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: Based on the results of our study we concluded that single dose spinal analgesia is a good alternative to epidural analgesia in controlling labour pain i.e. spinal compared to epidural is more easy performed, faster, less expensive, and provide effective analgesia.

  14. Spreading of a Lidocaine Formulation on Microneedle-Treated Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Atul; Das, Diganta B; Chao, Tzu C; Starov, Victor M

    2015-12-01

    The spreadability of a liquid drug formulation on skin is an indication of it either remaining stationary or distributing (spreading) as a droplet. Factors determining droplet spreadability of the formulation are spreading area, diameter of the droplet base, viscosity of the liquid, contact angle, volume of droplet on skin and any others. The creation of microcavities from the application of microneedle (MN) has the potential to control droplet spreading, and hence, target specific areas of skin for drug delivery. However, there is little work that demonstrates spreading of liquid drug formulation on MN-treated skin. Below, spreading of a lidocaine hydrogel formulation and lidocaine solution (reference liquid) on porcine skin is investigated over MN-treated skin. Controlled spreadability was achieved with the lidocaine hydrogel on MN-treated skin as compared with lidocaine solution. It was observed that the droplet spreading parameters such as spreading radius, droplet height and dynamic contact angle were slightly lower for the lidocaine hydrogel than the lidocaine solution on skin. Also, the lidocaine hydrogel on MN-treated skin resulted in slower dynamic reduction of droplet height, contact angle and reduced time taken in attaining static advancing droplets because of the MN microcavities.

  15. Ketamine reduces lidocaine-induced seizures in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Gulen; Erdogan, Fusun; Golgeli, Asuman; Akin, Aynur; Boyaci, Adem

    2005-08-01

    Systemic toxic reactions to local anesthetics are brought about by absolute overdosage, and, most commonly, inadvertent intravascular injections. The anti-convulsant action of ketamine has been studied. However, the effect of ketamine on lidocaine-induced convulsions has not been reported. This study investigated the effect of ketamine on lidocaine-induced seizures in mice. Mice (32-41 g) were divided into 2 groups, 15 in each group, and were pretreated with intraperitoneal normal saline solution or intraperitenoeal (ip) ketamine before lidocaine. Group 1 (N = 15) received 75 mg kg ip lidocaine; Group 2 (N = 15) received 20 mg kg ketamin ip; 5 min later 75 mg kg lidokaine ip were applied. Clinical features, incidences, latencies, durations, and mortality rate of convulsions were recorded. After 75 mg kg lidocaine injection, ataxia, loss of righting reflex, and generalized tonic-clonic convulsions were seen within 2-5 min in Group 1. Generalized tonic-clonic convulsions were seen in 8 mice and deep sedation was seen in 7 mice in Group 2 (p .05). It was concluded that ketamine significantly prevented lidocaine-induced generalized tonic-clonic seizures; on the other hand, the lethality of lidocaine was least reduced by ketamine.

  16. Vestibular effects of lidocaine intratympanic injection in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H H; Kim, M J; Jo, Y K; Kim, J Y; Han, G C

    2014-11-01

    When lidocaine is locally delivered into the inner ear, it rapidly paralyzes the peripheral vestibular afferent neurons and induces unilateral vestibular loss. The goals of this study were to explore the possibility of developing intratympanic injection (IT) of lidocaine as a modality for treating acute vertigo. To evaluate the minimum concentration required, latent time, action duration, and possibility of lidocaine IT readministration to the vestibular system, we compared the development of horizontal nystagmus after IT of 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10% lidocaine solutions in rats. To identify the induction of vestibular compensation, c-Fos-like protein expression was observed in the vestibular nucleus. Results of our investigation showed that lidocaine IT concentrations greater than 4% induced vestibular hyporeflexia in the injected ear. In order to induce hyporeflexia 4 and 6% lidocaine solutions could also be repeatedly injected. Regardless of concentration, effects of the lidocaine IT dissipated gradually over time. Our findings could be used to develop novel methods for symptom control in vestibular disorder patients.

  17. Effects of lidocaine on torn rotator cuff tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Hirokazu; Gotoh, Masafumi; Kanazawa, Tomonoshin; Nakamura, Hidehiro; Ohta, Keisuke; Nakamura, Kei-Ichiro; Shiba, Naoto

    2016-09-01

    We determined lidocaine's action on torn rotator cuff tendons in vitro and in vivo. For in vitro experiments, cell proliferation and viability assays were performed using tenocytes derived from human torn rotator cuff tendons. For in vivo experiments, acute rotator cuff tears were made on the supraspinatus tendons in the rats' bilateral shoulders; before closure, lidocaine was injected into the shoulder and saline into the contralateral shoulder (control). After sacrifice, the specimens underwent biomechanical testing or histological analysis at 24 h and at 2, 4, and 8 weeks after surgery. The extent of collagen organization and apoptosis were semi-quantitatively evaluated using collagen picrosirius red staining. Apoptosis was examined using TUNEL staining and electron microscopy. Cell proliferation decreased dose-dependently. After exposure to 0.1% lidocaine for 24 h, cell viability decreased. Two and 4 weeks after surgery, the ultimate load to failure decreased more in the lidocaine group than in the control group, with significantly reduced stiffness in the lidocaine group 2 weeks after surgery. Collagen organization significantly decreased in the lidocaine group by 4 weeks after surgery but returned to baseline at 8 weeks. TUNEL staining detected numerous apoptotic tenocytes at the torn tendon edge exposed to lidocaine 24 h after surgery; electron microscopy confirmed the condensed cell nuclei. These changes were not observed in controls. Lidocaine caused cytotoxicity to tenocytes under both conditions, decreased biomechanical properties, and induced apoptosis and delay of collagen organization in this model. Subacromial lidocaine injections in patients with rotator cuff tears should be performed carefully. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1620-1627, 2016.

  18. Systemic Lidocaine Shortens Length of Hospital Stay After Colorectal Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herroeder, Susanne; Pecher, Sabine; Schönherr, Marianne E.; Kaulitz, Grit; Hahnenkamp, Klaus; Friess, Helmut; Böttiger, Bernd W.; Bauer, Harry; Dijkgraaf, ↶oMarcel G. W.; Durieux, Marcel E.; Hollmann, Markus W.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To characterize the beneficial effects of perioperative systemic lidocaine on length of hospital stay, gastrointestinal motility, and the inflammatory response after colorectal surgery. Summary Background Data: Surgery-induced stimulation of the inflammatory response plays a major role in the development of several postoperative disorders. Local anesthetics possess anti-inflammatory activity and are thought to positively affect patients' outcome after surgery. This double-blinded, randomized, and placebo-controlled trial aimed to evaluate beneficial effects of systemic lidocaine and to provide insights into underlying mechanisms. Methods: Sixty patients undergoing colorectal surgery, not willing or unable to receive an epidural catheter, were randomly assigned to lidocaine or placebo treatment. Before induction of general anesthesia, an intravenous lidocaine bolus (1.5 mg/kg) was administered followed by a continuous lidocaine infusion (2 mg/min) until 4 hours postoperatively. Length of hospital stay, gastrointestinal motility, and pain scores were recorded and plasma levels or expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators determined. Results: Lidocaine significantly accelerated return of bowel function and shortened length of hospital stay by one day. No difference could be observed in daily pain ratings. Elevated plasma levels of IL-6, IL-8, complement C3a, and IL-1ra as well as expression of CD11b, l- and P-selectin, and platelet-leukocyte aggregates were significantly attenuated by systemic lidocaine. Conclusions: Perioperative intravenous lidocaine not only improved gastrointestinal motility but also shortened length of hospital stay significantly. Anti-inflammatory activity modulating the surgery-induced stress response may be one potential mechanism. Systemic lidocaine may thus provide a convenient and inexpensive approach to improve outcome for patients not suitable for epidural anesthesia. PMID:17667496

  19. Treatment of localized neuropathic pain of different etiologies with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster – a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likar R

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rudolf Likar,1 Susanne Demschar,1 Ingo Kager,1 Stefan Neuwersch,1 Wolfgang Pipam,1 Reinhard Sittl2 1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, Hospital Klagenfurt, Klagenfurt, Austria; 2Department of Anesthesiology, Interdisciplinary Pain Centre, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany Objective: To assess the efficacy and safety of the topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in the treatment of localized neuropathic pain. Study design: This was a case series at an Austrian pain clinic, using retrospective analysis. Patients and methods: Data of 27 patients treated for localized neuropathic pain with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster were retrospectively analyzed. Assessment included changes in overall pain intensity, in intensity of different pain qualities, and of hyperalgesia and allodynia, and changes in sleep quality. Results: Patients (17 female, ten male; mean age 53.4±11.4 years presented mainly with dorsalgia (16 patients or postoperative/posttraumatic pain (seven patients; one patient suffered from both. The mean overall pain intensity prior to treatment with lidocaine medicated plaster was 8.4±1.2 on the 11-point Likert scale. In the majority of cases, the lidocaine plaster was applied concomitantly with preexisting pain medication (81.5% of the patients. During the 6-month observation period, overall mean pain intensity was reduced by almost 5 points (4.98 to 3.5±2.6. Substantial reductions were also observed for neuralgiform pain (5 points from 7.9±2.6 at baseline and burning pain (3 points from 5.2±4.1. Sleep quality improved from 4.6±2.6 at baseline to 5.5±1.8. Stratification by pain diagnosis showed marked improvements in overall pain intensity for patients with dorsalgia or postoperative/posttraumatic pain. The lidocaine plaster was well tolerated. Conclusion: Overall, topical treatment with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster was associated with effective pain relief and was well tolerated. Keywords

  20. Effects of entonox in comparison of lidocaine on pain severity during episiotomy incision in nulliparous women: A randomized control trial

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    Azam Honarmandpour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aim: Episiotomy is one of the most common surgical procedures in obstetrics, which requires analgesia. Entonox gas is known to have analgesic and sedative properties. However, no studies have been found on the analgesic effects of Entonox on episiotomy incision. Therefore, this study aimed to compare the effects of Entonox and lidocaine on pain intensity during episiotomy incision in nulliparous women. Materials and Methods: This randomized controlled trial was conducted on 120 term nulliparous women, who met the inclusion criteria. Subjects were selected by randomized sampling and equally divided into two groups of intervention and control (n=60. In the intervention group, Entonox gas was applied two minutes before episiotomy incision until the end of the procedure. On the other hand, the control group received 5 ml of lidocaine 2% as routine care before episiotomy incision. Data were collected using visual analogue scale to compare the study groups in terms of pain intensity. In addition, patient satisfaction with pain management technique during episiotomy and side effects of Entonox were assessed. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 22 using Mann-Whitney U and Chi-square tests, and P value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: In this study, no significant difference was observed between the intervention and control groups regarding pain intensity (P=0.52. Moreover, no significant difference was observed in the satisfaction level of the two groups (P=0.70. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, Entonox could be used as an effective and noninvasive alternative to lidocaine to reduce pain during episiotomy incision without significant side effects.

  1. Lidocaína por via venosa intraoperatória Lidocaína por vía venosa intraoperatoria Intraoperative intravenous lidocaine

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    Caio Marcio Barros de Oliveira

    2010-06-01

    anesthetic technique. Intravenous lidocaine has been widely used in the treatment of chronic pain. The objective of this report was to review the use of intravenous lidocaine for postoperative analgesia. CONTENTS: The pharmacologic aspects and mechanism of action of lidocaine as well as clinical studies in which the authors used intraoperative lidocaine were reviewed. CONCLUSIONS: Intravenous lidocaine can promote analgesia in surgical procedures, representing another alternative for the treatment of acute pain. Controlled studies with different surgical interventions could bring more information on this modality of analgesia.

  2. Opioid-free total intravenous anesthesia with propofol, dexmedetomidine and lidocaine infusions for laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a prospective, randomized, double-blinded study

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    Mefkur Bakan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Intraoperative use of opioids may be associated with postoperative hyperalgesia and increased analgesic consumption. Side effects due to perioperative use of opioids, such as postoperative nausea and vomiting may delay discharge. We hypothesized that total intravenous anesthesia consisting of lidocaine and dexmedetomidine as an opioid substitute may be an alternative technique for laparoscopic cholecystectomy and would be associated with lower fentanyl requirements in the postoperative period and less incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting. METHODS: 80 Anesthesiologists I-II adults were scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups to have either opioid-free anesthesia with dexmedetomidine, lidocaine, and propofol infusions (Group DL or opioid-based anesthesia with remifentanil, and propofol infusions (Group RF. All patients received a standard multimodal analgesia regimen. A patient controlled analgesia device was set to deliver IV fentanyl for 6 h after surgery. The primary outcome variable was postoperative fentanyl consumption. RESULTS: Fentanyl consumption at postoperative 2nd hour was statistically significantly less in Group DL, compared with Group RF, which were 75 ± 59 µg and 120 ± 94 µg respectively, while it was comparable at postoperative 6th hour. During anesthesia, there were more hypotensive events in Group RF, while there were more hypertensive events in Group DL, which were both statistically significant. Despite higher recovery times, Group DL had significantly lower pain scores, rescue analgesic and ondansetron need. CONCLUSION: Opioid-free anesthesia with dexmedetomidine, lidocaine and propofol infusions may be an alternative technique for laparoscopic cholecystectomy especially in patients with high risk for postoperative nausea and vomiting.

  3. Opioid-free total intravenous anesthesia with propofol, dexmedetomidine and lidocaine infusions for laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a prospective, randomized, double-blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Mefkur; Umutoglu, Tarik; Topuz, Ufuk; Uysal, Harun; Bayram, Mehmet; Kadioglu, Huseyin; Salihoglu, Ziya

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative use of opioids may be associated with postoperative hyperalgesia and increased analgesic consumption. Side effects due to perioperative use of opioids, such as postoperative nausea and vomiting may delay discharge. We hypothesized that total intravenous anesthesia consisting of lidocaine and dexmedetomidine as an opioid substitute may be an alternative technique for laparoscopic cholecystectomy and would be associated with lower fentanyl requirements in the postoperative period and less incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting. 80 Anesthesiologists I-II adults were scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups to have either opioid-free anesthesia with dexmedetomidine, lidocaine, and propofol infusions (Group DL) or opioid-based anesthesia with remifentanil, and propofol infusions (Group RF). All patients received a standard multimodal analgesia regimen. A patient controlled analgesia device was set to deliver IV fentanyl for 6h after surgery. The primary outcome variable was postoperative fentanyl consumption. Fentanyl consumption at postoperative 2nd hour was statistically significantly less in Group DL, compared with Group RF, which were 75 ± 59 μg and 120 ± 94 μg respectively, while it was comparable at postoperative 6th hour. During anesthesia, there were more hypotensive events in Group RF, while there were more hypertensive events in Group DL, which were both statistically significant. Despite higher recovery times, Group DL had significantly lower pain scores, rescue analgesic and ondansetron need. Opioid-free anesthesia with dexmedetomidine, lidocaine and propofol infusions may be an alternative technique for laparoscopic cholecystectomy especially in patients with high risk for postoperative nausea and vomiting. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. [Opioid-free total intravenous anesthesia with propofol, dexmedetomidine and lidocaine infusions for laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a prospective, randomized, double-blinded study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Mefkur; Umutoglu, Tarik; Topuz, Ufuk; Uysal, Harun; Bayram, Mehmet; Kadioglu, Huseyin; Salihoglu, Ziya

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative use of opioids may be associated with postoperative hyperalgesia and increased analgesic consumption. Side effects due to perioperative use of opioids, such as postoperative nausea and vomiting may delay discharge. We hypothesized that total intravenous anesthesia consisting of lidocaine and dexmedetomidine as an opioid substitute may be an alternative technique for laparoscopic cholecystectomy and would be associated with lower fentanyl requirements in the postoperative period and less incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting. 80 Anesthesiologists I-II adults were scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Patients were randomly allocated into two groups to have either opioid-free anesthesia with dexmedetomidine, lidocaine, and propofol infusions (Group DL) or opioid-based anesthesia with remifentanil, and propofol infusions (Group RF). All patients received a standard multimodal analgesia regimen. A patient controlled analgesia device was set to deliver IV fentanyl for 6h after surgery. The primary outcome variable was postoperative fentanyl consumption. Fentanyl consumption at postoperative 2nd hour was statistically significantly less in Group DL, compared with Group RF, which were 75±59μg and 120±94μg respectively, while it was comparable at postoperative 6th hour. During anesthesia, there were more hypotensive events in Group RF, while there were more hypertensive events in Group DL, which were both statistically significant. Despite higher recovery times, Group DL had significantly lower pain scores, rescue analgesic and ondansetron need. Opioid-free anesthesia with dexmedetomidine, lidocaine and propofol infusions may be an alternative technique for laparoscopic cholecystectomy especially in patients with high risk for postoperative nausea and vomiting. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Analgesia adjuvante e alternativa Analgesia adyuvante y alternativa Adjuvant and alternative analgesia

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    Nilton Bezerra do Vale

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: Embora a dor aguda e a crônica sejam habitualmente controladas com intervenções farmacológicas, 14 métodos complementares de analgesia adjuvante e alternativa (AAA podem reduzir o uso e abuso na prescrição de analgésicos e diminuir os efeitos colaterais que eventualmente comprometem o estado fisiológico do paciente. CONTEÚDO: Todos os mecanismos antiálgicos atuam através da via espinal de controle da comporta de Melzack e Wall e/ou através da transdução do sinal nos sistemas de neurotransmissão e neuromodulação central relacionados com analgesia, relaxamento e humor: peptidérgico, monaminérgico, gabaérgico, colinérgico e canabinóide. A analgesia adjuvante complementar é habitualmente utilizada nos tratamentos fisiátricos, ortopédicos, reumatológicos, obstétricos e com acupuntura. A analgesia alternativa complementar pode potencializar os métodos analgésicos convencionais, a exposição à luz do sol matutino, luz e cores sob luz artificial, o tempo (T - anestésicos gerais mais potentes à noite, opióides de manhã e anestésicos locais à tarde, dieta, bom humor e riso, espiritualidade, religião, meditação, musicoterapia, hipnose e efeito placebo. CONCLUSÕES: Se a dor aguda é um mecanismo de defesa, a dor crônica é um estado patológico desagradável relacionado com a depressão endógena e a uma baixa qualidade de vida. É importante estabelecer relações interdisciplinares entre a Medicina adjuvante e alternativa nas terapias analgésicas e antiinflamatórias clássicas.JUSTIFICACIÓN Y OBJETIVOS: Aunque el dolor agudo y el crónico sean habitualmente controlados con intervenciones farmacológicas, 14 métodos complementarios de analgesia adyuvante y alternativa (AAA pueden reducir el uso y el abuso en la prescripción de analgésicos y disminuir los efectos colaterales que eventualmente comprometen el estado fisiológico del paciente. CONTENIDO: Todos los mecanismos anti

  6. Onset Time of 2% Lidocaine and 0.5% Bupivacaine Mixture versus 0.5% Bupivacaine Alone using Ultrasound and Double Nerve Stimulation for Infraclavicular Brachial Plexus Anesthesia in ESRD Patients Undergoing Arteriovenous Fistula Creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongraweewan, Orawan; Inchua, Nipa; Kitsiripant, Chanatthee; Kongmuang, Benchawan; Tiwirach, Wannapa

    2016-05-01

    To reduce the onset of 0.5% bupivacaine by adding 2% lidocaine with 0.5% bupivacaine for ultrasound-guided and double stimulation technique at musculocutaneous and radial nerve for infraclavicular brachial plexus block. Prospective randomized double-blinded, controlled trial study. 90 patients undergoing creation of arteriovenous fistula under ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block were randomized into 2 groups. Gr B (46 patients) received 0.5% bupivacaine 30 mL and Gr BL (44 patients) received mixture of 0.5% bupivacaine 20 mL and 2% lidocaine 10 mL. The onset of sensory block were assessed by response to pinprick (grading: 0 = no sensation, 1 = hypoesthesia, and 2 = normal sensation). Rescue analgesia during the operation, duration of sensory and motor blockade were recorded. Surgeon and patient satisfactions are also evaluated using 6-point scale (0 = dissatisfied to 5 = very satisfied). There were no significant difference in the onset time of either group. Duration of sensory and motor block was not different. Surgeons' and patients' satisfaction were also not significantly different between the groups. Mixing 2% lidocaine with 0.5% bupivacaine to the final concentration of 0.67%for lidocaine and 0.33% for bupivacaine does not reduce the onset of ultrasound-guided infraclavicular brachial plexus block.

  7. Lidocaine for reducing propofol-induced pain on induction of anaesthesia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euasobhon, Pramote; Dej-Arkom, Sukanya; Siriussawakul, Arunotai; Muangman, Saipin; Sriraj, Wimonrat; Pattanittum, Porjai; Lumbiganon, Pisake

    2016-02-18

    , aged 13 years to 89 years, were American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I-III patients undergoing elective surgery. Each study was conducted in a single centre in high- , middle- and low-income countries worldwide. According to the risk of bias assessment, all except five studies were identified as being of satisfactory methodological quality, allowing 84 studies to be combined in the meta-analysis. Five of the 84 studies were assessed as high risk of bias: one for participant and personnel blinding, one for incomplete outcome data, and three for other potential sources of bias.The overall incidence of pain and high-intensity pain following propofol injection in the control group were 64% (95% CI 60% to 67.9%) and 38.1% (95% CI 33.4% to 43.1%), respectively while those in the lidocaine group were 30.2% (95% CI 26.7% to 33.7%) and 11.8% (95% CI 9.7% to 13.8%). Both lidocaine admixture and pretreatment were effective in reducing pain on propofol injection (lidocaine admixture OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.25, 31 studies, 4927 participants, high-quality evidence; lidocaine pretreatment OR 0.13, 95% CI 0.10 to 0.18, 43 RCTs, 4028 participants, high-quality evidence). Similarly, lidocaine administration could considerably decrease the incidence of pain when premixed with the propofol (OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.24, 36 studies, 5628 participants, high-quality evidence) or pretreated prior to propofol injection (OR 0.14, 95% CI 0.11 to 0.18, 52 studies, 4832 participants, high-quality evidence). Adverse effects of lidocaine administration were rare. Thrombophlebitis was reported in only two studies (OR not estimated, low-quality evidence). No studies reported patient satisfaction. Overall, the quality of the evidence was high. Currently available data from RCTs are sufficient to confirm that both lidocaine admixture and pretreatment were effective in reducing pain on propofol injection. Furthermore, there were no significant differences of effect between the two techniques.

  8. Endotracheal tube cuff lidocaine is not superior to intravenous lidocaine in short pediatric surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Mehrdad; Hajimohamadi, Fatemeh; Alagha, Afshar Etemadi; Abouzari, Mehdi; Rashidi, Armin

    2010-05-01

    Instillation of lidocaine into the endotracheal tube cuff is a method with reported efficiency in promoting a smoother emergence from anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. However, whether or not this method is helpful in children and in surgeries with short duration has not been investigated previously. 176 ASA I-II children undergoing adenotonsillectomy were enrolled in this prospective, double-blind, randomized clinical trial. Patients were randomly allocated to two groups. Patients in the ECL group (n=88) were injected 2% lidocaine into their endotracheal tube cuff and received saline (1.5mg/kg) intravenously. The IVL group (n=88) received 1.5mg/kg of 2% lidocaine intravenously and saline into the endotracheal tube cuff. In both groups, intra-cuff injections were initiated immediately after insertion of the endotracheal tube and terminated before the cuff pressure reached 20 cmH(2)O. The parameters measured were: coughing (graded by a scale of 3 at the time of extubation), systolic and diastolic blood pressures and heart rate (from the time of extubation up to 5 min after extubation at 1-min intervals), and laryngospasm (defined as the presence of hoarseness or absence of airflow). The groups were not different in sex, age, weight, height, body mass index, anesthesia duration, and baseline hemodynamic parameters. The grade of coughing was significantly higher in the ECL group. The incidence of laryngospasm and hemodynamic trends did not differ between the groups. Our results indicate that intra-cuff lidocaine may not be beneficial in children and in surgeries with a short duration. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Systemic analgesia for postoperative pain management in the adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binhas, M; Marty, J

    2009-02-01

    Severe postsurgical pain contributes to prolonged hospital stay and is also believed to be a risk factor for the development of chronic pain. Locoregional anesthesia, which results in faster patient recovery with fewer side effects, is favored wherever feasible, but is not applicable to every patient. Systemic analgesics are the most widely used method for providing pain relief in the postoperative period. Improvements in postoperative systemic analgesia for pain management should be applied and predictive factors for severe postoperative pain should be anticipated in order to control pain while minimizing opioid side effects. Predictive factors for severe postoperative pain include severity of preoperative pain, prior use of opiates, female gender, non-laparoscopic surgery, and surgeries involving the knee and shoulder. Pre- and intraoperative use of small doses of ketamine has a preventive effect on postoperative pain. Multimodal or balanced analgesia (the combined use of various analgesic agents) such as NSAID/morphine, NSAID/nefopam, morphine/ketamine improves analgesia with morphine-sparing effects. Nausea and vomiting, the principle side effects of morphine, can be predicted using Apfel's simplified score; patients with a high Apfel score risk should receive preemptive antiemetic agents aimed at different receptor sites, such as preoperative dexamethasone and intraoperative droperidol. Droperidol can be combined with morphine for postoperative patient-controlled anesthesia (PCA). When PCA is used, dosage parameters should be adjusted every day based on pain evaluation. Patients with presurgical opioid requirements will require preoperative administration of their daily opioid maintenance dose before induction of anesthesia: PCA offers useful options for effective postsurgical analgesia using a basal rate equivalent to the patient's hourly oral usage plus bolus doses as required.

  10. Labor analgesia for the obese parturient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellinas, Elizabeth H

    2012-10-01

    Obese parturients present obstetric anesthesia providers with multiple challenges, including increased incidence of maternal coexisting disease, labor complications, and potential for difficult initiation and failure of neuraxial labor analgesia. This focused review discusses these challenges, and suggests potential methods to increase labor analgesia success in this population.

  11. Analgesic efficacy of lidocaine for suction-assisted lipectomy with tumescent technique under general anesthesia: a randomized, double-masked, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilla, Stefan; Fontbona, Montserrat; de Valdés, Victoria Diaz; Dagnino, Bruno; Sorolla, Juan Pablo; Israel, Guillermo; Searle, Susana; Norambuena, Hernán; Cabello, Rodrigo

    2013-08-01

    Suction-assisted lipectomy is one of the most common procedures performed in plastic surgery. To minimize blood loss and to obtain adequate analgesia, a liquid solution is infiltrated into the subcutaneous plane before suction. The objective of this study was to determine whether the use of lidocaine in the infiltration solution reduces postoperative pain. A prospective, randomized, double-masked, clinical trial was designed. Each side of patients' body zones to be treated with suction-assisted lipectomy was randomized to receive infiltration solution with or without lidocaine. Treatment allocation was performed using computer-generated random numbers in permuted blocks of eight. Pain was assessed using the visual analogue scale and registered 1, 6, 12, 18, and 24 hours after the procedure. The trial was stopped after a first interim analysis. The use of lidocaine in the dilute solution reduced pain by 0.5 point on the visual analogue scale (95 percent CI, 0.3 to 0.8; p<0.001). The effect was independent of the suctioned body zone (p=0.756), and lasted until 18 hours after surgery. Its analgesic effect was lost at the 24-hour postoperative control. Pain increased an average of 0.018 point on the visual analogue scale per hour (95 percent CI, 0.001 to 0.036; p=0.043). The use of lidocaine in the infiltration solution is effective in postoperative pain control until 18 hours after surgery. Nevertheless, its clinical effect is limited and clinically irrelevant, and therefore it is no longer used by the authors. Therapeutic, I.

  12. Multimodal analgesia and regional anaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornero Tornero, C; Fernández Rodríguez, L E; Orduña Valls, J

    Multimodal analgesia provides quality analgesia, with fewer side effects due to the use of combined analgesics or analgesic techniques. Regional anaesthesia plays a fundamental role in achieving this goal. The different techniques of regional anaesthesia that include both peripheral and central blocks in either a single dose or in continuous infusion help to modulate the nociceptive stimuli that access the central level. The emergence of the ultrasound as an effective system to perform regional anaesthesia techniques has allowed the development of new regional anaesthesia techniques that formerly could not be carried out since only neurostimulation or skin references were used. It is essential to take into account that even with effective blocking it is advisable to associate other drugs by other routes, in this way we will be able to reduce the required doses individually and attempt to achieve a synergistic, not purely additive, effect. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Analgesia regional em cuidados intensivos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luísa Guedes

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVAS E OBJETIVOS: A analgesia regional desempenha um papel importante na abordagem multimodal da dor no doente crítico e permite amenizar o desconforto do doente e reduzir os estresses fisiológico e psicológico associados. Ao diminuir as doses de opioides sistêmicos, reduz alguns dos seus efeitos colaterais, como a síndrome de abstinência, possíveis alterações psicológicas e disfunção gastrintestinal. Apesar desses benefícios, seu uso é controverso, uma vez que os doentes em unidades de cuidados intensivos apresentam frequentemente contraindicações, como coagulopatia, instabilidade hemodinâmica e dificuldade na avaliação neurológica e na execução da técnica regional. CONTEÚDO: Os autores apresentam uma revisão sobre analgesia regional em cuidados intensivos, com foco nas principais vantagens e limitações de seu uso no doente crítico, e descrevem as técnicas regionais mais usadas e a sua aplicabilidade nesse contexto.

  14. Lidocaine patches reduce pain in trauma patients with rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Karen A; Mayberry, John C; Peck, Ellen G; Schreiber, Martin A

    2011-04-01

    Rib fracture pain is notoriously difficult to manage. The lidocaine patch is effective in other pain scenarios with an excellent safety profile. This study assesses the efficacy of lidocaine patches for treating rib fracture pain. A prospectively gathered cohort of patients with rib fracture was retrospectively analyzed for use of lidocaine patches. Patients treated with lidocaine patches were matched to control subjects treated without patches. Subjective pain reports and narcotic use before and after patch placement, or equivalent time points for control subjects, were gathered from the chart. All patients underwent long-term follow-up, including a McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ). Twenty-nine patients with lidocaine patches (LP) and 29 matched control subjects (C) were analyzed. During the 24 hours before patch placement, pain scores and narcotic use were similar (LP 5.3, C 4.6, P = 0.19 and LP 51, C 32 mg morphine, P = 0.17). In the 24 hours after patch placement, LP patients had a greater decrease in pain scores (LP 1.2, C 0.0, P = 0.01) with no change in narcotic use (LP -8.4, C 0.5-mg change in morphine, P = 0.25). At 60 days, LP patients had a lower MPQ pain score (LP 7.7, C 12.2, P rib fracture pain. Lidocaine patches resulted in a sustained reduction in pain, outlasting the duration of therapy.

  15. [Pneumoencephalotomography under diaz-analgesia and narco-analgesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, J L; Renou, A M; Boulard, G; Vernhiet, J; Nicod, J

    1978-01-01

    The authors reported 92 observations of anesthesia for gaseous encephalotomography interest the adult. The contrast produce is air. 49 under diazanalgesia and myoresolution. Diazepam, +Fentanyl, pancuronium bromide N2O to 60 p. 100. 25 under diazanalgesia and myoresolution. Diazepam, +Fentanyl, succinylcholine, N2O to 60 p. 100. 18 under narco-analgesia and myoresolution. +Fentyl, pancuronium bromide N2O to 60 p. 100. The conditions of the study are described in the first part. The results and their analysis permit the appreciation of: - the patient confort, the quality of the examination; -the respect of the hemodynamics for this examination, reputed to be "difficult"; -the immediatly noticeable diminution of side effects; -the absence of side effects; -the justification and interesting of the control ventilation; -the quality of waking up. In the conclusion the authors underline the interest of their different techniques and the possibility of using them in operations in sitting position in neurosurgery, and all important chirurgical intervention.

  16. Partial reinforcement, extinction, and placebo analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au Yeung, Siu Tsin; Colagiuri, Ben; Lovibond, Peter F; Colloca, Luana

    2014-06-01

    Numerous studies indicate that placebo analgesia can be established via conditioning procedures. However, these studies have exclusively involved conditioning under continuous reinforcement. Thus, it is currently unknown whether placebo analgesia can be established under partial reinforcement and how durable any such effect would be. We tested this possibility using electrocutaneous pain in healthy volunteers. Sixty undergraduates received placebo treatment (activation of a sham electrode) under the guise of an analgesic trial. The participants were randomly allocated to different conditioning schedules, namely continuous reinforcement (CRF), partial reinforcement (PRF), or control (no conditioning). Conditioning was achieved by surreptitiously reducing pain intensity during training when the placebo was activated compared with when it was inactive. For the CRF group, the placebo was always followed by a surreptitious reduction in pain during training. For the PRF group, the placebo was followed by a reduction in pain stimulation on 62.5% of trials only. In the test phase, pain stimulation was equivalent across placebo and no placebo trials. Both CRF and PRF produced placebo analgesia, with the magnitude of initial analgesia being larger after CRF. However, although the placebo analgesia established under CRF extinguished during test phase, the placebo analgesia established under PRF did not. These findings indicate that PRF can induce placebo analgesia and that these effects are more resistant to extinction than those established via CRF. PRF may therefore reflect a novel way of enhancing clinical outcomes via the placebo effect.

  17. Paediatric analgesia in an Emergency Department.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hawkes, C

    2012-02-03

    Timely management of pain in paediatric patients in the Emergency Department (ED) is a well-accepted performance indicator. We describe an audit of the provision of analgesia for children in an Irish ED and the introduction of a nurse-initiated analgesia protocol in an effort to improve performance. 95 children aged 1-16 presenting consecutively to the ED were included and time from triage to analgesia, and the rate of analgesia provision, were recorded. The results were circulated and a nurse initiated analgesia protocol was introduced. An audit including 145 patients followed this. 55.6% of patients with major fractures received analgesia after a median time of 54 minutes, which improved to 61.1% (p = 0.735) after 7 minutes (p = 0.004). Pain score documentation was very poor throughout, improving only slightly from 0% to 19.3%. No child had a documented pain score, which slightly improved to 19.3%. We recommend other Irish EDs to audit their provision of analgesia for children.

  18. EFFECTIVENESS OF LIDOCAINE/PRILOCAINE CREAM ON PERCEIVED PAIN DURING MAMMOGRAPHY: A PILOT STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serife Simsek

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mammography (MG is an important imaging method in the diagnosis of breast diseases. However, pain during MG is an uncomfortable factor for the majority of women. Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the effectiveness of lidocaine/prilocaine cream on reducing pain during mammography. Methods: This is a prospective clinical study. A total of 60 female patients who had mammographic examination were equally divided into three groups; patients receiving 10 g EMLA cream (EMLA group, patients receiving 10 g Bepanthen cream (placebo group, and patients not receiving any cream (control group. Pain levels were assessed by using visual analogue scale (VAS before and after MG. RESULTS: Each group was statistically similar in terms of basic patient characteristics. There was also no significant difference between the pre-MG VAS scores of the three groups (p = 0.996. On the other hand, VAS scores during MG was found significantly different between the groups (p = 0.001. When the groups were compared in pairs, the patients in EMLA group had significantly less post-MG VAS score than the Bepanthen and control groups (p = 0.001. There was no significant difference between Bepanthen and control groups (p = 0.678. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating that a topical anaesthetic, EMLA, provides an effective analgesia during MG. Reducing the pain can change women’s preconceptions regarding MG.

  19. Effects of subtle cognitive manipulations on placebo analgesia - An implicit priming study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosén, A; Yi, J; Kirsch, I; Kaptchuk, T J; Ingvar, M; Jensen, K B

    2017-04-01

    Expectancy is widely accepted as a key contributor to placebo effects. However, it is not known whether non-conscious expectancies achieved through semantic priming may contribute to placebo analgesia. In this study, we investigated if an implicit priming procedure, where participants were unaware of the intended priming influence, affected placebo analgesia. In a double-blind experiment, healthy participants (n = 36) were randomized to different implicit priming types; one aimed at increasing positive expectations and one neutral control condition. First, pain calibration (thermal) and a credibility demonstration of the placebo analgesic device were performed. In a second step, an independent experimenter administered the priming task; Scrambled Sentence Test. Then, pain sensitivity was assessed while telling participants that the analgesic device was either turned on (placebo) or turned off (baseline). Pain responses were recorded on a 0-100 Numeric Response Scale. Overall, there was a significant placebo effect (p priming conditions (positive/neutral) did not lead to differences in placebo outcome. Prior experience of pain relief (during initial pain testing) correlated significantly with placebo analgesia (p Priming is one of many ways to influence behaviour, and non-conscious activation of positive expectations could theoretically affect placebo analgesia. Yet, we found no SST priming effect on placebo analgesia. Instead, our data point to the significance of prior experience of pain relief, trait neuroticism and social interaction with the treating clinician. Our findings challenge the role of semantic priming as a behavioural modifier that may shape expectations of pain relief, and affect placebo analgesia. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Pain published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  20. Lidocaine for prolonged and intensified spinal anesthesia by coadministration of propranolol in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Wen; Chu, Chin-Chen; Chen, Yu-Chung; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Li, Yung-Tsung; Wang, Jhi-Joung

    2011-09-26

    Although the coadministration of lidocaine with propranolol interferes with the metabolic profile (pharmacokinetics), its pharmacodynamics is still unclear. In this report, we investigate whether propranolol can potentiate the effect of lidocaine. Rats received spinal anesthesia with lidocaine co-injected with propranolol. After intrathecal injections of drugs in rats, three neurobehavioral examinations (motor function, proprioception, and nociception) were performed. We showed that lidocaine and propranolol elicited a spinal blockade in motor function, proprioception, and nociception. Propranolol at the dose of 0.82 μmol/kg produced no spinal anesthesia. Co-administration of lidocaine [50% effective dose (ED(50)) or ED(95)] and propranolol (0.82 μmol/kg) produced greater spinal anesthesia than lidocaine (ED(50) or ED(95)), respectively. These preclinical findings demonstrated that propranolol and lidocaine displayed spinal anesthesia. When combined with propranolol, lidocaine elicited a supra-additive effect of spinal anesthesia.

  1. Remifentanil vs. Lidocaine on Response to Tracheal Tube during Emergence of General Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Sadegi

    2014-08-01

    Conclusion: we specified Remifentanil reduces cough during the emergence from general anesthesia more effective than Lidocaine in patients undergoing general surgery. In addition, Remifentanil and i.v. lidocaine revealed comparable impact regarding VAS scoring, sedation level and pethidine consumption.

  2. [Monoethylglycinexylidide--a metabolite of lidocaine--as an index of liver function in chronic hepatic parenchymal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupcová, V; Turecký, L; Szántová, M; Schmidtová, K

    1999-01-01

    The changes of biotransformation enzyme system (b.e.s.) activity and capacity in liver diseases significantly influence the metabolism of various xenobiotics. Lidocaine is metabolised through oxidative N-deethylation by b.e.s. resulting in the production of monoethylglycinexylide (MEGX). The aim of this study was the determination of serum MEGX concentration as a model substance for indirect evaluation of liver b.e.s. function in patients with liver steatofibrosis and cirrhosis and the assessment of the possibilities to use it as a quantitave test of liver functional state. The study group consisted of 53 patients, 36 of them with liver disease of different etiology (postviral, ethyltoxic, cryptogenic, liver cirrhosis on the basis of autoimmune hepatitis, liver cirrhosis induced by primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis in the stage of cirrhosis, Wilson's disease in the stage of cirrhosis), 7 patients with liver steatofibrosis and 10 control persons. After intravenous administration of lidocaine (1 mg/kg of body weight), concentration of MEGX was assessed by fluorescence polarization immunoassay (FPIA) using Tdx system in venous blood. The concentration was assesed prior to administration of lidocaine and 15 and 30 minutes after. In the group of liver steatofibrosis the concentrations in the 15th minute after administration were lower comparing to controls, in the 30th minute the difference was less significant. The values of MEGX in cirrhosis group were significantly decreased 15 and 30 minutes after lidocaine administration in comparison with control group. The cirrhosis group was divided into two subgroups: compensated (Ci c) and decompensated (Ci d) and independently of this division into three parts according to score system of Child-Pugh classification (Ci A, Ci B, Ci C). The concentrations 15 and 30 minutes after lidocaine administration in patients with Ci c and Ci d were significantly different, similarly there were statistically

  3. Analysis of the action of lidocaine on insect sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weizhong; Silver, Kristopher S; Du, Yuzhe; Liu, Zhiqi; Dong, Ke

    2011-01-01

    A new class of sodium channel blocker insecticides (SCBIs), which include indoxacarb, its active metabolite, DCJW, and metaflumizone, preferably block inactivated states of both insect and mammalian sodium channels in a manner similar to that by which local anesthetic (LA) drugs block mammalian sodium channels. A recent study showed that two residues in the cockroach sodium channel, F1817 and Y1824, corresponding to two key LA-interacting residues identified in mammalian sodium channels are not important for the action of SCBIs on insect sodium channels, suggesting unique interactions of SCBIs with insect sodium channels. However, the mechanism of action of LAs on insect sodium channels has not been investigated. In this study, we examined the effects of lidocaine on a cockroach sodium channel variant, BgNa(v)1-1a, and determined whether F1817 and Y1824 are also critical for the action of LAs on insect sodium channels. Lidocaine blocked BgNa(v)1-1a channels in the resting state with potency similar to that observed in mammalian sodium channels. Lidocaine also stabilized both fast-inactivated and slow-inactivated states of BgNa(v)1-1a channels, and caused a limited degree of use- and frequency-dependent block, major characteristics of LA action on mammalian sodium channels. Alanine substitutions of F1817 and Y1824 reduced the sensitivity of the BgNa(v)1-1a channel to the use-dependent block by lidocaine, but not to tonic blocking and inactivation stabilizing effects of lidocaine. Thus, similar to those on mammalian sodium channels, F1817 and Y1824 are important for the action of lidocaine on cockroach sodium channels. Our results suggest that the receptor sites for lidocaine and SCBIs are different on insect sodium channels.

  4. Lidocaine-induced CNS toxicity--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Y Y; Tseng, K F; Lih, Y W; Tsai, T C; Liu, C T; Leung, H K

    1996-12-01

    Lidocaine is the first local anesthetic of the amide type to be introduced to clinical practice. It is a versatile drug and in anesthesia, is the most commonly used local anesthetic because of its aptness of potency, rapid onset, moderate duration of action and topical activity. It is relatively safe and useful in many other clinical settings. Unfortunately, systemic intoxication and psychotic reaction associated with its use often occur because of its popularity and wider safety margin, for which guide in use is often ignored and overdose becomes commonplace. Moreover, due to its universality in use seldom reports have recently dealt with lidocaine, particularly regarding its toxic reaction. Here, we present a case of lidocaine intoxication occurring during circumcision for a reviewal of the problem. A healthy young male, weighing 65 kg, underwent circumcision for phimosis under penile block with 2% lidocaine which totaled 600 mg. Twenty minutes after injection the patient developed headache, tinnitus, visual and auditory disturbances. Muscle twitching over the mouth angles, trismus and rigidity of extremities were also noted. Later in the course he became restless, agitative, hallucinative, talkative, and verbose with repetitious words. The whole course of the disorder lasted about 5 h. It was believed that lidocaine-induced CNS intoxication, manifested by psychotic reaction broke out. Treatment with thiopental was not very impressive. Also, we took this opportunity to discuss and review the toxic reaction associated with the use of lidocaine, its risk factors, mechanism, treatment and prevention. The complicated associations of lidocaine-induced CNS toxic reaction with central control of behavior and the neurotransmitter systems (adrenergic, dopaminergic and serotonin) were also touched.

  5. Intravenous lidocaine for post-operative pain relief after hand-assisted laparoscopic colon surgery: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikuišis, R; Miliauskas, P; Samalavičius, N E; Žurauskas, A; Samalavičius, R; Zabulis, V

    2014-04-01

    Perioperative intravenous (IV) infusion of lidocaine has been shown to decrease post-operative pain, shorten time to return of bowel function, and reduce the length of hospital stay. This randomized, prospective, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial evaluated the impact of IV lidocaine on the quality of post-operative analgesia and other outcomes after hand-assisted laparoscopic colon surgery. Sixty four patients with colon cancer scheduled for elective colon resection were involved in this study. Patients were randomized to receive either lidocaine infusion [lidocaine group (LG)] or normal 0.9 % saline infusion [placebo group (PG)] for a period of 24 h. Anaesthetic and surgical techniques were standardized. Twenty-four-hour post-operative analgesia in the recovery area was maintained by continuous infusion of 0.1 μg/kg/h fentanyl. The primary outcome of the study was post-operative pain control. Pain was assessed using visual analogue scale (VAS) scores at 2, 4, 8, 12, and 24 h after surgery. Patients with a VAS score >3 were treated with ketorolac 30 mg as needed. Secondary outcomes included time to resumption of bowel function and length of hospital stay. Data in the two groups were compared using the two-tailed Student's t test. All statistical tests were two-tailed at a significance level of 0.05. Demographic characteristics and clinical features of both groups were similar. Intensity of pain at rest in LG compared with PG was significantly lower during the first 24 h post-operatively. LG patients reported significantly less pain during movements at 2-, 12-, and 24-h post-surgery than PG patients. The study showed that ketorolac consumption was significantly higher in PG: mean ketorolac consumption in LG was 43.77 ± 13.86 mg and in PG 51.67 ± 13.16 mg (p = 0.047). Compared with placebo, lidocaine infusion produced a 32 % reduction in time to the first drink (Cohen's d = 3.85), 16 % reduction in time to the first full diet

  6. DOES THE ADDITION OF DEXAMETHASON TO LOCAL ANESTHETIC PROLONG THE ANALGESIA OF INTERSCALEN PLEXUS BRACHIALIS BLOCK IN PATIENTS WITH SHOULDER SURGERY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancheva Jasminka

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Introduction: Peripherial nerve blocks is a suitable alternative to general anesthesia especially for one-day case surgery. Interscalene approach of plexus brachialis block as much as supraclavicular and infraclavicular provide reliable, safe, effective, low cost and most complete anesthesia with satisfactory postoperative analgesia for upper limb surgery. Postoperative analgesia of plexus brachialis blocks can be prolonged by using different drugs as adjuvants with local anesthetics. Dexamethasone has been shown to prolong the duration of postoperative analgesia when given as an adjunct for peripheral nerve blocks. The investigation was randomized, prospective, double blinded and controlled study. Objective: The study was designed to compare the effects of dexamethasone administered as an adjunct to bupivacaine in interscalene brachial plexus block on the onset, duration and postoperative analgesia in patients under the shoulder surgery. Methods: A prospective, double-blind study was undertaken in patients scheduled for shoulder surgeries under the interscalene brachial plexus block. We enrolled 60 patients, ASA I-II both sexes, aged 19-65 years, weighing 54-89 kg, divided to two groups G1 and G2. The brachial plexus block was performed by interscalene approach and mixture of 2% lidocaine (12ml and 0.5% bupivacaine (22 ml either alone or combined with dexamethasone (4 mg. The block was performed by using double technique neurostimulator/ultrasound technique. Results: In our investigation we found a significant increase in onset and duration of motor and sensory block in Group G2 (with dexamethasone as compared to Group G1 patients (p < 0.01. Conclusion: Addition of dexamethasone to local anesthetic drugs in interscalene plexus brachialis block, significantly prolongs the duration of analgesia and motor block in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy. Moreover, it is a remarkably safe and costeffective method of providing

  7. AMPAkines and morphine provide complementary analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yongjun; Liu, Kevin; Martinez, Erik; Dale, Jahrane; Huang, Dong; Wang, Jing

    2017-09-15

    Glutamate signaling in the central nervous system is known to play a key role in pain regulation. AMPAkines can enhance glutamate signaling through α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors. previous studies have shown that AMPAkines are effective analgesic agents, and their site of action is likely in the brain. It is not known, however, if AMPAkines can provide complementary analgesia in combination with opioids, the most commonly used analgesics. Here, we show that the co-administration of an AMPAkine with morphine can provide additional analgesia, both in naïve rats and in rats that experience postoperative pain. Furthermore, we show that this AMPAkine can be administered directly into the prefrontal cortex to provide analgesia, and that prefrontal AMPAkine infusion, similar to systemic administration, can provide added pain relief to complement morphine analgesia. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Liquid paraffin is superior to 2% lidocaine gel in reducing urethral pain during urodynamic study in men: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stav, Kobi; Taleb, Eyal; Sabler, Itay M; Siegel, Yoram I; Beberashvili, Ilia; Zisman, Amnon

    2015-06-01

    To compare the pain perception between intraurethral instillation of 2% lidocaine gel and liquid paraffin during Urodynamic study in men. A randomized, single-blind comparison trial was conducted. Forty men scheduled to undergo multichannel Urodynamic study were randomized to receive either 10 ml of 2% lidocaine gel (group 1, n = 20) or 10 ml of liquid paraffin (group 2, n = 20). Patients recorded their pain on a 0-10 visual analog scale prior to lubricant instillation, immediately after lubricant instillation, after the introduction of the Urodynamic catheter, 5 and 30 min after the catheter was taken out. pain scores were significantly higher in group 1 compared to group 2 immediately after the instillation of the lubricants (4.2 ± 1.5 vs. 2.6 ± 0.9, P 2% lidocaine gel in reducing urethral pain during Urodynamic study in men. Pain scores were specifically better during the instillation of the lubricant and during the delivery of the urethral catheter. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Analgesia pós-operatória Postoperative analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Sílvia Beozzo Bassanezi

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVAS E OBJETIVOS: A dor sempre foi uma das maiores preocupações do homem, entretanto, apesar dos progressos da ciência, ainda existem várias barreiras ao seu adequado tratamento, incluindo a falta de conhecimento por parte da equipe médica, sobre o mecanismo das diversas drogas e técnicas empregadas. O objetivo deste trabalho é abordar as principais drogas e técnicas empregadas no controle da dor pós-operatória, visando estimular o interesse sobre o assunto bem como aumentar a eficácia do tratamento dado aos pacientes. CONTEÚDO: Está ressaltada neste artigo, a importância da adequada analgesia pós-operatória, considerando as principais drogas e técnicas utilizadas no controle da dor, seus mecanismos de ação, posologias, vias de administração e efeitos colaterais, bem como a importância da integração de toda a equipe envolvida nos cuidados do paciente para o sucesso do tratamento. O tratamento inadequado da dor no pós-operatório não se justifica, pois há um arsenal considerável de drogas e técnicas analgésicas. O que se faz necessário, portanto, é que toda equipe, anestesistas, cirurgiões, e enfermeiros tenham conhecimento e estejam integrados na utilização deste arsenal.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pain has been one of the men's biggest worries. Despite of scientific progress there still exist many barriers in an adequate treatment of pain including the lack of knowledge of many drugs and pain management techniques. The objective of this study is to discuss the main drugs and analgesics process in an effort to stimulate our colleague interest about the subject and thus increasing treatment efficiency of our patients. CONTENTS: It is emphasized in this study the importance of an adequate postoperative analgesia discussing the main drugs and techniques used in pain management, their mechanism of action, dose, administration route and side effects of each drug. It is also pointed out the great importance

  10. Lidocaine Concentration in Oral Tissue by the Addition of Epinephrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Eri; Yoshida, Kenji; Kawaai, Hiroyoshi; Yamazaki, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    The vasoconstrictive effect due to the addition of epinephrine to local anesthetic has been clearly shown by measuring blood-flow volume or blood anesthetic concentration in oral mucosal tissue. However, there are no reports on the measurement of anesthetic concentration using samples directly taken from the jawbone and oral mucosal tissue. Consequently, in this study, the effect of lidocaine concentration in the jawbone and oral mucosal tissue by the addition of epinephrine to the local anesthetic lidocaine was considered by quantitatively measuring lidocaine concentration within the tissue. Japanese white male rabbits (n = 96) were used as test animals. General anesthesia was induced by sevoflurane and oxygen, and then cannulation to the femoral artery was performed while arterial pressure was constantly recorded. Infiltration anesthesia was achieved by 0.5 mL of 2% lidocaine containing 1 : 80,000 epinephrine in the upper jawbone (E(+)) and 0.5 mL of 2% of epinephrine additive-free lidocaine (E(0)) under the periosteum. At specified time increments (10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 minutes), samples from the jawbone, oral mucosa, and blood were collected, and lidocaine concentration was directly measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. No significant differences in the change in blood pressure were observed either in E(+) or E(0). In both E(+) and E(0) groups, the serum lidocaine concentration peaked 10 minutes after local anesthesia and decreased thereafter. At all time increments, serum lidocaine concentration in E(+) was significantly lower than that in E(0). There were no significant differences in measured lidocaine concentration between jawbone and mucosa within either the E(+) or the E(0) groups at all time points, although the E(0) group had significantly lower jawbone and mucosa concentrations than the E(+) group at all time points when comparing the 2 groups to each other. Addition of epinephrine to the local anesthetic inhibited systemic

  11. Intranasal sufentanil/ketamine analgesia in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bettina Nygaard; Friis, Susanne M; Rømsing, Janne

    2014-01-01

    The management of procedural pain in children ranges from physical restraint to pharmacological interventions. Pediatric formulations that permit accurate dosing, are accepted by children and a have a rapid onset of analgesia are lacking.......The management of procedural pain in children ranges from physical restraint to pharmacological interventions. Pediatric formulations that permit accurate dosing, are accepted by children and a have a rapid onset of analgesia are lacking....

  12. Effect of 4% lidocaine inhalation in bronchial asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, G S; Sharma, S K; Pande, J N

    1990-01-01

    The effect of 4% lidocaine inhalation was studied in a single-blind fashion in 18 patients with chronic stable asthma. Inhalation of normal saline solution was used as placebo. None of the parameters except flow rate at 50% of vital capacity (V50) showed any statistically significant change from baseline values. V50 at 15 min was significantly lower (p less than 0.05) after 4% lidocaine inhalation. Considering more than 10% change from the baseline value as significant, 8 of 15 patients showed decrease in airway resistance (Raw) and 7 of the 15 patients showed an increase in specific airway conductance (SGaw) after 15 min of inhalation. However, V50 (8/18 patients), flow rate at 25% vital capacity [V25 (6/15 patients], and forced expiratory flow rate at 25-75% of the vital capacity (FEF25-75) (5/15 patients) showed a decrease after 15 min of 4% lidocaine inhalation. No change in pulmonary function was noted after 30 min of lidocaine inhalation. It is concluded from this study that lidocaine produces a small bronchodilatory effect on the large airways and a bronchoconstrictor effect on the small airways after 15 min of inhalation, but this effect is not statistically significant. It can be safely used as topical agent for bronchoscopy in patients with bronchial asthma.

  13. Clinical efficacy of lidocaine, mepivacaine, and articaine for local infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisurang, Suttapreyasri; Narit, Leepong; Prisana, Pripatnanont

    2011-02-01

      To assess and compare the efficacy of single buccal and palatal infiltration of lidocaine, mepivacaine, or articaine with 1:100 000 epinephrine by maxillary anesthetic injection.   A double-blinded, randomized, clinical trial was conducted with 33 patients undergoing upper premolar extraction. The patients were randomly allocated into one of three groups, according to the local anesthetic agent used: 2% lidocaine, 2% mepivacaine, or 4% articaine, all with 1:100 000 epinephrine, and were blinded to the anesthetic used. The extent of anesthetization, pulpal anesthetization in adjacent teeth, pain on injection, and adverse effects of the anesthetic agents were assessed.   The extent of anesthetization produced by 4% articaine (42 mm) was statistically more significant (P ≤ 0.05) than 2% lidocaine (33 mm) and 2% mepivacaine (32.5 mm). The successful anesthetization of adjacent teeth occurred more often in the articaine group than in the lidocaine and mepivacine groups, although not to a statistically-significant extent. The pain scores for the injections were comparable between the three groups.   Local anesthetization using 4% articaine with 1:100 000 epinephrine covers a wider area of soft tissue and adjacent teeth than 2% lidocaine or 2% mepivacaine with 1:100 000 epinephrine, which is sufficient for the extraction of one or two teeth. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  14. Effect of dexmedetomidine priming on convulsion reaction induced by lidocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi-Feng; Luo, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Wei-Cheng; Hou, Ben-Chao; Huang, Jian; Zhan, Yan-Ping; Chen, Shi-Biao

    2016-10-01

    To study the effect of dexmedetomidine priming on convulsion reaction induced by lidocaine.The New Zealand white rabbits were applied for the mechanism study of dexmedetomidine priming for preventing convulsion reaction induced by lidocaine. The influence of dexmedetomidine priming with different doses on the time for convulsion occurrence and the duration time of convulsion induced by lidocaine, as well as contents of excitatory amino acids (aspartate [Asp], glutamate [Glu]) and inhibitory amino acids (glycine [Gly], γ-aminobutyric acid [GABA]) in the brain tissue were investigated.With 3 and 5 μg/kg dexmedetomidine priming, the occurrence times of convulsion were prolonged from 196 seconds to 349 and 414 seconds, respectively. With dexmedetomidine priming, the contents of excitatory amino acids (Asp, Glu) were much reduced at occurrence time of convulsion comparing with that without dexmedetomidine priming, while content of inhibitory amino acids Gly was much enhanced.The application of dexmedetomidine before local anesthetics can improve intoxication dose threshold of the lidocaine, delay occurrence of the convulsion, and helped for the recovery of convulsion induced by lidocaine. The positive effect of dexmedetomidine on preventing convulsion would owe to not only the inhibition of excitatory amino acids (Asp, Glu), but also the promotion of inhibitory amino acids Gly secretion.

  15. Hypno-analgesia and acupuncture analgesia: a neurophysiological reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saletu, B; Saletu, M; Brown, M; Stern, J; Sletten, I; Ulett, G

    1975-01-01

    The effects of hypnosis, acupuncture and analgesic drugs on the subjective experience of pain and on objective neurophysiological parameters were investigated. Pain was produced by brief electric stimuli on the wrist. Pain challengers were: hypnosis (induced by two different video tapes), acupuncture (at specific and unspecific loci, with and without electrical stimulation of the needles), morphine and ketamine. Evaluation of clinical parameters included the subjective experience of pain intensity, blood pressure, puls, temperature, psychosomatic symptoms and side effects. Neurophysiological parameters consisted of the quantitatively analyzed EEG and somatosensory evlked potential (SEP). Pain was significantly reduced by hypnosis, morphine and ketamine, but not during the control seesion. Of the four acupuncture techniques, only electro-acupuncture at specific loci significantly decreased pain. The EEG changes during hypnosis were dependent on the wording of the suggestion and were characterized by an increase of slow and a decrease of fast waves. Acupuncture induced just the opposite changes, which were most significant when needles were inserted at traditional specific sites and stimulated electrically. The evoked potential findings suggested that ketamine attenuates pain in the thalamo-cortical pathways, while hypnosis, acupuncture and morphine induce analgesia at the later CNS stage of stimulus processing. Finally some clinical-neurophysiological correlations were explored.

  16. The elusive rat model of conditioned placebo analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNabb, Christopher T; White, Michelle M; Harris, Amber L; Fuchs, Perry N

    2014-10-01

    Recent research on human placebo analgesia has suggested the need for rodent models to further elucidate the neural substrates of the placebo effect. This series of 3 experiments therefore was performed in an attempt to develop a model of placebo analgesia in rats. In each study, female Sprague-Dawley rats received an L5 spinal nerve ligation to induce a neuropathic pain condition. Each rat then underwent a 4-day conditioning procedure in which an active analgesic drug or its vehicle (unconditioned stimulus) was associated with the following cues (conditioned stimuli): novel testing room (environmental), vanilla scent cue (olfactory), dim incandescent lighting (visual), restraint procedure/injection (tactile), and time of day and injection-test latency (temporal). The analgesics for each experiment were as follows: Experiment 1 used 90 mg/kg gabapentin, experiment 2 used 3mg/kg loperamide hydrochloride, and experiment 3 used 6 mg/kg morphine sulfate. On the following test day, half of the animals received the opposite treatment, resulting in 4 conditioning manipulations: drug/drug, drug/vehicle, vehicle/drug, and vehicle/vehicle. Nociceptive thresholds were assessed with the mechanical paw withdrawal threshold test each day after the conditioning procedure. In all 3 experiments, no significant differences were detected on test day between control and placebo groups, indicating a lack of a conditioned placebo analgesic response. Our results contrast with prior research that implies the existence of a reliable and robust response to placebo treatment. We conclude that placebo analgesia in rats is not particularly robust and that it is difficult to achieve using conventional procedures and proper experimental design.

  17. Oral mexiletine for lidocaine-responsive neonatal epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Mika; Okumura, Akihisa; Niijima, Shinichi; Yamashita, Shintaro; Shimono, Kuriko; Hirose, Shinichi; Shimizu, Toshiaki

    2013-08-01

    We report a patient with lidocaine-responsive neonatal epilepsy treated successfully with oral mexiletine. The patient was a male neonate who had seizures since 2days of age. While his seizures were refractory to phenobarbital, lamotrigine, vitamin B6, and midazolam, they were controlled by continuous lidocaine infusion. Oral mexiletine at serum levels of 0.2-0.4μg/ml was used successfully for long-term treatment of his seizures. No delay in psychomotor development was observed at the last follow-up at 20months of age. No mutation was identified in any of four genes: SCN1A, SCN1B, KCNQ2, and KCNQ3. Our patient demonstrates that oral mexiletine can be useful for long-term treatment of patients with lidocaine-responsive epilepsy. Copyright © 2012 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical observation on lidocaine's application in phacoemulsification as surface anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Liu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the effect of surface anesthesia for phacoemulsification using 20g/L lidocaine.METHODS: There were 1 850 patients(2 600 eyeswho underwent phacoemulsification via surface anesthesia using 20g/L lidocaine. The analgesic effect was observed. RESULTS: Totally 93% of 1 850 patients had not any pain during the surgery, a nice analgesic effect was showed, there was no complications duo to anaesthesia. Seven percent of all patients felt swelling pain during surgery but could tolerate. The naked or corrected visual acuity of 89.4% eyes was ≥0.6 one month after surgery.CONCLUSION: Surface anesthesia of using 20g/L lidocaine is safe and painless for phacoemulsification.

  19. Evaluation of lidocaine and mepivacaine for inferior third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porto, Gabriela Granja; Vasconcelos, Belmiro Cavalcanti Do Egito; Gomes, Ana Cláudia Amorim; Albert, Daniela

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare 2% lidocaine and 2% mepivacaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine for postoperative pain control. A group of 35 patients, both genders were recruited, whose had ages ranged from 13 to 27 years-old and had two inferior third molars in similar positions to be extracted. The cartridges were distributed to the patients according to a randomised pattern, where lidocaine was in the control group and mepivacaine in the experimental group. Results showed no significant association between the anesthetics and postoperative pain, pulp sensibility after one hour, gender, tooth position and duration of the surgical procedure. It was shown that lidocaine and mepivacaine have similar time of anesthesia, they are adequate for surgical procedures that last one hour, and there was no difference between the two anesthetics in relation to the severety of post-operative pain.

  20. Evaluation of chemical enhancers in the transdermal delivery of lidocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Philip J; Ahmad, Naina; Langer, Robert; Mitragotri, Samir; Prasad Shastri, V

    2006-02-03

    The effect of various classes of chemical enhancers was investigated for the transdermal delivery of the anesthetic lidocaine across pig and human skin in vitro. The lipid disrupting agents (LDA) oleic acid, oleyl alcohol, butenediol, and decanoic acid by themselves or in combination with isopropyl myristate (IPM) showed no significant flux enhancement. However, the binary system of IPM/n-methyl pyrrolidone (IPM/NMP) improved drug transport. At 2% lidocaine dose, this synergistic enhancement peaked at 25:75 (v/v) IPM:NMP with a steady state flux of 57.6 +/- 8.4 microg cm(-2) h(-1) through human skin. This observed flux corresponds to a four-fold enhancement over a 100% NMP solution and over 25-fold increase over 100% IPM at the same drug concentration (p enhancement due to LDA. These findings allow a more rational approach for designing oil-based formulations for the transdermal delivery of lidocaine free base and similar drugs.

  1. Resolving the Brainstem Contributions to Attentional Analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jonathan C.W.; Davies, Wendy-Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Previous human imaging studies manipulating attention or expectancy have identified the periaqueductal gray (PAG) as a key brainstem structure implicated in endogenous analgesia. However, animal studies indicate that PAG analgesia is mediated largely via caudal brainstem structures, such as the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) and locus coeruleus (LC). To identify their involvement in endogenous analgesia, we used brainstem optimized, whole-brain imaging to record responses to concurrent thermal stimulation (left forearm) and visual attention tasks of titrated difficulty in 20 healthy subjects. The PAG, LC, and RVM were anatomically discriminated using a probabilistic atlas. Pain ratings disclosed the anticipated analgesic interaction between task difficulty and pain intensity (p pain intensity. Intersubject analgesia scores correlated to activity within a distinct region of the RVM alone. These results identify distinct roles for a brainstem triumvirate in attentional analgesia: with the PAG activated by attentional load; specific RVM regions showing pronociceptive and antinociceptive processes (in line with previous animal studies); and the LC showing lateralized activity during conflicting attentional demands. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Attention modulates pain intensity, and human studies have identified roles for a network of forebrain structures plus the periaqueductal gray (PAG). Animal data indicate that the PAG acts via caudal brainstem structures to control nociception. We investigated this issue within an attentional analgesia paradigm with brainstem-optimized fMRI and analysis using a probabilistic brainstem atlas. We find pain intensity encoding in several forebrain structures, including the insula and attentional activation of the PAG. Discrete regions of the rostral ventromedial medulla bidirectionally influence pain perception, and locus coeruleus activity mirrors the interaction between attention and nociception. This approach has enabled the

  2. Is lidocaine patch as effective as intravenous lidocaine in pain and illus reduction after laparoscopic colorectal surgery? A randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhafz, Ahmed Ali Abd; Elgebaly, Ahmed Said; Bassuoni, Ahmed Sobhy; El Dabaa, Ahmed Ali

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of lidocaine patch applied around wound in laparoscopic colorectal surgery in reduction of postoperative pain and illus compared to intravenous lidocaine infusion and placebo. Background: Postoperative illus and pain after colorectal surgery is a challenging problem associated with increased morbidity and cost. Inflammatory response to surgery plays crucial rule in inducing postoperative illus. Systemic local anesthetics proved to have anti-inflammatory properties that may be beneficial in preventing ileus added to its analgesic actions. The lidocaine patch evaluated in many types of pain with promising results. We try to evaluate the patch in perioperative field as a more simple and safe technique than the intravenous route. Materials and Methods: Prospective, randomized, controlled study was conducted, comparing three groups. Group 1 (placebo) received saline infusion, group 2 received i.v. lidocaine infusion after induction of anesthesia, 2 mg/min if body weight >70 kg or 1 mg/min if body weight lidocaine patch 5%, three patches each one divided into two equal parts and applied around the three wounds just before induction. Data collected were, pain scores (VAS), morphine consumption, return of bowel function, pro-inflammatory cytokines plasma levels and plasma lidocaine level. Results: Pain intensity (VAS) scores at rest and during coughing were significantly lower during the first 72 h postoperative in i.v. lidocaine group and patch group compared to the placebo group. Mean morphine consumption were significantly lower in the i.v. lidocaine group and patch group compared to placebo group. Return of the bowel function was significantly earlier in i.v. lidocaine group in comparison to the other groups. Proinflammatory cytokines (IL6, IL8, and C3a) were significantly lower in i.v. lidocaine group compared to the other two groups. Conclusion: The lidocaine patch was equal to i.v. lidocaine infusion in decreasing pain scores and

  3. The incidence of transient neurologic syndrome after spinal anesthesia with lidocaine or bupivacaine: The effects of needle type and surgical position: brief report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etezadi F

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available "nBurning Transient Neurologic Syndrome (TNS which was first described by Schneider et al in 1993, is defined as a transient pain and dysesthesia in waist, buttocks and the lower limbs after spinal anesthesia.1,2 The incidence of TNS after spinal anesthesia with lidocaine is reported to be as high as 10-40%.3,4 This prospective study was designed to determine the incidence of TNS with two different types of drugs, lidocaine and bupivacaine, in lithotomy or supine positions as the primary outcomes and to determine the association between two different types of needles and surgical positions with the occurrence of TNS as the secondary outcome."nThe present study was conducted on 250 patients (ASA I-II, aged 18-60 years old, who were candidates for surgery in supine or lithotomy positions. According to the needle type (Sprotte or Quincke and the local anesthetic (lidocaine or bupivacaine all patients were randomly divided into four groups. After establishing standard monitoring, spinal anesthesia was performed in all sitting patients by attending anesthesiologists at L2-L3 or L3-L4 levels. The patients were placed in supine or lithotomy position, in regards to the surgical procedure. During the first three postoperative days, patients were observed for post spinal anesthesia complications, especially TNS. Any sensation of pain, dysesthesia, paresthesia or hyperalgesia in the low back area, buttocks, the anterior or posterior thigh, knees, either foot or both feet were recorded. Moreover, duration of pain, its radiation and its relation to sleep and the patients' position were all carefully considered. Ultimately, the patients' response to opioid (pethidine for analgesia was determined."nThe incidence of TNS was higher when spinal anesthesia was induced with lidocaine (68% vs. 22%, P=0.003. TNS developed in 85% of the patients in lidocaine group and 58% in bupivacaine group after surgery in lithotomy position (P=0.002. In 77 patients pain

  4. Lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster: in minor dermatological and needle puncture procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croxtall, Jamie D

    2010-11-12

    The lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster comprises a lidocaine/tetracaine 70 mg/70 mg patch and a controlled heat-assisted drug delivery pod that increases the diffusion of lidocaine and tetracaine into the dermis. Following a 1-hour application period, systemic absorption of lidocaine or tetracaine from the plaster was minimal. The lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster provided effective pain relief for adult (including elderly) patients undergoing minor dermatological procedures and for adult and paediatric patients undergoing vascular access procedures. In randomized, double-blind clinical trials, patient-reported median pain scores were significantly lower with the lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster than with an identical plaster containing placebo in patients undergoing minor dermatological or vascular access procedures. Furthermore, patient-reported median pain scores were significantly lower with the lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster than with a lidocaine/prilocaine cream in patients undergoing vascular access procedures. In a large, randomized, double-blind trial in paediatric patients undergoing venipuncture, the overall incidence of pain was significantly lower with the lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster than with a lidocaine/prilocaine plaster. The lidocaine/tetracaine medicated plaster was well tolerated, with the most frequent treatment-related adverse events resolving spontaneously.

  5. A Comparative Study Between 1% and 0.1% Lidocain with Adrenaline in Skin Local Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Zamanian

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Lidocain solution 1-2% have used with or without adrenaline for skin local anesthesia. Also normal salin, diphenhydramine and bacteriostatic salin have been used. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of 1% lidocain with 0.1% lidocain in local skin anesthesia.This study was carried out by triple blind method on 140 patients that submitted to Hamedan Sina Hospital in 2000. These patients divided in two groups randomly, 70 cases received 1% lidocain and other 70 cases received 0.1% lidocain. The pain assessment score was between 0-10 that was asked from each patient and collected data analyzed by statistical methods.This study showed that 51.1% of patients that received 1% lidocain and 48.9% that received 0.1% lidocain did not have any pain during injection (P>0.05. Also 54.3% of patients that received 1% lidocain and 45.7% that received 0.1% lidocain solution did not have any pain throw the procedure (P>0.05.The effect of 0.1% lidocain solution had no much difference from 1% lidocain in skin local anesthesia and thus it is suggested to use it for wide anesthesia in skin surgeries.

  6. Progress in analgesia for labor: focus on neuraxial blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Sudharma Ranasinghe

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available J Sudharma Ranasinghe, David J BirnbachMiller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Florida, USAAbstract: Neuraxial analgesia is widely accepted as the most effective and the least depressant method of providing pain relief in labor. Over the last several decades neuraxial labor analgesia techniques and medications have progressed to the point now where they provide high quality pain relief with minimal side effects to both the mother and the fetus while maximizing the maternal autonomy possible for the parturient receiving neuraxial analgesia. The introduction of the combined spinal epidural technique for labor has allowed for the rapid onset of analgesia with minimal motor blockade, therefore allowing the comfortable parturient to ambulate. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia techniques have evolved to allow for more flexible analgesia that is tailored to the individual needs of the parturient and effective throughout the different phases of labor. Computer integrated systems have been studied to provide seamless analgesia from induction of neuraxial block to delivery. New adjuvant drugs that improve the effectiveness of neuraxial labor analgesia while decreasing the side effects that may occur due to high dose of a single drug are likely to be added to future labor analgesia practice. Bupivacaine still remains a popular choice of local anesthetic for labor analgesia. New local anesthetics with less cardiotoxicity have been introduced, but their cost effectiveness in the current labor analgesia practice has been questioned.Keywords: labor, neuraxial, analgesia, neuraxial labor analgesia

  7. Specifying the non-specific components of acupuncture analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vase, Lene; Baram, Sara; Takakura, Nobuari; Yajima, Hiroyoshi; Takayama, Miho; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Schou, Søren; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Zachariae, Robert; Svensson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that acupuncture has pain-relieving effects, but the contribution of specific and especially non-specific factors to acupuncture analgesia is less clear. One hundred and one patients who developed pain ≥ 3 on a visual analog scale (VAS, 0-10) following third molar surgery were randomized to receive active acupuncture, placebo acupuncture, or no treatment for 30 min with acupuncture needles with potential for double-blinding. Patients’ perception of the treatment (active or placebo), and expected pain levels (VAS) were assessed prior to and halfway through the treatment. Looking at actual treatment allocation, there was no specific effect of active acupuncture (P = 0.240), but a large and significant non-specific effect of placebo acupuncture (P acupuncture (P acupuncture had significantly lower pain levels than those who believed they received placebo acupuncture. Expected pain levels accounted for significant and progressively larger amounts of the variance in pain ratings following both active and placebo acupuncture (up to 69.8%), This is the first study to show that under optimized blinding conditions non-specific factors such as patients’ perception of and expectations toward treatment are central to the efficacy of acupuncture analgesia and that these factors may contribute to self-reinforcing effects in acupuncture treatment To obtain an effect of acupuncture in clinical practice it may, therefore, be important to incorporate and optimize these factors. PMID:23707680

  8. The effects of lidocaine or a lidocaine-bupivacaine mixture administered into the infraorbital canal in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Peter J

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the onset, duration, and extent of regional nerve blocks performed by administration of lidocaine or lidocaine-bupivacaine into the infraorbital canal in dogs. ANIMALS 6 healthy hound-type dogs. PROCEDURES Under general anesthesia, stimulating needles were inserted into the gingiva dorsolateral to both maxillary canine (MC) teeth and the maxillary fourth premolar (MPM4) and second molar (MM2) teeth on the treatment side. A reflex-evoked muscle potential (REMP) was recorded from the digastricus muscle after noxious electrical stimulation at each site. After baseline measurements, 1 mL of 2% lidocaine solution or a 2% lidocaine-0.5% bupivacaine mixture (0.5 mL each) was injected into the infraorbital canal (at approx two-thirds of the canal length measured rostrocaudally). The REMPs were recorded for up to 7 hours. The REMP data for the contralateral (untreated control) canine tooth were used to normalize results for all stimulation sites. RESULTS With both treatments, nerve block for MC teeth on the treated side was achieved by 5 (n = 5 dogs) or 10 (1) minutes after injection, but nerve block for ipsilateral MPM4 and MM2 teeth was successful for only 3 dogs and 1 dog, respectively. Mean duration of nerve blocks for MC teeth was 120 and 277 minutes following injection of lidocaine and lidocaine-bupivacaine, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Local anesthesia, as performed in this study, successfully blocked innervation of MC teeth, but results for MPM4 and MM2 teeth were inconsistent. This specific technique should not be used during tooth extractions caudal to the MC teeth.

  9. Remifentanil patient controlled analgesia versus epidural analgesia in labour. A multicentre randomized controlled trial

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    Freeman Liv M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pain relief during labour is a topic of major interest in the Netherlands. Epidural analgesia is considered to be the most effective method of pain relief and recommended as first choice. However its uptake by pregnant women is limited compared to other western countries, partly as a result of non-availability due to logistic problems. Remifentanil, a synthetic opioid, is very suitable for patient controlled analgesia. Recent studies show that epidural analgesia is superior to remifentanil patient controlled analgesia in terms of pain intensity score; however there was no difference in satisfaction with pain relief between both treatments. Methods/design The proposed study is a multicentre randomized controlled study that assesses the cost-effectiveness of remifentanil patient controlled analgesia compared to epidural analgesia. We hypothesize that remifentanil patient controlled analgesia is as effective in improving pain appreciation scores as epidural analgesia, with lower costs and easier achievement of 24 hours availability of pain relief for women in labour and efficient pain relief for those with a contraindication for epidural analgesia. Eligible women will be informed about the study and randomized before active labour has started. Women will be randomly allocated to a strategy based on epidural analgesia or on remifentanil patient controlled analgesia when they request pain relief during labour. Primary outcome is the pain appreciation score, i.e. satisfaction with pain relief. Secondary outcome parameters are costs, patient satisfaction, pain scores (pain-intensity, mode of delivery and maternal and neonatal side effects. The economic analysis will be performed from a short-term healthcare perspective. For both strategies the cost of perinatal care for mother and child, starting at the onset of labour and ending ten days after delivery, will be registered and compared. Discussion This study, considering cost

  10. Buffered 1% Lidocaine With Epinephrine Is as Effective as Non-Buffered 2% Lidocaine With Epinephrine for Mandibular Nerve Block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Victor T; Fisher, Anson G; Rivera, Eric M; Saha, Pooja T; Turner, Blake; Reside, Glenn; Phillips, Ceib; White, Raymond P

    2017-07-01

    To assess outcomes for pulpal anesthesia and pain on injection for buffered 1% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine (EPI) versus non-buffered 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 EPI. In a randomized cross-over trial approved by the institutional review board, buffered 1% lidocaine with 1:100,000 EPI was compared with non-buffered 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 EPI. After mandibular nerve block with buffered lidocaine 40 mg or non-buffered lidocaine 80 mg, patients reported responses at the mandibular first molar and canine after cold and electrical pulp testing (EPT). Patients also reported pain on injection with a 10-point Likert-type scale. Teeth were tested before nerve block and at 30-minute intervals until a positive response returned. Two weeks later, patients were tested with the alternate drug combinations. The same outcomes were assessed. Predictor variables were alternate drug formulations. Outcome variables were patients' responses to cold and EPT stimulation of the mandibular first molar and canine and pain on injection. An assessment of treatment difference was performed using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests with Proc NPAR1WAY (SAS 9.3, SAS Institute, Cary, NC). Significance was set at a P value less than .05. Fifty-seven percent of patients were women and 43% were men. Seventy percent were Caucasian, 17% were African American, and 13% had another ethnicity. Median age was 25 years (interquartile range [IQR], 21-26 yr) and median body weight was 140 lbs (IQR, 120-155 lbs). After the cold test and EPT, the time to sensation return for the molar or canine was not statistically different between the 2 drug formulations. Patients reported significantly lower pain scores with the buffered versus non-buffered drug (P lidocaine with EPI can produce similar clinical outcomes for duration of pulpal anesthesia as non-buffered 2% lidocaine with EPI and lower pain on injections, which are a potential benefit to patients. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and

  11. Involvement of connexin 43 in acupuncture analgesia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Guang-ying; ZHENG Cui-hong; YU Wei-chang; TIAN Dai-shi; WANG Wei

    2009-01-01

    Background Connexin 43 (Cx43) is one of the major components of human keratinocyte gap junctions. To study whether gap junctional intercellular communication participates in the transfer of acupoint signals and acupuncture analgesia, the expression of Cx43 was studied in Zusanli (ST36) acupoints compared with control non-acupoint regions in rats after acupuncture. In addition, Cx43 heterozygous gene knockout mice were used to further explore the relationship between Cx43 and acupuncture analgesia. Methods The expression of Cx43 was detected by immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting, and RT-PCR for the Cx43 protein and mRNA. The influence of the Cx43 gene knockout on acupuncture analgesia was measured by a hot plate and observing the writhing response on Cx43 heterozygous gene knockout mice. Results Immunohistochemistry showed abundant Cx43 expression in some cells in the skin and subcutaneous tissue of rat ST36 acupoints. The mRNA and protein levels of Cx43 in acupoints were significantly higher than those in the control points in the non-acupuncture group, and even more so after acupuncture. The hot plate and writhing response experiments showed that partial knockout of the Cx43 gene decreased acupuncture analgesia. Conclusion Cx43 expression and acupuncture analgesia showed a positive correlation.

  12. Effect of postoperative epidural analgesia on surgical outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, K; Holte, Kathrine

    2002-01-01

    Pain relief allowing sufficient mobilization after major surgical procedures can only be achieved by continuous epidural analgesia with local anesthetics, which also reduces the stress response to surgery. However, the role of postoperative epidural analgesia on postoperative morbidity is controv......Pain relief allowing sufficient mobilization after major surgical procedures can only be achieved by continuous epidural analgesia with local anesthetics, which also reduces the stress response to surgery. However, the role of postoperative epidural analgesia on postoperative morbidity...... is controversial. We therefore update the effects of postoperative analgesia on surgical outcome. After major abdominal surgery, postoperative epidural analgesia with local anesthetics significantly reduces postoperative ileus and pulmonary complications while effects on cardiac morbidity are debatable. Continuous...... regimen does not contain a sufficient amount of local anesthetics. Future evaluation of the effects of epidural analgesia on postoperative outcome also requires integration of epidural analgesia within a multimodal rehabilitation programme....

  13. Effect of postoperative epidural analgesia on surgical outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, K; Holte, Kathrine

    2002-01-01

    Pain relief allowing sufficient mobilization after major surgical procedures can only be achieved by continuous epidural analgesia with local anesthetics, which also reduces the stress response to surgery. However, the role of postoperative epidural analgesia on postoperative morbidity is controv...

  14. Preemptive analgesic effect of lidocaine in a chronic neuropathic pain model Efeito analgésico preemptivo da lidocaína em modelo de dor crônica neuropática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo M. Batista

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Preemptive analgesia inhibits the progression of pain caused by surgical lesions. To analyze the effect of lidocaine on postoperative pain relief, we performed compression of the right sciatic nerve in Wistar rats and observed the differences on behavior between the group that received lidocaine and the group that was not treated with the local anesthetics pre-operatively. Group 1 was not operated (control; group 2 underwent the sciatic nerve ligature without lidocaine; group 3, underwent surgery with previous local infiltration of lidocaine. Group 2 showed significantly longer scratching times with a peak on day 14 post-operative (p=0.0005 and reduction in the latency to both noxious (p=0.003 and non-noxious (p=0.004 thermal stimulus. Group 3 presented significantly shorter scratching times (p=0.004 and longer latency times when compared to Group 2. Preemptive use of lidocaine 2% can potentially reduce the postoperative neuropathic pain associated with sciatic nerve compression.A analgesia preemptiva inibe a progressão da dor causada por lesão cirúrgica. Para analisar o efeito da lidocaína na diminuição da dor pós-operatória, submetemos ratos Wistar a compressão cirúrgica do nervo ciático e observamos diferenças em alguns padrões de comportamento entre o grupo tratado com lidocaína pré-operatória e o grupo não-tratado com o anestésico local. O grupo 1 não foi operado (controle; o grupo 2, submetido a ligadura do nervo ciático sem lidocaína, apresentou significativo aumento do tempo de coçar-se com um pico no 14º pós-operatório (p=0.0005 e redução na latência para os estímulos térmicos nocivo (p=0.003 e não-nocivo (p=0.004; o grupo 3, operado com a droga preemptiva, demonstrou significativo decréscimo no tempo de coçar-se (p=0.004 e maiores tempos de latência quando comparados aos do grupo 2. O uso preemptivo da lidocaína 2% pode, potencialmente, reduzir a dor neuropática pós-operatória associada à compress

  15. Epidural anaesthesia and analgesia for liver resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzimas, P; Prout, J; Papadopoulos, G; Mallett, S V

    2013-06-01

    Although epidural analgesia is routinely used in many institutions for patients undergoing hepatic resection, there are unresolved issues regarding its safety and efficacy in this setting. We performed a review of papers published in the area of anaesthesia and analgesia for liver resection surgery and selected four areas of current controversy for the focus of this review: the safety of epidural catheters with respect to postoperative coagulopathy, a common feature of this type of surgery; analgesic efficacy; associated peri-operative fluid administration; and the role of epidural analgesia in enhanced recovery protocols. In all four areas, issues are raised that question whether epidural anaesthesia is always the best choice for these patients. Unfortunately, the evidence available is insufficient to provide definitive answers, and it is clear that there are a number of areas of controversy that would benefit from high-quality clinical trials.

  16. [Treatment of persistent postmastectomy pain with 5% Lidocaine medicated plaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruto, M E; Baricocchi, E; Battistella, M; Bona, F; Giacoletto, G; Iacobellis, A; Moselli, N; Palomba, G; Sardo, E; Savojardo, M; Suita, L; Zocca, E; Debernardi, F

    2015-04-01

    Persistent postmastectomy pain (PPMP) syndrome is characterized by neuropathic pain that develops following surgery in breast cancer patients. The reported incidence of PPMP ranges between 30% and 50% and is estimated to increase as the number of women surviving cancer continues to rise. Though effective, today's drug treatments are poorly tolerated, limiting their use and reducing adherence to therapy. Since neuropathic pain is localized, international guidelines suggest that topical treatment with 5% Lidocaine medicated plaster either alone or combined with systemic drugs can be considered for pain management. In this retrospective study we reviewed the medical records of 11 patients treated with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster for moderate-to-severe PPMP at our institute between November 2013 and October 2014. Analysis showed that treatment with 5% Lidocaine medicated plaster, either alone or in combination with systemic drugs, achieved significant pain control already after the first week of therapy. The effectiveness and tolerability of 5% Lidocaine medicated plaster we observed suggests that it is a viable option in the management of PPMP.

  17. [Comparative study between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekhemar, Nashwa Abdallah; El-Agwany, Ahmed Samy; Radi, Wafaa Kamel; El-Hady, Sherif Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative sore throat is a common complication after endotracheal intubation. After tracheal intubation, the incidence of sore throat varies from 14.4% to 50%. The aim of the study was to compare between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on the endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat. The present study was carried out on 124 patients admitted to Alexandria university hospitals for lumbar fixation surgery requiring general anesthesia. Patients were randomly allocated into 4 groups. Benzydamine hydrochloride gel, 5% lidocaine hydrochloride gel, 10% lidocaine hydrochloride spray, or normal saline were applied on endotracheal tube cuffs before endotracheal intubation. The patients were examined for sore throat (none, mild, moderate, or severe) at 0, 1, 6, 12, and 24h after extubation. The results were collected, analyzed and presented in table and figure. The highest incidence of postoperative sore throat occurred at 6h after extubation in all groups. There was a significantly lower incidence of postoperative sore throat in the benzydamine group than 5% lidocaine gel, 10% lidocaine spray, and normal saline groups. The benzydamine group had significantly decreased severity of postoperative sore throat compared with the 10% lidocaine, 5% lidocaine, and normal saline groups at observation time point. Compared with the 5% lidocaine the 10% lidocaine group had significantly increased incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat after extubation. Compared with normal saline the 10% lidocaine group had increased incidence of postoperative sore throat. There were no significant differences among groups in local or systemic side effects. So in conclusion, benzydamine hydrochloride gel on the endotracheal tube cuff is a simple and effective method to reduce the incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat. Application of 10% lidocaine spray should be avoided because of worsening of postoperative sore

  18. Comparative study between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nashwa Abdallah Mekhemar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Postoperative sore throat is a common complication after endotracheal intubation. After tracheal intubation, the incidence of sore throat varies from 14.4% to 50%. The aim of the study was to compare between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on the endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat. The present study was carried out on 124 patients admitted to Alexandria university hospitals for lumbar fixation surgery requiring general anesthesia. Patients were randomly allocated into 4 groups. Benzydamine hydrochloride gel, 5% lidocaine hydrochloride gel, 10% lidocaine hydrochloride spray, or normal saline were applied on endotracheal tube cuffs before endotracheal intubation. The patients were examined for sore throat (none, mild, moderate, or severe at 0, 1, 6, 12, and 24 h after extubation. The results were collected, analyzed and presented in table and figure. The highest incidence of postoperative sore throat occurred at 6 h after extubation in all groups. There was a significantly lower incidence of postoperative sore throat in the benzydamine group than 5% lidocaine gel, 10% lidocaine spray, and normal saline groups. The benzydamine group had significantly decreased severity of postoperative sore throat compared with the 10% lidocaine, 5% lidocaine, and normal saline groups at observation time point. Compared with the 5% lidocaine the 10% lidocaine group had significantly increased incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat after extubation. Compared with normal saline the 10% lidocaine group had increased incidence of postoperative sore throat. There were no significant differences among groups in local or systemic side effects. So in conclusion, benzydamine hydrochloride gel on the endotracheal tube cuff is a simple and effective method to reduce the incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat. Application of 10% lidocaine spray should be avoided because of

  19. Comparative study between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekhemar, Nashwa Abdallah; El-Agwany, Ahmed Samy; Radi, Wafaa Kamel; El-Hady, Sherif Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative sore throat is a common complication after endotracheal intubation. After tracheal intubation, the incidence of sore throat varies from 14.4% to 50%. The aim of the study was to compare between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on the endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat. The present study was carried out on 124 patients admitted to Alexandria university hospitals for lumbar fixation surgery requiring general anesthesia. Patients were randomly allocated into 4 groups. Benzydamine hydrochloride gel, 5% lidocaine hydrochloride gel, 10% lidocaine hydrochloride spray, or normal saline were applied on endotracheal tube cuffs before endotracheal intubation. The patients were examined for sore throat (none, mild, moderate, or severe) at 0, 1, 6, 12, and 24h after extubation. The results were collected, analyzed and presented in table and figure. The highest incidence of postoperative sore throat occurred at 6h after extubation in all groups. There was a significantly lower incidence of postoperative sore throat in the benzydamine group than 5% lidocaine gel, 10% lidocaine spray, and normal saline groups. The benzydamine group had significantly decreased severity of postoperative sore throat compared with the 10% lidocaine, 5% lidocaine, and normal saline groups at observation time point. Compared with the 5% lidocaine the 10% lidocaine group had significantly increased incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat after extubation. Compared with normal saline the 10% lidocaine group had increased incidence of postoperative sore throat. There were no significant differences among groups in local or systemic side effects. So in conclusion, benzydamine hydrochloride gel on the endotracheal tube cuff is a simple and effective method to reduce the incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat. Application of 10% lidocaine spray should be avoided because of worsening of postoperative sore

  20. Protective effects of lidocaine injected into the hepatoduodenal ligament on warm ischemia-reperfusion injury to the rat liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈明易; 李崇辉; 黄志强; 刘巨超; 周宁新; 黄晓强; 王燕生

    2004-01-01

    Background Ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury to the liver is still a critical and daunting problem in the field of hepatobiliary surgery. Ischemic preconditioning (IP) of the liver serves as an effective approach against IR injury. This study was to develop a novel procedure that could mimic IP, but might be more feasible than IP during surgery. Methods Eighty-two SD rats were randomly divided into 5 groups. L group (n=21): 0.4% lidocaine (10 mg/kg) was injected into the hepatoduodenal ligament 10 minutes before a 40-minute hepatic IR. IP group (n=16): a 5-minute ischemia was followed by a 10-minute reperfusion prior to a 40-minute hepatic IR. ILR group (n=15): after a 40-minute ischemia of the liver, 0.4% lidocaine ( 10 mg/kg) was injected into the hepatoduodenal ligament 10 minutes prior to a 40-minute reperfusion of the liver. IR group (n =15): the liver of the rat was subjected to a 40-minute IR. Control group (n = 15) 0.9% sodium chloride was injected into the hepatoduodenal ligament without other treatments. The levels of plasma alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) were determined for each group after treatment. Results The mean concentrations of ALT and AST were (379. 80 + 141.69) U/L and (606.05± 220.26) U/L for the L group, (334.64 ±141.94) U/L and (625.68 ±267.06) U/L for the IP group,(523. 36 ±170. 35) U/L and (765.47 ±238. 45) U/L for the lLP group, (524. 29 ±163. 59) U/L and (764. 63 ±246.79) U/L for the IR group, and (150.90 ±27.05) U/L and (298. 15 ±47.68) U/L for the control group (standard error of the mean). Conclusion A significant decrease in ALT and AST levels was observed in the L and IP groups when compared to the ILR and IR groups ( P<0.05), but no significant difference in ALT and AST levels was observed in the L group when compared to the IP group (P>0. 05). These results suggest that pretreatment with lidocaine injected into the hepatoduodenal ligament prior to IR provides effective protection against

  1. Pre-emptive local analgesia in video-assisted thoracic surgery sympathectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorelli, Alfonso; Vicidomini, Giovanni; Laperuta, Paolo; Busiello, Luigi; Perrone, Anna; Napolitano, Filomena; Messina, Gaetana; Santini, Mario

    2010-03-01

    Our goal is to determine whether infiltration with a short-acting local anaesthetic such as lidocaine before the surgical incision has a pre-emptive effect on postoperative pain intensity and on incidence of paraesthesia in patients undergoing standard thoracoscopic sympathectomy for palmar hyperhidrosis. This prospective study includes a consecutive series of 18 patients undergoing bilateral standard thoracoscopic sympathectomy for palmar hyperhidrosis during January 2005-December 2007. Each patient enrolled in the study was randomised to receive pre-incisional lidocaine with epinephrine infiltration of the wounds on the one side, and normal saline solution on the other. The identical surgery was performed on each side to allow patients to act as their own controls. Then, the side which received local analgesia was compared with the control side with regard to pain control and paraesthesia after 4, 24 and 168 h postoperatively. The patients and investigators were both blinded concerning the side randomised to receive pre-emptive local analgesia (PLA). We found that patients reported significantly less pain on the side treated with pre-emptive local anaesthesia in contrast to the control side 4 and 24h after surgery (p=0.001 and p=0.004, respectively). However, that difference decreased with time and was no longer significant 168 h following surgery (p=0.156). Regarding the paraesthesia, the incidence was higher in the control side than the PLA side at 4, 24 and 168 h postoperatively, but the difference was not statistically significant. A total of 17 of 18 (94%) patients noted a change in palmar hyperhidrosis status after surgery. Our study shows that the pre-injection of local anaesthetic before standard thoracoscopic sympathectomy suppresses the local pain mediators, hence resulting in significantly less pain in the first postoperative 24 h but not thereafter. The clinical impact of the procedure is the possibility of early discharge to home and early return to

  2. Continuous Spinal Anesthesia for Obstetric Anesthesia and Analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Veličković

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The widespread use of continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA in obstetrics has been slow because of the high risk for post-dural puncture headache (PDPH associated with epidural needles and catheters. New advances in equipment and technique have not significantly overcome this disadvantage. However, CSA offers an alternative to epidural anesthesia in morbidly obese women, women with severe cardiac disease, and patients with prior spinal surgery. It should be strongly considered in parturients who receive an accidental dural puncture with a large bore needle, on the basis of recent work suggesting significant reduction in PDPH when intrathecal catheters are used. Small doses of drug can be administered and extension of labor analgesia for emergency cesarean delivery may occur more rapidly compared to continuous epidural techniques.

  3. High-dose lidocaine does not affect defibrillation efficacy: implications for defibrillation mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujhelyi, M R; Sims, J J; Miller, A W

    1998-04-01

    This study assessed the effect of low (10 mg.kg-1.h-1) and very high (18 mg.kg-1.h-1) doses of lidocaine on defibrillation energy requirements (DER) to relate changes in indexes of sodium-channel blockade with changes in DER values using a dose-response study design. In group 1 (control; n = 6 pigs), DER values were determined at baseline and during treatment with 5% dextrose in water (D5W) and with D5W added to D5W. In group 2 (n = 7), DER values were determined at baseline and during treatment with low-dose lidocaine followed by high-dose lidocaine. In group 3 (n = 3), DER values were determined at baseline and high-dose lidocaine. Group 3 controlled for the order of lidocaine treatment with the addition of high-dose lidocaine after baseline. DER values in group 1 did not change during D5W. In group 2, low-dose lidocaine increased DER values by 51% (P = 0.01), whereas high-dose lidocaine added to low-dose lidocaine reduced DER values back to within 6% of baseline values (P = 0.02, low dose vs. high dose). DER values during high-dose lidocaine in group 3 also remained near baseline values (16.2 +/- 2.7 to 12.9 +/- 2.7 J), demonstrating that treatment order had no impact on group 2. Progressive sodium-channel blockade was evident as incremental reduction in ventricular conduction velocity as the lidocaine dose increased. Lidocaine also significantly increased ventricular fibrillation cycle length as the lidocaine dose increased. However, the greatest increase in DER occurred when ventricular fibrillation cycle length was minimally affected, demonstrating a negative correlation (P = 0.04). In summary, lidocaine has an inverted U-shaped DER dose-response curve. At very high lidocaine doses, DER values are similar to baseline and tend to decrease rather than increase. Increased refractoriness during ventricular fibrillation may be the electrophysiological mechanism by which high-dose lidocaine limits the adverse effects that low-dose lidocaine has on DER values

  4. The disposition of lidocaine during a 12-hour intravenous infusion to postoperative horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, M; Kukanich, B; Beard, W; Waxman, S

    2006-12-01

    Lidocaine is administered as an intravenous infusion to horses for a variety of reasons, but no study has assessed plasma lidocaine concentrations during a 12-h infusion to horses. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetics of lidocaine during a 12-h infusion to postoperative horses. A second purpose of the study was to evaluate the in vitro plasma protein binding of lidocaine in equine plasma. Lidocaine hydrochloride was administered as a loading dose, 1.3 mg/kg over 15 min, then by a constant rate IV infusion, 50 microg/kg/min to six postoperative horses. Lidocaine plasma concentrations were measured by a validated high-pressure liquid chromatography method. One horse experienced tremors and collapsed 5.5 h into the study. The range of plasma concentrations during the infusion was 1.21-3.13 microg/mL. Lidocaine plasma concentrations were significantly increased at 0.5, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 h compared with 1, 2 and 3 h. The in vitro protein binding of lidocaine in equine plasma at 2 microg/mL was 53.06+/-10.28% and decreased to 27.33+/-9.72% and 29.52+/-6.44% when in combination with ceftiofur or the combination of ceftiofur and flunixin, respectively. In conclusion, a lower lidocaine infusion rate may need to be administered to horses on long-term lidocaine infusions. The in vitro protein binding of lidocaine is moderate in equine plasma, but highly protein bound drugs may displace lidocaine increasing unbound concentrations and the risk of lidocaine toxicity.

  5. Control of postoperative pain after awake craniotomy with local intradermal analgesia and metamizol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Rachel; Ram, Zvi; Perel, Azriel; Yusim, Yakov; Zaslansky, Ruth; Berkenstadt, Haim

    2007-05-01

    Pain following brain surgery is a significant problem. Infiltration of the scalp with local intradermal anesthetics was suggested for postoperative pain control but was assessed only in the first hour postoperatively. To evaluate wound infiltration with a single dose of metamizol (dipyrone) for postoperative pain control in patients undergoing awake craniotomy. This open, prospective, non-randomized observational study, conducted in anesthesiology and neurosurgical departments of a teaching hospital, included 40 patients undergoing awake craniotomy for the removal of brain tumor. Intraoperative anesthesia included wound infiltration with lidocaine and bupivacaine, conscious sedation using remifentanil and propofol, and a single dose of metamizol (dipyrone) for postoperative pain control. Outcome was assessed by the Numerical Pain Scale on arrival at the postoperative care unit, and 2, 4 and 12 hours after the end of surgery. On arrival at the postoperative care unit, patients reported NPS scores of 1.2 +/- 1.1 in a scale of 0-10 (mean +/- SD) (median = 1, range 0-4). The scores were 0.8 +/-0.9, 0.9 +/- 0.9 and 1 +/- 0.9 at 2 hours, 4 hours and 12 hours after the end of surgery, respectively. Based on patients' complaints and NPS lower than 3, 27 patients did not require any supplementary analgesia during the first 12 postoperative hours, 11 patients required a single dose of oral metamizol or intramuscular diclofenac, one patient was given 2 mg of intravenous morphine, and one patient required two separate doses of metamizol. Although the clinical setup prevents the use of placebo local analgesia as a control group, the results suggest the possible role of local intradermal infiltration of the scalp combined with a single dose of metamizol to control postoperative pain in patients undergoing craniotomy.

  6. US-Guided Femoral and Sciatic Nerve Blocks for Analgesia During Endovenous Laser Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Saim, E-mail: ysaim@akdeniz.edu.tr; Ceken, Kagan; Alimoglu, Emel; Sindel, Timur [Akdeniz University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Turkey)

    2013-02-15

    Endovenous laser ablation may be associated with significant pain when performed under standard local tumescent anesthesia. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of femoral and sciatic nerve blocks for analgesia during endovenous ablation in patients with lower extremity venous insufficiency. During a 28-month period, ultrasound-guided femoral or sciatic nerve blocks were performed to provide analgesia during endovenous laser ablation in 506 legs and 307 patients. The femoral block (n = 402) was performed at the level of the inguinal ligament, and the sciatic block at the posterior midthigh (n = 124), by injecting a diluted lidocaine solution under ultrasound guidance. After the blocks, endovenous laser ablations and other treatments (phlebectomy or foam sclerotherapy) were performed in the standard fashion. After the procedures, a visual analogue pain scale (1-10) was used for pain assessment. After the blocks, pain scores were 0 or 1 (no pain) in 240 legs, 2 or 3 (uncomfortable) in 225 legs, and 4 or 5 (annoying) in 41 legs. Patients never experienced any pain higher than score 5. The statistical analysis revealed no significant difference between the pain scores of the right leg versus the left leg (p = 0.321) and between the pain scores after the femoral versus sciatic block (p = 0.7). Ultrasound-guided femoral and sciatic nerve blocks may provide considerable reduction of pain during endovenous laser and other treatments, such as ambulatory phlebectomy and foam sclerotherapy. They may make these procedures more comfortable for the patient and easier for the operator.

  7. Neuraxial block and postoperative epidural analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leslie, K; McIlroy, D; Kasza, J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We assessed associations between intraoperative neuraxial block and postoperative epidural analgesia, and a composite primary outcome of death or non-fatal myocardial infarction, at 30 days post-randomization in POISE-2 Trial subjects. METHODS: 10 010 high-risk noncardiac surgical pat...

  8. Analgesia and sedation after pediatric cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Andrew R; Jackman, Lara

    2011-05-01

    In recent years, the importance of appropriate intra-operative anesthesia and analgesia during cardiac surgery has become recognized as a factor in postoperative recovery. This includes the early perioperative management of the neonate undergoing radical surgery and more recently the care surrounding fast-track and ultra fast-track surgery. However, outside these areas, relatively little attention has focused on postoperative sedation and analgesia within the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). This reflects perceived priorities of the primary disease process over the supporting structure of PICU, with a generic approach to sedation and analgesia that can result in additional morbidities and delayed recovery. Management of the marginal patient requires optimisation of not only cardiac and other attendant pathophysiology, but also every aspect of supportive care. Individualized sedation and analgesia strategies, starting in the operating theater and continuing through to hospital discharge, need to be regarded as an important aspect of perioperative care, to speed the process of recovery. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Postoperative opioid analgesia: time for a reconsideration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, H; Rung, G W; Callesen, T

    1996-01-01

    limit their future use in some situations. Thus, the recent emphasis on ambulatory surgery and accelerated surgical stay programs, both with a focus on early recovery of organ function and provision of functional analgesia [i.e., pain relief that allows normal function (Kehlet H: Postoperative pain...

  10. Nerve injury caused by mandibular block analgesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillerup, S; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2006-01-01

    : feather light touch, pinprick, sharp/dull discrimination, warm, cold, point location, brush stroke direction, 2-point discrimination and pain perception. Gustation was tested for recognition of sweet, salt, sour and bitter. Mandibular block analgesia causes lingual nerve injury more frequently than...

  11. The effects of maternal labour analgesia on the fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Felicity

    2010-06-01

    Maternal labour pain and stress are associated with progressive fetal metabolic acidosis. Systemic opioid analgesia does little to mitigate this stress, but opioids readily cross the placenta and cause fetal-neonatal depression and impair breast feeding. Pethidine remains the most widely used, but alternatives, with the possible exception of remifentanil, have little more to offer. Inhalational analgesia using Entonox is more effective and, being rapidly exhaled by the newborn, is less likely to produce lasting depression. Neuraxial analgesia has maternal physiological and biochemical effects, some of which are potentially detrimental and some favourable to the fetus. Actual neonatal outcome, however, suggests that benefits outweigh detrimental influences. Meta-analysis demonstrates that Apgar score is better after epidural than systemic opioid analgesia, while neonatal acid-base balance is improved by epidural compared to systemic analgesia and even compared to no analgesia. Successful breast feeding is dependent on many factors, therefore randomized trials are required to elucidate the effect of labour analgesia.

  12. Plasma concentration and cardiovascular effects of lidocaine during continuous epidural administration in dogs anesthetized with isoflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakonju, Iwao; Maeda, Kenichi; Karasawa, Koichi; Tadokoro, Toshiyuki; Kakuta, Tomoko; Takase, Katsuaki

    2011-03-01

    The cardiovascular effects of continuous epidural administration (CEA) of lidocaine were investigated in anesthetized dogs. Loading epidural injections of 2, 4, or 6 mg/kg of lidocaine were followed by CEA with 1, 2, or 3 mg/kg/hr lidocaine, respectively, for 2 hr under 2.0% isoflurane anesthesia. Heart rate, direct blood pressure, cardiac index, and stroke volume decreased dose-dependently during CEA, whereas systemic vascular resistance did not significantly differ with dose, and no characteristic changes were observed in any groups. Plasma lidocaine concentration reached a steady state during CEA and increased in a dose-dependent manner. Circulatory suppression caused by lidocaine CEA was not attributable to peripheral vasodilation, but rather to the direct cardiac action of systemic lidocaine absorption from the peridural space.

  13. The immediate effects of lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current on pressure sense threshold and tactile sensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoosefinejad, Amin Kordi; Motealleh, Alireza; Abbasnia, Keramatollah

    2016-01-01

    Iontophoresis is the noninvasive delivery of ions using direct current. The direct current has some disadvantages such as skin burning. Interferential current is a kind of alternating current without limitations of direct current; so the purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the effects of lidocaine, interferential current and lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current. 30 healthy women aged 20-24 years participated in this randomized clinical trial study. Pressure, tactile and pain thresholds were evaluated before and after the application of treatment methods. Pressure, tactile and pain sensitivity increased significantly after the application of lidocaine alone (p < 0.005) and lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current (p < 0.0001). Lidocaine iontophoresis using interferential current can increase perception threshold of pain, tactile stimulus and pressure sense more significantly than lidocaine and interferential current alone.

  14. Dimethylsulfoxide potentiates the nerve conduction-blocking effect of lidocaine without augmentation of the intracellular lidocaine concentration in the giant axon of crayfish in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Takeshi; Ibusuki, Shoichiro; Takasaki, Mayumi; Tsuneyoshi, Isao

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) potentiates the blocking action of lidocaine. A giant axon removed from a crayfish was used to investigate nerve conduction and intracellular lidocaine concentration. The maximum values of the differential waveform (dV/dt max) calculated from evoked action potentials were used for evaluating an inhibition of nerve conduction. The inhibition of the dV/dt max in low-frequency stimulation (tonic block) and high-frequency stimulation (phasic block) after perfusion of 1 mm lidocaine with or without 0.2 vol % DMSO, in which the concentration of DMSO alone had no anesthetic effect, was measured to evaluate the potentiating action of DMSO. The intracellular lidocaine concentration was measured via a lidocaine-sensitive glass microelectrode during 30 min of perfusion of 1 mm lidocaine alone or in combination with DMSO. When applied without lidocaine, DMSO caused a dose-dependent nerve conduction block when used at concentrations >1 vol %. The dV/dt max in the tonic block was significantly decreased when 0.2 vol % DMSO was added to the lidocaine solution (P = 0.004). In the phasic block, there was no significant potentiating action of DMSO. There were no significant differences in the intracellular lidocaine concentrations with or without DMSO. The potentiating effects of DMSO were observed only in the condition of low-frequency stimulation and were not related to the intracellular lidocaine concentration in the giant axon of crayfish in vitro.

  15. The mechanism and site of action of lidocaine hydrochloride in guinea pig inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurikainen, E; Lin, X; Nuttall, A L; Dolan, D F

    1997-07-01

    Lidocaine was applied to the round window (RW) in order to localize its site of action in the cochlea. Cochlear microphonic (CM), summating potential (SP), and compound action potential (CAP) input/output functions were measured to a 16 kHz tone burst to assess the functional changes of the cochlea. In separate experiments, the effect of lidocaine on the whole cell current of isolated outer hair cells (OHC) was studied. A dose of 2 microliters of 40 mM lidocaine in saline solution, when applied to the RW, caused a small change in all measured variables, indicating a passage of the drug through the RW membrane to sites of action. However, 160 mM of lidocaine further decreased CM, SP, and CAP by a total of 40% from the control. A partial recovery occurred for CM during the 30 min follow-up period. CAP and SP continued to decline. In isolated OHCs, lidocaine decreased the whole cell current in a dose-dependent fashion. The KD for lidocaine effect on OHCs was 7 mM. Our in vivo results indicate that lidocaine affects OHCs and reduces CM, causing a subsequent reduction in SP and CAP. The increased effect of lidocaine on CAP and SP, while CM is recovering, suggests an additional specific effect of lidocaine on the cochlear nerve and/or on inner hair cells. Considering that lidocaine alters OHC current (in isolated hair cells) and that lidocaine does not affect endocochlear potential [Laurikainen et al. Acta Otolaryngol (Stockh) 1991: 112: 800-9], the observed CM changes are most likely due to an in vivo effect on OHCs. Thus, the early effect of lidocaine on the cochlea appears to be due to a significant change in organ of Corti function, rather than to direct anesthesia of the cochlear nerve. Later, an independent effect of the drug may occur on neural tissues in the inner ear.

  16. The effect of perioperative intravenous lidocaine and ketamine on recovery after abdominal hysterectomy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grady, Martin V; Mascha, Edward; Sessler, Daniel I; Kurz, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Perioperative ketamine infusion reduces postoperative pain; perioperative lidocaine infusion reduces postoperative narcotic consumption, speeds recovery of intestinal function, improves postoperative fatigue, and shortens hospital stay...

  17. Intravenous lidocaine infusion--a new treatment of chronic painful diabetic neuropathy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, J; Petersen, P; Dejgård, A

    1987-01-01

    In a randomized double-blind, cross-over study the effect of intravenous lidocaine (5 mg/kg body weight) on the symptoms and signs of painful diabetic neuropathy of more than 6 months duration has been evaluated. Using a clinical symptom scale, there was significant beneficial effect 1 and 8 days...... alternative treatment of chronic painful diabetic neuropathy....... after lidocaine infusion compared to after saline infusion (P less than 0.05 and P less than 0.02, respectively). The duration of the individual effect ranged from 3 to 21 days. Lidocaine infusion had no effect on the objective measurements of neuropathy. Intravenous lidocaine infusion seems to be a new...

  18. Evaluation of the Population Pharmacokinetic Properties of Lidocaine and its Metabolites After Long-Term Multiple Applications of a Lidocaine Plaster in Post-Herpetic Neuralgia Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bursi, Roberta; Piana, Chiara; Grevel, Joachim; Huntjens, Dymphy; Boesl, Irmgard

    2017-01-12

    Lidocaine 5% medicated plaster is the first lidocaine containing product for chronic use. As no previous investigations have been conducted to evaluate the population pharmacokinetics of long-term exposure to lidocaine 5% medicated plasters, further insights into the evaluation of the pharmacokinetic properties of lidocaine and its metabolites were needed for the assessment of its safety. The population pharmacokinetic properties of lidocaine and its metabolites were evaluated after multiple applications of lidocaine 5% medicated plasters based on data collected for up to 14.5 months from two phase III clinical trials (up to 2.5 months in the first trial, and up to 12 months in a follow-up trial) in post-herpetic neuralgia patients. Modeling was performed using nonlinear mixed effects as implemented in NONMEM(®) (nonlinear mixed-effect modeling) v.5. A stepwise forward inclusion and backward elimination procedure were used for covariate model building. The model provides reliable estimates of the pharmacokinetic behavior of lidocaine after medicated plaster application. It was validated using simulations and showed adequate predictive properties. Apparent Clearance was estimated to be 48 L/h after application of two or fewer plasters, whereas its value increased to 67 L/h after application of three plasters. Model-based simulations predicted no accumulation of lidocaine or any of its metabolites after long-term exposure of three simultaneous plasters up to 1 year. The variability explained by adding covariates into the model for the long-term exposures of lidocaine following one plaster or three simultaneous plaster applications was found to be very small with respect to the overall between-subject variability. In conclusion, exposure to lidocaine after the application of the lidocaine medicated plaster was found to be primarily affected by the number of plasters simultaneously applied, i.e., it increased with the number of applied patches, but less than

  19. Fighting Prior Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, John

    1990-01-01

    Reviews arguments for and against prior administrative review and censorship of student expression. Suggests that prior review strips any pretense of democracy from many American educational institutions. Argues that prior review is journalistically inappropriate, educationally unsound, and practically illogical. (KEH)

  20. Use of adrenalin with lidocaine in hand surgery ,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Antonio de Freitas Novais Junior

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective:Because of the received wisdom within our setting that claims that local anesthesia should not be used with adrenalin in hand surgery; we conducted a study using lidocaine with adrenalin, to demonstrate its safety, utility and efficacy.Methods:We conducted a prospective study in which, in wrist, hand and finger surgery performed from July 2012 onwards, we used local anesthesia comprising a 1% lidocaine solution with adrenalin at 1:100,000. We evaluated the quantity of bleeding, systemic alterations, signs of arterial deficit and complications, among other parameters. We described the infiltration techniques for specific procedures individually.Results:We operated on 41 patients and chose to describe separately the raising of a lateral microsurgical flap on the arm, which was done without excessive bleeding and within the usual length of time. In only three cases was there excessive bleeding or use of bipolar tweezers. No systemic alterations were observed by the anesthesiologists or any complications relating to ischemia and necrosis in the wounds or in the fingers, and use of tourniquets was not necessary in any case.Conclusions:Use of lidocaine with adrenalin in hand surgery was shown to be a safe local anesthetic technique, without complications relating to necrosis. It provided efficient exsanguination of the surgical field and made it possible to perform the surgical procedures without using a pneumatic tourniquet, thereby avoiding its risks and benefiting the patient through lower sedation.

  1. Lidocaine preferentially inhibits the function of purinergic P2X7 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okura, Dan; Horishita, Takafumi; Ueno, Susumu; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki; Sudo, Yuka; Uezono, Yasuhito; Minami, Tomoko; Kawasaki, Takashi; Sata, Takeyoshi

    2015-03-01

    Lidocaine has been widely used to relieve acute pain and chronic refractory pain effectively by both systemic and local administration. Numerous studies reported that lidocaine affects several pain signaling pathways as well as voltage-gated sodium channels, suggesting the existence of multiple mechanisms underlying pain relief by lidocaine. Some extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) receptor subunits are thought to play a role in chronic pain mechanisms, but there have been few studies on the effects of lidocaine on ATP receptors. We studied the effects of lidocaine on purinergic P2X3, P2X4, and P2X7 receptors to explore the mechanisms underlying pain-relieving effects of lidocaine. We investigated the effects of lidocaine on ATP-induced currents in ATP receptor subunits, P2X3, P2X4, and P2X7 expressed in Xenopus oocytes, by using whole-cell, two-electrode, voltage-clamp techniques. Lidocaine inhibited ATP-induced currents in P2X7, but not in P2X3 or P2X4 subunits, in a concentration-dependent manner. The half maximal inhibitory concentration for lidocaine inhibition was 282 ± 45 μmol/L. By contrast, mepivacaine, ropivacaine, and bupivacaine exerted only limited effects on the P2X7 receptor. Lidocaine inhibited the ATP concentration-response curve for the P2X7 receptor via noncompetitive inhibition. Intracellular and extracellular N-(2,6-dimethylphenylcarbamoylmethyl) triethylammonium bromide (QX-314) and benzocaine suppressed ATP-induced currents in the P2X7 receptor in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, repetitive ATP treatments at 5-minute intervals in the continuous presence of lidocaine revealed that lidocaine inhibition was use-dependent. Finally, the selective P2X7 receptor antagonists Brilliant Blue G and AZ11645373 did not affect the inhibitory actions of lidocaine on the P2X7 receptor. Lidocaine selectively inhibited the function of the P2X7 receptor expressed in Xenopus oocytes. This effect may be caused by acting on sites in the ion

  2. Interaction between lidocaine hydrochloride (with and without adrenaline) and various irrigants: A nuclear magnetic resonance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidhya, Nirmal; Karthikeyan, Balasubramanian Saravana; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy; Abarajithan, Mohan; Nithyanandan, Sivasankaran

    2014-01-01

    Background: Interaction between local anesthetic solution, lidocaine hydrochloride (with and without adrenaline), and root canal irrigants such as sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA), and chlorhexidine (CHX) has not been studied earlier. Hence, the purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the chemical interaction between 2% lidocaine hydrochloride (with and without adrenaline) and commonly used root canal irrigants, NaOCl, EDTA, and CHX. Materials and Methods: Samples were divided into eight experimental groups: Group I-Lidocaine hydrochloride (with adrenaline)/3% NaOCl, Group II-Lidocaine hydrochloride (with adrenaline)/17% EDTA, Group III- Lidocaine hydrochloride (with adrenaline)/2% CHX, Group IV-Lidocaine hydrochloride (without adrenaline)/3% NaOCl, Group V-Lidocaine hydrochloride (without adrenaline)/17% EDTA, Group VI-Lidocaine hydrochloride (without adrenaline)/2% CHX, and two control groups: Group VII-Lidocaine hydrochloride (with adrenaline)/deionized water and Group VIII-Lidocaine hydrochloride (without adrenaline)/deionized water. The respective solutions of various groups were mixed in equal proportions (1 ml each) and observed for precipitate formation. Chemical composition of the formed precipitate was then analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) and confirmed with diazotation test. Results: In groups I and IV, a white precipitate was observed in all the samples on mixing the respective solutions, which showed a color change to reddish brown after 15 minutes. This precipitate was then analysed by NMR spectroscopy and was observed to be 2,6-xylidine, a reported toxic compound. The experimental groups II, III, V, and VI and control groups VII and VIII showed no precipitate formation in any of the respective samples, until 2 hours. Conclusion: Interaction between lidocaine hydrochloride (with and without adrenaline) and NaOCl showed precipitate formation containing 2,6-xylidine, a toxic compound

  3. Median effective concentration of epidural lidocaine inhibiting herpetic neuralgia%硬膜外注射利多卡因抑制患者带状疱疹性疼痛的半数有效浓度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅少雄; 陈彦青; 刘荣国; 吴晓丹

    2014-01-01

    目的 确定硬膜外注射利多卡因抑制患者带状疱疹性疼痛的半数有效浓度(EC50).方法 胸腰段带状疱疹性疼痛患者,性别不限,20 ~ 60岁,体重指数18 ~ 25 kg/m2,ASA分级Ⅰ或Ⅱ级.数字减影血管造影机引导下行硬膜外穿刺置管术,注射含有碘佛醇+利多卡因的混合液,利多卡因初始浓度为0.37%,采用序贯法进行试验,镇痛有效时下一例患者下调一级浓度,否则上调一级浓度,相邻浓度之比为1.06.镇痛有效的标准:注药后30 min内VAS评分≤1分.采用Dixon公式计算EC50及其95%可信区间.结果 硬膜外注射利多卡因抑制患者带状疱疹性疼痛的EC50为0.199%,其95%可信区间为0.168%~ 0.216%.结论 硬膜外注射利多卡因抑制患者带状疱疹性疼痛的EC50为0.199%.%Objective To determine the median effective concentration (EC50) of epidural lidocaine inhibiting herpetic neuralgia.Methods The patients with thoracic or lumbar herpetic neuralgia,aged 20-60 yr,with body mass index of 18-25 kg/m2,of ASA physical status Ⅰ or Ⅱ,were included in the study.Epidural catheter was placed under the guidance of the digital subtraction angiography (DSA).An injection of iohexol mixed with lidocaine was given under the guidance of DSA to make sure that drug solution covered all the injured nerve roots.The initial concentration of lidocaine was 0.37%.The concentration was determined by up-and-down sequential allocation.Each time the concentration of lidocaine increased/decreased in the next patient depending on whether or not the analgesia was effective.The ratio between the two successive concentrations was 1.06.Effective analgesia was defined as VAS score ≤ 1 within 30 min after administration.The EC50 and 95 % confidence interval of lidocaine inhibiting herpetic neuralgia were calculated using Dixon formula.Results The EC50 of lidocaine inhibiting herpetic neuralgia was 0.199 % and the 95 % confidence interval was 0.168

  4. Epidural Analgesia and Fever at Labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. M. Shifman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the incidence of labor fever under epidural analgesia (EA and to evaluate its impact on the courses of puerperium and early neonatality. Subjects and methods. The paper presents the data of a prospective study of the course of labor, puerperium, and early neonatality in 397 women in whom labors occurred at the Republican Peritoneal Center in 2006. A study group included 324 parturients in whom labor pain was relieved by EA. A comparison group comprised 55 parturients in whom no analgesics were used at labor. Results. There were no significant statistical differences between the groups in the incidence of labor fever and complicated puerperium and in that of neonatal pyoseptic diseases. Key words: labor hyperthermia, epidural analgesia, labor pain relief.

  5. [Epidural analgesia in combination with general anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, Antje; Poepping, Daniel M

    2015-07-01

    Epidural anaesthesia is a widely used and accepted technique for perioperative analgesia in different kinds of surgery. Apart from analgetic effect and due to wide positve effects on patients outcome epidural analgesia is often used with general anaesthesia. It represents a reliable and reversible neural deafferentation technique that effectively contributes to a reduction of the surgical stress response with subsequent positive effects on cardiopulmonary, gastrointestinal, and immune function. Animal studies suggest that the use of epidural anaesthesia may be beneficial for cancer surgery because of less tumour recurrence. Further, a benefit is expected in patient's mortality. This article summarizes and critically discusses the current knowledge on the effects of epidural anaesthesia on pain management, cardiopulmonary as well as gastrointestinal functions and patient's outcome.

  6. Acupuncture for analgesia in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Lindsey M; Neary, Susan M; Sharrock, Joseph; Rychel, Jessica K

    2014-06-01

    Acupuncture for analgesia is growing rapidly in popularity with veterinarians and pet owners. This article summarizes the mechanisms of analgesia derived from acupuncture and reviews current literature on the topic. Areas covered include the local effects at area of needle insertion, systemic effects secondary to circulating neurotransmitters and changes in cell signaling, central nervous system effects including the brain and spinal cord, and myofascial trigger point and pathology treatment. Clinical applications are discussed and suggested in each section. When used by appropriately trained professionals, acupuncture offers a compelling and safe method for pain management in our veterinary patients and should be strongly considered as a part of multimodal pain management plans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Isothermal crystallization kinetics of lidocaine in supersaturated lidocaine/polyacrylate pressure sensitive adhesive systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong; Frank, Sylvan G

    2005-09-01

    Isothermal crystallization of lidocaine (LC) in supersaturated LC/Duro-Tak 87-2287 (DT2287) polyacrylate pressure sensitive adhesive (PSA) systems has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It was found that crystallization of LC in supersaturated LC/DT2287 systems was governed by the nucleation process, which in turn was dependent on temperature and composition of the systems. A critical temperature T(crit) was found at approximately 26 degrees C, above which the crystallization of LC in LC/DT2287 systems becomes slow. The lack of dependence of T(crit) on the composition of the mixtures indicates that the presence of the PSA affected the kinetics (diffusion) rather than the thermodynamics of the nucleation process. A critical degree of saturation S(crit) of approximately 4 was also found, above which the nucleation rate sharply increases. Kinetic analysis based on the classical theory of nucleation indicates that nucleation of LC in the PSA medium is a diffusion-controlled process. The activation energy of crystallization had a two-phase dependence on temperature suggesting that the mechanism of crystallization may change at the transition temperatures. As the weight fraction of LC increased in the systems, the activation energy of crystallization, DeltaG(c), was minimal at approximately 15 degrees C, indicating that the nucleation of LC in the LC/DT2287 systems is at its fastest rate around this temperature. These fundamental analyses of nucleation and crystallization mechanisms are of practical significance in the design of supersaturated drug delivery systems.

  8. Remifentanil for labor analgesia: an evidence-based narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, M; Carvalho, B

    2016-02-01

    This manuscript reviews the available literature on remifentanil patient-controlled intravenous analgesia in labor focusing on efficacy and safety. Remifentanil compares favorably to other potent systemic opioids but with fewer opioid-related neonatal effects. However, remifentanil provides modest and short-lasting labor analgesia that is consistently inferior when compared to neuraxial analgesia. The initial analgesic effect provided with remifentanil also diminishes as labor progresses. In several studies, remifentanil induced significant respiratory depressant effects in laboring women with episodes of desaturation, hypoventilation and even apnea. Given the safety concerns, we recommend that remifentanil patient-controlled intravenous analgesia should not be a routine analgesia technique during labor. In cases where neuraxial analgesia is refused or contraindicated and the use of remifentanil justified, continuous and careful monitoring is required to detect respiratory depression to provide safe care of both the pregnant woman and unborn child.

  9. Outcome predictors for treatment success with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in low back pain with neuropathic components and neuropathic pain after surgical and nonsurgical trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, Andrew; Nicholson, Bruce; Hans, Guy; Brasseur, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Five percent lidocaine medicated plaster has been proven efficacious for the symptomatic relief of neuropathic pain in diverse pain conditions which might be attributed to a common localized symptomatology in these indications, possibly with common predictors of treatment success. To discuss potential symptoms and other factors predicting response to treatment with lidocaine plaster for the indications of low back pain with neuropathic components and neuropathic pain after surgical and nonsurgical trauma, 44 pain specialists from 17 countries attended a two-day conference meeting in December 2009. Discussions were based on the retrospective analysis of case reports (sent in by participants in the four weeks prior to the meeting) and the practical experience of the participants. The results indicate some predictors for success with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster for the two indications. Localized pain, hyperalgesia and/or allodynia, and other positive sensory symptoms, such as dysesthesia, were considered positive predictors, whereas widespread pain and negative sensory symptoms were regarded as negative predictors. Paresthesia, diagnosis, and site of pain were considered to be of no predictive value. Common symptomatology with other neurologic pathologies suggests that treatment of localized neuropathic pain symptoms with the plaster can be considered across different neuropathic pain indications. PMID:21386952

  10. Offset analgesia is reduced in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naugle, Kelly M; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Fillingim, Roger B; Riley, Joseph L

    2013-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that aging is associated with dysfunctional changes in pain modulatory capacity, potentially contributing to increased incidence of pain in older adults. However, age-related changes in offset analgesia (offset), a form of temporal pain inhibition, remain poorly characterized. The purpose of this study was to investigate age differences in offset analgesia of heat pain in healthy younger and older adults. To explore the peripheral mechanisms underlying offset, an additional aim of the study was to test offset at 2 anatomical sites with known differences in nociceptor innervation. A total of 25 younger adults and 20 older adults completed 6 offset trials in which the experimental heat stimulus was presented to the volar forearm and glabrous skin of the palm. Each trial consisted of 3 continuous phases: an initial 15-second painful stimulus (T1), a slight increase in temperature from T1 for 5 seconds (T2), and a slight decrease back to the initial testing temperature for 10 seconds (T3). During each trial, subjects rated pain intensity continuously using an electronic visual analogue scale (0-100). Older adults demonstrated reduced offset compared to younger adults when tested on the volar forearm. Interestingly, offset analgesia was nonexistent on the palm for all subjects. The reduced offset found in older adults may reflect an age-related decline in endogenous inhibitory systems. However, although the exact mechanisms underlying offset remain unknown, the absence of offset at the palm suggests that peripheral mechanisms may be involved in initiating this phenomenon.

  11. Intravenous lidocaine infusion reduces bispectral index-guided requirements of propofol only during surgical stimulation(dagger)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hans, G. A.; Lauwick, S. M.; Kaba, A.; Bonhomme, V.; Struys, M. M. R. F.; Hans, P. C.; Lamy, M. L.; Joris, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    I.V. lidocaine reduces volatile anaesthetics requirements during surgery. We hypothesized that lidocaine would also reduce propofol requirements during i.v. anaesthesia. A randomized controlled study of 40 patients tested the effect of i.v. lidocaine (1.5 mg kg(-1) then 2 mg kg(-1) h(-1)) on propofo

  12. Detection of follicular transport of lidocaine and metabolism in adipose tissue in pig ear skin by DESI mass spectrometry imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Alvise, Janina; Mortensen, Rasmus; Hansen, Steen H;

    2014-01-01

    of lidocaine into the deeper skin layers is demonstrated for the first time. Furthermore, metabolism of lidocaine to 3-OH-lidocaine was observed in subcutaneous tissue as well as in lobules of white adipose tissue surrounding the hair follicles. These results suggest that it is advantageous to use full...... thickness skin, including subcutaneous tissue, for skin metabolism studies....

  13. Addition of clonidine or fentanyl to local anaesthetics prolongs the duration of surgical analgesia after single shot caudal block in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constant, I; Gall, O; Gouyet, L; Chauvin, M; Murat, I

    1998-03-01

    Caudal anaesthesia is indicated for surgical procedures lasting less than 90 min. Fentanyl and clonidine are known to prolong postoperative caudal analgesia, but there are no data on their effect on duration of surgical analgesia. We evaluated if the addition of clonidine or fentanyl to local anaesthetics prolonged the duration of surgical analgesia after single shot caudal block in children in a randomized, double-blind study. We studied 64 children, aged 6-108 months, undergoing bilateral correction of vesicoureteral reflux which was expected to last more than 90 min. Patients were allocated to one of four groups: group O received 1 ml kg-1 of a mixture of 0.25% bupivacaine with epinephrine and 1% lidocaine in equal parts; group F received the same mixture of local anaesthetics in addition to fentanyl 1 microgram kg-1; group C received the same mixture of local anaesthetics in addition to clonidine 1.5 micrograms kg-1; and group C + F received the same mixture of local anaesthetics in addition to fentanyl 0.5 microgram kg-1 and clonidine 0.75 microgram kg-1. Single shot caudal block was sufficient in only 57% of children in group O compared with 93% in groups C and F and 86% in group C + F (P = 0.035). Global assessment of anaesthesia, defined as the time from caudal injection to the first administration of analgesic (either during or after surgery), was significantly longer in the three groups of children who received additives compared with local anaesthetics alone (P = 0.035), but there were no differences between the three additive groups. Vomiting was observed only in children who received fentanyl. Addition of clonidine or fentanyl to local anaesthetics prolonged the duration of surgical analgesia of caudal block, allowing single shot caudal anaesthesia to be recommended for surgery lasting 90-150 minutes. Clonidine had some advantages over fentanyl as it did not produce clinically significant side effects.

  14. Hands-and-knees positioning during labor with epidural analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stremler, Robyn; Halpern, Stephen; Weston, Julie; Yee, Jennifer; Hodnett, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Hands-and-knees position has shown promise as an intervention to improve labor and birth outcomes, but no reports exist that examine its use with women laboring with epidural analgesia. Concerns of safety, effects on analgesia, and acceptability of use may limit use of active positioning during labor with regional analgesia. This article presents a case study series of 13 women who used hands-and-knees position in the first stage of labor.

  15. Sedation and analgesia in gastrointestinal endoscopy: What’s new?

    OpenAIRE

    Fanti, Lorella; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Various types of sedation and analgesia technique have been used during gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures. The best methods for analgesia and sedation during gastrointestinal endoscopy are still debated. Providing an adequate regimen of sedation/analgesia might be considered an art, influencing several aspects of endoscopic procedures: the quality of the examination, the patient’s cooperation and the patient’s and physician’s satisfaction with the sedation. The properties of a model sedat...

  16. Sedation and analgesia in gastrointestinal endoscopy: What’s new?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lorella; Fanti; Pier; Alberto; Testoni

    2010-01-01

    Various types of sedation and analgesia technique have been used during gastrointestinal endoscopy procedures.The best methods for analgesia and sedation during gastrointestinal endoscopy are still debated.Providing an adequate regimen of sedation/analgesia might be considered an art,influencing several aspects of endoscopic procedures: the quality of the examination,the patient’s cooperation and the patient’s and physician’s satisfaction with the sedation.The properties of a model sedative agent for endosc...

  17. Analgesia accompanying food consumption requires ingestion of hedonic foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, H; Mason, Peggy

    2009-10-14

    Animals eat rather than react to moderate pain. Here, we examined the behavioral, hedonic, and neural requirements for ingestion analgesia in ad libitum fed rats. Noxious heat-evoked withdrawals were similarly suppressed during self-initiated chocolate eating and ingestion of intraorally infused water, sucrose, or saccharin, demonstrating that ingestion analgesia does not require feeding motivation, self-initiated food procurement, sucrose, or calories. Rather, food hedonics is important because neither salt ingestion nor quinine rejection elicited analgesia. During quinine-induced nausea and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced illness, conditions when chocolate eating was presumably less pleasurable, analgesia accompanying chocolate consumption was attenuated, yet analgesia during water ingestion was preserved in LPS-injected rats who showed enhanced palatability for water within this context. The dependence of ingestion analgesia on the positive hedonics of an ingestate was confirmed in rats with a conditioned taste aversion to sucrose: after paired exposure to sucrose and LPS, rats no longer showed analgesia during sucrose ingestion but continued to show analgesia during chocolate consumption. Eating pauses tended to occur less often and for shorter durations in the presence of ingestion analgesia than in its absence. Therefore, we propose that ingestion analgesia functions to defend eating from ending. Muscimol inactivation of the medullary raphe magnus blocked the analgesia normally observed during water ingestion, showing the involvement of brainstem endogenous pain inhibitory mechanisms in ingestion analgesia. Brainstem-mediated defense of the consumption of palatable foods may explain, at least in part, why overeating tasty foods is so irresistible even in the face of opposing cognitive and motivational forces.

  18. Intrathecal analgesia and palliative care: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen S Salins

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrathecal analgesia is an interventional form of pain relief with definite advantages and multiple complications. Administration of intrathecal analgesia needs a good resource setting and expertise. Early complications of intrathecal analgesia can be very distressing and managing these complications will need a high degree of knowledge, technical expertise and level of experience. Pain control alone cannot be the marker of quality in palliative care. A holistic approach may need to be employed that is more person and family oriented.

  19. Bupivacaine Lozenge Compared with Lidocaine Spray as Topical Pharyngeal Anesthetic before Unsedated Upper Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salale, Nesrin; Treldal, Charlotte; Mogensen, Stine;

    2014-01-01

    Unsedated upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE) can induce patient discomfort, mainly due to a strong gag reflex. The aim was to assess the effect of a bupivacaine lozenge as topical pharyngeal anesthetic compared with standard treatment with a lidocaine spray before UGE. Ninety-nine adult...... with a lidocaine spray proved to be a superior option as topical pharyngeal anesthetic before an UGE....

  20. Anticonvulsant treatment of asphyxiated newborns under hypothermia with lidocaine : efficacy, safety and dosing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Marcel P. H.; Rademaker, Carin M. A.; van Straaten, Henrica L. M.; Huitema, Alwin D. R.; Toet, Mona C.; de Vries, Linda S.; Egberts, Antoine C. G.; Groenendaal, Floris

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lidocaine is an antiarrythmicum used as an anticonvulsant for neonatal seizures, also during therapeutic hypothermia following (perinatal) asphyxia. Hypothermia may affect the efficacy, safety and dosing of lidocaine in these patients. OBJECTIVE: To study the efficacy and safety of lidoc

  1. Influence of lidocaine on ouabain-induced inotropic response in rat atria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterin-Borda, Leonor; Orman, Betina; Reina, Silvia; Borda, Enri

    2003-11-01

    In this paper we demonstrated that lidocaine broadens the therapeutic range of ouabain action having a protective effect on ouabain-induced toxicity on rat atria. The lidocaine effect on therapeutic ouabain action was associated with the increase in the sensitivity of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase related to a decreased in the equilibrium dissociation constant (K(d)) of high affinity binding sites. Lidocaine suppressed the ouabain-induced tonotropic effect and arrhythmias, decreasing the number of low affinity binding sites (B(max)) without changes in K(d). Blockade of Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchange with KB-R7943 or dual Na(+)-Ca(2+) channel with flunarizine, mimicked lidocaine effect increasing ouabain therapeutic action, extending its concentration range tolerated, delaying the onset of contracture. Lidocaine itself triggered negative inotropic response at high concentration. This effect was increased in the presence of flunarizine and verapamil but not by the inhibition of calcium/calmodulin with W-7. The mechanism underlying the lidocaine-induced negative inotropic response, appears to be different that underlying the positive inotropic effect on ouabain action. This study provides evidence that lidocaine can interact with the same or similar binding sites for ouabain in rat atrial tissue, providing a protective effect on ouabain-induced changes in contractility. The contribution of Na(+)-Ca(2+) exchange and/or Ca(2+) overload on lidocaine effect is discussed.

  2. Pain behaviour after castration of piglets; effect of pain relief with lidocaine and/or meloxicam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluivers-Poodt, M.; Zonderland, J.J.; Verbraak, J.; Lambooij, E.; Hellebrekers, L.J.

    2013-01-01

    Behavioural responses and the effect of lidocaine and meloxicam on behaviour of piglets after castration were studied. A total of 144 piglets of 2 to 5 days of age were allocated to one of six treatments: castration (CAST), castration with lidocaine (LIDO), castration with meloxicam (MELO),

  3. Pain behaviour after castration of piglets; effect of pain relief with lidocaine and/or meloxicam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluivers-Poodt, M.; Zonderland, J.J.; Verbraak, J.; Lambooij, E.; Hellebrekers, L.J.

    2013-01-01

    Behavioural responses and the effect of lidocaine and meloxicam on behaviour of piglets after castration were studied. A total of 144 piglets of 2 to 5 days of age were allocated to one of six treatments: castration (CAST), castration with lidocaine (LIDO), castration with meloxicam (MELO), castrati

  4. Antibacterial properties of 2% lidocaine and reduced rate of endophthalmitis after intravitreal injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tustin, Aaron; Kim, Stephen J; Chomsky, Amy; Hubbard, G Baker; Sheng, Jinsong

    2014-05-01

    To determine whether the application of subconjunctival 2% lidocaine/0.1% methylparaben for anesthesia may reduce rates of endophthalmitis after intravitreal (IVT) injection. We performed in vitro experiments to determine the antibacterial properties of 2% lidocaine/0.1% methylparaben (lidocaine) against causative organisms of endophthalmitis. Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Streptococcus viridans from patients with endophthalmitis were incubated with or without lidocaine. Aliquots (100 µL) were plated on Mueller-Hinton (S. aureus and S. epidermidis) or blood agar plates (S. viridans) at 0, 10, 30, 120, and 240 minutes, and colonies were counted after 24 hours. A retrospective review of 15,042 IVT injections was performed from January 2004 to February 2011 to determine the rate of endophthalmitis with or without application of subconjunctival lidocaine for anesthesia. Lidocaine demonstrated rapid bactericidal effects against all 3 organisms. After 10 minutes of exposure, there was approximately a 90% (P 2% (P lidocaine and 8 cases of endophthalmitis of 8,189 (0.1%) IVT injections performed with other methods of anesthesia (P = 0.03). Application of subconjunctival 2% lidocaine/0.1% methylparaben for anesthesia may reduce the incidence of endophthalmitis after IVT injection.

  5. Toxicity of topical lidocaine applied to the breasts to reduce discomfort during screening mammography

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    Colleen K Lambertz

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Thirty mL of 4% lidocaine gel on the breasts and chest wall covered for 1 h in healthy women resulted in plasma concentrations of lidocaine and MEGX well below therapeutic or toxic levels and no clinically significant adverse events.

  6. Synergistic effect of lidocaine with pingyangmycin for treatment of venous malformation using a mouse spleen model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Nan; Chen, Yuan-Zheng; Mao, Kai-Ping; Fu, Yanjie; Lin, Qiang; Xue, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To explore whether lidocaine has the synergistic effect with pingyangmycin (PYM) in the venous malformations (VMs) treatment. Methods: The mouse spleen was chosen as a VM model and injected with different concentration of lidocaine or PYM or jointly treated with lidocaine and PYM. After 2, 5, 8 or 14 days, the mouse spleen tissues were acquired for hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, TUNEL assay and quantitative RT-PCR analysis to examine the toxicological effects of lidocaine and PYM on splenic vascular endothelial cells. Results: 0.4% of lidocaine mildly promoted the apoptosis of endothelial cells, while 2 mg/ml PYM significantly elevated the apoptotic ratios. However, the combination of 0.2% lidocaine and 0.5 mg/ml PYM notably elevated the apoptotic ratios of splenic cells and severely destroyed the configuration of spleen, compared to those of treatment with 0.5 mg/ml PYM alone. Conclusion: Lidocaine exerts synergistic effects with PYM in promoting the apoptosis of mouse splenic endothelial cells, indicating that lidocaine possibly promotes the therapeutic effects of PYM in VMs treatment via synergistically enhancing the apoptosis of endothelial cells of malformed venous lesions. PMID:24966943

  7. LABOUR ANALGESIA: EPIDURAL DEXMEDITOMIDINE WITH EITHER BUPIVACAINE OR ROPIVACAINE

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    Varaprasad

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pain relief in labour is associated with myths and controversies. Providing effective and safe analgesia has remained a challenge. AIM: The purpose of the study was to compare the effect of analgesia with epidural bupivacain or ropivacain along with dexme ditomidine. METHODS AND MATERIAL: Sixty parturients of ASA grade I and II were randomly selected for the study. Each group consisted of thirty patients. The analgesia, motor loss and level of sedation were studied. RESULTS: There was no significant differ ence between the two groups in maternal satisfaction, analgesia and neonatal outcome .

  8. Selective REM Sleep Deprivation Improves Expectation-Related Placebo Analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouchou, Florian; Chauny, Jean-Marc; Rainville, Pierre; Lavigne, Gilles J

    2015-01-01

    The placebo effect is a neurobiological and psychophysiological process known to influence perceived pain relief. Optimization of placebo analgesia may contribute to the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of medication for acute and chronic pain management. We know that the placebo effect operates through two main mechanisms, expectations and learning, which is also influenced by sleep. Moreover, a recent study suggested that rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is associated with modulation of expectation-mediated placebo analgesia. We examined placebo analgesia following pharmacological REM sleep deprivation and we tested the hypothesis that relief expectations and placebo analgesia would be improved by experimental REM sleep deprivation in healthy volunteers. Following an adaptive night in a sleep laboratory, 26 healthy volunteers underwent classical experimental placebo analgesic conditioning in the evening combined with pharmacological REM sleep deprivation (clonidine: 13 volunteers or inert control pill: 13 volunteers). Medication was administered in a double-blind manner at bedtime, and placebo analgesia was tested in the morning. Results revealed that 1) placebo analgesia improved with REM sleep deprivation; 2) pain relief expectations did not differ between REM sleep deprivation and control groups; and 3) REM sleep moderated the relationship between pain relief expectations and placebo analgesia. These results support the putative role of REM sleep in modulating placebo analgesia. The mechanisms involved in these improvements in placebo analgesia and pain relief following selective REM sleep deprivation should be further investigated.

  9. Selective REM Sleep Deprivation Improves Expectation-Related Placebo Analgesia.

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    Florian Chouchou

    Full Text Available The placebo effect is a neurobiological and psychophysiological process known to influence perceived pain relief. Optimization of placebo analgesia may contribute to the clinical efficacy and effectiveness of medication for acute and chronic pain management. We know that the placebo effect operates through two main mechanisms, expectations and learning, which is also influenced by sleep. Moreover, a recent study suggested that rapid eye movement (REM sleep is associated with modulation of expectation-mediated placebo analgesia. We examined placebo analgesia following pharmacological REM sleep deprivation and we tested the hypothesis that relief expectations and placebo analgesia would be improved by experimental REM sleep deprivation in healthy volunteers. Following an adaptive night in a sleep laboratory, 26 healthy volunteers underwent classical experimental placebo analgesic conditioning in the evening combined with pharmacological REM sleep deprivation (clonidine: 13 volunteers or inert control pill: 13 volunteers. Medication was administered in a double-blind manner at bedtime, and placebo analgesia was tested in the morning. Results revealed that 1 placebo analgesia improved with REM sleep deprivation; 2 pain relief expectations did not differ between REM sleep deprivation and control groups; and 3 REM sleep moderated the relationship between pain relief expectations and placebo analgesia. These results support the putative role of REM sleep in modulating placebo analgesia. The mechanisms involved in these improvements in placebo analgesia and pain relief following selective REM sleep deprivation should be further investigated.

  10. Prospective randomized study of viscous lidocaine versus benzocaine in a GI cocktail for dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilke, Gary M; Jin, Albert; Davis, Daniel P; Chan, Theodore C

    2004-07-01

    We hypothesized that Benzocaine (Hurricaine) would work as quickly and effectively as viscous Lidocaine in this preparation. This was a prospective randomized, single-blinded comparison between Benzocaine and Lidocaine as the topical anesthetic in a gastrointestinal (GI) cocktail. Patients 18 years or older were approached for participation when a GI cocktail was ordered by the Emergency Physician. Patients were randomized to equivalent doses of either Benzocaine or viscous Lidocaine in addition to 30 cc of Maalox and 10 cc of Donnatal. Assessment using a visual analog pain scale occurred at time intervals of 0, 5, 15, and 30 min. Eighty-two patients were enrolled (44 to Benzocaine, 38 to viscous Lidocaine), with each group having a statistically significant improvement in pain (p Benzocaine and viscous Lidocaine groups in terms of the relief of symptoms at each of the assessment times. There were no adverse outcomes in either group.

  11. Neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of lidocaine in kainic acid-injected rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Kuan Ming; Lu, Cheng Wei; Lee, Ming Yi; Wang, Ming Jiuh; Lin, Tzu Yu; Wang, Su Jane

    2016-05-04

    Lidocaine, the most commonly used local anesthetic, inhibits glutamate release from nerve terminals. Given the involvement of glutamate neurotoxicity in the pathogenesis of various neurological disorders, this study investigated the role of lidocaine in hippocampal neuronal death and inflammatory events induced by an i.p. injection of kainic acid (KA) (15 mg/kg), a glutamate analog. The results showed that KA significantly led to neuronal death in the CA3 pyramidal layers of the hippocampus and this effect was attenuated by the systemic administration of lidocaine (0.8 or 4 mg/kg, i.p.) 30 min before KA injection. Moreover, KA-induced microglia activation and gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines, namely, interleukin-1β, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the hippocampus were reduced by the lidocaine pretreatment. Altogether, the results suggest that lidocaine can effectively treat glutamate excitotoxicity-related brain disorders.

  12. [Comparison of two modified lidocaine solutions for local anesthesia in blepharoplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca Júnior, Nilson Lopes da; Lucci, Lucia Miriam Dumont; Badessa, Marianne Peixoto Sobral Giroldo; Rehder, José Ricardo Carvalho Lima

    2009-01-01

    To compare pain on injection of two modified anesthetic lidocaine solutions for use in upper blepharoplasty: 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine, and 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine buffered 9:1 with 8.4% sodium bicarbonate. In this prospective, double-masked study, 25 consecutive patients undergoing upper blepharoplasty were submitted to the anesthesic procedure. Each eyelid received one of two modified lidocaine solutions. Heart rate, systemic arterial pressure and oxygen saturation level were obtained before, during and after injection of two different anesthetic solutions. Patients used a 4-point scale to rate the perceived pain on injection. All parameters were statistically analyzed and there was a significant difference in heart rate and oxygen saturation level. Pain on injection of eyelid anesthesia does not differ significantly with either buffered or unmodified lidocaine solutions.

  13. Anestesia epidural com ropivacaína, lidocaína ou associação de lidocaína e xilazina em cães: efeitos cardiorrespiratório e analgésico Epidural anaesthesia using ropivacaine, lidocaine or the combination of lidocaine and xylazine in dogs: cardiorespiratory and analgesic effects

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    Simone Salata Gasparini

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo investigou o efeito da ropivacaína, da lidocaína e da associação de lidocaína e xilazina na anestesia epidural de cães. Trinta cães foram tranqüilizados com acepromazina intravenosa, distribuídos em três grupos e submetidos à anestesia epidural no espaço lombo-sacro, com lidocaína 2% com vasoconstrictor (GL, ropivacaína 1% (GR ou com xilazina associada à lidocaína (GXL. Mensuraram-se as freqüências cardíaca (FC e respiratória (f, a pressão arterial sistólica (PAS, a concentração final expirada de CO2 (EtCO2, o volume minuto (VM e a temperatura retal (T. Para avaliação da analgesia somática, utilizou-se o teste do panículo e o teste térmico a 55°C. Os protocolos produziram anestesia da região retro-umbilical, sendo que a associação XL produziu bloqueio anestésico mais cranial, porém causou bradicardia moderada. A duração da anestesia foi mais prolongada nos animais dos grupos GXL (240 min e GR (250 min, quando comparada as do grupo GL (120 min.This study was aimed at investigating the effects of ropivacaine, lidocaine or lidocaine combined with xylazine for epidural anaesthesia in dogs. Thirty dogs were sedated with acepromazine IV, divided in to three groups and submitted to lumbosacral epidural anaesthesia using 2% lidocaine with adrenaline (L or 1% ropivacaine (R or xylazine combined with lidocaine (XL. Heart and respiratory rates, systolic arterial blood pressure, EtCO2, minute volume and temperature were measured. Cutaneous anaesthesia was investigated using a forceps and thermic stimulus. All protocols produced retroumbilical anaesthesia. The combination of XL produced a more cranial anaesthetic block, with moderate bradycardia. The duration of the anaesthesia was more prolonged in animals treated with XL (240min and R (250min, when compared to L alone (120min.

  14. Comparative study between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat

    OpenAIRE

    Mekhemar,Nashwa Abdallah; El-Agwany, Ahmed Samy; Radi,Wafaa Kamel; El-Hady,Sherif Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Postoperative sore throat is a common complication after endotracheal intubation. After tracheal intubation, the incidence of sore throat varies from 14.4% to 50%. The aim of the study was to compare between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on the endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat. The present study was carried out on 124 patients admitted to Alexandria university hospitals for lumbar fixation surgery requiring general ...

  15. Antinociceptive effects of systemic lidocaine: involvement of the spinal glycinergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth-Selbach, Uta; Hermanns, Henning; Stegmann, Jens Ulrich; Kollosche, Kathrin; Freynhagen, Rainer; Bauer, Inge; Lipfert, Peter

    2009-06-24

    Beside their action on voltage-gated Na(+) channels, local anesthetics are known to exert a variety of effects via alternative mechanisms. The antinociceptive effect of lidocaine is well documented, yet the exact mechanism is not fully understood. Whether glycinergic mechanisms, which play a pivotal role in pain modulation, are involved in lidocaine-induced antinociception is hitherto unclear. In the present study, lidocaine was injected intravenously in rats using the formalin test for acute pain and the chronic constriction injury model for neuropathic pain. The effect of intrathecally administered d-serine (an agonist at the glycine-binding site at the NMDA-receptor), its inactive isomer l-serine, CGP 78608 (antagonist at the glycineB-site of the NMDA-receptor) and strychnine (antagonist at inhibitory glycine-receptors) on lidocaine-induced antinociception was examined. Systemically administered lidocaine was antinociceptive in both acute and chronic pain model. In the formalin test, the effect of lidocaine was antagonized by d-serine, but not by l-serine or strychnine. In the chronic constriction injury model, antinociception evoked by lidocaine was reduced by d-serine, strychnine and CGP 78608, while l-serine had no effect. These results indicate a modulatory effect of lidocaine on the NMDA-receptor. Additionally, since in our study lidocaine-induced antinociception was antagonized by both glycineB-site modulators and strychnine our results may favor the hypothesis of a general glycine-like action of lidocaine or some of its metabolites on inhibitory strychnine-sensitive receptors and on strychnine-insensitive glycine receptors.

  16. Lidocaine stabilizes the open state of CNS voltage-dependent sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Castellanos, David R; Nikonorov, Igor; Kallen, Roland G; Recio-Pinto, E

    2002-03-28

    We have previously reported that the lidocaine action is different between CNS and muscle batrachotoxin-modified Na+ channels [Salazar et al., J. Gen. Physiol. 107 (1996) 743-754; Brain Res. 699 (1995) 305-314]. In this study we examined lidocaine action on CNS Na+ currents, to investigate the mechanism of lidocaine action on this channel isoform and to compare it with that proposed for muscle Na+ currents. Na+ currents were measured with the whole cell voltage clamp configuration in stably transfected cells expressing the brain alpha-subunit (type IIA) by itself (alpha-brain) or together with the brain beta(1)-subunit (alphabeta(1)-brain), or the cardiac alpha-subunit (hH1) (alpha-cardiac). Lidocaine (100 microM) produced comparable levels of Na+ current block at positive potentials and of hyperpolarizing shift of the steady-state inactivation curve in alpha-brain and alphabeta(1)-brain Na+ currents. Lidocaine accelerated the rates of activation and inactivation, produced an hyperpolarizing shift in the steady-state activation curve and increased the current magnitude at negative potentials in alpha-brain but not in alphabeta(1)-brain Na+ currents. The lidocaine action in alphabeta(1)-brain resembled that observed in alpha-cardiac Na+ currents. The lidocaine-induced increase in current magnitude at negative potentials and the hyperpolarizing shift in the steady-state activation curve of alpha-brain, are novel effects and suggest that lidocaine treatment does not always lead to current reduction/block when it interacts with Na+ channels. The data are explained by using a modified version of the model proposed by Vedantham and Cannon [J. Gen. Physiol., 113 (1999) 7-16] in which we postulate that the difference in lidocaine action between alpha-brain and alphabeta(1)-brain Na+ currents could be explained by differences in the lidocaine action on the open channel state.

  17. Intravenous lidocaine for effective pain relief after bimaxillary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Uilyong; Choi, Young-Jun; Choi, Geun Joo; Kang, Hyun

    2017-02-06

    The aim of this prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to evaluate the analgesic effect of intravenous lidocaine on postoperative pain in bimaxillary surgery. Between July 2015 and November 2015, 52 consecutive patients that underwent bimaxillary surgery were recruited to the present study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups: group L (1.5 mg/kg bolus and 2 mg/kg/h continuous infusion during the operation) and group C (normal saline). To measure pain intensity, a visual analog scale (VAS) was used at 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, and 48 h after surgery. Rescue ketorolac use was measured in the first 4, 4-8, 8-24, and 24-48 h after surgery. Total ketorolac consumption (the sum of rescue and eight-hourly fixed schedule ketorolac injection), WBC count, neutrophil count, and postoperative swelling were recorded. There were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to demographics. VAS pain scores were significantly lower in group L compared with group C up to 8 h after surgery. Rescue ketorolac use up to 8 h after surgery and total ketorolac consumption were significantly lower in group L than in group C. Postoperative WBC and neutrophil counts were significantly decreased in group L. Compared with group C, the amount of calibrated postoperative swelling was lower in group L. Systemic lidocaine infusion during bimaxillary surgery reduces postoperative pain, analgesic consumption, and facial swelling. Systemic lidocaine is simple, economic, and a safe procedure reducing pain and soft tissue swelling after bimaxillary surgery.

  18. Prevention of propofol injection pain: Comparison between lidocaine and ramosetron

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    Dipali Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Propofol causes a high incidence of pain during intravenous (IV injection. The aim of this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study was to determine whether pre-treatment with IV ramosetron, used for prophylaxis of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV, would reduce propofol-induced pain as an equivalent to lidocaine. Materials and Methods: Hundred and twenty American Society of Anesthesiologists grade (ASA I and II patients were randomly assigned into three groups (40 in each. Group N received 2 ml of 0.9% saline, Group L received 2 ml of lidocaine, and Group R received 2 ml of ramosetron. Mid forearm was occluded manually before injection and released after 1 min and then propofol was injected over 5 s. Patients were observed and questioned 15 s later if they had pain in the arm and pain was scored on a four-point scale: 0 = no pain, 1 = mild pain, 2 = moderate pain, and 3 = severe pain. Unpaired Student′s t-test and chi-square test/Fisher′ exact test were used to analyze results. Results: The incidence of pain in groups N, L, and R were 65, 35, and 30%, respectively. Pain was reduced significantly in the groups L and R (P < 0.05. Two patients each in Groups L and R (5% each had moderate and severe pain. This difference in pain was statistically insignificant, but when compared to Group N (25 and 30%, respectively it was statistically significant. Conclusion: Pretreatment with ramosetron 0.3 mg and lidocaine 40 mg are equally effective in preventing pain from propofol injection.

  19. Labor analgesia: An update on the effect of epidural analgesia on labor outcome

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    Samina Ismail

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the introduction of epidural for labor analgesia, debate has centered on the issue of its effect on outcome of labor; in terms of length of labor and increase in the rate of instrumental vaginal delivery and cesarean section (CS. There is no ideal study on the effect of epidural analgesia (EA on the outcome of labor due to logistic problems in randomization, blinding and getting a control group; as a result these queries are partly answered. Despite these problems, it has been established that labor epidural has minimal effect on progress of established labor and maternal request should be a sufficient indication to start an epidural. Although instrumental vaginal delivery is probably increased with epidural but obstetrician practice, pain free patient and teaching opportunity are likely factors increasing the incidence. Maternal-fetal factors and obstetric management and not the use of EA are the most important determinants of the CS rate. The purpose of this review is to summarize data from controlled trials addressing the question of whether neuraxial labor analgesia causes an increased risk of CS or rate of instrumental delivery. In addition, the review discusses whether the timing of initiation of analgesia infl uences the mode of delivery.

  20. Remifentanil patient controlled analgesia versus epidural analgesia in labour. A multicentre randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freeman, Liv M.; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W. M.; Franssen, Maureen T. M.; Papatsonis, Dimitri N. M.; Hajenius, Petra J.; van Huizen, Marloes E.; Bremer, Henk A.; van den Akker, Eline S. A.; Woiski, Mallory D.; Porath, Martina M.; van Beek, Erik; Schuitemaker, Nico; van der Salm, Paulien C. M.; Fong, Bianca F.; Radder, Celine; Bax, Caroline J.; Sikkema, Marko; van den Akker-van Marle, M. Elske; van Lith, Jan M. M.; Lopriore, Enrico; Uildriks, Renske J.; Struys, Michel M. R. F.; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Dahan, Albert; Middeldorp, Johanna M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pain relief during labour is a topic of major interest in the Netherlands. Epidural analgesia is considered to be the most effective method of pain relief and recommended as first choice. However its uptake by pregnant women is limited compared to other western countries, partly as a res

  1. Subcutaneous Injection of Triamcinolone and Lidocaine to Prevent Postherpetic Neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jiaxiang; Wang, Xiaoping; Tang, Yuanzhang; Yang, Liqiang; Zeng, Yuanjie; Guo, Yuna

    2017-07-01

    Herpes zoster (HZ) is associated with inflammation of the peripheral nerves, which is considered to be an important cause of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Interventions aimed at reducing this inflammation could prevent PHN. One option is the epidural administration of corticosteroid and local anesthetic. However, several authors have reported a risk of arachnoiditis with epidural corticosteroids. Subcutaneous injection in an outpatient setting is a safer option. However, there is limited evidence of the effectiveness of this alternative for preventing PHN. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of subcutaneous injection of triamcinolone and lidocaine for the prevention of PHN in elderly HZ patients. Randomized, single-center, clinical trial. Department of pain management of a teaching hospital in Beijing, China. Patients with acute HZ with rash subcutaneous injection of triamcinolone and lidocaine. The severity of pain was assessed using a numeric rating scale (NRS) at enrollment and at one, 3, and 6 months after rash onset. Quality of life (QoL) was evaluated by the SF-36 before treatment and at 3 and 6 months after rash onset. The primary endpoint was the presence of zoster-associated pain (ZAP) at 3 months after rash onset. At enrollment, all patients reported ZAP with average NRS scores of 6.64 ± 1.44 and 7.16 ± 1.22 in the standard group and subcutaneous group, respectively. At 3 and 6 months after rash onset, the pain had decreased in both groups, but the decrease was significantly greater in the subcutaneous injection group. At 3 months, 2 (4%) patients in the subcutaneous injection group vs. 10 (20%) patients in the standard group had ZAP with NRS > 3 (P = 0.014). Both groups showed significant improvement in QoL at 3 and 6 months. No patient had major adverse events related to the subcutaneous injection. The main limitation of the study was the absence of a placebo subcutaneous injection in the standard group. Subcutaneous injection of

  2. Immediate reaction to lidocaine with periorbital edema during upper blepharoplasty

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    Benjamin Presman

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: In clinical practice, we recommend that patient should be informed about the possibility of recurrence of an adverse reaction in case of re-exposure to lidocaine, even in the vast majority of cases where true allergy could not be proven. In case of further need for local anesthesia with history of an adverse event, a different agent may be chosen even from the same class (another amide as cross-reactions in the amide group are rare. Otherwise, an anesthetic from the ester group can also be safely used.

  3. Effect of postoperative epidural analgesia on surgical outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, K; Holte, Kathrine

    2002-01-01

    epidural analgesia significantly lowers the risk of thromboembolic complications after lower body procedures, while no effect is seen after major abdominal surgery. Unfortunately, many studies have inadequate study design, with use of lumbar epidural analgesia for abdominal procedures, or the epidural...

  4. Influence of adrenergic and cholinergic mechanisms in baclofen induced analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, L; Rifo, J; Contreras, E

    1988-01-01

    1. Baclofen induced analgesia was confirmed by means of the mouse hot plate test. 2. Physostigmine significantly increased the response to baclofen whilst neostigmine was ineffective. Baclofen analgesia was reduced by atropine. 3. The response to baclofen was increased by the administration of tolazoline, propranolol and nadolol. In contrast, the analgesic response to morphine was attenuated by the antiadrenergic drugs phenoxybenzamine, tolazoline and nadolol.

  5. Hypertonic saline does not reverse the sodium channel blocking actions of lidocaine: evidence from electrophysiologic and defibrillation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujhelyi, M R; Schur, M; Frede, T; Bottorff, M B; Gabel, M; Markel, M L

    1997-01-01

    Studies have shown that increasing extracellular sodium concentration can partially reverse sodium channel blockade. However, there is conflicting in vitro evidence in this regard for lidocaine. The effects of lidocaine on cardiac electrophysiology and defibrillation were studied in a basal and hypernatremic state to determine reversibility of sodium channel blockade. Electrophysiologic studies measured right ventricular effective refractory period at 350 ms pacing cycle length and QRS interval, JT interval, and monophasic action potential duration during sinus rhythm and right ventricular pacing (350 ms cycle length) in 14 pentobarbital-anesthetized swine (25-30 kg). Defibrillation threshold (DFT) was measured by quantitating successful conversion of sustained ventricular fibrillation to normal sinus rhythm. Each pig was randomly assigned to a treatment group with three study phases; group 1 = baseline, lidocaine (20 mg/kg/h), and lidocaine plus placebo (D5W; n = 7); and group 2 = baseline, lidocaine, and lidocaine plus hypertonic saline (2-3 mM/kg/h; n = 7). In groups 1 and 2, lidocaine infused alone significantly (p Lidocaine alone reduced right ventricular action potential duration (APD) in groups 1 and 2 (214 +/- 18 to 206 +/- 20 ms; p lidocaine, DFT and QRS duration values were unaffected (14.7 +/- 5.4 to 16.1 +/- 3.7 J and 103 +/- 12 to 100 +/- 11 ms, respectively). However, APD and JT intervals returned to basal values when hypertonic saline was added to lidocaine (212 +/- 8 to 225 +/- 13; p Lidocaine slowed ventricular conduction velocity and reduced APD. The administration of hypertonic saline to increase extracellular sodium concentrations failed to reverse the effect of lidocaine on conduction-velocity slowing or elevated DFT values. Hypertonic saline did reverse the effects of lidocaine on repolarization parameters. These data suggest that shortening of repolarization is not a mechanism by which lidocaine makes it more difficult to defibrillate the

  6. Relationship between analgesia and turnover of brain biogenic amines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensemana, D; Gascon, A L

    1978-10-01

    The analgesic activity of morphine, delta9THC, and sodium salicylate was studied concomitantly with changes in brainstem and cortex turnover of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), and serotonin (5HT). The results show that a correlation exists between the presence of analgesia and the increased turnover rates of the three biogenic amines. Morphine and sodium salicylate induced analgesia is accompanied by an increased turnover rate of all three biogenic amines; delta9THC-induced analgesia is accompanied by an increased turnover rate of DA and 5HT only. There is, however, no consistent relationship between the degree of analgesia and the degree of change in the turnover rates. The existence of the endogenous morphine-like substances, endorphines, may explain why morphine analgesia is distinct from that of delta9THC and sodium salicylate. The possible relationship between this morphine-like substance and biogenic amines is discussed.

  7. Intraarticular lidocaine versus intravenous analgesic for reduction of acute anterior shoulder dislocations. A prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, D E; Roberts, T

    1995-01-01

    We performed a prospective, randomized study to evaluate the use of injected lidocaine as an anesthetic for closed reduction of acute anterior shoulder dislocations. Thirty consecutive patients who presented at the emergency department with acute anterior shoulder dislocations were randomly placed in one of two groups. One group received an intraarticular injection of 20 ml of 1% lidocaine and the other group, intravenous injections of morphine sulfate and midazolam. The groups were compared regarding time of reduction maneuver, difficulty of reduction, subjective pain, complications, and total time spent in the emergency department. The lidocaine provided adequate anesthesia and secondary relief of muscle spasm in 15 of 15 (100%) patients. When compared with the intravenous sedation group, the lidocaine group showed no statistically significant difference in time for reduction maneuver, difficulty of reduction, or subjective pain. The lidocaine group had no complications and had a statistically significant shorter emergency department visit when compared with the intravenous sedation group (mean, 78 minutes versus 186 minutes; P = 0.004). Lidocaine provides excellent anesthesia for patients with uncomplicated anterior shoulder dislocations and can be very beneficial when sedation is contraindicated. Lidocaine injections also proved to be cost effective in our institution, reducing total costs by as much as 62%.

  8. Intravenous lipid emulsion given to volunteers does not affect symptoms of lidocaine brain toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinonen, Juho A; Litonius, Erik; Salmi, Tapani; Haasio, Juhani; Tarkkila, Pekka; Backman, Janne T; Rosenberg, Per H

    2015-04-01

    Intravenous lipid emulsion has been suggested as treatment for local anaesthetic toxicity, but the exact mechanism of action is still uncertain. Controlled studies on the effect of lipid emulsion on toxic doses of local anaesthetics have not been performed in man. In randomized, subject-blinded and two-phase cross-over fashion, eight healthy volunteers were given a 1.5 ml/kg bolus of 20% Intralipid(®) (200 mg/ml) or Ringer's acetate solution intravenously, followed by a rapid injection of lidocaine 1.0 mg/kg. Then, the same solution as in the bolus was infused at a rate of 0.25 ml/kg/min. for 30 min. Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded, and 5 min. after lidocaine injection, the volunteers were asked to report subjective symptoms. Total and un-entrapped lidocaine plasma concentrations were measured from venous blood samples. EEG band power changes (delta, alpha and beta) after the lidocaine bolus were similar during lipid and during Ringer infusion. There were no differences between infusions in the subjective symptoms of central nervous system toxicity. Lidocaine was only minimally entrapped in the plasma by lipid emulsion, but the mean un-entrapped lidocaine area under concentration-time curve from 0 to 30 min. was clearly smaller during lipid than Ringer infusion (16.4 versus 21.3 mg × min/l, p = 0.044). Intravenous lipid emulsion did not influence subjective toxicity symptoms nor affect the EEG changes caused by lidocaine.

  9. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of lidocaine- loaded biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianming; Lv, Xin

    2014-09-29

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel lidocaine microspheres. Microspheres were prepared by the oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion technique using poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA) for the controlled delivery of lidocaine. The average diameter of lidocaine PLGA microspheres was 2.34±0.3 μm. The poly disperse index was 0.21±0.03, and the zeta potential was +0.34±0.02 mV. The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading of the prepared microspheres were 90.5%±4.3% and 11.2%±1.4%. In vitro release indicated that the lidocaine microspheres had a well-sustained release efficacy, and in vivo studies showed that the area under the curve of lidocaine in microspheres was 2.02-2.06-fold that of lidocaine injection (ppharmacodynamics results showed that lidocaine microspheres showed a significant release effect in rats, that the process to achieve efficacy was calm and lasting and that the analgesic effect had a significant dose-dependency.

  10. The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Lidocaine- Loaded Biodegradable Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid Microspheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Liu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to develop novel lidocaine microspheres. Microspheres were prepared by the oil-in-water (o/w emulsion technique using poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide acid (PLGA for the controlled delivery of lidocaine. The average diameter of lidocaine PLGA microspheres was 2.34 ± 0.3 μm. The poly disperse index was 0.21 ± 0.03, and the zeta potential was +0.34 ± 0.02 mV. The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading of the prepared microspheres were 90.5% ± 4.3% and 11.2% ± 1.4%. In vitro release indicated that the lidocaine microspheres had a well-sustained release efficacy, and in vivo studies showed that the area under the curve of lidocaine in microspheres was 2.02–2.06-fold that of lidocaine injection (p < 0.05. The pharmacodynamics results showed that lidocaine microspheres showed a significant release effect in rats, that the process to achieve efficacy was calm and lasting and that the analgesic effect had a significant dose-dependency.

  11. Lidocaine action and conformational changes in cytoskeletal protein network in human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, E; Hamada, N; Shindo, J

    1995-11-03

    The mechanism of action of lidocaine, which is commonly used clinically as a local anesthetic, was studied in human red blood cells. The influx of [14C]lidocaine through the cell membrane induced reversible transformation of human red blood cells from discocytes to stomatocytes. This change in shape depended on the lidocaine concentration and required both ATP and carbonic anhydrase. The lidocaine-induced shape change occurred as a result of spectrin aggregation, which altered the intracellular environment of the human red blood cells, mediated by carbonic anhydrase and activation of vacuolar type H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase). Lidocaine controlled the influx of 22Na into the human red blood cells in a concentration-dependent manner. When incubated in media containing 6-chloro-9-[(4-diethylamino)-1-methyl-butyl]amino-2-methoxyacridine (mepacrine), an inhibitor of Na+ channels, human red blood cells changed shape from discocytes to stomatocytes and the intracellular pH decreased. This phenomenon was very similar to the shape change induced by lidocaine. These results suggest that the mode of action of lidocaine is related to a conformational change in the cytoskeletal protein network.

  12. Radioprotective Effect of Lidocaine on Function and Ultrastructure of Salivary Glands Receiving Fractionated Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakim, Samer George, E-mail: samer.hakim@mkg-chir.mu-luebeck.de [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Benedek, Geza Attila [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Su Yuxiong [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guanghua (China); Jacobsen, Hans Christian [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Klinger, Matthias [Institute of Anatomy, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Dendorfer, Andreas [Institute of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Hemmelmann, Claudia [Institute of Medical Biometry and Statistics, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Meller, Birgit [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Nadrowitz, Roger; Rades, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany); Sieg, Peter [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Luebeck, Luebeck (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: Radiation-induced xerostomia still represents a common side effect after radiotherapy for head-and-neck malignancies. The aim of the present study was to examine the radioprotective effect of lidocaine hydrochloride during fractionated radiation in an experimental animal model. Methods and Materials: To evaluate the influence of different radiation doses on salivary gland function and the radioprotective effect of lidocaine, rabbits were irradiated with 15, 25, 30, and 35 Gy (equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions equivalent to 24, 40, 48, and 56 Gy, respectively). Lidocaine hydrochloride (10 and 12 mg/kg) was administered before every radiation fraction in the treatment groups. Salivary gland function was assessed by flow sialometry and sialoscintigraphy, and the morphologic changes were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. Results: Functional impairment was first observed after 35 Gy and pretreatment with lidocaine improved radiation tolerance of both parotid and submandibular glands. The use of 12 mg/kg lidocaine was superior and displayed significant radioprotection with regard to flow sialometry and sialoscintigraphy. The ultrastructure was largely preserved after pretreatment with both lidocaine doses. Conclusions: Lidocaine represents an effective radioprotective agent and a promising approach for clinical application to avoid radiation-induced functional impairment of salivary glands.

  13. Lidocaine Stimulates the Function of Natural Killer Cells in Different Experimental Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cata, Juan P; Ramirez, Maria F; Velasquez, Jose F; Di, A I; Popat, Keyuri U; Gottumukkala, Vijaya; Black, Dahlia M; Lewis, Valerae O; Vauthey, Jean N

    2017-09-01

    One of the functions of natural killer (NK) cells is to eliminate cancer cells. The cytolytic activity of NK cells is tightly regulated by inhibitory and activation receptors located in the surface membrane. Lidocaine stimulates the function of NK cells at clinically relevant concentrations. It remains unknown whether this effect of lidocaine has an impact on the expression of surface receptors of NK cells, can uniformly stimulate across different cancer cell lines, and enhances the function of cells obtained during oncological surgery. NK cells from healthy donors and 43 patients who had undergone surgery for cancer were isolated. The function of NK cells was measured by lactate dehydrogenase release assay. NK cells were incubated with clinically relevant concentrations of lidocaine. By flow cytometry, we determined the impact of lidocaine on the expression of galactosylgalactosylxylosylprotein3-beta-glucuronosytranferase 1, marker of cell maturation (CD57), killer cell lectin like receptor A, inhibitory (NKG2A) receptors and killer cell lectin like receptor D, activation (NKG2D) receptors of NK cells. Differences in expression at pcells against ovarian, pancreatic and ovarian cancer cell lines. Lidocaine also increased the cytolytic activity of NK cells from patients who underwent oncological surgery, except for those who had orthopedic procedures. Lidocaine showed an important stimulatory activity on NK cells. Our findings suggest that lidocaine might be used perioperatively to minimize the impact of surgery on NK cells. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  14. Intraurethral Lidocaine for Urethral Catheterization in Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonai, Naveen; Li, Jennifer; Langford, Cindy; Lepore, Natasha; Taddio, Anna; Gerges, Sandra; Stitt, Larry; Teefy, John; Manji, Karim; Castelo, Matt; Rieder, Michael; Qui, Tingting; Matsui, Doreen; Ali, Samina

    2015-10-01

    To determine whether lidocaine is superior to nonanesthetic lubricant (NAL) for relieving pain in children undergoing urethral catheterization (UC). Children 0 to 24 months requiring UC were randomized to NAL or topical and intraurethral 2% lidocaine gel. Primary outcome was facial grimacing in the pre to during drug administration and catheterization phases. Secondary outcome was caregiver satisfaction by using a Visual Analog Scale. There were 133 participants (n = 68 lidocaine, n = 65 NAL). There were no significant differences in mean (SD) scores during UC between lidocaine and NAL (86.4% [121.5%] vs 85.2% [126.6%]), respectively (Δ [confidence interval (CI)] = -1.2 [-21.0 to 49.0], P = .4). There was a significantly greater difference in mean (SD) scores during instillation of lidocaine versus NAL (61.8% [105.6%] vs 3.2% [84.9%]), respectively (Δ [CI] -58.6 [-95.0 to -32.0], P lidocaine and NAL (4.8 [3.2] vs 5.9 [2.9]), respectively (CI-0.1 to 2.2; P = .06). In the subgroup analysis, age, gender, and positive urine culture did not significantly influence between-group differences in facial grimacing. Compared with NAL, topical and intraurethral lidocaine is not associated with significant pain reduction during UC, but significantly greater pain during instillation. Therefore, clinicians may consider using noninvasive pain-reducing strategies for young children who require UC. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  15. Anesthesia with topical lidocaine hydrochloride gauzes in acute traumatic wounds in triage, a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridderikhof, Milan L; Leenders, Noukje; Goddijn, Helma; Schep, Niels W; Lirk, Philipp; Goslings, J Carel; Hollmann, Markus W

    2016-09-01

    Topical application of lidocaine in wounds has been studied in combination with vasoconstrictive additives, but the effect without these additives is unknown. The objective was to examine use of lidocaine-soaked gauzes without vasoconstrictive agents, in traumatic wounds in adult patients, applied in triage. A prospective pilot study was performed during 6 weeks in the Emergency Department of a level 1 trauma center. Wounds of consecutive adult patients were treated with a nursing protocol, consisting of lidocaine hydrochloride administration directly into the wound and leaving a lidocaine-soaked gauze, until wound treatment. Primary outcome was need for infiltration anesthesia. Secondary outcomes were Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) pain scores, adverse events and patient and physician satisfaction. Forty patients with a traumatic wound were included, 85% male with a wound on the arm. Thirty-seven patients needed a painful procedure as wound treatment. When suturing was necessary, 77% required additional infiltration anesthesia. Mean NRS pain scores decreased from 3.3 to 2.2 after application of the lidocaine gauze. No adverse events were recorded. Of the patients, 60% were satisfied with use of the lidocaine gauzes, compared to 40% of physicians. Lidocaine hydrochloride (2%) gauzes without vasoconstrictive additives cannot replace infiltration anesthesia in traumatic wounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Kidney ischemia and reperfunsion syndrome: effect of lidocaine and local postconditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IGOR NAGAI YAMAKI

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the effects of blocking the regulation of vascular tone on the ischemia and reperfusion syndrome in rats through the use of lidocaine in the postconditioning technique. Methods: we randomized 35 rats into seven groups of five animals: Group 1- Control; Group 2- Ischemia and Reperfusion; Group 3- Ischemia, Reperfusion and Saline; Group 4- Ischemic Postconditioning; Group 5- Ischemic Postconditioning and Saline; Group 6- Lidocaine; Group 7- Ischemic Postconditioning and Lidocaine. Except for the control group, all the others were submitted to renal ischemia for 30 minutes. In postconditioning groups, we performed ischemia and reperfusion cycles of five minutes each, applied right after the main ischemia. In saline and lidocaine groups, we instilled the substances at a rate of two drops per minute. To compare the groups, we measured serum levels of urea and creatinine and also held renal histopathology. Results: The postconditioning and postconditioning + lidocaine groups showed a decrease in urea and creatinine values. The lidocaine group showed only a reduction in creatinine values. In histopathology, only the groups submitted to ischemic postconditioning had decreased degree of tubular necrosis. Conclusion: Lidocaine did not block the effects of postconditioning on renal ischemia reperfusion syndrome, and conferred better glomerular protection when applied in conjunction with ischemic postconditioning.

  17. The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Lidocaine-Loaded Biodegradable Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) Microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianming; Lv, Xin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel lidocaine microspheres. Microspheres were prepared by the oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion technique using poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA) for the controlled delivery of lidocaine. The average diameter of lidocaine PLGA microspheres was 2.34 ± 0.3 μm. The poly disperse index was 0.21 ± 0.03, and the zeta potential was +0.34 ± 0.02 mV. The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading of the prepared microspheres were 90.5% ± 4.3% and 11.2% ± 1.4%. In vitro release indicated that the lidocaine microspheres had a well-sustained release efficacy, and in vivo studies showed that the area under the curve of lidocaine in microspheres was 2.02–2.06-fold that of lidocaine injection (p lidocaine microspheres showed a significant release effect in rats, that the process to achieve efficacy was calm and lasting and that the analgesic effect had a significant dose-dependency. PMID:25268618

  18. Comparison of the effects of mepivacaine and lidocaine on rat myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, J-S; Amour, J; Duracher, C; Ferretti, C; Precloux, P; Petit, P; Riou, B; Gueugniaud, P-Y

    2007-02-01

    To compare the inotropic and lusitropic effect of lidocaine and mepivacaine on rat papillary muscle. Effects of lidocaine and mepivacaine (10-8-10-3 M) were studied in rat left ventricular papillary muscles in vitro at a calcium concentration of 1 mmol, under low (isotony) and high (isometric) loads. Lidocaine induced a significant negative inotropic effect in isotonic and isometric conditions whereas mepivacaine did not. Mepivacaine only induced a negative inotropic effect when added as a bolus for the highest concentration and this effect was significantly more pronounced with lidocaine than with mepivacaine (active force at 10-3 M: 63 +/- 10 vs. 84 +/- 10% of baseline, P mepivacaine groups (197 +/- 22% of baseline) when compared to the lidocaine group (163 +/- 19% of baseline, P mepivacaine and suggested an impairment of sarcoplasmic reticulum function. Lidocaine and mepivacaine did not modify post-rest potentiation but significantly depressed the force-frequency relationship. The negative inotropic and lusitropic effects induced by lidocaine were more important than that of mepivacaine and may involve an impairment of intracellular Ca2+ handling.

  19. The effect of Hegu acupoint stimulation in dental acupuncture analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fransiskus Andrianto

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In daily life, dental treatments are often related with oral pain sensation which needs anesthesia procedures. Sometimes local anesthetics can not be used because patients have hypersensitive reaction or systemic diseases which may lead to complications. Stimulating acupoint, such as Hegu activates hypothalamus and pituitary gland to release endogenous opioid peptide substances that reduce pain sensitivity. The aim of the study was to determine Hegu acupoint stimulation effect on the pain sensitivity reduction in maxillary central incisor gingiva. The laboratory experimental research was conducted on 12 healthy male Wistar rats (3 months old, weights 150–200 grams. All rat samples received the same treatments and adapted within 1 month. The research was done in pre and post test control group design. 40-Volt electro-stimulation was done once on the maxillary central incisor gingiva prior to the bilateral Hegu acupoint stimulation, then followed by 3 times electro-stimulation with 3 minutes intervals. The pain scores were obtained based on the samples’ contraction in each electro-stimulation. The responses were categorized into 5 pain scores and statistically analyzed using Wilcoxon Test. The results showed that Hegu acupoint stimulation lowered the pain scores significantly (p < 0.05. Hegu acupoint stimulation could reduce the pain sensitivity in maxillary central incisor gingiva. Therefore, the use of acupuncture analgesia in dental pain management can be considered in the future.

  20. Perioperative analgesia and the effects of dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Andrew; Kaye, Alan David; Gritsenko, Karina; Urman, Richard D; Kaye, Adam Marc

    2014-06-01

    With over 50,000 dietary supplements available, resurgence in consumer interest over the past few decades has resulted in an explosion of use of these agents worldwide. Disillusionment with current medications and belief in "natural medicines" has resulted in a multibillion dollar industry. Active ingredients in a number of herbs are being tested for therapeutic potential, and some are efficacious, so herbal medicines cannot be dismissed. The prevalence of herbology is further encouraged by a relatively relaxed policy of the FDA regarding these compounds, which they consider foods. As herbal products are included in the "supplement" category, there is no existing protocol for standardization of these products. There are numerous examples of herbals that can adversely affect patient recovery and outcomes in anesthesia. The prudent anesthesia provider will make sure to obtain correct information as to accurate herbal usage of each patient and attempt to discontinue these products two to three weeks prior to the delivery of an anesthetic. Postoperative analgesia, bleeding, and level of sedation can be negatively impacted related to herbal products and herbal-drug interactions. Over 90 herbal products are associated with bleeding and this can be a specific problem intraoperatively or when considering placement of a regional anesthetic for postoperative pain management.

  1. Preventive analgesia for postoperative pain control: a broader concept

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    Vadivelu N

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nalini Vadivelu,1 Sukanya Mitra,2 Erika Schermer,3 Vijay Kodumudi,4 Alan David Kaye,5 Richard D Urman61Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA; 2Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Government Medical College and Hospital, Chandigarh, India; 3Yale College, New Haven, 4School of Liberal Arts and Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT, 5Department of Anesthesiology, Louisiana State University School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA, 6Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Pain from surgical procedures occurs as a consequence of tissue trauma and may result in physical, cognitive, and emotional discomfort. Almost a century ago, researchers first described a possible relationship between intraoperative tissue damage and an intensification of acute pain and long-term postoperative pain, now referred to as central sensitization. Nociceptor activation is mediated by chemicals that are released in response to cellular or tissue damage. Pre-emptive analgesia is an important concept in understanding treatment strategies for postoperative analgesia. Pre-emptive analgesia focuses on postoperative pain control and the prevention of central sensitization and chronic neuropathic pain by providing analgesia administered preoperatively but not after surgical incision. Additional research in pre-emptive analgesia is warranted to better determine good outcome measurements and a better appreciation with regard to treatment optimization. Preventive analgesia reduces postoperative pain and consumption of analgesics, and this appears to be the most effective means of decreasing postoperative pain. Preventive analgesia, which includes multimodal preoperative and postoperative analgesic therapies, results in decreased postoperative pain and less postoperative consumption of analgesics.Keywords: preventive analgesia, central

  2. The experience of giving birth with epidural analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepsen, Ingrid; Keller, Kurt Dauer

    2014-06-01

    There is a lack of literature about what constitutes good midwifery care for women who have epidural analgesia during labour. It is known that an increasing number of women receive epidural analgesia for labour pain. We also know that while women rate the painkilling effect of the epidural analgesia as high, in general, their satisfaction with labour is unchanged or even lower when epidural analgesia is used. How do women experience being in labour with epidural analgesia, and what kind of midwifery care do they, consequently, need? A field study and semi-structured interviews were conducted on a phenomenological basis. Nine nulliparous women were observed from initiation of epidural analgesia until birth of their baby. They were interviewed the day after the birth and again 2 months later. The involved midwives were interviewed 2-3h after the birth. Initiation of epidural analgesia can have considerable implications for women's experience of labour. Two different types of emotional reactions towards epidural analgesia are distinguished, one of which is particularly marked by a subtle sense of worry and ambivalence. Another important finding refers to the labouring woman's relationship with the midwife, which represents an essential influencing factor on the woman' experience of labour. Within this relationship, some rather unnoticed matters of communication and recognition appear to be of decisive significance. After initiation of epidural analgesia the requirements of midwifery care seem to go beyond how women verbalise and define their own needs. The midwife should be attentive to the labouring woman's type of emotional reaction to epidural analgesia and her possible intricate worries. Copyright © 2014 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A COMPARISON OF ANALGESIA AND FOETAL OUTCOME IN TERM PARTURIENTS WITH AND WITHOUT LOW DOSE COMBINED SPINAL EPIDURAL LABOUR ANALGESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjunath

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available : STUDY OBJECTIVE: We aimed to find a safe method of labor analgesia with minimal side effects and toxicity in mother and fetus using combined ‘low dose’ spinal and epidural (CSE. DESIGN: prospective case control study. SETTING: Labour suite of a tertiary care hospital. PATIENTS: study population included 120 pregnant women of ASA physical status I and II parturients in active labor who requested analgesia, 60 of these patients were given labour analgesia - ‘GROUP T’ and 60 of who underwent a delivery without labour analgesia -‘GROUP C’. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Maternal hemodynamics, degree of pain relief, duration of labour, fetal heart rate, Apgar scores, mode of delivery, intervention to relieve pain, Adverse effects because of procedure and drugs used were also noted. Low dose epidural analgesia does not prolong labour and does not increase the incidence of instrumental deliveries when compared to parturients undergoing delivery without labour analgesia. Even with the reduced dose of fentanyl the parturients had acceptable pain relief and a decreased incidence of intervention for pain. It does not cause more fetal depression when compared to normally laboring term parturients. ‘Low dose’ labour analgesia is a safe technique for painless labour with no harmful effects on the mother or baby and it does not significantly affect the obstetric outcome. CONCLUSION: ‘Low dose’ labour analgesia is a safe technique for painless labour with no harmful effects on the mother or baby and it does not significantly affect the obstetric outcome.

  4. Nebulized lidocaine blunts airway hyper-responsiveness in experimental feline asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafe, Laura A; Guntur, Vamsi P; Dodam, John R; Lee-Fowler, Tekla M; Cohn, Leah A; Reinero, Carol R

    2013-08-01

    Nebulized lidocaine may be a corticosteroid-sparing drug in human asthmatics, reducing airway resistance and peripheral blood eosinophilia. We hypothesized that inhaled lidocaine would be safe in healthy and experimentally asthmatic cats, diminishing airflow limitation and eosinophilic airway inflammation in the latter population. Healthy (n = 5) and experimentally asthmatic (n = 9) research cats were administered 2 weeks of nebulized lidocaine (2 mg/kg q8h) or placebo (saline) followed by a 2-week washout and crossover to the alternate treatment. Cats were anesthetized to measure the response to inhaled methacholine (MCh) after each treatment. Placebo and doubling doses of methacholine (0.0625-32.0000 mg/ml) were delivered and results were expressed as the concentration of MCh increasing baseline airway resistance by 200% (EC200Raw). Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed after each treatment and eosinophil numbers quantified. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) % eosinophils and EC200Raw within groups after each treatment were compared using a paired t-test (P eosinophils in asthmatic cats treated with lidocaine (36±10%) or placebo (33 ± 6%). However, lidocaine increased the EC200Raw compared with placebo 10 ± 2 versus 5 ± 1 mg/ml; P = 0.043). Chronic nebulized lidocaine was well-tolerated in all cats, and lidocaine did not induce airway inflammation or airway hyper-responsiveness in healthy cats. Lidocaine decreased airway response to MCh in asthmatic cats without reducing airway eosinophilia, making it unsuitable for monotherapy. However, lidocaine may serve as a novel adjunctive therapy in feline asthmatics with beneficial effects on airflow obstruction.

  5. Skin permeation of lidocaine from crystal suspended oily formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Rakan; Hasegawa, Masaaki; Ishida, Masami; Ebata, Toshiya; Namiki, Noriyuki; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2005-09-01

    In vitro permeation of lidocaine (lidocaine base, LID) through excised rat skin was investigated using several LID-suspended oily formulations. The first skin permeation of LID from an LID-suspended oily solution such as liquid paraffin (LP), isopropyl myristate (IPM), polyoxyethylene (2) oleylether (BO-2), and diethyl sebacate (DES) was evaluated and compared with that from polyethylene glycol 400 (PEG400) solution, a hydrophilic base. The obtained permeation rate of LID, Japp, from PEG400, LP, IPM, BO-2, and DES was in the order of DES>BO-2=IPM>LP>PEG400, and increased with LID solubility in the oily solvents, although LID crystals were dispersed in all solvents. Subsequently, oily formulations that consisted of different ratios of the first oily solvent (IPM, BO-2, or DES) (each 0-20%), the second oily solvent (LP) and an oily mixture of microcrystalline wax/white petrolatum/paraffin (1/5/4) were evaluated. BO-2 groups at a concentration of 5% and 10% had the highest Japp among the oily formulations, although a higher BO-2 resulted in lower skin permeation. In addition, pretreatment with BO-2 increased the skin permeation of LID. These results suggest that the penetration enhancing effect by the system may be related to the skin penetration of BO-2 itself. Finally, mathematical analysis was done to evaluate the effect of BO-2, and it was shown that BO-2 improved the LID solubility in stratum corneum lipids to efficiently enhance the LID permeation through skin.

  6. INTRA-SNAIL LIDOCAIN FOR TREATMENT OF MIGRAINE ATTACK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qu Songbin; Wang Xiaofeng

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore a mcthod of trcating migraine attack. BACKROUND Migraine is the most common disorder which causcs .severe headache, nausea and vomiting in attack continuing several hours. There is little method to cease migraine attack quickly. METHOD The patients lied down and kept the head backward. Lidocain 2% 1 to 2 ml was slowly instilled into the nostril ipsilatcral to thc headache. RESULTS Pain relief was achievcd in minutes. The headache disappeared in 19 cases and slight headache rcmained in 2 cases mong 21 cascs. TCD (transcranial dopple ) was tested in 6 cases before thc treatment and 5 minutes after thc treatment. The results showed that CBF (cerebral blood flow) velocity diminished before thc treatment and increased to normal value after the treatment in 5 cases, and it increased beforc thc treatment in another case and diminished after the treatment. DISSCUSION Thc migraine attacks are associated with dysfunction of the vascular constriction and vasodilatation. It was reported that Lidocain had diplex effect that induce the vascular constriction and also induce vasodilatation on the bases of regulation of the autonomic nerves. Medications to abort the attack dramatically by the transnasal route.. CONCLUSION This method is casy to use, painless and effective.

  7. [Maternal postures and epidural analgesia during labour].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducloy-Bouthors, A-S; De Gasquet, B; Davette, M; Cuisse, M

    2006-06-01

    The evolution of birth is of interest for obstetricians and midwives. Postures with asymmetric stretching and balance, kneeling, or sitting have been claimed to be able to help foetal head rotation. Although walking during labour have no influence on the outcome of labour, hip-flexed postures enlarging the pelvic diameter are yet evaluated to improve the obstetric course of labour. In a prospective randomised study including 93 parturients, we compared the supine 30 degrees lateral tilt (control group) to three hip-flexed postures: sitting (S), right hip-flexed left lateral position (L) and left hip-flexed right lateral position (R). Epidural analgesia with 12 ml ropivacaine 0.1% and sufentanil 0.5 microg/ml was administered over a period of six minutes. The total epidural spread was 15+/-0.3 dermatomes and the upper level of thermo-analgesic blockade reached T7-T8 (T5 to T10) in each group. There were no differences between groups for the left and right total spread and upper level of epidural blockade, for the time to maximal block and pain relief. There was no motor block and no maternal or foetal side effects. We conclude that, for the three hip-flexed postures tested, position does not influence local anesthetic spread or symmetry of analgesia after induction of obstetric epidural anaesthesia.

  8. Regional analgesia in postsurgical critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moliner Velázquez, S; Rubio Haro, R; De Andrés Serrano, C; De Andrés Ibáñez, J

    2017-03-01

    Regional analgesia intrinsically, based on its physiological effects, is routinely used for the perioperative treatment of pain associated with surgical procedures. However, in other areas such as the non-surgical treatment of acute pain for patients in a critical condition, it has not been subjected to specific prospective studies. If we confine ourselves to the physiological effects of the nerve block, in a situation of stress, the indications for regional anaesthesia in this group of patients extend to the management of a wide variety of medical as well as postsurgical conditions, of trauma patients and of other painful procedures performed in the patient's bed. The critical patient certainly must be analyzed individually as their own primary conditions is of vital importance, as well as any associated conditions they have developed that can potentially increase the risk of systemic toxicity or morbidity, such as, coagulopathies, infection, immunosuppressive states, sedation and problems associated with mechanical ventilation. This review aims to assess the role of regional analgesia in critically ill patients, placing it within the algorithm decision tree of the professional responsible for patients in critical care units, all based on the evidence of potential benefits according to the published literature. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Intrapleural analgesia after endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Patrícia Gomes da; Cataneo, Daniele Cristina; Leite, Fernanda; Hasimoto, Erica Nishida; Barros, Guilherme Antonio Moreira de

    2011-12-01

    To compare analgesia traditionally used for thoracic sympathectomy to intrapleural ropivacaine injection in two different doses. Twenty-four patients were divided into three similar groups, and all of them received intravenous dipyrone. Group A received intravenous tramadol and intrapleural injection of saline solution. Group B received intrapleural injection of 0.33% ropivacaine, and Group C 0.5% ropivacaine. The following aspects were analyzed: inspiratory capacity, respiratory rate and pain. Pain was evaluated in the immediate postoperative period by means of the visual analog scale and over a one-week period. In Groups A and B, reduced inspiratory capacity was observed in the postoperative period. In the first postoperative 12 hours, only 12.5% of the patients in Groups B and C showed intense pain as compared to 25% in Group A. In the subsequent week, only one patient in Group A showed mild pain while the remainder reported intense pain. In Group B, half of the patients showed intense pain, and in Group C, only one presented intense pain. Intrapleural analgesia with ropivacaine resulted in less pain in the late postoperative period with better analgesic outcomes in higher doses, providing a better ventilatory pattern.

  10. The Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Lidocaine- Loaded Biodegradable Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) Microspheres

    OpenAIRE

    Jianming Liu; Xin Lv

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel lidocaine microspheres. Microspheres were prepared by the oil-in-water (o/w) emulsion technique using poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA) for the controlled delivery of lidocaine. The average diameter of lidocaine PLGA microspheres was 2.34 ± 0.3 μm. The poly disperse index was 0.21 ± 0.03, and the zeta potential was +0.34 ± 0.02 mV. The encapsulation efficiency and drug loading of the prepared microspheres were 90.5% ± 4.3% and 11.2% ± 1...

  11. How lidocaine influences the bilayer thickness and bending elasticity of biomembranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Yi; Nagao, Michihiro; Bossev, Dobrin P, E-mail: zhyi@indiana.edu

    2010-11-01

    We have studied how local anesthetics influence the structural and dynamical properties of model bio-membranes. The measurements of small-angle neutron scattering have been performed on 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) unilamellar vesicles with different concentrations of lidocaine in D{sub 2}O to determine the bilayer thickness as a function of the lidocaine concentration. The neutron-spin echo spectroscopy (NSE) has been used to study the influence of lidocaine on the bending elasticity of DMPC bilayers in fluid crystal phase (L{sub {alpha}}) and the ripple gel (P{sub {beta}}') phase.

  12. Overcoming priors anxiety

    CERN Document Server

    D'Agostini, Giulio

    1999-01-01

    The choice of priors may become an insoluble problem if priors and Bayes' rule are not seen and accepted in the framework of subjectivism. Therefore, the meaning and the role of subjectivity in science is considered and defended from the pragmatic point of view of an ``experienced scientist''. The case for the use of subjective priors is then supported and some recommendations for routine and frontier measurement applications are given. The issue of reference priors is also considered from the practical point of view and in the general context of ``Bayesian dogmatism''.

  13. Comparison of the Concentrations of Lidocaine in Different Body Fluids/Tissues after Subarachnoid Space and Intravenous Administration of a Lethal Dose of Lidocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to compare the concentration of lidocaine in different body fluids/tissues after subarachnoid space and intravenous administrations of a lethal dose of lidocaine. Totally 18 dogs were used in the experiment. Six dogs were given subarachnoid anesthesia, another were given an intravenous injection of a dose of 75 mg/kg weight of lidocaine hydrochloride in 5 min and the last 6 dogs were used as the blank control dogs and given a subarachnoid space injection or a femoral artery injection of the same volume of sodium chloride. As soon as its vital signs disappeared, each dog was dissected and the specimen, such as brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF in lateral ventricle, CSF in subarachnoid space, spinal cord (cervical spinal cord, thoracic spinal cord, lumbar spinal cord, and waist spinal cord, heart, lung, liver, spleen, kidney, bile, urine, heart blood, peripheral blood, muscle in injection location, and muscle in no injection location, were collected for analysis of lidocaine immediately. Analysis was performed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. From the maximum to the minimum, the order of lidocaine concentration detected in the subarachnoid space-administered dogs was as follows: CSF in subarachnoid space, waist spinal cord, thoracic spinal cord, CSF in lateral ventricle, lumbar spinal cord, cervical spinal cord, lung, kidney, muscle in injection location, heart, brain, spleen, heart blood, liver, peripheral blood, bile, muscle in no injection location, and urine. The order of lidocaine concentration detected in the intravenously administered dogs was as followed: Kidney, heart, lung, spleen, brain, liver, peripheral blood, bile, heart blood, cervical spinal cord, thoracic spinal cord, muscle in injection location, lumbar spinal cord, muscle in no injection location, CSF in subarachnoid space, urine, and CSF in lateral ventricle. The maximum concentration of lidocaine was detected in the subarachnoid

  14. Developments in labour analgesia and their use in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eley, V A; Callaway, L; van Zundert, A A

    2015-07-01

    Since the introduction of chloroform for labour analgesia in 1847, different methods and medications have been used to relieve the pain of labour. The use of heavy sedative medication in the early 1900s was encouraged by enthusiastic doctors and by women empowered by the women's suffrage movement in America. Nitrous oxide by inhalation has been used in Australia since the 1950s and improved methods of administration have made this method of analgesia safe and practical. Caudal epidural analgesia and lumbar epidural analgesia were first made popular in America and by the 1970s these techniques were more widely available in Australia. In 1847, physicians and the public were unsure whether relieving labour pains was the 'right' thing to do. However, many medical and social changes have occurred thanks to the clinical connection between Australia and the United Kingdom and those first settlers to land on Australian shores. Thanks to this historical connection, in today's Australia there is no question that women should use analgesia as a pain relief if they wish. Currently, the majority of women worldwide use some form of analgesia during labour and different methods are widely available. This paper discusses the four milestones of the development of obstetric analgesia and how they were introduced into patient care in Australia.

  15. Intracortical modulation, and not spinal inhibition, mediates placebo analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, M; Lee, M C H; Valentini, E; Iannetti, G D

    2015-02-01

    Suppression of spinal responses to noxious stimulation has been detected using spinal fMRI during placebo analgesia, which is therefore increasingly considered a phenomenon caused by descending inhibition of spinal activity. However, spinal fMRI is technically challenging and prone to false-positive results. Here we recorded laser-evoked potentials (LEPs) during placebo analgesia in humans. LEPs allow neural activity to be measured directly and with high enough temporal resolution to capture the sequence of cortical areas activated by nociceptive stimuli. If placebo analgesia is mediated by inhibition at spinal level, this would result in a general suppression of LEPs rather than in a selective reduction of their late components. LEPs and subjective pain ratings were obtained in two groups of healthy volunteers - one was conditioned for placebo analgesia while the other served as unconditioned control. Laser stimuli at three suprathreshold energies were delivered to the right hand dorsum. Placebo analgesia was associated with a significant reduction of the amplitude of the late P2 component. In contrast, the early N1 component, reflecting the arrival of the nociceptive input to the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), was only affected by stimulus energy. This selective suppression of late LEPs indicates that placebo analgesia is mediated by direct intracortical modulation rather than inhibition of the nociceptive input at spinal level. The observed cortical modulation occurs after the responses elicited by the nociceptive stimulus in the SI, suggesting that higher order sensory processes are modulated during placebo analgesia.

  16. Cognitive Temporal Document Priors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peetz, M.H.; de Rijke, M.

    2013-01-01

    Temporal information retrieval exploits temporal features of document collections and queries. Temporal document priors are used to adjust the score of a document based on its publication time. We consider a class of temporal document priors that is inspired by retention functions considered in cogn

  17. First-time success with needle procedures was higher with a warm lidocaine and tetracaine patch than an eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Giorgio; Borrometi, Fabio; Benini, Franca; Neri, Elena; Rusalen, Francesca; Celentano, Loredana; Zanon, Davide; Schreiber, Silvana; Ronfani, Luca; Barbi, Egidio

    2017-05-01

    More than 50% of children report apian during venepuncture or intravenous cannulation and using local anaesthetics before needle procedures can lead to different success rates. This study examined how many needle procedures were successful at the first attempt when children received either a warm lidocaine and tetracaine patch or an eutectic mixture of lidocaine and prilocaine (EMLA) cream. We conducted this multicentre randomised controlled trial at three tertiary-level children's hospitals in Italy in 2015. Children aged three to 10 years were enrolled in an emergency department, paediatric day hospital and paediatric ward and randomly allocated to receive a warm lidocaine and tetracaine patch or EMLA cream. The primary outcome was the success rate at the first attempt. The analysis included 172 children who received a warm lidocaine and tetracaine patch and 167 who received an EMLA cream. The needle procedure was successful at the first attempt in 158 children (92.4%) who received the warm patch and in 142 children (85.0%) who received the cream (p = 0.03). The pain scores were similar in both groups. This study showed that the first-time needle procedure success was 7.4% higher in children receiving a warm lidocaine and tetracaine patch than EMLA cream. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Prevention of pain with the injection of microemulsion propofol: a comparison of a combination of lidocaine and ketamine with lidocaine or ketamine alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Insung; Noh, Jung Il; Kim, Soon Im; Kim, Mun-Gyu; Park, Sun-Young; Kim, Sang Ho; Ok, Si Young

    2010-10-01

    Aquafol, a microemulsion propofol, causes more severe and frequent pain on injection than propofol. The purpose of this study was to compare a combination of lidocaine and ketamine on aquafol-induced pain with lidocaine or ketamine alone during the induction of anesthesia. In this prospective, randomized, double-blinded study, 130 healthy patients who were undergoing elective surgery under general anesthesia were enrolled. The patients received IV lidocaine 40 mg plus ketamine 25 mg (Group LK, n = 43), lidocaine 40 mg (Group L, n = 42), or ketamine 25 mg (Group K, n = 45) with a rubber tourniquet on the forearm 1 min before the injection of microemulsion propofol. The pain score was assessed by a 4-point verbal rating scale (VRS) at 10 seconds after injection of microemulsion propofol 30 mg and during the injection of the remaining total dose. The incidence and severity of pain was significantly lower in Group LK than Group L or Group K at 10 seconds after the injection of microemulsion propofol 30 mg (P injection of the remaining total dose (P rubber tourniquet on the forearm 1 min before the injection of microemulsion propofol is more effective than lidocaine 40 mg or ketamine 25 mg alone in preventing pain from the injection of microemulsion propofol.

  19. Use-dependent block of cardiac sodium channels by quaternary derivatives of lidocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gintant, G A; Hoffman, B F

    1984-02-01

    Modulation of the reduction of fast inward sodium current by local anesthetics due to changes in electrical activity has been termed use-dependent block ( Courtney 1975). To determine the mechanisms responsible for use-dependent block of cardiac sodium channels and to compare use-dependent block in cardiac and nerve preparations, we investigated use-dependent block of cardiac sodium channels by the quaternary lidocaine analogues QX -314 and QX -222 (two agents previously studied in nerve). We used canine cardiac Purkinje fibers, and assessed changes in the fast inward sodium current using changes in the maximum rate of rise of the action potential upstroke (Vmax). Two microelectrode voltage clamp and current clamp techniques were used to control membrane potential prior to stimulated upstrokes . Use-dependent block was not affected by shortening the action potential duration during rapid stimulation. Partial recovery from use-dependent block was observed during rapid stimulation with brief depolarizing prepulses terminating immediately prior to the upstroke. Similar prepulses also prevented the development of use-dependent block following an abrupt increase in the stimulation rate. Hyperpolarizing prepulses during rapid stimulation caused recovery from use-dependent block; recovery was greater and more rapid with increasingly negative prepulses . Hyperpolarization during periods of electrical quiescence also caused greater recovery. These results, interpreted using the modulated receptor hypothesis ( Hille 1977; Hondeghem and Katzung 1977), suggest that use-dependent block of cardiac sodium channels by quaternary local anesthetics is due to drug association with the inactivated sodium channel receptor which occurs only after these drugs gain access to the receptor site through open sodium channels.

  20. Expectancy and treatment interactions: A dissociation between acupuncture analgesia and expectancy evoked placebo analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Jian; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Polich, Ginger; Kirsch, Irving; Vangel, Mark; Zyloney, Carolyn; Rosen, Bruce; Gollub, Randy

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in placebo research have demonstrated the mind’s power to alter physiology. In this study, we combined an expectancy manipulation model with both verum and sham acupuncture treatments to address: 1) how and to what extent treatment and expectancy effects --including both subjective pain intensity levels (pain sensory ratings) and objective physiological activations (fMRI) -- interact; and 2) if the underlying mechanism of expectancy remains the same whether placebo treatment is given alone or in conjunction with active treatment. The results indicate that although verum acupuncture + high expectation and sham acupuncture + high expectation induced subjective reports of analgesia of equal magnitude, fMRI analysis showed that verum acupuncture produced greater fMRI signal decrease in pain related brain regions during application of calibrated heat pain stimuli on the right arm. We believe our study provides brain imaging evidence for the existence of different mechanisms underlying acupuncture analgesia and expectancy evoked placebo analgesia. Our results also suggest that the brain network involved in expectancy may vary under different treatment situations (verum and sham acupuncture treatment). PMID:19159691

  1. Pupil dilation with intracameral lidocaine during phacoemulsification: Benefits for the patient and surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikeghbali Aminollah

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Topical and/or intracameral administration of anticholinergic and/or sympathomimetic mydriatic agents which are usually used for pupillary dilation during cataract surgery, have some disadvantages such as slow onset of dilation and adverse ocular and systemic effects. We evaluated intracameral injection of preservative-free 1% lidocaine without using any preoperative or intraoperative mydriatics to induce pupil dilation in 31 consecutive eyes scheduled for phacoemulsification cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. Pupil diameter was measured before and 90 sec after intracameral lidocaine injection. After intracameral lidocaine injection, the mean pupil diameter was significantly greater than the baseline measurement (P< 0.001. No additional mydriatics were needed up to the end of the operations. Intracameral preservative-free lidocaine 1% has a rapid and effective mydriasis that could be a safe alternative to topical and intracameral mydriatics in phacoemulsification.

  2. Benefits of adding lidocaine to a hyaluronic gel - Stylage® M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mole, Bernard; Gozlan, Lyliane

    2011-10-01

    Although the benefits of adding lidocaine are recognized in terms of relieving the pain experienced upon injection, it would appear beneficial to establish the impact of lidocaine within the Stylage® range, the only one to incorporate both an anaesthetic (lidocaine) and an antioxidant in the form of mannitol in its crosslinked gel of HA. A clinical follow-up was carried out at 11 centres over a period of 6-8 months, depending on the practitioner, and involved 84 patients. The aim of this study was to determine fact from fiction with regards to the benefits of adding local anaesthetic to a filler : 1.Does this addition offer a real benefit in relation to the basic gel? 2)Could it be the cause of other incidents directly linked to lidocaine? 3. Could it have an impact on the durability of the result?

  3. Review of Lidocaine/Tetracaine Cream as a Topical Anesthetic for Dermatologic Laser Procedures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alster, Tina

    2013-01-01

    .... The lidocaine/tetracaine cream (Pliaglis®, Galderma Laboratories, Texas, USA), one of the newer combination options, offers effective pain alleviation that has been evaluated in numerous clinical trials...

  4. The effect of perioperative intravenous lidocaine on postoperative pain and immune function

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yardeni, Israel Z; Beilin, Benzion; Mayburd, Eduard; Levinson, Yuri; Bessler, Hanna

    2009-01-01

    .... These cytokines can induce peripheral and central sensitization, leading to pain augmentation. Recently, a frequently used local anesthetic, lidocaine, was introduced as a part of a perioperative pain management technique...

  5. Intravenously administered lidocaine in therapeutic doses increases the intraspinal release of acetylcholine in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Höglund, A Urban

    2002-01-01

    The local anesthetic lidocaine suppresses different pain conditions when administered systemically. Part of the antinociceptive effect appears to be mediated via receptor mechanisms. We have previously shown that muscarinic and nicotinic agonists that produce antinociception increase the intraspi...

  6. Cutaneous in vivo metabolism of topical lidocaine formulation in human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolsted, K; Benfeldt, E; Kissmeyer, A-M

    2009-01-01

    , the enzymes involved are also expressed in the skin. Hence, the aim of the current study was to investigate the extent of the cutaneous in vivo metabolism of topically applied lidocaine in human volunteers. A dose of 5 mg/cm(2) of Xylocaine(R) (5% lidocaine) ointment was applied onto the buttock skin...... of the volunteers. After 2 h, residual formulation was removed, and two 4-mm punch biopsies were taken from each volunteer. The quantity of lidocaine extracted from the skin samples (epidermis + dermis) was 109 +/- 43 ng/mm(2) skin. One metabolite (monoethylglycine xylidide, MEGX) was detected in skin from 7......Little is known about the metabolising capacity of the human skin in relation to topically applied drugs and formulations. We chose lidocaine as a model compound since the metabolic pathways are well known from studies concerning hepatic metabolism following systemic drug administration. However...

  7. Pharmacokinetics of lidocaine with epinephrine following local anesthesia reversal with phentolamine mesylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Paul A; Hersh, Elliot V; Papas, Athena S; Goodson, J Max; Yagiela, John A; Rutherford, Bruce; Rogy, Seigried; Navalta, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Phentolamine mesylate accelerates recovery from oral soft tissue anesthesia in patients who have received local anesthetic injections containing a vasoconstrictor. The proposed mechanism is that phentolamine, an alpha-adrenergic antagonist, blocks the vasoconstriction associated with the epinephrine used in dental anesthetic formulations, thus enhancing the systemic absorption of the local anesthetic from the injection site. Assessments of the pharmacokinetics of lidocaine and phentolamine, and the impact of phentolamine on the pharmacokinetics of lidocaine with epinephrine were performed to characterize this potentially valuable strategy. The blood levels of phentolamine were determined following its administration intraorally and intravenously. Additionally, the effects of phentolamine mesylate on the pharmacokinetics of intraoral injections of lidocaine with epinephrine were evaluated. Sixteen subjects were enrolled in this phase 1 trial, each receiving 4 drug treatments: 1 cartridge lidocaine/epinephrine followed after 30 minutes by 1 cartridge phentolamine (1L1P), 1 cartridge phentolamine administered intravenously (1Piv), 4 cartridges lidocaine/epinephrine followed after 30 minutes by 2 cartridges phentolamine (4L2P), and 4 cartridges lidocaine/epinephrine followed by no phentolamine (4L). Pharmacokinetic parameters estimated for phentolamine, lidocaine, and epinephrine included peak plasma concentration (Cmax), time to peak plasma concentration (Tmax), area under the plasma concentration-time curve from 0 to the last time point (AUClast) or from time 0 to infinity (AUCinf), elimination half-life (t1/2), clearance (CL), and volume of distribution (Vd). The phentolamine Tmax occurred earlier following the intravenous administration of 1Piv (7 minutes than following its submucosal administration in treatment 1L1P (15 minutes) or 4L2P (11 minutes). The phentolamine t1/2, CL, and Vd values were similar for 1L1P, 1Piv, and 4L2P. The Tmax for lidocaine occurred

  8. Molecular Action of Lidocaine on the Voltage Sensors of Sodium Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Sheets, Michael F.; Hanck, Dorothy A

    2003-01-01

    Block of sodium ionic current by lidocaine is associated with alteration of the gating charge-voltage (Q-V) relationship characterized by a 38% reduction in maximal gating charge (Qmax) and by the appearance of additional gating charge at negative test potentials. We investigated the molecular basis of the lidocaine-induced reduction in cardiac Na channel–gating charge by sequentially neutralizing basic residues in each of the voltage sensors (S4 segments) in the four domains of the human hea...

  9. Decreasing Effect of Lidocaine·HCl on the Thickness of the Neuronal and Model Membrane

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sung-Min; Park, Jong-Sun; Kim, Jae-Han; Baek, Jin-Hyun; Yoon, Tae-Gyun; Lee, Do-Keun; Ryu, Won-Hyang; Chung, In-Kyo; Sohn, Uy Dong; Jang, Hye-Ock; Yun, Il

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the mechanism of action of a local anesthetic, lidocaine·HCl. Energy transfer between the surface fluorescent probe, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid, and the hydrophobic fluorescent probe, 1,3-di(1-pyrenyl) propane, was used to determine the effect of lidocaine·HCl on the thickness (D) of the synaptosomal plasma membrane vesicles (SPMV) isolated from the bovine cerebral cortex, and liposomes of the total lipids (SPMVTL) and phospholipids (SPMVPL) extracted from the SP...

  10. Perivascular action of the local anaesthetic, lidocaine, on pial terminal arterioles: direct observations on the microcirculation.

    OpenAIRE

    Altura, B. M.; Lassoff, S.

    1981-01-01

    Considerable controversy currently exists with respect to whether or not local anaesthetics exert direct action on cerebral arteriolar tone. In situ experiments were therefore undertaken on pial terminal arterioles of rats to determine whether or not perivascular application of lidocaine exerts any action on such cerebral vessels. Vessel size was assessed with an image-splitting television microscope recording system. The vessels studied ranged in size from 25 to 30 micron. Lidocaine was appl...

  11. Topical pain management with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mick, Gérard; Correa-Illanes, Gerardo

    2012-06-01

    The topical 5% lidocaine medicated plaster is recommended as first-line treatment for localized peripheral neuropathic pain. In order to provide an overview of the efficacy and safety of the lidocaine plaster in the treatment of different neuropathic pain conditions, all efficacy and safety studies (randomized, controlled, or open-label with well described methodology), case reports, and pharmacological studies on the lidocaine plaster retrieved from a PubMed literature research (1960-March 2012) plus additional references identified from retrieved articles were included. The lidocaine plaster is efficacious in the treatment of neuropathic pain symptoms associated with previous herpes zoster infection. Results from a large open-label controlled study suggest that the lidocaine plaster could be at least as effective as systemic pregabalin in the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia and painful diabetic polyneuropathy. Open-label studies indicate efficacy in the treatment of other localized neuropathic pain conditions, such as painful idiopathic sensory polyneuropathy, complex regional pain syndrome, carpal tunnel syndrome sequelae, postsurgical and posttraumatic pain. Quality of life markedly improved in a variety of neuropathic pain conditions and long-term treatment provided sustained relief in patients with neuropathic pain who are responsive to lidocaine plaster. The lidocaine plaster is usually well tolerated. The risk of systemic adverse events and pharmacokinetic interactions with concomitant medication is minimal owing to low systemic exposure. Treatment of several, primarily neuropathic and mixed-pain conditions with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster was found efficacious and safe. Further controlled studies, in particular where only small open-label studies or case reports are available, should be considered.

  12. Lidocaine for systemic sclerosis: a double-blind randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevisani Virgínia FM

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systemic sclerosis (scleroderma; SSc is an orphan disease with the highest case-specific mortality of any connective-tissue disease. Excessive collagen deposit in affected tissues is a key for the disease's pathogenesis and comprises most of the clinical manifestations. Lidocaine seems to be an alternative treatment for scleroderma considering that: a the patient's having excessive collagen deposits in tissues affected by scleroderma; b the patient's demonstrating increased activity of the enzyme prolyl hydroxylase, an essential enzyme for the biosynthesis of collagen; and c lidocaine's reducing the activity of prolyl hydroxylase. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of lidocaine in treating scleroderma. Methods A randomized double-blind clinical trial included 24 patients with scleroderma randomized to receive lidocaine or placebo intravenously in three cycles of ten days each, with a one-month interval between them. Outcomes: cutaneous (modified Rodnan skin score, oesophageal (manometry and microvascular improvement (nailfold capillaroscopy; improvement in subjective self-assessment and in quality of life (HAQ. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the groups for any outcome after the treatment and after 6-months follow-up. Improvement in modified Rodnan skin score occurred in 66.7% and 50% of placebo and lidocaine group, respectively (p = 0.408. Both groups showed an improvement in subjective self-assessment, with no difference between them. Conclusions Despite the findings of a previous cohort study favouring the use of lidocaine, this study demonstrated that lidocaine at this dosage and means of administration showed a lack of efficacy for treating scleroderma despite the absence of significant adverse effects. However, further similar clinical trials are needed to evaluate the efficacy of lidocaine when administered in different dosages and by other means.

  13. Lidocaine spray as a local analgesic for intravenous cannulation: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datema, Joris; Veldhuis, Jeroen; Bekhof, Jolita

    2017-08-10

    Lidocaine spray is an effective analgesic of mucous membranes. Lidocaine spray is also used during intravenous (i.v.) cannulation, especially in children. However, the analgesic effect of lidocaine spray during i.v. cannulation has not been studied. We aimed to assess the analgesic effectiveness of lidocaine spray during i.v. cannulation. We conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial in seventeen healthy adults who received an i.v. cannulation in the right and left elbow, respectively, where the order of application of 60 mg lidocaine spray (Xylocaine 10% pump spray) or placebo spray (chlorhexidine gluconate 0.5% in 70% alcohol base) before i.v. cannulation was randomized. Thus, each participant had an i.v. cannulation in both arms: one with lidocaine spray and the other with placebo spray. The primary outcome was pain intensity assessed by a 100 mm Visual Analogue Scale. The secondary outcomes were adverse events, success rate of i.v. cannulation and the degree of difficulty of i.v. cannulation as estimated by the nurse performing the i.v cannulation. The pain score (Visual Analogue Scale) during i.v. cannulation was 18.0 mm (interquartile range: 5.0-34.5 mm) after lidocaine application and 21.0 mm (interquartile range: 11.0-30.5) after placebo application. These scores were not significantly different (95% confidence interval: -9.0-11.0, P=0.698). No adverse events occurred and all i.v. cannulations were successful at first attempt. Local administration of lidocaine is not effective in reducing pain during i.v. cannulation.

  14. Lidocaine lozenges for pharyngeal anesthesia during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Supe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: A novel lozenge formulation with advantages of ease of drug administration, palatable taste and improved patient compliance could be the preferred mode of topical pharyngeal anesthesia during upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE. This randomized, open-label, active-controlled study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and safety of lidocaine lozenges versus lidocaine spray in the diagnostic gastroduodenal endoscopy in Indian patients. Subjects and Methods: Two hundred and forty-seven patients of either sex (18-80 years undergoing diagnostic gastroduodenal endoscopy were randomized either to; lidocaine lozenge 200 mg or lidocaine spray 200 mg to be applied as a single dose before gastroduodenal endoscopy. Ease of procedure, level of gag reflex, ease of application of the local anesthetic, and investigators global assessment were the primary efficacy endpoints. Need for rescue medication and patient′s global assessment were secondary efficacy endpoints. The incidence of any adverse event was the safety endpoint. Between groups, comparison was done by using appropriate statistical test. Results: Investigator reported significantly lesser procedural difficulty (P = 0.0007 and suppressed gag reflex (P < 0.0001 during UGE with lidocaine lozenge compared to spray. Ease of application of local anesthetic was reported easy in significantly more patients as compared with lidocaine spray (P = 0.001. Global assessment by patient and physician was favorable toward lozenge. Incidences of adverse events were similar in both the groups. Conclusions: The study suggests that lidocaine lozenges are an easier way of applying local oropharyngeal anesthesia, produces better suppression of gag reflex and makes the procedure easier when compared with lidocaine spray.

  15. Lidocaine induces ROCK-dependent membrane blebbing and subsequent cell death in rabbit articular chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Tsutomu; Toyoda, Futoshi; Imai, Shinji; Tanigawa, Hitoshi; Kumagai, Kousuke; Matsuura, Hiroshi; Matsusue, Yoshitaka

    2016-05-01

    Local anesthetics are administered intraarticularly for pain control in orthopedic clinics and surgeries. Although previous studies have shown that local anesthetics can be toxic to chondrocytes, the underlying cellular mechanisms remain unclear. The present study investigates acute cellular responses associated with lidocaine-induced toxicity to articular chondrocytes. Rabbit articular chondrocytes were exposed to lidocaine and their morphological changes were monitored with live cell microscopy. The viability of chondrocytes was evaluated using a fluorescence based LIVE/DEAD assay. Acute treatment of chondrocytes with lidocaine (3-30 mM) induced spherical protrusions on the cell surface (so called "membrane blebbing") in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The concentration-response relationship for the lidocaine effect was shifted leftward by elevating extracellular pH, as expected for the non-ionized lidocaine being involved in the bleb formation. ROCK (Rho-kinase) inhibitors Y-27632 and fasudil completely prevented the lidocaine-induced membrane blebbing, suggesting that ROCK activation is required for bleb formation. Caspase-3 levels were unchanged by 10 mM lidocaine (p = 0.325) and a caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not affect the lidocaine-induced blebbing (p = 0.964). GTP-RhoA levels were significantly increased (p ROCK inhibitors or a myosin-II inhibitor blebbistatin (p ROCK-dependent membrane blebbing and thereby produces a cytotoxic effect on chondrocytes. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:754-762, 2016.

  16. Post operatory analgesia in caesarean surgery.

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    Bárbara Lucía Cabezas Poblet

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post-operatory pain is a spread and constant problem during the care of the surgical patient. The tendency to find new therapeutic techniques to alleviate pain has lead scientists to make and use a great variety of analgesics which are administered by different vias. The effects of narcotics on the new born are well known and the author´s worries about this problem has been the motivational point to search about the use of epidural and intratecal narcotics in the obstetric patient. Objective: To assess the use of peridural liophilized morphine in the Caesarean Section Method: A study of a series of cases was carried out at the Surgical Unit of the Gynecobstetric service of the University Hospital ¨Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima¨ from February 2001 to August 2002 . This search included 120 patient who were selected to elective iterative caesarean section The variables under study were blood pressure, pulse and respiration during the pre- trans and post operative phases, onset of the anaesthetic effect and its duration, peri operatory complications , quality of the post operatory analgesia and its effect on the newborn measured by using Apgar values . The statistical procedure was developed by using the statistical package Epi Info 6. Results: The onset of the anesthetic effect and the duration of the anesthesia were not modified with the use of liophilized morphine. Vital signs remained within normal limits in most of the patients during the pre- trans and post operatory phases. The complications were: pruritus, urinary retention, nausea nad vomiting. The quality of the analgesia was satisfactory in most of the patients. The Apgar values were normal in all neonates. Conclusion: The administration of peridural liophilized morphine in elective caesarean sections is a reliable, sure and useful method in our environment.

  17. Analgesia acupuntural en las extracciones dentarias

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    Juana María Abreu Correa

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Se compararon los resultados de la exodoncia con anestesia y con analgesia con acupuntura en 2 grupos de 60 pacientes cada uno, en los cuales se evaluaron los efectos de ambos tratamientos a las 24, 48 y 72 horas de realizada la extracción. Los aspectos evaluados fueron las complicaciones posextracción y la presencia de dolor, molestias o inflamación con posterioridad a ésta. En el grupo de los pacientes a los que se les aplicó la anestesia a las 24 horas, 51 tenían inflamación y a las 72 horas 31 continuaban con ligero enrojecimiento e inflamación, 3 casos presentaron alveolitis fungosa. Entre los que recibieron la acupuntura a las 24 horas, 26 tenían ligero enrojecimiento que desapareció antes de las 72 horas sin otras complicaciones.The results of exodontia with anesthesia and with acupuncture analgesia are compared in two groups of 60 patients each, in which the effects of both treatments were evaluated 24, 48 and 72 hours after the extraction. The aspects evaluated were the postextraction complications and the presence of pain, disturbance or inflammation after it. In the group of patients that received anesthesia, 51 had inflammation 24 hours after the extraction, whereas 31 still had a mild redness and inflammation 72 hours later. 3 patients presented fungous alveolitis. Among those who were treated with acupuncture, 26 showed a mild redness 24 hours after the extraction that dissapeared before the 72 hours without other complications.

  18. Preemptive analgesia with ketamine for laparoscopic cholecystectomy

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    Harsimran Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of preemptive analgesia is to reduce central sensitization that arises from noxious inputs across the entire perioperative period. N-methyl d-aspartate receptor antagonists have the potential for attenuating central sensitization and preventing central neuroplasticity. Materials and Methods: Patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomized into four groups of 20 patients each, who were administered the study drug intravenously 30 min before incision. Groups A, B, and C received ketamine in a dose of 1.00, 0.75 and 0.50 mg/kg, respectively, whereas group D received isotonic saline. Anesthetic and surgical techniques were standardized. Postoperatively, the degree of pain at rest, movement, and deep breathing using visual analogue scale, time of request for first analgesic, total opioid consumption, and postoperative nausea and vomiting were recorded in postanesthesia care unit for 24 h. Results: Pain scores were highest in Group D at 0 h. Groups A, B, and C had significantly decreased postoperative pain scores at 0, 0.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 12 h. Postoperative analgesic consumption was significantly less in groups A, B, and C as compared with group D. There was no significant difference in the pain scores among groups A, B, and C. Group A had a significantly higher heart rate and blood pressure than groups B and C at 0 and 0.5 h along with 10% incidence of hallucinations. Conclusion: Preemptive ketamine has a definitive role in reducing postoperative pain and analgesic requirement in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The lower dose of 0.5 mg/kg being devoid of any adverse effects and hemodynamic changes is an optimal dose for preemptive analgesia in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

  19. Preemptive analgesia with Ketamine for Laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harsimran; Kundra, Sandeep; Singh, Rupinder M; Grewal, Anju; Kaul, Tej K; Sood, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of preemptive analgesia is to reduce central sensitization that arises from noxious inputs across the entire perioperative period. N-methyl d-aspartate receptor antagonists have the potential for attenuating central sensitization and preventing central neuroplasticity. Materials and Methods: Patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were randomized into four groups of 20 patients each, who were administered the study drug intravenously 30 min before incision. Groups A, B, and C received ketamine in a dose of 1.00, 0.75 and 0.50 mg/kg, respectively, whereas group D received isotonic saline. Anesthetic and surgical techniques were standardized. Postoperatively, the degree of pain at rest, movement, and deep breathing using visual analogue scale, time of request for first analgesic, total opioid consumption, and postoperative nausea and vomiting were recorded in postanesthesia care unit for 24 h. Results: Pain scores were highest in Group D at 0 h. Groups A, B, and C had significantly decreased postoperative pain scores at 0, 0.5, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 12 h. Postoperative analgesic consumption was significantly less in groups A, B, and C as compared with group D. There was no significant difference in the pain scores among groups A, B, and C. Group A had a significantly higher heart rate and blood pressure than groups B and C at 0 and 0.5 h along with 10% incidence of hallucinations. Conclusion: Preemptive ketamine has a definitive role in reducing postoperative pain and analgesic requirement in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The lower dose of 0.5 mg/kg being devoid of any adverse effects and hemodynamic changes is an optimal dose for preemptive analgesia in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:24249984

  20. Benzocaine and lidocaine induced methemoglobinemia after bronchoscopy: a case report

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    Kwok Sophie

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Methemoglobinemia is a rare cause of hypoxemia, characterized by abnormal levels of oxidized hemoglobin that cannot bind to and transport oxygen. Case presentation A 62-year-old male underwent bronchoscopy where lidocaine oral solution and Hurricaine spray (20% benzocaine were used. He developed central cyanosis and his oxygen saturation was 85% via pulse oximetry. An arterial blood gas revealed pH 7.45, PCO2 42, PO2 282, oxygen saturation 85%. Co-oximetry performed revealed a methemoglobin level of 17.5% (normal 0.6–2.5%. The patient was continued on 15 L/minute nonrebreathing face mask and subsequent oxygen saturation improved to 92% within two hours. With hemodynamic stability and improved SpO2, treatment with methylene blue was withheld. Conclusion Methemoglobinemia is a potentially lethal condition after exposure to routinely used drugs. Physicians should be aware of this complication for early diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Coapplication of lidocaine and membrane-impermeable lidocaine derivative QX-222 produces divergent effects on evoked and spontaneous nociceptive behaviors in mice.

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    Hu, Si-Ping; Zhao, Jing-Jing; Wang, Wei-Xing; Liu, Yang; Wu, He-Fen; Chen, Chao; Yu, Liang; Gui, Jing-Bing

    2014-01-01

    The present study was aimed at investigating the analgesic properties of a combination of lidocaine and QX-222 and its effects on evoked pain behavior (complete Freund's adjuvant-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia in inflammatory condition) and spontaneous pain behavior (formalin-induced acute pain) in mice. Drugs were injected adjacent to sciatic nerve or into plantar. Motor function, thermal withdrawal latency, mechanical withdrawal threshold, and licking/biting were evaluated by behavioral tests. A combination of lidocaine and QX-222 adjacent sciatic nerve injection produced the long-lasting sensory-specific nerve block, and intraplantar injection inhibited spontaneous pain in the formalin-treated mice but did not detectably attenuated hyperalgesia and allodynia in the complete Freund's adjuvant- (CFA-) treated mice. Our results suggest that a combination of lidocaine and QX-222 achieves a long-lasting differential block (sensory selective) and produces divergent effects on evoked and spontaneous pain behaviors in mice.

  2. Understanding the large solubility of lidocaine in 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium based ionic liquids using molecular simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ley, Ryan T.; Paluch, Andrew S.

    2016-02-01

    Room temperature ionic liquids have been proposed as replacement solvents in a wide range of industrial separation processes. Here, we focus on the use of ionic liquids as solvents for the pharmaceutical compound lidocaine. We show that the solubility of lidocaine in seven common 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium based ionic liquids is greatly enhanced relative to water. The predicted solubility is greatest in [BMIM]+[CH3CO2]-, which we find results from favorable hydrogen bonding between the lidocaine amine hydrogen and the [CH3CO2]- oxygen, favorable electrostatic interactions between the lidocaine amide oxygen with the [BMIM]+ aromatic ring hydrogens, while lidocaine does not interfere with the association of [BMIM]+ with [CH3CO2]-. Additionally, by removing functional groups from the lidocaine scaffold while maintaining the important amide group, we found that as the van der Waals volume increases, solubility in [BMIM]+[CH3CO2]- relative to water increases.

  3. The neurotoxicity of intrathecal lidocaine is enhanced in postpartum compared to virgin rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fei; Zhang, Bingxi; Li, Tianzuo

    2013-08-01

    During the perinatal period, the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs may be altered. Data about the neurotoxicity of intrathecal local anesthetics in the peripartum period are lacking. So we hypothesized that the neurotoxicity of intrathecal lidocaine during perinatal period may be changed. Therefore, we designed the present study to determine whether the neurotoxicity of intrathecal lidocaine in postpartum rats would be different from that in nonpregnant, virgin rats. Postpartum and nonpregnant rats randomly received an intrathecal infusion of lidocaine 50 mg/mL in saline, lidocaine 20 mg/mL in saline, or saline for 1 h at a rate of 1 μL/min. Four days after drug infusion, the rats were assessed for persistent impairment of sensory and motor function (MF) using the tail-flick (TF) test, paw pressure test, and MF score. Spinal cords and nerve roots were obtained for light and electron microscopic examinations, and the injury scores were compared between groups. The TF latencies and the mean nerve injury scores of the postpartum group were significantly higher than those of nonpregnant group. Lidocaine induced a dose-dependent impairment in TF latencies and nerve injury scores. There was no significant interaction between postpartum and the drug. Our results suggest that the neurotoxicity of intrathecal lidocaine is enhanced in rats during the early postpartum period compared with nonpregnant, virgin rats.

  4. Skin biopsy and quantitative sensory testing do not predict response to lidocaine patch in painful neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, David N; Pannoni, Valerie; Barbano, Richard L; Pennella-Vaughan, Janet; Dworkin, Robert H

    2006-01-01

    Predictors of response to neuropathic pain treatment in patients with painful distal sensory neuropathies are lacking. The 5% lidocaine patch is believed to exert its effects on neuropathic pain via a local stabilizing effect on cutaneous sensory afferents. As such, it provides a model to assess whether the status of epidermal innervation as determined by skin biopsy or quantitative sensory testing (QST) of small- and large-diameter sensory afferents might serve as predictors of response to topical, locally active treatment. In this study we assessed associations between epidermal nerve fiber (ENF) densities, sensory nerve conduction studies (NCS), QST, and response to a 5% lidocaine patch in patients with painful distal sensory neuropathies. We observed no association between distal leg epidermal and subepidermal innervation and response to the lidocaine patch. Several patients with complete loss of distal leg ENF showed a response to the lidocaine patch. Similarly we observed no consistent association between treatment response and QST for vibration, cooling, warm, heat-pain, and cold-pain thresholds, or distal sensory NCS. Thus, distal-leg skin biopsy, QST, and sensory NCS cannot be used to identify patients with painful polyneuropathy likely to respond to a lidocaine patch in clinical practice. Further studies are required to clarify precisely the mechanism and site of action of the lidocaine patch in patients with peripheral neuropathic pain.

  5. The role of lidocaine, epinephrine, and flap elevation in wound healing after chemical peel.

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    Davies, B; Guyuron, B; Husami, T

    1991-03-01

    We have observed 5 patients with hypertrophic scarring at the lateral boundaries of the chemically peeled area when circumoral peel was combined with facial rhytidectomy. Some of the potential contributory factors include flap elevation, epinephrine, and lidocaine hydrochloride. To discover whether any one of these three factors or a combination played a role, a rat model study was designed. Initially, 40, 400-gm Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups, each comprised by 10 rats. Injections with lidocaine or lidocaine with epinephrine, and chemical peel were done in 2 groups. The same injections were used in the remaining 2 groups together with simultaneous preliminary flap elevations and chemical peeling. After the review of the initial study results, another 40 Sprague-Dawley rats were used to repeat the study and compare on a larger scale the effects of lidocaine with and without epinephrine on the depth of chemical peel. The findings of the rat model studies indicate that preliminary injections with lidocaine containing solution (with or without epinephrine) result in a major delay in healing time. Flap elevation and chemical peeling were associated with major morbidity and mortality in the test rats. The presence of epinephrine in lidocaine solution had no significant role in increasing the delay in the healing process.

  6. Efficacy of lidocaine lontophoresis using either alternating or direct current in hairless rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Atsushi; Wakita, Ryo; Haida, Haruka; Fukayama, Haruhisa

    2013-09-30

    The aim of this study was to determine transport of lidocaine ions through a hairless rat skin in vivo and to compare the efficacy of alternating current (AC) with that of direct current (DC) iontophoresis (IOP). We measured the concentration of lidocaine transported through a cellophane membrane or a hairless rat dorsal skin applying either AC-IOP or DC-IOP. The results revealed that lidocaine concentration increased in a time-dependent manner in vitro in both DC-IOP and AC-IOP. However, the in vivo study showed different tendencies in lidocaine concentration. In the DCIOP group, lidocaine concentration reached its maximum 20 min after current application and then decreased rapidly; the AC-IOP group showed an increase in lidocaine concentration in a time-dependent manner. There were no side effects such as electrical burns in the rats. In conclusion, AC can be applied for long periods and DC for short periods, or their application time can be appropriately scheduled. Our study also suggests the mechanism by which voltage waveforms affect the skin when applied by IOP. In the future, these findings will be a solid foundation for developing various kinds of medical equipment such as scheduled drug delivery system that can easily deliver various types of drug.

  7. Effect of Modulated Alternating and Direct Current Iontophoresis on Transdermal Delivery of Lidocaine Hydrochloride

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    Gaurav Bhatia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the iontophoretic delivery of lidocaine hydrochloride through porcine skin and to compare the effects of modulated alternating and direct current iontophoresis. Continuous and modulated iontophoresis was applied for one hour and two hours (0-1 h and 4-5th h using a 1% w/v solution of lidocaine hydrochloride. Tape stripping was done to quantify the amount of drug permeated into stratum corneum and skin extraction studies were performed to determine the amount of drug in stripped skin. Receptor was sampled and analyzed over predefined time periods. The amount of lidocaine delivered across porcine skin after modulated direct current iontophoresis for 2 h was 1069.87±120.03 μg/sq·cm compared to 744.81±125.41 μg/sq·cm after modulated alternating current iontophoresis for 2 h. Modulated direct current iontophoresis also enhanced lidocaine delivery by twelvefold compared to passive delivery as 91.27±18.71 μg/sq·cm of lidocaine was delivered after passive delivery. Modulated iontophoresis enhanced the delivery of lidocaine hydrochloride across porcine skin compared to the passive delivery. Modulated alternating current iontophoresis for duration of 2 h at frequency of 1 kHz was found to be comparable to the continuous direct current iontophoresis for 1 h.

  8. Effect of modulated alternating and direct current iontophoresis on transdermal delivery of lidocaine hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Gaurav; Banga, Ajay K

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the iontophoretic delivery of lidocaine hydrochloride through porcine skin and to compare the effects of modulated alternating and direct current iontophoresis. Continuous and modulated iontophoresis was applied for one hour and two hours (0-1 h and 4-5th h) using a 1% w/v solution of lidocaine hydrochloride. Tape stripping was done to quantify the amount of drug permeated into stratum corneum and skin extraction studies were performed to determine the amount of drug in stripped skin. Receptor was sampled and analyzed over predefined time periods. The amount of lidocaine delivered across porcine skin after modulated direct current iontophoresis for 2 h was 1069.87 ± 120.03 μ g/sq · cm compared to 744.81 ± 125.41 μ g/sq · cm after modulated alternating current iontophoresis for 2 h. Modulated direct current iontophoresis also enhanced lidocaine delivery by twelvefold compared to passive delivery as 91.27 ± 18.71 μ g/sq · cm of lidocaine was delivered after passive delivery. Modulated iontophoresis enhanced the delivery of lidocaine hydrochloride across porcine skin compared to the passive delivery. Modulated alternating current iontophoresis for duration of 2 h at frequency of 1 kHz was found to be comparable to the continuous direct current iontophoresis for 1 h.

  9. Intralesional Lidocaine Anesthesia: A Novel Facilitated Anesthesia Technique for Ethanol Sclerotherapy of Venous Malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xi; Chen, Hui; Lin, XiaoXi; Jin, YunBo; Ma, Gang; Hu, Li; Wang, YongYing; Yu, WenXin; Chang, Lei; Qiu, YaJing

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to describe a novel anesthesia, intralesional lidocaine anesthesia (ILA), for ethanol sclerotherapy of venous malformation and evaluate the efficacy and safety. A prospective study of 100 patients with venous malformations undergoing 100 sclerotherapy procedures with intralesional lidocaine anesthesia (ILA) was conducted. Pain was evaluated by numeric rating scale (NRS) immediately following the procedure. The grade of pain was classified by the NRS as no pain (0), mild (1-3), moderate (4-6), and severe (7-10). Local and systemic complications caused by lidocaine were recorded. The median injected volume of absolute ethanol and 0.25% lidocaine was 5.9 mL and 17.0 mL, respectively. In ILA group, 13 patients had no pain during the procedure, 42 patients had mild pain, 38 patients had moderate pain, and 7 patients had severe pain. The mean NRS scores of the whole ILA group were 3.2 (0-8). No local or systemic complications attributed to lidocaine were reported. In a limited series, intralesional lidocaine anethesia seems to be efficient and safe for use in pain management for ethanol sclerotherapy of venous malformation. This anesthesia technique may be a promising first approach for the ethanol sclerotherapy of venous malformations, as it is easy to handle and has minimal sequelae.

  10. Analgesia postoperatoria en la queiloplastia del lactante. Estudio comparativo: bloqueo infraorbitario intraoral bilateral con bupivacaína 0,25% con adrenalina vs. analgesia intravenosa con tramadol Postoperative analgesia for the management of chieloplasty in the breast-fed baby. Comparative study: bilateral intraoral blockade of the infraorbitary nerve with bupivacaine 0.25% plus adrenaline versus intravenous analgesia with tramadol

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    J. A. Delgado

    2005-05-01

    ó la aparición de cualquier complicación o efecto adverso. Los datos se analizaron mediante t Student y test χ². Resultados: No existieron diferencias en cuanto a las características demográficas. La duración de la analgesia fue mayor en el grupo A (7,3 ± 5,1 h que en el grupo B (2,8 ± 2,2 h (p Objective: To compare the effectiveness and length of bilateral intraoral blockade of the infraorbitary nerve versus standard intravenous analgesia with tramadol for the management of postoperative pain in breast-fed infants undergoing chieloplasty due to harelip. Material and methods: After conducting an adequate pre-anesthetic assessment and obtaining the informed consent from their parents, we performed a double-blind, randomized, controlled and randomized study in 25 ASA I infants with ages ranging from 3 to 10 months that were candidates to corrective harelip surgery (chieloplasty. All of them were pretreated half an hour before the surgical procedure with oral midazolan (0.5 mg.kg-1 and the same anesthesiologist performed the anesthetic technique and the nerve blockade in all the cases, this being inhaled induction with sevoflurane prior to venoclysis. General anesthesia was achieved with intravenous administration of atropine, fentanyl and rocuronium at the standard doses prior to endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. Patients were randomized to one of the following groups: Group A (n = 12: 1-2 ml of bupivacaine 0.25% plus adrenaline was administered for bilateral blockade of the intraorbitary nerve and intravenous saline solution instead of intravenous analgesia with tramadol. Group B (n = 13: saline solution was administered for nerve blockade, instead of bupivacaine, and intravenous tramadol (1.5 mg.kg-1 was provided as postoperative analgesia. All of the patients underwent general anesthesia with sevoflurane and fentanyl "on-demand" according to standard parameters (blood pressure, heart rate, pupil size, etc.. During the first six hours at

  11. Constructing priors in synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Tessa M

    2014-01-01

    A new theoretical framework (PPSMC) applicable to synesthesia has been proposed, in which the discrepancy between the perceptual reality of (some) synesthetic concurrents and their subjective non-veridicality is being explained. The PPSMC framework stresses the relevance of the phenomenology of synesthesia for synesthesia research-and beyond. When describing the emergence and persistence of synesthetic concurrents under PPSMC, it is proposed that precise, high-confidence priors are crucial in synesthesia. I discuss the construction of priors in synesthesia.

  12. [Epidural obstetric analgesia, maternal fever and neonatal wellness parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Guisasola, J; Delgado Arnáiz, C; Rodríguez Caravaca, G; Serrano Rodríguez, M L; García del Valle, S; Gómez-Arnau, J I

    2005-04-01

    To study the relation between epidural analgesia and the development of maternal fever during labor and childbirth, and to determine the possible relation between that association and neonatal welfare and in the performance of tests to rule out sepsis in newborns. Prospective study of all women who gave birth at Fundación Hospital Alcorcón over a period of 3 years. All the women were offered epidural analgesia based on infusion of 0.0625% bupivacaine and 2 microg x mL(-1). Data collected were age, nulliparity, epidural analgesia infusion, induction of labor, uterine stimulation with oxytocin, type of birth, fetal weight, duration of dilation and expulsion, Apgar score (at 1 and 5 minutes), umbilical artery pH, and maternal temperature. Data for 4364 women were analyzed. Fever developed during labor in 5.7%; 93.7% of the fevers occurred in women receiving epidural analgesia (Pneonatal wellness parameters studied.

  13. Stability of piritramide in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remane, D; Scriba, G; Meissner, W; Hartmann, M

    2009-06-01

    For patient controlled analgesia, syringes with solutions of 1.5 mg/ml piritramide in 0.9% aqueous sodium chloride are used. The physical and chemical stability for dilutions of the commercially available preparation of piritramide is limited up to 72 hours by the manufacturer. Since application duration for patient-controlled analgesia can exceed that limited time, stability was investigated by HPLC. Our results show that these solutions are chemically stable over a time period of 60 days.

  14. The Neuroanatomy of Sexual Dimorphism in Opioid Analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-13

    2012 for review). Studies utilizing orofacial, somatosensory or visceral pain assays typically report that morphine produces a significantly greater...The reported sex differences in morphine analgesia are not trivial; in both persistent inflammatory pain (Wang et al., 2006) and visceral pain (Ji et al...117 (3), 433–442. Ji, Y., Murphy, A.Z., Traub, R.J., 2006. Sex differences in morphine-induced analgesia of visceral pain are supraspinally and

  15. Time Course of the Soleus M Response and H Reflex after Lidocaine Tibial Nerve Block in the Rat

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    Kévin Buffenoir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. In spastic subjects, lidocaine is often used to induce a block predictive of the result provided by subsequent surgery. Lidocaine has been demonstrated to inhibit the Hoffmann (H reflex to a greater extent than the direct motor (M response induced by electrical stimulation, but the timecourse of these responses has not been investigated. Methods. An animal (rat model of the effects of lidocaine on M and H responses was therefore developed to assess this time course. M and H responses were recorded in 18 adult rats before and after application of lidocaine to the sciatic nerve. Results. Two to five minutes after lidocaine injection, M responses were markedly reduced (mean reduction of 44% and H reflexes were completely abolished. Changes were observed more rapidly for the H reflex. The effects of lidocaine then persisted for 100 minutes. The effect of lidocaine was therefore more prolonged on the H reflex than on the M response. Conclusion. This study confirms that lidocaine blocks not only alpha motoneurons but also Ia afferent fibres responsible for the H reflex. The authors describe, for the first time, the detailed time course of the effect of lidocaine on direct or reflex activation of motoneurons in the rat.

  16. Detection of follicular transport of lidocaine and metabolism in adipose tissue in pig ear skin by DESI mass spectrometry imaging.

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    D'Alvise, Janina; Mortensen, Rasmus; Hansen, Steen H; Janfelt, Christian

    2014-06-01

    Desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) mass spectrometry imaging is demonstrated as a detection technique for penetration experiments of drugs in skin. Lidocaine ointment was used as the model compound in ex vivo experiments with whole pig ears as the skin model. Follicular transport of lidocaine into the deeper skin layers is demonstrated for the first time. Furthermore, metabolism of lidocaine to 3-OH-lidocaine was observed in subcutaneous tissue as well as in lobules of white adipose tissue surrounding the hair follicles. These results suggest that it is advantageous to use full thickness skin, including subcutaneous tissue, for skin metabolism studies.

  17. Effects of Fentanyl-lidocaine-propofol and Dexmedetomidine-lidocaine-propofol on Tracheal Intubation Without Use of Muscle Relaxants

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    Volkan Hancı

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effects of fentanyl or dexmedetomidine when used in combination with propofol and lidocaine for tracheal intubation without using muscle relaxants. Sixty patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists stage I risk were randomized to receive 1 mg/kg dexmedetomidine (Group D, n = 30 or 2 mg/kg fentanyl (Group F, n = 30, both in combination with 1.5 mg/kg lidocaine and 3 mg/kg propofol. The requirement for intubation was determined based on mask ventilation capability, jaw motility, position of the vocal cords and the patient's response to intubation and inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff. Systolic arterial pressure, mean arterial pressure, heart rate and peripheral oxygen saturation values were also recorded. Rate pressure products were calculated. Jaw relaxation, position of the vocal cords and patient's response to intubation and inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff were significantly better in Group D than in Group F (p < 0.05. The intubation conditions were significantly more satisfactory in Group D than in Group F (p = 0.01. Heart rate was significantly lower in Group D than in Group F after the administration of the study drugs and intubation (p < 0.05. Mean arterial pressure was significantly lower in Group F than in Group D after propofol injection and at 3 and 5 minutes after intubation (p < 0.05. After intubation, the rate pressure product values were significantly lower in Group D than in Group F (p < 0.05. We conclude that endotracheal intubation was better with the dexmedetomidine–lidocaine–propofol combination than with the fentanyl–lidocaine–propofol combination. However, side effects such as bradycardia should be considered when using dexmedetomidine.

  18. Effect of lidocaine on retinal aquaporin-4 expression after ischemia/reperfusion injury in the rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liying He; Li Li

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have demonstrated that high doses of lidocaine can reduce edema in rats with brain injury by down-regulating aquaporin-4 (AQP4) expression. The hypothesis for the present study is that lidocaine could retinal edema that is associated with AQP4 expression.OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to investigate the interventional effects of lidocaine on retinal AQP4 expression and retinal edema following ischemia/reperfusion injury in the rat.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: This study, a randomized, controlled, animal experiment, was performed at the Basic Research Institute, Chongqing Medical University from September 2006 to May 2007.MATERIALS: Seventy-five, healthy, adult, female, Sprague-Dawley rats were included. A total of 50 rats were used to establish a retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury model using an anterior chamber enhancing perfusion unit. Rabbit anti-rat AQP4 antibody was purchased from Santa Cruz Biotechnology, USA.METHODS: All 75 rats were randomly divided into three groups, with 25 rats in each: control, model, and lidocaine. At each time point (1, 6, 12, 24, and 48 hours after modeling, five rats for each time point), each rat in the lidocaine group was intraperitoneally administered lidocaine with an initial dose of 30 mg/kg, followed by subsequent doses of 15 mg/kg every six hours. The entire treatment process lasted three days for each rat. At each above-mentioned time point, rats in the model group were modeled, but not administered any substances. Rats in the control group received the same treatments as in the lidocaine group except that lidocaine was replaceld by physiological saline.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Following hematoxylin-eosin staining, rat retinal tissue was observed to investigate retinal edema degree through the use of an optical microscope and transmission electron microscope. Retinal AQP4 expression was determined by immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: At each above-mentioned time point, AQP4 expression was

  19. Muscle-type nicotinic receptor blockade by diethylamine, the hydrophilic moiety of lidocaine

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    Armando eAlberola-Die

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Lidocaine bears in its structure both an aromatic ring and a terminal amine, which can be protonated at physiological pH, linked by an amide group. Since lidocaine causes multiple inhibitory actions on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs, this work was aimed to determine the inhibitory effects of diethylamine (DEA, a small molecule resembling the hydrophilic moiety of lidocaine, on Torpedo marmorata nAChRs microtransplanted to Xenopus oocytes. Similarly to lidocaine, DEA reversibly blocked acetylcholine-elicited currents (IACh in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 close to 70 μM, but unlike lidocaine, DEA did not affect IACh desensitization. IACh inhibition by DEA was more pronounced at negative potentials, suggesting an open-channel blockade of nAChRs, although roughly 30% inhibition persisted at positive potentials, indicating additional binding sites outside the pore. DEA block of nAChRs in the resting state (closed channel was confirmed by the enhanced IACh inhibition when pre-applying DEA before its co-application with ACh, as compared with solely DEA and ACh co-application. Virtual docking assays provide a plausible explanation to the experimental observations in terms of the involvement of different sets of drug binding sites. So, at the nAChR transmembrane (TM domain, DEA and lidocaine shared binding sites within the channel pore, giving support to their open-channel blockade; besides, lidocaine, but not DEA, interacted with residues at cavities among the M1, M2, M3 and M4 segments of each subunit and also at intersubunit crevices. At the extracellular (EC domain, DEA and lidocaine binding sites were broadly distributed, which aids to explain the closed channel blockade observed. Interestingly, some DEA clusters were located at the α-γ interphase of the EC domain, in a cavity near the orthosteric binding site pocket; by contrast, lidocaine contacted with all α-subunit loops conforming the ACh binding site, both in α-γ and

  20. Buffered Versus Non-Buffered Lidocaine With Epinephrine for Mandibular Nerve Block: Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phero, James A; Nelson, Blake; Davis, Bobby; Dunlop, Natalie; Phillips, Ceib; Reside, Glenn; Tikunov, Andrew P; White, Raymond P

    2017-04-01

    Outcomes for peak blood levels were assessed for buffered 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine compared with non-buffered 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. In this institutional review board-approved prospective, randomized, double-blinded, crossover trial, the clinical impact of buffered 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine (Anutra Medical, Research Triangle Park, Cary, NC) was compared with the non-buffered drug. Venous blood samples for lidocaine were obtained 30 minutes after a mandibular nerve block with 80 mg of the buffered or unbuffered drug. Two weeks later, the same subjects were tested with the alternate drug combinations. Subjects also reported on pain on injection with a 10-point Likert-type scale and time to lower lip numbness. The explanatory variable was the drug formulation. Outcome variables were subjects' peak blood lidocaine levels, subjective responses to pain on injection, and time to lower lip numbness. Serum lidocaine levels were analyzed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Statistical analyses were performed using Proc TTEST (SAS 9.3; SAS Institute, Cary, NC), with the crossover option for a 2-period crossover design, to analyze the normally distributed outcome for pain. For non-normally distributed outcomes of blood lidocaine levels and time to lower lip numbness, an assessment of treatment difference was performed using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests with Proc NPAR1WAY (SAS 9.3). Statistical significance was set at a P value less than .05 for all outcomes. Forty-eight percent of subjects were women, half were Caucasian, 22% were African American, and 13% were Asian. Median age was 21 years (interquartile range [IQR], 20-22 yr), and median body weight was 147 lb (IQR, 130-170 lb). Median blood levels (44 blood samples) at 30 minutes were 1.19 μg/L per kilogram of body weight. Mean blood level differences of lidocaine for each patient were significantly lower after nerve block with the buffered drug compared with the

  1. Modern neuraxial labor analgesia: options for initiation, maintenance and drug selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, M

    2009-11-01

    In the present review we outline the state-of-the-art of neuraxial analgesia. As neuraxial analgesia remains the gold standar of analgesia during labor, we review the most recent literature on this topic. The neuraxial analgesia techniques, types of administration, drugs, adjuvants, and adverse effects are investigated from the references. Most authors would agree that central neuraxial analgesia is the best form to manage labor pain. When neuraxial analgesia is administered to the parturient in labor, different management choices must be made by the anesthetist: how will we initiate analgesia, how will analgesia be maintained, which local anesthetic will we use for neuraxial analgesia and which adjuvant drugs will we combine? The present manuscript tries to review the literature to answer these questions.

  2. Comparison of 1.5% lidocaine and 0.5% ropivacaine epidural anesthesia combined with propofol general anesthesia guided by bispectral index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Yan; LI Yu-hong

    2007-01-01

    Objective:To compare the effects of epidural anesthesia with 1.5% lidocaine and 0.5% ropivacaine on propofol requirements,the time to loss of consciousness (LOC),effect-site propofol concentrations,and the hemodynamic variables during induction of general anesthesia guided by bispectral index (BIS) were studied.Methods:Forty-five patients were divided into three groups to receive epidurally administered saline (Group S),1.5% (w/w) lidocaine (Group L),or 0.5% (w/w) ropivacaine (Group R).Propofol infusion was started to produce blood concentration of 4 μg/ml.Once the BIS value reached 40~50,endotracheal intubation was facilitated by 0.1 mg/kg vecuronium.Measurements included the time to LOC,effect-site propofol concentrations,total propofol dose,mean arterial blood pressure (MABP),and heart rate (HR) at different study time points.Results:During induction of anesthesia,both Groups L and R were similar for the time to LOC,effect-site propofol concentrations,total propofol dose,MABP,HR,and BIS.The total doses of propofol administered until 1 min post-intubation were significantly less in patients of Groups R and L compared with Group S.MABP and HR were significantly lower following propofol induction compared with baseline values in the three groups,or MABP was significantly increased following intubation as compared with that prior to intubation in Group S but not in Groups R and L while HR was significantly increased following intubation in the three groups.Conclusion:Epidural anesthesia with 1.5% lidocaine and 0.5% ropivacaine has similar effects on the time to LOC,effect-site propofol concentrations,total propofol dose,and the hemodynamic variables during induction of general anesthesia.

  3. Does Injection of Lidocaine with 1/100000 Epinephrine Immediately before Lateral Osteotomy Reduce Post-Operative Periorbital Edema and Ecchymosis in Rhinoplasty?

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    mansoor zojajy

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative periorbital edema and ecchymosis are common after rhinoplasty. We studied the effect of local injection of Lidocaine/Adrenaline immediately before osteotomy on prevention of post-operative periorbital edema and ecchymosis in rhinoplasty.Materials and Methods: Thirty healthy candidates for rhinoplasty were enrolled in the self-controlled clinical trial study. Lidocaine/Adrenaline solution injected randomly to one side just prior to the lateral osteotomy. The opposite side used as a control. The degree of edema/ecchymosis on both sides was compared on the 1st, 2nd and 7th day postoperatively.Results: Mean of severity of edema, 24 hours after operation was 3in both sides, (Mann-whitney U; p=0.829. Mean of severity of edema, 48 hours after operation was 2 in both sides (Mann-whitney U; p=0.867 and it was 1 in both sides 7 days after operation (Mann-whitney U; p=0.756.There was no significant difference between two sides. Mean of severity of ecchymosis, 24 hours after operation was 3 in both sides (Mann-whitney U; p=0.692. Mean of severity of ecchymosis, 48 hours after operation was 2 in both sides (Mann-whitney U; p=0.655 and it was 1 in both sides 7 days after operation (Mann-whitney U; p=0.873. There was no significant difference between two sides.Conclusion: local injection of Lidocaine/Adrenaline solution immediately before lateral osteotomy could not reduce postoperative edema and ecchymosis in rhinoplasty.

  4. Peripheral morphine analgesia in dental surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likar, R; Sittl, R; Gragger, K; Pipam, W; Blatnig, H; Breschan, C; Schalk, H V; Stein, C; Schäfer, M

    1998-05-01

    The recent identification of opioid receptors on peripheral nerve endings of primary afferent neurons and the expression of their mRNA in dorsal root ganglia support earlier experimental data about peripheral analgesic effects of locally applied opioids. These effects are most prominent under localized inflammatory conditions. The clinical use of such peripheral analgesic effects of opioids was soon investigated in numerous controlled clinical trials. The majority of these have tested the local, intraarticular administration of morphine in knee surgery and have demonstrated potent and long-lasting postoperative analgesia. As the direct application of morphine into the pain-generating site of injury and inflammation appears most promising, we examined direct morphine infiltration of the surgical site in a unique clinical model of inflammatory tooth pain. Forty-four patients undergoing dental surgery entered into this prospective, randomized, double-blind study. Before surgery they received, together with a standard local anesthetic solution (articaine plus epinephrine) a submucous injection of either 1 mg of morphine (group A) or saline (group B). Postoperative pain intensity was assessed using the visual analog scale (VAS) and numeric rating scale (NRS) at 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 20 and 24 h after surgery. In addition, patients recorded the occurrence of side effects and the supplemental consumption of diclofenac tablets. Results of 27 patients were analyzed (group A: n=14, group B: n=13). Pain scores which were moderate to severe preoperatively were reduced to a similar extent in both groups up to 8 h postoperatively. Thereafter, pain scores in group A were significantly lower than those in group B for up to 24 h, demonstrating the analgesic efficacy of additional morphine. The time to first analgesic intake and the total amount of supplemental diclofenac were less in group A than in group B. No serious side effects were reported. Our results show that 1 mg of

  5. Meningitis tras anestesia y analgesia espinal

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    M. Robles Romero

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de esta revisión es una puesta al día en la etiología, diagnóstico, profilaxis y tratamiento de la meningitis tras anestesia y analgesia espinales. Aunque es una complicación mayor de esta técnica y su incidencia es baja, cada vez son más frecuentes los casos publicados en la literatura médica. Según su etiología se les clasifica en meningitis sépticas, víricas y asépticas. Las meningitis sépticas son las más frecuentes, y en su etiología cada vez juega un papel más destacado como agente implicado el estreptococo salivarius. Como meningitis asépticas se clasifican aquellas en las que el cultivo de líquido cefalorraquídeo es negativo, con un periodo de latencia de síntomas inferior a seis horas, que pueden cursar con eosinofilia en el líquido cefalorraquídeo y unos niveles cercanos a la normalidad en la glucorraquia. Suelen tener buena respuesta y evolución con tratamiento antibiótico con vancomicina y cefalosporinas de tercera generación. Como profilaxis incidir en las medidas de asepsia, sobre todo en el uso de mascarilla facial para realizar la técnica, como práctica para disminuir la incidencia de gérmenes cuyo origen está en la cavidad oral y orofaringe. Asimismo podrían reducir la incidencia de meningitis las medidas de asepsia tales como el lavado de manos, uso de guantes y asepsia de la piel. La diferenciación entre meningitis séptica y aséptica se hará con mayor seguridad cuando se estandaricen las técnicas para detectar genoma bacteriano en el líquido cefalorraquídeo; actualmente se etiquetan como meningitis asépticas aquellas en las que el cultivo de líquido cefalorraquídeo es negativo y cuya tinción de Gram es negativa. Pese a que el pronóstico y evolución en rasgos generales de las meningitis tras anestesia y analgesia espinal es bueno, en comparación con las meningitis adquiridas en la comunidad, por la escasa virulencia de las bacterias implicadas (Estreptococo salivarius

  6. Efficacy of the methoxyflurane as bridging analgesia during epidural placement in laboring parturient

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    Jamil S Anwari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Establishing an epidural in an agitated laboring woman can be challenging. The ideal pain control technique in such a situation should be effective, fast acting, and short lived. We assessed the efficacy of inhalational methoxyflurane (Penthrox™ analgesia as bridging analgesia for epidural placement. Materials and Methods: Sixty-four laboring women who requested epidural analgesia with pain score of ≥7 enrolled in an observational study, 56 of which completed the study. The parturients were instructed to use the device prior to the onset of uterine contraction pain and to stop at the peak of uterine contraction, repeatedly until epidural has been successfully placed. After each (methoxyflurane inhalation-uterine contraction cycle, pain, Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale (RASS, nausea and vomiting were evaluated. Maternal and fetal hemodynamics and parturient satisfaction were recorded. Results: The mean baseline pain score was 8.2 ± 1.5 which was reduced to 6.2 ± 2.0 after the first inhalation with a mean difference of 2.0 ± 1.1 (95% confidence interval 1.7-2.3, P < 0.0001, and continued to decrease significantly over the study period (P < 0.0001. The RASS scores continuously improved after each cycle (P < 0.0001. Only 1 parturient from the cohort became lightly sedated (RASS = −1. Two parturients vomited, and no significant changes in maternal hemodynamics or fetal heart rate changes were identified during treatment. 67% of the parturients reported very good or excellent satisfaction with treatment. Conclusion: Penthrox™ provides rapid, robust, and satisfactory therapy to control pain and restlessness during epidural placement in laboring parturient.

  7. Effects of remifentanil on measures of anesthetic immobility and analgesia in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosnan, Robert J; Pypendop, Bruno H; Siao, Kristine T; Stanley, Scott D

    2009-09-01

    To evaluate effects of various doses of remifentanil on measures of analgesia in anesthetized cats. 6 healthy adult cats. Minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) for isoflurane and thermal threshold responses were evaluated in anesthetized cats. Remifentanil infusions of 0 (baseline), 0.0625, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 microg/kg/min were administered; after a 45-minute equilibration period, isoflurane MAC and responses were determined. Isoflurane MAC was determined in anesthetized cats once for each remifentanil infusion rate by use of a standard tail clamp technique. Thermal threshold was measured in awake cats by use of a commercially available analgesiometric probe placed on the lateral portion of the thorax; remifentanil infusions were administered in randomized order to anesthetized cats, and thermal threshold determinations were made by an investigator who was unaware of the infusion rate. Mean +/- SEM median effective concentration (EC(50)) for remifentanil and its active metabolite, GR90291, for the thermal threshold test was 1.00 +/- 0.35 ng/mL and 307 +/- 28 ng/mL of blood, respectively. Dysphoria was detected in all awake cats at the 2 highest remifentanil infusion rates. However, isoflurane MAC during remifentanil infusions was unchanged from baseline values, even at blood opioid concentrations approximately 75 times the analgesic EC(50). Immobility and analgesia as reflected by thermal threshold testing were independent anesthetic end points in the cats. Results of MAC-sparing evaluations should not be used to infer analgesic potency without prior validation of an MAC-analgesia relationship for specific drugs and species.

  8. Influence of repeated painful procedures and sucrose analgesia on the development of hyperalgesia in newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddio, Anna; Shah, Vibhuti; Atenafu, Eshetu; Katz, Joel

    2009-07-01

    This study determined the effects of cumulative exposure to painful needle procedures and sucrose analgesia on the development of remote hyperalgesia in newborn infants, defined as an increase in response to a normally painful stimulus at a site distal from the site of injury. One-hundred and twenty healthy newborns and 120 healthy newborn infants of diabetic mothers equally randomized to sucrose analgesia or placebo prior to all needle procedures in the first two days after birth were divided into two exposure groups according to number of needle procedures they had undergone [high (> or =5) or low (pain response during a subsequent venipuncture distal to the site of previous injury, assessed by the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) [7.1 vs. 8.4; p=0.012] and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) [2.5 cm vs. 3.2 cm; p=0.047], and a trend for longer cry duration [25.7 s vs. 33.8 s; p=0.171]. PIPP scores did not differ during a routine diaper change, suggesting a nociceptive specific mechanism for the remote hyperalgesia to venipuncture. Sucrose reduced PIPP, VAS, and cry duration scores during venipuncture, but did not prevent hyperalgesia (p>0.05). There was a preponderance of infants of diabetic mothers in the high exposure group; however, the analysis did not demonstrate this to be a confounding factor. In conclusion, sucrose analgesia for repeated painful procedures in the first day of life does not prevent development of remote hyperalgesia in newborns.

  9. Analgesia epidural para parto en la gestante obesa Epidural analgesia for labour in obese patients

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    E. Guasch

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available La obesidad es un problema global de salud en continuo aumento en el mundo desarrollado. Dado que la incidencia de la obesidad es mayor en mujeres que en hombres, los anestesiólogos con especial dedicación a la obstetricia, tendrán mayor oportunidad de enfrentarse a este tipo de pacientes. Nuestro objetivo es determinar la dificultad en la realización de la técnica epidural para analgesia de parto y analizar la incidencia de complicaciones ocurridas durante la punción en las gestantes obesas, así como evaluar la eficacia de la analgesia epidural en este grupo de pacientes en un estudio observacional retrospectivo de todos los bloqueos epidurales para analgesia de parto realizados en un hospital universitario de nivel 4 durante un periodo de cuatro años. Se ha estudiado un total de 13616 pacientes, clasificándolas según el índice de masa corporal en Kg./m² (IMC. En las pacientes no obesas (IMCObesity is an increasing global health problem in Developer countries. As its incidence is grater in women than men, obstetric anesthesiologists wil be envolved in the care of the obese patient more often. Our aim is to study punction dificulties in obese parturients requiring epidural analgesia for labor, and to compare punction complications between obese and non obese parturients as analgesic efficacy between obese and non obese patients in a retrospective observational study among all the epidural analgesic blocks performed in a universitary hospital in a four years period. We studied 13616 patients, who were classified according to body mass index in Kg/m² (BMI. In the non obese group patients (BMI<30; first attempt epidural success was achieved in 76,5%. Mild obese patients (BMI 30-32, severe obese (BMI 33-39 and morbid obese (BMI≥40, the percents were 69, 3%, 63,2% y 47,4% respectively. The comparison among obese and non obese patients was significati-vely different (p<0,001. Punction complications did not show differences among groups

  10. Beyond-use dating of lidocaine alone and in two "magic mouthwash" preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Loren Madden; Brown, Stacy D; Luu, Yao; Ogle, Amanda; Huffman, Jessica; Lewis, Paul O

    2017-05-01

    Beyond-use dating (BUD) of lidocaine alone and in two "magic mouthwash" preparations stored in amber oral syringes at room temperature was determined. Two formulations of mouthwash containing oral topical lidocaine 2% (viscous), diphenhydramine 2.5 mg/mL, and aluminum hydroxide-magnesium hydroxide-simethicone were prepared in 1:1:1 and 1:2.5:2.5 ratios, divided into 3-mL samples, and stored in unit-dose oral amber syringes. Unit-dose single-product lidocaine samples were also prepared to serve as controls and stored in oral amber syringes. The lidocaine concentrations in these samples were measured periodically for 90 days. A stability-indicating high-performance liquid chromatographic method was developed and validated for system suitability, accuracy, repeatability, intermediate precision, specificity, linearity, and robustness. Based on the calculated percentages versus the initial concentration and the results from an analysis of variance comparing the two formulations, a BUD of 21 days is deemed appropriate for both magic mouthwash formulations. Based on the stability data, published safety concerns, and lack of efficacy in combination, packaging and dispensing lidocaine separately from other ingredients are recommended when administering magic mouthwash mixtures. Utilizing a 90-day BUD, lidocaine can be packaged separately from other magic mouthwash ingredients in individual dosage units and applied to the oral cavity using the swish-and-spit method. The delivery of the diphenhydramine and aluminum hydroxide-magnesium hydroxide-simethicone could be separated, allowing for a swish-and-swallow method of administration. A BUD of 21 days is recommended for lidocaine prepared with diphenhydramine and aluminum hydroxide-magnesium hydroxide-simethicone in ratios of 1:1:1 and 1:2.5:2.5 and stored at room temperature in amber oral plastic syringes. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of lidocaine volume and concentration on preventing incidence and severity of propofol injection pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharavi, Mohammad; Sabzevari, Alireza; Ghorbanian, Ehsanolah; Sajadi, Rasoul; Akhondi, Mohsen

    2014-03-01

    Propofol is one of common anesthetic drugs used in anesthesia. The most common side effects of propofol are local pain. Pretreatment with lidocaine can reduce propofol injection pain. The aim of the present study was to assess and compare the efficiency of lidocaine 0.4% and 2% in reducing the incidence and severity of propofol injection pain. This was a double blind prospective clinical trial on children 4-8 years old with class ASA I and II candidates who were referred to Dr. Shaikh Hospital in Mashhad for elective surgery. Sample size calculated 50 patients in each groups based on pilot study. 100 children's were randomly divided equally in two groups, who were injected with lidocaine solutions 2% and 0.4% respectively. patient's pain evaluation based on VSD (verbal descriptor scale) and NRS (Numeric Rating Scale) using patient's verbal reaction and behavior namely fretting, hand drag and tearing. The collated data was analyzed. There was nosignificant difference as to the first three variables (age, gender and weight P > 0.2). The significant difference regarding pain experience in both groups was noteworthy (P > 0.2). Most of the studies compared lidocaine with other drugs or its efficiency at different doses. Our study is different in that we applied a constant dose of lidocaine in various volumes and concentration. This result shows that lidocaine with the same does but lower concentration and higher volume is more effective in preventing propofol injection pain. Using diluted lidocaine with the dosage of 1 mg/kg and a concentration of 0.4% is an effective way to relieve pain caused by propofol injection in children.

  12. Regional myocardial lidocaine concentration following continuous intravenous infusion early and later after myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zito, R.A.; Caride, V.J.; Holford, T.; Zaret, B.L.

    1982-09-01

    The regional concentration of lidocaine using a double constant infusion technique (250 micrograms/kg/min x 15 minutes followed by 35 micrograms/kg/mg/min x 120 minutes) was studied immediately (2 hours) in seven dogs and 24 hours (six dogs) after myocardial infarction. Tissue levels were determined by gas chromatography and related to regional myocardial blood flow as determined by the radioactive microsphere technique in multiple samples. At 2 hours after infarction a significantly higher lidocaine concentration (4.1 +/- 0.42 micrograms/g) was found in zones with greatly reduced blood flow (regional myocardial blood flow less than 0.2 ml/min per g) when compared with that (2.6 +/- 0.19 micrograms/g) in zones with normal blood flow (regional myocardial blood flow greater than 0.8 ml/min per g) (p less than 0.01). In contrast, in the 24 hour model the opposite situation was observed. Although the concentration of lidocaine in the infarct zone was substantial, a significant decline in lidocaine tissue concentration was found in the zones of lowest blood flow (regional myocardial blood flow less than 0.2 ml/min per g) when compared with that in normal zones (1.76 +/- 0.21 versus 3.38 +/- 0.21 micrograms/g, p less than 0.001). In addition, no significant differences in lidocaine concentrations were found between endocardium and epicardium in any of the groups other than those related to regional myocardial blood flow. Thus, with the double constant infusion technique, lidocaine reached normal and ischemic myocardium in concentrations equivalent to therapeutic plasma concentrations, even in lower infarct blood flow zones, with no significant differences between endocardium and epicardium. Of perhaps greater significance, the age of the ischemic insult is an important determinant of lidocaine tissue distribution in infarcted myocardium.

  13. Modulation of major voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels in cultured neurons of the rat inferior colliculus by lidocaine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu YU; Lin CHEN

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of the present study was to explore how lidocaine as a thera-peutic drug for tinnitus targets voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels and changes the excitability of central auditory neurons. Methods: Membrane cur-rents mediated by major voltage- and ligand-gated channels were recorded from primary cultured neurons of the inferior colliculus (IC) in rats with whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in the presence and absence of lidocaine. The effects of lidocaine on the current-evoked firing of action potentials were also exam-ined. Results: Lidocaine at 100 μmol/L significantly suppressed voltage-gated sodium currents, transient outward potassium currents, and the glycine-induced chloride currents to 87.66%±2.12%, 96.33%±0.35%, and 91.46%±2.69% of that of the control level, respectively. At 1 mmol/L, lidocaine further suppressed the 3 currents to 70.26%±4.69%, 62.80% ±2.61%, and 89.11%±3.17% of that of the control level, respectively, However, lidocaine at concentrations lower than 1 mmol/L did not significantly affect GABA- or aspartate-induced currents. At a higher concentration (3 retool/L), lidocaine slightly depressed the GABA-in-duced current to 87.70%±1.87% of that of the control level. Finally, lidocaine at 100 μmol/L was shown to significantly suppress the current-evoked firing of IC neurons to 58.62%±11.22% of that of the control level, indicating that lidocaine decreases neuronal excitability. Conclusion: Although the action of lidocaine on the ion channels and receptors is complex and non-specific, it has an overall inhibitory effect on IC neurons at a clinically-relevant concentration, suggesting a central mechanism for lidocaine to suppress tinnitus.

  14. Newborn Analgesia Mediated by Oxytocin during Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzuca, Michel; Minlebaev, Marat; Shakirzyanova, Anastasia; Tyzio, Roman; Taccola, Giuliano; Janackova, Sona; Gataullina, Svetlana; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Giniatullin, Rashid; Khazipov, Rustem

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling pain in newborns during delivery are poorly understood. We explored the hypothesis that oxytocin, an essential hormone for labor and a powerful neuromodulator, exerts analgesic actions on newborns during delivery. Using a thermal tail-flick assay, we report that pain sensitivity is two-fold lower in rat pups immediately after birth than 2 days later. Oxytocin receptor antagonists strongly enhanced pain sensitivity in newborn, but not in 2-day-old rats, whereas oxytocin reduced pain at both ages suggesting an endogenous analgesia by oxytocin during delivery. Similar analgesic effects of oxytocin, measured as attenuation of pain-vocalization induced by electrical whisker pad stimulation, were also observed in decerebrated newborns. Oxytocin reduced GABA-evoked calcium responses and depolarizing GABA driving force in isolated neonatal trigeminal neurons suggesting that oxytocin effects are mediated by alterations of intracellular chloride. Unlike GABA signaling, oxytocin did not affect responses mediated by P2X3 and TRPV1 receptors. In keeping with a GABAergic mechanism, reduction of intracellular chloride by the diuretic NKCC1 chloride co-transporter antagonist bumetanide mimicked the analgesic actions of oxytocin and its effects on GABA responses in nociceptive neurons. Therefore, endogenous oxytocin exerts an analgesic action in newborn pups that involves a reduction of the depolarizing action of GABA on nociceptive neurons. Therefore, the same hormone that triggers delivery also acts as a natural pain killer revealing a novel facet of the protective actions of oxytocin in the fetus at birth.

  15. [Nitrous oxide - oxygen analgesia in aesthetic dermatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosner, M

    2013-06-01

    Local anaesthesia often is insufficient for more extensive procedures. Instead of general anaesthesia or sedation, pediatricians, gynaecologists and dentists increasingly use nitrous oxide (N2O). This study evaluates the suitability of this form of anesthesia in dermatology. In 24 patients (18 w, 6 m, mean age 49 y.) N2O/O2 inhalation (Livopan®) was used during 46 procedures with indications including fractional RF/wrinkle reduction, IPL/rosacea, q-sw. laser/tattoos and hemosiderosis as well as fractional Er:Glass laser for scars and hypopigmentation. In 26 procedures subjective pain intensity was measured (visual analogue scale 0-10). With N2O the treatment pain was lowered from 6.6 ± 1.6 to 2.9 ± 1.7 (median, p = 0.000). 23/24 patients chose N2O for their next treatment. Beside euphoria, fatigue, slight drowsiness, dizziness, nausea or change in auditory perception, no other side effects occurred. The pronounced analgesia, the easy self-administration, the fast onset and complete recovery after a few minutes and the low ratio of side effects make the N2O/O2 inhalation to an ideal addendum in the management of larger painful procedures in dermatology as long as contraindications and safety precautions are respected.

  16. Prior Knowledge Assessment Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    determine the students’ extent of prior knowledge, not their reading speed or comprehension. Therefore, be sure to consider the reading and English ...backgrounds and skills to make training more effective, meaningful and efficient. Initial research in this tailored training program was on...history of developing measures of mental ability or cognitive skills for personnel selection; beginning with World War I (Zeidner & Drucker, 1988

  17. Arthur Prior and 'Now'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blackburn, Patrick Rowan; Jørgensen, Klaus Frovin

    2015-01-01

    ’s search led him through the work of Castaneda, and back to his own work on hybrid logic: the first made temporal reference philosophically respectable, the second made it technically feasible in a modal framework. With the aid of hybrid logic, Prior built a bridge from a two-dimensional UT calculus...

  18. Comparison of lidocaine/tetracaine cream and lidocaine/prilocaine cream for local anaesthesia during laser treatment of acne keloidalis nuchae and tattoo removal: Results of two randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Greveling (Karin); E.P. Prens (Errol); ten Bosch, N.; M.B. van Doorn (Martijn)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Pain is a common adverse effect of dermatological laser procedures. Currently, no standard topical anaesthetic cream exists for deeper dermal laser procedures. Objectives: To compare the efficacy of lidocaine/tetracaine cream and lidocaine/prilocaine cream in reducing self-re

  19. Comparison of lidocaine/tetracaine cream and lidocaine/prilocaine cream for local anaesthesia during laser treatment of acne keloidalis nuchae and tattoo removal: Results of two randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Greveling (Karin); E.P. Prens (Errol); ten Bosch, N.; M.B.A. van Doorn (Martijn)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Pain is a common adverse effect of dermatological laser procedures. Currently, no standard topical anaesthetic cream exists for deeper dermal laser procedures. Objectives: To compare the efficacy of lidocaine/tetracaine cream and lidocaine/prilocaine cream in reducing self-re

  20. Comparison of lidocaine/tetracaine cream and lidocaine/prilocaine cream for local anaesthesia during laser treatment of acne keloidalis nuchae and tattoo removal: Results of two randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Greveling (Karin); E.P. Prens (Errol); ten Bosch, N.; M.B.A. van Doorn (Martijn)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Pain is a common adverse effect of dermatological laser procedures. Currently, no standard topical anaesthetic cream exists for deeper dermal laser procedures. Objectives: To compare the efficacy of lidocaine/tetracaine cream and lidocaine/prilocaine cream in reducing

  1. Efficacy and Safety of a Lidocaine Gel in Patients from 6 Months up to 8 Years with Acute Painful Sites in the Oral Cavity: A Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Double-Blind, Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörte Wolf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lidocaine is a well-accepted topical anaesthetic, also used in minors to treat painful conditions on mucosal membranes. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (registered prospectively as EudraCT number 2011-005336-25 was designed to generate efficacy and safety data for a lidocaine gel (2% in younger children with painful conditions in the oral cavity. One hundred sixty-one children were included in two subgroups: 4–8 years, average age 6.4 years, treated with verum or placebo and 6 months–<4 years, average age 1.8 years, treated only with verum. Pain reduction was measured from the time prior to administration to 10 or 30 minutes after. In addition, adverse events and local tolerability were evaluated. In group I, pain was reduced significantly after treatment with verum compared to placebo at both time points. In group II, the individual pain rating shift showed statistically significant lower pain after treatment. Only seven out of 161 patients reported an adverse event but none were classified as being related to the study medication. The local tolerability was assessed as very good in over 97% of cases. For painful sites in the oral cavity, a 2% lidocaine gel is a meaningful tool for short-term treatment in the paediatric population.

  2. Safe extensive tumescent liposuction with segmental infiltration of lower concentration lidocaine under monitored anesthesia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Cao, Wei-Gang; Li, Sheng-Li; Liu, Li-Na; Jiang, Zhao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Tumescent anesthesia makes it feasible to perform liposuction in an office setting. There are often patients who desire extensive liposuction on approximately 30% of total body surface area, which means the lidocaine total dose might be over the dosing recommendation. So the segmental infiltration is applied, although the concentration of lidocaine in tumescent fluid is gradually reduced to 0.0252%. Moreover, supplemental intravenous (IV) sedation using monitored anesthesia care is usually applied concurrently to help alleviate discomfort and pain of the patients during tumescent anesthetic infusion and fat extraction which in turn increases the risks of potential lidocaine toxicity due to possible drug interactions. This study was to demonstrate the safety of segmental infiltration of tumescent fluid with lower lidocaine concentration combined with IV sedation in extensive liposuction and determine whether the risk of lidocaine toxicity is increased in this protocol. Ten female patients who requested the extensive liposuction participated in the study. The targeted areas were divided into 2 segments and treated in turn in 1 session. Lidocaine (1600 mg) was infiltrated into the first segment, and approximately 928 mg lidocaine was subsequently infiltrated after accomplishment of the first segment operation. Serum levels of lidocaine were taken every 4 hours during the first 24 hours after the second infiltration. The average time of the procedure is 222 (33) minutes. The dose and total amount of lidocaine injected are 40.7 (5.8) mg/kg and 2528.2 (155.2) mg, respectively. The total volume of the infusates and aspirates are 9918.1 (494) and 6325 (1461.6) mL, respectively, the ratio of total infusates to total aspirates is 1.66 (0.45). The total aspirated fat and fluids are 3280 (1051.8) and 3045 (824.1) mL, respectively. The peak lidocaine levels [2.18 (0.63) μg/mL] occurred after 12 to 20 hours [16.4 (2.27) hours]. No significant correlation between dose per

  3. Psychophysical testing of spatial and temporal dimensions of endogenous analgesia: conditioned pain modulation and offset analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honigman, Liat; Yarnitsky, David; Sprecher, Elliot; Weissman-Fogel, Irit

    2013-08-01

    The endogenous analgesia (EA) system is psychophysically evaluated using various paradigms, including conditioned pain modulation (CPM) and offset analgesia (OA) testing, respectively, the spatial and temporal filtering processes of noxious information. Though both paradigms assess the function of the EA system, it is still unknown whether they reflect the same aspects of EA and consequently whether they provide additive or equivalent data. Twenty-nine healthy volunteers (15 males) underwent 5 trials of different stimulation conditions in random order including: (1) the classic OA three-temperature stimulus train ('OA'); (2) a three-temperature stimulus train as control for the OA ('OAcon'); (3) a constant temperature stimulus ('constant'); (4) the classic parallel CPM ('CPM'); and (5) a combination of OA and CPM ('OA + CPM'). We found that in males, the pain reduction during the OA + CPM condition was greater than during the OA (P = 0.003) and CPM (P = 0.07) conditions. Furthermore, a correlation was found between OA and CPM (r = 0.62, P = 0.01) at the time of maximum OA effect. The additive effect found suggests that the two paradigms represent at least partially different aspects of EA. The moderate association between the CPM and OA magnitudes indicates, on the other hand, some commonality of their underlying mechanisms.

  4. Displacement of nortriptyline and uptake of 14C-lidocaine in the lung after administration of 14C-lidocaine to nortriptyline intoxicated pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, C; Lewis, D H

    1979-09-01

    Six anaesthetized Swedish land-race pigs were intoxicated by an intravenous infusion of nortriptyline-HCl (NT) up to a concentration of 4.58 +/- 0.58 (mean +/- S.E.M.) microM in arterial whole blood. A rapid injection of 2 mg/kg b.wt. lidocaine-HCl in the right atrium was followed by a rise in arterial whole blood concentration of NT up to a maximum of 7.32 +/- 0.28 microM NT. Amount displaced NT from the cardio-pulmonary circulation after the 14C-lidocaine bolus, was calculated to be 0.66 +/- 0.03 mumol. Lung uptake of 14C-lidocaine during first-pass through the lung was not influenced to any statistically signficant degree compared to a control group. Thus, first pass uptake (FPU) was 30 +/- 8 (mean +/- S.E.M.)% and 39 +/- 5% respectively. The duration of the QRS-complex of the ECG was increased (P less than 0.01) during the infusion of NT from 0.07 +/- 0.01 (mean +/- S.E.M.) sec. to 0.14 +/- 0.02 sec. when 250 mg NT-HCl had been administered. The QRS-duration was decreased (P less than 0.01) after the injection of the 14C-lidocaine bolus to 0.09 +/- 0.01 sec. Mean arterial blood pressure and heartrate decreased slightly during the infusion of NT, but did not change immediately after the 14C-lidocaine bolus.

  5. Microneedle integrated transdermal patch for fast onset and sustained delivery of lidocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhar, Jaspreet Singh; Lim, Wan Xuan Selina; Zou, Shui; Foo, Wei Yan; Pan, Jing; Kang, Lifeng

    2013-11-04

    Lidocaine as an analgesic is of particular interest in both acute and chronic pain conditions and is used via injections or transdermal patches. While injections are associated with problems such as patient incompliance, topical administration of lidocaine using patches is less efficient due to variability of drug absorption among individuals, slower drug permeation through the skin, and hence a resultant undesirable delay in analgesic effects. To address this clinical problem, we developed a microneedle integrated transdermal patch (MITP), using a photolithography based process, in which microneedles create micrometer-sized channels in the skin to deliver lidocaine rapidly, while the reservoir patch holding the bulk of the drug enables higher drug loading and carries on to release the drug for prolonged periods. We demonstrated a new approach of drug delivery using microneedles, where drugs diffuse out of microneedles through the porous channels left by dissolving drug particles. MITP was shown to be able to encapsulate up to 70 mg of lidocaine. In vitro permeation through rat skin demonstrated that MITP delivered a significantly higher amount of lidocaine than a commercial patch and with a faster onset of drug permeation.

  6. Posterior lingual lidocaine:A novel method to improve tolerance in upper gastrointestinal endoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Assaad M Soweid; Shadi R Yaghi; Faek R Jamali; Abdallah A Kobeissy; Michella E Mallat; Rola Hussein; Chakib M Ayoub

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of posterior lingual lidocaine swab on patient tolerance to esophagogastroduodenoscopy, the ease of performance of the procedure, and to determine if such use will reduce the need for intravenous sedation. METHODS: Eighty patients undergoing diagnostic esophagogastroduodenoscopy in a tertiary care medical center were randomized to either lidocaine swab or spray. Intravenous meperidine and midazolam were given as needed during the procedure. RESULTS: Patients in the lidocaine swab group (SWG) tolerated the procedure better than those in the spray group (SPG) with a median tolerability score of 2 (1, 4) compared to 4 (2, 5) (P < 0.01). The endoscopists encountered less difficulty performing the procedures in the SWG with lower median difficulty scores of 1 (1, 5) compared to 4 (1, 5) in the SPG (P < 0.01). In addition, the need for intravenous sedation was also lower in the SWG compared to the SPG with fewer patients requiring intravenous sedation (13/40 patients vs 38/40 patients, respectively, P < 0.01). The patients in the SWG were more satisfied with the mode of local anesthesia they received as compared to the SPG. In addition, the endoscopists were happier with the use of lidocaine swab. CONCLUSION: The use of a posterior lingual lidocaine swab in esophagogastroduodenoscopy improves patient comfort and tolerance and endoscopist satisfaction and decreases the need for intravenous sedation.

  7. Lidocaine-induced apoptosis of gingival fibroblasts: participation of cAMP and PKC activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarruel, Emmanuel Quinteros; Borda, Enri; Sterin-Borda, Leonor; Orman, Betina

    2011-08-01

    Local anaesthetics are drugs that prevent or relieve pain by interrupting nervous conduction and are the most commonly used drugs in dentistry. Their main targets of action are voltage-dependent Na+ channels. The Na+ channel is modulated by phosphorylation of two enzymes: PKA (protein kinase A) and PKC (protein kinase C). We studied the ability of lidocaine to modulate programmed cell death of human gingival fibroblasts and the mechanisms involved in this process. Lidocaine (10-5 to 10-7 M) stimulated apoptosis in primary cultures and the caspase-3 activity in a concentration-dependent manner. The stimulatory effect of lidocaine on apoptosis was attenuated in the presence of HA 1004 (PKA inhibitor) and stimulated by staurosporine and Go 6976 (PKC inhibitors). Lidocaine-induced apoptotic nuclei correlated positively with cAMP accumulation and negatively with PKC activity. These results show that lidocaine promotes apoptosis in human gingival fibroblasts at concentrations used for local anaesthesia. The mechanism involves PKA stimulation and PKC inhibition, which in turn stimulates caspase-3 and leads to programmed cell death.

  8. Lidocaine alters the input resistance and evokes neural activity in crayfish sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keceli, M B; Purali, N

    2007-03-01

    Lidocaine, a use-dependent Na(+) channel blocker, paradoxically evokes neural activation in the slowly adapting stretch receptor organ of crayfish at 5-10 mmol/l concentration. For elucidating the underlying mechanisms of this paradoxical effect, a series of conventional electrophysiological experiments were performed in the stretch receptor neurons of crayfish. In the presence of tetrodotoxin, lidocaine did not evoke impulse activity, however, a slowly developing and dose-dependent depolarization occurred in both the rapidly and slowly adapting stretch receptors. Similar effects were observed by perfusion of equivalent concentrations of benzocaine but not of procaine or prilocaine. Lidocaine did not evoke neural activity in the rapidly adapting neuron which fires action potential(s) in response to rapid changes in membrane potential. Slowly developing mode of the depolarization indicated the reason why only depolarization but not action potential responses were observed in the rapidly adapting neuron. The depolarizing effect of lidocaine was independent from any ionic channel or exchanger system. However, lidocaine and benzocaine but not procaine and prilocaine evoked a dose-dependent alteration in the input resistance of the neuron. It was proposed that the principal mechanism of the effect could stem from a change in the physical properties of the neuronal membrane.

  9. Cluster headache with ptosis responsive to intranasal lidocaine application: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakbak Berker

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The application of lidocaine to the nasal mucosal area corresponding to the sphenopalatine fossa has been shown to be effective at extinguishing pain attacks in patients with a cluster headache. In this report, the effectiveness of local administration of lidocaine on cluster headache attacks as a symptomatic treatment of this disorder is discussed. Cases presentation A 22-year-old Turkish man presented with a five-year history of severe, repeated, unilateral periorbital pain and headache, diagnosed as a typical cluster headache. He suffered from rhinorrhea, lacrimation and ptosis during headaches. He had tried several unsuccessful daily medications. We applied a cotton tip with lidocaine hydrochloride into his left nostril for 10 minutes. The ptosis responded to the treatment and the intensity of his headache decreased. Conclusion Intranasal lidocaine is a useful treatment for the acute management of a cluster headache. Intranasal lidocaine blocks the neural transmission of the sphenopalatine ganglion, which contributes to the trigeminal nerve as well as containing both parasympathetic and sympathetic fibers.

  10. Effect of Intracameral Lidocaine Anesthesia on the Anterior Segment of Rabbit Eyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Yang; Danying Zheng; Zhenping Zhang

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of intracameral anesthesia on the anterior segment ofrabbit eyes using chinese-made lidocaine.Method: The study comprised eight eyes of four white rabbits which were divided intothree groups according to the concentration of the lidocaine given. They are 0.5%, 1%,2% lidocaine groups and balanced salt solution(BSS)control group. Each groupcontained two eyes.After 0.5 ml of the anesthetic agent was injected into the anteriorchamber and retainedthere for ten minutes, the rabbits were executed and the eye balls wereenucleated. Pathological examinations of the anterior segment, including cornea, iris andcilliary body, were carried out immediately.Result:The pathological study revealed no abnormal findings in lidocaine 0. 5% and 1%groups compared with the control group, where as in the lidocaine 2% group, muchabnormal pathological change was found, including the shrinkage of corneal endothelium,stroma edema of iris and cilliary body.Conclusion: Using intracameral anesthesia of high concentration of chinese-made lidocainewould run a risk of damaging the anterior segment of rabbit eye. But at the low concentrationusually usedin cataract surgery, no adverse effect was found.

  11. The effect of intracuff alkalinized 2% lidocaine on emergence coughing, sore throat, and hoarseness in smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Laís Helena Camacho; Lima, Rodrigo Moreira e; Aguiar, Andressa Simões; Braz, José Reinaldo Cerqueira; Carness, Jeffrey M; Módolo, Norma Sueli Pinheiro

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated whether endotracheal tube (ETT) intracuff alkalinized lidocaine was superior to saline in blunting emergence coughing, postoperative sore throat, and hoarseness in smokers. In our prospective, double-blind trial, we enrolled 50 smoking patients undergoing surgery under general anesthesia including nitrous oxide (N2O). Patients were randomly allocated to receive either ETT intracuff 2% lidocaine plus 8.4% sodium bicarbonate (L group), or ETT intracuff 0.9% saline (S group). The ETT cuff was inflated to achieve a cuff pressure that prevented air leak during positive pressure ventilation. Incidence of emergence coughing, sore throat, and hoarseness were analyzed. The volume of inflation solution, the intracuff pressure, the duration of anesthesia, the time elapsed to extubation after discontinuation of anesthesia, and the volume of the inflation solution and the air withdrawn from the ETT cuff were also recorded. Intracuff alkalinized 2% lidocaine was superior to saline in blunting emergence coughing (p sore throat was significantly lower in the L group at the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) (p = 0.02). However, at 24 hours after extubation, sore throat incidence was similar in both groups (p = 0.07). Incidence of hoarseness was similar in both groups. Intracuff pressure in the saline group increased with time while the intracuff pressure in the lidocaine group remained constant. The present study demonstrated that the intracuff alkalinized 2% lidocaine was superior to saline in decreasing the incidence of emergence coughing and sore throat during the postoperative period in smokers.

  12. A comparison of the anesthetic efficacy of articaine and lidocaine in patients with irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortamano, Isabel Peixoto; Siviero, Marcelo; Costa, Carina Gisele; Buscariolo, Inês Aparecida; Armonia, Paschoal Laércio

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the anesthetic efficacy of 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine with that of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine during pulpectomy in patients with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular posterior teeth. Forty volunteers, patients with irreversible pulpitis admitted to the Emergency Center of the School of Dentistry at the University of São Paulo, randomly received a conventional inferior alveolar nerve block containing 3.6 mL of either 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine or 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine. During the subsequent pulpectomy, we recorded the patients' subjective assessments of lip anesthesia, the absence/presence of pulpal anesthesia through electric pulp stimulation, and the absence/presence of pain through a verbal analogue scale. All tested patients reported lip anesthesia after the application of either inferior alveolar nerve block. Regarding pulpal anesthesia success as measured with the pulp tester, the lidocaine solution had a higher success rate (70%) than the articaine solution (65%). For patients reporting none or mild pain during pulpectomy, the success rate of the articaine solution (65%) was higher than that of the lidocaine solution (45%). Yet, none of the observed differences between articaine and lidocaine were statistically significant. Apparently, therefore, both local anesthetic solutions had similar effects on the patients with irreversible pulpitis in mandibular posterior teeth. Neither of the solutions, however, resulted in an effective pain control during irreversible pulpitis treatments.

  13. Site-directed topical lidocaine spray attenuates perioperative respiratory adverse events in children undergoing elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Wei; He, Long; Ai, Yanqiu; Chu, Qinjun; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Perioperative respiratory adverse events (PRAEs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with pediatric anesthesia. Topical lidocaine administration reduces risk of PRAE in children undergoing elective endotracheal intubation. However, definitive evidence of its efficacy remains elusive, due, in part, to the wide variability in the methodology for spraying topical lidocaine. In this randomized controlled double-blind clinical trial, we sought to evaluate the effect of site-directed topical airway lidocaine, sprayed directly onto supraglottic, glottis, and subglottic areas, on the incidence of PRAE. The study population consisted of 322 children (age range, 6 mo-12 y), who were scheduled for an elective surgical procedure under general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Patients were randomly assigned to receive topical spray of lidocaine (group L) or saline (group S) over the supraglottic, glottis and subglottic areas under direct vision before tracheal intubation. Incidence of PRAE and time to extubation was recorded. There were no statistically significant intergroup differences with regard to baseline demographics, patient characteristics, and surgical parameters. Group L was associated with a significantly lower incidence of PRAE as compared with group S (12.80% versus 38.13%, respectively; P 2%; P = 0.005), and oxygen desaturation lidocaine over supraglottic, glottis, and subglottic areas before tracheal intubation significantly reduced the incidence of PRAE and a prolongation of extubation time in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Exploring the role of pH in modulating the effects of lidocaine in virtual ischemic tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Karen; Trénor, Beatriz; Moltó, Germán; Martínez, Miguel; Ferrero, José María; Starmer, Frank; Saiz, Javier

    2010-11-01

    Lidocaine is a class I antiarrhytmic drug that blocks Na(+) channels and exists in both neutral and charged forms at a physiological pH. In this work, a mathematical model of pH and the frequency-modulated effects of lidocaine has been developed and incorporated into the Luo-Rudy model of the ventricular action potential. We studied the effects of lidocaine on Na(+) current, maximum upstroke velocity, and conduction velocity and demonstrated that a decrease of these parameters was dependent on pH, frequency, and concentration. We also tested the action of lidocaine under pathological conditions. Specifically, we investigated its effects on conduction block under acute regional ischemia. Our results in one-dimensional fiber simulations showed a reduction of the window of block in the presence of lidocaine, thereby highlighting the role of reduced conduction velocity and safe conduction. This reduction may be related to the antifibrillatory effects of the drug by hampering wavefront fragmentation. In bidimensional acute ischemic tissue, lidocaine increased the vulnerable window for reentry and exerted proarrhythmic effects. In conclusion, the present simulation study used a newly formulated model of lidocaine, which considers pH and frequency modulation, and revealed the mechanisms by which lidocaine facilitates the onset of reentries. The results of this study also help to increase our understanding of the potential antifibrillatory effects of the drug.

  15. Alteration of GABAergic and glycinergic mechanisms by lidocaine injection in the rostral ventromedial medulla of neuropathic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadé, Nayef E; Al Amin, Hassen; Tchachaghian, Sima; Jabbur, Suhayl J; Atweh, Samir F

    2010-04-01

    Attenuation of neuropathic manifestations in experimental animals, by lidocaine injection in the rostral ventro-medial medulla (RVM), has been traditionally attributed to selective block of a descending pain facilitatory system. However, the presence of descending fibers carrying this effect and the selective action of lidocaine on the facilitatory neurons, have not been supported by convincing experimental evidence. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanisms underlying the hypoalgesic action of lidocaine injection in the brainstem. Several groups of rats were subjected to mononeuropathy on their left hind paws, according to the model of spared nerve injury, and were subsequently implanted with guide cannulae in the RVM. After recovery, rats received injections of lidocaine, GABA and glycine agonists or antagonists and their effects were assessed on behavioral tests of allodynia and hyperalgesia. Injections of lidocaine at doses ranging between 0.05% and 2% produced attenuation at high doses and no effects or increasing hyperalgesia at low doses. GABA and glycine agonists increased neuropathic manifestations while their antagonists elicited the opposite effects. A combined injection of GABA agonist or glycine with lidocaine (0.5%) prevented the inhibitory effects of lidocaine injection alone. Our results are in line with the abundant documentation on the alteration of the function of inhibitory neurons by lidocaine and reveal a possible action of the injected high doses on the GABAergic and glycinergic neurons in the RVM. The resulting block of the inhibitory tone exerted by these neurons can lead to a release of the descending pain inhibitory systems.

  16. Effect of trochar site lidocaine on postoperative pain scoring and patient satisfaction after gynecologic laparoscopies – A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal M. Zahran

    2011-06-01

    Conclusion: The combined use trochar sites and intraperitoneal lidocaine is superior to intraperitoneal lidocaine alone in managing postoperative pain after laparoscopic gynecological procedures. It leads to lower VAS at day 1 and day 7 postoperatively, less need for additional analgesics and higher patient satisfaction.

  17. Carprofen provides better post-operative analgesia than tramadol in dogs after enucleation: A randomized, masked clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Cherlene; Bentley, Ellison; Hetzel, Scott; Smith, Lesley J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare analgesia provided by carprofen or tramadol in dogs after enucleation. Design Randomized, masked trial Animals Forty-three dogs Procedures Client-owned dogs admitted for routine enucleation were randomly assigned to receive either carprofen or tramadol orally 2 hours prior to surgery and 12 hours after the first dose. Dogs were scored for pain at baseline, and postoperatively at 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 24, and 30 hours after extubation. Dogs received identical premedication and inhalation anesthesia regimens, including premedication with hydromorphone. If the total pain score was ≥9, if there was a score ≥ 3 in any one category, or if the visual analog scale score (VAS) was ≥35 combined with a palpation score of >0, rescue analgesia (hydromorphone) was administered and treatment failure was recorded. Characteristics between groups were compared with a Student’s t-test and Fisher’s exact test. The incidence of rescue was compared between groups using a log rank test. Pain scores and VAS scores between groups were compared using repeated measures ANOVA. Results There was no difference in age (p=0.493), gender (p=0.366) or baseline pain scores (p=0.288) between groups. Significantly more dogs receiving tramadol required rescue analgesia (6/21) compared to dogs receiving carprofen (1/22; p=0.035). Pain and VAS scores decreased linearly over time (p=0.038, ptramadol in dogs undergoing enucleation. PMID:25459482

  18. Epidural and opioid analgesia following the Nuss procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walaszczyk, Malgorzata; Knapik, Piotr; Misiolek, Hanna; Korlacki, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Parents have the right to decide on behalf of their children and deny consent to regional anaesthesia. The investigators decided to investigate quality of postoperative analgesia in adolescents undergoing epidural and opioid analgesia following the Nuss procedure. Material/Methods The study subjects were 61 adolescents aged 11–18 years who underwent pectus excavatum repair with the Nuss procedure. Patients were divided into epidural (n=41) and opioid (n=20) groups, depending on their parents’ consent to epidural catheter insertion. Intraoperatively, 0.5% epidural ropivacaine with fentanyl or intermittent intravenous injections of fentanyl were used. Postoperative analgesia was achieved with either epidural infusion of 0.1% ropivacaine with fentanyl, or subcutaneous morphine via an intraoperatively inserted “butterfly” cannula. Additionally, both groups received metamizol and paracetamol. Primary outcome variables were postoperative pain scores (Numeric Rating Scale and Prince Henry Hospital Pain Score). Secondary outcome variables included hemodynamic parameters, additional analgesia and side effects. Results Heart rate and blood pressure values in the postoperative period were significantly higher in the opioid group. Pain scores requiring intervention were noted almost exclusively in the opioid group. Conclusions Denial of parental consent to epidural analgesia following the Nuss procedure results in significantly worse control of postoperative pain. Our data may be useful when discussing with parents the available anaesthetic techniques for exceptionally painful procedures. PMID:22037752

  19. Preemptive analgesia II: recent advances and current trends.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, D J

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: This two-part review summarizes the current knowledge of physiological mechanisms, pharmacological modalities and controversial issues surrounding preemptive analgesia. SOURCE: Articles from 1966 to present were obtained from the MEDLINE databases. Search terms included analgesia, preemptive; neurotransmitters; pain, postoperative; hyperalgesia; sensitization, central nervous system; pathways, nociception; anesthetic techniques; analgesics, agents. Principal findings: In Part I of this review article, techniques and agents that attenuate or prevent central and peripheral sensitization were reviewed. In Part II, the conditions required for effective preemptive techniques are evaluated. Specifically, preemptive analgesia may be defined as an antinociceptive treatment that prevents establishment of altered central processing of afferent input from sites of injury. The most important conditions for establishment of effective preemptive analgesia are the establishment of an effective level of antinociception before injury, and the continuation of this effective analgesic level well into the post-injury period to prevent central sensitization during the inflammatory phase. Although single-agent therapy may attenuate the central nociceptive processing, multi-modal therapy is more effective, and may be associated with fewer side effects compared with the high-dose, single-agent therapy. CONCLUSION: The variable patient characteristics and timing of preemptive analgesia in relation to surgical noxious input require individualization of the technique(s) chosen. Multi-modal analgesic techniques appear more effective.

  20. Simultaneous micellar LC determination of lidocaine and tolperisone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngvises, Napaporn; Liawruangrath, Boonsom; Liawruangrath, Saisunee

    2003-03-26

    A micellar liquid chromatography (MLC) procedure was developed for the simultaneous separation and determination of lidocaine hydrochloride (LD HCl) and tolperisone hydrochloride (TP HCl) using a short-column C18 (12.5 mm x 4.6 mm, 5 microm), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) with a small amount of isopropanol, and diode array detector. The optimum conditions for the simultaneous determination of both drugs were 0.075 mol l(-1) SDS-7.5% (v/v) isopropanol with a flow rate of 0.7 ml min(-1) and detection at 210 nm. The LOD (2S/N) of LD HCl was 0.73 ng 20 microl(-1), whereas that of TP HCl was 1.43 ng 20 microl(-1). The calibration curves for LD HCl and TP HCl were linear over the ranges 0.125-500 microg ml(-1) (r(2)=0.9999) and 1.00-500 microg ml(-1) (r(2)=0.9997), respectively. The %recoveries of both drugs were in the range 98-103% and the %RSD values were less than 2. The proposed method has been successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of TP HCl and LD HCl in various pharmaceutical preparations.

  1. Liposomal formulations of prilocaine, lidocaine and mepivacaine prolong analgesic duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereda, Cíntia Maria Saia; Brunetto, Giovana Bruschini; de Araújo, Daniele Ribeiro; de Paula, Eneida

    2006-11-01

    A laboratory investigation was undertaken to compare the in vivo antinociceptive effects of 2% liposomal formulations of prilocaine (PLC), lidocaine (LDC) and mepivacaine (MVC) compared to plain solutions of each of these three local anesthetics. Large unilamellar vesicles were prepared by extrusion (400 nm), at pH 7.4. The membrane/water partition coefficients were obtained from encapsulation efficiency values, after incorporation of each local anesthetic to the vesicles. The anesthetic effect of each liposomal formulation was compared to the respective local anesthetic solution in water, using the infraorbital nerve-blockade test, in rats. The partition coefficients were: 57 for PLC, 114 for LDC and 93 for MVC. In vivo results showed that local anesthetic-free liposomes, used as control, had no analgesic effect. In contrast, the encapsulated formulations induced increased intensities of total anesthetic effect (35.3%, 26.1% and 57.1%) and time for recovery (percentage increases of 30%, 23.1% and 56%), respectively, for PLC, LDC and MVC when compared to the plain solutions (P Mepivacaine was affected to the greatest extent, while LDC benefited least from liposome encapsulation, possibly due to greater vasodilatory properties of LDC.

  2. A randomized, controlled trial comparing local infiltration analgesia with epidural infusion for total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Karen Vestergaard; Bak, Marie; Christensen, Birgitte Viebæk;

    2010-01-01

    There have been few studies describing wound infiltration with additional intraarticular administration of multimodal analgesia for total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In this study, we assessed the efficacy of wound infiltration combined with intraarticular regional analgesia with epidural infusion...

  3. The evaluation of efficacy and safety of paravertebral block for perioperative analgesia in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Agarwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Paravertebral block is a popular regional anesthetic technique used for perioperative analgesia in multiple surgical procedures. There are very few randomized trials of its use in laparoscopic cholecystectomy in medical literature. This study was aimed at assessing its efficacy and opioid-sparing potential in this surgery. Methods: Fifty patients were included in this prospective randomized study and allocated to two groups: Group A (25 patients receiving general anesthesia alone and Group B (25 patients receiving nerve-stimulator-guided bilateral thoracic Paravertebral Block (PVB at T6 level with 0.3 ml/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine prior to induction of general anesthesia. Intraoperative analgesia was supplemented with fentanyl (0.5 μg/kg based on hemodynamic and clinical parameters. Postoperatively, patients in both the groups received Patient-Controlled Analgesia (PCA morphine for the first 24 hours. The efficacy of PVB was assessed by comparing intraoperative fentanyl requirements, postoperative VAS scores at rest, and on coughing and PCA morphine consumption between the two groups. Results: Intraoperative supplemental fentanyl was significantly less in Group B compared to Group A (17.6 μg and 38.6 μg, respectively, P =0.001. PCA morphine requirement was significantly low in the PVB group at 2, 6, 12, and 24 hours postoperatively compared to that in Group A (4.4 mg vs 6.9 mg, 7.6 mg vs 14.2 mg, 11.6 mg vs 20.0 mg, 16.8 mg vs 27.2 mg, respectively; P <0.0001 at all intervals. Conclusion: Pre-induction PVB resulted in improved analgesia for 24 hours following laparoscopic cholecystectomy in this study, along with a significant reduction in perioperative opioid consumption and opioid-related side effects.

  4. Lidocaine does not prevent bispectral index increases in response to endotracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woon-Young; Lee, Yoon-Sook; Ok, Se-Jin; Chang, Moon-Seok; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Park, Young-Cheol; Lim, Hye-Ja

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effect of IV lidocaine on the hemodynamic and bispectral index responses to induction of general anesthesia and endotracheal intubation. Forty patients (ASA I) were randomly allocated into 2 groups of 20 to receive normal saline or lidocaine 1.5 mg/kg IV 30 s after induction. Ninety seconds later, endotracheal intubation was performed. Systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and bispectral index were measured at baseline, 1 min after induction, at preintubation, and every minute until 5 min after endotracheal intubation. Bispectral index at 1 min after induction and preintubation in the lidocaine group were significantly lower compared with the control group (P intubation in the control group compared with the baseline value (P endotracheal intubation.

  5. Transient impairment of the axolemma following regional anaesthesia by lidocaine in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moldovan, Mihai; Lange, Kai Henrik Wiborg; Aachmann-Andersen, Niels Jacob;

    2014-01-01

    action of lidocaine could be accounted for solely by the block of VGSCs or whether other mechanisms are also relevant. We tested the recovery of motor axon conduction and multiple measures of excitability by 'threshold-tracking' after ultrasound-guided distal median nerve regional anaesthesia in 13......The local anaesthetic lidocaine is known to block voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs), although at high concentration it was also reported to block other ion channel currents as well as to alter lipid membranes. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the clinical regional anaesthetic...... healthy volunteers. Lidocaine caused rapid complete motor axon conduction block localized at the wrist. Within 3 h, the force of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle and median motor nerve conduction studies returned to normal. In contrast, the excitability of the motor axons at the wrist remained markedly...

  6. Use of topical lidocaine in the treatment of muscle tension dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, J P; Meleca, R J; Simpson, M L; Garfield, I

    2000-12-01

    This investigation explored the potential usefulness of topical lidocaine in the treatment of muscle tension dysphonia. Three patients with this disorder, who were previously unresponsive to standard voice therapy, were treated with lidocaine. In each case, the outcome was prompt, clinically significant, and sustained. Persistently high-pitched and shrill vocal quality was converted to near normal voice patterns within 15 minutes after transcricothyroid membrane lidocaine injection. We suggest that this temporary and simple laryngeal and tracheal anesthetic technique may have helped to break the perverse cycle of hyperactive glottal and supraglottal muscle contractions evident in each of these patients during phonation efforts. We discuss the possible sensorimotor mechanism of action of this therapeutic technique.

  7. Peripheral lidocaine, but not ketamine inhibit capsaicin-induced hyperalgesia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottrup, Hanne; Bach, Flemming Winther; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2000-01-01

    We examined the effect of the subcutaneous infiltration of ketamine, lidocaine and saline before injury on capsaicin-induced pain and hyperalgesia. Twelve healthy volunteers participated in two separate, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover experiments. In experiment 1, 100...... micrograms capsaicin was injected intradermally in one volar forearm 10 min after the skin had been pretreated with lidocaine 20.0 mg in 2.0 ml or 0.9% saline 2.0 ml at the capsaicin injection site. In experiment 2, a similar capsaicin test was given 10 min after the skin had been pretreated with ketamine 5...... and brush stimuli, and areas of brush-evoked and punctate-evoked hyperalgesia. Lidocaine reduced all measures compared with placebo (P ketamine failed to change any measures. Pain scores and areas of hyperalgesia were not affected when the contralateral site was infiltrated with ketamine...

  8. Thermodynamic studies of mixtures for topical anesthesia: Lidocaine-salol binary phase diagram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazerges, Mathieu [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique (EA 4066), Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, Universite Paris Descartes, 4 Avenue de l' Observatoire, 75270 Paris Cedex 06 (France); Rietveld, Ivo B., E-mail: ivo.rietveld@parisdescartes.fr [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique (EA 4066), Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, Universite Paris Descartes, 4 Avenue de l' Observatoire, 75270 Paris Cedex 06 (France); Corvis, Yohann; Ceolin, Rene; Espeau, Philippe [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique (EA 4066), Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, Universite Paris Descartes, 4 Avenue de l' Observatoire, 75270 Paris Cedex 06 (France)

    2010-01-10

    The lidocaine-salol binary system has been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry, direct visual observations, and X-ray powder diffraction, resulting in a temperature-composition phase diagram with a eutectic equilibrium. The eutectic mixture, found at 0.423 {+-} 0.007 lidocaine mole-fraction, melts at 18.2 {+-} 0.5 {sup o}C with an enthalpy of 17.3 {+-} 0.5 kJ mol{sup -1}. This indicates that the liquid phase around the eutectic composition is stable at room temperature. Moreover, the undercooled liquid mixture does not easily crystallize. The present binary mixture exhibits eutectic behavior similar to the prilocaine-lidocaine mixture in the widely used EMLA topical anesthetic preparation.

  9. Hyaluronic acid dermal fillers: can adjunctive lidocaine improve patient satisfaction without decreasing efficacy or duration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lynnelle; Cockerham, Kimberly

    2011-03-14

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) dermal fillers are the most widely used injectables to augment facial volume without surgery. HA dermal fillers are popular because of their ease of administration, predictable effectiveness, good safety profile, and quick patient recovery. The most common patient complaint is pain. Our goal is to review the current literature on HA fillers and compare outcomes with and without lidocaine. We found adjunctive lidocaine significantly decreases pain during injection and postinjection with corresponding increased patient satisfaction. The efficacy and safety profile appears unchanged. Rare complications with HA fillers and those associated with constituents of the product, contaminants, and lidocaine are reviewed. The corrective effects of HA fillers are temporary; repeat treatment is required to maintain results. Minimizing pain is crucial to optimize patient satisfaction.

  10. [Sensitization of bradycardia during final hypotension induced by serotonin in rats: effect of lidocaine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, L B; Oliveira-Filho, R M; Armonia, P L; Nassif, M; Saraceni, G

    1975-10-01

    It was studied the sensibilizing effect of lidocaine (8.5 mg/kg, i.v.) on the ECG (heart rate, P-R interval, QRS complex and Q-T interval) of both intact and bilaterally vagotomised rats, in the nadir of the final hypotension determined by serotonine (60 mug/kg, i.v.). The results showed (1) a certain degree of selectivity of the vagi, and (2) the effects of serotonine either isolated or associated to lidocaine on P-R interval and heart rate were reinforced when intact animals were used. Although no significant alterations of Q-T were elicited by the drugs, lidocaine surprisingly enlarged the QRS complex in a more significant fashion for the intact than for the vagotomised animals.

  11. The stability and microbial contamination of bupivacaine, lidocaine and mepivacaine used for lameness diagnostics in horses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler, D. M. T.; Cornett, C.; Damborg, P.

    2016-01-01

    . Lidocaine concentration decreased 6.3% in one group and increased 5.3–7.2% in two groups. Risk factors for degradation were heat and RP vials whereas storage in practice vehicles was a risk factor for increased concentrations. Methylparaben decreased 8.3–75.0% in seven groups, and RP vials, heat and storage......Local anaesthetics (LAs) are frequently used for diagnostic procedures in equine veterinary practice. The objective of this study was to investigate the physico-chemical stability and bacterial contamination of bupivacaine, lidocaine and mepivacaine used for lameness examinations in horses. The LAs...... were stored in 12 different groups at different temperatures (−18 °C to 70 °C), light intensities and in common veterinary field conditions for up to 16 months. The pH, presence of bacterial contamination and concentrations of LAs and methylparaben (a preservative present in lidocaine) were determined...

  12. Pain relief with lidocaine 5% patch in localized peripheral neuropathic pain in relation to pain phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Dyveke T; Lund, Karen; Finnerup, Nanna B

    2015-01-01

    (-1 to 5) points more (p=0.036). For these measures, there was no significant interaction between treatment and phenotype, but there was a significant interaction for pain paroxysms (0.8, 95% CI 0.4;1.2, plidocaine 5% patch...... periods of lidocaine 5% patch and placebo was performed to search for phenotype differences in effect. The primary efficacy measure was the total pain intensity on an 11-point numeric rating scale (NRS), and the primary objective was to compare the effect of lidocaine in patients with and without...... patients with irritable nociceptor and 25 patients with non-irritable nociceptor. In the total sample, lidocaine reduced pain by 0.3 NRS points (95% CI 0.1;0.5) and pain-related sleep disturbance by 0.6 points (95% CI 0.4;0.8) more than placebo (p=0.007 and p

  13. Mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia: effective therapy for musculoskeletal pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staud, Roland

    2007-12-01

    Acupuncture (AP) is effective for the treatment of postoperative and chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting and for postoperative dental pain. Several recent randomized trials have provided strong evidence for beneficial AP effects on chronic low-back pain and pain from knee osteoarthritis. For many other chronic pain conditions, including headaches, neck pain, and fibromyalgia, the evidence supporting AP's efficacy is less convincing. AP's effects on experimental pain appear to be mediated by analgesic brain mechanisms through the release of neurohumoral factors, some of which can be inhibited by the opioid antagonist naloxone. In contrast to placebo analgesia, AP-related pain relief takes considerable time to develop and to resolve. Thus, some of the long-term effects of AP analgesia cannot be explained by placebo mechanisms. Furthermore, it appears that some forms of AP are more effective for providing analgesia than others. Particularly, electro-AP seems best to activate powerful opioid and non-opioid analgesic mechanisms.

  14. Classical conditioning and pain: conditioned analgesia and hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguez, Gonzalo; Laborda, Mario A; Miller, Ralph R

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews situations in which stimuli produce an increase or a decrease in nociceptive responses through basic associative processes and provides an associative account of such changes. Specifically, the literature suggests that cues associated with stress can produce conditioned analgesia or conditioned hyperalgesia, depending on the properties of the conditioned stimulus (e.g., contextual cues and audiovisual cues vs. gustatory and olfactory cues, respectively) and the proprieties of the unconditioned stimulus (e.g., appetitive, aversive, or analgesic, respectively). When such cues are associated with reducers of exogenous pain (e.g., opiates), they typically increase sensitivity to pain. Overall, the evidence concerning conditioned stress-induced analgesia, conditioned hyperalagesia, conditioned tolerance to morphine, and conditioned reduction of morphine analgesia suggests that selective associations between stimuli underlie changes in pain sensitivity.

  15. CLASSICAL CONDITIONING AND PAIN: CONDITIONED ANALGESIA AND HYPERALGESIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguez, Gonzalo; Laborda, Mario A.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews situations in which stimuli produce an increase or a decrease in nociceptive responses through basic associative processes and provides an associative account of such changes. Specifically, the literature suggests that cues associated with stress can produce conditioned analgesia or conditioned hyperalgesia, depending on the properties of the conditioned stimulus (e.g., contextual cues and audiovisual cues vs. gustatory and olfactory cues, respectively) and the proprieties of the unconditioned stimulus (e.g., appetitive, aversive, or analgesic, respectively). When such cues are associated with reducers of exogenous pain (e.g., opiates), they typically increase sensitivity to pain. Overall, the evidence concerning conditioned stress-induced analgesia, conditioned hyperalagesia, conditioned tolerance to morphine, and conditioned reduction of morphine analgesia suggests that selective associations between stimuli underlie changes in pain sensitivity. PMID:24269884

  16. Role of collagen fibers in acupuncture analgesia therapy on rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaojia; Ding, Guanghong; Huang, Hong; Lin, Jun; Yao, Wei; Zhan, Rui

    2009-01-01

    Acupuncture, a traditional Chinese therapeutic technique, has been put into practice for more than 4000 years and widely used for pain management since 1958. However, what is the mechanism underlying the acupuncture for analgesia effects by stimulation of acupoints, what substances receive the original mechanical acupuncture signals from the acupoints, or what transforms these signals into effective biological signals are not well understood. In this work, the role of collagen fibers at acupoints during acupuncture analgesia on rats was investigated. When the structure of the collagen fibers at Zusanli (ST36) was destroyed by injection of type I collagenase, the needle force caused by the acupuncture declined and the analgesic effects of rotation or lift-thrusting manipulations was attenuated accompanying the restraint of the degranulation ratios of mast cells. We propose that collagen fibers play an important role in acupuncture-induced analgesia, and they participate in signal transmission and transform processes.

  17. Intravenous patient-controlled analgesia for acute postoperative pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolajsen, Lone; Haroutiunian, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Intravenous patient-controlled therapy is used routinely in postoperative care in much of the developed world. Intravenous patient-controlled analgesia results in higher patient satisfaction than conventional administration of analgesics, although it appears to have no advantage over conventional...... analgesia in terms of adverse effects and consumption of opioids. Standard orders and nursing procedure protocols are recommended for patients receiving intravenous patient-controlled analgesia to monitor treatment efficacy and development of adverse effects. Some subgroups of patients need special...... consideration. For example, opioid-tolerant patients need higher postoperative opioid doses to achieve satisfactory analgesic effect. In patients with renal or hepatic insufficiency, the elimination of some opioids may be substantially impaired, and the optimal opioid should be selected based on its...

  18. Lidocaine versus lidocaine plus benzydamine as a topical anesthesia regimen for unsedated upper gastrointestinal endoscopy: A comparison study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    İbiş, Mehmet; Arhan, Mehmet; İbiş, Tuba; Önal, İbrahim Koral; Erdal, Harun; Utku, Özlem Gül

    2015-05-01

    The aim was to assess the efficacy of adding benzydamine (B) spray to standard treatment with a lidocaine (L) spray before upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGE) as a topical anaesthetic regimen. A total of 118 adult patients undergoing outpatient UGE were randomly assigned to receive L (n=44), LB (n=38) or B (n=36) before the procedure. The primary outcome was the patient tolerance score, which represents a summative evaluation of the taste of the anesthetic agent, the intensity of pharyngeal numbness, the amount of coughing or gagging and the degree of discomfort during oesophageal intubation. The median (min-max) patient tolerance scores were comparable between groups LB (10.5; range 5-12) and L (10; range 4-13) (p=0.235) and significantly lower in group B (7.5; range 3-12) (psore throat (4 [10.5%] vs 15 [34.1%], p=0.011) in LB compared to L. LB is not superior to L in terms of overall patient tolerance, but LB may be preferred over L in cases with difficult oesophageal intubation or a previous history of postprocedural sore throat.

  19. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial using lidocaine patch 5% in traumatic rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingalls, Nichole K; Horton, Zachary A; Bettendorf, Matthew; Frye, Ira; Rodriguez, Carlos

    2010-02-01

    The lidocaine patch 5% was developed to treat postherpetic neuralgia. Anecdotal experience at our institution suggests the lidocaine patch 5% decreases narcotic usage in patients with traumatic rib fractures. This trial was developed to define the patch's efficacy. Patients with rib fractures admitted to the trauma service at our Level I trauma center were enrolled and randomized in a 1 to 1 double-blind manner to receive a lidocaine patch 5% or placebo patch. Fifty-eight patients who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled from January 2007 to August 2008. Demographic and clinical information were recorded. The primary outcomes variable was total narcotic use, analyzed using the 1-tailed Mann-Whitney test. The secondary outcomes variables included non-narcotic pain medication, average pain score, pulmonary complications, and length of stay. Significance was defined based on a 1-sided test for the primary outcome and 2-sided tests for other comparisons, at p rib fractures, gender, trauma mechanism, preinjury lung disease, smoking history, percent of current smokers, and need for placement of chest tube between the lidocaine patch 5% and placebo groups. There was no difference between the lidocaine patch 5% and placebo groups, respectively, with regard to total IV narcotic usage: median, 0.23 units versus 0.26 units; total oral narcotics: median, 4 units versus 7 units; pain score: 5.6 +/- 0.4 versus 6.0 +/- 0.3 (mean +/- SEM); length of stay: 7.8 +/- 1.1 versus 6.2 +/- 0.7; or percentage of patients with pulmonary complications: 72.7% versus 72.0%. The lidocaine patch 5% does not significantly improve pain control in polytrauma patients with traumatic rib fractures.

  20. EFFECT OF ORAL CLONIDINE AND INTRAVENOUS LIDOCAINE ON INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE FOLLOWING LARYNGOSCOPY AND INTUBATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P KASHEFI

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Control and prevention of increase in ntraocular Pressure (lOP can affect outcome of ophthalmologic surgical procedures. Sometimes it's necessary to administer a succinylcholine and intubate the trachea in cases of penetrating eye trauma and corneal laceration. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of intravenous lidocaine and oral clonidine as premedicants on lOP following administration of succinylcholine and intubation of trachea. Methods. This study was a double blind clinical trial performed on 90 patients aged 20 - 40 years in physical status of ASA I, II (American Society of Anesthesiologists candidated for nonophthalmic elective surgical procedures. Patients were randomly divided into three groups. The first group received oral clonidine 300 µg/kg, 90-120 minutes before induction(clonidine group. The scond group received IV Lidocaine 1.5mg/kg 3 minutes preceding the induction (lidocaine group and the third group received no premedicant (control group. Induction and maintenance of anesthesia were performed by identical techniques for all three groups. Results. There was no statistically significant difference of lOP at second and fifth postinduction minutes between clonidine and lidocaine groups(p > 0.05 but this difference was statistically significant between clonidine and control, as well as lidocaine versus control groups (p < 0.05. Discussion. Oral clonidine 300 µg, 90-120 minute preinduction and intravenous lidocaine 1.5mg/kg, 3 minutes preinduction could be used as effective premedicants to prevent increase in lOP following induction with succinylcholine and intubation of trachea.

  1. The Effect of Lidocaine · HCl on the Fluidity of Native and Model Membrane Lipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Seop; Jung, Tae-Sang; Noh, Yang-Ho; Kim, Woo-Sung; Park, Won-Ick; Kim, Young-Soo; Chung, In-Kyo; Sohn, Uy Dong; Bae, Soo-Kyung; Bae, Moon-Kyoung; Jang, Hye-Ock; Yun, Il

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigated the mechanism of pharmacological action of local anesthetic and provide the basic information about the development of new effective local anesthetics. Fluorescent probe techniques were used to evaluate the effect of lidocaine·HCl on the physical properties (transbilayer asymmetric lateral and rotational mobility, annular lipid fluidity and protein distribution) of synaptosomal plasma membrane vesicles (SPMV) isolated from bovine cerebral cortex, and liposomes of total lipids (SPMVTL) and phospholipids (SPMVPL) extracted from the SPMV. An experimental procedure was used based on selective quenching of 1,3-di(1-pyrenyl)propane (Py-3-Py) and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) by trinitrophenyl groups, and radiationless energy transfer from the tryptophans of membrane proteins to Py-3-Py. Lidocaine·HCl increased the bulk lateral and rotational mobility of neuronal and model membrane lipid bilayes, and had a greater fluidizing effect on the inner monolayer than the outer monolayer. Lidocaine·HCl increased annular lipid fluidity in SPMV lipid bilayers. It also caused membrane proteins to cluster. The most important finding of this study is that there is far greater increase in annular lipid fluidity than that in lateral and rotational mobilities by lidocaine·HCl. Lidocaine·HCl alters the stereo or dynamics of the proteins in the lipid bilayers by combining with lipids, especially with the annular lipids. In conclusion, the present data suggest that lidocaine, in addition to its direct interaction with proteins, concurrently interacts with membrane lipids, fluidizing the membrane, and thus inducing conformational changes of proteins known to be intimately associated with membrane lipid.

  2. Effect of PaCO2 and PaO2 on lidocaine and articaine toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelos, K C; Furtado, D P; Ramacciato, J C; Cabral, A M; Haas, D A

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in arterial PaCO₂ can influence local anesthetic toxicity. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of stress-induced changes in PaCO₂ and PaO₂ on the seizure threshold of lidocaine and articaine. Lidocaine (2% with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine) or articaine (4% with 1 : 100,000 epinephrine) was administered intravenously under rest or stress conditions to 36 rats separated into 4 groups. Propranolol and prazosin were administered preoperatively to minimize cardiovascular effects of epinephrine. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and arterial pH, PaCO₂, and PaO₂ were measured. Results showed no differences in MAP, HR, or pH. Stress significantly increased the latency period for the first tonic-clonic seizure induced by a toxic dose of both lidocaine and articaine (P < .05). Seizures were brought on more rapidly by articaine. No significant difference between toxic doses of lidocaine and articaine was noted. Stress raised the seizure threshold dose for both drugs and significantly (P < .01) increased arterial PaO₂ from 94.0 ± 1.90 mm Hg to 113.0 ± 2.20 mm Hg, and reduced PaCO₂ from 36.0 ± 0.77 mm Hg to 27.0 ± 0.98 mm Hg. In conclusion, reduction in PaCO₂ and/or increase in PaO₂ raised the seizure threshold of lidocaine and articaine. This study also confirmed that lidocaine and articaine have equipotent central nervous system toxicity.

  3. A Comparison of Equivalent Doses of Lidocaine and Articaine in Maxillary Posterior Tooth Extractions: Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C. Friedl

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Local anaesthesia is the standard of care during dental extractions. With the advent of newer local anesthetic agents, it is often difficult for the clinician to decide which agent would be most efficacious in a given clinical scenario. This study assessed the efficacy of equal-milligram doses of lidocaine and articaine in achieving surgical anaesthesia of maxillary posterior teeth diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis. Material and Methods: This case-series evaluated a total of 41 patients diagnosed with irreversible pulpitis in a maxillary posterior tooth. Patients randomly received an infiltration of either 3.6 mL (72 mg 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine or 1.8 mL (72 mg 4% articaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine in the buccal fold and palatal soft tissue adjacent to the tooth. After 10 minutes, initial anaesthesia of the tooth was assessed by introducing a sterile 27-gauge needle into the gingival tissue adjacent to the tooth, followed by relief of the gingival cuff. Successful treatment was considered to have occurred when the tooth was extracted with no reported pain. Data was analyzed with the Fisher’s exact test, unpaired t-test and normality test. Results: Twenty-one patients received lidocaine and 20 received articaine. Forty of the 41 patients achieved initial anaesthesia 10 minutes after injection: 21 after lidocaine and 19 after articaine (P = 0.488. Pain-free extraction was accomplished in 33 patients: 19 after lidocaine and 14 after articaine buccal and palatal infiltrations (P = 0.226. Conclusions: There was no significant difference in efficacy between equivalent doses of lidocaine and articaine in the anaesthesia of maxillary posterior teeth with irreversible pulpitis.

  4. Self-Administered Lidocaine Gel for Intrauterine Device Insertion in Nulliparous Women: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapkin, Rachel B; Achilles, Sharon L; Schwarz, E Bimla; Meyn, Leslie; Cremer, Miriam; Boraas, Christy M; Chen, Beatrice A

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate self-administration of vaginal lidocaine gel to decrease pain with intrauterine device (IUD) insertion in nulliparous women. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, women self-administered 2% lidocaine or placebo vaginal gel 5 minutes before IUD insertion. The primary outcome was change in pain from baseline to IUD insertion on a 100-mm visual analog scale. We also assessed pain after speculum insertion, tenaculum placement, uterine sounding, and 5 minutes after IUD insertion. Secondary outcomes included patient acceptability, ease of IUD insertion, and need for pain medication for up to 7 days. From July 2012 to May 2013, 59 women were randomized; 30 received lidocaine gel and 29 placebo. Baseline demographics, including age, race, and body mass index, were similar. There was no difference in median change in pain during IUD insertion in women receiving lidocaine (61 mm [interquartile range 53-71]) compared with placebo (69 mm [interquartile range 63-80], P=.06). Women receiving lidocaine experienced less pain with tenaculum placement (32 mm [interquartile range 18-54]) compared with placebo (56 mm [interquartile range 26-75], P=.02). Most (76%) women were satisfied with their IUD insertion experience and 86% would probably or definitely recommend an IUD to a friend. Thirty-four percent of women required pain medication for at least 3 days after IUD insertion. For nulliparous women, self-administered vaginal lidocaine gel does not reduce pain with IUD insertion, but does decrease pain with tenaculum placement. ClinicalTrials.gov, http://clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01534520.

  5. Lidocaine alleviates propofol related pain much better than metoprolol and nitroglycerin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asutay Goktug

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Injection pain after propofol administration is common and maydisturb patients' comfort. The aim of this study was to compare effectiveness of intravenous(iv nitroglycerin, lidocaine and metoprolol applied through the veins on the dorsum of hand orantecubital vein on eliminating propofol injection pain.METHOD: There were 147 patients and they were grouped according to the analgesic adminis-tered. Metoprolol (n = 31, Group M, lidocaine (n = 32, Group L and nitroglycerin (n = 29, GroupN were applied through iv catheter at dorsum hand vein or antecubital vein. Pain was evalu-ated by 4 point scale (0 - no pain, 1 --- light pain, 2 --- mild pain, 3 --- severe pain in 5, 10, 15and 20th seconds. ASA, BMI, patient demographics, education level and the effect of pathwaysfor injection and location of operations were analyzed for their effect on total pain score.RESULTS: There were no differences between the groups in terms of total pain score (p = 0.981.There were no differences in terms of total pain score depending on ASA, education level,location of operation. However, lidocaine was more effective when compared with metoprolol(p = 0.015 and nitroglycerin (p = 0.001 among groups. Although neither lidocaine nor metopro-lol had any difference on pain management when applied from antecubital or dorsal hand vein(p > 0.05, nitroglycerin injection from antecubital vein had demonstrated statistically lowerpain scores (p = 0.001.CONCLUSION: We found lidocaine to be the most effective analgesic in decreasing propofolrelated pain. We therefore suggest iv lidocaine for alleviating propofol related pain at operations.

  6. Racial differences in the use of epidural analgesia for labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glance, Laurent G; Wissler, Richard; Glantz, Christopher; Osler, Turner M; Mukamel, Dana B; Dick, Andrew W

    2007-01-01

    There is strong evidence that pain is undertreated in black and Hispanic patients. The association between race and ethnicity and the use of epidural analgesia for labor is not well described. Using the New York State Perinatal Database, the authors examined whether race and ethnicity were associated with the likelihood of receiving epidural analgesia for labor after adjusting for clinical characteristics, demographics, insurance coverage, and provider effect. This retrospective cohort study was based on 81,883 women admitted for childbirth between 1998 and 2003. Overall, 38.3% of the patients received epidural analgesia for labor. After adjusting for clinical risk factors, socioeconomic status, and provider fixed effects, Hispanic and black patients were less likely than non-Hispanic white patients to receive epidural analgesia: The adjusted odds ratio was 0.85 (95% CI, 0.78-0.93) for white/Hispanic and 0.78 (0.74-0.83) for blacks compared with non-Hispanic whites. Compared with patients with private insurance, patients without insurance were least likely to receive epidural analgesia (adjusted odds ratio, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.64-0.89). Black patients with private insurance had similar rates of epidural use to white/non-Hispanic patients without insurance coverage: The adjusted odds ratio was 0.66 (95% CI, 0.53-0.82) for white/non-Hispanic patients without insurance versus 0.69 (0.57-0.85) for black patients with private insurance. Black and Hispanic women in labor are less likely than non-Hispanic white women to receive epidural analgesia. These differences remain after accounting for differences in insurance coverage, provider practice, and clinical characteristics.

  7. Effect of sufentanil combined with different concentrations of ropivacaine for labor analgesia on maternal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han-He Wang; Min-Jia Jiang; Wan-Dong Liao

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of sufentanil combined with different concentration of ropivacaine for stepped analgesia on stage of labor, stress indexes and blood coagulation function.Methods:A total of 178 cases of full-term singleton primiparas who awaited delivery and received epidural labor analgesia in our hospital from January 2015 to June 2016 were selected and randomly divided into stepped analgesia group and routine analgesia group, and the stage of labor, levels of stress hormones and pain mediators during childbirth and blood coagulation function indexes after childbirth were observed between two groups.Results: The duration of latent phase of labor of stepped analgesia group was shorter than that of routine analgesia group while the duration of active phase of labor, the duration of second stage of labor and the duration of third stage of labor were not significantly different from those of routine analgesia group; serum PRL level of stepped analgesia group was significantly higher than that of routine analgesia group while PA, NE, E, DYN,β-EP, SP, PGE2, 5-HT, TF, TFPI, FPA, AT-III and DD levels were not significantly different from those of routine analgesia group.Conclusions: Sufentanil combined with different concentration of ropivacaine for stepped analgesia is with equivalent effect to routine analgesia, and can shorten the latent phase of labor and reduce the inhibitory effect of pain on prolactin without affecting the degree of stress during childbirth and the blood coagulation function after childbirth.

  8. Remifentanil em analgesia para o trabalho de parto Remifentanil en analgesia para el trabajo de parto Remifentanil as analgesia for labor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane C S Soares

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: As técnicas neuroaxiais representam atualmente os métodos mais efetivos para controle da dor durante o trabalho de parto e a analgesia peridural utilizando soluções anestésicas ultradiluídas é considerada o padrão ouro, promovendo alívio adequado da dor com mínimos efeitos colaterais. Em algumas situações, no entanto, o emprego dessas técnicas é limitado pela existência de contraindicações maternas ou obstáculos estruturais e materiais. Nestes casos, as opções alternativas ainda são precárias e escassas, oferecendo resultados pouco otimistas e de eficácia questionável. CONTEÚDO: Este artigo apresenta, com base em uma revisão da literatura, as informações disponíveis relacionadas ao emprego do remifentanil como técnica alternativa para a analgesia de parto discutindo aspectos farmacocinéticos, farmacodinâmicos, eficácia analgésica, satisfação materna e efeitos colaterais maternos e fetais. CONCLUSÕES: Os dados iniciais apontam o remifentanil como uma opção promissora a ser empregada nas situações em que a gestante não quer ou não pode receber a analgesia neuroaxial.JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: Las técnicas neuroaxiales representan actualmente los métodos más efectivos para el control del dolor durante el trabajo de parto, y la analgesia epidural utilizando soluciones anestésicas ultradiluidas se considera el estándar oro, promoviendo el alivio correcto del dolor con los mínimos efectos colaterales. En algunas situaciones, sin embargo, el uso de esas técnicas queda limitado por la existencia de contraindicaciones maternas u obstáculos estructurales y materiales. En esos casos, las alternativas todavía son precarias y escasas, ofreciendo resultados poco optimistas y de una eficacia cuestionable. CONTENIDO: Con base en una revisión de la literatura, este artículo muestra que las informaciones disponibles relacionadas a lo empleo de lo remifetanil como técnica alternativa

  9. Synthesis and antispasmodic activity of lidocaine derivatives endowed with reduced local anesthetic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Jorge C S; Neves, Josiane S; de Souza, Marcus V N; Siqueira, Rodrigo A; Romeiro, Nelilma C; Boechat, Nubia; e Silva, Patrícia M R; Martins, Marco A

    2008-02-01

    The present structure-activity relationship (SAR) study focused on chemical modifications of the structure of the local anesthetic lidocaine, and indicated analogues having reduced anesthetic potency, but with superior potency relative to the prototype in preventing anaphylactic or histamine-evoked ileum contraction. From the SAR analysis, 2-(diethylamino)-N-(trifluoromethyl-phenyl) and 2-(diethylamino)-N-(dimethyl-phenyl) acetamides were selected as the most promising compounds. New insights into the applicability of non-anesthetic lidocaine derivatives as templates in drug discovery for allergic syndromes are provided.

  10. [Studying the mechanism of antiarrhythmic action of a tertiary derivative of lidocaine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinov, D S; Kostin, Ia V; Skachilova, S Ia

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of electrophysiological parameters of the cardiac activity in cats showed that, a derivative of lidocaine with glutamic acid (anion), does not influence the cardiac pacemaker and the myocardial excitability of atrium and ventricles, but decreases the atrioventricular conduction and increases the refractory period of myocardium in the left ventricle of intact heart. Under the conditions of myocardial ischemia, LKhT-3-00 exhibits a negative chronotropic effect. Lidocaine glutamate increases the refractory period of atrium and decreases the excitability and refractory period of ventricles.

  11. Tedisamil and lidocaine enhance each other's antiarrhythmic activity against ischaemia-induced arrhythmias in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Sarraf, Guilda; Barrett, Terrance D; Walker, Michael J A

    2003-01-01

    Combinations of the action potential-widening drug tedisamil (Class III antiarrhythmic activity), and the inactivated state sodium channel blocker lidocaine (Class Ib antiarrhythmic activity) were assessed for antiarrhythmic actions in a rat model of ischaemia-induced arrhythmias and for electrophysiological actions in normal rat myocardial tissue.Both tedisamil and lidocaine dose-dependently suppressed ischaemia-induced arrhythmias. The ED50 values were 3.0±1.3 and 4.9±0.6 μmol kg−1 min−1, r...

  12. Profound bradycardia with lidocaine during anesthesia induction in a silent sick sinus syndrome patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Ok; Chung, Seunghyun; Lee, Kyoungjin; Cho, Hun

    2011-05-01

    Sick sinus syndrome is caused by sinus node dysfunction that renders it unable to function as a pacemaker. Patients with sick sinus syndrome are often asymptomatic or have symptoms that are mild and nonspecific. Lidocaine (0.5 mg/kg) injection is used for reduction of pain associated with intravenous injection of propofol. Episodes of marked bradycardia with sinus arrest after prophylactic lidocaine injection are reported in a 69-y-old man with no apparent preoperative cardiac disease or electrocardiographic abnormality. Surgery was postponed, and he was later diagnosed with sick sinus syndrome.

  13. Digital Necrosis After Lidocaine and Epinephrine Injection in the Flexor Tendon Sheath Without Phentolamine Rescue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jacques X; Gray, Jason; Lalonde, Donald H; Carr, Nicholas

    2017-02-01

    The literature generally supports the safety of epinephrine injection in the digits, but recent case reports describe ischemic adverse events associated with the use of lidocaine and epinephrine in which phentolamine rescue was not performed. We present a case of finger necrosis and subsequent amputation in a patient after 1% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine was injected in the fat and flexor sheaths in the palm for a 3-finger trigger release. Phentolamine rescue was not performed. All surgeons who use epinephrine in the finger should be prepared to reverse vasoconstriction with phentolamine rescue if there is persistently inadequate perfusion of the fingertip.

  14. Effect of Modulated Alternating and Direct Current Iontophoresis on Transdermal Delivery of Lidocaine Hydrochloride

    OpenAIRE

    Gaurav Bhatia; Banga, Ajay K.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the iontophoretic delivery of lidocaine hydrochloride through porcine skin and to compare the effects of modulated alternating and direct current iontophoresis. Continuous and modulated iontophoresis was applied for one hour and two hours (0-1 h and 4-5th h) using a 1% w/v solution of lidocaine hydrochloride. Tape stripping was done to quantify the amount of drug permeated into stratum corneum and skin extraction studies were performed to determi...

  15. Transient neurologic symptoms (TNS) following spinal anaesthesia with lidocaine versus other local anaesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaric, Dusanka; Pace, Nathan Leon

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spinal anaesthesia has been in use since 1898. During the last decade there has been an increase in the number of reports implicating lidocaine as a possible cause of temporary and permanent neurologic complications after spinal anaesthesia. Follow up of patients who received uncompli......BACKGROUND: Spinal anaesthesia has been in use since 1898. During the last decade there has been an increase in the number of reports implicating lidocaine as a possible cause of temporary and permanent neurologic complications after spinal anaesthesia. Follow up of patients who received...

  16. Regional anesthesia and analgesia for oral and dental procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochette, Judy

    2005-07-01

    Regional anesthesia and analgesia benefit the client, the patient, and the practitioner, and their use is becoming the standard for care. Familiarity with the processes involved in the generation of pain aids in understanding the benefits of preemptive and multimodal analgesia. Local anesthetic blocks should be a key component of a treatment plan, along with opioids, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, and other therapies. Nerve blocks commonly used for dentistry and oral surgery include the infraorbital, maxillary, mental,and mandibular blocks.

  17. Effects of hypnotic focused analgesia on dental pain threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facco, Enrico; Casiglia, Edoardo; Masiero, Serena; Tikhonoff, Valery; Giacomello, Margherita; Zanette, Gastone

    2011-01-01

    The rate, intensity, and selectivity of hypnotic focused analgesia (HFA) were tested with dental pulp stimulation. Thirty-one healthy subjects were hypnotized, and hypnotic suggestions were given for anesthesia of the right mandibular arch. A posthypnotic suggestion of persisting analgesia was also given. The pain threshold of the first premolar was bilaterally measured before, during, and after hypnosis using a pulp tester. During hypnosis, the pain threshold increased significantly (p < .0001) for both sides. The posthypnotic right pain threshold was also significantly (p < .0015) higher than in the basal condition.

  18. Hyperventilation-induced tetany associated with epidural analgesia for labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, N; Camann, W

    2005-01-01

    We report a case of painful carpo-pedal spasm associated with the initiation of epidural analgesia for labor. The patient, an otherwise healthy primigravida in early labor at term, was experiencing severe hyperventilation as a result of inappropriate use of the Lamaze breathing technique. Bilateral carpo-pedal spasm occurred, and produced severe pain. Resolution of symptoms coincided with onset of effective epidural labor pain relief. A diagnostic challenge was presented to the anesthesiologist, as the symptoms could have been consistent with subdural block, local anesthetic toxicity, high sensory level of analgesia or eclamptic neuro-excitation activity.

  19. CLINICAL EFFECTS OF ROPIVACAINE MESYLATE IN EPIDURAL ANESTHESIA AND ANALGESIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-qing Xu; Bo Zhu; Tie-hu Ye

    2005-01-01

    @@ SINCE the report that ropivacaine hydrochloride, a new amide local anesthetic, is of lower cardiac toxicity both in animals and humans,1 several studies have shown it to be a clinically effective local anesthetic widely used for both epidural anesthesia2-4 and analgesia5-7. Ropivacaine mesylate made in China is structurally from ropivacaine hydrochloride by substituting a mesylate group for hydrochloride group.8 This study was designed to clinically provide a double-blind comparison of ropivacaine mesylate with ropivacaine hydrochloride in epidural anesthesia and analgesia.

  20. Stellate ganglion blockade for analgesia following upper limb surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, J G

    2012-01-31

    We report the successful use of a stellate ganglion block as part of a multi-modal postoperative analgesic regimen. Four patients scheduled for orthopaedic surgery following upper limb trauma underwent blockade of the stellate ganglion pre-operatively under ultrasound guidance. Patients reported excellent postoperative analgesia, with postoperative VAS pain scores between 0 and 2, and consumption of morphine in the first 24 h ranging from 0 to 14 mg. While these are preliminary findings, and must be confirmed in a clinical trial, they highlight the potential for stellate ganglion blockade to provide analgesia following major upper limb surgery.

  1. Analgesia for pain during subcutaneous injection: effectiveness of manual pressure application before injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Yutaka; Harada, Masanori; Okayama, Masanobu; Kajii, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    It is necessary to establish an effective subcutaneous injection procedure for adult and elderly individuals because many drugs such as hormones and interferon are generally delivered by subcutaneous injection. We tested whether pain during subcutaneous injection can be decreased by prior application of localized manual pressure at the injection site. In this semirandomized, open-label study evaluating the manual pressure method for transient analgesia, physicians applied pressure with their thumbs for 10 seconds to create a nonpainful skin depression at the injection site immediately before subcutaneous injection of the influenza vaccine to patients. Control patients received the vaccine by the same route, but without prior application of focal pressure. In addition to pain, we evaluated patient age, gender, height, weight, body mass index, body temperature, and fat thickness at the brachial triceps muscle. Pain intensity was estimated using a 100 mm visual analog scale (VAS) and the face scale (FS). Categorical variables were compared using Chi-square tests and continuous variables were compared using unpaired t-tests between the intervention group and control group. Multivariate analysis was performed using the VAS or FS score as the dependent variable and weight, age, height, fat thickness at the brachial triceps muscle, and body temperature as independent variables. There were no significant differences in demographic variables, VAS scores (22.5 ± 23.0 versus 21.2 ± 23.6, P = 0.4), or FS scores (2.5 ± 2.1 versus 2.4 ± 2.1, P = 0.4) between the intervention and control groups. There was a significant negative correlation between age and subjective pain intensity (VAS, r = -0.32; FS, r = -0.28). The manual pressure method was not effective in decreasing pain during subcutaneous injection. Alternative methods of focal transient analgesia should be developed to improve vaccination rates and relieve anxiety associated with subcutaneous injection.

  2. Comparison of relative oxycodone consumption in surgical pleth index-guided analgesia versus conventional analgesia during sevoflurane anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Young Ju; Lim, Byung Gun; Lee, So Hyun; Park, Sangwoo; Kim, Heezoo; Lee, Il Ok; Kong, Myoung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: The surgical pleth index (SPI) is proposed for titration of analgesic drugs during general anesthesia. Several reports have investigated the effect of SPI on the consumption of opioids including remifentanil, fentanyl, and sufentanil during anesthesia, but there are no reports about oxycodone. We aimed to investigate intravenous oxycodone consumption between SPI-guided analgesia and conventional analgesia practices during sevoflurane anesthesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. Methods: Forty-five patients undergoing elective thyroidectomy were randomly assigned to an SPI group (SPI-guided analgesia group, n = 23) or a control group (conventional analgesia group, n = 22). Anesthesia was maintained with sevoflurane to achieve bispectral index values between 40 and 60. In the SPI group, oxycodone 1 mg was administered intravenously at SPI values over 50; in the control group, oxycodone 1 mg was administered intravenously at the occurrence of tachycardia or hypertension event. Intraoperative oxycodone consumption and extubation time were recorded. The number of hemodynamic and somatic movement events was recorded, as were postoperative pain and recovery scores. Results: Patients’ characteristics were comparable between the groups. Intraoperative oxycodone consumption in the SPI group was significantly lower than the control group (3.5 ± 2.4 vs 5.1 ± 2.4 mg; P = 0.012). Extubation time was significantly shorter in the SPI group (10.6 ± 3.5 vs 13.4 ± 4.6 min; P = 0.026). Hemodynamic and somatic movement events during anesthesia were comparable between the groups, as were numeric rating scales for pain and modified Aldrete scores at postanesthesia care unit. Conclusions: SPI-guided analgesia reduces intravenous oxycodone consumption and extubation time compared with conventional analgesia based on clinical parameters during sevoflurane anesthesia in patients undergoing thyroidectomy. PMID:27583920

  3. Ventromedial and medial preoptic hypothalamic ibotenic acid lesions potentiate systemic morphine analgesia in female, but not male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Giuseppe; Lovric, Jelena; Chen, Chia-Chien; Pytte, Carolyn L; Bodnar, Richard J

    2010-12-25

    Sex differences in systemic morphine analgesia occur with male rodents displaying significantly greater analgesic magnitudes and potencies than females. Neonatal androgenization, and to a lesser degree, adult ovariectomy enhance systemic morphine analgesia in female rats, implicating both organizational and activational effects of gonadal hormones. The neuroanatomical circuits sensitive to sex-related hormones by which females display a smaller opiate analgesic effect is not clear, but the ventromedial (VMH) and medial preoptic (MPOA) hypothalamic nuclei are critical in the monitoring of estradiol and other sex hormone levels. To assess the contribution of these nuclei to sex and adult gonadectomy differences in systemic morphine analgesia, intact male, intact female and adult ovariectomized (OVEX) female rats received bilateral saline (SAL) or ibotenic acid (IBO) microinjections into either the VMH or MPOA. Following surgeries, baseline tail-flick latencies over 120 minutes (min) were assessed over 4 days in all nine groups with intact females tested in the estrus phase of their cycle. All animals then received an ascending series of morphine (1.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, 10.0mg/kg) injections 30min prior to the tail-flick test time course with 8-12 day inter-injection intervals between doses. Baseline latencies failed to differ between SAL-treated intact males and females, but were significantly higher in SAL-treated OVEX females. Both VMH IBO and MPOA IBO lesions increased baseline latencies in intact male and female rats, but not in OVEX females. SAL-treated intact males (ED(50)=4.0mg/kg) and SAL-treated OVEX females (ED(50)=3.5mg/kg) displayed significantly greater potencies of systemic morphine analgesia than SAL-treated intact females (ED(50)=6.3mg/kg), confirming previous gender and gonadectomy differences. Neither VMH IBO (ED(50)=3.7 mg/kg) nor MPOA IBO (ED(50)=4.1mg/kg) males differed from SAL-treated males in the potency of systemic morphine analgesia. In

  4. Comparison of topical tetracaine, adrenaline, and cocaine anesthesia with lidocaine infiltration for repair of lacerations in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegenbarth, M A; Altieri, M F; Hawk, W H; Greene, A; Ochsenschlager, D W; O'Donnell, R

    1990-01-01

    Local anesthetic infiltration is painful and frightening for children. We prospectively compared a topical alternative, TAC solution (tetracaine 0.5%, adrenaline 1:2,000, cocaine 11.8%), with 1% lidocaine infiltration for use in laceration repair in 467 children. Adequate anesthesia of facial and scalp wounds was achieved for 81% of TAC-treated wounds versus 87% of lidocaine-treated wounds (P = .005). TAC was less effective on extremity wounds; 43% had effective anesthesia compared with 89% of lidocaine-treated extremity wounds (P less than .0001). No systemic toxicity was observed. The incidence of wound infection was 2.2% for both TAC and lidocaine. Wound dehiscence occurred in seven TAC- and two lidocaine-treated facial or scalp wounds (4.5% vs 1.8%, NS) and in five TAC- and four lidocaine-treated extremity wounds (20% vs 17.4%, NS). The unusually high rate of dehiscence was due partially to recurrent trauma or coincident infection. TAC was well accepted by patients and parents. We encourage the careful use of TAC as a less painful alternative to lidocaine infiltration for selected scalp and facial lacerations in children.

  5. Effect of Lidocaine and Amiodarone on Transmural Heterogeneityricular Repolarization in Isolated Rabbit Hearts Model of Sustained Global Ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Binquan; PU Jun; LIU Nian; YU Ronghui; RUAN Yanfei; LI Yang; WANG Lin

    2005-01-01

    To study the effect of of lidocaine and amiodarone on the transmural heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization in isolated rabbit hearts model of sustained global ischemia and to explore the mechanisms underlying the antiarrhythmic activity of lidocaine and amiodarone, rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups: control group, ischemia group, lidocaine group and amiodarone group. By the monophasic action potential (MAP) recording technique, MAPs of recorded across the left ventricular free wall in rabbit hearts perfused transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) and arrhythmic induced by ischemia. Our results showed that TDR of three myocardial layers in ischemia group were significantly lengthened after ischemia. TDR was increased from 17.5±3.9 ms to 31.2±4.6 ms at the time that concided with the onset of sustained ventricle arrhythmic. Amiodarone could decrease TDR, but lidocaine could increase TDR at initial ischemia, and no significant difference was found at other ischemia time points. 5 cases had ventriclar arrhythmia in ischemia group (62.5 %), but no case in lidocaine group (P<0.01) and only 1 case in amiodarone group had ventrilar arrhythmia (P< 0.01). No significant difference was found between amiodarone group and lidocaine group. It is concluded that TDR of of three myocardial layers increases significantly at ischemia and it is closely associated with development of ventricular arrhythmia, and amiodarone could decrease TDR, but lidocaine could increase TDR at initial ischemia and has no effects at other ischemia time points.

  6. A comparison of mepivacaine versus lidocaine for episcleral (sub-tenon's) block for cataract surgery in an ambulatory setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripart, Jacques; Nouvellon, Emmanuel; Chaumeron, Arnaud; Chanial-Bourgaux, Catherine; Mahamat, Aba

    2006-01-01

    For eye surgery, motor block is still often requested by the surgeon. For cataract surgery, rapid block resolution allows eyelids to move and allows eye-patch removal. Therefore, short-duration block is useful in early rehabilitation for ambulatory surgery. Lidocaine is classically assumed to have shorter duration than mepivacaine. Therefore, lidocaine alone might be considered as an alternative to mepivacaine. In this randomized, double-blind study, we compared mepivacaine 2% (n = 22) and lidocaine 2% (n = 25) in 47 patients who received episcleral (sub-Tenon's) block for cataract surgery. Akinesia score was measured 1, 5, 10, and 15 minutes and 1, 2, 4, and 6 hours after the end of injection. Primary outcome was block duration (time from injection to full recovery). Secondary outcomes were time to block onset and best akinesia score for each patient. Complications were recorded. The 2 groups were similar for demographic and anesthetic features. We observed no significant difference between mepivacaine and lidocaine in terms of onset, quality of akinesia, and block duration. One case of ocular hypertonia and 1 case of strabismus were observed in the lidocaine group, which could be imputed to hyaluronidase unavailability during the study period or to increased lidocaine myotoxicity. We found no argument to favor lidocaine over mepivacaine in episcleral (sub-Tenon's) eye block, especially in terms of motor-block duration.

  7. Mechanisms of acupuncture analgesia for clinical and experimental pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staud, Roland; Price, Donald D

    2006-05-01

    There is convincing evidence that acupuncture (AP) is effective for the treatment of postoperative and chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting, as well as postoperative dental pain. Less convincing data support AP's efficacy for chronic pain conditions, including headache, fibromyalgia and low back pain. There is no evidence that AP is effective in treating addiction, insomnia, obesity, asthma or stroke deficits. AP seems to be efficacious for alleviating experimental pain by increasing pain thresholds in human subjects and it appears to activate analgesic brain mechanisms through the release of neurohumoral factors, some of which can be inhibited by the opioid antagonist naloxone. In contrast to placebo analgesia, AP-related pain relief takes some time to develop and to resolve. Furthermore, repetitive use of AP analgesia can result in tolerance that demonstrates cross-tolerance with morphine. However, it appears that not all forms of AP are equally effective for providing analgesia. In particular, electro-AP seems to best deliver stimuli that activate powerful opioid and nonopioid analgesic mechanisms. Thus, future carefully controlled clinical trials using adequate electro-AP may be able to provide the necessary evidence for relevant analgesia in chronic pain conditions, such as headache, fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome and low back pain.

  8. Inhaled analgesia for pain management in labour (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, T.; Poppel, M. van; Jones, L.; Lazet, J.; Nisio, M. Di; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many women would like to have a choice in pain relief during labour and also would like to avoid invasive methods of pain management in labour. Inhaled analgesia during labour involves the self-administered inhalation of sub-anaesthetic concentrations of agents while the mother remains a

  9. Information Models of Acupuncture Analgesia and Meridian Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Hua Zou

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture and meridian channels have been major components of Chinese and Eastern Asian medicine—especially for analgesia—for over 2000 years. In recent decades, electroacupuncture (EA analgesia has been applied clinically and experimentally. However, there were controversial results between different treatment frequencies, or between the active and the placebo treatments; and the mechanisms of the treatments and the related meridian channels are still unknown. In this study, we propose a new term of infophysics therapy and develop information models of acupuncture (or EA analgesia and meridian channels, to understand the mechanisms and to explain the controversial results, based on Western theories of information, trigonometry and Fourier series, and physics, as well as published biomedical data. We are trying to build a bridge between Chinese medicine and Western medicine by investigating the Eastern acupuncture analgesia and meridian channels with Western sciences; we model the meridians as a physiological system that is mostly constructed with interstices in or between other physiological systems; we consider frequencies, amplitudes and wave numbers of electric field intensity (EFI as information data. Our modeling results demonstrate that information regulated with acupuncture (or EA is different from pain information, we provide answers to explain the controversial published results, and suggest that mechanisms of acupuncture (or EA analgesia could be mostly involved in information regulation of frequencies and amplitudes of EFI as well as neuronal transmitters such as endorphins.

  10. Bayesian prediction of placebo analgesia in an instrumental learning model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Won-Mo; Lee, Ye-Seul; Wallraven, Christian; Chae, Younbyoung

    2017-01-01

    Placebo analgesia can be primarily explained by the Pavlovian conditioning paradigm in which a passively applied cue becomes associated with less pain. In contrast, instrumental conditioning employs an active paradigm that might be more similar to clinical settings. In the present study, an instrumental conditioning paradigm involving a modified trust game in a simulated clinical situation was used to induce placebo analgesia. Additionally, Bayesian modeling was applied to predict the placebo responses of individuals based on their choices. Twenty-four participants engaged in a medical trust game in which decisions to receive treatment from either a doctor (more effective with high cost) or a pharmacy (less effective with low cost) were made after receiving a reference pain stimulus. In the conditioning session, the participants received lower levels of pain following both choices, while high pain stimuli were administered in the test session even after making the decision. The choice-dependent pain in the conditioning session was modulated in terms of both intensity and uncertainty. Participants reported significantly less pain when they chose the doctor or the pharmacy for treatment compared to the control trials. The predicted pain ratings based on Bayesian modeling showed significant correlations with the actual reports from participants for both of the choice categories. The instrumental conditioning paradigm allowed for the active choice of optional cues and was able to induce the placebo analgesia effect. Additionally, Bayesian modeling successfully predicted pain ratings in a simulated clinical situation that fits well with placebo analgesia induced by instrumental conditioning. PMID:28225816

  11. Analgesia in the horse, assessing and treating pain in equines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, Thijs van

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on pain and nociception in horses and is based on the PhD thesis “Analgesia in the Horse, various approaches for assessment and treatment of pain and nociception in equines” by J.P.A.M. van Loon. Apart from a scientific review of the related literature, a multi-disciplinary appro

  12. Inhaled analgesia for pain management in labour (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klomp, T.; Poppel, M. van; Jones, L.; Lazet, J.; Nisio, M. Di; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many women would like to have a choice in pain relief during labour and also would like to avoid invasive methods of pain management in labour. Inhaled analgesia during labour involves the self-administered inhalation of sub-anaesthetic concentrations of agents while the mother remains

  13. Side effects of pain and analgesia in animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirkof, Paulin

    2017-03-22

    This review highlights selected effects of untreated pain and of widely used analgesics such as opioids, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and antipyretics, to illustrate the relevance of carefully planned, appropriate and controlled analgesia for greater reproducibility in animal experiments involving laboratory rodents.

  14. Ingestion analgesia occurs when a bad taste turns good.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Hayley; Mason, Peggy

    2011-12-01

    During ingestion of water, chocolate, sucrose, and saccharin, pain-related behaviors are suppressed. This ingestion analgesic effect is reversed when the hedonic valence of a food is switched from "good" to "bad" as occurs during conditioned taste aversion. Here, we tested the converse hedonic shift to determine if ingestion analgesia occurs when 0.3 M NaCl is made palatable by inducing a sodium appetite. In Experiment 1, sham- and sodium-depleted rats were tested for paw withdrawal and lick latencies to brief noxious heat during quiet wake and intraoral NaCl ingestion. Only sodium-depleted rats showed a suppression of heat-evoked reactions during NaCl ingestion. In Experiment 2, we tested whether this analgesic effect is mediated by the brainstem nucleus raphe magnus (NRM). Inactivation of NRM with muscimol blocked ingestion analgesia during NaCl ingestion by sodium-depleted rats. This attenuation was not due to a hyperalgesic effect of NRM inactivation. Muscimol microinjections into a nearby region, the nucleus raphe obscurus (NRO), were ineffective. The present findings demonstrate that the internal milieu of an animal can modify ingestion analgesia, and that the analgesia during NaCl ingestion by sodium hungry rats is mediated by NRM. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  15. Difficulty in the removal of epidural catheter for labor analgesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed S Hajnour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For labor pain management epidural analgesia is a popular and an effective method. Difficult removal of epidural catheters occasionally occurs, and several maneuvers have been recommended. The purpose of this article is to raise awareness of the problem of retained epidural catheter fragments and identify the potential impact of complications.

  16. Difficulty in the removal of epidural catheter for labor analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajnour, Mohamed S; Khokhar, Rashid Saeed; Ejaz, Abdul Aziz Ahmed; Al Zahrani, Tariq; Kanchi, Naveed Uddin

    2017-01-01

    For labor pain management epidural analgesia is a popular and an effective method. Difficult removal of epidural catheters occasionally occurs, and several maneuvers have been recommended. The purpose of this article is to raise awareness of the problem of retained epidural catheter fragments and identify the potential impact of complications.

  17. Analgesia and anesthesia for neonates : Study design and ethical issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anand, KJS; Aranda, JV; Berde, CB; Buckman, S; Capparelli, EV; Carlo, WA; Hummel, P; Lantos, P; Johnston, CC; Lehr, VT; Lynn, AM; Oberlander, TF; Raju, TNK; Soriano, SG; Taddio, A; Walco, GA; Maxwell, L.G.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this article is to summarize the clinical, methodologic, and ethical considerations for researchers interested in designing future trials in neonatal analgesia and anesthesia, hopefully stimulating additional research in this field. Methods: The MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, and

  18. Duration of action of mepivacaine and lidocaine in equine palmar digital perineural blocks in an experimental lameness model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerdemann, Mona; Smith, Rachael L; Hosgood, Giselle

    2017-10-01

    To establish and compare the onset and duration of action of 2 local anesthetics based on objective lameness and skin sensitivity assessment. Interventional crossover experimental trial with balanced randomization. Eight horses. Reversible forelimb lameness was induced in 8 horses. A palmar digital nerve block (PDNB) was applied with mepivacaine or lidocaine (both 2%). Quantitative lameness and skin sensitivity data were collected with an inertial sensor system and a force gauge, respectively. The times to lameness resolution/skin desensitization (T1), consistent lameness detection/partial return of skin sensitivity (T2), and complete return of lameness/skin sensitivity (T3) were determined and compared between treatments and assessment methods. Mepivacaine blocks resolved lameness in 8/8 horses, compared to 3/8 horses with lidocaine blocks. Both agents led to skin desensitization in 8/8 horses. Skin desensitization occurred sooner than lameness resolution after mepivacaine (P = .047). Duration of action was longer with mepivacaine than lidocaine (mean T3_lameness mepivacaine 366 minutes, lidocaine 113 minutes (P = .038); T3_skin mepivacaine 195 minutes, lidocaine 63 minutes [P ≤ .001]). Skin sensitivity returned sooner than lameness after lidocaine block at T3 (P = .015). The use of lidocaine in PDNBs for the purpose of lameness diagnosis should be reassessed, as it may not resolve lameness despite loss of skin sensation. Mepivacaine is superior, with a reliable onset and longer duration of action. Skin desensitization as an indicator for the onset of action or effectiveness of PDNBs for mepivacaine and lidocaine, or as a measure of the duration of action of lidocaine PDNBs should be interpreted with caution. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  19. Labour epidural analgesia in Poland in 2009 - a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furmanik, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Labour analgesia in most developed countries is funded by the state, available to every woman in labour, and plays an important role in the everyday activities of most anaesthetists. This paper presents the second part of an Obstetric Anaesthesia Survey which was conducted in 2009. The first part of the Survey, relating to anaesthesia for caesarean sections, was published in 2010. The author sent out 432 questionnaires containing questions about hospital size and location, staffing levels and numbers of deliveries per year. There were also questions regarding regional and other pain relief methods used in labour, ways of administration, drugs used and monitoring of patients. The response rate was 24%. Around 45% of responding hospitals had only 1-3 deliveries per year, which makes it difficult to provide separate obstetric anaesthetic cover. Only ten hospitals (11%) employed an anaesthetist for the labour ward. Epidural analgesia was used in 55% of hospitals but only 20% provided the service for 24 hours per day and free of charge. Entonox was used very occasionally, but the most common means of pain relief was pethidine injection. There were marked differences in the medication used for labour epidurals, with 18% of units using high concentrations of local anaesthetics which could result in motor block. Despite a lack of regulations in Polish law and a lack of proper training in 50% of units, midwives were looking after the patients with established labour epidural which could create medico-legal consequences. There was also a marked variation in the parameters monitored during labour analgesia. Epidural labour analgesia was offered for 24 hours per day and free of charge in only 20% of hospitals. Without public pressure it will be difficult to get more funding from the National Health Fund (NFZ) to enable other hospitals, especially those with small obstetric units, to introduce regional labour analgesia. Although the 2009 guidelines addressed most of the issues

  20. Test of a model of antiarrhythmic drug action. Effects of quinidine and lidocaine on myocardial conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondeghem, L; Katzung, B G

    1980-06-01

    The effects of quinidine and lidocaine on the maximum upstroke velocity (Vmax) of the ventricular myocardial action potential were compared with the effects predicted by a model over a wide range of driving rates, rhythm disturbances and holding potentials. These rate-, rhythm- and voltage-dependent effects were accurately predicted by the proposed model. The model was also able to predict several previously undocumented properties of the drugs: 1) If lidocaine decreases Vmax of a pulse train, the steady state is reached within a few action potentials. 2) The poststimulation recovery of Vmax in the presence of lidocaine or quinidine can occur in a multiexponential fashion, if the membrane potential is kept at the potential where both the fast (operating mainly at more negative membrane potentials) and the slow (operating at more positive potentials) recovery processes are operative. 3) Hyperpolarization markedly attenuates the rate-dependent drug effects. 4) Combinations of lidocaine and quinidine have a superadditive effect on the Vmax of early extrasystoles.

  1. Prevention of reperfusion lung injury by lidocaine in isolated rat lung ventilated with higher oxygen levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das K

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lidocaine, an antiarrhythmic drug has been shown to be effective against post-ischaemic reperfusion injury in heart. However, its effect on pulmonary reperfusion injury has not been investigated. AIMS: We investigated the effects of lidocaine on a postischaemic reperfused rat lung model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Lungs were isolated and perfused at constant flow with Krebs-Henseilet buffer containing 4% bovine serum albumin, and ventilated with 95% oxygen mixed with 5% CO2. Lungs were subjected to ischaemia by stopping perfusion for 60 minutes followed by reperfusion for 10 minutes. Ischaemia was induced in normothermic conditions. RESULTS: Postischaemic reperfusion caused significant (p < 0.0001 higher wet-to-dry lung weight ratio, pulmonary arterial pressure and peak airway pressure compared to control lungs. Lidocaine, at a dose of 5mg/Kg b.w. was found to significantly (p < 0.0001 attenuate the increase in the wet-to-dry lung weight ratio, pulmonary arterial pressure and peak airway pressure observed in post-ischaemic lungs. CONCLUSION: Lidocaine is effective in preventing post-ischaemic reperfusion injury in isolated, perfused rat lung.

  2. Do lubricants with 2% lidocaine gel have an effect on patient comfort in diagnostic cystoscopy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goktug, Hasan Nedim Goksel; Ozturk, Ufuk; Sener, Nevzat Can; Tuygun, Can; Bakırtas, Hasan; Imamoglu, M Abdurrahim

    2014-01-01

    Patients undergoing both rigid and flexible cystoscopic evaluation suffer from a great deal of pain and discomfort. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of lidocaine gel anestesia on patient comfort on diagnostic rigid cystoscopy. 11 mL of lubricant gel applied to each patient via the external meatus in 10 s. Patients were randomized into three groups. In group 1, liquid glycerine was applied and cystoscopy was immediately performed, in group 2 lidocaine gel (Aqua Touch™: İstem Tıbbi Cihaz Ve Sanayi Ltd.Şti, Ostim, Ankara, Türkiye) was applied and the procedure undergone immediately and in group 3, lidocaine gel was applied and penis was clemped for 10 minutes before the procedure. VAS forms were filled to determine the discomfort and pain during cystoscopy and the first micturation after. After the evaluation between groups, VAS scores were significantly lower in Group II and III than Group I and in Group III than in Group II (p ocal anesthetic lidocaine gel in rigid cystoscopy, is a practical, safe and efficient method to improve patient comfort when applied in appropriate dose and waiting duration.

  3. [Comparative study on effect of acupuncture and lidocaine block for lumbar myofascial pain syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Gui-Mei; Lin, Mou-De; Wang, Lu-Ying

    2013-03-01

    To observe the clinical efficacy of acupuncture at Jiaji (EX-B 2) points mainly for lumbar myofascial pain syndrome (MPS). Sixty-six cases of MPS were randomized into an acupuncture group and a lidocaine group, 33 cases in each group. The acupuncture group was treated with acupuncture at Jiaji (EX-B 2) points combined with needling local myofascial trigger points (MTrP), and the lidocaine group was treated with local block at trigger points with lidocaine injection. The treatment was given once every 2 days. After three and five times of the treatment, the simplified McGill scale, Oswestry disability index (ODI) and pressure-pain threshold were assessed to compare the therapeutic effects between the two groups. After treatment, the scores of simplified McGill and ODI of two groups were obviously reduced while the score of pressure-pain threshold was obviously increased (all P 0.05). Acupuncture at Jiaji (EX-B 2) points combined with needling MTrP is an effective and safe therapy for lumbar MPS, the therapeutic effect is equal to lidocaine block.

  4. Seizure threshold to lidocaine is decreased following repeated ECS (electroconvulsive shock)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, J; Seidelin, J; Bolwig, T G

    1993-01-01

    Seizure susceptibility to lidocaine was investigated in rats which had received repeated ECS (electroconvulsive shock). In the first experiment three groups of rats received an ECS daily for 18 days, an ECS weekly for 18 weeks, and 18 sham treatments, respectively. Twelve weeks after the last ECS...

  5. Decreasing Effect of Lidocaine·HCl on the Thickness of the Neuronal and Model Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Min; Park, Jong-Sun; Kim, Jae-Han; Baek, Jin-Hyun; Yoon, Tae-Gyun; Lee, Do-Keun; Ryu, Won-Hyang; Chung, In-Kyo; Sohn, Uy Dong; Jang, Hye-Ock; Yun, Il

    2013-08-01

    This study examined the mechanism of action of a local anesthetic, lidocaine·HCl. Energy transfer between the surface fluorescent probe, 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid, and the hydrophobic fluorescent probe, 1,3-di(1-pyrenyl) propane, was used to determine the effect of lidocaine·HCl on the thickness (D) of the synaptosomal plasma membrane vesicles (SPMV) isolated from the bovine cerebral cortex, and liposomes of the total lipids (SPMVTL) and phospholipids (SPMVPL) extracted from the SPMV. The thickness (D) of the intact SPMV, SPMVTL and SPMVPL were 1.044±0.008, 0.914±0.005 and 0.890±0.003 (arbitrary units, n=5) at 37℃ (pH 7.4), respectively. Lidocaine·HCl decreased the thickness of the neuronal and model membrane lipid bilayers in a dose-dependent manner with a significant decrease in the thickness, even at 0.1 mM. The decreasing effect of lidocaine·HCl on the membrane thickness might be responsible for some, but not all of its anesthetic action.

  6. Positive symptoms in multiple sclerosis: their treatment with sodium channel blockers, lidocaine and mexiletine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, M; Kanazawa, I

    1999-01-15

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) often show positive symptoms of painful tonic seizure and dysesthesia as well as negative symptoms of paralysis and hypesthesia. Positive manifestation is paroxysmal and/or persistent. These are considered to be mediated by ectopic impulses generated at the site of demyelination, whereas negative symptoms are caused by conduction block. Conduction block at a demyelinated segment should reduce positive symptoms, but worsen negative ones. As reported previously, lidocaine, an Na channel blocker unmasks silent negative symptoms presumably by further reducing the action current in demyelinated portions and blocking conduction. Furthermore, because it blocks Na channels in a voltage- and frequency dependent manner, fibers that mediate positive symptoms are preferentially blocked. We administered lidocaine to 30 MS patients with positive symptoms. Lidocaine (mean plasma level, 2.4 pg/ml) almost completely abolished the paroxysmal manifestation of painful tonic seizures, neuralgic attacks, paroxysmal itching, and Lhermitte's sign. It also markedly alleviated persistent symptoms, but less so than paroxysmal symptoms. Similar effects were obtained with orally-administered mexiletine (300-400 mg/day), a derivative of lidocaine, but to a lesser extent. Na channel blockers have a dual effect on symptoms in MS, depending on whether symptoms are positive or negative. The mechanism that produces positive symptoms and the effects of the drugs on these symptoms are discussed.

  7. Lidocaine does not affect myocardial electrical heterogeneity: implications for low proarrhythmic actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, J J; Winecoff, A P; Ujhelyi, M R

    1997-01-01

    An area of unidirectional conduction block is one requirement for reentrant arrhythmias to occur. Functional block caused by dispersion of repolarization and refractoriness is the most probable mechanism of drug-induced unidirectional conduction block. We assessed the effects of lidocaine on spatial dispersion of myocardial repolarization and refractoriness in the intact porcine heart. Monophasic action potential duration at 90% repolarization, effective refractory period (ERP), and ventricular fibrillation cycle length (VFCL) were measured at two endocardial and one epicardial sites at baseline and during a treatment phase with D5W (n=11) or lidocaine 10 mg/kg/hour (n=12). Dispersion was calculated as the difference between the maximum and minimum values of the three recording sites. Lidocaine produced significant changes in ERP, VFCL, paced QRS duration, and intraventricular conduction time. It did not change basal levels of dispersion in repolarization and refractoriness. Lidocaine produced changes in myocardial electrophysiology that are uniform across the myocardium and thus did not change myocardial electrical heterogeneity. This may be a mechanism of the agent's lower proarrhythmic effects compared with other sodium channel blockers that increase myocardial electrical heterogeneity.

  8. The addition of lidocaine to bupivacaine does not shorten the duration of spinal anesthesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jon; Husum, Bent; Staffeldt, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The duration of spinal anesthesia with bupivacaine is often too long for day surgery. A recent study of patients presenting for transurethral surgery suggested that the addition of a small amount of lidocaine to intrathecal hyperbaric bupivacaine could shorten the duration of the sensory and motor...

  9. Health economic evidence of 5% lidocaine medicated plaster in post-herpetic neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedgens, Hiltrud; Obradovic, Marko; Nuijten, Mark

    2013-11-25

    Post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN) is the most common and most debilitating complication of herpes zoster, and involves considerable associated costs. This paper presents results from nine health economic studies undertaken in eight European countries that compared lidocaine medicated plaster with gabapentin and/or pregabalin in PHN. It aims to support the increasing need for published cost-effectiveness data for health care decision-making processes in Europe. All studies were based on a similar core Markov model with data derived from clinical trials, local Delphi panels, and official national price and tariff lists. The main outcome measure was cost per quality-adjusted life year gained; time without pain or intolerable adverse events was also included as a secondary outcome measure. All studies focused on an elderly population of patients with PHN who had insufficient pain relief with standard analgesics and could not tolerate or had contraindications to tricyclic antidepressants. Despite considerable differences in many of the variables used, the results showed remarkable similarity and suggested that use of lidocaine medicated plaster offered cost-savings in many of the countries studied, where it proved a highly cost-effective alternative to both gabapentin and pregabalin. Lidocaine medicated plaster is a cost-effective alternative to gabapentin and pregabalin in the treatment of PHN. These savings are largely the result of the superior safety profile of the lidocaine medicated plaster.

  10. Treatment of localized neuropathic pain after disk herniation with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likar, Rudolf; Kager, Ingo; Obmann, Michael; Pipam, Wolfgang; Sittl, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess treatment with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster for peripheral neuropathic pain after disk herniation. Study design Case series, single center, retrospective data. Patients and methods Data of 23 patients treated for neuropathic pain with the lidocaine plaster for up to 24 months after a protrusion or prolapse of the cervical, thoracic, or lumbar vertebral disks were retrospectively analyzed. Changes in overall pain intensity, in intensity of different pain qualities and of allodynia and hyperalgesia were evaluated. Results Patients (14 female/nine male, mean age 53.5 ± 10.4 years) presented with radiating pain into the abdomen, back, neck, shoulder, or legs and feet with a mean pain intensity of 8.3 ± 1.5 on the 11-point Likert scale. Mean treatment duration was 7.6 months; 52% of the patients received lidocaine plaster as monotherapy. At the end of the observation, mean overall pain intensity had been reduced to 3.1 ± 1.8. All other parameters also improved. The treatment was well tolerated. Conclusion These results point to a safe and effective treatment approach with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster for localized neuropathic pain related to disk herniation. However, owing to the small sample size, further investigation in a larger-scale controlled trial is warranted. PMID:22973116

  11. Transcatheter administration of buffered Lidocaine for pain relief due to transarterial chemoembolization for HCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Alaa Abusedera

    2014-06-01

    Conclusions: Intra-arterial administration of buffered Lidocaine before infusing the embolization particle of TACE is safe and effective in dose as low as 50 mg for reducing peri and post-procedural pain and dosage of narcotic analgesics in patients with HCC.

  12. Determination of lidocaine in plasma by direct solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, EHM; Wemes, C; Morsink, JB; de Jong, GJ

    2000-01-01

    Direct-immersion solid-phase microextraction (SPME) has been used to extract the local anesthetic lidocaine from human plasma. A simplified model shows the relationship between the total amount of drug in plasma and the amount of drug extracted. The model takes into account that the drug participate

  13. Treatment of localized neuropathic pain after disk herniation with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likar, Rudolf; Kager, Ingo; Obmann, Michael; Pipam, Wolfgang; Sittl, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    To assess treatment with the 5% lidocaine medicated plaster for peripheral neuropathic pain after disk herniation. Case series, single center, retrospective data. Data of 23 patients treated for neuropathic pain with the lidocaine plaster for up to 24 months after a protrusion or prolapse of the cervical, thoracic, or lumbar vertebral disks were retrospectively analyzed. Changes in overall pain intensity, in intensity of different pain qualities and of allodynia and hyperalgesia were evaluated. Patients (14 female/nine male, mean age 53.5 ± 10.4 years) presented with radiating pain into the abdomen, back, neck, shoulder, or legs and feet with a mean pain intensity of 8.3 ± 1.5 on the 11-point Likert scale. Mean treatment duration was 7.6 months; 52% of the patients received lidocaine plaster as monotherapy. At the end of the observation, mean overall pain intensity had been reduced to 3.1 ± 1.8. All other parameters also improved. The treatment was well tolerated. These results point to a safe and effective treatment approach with 5% lidocaine medicated plaster for localized neuropathic pain related to disk herniation. However, owing to the small sample size, further investigation in a larger-scale controlled trial is warranted.

  14. Hyaluronic acid dermal fillers: can adjunctive lidocaine improve patient satisfaction without decreasing efficacy or duration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynnelle Smith

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Lynnelle Smith1, Kimberly Cockerham21Ophthalmology Department, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA, USA; 2Ophthalmology Department, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USAAbstract: Hyaluronic acid (HA dermal fillers are the most widely used injectables to augment facial volume without surgery. HA dermal fillers are popular because of their ease of administration, predictable effectiveness, good safety profile, and quick patient recovery. The most common patient complaint is pain. Our goal is to review the current literature on HA fillers and compare outcomes with and without lidocaine. We found adjunctive lidocaine significantly decreases pain during injection and postinjection with corresponding increased patient satisfaction. The efficacy and safety profile appears unchanged. Rare complications with HA fillers and those associated with constituents of the product, contaminants, and lidocaine are reviewed. The corrective effects of HA fillers are temporary; repeat treatment is required to maintain results. Minimizing pain is crucial to optimize patient satisfaction.Keywords: hyaluronic acid, lidocaine, drug toxicity, hypersensitivity, collagen, herpes simplex

  15. Tolperisone: evaluation of the lidocaine-like activity by molecular modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fels, G

    1996-04-01

    Tolperisone (1), a muscle relaxant with lidocaine-like activity, was compared to lidocaine (2) by molecular modeling methods. Conformational search analysis has been employed to find the global minima of these compounds along with numerous low energy conformations from which specific conformers were extracted that show good superimposition of the structural features important for protein binding. Two additional compounds, mepi- (3) and bupivacaine (4), were included in the analysis to validate the method as these ligands show very close structural and pharmacological relationship to lidocaine (2) and are assumed to bind to an identical site. As a result we find conformers of all four ligands that have exactly the same position and orientation of the potential sites for hydrogen bonding with the rest of the molecule showing close comparison of the three-dimensional geometry. Semiempirical calculations furthermore reveal good agreement of the electrostatic potentials of these conformations indicating similar interactions with a receptor. We conclude that tolperisone (1) and lidocaine (2) despite their chemical divergence can still attach to identical protein binding sites.